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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 02-27-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03044

Full Text


Inside: Guide to Strawberry Festival


CITRU-S CO U N T Ye





HlRONICLE
k www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


TIIY


VOL. 118 ISSUE 204


Mostly sunny


PAGE A4


TODAY & next morning

A '
A A L
,7j,44


HIGH LOW
69 49



Deputy


avoids


sanction

Officers' 'Bill of
Rights'comes
intoplay

A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
The deputy embroiled in a
profanity-laced traffic stop
and arrest of a concealed
weapon permit holder will
not be sanctioned, according
to the conclusions of a Citrus
County Sheriff's Office
investigation.
Deputy Andy Cox was in-
volved in the 2009 stop of mo-
torist Joel Smith on Miss
Maggie Drive, which erupted
into a firestorm of contro-
versy about everything from
gun rights to proper officer
conduct after someone
placed the video of the en-
counter on YouTube.
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy said
Tuesday the incident was
mishandled by supervisors
and vows to prevent future
occurrences. Dawsy also
said his hands are tied re-
garding disciplinary action
because of a Law Enforce-
ment Officers' Bill of Rights,
which Cox invoked in the
investigation.
The agency had initially
recommended the following
against Cox on Feb. 12:
Receive a written
reprimand.
Removal from the K-9
unit.
Removal from the Dive
Team.
Be retrained on profes-
sional conduct and officer
presence.
Be reassigned to the Ju-
dicial Service Division in the
duty office.
However, Cox disagreed
with those conclusions and
appealed, citing an Officer
Bill of Rights, which man-
dated an agency complete an
investigation of misconduct
within 180 days after it re-
ceives an allegation or com-
plaint. Smith, according to
Internal Affairs Detective
Corey Davidson, filed a com-
plaint with CCSO after the
traffic stop.
Cox was reportedly coun-
seled by his supervisors
about "inappropriate" lan-
guage during the incident
See Page A2


More BOCC fireworks


Adams, other members at odds


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer


Scott Richard INVERNESS Citrus
Adams Wesch County Commissioner Scott
proposed said Adams Adams' attempt Tuesday night
salary cuts. has vendetta, to fire County Attorney Richard


Wesch fell on deaf ears.
And Wesch didn't take it lying
down.
Adams, who made a similar
attempt two weeks ago to fire
See Page A5


* All involved are enthusias-
tically aboard the county's
first step for a medical
corridor on County Road
491./Page A4
* Commissioners agree to
move ahead with stormwa-
ter study./Page A4


Parking under pressure


-~ ~id~ ~J1~J~


..... - ..-..
-
~


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Connie Jones, owner of Connie's Kick Stand in Floral City, is concerned about a pending road project to add turn lanes that she
says could negatively affect her business.


Floral City businesses worry how new road design


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
FLORAL CITY Keeping close to
traffic, but not too close, is the challenge
ahead for Floral City business owners.
Connie Jones of Connie's Kickstand
fears traffic will push her out of business
when the state widens the intersection of
U.S. 41 and County Road 48 (East Orange


Avenue) for turn lanes.
"Traffic is going to be speeding by right
here, and it's going to be so dangerous,"
Jones said last week at her corner store.
"That's why I have to close because it's
already so dangerous."
Standing outside the front door of her
business that caters to motorcycle enthu-
siasts, Jones pointed to her forecourt roof
that extends like a carport.


could affect them


"There are some big trucks that come
through this corner When the road comes
10 feet in, traffic will be coming in right
here," Jones said as she gestured toward
the pavement edge near her front door
In present traffic conditions, drivers
turning left from U.S. 41 onto East Or-
ange Avenue can stall traffic to a


Page A9


Clock ticks on possible downlisting of manatees

Status ofpopular animals could switch from 'endangered' to 'threatened'


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
A petition on behalf of Save
Crystal River Inc. has started the
clock on possible action by the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to
reclassify the manatee from en-
dangered to threatened.
In a letter to Pacific Legal


Foundation attorney Alan Dese-
rio, responding to the petition,
the agency acknowledged it had
determined in April 2007 that
manatees be listed as a threat-
ened species as the result of a
five-year review.
Deserio got involved last year
on behalf of Save Crystal River
and filed the petition asking the


agency to change the status of
manatees from endangered to
threatened.
"We believe they were start-
ing to think they were going to
begin the process of finalizing
the rule to downlist the mana-
tee," Deserio said. "But now
that they submitted the letter,
they basically have 90 days to do


what they say they are going to
do, which should allow them
sufficient time to enact the
downlisting.
"But one of the reasons we pe-
titioned in this case was an ef-
fort to give them a little nudge in
the right direction to get them to
See Page A2


6 Il481 ll Ulll5 l||! 11025 1 5


Com ics .......... C7
Community ...... .C5
Crossword ....... .C6


Editorial ......... A8
Entertainment . .B6
Horoscope ....... .B6


Lottery Numbers .B4


Lottery Payouts .... B6
M ovies .......... .C7
Obituaries ....... .A5


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A2 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013


DEPUTY
Continued from PageAl

with Smith, but no formal
investigation was launched.
It is unclear if Cox's repri-
mand about inappropriate
language was because of
Smith's complaint
"This situation was mis-
handled by our supervi-
sors and this agency back
in 2009," Dawsy said. "Had
it been escalated, I would
have dealt with it then."
"I want to make it clear
that I do not condone
Deputy Cox's behavior,"
Dawsy continued, "but be-
cause of the limitations of
the Law Enforcement Offi-
cers' Rights, my hands are
tied and he will not face
any disciplinary action.
Going forward, we will do
everything in our power to
ensure that a situation like
this does not occur again."
In the various charges
launched against Cox in
the internal investigation,
which include arrest with-
out a warrant, he was ex-
onerated in all except in
the inappropriate use of
profanity and partly on the
charge of conduct unbe-
coming of an officer.
Cox has been reassigned
to the Training Division ef-
fective immediately for re-
training in high liability
areas, according to CCSO
officials.
The 6-minute 41-second
video shows Cox stopping
Smith, a motorist, for an
expired tag.
When Smith, formerly of
Homosassa, stepped out of
his van and was asked for his
registration and proof of in-
surance, he turned and
reached back into the vehi-
cle. That's when Cox noticed
a holstered handgun sticking
out from around his waist
Cox, in a quickly
changed tone, ordered
Smith to put his hands on
the van, then reasserted:
"Put your hands right
there or I'll shoot you in
the (expletive) back."
Cox then promptly or-
dered Smith to the ground
with profanity-laced com-
mands. Smith could be
heard telling the Cox he
had a concealed/carry per-


KEY POINTS IN THE INTERNAL
AFFAIRS INVESTIGATION
* The sheriff's office received a complaint in July
2009, in reference tp the actions of Deputy. Andy
Cox.
* The complaint was handled by a sergeant and es-
calated to a captain.
* Deputy Cox was verbally counseled at that time
because of his actions.
* The case against Mr. Joel Smith was dropped by
the State Attorney's Office because the likelihood
of conviction was minimal.
A As part of an internal investigation (IA), the
deputy being investigated has certain rights, as
found in The Law Enforcement Officers' and Cor-
rectional Officers' Rights. (see www.police.ufl.edu
/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/Florida-Officer-
Bill-of-Rights.pdf (6)a). Once a complaint is made
to a law enforcement agency, the agency has 180
days to initiate an investigation of misconduct.
* Hence, the recommended disciplinary action for
Deputy Cox cannot be carried out due to the 180
days clause found in the Rights document.
* Deputy Cox has been reassigned to the Training
Division effective immediately for retraining in high
liability areas.
Note: The internal affairs investigator had to verify that
a complaint had actually been lodged back in 2009 in
order for the Bill of Rights 180 days clause to be
legitimate. Therefore, the time it took to complete the
investigation was lengthened in order to track down
the complainant and confirm information.
Complainant does not live in the area.
Source: Citrus County Sheriff's Office


mit. Cox's answer was he
didn't care.
In audio, Cox later could
be heard telling Smith he
would be charged with bran-
dishing a firearm, and Cox
said Smith never told him he
had a permit for the pistol.
Cox and the man dis-
agreed on the deputy's as-
sertion he brandished a
firearm, which showed
under his shirttail when
he reached into the van.
The case against Smith
was dropped by the State
Attorney's Office because
the likelihood of conviction
was minimal. In 2009, state
did not allow accidental


brandishing of firearms
even with conceal/carry
permit holders. That law
was changed in 2011.
According to CCSO, the
agency launched an inter-
nal investigation Jan. 12 as
soon as Dawsy became
aware of the incident.
According to CCSO, the
internal affairs investiga-
tion was opened on Jan. 15.
Cox was hired as a CCSO
deputy in October 2006, but
has been a law enforce-
ment officer for 22 years.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe
@chronicleonline. com.


STATUS
Continued from PageAl

do what they have al-
ready concluded should
be done," he said. "Part of
our job at Pacific Legal is
to give the government a
nudge; they probably con-
sider it a kick.
"If the agency had re-
sponded to its own studies
the process would have
started along time ago,"
he said. "The issue of the
manatee is a very sensi-
tive one in Florida and
they basically decided to
sit back until someone put
them in a position of hav-
ing to take action."
Deserio said when they
get close to the deadlines,
if they have not heard
anything, it would be up to
Save Crystal River to
make a decision as to
whether to proceed to file
suit in federal court. "We
hope it doesn't come to
that," he said. "We hate to
waste time and
resources."
"Absolutely, it was a
very positive step," Save
Crystal River member
Steve Lamb said. "I think
we were able to nudge
U.S. Fish and Wildlife into
moving forward and fol-
lowing their own rules."
Chuck Underwood,
public information officer
with USFWS, confirmed
the 90-day time that will
lead to notice in the Fed-
eral Register of the status
review.
He said the letter ac-
knowledged they received
the petition and said the
agency is already in the
process of review for a
possible recommendation
later this year.


The ad that ran in the Feb.
23,2013 Central Ridge
Visitor was incorrect. The
ad should have read
"SAVE UP TO" 5 SQ.
FT. We're sorry for any
inconvenience this may
have caused.
J&J Sod & Landscaping
352-302-6049


"We are looking at most
recent data since the 2007
review," he said. "In this
case we had time, we
knew new data would be
available in the next three
to five years and now have
that data plugged into
population models."
He explained once the
manatee was listed as en-
dangered, it was pro-
tected as the agency dealt
with other species and
funding constraints. Each
listed species has to be
reviewed every five
years.
Patrick Rose, executive
director of Save the Man-
atee Club, offered a
sweeping view of the
manatee situation. He
sees the future of mana-
tees as closely tied to
Florida's will and ability
to protect its water re-
sources. He cited factors
such as growth, water use
permits, climate change,
reduced spring flows, is-
sues of habitat and mana-
tee access to warm water.


He praised the local
work in acquiring Three
Sisters Springs, but said
that is not going to fix the
problem.
"We would like to see
them in a position to be
downlisted," Rose said,
"But it's premature.
There is way too much to
do to get to that point And
if we get this wrong now,
we'll never get it right."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty
@chronicleonline. com.



The Homosassa Lions
Auxiliary ad that ran in
the Feb. 25,2013
Chronicle was incorrect.
The Friday Night Pay outs
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Page A3 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Council seeks consultant on Riverwalk


Crystal River adds

another delay to

douwntoumproject

A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer

CRYSTAL RIVER- The long-
planned, oft-delayed construc-
tion of the elevated boardwalk
on the banks of King's Bay has
been delayed once again.
City Manager Andy Houston
said this delay is to give the city
a chance to hire a consultant
who can suggest a wide-ranging
plan about how the boardwalk
fits into the redevelopment and
economic future of the area.


"I still think
the Riverwalk
could be one of
the greatest cata- .
lysts for down-
town and
waterfront rede-
velopment," .
Houston told the nd
Andy
city council, Houston
which was acting Crystal River
in its capacity as city manager.
the Community
Redevelopment Agency
Houston, however, thinks the
council members should hold off
on a yes-or-no vote on construc-
tion until the city can hire a con-
sultant and tender a report. He
believes the boardwalk should be
part of a greater vision for rede-
veloping the waterfront district
Houston said the city council


may have to re-
think some
things, including
building-height
requirements.
But no one
knows what sug-
gestions will be
Robert proffered.
Holmes "It's critical
Crystal River we do this
council member, right," Houston
said.
Council members overwhelm-
ingly approved Houston's
recommendation.
"I have to be honest, this is be-
yond my scope. I think we need
some help," council member
Ken Brown said.
Brown would like to see a
short- and long-range plan for
the boardwalk. Meanwhile, he


said the area of boardwalk al-
ready completed behind Crack-
ers Restaurant should be made
more accessible to the public via
more visible signage.
Council member Robert
Holmes suggested city officials
commensurate with business-
people, mine ideas for redevel-
opment and present them to the
consultant, so he or she knows
the city's expectations.
Plans for a boardwalk on the
bayfront have been in the works
since 1989. A portion of it has
been constructed, but talks over
easement with property owners
along the route of the proposed
boardwalk and public parking
concerns had delayed work.
However, those issues were re-
cently resolved and the city pur-
chased land near the site to be


converted it into parking area.
Longtime Crystal River resi-
dent Joe Chrietzberg said it's
time for the city council to make
up its mind about issues such as
building heights.
"Everyone panics whenever
you want to go over two stories
in this town," Chrietzberg said.
He said Crystal River is dying
with its dwindling business base.
The city is a small town with big-
city aspirations, but is still mired
in a "small-town thought
process," he added.
Chrietzberg favors dynamic
change without the "small fish-
ing village" notion many hold in
the city, which means being flex-
ibility about building heights.
Contact Chronicle reporter
A.B. Sidibe at 352-564-2925 or
asidibe@chronicleonline.com.


STEPPIN'


UP TO MAKE A



STATEMENT

Black history speaks with many voices


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer

Music, drumming, singing,
Steppin' and drama featured
Sunday were among the many
oral presentations at the sixth
annual African-American
Read-In, representing a wide
cultural experience.
"The event today is a high-
light of the celebration of
Black History Month," said
former Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles, who, along with
Purvis Hunt, gave introduc-
tions. "The diversity of our
readers and artists are a re-
flection of the changes that
are not only here in Citrus
County but across America."
The event opened with jazz
music performed by Sally
Smith and Friends. The Rev.
Gladys Brown of the Her-
nando Church of Living God
read "I Want to Write" by Mar-
garet Walker. "The First
Book," a poem by Rita Dove,
was read by school board
member Ginger Bryant. Al
Young's poem "For Poets" was
read by Inverness Primary
Principal Marlise Bushman,
Supervisor of Elections Susan
Gill and Hernando Elemen-
tary Principal Laura Manos.
In an original scene, Bruce
Bellamy portrayed a teacher
leading a class, represented by


some of Gail Bockiaro's
fourth-graders at Crystal River
Primary School, through a les-
son in Black History
Twin sisters Leondra and
Leandra Crummer with the
Lecanto High School Pep
Team demonstrated Steppin'
- a dance of synchronized
routines that has African roots.
Bertha Brooks-Walker of
Forest Ridge Elementary and
Larissa Barnes of Lecanto
High School's International
Baccalaureate (IB) program
read "Ars Poetica No. 92, Mar-
cus Garvey on Elocution."
Lecanto High School Drama
Club members performed an
excerpt from "A Raisin in the
Sun" by Lorraine Vivian
Hansberry, directed by
Amanda Mathieu.
Danita Eatman of the Ren-
aissance Center and Timmeya
Eatman of The New Church
Without Walls read "There's
Hope" by India Arie. Lydia
Valentine from Crystal River
read her own poem "My Boy"
in loving memory of her son
Allen, who died in 2010. "Res-
urrections No. 36" by Gloria
Oden was read by Ken Hinkle
of the Inverness City Council.
Crystal River Mayor Jim
Farley read a humorous story
by Bill Cosby, "Good Morning,
Opponents."
Judi Redd of The Afro-


American Club of Citrus
County read "From the Heart:
Seven Rules to Live By" by
Robin Roberts, about a child
who had to drink from the
water fountain labeled "col-
ored" and was disappointed:
"That's just plain ol' water. It
isn't colored."
Nikki Grimes' story "The
Gift," about her father playing
classical violin, was read by
Dr. Carlene Wilson of the
IM&P Wellness Center in
Crystal River.
The Journey Men, a gospel
music group with members
Nathan Duncanson, Tony
Singer, Michael O'Grady, Ron
Hoopes and Jim Witherow,
sang "Swing Low" and "Give It
Away" Collinnettee Spears of
the Literary Club's Florida
chapter read "Abruptly," a
poem by Gwendolyn Brooks
that begins with the line: "God
is a gorilla." Trish Douglas of
Inverness Middle School,
nurse practitioner Monica
Gonzalez and Sandra Maxwell
of Mount Carmel Missionary
Baptist Church read "Four


Glimpses of Night," a poem by
Frank Marshall Davis, an
American journalist, poet and
political and labor movement
activist.
County commissioner John
"JJ" Kenney read "The Word
the Devil Made Up" by Zora
Neale Hurston. Edwin and
Bonita Martin of the Art Cen-
ter of Citrus County read
"Br'er Possum's Dilemma: A
Traditional African-American
Folktale" retold by Jackie Tor-
rence. The Rev. Ronald A. Sut-
ton of Mount Olive Missionary
Baptist Church read "My Peo-
ple" by Langston Hughes. An-
other Hughes poem,
"Dreams," was read by Scott
Adams, county commissioner.
Led by Crystal Wilson, the
audience stood and sang a tra-
ditional African-American
hymn, "Lift Every Voice and
Sing." Bellamy, of the Mount
Carmel Missionary Baptist
Church Community Players,
read an excerpt from a ser-
mon by Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr, "Loving Your Ene-
mies." Commission Chairman


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
ABOVE: A crowd turned out
Sunday for the sixth annual
African-American Read-In at
the Citrus Learning and
Conference Center in Lecanto.
Attendees were treated to jazz
music by Sally Smith-Adams,
readings of many popular and
poignant works, dancing by
sisters, Leondra and Leandra
Crummer and African
drumming by South African Eric
Bli Bi Gore. LEFT: Leondra
Crummer, right, and Leandra
Crummer entertain with a
dance called "Steppin."'
BELOW: Lydia Valentine reads
an emotional poem she wrote
titled "My Boy."


Joe Meek read "Quiet
Strength: A Memoir" by foot-
ball coach Tony Dungy
Gerry Mulligan, Chronicle
publisher, read an excerpt
from a speech by President
Obama: "Instilling a Love of
Reading in Children." Part of
a sermon by Dr. Douglas
Alexander Sr. of the New
Church Without Walls, "O-
Opportunity," was read by his
sister-in-law, Sharon Watson.
The event ended with
African drumming by Eric Bli
Bi Gore and refreshments.
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached at
352-564-2916 or cvanormer@
chronicleonline. com.


Insurance problematic for nuke plant Aroundthe
R t tD i-kate


Cost shortfall could

affect ratepayers

PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer

There will be no quick resolution
on how costs associated with the
shutdown of the nuclear plant north
of Crystal River will eventually af-
fect ratepayers. But some of the par-
ties involved want customers off the
hook for a shortage in the insurance
coverage.
Acknowledging the "one-of-a-
kind" nature of the event, partici-
pants at a Public Service
Commission informational meeting
Tuesday agreed it is more important
to do the process right rather than
do it quickly Progress Energy
Florida has suggested getting it
done by the end of the year.


PUBLIC SERVICE
COMMISSION MEETING
The next information meeting is
March 12. More hearings in
June.

The docket concerns a review of
the utility's actions resulting in the
extended shutdown of CR3, as the
nuclear unit is known, the need to
purchase replacement power and a
settlement with Nuclear Electric In-
surance Limited (NEIL).
Attorney John T Burnett, repre-
senting Progress Energy, said there
are three main issues: the decision
to repair versus retire, the prudence
of accepting the NEIL settlement
and the global settlement. He said
timing is different for each.
The state Office of Public Counsel,
representing the residents of
Florida and the Florida Retail Fed-
eration, petitioned the PSC for an


investigation of Progress Energy's
efforts to acquire insurance money
Officials also want to establish
Progress customers are not respon-
sible for certain costs relating to
CR3 not covered by the nuclear cost
recovery mechanism. According to
the petition, those costs would not
hit until January 2017.
The petition states Progress En-
ergy's efforts to settle the insurance
claims were insufficient and the
$530 million the utility intends to ac-
cept is "woefully inadequate" and
practically a fraud upon the
electricity-consuming public.
The docket had been scheduled
for hearings in June. PSC staff mem-
ber Keino Young said they would
meet with the pre-hearing officer on
resetting the deadlines. The next
informational meeting will be
March 12.
Contact Chronicle reporter Pat
Faherty at 352-564-2924 or pfaherty
@chronicleonline. com.


available
The Nature Coast Chapter
of the Florida Public Rela-
tions Association will host the
fifth annual Roast 'n' Toast
fundraiser Friday, March 8,
at Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club.
This year's guest of honor
is Chris Moling, owner of
TMC Productions and DRC
Sports. Roasters will include
roastmaster Frank DiGio-
vanni along with Pati Smith
and several others.
Additionally, a champagne
toast will honor the Public
Relations Professional of the
Year.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m.;
dinner and program begin at
7 p.m. Tickets are $75 per
person and table sponsor-
ships are still available.


COUNTY


For information or tickets,
call Katie Mehl at 352-344-
6501 or email kmehl@citrus
mh.org.
R.R. Assembly
meets March 2
The public is invited to
the Ronald Reagan Repub-
lican Assembly meeting at
1 p.m. Saturday, March 2.
The guest speaker is Hamil-
ton Hanson of Weekie
Wachee, a fiscal conserva-
tive and constitutionalist,
who will speak on the pros
and cons of charter county
government.
The meeting is at 938 N.
Suncoast Blvd. (U.S. 19)
Crystal River. Refreshments
will be provided. Donations
for CASA are accepted.
For more information, call
352-257-5381.
From staff reports






A4 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013


Board nixes two out of



three revenue options



County required to meetfederal mandate


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer

In the final chapter of
exploring alternate rev-
enue methods for the
county to meet its budget
shortfall, county commis-
sioners voted by 4 to 1
Tuesday to go forward
with only one of three pre-
sented and it was feder-
ally mandated.
"Looking at your latest
census, I anticipated you
would soon be open to the
NPDES (National Pollu-
tant Discharge Elimination
System) stormwater per-
mitting program," Heather
Encinosa, of the law firm
Nabors, Giblin and Nicker-
son, told the Citrus County
Board of County Commis-
sioners (BOCC).
Essentially, the county
implementing a fee system
for a stormwater manage-
ment program would not
produce funds to replace
those lost from the Duke
Energy tax shortfall be-
cause U.S. Census data im-
posed new federal
requirements to install
capital improvements to
contain, store and treat
stormwater Encinosa said
it would be assessed as a
rate for each parcel based
on that parcel's amount of
impervious surface area
- the areas within a par-
cel of land covered by
structures, driveways and
walkways from which
stormwater would run off.
County Administrator
Brad Thorpe said the
stormwater assessment
would take some of the
load off property taxes as


about $1 million a year of
ad valorem revenue gets
spent on such projects as
cleaning swales that would
be reassigned to the
stormwater program.
Commissioner Scott
Adams said it seemed co-
incidental that this federal
mandate came up at the
same time as the county
was considering non-ad
valorem funding options.
Encinosa said she became
aware of it last year when
she started studying the
county's options. She said
the county would have a
year to apply for a five-year
permit for the program.
Adams asked what the
consequences would be
for a county that did not
comply, but Encinosa said
she did not know.
"I haven't dealt with a
county that refused to
comply," Encinosa said.
County Attorney
Richard Wesch read aloud
the penalties under the
Clean Water Act of 1987
that included fines of as
much as $25,000 per day
and imprisonment of one
or more years.
"You cannot decline
Uncle Sam's invitation,"
Wesch said.
Adams asked if the
county could appeal its
U.S Census urbanized
area status that necessi-
tated the stormwater pro-
gram. Commission
Chairman Joe Meek said
the new status based on
population clusters would
be bringing the county
benefits in regional trans-
portation projects.
"You can't have it both


ways," Meek said. "We're
mandated to have this."
In the decision, Adams
cast the lone vote against
asking Nabors, Giblin and
Nickerson to write a plan
for the mandated
stormwater program be-
cause he said the firm had
not been hired through
competitive bidding.
The board took no ac-
tion on implementing the
option of franchise fees to
utility companies because
members felt fees would
be passed through to con-
sumers and a sales tax op-
tion failed because it
would need a referendum.
Thorpe said the board's
previous decisions have
given him four new lines to
work out a balanced budget
by the time the millage rate
has to be set on July 24.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Chris Van Ormer at
352-564-2916 or cvanormer
@chronicleonline. com.


Hospital board votes to



back Allen Ridge-491 plan


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer

INVERNESS The
final agreement isn't fin-
ished yet, but all involved
are enthusiastically
aboard the county's first
step for a medical corri-
dor on County Road 491.
Members of the Citrus
Memorial Health Founda-
tion board voted unani-
mously Monday night to
"bless the concept" of a
medical campus at the
Allen Ridge complex that
includes the swap of prop-
erty to help widen C.R.
491.
A proposed interlocal
agreement was scheduled
to come to the Citrus
County Commission on
Tuesday County Attorney
Richard Wesch said the
agreement's language will
be finalized for the
board's March 12 meeting.
The timing is crucial
because the Citrus County
Hospital Board, which
owns the Allen Ridge


The agreement calls for the

CCHB to donate land for drainage

that can be utilized by other

properties along C.R. 491. That

is critical for the county's hope

that landowners will donate right

of way in exchange for drainage.


property, is having an ap-
praisal done of all Citrus
Memorial Health System
property.
The appraisal, due to
the CCHB by March 14,
could determine whether
the hospital is sold or
merged with another
company
CCHB attorney Bill
Grant said the interlocal
agreement significantly
increases the value of the
Allen Ridge property.
The agreement calls for
the CCHB to donate land
for drainage that can be
utilized by other proper-


ties along C.R. 491. That is
critical for the county's
hope that landowners will
donate right of way in ex-
change for drainage.
The county also would
build a new entry road to
the complex just north of
the current Allen Ridge
entrance, plus a north-
south road designed to
give the public access to
medical facilities without
having to access C.R. 491.
Plus, CCHB will seek to
rezone 40 acres of vacant
property from residential
to public/commercial for a
potential medical center.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
PR H O PR |HI LO PR
0.90 -. 72 64 0.30 L, J77 62 0.50


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES
City H L F'cast City H
Daytona Bch. 72 49 pc Miami 78
Ft. Lauderdale 77 61 ts Ocala 74
Fort Myers 76 56 sh Orlando 77
Gainesville 73 42 s Pensacola 65
Homestead 78 58 ts Sarasota 72
Jacksonville 70 43 s Tallahassee 70
Key West 77 66 sh Tampa 72
Lakeland 74 52 pc Vero Beach 76
Melbourne 75 54 pc W. Palm Bch. 77


F'cast
ts
s
pc
s
pc
s
pc
sh
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northwest winds around 10 knots.
Seas 3 to 5 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a light chop. Mostly
sunny today.


73 68 1.00 73 67 0.60

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclus vedally
forecast by:
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 69 Low: 49
Mostly sunny.

k THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
High: 67 Low: 39
Mostly sunny.

FRIDAY & SATURDAY MORNING
i High: 60 Low: 36
SPartly cloudy with a slight chance of showers.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Tuesday 73/67
Record 90/24
Normal 75/47
Mean temp. 70
Departure from mean +9
PRECIPITATION*
Tuesday 1.10 in.
Total for the month 2.00 in.
Total for the year 2.10 in.
Normal for the year 5.73 in.
*As of 7 pm at Inverness
UV INDEX: 8
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Tuesday at 3 p.m. 29.80 in.


DEW POINT
Tuesday at 3 p.m. 57
HUMIDITY
Tuesday at 3 p.m. 570
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, Oak, Nettle
Today's count: 9.9/12
Thursday's count: 10.8
Friday's count: 10.3
AIR QUALITY
Tuesday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
2/27 WEDNESDAY 6:22 12:10 6:47 12:35
2/28 THURSDAY 7:16 1:03 7:41 1:29
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
S SUNSET TONIGHT............................6:29 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:56A.M.
SMOONRISE TODAY........................... 8:33 PM.
MARCH 4 MARCH11 MARCH19 MARCH 27 MOONSET TODAY ............................7:45A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
informationon drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Wednesday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 6:26 a/2:16 a 6:45 p/2:33 p
Crystal River** 4:47 a/11:55 a 5:06 p/--
Withlacoochee* 2:34 a/9:43 a 2:53 p/10:04 p
Homosassa*** 5:36 a/1:15 a 5:55 p/1:32 p


***At Mason's Creek
Thursday
High/Low High/Low
7:08 a/2:54 a 7:13 p/3:05 p
5:29 a/12:16 a 5:34 p/12:27 p
3:16 a/10:15 a 3:21 p/10:45 p
6:18 a/1:53 a 6:23 p/2:04 p


Gulf water
temperature


70
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Mon. Tues. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.21 28.20 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.74 37.73 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 38.64 38.63 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.93 39.91 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY


Tuesday Wednesday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 45 24 sn 39 31
Albuquerque 48 21 s 42 24
Asheville 39 32 1.54 pc 50 31
Atlanta 59 37 1.51 pc 58 36
Atlantic City 46 23 .06 pc 54 39
Austin 68 41 s 65 30
Baltimore 43 26 .11 c 57 36
Billings 44 30 pc 39 24
Birmingham 52 45 .44 s 58 34
Boise 40 22 pc 45 29
Boston 41 29 sh 41 36
Buffalo 43 26 .06 rs 37 33
Burlington, VT 42 30 rs 39 32
Charleston, SC 73 49 1.88 s 64 42
Charleston, WV 53 37 .21 sh 44 32
Charlotte 45 33 1.16 s 59 37
Chicago 36 32 .39 sn 35 29
Cincinnati 51 35 .10 rs 39 31
Cleveland 38 26 .51 rs 39 31
Columbia, SC 55 39 1.21 s 62 38
Columbus, OH 43 35 .68 rs 39 32
Concord, N.H. 39 28 rs 34 29
Dallas 59 40 s 55 35
Denver 31 8 .09 pc 32 15
Des Moines 34 30 .43 c 35 25
Detroit 35 30 .85 sn 35 29
El Paso 65 37 pc 55 30
Evansville, IN 50 40 .73 rs 39 32
Harrisburg 42 27 .11 sh 52 35
Hartford 42 33 rs 38 34
Houston 64 44 s 71 41
Indianapolis 41 331.24 sn 36 31
Jackson 58 42 pc 61 34
Las Vegas 59 37 s 59 42
Little Rock 46 41 .06 pc 49 30
Los Angeles 66 44 s 72 49
Louisville 52 41 .62 rs 38 33
Memphis 56 42 c 50 35
Milwaukee 34 32 .27 sn 35 27
Minneapolis 36 17 c 36 21
Mobile 64 49 s 67 40
Montgomery 61 50 .62 s 65 38
Nashville 54 41 .18 sh 43 34
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Tuesday Wednesday
City H LPcp.FcstH L
New Orleans 60 46 pc 68 46
New York City 44 35 r 46 40
Norfolk 58 37 .88 pc 62 41
Oklahoma City 46 33 pc 42 26
Omaha 34 27 .01 c 38 23
Palm Springs 74 44 s 74 47
Philadelphia 47 28 .01 sh 57 39
Phoenix 69 42 s 69 46
Pittsburgh 42 32 .71 rs 41 31
Portland, ME 40 32 rs 35 31
Portland, Ore 49 37 c 52 41
Providence, R.I. 44 34 sh 42 37
Raleigh 58 36 .86 pc 61 37
Rapid City 45 16 pc 37 15
Reno 48 22 pc 53 29
Rochester, NY 44 25 rs 36 32
Sacramento 67 37 s 68 40
St. Louis 41 35 .85 sn 37 30
St. Ste. Marie 33 28 sn 37 23
Salt Lake City 34 22 .01 pc 34 19
San Antonio 66 40 s 69 35
San Diego 64 45 s 70 50
San Francisco 63 41 s 60 44
Savannah 77 47 1.74 s 66 43
Seattle 48 38 .01 sh 48 40
Spokane 41 25 c 44 30
Syracuse 44 19 rs 39 33
Topeka 36 32 .14 c 36 22
Washington 45 33 .22 pc 60 39
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 88 Fort Pierce, Fla.
LOW -8 Gunnison, Colo.
WORLD CITIES


WEDNESDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 8572/s
Amsterdam 36/29/c
Athens 60/45/pc
Beijing 48/29/pc
Berlin 40/31/c
Bermuda 68/67/sh
Cairo 81/52/s
Calgary 38/18/pc
Havana 84/67/sh
Hong Kong 76/54/pc
Jerusalem 71/49/s


Lisbon 54/36/pc
London 40/34/c
Madrid 46/34/c
Mexico City 80/49/s
Montreal 34/30/rs
Moscow 29/19/c
Paris 39/34/c
Rio 81/72/sh
Rome 52/40/s
Sydney 82/72/pc
Tokyo 52/43/sh
Toronto 32/32/rs
Warsaw 38/30/c


legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle



Town of Yankeetown................................A6
Bid Notices............................ ..........C12
Meeting Notices...................................C12
Lien Notices...................................... C12
Miscellaneous Notices...................................... ...C12
Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices................................. C11
Notice to Creditors/Administration............................... C11
., erTax Deed Notices.............................. .......................C11
Termination of Parental Rights Notices....................C11


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LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


cT C I T R U S.


C 0 U N T y--





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Truce sought as suit threatens


Chronicle
The Citrus Memorial Health Founda-
tion board discussed pending lawsuits
with its attorneys Monday night but took
no action after a closed session.
Earlier in the open section of the meet-
ing, Citrus County Hospital Board mem-
bers Debbie Ressler and Krista Joseph
pleaded with foundation members to
agree to a truce in a lawsuit that could be
headed to the Florida Supreme Court.
The Citrus County Hospital Board
leases the hospital to the foundation,
which oversees day-to-day operations.
The so-called governance lawsuit, over


BOCC
Continued from Page Al

County Administrator Brad
Thorpe with the same re-
sult, said the county con-
tracts with too many
outside attorneys, particu-
larly the $307,000 paid so
far to Tampa attorney Fred
Busack for the County
Road 491 widening project
His motion to terminate
Wesch's contract received
no support from other
commissioners.
Wesch, however, ques-
tioned the timing of
Adams' motion.
"Is this simply my turn
in the fish bowl?" Wesch
said.
He suggested Adams' ac-
tions were not related to
budget concerns but rather
Wesch's response to a com-
plaint from a garbage
hauler who was not
named that Adams
sought to sway his business
from the Citrus County
landfill to a Sumter County
private landfill co-owned
by Adams and the son of
state Sen. Charlie Dean.
Wesch said Chairman
Joe Meek and Solid Waste
Division Director Casey
Stephens each informed
him earlier this month the
hauler said Adams wanted
him to meet with his busi-
ness partner, Charles
Dean Jr
Wesch said the hauler
thought the contact was in-
appropriate, and Meek
and Stephens wanted to


a 2011 state law giving trustees oversight
of the Citrus Memorial Health System,
reached a pinnacle last week with the
First District Court of Appeal ruling the
law unconstitutional because it effec-
tively severed an existing lease the foun-
dation has with the hospital board.
CCHB members last week voted to ap-
peal to the Supreme Court However, they
said they would drop the appeal if the foun-
dation agreed to a 5-5-1 board makeup: five
foundation members, five trustees and the
hospital medical chief of staff. Trustees also
want a supermajority vote on major deci-
sions, such as hiring the chief executive of-
ficer or extending his contract


know what they should tell
him.
Wesch said he re-
sponded in an e-mail the
hauler should contact the
Florida Commission on
Ethics if he wanted to reg-
ister a formal complaint
about Adams.
He said Adams, who re-
ceived a copy of the email,
is seeking retribution.
Wesch said public office
is "not a pedestal to ad-
vance a personal
vendetta."
Adams fired right back.
"There is nothing wrong
with being in business and
trying to make a living," he
said. "That hauler chose to
meet with my partner."
Adams then accused
Wesch of slouching on the
job.
"What you have is a
county attorney who don't
show up for work," Adams
said. "He's been with the
system. That's the problem."
The Wesch episode
summed up a day during
which Adams made sev-
eral motions that none of
the four other commis-


sioners would support.
For example, during a dis-
cussion on whether to hire a
lobbyist to represent the
county during the legislative
session, Adams made a mo-
tion to drop all further work
toward Port Citrus.
"It's costing us a bunch
of money," he said.
Adams' motion received
no support Commissioners
voted 4-1 for the lobbyist
Adams also presented a
list of budget proposals -
including eliminating six
to nine administrative po-
sitions. In addition, he pro-
posed slowing hiring of
outside attorneys and con-
sultants, freezing hiring,
and giving pay cuts of 2
percent to 12 percent to
salaried county employ-
ees, with the highest cuts
coming at the top of the
pay scale.
He made a motion that all
commissioners cut $5,000
from their pay It died from
a lack of a second.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright
@chronicleonline. cor


I A
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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013 A5





I5






A6 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013


Robert
Ackermann, 81
SUMMERFIELD
Robert Charles Acker-
mann, 81, Summerfield,
Fla., died Feb. 25, 2013, in
Hospice of Citrus County.
Mr Ackermann was born
in Brooklyn, N.Y, Dec. 28,
1931, to the late Frank and
Margaret (Dannhardt)
Ackermann. He was a re-
tired sales supervisor for
Entenmann's Baking Com-
pany and served our coun-
try in the U.S. Army He
was of the Catholic faith.
He is survived by his
wife of 56 years, Ida (Di-
Tocco) Ackermann; three
sons, Joseph (Victoria)
Hertik, Inverness, Philip
(Amber) Hertik, Nashville,
Tenn., and Robert (Trish)
Ackermann, Spring Hill,
Tenn.; his brother Frank
(Joann) Ackermann, Hud-
dleston, Va.; eight grand-
children; and seven
great-grandchildren.
The Mass of Christian
Burial will be offered at 11
a.m. Friday, March 1, 2013,
from Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church with Fr.
Erwin Belgica, celebrant.
Cremation arrangements
under the direction of
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory
The family requests dona-
tions in Robert's memory
to Helping Hands, Our
Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church in lieu of flowers.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Eddie
Anderson, 71
HOMOSASSA
Eddie M. Anderson, 71,
of Homosassa, Fla., passed
away Feb. 21, 2013. Pre-
ceded in death by his par-
ents Volen and Oleta
Anderson, Eddie was born
Sept. 1, 1941, in
Gainesville, Texas. He is
survived by his children
Edie Yost (Mike) of
Carmel,
Ind., Suzi
Grant
(Trey) of
Houston,
Texas,
Dan Gill
(Marie) of
Dallas,
Eddie Texas,
Anderson and Kemp
Anderson of Coconut
Grove; and sister Jean
Kevil (Phil) of Arlington,
Texas. His grandchildren,
Brad (Catherine), Ryan,
Adie, Jack, Tate, Alex,
Ethan and Mason, were
his greatest joy
Having grown up in
Levelland, Texas, Eddie
graduated from Abilene
Christian University in
1963, where he was a cap-
tain on the football team.
He worked as a salesman,
football coach, teacher and
primarily as a chemical
toxicologist for the Texas
Department of Public
Safety and Florida De-
partment of Law Enforce-
ment. Eddie was a man of
quick humor He was a
skilled golfer, a deter-
mined fisherman and had
an unconditional love for
his family and friends. In
his waterfront "paradise,"
he enjoyed life to the end.
On Saturday, March 9, a
graveside service will be
in Alvord, Texas, at 10 a.m.,
followed by a memorial
service at 1 p.m. at the
North Davis Church of
Christ in Arlington, Texas
(Biggers Funeral Home of
Fort Worth, Texas.)
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.




Johnny
Palmer, 70
HOMOSASSA
Graveside services for
Johnny Hall Palmer, 70, of
Homosassa, who died Nov.


30, 2012, will be at Foun-
tains Memorial Park, Ho-
mosassa, at 11 a.m. Friday,
March 1, 2013. Wilder Fu-
neral Home, Homosassa.

Roy Craig, 58
WILLISTON
Roy Edward Craig, 58,
died Feb. 21, 2013, at his
residence under the care
of Hospice of Citrus
County. Private cremation
services are entrusted to
New Serenity Memorial
Funeral Home & Crema-
tion Services Inc.


Helen
Houck, 93
HOMOSASSA
Helen Hopkins Houck,
of Homosassa, Fla., passed
away Feb.
'* 20, 2013,
S ^,at the age
S of 93. She
S"-- had been
a resident
l of Florida
Sfor over 25
years, in-
Helen eluding
Houck the past
20 years in Homosassa.
Mrs. Houck was born in
Yorkville, Ill., and gradu-
ated from Northwestern
University School of Den-
tal Hygiene in Chicago, Ill.,
in 1941, where she also
met her husband of 71
years, Dr Roland V Houck,
DDS, of Homosassa, who
survives her She lived
most of her adult life in
Easton, Md., before retir-
ing to Florida in 1986.
In addition to her hus-
band, Mrs. Houck is sur-
vived by her two children,
Dr William R. Houck (and
wife Millie), Maryland and
Homosassa, and Suzanne
Houck Collins, Ho-
mosassa; three grandchil-
dren, Dr Kristine Houck
Morris and Jeanette Rad-
vansky, both of Maryland,
and Christopher T Collins
of Fort Collins, Colo.; and
nine great-grandchildren.
Mrs. Houck was preceded
in death by three sisters
and one brother and is sur-
vived by one brother,
James R. Hopkins of Mon-
ticello, Wisc.
Mrs. Houck had been a
longtime member of the
Talbot Country Club in
Easton, Md., and Sugarmill
Woods Country Club in
Homosassa. She was a
member of the Memorial
Hospital Junior Auxiliary,
Easton, Md., and the Tal-
bot Women's Club, Easton,
Md., in which she served
and volunteered in numer-
ous charitable and civic
services for more than 40
years. Helen was a mem-
ber of the First Presbyte-
rian Church, Crystal River
A memorial service cel-
ebrating her life will be at
Sunflower Springs As-
sisted Living Facility, 8733
Yulee Dr, Homosassa, FL
34446 at 10 a.m. Saturday,
March 9, 2013. In lieu of
flowers, memorial contri-
butions in Helen's name
can be made to Society of
St. Vincent de Paul Food
Pantry, PO. Box 783, Eas-
ton, MD 21601 or Hospice
of Citrus County, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464. Wilder Funeral
Home, Homosassa,
www.wilderfuneral.com.

Ruth
Martin, 67
INVERNESS
Ruth Naomi Martin, 67,
Inverness, died Feb. 25,
2013, at Timberridge Nurs-
ing Center in Ocala. Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory is in charge
of private arrangements.




John
Stewart Jr., 88
HOMOSASSA
A funeral Mass for John
Richard Stewart Jr, 88, of
Homosassa, Fla., will be
celebrated at 10 a.m. Tues-
day, March 5, 2013, at St.
Benedict's Catholic
Church in Crystal River
with Father Ryszard
Stradomski as celebrant.
Inurnment will follow at
12:30 p.m. at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery in Bush-
nell. Strickland Funeral
Home with Crematory
Crystal River assisted the
family with arrangements.

* Call 352-563-5660 to
submit an obituary.


To Place Your


"In Memory" ad,

Judy
Moseley
at 564-2917
jmoseley@chronicleonline.com



fill I


Clyde
Carruthers, 86
BEVERLY HILLS
Clyde L. Carruthers, 86,
of Beverly Hills, Fla., died
Thursday,
Feb. 21,
2013. A
memorial
"" service of
remem-
brance
will take
place at
Clyde the Fam-
Carruthers ily of
Faith United Methodist
Church at 11 a.m. Friday,
April 12, 2013, in Akron,
Ohio. Arrangements by
Fero Funeral Home.
See DEATHS/Page A7

Call 352-563-5660 to
submit an obituary.


611". E. 5,avu
Funeral Home With Crematory
THOMAS DONAHUE
Service' Thnrs. 00 AM Chapel
JULIE FORGIONE
Mass Thurs. 230 PM Our Lady of Fatima
ROBERT ACKERMAN
Mass Fri. ll00AM OurLady of Fatima
JEFFREY PRICE
Service' Sat. 3'00PM
LAURA ELLIS
Private Arrangements
RUTH MARTIN
Private Arrangements
WANDABORGEN
Private Arrangements
MARY SNYDER
PrivateArrangements
726-8323 QDWD3


VAleft in limbo by sequestration


Associated Press


WASHINGTON- The
Department of Veterans
Affairs has put a dozen
new or expanded clinics
on hold and says it may
have to close others unless
Congress comes up with
money to pay for the
long-planned expansion.
Since the mid-1990s, the
VA has turned to outpa-
tient clinics to bring health
care closer to veterans.





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0227-WCRN

NOTICE OF INTENT

TO CONSIDER AN ORDINANCE

TO ESTABLISH OR CHANGE

REGULATIONS AFFECTING THE

USE OF LAND
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners (BCC) proposes to adopt the
following by ordinance:
AN ORDINANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, AMENDING THE CITRUS
COUNTY FUTURE LAND USE MAP BY REDESIGNATING; THE FUTURE
LAND USE OF APPROXIMATELY 22.9 ACRES FROM MEDIUM DENSITY
RESIDENTIAL TO GENERAL COMMERCIAL AND APPROXIMATELY 25.7
ACRES FROM PROFESSIONAL SERVICE OFFICE TO GENERAL
COMMERCIAL AND APPROXIMATELY 4.9 ACRES FROM MEDIUM
DENSITY RESIDENTIAL TO PROFESSIONAL SERVICE OFFICE; AND
AMENDING THE CITRUS COUNTY LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE ATLAS
BY REDESIGNATING THE LAND USE OF APPROXIMATELY 22.9 ACRES
FROM MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL TO GENERAL COMMERCIAL
WITH A PLANNED DEVELOPMENT OVERLAY AND APPROXIMATELY 25.7
ACRES FROM PROFESSIONAL SERVICE OFFICE TO GENERAL
COMMERCIAL WITH A PLANNED DEVELOPMENT OVERLAY AND
APPROXIMATELY 4.9 ACRES FROM MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL TO
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE OFFICE WITH A PLANNED DEVELOPMENT
OVERLAY AND APPROXIMATELY 4.3 ACRES FROM MEDIUM DENSITY
RESIDENTIAL TO MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL WITH A PLANNED
DEVELOPMENT OVERLAY AND APPROXIMATELY 4 ACRES FROM
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE OFFICE TO PROFESSIONAL SERVICE OFFICE
WITH A PLANNED DEVELOPMENT OVERLAY; PROVIDING FOR
APPLICABILITY; PROVIDING FOR MODIFICATION; PROVIDING FOR
SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
CPA/AA/PDO-12-26 Genesis Group for CR486 LLC.
The property is located in Section 21, Township 18 South. Range 18 East. Parcel 1-
A, in Section 21, Township 18 South, Range 18 East, and further described as a
parcel of land being a portion of the Parcel "1" of the lands described in Official
Records Book 2218, Page 191, which property is known as 3499 W. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Lecanto, FL. (Lecanto Area) Acomplete legal description is on file.
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will conduct a Public
Hearing on March 12. 2013 at 5:01 PM in Room 100, Citrus County
Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida.
Interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the
proposed application.

-V-



; X --

I ,




A copy of the proposed ordinances) and supporting materials are available for
public inspection and copying between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M.,
Monday through Friday, at the Department of Planning and Development,
Geographic Resource and Community Planning Division, 3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 292, Lecanto, Florida 34461. (352) 527-5544.
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the board with respect to any
matter considered at this meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the
proceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may need to insure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which record includes all testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450,
(352) 341-6565, (352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are
hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Chairman
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners
Citrus County, Florida
OOOE59G


Lawmakers first took a
look at the clinics last year
and estimated 2013 costs at
tens of millions of dollars.
The estimate from the
Congressional Budget Of-
fice came in at $1.2 billion,
taking into account the full
cost of the leases.


That leaves Congress
with two options -find the
money from other govern-
ment programs or waive
the rules that require off-
sets to new spending. Nei-
ther is likely to be palatable
in the budget-cutting cli-
mate on Capitol Hill.


0207 WCRN
PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE
TOWN OF YANKEETOWN,
FLORIDA
The Town of Yankeetown will hold a Public Hearing
to be conducted by the Yankeetown Board of
Adjustment on Wednesday, March 6, 2013 at 1:00 PM.
at the Inglis / Yankeetown Lion's Club located at 22
59th Street in Yankeetown, Florida 34498.
The purpose of the Hearing is to consider a
variance from the twenty-five (25) foot waterfront
setback, required in the R 1 Zoning District, for a small
portion of an overhang, (attached to a new single
family residence), to cover an existing boat slip. The
property described as Parcel ID Number 0787100000,
is located at 5317 Riverside Drive, Yankeetown, FL
34498, Block 2, Lot 2 or Book 11-40, page 49. The
owner is Clifford B. Ayer, and the applicant is Gary
Cummins. The property is located as shown on this
map below:




5317 Riverside Dr.



S0%





A copy of the proposed Variance is available for
public inspection at the Office of the Town Clerk,
located at Yankeetown Town Hall, 6241 Harmony
Lane, Yankeetown, Florida, Monday through Friday,
during regular Town Hall business hours (9:00 am till
12 noon).
All interested parties may appear and be heard with
respect to the proposed Variance at the Public
Hearing. The Public Hearing may be continued to one
or more future dates: any interested party shall be
advised that the dates, times and places of any
continuation of the Public Hearing shall be announced
during the Public Hearing and that no further notices
regarding these matters will be published.
All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal
any decision made at the above referenced Public
Hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings,
and that, for such purpose, they may need to ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made,
which record includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based, pursuant to Fla.
Stat. Section 286.0105.
One or more other elected or appointed
Yankeetown officials may be in attendance at this
meeting.
Any handicapped or person with disabilities
requiring reasonable accommodation to participate in
this meeting should contact the Town Clerk at (352)
447-2511 at least 48 hours prior to the meeting so
arrangements can be made pursuant to Fla. Stat.
Section 286.26.
000DX9J









MARCH 8 -12
Citrus County Auditorium
Citrus County Fairgrounds U.S. 41 S,, Inverness

Sale Hours
Fri. 5-8 p.m.
with $5 donation
No admission charge for the following
Sat. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Sun. 1 p.m.-4 p.m.
Mon. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. (half price day)
Tues. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. ($3 a bag)

Great bargains in recycled reading!
Thousands of best sellers, large print, crafts,
cooking, health, children's, travel, CDs, DVDs,
games, puzzles, treasures, etc.
Proceeds benefit Friends of Coastal Region,
Central Ridge and Lakes Region Libraries and
Citrus County Library System.
www.foccls.org
For book sale information call
746-1334 or 527-8405 11( (.:,1.



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OBITUARIES


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013 A7


Money&Markets


1,560 .............................


- 1.0 I 10 DAYS
1 ,5 5 0 .............. ............. ...........

1,500

1,450-

1,400 .......... ........

1,350 ... .......


StocksRecap


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE
3,862
3,887
2030
1002
61
31


NASD
1,807
1,844
1482
965
41
27


S&P 500
Close: 1,496.94
Change: 9.09 (0.6%)


D J F


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
13917.83
5839.12
475.92
8779.15
3135.57
1498.99
1089.69
15822.11
902.13


A click of the wrist K
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com
. 1'" .... Dow Jones industrials
Close: 13,900.13
S Change: 115.96(0.8%)


IU UODA
14 ,40 0 : ........................................
14,000


13,200.
13,200-- ""


12,800. ....................... ... ..... ........
12,400
12,400 S 0 N D


LOW
13784.17
5789.20
471.43
8700.73
3105.37
1485.01
1078.65
15674.94
894.24


CLOSE
13900.13
5820.15
473.91
8766.17
3129.65
1496.94
1088.15
15801.66
900.05


CHG.
+115.96
+4.58
+1.57
+46.77
+13.40
+9.09
+6.47
+91.94
+4.21


%CHG.
+0.84%
+0.08%
+0.33%
+0.54%
+0.43%
+0.61%
+0.60%
+0.59%
+0.47%


F
... .... ...


YTD
+6.07%
+9.67%
+4.60%
+3.82%
+3.65%
+4.96%
+6.64%
+5.38%
+5.97%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO TR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 3.42 8.65 3.70 -.05 -1.3 V V V -19.6 -53.1 dd
AT&T Inc T 29.95 -0 38.58 35.49 +.30 +0.9 V A A +5.3 +21.8 28 1.80f
Ametek Inc AME 29.86 0 42.45 41.49 +.45 +1.1 V A A +10.4 +28.3 22 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 64.99 0 94.49 91.80 -.12 -0.1 V V A +5.0 +40.7 1.57e
Bank of America BAG 6.72 0 12.42 11.13 +.10 +0.9 V V V -4.1 +40.5 43 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 6.35 0- 12.23 11.23 +.04 +0.4 V V V -1.2 +33.7 cc
CenturyLink Inc CTL 32.05 43.43 34.13 +.04 +0.1 V V V -12.8 -7.3 27 2.16m
Citigroup C 24.61 0- 44.71 41.29 +.14 +0.3 V V A +4.4 +27.3 13 0.04
CommnwlthREIT CWH 13.46 0 19.48 24.40 +8.55 +53.9 A A A +54.0 -9.0 44 1.00
Disney DIS 40.88 0- 55.95 53.90 +.31 +0.6 V V A +8.3 +31.5 17 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 0- 71.13 69.59 +.48 +0.7 A A A +9.1 +14.0 19 3.06
EPR Properties EPR 40.04 48.92 47.09 +.07 +0.1 V V A +2.1 +10.9 21 3.16f
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 77.13 -0 93.67 88.51 +.81 +0.9 V V A +2.3 +3.0 11 2.28
Ford Motor F 8.82 14.30 12.34 +.21 +1.7 V V V -4.7 +1.2 9 0.40f
Gen Electric GE 18.02 0- 23.75 23.05 +.24 +1.1 V A A +9.8 +22.3 17 0.76
Home Depot HD 46.12 0 68.15 67.56 +3.64 +5.7 A A A +9.2 +38.5 24 1.56f
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 -0 29.27 20.58 +.35 +1.7 A V V -0.2 -20.9 10 0.90
IBM IBM 181.85 -0 211.79 199.14 +1.63 +0.8 V V A +4.0 +1.6 13 3.40
LKQ Corporation LKQ 14.63 0- 23.99 22.37 ... ... V T A +6.0 +38.2 26 ...
Lowes Cos LOW 24.76 39.98 36.59 +.73 +2.0 V V A +3.0 +34.3 22 0.64
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 100.75 96.22 +.08 +0.1 A A A +9.1 -1.3 18 3.08
Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.26 -0-- 32.95 27.37 ... ... A +2.5 -10.3 15 0.92
Motorola Solutions MSI 44.49 0 62.08 60.63 +.35 +0.6 V A A +8.9 +23.9 20 1.04
NextEra Energy NEE 59.10 0 73.50 72.27 +.08 +0.1 V V A +4.5 +22.7 16 2.64f
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 15.69 -- 41.73 21.02 -.49 -2.3 V A +6.6 -48.0 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 0 20.00 19.67 +.01 +0.1 V A A +9.0 +14.6 36 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 5.46 0- 8.00 7.50 +.02 +0.3 V V A +5.2 +29.7 10 0.04
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 -- 85.90 45.43 -.60 -1.3 V V A +9.8 -27.5 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 73.20 0 94.99 93.15 +1.64 +1.8 A A A +8.0 +25.2 20 2.08
Sprint Nextel Corp S 2.30 0 6.04 5.78 +.05 +0.9 V A A +1.9 +132.0 dd
Texas Instru TXN 26.06 0 34.45 33.76 +.03 +0.1 V A A +9.3 +3.5 22 1.12f
Time Warner TWX 33.62 0 53.90 52.28 +.93 +1.8 V A A +9.3 +39.8 17 1.60f
UniFirst Corp UNF 55.86 88.35 83.08 +.26 +0.3 V A A +13.3 +35.8 17 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 36.80 48.77 46.12 +.40 +0.9 A A A +6.6 +25.2 cc 2.06
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 0 30.07 24.55 -.05 -0.2 V V V -2.5 -4.4 1.53e
WalMart Strs WMT 57.18 -0 77.60 71.11 +.67 +1.0 A A A +4.2 +22.5 14 1.88f
Walgreen Co WAG 28.53 0 42.00 40.80 +.16 +0.4 V A A +10.2 +23.1 18 1.10
Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement I Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates



flU

The yield on the
10-year Treasury
note rose to 1.88
percent Tues-
day. Yields affect
interest rates on
consumer loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MO AGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
The price of
crude oil fell to
its lowest settle-
ment price of
2013. Gold
rose for the sec-
ond straight day
and settled
above $1,600
per ounce for
the first time in
a week.






lt


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .10 0.11 -0.01 .10
6-month T-bill .13 0.13 ... .13
52-wk T-bill .14 0.15 -0.01 .15
2-year T-note .25 0.24 +0.01 .29
5-year T-note .76 0.76 ... .85
10-year T-note 1.88 1.86 +0.02 1.93
30-year T-bond 3.08 3.06 +0.02 3.05


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 2.79 2.81 -0.02 2.57
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.04 4.05 -0.01 4.57
Barclays USAggregate 1.86 1.90 -0.04 2.11
Barclays US High Yield 5.85 5.92 -0.07 7.05
MoodysAAA Corp Idx 3.84 3.90 -0.06 3.81
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.06 1.08 -0.02 1.04
Barclays US Corp 2.74 2.79 -0.05 3.34


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 92.63
Ethanol (gal) 2.39
Heating Oil (gal) 3.03
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.43
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.98
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1615.20
Silver (oz) 29.26
Platinum (oz) 1616.50
Copper (Ib) 3.57
Palladium (oz) 739.00
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.27
Coffee (Ib) 1.43
Corn (bu) 7.05
Cotton (Ib) 0.80
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 375.10
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.27
Soybeans (bu) 14.48
Wheat (bu) 7.06


PVS.
93.11
2.37
3.10
3.41
3.06
PVS.
1586.20
28.98
1620.70
3.54
748.65
PVS.
1.27
1.43
6.94
0.80
369.00
1.29
14.51
6.99


%CHG
-0.52
-0.17
-2.17
+0.38
-2.60
%CHG
+1.83
+0.94
-0.26
+0.72
-1.29
%CHG
+0.25
+0.21
+1.66
+0.14
+1.65
-2.09
-0.24
+0.93


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 21.07 +.08 +3.3 +10.7 +11.2 +5.1
BondA m 12.89 -.01 -0.1 +4.1 +5.8 +4.2
CaplncBuA m 53.84 -.01 +2.0 +9.4 +9.4 +2.5
CpWIdGrlA m 38.20 ... +2.7 +10.9 +8.8 +0.8
EurPacGrA m 41.74 -.04 +1.3 +7.1 +6.6 -0.2
FnlnvA m 42.47 +.22 +4.1 +11.4 +11.6 +2.7
GrthAmA m 35.67 +.18 +3.8 +11.8 +10.7 +2.7
IncAmerA m 18.59 +.05 +2.9 +10.6 +11.2 +4.8
InvCoAmA m 31.41 +.15 +4.1 +10.7 +10.1 +2.8
NewPerspA m 32.23 +.09 +3.1 +11.5 +10.3 +3.0
WAMutlnvA m 32.59 +.25 +4.4 +11.1 +13.0 +3.5
Dodge & Cox Income 13.91 ... +0.4 +5.6 +6.3 +7.0
IntlStk 35.28 -.09 +1.8 +8.6 +7.2 -0.3
Stock 129.09 +.64 +5.9 +16.7 +12.0 +1.9
Fidelity Contra 79.87 +.42 +3.9 +9.4 +12.9 +4.5
GrowCo 95.74 +.51 +2.7 +4.9 +14.5 +6.1
LowPriStk d 41.17 +.14 +4.2 +10.0 +13.5 +6.3
Fidelity Spartan 5001dxAdvtg 53.18 +.33 +5.3 +12.1 +13.0 +3.9
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.27 ... +2.3 +11.4 +10.6 +5.4
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.39 -.02 +0.7 +8.3 +7.8 +9.2
GIBondAdv 13.35 -.02 +0.7 +8.6 +8.1 +9.4
Harbor Intllnstl d 62.79 +.31 +1.1 +5.7 +8.8 +0.3
PIMCO TotRetA m 11.22 -.02 +0.1 +7.3 +6.6 +7.5
T Rowe Price GrowStk 38.98 +.23 +3.2 +8.2 +13.5 +5.1
Vanguard 500Adml 138.37 +.86 +5.3 +12.1 +13.0 +3.9
5001nv 138.34 +.85 +5.3 +12.0 +12.9 +3.8
GNMAAdml 10.85 +.01 -0.2 +1.9 +5.1 +5.9
MulntAdml 14.41 +.03 +0.7 +4.3 +5.6 +5.8
STGradeAd 10.83 -.01 +0.3 +3.5 +3.5 +3.9
TotBdAdml 11.03 -.01 -0.2 +3.2 +5.4 +5.8
Totlntl 15.15 +.05 +1.1 +5.5 +6.0 -1.7
TotStlAdm 37.63 +.23 +5.6 +11.9 +13.4 +4.6
TotStldx 37.61 +.23 +5.5 +11.8 +13.3 +4.4
Welltn 35.06 +.10 +3.6 +10.2 +10.4 +5.4
WelltnAdm 60.56 +.17 +3.6 +10.3 +10.5 +5.5
-Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
Stronger-than-expected eco-
nomic reports pushed stock in-
dexes higher Tuesday. The
pace of new home sales rose
last month to its strongest level
since July 2008, home prices
rose in December from a year
earlier and consumer confi-
dence strengthened.

Home Depot HD
Close: $67.56A3.64 or 5.7%
The home improvement retailer's
fourth-quarter net income jumped 32
percent due to strong sales and Su-
perstorm Sandy cleanup.




D J F
52-week range
$46.12 L-- -1 $68.15
Vol.:22.8m (3.4x avg.) PE:24.0
Mkt. Cap:$101.01 b Yield: 1.7%
Martha Stewart MSO
Close:$2.85V-0.16 or -5.3%
The media company's fourth-quarter
net income fell 74 percent as due to
weak results at its publishing and
broadcasting divisions.
$31


Dow moves higher


Associated Press


NEW YORK A jump
in home sales and strong
earnings from Home
Depot helped the Dow
claw back more than half
of its losses from Monday.
Improving consumer con-
fidence also brought back
buyers to the market
The Dow Jones indus-
trial average closed up
115.96 points, or 0.8 per-
cent, to 13,900.13. The Dow
fell 216 points the day be-
fore, its biggest drop in
three months, on concern
the European debt crisis
may flare up again. The
index has moved 100
points or more on four out
of the past five trading
days.
The Standard & Poor's
500 index rose 9.09 points,
or 0.6 percent, to 1,496.94.
The Nasdaq composite
was up 13.40 points, or 0.4
percent, at 3,129.65.
Home Depot, the biggest




DEATHS
Continued from Page A6





Richard
Jackson, 79
HOMOSASSA

On Feb. 20, 2013,
Richard Thomas Jackson
passed away at Citrus Me-
morial Hospice Care.
Richard was born April 9,
1933, in York, Pa., and
lived the last several years
in Homosassa, Fla. He is
the son of the late William
and Mary Ellen Jackson.
He was preceded in
death by his six brothers
Vincent, William, George,
Robert, Woodrow and
James Jackson; one sister,
Betty Jackson; and one
daughter, Bonnie Ann
Heward. He is survived by
his brother Charles Jack-
son; sister-in-law Mary
Jackson; son Christopher
Jackson; daughter Ginger
Clark and her children
Kelly and Richard; daugh-
ter Cathy and husband
Nellison Brown and their
children Jenna, Mason
and Hayden; granddaugh-
ter Missy and husband
Randy and their children
Samantha, Austin and
Brady; granddaughter
Michelle Jackson and hus-
band, J.T Mason and their
children Kody, Logan and
Sheyenne; granddaughter
Amanda Heward and hus-
band Patrick McConnell
and their children Tori
and Kaileigh; and grand-
son Scott and his wife
Rochelle Heward and
their children Renis and
Skyler.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Barbara
Scott, 82
HOMOSASSA
SPRINGS


2 y Barbara Louise Graffius
2. Scott has passed away at
D J F Westminster at Lake Ridge
52-week range
$2.28 8r $4.75 in Woodbridge, Va. She
Vol.:313.7k (1.7x avg.) PE:... was 82 years old.
Mkt. Cap:$117.1 m Yield:... Barbara was preceded
Vitamin Shoppe VS in death by parents Earl
vitamin Shoppe v George Graffius and Ann
Close: $51.44V-11.78 or -18.6% r Graffus and
The vitamin retailer said that fourth- Erickson Graffs d hus-
quarter net income rose 3 percent, band Franklin P Scott, who
but revenue growth fell short of ana- passed away five years
lysts' expectations.
-,-ly. ago. She was born in Hast-
ings, Pa., and attended
",-/Barnesboro High and
SBusiness College in Al-
D J F toona, Pa. She and Frank
52-week range married in 1950. They
$41.621 1 j $65.93
lived in Manassas, Va.,
Vol.:4.3m (11.5x avg.) PE:25.5
Mkt. Cap:$1.55 b Yield:... where daughter Deborah
was born.
Hovnanian HOV "Sis" and Frank spent
Close:$5.79A0.59or 11.3% two years in Iran, where
Shares of the homebuilder rose after he was based with the gov-
the government said that new-home e was e e g
sales jumped in January and home ernment. They moved to
prices rose in December. Punxsutawney, Pa., for a
? few years and then settled
SV, in Homosassa Springs,
Fla., where Barbara was
4 D J F an accomplished artist
52-week range (Mitzi), avid golfer and
$1.52 = =i $7.43 baker.
Vol.:12.8m (1.3xavg.) PE:... She is survived by
Mkt. Cap:$718.94 m Yield:... daughter Deborah in Man-
Telephone & Data TDS assas, Va.; sister Ruth
Close:$23.36 -2.01 or -7.9% (Teddy) Davis; and
The owner of U.S. Cellular and TDS nephew Rodney Davis and
Telecom posted a fourth-quarter loss his f S ann f
and said it acquired Baja Broadband i wife Suzanne of
for $267.5 million. Gainesville.
-Barbara was of Chris-
tian faith. Services were
held at Westminster in Vir-
D ginia and a memorial in
52-week range Pennsylvania will be
$19.20 1 I-- 1 $27.17 planned at a later date.
Vol.:1.5m (2.6x avg.) PE:23.4 Sign the guest book at
Mkt. Cap:$2.37 b Yield: 2.1% ww.chronicleonline.com.


World markets
How key international stock
markets performed:
Amsterdam Milan
AEX FTSE MIB
4W 340.26 16,351.99
-1.5% 335.29 -4.9% 15,552.20
Brussels Paris
BEL20 CAC40
S 2,559.01 4 3,721.33
-1.9% 2,510.62 -2.7% 3,621.92
Frankfurt Sydney
DAX ASX All Ordinaries
4 7,773.19 5,072.75
-2.3% 7,597.11 -1.0% 5,021.80
Hong Kong Tokyo
Hang Seng Nikkei
_ 22,820.08 4 11,662.52
-1.3% 22,519.69 -2.3% 11,398.81
London Zurich
FTSE 100 Swiss Market Index
* 6,355.37 7,594.35
-1.3% 6,270.44 -1.9% 7,449.98

-W Previous close
% change Today's close
AP

home improvement store
chain in the country,


Karyn
Langer, 59
INVERNESS

The Service of Remem-
brance for Mrs. Karyn A.
Langer, age 59, of Inver-
ness, Florida, will be held

Saturday,
March 2,
2013 at
S the Inver-
n e s s
ca Chapel of
Hooper
Funeral
Karyn Homes.
Langer Interment
will follow at Oak Ridge
Cemetery, Inverness,
Florida. The family will
receive friends from 10:00
AM until the time of service,
Saturday at the chapel.
The family requests ex-
pressions of sympathy take
the form of memorial do-
nations to the Huntington's
Disease Society of Amer-
ica, 505 Eighth Avenue,
Suite 902, NY, NY 10018.
Online condolences may be
sent to the family at www
HooperFuneralHome.com.
Mrs. Langer was born
September 26, 1953, in
New Bedford, MA, daugh-
ter of the late James and
Elaine Bicker. After a long
illness, she went to the Lord
on February 21, 2013 in In-
verness, FL. Mrs. Langer
attended SMU where she
earned her BA degree and
St. Leo where she earned
her Masters Degree in So-
cial Work. She worked as a
social worker with the Cit-
rus County School System
for 10 years and was
elected School Volunteer
of the Year in 2000. Mrs.
Langer was a volunteer for
Guardian Ad Litem and
team, a member of Our
Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church, Inverness and en-
joyed swimming and boat-
ing. At Mrs. Langer's
request, Publix Supermar-
ket started carrying Gas-
par's Sausage in Florida.
Survivors include her
husband of 30 years, David
Langer, 3 sons, Tommy
Langer, Timmy Langer,
and Tony Langer, daugh-
ter, Tamara Lee, 11 grand-
children, and 2 great
grandchildren.


qSunday
] 11:30 AM I4 P

~ PM





3ASIIe



p"Im


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


jumped $3.64, or 5.7 per-
cent, to $67.56 after report-
ing its income rose 32
percent in the latest quar-
ter thanks to strong U.S.
sales and the cleanup that
followed superstorm
Sandy. That made it the
biggest gainer in the Dow,
accounting for about 28
points, or about a quarter,
of its advance.
Strong earnings from
home improvement com-
panies, such as Home
Depot and Lowe's, which
reported earnings Monday
that beat Wall Street fore-
casts, compounded evi-
dence that the U.S.
housing market is main-
taining its recovery, Mus-
sio said. Also Tuesday, the
government reported sales
of new homes jumped 16
percent last month to the
highest level since July
2008.
The report boosted
housing companies, which
led the S&P 500 higher.







John
Langenbacher, 88
CRYSTAL RIVER

John K. Langenbacher,
88, of Crystal River, Fla.,
passed away Thursday,
Feb. 21, 2013, at his home
under the care of his fam-
ily and HPH Hospice. He
was born June 25, 1924, in
Clarksburg, WVa., to
Clarence and Rossanna
(Stout) Langenbacher He
came here 30 years ago
from St. Petersburg. He
was a retired restaura-
teur, having owned sev-
eral restaurants in
Orlando in the 1960s. He
was a U.S. Navy veteran
of World War II and was a
recipient of the Purple
Heart after his destroyer
the USS Thatcher was hit
by a kamikaze plane in
the Asiatic Pacific. He
was a Catholic and a
member of St. Benedict's
Catholic Church in Crys-
tal River.
His loving wife of 60
years Betty Jane Langen-
bacher preceded him in
death May 12, 2004. Sur-
viving are his two sons
Mark Langenbacher of
Oahu, Hawaii, and
Michael Langenbacher of
Crystal River; two daugh-
ters, Pat Garskof of Crystal
River and Rossanna
Sokolosky of Connecticut;
six grandchildren; and
four great-grandchildren.
Private services and
burial will be at the
Florida National Ceme-
tery in Bushnell under the
direction of Strickland
Funeral Home Crystal
River.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.


Adeline
Ault, 81
CRYSTAL RIVER

Adeline Ault, 81, of Crys-
tal River, died Feb. 24,
2013, under the care Hos-
pice of Citrus County in
Lecanto. Arrangements by
McGan Cremation Service
LLC, Hernando.







Page A8 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan .................................... publisher
M ike A rnold .............................................editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Curt Ebitz ................................ citizen member
M 0 Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may difer with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


OUT OF BUSINESS




Evictions



bad news for



downtown


What would you do if you
had to leave every-
thing behind in a day?
Imagine: You head out to
grab the paper or leave for
work in the morning, and
waiting for you on your door,
without warning,
is a notice of evic- THE I
tion. Get out, it
says you have Inve
24 hours, busin
What first? church b
Pack your belong- by ev
ings? Find a new not
home? What
about the paper- OUR 01
work mail, Accor(
bills, insurance? have
You'll have to no-se
tify friends, fam- busine'
ily, your employer, the con
the government.
For two busi-
nesses and a church in Con-
nors Shopping Plaza in
downtown Inverness, that
panic was real. On Feb. 12,
plaza owner Arvana Inc.
served Journey Church, The
Grove Downtown Martini Bar
and Karma Boutique with
writs of possession, giving the
tenants little less than a day
to clean up and clear out.
To hear the tenants tell it,
the notice came without
warning.
"We've contacted the com-
pany that bought this plaza
numerous times through
emails and phone calls ask-


Freakish storm
Some callers have asked why
a new plant could not be built at
the Crystal River site.
Perhaps a look at his-
tory will explain one 0
reason: On March 13,
1993, a freak winter
storm slammed the
west coast of Florida.
The "no name" storm
packed hurricane-force
winds and pushed a
storm surge of 6 to 9 CAL
feet of water into the 563
coast. In Crystal River, 000
(U.S.) 19 was under
water and boats were launched
from the King's Bay Plaza park-
ing lot to rescue people
stranded on their rooftops. The
power plant site had 3 feet of
water in the parking lot and the
plant road was under water.
After the storm, Florida Power
said they would not build an-
other unit at their Crystal River
site. New plants would be built
inland away from the flood zone.
That was 20 years ago. It could
happen again.

Animal lovers speak out
After a recent article in the
Chronicle stating that up to 2 bil-
lion to 2.5 billion birds are killed
each year by house pets and
feral cats, I had to bite my
tongue not to call in Sound Off.
But in today's Chronicle, Satur-
day, Feb. 16, under an article
"Pythons not only animal prob-
lem," page A3, I had to call. It
states several million feral and
free-ranging cats believed to be
stalking in Florida kill several mil-
lion wild animals in Florida each
year even when they're regularly
fed, especially migratory birds.


S
r
Ie


i c

P
d
I:
rv
s"


I


I
1
.0


ing where we should send
our rent payments and they
wouldn't even respond to us,"
Journey Church pastor Kevin
Brian told the Chronicle
recently
Not all the tenants in the
plaza were given
iSUE: marching orders:
The Hen House
ness Caf6 and the Key
esses, Center-owned La-
indsided bels clothing
action store are sticking
ces. around.
"We've had a
'INION: pleasant experi-
would ence with the
better new owners," Key
ved Center Assistant
ses and Executive Direc-
msunitd tor Melissa
munty Walker said.
A representa-
tive from Arvana, based in St.
Petersburg, decline to elabo-
rate on the nature of the
dispute.
It's unfortunate for the in-
dividuals involved and for
the city that they should be
displaced like this. Had a
short- or long-term compro-
mise been reached, down-
town Inverness would be a
livelier place; instead, it now
has three more empty store-
fronts. When property own-
ers can work with established
businesses to keep them in
their current locations,
everyone benefits.


Cats kill not only for food but
mauling and killing is their na-
ture. The article also states cap-
turing or killing cats would be
unlikely, as it would be
D too controversial. In our
ND county, our commission-
l ers passed new laws to
allow capture and re-
lease of feral cats. It's
time our animal and
bird lovers spoke up. We
also are voters. When I
take my little 10-pound
S dog out for a walk, I
579 have to have around a
S leash, a collar, a license
and a rabies shot and,
oh yes, a plastic bag in my pos-
session. In this county, cats are
also required to be on a leash.
Bird lovers, what say ye?
Volunteering as juror
The past few days have had at
least three stories about the sick
society in which we live today.
One story involved a health care
worker who sexually abused an
infirm young patient who was in
his care. This was an unspeak-
able violation of trust. Another
involved yet another health care
professional and his wife who
neglected and abused their own
son. These are trained health
care professionals. Today an-
other person did, over a period
of 17 months, neglect, abuse,
torture and did unspeakable, un-
conscionable and unforgiveable
atrocities to her own infant. I am
offering to sit on the jury of all
three of these cases and I intend
to forward my request to the Cit-
rus County court system. Feel
free to try to be a juror, too. At
least it's something we can try to
do. We've had enough. Enough.
May God forgive them all.


Stop deficit spending
Dear Sen. Nelson,
I have enclosed a recent
news article reporting NASA's
program to search for alien life
on Earth.
The article stated that this
work is funded through
NASA, which provided a $7
million, five-year grant and
was the group's second five-
year grant for a total of
$14 million.
What is disturbing to me is
that I know that 40 cents of
every dollar of the $14 million
we had to borrow and is con-
tributing to our national debt
which is now more than $16.5
trillion. I will not debate the
merits of this grant, but use
this as an example of the men-
tality that I believe is prevalent
in our government. Spending
on "pet projects" and "pork" is


"Try not to become a man ofsuccess, but
rather try to become a man of value."
Albert Einstein, 1879-1955


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


What have ethics rules wrought?


On the eve of
the 2013 leg-
islative ses-
sion next Monday,
just about everybody I
with an interest in
what happens in the
Capitol during the
ensuing 60 days will
gather in the sedate
courtyard of Associ- Bill C(
ated Industries of FLOI
Florida for Tallahas-
see's biggest party of VOI
the year, a welcoming
reception that the state's "voice
of business" sponsors.
Discretely tucked inside
AIF's trifold invitation to the
big bash is a little note remind-
ing public officers that, for
them, there is a $25 charge. This
is a result of the dumbest, but
most immovable, ethics reform
our Legislature ever imposed
upon itself.
The law provides that no
state employee required to file
annual financial disclosures
may accept anything of value
from a lobbyist or anyone who
employees a lobbyist.
It's commonly called the "gift
ban" around Tallahassee, and it
grew out of a series of reform
attempts over several years in
reaction to public disgust with
some fairly flagrant abuses.
About 20 years ago, lawmak-
ers were skulking across the
street from the Capitol, to the
State Attorney's Office, entering
no-contest pleas and paying
token fines for failing to report
various gifts from corporate
favor seekers. Those included
quail-hunting weekends up in
Georgia, lavish dinners for
whole committees or caucuses,
sometimes even resort
vacations.
Some members said report-
ing laws were unclear or at
least, their lawyers could make
a straight-faced argument that
legislators thought lobbyists
sought them out just for their
collective wit and personality.
After all, nobody was dumb
enough to spell out a quid-pro-
quo. After considerable self-
righteous huffing by wounded
lawmakers who insisted their
votes could not be bought with
blended whisky and thick
steaks, they simply decided to
stop trying to decide where to


otterell
RIDA
CES


draw the line, and
they forbade lobby-
ists to spring for so
much as a cup of cof-
fee.
They must have
felt very virtuous,
sacrificing the com-
mon everyday cour-
tesies of business.
But they managed to
knock off the non-
corrupting form of
fraternizing, while
leaving the most


egregious types intact
The legendary California As-
sembly Speaker Jesse Unruh
used to say of Sacramento lob-
byists, "If you can't eat their
food, drink their booze ...and
then vote against them, you
have no business being up
here." Historians disagree
whether he also said something
about "their women" in his
most famous epigram (hence
the ellipsis), but Unruh was
right. A corollary to his rule
might be, if your vote can be
swayed by a free meal, you re-
ally, really have no place in
public policy
The trouble with the gift ban
is, it strains to swat gnats while
elephants (and donkeys) run
rampant.
A lobbyist can't take a legisla-
tor to lunch. But if they go
Dutch, lobbyists can hand over
contributions of $500 from each
of their clients and from each
officer of the corporations they
represent, their attorneys, cus-
tomers and suppliers an end-
less array of well-heeled donors
who may have forgotten the re-
cipient's name a minute after
writing them checks. So here's
how the gift ban cleans up
government:
Lobbyist: "Thanks for com-
ing, senator. I've got $5,000 in
bundled contributions from 10
of my clients who think you're
doing a terrific job. There'll be
more next week."
Senator: "Oh, good. Will 20
bucks cover my share of
lunch?"
This can't happen while
they're in session. But in the
past few weeks, during commit-
tee work, there has been a
nightly round of private recep-
tions at the Governors Club and
in boardrooms of law firms and


trade associations, within
blocks of the Capitol, so legisla-
tors can fill their re-election
campaign funds before March
5. At those little gatherings, the
same lobbyists who can't give a
legislator a Coke can drop a
$500 check in the little wicker
basket at the sign-in table,
schmooze a minute with the
host legislator, then head for
the next event.
And, of course, the special in-
terests can channel unlimited
money through the political
parties.
Speaker Will Weatherford, R-
Wesley Chapel, wants to raise
the $500 limit for candidates to
$10,000 and do away with the
"committees of continuous ex-
istence," the specialized
stashes that some members set
up to spread money around
among allies. Senate President
Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, wants
to stop legislators from essen-
tially living on their CCEs,
charging travel, food and other
expenses to them. Gaetz also
has senators attending ethics
classes, which he wants to re-
quire for all high-ranking state
officers.
One sad side-effect of the gift
ban and probably not an un-
intended consequence is that
it gives the public a false sense
of civic morality. It erases the
cartoon image of a lobbyist
lighting a politician's cigar
while filling a wine glass. But it
does nothing about the money
they channel to legislators so
many other ways.
They say that money in poli-
tics is like rain water on a side-
walk it will always find the
cracks. If Gaetz and Weather-
ford succeed in improving the
ethical climate and once again
reforming campaign finance
this session, legislators and
their donors will find new ways
to keep the torrent flowing.
But, at least, they'll do it with
no free lunch.

Bill Cotterell is a retired
Capitol reporter who covered
government and politics 44
years for United Press Interna-
tional and the Tallahassee
Democrat. He can be con-
tacted at billcotterell
@gmail.com.


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.

embedded into all agency
budgets.
As a former NASA employee,
I can assure you that I can
could take the NASA budget
and find at least 10 percent
that can be cut with little or no
impact on NASAs overall mis-
sion. The grant cited herein is
just one example. I suspect the


same is true for all other gov-
ernment agencies.
The point if this letter is that
spending by the government is
out of control and the grant
cited is just one example of
why we have had four years of
trillion dollar deficits. It is
time that you and the rest of
Congress, do the job that you
are elected to do.
I appeal to you as a grand-
parent, do what is necessary to
stop the deficit spending and
pay down the national debt.
Our children and grandchil-
dren deserve the same oppor-
tunities and quality of life that
you and I have lived and un-
less drastic changes are made
by you and other elected offi-
cials, they will pay a dear price
for our negligence.
Floyd Ford
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


i/ '
7Tol6 i1:
XyhXC?71a
SrH


TW7 FfRs PRZiPeW OF tledoPS: SM OFVAL T O RST


SLETTER / to the Editor


I





WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013 A9


standstill while waiting for
oncoming traffic to pass
through the green light.
At a recent public meet-
ing, the Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation
presented Floral City busi-
ness owners and residents
with a plan to widen the
intersection within exist-
ing right of way to add left
and right turn lanes to
East Orange Avenue.
"We've been asked for
years to do something
about the light," Ken
Frink, assistant county ad-
ministrator and public
works director, told resi-
dents. The intersection im-
provement plan would be
part of the state's U.S. 41
resurfacing project sched-
uled to start this summer.
Frank Chupka, FDOT
district consultant project
management engineer, told
the residents the turning
lanes would keep within
the state's right of way and
maintain the oak trees on
the west side. The widen-
ing would stretch to the
east side.
The east side is where
Jones operates her store.
"It's going to hurt the mo-
torcycle community," Jones
said. "This is their place.
That's the only reason I
rented this. I'm not a biker
I opened it to create a busi-
ness and it worked. This is
the only place I wanted to
be. It's a good corner I've
been here three and a half
years and it's just starting
to make money"
As Jones felt the location
was ideal for her business,
she said she could not
move but would just have
to close. Her customers
like to pull up to her store
for convenience and they
like to park their bikes
where they can see them.
That aspect raised her
business's popularity
"At weekends, I have 35
people in there at a time.
It's slammed," Jones said.
"I get trikers, the bikes, the
Harley-Davidsons. They go
to Sleepy Hollow. They go
to Istachatta. They love In-
verness. They love the


PARKING As Jones felt the location was
Continued from PageAl ideal for her business, she said


Shamrock. They love Flo-
ral City There was nothing
here when I came here."
Other businesses will
feel the effect of the wider
intersection.
Martha Burs at Aunt
Martha's Produce is Jones'
neighbor She's been in
business for seven years. As
with Jones' business, Burns'
customers pull up from U.S.
41 for speedy shopping. But
the produce store does have
a parking area to the side
that Burns encourages her
customers to use.
"We have a lot of space
over here where they can
park, so I don't think it will
bother us like Connie,
where she's got no space at
all," Burns said.
Still, Burns will lose ac-
cess to her U.S. 41 frontage
parking.
"I wouldn't think it would


be safe for anyone to park
out there," Burns said.
On the other side of the
intersection, Joseph Ar-
ruda operates Arruda Jew-
elers and First Class Pawn.
His parking spaces may all
but disappear when a right
turn lane is built.
"I just have four parking
places, but once they make
the turning lane, we're
going to have just enough
to get in and get out," Ar-
ruda said.
Customers could pass by
his store if parking is too
tricky
"If it's not convenient to
them easy in, easy out -
they don't want to bother,"
Arruda said.
When asked about
Jones' concern for losing
her business, Frink said
addressing these issues
was the purpose of the re-


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Connie Jones, owner of Connie's Kick Stand in Floral City, is concerned about a pend-
ing road project to add turn lanes that she says could negatively affect her business.
The intersection of U.S. 41 and Orange Avenue is a heavily traveled one and plans are
in the works to widen the roadway to add turn lanes.


cent town hall meeting. He
said he would like for
Jones to talk to FDOT be-
fore deciding to close her
business.
"I'd be happy to meet
and I'd like to bring the
state out there since it's
their project and show her


what the impacts would
be," Frink said. "I know the
state goes to great pains to
make sure all the turning
movements work and the
traffic stays on the road
and within the right of way
Not that I disagree with
what she is saying, but I'd


like for her to take a look at
what the plans would be
specific to her situation be-
fore she makes a decision
to move out of there."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Chris Van Ormerat
352-564-2916 or cvanormer
@chronicleonline. com.


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she could not move but would
just have to close.


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Thursday, February 28
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Friday, March 1
10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m
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NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Stormy


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Adventure turns deadly


World BRIEFS

Protests


Associated Press
A sculpture of a Trojan
mascot stands covered in
snow Tuesday at Topeka
High School in Topeka,
Kan., as a winter storm
continues passing through
northeast Kansas.


Senate confirms
Hagel for defense
WASHINGTON -A
deeply divided Senate
voted Tuesday to confirm
Republican Chuck Hagel to
be the nation's next de-
fense secretary, handing
President
Barack
Obama's
pick the
top Pen- '
tagon job 7%
just days 11,
before bil-
lions of
dollars in Chuck
auto- Hagel
matic, secretary of
across- defense to be
the-board sworn in today.
budget
cuts hit the military.
The vote was 58-41, with
four Republicans joining the
Democrats in backing the
contentious choice. Hagel's
only GOP support came
from former colleagues
Thad Cochran of Missis-
sippi and Dick Shelby of Al-
abama as well as Mike
Johanns of Nebraska and
Rand Paul of Kentucky.
The vote came just hours
after Republicans dropped
their delay of the nomina-
tion and allowed it to move
forward on a 71-27 vote.
Hagel, 66, a former two-
term Nebraska senator and
twice-wounded Vietnam
combat veteran, succeeds
Defense Secretary Leon
Panetta. Hagel is expected
to be sworn in Wednesday
at the Pentagon.
Music, movie
industry warning
WASHINGTON Inter-
net users who illegally
share music, movies or TV
shows online may soon get
warning notices from their
service providers that they
are violating copyright law.
Ignore the notices, and vio-
lators could face an Internet
slowdown for 48 hours.
Those who claim they're in-
nocent can protest for a
fee.
The Copyright Alert Sys-
tem was put into effect this
week by the nation's five
biggest Internet service
providers Verizon, AT&T,
Time Warner Cable, Comn-
cast and Cablevision -
and the two major associa-
tions representing industry
the Motion Picture Asso-
ciation of America and the
Recording Industry Associa-
tion of America.
Under the new program,
the industry will monitor
"peer-to-peer" software
services for evidence of
copyrighted files being
shared. Each complaint will
prompt a customer's Inter-
net provider to notify the
customer their Internet ad-
dress has been detected
sharing files illegally.
If a person believes
they've been wrongly ac-
cused, they can pay $35 to


appeal a charge in-
tended to deter frivolous ap-
peals but also one that can
be waived.


-From wire reports


Associated Press

LUXOR, Egypt The
terror lasted less than two
minutes: Smoke poured
from a hot air balloon car-
rying sightseers on a sun-
rise flight over the ancient
city of Luxor, it burst in a
flash of flame and then
plummeted about 1,000 feet
to earth. A farmer watched
helplessly as tourists trying
to escape the blazing gon-
dola leaped to their deaths.
Nineteen people were
killed Tuesday in what ap-
peared to be the deadliest
hot air ballooning accident
on record. A British tourist
and the Egyptian pilot,


who was badly burned,
were the sole survivors.
The tragedy raised wor-
ries of another blow to the
nation's vital tourism in-
dustry, decimated by two
years of unrest since the
2011 revolution that top-
pled autocrat Hosni
Mubarak The southern city
of Luxor has been hit hard,
with vacant hotel rooms
and empty cruise ships.
It also prompted accusa-
tions that authorities have
let safety standards decline
amid the political turmoil
and infighting, although
civil aviation officials said
the balloon had been in-
spected recently and the


pilot may have been to
blame, jumping out rather
than stopping the fire.
Authorities suspended
hot air balloon flights, a
popular tourist attraction
here, while investigators
determined the cause.
The balloon was carry-
ing 20 tourists from
France, Britain, Belgium,
Japan and Hong Kong -
and an Egyptian pilot on a
flight over Luxor, 320 miles
south of Cairo, officials
said. The flights provide
spectacular views of the
ancient Karnak and Luxor
temples and the Valley of
the Kings, the burial
ground of Tutankhamun
and other pharaohs.
The crash immediately
killed 18, according to
Luxor Gov Ezzat Saad. Two
Britons and the pilot were


SOURCE: ESRI


0 20 mi
0--. 200 km
AP


taken to a hospital, but one
of the Britons died of his
injuries soon after
Among the dead were
nine tourists from Hong
Kong, four Japanese in-
cluding a couple in their
60s two French, a Bel-
gian and a second Briton,
according to Egyptian offi-
cials, although there were
conflicting reports on the
nationality of the 19th
victim.


Protest in Bahrain


Associated Press
A Bahraini anti-government protester flashes the victory sign Tuesday as he stands behind old furniture set
on fire in a street in Malkiya, Bahrain. Protests went on in opposition villages nationwide, demanding the
government release for burial the body of a 20-year-old who died last week from injuries sustained during
earlier clashes with police.




Survey: US budget impasse holding back economy


Associated Press

WASHINGTON The political
standoff over the U.S. budget is slow-
ing the U.S. economy more so
than any hesitance by Americans to
spend freely
That consensus emerges from the
latest Associated Press Economy
Survey just as the budget impasse in
Washington is about to trigger auto-
matic spending cuts across the
economy
Many of the economists think con-
sumer spending has slowed in re-
sponse to higher tax burdens but
will rebound later in the year By
contrast, they worry the budget
fights in Washington will persist for
much of 2013 and drag on economic
growth.
Twenty-three of the 37 economists
who responded to the survey last


week say the paralysis in Washing-
ton is a significant factor in slowing
the economy. The next biggest fac-
tors they cite, in order: too little job
growth, excessive government regu-
lation and taxes, stagnant wages and
cautious bank lending. Only eight
say they worry about consumers sav-
ing more and spending less.
The budget impasse that will set
off $85 billion in spending cuts start-
ing Friday will shave an estimated
half-percentage point from eco-
nomic growth this year
It will be followed by other key
deadlines: Much of the government
will shut down March 27 without
new legislation to authorize spend-
ing. Congress must also agree to
raise the government's borrowing
limit in May or the government will
risk defaulting on its debt.
Meeting those deadlines could in-


volve more spending cuts or tax in-
creases. Either could further slow
growth.
The economists' views suggest the
budgetary paralysis hurts the econ-
omy in at least two ways: It's eroding
consumer and business confidence,
which could reduce spending and
investment. And it will trigger the
government spending cuts that are
about to kick in.
These come on top of the reduced
take-home pay for most workers
caused by the Social Security tax in-
crease that took effect Jan. 1.
Businesses "aren't willing to hire
people or invest in plant and equip-
ment knowing the uncertainty," said
Sung Won Sohn, an economics pro-
fessor at California State University
Channel Islands.
"The prudent thing to do is to
postpone," he said.


Pope and 'emeritus pope' to reside at Vatican


Associated Press


VATICAN CITY Two
pontiffs, both wearing
white, both called "pope"
and living a few yards from
one another, with the same
key aide serving them.
The Vatican's announce-
ment Tuesday that Pope
Benedict XVI will be
known as "emeritus pope"
in his retirement, be called
"Your Holiness" and con-
tinue to wear the white
cassock associated with
the papacy has fueled con-
cerns about potential con-
flicts arising from the
peculiar reality now facing
the Catholic Church: hav-
ing one reigning and one
retired pope.
Benedict's title and
what he will wear have
been a major source of
speculation since the 85-
year-old pontiff stunned
the world and announced
he would resign Thursday,


inC.IMAMig NgMliAGGI 6 !At MP-llNROMaWElSi LUArliPLADhOFDROME IRBU MAPDbDMON
Associated Press
Posters of Pope Benedict XVI are pictured Tuesday at a
gift shop near St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican. The
slogan between the pictures reads "Thanks" in Italian.
The Vatican on Tuesday answered some of the
outstanding questions about Pope Benedict XVI's future
once he's retired, saying he'll be known as "emeritus
pope" and continue to wear a white cassock.

the first pope to do so in turies, given the possibility
600 years. for divided allegiance
There has been good and even schism. But the
reason why popes haven't Vatican insists that while
stepped down in past cen- the situation created by


Benedict's retirement is
certainly unique, no major
conflicts will arise.
"According to the evolu-
tion of Catholic doctrine
and mentality, there is only
one pope. Clearly it's a
new situation, but I don't
think there will be prob-
lems," Giovanni Maria
Vian, the editor of the Vat-
ican newspaper LOsserva-
tore Romano, said in an
interview.
Critics aren't so sure.
Some Vatican-based cardi-
nals have privately grum-
bled it will make it more
difficult for the next pope
with Benedict still around.
Swiss theologian Hans
Kueng, Benedict's one-time
colleague-turned-critic,
went further: "With Bene-
dict XVI, there is a risk of a
shadow pope who has abdi-
cated but can still indirectly
exert influence," he told
Germany's Der Spiegel
magazine last week.


Associated Press
Bangladeshi protesters
march Tuesday in Dhaka
to submit a memorandum
demanding immediate ar-
rest of Mahmudur Rah-
man, acting editor of the
Bangla newspaper Amar
Desh, accusing him of
spreading communal
hatred and instigating
violence through the
newspaper.


Israel quietly
returns migrants
JERUSALEM Israel
has quietly repatriated hun-
dreds of Sudanese mi-
grants in recent months,
drawing accusations from
rights groups it has coerced
the Africans into potentially
life-threatening situations
and possibly violated inter-
national norms for treating
refugees.
Israel says the departures
have been voluntary, but
they follow mass arrests of
migrants and vows by Israeli
leaders to halt the influx.
In the past eight years,
as many as 60,000 African
migrants, mostly Sudanese
and Eritrean, have sneaked
across Israel's border with
Egypt's lawless Sinai
desert, some fleeing re-
pressive regimes and oth-
ers looking for work and
better conditions.
Israel initially tolerated
their arrival but has since
grown jittery as their num-
bers swelled, turning some
neighborhoods into immi-
grant slums.
Mexican police
find drug cannon
MEXICALI, Mexico -
Police in the border city of
Mexicali say they have re-
covered a powerful impro-
vised cannon used to hurl
packets of marijuana
across a border fence into
California.
Police told the Televisa
network the device was
made up of a plastic pipe
and a crude metal tank that
used compressed air from
the engine of an old car.
The apparatus fired cylin-
ders packed with drugs that
weighed as much as 30
pounds, police. It was con-
fiscated last week after U.S.
officers told Mexican police
they had been confiscating
a large number of drug
packages that appeared to
have been fired over the
border. Mexican police on
the border have recovered
a series of similar devices
in recent years.
UN cleans up
sanctions list
UNITED NATIONS -
The United Nations has fi-
nally removed Osama bin
Laden from the list of al-
Qaida members subject to
U.N. sanctions, nearly two
years after he was killed by
U.S. com-
mandos
in Pak-
istan.
The
U.N. Se-
curity
Council
commit-
Osama bin
tee moni- Laden
storing died in 2011.
sanctions
against the terrorist group
approved the deletion on
Feb. 21, according to their
website.
The al-Qaida leader was
accused of masterminding
the Sept. 11,2001, terrorist
attacks at the World Trade
Center in New York, the
Pentagon in Washington,
and on a crashed plane in
Pennsylvania, that killed
nearly 3,000 people.
-From wire reports


Fiery balloon accident kills

19foreign tourists in Egypt


~,Von;e~











SPORTS


* Magic
snap long
road losing
streak in
Philadelphia
on Tuesday
night./B3


0 Golf/B2
0 Baseball/B3
0 Bowling/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Basketball/B5
0 Hockey/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Tennessee defends court vs. UF


Snaer leads FSU past
Wake Forest 76-62
TALLAHASSEE Michael
Snaer scored 19 of his game-high
24 points in the second half Tues-
day night leading Florida State to a
76-62 win over Wake Forest.
Snaer scored 13 points during a
23-3 run midway through the sec-
ond half that put the game out of
reach for the visitors. Okaro White
added 13 points and Boris Bo-
janovsky matched his career best
with 10 for the Seminoles, who
avenged a 25-point loss to the
Demon Deacons 17 days earlier.
C.J. Harris' lone 3 of the game
with 15:56 left pulled Wake Forest to
within 44-43 before Snaer ignited
the run that gave FSU a 67-46 lead.


No. 8 Gators

fall to rival

Volunteers

Associated Press

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. -Jor-
dan McRae scored 27 points
and Tennessee boosted its
NCAA tournament hopes by
beating No. 8 Florida 64-58 on
Tuesday night, the Volun-
teers' sixth consecutive
victory
McRae had a career-high 34
points against LSU and 23
points against Texas A&M in
the two games leading up to
this one. He scored 17 points


in the first half Tuesday and
was the lone Volunteer to
reach double figures.
Jarnell Stokes had eight
points and 14 rebounds as
Tennessee (17-10, 9-6 South-
eastern Conference) won the
lone regular-season meeting
between these SEC rivals.
This marks the first time
since 1964 that Florida and
Tennessee aren't facing each
other twice in the regular
season.
Mike Rosario scored 16
points, Patric Young added
15 and Casey Prather had 10
for Florida (22-5, 12-3).
The SEC-leading Gators
were playing without injured
forward Will Yeguette (knee)
and guard Michael Frazier II
(concussion).


Associated Press
Florida center Patric Young works against Tennessee forward Kenny
Hall in the first half Tuesday in Knoxville, Tenn.


Cruising along


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Seven Rivers Christian's Alexis King slides into third base, beating the throw to Santa Fe Catholic third baseman Tiffany
Rivera on Tuesday at Bicentennial Park in Crystal River. Seven Rivers' Kim Iwaniec swings and finds the hole for a single.


Seven Rivers Christian softball swings past Santa
JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent


CRYSTAL RIVER The
Seven Rivers Christian Warriors
softball team was forced to play
shorthanded Tuesday evening as
seven Warrior seniors were ab-
sent from the game against the
visiting Santa Fe Catholic Hawks
from Lakeland while attending a
mission for their school.
Four of those absent seniors
are starting players on the War-
rior softball team.
Regardless, the remaining War-
rior players stepped up and
shutout the Hawks in a lopsided
12-0 mercy-rule win in the fifth
inning at Bicentennial Park.
"I'm pretty happy with what we
ended up (with) here," Seven
Rivers head coach Gary Dreyer
said of the game. "I'm just proud
of the girls for playing a nice,
clean game. They played a very


Fe Catholic 12-2
defensive game and they ran well
around the bases. They just
played a (real) strong game."
All of Seven Rivers' runs were
earned in the first two innings as
the Warriors (2-1 overall) racked up
nine runs and nine RBIs to outdis-
tance the Hawks early in the game.
Seven Rivers' Alexis King
started things off with a single at
her first at bat. King stole two
bases and then rocketed home for
the first run of the game off a
passed ball.
Santa Fe faced nine Warrior
batters before the end of the in-
ning and Seven Rivers had a com-
fortable 3-0 lead.
Strong pitching by Warrior
hurler Tessa Kacer (three strike-
outs) and first baseman Alyssa
Gage's strong defensive play paced
Seven Rivers. Kacer pitched all
five innings for her team.
Despite a slightly tired arm in
See Page B4


Afew


deadlines


to watch
The winter league of the
USTA is nearing its end and
one Citrus County team is
closing in on a championship title,
which will be announced in the
next couple of weeks. It also
means we need to start looking at
the upcom-
ing spring
league and
its deadline
for team a
commitment 'a-
and player AV
rosters. The .
next league
will be the
mixed 18-
and-over in Eric van den
the following Hoogen
division lev- ON TENNIS
els: 5.0, 6.0,
7.0, 8.0 and
9.0. The deadline for your team
commitment and player rosters is
March 10 and the league start date
is March 16.
As you can tell by the level num-
bers, this is a combined level
event, meaning the combined rat-
ing of the two players in a mixed
doubles can't be higher than the
division level. So at the 5.0 level,
each player can be rated 2.5 and
the difference between them can
be no larger then 1.0, meaning one
could be 2.0 and the other 3.0.
This league is open to anybody
who turns 18 at any date in 2013.
The schedule for the rest of 2013:
18-up mixed (3 doubles) in
March, April and May
40-up adult (3 doubles 2 sin-
gles) May, June and July,
40-up mixed (3 doubles) Au-
gust, September and October,
Combo senior and adult (3
doubles) October, November and
December
If you have any questions for in-
formation in our District 4 (south),
call or e-mail Leigh Chak at 352-
572-7157 or vacocala@gmail.com
or ustaflorida.com.
The other deadline is Wednesday
Feb. 27, for the Second Annual
Spring Classic at Crystal River High
School, on March 2 and 3. For more
info, see the end of this article.
Tuesday Team Tennis
This women-only league is
geared towards players rated 3.0 to
3.5. If interested in playing or want
to captain a team, contact chair-
woman Candace Charles at


Page B4


Price, Longoria make successful spring debut for Rays


Associated Press
PORT CHARLOTTE, Fla. -
AL Cy Young Award winner
David Price and Evan Longoria
had brief, but satisfying spring
debuts for the Tampa Bay Rays.
Price pitched one scoreless
inning and escaped injury
when a groundball glanced off
his left wrist, while Longoria
successfully tested his surgi-
cally-repaired left hamstring on
the base paths and had a RBI
single during Tuesday's rain-
shortened 7-2 victory over a
Houston Astros split-squad.
Both players felt good about
the way they performed.


"Its' just getting back in a last season after partially tear-
competitive mind-set. That's ing his hamstring sliding into
the first real competitive second base on
thing I've done since last I April 30. The
year that really meant Rays went 41-44
something," said Price, during his ab-
who went 20-5 with a B sence, compared
2.56 ERA in 31 starts in to 47-27 in the ca-
2012 to edge Justin Ver- reer-low 74
lander in the closest Cy games he started
Young balloting ever at either third
"I know this doesn't David base or as the E
mean a whole lot, but to Price designated hitter. Lon
me it does," the 27-year- Keeping the
old left-hander added. "I told three-time All-Star healthy fig-
(pitching coach Jim Hickey), it ures to be one of the keys to the
starts today One scoreless in- club's hopes of getting back to
ning, I'm happy with that." the playoffs following a one-
Longoria missed 85 games year hiatus.


Longoria, who had minor sur-
gery on his hamstring in No-
vember, left camp for
four days last week to be
with his girlfriend for
the birth of his baby
The third baseman
played three innings,
going 2 for 2. He singled
and was thrown out try-
ing to score from second
an base in the first inning,
oria then delivered his RBI
single before scoring
from first base on Leslie Ander-
son's two-run, second-inning
triple off Astros starter Jordan
Lyles.
"I definitely got my baserun-


ning in today," said Longoria,
who slid into home plate when
he was thrown out trying to
score from second on Shelley
Duncan's single to left field.
"That's always the way it
works. The first day out you get
tested. I'm glad I got it out of the
way early," the slugger added. "I
felt great. I don't know how it
looks, but it feels 100 percent
better than it did at the end of
the season last year And that's
all that really matters."
The 21-year-old Lyles, the
youngest starting pitcher in the
majors over the past two
See Page B4


I= ic, Vl%-WlV'


f,



lg






B2 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013


making it up to him


Watson's shot

helps out caddie

at 2012 Masters

Associated Press

MARANA, Ariz. The artis-
tic, majestic wedge out of the
trees and onto the 10th green at
Augusta National. The tearful
celebration. Slipping into that
beautiful green jacket for the
first time in Butler Cabin. The
trophy presentation.
Bubba Watson finally had a
chance to catch his breath when
he sat down for dinner to honor
the latest Masters champion.
And that's when it hit him.
"We're all upstairs at the din-
ner and he said, 'Dude, do you re-
alize what this means?"' caddie
Ted Scott recalled. "And we're
thinking, 'Yeah, Bubba. You're
the Masters champion. This is a
pretty big deal.' He stops dead in
his tracks and he says, 'I've got to
buy Paul that ring.'"
Paul Tesori, the caddie for
Webb Simpson, was listening to
the playoff on the radio while
driving home to Florida when
Watson made his incredible es-
cape and beat Louis Oosthuizen
with a par. Tesori smiled when
he thought about the ring and
wondered if Watson even re-
membered his promise.
Leave it to Watson to have in-
stant recall of such an insignifi-
cant moment compared with
the magnitude of winning


Associated Press
Caddie Paul Tesori, left, was thrilled for Bubba Watson when he won The Masters in 2012. And so was
his wife.


the Masters.
There are 350 varieties of
more than 80,000 plants at Au-
gusta National, but only one
palm tree on the golf course. It
now takes on new meaning for
Watson, a reminder of how he
ruined a caddie's bet with his
wife over a wedding ring and
made up for it by winning a
green jacket.
It all started when Simpson
had an extra ticket for the prac-
tice round that he gave to
Tesori's wife, Michelle. Tesori
was so excited about her first trip
to the Masters that, as they drove


to Augusta and he raved about
the beauty of the golf course, he
served up a challenge.
"I said, 'Honey, one of the cool
things is that there's one palm
tree on the property and half the
players don't even know where it
is. If you can find the palm tree,
anything you want is yours,"'
Tesori said.
She had been asking about a
diamond ring that cost $10,000
and would complete her wedding
band. Tesori figured he would
buy it whenever Simpson won his
next golf tournament, but he got
caught up in the moment and of-


fered that as the reward.
They played nine holes that
Wednesday with the regular
group Watson, Simpson and
Rickie Fowler. Jason Day
joined them on the first tee, but
his wrist was a little sore and so
the Australian left them after
three holes.
The lone palm at Augusta is
tucked away to the right of the
green on the par-3 fourth hole.
This was the big moment.
And that's when Tesori made
his first big mistake.
"Paul was talking to Bubba
about it and I'm thinking to my-


self, 'This is not a good idea,"'
Simpson said.
Watson had no clue about the
only palm at Augusta National.
And when he heard the deal
Tesori had with his wife, Watson
couldn't help himself.
"My best recollection is Bubba
being his normal self and throw-
ing Paul under the bus," Fowler
said. "There are certain secrets
Bubba can keep if they need to
be kept secret. But if it's some-
thing along the lines of a bet, and
nothing that can hurt you too
bad like a $10,000 ring -
that's out the door"
Watson found the palm and
began making a scene, his voice
getting louder as he pointed to
the tree.
Tesori urged him to keep it
down, which only egged on Wat-
son, who continued to raise his
voice and point to the palm.
Tesori's only hope was his wife
was far enough back in the
crowd and couldn't see or
hear what Watson was doing.
But when the caddie reached
the green and looked to the left,
he was doomed.
"I found my wife in the
crowd," he said. "She's got her
arms up in the air in a V forma-
tion, jumping up and down. And
Bubba thinks it's the greatest
thing in the world."
Tesori felt otherwise.
"His face ... he looked like he
was in shock," Scott, the caddie,
said.

See GOLF/Rage B4


Local LEADERS


BRENTWOOD
On Feb. 13, the Wednesday afternoon
point quota group played.
First +7
Angelo Deyeso and Art Miller
Second +3 (MOQ)
Possum Lindsey, Basil Varney
and C. W. Goschen
Closest to the pin:
No. 2 Jim Pearson
No. 4 Steve Leonard
50/50 winner:
Steve Leonard
Feb. 16, Saturday Scramble results.
First
Rick Urban, Pete Krol,
Gene Pokaluk and Mike O'Donaghue
Second
Frank Hughes, Jerry Krause,
and Dennis Ronk
Third
Bob Myers, Irv Rayburn,
L.T. Schull and Nel Lamoreaux
Closest to the pin:
No. 4 Clair Lockwood
Feb. 17, Sunday Morning Scramble.
First
Steve Leonard, Mona Evans
and Bruce Liston
Second (MOC) Eagle No. 6
Kenny McCabe, Don Gittings
and Chuck Curtis
Third
Bob Staker, Dave Mc Laughlin,
Ann McLaughlin and Rolf Kettenburg
Closest to the pin:
No. 2 Jim Pearson
No. 4 Bob Staker
50/50 winner:
Tony Longo
Feb. 17, Monday Men's Group results.
First +5
Bob Flegel
Second +4
Bob Lewis
(MOC) +3
Ron Diehl
Closest to the pin:
No. 2 Freddie Krattiger
No. 4 Jim Pearson
CITRUS SPRINGS
MEN
On Feb. 16, the Citrus Springs Men's
Association played 2 Best Ball.
First 116
Bill Curry, Harvey Jenkins and Bob Hunt
Second 123
Jerry Feher, Bob Malloy,
Don Gonzi and Rocky Marziani
Closest to the pin:
No. 4 Russ Woodworth
No. 11 Pete Clutter
No. 14 Bill Curry
No. 16 P Clutter


On Feb. 19, the Citrus Springs Men's
Association played net front and back.
Front 137
John Vanzo, Dave Balas,
Bob Hunt and Jack Williamson
Back 134
Jerry Feher, Walt Norton,
Bob Malloy and Emil Colletti
On Feb. 21, the Citrus Springs Men's Golf
Association played 2 on the front/3 on the
back.
First 138
Glen Robertson, Russ Woodworth,
Bob Hunt and Jack Williamson
Second 151
Pete Clutter, Walt Norton,
Dave Balas and Leon Smith
Third 157
Jerry Feher, Bob Malloy,
Emil Colletti and Bill Mannix
Closest to the Pin:
No. 4 Bill Curry
No. 8 Rick Hancock
No. 11 Bob Hunt
No. 16 Bob Hunt
On Feb. 23, the Citrus Spring Men's Golf
Association Played one low net front and
two low net back.
Winner front -34
Pete Clutter, Bob Malloy,
Rocky Marziani and John Lycke
Winner back -65
Harvey Jenkins, Don Gonzi,
Walt Norton and Emil Colletti
EL DIABLO
On Feb. 10, the group had a Valentine
Tournament and Dinner. Tournament for-
mat was "Alternate Shot."
Flight A
First 67.60
Jon and Hattie Townsend
Second 70
Dale and Wendy Rasmussen
Third 71.80
Pat Moran and Marty
Fourth 72.40
Ron and Maggie Cart
Fifth 75.40
Ric Dias/Ray Humphreys
Sixth 77.80
Pete Palmer and Rick Palmer
Seventh 80.60
Bill Hickey and Tom Hickey
Eighth 81
Juanita Emrich and Dave Whitacre
Best Overall Gross 83
Ron and Maggie Cart
Fewest Putts 31
Pat Moran and Marty
Flight B
First 61.40
Jack and Donna Durden
Second 69.20
Gary and Ileen Zavoda
Third 70
David and Rosemary Orr


Fourth 70.20
Jon and Gaby Thompson
Fifth 71
Curtis Karr and Stan Webber
Sixth 72.60
Paul and Ginna Langevin
Seventh 76.60
Mike and Donna Dougherty
Eighth 85.60
Gary Greene and Ed Stup
Best Overall Gross 83
Jack and Donna Durden
Fewest Putts 28
Jack and Donna Durden
Closest to the pin (Men):
No. 3 Curtis Karr
No. 13 Gary Greene
Closest to the pin (Ladies)
No. 6 Juanita Emrich
No. 15 Donna Durden
On Feb. 17, the format was Skins.
MEN
First 9 skins
Mike Dougherty
Second 5 skins
Jon Thompson
Third 4 skins
Paul Langevin
WOMEN
First 8 skins
Juanita Emrich
Second 4 skins (tied)
Donna Dougherty and Gaby Thompson
Third 2 skins
Ginna Langevin
On Feb. 18, the format was a 9 Hole
Scramble.
First 22.125
Jon Townsend, Pete Palmer,
Kaye Cansler and Mike Pombier
Second 22.175
Mike and Donna Dougherty,
Logan Crume and Jeff Sprague
Third 22.875
Bob Marino, Hattie Townsend,
Dan Denaut and Jack Durden
Fourth 23.75
Ric Dias, Debbie Marino,
Curtis Karr and Dave Whitacre
Fifth 25.5
Ray Humphreys, Rory Natzke,
Stan Webber and Dayle Montgomery
Sixth 25.875
Doc Freer, Juanita Emrich,
Bob Montgomery and Ed Stup
Closest to the Pin:
No. 3 Bob Marino
No. 4 Team of Bob, Hattie,
Dan and Jack
No. 6 Mike Dougherty
No. 7 Team of Ric, Debbie,
Curtis and Dave
Birdie Points (10)
Team of Mike, Donna, Logan and Jeff
PINE RIDGE
WOMEN
On Feb. 20, the women played Low Gross.


Babe Zaharais Flight
First 33
Lisa Wahba
Second 36
Jan Lassiter
Third 37
Jo Steele
Patty Berg Flight
First 36
Diane Quindon
Second 36
Margie Ebbert
Third 37
Julie Kranker
Julie Inkster Flight
First 41
Barbara Lamb
Second 41
Millie Mum
Third 42
Jean Cocking
Nancy Lopez Flight
First 43
Betty Colbourn
Second 46
Maud Gloddy
Third 54


Janet Greig
Closest to the pin:
No. 1
No. 2
No. 7
No. 9
No. 6
Birdies:
No. 2
Nos. 2 & 9
No. 7
No. 3


Kay Krieger
Rainey Hart
patsy Tessier
Shirley Peterson
Millie Mum

Zona Doane
Casey Owen
Barbara Lamb
Lisa Wahba


7 RIVERS
MEN
On Feb. 21, the 7 Rivers Men's Golf
Association played a "Best 2 of 4 Balls."
First 112
Don Eddy, Clayton Jeck,
Don Tuers and Sam McMechan
Second 118 (MOC)
Bob Cox, Paul Mantey,
Fred Plushanski and Bill Stallings
Closest to the pin:
No. 7 Gene Kelly
No. 11 WillTripp
SUGARMILL WOODS
MEN
On Feb. 19,the Sandblasters Men's Group
played team point quota.
First +15
Chuck Reeb, Roger Kessinger and Frank
Vanzin
Second +9 (Tie)
John Doyle, Dick Cobb and Jim Rettick
Jim Turner, Sam Hunt,
Bob Strausser and Bill Pierson


Notable Rounds:
Chuck Reeb, 75 with 4 birdies
On Feb. 21, the Sugarmill Woods Country
Club Men's Golf Association played two-
man point quota.
Flight 1
First +2
Jay Yarger and Tom Venable
Second +1 (Tie)
Howard Watson and Rick Wehrheim
Stuvyie Wainwright and Dennis Borras
Flight 2
First +10
Bob Gunderman and Bob Chadderton
Second +6
Mel Schroeder and Alex Law
Third +5
Larry Mantle and Mike Theodore
Flight 3
First +13
Zane Megos and Bob Carriveau
Second +11
Ernie Pettine and Bill Lent
Third +8
Bob Mason and Bill Moreau
Golfers of the Week:
Low Gross 79
Carl Pedersen
Low Net 67
Bob Chadderton
Low Net 61
Sr. Bill Lent
Closest to the Pin:
Oak No. 3 Zane Megos
Oak No. 6 Bob Strausser
Pine No. 4 PaulVanTassell
Pine No. 7 Jay Yarger
TWISTED OAKS
WOMEN
On Feb. 12, the Twisted Oaks Ladies
Association played "Throw out the worst
hole front and back."
Flight A
First 55
Jan Himmelspach
Second
Mia Husler
Flight B
First 46
May Forsyhte
Second 50
Nancy Stewart
Third 51
Chris McGraw
Flight C
First (tie) 53
Nancy Vallimont and Terry McCusker
Second 54
Carol Lanzillo
On Feb. 19, the Twisted Oaks Ladies
Association played low net with the fol-
lowing results.
Flight A
First 67
Jan Himmelspach


Second 71
Betty Smith
Third 73
Maria Valdes
Flight B
First 69
Sue Kang
Second (tie) 71
May Forsythe, Wink O'Brien and Dianne
Flagg
Flight C
First 65
Nancy Stewart
Second (tie) 67
Terry McCusker, Pat Milburn and Marge
Abernathy
PLANTATION
On Feb. 16,the group played a points game.
T Hume 9 points
B. Matthews 4 points
D. Brown 3 points
C. Clabaugh 3 points
D. Patel 3 points
J. Brothers Sr. 2 points
J. Cioe 2 points
On Feb. 18,the group played a points game.
D. Yox +6
On Feb. 20, the ladies played a points game.
C. McNeil +1
L. Brown +1
M. Ford +1
K. Clabaugh +2
K. LeDue +2
G. Bolle +4
G. Edgar +5
On Feb. 21,the group played a points game.
J. Hartson +1
J.Timmons +1
J. Rizzo +1
E. Hogan +2
D. Patel +3
D. Yox +3
D. Stickney +4
B. Reynolds +7
Hole in one:
No. 8 Ann Marie Lohr (Feb. 20)
No. 8 Wayne Johnson (Feb. 19)
BEVERLY HILLS
OnFeb. 26, the Beverly Hills Men's Nine
Hole Golf League results from Brentwood
Golf Course C.C. Due to the inclement
weather, our game was cancelled.
Golfers of any age or ability, snowbirds and
those newto the Citrus County area, are wel-
come to join in for a friendly round of nine
holes of handicap golf. We know you have a
lot to do, so we get the round of golf out of
the way early Tuesday mornings at Brent-
wood Farms Golf Course. The groups start
with tee time at 7:45 a.m. For information, call
Frank Hughes at 352-746-4800 or email
new216@tampabay.rr.com.


Citrus

Springs

GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB
* OPEN TO THE PUBLIC*


Come And Play

The Areas Best

Maintained

Golf Course

Mention this ad while
bookingyour tee times
and
Play for just
$32 before noon

and only
$24 after 1:00 PM

All Day Sat. & Sun
Just $29

Offer Expires 3/16/13


V CARE FOOD PyR


SCRAMBLE



GOLF TOURNAMENT


Saturday 0

March 16th
SEVEN RIVERS GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

Registration: 8:00 a.m.

Shotgun Time: 9:00 a.m.

$60 per person
$200 per foursome
including greens fees,
cart ,lunch and
thank you gifts. arl ey Davidson

tHole in One Prize


0 0





Special

Olympics

Florida


2nd Annual Winter
Golf Scramble Classic
Special Olympics
Florida


March 2nd, 2013
Registration begins
at 7:00 am
/Shotgun start at 8:30am
$60 per person or
$240 per four person team


Seven Rivers Golf & Country Club
7395 W. Pinebrook St.
Crystal River, FL 34429


Mulligans: 3 for $15 maximum of 12 per Team
50/50 Tickets will be sold: one for $1 or six for $5

Snacks will be available throughout the event.
Lunch will be provided at the end of tournament

Coffee & Juice as well as donuts or bagels will be
provided before the outing.

Any Questions call 746-3262 ext. 231 or 422-0819
or email: duane.dustin@gmail.com


CH0R NICLE
)OODWBM P w howeniecr


GOLF


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013 B3


Phillies club way past Yankees


Associated Press

CLEARWATER Domonic
Brown and Tommy Joseph hit
long home runs in the seventh
inning and the Philadelphia
Phillies rallied past the New
York Yankees 4-3 on Tuesday for
their first win of the exhibition
season.
Brown connected off Zach
Nuding, sending his second
home run this spring over the
batter's eye in center field.
Brown is competing for the left
field vacancy
Joseph, a catcher considered
by some as the Phillies' current
top hitting prospect, sent a two-
run drive deep over the left-field
fence. He was acquired from
San Francisco last summer in
the trade for Hunter Pence.
Ichiro Suzuki went 3 for 3 to
lead the Yankees.
Cards 15, Red Sox 4
FORT MYERS Cardinals left-
hander Jaime Garcia returned to the
mound for the first time since injur-
ing his shoulder in the playoffs, get-
ting through two scoreless innings
as St. Louis beat the Boston Red
Sox 15-4.
Garcia was pulled early in the
NL division series against Wash-
ington with a strained rotator cuff
and inflammation.
Garcia kept the Red Sox score-
less, working around three hits and
a walk. He threw 43 pitches, 30 for
strikes, and struck out two.
Braves 9, Nationals 5
KISSIMMEE Washington's
Ross Detwiler got in some much-
needed work before the World
Baseball Classic, while the Atlanta
Braves scored five runs in the fifth
on the way to a 9-5 win over their
division rival.
Detwiler pitched two scoreless in-
nings before failing to get out of the
third, allowing two runs. The left-
hander gave up five hits and struck
out two in a game delayed an hour
by rain.
The Braves erased a 3-2 deficit
against loser Ryan Perry, who al-
lowed Jordan Parraz's homer and
run-scoring singles to Freddie Free-
man and Juan Francisco.
Marlins 7, Mets 5
JUPITER Giancarlo Stanton hit
his first homer of spring training to
help the Miami Marlins beat the New
York Mets 7-5.
Stanton, who led the NL in slug-
ging last year and had 37 home runs,
homered off Hansel Robles. Matt
Downs also homered off Robles.
Casey Kotchman hit a grand slam
in his first at-bat of spring training
against Mets starter Jenrry Mejia,
who needed 30 pitches to get through
his one inning and allowed five runs.
Astros (ss) 9, Tigers 4
KISSIMMEE Jason Castro and
Brett Wallace each homered for a
Houston Astros split squad in a 9-4
victory over the Detroit Tigers.


Associated Press
Philadelphia Phillies infielder Cody Asche makes a catch Tuesday against the New York Yankees in
Clearwater, Fla. The Phillies, behind a pair of home runs, took a 4-3 victory over the Yankees.


Wallace had three hits for the As-
tros. Castro and Rick Ankiel had two
hits apiece for Houston.
Robbie Grossman and Trevor
Crowe drove in four runs on back-to-
back extra base hits in Houston's
five-run fifth inning against Duane
Below.
Giants 8, Dodgers 8, tie
GLENDALE, Ariz. Tim Lince-
cum struggled in his first start of
spring training, giving up three runs
and failing to get through two innings
for the San Francisco Giants in an 8-
8 tie with the Los Angeles Dodgers.
Josh Beckett struck out three in two
scoreless innings for Los Angeles.
Coming off a season in which he
faltered as a starter but thrived out of
the bullpen during the Giants' run to
a World Series title, the two-time CY
Young Award winner with a new
closely-cropped hairdo allowed four
hits in 1 1/3 innings.
D'backs (ss) 7, Angels 7
TEMPE, Ariz. Josh Hamilton
went 0 for 3 in his Cactus League
debut with the Los Angeles Angels,


playing five innings in their 7-7 tie
with Arizona's split squad.
Hamilton grounded out on the first
pitch he faced and later flied out twice
for the Angels, who signed him to a
five-year, $125 million free-agent deal
to leave Texas for its AL West rivals.
Mariners 6, Brewers 5
PHOENIX Justin Smoak hit a
two-run homer in the eighth inning,
and the Seattle Mariners beat the
Milwaukee Brewers 6-5.
Franklin Gutierrez and Michael
Saunders connected for consecutive
one-out home runs in the third for
the Mariners, who have hit 10 home
runs in their first five games.
Hisashi Iwakuma started for the
Mariners and pitched a perfect in-
ning before giving way to Joe Saun-
ders, who gave up two runs on three
hits in his only inning.
Padres 7, Reds 5
PEORIA, Ariz. Yasmani
Grandal, Travis Buck, Alexi Amarista
and Everth Cabrera had RBI singles
in San Diego's six-run fourth inning
and the Padres went on to a 7-5 vic-


tory over the Cincinnati Reds.
San Diego had five consecutive
hits in the big inning and Kyle Blanks
and Chase Headly had sacrifice flies
for the Padres.
Anthony Bass, who made 15
starts last season and is a contender
for San Diego's rotation this year,
pitched two scoreless innings in his
spring debut
Cubs 4, Rockies 2
MESA, Ariz. Edwin Jackson
pitched two scoreless innings in his
first outing with the Cubs, and
Chicago beat the Colorado Rockies.
Jackson signed a four-year, $52
million contract this winter. He gave up
consecutive singles to start the game
but finished by retiring four in a row.
Chicago outfielder Dave Sappelt,
in the running for a backup job,
homered leading off the sixth among
his two hits.
W. Sox 14, Rangers 8
SURPRISE, Ariz. Yu Darvish
struck out two while retiring all six
White Sox batters he faced in his
first spring start before Chicago


scored 11 runs over the next two in-
nings in a 14-8 win over the Texas
Rangers.
Darvish, the Japanese ace who
won 16 games as a major league
rookie last season, threw his fastball
in the mid-90s.
Twins 8, Blue Jays 4
DUNEDIN -Justin Morneau had
two hits, including a run-scoring dou-
ble, and the Minnesota Twins beat
the Toronto Blue Jays.
Morneau and teammate Joe
Mauer, both taking part in next
month's World Baseball Classic,
made the 2 1/2 hour trip from Fort
Myers.
Mauer singled and walked twice.
He scored on Morneau's third-inning
RBI double.
Royals 4, Indians 1
GOODYEAR, Ariz. Billy Butler
homered and drove in three runs as
the Kansas City Royals beat the
Cleveland Indians 4-1.
Both teams began the day un-
beaten in exhibition play. The Royals
improved to 4-0-1, Cleveland lost for
the first time in six tries.
Before the game, new Indians
manager Terry Francona told Justin
Masterson in the dugout he would
be his opening day starting pitcher
in Toronto.
Wade Davis became the first rota-
tion pitcher used this spring by Roy-
als manager Ned Yost. Acquired
with fellow right-hander James
Shields from Tampa Bay this winter,
Davis started and gave up one sin-
gle over two innings.
Eric Hosmer added an RBI triple
for Kansas City. Matt Carson hit his
second home run for Cleveland.
D'backs (ss) 9, A's 4
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Jason
Kubel, Adam Eaton and Cliff Pen-
nington each hit two-run homers and
a split squad of Arizona Diamond-
backs beat the Oakland Athletics.
A's starter A.J. Griffin was sharp in
his spring debut. The right-hander,
who came up from the minors to go 7-
1 with a 3.06 ERAin 15 starts and
help the A's win the AL West last sea-
son, gave up one hit and struck out
three in two scoreless innings. It was
his first big league spring training start.
Josh Collmenter, sporting a mag-
nificent beard grown in the offsea-
son, started and pitched two
scoreless innings in his spring debut
for Arizona, giving up a hit and strik-
ing out two.
Orioles, Pirates contest
rained out Tuesday
BRADENTON The Pittsburgh
Pirates are giving two youngsters a
fair shot at winning the fifth starter
spot in their rotation.
Left-hander Jeff Locke and right-
hander Kyle McPherson were im-
pressive in their first outings of
spring training. Neither got a chance
to pitch because the Pirates' game
against the Baltimore Orioles was
rained out. There was no initial indi-
cation if there would be a makeup.


Women's bowling tournament winners announced


Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus County Bowl-
ing Association announced
the winners of the 2013
Women's Bowling Tourna-
ment, which was at
Parkview Lanes in Holder
earlier this month. Tourna-
ment entrants competed in
team, doubles and singles
events, bowling nine
games over two days. Bowl-
ing in two handicap divi-
sions based upon
individual bowler's aver-
ages, more than 60 Citrus
County women bowlers
participated in this tourna-
ment which has been held
annually since the 1970s.
In the team event, LeP-
ree's Girls took first place
in Division 1 (161 average
or higher) with a team
score of 2,950. Team mem-
bers were Bridget Foley,
Debbe Chung, Stephanie
Flory and K.C. Cridland.


Denise's Nails came in
first place in Division 2
(160 average or below)
with team members Kathy
Pollari, Bev Hanner, Ros-
alin Homes and Janet Pohl
compiling a team score of
2,887.
In the doubles competi-
tion, Debbie Chung and
K.C. Cridland won the Di-
vision 1 title with a 1,527
score. Sue Kuzel and Sher-
rie Hill won in Division 2
with a 1,529 score. The sin-
gles event was won by
Shirley Tennity (Division
1) with an 870 series and
Peggy Murdock (Division
2) with an 822 series.
In addition to competing
in team, doubles and sin-
gles events, the bowlers'
individual scores in all
events were combined to
determine an all events
winner The trophy for this
competition was won by
the two bowlers who over-


all bowled consistently
better than all other
bowlers. Shirley Tennity's
2,294 overall score was the
best in Division 1. In Divi-
sion 2, Debbe Chung
bowled a 2,380.
The February doubles
sweeper sponsored by the
Greater Citrus USBC As-
sociation was at Sports-
men's Lanes on Saturday,
Feb. 23. Winners of the
fourth monthly doubles
sweeper were Derek and


John Fish. Second place
was taken by Timothy Gru-
man and Ryan Aguilar and
third place went to Joseph
Paprzychi and Dalton
Gruzdus.
The March sweeper will
be held at the Beverly Hills
Bowling Center on
Lecanto Highway in Bev-
erly Hills on March 23. The
monthly sweepers tourna-
ment has received tremen-
dous support from the
bowling community and


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the GCUSBCA continues to
provide local bowlers of all
abilities with a competitive
venue where their bowling
skills can be tested against
other bowlers. Visit
greatercitrususbca.com for
more information.
Kudos to Cora Covington
who bowls on Monday with
the Nature Coast Mixers at
Beverly Hills Bowl.
On Jan. 14, Cora con-
verted a split that every-
one has had at some point


Every day hundreds
of senior citizens,
some of whom live
right here in our
community, go
hungry.
Please help the
Home Delivered
Meals Program in
our pursuit to end
senior hunger in
Citrus County.

$350 Team
& Hole
Sponsorship


but almost nobody has
made. The 7-10 split is one
of those even the best of
bowlers leave.
That day, Cora focused
on the 7 pin, hitting it
slightly from behind as her
ball hooked into it, slap-
ping it against the wall and
spinning it back onto the
deck and rolling it slowly
over to the 10 pin, knock-
ing it over just before the
sweep came down.
Congratulations Cora.


9:00 a.m.
Shotgun Start
Four person scramble
Prize for Straightest Drive
Prizes for closest to the
pin
Lunch during the event
Hole-in-one
prize provided by:
Harley Davidson
Crystal River



$150 Hole
Sponsorship


H O M E C A R E
H 0 M F C A R E


Presents the 2nd Annual

Golf For Meals
Golf Tournament


Golf at Plantation after 2:00 PM
any day except Sunday 6



for only per person
'c lid toi plo\ on the Clhoinpioisl.ip Coti se onl I
- -


.0 to book a iObme no more
than 3 days it advance. LANTATION
PLANTATION:
,_,: ,' .-,-"" '. ...rlA r, ,r ir_ .L [l ,[
" :1. :. 1 i

. ... .. .
...... ..... :i!"" .,.,.. ... ;l,," ,,.:ii.n,,,,.,.. .:'i:: .:'


Saturday March 30, 2013
8:00 a.m. Registration Begir
$55 Entry
per Golfer


7 Rivers Golf and Country Club
For more information call (352) 527-5975
Sign up as an individual or a team
Make checks payable to: Friends of the NCVC
Send completed form and payment to:
2804 W. Marc Knighton Ct. Key #3, Lecanto, FL 34461

,OEIXQ F VofzmteerCenter
O00E1XQ


I o -,,_1


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPORTS


~H






B4 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013




MLB Spring
Training Glance
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct
Baltimore 3 0 1.000
Chicago 2 0 1.000
Kansas City 4 0 1.000
Cleveland 5 1 .833
Seattle 4 1 .800
Tampa Bay 4 1 .800
Detroit 2 2 .500
Houston 2 2 .500
Minnesota 2 2 .500
Boston 2 3 .400
Toronto 2 3 .400
NewYork 1 3 .250
Oakland 1 3 .250
Los Angeles 0 4 .000
Texas 0 4 .000
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct
Chicago 3 1 .750
Miami 2 1 .667
Pittsburgh 2 1 .667
San Diego 3 2 .600
Arizona 2 2 .500
Colorado 2 2 .500
Los Angeles 1 1 .500
San Francisco 1 1 .500
St. Louis 2 2 .500
Atlanta 2 3 .400
NewYork 1 2 .333
Philadelphia 1 2 .333
Washington 1 2 .333
Cincinnati 1 4 .200
Milwaukee 1 4 .200
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the stand-
ings; games against non-major league teams
do not.
Monday's Games
Detroit 10, Philadelphia 1
Boston (ss) 4, Toronto 2
Tampa Bay 6, Boston (ss) 3
Atlanta 7, Miami 6
Baltimore 5, N.Y Yankees 1
Minnesota 5, Pittsburgh 4
St. Louis 10, Houston 2
L.A. Dodgers 7, Chicago Cubs 6
Seattle 9, L.A. Angels 8
Cleveland 14, Oakland 10
San Diego 7, Milwaukee (ss) 1
Cincinnati 5, Milwaukee (ss) 2
San Francisco 9, Chicago White Sox 9, tie
Kansas City 16, Arizona 4
Colorado 9, Texas 1
Washington 6, N.Y Mets 4
Tuesday's Games
Miami 7, N.Y Mets 5
Atlanta 9, Washington 5
Baltimore vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla.,
ccd., Rain
Minnesota 8, Toronto 4
Houston (ss) 9, Detroit 4
Philadelphia 4, N.Y Yankees 3
Tampa Bay 7, Houston (ss) 2, 6 innings
St. Louis 15, Boston 4
L.A. Dodgers 8, San Francisco 8, tie
Chicago Cubs 4, Colorado 2
Seattle 6, Milwaukee 5
Chicago White Sox 14, Texas 8
Kansas City 4, Cleveland 1
San Diego 7, Cincinnati 5
L.A. Angels 7, Arizona (ss) 7, tie
Arizona (ss) 9, Oakland 4
Today's Games
Philadelphia vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Atlanta vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore (ss) vs. N.Y Yankees at Tampa,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Miami vs. Washington atViera, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Houston vs. Toronto at Dunedin, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
St. Louis vs. N.Y Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla.,
1:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Milwaukee vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
San Francisco vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Colorado vs. San Diego (ss) at Peoria, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
Seattle vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
Texas vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
San Diego (ss) vs. Oakland at Phoenix,
3:05 p.m.
Cincinnati vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
3:10 p.m.
Boston vs. Baltimore (ss) at Sarasota, Fla.,
7:05 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Miami vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Toronto vs. N.Y Yankees (ss) at Tampa, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Detroit vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Atlanta vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Boston vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
N.Y Yankees (ss) vs. Houston at Kissimmee,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Arizona vs. Cincinnati (ss) at Goodyear, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
Cleveland vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Kansas City vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
Oakland vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix,
3:05 p.m.
Seattle vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (ss) vs. Colorado at Scottsdale,
Ariz., 3:10 p.m.
N.Y Mets vs. Washington at Viera, Fla.,
6:05 p.m.



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pet GB
New York 33 20 .623 -
Brooklyn 34 24 .586 1'/2
Boston 30 27 .526 5
Toronto 23 34 .404 12
Philadelphia 22 33 .400 12
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 41 14 .745 -
Atlanta 32 23 .582 9


Washington 18 37 .327 23
Orlando 16 41 .281 26
Charlotte 13 43 .232 28/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 36 21 .632
Chicago 32 25 .561 4
Milwaukee 27 28 .491 8
Detroit 22 37 .373 15
Cleveland 19 38 .333 17
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 45 13 .776 -
Memphis 37 18 .673 6V2
Houston 31 27 .534 14
Dallas 25 31 .446 19
New Orleans 20 38 .345 25
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 41 15 .732 -
Denver 36 22 .621 6
Utah 31 26 .544 10'/2
Portland 26 30 .464 15
Minnesota 20 33 .377 19/2


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOT r the lL reord[ RAYS


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Tuesday in the Florida Lottery:
.- .CASH 3 (early)
5-2-3
CASH 3 (late)
1-4-7
PLAY 4 (early)
1-8-0-9
PLAY 4 (late)
2-7-6-2
FANTASY 5
9-19-27-29-32
MEGA MONEY
7-12-22-35
Ftoida LoMEGA BALL
10



On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Georgetown at Connecticut
8 p.m. (MNT) Mississippi State at Kentucky
9 p.m. (ESPN2) Oklahoma at Texas
9 p.m. (SUN) Georgia at Vanderbilt
11 p.m. (ESPN2) Colorado at Stanford
NBA
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Sacramento Kings at Orlando Magic
8 p.m. (ESPN) Golden State Warriors at New York Knicks
10:30 p.m. (ESPN) Denver Nuggets at Portland Trail Blazers
BOAT RACING
5 p.m. (FSNFL) OPA Offshore Racing Series (Taped)
HOCKEY
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Washington Capitals at Philadelphia
Flyers
10 p.m. (NBCSPT) Detroit Red Wings at Los Angeles Kings

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



Prep CALENDAR


TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BOYS WEIGHTLIFTING
4 p.m. Hernando, Dunnellon at Citrus


Pacific Division
W L Pct
L.A. Clippers 40 18 .690
Golden State 33 24 .579
L.A. Lakers 28 30 .483
Sacramento 19 39 .328
Phoenix 18 39 .316
Monday's Games
Washington 90, Toronto 84
Atlanta 114, Detroit 103
Denver 119, L.A. Lakers 108
Boston 110, Utah 107, OT
Tuesday's Games
Orlando 98, Philadelphia 84
Indiana 108, Golden State 97
Miami 141, Sacramento 129,20T
Cleveland 101, Chicago 98
Brooklyn 101, New Orleans 97
Milwaukee 95, Dallas 90
Minnesota at Phoenix, late
Charlotte at L.A. Clippers, late
Today's Games
Toronto at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Washington, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Houston, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Memphis, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Golden State at New York, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Utah, 9p.m.
Denver at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
L.A. Clippers at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
Pittsburgh 20 13 7 0 26 69
New Jersey 19 10 5 4 24 48
Philadelphia 21 911 1 19 60
N.Y Rangers 18 8 8 2 18 44
N.Y. Islanders 20 811 1 17 57
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
Montreal 19 12 4 3 27 53
Boston 16 12 2 2 26 49
Ottawa 20 12 6 2 26 48
Toronto 20 12 8 0 24 57
Buffalo 20 712 1 15 50
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
Carolina 18 9 8 1 19 50
Tampa Bay 19 9 9 1 19 70
Winnipeg 19 9 9 1 19 52
Florida 19 6 9 4 16 48
Washington 18 710 1 15 51
WESTERN CONFERENCE


Central Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Chicago 19 16 0 3 35 61 37
Nashville 20 9 6 5 23 44 47
St. Louis 18 10 6 2 22 55 52
Detroit 19 9 7 3 21 57 54
Columbus 20 512 3 13 44 61
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 18 10 4 4 24 52 48
Minnesota 18 9 7 2 20 39 43
Calgary 18 7 7 4 18 49 61
Edmonton 18 7 7 4 18 42 49
Colorado 17 7 8 2 16 42 51
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 17 13 3 1 27 59 47
Dallas 20 10 8 2 22 56 57
LosAngeles 17 9 6 2 20 45 41
Phoenix 18 8 7 3 19 50 49
San Jose 17 8 6 3 19 41 39
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Monday's Games
Ottawa 2, Montreal 1, SO
Toronto 4, Philadelphia 2
Nashville 5, Dallas 4, OT
Chicago 3, Edmonton 2, OT
Los Angeles 5, Anaheim 2
Tuesday's Games
Dallas 5, Columbus 4, OT
Washington 3, Carolina 0
Winnipeg 4, N.Y Rangers 3
Florida 6, Pittsburgh 4
Buffalo 2, Tampa Bay 1
Boston 4, N.Y Islanders 1
Minnesota 2, Calgary 1, OT
Phoenix at Vancouver, late
Colorado at San Jose, late
Today's Games
Washington at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Montreal at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.
Nashville at Anaheim, 10 p.m.


Thursday's Games
GB Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7p.m.
- Tampa Bay at N.Y Rangers, 7 p.m.
6'2 Toronto at N.Y Islanders, 7 p.m.
12 Ottawa at Boston, 7 p.m.
21 Buffalo at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
211/2 Chicago at St. Louis, 8p.m.
New Jersey at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.
Edmonton at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Calgary at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Detroit at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.


BASEBALL
American Association
AMARILLO SOX-Signed RHP Joe Newby.
Acquired OF Cory Patton from San Angelo for
a player to be named
GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS-Signed
RHPWill Krout and OF Adam Klein.
KANSAS CITYT-BONES-Signed OF Bran-
don Jones, RHP Ethan Cole and OF Kennard
Jones.
LINCOLN SALTDOGS-Signed RHP Travis
Parker and C Sean O'Connell.
Can-Am League
NEWARK BEARS-Signed RHP Kyle Morri-
son and OF JJ Sherrill. Sold the contract of OF
James Roche to the New York Mets.
FRONTIER LEAGUE
LAKE ERIE CRUSHERS-Signed LHP Matt
Rein.
ROCKFORD AVIATORS-Signed C Eric
Bainer and OF Alvaro Ramirez. Released RHP
Nelson Curry.
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS MINERS-Signed
RHP Brandon Cunniff to a contract extension.
WINDY CITY THUNDERBOLTS-Signed
LHP Matt Wickswat.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
MILWAUKEE BUCKS-Suspended C
Samuel Dalembert one game for a violation of
team policy.
Women's National Basketball Association
LOS ANGELES SPARKS-Signed G Jenna
O'Hea and G Paola Ferrari.
FOOTBALL
Canadian Football League
CALGARY STAMPEDERS-Signed LBYan-
nick Carter.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
ANAHEIM DUCKS-Assigned F Peter Hol-
land to Norfolk (AHL). Recalled F Emerson
Etem from Norfolk.
FLORIDA PANTHERS-Recalled C Scott
Timmins from San Antonio (AHL).
LOS ANGELES KINGS-Traded LW Simon
Gagne to Philadelphia for a conditional draft
pick.
MONTREAL CANADIENS-Acquired F
Michael Ryder and a third-round draft pick in
2013 from Dallas for F Erik Cole.
NEW JERSEY DEVILS-Placed G Martin
Brodeur on injured reserve, retroactive to Feb.
24. Recalled G Keith Kinkaid from Albany
(AHL).
ST LOUIS BLUES-Recalled F Andrew Mur-
ray from Peoria (AHL).
SAN JOSE SHARKS-Recalled F D Matt
Irwin from Worcester (AHL).
WASHINGTON CAPITALS-Recalled F
Casey Wellman from Hershey (AHL).
American Hockey League
AHL-Suspended Binghamton LW Darren
Kramer three games for leaving the players'
bench on a legal line change for the purpose of
starting an altercation in a Feb. 23 game vs. Al-
bany
GRAND RAPID GRIIFINS-Announced LW
Trevor Parkes was reassigned to Toledo
(ECHL).
SAN ANTONIO RAMPAGE-Loaned G Brian
Foster to Cincinnati (ECHL).
ECHL
IDAHO STEELHEADS-Announced F Austin
Smith was assigned to the team from Texas
(AHL).
GWINNETT GLADIATORS-Announced F
Doug Jones was called up to Texas (AHL).
SOUTH CAROLINA STINGRAYS-An-
nounced D Ryan McGinnis was acquired from
Florida to complete an earlier trade.
SOCCER
Major League soccer
D.C. UNITED-Signed MF Marcos Sanchez.
SAN JOSE EARTHQUAKES-Re-signed F
Chris Wondolowski.
VANCOUVER WHITECAPS-Agreed to
terms with MF Gershon Koffiea on contract ex-
tension.
COLLEGE
DUKE-Named Re'quan Boyette running
backs coach.
OKLAHOMA-Named Jerry Montgomery de-
fensive line coach.


Continued from Page B1


seasons, allowed six runs and 10 hits
over two innings.
The Astros scored twice in the
sixth off right-hander Alex Colome.
Justin Maxwell's double led to the
first run, and Matt Dominguez hit a
solo homer for the other.
Lyles, 5-12 with a 5.09 ERA in 25
starts last season, wasn't concerned
about the ugly numbers he posted.
"I'm not worried about the results
right now," Lyles said, adding that he



CRUISING
Continued from Page B1

the final two innings, Kacer main-
tained pitch control late in the game
to deny the Hawks any passed ball op-
portunities to score.
Gage also performed well at the
plate, earning a double and an RBI en
route to a 3-for-3 performance.
Santa Fe pitcher Courtney Myers
struggled in the early innings but ze-
roed her pitches into the strike zone
in the later innings, giving the War-
riors a harder time at scoring for the
rest of the game.
The Hawks successfully stopped
the Warriors from scoring in the final



GOLF
Continued from Page B2


In some respects, it was like the Old
Testament story of Samson offering to
buy linen garments and a set of
clothes for his 30 wedding guests if
they could solve his riddle. The guests
pressured his wife to get the answer,
and they solved it on the last night of
the wedding feast. Samson was so
angry he killed 30 men and took their
garments to pay off the bet.
This was just a ring.
And the man who ruined it all was
the first to come to the rescue.
"I said, 'Hey, you lost. You better go
down there and hug it,"' Watson said
he told Tesori, meaning the tree. "He
was mad. He said, 'Why would you do


felt comfortable on the mound and
felt good about the way he threw the
ball.
Price was not injured when he in-
stinctively reached for leadoff batter
Marwin Gonzalez's grounder back to
the mound. Shortstop Ben Zobrist
fielded the ball and threw to first for
the out.
"It didn't hurt. I'm fine," Price
said.
Yeah, but it wasn't an ideal way to
begin a spring training outing.
"Sure it was," Price said, adding
that the wrist didn't require treat-
ment. "It was an out. That's all that
matters."


three innings.
Santa Fe saw a few great scoring op-
portunities in the third inning as Mary
Helen Friel smacked a triple into cen-
ter field for the Hawks, followed by
two Kacer walks to load the bases
with one out. But a strikeout from
Kacer followed by a pop out to third
base quickly ended the threat.
Dreyer is very happy with what his
team was able to do despite missing
several key starters.
"We did change our strategy a little
bit," Dreyer said. "Frankly, I'm just re-
ally proud of all of them. When you
play a game and have no errors, then
you know you're doing well."
Seven Rivers faces Lakeside Chris-
tian at 5 p.m. Thursday at Bicenten-
nial Park.


that?' So I told him, 'Hey, if I win this
week, I'll buy it.' Webb said he'd do it
and Rickie said he'd do it, too. And
then we totally forgot about it."
Tesori was thrilled for Watson when
the Masters ended that night and so
was his wife.
"She said I should send him a text,"
Tesori said. "I said, no, I don't want to
do that. He's not going to remember,
and I would never even bring it up.
I'm rooting for Bubba because he's a
friend of mine."
The next morning, he received a di-
rect message on Twitter from Scott,
who was with Watson during the
hours after his Masters win. He told
him about Watson's reaction that Sun-
day night when he remembered the
ring.
"The look on Bubba's face was
about the same look as Paul's face
when she saw the tree," Scott said.


Associated Press
Bubba Watson has the green jacket put on him after winning the 2012 Masters
golf tournament in Augusta, Ga. There's one palm tree at Augusta National, and
it takes on new meaning for Watson.


TENNIS
Continued from Page B1

352-563-5859 or Candacecharles@
tampabay.rr.com.
Citrus Area Senior Ladies
3.0/3.5 Tuesday League
The results for Feb. 19: Pine Ridge
Mustangs def. Riverhaven Ospreys, 3-
2; Meadowcrest Racquettes def. Cit-
rus Hills, 3-2; Sugarmill Woods def.
Crystal River, 3-2.
To play in this league, a player must
be at least 50 years of age or older,
with a 3.0/3.5 rating. The league is al-
ways looking for players to sub for
teams.
For information, email chairwoman
Lucy Murphy at wjlrmurphy@embar-
qmail.com or 527-4239.
Thursday Morning Citrus
Area Doubles League
The results for Feb. 21: Skyview def
Skyview Aces, 5-4; The Bratz def. Pine
Ridge Mavericks, 7-4; Skyview Advan-
tage def. Sugarmill Woods, 7-5; Pine
Ridge Fillies def. Bicentennial Babes,
6-2.
For information, contact chair-
woman Diane Halloran at 352-527-
7763 or tdhfla@tampabayrr.com
Ladies on the Court
The results for Feb. 21: Barbara and
Mary, Marta and Dot.
Ladies on The Court play at 8:30
a.m. Thursday at Le Grone Park
courts in Crystal River. Bring a new
can of balls and 50 cents. Two out of
three tiebreak sets are played.
For information, contact Barbara
Shook at dshook@tampabayrr.com or
352-795-0872.
The Friday Senior Ladies
Doubles 3.0-3.5 League
The results for Feb. 22: Riverhaven
Eagles def. Citrus Hills Hot Shots, 4-1;
Pine Ridge Mustangs def. Bicenten-
nial Flyers, 4-0; Sugarmill Woods def.
Meadowcrest Aces, 3-2.
All players must be at least 50 years


of age or older with a 3.0 3.5 rating.
Players cannot be both a member of a
team and a sub.
For information, email chairwoman
Sue Doherty at suedoherty
@prodigynet.
USTA Leagues
3.5 Adult 55+ Women: Skyview def
Fort King, 3-0. Record 6-0. Jacqueline
Bennett/April Manley, 7-5, 7-6; Marti
Little /Nelva Polich, 6-1, 6-0; Anne
Finnin /Ann Sulinski, 6-3, 6-4.
7.0 Adult 65+ Women: Bicentennial
Park def. Skyview, 2-1. Record 1-3.
Anne Finnin/Myrt Thomas won, 6-2,
6-3; Marciel Marcus/Joan Roberts lost,
7-6, 4-6, 1-0; Hermie Thadhani/Gail
Sansom won, 6-1,7-5.
Skyview record 0-4.
For information in our District 4
(south) call or e-mail Leigh Chak at
352-572-7157 or vacocala@gmail.com
or ustaflorida.com.
Tournaments
March 2 and 3: 2nd Annual Spring
Classic at Crystal River High School.
This tournament is the only one to
offer singles, in A, B and C divisions
for Men and Women as well as Men's,
Women's, and Mixed doubles divi-
sions in A, B and C.
Entry fee will be $20 per person for
a single event, and just an extra $10
donation for a second event. Donation
can also be in the form of non perish-
able foods and/or gently used clothing.
Proceeds from this tournament will
go toward youth missions for Inver-
ness First United Methodist Youth and
Children's Ministry
Each participant will be guaranteed
two matches, a thank you gift and
prizes will be awarded to division
champions. The organizers would like
to stress the point that, as usual, they
will adjust the schedule any way pos-
sible to allow you to participate if you
have other commitments, tennis or
otherwise.
Tournament Directors: Cindy
Reynolds, AJ Glenn at 697-3089 or aj-
glenn03@gmail.com; Sally deMontfort
at 795- 9693 or deMont@embarq-
mail.com; Eric van den Hoogen at
(352) 382-3138 or hoera@juno.com.


SCOREBOARD





WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013 B5


Streak snapped


Magic break

out offunk

with triumph

Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA -
Arron Afflalo and Tobias
Harris scored 16 points
apiece, and the Orlando
Magic snapped a 10-game
road losing streak with a
98-84 victory over the
Philadelphia 76ers on
Tuesday night.
Andrew Nicholson con-
tributed 13 and Nikola
Vucevic had 12 points and
19 rebounds for the Magic
(16-41), who hadn't won on
the road since Jan. 12
against the Los Angeles
Clippers.
E'Twaun Moore had 12
points and a career-high
10 assists, while Maurice
Harkless had 10 points for
the Magic.
The Magic won for just
the seventh time all sea-
son on the road while also
snapping a five-game skid
overall.
The Sixers lost their
sixth straight game, their
longest streak in nearly
three years.
Heat 141,
Kings 129, 20T
MIAMI LeBron James
had 40 points and 16 assists,
Dwyane Wade scored 39
and the Miami Heat pushed
their winning streak to 12
games by outlasting the
Sacramento Kings 141-129
in double overtime.
Ray Allen added 21, Chris
Bosh finished with 15 and
Chris Andersen had 10 for
the Heat, who remained six
games clear of second-place
Indiana in the Eastern Con-
ference standings.
Miami's 12-game winning
streak is the longest in the
NBA and matches the second-
longest in franchise history.
Marcus Thornton scored 36
points for Sacramento, the
most by any reserve in the
NBA this season. DeMarcus
Cousins finished with 24 points
and 15 rebounds, Tyreke
Evans added 26 points, John
Salmons 15 and Isaiah
Thomas 14 for the Kings.
Pacers 108,
Warriors 97
INDIANAPOLIS David
West had 28 points and
seven rebounds, and the In-
diana Pacers overcome the
ejection of Roy Hibbert fol-
lowing a fourth-quarter scuffle
to beat the Golden State
Warriors 108-97.


Associated Press
Orlando Magic forward Tobias Harris throws down a left-handed dunk as the
Philadelphia 76ers' Dorell Wright defends in the second half Tuesday in Philadelphia.


West also was called for a
technical foul, along with the
Warriors' David Lee, Stephen
Curry and Klay Thompson, for
the altercation that began with
6:10 remaining in the game.
George Hill had 23 points
and seven assists, and Paul
George had 21 points and
11 rebounds for the Pacers
(36-21), who have won five
straight.
Curry scored a season-
high 38 points and Thomp-
son had 13 for the Warriors
(33-24), who had a three-
game winning streak
snapped.
Cavaliers 101,
Bulls 98
CHICAGO Dion Waiters
scored 25 points to help
make up for the absence of
Kyrie Irving, and the Cleve-
land Cavaliers snapped an
11-game losing streak
against the Chicago Bulls
with a 101-98 victory.
While Irving rested a sore
right knee in street clothes on
the sideline, Waiters con-
verted a fadeaway jumper
and a layup before Tyler
Zeller drove along the base-
line for a layup that helped
Cleveland open an 87-78
lead with 7:33 left in the
game.


The Bulls were down two
when they got the ball back
with 37 seconds left, but Luol
Deng missed a long jumper.
Shaun Livingston, starting
in place of Irving, finished
with 15 points as improving
Cleveland held on for its third
win in the last four games,
bouncing back from a difficult
109-105 loss at Miami on
Sunday.
Nets 101,
Hornets 97
NEW ORLEANS Deron
Williams scored 33 points,
Brook Lopez added 20 while
playing against his twin
brother, Robin, and the
Brooklyn Nets snapped a
two-game skid with a 101-97
victory over the New Orleans
Hornets.
Williams did not score for
much of the second half, but
drained a timely 3-pointer
with 1:24 left, then added a
fadeaway jumper, followed by
six free throws in the final
18.7 seconds to seal it.
Keith Bogans added 12
points for Brooklyn, hitting all
four of his shots, including
three 3-pointers in the fourth
quarter, when New Orleans
nearly erased a deficit that
had been as large as 22
points in the second quarter.


Greivis Vasquez scored 20
and Robin Lopez 14 for New
Orleans, which has lost four
of five.
Bucks 95,
Mavericks 90
DALLAS Monta Ellis
scored 22 points, and the Mil-
waukee Bucks spoiled Dirk
Nowitzki's first game in nearly
10 years with at least 20
points and 20 rebounds with
a 95-90 victory against the
Dallas Mavericks.
Ellis twice put the Bucks
ahead in the final 2 min-
utes, the last time on a
jumper for a 92-90 lead with
1:03 remaining.
Nowitzki had 21 points and
20 rebounds for the Maver-
icks, who had two chances
after Ellis' go-ahead basket.
Vince Carter missed a 3-
pointer and Darren Collison's
wild shot on a drive wasn't
close.
Nowitzki's last 20-20 game
was April 3, 2003, against the
Los Angeles Lakers, when he
had 25 points and 22 boards.
J.J. Redick, playing his
second game in Dallas in six
days but in a different uniform
after he was traded from Or-
lando to Milwaukee, had 14
points and Mike Dunleavy
added 13.


Sabres avoid


Lightning strike


Associated Press

TAMPA Tyler Myers
scored a go-ahead goal
early in third period, help-
ing Ron Rolston win for
the first time as the Buf-
falo's interim coach, in the
Sabres' 2-1 victory over the
Tampa Bay Lightning on
Tuesday night
Myers made it 2-1 from
the top of the left circle 52
second into the third after
a Tampa Bay turnover.
Rolston replaced long-
time Buffalo coach Lindy
Ruff on Feb. 20.
Ryan Miller made 30
saves and improved to 19-
7-0 against the Lightning.
The Sabres also got a goal
from Cody Hodgson,
while Thomas Vanek had
two assists.
Bruins 4,
Islanders 1
UNIONDALE, N.Y. Brad
Marchand scored the goal-
ahead in the second period
and the Bruins continued their
dominance of the Islanders
with a 4-1 victory Boston's
16th win in its last 20 games
against New York.
Adam McQuaid, David Kre-
jci and Greg Campbell also
scored for the Bruins (12-2-2),
who won their fourth straight to
bolster their best start since the
1976-77 season. All four victo-
ries have come on the road,
where the Bruins are 8-1-1.
Jets 4, Rangers 3
NEW YORK Olli Jokinen
scored twice and Evander
Kane had a goal and assist in
the second period for the
surging Winnipeg Jets, who
completed a dominant road
trip with a 4-3 victory over the
injury-riddled and slumping
New York Rangers.
After a scoreless first pe-
riod, Jokinen broke the dead-
lock 5:55 into the second off
an assist from Kane, who
then gave Winnipeg a 2-0
lead 1:07 later with his eighth


goal of the season. Anthony
Peluso also had two assists in
the period.
Panthers 6,
Penguins 4
SUNRISE Tomas
Kopecky recorded his first ca-
reer hat trick and Tomas Fleis-
chmann netted the go-ahead
score for his 100th career
goal, lifting the Florida Pan-
thers to a 6-4 win over the
Pittsburgh Penguins.
Brian Campbell and Marcel
Goc also scored goals and
Fleischmann also had two as-
sists for the Panthers. Scott
Clemmensen stopped all 15
shots he faced in the third after
replacing Jose Theodore dur-
ing the second intermission.
Chris Kunitz, Dustin Jeffrey,
Paul Martin, and James Neal
scored for the Penguins. Mark
Andre-Fleury made 12 saves
for Pittsburgh and Sidney
Crosby had two assists.
Stars 5,
Blue Jackets 4
COLUMBUS, Ohio Loui
Eriksson fought off two de-
fenders to get his stick on a
rebound and jammed it in
3:03 into overtime to give the
Dallas Stars a 5-4 victory over
the Columbus Blue Jackets.
Eriksson was being held
back by a pair of Blue Jackets
but reached for the puck as
he was falling and whipped it
past goalie Sergei Bobrovsky
for the winner.
Capitals 3,
Hurricanes 0
WASHINGTON -The
Washington Capitals shut
down former teammate
Alexander Semin, scored a
goal with a one-of-a-kind
combo and put together a
second consecutive impres-
sive performance, beating the
Carolina Hurricanes 3-0 in
their quest to make a quick
last-to-first move in the
Southeast Division.


l. l i-
A .g<


F-4u
y4


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning right wing Martin St. Louis gets
tripped by Buffalo Sabres defenseman Tyler Myers during
the second period Tuesday in Tampa.


Gophers down No. 1 IU No. 2 Irish rally to


Ranked teams

falter Tuesday

night on road

Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS Trevor
Mbakwe had 21 points and 12
rebounds to help Minnesota
take down No. 1 Indiana 77-73
on Tuesday night, the seventh
time the top-ranked team in
The Associated Press' poll has
lost this season.
Andre Hollins added 16 points
for the Gophers (19-9, 7-8 Big
Ten), who outrebounded Cody
Zeller and the Hoosiers 44-30
and solidified their slipping
NCAA tournament case.
Zeller was held to nine points
with four turnovers for the
Hoosiers (24-4, 12-3), who have
held the No. 1 ranking for 10 of
17 polls this season including
the last four. Victor Oladipo
scored 16 points and Jordan
Hulls had 14 of his 17 before
halftime.
Mbakwe, a sixth-year senior,
posted his conference-leading
seventh double-double for Min-
nesota, which had 23 offensive
rebounds.
Xavier 64,
No. 19 Memphis 62
CINCINNATI Brad Redford hit
a long 3-pointer that put Xavier back
ahead after wasting a 13-point lead
and the Musketeers ended Mem-
phis' 18-game winning streak.
Xavier (16-11) made good on its
second straight chance to beat a
ranked team at home. The Muske-
teers blew a 17-point lead before los-


Associated Press
Minnesota's Trevor Mbakwe pulls down a rebound in front of Indi-
ana's Christian Watford during the second half Tuesday in Min-
neapolis. Minnesota won 77-73.


ing to then-No. 24 VCU on Saturday.
The Tigers (24-4), who were out-
rebounded 45-36, scored only 20
points in the first half. Their winning
streak was tied with Akron for
longest in the nation.
Memphis was the only Division I
school that hadn't lost a road game
this season. The Tigers had won 11
straight on the road overall, the na-
tion's longest active streak.
Travis Taylor had 18 points and
10 rebounds for Xavier, which was
missing point guard Dee Davis, who
was recovering from a head injury
suffered against VCU.
Geron Johnson led Memphis with
14 points, including three 3-pointers
that helped the Tigers overcome the
13-point deficit in the second half.
Central Florida 65,
Ga. Southwestern 50
ORLANDO Kasey Wilson
scored 20 points, knocking down 5


of 7 3-pointers as Central Florida
used a second-half run to beat Di-
vision II's Georgia Southwestern
65-50.
Tristan Spurlock added 13 points,
Isaiah Sykes had 11, and Keith
Clanton's game-high 12 boards
helped UCF (19-9) outrebound
Georgia Southwestern 45-39.
On top 23-16 at halftime, the
Knights started the second half on
a 19-6 run, capped by Wilson's 3-
pointer to go up 42-22 with 16:06
left to play. UCF maintained a dou-
ble-figure lead the rest of the way.
The Knights made 41.2 percent
(14 of 34) their shots in the second
half and led by as many as 23 points.
Georgia Southwestern shot just
16.7 percent (4 of 24) in the first half,
and 27.3 percent (15 of 55) for the
game.
Daryl Davis scored 16 points for
the Hurricanes (12-13), who have
lost three straight games.


Rutgers coach

earns 900th

career victory

Associated Press

SOUTH BEND, Ind. Kayla
McBride scored 25 points and
Skylar Diggins added 24 points
and eight assists as second-
ranked Notre Dame overcame
a 15-point first-half deficit to
beat No. 22 Syracuse 79-68 on
Tuesday night, the 21st straight
victory for the Fighting Irish.
The Irish (26-1, 14-0 Big East)
struggled early, hitting just 2-of-
16 shots to start the game as the
Orange (22-5, 10-4) jumped to a
22-7 lead. But Diggins scored
nine points during a 13-2 run
late in the first half to get the
Irish back into the game and
the Irish took control by open-
ing the second half with a 9-0
run. The Irish cruised from
there as they improved to 26-2
all-time against the Orange.
After shooting just 31 percent
in the first half and being out-
rebounded 32-20, the Irish shot
44 percent in the second half
and had a 26-13 rebounding
edge.
No. 3 Connecticut 76,
Pittsburgh 36
HARTFORD, Conn. Kaleena
Mosqueda-Lewis had 19 points
and 13 rebounds to help Connecti-
cut close out its home schedule
with a rout of Pittsburgh.


Breanna Stewart added 15
points, nine rebounds and four
blocked shots while Stefanie Dol-
son had 14 points for the Huskies
(26-2, 13-1 Big East).
Brianna Kiesel had 11 points to
lead Pittsburgh (9-18, 0-14), which
is just two losses away from its
second consecutive winless sea-
son in the Big East. Asia Logan
added 10 points.
The win was the 28th straight for
the Huskies over Pitt, a team they
haven't lost to in 20 years.
UConn travels to South Florida on
Saturday, before Monday's regular
season finale at No. 2 Notre Dame.
Rutgers 68,
South Florida 56
PISCATAWAY, N.J. C. Vivian
Stringer became the fourth
women's college basketball coach
to reach 900 wins as Rutgers
cruised past South Florida 68-56.
Stringer, a Hall of Famer in her
42nd season as head coach,
reached the milestone thanks to
Erica Wheeler, who scored 24
points to help the Scarlet Knights
(15-12, 6-8 Big East) snap a four-
game losing streak.
Stringer joined Pat Summitt,
Jody Conradt and Sylvia Hatchell.
Mike Krzyzewski, Bob Knight and
Jim Boeheim have done it on the
men's side.
As the game ended, a crowd of
1,304 at the Rutgers Athletic Cen-
ter saluted Stringer with chants of
"900" and "C.V.S." and Scarlet
Knights Athletics Director Tim Per-
netti was among the first to greet
her with a congratulatory banner.


squeeze Orange


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPORTS












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


AP photo/courtesy Leonard Freed/Magnum Photos
Activists take part in The March on Washington on Aug. 28, 1963, in Washington, D.C. The scene is in the film,
"Makers: Women Who Make America," a three-hour PBS documentary about the fight for women's equality. It features prominent
activists including Gloria Steinem and Mario Thomas.




Historic positions


'Makers'shows

women place in US
LYNN ELBER
AP television writer

LOS ANGELES The fight for
women's equality first had to argue it was
a fight worth having.
Apparently, the same goes with giving
the movement recognition: "Makers:
Women Who Make America" is billed by
PBS as an unprecedented account of
women's changing lives and the impact
on U.S. society during the past 50 years.
"People are shocked by the fact it
hasn't already existed. ... It is long over-
due," said Gloria Steinem, the enduring
face and voice of U.S. feminism.
She's among the prominent women fea-
tured in the three-hour documentary nar-
rated by Meryl Streep. Check local PBS
stations for time of airing.
We hear from retired Supreme Court
Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, who re-
counts eagerly following up on job leads
posted at her law school in the early
1950s, only to be told, "Oh, we didn't
mean women. We don't hire women."
Actress-producer Marlo Thomas told
of reading Betty Friedan's "The Femi-
nine Mystique," the 1963 on-switch for
contemporary feminism's so-called sec-
ond wave, and realizing "masses of
women" wanted more from life than
marriage and children.
Other famous voices are heard, but the
documentary's broad reach includes the
struggles of lesser-known women, and its
illustration of how restricted women's
opportunities were at nearly every junc-
ture. Think early "Mad Men," nonfiction
version.
"Movements, as I've ever said, come
from the bottom up, not the top down,
like a tree," Steinem said. "So it was im-
portant to me that this record the women
people don't know and should know."
Among them is Katherine Switzer, who
managed in 1967 to crack the officially
male-only world of distance running.
Her boyfriend intervened when an in-
censed race official tried to physically
oust her, a scene memorably captured by
news photographers and shown in the
documentary
"I started the Boston Marathon as a
girl and I finished the Boston Marathon
as a grown woman," she said in the film.
The Amateur Athletic Union didn't for-
mally accept female participation in its
sanctioned marathons, including Boston,
until 1971.
In the mid-1960s, flight attendants filed
complaints with the then-nascent U.S.
Equal Employment Opportunity Com-
mission over airline age restrictions: A
woman could expect to be automatically
fired at 32 because, as one recalls being
told, that was "too old."
Lorena Weeks, a Georgia phone com-


Birthday Several old but good relationships might
be revived and revitalized in the year ahead. These
wonderful and trustworthy friends again will play con-
structive roles in your affairs, with everyone benefiting.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) There are always
those times when we turn out to be the victor with
something in which we are vulnerable. If you take a
beating in the early rounds today, keep this in mind.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Be as flexible as possi-
ble when trying to iron out the snags in an agreement.
When you allow everything to be on the table during
negotiations, the problems will dissolve.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Stay out of office politics
as much as possible. Chances are nothing will be re-
solved, but the brouhaha it stirs up could unsettle you
and affect your job performance.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Unless you match your ac-


Gloria Steinem, left, and Mario Thomas, are prominent figures in the program
"Makers: Women Who Make America."


pany worker who applied for a higher-
paid job reserved for men, was told by
her boss men are the breadwinners, and
if she got the job, other women would ex-
pect the same chance. She pushed back,
using the courts.
Barbara Bums, seeking higher wages
than she could earn in the waitress and
cashier positions routinely open to
women, fought against sexual harass-
ment as she became one of the first fe-
male coal miners in the United States.
Efficiently (if sometimes too quickly)
condensing the complexities of a devel-
oping movement, "Making" covers the
change from Friedan's relatively re-
strained view of feminism to the more
sweeping agenda of grassroots, youth-
driven "women's liberation."
As Steinem puts it, Friedan wanted to
join society as it existed, while younger
feminists sought to change the world.
Black-and-white film clips show an en-
trenched refusal to accept civil rights
could be violated on the basis on gender
as well as race. Prominent TV journalists,
Harry Reasoner and Eric Sevareid among
them, derided the notion of "women's lib,"
with Reasoner seen giving a mea culpa for
his off-target prediction that ground-
breaking Ms. magazine would quickly fold.
(The magazine turned 40 last year)
The documentary also addresses how
white, middle-class women and working-
class minorities responded differently to
the movement, as well as some activists'
deliberate exclusion of lesbians they
viewed as a threat to feminism's main-
stream acceptance.
Others, such as conservative activist
Phyllis Schlafly, were outsiders by
choice, casting feminism as a dangerous

Today's HOROSCOPE


tivity with the clock, not everything you want to accomplish
will get done. Don't spend too much time on interruptions.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Don't fight for what you
want if you know doing so will have detrimental side
effects. What's good for you might not be equally re-
warding for the others involved.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Even though Lady Luck is
willing to help you out, you might not notice her contri-
bution until late in the game. Make some room for her
to squeeze into the picture.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) When it comes to your fi-
nancial affairs, be careful and prudent by thinking first
and acting second. If you reverse this order, you might
not be able to clean up your mistakes.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) In negotiating a matter of
importance, don't be too hasty and accept what is first
offered. If you aren't getting exactly what you want,


attack on women and traditional family
life. It was personally insulting, as an-
other opponent said in the film, with the
stinging implication "if we had a brain in
our head, we couldn't be happy changing
that baby's diaper."
Last year, as a precursor to the docu-
mentary, PBS and AOL launched
MAKERS.com, an interactive video plat-
form showcasing a growing collection of
women's stories.
Why the generic "Makers" title for the
project and film?
"I think 'Makers' gives you the sense
that this is still a movement This is still
moving forward, and specifically we
didn't put the word 'women' in there be-
cause we wanted it to be inclusive," said
project founder and executive producer
Dyllan McGee, who worked with film-
makers Betsy West and Peter Kunhardt.
Aileen Clarke Hernandez, among the
first members of the EEOC and a founder
and early president of the National Or-
ganization for Women, said the past must
be understood for progress to continue.
"We have not made it. We have not
made it by any way So we have a lot of
work to do, and we need the young peo-
ple to know the history," she told a news
conference.
The battle is only half-won, as Steinem
sees it, with much-debated reproductive
as well as economic rights unsettled. Any
social justice movement takes a century
to become an entrenched part of society,
she said, and this one can be stopped.
"The very same people who used to
say to me, 'This is crazy It's against God,
nature, Freud,' whatever, the same peo-
ple will say, 'Oh, that used to be neces-
sary But it's not anymore."'


you should be able to improve your position.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Something you work re-
ally hard on might not turn out as well as you ex-
pected. Conversely, that to which you devote little
effort could go over like gangbusters.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Try to be tolerant
and forgiving in involvements with your family and
friends. When you overlook their shortcomings, they,
in turn, will overlook yours.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -Although it might not
be easy, a critical objective can be achieved. When
Lady Luck sees you are doing everything you can,
she will lend a helping hand.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You'll have good luck
in fulfilling your expectations and hopes, but not nec-
essarily in the way you expected. Unforeseen devel-
opments will cause you to scrap your original plans.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25
Fantasy 5: 5 21 27 34 35
5-of-5 1 winner $210,018.80
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3-of-5 8,285 $11
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INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
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players should double-check
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with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
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487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Wednesday, Feb. 27,
the 58th day of 2013. There are
307 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Feb. 27,1933, Germany's
parliament building, the Reichstag,
was gutted by fire. Chancellor
Adolf Hitler, blaming the Commu-
nists, used the fire as justification
for suspending civil liberties.
On this date:
In 1801, the District of Columbia
was placed under the jurisdiction
of Congress.
In 1911, inventor Charles F.
Kettering demonstrated his elec-
tric automobile starter in Detroit by
starting a Cadillac's motor with
just the press of a switch, instead
of hand-cranking.
In 1913, author and playwright
Irwin Shaw ("Rich Man, Poor
Man") was born in New York.
In 1922, the Supreme Court, in
Leser v. Garnett, unanimously up-
held the 19th Amendment to the
Constitution, which guaranteed
the right of women to vote.
In 1939, the Supreme Court, in
National Labor Relations Board v.
Fansteel Metallurgical Corp., out-
lawed sit-down strikes.
In 1951, the 22nd Amendment
to the Constitution, limiting a presi-
dent to two terms of office, was
ratified.
In 1960, the U.S. Olympic
hockey team defeated the Soviets,
3-2, at the Winter Games in Squaw
Valley, Calif. (The U.S. team went
on to win the gold medal.)
In 1968, at the conclusion of a
CBS News special report on the
Vietnam War, Walter Cronkite de-
livered a commentary in which he
said the conflict appeared "mired
in stalemate."
In 1973, members of the Ameri-
can Indian Movement occupied
the hamlet of Wounded Knee in
South Dakota, the site of the 1890
massacre of Sioux men, women
and children. (The occupation
lasted until May.)
In 1991, during Operation
Desert Storm, President George
H.W. Bush declared "Kuwait is lib-
erated, Iraq's army is defeated,"
and announced the allies would
suspend combat operations at
midnight, Eastern time.
Ten years ago: Children's tele-
vision host Fred Rogers died in
Pittsburgh at age 74.
Five years ago: Civil rights
leader John Lewis dropped his
support for Democratic presiden-
tial candidate Hillary Rodham
Clinton in favor of Barack Obama.
One year ago: President Barack
Obama urged the nation's gover-
nors at the White House to invest
more state resources in education,
saying a highly skilled workforce
was crucial for the U.S. to remain
competitive with other countries.
Today's Birthdays: Actress
Joanne Woodward is 83. Con-
sumer advocate Ralph Nader is
79. Opera singer Mirella Freni is
78. Actress Debra Monk is 64.
Rock singer-musician Neal Schon
(Journey) is 59. Rock musician
Adrian Smith (Iron Maiden) is 56.
Country singer Johnny Van Zant
(Van Zant) is 53. Basketball Hall-
of-Famer James Worthy is 52.
Actor Adam Baldwin is 51. Actor
Donal Logue is 47. Chelsea Clin-


ton is 33. Singer Josh Groban is
32. Actress Kate Mara is 30.
Thought for Today: "Reason-
ing with a child is fine, if you can
reach the child's reason without
destroying your own." John
Mason Brown, American essayist
(1900-1969).










E DUCATIQONCL

CITRUS Report: High COUNTY CHRONICLE



Report: High school dropouts cost billions


Associated Press
WASHINGTON High school
dropouts are costing some $1.8
billion in lost tax revenue every
year, education advocates said in
a report released Monday
If states were to increase their
graduation rates, state and fed-
eral lawmakers could be plug-
ging their budgets with workers'
taxes instead of furloughing
teachers, closing drivers-license


offices and cutting unemploy-
ment benefits. While advocates
tend to focus on the moral argu-
ment that all children deserve a
quality education, they could
just as easily look at budgets'
bottom lines.
'This has huge economic impli-
cations," said John Bridgeland,
president and CEO of Civic En-
terprises, a public policy group
that helped write the report
That's part of the reason Edu-


cation Secretary Arne Duncan
on Monday introduced a three-
year, $15 million effort to put
AmeriCorps members in 60 of
the nation's worst schools. About
650 AmeriCorps members are
going to try to raise graduation
rates, increase math and read-
ing skills and prepare more stu-
dents for college.
"Turning around our nation's
lowest-performing schools is
challenging work that requires


everyone to play
a part from
teachers, admin-
istrators and
counselors to
business lead-
ers, the philan-
thropic sector
Arne and community
Duncan members," Dun-
educationcan said.
education Increased
secretary. Increased
graduation rates
might be the most lasting way to
turn around struggling budgets.
Some 24 state budgets are


smaller than they were in 2008
and states are still clawing their
way back to pre-recession levels,
according to the National Asso-
ciation of State Budget Officers.
Lawmakers in state capitols
are making tough choices about
whether to raise taxes to keep
classroom lights on or to sell off
state agencies to provide health
care to seniors. Federal officials,
meanwhile, are looking at some
$85 billion in automatic spend-
ing cuts that are set to take hold


Page C2


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
INVERNESS -The job: Put
together a site plan for a new
school on a $29 million budget.
Make sure the plan includes
parking, drainage and a spot
for the building itself.
It's routine stuff for the de-
velopers in Citrus County.
But to Inverness Middle
School sixth-graders Eli
Moore, Kevin Parker and Ger-
ard Banawan, it was like trying
to complete a jigsaw puzzle.
"I think we need a parking
lot," Kevin said. "We need to


Sol Vng problems


ai..


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Inverness Middle School sixth-graders from left, Gerald Banawan, Kevin Parker and Eli Moore work together on their STEM class project.


Students work on building a fictional park.
gether to help students solve are thinking," science teacher
problems, and help teachers Robin Martone said. "We're
learn what kind of help stu- looking for what skills they
dents need.
"We're learning how the kids See Page C3


find a spot for it."
So they and other classmates
in Catherine Densmore's sci-
ence class spent the better part
of 40 minutes trying to decide
what should go where, how
much it costs, whether they
could afford it and whether it
all made sense.
Watching their progress
were teachers with clipboards
- students themselves.
Middle school teachers are
involved with a program from
Florida State University called
STEM Science, Technology,
English and Math. The idea is
to use all four curriculums to-


Social


groups


key to


helping


families
JUSTIN A. HINKLEY
Battle Creek Enquirer
BATTLE CREEK, Mich.
A dozen Burmese tots
and their parents sat in a
circle recently in the club-
house at Brookside Apart-
ments, and Ayesha
Franklin moved from one
child to the next.
"Ba-ba-ba, ba-ba-ba-ba-
ba," she sang in a melodic
key, making eye contact
with the child in front of
her.
Watching from a corner
of the room, Mary Barkley
smiled and said, "The
beauty of this is, music
doesn't need any transla-
tion. And everybody can
participate."
Franklin is an instructor
with the Music Center.
Barkley is project coordi-
nator for Early Childhood
Connections. And the gath-
ering at Brookside was one
of three special play-
groups designed to con-
nect community resources
with families who might
not otherwise have the op-
portunity to enjoy them,
the Battle Creek Enquirer
reported.
In addition to the Music
Center group for Burmese
families, two groups meet
weekly at Binder Park Zoo
for its Knee High Natural-
ist program, including an
afternoon group that fo-
cuses on Hispanic fami-
lies. About half of the
families who attend the
Music Center group live at
Brookside, but Early
Childhood Connections of-
fers taxi service to families
who can't reach the play-
groups on their own,
Barkley said.
The programs combine
Early Childhood Connec-
tion's playgroup model -
at which family coaches
teach parents and kids
how to socialize and use
See Page C8


Feds' loan changes hamper black college enrollment

Gov't tries to align lending with industry standards 3.,


Associated Press
ATLANTA Ariadne Part-
low dreamed of graduating
Spelman College and moving
on to medical school, but in-
stead of studying biology this
semester, she worked at a fast-
food Chinese restaurant
The Jackson, Tenn., native
was among thousands of stu-
dents who unexpectedly either
had to stay at home, transfer to
a less expensive school or find
new money when the U.S. De-
partment of Education quietly
changed how it evaluated the
credit of parents applying for a
federal PLUS loan.
The greater scrutiny af-
fected families and schools
everywhere, but historically
black colleges were hit partic-
ularly hard because so many of
their students come from low-
income families dependent on


PLUS loans. In recent years, as
many as a third of all black col-
lege graduates had used PLUS
loans, a proportion twice as
high as the rate for all schools,
according to one estimate.
"All I've known is school, so
this is weird not being in
school all the time," said Part-
low, who would've been a jun-
ior this year at historically
black Spelman in Atlanta.
Partlow attended Spelman
last spring with the help of a
PLUS loan, but her applica-
tion for the fall was rejected.
The Education Department
said the changes were made as
part of an effort to more closely
align government lending pro-
grams with industry standards
and decrease default rates.
Before the changes, the loan
program looked at whether an
applicant had an adverse
credit history for an account


in the past 90 days. Now the -
program looks for delinquent
accounts during the past five
years. The examination in-
cludes foreclosures, bankrupt-
cies, wage garnishments,
repossessions and tax liens, in
addition to past due payments
on bills such as utilities.
While many colleges wor-
ried about the denials, others
said the changes prevented
lower-income families from
being saddled with debt they
can't afford.
"There are parents getting
these loans that really should-
n't be getting these loans. They
just don't have the money,"
said Rachel Fishman, an edu-
cation policy analyst for the Associated Press
nonpartisan New America Xavier University freshman Triton Brown studies recently in a common area
Foundation think tank in on campus before going to one of his part-time jobs in New Orleans. Brown,
Washington. a Milwaukee native, said his family was counting on a PLUS loan, but his
mother's application was rejected after he had been accepted the previous
See Page 0C3 semester.


Increasing graduation rates could boost economy


STEM program pieces together

a plan for students and teachers





C2 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013


HONORS
Lecanto High School stu-
dents Caroline Brockett and
Christian Wesch, both 17,
have been named the West
Citrus Elks Lodge No. 2693
students of the month for
February.
Caroline Brockett is the
daughter of
Dr. Robert
and Claudia
Brockett of
Lecanto.
S She is a
three-year
member of
Caroline National
Brockett Honor Soci-
ety and
Spanish club. She serves as
a class representative for the
Citrus County International
Baccalaureate Parent
Organization.
Brockett maintains a 4.82
weighted GPA, has been on
the principal's honor roll, was
recognized as a National
Merit Commended Scholar
and named an AP Scholar.
She has been a member of
the girls' volleyball team for
three years.
She established Colors for
CASA, which is designed to
raise money for the local
CASA women's abuse shelter
and to promote awareness
concerning domestic violence.
She also volunteers as an IB
peer tutor.
Brockett's post-secondary



DROPOUT
Continued from Page C1

at the end of the week.
Take Colorado, where
the state cut $4.7 million
from its higher education
budgets between fiscal
years 2012 and 2013, ac-
cording to the budget offi-
cers' annual report.
If 90 percent of students
finished high school, state
and local governments
would have $4.1 million
extra, the education advo-
cates said. The state grad-
uated 74 percent of its
students in 2011.
Or New Jersey, where the
state cut $19.2 million from
its public assistance budget
that includes disaster relief
and mental health services,
the budget officers' said in
their annual report
Had the state gradua-
tion rate been 90 percent,
the cuts could have been
dodged through $19 mil-
lion in added tax revenue
these high school dropouts
would pay in state and
local taxes, according to
the education advocates'
report. Some 83 percent of
New Jersey students grad-
uated on time in 2011.
Or Washington, where the
state cut $17 million from its
primary and secondary ed-
ucation budget, according
to the budget officers.
Had 90 percent of its stu-
dents finished high school
instead of 76 percent in
2011, state and local gov-
ernments could be collect-
ing $14 million more in
taxes, the education advo-
cates said.
Nationally, a 90 percent
graduation rate would
yield $1.8 billion in local,
state and federal taxes
based on $5.3 billion in
higher wages, according to
the Alliance for Excellent
Education.
All told, the group sees a
graduation rate at that
level producing an addi-
tional $6.6 billion in eco-
nomic growth.
The group reached
those tallies by comparing
the annual average earn-
ings of a high school
dropout against those of a
high school graduate in
each state and projecting
over time. The calcula-
tions took into account the
share of students who go
on to college and pro-
jected workers' tax rates
based on training.
None of their projec-
tions took into account
government costs for those


who don't finish high
school, such as law en-
forcement, unemployment
aid or job training.
Other groups that
helped craft parts of the
report included Civic En-
terprises, America's Prom-
ise Alliance and Johns
Hopkins University's
School of Education.
While there's no doubt
students who attain higher
education earn more and
likely pay higher taxes, the
groups' methods for calcu-
lating deserves some
scrutiny


EDUCATION


major will be either literature
or human development. She
is undecided on her college
choice at this time.
Christian Wesch is the son
of Richard and Diane Wesch
of Hernando.
He has been a member of
National
Honor Soci-
ety for two
years. He is
'the recipient
of the John
E. Kirk Avia-
tion Schol-
Christian arship and
Wesch is working
towards his
FAA certification as a private
pilot.
Wesch has a 3.92 weighted
GPA and has been on the
principal's and distinguished
honor. He participates in the
dual enrollment program at
the College of Central Florida
and will have earned 15 col-
lege credits by graduation.
He has been a member of
the Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice Explorer for four years,
rising to the rank of Captain.
He has participated in local
and state Explorer training
seminars on subjects includ-
ing unknown risk traffic stops,
active shooter, domestic dis-
turbance, crime scene, officer
down, first aid and car crash
investigation. He has logged
more than 425 hours with the
Sheriff's Explorer ride-along
program, is a Citizens Acad-

"They tend to take the
numbers that they find
and then extrapolate
them. It's a very simple
way of doing things," said
Henry Levin, the co-
director of the Center
for Benefit-Cost Studies
in Education at
Teacher's College Colum-
bia University.
"You have to be very
careful with these," said
Levin, who studies the
economics of education.
"It's like saying, if my 3-
foot-tall child were 6 feet
tall, my child would be
able to do all sorts of
things. But it doesn't make
any sense to talk that way
because it's not going to
happen right now."
The same can be said for
suddenly increasingly the
graduation rate to 90 per-
cent, he said.


emy graduate, earned first re-
sponder certification from Na-
ture Coast EMS, and was
awarded the Unit Citation of
Excellence by Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy.
Wesch plans to attend the
St. Leo University and major
in criminology.
FUNDRAISERS
Citrus Springs Middle
School is holding its annual
Falcon Family Festival from
4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday,
March 7, at the school.
All proceeds benefit local
families in need.
The ticket price of $2 in-
cludes access to conces-
sions, carnival games and
music by the CSMS band. An
additional $8 wristband in-
cludes unlimited inflatable
rides.
Monetary contributions to
help defray expenses are ap-
preciated. Donated items for a
silent auction can be dropped
off at the front office during
school hours.
For more information, call
Muriel Dufresne at 352-344-
2244 ext. 4411.
The Rotary Club of Sug-
armill Woods and the Rotary
Interact Club of Lecanto High
School have joined together


to support the Box Tops for
Education fundraiser for
Lecanto Primary School. Box
Tops for Education labels can
be found on more than 300
products that families pur-
chase and use on a daily
basis.
There are two drop boxes
- one in the lobby of the
Sugarmill Woods Country
Club and the other in the Mili-
tary Outlet Store on West Cit-
rus Avenue in Crystal River.
For a complete listing of the
products, go to www.Rotary
SMW.com.
The labels can also be
mailed to the Sugarmill
Woods Rotary Club. P.O. Box
8, Homosassa Springs, FL
34447.
SCHOLARSHIPS
AND CONTESTS
The Festival of the Arts
Committee is offering $1,500
scholarships to graduating
seniors from any Citrus
County high school or home-
schooled graduating seniors
who are interested in continu-
ing their education in the vi-
sual arts.
Applications may be ob-
tained from their high school
guidance counselors or call
Jaret at 352-726-0366. Appli-


cations must be returned to
the Festival of the Arts Com-
mittee by April 8.
Citrus 20/20 Inc., in sup-
port of its 'Youth Needs" aspi-
ration, is offering a $500
scholarship for academic
year 2013-14 for college-
bound students who have ful-
filled the requirements for
graduation from an accredited
Citrus County secondary
school.
Scholarship applicants will
be evaluated on their
SAT/ACT score, GPA, antici-
pated major, community in-
volvement, extracurricular
activities and written essay.
Applicants selected as final-
ists will be interviewed and
evaluated by the Citrus 20/20
scholarship committee. Award
of the scholarship is contin-
gent upon verification of the
recipient's enrollment at an in-
stitution of higher learning ac-
credited to confer a
baccalaureate degree by its
office of admissions.
Applicants may obtain the
scholarship application by vis-
iting the Citrus 20/20's web-
site at www.citrus2020.org or
from their high school guid-
ance counselor. Applications
must be received no later
than 5 p.m. March 15. Appli-
cations may be submitted by
email to info.citrus2020@
gmail.com or mailed to Citrus
20/20 Inc., P.O. Box 1141
Lecanto, FL 34460-1141.
For more information, call


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Lace Blue-McLean at 352-
201-0149.
The Citrus County
Shooting Club is offering
scholarship money to stu-
dents graduating from Citrus
County high schools who are
planning on a career in some
form of law enforcement.
Interested students may in-
quire at their school's guid-
ance office. Applications are
available at the club's website
at www.ccsc.us, or by calling
Jim Echlin at 352-746-0806,
or Luis Michaels at 352-746-
2414.
Yankeetown-Inglis
Woman's Club awards schol-
arships each year to deserv-
ing students who attended
Yankeetown School for at
least two years and gradu-
ated, or will graduate, from
Dunnellon High School or
Crystal River High School.
Also eligible are home-
schooled seniors, those at-
tending college and maintain
a 3.0 GPA, and those who
have worked after graduation
but now have concrete plans
for resuming their education.
To be considered for a
scholarship, students are
asked to write a personal
essay and complete a ques-
tionnaire, have a 3.0 GPAor
higher and submit teacher
and counselor recommenda-
tion letters. Those who wish to
apply may obtain an applica-
tion from guidance counselors
See Page C3


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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013 C3


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus Springs Elementary School team, from left:
Dorothy Scott, Mary Ann Vantine, Principal Scott Hebert,
Anne Fleck and Kristen Middlemiss.


Three teams head to


Spell-A-Rama finals


Special to the Chronicle

Three teams of Citrus
County elementary school
teachers have earned
their way into the finals of
the Central Citrus Rotary
2013 Citrus Spell-A-Rama
planned for late April or
early May
The winners of each of
the preliminary meets
were Crystal River Primary
School, Citrus Springs Ele-
mentary and Floral City El-
ementary School.
Crystal River defeated
Homosassa and Rock
Crusher elementary
schools. Citrus Springs de-
feated Forest Ridge and
Hernando elementary
schools. Floral City de-



CHALK
Continued from Page C2

at Dunnellon or Crystal River
high schools, atA.F. Knotts Li-
brary on 56th Street in Yan-
keetown, or download it from
the Woman's Club website,
www.yiwomansclub.com.
Selection will be made by
members of the Yankeetown-
Inglis Woman's Club Educa-
tion Committee. Completed
applications should be mailed
to: Yankeetown-Inglis
Woman's Club Education
Committee, P.O. Box 298,
Yankeetown, FL 34498, and
must be postmarked no later
than April 5.
For more information, call
352-447-2057, from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Tuesday through
Saturday, or email yiwomans
club@gmail.com.
Disabled American Veter-
ans, Gerald A. Shonk Chapter
70 of Inverness, is offering a
$1,000 scholarship for the 2013
school year. The scholarship is
offered to a disabled veteran,
veteran, survivor of a veteran
or dependent of a veteran.
The recipient shall be en-
rolled in a full-time course of
instruction leading to a degree
program or to a vocational
skill. Selection shall be con-
ducted by the scholarship
committee and will be based
on the applications submitted.
The procedure requires that
applicants write a statement
detailing course of study,
goals and why they are de-
serving of this award. Applica-
tions may be picked up at
guidance department offices
in area high schools, the
Withlacoochee Technical In-
stitute, Central Florida Com-
munity College guidance
offices, or by calling John
Seaman at 352-860-0123.
All applications must be re-
turned to the DAV Chapter at
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, FL 34453 by March 31.
The Hernando-Citrus
County Farm Bureau will
award one or more scholar-
ships up to $1,000. To be eli-
gible for the scholarship,
students must be a senior,
carry at least a 2.5 grade
point average and plan to
major in an agriculture-
related field in college.
Application forms are avail-
able in the guidance offices of
all Hernando and Citrus
County high schools and in
private schools.
All applications must be
postmarked or hand-delivered
to the Farm Bureau office in
Citrus County or in Hernando
County by April 1. For infor-
mation, call 352-796-2526 or
800-282-8317.
The BFF Society is offer-
ing a minimum of two $1,000
scholarships.
The scholarships are avail-
able to all U.S. citizens at-
tending Citrus County schools
or Citrus County residents
seeking a professional career.
Students must have a cu-


feated Pleasant Grove Ele-
mentary and Inverness
Primary schools.
Prior to the competition,
each school collected
sponsorships, which were
given to the Rotary Club of
Central Citrus Charitable
Foundation.
The school received 20
percent of donations col-
lected and Central Citrus
Rotary received 50 percent
of donations collected. The
remaining 30 percent is
given to the winning school.
The schools had the op-
portunity to collect sponsor-
ships to earn lifelines such
as ask a friend, 30 seconds
with a smartphone to look
up the word and passing the
word to another team.


mulative GPA of 3.0 or above.
Applicants may be subject to
an interview. The scholarship
must be used to attend an ac-
credited college, junior col-
lege or professional school.
Applicants may be graduating
high school seniors or adult
students seeking to further
their education.
Candidates will be judged on
academic achievement and fi-
nancial need. Scholarships will
be awarded for the 2012-13
school year and are to be used
for tuition and books only. The
check will be made payable to
the educational institution for
the benefit of the scholarship
recipient. Scholarship winners
will be notified by April. It will be
necessary for the scholarship
winners) to attend the BFF So-
cietyAwards Banquet on May
13 or forfeit the scholarship. If
the monies for the scholarships
are not used as indicated, all
monies will be rescinded to the
founding chapter.
Applications must be post-
marked by March 31. The ap-
plication must be in its entirety
or it will not be considered for
review.
For more information or an
application, contact Dianne
Micklon at 352-527-7442 or
trechuck@tampabay.rr.com.
The Daughters of the
American Revolution are of-
fering scholarships at three
different levels local, state
and national.
The local Fort Cooper
chapter offers a $500 award
for a graduating senior girl
who has at least a 3.0 grade
point average and is accepted
at an accredited college or
university.
The Florida state society
DAR provides $500 scholar-
ships for male or female high
school graduates and post-
graduates with a minimum 3.0
GPA who has been accepted
at an accredited college or
university. Guidelines and ap-
plications are available at Cit-
rus County public and private
high schools.
The national DAR has
many scholarships available
for high school and college
graduates. For information
about them, visit the website
www.dar.org. Click on Schol-


Special to the Chronicle
TOP: The Floral City Elementary School team, from left:
Jennifer Moore, Kari Siderio, Melanie Smith and
Principal Janet Reed. BOTTOM: The Crystal River Primary
School team, from left, seated: teachers Donna Whetzel,
Susan McClelland and Linda Lang. Standing, from left:
Lee Mulder (assistant principal), Beth Stone
(alternate) and Principal Donnie Brown.


arships and follow the
prompts.
For more information, con-
tact Shirley Hartley, DAR
scholarship chairman, at 352-
270-8590 or visit the website
at www.rootsweb.ancestry.
com/-flfccdar/.
The SECO Board of
Trustees has voted to con-
tinue SECO's scholarship pro-
gram for 2013. The board has
authorized an increase in the
scholarship amount from
$2,500 to $3,000 per student
in recognition of the ever in-
creasing cost of higher educa-
tion. Up to 12 high school
seniors from the cooperative's
service territory will receive
assistance to go on to a col-
lege or technical school after
graduation.
To qualify, graduates must
reside in a home being served
by SECO and be enrolled in
an accredited college, univer-
sity or vocational/technical
school by the end of 2013.
Applications are now avail-
able at area high school guid-
ance offices and at any of


SECO's customer service
centers in Marion, Lake, Cit-
rus and Sumter counties.
They must be returned to
SECO no later than
March 29.
The Homosassa Civic
Club is offering the Beri
Hagerty-Phelps Scholar-
ships to graduating high
school students and adults
who live within the boundaries
of the Homosassa Elemen-
tary School District and/or the
Homosassa Special Water
District.
Information and applica-
tions are available through
guidance counselors at Crys-
tal River High School,
Lecanto High School, Withla-
coochee Technical School, or
College of Central Florida.
They are also available at
www.homosassaseafood
festival.org
Applications must be re-
ceived by March 31. For more
information, call 352-
628-9333

See CHALK/Page C8


STEM
Continued from Page C1

need to solve a problem."
Prior to being tasked to
develop a school site
plan, students learned
about rainfall, the effects
of stormwater runoff on
the environment, and
ecological building ideas,
such as a greenhouse roof
system.
They had also learned
pervious pavement does-
n't cause as much runoff
as asphalt. Swales, they
learned, direct water to
drainage areas. And veg-
etative buffers help pre-
vent some pollution from
reaching drainage ponds.
"It's a real filter," Eli
said.
They came up with
their plan, laying out the
pieces and explaining
why they were placed
there.
"We have the main
things we need," Eli said.
"We made our budget,"
Kevin said, adding the
team still had $300,000
left over.
Math teacher Jean Bea-
gan said teachers in the
program meet regularly
with FSU advisers to
compare notes.
They learn by observ-
ing students as they learn.
"I'm listening to the



LOANS
Continued from Page C1

The policy change was
made in October 2011, but
most students and
schools were unaware of
it until this past summer
when their loans were
unexpectedly rejected.
PLUS loans are popular
because they don't have a
limit and can cover tuition,
fees, books as well as room
and board and other ex-


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Inverness Middle School
teacher Cathy Densmore
works with students while
they complete their STEM
projects.
questions they're asking
to see their difficulties,"
Beagan said.
One difficulty for sixth-
graders: calculators. The
site plan project required
students to juggle a half-
dozen large dollar
amounts to make sure the
plan didn't exceed
budget.
"They don't use calcu-
lators in sixth grade,"
Beagan said. "They're not
used to it."
Eli said he appreciated
the exercise, especially
placing drainage ponds
and buffers.
"None of us knew what
any of this was for," he
said. "I thought it was all
decoration. Now when I
see it, it'll make sense."


penses set by a school.
Triton Brown, a Mil-
waukee native who is a
freshman at Xavier Uni-
versity of Louisiana, said
his family was counting
on a PLUS loan. His
mother's application was
rejected after he had
been accepted the previ-
ous semester
Brown is working up to
35 hours a weeks a bus-
boy and has an on-cam-
pus office job to pay off
his tuition all while
taking a full course load.


KUMON MATH & READING CENTERS


K U MO N NtoIe
Early Learning: Remedial: Enrichment:
Your child will have an Your child needs a little Your child needs new
early path to success extra help academic challenges
Call Today 726-9694
3380 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. Inverness


Take Stock in Children f( Citru County nresents........




Take Stockin
Children













k -RIA Sunday March 3, 2013-3:00 P.M.
k Curtis Peterson Auditorium Doors Open
3810 West Educational Path, Lecanto
i... Located in the Lecanto School complex 200PM
C Tickets $10.00 per person

InalIn the hits cf the iCs and V s......
The ne & nly'......Lia & h7m e Saints

Music, Leather Jackets, Poodle Skirts, Silent Auction and More!
For ticket information, please call Pat Lancaster at 352-422-2348
ALL PROCEEDS WILL BE USED TO PURCHASE SCHOLARSHIPS FOR STUDENTS IN CITRUS COUNTY
Take Stock in Children of Citrus County is a program sponsored by the Citrus County Sheriffs Office
MODPEM


WILDLIFE PFRRK

HOMOSASSA

HERITAGE DAY
Saturday. larch 9. 2013
10:00 anii to 4:00 pin
In lit. F/a, i /a R,', II atI Ell/ i. //t.
'III.'M f ./"n \\ IllJhllt /lfI PIL O -
\ "'l 'l IIh I I (' "ll ,IC '.

l [l .C cll, ....1 ..1 .. Ill II ...I .I I R ,., .. .. .
1lC .-Ij C 0r .c c.u ...j, .c II e I C R .-.h R.-m.o


A".,3..c ... c-. m A 11. 1m .


For niore inform.ilion.caill 1352l 628-5445. ext. 1002
* Old Phoio. Ihiin wiiith large paul of hiorical photo.
G(ueIt perakeri% % harelmmoriei' of it' (area'% hiioy.


5 PM. TIL 9 P.M.
Look for the lighted pathways
Get to know your local artists
Artist Demonstrations
Refreshments Free Admission & Parking
1 Olde Mill House Gallery & Cafe Photography,
Painting & Print Museum
2 River Safaris & Safari Cafe-Pottery, Wood,
Glass & Metal Work
3 Glass Garage Stained & Fused Glass,
Jewelry Wildlife Paintings on Wood
4 Pepper Creek Pottery Sculptural
Functional Clay Works & Studio
v 5-Riverworks & Homosassa Smokehouse,
Copper Sculpture & Driftwood Furniture
\ > ^6-.Owl's Pellet Studio-Potography, JV /' -
> 6- Paintings, Local Nautical Art "<' .
All shops owned and operated by local
artists!! For more info call HWIRSRd
(352) 628-5222 or (352) 212-3617 us19


OU.WBL 6 e


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EDUCATION





C4 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013


!The MiniP ?a
Ii ag
Betty Debnam, Founding Editor and Editor at Large g
@ 2013Universal Uclck


from The Mini Page 2013 Universal Uclick
A Sign of Trouble


Giant Fish Disappearing


Giant fish swim through the world's
rivers and lakes. But most of them are
hidden and mysterious. Legends about
creatures such as the Loch* Ness Monster
could have sprung from sightings of
giant fish. The Loch Ness Monster
is a dinosaur-like, and probably
imaginary, animal that many say they
have spotted in a lake in Scotland.
*"Loch" (lok) means "lake."
Folks tell tales of Volkswagen-sized
catfish at the bottom of dams in the
Mississippi River. Some experts think
mermaid sightings may have really
been giant fish.
To learn more about these gigantic
creatures, The Mini Page talked with
the curator of fishes at the Tennessee
Aquarium in Chattanooga, which
recently opened an exhibit on "River
Giants."





photo odt- Msm d-h~toin- Naturei
The 1,100-pound Chinese paddlefish may
be the largest freshwater fish in the world,
at 23 feet long. But scientists fear it is
extinct. No one has seen one since 2003.
Giant dams are separating populations,
making it harder for them to breed.


I ne blue cadLISn swims in i ennessee
waters. It can weigh about 200 pounds
now, but 100 years ago, it was probably
much larger. Writer Mark Twain described
an 800-pound catfish that many believe
was a blue catfish.

Shrinking giants
People have discovered huge fish
weighing hundreds of pounds in
rivers and lakes. Centuries ago, their
ancestors were probably even bigger.
Overfishing and habitat destruction
may be preventing the fish from
growing so large and may be killing
whole species.
Giant freshwater fish may be
disappearing before we have had a
chance to study them.


A sign of health
Some freshwater fish weigh
hundreds of pounds and can be at
least 6 feet long. There are about 20
species of these giant fish left in the
wild.
In order for fish to grow this large,
the rivers and lakes where they live
must be healthy. It takes a lot of food
to feed a fish that will grow to weigh
hundreds of pounds. The fish also
must have the time to grow so huge. If
many fish manage to live long enough
to reach that size, it is a sign that
people are not overfishing the area.
Unfortunately, giant fish are
disappearing from our freshwater,
or bodies of water other than the
sea. This is a sign of more serious
problems.
Freshwater fish of all sizes are in
trouble. More than one-fifth of all
known
freshwater
Fish have
\become
4 I extinct or severely
threatened in recent
years. In North America, freshwater
fish are becoming extinct at nearly
900 times the rate they did before the
1800s, according to fossil records.


Meet Zeb Hogan
Zeb Hogan hosts the National Geographic
Wild TV series "Monster Fish." He is the director
of the Megafishes Project, which studies and
tries to save the world's giant fish.
Zeb grew up in Arizona. When he was a kid,
he went on camping trips with his family to
desert canyons with creeks. This made him
appreciate the importance of water. When he
was in eighth grade, he got a summer volunteer
job at an aquarium in Woods Hole, Mass.
When he was in college, he spent two
summers studying fish on the Colorado River at the bottom of the Grand
Canyon. When he studied fish in Thailand, he saw 10-foot-long Mekong
catfish and was amazed at how huge freshwater fish could grow.
He studied ....... i ..ii. ...... ,ii.. .. He is an assistant research
professor at ti. 'I i..-i .1 !.. '... He enjoys hiking, camping,
traveling and exploring.
fTom The Mini Page 2013 Unirsal Uchck
'- Goldie Goodsport's Report
Supersport: Elizabeth Williams
E Height: 6-3 Hometown: Virginia Beach, Va.
The ball is on a perfect flight toward the rim Suddenly, a big
hand swats it off course. That's what many shooters have happen
when they face Duke University All-American Elizabeth Williams.
The intimidating 6-3 sophomore is a shot-blocking artist who
also leads the highly ranked Blue Devils women in scoring
(15.5 per game) and is second in rebounding (6.5).
A former high school high jumper, Williams blocked 116 shots -
including 12 in one game on the way to winning National Freshman
of the Year honors last season. She blocked 54 in the first 17 games this
season. When not slapping opponents' shots away, she makes her own
shots, knocking in 55.7 percent from the field.
Williams is a winner. She's an honor student, played on three gold-
medal U.S. national teams, and has helped Duke carve an impressive
record so far this season.


from T-h Minage @ 213 Uniral Ucick


Protecting Our Water


Habitat health
The existence of giant fish is a
sign of how healthy their habitat is.
When they vanish, it tells us that
something is wrong in their habitat.
There may be only one problem or a
combination of troubles.
People might be overfishing the
area, wiping out smaller fish that are
food for the giants. Pollution may be
sickening or killing fish. People and
businesses dump sewage and farm or
factory pollutants in rivers.
Dams might have slowed the flow
of the rivers so much that there is
not enough oxygen left in the rivers.
Climate change may be affecting the
makeup of rivers and lakes.
The giant
pangasius
catfish can
grow to more
than 9 feet
long. It lives
in rivers in the
rainforests
of southeast
Asia.


Keeping water safe
Everything we do in our own
backyards affects the whole
environment. All water from our
cities and farms ends up back in the
rivers and then in the oceans.
Recycling, handling waste safely,
keeping chemicals off our lawns
and gardens, conserving water and
protecting our resources are all
things everyone can do to help.
Remember that rivers and lakes
are important not only to fish. We
get our drinking water from the
same water system. River and lake
ecosystems support millions of people
and animals around the world.


Alligator gar have broad
snouts that look like
those of alligators. They
live in waters in the
southeast United States,
but have been found as
far north as Ohio. They
can grow to 12 feet long,
weighing more than 300
pounds.


Changing our habits
As the world's population grows,
there is more demand for fresh
drinking water. The increased use
has threatened fish living in the
waters.
By making good laws and stopping
overfishing, we can protect our rivers
and lakes and still make it possible
for people to feed their families. Fish
farms are one solution.
In some areas, ecotourism is a
growing industry. Sportspeople can
fish and then release the fish back
into the wild after they've caught
them. Tourists pay local people to see
the giant fish and their habitat.


Lake sturgeon
The lake sturgeon is a dinosaur-
like fish swimming in rivers and
lakes in many parts of North
America. A few years ago, it was
almost extinct in parts of the
country, such as Tennessee.
But the Tennessee Aquarium
and conservation groups fought to
stop the extinction. They worked to
increase river flow to what it had
been before dams. This caused the
oxygen levels to rise in the rivers.
Fishers had been catching
sturgeon and throwing them on
riverbanks to die. Now overfishing
has been stopped. Tennessee has put
about 125,000 sturgeon back into
the rivers. Conservationists plan to
double that number.
Experts praise the success in
saving the sturgeon as an example of
how we can turn things around and
save other threatened fish.


Lake sturgeon can grow up to 8 feet long
and can live for 150 years in the wild.
They feed on fish at the bottom of rivers
and lakes.
The Mini Page thanks Thom Demas, curator
of fishes, Tennessee Aquarium, for help
with this issue.
Next week, The Mini Page is about
Newspaper in Education Week.


The arapaima can be 15 feet long and
weigh several hundred pounds. It is a
fierce hunter, sometimes even grabbing
small primates, such as tamarins, from
the shore and gulping them down. It also
eats birds and fish. It swims in South
American rivers.
The arapaima
The arapaima has primitive lungs
as well as gills. It has to surface
about every 20 minutes to breathe
oxygen from the air or it will drown.
In dry seasons, the Amazon River
is much shallower. Without lungs,
the arapaima would not be able to
get enough oxygen from the river.
Its primitive lungs are so ancient
that they are not found in any other
modern fish.


I ne Treshwater whipray can weign more
than half a ton and stretch to 12 feet long.
The two species, in Asia and Australia,
are related to stingrays living in the sea.
Wallago catfish
The wallago catfish has rows and
rows of sharp teeth. Some of its teeth
~ point backward
so they can better
trap their prey.
The sharp teeth
grab onto prey
The wallago swims grab onto prey
in Asian rivers and like a fishhook.
can be 8 feet long.
Look through your newspaper for stories
about rivers, lakes and fish.


The Mini Page Staff
Betty Debnam Founding Editor and Editor at Large Lisa Tarry Managing Editor Lucy Lien Associate Editor Wendy Daley Artist


fom The Mini Page 2013 Unirsl U.C- i
54TM MIGHTY 0 0
G, FUNNY'S AVIIIini 11J(valkr&
All the following jokes have something in common.
Can you guess the common theme or category?
Ricky: Why did the hippo quit using soap
when he took a bath?
Rose: Because it left a ring around
the river!
Rita: What do turtles wear when they're cold?
Ray: People-necked sweaters!

Randy: What is the best way to cook a :
crocodile?
Rudy: In a croc-pot! '- 4' ...,CJ
M 4fO mTheMin.Pa e@2013 Unr.I UdIa
z2XBasset BxOs"1 TRY 'N
Jels Giant Fish FIND
Words that remind us of giant fish are hidden in the block below. Some
words are hidden backward or diagonally. See if you can find: ARAPAIMA,
CATFISH, DAM, ENDANGERED, EXTINCT, FISH, FRESHWATER, GAR,
GIANT, GILL, HABITAT, HUGE, LAKES, POLLUTION, POUNDS, RAY,
RIVERS, SIGN, STURGEON, SWIM, WEIGH, WILD.
F NO E G R U T SW G G G G R
DOYOUHAV S I W T AT I B A H E A G I I
S TO? L I S I YA R SW I M I R L V
A H G H L L S D N U O P G L E
K D U N L D H S I F T A C H R
E K A G N O I T U L L O P V S
S V K M E D E R E G N A D N E
T C N I TX E AM I A P A R A
T N A I GR E T A W H S E R F

from The Mini Page 2013 Unne ,al Uclck

Ready Resources Q9
The Mini Page provides ideas for -
websites, books or other resources that will
help you learn more about this week's topics.
On the Web:
tnaqua.org/RiverGiants.aspx
megafishes.org
bit.ly/WWQsAU
on.natgeo.com/11TZRka
At the library:
"DK Eyewitness Books: Fish" by Steve Parker


The Mini Page

Book of States
The Mini Page's popular series of issues about each state is collected
here in a 156-page softcover book. Conveniently spiral-bound for ease
of use, this invaluable resource contains A-to-Z facts about each state,
along with the District of Columbia. Illustrated with colorful photographs
and art, and complete with updated information, The Mini Page Book of
States will be a favorite in classrooms and homes for years to come.


"" "Montana From A to Z

_-4 s :-

": : : -- -

.... --


*_________________________________________
To order, send $15.99 ($19.99 Canada) plus $5 postage and handling for each copy. Make
check or money order (U.S. funds only) payable to Universal Uclick. Send to The Mini
Page Book of States, Universal Uclick, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood, KS 66206. Or call toll-
free 800-591-2097 or go to www.smartwarehousing.com.
Please send copies of The Mini Page Book of States (Item #0-7407-8549-4) at $20.99 each, total
cost. (Bulk discount information available upon request.)
Name:
Address:
City: State: Zip:
.- - - - - - - - - - -.


(& ^


Min. 2013 U-...InU.ii.

MokleM
SRookie Cookie's Recipe
VVegetable Cheese Frittata*
You'll need:
* 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 tablespoons milk
* 2 cups chopped broccoli 1/2 teaspoon salt
* 1/2 cup chopped green bell pepper 4 ounces reduced-fat cream cheese
* 8 eggs
What to do:
1. Heat olive oil and cook broccoli and green pepper for 4 to 5 minutes.
2. In a medium bowl, whisk eggs, milk and salt.
3. Coat a pie or quiche dish with cooking spray. Spread cooked
vegetables on bottom of dish.
4. Cut cream cheese into 16 squares; place on top of vegetables.
5. Pour "g mivtiir on top. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes until
done. ..
*A frittata is an egg-based dish similar to a quiche or omelet.
You will need an adult's help with this recipe. m.T..Mimni. ..m3numn..udiUi


fromMeet Some G Tia Minnt Fishge 2013 Unial Ucick


Meet Some Giant Fish


EDUCATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Mini Spy...
Mini Spy and her friends are visiting an aquarium and looking
at a giant catfish. See if you can find: exclamation mark
* pencil number 3 book key kite
* letter E teapot ruler peanut
* bandage umbrella needle tooth
* ladder word MINI heart mushroom







Page C5 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Relay car wash
set for Saturday
Life Care Center of Cit-
rus County will host a car
wash fundraiser for Relay
For Life from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday, March 2.
All donations will go to
the Relay For Life effort.
For more information,
call 352-746-0707.
Masons to serve
burgers, brats
Ridge Masonic Lodge
No. 398 will present its an-
nual "Burgers & Brats at
the Blue Lodge" at 2 p.m.
Saturday, March 2, at
5060 S. Memorial Drive,
Homosassa.
Music will be provided by
the Hush 415 Band. Bring
your own lawn chairs for an
afternoon of burgers,
bratwurst and the fixings,
as well as 1950s and '60s
music. This is a family-
friendly event.
A $10 donation is re-
quested to benefit Masonic
charities.
For more information,
call Gunnar Erickson at
352-228-7666.
RSVP now for
free spa night
Free Spa Night exclu-
sively for nurses, case
managers and social work-
ers will be held from 5 to
8 p.m. Tuesday, March 12,
at Superior Residences of
Lecanto Memory Care,
4865 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Lecanto.
Participants can enjoy a
manicure, mini massage,
wine, cheese, door prizes
and more. RSVP before
March 4 to April Zay at
352-746-5483 or azay@
superioralf.com.
Yard sale to
benefit Relay
A yard sale to benefit
Relay For Life will be held
from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Satur-
day, March 2, at 521 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
For more information,
call 352-746-0707.
B.H. civic group
convenes Feb. 28
The next member meet-
ing of the Beverly Hills
Civic Association will be at
7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 28,
in the auditorium of the
Central Ridge Community
Center at 77 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills.
The meeting is open only
to members of the associa-
tion, but anyone can be-
come a member by paying
$5 at the door (annual dues
for 2013). Refreshments
will be served.
Guest speaker is
Chronicle publisher Gerry
Mulligan. He will talk about
Progress Energy Florida,
the proposed medical corri-
dor along County Road
491, fundraising for the
new YMCA on the Olsen
property and the county
budget, including new
taxes we may face. Mulli-
gan will also field questions
from the audience on other
subjects of interest.

Pet SPOTLIGHT


Bear


Special to the Chronicle
Bright-eyed Bear is a
handsome Persian mix,
1 year old, with silky gray
fur. He lives with
Roseann and Michael
Piccione of Inverness.

* Submit information at
event.


Hands-on activities at market NewsNOTES


Special to the Chronicle

The next Beverly Hills
Farmers Market will be
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Fri-
day, March 1, at 77 Civic
Circle. At the most recent
market on Feb. 15, new
produce vendor Jude Hob-
son received rave reviews
from customers about the
low cost of her garden
vegetables.


Scheduled for the regu-
lar "Healthy Living Tour"
are:
10 a.m. Ron Hipner
will talk about the health-
ful benefits of alkaline
water;
10:15 a.m. Sarah
Meyer will talk about soap
nuts;
10:30 a.m. -Jonathan
of Gipetto's Bakery will
discuss the benefits of


cooking with all-natural
ingredients;
10:45 a.m. Jude
Hobson will speak about
healthy produce choices;
11 a.m. Randy Hob-
son will discuss herbs and
edible landscaping;
11:15 a.m. Karen
Esty will speak on essen-
tial oils.
Selected vendors are
providing hands-on activi-


ties and free take-home
gifts for participants.
For more information
about becoming a vendor,
call Bonnie Larsen at the
Beverly Hills Civic Associ-
ation from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Monday through Friday at
352-746-2657.
The Beverly Hills Farm-
ers Market is held the first
and third Fridays of each
month.


'British Accent'


Nature Coast Community Band show coming up March 2, 3


Special to the Chronicle

The Nature Coast Community
Band, under the direction of Cindy
Hazzard, will present two concerts
- "British Accent" at 2:30 p.m.
Saturday, March 2, at the Citrus
Springs Community Center, 1570 W
Citrus Springs Blvd., and at 2:30
p.m. Sunday, March 3, at the Cor-
nerstone Baptist Church, 1100 W
Highland Blvd, Inverness.
British composers have had great
influence on music written for con-
cert bands and these concerts are
dedicated to both British com-
posers and those they have influ-
enced. The program will include
music by Ralph Vaughn Williams,
Percy Grainger, the Beatles, John
Philip Sousa, Richard Saucedo,
Leroy Anderson, Lerner and Lowe,
Robert W Smith and more. Fea-
tured on the program will be clas-
sics in band literature:
"Lincolnshire Posy," "Country Gar-
dens," "Irish Tune" from County
Derry, selections from "My Fair


Lady" and "Along An English narration is presented by Doreen
Countryside." Morgan.
The Nature Coast Community All NCCB concerts are free of ad-
Band is a 75-musician concert band mission charge. The band is finan-
cially supported by NCCB Friends
with donations by individuals and
0 p W businesses who believe Citrus
,* County needs the symphonic expe-
rience. NCCB Friends are acknowl-
SI edged in all programs and at the
-: concerts, and are sent reminders
of upcoming concerts. This concert
season includes 12 concerts in
various locations around Citrus
p County. The NCCB has five CDs
available for $15 each at the
concerts.
NCCB concerts have become
with members traveling from many popular attractions, so it is advised
counties to participate in weekly to arrive early to obtain a parking
rehearsals from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. space and seat. No tickets are nec-
Tuesdays at the First United essary, but the venue fills up
Methodist Church Fellowship Hall quickly and people have to be
on County Road 581 (Pleasant turned away For more information
Grove) in Inverness. All musicians on becoming a band member, a
are volunteers, creating educa- Friend, or to check the concert
tional and enjoyable concerts for schedule, visit the NCCB website at
the community. The informative naturecoastcommunityband.com.


'Navigating the
Healthcare Maze'
"Aging Gracefully: Tips
for Navigating the Health-
care Maze," is the subject
of a free community semi-
nar hosted by HPH
Hospice, Healing People's
Hearts. The seminar will be
from noon to 2 p.m. Friday,
March 8, at St. Timothy's
Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 1071 N. Suncoast
Blvd. (U.S. 19) in Crystal
River.
A panel of local physi-
cians with expertise in vari-
ous chronic illnesses will
discuss how to better man-
age one's health problems;
tap into the health care sys-
tem to get the care one
needs; and suggest com-
munity caregiver resources.
Several health care organi-
zations that offer help to
caregivers will be present to
answer questions following
the program.
A light lunch is provided
to attendees at no charge.
Preregistration is required
by calling Sandi at 800-
486-8784.
Nordic sons to
meet in Spring Hill
The Sons of Norway,
Sun Viking Lodge No. 607
will meet at 6:30 p.m. Fri-
day, March 8, at Holy Cross
Lutheran Church, 6193
Spring Hill Drive, Spring
Hill.
All are welcome at the
St. Patrick's Day Celebra-
tion featuring corned beef
sandwiches, coleslaw, po-
tato salad and cupcakes.
Price is $10 for adults, $4
forages 13 to 16 and free
for children 12 and
younger.
For reservations, call
Clair at 352-596-2171 or
Gail at 727-863-3145 no
later than Tuesday,
March 5.
Join seniors for
some active fun
Are you looking for some
fun? Why not join the Sen-
iors on the Move? Three
coordinators cover most of
Citrus County and provide
a calendar of events every
month, including trips to the
movies, wildlife parks, boat
trips, lunch, theater and
more.
The group is sponsored
by the Senior Foundation of
Citrus County and also
does trips, open to every-
one, not just Seniors on the
Move patrons. Everyone is
welcome at next event to
Tarpon Springs March 9.
Tickets are $45 include bus
ride, a visit to an antique
car show, lunch at a local
Greek restaurant, and free
time at the sponge docks.
Or how about a Day at the
Races a trip to Tampa
Bay Downs Saturday, April
6. Tickets are $48 and in-
clude bus ride, admission
to the race track with re-
served seating, program
and buffet lunch.
To find out how you can
be a part of the group, call
Sue at 352-527-5959.
Learn about the
Nature Coast
Gary D. Ellis, director,
Gulf Archaeology Research
Institute, will present "Ar-
chaeology of the Nature
Coast" at 7 p.m. Tuesday,
March 5, and 3 p.m.
Tuesday, March 19, at
Crystal River Preserve
State Park headquarters
auditorium.
Ellis will discuss archae-
ological research along the
Nature Coast and Citrus
County. The public is in-
vited to atte anand learn
about what makes this
coast one of the most
exciting areas of Florida
archaeology.
For more information,
email Ellis at gari.arch@
gmail.com, or call
352-464-4274.


Special to the Chronicle

Have you been wanting
to try growing vegetables,
fruit or flowers, but are
concerned about having a
brown thumb? UF/IFAS
Citrus County Extension,
in conjunction with United
Way, is offering workshops
to enhance knowledge and
gardening abilities. Three
workshops will be pre-
sented in March to hone
gardening skills.
All are welcome at the


w
P
be


following:
Incredible Edible
Landscape, 10 a.m. Friday,
March 1. Learn about
practical integration of
vegetables, herbs and fruit
plants into a landscape.
Using edibles in landscape
design can enhance a gar-
den by providing a unique
ornamental component
with additional health,
aesthetic and economic
benefits.
Gardening in Small
Spaces Container Grow-


ing, 10 a.m. Friday,
March 8. Many vegetables
lend themselves well to
container gardening. With
some thought, almost any
vegetable can be adapted
to growing in a pot.
Paydirt in Your Yard
- Composting, 10 a.m. Fri-
day, March 15. Turn gar-
den trash into soil
enhancing treasures
through composting. Dis-
cover how simple com-
posting can be and learn
the common mistakes


made and how to correct
them.
To participate in any of
the workshops, preregister
by calling 352-527-5700.
Space is limited and pre-
registration is required. A
$5 registration fee will be
charged for each class.
All workshops will be at
University of Florida/IFAS
Citrus County Extension,
3650 W Sovereign Path,
Suite 1, Lecanto.
For more information,
call 352-527-5700.


Club to stage 'Spring Passion for Fashions'
Special to the Chronicle 2, at Citrus Hills Golf & Country old singer There will be door prize
Club. The show will follow lunch and a silent auction.
The Garden Club of Cyrstal River from 1 to 3 p.m. Tickets are $25; doors will open a
*ill host a fashion show, "Spring Fashion host will be JCPenney 11 a.m.
assion for Fashions," with lunch The show will feature entertain- For more information, call Margi
beginning at noon Saturday, March ment by Marleigh Miller, an 8-year- Harper at 352-795-6790.


least two weeks before the


* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


es

at

e


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.


Black Diamond donation


Special to the Chronicle
The Black Diamond Foundation made a donation recently to Daystar Life Center of Citrus County to facilitate
Daystar's move into its new office building. Due to the ever-increasing needs of those requiring assistance in Citrus
County, Daystar also saw the need to expand. The Black Diamond Foundation set aside $15,000 to make it possi-
ble. Prior to the new office building being ready for occupancy, the foundation released the check, covering most of
the cost. Denise Kennard, executive director for Daystar, said without the generosity of the Black Diamond Foun-
dation, the move could not have been possible. The Black Diamond Foundation recently had its celebration lunch-
eon to applaud reaching $1,000,000 in donations to help the community. Some of the foundation members took a
tour of the Daystar Facility. Pictured, from left, are: Sue Pratt, Bill Joens, Daystar Executive Director Denise
Kennard, Jill Ludowese and Karen Evans.



Get green thumb at gardening classes






C6 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013


WEDNESDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 27, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D1: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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North 02-27-13
4 A 10 7 2
Q 5
J 6 3
SQ 9 6 5
West East
S63 4 K
V 10 9742 VKJ863
+ 94 KQ107
S A 8 7 4 J 3 2
South
4 QJ 9 8 5 4
V A
+ A 8 5 2
K 10
Dealer: East
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
IV
1 t 4 V 4 All pass

Opening lead: V 10


Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

From "Romeo and Juliet," we all know the
line: "that which we call a rose by any other
name would smell as sweet."
At the bridge table, sometimes it pays to take
time to smell the high-card points, which by any
other name would be as important.
How does that apply in today's deal? South is
in four spades. West leads the heart 10 to de-
clarer's ace. How should South continue?
West applied the Law of Total Tricks for his
jump to four hearts. In a competitive auction (or
when you are confident your side does not have
the high-card values for game), bid as high as
your side's combined number of trumps. West
knew about a 10-card fit, so jumped to the 10-
trick level.
South saw four potential losers: one spade,
two diamonds and one club. It looked as though
he needed the spade finesse to work. But since
there were only 17 high-card points missing, de-
clarer took time to learn who held the club ace.
At trick two, he led his club king.
West won with his ace and shifted to the dia-
mond nine, but now South won with his ace and
led the spade queen, tempting West to cover if
he unexpectedly had the king. However, after
West played low, declarer called for dummy's
ace to drop East's king.
If East had not held the spade king, he would
have opened with only 10 high-card points,
which was highly unlikely
When the opponents have been bidding, al-
ways check the high-card points when the
dummy comes down. It will make it easier to
place the missing key cards.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles, I wouldn't start my day without
one letter to each square, Jumble Java. Neither should you!
to form four ordinary words.
SIRBK | '

1 T.,.. r l-. Ser ces, Inc E

LAVUT She seems oh
alway ers tomorrow)


CUREED s 2 I

J BLIM WHEN THE ACTRESS
5ATARTEnD APPEARING
IN COMMERCIALS, SHE
PAYRAL I ECAMEA---
N ow arrangee th circled letters
suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans:
(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles: BLIMP INEPT THORAX PALLET


He wanted to buy the classic drum set, but
someone BEAT HIM TO IT


ACROSS
1 Sweater style
(hyph.)
6 More risky
12 Supernatural
14 Like the forest
15 Not as tight
16 Rose oils
17 "- Jude"
18 Dock denizen
19 Sardonic
21 Numskull
23 Ex-Bruin
Bobby -
26 Golf
instructor
27 Actor Brynner
28 Dirty look
30 Barbecue
tidbit
31 And so on,
briefly
32 Subscription
unit
33 Coral
formation
35 Website suffix
37 Hobby ender


2-27


38 Lead or
copper
39 Winery cask
40 Kiki or Joey
41 Nine-digit ID
42 Bastille Day
season
43 Koppel or
Turner
44 Precious
stone
46 Tallahassee
sch.
48 Commute
destination
51 Except
55 Baltimore bird
56 More verdant
57 Slept noisily
58 Military posts


Answer to Previous Puzzle


DOWN -...'-
5 "Fish Magic"
1 Encyc. book artist
2 Drill sgt. 6 Tower over
3 Environmental 7 Modicum
prefix 8 Natural
4 Like some fabrics
jobs


9 Potato st.
10 Always, to the
bard
11 Hwys.
13 Audition
19 Jots down
20 Droids
22 March family
creator
24 Dwell
25 Got more
out of
26 Stroller
27 Cry out
28 Poster
29 Solar plexus
34 Lassitude
36 Really sorry
42 Fix firmly
43 Oklahoma city
45 Perry's
creator
47 Rebuff
48 Plea at sea
49 Samovar
50 Life story, for
short
52 Codgers'
queries
53 Witness
54 AARP
members


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
* Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


Dear Annie: My daugh-
ter is a drug addict who
is in and out of jail.
Over the past 14 years, we
have taken custody of her four
children. Two of the kids are
great. However, the other two
are the problem.
The oldest girl
just turned 18 and
moved out. This kid
made our lives mis-
erable. She saw
counselors multiple
times and began
cutting herself, and
we finally had to
have her committed
to a hospital. We did
whatever we
thought would
work, but nothing ANN
did. She quit school MAIL
and now lives with
any friend who will
take her in.
Now, one of the other girls is
13 and doing the same thing.
It's as if they lose their minds
once they hit middle school.
Her grades are down, she is
getting into trouble at school,
she cuts classes and has
briefly run away twice.
The other two kids are very
involved with school and
church and are as good as they
can be. But, Annie, we don't
want to handle the 13-year-old
anymore. All of the counsel-
ing, the discipline, the prob-
lems, it's too much. My
stomach is in knots trying to
decide what to do. I am so
tired of kids who think they
know everything but are
dumber than dirt, and all of
the drama they command.
My friends tell me to turn
her over to foster care, but no
one else is going to worry
enough about her. My husband
has had two heart surgeries in


I
L1


the past year, and my blood
pressure is way too high, even
though I take medication.
Should I put her in foster
care? Helpless, Tired
Granny
Dear Helpless: You sound
like a caring, loving
grandmother, but
you are obviously
overwhelmed by
this difficult situa-
tion. You are not
alone. Please con-
tact the AARP
Foundation Grand-
Care Support Loca-
tor at giclocal
support.org for a
list of available
agencies and or-
IE'S ganizations in your
.BOX area that help
grandparents rais-
ing grandchildren.
Some of them offer respite
care, and it sounds like you
could use that kind of
assistance.
Dear Annie: My husband's
son is getting married in July
We have not been asked
whether we would like to in-
vite any of our close friends to
the wedding. I know my hus-
band would like to have his
good friends see his son get
married. Would it be proper to
ask whether we could invite a
few to the wedding? My hus-
band's ex-wife and her hus-
band are inviting all of their
friends and relatives.
I know my husband is hurt. I
have told him to call his son
and just ask. Is this OK? -
Concerned Stepmom
Dear Concerned: Yes. Is
your husband contributing to
the cost of the wedding? If so,
he should have been allotted a
small guest list of his own. If
he is not contributing, he


should offer to pay for the cost
of adding his friends to the
event.
Dear Annie: "Frustrated"
said she felt taken advantage
of by a friend who relies on
her for transportation. You
suggested setting time limits.
As a woman who is disabled
and unable to drive, time gets
away from me when I'm out. I
need to have the visual stimu-
lation every now and then.
"Frustrated's" friend may be
in a similar situation. And the
intellectual stimulus of being
with her friend may help her
mood tremendously, since
being stuck at home can make
a person depressed.
Please ask "Frustrated" to
have patience for her friend.
- Louisville, Ken.
Dear Louisville: Many read-
ers assumed this friend was
disabled, but the writer made
no mention of it. If there is a
disability preventing someone
from driving, of course it
would require additional pa-
tience and time to be accom-
modating. But if the friend
simply doesn't have a license,
she needs to be more consid-
erate of those who make the
effort to transport her.


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie's Mailbox,
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit
www crea tos. com.


ID L SCAARD
HI A OOHDIE
A RE ALOA
ANDEM ATOIPA
RAID D AITA



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G A Y DO G N A T
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ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Yesterdaya
s Answer:


1jvm3a21






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts

MOM AY9 45HE
WANT TO A5H
qOUR BLANKET.






2-27

Pickles

ARE Y o lOOKIlM"
VOR. SOMETHING,
EARFL? r
:al Fr AM.








Sally Forth


OKAYH...ERE,TAKE IT...
YOU MEAN OU
CAN 6IVE IT UP
JU5T LIKE THAT?


ALL I HAVE TO DO K1 SPEND
THE DAY IN BED (ITH AN
ICE-BAG ON MY HEAD!
/C -^


For Better or For Worse


SHoIkER BEFoRE. W-(- MUCPFRIVP
00 HoME' yoO 0 THR-K,CoN
-e COMING. DON'TtHIN









Beetle Bailey


ITJUSTTURNEP HE KNOWS
FROM GREEN TO YOU'RE HERE, .
YELLOW TOREP I'P LEAVE
BEFORE IT
GOES SLACK


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser


YOUR fAN1U ) II FRECA, &UT |
I. DO0' KNOW AW -
FREPA WORo> I
FOR. FO I


I WOULD BE. RAPPY(TO AS\ST ou. "ROW OOY'OU SW FILET t16 ONO
JUST TELL-ETRE TPE OF / I FINFE. CRK7
FOODYOU N E INTSE.5ETD +
IN, At t W LLTELL'(OU a


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Blondie
WE WANT TO HAVE A
CELEBRATION TO HONOP
OUR 5OSS'S RETIRING AFT=rE
20 YEARS WITHOUT TAKING
A DAY OF

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^**'*1^


|20 LONG YEARS... |
20 VERY LONG
S YEARS'


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CAN YOU IMAGINE 20 YEARS OF
HAVING SOMEONE LEANING OVER
VOUR SHOULDER AT WORK?!

20 I'LLTHROWNOONSME



r ,_.' -.


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


2-27 \ / ,,,,-


"Do you want me to help hold
Daddy down so he'll take
his medicine?"


Doonesbury Flashback


600P MORMHI6, THIS 19
JyYFACTS, PRIYATIZINS
THE TRUTH SINCE 2003.
THIS 15AUSTIN, HOW MAY
I He1P WO.PM


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Big Nate

SO IT'S OFFICIAL'
FROM NOW ON, WE'RE
CALLING OURSELVES
Arlo and Janis








Arlo and Janis


YES, I'M TRYING TO TEACH
MY KIO CREATIONISM, SO
I NEEP OME MATERIAl5
TO P5PROYE REVOLUTION.











WHEN PEOPLE SEE US,
THEY'LL SAY "HERE
COMES POW"!'
WAIT, WILL THEY
SAY "HERE COMES
POW" OR "HERE
COME Pow"

A Jih


Y59, MAWAM, I HAVE A COM- 7T'SA FULLY
PLTE PACKA46 FOR P9UAIK- BATH- W LOAPP ARK -
IN16 SOLUTION IN THE HOME. TUB? COMPLETE WITH
IT COMES OITH A PLASTIC PROWNABLE
TACHIN6 MOPE6L FOR 15/ IA PINO'AURS!
/TH59BATHTUB.


IT'S YEAH' O o
THE YOU SAY
WHOLE THE UTAH
SINGULAR JA22. I S
OR PLURAL PLAYING
QUESTION. WELL, OP.
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IN THE NEXT GAME
MO TRUE GUYS
HEY'
FOCUS!

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Betty


Frank & Ernest


Today ysMOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Snitch" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Escape from Planet Earth" (PG) In 3D.
1:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m. No passes.
"Escape from Planet Earth" (PG) 4:45 p.m.
"Safe Haven" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:15 p.m.
"A Good Day to Die Hard" (R) 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Beautiful Creatures" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7p.m.
"Identity Thief" (R) ID required. 1:25 p.m.,
4:25 p.m., 7:25 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Dark Skies" (PG-13) 2 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 8 p.m.
"Snitch" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.


"Escape from Planet Earth" (PG) In 3D.
1:25 p.m., 7:05 p.m. No passes.
"Escape from Planet Earth" (PG) 4:20 p.m.
"Beautiful Creatures" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m.,
4:05 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Safe Haven" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"A Good Day to Die Hard" (R) 1:55 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Side Effects" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Identity Thief" (R) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"Warm Bodies" (PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 4:35 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie I
istings and entertainment information.


WJUF-FM90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: 8 slenba S


"MCJZ HJXWFZ CJD


FWNWX


JF YSDZJKVW. 0


OZ WJDB?


0 IADZ


IADZ TY OZ."


RJXVWW RJZVOF

Previous Solution: "The best scientist is open to experience and begins with ro-
mance the idea that anything is possible." Ray Bradbury
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 2-27


Garfield


Dilbert


RJPW ZCW TOLLOKAVZB YL OZ


COMICS


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013 C7






C8S WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013


GROUPS
Continued from Page Cl


playtime for learning -
with the educational
programs offered by the
Music Center and the
zoo. Those organizations
run their regular pro-
gramming and Early
Childhood Connections
offers family coaches to
help with translation
services and some of the
education they usually
provide.
The Music Center and
zoo programs typically
come at a cost, but PNC
Bank has given scholar-
ships to the families,
Barkley said, and
helped cover transporta-
tion and other costs.
Barkley said she re-
ceived a $10,000 grant,
and the Music Center
also received a grant for
its program.
"This is just a great
collaboration between
agencies," Barkley said.
She said the goal of
the program is to expose
families to community
offerings they might not
know about and to bring
those resources to fami-
lies who couldn't other-
wise afford it.
But the goal is also to
wrap more of the com-


The

community

needs to

embrace their

children.


Mary Barkley
Early Childhood
Connections project
coordinator.

munity into a broad col-
laboration around edu-
cating kids. She said the
group is also in talks
with Kingman Museum
about offering a play-
group there and has
partnered with First
Presbyterian Church for
programming.
"The community
needs to embrace their
children," Barkley
said. "It can't just be
Early Childhood Con-
nections. All of us need
to feel like we have a
part in developing the
whole child."
Early Childhood Con-
nections is seen as an in-
vestment toward the
long-term goal of 100
percent high school
graduation rates for the
city's schools, so Barkley
said the programs are
educational, as well.


At Binder Park Zoo on
a recent Tuesday after-
noon, some kids were
streaming in while those
who'd already arrived
played with a bucket of
faux snow. An indoor
snowball fight was afoot,
before zoo educator
Amanda Bailiff was to
bring out the creature of
the day
Miriam Vilchis, 30,
said her 5-year-old
daughter, Jennitzy Ta-
lavera, had picked up a
lot from the playgroup.
"At home, she takes a
notebook and a pencil
and draws any animals
she sees here," Vilchis
said. "Sometime she re-
members things about
where they live and
where they eat. It's
great. She's learning."
In addition to those bi-
ological facts, the kids
pick up important social
lessons, Bailiff said.
"They're learning
right now," she said.
"They're learning who
they are and what their
likes and dislikes are."
At the Music Center
program, Barkley said
research has linked
music comprehension
with math proficiency
And, "you can see the
future musicians when
they break out those
drums," she said.


Helping Habitat


Special to the Chronicle
The Seven Rivers Christian School senior class left for Tuscaloosa, Ala., on Feb. 22 to work
with Habitat for Humanity, helping families rebuild from the 2011 tornadoes that devastated
the area. The group is staying at Trinity Presbyterian Church in Tuscaloosa until Thursday
and then going skiing at Sugar Mountain in North Carolina. They will return March 2.


CHALK
Continued from Page C3


MISCELLANEOUS

An organizational meet-
ing for the formation of a
Lecanto High school alumni as-
sociation will be 10 a.m. to
noon March 2, in room 155


(near gym) of the school. The
purpose of the organization is
to support LHS. It is open to all
LHS alumni, families and
friends of Lecanto. For more in-
formation, contact Mike Oss-
mann at mikeossmann@
nefcom.net, Ron Allan at 352-
746-2334 or Freddie Bullock at
bullockf@citrus.kl2.fl.us.
Withlacoochee Technical


Institute will have a Career
Expo and Open House from
noon to 2:30 p.m. Thursday,
March 7, at WIT, 1201 W. Main
St., Inverness.
Enter WTI at the eastern en-
trance off of Montgomery Street
(across from the Suncoast Fed-
eral ATM).
For more information, call
352-726-2430, ext. 4326.


Classifieds /


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fx(32563-665 TllFre .(88.82-30 E ai: lssf 6dsc* oice0lie.0 Iwes0e


Tom's Pinochle Club
Looking for some good
players to fill in on
Thursday nights. If
interested please call
352-527-9632.



**K&K Cleaning**
**Good Rates**
Residential, Free Est.
Kevin 352-364-6185
60 ft white wire closet
shelving & misc hdwr,
3ft to 10ft lenghts, $30,
3%HP Lawn Edger.
Needs tune-up. $90
(352) 382-7074
BAVARIAN CHINA
SERVICE FOR 12+
DINNERWARE w/gold
trim. $200 OBO
(352) 746-3327
CANNA BULBS
2 colors, $1 ea.
352-212-5244


Your World


C4~o ae4t


COMPUTER
Dell dimension 3000,
windows XP home,
15" flat screen, key-
board, printer, mouse,
speakers, $125. Com-
puter Desk $35. Both
for $150(352) 382-7074

Exp. Breakfast
Cook

Must cook eggs in a
pan! Apply in person
or call between
2pm to 4pm
Shrimp Landing, Inglis
352-447-5201
FlexSteel Sofa
7/2 ft long,exc.
shape Tweed, $100
352-503-5147

FOR RENT
BARN & PASTURE
Approx. 10 acres
room for 2-4 horses
Lighted, security.
Water furnished
off Citrus Ave/495
(352) 628-0508
FORD
1994 AreoStar XLT
good cond, clean, cold
air, ready to roll
352-637-0441
Golf Cart Rear Seat
and frame $150
Riding lawn mower
attachments,
for JD, wheelhorse,
craftsman $50
(315) 466-2268


HOMOSASSA
Sat. 2 & Sun. 3 8a-?
NO EARLY BIRDS
3510 S. Lee Way
off Rosedale
INVERNESS 55+
1/1 Fully Furnished,
Everything stays, Like
new turn., Washer/Dryer
2 sheds, Flat Scrn. TV's
$7,000. (708) 308-3138
Owner Finance/Lease
Opt. 2/2, 1978, SW MH,
14 x 20 block building,
New Septic, Handy
person, $28,900./Offer
352-422-1916
REFACING
LAMINATOR

Cabinets &
Countertops,Top Pay,
352-503-7188
Swivel Barstools
set of 4, padded seats
$200,Cmplete
Bedroom QueenSet,
SertaPedic Pillowtop,
$200 352-249-3259
TRAILER
Former construction
site trailer, fully
insulated/wired.
28'l/7'h/8'w. Garage
door one end, fr door
other end. $1500 OBO
(352) 603-2761
Triumph
1971, Rebuilt upper end
of motor, runs like new,
reliable vintage bike,
$3,200 352-586-8396


4 chairs w/cushions
and glass top table.
Good Cond. $180
(352) 270-8488



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087



FLOAT PONTOON
no motor, no trailer
needs some work
pis call 859-229-5667
or eve's 352-447-4485
Free Mom, Dad
or also have puppies
Blue Nose Hunting
Dogs, 352-795-0898



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.1OOlb


BlaCK LUUraUUr lOSt
on W Homosassa Tr
close to Rock Crusher
2/20 evening. 8 yrs
old, neutered. Ans to
Clyde, gentle dog
(352) 476-7947
CHIHUAHUA
his name is Bo
weighs approx 7 Ibs. Igt
Tan, lost in vicinity of
Fairview Estates,
missing since Saturday
Reward 352-697-1937
Lost
1 eyed black cat,short
haired, male
Between,
Dixie land/Highland,
Homosassa
352-201-4522
Mens Watch lost in the
vacinity of Bealls and
TJ Maxx in Inverness.
Reward offered (352)
270-8488
MIXED BREED
HOUNDOG, Mostly
Black, little bit of Brown,
35 TO 40 Ibs answers
to Daisy, dragging 4ft
red/white leash
352-270-0812



Small Black and Tan
dog w/ collar. In Dun-
ellon Rainbow Lake
Estates Saturday Even-
ing. (352) 445-9564
Small Dog
in Inverness Area
pls call 352-201-1435
Turn Signal Lens,
orange, from a Harley
Davidson. Found in
Inverness @ Pizza Hut.
(352) 419-6506



AVAILABLE
Pool Supplv Store
W/Service and ReDair!l
Cash Flowing over a
$100,00011 Call Pat
"(813) 230-7177"*


FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb
Delivered 352-795-0077



Adult Student
Looking for pt work
MWF & some Satur-
days can help with
driving,cooking, nanny,
elder assistance,
cleaning, office work
(office software certified)
Call Melissa
352-949-7033 with best
time to call.
Retired Iowa Widower
wants to rent a room
$400pr month. clean
man! 712-790-8470



PRE SCHOOL
TEACHERS NEEDED
Exp req., CDA Pre-
ferred (352) 341-1559



MEDICAL
OFFICE/FRONT
DESK
West Coast Eye Insti-
tute, just off Highland
Blvd, in Inverness.
Looking for a bright
individual, with a smile
and good people skills.
Full or part-time. Fill out
application or leave
resume at the office.
726-6633









Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966




Dental Assistant
Must be proficient in
crown & bridge
temporizing
Dental Hygienist
Call 352-465-3008
or fax resume to
352-465-3009

F/T DENTAL
FRONT DESK
RECEPTIONIST
Dental Exp. a must!!
Great Customer
Service, Telephone
Skills, Professional
ADDearance Up Beat
Multi Task, Team
Player, Good Work
Ethics. FAX Resume
to 352-628-9199 OR
Drop off at office
Ledger Dentistry


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


PIT Activities
Director/
Caregiver

CNA/Caregiver
352-344-5555


RN/LPN
CNA/HHAs

Needed for home
care. Make your own
schedule.
888/783-1133
csi.recruit@cgsi.cc
www.csicaregiver.
com


RN's, PT & OT'S
LPN's, Phsych
Nurse, & ST

CITRUS &
HERNANDO
(352) 794-6097


RNs-Hospice
FT & PT POSITIONS
Hospice is a
not- for-profit
community-based
healthcare organiza-
tion providing innova-
tive, skilled medial
care to patients with
life-limiting illness and
compassionate
support to their
family members.
Weekends, FT & PT,
Night, FT & PT
Evenings, FT & PT
OPEN HOUSE
On-site interviews
will be contacted !
Thursday, Feb 28th,
3pm-7pm
Beverly Hills, FL
34465
Ask about our
Sigh-on-Bonuses!
If you can't make it
to our open house
or would like more
information, please
call our recruiter,
Cynthia at:
800-486-8784 or
apply online at:
www.HPH-Hospice.
org/careers

,Pu.hospice
EOE





AIRLINES ARE
HIRING -
Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid if
qualified Housing
available CALL Aviation
Institute of Maintenance
(866)314-3769


Exp. Breakfast
Cook

Must cook eggs in a
pan! Apply in person
or call between
2pm to 4pm
Shrimp Landing, Inglis
352-447-5201





CHSeONICLE


ADVERTISING
INSIDE SALES
Representative
The Citrus County
Chronicle is now
accepting applications
tor an
Advertising
Inside Sales
Representative.
* Must have mini-
mum of 2 years sales
experience with
proven sales results.
- Must be able to
maintain current
account base as well
as prospecting for
new clients over the
phone.
- Fast paced envi-
ronment that requires
ability to multi task
with ease.
w- Computer profi-
ciency a must.
- Excellent organiza-
tional and customer
service skills.
Fax cover letter and
resume to HR at:
(352)564-2935
or email:
djkamlot@chronicle
online.com
Final applicant must
undergo a drug
screening. EOE

Nick Nicholas
Ford Lincoln
In Crystal River
SALES
Good Benefits,
401 K,
& Medical Plans.
Retail sales exp.
helpful, will train.
We're looking for a
long term relation-
ship. Apply in person
Mon.- Sat. 9-5.
2440 US. 19 Crystal
River, Florida.
Just North Of The
Mall.
Drug Free Workplace



AUTO DETAILERS
& MANAGERS
Homosassa, Brooksville
& Inverness dealers.
Call 727-808-0341


482953167.
935 1 6 7 4 2 8
617824359


879236541
124598736
591372684
268415973
743689215
5 91 372 68 4
2 68 415 97 3
7 4 6 89 21 5


AutoTechnician
Min. 5 years, exp.
with tools
Automotion,
Floral City
352-341-1881


ME

Manufacturer of A/C
grilles, registers and
diffusers is currently
accepting
applications for
experienced
Assembly workers.
Must be able to
read tape measure
and assemble parts
using hand tools,
hands and machin-
ery. Welding
experience a plus.
Apply in Person
(Mon-Fri between
the hours of
8:00 am to 3:00 pm).
Metal Industries,
400 W. Walker Ave.,
Bushnell, F133513.
Excellent benefits
package, 40 1k.
DFW, EOE.

Now Hiring !
Pest Control
Technician

must have valid Dr.
Lic. & good driving
record, self motivated,
punctual, physically
able to do light man-
ual labor. Exp. pref.
Will train the right
person. PIs. Call
352-726-2840

REFACING
LAMINATOR

Cabinets &
Countertops,Top Pay,
352-503-7188

STEEL CUTTER /
WELDER

Inter County Recycling
in Lecanto, Fl. is looking
for an experienced Steel
Cutter, with Welding
Experience also.
Full time, Pays $13.50
per hour. Drug Free
Workplace.
E-mail resumes to
Resumel801@yahoo
.com, No walk-in's or
phone calls

STUCCO
Mechanic Wanted
Crew leader
position
All inquiries
Please call:
(3521 746-5951


APPT. SETTERS
NEEDED
$500. Sign on Bonus.
Great Commission Pay
and weekly bonuses
Call Bob 352-628-3500

FT Auto Detailer

Apply in Person
Must have valid
drivers license. Must
work weekends.DFWP
CITRUS KIA
1850 Hwy 19,
Crystal River


GENERAL
LABORER
F/T, Clean Lic. Drug
Test, GED required
Apply At
8189 S. Florida Ave.,
Floral City. 8AM-3PM


NEWSPAPER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and
other newspapers
for home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per
day.
Must have insured
and reliable
vehicle -
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up
with a cap Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product
Apply in Person
1624 N
Medowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pmr
Newspaper
carriers are
independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle



L------J




CARE GIVER
Dependable for 115 lb
woman. 5p-8p, 6 days
week. Send Resume
whan(a)
tamoabav.rr.com


I rfesonl


EDUCATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED

Train to become a
Medical Office Assistant.
NO EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online train-
ing gets you Job ready
ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294




AVAILABLE
Pool Suooly Store
W/ Service and Repair!
Cash Flowing over a
$100000!! Call Pat
*(813) 230-7177**




Antique Wooded
Tool Box
Loaded with Machinist
tools $400
352-344-1713




700 50's & 60's LP's
Record Player & CD
Recorder $350 for all
352-527-6955



a


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII





DISH WASHER GE
white, Energy Star,
good condition. $100.
352 382 0347
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179

TAPPAN ELECTRIC
DOUBLE
OVEN/RANGE. Ovens
and elements work fine.
$75 OBO. 527 1239

Whirlpool. Electric
Range, self cleaning,
broiler never used 2
large & 2 small heat-
ing elements, unit in
excel. cond. works
perfectly. No dings
$100. (352) 489-4649





DUDLEY'S






3 AUCTIONS

2/26: On Site 9am
Antique Tractors,
Cars, Tools, @
3363 S Fitch Ave
Inverness 34452

2/28: Estate Walk
About- 3pm
Furniture,
Household, Tools
& plenty more.

3/3: Antique &
Collectible 1pm Fur-
niture, Estate Jewels,
Sterling, art, coins
& more
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667





12" CUT OFF WHEELS
5/32x20mm 3 metal
1 masonary
all 4 $35.00
352-586-8657


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179



Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052
HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping Dr.
appts errands etc Hablo
Espanol 813-601-8199
0, Need Help!
Certified CNA avail for
prnv duty in-home Health
Care. (352) 453-7255



JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469


#1 Employment source is


www.chronicleonline.com


14" Abrasive Cut-Off
Saw 408511T
$50
Craftsman 4 drawer
work table, steel top
$75. 352-447-6139
Auto-Repair
Manuals 1981,
1977- 1983
$50.
352-447-6139




SONY
42" FLAT SCREEN
TV $100
(347) 266-9328
YAMAHA RECEIVER
GOOD CONDITION
$85 352-613-0529
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 GOOD
CONDITION $100
352-613-0529




7 Windows 1 Door,
w/ upperslide/ open
window, all bronze in
color $250 obo
(352) 795-9187




40 Sweep States
Computers/ Monitors/
Desks/Chairs/Loader
and Server. Best Offer
(352) 341-2200
COMPUTER
Dell dimension 3000,
windows XP home,
15" flat screen, key-
board, printer, mouse,
speakers, $125. Com-
puter Desk $35. Both
for $150(352) 382-7074
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
Wii
Original Wii with extra
numchuk, 2 games, 2
controllers $95 firm
352-205-7973/220-4483




4' Bush Hog
good condition
352-422-4548

DUDLEY'S
AUCTI'Ow





3 AUCTIONS

2/26: On Site 9am
Antique Tractors,
Cars, Tools, @
3363 S Fitch Ave
Inverness 34452

2/28: Estate Walk
About- 3pm
Furniture,
Household, Tools
& plenty more.

3/3: Antique
& Collectible 1pm
Furniture, Estate
Jewels, Sterling, art,
coins & more
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267AB1667




Wrought Iron Patio Set
4 chairs w/ cushions
and glass top table.
Good Cond. $180
(352) 270-8488




2 Swivel Rockers
Very Good Cond.
Wine Colored
$75.00, Winged
back Chair Bei e
$40.00 (SMW
352-503-7536
8 pc Oak King
Bedroom Suite, 10'
wall & Pier and two
etagere's, dresser, mir-
ror, chest & armoire, pd
$6000, sacrifice $1500
765-748-4334
48" Round Oak
Pedestal Tble $90
& 6 drawer wooden
desk $50
352-726-5159
BroyHill Pecan
Dinning roomset,2 leafs,
rectangle table, 6 high
back chair, china hutch,
exec. cont. $550.00
718-666-6624
China Hutch 2 pc,
2 doors on hutch,
very good condition
$150; (352) 527-0137


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping Dr.
appts errands etc Hablo
Espanol 813-601-8199




COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777


COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
795-0121
Deacon's Bench
Made from Hatch Cover
of 1900 Sailing Vessel,
Originally sold atAber-
crombie & Fitch in NYC
$300 352-746-0100
DINETTE SET 5 pcs
Marble Top table
w/glass insert, 4 floral
padded chairs
3 pc. 7ft Wall Unit
,mirror back w/lights,
shelves, 2 side beveled
doors, 3 Glass top ta-
bles, 1 oval coffee table,
2 round end tables.
$500 for all, pis call
(352) 527-9862

DUDLEY'S
AUCTIOaW






3 AUCTIONS

2/26: On Site 9am
Antique Tractors,
Cars, Tools, @
3363 S Fitch Ave
Inverness 34452

2/28: Estate Walk
About- 3pm
Furniture,
Household, Tools
& plenty more.

3/3: Antique
& Collectible 1pm
Furniture, Estate
Jewels, Sterling, art,
coins & more
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.comr
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Estate Sale
Whole house full of
Furn. and access.
Qu Bed Set $475
Call for appt. to view
352-794-3693
FlexSteel Sofa
7/2 ft long,exc.
shape,Tweed, $100
352-503-5147
FUTON
metal, light oak frame
beige mattress & cover
very good condition
$225, 352-628-2753
Glass
For Table top
1 3x5 1/4' thick
1 48" round1/2 thick
352-422-2164
Leather Couch
Navy Blue, exec. cond.
$175.00, Wht leather
love seat, good condi-
tion $125.00 (SMW)
352-503-7536

LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET, In Origi-
nal Plastic, Never
Used, Org $3000,
sacrifice $975.
CHERRY, BEDROOM
SET Solid Wood, new
in factory boxes Org.
$6000, sacrifice
$1995. Can Deliver.
Bill (813)298-0221.
Maple Rider Rocker
w/footstool, green
cushions $50
352-795-7254
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500
Motorized Recliner
King size,black vinyl
rocker/recliner, 7 mo
old, $400
(352) 489-6341
Ornate Victorian
Bed w/dresser
$450, Oak Bar w/brass
Rails $275, good
cond.352-895-0140
Rocker Chairs
2 Heavy dark wood
rockers $50.00 pair,
Great cond.
352-201-4522
Sleeper Sofa
Navy velour
ottoman and corner
chair good condition
1 round glass coffee
table and 1 sofa table
$550
352-464-2335
STEEL DESK 22X42
top with 5 draws
very solid
needs paint $25.00
352-586-8657
Swivel Barstools
set of 4, padded seats
$200,Cmplete
Bedroom QueenSet,
Serta Pedic Pillowtop,
$200 352-249-3259
TRUNDLE BED
w/ 2 mattress'
$195; double mattress
w/ box spring & frame.
Like new, $175
(352) 586-0493


DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
-k 352422-7279**




DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK
$80 Delivered &
Stacked. 352-344-2696




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
VFAST. 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


TWIN BEDS
Mattresses, Box
Springs and Frames
$75.00 each
352-382-7454
Twin Hide-A-Bed
brown tweed
exc. cond. $100
765-748-4334
X-wide cushioned
wicker chair & foot-
stool, 4 pillows, $125
(352) 425-0667




Roto-Tiller
Troy-Built Pony
rear tine, 5hsp, runs
good $200 firm
352-507-1490




CANNA BULBS
2 colors, $1 ea.
352-212-5244

Staghorn Fern
4 ft diameter
excellent condition
$125.00 firm
(352) 489-6212




HOMOSASSA
Sat. 2 & Sun. 3 8a-?
NO EARLY BIRDS
3510 S. Lee Way
off Rosedale




2 MENS SPORTS
JACKETS SIZE 40R
VARIOUS COLORS
$30ea 352-613-0529
BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING SIZES 5 &
6 SHIRTS, PANTS &
JACKETS $25
352-613-0529
Men's Durango Boots
11'% D & Harley
Davidson Boots 9'/2D
both pairs $150
352-795-7254
MENS SUITS SIZES
34X30 & 36X30, $70
EACH 352-613-0529



****195/70 R14*****
Good tread!! Only ask-
ing $60 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
-~~~235\70 R15-~~~
Good tread!! Only ask-
ing $70 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, hand brakes,
basket, folds, Ex., $50.
352-628-0033
60 ft white wire closet
shelving & misc hdwr,
3ft to 10ft lenghts, $30,
3'/2HP Lawn Edger.
Needs tune-up. $90
(352) 382-7074
20" GIRLS BIKE
glamour girl
silver/blue,basket &
streamers $30.00
352-794-3020/586-4987
BOX OF KIDS BOOKS
large box of books
and misc girls toys
$15.00 for all
352-794-3020/586-4987
Boys Bicycle
Spider man 12"
w/training wheels, good
cond. $30.00
352-613-0529
Chiroprac
INVERSION TABLE
mint cond. $200obo
352-503-7957
Guardian Air Cooled,
Automatic stand by
Generator, by
Generac Pwr. Systems
Inc., This model is a
compact, high perfor-
mance, air cooled,
engine driven genera-
tor designed to auto-
matically supply elec-
trical power to oper-
ate critical loads
during a utility power
failure. This unit is
factory installed, in an
all weather, metal
enclosure, that is in-
tended exclusively for
outdoor installation.
The generator will
operate using either,
propane, or natural
gas, This unit comes
with product registra-
tion card. Generator
installation guidelines
book and installation
and owners manual.
2013 model, list for
3,900 this is a 2008
model w/ no to low
hours, volts 120/240
amp 130/65, W1600
3,600 rmp, suggested
retail value $2,500
Asking $,1,750 obo
(352) 382-1352


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
Affordable Handyman
V*FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
VFAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067




*K&K Cleaning**
"Good Rates-
Residential, Free Est.
Kevin 352-364-6185
Marcia's Best Clean
Experienced Expert
lic+ref, Free Estimates
"call 352-560-7609**
NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate $20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


CLASSIFIED



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077
Garden Tracker,
Wheel Horse, 16hp
Hydrostatic dr, fresh
paint, smokes, $675
OBO. Unique signed
Young Hinkle, wood
desk 1 drawer w/
chair 46x30 $125
(352) 341-5053
GENERATOR
portable, 5550 watts
8550 starting watts
never used $350
352-795-2399
GERBIL CAGE
$20 352-613-0529
Golf Cart Rear Seat
and frame $150
Riding lawn mower
attachments,
for JD, wheel horse,
craftsman $50
(315) 466-2268
HOSPITAL BED motor-
ised $85.00 or b/o
inverness 352 6372499
leaning post with bases,
3 rod holders, clean,
$60.00 obo.
1-352-726-2350
Mattress and boxspring
double bed set $55
860-2475
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Fulls $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125,621-4500
Mossberg 715T,
22 Long Riffle AR look
alike, 25 round clip
almost new $500.
17HMR Taurus
Revolver 8 shot, super
clean, 400 round
$500. For revolver
must have concealed
weapons permit
(352) 563-0328
Scaffold $375 OBO
4 locking wheel 6 ft
352-447-1244
SPREADER
SMALL MANUAL
GOOD CONDITION
$20 352-613-0529
Wacker GP 5600
Commercial
Generator 120/240V
Low Hrs. $600.
(352) 563-0328
Window, truck
GMCrear solid
factory tinted
$50.00
352-628-4210
WINDOWS
Wht vinyl, db sliding,
gas filled, (2) 90 x 58
$50.00 Pr. you remove
352-201-1735
WINE CABINET Wood,
holds 20 bottles of wine
& has one drawer, EUC
off white, $65.00
352-249-7212
WOOD PALLETS Free
(2) 40"X48" wood
pallets.Like new. Call
352 382-2591



2 POWER LIFT
CHAIR RECLINERS
1 Med. size $250.
1 Large $325
Both excel., runs great
(352) 270-8475
SAFETY RAIL
for bathtub
Medline Deluxe
$35.00
352-682-4210
WALKER good
condition
seat/basket
wheels/handbrake
$50.00 352-628-4210



CASIO, ELECTRIC
PIANO/ORGAN
exc. cond. sounds great
comes w/big amplifier,
eve's $200
352-489-4844
EPIPHONE LES PAUL
STUDIO LIMITED EDI-
TION PLAYS &
SOUNDS PERFECT!
$200 OBO
352-601-6625
Forming Country
Band.
(352) 527-1430



BAVARIAN CHINA
SERVICE FOR 12+
DINNERWARE w/gold
trim. $200 OBO
(352) 746-3327
WOLF ENTHUSIAST
wolf comforter, knick
nack,dresser box and
picture $25.00
352-794-3020/586-4987




Bowflex Extreme
$600. obo
or Trade for hand guns
(352) 249-7221


All Tractor & Tree Work
Household, Equipment
& Machinery Moving
(352) 302-6955

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




#1 Professional Leaf
vac system why rake?
w FULL Lawn Service
Free Est 352-344-9273

BEAT ANY PRICE
Paint & Power wash
Lawn & Trees Trim
Jim (352) 246-2585

LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up time.
352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767

ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from Ato Z
352-628-6790


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013 C9


Treadmill Proform XP,
all electronics, includ-
ing power incline,
cost over $800 New
Asking $195.
(352) 464-0316
TREADMILL,
WESLO, Crosswalk
5.0t,like new, $150
Call 561-234-0535



5 HP, Outboard,
by Force, with Tank
$395.
Will take Gun on trade
Also Remmington
7600 30-06 Pump, with
scope as new condition
$495. (906) 285-1696
1911 GOVT/OFFICER
45 Colt Officers slide,
Armscor Precision full
Govt frame, Black w/SS
buttons, VZ grips, ambi
safety, 2xtra grips. Buy-
ers only, must be 21.
first cash takes it !$625
LV MESSAGE.
352-586-4022
CLUB CAR
GOLF CART
Electric w/ charger,
refurbished, new
paint, 4 seater, $2000
(803) 842-3072
CLUB CAR. 2006
w/ Charger, good
tires, almost new bat-
teries, garage kept
$1500 must sell
352-527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
ECLIPSE ELLIPTICAL
space saver exercise
like new, $150
352-422-0311
EZ GO GOLF CART
Electric with charger,
2002,
Very good cond.
$1,500
352-564-2756
FISHING TACKLE
Rods/ Lures/Line
Hooks, Lead Weights
other Misc. Related
Items, $2. and up.
352-257-3288
PAINT BALL GUNS (2)
brass eagle .68 caliber
co2 powered
$45.00
352-794-3020/586-4987
Ruger LCP
new never fired
.380 ACP, light weight
for CWP 1 box of
ammo, $450.00
352-637-0844
Schwinn Bicycle
Ladies Red 26 "
cruiser, Used once.
Asking $95
(352) 341-5053
TRADITIONS
Buckhunter inline
50 Caliber, blk powder
$100.
(352) 447-6139



2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1895
call 352-527-0555 **
TRAILER
Former construction
site trailer, fully
insulated/wired.
28'l/7'h/8'w. Garage
door one end, fr door
other end. $1500 OBO
(352) 603-2761
Utility Trailer
4 x 8 ft, like new,
lots of extra's $500
352-527-3948




Baby stroller
Dark blue deluxe model
$25 860-2475

SelorSwa


I I '



Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
On ly$28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570




30 yrs. Experience!
Int/Ext. Comm/Res.
Lic/Ins. Jimmy
*352-212-9067*
CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
BEAT ANY PRICE
Paint & Power Wash
Lawn & Trees Trim
Jim (352) 246-2585
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300


"I just moved in upstairs."


Thank You for 15 Iears, otf es!tl


CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
Looking to buy
6X12 Enclosed Trlr
(352) 270-9187
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


Natalie Hill

Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"


Specialty: Color,
Foils, Make-overs,
Up-do's, Perms,
Cutting and Styling

Redken Trained


Robbie Ray

Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"

Make-overs,
Color, Foiling,
Precision Cuts,
Avant Garde
hairstyles and
updo's.

Paul Mitchell
Certified.


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.



Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


ANSLEY
Ansley is a very
beautiful and
unique Jack
Russell.Terrie mix.
She is so striking that
she attracts atten-
tion everywhere she
goes. She is 1 y.o.
and weighs 40
pounds. She is very
smart and a quick
learner. Knows basic
commands, is
housebroken, & gets
along with other
dogs. Seems OK
with cats. You
would be blessed to
add her to your
family.
ID # 17387903.
Call Victoria @
352-302-2838.











BLUE
Blue, nicknamed
Boo-Boo, is a 7-8 y.o.
Australian cattle
dog mix, with beau-
tiful blue eyes. He
came to the shelter
because his family
lost their home.
He is neutered
and housebroken,
weighs about 50
pounds and is very
easy to handle.
His goal is to be a
"couch potato".
He is very friendly
and affectionate
and gives lots of
kisses. Blue is actu-
ally the perfect dog
for an older person
or couple who
want a gentle
companion dog.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.









CHONIEidE
,u ,l c s


COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn Re-
moval 352-302-6838



SPRINKLERS & SOD
Complete Check & Ad-
just, Full System $49
(352) 419-2065



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452





SQui rd\\oid first

Need a jil)
m. a

qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


CRONIfiE
Classifieds
b.i. -.i f-f


BUD
Striking! This is how
we describe Bud,
a very beautiful,
sweet, 2-y.o. black
& white American
Bulldog/Terrier mix.
Has beautiful eyes,
one blue & one
brown. Loves peo-
ple & other dogs,
has medium energy
level, settles down
nicely after exercise.
Walks well on a
leash & sits for treats.
Weighs 55 Ibs.
Heartworm-negaive. This
funbving boy
would make a
good family pet.
ID#: 17461796.
Visit or call Citrus
County Animal Shel-
ter @ 352-746-8400.


FUNKIE
If you are looking for
personality plus, look
no further. Funkie is
all that & more. He
gives unconditional
love & devotion,
gets along with
people, loves
children, good
with cats. He is a
2-y.o. neutered
Retriever/Terrier mix,
weighs 55 lbs.
He has beautiful
bronze brindle
markings, a very
cute face & a lovely
curled tail. A bit shy
with new people
but funloving &
warms up quickly &
is playful & friendly.
Must see to appreci-
ate how handsome
& unusual he is.
Would make a
great companion
or family dog.
Call Anne @
352-586-2812.


All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's LAND CLEAR-
ING & TREE SERVICE
Complete tree & stump
removal hauling, demo
& tractor work. 32 yrs.
exp. (352) 220-9819
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827

REAL TREE
SERVICE
(352) 220-7418
"Tax Specials*
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316


Mroi MI.e-mesieo


I et







C10 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013
Ir .


2 Maltese Puppies
Left, 1 female $650.
1 Male $600, CKC reg.
will have Fl. Health
Cert.. Call to come
play with them,
(352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258
CHICKS & DUCKLINGS
Delaware, Buff, Silkie,
Frizzle Chicks $4.50ea
Cayuga, Pekin, Buff
Ducklings $7ea.
all are straight run.
727-517-5337
(Brooksville)
Fish Tanks.
and stands.
352-447-1244
FREE BORDER
COLLIE MIX
2 year old
female, border collie
mix. Free to good
home. Great with
kids and other pets.
Call (352)201-4705


MOXIE
My name is Moxie.
My owner left me.
but I'll never leave
you if you take me
home. You'll never
find a more loyal
companion than
me." Moxie is a 3
y.o. Black Mouth
Cur, weighs 60 lbs.
He is strong, yet
gentle to his
humans. Likes peo-
ple and seems
good with children.
Neutered & house-
broken. He is ath-
letic, so a fenced
yard is recom-
mended. He needs
room to exercise first
and then he settles
down. Look in his
beautiful eyes and
see the love he is
waiting to give his
forever family.
Call Donna @
352-249-7801.










NICKY
Nicky is a beautiful
black lab/bulldog
mix male, a big.
sweet and loveable
guy. He is 2 y.o. and
is very intelligent, will
sit for treats. He
weighs about 75
pounds and is a
very strong dog,
needing a strong
handler. Would be
a good watchdog.
He is a good
hearted dog who
gets along well with
other dogs. As he is
very active, a
fenced yard is
recommended.
Call 352-746-8400


REMY
Remy is a joyous.
active young terrier
mix who was surren-
dered to the shelter
because of neglect.
Weight about
42 pounds. Dark
golden brown brin-
die in color, neu-
tered, heartworm
-negative, appears
housebroken. He is
a delightful, happy
dog, very eager to
learn, and very intel-
ligent. Gets along
with other dogs and
loves his human
friends. Tries very
hard to please. A
fenced yard would
be preferred for
him, as he is very
active. Call Joanne
@ 352-795-1288.
Shih-Tzu Pups, Males
Starting@ $400.
Registered
Lots of colors, Beverly
Hills, FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.ne




FOR RENT
BARN & PASTURE
Approx. 10 acres
room for 2-4 horses
Lighted, security.
Water furnished
off Citrus Ave/495
(352) 628-0508


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIII II II




BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!

HERNANDO
2/2 $450. mo. 1st last
+dep 352-201-2428
OLD HOMOSASSA
2 bedroom. 1-1/2 bath.
$475/mo $400 dep pool
and clubhouse
3526284441


-I.


must sell!
2006 FLEETWOOD
ENTERTAINER. 32X66.
OWNER MUST SELL!
CALL (352) 795-1272
43,900. 3/2,Dblewide.
Delivered & set up.
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr. only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P& W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807
2/1, DW, H/A, 12 x20
glass porch Co. water
& sewer, paved rd.
No HOA $49,995 firm
$15,000 down, own fi-
nan. (352) 567-2031

v THIS OUT!
2br 2ba Single Wide
12years YOUNG
14X66. Trade in.
WILL GO FAST!
$14,900 YOUR BABY
$19,900 Incls Delv,
Set, New AIC, skirt &
steps, Must See!
NO HIDDEN FEES.
CALL (352) 795-1272

BIG
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Hnder $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183
Homosassa
Dbl. Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$69,900 (352) 621-0192
INVERNESS
2b/2% ba, V2 acre
off Turner Camp Rd
a/c, heat pump 3yrs.
old, 30ft scn porch &
48'open porch on other
side, new septic, 18'x31'
building w/ 220 electric,
shed, fenced, on canal
$68,000 352-726-1791
INVERNESS
55+ Park 14 x 58,
2/1/2, furniture,
appliances, shed,
scrn. porch, $8,500.
(352) 419-5133

NEW 312
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181

New Palm Harbor
Homes Mobile Condo
$39,000. Delivered to
your site $0 down
financing. John
Lyons 800-622-2832
ext 210


I Livesto


WORDY GURDY BY TRICKY RIC I(KANE
1. Give an A or F to a hotel worker (1) Every answer is a rhyming
n pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. More bad than bad hospital worker (1) theywill fit in the letter
I_ squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Excluded a bank security worker (1) syllables in each word.
2013UFS Dist byUniv UclickforUFS
4. Less prompt restaurant worker (2)


5. More low-spirited sink pipe worker (2)


ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE
INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great
Loc., clean & roomy.
no pets $500.mo 1st. &
Last $300. Sec.
352-341-1847
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/613-6000



CRYSTAL RIVER
LG 2/1 water, sewer,
garbage, w/d hkup,
lawn inc. $475 mo.
(352) 212-9205
or 352-212-7922



CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy 19 Downtown
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000 SF, exc. loc.
$795/mo 352-634-2528



HERNANDO
4 BR, 2 BA. Playroom &
office, fenc. yard, on
over 2AC, or Comm.
Office on Hwy 200
$875 + Sec. 344-3084
HERNANDO
APROX. 1100 SQ FT
OFFICE ON OVER 1/2
ACRE ON HWY 200
$625 mo.352-344-3084


[.II 'i L l i I-
Y, l II v I IISt.I




Classifieds


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


CLASSIFIED



LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza,
Office/Retail, CR 486,
900 sf. @ $700+ util. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801




INVERNESS
Whispering Pines Villa
3/2/2 w/ enclosed patio,
$850 F/L/S, BK/CK req
321-303-0346




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 Sm house incl.
electric. $475 per mo.
1st/last/sec. References
352-628-1062




BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, Fl. rm., CHA, $495
35 Golden St 464-2701
BEVERLY HILLS
Huge House 3/2/2,
$800. 352-464-2514
Beverly Hills Rental
1/1 with carport, $500
monthly and $500 Se-
curity deposit.
352-249-6098
BLACK DIAMOND
Homes for rent from
$1,100/mo. Bob
Coldwell Banker
634-4286
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
Water Incl. CHA $496.
220-2447 or 212-2051
Crystal River North
Lease w/ opt. country
setting 2/1, on /2AC,
$550/ mo, $300 dep
Firm (352)795-0161


DUNNELLON
Rainbow Springs
Rent/Rent To own
Georgous, 2/2/2
Country Club Home
Fireplace D Washer
Carpeted, lanai.
spotless 1/2 acre
quiet. Special $799.
352-527-0493

HERNANDO
4 BR, 2 BA. Playroom &
office, fenc. yard, on
over 1/AC, or Comm.
Office on Hwy 200
$875 + Sec. 344-3084

Hernando
Rentals
from $425.00 (a MO.
Call A.W.
'Skip' Craven
352-464-1515

INVERNESS
Country Living on
Large '/ acre lot. 3 bd.,
2 ba. home. Garden
and fenced areas. Well
& septic, so no water
bill! $595. 352-476-4964
Sugarmill Woods
2/2/2, 2 MB Rrms
$850. 352-302-4057
Sugarmill Woods
2006,4/2/2, appl. inc.
$900, 319-371-9843
SUGARMILL
WOODS 4/2/2
1/3ac. $1100. mo.
727-919-0797




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225




INVERNESS
Rm. for Rent, furn.
Share large DW, Util.
incl'd, $325+ $100
sec. 352-726-0652


CRYSTAL RIVER
Office & Warehouse
$300-$600, Plantation
Rentals 352-634-0129




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


20 DOCKABLE
ACRES: St. Lucie
Waterway. $189,500.
45mins boat Atlantic;
5mins boat Lake
Okeechobee.
Beautiful land,
abundant wildlife.
Gated/Privacy.
888-716-2259 Gulf
Atlantic Land, Broker.


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


For Sale Btrt
FLORAL CITY
Exceptionally Nice
3/2 on Beautiful 1% AC,
treed lot, garage, shed,
dock, Ideal for Fishing/
Airboats $95,900
716-523-8730




2BR/12BA, MH &
Land Needs little Work
$17,500 9340 W.Tonto
Dr., Crystal River
Call 352-382-1544 or
813-789-7431
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Considering
ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498
HERNANDO/486, Lg.
Wkshop 2/1/den SW,
w/AC,1+acre, $43,500,
Cridland Real Estate
JDesha(352)634-6340

HOME-ON-LAND
Only $59,900, 3/2
"like new" on % acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,350
dwon, $319.22/mo
P&l, W.A.C. Owner
can finance. Call
352-621-9182
Owner Finance/Lease
Opt. 2/2, 1978, SW MH,
14 x 20 block building,
New Septic, Handy
person, $28,900./Offer
352-422-1916



FLORAL CITY
DW, 2/2/2 carport
Screen room, shed,
all you need is a tooth-
brush to move in
$17,500. Lot Rent $183.
352-344-2420
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $179/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS 55+
1/1 Fully Furnished,
Everything stays, Like
new furn., Washer/Dryer
2 sheds, Flat Scm. TV's
$7,000. (708) 308-3138
LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access. ramp and
shower $25,000.
352-212-6804
LECANTO 55+ PK
MUST SELL
3br/2ba. Furn, Cpt,
Shed, New Roof,
CHA, washer/dryer,
MAKE OFFER
931-210-0581
Sandy Oak 55+ RV PK
14x60 split 2/2, new
heat/ac, remodeled,
furn. Ig send in FL Rm.
55 ft crpt w/laundry
room, 989-858-0879
STONEBROOK, CR
Pondview/Gourmet
Kitch, 2Br, MSuite,
$51,900, Cridland RE,
Jackie 352-634-6340

-I

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully furn. efficiency
w/ equipped kitchen.
All utilities, cable,
Internet, & cleaning
provided. $699/mo
352-586-1813
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
Inverness
2/1 on private estate, no
smoking,$650 monthly
Utilities included 1st,
last, sec. Req.
352-422-2393
N. CRYSTAL RIVER
800sqft. 1Bdr
12mi. north of Seven
Rivers Hospital, w/d
Direct TV, non-smoker
(horse-stall available)
$650mo. 352-586-9598
S. Inverness
Country Cottage for 1
person, all included
$450pr mnth, $300 dep
727-916-1119




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR/ 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE


1tORt4~





OOosXD


For more information on how to reach

Citrus County readers daiF
352-563-5592.


CITRUS -COUNTY


CHRONICLE
www .hronicleonline.com
Florda F and Wildlife Cnservatlon Commission;
ttp:l/tinayu.msot p-my Nc-custelp-cm-app


Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Developed site with
gazebo & storage bldg,
reduced to $49,500.
Separate storage
lot available. (RV sold).
For info and pictures
Click on
detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441




Ceramica de Espana
is relocating! Public
Auction Moving sale!
Wed Feb 27 10am
Preview:
Day of Sale 9-10am
7700 NW 54 St,
Miami. Fl 33166
Quality handmade &
hand-painted Spanish
ceramics (all types),
showroom
displays, warehouse
items, furniture.
computers & more!
www.moecker
auctions.com
Moecker Auctions.
Inc. (800) 840-BIDS
15% -18%BP, $100 ref.
cash dep.
Subj to confirm.
AB-1098 AU-3219,
Eric Rubin




HERNANDO
Building Off Hwy 200,
$800.mo 352-201-2428



4/3+/4 pool home w/
inlaw suite on 23/4 ac.
HW firs, granite cntrs.
2009 Custom Home
S. McDermott (352)
697-1593 Cridland RE


6. ABC anchor Diane's courtroom workers (2)


7. Highlights classroom workers (2)


SUIHJVI3 S83I V33d' SiHAA VI SBHAA~VS'9 lU aM d 3IWWIO 'g9
11LIVAM 31VVIT '( HVfl9Vn a121HvW 'I SNSLIN HSOM '* (IVWl (I 9 'I
2-27-13 S IaMtSNv


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


Real Estate]
For Sale


*. .,
- w


%Ea- mu~







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything! 4/3 %
w/7 car
garage/workshop &
in-law suite on 5.83 ac-
res.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164




Beverly Hills
2/1 family room and
carport, investment or
seasonal living $38,900
352-422-2433
HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2/1/1 needs paint &
cosmetics $23k
**cash only
352-503-3245




Custom Home,
3 bedroom, 2%/ bath,
w/Master w/DBL
walk-ins + bath +
den/off. 2+ car garage.
1 Acre. MUST SEE!
$249,900.
352-860-0444



Beautiful Whispering
Pines Villa $79,900
Managed, low Maint.
fee indowed for sudden
expenses, walk to park
352-341-0170
352-726-5263
FSBO 3/2/2 Scrn Porch,
metal roof, appls, CHA,
fans, verticals, shed,
fence, deck, spklrs, near
dog park. $120,000
(352) 586-0872
NICE HOUSE on
Nice Street $69,000
2/1/1, Attached
carport w/ 12 x32
scrn. por., built in '95
on 1/2 acre lot fenced
12 x14 matching out
building, New roof,
stucco paint, flooring,
upper line appl's,
irrigation & water
system.,
taxes & ins. $1,135 yr
606-425-7832




3BD, 2BA, 2Gar,
Gas fireplace, on
Water, Main Canal,
dock large lot with
fruit trees. $138,000
(321) 303-2875




3BR 2BA 1,500 sq. ft.,
6823 W. Merrivale Ln
Built 2006, Fully
Furnished, by Owner,
$77,000 obo
(260) 348-9667




4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home
$65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell


-I
4/3/2, POOL HOME
3,000 sf, granite coun-
ters, SS appl's., wood
firs., Reduced $25,000
Asking $235,000
850-585-4026











Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyh u nts
homes.com.

Custom Built 3/2/2/
Pool Home on 1.26
acres on Golf Course
2339 sq.ft. living area
3366 sq.ft. under roof
Many xtras, price
reduced. 352-382-1531


Phyllis
Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!

I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
gail@citrusrealtor
.com
www.citrusrealtor
.com
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.


I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!








DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com












A A %
MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515










SANDI

HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855







[I




TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant




3/2 pool home on 10
acres w/ FP, zoned
agriculture, walk to all
schools. $179,900
(727) 528-2803 or
727-698-0723



Brooksville Deeded
spacious, shaded cnr
lot, 1BR/1BA, Large FL
room, Large storage
shed & patio. 55+ RV
Park w/ heated pool,
and music activities,
$36,000 352-848-0448,
352- 428-0462 anytime
HOME FOR SALE
NORTON, VA
5Bd/2%/Ba inc. 3 lots
70miles from Bristol
Racetrack $69,000
276-393-0446 OR
276-679-1331




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner

Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com
2BD 1'BA 2 Carport
on Lake Rousseau
Dunnellon 1.4 AC,
168 ft on lake, No flood
insurance completely
remodedled, Price
Reduced$169.000
Barney Chilton
352-563-0116


Gulf Prvt Island home
on 15 ac 80' dock. 4/2
All util. Mainland dock
& pkg. Jacuzzi house
S. McDermott (352)
697-1593 Cridland RE
INVERNESS
3/2/2 waterfront pool hm
on Lisa Ct, 1/2 acre lot
quiet St, whole house
generator $229,000
352-419-8337

YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNafureC ast
Properties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"




% ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact fee
credit, high and dry,
trees, $11,000 obo
(352) 795-3710
INVERNESS, FL
3 miles east of Inv;
5-20ac wooded/some
cleared, owner finance
available.Owner is
licensed Real Estate
Broker,Ed Messer.ed
.messer@yahoo.com




WINDSHIELD
Citabria, brand new
PMA part, $150 obo
352-419-6086




Ele. Trolling Motor
$75.00
352-527-3948




BUY, SELL*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*352-563-5510"

03 SEAPRO
17' 90 hp mercy. vhf,
gps, trol mtr, fullcover,
bimini, alum trlr $7200
352-419-5363pm
ALUMICRAFT
18 ft.,wide rhino lined
inside, 25HP Merc.,
boat mtr. & trailer in
great shape $3,700
(352) 563-0328

















MONTEREY
07, 180 Bowrider
38hrs,mint,135hp.volvo
factory loaded, alum. trlr
orig. owner $14k obo
352-419-6086
PENN YAN
1979 27' Sports fisher-
man w/trailer, needs
some work. $4000
OBO (352) 621-0192

SOLD
BOSTON WHALER
12ft w/20hp Johnson
Motor, galvanized
Trailer, all in exc. cond.
TRI PONTOON
BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
(352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com




ITASCA
2007 Navaron 23H
Mercedes Diesel, 2.7L,
17 mpg, generator, AC,
one slide out, sleeps 5,
excellent condition,
$55,000 make offer
352-422-1309
SUNNYBROOK
2008, 35FT Fifth Wheel
3 slides, electric awning
fireplace, 2 act's, 50 amp
king bed, assume
balance of $37,500.
352-279-3544




4 WINDS TRAILER
2006, 26FT
Take Over Payments
352-628-7765
2012 Wildwood TT
26'Ft. sleeps 8,
Elec.Awning and
Jack, bunks $13,999
813-699-2262
'05 CAMPER
29' Holiday Rambler
Alum fr, Ig slide out.
great cond. $10,900
352-795-5310 or
410-474-3454
Brooksville Deeded
spacious, shaded cnr
lot, 1BR/1BA, Large FL
room, Large storage
shed & patio. 55+ RV
Park w/ heated pool,
and music activities,
$36,000 352-848-0448,
352- 428-0462 anytime


2001, Expedition 18ft,
storage for stabilizers,
$3,500. obo
(352) 795-6295
CAR HAULER
2007
32 ft Enclosed Goose-
neck w/liv qtrs. $13,900.
For more info call
352-560-7247
FOREST RIVER
2010, Surveyor, Sport
189, 20 ft. Travel
Trailer,
1 slide, w/AC, qn. bed,
awning, pwr. tonque
jack, corner jacks,
microwave, equilizing
hitch, $9000
(352) 382-1826
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lie/Ins.
POP-UP CAMPER
2002 Coleman
Tacoma Exc Cond.
With add a room.
$4500
(352) 726-3919
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, kg bd,like new,
60amp serve. NADA
$29K asking $25K
obo 352-382-3298
TRAVEL TRAILER
14 ft KZ Sportsman
Classic, 2010, Like
New $6000
(352) 628-3455
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



350 Chevy Motor
Speed Pro Cam
headers, edelbrock
carb. Approx. Miles
30K $1200 OBO
352-628-4240
LUGGAGE ROOF
CROSSRAILS
will fit any Chevy
Traverse $150
obo 352-503-6414
RV ROADMASTER
Hidden Face Plate
fits Dodge Ram 1500
asking $200,
727-251-7568



"BEST PRICE*
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
*352-426-4267-*
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ




BUICK
'00, Regal, LS, custom
4 DR. Loaded, only
70K stereo, leather, V6
alloys, garaged, clean
$4,650. 352-212-4882
Buick Century
Custom, 57k mi, extra
clean, full power. Runs
excellent $4500
(352) 257-3894 Cell
(352) 794-6069 Office
CADILLAC
1994 DEVILLE
79K MILES, CAR IS
PERFECT $4995
352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2005 STS
LOW MILES
NICE CAR
$9850, 352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2011 CTS, LOADED
ONLY 15K
MILES, SUNROOF
$27,850 352-628-5100
CHEVROLET
1999, Camaro,
Convertible
$6,990.
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CHEVY VETTE,
02 Convert. Royal Blue,
Saddle oak int. 16k mi,
Gar, Mint, $23,900 obo
call 352-489-1700
CHRYSLER
2006 PT Cruiser cony....
weather is getting
nice...time to drop the
top...call 352-628-4600
to set appointment
to see
FORD
1995 Escort wagon
4cyl., Auto,
call 352-628-4600
for low price and
appointment
FORD
2005, Focus
$4,850.
352-341-0018
FORD
2010, Pruis,
$17,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
2011 FIESTA SDN
36K MILES, "S"
MODEL, ONE OWNER


$9950,352-628-5100


CLASSIFIED




HONDA
2010 ACCORD LX,
85K MILES, NICE,
$12,850 352-628-5110
LINCOLN
Towncar 2010
29,900ml, gold w/beige
vinyl top, white leather
asking, $24,900
352-476-5061
MINI COOPER
2008 2DR, HARDTOP
ONLY 20K MILES,
SUPER CLEAN
$13980, 352-628-5100
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!I
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
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US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
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NISSAN
2005, Altima
$5,895
352-341-0018
PONTIAC
2003 Bonneville, must
SE V6,pw....pl....priced
to sell.....call jan at
352-628-4600 for
appointment
and pricing

SOLD
MERCURY
2001 Grand Marquis
107K mi, looks & runs
good, AC, good tires



2002 JAGUAR XJR
4 DR, $7200. Super
Charged 4.0 V-8,
exc cond, auto trans,
leather int, AC, power
sun roof, XJR Sport
Pkg, factory chrome
wheels (352) 637-6443
AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR
Show
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. MAR 3. '13
1-800-438-8559

CHEVY
'87, S10 Blazer, excel.
cond. 87K org. mi. on
body, 22K on engine
$1,700 obo 795-9187






IIIIIIII
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person
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with a classi-
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includes a photo

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tails
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2002 Ford F 150 Sport
4X4 Super Cab 4 Dr,
Auto, Black, 5.4 V8,
Runs Great. $5500
(352) 257-3894 Cell
(352) 794-6069 Office
CHEVY S10
2000 4x4 loaded,v6,
3 dr, fair condition,
runs great! $2000 obo
(352) 585-3264
FORD
1997 F250 V8 4.6L
Auto XL Supercab A/C
Cruise Toolbox 139,000
mi. $3850
352-212-9415



2374-0313 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-311
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
CITRUS COUNTY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-0549
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
DE ROSA INC UNIT 5 RE-
VISED PB 11 PG 29 LOT 5
DESC IN OR BK 890 PG
1116
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: GIROLAMA OR-
LANDO, GUISEPPE OR-
LANDO
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on line,
on March 27, 2013 at 9:30
A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated February 1, 2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
February 20, 2013
February 27, 2013
March 6, 2013
March 13, 2013
2375-0313 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-312
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
CITRUS COUNTY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:


CERTIFICATE NO:


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013 ClI


10-10018 YEAR OF ISSU-
ANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
SEVEN LAKES PARK 2ND
ADDITION PB 11 PG 122
LOT 6 BLK I
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: BRIAN G
MCKEN-
ZIE, JAMES T MOORE JR
Said property being in
the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold
to
the highest bidder on
line,
on March 27, 2013 at
9:30
A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated February 1, 2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox,
Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
February 20, 2013
February 27, 2013
March 6, 2013
March 13, 2013

2376-0313 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-313
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
CITRUS COUNTY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-2960
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
TOWN OF DUNNELLON LOT
697 DESC IN OR BK 611 PG
321, DC IN OR BK 706 PG
615, OR BK 793 PG 2002,
DC IN OR BK 840 PG 10 55
& REF ONLY: OR BK 840 PG
1057
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: WILLIE CLEVE-
LAND 3RD, ESTATE OF
JOYCE ANN DIXON
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on line,
on March 27, 2013 at 9:30
A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated February 1,2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
February 20, 2013
February 27, 2013
March 6, 2013
March 13, 2013
2372-0313 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-309
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
CITRUS COUNTY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-5939
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
CITRUS SPGS UNIT 23 PB
568 PG 968 LOT 9 BLK 1740
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: ELAINE I BRIGHT-
MAN
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on line,
on March 27, 2013 at 9:30
A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated February 1, 2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
February 20, 2013
February 27, 2013
March 6, 2013
March 13,2013

2373-0313 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-310
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
CITRUS COUNTY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-9771
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
EDEN GARDENS PB 3 PG
46 LOT 1
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: EVELYN CASE,
JACK CASE, ESTATE OF
LEO CASE, JEWEL
HOLVERSTOTT, LAWSON
HOLVERSTOTT
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on line,
on March 27, 2013 at 9:30
A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated February 1,2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
February 20, 2013
February 27, 2013
March 6, 2013
March 13,2013


n 1


702-0306 WCRN
To: Ronald Bailey Case No: 2011-DP-091 Term, of Parental Rights
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO.:2011-DP-091
IN THE INTEREST OF:
C.F. DOB: 01/15/1997
Minor Child
NOTICE OF ACTION. SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF ADVISORY HEARING
FOR TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS AND GUARDIANSHIP
THE STATE OF FLORIDA
TO: Ronald Bailey
L/K/A Unknown
You are hereby notified that a petition under oath has been filed in the
above-styled court for the termination of your parental rights as to C.F. a female
child born on 15th day of January, 1997, in Ohio; and for placement of the child
with the Florida Department of Children and Families for subsequent adoption, and
you are hereby commanded to be and appear before General Magistrate Keith
Schenck of the Circuit Court or any judge assigned to hear the above cause, at the


m


m


m


Advisory Hearing on March 25, 2013 at 1:30 PM at the Citrus County Courthouse, 110
N. Apopka Avenue, 3rd floor, Inverness, FL 34450.
YOU MUST PERSONALLY APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED.
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT
TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS CHILD, IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON
THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS TO THE CHILD NAMED
IN THE PETITION.
YOU ARE ENTITLED TO HAVE AN ATTORNEY PRESENT TO REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER.
IF YOU WANT AN ATTORNEY, BUT ARE UNABLE TO AFFORD ONE, YOU MUST NOTIFY THE
COURT, AND THE COURT WILL DETERMINE WHETHER YOU QUALIFY FOR AN ATTORNEY TO
BE APPOINTED TO REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER.
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to
participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator at the Office of the Trial
Court Administrator, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL
34450, Telephone (352) 341-6700 within seven (7) working days of your receipt of this
notice; If you are hearing or voice impaired call 1-800-955-8771, Florida Relay Serv-
ice 711.
THIS NOTICE shall be published once a week for four consecutive weeks
in the
Citrus County Chronicle's Classified Section.
Dated this 30th day of January, 2013 at Inverness, Citrus County, Florida.
ANGELA VICK, Clerk of Courts
(SEAL) By:/s/ D. Pennington, Deputy Clerk
February 13, 20, 27 & March 6, 2013.


705-0227 WCRN
Marilyn Reid File No: 2012-CP-000652 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 2012-CP-000652
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARILYN Y. REID a/k/a MARILYN LOUISE REID
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of MARILYN Y. REID, a/k/a MARILYN LOUISE REID,
whose date of death was August 5, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, FL 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and
that personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
Al other crecitorsofthe decedent and other persons having ddmsordemnds
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED 2
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is February 20, 2013.
Personal Representative
/s/THOMAS C. RANEW, JR.
5138 SE 14th Place, Ocala, FL 34471
Attorney for Personal Representative
/s/THOMAS C. RANEW, JR. P.A., Attorney for Personal representative, Florida Bar No.
220620, Post Office Box 956, Silver Springs, FL 34489, Telephone: (352) 840-5914
February 20 & 27, 2013.


707-0227 WCRN
Harold William Shreve Case No: 202 CP 327 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.:2012 CP 327 PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
HAROLD WILLIAM SHREVE
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of HAROLD WILLIAMS SHREVE, deceased, whose
date of death was June 20,2010, Case Number 2012CP327, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N.
Apopka Avenue Inverness, FL. 34450.
The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file
their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against the decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILE TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT=S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is February 20,2013.
Personal Representative:
/s/SANDRA PORTER
6589 East Haynes Lane, Inverness, Florida 34452
Attorney for Personal Representative
/s/TIMOTHY H. DAVID, ESQUIRE, Florida Bar No.: 0485993 DAVID & PHILPOT,
PL, 100 E. FAITH TERRACE, POST OFFICE BOX 940218
MAITLAND, FLORIDA 32794-0218, Telephone: (407) 830-5050
February 20 & 27, 2013.


710-0306 WCRN
Patty Jo Bodenhorn File No: 2012-CP-729 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2012-CP-729
IN RE: ESTATE of PATTY JO BODENHORN,
DECEASED,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been en-
tered in the Estate of Patty Jo Bodenhorn, deceased, File Number 2012-CP-729 by
the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450; that the decedent's date of
death was October 13,2012 that the total value of the estate is $55,000.00 and that
the names and address of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are:
Susan J. Korman, 1700 N. Envoy Drive, Crystal River, FL 34429
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for
full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WITH BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWIIHSTANDINGANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is February 27, 2013.
Person Giving Notice:
/s/Susan J. Korman
1700 N. Envoy Drive, Crystal River, FL 34429
Attorney for Person Giving Notice
BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A.
/s/Michael Mountjoy, Esquire Florida Bar Number: 157310 209
Courthouse Square, Inverness, FL 34450, Telephone: (352) 726-1211
February 27 & March 6, 2013.


711-0306 WCRN
Wanda C. McKeever File No: 2013-CP-35 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2013-CP-35
IN RE: ESTATE of WANDA C. McKEEVER,
DECEASED,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Wanda C. McKeever, deceased, whose date
of death was January 7, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is February 27,2013.
Personal Representative:
/s/Tammy Sue Hiles
12148 Luftburrow Lane, Hudson, FL 34669


Attorney for Personal Representative
BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A.
/s/Michael Mountjoy, Esquire, Florida Bar Number: 157310
Square, Inverness, FL 34450, Telephone: (352) 726-1211
February 27 & March 6, 2013.


209 Courthouse


211-0227 SA & WCRN
Vs. Eric Peterson Case No: 09-2011-CA-003409 Notice of Sale Pursuant to Chapter
45
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.09-2011-CA-003409 DIVISION
PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ERIC PETERSON A/K/A ERIC C. PETERSON et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February
7, 2013, and entered in Case No. 09-2011-CA-003409 of the Circuit Court of the Fifth
Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida in which PHH Mortgage Corporation,
is the Plaintiff and Eric Peterson a/k/a Eric C. Peterson, Tanya Peterson a/k/a Tanya S.
Peterson, Martin Federal Credit Union, Tenant 1 n/k/a Erica Peterson, Tenant 2 n/k/a
Ame Peterson, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at 10:00 a.m.
on the 7th day of March, 2013 at www.realforeclose.com, the following described
property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure:
LOT 8 AND THE NORTH 165.79 FEET OF LOT 15, CARDINAL ACRES, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 109, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; LESS AND EXCEPT THE EAST 483 FEET THEREOF.

SUBJECT TO A 15.79 FOOT EASEMENT ALONG THE SOUTH LINE THEREOF FOR ROAD
RIGHT-OF-WAY
A/K/A 2847 W RENNET CT, LECANTO, FL 34461-8345
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days af-
ter the sale.
Albertelli Law, Attorney for Plaintiff
P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, (813) 221-4743, (813) 221-9171 facsimile


Notices to Creditors/
Administration I


Nodces to Creditors
Administration 9


Nodces to Creditors/
Administration I


Foreclosure Salle/
s
Action Notice I


Foreclosure Sale/
Action Notices I


FoelsreSll






C12 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013


FORD
2004, Ranger
$7,990
352-341-0018
FORD
F150, 1978, 4x4
Runs good, 6" Lift kit,
$1,650 obo
(352) 564-4598
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
SOLD
CHEVROLET
2001 S10 Pickup Ext.
Cab, no rust, no dents,
very clean, white, low
mileage


BUICK
2005 RANIER
46K MILES, CXL
LIKE NEW
$9850, 352-628-5100
HONDA
1997 CRV, priced to
sell....it's a honda
auto, pwr windows
call 352-628-4600 for
special newspaper
pricing
KIA
2012 SOUL
ONLY 7K MILES
$15,800 352-628-5100
SUBARU
2011 FORESTER
29K MILES
ONE OWNER
$17850, 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
1997 RAV 4
ONLY 89K MILES,
NICE $5850,
352-628-5100


JEEP
2000, Grand
Cherokee 4x4, V8
pw, pl, priced to low
to list.....call adam at
352-628-4600 for
appointment


FORD
1994 AreoStar XLT
good cond, clean, cold
air, ready to roll
352-637-0441


BAD BOY BUGGIE
2011 "ready to hunt"
Only $5998.
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS
2002, SPORTSMAN
700 CC 4X4 AUTO
READY FOR THE MUD
ONLY $4288
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS RZR 800 LE
TIME TO PLAY HARD
ONLY $8388
(352) 621-3678


CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492


Harley Davidson
2009 Street Glide
Black, 20k, many extras
$18,500 firm, pls call
*352-422-5448"-
HARLY DAVIDSON
08, 1200cc Sportster
classic 976mi. show-
roomcondition, $9250
obo (352) 447-1244
HONDA BLACK BIRD
CBR 1100 LOW LOW
MILES ONLY $3488.00
(352) 621-3678
HONDA ST1300
2006 MADE TO TOUR
ONLY $7786
(352) 621-3678
KAWASKI NINFA
650
LIKE NEW ONLY
$5488 (352) 621-3678
KYMCO
2009, AJILITY
SCOOTER GREAT
GAS SAVER ONLY
$998 (352) 621-3678
SUZUKI BURGMAN
AUTOMATIC TWIST
AND GO FUN ONLY
$4686 (352) 621-3678
SUZUKI GSXR 750
195 MILES "HOLD ON"
ONLY $9996
(352) 621-3678
Triumph
1971, Rebuilt upper end
of motor, runs like new,
reliable vintage bike,
$3,200 352-586-8396
VICTORY CROSS
ROADS
"GREAT American
MADE CRUSIER"
ONLY $12888
(352) 621-3678


713-0227 WCRN
03/11 Sale
Knightly Auto Service
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
gives Notice of Foreclo-
sure of Lien and intent to
sell these vehicles on
Monday, March 11
2013, 8:00 AM at 61 NE
HWY 19 SUITE A CRYSTAL
RIVER FL pursuant to sub-
section 713.78 of the Flor-
ida Statutes. KNIGHTLY
AUTO SERVICE reserves
the right to accept or re-
ject any and/or all bids.
2005 Chrysler PT Cruiser
VIN 3C4FY58B55T614980
February 27,2013.


eService: servealaw@albertellilaw.com, CH 11-91451
If you are a person with a disability who needs assistance in order to participate in a
program or service of the State Courts System, you should contact the ADA Coordi-
nator, John Sullivan, (352) 341-6700 within two (2) working days of receipt of this no-
tice; if you are hearing or voice impaired, please call 1-800-955-8771. To file re-
sponse please contact Citrus County Clerk of Court, 110 N. Apopka Ave, Inverness,
FL 34450, Tel: (352) 341-6400; Fax: (352) 341-6413.
February 23 & 27, 2013.


714-0227 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
HISTORICAL RESOURCES ADVISORY BOARD
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Historical Resources Advisory
Board will meet on Wednesday, March 6, 2013, at 4:00 PM at the Lecanto Govern-
ment Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida, to discuss busi-
ness of the Historical Resources Advisory Board which may properly come before
them.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two (2) days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Telephone
(352) 341-6580.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Histoical Resources
Advisory Board with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

BY:
Eric C. Williams, Director
Geographic Resources and
Community Planning
February 27, 2013.

706-0227 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Application for Transfer of Water Certificate
Aqua Utilities Florida, Inc. has applied to the Citrus County Board of County Commis-
sioners for transfer of its water systems located in Citrus County, Florida to the Florida
Governmental Utility Authority (FGUA). The names of the affected water systems
are: West Citrus, Kenwood North, The Meadows, Pine Valley, and Castle Lake. The
Water and Wastewater Authority will review the franchise transfer application at its
meeting on March 4, 2013, 2013 at 1:00 p.m. in Room #166 at the Lecanto Govern-
ment Building, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Any concerns may be directed to Terry Rakocy, P.O. Box 2480 Lady Lake, FL
32158-2480.
Below are the legal descriptions of the area serviced by Aqua Utilities Florida, Inc.
that are affected by this transfer of utility franchise.
CRYSTAL RIVER UTILITIES, INC.
d/b/a AQUA UTILITIES FLORIDA, INC.
WATER TARIFF
TERRITORY SERVED
CERTIFICATE NUMBER
COUNTY- CITRUS
BOARD RESOLUTIONS) APPROVING TERRITORY SERVED
Resolution Number Date Issued Docket Number Filing Type
2000-146 July 25, 2000 Original
Certificate
DESCRIPTION OF TERRITORY SERVED
WEST CITRUS, KENWOOD NORTH AND THE MEADOWS
FORMERLY SEVEN RIVERS UTILITIES, INC.
WEST CITRUS (HOMOSASSA VILLA TERRACE UNIT 11 WATER SYSTEM) Northeast 1/4 of
Section 24, Township 19 South, Range 17 East; Citrus County, Florida, being a re-
corded subdivision -Sub. 0110, Pb. 1, Pg. 52, further shown on the County Aerial No.
72D, County Map 218A and further being described as follows:
Beginning at a point of commencement the Northeast corner of Section 24 and
running due West along the North line of Section 24, 1373.08 feet to the Point of Be-
ginning. From the Point of Beginning, going due South along the center line of
Country Club Place a distance of 405.00 feet to a point. Thence going due East
along the center line of Grant Drive 283.51 feet to a point of curvature. Thence
along the curve having a radius of 2315.10 feet, an arc of 232.74 feet, a chord of
230.78 feet and a chord bearing of North 87 08'00" East to a point. Thence going
due South along the center line of Citrus Avenue 611.50 feet to a point of curvature.
Thence along the curve having a radius of 470.00 feet, an arc of 738.27 feet, a
chord of 666.26 feet and a chord bearing of South 45 00'00" West to a point. Thence
going due North a distance of 10 feet to a point. Thence going due West a distance
of 170.00 feet to a point. Thence going due North along the center line of Country
Club Place a distance of 390.00 feet to a point. Thence going due West along the
Center line of Pershing Avenue a distance of 983.35 feet to a point on the center
line of Rosedale Avenue and also a point of curvature. Thence along the curve
have a radius of 1378.24 feet, an arch of 225.99 feet, a chord of 225.66 feet and a
chord bearing of North 04 24'35" East to a point. Thence continuing due North along
the center line of Rosedale Avenue a distance of 850.00 feet to a point on the North
Section line of Section 24. Thence going due East along the North Section line, a dis-
tance of 1090.00 feet to the Point of Beginning.
KENWOOD NORTH West 1/2 of the Northwest 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of Section 25,
Township 19 South, Range 17 East; Citrus County, Florida, being an unrecorded sub-
division 1 DOOO, further shown on the County Aerial No. 73A, County Map 219A and
being further described as follows:
From a Point of Beginning Being the Southwest corner of the Northwest 1/4 of Sec-
tion 25, Township 19 South, Range 17 East, North 00 25'47" West 1288.98 feet to a
point on the South right-of-way of Grover Cleveland Boulevard. Thence along the
South right-of-way -South 89 58'00" East, 666.04 feet to a point. Thence leaving the
South right-of-way South 00 18'48" East, 1292.47 feet to a point. Thence North
89 39'48" West, 663.43 feet to the Point of Beginning.
THE MEADOWS (MEADOW STREET WATER SYSTEM) Green Acres Pb. 5, Pg. 4, Sub. 0200
within the Southeast 1/4 of Section 36, Township 19 South, Range 17 East and within
Green Acres Subdivision No. 1, Sub. 0210 Pb. 5, Pg. 5, within the North 1/2 of the
Southwest 1/4 in Section 31, Township 19 South, Range 18 East; Citrus County, Florida,
and further shown on the County Aerial 86C, County Map 375C, being further de-
scribed as follows:
From a point of commencement being the Southeast corner of Section 36, Township
19 South, Range 17 East North a distance of 1966.84 feet to the Point of Beginning on
the North ight-of-way of Meadow Street. Thence South 89'44'44" West, 332.02 feet to
a point. Thence leaving the right-of-way North 00 04'49" East, 623.43 feet to a point.
Thence South 89 29'56" East, 331.09 feet to a point. Thence South 00 05'32" East,
622.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Further being the East 1/2 of Lot 22 within Sec-
tion 36, Township 19 South, Range 17 East.
Also the following within Section 31, Township 19 South, Range 18 East.
Beginning at the point of commencement being the Southwest corner of Section
31, North 1294.56 feet to the Point of Beginning: Thence North 0013'45" East, 622.28
feet to a point on the South right-of-way of Meadow Street. Thence North 88 49'19"
East, 336.54 feet to a point on the right-of-way. Thence leaving the right-of-way
South 0014'28" West, 624.90 feet to a point. Thence 89 15'59" West, 336.37 feet to the
Point of Beginning, being Lot 40.
Beginning at a point of commencement being the Southwest corner of Section 31,
North 1966.84 feet to a point on the North right-of-way of Meadow Street. Thence
along the right-of-way North 8849' 19" East, 336.55 feet to the Point of Beginning on
the West Property Line of Lot 42. Thence North 00 14'28" East 624.90 feet to a point.
Thence along the North Property line of Lots 42 and 43, North 88 22'40" East, 673.54
feet to a point on the Northeast corner of Lot 43. Thence South 00 15'54" West,
630.13 feet to a point on the North right-of-way of Meadow Street. Thence along the
North right-of-way, South 88 49 19" West, 673.10 feet to the Point of Beginning, being
Lots 42 and 43.
Beginning at a point of commencement, being the Southwest corner of Section 31,
North 1966.84 feet to a point on the North right-of-way of Meadow Street. Thence
along the North right-of-way, North 8849' 19" East, 1346.20 feet to the Point of Begin-
ning on the West Property Line of Lot 45. Thence North 00 16'37" East, 632.74 feet to
the Northwest corner of Lot 45. Thence along the North Property Line of Lots 45 and
46, North 88 22'40" East, 673.56 feet to the Northeast corner of Lot 46. Thence South
0018'02" West, 637.96 feet to a point on the North right-of-way of Meadow Street.
Thence along the North right-of-way South 8849'19" West, 673.10 feet to the Point of
Beginning, being Lots 45 and 46.
DESCRIPTION OF TERRITORY SERVED PINE VALLEY
FORMERLY DEMETREE INDUSTRIES, INC.
Township 19 South Range 18 East
Section 19
The Southeast 1A of the Southwest 14 of said Section 19.
DESCRIPTION OF TERRITORY SERVED CASTLE LAKE
FORMERLY LANDS INC. OF RHINELANDER
Township 19 South Range 20 East
Section 34
The Southeast 1 of the Southwest 1 less and except Right-of-Way of U.S. Highway
No. 41 and other peripheral roadways and easements as may exist.
February 20 & 27, 2013.


715-0227 WCRN
03/06 Meeting Citrus Springs Advisory Council
PUBLIC NOTICE
CITRUS SPRINGS MSBU
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus Springs Advisory Council will meet on
Wednesday, March 6, 2013 at 9:00 o'clock A.M., at the Citrus Springs Community
Center, 1570 W. Citrus Springs Boulevard, Building "B", Citrus Springs, Florida, to con-
duct business of the Citrus Springs Municipal Service Benefit Unit.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two (2) days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TTY Telephone
(352) 341-6580.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Advisory Council with
respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testi-
mony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
By:
Joan Dias, Chairwoman
CITRUS SPRINGS MSBU
February 27, 2013.


921-0302 WeekCRN
Twin Rivers 3-7 Bids
PUBLIC NOTICE
Twin Rivers Marina will be accepting bids for drive area resurfacing on or before
2:00pm, March 7, 2013 at the business office located at 2880 N. Seabreeze point,
Crystal River, Florida 34429. Plans and Specifications can be obtained during normal
weekday business hours from the Marina Manager on site. Twin Rivers Marina re-
serves the right to reject any and all bids. Only bids coming from qualified and li-
censed firms will be considered.
Scope is as follows: Regrade and compact existing surface area of approximately
1820 SY for positive drainage. Supply and install 3" of compacted fresh asphalt mill-
ings over entire area (1820 SY) to create new surface free of defects and grading in
such a way to create a positive drainage surface. All completed, inspected and ex-
cepted by owners Rep.
February 25, 26, 27, 28 & March 1 & 2, 2013.


Foelsrale


Citrus County's



Volume Sales



Leader





We Deliver The Best



Customer Service



Buying Experience



Vehicle Selection



Showroom



2 Year Toyota Care



Complimentary



Maintenance




Come See Why We Are


Rated The Best!







LLAGE TOYOTA




OF CRYSTAL RIVER



Ia 352-528-5100

www.vllaelove o ao.compicture for illustration purposes only.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


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CRYSTAL RIVER


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G2 Wednesday, February 27, 2013


2013
C-MAX HYBRID
RATED AT UP TO
4 HWY
47MPG2


2013
FUSION HYBRID
RATED AT UP TO
4 HWY
47MPG2


2013 FOCUS
RATED AT UP TO

40MPG


2013 FIESTA
RATED AT UP TO

40MPG


Where do you find America's freshest lineup? You'll find these fuel-efficient vehicles
in a Nick Nicholas Ford Showroom near you. Exclusive EcoBoost technology delivers
efficient power. And now, Nick Nickolas Ford offers 4 models EPA rated at 40 mpg
highway or better. So you can go further.


After You Enjoy The Strawberry Festival Stop By And Check Out Our New 2013 Models.
Based on AutoSource, Inc. data pulled on 9/21/12. 2EPA-estimated 47 city/47 hwy/47 combined mpg. EPA-estimated 29 city/40 hwy/33 combined mpg. Actual mileage will vary.
...... Tm)ml GENUINE PARTS.
IIIr |LCommitted" GENUINE SERVICE.
LINCOLN Co tted" GENUINE PEOPLE.
1M1 A! A -- GENUINE PEACE OF MI


NICK NICHOLAS -
IN CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy. 19 N. Crystal River
TOLL FREE 1-877-795-7371 :3 7
Sales : Mon-Fri 8:30 AM to 7 PM; Sat 8:30 AM to 5 PM Parts & Service: Mon-Fri 8 AM to 5:30 PM; Sat 8 AM to 4 PM


Hwy. 44 W. Inverness
www.nicknicholasford.com
SALE HOURS: Mon Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5
tBased on CYTD sales, 11/11.


ND.


726-1231


STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


74s.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE STRAWBER

What's Inside
Welcome to the festival ......................................................Page G4
Festival sponsors ................................................................ Page G4
Festival kickoff party ..........................................................Page G5
Pageant information and sponsors ..................................Page G6
Food vendors .................................................................Page G7
Festival m ap ........................................................................ Page G8
Arts and crafts vendors....................................................Page G10
Entertainment schedule....................................................Page G12
AmaZZing Steel Drum Ensemble ....................................Page G12
Dan Story Band ................................................................Page G13
Craig Jaworski .................................................................. Page G13
Sophie Robitaille .............................................................. Page G14
Phantastic Sounds ...........................................................Page G14
Marketplace and specialty vendors ................................Page G14
Cajun Dave & Neon Leon..................................................Page G15

Gerry Mulligan
Publisher
Ken Melton
Community Affairs Editor
Cindy Connolly
Community Affairs
Graphic Artist
Sarah Gatling
hoe, Community Editor
Trista Stokes
Advertising Sales Manager

Citrus Publishing
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
352-563-6363
www.chronicleonline.com


RY FESTIVAL


Wednesday, February 27, 2013 G3


We have ...
* Gardening Tools
* Lawn & Garden Seeds, Fertilizer & Insecticides
* Flags & Decorative Items For Garden & Home
* Irrigation Parts, Timers And More
* Full Line Of Small Engine V-Belts
* Organization For Home & Garage
* Paint And Supplies Electrical Propane
* Plumbing Rope Chain
* Clark & Kensington Paint Craftsman Tools

AtCE 2 LOCATION
465 E. Highland Blvd., I
Hardware 2585 N. Florida Ave., H


S TO SERVE YOU
nverness 352-726-8811
lernando 352-726-1481


SE U AD IN S AW PAPE


t .

VI II






G4 Wednesday, February 27, 2013


It's Strawberry Festival time


Picturesque Floral
Park is the setting
for this year's -
the 26th annual -
Floral City Strawberry
Festival.
The festival will be
Saturday, March 2, and
Sunday, March 3.
This year's plans
include the festival
pageants, fantastic
entertainment, hundreds
of craft and marketplace
vendors, a children's play
area, strawberry shortcake
and flats of strawberries
for sale and a food court
with food to satisfy just
about everyone's taste.


And again this year, the
Friday night Berries Brew
& BBQ on March 1 will
serve as the festival's
kickoff.
From 5 to 10 p.m. the
free event will be at the
Floral City Library
Complex, 8360 E. Orange
Ave. More details about
this event on Page 5.
Floral City Park is just
south of Floral City on
U.S. 41. Parking is
extremely limited, but
continuous shuttle service
is offered for $1 round trip
from the Citrus County
Fairgrounds, north of
Floral City at 3600 S.


Florida Ave., Inverness.

At a glance
* Saturday March 2
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Little Miss Strawberry
Princess Pageant -
9 to 10 a.m.
Miss Strawberry
Princess Pageant -
10 to 11 a.m.

* March 3
9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Admission $3,
younger than 12 free
Entertainment schedule
is on Page 12


Festival Sponsors 2013

Floral City Strawberry Festival


Celebrate Sights / Symbols throughout the mall
with art from Citrus County Schools

Crystal River Mall will be holding an
Art Day Wednesday, March 27
*from 2-5 pm in Center Court.
There will be art & crafts,
face paintirig, bounce and
L.-* entertainment with Sophie Robitaille.
This is a Free Event!



Aim
... V


I .1


Sonic Platinum Corporate Sponsor
Tampa Bay Times -
Platinum Media Sponsor
Citrus County
Chronicle- Sustaining Partner
FDS Disposal Presenting Sponsor
The Fox 95.3 and 96.7
Classic Hits Presenting Sponsor
Sibex Gold Sponsor
Florida Lottery Silver Sponsor
Hometown Values Silver Sponsor
Nature Coast EMS Silver Sponsor
Ted Williams Museum Silver Sponsor
Insight Credit Union Bronze Sponsor
Neon Leon's / Ike's Old Florida
Kitchen Bronze Sponsor
Nick Nicholas Ford Bronze Sponsor
Rock Monster Inc. Bronze Sponsor
Suncoast Schools Federal
Credit Union Bronze Sponsor


Brannen Bank/Floral City
Branch Friend of the Festival
Citrus Buyers
Guide Friend of the Festival
Crime Stoppers of
Citrus County Friend of the Festival
Insight Credit
Union Friend of the Festival
Life Care Center of
Citrus County Friend of the Festival
M & B Dairy Friend of the Festival
Regions Bank Friend of the Festival
Schnettler
Construction Friend of the Festival
Sunshine Lodge Friend of the Festival
Citrus County
Chronicle- Gate Sponsor
Insight Credit Union Gate Sponsor
Nature Coast Bank Gate Sponsor
Sun Trust Bank Gate Sponsor


STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sauce Boss will help

get the party started


The Sauce Boss is headed
to Floral City for the Berries,
Brew & BBQ event Friday,
March 1,
which kicks
off the
Floral City
Strawberry
Festival.
With his
distinctive
slide guitar
sound, Bill
"Sauce Boss"
Wharton has
a truly au-
thentic sound
that leaves
you looking
for something Bill "Sauce Bo
you thought
you'd lost, but in fact you
never knew you had.
He has weathered more
than his share of hurricanes,
sunburn, and mosquitoes -
and he's got the chops to
prove it.
He has taken his blues and


a huge pot of gumbo to the
disaster zones of the Missis-
sippi Delta and to homeless
shelters
across Amer-
ica where
he's fed war
veterans, hur-
ricane sur-
vivors, and
plenty of
other regular
folks who
come for
music, but
leave with
more.
The Sauce
S Boss offers
ss" Wharton up sustenance
and redemp-
tion in the form of music,
food, and above all, "the
love of the brotherhood of
man." Read more at
www.sauceboss.com/fr sauce
boss.cfnm. Then be sure to
come see him cook gumbo
and perform.


Berries, Brew &
BBQ Sponsors
Brought to you by:
Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce
Floral City
Merchants Association
Agriculture Alliance
of Citrus County
Sponsored by:
Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home
Ferris Farms
Floral City Heritage Council
Insurance Resources
& Risk Management
Mike Bays State
Farm Insurance
M&B Dairy
Moonrise Resort
SECO (Sumter Electric Co-Op)
Sibex
Sunflower Springs
Assisted Living Facility
West Central Solutions


STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL


Wednesday, February 27, 2013 G5


Local band The Magic Bus
will warm up the stage
Friday, March 1, at the
Floral City Library
Complex, 8360 E. Orange
Ave., for nationally known
Bill "Sauce Boss"
Wharton as the kickoff for
the 26th Annual Floral City
Strawberry Festival.
Gather with us to enjoy
live entertainment, food
from the Ag Alliance of
Citrus County as well as
gumbo from Bill "Sauce
Boss" Wharton,
strawberry shortcake from
Ferris Farms and beer,
soda and water.
Downtown businesses will
be open late to showcase
their products and
services. There is no
admission to this event,
which will be from
5 to 10 p.m.
Special to
the Chronicle


We're by your side so your loved one can stay at home.
-~~ ... n ~


To you, it's about making the right choice.
To us, it's personal.



Home'Tnstead




4224 W Gulf to Lake Hwy.,, Lecanto, FL 34461


Services Include:
Companionship
Light Housekeeping
Meal Preparation
Shopping & Errands
Incidental Transportation
Respite Care
Transitorial Care HHA299993253
Personal Care HCS230036

homeinstead.com


Wheth yo are
lookingI for seone
111e 1 an aging family



mem^?lIiber afew hours
a weeki[[iMTorTneedimore
comrehnsieip


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G6 Wednesday February 27, 2013 STRAWBERRY FESTIvAl ~Imus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Pageants

March 2
9- 10 a.m.
Little Miss Strawberry
Princess Pageant
10- 11 a.m.
Miss Strawberry
Princess Pageant


Pageant
sponsors
B & W Rexall Drug
Beef 'O'Brady's,
Inverness
Mama's Kuntry Kafe
New Concepts
International Hair Salon
RJ Roofing
Virgilio Insurance
Services
Walmart, Inverness


)ES:HSrEG,.^ T IR:. E > JUICE F S QEDIRESH SQUEEZED ORA JI7gS E DR7


RAIN OR SHINE RAIN OR SHINE RAIN OR SHINE RAIN OR


INE RAIN OR SHINE RAIN OR SHINE RAIN OR SHINE RAIN OR SHINE RAIN OR SHINE


Welcome to the Floral City

Strawberry Festival

OPEN SATURDAY & SUNDAY
During The Festival March 2 & 3
Strawberry Pies Strawberry Shortcake
N, Fresh Strawberry Milk Shakes
-IN STORE SPECIALS: MARCH 1-MARCH 6&
Now Shipping Oranges, Tangerines & Red Grapefruit
Candy Amish Cheese Gifts Homemade Fudge


''-" -~f ,.
VDw't Foigel...
FERRIS
BEEFk


Where every day is a VStrawberry Festival
(352) 860-0366 800-872-7318
Fax (352)726-2125
Historic Downtown Floral City, US Hwy. 41 South
Open Mon-Sat. 9am-5pm, Sun. 12-5pm


uAifA farriccarmvac rmar


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G6 Wednesday, February 27, 2013


STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


7S^






Wednesday, February 27, 2013 G7


Food

vendors
he strawberry is the belle
of the ball, but is joined
by some other great
foods.
The selection of edibles
includes Greek, Thai, Mexican,
barbecue, all-American ham-
burgers, dogs and fries, as well
as traditional festival foods such
as funnel cakes, popcorn, kettle
corn, smoothies, shaved ice,
nuts and unique homemade
soda.
A & B Concessions
Ali's Refreshments
Bayou Billy
Bom Grill
Citrus Lodge 118 F & AM


Fantastic Edibles
Fun Time Foods
Gabby's Dough Factory
Greek Corner
Hillbilly's Famous Funnel Cakes
& Lemonade
Inverness Chapter 65
Inverness Sertoma
Joan Smith
Jon Payne
Kona Ice of Hernando
Original Nut Hut
Papa John's
Papa's Old Fashion Kettle Korn
Rudy's Inc.
Shockley's Food Service
Simon's Concessions
Smoking D's BBQ
Sunshine Dogs
Terry's Tastee Treats
Vintage Popcorn LLC


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Ills


INVERNESS
BEVERLY HILLS
HOMOSASSA


501 W.Main Street, Inverness, FL 34450
5054 N. Lecaito Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465
8495 W. Grover Cleveland, Homosassa, FL 34446


(352) 726-2271 1-888-7HOOPER(746-6737)
.:. ,. wwWv.HooperFuneralHome.com


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STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL





G8 Wednesday, February 27, 2013


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





Wednesday, February 27, 2013 G9


Floral Park Drive


p March


9AM


2


- 5PM


March 3


9AM


- 4PM


$3.00 ADMI99ION
CHILDREN
UNDER 12 FREE


Parking Also Available
at the Citrus County
Fairgrounds on U.S. 41
in Inverness


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL








GIO Wednesday February 27, 2013 STRAWBERRY FFsIWM Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Arts and crafts vendors


This Is Where Wea

Live, Love & Laugh


M AlIIIE assisted Livin/C o m i t y
Assisted Living lic. #11566
(352) 621-8017 wwwSunflowerALF.com
8733 West Yulee Drive, Homosassa,FL 34448


A unique resort lifestyle with the
many benefits of assisted living.


SUPERIOR
RESIDENCES
of Lecanto
MEMORY CARE
Assisted Living lic. #12256
(352) 746-5483 wwwSuperiorALF.com
4865 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy. (SR 44)
Lecanto, FL 34461


Handiwork from more than
100 crafters will be on
display and up for sale at the
26th Annual Floral City Strawberry
Festival.
Among the favorite craft items
available are stained glass; pet gifts,
clothing and treats; photography,
acrylics and oils; wooden signs;
pottery; wood spoons and kitchen
ware; floral wreaths and arrange-
ments; and squirrel and bird feeders.
Some of the unique crafts include
"silver-wear" spoon jewelry, home-
grown loofa sponges, the popular
crushable straw hats, novelty license
plates, sand art and handmade soaps.

7th Son
Air Expressions


Beastie Biscuits N' More
Bee Sweet Apiaries
Big G Wooden Toys
Bird Brain Inventions
Bob's Scrollsaw & Wood Turning
Bodin's Tropicals
John Branning
Paul Buckley
Caricature Sketch Artist
Carole's Custom Crafts
CJ's Creations & It's Your Bling
Classic Jewelry
Cool Zone Coozies
Croft Farm House Sauces
Cubby's An Art Studio
Patricia & Richard D'Angelo


continued on next page


__


G10 Wednesday February 27, 2013


STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LN






Wednesday February 27, 2013 Gil


from previous page


Dawn's Creations
Designs by Brenda
Designs by Chris
Diane's Do-Dads & Dinosaurs
Diet Proof Swimsuit
Donna's Essentials
Down Stairs Art
David Doucet
Elegant Creations
Emerald Coast Fine Jewelry
Everyday Art
Finchberry Soapery
Florida Shell Art
Fort Remington Wood Spoons
Friar Tucks Crafts
Garden Items
Denise Garnett
Gayane's Gift's & Crafts
Grandma's Gourds & Glass
Annette Greenblatt
Handmade Pottery & Fragrance Oil
Robert Henshaw
It's a Bling Thing
J & L Swings and Things
Jean Bull Designs
jeansrescue.com
Joe Dube Photography
Judy's Tag's & Country Crafts
Kicking Bird Pottery
Robert & Colette Kienzle
King Pick Stick
Kitchen Table Jewels
Kyung's A's Art Studio
Linda's Oil's & Acrylics
M & N Designs
Made Especially for You
Ms. Mary's Handmade Crafts & Gifts
Mulburytree.com
Nana Bunn's Bows


Native South West
Nordic Woodcrafters
Original Acrylics by Michael
Overrocker Novelty
Para-Kord Creations
Pep's Memory Crafts
Personalized Hats & More
Petelyn Crafts
Pistarckle Wildlife
Prairie Farm Organics
Red Fox Lodge Shirt Co.
Minna Rittscher
Christine Rogers & James Sadler
Sage Berry Candle Company
Seasons In the Sun
Sewing All
Shop Till You Drop Now
Sign Carver
Silver-Wear Spoon Jewelry
Joan Smith
Sumar / Shirtz-n-Shooz /
Create-a-Scarf
Sunday Soap
Tammie Unique
Tammy's Flowers and More
Teatime Bird Feeders
The Basket Tree
The Butler's
The Fudge Box
The Sand Man
Touch of Glass by Susan
Treasured Memories
U-Dog-U
Ullman & Ullman
Ultra Balm
Walking Puppets
Whim'Sue'cal Embroidery
Doris Wilbur
Winter Park Soap
Woodcrafts by Michael & Gretchen
Woodturner


FLORAL CITY. FLORIDA
Presented by: .BN ESrDISPOSL SAL. ,IC _I,
Satur Mah 2 9-5 & Su Marh 3 9-

Saturday, March 2 9-5 & Sunday, March 3 9-4


Sponsored by: j

Brought to you by: Cius CouNTY


QA nu t lu Am iBn Susainin CHRNCLE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL


i






G12 Wednesday February 27, 2013


Entertainment schedule

Saturday, March 2
9 a.m. Patriotic opening and Little Miss
Strawberry Princess Pageant

10 a.m. Miss Strawberry Princess Pageant

11 a.m. 1 p.m. AmaZZing Steel
Drum Ensemble


Sunday March 3
9 11 a.m.- Craig Jaworski

11:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m. Sophie Robitaille

1 2 p.m. Phantastic Sounds

2 4 p.m. Cajun Dave & Neon Leon


3 5 p.m. Dan Story Band


r 1


AmaZZing Steel
The AmaZZingg Steel Drum
Ensemble began in 1993 as a music
teaching activity for the Good Spirit
Foundation Summer Camp.


Drum Ensemble
Two lead pans served as introduc-
tory instruments. Interest in the steel
drum pans led to the eventual pur-
chase of all the instruments needed of


a pan orchestra over a period of time.
The band has 14 pan positions
available, along with a trap set and
auxiliary percussion.


Performing on Saturday, March 2, from 11 a.m. 1 p.m.


MAJAl


STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






Wednesday February 27, 2013 G13


Dan Story Band
The Dan Story Band was formed
in spring 2005 to support a national
single being released to radio from
the album "300 Horses." Dan had
signed the previous year to a
recording contract with Radiance
Records in Nashville and recorded a
full-length album project with two
singles released, both charting on
Music Row.
The Dan Story Band currently
works the club scene in Florida and
south Georgia, playing a variety of
genres including, but not limited to,
country, southern rock, classic rock
and many others.
They also work with several large
promoters as the opening acts for


nationals at larger venues such as
fairs, festivals and bike fest events.
Some of the larger venues include
Hard Rock Caf6 in Tampa for the
Charlie Palooza with Charlie
Daniels, Journeyfest again with
Charlie and Silver Springs as the
opening act for George Jones and
Mark Chestnut. They have also
opened for John Anderson, Darrell
Singletary, David Lee Murphy, Chris
Cagle and Aaron Tippin.
The band delivers great vocals and
musicianship and always plays to
please the crowd. Playing top 40 hits
from the 1970s through 2011, they
are the hottest country act in
Central Forida.


Performing on Saturday, March 2, from 3 5 p.m.


Craig Jaworski


Craig Jaworski has been
playing the guitar for over
40 years as a soloist, in
musical groups, and as an
accompanist.
Craig specializes in
performing instrumental
arrangements of classic
rock and top 40s songs,
mostly from the mid-1960s
to the mid-1970s.
Craig and his wife Jean
live in Inverness, where
they have both been
educators for the past
35 years.
Craig has performed for
Inverness Relay For Life,
Floral City Heritage Days,
Heritage Village in Crystal
River, The Inverness


Mayor's Ball, sponsored by
the Dream Society of
Inverness, Homosassa
School Oprey Night. He
was a regular performer at
Woodview Coffee House's
open mike for several
seasons and appeared with
other performers at
Abigale's Caf6 in
Dunellon. Craig performed
for a political gathering for
Rebecca Bays, at the Cove
Inn in Inverness and has
appeared at the County
Fair. Recently, he played at
the Manatee Festival in
Crystal River. He is now
appearing on Friday nights
at Enrico's Italian
Restaurant in Inverness.


Owners: Jan & Mike Thomas






* Seminole Wellness 1 16% Layer Feed U Floating Fish Food
Coastal U Tifton U Compressed Alfalfa Bales
Tack Supplies U Chicken Feeders/Waters U Show Sticks
Animal Health Products U Flea & Tick Control
SSE$MINOLE


l Nutrena@

7298 S. Florida Ave., Floral City (US 41 1/2 mile North of 48)
352-637-6600


Performing on Sunday, March 3, from 9 11 a.m.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL






G14 Wednesday February 27, 2013


Sophie Robitaille

Sophie Robitaille is no stranger
to the stage. She has performed at
the Floral City Strawberry Festival,
the Manatee Festival and numerous
local charitable events. Sophie has
had the honor of singing the
National Anthem at many venues
including the Citrus County
Fairgrounds for the 2011 Citrus
Stampede Rodeo, the Citrus
County Speedway for the Blood
Sweat & Tears/Chuck Negron
concert, the St. Petersburg Times
Forum for Tampa Bay Lightning
hockey games and Tropicana Field
for a Tampa Bay Rays game.


Performing on Sunday, March 3,
from 11:30 a.m.- 12:30 p.m.


Phantastic Sounds

Paul Stevio is from Medford, N. J.
Paul was a police sergeant with the
Lumberton Police Department for 30
years and a federal officer after that.
While working in law enforcement, he
also sang with 50-piece orchestra and
performed all over New Jersey. He is
now working as a head of security in
Citrus Hills. Paul moved to Florida
11 years ago and never plans to go back
to the cold.
Jackie Stevio is from West Virginia
and has lived in Florida since 1980.
Before meeting Paul, Jackie focused on
raising her three children and singing at
church. Jackie and Paul met seven
years ago at a USO show in Lecanto. It
was love at first sight and they were
married on July 7, 2007 at 7 p.m.
Jackie is a music teacher of piano


and voice for all ages at her studio in
Citrus Springs, as well as a choir at the
Art Center of Citrus County.


MANATEE TOUR MANATEE LUNCH PKG.
SI Includes manatee snorkeling trip (with all equip.
io OFF : supplied) & lunch from Uest 82 Grill.
$10 OFF ------- 1 $98 for 2
Per person. Reservations required. 3 $98 Ro
Book in advance. With ad. | I 30% Savings. Reservations
Expires 3/31/13 A T ON required. Expires 3/31/13 1

a\,J Q,.o 1. onCrystalRiver PLANTATION


VVtz G102
eBA ScaGILL


352-795-4211 or 800-632-6262
9301 West Fort Island Trail Crystal River, FL
www.PlantationOnCrystalRiver.com


Performing on Sunday, March 3, from 1-2 p.m.





Marketplace and specialty vendors


More than 50 local business
and nonprofits will be at
the festival to provide
information regarding their
products and services. Stop by and
acquaint yourself with some of the
wonderful organizations within
Citrus County.
First Assembly of God Inverness
AAA Auto Club Group
Advance Aluminum
American Cancer Society
Angelic Air
Audibel Hearing Centers
Bath Fitters
Blackshears II Aluminum
BOCC Florida Yards and
Neighborhoods
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus


Center State Bank
Citrus A's Model A Car Club
Citrus County Supervisor
of Elections
Citrus County YMCA
Citrus Regional Clinic of Chiropratic
Coating Systems Inc.
Fairbanks Construction
Family Adventure Camp
Floral City Fire Department
Floral City Merchant's Association
Florida's Water & Land Legacy
Friends of the CR NWRC Inc.
Girls Scouts of West Central Florida
Humanitarians of Florida
Inside Citrus
International Satellite
& Antenna Service
continued on next page


STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1' Lu;ll,,l Olutdoors






Wednesday February 27, 2013 G15


Cajun Dave

& Neon Leon
Most locals are familiar with
Cajun Dave & Neon Leon and their
own brand of Cajun music.
The late Leon Wilkeson is known
the world over as the bass guitarist
for the legendary Rock and Roll
Hall of Fame band LynyrdSkynyrd.
For more than 30 years his colorful
personality complemented hi
musicianship, endearing him to
millions.
Now his newphew, Mitch
Simmons, continues to play music
teamed up with Cajun Dave. This
band is sure to get your feet
tapping and heart thumping.

Performing on
Sunday, March 3,
from 2 4 p.m.


continued from previous page
Joshua's House for Golden Retriever Rescue
Jusuru
Keep Citrus County Beautiful
LHS International Baccalaureate Program
LifeSouth Community Blood Centers
My Feet
Nature Coast Unitarian Universalist Fellowship
Nature World Wildlife Rescue
Operation Christmas Child
Operation Welcome Home
Premium Roofing and Restoration
Psychic &Tarot Card Reader
Quilters of the Nature Coast
R & K Sunglasses
Red Eagle Lodge of West Central Florida Inc.
Sea Shepherd Conservation Society
SECO (Sumter Electric Cooperative)
Sheriffs Ranches Enterprises
Traveling A's Model A Club
Triple A Roofing
United Healthcare
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary 1504
Verizon
West Central Solutions


tree S$raw berrLes!


G et a half flat of strawberries with

a New Chronicle Subscription!

Drop by our booth at the

Strawberry Festival

March 2nd & 3rd.


Offer good March 2nd & 3rd 2013 at the Floral City Strawberry FestivalT have subscribed in the past 60 days New 52 week, prepaid subscriptions only
*Offer good March 2nd & 3rd 2013 at the Floral City Strawberry Festival. Can not have subscribed in the past 60 days. New 52 week, prepaid subscriptions only.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


G16 Wednesday February 27, 2013

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