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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 02-24-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03041

Full Text


Thirty injured when car flies off Daytona track /Bl


CITRU-S CO U N T Yl





wcreRONICLE.
k& www.chronicleonline.com


Partly sunny; 50
percent chance
of showers.
PAGE A4


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


NE 213TOOT








TI IY


VOL. 118 ISSUE 201


County discusses interlocal agreement


BOCC would gain sale proceeds


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
The possible sale of Citrus
Memorial hospital will bring
an interlocal agreement to
Tuesday's county commission
agenda.
Senior county staff and
commission chairman Joe
Meek were asked at last
week's meeting with the
Chronicle Editorial Board
what would happen with the
proceeds of any sale of Citrus
Memorial Health System. In
October, the Citrus County


Hospital Board began to ex-
plore benefits of a sale of the
public hospital as required by
state law.
After paying off outstand-
ing bonds, the money "comes
under the control of the
board of county commission-
ers (BOCC)," answered
County Attorney Richard
Wesch.
The law is detailed in
Florida Statute 155.
"By statute, 50 percent of
the proceeds has to be set
See Page A6


* WHAT: Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners meeting.
* WHEN: 1 p.m. Tuesday.
* WHERE: Room 100, Citrus County
Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Ave.,
Inverness.
* AGENDA: Available on the county's
website, www.bocc.citrus.fl.us, at
the Lecanto Government Building
or in the commissioners' suite on
the second floor of the courthouse
in Inverness.
* WATCH: The meeting will be
televised live on cable TV on
Channel 622 on Bright House and
Channel 9 on Comcast. The
meeting also can be viewed live
online in a small digital format.


CCHB backs


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
INVERNESS Count the
Citrus County Hospital Board
enthusiastically on board
with the county's proposed
County Road 491 widening
project.
CCHB members endorsed
a plan Friday opening the
possibilities of expansion at
the Allen Ridge medical com-
plex in Lecanto while keep-
ing costs much lower than
previously discussed.
County officials are negoti-


CR 491 plan
ating with property owners to
donate right of way rather
than the county buying it
through eminent domain.
The county says it has $9 mil-
lion to spend for construction
or right of way but not both.
The proposed interlocal
agreement would have the
county building an east-west
road along the northern bor-
der of the Allen Ridge prop-
erty that would connect to the
entrance of a new Citrus Hills
development. The county
See Page A6


helping


hands


All hands in to

feed the hungry
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER
nets on and
plastic gloves
covering their
hand and wrists, volunteers
put all hands in, digging
deep to stop hunger around
the world.
Boxes full of vitamins,
rice, dehydrated vegetables
and soy meals lined the ta-
bles as an assembly line
formed for volunteers to fill
plastic bags with nutritious
meals.
Accompanying them was
a bit of up-tempo music,
encouraging volunteers
to plug away toward
packaging 50,000 meals Sat-
urday at Crystal River High
School.
Members of the local Ro-
tary Clubs, Interact, Ro-
taract, Boy Scout troops and
other groups participated in
the fourth year of this event,
done in partnership with
Stop Hunger Now. The non-
profit organization provides
meals to those in need for
more than 20 countries
worldwide.
"The children appreciate
you," Stop Hunger Now liai-
son Lee Warren from South
Hill, Va., Rotary Club said to
volunteers. "Our packaging
program began in 2006.
Seven years later, we have
packaged 86 million meals.
This week alone, we are
going to hit close to 2.3 mil-
lion meals. Rotary has pack-
aged 12 percent of that.
That is huge. You are
making an incredible
difference."
After the food was assem-


Classifieds ....... D6
Crossword .... .. .A16
o Excursions ...... .A15


Many
hands of
volunteers
make light
work with
mixed
bags of
rice, soy
meals,
vitamins
and veg-
etables
Saturday.


bled, sealed and packaged,
it was taken to Orlando for
processing through customs
and will be sent to
different countries, such as
Haiti.
"I have seen first hand
the results of what Stop
Hunger Now has done for


the children," said Dennis
Barnard, community devel-
opment director for Stop
Hunger Now.
"If children go to school
without any breakfast or
food, more than likely
they will not retain
information."


Editorial ......... C2
Entertainment . .B6
Horoscope ....... .B6


Lottery Number


Warren added, "No coun-
try has gotten out of poverty
without 40 percent of its
people being literate. We
have got to get those chil-
dren educated."
With 50,000 meals being
See .Page A6

Lottery Payouts . B6
Movies ......... .A16
rs .. .B4 Obituaries ....... .A7


Bill
Grant
attorney
involved in
wrestling.


Mike
Porcelli
longtime
wrestler and
coach.


Olympic


wrestling


notice


shocking

MATT PFIFFNER
Staff writer
"It's worse than death, be-
cause you can't control death. I
feel like we could have con-
trolled this to some degree, get
ahead of it a little bit. There
were warning signs in the past."
That was just one of the
strong comments made Feb. 12
by University of Iowa head
wrestling coach and 1996
Olympic freestyle gold medalist
Tom Brands just hours after the
news broke about the Interna-
tional Olympic Committee (IOC)
recommended removing the
sport from the 2020 games.
Word of the decision spread
quickly around the world
through Facebook, Twitter and
media outlets.
The outrage throughout the
wrestling community soon
turned into determination to
not let this occur.
Two Citrus County men who
have spent a great deal of their
lives involved in wrestling are
hopeful the sport will not be
dropped from the Olympics.
"We are, by far, one of the
most universal sports in the
games. Wrestling is an Olympic
sport. It's one of the core
sports," said Bill Grant, an In-
verness lawyer who is heavily
involved in the sport through
his work for USA Wrestling and
the Florida Amateur Wrestling
See Page A6


TV Listings ...... A16
Together ........ A18
Veterans Notes .A17


' CRYSTAL 800-584-8755 EXT.3 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
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^39 MONTH LEASE WITH $2999 TOTAL DUE AT SIGNING WITH APPROVED CREDIT. *0% APR FOR WELL QUALIFIED BUYERS. NOT ALL WILL QUALIFY. +ALL PRICES
PLUS TAX TAG AND DEALER FEES WITH $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE. OFFERS CAN NOT BE COMBINED. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK. I


"* >.9


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
79
LOW
60


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Everybody came to help feed the hungry around the world at the Crystal River High School
cafeteria Saturday, organized by the Rotary Club and Stop Hunger Now organization.


6 1845


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Page A3 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24,2013



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Dunnellon man makes living panhandling


Officials advise

public not to give

Wagner money

HEATHER YATES
Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County usually evokes
images of manatees, calm lakes,
views of nature, baseball games
and biking on trails. Folks can be
seen walking on the dock behind
Cooter Pond or kayaking in
King's Bay
But beyond the ideal snap-
shots or in the background is Jef-


frey Wagner standing on
a corner somewhere in
the county and asking
for money
Wagner, 25, of Dunnel-
lon, makes his living out-
doors in parking lots and
on street corners. From
his perches across the
county, he approaches
residents in their cars or
while pumping gas to
seek cash.
He usually says some-
thing like "I need gas
money because my


Jeffi
Wag
has told
he me
$1,000
panhan
grand-


mother's car ran out of gas," or
"I need money for food for me
and my kids."
Many kind and generous peo-


ple have handed over
singles, fives, 10s, 20s
and more to the man.
The catch is, his ac-
tions are criminal. Most
' of Wagner's 24 arrests -
including 39 misde-
meanor and 17 felony
charges are for tres-
ner passing. He has tres-
olice passed on at least 63
akes businesses in Citrus
a week County.
idling. "I asked if the many
trips to jail are really
worth what he is doing," said
Deputy Laura Newton, who re-
cently encountered Wagner. "He
said that it was definitely worth
it because he clears $1,000 a


week, sometimes more. So why
should he get a 9-to-5 job being
'owned by the man' when he can
work for himself?"
Wagner knows it is not illegal
to "panhandle" in the county, ex-
cept in Crystal River. Therefore,
he moves from location to loca-
tion, keeping deputies from
catching him, officials said. But
he continues his routine.
Wagner is arrested for violat-
ing a trespass order, landing him
in jail with small bond. He is re-
leased and quickly goes back to
"business."
On Thursday, Feb. 21, deputies
arrested Wagner for obstruct-
ing/hindering the flow of traffic
when he approached a woman


backing out of her parking
space. He was charged with a
misdemeanor.
Authorities explained Wagner
has been known to become hos-
tile when people refuse his
requests.
One man told deputies, "I told
Wagner I had given him money
before and I knew his game. I
wasn't going to be a victim again."
Wagner threatened to beat the
man up, officials said.
Therefore, local officials are
asking the public not to buy into
the "Wagner way" They said if
you see a man with a "100%
Mama's Boy" tattoo on the left
side of his neck, walk or drive the
other way


Sound communication


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
On tour from the Ivory Coast, Eric Bli Bi Gore teaches participants the art of the African drum Saturday at Hernando Church of the Living God.


South African man teaches locals

how to talk with beat ofa drum


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
HERNANDO Nine
strangers seated in the circle
spoke not a word, but commu-
nicated with each other
through a thundering beat
and vibration. Hands moved
quickly back and forth across
drums to create simultaneous
sounds signaling a cultural
meaning.
"When you are playing, you
are talking in language," said
internationally known profes-
sional drummer Eric Bli Bi
Gore, of Djsanufla, Ivory
Coast, West Africa.
Gore joined other profes-
sional drummers and dancers
Saturday at Hernando Church
of the Living God to educate
the public on the African
culture.
"My goal was to try to bring
the community together from
all ethnic backgrounds so we
can have fun and learn about


culture," event organizer
Sophia Phillips said.
Diverse movements of the
hand created unique sounds.
Some participants didn't miss
a beat, while others needed
Gore's help.
"It was kind of hard to keep
up with the beat," participat-
ing drummer Angelia Ballemy
said. "But once you got the
rhythm, it was a lot easier.
Most of the time that I was
drumming I was looking at
him and watched his hands
while I was counting."
From the age of 6, Gore
studied the master drummer
in his village. He then contin-
ued traveling around the
world, performing in the
United States, Europe, Africa
and South America. He has
played with artists such as
the Rolling Stones and
Ludacris.
"The drum speaks the lan-
guage," Gore said to his stu-
dents. "You have to organize


Park hosts Herita


Special to the Chronicle
Area residents or visi-
tors interested in history
can step back in time Sat-
urday, March 9, at during
Homosassa Heritage Days
at Ellie Schiller Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park.
Displays of historic pho-
tos of the Homosassa area
and Homosassa Springs
will be on display during
the annual event from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the
Florida Room. Regular
admission will apply for
entrance into the wildlife
park, but viewing the ex-
hibits is free.
Jason D. Moser, Ph.D.


with the Florida Public
Archaeology Network will
deliver a special Florida
Archaeological Month
presentation focusing on
research into the people,
places and lands of
David Yulee's Margarita
Plantation.
Candace Boothe, Mar-
garet Harris, Betty Berger
and Gus Valderrama will
don costumes and re-
enactment conversations
among Florida pioneer
woman Dessie Smith
Prescott, Marjorie Kinnan
Rawlings and Ernest
Hemingway Retired park
rangers Jack Kearns and
Patrick Dillard will remi-
nisce about the early days


.Lu.I

-South African Eric Bli Bi Gore
helps celebrate Black History
Month by conducting a class
on the African drum Saturday
afternoon at Hernando Church
of the Living God. Gore, seen
above and left, travels around
the world performing on his na-
s tive drums and teaching others
-the same technique. The
professional drummer has
performed with the Rolling
Stones and Ludacris.
"
your hand. Everything we do 270-6148 or 352-897-4173. 5660, ext. 1334, or
in Africa has to make sense." Contact Chronicle reporter eworthington@chronicle
For information, call 352- Eryn Worthington at 352-563- online.com.


Around the COUNTY


ige Days
of Homosassa Springs at
2 p.m. Park service spe-
cialist J.D. Mendenhall
and park ranger Andrew
Moody will discuss Ivan
Tors Animal Actors and
Gentle Ben, Clarence the
cross-eyed Lion, Flipper
the dolphin and other fa-
mous animals that win-
tered at Homosassa
Springs in the late 1960s
and early 1970s.
Local authors Barbara
Cairns and Betty Berger
will sign copies of their
books in the Florida room.
For more information
on Homosassa Heritage
Day, call Susan Straw-
bridge at 352-628-5445, ext
1002.


Cutler Spur project begins
Monday, Feb. 25
The Cutler Spur Boulevard Road Improve-
ment Project is set to begin Monday, Feb. 25.
Cutler Spur Boulevard will be closed be-
tween Paradise Pointe Road and King's Bay
Drive for 90 days.
Transportation board
to meet March 14
The Citrus County Transportation Planning
Organization (TPO) board will meet at 5:15
p.m. Thursday, March 14, in the council
chamber at the Inverness Government Cen-
ter, 212 W. Main St., Inverness.
Any person requiring reasonable accom-
modation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment, contact the
Citrus County Administrator's Office, 110 N.
Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450, 352-341-
6560, at least two days before the meeting. If
you are hearing or speech impaired, use the
TDD Telephone 352-341-6580.


If a person decides to appeal any decision
made by the Transportation Planning Organi-
zation with respect to any matter considered
at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made,
which record shall include the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be
based.
Free landscaping class set
for Tuesday, March 12
The Citrus County Water Resources De-
partment will offer a free class on Florida-
Friendly Landscaping.
Gardeners will learn how to determine en-
vironmental conditions and plan accordingly
- "Right Plant, Right Place" is a best man-
agement practice.
The class is scheduled from 2 to 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday, March 12, in the extension class-
room at 3650 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
Preregistration is required by calling Gina
Hamilton at 352-527-5707.
From staff reports


*


rJ
^ j^






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DCF: Medicaid



paying nursing home



bill for wealthy


Associated Press

MIAMI Florida welfare officials are
proposing a bill that targets Medicaid
fraud among patients who hide their as-
sets with family and friends to get the
taxpayer-funded program to pay for
their nursing home care.
Patients are allowed to hire a relative
or friend to oversee small aspects of
their care, such as hair styling or room
decorating. But instead of being paid
monthly or yearly, some caregivers are
paid up front for years of service at a
time, which can decrease some patients'
assets so they in turn qualify for Medi-
caid. Spouses also can sign over their
patient's financial support to the state,
which allows couples with millions of
dollars in assets to get Medicaid to foot
the bill, Department of Children and
Families spokesman Joe Follick said
Friday
A 58-year-old patient submitted a con-
tract last September to pay someone $25
an hour for 10 hours a week over the
next 22 years, paying them up front and
diverting nearly $300,000. The em-
ployee's job description included label-
ing clothes so they aren't lost,
shampooing and brushing the patient's
hairand decorating the patient's room
with family photos, according to Medi-
caid records provided by DCE
"These are services that most people's
loved ones would be providing without
compensation, and it causes us to ques-
tions what the purpose of these con-
tracts are really for," Follick said.
DCF officials said the loopholes allow
patients to unfairly divert assets and are
costing the taxpayer-funded Medicaid
program millions of dollars a year.
The agency tracked 538 cases over six
years and found Medicaid spent more
than $29 million in services for people
whose spouses were financially stable
but had signed over financial support to
the state so Medicaid would pay for the
nursing home. Officials could have re-
covered $24 million from those spouses
under federal law, but the state cur-


rently lacks a process to do, DCF offi-
cials said.
Here's how it works: The healthy
spouse legally turns over the patient
spouse's financial support to the state.
The healthy spouse still lives in the cou-
ple's home and is allowed to have assets
including personal income, a car and up
to roughly $115,000 a year in the bank.
"Taxpayers shouldn't be subsidizing
nursing home care for the wealthy And
with Medicaid being expanded in the fu-
ture, it's more important now than ever
that we make sure that every dollar is
being spent correctly," Follick said.
DCF is meeting with lawmakers to
discuss a bill that would increase over-
sight and close loopholes.
There are no federal or state policies
prohibiting patients from transferring
funds and assets to family and friends
they hire to fill caregiver roles.
Florida, New York and Connecticut
struggle with this problem, likely be-
cause they have a strong sector of elder-
law experts who advise clients to take
advantage of the loophole, welfare offi-
cials said.
In New York, Medicaid attorneys have
to open a lawsuit before the state
supreme court to try to recoup money
from a person who has signed over a
spouse's financial support to the state.
They typically only open cases involving
couples with assets of more than
$100,000. Connecticut enacted a law that
allows people to sign over rights to the
state only if the healthy spouse can't be
located or can't provide information
about the assets. The law is being chal-
lenged by elder-law advocacy groups.
Some states have restricted contracts
so patients can't pay up front or the serv-
ices can't duplicate those already pro-
vided by a nursing home.
The Florida Bar is looking for clarifi-
cation on the subject and conducted a
public hearing in Tampa on Friday to
discuss whether it's OK for non-lawyers
to prepare personal service contracts or
give advice about the implementation of
Florida law to obtain Medicaid benefits.


State BRIEFS


State warns about Pilot hits water
fake websites near Clearwater


TALLAHASSEE Flori-
da's Department of Children
and Families is warning about
fake websites that offer to
help people apply for public
assistance.
The state agency said Fri-
day it had gotten several re-
ports this week regarding
websites that ask for financial
and personal information.
DCF officials said there
was only one website author-
ized to accept applications for
Medicaid, food stamps or wel-
fare, and it is run by the state.
The web address is www.
myflorida.com/accessflorida.
DCF Secretary David
Wilkins cautioned public as-
sistance applicants to safe-
guard their personal data just
like they would bank or finan-
cial information.
The department also cau-
tioned about mobile phone
applications that request con-
fidential information from peo-
ple who have electronic
benefits transfer (EBT) cards.
DCF officials said such phone
applications could open the
door to potential fraud.

Man dies after
kicked by horse
WELLINGTON -A man
kicked by a horse at a South
Florida polo club has died.
Palm Beach County Sher-
iff's Office spokeswoman Teri
Barbera said Jose Calverio
was taking a horse from a
field Friday afternoon at the
International Polo Club in
Wellington.
She said Calverio, a paid
horse groomer for a profes-
sional polo player, spooked an-
other horse as he ran behind it.
The other horse kicked Calve-
rio, knocking him unconscious.
Calverio was flown to a hos-
pital. He was pronounced dead
an hour after the accident.


CLEARWATER A pilot
says he splashed down in the
waters off Clearwater to avoid
crashing his stalled plane into
traffic.
Anthony Marsh was flying
from Pennsylvania to the
Tampa Bay area early Friday
when the Piper Cherokee's
engine stopped as he ap-
proached St. Petersburg-
Clearwater International
Airport.
Marsh told the Tampa Bay
Times knew he couldn't make
it to the airport, so he franti-
cally looked for somewhere to
land. Marsh said a nearby
bridge and highway were too
crowded with traffic, so he
aimed for the water.
Marsh said the plane
quickly filled with water. He
kicked out the windshield and
swam away.
Rescue crews found him
clinging to the plane's tail.
Marsh was treated for injuries
to his hand and head.
The Federal Aviation Ad-
ministration is investigating.
Court upholds
license revocation
TALLAHASSEE -A three-
judge panel has upheld the
state's revocation of an out-of-
state resident's Florida driving
privileges in a drunken driving
case.
The ruling Friday by the 1st
District Court of Appeal is
based on a law that perma-
nently revokes a motorist's
driver license after getting a


fourth conviction for driving
under the influence.
The panel rejected Jeffrey
John Silha's argument the law
didn't apply to him because
he no longer lived in the state
and did not have a Florida li-
cense when he got his fourth
DUI conviction in Georgia.
Florida revoked his license
in 1999, but two years later he
obtained an Arkansas license.
In 2010, though, Arkansas re-
fused to renew his license be-
cause Florida had suspended
his driving privileges, even
though he no longer had a
Florida license.
Ticket wins Mega
Money jackpot
TALLAHASSEE One
ticket matched all four num-
bers plus the Mega Ball in the
Mega Money game to win an
$800,000 jackpot, the Florida
Lottery said Saturday.
The winning ticket was
bought in Doral, officials said.
One ticket won $7,609.50
for picking 4-of-4; 52 tickets
won $320.50 each for picking
3-of-4 plus the Mega Ball
number; 838 tickets won $59
each for picking 3-of-4; 1,537
tickets won $22.50 each for
picking 2-of-4 plus the Mega
Ball; 13,419 won $2.50 each
for matching one number plus
the Mega Ball; 25,327 tickets
won $2 each for picking 2-of-
4; and 32,069 won a free
Quick Pick ticket for matching
the Mega Ball.
The numbers drawn Friday
night were 2-32-43-44 and the
Mega Ball was 22.
-From wire reports


gnoices in today's Citrus County Chronicle

Bid Notices..............D9


Meeting Notices......D8


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
PR HI LO PR |HI LO PR
NA 88 67 NA L. J82 63 0.00


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
pc
pc
ts
pc
ts
pc
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts
ts
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southwest winds around 10 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a light chop. Chance of showers
and thunderstorms today.


85 67 0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK E xclusvebdaily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 79 Low: 60
Partly sunny; 50% chance of
showers.
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 83 Low: 68
Partly sunny; 40% chance of showers.

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 76 Low: 50
A line of thunderstorms will move through.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 84/65
Record 88/32
Normal 75/46
Mean temp. 75
Departure from mean +15
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.90 in.
Total for the year 1.00 in.
Normal for the year 5.40 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 7
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.93 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 64
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 49%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
juniper, oak, nettle
Today's count: 7.6/12
Monday's count: 8.6
Tuesday's count: 7.6
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
2/24 SUNDAY 4:01 10:13 4:24 10:36
2/25 MONDAY 4:46 10:57 5:09 11:20
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SSUNSET TONIGHT............................6:27 PM .
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:59A.M.
4 W MOONRISE TODAY...........................5:37 P.M.
FEB. 25 MARCH 4 MARCH11 MARCH19 MOONSET TODAY ............................ 5:55A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers


City
Chassahowitzka*
Crystal River**
Withlacoochee*
Homosassa***


High/Low
4:25 a/12:21 a
2:46 a/10:20 a
12:33 a/8:08 a
3:35 a/11:57 a


**At King's Bay
Sunday


High/Low
5:27 p/12:58 p
3:48 p/10:23 p
1:35 p/8:11 p
4:37 p/--


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
5:06 a/1:01 a 5:53 p/1:30 p
3:27 a/10:52 a 4:14 p/11:01 p
1:14 a/8:40 a 2:01 p/8:49 p
4:16 a/12:00 a 5:03 p/12:29 p


Gulf water
temperature


68
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.25 NA 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.77 NA 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 38.66 NA 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.96 NA 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


Saturday
City H LPcp.
Albany 37 32 .01
Albuquerque 47 22
Asheville 53 37 .17
Atlanta 52 41 1.32
Atlantic City 47 35 .42
Austin 72 37
Baltimore 46 32 .12
Billings 38 30 .03
Birmingham 59 46 .21
Boise 42 28 .29
Boston 38 32
Buffalo 38 31
Burlington, VT 37 32 .07
Charleston, SC 63 44 2.22
Charleston, WV 55 40
Charlotte 43 37 .43
Chicago 28 23
Cincinnati 45 32
Cleveland 35 31
Columbia, SC 47 40 .83
Columbus, OH 41 35
Concord, N.H. 35 26 .06
Dallas 55 30
Denver 45 18
Des Moines 32 12
Detroit 34 30
El Paso 58 32
Evansville, IN 43 25
Harrisburg 41 32 .03
Hartford 38 34 .06
Houston 70 47
Indianapolis 36 22
Jackson 59 42
Las Vegas 63 40
Little Rock 53 30
Los Angeles 60 45
Louisville 48 29
Memphis 51 32
Milwaukee 30 24
Minneapolis 29 19
Mobile 61 55 .75
Montgomery 58 51 .60
Nashville 54 36


Sunday
FcstH L
sn 38 23
pc 37 21
s 58 31
s 64 43
pc 52 32
pc 77 46
pc 46 29
pc 38 22
pc 61 50
pc 42 25
rs 38 29
sf 35 26
rs 39 23
pc 68 49
s 48 25
s 64 37
pc 33 24
s 43 24
sn 34 24
s 67 43
pc 40 26
rs 35 23
pc 68 42
sn 29 11
c 32 24
pc 34 24
pc 57 31
s 47 31
pc 44 25
rs 39 26
pc 73 54
pc 40 25
pc 66 51
s 56 38
pc 58 42
s 67 47
s 51 32
s 58 43
c 33 24
c 29 16
pc 68 57
pc 67 54
s 56 35


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY

Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 60 55 .85 ts 69 59
New York City 42 36 .26 sh 44 31
Norfolk 47 43 .70 pc 57 34
Oklahoma City 47 22 pc 60 35
Omaha 37 5 c 34 25
Palm Springs 71 42 s 68 45
Philadelphia 48 35 .12 pc 48 30
Phoenix 66 43 s 62 41
Pittsburgh 43 33 c 34 24
Portland, ME 37 29 .08 rs 35 26
Portland, Ore 48 38 .06 sh 49 40
Providence, R.I. 38 30 .12 rs 41 28
Raleigh 43 36 .92 s 60 35
Rapid City 46 12 c 35 17
Reno 47 34 pc 49 25
Rochester, NY 39 33 .06 sf 36 26
Sacramento 60 44 s 65 38
St. Louis 34 16 pc 40 29
St. Ste. Marie 32 26 .24 c 31 20
Salt Lake City 37 26 .23 pc 33 21
San Antonio 74 43 pc 77 47
San Diego 62 46 s 67 50
San Francisco 56 47 s 58 44
Savannah 62 49 .33 pc 70 54
Seattle 50 39 sh 47 40
Spokane 42 28 c 39 30
Syracuse 37 34 .09 sf 34 26
Topeka 35 1 pc 38 31
Washington 46 34 .08 pc 48 33
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 89 Orlando, Fla. LOW -11 Gunnison,
Colo.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 86/70/s
Amsterdam 33/32/sf
Athens 65/54/pc
Beijing 39/26/pc
Berlin 36/33/sn
Bermuda 67/63/sh
Cairo 74/54/pc
Calgary 39/28/pc
Havana 83/66/pc
Hong Kong 71/68/pc
Jerusalem 60/51/pc


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


55/41/pc
36/33/c
48/28/pc
75/45/s
32/27/sn
28/17/pc
34/31/c
90/73/ts
49/45/sh
84/72/ts
46/28/pc
36/23/sf
35/33/c


Z- C I T R U S


C 0 U N T Y -"--1


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A4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013


STATE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Week in state gov't: Scott pulls off a stunner


JIM SAUNDERS
The News Service of
Florida

TALLAHASSEE No-
body could have seen this
coming when Rick Scott
ran for governor in 2010.
But there he was
Wednesday, stand-
ing before the mi-
crophones in the
Governor's Man- fc .
sion and announc-
ing he would L
support a massive
expansion of the
Medicaid program. Gov.
Sometimes, to Sc
borrow a well- annou
worn cliche, you his de
just can't make this Wedn
stuff up.
Scott, who launched his
political career by railing
against President Obama's
plans to overhaul health
care, said he would sup-
port a Medicaid expansion
that is part of the federal
Affordable Care Act, aka
Obamacare. He added the
caveat that the expansion
should be re-evaluated
after three years.
Democrats and groups
like Planned Parenthood
praised Scott for his stance
- almost certainly one of
the few times they have
praised the Republican
during the past three years.
Meanwhile, tea party ac-
tivists and groups such as
Americans for Prosperity
- the conservative types
heavily responsible for
electing Scott in the first
place were aghast.
Scott, who is preparing
for a re-election campaign
in 2014, described his


stance as a "compassion-
ate, common-sense step
forward." If lawmakers go
along with Scott, hundreds
of thousands of Floridians
will become eligible for
Medicaid coverage, with
the federal government
paying 100 percent
of the expansion
costs during the
first three years
and at least 90 per-
cent of the costs
^^ later.
"We have a
choice and it's
Rick not an easy choice
ott but my job is to
minced worry about every
cision Florida family,"
esday. Scott said during
the news confer-
ence at the mansion.
Scott also described the
Affordable Care Act as the
"law of the land," after it
was cemented by Obama's
re-election in November
and a landmark U.S. Su-
preme Court ruling last
year.
But one critical piece of
the ruling in a lawsuit
spearheaded by Florida -
was states can't be forced
to go along with the Medi-
caid expansion. So while
the Affordable Care Act
will remain the law of the
land, Medicaid expansion
boils down to a policy
choice.
Scott's announcement
also came less than two
months after he got pillo-
ried for using what critics
said were inflated esti-
mates about the Medicaid
expansion's future costs
for the state. Those esti-
mates were widely viewed


Weekly ROUNDUP


as an attempt to raise
doubts about going for-
ward with the expansion.
Regardless, Scott's new-
found support is a political
gamble. Ultimately, he will
need the Legislature to
agree to the expansion,
which at least at this point
appears far from certain.
Some key Senate Re-
publicans indicated this
week they might be willing
to go along, and Scott
could count on support
from House and Senate
Democrats. But House Re-
publicans are another
story, with Speaker Will
Weatherford, R-Wesley
Chapel, repeatedly saying
he is "skeptical" about the
expansion.
"Governor Scott has
made his decision, and I
certainly respect his
thoughts," Weatherford
said in a statement emailed
to reporters a few minutes
before Scott made the an-
nouncement. "However,
the Florida Legislature will
make the ultimate decision.
I am personally skeptical
that this inflexible law will
improve the quality of
health care in our state and
ensure our long-term finan-
cial stability."
MEANWHILE,
MORE MEDICAID
Just hours before Scott's
announcement, he and
other Republicans got
news they have sought for
nearly two years: The fed-
eral government is poised
to approve a proposal to
enroll almost all Medicaid
beneficiaries in managed-


care plans.
Scott and the GOP-
dominated Legislature ap-
proved the proposal in
2011, arguing it would help
hold down costs and better
coordinate care for Medi-
caid beneficiaries. It has
been controversial, how-
ever, because Democrats
and other critics contend
that HMOs could squeeze
the care provided to
beneficiaries.
State and federal offi-
cials still have to work out
the final details, but
Florida received notice
from Washington of an
"agreement in principle."
Scott described the deci-
sion as a win for the state.
"Improving the coordi-
nation of care in Medicaid
means we will be able to
better manage chronic
conditions and give more
preventative treatments to
help keep Florida families
healthy," he said.
Hundreds of thousands
of Medicaid beneficiaries
already get services
through managed-care
plans, but the changes
would make enrollment
mandatory. Federal offi-
cials recently approved a
related proposal for Medi-
caid-eligible seniors who
need long-term care; this
week's announcement ap-
plies to the broader Medi-
caid population, such as
low-income women and
children.
The timing of the notice
and Scott's announcement
of supporting the Medicaid
expansion created specula-


tion the issues could be
linked. Bottom line, Florida
leaders wanted statewide
managed-care, while the
Obama administration
wants Medicaid expansion.
But Scott and Senate
President Don Gaetz, R-
Niceville, denied any con-
nection, or quid pro quo,
between the issues.
"I don't think there's any
linkage," Gaetz said.
"There's certainly no link-
age in my mind."
BILLS ARE MOVING
(OR DYING)
Whatever their differ-
ences on the Medicaid ex-
pansion, Republican law-
makers showed this week
they remain in firm control
as the legislative session
gets ready to start March 5.
As an example, a House
panel Wednesday ap-
proved a bill to give the
governor more power over
the make-up of judicial
nominating commissions.
While those commissions
might sound obscure and
wonky, they play an impor-
tant role in the process of
choosing new judges.
Republicans said the
changes would make
judges more attuned to the
wishes of the people, with
Rep. Charlie Stone, R-
Ocala, adding the governor
is an "elected official held
accountable to the voting
public."
But Democrats, who lost
a party-line vote on the
bill, argued the measure
would make it easier for
the Republican governor
to stack the courts.
"The governor not only
gets to pick who the judges


are, he gets to pick who
gives him the list," said
Rep. Cynthia Stafford, D-
Miami. "I think that upsets
the balance of power here.
I think we need to keep an
independent judiciary"
Another example of Re-
publicans flexing their
muscles came as Sen.
Eleanor Sobel, D-Holly-
wood, had to pull back a
bill (SB 196) aimed at al-
lowing civil unions, which
would grant legal relation-
ship rights to people who
aren't married.
Sobel is chairwoman of
the Senate Children, Fam-
ilies and Elder Affairs
Committee, but she de-
cided against bringing up
the measure for a vote, be-
cause it likely would have
failed. Republicans make
up a majority of the panel.
"I can count," Sobel said.
Conservative opponents
of the bill claimed victory
"Just hours ago, de-
feated SB 196, the stealth
gay marriage bill," tweeted
John Stemberger, presi-
dent of the Florida Family
Policy Council, after the
measure was postponed.
STORY OF THE
WEEK: Gov Rick Scott, a
longtime critic of the fed-
eral Affordable Care Act,
announced he would sup-
port an expansion of the
Medicaid program.
QUOTE OF THE
WEEK: "Will Medicaid ex-
pansion cover me for the
knife (Scott) just buried in
my back?" Henry Kelley, a
tea party leader in
Florida, said in a Twitter
message after Scott's
announcement


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STATE


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 A5


U
e(
IE





A6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013


BOCC
Continued from Page Al

aside by the board to pro-
vide for indigent health
care, long term," Wesch
said. "The other 50 per-
cent there's a larger list
of uses but they are
medically related in order
to further the development
of the medical community
- things along those lines
as opposed to just going
into the general fund for
general purposes."
County Administrator
Brad Thorpe said some of
the money could be used
by the designer of the med-
ical corridor along County
Road 491 to improve it.
"We're making great


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


progress here with the
hospital and the trustees,"
Thorpe said.
Wesch said plans were
under way
"We're finalizing an in-
terlocal agreement be-
tween the board and the
trustees to be placed on
the board's agenda for
next Tuesday that's going
to outline our responsibil-
ities with the development
of their holdings and we'll
use that as the nucleus for
the corridor expansion,"
Wesch said.
Meek addressed the
road funding issue.
"We're not asking them
to use the hospital indi-
gent care millage to fund
roads," Meek said.
The public hospital sale
does represent a funding


source loss.
'"As soon as that hospital
is sold and the proceeds
delivered, the lawful abil-
ity to levy the millage goes
away," Wesch said.
Thorpe said he would
like to change the statute
to keep the millage to use
for indigent care.
"Other counties took
that money and spent it all
down and now they are out
of money for indigent care
again," Thorpe said.
However, the county
could look into putting the
money into a trust fund as
a base to generate funding
for indigent care.
Chronicle reporter
Chris Van Ormer can be
reached at 352-564-2916 or
cvanormer@chronicle
online.com.


CCHB
Continued from Page Al

would pay for construction of that road,
along with installation of a traffic signal
at C.R. 491.
County officials also propose another
north-south roadway through a medical
campus extending beyond Allen Ridge,
if it is developed.
The CCHB agrees to donate the right
of way and pay for any internal drive-
ways that connect to the new roads,
CCHB attorney Bill Grant told the board
Friday
Trustees also said they will ask that
the interlocal include possibly moving
or closing the current Allen Ridge en-
trance, since it is just south of the pro-
posed new road.
They also would like the potential for
a second Allen Ridge access further to
the south to any possible future office or


commercial development.
They will seek rezoning of 40 vacant
acres west of Allen Ridge to allow con-
struction of medical facilities.
CCHB trustees say the agreement has
value above the actual development po-
tential. With the board considering a
sale or merger of the public hospital, an
interlocal agreement with the county
for development rights at Allen Ridge
increases the value for a potential
buyer.
"I hate to say this, but that's more
valuable than the building we have over
there," trustee Bob Priselac said, com-
paring the Allen Ridge agreement to the
hospital in Inverness.
The plan will be presented Monday
night to the Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation, which oversees operation
of the hospital and its assets by lease
with the CCHB.
Contact Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright at 352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


H. -
,-~ --r.~ T


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
In this composite image, an organized crowd attacks the food tables Saturday in Crystal River High School's cafeteria as community members join the Stop Hunger Now
organization in putting 50,000 meals together in about five hours. The nonprofit organization provides meals to those in need for more than 20 countries worldwide.


HANDS
Continued from Page Al

their goal Saturday, workers
viewed their progress in the
process. A big white board on
the stage of the cafeteria kept
track of the thousands of meals
being prepared by the hands of
volunteers.
Each meal prepared has
proven to provide nutrition for
children.
"Our meals also go to clinics to
address malnutrition," Warren
said. "A lot of problems in coun-
tries are malnutrition. We have
follow-up at some of these clin-
ics that are receiving the food. A


year later, parents are brining
their children back in for a
checkup and they are not sick. It
is because they are getting the
food."
In addition to hosting Stop
Hunger Now, Rotarians cele-
brated the 108th anniversary of
the birth of Rotary while spon-
soring polio awareness day
"We want to make people
aware that we are still fighting
polio in far areas of the world,"
said Art Jones, president-elect
of the Kings Bay Rotary "We are
not going to give up. We are ded-
icated to wipe it out.
"The beauty of this event is
that they complement one an-
other," Jones continued. "So
many kids and great people in


the community come out for
Stop Hunger Now. That's why
we decided to bring the polio
campaign here to remind every-
one of the awareness."
Saving lives was exactly the
mission behind Saturday's gath-
ering, as awareness was brought
to hunger and polio.
"One thing that many people
here in the room may not under-
stand is that they are saving
more than one life today,"
Barnard said. "Think about chil-
dren waking up when their par-
ents don't have enough money
for food. They are saving lives."
Contact Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at 352-563-
5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington
@chronicleonline. com.


Young and old alike participated in the Stop Hunger Now project at
the Crystal River High School cafeteria Saturday, as Emma
Thompson can eagerly attest.


WRESTLING
Continued from Page Al

Association. "It's only a
recommendation. But you
never take anything for
granted. I certainly don't. I
never thought it was
possible."
Mike Porcelli of Inver-
ness, a wrestling coach for
26 years, including from
2004-10 at Citrus High
School, and a 1988
Olympic alternate in
freestyle wrestling, was
shocked when the an-
nouncement was made by
the IOC.
"I've been involved with
USA Wrestling for many
years at many different
levels," he said. "Like
many of us, I did not see
this coming. There wasn't
a lot of talk that this was a
possibility. In essence, we
got caught with our pants
down and now have to
fight to keep wrestling as
an Olympic sport. It's been
involved in every
Olympics and has always
done well and is always
sold out. People wrestle
everywhere, all over the
world. It was shocking to
even be in this boat."
Wrestling organizations
across the globe have
formed committees and
are banding together to
fight this recommendation.
"What it has done is gal-
vanize the sport," Porcelli
said. "The U.S., Iran and
Russia have made a pact
to work together in attack-
ing this issue, which is a
good thing. They say fail-


WRESTLING'S OLYMPIC FUTURE
* WHAT: On Feb. 12, the International Olympic
Committee recommended to remove the sport of
wrestling from the 2020 Olympics.
* NEXT: The IOC executive board meets in May in
St. Petersburg, Russia, to recommend what sports
to consider for inclusion in the 2020 Games.
* FINAL: In September, the entire IOC will meet in
Buenos Aires, Argentina, for a final vote on which
sport gets the nod for 2020.


ure is not an option, and
that really holds true
here."
The IOC executive
board will meet in St. Pe-
tersburg, Russia, in May In
that meeting, the group
will recommend what
sports to include in the
2020 Olympics, which
could put wrestling back
on the table. But even if
wrestling isn't included in
that decision, a final vote
by the entire IOC will
occur in a September
meeting in Buenos Aires,
Argentina.
"Wrestling won't know
its fate until September.
All the other sports con-
sidered will also be eligi-
ble in September," said
Craig Sesker, USA
Wrestling manager of com-
munications. "The effort
worldwide has been in-
credible. It's been unbe-
lievable, I just hope the
IOC is paying attention
and realizes how impor-
tant this is to so many
countries."
According to Sesker,
nearly 200 countries have
wrestling, 71 of those were
represented in the 2012
London Olympics and 29
countries won medals -


the most of any sport.
Unlike some sports, the
Olympics have always
been the pinnacle for
wrestling success. If it is
not included in 2020, the
damage could be
devastating.
"I feel comfortable that
we'll be moving in the right


direction. We're very pre-
pared and are very protec-
tive of wrestling," Grant
said. "The Olympic move-
ment is especially impor-
tant in wrestling. Without
that aspiration, wrestling
could be damaged for
many years to come."
Porcelli said the work
being done now across the
globe could decide wrest-
ling's Olympic future, not
just for 2020, but forever.
"There should be a huge
push over the next two
months to get this recti-
fied," he said. "If it doesn't
happen, I seriously doubt
wrestling would ever be
reinstated. Once you're
gone, it's very hard to get
put back in the program.


"It is up to us as an or-
ganization to seize this mo-
ment and sell our sport to
the masses. It's really one
of the pure amateur sports
that's left. It hasn't been
touched by pro leagues and
pro money I really believe
it's going to be reversed. I
just can't see it. There's
never been an Olympics
without wrestling. I'm hold-
ing out hope."
Porcelli, who still works
with young wrestlers
through a club run out of


his house, knows the work
and dedication it takes to
reach the top of the sport
and doesn't want to see
Olympic dreams dashed.
"I made a vow to myself
that I wanted to be an
Olympian," he said. You
put many, many years of
hard work into this. It
takes quite a while to get to
that level."
"To have it taken out in
2020, would be like putting
a stake in the heart of the
sport"


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Louise
Butterworth, 84
HOMOSASSA
A Funeral Mass for Mrs.
Louise M. Butterworth,
age 84 of Homosassa,
Florida, will be held 11:00
AM, Thursday, February
28, 2013 at St Thomas the
Apostle Catholic Church,
Homosassa with Father
Ron Marecki officiating.
She died Monday, Febru-
ary 11, 2013 in Homosassa,
FL. Friends who wish may
send memorial donations
to Hospice of Citrus
County PO. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, FL 34464.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com.
Mrs. Butterworth was
born August 1, 1928 in
Boston, MA, daughter of
Joseph and Elizabeth
(Sheehan) Kelly She
worked as an office man-
ager for Electrolux and
moved to Naples, FL from
Scituate, MA in 1991 and
then to Homosassa, FL in
1999. She enjoyed the
beach, playing golf and
reading. She was a mem-
ber of Sugarmill Woods
Country Club and St.
Thomas the Apostle
Catholic Church, Ho-
mosassa, FL.
Mrs. Butterworth was
preceded in death by her
parents, husband, J. Mar-
shall Butterworth, and sis-
ter, Elizabeth Corley
Survivors include three
sons, William J. (Julie) But-
terworth of Homosassa,
FL, Richard J. (Anne) But-
terworth of Ipswich, MA,
and Robert J. Butterworth
of Duxbury, MA, two
daughters, Marsha
Benedetti of FL, and Bar-
bara West of Dunnellon,
FL, sister, Helen Stone of
Grafton, MA, ten grand-
children, and five great
grandchildren.




Clyde
Carruthers, 86
BEVERLY HILLS
Clyde L. Carruthers, 86,
of Beverly Hills, died
Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013.
Arrangements entrusted
to Fero Funeral Home.

June
Richardson, 87
BEVERLY HILLS
June Richardson, 87, of
Beverly Hills, died
Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2013.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is in
charge of private
arrangements.


"Your Trusted Family-Owned
Funeral Home for 50 Years"



Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
1901 SE Hwy. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


Edith Reed, 88
OCALA
Edith Morrow Reed, for-
merly of Sugar Run, Pa.,
and Horseheads, N.Y,
passed away Feb. 9, 2013,
in Ocala,
Fla., at the
age of 88.
Born
Dec. 11,
1924, in --
Sugar
Run, Pa.,
Edie com-
ple ted Edith
Mansfield Reed
Univer-
sity's registered nurses
program in 1946. In 1958,
Edie moved with her fam-
ily to Horseheads, N.Y.
She worked at Tyler Me-
morial Hospital and St.
Joseph's Hospital, retiring
in 1989. Edie was passion-
ate about her patients and
her nursing career. She
was a wonderful cook and
enjoyed feeding her neigh-
bors and friends. She also
enjoyed gardening, card
making, playing mahjong
and painting.
Edith was preceded in
death by her husband of 57
years, Edward. She is sur-
vived by her brother,
Wayne Morrow (Mabel) of
Sugar Run, Pa.; sister-in-
law Doris Madill (William)
of Monroeton, Pa.; her
three children, Edward M.
of Palm Coast, Fla., Scott
A. of Horseheads, N.Y.,
and Cindy Chilton
(Michael) of Phoenix,
Ariz.; seven grandchil-
dren; four great-grand-
daughters; and many dear
nieces and nephews.
A 1 p.m. memorial serv-
ice will be March 9, 2013,
at Countryside Presbyte-
rian Church. A graveside
service will be held in
Wyalusing, Pa., at a later
date. Contributions in her
name can be made to
Countryside Presbyterian
Church Memorial Garden
Fund, 7708S.W State Road
200, Ocala, FL 34476; or St.
Joseph's Hospital Auxil-
iary, 555 St Joseph's Blvd.,
Elmira, NY 14901.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.


SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online. com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
C Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.




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call 726-8323


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Licensed Funeral Director
6I%3 1. 352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-66941
brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com


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Located in the Hampton Square Plaza
It is our office policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payment has the
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examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding
to the advertisement for the free discounted-offer or reduced-fee service, examination or
treatment Mm Fee ADAcode D0210, D0150 I


Donna
Scheesley, 81
HERNANDO
Donna Jean Scheesley,
81, Hernando, died at
home suddenly on Feb. 22,
2013. Mrs.
Scheesley
was born
Aug. 14,
1931, in
Rutland, sY
Ill., to the "-
late Kieth
and Lu-
cille Albee Donna
and came Scheesley
to this
area in 1979. She was the
former owner and opera-
tor of Donna J's Fancy
Pantry Restaurant in Dun-
nellon and member of the
First Baptist Church of
Hernando. Her other
memberships included
TOPS and the Hernando
VFW Post Auxiliary
She is survived by her
daughter, Deborah Simon-
ton, Hernando; her
brother and sister, Kieth
(Sue) Albee and Sharon
(Don) Harris, both of Albu-
querque, N.M.; grandchil-
dren, Michael and
Matthew Jaquet and
Tammy Short; great-grand-
children, Rachelle and
Alexander Jaquet and
Trey, Taryn and Tanner
Short. There are several
additional grand- and
great-grandchildren, as
well. She was preceded in
death by three husbands,
Richard Phillips, William
"Joe" Johanson and Walter
Scheesley; and three chil-
dren, Gary, Robert and
Denise Humphrey
Funeral services will be
conducted at 2 p.m. Tues-
day, Feb. 26, from Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
the Rev Keith Dendy offi-
ciating. Entombment will
follow at The Fountains in
Homosassa. Visitation will
be Tuesday from noon
until the hour of service.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

FREE OBITUARIES
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)
Obituaries will be
posted online at www.
chronicleonline.com.


To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Judy
Moseley
at 564-2917
jmoseley@chronicleonine.com
f i I


Gloria
Young, 89
LECANTO
Gloria L. Young, 89, of
Lecanto, Fla., formerly
from Redford, Mich.,
passed away Tuesday, Feb.
5, 2013, at
HPH Hos-
p i c e
House,
Lecanto,
Fla. *
Gloria .
was born
July 4,
1923, in Gloria
Highland Young
Park ,
Mich. She was the daugh-
ter of Byron Eldred and
Leota Mills. Gloria mar-
ried James Vincent Young
on Oct. 22, 1946, in Detroit,
Mich., and they raised two
sons who are surviving
her: Thomas Byron Young
of Lecanto, Fla., and
Michael James Young and
wife Karen of Northville,
Mich. Also surviving are
six grandchildren and two
great-grandchildren.
She was preceded in
death by her husband,
James Vincent Young; her
parents, Byron Eldred and
Leota Mills, formerly of
Detroit, Mich.; and her two
brothers, William Mills,
formerly of Palm Beach,
Fla., and Jack Eldred
Mills, formerly of Port
Charlotte, Fla.
Gloria was a member of
Unity Church of Citrus
County, Lecanto, Fla. A
private memorial service
was held at Unity Church
for close family members
and friends, officiated by
the Unity Church Prayer
Chaplains.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARY FEES
Area funeral homes
with established
accounts with the
Chronicle are charged
$8.75 per column
inch.
Non-local funeral
homes and those
without accounts are
required to pay in
advance by credit
card, and the cost is
$10 per column inch.
Small photos of the
deceased's face can
be included for an
additional charge.
Larger photos can be
accommodated for a
size-based fee.


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Polish cosmetics

maker Inglot dies


Associated Press

WARSAW, Poland -
Wojciech Inglot, a Polish
chemist and businessman
who founded and ran a
cosmetics company, In-
glot, that grew into an in-
ternational success with
nearly 400 stores in 50
countries, has died. He
was 57.
Inglot died unexpect-
edly Saturday after suf-
fering internal hemorr-
haging, a longtime friend
of Inglot's and associate
of the company, Mariusz
Ziomecki, told The Asso-
ciated Press. Inglot was
rushed to a hospital in
Przemysl, the eastern
Polish city where his cos-
metics are produced, but
doctors were unable to
save him.
After Poland began its
transition to a market
economy in 1989, Inglot
turned to producing cos-
metics, finding success
first at home and then in-
ternationally with a range
of nail polishes, eye shad-


ows and other products.
Today the Inglot logo can
be seen large-scale at
Times Square in New
York City and the cosmet-
ics are sold in nearly 400
boutiques and malls in
some 50 countries, in-
cluding at Macy's.
Recently, Inglot found
unexpected success with
a breathable nail polish
that became a surprise
hit with Muslim women.
The enamel, called 02M
- for Oxygen and Mois-
ture allows air and
water to pass through it,
unlike traditional var-
nishes that completely
occlude the nail.
Traditional varnishes
pose a religious problem
for observant Muslim
women because of
prayers five times a day
that require a pre-prayer
washing ritual. Islamic
scholars have long said
water must run over the
hands and arms, even the
finger nails, leading many
women to avoid using
polish.


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CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Meals include juice and milk.
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast,
cereal variety and toast, tater
tots.
Tuesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, cereal variety
and toast, grits.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, tater tots,
cereal variety and toast.
Lunch
Monday: Cheese pizza,
pulled barbecued pork on
bun, Very Berry super salad
with roll, fresh garden salad,
sweet peas, chilled flavored
applesauce.
Tuesday: Baked chicken
nuggets, hot ham and cheese,
yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby
carrots, steamed green beans,
chilled strawberry cups, fruit.
Wednesday: Hamburger
sliders, barbecued roasted
chicken with roll, turkey super
salad with roll, PB dippers,
fresh baby carrots, baked
beans, flavored Craisins, fruit.
Thursday: Nacho rounds,
uncrustable PBJ, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh baby carrots,
sweet corn, chilled mixed fruit.
Friday: Hot dog, turkey
wrap, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, potato smiles,
steamed broccoli, chilled
peach cups.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots, grits, milk and juice
variety.
Tuesday: Sausage and egg
biscuit, ultra cinnamon bun,


cereal and toast, tater tots,
milk and juice variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, tater
tots, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Monday: Pepperoni pizza,
chicken and rice burrito, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
steamed broccoli, chilled ap-
plesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Tuesday: Chicken nuggets
with ripstick, hot ham and
cheese, Italian super salad
with roll, yogurt parfait plate,
fresh baby carrots, sweet
peas, potato smiles, chilled
strawberry cups, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Wednesday: Breaded
chicken sandwich, turkey
wrap, PB dippers, fresh gar-
den salad, baked beans, fla-
vored Craisins, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds,
oven-baked breaded chicken
with ripstick, Very Berry super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh baby carrots,
sweet corn, chilled apple-
sauce, fruit juice, milk variety.
Friday: Chicken alfredo with
ripstick, hot dog, PB dipper,
fresh baby carrots, steamed
green beans, chilled flavored
applesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety, toast, tater
tots, grits, juice and milk


variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, ultra cin-
namon bun, cereal and toasts,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco bread, ultimate
breakfast round, cereal and
toast, grits, tater tots, juice and
milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun, ce-
real variety, toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken and rice
burrito, macaroni and cheese
with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken super salad with roll,
pizza, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, fresh broccoli,
potato roaster, steamed broc-
coli, chilled applesauce, juice,
milk.
Tuesday: Oriental orange
chicken plate, turkey and
gravy over noodles with rip-
stick, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, Italian super salad
with roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, cold corn
salad, celery, potato triangles,
sweet peas, baby carrots,
strawberry cup, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Barbecued
roasted chicken with roll,
spaghetti with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich,
turkey super salad with roll,
pizza, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, chilled baked
beans, baked beans, potato
roasters, flavored Craisins,
juice, milk.
Thursday: Fajita chicken
and rice with ripstick, macaroni



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and cheese with ripstick, ham-
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ham super salad with roll,
maxstix, yogurt parfait plate,
garden salad, baby carrots,
celery, green beans, potato tri-
angles, cucumbers, chilled
peach cups, juice, milk.
Friday: Hot ham and
cheese, chicken alfredo with
ripstick, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, Very Berry super
salad with roll, pizza, yogurt
parfait plate, baby carrots,
sweet corn, potato roasters,
cold corn salad, chilled straw-
berry cup, juice, milk.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Sliced turkey with
gravy, potatoes O'Brien, carrot
coins, sugar cookie, slice
whole-grain bread, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Beef and mush-
room penne pasta, mixed veg-
etables, garlic spinach,
pineapple, slice wheat bread,
low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Baked
chicken thigh with gravy,
mashed potatoes, green
beans, graham crackers, slice
whole-grain bread, low-fat
milk.
Thursday: Hamburger
patty with bun and ketchup/
mustard, baked beans, yellow
corn with diced tomatoes,
mixed fruit, low-fat milk.
Friday: Menu not available.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


ROOM TO
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Enjoy some "me" time with
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Accreditation by JCAHO


Adopt dog, get
free training
For the month of Febru-
ary, courtesy of Adopt a Res-
cued Pet, Citrus County
Animal Services offers dis-
counted prices on dogs at its
"My Furry Valentine" promo-
tion. Every dog will be of-
fered for the regular adoption
price, minus the discount
equal to its weight. A sepa-
rate $5 county license fee
applies. Animals Services is
at 4030 S. Airport Road in In-
verness. Call 352-746-8400
for more information, or visit
www.citruscritters.org.
A free six-week dog
obedience class is offered to
anyone adopting a dog from
Citrus County Animal Serv-
ices. A $20 donation is re-
quested for privately owned
dogs.
To preregister for the next
class, visit the shelter at
4030 S. Airport Road in In-
verness or the website at
www.citruscritters.com to
complete an application.
Proof of rabies vaccination
and county license are re-
quired. Call 352-746-8400
for more information.
Rescue continues
spay, neuter deal
Precious Paws Rescue
sells vouchers for its low-
cost spay and neuter pro-
gram at Greta's Touch
Grooming and Doggie Day
Care at 7360 S. Florida Ave.


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Pets are welcome to visit'


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in Floral City and at the PPR
Crystal River Mall Adoption
Center from noon to 4 p.m.
Thursday through Sunday.
The voucher price for
dogs is based on their
weight, starting at $25 to
neuter a male dog up to 50
pounds, and range from $30
to $60 to spay a female dog.
Cat spays are $20 and the
neuter fee is $10.
The pet owner is responsi-
ble to make a surgery ap-
pointment directly with the
Floral City Veterinary Hospi-
tal and transport the pet,
along with the voucher, to
and from FCVH. Any addi-
tional veterinary services
must be arranged by the
owner and paid for at the
FCVH appointment.
For more information, to
make a donation or to volun-
teer, call 352-726-4700.
Fosters sought for
homeless felines
PPR has several adult
and special needs cats that
would love to be in a home.
They miss living with a spe-
cial person, curling up on a
lap or just gazing out a win-
dow. They are up to date on
all veterinary care, litterbox
trained and socialized.
Each cat will remain an of-
ficial PPR foster. All neces-
sary veterinary care, food
and litter will be provided by
PPR. The foster family will
provide shelter and love.
Call 352-726-4700.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Touristy Sin City scary again


Las Vegas seen as

dangerous even as

crime drops

Associated Press
LAS VEGAS Variously
known as an adult playground
and Disneyland for grown-ups,
Las Vegas brands itself as a
place where tourists can enjoy a
sense of edginess with no real
danger.
But a series of high-profile
episodes of random violence
amid the throngs of tourists is
threatening Sin City's reputation
as a padded room of a town
where people can cut loose with
no fear of consequences.
A car-to-car shooting and fiery
crash that killed two bystanders
and an aspiring rapper Thurs-
day followed a bizarre elevator
stabbing and a movie theater
parking lot shooting.
Though crime has been falling
on the glitzy stretch of Las Vegas
Boulevard that houses most of
the city's major casinos, tourism
officials worry that vacationers
and convention planners could
begin to steer clear of the town
because of a perception of
mayhem.
"We are concerned because it
can create misperceptions about
the safety of the city, the safety of
the Strip," said Gary Thompson,
spokesman for Caesars Enter-
tainment, which owns 10 resorts
in the tourist zone, including
Caesars Palace and Paris Las
Vegas.
Casinos are particularly wor-
ried about convention business,
which helps fill rooms and gam-
bling tables between weekends.
Corporate planners can swing
the market with a few decisions,
said Gordon Absher, spokesman
for MGM Resorts International.
"And that decision will bring
thousands of people," he said.
MGM operates several major
casino-hotels, including City-
Center, where Thursday's con-
vulsion of violence originated.
Violent crime, which includes
murder, rape, robbery and as-
sault, in the city's main tourist
hub fell 13 percent in 2012, from


s Veg as -


Associated Press
Law enforcement personal investigate the scene of a mulit-vehicle accident Thursday on Las Vegas
Boulevard and Flamingo Road. Variously known as an adult playground and Disneyland for grown-ups, Las
Vegas has worked to brand itself as a place where tourists can enjoy a sense of edginess with no real
danger. But a series of high-profile and seemingly random incidents that have left visitors to the Strip
dead or in the hospital is threatening Sin City's reputation as a padded room of a town where people can
cut loose with no fear of consequences.


256 to 223 incidents, and is down
11 percent for the first part of
2013, with 50 incidents reported.
The number of rapes has fallen
by more than a third.
There have been two homi-
cides just off the Strip this year,
in addition to the three deaths
Thursday, compared to none in
the area during the first month
and a half of 2012.
Had they taken place else-
where, the incidents that made
headlines in recent weeks
would never have become na-
tional stories, Thompson said.
But when the crime happens in
a city that welcomes 40 million
visitors a year, people tend to
care even if they haven't seen
the neon lights in years.
"It's like, 'I was there! I stayed
in there in Las Vegas! I walked
that part of the Strip!"' he said.
The spate of violence started
just before the new year, when a
man shot and killed his ex-
girlfriend, an Excalibur hotel-
casino concierge clerk, before
fatally shooting himself.
The following week, a black-
jack dealer was wrestled to the


ground at the Bellagio with
razor blades in both hands. She
is charged with killing a 10 year-
old girl and then slashing her co-
worker's face.
On New Year's Eve, a man al-
legedly fired a gunshot into the
floor of the crowded Circus Cir-
cus casino during an argument
A Saudi air force sergeant is ac-
cused of raping a 13-year-old boy
in the rooms above the same
night
A nighttime shooting outside a
Strip movie theater left two peo-
ple critically wounded earlier
this month. Last week, two ran-
dom men allegedly assaulted a
visitor in the elevator at the
Mandalay Bay property, tackling
him and stabbing him in such a
frenzy that they also stabbed
each other
During the same period, Las
Vegas courts sentenced a
Florida teacher for killing a
stranger with a single punch
after trading words in a casino
bathroom, and heard the case of
two law students charged with
beheading an exotic bird at the
Flamingo casino-hotel.


The shoot-'em-up car chase
that closed the Strip for 12 hours
Thursday was the most public
and deadly incident yet.
A person in a luxury SUV
opened fire on an aspiring rap-
per in a Maserati near one of the
busiest intersections on the
iconic corridor. As the bullets
flew, the Maserati ran a red light
and crashed into a taxi, which
burst into flames. The taxi
driver, a passenger and the rap-
per were killed, and six people
were injured.
Casino executives say they do
all they can to keep visitors safe,
with armies of guards, networks
of high-definition surveillance
cameras and undercover security
workers scattered throughout
nearly every major attraction.
"Unless you are a complete
idiot, you're not going to want to
commit many crimes in or
around a casino, because you're
going to get caught," Thompson
said.
But catching a criminal isn't
the same as stopping the crime.
Commissioners in Clark
County, where Las Vegas is lo-


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A10 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013


NATION


RECENT VIOLENCE ON
THE LAS VEGAS STRIP
Dec. 21, 2012: A casino
card dealer is accused of
using razor blades to slash
a co-worker's face at a
blackjack table at the
Bellagio casino-resort.
Jan. 1, 2013: A 20-year-old
man is accused of firing a
gunshot into the floor of a
crowded Circus Circus
during a New Year's Eve
argument.
Jan. 1, 2013: A sergeant in
Saudi Arabia's air force is
accused of pulling a 13-
year-old boy into a hotel
room at Circus Circus and
sexually assaulted him.
Feb. 11, 2013: A University
of California, Berkeley, law
student pleads not guilty in
what prosecutors allege was
the torture death and
beheading of an exotic bird
at a resort.
Feb. 6, 2013: An overnight
shooting in a parking
structure outside a movie
theater left two teens with
major injuries and also hurt
a third teen.
Feb. 14, 2013: A former
high school football coach
and teacher from Florida
was sentenced to three
months in jail after being
convicted for accidentally
killing a Utah man with a
single punch at a casino.
Feb. 16, 2013: Two men
were booked on suspicion
of attempted murder after
allegedly stabbing a guest
in the elevator of The Hotel
at Mandalay Bay on the Las
Vegas Strip.

cated, are weighing steps to in-
crease safety, including installing
additional cameras in public
spaces and broadening the side-
walks. In October, they banned
potentially dangerous objects in-
cluding fireworks, knives and toy
guns from the Strip.
But real guns remain permis-
sible. Nevada's relaxed gun
laws, including the ability to
carry them openly, have made
Las Vegas an attractive spot for
shooting ranges and gun shows.


N^





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Former Nebraska Sen. Chuck Hagel testifies Jan. 31 at his Senate Armed Services Committee confirmation hearing
on Capitol Hill in Washington.

It'spersonal business in GOP fight over defense secretary nominee


Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
fierce Republican opposi-
tion to President Barack
Obama's nomination of
Chuck Hagel to be defense
secretary is personal and
business.
The nasty fight long has
been seen as a proxy for
the never-ending scuffles
between the Democratic
president and congres-
sional Republicans, with
barely any reservoir of
good will between the
White House and lawmak-
ers, and the GOP still
smarting over the Novem-
ber election results.
Barring any surprises,
the drawn-out battle over
Hagel's nomination proba-
bly will end this week with
his Senate confirmation.
But his fellow Republi-
cans have roughed him up.


A vote is expected on
Tuesday
In the weeks after
Obama secured a second
term, Republicans
knocked out a presidential
favorite, U.N. Ambassador
Susan Rice, and dashed
her secretary of state hopes
over her widely debunked
remarks about protests
precipitating the assault on
the U.S. diplomatic mission
in Libya on Sept 11.
Emboldened Republi-
cans then set their sights
on Hagel, whose GOP clas-
sification won him no
points with the party.
The former two-term
Nebraska senator was
widely viewed as a politi-
cal heretic. He disagreed
with President George W
Bush over the Iraq war,
stayed on the sidelines in
the 2008 president race be-
tween Obama and the Re-


publican nominee, Ari-
zona Sen. John McCain,
and endorsed fellow Viet-
nam veteran and former
Democratic Sen. Bob Ker-
rey in last year's Nebraska
Senate race.
Republicans remember
it well.
"There's a lot of ill will
toward Sen. Hagel be-
cause when he was a Re-


publican, he attacked
President Bush merci-
lessly, at one point said he
was the worst president
since Herbert Hoover, said
the surge (of U.S. troops in
Iraq) was the worst blun-
der since the Vietnam War,
which is nonsense, and
was anti-his own party and
people," McCain said in an
interview on Fox News.


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National BRIEFS
NRA uses Justice memo
to accuse Obama on guns
WASHINGTON The National Rifle Association is using
a Justice Department memo it obtained to argue in ads the
Obama administration believes its gun control plans won't
work unless the government seizes firearms and requires
national gun registration ideas the White House has not
proposed and does not support.
The NRA's assertion and its obtaining of the memo in the
first place underscore the no-holds-barred battle under way
as Washington's fight over gun restrictions heats up.
The memo, under the name of one of the Justice Depart-
ment's leading crime researchers, critiques the effectiveness
of gun control proposals, including some of President
Barack Obama's. A Justice Department official called the
memo an unfinished review of gun violence research and
said it does not represent administration policy.
Justices asked to void
marriage law provision
WASHINGTON The Obama administration is asking
the Supreme Court to declare unconstitutional a section of
federal law that only recognizes male-female marriages.
In a filing with the court, the administration said Section 3
of the Defense of Marriage Act denies legally married same-
sex couples many federal benefits available only to legally
married heterosexual couples. Federal tax and Social Secu-
rity survivor's benefits are among them.
In its brief, the administration said the provision "violates
the fundamental constitutional guarantee of equal protection."
Forbes: Poughkeepsie
is wonderful! Or miserable
POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y. Is Poughkeepsie, N.Y., one of
the best places to live in the country, or one of the worst?
Forbes magazine can't seem to make up its mind.
Less than a year after naming the small Hudson River
Valley city the sixth-best place in the U.S. to raise a family,
Forbes now puts it 18th on a list of the country's 20 most-
miserable cities.
The Poughkeepsie Joumal reported Saturday city resi-
dents are baffled.
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Whitney Young meets with President Lyndon Johnson in
the Oval Office of the White House on Jan. 18, 1964, in
Washington, D.C.


New film tells story


of unsung leader


Documentary

to air on PBS
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Just
before the March on Wash-
ington in 1963, President
John F Kennedy sum-
moned six top civil rights
leaders to the White House
to talk about his fears that
civil rights legislation he
was moving through Con-
gress might be undermined
if the march turned violent
Whitney Young Jr. cut
through the president's
uncertainty with three
questions: "President
Kennedy, which side are
you on? Are you on the
side of George Wallace of
Alabama? Or are you on
the side of justice?"
One of those leaders,
John Lewis, later a long-
time congressman from
Georgia, tells the story of
Young's boldness in "The
Powerbroker: Whitney
Young's Fight for Civil
Rights," a documentary
airing during Black His-
tory Month on the PBS se-
ries "Independent Lens"
and shown in some com-
munity theaters.
In the civil rights strug-
gle, Young was overshad-
owed by his larger-than-life
peer, Martin Luther King
Jr But Young's penetration
of white-dominated corpo-
rate boardrooms and the
Oval Office over three ad-
ministrations was critical
to the movement. Working
with leaders within the sys-
tem, including three presi-
dents, made him a target of
criticism by those who
wanted a more aggressive
path to racial equality.
An appreciation for what
Young brought to the move-
ment came after his death
in Nigeria in 1971 at age 49.
But it was not sustained,


said Dennis Dickerson, au-
thor of "Militant Mediator:
Whitney M. Young Jr."
"He should not be di-
minished," said Dickerson,
a Vanderbilt University
history professor who ap-
pears in the film.
A number of schools and
facilities have been named
for Young. First lady
Michelle Obama gradu-
ated from a Chicago high
school named for him. But
his role in economic issues
surrounding civil rights
has not gotten just due,
said Marc Morial, presi-
dent and CEO of the Na-
tional Urban League, an
organization Young led as
executive director from
1961 to 1971. During his
tenure the organization
greatly expanded.
Young influenced a num-
ber of anti-poverty pro-
grams such as Job Corps,
housing counseling and
Head Start, Morial said.
"He was one of the ear-
liest voices who said to
corporate America ... that
business leaders and the
business community had a
stake in the development
and rebuilding of urban
America, but also in the
success of civil rights," Mo-
rial said.
Born July 31, 1921, in
Lincoln Ridge, Ky., Young
learned to negotiate with
whites from his father, an
educated man who ran the
all-black Lincoln Institute
boarding school, said Bon-
nie Boswell, the filmmaker
and Young's niece.
There, Young's father
surreptitiously educated
black students to become
doctors, lawyers and
teachers to escape segre-
gation and poverty while
tricking white financial
backers of the school into
believing he was training
the black students to be
nannies, maids, janitors
and mechanics.


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Civil rights martyr


JFK holds

place in black

history

JESSE
WASHINGTON
AP national writer


Not that many years
ago, three portraits hung
in thousands of African-
American homes, a vi-
sual tribute to men who
had helped black people
navigate the long
journey to equality
There was Jesus,
who represented
unconditional hope,
strength and love.
There was Martin
Luther King Jr, who
personified the
moral crusade that B
ended legal segrega-
tion. And then there
was President John E
Kennedy
Kennedy's inclu-
sion may seem puz-
zling, considering his
civil rights legacy has
undergone substantial
reassessment since his
Nov 22, 1963, assassina-
tion. But a look at why
so many black people
revered him then-- and
why younger genera-L
tions have largely forgot-
ten his civil rights work shows
even 50 years later, Kennedy holds
an important but complicated place
in black history
"We're still trying to figure it out,"
said John Mack, a longtime civil
rights activist who was fighting seg-
regation in Atlanta when Kennedy
was elected president in 1960.
Mack said we can only speculate
on what Kennedy might have done
for civil rights had he not been killed.
"It's a question we're wrestling
with and cannot answer," he said.
For many older blacks, Kennedy
sympathized with black struggle
like no other before him.
They recall him speaking elo-
quently against segregation despite
resistance from Southern racists in
his own Democratic party Some
even feel his support for civil rights
was one reason he was killed, even
though racial motives are not
prominent among the many theo-
ries about Kennedy's death.
Yes, these black folks say,


Associated Press
TOP: President John F. Kennedy stands Aug. 28, 1963, with
a group of leaders of the March on Washington at the White House in
Washington. Immediately after the march, they discussed civil rights
legislation inching through Congress. BOTTOM LEFT: Women burst into
tears outside Parkland Hospital upon hearing President Kennedy died from
the shooting by an assassin while riding in a motorcade Nov. 22, 1963, in
Dallas. BOTTOM RIGHT: Kennedy speaks in the House Chamber on Capitol
Hill in Washington during his State of the Union report Jan. 14, 1963, to a
joint session of Congress with Vice President Lyndon Johnson sitting behind.


Kennedy may have moved reluc-
tantly on civil rights. Yes, he may
have been motivated by the need for
votes more than racial justice but
they speak of the effort he made.
"People say he should have
moved faster, but he's dead because
of the pace that he did move," said
the Rev Shirley Jordan, a pastor
and community activist in her
native Richmond, Va.
She was 13 when Kennedy was
shot in Dallas. She heard the news
in school, she recalled, but espe-
cially felt the impact when she got
home: "My mother cried as though
it was her child who had died."
"That was just the tone, the aura.
There was a big cloud over the


whole black community," Jordan
said. "When you look at the pictures
of the funeral, you see so many
black people out there."
Later, Jordan's parents hung
Kennedy's portrait next to King's in
their housing project apartment.
Such portraits were a common sight
in black homes for the Rev Charles
Booth, who grew up in Baltimore.
"You always saw pictures ofJesus
Christ, John E Kennedy, Dr. Martin
Luther King," said Booth, a pastor
in Columbus, Ohio. "You could go in
an average home and see a picture
of JFK on the wall. In the minds of
most black people at the time, he
was a friend to the African-
American community"


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A12 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013


NATION





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Rebuttal of value
We continue to read
about great contributions
unions have won for
American workers in the
past. And I heartily agree.
However, what proved
beneficial in the past does
not necessarily relate to
today's value. I agree.
Gained increases in
wages, overtime pay, de-
cent working hours, vaca-
tions, medical benefits
and worker protections
were excellent organized
labor achievements of
early days. Since those
achievements, however,
what have unions really
contributed besides con-
tinual worker slowdowns,
excessive wage demands
throughout many seg-
ments of private and pub-
lic employment and
mental and physical coer-
cion of workers to "keep
them in line?"
Worker "protection," in
union speak, means forc-
ing companies to employ
three workers to do what
one or two could.
In 1951, employed with
a painting contractor in
upstate Rhode Island, I
was told to paint a new
house's living room.
Being conscientious, I fin-
ished the room in short
order. I then painted a
small bathroom and fin-
ished a closet when my
boss arrived. After a vul-
gar cursing, he grabbed
my shirt collar, pulled me
toward the front door, lit-
erally kicked my butt and
told me to sit in his truck
for the next two days, be-
cause I already did more
than two days work. Fri-
day was my last day
As sales service man-
ager for Larson Boat Man-
ufacturing in 1967, I was
in charge of our annual
Madison Square Garden
Boat show display in New
York City. I dispatched
four truckloads of run-
abouts for delivery My
drivers called, saying we
had to pay $50 per boat
before unloading. I in-
structed them to pay the
extortion fees. Unloading
and loading cost suppos-
edly was included in our
registration fee. One
driver refused to submit


and received a severe
beating.
In 1985, while with a
large corporation in Rich-
mond, Va., I was sent to
Kalamazoo, Mich., to as-
sist our local plant with a
project for a parts sup-
plier for General Motors.
We arrived at the GM
plant supplier's operation
with two packages weigh-
ing about 18 pounds. We
were told by a gate guard
we could not carry them
ourselves. We waited 10
minutes for a man in a
golf cart to do our "heavy
lifting."
We met at the plant
entry where he unloaded.
Bending to pick up the
packages, I was told in no
uncertain terms we were
not allowed to. We waited
for another golf cart hot
rod and followed him to a
machinery area to do our
thing. I immediately
pulled out my pocket
knife to cut several strings
holding our items. Again I
was told "you can't do
that." Filly 25 minutes
later, another golf cart
driver arrived, cut the
strings, then left. We
asked the machine opera-
tor to open a section of his
machine. He couldn't do
that. We waited another
15 minutes for another
driver carrying a huge


ring of keys to unlock the
operator's machine.
An underperforming
plant of ours in upstate
New York was in negotia-
tions with its Teamster
union. Their president
said even though the
plant lost money four con-
secutive years, they ab-
solutely refused required
concessions. Their rea-
soning? Other corporate
plants made a profit, and
any loss could be re-
couped from them.
After we closed the op-
eration for good, former
workers paraded in the
city streets with large
signs saying "we won -
we didn't give in."
I have many examples
experienced while work-
ing 32 years for my former
employer These illustrate
the current state of union-
ization and explain why
many American-made
goods are so costly
William Lambert
Inverness

Socialism does
not work
I guess Larry Johansen
hasn't heard the old say-
ing "If you aren't liberal
when you are young, you
don't have a heart If you
aren't conservative when


you are old, you don't
have a brain."
The Democratic Party
that I knew as a young
man has moved so far to
the left today it should be
called the Marxist/social-
ist party of America. I was
never that far left even
when I was young.
The liberal left has un-
dergone a rebranding
today and they are no
longer Marxist/socialists
but progressives. Don't be
confused by the name
change. Slick marketing
does not change the fact
that the terms progressive
and socialist are virtually
synonymous in politics
today; nor does it change
the fact that the most
prominent manifestation
of the socialist (progres-
sive) political machine
today, the Congressional
Progressive Caucus
(CPC), constitutes the
largest voting block of De-
mocrats in the House of
Representatives. This
group of 70 representa-
tives has deep and long-
standing ties to the
socialist movement in
America and is pushing
its Marxist agenda into


legislation, strategically
dismantling the Constitu-
tion in the process.
There are no success
stories in the history
books of a thriving vibrant
Marxist/socialist society.
There are plenty of sto-
ries of depravation,
poverty and desperation.
However, we don't have
to look to the history
books for sources. We
have more than enough
examples in the world
today if we will open our
minds to the facts. Fifty
percent of the citizens of
Spain under 25 of work-
ing age are unemployed.
All the social democra-
cies of Europe are being
crushed under their wel-
fare burdens. Greece
jumps from one financial
crisis to another on a
monthly basis. Even Ger-
many is feeling the
strain. We have 11 states
where more people are
on assistance than are
working, including the
big three for Obama: Cal-
ifornia, New York and
Illinois.
The socialist policies of
the Democratic Party are
directly responsible for


our financial crash. Bush
tried 11 times to rein in
the out-of-control lending
policies of the mortgage
industry and was blocked
each and every time by
the Congressional Social-
ists Caucus as it was
known back then. One of
Obama's few cases as a
lawyer was representing
ACORN in suing the gov-
ernment to relax lending
requirements.
I see no future for so-
cialism. It's founded on a
huge Ponzi scheme. It re-
quires an ever increasing
number of citizens com-
ing in at the bottom of the
pyramid. By some esti-
mates Europe would need
a population growth rate
of 15 percent to 30 per-
cent to support their wel-
fare systems.
What's really the kiss of
death for socialism is a
declining population.
Spain's population is
halving every 35 years. By
2050, there still will be
people living in Italy but
they won't be Italians.
Yemen will soon out num-
ber Russia in population.
We are on our way to
two or less people paying
into Social Security for
everyone drawing it.
Medicare is even worse.
The death panels are
coming.
That is why I oppose
Obama. His policies will
not work. They have been
tried by much smarter
men than he is and they
couldn't find a way to
make a go of it. The evi-
dence is very clear social-
ism cannot survive a
post-Christian birth rate.
Hypocritical cries for
bipartisanship fall on
deaf ears with conserva-
tives. We saw how the left
practices bipartisanship
with Obamacare.
I am quite happy to see
Obama and Reid blocked
at every turn until we can
get them out of there.
Their solutions don't
work.
Harley Lawrence
Homosassa


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OPINION


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 A13











NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Swerving

I 1 --


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Smugglers cash in on recycled cans


Legislators aim to crack down on scammers


Associated Press
Tracks tell the story of a
vehicle that had trouble
maintaining it's course on
a snowy road Feb. 22, in
Omaha, Neb., following a
large winter storm that
traveled through the
heartland.


Police: Gunman
at MIT was a hoax
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -
An unfounded report of a
gunman at the Massachu-
setts Institute of Technology
that briefly caused a cam-
pus-wide lockdown Satur-
day stemmed from an
electronic message sent to
police, authorities said.
Officers searched for a
man reported to be carrying
a long rifle and wearing body
armor but found nothing un-
usual, Cambridge police
said. The report turned out to
be a hoax, and there was no
threat to public safety, state
police spokesman David
Procopio said.
Cambridge police re-
ceived the tip in an elec-
tronic chat message around
7:30 a.m., but witnesses on
the scene eventually con-
tradicted it, spokesman Dan
Riviello said. MIT sent two
emergency alerts via text
message, urging people to
stay indoors. Less than an
hour later, police posted on
Twitter the scene was clear.
Investigators are trying to
identify the prankster and
will pursue criminal charges
if they do, Riviello said.

World BRIEF

Praying


Associated Press
LANSING, Mich. -
Michigan lawmakers want
to crack down on can and
bottle smugglers they say
are scamming Michigan for
undeserved recycling re-
funds, corrupting a gener-
ous 10-cent per container
payback policy once infa-
mously portrayed in a "Se-
infeld" episode and which
beverage officials now
claim costs the state mil-
lions of dollars annually
"Seinfeld" characters
Kramer and Newman
failed miserably in their


comedic attempt to cash in
on the refund, when they
loaded a mail truck full of
cans and bottles in New
York and attempted to
drive them to Michigan.
But lawmakers say it's a
serious problem, espe-
cially in border counties,
and they want to toughen
penalties on people who
try to return unmarked,
out-of-state cans and bot-
tles for refunds.
"If you are intending to
defraud ... then you should
be held accountable for it,"
said Republican Rep. Ken-
neth Kurtz of Coldwater


He recently introduced
legislation aimed at crack-
ing down on scammers
who drive car and truck
loads of cans from Indiana,
Wisconsin and Ohio -
states that do not offer re-
funds to stores across
the border in Michigan.
His legislation would
make an attempt to return
between 100 and 10,000
non-returnable containers
punishable by up to 93
days in jail and a $1,000
fine. Current law sets
penalties only for those
who actually return fraud-
ulent containers.


Associated Press
A Michigan deposit is shown stamped on a beverage
Saturday in Detroit.


Associated Press
Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad, left, speaks to reporters Feb. 23 during a break at the opening session of the
National Governors Association 2013 Winter Meeting in Washington, D.C.


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Associated Press
A woman prays Friday
during a special Mass of
thanksgiving celebrated
by Cardinal Odilo Pedro
Scherer, Sao Paulo's
archbishop, in honor of
Pope Benedict XVI at the
Cathedral in Sao Paulo,
Brazil. The cardinal will
be part of the conclave
that will elect the next
Pope.

Reshaped papacy
raises questions
As the first pontiff in six
centuries to step down,
Benedict has carved a new
path for his successors who
decide they cannot rule for
life. But scholars said the
repercussions could reach
beyond changing how pon-
tiffs leave to shape percep-
tions about the authority and
significance of the pontificate.
Benedict's pontificate will
end at 8 p.m. Thursday. He
plans no role in choosing
the next pontiff.
But papal resignations
are expected to become
more likely over time be-
cause of extended lifespans
and the growing demands
of the pontificate.
-From wire reports


Federal fallout

Governors say loomingfinancial cuts GOP bills aimed to
offset spending cuts
threaten economic gains The Republican-led House last
year twice passed bills to replace
Associated Press job development and automatic spending cuts now
grow their state scheduled to go into effect March 1.
WASHINGTON economies, measures to The bills, first passed May 10 and
Jashington's protracted restrict gun violence and then in an updated version Dec. 20,
budget stalemate could implement the new both advanced by narrow margins
seriously undermine the health care law approved with no Democratic votes. They
economy and stall gains during Obama's first term. were never considered in the Sen-
nade since the recession, Some Republican gov- ate and did not carry over to the
xasperated governors Neil ernors have blocked the new Congress.
aid Saturday as they try Abercrombie use of Medicaid to expand Among the principal provisions:
o gauge the fallout from governor a health insurance cover- U Rule tightening that could
mpendingfederal spend- of Hawaii. age for millions of unin- reduce food stamp recipients,
ng cuts. sured while others have now about 47 million, by
At the annual National Gover- joined Democrats in a wholesale about 2 million, and shrink
ors Association meeting, both expansion as the law allows. The school lunch programs.
democratt and Republican chief Medicaid expansion aims to cover Block i i ts
executives expressed pessimism about half of the 30 million unin- frBlocking illegal immigrants
hat both sides could find a way to sured people expected to gain credits of up to $1,000 a child
void the massive, automatic coverage under the overhaul. credits of upto $1,000 a child.
pending cuts set to begin March Yet for many governors, the 0 Cutting Social Service Block
, pointing to the impasse as an- budget-cutfightremains front-and- Grant programs, which Re-
ther crisis between the White center and fuels a pervasive sense publicans say are duplicative,
housee and Congress that spooks of frustration with Washington. affecting programs such as
)cal businesses from hiring and "My feeling is I can't help Meals on Wheels for the
ampers their ability to construct what's going on in Washington," elderly, child care and child
tate spending plans. Gov Terry Branstad, R-Iowa, said abuse prevention.
Hawaii Gov Neil Abercrombie, in an interview Saturday "I can't 0 Taking away the government's
former congressman, noted the help the fact that there's no lead- authority to liquidate "too big
uts known in Washington- ership here, and it's all politics as to fail" financial institutions to
peak as "the sequester" could usual and gridlock. But I can do avoid a Wall Street crisis.
ead to 19,000 workers laid off at something about the way we do Eliminating the ability of the
'earl Harbor, site of the surprise things in the state of Iowa." new Consumer Financial
attack in 1941 that launched the Indeed, right now no issue car- Protection Bureau to set its
United States into World War II. ries the same level of urgency as own budget.
"That will undermine our ca- the budget impasse.
city for readiness at Pearl Har- Congressional leaders have in- 0 Consolidating dozens of
or If that doesn't symbolize for dicated a willingness to let the duplicative federal employ-
le nation ... what happens when cuts take effect. ment training programs.
'e fail to meet our responsibili- The cuts would trim $85 billion 0 Defunding or limiting several
es congressionally, I don't know in domestic and defense spending, provisions in the new health
'hat does," he said. leading to furloughs for hundreds care act, including provisions
The budget fight came as many of thousands of workers at the that give states incentives to
states say they are on the cusp of Transportation Department, De- increase their Medicaid rolls.
n economic comeback from the fense Department and elsewhere. Seeking reductions in health
nancial upheaval in 2008 and Defense Secretary Leon Panetta c Seeking reductions in health
care costs by reining in
009. States expect their general has said the cuts would harm the medical malpractice lawsuits.
und revenues this year to sur- readiness of U.S. fighting forces.
ass the amounts collected be- The looming cuts were never 0 Eliminating a program to help
ore the Great Recession kicked supposed to happen. They were homeowners who are "under-
n. An estimated $693 billion in intended to be a draconian fall- water" on their mortgages.
revenues is expected for the 2013 back intended to ensure a special 0 Requiring federal workers to
budget year, nearly a 4 percent deficit reduction committee contribute 5 percent more of
ver the previous year would come up with $1 trillion or their pay toward their pension
At the weekend meetings, gov- more in savings from benefit pro- plans.


rnors focused on ways to boost


grams. It didn't.


Talk of


peace


angers


Taliban


victims

Pakistan mulls

negotiating

with terrorists
Associated Press
PESHAWAR, Pakistan
- Hazratullah Khan,
who lost his right leg
below the knee in a car
bombing, answers imme-
diately when asked
whether the Pakistani
government should hold
peace talks with Taliban
leaders responsible for
attacks like the one that
maimed him.
"Hang them alive,"
said the 14-year-old, who
survived the explosion
on his way home from
school. "Slice the flesh
off their bodies and cut
them into pieces. That's
what they have been
doing to us."
Khan, who is from the
Khyber tribal region, pon-
dered his future recently
at a physical rehabilita-
tion center in Peshawar
"What was my crime
that they made me dis-
abled for the rest of my
life?" he asked as he
touched his severed limb.
In recent weeks, the
Pakistani government
and Taliban forces fight-
ing in northwestern tribal
areas have expressed an
interest in peace talks to
end the years-long con-
flict. An estimated 30,000
civilians and 4,000 sol-
diers have died in terror-
ist attacks in Pakistan
since Sept 11, 2001 -
many at the hands of the
Pakistani Taliban.
To many victims of
Taliban violence, the
idea of negotiating with
people responsible for
so much human pain is
abhorrent. Their voices,
however, are rarely
heard in Pakistan, a
country where people
have long been con-
flicted about whether
the Taliban are enemies
or fellow Muslims.


Associated Press
Pakistani newspaper seller
Mohammed Rafiq, 20,
was injured in a Taliban-
initiated bomb blast June,
29, 2008, in Swat valley.







S' Veterans
Notes can be
found on Page M17
of today's Chioncle. '
SolaCITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLEd glory





Solarpowered glory


It's a big year


for northern


lights tourism


in Alaska

JOSHUA BERLINGER
Associated Press
JUNEAU, Alaska
Bill Carter had been
planning his bucket-
list winter vacation to
Alaska for 30 years,
and he couldn't have
picked a better time to take it.
The retired chemist from Jesup, Ga., didn't mind
that February temperatures can hover near minus
40 degrees on the outskirts of Fairbanks, because
the night sky there offered Carter something most
people never get to see: the aurora borealis.
"Yellows, oranges, greens. There were light
bursts that would come from time to time," Carter
said during his trip. "There were light rays that
seemed to come from the ground up, and from the
sky down."
The northern lights can be seen on dark, clear
nights when charged solar particles strike the
upper atmosphere near the North Pole. Because
of a predicted peak in a solar cycle, this year and
next year are expected to offer prime viewing for
the elusive phenomenon. So Alaska's tourism in-
dustry is gearing up for thousands of visitors like
Carter including jet loads from Japan who
are willing to wait outside in freezing weather,
often for hours past midnight, in hopes of catching
a once-in-a-lifetime glimpse of the lights.
Fairbanks, the largest city in Alaska's interior, is
well-suited for aurora tourism because it's located
just at the edge of the "auroral oval," a ring-
shaped region that circles the north magnetic pole
where auroral activity is most common.
It also has less cloud cover because of its dis-
tance from the ocean, and tourists can usually es-
cape the city's light pollution by driving just
10 miles out. Lonely Planet, National Geographic
and the Los Angeles Times travel section have all
named Fairbanks or its surrounding areas as one
of the best tourist destinations this year
Dixie Burbank got a glimpse of the aurora as a
child growing up in Wisconsin, but as an adult al-
ways wanted to travel to where the lights are more
powerful.
"This has been something I've talked about for
years, finally making our trek up to Alaska to see
the northern lights," said Burbank, of Sun Prairie,
Wis., who, like Carter, saw the lights during a visit
to Alaska this month. "Because of the solar max,
this was the year to do it."


It's more than
a phenomenon for
the Japanese people.
It's tradition, it's
history.
Shigeo Mori
Japanese marketing professional.


Solar cy-
cles last
roughly 10
or 11 years
and the
"solar
max" is the
cycle peak,
when the
sun emits
the most
energy
"The
heavens
just


opened up with activity," Burbank added. "It's
sheer excitement to see the lights come out."
When the solar cycle hit its low point or solar
minimum in 2006, NASA predicted that the next
solar maximum could produce the most activity
since the historic solar max of 1958, when the
northern lights could be seen as far south as
Mexico. If you compound that with the fact that
aurora activity tends to become more common
around autumnal and vernal equinoxes, the start


Associated Press
The aurora borealis, or northern lights, shining in January 2012 near the city of Talkeetna, Alaska. This year
and next year are expected to offer prime viewing for the northern lights due to a peak in the cycle of solar
activity that causes the lights. The Fairbanks region of Alaska is gearing up for increased tourism as
visitors flock to see the colorful but elusive phenomenon.


of spring in March could be quite hectic for
Fairbanks.
"Because of the buzz of the aurora blasts, we
definitely think it's gotten more attention from the
media," said Deb Hickok, the president and CEO
of the Fairbanks Visitor Bureau and Convention
Center. "It's certainly been a busy winter."
Bernie Karl owns one of the most popular re-
sorts in the Fairbanks area to see the lights. He
said his Chena Hot Springs resort has been com-
pletely booked from the end of December to the
end of March and all of next winter.
Todd Salat, a professional Alaska-based photog-
rapher who has been chasing the northern lights
for 16 years, said he has seen some of the most
powerful auroras of his career this winter, and has
taken some of his best photographs, too.
"The thing just goes crazy and starts ripping
across the sky, then all of a sudden you can't be-
lieve what you're seeing ripples of light going
from one horizon to the other in a matter of, you
know, five or 10 seconds," Salat explained. "(It's)
just incredible. It makes you feel small because
it's big. It's global."
But Salat and others who observe the aurora
on a regular basis aren't quite sure the predic-
tions of increased activity will hold true based


upon what they've seen so far this season.
Mark Conde, a professor of physics at the Uni-
versity of Alaska Fairbanks, expects that recent
solar activity indicates that auroras may not be as
active this March as some have anticipated.
"The current solar cycle is proving to be far less
active than previous ones by quite a wide margin,"
Conde said. "I would expect the peak of the cur-
rent cycle if it follows the current trend we have
now it's probably going to only be about half as
active as it was in 1958."
Despite Conde's expectations, Fairbanks still
expects to be inundated with tourists, especially
from Japan. Japanese tourists have been traveling
to see the lights for years, but the number of them
traveling to the United States has risen signifi-
cantly since Japan Airlines began chartering
flights directly to Alaska almost a decade ago. The
airline chartered 15 jets from cities throughout
Japan to fly to Fairbanks this winter.
Shigeo Mori, who does Japanese marketing for
Chena Hot Springs, explained that the Japanese
fascination with northern lights stems from a phi-
losophy that contemplates both sides of nature: its
destructive power as well as its natural beauty
"It's more than a phenomenon for the Japanese
people," Mori said. "It's tradition, it's history"


European visit

Bert and June Hombergen of Sugarmill Woods took their daughter, Janine
Colleran, and granddaughter, Megan Colleran, from Northboro, Mass., to Europe
last summer. After their visit to Holland (where this canal ride photo was taken),
the foursome headed to Brugge, Belgium, and then to Paris. Megan's favorite
place was ancient Brugge and second, Notre Dame Cathedral, where they climbed
all 387 steps. Megan started at the University of New Hampshire in the fall.


DREAM
VACATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 24, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House DI: Comcast Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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*** "Coach Carter" *** "He Got Game"(1998, Drama) Denzel Washington. A high-school Husbands Second Don't Sleep! Hosted by
) 96 19 96 (2005) c basketball star faces his estranged father. R' T.J. Holmes'PG'
[BiAVDJ 254 51 254 *** "Bad Boys" (1995, Action) 'R' Housewives/Atl. Shahs of Sunset'14' Housewives/Atl. *** "Bad Boys"
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*** "Top Gun" My Big Redneck Swamp Pawn (In **2 "Days of Thunder" (1990, Action) Tom Cruise. Upstart stock-car
)_ 98 45 98 28 37 (1986) Tom Cruise. Vacation'PG' Stereo)'PG' driver goes to the edge. (In Stereo) PC-13

(NN) 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents'PG' Piers Morgan CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents 'PG'
i Austin & A.N.T. Shake It Dog With a Dog With a Austin & Shake It Jessie Austin & Jessie A.N.T Shake It
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** "The Wedding Planner" (2001, Romance- *** "The Lion King" (1994, Musical) Voices *** "The Lion King" (1994, Musical) Voices
(1 _) 29 52 29 20 28 Comedy) Jennifer Lopez. PG-13' of Rowan Atkinson. of Rowan Atkinson. 'G
** "White Squall" (1996, Drama) Jeff Bridges, **+ "Adventures in Babysitting" (1987, ** "Agent Cod Banks" (2003) "Return to
(L 118 170 Scott Wolf.(In Stereo)'PG-13 Comedy) Elisabeth Shue.GPG-1 Frankie Muniz. 'P' Para.
(TNti 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
(jOD) 26 56 26 Diners | Diners Worst Cooks Chopped (N) Worst Cooks Iron Chef America Anne Burrell
([SNFLJ 35 39 35 Car Warriors (N) 14' World Poker Tour World Poker Tour The Best of Pride (N) World Poker Tour World Poker Tour
F1 *** "Iron Man" (2008, Action) Robert Downey **I "Iron Man 2" (2010, Action) Robert Downey Jr, ** "Iron Man 2" (2010) Robert
(E) 30 60 30 51Jr, Terrence Howard. PG-13' Gwyneth Paltrow, Don Cheadle. PG-13' Downey Jr'PG-13'
(GOLF 727 67 727 Golf Central (N) PGA Tour Golf WGC Accenture Match Play Championship, Semifinals. PGA Tour Golf
*** "Backyard ** "Elevator Girl" (2010, Romance) Lacey "l Married Who?" (2012, Romance-Comedy) Frasier PG Frasier PG'
59 68 59 45 54 Wedding" (2010) Chabert, Ryan Merriman. N Kellie Martin, Ethan Erickson. cN
*** "X-Men: First **+ "Wanderlust" (2012, Comedy) Paul Rudd. Girls (N) Enlightened Gids MA' Enlightened Girls MA' Enlightened
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303 202 303 Grudge" Stereo) 'MA' c Kitsch. (In Stereo) PG-13' James Franco.'PG-13' m
(HlTV) 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters Hunt Intl Hunters |Hunt Intl Cool Pools 'G' Hawaii Hawaii House Hunters Reno Hunters |Hunt Intl
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** "Prosecuting "Blue-EyedButcher" (2012, Docudrama) Sara "She Made Them Do It" (2012, Docudrama) "Blue-Eyed Butcher"
HLIEJ 24 38 24 31 CaseyAnthony Paxton, Lisa Edelstein.'NR' Jenna Dewan Tatum. NR' N (2012) Sara Paxton.
"Love Sick: Secrets of a Sex Addict" (2008) **+ "Sleeping With the Enemy" (1991) Julia "Intimate Stranger" (2006) Kari Matchett. A
(50 119 Sally Pressman. (In Stereo) NR' Roberts. (In Stereo) 'R' man stalks his former girlfriend. NR' N
n** "Safe House" (2012, Action) Denzel **** "Jaws" (1975, Horror) Roy Scheider, **** "Saving Private Ryan" (1998, War) Tom
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(WNJ 103 62 103 Oprah: Where Now? Oprah: Where Now? Oprah's Lifeclass Oprah's Lifeclass (N) Oprah's Lifeclass Oprah's Lifeclass
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(WGjN1A) 18 18 18 18 20 Videos |Blooers! pers! Mother Mother |Mother Mother |Mother Funny Home Videos 30 Rock 30 Rock


Please don't call


her 'Gramma'


D earAnnie: I would
like your opinion
on something. I
am a grandmother of four
wonderful grandkids and
very proud of the fact.
The problem comes
when dealing with the
other grandmother, espe-
cially when others are in
the vicinity. I don't know
whether it's because I am
older than she is or what,
but she al-
ways ad-
dresses me as
"Gramma
Mary," as in,
"Gramma
Mary, what
would you
like to do
today?"
I find this
condescend-
ing, disre-
spectful and AN N
rude. First of MAIL
all, I am not MAIl
her grand-
mother. Second, I am a
person in my own right,
with a job and hobbies. I
am not defined solely by
being a grandmother.
I was at a family func-
tion last week where I
met my granddaughter's
soon-to-be mother-in-law,
and this woman called
me "Gramma," too! My
daughter later said it was
because she couldn't re-
member my name, which
is all well and good, but
when I couldn't remem-
ber her name, I didn't call
her "Mom." I took my
daughter aside and asked
what her name was.
I don't mean to sound
petty, but this bothers me


I
.1


so much that I want to
scream. If a grandchild
calls me "Gramma," I'm
thrilled and want them to
shout it from the rooftops.
But when non-related
adults do it, it is demean-
ing. How can I get them to
stop? No Name, No
City
Dear No Name: Not
every grandmother
would object to this, es-
pecially since
other adults
might consider
it part of your
title and uncon-
nected to your
relationship to
them. Also keep
in mind that, in
front of the
grandchildren,
others may feel
it is less confus-
E'S ing to the kids
BOX to refer to you
by the same
name the chil-
dren use. But since this
bothers you so much, it's
perfectly OK to state your
preference at the time.
When someone calls you
"Gramma Mary," smile
and say, "I'd prefer you
call me 'Mary.'" You can
remind them when
necessary


Annie's Mailbox is
written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy
Sugarr Email
anniesmailbox@
comcast.net, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St., Hermosa
Beach, CA 90254.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Snitch" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"Escape from Planet Earth"
(PG) In 3D. 1:45 p.m.,
7:45 p.m. No passes.
"Escape from Planet Earth"
(PG) 4:45 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Safe Haven" (PG-13)
1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
10:05 p.m.
"A Good Day to Die Hard"
(R) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No
passes.
"Beautiful Creatures" (PG-
13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10 p.m.
"Identity Thief'" (R) ID
required. 1:25 p.m., 4:25 p.m.,
7:25 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864


"Dark Skies" (PG-13) 2 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 8 p.m.
"Snitch" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Escape from Planet Earth"
(PG) In 3D. 1:25 p.m.,
7:05 p.m. No passes.
"Escape from Planet Earth"
(PG) 4:20 p.m.
"Beautiful Creatures" (PG-
13) 1:15 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Safe Haven" (PG-13)
1:20 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"A Good Day to Die Hard"
(R) 1:55 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:50 p.m. No passes.
"Side Effects" (R) 1:40 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Identity Thief" (R) 1:45 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Warm Bodies" (PG-13)
1:50 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Santa -
6 Wetlands plant
11 En-
16 "- the Barbarian"
21 Wash cycle
22 Sea
23 Fragrant
essential oil
24 Town in Maine
25 Beneath
26 Vice presidential candi-
date
28 Worth
29 Billy Williams
30 Name
for a bystander
32 Profit
33 New Mexico's flower
35 Dir. letters
36 Gaelic
38 "- of the d'Urbervilles"
41 Hammer part
43 Itinerary (abbr.)
44 Attention
45 Electric cell
48 Hawke or Allen
50 Before
52 Mend, as a shoe
55 Fastened
57 Cup handle
58 The underworld
62 Cakes and -
63 Elaborate song
65 Bite
67 End
69 Secret
70 Metal fastener
71 Jet-
72 Enthusiast
74 Pedestal part
76 Lab burner
77 At any time
79 Morning moisture
81 Commenced
83 Impudent
85 Skeletal part
86 Lively party
88 Chief
90 Ump's cousin
92 Conveys
94 Burden of proof
96 Holiday drink
97 Snaky fish
99 Soil
100 City in Sicily
103 Something viscous
105 Did sums
107 Long lock


110 Cheer
from a crowd
111 Chess piece
113 Like brine
115 Summit
117 Wall pier
118 Some children
120 Hardware item
122 --de Janeiro
123 Grampus
125 Quite a lot
126 Urge on
128 Pom or beagle, e.g.
130 Shade tree
132 Helen of -
133 In addition
134 Sweet and wisdom
135 Go team!
137 Hideaway
139 Lily of the -
141 Very important
143 Orchid part
145 Nutty confection
147 Montez orAlbright
150 Maria
152 Love god
154 Watched
155 Struggle for air
159 Female animal
160 Beam
162 Laugh out loud
164 After deductions
166 Mild interjection
167 Gladden
169 Like a prude
173 Not hidden
175 Variety show
176 Taut
177 Century plant
178 Scope
179 Precipitous
180 Skillful
181 Prevent
from acting
182 Knock's answer


DOWN
1 Unrefined oil
2 Eye and ocean
3 South American range
4 Employ
5 Eastern European
6 Frozen dessert
7 Old coin
8 Part of Eur.
9 Lawless group
10 Early computer
11 Big businessman


12 Cash dispenser, for
short
13 Remain
14 Giant planet
15 Put up
16 Insensible state
17 Mineral
18 Scandinavian
19 Flavoring plant
20 Famous
27 "Death on the -"
31 Said
34 So-so grade
37 Wane
39 Plant bristle
40 Lanka
42 So -?
44 Throw something
weighty
46 Sorrowful cry
47 Hankering
49 Dry
51 Greek letter
52 Escapade
53 Martini fruit
54 Inclination toward good
56 Restaurant
59 Harmful
60 Tennessee
Ford
61 Gores
64 Particular
66 Small dog
68 Food for babies
69 Pinkish color
73 Seaman
75 Calendar abbr.
78 Descartes or Coty
80 Pallid
81 Fraudulent
82 The poor
84 Horse's gait
87 Lie in wait
89 Run
91 Part of FDIC (abbr.)
93 avis
95 Strike
98 Term in tennis
100 Take as a given
101 Exclusively
102 Yoko-
104 Spoil
105 Ring-shaped island
106 Portal
108 Peach pit
109 Arenaceous
112 Supreme being
114 Tell a tale
116 Furnish


119 Town in Alaska
121 Traditional
learning
124 Blue-green
127 An article
129 Arena entrance
131 Chart
132 Salver
136 Beecher Stowe
138 Wrath
140 Chair part


Root vegetable
Hit repeatedly
Plunder
Usurer
Casts a sidelong glance
Young bird
Permission
Prospect
Low-cal lunch
Emissary
Woolen fabric


Puzzle answer is on Page A18.


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick I


Today MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Falk or Fonda
Ooze
Sea eagle
Great anger
Ripped
After Mon.
Snake
Feline
"All About-"
Mover's truck


A16 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well
as events to which the public
is invited. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activi-
ties, meals and more for a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.

POST NEWS
VFW Riders Group
meets at 10 a.m. Saturday
(different weeks each month)
at different VFW posts
throughout the year. For
information, call director Gene
Perrino at 352-302-1037, or
email geneusawo@tampa
bay.rr.com.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Satur-
day monthly at 1 p.m. for
lunch and coffee at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). All Coastie veterans
are welcome. For more infor-
mation, call Charlie Jensen at
352-503-6019.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Lounge open at 11 a.m. Mon-
day through Saturday and
noon on Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The public is welcome
Everyone is invited to lunch
from noon to 3 p.m. Wednes-
days in the lounge. On Mon-
days and Thursdays, lunch is
served in the lounge and
dining hall.
The post will conduct a
Legion Day celebration at 5
p.m. Friday, March 15, to
honor the American Legion
and the service of its volun-
teers, as well as hold a din-
ing-in to honor all the armed
services. There will be a grog
bowl ceremony, group skids,
etc. The public is invited. All
veterans are encouraged to
wear their respective uniforms
whether class A or utility to
show their past service.
The event is informal and
casual attire is preferred. To
RSVP, call the post at 352-
795-6526 or the Cmdr. Mike
Klyap at 352-302-6096, so the
post can get accountability for
meals.
The 40/8 will have a St.
Patrick's Day celebration on
March 17 with the cost of the
meal being $10. This will be a
fun day for the family and all
legionnaires. The public is
welcome.
On March 30, the Legion
Riders will have its annual
poker run, which will begin
and end at the post. The
event is open to all motorcy-
cle organizations and regular
vehicles are welcome.
For more information about
the post and its other activi-
ties, call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at
352-302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who
served during war time (also
stepchildren); stepchildren;
and female veterans who
served during wartime. Call
Unit President Sandy White at
352-249-7663, or member-
ship chairman Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
The Unit will serve a shrimp


alfredo dinner Friday, Feb. 27,
at the post home, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway. All
members and the public are
welcome to come and enjoy
dinner with their friends and
families for a donation of $7.
All profits support the many
programs of the American
Legion Auxiliary. For more in-
formation, call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-
249-7663.
0 H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post


10087, Beverly Hills, offers
activities such as meals,
bingo, golf, darts, karaoke,
pool and more for members
and guests. Review the
monthly newsletter for activi-
ties and updates, and call the
post at 352-746-0440. The
VFW Post 10087 is off County
Road 491, directly behind
Cadence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 746-0440. The
Cake Crab Company Golf
League plays at Twisted Oaks
G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.
Check with Jack Gresham for
tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf
League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted
Oaks Golf Club and Citrus
Springs Country Club. Tee
time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Ham dinner from 5 to 6:30
p.m. Friday, March 1. Cost is
$8; children younger than 6
eat for $4. Karaoke by Mike.
The public is welcome.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, at the intersection of In-
dependence Highway and
U.S. 41. The chapter hall is on
the corner of Independence
Highway and Paul Drive. We
thank veterans for their serv-
ice and welcome any disabled
veteran to join us from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we
accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to as-
sist disabled veterans and
their families when we are
able. Anyone who knows a
disabled veteran or their fam-
ily who requires assistance is
asked to call Commander
Richard Floyd 727-492-0290,
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207,
or 352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClis-
ter is available to assist any
veteran or dependents with
their disability claim by ap-
pointment. Call 352-344-3464
and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the
veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA med-
ical center in Gainesville may
call the Citrus County Transit
office for wheelchair trans-
portation; call 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant
Lynn Armitage at 352-341-
5334.One of the DAVA's proj-
ects is making lap robes and
ditty, wheelchair and monitor
bags for needy veterans in
nursing homes. All who wish
to help in our projects are wel-
come. We need to make the
items certain sizes, so please
call for information. We also
collect toiletry items for the
veterans. Good, clean mate-
rial and yarn are needed.


For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries
are at 906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness. Call the post at
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org for informa-
tion about all weekly post ac-
tivities. Men's Auxiliary meets
7 p.m. first Wednesday at the
post. Call Neil Huyler at 352-


344-3495.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Aux-
iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Post and auxiliary meet
the first Wednesday of the
month at 7 p.m. Dunnellon
Young Marines meet 6 p.m.
Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4 p.m.
Everyone is welcome at
free AARP income tax service
through April 10 from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Wednesday. For in-
formation, call Wayne Sloan
at 352-489-5066.
For information about activ-
ities and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets the
second Saturday monthly at
the DAV building at 1039 N.
Paul Drive in Inverness. This
is an advocacy group for cur-
rent and future veterans, as
well as for POWs and MIAs.
Florida Chapter 7 welcomes
new members to help pro-
mote public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help vet-
erans in need of help. Full
membership is open to all in-
dividuals 18 years or older
who wish to dedicate time to
the cause. Visit the website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker
for your next meeting or
event. Call club President Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell), or email him at ultra
rayl997@yahoo.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
or President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
Any female relative age 16 or
older who is a wife, widow,
mother, mother-in-law, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,


granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of an honor-
ably discharged Marine and
FMF Corpsman eligible to join
the auxiliary, and female
Marines (former, active and
reserves) are eligible for
Marine Corps League
membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
Call or visit the post for regu-
lar events, as well as meet-
ings. Google us at VFW 4252,
Hernando.
The public is welcome at
"Show Me the Money" from
2 to 4 p.m. Thursday at the
post.
Sunday breakfasts are
open to the public from 9:30
to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $6.
Everyone is invited to "Bo-
nanza Bingo" beginning at 9
a.m. Saturday, March 2. Cost
is $35 for the bingo package,
which includes lunch.
Call 352-726-5206.
The public is welcome at
the Sunday buffet breakfasts
from 10 a.m. to noon; cost
is $5.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-
5012 for information. VFW
membership is open to men
and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including
service in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The Korean
Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above for
information.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For
information about the post
and its activities, call 352-637-
0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, in-
vites all eligible veterans to
join or transfer to our Post
237 family. There are many


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activities and monthly events,
and our Legion, Sons of the
Legion, Legion auxiliary and
Legion Riders are active in
support of veterans and our
community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org
to view the calendar of up-
coming events and regularly
scheduled activities open to
all members of the Legion,
VFW and AMVETS and their
auxiliaries. Visit or call the
post at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of
the U.S. is eligible for mem-
bership if said service was
within Korea, including territo-
rial waters and airspace, at
any time from Sept. 3, 1945,
to the present or if said serv-
ice was outside of Korea from
June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77 meet the first
Thursday monthly at the for-
mer Inverness Highlands
S&W Civic Association build-
ing at 4375 Little Al Point, off
Arbor Street. Call Post Cmdr.
Norman Brumett at 352-860-
2981 or Auxiliary president
Marie Cain at 352-697-3151
for information about the post
and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food
available.
American Legion Allen
Rawls Post 77 will host John
Thomas and the Ramblin'
Fever Band Friday, March 1,
featuring a jam, from 6 to 9
p.m. at the post home. The
jams will be on the first and
third Fridays of each month.
Finger food and soft drinks
will be available. All musicians
are welcome, as well anyone
who wants to come and enjoy
the music.
The post hosts karaoke


from 5 to 8 p.m. the first and
third Fridays monthly, with a
fish fry on the third Friday at
the post home, 4375 S. Little
Al Point, Inverness. Everyone
is welcome. The menu fea-
tures fried and baked had-
dock, baked potato, baked
beans, coleslaw, tea, lemon-
ade coffee and soft drink for
$8. Serving will begin at 4:30
p.m. and karaoke will begin at
5p.m.
For more information, call
Norm at 352-860-2981 or
352-476-2134.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Dinner is at 6 p.m. and the
meeting follows at 7. All veter-
ans in the Homosassa/Ho-
mosassa Springs area are
invited to be a part of Ameri-
can Legion Post 166. For in-
formation about the post or
the American Legion, call and
leave a message for the post
commander at 352-860-2090.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose
and Crown restaurant, Citrus
Hills. Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway). For more informa-
tion about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959; or
visit www.Postl 55.org.

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 A17





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


In SERVICE


James. C. Clair
Army Spec. James C. Clair
has returned to the U.S. after
being deployed overseas at a
forward operating base to
serve in support of Operation
Enduring Freedom.
Operation Enduring Free-
dom is the official name given
to anti-terrorism military oper-
ations involving U.S. troops
and allied coalition partners.
Active duty and reserve com-
ponent members from all
branches of the U.S. armed
forces have been deployed to
support the war against global
terrorism outside the borders
of the United States. U.S.
troops serve in South, South-
west and Central Asia, the
Arabian Peninsula, the Horn
of Africa, islands in the Pa-
cific, and Europe.
Clair is a gunner assigned
to the 4th Airborne Brigade
Combat Team, 25th Infantry
Division at Joint Base Elmen-
dorf-Richardson, Alaska. He
has served in the military for
two years.
He is the son of Patricia
Williams of Homosassa. The
specialist is a 2010 graduate
of Crystal River High School.

Kayla J. Wilcome
Army Spec. Kayla J.
Wilcome has returned to the
U.S. after being deployed
overseas at a forward operat-
ing base to serve in support of
Operation Enduring Freedom.
Wilcome is assigned to the
4th Airborne Brigade Combat



VETERANS
Continued from Page A17

Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 1 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November at
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. All combat-wounded
veterans, lineal descendants,
next of kin, spouses and sib-
lings of Purple Heart recipi-
ents are invited. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 MOPH, visit the chap-
ter's website at www.citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-
0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post. Call the post
at 352-447-3495.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call Commander Tom
Gallagher at 860-1629 for in-
formation and directions.


Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.


Team, 25th Infantry Division
at Joint Base Elmendorf-
Richardson, Alaska.
While deployed, Wilcome
received the Army Commen-
dation Medal.
She is the daughter of
Brandi Wilcome of Brooksville
and Shelley Taylor of Polk
City. The specialist is a 2007
graduate of Hernando High
School.

Tyler Swain
Tyler "Colt" Swain will grad-
uate Basic Training for the
U.S. Navy on March 15,
2013.
Swain enlisted for 10 years
due the extensive training he
will receive for Advanced
Computers (launching mis-


Tyler 'Colt'
Swain
U.S.Navy


siles and
satellites.)
He is a
2010 gradu-
ate of
Lecanto
High School,
where he
played four
years of
Panther
baseball.
Swain has
already been


promoted to Petty Officer due
to education. His long-term
goals are to receive his mas-
ter's degree while serving and
to retire with the Navy.
Before leaving for the Navy,
Swain attended the College of
Central Florida and was run-
ning his own business, Big
Nugget Gold & Electronics.


Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2013 will
be at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill.
Dates are: March 9, April 13
and May 11.

SERVICES & GROUPS
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to
veterans in need. Food dona-
tions and volunteers are al-
ways welcomed and needed.
The Veterans Food Bank is
open 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tues-
days. The CCVC is on the
DAV property in Inverness at
the corner of Paul and Inde-
pendence, off U.S. 41 north.
Appointments are encour-
aged by calling 352-400-
8952. CCVC general
meetings are at 10 a.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly at
the DAV building in Inverness.
All active duty and honorably
discharged veterans, their
spouses, widows and widow-
ers, along with other veterans'
organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. The CCVC is a non-
profit corporation; donations
are tax deductible. Members
can renew with Gary
Williamson at 352-527-4537,
or at the meeting. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran
in need of food, haircut, voter
ID, food stamps, medical as-
sistance or more blankets is
asked to call Ed Murphy at
the Hunger and Homeless
Coalition at 352-382-0876, or
pass along this phone num-
ber to the veteran.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency Ser-
viceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, of email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the De-
partment of Veterans Affairs
(VA), provides tailored care
for veterans and their families.
The program is provided in
private homes, assisted living
facilities and nursing homes,
and staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to ill-
nesses and conditions unique
to each military era or war. It
also provides caregiver edu-
cation and a recognition pro-
gram to honor veterans. HPH
Hospice care and programs
do not affect veterans' bene-
fits. Call 352-527-4600.


FOR THE RECORD
* Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida
are a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus
County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the
website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.


Engagement

Heindl/Wilcox

Lisa Heindl and
Michael Wilcox of Crystal
River have announced
their engagement and ap- ,
preaching marriage.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Nancy Hilton
and Walter Heindl of
Pennsylvania. Her fiance
is the son of Robin Moore
and Johnny Wilcox of
Texas.
The couple will ex-
change nuptial vows at
4:30 p.m. March 9,2013, in
Apopka.


Wedding

Dawson

Pam Dawson and Mike
Dawson of Inverness ex-
changed nuptial vows at 1
p.m. Feb. 9, 2013, at
Bayfront Marin House in
St. Augustine. The Rev
David Shopes officiated
the ceremony.
The couple's daughters
- Amber and Morgan
Dawson served as
bridesmaids.
The bride works with
Signature Dental Care,
Crystal River, and her
husband is associated nance and
with Central Mainte- Crystal River.

90th BIRTHDAY

Joe Lanzendofer

Joe Lanzendorfer cele-
brated his 90th birthday
with wife Louise recently
He hails from Fstrvl Tr-
vose, Pa., has three chil-
dren and will be leaving
soon on a cruise to cele-
brate with family.
Joe is a longtime mem- a Masonic I
ber of Inverness Elks and Pennsylvania.

For the RECORD


Divorces 2/11/13 to 2/17/13
Scott F. Carrig vs. Debbie
A. Carrig
Theodore Richard
Davidson Sr., Crystal River
vs. Theda May Davidson,
Palmetto
Joan M. Domingue vs.
Kenneth H. Domingue,
Ocala
Kathryn Doris Drosdick,
Inverness vs. Richard J.
Drosdick Jr., Inverness
Tina Arancibia Haines vs.
Barrie William Haines,
Ocala
Ashley Horovitz,
Inverness vs. Richard
Horovitz, Bushnell
Roy Elbert Newton
Kennedy, Inglis vs. Carrie Jo
Kennedy, Crystal River
Deborah L. Miller vs.
Bruce J. Miller, Indiantown
Frances M. Quillen,
Crystal River vs. Earl C.
Quillen, Crystal River
Kristie R. Struble
Thomas, Brooksville vs.
Jason A. Thomas, Lecanto
Suzanne L. Taylor,
Homosassa Springs vs.
Bruce D. Taylor, Homosassa
Debra S. Wheeler, Cedar
Grove, Ind. vs. James W.
Wheeler, Beverly Hills

Marriages 2/11/13 to 2/17/13
Danny Lee Alley,
Dunnellon/Nancy A. Abbott,
Dunnellon
David Douglas Bahringer,
Homosassa/Georgianna
Lynn Ricci, Homosassa
Antonio Manuel Cardoza,
Inverness/Rocio Cardoza,
Inverness
David Andrew Givens,
Hernando/Lisa Marie Opel,
Hernando
Eric Troupe Grimes,
Inverness/Melissa Ann
Zblewski, Inverness
Paul Leon Harnish, Cedar
Springs, Mich./Geraldine
Ruth Doorn, Inverness
Lester Henry Hillard Jr.,
Citrus Springs/Olive Letman
Rowe, Citrus Springs
Douglas Alan Kunkel,
Eaton Rapids, Mich./
Amanda Lynn Omans,
Eaton Rapids, Mich.
Christopher Daniel
Mcleskey, Inverness/
Sheena Ann Mansfield,
Inverness
Harold Arthur Moore,
Floral City/Donna Jean
Palmer, Earlville, N.Y.
Richard Charles Morse,
Floral City/Kimberly Lynn
Ripp, Floral City
Chad Don Pool, Crystal
River/Sharon Biggs Bushell,
Crystal River
Donald Charles Riley,
Inverness/Helen Eloise


Wedding

Zambrano/St. Martin


Deyanira Janeth Zam-
brano and Chanel St.
Martin exchanged nup-
tial vows Dec. 29, 2012, in
their Inverness home.
Chaplain Donna
Viglione of The Wedding
Chapel in Inverness offi-
ciated at the ceremony
Dacelin St. Martin was
best man and maid of
honor was Antonette St.
Martin.


Engagement

Griffin/Malanga


Cheri Reed of Crystal
River, mother of the
bride, and Allen and Lisa
Kalansky of Homosassa,
parents of the groom, an-
nounce the engagement
of their children, Ashley
Gail Griffin and James
Robert Malanga.
The bride-elect is a
S graduate of Crystal River
High School and is cur-
rently attending Keiser
University. She is em-
ployed at Superior Resi-
dences of Lecanto.
The prospective groom
is a graduate of Lecanto
Welding, High School and is the
co-owner of Nature Coast


Houston, Inverness
Matthew William
Sorenson, Homosassa/
Christine Lynn Cook,
Homosassa
Eugene Alex Tafelski,
Floral City/Brenda Darlene
Tafelski, Floral City
J. Warren Taylor, Beverly
Hills/Darlene Jan Helmbold,
Beverly Hills


Home Repair & Mainte-
nance Inc.
Wedding vows will be
exchanged Nov 23,2013.


Sunday's PUZZLER-

Puzzle is on Page A16.

CLAUS SEDGE MASSE CONAN
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STEEP A ETAD R ENTER


2-24


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


A18 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013


TOGETHER











SPORTS


Heat stay
cool under
pressure in
Philadelphia.
/B3


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Youth sports/B2
0 Adult recreaton/B2
0 Hockey/B3
0 Basketball/B3
0 Baseball/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 Entertainment/B6


Rays squads top Red Sox, fall to Pirates


- B^ Bf .
Associated Press
Los Angeles Dodgers Hall of
Famer Sandy Koufax signs
autographs Thursday during
spring training in Phoenix.
Koufax suits up to
lend Dodgers a hand
GLENDALE, Ariz. Sandy
Koufax hadn't worn a major
league uniform for more than
two decades until the Dodgers
got him back in blue this
spring.
The beloved left-hander is in
camp with Los Angeles as a
special instructor, doling out
advice and experience to
young players who haven't for-
gotten his singular achieve-
ments during an all-too-brief
career.
During a rare interview, the
77-year-old Koufax said he
doesn't know why so many
people think he's reclusive and
shy. He's grateful simply to talk
pitching with the Dodgers, say-
ing it might be the only thing
he's ever been good at.
Manager Don Mattingly says
the three-time Cy Young Award
winner is just one of the guys
during spring, although he read
a list of Koufax's accomplish-
ments to the team just to make
sure everybody knew.
Jeter resumes
on-field running drills
TAMPA- Yankees captain
Derek Jeter practiced on-field
running and agility drills for the
first time since breaking his
ankle last fall.
Jeter worked out at Stein-
brenner Field on Saturday with
players who didn't travel for the
Yankees' spring training opener
against Atlanta.
"It's a natural progression,
but everything went good,"
Jeter said. "It went fine."
Jeter has been hitting and
fielding grounders since the
Yankees started full squad
workouts last Monday.


SPORTS
BRIEFS^^


Pirates 3, Rays 2
PORT CHARLOTTE Roberto
Hernandez made his Tampa Bay
debut a good one, needing just 12
pitches for a perfect first inning Sat-
urday in the Pittsburgh Pirates' 3-2
win over a split squad of Rays.
Formerly known as Fausto Car-
mona, Hernandez was 0-3 with a
7.53 ERA last season for Cleveland.
Hernandez and Jeff Niemann are
aiming for the fifth spot in the Rays'
rotation. Niemann needed just 11
pitches to strike out two and retire
the side in the second.
Rays reliever Fernando Rodney
struck out the side in the third.
Pittsburgh starter Jeff Locke
pitched three hitless innings. He
went 10-5 with Triple-A Indianapolis
last year, and is competing for the
fifth rotation spot with fellow
prospect Kyle McPherson.


Rays 4,

Red Sox 3

Associated Press
FORT MYERS Boston
starter John Lackey returned to
the mound after missing last
year, allowing one run in one in-
ning Saturday as a split squad of
Tampa Bay Rays beat the Red
Sox 4-3.
Lackey had Tommy John sur-
gery after the 2011 season.
Tampa Bay loaded the bases
against the right-hander with no
outs before he retired three
straight batters.
Lackey gave up one hit, a walk
and hit a batter He struck out one.
Rays starter Alex Colome
pitched a hitless inning.


Disaster at Daytona


Associated Press
Kyle Larson goes airborne Sunday before catching the fencing in a wreck including Dale Earnhardt Jr. (88), Parker Kligerman (77),
Justin AIIgaier (31) and Brian Scott (2) during the final lap of the NASCAR Nationwide Series race at Daytona International Speedway.


Miami C Mathis out
six weeks; collarbone
JUPITER, Fla. Miami
Marlins catcher Jeff Mathis has
broken his right collarbone in
the team's spring training
opener and is expected to be
out six weeks.
Mathis was injured in the
fourth inning Saturday when he
was hit by a foul ball off the bat
of St. Louis Cardinals slugger
Matt Holliday. After Holliday
walked, Mathis was replaced
by Kyle Skipworth.
Marlins rookie manager Mike
Redmond says it's a big blow
to the club because Miami
doesn't have a lot of depth
behind the plate.
Mathis, projected to be the
backup to starter Rob Brantly
this season, singled in two
at-bats during Miami's 8-3
victory.
-From wire reports


Fans injured when car sails into fence; Stewart wins


Associated Press
DAYTONA BEACH,
Fla.
A t least 30
NASCAR fans
were injured
Saturday when
a car sailed
into the fence at Daytona


Eric van
den Hoogen
ON TENNIS


International Speedway,
and large chunks of debris
- including a tire flew
into the grandstands. No
fatalities were reported
from the accident on the
last lap of the Nationwide
Series race.
The crash began as the
field closed in on the finish


line, and rookie Kyle Larson's -.
car came upon the wreck S
and went airborne into the
fence that separates the
track from the seats.
Large chunks of Larson's
car landed in the grand- .
stands, and one of his tires
A wheel, tire and suspension parts sit
See Page B4 in the stands after the crash.


Making a difference through tennis
W hat does it take mouths that is where make a big difference. annual Spring Classic is
to make a differ- real donations of time, Giving is a double-edged all about. This event
ence? It is not food, clothing and cash sword; it puts a smile on brings together a lot of
just big donations and or- come in. There are a lot of the faces of those who re- people willing to help,
ganizations; it can be as people who would like to ceive and on those who with time (volunteers)
little as a smile. Obviously, help but are in a tight give. In this case, an and donations (players,
a smile alone is not going squeeze themselves, but added bonus is that you sponsors). If you would
to put clothes on people's remember: A lot of small get to play tennis as well.
backs or food in their donations together can That's what the second See Page B4


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Associated Press
Boston Red Sox third baseman Will Middlebrooks leaps as he misses
a throw from catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia on Saturday, allowing
Tampa Bay Rays' Desmond Jennings to score from third base during
the third inning in Fort Myers, Fla.










Program for very young ones ready


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County Parks and
Recreation is offering a great
sports opportunity for little ones
who may be too young to join the
organized sports leagues within
the county. PL.A.Y ,which is an
acronym for Preparing Little
Athletes Youth, was created for
those children who are ready to
play sports.
The PL.A.Y programs offered
in the upcoming session include:
basketball, which will be at the
Citrus County Resource Center
on Monday or Wednesdays; flag
football, located at Bicentennial
Park on Tuesdays or Thursdays;
and cheerleading, which will be
at Bicentennial Park on Thurs-
days. The next session will begin
the week of April 8. Boys and
girls ages 3 to 5 are encouraged
to join the six-week program.
After enrollment, each child re-
ceives age-appropriate sports
equipment and a team T-shirt.
Registration opens on Monday,
March 11. Spots fill up fast and
space is limited. Call Crysta
Henry, recreation program
specialist for youth programs, at
352-527-7543 or visit www.citrus


countyparks.com for more infor-
mation.
All programs and activities of-
fered by the division of parks
and recreation are available to
all persons without regard to
race, color, handicap, sex, reli-
gion or national origin. For per-
sons with disabilities requiring
special accommodations, please
contact our office five days prior
to the program so that proper
consideration may be given to
the request.
Youth golf lessons
Citrus County Parks and Recre-
ation, in partnership with Pine Ridge
Golf Course, will hold spring youth
golf lessons. The lessons are at
Pine Ridge Golf Course on Wednes-
day evenings from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
They will begin Wednesday,
March 27, and run for five weeks.
Children ages 6 to 15 are eligible
and the cost is $50 per child. In-
struction will be given by golf pro
Randy Robbins and several of his
volunteers.
For more information, call
Crysta Henry, recreation program
specialist for youth programs, at
352-527-7543 or Randy Robbins at
352-746-6177.


Super Series baseball
coming to county
The Key Training Center's Who's
on First and Florida Premier
Prospects (in conjunction with Citrus
County Parks and Recreation) are
proud to present Super Series
Baseball Tournaments. Super Se-
ries Baseball is one of the nation's
largest and fastest-growing baseball
organizations. The qualifying tour-
naments will be held at Citrus
County's Bicentennial Park in Crys-
tal River on March 30 and 31 and
June 15 and 16.
For more information, call Tim
Ramsay or Adam Thomas at 352-
287-1415 or 786-877-5041.
Underwater egg hunt
Citrus County Parks and Recre-
ation will host its next Underwater
Egg Hunt on Saturday, March 23,
from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. for children
up to the age of 12. There will be two
egg hunts for different age groups:
Children up to age 6 will hunt from 11
a.m. to 1 p.m., while children age 7
to 12 will hunt from 1 to 2:30 p.m.
Admission is free and children will
need to bring their own basket.
Swimming attire and an application


Special to the Chronicle
The Preparing Little Athletes Youth (or P.L.A.Y.) program will offer
football, basketball and cheerleading for boys and girls ages 3 to 5.
The program is a good introduction for young ones to learn how to
play team sports.


of sunscreen are encouraged.
Eggs will be hidden throughout
the Bicentennial Park Pool area in
Crystal River. The pool itself will be
set up with different levels of diffi-
culty based on swimming ability.
There will also be a land-based egg


hunt, which is designed for younger
children and non-swimmers.
For more information, call Bicen-
tennial Park Pool at 795-1478, Cit-
rus County Parks & Recreation at
527-7540, or visit www.citruscounty
parks.com.


Special to the Chronicle


Registration for the latest men's flag football season begins Monday.


Adults, it's playtime


Various sports leagues starting up for those ages 18 and older


Special to the Chronicle

The men's flag football is a league
for adults 18 and older. It is a very
fast-paced, physical game. If you are
up for a challenge, the league is
starting on March 14.
The league is looking forward to
increasing the number of teams, and
to expanding competition. Registra-
tion begins on Feb. 25.
For more information, call Maci at
352-527-7547.
Men's softball
All are encouraged to come out
and witness the talented Citrus
County adult leagues.
Games are at Bicentennial Park in
Crystal River and are at 6:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Monday.
The newseason will start April 1.
Registration begins on March 4; for
more information, call Maci at 352-
527-7547.
Co-ed kickball
This co-ed kickball league is for
adults 18 and up. It is a great way to
meet new people and get some ex-
ercise while having fun.
Games are at 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
and 8:30 p.m. at Bicentennial Park
in Crystal River, lasting an hour or
nine innings, whichever comes first.
The new season will start April 16.
Registration begins March 1; for
more information, call Maci at 352-
527-7547.
Co-ed beach volleyball
The first beach volleyball season


was extremely successful! There
were 10 teams of four, and the league
is looking forward to having even
more this season, which is set to
begin on April 23.
Games are played at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday at Bicentennial Park in
Crystal River. The team fees, days
and times are dependent on how
many teams sign up. You don't need
to be a star athlete to play; this
league is geared toward having fun
and exercising.
Registration will begin on March
11; for more information, call Maci
at 352-527-7547.
Co-ed softball
Co-ed softball is scheduled to start
up again on April 11. Games are
played at Bicentennial Park in Crys-
tal River on Thursdays starting at
6:30 p.m. Registration will begin on
March 11; for more information, call
Maci at 352-527-7547.
Women's basketball
Ladies, are you interested in play-
ing hoops? Organizers are looking to
start a women's basketball league
and would are attempting to gauge
interest. If you're interested in play-
ing, call Maci at 352-527-7547.
Register now for
leagues in Inverness
Registration is open for men's softball,
coed softball and coed kickball at Whis-
pering Pines Park.
Men's softball starts March 12 and will
be played on Tuesdays and Thursdays,


with upper and lower divisions. The cost
for a team is $325; must be older than
18 to participate. There will be 12 games
plus playoffs.
Coed softball will begin March 11, with
Wednesday-night play. Coed softball has
upper and lower divisions, with all partici-
pants being older than 18. The cost of a
team is $325, with 12 games plus playoffs.
Coed kickball will begin March 15, with
Friday-evening games. There will be
only one division, and participants must
be older than 16. The cost for a team is
$175. Any managers/teams interested
may call Whispering Pines Park at 352-
726-3913 or Woody Worley at 352-613-
0866, or stop by Whispering Pines Park
Administration Office for coach packets
and registration information.
Coalition slates
'Family Fun Walk'
The Citrus Breastfeeding Coalition is
sponsoring a "Family Fun Walk" on Sat-
urday, March 9, to benefit the new La
Leche League of Citrus County.
The event is to educate on the impor-
tance of breastfeeding and to increase
awareness of local breastfeeding sup-
port. All are welcome.
The event will be at "The Ceili A
Gathering Place" at 116 N.E. Fifth St.,
Crystal River. Registration will start at
9 a.m.; the walk begins at 9:30 a.m. with
a warm-up by Dance Central from Inver-
ness. Festivities will end at 11:30 a.m.
Call Melissa Salmon-Heil at 352-795-
6233, ext.533, for more information or to
preregister.


YMCA youth basketball begins


Special to the Chronicle

The Key Training Cen-
ter's Chet Cole Life En-
richment Center was filled
with the sounds of cheer-
ing fans. Friends and fam-
ily crowded the
gymnasium to enjoy bas-
ketball games for each of
the age brackets
The co-ed league is of-
fered for children be-
tween the ages of 3 and 12.
Games take place every
Saturday at the Key Train-
ing Center for each age
group (3 to 5, 6 to 8 and 9
to 12).
The scores were as
follows:
Age group 6-8
Scoring a total of 12 points,
Barn Cleveland pushed the
Seminoles to come out with a
victory over Wolfpack by a
close score of 14-10.
Chris Henry dropped in a
total of eight points and team-


mate Amari Wilson added six
points to propel the Tigers to
a 16-0 triumph over the
Hurricanes.
Age group 9-12
The Gators fought to a
close win against the Bull-


dogs, with a final score of
43-42. Israel Diaz netted 18
points and teammate Kyle
Barter scored 11 points.
Jordan Chapman led his
team to victory with a total of
24 points and helped the LSU
Tigers come out on top


against the Wildcats 55-10.
Tiger, Matt Diaz was next
best with 14 points.
The Razorbacks overcame
the AU Tigers 34-26. Team-
mates Curtis Tanascu and
Kyle Mitchell scored 12 points
each for the victors.


Recreation BRIEFS


Register now for
Camp Soquili
Camp Soquili 2013 at
Faith Haven Christian Re-
treat Center in Crystal River
will be in June and July at
Soquili Stables.
Eight weeklong sessions
will be offered from 8 a.m. to
4 p.m. Monday through Fri-
day. Campers can learn to
ride and care for a horse.
There will be equine activi-
ties, in the saddle and on
the ground, as well as
crafts, swimming and more.
For more information and
to sign up, visit the website
at www.faithhavencrc.org
/camp_soquili.php, call
352-206-2990, or e-mail
soquili.stables@gmail.com.
Sugarmill plans
Schoolastic event
The Women of Sugarmill
Woods will stage its 17th
annual Schoolastic Classic
Golf Tournament Monday,
Feb. 25, at Sugarmill Woods
Country Club.
Entrance fee is $55.
All net proceeds go to
scholarships for Citrus
County students. Registra-
tion starts at 7:30 a.m., with
shotgun start at 9 a.m. Fee
includes cart fees, break-
fast, snacks, lunch and a
Chinese auction.
For more information, call
352-586-8021.
Scramble to
benefit Special
Olympics
Spedal Olympics of Florida
- Citrus County will host its
second annual golf scramble
March 2 at Seven Rivers Golf
and Country Club. Shotgun
start is 8:30 a.m.
Registration begins at 7
a.m. Cost is $60 per player
or $240 for a four-person
team. Mulligans are three for
$15, with a maximum of 12
per team.
There will be a putting
contest, 50/50 drawing and
more. Snacks will be avail-
able and lunch will follow
the tournament.
Registration forms must
be turned in by Feb. 26. For
information, call Duane
Acha, events coordinator, at
352-746-3262, ext. 231, or
email duane.dustin@
gmail.com, or call Mary
Louise at 352-422-0819.


The scramble will benefit
year-round support for a va-
riety of Special Olympics
sports for children and adults
with intellectual disabilities.
Father Wilile classic
returns April 13
The Knights of Columbus
Abbot Francis Sadlier Coun-
cil No. 6168 will have its 19th
annual Father Willie Golf
Classic, open to men and
women, beginning at 8:30
a.m., with a shotgun start
Saturday, April 13, at Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club on
the Oaks Course.
The event benefits the
Pregnancy and Family Life
Center of Citrus County.
Sponsorships are $50 per
hole. Sponsors will be ac-
knowledged with a sign on
the greens and in various
Knights of Columbus publi-
cations prior to the event.
Entry fee is $60, which in-
cludes coffee and doughnuts
prior to the start, green and
cart fees, prizes and lunch at
the country club. Prizes will
be awarded for all par 3
holes, and the person hitting
a hole in one on the seventh
hole will receive a prize of
$15,000.
Winning teams will receive
$200 for first place, $150 for
second place and $100 for
third place. There will be
door prizes, 50/50 prizes
and a separate raffle for a
round of golf for four at the
Black Diamond course.
Play will be a scramble
format with four-player
teams. Form a team or the
council can do so. Entries
must be received no later
than April 10 with checks at-
tached, made out to the
Knights of Columbus.
The field must be limited
to 120 players, so make
reservations soon with Jim
Louque at 352-746 7563.
Throw shoes in
Beverly Hills
Beverly Hills Horseshoe
Club meets at 8:30 a.m.
each Wednesday. Men,
women and juniors age 10
and older can join.
There are all levels of
play; handicapped method.
Call Ron Fair 352-746-3924,
or email rfair3@
tampabay.rr.com.
-From staff reports


NAA www.dudleysauction.com
I Estate Collection Antique Tractors,
;LQ Vehicles, Tools, Implements, Etc.
AM" CTI O ENU
Tues., Jan. 26, 2013 Preview: 8am Auction: 9am
3363 S. Fitch Avenue, Inverness, FL 34452
Dudley's has been n-i-ned to sell the
complete lifetime .1 .)f Tractors,
Vehicles, Parts, Equipment & stored
items for this inverness concern. This private
collection has been collected, kept & stored at
this residential site tucked away in the inverness
Hi-hl i1- The extensive photos on the website
111. 1 ,, Th-, Ar-fihn -. r .. ill b pr-ppin-
for updated photos as warrants & plan to attend
Highlights to include: this important sale. __


"31" Model A For
"47" Studebaker I
7 Oliver Tractors
Farmall Super M
Rare Cockschutt
Check out our website
for more info!


d
P/U


S- W L BE SURE TO WATCH THE WEBSITE.
DUDLEY'S AUCTION
4000 S. Florida Ave., Inverness, FL (1/2 mile S. of the Fairgrounds)
Absentee and phone bids always accepted. 352-637-9588. Up-to-date photos on web.
Personal Property sold Dudley's Auction Ab1667. 12% bp, 2% ca/chk discount.
Announcements from the block take precedent.


ft Iifi~ll~


Snacks & Beverages
Wednesday Men's Day
Friday Nights Pizza
Saturdays-Hot Dogs
Sunday Subs


I


"r 299 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. (44), Lecanto
2 miles west of Lowe's.
352-419-7960
Mon-Thurs lOam-1Opm Fri & Sat 10am-12am Sun 12pm-10pm


I


B2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


^





CITRmus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Stamkos leads Lightning to 5-2 win over 'Canes

Associated Press Senators (11-6-2), who got 26 Red Wings 4, Kings 4, Avalanche 1
SA T'TT-TI saves from Ben Bishop. The Predators 0 .-.LOS ANGELES Dustin
...'C T TC .. .l .. .-


RIJALEI1jH, IN.C. -
Steven Stamkos scored
and had an assist in a four-
goal third period that sent
the Tampa Bay Lightning
to a 5-2 win over the Car-
olina Hurricanes on Satur-
day night.
Benoit Pouliot, Tom
Pyatt and Richard Panik
had the other third-period
goals for the Lightning, who
snapped a first-place tie with
the Hurricanes atop the
Southeast Division. Marc-
Andre Bergeron scored in
the first to help Tampa Bay
win for the third time in
four games following a six-
game winless streak.
Mathieu Garon made 32
saves for his second vic-
tory of the season.
Senators 3,
Maple Leafs 2
OTTAWA- Colin Green-
ing batted in a puck midair
with 24 seconds remaining to
give the Ottawa Senators a 3-
2 win over the Toronto Maple
Leafs on Saturday.
Mika Zibanejad and Erik
Condra also scored for the


win extends utawa s winning
streak to four games.
Mikhail Grabovski and
Clarke MacArthur scored for
Toronto (11-7-0).
Islanders 4, Sabres 0
BUFFALO, N.Y. Evgeni
Nabokov stopped 35 shots in
the New York Islanders'4-0
win over the skidding and un-
raveling Buffalo Sabres, who
were booed off the ice for a
second consecutive home
game on Saturday night.
Mark Streit and Michael
Grabner broke the game
open with goals 65 seconds
apart late in the second pe-
riod. John Tavares and Colin
McDonald sealed the win with
third-period goals. Matt Moul-
son added two assists in help-
ing the Islanders (8-9-1) win
their second straight and
fourth in six games.
Nabokov was particularly
sharp in stopping 13 shots in
the second period for his first
shutout of the season and
53rd of his NHL career.
The Sabres have lost four
in a row and five of six.


DETROIT Jimmy Howard
made 33 saves for his first
shutout of the season, and
Drew Miller scored an early
goal as the Detroit Red Wings
snapped a season-high, five-
game losing streak with a 4-0
victory over the Nashville
Predators on Saturday night.
Tomas Tatar gave Detroit a
two-goal lead early in the sec-
ond and Niklas Kronwall
made it a three-goal cushion
late in the period.
Pekka Rinne gave up those
three goals on just 17 shots
and finished with 23 saves for
the Predators.
Canadiens 3,
Rangers 0
MONTREAL-- Carey
Price made 17 saves, and the
Montreal Canadiens topped
the slumping New York
Rangers 3-0 on Saturday.
Each player on the line of
Erik Cole, Alex Galchenyuk
and Lars Eller scored a goal
and added an assist for Mon-
treal (12-4-2), which bounced
back after Thursday's loss to


Associated Press
Carolina Hurricanes goalie Dan Ellis defends the goal Sunday
with Joe Corvo (77) as the Tampa Bay Lightning's Steven
Stamkos (91) and Martin St. Louis (26) try to score
during the first period in Raleigh, N.C.


the New York Islanders and
won for the sixth time in
seven games.
Price's shutout was his sec-
ond this season. He allowed
just one goal in two starts
against the Rangers this
week.
Martin Biron, in his third
start of the season, stopped
15 shots for New York (8-7-2),
which dropped its third
straight and has just one win
in five games.


Capitals 5, Devils 1
WASHINGTON -Alex
Ovechkin produced his first
hat trick in more than two
years Saturday, leading the
struggling Washington Capi-
tals to a 5-1 victory over the
New Jersey Devils.
Ilya Kovalchuk's goal with
37.5 seconds left in the sec-
ond period tied the game for
New Jersey, but Ovechkin put
Washington ahead to stay
1:23 into the third.


Brown and Jeff Carter scored
first-period goals, Trevor Lewis
added his first career short-
handed goal, and Los Angeles
won its third straight victory.
Anze Kopitar also scored
and Jonathan Quick made 23
saves for the defending Stan-
ley Cup champion Kings.
Flyers 5, Jets 3
PHILADELPHIA- Wayne
Simmonds scored a go-ahead
goal about halfway through
the third period and Philadel-
phia beat Winnipeg.
Brayden Schenn scored
two goals and Claude Giroux
added one for the Flyers.
Evander Kane, Olli Jokinen
and Alexander Burmistrov
scored for the Jets.
Flyers left wing Scott Hart-
nell, who had missed the last
16 games with a broken foot,
was a last-minute addition to
the team's lineup. Not even his
surprise return was enough
for the Flyers to hit the ice
with any energy. They went a
stretch of 9:47 in the opening
period without registering a
shot on Ondrej Pavelec.


Heat keep lead safe


Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA-Le-
Bron James had 16 points,
11 assists and 10 rebounds
for his 35th career triple-
double and the Miami
Heat cruised to their 10th
straight win, 114-90 over
the Philadelphia 76ers on
Saturday night
Dwyane Wade had 33
points, Mario Chalmers
scored 14 and Chris Bosh
added 13 to help the de-
fending NBA champions
improve to 39-14.
The Heat have a com-
fortable 5 1/2-game lead
over Indiana in the East-
ern Conference. They've
won four in a row on the
road, including impressive
wins over Oklahoma City
before the All-Star break and
at Chicago on Thursday
Jrue Holiday scored 21
points and Nick Young
had 19 for Philadelphia,
which continues to fall
further behind in the play-
off chase. The Sixers en-
tered 3 1/2 games behind
Milwaukee for the No. 8
spot in the East.
Pacers 90,
Pistons 72
AUBURN HILLS, Mich.-
David West scored 16 points
and Paul George added a
double-double to help Indiana
Pacers easily beat Detroit.
The Pacers won 114-82
Friday night in Indianapolis,
and led by as many as 21 in
the return leg. George fin-
ished with 12 points and 12
rebounds for Indiana, which
had five players in double fig-
ures and got Danny Granger
on the floor for the first time.
After trailing by as many as
43 in Indiana on Friday, the
Pistons started the second
game of the home-and-home
set by missing 16 of their first
17 shots. Will Bynum led De-
troit with 15 points before get-
ting ejected for striking Tyler
Hansbrough in the groin in
the fourth quarter.


Associated Press
LeBron James drives past Spencer Hawes on Saturday during the first half in Philadelphia.


Nuggets 113,
Bobcats 99
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
JaVale McGee had 17 points,
including seven dunks, and
Denver snapped a four-game
road losing streak with a vic-
tory over Charlotte.


The Nuggets hadn't won
on the road since Jan. 23.
Ty Lawson had nine of his
20 points in the final quarter
and handed out five assists
as the Nuggets broke open
a close game early in the
fourth with a flurry of fast-
break points. Kenneth


Faried finished with 15
points on 7-of-9 shooting,
Corey Brewer had 14 points
and Andre Iguodala chipped
in with 13 points and 10 re-
bounds.
Kemba Walker had 24
points on 9-of-14 shooting for
the Bobcats.


Cavaliers 118,
Magic 94
ORLANDO, Fla. Mar-
reese Speights scored 18
points, Alonzo Gee added 17
and Cleveland used a big
fourth quarter to run past Or-
lando.
Kyrie Irving chipped in with
12 points and nine assists for
the Cavaliers, who have won
two straight overall and
snapped a six-game losing
streak in Orlando.
Arron Afflalo scored 16
points for the Magic in their
first home game since a
trade deadline deal last
week that saw the departure
of four players. Two of their
three new additions, Tobias
Harris and Beno Udrih, fin-
ished in double figures with
14 and 10 points, respec-
tively.
Orlando has lost five con-
secutive games and 28 of its
last 31.

Wizards 105,
Rockets 103
WASHINGTON Emeka
Okafor had 17 points, 11 re-
bounds and made the go-
ahead free throw with 5.2
seconds remaining to help
Washington overcome a 3-
point barrage for a win over
Houston.
Bradley Beal scored 21
points, Trevor Ariza added
18, and John Wall had 12
points and 11 assists for the
Wizards, who came back
from a 17-point deficit for
their second straight win.
Washington scored 54 points
in the paint and has won 10
of its 12 home games.
James Harden scored 27
points and Chandler Parsons
had 24 for the Rockets, in-
cluding five of Houston's 19
3-pointers. Houston at-
tempted 46 3-pointers, the
most in the NBA this season.
The Rockets made 13 from
beyond the arc in the first
half, one off the NBA record.


Unranked Deacons upset No. 2 Miami


Associated Press

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. C.J.
Harris scored 23 points and Wake
Forest beat No. 2 Miami 80-65 on
Saturday to snap the Hurricanes'
14-game winning streak.
Codi Miler-McIntyre added 15
points while Harris was 5 for 5
from 3-point range to lead the
Demon Deacons (12-14, 5-9 At-
lantic Coast Conference).
They shot 54 percent, led by
double figures for the entire sec-
ond half and reeled off 12 straight
points to pull away for their
biggest victory under third-year
coach Jeff Bzdelik.
Durand Scott had all 17 of his
points in the second half for the
Hurricanes (22-4, 13-1), the last of
the schools in the six BCS confer-
ences to get its first league loss.
Shane Larkin added 13 points,
Trey McKinney Jones had 11 and
Kenny Kadji finished with 10, but
Miami was outrebounded 36-35.


No. 3 Gonzaga 81,
San Diego 50
SPOKANE, Wash. Kevin Pan-
gos scored 18 points for Gonzaga,
which is in position to rise to second
in the AP poll after No. 2 Miami was
upset by Wake Forest.
Kelly Olynyk added 14 points and
nine rebounds for Gonzaga (27-2,
14-0 West Coast Conference), which
clinched at least a tie for the WCC
regular-season title it yielded to Saint
Mary's last year.
No. 5 Florida 71,
Arkansas 54
GAINESVILLE, Fla. Mike
Rosario scored 15 points and Patric
Young added 14 as Florida re-
bounded from one of its two South-
eastern Conference losses.
Kenny Boynton and Erik Murphy
both had 12 points for the first-place
Gators (22-4, 12-2 SEC).
The Gators played their worst


game of the season in falling behind
early and losing 80-69 to Arkansas
(17-10, 8-6) in Fayetteville, but never
trailed in this one.
No. 11 Georgetown 57,
No. 8 Syracuse 46
SYRACUSE, N.Y. Otto Porter
scored a career-high 33 points and
Georgetown put an emphatic stamp
on the impending end of an era be-
fore an imposing Orange crowd.
Thirty-three years after the Hoyas
halted Syracuse's 57-game home
winning streak at Manley Field
House, Porter added his name to the
pantheon of stars who made this ri-
valry scintillating over the years.
His incredible play stopped the Or-
ange's 38-game winning streak in the
Carrier Dome, the longest in Division I,
and it came in front of a disappointed
record crowd of 35,012, the largest
ever to see a college basketball game
on campus. C.J. Fair had 13 points
and seven rebounds for Syracuse.


No. 9 Kansas 74,
TCU 48
LAWRENCE, Kan. Jeff Withey
scored 18 points and Ben McLemore
added 14 as Kansas avenged a stun-
ning loss to the lowly Horned Frogs
just over two weeks ago.
Perry Ellis and Travis Releford
added 12 points each for the Jay-
hawks (23-4, 11-3 Big 12), who
began the day tied with Kansas State
for first place in the conference.
Kansas has won three straight
since a rare three-game losing streak,
one that included an embarrassing
62-55 loss to the Horned Frogs (10-
17, 1-13) on Feb. 6. TCU still has not
managed to beat another Big 12
team during its first season in the
conference.
The eight-time defending
Big 12 champions built a 38-9 lead
by halftime and coasted the final
20 minutes to give coach Bill Self
his 499th win.


Poulter,

Mahan on

collision


course at

Match

Play
Associated Press

MARANA, Ariz. Be-
fore the first shot of the
Match Play Champi-
onship, and before the first
snowfall, Hunter Mahan
was asked for three play-
ers with the best reputa-
tion in match play
Ian Poulter was on his list
Now he gets to find out
for himself.
Poulter again proved to
be one tough customer
Saturday when he beat
Steve Stricker with one big
putt after another, advanc-
ing to the semifinals and
improving his record in
match play around the
world to 19-3-2 over the
last four years.
Next up is Mahan, who
is leaving his own mark at
Dove Mountain. Mahan
outlasted U.S. Open cham-
pion Webb Simpson in 18
holes, leaving him two
wins away from joining
Tiger Woods as the only re-
peat winners of this World
Golf Championship. Not
only has Mahan won every
match he has played 11
in a row over the last
two years, he now has gone
151 consecutive holes at
the Match Play Champi-
onship without trailing.
Poulter is aiming for his
second Match Play win in
the last four years.
"I have so much respect
for the guy and how he
plays," Mahan said.
"There's not one part of
his game that really
shines. He has a great
short game and he's a
great putter, but to me, his
determination and his will
is his greatest strength.
He's never going to think
he's out of a hole."
Not to be outdone, Matt
Kuchar reached the semi-
finals for the second time
in three years with steady
play, rarely taking himself
out of position. That
proved way too much for
Robert Garrigus, who was
4 down through 10 holes
and didn't make it beyond
the 16th green.
Kuchar will play Jason
Day of Australia, who won
a tight match against
Graeme McDowell in 18
holes.
The biggest stars in golf
might be long gone. In
their place are two guys
who might be the best in
match play over the last
few years.
"I know it's not the top
four in the world, probably
what everyone was hoping
for," Mahan said. "But
there's been a lot of great
golf played, a lot of great
shot, a lot of great putts.
There's a lot of great
players."


SPORTS


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 B3






B4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
New Jersey 18 10 4 4 24 46 45
Pittsburgh 18 12 6 0 24 60 45
Philadelphia 20 910 1 19 58 62
N.Y Rangers 17 8 7 2 18 41 44
N.Y Islanders 18 8 9 1 17 54 60
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Montreal 18 12 4 2 26 52 39
Ottawa 19 11 6 2 24 46 36
Boston 14 10 2 2 22 41 33
Toronto 19 11 8 0 22 53 44
Buffalo 19 612 1 13 48 63
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Tampa Bay 17 9 7 1 19 66 53
Carolina 16 8 7 1 17 46 49
Winnipeg 17 7 9 1 15 44 55
Florida 17 5 8 4 14 41 61
Washington 17 610 1 13 48 55
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 17 14 0 3 31 57 35
Nashville 19 8 6 5 21 39 43
St. Louis 17 9 6 2 20 53 51
Detroit 18 8 7 3 19 49 51
Columbus 17 510 2 12 39 53
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 17 10 3 4 24 49 40
Minnesota 16 8 6 2 18 36 39
Edmonton 17 7 7 3 17 40 46
Colorado 16 7 8 1 15 39 47
Calgary 15 5 7 3 13 40 54
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 15 12 2 1 25 53 39
Phoenix 17 8 6 3 19 46 44
San Jose 16 8 5 3 19 40 36
Los Angeles 16 8 6 2 18 40 39
Dallas 17 8 8 1 17 44 47
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Saturday's Games
Edmonton 3, Phoenix 2, SO
Washington 5, New Jersey 1
Philadelphia 5, Winnipeg 3
Los Angeles 4, Colorado 1
Detroit 4, Nashville 0
Tampa Bay 5, Carolina 2
Ottawa 3, Toronto 2
Montreal 3, N.Y. Rangers 0
N.Y Islanders 4, Buffalo 0
San Jose at Dallas, late
Columbus at St. Louis, late
Minnesota at Calgary late


NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 32 20 .615 -
Brooklyn 33 23 .589 1
Boston 29 26 .527 4Y2
Philadelphia 22 31 .415 10Y2
Toronto 23 33 .411 11
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 39 14 .736 -
Atlanta 31 23 .574 812
Washington 17 37 .315 2212
Orlando 15 41 .268 2512
Charlotte 13 43 .232 2712
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 35 21 .625 -
Chicago 32 23 .582 2Y2
Milwaukee 26 28 .481 8
Detroit 22 36 .379 14
Cleveland 18 37 .327 16Y2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 44 13 .772 -
Memphis 36 18 .667 612
Houston 31 27 .534 1312
Dallas 25 29 .463 1712
New Orleans 19 37 .339 2412
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 40 15 .727 -
Denver 35 22 .614 6
Utah 31 24 .564 9
Portland 25 30 .455 15
Minnesota 20 32 .385 1812
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 39 18 .684 -
Golden State 32 23 .582 6
L.A. Lakers 27 29 .482 1112
Sacramento 19 37 .339 19/2
Phoenix 18 38 .321 2012
Saturday's Games
Denver 113, Charlotte 99
Cleveland 118, Orlando 94
Washington 105, Houston 103
Miami 114, Philadelphia 90
Indiana 90, Detroit 72
Atlanta 103, Milwaukee 102
Utah at L.A. Clippers, late


Spring training
standings
All Times EST
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct
Baltimore 1 0 1.000
Chicago 1 0 1.000
Cleveland 1 0 1.000
Houston 1 0 1.000
Kansas City 1 0 1.000
NewYork 1 0 1.000
Toronto 1 0 1.000
Detroit 1 1 .500
Seattle 1 1 .500
Tampa Bay 1 1 .500
Boston 0 1 .000
Los Angeles 0 2 .000
Minnesota 0 1 .000
Oakland 0 1 .000
Texas 0 1 .000
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct
Chicago 1 0 1.000
Colorado 1 0 1.000
Miami 1 0 1.000
Milwaukee 1 0 1.000
NewYork 1 0 1.000
Pittsburgh 1 0 1.000
San Francisco 1 0 1.000
San Diego 1 1 .500
Arizona 0 1 .000
Atlanta 0 2 .000
Cincinnati 0 1 .000
Los Angeles 0 1 .000
Philadelphia 0 1 .000
St. Louis 0 1 .000
Washington 0 1 .000


NOTE: Split-squad games count in the stand-
ings; games against non-major league teams
do not.
Friday's Games
Detroit 2, Atlanta 1
Texas 5, Kansas City 5, tie
San Diego 9, Seattle 3
Cleveland 11, Cincinnati 10
Saturday's Games
N.Y Mets 5, Washington 3
Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay (ss) 2
Miami 8, St. Louis 3
Houston 8, Philadelphia 3
Toronto 10, Detroit 3
N.Y Yankees 8, Atlanta 3
Baltimore 5, Minnesota 3
Tampa Bay (ss) 4, Boston 3
Chicago White Sox 9, L.A. Dodgers 0
Milwaukee 2, Oakland 1
Seattle 8, San Diego 6
San Francisco 4, L.A. Angels (ss) 1
Indians 13, Reds 10
Chicago Cubs 11, L.A. Angels (ss) 2
Kansas City 4, Texas 2
Colorado 11, Arizona 2


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
S. CASH 3 (early)
3-1-6
y *- CASH 3 (late)
4-3-6

PLAY 4 (early)
S8-1-8-2
PLAY 4 (late)
4-8-7-4

FANTASY 5
Lottery 13- 26- 28 31 33

POWERBALL LOTTERY
2-5-31-39-41 1-2-3-9-23-53
POWER BALL XTRA
29 5


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
12 p.m. (FOX) Daytona 500 from Daytona International
Speedway in Daytona Beach, Fla.
8 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRAdrag racing: Arizona Nationals. From
Chandler, Ariz. (same-day tape)
BOWLING
3 p.m. (ESPN) PBA USBC Masters. From North Brunswick, N.J.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN) Illinois at Michigan
2 p.m. (CBS) Cincinnati at Notre Dame
2 p.m. (CW) Boston College at Duke
4 p.m. (CBS) Michigan State at Ohio State
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN2) Purdue at Minnesota
1 p.m. (SUN) Miami at Georgia Tech
2 p.m. (MNT) Tennessee at Arkansas
3 p.m. (ESPN2) Duke at Maryland
5 p.m. (ESPN2) Texas A&M at Vanderbilt
NBA BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (ABC) Los Angeles Lakers at Dallas Mavericks
6 p.m. (SUN) Cleveland Cavaliers at Miami Heat
7 p.m. (ESPN) Memphis Grizzlies at Brooklyn Nets
9:30 p.m. (ESPN) Chicago Bulls at Oklahoma City Thunder
12:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Chicago Bulls at Oklahoma City Thunder
(same-day tape)
2:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Memphis Grizzlies at Brooklyn Nets.
(same-day tape)
3 a.m. (ESPN) Los Angeles Lakers at Dallas Mavericks
(same-day tape)
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: WGC Accenture Match Play Cham-
pionship, semifinals. From the Ritz-Carlton Golf Club at Dove
Mountain in Marana, Ariz.
1:30 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour: Honda LPGA Thailand, final
round. From Chonburi, Thailand. (same-day tape)
2 p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour: WGC Accenture Match Play
Championship, finals.
11 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Accenture Match Play Champi-
onship, finals. (same-day tape)
HOCKEY
3 p.m. (FSNFL) Boston Bruins at Florida Panthers
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Tampa Bay Lightning at Pittsburgh Penguins
RODEO
1 p.m. (CBS) PBR 15/15 Bucking Battle. From Kansas City,
Kan. (taped)
SOCCER
1 p.m. (UNI) Futbol Mexicano, Primera Division: Deportivo
Toluca FC vs Jaguares de Chiapas. From Estadio Nemesio
Diez, Toluca, Mexico.
SURFING
11 a.m. (ESPN2) Volcom Pipe Pro. (taped)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE GYMNASTICS
10:30 a.m. (SUN) Florida at Georgia. (taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



NASCAR Nationwide DRIVE4COPD 300 results
Saturday at Daytona International Speedway
Daytona Beach, Fla.
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (10) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 120 laps, 88.8 rating, 0 points, $109,220.
2. (2) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 120, 82.6, 42, $99,378.
3. (8) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 120, 89.8, 41, $85,603.
4. (13) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 120, 98, 0, $68,635.
5. (3) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 120, 85.6, 40, $69,838.
6. (29) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 120, 74.4, 39, $64,013.
7. (14) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 120, 100.1, 38, $61,713.
8. (28) Eric McClure, Toyota, 120, 75.3, 37, $60,638.
9. (30) Robert Richardson Jr., Chevrolet, 120, 63.4, 35, $59,388.
10. (4)Travis Pastrana, Ford, 120, 65.9, 34, $59,713.
11. (17) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevrolet, 120, 62.5, 33, $57,338.
12. (11) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 120, 85.2, 0, $50,495.
13. (21) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 120, 83, 32, $56,488.
14. (15) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 120, 93.8, 32, $51,995.
15. (6) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 120, 112, 30, $57,538.
16. (9) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 120, 104.4, 0, $51,095.
17. (27) Mike Harmon, Dodge, 120, 41.4, 28, $55,413.
18. (33) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 120, 86.9, 26, $55,188.
19. (20) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 118, 79.2, 26, $48,595.
20. (19) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 118, 95, 0, $49,145.
21. (5) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 117, 64.7, 23, $54,813.
22. (31) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Ford, accident, 116, 52.7, 23, $55,088.
23. (26) Mike Bliss, Toyota, accident, 116, 45.1, 22, $54,513.
24. (35) Jason White, Toyota, accident, 116, 56.1, 20, $54,388.
25. (38) Danny Efland, Chevrolet, accident, 116, 49.7, 20, $54,713.
26. (22) Michael Annett, Ford, accident, 115, 76.7, 18, $54,113.
27. (25)Johanna Long, Chevrolet, accident, 115, 68.6, 17, $54,013.
28. (32) Hal Martin, Toyota, accident, 115, 38.8, 16, $53,913.
29. (18)Jamie Dick, Chevrolet, accident, 115, 48.3, 15, $47,345.
30. (39) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, engine, 102, 58, 14, $53,988.
31. (1)Trevor Bayne, Ford, 101,82, 14, $57,413.
32. (7) Kyle Busch, Toyota, engine, 100, 106.7, 0, $46,970.
33. (37) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, oil line, 88, 38.7, 11, $53,388.
34. (23) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 87, 70.2, 10, $53,338.
35. (40) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, accident, 65, 80.6, 0, $46,702.
36. (12) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, engine, 31,71.1,0, $42,185.
37. (36) Juan Carlos Blum, Ford, accident, 30, 26.6, 7, $42,120.
38. (34) Blake Koch, Toyota, overheating, 14, 29.1, 6, $42,059.
39. (24) Scott Lagasse Jr., Chevrolet, accident, 7, 28.7, 5, $40,960.


40. (16) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 4, 25.4, 4, $40,910.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 139.951 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 8 minutes, 37 seconds.
Margin of Victory: Under Caution.
Caution Flags: 7 for 26 laps.
Lead Changes: 34 among 20 drivers.
Lap Leaders: T.Bayne 1-3; Ky.Busch 4-5;T.Stewart 6; D.Patrick 7-11; E.Sadler 12-17; B.Vickers
18-22; E.Sadler 23-27; B.Keselowski 28-29; Ky.Busch 30-45; M.Kenseth 46-49; J.Allgaier 50;
M.Kenseth 51-57; D.Earnhardt Jr. 58-59; Ky.Busch 60-62; K.Kahne 63-65; D.Efland 66; J.Earn-
hardt 67; M.Harmon 68; R.Smith 69-70; D.Earnhardt Jr. 71; R.Smith 72-85; Ky.Busch 86; M.Bliss
87; B.Keselowski 88-90; M.Kenseth 91; B.Scott 92-93; M.Kenseth 94; B.Scott 95-96; K.Larson 97;
B.Scott 98; E.McClure 99; P.Kligerman 100-109; E.Sadler 110-111; R.Smith 112-118;T.Stewart
119-120.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): R.Smith, 3 times for 23 laps; Ky.Busch, 4
times for 22 laps; E.Sadler, 3 times for 13 laps; M.Kenseth, 4 times for 13 laps; PKligerman, 1 time
for 10 laps; B.Scott, 3 times for 5 laps; B.Keselowski, 2 times for 5 laps; B.Vickers, 1 time for 5 laps;
D.Patrick, 1 time for5 laps; TStewart, 2 times for 3 laps; D.Earnhardt Jr., 2 timesfor3 laps; K.Kahne,
1 time for 3 laps; TBayne, 1 time for 3 laps; J.Allgaier, 1 time for 1 lap; E.McClure, 1 time for 1 lap;
K.Larson, 1 time for 1 lap; M.Harmon, 1 time for 1 lap; J.Earnhardt, 1 time for 1 lap; M.Bliss, 1 time
for1 lap; D.Efland, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 10 in Points: 1. S.Hornish Jr, 42; 2. A.Bowman, 41; 3. PKligerman, 40; 4. B.Scott, 39; 5. J.Allgaier,
38; 6. E.McClure, 37; 7. R.Richardson Jr, 35; 8.TPastrana, 34; 9. N.Piquet Jr, 33; 10. K.Larson, 32.


Cano homers; Yankees beat Braves


Associated Press


KISSIMMEE, Fla. While a bunch
of aging stars try to get healthy, the
New York Yankees have a chance to
check out their younger players at
spring training.
Zoilo Almonte homered and threw
out a runner from right field, Francisco
Cervelli began his pitch to win the
catching job, and David Phelps threw
two scoreless innings as New York de-
feated the bumbling Atlanta Braves 8-3
in its spring training opener Saturday
Robinson Cano and Mark Teixeira
were about the only big names making
the trip for the Yankees, with Derek
Jeter, Alex Rodriguez, CC Sabathia
and Mariano Riviera among those still
in various stages of rehab.
"I'm never going to say that injuries
are a good thing," New York manager
Joe Girardi said. "But this will give the


kids a chance to grow up a little bit."
Cano also homered for the Yankees,
who took advantage of three Atlanta
errors and a passed ball. Freddie
Freeman bobbled a ground ball at
first, new third baseman Chris John-
son missed a popup near home plate,
and second baseman Dan Uggla
skipped a throw on a routine grounder.
New York broke a scoreless tie in the
third with four runs off another Braves
newcomer, Jordan Walden, though only
one was earned because of two errors.
Still, it wasn't as if Walden fooled anyone,
surrendering a homer to Almonte on a 1-2
pitch and a double to Eduardo Nunez.
The one bright spot for the Braves
was Evan Gattis, trying to win a job as
a backup catcher and outfielder. He
doubled to set up Atlanta's first run,
then drove a two-run homer halfway
up the left-field berm in the sixth, cut-
ting the Yankees' lead to 5-3.


Associated Press
Driver Tony Stewart holds up the championship trophy in Victory Lane on Sunday.


DAYTONA
Continued from Page B1

appeared to fly over the fence and
land midway up the lower section. The
car itself had its entire front end sheared
off, with the burning engine wedged
through a gaping hole in the fence.
Speedway President Joie Chitwood
said 14 fans were treated on site, and
14 others were taken to hospitals. Chit-
wood didn't give any updates on their
conditions.
The number of those transported
given by Chitwood was slightly lower
than that given by local officials.
Halifax Health spokesman Byron
Cogdell said 12
people were trans- As the ca
ported to Halifax
Health Medical Wrecking
Center in Daytona Smith and I
Beach and six oth-
ers were taken to Stewart slid
Halifax Health
Medical Center of the win, b
Port Orange. All
were in stable con- plowed into
edition, Cogdell and his ca
said.
Lindsay Rew, a airborne into
spokeswoman for
Florida Hospital Memorial Medical
Center, said its Daytona Beach hospi-
tal had one fan there who was in good
condition. She said three others they
had been expecting were diverted to
another hospital.
No fatalities were reported at either
hospital. Cogdell said two people
taken to the Halifax in Daytona Beach
arrived in critical condition, and one
of those had life-threatening injuries,
both were upgraded to stable condition.
The accident happened the day be-
fore the Sprint Cup Series season-
opening Daytona 500 NASCAR's
version of the Super Bowl. Daytona
workers could be seen repairing the
large section of fence where Larson
hit, as well as the wall that was dam-
aged in the accident.
"First and foremost our thoughts
and prayers are with our race fans,"
Chitwood said. "Following the inci-
dent we responded appropriately ac-
cording to our safety protocols, and
had emergency medical personnel at
the incident immediately


TENNIS
Continued from Page B1

like to lend a hand but
cannot participate or
maybe you do not even
play tennis you can
still help. Volunteers will
be available Saturday
and Sunday from 8 a.m.
to 4 p.m. to take your do-
nations of nonperishable
foods, gently used cloth-
ing or cash.
Participants can also
bring donations such as
nonperishable foods,
gently used clothing as
their entry fee, or a com-
bination of the afore-
mentioned and cash.
The Spring Classic is
the only tournament in
Citrus County where you
will have the opportunity
to play singles, which
makes it perfect as a
warm-up for the upcom-
ing USTA season, with


"We're in the process of repairing
the facility and will be ready to go rac-
ing tomorrow."
As emergency workers tended to in-
jured fans and ambulance sirens
wailed in the background, a somber
Tony Stewart skipped the traditional
post-race victory celebration.
Stewart, who won for the 19th time
at Daytona and seventh time in the last
nine season-opening Nationwide
races, was in no mood to celebrate.
"The important thing is what going
on on the frontstretch right now," said
Stewart, the three-time NASCAR
champion. "We've always known, and
since racing started, this is a danger-
ous sport. But it's hard. We assume
that risk, but it's hard when the fans
get caught up in
irs began it.
It was a chaotic
all around finish to a race that
.eselowski, was stopped for
nearly 20 minutes
through for five laps from the
finish by a 13-car
iut Larson accident that sent
driver Michael An-
Keselowski nett to a hospital,
r was sent where his Richard
Petty Motorsports
the stands. team said he
would be held
overnight with bruising to his chest.
The race resumed with three laps to
go, and the final accident occurred with
Regan Smith leading as he headed out
of the final turn to the checkered flag.
He admittedly tried to block Brad Ke-
selowski to preserve the win.
"I tried to throw a block. It's Day-
tona, you want to go for the win here,"
Smith said. "I don't know how you can
play it any different other than con-
cede second place, and I wasn't willing
to do that today Our job is to put them
in position to win, and it was, and it
didn't work out"
As the cars began wrecking all around
Smith and Keselowski, Stewart slid
through for the win, but Larson plowed
into Keselowski and his car was sent
airborne into the stands. When Lar-
son's car came to a stop, it was missing
its entire front end. The 20-year-old,
who made his Daytona debut this
week, stood apparently stunned,
hands on his hips, several feet away
from his car, before finally making the
mandatory trip to the care center.


Methodist Youth and
Children's Ministry
Each participant will be
guaranteed two matches,
and a thank-you gift and
prizes will be awarded to
division champions. The
organizers would like to
stress the point that, as
usual, they will adjust
the schedule any way
possible to allow you to
participate if you have
other commitments, ten-
nis or otherwise. Tourna-
ment directors: Cindy
Reynolds and AJ Glenn
at 352-697-3089 or
ajglenn03@gmail.com;
Sally deMontfort at 352-
795-9693 or deMont
@embarqmail.com; Eric
van den Hoogen at 352-
382-3138 or
hoera@juno.com.


Eric van den Hoogen,
Chronicle tennis colum-
nist, can be reached at
hoera@juno.com.


I

i



D
i


)



r


also the only opportunity
within the USTA leagues
for singles competition.
If you would like to
sign up for two events,
we would love it. A lot of
you do, but please be
aware that singles takes
a lot more out of you
than doubles does.
Knowing this, it is time
to pick up the phone or
email and sign up for the
second annual Spring
Classic at Crystal River
High School on March 2
and 3.
Singles offered in A,B
and C divisions for men
and women as well as
men's, women's, and
mixed doubles divisions
in A,B and C.
Entry fee will be $20
per person for a single
event, and just an extra
$10 for a second event.
Proceeds from this tour-
nament will go toward
youth missions for Inver-
ness First United


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 B5


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ENTERTAINMENT
^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ CIRUS COUNTY CHRONJICLE ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^


CHRISTY LEMIRE AND
DAVID GERMAIN
AP Movie Writers

LOS ANGELES Sur-
prises and snubs on nomina-
tions day held the promise of
an unpredictable Academy
Awards night. But things have
settled into the usual pre-
dictability, with clear favorites
emerging in key categories.
Associated Press movie
writers Christy Lemire and
David Germain prefer to dis-
agree, but they're in harmony
on the top prizes for Sunday's
show. Here are their picks,
with Lemire sounding off on
best picture, actor and sup-
porting actress and Germain
offering their take on director,
actress and supporting actor
BEST PICTURE
Nominees: "Amour," "Argo,"
"Beasts of the Southern Wild,"
"Django Unchained," "Les
Miserables," "Life of Pi,"
"Lincoln," and "Silver Linings
Playbook."
Lemire: The road to the top
prize at the Academy Awards
is a long haul full of ups and
downs, front-runners and un-
derdogs, and it's been espe-
cially eventful this year. Back
in November, Steven Spiel-
berg's stately "Lincoln" looked
like the safe bet. Then the
gripping "Zero Dark Thirty"
figured into the mix. Then
when Oscar nominations were
announced, and the quirky ro-
mance "Silver Linings Play-
book" received seven
including one for best picture,
it looked like a contender Ac-
cusations of inaccuracy
plagued some of these films
and eventually were shot
down, adding further drama.
Which brings us to "Argo,"
whose makers have acknowl-
edged since then they
tweaked some details in de-
picting the daring rescue of
six American embassy work-
ers during the 1979 Iranian
hostage crisis. Ben Affleck's
film steadily and deservedly
has been racking up key
prizes leading to the big night
and has unstoppable momen-
tum. That Affleck weirdly did-
n't receive a director
nomination for the film,
which I (and many other crit-
ics) named the year's best,
won't matter; as a producer,
he'll walk away with a trophy
Sunday night anyway Plus
"Argo" is a sure thing because


Birthday Conditions in general in the year ahead
are likely to be much easier than usual for you. Just
because things begin to run smoother, don't use it as
an excuse to coast.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Don't make any grand,
generous gestures if you're expecting repayment
down the line. The response you will later get from the
recipients will be anything but what you expect.
Aries (March 21-April 19) It's always constructive
to say nice things about our friends, but think twice
about flattering someone who doesn't deserve it. Such
behavior would make you look like a phony.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Unless your ambitions
are in harmony with your will to work, it isn't likely you
will expend the effort needed to achieve your objec-
tives. Just wishing for something won't cut it.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) It's best not to pretend


it seamlessly blends Holly-
wood satire with thrilling ac-
tion, and this industry loves to
honor itself for teasing itself.
BEST DIRECTOR
Nominees: Michael
Haneke, "Amour"; Benh
Zeitlin, "Beasts of the South-
ern Wild"; Ang Lee, "Life of
Pi"; Steven Spielberg, "Lin-
coln'; and David 0. Russell,
"Silver Linings Playbook."
Germain: We will never
know what might have hap-
pened if not for the surprise
directing snubs that included
Ben Affleck for "Argo" and
Kathryn Bigelow for "Zero
Dark Thirty."
Without them -
and particularly Af- -
fleck in the pic-
ture, best director
becomes a third ,
coronation for
Steven Spiel-
berg, who won
previously for
"Schindler's
List" and "Sav-
ing Private .
Ryan." Another .i
win would piut T
Spielberg in rare I
company, tying h i ii
with Frank Capr.
and William W Iler:
who each won three
directing Oscjr-.
and putting him i ist
behind record-
holder John Ford.
who won four
Despite a
monumental
performance
by Daniel
Day-Lewis
as the 16th
president,
"Lincoln"
is more
academi-
cally than
emotionally
engaging. Yet the
film still is an epic period
saga, with Spielberg master-
fully marshaling his own film-
making army to recreate the
capital in the last days of the
Civil War
Lincoln was the man
needed to preserve the union.
Spielberg was the man
needed to make this film. His
third directing trophy will be
an awfully nice consolation
prize for missing out on best
picture.
BEST ACTOR
Nominees: Bradley Cooper,
"Silver Linings Playbook";


'Argo' for Oscar best picture


Daniel Day-Lewis, "Lincoln";
Hugh Jackman, "Les Miser-
ables"; Joaquin Phoenix,
"The Master"; and Denzel
Washington, "Flight."
Lemire: From the first mo-
ment you see Daniel Day-
Lewis on screen as the
revered 16th president of the
United States, it's clear he's
destined to win the best-actor
Oscar. He totally immerses
himself in portraying this sto-
ried figure no shocker
there from one of the greatest
actors of our time from his
appearance and voice to his
carriage and gait And in play-
ing Abraham Lincoln as he
charms, lobbies and cajoles
his way to the historic pas-
sage of the 13th Amendment,
abolishing slavery, Day-
Lewis will make some his-
tory of his own by
becoming the first per-
S son ever to win the
Academy Award for
best actor three times.
As good and as deeply
committed as the other
S nominees in this cate-
Sory are, none of them
st.inds a chance.
BEST ACTRESS
Nominees: Jessica
Chlistain, "Zero Dark
Thirty"; Jennifer
S L.i'rence, "Silver Linings
SPL. book"; Emmanuelle
Ri\.1, "Amour"; Quven-
zhane Wallis, "Beasts of
the Southern Wild";
and Naomi Watts,
"The Impossible."
-.- Germain: This is
such a close call be-
tween Jessica
Chastain, who's
almost demonic
as a CIA opera-
tive obsessively
tracking Osama
bin Laden, and
J e n n i f e r
Lawrence, who's one
of the most endearing dam-
aged souls to hit the big-screen
in ages.
Chastain's a lone-wolf
through much of "Zero Dark
Thirty," interacting with
scores of minor characters but
never really connecting with
anyone as she sinks into a
cold, calculating, compulsive
and lonely world of her own.
Because of that, Chastain
connects less with the audi-
ence than Lawrence, who's an
open book of tics, anxieties,
desires and doubts. Chastain is
extraordinary in extraordi-
nary circumstances; Lawrence
is extraordinary in ordinary


Today's HOROSCOPE
to be knowledgeable about something you have little
experience with. If you do, someone might test your
words and find them wanting.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) The world doesn't owe
you any free rides, especially concerning your financial
or commercial dealings. If you expect to receive some-
thing you don't deserve, you're just kidding yourself.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Certain clandestine roman-
tic adventures could be unusually appealing to you.
Don't involve yourself in something from which you will
have trouble extricating yourself.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Usually, you're rather dis-
ciplined and feel a need to be industrious and produc-
tive at all times. Today, however, these urges might not
be in play. Enjoy the break.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Don't let it be said you're
only nice to those who can help you. When you try to


circumstances. The latter is
harder, and Lawrence not only
manages that, but also out-
shines a remarkable cast that
includes Bradley Cooper,
Robert De Niro and Jacki
Weaver
Dominating your scenes
when you're alongside De
Niro? Lawrence goes home
with an Oscar.
BEST SUPPORTING
ACTOR
Nominees: Alan Arkin,
'Argo"; Robert De Niro, "Sil-
ver Linings Playbook"; Philip
Seymour Hoffman, "The Mas-
ter"; Tommy Lee Jones, "Lin-
coln"; and Christoph Waltz,
"Django Unchained."
Germain: The big Oscar cer-
tainty: supporting actor goes
to a previous Oscar winner.
All five nominees have won
before, and Robert De Niro
has won twice.
The prize probably comes
down to the two guys in Civil
War-era times, Tommy Lee
Jones as abolitionist fire-
brand Thaddeus Stevens and
Christoph Waltz as a genteel
bounty hunter
Waltz has a disadvantage in
that his supporting-actor win
for 2009's "Inglourious Bas-
terds" is fresh in people's
minds, so in a way, he's up
against himself along with the
other current nominees.
Jones, however, is as good
as ever as grouchy, uncompro-
mising crusader Stevens. He's
mastered the art of playing
noble curmudgeons and
should join De Niro as a two-
time Oscar winner.
BEST SUPPORTING
ACTRESS
Nominees: Amy Adams,
"The Master"; Sally Field,
"Lincoln"; Anne Hathaway,
"Les Miserables"; Helen
Hunt, "The Sessions"; and
Jacki Weaver, "Silver Linings
Playbook."
Lemire: It sounds so cynical
to suggest if you cut all your
hair off, lose a bunch of
weight and play a prostitute,
you're guaranteed to win an
Academy Award. But Anne
Hathaway does indeed do all
of this and she sings! Live,
on camera! As the doomed
Fantine in the musical fa-
vorite "Les Miserables," Hath-
away isn't on screen very long
before she dies a hacking,
wrenching death amid the
squalor and tumult of 19th-
century France.


manipulate people, it usually backfires.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) If you make it a point to
toot your own horn in front of others, chances are all
that will come out is a bunch of sour notes. Being mod-
est will get you much better attention.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Try not to be cocky if
you catch on to something far quicker than anybody
else. If later you should encounter someone who is
smarter than you, you will look foolish.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) When drawn into a
joint endeavor requiring a cash outlay, make certain
everyone antes up equally. Don't put up if no one else
does.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Be careful about bas-
ing your promises on expediency rather than sincerity.
It is far better to say no up front rather than risk disap-
pointing someone depending on you later.


Taking home Oscar


39. Rhythm-and-blues singer
Brandon Brown (Mista) is 30.
Thought for Today: "Three
things in human life are important:
the first is to be kind; the second is
to be kind; and the third is to be
kind." Henry James, American
author (1843-1916).


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22
Mega Money: 2 32 43 44
Mega Ball: 22
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $800,000
4-of-4 1 $7,609.50
3-of-4 MB 52 $320.50
3-of-4 838 $59
2-of-4 MB 1,537 $22.50
1-of-4 MB 13,419 $2.50
2-of-4 25,327 $2
Fantasy 5:9 22 27 29 31
5-of-5 2 winners $118,360.79
4-of-5 361 $105.50
3-of-5 11,152 $9.50
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21
Fantasy 5:3 13 15 28 33
5-of-5 6 winners $36,279.19
4-of-5 367 $95.50
3-of-5 9,301 $10.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Feb. 24, the
55th day of 2013. There are 310
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Feb. 24, 1868, the U.S.
House of Representatives im-
peached PresidentAndrew John-
son following his attempted
dismissal of Secretary of War
Edwin M. Stanton; Johnson was
later acquitted by the Senate.
On this date:
In 1582, Pope Gregory XIII is-
sued a papal bull, or edict, outlin-
ing his calendar reforms. (The
Gregorian Calendar is the calen-
dar in general use today.)
In 1803, in its Marbury v. Madi-
son decision, the Supreme Court
established judicial review of the
constitutionality of statutes.
In 1863, Arizona was organized
as a territory.
In 1920, the German Workers
Party, which later became the
Nazi Party, met in Munich to adopt
its platform.
In 1961, the Federal Communi-
cations Commission authorized
the nation's first full-scale trial of
pay television in Hartford, Conn.
In 1983, a congressional com-
mission released a report con-
demning the internment of
Japanese-Americans during
World War II as a "grave injustice."
In 1993, Canadian Prime Minis-
ter Brian Mulroney resigned after
more than eight years in office.
Ten years ago: Seeking U.N.
approval for war against Iraq, the
United States, Britain and Spain
submitted a resolution to the Se-
curity Council declaring Saddam
Hussein had missed "the final op-
portunity" to disarm peacefully and
indicated he had to face the con-
sequences.
Five years ago: "No Country
for Old Men" won Academy
Awards for best picture, best di-
rector and best screenplay adap-
tation for Joel and Ethan Coen
and best supporting actor for
Javier Bardem; Daniel Day-Lewis
won best actor for "There Will Be
Blood," while Marion Cotillard was
named best actress for "La Vie en
Rose."
One year ago: Secretary of
State Hillary Rodham Clinton, in
Tunisia for a conference on Syria,
blasted Russia and China as "de-
spicable" for opposing U.N. action
aimed at stopping the bloodshed
in Syria.
Today's Birthdays: Actor Abe
Vigoda is 92. Actress Emmanuelle
Riva is 86. Movie composer
Michel Legrand is 81. Former
Sen. Joseph Lieberman, I-Conn.,
is 71. Actor Barry Bostwick is 68.
Actor Edward James Olmos is 66.
Rock singer-musician George
Thorogood is 63. News anchor
Paula Zahn is 57. Country singer
Sammy Kershaw is 55. Actor
Mark Moses is 55. Singer Michelle
Shocked is 51. Actor Billy Zane is
47. Actress Bonnie Somerville is


Associated Press
Anne Hathaway portrays Fantine, a struggling, sickly mother forced into prostitution in 1800s Paris, in the screen
adaptation of "Les Miserables." Hathaway is nominated for an Academy Award for supporting actress. Tommy Lee Jones
is nominated for an Academy Award for supporting actor in the film "Lincoln." The 85th Academy Awards are Sunday.


Associated Press writers pick











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Associated Press
In the latter part of the 20th century, the concept of world trade and free markets entered the picture, and manufacturers took
advantage of the situation to move plants out of the country or demand their employees work for less. This, of course, led to 80 million
unemployed, ever-growing national debt and large quantities of foreign products in our stores. Manufacturing was once the heart of
Midwestern economies. But even with decades of Rust Belt exodus, companies produce machinery such as these John Deere combines
in Illinois, making it a relatively steady job provider despite an uneven recovery.




A fiscal mess history


Past, present and

future of our

socio-economic

system
JACK MANN
Special to the Chronicle
During the past few
years, I have read
many letters to the edi-
tor relative to our present
socio-economic condition. As
a retired professor of econom-
ics and management and nei-
ther an ultra-progressive nor
extremely conservative, I
thought a discussion of how
we arrived at our present situ-
ation and what the future may
hold would be appropriate.
At the time of gaining our
freedom from England, we
were an agricultural nation
with very little manufacturing.
The first step toward becom-
ing an industrial nation was
the advent of the steam engine
and the railroad, which
opened the country to ex-
panded commerce and, there-
fore, more manufacturing.
Manufacturing begins
By the time of the Civil War,
manufacturing was becoming
more and more important.
With the concept of the Besse-
mer method of producing
steel and the discovery of oil,
manufacturing continued to
become more important. So
much so that powerful men
such as John D. Rockefeller
and Andrew Carnegie at-
tempted to control large seg-
ments of the economy As a
result, the Sherman Antitrust
Act was passed to maintain
competition and preserve a
free market.
At the same time, the first
union was born. The A72 was
the skilled trade union whose
founder Samuel Gompers
merely asked for a fair day's
pay for a fair day's work.
By 1912, Henry Ford devel-
oped the moving production
line and put Americans on


An unidentified woman answers questions on a job application this month at a job fair in Sunrise. The
Labor Department reports the number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits jumped 20,000
the first week of February to a seasonally adjusted 362,000, though it remains at a level suggesting
a slow but steady improvement in the job market. Applications for unemployment benefits are a proxy
for layoffs. Even with last week's jump, they have trended downward recently. The four-week average
has declined 7.5 percent since mid-November and fell to a five-year low three weeks ago.


wheels. His concept was to
pay his people a wage en-
abling them to buy the prod-
uct they produced. Steel,
glass, tires and all industry
expanded at a rapid rate.
Depression hits
These companies needed
workers to man the factories,
and we literally imported mil-
lions of people for this pur-
pose until the late 1920s when
the Depression stopped the
nation's expansion.
Now for the first time, major
problems arose. In the past
when recessions hit, the work-
ers who came to the cities for
factory work returned to the
family farm until the economy
recovered. (Capitalism, due to
its structure, will always have
periods of boom and then re-
covery followed by boom and
then recession).


However, the 20 or so mil-
lion people who came from
mainly Europe and went to
the cities to work in the facto-
ries had no place to go for any
means of support. Thus much
of the social welfare pro-
grams of the 1930s were cre-
ated to solve the nation's
problems.
Programs develop
Legislators allowed for the
CIO (Congress of Industrial
Organization) to be formed,
which led to the formation of
worker unions in almost all
major industries. Social Secu-
rity was established to pro-
vide a basic means of support
for those who did not save for
their old age. Aid to depend-
ent children was adopted to
provide for the millions of
children in the cities whose
parents were without means


of support. Later Employment
Insurance (paid by the em-
ployer) was established, as
was Workmen's Compensa-
tion. OSHA was brought about
to make the workplace safer
for the workforce.
To pay for all of this Social
Security, the employer paid
half of the Social Security
cost and the worker the other
half. (Social Security started
as a mandatory insurance
program but became known
as an entitlement as govern-
ment used the trust fund to fi-
nance government rather
than raise taxes.)
In the 1960s, Medicare and
Medicaid came into existence
to provide care for the elderly
on one hand and those unable
to provide care for them-
selves on the other. Why was
See Page C3


City, county partnership moving forward


Editor's note: The fol-
lowing is a prepared
statement read on be-
half of county commis-
sioner Dennis Damato
to the members of the
Crystal River City
Council last Monday
evening at a workshop
to examine future plans
for the city The com-
ments are reprinted
here at Commissioner
Dama to's request


I would like to start off by
saying I love the city of
Crystal River and have
enjoyed working for its bet-
terment as a citizen, prop-
erty owner and the District 1
commissioner for more than
25 years.
I participated in the com-
pilation of the city's 2008 Vi-
sion Study and was
personally interviewed for
my comments on the rede-
velopment and revitalization


on issues by Michael Dove of
My Town Team Inc.
The partnership concept
between the city and Citrus
County evolved from the
city's 2008 Vision Plan. It
adds and links the Town
Center/Environmental Dis-
trict, the Resort District and
the U.S. 19 beautification to
the Historic Waterfront
Downtown District (CRA). (It
is) all connected and united
by the roadway, paved trail


and drainage improvements
to Cutler Spur Boulevard.
The results of community
input from the 2008 Vision
Study listed the "River-
walk/improved accessibility
to water" as the improve-
ment 994 respondents would
like to see added to the
downtown area.
A park at the vacant corner
of U.S. 19 and Citrus Avenue
See Page C4


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Fights


won't


repair


budget
ou may not want
to hear this, but
Citrus County em-
ployees are not overpaid.
Since Scott Adams got
elected to the county
commission in Novem-
ber, there seems to be a
new sport being devel-
oped in the county -
bashing public employ-
ees for being overpaid
loafers.
While it is great fun to
complain about govern-
ment at all levels, it's re-
ally unfair and wrong to
suggest they are over-
paid and perform poorly
Commissioner Adams
really means no harm to
the line employees on
the county staff, but it is
obvious he would like to
see a blanket termination
of the leadership group.
He has already once
made an unsuccessful
motion to terminate
county administrator
Brad Thorpe, and you
can expect additional ef-
forts in the weeks and
months to come.
Thousands of people
believe Adams is cor-
rect. And you will in-
evitably read lots of
letters and Sound Offs in
the Chronicle about how
the new commissioner is
right on target
But let's remember,
opinions are like noses
- everyone has one.
Many other residents
understand the complex
problems facing the
county and know the so-
lutions will only come if
the five commissioners
and the constitutional of-
ficers work together to
find a balance of budget
cuts and new tax sources.
Adams could not get a
second for his motion to
fire the administrator
and it went nowhere. But
it did get a lot of people
upset, especially some of
the other commissioners
at the meeting.
The reason Adams
wanted to fire the ad-
ministrator was because
he believed Thorpe was
seeking permission to
replace two aging
county vehicles even
though the commission
put a freeze on new ve-
hicle purchases. But
here's the problem with
this issue: Adams was
wrong.
Thorpe never brought
a request forward to
purchase the two new
cars even though his
fleet manager wanted
him to. Some paperwork
was generated, but
Thorpe killed the re-
quest, because he knew
the county wants to stop
vehicle purchases while
it wrestles with its cur-
rent budget crisis.
The real reason
Adams wants to fire
Thorpe is because they
are at opposite ends of
the political spectrum in
Citrus County Adams
was wrong about the ve-
hicle purchase issue,
but that's beside the
point. He will find other
reasons to recommend
Thorpe's termination.
That action will create
an ongoing and unfortu-
nate tension in county
government.
See Page C3


Dennis Damato
GUEST
COLUMN







Page C2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2012



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .............. ...........publisher
Mike Arnold ................. .................. editor
Charlie Brennan.................. managing editor
Curt Ebitz .......................citizen member
0 Mac Harris ...........................citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ............... ..........copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


JOINT VENTURE




Partnership



will create



opportunities


While some Crystal
River council mem-
bers harbored ill
feelings prior to last Mon-
day's workshop to discuss
competing visions for the re-
development and rejuvena-
tion of the city, we
were glad to see THE I<
those hard
stances set aside Crysta
in the interest of partners
crafting a part- cou
nership greatly
benefitting the OUR OF
city's residents. Cit
Crystal River redevel
City Manager redevel
Andy Houston hareeds
began by compar-
ing the two plans
- one crafted by the city in
2008 and the other developed
by District 1 County Commis-
sioner Dennis Damato late
last year and pointing out
the main differences.
Damato also prepared a
statement to be read,
wherein he offered an apol-
ogy for his part in eliciting
hard feelings between the
city and county.
These two actions assuaged
some of the past hard feelings
and moved the council to-
ward taking advantage of
some real opportunities be-
fore the city.
Moving beyond personal
feelings is a key element, be-
cause Crystal River has a
tremendous opportunity in
front of it an opportunity


greatly enhanced by partner-
ing with the county. The
BOCC potential has $6.5 mil-
lion at its disposal from the
BP Deepwater Horizon Oil
Spill Settlement it has ear-


marked

ISSUE:
il River
ship with
nty.

PINION:
ty's
opment
trumps
belings.


for funding Crystal
River waterway
restoration
projects.
Rejuvenating
Crystal River
benefits the city
and county. The
area is already a
prime tourism
draw and the city
is enhancing it
with projects
such as the down-
town Riverwalk


and Cutler Spur roadway im-
provement project. Adding
these funds will help lever-
age even more grants to fin-
ish existing projects and pay
for future enhancements.
If Crystal River continues
to grow as a tourist destina-
tion, the rest of the county
benefits as tourists begin to
explore the other amenities
within Citrus County's bor-
ders. As economists often
note: "A rising tide lifts all
boats."
The county has renewed its
vow to foster better relation-
ships with city leaders. The
council appears ready to
move forward with the part-
nership and that can only
help all concerned city and
county residents alike.


= LETTER to the Editor =


Unions important for
worker rights
This letter is a reply to the
letter written by Jack Flynn ti-
tled "Unions increase our
prices."
Mr Flynn starts his letter by
saying we needed unions 100
years ago, but we no longer
have sweat shops, unfair wages
and no days off. That is not
true. As I have mentioned in
the past, many low-paying jobs
are way below the poverty
level, and without the help of
the government, these employ-
ees could not make it on such
low pay Many of the low-wage
employees receive food stamps,
Medicaid and, in some cases,
low-income housing.
Another thing Mr Flynn has
wrong is, many union employ-
ees do improve themselves into
higher-paying jobs by being
good at what they do. Many
unions, not all but some, have a
low rate, but the employer can
pay them more.
Mr Flynn mentions when he
was a sales manager he went to
a trade center or convention
center in New York and could
have done the work in one
hour, but the union employees
took five hours. I doubt that
The trade centers have union
contracts and those employees
are certified to do the work in
those centers. The center does
not want their electrical work
done by a minimum-wage guy
or sales manager who might
burn the building down. The


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters sent
via email. Names and home-
towns will be printed; phone
numbers will not be published or
given out.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

same goes for the employees
moving boxed materials. As a
sales manager, I would think
you would want people to make
a decent wage to sell your
product.
Mr Flynn mentions he would
have done the setup work him-
self. Here are some union jobs
when you have an emergency
you would reconsider doing it
yourself. Many emergency re-
sponders are union members.
They are fireman, law enforce-
ment, ambulance drivers, EMTs
- people who put themselves
in danger to keep you safe and
protect society
Chuck Weiler
Crystal River


Kudos on your editorial and accompanying ar-
ticle by Diana West and somebody who wrote in,


James Willis, about women being in com-
bat. It's horrible. It's unbelievable. It's stu-
pid. I'm speechless. Why would anybody
want to send a woman into combat next
to a soldier? Both of them lying there and
one of them's going to have to move for-
ward over the other. It's unbelievable. Now
my question is, everybody out there, how
do I get in touch with who is responsible?
The secretary of defense, right, approved
it. How do I get in touch of the secretary
of defense to tell him what a moron he is?


LI
CAI
563-0


What's in a name?
I fail to understand why the Floral City town
center has suddenly been renamed the Floral City
Library Complex. What complex? Who made this
decision? The Strawberry Festival folks? Get real.


"The educational process has no end
beyond itself; it is its own end."
John Dewey,
"Democracy and Education" 1916


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


FCAT's line shifts constantly


H ere we are
with Febru-
ary not yet
over and the first
wave of state- <*-
mandated standard-
ized testing is about | __
to begin next week-
FCAT Writing for
fourth-, eighth- and
10th-grade students. Pat Deul
A little history, GUI
FCAT writing or CO
what was first know COL
as Florida Writes
goes back to 1997. It hasn't
changed much during the
years; students are given a
"prompt" or topic to write an
essay Originally, students were
given 45 minutes; now they
have 60 minutes to compose,
edit and rewrite a "draft" ver-
sion of their composition.
Spelling and proper use of
punctuation had never been
part of the scoring process, as
the quality of the thoughts and
ideas were the goal and al-
lowed students to be more ex-
pressive without the worry of
spelling mistakes since they are
without the aid of a dictionary
This is no longer the case.
Last year, the scoring
changed dramatically, de-
scribed as "raising the bar," the
essays were scored not only on
the quality of the expression,
but also on the proper use of
grammar, spelling and factual
basis for the student's response.
As a result, the passing rate in
Citrus County fell by 50 percent,
as did as did the rest of the stu-
dents in Florida! The results
were so shocking the State
Board of Education, who gov-
erns the testing regime, de-
cided to lower the passing score
to have the same pass rate as
previous years. For our Citrus
County students, it is around 85
percent.
Considered controversial by
many, critics accused the board
of watering down the expecta-
tions while others accused the
board of purposely making the
test more difficult to lower the
passing rate. Regardless of the
motive, most people includ-
ing the commissioner of educa-
tion recognized students did
not suddenly become poor writ-
ers overnight. But for many stu-
dents who had previously
scored very high on the writing
exam, they were left with a
lower score as part of their per-
manent record due to the lack
of communication from the
Florida Department of Educa-


ts
E


tion. This is
unacceptable.
Additional chal-
lenges for students
come from the qual-
ity of the "prompt" or
subject they must
write their essay
about. From a fourth-
grade test asking stu-
schmann dents to write a story
EST about what happens
on a camel ride when
U MN they have never seen
one, or ask high
school students to write about
their favorite toy when they are
trying desperately to be viewed
as grown-ups, some topics can
be less inspiring than others,
leaving students scratching
their heads trying to think of
something to write. This fur-
thers my concern about a one-
time test being used to define
the ability of students to write
rather than the work they have
produced all yearlong.
Our school district always
takes test scores seriously It set
a goal to increase FCAT writing
test scores this year, investing
more time and money in train-
ing teachers different writing
strategies.
I am not a fan of constantly
chasing our tail after the ever-
elusive test scores. While writ-
ing and communication are
essential for success and is
highly valued, is that what is re-
ally being developed when we
are focused on a state-
mandated formula? Our teach-
ers have done an excellent job
in helping our students become
better writers at every grade
level and in every curriculum,
not just language arts.
Students will use their writ-
ing skills on the required writ-
ten responses for all
standardized tests in the future,
including End of Course exams
in math and science, Common
Core Assessments, ACT, SAT,
Advanced Placement exams,
International Baccalaureate
exams and college entrance ap-
plications. Employers want
workers who are excellent com-
municators, effective writing is
essential to their future
opportunities.
Students have learned to use
their technology skills to im-
prove their writing, as evi-
denced by the Citrus Springs
Middle School students who
use iPads instead of notebooks
and joyfully write essays (which
they grumbled about in the
past) that include graphics and


colors, pictures, icons and some
go so far as to insert a video or
audio component. Whatever it
takes!
The act of writing itself is also
in great transition. Beginning in
2015, the FCAT writing exam
will be on a computer rather
than with paper and pencil.
This means all students need to
be proficient in keyboarding
skills and word-processing pro-
grams by fourth grade. So, in
addition to teaching kinder-
gartners how to hold a pencil
properly and form their letters,
they will begin to learn typing,
clicking, dragging, navigating
and editing on a computer
There is a tug of war going on
in schools across the country
between teaching cursive writ-
ing and printing, something that
seems to be less important to
younger learners than adults.
The reality is, if students cannot
write in cursive, they will not be
able to read cursive. It is some-
thing we have begun to pay at-
tention to locally We still
believe teaching cursive
matters.
Citrus County schools have
excellent teachers and educa-
tional leaders who truly are mo-
tivated to bring out the best in
every student and provide a
high-quality education that is
relevant and personal. Equally
as vital is what happens at
home, starting with reading to
children from birth. The more
words children hear, the richer
their vocabulary becomes. Sto-
ries take them to foreign lands
or create colorful and imagina-
tive worlds. Exposure to TV
channels such as Discovery or
Smithsonian add immensely to
a student's background knowl-
edge of the world, highly im-
portant in this new expectation
for fact-based writing to sup-
port an idea or question.
What the most important, es-
sential question for me is how
do we inspire students and help
them discover the sheer joy of
learning? It is not by testing and
testing and more testing. If I
could write the prompt for this
year's FCAT writing exam, I
would ask students to devise a
method of student-performance
assessment that best demon-
strates what they have learned
and are able to do. I bet they
would have a lot to say!

Pat Deutschman is a member
of the Citrus County School
Board.


State car inspections have something to say
for them. Both headlights must be operational,


A


tires must have tread, brakes must have
function, windshield wipers need to be
operational and rear lights must work. If
the above conditions weren't met by your
car, stay the heck off the road. I don't
want you on the same road as I am.
Show some respect


,'- Today is Presidents Day. How come
1579 none of our stores are closed? It's the
most important position ever held. I don't
understand it.
Bring back auto inspections
Want to bring more revenue into Citrus
County? Have auto inspection stations in Crystal
River and Inverness. Don't bring more cars down
here. Fix the ones we've got.


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


No women in combat Call for auto inspections


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'Cheryl! Sometimes Jamaica me crazy!'


O nce we were on
board and the
ship left Fort
Lauderdale, it would
take a week to reach a
what was to be the
pinnacle of this par-
ticular adventure -
passing through the
Panama Canal.
Cheryl and I have Fred E
been in the Caribbean A SK
on a number of occa- OF
sions and have visited
many islands, so it
was surprising this time there
would be no repeats. The com-
ing week would be filled with
four sea days and three ports of
call, including Jamaica, Bonaire
and Aruba.
Our first stop was Jamaica, but
I think I'll come back to that one
a little later. So, let's take them


L


in reverse order.
Aruba sits rather
:I close to Colombia,
and in spite of a
much-publicized
tragic event in recent
years, it is still a
bustling tourist
mecca, especially for
folks who like to do
rannen water stuff such as
LICE snorkeling. I'm not
LIFE much of a water per-
son myself, but
Cheryl is. Perhaps
I'm too protective. I trust no one
to make sure she remains safe
except me. So, as is often the
case, she enjoyed a day snorkel-
ing in the azure waters off of
Aruba and I enjoyed the boat
ride, the refreshments and
watching my sweetheart enjoy
being in the water.


We'd never even heard of
Bonaire which, too, is very close
to the Colombian coast. But
Cheryl and I enjoyed a bus ex-
cursion inland, seeing flora and
fauna we'd not seen before. Just
as it is with Aruba, the waters
surrounding Bonaire are beau-
tiful, but the diving seems to be
a little bit less commercialized.
OK. Let's go back to Jamaica.
Jamaica sits south and slightly
east of Fort Lauderdale, just
below Cuba. It's hard to imagine
we've missed this island on so
many trips, but this would, in
fact, be our first visit.
As is true for all of the islands,
the greenery of the landscape
and the beautiful shades of the
water are wonderful together.
But we also made a most in-
teresting tour of the interior. In
addition to stopping at a mar-


velously manicured tropical
garden and having a delicious
lunch including some jerk-
seasoned favorites, we visited
"Firefly," the vacation estate
and now the final resting place
of the English writer, Sir Noel
Coward.
Coward lived from 1899 until
1973. Though he was a some-
what controversial fellow, no
one can deny his wit was beyond
compare.
While touring the Firefly
main house, I noticed a number
of canvases signed by Coward.
The paintings have not been
given the respect I would think
they are due and for the most
part they remain unframed. Un-
fortunately, my observation was
also they weren't exceptional
works of art, which caused me to
comment to the greatest sup-


porter of my attempts at paint-
ing and writing my Cheryl.
I matter-of-factly said, "I think
these paintings should be given
more impressive presentations,
but, in truth, I think mine com-
pare very well with his."
She looked at me as only she
can and replied, "I agree about
the paintings, but please don't
ask me to compare your writing."
I feigned incredulity and
countered with the much-used
cliche, "Cheryl! Sometimes Ja-
maica me crazy!"
Come to think of it, that might
give a clue as to why she said not
to ask her to compare my word-
smithery with that of Sir Noel!


Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


missing the mark


GooMAIU. 23
GO(DIVMlt.COM 2o\3


Robert Hagaman
OTHER
VOICES


State of the

Union speech

unrealistic
A s usual, Presiden
Barack Obama gave
his message to the
ceiling. He seldom makes
eye contact with his audi
ence while reading his
constant campaign
speeches. He needs to
start leading.
He said the State of the
Union is excellent.
Just what bubble is he
living in? The cost of living
is spiraling, violent acts
continue daily, and we
continue to lose wars. Also
a worldwide economic col
lapse is imminent
His solution to solving
our problems is to raise
taxes. He said the middle
class will not foot the bill.
Really? Who else woulc
pay? Certainly not those
who pay nothing now; the
same group he keeps
promising more to in
hopes of the group grow-
ing. The wealthy already
pay a disproportionate
share and even if they gave
all, it would not begin to
pay for his plans.
President Obama claims
to have reduced the
deficit. However, he has no
comprehension of wha
debt means and seems to
confuse debt and deficit
His economic advisers
continue to believe we can
spend our way out of debt
Has anyone ever suc
ceeded in doing that?
Medicare cuts are pro
posed without reducing



SUBMIT LETTERS
TO THE EDITOR
The opinions expressed
in Chronicle editorials
are the opinions of the
newspaper's editorial
board.
Viewpoints depicted in
political cartoons,
columns or letters do
not necessarily repre-
sent the opinion of the
editorial board.
All letters must be
signed and include a
phone number and
hometown, including
letters sent via email.
Names and hometowns
will be printed; phone
numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to
edit letters for length,
libel, fairness and good
taste.
Letters must be no
longer than 600 words,
and writers will be lim-
ited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO:
The Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429.
Or, fax to 352-563-2280,
or e-mail to letters@
chronicleonline.com.


some of our best defense
weapons to Egypt while
disarming our nation.
Also, we helped North
Korea with technology that
may soon be used to attack
our country
Finally, minimum wage
will always be minimal.
Employers should be al-
lowed to determine what
an employee is worth to
the organization. Few
would remain at a mini-
mum level if they have the
skills to advance. In fact,
few employers would want
to employ any significant
number of marginal em-
ployees. It would never en-
hance their organization
or their public image. At
the same time, there are a
few individuals who sim-
ply cannot or, in rare in-
stances, will not produce
at a higher level yet still
need employment.


Robert E. Hagaman is
Citrus County Republican
state committeeman. He
resides in Homosassa.


and move manufacturing
out of the country.
So much more could be
discussed, but that could
be at another time.
Future predictions
When, and only when,
the idle go back to work
and pay taxes will we start
to reduce the deficit and
see our economy healthy
again. When workers do
return, it will not be like
the industrial revolution
or early 20th century. In
the 21st century, workers
will use computers to tell
the automated technology
how to produce, and tech-
nicians will maintain this
equipment, not sit at the
machines all day (or night)
just doing the same mo-
notonous job over and
over.
New problems will arise
as to the standard work
week hours. One hundred
years ago it was 12 hours,
then in the 1930s eight
hours. What will it be in
the future?


Jack Mann is a retired
economist who lives in
Crystal River.


t
e
e
s course, what it really

ri
o

e

e
g services to anyone. Of
s course, what it really
e means is certain services
, will be deemed non-essen-
- tial. If one has a serious
ailment, it will become an
g economical waste to treat.
e Also, Obama plans to
e make the rich pay What
happens when the rich be-
d come part of those in
e poverty? Ever hear of the
e Soviet Union? Like abor-
s tion on demand, euthana-
i sia will soon become a
- common way of life.
y If we subsidize bringing
e jobs back to our country, it
e will burden our citizens
o with more government
cost. It is much better to
s take steps to encourage
e economic growth without
o burdening business in
t ways that reduce employ-
o ment opportunities.
. Adding government jobs
s without increasing pro-
i ductive growth employ-
. ment opportunities
- further weakens our
economy
The best way to combat
g global warming is to cap



MESS
Continued from Page C1

Medicare essential? Two
reasons: 1. People were
living longer. 2. They were
living longer because of
the tremendous advances
being made in medical
technology, which a large
part of the population
could not afford.
Then came the last part
of the 20th century when
everything started to
change.
Eventually the unions
had become quite de-
manding as to wages, work
regulations and benefits.
Global trade
evolves
For the first time, the
concept of world trade
and free markets entered
the picture and manufac-
turers took advantage of
this situation to move
plants out of the country
or demand their workers
work for less. This, of
course, led to 80 million
unemployed, ever-growing
national debt and large
quantities of foreign prod-


and trade? Many well-
trained scientists report
no evidence to support
global warming theories.
Those who support the
theory generally stand to
profit from their ideas.
Selling pollution credits is
the biggest farce ever. If an
industry can purchase the
right to pollute, then the
middle class will pay the
price with added costs
when a product or service
is purchased. Only the sell-
ers of the pollution credits
will benefit
Fixing the housing mar-
ket is no simple task. Be-
cause certain government
leaders forced lenders to
sell homes to unqualified
purchasers, many loans
were processed and then
sold and resold. This
makes it very difficult to
reprocess the loans. Also,
most lenders are reluctant
to make almost any loans
now, because the govern-
ment might just add more
unreasonable restrictions
on them that will destroy
their stockholders and


ucts in our stores.
At the same time, much
of the regulation of finan-
cial and manufacturing
led to the housing debacle
of the past decade.
Plenty to blame
Who's to blame? You de-
cide. Was it the labor
unions and their de-
mands, the industries that
moved out of the country,
the banks and the insur-
ance companies that
caused the bank collapse
or the government who al-
lowed this to happen? Or
perhaps the Supreme
Court who's decisions are
so important.
So here we are with a
$16 trillion national debt,
foreign nations hold $6
trillion to $8 trillion of our
money for goods we have
purchased so our retailers
can continue in business,
maybe 20 million unem-
ployed or underemployed,
government forcing a fis-
cal cliff regularly, and gov-
ernment trying to raise
taxes and reduce cost of
operation.
Now those who own the
wealth hold the power to
use their wealth to finance


their credibility.
Federalizing our kids
would be a final step
where government would
guide the minds of chil-
dren from the cradle on.
That has also been tried. It
ultimately fails, but great
damage is done first. We
are already close to that
status now, because many
parents choose to have
children then pay some-
one else to raise them so
they can earn money to
support the good life.
Looking at the interna-
tional situation militarily,
we have gone from bad to
worse. Waterboarding to
get information was con-
sidered torture. Now, if we
think someone is bad, we
just blast them into obliv-
ion. Why bother to capture
them and have the ACLU
get involved. If they are
dead, no problem. We have
abandoned Iraq and un-
controlled killing goes on.
When we leave
Afghanistan, it will likely
become like Iraq. At the
same time, we are giving


elections ($60 billion in
2012) and send lobbyists to
Washington to make sure
the legislation they want is
enacted.
In closing, so we have
seen the great shift of
wealth from the middle
class to the top 5 percent of
the wealthiest population.
Campaign finance
changes
How can this be
changed? Only by chang-
ing the way we finance
elections and limiting
campaigns in the primary
elections and the general
elections.
One way would be to use
the check-off system on
the income tax form and
put the proceeds in a spe-
cial, nonpolitical fund to
be dispersed in the pri-
mary and general elec-
tions. (I wrote an article
about this several years
ago.)
Another theory is gov-
ernment cannot and
should not create jobs in
the private sector. Those
who control the large
sums of money should
form consortium to cre-
ate jobs, not destroy jobs


WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl


ASIDE FROM WHERE

WE ARE, WHAT'D YOU

THINK OF THE STATE OF
THE UNION ADDRESS?


Adams is closely
aligned with Sen.
Charles Dean (R-
Inverness) and the fall-
out over
paying
impact
fees on
the sen-
ator's I
barn a
f e w

back still Scott
rings Adams
clearly
at the county court-
house. We do not end po-
litical feuds in Citrus
County; they go on until
all parties die or folks
move to Brooksville.
Our county had huge
budget problems even
before Progress Energy
disputed its tax bill or
decided to close the nu-
clear plant. But it's not
because county employ-
ees are over-paid and
lazy The county's budget
is out of balance because
we grew too quickly dur-
ing the boom years of
2002-07 and have been
unable and/or unwilling
to control our spending.
The commission has de-
pended on its reserves to
balance the budget and
now those reserves are
just about gone.
All five commissioners
are going to have to face
some tough realities in
the coming year Big cuts
will be necessary or
spending increases will
be pushed through.
Adams has been talk-
ing about how irrespon-
sible everyone else has
been with county spend-
ing. Now is the time for
him to step forward and
do the job he got elected
to do. Scott Adams needs
to come forward and tell
citizens how he wants to
cut spending in county
government or how he
wants to raise new dol-
lars to cover the poten-
tial deficit.
Firing the county ad-
ministrator won't save us
any money because we'd
have to turn around and
employ another adminis-
trator Reducing cell-
phone use and county car
use might save a couple
of thousand dollars and
that's good. But we are
talking about the county
being more than $10 mil-
lion out of balance.
Adams got elected by
telling folks we have a
bunch of incompetents
running our local govern-
ment. Well now he is one
of them and he is proba-
bly finding it is much eas-
ier to be on the outside
throwing hand grenades
than on the inside find-
ing real solutions.
We challenge Commis-
sioner Adams to offer
some concrete recom-
mendations on how he
wants to reduce spend-
ing or raise new rev-
enues to balance the
county's budget. And
we'll be glad to publish
his recommendations so
all citizens can review
his ideas. His recom-
mendations can be the
starting point of a coun-
tywide conversation
about how to deal with
this very real problem.


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the
Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicle
online.com.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DAMATO
Continued from Page Cl

was also a recommended project
The Vision Plan mentioned this site
possesses:
Unique architectural legacy and
compatibility;
It is the "front door" of the down-
town as something passing motorists
would notice;
As a location for musical events;
As a farmer's market;
Additional off-street downtown
parking as a component;
The ability to begin transformation
of the downtown and how the commu-
nity views it.
Under the city's leadership, the Cut-
ler Spur roadway improvements will
soon commence.
The three initial projects that should
be viewed as "cornerstone projects" to
kick start further joint city/county revi-
talization efforts because they are
available for immediate in-place fund-
ing and fast-track completion are:
Phase 1 of the downtown River-
walk from Cracker's Restaurant to
Charlie's Fish House.
The Park/Activity Center at the cor-
ner of U.S. 19 with the inclusion of ad-
ditional off-street parking and ADA
compliant public restroom facilities, a
Wetland Educational Center and a bi-
cycle/pedestrian Trailhead.
The Cutler Spur roadway improve-
ment project.
The Supplemental Information Part-
nership Progress booklet the city re-
cently received from County
Administrator Brad Thorpe will help
answer questions from the public input
session the Chamber Area Council con-
ducted on Dec. 20, 2012.
It further highlights the city, county
and state funding available for the
three initial "cornerstone projects"
along with the Crystal River water
quality clean-up and restoration proj-
ects and their attached funding
sources.
The BOCC has earmarked a potential
$6.5 million at the top of its list for fund-


ing Crystal River waterway restoration
projects from the RESTORE ACT
monies coming out of the BP Deepwa-
ter Horizon Oil Spill Settlement.
At the Feb. 12, 2013, BOCC meeting, I
presented our paid consultant the part-
nership and supplement documents for
funding even more projects for Crystal
River from the additional "buckets of
money" within the RESTORE ACT
The strategy is to recapture and then
leverage the extra money through the
acquisition of more grants to be dedi-
cated to the revitalization of the city of
Crystal River. These actions have the
potential to bring millions of dollars for
infrastructure, tourism, revitalization
and enhanced water-quality projects
all within the city of Crystal River.
If you feel I have offended any of you
during the process we have been en-
gaged in, you know that is not my intent.
If any apology is desired, I offer one
willingly with sincerity and the hope of
your acceptance.
My only desire is to have the county
and city work together to achieve all of
your goals for the betterment of the
water, land, wildlife, our residents,
guests and visitors.
The county's significant tax incre-
ment financing monies, water quality
funding, road and park impact fees, ad-
ministrative and staff support are
clearly focused on the city of Crystal
River It is the right time to utilize the
county's resources to forge a new rela-
tionship in a spirit of mutual coopera-
tion to assist the city in achieving its
revitalization goals and objectives.
Now is also the right time for the city
of Crystal River to "take ownership" of
the partnership concept, the supple-
mental information and unique fund-
ing opportunities offered by Citrus
County
As always you have my pledge to
work tirelessly within the city and
county's combined efforts for the bet-
terment of all of the parties to bring this
matter to fruition in a timely respectful
manner.


Dennis Damato is the District 1
Commissioner for Citrus County


Support Duke Energy
It would be great, tax-wise, to have a
healthy Duke Power Company contributing
to the Citrus County tax base. This could be
a reality if the tax collectors in the area
would refrain from harassing the company
and let it handle its own business.
What happened, it appears, is the neg-
ative publicity making the company the
bad guy in what happened to our tax
base has convinced Duke it would be
best to forego spending quite a bit of
money repairing the existing facility and
doing other things with its money
The constant barrage of negatives
about Duke, from all sources, has hurt
the county's bargaining position with the
company Why not try to give the county's
largest taxpayer a break and say some-
thing good about it The Chronicle could
publish an editorial saying we really ap-
preciate the contributions Progress En-
ergy, and now Duke, have made to the
health and well-being of our economy
and hope it will continue unabated.
All the stories published in the Chroni-
cle about manatees are interesting, but
are they producing much revenue from


other than curious tourists?
I worked for a paper company in the
Northeast, which was badgered by the
press and unions to the point it shut down
five operating mills and went to a southern
state where the environment was much
more favorable for business enterprises.
I would ask also what is the Chamber
of Commerce in the county doing to en-
courage other businesses to relocate
here? We have enough pizza shops and
other small business to pay taxes, but
now we are effectively chasing the major
tax account out of town. Go after auto as-
sembly plants, other big businesses that
employ more than 1,000 people. If the
powers-to-be in South Carolina can do it,
why can't we do it here?
Never mind the impact on the environ-
ment. We need good paying jobs and
many of them here so just one company
does not hold our destiny hostage. Other
than Duke Power, we have only food and
fish to rely on for tax contributions and
that is not enough. Our superstructure
requires much more to support it.
David A. Carey
Homosassa


41 w .'. F:" ,.'. & 'f t ,
^ 'AA1'^:; 1'" .. .


In February of 1870 Hiram Rhodes Revels became the
first ever African American United States Senator. He
represented Mississippi until March of 1871.


^^^^^^ ^^^-- *-- -


Take StcC in Children c fCitrus Cunty presents........


Take Stock in
Children


"11A~tiS D4!A wlim/btab t"
U4,Maiirl'Aw BULH IA^WM' I J'


Sunday March 3, 2013-3:00 P.M.
Curtis Peterson Auditorium
3810 West Educational Path, Lecanto
Located in the Lecanto School complex
Tickets $10.00 Per person


DoorsOpen
at
2:00 PM


Sinoina the its cfthe s and "cs......
Mie one & Cnh' ......Iola & The Saint


Music, Leather Jackets, Poodle Skirts, Silent Auction and More!
For ticket information, please call Pat Lancaster at 352-422-2348
ALL PROCEEDS WILL BE USED TO PURCHASE SCHOLARSHIPS FOR STUDENTS IN CITRUS COUNTY
Take Stock in Children of Ctrus County is a program sponsored by the Citrus County Sheriffs Office


SCORE 15th
ANNUAL
Monday, April 8th, 2013
.JU ,..:JIIL" 'jJ'. J., C U'J ,ilf:t C"LJ
,'jj_.,iil] '. ..1_, i H. 5_-..i, J-. _jj


LB


a


Tournament Sponsor $100
Includes: Name displayed at tournament and awards
banquet, Media Recognition, Free greens fee (foursome)
at Sugarmill Woods Country Club during 2013
11:00 a.m. Registration
11:30 a.m. Lunch
1:00 p.m. Shotgun Start
5:30 p.m. Award Ceremony
All Entries Must Be Received by Friday. March 29.2013


February 24th 6 p.m.- 9 p.m.
Cooking for a Cause
$30 in advance $35 at door
at the Crystal River Mall
Fundraiser for Jessie's Place, Cash Bar, Cocktail Attire. Enjoy a
variety of delicious menu items from Citrus County
restaurants.The restaurants will be judged in seven food
categories. Proceeds help our local children that need
Jessie's Place. Call 270-8814 for more information.


February 24th 6 p.m.
Oscar Night
$85 entrance fee
at the Sugarmill Woods Country Club
Fundraising Gala Event with gourmet dining and
entertainment. All proceeds to benefit LOCAL service
projects particularly promoting literacy and projects at
Lecanto schools. Call 382-4700,382-4500, or 697-1783 for
more information.


February 24th 2:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m.
6th Annual African American Read-In
Free Admission
at the College of Central Florida, Citrus Campus
Event
African American Read-in Returns Out LoudUJoin together
with people of all ages,backgrounds,and ethnicities. This
celebration promoting history, literacy,and African
American contributions to literature was first introduced by
the National Council of Teachers of English in 1990.The
afternoon will feature special musical performances and
refreshments donated by local business sponsors.
More information about the event and about African
American authors on our Facebook page @
www.facebook.com/citrusaari.


February 25th
7:30 a.m. Registration 9 a.m. Shot gun start
17th Annual School-astic
Classic Golf Tournament
$55 entrance fee
Women of Sugarmill Woods Organization
All net proceeds go to scholarships for Citrus County
Students. includes cart fees, breakfast, snacks,lunch and a
chinese auction.
Call (352)746-7058 more information.


February 28th 5 p.m.
Friends of the Library of
Homosassa Spring Book Sale
At Nature Coast Bank 2455 North Citrus Hills Blvd.
This book sale is one of two held every year for the purpose
of funding Homosassa Library.
Call 503-6385 for more information.


Letter to THE EDITOR


rK-


CHONLE


(uL(ONICLIS^ ^,
CwOMM.mea ee TM


SCOPE &

Run/Walk for Colon Cancer AwarenessK
Run/Walk for Colon Cancer Awareness


participation award $100 Saturday, March 9, 2013 8:00AM
CREST School
Lecanto, Florida

FOR INFORMATION CALL: Paul (352) 249-7887 Register at www.debbys5k.org
Registration formavailable at ourweb site Debby Hudson Colon Cancer Foundation 501(c)(3)
w .dtrus untyuisers.com Proceeds to benefit The Prevent Cancer Foundation
m and Colon Cancer Alliance
Swwcronciceaninon 000__ ODPY2 OOODUJB


C4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013


COMMENTARY


r]K<







Smart
Money
FAGE.D5


BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Danielle Kerese
IN THE
MEME TIME



iPad



may



suit



needs
T hanks for all the
questions this week.
I will answer as
many as I can in the space
I have, but if I missed you,
be patient and I will an-
swer your question next
time. In the meme time, I
encourage questions from
readers on all things
online- and technology-
related.
Dear Danielle: Your col-
umn on computers caught
my eye since, like your
grandmother, I am old and
computer-illiterate. Be-
lieve me, I did try learning.
I went to two different
classes, which were sup-
posedly for beginners and
after the classes I went
home bewildered. I do not
have a computer, but was
thinking of buying one and
then trying to locate some-
one to come help me at
home, and if so, how do I
go about that?
I feel so helpless, since
getting around is getting
more difficult and having a
computer will at least
keep me in touch with the
world. Any suggestions? -
Helpless and Bewildered
Dear Bewildered: I ap-
plaud your efforts of learn-
ing how to use a computer
by taking classes. Your be-
wilderment is understand-
able; especially because
you don't have a computer
at home to practice what
you were taught.
First, I'm not sure you
need a computer. It sounds
like you would be a perfect
candidate for a tablet. A
tablet such as an iPad or a
Samsung Galaxy would
probably be perfect for
you. You can keep in touch
with friends and family via
email, Facebook or Skype.
You can check your fa-
vorite website for news,
www.chronicleonline.com,
for example. Go shopping
online, pay bills online and
tell the post office to hold
your mail online all on a
tablet. It's not necessarily
the product you would
want to do your taxes on,
write a novel or do any
kind of professional-
quality design work, but it
sounds perfect for what
you are looking to do.
If you really want a com-
puter, get a laptop so you
See Page D5


Special to the Chronicle
Military veterans in the post 9/11 world are finding it difficult to find civilian jobs after serving in the armed forces..




LIFESTYLE CHANGE


Young

Associated Press
WASHINGTON Two
months after completing his
five-plus years as an Army
medic, Dan Huber is still look-
ing for a job. And while he's
had some promising inter-
views, he has no assurances
the search will end soon.
That's given him some in-
sight he shares with some of
his buddies back at Fort Polk
in Louisiana: Don't wait until
you've left the military to de-
termine how you'll make ends
meet as a civilian.
"I've told them: 'Hey, man,
you guys have really got to
start planning months and
months in advance. It's not
just planning for interviews.
It's planning to make sure
you'll be afloat in this time pe-
riod, which you don't know
how long will take,"' said
Huber, 26, of Waukesha, Wis.
Although veterans as a whole
have a lower unemployment
rate than the nation at large,
younger veterans who served
in the years following the Sept
11 attacks are having a much
harder time finding work
The unemployment rate for
veterans between 18 and 24 ex-
ceeded 20 percent last year It
was also in double digits for
those 25 to 34. The unemploy-
ment rate for both age groups
was higher than for their non-
veteran peers and much higher
than the national average.
The job problems for
younger vets have continued
despite a wide range of pri-
vate and public efforts. Con-
gress approved tax credits for
companies that hire veterans.
Federal agencies stepped up
their preferential hiring of
vets. Many thousands are tak-
ing advantage of a generous
package of educational bene-
fits instead of entering the job
market. Companies such as
Walmart, General Electric and


veterans still struggle as job scene improves


Special to the Chronicle
Job Seeker Brett Culver, left, of Newalla, Okla., formerly of the Air Force, talks with Texas state
trooper Deon Cockrell at a Recruit Military job fair Jan. 31 in Oklahoma City.


many others announced pro-
grams designed to hire more
veterans. And organizations
such as the U.S. Chamber of
Commerce have helped put
on hundreds of job fairs
around the country
Kevin Schmiegel, a retired
lieutenant colonel who spent
years trying to get young
Marines to re-enlist, said the
youngest vets are making a cou-
ple of critical mistakes when it
comes to searching for a job.
With little job experience
outside the military, many
cannot explain how the skills
they learned in the military
translate to the private sector,
said Schmiegel, now execu-
tive director of the U.S. Cham-
ber of Commerce Hiring Our
Heroes program. The program
has helped more than 14,000
veterans land jobs and will
fine-tune its focus during the


Unemployed vets
The jobless rate for younger
veterans who served after
the Sept. 11 attacks is higher
than that of nonveterans:
*Veterans serving since 2001
Nonveterans
25 pe rce nt .............................. ........
20 .......





18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64
Age
SOURCE: Labor Department AP
coming to year to help
younger vets, as well as mili-
tary spouses.
Trooper Deon Cockrell, mil-


itary liaison for the Texas De-
partment of Public Safety, had
a similar take at a recent job
fair in Oklahoma City. He said
the discipline and skills ac-
quired during military service
translate well to a career in
law enforcement.
"A lot of them don't know
that they're eligible," Cockrell
said. "They can walk from uni-
form to uniform."
Congress tried to help with
the transition to civilian life.
Since November 2011, depart-
ing service members are re-
quired to attend various
workshops designed to help
them with things such as how
to write effective resumes and
cover letters and improve
their interview skills. Previ-
ously, the training was volun-
tary, which greatly lessened
participation rates.
See Page D5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Pati Smith joins HPH
Hospice as gift planner
Pati Smith recently joined HPH
Hospice's Development Department
as a gift planner in Citrus County.
Smith comes to HPH after retiring
from a 30-year career with the city of
Inverness, where she served Citrus
County as parks and recreation and
special events director.
Throughout her career, Smith has
been instrumental in writing and
managing land acquisition and de-
velopment grants; working with com-
munity members and civic/service
organizations; and organizing and
implementing signature events. She
continues her involvement as a
committee member with nonprofit
organizations.
Through personal experiences
with HPH, Smith is pleased to have
been afforded the opportunity to as-
sist with coordination of the HPH
mission in Citrus County.
"My respect for all HPH does to
provide dignity, comfort and care to
patients and their families runs
deep, and I am honored to work with
a wonderful and dedicated group of
professionals," she said.
To speak with Smith and learn
more about HPH partnership oppor-


tunities in Citrus Count
527-4600.


Kyoko
Kraus


Two Oak Hill I
nurses cer
SPRING HILL- Oa
announced Kyoko Krau
bara Brown have succ<
pleted the examination
certification in pediatric
nursing, administered b
atric Nursing Certificati
the Board of Certificati
agency Nursing, as a req


Special to the Chronicle
Pati Smith recently joined HPH Hospice's Development Department as a gift planner in Citrus County.
Smith comes to HPH after retiring from a 30-year career with the city of Inverness, where she served
Citrus County as parks and recreation and special events director.


y, call 352- working in the Pediatric Emergency
Care Center.
CPEN is a nationally recognized
credential that represents Oak Hill's
commitment to excellence in the
profession of pediatric emergency
nursing and to providing the highest
quality of care to our patients.
The Certified Pediatric Emergency
Nurse exam was developed and is
Barbara delivered in equal partnership be-
Brown tween PNCB and BCEN. This unique
exam was developed in response to
the Institute of Medicine's report iden-
Hospital tifying an urgent need for specialized
tified nursing expertise in the management
of the emergency healthcare needs
ak Hill Hospital of pediatric patients.
us and Bar- The pediatric age group presents
essfully com- unique challenges to emergency de-
for national apartments in healthcare facilities
emergency around the country. To help mitigate
by the Pedi- those challenges, the CPEN exam
on Board and highlights the specific needs of pedi-
on for Emer- atric emergency patients and en-
quirement for sures nurses earning this new


certification are well versed in the
emergency care of children.
Oak Hill Hospital requires emer-
gency nursing staff to be certified in
emergency nursing or pediatric
emergency nursing.
Old Florida National
Bank expands
Old Florida National Bank today
announced the opening of the
bank's second Citrus County office,
10th in the region, at 1101 N.E. 5th
St. in Crystal River. Old Florida re-
ceived regulatory approval for the
acquisition of the Crystal River
branch of Orange Bank of Florida in
October and opened its office as a
part of the Old Florida franchise.
As market executive, veteran
banker and Citrus County native
Patrick Fitzpatrick will lead the local
team, which will remain in place and is
committed to providing excellent serv-
ice to existing and new customers.
"Our expansion into Crystal River


will allow us to bring additional serv-
ices to both retail and business cus-
tomers in the area," said John
Burden, president and CEO of Old
Florida National Bank. "This second
office location and an already estab-
lished team of bankers expands our
ability to provide service excellence
across Citrus County. We are excited
to be a part of the Crystal River com-
munity and we look forward to grow-
ing together with our neighbors."
As with each of Old Florida's
branch locations, the Crystal River
office will operate as a part of the
community, with local and experi-
enced bankers and staff members.
In addition, the branch will engage
with the community through civic in-
volvement and local partnerships.
Former local resident
in paralegal journal
Karen M. Cummins, MPS, PP, PLS
of Beaufort, S.C., and formerly of
Crystal River, was recently published


BUSINESS DIGEST
Submit information via
email to newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or fax
to 352-563-3280, attn:
Business Digest.
The Chronicle reserves the
right to edit notices.
High-resolution photos will
be considered for
publication. Images taken
with most cellphone cam-
eras do not reproduce well.
Publication on a specific
date or in color cannot be
guaranteed.

in The American Paralegal Journal in-
troduced by the Florida Alliance of
Paralegal Associations on Feb. 1.
Her thesis, entitled "The Role of
Jury Nullification in the Legal
Process," was featured in the spe-
cial inaugural edition of the publica-
tion. The document discusses the
topic of jury nullification, its meaning,
history, legality, significance and
value to our society, the opinions of
the courts, and the messages sent
by jurors to the general public and
the judiciary.
Cummins is a member of the Na-
tional Association of Legal Profes-
sionals Certified Paralegal, with
more than 30 years of professional
experience in Beaufort County, S.C.
She holds a Master of Professional
Studies from George Washington
University College of Professional
Studies, Bachelor of Science in
Criminal Justice Administration from
Park University and an Academic
Associates Degree in Public Service
and Paralegal Studies.
Her professional affiliations in-
clude membership in the S.C. Asso-
ciation for Justice and American
Association for Justice, the National
Association of Legal Staff Profes-
sionals, the Legal Staff of South
Carolina and the Hilton Head Legal
Staff Professionals.
She is the senior paralegal with
the law firm of Ralph V. Baldwin, Jr.,
Attorney at Law, LLC, with expertise
in family law, criminal defense, per-
sonal injury, and medical malprac-
tice litigation.


BOB LANE ,Accountant
Accounting & Income Tax Returns
Fixed & Equity Indexed Annuities
(352) 344-2888 (352) 344-2599
(352) 344-2480 Fax (352) 637-5500

400 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL. 34450
43 Years in Business 31 Years in Inverness


WILLIAMS,
a McCRANIE,
WARDLOW
& CASH, P.A.
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS


2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS to serve you!
Complete Income Tax Service


Christine C. Eck, CPA, PA
910 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 563-2522
Certified Public Accountant Member: Florida Institute of CPAs


Tax Preparation:
'.id; N,.,. ,F;, ] ., .,.

\ isil nuuu.lahri lt ,.u.ni inh..rniit.n ,1Ii,. n


PRICE & COMPANY, P.A.
Certified Public Accountants
795-6118
Serving Citrus County for over 30 years

Charles E. Price, EA

Federal & Out-of-State Tax Preparation
Corporate Tax Preparation
Business Accounting Services
QuickBooks Consulting
wPayroll Services

www.pwprice.com


IT'S TAX TIME!


There's Still Time Left

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For more information
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Yvonne Shepard at
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D2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013


BUSINESS


Inverness
726-8130











D3


CITRUS CITRUS COUNTY
Economic DeveIop.- j CITRUS COUNT
Council, Inc. Chamber of Commerce


numberr connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801




26th annual Floral City Strawberry


Festival kicks off Friday, March 1


T he Floral City Strawberry Festi-
val started 26 years ago on the
property of Ferris Farms. Several
years ago it outgrew that venue, and
the Chamber of Commerce, along
with the Floral City Merchants As-
sociation, continued the tradition at
beautiful Floral Park. For complete
details on the 2013 Strawberry Fes-
tival check out the pullout section in
this Wednesday's Chronicle.
One of the very recent additions
to the festival is Friday night's
Berries, Brew and BBQ kickoff
party. The Floral City Library Com-
plex transforms into a wine and beer
garden complete with live entertain-
ment and cooking from the Citrus
County Agricultural Alliance, fea-
turing pulled pork, chicken and ribs,
baked beans, coleslaw, collard
greens and rolls. Local businesses
stay open late so people can mean-
der through the stores and under-


stand what Floral City has to offer.
The festivities take place Friday
night from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.
This year we add a nationally
known entertainer with the appear-
ance of Bill "The Sauce Boss" Whar-
ton, who takes a novel approach to
performing; he cooks gumbo AND
performs. While that might sound a
little strange, Jimmy Buffet found it
interesting enough to write the song
"I Will Play for Gumbo." Warming
up the stage for the Sauce Boss is
local favorite The Magic Bus.
Berries, Brew & BBQ is brought to
you by the Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce, the Floral City Mer-
chants Association, the Agricultural
Alliance of Citrus County and our
generous sponsors: Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home, Ferris Farms, Floral
City Heritage Council, Insurance
Resources & Risk Management,
Mike Bays State Farm Insurance,


FLORAL CITY, FLORIDA
M&B Dairy, Moonrise Resort,
SECO (Sumter Electric Co-op),
Sibex, Sunshine Springs Assisted
Living Facility and West Central So-
lutions.
Floral Park becomes a strawberry
wonderland with Ferris Farms
strawberry flats and strawberry
shortcakes for sale. The honored
strawberry is joined by more than
100 additional food vendors and
more than 100 arts and crafts and
marketplace vendors.
The festival opens Saturday with a
patriotic opening and the Little Miss


Strawberry Princess Pageant for
girls ages 4 to 6 at 9 a.m. followed by
the Miss Strawberry Princess Pag-
eant at 10 a.m. for girls 7 to 12. Sat-
urday's music includes the
"Amazzing" Steel Drum Ensemble
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and country
musicbythe Dan Story Band from 2
p.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday's music includes acoustic
guitarist Craig Jaworski from 9 a.m.
to 11 a.m., local talent Sophie Ro-
bitaille at 11:30 a.m., popular duet
Phantastic Sounds from 1 p.m. to 2
p.m. and Cajun music from Neon
Leon & Cajun Dave closing the festi-
val from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Childhood Development Services
will run a children's area with games
and activities both Saturday and
Sunday. Both festival days offer a wide
selection of concessions, the return of
favorite crafters as well as new faces
and, new this year, a beer garden.


Admission to the festival is just
$3; children under 12 admitted free.
Parking is extremely limited in
downtown Floral City, so we recom-
mend that you park at the Citrus
County Fairgrounds (3600oo S.
Florida Ave., Inverness, FL 34450)
and ride the $1 shuttle bus to and
from the festival grounds.
The 26th annual Strawberry Festival
is presented by FDS Disposal and
Citrus 95.3/96.7 the Fox with Plat-
inum Sponsorship from Tampa Bay
Times and Sonic and Gold Sponsor-
ship from Sibex, with additional
sponsorship support from many
others, including Hometown Values,
the Florida Lottery, Nature Coast EMS
and the Ted Williams Museum. The
Floral City Strawberry Festival is
brought to you by the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce, the Floral City
Merchants Association and sustaining
partner the Citrus County Chronicle.


Citrus County is

going to Tallahassee!
T he Chamber of Commerce heads to Tallahassee on
March 20 and 21 for its annual Legislative Day trip,
when Citrus County will make its mark on the state capital!
This year, in partnership with the Economic Development
Council and the Tourist Development Council, we are adding
a new event: a barbecue! On Wednesday, March 20, the
evening before our traditional Legislative Day session, the
barbecue will give our participants the opportunity to net-
work with our state legislators
and officials in a fun and infor-
mal atmosphere. The barbecue,
sponsored by Progress Energy
o stand the Tourism Development
Council, will be held at the Good-
wood Museum & Gardens Car-
riage House near downtown,
and feature the mouthwatering
cooking of our own Citrus
County Ag Alliance and live
music by Southern Satisfaction.
The following day, Thursday,
March 21, we conduct our "regu-
lar" Legislative Day sessions.
Our day will begin with an op-
tional tour of the Supreme Court
While in Tallahassee or other state office. At
making arrangements lunchtime, we will convene on
for the Legislative Day, the 22nd floor of the state capitol
Ardath Prendergast building, where our speakers will
had an impromptu come to meet with us. This is
photo opportunity with also the time we formally pres-
Gov. Rick Scott. ent the Chamber's and EDC's list
of legislative priorities to the
members of the House and Senate to gain their endorsement
and sponsor bills to achieve our objectives. These priorities
include education, the Suncoast Parkway, Port Citrus and
other issues key to Citrus County. Our luncheon keynote
speaker will be Secretary of Commerce Grey Swoope, who also
heads Enterprise lorida, the state's economic development
organization. Additionally, we have invited the governor and
lieutenant governor and have tentative acceptance from
Agriculture and ConsumerAffairs Commissioner Adam Put-
nam and Visit Florida CEO Will Seccomb, along with many
other top officials. We thank SunTrust Bank for helping
sponsor the day, and we thank state Rep. Jimmie T. Smith
and his staff for their assistance in coordinating the speakers.
We encourage you tojoin us! Last year, more than 7o busi-
nesspeople went on the trip. This year, we expect many more!
This is a great way to ensure Tallahassee hears our voices and
knows Citrus County is aware and involved in state government.
Reserve your seat at www.CitrusCountyChamber.com and
click on the NEWS & EVENTS tab and scroll to "2013 Legislative
Day," or call Ardath Prendergast, Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce, at 352-726-2801. Don't delay! The bus is filling fast!


Keeping it in the building and the family

Welcome new chamber members Alikat Fashions, owned by Alice Watkins, and Ridin' Dirty,
owned by Michael Watkins. The businesses share a building at 7763 W. Gulf-to-Lake Hwy., Crys-
tal River. Alikat Fashions sells new clothing for women and teens. The selection includes something for
all sizes, from small to 5XL tops and dresses, shoes 5 to 12 and bottoms 0 to 22. Alikat Fashions also car-
ries purses, wigs, stockings, garters/garter belts, belts, scarves, formalwear, body jewelry and simple
exotics. Ridin' Dirty sells ATVs, dirt bikes, helmets and scooters. Both businesses are open Monday
through Saturday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Contact either business at 352-794-6116.


Alikat team members are joined by Chamber Highli
members and ambassadors including, back row: are ti
Mike Buchanan, Excel Printing; Sarah Fitts, First dors
International Title; Lisa Nash; Bill Hudson, Land Bill H
Title of Citrus County; Jeanne Green, the Grove Pest
Downtown; George Bendtsen, Insurance by George; Greel
and Kelley Paul, Wollinka Wikle Title Ins. Front row: Citrus
Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers; Crystal Ashe, sen, I
Health Center at Brentwood; Rhonda Lestinksy, Front
Nature Coast Bank; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Healt
Control; Janet Mayo, Plantation on Crystal River. and L


Fallen Heroes honored


fighting some of the vehicles available for rent at Ridin' Dirty
eam members joined by Chamber members and ambassa-
including, back row: Kelley Paul, Wollinka Wikle Title Ins.;
Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin
Control; Janet Mayo, Plantation on Crystal River; Jeanne
n, the Grove Downtown; Tom Corcoran, Life Care Center of
s County; Mike Buchanan, Excel Printing; George Bendt-
Insurance by George; Sarah Fitts, First International Title.
row: Rhonda Lestinksy, Nature Coast Bank; Crystal Ashe,
:h Center at Brentwood; Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers
.isa Nash.



Upcoming Chamber

of Commerce events


IFE I


go] r .


The official ribbon-cutting and opening ceremonies for the
Fallen Heroes Monument took place on Saturday, Feb. 2,
with local community members and organizer Vinnie De Rosa.
For more information, visit www.citruscountyfallenheroes
.org or call 888-738-7381.


9I"like"us on
Sfacebook


7


On this weeks Chamber Chat...
*Sharon Skeele-Hogan from the City of Inverness
shares some upcoming local events like Friday
Night Thunder, the 10th Annual Car & Truck
Show, St. Patricks Day festivities and the Taste
of Inverness.
* Kelly Gill from the Citrus County Animal
Services tells us how their new Mobile Adoption
Unit is bringing the shelter animals to you!
*On our "Chamber Cooks" segment Chef Joseph
Perruccio from Cedar Creek is going to make a
tasty Tomato Basil Pasta Salad. Delish!
You have 3 chances to watch Chamber Chat
Monday 6pm-- Thursday 8am-- Friday 1pm
If you would like your business or local event featured
on Chamber Chat-- at no cost to you--
Email Melissa Benefield at Spotlightmelissa@aol.com
"LIKE" Chamber Chat on Facebook for clips of past
segments and updates on our weekly show!


r-L ORAL .C-ZTy.- r
J0JIN_ US-for-1wo-days of
famlly-fun in PFloral Parkil
The 26th annual Strawberry
Festival brings to town more
than 100 craft booths, great
food. Ure entertainment. a. -_
active kids area., antique car.-.
shows, local Ferris Farms
strawberry flats,- the&popular
Strawberry Princess Pageant
and of cou.rse. the famous
STRAWBERRY Sl.OR-TCAKEI -


*LOR ZDA
PRESENTED BT


-D..
.. CITRUS DISPOSAL-
SPONSORED BY:
li p7r r.,v P FP7.7li.
-* -
-- 7
-- --- CITRUS COiNn


Thursday, Feb. 28 -
Membership Drive for
Business Leaders of
Tomorrow, 6 to 8 p.m.,
SUNCOAST PLUMBING &
ELECTRIC, Homosassa.


Thursday, March 7 Business After Hours,
5 to 7 p.m., with INVERNESS ROTARY at the
Historic Courthouse in Inverness.
Friday, March 8 Chamber lunch, 11:30 a.m.
to 1 p.m. at CITRUS HILLS GOLF & COUNTRY
CLUB featuring a special guest speaker with a
moving personal story.
Wednesday, March 20, and Thursday,
March 21 Legislative Days in
TALLAHASSEE. Make your reservations now at
www.citruscountychamber.com (see article on
this page regarding specifics.)
Check out our complete calendar for
community, entertainment and fundraising
events.


Seagrass opens doors


Josh Wooten, president and CEO of the Citrus County
Chamber, and Commissioner JJ Kenney take a moment
to congratulate Basil Green and Beverly Plein on the
official grand opening of Seagrass Waterfront Restaurant
on Wednesday, Feb. 20.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


k b - -. A


L






Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Builders Association


S=U Builder s Connection






CCBA supports Purple Heart chapter


The 18th annual Family Fish-
ing Tournament, presented by
Exclusive Platinum Sponsor
ED.S. Disposal, has been sched-
uled for April 27 and 28 at the
Homosassa Riverside Resort in
Homosassa, with the Captain's
Meeting to take place at 6 p.m.
Friday, April 26, at the same lo-
cation. This year's tournament
will boast more than $12,500 in
cash and prizes based on 125
paid boat entries. CCBA expects
to beat 2012 totals of 119 paid
boats at 98 percent prize payout.
The 17th annual Family Fish-
ing Tournament was honored to
present the Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 Military Order of
the Purple Heart (MOPH) with a
check in the amount of $1,513.79
at their National Purple Heart
Day breakfast in August 2012.
Representatives of the CCBA
had the privilege of having
breakfast with many Citrus
County Purple Heart recipients
and listening as the heroes cited
their experiences in military
service.
Leaving the breakfast in-
spired, and determined to in-
volve the MOPH members even
more in the 2013 18th annual
Fishing Tournament, the com-
mittee has announced that not
only will they donate a portion of
the proceeds to the MOPH
again, but they are working with
the Homosassa Guides Associa-
tion to arrange donated time


From left are 2012 Exclusive Platinum Sponsor Erin Ray of F.D.S. Disposal Inc., 2012 CCBA President
Wayne Bardsley of Quality Crafted Builders, 2012 Tournament Chairman Randy Clark of Clark Con-
struction Inc. and Commander Richard "Bud" Allen of the Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military Order
of the Purple Heart.
with Charter Captains for up to five veterans and their family members to fish during this


year's tournament. The veterans
will be selected by the MOPH ac-
cording to capacity limits and
time availability of the donating
captains. The CCBA and the
2013 Exclusive Platinum Spon-
sor FD.S. Disposal Inc. are
pleased at the enthusiastic re-
sponse to this part of the pro-
gram and excited to be able to
create this opportunity for the
veterans and the captains alike.
Additionally, the CCBA Family
Fishing Tournament has teamed
up with the Mel Tillis & Friends
Fishing Tournament, for a sec-
ond year, to offer the popular
Super Angler Pass. The 2013
Super Angler Pass offers fisher-
men who wish to enter both the
Mel Tillis & Friends Fishing
Tournament (scheduled for
April 13) and the CCBA 18th an-
nual Family Fishing Tourna-
ment can save $25 on each
tournament by registering at the
CCBA for the Super Angler Pass
no later than March 31.
Tournament information as
well as registration and sponsor-
ships are now available online
at the events page of www.Citrus
Builders.com, or registration
and sponsor sign up can be done
in person at the CCBA between
9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Monday
through Thursday For more in-
formation about participating in
or donating to this tournament,
please contact Executive Officer
Donna Bidlack at 352-746-9028.


Important upcoming CCBA events


The annual CCBA Bull & BBQ has
been set for 5 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 28.
Competitors signed up to date are:
AAA Roofing
Advanced Waste
Solutions
Curry's Roofing
Curry's Rooftop
BBQ
ED.S. Disposal Inc.
Gold Crest Homes
Larder & Sons
Construction
This year's event is
open to all mem-
bers of all Citrus *
County business or-


ganizations, and will be a "Master Chef"
Competition with categories being Chili,
Wings, BBQ, Best Side Dish and People's
Choice for best presentation.
L All categories except People's Choice
Best of Show will be judged by
:X celebrity judges to be announced.
Those interested in entering,
please contact Executive
Officer, Donna Bidlack at
352-302-6600 for entry
information.
Attendees are $10 per
person and can regis-
ter online at the
I S events page ofwww.
CitrusBuilders.com.


Builders flock to Parade of Homes


The 2013 Spring Parade of Homes for
Citrus and Hernando counties, pre-
sented by Gold Sponsors Cadence Bank
and Florida Public Utilities, will begin
March 16 and end March 24. The 2013
Spring Parade of Homes features 15
models from the following fine Citrus
and Hernando county builders:
0 Alexander Custom Homes
0 Artistic Homes
0 Dream Custom Homes
0 Gold Crest Homes
0 GreenPointe Homes
0 Hartland Homes
0 Pastore Custom Builders
0 Richard Van Orden Distinctive
Homes


Royal Coachman Homes
Parade of Homes models will be open
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through
Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday Of-
ficial Parade of Homes guides can be ob-
tained from 2013 Print Media Sponsor
Tampa Bay Times on Friday, March 15.
Official guides can also be picked after
March 15 at the CCBA at 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto, FL, 34461 during reg-
ular office hours of 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mon-
day through Thursday
For more information about the Pa-
rade of Homes models, virtual tours, ad-
ditional sponsors and an interactive
map, please visit www.CitrusParadeof
Homes.com or call 352-746-9028.


New members


From left are CCBA Membership Chair, Anjela Wright of Gold Crest Homes Inc., mew
members Richard Sanvenero and Pat Fitzgerald of West Coast Pools & Decking dba
Florida Pools & Pavers, and CCBA President Randy Clark of Clark Construction Inc.
New member not present was Affiliate Ricci Diaz of Sherwin Williams.


Spike Club


Associate Vice President Dan Kern, center, receives a New Spike pin from Spike Club
President Rich Gelfand of Sherwin Williams, left, and President Elect Randy Clark, right.
CCBA members become Spike Club members by recruiting six or more members within
two years and/or assisting with renewing members.


Renewing members


3


Renewing members, from left, are: John Porter of Porter's Locksmithing (10 years), Gaston Hall of Hall Brothers of Citrus County Inc. (25 years), Bart Lucas of Ro-mac
Lumber & Supply (8 years), Dennis Jenkins of Pro-Line Tile (18 years), Ryan Bishara of Suncoast Plumbing & Electric (15 years), Ken Lindquist of Ken Lindquist Corp. on
behalf of Affiliates Lance Peavy, Rosemarie Lindquist and Ken Lindquist Jr. (2 years), Membership Chair Anjela Wright of Gold Crest Homes and President Elect Randy Clark
of Clark Construction Inc. Renewing members not present were: Bay Area Air Conditioning (33 years), City Electric Supply (3 years), Don Poss Roofing Inc (24 years),
Fairbanks Construction (7 years), Florida Pest Control (32 years), Flynn Builders (18 years), Hulbert Construction Co (12 years), J.A. Floyd Inc. (15 years), Lada Construction
Inc. (7 years), Nature Coast Pools Inc (18 years), Paul LaFond Fine Homes (29 years), Smart Interiors II LLC (8 years), Surfaces Flooring Inc. (7 years), Richard Clay,
Architect (1 year), Waste Pro of Florida Inc. (2 years), White Aluminum Inc. (32 years) and Winkel Construction Inc. (13 years).





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Follow Girl Scout's goals


F lipping through the latest
issue of Mental Floss maga-
zine, I was drawn to the
"Work Study" Q & A with Girl Scout
Kiara Hubbard of New York City's
Troop 3054. The feature was titled,
"Cookies Are For Closers."
It seems the average Girl Scout
in the Big Apple peddles about 45 \
boxes of cookies a year Last year,
13-year-old Kiara sold more than Laura
eight times that amount WORK
What's her secret? More impor- CONNE
tantly, what can a newly Thin-
Minted teen teach us about waging
a successful job-search campaign?
Turns out, plenty.
First, set clear objectives.
Kiara said "each new season, I try to sell 50
more boxes than I did the previous year ...
Most Girl Scouts want to sell a lot of cookies,
but I always have to remind myself that I have
to be realistic. If I see 200 boxes one season,
then it's not realistic to set a goal of 1,000 boxes
the next"
That kind of objective is "SMART:" Specific,
measurable, attainable, relevant, time-bount
Specific: Be precise about what is to be
accomplished.
Measurable: Set a criteria for knowing
when you have achieved it
Attainable: Challenge but within reach of
goal. (Or, as Kiara said, realistic)
Relevant: Be aligned with your personal
mission or needs.
Time-Bound: Attach time frames or dead-
lines for when the job will be completed.
Ultimately, your big picture goal is to get a
job. But without clearly articulated objectives,
a roadmap if you will, it is hard to know how to
get there, or where to start
A SMART objective, for example, could be,
"By March 15,1 I will create a professional-look-
ing resume and cover letter that follows the
proper format recommended by my Work-
force Connection placement specialist" Or "I
will attend three job fairs in the next six
months and meet with at least a dozen hiring
managers."
Next, Kiara said she prepared for her
cookie campaign by making what she de-
scribed as her "hot and cold" lists.
"People who I see often go on the hot side,"
Kiara said. "People who I'm not that close with
or who I don't speak to that often are on the
cold side."
Whether she knows it or not, this is a key
technique for building and working social net-
works to connect you to job openings, intro-
duce you to hiring managers or provide
valuable insight about the company where you
hope to work
Sure, you still will have to apply electroni-
cally via the corporate website or online
through the Employ Florida Marketplace. But
reaching out or making a warm call is a good
way to connect with hiring managers or at the
least, when properly done, lay the groundwork
for a warmer reception.
Lisa Rangel, managing director and
founder of Chameleon Resumes, noted during
a Workforce Innovation webinar, "This isn't
easy, but as a result, not everyone is doing it"
Translation: Stand out from the crowd. If
you do it right, you will stand out in a good way.
The caveat here is do it right A human re-
sources manager recently told me about an
applicant who, shortly before applying, invited
her to join his professional network on


I
I


I


buffalo nickels, Mercury
dimes, silver quarters,
half-dollars and silver
coins from the late 1800s
and early 1900s. I have far
too many to pay
for a "coin by
c coin" appraisal.
I would like to
sell these coins
to a collector,
but I don't know
how to go about
finding a credi-
ble and trust-
worthy dealer
Villiams who would pay
APRT me a fair and
reasonable
M EY price for the en-
tire lot. Face
value of the coins is $500 to
$600. Can you please pro-
vide some advice and
guidance? -Reader inAt-
lanta
Dear Reader: Unfortu-
nately, it is likely your
coins, unless they are un-
circulated, would be val-
ued only for the silver they
contain. The silver dollars,
wheat pennies, buffalo
nickels and Mercury
dimes may have a little nu-
mismatic value, but possi-
bly not as much as the
"junk value" of the silver.
I wish I could recom-
mend someone to you, but
for the modest amount of
silver you hold, I think
you're going to have to
deal with a local coin
dealer. Go to two or three
and let them make an
offer.


Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.
com or to Smart Money,
PO. Box 7150, Hudson, FL
34674. Questions of gen-
eral interest will be an-
swered in future columns.


LinkedIn. He did the same with
several other employees at her
company And then, without estab-
lishing a credible relationship,
bombarded them with demands
for preferential consideration and
insider information about the hir-
ing process.
This is clearly not the right way
to lay the groundwork for a warmer
Byrnes reception. Every parent of
FORCE teenagers or young adults will rec-
-CTION ognize that tactic: you seldom hear
from them, and they screen your
calls and texts, when out of the
blue they contact you, suddenly all sweetness
and solicitous. Because bam! They want some-
thing. You see right through this ploy and hir-
ing managers will, too.
Three final takeaways I gleaned from Kiara
the Girl Scout: closing the deal requires opti-
mizing your resources, dedication and serious
time management
Kiara said she spends two to three hours
every day of the week selling cookies by "going
door to door, calling, mailing and texting cus-
tomers."
First, you will notice she doesn't just rely on
one approach setting up a card table in
front of the grocery store, for example but
leverages a diverse mix of tactics to reach her
target audience.
Second, this definitely involves a lot of ef-
fort and a goodly amount of time more than
20 hours a week in Kiara's case. And that's not
always easy to manage when juggling piano
lessons, maintaining good grades in her hon-
ors program and everything else life throws
her way
Ask yourself, when it comes to your job-
search, how diverse is your campaign? Do you
scan the ads in Monster com and leave it at
that? Do you post your resume on a job board
and hope employers will knock on your door
like a Girl Scout eager to sell cookies?
Opportunity isn't apt to come knocking on
your door unless, as Rangle put it, you "engage
in activities to find opportunities and put your-
self out there for opportunity to find you."
If you need help, we have got you covered. If
you haven't done so already, register on
www.employflorida.com and contact us at 352-
637-2223 or 800-434-JOBS to book an appoint-
ment with a placement specialist
Next, check out our full calendar of free em-
ployability workshops at www.Workforce
ConnectionFL.com and sign up for any ses-
sions striking your interest You will also want
to follow us on Twitter @WorkforceCLM to get
the latest job alerts, tips and information about
upcoming hiring events.
Lastly, plan to attend the second annual
Spring Fling Job Fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
March 27 at the College of Central Florida's
Citrus campus in Lecanto. This will be your
opportunity to meet with local employers who
are hiring. We will provide more details as the
date nears.
As I mentioned earlier, finding work takes a
lot of work But chew on this: what Kiara the
Closer does for cookies, you can certainly do to
land your next job.


Laura Byrnes is a certified workforce profes-
sional and communications manager at
Workforce Connection. Contact her at 352-
291-9559 or 800-434-5627, ext 1234, or
lbyrnes@workforceconnectionfl.com.


JOBS
Continued from Page Dl

Huber said he got help when he
left Fort Polk, but admits he waited
too long to seek it He said he was too
busy on many days to worry about
following through on the advice.
"I definitely wasn't focused on it,
and I wasn't prepared for such a
lengthy ordeal that is applying for a
real, sustainable job," said Huber,
who served in Baghdad in 2008.
At the Oklahoma City job fair,
Jacob Clark, 25, had strong praise
for the job counseling he got when
he ended his Air Force career six
months ago. He now works as a
forklift operator and hopes to land
a job maintaining airplanes.
"I'm used to working with my
hands," Clark said. "Planes are
everywhere. They all need avionics
maintenance."
But he said civilian employers re-
quire a different kind of license that
is difficult and time-consuming to get
Michael Jackson, 27, of Oklahoma
City and a former corporal in the
Marine Corps, said the transition-
ing classes helped a little bit, but
he's still without a job.



KERESE
Continued from Page Dl

can bring it with you to any future
classes you might take, then you can
learn on the computer you will use
at home. Finding someone to teach
you at home might not be the best
idea. I just wouldn't want you invit-
ing anyone into your home without
knowing them that well. I suggest
asking the teacher at a class to stay
after class to show you something
you didn't understand.
Dear Danielle: First, is Nook a
Kindle? Second, I have a book with
Amazon, how do I download it to my
Nook? Nookindle-fused
Dear Nookindle: A Nook is not a
Kindle. They are, however, both e-
readers. Nook was developed by
Barnes and Noble and the Kindle
was developed by Amazon.
If you have a Nook, there is un-
fortunately no easy way to read a


Dear Bruce: I have
been a regular
reader of your col-
umn and have learned a
great deal. One of the
things you say is
to always be
represented
when buying a r.
house. I'm as- f
suming you r
mean when a .
mortgage is in I
place. We are
buying a condo-
minium and
plan to pay cash Bruce X
for it. We are SM,
buying directly
from the devel- MOI
oping company
Since we are paying cash,
is an attorney vital in this
situation? Reader, via
email
Dear Reader: Has a cat
got whiskers? Of course,
you need an attorney,
whether you have a mort-
gage in place or are paying
cash.
You are spending a sub-
stantial amount of money
in a real transaction. Even
if you pay cash, you will
sign a number of docu-
ments agreeing to terms
the condominium associa-
tion imposes, etc. For the
tiny amount of money the
attorney will cost, it is to
your advantage to hire
one, if for nothing else as
an insurance policy. If
something goes wrong,
your recourse would be
against the attorney, who
undoubtedly has insur-
ance.
Dear Bruce: I have a
coin collection from my
days as a paperboy in the
1960s, as well as assorted
coins from small inheri-
tances. The collection in-
cludes wheat pennies,


Associated Press
Janet Falk, a public relations professional, rides the Roosevelt Island tramway
with a Manhattan view behind her Feb. 21 in New York. Falk applied for a
public relations job at a New York City law firm two years ago, but the recruiter
told her she wouldn't be considered because she had been unemployed for more
than three months, Falk said.


Unemployed complain


they need job to find a job


Associated Press

NEW YORK Help wanted. Qual-
ifications: Must already have a job.
It's a frustrating catch for those out
of work in an era of high unemploy-
ment: looking for a job, only to find
some employers don't want anyone
who doesn't already have one.
But after four years of above-
average joblessness in the U.S., ef-
forts to bar such practices by employ-
ers have met with mixed results.
While New Jersey, Oregon and
Washington, D.C., have passed laws
making it illegal to discriminate
against the unemployed, New York
City's billionaire-businessman mayor
vetoed Friday what would have been
the most aggressive such measure in
the country. Similar proposals have
stalled in more than a dozen other
states and Congress.
Advocates for the unemployed say
such hiring practices are unfair, par-
ticularly to those who have been laid
off because of the economic crunch
and not through any fault of their
own. Businesses, though, say the ex-
tent of such practices is exaggerated,
hiring decisions are too complicated
to legislate, and employers could end
up defending themselves against du-
bious complaints.
Nationally, more than 1 in 3 unem-
ployed workers has been looking for
at least six months, according to the
federal Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Janet Falk said when she applied for
a public relations job at a New York
law firm two years ago, the recruiter
told her she wouldn't be considered
because she had been out of work for
more than three months. The recruiter
was being paid to find candidates who
were in jobs or just out of them.
"My personal view is that hiring is


ONLINE
Hiring Our Heroes program:
www.hiringourheroes.org
VetJobs board: www.vetjobs.
corn

"It's been pretty tough," Jackson
said. "I've had a lot of no re-
sponses."
He sounded encouraged though
by the recent announcement from
Walmart, stating it planned to hire
100,000 people in the next five
years. Jackson may not exactly fit
the company's hiring criteria be-
cause he left the military more than
a year ago.
"Walmart would be the career I
would be looking for," he said.
Schmiegel said the second prob-
lem he sees most frequently among
young veterans is the desire to go
home regardless of job prospects.
"They are making a decision of
the heart," Schmiegel said. "They
are not going to where the jobs are.
They are not going to the industries
that are hiring."
His organization has developed a
computer website with Google and
various federal agencies designed to
point veterans to the 100 fastest-


book downloaded from Amazon.
When you purchase books for your
e-reader (your Nook), make sure
you purchase from wwwbarnes
andnoble.com and you will be fine.
The book you downloaded from
Amazon will be readable from your
computer. Or if you have a smart
phone, you also can download the
Kindle app and read it on that de-
vice, or for that matter, any device
that has the ability to download the
Kindle app. Like a laptop or a tablet.
Dear Danielle: You are very
sweet to help your grandma like you
are doing. I wanted to give you some
advice on your efforts. One of the
bigger problems with aging is short-
term memory loss. It's the reason
older folks cannot remember where
they put their glasses, use the wrong
clicker for the TV forget if they took
their medication, etc. Most folks de-
velop tricks to aid themselves with
this.
Elderly people who are just
learning should have numbered in-


like musical chairs, and if only the peo-
ple who are already on the dance floor
are playing, then the long-term unem-
ployed can't get in the game," said Falk,
who was laid off four years ago. She
now runs her own consulting business.
An October 2011 search of New York
City-based job listings found more
than a dozen explicitly requiring can-
didates to be employed, Manhattan
Borough President Scott Stringer's of-
fice said. A broader review by the Na-
tional Employment Law Project found
150 ads were restricted to or aimed at
people currently working.
As for why, experts said employers
may think unemployed applicants'
skills have atrophied, they lost their
jobs because of their own shortcom-
ings, or they will jump at any job offer
and then leave as soon as something
better comes along.
But '"don't apply, don't even try' is
the opposite of American values,"
New York City Council Speaker
Christine Quinn said when the meas-
ure passed last month. She said Fri-
day she expects the City Council will
override Mayor Michael Bloomberg's
veto within a month.
Bloomberg called the measure a
well-intended but misguided effort
that would create more lawsuits than
jobs.
"Hiring decisions frequently in-
volve the exercise of independent,
subjective judgment about a prospec-
tive employee's likely future per-
formance," he said in a statement.
And unlike other characteristics em-
ployers are generally banned from con-
sidering, such as an applicant's race,
religion or gender, "the circumstances
surrounding a person's unemployment
status may, in certain situations, be rel-
evant to employers when selecting
qualified employees," he said.


growing cities and the five or six in-
dustries within those communities
that are hiring the most The aim is
to push veterans to use their educa-
tional benefits to get training in a
high-demand field and then relocate.
Curtis Coy, an undersecretary at
the Veterans Affairs Department,
said expanded educational benefits
are playing an important role in
lowering the unemployment rate as
hundreds of thousands of veterans
attend college through a program
that covers tuition and fees, hous-
ing, books and relocation expenses.
Participation in the Post 9/11 GI Bill
program has jumped from 366,000
in 2010 to 646,000 in the latest year.
Some of those enrolled are spouses
or children of a veteran. The pro-
gram allows veterans to transfer
their benefits to immediate family
members if they have six years of
service and commit to another four.
Coy said he's confident the em-
ployment trend is moving in the
right direction. He said younger vet-
erans often need a little time to fig-
ure out what they're going to do
when they get out of the service.
"I'm a 24-year veteran so I'm
acutely aware of standing there at
the steps going, 'So what do I do
now?'" he said.


structions printed in large font on a
piece of paper. Short-term memory
loss cannot be helped or fixed.
Young people have a tendency to
get frustrated with this, because on
the surface, grandparents may be
sharp as a tack, and function per-
fectly well.
My dad did this for my Mom, so
she could use their complicated
TV/satellite system when he went
into the hospital. (It is a little com-
plicated as they have an antennae
system and satellite, and a DVD
player and several clickers). -
Tipster for the non-hipster
Dear Tipster: Thanks for the tip!
Taking notes is especially helpful to
everyone, not just older people. I
make notes for myself all the time!


Send your questions to Danielle
Kerese at dkerese@chronicle
online, com or mail them to
1624 N Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 24429.


Always retain lawyer


when buying a home


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 D5


*j
I












i To place an ad, call 563-5966


sin
'a ~ ~ -
.w. *



~v

~: ~

~a

b.

'I


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


F (3 5 2 ) ... .. .. .. ..... ...... .. .. .... .... .... .. ... .... .... .


Tom's Pinochle Club
Looking for some good
players to fill in on
Thursday nights. If
interested please call
352-527-9632.



Adult Student
Looking for pt work
MWF & some Satur-
days can help with
driving,cooking, nanny,
elder assistance,
cleaning, office work
(office software certified)
Call Melissa
352-949-7033 with best
time to call.
BOSTON WHALER
12ft w/20hp Johnson
Motor, galvanized
Trailer, all in exc. cond.
$1900, Will take guns
on trade 906-285-1696
Carpet Cleaners
Positions open now
at Stanley
Steemer.
Clean Fl MVR record
22 yrs or older. Drug
free, background
check. Benefits
include Paid training,
401k, holiday pay and
more!!
Apply at 911 Eden
Dr. Inverness, or
email
ci.whiteia
steemer.com
China Hutch 2 pc,
2 doors on hutch,
very good condition
$150; (352) 527-0137
GENERATOR
portable, 5550 watts
8550 starting watts
never used $350
352-795-2399
Laudromat for Sale
CrystalRiver,Dropoff
Svc. Lg, Clean, Well
Est. 352-795-2399
MERCURY
2001 Grand Marquis
107K mi, looks & runs
good, AC, good tires
$2995 850-653-5497
0- Need Help!
Certified CNA avail for
prnv duty in-home Health
Care. (352) 453-7255



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087



DOG, MIXED BREED
must be only dog.
352-445-6368 or
352-564-0595
FLOAT PONTOON
no motor, no trailer
needs some work
pls call 859-229-5667
or eve's 352-447-4485
Large 3 Tiered
fountain, needs new
pump. First come, first
serve.(352) 746-2210


- g so a
----^Oj


BlaCK LaOraaor IOST
on W Homosassa Tr
close to Rock Crusher
2/20 evening. 8 yrs
old, neutered. Ans to
Clyde, gentle dog
(352) 476-7947
Crystal River &
Homosassa Springs
area, lost gold St. Pe-
tersburg Times award
ring, green stone
863 697 6772.



Cat Found
male, orange tabby
strips, very friendly
found near feed store
on Grover Cleav-
eland, Homosassa
call to identify
352-228-9035


Found Girls Coat
Like new Gray
on Croft
(352) 341-8479
FOUND: Friendly male
mix puppy. He was in
my yard in Crystal River
near the mall. Please
call to identify
352-697-2795.





(f" AVAILABLE
Pool Supply Store
W/ Service and Repair!
Cash Flowing over a
$100.000!! Call Pat
*(813) 230-7177-*




FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001lb
Delivered 352-795-0077




Adult Student
Looking for pt work
MWF & some Satur-
days can help with
driving,cooking, nanny,
elder assistance,
cleaning, office work
(office software certified)
Call Melissa
352-949-7033 with best
time to call.




PRE SCHOOL
TEACHERS NEEDED
Exp req., CDA Pre-
ferred (352) 341-1559




MEDICAL
OFFICE/FRONT
DESK
West Coast Eye Insti-
tute, just off Highland
Blvd, in Inverness.
Looking for a bright
individual, with a smile
and good people skills.
Full or part-time. Fill out
application or leave
resume at the office.
726-6633










Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966





ARNP LPN

FLORIDA CANCER
SPECIALISTS
NOW HIRING
APPLY ON LINE
www.flcancer.com

Dental Assistant
Must be proficient in
crown & bridge
temporizing
&
Dental Hygienist
Call 352-465-3008
or fax resume to
352-465-3009

MEDICAL
OPPORTUNITIES

Billing Clerk
Receptionist
Medical Asst.
Scanning Asst.
Blind Box 1792P
c/o Citrus
County
Chronicle, 1624
N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal
River, FL 34429


Dental Assistant
30 hours per week
Certified and
Experienced,
Coleman Area
1-800-469-4467

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

PHYSICAL
THERAPY
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center of
Citrus County in
Lecanto
PHYSICAL THERAPIST
PHYSICAL THERAPY
ASSISTANT
PRN positions availa-
ble for qualified
physical therapists
and physical
therapy assistants
with current state
license. We offer
great pay and ben-
efits in a team- ori-
ented environment.
Melanie Reyna
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln
Lecanto, FL 34461
Melanie_Reyna@
LCCA.comn
Visit us: LCCA.COM
EOE/M/F/V/D -
38347

Life




RN/LPN
CNA/HHAs

Needed for home
care. Make your own
schedule.
888/783-1133
csi.recruit@cgsi.cc
www.csicaregiver.
com _

RN's, PT & OUT'S
LPN's, Phsych
Nurse, & ST

CITRUS &
HERNANDO
(352) 794-6097

SUNSHINE GARDENS
Assisted Living
Facility

Is hiring
CNAs
we pay a higher rate
for the best
ADDIv at the facility:
311 NE 4th Ave
Crystal River
Or download an
application at: www.
sawsenlors.com
click on the
"About Us" tab
to download the
application
Fax to: 563-0239




INSURANCE
AGENT WANTED

Looking for licensed
220 or 440 customer
service agent,
salary plus benefits.
email resume to:
david@birdinsurance
group.com

SUNSHINE GARDENS
Assisted Living
Facility
Is now hiring for an
Administrative
Assistant/
Receptionist
Candidate must be
good on the com-
puter and be able
to work in a diverse
environment
Sunshine Gardens
Assisted Living
Facility
311 NE 4th Ave.
Crystal River, Fla
FAX RESUME TO:
352-563-0239
OR email to:
marceymast@
sgseniors.com


EXPERIENCED
SERVERS
Old World Restaurant
Floral City, apply in
person (352) 344-4443

TWISTED OAKS
GRILL
P/T Exp. Only

that can work all
aspects of a
restaurant, call
between 9 & 11 am
(352) 746-6882





CHSalNieHE


ADVERTISING
INSIDE SALES
Representative
The Citrus County
Chronicle is now
accepting applications
for an
Advertising
Inside Sales
Representative.
u Must have mini-
mum of 2 years sales
experience with
proven sales results.
M Must be able to
maintain current
account base as well
as prospecting for
new clients over the
phone.
- Fast paced envi-
ronment that requires
ability to multi task
with ease.
* Computer profi-
ciency a must.
w Excellent organiza-
tional and customer
service skills.

Fax cover letter and
resume to HR at:
(352)564-2935
or email:
djkamlot@chronicle
online.corn

Final applicant must
undergo a drug
screening. EOE

COMMERCIAL
INSURANCE CSR
Commercial Insurance
CSR and inside sales
position needed.
Knowledge of AMS360
preferred. Email resume
to Tracy Fero at
insurance.com
or call 352-422-2160

ENERGETIC
RETAIL SALES

W/Sales Experience
for gift shop in
Inverness, min 30 hrs.
Mail ResumeTo:
PO Box 1282,
Inverness, FL 34451

Nick Nicholas
Ford Lincoln
In Crystal River
SALES
Good Benefits,
401 K,
& Medical Plans.
Retail sales exp.
helpful, will train.
We're looking for a
long term relation-
ship. Apply in person
Mon.- Sat. 9-5.
2440 US. 19 Crystal
River, Florida.
Just North Of The
Mall.
Drug Free Workplace


NOW HIRING
Entry-level to Mgmt.
Exp. Not req'd. Train-
ing provided. Benefit
package offered.
$600-$850/wk. Call
Ashley 352-436-4460






CARPENTER

Carpenters with 5
years experience,
duties include, but
not limited to: wood
& metal framing,
hardie siding & trims.
Work in Marion,
LakeSumter,&
surrounding areas.
Must have own
transportation
to job sites. DFWP
352-690-6334 please
come in and fill out
an application at
2531 NW 35th Street,
Ocala, FL. 34475


Carpet Cleaners
Full Time Positions
Stanley Steemer
Clean Fl MVR record
22 yrs or older. Drug
free, background
check. Benefits
Paid training,
401k, holiday pay
911 Eden Dr
Inverness,
fax 726-8895
ci.whitefa)
steemer.com

EXP MECHANIC
Must have tools
Must have D.lic./Trans
apply in person
American Auto
8696 W. Halls River Rd

FRAMER WANTED

For immediate
employed. Experi-
ence Reauired, PT
may lead to FT.
Fax resume to
352-637-4141 or call
(352) 637-4138


General Con-
struction workers
and Laborers
Needed

Please send resume
to: ecombee@
mtacfl.com





Manufacturer of A/C
grilles, registers and
diffusers is currently
accepting
applications for
experienced
Assembly workers.
Must be able to
read tape measure
and assemble parts
using hand tools,
hands and machin-
ery. Welding
experience a plus.
Applv in Person
(Mon-Fri between
the hours of
8:00 am to 3:00 pm).
Metal Industries,
400 W. Walker Ave.,
Bushnell, FI133513.
Excellent benefits
package, 40 1k.
DFW, EOE.


Key Training
Center
F/T Radio
Announcer
for local radio sta-
tion. Experience
preferred. High
school diploma/
GED required.
Apply in Person at
Key Training Center
Business Office-5399
W Gulf to Lake Hwy,
Lecanto FL 34461.
*EOE*


Now Hiring !
Pest Control
Technician

must have valid Dr.
Lic. & good driving
record, self motivated,
punctual, physically
able to do light man-
ual labor. Exp. pref.
Will train the right
person. PIs. Call
352-726-2840


STEEL CUTTER /
WELDER

Inter County Recycling
in Lecanto, Fl. is looking
for an experienced Steel
Cutter, with Welding
Experience also.
Full time, Pays $13.50
per hour. Drug Free
Workplace.
E-mail resumes to
Resumel 801 @yahoo
.com, No walk-in's or
phone calls


STUCCO
Mechanic Wanted
Crew leader
position
All inquiries
Please call:
(3521 746-5951





r-----
NEWSPAPER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and
other newspapers
for home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per
day.
Must have insured
and reliable
vehicle -
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up
with a cap Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product
Apply in Person
1624 N
Medowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pm
Newspaper
carriers are
independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle



Ln mil


APPT. SETTERS
NEEDED
$500. Sign on Bonus.
Great Commission Pay
and weekly bonuses
Call Bob 352-628-3500
GENERAL
LABORER
F/T, Clean Lic. Drug
Test, GED required
Apply At
8189 S. Florida Ave.,
Floral City. 8AM-3PM

STORE CLERK
All Applicants must
have Computer Skills,
Cash Handling,
Customer Service
Background Check
is required.
Pay Day Cash
Advance& All Star
Rentals
(352) 564-0700



CARE GIVER
Dependable for 115 lb
woman. 5p-8p, 6 days
week. Send Resume
whani
tamoabav.rr.com
Secretary
Administrator

office exp. preferred
have exceptional
computer skills,
including Quick
books, Excel &
Microsoft Power
point, Send resume
to: janmetcalf
@embarq.mail.com



MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED
Train to become a
Medical Office Assistant.
NO EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online train-
ing gets you Job ready
ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294



AVAILABLE
Pool Supply Store
W/ Service and Repair!
Cash Flowing over a
$100000!! Call Pat
*(813) 230-7177**



Laudromat for Sale
CrystalRiver,Dropoff
Svc. Lg, Clean, Well
Est. 352-795-2399






Need ai joh
or ia
qualified
employee?

This area's
#1
employment
source!


Classifieds


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED

30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED

40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
* We custom build-
We are the factory
* Meets & exceeds
2010 FI. wind codes.
* Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
SAll major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com




Antique Wooded
Tool Box
Loaded with Machinist
tools $400
352-344-1713

TOASTMASTER
TOASTER 1940's
Circa MODEL 1B14
Good Cond.
$25.00 352-601-7816

WESTINGHOUSE
TOASTER 1940's
Circa Good Cond.
Model TO-501 B
$25.00 601-7816




Nascar Team Caliber
dicast collectable
cars $200. Qty 25
various yrs. 97-01
Monster IncCapillar
Big Kmart352-201-2120

,A


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fie d ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


700 50's & 60's LP's
Record Player & CD
Recorder $350 for all
352-527-6955



CLOTHES WASHER.
General Electric. Works
fine. $75. 527-1239
DRYER$100 with 30
day full warranty call/text
352-364-6504
HOT WATER HEATER
30 gal. Needs thermo
50.00 linda 341-2271
NEW BATH TUB
5 FEET /LIGHT
TAN/100.00 FIRM
LINDA 341-2271
REFRIGERATOR GE
18 cubic ft. Freezer and
refrigerator work fine.
$75 OBO. 527-1239
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179
STOVE Black Kenmore
glass top,30",self
cleaner, $100
352-563-8033 after 5:30
TAPPAN ELECTRIC
DOUBLE
OVEN/RANGE. Ovens
and elements work fine.
$75 OBO. 527 1239
VACUUM Dirt Devil
"Jaguar"
Model 085830
$30.00 obo 419-5453
WASHER$100 with 30
day full warranty.
call/text 352-364-6504
Whirlpool. Electric
Range, self cleaning,
broiler never used 2
large & 2 small heat-
ing elements, unit in
excel. cond. works
perfectly. No dings
$100. (352) 489-4649
Wine Cooler
Holds 4 6 Bottles
Glass Front Door
Asking 60.00 obo
352-601-7816



12" CUT OFF WHEELS
5/32x20mm 3 metal
1 masonary
all 4 $35.00
352-586-8657
14" Abrasive Cut-Off
Saw 408511T
$50
Craftsman 4 drawer
work table, steel top
$75. 352-447-6139
Auto-Repair
Manuals 1981,
1977- 1983
$50.
352-447-6139
BANDSAW 6"
CRAFTSMAN
VG to EX cond w/legs
$100. Call 527-6425
BENCH GRINDER Ash-
land industrial 5" bench
grinder. 3450 rpm.
$35.00 352-527-7840
WERNER
FIBERGLASS LADDER
New 6' with tag load ca-
pacity 225 Ibs asking
$50 352-419-5549
Wood Lathe
Chizzles Included
$100.
(352) 628-9175



SONY
42" FLAT SCREEN
TV $100
(347) 266-9328
TECHNICS DUAL
STEREO CASSETTE
DECK GOOD
CONDITION $30
352-613-0529


Some


pets


sell right


Saway.











Others take a


little more time.


Couo tOt.






Find out what these values can mean for
your career.

HOSPICE RN OPPORTUNITIES

Weekends, IT & PT
Nights, IT & PT
Evenings, FT & PT


OPEN HOUSE
On-site interviews will be conducted

Thursday, February 28th,
3pmn-7pm

3545 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465

If you can't make it to our open house
or would like more information,
please call our recruiter, Cynthia at:
800-486-8784 or apply online at:

www.HPH-Hospice.org/careers






EOE/DFWP
)OE4VE


I


I VEHODAI


D6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


CI. T REU 5 'e c 0 0 I E
CH RO-)N I CLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


YAMAHA RECEIVER
GOOD CONDITION
$85 352-613-0529
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 GOOD
CONDITION $100
352-613-0529



2 Doors Framed
$40., obo
12 Windows Large
$250 obo
Will separate
(352) 270-8044
7 Windows I Door,
w/ upperslide/ open
window, all bronze in
color $250 obo
(352) 795-9187



40 Sweep States
Computers/ Monitors/
Desks/Chairs/Loader
and Server. Best Offer
(352) 341-2200
CHAIR- Office Max,
grey managers chair,
great shape, $20
(352)212-1596


Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




4' Bush Hog
good condition
352-422-4548




Patio Furniture Set
14 pieces, 40 x 66
glass top table with
umbrella, 6 chairs,
2 recliners, 2 glass top
side table, 2 ottomans
black, anodized
metal frame w/ taupe
mesh fabric, very
good cond. $400.
Lanai furniture, 38 x 66
table w/ marble oval
insert, can hold um-
brella 4 chairs with
taupe dble thick
cushions anodized
antique bronze metal
frame good cond
$250. (352) 382-2497


2 Swivel Rockers
Very Good Cond.
Wine Colored
$75.00, Winged
back Chair Beige
$40.00 (SMW)
352-503-7536
4 Bar Stools
Bar height swivel,
$150. Palm Tree ped-
estal table glass top
$50. 4 Large, Heavy
Oak Chairs
w/ arms $150.
(352) 422-2164



Your World
Iro.---t9 E






CHONICLE



.. i ,, I ,


-p
Bedroom Suite, 10'
wall & Pier and two
etagere's, dresser, mir-
ror, chest & armoire, pd
$6000, sacrifice $1500
765-748-4334
48" Round Oak
Pedestal Tble $90
& 6 drawer wooden
desk $50
352-726-5159
BroyHill Pecan
Dinning roomset,2 leafs,
rectangle table, 6 high
back chair, china hutch,
exec. cont. $550.00
718-666-6624
China Hutch 2 pc,
2 doors on hutch,
very good condition
$150; (352) 527-0137
Contour Adjustable
Bed, Twin, Premier
Sleep System,
variable speed
massage,w/ waves
& timer & remote
control $1,000
(352) 344-3827


#1 Employment source is

www.chronicleonline.com


CLASSIFIED


-m-
Deacon's Bench
Made from Hatch Cover
of 1900 Sailing Vessel,
Originally sold at Aber-
crombie & Fitch in NYC
$300 352-746-0100

DINETTE SET 5 pcs
Marble Top table
w/glass insert, 4 floral
padded chairs
3 pc. 7ft Wall Unit
,mirror back w/lights,
shelves, 2 side beveled
doors, 3 Glass top ta-
bles, 1 oval coffee table,
2 round end tables.
$500 for all, pls call
(352) 527-9862

ESTATE SALE Dinette
$300, 3 pc. Wall Unit
$600, Twin bed set $50,
Dining Rm Set $600,
Sofa & 2 Chairs $200,
Teak carved tables
$1500, Entertainment
Ctr. $50, Bedroom Set
$400, Computer Desk
$50, Casio Keyboard
$50 352-476-5468
Full Size 4 Piece
Bedroom Set
$100.
(352) 726-8474


FUTON
metal, light oak frame
beige mattress & cover
very good condition
$225, 352-628-2753
GRILL Older Char-Broil
2 Burner w/side burner
Good cond.
30.00 obo
352-601-7816

Leather Couch
Navy Blue, exec. cond.
$175.00, Wht leather
love seat, good condi-
tion $125.00 (SMW)
352-503-7536

LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET, In Origi-
nal Plastic, Never
Used, ORG $3000,
Sacrifice $975.
CHERRY, BED-
ROOM SET Solid
Wood, new in factory
boxes- $895
Can Deliver. Bill
(813)298-0221.

Maple Rider Rocker
w/footstool, green
cushions $50
352-795-7254


HowSo

in-ff


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Chronicle

Classifieds

In Print


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4.

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sp, if


if
a
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I


Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500
Motorized Recliner
King size,black vinyl
rocker/recliner, 7 mo
old, $400
(352) 489-6341
OAK END TABLE
measuring 22"W X
25"L, great shape.
$40.00 352-382-4727
Ornate Victorian
Bed w/dresser
$450, Oak Bar w/brass
Rails $275, good
cond.352-895-0140
Sleeper Sofa
Navy velour
ottoman and corner
chair good condition
1 round glass coffee
table and 1 sofa table
$550
352-464-2335
SOFA
brown, microsuede
1 yr. old, $275
352-746-6678
Solid Oak kitchen oval
pedestal table 58x39
w/6 chairs $175;
X-wide cushioned
wicker chair & foot-
stool, 4 pillows, $125
(352) 425-0667
STEEL DESK 22X42
top with 5 draws
very solid
needs paint $25.00
352-586-8657
Triple Dresser
w/ Mirror,
10 Drawer
Excel. Cond. $250.
(352) 220-3883
TRUNDLE BED
w/ 2 mattress'
$195; double mattress
w/ box spring & frame.
Like new, $175
(352) 586-0493
TWIN BEDS
Mattresses, Box
Springs and Frames
$75.00 each
352-382-7454
Twin Hide-A-Bed
brown tweed
exc. cond. $100
765-748-4334



HONDA
SELF-PROPELLED
LAWN MOWER 2007
HONDA HRR21 LAWN
MOWER $100FIRM
586-7222
SPREADER-
Extra-large manual,
12" tires, for seeds,
fertilizer,etc. great
shape-$25-
(352)212-1596



Staghorn Fern
4 ff diameter
excellent condition
$125.00 firm
(352) 489-6212



HOMOSASSA
Fri, Sat, Sun 7:30 2pm
scooter, fishing boat,
elec organ w/ bench
and music books, and
more! Moving sale -
everything must go!
7461 W Fair Acres PL
(325) 212-6170
INVERNESS
CLOSING SALE
CRAFTY LADY
Publix/KMart Shopp-
ing Cntr, Hwy 41
Bairgain's Galore
344-4800 10a-5p
2/23-3/1


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 D7


MM


FLORAL CITY
Saturday & Sun. 7A-2P
9659 S. Buckskin Ave.



BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING SIZES 5 &
6 SHIRTS, PANTS &
JACKETS $25
352-613-0529
KIDS SUIT Black pinned
stripped / size 12
huskey,worn once. $40
obo Linda 341-2271
Men's Durango Boots
111 D & Harley
Davidson Boots 9'/2D
both pairs $150
352-795-7254
MENS SUITS SIZES
34X30 & 36X30, $70
EACH 352-613-0529



GPS Magellan
Roadmate 5220-LM
New $85.00
352-637-5969


****195/70 R14*****
Good tread!! Only ask-
ing $60 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
--~~~235\70 R15~~--
Good tread!! Only ask-
ing $70 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
2 KAYAK PADDLES-
Seasense Brand, 96
inches, 2 piece for stor-
age, black, Ex., $30 ea.
352-28-0033
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, basket, hand
brakes & wheel locks,
folds for storage, Ex.
$50. 352-628-0033
18 Steel Framed
Folding Tables
30' x 96", $25. ea. obo
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church
(352) 746-7161
2007 HONDA
SELF-PROPELLED
LAWN MOWER
HONDA "ONE-START"
$100 FIRM 586-7222
2012 PAZZEL
INSPIRATIONAL
CREATIVE CUTTER w/
accessories. New cond.
Cost $725, asking $515
obo (352) 586-4630
BICYCLE BOYS 20"
$20 352-613-0529
CUSTOM MADE
WHITE LACE DRA-
PERIES fits windows
16'W X 84"L. perfect
condition. $50.00
352-382-4727
DOLLS & BEARS
LIKE NEW
345 Scarboro Ave.
(267) 983-5731 Cell
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001lb
Delivered 352-795-0077
FLAG- U.S. Military, in
glass/wood display
case, perfect condi-
tion-$25- (352)212-1596
Full Sofa Bed, Very
good condition $25;
Metal filing cabinet,
3 drawer, $20.
(352) 527-0137
Garden Tracker,
Wheel Horse, 16hp
Hydrostatic dr, fresh
paint, smokes, $675
OBO. Unique signed
Young Hinkle, wood
desk 1 drawer w/
chair 46x30 $125
(352) 341-5053
GENERATOR
portable, 5550 watts
8550 starting watts
never used $350
352-795-2399


FRYER- Hamilton
Beach, great shape-$20
(352)-212-1596
GERBIL CAGE
$20 352-613-0529
GOODYEAR REGATTA
CAR TIRE P225/60R16
60% TREAD ONLY
35.00 464- 0316
GPS Magellan
Roadmate 5220-LM
New $85.00
352-637-5969
Guardian Air Cooled,
Automatic stand by
Generator, by
Generac Pwr. Systems
Inc., This model is a
compact, high perfor-
mance, air cooled,
engine driven genera-
tor designed to auto-
matically supply elec-
trical power to oper-
ate critical loads
during a utility power
failure. This unit is
factory installed, in an
all weather, metal
enclosure, that is in-
tended exclusively for
outdoor installation.
The generator will
operate using either,
propane, or natural
gas, This unit comes
with product registra-
tion card. Generator
installation guidelines
book and installation
and owners manual.
2013 model, list for
3,900 this is a 2008
model w/ no to low
hours, volts 120/240
amp 130/65, W1600
3,600 rmp, suggested
retail value $2,500
Asking $,1,750 obo
(352) 382-1352
GUITAR STAND FOR 3
GUITARS- folds for stor-
age, black, Ex., $25.
352-628-0033
Homemade Quilt
Tops 5/$100;
Anne Geddes
Pictures 6/$100
(352) 795-7254
HOSPITAL BED motor-
ised $85.00 or b/o
inverness 352 6372499
JUICER- Hamilton
Beach, great
shape-$15-
(352)-212-1596
Mattress and boxspring
double bed set $55
860-2475
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Fulls $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
Mossberg 715T,
22 Long Riffle AR look
alike, 25 round clip
almost new $500.
17HMR Taurus
Revolver 8 shot, super
clean, 400 round
$500. For revolver
must have concealed
weapons permit
(352) 563-0328
NEW SKYLIGHT
BUBBLE TYPE 27+27
SMOKED POLY-
CARBONITE ONLY
50.00 464- 0316
PORCH SWING
HEAVY DUTY IT
NEEDS A (BOARD
REPLACED) ONLY
35.00 464- 0316
RYOBI 10" COM-
POUND MITER SAW-
#TS1342, 15 AMP,5500
RPM, dust bag, Ex+.,
$60. 352-628-0033
SALMON FISH
MOUNT- Natural skin,
31", Ex., $35.
352-628-0033
Scaffold $375 OBO
4 locking wheel 6 ft
352-447-1244
Wacker GP 5600
Commercial
Generator 120/240V
Low Hrs. $600.
(352) 563-0328


rwaees D ~w"y


Certified CNA avail for
prnv duty in-home Health
Care. (352) 453-7255




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374

THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469


NEED SOMEONE TO
GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?





DISAPPEAR FOR LESS
IF YOU WANT IT
TAKEN AWAY...CALL FOR A
FREE ESTIMATE TODAY! I
352-220-91 90





GENERAL
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

35 -2 1 4*


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping Dr.
appts errands etc Hablo
Espanol 813-601-8199
tw e


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
S Repairs
*Small Carpentry
0 Fencing
"i Screening
C* lean Dryer
Vents
S 4ttord',l'e & Dependable
Exp. 'ence lifelong
S 31 52.344-0905
1ll' 400-1722
wred- Lic. #37761


AAA ROOFING
Call the "Acakhmuse. "
Free Written Estimate

s 100 OFF:
!Any Re-Roof :
SMust present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 000DWEQ


COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777

DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




*BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194

A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352 422-7279 **


I-

Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
v FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


CARPET & L
a UPHOLSTERY o
CLEANING

Special izing in: 5Rooms
Carpet Stretching8. 995
Carpet Repair
352-282-1480 cell
352-547-1636 office
Free In Home Estimates
Li & Ins Lifetime Warranty


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over'Your Old OneT!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


HANDYMAN DAVEW
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067



Marcia's Best Clean
Experienced Expert
lic+ref, Free Estimates
"call 352-560-7609"
NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate $20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



All Tractor & Tree Work
Household, Equipment
& Machinery Moving
(352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



#1 Professional Leaf
vac system why rake?
wr FULL Lawn Service
Free Est 352-344-9273
BEAT ANY PRICE
Paint & Power wash
Lawn & Trees Trim
Jim (352) 246-2585
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570



AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up time.
352-220-4244


Add an artisic touch to your existing yard
'. _; or pool or plan
S something
S" omp new!
S "Often imitated,
nevel dupikated"


YOUR INTElOCKING BRICK PA VEIR SPECIALIST
COPES
POOL AND PAVER LLC
Licensed 352-400-3188
& Insured 3 W52-400-318


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570



30 yrs. Experience!
Int/Ext. Comm/Res.
Lic/Ins. Jimmy
"352-212-9067"
CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
BEAT ANY PRICE
Paint & Power Wash
Lawn & Trees Trim
Jim (352) 246-2585
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713





MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.

COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn Re-
moval 352-302-6838


SPRINKLERS & SOD
Complete Check & Ad-
just, Full System $49
(352) 419-2065



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
I time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's LAND CLEAR-
ING & TREE SERVICE
Complete tree & stump
removal hauling, demo
& tractor work. 32 yrs.
exp. (352) 220-9819
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
REAL TREE
SERVICE
(352) 220-7418
"Tax Specials"
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316


WINDOW
GENI IYE
We (lean Windows and o Whole Lot More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES x
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


I


& Online ..-.. ;.


-L C U


CH352)ONICL 563 E59 C,




(352)563-5966 'Ad


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179



Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052
HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping Dr.
appts errands etc Hablo
Espanol 813-601-8199



Your World








CHONICLE



.. ,"I 1 r, 1" I i 11 i' n,: lr


I


w w w ~ h r o n 'c lo n l ~ n~ o ~ o m







D8 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013


SLIDING SHOWER
DOORS Like new
30.00 Linda 341-2271
Window, truck
GMCrear solid
factory tinted
$50.00
352-628-4210
WINE CABINET Wood,
holds 20 bottles of wine
& has one drawer, EUC
off white, $65.00
352-249-7212
WOOD PALLETS Free
(2) 40"X48" wood
pallets.Like new. Call
352 382-2591



2 POWER LIFT
CHAIR RECLINERS
1 Med. size $250.
1 Large $325
Both excel., runs great
(352) 270-8475
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH SEAT AND
BRAKES FOLDS UP
GREAT SHAPE 75.00
464- 0316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER BRAND NEW
ONLY 25.00 464- 0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
ADJUSTABLE LEGS
ON BOTH 20.00 EACH
464- 0316
CANE ADJ. $5.00 Quad
Cane adj. $10.00.
Crutches $15.00. Alum.
walker w/ basket $20.00
(352)563-6410
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT-
RESTS AND LEG EX-
TENTIONS ONLY
100.00 464 0316
SAFETY RAIL
for bathtub
Medline Deluxe
$35.00
352-682-4210
TRAPEZE FOR ANY
BED Free standing,
excellent condition,
$100.00 (352)563-6410
WALKER good
condition
seat/basket
wheels/handbrake
$50.00 352-6284210



CASIO, ELECTRIC
PIANO/ORGAN
exc. cond. sounds great
comes w/big amplifier,
eve's $200
352-489-4844
EPIPHONE LES PAUL
STUDIO LIMITED EDI-
TION PLAYS &
SOUNDS PERFECT!
$200 OBO
352-601-6625
Kawai, SR 5
ORGAN
$600 obo
616-914-0980 cell
Crystal River
TUNER Peterson stro-
bostomp floor pedal,
most accurate tuner,
great shape,$25
(212-1596)



LOVE SEAT Like
new/Light tan with
flowers
100.00 linda 341-2271



AB LOUNGER NEARLY
NEW ONLY 30.00
464-0316,464-0316
Bowflex Extreme
$600. obo
or Trade for hand guns
(352) 249-7221
EXERCISE BIKE (DP)
UPRIGHT TYPE IT
ALSO WORKS THE
ARMS ONLY 75.00
464- 0316
TREADMILL,
WESLO, Crosswalk
5.0t,like new, $150
Call 561-234-0535



5 HP, Outboard,
by Force, with Tank
$395.
Will take Gun on trade
Also Remmington
7600 30-06 Pump, with
scope as new condition
$495. (906) 285-1696
1911 GOVT/OFFICER
45 Colt Officers slide,
Armscor Precision full
Govt frame, Black w/SS
buttons, VZ grips, ambi
safety, 2xtra grips. Buy-
ers only, must be 21.
first cash takes it !$625
LV MESSAGE.
352-586-4022


Beautiful Compact
Taurus 22 Caliber
New In Box
$350. obo
(352) 795-0088
After 11 am til 7p
BICYCLE TREK 7500
Womans, Shock Fork,
Fast and Easy, Clean,
24Speeds, $195
341-0450
BIKE RACK purchased
from Santos Bike
shop, holds 3 bikes,
used once. $100.00
firm 352-382-4727
CAMPING STOVE cole-
man 2 burner camping
stove. NEW. never
used. $50.00 firm
352-527-7840
CLUB CAR
GOLF CART
Electric w/ charger,
refurbished, new
paint, 4 seater, $2500
(803) 842-3072
CLUB CAR. 2006
wl Charger, good
tires, almost new bat-
teries, garage kept
$1500 must sell
352-527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
ECLIPSE ELLIPTICAL
space saver exercise
like new, $150
352-422-0311
EZ GO GOLF CART
Electric with charger,
2002,
Very good cond.
$1,500
352-564-2756
NISHIKI 26" RACING
BIKE SEVERAL
SPEEDS LITE.NEEDS
TIRES ONLY 75.00
464-0316
Ruger LCP
new never fired
.380 ACP, light weight
for CWP 1 box of
ammo, $450.00
352-637-0844
Schwinn Bicycle
Ladies Red 28 "
cruiser, Used once.
Asking $95
(352) 341-5053
SMITH & WESSON
.357 Highway Patrol-
man. Model # 28,
6" barrel, like new, in
original box. $475
(352) 423-0289
TRADITIONS
Buckhunter inline
50 Caliber, blk powder
$100.
(352) 447-6139



2009 24 x 9 Trailer,
tandem axel, rear ramp,
side door, AC, 200 mi
$2750 (727) 207-1619
2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1895
call 352-527-0555
Utility Trailer 8'x12'
w/loading gate
exc. cond. $750
352-341-0959



Baby stroller
Dark blue deluxe model
$25 860-2475
GIRLS SIZE 12 MOS.
34 pieces in all. Shorts,
shirts,pj's,one piece out-
fits, more $25.00
352400-5650


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966


CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
Looking to buy
6X12 Enclosed TrIr
(352) 270-9187
Old Black & White
Snapshot and/or
photos (269) 275-4698
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


Robbie Ray
Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777
"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"

Make-overs,
Color, Foiling,
Precision Cuts,
Avant Garde
hairstyles and
updo's.

Paul Mitchell
Certified.



2 Maltese Puppies
Left, 1 female $650.
1 Male $600, CKC reg.
will have Fl. Health
Cert.. Call to come
play with them,
(352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258
8 Month Old
MALE YORKIE
CKC registered all
shots, house trained,
loveable, affection-
ate Silver & brown
$600. (352) 341-4009










BLUE
Blue, nicknamed
Boo-Boo, is a 7-8 y.o.
Australian cattle
dog mix, with beau-
tiful blue eyes. He
came to the shelter
because his family
lost their home.
He is neutered
and housebroken,
weighs about 50
pounds and is very
easy to handle.
His goal is to be a
"couch potato".
He is very friendly
and affectionate
and gives lots of
kisses. Blue is actu-
ally the perfect dog
for an older person
or couple who
want a gentle
companion dog.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.
CHICKS & DUCKLINGS
Delaware, Buff, Silkie,
Frizzle Chicks $4.50ea
Cayuga, Pekin, Buff
Ducklings $7ea.
all are straight run.
727-517-5337
(Brooksville)





YOU r"\\irid first

Need a.jiob
ir a
qualified
employee?


This area's

#1
employment
source!


CHlpNICLE


DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.comrn






* (352) 634-5039 *

Fish Tanks,
and stands,
352-447-1244

FREE BORDER
COLLIE MIX
2 year old
female, border collie
mix. Free to good
home. Great with
kids and other pets.
Call (352)201-4705








MOXIE
My name is Moxie.
My owner left me,
but I'll never leave
you if you take me
home. You'll never
find a more loyal
companion than
me." Moxie is a 3
y.o. Black Mouth
Cur, weighs 60 Ibs.
He is strong, yet
gentle to his
humans. Likes peo-
ple and seems
good with children.
Neutered & house-
broken. He is ath-
letic, so a fenced
yard is recom-
mended. He needs
room to exercise first
and then he settles
down. Look in his
beautiful eyes and
see the love he is
waiting to give his
forever family.
Call Donna @
352-249-7801.


NICKY
Nicky is a beautiful
black lab/bulldog
mix male, a big,
sweet and loveable
guy. He is 2 y.o. and
is very intelligent, will
sit for treats. He
weighs about 75
pounds and is a
very strong dog,
needing a strong
handler. Would be
a good watchdog.
He is a good
hearted dog who
gets along well with
other dogs. As he is
very active, a
fenced yard is
recommended.
Call 352-746-8400











REMY
Remy is a joyous,
active young terrier
mix who was surren-
dered to the shelter
because of neglect.
Weight about
42 pounds. Dark
golden brown brin-
die in color, neu
tered, heartworm
-negative, appears
housebroken. He is
a delightful, happy
dog, very eager to
learn, and very intel-
ligent. Gets along
with other dogs and
loves his human
friends. Tries very
hard to please. A
fenced yard would
be preferred for
him, as he is very
active. Call Joanne
@ 352-795-1288.

Shih-Tzu Pups, Males
Starting@ $400.
Registered
Lots of colors, Beverly
Hills, FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.ne


CLASSIFIED



LIQUIDATION SALE
Horses & tack, new &
used. 352-873-6033

Livestock


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




BOSTON WHALER
12ft w/20hp Johnson
Motor, galvanized
Trailer, all in exc. cond.
$1900, Will take guns
on trade 906-285-1696




BUY, SELL*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510"

87 PROLINE
17', Deep V haul
Center Console
w/ trailer
315 W. Inverness Blvd
ALUMACRAFT
2012, 1436 LT, tilt
trailer, 8HP, Yam. 4
stroke, motor guide,
40 Ib, battery, swivel
seats, Lowrance Sonar
/GPS, $2,500.
Info. 352-489-2011
ALUMICRAFT
18 ft.,wide rhino lined
inside, 25HP Merc.,
boat mtr. & trailer in
great shape $3,700
(352) 563-0328
















PENN YAN
1979 27'Sports fisher-
man w/ trailer, needs
some work. $4000
OBO (352) 621-0192


TRI PONTOON
BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
WANTED TO BUY
Pontoon Boat
Needing Repair
(352) 637-3983
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
(352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com




ITASCA
2007 Navaron 23H
Mercedes Diesel, 2.7L,
17 mpg, generator, AC,
one slide out, sleeps 5,
excellent condition,
$55,000 make offer
352-422-1309
SUNNYBROOK
2008, 35FT Fifth Wheel
3 slides, electric awning
fireplace, 2 ac's, 50 amp
king bed, assume
balance of $37,500.
352-279-3544




4 WINDS TRAILER
2006, 26FT
Take Over Payments
352-628-7765
2012 Wildwood TT
26'Ft. sleeps 8,
Elec.Awning and
Jack, bunks $13,999
813-699-2262
'05 CAMPER
29' Holiday Rambler
Alum fr, Ig slide out.
great cond. $10,900
352-795-5310 or
410-474-3454
ALINER
2001, Expedition 18ft,
storage for stabilizers,
$3,500. obo
(352) 795-6295
Brooksville Deeded
spacious, shaded cnr
lot, 1BR/1BA, Large FL
room, Large storage
shed & patio. 55+ RV
Parkw/ heated pool,
and music activities,
$36,000 352-848-0448,
352- 428-0462 anytime
CAR HAULER
2007
32 ft Enclosed Goose-
neck w/liv qtrs. $15,500.
For more info call
352-560-7247
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
POP-UP CAMPER
2002 Coleman
Tacoma Exc Cond.
With add a room.
$4500
(352) 726-3919
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, kg bd,like new,
60amp serv. NADA
$29K asking $25K
obo 352-382-3298


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



350 Chevy Motor
Speed Pro Cam
headers, edelbrock
carb. Approx. Miles
30K $1200 OBO
352-628-4240
LUGGAGE ROOF
CROSSRAILS
will fit any Chevy
Traverse $150
obo 352-503-6414
RV ROADMASTER
Hidden Face Plate
fits Dodge Ram 1500
asking $200,
727-251-7568



"BEST PRICE**
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
*352-426-4267**
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ



AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides
$495 D6WN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE.
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 56 3-1902
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.

Meeting^
No.tices


'00, Regal, LS, custom
4 DR. Loaded, only
70K stereo, leather, V6
alloys, garaged, clean
$4,650. 352-212-4882
Buick Century
Custom, 57k mi, extra
clean, full power. Runs
excellent $4500
(352) 257-3894 Cell
(352) 794-6069 Office
CADILLAC
1994 DEVILLE
79K MILES, CAR IS
PERFECT $4995
352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2005 STS
LOW MILES
NICE CAR
$9850, 352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2011 CTS, LOADED
ONLY 15K
MILES, SUNROOF
$27,850 352-628-5100
CHEVROLET
1999, Camaro,
Convertible
$6,990.
352-341-0018
CHEVY VETTE,
02 Convert. Royal Blue,
Saddle oak int. 16k mi,
Gar, Mint, $23,900 obo
call 352-489-1700
CHRYSLER
2006 PT Cruiser conyv....
weather is getting
nice.. .time to drop the
top...call 352-628-4600
to set appointment
to see
FORD
1995 Escort wagon
4cyl., Auto,
call 352-628-4600
for low price and
appointment
FORD
2005, Focus
$4,850.
352-341-0018
FORD
2010, Pruis,
$17,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
2011 FIESTA SDN
36K MILES, "S"
MODEL, ONE OWNER
$9950, 352-628-5100
FORD
Mustang Cobra, Indy
500 Pace Car-1994,
Convertible, 7100 mi,
Gar. kept 252-339-3897
LINCOLN
1999 Continental
Exc. Condition, 27mpg
hwy, Garage kept,
$4500 352-422-4548


I0 % 11d1 11






( I I





330-0224 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Citrus County
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB 014-13


HONDA
2010 ACCORD LX,
85K MILES, NICE,
$12,850 352-628-5110
LINCOLN
Towncar 2010
29,900mi, gold w/beige
vinyl top, white leather
asking, $24,900
352-476-5061
MERCURY
2001 Grand Marquis
107K mi, looks & runs
good, AC, good tires
$2995 850-653-5497
MINI COOPER
2008 2DR, HARDTOP
ONLY 20K MILES,
SUPER CLEAN
$13980, 352-628-5100
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
NISSAN
2005, Altima
$5,895
352-341-0018
PONTIAC
2003 Bonneville, must
SE, V6, pw....pl.....priced
to sell.....call jan at
352-628-4600 for
appointment
and pricing



2002 JAGUAR XJR
4 DR, $7200. Super
Charged 4.0 V-8,
exc cond, auto trans,
leather int, AC, power
sun roof, XJR Sport
Pkg, factory chrome
wheels (352) 637-6443
CHEVY
'87, S10 Blazer, excel.
cond. 87K org. mi. on
body, 22K on engine
$1,700 obo 795-9187







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966




2002 Ford F150 Sport
4X4 Super Cab 4 Dr,
Auto, Black, 5.4 V8,
Runs Great. $5500
(352) 257-3894 Cell
(352) 794-6069 Office

Meeing'^
NoticesH


DDODZ38





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EBUJICKi C5CIVi"

1275 S. Suncoast Blvd./ US Hwy 19

Homosassa 352-795-6800
*2013 GMC Terrain: 39 mo. closed end lease, $3,499 total due at signing. 2013 Buick Verano: 24 mo. closed end lease, $2,619 total due at
signing. Plus tax, tag, title and 499.50 dealer fee. Includes all available incentives and rebates assigned to dealer. 12,000/mi., year, $.20/mile for
overage. Lessee pays for excess wear. WAC. (1) See dealer for details. (2) WAC. See dealer for details. Photos for illustration purposes only.



6 igin.Pls a, ag ite n 49.0dele ee Iclds llaaiabeineniesan ebte ssgnd odele.12 00mi, er,$.0mie o


FREE S RNIVIC




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in ve 10 ANUAES








i d shelter and clothing.ffla H^^^


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE DECLASSIFIED


m


CHEVROLET
2001 S10 Pickup Ext.
Cab, no rust, no dents,
very clean, white, low
mileage $5600
352-419-4373 or
614-893-3268
CHEVROLET
98, 1500 long box,
4.3 V6, auto, air,14,500
orig. miles, Grg kept,
$8700 352-212-4678
FORD
1997 F250 V8 4.6L
Auto XL Supercab A/C
Cruise Toolbox 139,000
mi. $3850
352-212-9415
FORD
2004, Ranger
$7,990
352-341-0018
FORD
F150, 1978, 4x4
Runs good, 6" Lift kit,
$1,650 obo
(352) 564-4598
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440



BUICK
2005 RANIER
46K MILES, CXL
LIKE NEW
$9850, 352-628-5100
FORD
2000 Explorer $2,000 or
best offer. 263000 miles
runs god needs rear
main seal. May need
ball joints. 476-7942
HONDA
1997 CRV, priced to
sell....it's a honda
auto, pwr windows
call 352-628-4600 for
special newspaper
pricing
KIA
2012 SOUL
ONLY 7K MILES
$15,800 352-628-5100
SUBARU
2011 FORESTER
29K MILES
ONE OWNER
$17850, 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
1997 RAV 4
ONLY 89K MILES,
NICE $5850,
352-628-5100


JEEP
2000, Grand
Cherokee 4x4, V8
pw, pl, priced to low
to list.....call adam at
352-628-4600 for
appointment


BAD BOY BUGGIE
2011 "ready to hunt"
Only $5998.
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS
2002, SPORTSMAN
700 CC 4X4 AUTO
READY FOR THE MUD
ONLY $4288
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS RZR 800 LE
TIME TO PLAY HARD
ONLY $8388
(352) 621-3678


CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
Harley Davidson
2005, 883
LOW MILES
$3,995.
Harley Davidson
2006, STREET GLIDE
EZ FINANCE
$11,500.
HONDA
2009, VT750 AERO,
CLEAN
$4,995.
SUZUKI
2001, VOLUSIA
EZ FINANCE
$2,995.
KAWASAKI
1999, NOMAD
RUNS GREAT
$3,800.
LUCKY U CYCLES
352-330-0047
WWW.LUCKYU
CYCLES.COM






Harley Davidson
2009 Street Glide
Black, 20k, many extras
$18,500 firm, pls call
*352-422-5448**
HARLY DAVIDSON
08, 1200cc Sportster
classic 976mi. show-
room condition, $9500
(352) 447-1244
HONDA
'04, Shadow, Aero,
750 CC, 16k Miles,
Like new $3,995
461-4518 or 586-2807
HONDA BLACK BIRD
CBR 1100 LOW LOW
MILES ONLY $3488.00
(352) 621-3678
Honda Gold Wing
1976,custommintcont
low miles $2500
503-6550/810-275-2500
Ask for Mark
HONDA ST1300
2006 MADE TO TOUR
ONLY $7786
(352) 621-3678
KAWASKI NINFA
650
LIKE NEW ONLY
$5488 (352) 621-3678
KYMCO
2009, AJILITY
SCOOTER GREAT
GAS SAVER ONLY
$998 (352) 621-3678


RAMPAGE
Motorcycle lift for p/u
truck. Like new $1800.
(352) 637-0397
SUZUKI
'06, Boulevard 800CC,
Lots of extras, like new
$3,995. 352-461-4518
352-586-2807
SUZUKI BURGMAN
AUTOMATIC TWIST
AND GO FUN ONLY
$4686 (352) 621-3678
SUZUKI GSXR 750
195 MILES "HOLD ON"
ONLY $9996
(352) 621-3678
VICTORY CROSS
ROADS
"GREAT American
MADE CRUSIER"
ONLY $12888
(352) 621-3678


Citizen Service Area and Site Improvements
Citrus County Landfill
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to ITB 014-13, Citizen Service Area (CSA) and Site Improvements. The purpose of
the project is to construct improvements within the CSA area of the landfill site that
will simplify traffic flow, provide better service to residents and improve operational
efficiency and site security. The proposed construction includes improved access
drives, an addition scale, storage bunker repairs, a new retaining wall for customer
drop-offs, and construction of a new recycling area adjacent to the currently devel-
oped site.
Minimum Requirements for Submitting a Bid
Bidder shall meet, at a minimum, the following requirements to be determined a re-
sponsive and responsible Bidder at the time of Bid Submittal:
1. Florida Registered or Certified General Contractor or Building
Contractor
2. Have bonding capacity for the value of the project.
A Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference: will be held on March 11, 2013 at 10:00 am. The
Conference will be held at the Citrus County Landfill, 230 W. Gulf to Lake Highway,
Lecanto, Florida 34461. Please limit your company's attendance to only two individ-
uals.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before April 1, 2013 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy Craw-
ford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for April 1, 2013 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at these meetings because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management & Budget
at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Documents for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "PURCHASING/BIDS" on the left
hand side of the Home Page then select "BIDS". Or, call the Office of Management
& Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
Joe Meek, Chairman
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
February 24, 2013.

331-0224 SUCRN
3/14 meeting- Citrus County Transit
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board
will hold a regular meeting at 10:30 A.M. on the 14th day of March. 2013 at the
Lecanto Government Building at 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, FL
34461.
Any person requiring special accommodations or desiring further information regard-
ing this meeting may contact the Transportation Supervisor of Citrus County Transit,
1410 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL. 34461-9015. Telephone: (352) 527-7630.
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purposes may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which includes testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is based. (Section 286.0101, Florida Statutes)
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
February 24, 2013.

332-0224 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION: ORDER TO DEMOLISH HOME & ADDITION
CASE NUMBER: 134319
Description of property: AK: 1615046 and legally described as PARSONS PT ADD TO
HERNANDO PB 2 PG 19 LOTS 19, 20 & 21 BLK 15
MABELENE POMEROY
4695 E DARTMOUTH LN
HERNANDO, FL
On December 26, 2012, an order was issued by the Citrus County Certified Building
Official to demolish the structures) on the property located at: 4695 E. Dartmouth
Ln.; Hernando, FL. If the property owners) fail to comply with this order, the Code
Compliance Division will issue a work order to abate the nuisance condition.
Any persons) having a legal interest in this property may contact the Code Compli-
ance Office within 30 days of this publication. Board of County Commissioners, Dept.
of Planning and Development, Code Compliance Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, FL. 352-527-5350. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
February 24, 2013.


326-0217 SUCRN
Inv, to Bid
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
Sealed bids for furnishing of all labor and materials and performing all work neces-
sary and incidental to Re-roofing Portions of Inverness Middle School will be received
by the Citrus County School Board prior to 2:30p.m. local time March 21, 2013, in the
Purchasing Department, Citrus County School Board, Building 200, 1007 West Main
Street, Inverness, Florida, 34450-4698. Immediately following all bids received will be
opened and read aloud in Building 200, Purchasing Department.
Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond in the amount of
not less than five percent (5%) of the maximum amount of the Bid as a guarantee
that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will within ten (10) calendar days after writ-
ten notice being given of bid acceptance, enter into a written Contract with the
Citrus County School Board, in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a
surety bond satisfactory to the Citrus County School Board equal to one hundred
percent (100%) of the Contract amount.
No Bidder may withdraw his/her Bid for a period of thirty (30) days after the date set
for the opening of the Bids.
All prime contractors must hold a Citrus County School Board Certificate of
Pre-qualification to bid on Citrus County School Board construction projects. Prime
contractors must be pre-qualified by the Citrus County School Board prior to submit-
ting a bid. Prime contractor's bids must be within the bid limits specified on their
pre-qualification certificate. For contractor pre-qualification information call the Cit-
rus County School Board Facilities and Construction Department at 352/726-1931,
ext. 2208.
Pre-bid Conference:
A. A mandatory pre-bid conference for Prime Contractors, and optional for
sub-contractors, will be held at Inverness Middle School, 1950 U.S. Highway 41
North, Inverness, FL 34450, Cafeteria.
B. Conference will occur March 7, 2013, 3:30 pm.
Bidders may obtain a maximum of two (2) sets of Contract Documents from Rogers
& Sark Consulting, Inc., 2021 Palm Lane, Orlando, FL 32803, (407) 228-4242 or (407)
797-4953 upon deposit of a check made payable to the Citrus County School Board
in the amount of $100.00 per set. A refund of this deposit will be made upon the re-
turn of these Documents in satisfactory condition within ten (10) days after the open-
ing of Bids.
The Citrus County School Board reserves the absolute right to award the Bid to the
lowest, responsive Bidder, to waive any informality or irregularity in any Bid, or to re-
ject any and all Bids received based solely on the Board's determination of the best
interests of the School District.

CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
INVERNESS, FLORIDA

BY: Sandra Himmel
Superintendent of Schools
February 17, 24 & March 3, 2013.

327-0217 SUCRN
Inv, to Bid
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
Sealed bids for furnishing of all labor and materials and performing all work neces-
sary and incidental to Re-roofing Portions of Lecanto High School will be received by
the Citrus County School Board prior to 2:00p.m. local time March 21, 2013, in the
Purchasing Department, Citrus County School Board, Building 200, 1007 West Main
Street, Inverness, Florida, 34450-4698. Immediately following all bids received will be
opened and read aloud in Building 200, Purchasing Department.
Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond in the amount of
not less than five percent (5%) of the maximum amount of the Bid as a guarantee
that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will within ten (10) calendar days after writ-
ten notice being given of bid acceptance, enter into a written Contract with the
Citrus County School Board, in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a
surety bond satisfactory to the Citrus County School Board equal to one hundred
percent (100%) of the Contract amount.
No Bidder may withdraw his/her Bid for a period of thirty (30) days after the date set
for the opening of the Bids.
All prime contractors must hold a Citrus County School Board Certificate of
Pre-qualification to bid on Citrus County School Board construction projects. Prime
contractors must be pre-qualified by the Citrus County School Board prior to submit-
ting a bid. Prime contractor's bids must be within the bid limits specified on their
pre-qualification certificate. For contractor pre-qualification information call the Cit-
rus County School Board Facilities and Construction Department at 352/726-1931,
ext. 2208.
Pre-bid Conference:
A. A mandatory pre-bid conference for Prime Contractors, and optional for
sub-contractors, will be held at Lecanto High School, 3810 W. Educational Path,
Lecanto, FL 34461, Cafeteria.
B. Conference will occur March 7, 2013, 1:30 pm.
Bidders may obtain a maximum of two (2) sets of Contract Documents from Rogers
& Sark Consulting, Inc., 2021 Palm Lane, Orlando, FL 32803, (407) 228-4242 or (407)
797-4953 upon deposit of a check made payable to the Citrus County School Board
in the amount of $100.00 per set. A refund of this deposit will be made upon the re-
turn of these Documents in satisfactory condition within ten (10) days after the open-
ing of Bids.
The Citrus County School Board reserves the absolute right to award the Bid to the
lowest, responsive Bidder, to waive any informality or irregularity in any Bid, or to re-
ject any and all Bids received based solely on the Board's determination of the best
interests of the School District.

CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
INVERNESS, FLORIDA

BY: Sandra Himmel
Superintendent of Schools
February 17, 24 & March 3, 2013.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 D9


VILLAGE TOYOTA

CRYSTAL RIVER


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Citrus County's



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* Customer Service



* Buying Experience



* Vehicle Selection



* Showroom



* 2 Year Toyota Care



Complimentary



Maintenance




Come See Why We Are


Rated The Best!


OF CRI


www.villagetovota.com


VILLAGETOYOTA




FSTAL RIVER




352-628-5100
*picture for illustration purposes only.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


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...1




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


a


New 2013 Honda CMc LX
(^^", 'T1C


LIII'


New 2013 Honda Fit -9
MODEL GE.O3CEXW. EQUIPPED NOT STRIPPED '
AUTOMATIC, AC AND CRUISE


New 2013 Honda Accordn LX Sedal
MODEL CR2F3DEW
AUTOMATICTRANSISSON
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New 2012 Honda CR-V LX 2WD
MOCEL RMH3CEW. COME SEEWlHYTHE CMR- IS THE BEST
SELUNG COMPACT SUV IN AMEHCA SUIE WILE THEY LAST


New 2013 Honda Odyssey LX



New 2012 Honda RidgellneT T
M00.ELYK1F2CEW,4WDWTHTHE UNK4NTItHER POD PR PKG



New 2012 Honda Crosslour 2WD 2..414 EX
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2013 Chevy Silverado
Crew Cab All Star Edition


AND 0% APR for 72 Mo.
Over 75Trucks to choose from! Accessorize your truck right on site!
TOP DOLLAR PAID FOR YOUR TRADE-INS!
2012TRUCKS STARTING AT $17,995


All-New 2013 Chevy Spark 1LS
Automatic Transmission


2012 Chevy Sonic 5 Dr. LS
MSRP $S15,560


2013 Chevy Equinox LS
Sik MCI13135, Auto, 4cyl. MSRP: $25,030
Son oae


N


2013 Chevy Avalanche
Black Diamond Edition. Personalized Coffee
Table Book, Own a Legend
MSRP: S37,115, Dealer Discount: $1.720
Rebate: $2,000. USAA Discount $750


= 1


2013 Chevy Tahoe
MSRP: $40,075, Dealer Discount: S3.250
Rebate: $750, USAA Discount $750
Bonus Cash: $750


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 D11


- -^


ILl :0




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THE


EVENT


$ DOWN $ DUE AT
) PAYMENT' SIGNING2

$ ISTMONTHS $ MAINTENANCE
O PAYMENT $ PLAN'
Example Deal: 2013 ESCAPE SE. $278 mo./36 mo. Red Carpet lease
Security deposit waived, taxes, title and license fees extra.


2. Not all buyers will qualify for Ford Credit Red Carpet Lease. Payments may vary; dealers determine prices. Residency restrictions apply. First month's payment paid
by Ford: Fiesta up to $275; Focus up to $300; Fusion up to $350; Escape up to $350; Edge up to $400; Explorer up to $425. Cash due at signing on Fiesta is after
$500 cash back; Focus is after $750 cash back; Fusion is after $250 cash back; Escape is after $750 cash back; Edge is after $1,500 cash back; Explorer is $2,000
cash back. 3-year/45,000 mile Basic Maintenance Plan on eligible featured vehicles includes a maximum of 4 regularly scheduled maintenance services. Take new
retail delivery from dealer stock by 4/1/13. See dealer for qualifications and complete details. Vehicle shown may have optional equipment not included in payment.

It's Just That Simple...


2013 ESCAPE SE


5


Family Owned
& Operated

gn&RRide


2013 EDGE SE 2013-EXPLORER XLT


6 mo. Red Carpet lease 3 mo. Red Carpet lease

$278 MO 317 MO
$0.00 Down Payment $0.00 Due At Signing 0.00 Down Payment $0.00 Due At Signing
Security Deposit Waived, tax, title & license fees extra Security Deposit Waived, tax, title & license tees extra


6 mo. Red Carpet lease

5349 MO
$0.00 Down Payment $0.00 Due At Signing
Security Deposit Waived, tax, title & license tees extra


2013 FIESTA SE 2013 FOCUS SE 2013 FUSION SE
3.6 mo. Red Carpet lease 3.6 mo. Red Carpet lease 16 mo. Red Carpet lease


$198 MO
$0.00 Down Payment $0.00 Due At Signing
Security Deposit Waived, tax, title & license tees extra


$0.00 Down Payment $0.00 Due At Signing
Security Deposit Waived, tax, title & license tees extra


$0.00 Down Payment $0.00 Due At Signing
Security Deposit Waived, tax, title & license tees extra


MANAGER'S USED CLEARANCE!

FORD EDGE
Starting At
2007 FORD MISTANG GT CONVT 2010 CHEVY MALIBU LT 2009 KIA SEDONA EX 2010 TOYOTA CAMRY LE 2009 PONTIAC TORRENT
Was $21,968 N2T235A Was $19,968 N2C161A Was $21,668 N2T224B Was $20,668NP5737 Was $18,968 N2T215M 9 9 m
$15,975 $15,975 $16,975 $15,975 $14,975


2009 MAZDA MIATA CONVT 2010 FORD MUSTANG GT 2006 FORD FUSION
Was $22,668 N2T244D Was $27,668 NP5748 Was $13,468 N2C26:
$18,975 $23,975 $8,975
NICK NICHO LA ft-


UIU IHKIRtK IVWll & OUNRIKI IVUK I1Y
Was $23,668 N2T231A V
$17,975
NJ-I 4~ w-yTTI


2005 CHEVROLET MALIBU 1995 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE ORVIS 4X4 2003 FORD CROWN VICTORIA LX 2007 CHEVY UPLANDER EXT LT
Great starter car. NP5740B Great SUV w/Iols of options. N2T386B Great car. N2C294B Room for the whole family. NP5642B
$7,868 $7,968 $9,868 $12,668


2006 FORD EXPLORER XL$
Nice explorer for not much money. N3C032A I
$13,968


2005 FORD MUSTANG
Low mileage pony car. N2T410A
$13,968
WF i"^


2003 JEEP WRANGLER 4X4
Extra clean and ready to tow. NP5777D
$14,968


D12 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013


t




Section E -SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013


OME


RONT


Sikorski's
-- Attic PAGE E6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUID


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HYtZUaaiEUK.


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The WallPops Paisley
Please Red Dry-Erase
Message Board from
Brewster Home Fashions
can help keep a student's
desk area organized.
Associated Press


I .







E2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


(24 7 o5f^
-2- '637-2828






60 S KELLNER BLVD.
* 2BD/1.5BA/2CG Warm & Comfortable
* Beautifully Maintained Living RM & Fla RM
* Enclosed lanai Larger lot

PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


3501 W. BLOSSOM DR.
PINE RIDGE ESTATES
*3BD/3BA/2+CG + POOL Newly Remodeled Kitchen
* Wonderfully Maintained ON THE GOLF COURSE
* 2,000+/- Living Area Gas Fireplace/Great Rm.
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


7 IV I I ill
2763 BEAMWOOD DR., PINE RIDGE
WOWII Describes this beautiful Pine Ridge home No expenses
spared Large 3/2/2 split plan home with separate office space
Intenor features boast light & bnght spaces, gourmet upgraded
kitchen, travertine tile throughout, formal dining, bar/sitting area,
window treatments and much more Extenor offers fresh paint,
solar heated pool, fenced rear yard, large patio area, workshop,
fenced garden to name a few
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460
Email: davidsivory@hotm il.comrn


HISTORICAL DOWNTOWN
FLORAL CITY LOCATION
2 Bedroom home on large corner lot
with detached workshop. Total of
1259 sq ft under roof, fireplace, newer
roof and paint, move-in
condition.
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200
Email: barbaraimils@eorthlink.nnet


RWM
REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish

I' I


This home is in outstanding condition and shows
like a model home. Gas range, gas water heater,
and gas dryer for those who prefer gas appliances.
Directions 19 to Cypress Blvd, to left on
Corkwood Blvd, to left on Honeysuckle Drive, to
house #5 Honeysuckle Dr
RON MCEVOY (352) 586-2663
www.ronmcevoy.remax.com
Certified Distressed Property Expert


PERFECT FOR ENTERTAINING!
Live your waterfront dream today Don't miss this
opportunity to own Crystal River waterfront with Gulf
Access New floors and fresh paint say "Move Right
Inl" Over 1000 square feet of decking with custom
seating for 24 says "Bring your Friends" The blue
water beckons what are you waiting for?
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpolts@aol.comin I
Weisite: www.CryslalRiverLiving.comi


1 Ub FiET UN THE WATEH!
*1 + Acre Lot 2/2 with Attached Carport
* Seawall Extensive Brick Walk Ways
* Fully Fenced RV Pad w/Hook Up
* Detached 2 Car Garage Massive Storage Area
* Summer Kitchen All Tile Floors
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpotls@aol.coin vi
Welsite: www.CryslalRiverLi,,ing coin U J


HOMOSASSA
'Remodeled into a beauty 2/2/1 on 2.6 acres
'Private pond & greenhouse 'Cast Iron Stove in living area
*Massive back deck '2 Large master suites
*24 x 14 Screened Patio MUST SEE!!
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcuningham@remax.net


REDUCED TO SELL!!
Live the good life in Crystal River Great 3/2/1 lovingly
cared for, on 2 pretty fully fenced lots Some amenities
include RV/boat storage, 12x13 utility bldg w/attached
carport Roof, soffits & gutters in 2005, A/C 2005
Guys check out the MANCAVE garage/work area 9'
ceiling, plumbed, insulated and cabinets GALORE
Sellers want to hear offers i
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


241N aio w. eel Hls5774 ww.Rt4X1o I 10 1* N. Flord v.neres6760


NEW ON MARKET- CITRUS SPRINGS!
*2005 Built 3/2/2 Split Floor Plan
*Wood Cabinets *Fully Appliances
*Master Bath Utility Shed
* Enclosed Florida Rm. Convenient to Beverly Hills

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorido.com


I r f g *
r^-Aam.v j


8414 H. CREEK WAY
CITRUS SPRINGS
* Nice 3BR/2BA/2CG Home
* Great Room Dining Area
* Enclosed Lanai Covered Patio
* Fenced Backyard
* Move-in-Ready
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nature follows a pattern called Fibonacci


Associated Press
This undated photo shows a spruce cone with a marked
fibonacci number sequence. A numbers sequence
thought up by the 13th century Italian mathematician
known as Fibonacci plays out in plants, from pine cones
to pineapples.

Where function
meets prestige.
This 3/3.5/3 custom
built pool home has the
livability for everyday
life & the elegance & upgrades for any buyer. Located in
Citrus Hills on a aoraeous one-acre landscaped lot.


LEE REICH
Associated Press

What do pine cones and
paintings have in com-
mon? A 13th century Ital-
ian mathematician named
Leonardo of Pisa.
Better known by his pen
name, Fibonacci, he came
up with a number se-
quence that keeps popping
up throughout the plant
kingdom, and the art
world, too.
A fibonacci sequence is
simple enough to gener-
ate: Starting with the num-
ber 1, you merely add the
previous two numbers in
the sequence to generate
the next one. So the se-
quence, early on, is 1, 2, 3,
5,8,13,21 and so on.
Numbers and
plants
To see how it works in
nature, go outside and find
an intact pine cone (or any
other cone). Look carefully
and you'll notice that the
bracts that make up the
cone are arranged in a spi-
ral. Actually two spirals,
running in opposite direc-
tions, with one rising
steeply and the other grad-
ually from the cone's base
to its tip.


Count the number of spi-
rals in each direction a
job made easier by dab-
bing the bracts along one
line of each spiral with a
colored marker The num-
ber of spirals in either di-
rection is a fibonacci
number. I just counted 5
parallel spirals going in
one direction and 8 paral-
lel spirals going in the op-
posite direction on a
Norway spruce cone.
Or you might examine a
pineapple. Focus on one of
the hexagonal scales near
the fruit's midriff and you
can pick out three spirals,
each aligned to a different
pair of opposing sides of
the hexagon. One set rises
gradually, another moder-
ately and the third steeply
Count the number of spi-
rals and you'll find eight


I


OPEN HOUSE FEB. 24 1:30-3:30 PM
67 South Heron Creek Loop -
THE WORK IS ALL DONE! Imagine finding a three BR, two bath condominium, complete
with garage and screen room and finding it is just waiting for you to move in! Freshly
painted throughout, new tile floors and best of all, a brand new kitchen. Scenic garden
entrance and a glorious view of the nine hole golf course across the street. All the
community amenities you would like: pool and shelter, storage area, and access to the
chain of lakes!
MLS 355354 $89,000
Host: Tim Donovan 220-0328
ooo~.l tions: Gospel island Road to Moorings entrance on left to Golf Harbor Path to corner of Heron Creek Loop.


gradual, 13 moderate and
21 steeply rising ones. Fi-
bonacci numbers again.
Scales and bracts are
modified leaves, and the
spiral arrangements in
pine cones and pineapples
reflect the spiral growth
habit of stems. To confirm
this, bring in a leafless
stem from some tree or
shrub and look at its buds,
where leaves were at-
tached. The buds range up
the stem in a spiral pat-
tern, which kept each leaf
out of the shadow of leaves
just above it. The amount
of spiraling varies from


A fibonacci sequence is simple
enough to generate: Starting with
the number 1, you merely add the
previous two numbers in the se-
quence to generate the next one.
So the sequence, early on, is 1,
2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21 and so on.


Pt a sl0e4 y www.parsleyrealestate.com
Ia c.1eJy 352.726.2628


rKUErtbiIUNAL ui-L--t UILUIIN' located on corner lotr.
Citrus Memorial Hospital & Citrus High School are across the
street. 2,800+/- sq. ft., brick building. 2 separate entrances. 5
restrooms. Occupy one side, rent the other. Possible owner
financing. $359,000


S Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtor,- Realtor@

7406 700 S 287.9022
The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.


3826 N BRIARBERRY PT., Beverly Hills $39,900
Parkside Village Villa maintance free living.
2 bedrooms, 1 1/2 baths, I car garage,
on a cul Ide sac. 5 5+ co mmun ity.I


plant to plant, with new
leaves developing in some
fraction such as 2/5, 3/5,
3/8 or 8/13 of a spiral.
Eureka, the numbers in
those fractions are fi-
bonacci numbers!
You can determine the
fraction on your dormant
stem by finding a bud di-
rectly above another one,
then counting the number
of full circles the stem
went through to get there
while generating buds in
between. So if the stems
made three full circles to
get a bud back where it
started and generated
eight buds getting there,
the fraction is 3/8, with
each bud 3/8 of a turn off its
neighbor upstairs or down-
stairs. Different plants
have favored fractions, but
they evidently don't read
the books because I just
computed fractions of 1/3
and 3/8 on a single apple
stem, which is supposed to
have a fraction of 2/5. All

See NUMBERS/Page E14


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 E3







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Frugal ideas for using frozen bananas


Dear Sara: Any ideas
for what to do with
five frozen ba-
nanas? I usually do ba-


nana muffins,
but I'm kind of
sick of them. -
Sa rah ,
Massachusetts
Dear Sarah:
I'd make banana
bread, cake,
cookies, pan-
cakes or smooth-
ies. You can Sara Noel
make a mock ice
cream, too. Sim- FRUGAL
ply cut a frozen LIVING
banana into four
sections and blend with a butter.
splash of milk in your food 0 1/
processor until creamy mon.
Then enjoy a frozen treat Preh
that's lower in fat than ice grees I
cream, but doesn't sacrifice two 8-b
taste. Here's a banana a mixed
bread recipe with a won- cream
derful streusel topping: until
Banana Bread: add su
3/4 cup butter, soft- light a
ened. one at
1 8-ounce package until b


cream cheese.
2 cups sugar.
2 large eggs.
3 cups flour.
1/2 teaspoon
powder.
1/2 teaspoon
soda.


1/2 teaspoon salt.
1 1/2 cups mashed
bananas.


1 cup
chopped
pecans, toasted.
1/2 tea-
spoon vanilla.
Streusel:
1/2 cup
packed brown
sugar
1/2 cup
toasted pecans,
chopped.
1 table-
spoon flour.
1 table-
spoon melted


8 teaspoon cinna-

eat oven to 350 de-
E Grease and flour
y-4 loaf pans. Using
r, beat butter and
cheese together
creamy Gradually,
gar and beat until
nd fluffy. Add eggs
a time and beat
ended. Gradually
ur, baking powder,
soda and salt to
mixture. Beat at low
until just blended.
bananas, pecans
nilla. Spoon batter
ns.
streusel: Stir to-


add flc
baking
butter
speed
baking Stir in
and va
baking into pa
For


JOANN MARTIN
Prefer recd
REAL ESTA TE


352-270-3255


9LS


OE HOSS SiND I m.


3117 N Woolflower Ter. 3925 N Rock Jasmine
Beverly Hills Beverly Hills
Windsor model 2/1.5/1 in excellent 1440 sf of living 2/1.5/1. Roof replaced
condition. Nothing to do but move in. 2009, AC 2001. Fenced in yard. Asking
Priced to sell $62,900. MLS #356403 $64,900.
Directions: from 486 go North on Forest Dir: from 486 go North on Forest Ridge
Ridge Blvd to right on Sugarmaple Ln to Blvd to right on Sugarberry to left on Rock
left on Woolflower to #3117 Jasmine to #3925


gether brown sugar,
toasted pecans, flour,
melted butter and cinna-
mon. Sprinkle mixture
evenly over batter in pans.
Bake for 1 hour or until a
toothpick inserted comes
out clean. Cool in pans on
wire rack for 10 minutes.
Remove from pans and
cool 30 more minutes be-
fore slicing. Nancy,
Virginia


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3
'Lstii1g


S"Jilli 801 E Hillsborouih CI
MLS 7uI 116 $84,900
2bd/2ba villa, neat & clean, light & bright
with panoramic views.
Directions: Norvell Bryant Hwy, south on
AnnapolisAve, right on Hiilsborough Ct.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086






1064 W Diamond Shore Lp
,Vs, MLS 358227 $209,900
Newly renovated maintenance free villa
with pool.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


Dear Sara: We have
quite a bit of leftover fried
chicken from dinner. Any
ideas what to make with
it? -B.N, Midwest
Dear B.N.: I eat it cold
the following day It can be
used in wraps or chopped
for chicken salad sand-
wiches. Add some to a
salad, casserole or soup.
Mix shredded chicken
with barbecue sauce for


v ^jACW 4257 N Mayan Dr
MLS 357081 $296,950
Spacious 4/3/3 custom home on a
private wooded acre.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926






7" 1 2770 W Apricot Dr
MLS 356456 $179,900
Unique design-English Tudor style two
story 3/3.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523
PENDING



'Ps~L~~it


sandwiches, use it as a
pizza topping or to make
chicken fettuccine Al-
fredo, fried rice, quesadil-
las, tacos or spaghetti.
Dear Sara: My son works
at a pizza parlor and he
brought me 12 containers
of dough. Each one makes
a 14-inch pizza. I wasn't
sure about freezing them,
but went ahead and did it
anyway My question is,


-1L 48317 W Mohawk Dr
MLS701122 $189,000
Meticulously maintained inside & out,
on a beautiful 1 acre corner lot.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213


-


I


l, A..UJS 3889 N Indianriver Dr
4W,1. 3771 N Goldencup Terr MLS 359154 $248,000
MLS 358118 $62,750 Gigantic lanai, pool+summer kitchen 3/
Affordable 2/2/1 near amenities, with this 3/3 perfect Florida design.
Richard DeVita 352-601-8273 Mark Casper 352-476-8136
S 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker mer
Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Rnancial, Inc. and its related entities,


can you use pizza dough to
make potpies and regular
pies? -EN, Ohio
Dear EN.: Freezing the
dough is OK, but no, pizza
dough isn't used to make
potpies or regular pies.
You can make bread sticks,
flat bread, calzones, hot
pretzels, dinner rolls, cin-
namon rolls or cinnamon

See FRUGAL/Page E5


SftW$f 1421 W Laurel Glen Path
MLS 351452 $274,700
Beautiful 2/2/2 pool home w/den & lush
landscaping.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


S 810 E Gilchrist C 28 5A 1180 E Triple Crown Loop
MLS 356430 $62,900 MLS 356404 $224,900
EASY, BREEZY FLORIDA LIVING. 3 BR, 3 BA, pool home with many special
2/2 second floor condo. features.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952 Steve Dobbyn 352-634-0499
PENDING PENDING





4Agglb 1412 E St James Lp ^ 8225 N Duval Dr
MLS 359346 $149,900 > MLS 358732 $141,000
'2/2w/Large Entrywelcomesyou to Perfect size home on a "WOW" golf
this spacious home. course lot.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


nber of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential,the
registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


- U U U U


PINE RIDGE Dpp *1 CITRUS HILLS
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd. VW, PruUdelLtial 20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Florida Showcase Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 Foria (352) 746-0744
Properties


E4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E4

sticks. Pizza bites are tasty, too. Sim-
ply roll out the dough, cut it into
small squares and place a piece of
mozzarella cheese (you can cut
string cheese into small pieces) and
pepperoni in the center of each
dough square. Roll the squares into
balls, drizzle olive oil and sprinkle
some grated Parmesan cheese on
the top and bake at 400 degrees F for
15 minutes. Serve with pizza sauce.
Spaghetti or marinara sauce works
well, too.
MEN
You can create a first-aid kit for
your home or vehicle, rather than
buying one. Add items such as an-
tibiotic ointment, adhesive band-
ages, cotton balls, antiseptic wipes,
calamine lotion, ChapStick, eye-
drops, sunscreen, instant cold com-
presses, hand-warmer packets,
tweezers, a thermometer, gauze and
pain-relieving medication. You can
also make a power-outage kit for
your home that holds items such as
candles, a lighter or matches, bat-
teries and flashlights. Don't spend
money on the containers for your
homemade kits reuse plastic cof-
fee canisters, baby-wipes contain-
ers, plastic ice-cream tubs, tackle
boxes or old lunchboxes.
The first reader tip has another
suggestion to hold your supplies:
Repurpose: I bought a multi-
pocket bag at the thrift store. I'm
going to use it to create a large first-
aid kit for my truck. S.D.,
Minnesota
Salvage notions: When I've got
used clothes that are so torn, worn
or stained that they aren't worthy of

1t1 CitrusCounty






WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
For a FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
$1.8 million closed and under contract.
Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com

(35 learn More
(35T2) 746-9924


even a donation to Goodwill, I glean
buttons, elastic, hooks, snaps and
zippers from them that I use later in
my sewing projects. I cut up the rest
of the fabric to use as rags or tear it
into strips to make rag rugs. CL.,
Mississippi
Turn off power: If you have cen-
tral air conditioning and you have a
big unit outside, go switch off the
breaker on the outside unit to avoid
using up "phantom power." Phan-
tom power is electricity that is
wasted on electrical appliances that
are plugged in but not powered up.
Many of these devices are designed
to come on quickly with the use of a
remote, which means that even
while they are off, they are drawing
energy and running up your electric
bill. S.S., Indiana
Handy measurement: Whenever I
find myself without a tape measure,
I can still get a reasonably accurate
measurement using currency Bills
are about six inches long, and I've
used them more than once in a
pinch to get a rough measurement.
- S.D., Minnesota
Get a hobby job: My hubby and I
are motorcycle enthusiasts, with two
Harleys of our own. I got a part-time
job at my favorite independent mo-
torcycle shop about a year ago to
earn a little extra money I love it!
Not only am I learning a lot about
the care and maintenance of motor-
cycles, I also get an employee dis-
count on parts and labor. We have a
consignment shelf at the shop for
people to sell used parts, and I've
saved a lot of money buying from
there. And I even have my own dis-
play in the shop where I sell key
See FRUGAL/Rage E14









GENTLEMAN'S FARM
7400 W. Glendale Ct., Dunnellon, FL
35 Acres farm offers privacy amongst
large oaks, gourmet kitchen, workshop
Barn and Stalls, Jetted tub, RV Parking,
Fireplace & security system. MLS #351844
Reduced price of $649,000
Directions: Hwy. 19 N to right on N. Citrus Ave. Continue
north approximately 8 miles to intersection of Citrus Ave
& Hwy 488. Continue through intersection, turn right on
W. Glendale Ct. home at end of road.
Rick Snell
352-794-6100 NsmmNEONo


Growing hybrid hollies


seventeen
species of
Ilex holly
evolved in eastern
North America.
Eleven species,
one naturally oc-
curring hybrid and
several varieties
occur in Florida,
according to
famed naturalist
Gil Nelson in his
2010 book "Best
Native Plants for
Southern Gardens.'


Affordable waterfront home 2 bedroom, 1.5
bath, DW mobile home with stucco outside
and shingle roof Large open living room 2
spacious bedrooms Workshop* boat dock
Quiet neighborhood on north end of Lake
TsalaApopka. MLS 359043 $38,900
d


Jane Weber
JANE'S
GARDEN


Nelson's 1994
pocket book "The
Trees of Florida"
was indispensable
for field naturalists
a decade ago. In
2003, his point-
form "Florida's
Best Native Land-
scape Plants" be-
came the best and
most accurate ref-
erence book for
Florida gardeners
and professionals.


All are available at the library


(


This 3/2/2, 2,100 sq. ft. home features formal
and more casual living areas Larqe
inside laundry Family room with fireplace
* Open kitchen area All on one acre. MLS
#357571 $199,500


CITY OF INVERNESS
CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT
HISTORIC HOME
1,300 sq. ft Cracker home Lots of rooms for
offices Showrooms Many uses Great lot with
ample parking Separate storage building City
water and sewer. MLS #357936 REDUCED-
NOW $134,900!!


A species is a category,
kind or sort of living thing,
plant or animal having simi-
lar attributes and given a log-
ical name or taxon (plural
taxa). Closely related species
are grouped in a genus
(plural genera). There are
about 350 species of Ilex. Sev-
eral closely related genera
are given a family name such
as Aquifoliaceae, with three
holly genera and some 400 in-
dividual species. Species do


See JANE/Page E11


KAREN E. MORTON
Hall of Fame Centurion Membe
E-mail kemorton@tampabay nrcon
Website:karenemorton con
(352) 726-6668 (352) 212-7595 NEW LISTING"JAMES ISLAND
TOLL FREE 1-800-543-9163 OPEN WATERFRONT HOME
Surrounded by Lake Henderson, this 4
i J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE bedroom, 3 bath home has views you can't
f 16A5 W Nt Main.Srf in-em- FI. 3AA50 find elsewhere. This home has been used as
S .. --: : .r:. a vacation home. Open great room with
''L' Z : r" .fireplace *Oversized qaraqe with workshop
PLUS a long dock stretching over sand
~~~~~~______~~~~_______ _bottom lake. MLS #359266 $520,000


""L"2USiW l ,ne INVERNESS HORSE/CATTLE RANCH WITHLACOOCHEE RIVER -
INVERNESS GOLF ANi COUNTRY CLUB One of the larertracts in the city limits. One owner- BASS BITING AT YOUR BACK DOOR!
Waterfront home Check the space in the 3 custom cedar home istruly one of a kind. Close the Nestled under the majestic oaks this Florida 2
bedroom 2 bath open floor plan design with forest for great trail riding. Super convenient to story 2000 sq. ft. stilt home is a fisherman's
over 2100 sq. ft of living area. Great home for town-just around the corner. 2700 sq. ft liv. area. dream. Spotless and sparkling, this home features
entertaining or active family living 3 Br 2 Great rm. w/beautiful beamed ceiling, stone OPEN GREAT ROOM WITH beautiful stone fireplace,
bath 2 car garage Located on canal just one fireplace, wood and laminate flooring, 3 bedrooms fully equipped updated kitchen. CAGED INGROUND
block from the club house. Where else can you (one currently used as art studio), wrap around POOL, lots and lots of storage. WORKSHOP. MOVE-
fish and golf in the same neighborhood??? porches, fencing, pastures, barn. This ranch is turn- IN READY. Additional lot optional for S125,000.
MLS 349550 WasS174,900 NOW $149,900 key. Call for showing 359026 $599,000 NOW $264,900 MLS #354170


INVERNESS GOLF & COUNTRY CLB WATERFRONT POOL HOME
Timeless elegance and comfort. This 3BR, 2.5BA pool
home feature formal din. rm, I. eat-in kit. overlooking
wonderful POOL area with summer kit. Huge master
suite with corner office area, split BRs, fam. rm. with
wood-burning fpl., In. inside laundry PLUS climate
controlled large storage closet in garage. 2 car gar.
plus golf cart storage. Boat house, lush landscaping.
MLSH355013. OFFERED AT $224,900.


IHI: ULL-NN
IN BEVERLY HILLS
2 Bedroom, 2 bath, single garage, GREAT
ROOM, bright and cheery kitchen, full
equipped, inside laundry. MLS # 358368.
PRICED TO SELL AT $49,900



CLASSIC HIGH-STYLE IN CITRUS HILLS
You don't need a decorator as this 2100 sq. ft.
home is MOVE-IN READY* 3 BR 2 BA Den/office
with beautiful coffered ceilings Travertine floors
flow throughout the living area Dream kitchen with
bright and cheery Good Morning Room Upgraded
cabinets All appliances included Elegant
master suite with fireplace and large bath area *
Caged Pool with back yard landscaped for privacy.
Oversized 2 car garage This home will not last.
MLS # 700908 $219,900.


BOLD & BEAUTIFUL
** GOSPEL ISLAND **
5 ACRES First Time Offered!!
Check out this kitchen with Granite and pull outs Top of the
line appliances Seamless glass window overlooking
backyard. 3 BR 2 Bath 2488 sq. ft. living area 3 car
garage Formal and Casual areas Elegant master bath *
Nestled in the woods and sheltered by the trees ** Not visible
from road, this custom dream home is a jewel and only
minutes from town. FIRST TIME OFFERED... MLS #701113
PRICE IS $296,900!


CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE


OOOE4LG CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 E5






E6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
.............................. .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information............352-563-5966
News information.......................................... 352-563-5660
................................. ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"



HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Growing vegetables:


Tips, tricks and classes


spring is in the air, and it's time to
think vegetable gardening! Veg-
etable gardening offers fresh air,
sunshine, exercise, enjoyment,
not to mention nutritious and
flavorful vegetables.
There's nothing quite like
having homegrown vegetables .
right at your back door and
now's the time to prepare for -.
spring vegetable gardening.
Before grabbing your shovel .
and rushing outdoors, there
are a few important considera- Joan Bi
tions prior to getting started. FLOI
Location of vegetable gar- FRIE
den: For convenience, locate LIV
the garden near the house, on a
well-drained site, close to a
source of water, and in a location that re-
ceives at least six hours of direct sunlight
daily With proper care, vegetables may
also be included in the landscape among
ornamental plants.
Have a plan: For best results, have a
garden plan that includes the name, loca-
tion, and planting dates of the vegetables
you want to grow. Spring vegetable gar-


I


den choices include sweet corn, cucum-
ber, tomato, squash, watermelon, can-
taloupe and several kinds of beans. For
best results, choose varieties
'- recommended for Florida. A
comprehensive planting guide
can be found at Florida Veg-
etable Garden Guide located
on the Web at:
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/vh021.
-" Soil Preparation: Garden-
ers often plant on whatever
soil type is available, but it is
adshaw usually worthwhile to improve
I|DA- the garden plot with additions
NDLY of organic matter such as ani-
OLY mal manure, rotted leaves,
ING compost, commercial soil
mixes and cover crops. Spade
or plow the plot at least three weeks be-
fore planting. At planting time, rework
the soil into a smooth, firm surface.
Before beginning your spring garden,
consider your soil's pH. Gardeners need
to know their soil's pH because it ulti-
mately affects the growth and quality of
their plants. To have your soil pH tested,
See VEGGIES/Page E10


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Inside...


Get kids organized
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E5
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Picture appears to be hand-colored photo; comic collection


D ear John: I have had
this painting or print
for about 40 years and
it was tucked away in a closet,
can you please help me with
identification. The signature
seems original and unique.
Thank you for any help you
can give me. G.C., Internet
Dear G.C.: The photographs
are not very helpful. The land- John S
scape picture appears to be a SIKOI
hand-colored photograph.
Wallace Nutting was a nation- AT
ally recognized name inAmer-
ica during the early 20th century His
popularity lead to others producing simi-
lar pictures. I think the signer of your pic-
ture was one of these photographers. I
was not able to decipher the signature on
your picture. Open the back of the picture
and see if there are any notations. Then
send a few good, clear photographs and
perhaps I can help further
Dear John: I have been entrusted


R

-I


with my brother's extensive
comic book collection. I do
not have an accurate count,
but estimate there to be ap-
proximately 1,000 to 1,500,
maybe more. They are from
-the Silver and Bronze age
and in very good condition
overall. How should I go
about selling the collection?
ikorski -M.E.B., Internet
ISKI'S Dear M.E.B.: I suggest the
first thing to do is make an in-
TI'C ventory of the collection. To
sell the collection a good re-
source is Heritage Auctions in Dallas,
Texas. Comic books are one of their spe-
cialties. They have set several high price
records for comic books. The website is
See ATTIC/Page E10
This picture appears to be a
hand-colored photograph, in the style of
Wallace Nutting.
Special to the Chronicle







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ranchers feeling the pinch of hay prices


ALICE WALLACE
Daily Camera

BOULDER, Colo. Three
years ago, Boulder County
rancher Bill Berg was yielding
about 1,000 bales of hay from his
fields.
It was plenty for him to feed
his small, but growing, herd of
cattle and plenty for him to sell
for $4 to $4.50 a bale.
Last year, Berg was lucky to
pull 450 bales from his land 9
acres of which had turned into a
"dust bowl."
Not having enough to feed his
12 head of cattle for his Ridge
Ranch Cattle Co. grass-fed beef
business, Berg shelled out any-
where from $10.50 to $14 a bale
to buy more.
That was if he could find the
hay
The nationwide drought cou-
pled with the fires in Colorado,
Texas and Oklahoma over the
past few years is hampering the
nation's hay industry, putting in-
creased pressure financially on
area ranchers, businesses and
nonprofit groups that rely on
finding high-quality feed for
their horses and steers.
"The hay is worth more than
my cows right now," Berg said.
The tightness in the industry
also has forced some ranchers to
give up their livestock and re-
sulted in the creation of a black


Associated Press
Bill Berg loads hay into his tractor before feeding his small herd of cattle at Ridge Ranch in Hygiene, Colo.
Three years ago, Berg was yielding about 1,000 bales of hay from his fields. It was plenty for him to feed
his small, but growing, herd of cattle and plenty for him to sell for $4 to $4.50 a bale. Last year, Berg
was lucky to pull 450 bales from his land, 9 acres of which had turned into a "dust bowl."


market for hay
During the past year, thieves
hit a smattering of Boulder
County farms including the
nonprofit Rocky Mountain Rid-


ing Therapy and ran off with
hundreds of bales.
Some local ranchers say
they're doing their best to
weather the short-term woes,


hoping that a wet spring could
turn their fortunes around.
"We need to get some rain or
some snow this year or every-
body's going to be in trouble,"


said Gina Elliott, co-owner of
the Boulder-based Colorado's
Best Beef company
As of Jan. 31, large squares of
supreme quality alfalfa grown in
northeastern Colorado carried a
value of $250 to $270 per ton, ac-
cording to the latest Colorado
Hay Report from the state arm
of the U.S. Department of Agri-
culture's Agricultural Marketing
Service.
This time in 2010, those prices
ranged from $110 to $120 per ton.
The wildfires that raged
throughout Colorado last sum-
mer put added pressure on the
state's overall forage supply, said
Tess Norvell, market reporter
for the state AMS bureau.
"Not only did the fires burn
available grazing lands, but have
also created added demand for
straw to go back on the burn
areas for reclamation," she
wrote in an email to the Daily
Camera. '"Add the fires to light
yields and the fact that Colorado
was already operating on lim-
ited carry-over of hay from the
previous year (as a lot of Col-
orado hay was shipped to Texas
in 2011 to assist their forage
needs during the Southern
drought last year) and our sup-
plies are really down this year"
Concurrently, demand also
has softened somewhat, she

See HAY/Page E15


I "Always There For You"
GAIL COOPER
mu illiin, million DollafII Rea.ilo
Cell: (352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3. mindsprmng.com


* 3/2/2 home with wooded setting 3+office/2/3 on 2 elevated lots
* Two-sided stone fireplace Pool w/waterfall newer pump & filter
* Roof replaced in 2011 Plantation shutters in office & dining room
* New AC/heat in 2011 Spacious laundry room with great storage
* Florida room has 18" tile flooring 800 sq ft garage-plenty ofroom forworkshop
* Dual pane Pella windows Home warranty for buyers
#700102 $118,000 #356183 $229,000
See .JVirItu .IIIou ,.i..UJJIJr II.I.I..Ie IIB.I..m


I TO SETTLE ESTATE-FLORAL CITY, FL
Gorgeous oaks and backdrop on Lake Magnolia.
3BR/2BA DW on large lot. Central water.
$32,500 MLS#359133


-"- I.- -.-- ""-1
NATURE'S PARADISE-FLORAL CITY, FI
Waterfront 2-story on 2.27 acres of nature,
privacy and trees.
S 149,900 MLS#358757


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email:roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 302-6714 3 -


f] AMERICAN REALTY & INVESTMENTS
NNE 4511 N. Lecano Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Office: 352-746-3600


Fran Perezf

cell (352) 586-8885 |A


1600 N. OTTAWAAVE.
-LECANTO
__Nestled amongst 2.31 acres sits this
cute 2326 Ivg. sq. ft. 3/2 home
S. needs a lite TLC rugs, paint, etc. but
is bright and airey. Large kitchen w/breakfast bar. Wood burning fireplace keeps you cozy
and comfy come winter's cold. Two screened rooms to view the enormous backyard w/
wood deck attached. Large shed to store tools, private, but close to everything. Come take
a look and create your own paradise. $115,000 Call Fran 352-586-8885
4515 W. BONANZA DR.
BEVERLY HILLS
.- 1Gentlemen's turn key horse farm.
ITree lined circular driveway divided
by two 4/5 board paddocks. Lovely
expanded ranch pool home set up as mother/daughter 3500 sq. ft. 6 bdrms. 5 baths
2/1 car garages. solar heated pool overlooking barn, paddocks and horses. Barn has
4 large stalls w/separate tack & feed rooms w/wash area. Property has 4 huge
paddocks w/improved pasture. 1 ac. Underground electric dog containment so much
forth horse person. Must see to appreciate $379,000 call fran 352-586-8885
:i = .:^ ^ .-^ ^ a i~ ^ ^ aii


DIVE BY= *,i = DRIVE^= BY ~ i = RV Y*DRV Y*DIVE B


m


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 E7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IZATIO


1


Simple tricks to straighten up kids' bedrooms


ORG.


See KIDS/Page E9


;~r~- ~
'if
~I


MELISSA RAYWORTH
Associated Press
The conversation often starts
with, "Where are your shoes?"
For many parents trying to
get out the door on time in the
morning, a child with a disor-
ganized bedroom can be a huge
roadblock. The clock is ticking.
The bus is coming. And your off-
spring is searching for his favorite
hoodie.
The day often ends with similar
challenges: "Is your backpack
ready for school tomorrow?"
"Where are your library books?"
Getting a child's room organ-
ized can be the first step toward
smoother mornings and more
peaceful evenings.
"It was nice to be organized 20
years ago," says organizing con-
sultant Kathryn Bechen, author of
"Small Space Organizing: A
Room-by-Room Guide to Maximiz-
ing Your Space" (Revell, 2012).
But given how busy we are today,
she says, "it's become a necessity."
Here are some experts' tips on
decorating and arranging your
child's bedroom in ways that will
simplify daily life.
Get them excited
No need for full-scale redeco-
rating. An offer to rearrange items
and perhaps add a few new ones
will probably get your child ex-
cited enough to help shape up her
space.
"Try to make it fun," Bechen
says. "Take one whole Saturday or
Sunday for the whole family to
work on it."
Pare down
Eliminating clutter isn't simple,
especially when kids would prefer


The WallPops Dry-Erase Chalk Message
Board from Brewster Home Fashions can
be used for a checklist of chores or to
track appointments.
Associated Press





T MoVi4es


E8 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


KIDS
Continued from Page E8

not to part with anything.
Donna Smallin, author
and creator of unclut-
ter.com, suggests having
kids help haul everything
they own into the hallway
outside their room. When
the room is empty, have
them bring back in only
their favorite or most nec-
essary things. You can su-
pervise: When all the
necessities are back in,
start discussing what
might be good to give
away, sell or box up for
storing in an attic or base-
ment. Reassure the child
that items in storage can
always come out again
later.
If the room includes a
desk, keep it as unclut-
tered as possible, suggests
Dr Martin L. Kutscher,
pediatric neurologist and
co-author of "Organizing


the Disorganized Child"
(William Morrow Paper-
backs, 2009).
Get a bin that holds
hanging file folders to
store finished papers that
come home from school
or pending homework.
Another small bin can
hold pens, pencils and a
few other supplies
needed for schoolwork.
Otherwise, keep the desk
clear
Rethink the closet
To get children excited
about actually putting
things away in the closet,
let them "paint it a neat
color inside," says
Bechen. It can be as out-
rageous as they'd like; it's
hidden behind a door. If
they love it and it feels
personal, she says, they're
more likely to use it. (For
kids who share a room, let
each choose the color for
one side of the closet.)
Then, work with their
habits: If your child isn't a


fan of hanging up cloth-
ing, consider filling some
or all of the closet with
open shelving.
Put bins or baskets on
each shelf, labeling with
words and/or pictures to
describe what belongs
inside.
You might prefer T-
shirts to be neatly folded,
says Smallin, but having
them wrangled in large
baskets is better than
finding them on the floor.
If shoes get misplaced,
add a large crate to the
closet where the child can


drop them.
If you will be using the
closet rod, Smallin sug-
gests adding a small dou-
ble rod that hangs below
one portion of the main
rod. Put items the child
wears most often on the
lower rod, so they're
within easy reach. Or use
this extra rod for the
clothing the child will
wear to school this week.
If those items are chosen
in advance and all located
in one place, you won't
spend time searching for
them.


Get playful
Make straightening up
fun.
Consider buying one
large trashcan for sports
equipment and another to
use as a hamper. Let the
child label and personal-
ize the outside. You can
even add a plastic basket-
ball hoop to the top of
each trash can, so the
child can have fun tossing
items inside.
"Who doesn't love to
throw stuff?" asks
Smallin.


I T "


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 E9

Also, have the child
decorate a special bin or
basket where tomorrow's
clothes and shoes will go.
Then choose a permanent
spot for it. Each night,
toss in everything your
child will wear tomorrow
(including the packed,
zipped school bag). Better
to find missing socks and
debate which clothes are
appropriate in the
evening than do it when
the school bus is on its
way

See Page E15


Amanda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty 7
BROKER/ASSOC.'REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR

4AL S =-1-- 11 S i vi111111


6262 W SETTLER
5/4/3 700993 $379,900


a.-


Dir: 491, East on Oak Riddge
Entrance, Left on Silver Plam
6121 N. SILVER PALM
3/2.5/2 358309 $148,500


8410 N. SAXON WAY 10953 N. TARTAN 6560 N. DELTONA BLVD. 7170 N. GRACKLE 7973 N. GOLFVIEW
3/2/2 70484 $110,000 4/2/2 355923 $106,900 | 3/2.5/2 700080 $119,900 3/2/2 700780 $109,900 3/2/2 701163 $124,900


-


1503 & 1525 W. EVERGREEN .dj..
5/5/2 car garage attached and 2 car detached garage. 4210 E. LAKE PARK DR. 2047 W. PARAGON LN. 7239 COTTAGE 9328 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD.
700929 $279,900 2/1.5 359138 $81,900 3/2/2 358792 $149900 2/1CPDet.4+CPDet. 357796 $139,900 3/2/1 356581 $69,900





16 S. ADAMS 31 N. MELBOURNE 18 TRUMAN 2616 E. VENUS 6260 S. CANNA LILY 13290 S. OAKVIEW
2/1 356532 $42,900 2/2/2 700838 $45,000 2/2/1 701074 $54,750 3/2 700201 $24,900 3/2 359137 $59,900 4/2358122 $109,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


Jackide Dacvis
^ American Realty & Investments
m* 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
ERA (352) 634-2371 cell
REAL EITATE jackie@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS: bidavis.com










GENTLY LIVED IN only part of each year by snowbirds, this 3 bedroom, 2 bath,
2-car garage home is about to have a new roof. Sitting on a corner lot the home
enjoys half of the lot to the south for a total of .43 acres with a fenced rear yard. The
large retention area (DRA) across the street adds to its sense of seclusion while still
benefitting from nice neighbors. The split and open floor plan uses bedroom #3 as a
family room and can easily be made back into a bedroom. Newer tile floors in both
baths, 2 sinks in master bath, soaktub in interior laundry; central vac; eat-in kitchen
with a sunny nook $94,000 MLS 701084
--^5., :.^^^S ,^(ff^^


CRISP AND NEW LOOKING. How come? Because th s was an unlived-in model that
was installed 12/12 and that's how new the C/H/A is. 3 Bedrooms, 2 baths, an eat-in
kitchen, a detached 20' x 31' 2-car garage, a 12' x 20' workshop and a 7' x 12' block
building for a shed. The washer/dryer hookup is in the mobile but the seller uses the
shed as a laundry. Full RV hookup, too. All on 4.3 acres. The seller attests to having
good water and offers his unused water softener. $79,900 MLS 701182


2587 W. ANGOLA
14/3/3 701069 $244.9001







E10 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013


VEGGIES
Continued from Page E6

bring a sample to Citrus County Ex-
tension, 3650 W Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, for analysis. A $3 fee will be
charged to analyze your sample.
Need more help? For those indi-
viduals who have wanted to try
growing vegetables, fruits or flowers,
but are concerned about having a
brown thumb, UF/IFAS Citrus
County Extension in conjunction
with the United Way will offer work-
shops to enhance your knowledge
and gardening abilities. Three work-
shops will be presented in March to
hone your gardening skills. Join us
for the following:
Incredible Edible Landscape:
10 a.m. March 1. about practical in-
tegration of vegetables, herbs, and
fruit plants into your landscape.
Using edibles in landscape design
can enhance a garden by providing a
unique ornamental component with
additional health, aesthetic and eco-
nomic benefits.
Gardening in small spaces -
container growing: 10 a.m. March 8.
You don't need a plot of land to grow
fresh vegetables. Many vegetables
lend themselves well to container
gardening. With some thought al-
most any vegetable can be adapted
to growing in a pot.
Paydirt in your yard compost-
ing: 10 a.m. March 15. Turn garden
trash into soil enhancing treasures
through composting. Discover how
simple composting can be and learn
the common mistakes made and
how to correct them.
To participate in any of the work-
shops listed above, pre-register by
calling 352-527-5700. Space is lim-
ited and preregistration is required.
A $5 registration fee will be charged
for each program. All workshops
will be held University of


MEET AND GREET
Clubs are invited to submit in-
formation about regular meet-
ings for publication on the
Community page each
weekday.
Include the name of the or-
ganization, the time, day and
place of the meeting, whether
it meets weekly, biweekly or
monthly, and whom to call for
details.


Florida/IFAS Citrus County Exten-
sion located at 3650 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 1, Lecanto, FL 34461.
For more information, please call
Citrus County Extension at 352-527-
5700.
Citrus County Extension links the
public with the University of
Florida/IFAS's knowledge, research
and resources to address youth, fam-
ily, community and agricultural
needs. Programs and activities of-
fered by the Extension Service are
available to all persons without re-
gard to race, color, handicap, sex, re-
ligion,or national origin.


Dr Joan Bradshaw is the natural
resource conservation faculty for
specialized programs in Citrus,
Hernando, Pasco and Sumter
counties for the University of
Florida/IFAS Cooperative
Extension Service.


000E4EP


ED^
AIL


,4lxcueder
REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
-.... (;2? 79;_-66ii3


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

www.ha.com. Let us know
how things work out.
Dear John: I have the metal
urn in the attached photo-
graph. Can you please identify
this piece? I received it about
60 years ago as a wedding gift
-L., Internet
Dear L: I think you have a
jardiniere. It appears to be
made of copper and origi-
nally perhaps silver plated. I
will assume you have exam-
ined the piece for marks and
found none. It was likely
made in the Middle East per-
haps close to 100 years ago.
There is no specific collector
interest. Potential dollar
value is catch-as-catch-can.


eator


Realtor


IHERNANDO 1974 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath M/ bath, 84 ft on deep water canal, covered
H, one blk from Tsala Apopka Lake for boathouse (21 x 30), dock, seawall, tile floors,
." ,, 1.:.... '1 P.mnellon, Ocala new carpet m bedrooms, new roof, double paned e
i_. ... .1 1. eat-in kitchen, windows, updated kitchen & baths. #358553


LECANTO Nice half acre with well
septic and impact fees paid. Mobile not
livable but, take it off and replace with
new. Center of county, lecanto school dist.
#356605 $18,000


HOMOSASSA 3/2 home on 160 acres,(2-80
ac tracts) surrounded by 5 000 acre Homosassa

independent home is powered by photo-
electnc cells & generator. #352951 $500,000


. I 'I %i i 1< \,' I .
bedroom, 2 bath, D/W M/H .....
S. ... i .. ...try kitchen, large
master bath w/garden tub & separate shower.
Owner Financing #354504 $99,500





HOMOSASSA nice older mobile w/2
bedrooms, 1 bath, large front and rear
screened porches. Newer roofover in
2010, newer appliances approximately 2
years old. Fullly fenced backyard with
shed. #700919 $22,500
I| .-a-- l


hI CE '1T T l i. ..1.1 .. HERNANDO 2004 HFleetwood D/W M/H 4
t .. i 11 .. .. bedrooms, 2 baths, on 2.5 acres w/ hvimg &
cI .. i .. family room w/ fireplace. Needs refrigerator,
(I .11 i I I dishwasher and sc.
planned on being living area. #359722 $851100 A/C and carpet. "'-2, i.


Dear John: Recently my
husband did some research
on a print that I bought at a
junk store several years ago. It
is rather ugly, but at the same
time, it has a certain pres-
ence, the artist is Georges
Braque. The signature
matches the one online. The
title is "Nature Morte," the
one we looked at was a print
that had an auction estimate
of $4,000 to $5,000. I would be
interested in selling it I look
forward to seeing what you
have to say. S. W, Internet
Dear S.W: Georges Braque,
1882-1963, was a French artist
whose work is eagerly sought
after by art collectors. His


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

category was Avant Garde or
non-representational, e.g., ab-
straction. In order to help you
further, I need a couple good
clear photographs. Make sure
to examine the back of the
picture for any other infor-
mation that may be there.


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the antiques
business for 30 years. He
hosts a call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from
noon to 1 p.m. Send ques-
tions to Sikorski's Attic, PO.
Box2513, Ocala 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and en-
gagement announcements, anniversaries, birth an-
nouncements and first birthdays.


9,, GITTA BARTH
Investors Realty REALTOR
of Citrus County, Inc. Cell: (352) 220-0466
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com gbarth@myflorida-house .com






MOVE RIGHT IN A BOATER'S DREAM
NATURE LOVERS BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS Sailboat water (no bridges); 240
3/2/2 Ranch on f(60 acres, very Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home on a 1 acre ,
3/2 2 Ranch on 60 acres, very comer lot withmatureoaktrees and lots feet of seawall; stationary &
I I I of privacy! Very well maintained, new floating dock; spacious modem 3/
] .'i..i .h. i h. ,_ i'... roof 05/09. Just bring your suitcase and 2.5 home sits high and dry (never
ai, .... I .1 ... i .... t move right in! Community features flooded) on 2 lots. This meticu-
golf, tennis, clubhouse, lously maintained property is a
,, ,,, $400,000 MLS #358397 $169,000 must see! $499,000





NORTHRIDGE ESTATES -
Villages of Citrus Hills, well known for
QUICK TRIP OUT INTO I M H an active Flonida lifestyle! 3/2/2 home on
THE GULF OF MEXICO! NATURE'S 1 acre, open floor plan, wood burning
3/3/1 Spanish style home, seawall and BEST KEPT SECRET fireplace, a sparkling pool and spacious
boat slip on deep water canal no 3/2 5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River covered lanai will make you feel at home
bridges to the Crystal River! Tile floors, Oaks East, a gated waterfront right away.A recent facelift included new
bonus room, fireplace, newer roof and community on the Withlacoochee River paint and flooring, and A/C, range and
windows; great income potential, too! $199,900 the garage door were replaced in 2012.
MLS 359564 $220,000 will buy you this peace of heaven! MLS700472 $142,500






CLASSIC AND LIVING ON THE WATER! 4590 WORLDWIDE DR., INVERNESS
CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is Completely updated 3/2 home! New. roof
the right setting for living the Florida 10/12, A/C & e-panel 01/12, windows
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront lifestyle. Open and airy with the 01/11, W/H 2009! Florida room, fenced
estate w/pool and separate apartment. A plantation shutters diffusing the backyard, 2 sheds, comer lot, quiet
true masterpiece in a park like setting sunlight. 190 ft. of seawall gives you location with lots of green Close to town,
off Lake Tsala Apopka, waiting for plenty of room to dock all the water medical and shopping What's left for.
l I ...4 ..I $399,500 iii $489,000 .0 i 1 0I i i i ... J, 0 i
1 11 $399,500 $489,000 .. .... $62,000







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



JANE
Continued from Page E5

not usually crossbreed; however,
rare exceptions and man-made
manipulations can occur.
One naturally occurring hy-
brid is the popular Topal Holly,
Ilex x attenuata, readily avail-
able at garden centers and local
nurseries. One parent is Ameri-
can Holly, I. opaca, ranging from
Central Florida to Maine and
west to eastern Texas. The other
parent is probably Dahoon
Holly, I. cassine, although
Myrtleleaf Holly, I. myrtifolia, is
also a candidate.
Both the latter hollies have
been manually and successfully
crossed with American Holly to
produce named cultivars. The
resulting plant is sterile, so can-


not reproduce by seeds. Stock is
grown from rooting cuttings or
grafting stems on related root-
stock. Suckers sprouting below a
graft will be of the parent root-
stock. These hybrids are faster-
growing than American Holly
Topal Holly "East Palatka" was
selected in the 1920s from a natu-
rally occurring hybrid H. Harold
Hume, found near East Palatka
on the St. Johns River in north-
east Florida. It thrives from Zone
7 to 10. Reaching 40 feet at matu-
rity "East Palatka" has a spread
of 15 feet Shape is symmetrical
like a cone. It is frequently
pruned to maintain a small shrub
shape for up to 10 years. Severe
pruning leads to disease prob-
lems and ruins the beautiful nat-
ural shape of the tree.
"East Palatka"'is evergreen,
drought-tolerant once estab-
lished, thrives in Central and


Topal Holly "East Palatka" was selected

in the 1920s from a naturally occurring

hybrid H. Harold Hume, found near

East Palatka on the St. Johns River in

northeast Florida. It thrives from

Zone 7 to 10.


North Florida's torrid, wet, hot
summers and is pest- and dis-
ease-free locally It sets masses of
bright red fruit in time for the
winter holidays. Birds relish the
abundant food and find roosting
sites among the dense leaves
where they are safe from preda-
tors. It flowers around May lo-
cally Green berries swell over the
summer and ripen in December
"Savannah" Holly is a Topal hy-
brid found in the 1960s in Georgia.


It looks more like American Holly
than does 'East Palatka.' Rela-
tively faster growing than its par-
ent, "Savannah" (cold Z7-9, 9-4
heat zone) does not suffer Central
Florida's hot zone 10 summers, as
well as "East Palatka." It reaches
45 feet tall and about 10 feet wide.
It is useful as a specimen, parking
lot, city and roadside tree.
The third Topal group is
called "Foster" hybrids. Nelson
wrote they are naturally occur-


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 Ell

ring crosses of American and
Dahoon Hollies originally pro-
duced in Bessemer, Alabama, in
the 1940s. "Foster" hollies grow
to about 15 to 25 feet tall and 12
feet wide. Leaves are long and
narrow like those of Dahoon
Holly, but glossy and have spiny
lobes like American Holly
Seeds of hybrid Topal hollies
are sterile, so will not germinate
and produce seedlings. How-
ever, ample berries ripen in win-
ter to feed wildlife.


Jane Weber is a professional
gardener and consultant.
Semi-retired, she grows
thousands of native plants.
Visitors are welcome to her
Dunnellon, Marion County,
garden. For an appointment,
call 352-249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


Real Estate

Classifieds



SiS'ro~ffwn


To place an ad, call 563-5966


-: -.Classifieds

In Print

Oand




All

The Time


II*i


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!





INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
S1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!


--I.
CRYSTAL RIVER
D/W 3br/2ba + CP
Sunroom, furn, incl. w/d,
fenced yd. $550 me
12mo lease 1st & Last
due @ signing
865-414-2318 or
865-8044290
HERNANDO
2/2 $450. mo. 1st last
+dep 352-201-2428
HOMOSASSA
2/1 $525-$550 mo.
352-464-3159
HOMOSASSA
2BR/2 BA, No Pets
$500 (352) 628-5696
OLD HOMOSASSA
2 bedroom. 1-1/2 bath.
$475/mo $400 dep pool
and clubhouse
3526284441


must sell
- I. D
2006 FLEETWOOD
ENTERTAINER. 32X66.
OWNER MUST SELL!
CALL (352) 795-1272

43,900. 3/2,Dblewide.
Delivered & set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr,
warr., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P& W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807

2/1, DW, H/A, 12x 20
glass porch Co. water
& sewer, paved rd.
No HOA $49,995 firm
$15,000 down, own fi-
nan. (352) 567-2031


V THIS OUT!
2br 2ba Single Wide
12years YOUNG
14X66. Trade in.
WILL GO FAST!
$14,900 YOUR BABY
$19,900 Incls Delv,
Set, New A/C, skirt &
steps, Must See!
NO HIDDEN FEES.
CALL (352) 795-1272

BIG
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Hnder $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183


Homosassa
Dbl. Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$69,900 (352) 621-0192
INVERNESS
2b/2%/2 ba, 1/2 acre
off Turner Camp Rd
a/c, heat pump 3yrs.
old, 30ft scn porch &
48'open porch on other
side, new septic, 18'x31'
building w/ 220 electric,
shed, fenced, on canal
$68,000 352-726-1791
INVERNESS
55+ Park 14 x 58,
2/1 '2, furniture,
appliances, shed,
scrn. porch, $8,500.
(352) 419-5133


NEW 2013
2br 2ba
Doublewide w/10 year
Warranty $39,900
Delivered & setup, alc,
skirt, steps.
Call(352) 795-1272


NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181


-I.-
New Palm Harbor
Homes Mobile Condo
$39,000. Delivered to
your site $0 down
financing. John
Lyons 800-622-2832
ext 210





For Sale %9
FLORAL CITY
Exceptionally Nice
3/2 on Beautiful 1/4 AC,
treed lot, garage, shed,
dock, Ideal for Fishing/
Airboats $95,900
716-523-8730


2BR/12%BA, MH &
Land Needs little Work
$17,500 9340 W.Tonto
Dr., Crystal River
Call 352-382-1544 or
813-789-7431
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 602/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Considering
ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


HERNANDO/486, Lg.
Wkshop 2/1/den SW,
w/AC, 1 +acre, $43,500,
Cridland Real Estate
JDesha(352)634-6340

HOME-ON-LAND
Only $59,900, 3/2
"like new" on 2 acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,350
dwon, $319.22/mo
P&I, W.A.C. Owner
can finance. Call
352-621-9182
Over 3,000 Homes
and Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
*Winter Specials *
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
2/2 New Model $59K
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

FLORAL CITY
DW, 2/2/2 carport
Screen room, shed,
all you need is a tooth-
brush to move in
$17,500. Lot Rent $183.
352-344-2420

HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $179/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977

In Park, On Lake
Rousseau, furnished,
2BR, IBA, CHA
tile & laminate floor-
ing 10 x 20 porch,
w/vynil wind., open
deck + 2 outdr. stor-
age sheds, Low lot
rent $11,500.
(828) 260-3146 Cell

LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access. ramp and
shower $25,000.
352-212-6804

LECANTO 55+ PK
MUST SELL
3br/2ba. Furn, Cpt,
Shed, New Roof,
CHA, washer/dryer,
MAKE OFFER
931-210-0581

Sandy Oak 55+ RV PK
14x60 split 2/2, new
heat/ac, remodeled,
furn. Ig scnd in FL Rm.
55 ft crpt w/laundry
room, 989-858-0879

STONEBROOK, CR
Pondview/Gourmet
Kitch, 2Br, MSuite,
$51,900, Cridland RE,
Jackie 352-634-6340







RENTAL MANAGEMENT
SREALTYp INC. p
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounityHomieRentals.comn
HOMOSASSA
2 Balsam C. S ..................... $1400
/3/3 POOL hme i Sl nc. 001d I n S.
2278 Sandb urg P.................. 00
2/1 duplex, ind. lawncare
8140 Miss Maggie Dr. #1 ,.....$550
2/1 dup x, inl. utilities with caps
41 Birchtree St ..................... $800
2/2/2 St W sp ous 1692 sq. ft. home
HERNANDO
5164N. Dewey Way .............. $775
3/2 DW newer mobile on 1/2 ACR
994 E. Winnetka St ................ $625
2/1.5 mobile on ACRI
CRYSTAL RIVER
9779 W. Cleveland Ln...............$675
2/2/1 cbse to See Rivers Hosp.
BEVERLY HILLS
9 Daniel St ............................. $650


331645 W. tMAINST




INVERNESS, FL
2 ArGENT $L850




Need a Good Tenant?


3/2/2 AvailableMarch...$800

2/1/1 .........................$650

2/2 Townhouse.............$700

3/2/2............... .....$800
2/1..................... $600
22/2 .... ................ $850

2/C/Carport............$650

2/2/1...................... $550
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
SRealtor-Associate
S352-726-9010
Chassahowitzka
2/2, fenc. Yd/DW $500
AGENT (352) 382-1000

-m


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully furn. efficiency
w/ equipped kitchen.
All utilities cable,
Internet & cleaning
provided. $699/mo
352-586-1813
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
S. Inverness
Country Cottage for 1
person, all included
$450pr month, $300 dep
727-916-1119




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Ap2S, 2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

Get .


Results in
the


homefront
class ifieds


CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bedroom
Apartments for Rent
352-465-2985

CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815

INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great
Loc., clean & roomy.
no pets $500.mo 1st. &
Last $300. Sec.
352-341-1847

LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/613-6000

SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant
Rd. to So. on Talla-
hasse Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719


V.. EAUALHOUSINO
OPPORTUNITY





CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret
Harbour Apts. Newly
remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incl Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037

CRYSTAL RIVER
LG 2/1 water, sewer,
garbage, w/d hkup,
lawn inc. $475 mo.
(352) 212-9205
or 352-212-7922




CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy 19 Downtown
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000 SF, exc. loc.
$795/mo 352-634-2528




HERNANDO
4 BR, 2 BA, Playroom &
office, fenc. yard, on
over /2AC, or Comm.
Office on Hwy 200
$875 + Sec. 344-3084

HERNANDO
APROX. 1100 SQ FT
OFFICE ON OVER 1/2
ACRE ON HWY 200
$625 mo.352-344-3084
LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza,
Office/Retail, CR 486,
900 sf. @ $700+ util. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801


HOMOSASSA
RIVERFRONT, 2/2/1,
Dock & Pool, H20 IncI
$950. mo. + $950. sec.
No pets 407-415-0622
www.moverightin.com
INVERNESS
Whispering Pines Villa
3/2/2 w/ enclosed patio,
$850 F/L/S, BK/CK req
321-303-0346




LECANTO 2/2
CHA, W/D, fncd. back
yrd, Pets Ok $625/mo.
(860) 334-1320




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 Sm house incl.
electric. $475 per mo.
1st/last/sec. References
352-628-1062




BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, Fl. rm., CHA, $495
35 Golden St 464-2701
BEVERLY HILLS
1/1/ w/ FL room $450.
mo. (352)897-4447 or
697-1384
Beverly Hills
2/1 $475.00
352-422-2433
Beverly Hills Rental
1/1 with carport, $500
monthly and $500 Se-
curity deposit.
352-249-6098
BLACK DIAMOND
Home for rent from
$1,100/mo. Bob
Coldwell Banker
634-4286
Crystal River
2 BR, 2 Full BA, 2-car
gar., enclosed back
porch and pool, shed.
Only $750.
4251 N. Concord Dr.
352-382-1373.
Crystal River North
Lease w/ opt. country
setting 2/1, on 1/2 AC,
$550/ mo $550 dep
Firm (352)795-0161
DUNNELLON
Rainbow Springs
Rent/Rent To own
Georgous, 2/2/2
Country Club Home
Fireplace, D Washer
Carpeted, lanai,
spotless 1/2 acre
quiet. Special $799.
352-527-0493
HERNANDO
4 BR, 2 BA, Playroom &
office, fenc. yard, on
over i AC, or Comm.
Office on Hwy 200
$875 + Sec. 344-3084
Hernando
Rentals
from $425.00 @ MO.
Call A.W.
'Skip' Craven
352-464-1515


Water Incl. CHA $496.
220-2447 or 212-2051
INVERNESS
Country Living on
Large % acre lot. 3 bd.,
2 ba. home. Garden
and fenced areas. Well
& septic, so no water
bill! $595. 352-476-4964
Sugarmill Woods
2/2/2, 2 MB Rrms
$850. 352-302-4057
Sugarmill Woods
2006,4/2/2, appl. inc.
$900, 319-371-9843
SUGARMILL
WOODS 4/2/2
1/3ac. $1100. mo.
727-919-0797




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225
HOMOSASSA, FL
3 bedroom. 2 bath.
Completely remodeled
fully furnished, carport,
& covered dock. House
is in a no wake zone
with beautiful view down
the river. No pets, no
smoking. $1,450. mo.
Long Term Only,
386-527-0126












-I
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/2, privacy/space,
must love dogs, $750
(352) 422-5735



INVERNESS
Pool home to share
w/fem-Priv BR/BAIWIC.
N/S,Employed w/ref.
$450/mo incl until, $200
sec.726-8982
INVERNESS
Rm. for Rent, turn.
Share large DW, Util.
incl'd, $325 + $100
sec. 352-726-0652



CRYSTAL RIVER

Rentals 352-634-0129




20 DOCKABLE
ACRES: St. Lucie
Waterway $189,500.
45mins boat Atlantic;
5mins boat Lake
Okeechobee.
Beautiful land,
abundant wildlife.
Gated/Privacy.
888-716-2259 Gulf
Atlantic Land, Broker.

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Developed site with
gazebo & storage bldg,
reduced to $49,500.
Separate storage
lot available. (RV sold).
For info and pictures
Click on
detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


RelEstt


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
cross landrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.








commercial


AUCTION





5 WILLIAM TELL LN
Beverly Hills, FL
2,384- SF Office Bldg
on .38- Acres Zoned GNC
Agent: Marvin Puryear
Coldwell Banker
7- 7-A -ACfff


3% to Buyer's Agents!
OPEN
INSPECTION:
Wed &Thurs, Mar 13 & 14
12:00 2:00 pm

HUDSON&
MARSHALL
866.539.9547
5% buyer's premium.
5% down, of which $5,000 in
certified funds required
see website for
terms & conditions
H&M CQ1035357, AB110; B. G.
Hudson, Jr., BK3006464, AU230


INVERNESS
3/2/2 waterfront pool hm
on Lisa Ct, 1/2 acre lot
quiet St, whole house
generator $229,000
352-419-8337


TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $58,500. Call
352-638-0905


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


CIr-mNicIf


HERNANDO
Building Off Hwy 200,
$800.mo 352-201-2428




2 ACRES
Quiet Country Setting
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sqftLA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area
only 20 Min. to Ocala
$127,000
Call 352-302-6784
for appt.



PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything! 4/3
w/7 car
garage/workshop &
in-law suite on 5.83 ac-
res.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164


Your World

a4 9aleo at"4


E12 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013


inlaw suite on 2mA ac.
HW firs, granite cntrs.
2009 Custom Home
S. McDermott (352)
697-1593 Cridland RE



Beverly Hills
2/1 family room and
carport, investment or
seasonal living $38,900
352-422-2433
HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2/1/1 needs paint &
cosmetics $23k
**cash only
352-503-3245



Custom Home,
3 bedroom, 2%m bath,
w/Master w/DBL
walk-ins + bath +
den/off. 2+ car garage.
1 Acre. MUST SEE!
$249,900.
352-860-0444



Beautiful Whispering
Pines Villa $79,900
Managed, low Maint.
fee endowed for sudden
expenses, walk to park
352-341-0170
352-726-5263
NICE HOUSE on
Nice Street $79,000
2/1 / 1, Attached
carport w/ 12 x 32
scn. por., built in '95
on 1/2 acre lot fenced
12x14 matching out
building, New roof,
stucco paint, flooring,
upper line apple's,
irrigation & water
system.,
taxes & ins. $1,135 yr
606-425-7832

Get
Results in
the
home ront
classified!







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


H
FSBO 3/2/2 Scrn Porch,
metal roof, appls, CHA,
fans, verticals, shed,
fence, deck, spklrs, near
dog park. $120,000
(352) 586-0872



3BD, 2BA, 2Gar,
Gas fireplace, on
Water, Main Canal,
dock large lot with
fruit trees. $138,000
(321) 303-2875



AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RFAMIC
REALTY ONE



3BR 2BA 1,500 sq. ft.,
6823 W. Merrivale Ln
Built 2006, Fully
Furnished, by Owner,
$77,000 obo
(260) 348-9667
AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number


REALTY ONE



4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home
$65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell


I ISI


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!
BETTY HUNT
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


3,000 sf, granite coun-
ters, SS appl's., wood
firs., Reduced $25,000
Asking $235,000
850-585-4026


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
gail@citrusrealtor
cornn
www.citrusrealtor
.corn
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.


Your World





C RONmCLE


I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!






DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com




iouC\\ 01dd fiirt

Need a: jobll
ol i.1
qualified
employee?

This area's
#1
employment
source!


Classifieds
gggigagg i gig i- u


Phyllis
Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503







SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!
352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


#1 Employment source is

www.chronicleonline.com


Bankruptcy Waterfront Condo Dev
Crystal River, FL
Tuesday, February 26 @ 11:00 AM ET


No Minimum Bid subject to court approval
* Bid in person or online (during live auction only)
* 9 Condos waterfront and interior
* 33 lots and acreage
* Purchase one property or buy them all
Please see website for full details.
Tranzon Driggers Walter J. Driggers, III, Lic. Real
Estate Broker, FL Lic# AU707 & AB3145 I 10% BP
Case No. 6:10-bk-07720-KSJ L


bI M 877-374-4437


m


H








TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant



3/2 pool home on 10
acres w/ FP, zoned
agriculture, walk to all
schools. $179,900
(727) 528-2803 or
727-698-0723


Office Open
7 Days a Week
LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFureCoast
Propertles.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"


Get
Results in
the
homefront
cldassifiedsi


Ftin Your Oreau, Hom ,
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.ch roniclehomefinder.com


Brooksville Deeded
spacious, shaded cnr
lot, 1BR/1BA, Large FL
room, Large storage
shed & patio. 55+ RV
Park w/ heated pool,
and music activities,
$36,000 352-848-0448,
352- 428-0462 anytime

HOME FOR SALE
NORTON, VA
5Bd/2%/Ba inc. 3 lots
70miles from Bristol
Racetrack $69,000
276-393-0446 OR
276-679-1331





"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


2BD 11%BA 2 Carport
on Lake Rousseau
Dunnellon 1.4 AC,
168 ft on lake, No flood
insurance completely
remodedled, Price
Reduced$169.000
Barney Chilton
352-563-0116


Get
Results in

the

homefront

classifiedsI


You've Got It!




Somebody





Wants




It!


t i I .O cL i I 44IJJ


(352) 563-5966

www.chronicleonline.com
6409SOt


Ssome
on 15 ac 80' dock. 4/2
All util. Mainland dock
& pkg. Jacuzzi house
S. McDermott (352)
697-1593 Cridland RE


z ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact fee
credit, high and dry,
trees, $11,000 obo
(352) 795-3710
INVERNESS, FL
3 miles east of Inv;
5-20ac wooded/some
cleared, owner finance
available.Owner is
licensed Real Estate
Broker,Ed Messer.ed
.messer@yahoo.com


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 E13


sense







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E5

chains and headbands,
adding even more to my
income. This part-time
job is paying off in many
frugal ways! Mary,
Texas
Donate: As a commu-
nity service project
through ORT America -
Desert Chapter in Ari-
zona, we have been col-
lecting hotel amenities
for homeless veterans
and hospitalized vets at
the VA. for many years.
We get toothpaste and
toothbrushes from den-
tists, as well as travel-
size soaps and shampoos
from friends and ac-


quaintances who travel,
and we pack them in in-
dividual bags for home-
less and sick veterans.
They have given up so
much for our safety and
defense, it is the least we
can do for them. -
Sharon S., Arizona


Sara Noel is the owner
of Frugal Village (www.
frugalvillage.com), a
website that offers
practical, money-saving
strategies for everyday
living. To send tips,
comments or questions,
write to Sara Noel, c/o
Universal Uclick, 1130
Walnut St., Kansas City,
MO 64106, or email
sara@frugal
village. com.


NUMBERS
Continued from Page E3

are fractions with fibonacci numbers,
at least.

Numbers and art
I haven't forgotten about the
artists. It turns out there are certain
proportions we humans generally
find pleasing: the rectangular pro-
portions of a painting, for example,
or the placement of a focal point in a
painting.
In a painting, for example, the
Golden Cut states that the ratio of the
distance of the focal point from the
closer side to the farther side of a
painting is the same as the ratio of
the distance from the farther side to
the painting's whole width. A pleas-
ing ratio, it turns out, is 0.618... or, if
you want to use the inverse, 1.618....


Enter fibonacci: Divide any fibonacci
number by the fibonacci number be-
fore or after it and you get 0.618... or
1.618..., not exactly at first, but closer
and closer the higher the fibonacci
number you start with. Try it
For a good visual explanation of fi-
bonacci in nature, visit http://all
bleedingstops.blogspot.com/2012/01/


spirals-and-fibonacci-series-and-
pine.html.
For more about basic fibonacci, try
the books "Fascinating Fibonaccis:
Mystery and Magic in Numbers" and
Trudi Hammel Garland's "Fibonacci
Fun: Fascinating Activities with In-
triguing Numbers" (both from Dale
Seymour Publications).


TRAL Spei in .O U
RELT GROUPo Rsae


U


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista

(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
BILL DECKER 352-464-0647 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133 VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777


Luxury and storage! With over 3,600 square feet of gorgeously appointed iving space,
DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS this home has all the options The tall cherry cabinets, Corian countertops, SS
'rice reduce by $10,000! This one is exceptional Elegant maintenance-free home in appliances and walk-in butler pantry make this gourmet kitchen the envy of every cook
erra Vista This 3 bedroom, 2,5 bath, 2-car garage, heated pool/spa home is on the The massive formal living area is perfect for entertaining with beautiful Canadian Birch
!th green of Skyview If you are quality conscious with sophisticated tastes, please hardwood flooring which carries through to the spacious family room Large master
lon't miss seeing this home with neutral colors throughout This is surely the kitchen suite w/sitting area & TWO walk in closets, split floor plan, guest bedrooms w/direct
f your dreams, with cabinetry, countertops and appliances of the highest quality bath access & huge walk-in closets A beautiful terrace garden and an oversized 2-car
Membership required garage with a separate golf cart entrance complete this fabulous home
ALS 357018 ..........................................................................................$ 3 2 9 ,0 0 0 M LS 700959..........................................................................................$ 4 5 9 ,0 0 0


DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
beautiful bright villa, 2 bedrooms, den (or 3rd bedroom), 2 baths, freshly painted, new
arpet Open and spacious floor plan Located in the lovely Village of Brentwood
kitchen contains plenty of cabinets, utility closet and a skylight Neutral tile everywhere
except the newly carpeted living room & bedrooms Top it off with a screened lanai all
icely situated on a fully landscaped lot A great place for someone who is looking to
ve an active and carefree life Minutes to golf course, pool, sauna, hot tub, exercise
Dom at Brentwood recreation center MLS 700872............... .....$.... 139,000


SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
Large roomy open split floor plan home featuring 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, office/den, Exceptional Windward Model Villa 3/2/2 with den, split floor plan, separate dining room
living room, open kitchen with breakfast bar, screened lanai and a 2-car Attached Many desirable upgrades including exquisite wood flooring, Corian countertops,
garage Dining area overlooking private backyard Upgrades include Corian surround sound, plantation shutters, self cleaning heated pool The panoramic vew is
countertops, ceramic tile, plantation shuttered windows, lots of cabinets in the kitchen spectacular of the 5th green on the Skyview Golf Course in the premier country club
Corner lot with huge trees and situated close to all amenities gated community of Terra Vista
M LS 700761 ............................................................................. $ 2 4 9 ,9 0 0 M LS 359361 ..........................................................................................$ 2 9 3 ,0 0 0


I _


SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 5 BED, 4 BATH, 3-CAR, TERRA VISTA SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 4 BATH, 2-CAR, WATERFORD PLACE
Elegant yet casual Enjoy morning coffee and evening drinks overlooking panoramic Private courtyard home on an acre of land in prestigious Waterford Place Nestled
views to the Gulf! Pride of ownership, lovingly maintained, 1st time on the market, among the trees on this extra large corner lot you will find a beautiful 3 bedroom,
move-in condition Beautiful custom home located in the community of Terra Vista Chef's 4 bath 2-car garage home (plus golf cart garage) Upgraded features include a Koi
kitchen, breakfast nook and great room Grand dining room and sitting area complete pond, wood floors in living room & dining room, a 20x40 (largest in Terra Vista), solar
with a wet bar 2 firstfloor master suites, Large guest bedrooms 4 baths 2nd floor game heated pool with spa and outdoor kitchen great for entertaining or family gatherings
room and office/bedroom 3-car garage, zoned HVAC Sec system Oversized screened A large master suite and private guest retreat completes this Oasis Loaded with
pool enclosure All of this and located on Legendary Ted Williams Ct features & upgrades you would expect in this caliber home
M LS 700149 .........................................................................................$ 8 4 9 ,0 0 0 M LS 700601 ................................................. ................................. $ 5 4 9 ,0 0 0


Term 6 Moth or More


2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS DETI
he community of Brentwood Open floor plan with Expandi
breakfast nook and den Social Club Membership lake vie


BED, 3.5 BATH, 2-CAR, LAKEVIEW
I with the best view in Terra Vista Extra la
frontage Custom 4 bedroom, 3 1/2 bath, tile


1 with pass-th
paved screen


DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
in Terra Vista Located in the community of Brentwood Freshly painted and new carpet
ough breakfast Immaculate unfurnished detached 2 bedroom villa w/den, 2 bath, 2-car garage
ed lanai Social Open floor plan with lots of space Social Club Membership Included


In a painting, for example, the Golden Cut

states that the ratio of the distance of the

focal point from the closer side to the farther

side of a painting is the same as the ratio of

the distance from the farther side to the

painting's whole width. A pleasing ratio, it

turns out, is 0.618... or, if you want to use

the inverse, 1.618.


SINGLE FAMILY, 5 BED, 5.5 BATHS, TERRA VISTA
Remarkably unique Mediterranean mansion, 2-story home at the peak of Terra Vista
with an amazing view of the Skyview Golf Course This home features a study, studio,
exercise room, formal living and dining with a double fireplace, gourmet kitchen w/
breakfast nook and a huge family room with wet bar perfect for entertaining Maid's
quarters, 2 staircases, 5 bedrooms, and 5,5 baths Magnificent courtyard and
Veranda, 25x17 heated pool, hot tub and cabana house w/full bath
M LS 700092................................................. ................................. $ 7 9 9 ,0 0 0


I


Ip" I


E14 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


KIDS
Continued from Page E9

Use the walls
Kids are more likely to use hooks
than hangers. So add lots of colorful
hooks at your child's level not just
one or two, but a whole row to
store hoodies, jackets and even
pants.
Also consider hanging a shoe bag
on back of the door, but don't feel ob-
ligated to use it for shoes. Smallin
says it can be filled with socks and
underwear, small toys or anything
else that needs to be easily located.
Another key item for the wall: a
clock with hands. Kutscher says non-
digital clocks make time a bit more
tangible for kids, helping them no-
tice the passage of time and hope-
fully stay on task. A large wall
calendar that children can reach is
also a great way to help them get
organized.
Last item: a dry-erase board
(WallPops makes one that's a reposi-
tionable vinyl decal) where kids can
keep a checklist of tasks for bedtime
and morning. Write out the checklist
with them, then praise them for
using it


HAY
Continued from Page E7

said. Some of the contributing fac-
tors include: a mild winter, produc-
ers selling calves earlier than
normal, producers culling deeper
into their herds and others growing
more cash-strapped.
If the dry spate continues, there is
a chance that prices could climb
higher, she said.
The current weather conditions
are expected to continue, said Matt
Kelsch, meteorologist for the Uni-
versity Corporation for Atmospheric
Research in Boulder.
"Patterns can change, but right
now there's not expected to be any
major changes throughout this
spring," he said, noting the global
circulations are trending toward a
drier La Nina event. "There's some
confidence that we're not going to
have an exceptionally moist spring."
Judy Smetana, executive director
of the Longmont-based
Colorado Horse Rescue, said one
of her biggest concerns is if the lat-


Better bed area
Kids who do homework on their
beds will be more organized if the
bed is made and uncluttered,
Kutscher says. So simplify bedding
-perhaps just use a fitted sheet and
a duvet with a cover you can drop in
the wash once a week Limit the dec-
orative pillows and piles of toys, so
school supplies can't get lost in the
chaos.
Smallin suggests lifting the child's
bed with risers to create extra stor-
age space, which can be filled with
labeled plastic bins. Use a bed skirt
to hide the bins from view.
Once you've done it
For the first few weeks, Bechen
says, "Run through the drill. Tell
them, 'You come home, you put your
things here...."'
Repeat the steps each day, as pa-
tiently as possible. And trust that in
time, your kids will keep their bed-
rooms organized out of habit "It's an
executive function. It requires the
ability to stop, plan, organize and ac-
tually execute a goal," Kutscher says.
As that ability is growing, parents
need to gently guide the process.
"We take the safety net approach,"
he says, "gradually letting the child
master the skills, as we stand by as
needed."

est drought continues, mimicking
what the United States experienced
in the 1930s and 1950s.
"Right now I'm conservatively
hopeful just because I don't want to
be totally not hopeful and then
worry myself to death," she said.
"I'm worried, that's for sure."
Inquiries to the organization
from people seeking to surrender
their horses have "for sure, dou-
bled and almost tripled," she said.
Colorado Horse Rescue also has 55
horses on site, leaving only five
spaces open.
In addition to the continued rising
cost of feed which can put further
crimps in an already tight operating
budget Smetana said her biggest
concern is that horses will face neg-
lect or be sold to slaughterhouses.
"We went through last year and we
made it, and we might be able to
make it barely this year," she said.
"If it continues, I just really worry"
The combination of drought and
wildfires in Colorado, Texas and
Oklahoma during the past two years
helped to cripple hay supplies,
bringing prices for the field crops to
record levels in Colorado.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 E15








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DRENCHED IN LUXURY
l'l..! ,1i l lh ,: ll I 1 ..,:.. i ..H I... i .J l -

,a..i a '0, b.ilh, l. .al I .J.. d J'l. lu

.IJh .i I I .hh .f. ,:w b,:lh ill j....i. ..... .:. : J

M11. = .h...'i REDUCED TO S240,000
Call Mainl n Booth 637 4904


* U I ..i l j .: i .j, i J ,i .: ji p .:.il
* '.I.
* 0IiV I 2200 '.. i1 I I ii.. I i.,

Mi_ = /II-_:*/ $200,000
Jeanne o1 Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
i'iir. CillusCountilSold. comn


11 -,-,' '. .-- a
GOOD TASTE GOOD BUY
_" _" _" v ll,_i ..Il I ll.3.1 i i.I, p ill ll ;



MI = :-, ,:'.il $119,900
Pal Davis i3521212 7280
View listing: wiv. c21ipaidavis. corn


BIG PRICE REDUCTION
ON INVERNESS HOME!


P l.. i i,,,,, i

OFFERED AT ONLY $69,900
C.l1i Ehis C N-i .. .it 352400 2635
Iut $brnil g tI1r/ .f1tu


BRAND NEW INVERNESS
WATERFRONT HOME!


.I. c. I. lI.. VI hq l .l ,..j 1 l i.w j n d n
.: .i .".'.i l l l. .l : Inind n 0 l i
ASKING $199K
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


2/2 INVERNESS DOUBLEWIDE

.... I, l h l~,, 1 hI. I,..llll h ,

m aI.I .I. li -n I. 1. I I ... h

Ni. = III MUST SEE i $42,000
C, ,D 4r j.,2 2 666 s,,, j.52 422 4O62


I KIMI UILUKUUm,
TWO BATH, POOL HOME
IN PINE RIDGE

, 1l11 1,1 11 ,.,I ,l l u II .W1 l t
MI i= h1li1)i $168,000
Call Isaac S. Baylon 352 697 2493


I i h ill .1.6,11,1 lill$ .' h .l.. I.j 1, .11:..
I in, I .l.: n I.. .,66 .


,.:i ,, 11, 1 n, 11 i,,, .,,:, $130,000
Call Ruth fiedenck 1 352 5636866


S I1 ,, 1 I.,, 1 -, i i ,,,
GREAT LOCATION FOR A DR'S OFFICE OR ... h... .... ... h,
MEDICAL LAB NEXT TO CITRUS MEMORIAL ,.. ,..- ,,,r ', ,: ,

,,,, d l. lhr m l I. I ,
Mi. = .JJ2 ASKING $225,000 C" I.t t.ut Dd Kdt 0 95. 3838786
Call Jim Mot Ion 4222173 flo louut lout Oil,. 352 726 6668


* i B i.:I .. a I. il hl



MI = '_ : 1I $350,000
Jeanne Pickiel 212 3410
It'i'IFi. CIItusCounlt'Sold. corn


WOW! REDUCED FOR QUICK SALE!
.D.U F......R .. ,UI.C.K L..E I0
I.| .... l .I...l ... ....I... [. 1.:. I. ..[. i ... .I


REDUCED FOR OUICK SALE S199,900
/I/'i ParsM. 634-1273


hii: =".Y- ASKING $158,900
Pt Di, -352'22 127280
".-I hi.itnp .siii 2/p r2 f d .,s ,,nm


CHEAP, CHEAP, CHEAP!!
eANi, uOVVNff I iMMfE I AL Pi li-ii Ni.
nl. ;. ..ll ..1 in%, nit n .i l Hinq 111
INCREDIBLE BUY
AT ONLY $57,500!!
Call Quade Feesei 352 302 7699


INVERNESS TRIPLEX

..: .1 1.. i 1.. I.,i.. .I..I _" ,, l ,

Mi=:, = 4'I $240,000
Call Jim Mot ton to see this
investment propeirly at 422 2173


AU Iu menUIL. num"i
IN FLORAL CITY
I- n',,. J .J ,,, ', ? .,,J v ,,I *hn.",, I v l :l1:,.

Mh.'-, =Ii11Ii $44,500
loitame 0 Regan 5860075


* .lA I i I.V h hl INl, i l. U F 1f


Mi_:, =,'i $395,000
Jeanne I Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
it'i'ir., CiltusCountr'Sold. com


..j Ifn..I.hrf i l 3h .. l. ..1 i.,: 0 h,:l ,
l1 IIn.. .l l .. ... .! .. ...

Ml. = IiliI .I PRICED TO SELL S53,900
Pat Davis 352127280
View hsting wv, c2lpaidaris cornm


FOXWOOD BEAUTY

I,, .1i l 1,11 .l i I fl. I oHl'l 'hlla


M1i =1'i11:l $128,0000
Nancy Jenks 352 400 8072 cell/
726 6668 tolhcel


IJi. ,illi.i.l : l v H i..l.lind.l; _II;::I im:l I

,.i ,n i..l. : l .:.i u l l I-I I_ nl.,:.i I_.

.il l.l I h :l I lll ,hI.l
Ml3 =1-1 11 $59,900
Ask lot Mailyn Booth 637 4904


PINE RIDGE CUL-DE-SAC

C.I .Ida,, Cani 352 20 0202=
Cjll N11dd Cjno 352 210 0202


E16 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013