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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 02-23-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03040

Full Text


On the field: CR baseball hosts Hernando /B1


TODAY
& next/
morning
HIGH
82 Partly sunny.
LOW Twenty percent
67 chance of rain.
6V PAGE A4


CITRU-S COI U N T Y





ceRONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


The Standard often

'v

I .. *


S.
2013 adillc AT


VOL. 118 ISSUE 200


Marino guilty of first-degree murder


County issues
boil water notice
A main water line break on
North Elkcam Boulevard re-
quires homes at 9621, 9749,
9791 N. Elkcam Blvd. only to
boil water as a precaution. Due
to the loss of pressure, the
bacteriological quality of water
is questionable.
County officials recommend
all water used for consumption
and cooking purposes be
boiled until further notice. Cit-
rus County Utilities will be
flushing the affected lines and
will collect two consecutive
days of bacteriological samples
as soon as all flushing and dis-
infecting is completed.
Once the water is safe, resi-
dents' doors will be tagged with
a rescinding notice. Call 352-
527-7650 for information.
-From staff reports



CCHB


appeals to


state's


high court
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
INVERNESS- What's the dif-
ference between 5-5-1 and 8-5?
An appeal to the state
Supreme Court, it seems.
The legal fight over gover-
nance of Citrus Memorial
Health System will continue to
the Florida Supreme Court
after hospital board trustees
Friday declined to stop the
process.
Trustees said the issue over
control remains the main obsta-
cle in finding resolution to a se-
ries of conflicts that date back
to 2009 when trustees vacated
their seats on the foundation.
The eight-member founda-
tion board has invited trustees
to join their board. Trustees say
they will do that only with equal
membership five trustees,
five foundation members plus
the hospital medical chief of
staff.
Trustee Gene Davis made a
motion to halt the appeal over a
2011 state law that gives
trustees majority membership
of the Citrus Memorial Health
See Page A5


Com ics ............... ..... ....... ..C8
Community .......................... C6
Crossword ............................ C7
Editorial .............................. A10
Entertainment.................... B6
Horoscope.......................... B6
Lottery Num bers ...................B4
Lottery Payouts .....................B6
Movies ................................. C8
Obituaries ................... ............A6
C lassified s.............................. C 9
TV Listings ............................C 7


6 II l781 l 2110025UII


Jennifer
Marino
found guilty
of murder.


Faces mandatory

life sentence
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
INVERNESS Jennifer Marino,
the woman accused in the carjacking
and death of a 64-year-old Lecanto
woman, was found guilty Friday


In a day marked by small out-
bursts from Marino, 34, it took the
jury about an hour of deliberation to
return the verdict after a four-day
trial before Circuit Judge Ric
Howard.
Marino was charged with the first-
degree murder of Mary Haynie on
April 7, 2010, after a scuffle involv-
ing the other charge carjacking.
The prosecution via its witnesses
said Haynie was at a pet grooming


business in a shopping plaza when
she spotted Marino getting into her
vehicle. She ran outside and tried to
stop Marino, but Marino pushed
Haynie to the ground and ran her
over with the SUV
According to the prosecution,
Marino then proceeded to leave the
parking lot.
Haynie later died from her in-
juries at Citrus Memorial hospital.
See Page A2


Dreaming big


There's a certain amount of 'Old Florida' that we want to hold onto ...

Marti Consuegra
Inverness city council member.


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
Lake Henderson at Wallace Brooks Park in Inverness is a site of constant activity boating, fishing and even rowing. The city
has ambitious plans for future development of the areas around the lakes, creating Inverness as a "waterfront city."

Inverness leaders set vision on smart growth for surrounding area


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer


-INVERNESS
imagine a hotel and convention center,
a lakeside restaurant with a wall of
windows showcasing a view of the water.


Imagine complementary retail
shops and eateries, restored and
repurposed historic buildings
and newly constructed contem-
porary apartments, all surround-
ing the Tsala Apopka chain of
lakes in the city of Inverness.
At last week's Inverness city
council meeting, members
were encouraged to dream big
as City Manager Frank DiGio-
vanni presented them with a
multimedia vision package fo-
cusing on Inverness as a water-
front city
Despite the struggling econ-
omy in Citrus County, DiGio-
vanni said, unless community
leaders cast a vision, the com-


munity is doomed to stagnate
and eventually die.
"Vision, when done correctly,
gets people thinking and creates
energy," he said. "The purpose of
a vision is to get people to un-
derstand the potential that
exists."
For example, the former
Cason's funeral home on Dampier
Street was razed recently, opening
up possibilities for future growth
near the Withlacoochee State
Trail, Wallace Brooks Park and
Lake Henderson.
"Not just Cason's, but that
whole area could be an active
center," DiGiovanni said.
See Page A7


Years ago out on the lakes
there used to be places where
you could fill your boat up with
gas and buy sundries to take out
on the boat, and none of those
exist any more. I'd like to see
something like that again so
people can have a place to pull
up to the shore and use
the picnic tables at the parks
and enjoy the laid-back
atmosphere that we have.
Rocky Hensley
Inverness businessman and longtime resident.
See Page A7


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Ozello Water Association recognized


Award honors utility's

outstanding performance


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer

OZELLO There was
cause for celebration last
Thursday at the monthly
meeting of the Ozello
Water Association.
Representatives from
the Florida Section of the
American Water Works As-
sociation (FSAWWA)
stopped by to honor the as-
sociation with an award.
"It is my privilege to pres-
ent the Ozello
Water Association with
FSAWWAs prestigious
Water Distribution System
Award," Jason Parrillo,
Florida Section chairman
said. "The Ozello Water As-
sociation was selected for
this honor in recognition of
your outstanding perform-



TRIAL
Continued from Page Al

Marino was arrested later
that day in Wildwood.
The defense team in the
case, Devon Sharkey and
Ed Spaight, conceded the
crime was committed by
Marino, but she was insane
or was having a "severe
manic episode" on that
fateful day Marino has an
extensive history of mental
illness marked by several
hospitalizations, including
a stint in a Miami psychi-
atric ward just two days be-
fore killing Haynie.
Her attorneys also said
the charge of carjacking
should have been grand
theft auto since she al-
ready was in the vehicle
and driving off when
Haynie confronted her.
And the only witness to the
carjacking was viewing the
encounter from the pas-
senger side of the vehicle
at a distance where her
view was obstructed and


ance in the following areas:
water quality, operational
records, maintenance pro-
cedures, professionalism in
public relations and cus-
tomer service, safety pro-
grams, emergency
preparedness and cross-
connection control plan.
"Since 1989, this award
has been presented by our
Manufacturers/Associates
Council to outstanding util-
ities on behalf of our 2,400
members," Parrillo said.
Carl Larrabee, chairman-
elect of the Florida sec-
tion, joined him on the
visit.
Each year, one winner is
selected from eight differ-
ent categories, according
to the number of service
connections in the water
district


therefore could not have
seen a scuffle between
Haynie and Marino.
Friday, Sharkey im-
plored jurors during his
closing arguments to look
at the "debilitating" and
"crippling impairment"
mental illness has
wreaked on Marino.
"It has reduced a col-
lege-educated person to
become homeless and to
panhandle," Sharkey told
jurors.
Mental illness, he said,
was driving his client and
that she was just a
passenger.
But prosecutor Pete Ma-
grino forcefully argued be-
fore jurors that Marino did


PAT FAHERTY/Chronicle
The Ozello Water Association was recognized by the Florida Section of the American Water Works Association on
Thursday with the Water Distribution Award. From left; Chris Bibeau, Jason Bibeau, Kyler Dominy, general manager
Gary Bibeau, Carl Larrabee, AWWA, Juan Gonzales and Jason Parrillo, AWAA.


Parrillo said the utility
should be congratulated
for its achievements in
the area of water distri-
bution and the recogni-
tion received by industry


know the difference be-
tween right and wrong.
Echoing the words of one
his witnesses Friday,
psychologist Dr. Greg
Prichard, Magrino told ju-
rors Marino was "goal-di-
rected" both in the
commission of the crimes
and the aftermath.
He said Marino tried to
cover her tracks every step
of the way and manipu-
lated everyone she en-
countered along the way
That comment gener-
ated an outburst from
Marino: "I was sick," she
said loudly
Marino had just been al-
lowed back into the court
by Howard after he side-


leaders.
"I was excited to get it,
we really appreciate it,"
Ozello Water Association
general manager Gary
Bibeau said. "I'm thankful


lined her in a "timeout
room" where she listened
to the proceedings with as-
sistant public defender
Luke Waatti.
Marino had repeatedly
interrupted the testimony
of Prichard with short
comments as he made the
case for the prosecution
that Marino was not psy-
chotic at the time of her
crimes.
Sharkey made a motion
for a mistrial and sought
further evaluation of
Marino's competency, but
Howard ruled against him,
saying it is clear that


we've got guys working
here who take pride in
their work."
He was also thankful to
the association for giving
utilities the chance for a


Marino began "acting out"
when the prosecution un-
veiled its own expert wit-
ness (Prichard) to rebut
assertions by the defense's
expert witness Dr. Ava
Land. Land had con-
tended during testimony
that she believed Marino
was psychotic and there-
fore was insane during the
commission of her crimes.
"The defendant has cho-
sen to manifest inappropri-
ate courtroom behavior,"
Howard said as part of his
reason for exiling Marino
during part of Friday's pro-
ceedings. Howard had re-


little friendly competition
to show what they can do.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. com.


peatedly warned her she
would be removed if she
had another outburst
Marino showed emotion
as the jury's verdict was
read, while relatives of
Haynie hugged and got a
nod and wink from prose-
cutor Marino.
She is facing a manda-
tory life sentence for the
murder charge. Howard
has set her sentencing
date for March 1. She
also has a violation of
probation hearing at the
same time stemming
from carjacking charges
in 2009.


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A2 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Page A3 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Task force: 'Stand your ground law' works


Rules guiding neighborhood watch

groups need to be reviewed


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Florida's
"stand your ground" law works
and should not be overturned,
but the standards for neighbor-
hood watch groups should be
looked at by the Legislature, a
state task force concluded
Friday
The 44-page report released
by Republican Gov Rick Scott's
office said people have a right
to feel safe and secure in
Florida and have a fundamen-


tal right to stand their ground
and defend themselves from at-
tack. Most of the recommenda-
tions had already been made
public.
The report, however, recom-
mended legislators look at
neighborhood watch groups.
The parents of Trayvon Martin,
a teenager killed a year ago by
neighborhood watch volunteer
George Zimmerman, had asked
the task force to change the 2005
law.
Tracy Martin and Sybrina Ful-


ton asked the task force last
June to support a "Trayvon Mar-
tin amendment" to the law,
which would make it harder for
someone who starts a fight to use
a self-defense argument under
the law.
"Just review and amend it,"
Fulton said then. "I had to bury
my son at 17. He was committing
no crime. He was doing no
wrong."
Zimmerman claims self-
defense. He has pleaded not
guilty to a second-degree
murder charge.
The 19-member Task Force on
Citizens Safety and Protection,
which held meetings in seven
different Florida cities, recom-
mended to Scott and the Legis-


lature the role of neighborhood
watch participants should be
limited to observing, not pursu-
ing, confronting or provoking po-
tential suspects.
On Feb. 26, 2012, Zimmerman
spotted Martin walking through
his neighborhood, a gated com-
munity, in Sanford. Martin was
walking back to a house he was
staying at in the community
after a trip to a convenience
store. Zimmerman started to fol-
low him because he thought he
looked suspicious. Despite a po-
lice dispatcher telling him "you
don't have to do that," Zimmer-
man got out of his truck to pur-
sue Martin.
They got into a fight and Mar-
tin was shot.


Key deposition
sought in Martin case
SANFORD -Ajudge said the
attorney for Trayvon Martin's par-
ents does not have to give a dep-
osition to George Zimmerman's
attorney.
Defense attorneys for the for-
mer neighborhood watch leader
accused of fatally shooting Martin
are seeking to obtain a deposition
from a witness who says she was
on the phone with the teenager
before he was killed.
Ajudge ruled Friday the infor-
mation would not be relevant to
the case.
-Associated Press


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
More than 100 law enforcement officials from Citrus County and Dunnellon participated in a weeklong training on how to best approach a mentally ill individual.
The Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) had its graduation Friday as 21 deputies were certified during week seven as part of CIT.




Armed with knowledge


Citrus County, Dunnellon first responders learn

best way to deal with mentally ill citizens


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
INVERNESS Effective
crisis response from first re-
sponders may save a life.
Through the Mental Health
Court program, deputies from
Citrus County and Dunnellon
partook in Crisis Intervention
Team (CIT) training at With-
lacoochee Technical Institute
in Inverness. CIT is a nation-
ally recognized program for
law enforcement training on
how to respond to people
with mental illnesses during
a crisis.
"We have a federal grant
that has allowed us to provide
training to first responders on
how to detect and react to
mental illness when they ar-
rive on scene," said Kelly


Chisman, court alternatives
supervisor. "Our hope is to
help avoid jail time for some
individuals. First responders
will be able to recognize the
mental illness and take them
to treatment instead of
straight to jail."
During the past eight
weeks, CIT liaison Alina
Stoothoff has instructed a
weeklong training session, in-
cluding lectures, tours, inter-
active role playing and
tutorials for deputies on how
to best respond to mentally ill
individuals. She said more
than 100 deputies have been
trained.
The Centers Chief Execu-
tive Officer Charles Powell
said one in 17 people have a
severe persistent mental ill-
ness in the country Through


the program, law enforcement
is better able to understand
the mental health system and
respond appropriately to the
individual needs.
Furthermore, CIT deputies
have added their training as
an effective tool when ap-
proaching mentally ill
individuals.
"It is important to us to
know that our law enforce-
ment personnel have got the
tools in the toolbox that they
need to do the job," Commis-
sioner J.J. Kenney said. "Just
being able to talk to a guy sit-
ting outside Circle K, you may
be able to save his life. There
is nothing better than saving a
life. You can do that by being
a good cop."
Seven of the eight weeks
were funded by the Depart-


Crisis Intervention Team liaison Alina Stoothoff congratulates
Citrus County Sheriff's Office Deputy Tony Ricci after he
graduated from his training.


ment of Justice, Office of Jus-
tice and Bureau of Justice As-
sistant on award No.
2009MOEX0008.


Contact Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at 352-563-
5660, ext 1334, oreworthington
@chronicleonline. com.


AroundTHE COUNTY


Homosassa
Southwest Citrus Democrats
to meet March 2
The Southwest Citrus Democratic Club
meets at 10:30 a.m. the first Saturday of
the month at Sugarmill Woods Country
Club, 1 Douglas St., Homosassa.
Democrats are welcome to attend.
For information, email swdems@
gmail.com or call 352-382-0343.

Homosassa Springs
Sponsors sought for annual
Shrimpapalooza event
The Rotary Club of Homosassa
Springs seeks sponsors for the upcom-
ing Shrimpapalooza 2013 on March 23.
Those interested in sponsoring the
event may participate in The Rotary Club
of Homosassa Springs' Shrimpapalooza
2013 parade with a car, float, trailer, mo-
torcycle or other entry advertising the
business. It will be seen by spectators
from Citrus and Hernando counties and
out-of-area visitors.
After the parade, sponsors may use


their booths to sell wares or promote
their business.
The festival, which attracted thou-
sands last year, will feature an array of
seafood and other foods, music, drinks,
crafts and kid-friendly entertainment.
For information on being a sponsor
and the sponsorship levels, call Tom
Feeney at 352-201-2520 or email
amstaff@infionline.net.

Crystal River
Community yard sale
benefits area charities
Local individuals and organizations
are raising money and awareness for
their favorite cause.
They have cleaned out their garages,
attics, closets or created items to sell at
Have A Heart Charity Yard Sale Fest. The
event is a community yard sale benefiting
different charities from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
today at Plantation Realty Inc., 1250
North Country Club Drive, Crystal River.
Featuring music, foods, kissing
booths, games and more, groups have
created signs for their favorite charity.
Each sign states who they are support-


ing and what percentage of the proceeds
are being donated.
For information, call Lisa Vandeboe at
352-634-0129.

Inverness
Workshop to mull
transportation merger
At a specially called workshop, the Cit-
rus County Transportation Planning Or-
ganization will review and discuss the
draft for a merger with the Hernando
County Metropolitan Planning
Organization.
It will review the planning area bound-
ary and apportionment plan and discuss
the merits of a larger or smaller board,
the economic importance of transporta-
tion to both Citrus and Hernando coun-
ties, the importance of a partnership and
the desire for fairness and equity.
It is set to meet at 5:15 p.m. Thursday,
March 7, at in the Inverness Government
Center, 212 W. Main St., Inverness.
Questions may be directed to Sheila
Martin, TBARTA, at 800-998-7433 or
sheila.martin@tbarta.com.
From staff reports


State BRIEFS

Plans for Sarasota National
Cemetery announced
SARASOTA- Plans for a $2 million art installation at a
veterans cemetery in Sarasota will include hand-tiled spires,
granite-embedded photos dating back to the Civil War, mas-
sive bronze eagles and a 50-foot landscape mosaic embroi-
dered with military service ribbons.
The Herald Tribune reported the design for the Sarasota
National Cemetery was released Friday.
The design includes Patriot Plaza, which is already under
construction for $8 million and holds a 2,800-seat amphithe-
ater. It's set for completion in 2014.
Tampa mom will be evaluated
before murder trial
TAMPA- Prosecutors will hire state-retained psycholo-
gists to evaluate Julie Schenecker, the Tampa mother ac-
cused of fatally shooting her two children in 2011.
A court hearing was Thursday for Schenecker. She is
charged with two counts of first-degree murder and prose-
cutors are seeking the death penalty.
Officials said Schenecker shot her two children, Calyx
and Beau, on Jan. 27, 2011. Schenecker, who has a history
of mental illness, told police she was tired of them talking
back.
Schenecker's lawyers plan to use an insanity defense.
From wire reports






CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic battery
arrest
Curtis Stuart, 47, of Ho-
mosassa, at 3:17 a.m. Tuesday
on a felony charge of domestic
battery by strangulation. No
bond.
Other arrests
Lauren Kassalias, 34, of
Julian Lane Drive, Tampa, at
6:39 p.m. Monday on a felony
charge of battery by a detainee
upon another detainee. Accord-
ing to her arrest affidavit, she
slapped another inmate while
jailed at the Citrus County De-
tention Center. Bond $2,000.
Michael Scheer, 47, of
West Arlington Place, Ho-
mosassa, at 8:06 p.m. Monday
on a Citrus County warrant for
failure to appear in court for an
original felony charge of pos-
session of a controlled sub-
stance and misdemeanor
charge of attached tag not as-
signed. No bond.
Robert Williams, 30, of
East Rabbit Lane, Floral City, at
10:11 p.m. Monday on a Citrus
County warrant for a felony
charge of grand theft. Bond
$2,000.
William Bettison, 52, of
North Florida Avenue, Her-
nando, at 10:25 a.m. Tuesday
on a Citrus County warrant for
a felony charge of petit theft.
Bond $2,000.
Edward Potter Jr., 23, of
South Canadian Way, Ho-
mosassa, at 10:38 a.m. Tues-
day on misdemeanor charges
of driving while license sus-
pended and attached tag not
assigned and violation of pro-
bation on an original felony
charge of possession of a con-
trolled substance. Bond
$1,000.
Krystal Dawn Connelly,
27, of Onara Street, Spring Hill,
at 2:20 p.m. Tuesday on a Her-
nando County warrant for vio-
lation of probation on original
felony charges of possession
of oxycodone and possession
of clonazepam. No bond.
Gregory Smith, 45, of


ON THE NET

For information about
arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's
Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus. org
and click on the
Public Information
link, then on Arrest
Reports.

For the Record reports
are also archived
online at www.
chronicleonline.com.

North Stirrup Drive, Beverly
Hills, at 3:21 p.m. Tuesday on
a felony charge of failure of a
sex offender to report a
name/address change within
48 hours. Bond $20,000.
Sherry Sullivan-Conley,
41, of South Finale Point, Ho-
mosassa, at 2:55 p.m. Tuesday
on a felony charge of grand
theft. According to her arrest af-
fidavit, she is accused of steal-
ing multiple pieces of jewelry
from a woman she was assist-
ing as a certified nursing assis-
tant. Bond $15,000.
Burglaries
SA vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 8:42 a.m. Thursday,
Feb. 21, in the 8400 block of N.
Lazy Trail, Crystal River.
SA residential burglary was
reported at 2:04 p.m. Feb. 21 in
the 11000 block of S. Brightstar
Ave., Floral City.
A residential burglary was
reported at 3:11 p.m. Feb. 21 in
the 8300 block of E. Julia St.,
Floral City.
Thefts
SA grand theft was reported
at 5:26 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 21,
in the 6600 block of W. Curlew
Place, Crystal River.
A petit theft was reported
at 6:34 a.m. Friday, Feb. 22, in
the 6600 block of S. Frankfurter
Way, Homosassa.
Vandalisms
A vandalism was reported
at 1:33 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 21,
in the 2200 block of W. Austin
Drive, Dunnellon.


State BRIEFS


Canadian pro tennis
player arrested
BRADENTON Florida officials
have arrested a professional tennis
player for attempting to have sex with a
13-year-old girl.
Pierre-Ludovic Duclos-Lasnier of
Quebec, Canada, was arrested Thurs-
day. The 27-year-old was training at
IMG Academy in Bradenton.
Authorities said a detective assumed
the victim's identity and chatted with
Duclos-Lasnier on the victim's cell phone.
Manatee County officials said Duclos-
Lasnier solicited the girl for sex and sent
a photograph of his penis. He offered to
meet the girl and was arrested at the
meeting point.
He faces charges including use of a
computer to solicit a child to commit sex
acts, two counts of transmission of
harmful material to a minor and at-
tempted lewd and lascivious battery.
He's being held at the Manatee County
Jail without bail. It's unclear whether he
has an attorney.

Teen, 17, fatally stabbed
at his Orlando home
ORLANDO Police in Orlando said
a 17-year-old boy was fatally stabbed at
his home.
Authorities found the teen after a 911
caller alerted them to some kind of dis-
turbance at the home around 12:30 p.m.
Thursday.


Family members were inside the
home at the time of the stabbing. Or-
lando police Sgt. Jim Young told WFTV
investigators are interviewing everyone
who was inside the home.

Small plane crashes into
water near Clearwater
CLEARWATER Multiple law en-
forcement agencies responded after a
small plane crashed into the water near
the Bayside Bridge in Clearwater.
The Pinellas County Sheriff's Office
said the plane crashed about 2:15 a.m.
Friday just north of the bridge's hump.
The pilot was taken to a local hospital
with non-life threatening injuries.
Deputies and rescue personnel re-
mained on the scene early Friday to as-
sist the Federal Aviation Administration
with its investigation.

Man awaiting sex
offender trial arrested
CLEARWATER -Authorities said a
man who was awaiting trial on charges
of molesting a 7-year-old girl is being
held without bail after he was arrested
for failing to complete sex-offender
treatment stemming from another case.
Pinellas County Sheriff's deputies ar-
rested 49-year-old Henry Cavalier on
Wednesday. It is the sixth time he's
been arrested on sexual offense
charges.
The Tampa Bay Times reported Cav-
aliere is scheduled for trial in March on


lewd and lascivious molestation
charges. He could face life in prison if
convicted.
Sheriff's officials and prosecutors said
Thursday they had recently learned of
Cavalier's probation violation. His
lawyer declined comment to the Times.
The newspaper reported Department
of Corrections officials said Cavalier
"failed to pay the cost of supervision"
and didn't complete the sex offender af-
tercare treatment.

Man gets more than 13
years for tax refund fraud
MIAMI -A South Florida man has
been sentenced to more than 13 years
in federal prison for a tax refund fraud
scheme involving stolen identities of
some 23,000 prison inmates.
U.S. District Judge Robert Scola im-
posed the maximum sentence Friday on
28-year-old Rodney Saintfleur. Saint-
fleur pleaded guilty in November to con-
spiracy to submit fraudulent claims to
the government, access device fraud
and aggravated identity theft.
Court documents show Saintfleur
used access to a database at his law of-
fice job to steal Social Security num-
bers, birthdates and other identifying
information of the prison inmates. He
and others would then use the stolen
IDs to file fraudulent tax returns.
Prosecutors estimate the fraud in-
volved at least $11 million.
-From wire reports


iegal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle




Fictitious Name Notices.....................C15



A Meeting Notices...................................C15


SForeclosure

Sale/Action Notices......................C15


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
LO PR HI LO PR |HI LO PI
61 NA 189 47 NA ,l J82 58 NA


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES
City H L F'cast City H
Daytona Bch. 82 66 pc Miami 83
Ft. Lauderdale 83 72 pc Ocala 83
Fort Myers 84 67 pc Orlando 85
Gainesville 80 62 c Pensacola 70
Homestead 82 69 pc Sarasota 80
Jacksonville 81 60 ts Tallahassee 75
Key West 82 73 pc Tampa 80
Lakeland 85 66 pc Vero Beach 84
Melbourne 84 65 pc W. Palm Bch. 83


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
ts
pc
ts
pc
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


South winds around 15 knots. Seas
2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a moderate chop. Partly cloudy
with a slight chance of thunderstorms
today.


87 60 NA -- 88 60 NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK E "lcusvedaly
forecast by:
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
) High: 82 Low: 67
Partly sunny; 20% chance of a
~- shower
l k SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 78 Low: 62
Mostly cloudy; 40% chance of showers

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 81 Low: 69
Partly sunny; 30% chance of a shower/storm

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 86/59
Record 89/29
Normal 74/46
Mean temp. 73
Departure from mean +13
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.90 in.
Total for the year 1.00 in.
Normal for the year 5.29 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 8
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.02 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 6
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 45%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, Oak, Nettle
Today's count: 8.8/12
Sunday's count: 9.2
Monday's count: 9.4
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
2/23 SATURDAY 3:18 9:30 3:41 9:53
2/24 SUNDAY 4:01 10:13 4:24 10:36
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT ............................6:26 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW ..................... 7:OO A.M.
SMOONRISE TODAY........................... 4:40 PM.
FEB. 25 MARCH4 MARCH11 MARCH19 MOONSET TODAY............................5:17A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
informationon drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 3:39 a/12:25 p 4:59 p/-
Crystal River* 2:00 a/9:47 a 3:20 p/9:43 p
Withlacoochee* 1:07 p/7:35 a 7:31 p
Homosassa** 2:49 a/11:24 a 4:09 p/11:20 p


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
4:25 a/12:21 a 5:27 p/12:58 p
2:46 a/10:20 a 3:48 p/10:23 p
12:33 a/8:08 a 1:35 p/8:11 p
3:35 a/11:57 a 4:37 p/-


Gulf water
temperature


67
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.27 28.25 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.77 37.77 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 38.67 38.66 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.98 39.96 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


nc"norg Jjneaaj Honolul,
- Sru o,,

70S,


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Friday Satu
H L Pcp. Fcst
36 18 sn
45 27 pc
40 35 .37 sh
48 42 1.23 sh
37 22 sh
58 41 s
34 28 .03 sh
41 23 c
54 49 .32 pc E
44 29 rs
38 26 sn
35 20 .04 rs
34 11 sn
63 50 .51 ts E
58 30 .09 c
44 37 .27 sh
34 24 .20 c
46 30 .06 pc
39 20 .07 pc
52 41 .22 sh
43 27 .07 pc
39 7 sn
48 31 s
32 5 c
28 23 .11 pc
34 23 .29 pc
55 33 s
46 34 .03 pc
34 25 sh
39 18 sn
65 55 s
36 28 .06 pc
64 46 .06 s 6
57 35 s
49 32 pc
63 43 s
50 33 .14 pc
50 36 pc
32 25 .29 c
29 19 .24 c
70 63 1.66 ts7
65 54 1.15 pc
62 44 pc 5


7"i




60.Ms~ko ,, .

,.70SF -
70s 'I

FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY

irday Friday Saturday
H L City H L Pcp. FcstH L
18 29 New Orleans 71 61 .01 pc 68 53
i5 28 New York City 38 25 sh 43 35
i4 34 Norfolk 43 36 .05 sh 55 40
i9 39 Oklahoma City 36 21 pc 48 33
19 39 Omaha 25 17 .02 pc 31 15
'2 41 Palm Springs 70 41 s 74 48
13 34 Philadelphia 39 25 sh 47 36
12 25 Phoenix 63 42 s 66 44
64 39 Pittsburgh 35 21 .01 c 42 27
19 25 Portland, ME 40 25 c 35 31
16 32 Portland, Ore 48 44 .39 sh 45 36
18 25 Providence, R.I. 40 26 sh 37 33
17 29 Raleigh 42 32 .27 sh 52 38
64 49 Rapid City 37 12 c 43 21
51 28 Reno 55 26 pc 46 22
i3 37 Rochester, NY 35 22 .06 rs 41 26
11 22 Sacramento 63 32 s 62 38
12 26 St. Louis 36 29 .01 pc 34 20
10 25 St. Ste. Marie 27 8 .05 sn 30 21
i4 45 Salt Lake City 37 25 .09 sn 35 20
10 26 San Antonio 68 46 s 74 42
16 29 San Diego 62 45 .04 s 64 50
i7 41 San Francisco 60 40 s 58 43
19 22 Savannah 62 55 .04 ts 71 50
28 15 Seattle 45 42 .35 sh 46 39
13 24 Spokane 35 30 .20 c 43 26
60 38 Syracuse 37 15 rs 41 28
11 25 Topeka 28 18 pc 31 19
11 31 Washington 35 31 .05 sh 42 35
16 31 YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
'1 50 HIGH 88 Plant City, Fla. LOW-7 Leadville,
34 24 Colo.
r QQ.


64 42
48 33
65 50
14 28
50 33
30 20
28 10
'0 46
65 43
i2 29


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/70/s
Amsterdam 35/29/c
Athens 62/53/pc
Beijing 44/32/pc
Berlin 30/30/sf
Bermuda 61/59/pc
Cairo 72/52/pc
Calgary 37/16/pc
Havana 83/67/pc
Hong Kong 72/67/pc
Jerusalem 56/48/sh


Lisbon 58/38/s
London 36/31/c
Madrid 45/26/s
Mexico City 79/50/s
Montreal 32/32/sn
Moscow 23/13/pc
Paris 32/27/c
Rio 82/72/ts
Rome 56/45/r
Sydney 77/73/ts
Tokyo 46/32/pc
Toronto 39/27/r
Warsaw 34/33/sf


C I T R U S


C U N T Y


For the RECORD


LHRONICLL
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $38.47* 6 months: $67.68*
1 year: $121.87*
*Subscription price Includes a separate charge of. 15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
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Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
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residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
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To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
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MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com


Where to find us:
Meadowcrest
44office
rj ".r, l Br',.ir,| Hl y 1624 N.
nr r He Meadowcrest
DunkerId Cannondale Dr Blvd.
A" | Crystal River,
A -I \ Meado.: re-s FL 34429
N I \1

Inverness
SC'urnu office
Tompkins St. I eujrr
r S 106 W. Main
C f L: St.,
1 44 Inverness, FL
34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publish er, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E d itor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trlsta Stokes.......................... ................................... Online M manager, 564-2946
Trlsta Stokes ................................... ........... .... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ..................................................M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Com m unity content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content ................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff .............................................................................................................. 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


L


iii_


A4 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013


LOCAL/STATE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOSPITAL
Continued from Page Al
Foundation, which oper-
ates the hospital and its
assets.
Davis' motion found no
support. Trustees Mike
Bays, Bob Priselac and
Chairwoman Debbie
Ressler all agreed the ap-
peal should go forward,
while at the same time
hoping for a resolution.
Trustee Krista Joseph did
not offer an opinion.
"We've got to look at our
people ... and do what is
really the right thing,"
Priselac said. "I feel I am
doing what is right."
The bottom line, they
say, is makeup of the Cit-
rus Memorial Health
Foundation, which leases
the hospital and its assets
from the publicly ap-
pointed board of trustees.
Hospital chief executive
officer Ryan Beaty said in
a statement he was disap-
pointed with the trustees'
action.
"We were saddened
today to hear the news that
the Citrus County Hospital
Board has decided not to
move forward with collab-
oration in mind, but to ap-
peal a recent decision
made by the First District
Court of Appeals," he said.
"Beginning another court-
room battle that wastes
taxpayer dollars on legal
fees rather than hospital
care is shameful and
wrong-headed."


* The foundation board
meets at 6 p.m.
Monday. Its agenda
includes a closed
shade meeting with
attorneys to discuss
the lawsuits still
pending.
The 2011 state law gave
majority membership of
the foundation to the
trustees. While the case
has been in appeal, both
boards have attempted to
negotiate a membership
makeup.
Foundation members
want the five trustees to
join the foundation as it
now sits. Trustees want a
5-5-1 makeup five
trustees, five foundation
members and the medical
chief of staff.
Trustees said the foun-
dation's unwillingness to
agree with that plan led
them to following through
with the Supreme Court
appeal.
CCHB attorney Bill Grant
said he didn't think the ap-
peal's cost would exceed
$50,000. However, he noted
the trustees budgeted
$150,000 this year for the
Supreme Court appeal.
The First District Court
of Appeal last week struck
down a Leon County cir-
cuit court judge's ruling
over the 2011 law. In a 2-1
ruling, the majority said
the law was unconstitu-
tional because it voided a
valid lease that the foun-
dation has with the board
of trustees.


The minority district
judge sided with the cir-
cuit court judge that the
foundation is a quasi-
governmental agency be-
cause it acts on behalf of
the public board of
trustees. Public agencies,
the judges said, do not
have the same contract
protections as private or-
ganizations.
At issue is the hospital
board's insistence that it
has equal membership of
the foundation, with super-
majority votes required for
major decisions, such as
the hiring of the chief ex-
ecutive officer
Trustees said they have
repeatedly made that re-
quest to the foundation, ei-
ther to be denied or
ignored all together.
Trustees said they
would be willing to stop
the appeal if the founda-
tion agrees to the gover-
nance changes.
While trustees see the
issue as governance, the
foundation sees it through
financial terms. Founda-
tion officials say the
trustees are withholding
millions of tax dollars
meant for the hospital.
In November, trustees of-
fered to pay the foundation
$4 million in exchange for
an agreement on equal
membership on the foun-
dation. They said the only
response they received was
a Feb. 15 memo from foun-
dation attorney Clark Still-
well to Grant, where he
suggested the issue is fund-
ing and not board parity.


Failed Florida candidate

facing campaign charges
Associatd press The FBI began investigating
MIAMI A failed Sternad after The Miami Herald
South Florida congres-
sional candidate linked to published stories last year ...
former U.S. Rep. David
Rivera was charged Fri- conspiracy to violate fed- an agreement with
day with violating federal eral campaign laws, mak- prosecutors.
campaign finance laws by ing false statements and The type of document
concealing the true source accepting illegal contribu- used to charge Sternad
of thousands of dollars, ac- tions. If convicted, Ster- called an "information,'
cepting illegal contribu- nad faces up to five years typically indicates in fed-
tions and trying to cover in prison on each of the eral court that a defen-
up the scheme with false three counts. dant is cooperating with
campaign filings. "We are committed to authorities and plans
Justin Sternad, 35, sur- promoting transparency eventually to plead guilty
rendered to Miami agents and accountability from But Yabor would not con-
Friday morning and ap- our elected officials and firm that, saying only
peared in court later in from those running for of- "Time will tell."
the day Sternad, previ- fice," said U.S. Attorney The FBI began investi-
ously a political unknown, Wifredo Ferrer. "Our citi- gating Sternad after The
was a candidate in the zens deserve no less." Miami Herald published
Democratic primary for At the brief court ap- stories last year that he
Florida's 26th congres- pearance, Sternad's attor- had received money from
sional district that ney Rick Yabor entered a the campaign of Rivera, a
stretches from the Miami not guilty plea for his Republican, to use in the
suburbs to Key West. client, who did not speak. Democratic primary
Federal prosecutors Sternad is being released against eventual winner
charged Sternad with on $100,000 bail under Joe Garcia.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Singer Cleotha Staples dies


Associated Press

CHICAGO In a family of vocal-
ists, it was Cleotha Staples' smooth
and velvety voice that helped set
apart the sound of the influential
and best-selling gospel group The
Staple Singers.
Staples, the eldest sister and mem-
ber of the group her father Roebuck
"Pops" Staples started in the 1940s,
died Thursday at age 78. She was at
her Chicago home and had been suf-
fering from Alzheimer's disease for
the past decade, said family friend
and music publicist Bill Carpenter.
The group included sisters Per-
vis, Yvonne, Mavis and Cynthia, but
Cleotha was the backbone, defining
herself by being the "strong, silent
type," said Carpenter, author of
"Uncloudy Day: The Gospel Music
Encyclopedia."
"When she was young, they used
to call her granny because she


Associated Press
Cleotha Staples of the sibling group
The Staples Singers is seen March
15, 1999, at the Rock and Roll Hall
of Fame induction ceremony in New
York. Cleotha died Friday at her
Chicago home after suffering from
Alzheimer's disease for the past
decade. She was 78.
acted like a granny in terms of
being wise and always sure of the
best thing to do," Carpenter said.
Staples, known as "Cleedi," was


inducted into the Rock and Roll
Hall of Fame with her family in
1999 and received a lifetime
achievement award from the Gram-
mys in 2005. The Staple Singers
gained a huge audience with their
first No. 1 hit "I'll Take You There"
in 1972 and followed with top 40 hits
"Respect Yourself," "Heavy Makes
You Happy," and "If You're Ready
(Come Go With Me)."
Cleotha Staples was born April
11, 1934, in Drew, Miss., the first
child of Pops and his wife, Oceola.
Two years later, the family moved to
Chicago, where Pops worked a vari-
ety of jobs performing manual labor
and Oceola worked at a hotel.
Chicago also was where the family's
four other children were born.
Pops and Mavis primarily took the
lead on the group's vocals, but a 1969
recording of duets featured Cleotha's
voice on the song "It's Too Late," a
bluesy ballad about a lost love.


MacFarlane aims to perk up Oscars


DAVID GERMAIN
AP movie writer

LOS ANGELES You
think the Academy
Awards are boring? Try
the nominations. They
only last a few minutes,
but it's generally a sleepy
academy suit and a sleepy
starlet droning a list of
names at 5:30 in the
morning.
Except last time. Some
baby-faced guy took the
stage, advised people who
don't know him to pretend
he's Donny Osmond, then
stood beside sleepy starlet
Emma Stone and cut loose
with this line about best-
picture nominee "Amour":
"I read 'Amour' was co-
produced in Austria and
Germany, right? The last
time Austria and Germany
got together and co-
produced something, it
was Hitler."
For good or bad, Oscar
host Seth MacFarlane al-
ready has enlivened the
awards scene. As emcee of
a broadcast notorious for
its predictability and
geezer audience, MacFar-
lane may bring a cheeki-
ness that prods younger
viewers to check out the
Oscars just to see what he
might pull. But given his
Hitler wisecrack, just how
far will MacFarlane push
it?
"It's a balance between
not being completely dis-
missive of the ceremony,
but at the same time, in-
jecting a little bit of a
lighter sensibility than
maybe we've seen in the
past," said MacFarlane,
the impudent creator of
"Family Guy" and last
summer's potty-mouthed
blockbuster "Ted."
"The Oscars does have a
history of taking itself so
deadly seriously And
while it obviously is a cer-
emony that's important to
the people involved, you
know we're not curing
cancer here. So if there's
any subtle reminder that
I'll try to inject into the
show tonally, it would be
that."
The most-beloved Oscar
hosts Billy Crystal,
Johnny Carson, Bob Hope
- are those who play it
safe while managing to
poke gentle fun at Holly-
wood, the awards and the
nominees. With TV ratings
generally declining dur-


Associated Press
Early reviews for Seth MacFarlane's Oscar-hosting skills are very positive. The
Academy Awards won't be presented until Sunday, but MacFarlane won laughs from
the show's director during a rehearsal Thursday inside the Dolby Theatre.


ing the past few decades,
Oscar overseers have
tried shaking things up,
trying out new hosts and
different ways of handing
out prizes.
The results have been
mixed. Jon Stewart and
Ellen DeGeneres earned
polite praise as Oscar
hosts. Chris Rock ruffled
feathers with a few tart
jabs but was mostly re-
spectful. Hugh Jackman
was charming and ener-
getic, while Steve Martin
and Alec Baldwin were an
able team as dual hosts.
Another duo, Anne
Hathaway and James
Franco, were brought in
two years ago to court
young viewers. Hathaway
was cute and perky, but
Franco seemed to sleep-
walk through the show. So
last year, Oscar organizers
lured back old stand-by
Crystal, the most-popular
among hosts of recent
years.
The show's audience
has inched up from its all-
time low five years ago,
when 32 million people
watched the Oscars. But
ratings remain well below
the Oscar heyday of
decades ago, and no mat-
ter who's the host, the
show has never been able
to shed its image as a
marathon broadcast
where rich and famous
people hand out trophies
to other rich and famous
people.
Enter MacFarlane,
who's not just a funny guy


but a gifted singer, with a
Frank Sinatra-style album
of standards to his credit.
"What I'm hoping for -
like everybody else, the
other billion people
watching is just that it's
the best show of all time
and he's the greatest host
ever to have lived," said
former emcee Jackman, a
best-actor nominee for
"Les Miserables." "He's
going to nail it. I think he's
very funny"
Not everyone's looking
forward to a Seth-fest
Oscars.
"I'm not that big a fan of
his," said Alan Arkin, a
supporting-actor winner
for "Little Miss Sunshine"
who's nominated in the
same category this time
for "Argo." "I find him a
little crude, more crude
than necessary"
MacFarlane gave a taste
of things to come Jan. 10,
when he became just the
second Oscar host to join
the nominations an-
nouncement (Charlton
Heston was the first, for
the 1972 show).
His early-morning
shtick lasted just 10 min-
utes a fraction of the
often interminable Oscar
show itself but it
brought a backlash from
people wondering what
sort of show might be ex-
pected from a guy whose
chubby cartoon hero on
"Family Guy" once was
forced to strip off his shirt
and moo like a cow while
a woman pretended to


milk his man-breasts.
The Hitler joke aside,
critics said MacFarlane
disparaged women with a
comment that supporting-
actress nominees no
longer had to pretend
they're attracted to Oscar
kingpin Harvey Weinstein;
belittled writers by saying
adapted-screenplay con-
tenders just cut-and-
pasted from their source
material; and slammed
the directing picks as the
"five people who are the
very best at sitting in a
chair watching other peo-
ple make a movie."
Edgy or insulting?
Some feel it's just the
jolt the stodgy Oscars
need to get younger, hip-
per fans the key audi-
ence for Hollywood films
- to tune in.


To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,

Judy
Moseley
at 564-2917
jmoseley@chronicleonline.com


Clsn < foBfiM s2hB,


Geneva
McQuillen, 91
HERNANDO
Geneva Reese McQuill-
en, 91, of Hernando, Fla.,
loving
wife, G
mother

passed
into the
loving
arms of
our Lord
on Feb. 12, Geneva
2013. McQuillen
Geneva
was born Oct. 17, 1921, in
Paris, Ky., to the late
Turner Carmichael and
Roberta Crouch.
She was preceded in
death by husband William
R. McQuillen and brothers
Turner Carmichael Jr. and
Eugene Carmichael. She is
survived by sister Eliza-
beth Tuttle and brother-in-
law Glen; five daughters,
Patsy Barnett, Barbara
Rivera, Lynn Ann Lang-
ford, Jean Marie Todsen
and Jo Ellen McQuillen,
and son-in-law Sid Todsen;
five grandchildren; three
step-grandchildren; five
great-grandchildren; and
several nieces and
nephews.
Geneva will forever be
loved and missed by all
who knew her. A memorial
service will be at 11 a.m.
Saturday, March 2, at the
Hernando United Meth-
odist Church 2125 Norvell
Bryant Highway, Her-
nando, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

DEADLINE
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.






D I& S


Emmabelle
Wright, 91
INVERNESS
Emmabelle Wright, 91,
of Inverness, died Friday,
Feb. 22, 2013.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is
assisting the family with
private arrangements.

Robert Kopp
HUDSON
Robert H. Kopp, of Hud-
son, Fla., passed away Feb.
20, 2013. Bob and his wife,
Gizelle own Furniture
Palace in
Inverness.
B o b
moved to -
Florida -
from Clin- -
ton, N.J., _0
in 1987. He
opened
the family Robert
business Kopp
in 1993.
He is survived by his
wife, Gizelle; daughters,
Lauren and Kristen; son,
Charles; brother, Don;
grandsons, Ryan and
Jason; and nephews,
Austin and Bryce. He was
predeceased by his daugh-
ter, Melinda.
A memorial service will
be 4 to 6 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 23, 2013, at Downing
Funeral Home in Spring
Hill. In lieu of flowers
please donate to the SPCA
of West Pasco.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
Email obits@
chronicleonline.com
or call 352-563-5660
for details and pricing
options for obituaries;
free options available.


4aa2 E. zaru
Funeral Home With Crematory
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CITRUS COUNTY RESIDENTS

Did you know you can dispose of the following materials

Free of charge at the landfill, up to the listed limits!

NO LIMITS ON THESE ITEMS
Bulky waste consisting of furniture, carpeting and padding, box springs and mattresses
* Computer components & all other electronic items Some metal appliances (stoves, washers, etc.)
* Lead acid and rechargeable batteries Scrap metal (all lawn equipment must have fluids drained)
ITEMS WITH LIMITS OF 2 PER VISIT & 4 PER YEAR
Televisions and computer monitors Refrigerators, Freezers, A/C units Propane tanks
ITEMS WITH OTHER LIMITS
SResidential passenger car tires maximum 5 per visit & 10 per year Used oil & antifreeze-
Up to 10 gallons per visit Fluorescent lamps & mercury containing devices- first 6 free
Latex paint maximum 10 gallons per visit

"PUT WASTE IN IT'S PLACE" <







Businesses will be charged business rate. For more information call (352)527-7670


Obituaries


-4


A6 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013


DE2MB





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cross-continental fight brewing


Alaska senatorpushes for wildlife refuge road through environmentally-sensitive area


Associated Press

ANCHORAGE, Alaska
- Thin barrier islands
five miles off the tip of
the Alaska Peninsula
shelter Izembek Lagoon
from the Bering Sea, but
it's what's beneath the
surface that makes the
lagoon special and part
of a brewing, cross-
continent fight.
Sen. Lisa Murkowski is
pushing for a road between
King Cove, population 938,
where flying is often impos-
sible, and Cold Bay, home to
an airport that can operate
in almost any weather The
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Serv-
ice and outgoing Interior
Secretary Ken Salazar last
week rejected a land swap
that would have allowed the
road to be built through the
refuge, skirting the lagoon.
Murkowski and her al-
lies said a road would be
safer than what's happen-
ing now. Local residents of
King Cove have died trying
to fly to Cold Bay and a
hospital in Anchorage.
Murkowski isn't backing
down, and has threatened
to block President
Obama's choice to head
the Interior Department,
Sally Jewell, unless the ad-
ministration agrees to a
land exchange that will
lead to construction of


-- --- --- :- -

-, .- - .- --A-- ,. -. -- -- -- -
n -7





Associated Press
Izembek Lagoon in the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska, is 25 miles of ocean sheltered from the Bering
Sea by long barrier islands, but it's what's beneath the water that makes it special for environmentalists. The shal-
low lagoon is home to the largest known bed of eelgrass.


a road.
"I'd like to think that I'm
not going to have to use
that tool, but it's available
to me and I am going to do
everything that I can
within my power as a
United States senator to
make sure that the safety
of the people in the King
Cove/Cold Bay region is
not compromised," she
said.
The political battle is
far from the peaceful
heart of the lagoon,
where the world's largest
known bed of eelgrass
grows upward in green
ribbons from the shallow


ocean bottom. Every fall,
the eelgrass provides a
buffet for millions of
geese and other water-
fowl as they leave Alaska
or Russia for warmer
climates.
Almost the entire popu-
lation of Pacific brant de-
scends on Izembek
National Wildlife Refuge,
foraging a mile or so off-
shore. The small sea geese
watch for bald eagles
launching attacks from
bluffs. Endangered
Steller's eiders feed on
tiny invertebrates. Tundra
swans, emperor geese and
countless shorebirds make


appearances.
Murkowski, generally an
advocate for environmen-
tal issues, has argued peo-
ple should come first in
this particular case.
Coast Guard helicopter
crews answered five emer-
gency calls in King Cove
last year. Murkowski said
they regard the King Cove
airport as the most dan-
gerous in the state. A 1981
crash out of King Cove
killed a pilot, a nurse prac-
titioner, a health aide and
a crab fisherman who was
being evacuated because
his foot had been severed.
Treacherous weather con-


editions have doomed other
flights, including six in a
1982 crash on a flight from
Kodiak to King Cove.
Debate over environ-
mental values versus
human life at Izembek
has been going on since
most of the Izembek Na-
tional Wildlife Refuge
was designated as
wilderness in 1980. King
Cove residents say they
were not consulted be-
fore their access was
restricted.
Residents seeking a
road in 1998 received a
sympathetic reception in
Washington, D.C., but left


with a consolation prize.
Congress appropriated
$37.5 million to upgrade
medical facilities and a
spend $9 million on a
hovercraft.
Icing and big waves
often kept the hovercraft
in port, said Aleutians East
Borough Administrator
Rick Gifford. At $73 for a
one-way ticket, the pro-
jected revenue never ma-
terialized. The boat turned
into a $1 million annual
drain on the budget and
the borough ended service
in November 2011. It was
transferred to another city
within the borough.
With the hovercraft out
of the picture, King Cove
officials renewed their call
for a road. With the back-
ing of the state and an
Alaska Native corporation,
they made an offer they
thought the federal gov-
ernment could not refuse:
43,093 acres of state land
and 13,300 acres of land
owned by King Cove Corp.
for a 10-mile corridor
through the refuge and
acreage from another fed-
eral refuge.
The U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service and
Salazar concluded the ad-
ditional acreage could not
match the quality of habi-
tat at Izembek and would
disrupt the birds.


US joins fraud lawsuit


against Lance Armstrong


Suit alleges riders used banned substances


Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
Justice Department joined
a lawsuit Friday against
disgraced cyclist Lance
Armstrong that alleges the
former seven-time Tour de
France champion con-
cealed his use of perform-
ance-enhancing drugs and
defrauded his longtime
sponsor, the U.S. Postal
Service.
The lawsuit alleges rid-
ers on the postal service-
sponsored team, including
Armstrong, knowingly vio-
lated their postal service
agreements by regularly
using banned substances
and methods to enhance
their performance.
"Lance Armstrong and
his cycling team took more
than $30 million from the
U.S. Postal Service based
on their contractual prom-
ise to play fair and abide
by the rules including
the rules against doping,"
said U.S. Attorney Ronald
Machen, whose office is
handling the case. "The
Postal Service has now
seen its sponsorship un-
fairly associated with
what has been described
as 'the most sophisticated,
professionalized and suc-
cessful doping program



CITY
Continued from Page Al

The vision is to expand
the downtown area out-
ward toward the lakes as
well as consolidating the
properties that house gov-
ernment services.
"We want to make sure
the abundance of land be-
longs to the private sector,"
he said. "When you re-
move government a non
tax-paying entity from a
piece of property and free
it up for a tax-paying in-
vestor, you've done a num-
ber of things to actually
support the government
and the community."
DiGiovanni said
SCORE's presence at the
city government center is a



QUOTES
Continued from Page Al

* "The McLeod House
bistro is an ideal footprint
for the types of businesses
Inverness needs .... we
could use a dozen of those
around town. We need
businesses that bring peo-


Associated Press
U.S. Postal Service cycling team leader and 2004 Tour
de France winner Lance Armstrong, wearing the overall
leader's yellow jersey, and teammate George Hincapie,
right, ride the victory lap on Champs Elysees boulevard
in Paris, France.


hat sport has ever seen."'
In recent weeks, settle-
ment discussions had
been under way between
the Justice Department
and Armstrong's lawyers.
A person familiar with the
negotiations said Friday
the two sides are tens of
millions of dollars apart
on how much the Austin
cyclist should pay to settle
the case. The person
spoke on condition of
anonymity because the
source was not authorized
to speak on the record


major asset, since the or-
ganization's purpose is to
help new small businesses
start and succeed.
"SCORE is part of our
outreach," he said.
Inverness Mayor Bob
Plaisted said right now ac-
tivities draw people to In-
verness, which is great,
"but we're just another
small town," he said. "We
have to look at drawing
high-end businesses here."
He also said entry into
the city, from State Road
44 and U.S. 41, needs to
make an impact, using
landscaping and signage.
"We need to look at ways
to make this an exclusive-
looking area so when peo-
ple enter they think, 'I'm
going into some place that's
important,"' Plaisted said.
Councilwoman Marti


ple into the area." Chris
Lloyd, Inverness resident.
* "I can see a multi-use
area, private residences
over retail or other
businesses." Ken Hin-
kle, Inverness city council-
man, talking about the
Mills grove area near Lake
Henderson.
* "How about a restaurant
with a view of the lake?


about the private talks.
From 1996 through 2004,
the postal service spon-
sored a professional cy-
cling team run by
Tailwind Sports Corp., and
Armstrong was the lead
rider. From 1999 to 2004,
he won six consecutive
Tour de France titles. The
suit also said Johan
Bruyneel, the team's man-
ager, knew that team
members were using per-
formance-enhancing sub-
stances and facilitated the
practice.


Consuegra said the city
needs to be a place that
appeals to younger people.
"There's a certain
amount of'Old Florida' that
we want to hold onto," she
said, "but we've got to ap-
peal to an up-and-coming
generation who looks for
areas where they can go
and do everything they
want to do in one place."
Council president Cabot
McBride said the cultural
perspective on growth
needs to change. He ac-
knowledged some people
don't want to see any
growth at all and others
want to see it "everywhere
and anywhere until not a
blade of grass is left"
"But we're talking smart
growth," he said. "We need
other people to buy into
this. If we're the only en-


Never could understand
why we have no restaurants
on the water" -Ann Smith
Snodgrass, from Chronicle's
Facebook page.
"I'd like to see a nice
hotel, and for the state to
dredge the lakes to get
them cleaned out for bet-
ter fish spawning." Ron
Rock, Jr, from the Chroni-
cle's Facebook page.


Rapper, cabbie meet violent


end together in Las Vegas


Associated Press

LAS VEGAS Kenny
Cherry was an aspiring
rapper who moved from
the Bay Area to Las Vegas
to pursue his career. His
music videos online show
him cruising the Strip in
his Maserati.
Michael Boldon was a
family man and taxi driver
who hailed from Michigan
and loved fast cars.
The two men's lives -
along with that of an
unidentified passenger in
Boldon's cab ended in
violence normally seen
only in movies: gunfire, a
fiery crash and an explo-
sion before dawn Thurs-
day on the neon-lit Las
Vegas Strip.
As investigators Friday
tried to find the gunman
in a black Range Rover
SUV who triggered the
shocking chain of events,
families and friends tried
to grasp the blink-of-an-
eye finality of it all.
"Right now my heart is
breaking," said Cherry's
great aunt, Patricia Sims,
of Oakland, Calif. "This
has really been a tragedy
Kenny was just a delight-
ful kid."
Sims, 75, said Cherry
moved to Las Vegas from
Northern California,
though she didn't know her


tity that's doing it, we won't
accomplish what we want
to accomplish."
DiGiovanni said Inver-
ness as a waterfront city is
a long-term plan, but with-
out a plan or a vision, the
city can't thrive.
"In the short-term, we're
going to invest in the Valerie
Theatre and it's going to
change the whole dynamics







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Associated Press
Tow truck drivers clean up and tow away cars involved
in a drive-by shooting on Las Vegas Boulevard Thursday.


nephew was a rapper using
the name Kenny Clutch.
Cherry's parents were
traveling to Las Vegas on
Friday to claim his body
The 27-year-old, whose
full name is Kenneth
Wayne Cherry Jr, was
driving a Maserati that
was peppered by gunfire
before it sped through a
red light and smashed into
Boldon's taxi.
The taxi exploded into
flames, killing Boldon and
a female passenger, as
four other vehicles
crashed like pinballs at an
intersection overlooked
by some of Las Vegas' most
famous hotel-casinos: Bel-
lagio, Caesars Palace,
Bally's and the Flamingo.
Police think an argu-
ment at the valet area of
the upscale Aria resort-
casino led to the shooting,


of the courthouse square,"
he said. "It's going to be
huge. It's going to cause a lot
of excitement and people
will want to come and be a


but they haven't shared
details. The shooting hap-
pened the same night that
Morocco-born rapper
French Montana was play-
ing at Aria's signature
nightclub, Haze.
"What the original dis-
agreement was is crucial
to the ongoing investiga-
tion and the identification
of the suspects," said Las
Vegas police officer Bill
Cassell.
He said investigators
were examining surveil-
lance video and enlisting
help from federal authori-
ties and agencies in neigh-
boring states to look for
the distinctive Range
Rover It had blackout
windows and custom
black rims and was last
seen speeding away from
the fiery scene around
4:30 a.m. Thursday


part of this city"
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. com.


i Our Goal Is A


Healthier You

New Patients & Walk-Ins
Are Always Welcome
Humana, Freedom, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted


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(352) 344-5511


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4363 S. Suncoast Blvd.
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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013 A7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Analysis: Obama, GOP see



no need to stop budget cuts


DAVID ESPO
AP special correspondent

WASHINGTON
U like in earlier
rounds of budget
brinkmanship,
President Barack Obama
and congressional Repub-
licans both seem content
to fight out their latest
showdown on the current
terrain, let across-the-
board spending cuts take
effect on March 1 and
allow them to stay in place
for weeks if not much
longer.
This time, there is no
market-rattling threat of a
government default to
force the two sides to com-
promise, no federal shut-
down on the short-term
horizon and no year-end
deadline for preventing a
tax increase for every
working American.
The rhetoric is reminis-
cent, for sure.
"So far at least, the ideas
that the Republicans have
proposed ask nothing of
the wealthiest Americans
or the biggest corpora-
tions," Obama said this
week as he campaigned to
pin the blame for any neg-
ative effects on his politi-
cal opponents. "So the
burden is all on the first
responders, or seniors, or
middle class families," he
said in comments similar
in tone to his re-election
campaign.
Republicans, standing
on political ground of their
own choosing, responded
sharply to the president's
fresh demand for higher
taxes.
"Spending is the prob-
lem, spending must be the
focus," said House
Speaker John Boehner of
Ohio, while Senate GOP
leader Mitch McConnell of
Kentucky declared,
"There won't be any easy
off-ramps on this one. The
days of 11th hour negotia-
tions are over"
A crisis atmosphere
could yet develop this
spring, when hundreds of
thousands or even millions
of threatened government
furloughs begin to take ef-
fect and the spending cuts
begin to bite.
Already, Republicans
are considering legislation
to give the administration
greater flexibility in mak-
ing the cuts, a step that
could minimize the impact
on the public. It's a step
the White House says it
opposes, although the
depth of that conviction
has yet to be tested.
At heart, the present
standoff is yet another in-
dication of the political re-
sistance to a compromise
curbing the growth of
Medicare, Medicaid and
possibly Social Security, a
step both Obama and Re-
publicans say is essential
to restoring the nation's
fiscal health. It is the last
major remaining chal-
lenge in divided govern-
ment's struggle, now in its
third year, to reduce
deficits by $4 trillion or
more over a decade.
Counting the across-the-
board cuts now beginning
to command the nation's
attention at a 10-year
cost of $1.2 trillion the
president and Congress
have racked up more than
$3.6 trillion in savings.
Much came from spend-
ing, although legislation
Republicans let pass at
year's end raised taxes on
the wealthy to generate an
estimated $600 billion for
the Treasury during a
decade.
The so-called sequester
now approaching was
never supposed to happen.
It was designed as an un-
palatable fallback, to take
effect only in case a con-
gressional super-commit-
tee failed to come up with
$1 trillion or more in sav-
ings from benefit
programs.
Now, more than a year
later, Republicans are
fond of saying the idea it-
self originated at the


White House.
That skips lightly over
the fact their own votes
helped enact it into law
Also, they decided a
month ago that it marked
the moment of most lever-
age in their struggle to ma-
neuver Obama and


Associated Press
President Barack Obama and congressional Republicans each seem content with the
political ground they hold and are prepared to let across-the-board spending cuts take
effect on March 1, unlike during earlier rounds of budget brinkmanship that saw last-
minute frantic dealmaking. TOP LEFT: President Obama. TOP RIGHT: House Speaker
John Boehner. BOTTOM LEFT: Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius.
BOTTOM RIGHT: Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood.


Democrats into curtailing
benefit programs. To ac-
complish that objective,
they already have raised
the debt limit without win-
ning any cuts in exchange,
a step they once vowed not
to take. And within two
weeks, they are likely to
launch legislation making
sure the government oper-
ates without interruption
when current funding au-
thority runs out for most
agencies on March 27.
Republicans aren't the
only ones partial to verbal
sleights of hand.
In a letter to lawmakers
earlier this month, Health
and Human Services Sec-
retary Kathleen Sebelius
sounded a series of
alarms. The spending cuts
"could compromise" the
health of more than
373,000 mentally ill or
emotionally disturbed in-
dividuals, "could slow ef-
forts to improve" health
care for American Indians
and Alaska Natives, she
wrote, and admissions to
inpatient addiction facili-
ties "could be reduced."
Could or could not. Soon
or later. Nothing pinned
down.
The administration
hopes to win over the pub-
lic and bring Republican
lawmakers to heel, and it
dispatched Transportation
Secretary Ray LaHood to
the White House briefing


room Friday
"Come to the table and
start talking" to find a way
to avert the cuts, the for-
mer GOP lawmaker urged
members of his own Re-
publican Party
Peppered with skeptical
questions, LaHood di-
rected reporters to his de-
partment's website, with a
listing of more than 300 air
traffic facilities where
overnight shifts could be
eliminated or perhaps


closed entirely
Asked if his office was
receiving unhappy calls
from the public, he got to
the political point.
"My phones will ring
from members of Congress
(asking) 'why is my control
tower being closed?"' he
said.


David Espo isAP's
chief congressional
correspondent.


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Boehner says US veterans'

claims system is broken


Associated Press

CINCINNATI U.S.
House Speaker John
Boehner said the system
for handling veterans' dis-
ability claims is broken
and he wants the head of
the Department of Veter-
ans Affairs to explain
what is being done to fix it.
Boehner, a Republican
from Ohio, said in a letter
to Secretary of Veterans
Affairs Eric Shinseki this
week that the benefit de-
livery system for veterans
has not shown any notice-
able improvement in the
four years Shinseki has
headed the department
and the backlog of com-
pensation claims "re-
mains alarmingly high."
The VA was preparing
a formal response to
Boehner's letter, a VA
spokesman said Friday.
The VA has said it com-
pleted a "record-break-
ing" 1 million claims per
year the past three years.
But the speaker wrote
in his letter that the back-
load remains high, espe-
cially in Ohio, despite the
announcement at the
Cleveland Veterans Af-
fairs Regional Office last
summer of a new organi-
zational model to help re-
duce the backlog by 2015.
The Cleveland office,
which handles claims
from around the state, is
now processing claims in
an average of 334 days
compared with the na-
tional average of 272 days
and the VAs own goal of
125 days, Boehner said.
Since the transforma-
tion began at the Cleve-
land office, the average
time to process a claim
has increased by 20 per-
cent, or about 56 days,
and the current national
average has increased by
17.7 percent since Janu-


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ary 2012, Boehner said.
The speaker said in a
statement he has been
"disappointed and dis-
heartened by the results"
of the new system and
that system failures re-
ported by Ohio veterans
are "shameful." His office
is handling more than 100
unresolved claims from
Ohio veterans, including
one from Air Force vet-
eran Tiffany Hilliard, of
Troy
Hilliard said Friday she
has been waiting more
than a year to add her now
17-month-old daughter as
a dependent She said she
was told when checking
last month on the status of
her October 2011 request
that inquiries about claim
statuses were no longer
being handled because of
the backlog. Hilliard said
she has lost benefits by not
having her daughter listed
as a dependent but hopes
"speaking out might help
other veterans who may
need more help."
Army veteran Randy
Bitner, of Eaton, said he
submitted a disability
claim around March 2011
and received a form letter
last month saying he was
now in the system. Bitner
said he has received no
information about the tim-
ing for resolving his claim.
Data from a report on
work load indicators re-
ported by Veterans Bene-
fits Administration field
offices for Jan. 24, 2009,
showed the number of
pending compensation
claims nationwide at
390,000, with 10,500 of
those pending at the
Cleveland office, Boehner
wrote. He said the report
for Feb. 11, 2013, showed
the total pending compen-
sation claims had grown to
821,000, with some 71 per-
cent older than 125 days.


A8 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013


NATION






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money&Markets
1,560 ................................. S& P 500
-- Close: 1,515.60
Change: 13.18(0.9%)
1,480 ........10 DAYS ........
1 ,5 5 0 ... ......... ........... ........... ......... .........

1,500

1,450

1 4 0 0 o o.. .... . ... .

1,350 S ...... N D D .................J F


StocksRecap


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE
3,340
4,161
2280
745
118
17


NASD
1,541
2,013
1777
669
100
26


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
14001.04
5952.29
477.91
8894.66
3161.83
1515.64
1103.70
15997.34
916.16


A click of the wrist k
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com
a ............................ Dow Jones industrials
S.,,:/ Close:14,000.57
Change: 119.95(0.9%)

14,40 0 .. ... ... .. ... ... ... ... ... ... .. ... .. ... ... .. .. ...

14,000.......................
13,60 0 ...... ..........................................


12 ,80 0 ................ ............. / ............ ........... ...........
12,400.. ". ... .... ... ..... ........ ........


LOW
13880.62
5875.56
472.56
8833.65
3139.55
1502.42
1093.28
15854.42
910.35


CLOSE
14000.57
5943.89
477.91
8894.63
3161.82
1515.60
1103.70
15997.33
916.16


CHG. %CHG. YTD
+119.95 +0.86% +6.84%
+68.33 +1.16% +12.01%
+5.35 +1.13% +5.48%
+84.34 +0.96% +5.34%
+30.33 +0.97% +4.71%
+13.18 +0.88% +6.27%
+10.43 +0.95% +8.16%
+142.91 +0.90% +6.68%
+10.76 +1.19% +7.87%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR%CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 3.42 8.65 3.94 +.06 +1.5 V V -14.3 -52.0 dd
AT&T Inc T 29.95 -- 38.58 35.68 +.25 +0.7 A A A +5.8 +22.6 29 1.80f
Ametek Inc AME 29.86 42.45 42.24 +.75 +1.8 A A A +12.4 +28.7 22 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 64.99 94.49 93.38 +1.32 +1.4 A A A +6.8 +42.6 1.57e
Bank of America BAG 6.72 12.42 11.44 +.02 +0.2 V V -1.5 +41.3 44 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 6.35 12.23 11.36 +.10 +0.9 A V -0.1 +29.7 cc
CenturyLink Inc CTL 32.05 --- 43.43 34.64 +.37 +1.1 A V -11.5 -5.7 28 2.16m
Citigroup C 24.61 44.71 42.79 +.44 +1.0 V A +8.2 +27.1 13 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 21.43 18.03 +.36 +2.0 A A A +13.8 -8.0 32 1.00
Disney DIS 40.88 55.95 54.25 +.08 +0.1 V A +9.0 +32.1 17 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 71.13 69.46 +.63 +0.9 A A A +8.9 +14.9 19 3.06
EPR Properties EPR 40.04 48.92 47.39 +.18 +0.4 V A +2.8 +19.8 21 3.00
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 77.13 93.67 89.20 +.61 +0.7 A V A +3.1 +5.0 11 2.28
Ford Motor F 8.82 14.30 12.48 +.09 +0.7 V V -3.6 +0.9 9 0.40f
Gen Electric GE 18.02 23.75 23.39 +.13 +0.6 A A A +11.4 +24.4 17 0.76
Home Depot HD 46.12 68.15 65.58 +1.20 +1.9 V V A +6.0 +39.7 23 1.16
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 --- 29.27 20.42 +.17 +0.8 V V -1.0 -22.2 10 0.90
IBM IBM 181.85 -- 211.79 201.09 +2.76 +1.4 A V A +5.0 +4.3 13 3.40
LKQ Corporation LKQ 14.63 23.99 22.48 +.49 +2.2 V V A +6.5 +35.7 26
Lowes Cos LOW 24.76 39.98 37.67 ... ... V V A +6.1 +37.9 22 0.64
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 -- 101.04 95.25 +1.11 +1.2 A A A +8.0 -3.5 18 3.08
Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.26 --- 32.95 27.76 +.27 +1.0 V V A +3.9 -9.8 15 0.92
Motorola Solutions MSI 44.49 0 62.05 61.90 +1.02 +1.7 A A A +11.2 +24.0 21 1.04
NextEra Energy NEE 59.10 0 73.41 72.75 +.22 +0.3 A A A +5.1 +24.0 16 2.64f
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 15.69 -- 42.85 22.47 +.92 +4.3 A A A +14.0 -47.4 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 0 19.87 19.96 +.44 +2.3 A A A +10.6 +13.8 36 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 5.46 0 8.00 7.77 +.18 +2.4 V A A +9.0 +27.6 11 0.04
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 -- 85.90 47.19 -.17 -0.4 V A A +14.1 +0.1 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 71.81 0 94.99 92.99 +1.09 +1.2 A A A +7.8 +29.7 20 2.08
Sprint Nextel Corp S 2.20 0 6.04 5.82 +.03 +0.5 V A A +2.6 +155.1 dd
Texas Instru TXN 26.06 0 34.29 34.18 +1.70 +5.2 A A A +10.7 -0.1 22 1.12f
Time Warner TWX 33.62 0 53.90 52.99 +.38 +0.7 V A A +10.8 +42.8 17 1.60f
UniFirst Corp UNF 55.86 88.35 84.48 +.49 +0.6 A A A +15.2 +36.7 17 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 36.80 48.77 45.40 +.28 +0.6 A A A +4.9 +22.5 cc 2.06
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 --- 30.07 25.01 +.43 +1.7 V V -0.7 -6.3 1.53e
WalMart Strs WMT 57.18 -- 77.60 70.40 +.14 +0.2 A A A +3.2 +19.6 14 1.88f
Walgreen Co WAG 28.53 42.00 41.81 +.19 +0.5 A A A +13.0 +24.8 19 1.10
Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement I Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Dow bounces back


Associated Press

Strong earnings from big U.S. compa-
nies pushed the Dow Jones industrial av-
erage to a rare triple-digit gain Friday,
but the S&P 500 index still posted its first
weekly loss of the year.
Hewlett-Packard had the biggest gain
in the Dow and the Standard & Poor's 500
index. It posted fiscal first-quarter earn-
ings late Thursday that beat all forecasts,
a relief after months of bad news for the
computer maker. H-P rose $2.10, or 12.3
percent, to $19.20.
Cabot Oil & Gas Corp. was the S&P
500's second-best performer, jumping a
day after reporting earnings beat ana-
lysts' expectations. It rose $5.95, or 11.1
percent, to $59.81.
American International Group Inc.
rose after its fourth-quarter operating re-
sults exceeded analysts' forecasts. The
company's net loss was $4 billion, mainly


because of claims related to superstorm
Sandy, in the first full quarter after it fin-
ished repaying its $182 billion govern-
ment bailout. AIG rose $1.17, or 3.1
percent, to $38.45.
The Dow closed up 119.95 points, or 0.9
percent, at 14,000.57 its third-biggest
gain this year. The S&P 500 rose 13.18
points, also 0.9 percent, to 1,515.60. The
Nasdaq composite index rose 30.33, or 1
percent, to 3,161.82.
The S&P 500 and Nasdaq closed
slightly lower for the week, while the
Dow edged higher
Bill Stone, chief investment strategist
with PNC Wealth Management, said he
expects stocks to hold up despite this
week's volatility.
"You're going to get bumps and bruises
along the way, but we do believe things
are actually getting better, so I think
there's underlying demand" for stocks,
Stone said.


Yen races to the bottom


The yen keeps sinking and that s fueling a rise
in the Japanese stock market.
The Japanese currency has plummeted 15
percent against the U.S. dollar over the last six
months. The lower value of the yen helps
Japanese exporters because the electronics,
televisions and other goods that they make are
more affordable to customers making purchases in
other currencies.
Japan s prime minister, Shinzo Abe, favors a
massive expansion of the money supply to create
inflation and jolt Japan out of its two decade
slump. A stronger economy could strengthen the
yen in the longer term. Central banks around the
world have been trying to stimulate their econo-
mies by keeping interest rates extremely low.
The Japanese government s efforts have


Over the last six months, the
Japanese yen is down:




15 percent 20 percent 12 percent
against the against the against the
U.S. dollar euro British pound


Source: FactSet Data through Feb. 21


resulted in big gains
for stockholders: The
Nikkel 225 index has
jumped 26 percent
since mid-
September. But
further moves may
not come as easily
Keep in mind that
the yen s recent
decline has only
brought it closer to
where it was for
much of the 2000s.


Stan Choe, Jenni Sohn AP


Olive Garden owner Darden


warns on third quarter


Interestrates
III




The yield on the
10-year Treasury
note fell to 1.96
percent Friday.
Yields affect in-
terest rates on
consumer loans.



PRIME FED
RATE FUNDS
YEST 3.25 .13
6MOAGO 3.25 .13
1YR AGO 3.25 .13


Commodities
The price of
crude oil rose
back above $93
per barrel, but it
recovered only
a fraction of the
losses that it
sustained earli-
er in the week.
A barrel was
$95.86 a week
ago.




1I1

EMt~


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .12 0.12 ... .08
6-month T-bill .13 0.13 ... .12
52-wk T-bill .15 0.15 ... .14
2-year T-note .25 0.25 ... .30
5-year T-note .83 0.84 -0.01 .89
10-year T-note 1.96 1.98 -0.02 2.00
30-year T-bond 3.15 3.17 -0.02 3.14


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 2.87 2.88 -0.01 2.65
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.06 4.06 ... 4.58
Barclays USAggregate 1.91 1.93 -0.02 2.12
Barclays US High Yield 5.91 5.81 +0.10 7.17
MoodysAAA Corp Idx 3.91 3.96 -0.05 3.86
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.11 1.12 -0.01 1.08
Barclays US Corp 2.80 2.82 -0.02 3.37


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 93.13
Ethanol (gal) 2.36
Heating Oil (gal) 3.10
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.29
Unleaded Gas (gal) 3.08
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1572.40
Silver (oz) 28.46
Platinum (oz) 1607.40
Copper (Ib) 3.53
Palladium (oz) 734.90
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.26
Coffee (Ib) 1.43
Corn (bu) 6.90
Cotton (Ib) 0.81
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 376.40
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.29
Soybeans (bu) 14.61
Wheat (bu) 7.15


PVS.
92.84
2.35
3.10
3.25
3.04
PVS.
1578.20
28.70
1620.00
3.55
733.20
PVS.
1.25
1.42
6.91
0.81
378.00
1.28
14.88
7.21


%CHG
+0.31
+0.04
+0.27
+1.39
+1.42
%CHG
-0.37
-0.83
-0.78
-0.58
+0.23
%CHG
+0.84
+0.95
-0.07
+0.10
-0.42
+0.51
-1.78
-0.87


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 21.25 +.14 +4.2 +12.2 +11.5 +5.6
BondA m 12.85 ... -0.5 +3.9 +5.9 +4.1
CaplncBuA m 54.36 +.35 +3.0 +11.2 +9.6 +3.1
CpWIdGrlA m 38.68 +.36 +4.0 +13.3 +8.9 +1.7
EurPacGrA m 42.27 +.30 +2.5 +9.5 +6.7 +0.8
FnlnvA m 43.01 +.41 +5.5 +13.6 +11.7 +3.6
GrthAmA m 36.06 +.33 +5.0 +13.8 +10.9 +3.4
IncAmerA m 18.72 +.13 +3.7 +12.1 +11.4 +5.3
InvCoAmA m 31.74 +.33 +5.2 +12.6 +10.3 +3.3
NewPerspA m 32.61 +.32 +4.3 +13.8 +10.4 +3.8
WAMutlnvA m 32.89 +.31 +5.4 +12.8 +13.1 +4.2
Dodge & Cox Income 13.88 +.01 +0.1 +5.5 +6.4 +6.9
IntlStk 35.77 +.28 +3.3 +11.4 +7.3 +0.6
Stock 131.15 +1.62 +7.6 +19.1 +12.5 +2.7
Fidelity Contra 80.73 +.74 +5.0+11.4+13.2 +5.0
GrowCo 96.94 +.80 +4.0 +7.8 +14.7 +6.9
LowPriStk d 41.66 +.22 +5.5 +11.8 +13.9 +7.1
Fidelity Spartan 5001dxAdvtg 53.83 +.47 +6.6 +14.2 +13.3 +4.6
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.28 +.01 +2.8 +12.4 +10.8 +5.7
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.46 +.03 +1.2 +9.2 +7.9 +9.3
GIBondAdv 13.41 +.02 +1.2 +9.5 +8.2 +9.6
Harbor Intllnstl d 63.76 +.96 +2.6 +8.8 +9.0 +1.3
PIMCO TotRetA m 11.20 +.01 -0.1 +7.0 +6.8 +7.5
T Rowe Price GrowStk 39.42 +.35 +4.3 +10.6 +13.9 +5.7
Vanguard 500Adml 140.07 +1.23 +6.6 +14.2 +13.4 +4.6
5001nv 140.05 +1.24 +6.6 +14.1 +13.2 +4.5
GNMAAdml 10.83 +.01 -0.4 +1.6 5.2 +5.8
MulntAdml 14.38 ... +0.4 +4.1 +5.6 +5.6
STGradeAd 10.83 ... +0.3 +3.5 +3.6 +3.9
TotBdAdml 10.99 ... -0.6 +2.9 +5.6 +5.7
Totlntl 15.34 +.17 +2.4 +8.1 +6.2 -0.8
TotStlAdm 38.10 +.35 +6.9 +14.1 +13.8 +5.3
TotStldx 38.08 +.35 +6.8 +14.0 +13.6 +5.2
Welltn 35.32 +.20 +4.4 +11.6 +10.8 +5.9
WelltnAdm 61.01 +.36 +4.4 +11.7 +10.8 +6.0
-Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
Stock indexes rose Friday for
the first time in three days fol-
lowing stronger-than-expected
earnings reports. Hewlett-Pack-
ard was the best stock in the
S&P 500 index after it reported
stronger quarterly revenue and
earnings than financial analysts
expected.

AIG AIG
Close:$38.45A1.17 or 3.1%
The insurer posted a $4 billion loss
on costs from Superstorm Sandy,
but its operating profit topped Wall
Street expectations.
$40

35

30
30N D J F
52-week range
$27.18 8 [a $39.90
Vol.: 47.4m (2.0x avg.) PE: 2.6
Mkt. Cap:$56.76 b Yield:...

Hewlett-Packard HPQ
Close:$19.20A2.10 or 12.3%
The latest quarter showed some
progress at the PC maker, which
has been struggling with a shift to-
ward smartphones and tablets.



I,
I I J F
52-week range
$11.351 2-we r $27.87
Vol.:133.1m (4.6x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap:$37.49 b Yield: 2.8%
Abercrombie & Fitch ANF
Close: $46.86V-2.19 or -4.5%
The teen clothing retailer's profit
rose during the holiday quarter, but
sales trends deteriorated. It plans to
close up to 50 U.S. stores.

-I,


Ii U, J F
52-week range
$28.64 $54.10
Vol.: 13.4m (5.4x avg.) PE:35.5
Mkt. Cap:$3.73 b Yield: 1.5%

Rackspace Hosting RAX
Close: $54.59 V-0.74 or -1.3%
The website hosting company is
cutting prices for its cloud band-
width by one-third and setting tiered
prices for other services.
$80



IJ I J F
52-week range
$40.57 I I $81.36
Vol.:6.Om (3.3x avg.) PE:75.8
Mkt. Cap:$7.48 b Yield:...

Zynga ZNGA
Close:$3.19A0.23 or 7.8%
The online games maker moved
closer to offering lucrative gambling
games in the U.S. after a Nevada
law legalized online gambling.
$4

3

2N D J F
52-week range
$2.09 $15.91
Vol.:37.4m (1.3x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap:$1.86 b Yield:...


Associated Press


ORLANDO Darden
Restaurants, struggling to
draw more customers into
its Olive Garden and Red
Lobster restaurants, pre-
dicted a third-quarter
profit Friday that was
below Wall Street's expec-
tations and cut its outlook
for the year.
The Orlando, Fla.-based
chain has tried to revamp
menus and marketing for
its flagship chains. But
revenue at Olive Garden,
Red Lobster and Long-
Horn Steakhouse loca-
tions open at least one
year is expected to fall 4.5
percent in the quarter
ending Feb. 24, indicating
those efforts have yet to
pay off.
"We recognize there is
still more to do to further
address affordability and


to improve other impor-
tant aspects of the guest
experiences we provide,"
said CEO Clarence Otis in
a statement, adding that
re-establishing growth at
the three chains was Dar-
den's top priority.
Otis said the first half of
the fiscal third quarter
was "encouraging," but
higher payroll taxes and
rising gas prices, along
with severe winter
weather, sent sales sliding
in February
Darden isn't the only
company saying the higher
payroll tax has cut into its
business. On Thursday,
Wal-Mart Stores Inc. said
higher taxes, along with
rising gas prices and de-
layed income tax refunds,
were also crimping spend-
ing by its customers.
On Jan. 1, Social Secu-
rity payroll taxes rose 2


percentage points after a
temporary tax cut expired.
That sliced about $1,000
from the annual take-
home pay of a household
earning $50,000.
But Darden has longer-
running problems. Like
other casual sit-down
restaurant companies, it's
been dealing with tougher
competition due to the
growing popularity of
chains such as Chipotle
Mexican Grill and Panera
Bread. They offer food
that's a step up from fast
food but not as expensive
as a sit-down restaurant.
To combat this, at Olive
Garden, the company
rolled out an updated ad-
vertising campaign and in-
troduced more light and
affordable dishes. At Red
Lobster, it added options
for people who don't like
seafood.


Business HIGHLIGHTS


Moody's downgrades UK
rating from AAA to AA1
LONDON Credit ratings agency Moody's
Investors Service downgraded Britain's gov-
ernment bond rating one notch from the top
AAA to AA1 Friday, saying sluggish growth
and rising debt were weakening the country's
medium-term outlook.
Treasury chief George Osborne said the
blow only redoubled his resolve "to deliver our
economic recovery plan," based on deep
spending cuts.
Moody's said "subdued" growth prospects
and a "high and rising debt burden" were
weighing on the British economy.
The agency said rising debt meant "a dete-
rioration in the shock-absorption capacity of
the government's balance sheet, which is un-
likely to reverse before 2016."
It said, though, "the U.K.'s creditworthiness
remains extremely high," and its outlook was
stable.
For the British government, the move was
unwelcome but not unexpected. All three of
the big rating agencies Moody's, Standard
& Poor's and Fitch had placed Britain's rat-
ing on negative watch, as the economy contin-
ues to struggle.

Feds probe J&J on recalled
hip implant marketing
TRENTON, N.J. Federal prosecutors are
investigating Johnson & Johnson's practices
in marketing a line of hip replacements re-
called in 2010 because many had to be re-
placed within a few years part of a string of
more than 30 product recalls by the health
care giant in the last 3 1/2 years.
The U.S. Attorney's Office in Massachusetts
and the Civil Division of the U.S. Justice De-
partment last August sent Johnson & Johnson


an "informal request" for information about its
ASR hip replacements, J&J reported in a reg-
ulatory filing Friday.
The company's annual report to the Securi-
ties and Exchange Commission states the
government has asked for additional docu-
ments from DePuy Synthes and two related
subsidiaries.
They have turned over the documents and
are cooperating fully with investigators, the fil-
ing states.
DePuy Synthes is one of the world's biggest
makers of joint replacements, surgical trauma
equipment and other orthopedic surgery
products.
In trading Friday, J&J shares fell 62 cents to
$76.25.

Discover CEO Nelms gets
$9.91 million in 2012 pay
NEW YORK Discover Financial Services
Co. says its Chairman and CEO David Nelms
received compensation valued at $9.92 million
in the credit card company's 2012 fiscal year.
That is a 28 percent drop from the prior year,
and reflects lower stock awards.
Riverwoods, Ill.-based Discover said in a
regulatory filing that Nelms' base salary was
unchanged at $1 million. He also received
$5.78 million in stock awards, down from
stock awards worth $9.6 million in the previ-
ous year.
Nelms' non-equity incentive compensation
slipped to $3.12 million, from $3.2 million the
previous year, according to a filing with the
Securities and Exchange Commission.
Nelms, 52, has been CEO since 2004 and
chairman since 2009.
For the year ended Nov. 30, 2012,
Discover earned $2.34 billion on revenue of
$7.65 billion.
-From wire reports


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013 A9







Page A10 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ................................ publisher
SM ike Arnold ........................ .................editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Curt Ebitz ................ ................. citizen member
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


SPORTS TOURISM




With times lean,


push for tourism


has some sheen


come?
That is the county's
question to itself as it eyes a
slice of the $600 billion sports
tourism is estimated to gen-
erate in the United States
annually
It's in luck: The answer may
be "yes." Last week's inaugu-
ral Legends track and field
meet drew ath-
letes from as far THE I1
afield as Califor-
nia, and Black Di- Tou
amond's courses Develo
have hosted U.S. Counci
Open qualifiers and Rec
and an LPGA departrr
tournament, to lure
bringing golfers of tourism
prestige to a local
gem they will OUR 01
likely return to. Batted
Regionally, com-
petitors routinely
travel to Citrus to trade vol-
leys at the Crystal River Open
tennis tournament, battle the
course at Seven Rivers Golf
and Country Club's Presiden-
tial Invitation and turn laps at
the Citrus County Speedway.
"It draws people to our
county," Assistant County Ad-
ministrator Cathy Pearson
told the Chronicle recently
"It puts people in our hotel
rooms. It helps support our
restaurants."
And our shops, parks, bars,
theaters and festivals.
Tourism brings demand,
and demand allows entrepre-
neurial Citrus Countians to
survive in an economy de-
pressed by the devastation of
the housing market, a lack of
employment opportunities
for highly skilled workers
and, most recently, the deci-
sion by the county's largest
taxpayer to curtail its opera-
tions here.
Take a trip to Clearwater, to
Port St. Lucie, Jupiter or Fort
Myers this weekend and you


will see the impact Major
League Baseball's spring
training has on those commu-
nities. Flip through the chan-
nels in December and there's
a decent chance one of the
football games you see will be
in Tampa, Orlando, Jack-
sonville, St. Petersburg or


Miami.
We're

ISSUE:
irist
ipment
I, Parks
creation
ient look
sports-
dollars.

PINION:
er up.


not starry-eyed,
and the county
shouldn't be, ei-
ther. Citrus
County won't ever
host a bowl game,
and county resi-
dents probably
shouldn't look
forward to spot-
ting major-
leaguers at the
Strawberry Festi-
val. But there's
room for growth.
In Manatee


County, to the south, last No-
vember's weeklong Nike In-
ternational Soccer
Tournament generated an es-
timated $19 million, the Sara-
sota Herald Tribune
reported.
Last month, the Chronicle
voiced its support for the
sports-tourism push in an ed-
itorial, lamenting the missed
opportunities of county ad-
ministrations past. We're glad
to see current county brass
making a concerted effort
this time, and we wish them
success.
We must engage reality on
reality's terms. Unless Citrus
County can entice people or
industry to bring their busi-
ness here, the county's future
is going to look very different
from its present. Tourism dol-
lars wouldn't just put bodies
in beds and meals in bellies.
They'd help the county fund
services used by all residents,
and help maintain the quality
of life that brought so many
here to begin with.


Help is coming
God bless you, Scott Adams.
And know this, sir: Help is com-
ing during the next election. God
bless you, sir.
The people's choice
The Chronicle keeps downing
Scott Adams as our
new county commis- 01
sioner, but we the peo-
ple knew who and what
Scott Adams was when
we elected him. That's
why we elected him. We
need somebody in there
to stir up these buf-
foons who have been CAL
wildly spending all of 56
our tax money. Just be- 563-
cause the Chronicle
doesn't like Scott
Adams and he wasn't their won-
der boy doesn't mean the peo-
ple don't. We knew what his
record was and what his attitude
was and that's why we elected
him. A leopard might not change
his spots and they might go dim-
mer as they get older, but the
spots are still there. The people's
choice was Scott Adams and
that's what we elected and that's
who we're going to back. The
next election we'll get him some-
one to help him.


I


Keep up the good work
Scott Adams, keep on fighting
because you're fighting the in
group...You're not one of the
good-ol' boys. They've done
everything they wanted to do for
years. Now somebody's disturb-
ing their boat. Keep up
ND the good work. Show
J D people where they're
Strong in what they're
T doing.
Lots of backers
Commissioner Adams,
you're the best thing
that's happened in this
county for I don't know
579 how many years. Just
7 i keep on going. You've got
a lot of backers.
Scott, we approve
We, the people, like what
Scott Adams is doing as a com-
missioner. We proved it on Elec-
tion Day.
Adams in a landslide
Remember, Scott Adams won
(the) election by a landslide
against three other candidates.
We, the people, want Commis-
sioner Adams in there to do the
people's work and to ask
questions.


Natural order
I found your article on coy-
otes very interesting. However,
it seemed there were more
negatives about the animals
than positives.
Coyotes definitely balance
the natural system of predators
and prey They do keep the ro-
dent population down as well
as other creatures.
Coyotes were here before
people began building homes
in rural areas.
People move to rural
wooded areas so they can get
away from the wall to wall peo-
ple and traffic congestion of
other areas.
People come here to be
more in nature and natural
surroundings.
The sounds of the coyotes
go with living in nature and
rural wooded areas. That is
why a good percentage of peo-
ple are living here.
All of the creatures that live
in our area have a right to be
here. The sound of coyotes and
other nature sounds are sure a
lot nicer than loud bands, ra-
dios, cars, etc. If people don't
like being in a rural area with
the animals/creatures that go
with it, they should move out of
here. Yes, they should learn to
not feed wild animals or leave
their cats and dogs out to roam.


"Even the most sadistic and destructive
man is human, as human as the saint."
Erich Fromm, 1973


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Scott loses tea party support


Gov. Rick Scott sipped the
tea party goodbye
Wednesday when he an-
nounced he would support a
three-year expansion of
Florida's Medicaid program
under the Affordable Care Act.
It was the right de-
cision for the 1 mil-
lion poor, working
and uninsured
Floridians who
would receive health
coverage. And it was
the right decision for
Scott politically, even
if it costs him tea
party support.
Everett Wilkinson, Rhond
chairman of the Na- FLOI
tional Liberty Feder- VOI
ation, formerly the
South Florida Tea
Party, called Scott "the Bene-
dict Arnold to the patriot and
tea party movement in
Florida."
Slade O'Brien, Florida Direc-
tor for Americans for Prosper-
ity, a conservative group that
backs the tea party financially,
was a little more kind.
"He was elected because of
his principled conservative
leadership against Oba-
macare's overreach, and led the
charge, with Attorney General
Pam Bondi, to take Obamacare
to the Supreme Court," O'Brien
said. "But today he came out in
support of the Medicaid expan-
sion he vowed to oppose."
Elections have conse-
quences. Political realities re-
placing principled leadership
is often one of them.
Scott not only has to contend
with the consequences of the
2012 election but also what's
ahead in 2014.
The tea party was the wind
beneath Scott's wings, helping
the first-time candidate win
office in 2010. The tea leaves,
though, say Scott is going to
need a slightly more diverse
base of support to win re-elec-
tion. That's the reading from


s1

I(


the 2012 election that saw
Florida go to Obama and the
Republicans lose their veto-
proof majority in the state
Legislature.
Even another $70 million -
the amount Scott spent on his
campaign from his
own wallet can't
erase his governing
record or the poli-
S cies he supported.
The governor also
has a serious like-
ability problem. His
critics don't call him
Skeletor for nothing.
So in addition to
SSwan raises for teachers,
RIDA Scott is seeking a
CES softer image with his
Florida Families
First budget and by
finally agreeing to provide
health care to the state's work-
ing poor
"I believe in a different ap-
proach," said Scott, who re-
fused to implement the health
care law for two years. "But re-
gardless of what I believe, or
anyone else, a Supreme Court
decision and the election last
November made the presi-
dent's health care mandates the
law of the land."
In fact, though justices up-
held the law they decided in
Florida's favor when they ruled
the federal government could
not force states to expand their
Medicaid programs to individu-
als earning less than 133 per-
cent of poverty. States have a
choice.
When Scott thought Mitt
Romney, who promised to "re-
peal Obamacare on Day One,"
had a shot at the White House,
his choice was not to expand
Medicaid. Those 1 million
Floridians to whom he can't "in
good conscious" deny health
care today, didn't matter until
November
Obama's victory took repeal-
ing the health care law off the
table. It didn't, however, change


the fact that states could opt out
of Medicaid expansion. Several
states with Republican gover-
nors, including Maine, Texas,
Alabama, Mississippi and Geor-
gia, have said they will not ex-
pand Medicaid.
Scott would like to be one of
them, but former Gov Charlie
Crist, a Republican turned De-
mocrat who wants the gover-
nor's mansion back, is nipping
at his heels.
Crist dissed the GOP and
turned Independent when the
tea party began its love affair
with Marco Rubio, his rival
for the Senate. Now Scott is
dissing the tea party in the
hope independents will find
him a more desirable suitor
The breakup was sad to
watch. Most politicians an-
nouncing their willingness to
provide health coverage to a
million poor people would be
happy Scott looked defeated.
After reading a speech to the
media, he turned to the camera
and said he wanted to talk di-
rectly to Florida families. His
real audience, though, was the
tea party supporters he knew
he was losing by embracing
Obamacare.
"Expanding access to Medi-
caid services for three years
is a compassionate, common
sense step forward," Scott
said. "It is not a white flag of
surrender to government-run
health care."
The tea party will see it as
surrender The poor Floridians
who stand to get health cover-
age will see it as a victory
How voters in 2014 will see it
remains to be seen.


Rhonda Swan is an editorial
writer for The Palm Beach
Post and author of Dancing to
the Rhythm of My Soul: A
Sister's Guide for
Transforming Madness into
Gladness. She can be reached
at rswan@floridavoices.com.


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

Then they become pests and
people want them destroyed. If
left to roam, domesticated cats
and dogs will be eaten by coy-
otes and should not be allowed
to roam freely Cats can be nice
home pets when left inside.


Also, when cats are contained
they are kept from killing all
the beautiful birds and other
small creatures that keep this
area a natural
paradise.
Please do more writing
about the protection of the ani-
mals and creatures that make
this area serene and beautiful.
Nancy Schubach
Homosassa

Thanks for the care
Citrus County is most fortu-
nate to have such an outstand-
ing hospital as Citrus
Memorial. Recently, I suffered
a heart attack and from the
time I was picked up by Na-
ture Coast EMS until my de-
parture, the care was first
class. The folks in the cath
unit, the CCU, and in general
were professional and caring.
They did everything they could
to make my stay comfortable.
I can certainly understand
why Citrus Memorial is rated
in the top 10 percent of cardiac
care hospitals in the United
States and I appreciate know-
ing each person I came in con-
tact with was concerned about
my well being.
Thank you for being there.
Howard Ennis
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


= Hot Corner: SCOTT ADAMS


LETTERS to the Editor


I





SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013 All


Letters to the EDITOR


Thanks for help
with event
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 Inverness
would like to thank every-
one who attended our
post 77 building dedica-
tion and open house on
Feb. 2. With your help, we
had a very successful day
Special thanks to Lee
Cloward, president of the
IHCA; Young Marines;
Marleigh Miller; Pastor
Jerry Carris; Bob Plaisted,
mayor of Inverness; Paul
Miller, past commander 77;
Norman Brumett, com-
mander 77; Florence Mc-
Cann, E-Board 77; Jack
Black, VFW 4337, Inver-
ness; Nancy Kennedy,
Chronicle reporter
A big thank you to Aux-
iliary Unit 77 for all their
help. Thank all the infor-
mation booth helpers, Jim
Ramos, Florida 4th Dis-
trict membership chair-
man; Charles Ferguston,
Florida 4th District com-
mander, Post 77; Alice
Brumett, 4th District Aux-
iliary president, Unit 77;
John Rose; S.A.L.; Debi
Shields, HPH Hospice;
Lorene Seidenstucker;
Davis Funeral Home;
Kurt Rotar; Florida Na-
tional Cemetery, Bush-
nell; Chuck Fettes, Citrus
County Veterans Services.
Norman Provencal
past commander/
chaplain
Inverness

Absurdity of
the plutocracy
Periodically, we readers
of the Chronicle are
treated to eloquent essays
from the pundits of the
plutocracy about how it is
not only sinful but self-
destructive to tax the eco-
nomic elite. After all, they
are the ones who create
jobs and wealth. Some-
times the descriptions of
the plutocracy resonate
like William of Occam's
appeals to God almighty in
his act of contrition: "For


Thou Art All Good and
Worthy of All our Love."
It never seemed more
absurd than in the wake
of the Progress/Duke nu-
clear plant fiasco which
threatens economic disas-
ter for Citrus County.
In 2009, the nuclear
plant in Citrus was closed
down for repairs. In sim-
plest terms, there seem to
be few companies (two,
according to Ivan Penn's
Tampa Bay Times article
Dec. 30) competent to re-
pair damaged nuclear
plants.
I had been surprised to
learn that from a Forbes
Magazine article read in a
doctor's waiting room
years ago. Apparently the
management of Progress
Energy either didn't have
to wait for medical ap-
pointments, or didn't get
past Sports Illustrated.
Instead of shelling out
$15 million to profession-
als, they decided to wing
it, producing a situation in
which an estimated $1.3
billion was needed. How-
ever, "estimating" nuclear
plant costs for repair and
construction seems to be a
magic art which could
only be improved with
tarot cards or Ouija
boards. According to the
Times, the cost could have
risen to $3.5 billion.
The Chronicle covered
this pretty well in the past,
and may even have identi-
fied the decision makers.
But, in any case, the out-
going head of Progress
was in charge, and one
might think that is where
the buck would stop.
The Penn article cites
the Crystal River Nuclear
Plant fiasco as the reason
given by the Duke board
for firing the Progress
CEO the minute he took
office as head of the joint
company Makes sense to
me. But firing seems a
misnomer when their first
offer was $10 million to
get him to take a hike. But
he seems to have held out
for rather more.
Meanwhile, to ensure


that abysmal incompe-
tence does not threaten
the wealth of the plutoc-
racy, our state govern-
ment has since 2006
enabled public utilities to
overcharge customers for
real or imagined future
construction costs.
A recent column by
Susan Clary gives the
amount of corporate wel-
fare to the two largest
Florida public utilities as
$1.4 billion, with an addi-
tional $394 million on the
way It does not appear to
have produced any actual
nuclear power plants.
Nor is it likely to.
Although reluctant to
pay royally for the screw
up of one company, the
Nuclear Energy Insur-
ance company has
achieved a negotiated set-
tlement with Duke. I
think the settlement is 50
times as much as having
the plant fixed profes-
sionally would have cost,
but only about 30 percent
of what it would cost to fix
the damage Duke in-
flicted on themselves (and
apparently the rest of us.)
Nancy Argenziano op-
posed this corporate wel-
fare. That is why she was
removed from the Public
Utilities Commission, and
also why the Republican
Party spent obscene
amounts of money re-
cently to keep her out of
the legislature and to
keep rubber stamp Jim-
mie Smith in it.
Pat Condray
Ozello

Saving water
resources
Why doesn't U.S. Gyp-
sum use reclaimed water
rather than drawing from
the aquifer?
Progress Energy is pay-
ing for a pipeline to their
generation station to use
reclaimed water for cool-
ing. Why don't they do it
jointly?
Dave Horsman
Crystal River


Thanks for hand
I would like to thank all the people
(who) helped me get up after I fell in
front of Long John Silvers on Friday
night (Feb. 8). Two of the names were
Miss Lillian and Mr. Roy and I'd like to
thank all the people who helped me. I
didn't catch all their names. And also
to my coworkers, especially Lollypop,
thank you.
Help with armadillos
My wish is, how do we get rid of the
armadillos? They are just ruining our
yard and we've tried mothballs. No
work. If anybody has any ideas short
of shooting them, I'd appreciate it.
Cut pay at top
To the county commissioners, school
board members and all top govern-
ment workers: Cut your pay down.
School board members, do it voluntar-
ily if you have other jobs or own busi-
ness, and let people that would
volunteer their services to do the job.
Not many in the county get paid what
you get paid.
Help for south Citrus
Where are the commissioners for Ho-
mosassa, Homosassa Springs and
everything south? Can't you see that
everything's being taken out of the
south end of the county and moved
north, moved to Allen Ridge, moved up
north to Crystal River? Why don't you
protect us? We're the first part of what


people see when they come here. Old
Homosassa was the thing that people
came to see for years and years. You're
doing nothing to keep up the south end
of the county. Do your job for your
constituents.
Great care for me
To all the nurses, anesthetists (and)
Dr. Fernandez, that work at Citrus Me-
morial Same Day Surgery, for your
great job that you do. I have never
been in a hospital that everyone there
treats you great. We are lucky to have
you.
Use common sense
To the person who wrote in about
some of the safety driving habits and
the comment he made about people
leaving their handicap placards on
their rearview mirror while they're driv-
ing: He is correct. It says right on it to
remove (it) when you're driving. But the
one thing, sir or madam, that you need
to know is the level of people that
you're dealing with right there ... It's a
safety feature. You're blocking your
view of the front window and also the
thing's swinging in your rearview mir-
ror ... It's just common sense.
Beware cedar pollen
The person that called in about the
pollen from the oak and the maple and
the elm and everything, they forgot the
cedar. The cedar, I think, is the worst
one of all. Cedar pollen will really get
you.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OPINION












NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Wintry

rl'~t*~u"


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WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Race a factor in nursing BRIEFS


Some patients won't tolerate

nurses ofdifferent race


You can't cure bigotry.

Dr. Susan Goold
professor of internal medicine and public health


Associated Press
Icicles hang from a street
sign Friday in Springfield,
III. Powerful wind gusts
created large snow drifts
on many roadways.
Accidents and slide-offs
were reported from
Kansas to Michigan as
the storm pushed east.


Engine crack
grounds F-35 fleet
WASHINGTON -The
Pentagon on Friday
grounded its fleet of F-35
fighter jets after discovering
a cracked engine blade in
one plane.
The problem was discov-
ered during what the Penta-
gon called a routine
inspection at Edwards Air
Force Base, Calif., of an
F-35A, the Air Force version
of the sleek new plane. The
Navy and the Marine Corps
are buying other versions of
the F-35, which is intended
to replace older fighters like
the Air Force F-16 and the
Navy F/A-18.
All versions a total of
51 planes were
grounded Friday pending a
more in-depth evaluation of
the problem discovered at
Edwards. None of the
planes have been fielded
for combat operations; all
are undergoing testing.
NATO meeting to
talk cybersecurity
BRUSSELS -With cy-
berthreats escalating, the
next meeting of NATO de-
fense ministers will include
a major focus on cyberse-
curity, Secretary of Defense
Leon Panetta said.
Panetta said he called on
NATO to address the issue,
as the cyberthreat from
other nations and hackers
continues to grow.
"We are seeing continu-
ing attacks in the cyber
arena, on the private sector,
on the public sector, in the
defense arena," Panetta
told reporters as the two-
day NATO ministerial here
wrapped up. "This is without
question the battlefield of
the future and a scenario
that NATO needs to pay at-
tention to."
To date there are no
broadly accepted rules that
describe what constitutes a
cyberact of war or the pa-
rameters of the battlefield in
cyberspace.
Nations also have widely
disparate laws governing
Internet crime.
Gov: 6 Hanford
nuke tanks leak
YAKIMA, Wash. Six
underground radioactive
waste tanks at the nation's
most contaminated nuclear
site are leaking, Gov. Jay
Inslee said Friday.
Inslee made the an-
nouncement after meeting
with federal officials in
Washington, D.C. Last
week, it was revealed that
one of the 177 tanks at
south-central Washington's
Hanford Nuclear Reserva-
tion was leaking liquids. In-
slee called the latest news
"disturbing."
The tanks, which already
are long past their intended
20-year life span, hold mil-
lions of gallons of a highly
radioactive stew left from
decades of plutonium pro-
duction for nuclear
weapons.
The federal government
created Hanford in the
1940s as part of the top-
secret Manhattan Project to
build the atomic bomb.
The government spends
$2 billion each year on Han-
ford cleanup one-third of
its entire budget for nuclear
cleanup nationally.
The cleanup is expected
to last decades.
-From wire reports


Associated Press

DETROIT It's been
called one of medicine's
"open secrets" allowing
patients to refuse treat-
ment by a doctor or nurse
of another race.
In the latest example, a
white man with a swastika
tattoo insisted black
nurses not be allowed to
touch his newborn.
Now two black nurses
are suing the hospital,
claiming it bowed to his il-
legal demands.
The Michigan cases are
among several lawsuits
filed in recent years that
highlight this seldom-
discussed issue, which


Up to 12,000 US,

Associated Press

WASHINGTON-The U.S. and
its NATO allies revealed Friday
they may keep as many as 12,000
troops in Afghanistan after the
combat mission ends next year,
largely American forces tasked
with hunting down remnants of
al-Qaida and helping Afghan
forces with their own security
Patience with the 11-year-old
war has grown thin in the U.S.
and Europe, yet Washington and
its allies feel they cannot pick up
and leave without risking a re-
peat of what happened in
Afghanistan after Soviet troops
withdrew in 1989: Attention
turned elsewhere, the Taliban
grabbed power and al-Qaida
found refuge.
In disclosing that he and his


quietly persists almost 60
years after the start of the
civil rights movement.
The American Medical
Association's ethics code
bars doctors from refusing
to treat people based on
race, gender and other cri-
teria, but there are no spe-
cific policies for handling
race-based requests from
patients.
"In general, I don't think
honoring prejudicial pref-
erences ... is morally justi-
fiable" for a health care
organization, said Dr
Susan Goold, a University
of Michigan professor of in-
ternal medicine and public
health. "That said, you
can't cure bigotry ... There


may be times when grudg-
ingly acceding to a patient's
strongly held preferences
is morally OK."
Those times could in-
clude patients who have
been so traumatized by
rape or combat, for in-
stance that accommo-
dating their request would
be preferable to forcing on
them a caregiver whose
mere presence might ag-
gravate the situation, she
said.
Tonya Battle, a veteran
nurse at Flint's Hurley
Medical Center, filed the
first complaint against the
hospital and a nursing
manager, claiming a note
posted on an assignment


clipboard read, "No
African-American nurse to
take care of baby"
She said the note was
later removed but black
nurses weren't assigned to
care for the baby for about
a month because of their
race.
That case is now a fed-
eral lawsuit. In a state-
ment earlier this week,
Hurley President Melany
Gavulic denied Battle's
claim, saying the father
was told his request could
not be granted. Gavulic
said the swastika tattoo
"created anger and out-
rage in our staff," and su-
pervisors raised safety
concerns.


allied troops to remain in Afghanistan


NATO counterparts were dis-
cussing a residual force of be-
tween 8,000 and 12,000 troops in
Afghanistan beyond 2014, De-
fense Secretary Leon Panetta
said most allied defense minis-
ters assured him they are com-
mitted to remaining part of a
U.S.-led coalition.
"I feel very confident that we
are going to get a number of na-
tions to make that contribution
for the enduring presence,"
Panetta told a news conference at
NATO headquarters in Brussels
at the conclusion of a defense
ministers meeting.
The U.S. and its allies have
managed to stick together
throughout the war, despite dif-
fering views. The Europeans have
seen the military mission as
mainly aimed at promoting stable


governance; the Americans have
viewed it as mainly combat. Some
allies, including France, have al-
ready pulled out their combat
troops.
The Obama administration has
not said how many troops or
diplomats it intends to keep in
Afghanistan after 2014; it is in the
early stages of negotiating a bilat-
eral security agreement with
Kabul that would set the legal pa-
rameters. There currently are
66,000 U.S. troops in Afghanistan,
down from a 2010 peak of 100,000.
In addition to targeting terror-
ists, the post-2014 missions are
expected to be defined as training
and advising a still-developing
Afghan army and police force and
providing security for the U.S.
and allied civilian and military
presence, officials said.


Soldiers stole children during El Salvador's war


Associated Press

SAN SALVADOR, El
Salvador One of Grego-
ria Contreras' first child-
hood memories was the
moment she last saw her
parents.
Fighting between gov-
ernment troops and guer-
rillas had broken out
around the 4-year-old girl's
family home in the coun-
tryside of this Central
American country The sol-
diers took advantage of the
confusion and seized Con-
treras and her two sib-
lings, who were younger
than 2.
"We all fled the house
and suddenly it all ended
because they captured us
and our parents disap-
peared," said Contreras,
now 35 and living in neigh-
boring Guatemala.
Contreras was one of


Associated Press
Gregoria Herminia Contreras, 35, talks about her
abduction during an interview Oct. 7, 2012, in Guatemala
City. Contreras was 4 years old when she was separated
from her parents by a Salvadoran soldier, who then
registered her under a new name and forcibly adopted her
during the country's civil war.

hundreds of children who left some 75,000 people
disappeared under a vari- dead and thousands more
ety of circumstances dur- missing. In most cases, the
ing El Salvador's brutal, parents have yet to find
13-year civil war, which out what happened to


their children, while a few
hundred of the missing
have been identified after
giving investigators DNA
samples and other
evidence.
Now, a human rights
group, Probdsqueda, is un-
covering another macabre,
and mostly unknown twist
to the tragedy In Contr-
eras' and at least nine
other cases, low- to mid-
ranking soldiers abducted
children in what an inter-
national court says was a
"systematic pattern of
forced disappearances."
Some of the soldiers
raised the children as
their own, while others
gave them away or sold
them to lucrative illegal
adoption networks. In
Contreras' case, an army
private spirited her away,
raped her and gave her his
own surname.


Associated Press
Displaced Syrian children
show their marbles while
playing Friday in the Azaz
camp for displaced
people, north of Aleppo,
Syria. According to Syrian
activists, the number of
people in the Azaz camp
has grown by 3,000 in
the last weeks due to
heavier shelling by
government forces.


Irish plant in
meat scandal
DUBLIN -An Irish
slaughterhouse has been
caught labeling horse meat
as beef and shipping it to a
company in the Czech Re-
public, Ireland's govern-
ment said Friday, in the
latest crackdown on alleged
fraud in Europe's month-old
scandal.
No other European gov-
ernment has pinpointed a
single slaughterhouse that
was mislabeling horse meat
as beef. Until now, any
companies found selling
meat products containing
hidden amounts of horse
have insisted they were
duped by others, while sus-
pected slaughterhouses
have insisted they either did
not handle horses or la-
beled all horse-meat ex-
ports correctly.
But Ireland said its fraud
detectives have identified the
practice at B&F Meats, a
small slaughterhouse in the
County Tipperary town of
Carrick-on-Suir that is li-
censed to debone both cows
and horses, and immediately
shut down the facility.
Raul Castro
thinks retirement
HAVANA Cuban
President Raul Castro has
unexpectedly raised the
possibility of leaving his

ing Friday
he is old
and has a
right to
retire. But
he did not
say when
he might aul Castr
do so or if Rto
such a president of
Cuba.
move
was imminent.
The Cuban leader is
scheduled to be named by
parliament to a new five-
year term Sunday, and Cas-
tro urged reporters to listen
to his speech that day.
"I am going to resign,"
Castro said at a joint ap-
pearance with visiting
Russian Prime Minister
Dmitry Medvedev.
"I am going to be 82
years old," Castro added,
the hint of a smile on his
face. "I have the right to re-
tire, don't you think?"
McCain optimistic
on immigration
MEXICO CITY- U.S.
Sen. John McCain said Fri-
day he is optimistic about
producing an immigration
overhaul that includes a
path to legalization for ille-
gal immigrants, but added
significant disagreement re-
mains between President
Obama and the bipartisan
group of lawmakers drafting
a bill.
McCain told reporters
after meeting with Mexican
President Enrique Pena
Nieto that many details
must be worked out be-
tween Obama and senators
trying to produce legislation.
Asked about the
prospects for reaching a
deal, he said: "I am guard-
edly optimistic that we could
by the end of the next
month."
-From wire reports


After mission's end


Associated Press
Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, third from right, and U.S. Ambassador to the North Atlantic Treaty
Organization Ivo Daalder, fifth from right, arrive Friday for the second day of the NATO Defense Ministers
Meetings at NATO headquarters in Brussels, Belgium. Panetta and his NATO counterparts are considering
leaving 8,000 to 12,000 troops in Afghanistan after 2014, but a dispute arose Friday between the U.S. and
German defense officials about whether that contingent would be an international force or an American one.











SPORTS


* FSU
women
fall in
battle of
ranked
teams./
B3
ti


0 Baseball/B2
0 Golf/B2
0 Basketball/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 Sports briefs/B4
0 NASCAR/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Lecanto suffers through tough night at home


C.J. RISK
Correspondent
LECANTO On Tuesday, Lecanto's
softball team opens its District 6A-6 sea-
son against the one team that caused it
the most grief last season Brooksville
Springstead, which beat the Panthers
four times in 2012. If Lecanto has any
plans in regards to the district title and
perhaps making a run in the state tour-
nament, it will have to do much better
than it did Friday against visiting South
Lake.
The Eagles (4-4), behind the hand-
cuffing performance of freshman
pitcher Dominique Johns, rolled to an
easy 7-2 victory at Lecanto. Johns sur-
rendered the two runs on four hits, two
walks and a hit batsman, pitching all
seven innings and striking out eight.
"My freshman pitcher did pretty well
tonight," said South Lake coach Mike
Ryan.


I'm the captain of
this ship, and tonight I
steered it into an
iceberg.

Robert Dupler
Lecanto head softball coach
Johns, he added, was one of three
substitutes in the game his top
pitcher, Nicole Jones, was sick and un-
able to play Also missing from his
lineup were his left and right outfield-
ers.
"We did pretty well," Ryan said.
"We're starting to come around. I
thought it was the first time we played
together We hit the ball much better
than we have been."
The tone of the game was set in the
first inning. South Lake got a run but


had four hits in the inning off Lecanto
starter Danielle Yant, leaving the bases
loaded. Lecanto tied it with a run in the
bottom half of the first, but the Panthers
had to literally steal their run. Amber
Atkinson reached base on a fielder's
choice and then stole second, third and
home.
It didn't stay tied for long. The Eagles
added a run in the second on a double
by Brittany Divine and scored two more
in the third, one on an error on a bunt
and a second on a single by Chelsea
King.
It never got better for Lecanto.
Panthers' coach Robert Dupler talked
to his team (1-2 for the season) for 25
minutes after the loss.
"I don't think they were happy with
their performance," he said. "They need
to realize there was no focus, no energy.
"Their pitcher hit her spots tonight.

See Page B4


Lady Pirate rally falls short
The Crystal River softball team fell to 3-4 on
the season and 0-3 in district action Friday
night, with a 4-3 loss at Nature Coast.
The Lady Pirates led 1-0 early, but Nature
Coast knotted the score in the fourth inning
and tacked on three more runs in the sixth for a
4-1 advantage.
Crystal River staged a rally in the top of the
seventh, as two runs crossed home plate, but
the tying run was stranded at third base.
McCale Wilson pitched well in the loss, as
she allowed three earned runs, struck out two
and walked two in six innings of work.
Chloe Lane was 2 for 4 at the plate with a
double, triple and two runs scored. Meagan
McMichen and Wilson each had two hits.
Marissa Pool drove in a pair of runs with a
double and Danielle Gomez added an RBI
double.
Crystal River is back in action at home Tues-
day at 7 p.m. against district rival Hernando.


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Crystal River second baseman Zack Pattison prepares to force out Hernando's Christian Arroyo in Friday night's game at Mike Hamp-
ton Field in Crystal River. The Leopards beat the Pirates 7-3.


Hernando ace Lawson beats Crystal River in district opener


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER Her-
nando senior pitcher Bran-
don Lawson continued to be a
thorn in Crystal River's side
in six shutout innings at Mike
Hampton Field.
Lawson held the Pirates
scoreless in three wins in-
cluding a 2-0 victory in the 5A-
7 quarterfinals last season
and threw 16 balls out of 70
pitches Friday, as he struck
out seven. He allowed three
hits and no walks to help his
club prevail, 7-3, in a district-
opener for both teams.
Crystal River junior Mason
Pateracki made his first var-
sity start on the mound and
displayed a lively arm and
powerful curveball while ad-
justing to the setting. He set-
tled down for four scoreless
innings after the Leopards (2-
1, 1-0 in District 5A-7) went up
3-0 in the first off a couple of
walks, two hits and a balk.
Lawson, who is committed
to play at the University of
South Florida, struck out five
of the first six Pirate batters


of the game before narrowly
escaping major damage in the
third when a blast to center
by sophomore shortstop Jor-
dan Humphreys with the
bases loaded and two outs
lined into
the mitt of
senior Rich I thou
Wilkes.
The Pi- (Hernand
rates (4-3, 0-
1 in 5A-7) ropes a cc
threatened times ton
again in the
fifth after but that
j u n i o r
catcher tough ov
Casey Pur-
nell and
senior left Crystal River
fielder Dal-
las Baldner
(3 for 3) each singled and
moved up to second and third
base, respectively, with two
outs. But junior center fielder
Garrett Lofley had the same
luck as Humphreys in the
third with a well-hit rip to
center
Pateracki (three strikeouts,
three walks, five hits, three
earned runs) was relieved by


iF




he


junior Austin Wiles in the
sixth as Hernando consoli-
dated its lead with four runs.
Senior designated hitter Trae
Ratliff and junior first base-
man Kyle Kilbourne each
hammered
doubles be-
ght we had fore senior
shortstop
)) on the ChristianAr-
royo (2 for 2,
uple two runs), a
ght, UF commit,
knocked a
pitcher's two- run
homer over
er there, the left field
fence.
Bobby Stack Crystal
ead baseball coach. River con-
tinued to
battle, rally-
ing for three runs in the sev-
enth. Lofley batted in
Baldner, who boarded with
his third base hit of the night,
while Wiles scored freshman
second baseman Zach Patti-
son with a grounder. Pattison
knocked in freshman right
fielder Shaun Frasier (walk)
on an error
Pirates coach Bobby Stack


was encouraged by Pateracki
and his club's effort against a
formidable opponent in the
absence of would-be starting
pitcher Cameron Pennington
and injured senior second
baseman Michael Kidd.
"Pateracki got a shot and he
definitely proved he could get
it done for us," Stack said. "I
thought he threw his breaking
ball well and his fastball had
some good velocity. We're
going to work with him and
see if we can develop him into
a once-a-week (pitcher).
"We're trying to learn from
our mistakes with a lot of in-
experienced players on var-
sity," Stack continued. "We're
not going to get down in the
dumps. It's a marathon, not a
sprint. We're still working on
finding pieces to the puzzle.
We just don't have this (Crys-
tal River) team figured out
yet.
"I thought we had (Her-
nando) on the ropes a couple
times tonight, but that
pitcher's tough over there,"
Stack said.
Crystal River next plays at
Springstead on Tuesday


New run


with a


new team

Kurt Busch on

third team in

three seasons

Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH Kurt
Busch had another date with a
tow truck.
Nah, not to
take away one
of his wrecked
cars.
Busch had
some fun with
Mater, the rusty,
bucktoothed
tow truck and Kurt Busch
cartoon star of
"Cars," on a trip this week to
Disney World. Busch playfully
stretched the back of his collar
to act like he was hooked to
Mater's cable. With his tongue
out, the picture on his Twitter
feed was a lighthearted snap-
shot at Busch's off-track life,
chilling with his girlfriend and
her son, and smiling alongside
Mater and his best friend,
Lightning McQueen.
It's the kind of aw-shucks per-
sonality so many in NASCAR
would like to see from Busch.
Busch's prodigious talent has
never been doubted, with 24 ca-
reer Cup wins and the 2004
championship etched on his
resume.
But his prickly personality
has cost him major rides, deep-
pocketed sponsors and turned
him into a journeyman driver at
only 34. His 2013 ride with Fur-
niture Row Racing is his third
team in three seasons, and no
one would confuse last season's
underfunded spin with Phoenix
Racing as anything close to his
previous heavyweight stops
with Jack Roush and Roger
Penske.
"Kurt's one of the best drivers
out there. I can say that,"
Phoenix owner James Finch
said. "I didn't say he was the
best person."
Busch's propensity for wreck-
ing cars about two dozen by
Finch's count-his outbursts at
the media and dustups with
See Page B4


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Thorbjorn Olesen hits out of the bunker Friday onto the third green against Tim Clark
during the second round of the Match Play Championship in Marana, Ariz.



Watson only top 10


seed left at Match Play


Associated Press

MARANA, Ariz. -And then there was
one.
One day after Rory McIlroy and Tiger
Woods went home, more top seeds fol-
lowed Friday in the Match Play Champi-
onship until Masters champion Bubba
Watson was the only seed from the top 10
remaining at Dove Mountain.
And even that wasn't easy
Watson, the No. 8 seed, missed two
straight putts from 5 feet that would have
won the match before he finally put away
Jim Furyk in 22 holes. It was the first
time since this World Golf Championship
began in 1999 that only one top-10 seed
was left after two rounds.
What does that mean?
"Nothing," Watson said. "This game ...
it's a toss-up. You can't really judge who's
going to win, or bet who's going to win."
Luke Donald, the No. 3 seed who
birdied his last two holes Thursday to
win his opening match, didn't know what
hit him Friday
Scott Piercy won the first three holes,
and then holed out from 221 yards with a
4-iron on the fifth hole and was on his
way He won, 7 and 6, to give Donald his
worst loss in this event.
Fourth-seeded Louis Oosthuizen
never led against Robert Garrigus, who
closed him out on the 16th hole.
Justin Rose, the No. 5 seed, couldn't
keep up with Nicolas Colsaerts and lost,
4 and 2.
"I think we're beyond surprises, in this
event especially," said Graeme McDow-
ell after needing 20 holes to beat Alex
Noren. "Anybody can have a great day
and anybody can have a tough day It's
what makes the game exciting, and it's
what makes this game extremely fickle


WGC-Accenture Match Play
Championship
Tee Times for Third Round, Saturday
At Dove Mountain,The Ritz-Carlton Golf Club
Marana, Ariz. Yardage: 7,791; Par: 72
All Times EST (Seeds in parentheses)
No.1 tee
9:10 a.m. Robert Garrigus (36), United States. vs. Fredrik
Jacobson (45).
9:22 a.m. Matt Kuchar (21), United States, vs. Nicolas Col-
saerts (37), Belgium.
9:34 a.m. Graeme McDowell (17), Northern Ireland, vs.
Shane Lowry (64), Ireland.
9:46 a.m. Bubba Watson (8), United States, vs. Jason Day
(41) Australia.
No.10 tee
9:10 a.m.- Steve Stricker (14), United States, vs. Scott
Piercy (35), United States.
9:22 a.m. lan Poulter (11), England, vs. Tim Clark (59),
South Africa.
9:34 a.m.-Webb Simpson (15), United States, vs. Gonzalo
Fernandez-Castano (31), Spain.
9:46 a.m. Hunter Mahan (23), United States, vs. Martin
Kaymer (26), Germany.

and extremely frustrating."
Shane Lowry earned a footnote in his-
tory at this 15-year-old tournament. After
knocking out McIlroy on the 18th hole of
the first round, the burly Irishman be-
came the first No. 64 seed to advance to
the third round. This wasn't that difficult,
as he seized control early and beat Carl
Pettersson, 6 and 5.
"I would have been all right to beat
Rory, but to lose in the second round is
not what I want coming here this week,"
Lowry said. "I wanted to go on. I feel like
I could potentially do very well in this
tournament."
Under beautiful sunshine and mild
temperatures, the snow-delayed tourna-
ment is almost back on schedule. The
third round will start Saturday morning,
followed by the quarterfinals Saturday
afternoon.


QBs start over in Indy


Combine used

asproving

ground

Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS -Matt
Barkley and Landry Jones
made some tough calls last
season.
Instead of taking first-
round money and leaving
school early, they decided
to stick around, hone their
skills, chase a national
championship and im-
prove their draft stock.
With the NFL draft
about two months away,
the two quarterbacks once
billed as Heisman Trophy
front-runners are now try-
ing to improve to enhance
their chances of being se-
lected early
"I've learned a lot in this
past year that you can't
teach in a classroom,"
Barkley said Friday at the
NFL scouting combine.
"You have to learn through
experience in regards to
handling adversity at its
peak. You have to get guys
going in the locker room,
in the huddle, on the prac-
tice field when you're not
playing for the postseason.
It allowed me to step up
and be that voice."
It's unclear whether that
will help Barkley in a year
where there is no clear-cut
top choice, even among
the quarterbacks.
Scouts saw Barkley and
Southern California's shot
at a national champi-
onship and his chance
for the Heisman come
crashing down in a season
that went terribly wrong.
Becoming the first quar-
terback taken in the draft
took a hit when he
sprained his right shoul-
der in a late-season loss to
crosstown rival UCLA.
Barkley never took an-
other college snap, and


Associated Press
Southern California quarterback Matt Barkley answers
a question Friday during a news conference at the NFL
football scouting combine in Indianapolis.


though he acknowledged
Friday the rehab program
is on track, critics are al-
ready wondering why he
won't throw until his
March 27 pro day.
Barkley also may find
himself answering ques-
tions about a locker room
dust-up that followed the
Trojans' Sun Bowl loss to
Georgia Tech.
"It was a normal football
locker room environment.
That happens all the time,
trust me. It happens all the
time on teams across the
country," Barkley said. "It
was nothing out of hand. It
was guys exchanging
words and wanting to set
the record straight But the
captains, myself and some
of the other seniors, we
had everything under
control."
The concerns about
Jones have nothing do
with health.
In 2012, he actually
threw for more touch-
downs, a higher comple-
tion percentage and had
fewer interceptions and a
better efficiency rating
than in the previous sea-
son. But the perception
after Oklahoma fell out of


the title chase was that
Jones failed to improve his
poise in the pocket or his
footwork. His perform-
ance at the Senior Bowl (3
of 9 for 16 yards with two
sacks) raised more red
flags.
Jones believes the extra
year in college has made
him better.
"I think I showed the
things that I wanted to im-
prove on," he said after
measuring in at 6-foot-4,
225 pounds in Indy "I
shortened my motion and
move around in the pocket
a lot more than I have
been."
There are so many con-
cerns about this year's
class of skill players, some
analysts believe the un-
thinkable could happen:
an entire first round with-
out a quarterback or run-
ning back selected.
Right now, the top-rated
quarterback is believed to
be West Virginia's Geno
Smith, like Jones and
Barkley a drop-back
passer, Others expect
North Carolina State's
strong-armed Mike Glen-
non to be a fast riser as the
draft nears.


Pistorius gets bail as



murder trial looms


Associated Press

PRETORIA, South
Africa Oscar Pistorius
walked out of a South
African court Friday a
free man for now -
after a magistrate agreed
to release him on bail
ahead of his premedi-
tated murder trial over
the shooting death of his
girlfriend.
But even as he was
driven away from court
and chased by videogra-
phers and photographers,
questions continued to
hound the Paralympian
about what actually hap-
pened when he opened
fire on Valentine's Day in-
side his home and killed
Reeva Steenkamp.
Chief Magistrate
Desmond Nair, who
agreed to bail with harsh
restrictions for the ath-
lete, expressed his own
doubts about Pistorius'
story. Those questions,
highlighted at a four-day
bail hearing that at times
foreshadowed his coming
trial, come from Pistorius'
account he felt threat-
ened and mistook
Steenkamp for an in-
truder when he fired the
four shots at her in his
bathroom.
"Why would (Pistorius)
venture further into
danger?" Nair asked.
Pistorius' supporters
shouted "Yes!" when Nair
made his decision after a
nearly two-hour explana-
tion of his ruling to a
packed courtroom in Pre-
toria, South Africa's capi-
tal. Yet when prosecutors
and the defense said they
agreed to bail terms, Nair


Associated Press
Olympic athlete Oscar Pistorius, right, and his sister
Aimee, are driven Friday to a relatives home in Pretoria,
South Africa. Pistorius was released on bail and will
return to court June 4, to face a charge of pre-meditated
murder in the shooting death of his girlfriend, Reeva
Steenkamp.


more than doubled those
conditions for the 26-year-
old runner to be free
ahead of trial.
Nair set the bail at
$113,000, with $11,300 in
cash up front and proof
the rest is available. The
magistrate said Pistorius
must hand over his pass-
ports and turn in any
other guns he owns. Pisto-
rius also cannot leave the
district of Pretoria with-
out the permission of his
probation officer, Nair
said, nor can he take
drugs or drink alcohol.
Pistorius' family mem-
bers hugged each other
after the decision was
read, with tears in their
eyes.
Sharon Steenkamp,
Reeva's cousin, had said
earlier the family would-
n't be watching the bail
decision and hadn't been
following the hearing in
Pretoria.
"It doesn't make any


difference to the fact that
we are without Reeva,"
she told The Associated
Press.
Nair set Pistorius' next
court appearance for
June 4. The Olympian left
the courthouse in a silver
Land Rover, sitting in the
rear, just more than an
hour after the magistrate
imposed the bail condi-
tions. The vehicle, tailed
by motorcycles carrying
television cameramen
aboard, later pulled into
the home of Pistorius'
uncle.
During Friday's long
session in Pretoria Magis-
trate's Court, Pistorius al-
ternately wept and
appeared solemn and
more composed, espe-
cially toward the end as
Nair criticized police pro-
cedures in the case and as
a judgment in Pistorius'
favor appeared imminent.
He showed no reaction as
he was granted bail.


Tigers beat Braves 2-1


Associated Press

KISSIMMEE Detroit's
Miguel Cabrera got a
chance to duel with Atlanta
closer Craig Kimbrel in
the third inning.
Coming offbaseball's first
Triple Crown season since
1967, Cabrera grounded out
against Kimbrel before fin-
ishing his day with a drive
to the warning track in cen-
ter field, not a factor as De-
troit won 2-1 in the first
exhibition game of the year
between big league teams.
Justin and B.J. Upton
made their Atlanta spring
training debuts. Both went
0 for 2.
The Tigers were hitless
through seven innings but
went ahead in the eighth,
long after the starters had
departed.
Padres 9,
Mariners 3
PEORIA, Ariz. Second
base prospect Jedd Gyorko
hit a grand slam off Hector
Noesi in a six-run first inning,
and the San Diego Padres
rolled to a 9-3 win over the
Seattle Mariners in the spring
training opener for both
teams.
Chris Denorfia had a go-
ahead RBI single in the first
following an error by new
Mariners left fielder Raul
Ibanez. Noesi forced in a run
with a bases-loaded walk to
Will Venable, his 11th batter,
and departed after 42 pitches.
Winner Sean O'Sullivan
pitched two hitless innings.
Seattle's Casper Wells hit a
two-run homer in the ninth.
Indians 11,
Reds 10
GOODYEAR, Ariz. The
Cleveland Indians opened a
new era under manager Terry
Francona with an 11-10
comeback win over the
Cincinnati Reds.
Mike McDade hit a three-
run double with one out in the
bottom of the ninth inning for
the Indians, who followed a
94-loss season by hiring
Francona and spending
nearly $120 million on free
agents.
Joey Votto singled in his
first two at-bats for Cincinnati,
which took a 10-8 lead into
the ninth.
Royals 5,
Rangers 5, 9 inn.
SURPRISE, Ariz. Will
Smith, one of several candi-


Associated rress
Detroits' Prince Fielder breaks up a double play Friday as
Atlanta Braves second baseman Dan Uggla leaps to avoid
him during an exhibition baseball game in Kissimmee.


dates for the fifth slot in
Kansas City's rotation, out-
pitched two Texas starters al-
ready assured spots as the
Royals and Rangers tied 5-all
in nine innings in their spring
training opener.
Smith, a left-hander who
was 6-9 with a 5.32 ERA in 16
starts as a rookie last season,
threw two perfect innings with


a strikeout.
Rangers starter Derek Hol-
land allowed a run and six hits
in three innings.
Nelson Cruz and Yangeris
Solarte homered for Texas.
Solarte's tying, two-run
homer in the bottom of the
ninth followed Brandon Allen's
two-run triple. The game was
called after the inning ended.


SFOR INFORMATION CALL: Paul (352) 249-7887
Registration form available at our web site
www.citruscountycruisers.com

_____CI-p DPY2


B2 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013


SPORTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Penguins pull away from Panthers in third


Associated Press

PITTSBURGH Matt
Niskanen and Dustin Jef-
frey scored third-period
goals to send the Pittsburgh
Penguins to a 3-1 victory
over the Florida Panthers.
Panthers goaltender
Jacob Markstrom made 37
saves in his first NHL start
this season.
Niskanen took a pass
from Kris Letang and
scored on a one-timer from
the left side at 7:49.
Jeffrey then scored his
first goal since Feb. 18, 2012,
when he redirected a shot
from Matt Cooke at 15:15 to
give the Penguins a 3-1 lead.
Chris Kunitz also scored
for the Penguins and goal-
tender Marc-Andre Fleury
made 22 saves in his first
start in five days.
Penguins center Evgeni
Malkin left the game in the
third period after he took
an off-balance check from
Erik Gudbranson while
driving to the net and slid
back-first into the end
boards.


Malkin remained down
on the ice for several mo-
ments, but skated off the ice
on his own.
Canucks 1,
Predators 0
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Dale
Weise broke a scoreless tie at
9:14 of the third period and
Roberto Luongo made 23
saves for the shutout and the
Vancouver Canucks defeated
the Nashville Predators 1-0.
The Canucks have won con-
secutive games on their four-
game road trip after losing three
straight.
Nashville has lost three of its
past four.
With the game still scoreless
in the third period, Maxim
Lapierre had the puck behind
the Nashville goal line and car-
ried it up to the right circle.
He then spun and sent a shot
toward Predators goaltender
Pekka Rinne. Rinne kicked the
puck away with his right pad,
but Weise was there to put
away the rebound for his first
goal of the season.


Associated Press
Pittsburgh Penguins left wing Chris Kunitz can't get to a rebound Friday off Florida Panther goalie Jacob
Markstrom as Panthers defenseman Tyson Strachan attempts to clear the puck in Pittsburgh.


Magic fall short


Knicks eed

in Toronto,

100-98

Associated Press

MEMPHIS, Tenn. -
Marc Gasol had 19 points
and 13 rebounds, Zach
Randolph added 16 points
and 14 boards, and the
Memphis Grizzlies beat the
short-handed Orlando
Magic 88-82 for their sixth
straight victory
Mike Conley finished
with 14 points and seven as-
sists for Memphis, and Ed
Davis scored 10.
Aaron Afflalo had 20
points, six rebounds and
seven assists for Orlando.
Mo Harkless scored 19, and
Andrew Nicholson added
14 points. E'Twaun Moore
scored 12 points and
handed out seven assists as
the Magic dropped their
fourth straight and 16th in
their last 17.
The Magic had only
seven players available be-
cause of injuries and trades
from Thursday that sent
players to Milwaukee. The
returning players were not
available.
Raptors 100,
Knicks 98
TORONTO Rudy Gay
scored a season-high 32
points, DeMar DeRozan had
18 and the Toronto Raptors
beat New York 100-98, hand-
ing the slumping Knicks their
season-worst fourth straight
loss.
Kyle Lowry scored 15, Amir
Johnson had 12 and John
Lucas 10 as the Raptors won
for the sixth time in seven
games.
Carmelo Anthony had 32
points and J.R. Smith added
19 for the Knicks, winless since
beating Minnesota on Feb. 8.
Amare Stoudemire scored
14 points and Raymond Felton
added 10 for New York, which
rallied from a nine-point deficit
in the fourth quarter to take the
lead with 6:11 left.
Pacers 114,
Pistons 82
INDIANAPOLIS David
West scored 18 points, George
Hill had 15 and the surging In-
diana Pacers beat the Detroit
Pistons 114-82.
Indiana has won three
straight and eight of 10, includ-
ing a 98-79 victory against De-
troit on Jan. 30.
This one was a runaway.
The Pacers grabbed control
with a 14-4 run at the start of
the second quarter. Orlando
Johnson had 11 points in the
run, making back-to-back
3-pointers to help Indiana to a
48-23 lead.
Bulls 105,
Bobcats 75
CHARLOTTE, N.C. Taj
Gibson scored 17 points on
8-of-11 shooting and the
Chicago Bulls beat Michael
Jordan's Charlotte Bobcats
105-75.
With Jordan looking on from
the end of the Bobcats' bench,


Associated Press

DURHAM, N.C. Eliz-
abeth Williams had 20
points and 13 rebounds to
help No. 5 Duke beat No.
19 Florida State 61-50.
Chloe Wells added 15
points for the Blue Devils
(25-1, 15-0 Atlantic Coast
Conference), who won
their 37th consecutive
home game against ACC
competition.
Duke trailed 24-20
early in the second half
but seized control with a
26-4 run over the next 9
minutes.
Wells hit a jumper from
the free throw line to give
the Blue Devils a 28-26
lead with 15:36 remain-
ing, and they never
trailed again.
Wells added a pair of
3-pointers, the second of
which gave her team a
43-28 cushion with 9 min-
utes left
Alexa Deluzio scored
16 points to lead Florida
State (20-6, 10-5), which


lost its sixth straight
matchup with Duke.
Natasha Howard added
15 points and 11 re-
bounds for the
Seminoles.
Florida State, which
had not scored fewer
than 62 points in a game
all season, shot a season-
low 29 percent from the
floor. The Seminoles also
committed 21 turnovers,
giving the ball away on
five consecutive posses-
sions during Duke's deci-
sive spurt.
The Blue Devils
stretched their lead to as
many as 20 points, going
ahead 52-32 on a layup by
Williams with 6:40
remaining.
The Seminoles re-
sponded with an 11-0 run
to cut the margin to 52-43
with 3:30 to play, and they
moved within 55-48 with
1:28 remaining. Tricia
Liston, however, made a
pair of free throws with
1:12 left to restore Duke's
lead to 10 points.


Associated Press
New York Knick Amare Stoudemire dunks on Toronto's Andrea Bargnani on Friday dur-
ing the first half in Toronto.


the Bulls jumped out to a 38-19
lead midway through the sec-
ond quarter and never looked
back.
The Bulls had failed to score
100 points in their previous six
games and were held to 67 by
Miami on Thursday night, but
found their groove against the
NBA-worst Bobcats.
Kemba Walker had 27
points to lead Charlotte.
Rockets 106,
Nets 96
NEW YORK James
Harden and Carlos Delfino
each scored 22 points, and the
Houston Rockets tied their
longest winning streak against
any opponent by beating the
Brooklyn Nets for the 13th
straight time, 106-96.
Houston blew most of a
15-point lead in the fourth
quarter before Delfino hit a big
3-pointer with 1:54 left. He later
made another jumper before
Harden followed with a
3-pointer to put it away.
Delfino made six 3-pointers.
Harden, coming off a career-
high, 46-point game Wednes-
day against Oklahoma City,
made four 3s and finished 7 of
14 from the field.
Brook Lopez scored 27
points for the Nets.
Wizards 119,
Nuggets 113
WASHINGTON -The
Washington Wizards put on
one of their best offensive


shows of the season, putting
seven players in double figures
while taking down another con-
tending team with a 119-113
win over the Denver Nuggets.
Emeka Okafor had 17 points
and 13 rebounds for the Wiz-
ards, who never trailed but had
an 18-point fourth-quarter lead
cut to two in the final minute.
Washington broke a two-
game losing streak.
Ty Lawson had 27 points
and 12 assists for the Nuggets.
Hawks 122,
Kings 108
ATLANTA-Al Horford led
Atlanta's balanced scoring with
24 points and the Hawks over-
came a slow start to beat the
Sacramento Kings 122-108.
Jeff Teague had 20 points
and 12 assists, Josh Smith
added 18 points and DeShawn
Stevenson had 17 for Atlanta,
which put six players in double
figures.
Isaiah Thomas scored 30
points to lead the Kings, who
have lost four straight and
eight of 10. DeMarcus Cousins
had 26 points and 13
rebounds.
Mavericks 104,
Hornets 100
NEW ORLEANS Vince
Carter capped a 22-point per-
formance with a 3-pointer that
gave Dallas the lead with 6.5
seconds left, and the Maver-
icks held on for their third
straight victory, 104-100 over
the New Orleans Hornets.


Dirk Nowitzki scored 25
points for the Mavericks, while
Elton Brand added 13 points
and Darren Collison 11, includ-
ing a pair of key free throws in
the final seconds.
Eric Gordon scored 23 for
the Hornets, who've lost three
straight. Anthony Davis added
10 points and 11 rebounds, but
left the game in the third quar-
ter with a sprained right knee.
Jason Smith added a
season-high 22 points for New
Orleans and Ryan Anderson
had 20, including a 3 that gave
the Hornets a 100-96 lead with
55.5 seconds left.
Thunder 127,
Timberwolves 111
OKLAHOMA CITY Rus-
sell Westbrook scored 37
points, Kevin Durant added 27
and the Oklahoma City Thun-
der snapped a three-game los-
ing streak by beating the
Minnesota Timberwolves
127-111.
The Thunder avoided losing
four in a row for the first time
since April 2009, near the end
of their first season in Okla-
homa City, but made little
progress in getting their de-
fense back in order.
They had allowed 113.7
points per game during the los-
ing streak and were just a bas-
ket better against Minnesota,
instead relying on an offense
that regained the NBA lead in
scoring average.
Alexey Shved led Minnesota
with 17 points.


Associated Press
Duke's Elizabeth Williams, left, and Florida State's
Natasha Howard chase a loose ball Friday during the
first half in Durham, N.C.



Billikens beat Butler


Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS -
Mike McCall had 18
points and Kwamain
Mitchell scored 10 of his
12 in the second half to
help Saint Louis rally for
a 65-61 victory over
No. 15 Butler.
Dwayne Evans added
17 points for the Bil-
likens, who won for the
fourth time this season
against a Top 25 oppo-
nent a school record
- and earned their ninth
victory in a row in At-
lantic 10 play The previ-


ous eight had all been by
10 points or more.
Saint Louis (21-5, 10-2)
remains firmly in control
in the conference, hold-
ing a one-game lead over
No. 24 Virginia Common-
wealth. The Billikens
beat VCU 76-62 on
Tuesday
Kellen Dunham led
Butler (22-6, 9-4) with 14
points, all in the first
half. Rotnei Clarke and
Roosevelt Jones each
scored 13 for the Bull-
dogs, who went 9 of 25
from the floor in the
second half.


No. 19 FSU



women fall at



No. 5 Duke


SPORTS


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013 B3






B4 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013



Nationwide Lineup
After Friday qualifying
Race Saturday
At Daytona International Speedway
Daytona Beach, Fla.
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (6) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 177.162.
2. (12) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 176.869.
3. (77) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 176.8.
4. (60)Travis Pastrana, Ford, 176.637.
5. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 176.401.
6. (11) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 176.367.
7. (54) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 176.367.
8. (99) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 176.339.
9. (18) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 176.325.
10. (33) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 176.322.
11. (22) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 176.322.
12. (34) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 176.239.
13. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 176.225.
14. (31) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 176.201.
15. (7) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 176.174.
16. (10) Jeff Green, Toyota, 175.915.
17. (30) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevrolet, 175.895.
18. (55) Jamie Dick, Chevrolet, 175.798.
19. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 175.774.
20. (20) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 175.723.
21. (32) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 175.706.
22. (43) Michael Annett, Ford, 175.555.
23. (01) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 175.421.
24. (8) Scott Lagasse Jr., Chevrolet, 175.24.
25. (70) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, 175.223.
26. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 175.097.
27. (74) Mike Harmon, Dodge, 174.985.
28. (14) Eric McClure, Toyota, 174.978.
29. (2) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 174.927.
30. (23) Robert Richardson Jr., Chevrolet,
174.317.
31. (79) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Ford, 174.311.
32. (44) Hal Martin, Toyota, 174.037.
33. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 174.017.
34. (24) Blake Koch, Toyota, 173.374.
35. (00) Jason White, Toyota, 173.314.
36. (15) Juan Carlos Blum, Ford, 172.397.
37. (51) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, Owner
Points.
38. (4) Danny Efland, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
39. (40) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, Owner
Points.
40. (1) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 174.978.
Failed to Qualify
41. (85) Bobby Gerhart, Chevrolet, 173.641.
42. (89) Morgan Shepherd, Dodge, 173.37.
43. (92) Dexter Stacey Ford, 171.713.
44. (52) Joey Gase, Toyota, 169.93.



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 32 20 .615 -
Brooklyn 33 23 .589 1
Boston 29 26 .527 4/2
Philadelphia 22 30 .423 10
Toronto 23 33 .411 11
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 38 14 .731 -
Atlanta 30 23 .566 8/2
Washington 16 37 .302 22/2
Orlando 15 40 .273 24/2
Charlotte 13 42 .236 26/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 34 21 .618 -
Chicago 32 23 .582 2
Milwaukee 26 27 .491 7
Detroit 22 35 .386 13
Cleveland 17 37 .315 16/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 44 12 .786 -
Memphis 36 18 .667 7
Houston 31 26 .544 13/2
Dallas 25 29 .463 18
New Orleans 19 37 .339 25
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 40 15 .727 -
Denver 34 22 .607 6/2
Utah 31 24 .564 9
Portland 25 29 .463 14/2
Minnesota 20 32 .385 18/2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 39 18 .684 -
Golden State 31 23 .574 6/2
L.A. Lakers 26 29 .473 12
Sacramento 19 37 .339 19/2
Phoenix 18 38 .321 20/2
Thursday's Games
Miami 86, Chicago 67
San Antonio 116, L.A. Clippers 90
Friday's Games
Chicago 105, Charlotte 75
Toronto 100, NewYork 98
Indiana 114, Detroit 82
Washington 119, Denver 113
Atlanta 122, Sacramento 108
Houston 106, Brooklyn 96
Memphis 88, Orlando 82
Dallas 104, New Orleans 100
Oklahoma City 127, Minnesota 111
Boston 113, Phoenix 88
San Antonio at Golden State, late
Portland at L.A. Lakers, late
Today's Games
Denver at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Houston at Washington, 7 p.m.
Miami at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Utah at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
L.A. Lakers at Dallas, 1 p.m.
Golden State at Minnesota, 3:30 p.m.
Sacramento at New Orleans, 6 p.m.
Cleveland at Miami, 6 p.m.
Philadelphia at NewYork, 7 p.m.
Memphis at Brooklyn, 7p.m.
San Antonio at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Boston at Portland, 9 p.m.
Chicago at Oklahoma City 9:30 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
New Jersey 17 10 3 4 24 45 40
Pittsburgh 18 12 6 0 24 60 45
N.Y Rangers 16 8 6 2 18 41 41
Philadelphia 19 810 1 17 53 59
N.Y Islanders 17 7 9 1 15 50 60


Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Montreal 17 11 4 2 24 49 39
Boston 14 10 2 2 22 41 33
Ottawa 18 10 6 2 22 43 34
Toronto 18 11 7 0 22 51 41
Buffalo 18 611 1 13 48 59
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Carolina 15 8 6 1 17 44 44
Tampa Bay 16 8 7 1 17 61 51
Winnipeg 16 7 8 1 15 41 50
Florida 17 5 8 4 14 41 61
Washington 16 510 1 11 43 54
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 17 14 0 3 31 57 35
Nashville 18 8 5 5 21 39 39
St. Louis 17 9 6 2 20 53 51
Detroit 17 7 7 3 17 45 51
Columbus 17 510 2 12 39 53
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 17 10 3 4 24 49 40


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FO r Kthe' rca-ecord


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:
.CASH 3 (early)
6-9-9
CASH 3 (late)
1-9-5
PLAY 4 (early)
8-5-1-3
PLAY 4 (late)
4-2-9-0
FANTASY 5
9-22-27-29-31
MEGA MONEY
2-32-43-44
For Lotty MEGA BALL
22


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1 a.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Arizona Nationals, Quali-
fying (same-day tape)
1 a.m. (SPEED) NASCAR Camping World Truck Series
(taped)
2:30 a.m. (ESPN2) NASCAR Racing Nationwide Series:
Drive4COPD 300 (same-day tape)
1:15 p.m. (ESPN) NASCAR Racing Nationwide Series:
Drive4COPD 300
NBA BASKETBALL
5 a.m. (ESPN2) San Antonio Spurs at Golden State Warriors
(same-day tape)
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Cleveland Cavaliers at Orlando Magic
7:30 p.m. (SUN) Miami Heat at Philadelphia 76ers
COLLEGE MEN'S BASKETBALL
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Clemson at Maryland
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami at Wake Forest
1 p.m. (SUN) Southern Mississippi at Memphis
1:30 p.m. (MNT) Alabama at LSU
2 p.m. (CBS) South Carolina at Georgia
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Oklahoma State at West Virginia
3 p.m. (FSNFL) Washington State at Arizona
4 p.m. (CBS) Georgetown at Syracuse
4 p.m. (MNT) Tennessee at Texas A&M
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) New Mexico at Colorado State
5 p.m. (SUN) Auburn at Mississippi
6 p.m. (ESPN) Creighton at St. Mary's
6 p.m. (ESPN2) Marquette at Villanova
6 p.m. (NBCSPT) Nevada at San Diego State
8 p.m. (ESPN2) South Dakota State at Murray State
9 p.m. (ESPN) Missouri at Kentucky
10 p.m. (ESPN2) Ohio at Belmont
BOXING
10:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Boxing Vyacheslav Glazkov vs. Malik
Scott
GOLF
12 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour WGCAccenture Match Play
Championship, Quarterfinals
2 p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour WGC Accenture Match Play Champi-
onship, Quarterfinals
2 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour Golf Honda LPGA Thailand, Third
Round
LACROSSE
1:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Maryland at Loyola (Md.)
OUTDOORS
6 a.m. (NBCSPT) O'Neill Outside (taped)
SOCCER
7:30 a.m. (ESPN2) English Premier League Fulham FC vs
Stoke City FC
8 p.m. (NBCSPT) MLS Desert Diamond Cup, Final: Teams
TBA
RADIO
SPRING TRAINING BASEBALL
1 p.m. (104.3 WYKE FM) Tampa Bays Rays (SS) vs. Pirates

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
TRACKAND FIELD
9 a.m. Crystal River at Forest Invitational


Minnesota 16 8 6 2 18 36 39
Colorado 15 7 7 1 15 38 43
Edmonton 16 6 7 3 15 37 44
Calgary 15 5 7 3 13 40 54
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 15 12 2 1 25 53 39
San Jose 16 8 5 3 19 40 36
Phoenix 16 8 6 2 18 44 41
Dallas 17 8 8 1 17 44 47
LosAngeles 15 7 6 2 16 36 38
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Thursday's Games
Ottawa 3, N.Y. Rangers 2, SO
Toronto 3, Buffalo 1
Florida 5, Philadelphia 2
New Jersey 3, Washington 2
Winnipeg 4, Carolina 3
N.Y. Islanders 4, Montreal 3, OT
Boston 4, Tampa Bay 2
Columbus 3, Detroit 2
Vancouver 4, Dallas 3
Minnesota 3, Edmonton 1
Friday's Games
Pittsburgh 3, Florida 1
Vancouver 1, Nashville 0
Chicago 2, San Jose 1
Today's Games
New Jersey at Washington, 12 p.m.
Winnipeg at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Phoenix at Edmonton, 3:30 p.m.
Colorado at Los Angeles, 4 p.m.
Nashville at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Montreal, 7 p.m.
N.Y Islanders at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Columbus at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Calgary, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Boston at Florida, 3 p.m.
Vancouver at Detroit, 5 p.m.
Winnipeg at New Jersey, 5 p.m.
Columbus at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Carolina at N.Y Islanders, 7p.m.
Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Colorado at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Calgary 8 p.m.



Accenture Match
Play Championship
At Dove Mountain,The Ritz-Carlton Golf
Club
Marana, Ariz.


Yardage: 7,791; Par: 72
Second Round
Friday
Seeds in parentheses
Nicolas Colsaerts (37), Belgium, def. Justin
Rose (5), England, 4 and 2.
Matt Kuchar (21), United States, def. Sergio
Garcia (12), Spain, 2 and 1.
Tim Clark (59), South Africa, def. Thorbjorn
Olesen (38), Denmark, 3 and 2.
lan Poulter (11), England, def. Bo Van Pelt
(22), United States, 3 and 1.
Bubba Watson (8), United States, def. Jim
Furyk (25), United States, 22 holes.
Jason Day (41) Australia, def. vs. Russell
Henley (56), United States, 19 holes.
Martin Kaymer (26), Germany, def. Rafael
Cabrera Bello (58), Spain, 2 and 1.
Hunter Mahan (23), United States, def.
Richard Sterne (55), South Africa, 4 and 3.
Robert Garrigus (36), United States, def.
Louis Oosthuizen (4), South Africa, 3 and 2.
Fredrik Jacobson (45), Sweden, def. Marcus
Fraser (52), Australia, 4 and 3.
Scott Piercy (35), United States, def. Luke
Donald (3), England, 7 and 6.
Steve Stricker (14), United States, def. Nick
Watney (19), United States, 21 holes.
Shane Lowry (64), Ireland, def. Carl Petters-
son (33), Sweden, 6 and 5.
Graeme McDowell (17), Northern Ireland,
def. Alexander Noren (49), Sweden, 20 holes.
Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano (31), Spain,
def. Charles Howell III (63), United States, 6 and
5.
Webb Simpson (15), United States, def. Peter
Hanson (18), Sweden, 1 up.


Feb. 23
Feb. 24
March 2
March 3
March 9
March 10
March 11
March 16
March 17
March 20
March 23
March 24
March 25
March 28
March 30


Tampa Bay Rays
Spring training radio schedule
104.3WYKE FM


SS vs. Pirates
at Twins
vs. Orioles
vs. Twins
at Phillies
vs. Red Sox
vs. Twins
vs. Red Sox
at Red Sox
at Twins
vs. Twins
at Yankees
vs. Pirates
at Orioles
vs. Tigers


Seven Rivers wins
big on the road
A six-run third inning led the Seven
Rivers baseball team to an easy 13-0 five-
inning victory Friday night against Corner-
stone Academy.
The Warriors led 4-0 after one inning and
broke the contest wide open in the third.
Coy Phillips had three hits for Seven
Rivers. Parker Pillsbury had two hits and
drove in two runs and Adam Gage
smacked a pair of hits.
Coy Weiand picked up the victory on the
mound, as he allowed one hit and struck
out six in three innings of work.
The Warriors improved to 2-0 overall, 1-0
in district play. The team is off until a
March 5 contest at 4 p.m. at Meadowbrook
Academy.

Citrus baseball walks
past West Port
The Citrus baseball team took advan-
tage of 14 walks and two hit batsmen in an
11-1 road victory over West Port.
The 'Canes also stole nine bases, as
they improved to 3-2 overall and 1-0 in
district action.
Ben Wright picked up the win, as he al-
lowed four hits, walked one and struck out
five in five innings.
Cy Yates paced the offense with a 2 for 3
night with a double and RBI.
The 'Canes return to the diamond Tues-
day at 7 p.m. at Umatilla.

Vikings' new stadium will
accommodate baseball
MINNEAPOLIS The Minnesota
Vikings' new football stadium will be de-
signed to accommodate a baseball field.
The Vikings and the Minnesota Sports



BUSCH
Continued from Page B1

other drivers that landed him on pro-
bation were more than Finch could
handle. When Busch had the chance
to finish last season with Furniture
Row, Finch let him walk.
Busch's aggressive driving followed
him to Denver-based Furniture Row.
He wrecked the No. 78 Chevrolet dur-
ing Daytona 500 practice last week
and was collected in a costly crash in
the exhibition Sprint Unlimited the
next night. His Furniture Row team
was getting assistance from Richard
Childress Racing on car repairs to en-
sure Busch gets to Sunday's Daytona
500, where he qualified a solid 11th.
"I guess he would probably win a
lot more races if he wasn't so aggres-
sive, but that's his style," Finch said.
Busch has lived through this cycle
before: A new team, a fresh start, a
smile on his face and the promise this
will be the season he keeps his atti-
tude in check and his cars on the
track. Busch beamed at Daytona as he
talked about his childhood racing
days against his dad and younger
brother, Kyle. He stayed at crew chief
Todd Berrier's house in Colorado in
the offseason and bonded with the pit
crew in North Carolina, calling those
visits the "best way" to build a team.
After only two top-10s with Phoenix
Racing, he had two eighth-place fin-
ishes and a ninth over his final three
races last season with Furniture Row.
"I think we're a B-plus program
right there, right now, as is," Busch
said. "What we're able to do with a
smaller team is navigate through the
waters more quickly"
Busch loved talking about the perks
of racing for his new team. Busch said
Furniture Row is fully committed to
having a strong season with check-
ered flag expectations. Maybe -
maybe this is the season Busch an-
swers his wake-up call and races his
way back to an elite level.
"There's a lot of opportunity there
and he's got to make the most of it,"
Kyle Busch said.
For the partnership to really work,
Busch knows he has to keep his cool
and stay out of the NASCAR hauler.
Busch is seeing a sports psychologist
to help him with his temper.
"There's so many situations that
come up these days, so many hats that
you have to wear as a driver, that
when you work through those situa-
tions, they can teach you things to
pick up very easily, to bring out the
best in yourself," Busch said. "It's just
another tool in the toolbox. It's like a
heavier hammer at some points."



LECANTO
Continued from Page B1

But for us, every time we made one


good play, we made one bad one.
"The good news is the sun will
come up tomorrow. I believe in this
team. And I don't dwell on the past.
They had an off night tonight. How
will I get us ready for Springstead?
We'll have practice on Monday."
Misplays kept piling up through-
out the game for Lecanto. Breanna
Martin relieved Yant in the fourth
inning, and on her first play tossed
wide to first on Bailey Knock's bunt.
With one out, Megan Schuster sin-
gled and Taylor Marris delivered
both runners when her drive to left
went off the outfielder's glove.
In the fifth, an error with two on


Facilities Authority announced an agree-
ment Friday on a multi-use field configura-
tion for the $975 million stadium.
The Minnesota Twins left the Metrodome
for their own new ballpark at Target Field in
2010. But the Minnesota Gophers and
other college and prep baseball teams want
to play early-season games in the Vikings'
new stadium.
Under the agreement, the new stadium
will feature a 26-foot-high right field wall, re-
tractable seats on the north sideline and re-
movable dugouts.
Plans now call for the Metrodome to be
tom down early next year and for the new
stadium to be ready to open by July 1,
2016.
Stacy Lewis holds 3-shot
lead at LPGA Thailand
CHONBURI, Thailand Stacy Lewis
shot a 3-under 69 Friday to keep her three-
stroke lead after the second round of the
LPGA Thailand.
Thai teenager Ariya Jutanugarn shot a
bogey-free 66 in windy and humid condi-
tions to move into second place. Beatriz
Recari (68), So Yeon Ryu (68) and Catriona
Matthew (69) were tied for third at 8 under.
Pace, laconelli tied
for first-day lead
TULSA, Okla. Cliff Pace of Petal,
Miss., and 2003 Bassmaster Classic
champ Michael laconelli of Pittsgrove, N.J.,
tied for the first-day lead at the world cham-
pionship of bass fishing on Grand Lake O'
the Cherokees.
They both brought 21 pounds, 8 ounces
to the scales at Tulsa's BOK Center on Fri-
day, the first of three days of competition for
the $500,000 top prize of the Bassmaster
Classic.
-From staff and wire reports



Bayne on pole for
Nationwide opener
DAYTONA BEACH Former Day-
tona 500 winner Trevor Bayne will start
from the pole in the Nationwide Series
season opener.
Bayne turned the fast lap during qual-
ifying at Daytona International Speed-
way on Friday, averaging 177.162 mph
around the 2 1/2-mile superspeedway.
Sam Hornish Jr. will start second, fol-
lowed by Parker Kligerman, Travis Pas-
trana and Austin Dillon.
Reuss named Daytona
honorary pace car driver
DAYTONA BEACH Mark Reuss,
president of General Motors North
America, will drive the honorary pace
car for Sunday's Daytona 500.
He'll be behind the wheel of a 2014
Chevrolet SS. The Chevy pace car al-
ready led The Sprint Unlimited and both
Budweiser Duels.

Ray Lewis Daytona 500
honorary starter
DAYTONA BEACH Retired NFL
star Ray Lewis will serve as honorary
starter for the Daytona 500.
Lewis will wave the green flag to start
Sunday's "Great American Race."
Oscar-nominated actor James
Franco will serve as grand marshal and
give the command to "start your
engines."
-From wire reports

Like so many weekend do-it-
yourself warriors, Busch must have
lost his tools at times last year.
After going to the pits for repairs
after a wreck at Darlington, Busch
did a burnout through Ryan New-
man's box while crew members were
over the wall an extremely reckless
move that could have left someone se-
riously injured. Afterward, Busch ran
into Newman's car on pit road and got
into it with several of the angry
crewmen.
NASCAR smacked him with proba-
tion, then suspended him for one race
after a profane meltdown with a re-
porter was captured on video.
The wins and the trash talk; the
championship and the controversy -
it's all part of the complicated Kurt
Busch story.
"You go through the thick and the
thin and hope you're able to maintain
and create a long-lasting opportunity
to drive in this series," he said.
"Sometimes it comes with baggage,
other times you let the rough edges
drag and go for those wins. That's
what I've done."


base and two outs brought home an-
other run for South Lake, making it
7-1. Lecanto got its second run of the
game in the sixth, with Atkinson
walking to open the inning and
Amber Russo reaching when hit by
a pitch. But the Eagles' Johns ral-


lied, striking out Paige Richards
and Sidney Holstein before Kelsie
Lilley drove in a run with a base hit.
Lecanto lead-off hitter Lilly Par-
rish had two of the Panthers' four
hits.
"I've said this since I started
coaching, there are 25 practice
games leading up to the state tour-
nament," Dupler said, reiterating
his approach to the game. "I take re-
sponsibility for what happened here
tonight. We must have made eight
errors. I'm the captain of this ship,
and tonight I steered it into an
iceberg."


I S O R T B I E F -


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


QUESTIONS & ATTITUDE
Compelling questions...
and maybe a few actual answers


SPEED FREAKS
A couple of questions we
just had to ask ourselves


AP/TERRY RENNA
Yes, she won more than a flag
for capturing the Daytona 500
pole position.
How many laps will
Danica lead in the
Daytona 500?
GODSPEAK: I think Danica will
stay up on the wheel until the
first round of pit stops, then
Kevin Harvick might lap the
field.
KEN'S CALL: I'm assuming
Jeff Gordon is sharp enough
to tuck in behind her for a few
laps. I put it at Lap 5.

Does she have a chance
to win the 500?
GODSPEAK: Do you recall
a kid by the name of Trevor
Bayne? Anything can happen
in the Daytona 500. Don't bet
against Patrick.
KEN'S CALL: No, but I'm not
pulling against it. No matter
how good your car is, if you
win the 500, you have earned
it in many ways.

ONLINE EXTRAS

news-journalonline.
com/nascar

I facebook.com/
nascardaytona

3 @nascardaytona

Do you have questions or com-
ments about NASCAR This Week?
Contact Godwin Kelly at godwin.
kelly@news-jrnl.com or Ken Willis
at ken.willis@news-jrnl.com

What's on
tap?
SATURDAY:
DRIVE4COPD 300
Nationwide race,
ESPN, 1 p.m.

SUNDAY: 55th-
annual Daytona 500,
Fox, 1p.m.


HOT TOPICS: 3 ISSUES GENERATING A BUZZ


SPEED DATING


Before they arrived at Speedweeks, Danica Patrick
and Ricky Stenhouse Jr. announced they were dating. It's
kind of a big deal because Danica drives a Chevrolet and
Stenhouse races a Ford. And, they are battling for Sprint
Cup Rookie of the Year honors.
When the couple got to NASCAR Media Day on
Thursday yes, Valentine's Day they were bombarded
with questions about their relationship. Patrick bravely
fielded all queries.
Three days later, she became the first female Cup
driver to earn a pole position. And not just any pole, but
the Daytona 500 pole.
After making history, Patrick admitted it was nice to
talk racing instead of Ricky.
"I don't mind answering questions about the other
stuff," she said. "I get that it's not about racing. It's
nice to change the tone of the questions because of
what's going on on the track. That is a really good
sign, and I like that."
For the record, Stenhouse posted the 12thi.:.: I
lap in 500 time trials and received little attenli.,ii.

Gordon's goals
Jeff Gordon, 41, has little more to prove tv.
validate his standing in the Cup Series. After '.i.
championships, 87 victories and bringing in r'
fans during the 1990s, he still has goals
in the sport.
"I've never won a 'Sprint
Cup' ever since they've gone to
this (Chase) format," Gordon
said. "I've come close but got
beat. There's only one thing
left and that's to win the
Sprint Cup championship.
"What I've realized
as I get older, the things
that matter to me. I like
to make other people
proud, people that put a
lot of effort into our race
team, my wife, my kids.
Those are the things that
motivate me."


Jeff Gordon, after earning outside pole honors for
the Daytona 500: "I'm the fastest MAN in the field."

Owner Tony Stewart, praising the teamwork of
driver Danica Patrick and crew chief Tony Gibson:
"Danica has two boyfriends. She has Ricky (Stenhouse)
and she has Tony Gibson. They are all but holding hands in
the shop when they're there every day together."


Lots of one-liners
The first four days of
Speedweeks produced
several one-liners. Here
is a quick sampling:

Sprint Unlimited
winner Kevin Harvick
about the spotlight on
the Danica Patrick-Ricky
Stenhouse Jr. romance
on Media Day: "I missed
all you guys because you
were all busy being TMZ the
other day."


GODWIN'S DAYTONA 500 PICKS
Godwin Kelly is the Daytona WINNER: Matt Kenseth Danica Patrick
Beach News-Journal's motor- REST OF THE TOP FIVE: Tony FIRST ONE OUT: Regan Smith
sports editor and has covered Stewart, Dale Earnhardt Jr., Kasey DON'T BE SURPRISED IF: There are
NASCAR for 30 years. Reach Kahne, Joey Logano two big wrecks. One early because
Shim at godwin.kelly@news- DARK HORSE: Mark Martin of a mistake and the other as drivers
jrnl.com BIGGEST DISAPPOINTMENT: jostle in the final laps.


Hey, Bud, one more year at RCR?


Does Kevin Harvick's win in
the Sprint Unlimited suggest
a successful final season for
him at Childress Racing?
Anything is possible, but don't bet on it just
yet. Things will come into better focus after we
learn where Anheuser-Busch will be spending its
racing budget next year. Whether the Budweiser
colors are leaving with Harvick or staying with
Childress, the decision is bound to hurt some
feelings and kneecap someone's budget.

So it's all about the beer?
Ain't that the way it always goes? Many a
friendship and partnership have spoiled due
to one side's desire to hog the keg. Yes, it's
possible that the Harvick/RCR combination will
end on a high note, but the odds are against it.
And if you like personal drama, it could be fun
to watch, considering both men have a stubborn
side. Can't wait.

Do we dare consider the possibility
of Danica Patrick winning
the Daytona 500?
We've learned to never doubt the Daytona
500's ability to serve up shockers. But keeping
the car calm and straight for one very fast lap
is entirely different from holding off the jackals
and bloodhounds on race day. A driver with
relatively little superspeedway experience,
especially at this level, will have to pedal fast
and learn even faster. A lead-lap, top-15 finish
would be like a win.


Ken Willis has been covering
NASCAR for The Daytona Beach
News-Journal for 27 years. Reach
him at ken.willis@news-jrnl.com


FEUD OF THE WEEK


Harvick Biffle
Kevin Harvick vs. Greg Biffle: Harvick blocked
Biffle on the last lap to win Saturday's Sprint
Unlimited.

Godwin Kelly gives his take: "Biffle could
have knocked Harvick aside but said he didn't
want to create a 'sparks and parts' situation in
Daytona's Turn 2."


DANICA PATRICK
Whli were you
Ihin i, g ...
Ji- [ lierncrhek'


BRAD
KESELOWSKI
Too: young f,,r tlot
brnoadicas:t b:.:ithl


JIMMIE JOHNSON
S.:,rriellO ,. five-timi,-
Cili3imp uinjdel
Dar,,tona ladar


KEVIN HARVICK
Ticl... tic: k ... ti
... tic ...


TONY STEWART
It we do .1
top-10 oiIner'r r 'l.
lies rio. 1


JEFF GORDON
CanmiE clh:e
lo ruiniig tlile
sltori liie OII
pole daJy


GREG BIFFLE
CColld' we wi-reked
Ullllllile d II vO.:.
but didn't


MATT KENSETH
FI:,UuinJ L, :g: ,,iii:'
SpoinpeBob
rJap in locIrl


KASEY KAHNE
HASCAPs
hl31f-tlm atlhill ,old
0medalis


CLINT BOWYER
Mr: Hun..I lile'.
lhim I11 tie 500




Ll A


23


SPRINT CUP
SCHEDULE
A look at the first
10 races of the season
(All Times Eastern)
SUNDAY: Daytona International
Speedway Daytona 500, FOX,
1p.m.

MARCH 3: Phoenix International
Raceway, FOX, 3 p.m.

MARCH 10: Las Vegas Motor
Speedway, FOX, 3 p.m.
MARCH 17: Bristol Motor
Speedway, FOX, 1 p.m.

MARCH 24: Auto Club Speedway,
FOX, 3 p.m.

APRIL 7: Martinsville Speedway,
FOX, 1 p.m.

APRIL 13: Texas Motor Speedway,
FOX, 7:30 p.m.

APRIL 21: Kansas Speedway, FOX,
1p.m.

APRIL 27: Richmond International
Raceway, FOX, 7:30 p.m.

MAY 5: Talladega Superspeedway,
FOX, 1 p.m.


SPRINT UNLIMITED REWIND



Lame-duck status doesn't concern Harvick


Kevin Harvick, driver of the No. 29
Chevrolet, won his third Sprint Unlimited in
dominating fashion Saturday night at Daytona
International Speedway. Harvick led 40 of the
75 laps. It was the eighth trip to the Sprint
Unlimited Victory Lane for team owner Richard
Childress. Here are some of Harvick's post-race
thoughts:

It seems in years after what appears to be
a crisis at Richard Childress Racing, you come
back stronger. Is there some kind of team
marriage counseling you go through in the
offseason?
"We went and hired these psychiatrists to
tell us what we need to do. Now, we call them
engineers (laughter). No. I think with all the
crew chiefs, the engineering staff, the amount
of effort that Richard has poured in from a
financial standpoint to a people standpoint,
getting organized, there's a lot of effort making
sure the cars are prepared better. Not that
everybody wasn't working just as hard. There's
a lot more structure and engineering that goes
into these cars nowadays."

How did the cars react compared with
what you expected? The long-range forecast


for the 500 calls for highs in the low 80s.
How different do you think that's going to
be from Saturday night's race in the cold
temperatures?

"Low 80s will be exactly what we were
expecting because there were zero handling
issues in the Sprint Unlimited. When we were
here at the test, there were a lot of handling
issues with the car sliding around. I think that
will fit more of what we were expecting when we
went home from the test. That will change the
ballgame a lot if it's not 40 degrees outside."

Everyone has heard the talk about lame-
duck drivers. I think you even referenced it on
your radio when you won. Why will you guys
be different?

"I don't think it's been that big of a deal.
Matt Kenseth did a great job with his situation
last year. For us, from his side of it, his guys,
our guys, they don't care. They just want to
win. For our side of it, it's our jobs to control the
atmosphere and the things that go around. The
atmosphere is great, honestly. Everybody is just
working toward the same goal. That's winning
races."


P/ IRKKI KR.NNA
Harvick handled the competition last Saturday, though he doesn't
know how to handle a beer.


AUTO RACING


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


Associated Press
Actors Josh Brolin, left, and
Diane Lane at the 69th annual
Golden Globe Awards on
Jan. 15, 2012, in Los Angeles.
Lane and Brolin are divorcing
after eight years of marriage. A
representative for the couple
confirmed the split Thursday.

Lane, Brolin divorce
after eight years
NEW YORK Diane Lane
and Josh Brolin are divorcing
after eight years of marriage.
A representative for the
couple confirmed the split
Thursday. Brolin and Lane
were married in 2004 in the
second marriage for both.
They don't have any chil-
dren together
Lane was previously mar-
ried to Christopher Lambert
They divorced in 1994 and
have a 19-year-old daughter
Brolin was previously mar-
ried to Alice Adair. They also
divorced in 1994 and have two
children: an 18-year-old
daughter and a 24-year-old
son.
The separation was first re-
ported by Us Weekly

Rapper Ja Rule
leaves NY prison
ALBANY, N.Y Platinum-
selling rapper Ja Rule has
left an upstate
New York
prison after
serving most
A ofhis two-
."i..t year sentence
for illegal gun
possession.
But he is
Ja Rule headed
straight into
federal custody in a tax case.
U.S. marshals escorted the
36-year-old musician out of
Mid-State Correctional Facil-
ity at 9:30 a.m. He was being
held at the Oneida County
Jail in central New York as he
awaited word from the Fed-
eral Bureau of Prisons about
where he will serve time in
the tax case.
The rapper has some time
remaining on a 28-month sen-
tence for tax evasion.

Lady Gaga says she's
had hip surgery
NEW YORK Lady Gaga
said she's had
surgery to fix
her hip.
The 26-year-
old singer
posted on her
blog late
Wednesday
she had hip
surgery and it
Lady Gaga "happened so
fast." She can-
celed her "Born This Way
Ball" tour last week.
She thanked her fans in the
post, saying they gave her "a
lot of strength." Lady Gaga
said as she was wheeled to
surgery, she reflected on her
fans.
Lady Gaga canceled more
than 20 dates on the remain-
der of her tour, which began
last April.


Birthday You might have to shoulder more responsi-
bilities in the year ahead than what you're accustomed to
handling, but don't be dismayed -with enhanced duties
come greater rewards.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) If you have a bad attitude,
unplanned developments could become overwhelming.
Try to roll with the punches and hope for the best.
Aries (March 21-April 19) There is a strong chance
you could run into one of your least favorite people at a
social gathering. If you allow your dislike to surface, the
event is likely to lose its luster.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -A disagreement between
you and your mate could tum into something serious if
neither one of you shows a willingness to compromise.
Be the one who offers the olive branch.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)- Criticism of someone's
work will not necessarily help enhance his or her per-


Same old story


Associated Press
John Goodman, left, Alan Arkin, center, and actor-director Ben Affleck in a scene from "Argo."
The film has dominated the awards with wins at the Golden Globes and ceremonies held by the
Directors Guild of America, the Screen Actors Guild and the Producers Guild of America. "Argo"
now is poised to do what only four movies have managed before at the Oscars: win best picture
without a nomination for its director.


Will there be any surprises

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Nominations morning
last month revealed major surprises for the
Academy Awards, promising one of the most
wide-open campaigns ever for Hollywood's
highest honors.
Six weeks later, things have shaken out into
the same old predictable Oscars.
Like almost every awards season, earlier
honors have established clear favorites for the
top prizes at Sunday's Oscars, where Ben Af-
fleck's CIA thriller "Argo" is expected to take
home the best-picture trophy
"Argo" has dominated the awards picture
with wins at the Golden Globes and cere-
monies held by the Directors Guild of Amer-
ica, the Screen Actors Guild and the
Producers Guild of America. The film now is
poised to do what only four movies have man-
aged before at the Oscars: win best picture
without a nomination for its director
With the top trophy and other key prizes ex-
pected to go to obvious front-runners, the Os-
cars will live or die on the show itself, which
has a hipper flair with "Family Guy" creator
Seth MacFarlane as host and a cool lineup of
current and vintage stars. Among performers,
presenters and other special guests are Bar-
bra Streisand, Norah Jones, "Harry Potter"
star Daniel Radcliffe, key players from "The
Avengers," and Mark Wahlberg and his cuddly
stuffed-bear sidekick from "Ted," voiced by its
writer-director, MacFarlane.
Adele will perform her nominated title tune
from the James Bond adventure "Skyfall," and
the show features a salute to the 007 franchise,
an appearance by Bond theme song singer
Shirley Bassey, and a tribute to the resurgence
of movie musicals over the last decade, which
includes current best-picture contender "Les
Miserables."
Oscar organizers are trying to inject more
verve into a show whose awards generally
play out by the numbers. While drama may be
lacking in the outcome Sunday night, there
was plenty of it early on in the Oscar race.
When nominations came out and Affleck
was omitted of the best-director lineup, it
seemed to doom the best-picture prospects for
"Argo." Likewise, the best-picture chances
looked slim for Kathryn Bigelow's Osama bin
Laden thriller "Zero Dark Thirty" and Tom
Hooper's musical "Les Miserables," since
they also were snubbed for directing
nominations.
Leading the field with 12 nominations, in-
cluding one for director Steven Spielberg, the
Civil War epic "Lincoln" suddenly looked like
the best-picture favorite, almost by default. It
seemed the only realistic choice among the
nine nominees, given how rare it is for a film
to win best picture without a directing nomi-
nation. The last time it happened and the
only time other than in the earliest years of
the Oscars was for 1989's "Driving Miss
Daisy."
Other best-picture contenders that had di-
recting nominations Michael Haneke's old-
age love story "Amour," Ang Lee's shipwreck
saga "Life of Pi," David O. Russell's oddball
romance "Silver Linings Playbook" and Benh
Zeitlin's low-budget bayou drama "Beasts of
the Southern Wild" were acclaimed films
that all seemed like best-picture longshots.
But the crowd-pleasing "Argo," Affleck's lib-
erally Hollywood-ized chronicle of the real-


Today's HOROSCOPE
formance. To encourage this person, your comments
must be constructive and positive.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) If you haven't been too
good about managing your money lately, you won't have
the funds you need to do or buy something you want.
Plan better for the future.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -Any restrictions to which you
might be subjected are not likely to be the fault of others,
but will be a product of your own mismanagement. Be
careful where you point the finger of blame.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) If you're too self-involved,
your efforts aren't likely to bring you much satisfaction
today. This malady can easily be cured, however, by put-
ting the needs of others ahead of your own.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct 23) -Allowing friends to pressure
you into spending more money than necessary could
cause you to resent them instead of yourself. You must


Sunday night at Oscars?


Steven Spielberg, nominated for directing and
best picture for "Lincoln," arrives at the 85th
Academy Awards Nominees Luncheon in Bev-
erly Hills, Calif. "Lincoln" leads the field with
12 Academy Awards nominations, including
one for director Steven Spielberg.
life rescue of six Americans during the Iran-
ian hostage crisis, defied expectations by
sweeping other awards despite the Oscar di-
recting snub or perhaps partly because of
it.
"There's this groundswell of support for
Argo' that took a lot of people by surprise, and
it's making me think that the omission of Ben
Affleck in the best-director category was the
best thing that ever happened to that movie,"
said Dave Karger, chief correspondent for
movie-ticket website Fandango.com. "All of
the Argo' fans are going to rally behind it in
that best-picture category"
As producers of "Argo," Affleck, Clooney
and Grant Heslov would share the best-
picture honor if the film wins.
Assuming it does, there still will be plenty
of love to spread around among other films,
particularly "Lincoln." Spielberg's consola-
tion prize, should "Lincoln" miss out on best
picture, is a probable third directing Oscar He
would be only the fourth filmmaker to achieve
that, along with Frank Capra and William
Wyler, who also won three times, and John
Ford, who won four.
"Lincoln" star Daniel Day-Lewis is ex-
pected to earn his third Oscar in the title role,
making him only the sixth performer to win
three or more Oscars and the first to win three
times in the best-actor category
Other acting favorites: Jennifer Lawrence,
best actress for "Silver Linings Playbook";
Anne Hathaway, supporting actress for "Les
Miserables"; and Tommy Lee Jones, support-
ing actor for "Lincoln."
So where's the surprise of Oscar night?
Maybe in the hands of versatile show host
MacFarlane, whose talents include animation,
comedy writing, singing and songwriting (he's
an Oscar nominee himself for a tune from
"Ted").
His skills also include crude humor, setting
the stage for something livelier, more irrever-
ent and less predictable than the usual ho-
hum broadcast.


be the one who has the willpower to abstain.
Scorpio (Oct 24-Nov. 22) Because you're likely to
do everything the hard way, you may not be able to
achieve all of your objectives. Try to use your time
wisely.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Guard against a ten-
dency to anticipate negative outcomes. If you think you
might fail, you'll make sure to find a way to prove your-
self right.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Do not allow yourself to
get into a situation that would put you in a bad financial
position with another. Don't start borrowing from friends if
you will have trouble paying them back.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Be careful, because
your colleagues could have a stronger influence over
your doings than you'd like. Their aims might not be in
harmony with yours.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21
Fantasy 5:3 13 15 28 33
5-of-5 6 winners $36,279.19
4-of-5 367 $95.50
3-of-5 9,301 $10.50
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20
Powerball: 3 -17 -19- 25 -32
Powerball: 17
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 No winner
No Florida winner
Lotto: 18 -23 -28 -36- 43 -45
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 36 $3,464.50
4-of-6 1,232 $81.50
3-of-6 25,881 $5.50
Fantasy 5:2 3 14 24 33
5-of-5 2 winners $123,725.34
4-of-5 299 $133
3-of-5 10,167 $10.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, Feb. 23, the
54th day of 2013. There are 311
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Feb. 23, 1863, British ex-
plorers John H. Speke and James
A. Grant announced they had
found the source of the Nile River
to be Lake Victoria.
On this date:
In 1836, the siege of the Alamo
began in San Antonio, Texas.
In 1848, the sixth president of
the United States, John Quincy
Adams, died in Washington, D.C.,
at age 80.
In 1861, President-electAbra-
ham Lincoln arrived secretly in
Washington to take office, follow-
ing word of a possible assassina-
tion plot in Baltimore.
In 1903, President Theodore
Roosevelt signed an agreement
with Cuba to lease the area
around Guantanamo Bay to the
United States.
In 1927, President Calvin
Coolidge signed a bill creating the
Federal Radio Commission, fore-
runner of the Federal Communi-
cations Commission.
In 1945, during World War II,
U.S. Marines on Iwo Jima cap-
tured Mount Suribachi.
In 1954, the first mass inocula-
tion of children against polio with
the Salk vaccine began in
Pittsburgh.
In 1965, film comedian Stan
Laurel, 74, died in Santa Monica,
Calif.
In 1970, Guyana became a re-
public within the Commonwealth
of Nations.
In 1992, the XVI Winter
Olympic Games ended in Al-
bertville, France.
Ten years ago: In West War-
wick, R.I., relatives of the victims
of a deadly nightclub fire were al-
lowed to walk up to the charred
rubble to pray and say goodbye.
Five years ago: Defense Sec-
retary Robert Gates and other
U.S. officials held daylong meet-
ings with Australian leaders in
Canberra.
One year ago: President
Barack Obama, speaking in
Miami, sought to confront public
anxiety over rising gasoline prices
as he promoted the expansion of
domestic oil and gas exploration,
as well as the development of new
forms of energy.
Today's Birthdays: Actor Peter
Fonda is 73. Pro and College
Football Hall of Famer Fred Bilet-
nikoff is 70. Singer-musician
Johnny Winter is 69. Rock musi-
cian Brad Whitford (Aerosmith) is
61. Tennis player Helena Sukova
is 48. Actor Marc Price is 45. Ac-
tress Niecy Nash is 43. Country
singer Steve Holy is 41. Rock mu-
sician Lasse Johansson (The
Cardigans) is 40. Actress Kelly
Macdonald is 37. Actress Dakota


Fanning is 19.
Thought for Today: "Never
doubt that a small, group of
thoughtful, committed citizens can
change the world. Indeed, it is the
only thing that ever has." Mar-
garet Mead, American anthropolo-
gist (1901-1978).











RELIGION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Feeding the hungry


ROSA SALTER RODRIGUEZ/The Journal-Gazette
In this Jan. 23 photo, Jared and Jenny Rosalez and their children, Nevaeh Fulk, 9, and Mencharo Rosalez, 7, pray before dinner at Gethse-
mane Lutheran Church in Fort Wayne, Ind. The free meal is part of a weekly community outreach program that serves about 150 people.

In tough economic times, churches find rising need for food ministries


ROSA SALTER
RODRIGUEZ
TheJournal Gazette
FORT WAYNE, Ind.
Jared and Jenny Rosalez sat
down to a hot, homestyle
dinner chicken-and-
noodle casserole with cheese,
mashed potatoes, peas, dinner
rolls and peaches and vanilla
ice cream.
Their kids, Nevaeh Fulk, 9,
and Mencharo Rosalez, 7, even
got a pre-dinner treat a cup
of hot chocolate that was


steamy, creamy and sweet on a
night when snow flurries flew
and winds made the tempera-
ture feel below zero.
But the family, which re-
cently moved to Fort Wayne
from northwestern Ohio,
wasn't dining at home. Their
dinner was at Gethsemane
Lutheran Church. The meal
cost them nothing as part of a
weekly community outreach
program organizers said has
swelled to an average of 150
weekly attendees since the be-
ginning of the year


"We come here to stretch
our food stamps," said Jenny,
30, who said the family has
been surviving on a single So-
cial Security disability check
while her 32-year-old husband
looks for work as a construc-
tion laborer
"You can't make it on $700 a
month," she said, "so coming
here for a meal once a week is
a big help."
A growing number of
churches in Fort Wayne are
finding there is no shortage of
people like the Rosalez family


as economic woes persist for
many residents. Regular free
or low-cost dinners and
lunches are becoming a staple
offering in churches, even
ones in middle-class and ap-
parently affluent areas, The
Journal Gazette reported.
"A lot of people tell us
they're unemployed or under-
employed, (or) they're older
people living on Social Secu-
rity," said the Rev Debra
Meuter, Gethsemane's pastor
See Page C5


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


Need

humility?


Apply

here
his semester, New
York Times
columnist David
Brooks is teaching a
course at Yale called
"Humility."
As part of the required
reading: passages from
the Bible, works from
St. Augustine and Ger-
man theologian Rein-
hold Niehbuhr and
columns by course pro-
fessor David Brooks
himself.
Brooks is teaching a
course on humility using
his own columns.
To be fair, Brooks has
good-naturedly accepted
all the jabs he has re-
ceived for daring to offer
a course on the subject
of humility and using
his own works as part of
the curriculum. He told
the online World maga-
zine site that the
columns of his that he's
using for the class are
not his own thoughts, but
compilations of life les-
sons sent to him by
readers.
Also, Brooks said, the
course is less about
See Page C5


From Citrus County to Costa Rica


Former WTIinstructor goes teaches at

Christian school in CentralAmerican nation


Special to the Chronicle
Retired Withlacoochee Tech criminal
justice instructor Dave Miller is dedicat-
ing his life to teaching school children as
a Costa Rica missionary at the Glory
Christian School in San Pedro de Barva,
a small mountain town of 400 to 500
people.
When budget cuts at WTI ended his po-
sition, Miller retired for a year and then
searched the Internet for missionary
jobs. He came across Glory Christian
School. He applied last July and by Jan. 3
he was accepted.
He currently teaches grammar, compo-
sition and reading. Miller instructs sev-
enth through 12th grades. He teaches
eight to 10 students per class and about
27 classes per week.
"One thing happened after another to
make the trip happen. I packed six bags
and brought my dog with me," Miller said.
"In Costa Rica, everyone has four or
five dogs and they run wild. My dog
comes to class with me and he doesn't
bother the kids," Miller continued.
Living less than 6 miles from two vol-
canoes, Miller said his views are phe-
nomenal. He even got buzzed by a wild
macaw parrot.
Without a car, Miller said that he walks
everywhere. Buses run every 15 minutes
and it's about 30 kilometers to San Jose,
Costa Rica's capital. Every store is within
walking distance.


Worship
Suncoast Baptist
Church in Homosassa
Springs celebrates the addi-
tion of Pastor Tom and Martha
Couric to their church family.
Pastor Tom is the church's


Meals for Miller typically consist of a
small loaf of French bread, onions, eggs,
rice and beans, which are Costa Rican
staples.
"I felt a calling to do what I'm doing
now to teach where they can't afford a
quality teacher My definition of learning
is correcting mistakes. The kids at the
school treat the teacher with respect. It's
nice to come to a country where the kids
say pledges to the flag and to the Bible."
For recreation, the kids at Glory Chris-
tian School use an open tennis field to
play soccer, the national pastime.
"There are huge call centers coming to
Costa Rica," Miller said about Costa
Rica's future. "The Costa Rican people
are more friendly. The companies are
trying to find bilingual workers. It's a
growing country
"My Spanish is such that I can order a
sandwich. They speak so fast you really
have to practice it."
Noting the differences in American
culture versus Costa Rican culture,
Miller described how American throw-
aways are their heirlooms.
"It's a society that fixes things rather
than throws them away," he said. "The
school could use supplies, like books and
pencils. Basic supplies are hard to get
"I'm really excited about the school.
Spending my retirement to be a mission-
ary teacher is well worth it."
Glory Christian School can be found
online at www.glorychristianschool.com.


new pastor. Pastor Tom and
Martha moved to this area
from Kansas last July. He has
been the church's interim pas-
tor since November.
Martha teaches first grade
at Seven Rivers Christian
School and has become the


Religion NOTES

church's pianist. They have
three grown children: Rachel,
who recently moved here
from Thailand where she was
a teacher; Nathan, who is in
the Navy and is stationed at
Diego Garcia in the Indian
Ocean; and Joanna, who is


-- M e c -:i -7
Special to the Chronicle
Former WTI instructor Dave Miller is serving as a mis-
sionary in Costa Rica.


married and lives in South
Korea with her new husband
Yohann.
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church in America invites
the public to attend Great
Vespers at 5 p.m. today and
Divine Liturgy at 10 a.m. Sun-


day. Father David Balmer also
invites all to Bible study class
- "The Words of Christ" at
3:30 p.m. Saturday. The
church is at 1277 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness (off U.S. 41

See Page C2


Terry Mattingly
ON
RELIGION


The pope

retires on

his own

terms

In the spring of 2009,
Pope Benedict XVI
stopped in Aquila,
Italy, to pray at the
shrine of St. Celestine V
The pope left his pal-
lium a wool garment
that resembles a yoke,
symbolizing bonds be-
tween a shepherd and
his flock on this me-
dieval pope's tomb.
Then, 15 months later, he
visited a cathedral out-
side Rome to pray be-
fore the relics, once
again, of St. Celestine V
Few noticed Bene-
dict's actions. So who
was this saint? He was
the elderly priest who
was elected pope in
1294, "somewhat against
his will," noted theolo-
gian Scott Hahn of Fran-
ciscan University of
Steubenville. Before
long, Pope Celestine V
issued a decree allowing
occupants of St. Peter's
throne to step down a
step he then proceeded
to take.
Looking back, it ap-
pears Benedict's visit to
shrines honoring this
particular pope were
"probably more than
pious acts," noted Hahn
on his Facebook page.
"More likely, they were
See Page C4


..- F -


~





C2 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013


NOTES
Continued from Page C1

North, across from Dollar Gen-
eral). The Holy Myrrhbearers
ask attendees to bring a box or
can of food for distribution at
Family Resource Center in
Hernando. Father Balmer will
be the Lenten retreat guest
speaker at 7 p.m. Friday at St.
Anne's Episcopal Church in
Crystal River. The topic is, "Or-
thodox spiritual practices dur-
ing Great Lent." The public is
also invited to attend Great
Vespers in at 6:30 p.m. Tues-
day at The Villages at St.
George Episcopal Church,
1250 Paige Place, Lady Lake.
Call 352-726-4777.
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in
Lecanto will celebrate the
second Sunday of Lent with
Holy Eucharist services at
5 p.m. today and 8 and
10:30 a.m. Sunday. A nursery
is provided during the 10:30
a.m. service. Christian Forma-
tion is at 9:15 a.m. Godly Play
Sunday school is at 10 a.m.
There is a healing service at
10 a.m. Wednesday followed
by Bible study. SOS is from
9 a.m. to noon Thursday at
Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church. Evening Bible study
is at 7 p.m. Thursday.
Saturday's contemporary
service at First Christian
Church of Homosassa
Springs begins at 5:30 p.m.
"Listen to Him" is the sermon
topic at the contemporary serv-
ice and Sunday worship at
10:30 a.m. The Wednesday
evening fellowship meal is
served at 6 followed by prayer
and Bible study at 7 p.m. The
men of the church will honor
the ladies at the Women's Ap-
preciation Banquet at 6 p.m.
Thursday. For reservations, call
the church office at 352-628-
5556. The church is at 7030 W.
Grover Cleveland Blvd. Dan
Wagner is the minister.


RELIGION


Faith Lutheran Church,
off State Road 44 and County
Road 491 in Crystal Glen
Subdivision in Lecanto, invites
the public to services at
6 p.m. Saturday and 9:30
a.m. Sunday. The service
theme this week by Pastor
Stephen Lane is "Foxes and
Hens," from Luke 31:31-38.
Following the Sunday service
is a time of fellowship. Sun-
day school and adult Bible
study classes are at 11 a.m.
Midweek Lenten services
continue at 5 p.m. Wednes-
days, Feb. 27, March 6, 13
and 20, followed by a potluck
supper in the fellowship hall.
Call 352-527-3325 or visit
faith lecanto.com.
First Presbyterian
Church is at 206 Washington
Ave., Inverness. The Sunday
worship schedule includes
traditional services at 8 and
11 a.m., casual service at
9:30 a.m., Sunday school
hour at 9:30 a.m., and coffee
hour from 9 to 11 a.m. For the
second Sunday of Lent, the
Rev. Craig S. Davies will
preach on the topic, "You
Need a Sanctuary," with read-
ings from Matthew 14:22-33
and Mark 1:35. The pastor's
Lenten study, "The Turbulent
Waters of Change," begins
with a prepared dinner at
6 p.m. followed by the study
topic, "Dealing With the
Changes of Growing Older."
Meal reservations are re-
quired; call 352-637-0770.
St. Paul's Lutheran
Church, at 6150 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills, has
worship services at 8 and
10:30 a.m. Sunday school is
at 9:15 a.m. Adult Bible class
at 9:15 a.m. will continue the
study of Revelations. "Bible
Information Class" is at noon
Sunday, at 8:15 a.m. Monday,
and 3:45 p.m. Wednesday.
Choir rehearsal is at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday. Wednesday mid-
week Lenten worship services
are at 4 and 6:30 p.m. St.
Paul's Lutheran School will


host a free soccer camp dur-
ing spring break. Students
must be registered by Friday,
March 1. Call 352-489-3027.
St. Anne's Episcopal
Church (a parish in the Angli-
can Communion) is on Fort
Island Trail North. The church
will celebrate the second Sun-
day of Lent with services at 8
and 10:15 a.m. tomorrow. St.
Anne's will host Our Father's
Table from 11:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. today. St. Anne's
Counseling Center is at full
staff with Dr. Caroline Morris
and Paul Winstead. Appoint-
ments for all levels of counsel-
ing needs may be made by
calling 352-795-3440. Friday
Lenten series begins with Sta-
tions of the Cross at 5 p.m.,
supper at 5:30 and an ongo-
ing series of talks by local
priests and ministers on
"What is Spirituality in our Tra-
dition." A new men's group
modeled after the Order of St.
Andrews meets in the church
library. Call the church for
dates and time. Alcoholics
Anonymous meets at 8 p.m.
Friday and Mondays in the
parish library. The young
adults meet for a light meal
and Bible study the first Fri-
day monthly at one of the
group member's homes. For
details, call Dave or Kathy
Jackson at 352-344-1167.The
"Widows Network" will meet at
12:30 p.m. Monday at the
Olive Tree Restaurant. This
group meets the fourth Mon-
day monthly at various loca-
tions. All widows are invited.
The St. Anne's sing-along is
at 6 p.m. Sunday. Annie and
Tim's United Bluegrass
Gospel Band will lead the
singing. All are invited.
St. Margaret's Episco-
pal Church will celebrate
Holy Eucharist Rite 1 at 8
a.m. Sunday and Holy Eu-
charist Rite 2 at 10:30 a.m.
which includes children's
church. Adult Sunday school
is at 9:30 a.m. Youth Sunday
school starts at 12:45 p.m. fol-


lowing lunch. Bible study at
the Radcliffes' home is at
7:30 p.m. Monday. Lenten
Bible study on "Facing the
Cross" is on Tuesday. Feed
My Sheep will provide a hot
lunch to those in need at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday fol-
lowed by a healing and Holy
Eucharist celebrating St.
Matthias at 12:30 p.m. Sta-
tions of the Cross at noon Fri-
day will be followed by a
"Souper" lunch. Food pantry
hours are from 9:30 to 11:45
a.m. Tuesday and
Wednesday.
Inverness Church of
God Sunday worship services
are at 8:30 and 10:30 a.m.
Children's church is during the
10:30 a.m. service following
praise and worship on the
second, third and the fourth
Sunday monthly. Children re-
main in the sanctuary for fam-
ily worship the first Sunday
monthly. Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m. with classes
for everyone. Adult Bible class
is at 7 p.m. Wednesday in
rooms 105 and 106. The
youth group meets at 7 p.m.
Wednesday in the Youth
Ministries Building. K.I.D.
Zone (for children pre-k
through eighth grade) meets
from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday.
This includes K.I.D.'s choir
practice from 6 to 6:30;
K.I.D.'s dinner from 6:30 to 7;
and children's Bible study
classes from 7 to 8 p.m. The
church is at 416 U.S. 41 S.,
Inverness. Call 352-726-4524.
First Baptist Church of
Floral City, 8545 E. Magnolia
St., invites everyone to share
in Sunday's worship services
at the 8:30 a.m. blended serv-
ice and the 11 a.m. traditional
service. Coffee and dough-
nuts are served in the fellow-
ship hall from 9 to 9:45 a.m.
Sunday school classes for all
ages begin at 9:45 a.m. For
more information, www.fbc
floralcity.org or call 352-
726-4296.
Good Shepherd


Lutheran Church invites the
public to worship at 8:30 and
11 a.m. Sunday. A coffee hour
follows both services. The
church is barrier free and of-
fers a free CD ministry, large-
print service helps and
hearing devices. A nursery at-
tendant is available for pre-
school-age children. The
touring ensemble of "Music,
Gettysburg!" will present a
free public concert, "Gather
us in: Songs and Hymns of
Our Generation," at 1 p.m.
today at the church. A freewill
offering will be received to
support "Music, Gettysburg!"
The church is on County
Road 486 opposite Citrus
Hills Boulevard in Hernando.
Call 352-746-7161.
Hernando United
Methodist Church invites
everyone to its various activi-
ties. Adult Bible study with the
Rev. Bob Martin is at
8:45 a.m. Sunday followed by
the 10 a.m. worship service
with the Rev. "Jerry" Carris.
Children's church, a nursery,
and hearing devices for the
hearing impaired are pro-
vided. The Korean worship
service with the Rev. Yoon is
at 2 p.m. Mark Bodenheim
chairs the Men's Connection
at 7 p.m. Monday. Holidaze
Crafters invites all to come
and enjoy crafts and fellow-
ship at 9 a.m. Tuesday. The
HUMW choir meets for prac-
tice at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday
under the direction of Darryl
Frenier. On Wednesdays,
Bible study with Pastor Jerry
Carris is at 1 p.m., Korean
Bible study with the Rev. Yoon
is at 4 p.m., and Bible study
with the Rev. Bob Martin is at
7 p.m. Cub Scouts Pack 452
meets at 6 p.m. Thursday.
The United Methodist Women
meet at 9:45 a.m. the second
Thursday monthly. The United
Methodist Men's breakfast
and meeting takes place the
fourth Saturday monthly.
Share Praise and Fellowship
meets at 6 p.m. the second


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

and fourth Sunday monthly.
The church is at 2125 E.
Norvell Bryant Highway, Her-
nando. Call 352-726-7245.
First Baptist Church of
Chassahowitzka will cele-
brate its 40th Homecoming to-
morrow. Sunday school starts
at 9:30 a.m. and the morning
service at 11. The church will
celebrate the one-year an-
niversary of its former pastor,
the Rev. Timothy Pauley and
his wife Gail, on returning to
FBCC. He was pastor from
April 2000 until July 2005.
"Simple Faith," a quartet from
St Petersburg, will sing. A cov-
ered-dish luncheon (finger
foods, no desserts) will follow
the morning service. The
church will serve cake and
punch following the lunch.
Join us for this special
occasion.
NorthRidge Church in-
vites the community to its new
location at the Realtors Asso-
ciation of Citrus County Build-
ing at 714 S. Scarboro Ave. in
Lecanto. The new worship
service time is at 10 a.m. Join
us at 9:30 a.m. for a coffee
fellowship, followed by the
worship service. Wednesday
we meet for weekly Bible
study.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
and study begins at 7. The
first Wednesday monthly is
the Faith Journey video les-
sons that gives insight and
understanding to the scrip-
tures as related to the culture
and land of biblical times. On
subsequent Wednesdays, we
are studying the book of Gala-
tians. Call Pastor Kennie
Berger at 352-302-5813.
Bring a friend for coffee
and doughnuts at 9:30 a.m.,
then stay for a mini-concert by
Mark and Andrea Forester
and a message by Mark from
God's Word at 10:15 a.m.
Sunday at Heritage Baptist
Church, 2 Civic Circle, Bev-
erly Hills. Call 352-746-6171.

See NOTES/Page C3


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!! !

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA i: I


SB Crystal
E River
Foursquare
Gospel Church

1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages- 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


ST. THOMAS

CATHOLIC

CHURCH


MASSES:
aturday.....4:30 P.M.
unday.......8:00 A.M.
...............10:30 A.M.

-. II 0 .t H ,in. .,
111MAW S i1-111l


l Crystal Diver
Church of Cod
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nurser
Provided


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am

HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
795-4479


ST. ANNE'S
T CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
wwwstannescr.org


Crystal River
CHURCH OF

CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M. 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


Special
Event or

Weekly

Services

Please Call

Beverly at

564-2912

For

Advertising

Information


SFirst Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship i iih Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Troy Allen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


I Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon


West
Citrus
Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352-564-8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr. o





I
US Hwy. 19



SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
Bob Dickey


THE [
SALVATION
ARMY CITRUS COUNT.
CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A.M.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller








HEKE, YOU'LL FIND
A CAINC FAMILY
IN CH KST!

CKYTAL
RIVCK
JNITvED
N ETHODIST
CHURCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon.- Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
,: A Stephen Ministry Provider ,


"The
Church
in the
Heart
of the
Community
with a
Heart
for the
Community"







Homosassa
First United
Methodist
church

Everyone
Becoming
A Disciple
of Christ

Sunday Worship
8:00 am & 9:30 am
& 11:00 am
Sunday School
9:30 am
Reverend
Kip Younger
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org
Office Hours:
8:30 4:30 M-F
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors



*fChis





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

New Covenant Grace
Fellowship meets at 10 a.m.
Sunday in a member's pri-
vate home. There is also a
healing school on Tuesday
nights and a small group dis-
cussion on Wednesday
nights. The Rev. Larry Silver-
man lead this ministry. Call
Pastor Silverman at 616-
291-9568.
The Nature Coast Uni-
tarian Universalist Fellow-
ship of Citrus County
welcomes Bonnie Whitehurst
to the pulpit at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Whitehurst's topic,
"The Mother of All Excuses,"
asks the questions: "Why do
we go to church? Why do
some people choose to stay
home? Why are we members
of a church? What are the
benefits of belonging to a
church?" The NCUU meets at
7633 N. Florida Ave. (U.S.
41), Citrus Springs. Call 352-
465-4225.
E If you are looking for a
friend, then Abundant Life of
Crystal River is the church
for you. Abundant Life is a
growing church where you
can find a church home, as
well as a caring church family.


The Sunday morning service
is at 10:30 and the midweek
service is at 7 p.m. Wednes-
day. Both services have un-
compromised and
encouraging Bible-based
teachings that will build your
faith. Abundant Life is a full-
Gospel, nondenominational
church that believes in the
power of Pentecost. Come
and grow with us. Come as
you are and leave forever
changed by the presence of
the Lord. Abundant Life of
Crystal River is at 4515 N.
Tallahassee Road, Crystal
River. Visit www.abundant
lifecitrus.org or call 352-
795-LIFE.
Congregation Beth Is-
rael of Ocala will celebrate
the festival of Purim at 11 a.m.
Sunday at the Collins Center,
building 300, 9401 State
Road 200 in Ocala. The cele-
bration with begin with the
reading of the Megillah, the
Scroll of Esther, followed by a
covered-dish brunch and the
telling of jokes and other
Purim frivolities. All are wel-
come to join in the fun and
levity. Call Lois at 352-291-
1308 or Janis at 352-861-
6732 and indicate what food
you will bring. Congregation
Beth Israel of Ocala is a lib-
eral, inclusive, progressive
Jewish community affiliated


with the Jewish Reconstruc-
tionist Movement.
Mid-week Lenten service
themes at Peace Lutheran
Church include: Feb. 27 -
"Awake at Night," Luke 6:12-
16; March 6 "The Journey
Ahead," Luke 9:18-24; March
13- "The Right Way to
Pray," Luke 11:1-4; March 20
- "(Un)finished Business,"
Luke 23: 34, 46. Lenten serv-
ices at 4 p.m. are followed by
a potluck meal. Maundy
Thursday and Good Friday
services are at 7 p.m. Easter
worship service is at 10 a.m.
Everyone is invited to all serv-
ices. The church is at 7201 S.
U.S. 41, five miles north of
Dunnellon. Call the church of-
fice at 352-489-5881 or visit
www.PeaceLutheranOnline
.com.
Sales & such
The Council of Catholic
Women of Our Lady of Grace
Church will continue its
"Trash'n Treasures Fund
Raiser" from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
today in the Parish Life Cen-
ter, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly
Hills. Find household items,
clothing, books, jewelry,
plants, tools, small furniture,
toys, knickknacks and white
elephant items. Proceeds go
to needed items for the
church and charitable contri-


butions. Call Anna Panasik at
352-527-3226. Our Lady of
Grace's monthly flea market
will take place outside from
8 a.m. to 2 p.m. today in con-
cert with "Trash'n Treasures."
Hernando United
Methodist Church's semi-
annual "Sell Your Own
Treasures Sale" is from 8
a.m. to 2 p.m. today. All are
invited to come. No reserva-
tions needed first come,
first served. Rent a 12-by-12-
foot space for $5. The kitchen
is open for breakfast and
lunch. The church is at 2125
E. Norvell Bryant Highway
(County Road 486). Call 352-
726-7245.
Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church in Beverly
Hills will host its monthly out-
door flea market from 8 a.m.
to 2 p.m. today on the church
property at 6 Roosevelt
Boulevard in Beverly Hills off
North Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491). Shoppers
are welcome. Up to 50 com-
mercial and private vendors
are expected to display their
wares. Commercial vendors
and private individuals are
welcome to bring and sell
goods. Spaces are available
for $10. A mobile kitchen will
serve breakfast and lunch
items. Flea markets take
place the fourth Saturday


monthly except in June, July
and August. Next month's flea
market is March 23. For more
information or to reserve a
space, call Rose Mary at 352-
527-6459 or e-mail wjeselso
@tampabay.rr.com.
The St. Scholastica
Council of Catholic Women
will host its "Annual Flea
Market" on Friday and Satur-
day, March 1 and 2, at the St.
Scholastica Parish Hall, 4301
W. Homosassa Trail, Lecanto.
Doors open at 7 a.m. both
days. Refreshments are avail-
able with donation. To donate
items, bring them to the same
location between 9 a.m. and
1 p.m. Tuesday through
Thursday. Call Jeannine at
352-527-2209. The Council of
Catholic Women support
many charitable organizations.
First Christian Church of
Chassahowitzka, at 11275 S.
Riviera Drive, Homosassa,
will have its annual rummage
sale from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Fri-
day and Saturday, March 1
and 2.
The Ladies Guild of Bev-
erly Hills Community Church
will have its annual rum-
mage sale from 10 a.m. to
6 p.m. Friday, March 1, and
from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday,
March 2, in the Jack Steele
Fellowship Hall, 82 Civic Cir-
cle. Items for sale include


RELIGION


SFloral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


Grace Bible
Church


Sunday
9:30 AM....................Discovery Time
11:00 AM...................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM.....................Evening Service
Monday
6:15PM.....................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept.- Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM.....................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
IV mi.east of US. 19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O.Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am 2
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


[ B pis

t. rc
OH a
Recin ndrstrn


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.

Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.

Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
000Y Floral City, FL.


$ Shepherd

of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon of faith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Sunday School
Adult 9:15
Child 10:00
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
Bishop Jim Adams,Rector
527-0052
2540W. Norvell Bryant Hwy
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
un .(.OTHE('.rl ,..
~. i i-. ,.


935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325
COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 PM.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com

{at 'i or e vt-teiw.
,,,er gro, w~


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 am
11:30 am
Saturday
Vigil
4:00 pm
6:00 pm
Weekday
Masses
8:30 am
Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm
(352) 746-9422


HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church

Ope
Ht, art
OpeM

OpeM
Doow

S ......'. .. r (Children and Families"
2125 E,Norvell Bryant Hwy, (486)
(1 miles from Hwy.41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl .org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Nursery is Provided.
I,,,,


/ Hernando
S Churchorf
TheNazarene
A Place to Belong

2101 N, Florida Ave,
Hernando FL

726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org



The New Church
Without Walls
"An Exciting & Growing
Multi-Cultural
Non-Denominational
Congregation Ministering to
the Heart of Citrus County"
Senior Pastors & Founders


4 n
k'j4


Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr.
& Lady "T" Alexander

Sunday School 9:30 am
Sunday Service 11:00 am
Wednesday Bible Study 7pm

3962 N. Roscoe Rd.
Hernando, FL
Ph: 352-344-2425
www.newchurchwithoutwalls.com
Email:cwow@embarqmail.com

"The perfect church for
people who aren't"


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Lifting Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
www.fbcfloralcity.org


0


Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA










Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
SFellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

352-74-71611


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!! i!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013 C3

white elephant, household,
men's and women's clothing,
toys, games, books and jew-
elry, plus bake sale and re-
freshments. Good, usable
household items and clothing,
including men's clothing, are
welcome as donations from 8
to 11 a.m. Monday through
Thursday. No computer com-
ponents or magazines will be
accepted as donations.
Money earned by the Guild
goes to further the work of the
church. Call the church office
at 352-746-3620.
Food & fellowship
The Yankeetown Com-
munity Church JOY Circle will
host a "Soup n Salad
Lunch" fundraiser from
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. today. All
you care to sample soup and
salad, with coffee, iced tea
and water. Cost is $5 for
adults and $3 for children.
Desserts may be bought for
$1.50. The church is on State
Road 40 West, about two
miles from the traffic light on
U.S. 19 in Inglis. Come join us
for good food and fellowship.
Floral City United
Methodist Church will have its
"Community Dinner" from 3
to 6 p.m. today in the church
hall. The menu consists of

See NOTES/Page C4





C4 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013


POPE
Continued from Page C1

profound and symbolic gestures of
a very personal nature, which con-
veyed a message that a pope can
hardly deliver any other way"
This was a message consistent
with the 86-year-old pope's stun-
ning announcement this week -
days before the start of Lent -
that he would end his eight-year
papacy on Feb. 28. Although it has
been seven centuries since the vol-
untary resignation of a pope, this
option remains in canon law and
was affirmed by Pope Paul VI in
1975 and the Blessed John Paul II
in 1996.
Benedict said he was thinking
about the future of the papacy, not
the past: "In today's world, subject
to so many rapid changes and
shaken by questions of deep rele-
vance for the life of faith, in order
to govern the bark of Saint Peter
and proclaim the Gospel, both
strength of mind and body are nec-
essary, strength which in the last
few months, has deteriorated in
me to the extent that I have had to
recognize my incapacity to ade-
quately fulfill the ministry en-
trusted to me."
The Vatican Press Office noted
these words were consistent with
his thoughts in the 2010 book,
"Light of the World." While it
would be wrong to flee in times of
trouble, Benedict said: "When a
Pope realizes clearly that he is no
longer physically, mentally, and
spiritually capable of carrying out
his role, then there is legally the
possibility, and also the obligation,
to resign."
Vatican leaders are planning for
the election of a pope by Easter,
thus creating a whirlwind of activ-
ity. Reactions, so far, have
included:
Comedy Central's Stephen
Colbert an active Catholic -
quipped that "popes don't quit.
God has a way of telling popes
when it's time to retire. It's called
death." Father James Martin, a Je-
suit known as The Colbert Report
chaplain, later tweeted that he
should have told the comedian,
"Pope Benedict XVI is raising the


bar when it comes to giving things
up for Lent."
On the far doctrinal left,
Catholics United noted: "The
Catholic church hierarchy has
been seen as an institution overly
focused on issues of human sexu-
ality, such as opposition to access
to birth control and marriage
equality.... The next pope has a
unique opportunity to radically
shift the agenda of the church."
Among journalists, "The Fix"
blogger Chris Cillizza at The Wash-
ington Post tweeted: "Pope Bene-
dict, following Sarah Palin's lead,
resigns."
This pope's departure drew
several tributes from Protestant
conservatives. Benedict reminded
the world that humans are not
mere machines, "collections of
nerve endings, that spark with
sensation when rubbed together,"
noted theologian Russell Moore of
Southern Baptist Theological
Seminary The pope defended
Down syndrome babies and
Alzheimer's patients, as well as
those "society wants to dehuman-
ize with language: 'embryo,' 'fetus,'
'anchor baby,' 'illegal alien,' 'col-
lateral damage,' and so on."
Strategically, the key is that
Benedict's "out of the blue" deci-
sion will do much to prevent the
months or even years of political
maneuvering that precede papal
elections, wrote Jimmy Akin of
Catholic Answers. It also helps
that Benedict did not act in re-
sponse to calls for his retirement,
such as the campaign aimed at
John Paul II.
At the same time, Akin noted,
"advancing medical technology
means increasingly long life spans
with a longer period of frail
health.... Unless we get really wiz-
ard regenerative medical technol-
ogy really soon, we're likely to
have more popes in that kind of
situation, and thus there are likely
to be more resignations in the
future."

Terry Mattingly is the director of
the Washington Journalism Cen-
ter at the Council for Christian
Colleges and Universities and
leads the GetReligion.org project
to study religion and the news.


RELIGION


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

pulled pork, baked beans, Greek
salad, applesauce, assorted
breads and desserts. Beverage in-
cluded. Cost is $7.50. Proceeds
go toward missions. The church is
at 8478 E. Marvin St., across from
the elementary school. Call 352-
344-1771.
The Ladies Auxiliary of the
Knights of Columbus Council
6168 will host their "Spring Fling
Luncheon" from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Tuesday, March 19, at the Knights
of Columbus Hall, 2389 W. Norvell
Bryant Highway, Lecanto. Doors
open at 10:30 a.m. The event in-
cludes tricky tray baskets, money
trees, raffles and door prizes.
Bring a baby item or a monetary
donation for the Pregnancy and
Family Life Center and receive a
free door prize ticket. Tickets ($15
each) include the lunch buffet
catered by John Mason, coffee,
dessert and door prizes. For infor-
mation and/or tickets, call Char
Fontaine at 352-746-9490, Pat
Louque at 352-746-7563 or Peggy
Goss at 352-746-7942. Net pro-
ceeds are donated to local non-
profit organizations and a
scholarship fund to a Citrus
County high school graduate.
Tickets are limited to 160.
St. John the Baptist Catholic
Church, on the corner of U.S. 41 and
State Road 40 East in Dunnellon,
hosts its fish fry from 4 to 6 p.m. Fri-
days during lent through March 22,
in the church pavilion. Cost is $7 for
adults and $3.50 for children. Fish fry
is open to the public.
Beverly Hills Community
Church spaghetti suppers have
resumed from 4 to 6 p.m. the third
Friday monthly through May 17 in
the Jack Steele Hall at 86 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills. A donation of
$8 per person or two tickets for
$15 includes all-you-can-eat
salad, spaghetti with meat sauce,
Italian bread, dessert and coffee
or tea. Come and enjoy a deli-
cious meal. Tickets are available
at the door.


Music & more
The touring ensemble of
"Music, Gettysburg!" will pres-
ent a free public concert, "Gather
us in: Songs and Hymns of Our
Generation," at 1 p.m. today at
Good Shepherd Lutheran Church.
A freewill offering will be received
to support "Music, Gettysburg!"
The church is on County Road
486 opposite Citrus Hills Boule-
vard in Hernando. Call 352-
746-7161.
For Black History Month, a
well-known drummer from the
Ivory Coast, West Africa, will bring
African drumming and dancing
to Citrus County from 1 to 5 p.m.
today at Hernando Church of the
Living God, 3441 E. Oleander
Lane, Hernando. Come out and
support African culture in your
community. Drumming classes will
be provided for a donations of $10
and $12. Come out to learn some
West African rhythms. Call 352-
270-6148 or 352-897-4173.
The monthly Saturday Night
Gospel Jubilee will take place at
6 p.m. today at First Church of
God, 5510 Jasmine Lane. Every-
one is invited and encouraged to
prepare a musical number and
participate in the evening. Good
food and fellowship follow in the
fellowship hall. Call 352-344-3700.
The Forgiven Trio will be in
concert at 6 p.m. Sunday at Light-
house Baptist Church, 974 Mar-
tinelli Blvd., Citrus Springs (at the
corner of Citrus Springs Boulevard
and W.G. Martinelli Boulevard).
The group was originally with the
Gaithers and Weatherfords. The
concert is free. A love offering will
be collected. Call 352-489-7515 or
352-208-3055.
Floral City United Methodist
Church welcomes a concert by
Dan Schall at 6:30 p.m. Sunday.
His familiar music offerings and
testimony focuses on encourage-
ment and God's love for man. A
stutterer, who was once discour-
aged with his life, he now shares
what God has brought to him and
how he is able to sing His praises.
He has formed "Dan Schall Min-
istries" based in Zelienople, Pa. All


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

are welcomes. A strawberries and
ice cream fellowship will follow. A
freewill offering will be collected.
The church is at 8478 E. Marvin
St., across from the elementary
school. Call 352-344-1771.
Hernando United Methodist
Church will host a spring concert
featuring the Baroque Ensemble
stringed-instrument group of stu-
dents from Pope John II Catholic
School and the Dunnellon Con-
cert Singers at 7 p.m. Friday at
the church, 2125 E. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Hernando. Admission is
free with a love offering accepted.
The Baroque Ensemble group
consists of guitar, cello, violin,
harpsichord and percussion in-
struments. The students are from
grades 3 to 8. The group is di-
rected by Darryl Frenier, who also
directs the choir of Hernando
UMC. The vocal portion of the
program will be presented by the
Dunnellon Concert Singers,
singing favorites from the Great
American Songbook. They are
dedicated to enrich the cultural life
of the community through music.
Mary Mahoney, coordinator, Sue
Koppler, Bill Thomas, and Bob
Cubbage on the piano will round
out the evening.
First Baptist Church of Bev-
erly Hills will host a free concert
featuring Michael James Fac-
ciani at 6 p.m. Saturday, March 2.
Experience the thunderous, rich
baritone voice that has been com-
pared to the late Robert Goulet. A
love offering will be collected. The
church is at 4950 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills. Call 352-
746-2970 or visit www.fbcbh.com.
Special events
For its community outreach
event this month, Reflections
Church is collecting very small
stuffed animals (Beanie Baby-
sized) for the fire and sheriff de-
partments. These departments
have requested that the stuffed
animals be small due to the lack
of storage room inside the emer-
gency response vehicles. These
stuffed animals will be used to

See NOTES/Page C5


SPRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Predica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bblicos
Les Eperamos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711




"First For Christ"...John 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS
We welcomeyou and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr Ray Kelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study

344-1908


Pastor
Tom Walker


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study, Gospel
m i....... ',l. i-in Dinners, singing
the old hymns? Then you'll enjoy
this Church family.
J- Home of the
"Saturday Nite GOSPEL
JUBILEE" A great Nite Out!
Last Saturday of the month 6:00
Fun,Food,Fellowship & Free!


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033


Special
Event or

Weekly
Services

Please Call

Beverly at

564-2912

For

Advertising

Information


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!



a First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452

Pastor,
Dairold

Bettye
Rushing


'11 <##//I#j 1 '/N.'.%

SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260





First United

Methodist


(Church
of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor



8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion

9:45 AM
Sunday School

10:00 AM


NureryAvia IContemporary
I Praise & Worship
OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School.............9:00
W orship................. 10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School.............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(At The Fla hint Light
..' i '
352-422-h11535

Todd
Langdon











VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.


SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM. & 10:30 A.M.


SPANISH MASS:
12:30 P.M.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.M. to 3:15 P.M. Sat.
or ByAppointment

WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
i. .catholicweb.com .


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca .com


Hwy.44 E @
* Washington Ave., Inverness U

* Sunday Services .
* Traditional *
8:00 AM & 11:00 AM U
S Casual Service
* 9:30 AM
11:00 AM Service
Tapes & CD's Available
" Sunday School for all ages
0 9:30 AM
" Nursery Provided
SFellowship & Youth Group m
* 5to7PM 0
SWeb Site: www.fpcinv.org
Podcast: FPC inv.com

* Church Office 637-0770
SPastor Craig Davies U


U-


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come n over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!! !

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C4

comfort children in an emergency
situation. Both departments have ac-
knowledged the calming effect for a
child. To donate stuffed animals,
drop them off at Citrus Springs Mid-
dle School from 9:30 a.m. to noon or
5 to 6:30 p.m. Sunday or call 352-
601-7964.
St. Paul's Lutheran Church will
provide an overview of information
families and friends need to know as
they care for a loved one with
Alzheimer's disease from 9 a.m. to
noon today in the church, 6150 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills. Pas-
tor Curt Seefeldt, director of church
relations for the Lutheran Home As-
sociation will facilitate the discussion
on Alzheimer's diagnosis, treatment
options, answers to spiritual ques-
tions and family care. Everyone is
invited to attend this free event. Call
the church at 352-489-3027 or email
office@stpauls.edu. Onsite registra-
tion will begin at 8:30 a.m.
To help those within our com-


RELIGION


munity who are in need, there will be
a free clothes giveaway from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. today at Inverness
First United Methodist Church, 3896
S. Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness
(two miles south of Applebee's on
County Road 581). All types of cloth-
ing for women, men and children will
be available, including shoes.
The public is invited to come in
costume and enjoy a fun evening at
the "Purim Play & Party" at 6 p.m.
today at Temple Beth David, 13158
Antelope St., Spring Hill. There will
be refreshments and prizes. Call
352-686-7034.
The Annual North Suncoast
CROP WALK for Hunger, spon-
sored by the North Suncoast Minis-
terium and Church World Services,
is at 2 p.m. Sunday starting at First
Presbyterian Church,1501 S.E. U.S.
19 (near Sweetbay). Walkers from
area churches will walk a mile (north
on U.S. 19, around the block and
passing Cypress Cove Care Center,
ending back at First Presbyterian).
Of funds collected, 25 percent stay
in Citrus County, to be shared by
feeding programs in the Crystal
River area. Area residents are wel-


come to participate.
For Feinstein's 16th annual
$1 Million Giveaway to Fight
Hunger, Alan Shawn Feinstein will
add money to donations given to the
Beverly Hills Community Church's
Food Pantry. Donations must be re-
ceived from March 1 through April
30, and can include cash, checks
and/or food items. The more dona-
tions made to the food pantry, the
more Feinstein money will be added
to the donation. The next food distri-
bution at the church is from 11 a.m.
to noon and 6 to 7 p.m. Tuesday. To
qualify for assistance, you must be a
Beverly Hills resident and initially
register an identification and Social
Security number for each individual
in the household. Notify the church
office at 352-746-3620, by mail, or
stop by to make a reservation.
As part of World Day of Prayer,
Floral City United Methodist Church
will conduct a 24-hour prayer vigil
Friday. During prayer time, those
participating are encouraged to pray
for their personal concerns, those of
the community and the world. World
Day of Prayer is a worldwide ecu-
menical movement of Christian


women of some 170 countries, who
come together to observe the com-
mon day of prayer. It was founded
with the idea that prayer and action
are inseparable in the service of
God's kingdom. The church invites
anyone to join them with their prayer
concerns any time during the day.
Ladies, come to "The Well" for
refreshment and prophetic prayer
ministry at 7 p.m. the first Friday
monthly beginning March 1 at
FresHope Ministries, 2991 E. Thomas
St., Inverness. If you are hurting,
need to hear a word from God, and/or
spiritual growth and strength, then this
is the night just for you. Come com-
fortable and come expecting to re-
ceive. You will not leave the same
way you came in. If you desire prayer
and can't come to 'The Well," we will
schedule a phone call with you for
prayer. Call 352-341-4011 or visit
www.freshopeministries.com.
First United Methodist Church,
at 21501 W. State Road 40 in Dun-
nellon, will host a nine-week Dave
Ramsey Financial Peace Uni-
versity seminar beginning Sunday,
March 3. Classes will take place
from 3:30 to 5 p.m. Sunday in the


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013 C5

fellowship hall of the church. For
more information or to register, call
Rick DuCharme at 352-465-2142 or
the church office at 352-489-4026.
St. Benedict Council of Catholic
Women will host a women's retreat
with nationally known speaker and
award-winning author Patricia Liv-
ingston from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thurs-
day, March 7, in Hilgert Hall at St.
Benedict Catholic Church, 455 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River. Liv-
ingston is best known for her touch-
ing, storytelling style of illuminating
the presence of God in everyday life.
Cost to attend the retreat is $10 per
person, including lunch. All Catholic
women are invited. Seating is lim-
ited. For reservations and payment,
call Jolinda at 352-503-6108.
The next Blood Drive spon-
sored by the joint ministries of Our
Lady of Grace Church and the
Knights of Columbus Council 6168
is from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday,
March 16, at Our Lady of Grace
Parish Life Center, 6 Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills. A complimentary
continental breakfast will be avail-
able, as well as other tokens of
thanks for donors.


HUNGRY
Continued from Page Al

"There are a lot of (mid-
dle-class) people who are
feeling the pinch of the
economy in the last few
years. They were doing
OK, and then someone
gets hurt or loses their job,
and they're not doing, as
well as they used to."
The Rev. Derek C.
Weber, pastor of Alders-
gate United Methodist
Church in southwest Fort
Wayne, said that church is
in a similar situation.
When the congregation
started its Me-N'-U com-
munity dinner about two
years ago, congregation
members were surprised
at statistics gathered by
Jared Thompson, then a
high school student, who
advocated for starting the
program.
"We found the income
level in the neighborhood
surrounding the church
was significantly lower
than in the congregation,"
said Weber, who said the
effort continues to feed
about 100 people weekly
even though Thompson
has moved on to college.
"Most people who come
here walk, and we're on a
bus line, so some people
take the bus," Weber said.
"There are folks in need
who were very invisible to
us before we started doing
this program. It opened
eyes for people to see what
was in our own
neighborhood."
Area church leaders say
the feeding programs fill a
niche by augmenting
church food banks that
provide free take-home
groceries.
"I do think having a
cooked meal, a hearty
meal, is a blessing to
many people," said the
Rev. Jeffrey Lehn of First
Presbyterian Church
downtown, which offers a
free lunch at 11:30 a.m. on
the fourth Thursday of
each month.
Many attendees live
alone or have disabilities
and may not cook or weary
of cooking for themselves,
while others are appar-
ently homeless or are from
the Fort Wayne Rescue
Mission, he said.
Attendees can pick out
free clothing and play
bingo after lunch.
"We don't pretend it's a
perfect ministry It's small
and maybe not as frequent
as some would like," Lehn
said. "We hope it's valu-
able and a respite. and a
safe and reliable haven for
people in our community."
Church leaders say at-
tendees of free or low-cost
meals generally aren't re-
quired to be members or
attend services or other
church programs. How-
ever, some congregations
do offer prayer groups,
worship or Bible study in
conjunction with the
meals. Often, a pre-meal
prayer is offered.
But churches entertain-
ing the idea of starting a
meals ministry can't do it
lightly, area pastors and
health officials say
The ministry may seem
ideal for those with a
church building that in-
cludes a full kitchen. But
those who regularly feed
the public must get a per-
mit annually and be in-
spected by the health
department twice a year,
said Ann Applegate, direc-


tor of the Allen County
Health Department's food
and consumer protection
division.
Food preparation must
be done on-site or in an ap-
proved facility, and health
officials urge that at least
one volunteer be certified
in food safety.
"We don't want anyone
getting sick," she said.
Churches also supply a
ready stream of committed
volunteers. At Gethse-
mane Lutheran, it takes
about 20 people to shop,
cook meals, set up and
take down tables, wait on
attendees restaurant-style
and clean up.
"I'm here to tell you this
is a God-driven ministry,"
said Ruth Ann Wiegand, a
retired nurse and ministry
founder with a knowing
laugh. "Some weeks we
don't know what we're
going to do, and when
we're about to start to
serve, 10 honor students
from Northrop (High
School) come through the
back door and set up the
tables."
Churches also have to
come up with significant
money
Generally, food comes
from bulk and discount
groceries, the Community
Harvest Food Bank in Fort
Wayne and donations from
individuals and busi-
nesses. Gethsemane, for
example, gets surplus
baked goods for its 6 p.m.
Wednesday meals from a
nearby Starbucks, organiz-
ers say
Meuter said the pro-


Special

Event or

Weekly

Services

Please Call

Beverly at

564-2912

For

Advertising

Information



INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. Larry Powers
Senior Pastor
Sunday Services:
Traditional Service...........8:30
Sunday School.................9:30 AM
Contemporary Service.. .10:30 A
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes....................7:00 PM
Boys and Girls Brigade... .7:00 PM
Teens ................................. 7:00 PM
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy.41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726 4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"


gram costs about $1,000 a
month, and the money has
come from denomina-
tional grants and congre-
gational donations.
Attendees are not asked to
contribute, she said.
Aldersgate's Weber said a
second offering once a
month pays for the program.
"We have a congregation
that is really behind it," he
said. "We have some good
cooks in the congregation
who are able to buy and
prepare meals very inex-
pensively. The cost is re-
ally low, maybe a couple of
dollars (per meal) at
most."
At Gethsemane, Meuter
said the community meal
also feeds a need for com-
panionship.
"We realized that people
saw this as their Wednes-
day evening together," she
said. "I think it's filling
what you could call a lone-
liness need. Neighbors
brought neighbors, and
friends brought friends,
and now there are people
who sit at the same tables
and each week. People
just get really close."
Jenny Rosalez vouches
for that. She said her fam-
ily uses part of the "little
bit of gas money" left over
after paying for rent, utili-
ties and medical needs to
come to the dinners.
"It's humbling because I
had everything we needed
growing up, and now I'm at
that other end," she said.
"It's very comfortable
here. They're so nice."
And, she added: "The
food is really good."


NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH




"New Place New Time!"
SUNDAY
10:00 AM
Family Worship
(Coffee Fellowship 9:30-10:00)
WEDNESDAY
7:00 PM
Bible Study
(Fellowship 6:30-7:00pm)
We are a nondenominational church
meeting at the Realtor's Association Building.
714 S. Scarboro Ave.
(on the corner ofSR 44 & Scarboro)
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813

Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


GRACE
Continued from PageAl

"Humility and How I
Achieved It" than it is
about character
He told World magazine
he felt the need for such a
course because today's
college students are "hard
working and nice, but
they are inarticulate
about character"
In his course descrip-
tion (that can be found on
the Yale website), Brooks
writes: "Everyone says
character is important to
leadership but few people
know how to build it. This
course will survey one
character-building tradi-
tion, one that emphasizes
modesty and humility.
"The strategies covered
here start from a similar
premise that human
beings are blessed with
many talents but are also
burdened by sinfulness,
ignorance and weakness.
Character emerges from
the internal struggles
against one's own
limitations."
As part of the class re-
quirements, Brooks spells
out cheating and plagia-
rism are not allowed.
He added, "If you do
not understand or are un-
certain about what consti-
tutes cheating or
plagiarism, please ask."
Seriously, what college
student doesn't
know what constitutes
cheating?
The day after the World


Our Lady of

Fatima

CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy, 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
SWeekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30- 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June- August)
\ 9:00 and 11:00 A.M.
726-1670

F I47 Years of
IRST Bringing Christ
FIRST B
FIRST to Inverness

LUTHERAN

CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am

Sunday School
& Bible Class
S9:00 AM.
726-1637
S Missouri Synod
www. 1 stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


magazine story about the
Yale humility course
came out, World posted a
story about a new study
suggesting "most college
freshmen think they're
better than their peers,
and better than they re-
ally are."
According to the annual
American College Survey,
psychologist Jean Twenge
found "college freshmen
are more likely to be self-
centered and possess un-
earned self-confidence
than at any time in the last
four decades."
Twenge said it's a result
of three decades of the
Self-Esteem Movement
telling kids how wonder-
ful they are in an effort to
combat issues such as
teen pregnancy, suicide
and violence. However,
instead of the rate of
these issues going down,
it has increased.
If you doubt that, just
watch an episode of the
"My Super Sweet 16" real-
ity documentaries on
MTV which document the
mega-thousands spent on
sweet 16 birthday parties
and the excess these teens
expect and demand.
Twenge calls it a narcis-
sism epidemic. We are
raising a world full of ego-
maniacs, a generation of
people who believe they
are entitled to the best of
everything because that's
what they have been told.
That's why Yale is offer-
ing a course on humility.
But before we who are
not necessarily of the cur-
rent narcissistic genera-


V II

in


At

Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Smnu.,, Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"Aplace to I 'a" I h1 ,,,' i


tion start shaking our fin-
gers in judgment, humil-
ity, or the lack of it, isn't a
new problem. It's intrinsic
to every one of us, al-
though it manifests itself
in different ways.
The person who refuses
charity from others is just
as "unhumble" as the per-
son who believes the
world owes him whatever
he wants. "Worm theol-
ogy" taking pleasure in
thinking of yourself as
lowly and wretched is
just as unbiblical as think-
ing too highly of yourself.
They're both rooted in
pride because they're
both me-centric.
As for learning humility
from a class, I'm not sure
you can. For Christians, I
think true humility comes
when we believe our-
selves to be simultane-
ously deeply flawed but in
Christ dearly loved.
Jesus told his followers,
"Blessed are the poor in
spirit" (Matthew 5:3).
Blessed, happy, spiritu-
ally prosperous are those
who know their true con-
dition and they're true
worth. Nothing more and
nothing less.

Nancy Kennedy is the au-
thor of "Move Over Victo-
ria I Know the Real
Secret," "Girl on a
Swing," and her latest
book, "Lipstick Grace."
She can be reached at
352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday or via
email at nkennedy@
chronicleonline. com.


5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
SMiles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM

Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! l

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS


) I



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(rossl
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ad


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Special to the Chronicle

Chris Moling, owner of TMC Pro-
ductions and DRC Sports, will be
guest of honor for the fifth annual
Roast 'n Toast fundraiser hosted by
the Nature Coast Chapter of the
Florida Public Relations Associa-
tion Friday, March 8, at Citrus Hills
Golf and Country Club.
Attendees of this year's circus-
themed event can expect a night of


laughter and tears, rumors and
hearsay, bad humor, good stories,
strange comments and entertaining
anecdotes. Roasters in attendance
will include roastmaster and ring-
leader Frank DiGiovanni, along with
Pati Smith, Deputy David "Pasta"
DeCarlo and Sam Himmel.
Additionally, a champagne toast
will honor the Public Relations Pro-
fessional of the Year. All proceeds
from the event enhance the public


COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

n teRoasting, toasting
Conn. retirees
to meet Feb. 26


The Connecticut State
Employees Association -
Retirees Chapter 422,
North Central Florida, will
have its annual meeting
from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 26, at Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club,
505 E. Hartford St.,
Hernando.
Cost is $8.80 for mem-
bers and $13.80 for guests.
Meal choices are London
broil, Swiss chicken or
tilapia. A Council 400 repre-
sentative will report on the
status of efforts to improve
retiree benefits. Anthem
Blue Cross/Blue Shield will
report on medical programs
and dental and pharmaceu-
tical representatives
will speak.
A door prize will be
awarded after the pro-
grams. Call Jim Carper at
352-726-3545 for more
information.
Coin Club to
meet Feb. 25
The Beverly Hills Coin
Club will meet at 5:30 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 25, at the
Central Ridge Library in
Beverly Hills.
There are no dues. The
club's purpose is to bring
local coin collectors to-
gether and for numismatic
education. For details, call
Joe at 352-527-2868.
Shrimp alfredo on
menu at post
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 155, Crystal River, will
serve a shrimp alfredo din-
ner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Fri-
day, Feb. 27, at the post
home, 6585 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway.
Everyone is welcome to
come and enjoy the pasta
dinner for a donation of $7.
All profits support the
programs of the American
Legion Auxiliary. For infor-
mation, call 352-249-7663.
All invited to
Pickin' Party
All are invited to an
Acoustic Bluegrass and
Old-time Pickin' Party be-
ginning at 1 p.m. Sunday,
Feb. 24, at Nature's Resort
on Halls River Road in
Homosassa.
The Pickin' Party is
staged every Sunday. The
event is free.


Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA


Special to the Chronicle
Jem and Scout are two of
the cutest, chubby little
kittens you will find. They
would love to bring some
playful coziness to your
home. If, however, you
are looking for a more
mature feline, all our
adult cat adoption fees
are presently half price at
$27.50. Visitors are wel-
come from 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m.
Monday through Satur-
day at the Humanitari-
ans' Manchester House
on the corner of State
Road 44 and Conant Av-
enue, east of Crystal
River. Drop by and enjoy
our felines in their cage-
free, homestyle environ-
ment. Call the
Humanitarians at 352-
613-1629 for adoptions,
or view most of the
Hardin Haven's felines
online at www.pet
finder.com/shelters/fl18
6.html.


Al welcome to sign upfor classes


Special to the Chronicle

Crystal River Users
Group invites the public to
sign up for its upcoming
classes.
Greeting Cards using
Word 2010 with Lynn Page,
9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mon-
day, March 4. The focus of
the class is on creating
personalized cards ready
to print and mail. Also
learn to create cards to
email to even those who do
not use Word. Cost is $10
for members; $15 for non-
members.
Corel PaintShop Pro
X5 Single Click Fixes
and Effects with Lynn
Page, 9:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. Monday, March


11. Corel PaintShop Pro
X5's powerful photo-
editing tools, new instant
effects and enhanced
HDR technology make
creating stunning photo
projects easier than ever.
New tools include face
recognition technology
and the ability to map pho-
tos to actual locations. Go
to corel.com for a trial ver-
sion. Cost is $10 for mem-
bers; $15 for nonmembers.
Office Web Apps with
Lynn Page from 9:30 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. Monday,
March 18. Thes class offers
a brief overview and look
at using Microsoft Office
Web Apps. With a Windows
Live ID you have access to
Microsoft's Office Web


relations profession by making
scholarships, training grants and ac-
creditation rebates possible for
Citrus and Hernando counties'
public relations professionals and
students.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m.; dinner
and program begin at 7 p.m. Tickets
are $75 and table sponsorships are
available. Call 352-344-6501 or email
kmehl@citrusmh.org for tickets and
information.


Apps and so can create,
open, edit and share Word,
Excel and PowerPoint
documents online using
SkyDrive. Work with docu-
ments from any computer,
whether it has the Office
applications installed or
not. Cost is $10 for mem-
bers; $15 for nonmembers.
Photoshop Elements
with Laura Boetto from
1 to 3:30 p.m. Thursday,
March 7, 14 and 21. Learn
to create greeting cards for
any occasion in any color
and with any design. It's
easy and fun. Participants
need a version of Photo-
shop Elements on a laptop
computer. Printed tutori-
als are available with the
class. Cost is $25 for mem-
bers; $35 for nonmembers.
PowerPoint with Car-
olyn Ohlmeyer from


9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mon-
day, March 25. PowerPoint
is a Microsoft program and
many computer users al-
ready have the program
installed. Interesting
slideshows can easily be
created and shared. Cost is
$10 for members; $15 for
nonmembers.
Windows 7 Basic from
9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mon-
days, April 1 and 8. This is
a basic class for students
who wish to review Win-
dows 7. The classes will
cover tasks commonly
used in Windows 7. Cost is
$20 for members; $25 for
nonmembers.
Go to wwwcrug.com to
sign up for classes and for
more information. CRUG
meets at Crystal Oaks Club
House, 4958 W Crystal
Oaks Blvd., Lecanto.




Watercolor
workshop

Yankeetown hosted a
five-day workshop by
internationally known
watercolorist Tony Couch
at the Yankeetown/Inglis
Lion's Club, Feb. 4 through
8. The 35 participants
hailed from as far away as
New York, New Jersey,
Maryland, Massachusetts,
Michigan, Illinois,
Nebraska, Kentucky,
Alabama, Georgia and
southern Florida, as well
as the local area (Ocala,
Dunnellon, Homosassa,
Inverness, Crystal River,
Inglis and Yankeetown).
Yankeetown artist Patricia
Candela coordinated the
workshop.

MARSHA DREW/
Special to the Chronicle


Public relations group to honor Chris Moling at fndraiser


call Norm or Alice at 352-
860-2981 or 352-476-2134.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.


Pilots promoting Playground Project


News NOTES

Masons to serve
fried fish dinner
Floral City Masonic
Lodge will have a fish fry
from 3 to 6 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 23.
On the menu are all-you-
can-eat fish, french fries,
coleslaw, hushpuppies,
beans, dessert and
beverage.
Donation is $8.
Writers learn
about love scenes
Romance writers looking
to amp up their love scenes
are welcome to the Satur-
day, Feb. 23, meeting of
the Sunshine State Ro-
mance Authors from 10
a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Ho-
mosassa Library, 4100 S.
Grandmarch Ave., in the
Community Room.
Erotic romance author
Evangeline Anderson will
be guest speaker. With
more than 60 romance
novels published, she will
share her expertise with
area romance authors with
her presentation of the "12
Rules for Writing a Love
Scene."
SSRA welcomes new
members and anyone inter-
ested in writing and becom-
ing published may attend.
For more information,
visit www.sunshinestate
romanceauthors.com.
Meet experienced
business leaders
All interested young pro-
fessionals are invited to
meet with experienced
business leaders at the Cit-
rus County Chamber of
Commerce's Business
Leaders of Tomorrow Feb-
ruary membership drive
event from 6 to 8 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 28, at Sun-
coast Plumbing & Electric.
Business Leaders of To-
morrow will provide oppor-
tunities to young
professionals ages 21 to 40
advancing in Citrus County
to make connections to
help business throughout
2013. Refreshments and
drinks will be served at the
meet-and-greet event.
Suncoast Plumbing &
Electric is at 6970 W.
Grover Cleveland Blvd.,
Homosassa. Reservations
are requested by calling
Keith Pullias at 352-
795-3149.
British American
Club to gather
It has been said Britain
and America speak a com-
mon language, but knowing
the meaning of such ex-
pressions as brolly, lift or
loo can be puzzling.
The British American
Club has a speaker who
will clarify this and other
terms at its Monday, Feb.
25, meeting at 7 p.m. in the
Holiday Inn Express, 903
Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Inverness. Claudine
Dervaes has been in the
travel industry for 37 years
and published 16 books for
travel education. She will
enlighten the group on our
different vocabulary.
The club meets the
fourth Monday monthly.
Refreshments are served.
Visit www.britamclub.
com, or call Judi Matthews
at 352-527-2581.
Come jam
with Post 77
American Legion Allen
Rawls Post 77 will host
John Thomas and the
Ramblin' Fever Band on
Friday, March 1, featuring a
jam, from 6 to 9 p.m. at the
post home at 4375 Little Al
Point, Inverness.
The jams will be the first
and third Fridays monthly.
Finger food and soft drinks
will be available. All musi-
cians are welcome.
For more information,


Special to the Chronicle
The members of the Gulf to Lakes Pilot Club donated $3,000 to CREST School's Playground Project on Feb. 12. From
left are: Jeanne Kirk, Melanie Howard, Kelly Dougherty, Mindy Thompson, Pat Scarcliff, Karen Ryan, Gail Drange,
Jeanmarie Patterson and CREST principal Richard Hilgert. This is an extensive project spearheaded by the staff at
CREST to make a new playground accessible to all special-needs students ages 5 to 21, many of whom have mo-
bility issues that make using regular playground equipment difficult or impossible. The Gulf to Lakes Pilot Club is an
international organization whose mission is to raise funds to support local organizations that deal with children and
adults afflicted with brain injuries and brain-related disorders. For more information on donating to the Playground
Project, call CREST at 352-527-0303. For information, or to become a member of the Gulf to Lakes Pilot Club, call
Jeanmarie Patterson at 352-746-1135.



Learn new skills on computer






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
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Opening lead: V Q

Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Carl Hiaasen, a columnist and novelist, said,
"My books are shelved in different places, de-
pending on the bookstore. Sometimes they can
be found in the Mystery section, sometimes in
the Humor department, and occasionally even
in the Literature aisle, which is somewhat as-
tounding."
At the bridge table, we try to find lines of play
or defense that are favorites to succeed. We ac-
commodate likely distributions. However, occa-
sionally we must allow for an unlikely scenario
to maximize our chances.
In this example, South is in three no-trump.
West leads the heart queen. What is the best de-
fense? How should South then try to make his
contract?
First, East must overtake with his heart king
at trick one. South will duck, hoping the king is
a singleton, but East returns his second heart.
Let's assume declarer plays low again. West
wins and leads a third heart, East discarding a
spade. South starts with seven top tricks: three
spades, one heart, two diamonds and one club.
The other two winners obviously will come from
the club suit. But if West gets on play with the
club king, he will cash his last two hearts to de-
feat the contract
Declarer must work to keep West off the lead.
After winning the third trick, South should
play a spade to the board, then lead the club
queen, encouraging East to cover if he has the
king. But when East plays low, South should put
up his ace.
If the king does not fall, declarer leads an-
other club, hoping East has to take the trick.
Here, though, the king tumbles (a priori, 6.22
percent) and declarer claims 11 tricks.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
I MEOGA


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Do you have 0,,,u -
asugar cube ,,llr
I could I
borrow? 0












THE HORSE IN THE
BARN WERE ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer T S 'Y_."hr
here:
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: TRAWL ORBIT AGENCY PULPIT
e Answer: He wasn't sure if he could give all his fortune to charity
upon his death, but he was WILLING TO TRY


ACROSS
1 Prevails
5 Form for
gelatin
9 Today
12 Valhalla host
13 Chew on
14 Famous Khan
15 Bread spread
16 Wooed
18 Interior
designs
20 Jobs for
actors
21 Nerve network
22 Kenya's loc.
23 Baker's need
26 Speck of dust
30 Andy Capp's
wife
33 Conduit
34 Lake swimmer
35 Charged
particles
37 Boulevard
39 Bridal notice
word


40 The two of
them
41 Heart
chambers
43 Stomach
muscles
45 Aspirin unit
48 Troll's kin
51 Term papers
53 Made public
56 Enticement
57 Wow
58 Soft drink
59 Great Lake
60 Geog. feature
61 Mia of
soccer
62 Fire

DOWN
1 Fireplace fuel
2 Slacker
3 Brother's
daughter
4 Stuck up
5 Execs
6 Yoko -


Answer to Previous Puzzle


VAN NOIG IB M
CO TES UHS D UD
EN TR Y MIOIU SE RS
DRAB IMAGE


LBA S UN ST- L A
LASM P EAK FLA W
ORES IRKS IDA
PSST LOIN VI I1

RECUR ARCH
UMPTEEN KOANS
TIA CRO SUPER
SRS TAN LEVI


7 Hasty escape
8 Tower over
9 Salt's formula
10 Type of arch
11 Rolls of
money


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


2-23


17 Benchmarks
19 Bulrush
22 Rose oil
24 Mystiques
25 Glasgow
citizen
27 Buy
28 kwon do
29 Compass pt.
30 Stretch the
truth
31 London lav
32 Toronto's
prov.
36 Disgrace
38 Ice cream
servings
42 Supermarket
lanes
44 Vacation spot
46 Writer -
Ingalls Wilder
47 Song part
48 Lab weight
49 Ex-Speaker
Gingrich
50 Bakery fixture
51 Party tray
cheese
52 Try to locate
54 Mauna -
55 Shade tree


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
* Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


earAnnie: I always felt
that my mother and I
were inseparable. I
never thought I would be
blessed to marry a wonderful
man and that it would damage
our relationship, but it did.
My mom has had
a great influence on
my life for 32 years,
but this had to end.
She only developed
a problem with my
then-boyfriend
when she saw that
it was serious. She
tried everything to
break us up, includ-
ing having him in-
vestigated. She told
me he was "no
good." I chose to ANN
pray and follow my MAIL
heart and not listen
to her. I'm happy I
did. I couldn't ask for a better
husband.
Mom did not come to my
wedding and refuses to come
to my house, saying I chose a
man over her. But, Annie, I
cannot allow her to continue
to be so disrespectful of my
husband. Please tell your
readers that trying to control
your children will only push
them away and create resent-
ment. My mom centered her
life around me and now feels
lost.
I'm still struggling to adjust
to not having her in my life,
but I refuse to leave my hus-
band to make her happy I
have made great choices. I
completed graduate school
and have a terrific career.
Many mothers would love to
have a daughter and son-in-
law like us. Is there anything I
can do? Missing My Mother
but Loving My Husband
Dear Missing: Your


mother's jealousy has clouded
her thinking, and instead of a
close, warm relationship with
you, your husband and your
future children, she has iso-
lated herself in bitterness. We
hope you will give her the op-
portunity to get past
this, although it
may take time and a
good deal of for-
giveness on your
part. Continue to
periodically reach
out to her, inviting
her to your home
with the under-
standing that she
must treat your
husband with de-
cency Over time,
IE'S we suspect she will
.BOX miss you enough to
make the effort.
DearAnnie: I live
in a rural residential area that
gets a lot of snow. Is there any
tactful way to word an invita-
tion to an open house that asks
guests not to wear street shoes
in the house?
The last time we had a party,
only one person was consider-
ate enough to remove dirty
shoes. We love to entertain
friends, but really don't care
for the snow, sand and salt
from the road tracked all over
our hardwood floors and ori-
ental rugs. Suggestions Ap-
preciated
Dear Suggestions: It is per-
fectly OK to ask your guests to
remove their shoes at the door,
especially if you provide
comfy little slippers for them
to wear. You also should place
doormats both inside and out-
side your front door so guests
can wipe their feet However,
if someone refuses to take off
his or her shoes, please wel-
come them into your home re-


gardless. Hardwood floors can
be cleaned, and oriental rugs
can be rolled up and put aside.
Dear Annie: This is in re-
sponse to "Midwest Cook,"
who can't believe that chil-
dren are truly picky eaters.
She says the fault lies with
permissive parents.
My husband and I followed
a similar tactic for years with
our four children. They either
ate what we cooked, or they
went without. The result was
often bitter frustration for
everyone involved, as well as
utter shock on the part of
those not familiar with our
methods.
In spite of that, two of our
now-adult children are still
genuinely picky eaters. Please
don't assume parents aren't
doing their jobs. Frustrated
Cook
Dear Frustrated: You are
right that some kids never out-
grow their aversion to certain
foods, but we hope parents
will encourage more adven-
turous eating habits.
-

Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcastnet, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 7373rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and car-
toonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www creators. com.


ENTERTAINMENT


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013 C7


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C8 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013

Peanuts

HERE'S THE ORLDP IELL, CHAPs, YOU DIDNLr
WAR I PILOT RETURNING THINK I'D MAKE IT, DID OU?
TO HIS qADRON THERE,THERE...I KNOi) YOU
AFTER BEIN6 5HOT DON WERE WORRIED, BUTDON'T
BYTHEREDBARON" / CARRY ON....PLEASE...


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Garfield


HERE'S THE PILOT LYING
IN HIS BUNK MAKING
A SOLEMN AND
DETERMINED VOW...





2 23


SOMEDAY I'LL 6ET
YOU, RED BARON!


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


Beetle Bailey


Dilbert

OUR ENGINEERS
BUILT A NUCLEAR
ROCKET TO BLAST AN
INCOMING ASTEROID
OUT OF ITS COLLISION
COURSE WITH EARTH.


BUT WE DIDN'T USE THE
APPROVED CORPORATE
FONT ON THE NOSE CONE
AND WE MISSED THE
LAUNCH LINDOLW
TRYING TO
ERASE n
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NOW WHAT WELL,
ARE WE THE MOON
GOING TO HAS
DO WITH ALWAYS
A NUCLEAR BEEN A
ROCKET? JERK.


The Grizzwells


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Kit 'N' Carlyle


I KNOW-5--E.TOL U>E. 5HE'S
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Rubes


Blondie
GUESS WHAT, HONEY? I GOT SOME
G 1RL SCOUT COOKIES FOR YOUV


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Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


With each failed doomsday prediction,
Chicken Little was reminded that the world
had not come to an end, though at times
she wished it had.


2-2 ILA
www famljyclrcus c rn
"Mommy, I'm ready if you're
cooking anything that
needs a good stirring. "


Doonesbury


Big Nate

LGORDIE, MY MAN'
HI. NATE! IS
ELLEN HERE?
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Arlo and Janis

WHAT I WITH THE
COMMERCIALS THESE DAYSM'


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REPLACE "'''
BYAN IR-
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FOR TACOS.





__ / _


Today ysMOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Snitch" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"Escape from Planet Earth" (PG) In 3D. 1:45
p.m., 7:45 p.m. No passes.
"Escape from Planet Earth" (PG) 4:45 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"Safe Haven" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15
p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"A Good Day to Die Hard" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:40
p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Beautiful Creatures" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7
p.m., 10 p.m.
"Identity Thief" (R) ID required. 1:25 p.m., 4:25
p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:10 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Dark Skies" (PG-13) 2 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 8 p.m.,
10:2 5p.m.


"Snitch" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:05 p.m.
"Escape from Planet Earth" (PG) In 3D. 1:25
p.m., 7:05 p.m. No passes.
"Escape from Planet Earth" (PG) 4:20 p.m.,
9:45 p.m.
"Beautiful Creatures" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:05
p.m., 7 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"Safe Haven" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10
p.m., 10 p.m.
"A Good Day to Die Hard" (R) 1:55 p.m., 4:40
p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Side Effects" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:45
p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Identity Thief" (R) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:30
p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Warm Bodies" (PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 4:35 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:05 p.m.


Betty

I THINK I' GOING BTTY,
TO TRY OUTING WHEAT IT JUST
OUT OF MY DIET AND QUACKERY
SEE HOW I FaEa.



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TIT'S SUPPOSEPTO
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SCIENTIFIC PROOF
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Frank & Ernest


WJUF-FM90.1 National Public L alRADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: r slenba yV


"EGEKBY EKL YJ SZZLPLYYEKC,


RLPESYL N HDNZU GL OLH YJ WSPD


JSH JX JSK GJKU MSYH RC BJNZO NH."


ZEHEINL AJKHWEZ

Previous Solution: "Make sure you are doing what God wants you to do then
do it with all your strength." George Washington
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 2-23


Pickles


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COMICS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Humane Society opens thrift store


Special to the Chronicle

The Humane Society of Citrus
County has a new thrift store
open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fri-
days and Saturdays.
All funds from items sold sup-
port the pet shelter and rescue


at 751 S. Smith Ave. in Inverness.
Those with gently used house-
hold items that are no longer
needed are welcome to donate.
Bring items to the shelter during
business hours, from 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Tuesday through Saturday,
or call Karron at 352-560-0051 to


make other arrangements.
Items must be clean and in
good repair (no clothing, please).
Crafters are also welcome to do-
nate items for sale, and the soci-
ety will display contact
information should someone
want to place an order.
The Humane Society of Citrus
County is a nonprofit corpora-
tion dedicated to the protection


of all animals, and has been op-
erating in Citrus County for
more than 30 years. It is not as-
sociated with or receiving fund-
ing from any other humane
society, local or national, and is
not associated with Citrus
County Animal Services. It is
supported through donations.
If anyone would like to help
the shelter where rescues are


being housed until they can be
placed in new homes, there are
many items needed on a daily
basis that could be donated any
time. Some of the items that are
always needed are paper towels,
liquid laundry detergent,
bleach, household cleaners and
blankets or quilts for the ani-
mals to sleep on. For more infor-
mation, call 352-341-2222.


News NOTES


All welcome at
Spirit of the Bear
Doug Pawis, an elder of the
Anishnabe Tradition, will con-
duct the Spirit of the Bear
Ceremony from 4 to 6 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 24, at the
Crystal River Archaeological
State Park.
The ceremonial feast is a
two-hour program conducted
in February during a full moon
to honor the birth of bears.
Everyone is welcome at the
educational presentation.
No photographs will be al-
lowed during the ceremony.
The park is at 3400 N.
Museum Pointe, Crystal
River, just north of the Crystal
River Mall. Drive north on
U.S. 19 and turn left onto
State Park Street.

Conn. retirees to
meet Feb. 26
The Connecticut State Em-
ployees Association Re-
tirees Chapter 422, North
Central Florida, will have its
annual meeting from 11 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 26, at
Citrus Hills Golf & Country
Club, 505 E. Hartford St.,
Hernando.
Cost is $8.80 for members
and $13.80 for guests. Meal
choices are London broil,
Swiss chicken or tilapia. A
Council 400 representative
will report on the status of ef-
forts to improve retiree bene-
fits. Anthem Blue Cross/Blue


Shield will report on medical
programs and dental and
pharmaceutical representa-
tives will speak.
Adoor prize will be
awarded after the programs.
Call Jim Carper at 352-726-
3545 for more information.

Crystal Oaks group
to have Tricky Tray
Crystal Oaks Civic Associa-
tion will host a Tricky Tray
fundraiser Saturday, March 2,
at the clubhouse, 4858 Crys-
tal Oaks Drive. Doors open at
11:30 a.m. and the drawings
will be at 1 p.m.
There will be a good selec-
tion of different baskets with
contents valued at $25 or
more, as well as raffles. A do-
nation of $4 will provide a
sheet of 20 tickets, which are
placed into baskets of choice
for a chance to win.
For more information, call
Hedda at 352-527-8144.

Make your wishes
known to loved ones
Hospice of Citrus County
Wings Community Education
will present a free workshop
to examine America's most
popular living will "Five
Wishes." The workshop will
be at 2 p.m. Tuesday, Feb.
26, at the Wings Education
Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle
Lane, Suite A, Homosassa.
"Five Wishes" is written in
everyday language and helps


start and structure important
conversations about care in
times of serious illness. It
helps you express how you
want to be treated if you are
seriously ill and unable to
speak for yourself. "Five
Wishes" also addresses per-
sonal, spiritual and emotional
wishes. It is a legal document
in 42 states across the nation,
including Florida.
Jonathan Beard, Wings
Grief services manager, will
moderate the presentation.
He will provide documents to
each participant and offer
helpful hints in filling them out.
"Five Wishes" is open to
the public and reservations
are suggested. Call Lynn
Miller at 352-621-1500.
Join seniors
for some fun
Are you looking for some
fun? Why not join the Seniors
on the Move? Three coordina-
tors cover most of Citrus
County and provide a calen-
dar of events every month, in-
cluding trips to the movies,
wildlife parks, boat trips,
lunch, theater and more.
The group is sponsored by
the Senior Foundation of Cit-
rus County and also does
trips, open to everyone, not
just Seniors on the Move pa-
trons. Everyone is welcome at
next event to Tarpon Springs
March 9. Tickets are $45 in-
clude bus ride, a visit to an
antique car show, lunch at a


local Greek restaurant, and
free time at the sponge docks.
Or how about a Day at the
Races a trip to Tampa Bay
Downs Saturday, April 6. Tick-
ets are $48 and include bus
ride, admission to the race
track with reserved seating,
program and buffet lunch.
To find out how you can be
a part of the group, call Sue at
352-527-5959.
Timeshare owners
convene in Sarasota
The Florida Timeshare
Owners Group will meet at 1
p.m. Sunday, March 3, Sun-
day in the Champs Room of
the Palm Aire Country Club,
5601 Country Club Way,
Sarasota.
Three speakers are
planned: Tom Tubbs, presi-
dent and owner of Island Re-
alty Consulting, and
co-founder of the Licensed
Timeshare Resale Brokers
Association; Charles An-
drews, vice president, busi-
ness development of
Defender Resorts Inc; and
Lisa Ann Schreier, director of
Timeshare Insights and au-
thor of a number of books on
timeshare vacation owner-
ship. An unlimited discussion
session will follow each
speaker, as well as a general
roundtable discussion on top-
ics of interest to members.
For more information, email
Frank Debar at fdebar433
@gmail.com.


Thinkers meet
March 9 at park
New Age Thinkers will meet
at 2 p.m. Saturday, March 9,
at Ellie Schiller Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park in
the Florida Room.
Guest speaker will be Patri-
cia Wagner, a certified Quan-
tum-Touch practitioner and
instructor, Intrinsic Coach and
agent of conscious evolution.
She is the owner of Grace
Unlimited Inc. and founder of
www.LookingforLight.net. Her
presentation will be "Looking
for Light: A Game of Joyful
Expectation."
Everyone is invited.
For information, call Donna
at 352-628-3253, or email
miss-donna@tampabay.
rr.com.

Center offers free
quilting classes
Free quilting classes are of-
fered from 9 a.m. to noon
Thursday at the Tri County
Community Association Cen-
ter, 28444 Forbes St., Noble-
ton (the old Nobleton
Firehouse).
The classes are offered to
everyone experienced and
inexperienced. Instructors will
help you get started and show
how it's done. If you know
what you are doing and just
wish to hang out and sew with
others who love quilting, bring
quilting materials and join the
group. You will need to pro-


vide your own materials for
sewing and a sewing
machine.
If you don't know what
you'll need, come to the class
and instructors will help get
you started. For more infor-
mation, call Marge at 352-
568-0216.

Boutique needs
donations to sell
The "Second to None" Bou-
tique at the Yankeetown-lnglis
Woman's Club needs dona-
tions of housewares.
Gently used men's and
women's clothing is also al-
ways welcome. Donations
can be dropped by the club-
house at 5 56th St., Yankee-
town, or call Joan at
352-443-1125.

Learn ballroom
dancing in March
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation and Dr. Fred Spur-
lock offers ballroom dancing
classes at the Citrus County
Canning Center in Lecanto.
Spurlock has been trained
at the Arthur Murray studios
outside Baltimore, and
teaches rumba, fox trot, waltz,
cha-cha and swing. Begin-
ners and intermediate
dancers are welcome.
Lessons are from 6:30 to
7:30 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Cost is $5 for sin-
gles or $7 for a couple. For in-
formation, call 352-465-7007.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


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Need A Friend
with same interests
Retired Oriental Lady
No smoking,drinking
or drugs. Healthy
will share
Tsai P.0, Box 895
Waldo, Fl. 32694

#1 Employment source is

www.chronicleonline.com


Tom's Pinochle Club
Looking for some good
players to fill in on
Thursday nights. If
interested please call
352-527-9632.



#1 Professional Leaf
vac system why rake?
FULL Lawn Service
Free Est 352-344-9273


2 POWER LIFT
CHAIR RECLINERS
1 Med. size $250.
1 Large $325
Both excel., runs great
(352) 270-8475

8 pc Oak King
Bedroom Suite, 10'
wall & Pier and two
etagere's, dresser, mir-
ror, chest & armoire, pd
$6000, sacrifice $1500
765-748-4334


OOODVNQ
Sudoku ****** 4puz.com

65 2

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8 4

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3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through






ip to $20 vu 120m







www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com
Intlaiosb53853i winds 1 A


m -4 4 v- -" .628-7519


'FREE- i S
Permit And -.T
I Engineering Fees V
Up to $200 value .....

,Siding-Soffit -Fascia.-Skirting.-RoefoverCarports -Screen Rooms.-Decks-Windows.-Door.Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


2002 Ford F 150 Sport
4X4 Super Cab 4 Dr,
Auto, Black, 5.4 V8,
Runs Great. $5500
(352) 257-3894 Cell
(352) 794-6069 Office
48" Round Oak
Pedestal Tble $90
& 6 drawer wooden
desk $50
352-726-5159
Antique Wooded
Tool Box
Loaded with Machinist
tools $400
352-344-1713
Beverly Hills Rental
1/1 with carport, $500
mthy and $500
Security deposit.
352-249-6098
Buick Century
Custom, 57k mi, extra
clean, full power. Runs
excellent $4500
(352) 257-3894 Cell
(352) 794-6069 Office
CHEVY VETTE,
02 Convert. Royal Blue,
Saddle oak int. 16k mi,
Gar, Mint, $23,900 obo
call 352-489-1700
CITRUS
SPRINGS
Saturday Only,
8am-?
MANY $1 ITEMS
2288 W. Nautilus Dr
CLUB CAR. 2006
w/ Charger, good
tires, almost new bat-
teries, garage kept
$1500 must sell
352-527-3125
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 Sm house incl.
electric. $475 per mo.
1st/last/sec. References
352-628-1062
CUSTOM APAAR-15
RIFLE /APA bullet
lower (7075 T651 alumi-
num), Rock Creek SS
hand lapped 20" barrel
1:8 twist, fluted, Daniel
Defense upper,bolt car-
rier group, and 7" AR
Lite rail, Magpul CTR
adjustable stock,
SureFire muzzle
brake/FAsuppressor
attachment, $2500.00
OBO Call 352-344-9482
LV message
Deacon's Bench
Made from Hatch Cover
of 1900 Sailing Vessel,
Originally sold at Aber-
crombie & Fitch in NYC
$300 352-746-0100


CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat, Sun 8:30 to 4:30
8378 W. Admiral Byrd
Ln, by Bicentenial Pk
ECLIPSE ELLIPTICAL
space saver exercise
like new, $150
352-422-0311
EXPERIENCED
SERVERS
Old World Restaurant
Floral City, apply in
person (352) 344-4443

For SaleBoI
FLORAL CITY
Exceptionally Nice
3/2 on Beautiful 1% AC,
treed lot, garage, shed,
dock, Ideal for Fishing/
Airboats $95,900
716-523-8730
FLORAL CITY
Saturday & Sun. 7A-2P
9659 S. Buckskin Ave.
INVERNESS
CLOSING SALE *
CRAFTY LADY
Publix/KMart Shopp-
ing Cntr, Hwy41
Bargain's Galore
344-4800 10a-5p
2/23-3/1
Motorized Recliner
King sizeblack vinyl
rocker/recliner,
7 mo old, $400
(352) 489-6341
Old Black & White
Snapshot and/or
photos (269) 275-4698
SMITH & WESSON
.357 Highway Patrol-
man. Model #28,
6" barrel, like new, in
original box. $475
(352) 423-0289
Solid Oak kitchen oval
pedestal table 58x39
w/6 chairs $175;
X-wide cushioned
wicker chair & foot-
stool, 4 pillows, $125
(352) 425-0667
Sugarmill Woods
2006,4/2/2, appl. inc.
$900, 319-371-9843
TREADMILL,
WESLO, Crosswalk
5.0t,like new, $150
Call 561-234-0535
TRUNDLE BED
w/ 2 mattress'
$195; double mattress
w/ box spring & frame.
Like new, $175
(352) 586-0493
Twin Hide-A-Bed
brown tweed
exc. cond. $100
765-748-4334


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087



BLACK LAB MIX
Female, 3/2 yrs old
581bs, spade,
microchipped, crate
trained, no cats or sml
children, call or text
352-895-1336
DOG, MIXED BREED
must be only dog.
352-445-6368 or
352-564-0595
FLOAT PONTOON
no motor, no trailer
needs some work
pls call 859-229-5667
or eve's 352-447-4485
FREE West Highland
(westy Terrier) White,
female 5yrs old, owner
passed away must give
up dog. Good with dogs
and children, Spayed
Call Thomas
352-249-4404
Large 3 Tiered
fountain, needs new
pump. First come, first
serve.(352) 746-2210
Plastic Laundry Tub
no faucets
352-476-7973



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077



Black Labrador lost
on W Homosassa Tr
close to Rock Crusher
2/20 evening. 8 yrs
old, neutered. Ans to
Clyde, gentle dog
(352) 476-7947


Retriever, about 1% yrs
old, answers to "Buddy",
lost in vicinity of
W. Dunnellon Rd.
Owner is heartbroken.
(352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662
Crystal River &
Homosassa Springs
area, lost gold St. Pe-
tersburg Times award
ring, green stone
863 697 6772.
Please be an honest
person....At library in
Bev Hills evening of
2/18/13, left red/white
usb drive in computer "r
vanslette" written in ink,
pictures and files on
drive..please return
352-364-1771



Cat Found
male, orange tabby
strips, very friendly
found near feed store
on Grover Cleav-
eland, Homosassa
call to identify
352-228-9035
Found Girls Coat
Like new Gray
on Croft
(352) 341-8479
Found in Vicinity of
Homosassa Trail &
Bolton Ave..Male Dog
Med. Size Brown &
White. Call to Identify
352-533-8158
FOUND: Friendly male
mix puppy. He was in
my yard in Crystal River
near the mall. Please
call to identify
352-697-2795.
White Chihuahua
found at Lakeside
County Club Inverness
call 726-1461




AVAILABLE
Pool Supplv Store
W/ Service and Repair!
Cash Flowing over a
$100000!! Call Pat
**(813) 230-7177**


FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077


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PRE SCHOOL
TEACHERS NEEDED
Exp req., CDA Pre-
ferred (352) 341-1559
IIIIIIII
-T Tell that special
person
S r ",Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
MEDICAL Happy Notes.
OFFICE/FRONT Onl $28.50
DESK includes a photo
West Coast Eye Insti- Call our Classi-
tute, just off Highland fled Dept for de-
Blvd, in Inverness. tails
Looking for a bright 352-563-5966
individual, with a smile
and good people skills. 1
Full or part-time. Fill out
application or leave
resume at the office. # pymet 1
726-6633 www.chronicleonine.com


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Funds supportpet shelter, rescue


COMMUNITY


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013 C9





C10 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013


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New 2013 Honda CMc LX
AUTOMATIC
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New 213 Honda Fit
MOCEL GEBH3CEXW. EQUIPPED NOT STRIPPED 4
AUTOMATIC, AC AND CRUISE




New 2013 Honda Accord LX Sedan
MODEL CR2F30EW
AUTOMATICTRANSIMSStO




New 2012 Honda CR-V LX 2WD
MODEL FW3H3CEW COME ~E WW THE CR.V IS THE BEST
SwalG CMPCT JN Ih AMHEBCA SAVEWHLEDEY LAST




New 2013 Honda Odyssey LX
MODEL RLSH2DEW




New 2012 Honda Ridgellne RT
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CRMSEFiRWPOR MC RIADEUKE NOOTHER

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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013 Cll


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2013 Chevy Silverado
Crew Cab All Star Edition


II


1:
14


AND 0% APR for 72 Mo.
Over 75 Tucks to choose from! Accessorize your truck right on site!
TOP DOLLAR PAID FOR YOUR TRADE-INS!
2012 TRUCKS STARTING AT $17,995


*- ~- :1
L.


All-New 2013 Chevy Spak 1LS
Automatic Transmission
.-$4n amn= I


2012 Chevy Sonic 5 Dr. LS
MSRPI $15.560
$04 0 12AA


2013 Chevy Equinox LS
Stk. #C13135u, Auo, 4cyl. MSRP: 525.030
S nc


\


2013 Chevy Avalanche
Black Diamond Edition. Personalized Coffee
Table Book. Own a Legend
MSRP: $37.115, Dealer Discount: S1,720
Rebate: $2000, USAA Discount S750


2013 Chevy Tahoe
MSRP: 540,075, Dealer Discount: 53.250
Rebate: 5750. USAA Discount $750
Bonus Cash: $750


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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C12 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013


Dental Assistant
Must be proficient in
crown & bridge
temporizing

Dental Hygienist

Call 352-465-3008
or fax resume to
352-465-3009

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

SUNSHINE GARDENS
Assisted Living
Facility

Is hiring
CNAs
we pay a higher rate
for the best
ADDIV at the facility:
311 NE 4th Ave
Crystal River
Or download an
application at: www.
sawseniors.com
click on the
"About Us" tab
to download the
application
Fax to: 563-0239





INSURANCE
AGENT WANTED

Looking for licensed
220 or 440 customer
service agent,
salary plus benefits.
email resume to:
david@birdinsurance
group.com

SUNSHINE GARDENS
Assisted Living
Facility

Is now hiring for an
Administrative
Assistant/
Receptionist

Candidate must be
good on the com-
puter and be able
to work in a diverse
environment

Sunshine Gardens
Assisted Living
Facility
311 NE 4th Ave.
Crystal River, Fla

FAX RESUME TO:
352-563-0239
OR email to:
marceymast@
sgseniors.com




EXPERIENCED
SERVERS

Old World Restaurant
Floral City, apply in
person (352) 344-4443


Sale H


ADVERTISING
INSIDE SALES
Representative

The Citrus County
Chronicle is now
accepting applications
for an
Advertising
Inside Sales
Representative.

v Must have mini-
mum of 2 years sales
experience with
proven sales results.
* Must be able to
maintain current
account base as well
as prospecting for
new clients over the
phone.
- Fast paced envi-
ronment that requires
ability to multi task
with ease.
* Computer profi-
ciency a must.
w Excellent organiza-
tional and customer
service skills.

Fax cover letter and
resume to HR at:
(352)564-2935
or email:
djkamlot@chronicle
online.corn

Final applicant must
undergo a drug
screening. EOE














SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179



Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052
HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping Dr.
appts errands etc Hablo
Espanol 813-601-8199




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers I
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557

Y iL v ,Iii. 'I St.
i 1 I lust.




Classifieds


INSURANCE CSR
Commercial Insurance
CSR and inside sales
position needed.
Knowledge of AMS360
preferred. Email resume
to Tracy Fero at
tfferoifero
insurance.com
or call 352-422-2160
ENERGETIC
RETAIL SALES

W/Sales Experience
for gift shop in
Inverness, min 30 hrs.
Mail ResumeTo:
PO Box 1282,
Inverness, FL 34451


Skills~


CARPENTER

Carpenters with 5
years experience,
duties include, but
not limited to: wood
& metal framing,
hardie siding & trims.
Work in Marion,
Lake,Sumter,&
surrounding areas.
Must have own
transportation
to job sites. DFWP
352-690-6334 please
come in and fill out
an application at
2531 NW 35th Street,
Ocala, FL. 34475
EXP MECHANIC

Must have tools
Must have D.lic./Trans
apply in person
American Auto
8696 W. Halls River Rd
FRAMER WANTED

For immediate
employed. Experi-
ence Reauired, PT
may lead to FT.
Fax resume to
352-637-4141 or call
(352) 637-4138

Key Training
Center

F/T Radio
Announcer
for local radio sta-
tion. Experience
preferred. High
school diploma/
GED required.

Apply in Person at
Key Training Center
Business Office-5399
W Gulf to Lake Hwy,
Lecanto FL 34461.
*EOE*





Manufacturer of A/C
grilles, registers and
diffusers is currently
accepting
applications for
experienced
Assembly workers.
Must be able to
read tape measure
and assemble parts
using hand tools,
hands and machin-
ery. Welding
experience a plus.
ADDIvpply in Person
(Mon-Fri between
the hours of
8:00 am to 3:00 pm).
Metal Industries,
400 W. Walker Ave.,
Bushnell, FI133513.
Excellent benefits
package, 401k.
DFW, EOE.

Now Hirina !
Pest Control
Technician

must have valid Dr.
Lic. & good driving
record, self motivated,
punctual, physically
able to do light man-
ual labor. Exp. pref.
Will train the right
person. PIs. Call
352-726-2840




Y II II\ II. M

Need 1a |>h

qualified
employee?

This area's
#1
employment
source!


Cla ifieds















Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk
Pool deck repair
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/I ns 352-795-5755



HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping Dr.
appts errands etc Hablo
Espanol 813-601-8199



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


Exp. Body Man
Citrus Collision
352-341-2639

STEEL CUTTER /
WELDER

Inter County Recycling
in Lecanto, Fl. is looking
for an experienced Steel
Cutter, with Welding
Experience also.
Full time, Pays $13.50
per hour. Drug Free
Workplace.
E-mail resumes to
Resumel 801 @yahoo
.com, No walk-in's or
phone calls
STUCCO
Mechanic Wanted

Crew leader
position
send inquiries and
resume to david@
colonvstone.com




APPT. SETTERS
NEEDED

$500. Sign on Bonus.
Great Commission Pay
and weekly bonuses
Call Bob 352-628-3500
GENERAL
LABORER

F/T, Clean Lic. Drug
Test, GED required
Apply At
8189 S. Florida Ave.,
Floral City. 8AM-3PM

NEWSPAPER

CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and
other newspapers
for home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per
day.

Must have insured
and reliable
vehicle -
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up
with a cap Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product

Apply in Person
1624 N
Medowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pmr

Newspaper
carriers are
S independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle





STORE CLERK

All Applicants must
have Computer Skills,
Cash Handling,
Customer Service
Background Check
is required.
Pay Day Cash
Advance& All Star
Rentals
(352) 564-0700




CARE GIVER
Dependable for 115 lb
woman. 5p-8p, 6 days
week. Send Resume
whan()
tamoabav.rr.com

Secretary
Administrator

office exp. preferred
have exceptional
computer skills,
including Quick
books, Excel &
Microsoft Power
point, Send resume
to: janmetcalf
@embarq.mail.com




MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED

Train to become a
Medical Office Assistant.
NO EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online train-
ing gets you Job ready
ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294


AVAILABLE
Pool Supply Store
W/ Service and Repair!
Cash Flowing over a
$100.000!! Call Pat
"(813) 230-7177**



ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS





1 -- -


130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13,995. INSTALLED

30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED

40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed

+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 FlI. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com



Antique Wooded
Tool Box
Loaded with Machinist
tools $400
352-344-1713
TOASTMASTER
TOASTER 1940's
Circa MODEL 1B14
Good Cond.
$25.00 352-601-7816
WESTINGHOUSE
TOASTER 1940's
Circa Good Cond.
Model TO-501 B
$25.00 601-7816



700 50's & 60's LP's
Record Player & CD
Recorder $350 for all
352-527-6955
Nascar Team Caliber
dicast collectable
cars $200. Qty 25
various yrs. 97-01
Monster Inc,Capillar
Big Kmart352-201-2120



I


11111111
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fie d ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




BEAUTIFUL GREEN
MABLE SPA Needs
motor/ framework.
100.00 firm Linda
341-2271
KIDS SUIT Black pinned
striped,worn once.Size
12 huskey.30.00 obo
Linda 341-2271


Your World






CHIuR ONIC LE


CLASSIFIED



DRYER$100 with 30
day full warranty call/text
352-364-6504
HOT WATER HEATER
30 gal. Needs thermo
50.00 linda 341-2271
NEW BATH TUB
5 FEET/LIGHT
TAN/100.00 FIRM
LINDA 341-2271
RANGE GE Electric
Glass cook top, self
cleaning, bisque,
warming burner
estate item $200
352-637-1792
REFRIGERATOR GE
18 cubic ft. Freezer and
refrigerator work fine.
$75 OBO. 527-1239
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179
STOVE Black Kenmore
glass top,30",self
cleaner, $100
352-563-8033 after 5:30
TAPPAN ELECTRIC
DOUBLE
OVEN/RANGE. Ovens
and elements work fine.
$75 OBO. 527 1239
VACUUM Dirt Devil
"Jaguar"
Model 085830
$30.00 obo 419-5453
WASHER$100 with 30
day full warranty.
call/text 352-364-6504
WHIRLPOOL
Dishwasher $100
352-746-1447
Whirlpool. Electric
Range, self cleaning,
broiler never used 2
large & 2 small heat-
ing elements, unit in
excel, cond. works
perfectly. No dings
$100. (352) 489-4649
Wine Cooler
Holds 4 6 Bottles
Glass Front Door
Asking 60.00 obo
352-601-7816







Salt


AUCTION
Feb 23 & 24
10 am,
Preview 8am
both days
Sat. Uniform, Military,
Civil War, George
Washington
Inaugural, Political &
Campaign pin backs,
Studs, Buckles. Sat. &
Sun. Selling almost
1200 lots of antique
Clothing Buttons from
the 18, 19, 20th
Century-all Materials
& Topics, artistic
displays. No
admission, Auction
Terms, info, full cata-
log & 100's of photos
online at
www.pagebutlonauctions.co
mCall
1-866-295-9228 for
free color brochure.
Public Welcome
Location:
Plantation Inn,
9301 W. Fort Island
Trl, Crystal River
(Magnolia Rm)
Phil McBride,
AU2771
1-866-295-9228




12" CUT OFF WHEELS
5/32x20mm 3 metal
1 masonary
all 4 $35.00
352-586-8657
14" Abrasive Cut-Off
Saw 408511T
$50
Craftsman 4 drawer
work table, steel top
$75. 352-447-6139
Auto-Repair
Manuals 1981,
1977- 1983
$50.
352-447-6139
BANDSAW 6"
CRAFTSMAN
VG to EX cond w/legs
$100. Call 527-6425
BENCH GRINDER Ash-
land industrial 5" bench
grinder. 3450 rpm.
$35.00 352-527-7840
WERNER
FIBERGLASS LADDER
New 6' with tag load ca-
pacity 225 Ibs asking
$50 352-419-5549
Wood Lathe
Chizzles Included
$100.
(352) 628-9175


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


iI .1


SONY
42" FLAT SCREEN
TV $100
(347) 266-9328
TECHNICS DUAL
STEREO CASSETTE
DECK GOOD
CONDITION $30
352-613-0529
TV (2) 32" color tv's,
both work good, $25.00
each 352-400-0452
after 5:00
YAMAHA RECEIVER
GOOD CONDITION
$85 352-613-0529
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 GOOD
CONDITION $100
352-613-0529



2 Doors Framed
$40., obo
12 Windows Large
$250 obo
Will separate
(352) 270-8044
7 Windows 1 Door,
w/ upperslide/ open
window, all bronze in
color $250 obo
(352) 795-9187



40 Sweep States
Computers/ Monitors/
Desks/Chairs/Loader
and Server. Best Offer
(352) 341-2200
CHAIR- Office Max,
grey managers chair,
great shape, $20
(352)212-1596
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469

.

4' Bush Hog
good condition
352-422-4548




Patio Furniture Set
14 pieces, 40x 66
glass top table with
umbrella, 6 chairs,
2 recliners, 2 glass top
side table, 2 ottomans
black, anodized
metal frame w/ taupe
mesh fabric, very
good cond. $400.
Lanai furniture, 38 x 66
table w/ marble oval
insert, can hold um-
brella 4 chairs with
taupe dble thick
cushions anodized
antique bronze metal
frame good cond
$250. (352) 382-2497




2 Swivel Rockers
Very Good Cond.
Wine Colored
$75.00, Winged
back Chair Beiqe
$40.00 (SMW
352-503-7536
4 Bar Stools
Bar height swivel,
$150, Palm Tree ped-
estal table glass top
$50.4 Large, Heavy
Oak Chairs
w/ arms $150.
(352) 422-2164
6 Pc. King, Size Set
with boxspring
& mattress
$450.
(352) 860-2792
8 pc Oak King
Bedroom Suite, 10'
wall & Pier and two
etagere's, dresser, mir-
ror, chest & armoire, pd
$6000, sacrifice $1500
765-748-4334
48" Round Oak
Pedestal Tble $90
& 6 drawer wooden
desk $50
352-726-5159
BroyHill Pecan
Dinning roomset,2 leafs,
rectangle table, 6 high
back chair, china hutch,
exec. cont. $550.00
718-666-6624
Contour Adjustable
Bed, Twin, Premier
Sleep System,
variable speed
massage, w/ waves
& timer & remote
control $1,000
(352) 344-3827
DINETTE SET 5 pcs
Marble Top table
w/glass insert, 4 floral
padded chairs
3 pc. 7ft Wall Unit
,mirror back w/lights,
shelves, 2 side beveled
doors, 3 Glass top ta-
bles, 1 oval coffee table,
2 round end tables.
$500 for all, pis call
(352) 527-9862


"I put these on the ones I haven't
done yet."





Thank You For 15 Years, of Votes!

I BEAU IFUL RESULFr

'"TWILLL"



I ~ lII l IIIH III I"HI IIQg z


Deacon's Bench
Made from Hatch Cover
of 1900 Sailing Vessel,
Originally sold atAber-
crombie & Fitch in NYC
$300 352-746-0100
ESTATE SALE Dinette
$300, 3 pc. Wall Unit
$600, Twin bed set $50,
Dining Rm Set $600,
Sofa & 2 Chairs $200,
Teak carved tables
$1500, Entertainment
Ctr. $50, Bedroom Set
$400, Computer Desk
$50, Casio Keyboard
$50 352-476-5468
FOLDING BED
TWIN $30
352-777-1256
Full Size 4 Piece
Bedroom Set
$100.
(352) 726-8474
FUTON
metal, light oak frame
beige mattress & cover
very good condition
$225, 352-628-2753
GRILL Older Char-Broil
2 Burner w/side burner
Good cond.
30.00 obo
352-601-7816
Leather Couch
Navy Blue, exec. cond.
$175.00, Wht leather
love seat, good condi-
tion $125.00 (SMW)
352-503-7536

LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET, In Origi-
nal Plastic, Never
Used, ORG $3000,
Sacrifice $975.
CHERRY, BED-
ROOM SET Solid
Wood, new in factory
boxes- $895
Can Deliver. Bill
(813)298-0221.

Maple Rider Rocker
w/footstool, green
cushions $50
352-795-7254
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500
Motorized Recliner
King size,black vinyl
rocker/recliner, 7 mo
old, $400
(352) 489-6341
Oak Dining Room
Table 42" Round
$100, Brown Lazy Boy
Rocker/Recliner $300
352-621-3034
OAK END TABLE
measuring 22"W X
25"L, great shape.
$40.00 352-382-4727
Ornate Victorian
Bed w/dresser
$450, Oak Bar w/brass
Rails $275, good
cond.352-895-0140


Sleeper Sofa
Navy velour
ottoman and corner
chair good condition
1 round glass coffee
table and 1 sofa table
$550
352-464-2335
SOFA
brown, microsuede
1 yr. old, $275
352-746-6678
Solid Oak kitchen oval
pedestal table 58x39
w/6 chairs $175;
X-wide cushioned
wicker chair & foot-
stool, 4 pillows, $125
(352) 425-0667
STEEL DESK 22X42
top with 5 draws
very solid
needs paint $25.00
352-586-8657
Triple Dresser
w/ Mirror,
10 Drawer
Excel. Cond. $250.
(352) 220-3883
TRUNDLE BED
w/2 mattress'
$195; double mattress
w/ box spring & frame.
Like new, $175
(352) 586-0493
TWIN BEDS
Mattresses, Box
Springs and Frames
$75.00 each
352-382-7454
Twin Hide-A-Bed
brown tweed
exc. cond. $100
765-748-4334




HONDA
SELF-PROPELLED
LAWN MOWER 2007
HONDA HRR21 LAWN
MOWER $100FIRM
586-7222
Sabre by John Deere,
Riding Mower
15HP, 38" cut.
$300
(352) 344-2297
SPREADER-
Extra-large manual,
12" tires, for seeds,
fertilizer,etc. great
shape-$25-
(352)212-1596




Staghorn Fern
4 ft diameter
excellent condition
$125.00 firm
(352) 489-6212




BEVERLY HILLS
"MOVING SALE-
Fri. & Sat. 9am-2pm
7 SJ Kellner Blvd.


BEVERLY HILLS
OUR LADY OF
GRACE CHURCH
FLEA MARKET T
SAT. FEB 23rd
8AM to 1PM.
6 Roosevelt
Blvd.

CITRONELLE
Fri. & Sat. 7am-?
Multi Family Sale*
Citrus Ave. to Pine
Bluff, to Neige

CITRUS
SPRINGS
Saturday Only,
8am-?
MANY $1 ITEMS
2288 W. Nautilus Dr

CITRUS SPRINGS
Thu, Fr&Sa 8to4
"MOVING SALE-
5680 Stockholm Ln
352-364-2350

CRYSTAL RIVER
BIG SALE
Friday & Sat., 8a-1p
5 Pc. Thomasville wall
unit, gold & silver
jewelry, antiques,
fenton glass, women
clothing and MUCH
MORE Behind Olive
Tree Restaurant, US
19, UNITS 80, 81, 82

CRYSTAL RIVER
FRI ,SAT 9 ?
BaseBall Cards
9140 N Citrus Ave

CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri., Sat. & Sun, All Day
4615 N. Elm Drive
CRYSTAL RIVER
MULTI-FAMILY
Fri, Sat 8a to 3p
9759 W Camphor Ln
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat, Sun 8:30 to 4:30
8378 W. Admiral Byrd
Ln, by Bicentenial Pk

HERNANDO
Thur, Fri, Sat 8a to 2p
HUGE INSIDE
MOVING SALE, Must
Sell Furn hshld, whole
house, Lots of stuff!!
2313 N. Lakefront
Dr. (off Parsons Pt)

HOMOSASSA
Fri, Sat, Sun 7:30 2pm
scooter, fishing boat,
elec organ w/ bench
and music books, and
more! Moving sale -
everything must go!
7461 W Fair Acres PL
(325) 212-6170

HOMOSASSA
Fri, Sat, Sun 9-4
collectibles, house-
hold goods, toys and
more Corner of
Isabel Ter and Rene,
off Oaklawn


- ~


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777

DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lie. & Insured
** 352422-7279**




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777

ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201


Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
v RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
v RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067




Marcia's Best Clean
Experienced Expert
lic+ref, Free Estimates
"call 352-560-7609"
NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate $20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


All Tractor & Tree Work
Household, Equipment
& Machinery Moving
(352) 302-6955

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




#1 Professional Leaf
vac system why rake?
FULL Lawn Service
Free Est 352-344-9273

BEAT ANY PRICE
Paint & Power wash
Lawn & Trees Trim
Jim (352) 246-2585

LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up time.
352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767

ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from Ato Z
352-628-6790


JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570




30 yrs. Experience!
Int/Ext. Comm/Res.
Lic/Ins. Jimmy
*352-212-9067"
CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
BEAT ANY PRICE
Paint & Power Wash
Lawn & Trees Trim
Jim (352) 246-2585
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.



Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn Re-
moval 352-302-6838



SPRINKLERS & SOD
Complete Check & Ad-
just, Full System $49
(352) 419-2065



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452





Yi u r\\orlid first

Need a jiuld
m, a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!

CHkON1CIE
Classifieds


All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's LAND CLEAR-
ING & TREE SERVICE
Complete tree & stump
removal hauling, demo
& tractor work. 32 yrs.
exp. (352) 220-9819
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
REAL TREE
SERVICE
(352) 220-7418
"Tax Specials"
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316


I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
Ir


W RDY GURD 1BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Misplace beers or teas (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
I and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. "Elementary" star Lucy's contusion (1) they will fit in the letter
____-_ ----- squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Highest-quality treasure box (1) syllables in each word.
I @2013UFS Dist.byUnriv.Uclck for UFS
4. The elms and oaks right here (1)


5. Grouchy "Four Seasons" singer Valli (2)


6. Faster Anglican parish priest (2)


7. Stadium section feet-in-the-air feat (2)


(NVISQNVH lNViSoNWV 'L aIIVIAa HDIlJl'9 HINVH AANVH'3 9

2-23-13 SHaASNIV


Saturday & Sun. 7A-2P
9659 S. Buckskin Ave.
HOMOSASSA
Sat. & Sun. 8a-3p
Appliances, tow bar,
brake buddy, elec-
tronics, clothes, STUFF!
2698 S. Bascombe Av
INVERNESS
1135 S WaterviewDr
HUGE 6 Family
Fri-Sat 8-3
INVERNESS
CLOSING SALE *
CRAFTY LADY
Publix/KMart Shopp-
ing Cntr, Hwy 41
Bargain's Galore
344-4800 10a-5p
2/23-3/1
INVERNESS
Fri & Sat. 8am -2pm
collectibles, furn,
knives, off 581
4702 Bow-N-Arrow LP
INVERNESS
Friday & Sat. 8am-?
912 Russell Ave.
INVERNESS
MOVING SALE *"
Saturday 23, 9a-5p
9022 E. Island Drive
INVERNESS
Saturday 23, 9a-3p
Moving Sale*
3681 E. Foxwood Lane
INVERNESS
Saturday Only 8a 2p
97 S Hunting Lodge
Dr.
Off of Turner Camp Rd
LECANTO
Fri, Sat 8am to 3pm
*no early birds
art, antiques, crafts,
paint, sink, furn,
kitch, appl, tools,
1284 N. Lombardo
LECANTO
Fri., Sat. & Sun. 8am-?
* HUGE YARD SALE *
3079 Cardinal Street
Stonebrook
COMMUNITY Sale
Sat 2/23 8am -pm
Take Hwy 19 to
Stonebrook Rd.
Follow SIGNS to
Clubhouse
NO EARLY BIRDS
Yard Sale
Sat. Only 8am-?
Tools, large generator
plumbing,
house hold items
4115 N. Little Hawk Pt.
Crystal River





PINE RIDGE
Fri 8 to 3, Sat 8 to 12
quality furn tv's, sml
appl, entire hshld
4002 W Pinto Loop



100%LEATHER COAT
Full length beige color
size lx but runs on
small size.worn 3 times.
cost $150.00 asking
$90.00 or best offer
352-503-7865
BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING SIZES 5 &
6 SHIRTS, PANTS &
JACKETS $25
352-613-0529
KIDS SUIT Black pinned
stripped / size 12
huskey,worn once. $40
obo Linda 341-2271
Men's Durango Boots
11% D & Harley
Davidson Boots 9'/2D
both pairs $150
352-795-7254



GPS Magellan
Roadmate 5220-LM
New $85.00
352-637-5969
Phone Samsung
Galaxy Prevail
boost/android
new $65.00
352-628-4210


.195/70 R14 ..
Good tread!! Only ask-
ing $60 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
2 KAYAK PADDLES-
Seasense Brand, 96
inches, 2 piece for stor-
age, black, Ex., $30 ea.
352-28-0033
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, basket, hand
brakes & wheel locks,
folds for storage, Ex.
$50. 352-628-0033
18 Steel Framed
Folding Tables
30' x 96", $25. ea. obo
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church
(352) 746-7161
2007 HONDA
SELF-PROPELLED
LAWN MOWER
HONDA "ONE-START"
$100 FIRM 586-7222
2012 PAZZEL
INSPIRATIONAL
CREATIVE CUTTER w/
accessories. New cond.
Cost $725, asking $515
obo (352) 586-4630
BICYCLE BOYS 20"
$20 352-613-0529
CUSTOM MADE
WHITE LACE DRA-
PERIES fits windows
16'W X 84"L. perfect
condition. $50.00
352-382-4727
DOLLS & BEARS
LIKE NEW
345 Scarboro Ave.
(267) 983-5731 Cell
Dragon
Mega Bloks Havocfire
#9693 in box
$35.00
352-628-4210
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077
FLAG- U.S. Military, in
glass/wood display
case, perfect condi-
tion-$25- (352)212-1596
FRYER- Hamilton
Beach, great shape-$20
(352)-212-1596
Full Sofa Bed, Very
good condition $25;
Metal filing cabinet,
3 drawer, $20.
(352) 527-0137
Garden Tracker,
Wheel Horse, 16hp
Hydrostatic dr, fresh
paint, smokes, $675
OBO. Unique signed
Young Hinkle, wood
desk 1 drawer w/
chair 46x30 $125
(352) 341-5053
GOODYEAR REGATTA
CAR TIRE P225/60R16
60% TREAD ONLY
35.00 464- 0316
Guardian Air Cooled,
Automatic stand by
Generator, by
Generac Pwr. Systems
Inc., This model is a
compact, high perfor-
mance, air cooled,
engine driven genera-
tor designed to auto-
matically supply elec-
trical power to oper-
ate critical loads
during a utility power
failure. This unit is
factory installed, in an
all weather, metal
enclosure, that is in-
tended exclusively for
outdoor installation.
The generator will
operate using either,
propane, or natural
gas, This unit comes
with product registra-
tion card. Generator
installation guidelines
book and installation
and owners manual.
2013 model, list for
3,900 this is a 2008
model w/ no to low
hours, volts 120/240
amp 130/65, W1600
3,600 rmp, suggested
retail value $2,500
Asking $,1,750 obo
(352) 382-1352


$20 352-613-0529
GPS Magellan
Roadmate 5220-LM
New $85.00
352-637-5969
GUITAR STAND FOR 3
GUITARS- folds for stor-
age, black, Ex., $25.
352-628-0033

GUN SHOW
Ocala National
Guard Armory
900 SW 20TH Street
Feb. 23, Sat 9-5
Feb. 24, Sun 9-4
Concealed Weap-
ons Classes Dail
-Bring your GUNS
to sell or trade
GunTrader
GunShows.com
352-359-0134
Homemade Quilt
Tops 5/$ 100;
Anne Geddes
Pictures 6/$100
(352) 795-7254
HOSPITAL BED motor-
ised $85.00 or b/o
inverness 352 6372499
HOSPITAL BED motor-
ised $85.00 or b/o
inverness 352 6372499
JUICER- Hamilton
Beach, great
shape-$15-
(352)-212-1596
LUGGAGE CARRIER
w/electrical hk/up
$100, Ladies 6 speed
bike, good condition
$100 352-746-9039
Mattress and boxspring
double bed set $55
860-2475
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Fulls $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
Mossberg 715T,
22 Long Riffle AR look
alike, 25 round clip
almost new $500.
17HMR Taurus
Revolver 8 shot, super
clean, 400 round
$500. For revolver
must have concealed
weapons permit
(352) 563-0328
MOTORBIKE HELMET
good condition,
green/white color,
i can email pic, $30
(352)465-1616
NEW SKYLIGHT
BUBBLE TYPE 27+27
SMOKED POLY-
CARBONITE ONLY
50.00 464- 0316
PORCH SWING
HEAVY DUTY IT
NEEDS A (BOARD
REPLACED) ONLY
35.00 464- 0316
RYOBI 10" COM-
POUND MITER SAW-
#TS1342, 15 AMP,5500
RPM, dust bag, Ex+.,
$60. 352-628-0033
SALMON FISH
MOUNT- Natural skin,
31", Ex., $35.
352-628-0033
Scaffold $375 OBO
4 locking wheel 6 ft
352-447-1244
SLIDING SHOWER
DOORS Like new
30.00 Linda 341-2271
TRUCK WINDOW
rear solid window,
tinted GMC
$75.00
352-628-4210
Wacker GP 5600
Commercial
Generator 120/240V
Low Hrs. $600.
(352) 563-0328
WINE CABINET Wood,
holds 20 bottles of wine
& has one drawer, EUC
off white, $65.00
352-249-7212



2 POWER LIFT
CHAIR RECLINERS
1 Med. size $250.
1 Large $325
Both excel., runs great
(352) 270-8475


4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH SEAT AND
BRAKES FOLDS UP
GREAT SHAPE 75.00
464- 0316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER BRAND NEW
ONLY 25.00 464- 0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
ADJUSTABLE LEGS
ON BOTH 20.00 EACH
464-0316
CANE ADJ. $5.00 Quad
Cane adj. $10.00.
Crutches $15.00. Alum.
walker w/ basket $20.00
(352)563-6410
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT-
RESTS AND LEG EX-
TENTIONS ONLY
100.00 464 0316
SAFETY RAIL
for bathtub
Medline Deluxe
$35.00
352-682-4210
TRAPEZE FOR ANY
BED Free standing,
excellent condition,
$100.00 (352)563-6410
WALKER good
condition
seat/basket
wheels/handbrake
$50.00 352-628-4210




"NEW" ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR,
BLACK W/ABALONE
TRIM $85
352-601-6625
"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR PACKAGE
W/GIGBAG & MANY
EXTRAS $60
352-601-6625
CASIO, ELECTRIC
PIANO/ORGAN
exc. cond. sounds great
comes w/big amplifier,
eve's $200
352-489-4844
EPIPHONE ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR
W/AMP,TUNER,STRAP
& MORE! $90
352-344-6625
EPIPHONE LES PAUL
STUDIO LIMITED EDI-
TION PLAYS &
SOUNDS PERFECT!
$200 OBO
352-601-6625


Miqdica
Equiment^


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013 C13


CLASSIFIED




Kawai, SR 5
ORGAN
$600 obo
616-914-0980 cell
Crystal River
KEYBOARD
Yamaha PSS-12
with adapter
$35.00
352-628-4210
LAP STEEL STRAT
STYLE W/SINGLE
HUMMBUCKING SLIDE
INCLUDED $65
352-601-6625
TUNER Peterson stro-
bostomp floor pedal,
most accurate tuner,
great shape,$25
(212-1596)




LOVE SEAT Like
new/Light tan with
flowers
100.00 linda 341-2271




AB LOUNGER NEARLY
NEW ONLY 30.00
464 -0316, 464- 0316
Bowflex Extreme
$600. obo
or Trade for hand guns
(352) 249-7221
EXERCISE BIKE (DP)
UPRIGHT TYPE IT
ALSO WORKS THE
ARMS ONLY 75.00
464- 0316
TREADMILL,
WESLO, Crosswalk
5.0t,like new, $150
Call 561-234-0535
Weslo Cross Cycle w/
upper body workout,
LCD window, WRPM
meter, $75. 382-5883




1911 GOVT/OFFICER
45 Colt Officers slide,
Armscor Precision full
Govt frame, Black w/SS
buttons, VZ grips, ambi
safety, 2xtra grips. Buy-
ers only, must be 21.
first cash takes it !$625
LV MESSAGE.
352-586-4022


-iI

5 HP, Outboard,
by Force, with Tank
$395.
Will take Gun on trade
Also Remmington
7600 30-06 Pump, with
scope as new condition
$495. (906) 285-1696
Beautiful Compact
Taurus 22 Caliber
New In Box
$350. obo
(352) 795-0088
After 11 am til 7p
BICYCLE TREK 7500
Womans, Shock Fork,
Fast and Easy, Clean,
24Speeds, $195
341-0450
BIKE RACK purchased
from Santos Bike
shop, holds 3 bikes,
used once. $100.00
firm 352-382-4727
CAMPING STOVE cole-
man 2 burner camping
stove. NEW. never
used. $50.00 firm
352-527-7840
CLUB CAR
GOLF CART
Electric w/ charger,
refurbished, new
paint, 4 seater, $2500
(803) 842-3072
CLUB CAR, 2006
w/ Charger, good
tires, almost new bat-
teries, garage kept
$1500 must sell
352-527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
CUSTOM APAAR-15
RIFLE / APA bullet
lower (7075 T651 alumi-
num), Rock Creek SS
hand lapped 20" barrel
1:8 twist, fluted, Daniel
Defense upperbolt car-
rier group, and 7" AR
Lite rail, Magpul CTR
adjustable stock,
SureFire muzzle
brake/FAsuppressor at-
tachment, $2500.00
OBO Call 352-344-9482
LV message
ECLIPSE ELLIPTICAL
space saver exercise
like new, $150
352-422-0311
EZ GO GOLF CART
Electric with charger,
2002,
Very good cond.
$1,500
352-564-2756


FISHING TACKLE
Rods, Reels, Lures,
Line, Tackle Box, Lead
Weights-other Items,
$25 to $75
352-257-3288

GUN SHOW
Ocala National
Guard Armory
900 SW 20TH Street
Feb. 23, Sat 9-5
Feb. 24, Sun 9-4
Concealed Weap-
ons Classes Dail
*Bring your GUNS
to sell or trade
GunTrader
GunShows.com
352-359-0134
NISHIKI 26" RACING
BIKE SEVERAL
SPEEDS LITE.NEEDS
TIRES ONLY 75.00
464-0316
Ruger LCP
new never fired
.380 ACP, light weight
for CWP 1 box of
ammo, $450.00
352-637-0844
Schwinn Bicycle
Ladies Red 28 "
cruiser, Used once.
Asking $95
(352) 341-5053
SMITH & WESSON
.357 Highway Patrol-
man. Model #28,
6" barrel, like new, in
original box. $475
(352) 423-0289
TRADITIONS
Buckhunter inline
50 Caliber, blk powder
$100.
(352) 447-6139
Wanted to buy Gun
Safe Steel, for long
guns, for 20 to 40 Guns
352-303-2525




2009 24 x 9 Trailer,
tandem axel, rear ramp,
side door, AC, 200 mi
$2750 (727) 207-1619
2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1895
call 352-527-05555
Utility Trailer 8'x12'
w/loading gate
exc. cond. $750
352-341-0959


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Onry $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966


BABY STROLLER
brown/green color,
Safety 1st, in ok condi-
tion, $20 (352)465-1616
Baby stroller
Dark blue deluxe model
$25 860-2475
BEAUTIFUL CRIB 3 IN
1 BROWN CHERRY
EXCELLENT condition
with mattress $ 75
352-777-1256
EVENFLO-EXER
SAUCER-ACTIVITY
$ 30, 352-777-1256
GIRLS SIZE 12 MOS.
34 pieces in all. Shorts,
shirts,pj's,one piece out-
fits, more $25.00
352-400-5650
JUMPERS HORSE $20
BROWN AND 1 BLUE
352-777-1256
ROCKING HORSE
Black-colored, rocks by
rubber,ok condition, $50
(352)465-1616
STROLLER THE
WINNIE POOH $25
CAR SEAT INFANT $20
AND TODDLER $15
352-777-1256
TODDLER HEAD-
BOARD Brand New
Metal Headboard, $15
(352)465-1616


Sell r Swa


Robbie Ray

Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edoe
to Care Free"

Make-overs,
Color, Foiling,
Precision Cuts,
Avant Garde
hairstyles and
updo's.

Paul Mitchell
Certified.




2 Maltese Puppies
Left, 1 female $650.
1 Male $600, CKC reg.
will have Fl. Health
Cert.. Call to come
play with them,
(352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258

iii' *.11'
lll 1 il Ill IIISt.
LO ) LDa)


CHRONiICLE


CAROLE LISTER E4GH
Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
ERA ell: 422-4620 Office: 382-1700r ^"~
EIR Cll.:" .... .=... .2:


CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
Looking to buy
6X12 Enclosed Trlr
(352) 270-9187
Old Black & White
Snapshot and/or
photos (269) 275-4698
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369
Wanted to buy Gun
Safe Steel, for long
guns, for 20 to 40 Guns
352-303-2525







C14 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013


8 Month Old
MALE YORKIE
CKC registered all
shots, house trained,
loveable, affection-
ate Silver & brown
$600. (352) 341-4009










BLUE
Blue, nicknamed
Boo-Boo, is a 7-8 y.o.
Australian cattle
dog mix, with beau-
tiful blue eyes. He
came to the shelter
because his family
lost their home.
He is neutered
and housebroken,
weighs about 50
pounds and is very
easy to handle.
His goal is to be a
couch potato".
He is very friendly
and affectionate
and gives lots of
kisses. Blue is actu-
ally the perfect dog
for an older person
or couple who
want a gentle
companion dog.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.

CHICKS & DUCKLINGS
Delaware, Buff, Silkie,
Frizzle Chicks $4.50ea
Cayuga, Pekin, Buff
Ducklings $7ea.
all are straight run.
727-517-5337
(Brooksville)

FREE BORDER
COLLIE MIX
2 year old
female, border collie
mix. Free to good
home. Great with
kids and other pets.
Call (352)201-4705


MOXIE
My name is Moxie.
My owner left me,
but I'll never leave
you if you take me
home. You'll never
find a more loyal
companion than
me." Moxie is a 3
y.o. Black Mouth
Cur, weighs 60 lbs.
He is strong, yet
gentle to his
humans. Likes peo-
ple and seems
good with children.
Neutered & house-
broken. He is ath-
letic, so a fenced
yard is recom-
mended. He needs
room to exercise first
and then he settles
down. Look in his
beautiful eyes and
see the love he is
waiting to give his
forever family.
Call Donna @
352-249-7801.










NICKY
Nicky is a beautiful
black lab/bulldog
mix male, a big,
sweet and loveable
guy. He is 2 y.o. and
is very intelligent, will
sit for treats. He
weighs about 75
pounds and is a
very strong dog,
needing a strong
handler. Would be
a good watchdog.
He is a good
hearted dog who
gets along well with
other dogs. As he is
very active, a
fenced yard is
recommended.
Call 352-746-8400










REMY
Remy is a joyous,
active young terrier
mix who was surren-
dered to the shelter
because of neglect.
Weight about
42 pounds. Dark
golden brown brin-
dle in color, neu-
tered, heartworm
-negative, appears
housebroken. He is
a delightful, happy
dog, very eager to
learn, and very intel-
ligent. Gets along
with other dogs and
loves his human
friends. Tries very
hard to please. A
fenced yard would
be preferred for
him, as he is very
active. Call Joanne
@ 352-795-1288.

Shih-Tzu Pups, Males
Starting@ $400.
Registered
Lots of colors, Beverly
Hills, FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.ne


Fish Tanks,
and stands,
352-447-1244



Bermuda Hay 501bs $6
Never been rained on
795-1906 586-1906
SHAMROCK FARM, CR



LIQUIDATION SALE
Horses & tack, new &
used. 352-873-6033

Livestock


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!

CRYSTAL RIVER
D/W 3br/2ba + CP
Sunroom, furn, incl. w/d,
fenced yd. $550 mo
12mo lease 1st & Last
due @ signing
865-414-2318 or
865-804-4290
HERNANDO
2/2 $450. mo. 1st last
+dep 352-201-2428
HOMOSASSA
2/1 $525-$550 mo.
352-464-3159
HOMOSASSA
2BR/2 BA, No Pets
$500 (352) 628-5696
OLD HOMOSASSA
2 bedroom. 1-1/2 bath.
$475/mo $400 dep pool
and clubhouse
3526284441




must sell!
2006 FLEETWOOD
ENTERTAINER. 32X66.
OWNER MUST SELL!
CALL (352) 795-1272
43,900. 3/2,Dblewide.
Delivered & set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&l W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807
2/1,DW,H/A, 12x20
glass porch Co. water
& sewer, paved rd.
No HOA $49,995 firm
$ 15000 down, own fi-
nan. (352) 567-2031

' THIS OUT!
2br 2ba Single Wide
12years YOUNG
14X66. Trade in.
WILL GO FAST!
$14,900 YOUR BABY
$19,900 Incls Delv,
Set, New A/C, skirt &
steps, Must See!
NO HIDDEN FEES.
CALL (352) 795-1272
BIG
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Hnder $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183
Homosassa
Dbl. Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$69,900 (352) 621-0192
INVERNESS
2b/2% ba, 1/ acre
off Turner Camp Rd
a/c, heat pump 3yrs.
old, 30ft scn porch &
48'open porch on other
side, new septic, 18'x31'
building w/ 220 electric,
shed, fenced, on canal
$68,000 352-726-1791




NEW 2013

2br 2ba
Doublewide w/10 year
Warranty $39,900
Delivered & setup, a/c,
skirt, steps.
Call(352) 795-1272


INVERNESS
55+ Park 14 x 58,
2/1'2, furniture,
appliances, shed,
scrn. porch, $8,500.
(352) 419-5133

NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181
Palm Harbor Factory
liquidation sale
3 stock models must
go. $39k off select
2012 models
John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext 210



WE WILL

BUY YOUR
MANUFACTURED
Home. from 1976-2013
CALL (352) 795-2377




For Sale'%
FLORAL CITY
Exceptionally Nice
3/2 on Beautiful 1 AC,
treed lot, garage, shed,
dock, Ideal for Fishing/
Airboats $95,900
716-523-8730



2BR/19%BA, MH &
Land Needs little Work
$17,500 9340 W.Tonto
Dr., Crystal River
Call 352-382-1544 or
813-789-7431
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Considering
ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498
HERNANDO/486, Lg.
Wkshop 2/1/den SW,
w/AC,1+acre, $43,500,
Cridland Real Estate
JDesha(352)634-6340

HOME-ON-LAND
Only $59,900, 3/2
"like new" on % acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,350
dwon, $319.22/mo
P&I, W.A.C. Owner
can finance. Call
352-621-9182




CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
*Winter Specials *
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
2/2 New Model $59K
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

FLORAL CITY
DW, 2/2/2 carport
Screen room, shed,
all you need is a tooth-
brush to move in
$17,500. Lot Rent $183.
352-344-2420
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $179/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
In Park, On Lake
Rousseau, furnished,
2BR, 1BA, CHA
tile & laminate floor-
ing 10x 20 porch,
w/ vynil wind., open
deck + 2 outdr. stor-
age sheds, Low lot
rent $11,500.
(828) 260-3146 Cell
LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access, ramp and
shower $25,000.
352-212-6804
LECANTO 55+ PK
MUST SELL
3br/2ba. Furn, Cpt,
Shed, New Roof,
CHA, washer/dryer,
MAKE OFFER
931-210-0581
Sandy Oak 55+ RV PK
14x60 split 2/2, new
heat/ac, remodeled,
furn. Ig scnd in FL Rm.
55 ft crpt w/laundry
room, 989-858-0879
STONEBROOK, CR
Pondview/Gourmet
Kitch, 2Br, MSuite,
$51,900, Cridland RE,
Jackie 352-634-6340




ACTION%

RENTAL MANAGEMENT
[ REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
ww.CilrusCounlyHonmeRentals.com
HOMOSASSA
2 Balsai(Ct........................$1400
4/3/3 POOL h nMe ind. pool and lwn se.
2278SandburgPt....................$500
2/1 duplex, incl. lawncare
8140 Miss Maggie Dr. ........S550
2/1 duplex, id. uI lies with ops
41 Biritree St..................... $800
2/2/2SMWspoiousi692sq.fthome
HERNANDO
5164 N. Dewey Way.............. $775
3/2 DW n ow i on ]/2 ACRE!
994 E. Winnetklia St..................$625
2/1.5 moble on1 ARE l
CRYSTAL RIVER
9779W. Cleveland li..............$675
2/2/1 close to Seven Rivers Hosp.
BEVERLY HILLS
9 Daniel St.... .........$650
2/1 nice clean home on culde-c street.


-m-
Chassahowitzka
2/2, fenc. Yd/DW $500
AGENT (352) 382-1000




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857

CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully furn. efficiency
w/ equipped kitchen.
All utilities, cable,
Internet, & cleaning
provided. $699/mo
352-586-1813

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025

S. Inverness
Country Cottage for 1
person, all included
$450pr month, $300 dep
727-916-1119





ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bedroom
Apartments for Rent
352-465-2985

CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815

INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great
Loc., clean & roomy.
no pets $500.mo 1st. &
Last $300. Sec.
352-341-1847

LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/613-6000

SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant
Rd. to So. on Talla-
hasse Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719


E.:EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY





CRYSTAL RIVER
H NICE** Secret
HarbourApts. Newly
remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Inc Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037

CRYSTAL RIVER
LG 2/1 water, sewer,
garbage, w/d hkup,
lawn inc. $475 mo.
(352) 212-9205
or 352-212-7922













aLETCAN
CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy 19 Downtown
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000 SF, exc. Freoc.
$795/mo 352-634-2528




LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza,
Office/Retail, CR 486,
900 sf. @ $700+ until. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12wmo. Lease
352-258-6801




HOMOSASSA
RIVERFRONT, 2/2/1,
Dock & Pool, H20 Incl
$950. mo. + $950. sec.
No pets 407-415-0622
www.moverightin.com

INVERNESS
Whispering Pines Villa
3/2/2 w/ enclosed patio,
$850 F/L/S, BK/CK req
321-303-0346




LECANTO 2/2
CHA, W/D, fncd. back
yrd, Pets Ok $625/mo.
(860) 334-1320




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225





CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 Sm house incl.
electric. $475 per mo.
1st/last/sec. References
352-628-1062


CLASSIFIED



BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, Fl. rm., CHA, $495
35 Golden St 464-2701
BEVERLY HILLS
1/11/ w/ FL room $450.
mo. (352)897-4447 or
697-1384
Beverly Hills
2/1 $475.00
352-422-2433
Beverly Hills Rental
1/1 with carport, $500
monthly and $500 Se-
curity deposit.
352-249-6098
BLACK DIAMOND
Home for rent from
$1,100/mo. Bob
Coldwell Banker
634-4286
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 $850. Month
352-897-4447,
352-697-1384
Crystal River
2 BR, 2 Full BA, 2-car
gar., enclosed back
porch and pool, shed.
Only $750.
4251 N. Concord Dr.
352-382-1373.
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
Water Incl. CHA $496.
220-2447 or 212-2051
Crystal River North
Lease w/ opt. country
setting 2/1, on /2AC,
$550/ mo $550 dep
Firm (352)795-0161
DUNNELLON
Rainbow Springs
Rent/Rent To own
Georgous, 2/2/2
Country Club Home
Fireplace, D Washer
Carpeted, lanai,
spotless 1/2 acre
quiet. Special $799.
352-527-0493

Hernando
Rentals
from $425.00 (a MO.
Call A.W.
'Skip' Craven
352-464-1515

HOMOSASSA
3/2, new carpet, appls.
Lg wooden deck,
nice area. off Grover
Cleveland $800.(352)
447-0977/302-3819
INVERNESS
Country Living on
Large %/ acre lot. 3 bd.,
2 ba. home. Garden
and fenced areas. Well
& septic, so no water
bill! $595. 352-476-4964
Sugarmill Woods
2/2/2, 2 MB Rrms
$850. 352-302-4057
Sugarmill Woods
2006,4/2/2, appl. inc.
$900, 319-371-9843
SUGARMILL
WOODS 4/2/2
1/3ac. $1100. mo.
727-919-0797




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225
HOMOSASSA, FL
3 bedroom. 2 bath.
Completely remodeled
fully furnished, carport,
& covered dock. House
is in a no wake zone
with beautiful view down
the river. No pets, no
smoking. $1,450. mo.
Long Term Only,
386-527-0126




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/2, privacy/space,
must love dogs, $750
(352) 422-5735




INVERNESS
Pool home to share
w/fem-Priv BR/BA/WIC.
N/S,Employed w/ref.
$450/mo indcl util, $200
sec.726-8982
INVERNESS
Rm. for Rent, furn.
Share large DW, Util.
incl'd, $325 + $100
sec. 352-726-0652



CRYSTAL RIVER
Office & Warehouse
$300-$600, Plantation
Rentals 352-634-0129




20 DOCKABLE
ACRES: St. Lucie
Waterway. $189,500.
45mins boat Atlantic;
5mins boat Lake
Okeechobee.
Beautiful land,
abundant wildlife.
Gated/Privacy.
888-716-2259 Gulf
Atlantic Land, Broker.


ESTATE SALE Nature
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Developed site with
gazebo & storage bldg,
reduced to $49,500.
Separate storage
lot available. (RV sold).
For info and pictures
Click on
detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441
INVERNESS
3/2/2 waterfront pool hm
on Lisa Ct, 1/2 acre lot
quiet St, whole house
generator $229,000
352-419-8337


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $58,500. Call
352-638-0905
UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.






Estate Sale
344 N. Michaelmas Ter.
Crystal River
Fri. & Sat. 8-4



4 Person Self Contained
Hot Tub




HERNANDO
Building Off Hwy 200,
$800.mo 352-201-2428




2 ACRES
Quiet Country Setting
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area
only 20 Min. to Ocala
$127,000
Call 352-302-6784
for appt.




PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything! 4/3 %
w/7 car
garage/workshop &
in-law suite on 5.83 ac-
res.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164


4/3+/4 pool home w/
inlaw suite on 23/4 ac.
HW firs, granite cntrs.
2009 Custom Home
S. McDermott (352)
697-1593 Cridland RE




Beverly Hills
2/1 family room and
carport, investment or
seasonal living $38,900
352-422-2433

HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2/1/1 needs paint &
cosmetics $23k
"cash only *
352-503-3245




Custom Home,
3 bedroom, 2%/ bath,
w/Master w/DBL
walk-ins + bath +
den/off. 2+ car garage.
1 Acre. MUST SEE!
$249,900.
352-860-0444

OPEN HOUSE
Saturday & Sunday
12Noon -3PM
3/21/2/3, Owner
399 E. Keller Court
Citrus Hills





Beautiful Whispering
Pines Villa $79,900
Managed, low Maint.
fee indowed for sudden
expenses, walk to park
352-341-0170
352-726-5263

FSBO 3/2/2 Scrn Porch,
metal roof, appls, CHA,
fans, verticals, shed,
fence, deck, spklrs, near
dog park. $120,000
(352) 586-0872

NICE HOUSE on
Nice Street $79,000
2/1/1, Attached
carport w/ 12 x 32
scrn. por., built in '95
on 1/2 acre lot fenced
12 x14 matching out
building, New roof,
stucco paint, flooring,
upper line appl's,
irrigation & water
system.,
taxes & ins. $1,135 yr
606-425-7832




3BD, 2BA, 2Gar,
Gas fireplace, on
Water, Main Canal,
dock large lot with
fruit trees. $138,000
(321) 303-2875




3BR 2BA 1,500 sq. ft.,
6823 W. Merrivale Ln
Built 2006, Fully
Furnished, by Owner,
$77,000 obo
(260) 348-9667




4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home
$65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell




4/3/2, POOL HOME
3,000 sf, granite coun-
ters, SS appl's., wood
firs., Reduced $25,000
Asking $235,000
850-585-4026


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Phyllis
Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!

I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
gail@citrusrealtor
.com
www.citrusrealtor
.com
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.

I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!








DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email :debinfantine@
yahoo.com













MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515










SANDI

HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855












TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant




3/2 pool home on 10
acres w/ FP, zoned
agriculture, walk to all
schools. $179,900
(727) 528-2803 or
727-698-0723



Brooksville Deeded
spacious, shaded cnr
lot, 1BR/1BA, Large FL
room, Large storage
shed & patio. 55+ RV
Park w/ heated pool,
and music activities,
$36,000 352-848-0448,
352- 428-0462 anytime
HOME FOR SALE
NORTON, VA
5Bd/2'/Ba inc. 3 lots
70miles from Bristol
Racetrack $69,000
276-393-0446 OR
276-679-1331


2BD 1%'BA 2 Carport
on Lake Rousseau
Dunnellon 1.4 AC,
168 ft on lake, No flood
insurance completely
remodeled, Price
Reduced$169.000
Barney Chilton
352-563-0116
Gulf Prvt Island home
on 15 ac 80' dock. 4/2
All util. Mainland dock
& pkg. Jacuzzi house
S. McDermott (352)
697-1593 Cridland RE

YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


-l u;'e."L... I

SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFureCboast
Properties.comrn
"To view
great waterfront
properties"




% ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact fee
credit, high and dry,
trees, $11,000 obo
(352) 795-3710
INVERNESS, FL
3 miles east of Inv;
5-20ac wooded/some
cleared, owner finance
available.Owner is
licensed Real Estate
Broker,Ed Messer.ed
.messer@yahoo.com




BUY, SELL*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*352-563-5510-

87 PROLINE
17', Deep V haul
Center Console
w/ trailer
315 W. Inverness Blvd
ALUMACRAFT
2012, 1436 LT, tilt
trailer, 8HP, Yam. 4
stroke, motor guide,
40 Ib, battery, swivel
seats, Lowrance Sonar
/GPS, $2,500.
Info. 352-489-2011
ALUMICRAFT
18 ft.,wide rhino lined
inside, 25HP Merc.,
boat mtr. & trailer in
great shape $3,700
(352) 563-0328

BASS BOAT
1985, 16ft Bayliner
Needs work 85HP
force eng., galvinized
trailer. $800obo
(352) 507-1490

















PENN YAN
1979 27' Sports fisher-
man w/ trailer, needs
some work. $4000
OBO (352) 621-0192
TRI PONTOON
BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453


CALL FOR DETAILS

... 563-3206


--A*-S-LowA ---


As low As S8 per adl~


EXTRA SAVINGS! NEW AND USED INVENTORY!

CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE THREE RIVERS MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597 1038 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 563-5510


Hme


Waterfron
^Ho~mes







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


a 1 7


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013 C15


Pontoon boaT
Needing Repair
(352) 637-3983
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
(352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com



ITASCA
2007 Navaron 23H
Mercedes Diesel, 2.7L,
17 mpg, generator, AC,
one slide out, sleeps 5,
excellent condition,
$55,000 make offer
352-422-1309
SUNNYBROOK
2008, 35FT Fifth Wheel
3 slides, electric awning
fireplace, 2 ac's, 50 amp
king bed, assume
balance of $37,500.
352-279-3544



4 WINDS TRAILER
2006, 26FT
Take Over Payments
352-628-7765
2012 Wildwood TT
26'Ft. sleeps 8.
Elec.Awning and
Jack, bunks $13,999
813-699-2262
'05 CAMPER
29' Holiday Rambler
Alum fr, Ig slide out.
great cond. $10,900
352-795-5310 or
410-474-3454
ALINER
2001, Expedition 18ft,
storage for stabilizers,
$3,500. obo
(352) 795-6295
Brooksville Deeded
spacious, shaded cnr
lot, 1BR/1BA, Large FL
room, Large storage
shed & patio. 55+ RV
Park w/ heated pool,
and music activities,
$36,000 352-848-0448,
352- 428-0462 anytime
CAR HAULER
2007
32 ft Enclosed Goose-
neck w/liv qtrs. $15,500.
For more info call
352-560-7247
FOREST RIVER
2010, Surveyor, Sport
189, 20 ft. Travel
Trailer,
1 slide, w/AC, qn. bed,
awning, pwr. tonque
jack, corner jacks,
microwave, equilizing
hitch, $10,500, reduced
to $9000
(352) 382-1826
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
POP-UP CAMPER
2002 Coleman
Tacoma .Exc Cond.
With add a room.
$4500
(352) 726-3919
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, kg bd,like new,
60amp serv. NADA
$29K asking $25K
obo 352-382-3298


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



350 Chevy Motor
Speed Pro Cam
headers, edelbrock
carb. Approx. Miles
30K $1200 OBO
352-628-4240
LUGGAGE ROOF
CROSSRAILS
will fit any Chevy
Traverse $150
obo 352-503-6414
RV ROADMASTER
Hidden Face Plate
fits Dodge Ram 1500
asking $200,
727-251-7568



"BEST PRICE-
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
**352-426-4267"*
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ




AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE.
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 563-1 9 02
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.
BUICK
'00, Regal, LS, custom
4 DR. Loaded, only
70K stereo, leather, V6
alloys, garaged, clean
$4,650. 352-212-4882
Buick Century
Custom, 57k mi, extra
clean, full power. Runs
excellent $4500
(352) 257-3894 Cell
(352) 794-6069 Office


CADILLAC
1994 DEVILLE
79K MILES, CAR IS
PERFECT $4995
352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2005 STS
LOW MILES
NICE CAR
$9850, 352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2011 CTS, LOADED
ONLY 15K
MILES, SUNROOF
$27,850 352-628-5100
CHEVROLET
1999, Camaro,
Convertible
$6,990.
352-341-0018
CHEVY VETTE,
02 Convert. Royal Blue,
Saddle oak int. 16k mi,
Gar, Mint, $23,900 obo
call 352-489-1700
CHRYSLER
2006 PT Cruiser conv....
weather is getting
nice...time to drop the
top...call 352-628-4600
to set appointment
to see
FORD
1995 Escort wagon
4cyl., Auto.
call 352-628-4600
for low price and
appointment
FORD
2005, Focus
$4,850.
352-341-0018
FORD
2010, Pruis,
$17,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
2011 FIESTA SDN
36K MILES, "S"
MODEL, ONE OWNER
$9950, 352-628-5100
FORD
Mustang Cobra, Indy
500 Pace Car-1994,
Convertible, 7100 mi,
Gar. kept 252-339-3897
HONDA
2010 ACCORD LX,
85K MILES, NICE,
$12,850 352-628-5110
LINCOLN
1999 Continental
Exc. Condition, 27mpg
hwy, Garage kept,
$4500 352-422-4548
LINCOLN
Towncar 2010
29,900ml, gold w/beige
vinyl top, white leather
asking, $24,900
352-476-5061
MINI COOPER
2008 2DR, HARDTOP
ONLY 20K MILES,
SUPER CLEAN
$13980,352-628-5100
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

NISSAN
2005, Altima
$5,895
352-341-0018
PONTIAC
2003 Bonneville, must
SEV6, pw....pl....priced
to sell.....call jan at
352-628-4600 for
appointment
and pricing


2002 JAGUAR XJR
4 DR $7200. Super
Charged 4.0 V-8,
exc cond, auto trans,
leather int, AC. power
sun roof. XJR Sport
Pkg, factory chrome
wheels (352) 637-6443
CHEVY
'87, S10 Blazer, excel.
cond. 87K org. mi. on
body, 22K on engine
$1,700 obo 795-9187






I I I I I I I I
Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
I I I I I I I I



2002 Ford F 150 Sport
4X4 Super Cab 4 Dr,
Auto, Black, 5.4 V8,
Runs Great. $5500
(352) 257-3894 Cell
(352) 794-6069 Office
CHEVROLET
2001 S10 Pickup Ext.
Cab, no rust, no dents,
very clean, white, low
mileage $5600
352-419-4373 or
614-893-3268
CHEVROLET
98, 1500 long box,
4.3 V6, auto, air,14,500
orig. miles, Grg kept,
$8700 352-212-4678
FORD
1997 F250 V8 4.6L
Auto XL Supercab A/C
Cruise Toolbox 139,000
mi. $3850
352-212-9415
FORD
2004, Ranger
$7,990
352-341-0018
FORD
F150, 1978, 4x4
Runs good, 6" Lift kit,
$1,650 obo
(352) 564-4598
FORD
F-150XL white 1995,
3L, straight 6, 2WD,
6' bed w/ cab $3600
(352) 637-5331 LM
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




BUICK
2005 RANIER
46K MILES, CXL
LIKE NEW
$9850, 352-628-5100
CHEVY TRAIL-
BLAZER LT 05
exc. cond. asking $6000
obo, in Hernando
(904) 923-2902


FORD
2000 Explorer $2,000 or
best offer. 263000 miles
runs god needs rear
main seal. May need
ball joints. 476-7942
HONDA
1997 CRV, priced to
sell...it's a honda
auto. pwr windows
call 352-628-4600 for
special newspaper
pricing
KIA
2012 SOUL
ONLY 7K MILES
$15,800 352-628-5100
SUBARU
2011 FORESTER
29K MILES
ONE OWNER
$17850, 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
1997 RAV 4
ONLY 89K MILES,
NICE $5850,
352-628-5100




JEEP
2000, Grand
Cherokee 4x4, V8
pw, pl, priced to low
to list.....call adam at
352-628-4600 for
appointment




BAD BOY BUGGIE
2011 "ready to hunt"
Only $5998.
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS
2002, SPORTSMAN
700 CC 4X4 AUTO
READY FOR THE MUD
ONLY $4288
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS RZR 800 LE
TIME TO PLAY HARD
ONLY $8388
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
new tires, am/fm, CB
250 engine, hitch, 4spd,
auto & reverse, canoe
rack, $750. obo
352-637-4011




Harley Davidson
2005,883
LOW MILES
$3,995.

Harley Davidson
2006, STREET GLIDE
EZ FINANCE
$11,500.

HONDA
2009, VT750 AERO,
CLEAN
$4,995.

SUZUKI
2001, VOLUSIA
EZ FINANCE
$2,995.

KAWASAKI
1999, NOMAD
RUNS GREAT
$3,800.

LUCKY U CYCLES
352-330-0047
WWW.LUCKYU
CYCLES.COM


CLASSIFIED



Spr/tlt


JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492








Harley Davidson
2009 Street Glide
Black, 20k, many extras
$18,500 firm, pls call
*352-422-5448*
HARLY DAVIDSON
08, 1200cc Sportster
classic 976mi. show-
room condition, $9500
(352) 447-1244
HONDA
'04, Shadow, Aero,
750 CC, 16k Miles,
Like new $3,995
461-4518 or 586-2807
HONDA BLACK BIRD
CBR 1100 LOW LOW
MILES ONLY $3488.00
(352) 621-3678
Honda Gold Wing
1976,custommintcont
low miles $2500
503-6550/810-275-2500
Ask for Mark
HONDA ST1300
2006 MADE TO TOUR
ONLY $7786
(352) 621-3678
KAWASKI NINFA
650
LIKE NEW ONLY
$5488 (352) 621-3678
KYMCO
2009, AJILITY
SCOOTER GREAT
GAS SAVER ONLY
$998 (352) 621-3678
RAMPAGE
Motorcycle lift for p/u
truck. Like new $1800.
(352) 637-0397
SUZUKI
'06, Boulevard 800CC,
Lots of extras, like new
$3,995. 352-461-4518
352-586-2807
SUZUKI BURGMAN
AUTOMATIC TWIST
AND GO FUN ONLY
$4686 (352) 621-3678
SUZUKI GSXR 750
195 MILES "HOLD ON"
ONLY $9996
(352) 621-3678
TRIUMPH
1998 Triumph Thunder-
bird Sport 900. 24700
Miles, 150 on Over-
hauled engine. Must
see condition. D&D
Custom exhaust, new
battery. Great rider, su-
per fast. Asking $ 4500
OBO. Dunnellon area.
Some trades. Photos
available Call Rick
352-445-1573 or e-mail
LongShotArmsLLC@
gmail.com
VICTORY CROSS
ROADS
"GREAT American
MADE CRUSIER"
ONLY $12888
(352) 621-3678

v


210-0223 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Transportation Planning Organiza-
tion (TPO) Transportation Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) and Citizens Advisory
Committee (CAC) will meet on Wednesday, March 6, 2013 in Room 280 at the
Lecanto Government Complex, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461, to
discuss the business of the Transportation Planning Organization. The TAC will meet at
1:00 pm and the CAC will meet at 3:00 pm.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus CountyTransporation Planning Orgcni-
zation (TPO) Board will hold a Workshop on Thursday, March 7, 2013 at 5:15 pm in
Council Chambers at the Inverness Government Center, 212 W. Main Street, Inver-
ness, Florida 34450, to discuss the business of the Transportation Planning Organiza-
tion.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Transportation Panning Orgcni-
zation (TPO) Board will hold a meeting on Thursday, March 14, 2013 at 5:15 pm in
Council Chambers at the Inverness Government Center, 212 W. Main Street, Inver-
ness, Florida 34450, to discuss the business of the Transportation Planning Organiza-
tion.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation attis meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Citrus County Administrator's Of-
fice, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two (2)
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
If a person decidesto qpeal any decdon made by the Trnspcrtation Plnring
Organization with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

BY: /s/ Sheila Martin
Planning and Administration, TBARTA
February 23,2013.


209-0223 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Noiceunder
Rci-
tious Name Law, pursuant
to Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN, that the
undersigned, desiring to


engage in business
under
the fictitious name of
FLORIDA PAWN, located
at 2504 Highway 44 West,
Inverness, Florida 34453,
in the County of Citrus,
intends to register said
name with Florida De-
partment of State, Divi-


#1 Employment source is


www.ch ron icleon Iine.com


sion of Corporations, Tal-
lahassee, Florida.
DATED at Inverness, FL
this 18th day of February,
2013.
/s/ Michael J. Piccione
Owner
Published one (1) time in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle. February 23, 2013.


tIIIIll,,ill I
Y'',ui .'. ,, IJ lust.
L,2 L'a,


Classified


The Standard of the World


*Ultra Low-Mileage Lease for Qualified Lessees. $299/month 36 month lease. $2,899 due at signing (after all offers). Includes security deposit. Tax, title, dealer fees and optional equipment extra. Mileage charge of $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles.


I I


211-0227 SA & WCRN
Vs. Eric Peterson Case No: 09-2011-CA-003409 Notice of Sale Pursuant to Chapter
45
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.09-2011-CA-003409 DIVISION
PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ERIC PETERSON A/K/A ERIC C. PETERSON, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February
7, 2013, and entered in Case No. 09-2011-CA-003409 of the Circuit Court of the Fifth
Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida in which PHH Mortgage Corporation,
is the Plaintiff and Eric Peterson a/k/a Eric C. Peterson, Tanya Peterson a/k/a Tanya S.
Peterson, Martin Federal Credit Union, Tenant 1 n/k/a Erica Peterson, Tenant 2 n/k/a
Ame Peterson, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at 10:00 a.m.
on the 7th day of March, 2013 at www.realforeclose.com, the following described
property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure:
LOT 8 AND THE NORTH 165.79 FEET OF LOT 15, CARDINAL ACRES, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 109, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; LESS AND EXCEPT THE EAST 483 FEET THEREOF.
SUBJECT TO A 15.79 FOOT EASEMENT ALONG THE SOUTH LINE THEREOF FOR ROAD
RIGHT-OF-WAY
A/K/A 2847 W RENNET CT, LECANTO, FL 34461-8345
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days af-
ter the sale.
Albertelli Law, Attorney for Plaintiff
P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, (813) 221-4743, (813) 221-9171 facsimile
eService: servealaw@albertellilaw.com, CH -11-91451
If you are a person with a disability who needs assistance in order to participate in a
program or service of the State Courts System, you should contact the ADA Coordi-
nator, John Sullivan, (352) 341-6700 within two (2) working days of receipt of this no-
tice; if you are hearing or voice impaired, please call 1-800-955-8771. To file re-
sponse please contact Citrus County Clerk of Court, 110 N. Apopka Ave, Inverness,
FL 34450, Tel: (352) 341-6400; Fax: (352) 341-6413.
February 23 & 27, 2013.


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