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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 02-22-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03039

Full Text


Inside: Check out estate planning guide


clTRU-S CO U N T Y





wRONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com


J


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


VOL. 118 ISSUE 199


I FR IDAY I


Morning fog; partly
cloudy and breezy.
PAGE A4
TODAY & next morning
HIGH LOW
83 60

Flu shots
less effective
for elderly
A This season's flu
\ shot seemed to do
\ little to protect
\ people over 65
S from the worst
and most domi-
nant flu strain
spreading
around, a
small govern-
ment study
found. Vaccinated peo-
ple in that age group
had only a 9 percent
lower chance of going
to the doctor with flu
symptoms from the
main virus than people
who didn't get the shot.
The vaccine was
much better at protect-
ing younger people.
Q: If the flu shot did
such a poor job for
older folks, why should
they get it?
A: Government doc-
tors and other health
experts say it's better
than nothing. And
some scientists at the
Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention
think it's possible that
even this less effective
vaccine may have
lessened symptoms.
Q: Why was the shot
especially weak at pro-
tecting older people?
A: Older, worn-out
immune systems have
a harder time respond-
ing to flu vaccines.
Protection for those
over 65 is considered
good if they have a 30
or 40 percent lower
chance of getting sick
enough to see the doc-
tor. This year, the vac-
cine provided about 27
percent protection
against all three strains
but again, for the
most dominant virus it
was only 9 percent ef-
fective. On the upside,
for people in their 50s
and early 60s, protec-
tion against the worst
virus was actually 50
percent.
-Associated Press


Com ics ..........C8
Community ...... .C6
Crossword ....... .C7
Editorial ....... .A12
Entertainment ... B6
Horoscope ........ B6
Lottery Numbers .B4
Lottery Payouts .B6
Movies ........... C8
Obituaries ........ A6
Classifieds ...... C9
TV Listings .......C7


6 184IlI0118 U! III 002


No time




for play


Park Serv-
ices Special-
ist Ken
Torres han-
dles a young
alligator in-
side the rep-
tile house at
the park.
Feeding the
reptiles is
one of his pri-
mary jobs.


People think our daily job is all cuddling and giving the snakey
snakey some love, but that's rare.


Ken Torres
park services specialist at Ellie Schiller
Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Park Services Specialist Ken Torres, an 11-year employee at the Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park, feeds four captive manatees at the park. Torres is responsible for feeding the aquatic mammals.

Wildlifepark employee's job isn'tjust one bigpetting zoo


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
HOMOSASSA
ne day Ken Torres heard
a commotion from park
visitors near the gator
pond at Ellie Schiller Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife State
Park
Some baby ducks had gotten
into the pond and people
were yelling for someone to
help.
Torres, 40, a park service
specialist, tried tossing rocks
into the water to get the duck-
lings' attention, but they
wouldn't move.
"People were going crazy, so
I went into the gator pond to
get the ducks and all of a sud-
den a gator came out of the
water and scared the heck out
of me, and I jumped over the
fence," he said.
Just part of the job.


Citrus County WORKS


EDITOR'S NOTE
In this economic climate
where jobs are at a pre-
mium, the Chronicle is run-
ning an occasional series,
"Citrus County Works,"
profiling local Citrus
County people and the jobs
they perform. Today: Ken
Torres, park service spe-
cialist, Ellie Schiller Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park.
"Sometimes you're working
with a snake and she's not
having a good day and you'll
start cleaning the cage and
she'll come out of nowhere
and bite your hand. But when
you work with animals, they
do what animals do," he said.
"A lot of the animals here are


injured or have some kind of
problem, but they're all our
'babies."'
Torres said his schedule
may be Monday through Fri-
day, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., but his
days are never the same and
he has little time to just sit.
He may get to work and feed
the manatees or clean the
hippo's area. He may put on
diving gear and clean the Fish
Bowl, the park's underwater
observation area.
And contrary to what people
think, he doesn't get much
time to pet and play with the
animals.
"People think our daily job
is all cuddling and giving the
snakey snakey some love, but
that's rare," he said. "The job
See Page A5


Marino


takes


stand

Claims not to

recall killing
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
INVERNESS The in-
sanity defense took center
stage Thursday at the trial
of murder defendant Jen-
nifer Marino.
Marino's defense team
of Ed Spaight and Devon
Sharkey
tried to
lay bare
the inner-
workings
of a mind
a purport-
edly laid
waste by
Jennifer visions of
Marino demons,
angels and two genera-
tions of bipolar disorder
Meanwhile, the prose-
cution embarked on an of-
fensive it said is meant to
See .Page A5



County

on 'Daily


Show'

Episode spoof

right to ride

manatees'
PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
Some of the region's

burst of h See the
national clip at
ex po www.
s u r e chronicle
w h e n online.com
Comedy
Central's "The Daily
Show" featured a satirical
spot on the Tea Party and
the right to ride manatees.
The show aired Feb. 19
with Daily Show
See Page A5


Lawmakers eye changes to nuclear cost recovery


* Current state law
allows utility com-
panies to pre-
charge customers
for nuclear plants
to be built in the
future. State law-
makers want to
change that,
though there's dis-
agreement about
the best way to go
about it.


GOP, Democrats

offer different

approaches

Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Four Republican
state senators Thursday announced
plans to seek changes in a Florida law
that lets utilities charge customers for
future nuclear power plant construc-


tion even if it never gets built
A House member sponsoring repeal
legislation, though, said the Tampa Bay
area lawmakers' proposal won't work
because it doesn't go far enough and
utilities will find a way around their
revisions.
Sen. John Legg, R-Lutz, said the leg-
islation's intent is to protect consumers'
interests, assure accountability and
transparency and responsibly plan for
Florida's long-term energy needs.
"On the details, there is plenty of
See Page A2


Sen. John
Legg
Republican
senator wants
changes to
cost recovery
bill.


Sen.
Michelle
Vasilinda
Democrat
wants full
repeal of cost
recovery.


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'Dress in Blue Day'to raise colon cancer awareness


Special to the Chronicle

The Debby Hudson Colon Cancer
Foundation is promoting "Dress in Blue
Day" on Friday, March 1. This day is rec-
ognized nationwide, thanks to the Colon
Cancer Alliance, to bring attention to
colon cancer and celebrate the courage
of those affected by this disease.
The Inverness City Council proclaimed
March 1 "Dress in Blue Day" Individuals,
many businesses, and community groups
will be participating by wearing blue,
dressing business windows in blue, and
encouraging others to do the same.
By "going blue," the foundation hopes
to raise public awareness and get people
talking about this cancer
The Debby Hudson Colon Cancer
Foundation (www.debbys5k.org) was
started in memory of Debby Hudson, a
longtime special education teacher in In-
verness. Debby was diagnosed with Stage


4 colon cancer at age 51. She lived 14
months after diagnosis.
In addition to raising awareness, the
foundation's mission is to encourage
early screening and fund research to find
a cure.
Colon cancer is the second leading
cause of cancer death in the United
States, yet is 90 percent curable when de-
tected early Unfortunately, only 37 per-
cent of cases are diagnosed early,
according to Cindy Staten, president of
the foundation. One in 20 people will be
diagnosed with colon cancer It could be
a parent, friend, co-worker, or sibling.
Early detection through screening can
dramatically reduce the risk for this dis-
ease. This means having your colon
checked regularly starting at age 50 or
sooner if you are at higher risk.
For more information, contact Cindy
Staten at (352) 726-3216 or www
debbys5k.org.


Special to the Chronicle
From left, Ed and Cindy Staten, from The Debby Hudson Colon Cancer Foundation, re-
ceive the proclamation from Inverness Mayor Bob Plaisted.


LAW
Continued from Page Al

room for conversation,"
Legg said at a news confer-
ence. "But on these three
principles there will be no
room for compromise."
Legg's bill, which hasn't
yet been filed, would set a
deadline for construction
to begin and eliminate the
profit utilities can make on
customers' prepayments if
they fail to build a plant.
Another provision would
reduce interest utilities
now earn on carrying costs
on their projected con-
struction cost balances
from a current 8.5 percent
to an annual market rate,
said Sen. Jack Latvala, R-
Clearwater
"This is merely a Band-
Aid or even could be a
whitewash telling con-
sumers that they've done
something and not doing
anything, really," said Rep.
Michelle Rehwinkel
Vasilinda. The Tallahassee
Democrat is sponsoring a
bill that would repeal the
2006 nuclear cost recovery
law. "This half-measure
just doesn't move us
forward."
Rehwinkel Vasilinda ad-
vocates conservation and
renewable energy as alter-


natives to nuclear power
She said the Senate legis-
lation appears to be aimed
at heading off a repeal
vote. Legg denied that.
Utilities normally can-
not begin billing cus-
tomers for the
construction costs or up-
grades until generating fa-
cilities go into service. The
2006 law makes an excep-
tion to that policy for nu-
clear power
It was designed to en-
courage construction of nu-
clear plants, which are
riskier and much more ex-
pensive to build, to reduce
the state's reliance on fossil
fuels such as coal and natu-
ral gas, which cost more
and contribute to air pollu-
tion and climate change.
Latvala, though, said
"times have changed." He
noted gas prices have
fallen since 2006 along
with the need for new gen-
erating capacity because
Florida's population
growth has slowed due to
hard economic times.
The senators' proposal
also drew criticism from
Florida Power & Light Co.
The state's largest electric
utility, FPL serves 4.6 mil-
lion homes, businesses
and other customers in
South Florida and on the
state's east coast.
The Juno Beach-based


Utilities normally cannot begin
billing customers for the
construction costs or upgrades
until generating facilities go into
service. The 2006 law makes an
exception to that policy for
nuclear power. It was designed to
encourage construction of nuclear
plants, which are riskier and much
more expensive to build.


company issued a state-
ment opposing any
changes to the current law,
contending it will save
consumers billions in the
long run on fuel costs
while creating thousands
of jobs and helping
Florida's economy


"Those benefits aren't
theoretical they are real
and happening now," the
statement says.
FPL spokesman Mark
Bubriski said in an email
that FPL recently com-
pleted nuclear plant up-
grades financed by the cost


recovery clause, which are
saving customers $7.5 mil-
lion a month in fuel ex-
penses. The typical
residential customer using
1,000 kilowatt hours per
month currently pays a $1.65
nuclear cost recovery fee.
A spokesman for
Progress Energy Florida,
which has 1.6 million cus-
tomers in central and north
Florida, did not immediate
respond to a telephone
message seeking comment.
Progress, recently pur-
chased by North Carolina-
based Duke Energy, has
been charging nuclear cost
recovery fees for upgrades
to an existing plant at
Crystal River and a new
one planned for nearby
Levy County
Duke, though, has de-
cided to close the damaged
Crystal River facility, but
the utility stands to earn a




of Citrus County, I


$50 million profit on the
$500 million customers al-
ready have paid. Customers
also have paid $1.5 billion
for the Levy plant Duke
could earn $150 million if
that project is not built
The Senate plan drew
measured praise from the
Southern Alliance for
Clean Energy, a group that
also advocates conserva-
tion and renewable power
The group's lobbyist,
Susan Glickman, com-
mended the senators for
taking on the issue and
predicted once they exam-
ine the costs they'll "figure
out that we really don't
need this kind of nuclear
power going forward."
Latvala will be co-spon-
soring Legg's bill along
with Sens. JeffBrandes, R-
St. Petersburg, and Wilton
Simpson, R-New Port
Richey




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A2 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


^-,h


*<







Page A3 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22,2013



TATE &


(


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONIC


CLE


Around the
STATE

Citrus County
TPO advisory
groups to meet
The Citrus County Trans-
portation Planning Organi-
zation (TPO)
Transportation's Technical
Advisory Committee (TAC)
and Citizens Advisory Com-
mittee (CAC) will meet on
Wednesday, March 6, in
Room 280 at the Lecanto
Government Complex,
3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto.
The TAC will meet at
1 p.m. and the CAC will
meet at 3 p.m. Any person
requiring reasonable ac-
commodation at this meet-
ing because of a disability
or physical impairment
should contact the Citrus
County Administrator's Of-
fice, 110 N. Apopka Ave.,
Inverness, FL 34450, 352-
341-6560, at least two days
before the meeting. If you
are hearing or speech im-
paired, use the TDD Tele-
phone 352-341-6580.
Veterans case
manager at two sites
The Citrus County Vet-
eran Services Department
has a veterans case man-
ager on-site every
Wednesday at the Lakes
Region Library at 1511
Druid Road, Inverness, to
assist veterans applying for
benefits and to provide in-
formation for other veter-
ans' benefits.
The veterans' outreach
has expanded to include
the Homosassa Library at
4100 S. Grandmarch Ave.
Both locations will offer
hours between 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. to meet with the case
manager.
Citrus County Veteran
Services office is in the Cit-
rus County Resource Cen-
ter at 2804 W. Marc
Knighton Court, Lecanto.
To make an appointment
to meet with the case man-
ager at either site, call 352-
527-5915.

Tallahassee
Senate panel passes
smoking ban bill
Cities and counties could
bar smokers from beaches,
parks and other publicly
owned outdoor areas under
a proposal that passed an
early Senate test Thursday,
despite concerns from
restaurateurs.
By unanimous vote, the
Senate Regulated Indus-
tries Committees approved
the measure (SB 258),
which expands the state's
clear indoor air restrictions
to more outdoor venues.
Voters approved the Florida
Indoor Clean Air Act a
decade ago.
The proposal would allow
local governments to enact
smoke free areas on pub-
licly owned land as long as
smoking sections are also
available.
A similar bill stalled last
year after concerns over
smoking on sidewalks. The
current version prohibits
smoking only on sidewalks
in public parks, on public
beaches or in recreation
areas, continuing to allow
smoking on regular street-
-From staff and wire reports

Correction

The "Our Home Citrus"
section contained an error
in the listing for the Friends
of Citrus County Animal
Services. The organiza-
tion's website is
www.FriendsOfCCAS.org.
SA story on Page 12 of
the Feb. 20 Crystal River
Current, "Hats Off,"
misidentified the Crystal


River Christian Women's
Club.
Readers can alert The
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles
by mailing newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or by
calling 352-563-5660.


Panel hears land


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
The thorny issue of car tent
sales may rise again as correc-
tions are made to the county's
Land Development Code.
Adopted by the Citrus County
Board of County Commissioners
(BOCC) last summer, the LDC has
had six months of use to find
anomalies or glitches. Thursday's
meeting of the Citrus County Plan-
ning and Development Commis-
sion (PDC) began to address them.
Inverness Realtor Diana Mar-
cum asked for language deletion
in the section about temporary
outdoor retail sales. The previous
code allowed such sales, but the








DJ4


current one says sales must be
"associated with an existing busi-
ness," a phrase she asked to be
stricken because it prevents sales
of any items on a lot she owns.
Vincent Cautero, director of
Planning and Development, said
the phrase was meant to prevent
the sale of motor vehicles on va-
cant lots, an issue that was ad-
dressed in 2007.
Mark Pickett with the Crystal
Motor Car Co. and Shane Bryant
with Nick Nicholas Ford spoke
against striking the phrase.
"You need to get businesses to
play by the rules," Pickett said.
"Striking the language takes the
guts out of it. We'll get back to the
old days of anything goes."


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
CHASSAHOWITZKA You
may not know his face, but lis-
teners of local Christian radio
know the voice of Peter Swartz.
Since 1991, with the excep-
tion of two short-lived retire-
ments, Swartz has owned and
operated the only Christian
radio station that broadcasts
from Citrus County.
Now 70, Swartz is approaching
retirement from broadcasting.
He currently has his dual,
low-power stations WEKJ in
Homosassa (107.9 FM) and
WCFQ in Inverness (104.9) -
for sale, hoping to turn them
over to someone local, someone
with the same passion he's had
for the past 20-plus years.
"Radio is still viable and
people still listen to it, but it's
changed so much," Swartz said.
"There's not the same degree
of participation. When I first
got into broadcasting, you'd get
15 to 20 request calls an hour.


code 'glitch
Clark Stillwell said the LDC two more public
should not require a public hear- adoption.
ing for wetlands mitigation in a 0 Blain Bart(
mining application when it al- conditional use
ready accepts a state exemption. of sabal palm t
But Catherine Mills said the 7347 S. Black
county's public hearing would be mosassa, unde
the only time residents could about 4.84 acres
voice their concerns. Neighbors Ap
Rodney MacRae of Dock Mas- ith Chupko and
ters of Homosassa Inc. said the letters ofobjecti
LDC did not differentiate between tion, citing issu
a boat slip and a boat lift. One of use of fertilizer
his customers had to buy extra water use, noise
property to get a second boat lift. In a PowerPo
After much discussion, the PDC Barton answer
unanimously approved recom- There will no
mending the amendments to the ing on Thursdo
BOCC with its notes and minutes. next scheduled
The "glitch bill" will go through be on Thursday,


signing


ON THE NET
* WEKJ can be heard online at www.tunein.com/radio/
WEKJ-LP-1079-s114166.


Now if you did request times
you'd probably not even get
one call."
He said his "golden" years of
radio in Citrus County were dur-
ing the mid-1990s, when the sta-
tion, then WXJC (91.9 FM), was
housed in a doublewide mobile
home on Grover Cleveland
Boulevard in Homosassa. The
radio station hosted gospel sings,
chili cook-offs and barbecues on
the grounds and conducted two
fundraising drives a year It was a
central resource for local
churches to get out information,
and people with needs would
call the station to connect with
people who could help.
Swartz did a daily live morn-
ing broadcast, often alone,
sometimes with guests. The
rest of the programming was
locally recorded and nationally


syndicated content.
"By 2000, I was getting fraz-
zled," Swartz said. He retired,
selling the station to a local
church that eventually sold it to
Moody Radio Network.
Meanwhile, Swartz and his
wife, Jan, traveled the U.S.,
then returned to Citrus
County.
"After I left WXJC I had a
number of people that missed
the format, but there was nothing
available on the dial," he said.
In 2002, the FCC opened up
low-powered FM community
broadcasting opportunities and
Swartz and the late Jimmy
Sheets applied for licenses and
started WEKJ and WCFQ, run-
ning the programming from the
property on Grover Cleveland
until a series of tropical storms
in 2004 knocked the tower


bill'
c hearings before
on was granted a
to plant hundreds
;rees at 7290 and
berry Point, Ho-
eveloped lots of
in size.
ril Sauve, Mered-
John Moskes sent
ion to the applica-
es about privacy,
r and insecticide,
Sand traffic.
)int presentation,
ed the issues.
it be a PDC meet-
ay, March 7. The
PDC meeting will
March 21.


off


down. After that, Swartz moved
the operation to his home in
Chassahowitzka.
He said he can't tell how
many listeners he has, but he
knows people are listening. He
and the Rev. J.D. Hatfield, pas-
tor of Riverside Christian Fel-
lowship in Hernando, do a live
public affairs show from 7 to 9
a.m. on Tuesdays and Thurs-
days. During the 2012 election
cycle they interviewed every
local candidate running for
office.
"We got lots of calls and texts
from people who heard us, so
there's interest out there and
definitely a need for commu-
nity-based radio," Hatfield
said. "So, it's still valuable for
the community"
"Radio as we've known it
doesn't have the same presence
and importance in people's
lives as it once did," Swartz
said. "There are too many other
things. But it doesn't mean that
it's not listened to. It's just lis-
tened to differently"


March 1 deadline for tax exemptions and classifications


Special to the Chronicle
The 2013 deadline for the filing
of homestead and other exemp-
tions and classifications for Citrus
County is Friday, March 1.
Property Appraiser Geoffrey
Greene said applications may be
hand delivered or mailed and post-
marked by no later than March 1.
For eligibility, a complete applica-
tion with all supporting documen-
tation is required.
This deadline applies to:
Homestead exemption.
Widow/widower exemption.
All veterans disability
exemptions.


Deployed military exemption
for duty in specified active war
zones during 2012.
Other eligible physical dis-
ability exemptions.
Portability applications.
Agricultural or conservation
classification.
Conservation in perpetuity
exemption.
Institutional, education, reli-
gious or charitable exemptions.
Homestead exemption is the
most common application. Prop-
erty owners with an existing ex-
emption or classification should
have received the annual renewal
postcard during January Assuming


there are no changes in ownership
or other status affecting the exemp-
tion or classification, renewal is au-
tomatic. In that case, a homeowner
need not apply again so the
March 1 deadline does not apply A
new application is required if you
bought a new home and/or moved,
or recorded a deed from an indi-
vidual into a family trust for tax
planning purposes.
Filings after March 1 are gener-
ally held, and will be considered for
the 2014 tax roll. For good cause,
late filings may be eligible for con-
sideration at the discretion of the
property appraiser upon request
One final remedy for considera-


tion for the 2013 tax year is to peti-
tion the Value Adjustment Board
(VAB). The VAB application is filed
through the Citrus County Clerk of
Court's Office and should be sub-
mitted by no later than Sept 6 for
this tax year The application fee is
$15, and still requires good cause
for not filing by March 1.
For more information, visit the
property appraiser's website
www.citruspa.org, or call 352-341-
6600 in Inverness or 352-564-7130
in the Crystal River area. The
mailing address is: Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office, 210
N. Apopka Ave., Suite 200, Inver-
ness, FL 34450.


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
Peter Swartz, 70, owns and operates the only Christian radio station that broadcasts from Citrus County. He is looking forward to some-
one else taking over the controls.

Longtime county Christian radio broadcaster ready for retirement


" '






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sex offender caught



in Levy County



Man allegedly stole truck, ditched GPS receiver


Special to the Chronicle


Sexual offender Stephen .,
Thomas Siddons, 26, Old Town,
was arrested by Levy County
Sheriff's Office Deputy Leroy
Prine on Feb. 17.
Prine spotted what he believed
was a disabled vehicle a silver Ste
Chevy Blazer on U.S. 19 just Side
north of Inglis and stopped to as-
sist the driver, whom he identified as Sid-
dons. Siddons told him he was headed to
Indiana and said his truck just stopped
working. Siddons, who appeared very
nervous, gave some evasive answers,
causing the deputy to become suspicious.
The deputy then discovered that Sid-


phen
ions


dons was listed as a high-risk sex
offender on probation and was
required to wear an ankle moni-
toring device. He contacted Sid-
dons' probation supervisor, who
told him that the ankle monitor
had recently been cut off and
thrown in an area off U.S. 19 just
south of Chiefland.
It was also found that the vehi-
cle was stolen from a home in


Dixie County and that Siddons had no li-
cense.
Siddons was arrested and booked into
the Levy County Jail for driving while li-
cense suspended or revoked, grand theft
auto and violation of probation.
He was held on $40,000 bond.


Puppies die
in fire
MIAMI Investigators said
a fire swept through a Miami
strip mall, killing 30 English
bulldog puppies.
The Miami Herald reported
the puppies died of smoke in-
halation at Beverly Hills Pup-
pies. The fire broke out about
10 p.m. Wednesday at Fancy
Beads before damaging sev-
eral other stores in the shop-
ping center.
Officials said it took about
40 firefighters more than an
hour to put out. There was no
word on how the fire started.

Student stabbed in
neck during class
WINTER PARK-A Full Sail
University student has been
charged with stabbing a class-
mate in an apparent hate crime.
The Orange County Sher-
iff's Office said 29-year-old


Xavier Nunez attacked an-
other student with a screw-
driver during a statistics class
on Thursday.
Sherriff's spokesman Jeff
Williamson said Nunez uttered
racial slurs and stabbed a
black student multiple times in
the neck and shoulder area.
The victim was treated at
the scene and released.
Accused man
fit to stand trial
TAMPA-A court-
appointed psychologist has
concluded a Tampa Bay area
terrorism suspect named
Sami Osmakac is competent
to stand trial.
The Tampa Tribune re-
ported that U.S. Magistrate
Anthony Porcelli ordered the
competency review and dur-
ing a hearing Thursday, said
that a psychologist determined
Osmakac is competent.
Osmakac, a naturalized citi-


zen from Kosovo, was ar-
rested in 2012 on charges of
attempting to use a weapon of
mass destruction and posses-
sion of an unregistered ma-
chine gun.
From wire reports


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic battery
arrests
Jayson Rothgeb, 40, of
Homosassa, at 4:51 p.m. Sun-
day on a misdemeanor charge
of domestic battery. No bond.
Allison Olson, 34, of Ho-
mosassa, at 1:06 a.m. Mon-
day on a misdemeanor charge
of domestic battery. No bond.
DUI arrest
Mark Brown,42, of 50th
Avenue North, St. Petersburg,
at 8:27 p.m. Sunday on mis-
demeanor charges of driving
under the influence and driving
while license suspended or re-
voked. According to his arrest
affidavit, he was pulled over
after the Citrus County Sher-
iffs Office received a report of
a drunken driver in the area of
County Road 491 and County
Road 486. He reportedly told
a sheriff's deputy he had con-
sumed four beers and had dif-
ficulty performing sobriety
tasks. He refused to submit to
a test of his breath. Bond
$1,000.
Other arrests
Jacob Lane, 23, of Ho-
mosassa, at 1:45 a.m. Sunday
on a felony charge of battery
on a person 65 years of age or
older and a misdemeanor
charge of resisting an officer


ON THE NET
* For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on the Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports.


without violence. Bond $2,500.
Anesti Vega, 30, of Clay-
more Drive, Tampa, at 9:25
a.m. Sunday on a misde-
meanor charge of driving while
license suspended or revoked
and a Hillsborough County
warrant for violation of proba-
tion on an original felony
charge of battery. Bond
$2,000.
Jennifer Bogosta, 30, of
Whitewater Road, Valdosta,
Ga., at 9:05 p.m. Sunday on a
Citrus County warrant for vio-
lation of probation on an origi-
nal felony charge of forgery.
Steven Marcic, 20, of
West Silver Hill Lane, Lecanto,
at 12:06 p.m. Monday on a
Citrus County warrant for vio-
lation of probation on original
felony charges of burglary of a
dwelling and grand theft. No
bond.
Melissa Ingeneri, 44, of
South Alita Terrace, Ho-
mosassa, at 4:09 p.m. Mon-
day on misdemeanor charges
of retail petit theft and resisting
a law enforcement officer or
merchant during or after theft.


Bond $750.
John Sikes, 28, of West
Minuteman Street, Ho-
mosassa, at 5:30 p.m. Mon-
day on a Citrus County
warrant for violation of proba-
tion on an original felony
charge of possession of illegal
fishing device within Florida
waters. No bond.
Burglary
A vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 10:41 a.m. Wednes-
day, Feb. 20, in the 900 block
of N. Hollywood Circle, Crystal
River.
Thefts
A larceny petit theft was
reported at 1:09 p.m. Wednes-
day, Feb. 20, in the 100 block
of W. Citrus Springs Blvd.,
Dunnellon.
SA petit theft was reported
at 4:27 p.m. Feb. 20 in the
2400 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Invemess.
Vandalism
SA vandalism was reported
at 5:32 p.m. Feb. 19 in the
8200 block of W. Alton Court,
Homosassa.


notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


S.... Bid Notices...................... .......................... C 13

Meeting Notices........................................C13

Lien Notices .................................... C13

S Miscellaneous Notices.........................C13

Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices....C12, C13

Notice to Creditors/Administration.........C12

S. Self Storage Notices.................................C12

... Dissolution of Marriage Notices..............C12


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PR HI LO PR HI LO PR
NA NA NA '79 47 0.00 ,. J 78 45 0.00


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES
City H L F'cast City H
Daytona Bch. 81 64 pc Miami 83
Ft. Lauderdale 82 74 pc Ocala 83
Fort Myers 85 65 pc Orlando 84
Gainesville 83 59 pc Pensacola 73
Homestead 83 70 pc Sarasota 81
Jacksonville 82 61 c Tallahassee 75
Key West 81 73 pc Tampa 82
Lakeland 85 64 pc Vero Beach 82
Melbourne 81 69 pc W. Palm Bch. 82


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
ts
pc
ts
pc
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southeast winds from 5 to 10 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a moderate chop. Partly cloudy
and warm today.


82 52 0.00 84 50 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exlus vedaily
forecast by:
S- -p TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 83 Low: 60
AM fog; Partly cloudy and breezy

rl SATURDAY & SUNDAY MORNING
High: 83 Low: 65
Partly sunny; 20% chance of a shower

SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 80 Low: 62
Partly sunny; 30% chance of showers

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Thursday 82/50
Record 87/25
Normal 74/46
Mean temp. 66
Departure from mean +6
PRECIPITATION*
Thursday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.90 in.
Total for the year 1.00 in.
Normal for the year 5.18 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 8
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Thursday at 3 p.m. 30.03 in.


DEW POINT
Thursday at 3 p.m. 56
HUMIDITY
Thursday at 3 p.m. 41%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, Oak, Grasses
Today's count: 9.5/12
Saturday's count: 11.1
Sunday's count: 8.7
AIR QUALITY
Thursday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
2/22 FRIDAY 2:35 8:47 2:59 9:11
2/23 SATURDAY 3:18 9:30 3:41 9:53


0
FEB. 25


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
S SUNSET TONIGHT...........................6:26 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:01 A.M.
4 0 ) MOONRISE TODAY...........................3:45 PM.
MARCH 4 MARCH11 MARCH19 MOONSET TODAY ............................4:37 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
informationon drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers


City
Chassahowitzka*
Crystal River**
Withlacoochee*
Homosassa***


High/Lov
2:45 a/11:4
1:06 a/9:10
12:37 p/6:5
1:55 a/10:4


**At King's Bay
Friday
w High/Low
8a 4:29 p/11:35 p
a 2:50 p/8:57 p
8 a 11:47 p/6:45 p
7a 3:39 p/10:34 p


***At Mason's Creek
Saturday
High/Low High/Low
3:39 a/12:25 p 4:59 p/-
2:00 a/9:47 a 3:20 p/9:43 p
1:07 p/7:35 a --- :31 p
2:49 a/11:24 a 4:09 p/11:20 p


Gulf water
temperature


64
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Wed. Thu. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.30 28.27 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.79 37.77 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 38.68 38.67 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.00 39.98 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


C I
Lncnru~,8~ Hno~~u~a
rlI..._ ~v


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
FRIDAY


Thursday Friday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 24 18 pc 37 26
Albuquerque 46 27 .22 pc 44 25
Asheville 60 24 r 41 37
Atlanta 64 34 ts 52 44
Atlantic City 37 22 r 41 36
Austin 79 59 .01 pc 66 38
Baltimore 38 23 r 38 33
Billings 38 20 .04 pc 39 26
Birmingham 63 33 .02 ts 66 49
Boise 43 20 r 47 31
Boston 33 25 s 37 29
Buffalo 21 16 rs 38 30
Burlington, VT 19 11 .02 s 33 25
Charleston, SC 65 34 ts 62 56
Charleston, WV 36 16 r 49 39
Charlotte 58 29 ts 41 38
Chicago 32 19 i 36 25
Cincinnati 32 21 sh 52 30
Cleveland 22 18 .01 i 37 30
Columbia, SC 65 32 ts 46 45
Columbus, OH 29 22 sh 44 29
Concord, N.H. 27 19 s 37 21
Dallas 68 43 .13 s 54 32
Denver 23 12 .11 pc 41 20
Des Moines 26 19 .08 sn 29 12
Detroit 27 21 i 35 30
El Paso 51 33 pc 54 33
Evansville, IN 33 21 .17 pc 49 26
Harrisburg 35 23 i 36 31
Hartford 31 24 pc 39 26
Houston 75 60 .29 pc 72 45
Indianapolis 31 17 .06 sh 43 26
Jackson 60 42 .96 ts 76 44
Las Vegas 53 37 s 57 43
Little Rock 37 32 1.25 s 51 30
Los Angeles 61 45 pc 63 48
Louisville 39 21 .02 sh 55 31
Memphis 46 34 .86 pc 53 31
Milwaukee 28 18 i 33 25
Minneapolis 22 7 sn 26 14
Mobile 65 42 ts 74 56
Montgomery 70 33 ts 70 57
Nashville 48 25 .18 c 62 34
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Thursday Friday
City H LPcp.FcstH L
New Orleans 75 55 .01 ts 72 57
New York City 34 24 pc 41 33
Norfolk 44 29 r 42 40
Oklahoma City 37 32 .74 s 40 27
Omaha 26 21 .39 c 25 6
Palm Springs 63 42 s 69 45
Philadelphia 37 25 r 40 33
Phoenix 58 39 s 62 43
Pittsburgh 25 19 i 38 35
Portland, ME 29 24 s 37 24
Portland, Ore 46 40 .03 r 46 36
Providence, R.I. 34 25 pc 39 27
Raleigh 54 25 r 39 36
Rapid City 25 19 .08 pc 33 17
Reno 46 27 pc 53 30
Rochester, NY 22 14 c 37 31
Sacramento 61 33 pc 64 42
St. Louis 32 21 .91 pc 37 19
St. Ste. Marie 20 1 sn 29 25
Salt Lake City 35 26 .02 sn 33 28
San Antonio 80 63 s 71 41
San Diego 59 48 pc 63 49
San Francisco 57 44 pc 58 45
Savannah 71 35 ts 67 58
Seattle 44 39 .07 r 49 39
Spokane 37 27 .04 rs 42 31
Syracuse 21 14 .04 pc 35 30
Topeka 27 21 .58 pc 26 6
Washington 41 25 r 39 35
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 92 McAllen, Texas LOW -26 Crane Lake,
Minn.
WORLD CITIES


FRIDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 88/70/s
Amsterdam 33/25/c
Athens 63/47/r
Beijing 40/31/pc
Berlin 30/27/c
Bermuda 63/57/pc
Cairo 77/55/pc
Calgary 37/23/pc
Havana 86/69/pc
Hong Kong 72/63/pc
Jerusalem 68/50/pc


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


59/52/sh
35/30/c
50/38/sh
75/45/s
32/27/pc
22/10/pc
34/25/pc
89/73/s
53/45/sh
73/70/sh
46/36/pc
32/32/sf
30/29/c


SC I T R U S


C U N T Y ---


State BRIEFS


RIONICL -E
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To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
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*Subscription price Includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
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Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
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Where to find us:
Meadowcrest
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Brr H, 1624 N.
Dunken eld Meadowcrest
'IeM- -C3nncndale Dr Blvd.
Ave C o e Crystal River,
A M \eadowcreS1 FL 34429
N I \\ :1"'

SInverness
FI Cur ntju~ office
TompkinsSt. g | :iujr
T o n 106 W M ain
/ ~ St.,
41 4 Inverness, FL
> 34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 63 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold ................................................ .......................... .... Editor, 564 -2 93 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trlsta Stokes .......................... ................................... Online M manager, 564-2946
Trlsta Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ..................................................M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Com m unity content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content ................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................... ........................................................................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Phone 352-563-6363
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


A4 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013


*





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JOB
Continued from Page Al

is more the husbandry,
taking care of the animals
and their (environments)."
He added that occasion-
ally he gets time to play
with the snakes and the
baby alligators.
Torres said he originally
had wanted to be a veteri-
narian, but during college
in his native Puerto Rico
he spent too much time
partying and not enough
time studying. He gradu-
ated with a bachelor's de-
gree in biology, then moved
to South Florida in 1999.
"When I moved to
Miami, my dad found a
coot, a wading bird, on the
side of the road, so I took it
to a wildlife rehab center
in Broward County. I saw
what they did there and
thought it was pretty neat,"
he said. "I was 28, had no
job, living with my mom
and dad in Miami and I
got hired as a wildlife care
person. A few months after
that, I was promoted to
wildlife rehab and release
coordinator."
Torres said he occasion-
ally brought injured birds
to the wildlife park in Ho-
mosassa and fell in love
with it. He was hired 11
years ago.
"When I started working
here, I knew some of the


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Visitors from around the world visit the Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park to get an up-close experience with both captive and
wild West Indian manatees as well as many native Florida wildlife species.


birds because I had ested in a career working
brought them here. I knew with wildlife, Torres said a
their history, so that was degree inbiologyis helpful.
neat," he said. Also, Santa Fe College in
For those who are inter- Gainesville has a Zoo Ani-


mal Technology program "Alot of jobs, they want two
that takes fewer than three years experience. If you're
years to complete. 16 or 18 years old and
"The main thing is to you've been volunteering,
start volunteering," he said. that looks good, it shows


that you care."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. com.


SHOW
Continued from PageAl

correspondent Al Madrigal visit-
ing Crystal River and getting up
close to manatees at Three Sis-
ters Springs.
"You should be able to ride a
manatee," author Michael Coff-
man said, giving the tea party
point of view, linking manatee
riding to states' rights. "People
used to ride manatees all the
time."
Speed limits for boaters came


up, as did a well-publicized ar-
rest of a woman photographed
riding a manatee.
This led to a juxtaposed inter-
view with Patrick Rose, execu-
tive director of Save the
Manatee Club. Madrigal went on
to visit Crystal River, where he
was filmed riding a person in a
manatee suit down King's Bay
Drive.
Armed with a saddle for his
manatee ride, Madrigal visited
River Ventures, a manatee swim
tour company in Crystal River.
He is shown sitting through the
educational portion of the tour


before hitting the water.
Filmed underwater, Madrigal,
still wearing a suit and tie, never
attempts to ride a manatee, but
tries a typical flat-hand touch as
the camera-shy mammal scur-
ries away
While the episode got a lot of
mention on Facebook and web-
sites that typically comment on
the show, there has not been a
lot of local feedback.
Ivan Vicente, visitor services
specialist with the Crystal River
National Wildlife Refuge, said
they had not received any phone
calls or local reaction. However,


a lot of people had emailed with
links to the video.
Vicente helped facilitate the
show and issued the permit.
"They were keeping every-
thing very low-key and did not
want us to disclose they were
here," he said. "It's going to be
good for Citrus County. People
are going to wonder where 'The
Daily Show' went to see mana-
tees in crystal-clear water"
He said next there will be a 14-
page National Geographic
spread coming out on the mana-
tees and they will be shown on a
Discovery Channel North Amer-


ican nature show in May
"The more there are, the bet-
ter it will be for the local econ-
omy," he said.
Kim Blanco with River Ven-
tures, said they had not received
any response yet, just some Face-
book postings. She said the show
selected them after researching
local tour companies. And even
though it was satire, she said
their intention was to express
their point of view on protecting
and preserving manatees.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Pat Faherty at 352-564-2924 or
pfaherty@chronicleonline. com.


TRIAL
Continued from Page Al

show Marino knew right
from wrong when she al-
legedly carjacked a woman
in a shopping plaza park-
ing lot and subsequently
ran her over with her own
vehicle, killing her
Marino, 34, of Longwood,
is charged with murdering
64-year-old Mary Haynie of
Lecanto on April 7, 2010,
after a scuffle involving the
carjacking. Marino is
charged with first-degree
murder and faces a life
sentence if convicted.
Officials and witnesses
said Haynie ran out of a
pet grooming business in a
shopping plaza and tried
to stop Marino, but Marino
reportedly pushed Haynie
to the ground and ran her
over with the SUV Marino
then proceeded to leave
the parking lot, authorities
said. Haynie later died
from her injuries at Citrus
Memorial hospital.
Marino was arrested
later that day in Wildwood.
Thursday, the defense
began the day with
Marino's mother, Barbara
Marino, who told jurors of
her own lifelong battle with
bipolar disorder and how
she watched her daughter
descend into mental illness
- with things getting worse
after the younger Marino
bore witness to the terror-
ist attack on the World
Trade Center on Sept. 11,
2001. Marino's place of em-
ployment was said to be lo-
cated about two blocks
away from the site.
Then Marino took the
stand in her own defense, at
times becoming confused
and emotional, such as
when as she recalled the
events of the Sept 11 attacks.
She also spoke about hav-


ing a lack of recollection
and told stories of seeing and
hearing things; she would
variously describe her vi-
sions as angels, demons or
even God talking to her
Marino described a
childhood marked by her
mother's mental illness, an
absent father and being
raped as a teen and having
to miss two years of school
because of it. She went on
to graduate from college,
only to be confronted with
images of death she said
she witnessed during the
Sept 11 attacks. She was di-
agnosed with post-traumatic
stress disorder because of
it, she told jurors.
She also talked about
her rebirth as a Christian
and her numerous stints in
various mental institu-
tions. Marino told of es-
caping from many of them.
She recounted a month
preceding the death of
Haynie, but told prosecu-
tor Pete Magrino she does
not remember anything
after she jumped into the
woman's vehicle.
"I remember hearing
voices from the dog saying
'Just do it,"' Marino told
jurors.
She said that's when she


acted by jumping into
Haynie's vehicle, but said she
does not recall anything else.
Probation officer Ariene
Huckabee testified that
she called the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office to
conduct a well-being
check on Marino when she
reportedly wandered into
their offices in Inverness.
Huckabee could be
heard in the recorded call
saying Marino was not
right and was walking
around with suitcases and
homeless.
Dr. Ava C. Land, a psy-
chologist who worked with
Marino, testified that she
concluded after collecting
all her data that Marino
exhibited symptoms of
psychosis.
"I believe that she
clearly was not sane at the
time" of the killing of
Haynie.
But prosecutor Ma-
grino challenged
Land about her data-col-
lection methods and her
experience as an expert
witness in murder trials.
At one point Magrino
asked: "Can people fake
the symptoms of insanity?"
- indicating a suspicion
Marino was doing so.


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After Land and Magrino
argued about various psy-
chiatric labels and related
issues, the defense rested.
As rebuttal, Magrino
called back the lead detec-
tive in the case, Matt Tay-


lor, to offer more insight
into Marino's state of mind
shortly after her arrest in
Wildwood. Taylor was the
first to interview her, and
Marino on Thursday said
she did not recall her en-


counter with Taylor. A
videotape of that interview
has already been pre-
sented in court.
The case continues in
Judge Ric Howard's court-
room Friday at 8:30 a.m.


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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lou Myers, Mr. Gaines

on A Different World,' dies


Associated Press


CHARLESTON, WVa.
- Actor Lou Myers, best
known for his role as
ornery restaurant owner
Mr. Gaines on the televi-
sion series "A Different
World," has died.
Tonia McDonald of
Myers' nonprofit, Global
Business Incubation Inc.,
said Myers died Tuesday
night at Charleston Area
Medical Center in West
Virginia. She said he was
76. McDonald said
Wednesday Myers had
been in and out of the
hospital since before
Christmas and collapsed
recently An autopsy was
planned.
A native of Chesapeake,
WVa., Myers had returned
to the state and lived in
the Charleston area.


His TV credits included
"NYPD Blue," "E.R.," "The
Cosby Show," "Touched by
an Angel," and more. He
also appeared in a number
of films, including "Tin
Cup," "How Stella Got
Her Groove Back," "Wed-
ding Planner" and more.
"A Different World" ran
from 1987-93 and origi-
nally starred Lisa Bonet
from "Cosby" fame. Myers
said he owed his intro-
duction to Hollywood to
Bill Cosby
Myers also appeared on
Broadway including "Cat
on a Hot Tin Roof"
African American Style
and "Oprah Winfrey's The
Color Purple."
He won a NAACP "Best
Actor" award for playing
the Stool Pigeon in "King
Hedley II," a play by Au-
gust Wilson.


Associated Press
British musician Kevin Ayers is pictured in 1974 in a
film made available by Max Films Limited. Ayers, the
influential singer-songwriter who co-founded the band
Soft Machine, died in France, his record label said Thursday.

Soft Machine co-founder

Ayers dies in France


Associated Press

LONDON Kevin
Ayers, an influential
singer-songwriter who co-
founded the band Soft
Machine, has died in
France, his record label
said Thursday He was 68.
Ayers was an important
figure in the British psy-
chedelic movement
spearheaded by the Beat-
les in the late 1960s. He
did not achieve sustained
commercial success, but
his work is treasured by
musicians and many fans.
Jack McLean, assistant
to the managing director
of Lo-Max Records in
London, said Thursday
that Ayers' body had been
discovered in his bed at
his home in the medieval
village Montolieu in the
south of France.
"We believe he died
Feb. 18 of natural causes
and was found two days
later," McLean said. "He
hadn't been ill, but he
lived a rock 'n' roll
lifestyle and everything
that comes with that."


Ayers, who was raised
partly in Malaysia, moved
to Canterbury on his re-
turn to England and
formed Soft Machine in
1966 with drummer and
singer Robert Wyatt They
took the name from a novel
by beat generation author
William Burroughs.
The band was part of the
"Canterbury scene" a
group of bands known for
a pastoral approach to music
that combined elements
of jazz, folk and rock.
Soft Machine and Pink
Floyd both enjoyed wide
followings for their imag-
inative and experimental
take on psychedelia.
Ayers also had a
lengthy solo career and
made many collaborative
records, working with Syd
Barrett, Brian Eno, Nico
and others. He released
"The Unfairground" in
2007, ending a lengthy
hiatus with an album that
was critically acclaimed.
The record company
said Ayers is survived by
three daughters and a
sister.


Nevada governor signs

online gambling bill


Associated Pr


press


CARSON CITY, Nev -
Gov Brian Sandoval
signed legislation Thurs-
day legalizing online
gambling in Nevada, cap-
ping a dizzying day at the
Legislature as lawmakers
passed the bill through
the Assembly and Senate
as an emergency A
measure. AB.
Nevada wanted auth(
to beat New Jer-
sey, its East Coast Neva
casino rival, to
the online gam- entei
bling punch.
New Jersey Gov comI
Chris Christie with
previously ve-
toed an online sta
wagering bill but
has indicated he to C
may sign an Inte
amended ver-
sion next week. p0o
Sandoval and
Nevada legislative lead-
ers said it was important
for Nevada to remain at
the forefront of gambling
regulation.
"This is an historic day
forthegreatstateofNevada,"
Sandoval said, flanked by
dozens of state lawmak-
ers. "Today I sign into law
the framework that will
usher in the next frontier
of gaming in Nevada."
AG Burnett, chairman
of the Nevada Gaming
Control Board, said the


state already has about 20
applications from various
operators, equipment and
software vendors to be li-
censed for online gambling.
AB114 authorizes Ne-
vada to enter into compacts
with other states to offer
Internet poker. It sailed
through both the Assem-
bly and Senate on Thurs-
day after a joint
114 hearing before
prizes the two judiciary
committees.
da to Gambling reg-
ulators will now
r into come up with
at regulations dic-
pacts tating compact
other parameters.
Lawmakers in
tes 2011 passed a bill
that put Nevada
offerr in position to le-
rnet galize Internet
gambling if the
ker. federal govern-
ment sanctioned
it. But when those efforts
failed in Congress, San-
doval said Nevada would
work toward agreements
with other states.
Several other states
began looking into online
gambling after the De-
partment of Justice is-
sued a letter in 2011
stating that the federal
Wire Act of 1961, often
used to crack down on
gambling over the Inter-
net, only applies to sports
betting.


Robert Kopp
HUDSON
Robert H. Kopp of Hud-
son, Fla., passed away Feb.
20, 2013. Bob and his wife,
Gizelle own Furniture Palace
in Inverness. Bob moved to
Florida
f r o m
Clinton,
N.J., in
1987. He
opened
the family
business
in 1993.
Robert He is
Kopp survived
by his wife Gizelle; daugh-
ters Lauren and Kristen;
son Charles; brother Don;
grandsons Ryan and Jason;
nephews Austin and Bryce.
He was predeceased by
his daughter Melinda.
A memorial service will
be 4 to 6 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 23, 2013, at Downing
Funeral Home in Spring
Hill. In lieu of flowers,
please donate to the SPCA
of West Pasco.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

William 'Bill'
Syers, 60
HOMOSASSA
William R. "Bill" Syers,
60, of Homosassa, Fla.,
passed away Monday, Feb.
19, 2013, at Brooksville Re-
gional Medical Center,
Brooksville. A native of
Elizabeth, N.J., he was
born
March 21,
1952, to
Edward
and Doris
S (Neuner)
Syers, one
of three
children.
William Mr. Syers
Syers was a re-
tired police officer for the
city of Elizabeth, retiring
at the rank of detective
with 30 years of service.
Bill, as he was known to
many, moved to Homosassa
in 2003 from Asbury, N.J.,
and is survived by his wife of
more than 22 years Chris-
tine Syers of Homosassa;
brother John Syers (wife
Janet) of Forked River, N.J.;
brother Edward Syers III
(wife Ellen) of Garwood,
N.J.; and nieces Linda and
Elizabeth as well as nephews
John Jr and Michael.
A celebration of life will
take place at 2 p.m. Satur-
day, Feb. 23, 2013, at
Wilder Funeral Home, Ho-
mosassa, wwwwilder
funeral.com.

Ida Broecker, 86
INVERNESS
Ida L. Broecker, 86, In-
verness, died Feb. 20,2013,
surrounded by her loving
family at New Horizon
Senior Citizen's Home. Ida
was born Oct. 14, 1926, in
Campbell, Minn., to the late
August and Opal (Hocking)
Hinrichs. She was employed
as a visiting nurse in Tampa,
where she lived since 1948.
After her retirement, she
moved to Inverness in 1990.
Ida was preceded in
death by her husband of 61
years David H. Broecker
in 2008; a sister; and one
brother. Left to cherish her
memory are her sons
David A. Broecker, Marsh-
field, Mass., Eugene R. and
his wife Raean Broecker,
Clyde, N.C.; daughter Linda
and her husband Ray-
mond Lorenzi, Jasper, Ga.;
brothers Gene, Lowell and
Harland Hinrichs, all from
Minnesota; grandchildren
Brian (Danielle) Broecker,
Kristen (Jonathan)
Chilcote, Jason Broecker
and Lillian Strong; and
three great-grandchildren.
Private arrangements
under the care of Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

To Place Your

("In Memory" ad,

Judy


Moseley
at 564-2917
jmoseley@chronicleonline.com

fill I~


I I


Yvonne Little
Yvonne Little, retired
nurse and long-time volun-
teer at Seven Rivers Re-
gional Medical Center,
passed on peacefully Feb-
ruary 14, 2013. She is sur-
vived by her daughters,
Robin Cummings and
RenSe Sheldon, and by
her grand-
sons, Dou-
glas and
Alexan-
der Cum-
S mings.
In addi-
tion to
Yvonne's
Yvonne love of
Little caring for
others, she was an expert
seamstress, an accom-
plished dancerand a tal-
ented musician. She was
also an active member of
West Citrus Elks Ladies.
Yvonne's wishes were
that no service be held
upon her passing. How-
ever, she was comforted in
her final days by the won-
derful people in the Hos-
pice Care Unit at Citrus
Memorial Hospital.
Yvonne requested that do-
nations be made in her
memory to Hospice of Cit-
rus County, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464. Online condolences
may be sent to the family
at www.HooperFuneral
Home.com.
Arrangements were by
the Homosassa Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes.




Robert 'Bobby'
Delesky, 75
PINE RIDGE
Robert 'Bobby' Adam
Delesky, 75, of Pine Ridge,
Fla., passed away Monday,
Feb. 18, 2013. Bobby was
born Nov 8, 1937, in
Manville, N.J. He was a
veteran of the U.S. Army
and a police officer for 42
years. Bobby moved to this
area in 2005 from
Manville,
N.J. He
was of the
Catholic
faith and
a lifetime
member
of the
American
Robert Legion.
Delesky Bobby
was preceded in death by
his brothers Edward, Lenny
and Richard Delesky; and
by his sister Theresa
Erdek. Survivors include
his wife Debra Delesky of
Pine Ridge; son David De-
lesky of Hillsborough, N.J.;
daughter Constance Mik-
lowcic of Hillsborough, N.J.;
stepdaughter Catherine
La Haye of Charlotte, N.C.;
brother Wally Delesky of
Easton, Pa.; sister Barbara
Bingert of Hillsborough,
N.J.; grandchildren Owen
and Alex; nephew Roger
Erdek; and several other
nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be
at Fero Funeral home
11 a.m. Saturday The fam-
ily will receive friends at
the funeral home Friday
evening from 6 to 8 p.m.
Fero Funeral Home
Beverly Hills, www.fero
funeralhome.com.

Eugene
Robinson, 93
CITRUS SPRINGS
Eugene E. Robinson, 93,
of Citrus Springs, Fla., died
Feb. 20, 2013, under the care
Hospice of Citrus County
in Lecanto. Arrangements
by McGan Cremation Serv-
ice LLC, Hernando.


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Frederick 'Will'
Brundick V, 32
CRYSTAL RIVER
Frederick W "Will"
Brundick V passed away
in a tragic accident at his
home in Crystal River Fri-


Frederick
Brundick


day, the
15th of
February,
10 days
short of
his 33rd
birthday.
An avid
outdoors-
man and a
licensed


captain, he was a profes-
sional fishing guide on the
Nature Coast of Florida,
chasing the giant tarpon
and redfish with his fly rod
"Grits." He could bow hunt
with the best of them. As a
graduate of Camden Mili-
tary Academy, he had a
great fondness for the mil-
itary and was a patriot. He
was a member of the
Sigma Chi fraternity
Will is survived by his
best friend, soul mate and
wife Ditte', whom he met
while going to school in
Tallahassee. Survivors
also include his father De-
rick and stepmother Jan;
stepbrother Emerson
Brundick of Jacksonville;
his mother Judith Marie
Taylor and stepfather Rick
Bishop of Marianna; his
sister Margy, husband
Danny, and their son Riley
Anderson of Jackson,
Miss.; his father and
mother-in-law Daryl and
Jane' Seaton of Crystal
River, and their children;
brother-in-law Jake
Seaton of Clearwater; sis-
ter-in-law Lena and hus-
band Mike Noel and their
children Jack and Abigail
of Crystal River, all of
whom helped him learn
the business of guiding
and the beauty of the Na-
ture Coast. His grandfa-
ther, George Dekle Taylor,
MD, of Jacksonville was al-
ways a large part of Will's
life. There is also a very
large host of surviving
family and extended fam-
ily who helped instill a be-
lief in Will that he could be
a great husband and follow
his dream of being the best
at what he was doing.
A private memorial
service will be in Crystal
River. The families re-
quest that donations be
made in the memory of
Capt. Will Brundick to the
Tarpon DNA Study, 1600
Ken Thompson Pkwy,
Sarasota, FL 34336, the
Coastal Heritage Museum
in Crystal River or Angels
for Allison in Jacksonville.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Joseph
Greenman, 53
LECANTO
Joseph Greenman, 53, of
Lecanto, passed away
peacefully Feb. 17, 2013.
He was a mason by trade.
He leaves behind a loving
mother; a wife; one daughter;
one stepdaughter: one son;
two sisters; and one brother
Special thanks to Hos-
pice and Cypress Cove for
their excellent care.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Dorothe
Seller, 82
BEVERLY HILLS
Dorothe Seiler, 82, of
Beverly Hills, Fla., died
Feb. 17, 2013, at Life Care
Center of Citrus County in
Lecanto. Arrangements by
McGan Cremation Service
LLC, Hernando.



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C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L Pace
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


Sharon
Delehanty, 69
HERNANDO
Sharon A. Delehanty, 69
of Hernando, Fla., died
Feb. 21, 2013. Visitation,
2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23,
2013, at Fero Funeral
Home. Interment follows
at 3 p.m., at Fero Memorial
Gardens.

Mark
Atkinson, 52
LAKE PANASOFFKEE
Mark E. Atkinson, 52,
Lake Panasoffkee, died
Feb. 21, 2103, at his resi-
dence. Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with
Crematory is in charge of
private arrangements.

Carole
Shackleton, 71
HOMOSASSA
Carole Shackleton, 71, of
Sugarmill Woods, Ho-
mosassa, passed away sud-
denly Feb. 14, 2013. Born
in London, England, Car-
ole en-
joyed the
last 15
Years in
S Sugarmill
Woods.
Loving
mother of
Angela
Carole Tanzer,
Shackleton son-in-law
Philip Tanzer and devoted
grandmother of Chris
Tanzer and his wife Jackie.
She will be sadly missed
by all whose lives she
touched through the years,
and especially by her fe-
line companion Daisy Lou.
She requested no fu-
neral, but friends and fam-
ily will be welcomed at the
Tanzer home from 2 to
4 p.m. Sunday, March 3,
2013. A private family me-
morial will be at a later
date. No flowers, please.
Tributes, if desired, in Ca-
role's name to your choice
of charity. Arrangements
under the care of Wilder
Funeral Home in Ho-
mosassa, www.wilder
funeral.com.

Dirk Hoag, 73
CITRUS SPRINGS
Dirk Hoag, 73, of Citrus
Springs, Fla., passed away
Feb. 18, 2013, under the
care of Hospice of Citrus
County.
Dirk was
born April
13, 1939,
in Ham-
burg, Ger-
many, and
became a
natural-
Dirk ized citi-
Hoag zen in
1975. He has resided with
his family in Florida since
1970. Dirk owned and op-
erated Dirk's Auto Clinic
for more than 30 years in
Crystal River.
Mr. Hoag is survived by
his wife of 53 years Evelyn
Hoag; one son, Bernard
Hoag of Canton, Ga.; and
one daughter, Mona Ron-
dolino of Citrus Springs.
Donations in lieu of
flowers: Multiple Myeloma
Research Foundation, 383
Main Ave., 5th Floor, Nor-
walk, CT 06851 or Hospice
House, 3350 West Audubon
Park Path, Lecanto, FL
34461.
Arrangements entrusted
to Fero Funeral Home.
Sign the guest book at
ww. chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
For information, call
352-563-5660.


Gia,. E. aa.
Funeral Home With Crematory
MARCELLA MILLER
Service: Fri. 11:00 AM
JAMES TAYLOR
Service: Florida National Cemetery
Fri. 2:00 PM
IDA L. BROECKER
Arrangements Pending
JOE GAINES mII
Private Arrangements
LAWANDA CRAWSHAW
Private Arrangements
JUNE RICHARDSON
Arrangements Pending


726-8323 DWD


Obituaries


A6 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Golden Sponsors


Special to the Chronicle
Partners for a Substance Free Citrus had an appreciation luncheon Jan. 17 to recognize and give appreciation to the businesses, agencies and community members that have
contributed either by monetary donations or in-kind donations to Partners for a Substance-Free Citrus. Golden Sponsors, from left, are: Toby Rowlinson, Crystal River High School
SADD adviser; Jim Fleisher, Citrus County Chronicle; Dr. Jeffery Kinnard, Kinnard Chiropractic Clinic; Sheriff Jeffrey J. Dawsy, Citrus County Sheriff's Office; Frank DiGiovanni,
city manager, City of Inverness; Jo Ann Otero, Capital City Bank; Cindy Clark, Capital City Bank; Tom Rogers, Graphic Elite Printing and Blue Heron Tees; Ed Serra, certified
public accountant; Ken Daley, Bernie Little Distributing; and Elizabeth Wood, Tobacco-Free Partnership. Citrus County School Board was also a Golden Sponsor.




Parks, preserve offer activities


Moon Over the Mounds begins


Special to the Chronicle
Looking for something
unusual to do? Join the
Florida Department of En-
vironmental Protection's
Friends of Crystal River
State Parks, the Gulf Ar-
chaeology Research Insti-
tute and the Florida
Public Archaeology Net-
work from 8 to 10 p.m.


today, Feb. 22, for Moon
Over the Mounds.
The event is held once a
month (September
through March) at the
Crystal River Archaeolog-
ical State Park.
The Crystal River ar-
chaeological site is a
world-famous pre-
Columbian mound com-
plex and a National


today at 8p.m.
Historic Landmark.
Join a torch-lit tour as
interpretive guides will
lead visitors through the
mound complex.
Travel back to A.D. 600
when the Crystal River
site was the most impor-
tant ceremonial site in the
region.
The tour will begin at
the park's museum at 8p.m.


* The park is at 3400 N. Museum Pointe, Crystal River, just north of the Crystal
River Mall. Drive north on U.S. 19, turn left onto State Park Street and left onto
Museum Pointe.


Spirit of the Bear Ceremony set for Sunday


Special to the Chronicle
Doug Pawis, an elder of
the Anishnabe Tradition,
will conduct the Spirit of
the Bear Ceremony from 4


to 6 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 24,
at the Crystal River Ar-
chaeological State Park.
The ceremonial feast is
a two-hour program con-
ducted in February during


a full moon to honor the
birth of bears. Everyone is
welcome at the educa-
tional presentation.
No photographs will be
allowed at the ceremony


Wildlife park slates walk along Pepper Creek


Special to the Chronicle
The Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental
Protection's Ellie Schiller
Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park, in co-
operation with Citrus
County Audubon Society,
will host a bird walk on
Pepper Creek Trail on
Saturday, Feb. 23.
An experienced birder
from Citrus County
Audubon will lead the
walk on this trail one
of 19 birding trails in Cit-
rus County that are part
of the West Section of the
Great Florida Birding
Trail.
Participants should
meet at 7:45 a.m. at the
entrance to the park's
Visitor Center. The bird
walk will begin at 8 a.m.
Binoculars and a field
guide are recommended.


Participation in the bird
walk on Pepper Creek is
free.
Pepper Creek Trail is
approximately 3/4 mile in
length and follows along
the park's tram road, con-
necting the Visitor Center
on U.S. 19 and the west
entrance on Fishbowl
Drive.
Participants can either
walk back down the trail


or wait and take the first
returning boat after the
park opens. There is no
charge to use the Pepper
Creek trail or to take the
return boat trip.
Bird walks are planned
for October and Novem-
ber and monthly from
January through April.
For more information
and to register, call 352-
628-5343, ext. 1002.


PATIO- CEILING?
/ -* (


I Cd Free Easy Clean *r


RO .352I


Friends ofpreserve to learn about exotics


Special to the Chronicle
Friends of the Withla-
coochee Gulf Preserve will
meet at 10 a.m. Saturday,
Feb. 23, at the Withla-
coochee Gulf Preserve,
1001 Old Rock Road, Yan-

News NOTE

Wilderness Circle
to be Feb. 24
The Wilderness Circle
Gathering will begin at 11 a.m.
Sunday, Feb. 24. It will be led
by Mackie Sanford, a member
of Dunnellon Baptist Church,
who is of Cherokee descent.
A potluck and afternoon
music will follow..
Call Betty Berger at 352-
447-2736 or email her at
bberger@bellsouth.net for
directions and more
information about the event.


keetown, for a program by
Keith Morin, park biologist
at Crystal River Preserve
State Park, on "Exotics -
What to do to get rid of
them."
The Friends' annual
meeting will follow after


the program.
The programs and
Friends' meetings are
open to the public. Visit
the website at withlacoo
cheegulfpreserve.com for
directions or to contact
them.


IOning SE -l7


1 0 .-On vH oF -4 2 7


physical exams, and lab
work at no charge.

Additionally:
Compensation may be
available to qualified
participants for each
completed visit (for time
and travel)


Contact Information
NATURE COAST CLINICAL
RESEARCH
411 W. HIGHLAND BLVD.,
INVERNESS, FL 34452
(352) 341-2100
6122 W. Corporate Oaks Dr.,
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
(352) 563-1865


FL
Pharn


irTitl BiowelSyndromTeo


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urier
laceuticals


A A









*After Ford $10 Mail In Rebate.
Up to 5 qts. Synthetic blend oil. For, Lincoln & Mercury vehicles. Excludes diesel
engines & full synthetic oil changes. Offer good Feb. 1 st March 31st.


MIKE CARON

Parts

Department


NICK NICHOLAS L LIN
IN CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy. 19 N.* Crystal River 795-7371
Parts & Service: Mon-Fri 8 AM to 5:30 PM; Sat 8 AM to 4 PM ..E4CU


^


I


COMMUNITY


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013 A7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Want fare in the fair? Get entries in soon


Categories include wine, vegetables, table settings, more


Deadline for pageant registration is today


Special to the Chronicle
It will soon be time to enter
homemade or home-grown
items in the 2013 Citrus County
Fair
There are many categories to
enter Some categories, in addi-
tion to the regular ones, are:
rubber stamping, themed table
settings, collections, and home-
made wine.
On tap again this year is the
Country Critters Competition for
Youth. Entries will be taken
from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday,
March 22, and from 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. Saturday, March 23.
Baked goods and agricultural
products will be accepted only


from 8 to 10 a.m. Monday,
March 25.
Youths must enter their own
exhibits, with the exception of
the Monday entries of baked
goods and agriculture. These
may be entered by an adult.
It's not too late to frame a pic-
ture, crochet an item, or show off
prize house plants or vegetables.
Showing off fruits and vegeta-
bles is a special service to the
citizens of Citrus County; many
are not able to grow their own.
Or perhaps enter a page from a
scrapbook of your grandchild, a
wedding or just a glimpse of life.
The fair is again featuring
themed table settings; the cate-
gory continues to grow. The


rules are simple (available on-
line at www.citruscounty
fair.com click on Competitive
Exhibit Rules or at the fair of-
fice, or in the Chronicle supple-
ment March 17). Bring your card
table, your settings and your
imagination and show just how
well you can set a table.
New this year are cash awards
for the best cheesecake and best
dill pickles, in both Youth and
Adult categories.
Each winner will be awarded
$25. The awards are sponsored
by the Earl Stokes Family
Ribbons will be awarded in all
categories; cash and ribbons will
be awarded in the Youth Divi-
sion. Youth entrants are also eli-


It's time to register for the chil-
dren's pageants, slated for
Sunday, March 24, at the 2013
Citrus County Fair.
The Pre Teen Pageant for
ages 7 to 13 will begin at 1 p.m.,
starting with the 13-year-olds.
The Little Miss/Mister, ages 5 and
6, will start immediately after the
Pre Teen contest, with the 6-year-
olds first. The Beautiful Baby
competition for ages 1 to 4 will
start at 3 p.m. with the 4-year-
olds and ending with the Deco-
rated Baby pageant for ages 6 to
11 months.


Contestants must be a resident
of Citrus County. There is a $30
entry fee and pre-registration is
required. All contestants are
awarded prizes. Applications
must be in the Fair Office by
Friday, Feb. 22. Applications are
available at www.citruscounty
fair.com under the Pageants tab
on the left, all Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce offices or
the Fair Office at 3600 S. Florida
Ave., Inverness.
All pageants are in the Citrus
County Auditorium. For more in-
formation, call 352-726-2993.


gible to apply for scholarships. www.citruscountyfair.com
For more information, visit call 352-726-2993.


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A8 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013


COMMUNITY




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IL?


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Judges have emotions, too


Justices told to squelch outbursts on bench


Associated Press

WASHINGTON A
Florida judge's harsh re-
action to a disrespectful
teenage defendant, cap-
tured on court video, was a
reminder that judges don't
shed their emotions when
they don their black robes.
The recent episode
quickly went viral. But for
a few dozen new federal
judges, it became a lesson
in finding ways to ac-
knowledge they experi-
ence a range of feelings on
the bench and to channel
them appropriately
"We tell judges, 'If you
ever detect an emotion,
squelch it.' That's an ex-
tremely bad idea," said
Vanderbilt University law
professor Terry Maroney,
who led a session for
roughly 40 judges in Wash-
ington that incorporated
the Florida incident.
"You're going to have emo-
tions as a judge, no matter
how many people tell you


you won't or aren't sup-
posed to."
In a Miami-Dade County
courtroom, Circuit Judge
Jorge Rodriguez-Chomat
doubled an 18-year-old's
bond when she laughed,
then gave her 30 days in
jail when she made an ob-
scene gesture with her
middle finger.
Several days later, she
admitted she had been
high on Xanax and alcohol
and apologized to the
judge. He erased the bond
and let her go home.
U.S. District Judge Je-
remy Fogel, who runs the
Federal Judicial Center in
Washington, said a judge's
first year can be especially
intense, and Maroney's
aim is to help judges cope
with the new stresses of
the job, including the diffi-
cult task of sending an-
other human being to
prison.
"We don't do a lot to pre-
pare them for that Judges,
when they're new, try par-


ticularly hard to live up to
the expectations of the job.
As you have more time and
more experience, you re-
alize you are not going to
get it right every time. You
have an obligation to try,
but you can't, because
we're all imperfect. It
takes a while to come to
terms with that," said
Fogel, a veteran of 30 years
as a judge in state and fed-
eral courts in California.
The discussion in Wash-
ington was held behind
closed doors, but Fogel
and two new judges
agreed to talk about it and
about their experiences on
the bench.
U.S. District Judge John
Gerard in Lincoln, Neb.,
served as a state Supreme
Court justice for 16 years,
hearing appeals generally
argued in measured tones
and in a sterile environ-
ment, at least compared to
a courtroom trial. President
Barack Obama nominated
him to the federal judiciary


Associated Press
Terry Maroney, a professor of Law at Vanderbilt Law School, tells judges it's a bad idea
to show emotion on the bench.


in 2011, and he began his
new job a year ago.
Among the most difficult
situations Gerard has en-
countered involved white-
collar fraud.
"Those are emotionally
charged. You're trying to


figure out what sentences
to impose. You have the
defendant's family mem-
bers on one side. They
sometimes have no idea of
the details. On the other
side are victims who have
been defrauded or whose


life savings are gone.
Those are fraught situa-
tions," Gerard said. "I'm
obviously going to base
what I do on the law, but
it's helpful to know it's OK
when you do feel some
anger, some revulsion."


More tests needed in hotel water-tank death


Police call

death suspicious

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES More
testing must be done to deter-
mine the cause of death of a
21-year-old Canadian tourist
whose body was found
wedged in a water tank atop
a downtown Los Angeles
hotel, authorities said Thurs-
day
Canadian tourist Elisa Lam
had been missing for about
two weeks when officials at
the Cecil Hotel found her
body in a water cistern on
the hotel roof.
Associated Press


An autopsy performed
Thursday didn't provide de-
finitive answers into whether
Elisa Lam was killed or if she
fell victim to a bizarre acci-
dent. Coroner's officials will
await toxicology tests before
making a final determination.
Lam's body was found
Tuesday in a water cistern
atop the downtown Cecil
Hotel. Police have called her
death suspicious.
Guest complaints about low
water pressure prompted a
maintenance worker to make
the gruesome discovery
Before she died, hotel sur-
veillance footage showed her
inside an elevator pushing
buttons and sticking her head
out the doors, looking in both
directions.
Meanwhile, water tested


from the hotel didn't contain
any live bacteria that would
cause illness.
Although county health of-
ficials issued a do-not drink
order, the results that came
back Thursday indicated the
water was safe from a "mi-
crobiological standpoint,"
said Angelo Bellomo, the
county's director of environ-
mental health.
"We can't say what the
quality of the water was prior
to the samples," taken on
Tuesday, Bellomo said. "We
can only say that the water
met the standard at the time
it was sampled."
Chlorine in the water likely
killed any bacteria in the tank
where Lam's body was found,
Bellomo said. Two standard
water tests were performed


and samples were taken from
throughout the hotel.
Bellomo said the hotel has
retained a consultant who
submitted a plan to sanitize
the water lines that will be
retested before they are put
back into operation. Only
water for toilets is flowing for
hotel guests currently
Lam, of Vancouver, British
Columbia, traveled alone to
Los Angeles on Jan. 26 and
was last seen five days later
by workers at the 600-room
hotel near Skid Row. She in-
tended to travel to Santa
Cruz, about 350 miles north of
Los Angeles.
High school classmate Alex
Ristea of Vancouver called
Lam's death shocking and
said she was one of the
friendliest people he knew.


New season of uncertainty


Sequester

Q&A

Associated Press

WASHINGTON Here
comes the sequester: big
federal spending cuts and
a new season of economic
uncertainty for a nation
still trying to shake off a
recession.
The politics of seques-
tration have been fierce,
the finger-pointing inces-
sant. And to no one's sur-
prise, what was designed
as a way out of one Wash-
ington standoff has pro-
duced another one and
more. A week out from the
March 1 deadline, there
are no meaningful efforts
in Washington to avert the
punishing automatic cuts
set out in a law nearly two
years ago.
Q: What's the big overall
picture?
A: A series of cuts to fed-
eral agencies that would
lead to longer lines at the
nation's borders, less
money for teachers and
more hassle at airport
checkpoints. Virtually
every dollar approved each
year by Congress would be
slashed by a uniform
amount, which would mean
at least temporary layoffs
for hundreds of thousands
of public and private-sector
workers. Programs like
Medicare and Social Secu-
rity are exempt, but there is
no question the slashing of
other programs would slow
the nation's fragile eco-
nomic recovery
Q: And the big numbers?
A: Under a 2011 law de-
signed to avert exactly this
type of inaction, March 1
means automatic cuts of
$85 billion from a $3.6 tril-
lion budget over the seven
months spanning March to
September. That would in-
clude cuts of 8 percent to
the Pentagon and 5 per-
cent to domestic agency
operating budgets. More
than 3.8 million Americans
who have been jobless for
six months or longer could
see their unemployment


benefits reduced by as
much as 9.4 percent.
Q: Why is this happen-
ing, what's actually going
to occur and who is likely
to be most affected?
A: The seeds of the se-
quester were sown by a de-
mand by House Speaker
John Boehner, R-Ohio, that
the 2011 debt limit in-
crease be matched, dollar-
for-dollar, by cuts in
federal spending. After
"grand bargain" talks be-
tween Boehner and
Obama broke down, the
White House came up with
the sequester idea as a way
to guarantee large enough
deficit cuts to offset
enough new borrowing to
make sure Washington did-
n't have to revisit the debt
limit until after the 2012
elections. The sequester
threat was designed to be
so harsh that it would drive
the sides to compromise on
an alternative.
It didn't work. House
Republicans twice last
year passed legislation to
replace the cuts with
larger savings drawn from
programs like food stamps
and federal employee pen-
sions. Democrats control-
ling the Senate didn't offer
an alternative and instead
put their faith in postelec-
tion negotiations to avert
the "fiscal cliff," which re-
sulted in Obama claiming


Floral City


Floating /Tussocks / Floating
Heart


Hernando Pool Nuphar / Hydrilla / Willows /
Duckweed


victory on his promise to
raise taxes on the rich but
only a two-month respite
from the sequester. Now,
Republicans say they
won't give in to demands
by Obama and the Democ-
rats controlling the Senate
for higher taxes as part of
any solution.
Q: How quickly will the
sequester's impact be felt?
A: It depends. At first,
the general public may not
much notice the cuts. The
sequester isn't a govern-
ment shutdown; it's a
government slowdown.
Furloughs of federal work-
ers forced unpaid days
off- generally won't start
for a month due to
notification requirements.
Many government con-
tracts would still be
funded using money previ-
ously approved even as
agencies slow down the
awards of new contracts.



O -






I(5) l-2
107 B.Ws Mit


Diquat /2,4D
Glyphosate
Diquat / Glyphosate /
2,4D /Aquathol / Clipper
Quest


MECHANICAL HARVESTING


Hernando Pool Tussocks
Inverness Pool Tussocks / Cabomba
Chassahowitzka Hydrilla
River


Harvesting
Harvesting
Harvesting


All treatments are contingent upon weather conditions and water quality. Treated areas will be identified
with "Warning Signs" indicating the date of treatment and the necessary water use restrictions. For
further information, please call 352-527-7620 or view our webslte at htto.//www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/
oubworks/aauatics/aauatic services.htm. Citrus County Division of Aquatic Services


-I '' I. 6,


$5 Registration Fee per


S AKC Canine Good Citizen Testing: $20
GAMES BOOTHS FOOD
\ .-....-.....SILENT AUCTION

To register for a booth: 352-586-7214
FREE Booths for Non-Profits! Other booths start at$35. All donations are tax deductible (501C3)

Contest to Select "SPARKY" to star in
a new comic book for Tommy Tucker


Dogs will be available lI

for adoption. pARTNEU
Sponsored by Partners for a Substance-Free Citrus, Inc. _i
This event will kick off FAMILY WEEK and "
PREVENTION WEEK. Dogs ONLY All dogs must
be leashed. For more information call
352-586-7214 or 352-601-6620 or email
substancefree.citrus@yahoo.com Partners For A Substance-Free


)\ i A


e Citrus


35 -8 ,- ,- I-..,26 1I6,
subtnerectu~ao o 9 wwwgsubstacerecir sco


WEEKLY AQUATIC TREATMENT
SCHEDULE FOR CITRUS COUNTY
Citrus County's Aquatic Services Division plans the following aquatic
weed control activities for the week beginning February 25, 2013
HERBICIDE TREATMENTS
Waterbodv Plant Herbicide Used
Inverness Pool Nuphar/Hydrilla/Torpedograss/ Glyphosate/Aquathol /
Willows / Pondweed 2,4D


A10 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013


NATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money&Markets
1,560 ................................. S& P 500
S' Close: 1,502.42
Change: -9.53 (-0.6%)
1,480 ........10 DAYS ........


1 ,5 5 0 ................. ............ .............



1,450........ .............

1,400 ..........

1,350..........
,350 ............StocksRecap...........
StocksRecap


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE
4,161
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941
2117
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2,013
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761
1717
56
36


D J


DOW
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NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
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Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


A click of the wrist L
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com
i 1i n.......................... Dow Jones industrials
SClose: 13,880.62
Change: -46.92 (-0.3%)
13,800 ........10 DAYS '"." "


14 ,4 0 0 ..... ............ ..... ...... ......... .. .......... .. ......... .. ...
14,000

13 ,6 0 0 ..... .. ............ ........... ...... .....


12 ,80 0 ..... ..... ................... ............ .............
12,400


HIGH
13927.54
5921.47
475.63
8852.67
3155.19
1511.95
1104.10
15966.15
912.70


LOW
13837.02
5842.24
472.23
8778.05
3118.62
1497.29
1088.48
15794.03
900.48


CLOSE
13880.62
5875.56
472.56
8810.29
3131.49
1502.42
1093.27
15854.42
905.40


%CHG.
-0.34%
-0.78%
-0.65%
-0.83%
-1.04%
-0.63%
-0.98%
-0.70%
-0.89%


YTD
+5.93%
+10.72%
+4.30%
+4.34%
+3.71%
+5.34%
+7.14%
+5.73%
+6.60%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR%CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 3.42 8.65 3.88 -.11 -2.8 V -15.7 -50.3 dd
AT&T Inc T 29.95 -- 38.58 35.43 -.04 -0.1 A A A +5.1 +24.1 29 1.80f
Ametek Inc AME 29.86 42.45 41.49 -.21 -0.5 V A A +10.4 +29.0 22 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 64.99 94.49 92.06 -.81 -0.9 V A A +5.3 +44.1 1.57e
Bank of America BAG 6.72 12.42 11.42 -.38 -3.2 V V -1.6 +47.6 44 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 6.35 12.23 11.26 -.17 -1.5 V V -1.0 +28.7 cc
CenturyLink Inc CTL 32.05 43.43 34.27 +.34 +1.0 A V -12.4 -6.2 27 2.16m
Citigroup C 24.61 44.71 42.35 -.87 -2.0 V A +7.1 +31.4 13 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 21.43 17.67 +.07 +0.4 A A A +11.6 -9.0 32 1.00
Disney DIS 40.88 55.95 54.17 -.43 -0.8 7 A A +8.8 +32.6 17 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 71.13 68.83 -.02 ... A A A +7.9 +14.7 19 3.06
EPR Properties EPR 40.04 48.92 47.21 -.23 -0.5 V V A +2.4 +18.6 21 3.00
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 77.13 -- 93.67 88.59 -.38 -0.4 A V A +2.4 +6.6 11 2.28
Ford Motor F 8.82 14.30 12.39 -.21 -1.7 V V -4.3 +0.8 9 0.40f
Gen Electric GE 18.02 23.75 23.26 +.04 +0.2 A A A +10.8 +25.1 17 0.76
Home Depot HD 46.12 68.15 64.38 -2.06 -3.1 V V A +4.1 +44.7 23 1.16
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 -- 29.27 20.25 -.48 -2.3 V V -1.8 -21.0 10 0.90
IBM IBM 181.85 211.79 198.33 -.98 -0.5 V A +3.5 +4.8 13 3.40
LKQ Corporation LKQ 14.63 23.99 21.99 -.61 -2.7 V V A +4.2 +40.0 26
Lowes Cos LOW 24.76 --- 39.98 37.67 -.97 -2.5 V V A +6.1 +41.8 22 0.64
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 -- 101.04 94.14 +.23 +0.2 A A A +6.7 -3.2 18 3.08
Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.26 -- 32.95 27.49 -.38 -1.4 V V A +2.9 -8.1 15 0.92
Motorola Solutions MSI 44.49 0 62.05 60.88 -.38 -0.6 V A A +9.3 +22.9 20 1.04
NextEra Energy NEE 59.10 0 73.41 72.53 -.41 -0.6 A A +4.8 +25.1 16 2.64f
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 15.69 -- 42.85 21.55 +1.36 +6.7 A A A +9.3 -52.2 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 0 19.87 19.52 -.07 -0.4 A A A +8.1 +13.3 35 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 5.46 8.00 7.59 -.12 -1.6 V V A +6.5 +29.2 11 0.04
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 -- 85.90 47.36 -.54 -1.1 A A A +14.5 -5.5 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 71.81 94.99 91.90 +.20 +0.2 V A A +6.6 +28.3 20 2.08
Sprint Nextel Corp S 2.20 0 6.04 5.79 ... ... A A +2.1 +151.7 dd
Texas Instru TXN 26.06 34.29 32.48 -.58 -1.8 V V A +5.1 +0.7 21 1.12f
Time Warner TWX 33.62 0 53.90 52.61 -.62 -1.2 V A A +10.0 +44.0 17 1.60f
UniFirst Corp UNF 55.86 88.35 83.99 -.05 -0.1 V A A +14.6 +36.8 17 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 36.80 48.77 45.12 +.20 +0.4 A A A +4.3 +22.1 cc 2.06
Vodafone Group VOD 24.59 30.07 24.58 -.11 -0.4 V V -2.4 -5.8 1.53e
WalMart Strs WMT 57.18 -- 77.60 70.26 +1.05 +1.5 A A A +3.0 +13.3 14 1.88f
Walgreen Co WAG 28.53 42.00 41.62 +.02 ... A A A +12.5 +22.9 19 1.10
Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement I Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates


UU


The yield on the
10-year Treasury
note fell to 1.98
percent Thurs-
day. Yields affect
interest rates on
consumer loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MO AGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
Crude oil set-
tled at its lowest
price since
2012 after a
report showed
that supplies
are healthier
than analysts
expected. When
a commodity's
supply is high,
its price tends
to fall.




IHi


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .12 0.12 ... .09
6-month T-bill .13 0.13 ... .12
52-wk T-bill .15 0.15 ... .14
2-year T-note .25 0.26 -0.01 .29
5-year T-note .84 0.86 -0.02 .86
10-year T-note 1.98 2.01 -0.03 2.00
30-year T-bond 3.17 3.20 -0.03 3.15


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 2.88 2.92 -0.04 2.66
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.06 4.05 +0.01 4.58
Barclays USAggregate 1.93 1.93 ... 2.16
Barclays US High Yield 5.81 5.83 -0.02 7.21
MoodysAAA Corp dx 3.96 3.95 +0.01 3.90
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.12 1.15 -0.03 1.08
Barclays US Corp 2.82 2.83 -0.01 3.41


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 92.84
Ethanol (gal) 2.35
Heating Oil (gal) 3.10
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.25
Unleaded Gas (gal) 3.04
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1578.20
Silver (oz) 28.70
Platinum (oz) 1620.00
Copper (Ib) 3.55
Palladium (oz) 733.20
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.25
Coffee (Ib) 1.42
Corn (bu) 6.91
Cotton (Ib) 0.81
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 378.00
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.28
Soybeans (bu) 14.88
Wheat (bu) 7.21


PVS.
94.46
2.37
3.16
3.28
3.06
PVS.
1577.60
28.62
1647.10
3.61
736.00
PVS.
1.25
1.41
7.01
0.82
383.20
1.26
14.83
7.39


%CHG
-2.52
-0.08
-1.92
-1.01
-0.75
%CHG
+0.04
+0.28
-1.65
-1.53
-0.38
%CHG
+0.16
+0.53
-1.39
-1.18
-1.36
+1.95
+0.34
-2.34


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 21.11 -.12 +3.5 +11.1 +11.2 +5.5
BondA m 12.85 +.01 -0.5 +4.1 +6.0 +4.1
CaplncBuA m 54.01 -.27 +2.3 +10.5 +9.3 +3.0
CpWIdGrlA m 38.32 -.39 +3.0 +11.8 +8.6 +1.6
EurPacGrA m 41.97 -.58 +1.8 +8.3 +6.5 +0.7
FnlnvA m 42.60 -.37 +4.5 +12.3 +11.4 +3.4
GrthAmA m 35.73 -.31 +4.0 +12.5 +10.6 +3.3
IncAmerA m 18.59 -.11 +2.9 +11.2 +11.1 +5.2
InvCoAmA m 31.41 -.20 +4.1 +11.0 +9.8 +3.2
NewPerspA m 32.29 -.32 +3.3 +12.5 +10.1 +3.6
WAMutlnvA m 32.58 -.22 +4.4 +11.3 +12.7 +4.1
Dodge & Cox Income 13.87 +.01 +0.1 +5.6 +6.4 +6.9
IntlStk 35.49 -.54 +2.5 +9.9 +7.1 +0.6
Stock 129.53 -1.31 +6.3 +16.9 +12.0 +2.6
Fidelity Contra 79.99 -.40 +4.1 +10.4 +12.8 +4.9
GrowCo 96.14 -.80 +3.1 +6.9 +14.2 +6.8
LowPriStk d 41.44 -.34 +4.9 +10.9 +13.8 +7.0
Fidelity Spartan 5001dxAdvtg 53.36 -.32 +5.7 +12.8 +13.0 +4.6
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.27 -.01 +2.3 +11.4 +10.6 +5.7
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.43 -.06 +1.0 +8.8 +7.9 +9.3
GIBondAdv 13.39 -.06 +1.0 +9.1 +8.2 +9.6
Harbor Intllnstl d 62.80 -.80 +1.1 +7.0 +8.5 +1.2
PIMCO TotRetA m 11.19 ... -0.2 +7.3 +6.8 +7.3
T Rowe Price GrowStk 39.07 -.22 +3.4 +9.6 +13.5 +5.6
Vanguard 500Adml 138.84 -.84 +5.7 +12.8 +13.0 +4.6
5001nv 138.81 -.85 +5.7 +12.7 +12.9 +4.5
GNMAAdml 10.82 -.01 -0.5 +1.5 +5.2 +5.7
MulntAdml 14.38 +.01 +0.4 +4.0 +5.6 +5.5
STGradeAd 10.83 +.01 +0.3 +3.6 +3.7 +3.9
TotBdAdml 10.99 +.01 -0.6 +3.2 +5.6 +5.6
Totlntl 15.17 -.18 +1.3 +6.7 +6.0 -0.9
TotStlAdm 37.75 -.26 +5.9 +12.7 +13.4 +5.2
TotStldx 37.73 -.26 +5.9 +12.5 +13.2 +5.1
Welltn 35.12 -.15 +3.8 +10.8 +10.5 +5.9
WelltnAdm 60.65 -.27 +3.8 +10.8 +10.6 +6.0
-Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
The S&P 500 fell a second
straight day Thursday. Stocks of
raw material producers had
some of the steepest drops af-
ter prices sank for copper and
other commodities. Technology
stocks also fell more than the
rest of the market.


Verifone Systems PAY
Close:$18.24 V-13.65 or -42.8%
The electronic payments company's
forecast disappointed due to the
weak European economy and prob-
lems with big customers.
$40-


I ,
I' i, J F
52-week range
$17.933. 9i r $55.89
Vol.:50.3m (14.8x avg.) PE:30.9
Mkt. Cap:$1.97 b Yield:...
Safeway SWY
Close:$22.97A2.84 or 14.1%
The grocery store chain's customer
loyalty program is boosting market
share, and its profit rose more than
Wall Street expected.
$2-



1N D J F
52-week range
$14.733 $23.96
Vol.:34.5m (6.2x avg.) PE:12.2
Mkt. Cap:$5.5 b Yield: 3.0%
Berry Petroleum BRY
Close: $46.02 A7.43 or 19.3%
Oil and gas producer Linn Energy is
buying the drilling company in a
stock deal worth about $2.5 billion.


40

Il DI J F
52-week range
$30.211 I $57.26
Vol.:11.2m (14.7x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap:$2.41 b Yield: 0.7%
Heckmann HEK
Close: $3.56V-0.12 or -3.3%
A Jefferies analyst downgraded the
drilling services provider's shares,
citing slower activity in the oil and
gas fields where it works.




I N D J F
52-week range
$2.60 $5.44


Vol.: 4.2m (1.8xavg.)
Mkt. Cap:$557.88 m


PE:...
Yield:...


Tesla Motors TSLA
Close: $35.16 V-3.38 or -8.8%
The electric car maker's loss deep-
ened on higher production costs for
the new Model S. It predicted a
small profit for this quarter.
$40



II I J F
52-week range
$25.52 $40.00
Vol.: 9.Om (6.0x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap:$4 b Yield:...


Associated Press
Sibanye Gold CEO Neal Froneman, left, and Chairman Sello Moloko, center, ring the
closing bell Thursday at the New York Stock Exchange.



Stock slide extended on



weak data, Fed qualms


Associated Press

U.S. stocks continued a two-day slide
Thursday on weak economic data and
concern about the Federal Reserve's re-
solve to keep juicing the economy
Signaling the U.S. labor market re-
mains in slow recovery mode, the gov-
ernment said more people applied for
unemployment benefits last week. The
four-week average, a less volatile meas-
ure, rose to the highest in
six weeks. Superr
The Dow Jones indus- chain
trial average closed down
46.92 points, or 0.3 percent, was the
at 13,880.62.
The S&P 500 index gainer
dropped 9.53, or 0.6 per-
cent, to 1,502.42. The S&P S&P
is headed for its first iin
weekly loss of the year.rising
The Nasdaq composite 14.1 p
index lost 32.92, or 1 per-
cent, to 3,131.49. to $2
In Europe, markets
closed sharply lower after a monthly
survey of European executives showed
that business activity in the European
Union slowed in February, a strong sig-
nal that a downturn that began last year
will continue into 2013. Benchmark in-
dexes lost 2.3 percent in France, 1.9 per-
cent in Germany, and 1.6 percent in
Britain.
U.S. indexes have soared this year to
the highest levels since the financial cri-
sis but may be ready to fall back to earth,
said Kim Caughey Forrest, senior ana-
lyst with Fort Pitt Capital Group, a port-
folio management firm in Pittsburgh.
"I think the market has gotten ahead
of itself," she said. She said fourth-quar-
ter earnings have generally met expec-
tations, but only after those expectations
were reduced because companies made
dire projections in November and De-
cember
Walmart Stores rose after beating an-
alysts' profit forecasts in the fourth
quarter. However, the biggest retailer
warned of a slow start to the year. It
gained $1.05, or 1.5 percent, to $70.26.


1
'Il








I
4
''


Walmart forecast bad news
for poor, middle-class
NEW YORK -As go the fortunes of many
Americans, so goes Walmart's, and so goes
the economy.
Even as the world's largest retailer on Thursday
reported a nearly 9 percent rise in fourth-
quarter profit during the busy holiday shopping
season, it offered a weaker forecast for the
coming months. The problem? The poor and
middle-class Americans that Walmart caters to
- and who are big drivers of spending in the U.S.
- are struggling with rising gas prices, delayed
income tax refunds and higher payroll taxes.
Walmart is the latest in a string of big-name
companies from Burger King to Zale to say those
Americans are being squeezed by new chal-
lenges. But since Walmart accounts for nearly
10 percent of nonautomotive retail spending
in the U.S., it is a bellwether for the economy.
"Walmart moms are the barometer of the
U.S. household," said Brian Sozzi, chief equi-
ties analyst at NBG Productions who follows
Walmart. "Right now, they're afraid of higher
taxes and inflation."

Oil prices down sharply
for a second day
NEW YORK Oil prices plunged for a
second day Thursday, raising hopes a relent-
less rise in gasoline prices may slow or re-
verse at least temporarily. U.S. benchmark
crude oil fell $2.38, or 2.5 percent, to finish at
$92.84 per barrel in New York, the second
drop of 2 percent in two days.
Crude oil's recent slide is a result of ample
supplies and recent speculation that the Fed-
eral Reserve may soon allow interest rates to
rise, which would reduce the supply of easy
cash investors have been using to buy com-
modities like oil.
The drop in crude hasn't translated into
lower pump prices yet. The average U.S.
retail gasoline price rose a penny to $3.78
per gallon Thursday, according to AAA, the
Oil Price Information Service, and Wright Ex-
press. Gasoline has risen for 34 days straight
since averaging $3.29 on Jan. 18.
The two day plunge in crude and slightly
lower wholesale gasoline futures prices are
expected to at least slow the rise in pump
prices, and perhaps push them back slightly.


Claims for US jobless aid
suggest modest hiring
WASHINGTON The number of Americans
seeking unemployment benefits jumped 20,000
last week to a seasonally adjusted 362,000,
though it remains at a level that suggests slow
but steady improvement in the job market.
The Labor Department said Thursday the
four-week average, a less volatile measure,
rose 8,000 to 360,750, the highest in six weeks.
Applications for unemployment benefits are
a proxy for layoffs. The four-week average has
declined 7.5 percent since mid-November and
fell to a five-year low three weeks ago. Last
week's increase puts applications for unem-
ployment benefits back in the 360,000-to-
390,000 range, where they have fluctuated since
early last year. Since then, employers have
added an average of 181,000 jobs a month.

Home sales rise to
second-highest pace in years
WASHINGTON U.S. sales of previously
occupied homes rose in January to the second-
highest level in three years, a sign the hous-
ing market is sustaining its recovery and
helping bolster the economy.
The National Association of Realtors said
Thursday that sales rose 0.4 percent in Janu-
ary compared with December to a seasonally
adjusted annual rate of 4.92 million. That was
the second-highest sales pace since Novem-
ber 2009. The median price for a home sold
in January was $173,600, a 12.3 percent in-
crease from a year ago.

US consumer prices flat in
January for second month
WASHINGTON U.S. consumer prices
were flat in January from December for the
second month in a row.
The consumer price index has risen 1.6
percent in the 12 months ending in January,
the Labor Department said Thursday. That's
down from a 2.9 percent pace a year ago.
Excluding the volatile food and energy cate-
gories, core prices rose 0.3 percent in Janu-
ary. Core prices have risen 1.9 percent in the
past year. That's down from the 2.3 percent
pace in the same month a year ago.

-From wire reports


After a strong start to the holiday sea-
son, Walmart said, the first three weeks
of December were weak, and business
has been volatile since then. The com-
pany attributed some of the weakness to
a delay in tax refund checks that have
left people strapped for cash. Walmart's
customers also have less money to
spend because a temporary payroll tax
cut expired in December
"Everybody's gotten a 2 percent pay
cut, and people who file
market their taxes early are not
afe ay getting a refund back in a
aeway timely manner," Forrest

biggest said.
Supermarket chain
in the Safeway was the biggest
gainer in the S&P 500, ris-
500, ing $2.84, or 14.1 percent,
8, or to $22.97 after saying its
2.84, or net income jumped 13 per-
ercent, cent in the fourth quarter,
helped by higher gift and
2.97. prepaid card revenue.
Electric car company
Tesla Motors plunged a day after re-
porting its fourth-quarter net loss grew
10 percent on costs related to produc-
tion of its new Model S. The stock fell
$3.38, or 8.8 percent, to $35.16.
Earlier, Asian stocks had closed
sharply lower. The sell-off began
Wednesday afternoon in New York after
the release of minutes from the Fed's
latest meeting. The meeting notes showed
some policymakers want to wind down
bond purchases and other measures
aimed at boosting the economy
The Fed's bond-buying has been
boosting markets by reducing the cost of
borrowing for companies and investors,
Forrest explained. When interest rates
are lower, it's possible to do business
cheaper even if a company isn't growing,
she said.
"Thinking maybe interest rates will
creep higher, this is a very chilling sce-
nario" for the market, she said.
The yield on the 10-year Treasury
note fell to 1.98 percent from 2.05
percent early Wednesday as demand
increased for ultra-safe assets.


Business HIGHLIGHTS


BUSINESS


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013 All







Page A12 l FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ................................ publisher
M ike Arnold ..............................................editor
Charlie Brennan ........................ managing editor
Curt Ebitz ............................... citizen member
M Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


FILL THE VOID




Vacancy on



school board



poses dilemma


With a vacancy on the
Citrus County School
Board, members
have to consider voting
against stances they might
otherwise take, to avoid 2-2
decisions that would negate
action on proposals.
Member Pat
Deutschman
faced such a deci- THE I
sion when the Schoo
issue of buying vac
1,054 new seats
for Curtis Peter- OUR O
son Auditorium -
at a cost of nearly ID most
$176,000 con- then ac
fronted the board.
While school
board members did not dis-
pute the seats were overdue
to be replaced, Deutschaman
and member Thomas
Kennedy said, prior to the
meeting, the present tax
crunch further elevates the
need to be tight-fisted when it
comes to spending.
While, at the Feb. 12 board
meeting, Kennedy voted
against the purchase,
Deutschman joined with the
two other board members
who favored the purchase.
Deutschman did so because
she thought it best not to be
the cause of a 2-2 vote, which
would have defeated the ini-
tiative. The measure passed
3-1.
The vacancy, created when
member Susan Hale abruptly
resigned just weeks after
being elected, leaves a void
until the governor names a
replacement.
According to state Rep.
Jimmie T. Smith, the gover-


Tax puzzler
I'd like to know how come
property values have dropped
but my property tax is the same
as I paid in 2005. I
know how to help the O
budget. Let's cut the
upper-echelon salaries
by, let's say, 20 percent.
If our property values
are down 20 percent,
they get cut 20 percent.
And if they spend more
than their budget, it
comes out of their pay. CAL
Maybe if they had less, 563-
they'd learn how to
spend less, like the rest
of us. Just an idea.
Wait your turn
As a person who has handi-
capped children, let's face it;
some of these children realize
that they are handicapped, but
that doesn't put them in front of
the line. They already have a
wheelchair and all the things
that we can do to help them,
which is nice, and we try to do
it. But just because you're hand-
icapped, that doesn't put you in
front of the line. It's only those
that have wheelchairs that if
you're at an association where
you can't put the wheelchair be-
tween seats, so you go in front
of the line. But otherwise, in
stores, you're in a chair, so wait
your turn. It won't kill you.
Driving menace
In answer to the comment
about vehicle inspections: The


Is

a

P
ct
;1


I
k


I


nor wants the replacement to
be a resident of District 4,
which covers Homosassa,
Sugarmill Woods and part of
Lecanto.
Several people offering a
range of qualifications have
thrown their hat in the ring;
few, however, live
in southwest
$SUE: Citrus.
board While several
ncy. of the applicants
are familiar
>INIONM names and some
have sought pub-
qualified, lic office in the
Swiftly past, former
board member
Bill Murray,
stands out. Murray served the
school board well during his
two terms, prior to being de-
feated by Hale, and in
hindsight his election to a
third term would have been
in the best interest of the
school system.
While all who have solid
qualifications and meet the
residency requirements war-
rant the governor's full con-
sideration, Murray could step
in and not have to undergo
the learning curve posed by
the complexities of educa-
tional bureaucracy
Whomever the governor
chooses, we hope the individ-
ual is someone who brings
enthusiasm, sound judgment
and fiscal accountability to
the board.
When that best of the op-
tions is identified, we hope
the governor acts swiftly to
bring the board back to five
members and business as
usual.


only place I have been rear-
ended was by a New York State
vehicle, which has very strict in-
spections. But you can't keep
people off the cellphone.

JND Manners
In regards to the arti-
cle, "We have rights": I
don't agree with this
person. They have no
manners whatsoever. I
am handicapped and
several times I have
,0' been in line, the last
S579 one, and somebody
)59 comes up with one or
two articles and I have
a basketful, I'll let them
go first. This is human nature.
This is not selfishness ... We in
Florida are taught manners.
Where's money going?
Replacing seats at Curtis Pe-
terson (Auditorium). When they
have a function at this audito-
rium, they certainly charge a
nice price for seating. This
should cover maintenance, re-
placement of equipment. Where
has all this money gone?
Rezone school board
If you're going to rezone the
high schools and middle
schools, why not rezone the
school board and do away with
one of the members? That
would save a whole lot of
money. If it's all for the children,
that is the best thing and the
governor won't have to worry
about appointing anybody.


Trickle down effect
Thanks to the debacle over
the Crystal River power plant
taxes, we now have financial
problems of near epic
proportions.
For example:
1. Thousands of dollars have
already been spent in regard to
the barge canal to nowhere
and there is nothing to show
for the expenditure.
2. Extending the Suncoast
Parkway through Citrus
County is a bad idea. I talked
with state representatives at a
meet and greet at the Inver-
ness library in regard to this
subject shortly after the 10-day
shutdown of the road to the
south of us due to flood dam-
age to the road (and surround-
ing area). I used that damage
to prove my point. During the
discussion, I told the people
there was only one way to
build the road that would not
leave all of Citrus County west


"Excellence is not a skill. It is an attitude."
Ralph Marston


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Alien Cox: Unsung GOP hero


On Feb. 11, with
the utterance
of three
words, "Guilty, Your
Honor," Jim Greer
prematurely ended
an ugly and convo-
luted chapter in the
Republican Party of
Florida's history The
disgraced former
party chair also
dashed the hopes of
many who wanted to
see the fireworks of a


---- jl-
Paula D
FLOOR
VOI(


full-blown trial and accounta-
bility for all who participated in
illegal or unethical behavior
The story was years in the
making. It began in 2006, when
Greer, handpicked by then Gov-
elect Charlie Crist and backed
by leaders in the Florida Legis-
lature, just barely received
enough votes to become the Re-
publican Party of Florida's
chair. He was re-elected two
years later with only 75 percent
of the vote, even though he was
not officially challenged.
While his arrogant behavior
and big-spending ways ruffled a
lot of feathers, he continued to
enjoy the support from those in
the highest echelons of state
government -the governor, at-
torney general and legislative
leaders.
Those in the grassroots of
Florida's Republican Party
started to express grave con-
cerns about fiscal mismanage-
ment, credit card scandals, and
the financial health of the party.
But the elected elite, who en-
joyed unfettered access to party
resources, circled the wagons
by sending a not-so-subtle mes-
sage to dissenters to cease and
desist
Some of the grassroots party
members caved to the influence
of these powerful forces. Oth-
ers, who took their fiduciary re-
sponsibilities seriously, didn't
believe that keeping Greer in
charge and allowing the ques-
tionable financial practices to
continue were in the best inter-
est of the party.
Enter Allen Cox. Cox, who
then served as vice chairman of
the party, was the man brave
enough to stand up against the
power elite to expose the mis-



5TH-. 2Or^o
~G~jy~[ S -osh


use of party funds.
He, along with a
few others, not only
repeatedly called for
a full financial audit,
a request rebuffed by
the attorney general
and legislative lead-
ers. He also enlisted
50 Republican Party
)ockery of Florida members
|IDA state committee
ES men and women and
county party chairs
to sign a written
request for a special meeting of
the party's state committee to
rescind the January 2009 elec-
tion of Chairman Greer The re-
quest outlined four charges,
including financial mismanage-
ment, violation of party rules,
and violation of two articles of
the Republican Party of
Florida's constitution.
Greer continued to be pro-
tected by those in position to
force a full accounting. Was
their intention to protect the
party, as they claimed, or to pro-
tect their shared secrets with a
chairman who was losing the
support of his organization?
Allen Cox reached out to me
and several supportive elected
officials to back up his call for
cleaning up the party. A few of
us joined in to publicly call for a
full and open audit, to no avail.
Party leaders supported a less
transparent accounting while
expressing their confidence in
the embattled chairman.
Renowned British conserva-
tive Edmund Burke reportedly
said, "All that is necessary for
evil to triumph is for good men
to do nothing."
Clearly Cox is a good man
who didn't stand by and do
nothing. His reward, however,
was to be ostracized by his own
political party. What a shame!
Allen Cox is an unsung hero.
He epitomizes what is right
within the party. He called out
bad behavior and had grass-
roots support in doing so. And
instead of good behavior being
rewarded, unfortunately the
opposite occurred.
Instead of the open process
requested, clandestine agree-
ments were signed, Greer re-
signed and the powers that be


installed a sitting state senator
to serve as chair, someone who
was part of the secret contract.
The result was more top-down
command, little accountability,
and business as usual.
Imagine what the past three
years and the last election cycle
could have been like for the Re-
publican Party of Florida if they
had heeded Cox's call for com-
ing clean and reforming the
party. Instead, the party suf-
fered through a long period of
rumor, innuendo and finger
pointing that led up to the much
anticipated trial that ended
abruptly last week with Greer's
guilty plea, leaving a plethora of
unanswered questions.
The lone casualty Jim
Greer became the fall guy for
all the bad behavior. His sup-
porting cast walked away rela-
tively unscathed. While it's
hard to feel sorry for Greer, it's
harder to believe that justice
was served or that lessons were
learned.
Cox recently said, in an arti-
cle in The Miami Herald, that
he hoped Greer's case would
serve as a catalyst to end the
tradition of legislators using
party funds to skirt state law. He
suggested eliminating the loop-
hole that allows legislative
leaders to raise money and
park it at the party and have
near total discretion in how it is
spent.
This year the Florida Legis-
lature is bringing forth ethics
reform and campaign finance
reform legislation. Yet not in-
cluded in either bill is any re-
form requiring political parties
to disclose how they collect or
spend political contributions.
Allen Cox was one of the
bravest and most ethical among
the Republican Party of Florida
in 2009 and he was cast aside.
The powers that be didn't listen
to him then. Will they be smart
enough to listen now?

Paula Dockery was term-
limited as a Republican state
senator from Lakeland after
16years in the Florida
Legislature. She can be
reached atpdockery@
floridavoices.com.


C \to the Editor


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.

of a line from Lecanto through
Beverly Hills underwater. That
line follows a natural granite
ridge line, as I understand it,
and would serve as a water


dam for areas east of there,
and not allow free flow of
water coming from the Gulf.
Constructing an earth dam
such as the rest of the parkway
is constructed on would cause
flooding of the surrounding
area with even a moderate
rain storm.
3. Increased taxes would not
offset the shutdown of Units 1,
2 and 3 at Crystal River. I no-
ticed a recent Chronicle article
which, in part, said Duke had
plans for a natural gas power
plant and that the Crystal
River site was a possibility. Re-
pairing the damage caused by
the tax issue at the power
plant site might put this area
in a more favorable and ac-
ceptable light that both sides
can live with. Either that or
learn to live with the loss of
revenue for good, both taxes
and jobs.
Earl Ehley
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


LETTER


I


r=





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LETTERS to the Editor


Make Citrus more
like up North
I just had to write to
you, since we read your
paper every day and
know what is going on. We
are in Citrus County only
renting a house, since we
are hoping to sell our
house up North and move
down here.
Here is my belief: You
truly have a beautiful
county, we love it here
and can't wait to move
here, but what is hap-
pening to your county is
kind of scary, especially
with your electric com-
panies. In your county
you have everything, but
it is not being handled
right.
You have sun, so why
aren't the people hanging
out their clothes to dry,
and not use the dryer so
much? Using the dryer,
costs lots of money and
with the sun shining it
would dry the clothes in
an hour.
You have wind; why no
wind turbines? You go to
other parts of the country,
or to Europe, and there
are wind turbines all
over. Europe has the
most. It produces a lot of
electricity.
Why not help people
put solar on their roofs?
Our country was sup-
posed to produce solar
panels, and then the pro-
duction went to China, a
country that is stealing
from us big time.
Why does your county
not make it mandatory to
recycle, as we do up
North big time? Newspa-
pers, cans, plastic, glass -
that is all worth lots of
money
In Germany, they take
the garbage and burn it,
making gas out of it and
helping lots of towns with
it. We just fill precious
land with it
Up North, when we buy
bottled water or soda,
beer, we have to pay a


nickel extra that we get
back when we return the
bottles. It also means
extra money; I've seen
people pick up empty bot-
tles on the road if they
have no job; it does
amount up to something.
A fire station in New Jer-
sey built a whole new fire
house with the old news-
papers they collected.
Here, we keep our plastic
and cans separate be-
cause we are used to it,
and it goes out with the
garbage, nothing happens.
What a waste.
We pay up North $6,000
a year on property tax. If
we can't pay because we
are retired and on Social
Security, they come and
take our house away
within two years.
For 150 gallons of oil to
heat our house, for just a
short time, costs us over
$560.
This is why I am writing
to you. You are truly
blessed. You have every-
thing given by God and it
is being wasted.
Iris Farrell
Beverly Hills

Save our
post office
The U.S. Postal Service
is a viable institution,
constitutionally estab-
lished, thanks to Ben-
jamin Franklin. It uses
no taxpayer dollars to
operate.
Its financial difficulties
are, to some degree, due
to the increased preva-
lence of emails. Neverthe-
less, there are many rural
areas in the country that
depend on regular snail
mail.
Twenty percent, or one
in five, still do not have
Internet access and de-
pend on Saturday deliv-
ery of mail.
The chief source of the
post office's woes, how-
ever, is the ill-conceived,
euphemistically titled
"Postal Accountability


@_om20M
MRC.orgOMI
{ f but by big Peatuw


and Enhancement Act"
passed during George W
Bush's administration,
which forced the post of-
fice to prefund future re-
tirees health benefits 75
years in advance. This
was an unfair, unprece-
dented act.
No other public or pri-
vate agency was ever re-
quired to pay vast sums in
advance. This act should
be revoked, with the
money collected since
2006 returned to the post
office and used for pen-
sions to those who are
ready to retire.
It is incomprehensible
that banksters who com-
mit fraud are bailed out
and receive huge com-
pensations in yearly
bonuses while the post of-
fice is starved of funds.
Valuable nonprofit pub-
lic institutions, devoted to
the common good, such as
our schools, firemen,
and police, deserve our
continued support.
Sybil Schweitzer
Beverly Hills


1 Q Habitat for Humanity"
Celebrates 2 i..., in Citrus C. n i) ,,i,, n :, i l
of building their 100th home 'hi ..,.


l nl


Bixth
*D


I Come and enjoy gourmet food paired with exquisite wines,
accompanied by the smooth sounds of live jazz/R&B/soul



Wine & Food


Pairing Benefit

WITH LIVE SILENT AUCTION
Thursday, March 7,2013 6:)00-10:00)) pn.
Skyriew Clubhouse at Terra iista


For tickets and 563
information c115634


OPINION


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013 A13


or a












NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS


Feds indict 4 in
salmonella case
ATLANTA-Afederal
grand jury has indicted four
people in a 2009 salmonella
outbreak linked to a Georgia
peanut processing plant.
The indictment unsealed
Wednesday in federal court
in Georgia charges four em-
ployees with Virginia-based
Peanut Corp. of America.
The charges include con-
spiracy, wire fraud, obstruc-
tion of justice and others
related to contaminated or
misbranded food.
The company's filthy pro-
cessing plants were blamed
for the outbreak that killed
nine people and sickened
hundreds. One plant was in
Plainview, Texas, which the
State Department of Health
Services dosed Feb. 10,
2009, after product samples
tested positive for salmonella.
Named in the indictment
were company owner Stew-
art Parnell, vice president
Michael Parnell, Georgia
plant manager Samuel
Lightsey and Georgia plant
quality assurance manager
Mary Wilkerson.
Peterson gets 38
years for murder
JOLIET, Ill. -Ajudge
has sentenced Drew Peter-
son to 38 years in prison for
murdering his third wife.
Will County Judge Edward
Burmila imposed the sen-
tence Thursday. The 59-
year-old
Peterson
faced a
maximum
60-year
prison
term.
Jurors
Drew convicted
Peterson Peterson
also a suspect in Sep-
in fourth wife's member in
disappearance. the 2004
death of Kathleen Savio.
Neighbors found her body in
a dry bathtub at her home
with a gash on her head.
Peterson is also a sus-
pect in the 2007 disappear-
ance of his 23-year-old
fourth wife, Stacy Peterson,
but hasn't been charged.
Her disappearance is what
led authorities to take an-
other look at Savio's death
and reclassify it from an ac-
cident to a homicide.
Fascination nationwide
with Peterson arose from
speculation he sought to use
his law enforcement expert-
ise to get away with murder.
Star Wars fans
feel the force
SAN FRANCISCO -A
group of San Francisco Star
Wars fans who want to travel
to a galaxy not far away
have created a combat cho-
reography class for Jedis-in-
training with their weapon of
choice: the lightsaber.
Alain Bloch is the self-
proclaimed Jedi master at
Golden Gate Knights. He
has a background in martial
arts and stage combat.
Clutching the neon-
glowing lightsabers, the
self-proclaimed "Star Wars
geeks" slice and parry as
they follow Bloch's lead,
and get a little exercise too.


Paratr
stuck ir
JOINT BASE
CHORD, Wash
said some of its
got stuck in tree
ing from a plane
day in Washingi
Joe Piek, a s
Joint Base Lew
south of Seattle
n't have many
what happened
ternoon, but fire
helping to resc
three paratroop
trees near one
drop zones.
The nearby
District said thr
were stuck in a
wooded area r
of Rainier, and
rescues were I
each.


66 die in Damascus


-; -t?--. -_-- .-. .. --_.. _: -- -
Associated Press
A car bomb shook central Damascus on Thursday, exploding near the headquarters of the ruling Baath party
and the Russian Embassy.

Suicide bombers strike Syrian capital" more than 200 hurt


Associated Press

DAMASCUS, Syria A car
bomb exploded Thursday near
Syria's ruling party headquarters
in Damascus, killing at least 53
people and scattering mangled
bodies among the blazing wreck-
age in one of the bloodiest days in
the capital since the uprising
began almost two years ago.
Elsewhere in the city, two other
bombs struck intelligence offices,
killing 13, and mortar rounds hit
the army's central command, ac-
tivists said.
Recent rebel advances in the
Damascus suburbs, combined
with the bombings and three
straight days of mortar attacks,
mark the most sustained chal-
lenge of the civil war for control
of the seat of President Bashar
Assad's power
Syrian state media said the car
bombing near the Baath Party
headquarters and the Russian Em-
bassy was a suicide attack that


killed 53 civilians and wounded
more than 200, with children
among the casualties. Anti-regime
activists put the death toll at 59,
which would make it the deadliest
Damascus bombing of the revolt
The violence has shattered the
sense of normalcy the Syrian
regime has desperately tried to
maintain in Damascus, a city that
has largely been insulated from
the bloodshed and destruction
that has left other urban centers
in ruins.
The rebels launched an offen-
sive on Damascus in July follow-
ing a stunning bombing on a
high-level government crisis
meeting that killed four top
regime officials, including
Assad's brother-in-law and the
defense minister Following that
attack, rebel groups that had es-
tablished footholds in the suburbs
pushed in, battling government
forces for more than a week be-
fore being routed and swept out
Since then, government war-


p w -. : I,
Associated Press
Police cordon off the scene of a shooting and multicar
accident on the Las Vegas Strip early Thursday.


planes have pounded opposition
strongholds on the outskirts, and
rebels have managed only small
incursions on the city's southern
and eastern sides.
But the recent bombings and
mortar attacks suggest that in-
stead of trying a major assault,
rebel fighters are resorting to
guerrilla tactics to loosen Assad's
grip on the heavily fortified
capital.
The fighting in Damascus also
follows a string of tactical victo-
ries in recent weeks for the rebels
- capturing the nation's largest
hydroelectric dam and overtaking
airbases in the northeast that
have contributed to the sense that
the opposition may be gaining
some momentum.
But Damascus is the ultimate
prize in the civil war, and many
view the battle for the ancient city
as the most probable endgame of
a conflict that, according to U.N.
estimates, has killed nearly 70,000
people.


t 4 ^i .
- 4-r;


t .
4


Associated Press
Gina Pucket shovels snow from her driveway Thursday in
Salina, Kan. "This is pretty easy, it's not heavy or wet,
and it's not blowing," Pucket said.


Police: Hotel altercation Midwest swaddled

sparked Vegas shooting in blanket of snow


Associated Press


LAS VEGAS The Las
Vegas Strip became a
scene of deadly violence
early Thursday when
someone in a black Range
Rover opened fire on a
Maserati, sending it crash-
ing into a taxi that burst
*-i+- fl -- 1---*-a 0-1- n


I Iu names, leaving tllree
Dopers people dead and at least
n trees six injured.
Police believe an alter-
LEWIS-Mc- cation earlier at an un-
.-TheArmy specified casino resort
paratroopers prompted the car-to-car
s while jump- attack in the heart of the
Son a windy Strip at Las Vegas Boule-
ton state. vard and Flamingo Road.
;pokesmanfor The crossroads is the
'is-McChord site of several major hotel-
, said he did- casinos, including Bella-
details about gio, Caesars Palace and
1 Thursday af- Bally's.
fighters were "This doesn't happen
ue two or where we come from, not
'ers stuck in on this scale," said Mark
of the base's Thompson, who was visit-
ing from Manchester, Eng-
Yelm Fire land, with his wife. "We get
stabbings, and gang vio-
ee people lence, but this is like some-
thickly thing out of a movie. Like
tear the town 'Die Hard' or something."
separate Police said they were
under way for contacting authorities in
three neighboring states
-From wire reports about the Range Rover


Sport with dark tinted
windows, distinctive black
custom rims and paper
dealer ads in place of li-
cense plates that fled the
scene about 4:20 a.m.
In Southern California,
the California Highway
Patrol alerted officers in
at least three counties to
be on the lookout for the
SUV
Las Vegas Police Sgt.
John Sheahan said the
Range Rover was last
seen near the Venetian re-
sort as it headed north
from the shooting scene
on Las Vegas Boulevard.
Witnesses also told po-
lice the SUV and Maserati
had come from the nearby
CityCenter area, just south
of the site of the attack.
Police also have video
from traffic cameras at the
intersection and were
checking hotel surveil-
lance systems. The video
will not be made public,
Sheahan said.
Police said the Maserati
hit the taxi cab, which
went up in flames, and the
driver and passenger
were killed. The male
driver of the Maserati also
died, and his passenger
was shot.


Travel tough

Associated Press

ST LOUIS Powdery
snow, up to a foot and a
half in some places, bom-
barded much of the
nation's midsection
Thursday, impeding travel
and shutting down air-
ports, schools and state
legislatures.
The widespread winter
storm system swirled to
the north and east Thurs-
day night, its snow, sleet
and freezing rain prompt-
ing winter storm warnings
in Kansas, Nebraska,
Iowa, Missouri and
Illinois.
Corey Mead, a meteor-
ologist with the National
Weather Service's Storm
Prediction Center in Nor-
man, Okla., said the win-
ter storm would be
centered in the upper
Midwest by Friday
morning.
"Even across Kansas,
the snowfall rates should
continue to taper off
through the evening,"
Mead said.
The system left behind


impressive snow accumu-
lations, especially in west-
ern Kansas, where 17
inches fell in Hays.
Several accidents and
two deaths were blamed
on icy and slushy road-
ways; two people died in
crashes Wednesday. Most
schools in Kansas and
Missouri, and many in
neighboring states, were
closed. Legislatures shut
down in Kansas, Missouri,
Arkansas, Nebraska and
Iowa.
National Weather Serv-
ice meteorologist Scott
Truett said the "thunder-
snow" that rumbled
through Kansas and Mis-
souri earlier Thursday
was the result of an unsta-
ble air mass, much like a
thunderstorm.
"Instead of pouring
rain, it's pouring snow,"
Truett said. And pouring
was a sound description,
with snow falling at a rate
of 2 inches per hour or
more in some spots.
Topeka got 3 inches of
snow in one 30-minute pe-
riod, leaving medical cen-
ter worker Jennifer
Carlock to dread the drive
home.


World BRIEFS

Protest


Associated Press
Protesters backing the
Cuban government
demonstrate Thursday
against Cuban blogger
Yoani Sanchez outside a
bookstore where she pro-
motes her book "De Cuba
con carino" or "From
Cuba with love" in Sao
Paulo, Brazil.

Three convicted in
British bomb plot
LONDON Three
young British Muslims have
been convicted of plotting
terrorist bomb attacks pros-
ecutors said were intended
to be bigger than the 2005
London transit bombings.
A London jury found 27-
year-old Irfan Khalid, 31-year-
old Irfan Naseer and Ashik
Ali, 27, of being central fig-
ures in the foiled plot to ex-
plode knapsack bombs.
Prosecutors said the
men, fired up by the ser-
mons of a US.-born al-
Qaida preacher, hoped to
cause carnage on a mass
scale. Their plot was un-
done by mishaps with
money and logistics, and
ended in a police countert-
errorism swoop in 2011.
Several other suspects
have pleaded guilty to of-
fenses related to the plot.
In July 2005, suicide
bombers killed 52 com-
muters on London's sub-
way and bus network.
'Baby Doc' spurns
court again
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti
- Former Haitian dictator
Jean-Claude Duvalier has
spurned a judge's order to
appear in court for a hear-
ing on whether to reinstate
charges of human rights
abuses against him.
The lawyer for the former
leader known as "Baby
Doc" said he has appealed
the order to the Supreme
Court. Attorney Reynold
Georges appeared and an-
nounced the appeal 90 min-
utes after Thursday's
hearing was scheduled to
start.
Duvalier ruled Haiti from
1971 to 1986, a time when
thousands were impris-
oned, tortured and killed for
opposing the government.
He made a surprise re-
turn to Haiti in January 2011
and was charged with em-
bezzlement and human
rights abuses. A court threw
out all but the embezzle-
ment charge, which carries
a maximum of five years in
prison.
Mexico pledges
hunt for missing
MEXICO CITY Mexico
said it will work with the In-
ternational Red Cross on
the search for thousands of
people who have disap-
peared during the country's
six-year war on drug cartels.
Officials provided few de-
tails of the arrangement
signed Thursday and did
not release a copy, but one
Interior Department official
said the search would in-
clude the creation of a data-
base with genetic
information from relatives of
the disappeared.
Human Rights Watch re-
leased a report Wednesday
that describes 249 cases of
disappearances, most of
which appeared to have
been carried out by the mili-
tary or law enforcement. The
same day, Mexican officials
said they had a preliminary
count of more than 27,000
people reported missing
during the last six years.
-From wire reports












SPORTS


* Panthers
pick up a
win in
Philly./B3


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Auto racing/B2
0 Basketball/B3, B5
0 Hockey/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 Sports briefs/B4
0 Baseball/B5
0 Golf/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Pirate bats silenced in 5-1 loss


Crystal River collects

first hit in sixth inning

against Leesburg
STEVE MCGUNNIGLE
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER Despite finally
getting something going offensively in
the bottom of the seventh inning, it was
too little, too late for the Crystal River
baseball team, who fell to visiting Lees-
burg 5-1 on Thursday night at Mike
Hampton Field.
The Pirates (3-2) were held hitless
until the sixth inning but, in the sev-
enth, Zack Pattison led off with a line
drive single to left field. After two quick
outs, Mason Pateracki reached on a


base hit, before Leesburg reliever Jason
Baita got Garrett Lofley swinging to end
it.
The Yellow Jackets (2-2) struck first in
the second inning, when Ryan Halsted
scored from third base following a pick-
off attempt to second gone awry with the
bases loaded. But Pirates starting
pitcher Miller Henderson limited the
early damage, getting out of the jam
with two runners still on.
Henderson (five innings, one earned
run on six hits, three walks and seven
strikeouts) performed well enough, but
Leesburg's pitching had their way with
the Pirate bats for the duration.
Crystal River tied it at 1-1 in the third,
as Dallas Baldner (two walks, two steals)
drew a one-out walk, stole second, then
advanced to third on a sacrifice fly by
Pattison. Baldner scored on an infield
error that allowed Austin Wiles to


Other area action
The Citrus baseball team picked up a
lopsided victory Thursday night, while the
Lecanto softball team was edged by a run.
See Page B4 for more on both games.

reach, but Jackets starter Garrett
Vathroder got Pateracki to fly out deep
to the track in center to end the inning.
"I've seen us a lot better at the plate.
(I'm) disappointed," Crystal River head
coach Bobby Stack said. "I think our
morale is down. We're missing a lot of
kids, and we're young."
Pirates freshman Colby Cornoyer
came to the mound in the fifth, giving up
a leadoff basehit to Kyle Brana. Brana
stole second then made it safely into
third on Jaden Langley's bunt single.
Vathroder then gave himself support,


punching an RBI single through the
hole on the left side to give Leesburg a
2-1 lead.
A bases-loaded walk by Andrew
Niglio made it 3-0 before Cornoyer got
Halstead swinging to end the inning.
Cornoyer struck out the side in the fifth,
around the pair of runs.
Cody Anderson's pinch-hit single with
two out in the sixth broke up the Lees-
burg no-hitter, but the Jackets added in-
surance runs in the sixth and seventh,
while Crystal River was unable to build
on any rally attempt in the late innings.
"We're not real deep right now," Stack
said. "We've got good athletes, but we're
young, we're hurt and we're beat up.
We're in a little hole, but we're going to
dig ourselves out."
Crystal River plays 7 p.m. tonight at
home against Hernando for its first dis-
trict game of the season.


Offensive storm


'Canes softball

downs Warriors

by 12-2 count
C.J. RISK
Correspondent

CRYSTAL RIVER The
fast start by Citrus' softball
team proved to be a bad start
for Seven Rivers Christian.
Fueled by a pair of two-run
doubles by freshman Erica
Corlew, the Hurricanes fol-
lowed a four-run first inning
with a three-run second, lead-
ing ultimately to a 12-2 victory
over the Warriors on Thursday
at Bicentennial Park in Crystal
River
"She's coming around," said
Citrus coach Larry Bishop of
Corlew's performance. "She's
one of the freshmen we have
high hopes for"
It wasn't just the offense that
looked promising for Citrus.
Three pitchers worked on the
mound for the Hurricanes,
combining to limit Seven
Rivers to one hit
"We were able to work on
some things," Bishop added.
"So I thought it was a good
game. It's always good to be
deep in the (pitching) circle,
and we have four pitchers who
can throw."
The win boosted the Hurri-
canes' record to 5-1. Seven
Rivers slipped to 1-1.
"First off, Citrus is a good
team and we always enjoy
playing them," Warriors coach
Gary Dreyer said. "But when
we're playing a team like this,
and we come out and make er-
rors like we did... We had a
rough defensive game. We did-
n't give ourselves much of a
chance."
Citrus' first-inning rally
started with singles by Chelby
Lawler and Aaron McIntyre.
Corlew's first double delivered
two runs and Amy Abramowich
doubled in another Emily Fer-
reira brought home the fourth
run with a sacrifice fly
Rachel Martin singled to get
the second inning rampage
started. Melissa Michaud sac-
rificed her to second and
Lawler singled in a run to
make it 5-0. McIntyre then sin-
gled and Corlew doubled in
two more runs.
Kelly Abramowich started
for Citrus and worked the first
two innings. Jordan Josey took


S ".
,... .. ,. ... :,
... ., .- .. ; : .


*i.... .. .. ... ..-


STEPHEN E. LASKO/for the Chronicle
As usual, pitching is the name of the game and Jordan Josey was in good form Thursday as Citrus took
on Seven Rivers Christian School at Bicentennial Park in Crystal River.
over to start the third and
worked into the sixth without
allowing a hit, walking three
and hitting three batters.
Seven Rivers got its two runs
in the sixth without the benefit
of a hit after Josey loaded the
bases on two hit batsmen and a
walk. Martin came on in relief
and hit the first batter she ...... ...
faced, Alyssa Gage, to force
home a run. A walk on four
pitches to Shannon Hoey
scored the Warriors' second
run. The Hurricanes got out of
the jam by striking out Jasmine
Fisher and on a double-play fly
ball to right field by Alexis
King.
Citrus scored a single run in
the third on singles by April
Desomma and Martin, fol-
lowed by Lawler's run-scoring
base hit, and added another in
the fifth on a single by Jessica Seven Rivers Christian School's Rebecca Wright takes the throw to
get Citrus High School's Kelly Abramowich out at first in Thursday's
See Page B4 game.


CR girls

fall 5-2 to

Hernando

JOE KORNECKI III
Correspondent

CRYSTAL RIVER -
The Crystal River girls ten-
nis team (0-2 overall) suf-
fered a 5-2 loss against an
undefeated Hernando
team Thursday night. The
Leopards (4-0) won three
out of the five singles
matches and swept the two
doubles matches.
"We're treating these
matches as learning expe-
riences," Crystal River
coach Cindy Reynolds
said. "Our primary goal is
to get ready for districts in
April."
In the singles matches,
four out of five Pirates won
the first set of their respec-
tive matches, in which two
Pirates won and two lost.
Crystal River's No. 1 Nikki
Moynihan was defeated 6-
1, 6-1 by Grace Curren.
Hernando's No. 2 Shelby
Marrero downed Veronica
Williams in three sets.
Williams took the first set
6-4, but Marrero came back
strong in the next two sets
winning both by a 6-2
score.
The most hard-fought
match and last match to be
completed was three hours
and 20 minutes long, and it
featured the Pirates' No. 3
Crystal Menietti against
the Leopards' Lida Marie
Steinkamp. Menietti won
the first set 7-5, but was de-
feated in the next two sets
7-6, 7-6 in tiebreakers.
Crystal River's No. 4
Anna Lane edged out Cait-
lynn Nixon. Lane narrowly
defeated Nixon in a first-
set tiebreaker 7-6 (10-8)
and the momentum car-
ried her on to victory 6-4 in
the second set.
The Pirates' Olivia
Parker cruised by Nikki
Shamblin 6-1, 6-0 in Crystal
River's most decisive vic-
tory of the match.
In the doubles matches,
the Leopards No. 1 unit of
Curren and Marrero mixed
in some nice forehands
and overhead shots and
won 8-1 in a pro-set over
Moynihan and Williams.
At. No. 2 doubles, Sham-
blin and Nixon beat the Pi-
rates' Kelsey Schroder and
Alanna Fields by an 8-4
score in another proset.
The Pirates are now 0-2
to start the season.


Harvick, Busch win Daytona 500 duels


Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH There are two certainties
heading into the Daytona 500: Kevin Harvick is the
favorite, and no one is sure what the action will look
like in the "Great American Race."
Harvick remained perfect through Speedweeks on
Thursday by winning the first of two 150-mile Bud-
weiser Duel qualifying races, and the victory has po-
sitioned him as the top pick to win NASCAR's version
of the Super Bowl.
Being labeled the favorite is the last thing the 2007
Daytona 500 winner wanted headed into Sunday's
season-opener
"We like to be the lame-duck underdog. That's what
we're shooting for," Harvick said.
Harvick is a perfect 2 for 2 at Daytona Interna-
tional Speedway He also won an exhibition race last


weekend. This strong start comes at a time when Har-
vick has found a balance in his life with the addition
of son, Keelan, who was born last July, and as he
heads into his final season with Richard Childress
Racing. Harvick has already decided to move to
Stewart-Haas Racing in 2014.
"We've been fortunate to win the first two races of
Speedweeks. We've just got to keep a level head on
our shoulders, not get too high over what we've done,
just do the same things that we've done," he said. "If
it's meant to be, it's meant to be. I think we definitely
See Page B5
Kevin Harvick celebrates Thursday in Victory Lane
after winning the first of two 150-mile qualifying
races for the NASCAR Daytona 500 at Daytona
International Speedway in Daytona Beach.
Associated Press






B2 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013


2013 Citrus County
Speedway race
schedule
Race key
SLM: Super Late Models
OWM: Open Wheel Modifieds
SP: Sportsman
MMS: Mod Mini Stocks
SS: Street Stocks
MS: Mini Stocks
PS: Pure Stocks
HD: Hornet Division
PF8: Pro Figure-8s
F8: Street Stock/Pure Stock Figure-8s
FUPS: Florida United Promoters Series
(Super Late Models)
TBARA: Tampa Bay Area Racing
Association (Sprints)
DAARA: Daytona Antique Auto Racing
Association
DWARFs
S.E.C.K.S.: South East Champ Kart Series
MIDGETS: FI 3/4 Midgets
Note: Races start at 5:30 p.m. Saturday
unless otherwise specified
Feb.23- MMS, SS, PS, HD, F8
March 2 OWM, SP SS, MS (50), PS,
FUPS
March 9 SLM, MMS, SS, MS, DWARFs
March 16 CLOSED
March 23 CLOSED
March 30 CLOSED
April 6 FUPS, MMS, SS, MS, HD
April 13 OWM, SP MS. PS, DWARFs,
Pro-Challenge
April 20 OWM (50), SP SS, PS, PF8,
S.E.C.K.S.
April 27- SLM, MMS, SS, PS, HD, F8
May 4 OWM, SP PS, MS, Pro-Challenge,
DAARA
May 11 SLM, MMS, SS, MS, DWARFs
May 18 -TRUCKs (50), SP (50), OWM (50),
PF8, S.E.C.K.S.
May 25 SLM, MMS, SS, MS, PS, F8
June 1 SS (50), MS, HD, OWM, SP,
Pro-Challenge
June 8 FUPS (Powell Memorial), MMS,
PS, MS, DWARFs
June 15 OWM, SP SS, MS, PF8
June 22 -TBARA, MMS, SS, PS, HD, F8,
MIDGETS
June 29 DAARA (Rest to be announced)
July 6 CLOSED
July 13 SLM, MMS (50), SS, PS,
DWARFs, HD
July 20 CLOSED
July 27 SLM, MMS, SS, MS, PS, HD, F8
Aug. 3 OWM, SP SS, PS, Pro-Challenge
Aug. 10- SLM, MMS, SS, MS, DWARFs, HD
Aug. 17-OWM, SP SS, PS, PF8
Aug. 24 CLOSED
Aug. 31 -CLOSED
Sept. 7-TRUCKs (50), SP (50), OWM (50),
MS, PS
Sept. 14 FUPS, MMS, SS, PS, F8,
DWARFs
Sept. 21 OWM, SP SS, PS (50), MS, PF8
Sept. 28 FLAG POLE, BOAT & TRAILER,
SUIT CASE RACE, F8
Oct. 5- SLM, MMS, SS, MS, HD
Oct. 12 OWM, TRUCKs (50), SP (50),
Pro-Challenge, DWARFs
Oct. 19 -TBARA, (Frank Stromquist) SS
(57), PS, F8, MIDGETS
Oct. 26 OWM, SP SS, PS, MS, PF8
Nov. 2- FUPS, MMS, SS, MS, HD
Nov 9 OWM, SP MS, PS, DWARFs
Citrus County
Speedway
Race finishes for Feb. 16, 2013
Open Wheeled Modifieds
No. Driver Hometown


Herb Neumann Jr.
Richie Smith
Roger Blevins
Steven Hise
Tommy Schnader
Troy Robinson
Jason Garver
Travis Roland
Jarrett Snowden
Doug Miller
Rick Coffin
Michael Cherry
Shane Butler
Gator Hise
John Ditges
Charlie Brown
Norman Dismuke
Sportsmen
Driver
Aaron Williamson
Mike Bell
Andy Nicholls
Jay Witfoth
Mark Peterson
Tom Posavec
John Buzinec
David Mothershed
Kenner Brown


Inverness
Hernando
Largo
Inverness
Largo
Wesley Chapel
Starke
Lake Alfred
Ocala
Largo
Lutz
Tampa
Bushnell
Inverness
Orlando
Lakeland
Alturas

Hometown
Lakeland
Brooksville
Orlando
Beverly Hills
Sarasota
Dunnellon
Summerfield
Brooksville
Jacksonville


Mini Stocks
Driver Hometown
Kevin Stone Dade City
Jesse Mallory Summerfield
Jerry Daniels Weirsdale
JasonTerry Belleview
Shannon Kennedy Summerfield
Mark Patterson Webster
Vince Scalise Lutz
Travis Sharrone Floral City
Pure Stocks
Driver Hometown
Karlin Ray Floral City
James Johnston Brooksville
James Holly Weirsdale
Mike Autenrieth Inverness
Larry Welter Sr. Bronson
Glen Colyer Homosassa
Happy Florian Lecanto
PRO Figure Eights
Driver Hometown
Joey Catarelli Pinellas Park
Thomas Peet Floral City
Eric Sharrone Floral City
Neil Herne Homosassa
Charlie Meyer Pinellas Park
Charles Herne Homosassa
William Stansbury Inverness
Gator Jones Inverness
Mike Autenrieth Inverness
Paul Bookmiller Plant City


AUTO RACING


Big weekend upcoming

SEAN ARNOLD then-leader Nick Neri the bottom after crashes.
Correspondent headed to the pits with a Floral City's Karlin Ray
flat tire with one lap to go. (219) will try to go 3 for 3 in
This week's racing Heat-winner Clint Foley, feature wins this season in
lineup at the Citrus of Dunnellon, and Bush- the Pure Stock class. The
County Speedway should nell's Chris Allen each lost young driver holds an
feature the highest con- leads due to crashes and early points lead over
centration of local drivers car failures in that season- Brooksville's James John-
so far this season as Pure opener, while Tampa's ston (205 points) and In-
Stocks race for the second Ray Miller (105 points) verness' Mike Autenrieth
consecutive week while and Hernando Beach's (204), who experienced
the Modified Mini Stock Leroy Moore (104) fin- car trouble last Saturday
and Street Stock classes ished second and third. Lecanto's Happy Florian
return for the second Curtis Flanagan (110 won this division last sea-
time of the 2013 season. points), of Inverness, fol- son and finished third in
Also on Saturday's card lowed up 12 feature wins the Feb. 2 opener, but did
is the debut of the regular in 2012 with a wire-to-wire not race last week
Figure 8 division, which feature victory in a con- Ocala's Jimmy Kruse
includes Street Stock and tentious Street Stock topped last season's Fig-
Pure Stock cars. opener two weeks ago. In- ure 8 standings with 670
Clermont's Michael verness' John Chance points. Floral City's
Lawhorn (109 points) (107) and Floral City's Thomas Peet, winner of
started on the pole in the Tommy Stokes (104 points) two of last year's seven
Modified Mini Stock fea- came in behind Flanagan features and second-place
ture on Feb. 9 and hung as Floral City Street Stock finisher in last week's Pro
around in the top four be- standouts Dora Thorne, Figure 8 feature, and In-
fore sneaking back in the 2012 points champ, verness'Ronnie Schrefiels
front for the win after and Bubba Martone fell to tied for second with 656


at track

points apiece. Neil Herne,
of Homosassa, and Pnut
Higginbotham, of
Brooksville, also finished
in a deadlock at 642 points.
Hornets race for the
third time this year before
taking a leave until April
6. With cars available for
rent, the division offers
newcomers an opportu-
nity to try their hand on
the track, and more expe-
rienced drivers a chance
to have fun in a less com-
petitive setting.
Heat races begin at 5:30
p.m. Adult admission is
$13, seniors and students
are $9 and children 11
and under are $5. Chil-
dren under 42 inches are
free. Annual and family
passes, as well as admis-
sions to the pits and sky-
boxes, are also available.
For more information
visit www.citruscounty
speedwaycom


Ray lighting it up


. -,


SEAN ARNOLD/For the Chronicle
Floral City resident Karlin Ray, a 16-year-old Citrus High School student, sits atop the Pure Stocks standings after
two races at the Citrus County Speedway in 2013.


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent


While 16-year-old Karlin Ray is
just getting started as a racecar
driver, his bloodline links him back
to over a half-century of racing
tradition.
Ray, of Floral City, won six fea-
tures and seven heat races in the
Pure Stocks division in his second
year of racing in 2012, and now sits
atop the Pure Stock standings after
going 2 for 2 in feature wins to start
this season.
Ray's grandparents -his mater-
nal grandfather Dave McInnis won
the first Florida State Late Model
Championship at Tampa's Golden
Gate Speedway and both his
parents, Robert and Kathy Ray,
have a history on the track.
Karlin Ray's connection to his
family's racing was palpable even
before he was born. His mother
was preparing to pursue a champi-
onship in the Street Stock class -
then known as Hobby Stocks in
1996 when news arrived of an ad-
dition to the family, derailing her
ambitions.
"We were working on my car,
getting it ready for the champi-
onship in January and I found out
I was pregnant," Kathy Ray re-


called. "I slammed the pregnancy
test down on the fender of the car
and told (my husband) Robert,
'You don't have to be in a hurry
with my car, you've got nine
months.' I was laughing and crying
at the same time."
Ray's father won the Open
Wheel Modified championship at
the Ocala Speedway in 1996 and
collected a feature win the day his
son was born.
The No. 72 on Karlin Ray's car is
even inspired by his parents. It
represents the sum of both his fa-
ther (No. 9) and mother's (No. 63,
from McInnis' 1963 championship)
car numbers.
"Both my parents race and both
my grandpas raced, and I just got
wrapped in it," Karlin Ray said
after his feature win last Saturday
"I first got started two seasons ago,
and we just started working on the
car and I learned how to drive it
and keep winning."
Even with his background, Ray
was reluctant toward racing at
first, only turning to driving once
his parents were mostly finished
racing.
"He loved working on the cars
but he didn't really want to drive,"
said Ray's uncle, Dennis Webb, of
Webb Roofing, who owns a collec-


tion of open wheel modified cars,
including those Robert Ray
drove. "One thing I love about his
parents is they never pushed him
into it even though they both
raced.
"He struggled a little bit there in
the beginning, but once he got it, he
got it He's just the sweetest kid be-
cause he acts the same whether he
wins or loses. He doesn't pout or
jump up and down, which I think is
a tremendous trait"
Along with Webb Roofing, Ray
enjoys sponsorship support from
his grandmother Ina Ray's FD.S.
Disposal of Lecanto, Xeria Tech of
Floral City and Single Stream
Processors and Don's Plumbing,
both of Lecanto. His mother says
he does all the wrench-work him-
self on the car.
"I mostly work on it during the
week," the Citrus High School stu-
dent said. "Whenever we have to
do something major, I'll work all
night on it."
Now that he's tasted the experi-
ence of driving, there's no going
back.
"I just want to keep racing," Ray
said of his future plans. "I just love
the feel of it and the winning. Other
guys at school play football and
stuff, and I drive a race car."


Patrick maintains pole position for Daytona


Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH -All Danica Patrick
needed to do was keep her car intact
She didn't exactly follow her team
owner's advice start and then park after
two laps, he joked -but she certainly saved
an all-out push for Sunday's Daytona 500.
Patrick started on the pole for the first 150-
mile Budweiser Duel before she coasted
and finished 17th out of 23 cars. She'll keep
the top spot for Sunday's Daytona 500.
She led the field to green, then quietly
faded to the back, never giving herself a
chance to race for the win.
"I suppose there's a sense of relief" she
kept the pole, Patrick said. "But at the same
point in time, I'm a race car driver, and it's
not fun to have to protect and be careful
and be cautious and drop back at times."
Patrick was nowhere near the four-lap

Danica Patrick waves to fans during driver
introductions before Sprint Cups' Budweiser
Duel 1 race Thursday at Daytona
International Speedway in Daytona Beach.
Associated Press


sprint to the finish that saw Kevin Harvick
hold off Greg Biffle for the win.
Patrick became the first woman in his-
tory to win a pole in NASCAR's Sprint Cup
series. Team owner Gene Haas even sug-
gested perhaps, jokingly that Patrick
call it a day after a couple of laps.
Not a chance.
"We really just wanted to run probably
10 or 15 laps and be in the pack, be in
front" crew chief Tony Gibson said. "Once
we got into a stalemate, we fell back, the
inside line wasn't moving and it was just
time to get out."
No driver has won the Daytona 500 from
the pole since Dale Jarrett in 2000.
She can't rest easy yet, not with Cup
practices Friday and Saturday, where any
wreck could send her to the back of the
field. But she passed the first major of
Speedweeks since she thrust herself and
NASCAR into the national spotlight with a
history-making run at the pole for "The
Great American Race."
"My nerves will be calmed down a little
bit Saturday afternoon when practice is over
and our car's in one piece," Gibson said.


$27,388.
12. (1) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 60, 102.2, 0,
$27,363.
13. (13) Aric Almirola, Ford, 60, 49.4, 0,
$27,338.
14. (6) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 59, 60.3,
0, $27,313.
15. (19) Dave Blaney Chevrolet, 59, 41.7, 0,
$27,288.
16. (16) Josh Wise, Ford, 59, 39.6, 0,
$27,263.
17. (21) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 59, 45.3, 0,
$27,238.
18. (18) Terry Labonte, Ford, 59, 50.9, 0,
$27,188.
19.(17) Michael McDowell, Ford, 59, 32.5, 0,
$27,163.
20. (20) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 59, 27.4, 0,
$27,138.
21.(2) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 58, 38.8, 0,
$27,088.
22. (22) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 55, 26.9, 0,
$27,063.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C.C. Speedway
points standings
Top 5 for each class through Feb.16
Super Late Models
Car Driver Points
50 Wayne Anderson 110
110 Steve Dorer 108
1 Dale Sanders 103
98 Herb Neumann Jr 103
23 Todd Brown 99
Open Wheel Mods
Car Driver Points
289 Richie Smith 216
01 Herb Neumann Jr 203
0 Troy Robinson 202
2 Steven Hise 196
1 Roger Blevins 194
Mod Mini Stocks
Car Driver Points
44 Michael Lawhorn 109
06 Ray Miller 105
99 Leroy Moore 104
71 Wayne Heater 100
24 Phil Edwards 99
Sportsman
Car Driver Points
73 Mark Peterson 209
66 Andy Nicholls 207
4 Jay Witfoth 207
17 Mike Bell 204
114 John Buzinec 192
Street Stocks
Car Driver Points
3 Curtis Flanagan 110
61 John Chance 107
52 Tommy Stokes 104
16 J.D.Goff 100
26 Bradley Lyon 96
Pure Stocks
Car Driver Points
72 Karlin Ray 219
45 James Johnston 205
32 Mike Autenrieth 204
85 Larry Welter Sr. 193
44 Glen Colyer 184
Mini Stocks
Car Driver Points
98 Kevin Stone 312
20 Shannon Kennedy 311
32 Travis Sharrone 300
50 Jesse Mallory 297
11 Jerry Daniels 297
Pro Figure-8's
Car Driver Points
6 Joey Catarelli 100
85 Thomas Peet 98
32 Eric Sharrone 96
13 Neil Herne 94
94 Charlie Meyer 92



Budweiser
Duel 1 results
Thursday
At Daytona International Speedway
Daytona Beach, Fla.
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (13) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 60 laps, 116
rating, 0 points, $57,792.
2. (14) Greg Biffle, Ford, 60, 95.9, 0, $42,789.
3. (7) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 60,
65.7, 0, $37,789.
4. (11) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 60, 82.2,
0, $32,789.
5. (17) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 60, 80.4, 0,
$30,789.
6. (3) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 60, 75.3, 0,
$28,389.
7. (12) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 60, 79, 0,
$27,289.
8. (8) Casey Mears, Ford, 60, 91.2, 0,
$26,289.
9.(6) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 60, 72.9,
0, $26,264.
10. (5) Joey Logano, Ford, 60, 87.2, 0,
$26,239.
11. (20) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 60, 62.6, 0,
$26,214.
12. (15) David Gilliland, Ford, 60, 38.1, 0,
$26,189.
13. (22) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 60, 46, 0,
$26,164.
14. (16) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 60, 69, 0,
$26,139.
15. (18) Scott Speed, Ford, 60, 52.3, 0,
$26,114.
16. (21) David Reutimann, Toyota, 60, 39.2,
0, $26,089.
17. (1) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 60, 50.4, 0,
$26,064.
18. (19) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 60, 48.7, 0,
$26,014.
19. (10) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 60, 80, 0,
$25,989.
20. (4) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 59, 72.7, 0,
$25,964.
21. (23) Brian Keselowski, Toyota, 58, 25, 0,
$25,914.
22. (9) Carl Edwards, Ford, accident, 52,
62.4, 0, $25,889.
23. (2) Trevor Bayne, Ford, accident, 52,
106.2, 0, $25,839.
Budweiser
Duel 2 results
Thursday
At Daytona International Speedway
Daytona Beach, Fla.
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (4) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 60 laps, 121.1 rat-
ing, 0 points, $58,977.
2. (3) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 60, 120.4, 0,
$43,963.
3. (8) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 60, 111.3, 0,
$38,963.
4. (9) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 60, 92, 0,
$33,963.
5. (5) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 60, 96.3, 0,
$31,963.
6. (14) Mark Martin, Toyota, 60, 88.7, 0,
$29,563.
7. (7) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 60, 98.2, 0,
$28,463.
8. (10) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 60, 85.7, 0,
$27,463.
9. (11) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 60, 68.5,
0, $27,438.
10. (15) David Ragan, Ford, 60, 68.8, 0,
$27,41 3.
11. (12) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 60, 69.1, 0,





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lady Volunteers remain on top of SEC


Associated Press

KNOXVILLE, Tenn.
Meighan Simmons scored 24
points and Cierra Burdick had a
double-double as No. 11 Ten-
nessee trounced Auburn 83-61 to
remain in sole possession of first
place in the Southeastern
Conference.
Simmons had 11 points in the
first 8 minutes and made three
3-pointers in a 67-second span
early in the game. Burdick had
15 points and a career-high 13
rebounds for the Lady Volun-
teers (21-5, 12-1 Southeastern
Conference).
Tyrese Tanner scored 20
points, Blanche Alverson added
15 points and Chadarryl Clay
had 10 points for Auburn (14-12,
3-10), which lost for the ninth
time in its last 10 games.
No. 8 Maryland 86,
Boston College 61
BOSTON -Alyssa Thomas
scored a season-high 30 points and
grabbed 12 rebounds to lead No. 8
Maryland to an 86-61 victory over
Boston College, the Terrapins' third
consecutive victory.


Tianna Hawkins scored 15 points
and Alicia DeVaughn had 10 points
and eight rebounds for Maryland
(22-4, 13-2 Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence). With four rebounds, Hawkins
became the third woman and the
fourth man or woman in school
history to grab 1,000 rebounds.
Kristen Doherty scored 18 points
for Boston College (10-16, 4-11).
No. 10 Texas A&M 82,
Mississippi 53
COLLEGE STATION, Texas -
Kelsey Bone had 24 points and a
career-high 17 rebounds to help No.
10 Texas A&M to an 82-53 victory
over Mississippi.
Texas A&M (21-6, 11-2 South-
eastern Conference) led by 12
points at halftime and was up by the
same margin 5 minutes into the sec-
ond half. The Aggies then used a
12-2 run to extend the lead to 60-38
midway through the half, and
coasted to the victory.
No. 13 Georgia 66,
Arkansas 34
ATHENS, Ga. Jasmine Hassell
scored 14 points as No. 13 Georgia


Associated Press
Boston College forward Kristen Doherty gets control of a loose ball
Thursday in Boston against Maryland forward Tianna Hawkins.


overwhelmed Arkansas 66-34 to set
a school record for fewest points al-
lowed in a Southeastern Conference
regular-season game.
The Lady Bulldogs defeated
South Carolina by an identical score
in the 2011 SEC tournament.
In their Jan. 17 matchup against
the Razorbacks, the Lady Bulldogs


trailed by 15 before rallying for a 57-
53 win. This time, Georgia (22-4, 10-
3) surged to an 18-4 lead and went
into halftime ahead 30-16.
The Lady Bulldogs opened the
second half with a 17-6 spurt, even-
tually pushing their advantage to 34.
Dominique Wilson and Erin
Gatling scored eight points apiece


for the Razorbacks (17-9, 5-8).
No. 14 Dayton 67,
St. Bonaventure 63
OLEAN, N.Y. -Andrea Hoover
scored 13 points and Ally Malott had
12 points and 11 rebounds to lead
No. 14 Dayton to a 67-63 victory
over St. Bonaventure in an Atlantic
10 Conference game.
Dayton's lead ranged from seven
to 14 points until St. Bonaventure
scored nine straight to close to
65-61 with 9 seconds remaining.
No. 24 Nebraska 57,
Michigan 39
ANN ARBOR, Mich. Jordan
Hooper scored 14 points and pulled
down 12 rebounds to lead No. 24
Nebraska to its eighth straight
victory, 57-39 over Michigan.
Lindsey Moore had 15 points and
eight assists for the Cornhuskers
(20-6, 10-3 Big Ten).
Nya Jordan scored 12 points and
grabbed 16 rebounds for the
Wolverines (19-7, 8-5).
Michigan opened the game on a
10-2 run and led 22-18 at halftime,
but Nebraska answered with a 21-0
run in the second half.


Power outage


~0t


Associated Press
Boston Bruins defenseman Adam McQuaid deflects the puck away from Tampa Bay's Adam Hall on Thursday in
front of Bruins goalie Tuukka Rask during the first period in Tampa.

Horton scores two goals as Bruins top Lightning 4-2


Associated Press

TAMPA Nathan Hor-
ton scored two goals, and
the Boston Bruins beat the
Tampa Bay Lightning 4-2.
Patrice Bergeron and
Brad Marchand also
scored for Boston, which
improved to 6-1-1 on the
road.
After blowing a two-goal
lead, the Bruins took a 3-2
advantage on Marchand's
goal from the slot with 6:02
to go in the second. Horton
extended the lead to 4-2
when he redirected Zdeno
Chara's pass at 2:33 of the
third.
Tampa Bay got goals
from Steven Stamkos and
Cory Conacher, but the
Lightning's two-game win-
ning streak, which fol-
lowed an 0-5-1 stretch, was
snapped.
Panthers 5,
Flyers 2
PHILADELPHIA-
Jonathan Huberdeau and
Peter Mueller each had two
goals to help the Florida Pan-
thers snap a five-game losing
streak with a 5-2 victory over
the Philadelphia Flyers.
Tomas Kopecky also
scored for Florida, which was
0-2-3 since a 3-2 shootout
victory in Philadelphia on
Feb. 7. Scott Clemmensen,
who backs up Jose Theodore,


stopped 32 shots to earn his
first win since April 7.
Luke Schenn and Jakub
Voracek scored Philadelphia's
goals in the third period.
The Flyers came out flat
one night after a wild 6-5 win
at Pittsburgh.
Devils 3, Capitals 2
WASHINGTON Ilya Ko-
valchuk scored the tiebreak-
ing goal on a 5-on-3 power
play with about 8 1/2 minutes
left to complete the New Jer-
sey Devils' 3-2 comeback vic-
tory over the Washington
Capitals, who have yet to beat
any of the Eastern Confer-
ence's elite teams.
Washington led 2-1 enter-
ing the third period, thanks to
power-play goals by Mathieu
Perrault and Mike Ribeiro.
Andrei Loktionov made it
2-all midway through the last
period, and Kovalchuk
dropped to a knee as he let
the puck fly to put New Jersey
ahead for the first time off Pa-
trik Elias' assist. Elias had
scored a short-handed goal in
the second period.
The East-worst Capitals
dropped to 0-7-1 against the
conference's top six teams.
Maple Leafs 3,
Sabres 1
TORONTO James van
Riemsdyk scored two goals to
lead the Toronto Maple Leafs


Florida Panthers goalie Scott Clemmensen deflects a
Flyers shot Thursday in Philadelphia.


past the Buffalo Sabres 3-1,
spoiling the NHL head coach-
ing debut of Ron Rolston.
Rolston, who until Wednes-
day was the head coach of
the AHL's Rochester Ameri-
cans, was hired as the Sabres
interim coach following the
club's decision to fire Lindy
Ruff.
Van Riemsdyk's power-play
goal at 14:28 of the third -
his team-leading 11th gave
Toronto breathing room after
Buffalo goalie Ryan Miller
stopped Van Riemsdyk with a
fabulous glove save earlier on
the power play.
Dion Phaneuf also scored
Toronto, which won its third
straight home game. Ben
Scrivens stopped 31 shots for
his third win in five starts
since James Reimer's knee
injury Feb. 11.
Tyler Ennis scored for
Buffalo.
Blue Jackets 3,
Red Wings 2
DETROIT Vinny Prospal
scored with 24.7 seconds left,
capping a comeback that
lifted the Columbus Blue
Jackets to a 3-2 win over the
Detroit Red Wings.
Damien Brunner and Valt-
teri Filppula scored in the first
2-plus minutes of the game to
put the Red Wings ahead by
two, a cushion they wasted
for a third time during their
five-game losing streak.
R.J. Umberger's power-
play goal a couple of minutes
after Detroit took its two-goal
lead pulled Columbus within
one. Derek Dorsett tied it in
the third period.
Prospal's backhander off
crisp passes from James Wis-
niewski and Derek Dorsett
ended the Blue Jackets'
three-game losing streak.
Jets 4,
Hurricanes 3
RALEIGH, N.C. Blake
Wheeler scored his second
goal of the game with 4:54 re-
maining to lift the Winnipeg


Jets to a 4-3 win over the Car-
olina Hurricanes.
Wheeler sped in on a par-
tial breakaway after Carolina
defenseman Joe Corvo
slipped near the blue line and
beat goalie Cam Ward.
Wheeler's goal concluded a
stretch where the teams
scored three goals in a span
of 1:03.
Jiri Tlutsy scored twice for
Carolina while Jordan Staal
also scored for the Hurri-
canes. Cam Ward made
19 saves.
Andrew Ladd and Evander
Kane also scored for Win-
nipeg and Ondrej Pavelec
made 27 saves.
Senators 3,
Rangers 2, SO
OTTAWA- Kaspars Dau-
gavins scored in the seventh
round of the shootout and
backup goalie Ben Bishop
picked up the victory in relief
of injured starter Craig Ander-
son and the Ottawa Senators
defeated the New York
Rangers 3-2.
Daugavins appeared to
mishit his winning shootout at-
tempt that beat Rangers
goalie Henrik Lundqvist be-
tween the legs. Kreider then
needed to score to keep the
game going, but he couldn't
beat Bishop.
Islanders 4,
Canadiens 3, OT
MONTREAL- Rookie de-
fenseman Thomas Hickey
scored in overtime for his first
NHL goal, and the New York
Islanders rallied to snap the
Montreal Canadiens' six-
game winning streak, 4-3.
Matt Moulson scored twice
and Frans Nielsen added a
goal in the third period for Is-
landers (7-9-1), who trailed 2-
0 and 3-1 but came back to
end a two-game slide and win
for the third time in 10 games.
Max Pacioretty had two
goals, and Travis Moen
added one for the Canadiens
(11-5-2).


Heat roll Bulls


Associated Press

CHICAGO LeBron
James scored 26 points
and grabbed 12 rebounds,
and the Miami Heat beat
the Chicago Bulls 86-67
Thursday for their season-
high ninth straight win.
James also had seven
assists in another big per-
formance after ending his
franchise-record seven-
game streak of scoring at
least 30 the previous night
in Atlanta.
Dwyane Wade added 17
points, and the Heat took
control in the first half,
sending the Bulls to their
fifth loss in seven games
on a night when the Der-
rick Rose recovery story
took another twist
After saying last week
that he wouldn't rush back
from his knee injury to
play this season if he was-
n't ready, Chicago's side-
lined superstar had to go
into damage control mode
after his older brother
Reggie blasted the organi-
zation in an
ESPNChicago.com article
for not making a move be-
fore Thursday's trade
deadline.
Things didn't get much
better for the Bulls once
the game started.


Nate Robinson scored
14 points, Carlos Boozer
had 12 points and 11 re-
bounds and Joakim Noah
added 11 points, eight re-
bounds and eight assists,
but he also committed
four of the Bulls' season-
high 27 turnovers.
Chicago was particu-
larly bad in the first half,
coughing it up 17 times as
the Heat built a 45-35 lead,
and the Bulls came up
short after winning at
Miami last month. This
time, the Heat took con-
trol in the second quarter,
scoring 13 straight points
during a 4 1/2-minute
stretch to turn a two-point
deficit into an 11-point ad-
vantage even though
James was on the bench
for much of the run.
It started after a soaring
right-handed dunk by Taj
Gibson to give Chicago a
28-26 lead with 8:16 re-
maining. Allen answered
with a driving layup, Wade
followed with two
jumpers and the Bulls
turned it over five times as
the Heat built a 39-28 lead.
Marco Belinelli ended
the scoring drought for
Chicago with a free throw,
and Boozer then nailed a
jumper after Bosh buried
a 20-footer.


Associated Press
Miami Heat center Chris Bosh drives to the basket
Thursday against Chicago Bulls center Joakim Noah
during the first half in Chicago.


-Men's basketball BRIEFS=


No. 6 Duke 88,
Virginia Tech 56
BLACKSBURG, Va. -
Seth Curry scored 19 of his
22 points in the first half as
No. 6 Duke opened a
20-point lead and sent Vir-
ginia Tech to its ninth con-
secutive loss, 88-56.
Rasheed Sulaimon added
17 points and Mason Plum-
lee had 13 points and 12 re-
bounds for the Blue Devils
(23-3, 10-3 Atlantic Coast
Conference) as they moved
coach Mike Krzyzewski into
sole possession of third
place on the career list for
victories at one school with
877.


California 48,
No. 23 Oregon 46
EUGENE, Ore. Justin
Cobbs' jumper with 0.7 sec-
onds to play gave California
a 48-46 victory over No. 23
Oregon.
Cobbs' shot, which came
after the Golden Bears (17-
9, 9-5 Pac-12) ran nearly all
of the final 26 seconds off
the clock, hit nothing but net.
Cobbs finished with 14
points and Allen Crabbe had
12 for Cal, which has won
four straight.
Arsalan Kazemi had 11
points and 18 rebounds for
the Ducks (21-6, 10-4).
-From wire reports


SPORTS


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013 B3






B4 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 32 19 .627
Brooklyn 33 22 .600 1
Boston 28 26 .519 5/2
Philadelphia 22 30 .423 10'2
Toronto 22 33 .400 12
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 38 14 .731
Atlanta 29 23 .558 9
Washington 15 37 .288 23
Orlando 15 39 .278 24
Charlotte 13 41 .241 26
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 33 21 .611 -
Chicago 31 23 .574 2
Milwaukee 26 27 .491 6V2
Detroit 22 34 .393 12
Cleveland 17 37 .315 16
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 43 12 .782 -
Memphis 35 18 .660 7
Houston 30 26 .536 13/2
Dallas 24 29 .453 18
New Orleans 19 36 .345 24
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 39 15 .722 -
Denver 34 21 .618 5/2
Utah 31 24 .564 8/2
Portland 25 29 .463 14
Minnesota 20 31 .392 17/2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 39 17 .696 -
Golden State 31 23 .574 7
L.A. Lakers 26 29 .473 12/2
Sacramento 19 36 .345 19/2
Phoenix 18 37 .327 20/2
Wednesday's Games
Detroit 105, Charlotte 99
Memphis 88, Toronto 82
Indiana 125, New York 91
Houston 122, Oklahoma City 119
Minnesota 94, Philadelphia 87
Brooklyn 97, Milwaukee 94
Miami 103, Atlanta 90
Cleveland 105, New Orleans 100
Dallas 111, Orlando 96
Golden State 108, Phoenix 98
L.A. Lakers 113, Boston 99
Thursday's Games
Miami 86, Chicago 67
San Antonio at L.A. Clippers, late
Today's Games
Chicago at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
New York at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Denver at Washington, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Houston at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Orlando at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Dallas at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Boston at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
San Antonio at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Portland at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Denver at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Houston at Washington, 7 p.m.
Miami at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Utah at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
NewJersey 17 10 3 4 24 45 40
Pittsburgh 17 11 6 0 22 57 44
N.Y Rangers 16 8 6 2 18 41 41
Philadelphia 19 810 1 17 53 59
N.Y Islanders 17 7 9 1 15 50 60
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Montreal 17 11 4 2 24 49 39
Boston 14 10 2 2 22 41 33
Ottawa 18 10 6 2 22 43 34
Toronto 18 11 7 0 22 51 41
Buffalo 18 611 1 13 48 59
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Carolina 15 8 6 1 17 44 44
Tampa Bay 16 8 7 1 17 61 51
Winnipeg 16 7 8 1 15 41 50
Florida 16 5 7 4 14 40 58
Washington 16 510 1 11 43 54
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 16 13 0 3 29 55 34
Nashville 17 8 4 5 21 39 38
St. Louis 17 9 6 2 20 53 51
Detroit 17 7 7 3 17 45 51
Columbus 17 510 2 12 39 53
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 16 9 3 4 22 48 40
Minnesota 15 7 6 2 16 33 38
Colorado 15 7 7 1 15 38 43
Edmonton 15 6 6 3 15 36 41
Calgary 15 5 7 3 13 40 54
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 15 12 2 1 25 53 39
San Jose 15 8 4 3 19 39 34
Phoenix 16 8 6 2 18 44 41
Dallas 17 8 8 1 17 44 47
Los Angeles 15 7 6 2 16 36 38
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Wednesday's Games
Philadelphia 6, Pittsburgh 5
Colorado 1, St. Louis 0, OT
Los Angeles 3, Calgary 1
Thursday's Games
Ottawa 3, N.Y Rangers 2, SO
Toronto 3, Buffalo 1
Florida 5, Philadelphia 2
New Jersey 3, Washington 2
Winnipeg 4, Carolina 3
N.Y Islanders 4, Montreal 3, OT
Boston 4, Tampa Bay 2
Columbus 3, Detroit 2
Vancouver 4, Dallas 3
Minnesota at Edmonton, late
Today's Games
Florida at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at Nashville, 8 p.m.
San Jose at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
New Jersey at Washington, 12 p.m.


Winnipeg at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Phoenix at Edmonton, 3:30 p.m.
Colorado at Los Angeles, 4 p.m.
Nashville at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
N.Y Rangers at Montreal, 7 p.m.
N.Y Islanders at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Columbus at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Calgary 10 p.m.



Daytona 500 Lineup
AfterThursday's Duel races
Race Sunday
At Daytona International Speedway
Daytona Beach, Fla.
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 196.434 mph.
2. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 196.292.
3. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 194.742.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr itherecord


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Thursday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
8-6-6
CASH 3 (late)
2-8-2

PLAY 4 (early)
S2-1-2-7
PLAY 4 (late)
2-4-3-1

FW" LoFANTASY 5
-- -- 3-13-15-28-33



On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
7 a.m. (SPEED) Sprint Cup Budweiser Duel
1:30 p.m. (SPEED) NASCAR Camping World Truck Series
Qualifying
3:30 p.m. (ESPN2) NASCAR Racing Nationwide Series: Day-
tona Qualifying
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m. (ESPN2) North Dakota State at Akron
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
6:30 p.m. (SUN) Florida State at Duke
8:30 p.m. (SUN) North Carolina at Virginia Tech
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m. (ESPN) Minnesota Timberwolves at Oklahoma City
Thunder
8 p.m. (FSNFL) Orlando Magic at Memphis Grizzlies
10:30 p.m. (ESPN) San Antonio Spurs at Golden State War-
riors
BOXING
9 p.m. (ESPN2) Friday Night Fights. Kendall Holt vs. Lamont
Peterson
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour Honda LPGA Thailand, Second
Round (taped)
2 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour WGC Accenture Match Play Cham-
pionship, Day Three
COLLEGE HOCKEY
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Yale at Quinnipiac
10 p.m. (NBCSPT) North Dakota at Denver
SOCCER
12 p.m. (FSNFL) English Premier League Soccer Liverpool
FC vs Swansea City AFC (taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



Prep CALENDAR


TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BASEBALL
4:30 p.m. Seven Rivers at Cornerstone Academy
6:30 p.m. Citrus at West Port
7 p.m. Hernando at Crystal River
SOFTBALL
4:30 p.m. Seven Rivers at Cornerstone Academy
7 p.m. South Lake at Lecanto
7 p.m. Crystal River at Nature Coast
BOYS TENNIS
3:45 p.m. Lecanto vs. Columbia at CF in Ocala
TRACKAND FIELD
3:30 p.m. Lecanto at Weeki Wachee Invitational


4. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 195.767.
5. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 194.729.
6. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 195.852.
7. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
195.508.
8. (33) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 195.385.
9. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 195.084.
10. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 195.228.
11. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 193.657.
12. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 195.725.
13.(14)Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 195.925.
14. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 194.683.
15. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 194.961.
16.(27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 195.503.
17. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 195.495.
18. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 195.156.
19. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 195.584.
20. (1) Jamie McMurray Chevrolet, 195.042.
21. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 195.767.
22.(34) David Ragan, Ford, 194.616.
23. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 192.563.
24. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 194.793.
25. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 194.654.
26. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 194.742.
27. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 190.046.
28. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 195.537.
29. (26) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 194.313.
30.(7) Dave Blaney Chevrolet, 192.996.
31. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 193.54.
32. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, 194.254.
33. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 195.976.
34. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 195.946.
35. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 195.771.
36. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 195.24.
37. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 195.207.
38. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 193.544.
39. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford, 193.515.
40.(51) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 193.096.
41.(36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 192.094.
42. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, 190.339.
43. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 190.142.
Failed to Qualify
44. (52) Brian Keselowski, Toyota, 183.876.
45. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 189.438.


FAVORITE
at Butler
Harvard
at Yale
at Columbia
at Cornell
at Akron
at Long Beach St.

FAVORITE
Denver
at Indiana
New York
Chicago
at Brooklyn
at Atlanta
Dallas
at Oklahoma City
at Memphis
at Phoenix
San Antonio
at L.A. Lakers

FAVORITE LINE
at Pittsburgh -220
at Nashville -110
at Chicago -155


NCAA Basketball


LINE UNDERDOG
2 Saint Louis
412 at Brown
11 Dartmouth
Pk Princeton
6 Penn
7 N. Dakota St.
3 Stephen F Austin
NBA
LINE UNDERDOG
212 at Washington
9'2 Detroit
212 at Toronto
6 at Charlotte
3 Houston
9 Sacramento
1 at New Orleans
12 Minnesota
111 2 Orlando
Pk Boston
212 at Golden State
10 Portland
NHL
UNDERDOG LINE
Florida +180
Vancouver -110
San Jose +135


WGC-Accenture
Match Play
Championship
At Dove Mountain, Ritz-Carlton Golf Club
Marana, Ariz.
Yardage: 7,791; Par: 72
First Round -Thursday
Seeds in parentheses
Sergio Garcia (12), Spain, def. Thongchai
Jaidee (53) Thailand, 20 holes.
Matt Kuchar (21), United States, def. Hiroyuki
Fujita (44), Japan, 3 and 2.
lan Poulter (11), England, def. Stephen Gal-
lacher (54), Scotland, 2 and 1.
Bo Van Pelt (22), United States, def. John
Senden (43), Australia, 6 and 5.
Russell Henley (56), United States, def. Charl
Schwartzel (9), South Africa, 1 up.
Jason Day (41) Australia, def. Zach Johnson
(24), United States, 6 and 5.
Richard Sterne (55), South Africa, def. Jason
Dufner (10), United States, 1 up.
Hunter Mahan (23), United States, def. Mat-
teo Manassero (42), Italy 5 and 4.
Justin Rose (5), England, def. K.J. Choi (60),
South Korea, 2 and 1.
Nicolas Colsaerts (37), Belgium, def. Bill
Haas (28), United States, 5 and 4.
Tim Clark (59), South Africa, def. Adam Scott
(6), Australia, 2 and 1.
Thorbjorn Olesen (38), Denmark, def. Jamie
Donaldson (27), 3 and 2.
Bubba Watson (8), United States, def. Chris
Wood (37), England, 2 and 1.
Jim Furyk (25), United States, def. Ryan
Moore (40), United States, 4 and 2.
Rafael Cabrera Bello (58), Spain, def. Lee
Westwood (7), England, 19 holes.
Martin Kaymer (26), Germany, def. George
Coetzee (39), South Africa, 2 and 1.
Marcus Fraser (52), Australia, def. Keegan
Bradley (13), United States, 1 up.
Fredrik Jacobson (45), Sweden, def. Ernie
Els (20), South Africa, 1 up.
Steve Stricker (14), United States, def. Hen-
rik Stenson (51), Sweden, 5 and 4.
Nick Watney (19), United States, def. David
Toms (46), United States, 5 and4.
Alexander Noren (49), Sweden, def. Dustin
Johnson (16), United States, 6 and 4.
Graeme McDowell (17), Northern Ireland,
def. Padraig Harrington (48), Ireland, 2 up.
Webb Simpson (15), United States, def.
David Lynn (50), England, 5 and 4.
Peter Hanson (18), Sweden, def. Thomas
Bjorn (47), Denmark, 3 and 2.
Louis Oosthuizen (4), South Africa, def.
Richie Ramsay (61), Australia, 2 and 1.
Robert Garrigus (36), United States, def.
Branden Grace (29), South Africa, 4 and 3.
Luke Donald (3), England, def. Marcel Siem
(62), Germany 1 up.
Scott Piercy (35), United States, def. Paul
Lawrie (30), Scotland, 4 and 3.
Shane Lowry (64), Ireland, def. Rory Mcllroy
(1), Northern Ireland, 1 up.
Charles Howell III (63), United States, def.
TigerWoods (2), United States, 2 and 1.
Did Not Finish
Carl Pettersson (33), Sweden, leads Rickie
Fowler (32), United States, 1 up through 17
holes.
Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano (31), all square
with Francesco Molinari (34), Italy, through 15
holes.


I S O R T B I E F -


Panthers strand 12 in
54 loss at Vanguard
The Lecanto softball team had runners
on base all night but couldn't bring
enough of them home in a 5-4 setback at
Ocala Vanguard on Thursday night.
Stranding 12 base runners total, the
Panthers left the bases loaded three
times once while down a run in the top
of the seventh inning.
Lily Parrish, Amber Atkinson (run), Sid-
ney Holstein (run) and Paige Richards
each had two hits for Lecanto while
Amber Russo (run), Amber Hopkins
(RBI) and Jordan Martin (RBI) also
contributed.
Lecanto (1-1 overall) plays 7 p.m.


tonight at home against Groveland South
Lake.

Hurricanes' bats come
alive late at Nature Coast
Led by sophomore starting pitcher
Alex Atkinson's efficient outing, the Citrus
baseball team scored a 9-1 victory at
Brooksville Nature Coast on Thursday.
Atkinson allowed two walks, six hits
and one earned run while striking out six
over six innings.
Offensively, Cody Bogart homered and
doubled for Citrus while Mitchell Ellis (2
for 3, double, two RBIs) and Cy Yates
(two-run single) chipped in.
Citrus (2-2) plays tonight at West Port.
-From staff reports


Associated Press
Kansas City Chiefs head coach Andy Reid answers a question Thursday during
a news conference at the NFL football scouting combine in Indianapolis.




Chiefs' free agent



choices could impact



No. 1 draft pick


Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS -The Kansas City
Chiefs are still deciding what do with
receiver Dwayne Bowe and left tackle
Branden Albert and it could have an
impact on how they use the No. 1 pick
in April's draft.
Bowe and Albert could both be-
come free agents next month. And
with a top-heavy class of offensive
linemen available, including Luke
Joeckel of Texas A&M, what the
Chiefs do over the next two weeks
could dictate how the draft falls.
"I did have a chance to look at him,
and I'll tell you, he's a pretty good foot-
ball player," Chiefs coach Andy Reid
said of Joeckel. "I haven't had an op-
portunity to meet him. I look forward
to having that opportunity."
Bowe played in only 13 games last
season because of injuries, but he still
had 59 catches for 801 yards and three
touchdowns. The former first-round
draft pick has been the Chiefs' top
wide receiver almost since his arrival,
catching 415 passes over the past six
seasons.
Last season, the Chiefs kept him
with the franchise tag. When the two
sides couldn't work out a long-term
deal, Bowe refused to report to the
team until midway through training
camp.
Reid said Thursday at the NFEs an-
nual scouting combine that no deci-
sion has been made on Bowe, though
it appears franchising him again is a
possibility if they can't sign him to a
new deal. The only other option is to
let him test the free-agent market.
"We are going through that right
now," Reid said. "Free agency kicks
off here in a little bit (March 12) and
we will see what happens before free
agency The main thing is, there is
communication there and we'll just
see how it works out over the next few
weeks."
The bigger question might be what
the Chiefs will do with Albert. He was
limited to 11 starts last season be-
cause of a back injury and has only
played in 16 games once in the last
five seasons. But he recently traveled
to Kansas City to undergo a physical,
and Reid said the team is still dis-
cussing his situation.
"I had him in because he had a
fairly significant injury, so we've kind
of got to work through that," Reid said.
"Our doctors were able to evaluate
him, we're talking through it and we'll
kind of reconvene after we're done
with this week down here."
Another option would be trading
out of the No. 1 pick, something Reid
did not discount.
"We're going to evaluate every-




SOFTBALL
Continued from Page B1

Liptrap, two errors and a ground out
byJosey
After Seven Rivers narrowed the
gap to 9-2 in the sixth, Citrus pushed
across three more in the seventh on
singles by Martin and Josey, followed
with one out by four Seven Rivers' er-
rors to score three runs.


Focused on replay issues
INDIANAPOLIS The NFL wants to
avoid a replay of what happened in De-
troit on Thanksgiving when Lions coach
Jim Schwartz threw a challenge flag on
a touchdown run, negating an automatic
replay.
NFL executive vice president of foot-
ball operations Ray Anderson promised
Wednesday the rule would be fixed be-
fore next season.
During a game against Houston,
Schwartz threw the challenge flag on an
81-yard touchdown run by the Texans'
Justin Forsett.
Replays clearly showed Forsett's
knee and elbow touched the turf at the
Houston 25 when he was hit by Lions
defenders.
Because all scoring plays are auto-
matically reviewed, Schwartz was given
a 15-yard unsportsmanlike conduct
penalty and the review was not allowed.
Anderson said the most important
thing is getting the call right.
-From wire report


thing," he said. "We're just not going
to give it away, so we'd have to see
what people throw our way. It's a
pretty valuable pick."
PEY-OFF: Broncos coach John Fox
dropped some bad news on the rest of
the league Thursday when he said
Peyton Manning could be even better
in 2013 than he was in 2012.
The reasoning is simple. A year ago,
as Manning worked out at Duke, he
was still trying to regain strength in
his right arm after multiple surgeries
to repair nerve damage in his neck.
Now Manning will have another off-
season to recover, another offseason
to fine-tune the Denver offense and
work with teammates.
"The reality was that it was a nerve
situation and it takes the nerves a
while to grow," Fox said. "He is getting
better every day and health-wise I be-
lieve he will be even better next year."
Whether that translates to better
numbers on the field is the great un-
known.
QUOTE OF THE DAY: When Lions
coach Jim Schwartz was asked about
the concern over BYU defensive line-
man Ezekiel "Ziggy" Ansah's practice
habits, Schwartz answered: "Allen
Iverson."
QUOTE OF THE DAY II: When Car-
dinals head coach Bruce Arians was
asked about assistant coach Tom
Pratt, a 34-year coaching veteran who
was on Hank Stram's staff with the
Chiefs in the 1960s, Moore said: "No-
body else can say they've got a guy
who coached in Super Bowl I."


Kim Iwaniec's lead-off single in the
seventh was the Warriors' only hit.
"We played a really good team, one
that's very well-coached," Dreyer
said. "This just tells me what we have
to work on. I'm not worrying about
this.
"In fact, if you look at it like that, it
shows me what we have to work on,
I'll take this as a positive."
With that type of perspective, one
could conclude there were no losers
in this game.


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Orlando's Redick shipped to Milwaukee


NBA trade

deadline features

only minor moves

Associated Press

NEW YORK The only trade
involving Dwight Howard came
last summer The potent scorers
that moved did so long ago.
There was no eye-catching ac-
tivity left for deadline day, re-
sulting in minor deals Thursday
to the disappointment of those
hoping for a frenzy
Josh Smith stayed put and the
Boston Celtics' core stayed to-
gether, leaving J.J. Redick, dealt
to Milwaukee, as the biggest
name to be traded.
There were nine moves, noth-
ing approaching a blockbuster
and none to jump-start the
Lakers.
Players such as James Harden
and Rudy Gay were traded far
before the deadline, but with


Associated Press
Dallas' Shawn Marion, left, and Elton Brand defend Wednesday as
Orlando's J.J. Redick makes a pass beneath the basket in Dallas. The
Magic agreed to trade veteran shooting guard Redick, center
Gustavo Ayon and reserve point guard Ish Smith to the Milwaukee
Bucks in exchange for guards Doron Lamb and Beno Udrih, as well as
forward Tobias Harris.


teams perhaps fearful of new
penalties for the biggest
spenders, Thursday was mostly
quiet.
"I don't think I've seen fewer
trade deadline deals, ever," said
Houston general manager Daryl
Morey, who completed two


trades Wednesday "But I think
it's a one-year blip."
The Atlanta Hawks held onto
Smith, and Utah kept both Paul
Millsap and Al Jefferson on a
day when much attention was fo-
cused on both situations, since
those players have value and


could leave their teams this
summer as free agents.
The long-shot deals never ma-
terialized. Howard remained in
Los Angeles, just what Lakers
general manager Mitch
Kupchak repeatedly said would
happen.
Kevin Garnett and Paul Pierce
will continue wearing Celtic
green, as will Rajon Rondo
when he's healthy enough to put
on a uniform again.
The Celtics did make one
deal, acquiring guard Jordan
Crawford from the Washington
Wizards for center Jason Collins
and injured guard Leandro
Barbosa.
Those were the types of trades
that were left after the big
names that were available had
already been moved.
Golden State sent forward Je-
remy Tyler to Atlanta and guard
Charles Jenkins to Philadelphia
in separate deals, slicing more
than $1.5 million off its payroll
after beginning the day about
$1.2 million over the league's
$70,307,000 luxury tax.


Magic and Bobcats
trade forwards
CHARLOTTE, N.C. The
Charlotte Bobcats acquired Josh
McRoberts from the Orlando
Magic on Thursday in exchange
for Hakim Warrick in a trade in-
volving two backup veteran
forwards.
The 6-foot-10 McRoberts, who
played at Duke, has appeared in
41 games this season with three
starts and is averaging 3.9 points
and 3.7 rebounds.
-From wire report

Rebuilding after trading
Howard, the Magic decided
Redick wasn't in their plans
while averaging career highs in
points (15.1) and field goal per-
centage (45.0). He was traded
along with center Gustavo Ayon
and reserve point guard Ish
Smith to the Bucks in exchange
for guards Doron Lamb and
Beno Udrih, and forward Tobias
Harris.


Associated Press
Northern Ireland's Rory Mcllroy reacts Thursday after a
shot on the 10th fairway in the first round against
Shane Lowry, of Ireland, during the Match Play Cham-
pionship in Marana, Ariz. Mcllroy, ranked No. 1 in the
world, was defeated by Lowry 1 up.



McIlroy, Woods


bounced from



Match Play
081106 T1m7


Associated Press

MARANA, Ariz. The
snow is gone from the
Match Play Championship,
and so are Rory McIlroy
and Tiger Woods.
In a stunning conclusion
to what already is a bizarre
week on Dove Mountain,
Shane Lowry of Ireland
made a 4-foot par putt on
the 18th hole to eliminate
Rory McIlroy in the open-
ing round of golf's most un-
predictable tournament
It was the third time in
the last four years the No.
1 seed went home after
one round.
Moments later, Charles
Howell III finished off a
fabulous round in cold
conditions by defeating
Woods on the 17th hole.
Howell, who had not faced
Woods in match play since
losing to him in the third
round of the 1996 U.S. Am-
ateur, played bogey-free on
a course that still had


patches of snow and ice
after being cleared Thurs-
day morning.
McIlroy, the No. 1 player
in the world, built a 2-up
lead early in the match
until Lowry rallied and
grabbed the moment by
chipping in for birdie on
the par-3 12th and then rip-
ping a fairway metal to
within a few feet for a con-
ceded eagle on the 13th.
The Match Play Champi-
onship lost its two biggest
stars in one day The only
other time the top two
seeds lost in the opening
round was in 2002, when
Woods and Mickelson lost
at La Costa.
Luke Donald nearly
made it the top three seeds
except for a clutch per-
formance. He holed a 10-
foot birdie putt to halve the
17th hole and stay tied with
Marcel Siem of Germany
Donald then birdied the
18th from 7 feet to win the
match.


the mend


Jeter one of

many stars

returning

from injuries

Associated Press

Derek Jeter crumpled to
the dirt, his season sud-
denly over and his future
uncertain.
New York's pennant
hopes faded quickly after
the star shortstop broke his
ankle last October, and the
offseason wasn't much eas-
ier for the Yankees, with
Jeter and his team forced
into a tense recovery
process that still isn't over
"Our big thing is not to
have any setbacks now,"
manager Joe Girardi said
recently "Let's not push
this too fast. Let's get to
where he's supposed to be
when he's supposed to be
there, and not hurry But,
it's really nice to see him on
the field."
For Jeter and the Yan-
kees, the April 1 season
opener against Boston is
looking more like a dead-
line than a day of anticipa-
tion. Jeter insists he'll be in
the lineup that afternoon,
but teammate Alex Ro-
driguez has no chance.
Then there's closer Mari-
ano Rivera, who is recover-
ing from a major injury of
his own after hurting his
knee last May
And the Yankees are just
one club with the injury
bug. All around baseball,
division races may be de-
cided not by offseason
moves or midsummer sur-
prises but by how well
teams can keep their top
players on the field.
"I think you get to the
point where you can't count
on what happens with an
injury, that a lot of times, it
goes on a lot longer than
you think," said Milwaukee
manager Ron Roenicke,
whose first baseman, Corey
Hart, is coming off right
knee surgery "I think you
just kind of move on. You
expect things not to go as
you would like them to."
Trying to handicap the
NL West race between the
World Series champion Gi-
ants and the new-look
Dodgers? A lot depends on


New York Yankee Mariano Rivera in act
during a workout at baseball spring training

Red Sox sweep exhibition oi
FORT MYERS New closer Joel Hanrahan
two hitters in the first inning, and the Boston Re
Northeastern 3-0 on Thursday in the first exhibit
spring training.
The Red Sox routed Boston College 11-1 in t
header's second game.
Hanrahan was brought in to anchor the Bost
but the Red Sox gave him the start against Norl


how healthy Carl Crawford
is, and whether he can re-
discover the form that
made him one of the game's
top left fielders.
Think Detroit is a lock to
win the AL Central? What if
Victor Martinez can't re-
bound from his knee injury,
and the Tigers go the whole
season without a produc-
tive designated hitter?
What about all the
changes in Toronto? The


Blue Jays cou
improved as
Bautista is ful
from wrist sur4
Detroit won
last year, even
tinez missed th
son because o
injury
Watching th4
on without hi
cult. In that r
tinez can rel;
what Baltim(


Roberts went through.
Roberts has been with
the Orioles his whole big
league career, but when the
team finally made the play-
offs in 2012, he'd had sea-
son-ending hip surgery in
August After another oper-
ation for a sports hernia in
December, it uncertain
whether the second base-
man's body can hold up.
No matter what a team
did during the offseason, a
significant injury can ruin
the best of plans. The Blue
Jays look like contenders in
the AL East after acquiring
Jose Reyes and R.A. Dickey,
but Bautista was limited by
those left wrist problems
last year, hitting only 27
home runs after slugging 97
over the previous two
seasons.
Atlanta was among the
biggest newsmakers in the
National League, signing
B.J. Upton and trading for
his brother Justin. But
there's still a question mark
at catcher because Brian
McCann is returning from

labrum in his right
shoulder
The Dodgers have under-
gone a complete makeover
since the start of last sea-
son, acquiring the likes of
Crawford, Hanley Ramirez,
Adrian Gonzalez, Josh
Beckett and Zack Greinke.
Crawford came over from
Boston in August, but he
hasn't played for his new
Associated Press team because of recon-
tion Feb. 13 structive elbow surgery
Sin Tampa. You could put together a
pretty good lineup just of
players coming back from
openers serious injuries or opera-
i struck out tions. Colorado shortstop
d Sox beat Troy Tulowitzki hit30 home
tion game of runs in 2011, but last season
was ruined by a groin in-
he double- jury that required surgery
Back in New York, the
Yankees aren't the only
on bullpen, team with medical con-
heatern cerns. Johan Santana
-From wire report missed a year following
shoulder surgery in Sep-
ld be much member 2010, and although
ssumingJose he looked plenty healthy
ly recovered last June 1 when he threw
gery the first no-hitter in Mets
the pennant history, his season ended in
though Mar- August because of ankle
4e whole sea- and back problems.
)f a left knee "What's important right
now is to stay healthy," San-
e Tigers play tana said. "As far as num-
m was diffi- bers and all that, if I'm
respect, Mar- healthy and I'm there, I
ate a bit to have a good chance to put
ore's Brian up those numbers."


DUELS
Continued from Page B1

have the car and team to be in contention
to do that"
But nobody is quite sure what the 500
will look like with NASCAR's new Gen-6
race car Sunday's race will go off with a full
43-car field, double the amount of cars that
ran in Thursday's qualifying races. There
were 19 cars in last Saturday's exhibition.
Kyle Busch, winner of the second duel,
believes more cars on the track will create
a much different race than what fans have
seen so far All three races at Speedweeks
to date have lacked much action as drivers
continue to learn the new cars and how it
reacts in traffic and different aerodynamic
situations.
"With more cars out there, we might see
it be a little bit different come Sunday,"
Busch said. "There were half the field in
each race, obviously There's going to be


twice as many good cars, twice as many
middle of the pack cars, twice as many
back of the pack cars. If you can get your
car handling, driving, feeling good, you'll
be able to be one of the guys that's up
front"
Busch gave Toyota its first victory of
Speedweeks and snapped Chevrolet's
dominance. Harvick took the new Chevro-
let SS to Victory Lane twice, and Danica
Patrick put it on the Daytona 500 pole in
time trials.
Busch held off Kasey Kahne, in a
Chevrolet, and learned the driver out front
is in the strongest position.
"It's hard to pass the leader," said Busch.
"Stay out front When you get out front, you
can hold everyone off."
In the first race, Harvick held off Greg
Biffle over a four-lap sprint to win. Harvick
and Biffle also went 1-2 in last Saturday
night's exhibition race.
The starting field for the Daytona 500 is
set by the results from the pair of 60-lap
qualifiers, but Patrick held onto the pole by


running a safe race in the first qualifier
The first woman to win a pole at NASCAR's
top level, Patrick earned the top starting
spot in time trials last weekend.
She started first in the first qualifier,
raced a bit early, then faded back to run a
conservative race and ensure she'll start
first in the 500.
The first race was dull until Denny Ham-
lin brought out the only caution with seven
laps remaining. Hamlin lost control of his
car, spun into Carl Edwards and triggered
a four-car accident that also collected
Regan Smith and Trevor Bayne, who had
a dominant car early in the qualifier
Hamlin said the accident was a product
of drivers trying to learn the nuances of
NASCAR's new Gen-6 car
Juan Pablo Montoya, who infamously
crashed into a jet dryer during last year's
Daytona 500 to trigger a massive fuel fire,
stopped for minor repairs during the cau-
tion. Montoya restarted the race in 13th
with four laps remaining, but rocketed
through the field to finish third.


"It was time to go," he said. "It's hard, you
don't want to tear up the car, and at the
same time you want to go. The bumpers are
a little fragile. You have to be careful with
that. You want to have a good car at the
end."
Austin Dillon, grandson of team owner
Richard Childress, finished third in the
second qualifying race to put his Richard
Childress Racing car in the Daytona 500. It
will be the 22-year-old Dillon's first Day-
tona 500.
"I'm glad my grandfather can sleep now,"
Dillon said. "He was wearing me out before
the race."
Brian Keselowski, older brother of reign-
ing Sprint Cup champion Brad Keselowski,
was the one driver who truly had to race
his way into the Daytona 500 in the first
qualifier But he lacked speed early, fell
two laps down and missed the race.
Mike Bliss was the driver from the sec-
ond qualifier trying to make the Daytona
500 field, but finished five laps down and
didn't make the race.


SPORTS


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20
Powerball: 3-17 -19 -25 -32
Powerball: 17
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 No winner
No Florida winner
Lotto: 18 -23 -28 -36- 43 -45
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 36 $3,464.50
4-of-6 1,232 $81.50
3-of-6 25,881 $5.50
Fantasy 5:2 3 14 24 33
5-of-5 2 winners $123,725.34
4-of-5 299 $133
3-of-5 10,167 $10.50
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19
Mega Money: 3 9 17 36
Mega Ball: 20
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 8 winners $871
3-of-4 MB 47 $325
3-of-4 1,098 $41.50
2-of-4 MB 1,401 $22.50
1-of-4 MB 10,490 $3
2-of-4 32,553 $2
Fantasy 5:10 25 30 35 36
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 257 $555
3-of-5 8,215 $24

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY -

Today is Friday, Feb. 22, the
53rd day of 2013. There are 312
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Feb. 22, 1732 (New Style
date), the first president of the
United States, George Washing-
ton, was born in Westmoreland
County in the Virginia Colony.
On this date:
In 1784, a U.S. merchant ship,
the Empress of China, left New
York for the Far East to trade
goods with China.
In 1865, Tennessee adopted a
new constitution which included
the abolition of slavery.
In 1924, President Calvin
Coolidge delivered the first radio
broadcast from the White House
as he addressed the country over
42 stations.
In 1959, the inaugural Daytona
500 race was held; although
Johnny Beauchamp was initially
declared the winner, the victory
was later awarded to Lee Petty.
In 1980, the "Miracle on Ice"
took place in Lake Placid, N.Y., as
the United States Olympic hockey
team upset the Soviets, 4-3. (The
U.S. team went on to win the gold
medal.)
In 1993, the U.N. Security
Council unanimously approved
creation of an international war
crimes tribunal to punish those re-
sponsible for atrocities in the for-
mer Yugoslavia.
Ten years ago: Jesica Santil-
lan, the teenager who'd survived a
botched heart-lung transplant long
enough to get a second set of do-
nated organs, died two days after
the second transplant at Duke
University Medical Center in North
Carolina.
Five years ago: Turkish troops
crossed into northern Iraq in their
first major ground incursion
against Kurdish rebel bases in
nearly a decade.
One year ago: Ajury in Char-
lottesville, Va., found University of
Virginia lacrosse player George
Huguely V guilty of second-degree
murder in the death of his ex-
girlfriend and lacrosse player
Yeardley Love in May 2010.
Today's Birthdays: Announcer
Don Pardo is 95. Actor Paul Doo-
ley is 85. Hollywood "ghost singer"
Marni Nixon is 83. Actor John Ash-
ton is 65. Basketball Hall of Famer
Julius Erving is 63. Actress Ellen
Greene is 62. White House ad-
viser David Axelrod is 58. World
Golf Hall of Famer Vijay Singh is
50. Actress Jeri Ryan is 45. Inter-


Associated Press
Sally Field portrays Mary Todd Lincoln and Daniel Day-Lewis portrays the 16th president in the film "Lincoln."





Fact or fiction?


In trues

how muci

license i

Associated

NEW YORK -
Tehran's Mehraba
uary 1980. Six U.
disguised as a fa
crew, are about to
with their CIA esc
denly there's a mo
in what had been
through the airport
The plane has m
ficulties and will bE
the Americans be c
rested, even kille(
Tony Mendez, als
tries to calm then
flight leaves about
If you saw the fi
you didn't miss
ment, which is
Mendez's book abo
operation. It was
cause director Be
screenwriter Chr
placed it with an e
matic scenario
canceled flight res(
picious Iranian off
the Hollywood offi
film crew (a
call answered
just in time),
and finally a
heart-pound-
ing chase on
the tarmac just
as the plane's
wheels lift off,
seconds from
catastrophe.
Crackling
filmmaking -
except that it
never happened.
Terrio, whose filr
frontrunner, never
film was a doc
course. But still, t
some flak for the
took in the
entertainment
And they aren't
other high-profile
nominees this y
Bigelow's "Zero
and Steven Spie
coln," have also b
for different sor
issues.
Filmmakers ha
ing movies based (
forever, and similar
been made. But b


three major films are in con-
tOTres, tention, the issue has come to the

poetc race, and with it a thorny cultural
question: Does the audience de-
pO K serve the truth, the whole truth
S and nothing but? Surely not, but
just how much fiction is OK?
SPress The latest episode involved
"Lincoln," and the revelation
- The scene: Spielberg and his screenwriter,
d airport, Jan- the Pulitzer-winning playwright
.S. diplomats, Tony Kushner, took liberties de-
ike sci-fi film picting the 1865 vote on the 13th
fly to freedom amendment outlawing slavery
:orts. But sud- In response to a complaint by a
)ment of panic Connecticut congressman, Kush-
a smooth trip ner acknowledged he'd changed
t the details for dramatic effect,
iechanicaldif- having two Connecticut con-
e delayed. Will gressmen vote against the
discovered, ar- amendment when, in fact, all
d? CIA officer four voted for it (The names of
o in disguise, those congressmen were
n. Luckily, the changed, to avoid changing the
an hour later vote of specific individuals.)
lm "Argo," no, In a statement, Kushner said
this develop- he had "adhered to time-
recounted in honored and completely legiti-
tutthe real-life mate standards for the creation
;n't there be- of historical drama, which is
n Affleck and what 'Lincoln' is. I hope nobody
is Terrio re- is shocked to learn that I also
ven more dra- made up dialogue and imagined
involving encounters and invented
ervations, sus- characters."
icials who call His answer wasn't satisfying to
ice of the fake everyone. New York Times
columnist
Maureen
People accept Dowd called
on Spiel-
that liberties will be berg this
weekend to
taken. A movie adsknd toe
adjust the
is a movie. DVD ver-
sion before
Richard Walter it's release
chairman of screenwriting at the lest the
University of California, Los Angeles. film leave
"students
everywhere
Affleck and thinking the Nutmeg State is
n is an Oscar nutty"
Claimed their One prominent screenwriting
umentary, of professor finds the "Lincoln"
they've caught episode "a little troubling"--but
liberties they only a little.
name of "Maybe changing the vote
went too far," said Richard Wal-
alone two ter, chairman of screenwriting at
best-picture the University of California, Los
ear, Kathryn Angeles. "Maybe there was an-
Dark Thirty" other way to do it But really, it's
*lberg's "Lin- not terribly important. People
een criticized accept that liberties will be
ts of factual taken. Amovie is a movie. People
going for a history lesson are
ve been mak- going to the wrong place."
on real events Walter said he always tells his
r charges have students: "Go for the feelings.
because these Because the only thing that's


Birthday In the year ahead, you'll be attracted to
strong, progressive thinkers in tune with the times.
Most of your closest new friends will be of this sort.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Lounging in a cozy
easy chair could have a strong appeal for you, yet if
you fail to be at least a tad productive, you're likely
to feel guilty for wasting all that valuable time.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Even though you
won't be putting on any pretenses, the persona you
present is likely to be more dramatic than usual.
Others will be drawn to you for this reason.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) You can't help but
succeed in situations where you are motivated to
do good things and bring joy to others. All you want
to do is help make people happy.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) You're not going to
find a better day to promote a cause in which you


Bryan Cranston, left, as Jack O'Donnell and Ben Affleck as Tony
Mendez are in the movie "Argo," a rescue thriller about the 1979
Iranian hostage crisis.
truly real in the movies are the alteration.
feelings that people feel when Fltterman also doesn't be-
they watch." grudge the "Argo" filmmakers,
Carson Reeves, who runs a because he felt they use a direc-
screenwriting website called trial style that implies some fun
Scriptshadow, said writers bas- is being had with the story
ing scripts on real events face a "All the inside joking about
constant problem: No subject or Hollywood tonally, you get a
individual's life is compelling sense that something is being
and dramatic enough by itself, he played with," he said.
said it neatly fits into a script He recalled his own object les-
with three acts, subplots, plot son in the difficulty of writing
twists and a powerful villain, about real people and events: In
"You just have to get rid of "Capote," he combined three of
things that maybe would have Truman Capote's editors into
made the story more truthful," one, for the sake of the narrative.
said Reeves, who actually gave He ended up hearing from the
the "Lincoln" script a negative son of New Yorker editor
review because he thought it was William Shawn, actor Wallace
too heavy on conversation and Shawn, who wasn't totally
lacking action, pleased with the portrayal of his
He adds, though, when the father Fitterman said he was
subject is as famous as Lincoln, sympathetic to those concerns
one has a responsibility to be and would certainly have ad-
more faithful to the facts. y
morefaenithful he actsr Dan dressed them in the script, had
Screenwriter anominated actor Dan he anticipated them.
Flutterman, nominated for an
Of the three Oscar-nominated
Oscar in 2006 for the "Capote" films in question, "Zero Dar-
screenplay, has empathy for any ms question, Zero Dark
writer trying to pen an effective Thirty" has inspired the most
script based on real events,ashe fervent debate. The most intense
did. criticism, despite acclaim for the
"This is fraught territory," he filmmaking craft involved, has
said. "You're always going to been about its depictions of in-
have to change something, and terrogations, with some, includ-
you're always going to get in ing a group of senators, saying
some sort of trouble, with the film misleads viewers for
somebody" suggesting torture provided in-
Futterman recalled seeing formation that helped the CIA
"Lincoln" and wondering briefly find Osama bin Laden.
why Connecticut would have There also have been ques-
voted the way the movie de- tions about the accuracy of the
picted it. On the other hand, he depiction of the main character,
said, he has so much admiration a CIA officer played by Jessica
for Kushner's achievement in Chastain; the real person or
writing an exciting movie about even combination of people, ac-
19th-century legislative history cording to some theories that
that he's inclined to overlook the she plays remains anonymous.


Today's HOROSCOPE
truly believe. Even those who usually give you a
hard time will succumb to your appeal.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) If you're prepared to
give in order to get, most of your material affairs
should work out to your benefit. Some of your
biggest obstacles may be taken out of the picture.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) It isn't likely you will shy
away from any challenges. In fact, you'll welcome
situations are much too trying for others.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You'll get far more out
of being helpful than merely feathering your own
nest. Good deeds will be appreciated and
rewarded.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) There's no reason why
you shouldn't be hopeful regarding the outcome of
events, because you're presently in a lucky cycle.
Being optimistic and positive helps a lot.


Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) You're not likely to
seek out competition, but you'll not duck any either.
Should a strong competitor challenge you, you'll be
a tough cookie to contend with.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) If you view things
from a positive perspective, your faith will work
wonders. Events will turn out the way you envision
them, if your belief is strong enough.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Joint ventures hold
far more promise for you than independent endeav-
ors at this time. However, this is true only if you're
teamed up with someone of equal talent who has a
similar work ethic.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Moderation is the
key to success, so do your best to play everything
down the middle. For best results, don't be too ag-
gressive or too passive.


national Tennis Hall-of-Famer
Michael Chang is 41. Actress
Drew Barrymore is 38.
Thought for Today: "It is infi-
nitely better to have a few good
men than many indifferent ones."
- President George Washington
(1732-1799).











SCENE


, Ken McNally
talks cars/Page C2
Heather Foster
Reviews a DVD
/Page C5


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Feel the blues rhythm,




DANCE TO THE BEAT


Drummer, dancers,

bands andpioneers

invade Citrus

Hernando
African drummer to perform
at Hernando church
Internationally known professional
drummer Eric Bli Bi Gore, of Djsanufla,
Ivory Coast, West Africa, will showcase
African drumming and dancing from
6 to 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 22, and 1 to
5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, at Hernando
Church of the Living God, 3441 E. Ole-
ander Lane, Hernando.
Gore is the musical director for Fo-
lade African Drum & Dance Ensemble,
and a music professor part time at
Agnes Scott College in Decatur, Ga.
Drumming classes will be available
for donations of $10 and $12.
For more information, call 352-270-
6148 or 352-897-4173.


IWDI


Tickets are $10. No ticket will be
sold at the door.
For information and tickets, call
Horst G. Spangenberg at 352-237-
7016, or email irmhorst@aol.com.

Crystal River
Cooking event to benefit
Jessie's Place
Cooking for a Cause, a benefit for
Jessie's Place, will be from 6 to 9 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 24, at Crystal River Mall.
Cost is $30 per person prior to the
event and $35 at door.
Call Crystal River Mall at 352-795-
2585 or Jessie's Place at 352-270-
8814 for tickets.
Christians take a musical
journey at St. Benedict
The Eye Of Light Experience -A
Christian Musical Journey will be at 4
p.m. Sunday, Feb. 24, at St. Benedict
Catholic Church, 455 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Crystal River.
A goodwill offering will be accepted.


Call 352-613-6949 or visit
www.theeyeoflight.com for information.
Browse crafts at annual
Spring Fling at armory
The 24th annual Spring Fling Craft
Show will be from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sat-
urday, Feb. 23, at the Crystal River Ar-
mory, at the corner of West Venable
Street and U.S. 19.
The show will offer a wide range of
crafts including homemade candy, cro-
chet and knitted blankets, floral arrange-
ments, baby items and other things.
Club members will offer raffle tickets
for donated prizes. Every crafter has
donated a sample of his or her work so
each winner will take home a special
handmade gift. Winning ticket numbers
will be announced every 30 minutes.
Refreshments will be available. Ad-
mission and parking is free.

Citrus County
Stomp to musical
sound in the swamp


Saturday, Feb. 23, off State Road 200
and Stokes Ferry Road. Turn at Reds
Restaurant and follow the signs to
community center.
Concessions open at noon and
music starts at 1 p.m. at the free event.
Bands include High Overhead, Foggy
Creek Band, Rye Whiskey and Sugar
Hill Dulcimer Gang. Bring a chair.
Call 352-637-4335 for information.

Homosassa Springs
Birders take to Pepper Creek
Trail for monthly bird walk
The monthly bird walk will begin at
8 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, on Pepper
Creek Trail at Homosassa Springs
State Wildlife Park, 4150 S. Suncoast
Blvd. Participants must RSVP.
Binoculars and field guide are rec-
ommended. Call 352-628-5343.

Dunnellon
Cracker Days celebrates life
of Florida pioneers


Newest 'Die Hard' installment not as good as others


After several years,
one ofAmerica's fa-
vorite cowboys,
New York City cop John
McClane, is back in an-
other explosive outing,
except this time it's in the
streets of Russia.
The fifth film in the
"Die Hard" series, action
star Bruce Willis has es-
tablished a successful
franchise with sequels
that are arguably all wor-


thy predecessors to the
original (though none of
them have managed to be
better). Now the question
is, does "A Good Day to
Die Hard" live up to the
series' iconic name?
McClane's son Jack (Jai
Courtney) has gotten into a
bit of trouble during a spe-
cial ops mission in Moscow.
In the process of trying to
crack a terrorist plot, Jack
is taken into custody by the


Russian police. But no
worries, because daddy
McClane is going on a "va-
cation" to Russia to relax,
lay by the pool, and... wait,
that's not right He's going
on "vacation" to find his
son, kill a bunch of "scum-
bags," and create some big
explosions. And that is all
you need to know for the
simple plot of this movie.
See Page C5


"Iv.
4


Liam Cash
CASHMONEY
MOVIES


Bruce
Willis
portrays
John
McClane,
left, and Jai
Courtney
plays his
son Jack in
"A Good
Day to Die
Hard."
Associated Press





C2 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013

THEATER
Auditions for "When
Elvis Came to Town," 2
p.m. Feb. 24 and 6:30 p.m.
Feb. 25, at Old Courthouse
in Inverness. Cast includes
five adult males, four adult
females and several teen
girls and boys. Perform-
ances 2 and 7:30 p.m. April
27. No experience required.
352-341-6427.
Ruth Eckerd Hall
performances:
"A Chorus Line," 8 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 26, and 2 and
8 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 27.
UNITY Mystery Dinner
Theater Team mysteries:
Friday, March 15, and
Saturday, March 16-
"Murder Most Green."
$20 per play or $60 for
season tickets. UNITY Mys-
tery Dinner Theater at 2628
W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Call
352-746-1270 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Tuesday through Friday.
MUSEUMS
Coastal Heritage Mu-
seum tours, 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Tuesday through Sat-
urday, Coastal Heritage Mu-
seum, 532 Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River. Extended
hours 10 a.m. to5 p.m. the
second Saturday monthly.
Free. 352-795-1755.
Olde Mill House
Gallery & Printing Mu-
seum "Pulp to Print"
workshops, 1 to 5 p.m.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cars thunder into city


Mourning a loved one
I .. t "


Special to the Chronicle
MurderS She Wrote Inc. presents My Big Fat Italian
Funeral at 6:15 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 28, at Spaghetti
Warehouse, 1911 N. 13th St., Tampa. Dinner and
show costs $34.95. Call 813-248-1720.


CANCELED
Taut mystery/drama "Mauritius," has canceled
its remaining performances.


third week of every month
at 10466 W. Yulee Drive,
Old Homosassa. Next work-
shop is Saturday, Feb. 23.
Instructors Master Printer
Jim Anderson and Paper-
maker Keith Gum. $40 per
class two-hour class. Lunch
available in Museum Cafe
from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. 352-628-9411. gemini
graphics30@yahoo.com.


"Chick Schwartz:
Cedar Key Artist," through
March 17 at Appleton Mu-
seum of Art, College of Cen-
tral Florida, 4333 E. Silver
Springs Blvd., Ocala. Trained
as an engineer, Schwartz is a
sculptor and master at model-
ing. $6 for adults; $4 for sen-
iors 55 or older and students
19 and older; $3 for youths
ages 10 to 18. 352-291-4455.


would like to tell you
about a great cruise-in Ai
event in our backyard, al-
though many people are not
aware of it. It is called "Fri-
day Night Thunder," which is
the third Friday of every
month from 5 to 7:30 p.m. in
the parking area of the gov-
ernment center in downtown
Inverness. Ken M
The event started more CA
than two years ago by the city CO
of Inverness to promote the
downtown area and provide
local car enthusiasts with an organized
gathering spot each month. The city at-
tempted to run the event for a year with-
out help from local car clubs. When the
officers of the Citrus MOPAR car club
heard the Inverness representatives
were looking for help, they offered to
run the event beginning July 2011.
The number of cars attending the
monthly cruise-in can vary, depending
on the weather But on a good night, as
many as 80 or more gorgeous cars and
trucks are there. All years, makes and
models are welcome to join the fun.
Spectators also are welcome browse
and admire the vehicles.
Citrus MOPAR also cranks out '50s,
'60s and '70s music and runs a 50/50
drawing. The club has arranged with
most of the downtown restaurants to
provide a discount on the third Fridays
for attendees who purchase $5 or more
of 50/50 tickets.
Another fun activity is Valve Cover
Racing. The race cars are made using
actual valve covers from engines by at-
taching four wheels and any other items
as long as the total weight is less the 10


pounds. No motors or propul-
sion of any kind can be used
on the race cars. They can be
S painted and/or decorated any
way the owner prefers. Each
car has three runs down a
track and the one that goes
the farthest wins.
The wooden track for the
race was built by one of the
cNally Citrus MOPAR club mem-
LR bers, Gene Raby, who has
NER quite a skill in working with
wood. He has built many
things, including a beautiful
full-size replica of an old-time service
station gas pump, which is in my garage.
He is currently working on a number of
exterior wooden body parts for a 1935
Ford pickup truck he is building. Gene
is also treasurer of the MOPAR club.
Upcoming events
Feb. 22: All American Muscle Night
cruise-in at 6 p.m. atArby's on U.S. 19 in
Crystal River
Feb. 23 and March 2: Cruise-in
hosted by Citrus County Cruisers at 6
p.m. at Wendy's on U.S. 19 in Crystal
River.
March 3: Manatee Car & Truck
show hosted by Citrus County Cruisers
at Crystal Chevrolet/Chrysler/Nissan on
U.S. 19 in Homosassa. Only vehicles
1988 and older can enter. Registration is
8 a.m. to noon for a $20 fee. Awards at
3 p.m. Visit wwwcitruscountycruisers.
com or call Joe at 352-527-2950.

Ken McNally is the car columnist for the
Chronicle. Contact him atkenmcnally
@tampabayrrcom or352-341-1165.


INING NOTION



S Entertainment


Enrico's i

Restaurant
Tucked away on U.S. Hwy. 41,
South in Inverness, you will find
a cozy Italian Restaurant serving
fine food.
The warm friendly atmosphere A
invites you to try their many entrees,
prepared when you order from high
quality, fresh ingredients. This is not "fast food
Italian" as in many restaurants. This is a dining experience with top notch
service. All desserts are also made on the premises including cheesecake
and tiramisu.
To accompany your meal, Enrico's has a fine selection of Italian wines
available.
Enrico's Italian Restaurant has been in Citrus County for 25 years and has
earned the Citrus County Chronicle,"Best of the Best" award.
Reservations are suggested and hours are Tuesday thru Saturday, 4:30
P.M. to 8:00 P.M. Enrico's is located at 439 South Hwy 41 in Inverness,
directly across from Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church. Their phone
number is 341-4555.


/I
( A g
!S141


The ORIGINAL
t. Patrick's Day!
S6th Arnnuol Crystol Rer
^ Dog Walking Parade
S' r l: i: l r i relandPub
Sunday. March 17, 2013
tolrd .... I ll Ill I I I h I~ i I I .i down Ctrus Avenlue
Hu enter I I I ... ... ..II .. .. 1.. I
For Charity
Citrus County Animal Shelter
SIGN UP NOW
Deadline March 10'
You too can be n the St. Ptrick's thay
bog Walking Parade for Charity. I
Ee If don't have a dog come wa a in
the parade anyway and have funi
RULES


5) Ech entry must be decorated in the St. Pddy theme don'tt forget your dog!)
6) Each person in entry must wear a costume, even if only a green hat.
7) DONT FORGET TO Abb YOUR MUSICIIIII
5 S4CitrusAvenue,"
u B lrke re1 Crystal River
795-0956
.-' '-. -., ') www.burkesofireland.com -_ _


U


Pizzeria & iTisorante

ITALIANO

Come Try Our D.aly Specials!
*'_ Authentic


10% OFF
Dine-In or Take-Out
Must present original coupon.
Not valid w/other offers. Expires 2/28/13
-TAKE OUT ONLY! -
Large 1 Topping Pizza
* 1/2 Doz. 1
Garlic Knots 1
* 2 Liter Soda
Must present original coupon.
Not valid w/other offers. Expires 2/28/13

Let (hefsofNapoli
afterr YourSpecial Event!


-I II


'OOE44poEn


_"4'"4 1 .1 l I H%
Hernando, FL

352-513-4860


-Big Ma ,Ia t I I .e ,. I 2 IB I 'a


- .





SGreek Pastries
NOW Available! a


SCENE


J(
Al


FOo00 4,





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPECIAL INTEREST
"Cracker Cow" au-
thor Barbara Cairns an-
nounces the publication of
her new picture book series,
"Gatsby's Grand Adven-
tures." In Book One of the
series, Gatsby, the art
gallery cat, explores famous
paintings at night. When he
remembers to jump out be-
fore dawn, everything is
fine. But sometimes, Gatsby
forgets and that's when
strange things happen to
Winslow Homer's painting
Snap the Whip. Cairns will
have Meet the Author ses-
sions at the following library
locations: Floral City Library,
3 to 5 p.m. Friday, Feb. 22;
Homosassa Library, 2:30 to
4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 26;
Lakes Region Library, 4 to 6
p.m. Tuesday, March 5; and
Coastal Region Library, 3 to
5 p.m. Tuesday, March 12.
wordpainter@tampabay.rr.
com or www.crackercow.com.
Chapter 156 of The
National Association of
Watch and Clock Collec-
tors (NAWCC) meeting,
8 a.m. fourth Sunday
monthly, Hernando Civic
Center, 3848 E. Parson's
Point Road, Hernando.
352-527-2669.
16th annual Nature
Coast Civil War Re-enact-
ment, 9 a.m. and 2 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 23 and Sun-
day, Feb. 24, in Webster, at
State Road 471 across from
Webster Elementary
School. Battles at 2 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday will
feature pyrotechnic special
effects. $5 donation per
adult; $2 for children ages 8
to 17. Children younger
than 8 free. Visit www.
naturecoastcivilwar
reenactment.com, or call
Ray Smutko at 352-220-


3013, or email him at
ray1861@earthlink.net.
Sixth annual African
American Read-in, 2:30 to
4:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 24,
at Learning and Conference
Center on the College of
Central Florida Citrus cam-
pus, at 3800 S. Lecanto
Highway off County Road
491. Free. Visit www.face
book.com/citrusaari.
National comedian
and writer Steven J.
Moore, 7:45 p.m. Thursday,
Feb. 28, at The Boathouse
Restaurant, 1935 U.S. 19,
Crystal River. 352-564-9636.
The Florida Chapter of
the Historical Novel Soci-
ety meeting, 1 p.m. first Sat-
urday monthly, Central Ridge
Library, 425 W. Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills. 352-726-
0162. www.fchns.org.
Business meeting begins
at 1 p.m. and the program
starts at 1:30 p.m. Carol
Megge will present pro-
gram, "How to Start Writing
a Historical Novel." Presi-
dent Joyce Moore will lead
a follow-up discussion of
Rick Seymour's February
program that explored the
12 stages of "The Hero's
Journey," if time is available.
Grammy-winning
trumpeter Herb Alpert with
singer-songwriter Michael
Franks, 7:30 p.m. Saturday,
March 2, at Ruth Eckerd
Hall. $75 and $59. 727-791-
7400 or www.rutheckerd
hall.com.
Harlem Globetrotters
2013'You Write the Rules"
World Tour, 7 p.m. Satur-
day, March 2, USF Sun
Dome. $24.50, $32.50,
$40.50, $56.50 and
$111.50. Fees may apply.
ticketmaster.com. 800-745-
3000. Groups of 10 or more
may save $7 per ticket on
select prices. 813-974-8916


Spotting birds


Special to the Chronicle
The Monthly Bird Walk will be at 8 a.m. Saturday,
Feb. 23, on Pepper Creek Trail at Homosassa Springs
State Wildlife Park, 4150 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Participants must RSVP. Binoculars and field guide
recommended. Call 352-628-5343.


or at meyrowitzr@usf.edu.
Crystal River of Life
Coffee House, Christian Fel-
lowship, conversation and
music from 7 to 9:30 p.m.
Friday, Village Cafe, 789
N.E. Fifth St., State Road 44.
352-817-6879.
Crystal River Preserve
State Park boat tour, 10:30
a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Monday,
Wednesday and Fridays,
Crystal River Preserve State
Park Visitor Center. $12.50
adults; $10 children ages 7 to
12; free, children 6 and
younger. Tickets on sale in
Preserve Visitor Center one
hour prior to departure; arrive
no less than 15 minutes prior
to departure. 352-563-0450.
www.crystalriverstateparks.org.
Four recent but "Forgot-
ten Films," 3 p.m. every
Thursday in March at Unitar-
ian Universalist Fellowship,
7633 No. Florida Ave (U.S.


41), Citrus Springs. $3
donation.
March 7: The Best Lit-
tle Exotic Marigold Hotel,
starring Dame Judi Dench,
Maggie Smith and six other
cash-strapped seniors who
decide to outsource their re-
tirement in a colorful resort in
India. Visit naturecoastuu.org
or call 352-465-4225.
"Firelight," 6 p.m. Fri-
day, March 8, at College of
Central Florida's Hampton
Center, 1501 W. Silver
Springs Blvd., Ocala. Free.
The film is the third in the
Hampton Center Film Se-
ries, which is a cultural and
educational outreach pro-
gram sponsored by the col-
lege. A brief discussion
follows each movie. For
more information or to re-
serve a seat, call 352-873-
5881 or visit www.CF.edu.
13th annual Holcim


Ranch Crystal River Raid,
March 9 and 10 on Holcim
property in Crystal River, six
miles north of the Crystal
River Mall, on U.S. 19 and
98. Full-scale battles with
pyrotechnics at 2 p.m. Sat-
urday and Sunday. $5 for
adults. Bring chairs or rent
them at the site. For infor-
mation, visit www.crystal
riverraid.org.
Music
Haydn's "London
Trios," noon Friday, Feb. 22,
at Appleton Museum of Art,
College of Central Florida,
4333 E. Silver Springs Blvd.
352-873-5810. Free with ad-
mission to museum. Daily
admission $6 for adults; $4
for seniors 55 or older and
students 19 and older; $3 for
youths ages 10 to 18.
Monthly events at
Crystal River Mall:
Karaoke, 1 p.m. Satur-
day, Feb. 23.
Cooking for a Cause, a
benefit for Jessie's Place,
6 to 9 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 24.
$30 per person prior to the
event and $35 at door. Call
Crystal River Mall 352-795-
2585 or Jessie's Place 352-
270-8814 for ticket
information.
Professional drummer
Eric Bli Bi Gore, from
Djsanufla, Ivory Coast,
West Africa, 6 to 8 p.m. Fri-
day, Feb. 22, and 1 to 5
p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, at
Hernando Church of the
Living God, 3441 E. Olean-
der Lane, Hernando.
$10 and $12 donation for
classes. 352-270-6148 or
352-897-4173.
Seventh annual blue-
grass and BBQ Stomping
in the Swamp, Saturday,
Feb. 23, off State Road 200
and Stokes Ferry Road.
Turn at Reds Restaurant


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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013 C3

and follow the signs to com-
munity center. Free. Con-
cessions open at noon and
music starts at 1 p.m.
Bands include High Over-
head, Foggy Creek Band,
Rye Whiskey and Sugar Hill
Dulcimer Gang. Bring a
chair. 352-637-4335.
Cherish the Ladies, a
six-member Grammy-
nominated Irish-American
band with dancers, 3 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 24, in Curtis
Peterson Auditorium, 3810
N. Educational Path,
Lecanto, and 7:30 p.m. Mon-
day, Feb. 25, in the Charles
R. Dassance Fine Arts Cen-
ter at CF Ocala campus,
3001 S.W. College Road.
$22. tickets.cf.edu or 352-
873-5810 or 352-746-6721,
ext. 1416.
The Eye Of Light Ex-
perience A Christian
Musical Journey, 4 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 24, at St.
Benedict Catholic Church,
455 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Crystal River. Good will of-
fering. 352-613-6949 or
www.theeyeoflight.com.
Woodview Coffee
House concerts, Fridays at
Lecanto's Unity Church Fel-
lowship Hall. To apply for
talent showcase, email
Talent@woodviewcoffee
house.org. Featured artists
to play include:
March 1 Defrates
and Brown.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
and talent showcase begins
after at Unity Church's of
Citrus County's Fellowship
Hall, 2628 Woodview Lane,
Lecanto. Featured group
plays at 8 p.m. $7 per per-
son. Coffee, tea, water,
sodas and homemade
desserts available for price.
www.woodviewcoffee
house.org or 352-726-
9814.


LieUsO


17Es


A


3E3JB





C4 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013

Arts & Crafts
Needlework Fun
Groups, 2 to 4 p.m. first and
third Saturdays monthly,
Wildwood Public Library,
310 S. Palmer Drive, Wild-
wood. 352-748-1158.
els34785@yahoo.com.
Gulfport's First Friday
Art Walk, 6 to 10 p.m. March
2, more than a half-mile
down scenic Beach Boule-
vard. Third Saturday Art
Walk is 6 to 10 p.m. Feb. 16.
Gulfport Art Walk is the first
Friday and third Saturday of
every month, year-round.
Parking free. Free trolley
rides from off-site parking
areas. Pet and family friendly.
www.GulfportMA.com.
866-ART-WALK.
All Day Art Club, 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Old Ho-
mosassa Civic Center, 5530
S. Mason Creek Drive, be-
hind the fire station. $10.
Bring supplies. Intermediate
and advanced artists wel-
come. 352-795-8774.
Mel Zeoli exhibits his
landscape and ocean works
during February at Home
Again Resale Store, across
from the Chevron on County
Road 486. Wine and cheese
open house 4 to 6 p.m.
Feb. 20. 352-270-8861.
Store hours 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Saturday.
Laurie Kansky and
Helene Lancaster's water-
color exhibit will be on dis-
play from Feb. 23 through
March 23 at Lorna Jean
Gallery, 6136 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway in Crystal
River. Wine-and-cheese
open house from 11 a.m. to
3 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23.
352-564-2781.
Nature Coast Decora-
tive Artists Chapter of the
Society of Decorative Artists
meets at 9 a.m. first Satur-
day monthly at Weeki
Wachee Senior Center off
U.S. 19 and Toucan Trail,
Spring Hill. Short meeting,
show-and-tell and birthday
raffle. This month's project


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


is Ruthy Orwig teaching
how to fabric painting on
apron or shirt. On March 30,
Sharon Poorman will teach
a Betty Caithness scene in
acrylics at the senior center.
352-688-4106. www.nature
coastdecorativeartists.com.
Community Needle-
works Crafters meet at
10 a.m. first Wednesday. All
quilters, knitters and crochet
crafters are welcome. 352-
746-1973.
Sandhill Crane Chap-
ter of the Embroiderers'
Guild of America, 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m., first Wednesday
monthly at Faith Evangelical
Presbyterian Church, 200
Mt. FairAve., Brooksville.
Bring lunch. 352-621-6680
(Citrus), 352-666-8350
(Hernando).
Citrus Watercolor
Club meeting, noon second
Friday monthly, United
Methodist Church on
County Road 581, Inver-
ness. Demonstrations by
well-know artists at each
meeting. $5. 352-382-8973
or 352-622-9352. www.
citruswatercolorclub.com.
Manatee Haven Deco-
rative Artists chapter of the
National Society of Decora-
tive Painters, meets second
Saturday monthly at North
Oak Baptist Church, 9324
N. Elkcam Blvd., Citrus
Springs. 352-270-3256 or
dynamite71@juno.com or
manateehavendecorative
artists.org.
ART CLASSES
The Florida Artists
Gallery, historic Knight
House, 8219 Orange Ave.,
Floral City, offers art classes.
352-344-9300. www.Florida
artistsgallery.com.
February classes:
Beginning Arduino
workshop, 6 to 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 23. Instruc-
tor Keith Gum. Begin with
basic projects and progress
to more complex robotics.
$15. 352-344-9300 or 352-
400-9778.


Artists of the Month


R .=i fe


Special to the Chronicle
A reception for February's artists of the month -
painter Jude Caborn, above, and photographer Larry
Jordan, below will be from 4 to 7 p.m. Friday,
Feb. 22, at Florida Artists Gallery. Refreshments will
be served. Artists will meet and greet guests and
answer questions. Call 352-344-9300 or www.florida
artistsgallery.com for more information.


Mixed Media, noon to
3 p.m. Sunday, March 17.
Instructor Carol Kreider. Learn
how to hand color papers for
collages and mixed media
paintings and complete a
painting. Bring own paints,
brushes, etc. $25. Will furnish
materials for extra $5. 352-
597-6639 or ckreider@tampa
bay.rr.com.
Fearless Painting with
Acrylics, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. with


lunch noon to 1 p.m. Thurs-
day, March 7. Instructor
Susi LaForsch. In one-day
workshop, students will cre-
ate an 18-inch-by-24-inch
acrylic painting. $75 with de-
posit required. Materials in-
cluded. laforsch@tampa
bay.rr.com or 352-726-8710.
Small, private art class
for home-schoolers, 10 to
11:30 a.m. $15. Instructor
Keith Gum. 352-344-9300.


Finding your way in
watercolor, 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. with break for lunch
Wednesday, March 6 and
20 and April 3 and 17. In-
structor Jean W. Morey.
Learn to use limited pallet. A
workshop day on each of
primaries plus white. $45
per class or $40 if paying
for two or more. jeanw.
morey@yahoo.com or 352-
586-3701.
Ongoing classes:
Painting with Acrylics,
1 to 3 p.m. every Friday. In-
structor Connie Townsend.
For beginners to advanced.
$15 per session. 352-400-
9757 or ConnieTown@
aol.com.
0 Painting with Oils, 1 to
3 p.m. every Tuesday. In-
structor Connie Townsend.
For beginners to advanced.
$15 per session. 352-400-
9757 or ConnieTown@
aol.com.
The Gallery is open from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednes-
day through Saturdays, and
noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday
and Sundays.
Garden Shed classes:
Origami class, 6 to
8 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12.
Materials and supplies in-
cluded. $25. Make an
origami ornament.
Full kitchen available for
you to bring food and drink.
The Garden Shed is at 2423
S. Rock Crusher Road in
Homosassa. Call 352-503-
7063 to register. Preregistra-
tion required. Major credit
cards accepted.
Photography classes
at Cafe Impression's Gallery
and Studio in February and
March. Classes include:
Digital Photography
Boot Camp, one-day work-
shop for beginner to ad-
vanced photographers,
10 a.m. Saturday, March 2.
Bring camera.
Adobe Light Room
Photo Editing, 10 a.m.
Sunday, Feb. 24; Sunday,
March 3; or Saturday,
March 23. $69. www.cafe


impressions.com or
352-505-2438.
Hobby Haven classes:
Acrylic painting with
Lois, noon every Friday. $15.
Classes are at Hobby
Haven & gifts, 1239 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., (U.S. 19), Ho-
mosassa, in Nottingham
Square next to GMC Buick.
352-794-6032.
Lorna Jean Gallery
art classes:
Learn to Draw, for
ages 8 and older. $15 for
group lessons. Pay for four,
receive one free. Materials
included. Group and private
lessons available.352-564-
2781.
Watercolor painting for
beginners, 1 to 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday. $15 per class.
Limit of six students. Materi-
als list and some supplies
available.
0 Jewelry class, 1 to
2:30 p.m. Saturday. $140.
Four-week course begins
March 2. Create sterling sil-
ver jewelry. Materials and
use of tools included. Limit
of four students.
Lorna Jean Gallery is at
6136 W. Gulf-to-Lake Hwy.,
Crystal River. 352-564-2781.
Watercolor classes
with instructor Pat Sistrand,
9 a.m. Tuesday, Citrus
Springs Community Center.
$10. www.citruscountyfl.org,
click on Parks & Recreation
to register. 352-465-7007.
Floral City Needle
Artists instructs in quilting,
embroidery, knitting and
crochet for beginners to ad-
vanced levels, 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. Tuesday at Floral
City Community House be-
tween the library and the
museum off Orange Av-
enue. Free. 352-344-5896.
Jewelry making,
1 p.m. every second
Wednesday at Citrus
Springs Library, 1826 W.
Country Club Blvd. in Citrus
Springs. Instructor Edna
Mikel. Learn to make
bracelets, necklaces and
earrings. 352-489-2313.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Mary Aiuto displays her wares


'Robot and Frank'


unexpected film


Special to the Chronicle
Mary Aiuto's exhibits will be on display through Thursday, Feb. 28, in upstairs exhibition hall in Dorothea G.
Jerome Building, 3800 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Exhibit hours are 8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Monday through
Thursday; 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Friday. Free. 352-746-6721, ext. 6131, or www.CF.edu.


FESTIVALS
24th annual Will
McLean Music Festival
featuring more than 50 of
Florida's finest acoustic
singer/songwriters, Friday,
March 8, through Sunday,
March 10, at Sertoma
campground, 85 Myers
Road, Brooksville. Perform-
ances begin at 10 a.m. Sat-
urday and Sunday.


CASH
Continued from Page C1

But it's OK for films to
have simple plots at times.
Look at the original "Die
Hard" back in 1988. The
whole film revolved
around a cop taking down
a bunch of bad guys with
guns, and it all took place
in a building. It was a great
film. And the other "Die
Hard" films were very sim-
ilar in plot structure. Un-
fortunately for this film,
the big problem (of sev-
eral) was it tried to be
more like other films.
First, "Die Hard 5" tries
to be like James Bond. I
thought this during the
very first scene when the
jazzy spy music started
playing. Nice cars were
paraded everywhere, at-
tractive females in nice
dresses were walking
around. It was very Bond-
ish. And if that was not
enough, the plot tried to
stock up on these plot
twists such as those found
in spy-thrillers. Unfortu-
nately, it was a sloppy at-
tempt at storytelling.
At one point, I actually
asked one of the people
with me what was going
on. He did not know, and
neither did the others.
Then I said to myself,
"This is too much thinking
for a Die Hard film." I
don't watch "Die Hard" for
a plot-twisting mystery. I
watch "Die Hard" to see


Free workshops include:
Basic fingerstyle guitar
with Pete Price;
Mandolin with Red and
Chris Henry;
Harmonica with Stan
Geberer;
Fiddle with Katie Bailey;
Advanced fingerstyle with
Clyde Walker;
Wooden flutes with Ray
Wood;

John McClane beat up sev-
eral guys (more on that
later) and make sarcastic
remarks.
Second, "Die Hard 5"
tries to be like "The Fast
and Furious" films. This
film is only 90 minutes, so
there is not a lot of time to
establish a plot and char-
acters. Since the film does
not even do that, there is
more time for great actions
sequences full of guns and
fists. Instead, you see a
drawn-out, car-chasing se-
quence that feels like it
lasts for a half hour. It is
entertaining for the first
five minutes. I could have
let that go, except the other
action scenes are increas-
ingly sub-par I left only re-
membering all the cars
crashing into each other.
Where is the gun-
shooting, punch-throwing
goodness of all the other


Dulcimer with Aaron
O'Rourke; and
Voice with Amy Carol
Webb.
$32 in advance and $37
at gate. One-day tickets $17
Friday; $20 Saturday; $17
Sunday. Children younger
than 12 free. willmclean.
com or 352-465-2167.
Weeki Wachee
Swamp Fest, featuring live

films? It is scarce in this
film.
The heart of the flaw of
"A Good Day to Die Hard"
is this: the film tries to be
more than a "Die Hard"
film, it tries to create a
new formula. The problem
is, there was never a prob-
lem with the old formula.
The "Die Hard" films have
a good track record until
this point. This new in-
stallment strays so far
away from the original's
heart and soul in its at-
tempt to create something
new, and that something is
a mess full of cheesy dia-
logue, an unnecessary and
weak story, and surpris-
ingly enough not enough
action worthy of the se-
ries. I give it one star out
of four.
"A Good Day to Die
Hard" has a running time
of 97 minutes and is rated R


entertainment, arts, crafts
and food court, 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. Friday, March 8, and
Saturday, March 9, and
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday,
March 4, at Weeki Wachee
Springs State Park, 6131
Commercial Way, Weeki
Wachee. Adults admission
$8 at gate and $4 for chil-
dren 6 to 12 years old. Free
for children 5 and younger.


for violence and language.

Liam Cash is a senior at
Seven Rivers Christian
School. For more from his
blog, "Cashmoney Movies,"
visit http://cashmoney
movies blogspot com.


To benefit
Citrus Memorial Health System
r irsMmoilHalhSse


CITRUS MEMORIAL H
^^ei~ fGS~kftww,


I loved Frank Langella
in "The Box," so I was
super curious about
the appropriately named
"Robot and Frank" flick.
Of course, I admired
Langella's super smooth
features and
distinct nos-
trils, not to .
mention his
great acting.
Surprisingly,
"Robot" 7
(voiced by
Peter Sars-
gaard) holds
his own Heathe
against his FOS
seasoned co-
star. Moreover, ON I
I enjoyed the
subtle, not-too-far in the
future setting as well as
the slow, strange bedfel-
lows take on the sci-fi
genre. Last but not least,
"Robot and Frank" had
some golden comedy
"Robot and Frank"
centers on Frank, an ex-
catburglar who is old,
slightly senile and living
alone. Frank's daughter,
Madison (Liv Tyler), trav-
els the globe doing chari-
table work while his son,
Hunter (James Marsden),
is busy with a wife and
kids. Neither see him
much.
Tight on time, Hunter
purchases a robot butler
(voiced by Peter Sars-
gaard) to watch his father
At first, Frank objects to
the chipper little droid
along with his strict rou-
tine and steamed veggie
meals, but he grows on
him. "Robot" is so eager
to keep Frank sharp, he
helps him with heists. A
beautiful friendship is
born.
Frank Langella is the
archetypical grandpa
with his wry humor, exas-
perated groans and even
his posture. From there,
you can't help but con-
nect to him.
However, Langella is
hardly a rosy, hallmark


STARTING MARCH 1

Dayz Gone By

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Repurposed and
Vintage Finds
S/i ,,I- the same buiillini', at
652 N. Citrus Ave.
Crystal River
352-228-4931


TUXEDOS!
Mary Beth's Bridal & Formal Wear will continue to rent
tuxedos and sell off remaining inventory in our same
building, now known as "Dayz Gone By" antique shop


Open Mon.-Sat. 10:00-5:00
563-0722


sketch. You see him de-
clining. The Alzheimer's
makes Frank slovenly
and aggressive. At points,
Langella stares blankly,
which really is tragic.
As a result, Robot's
willingness to
,D help Frank is
HJ doubly ad-
mirable.
Rachael Ma,
the petite ac-
C tress who per-
formed Robot,
has a slow, me-
thodical way of
SFoster moving to cap-
TER ture the
droid's sweet,
:ILM conscientious
nature. Sars-
gaard gives Robot a flat,
synthetic voice. Yet at
points, he adds just
enough of a pessimistic
cadence to make you
wonder if Robot is all ar-
tificial.
Besides its stellar
leads, "Robot and Frank"
has such a fresh, quiet
premise. The down-
played futuristic setting
does not obstruct the
story by any means.
Fleeting details like a
super slim Smart Car -
make Robot's presence
believable. Also, I like
how the movie empha-
sizes how Frank thinks
more of the Robot than
his children. Something
is slightly off with the
man-machine bond, but
once Langella steeps you
in Frank's mindset, it
seems wrong to put
Robot on the backburner.
By and Large, "Robot
and Frank" is a fantastic
movie. I give it an A+.
With a running time of
89 minutes, Robot and
Frank is rated PG-13 for
some language. "Robot
and Frank" is available
at Redbox kiosks.

Heather Foster is a
senior at the University
ofFlorida.


MARKET DAY


WITH ART TREASURES

Saturday,
Feb. 23rd
9:00 a.m. till 3:00 p.m. I

Local Produce, Plants, Pantry, Artistic Talent & Vintage
Collectibles on the 2nd & 4th Saturday of Each Month
on the Grounds of Heritage Village, 657 N. Citrus Ave.
in the9 of Historic Downtown Crystal River

www.theshoppesofheritagevillage.com

352-564-1400 / heritagevillageo8@yahoo.com



LUCKY FOR YOU OUR 99( ICE CREAM SPECIAL mention this ad for a
Mentin this ad for a

.99
.9 ice cream
cone or cup
(valid Market Day Feb 23, 2013)

LkeUs! 639 N. CITRUS AVE. 564-0311
I] OPEN 7 DAYS: MON.-FRI. 10AM-6PM SAT 10AM-5PM SUN NOON-3PM


KennyVance & he Planotones Tommy Mora & The Crests
(ome o littleBilt ose(r", "Cor Lia", "This Magic Moment" 6 Candles", "Step By Step", "Gee", "The AngelsListened In"

Sun., March 10, 2013 at 2:00 PM
Curtis Peterson Auditorium
3810 West Educational Path Lecanto, FL 34461


- -- H -I
L mK j


=2A '' U


SCENE


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013 C5








Page C6 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES News NOTES

fre shFE. Historic bones, buildings
Masons to serve. 2 Join seniors
fried fish Feb. 23 I for some fun


Floral City Masonic
Lodge will have a fish fry
from 3 to 6 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 23.
On the menu are all-you-
can-eat fish, French fries,
coleslaw, hushpuppies,
beans, dessert and
beverage.
Donation is $8.
Discover antiques
at thrift shop
The Homosassa Too
Thrift & Gift Shoppe will
present "The Antique Dis-
covery Tour" from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 23, at the shop, 8471
W. Periwinkle Lane,
Homosassa.
The public is invited to
have certified personal
property appraiser and pro-
fessional estate liquidator
Dale Smrekar examine an-
tiques. Appraisals are $5
per item and there is a limit
of three items per person.
Appraisals are on a first-
come, first-served basis.
For more information,
call Homosassa Too Thrift
Shoppe Manager Caroline
Wertel at 352-621-1550.
Visit "Hospice Thrift & Gift
Shoppe" on Facebook.

A Humane Society
CENTRAL FLA.


Visit Old Crystal River Cemetery to benefit Heritage Museum


Special to the Chronicle

The Crystal River Heritage Coun-
cil is sponsoring its first Historic
Bones and Buildings Tour from
11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, March 2.
Tickets are $20 for the tour and
lunch, and can be purchased at the
Coastal Heritage Museum, 532 Cit-
rus Ave., Crystal River, or any of the
other buildings on the tour the day
of the event.
The tour can be started anywhere.
Each building is open from 11 a.m.
to 3 p.m. The last cemetery tour be-
gins at 2 p.m. The tour is a fundrais-
ing event of the Crystal River
Heritage Council of the Citrus
County Historical Society. All pro-
ceeds will benefit the Coastal Her-
itage Museum.
The highlight of the tour will be a


guided visit through the Old Crystal
River Cemetery
Tours begin at 11 a.m. and will
take about 40 minutes. The history
of the cemetery will be presented,
along with information about some
of the individuals buried in it.
The buildings on the tour include
the Crystal River Train Depot, 190
Crystal St., where lunch will be
served. One of only three depots left
in the county, it was built around
1900 and was saved and restored by
the Crystal River Lions Club.
The county's second-oldest
church building and one of the old-
est structures in Crystal River is on
the tour.
Originally built as the First Pres-
byterian Church in 1889, it is now
the Calvary Baptist Church and is at
the corner of Third Avenue and


Ninth Street northeast.
A unique building on the tour is
the Seminole Club at 135 N.E. Third
St., built in 1924 as a social club for
winter residents of "Michigan
Town." It is now owned by Art Jones
and is used for club meetings and
community activities.
Dessert and other refreshments
will be served at the Coastal Her-
itage Museum, which served as the
city hall from 1939 to 1971. Exhibits
depicting the history of the west side
of the county are on display
Visitors can step inside one of the
original jail cells, along with viewing
photos taken during the filming of
an Elvis Presley movie.
For more information, call Sharon
Padgett, Heritage Council chairman,
at 352-212-8390, or the Coastal Her-
itage Museum at 352-795-1755.


Most Improved Cadet


Friends
l. ,.www;..


Special to the Chronicle
Cookie, a 12-pound, 7-
year-old, black and white
Jack Russell, is a cuddler
with a real sweet person-
ality. He loves everyone,
plays with three toys at a
time and thinks he is a
lap dog. His human
mother died, so Cookie
and his tri-colored, 6-
year-old, rat terrier girl-
friend, Katelynn, now
need a home, together or
separately. She is a little
overweight, but should
trim right down. A Hu-
mane Society of Central
Florida Pet Rescue Inc.
does home visits prior to
adoptions, so only adopts
to the Citrus County
area. Meet Cookie and
other little dogs at the
Saturday adoption events
from 10 a.m. to noon at
Pet Supermarket,
Inverness.


Special to the Chronicle
Manatee Division of the U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps named Seaman Recruit Lane Martin as Most Improved Cadet.
Throughout the year, cadets are evaluated based on their attendance and performance at drills, grades in school,
community service and advancement in the program. Commanding Officer Lt. Todd Dunn said the cadet continually
stepped up his performance during the past 12 months. When asked what it took to earn him this honor, Martin said,
"I spent more time on course work and community service than I had before." The seventh-grader attends Crystal
River Middle School, where he is in the National Junior Honor Society and runs the 800-meter event for the track
team. Manatee Division drills at Coast Guard Station Yankeetown on the second weekend of each month. To learn
more about Sea Cadets, go to www.manateediv.org or call Lt. Dunn at 352-212-5473.


New recruit joins Manatee Division
Seaman Recruit Trey Fowler recently joined the Manatee Division of the U.S. Naval
Sea Cadet Corps. The 13-year-old has aspirations to be in the U.S. Coast Guard. The
sixth-grader attends Crystal River Middle School, is on the track team and
participates in kickboxing. Manatee Division meets monthly at Coast Guard Station
Yankeetown and learns about Navy service. The Sea Cadet Corps is a youth
organization for Americans 11 to 17 years old. For more information, call
Commanding Officer Lt. Todd Dunn at 352-212-5473 or visit them online at
www.manateediv.org.
Special to the Chronicle


Are you looking for some
fun? Why not join the Sen-
iors on the Move? Three
coordinators cover most of
Citrus County and provide
a calendar of events every
month, including trips to the
movies, wildlife parks, boat
trips, lunch, theater and
more.
The group is sponsored
by the Senior Foundation
of Citrus County and also
does trips, open to every-
one, not just Seniors on the
Move patrons. Everyone is
welcome at next event to
Tarpon Springs March 9.
Tickets are $45 include bus
ride, a visit to an antique
car show, lunch at a local
Greek restaurant, and free
time at the sponge docks.
Or how about a Day at the
Races a trip to Tampa
Bay Downs Saturday, April
6. Tickets are $48 and in-
clude bus ride, admission
to the race track with re-
served seating, program
and buffet lunch.
To find out how you can
be a part of the group, call
Sue at 352-527-5959.
Make your
wishes known
Hospice of Citrus County
Wings Community Educa-
tion will present a free
workshop to examine
America's most popular liv-
ing will "Five Wishes." The
workshop will be at 2 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 26, at the
Wings Education Center,
8471 W. Periwinkle Lane,
Suite A, Homosassa.
"Five Wishes" is written
in everyday language and
helps start and structure
important conversations
about care in times of seri-
ous illness. It helps you ex-
press how you want to be
treated if you are seriously
ill and unable to speak for
yourself. "Five Wishes"
also addresses personal,
spiritual and emotional
wishes. It is a legal docu-
ment in 42 states including
Florida.
Jonathan Beard, Wings
Grief services manager, will
moderate the presentation.
"Five Wishes" is open to
the public and reservations
are suggested. Call Lynn
Miller at 352-621-1500.
Scouts to serve
pancakes Feb. 23
Cub Scout Pack 457 will
have a fundraiser pancake
breakfast from 8 to 10 a.m.
Saturday, Feb. 23, at Beef
'O' Brady's in Inverness.
Tickets are available for
$5. Each ticket also has a
coupon for $5 off a visit to
Beef 'O' Brady's in Inver-
ness.
To purchase tickets prior
to the event, call Janet at
352-422-1965.


Religion NOTES


Hernando SDA
Hernando Seventh-day Adventist services
start at 11 a.m. Saturday. A fellowship lunch-
eon will follow the worship service; all are
welcome.
The adult Sabbath school program begins
at 9:15 a.m. Saturday, followed at 10 a.m. by
Bible study. Classes for children are available
at 9:30 a.m.
There is a mid-week meeting at 6 p.m.
each Wednesday.
The church is at 1880 N. Trucks Ave.,
Hernando; phone 352-344-2008.
Glad Tidings SDA
Sabbath school begins at 9 a.m. Saturday
with song, then study, at Glad Tidings SDA
Church. Divine hour follows at 11 a.m.
Elder Sweet completes the series on
Hebrews with sermon No. 28. A vegan lunch
follows the service.
Bible study is at 6 p.m. Thursday.
CHIP (Coronary Health Improvement Pro-
gram) alumni meet at 5 p.m. the first Monday
monthly. Interested persons welcome.
For more information, call Bob at 352-
628-1743.
The church is at 520 N.E. Third Ave. (next
to the BP station), Crystal River.


Homosassa SDA
Norman Deakin will lead the worship serv-
ice at 11 a.m. Saturday. Bill McPherson will
lead the 10 a.m. adult Bible class.
The 9:30 a.m. Sabbath school will be a
special children's program. Bob Halstead will
talk about "Jesus: Provider and Sustainer" at
10 a.m. Sabbath school Saturday.
Tuesday Bible study is at 7 p.m.
Bible study is at 10 a.m. Thursday. The
men's study group meets at 6:30 p.m.
Thursday.
The public is welcome at all events. The
church is at 5863 Cardinal St.
For more information, call Bob Halstead at
352-382-7753.

Inverness SDA
Sabbath school song service starts at
9:10 a.m. Saturday. Children's classes begin at
9:30; toddler class is at 9:45; adult bible study is
at 9:50 a.m.
Sabbath services begin at 11 a.m. Saturday.
The Thrift Store is open 9 a.m. to noon
Wednesday.
The church is at 638 S. Eden Gardens,
4.5 miles east of Inverness off State Road 44.
Call is 352-726-9311. Visit online at www.
sda-inverness.org.


Advent Hope
Bible study is at 10 a.m. Saturday for all
ages. The worship service begins at
11:30 a.m. Saturday.
After the service, there is a weekly potluck.
Vegetarian store is open from 10 a.m. to
noon each Wednesday.
The church is at 428 N.E. Third Ave.,
Crystal River. Call 352-794-0071 or visit
online at www.adventhopechurch.com.

Congregation Beth Sholom
Celebrate Purim at 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb.
23, with food, fun and frolic featuring a joyous
and spirited reading of the Book of Esther.
Come in costume and bring noisemakers.
Children's costume parade, reading of
M'gillah, Hamantaschen.
The Genesis Project is an intensive, in-
depth analysis and discussion of the entire
text of the Book of Genesis conducted in Eng-
lish. We will employ the classical ancient, me-
dieval and modern commentators of the
biblical text; we will utilize archaeology, an-
thropology, history, linguistics, comparative lit-
erature; we will consult traditional texts of
Jewish mysticism and the stories and legends
of other near-eastern civilizations; and we will


use drama and literary analysis to study both
the prose and poetry of the biblical narrative. It
is expected that this course will continue over
several semesters.
Sessions are 7 to 8 p.m. Monday (17 ses-
sions). Fee is $5 per session, plus textbook.
History of Zionism and Israel explores how
a tiny, backwater province of the Ottoman Em-
pire became in a little more than 100 years
- the modern State of Israel that we know
today. The course examines the origins of
modern political Zionism, the development of
the Jewish community during the British Man-
date period, the struggle for independence
and the history of Israel since the establish-
ment of the state in 1948.
Sessions are 8:15 to 9:15 p.m. Monday
(17 sessions). Fee is $5 per session plus,
textbook.
Bingo is played at 6 p.m. Tuesday in Kell-
nerAuditorium.Congregation Beth Sholom
with Hazzan
Mordecai Kamlot as cantor/spiritual leader, is
at 102 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, and offers
spirited and participatory-style Friday (7:30
p.m.) and Saturday (9:30 a.m.) Shabbat serv-
ices, as well as social and cultural activities.
Call 352-643-0995, or email mkamlot2@
gmail.com.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRIDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 22,2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: BrightHouse DI: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: HolidayHeights
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31 59 31 26 29 Thienot, John Magaro, DenzelWhitaker.'R' Queen" (N)
TBS1 49 23 49 16 19 King ISeinfeld ISeinfeld ISeinfeld Fam.Guy IFam.Guy ** "Old School"(2003) Luke Wilson.'R' There |There
fTi** 1 3 19 30 35 "OnlyAngels Have Wings" (1939, ***h, "Here Comes Mr. Jordan" (1941) Robert*** "You Were Never Lovelier" (1942,
169 53 169 30 35 Adventure) ary Grant.'NR' H Montgomery 'NR' H Musical) Fred Astaire.'NR' H
i 53 4 5 Gold Rush (In Stereo) Gold Rush (In Stereo) Gold Rush (Season Finale) (N) (In Stereo Bering Sea Gold (In Gold Rush (In Stereo)
53 34 53 24 26 'GG' Live) H Stereo) H 'G'H
TLC1 50 46 50 29 30 Four Weddings'PG' SayYes ISayYes Four Weddings (N) SayYes ISayYes Borrowed Borrowed SayYes ISayYes
S*** "Knucklehead" (2010, Comedy) Mark ***Y "The Help" (2011) Viola Davis. An aspiring writer **Y "The Fighting Temptations"
(L i 350 261 350 Feuerstein. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' H captures the experiences of black women. N (2003) Cuba Gooding Jr
The Mentalist "Red The Mentalist "Code *** "300"(2007, Action) Gerard Butler Badly outnum- Dallas "Trial and Error" Monday
S 48 33 48 31 34 Herring"'14' Red"'14' H bered Spartan warriors battle the Persian army'R' '14' Mornings
ITDON1 38 58 38 33 Adven |Regular Regular |Regular Cartoon Planet'G' King/Hill |King/Hill American American Fam. Guy Fam. Guy
IRAV) 9 54 9 44 Bizarre Foods Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures The Dead Files'PG' The Dead Files'PG'
iiTVJ 25 55 25 98 55 Cops'PG' Cops'14' Wipeout'PG'm Wipeout'PG' c World Records Wipeout'PG' c World's Dumbest...
(TVD 32 49 32 34 24 M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Cosby Cosby Raymond IRaymond Raymond IRaymond Cleveland Cleveland King King
SLaw & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Suits "War" Differing
USAI 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit '14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit '14 opinions.'14'
Charmed Identities are Charmed Ghost stirs *, "Hope Floats" (1998, Romance) Sandra *** "Erin Brockovich" (2000, Drama) Julia
E 117 69 117 stolen.'PG' up trouble.'PG' Bullock, Harry Connick Jr 'PG-13' Roberts, Albert Finney 'R'
WGL-A 18 18 18 18 20 Chris |Chris Funny Home Videos Mother Mother |Mother |Mother WGN News at Nine IFunny Home Videos


North
A J 7 4
SA 8 7 2
* 10 5


West
SQ2
V 9 6 5 3
V9653
SJ 3
10 7 4 3 2


*AK


02-22-13


Q
East
SK 10
V J 10 4
SAK Q 9 6
S8 6 5


South
98653
V KQ
8 7 4 2
*8742
,J9
Dealer: East
Vulnerable: Both
South West North


Pass
14
44


Pass
Pass
Pass


Dbl.
2 *
Pass


East
1 +
Pass
Pass
Pass


Opening lead: + J


Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Louis Nizer, a noted trial lawyer who died in
1994, said, "When a man points a finger at some-
one else, he should remember that four of his
fingers are pointing at himself."
In bridge, points those for high cards are
very important. If it helps, count points on your
fingers under the table, where no one else can
see. Or use your fingers and toes!
Often, tracking high-card points will be in-
valuable for finding the right play In this deal,
how should East plan the defense against four
spades after West leads the diamond jack?
South's advance of one spade showed zero to
8 points. (With 9 to 11, he would have jumped to
two spades, and with 12 or more, he would have
cue-bid two diamonds.) When North raised to
two spades, he was saying that game was still
possible. So he was promising 18 or 19 points.
Now South, with six points and a fifth trump,
was happy to jump to game.
East could see three tricks: the spade king
and two diamonds. But the bidding suggested
that South would have the heart king and at
least one of the major-suit queens. If South had
the spade queen, East had to hope his side
would get a third-round heart trick. But if South
had the heart queen, a second trump trick could
be promoted.
East won the first trick with the diamond
queen (in case West's jack was a singleton),
cashed the diamond king, and carefully contin-
ued with the diamond six.
West saw what was required, ruffing with his
spade queen. Now the contract had to fail.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
WARLT

.'1- T.,,. .. I. Servi ces, Inc r

TOBIR



NEYGAC '



LUPTIP


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

I Welll Well
S 'h, want to
give this





I sh

2-- \

HE WASN'T SURE IF HF
COUL- GIVE ALL H 5
FORTUNE TO CHARITY
UPON HIS ~PATH,
BUT HE WAS ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: GRAFT ADAGE DEFEAT HOOFED
I Answer: After hiking down to the bottom of the Grand
Canyon, they GORGED


ACROSS
1 Terrible tsar
5 Festive quaff
8 Apple rival
11 Sheep
shelters
13 Cousins of
"urn"
14 Big flop
15 Admission
16 Working cats
18 Somber
20 Portrait
21 Ship's officer
23 Three before
V

24 Round veggie
25 Nile god
27 Status
31 Cruces,
N.M.
32 Former Mets
stadium
33 Defect
34 Borax et al.
36 Exasperates


38 Ms. Lupino
39 Over here!
40 Pork cut
41 IV plus III
42 Aunt or bro.
44 More than
willing
46 Happen again
49 Eyebrow
shape
50 Too many to
count
52 Zen riddles
56 Maria
57 -Magnon
man
58 Excellent
59 SAT takers
60 Light brown
61 Name in blue
jeans

DOWN
1 Frozen water
2 Max Sydow
3 ABA mem.
4 Bookish types


Answer to Previous Puzzle


5 Deaden
6 Gloating cry
7 NASA outfit
(hyph.)
8 Hunch
9 Small town


10 Inventory wd.
12 IHOP choices
17 Blue cartoon
character
19 Busy
community
21 Hibernating
animals
22 Caravan halts
23 Less reliable
24 Sit heavily
26 Prefix for
dynamic
28 Full of energy
29 Rock bottom
30 "The Bridge
on the
River -"
35 Swagger
37 Junk food
43 Vertical
45 Evil spirit
46 Grooves
47 Sheik
colleague
48 Tax pros
49 By and by
51 Memorable
decade
53 Mimic
54 Ariz. neighbor
55 Hindu Mr.


2-22 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


Dear Annie: My daugh-
ter hasn't spoken to
me in 20 years.
"Linda" is 45 years old and
has been married since
around 1993. I wasn't invited
to her wedding, so I am not
sure. I think she received a
master's degree,
but I wasn't in-
vited to her gradu-
ation, so I'm not
sure of that, ei-
ther.
Linda's mother
left me for her
married lover
when our daugh-
ter was 6. Instead
of taking custody, I
felt it best for her
mother to raise
ANN
her, which was a
big mistake. My MAII
current wife en-
joyed a good relationship
with Linda. We visited her
during her college years and
gave her money to spend.
But once she finished her
degree, we never heard from
her again. She didn't reply to
our phone calls, letters or
emails.
Linda's brother informed
me she and her husband
have four children we have
never met. The oldest must
be about 16 and the youngest
about 3, but I do not know
any of their birthdates.
When I tried to find out why
she stopped all contact, the
only thing she said was,
"Whatever the reason that
you think it is."
Linda was trained as a
family counselor. What hap-
pened in her training that
would lead her to refuse a
relationship with her own
father? The divorce wasn't
my idea, so why am I left out


II


in the cold? Father Who
Can't See His Child
Dear Father: This has
nothing to do with Linda's
training. More likely, it is
some grudge she has been
holding onto for years. Since
you are in contact with your
son and he is in
touch with his sis-
L ter, ask him to act
as your intermedi-
ary. Have him tell
Linda you are
sorry for anything
you may have done
that has created
S this estrangement,
and you want to
know how to rec-
oncile. We hope
IE she is responsive.
E'S Dear Annie: I
BOX am only 11, but I
want the truth and
not the lies most people tell
kids.
I have had a best friend,
"Janie," for about four years.
I am an only child, and my
parents are divorced, so
Janie is everything to me. I
recently started middle
school, and now we only
have one class together.
Janie recently became
friends with another girl. I
don't think I can compete
with this girl, because she is
really pretty and wears de-
signer clothes.
Anyway, Janie and this girl
always hang out together,
and it makes me feel really
left out. I can't lose her. She
is like the sister I never had.
Should I do something? If so,
what? Lost and Alone
Dear Lost: Here's the
truth, and you may not like
it: In middle school, it is not
unusual for children to de-
velop new interests and new


friends. Some of them dis-
card their old friends in the
process. If Janie is so shal-
low she chooses her friends
based on their clothes, she's
not much of a true friend,
and we think you know that.
It's OK to tell her you miss
the friendship you once had
and then see whether she is
more attentive. But you are
also changing and maturing.
As much as you have relied
on Janie in the past, it's time
for you to hold your head up
and make new friends who
are steadfast and appreciate
you as you are. It won't be
easy, but it will be worth it.
Dear Annie: Like "Too
Well Endowed in Kansas," I
have struggled for years with
the same problem.
I'm 72 years old, and my
current doctor is the only
one who suggested breast re-
duction as a way to help with
my back, neck and other is-
sues. I figured I was too old,
but the doctor said I was a
perfect candidate. I had sur-
gery and am loving the re-
sults. Newfound Freedom
in New York


Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar longtime edi-
tors of the Ann Landers col-
umn. Please email your
questions to anniesmail-
box@comcast.net, or write
to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o Cre-
ators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more
about Annie's Mailbox and
read features by other Cre-
ators Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit the Cre-
ators Syndicate Web page at
www creators. com.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


UR G EN|T PI N K I E
SI ESTA ENCODE

E IWES NUNS
PS I ODI E LE A


E KST UCK ET E


AMOK H AZ E|S
COLLAR CAME TO
FLRE E LY 1AK I T ASL
LOOSE TI DAL


ENTERTAINMENT


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013 C7






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C8 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013

Peanuts


HERE'S THE
WII RL' W APT'A PLrlP T
DOI N t' HIN I ,
ENN/N, LNE-


Pickles


U5DDNLY I 5EE AN ENEMY
SOLDIER! IT LOOKS LIKE A
-ENTRY...IF I CAN 6ET PAST
HIM,I CAN MAKE IT BACK
T M SQUAADRON...I'LL
-NEAK UPON HIM AND FLIP
HIM OVER MY5AHOULDER..
EA5' NO()...EA5Y....







OH, v 0TIN.6, MELSON .
ITS JI'e61 NO FFN .



.1 em. ~ p


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


9 I...I ACTUALLY JUST CAME IN FOR
ONE CUP OF COFFEE. SHOULD I BE
GETTING CHAIRS AND-
SOME PASTRIES? NO, THIS WON'T
S- BE RESOLVED
Q ESPECIALLY
'R L SINCE ALL
/ THE PASTRIES
I ',-). \ ARE LEMON-


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


GOOD NEWS! WE WERE
THE LOW BIDDER FOR
THE UNITED NATION'S
ASTEROID INTERCEPT
MISSILE.



^ ^ /
:\ ^ "Sf/


THE FATE OF EARTH
DEPENDS ON YOUR
COMBINED TALENTS
PLUS MY MANAGEMENT
SKILLS.


WALLY, YOU'RE IN
CHARGE OF FISSILE
MATERIAL, WHICH
I ASSUME IS A TYPE
OF SODA.


The Born Loser


WATCHING TV GAINTYOU K.OW, AKSk'ATERKOF FACT,I WAS WT W RPPELEk-DIDYOUP -
IT WOULDN'T RUKT(OUTOREA REAtNG LAST WNIT, UT I UPS &ET T~KE-t7
~- A, &OOK ONC IN|h~~ DA FAW FN.'-T 3, -
w-U. AWRL! ---.----w1 .


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Blondie

I CAN'T BELIEVE YOU HAVE TO ) BUT NONE OF THE
STOOP DOWN LIKE THIS O SPEAK EMPLOYEES i-- ---
THROUeH A TINY LITTLE SECURITV TO Ml. I




EL-(
x,: ,: fl I



Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"Hello, Fire Department? This is a
completely selfless good Samaritan, with
no personal agenda of any kind, calling to
report a poor little kitty in desperate need
of rescue."


Doonesbury


Big Nate
OHH THAT'S A
ADt FALL, SANDRA)!
SRE JUST
COULDN'T PULL
OFF THAT TRIPLE
LUTZ, SCOTT!






Arlo and Janis




?B

_


1711
7".- .".'.-- .' '

.







'...AD THAT'S GOINC&
TO TAKE HER. OFF
THE POPIUM.F
THAT'S RIGHT, SCOTT.
THERE'LL BE NO
GOLD MEDAL TODAY!

iLJy^


i SNMFF PE'
WHIMPER
C


0

0


'H ERE'S NO BET1R GIeHT THAN MAROARET
WALKIN' NT1E OPPOSITE DIRECTION."


Betty


Frank & Ernest


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Snitch" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"Escape from Planet Earth" (PG) In 3D. 1:45
p.m., 7:45 p.m. No passes.
"Escape from Planet Earth" (PG) 4:45 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"Safe Haven" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15
p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"A Good Day to Die Hard" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:40
p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Beautiful Creatures" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7
p.m., 10 p.m.
"Identity Thief" (R) ID required. 1:25 p.m., 4:25
p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Dark Skies" (PG-13) 2 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 8 p.m.,
10:2 5p.m.
"Snitch" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,


10:05 p.m.
"Escape from Planet Earth" (PG) In 3D. 1:25
p.m., 7:05 p.m. No passes.
"Escape from Planet Earth" (PG) 4:20 p.m.,
9:45 p.m.
"Beautiful Creatures" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:05
p.m., 7 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"Safe Haven" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10
p.m., 10 p.m.
"A Good Day to Die Hard" (R) 1:55 p.m., 4:40
p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Side Effects" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:45
p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Identity Thief" (R) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:30
p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Warm Bodies" (PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 4:35 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie list-
ings and entertainment information.


WJUF-FM90.1 National Public LocalRADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: 1/V s/lnb A


"VBFO PSIO DTS BIO XTHZM YWBR MTX


YBZRP DTS RT XT RWOZ XT HR


YHRW BCC DTSI PRIOZMRW."


MOTIMO YBPWHZMRTZ

Previous Solution: "Woman is the dominant sex. Men have to do all sorts of
stuff to prove that they are worthy of woman's attention." Camille Paglia
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 2-22


Garfield


Dilbert


I'LL BET HE'LL GRet
KILL ME WHEN HE H EO
THAWS OUT ..,- WAL2







2-22 -r


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


COMICS







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013 C9


To place an ad, call 563-5966





Classifieds


SIn Print


and


Online


All


Thie Time


Fa: 32)53-65 ol.re:(88.82230 1 m il*lasfid rnilo*ie Iwbst: w crnilonie0o


Need A Friend
with same interests
Retired Oriental Lady
No smoking,drinking
or drugs. Healthy
will share
Tsai P.0, Box 895
Waldo, Fl. 32694
Tom's Pinochle Club
Looking for some good
players to fill in on
Thursday nights. If
interested please call
352-527-9632.




EZ GO GOLF CART
Electric with charger,
2002,
Very good cond.
$1,500
352-564-2756




2 Swivel Rockers
Ver Good Cond.
One Colored
$75.00, Winged
back Chair Bei e
$40.00 (SMW
352-503-7536
7 Windows 1 Door,
w/ upperslide/ open
window, all bronze in
color $250 obo
(352) 795-9187
30 yrs. Experience!
Int/Ext. Comm/Res.
Lic/Ins. Jimmy
*352-212-9067**
700 50's & 60's LP's
Record Player & CD
Recorder $350 for all
352-527-6955
2002 JAGUAR XJR
4 DR, $7200. Super
Charged 4.0 V-8
engine, auto trans,
leather int, AC, power
sun roof, XJR sport
pkg, factory chrome
wheels (352) 637-6443
2009 24 x 9 Trailer,
tandem axel, rear ramp,
side door, AC, 200 mi
$2750 (727) 207-1619
3BR 2BA 1,500 sq. ft.,
6823 W. Merrivale Ln
Built 2006, Fully
Furnished, by Owner,
$77,000 obo
(260) 348-9667
ALINER
2001, Expedition 18ft,
storage for stabilizers,
$3,500. obo
(352) 795-6295

BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!


BEVERLY HILLS
"MOVING SALE*
Fri. & Sat. 9am-2pm
7 S J Kellner Blvd.

BEVERLY HILLS
OUR LADY OF
GRACE CHURCH
FLEA MARKET T
SAT. FEB 23rd
8AM to 1PM.
6 Roosevelt
Blvd.

Bowflex Extreme
$600. obo
or Trade for hand guns
(352) 249-7221
CHEVROLET
98 1500 ext. cab
4.3 V6, auto, air,14,500
orig. miles, Grg kept,
$8700 352-212-4678
CITRUS SPRINGS
Friday & Sat. 9A-2P
7909 N. Triana Drive

CRYSTAL RIVER
BIG SALE
Friday & Sat., 8a-1p
5 Pc. Thomasville wall
unit, gold & silver
jewelry, antiques,
fenton glass, women
clothing and MUCH
MORE Behind Olive
Tree Restaurant, US
19, UNITS 80, 81, 82

CRYSTAL RIVER
FRI ,SAT 9 ?
BaseBall Cards
9140 N Citrus Ave

CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri., Sat. & Sun, All Day
4615 N. Elm Drive
CRYSTAL RIVER
MULTI-FAMILY
Fri, Sat 8a to 3p
9759 W Camphor Ln

Executive Asst.

Email resume to:
resume2013ncf
.@.qmail.com
Garden Tracker,
Wheel Horse, 16hp
Hydrostatic dr, fresh
paint, smokes, $675
OBO. Unique signed
Young Hinkle, wood
desk 1 drawer w/
chair 46x30 $125
(352) 341-5053
HOMOSASSA
Fri, Sat, Sun 7:30 2pm
scooter, fishing boat,
elec organ w/bench
and music books, and
morel Moving sale -
everything must go!
7461 W Fair Acres PL
(325) 212-6170
Honda Gold Wing
1976,custom,mintcont
low miles $2500
503-6550/810-275-2500
Ask for Mark
INVERNESS
2b/2% ba, 1/ acre
off Turner Camp Rd
a/c, heat pump 3yrs.
old, 30ft scn porch &
48'open porch on other
side, new septic, 18'x31'
building w/ 220 electric,
shed, fenced, on canal
$68,000 352-726-1791
INVERNESS
Fri & Sat. 8am -2pm
collectibles, furn,
knives, off 581
4702 Bow-N-Arrow LP


#1 Employment source is








www.chronicleonline.com


HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067
INVERNESS
Huae Two-family
Sale
Fri-Sat 8a-4p
8531 Cresco Ln rear
of Inv. CC, tons of
misc.
Leather Couch
Navy Blue, exec. cond.
$175.00, Wht leather
love seat, good condi-
tion $125.00 (SMW)
352-503-7536
LG Leather Sectional
Couch, Mustard Color
Good Condition
$350 352-746-1447
Maple Rider Rocker
w/footstool, green
cushions $50
352-795-7254
Men's Durango Boots
11%/ D & Harley
Davidson Boots 9'/2D
both pairs $150
352-795-7254
Mossberg 715T,
22 Long Riffle AR look
alike, 25 round clip
almost new $500.
17HMR Taurus
Revolver 8 shot, super
clean, 400 round
$500. For revolver
must have concealed
weapons permit
(352) 563-0328
RANGE GE Electric
Glass cook top, self
cleaning, bisque,
warming burner
estate item $200
352-637-1792
RIDING MOWER,
Murray 12/2HP, 40"cut,
with bagger
$230.
(352) 344-9502
S. Inverness
Country Cottage for 1
person, all included
$450pr month, $300 dep
727-916-1119
Schwinn Bicycle
Ladies Red 28 "
cruiser, Used once.
Asking $95
(352) 341-5053
Secretary
Administrator

office exp. preferred
have exceptional
computer skills,
including Quick
books, Excel &
Microsoft Power
point, Send resume
to: janmetcalf
@embarq.mail.com
SPRINKLERS & SOD
Complete Check &
Adjust, Full System $49
(352) 419-2065

STORE CLERK

All Applicants must
have Computer Skills,
Cash Handling,
Customer Service
Background Check
is required.
Pay Day Cash
Advance &All Star
Rentals
(352) 564-0700
SUGARMILL
WOODS 4/2/2
1/3ac. $1100. mo.
727-919-0797
TOOLS FOR SALE
Friday only 9am-4pm
964 N Freson Ave
Citrus Hill, Fl
Utility Trailer 8'x12'
w/loading gate
exc. cond. $750
352-341-0959
Utility Trailer
with loading ramp
5 x 10
$550.
(352) 860-0124


S udoku ***** 4puz.com


6 8


4 36 5


5 2 1


2 4 9


56 27


3 1 8


9 51


8 34 7


1 4_4 6
Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3 by 3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


withstand
Installations by Brian CBC1253853 hwindsh






S Permit And T I-|T
I Engineering Fees I
\ Up to $200 value -

*Siding. Soffit *Fascia *Skirting *Roofovers* Carports* Screen Rooms* Decks *Windows* Doors* Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


INVERNESS
Friday & Sat. 8am-?
912 Russell Ave.
YARD SALE
Friday 9am-1pm
5484 W. Corral PI
Beverly Hills, FI
Yard Sale
Sat. Only 8am-?
Tools, large generator
plumbing,
house hold items
4115 N. Little Hawk Pt.
Crystal River



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087



BLACK LAB MIX
Female, 3/2 yrs old
581bs, spade,
microchipped, crate
trained, no cats or sml
children, call or text
352-895-1336
DOG, MIXED BREED
must be only dog.
352-445-6368 or
352-564-0595
Plastic Laundry Tub
no faucets
352-476-7973



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.OOlb,
Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb
Delivered 352-795-0077



Black Labrador
Retriever, about 1% yrs
old, answers to "Buddy",
lost in vicinity of
W. Dunnellon Rd.
Owner is heartbroken.
(352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662
Crystal River &
Homosassa Springs
area, lost gold St. Pe-
tersburg Times award
ring, green stone
863 697 6772.
Lost- White malti-poo
on Wed, 2/20 in the
Hernando City
Heights area. About
0l1bs, answers to Tini.
Cash reward for her
return.(352) 726-6868
Please be an honest
person....At library in
Bev Hills evening of
2/18/13, left red/white
usb drive in computer "r
vanslette" written in ink,
pictures and files on
drive.please return
352-364-1771



Cat Found
male, orange tabby
strips, very friendly
found near feed store
on Grover Cleav-
eland, Homosassa
call to identify
352-228-9035
Found Girls Coat
Like new Gray
on Croft
(352) 341-8479
Found in Vicinity of
Homosassa Trail &
Bolton Ave..Male Dog
Med. Size Brown &
White. Call to Identify
352-533-8158
FOUND: Friendly male
mix puppy. He was in
my yard in Crystal River
near the mall. Please
call to identify
352-697-2795.
White Chihuahua
found at Lakeside
County Club Inverness
call 726-1461


m ^^^


Precious Paws
Rescue, Inc.
pre-
ciouspawsflorida.
corn
726-4700





"RESCUING PETS
FOUR PAWS A
TIME"







ADOPTIONS
CRYSTAL RIVER
MALL
U.S. Hwy. 19
Crystal River
THurs. Fri. Sat &
Sun Noon-4pm



PETSUPERMARKET
2649 E. Gulf to
Lake Hwy.
Inverness
(cats only)
Regular store
hours


AVAILABLE
Pool Supply Store
W/ Service and Repair!
Cash Flowing over a
$100000!! Call Pat
*(813) 230-7177"

Adopt a
gzescued Pet ,








'nto Warn Hoi"s
View our adoptable
dogs @ www.
adootarescuedoet
.com or call
352-795-9550

ADOPTIONS
are held every
Saturday
10am-12pm
PetSupermarket
(exceptions listed
below)

Saturday 3/9
10:30 -12:30
PETCO Ocala

We are in NEED
of FOSTERS
to help save
more dogs. To foster
or volunteer please
contact us or come
to visit us at
Pet Supermarket
Inverness

CAT
ADOPTIONS










COME SEE
our adorable cats
and kittens that are
available for
adoption. In their
cage free home
style environment.
WE ARE OPEN
10:00 AM. till 1:00
PM.
& 200 PM 4PM
Monday-Saturday.
All Cats and Kit-
tens are
micro-chipped, al-
tered, & tested for
Feline Luk and
Aids. Up to date
on vaccines for
age
appropriate.
Phone 352-613-1629
Visit us at
www.hofspha.ora,
or stop by our of-
fices at 1149 N Co-
nant Ave. Corner of
44 and
Conant.
Look for the big
white building with
the bright paw
prints.




FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.OOlb,
Stone Crabs@ $6.00OOlb
Delivered 352-795-0077




PRE SCHOOL
TEACHERS NEEDED

Exp req., CDA Pre-
ferred (352) 341-1559




MEDICAL
OFFICE/FRONT
DESK
West Coast Eye Insti-
tute, just off Highland
Blvd, in Inverness.
Looking for a bright
individual, with a smile
and good people skills.
Full or part-time. Fill out
application or leave
resume at the office.
726-6633











Tell that special
person
"wpth a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966





Avante
At inverness
Is currently looking
for
LPN's
Full time All Shifts
& CNA'S
Apply online at
Avantecenters.com


Dental Assistant
Must be proficient in
crown & bridge
temporizing
&
Dental Hygienist

Call 352-465-3008
or fax resume to
352-465-3009

LPN's
All Shifts,
Full Time & Part Time
Exp. Preferred

Life Enrichment
Coordinator

Apply at:
Superior Residences
of Lecanto
Memory Care
4865 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy (352)746-5483
Drug free workplace
dselsavaae@
su erioralf.com
mriaaleman@
superioralf.com

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

PT Certified
Dental Assistant/
Front Office

Call 352-746-0330,
Ask for Vicki.

SUNSHINE GARDENS
Assisted Living
Facility

Is hiring
CNAs
we pay a higher rate
for the best
Apply at the facility:
311 NE 4th Ave
Crystal River
Or download an
application at: www.
sawsenlors.com
click on the
"About Us" tab
to download the
application
Fax to: 563-0239





Executive Asst.

Email resume to:
resume2013ncf
iqamail.com

INSURANCE
AGENT WANTED

Looking for licensed
220 or 440 customer
service agent,
salary plus benefits.
email resume to:
david@birdinsurance
group.com

SUNSHINE GARDENS
Assisted Living
Facility
Is now h ring for an
Administrative
Assistant/
Receptionist

Candidate must be
good on the com-
puter and Be able
to work in a diverse
environment

Sunshine Gardens
Assisted Living
Facility
311 NE 4th Ave.
Crystal River, Fla
www.
sawseniors.com

FAX RESUME TO:
352-563-0239





EXP. LINE COOKS
& SERVERS

Apply In Person
COACH'S PUB
& EATERY
Mon-Fri. 8am-11am
& 2pm-4pm
114 W. Main St.
Inverness
11582 N. Williams St.
Dunnellon
Save-A-Lot Shopping
Center

HIRING COOKS
or Kitchen Help
& SERVERS

Servers Must be 18
or older.
Apply Fisherman's
Restaurant
12311 E Gulf to Lake
(352) 637-5888
Closed Mon. & Tues

RETAIL, FOOD
ASSOCIATES &
COOKS

APPLY IN PERSON
Saturday 2/23
9:00-11:00 am Only
WILDSIDE CAFE
9225 W. Fishbowl Dr.
Homosassa

TWISTED OAKS
GRILL
P/T Exp. Only

that can work all
aspects of a
restaurant, call
between 9 & 11 am
(352) 746-6882


CHkONICLE


ADVERTISING
INSIDE SALES
Representative

The Citrus County
Chronicle is now
accepting applications
for an
Advertising
Inside Sales
Representative.

* Must have mini-
mum of 2 years sales
experience with
proven sales results.
e Must be able to
maintain current
account base as well
as prospecting for
new clients over the
phone.
- Fast paced envi-
ronment that requires
ability to multi task
with ease.
w Computer profi-
ciency a must.
w Excellent organiza-
tional and customer
service skills.

Fax cover letter and
resume to HR at:
(352)564-2935
or email:
djkamlot@chronicle
online.com

Final applicant must
undergo a drug
screening. EOE

COMMERCIAL
INSURANCE CSR
Commercial Insurance
CSR and inside sales
position needed.
Knowledge of AMS360
preferred. Email resume
to Tracy Fero at

insurance.com
or call 352-422-2160

ENERGETIC
RETAIL SALES

W/Sales Experience
for gift shop in
Inverness, min 30 hrs.
Mail ResumeTo:
PO Box 1282,
Inverness, FL 34451






CARPENTER

Carpenters with 5
years experience,
duties include, but
not limited to: wood
& metal framing,
hardie siding & trims.
Work in Marion,
Lake,Sumter,&
surrounding areas.
Must have own
transportation
to job sites. DFWP
352-690-6334 please
come in and fill out
an application at
2531 NW 35th Street,
Ocala, FL. 34475

EXP MECHANIC

Must have tools
Must have D.lic./Trans
apply in person
American Auto
8696 W. Halls River Rd

FRAMER WANTED

For immediate
employed. Experi-
ence Reauired PT
may lead to FT.
Fax resume to
352-637-4141 or call
(352) 637-4138






Manufacturer of A/C
grilles, registers and
diffusers is currently
accepting
applications for
experienced
Assembly workers.
Must be able to
read tape measure
and assemble parts
using hand tools,
hands and machin-
ery. Welding
experience a plus.
Apply in Person
(Mon-Fri between
the hours of
8:00 am to 3:00 pm).
Metal Industries,
400 W. Walker Ave.,
Bushnell, FI 33513.
Excellent benefits
package, 401k.
DFW, EOE.


STEEL CUTTER /I
WELDER

Inter County Recycling
in Lecanto, Fl. is looking
for an experienced Steel
Cutter, with Welding
Experience also.
Full time, Pays $13.50
per hour. Drug Free
Workplace.
E-mail resumes to
Resume1801@yahoo
.com, No walk-in's or
phone calls

STUCCO
Mechanic Wanted

Crew leader
position
send inquiries and
resume to david@
colonvstone.com


Exp. Body Man

Citrus Collision





APPT. SETTERS
NEEDED

$500. Sign on Bonus.
Great Commission Pay
and weekly bonuses
Call Bob 352-628-3500
GENERAL
LABORER

F/T, Clean Lic. Drug
Test, GED required
Apply At
8189 S. Florida Ave.,
Floral City. 8AM-3PM



CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
Wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and
other newspapers
for home delivery
I customers.
3 to 4 hours per
day.

Must have insured
and reliable
vehicle -
preferable a van
SSUV, or pick up
with a cap Large
1 enough to hold our 1
Sunday product

Apply in Person
1624N
Medowcrest Blvd,
S Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8amn 5pm

Newspaper
carriers are
S independent
contractors, not
Employees of the
Citrus County
I Chronicle


CORpNICLE
--- ---.J
STORE CLERK

All Applicants must
have Computer Skills,
Cash Handling,
Customer Service
Background Check
is required.
Pay Day Cash
Advance & All Star
Rentals
(352) 564-0700




CARE GIVER
Dependable for 115 lb
woman. 5p-8p, 6 days
week. Send Resume
whani@
tampabavy.rr.com
Secretary
Administrator

office exp. preferred
have exceptional
computer skills,
including Quick
books, Excel &
Microsoft Power
point, Send resume
to: janmetcalf
@embarq.mail.com




MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED
Train to become a
Medical Office Assistant.
NO EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online train-
ing gets you Job ready
ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!








$10.000!! Call Pat
*(813) 230-7177*



TOASTMASTER
TOASTER 1940's
Circa MODEL 1B14
Good Cond.
$25.00 352-601-7816
WESTINGHOUSE
TOASTER 1940's
Circa Good Cond.
Model TO-501 B
$25.00 601-7816



Nascar Team Caliber
dicast collectable
cars $200. Qty 25
various yrs. 97-01
Monster Inc,Capillar
Big Kmart352-201-2120


BEAUTIFUL GREEN
MABLE SPA Needs
motor / frame work.
100.00 firm Linda
341-2271
KIDS SUIT Black pinned
striped,worn once.Size
12 huskey.30.00 obo
Linda 341-2271



DRYER$100 with 30
day full warranty call/text
352-364-6504
HOT WATER HEATER
30 gal. Needs thermo
50.00 linda 341-2271
NEW BATH TUB
5 FEET /LIGHT
TAN/100.00 FIRM
LINDA 341-2271
RANGE GE Electric
Glass cook top, self
cleaning, bisque,
warming burner
estate item $200
352-637-1792
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179
STOVE Black Kenmore
glass top,30",self
cleaner, $100
352-563-8033 after 5:30
VACUUM Dirt Devil
"Jaguar"
Model 085830
$30.00 obo 419-5453
WASHER$100 with 30
day full warranty.
call/text 352-364-6504
WHIRLPOOL
Dishwasher $100
352-746-1447
Whirlpool. Electric
Range, self cleaning,
broiler never used 2
large & 2 small heat-
ing elements, unit in
excel. cond. works
perfectly. No dings
$100. (352) 489-4649
Wine Cooler
Holds 4 6 Bottles
Glass Front Door
Asking 60.00 obo
352-601-7816




AUCTION
Every Friday
Night @ 6pm
Estate Liquidations
and Auctions LLC
628 SE HWY 19
Crystal River
352-228-4920
estateliiuidations
andauctions.com
AU 4381 /AB 3202

DUDLEY'S
AUCTIOW





2 AUCTIONS

Thurs: 2/21
Estate Adventure
4000 S FI Ave(US41 S)
Inverness 3pm
Outside 4:30 Irish
Christmas w/400+
Angel & Santa's &
6pm inside w Full
Auction Hall Estate
Furniture, tools &
Wood lathes
Fri: 2/23 Mobile
Home 2/2 @Cloverleaf
Farms MH Park ,238
Middleton St.
Brooksville 34601
11am
SOLD ABSOLUTE
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.comr
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667




14" Abrasive Cut-Off
Saw 408511T
$50
Craftsman 4 drawer
work table, steel top
$75. 352-447-6139
Auto-Repair
Manuals 1981,
1977- 1983
$50.
352-447-6139
BANDSAW 6"
CRAFTSMAN
VG to EX cond w/legs
$100. Call 527-6425
BENCH GRINDER Ash-
land industrial 5" bench
grinder. 3450 rpm.
$35.00 352-527-7840
TOOLS FOR SALE
Friday only 9am-4pm
964 N FresonAve
Citrus Hill, Fl
WERNER
FIBERGLASS LADDER
New 6' with tag load ca-
pacity 225 Ibs asking
$50 352-419-5549
Wood Lathe
Chizzles Included
$100.
(352) 628-9175


691385742
483672915
527914683
278456139
156839274
349721568
764298351

812563497
935147826


CLASSIFIED







C10 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013


TECHNICS DUAL
STEREO CASSETTE
DECK GOOD
CONDITION $30
352-613-0529
TV (2) 32" color tv's,
both work good, $25.00
each 352-400-0452
after 5:00
YAMAHA RECEIVER
GOOD CONDITION
$85 352-613-0529
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 GOOD
CONDITION $100
352-613-0529



2 Doors Framed
$40., obo
12 Windows Large
$250 obo
Will separate
(352) 270-8044
7 Windows 1 Door,
w/ upperslide/ open
window, all bronze in
color $250 obo
(352) 795-9187



40 Sweet States
Computers/ Monitors/
Desks/Chairs/Loader
and Server. Best Offer
(352) 341-2200
CHAIR- Office Max,
grey managers chair,
great shape, $20
(352)212-1596
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




4' Bush Hog
good condition
352-422-4548



Fire Pit Table
4 Highback rocker
chairs. Tan$50.00
Rectangular Glass
table w/4 chairs Tan &
11 ft umbrella w/stand
$50.00 green
all excellent condition
352-746-6034
Patio Furniture Set
14 pieces. 40 x 66
glass top table with
umbrella. 6 chairs.
2 recliners, 2 glass top
side table, 2 ottomans
black, anodized
metal frame w/ taupe
mesh fabric, very
good cond. $400.
Lanai furniture, 38 x 66
table w/ marble oval
insert, can hold um-
brella 4 chairs with
taupe dble thick
cushions anodized
antique bronze metal
frame good cond
$250. (352) 382-2497
Pool
Lounge Chairs
4 adjustable large
heavy duty pool
chairs white, excel-
lent condition $15.00
each 352-746-6034


Furnitur


2 Swivel Rockers
Very Good Cond.
Wine Colored
$75.00, Winged
back Chair Bei e
$40.00 (SMW SEL
352-503-7536 LAW
4 Bar Stools HON[
Bar height swivel, MO'
$150, Palm Tree ped-
estal table glass top MI
$50. 4 Large. Heavy 40"
Oak Chairs $425
w/arms $150.
(352) 422-2164 RII
6 Pc. King, Size Set Murrc
with boxspring
& mattress
$450. 3
(352) 860-2792 Sabr
BroyHill Decan R
Dinning roomset,2 1
leafs, rectangle table
6 high back chair, (3
china hutch, exec.
cont. $550.00 Extr
718-666-6624 12"
Contour Adjustable fer
Bed, Twin. Premier

massage, w/ waves
& timer & remote
control $1,000
(352) 344-3827 Sta
DINETTE SET 5 pcs 4
Marble Top table excE
w/glass insert, 4 floral
padded chairs (3
3 pc. 7ft Wall Unit
,mirror back w/lights,
shelves, 2 side beveled
doors, 3 Glass top ta-
bles, 1 oval coffee table, BEV
2 round end tables. "M
$500 for all, pls call Fri. i
(352) 527-9862 7 S


ESTATE SALE Dinette
$300, 3 pc. Wall Unit
$600, Twin bed set $50,
Dining Rm Set $600,
Sofa & 2 Chairs $200,
Teak carved tables
$1500, Entertainment
Ctr. $50, Bedroom Set
$400, Computer Desk
$50, Casio Keyboard
$50 352-476-5468
FOLDING BED
TWIN $30
352-777-1256
Full Size 4 Piece
Bedroom Set
$100.
(352) 726-8474
FUTON
metal, light oak frame
beige mattress & cover
very good condition
$225, 352-628-2753
GRILL Older Char-Broil
2 Burner w/side burner
Good cond.
30.00 obo
352-601-7816
Leather Couch
Navy Blue, exec. cond.
$175.00, Wht leather
love seat, good condi-
tion $125.00 (SMW)
352-503-7536
LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET, In Origi-
nal Plastic, Never
Used, ORG $3000,
Sacrifice $975.
CHERRY, BED-
ROOM SET Solid
Wood, new in factory
boxes- $895
Can Deliver. Bill
(813)298-0221.
Maple Rider Rocker
w/footstool, green
cushions $50
352-795-7254
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500
Oak Dining Room
Table 42" Round
$100, Brown Lazy Boy
Rocker/Recliner $300
352-621-3034
OAK END TABLE
measuring 22"W X
25"L, great shape.
$40.00 352-382-4727
Ornate Victorian
Bed w/dresser
$450. Oak Bar w/brass
Rails $275. good
cond.352-895-0140
Sleeper Sofa
Navy velour
ottoman and corner
chair good condition
1 round glass coffee
table and 1 sofa table
$550
352-464-2335
SOFA
brown, microsuede
1 yr. old, $275
352-746-6678
Triple Dresser
w/ Mirror,
10 Drawer
Excel. Cond. $250.
(352) 220-3883
TWIN BEDS
Mattresses, Box
Springs and Frames
$75.00 each
352-382-7454
Wicker Etagere
5 ft White
$60
352-746-2329


HONDA
.F-PROPELLED
N MOWER 2007
DA HRR21 LAWN
IVER $100FIRM
586-7222
urray Rider,
Cut, Exc.Cond.
5. (352) 637-4718
DING MOWER,
ly 12/2HP 40"cut,
with bagger
$230.
52) 344-9502
e by John Deere,
hiding Mower
5HP, 38" cut.
$300
352) 344-2297
SPREADER-
ra-large manual,
tires, for seeds,
tilizer,etc. great
shape-$25-
352)212-1596




aghorn Fern
Sft diameter
ellent condition
$125.00 firm
352) 489-6212




VERLY HILLS
OVING SALE-
& Sat. 9am-2pm
J Kellner Blvd.


BEVERLY HILLS INVERNESS
Friday 9am-1pm Saturday 23, 9a-3p
5484 W. Corral PI Moving Sale*
Beverly Hills, FI 3681 E. Foxwood Lane
LECANTO
BEVERLY HILLS Fri., Sat. & Sun. 8am-?
OUR LADY OF HUGE YARD SALE *
GRACE CHURCH 3079 Cardinal Street
FLEA MARKET T Stonebrook
SAT. FEB 23rd
8AM to 1PM. COMMUNITY Sale
6 Roosevelt Sat 2/23 8am -1pm C
Blvd. Take Hwy 19 to (
Stonebrook Rd.
Follow SIGNS to
CITRONELLE Clubhouse
Fri. & Sat. 7am-? NO EARLY BIRDS
Multi Family Sale* Yard Sale
Citrus Ave to Pi kids cloths, toys, pack
Bluff, to Neig and play and much
more. Fri & Sat. 2/22
o Vn IN G and 2/23 8a-2p
& V 1-. 5623 KlineTerr, Inv.
S A L E Yard Sale
Sat. Only 8am-? c
CITRUS HILLS Tools large generator
Fri, Sat, Dining Set, plumbing, e
Kg Size Bdrm Set house hold items t
glass cocktail tble 4115 N. Little Hawk Pt.
w/ end tble, Rattan Crystal River
Glass Tble w/4
caster chairs, cedar
chest, 15' Fridge f
216-849-3447
CITRUS SPRINGS @ ED
Friday & Sat. 9A-2P PINE RIDGE t
7909 N. Triana Drive Fri 8 to 3, Sat 8 to 12
CITRUS SPRINGS quality furn tvs, sml
Thu, Fr & Sa 8 to 4 appl. entire hshld
"MOVING SALE- 4002 W Pinto Loop
5680 Stockholm Ln
352-364-2350
CR/RED LEVEL
Fri. 22 & Sat. 23, 8a-? 1i00LEATHER COAT
Community Yard Sale Full length beige color
Holiday Heights/488 size lx but runs on
CRYSTAL RIVER small size.worn 3 times.
BIG SALE cost $150.00 asking
Friday & Sat., 8a-lp $90.00 or best offer
5 Pc. Thomasville wall 352-503-7865
unit, gold & silver BOYS WINTER
jewelry, antiques, CLOTHING SIZES 5 &
fenton glass, women 6 SHIRTS, PANTS &
clothing and MUCH JACKETS $25 -
MORE Behind Olive 352-613-0529 c
Tree Restaurant, US KIDS SUIT Black pinned
19, UNITS 80, 81, 82 stripped / size 12
huskeyworn once. $40
CRYSTAL RIVER obo Linda 341-2271
FRI ,SAT 9 ? Men's Durango Boots
BaseBall Cards 11 % D & Harley
9140 N Citrus Ave Davidson Boots 9'/2D
CRYSTAL RIVER both pairs $150
Fri., Sat. & Sun, All Day 352-795-7254
4615 N. Elm Drive
CRYSTAL RIVER
MULTI-FAMILY
Fri, Sat 8a to 3p GPS Magellan
9759 W Camphor Ln Roadmate 5220-LM
DUNNELLON New $85.00
6421 W. Riverbend Rd, 352-637-5969
Feb 22/23, Phone Samsung
8-2; 3 home sale; Galaxy Prevail
furniture, clothing, boost/android
household items, new $65.00
more. 352-628-4210
HERNANDO
Thur, Fri, Sat 8a to 2p
HUGE INSIDE
MOVING SALE, Must 2 KAYAK PADDLES-
Sell Furn hshld, whole Seasense Brand, 96
house, Lots ofstuff!! inches, 2 piece for stor-
2313 N. Lakefront age, black, Ex., $30 ea.
Dr. (off Parsons Pt) 352-28-0033 -
HOMOSASSA 4 WHEEL WALKER-
Fri, Sat, Sun 7:30 2pm seat, basket, hand
scooter, fishing boat, brakes & wheel locks,
elec organ w/bench folds for storage, Ex.
and music books, and $50. 352-628-0033
more! Moving sale 18 Steel Framed
everything must go! Folding Tables
7461 W Fair Acres PL 30' x 96", $25. ea. obo
(325) 212-6170 Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church
HOMOSASSA (352) 746-7161
Fri, Sat, Sun 9-4
collectibles, house- 2007 HONDA
hold goods, toys and SELF-PROPELLED
more Corner of LAWN MOWER I
Isabel Ter and Rene, HONDA "ONE-START"
off Oaklawn $100 FIRM 586-7222
2012 PAZZEL r
HOMOSASSA INSPIRATIONAL
Sat. & Sun. 8a-3p CREATIVE CUTTER w/
Appliances, tow bar. accessories. New cond.
brake buddy, elec- Cost $725, asking $515
tronics, clothes, STUFF! obo (352) 586-4630
2698 S. Bascombe Av BICYCLE BOYS 20"
INVERNESS $20 352-613-0529
1135 S Waterview Dr CUSTOM MADE
HUGE 6 Family WHITE LACE DRA-
Fri-Sat 8-3 PERIES fits windows
16'W X 84"L. perfect
INVERNESS condition. $50.00
Fri & Sat. 8am -2pm 352-382-4727
collectibles, furn,
knives, off 581 DOLLS & BEARS
4702 Bow-N-Arrow LP LIKE NEW
345 Scarboro Ave.
INVERNESS (267) 983-5731 Cell
Friday & Sat. 8am-? Dr
912 Russell Ave. Dragon
912 Russell Ave. Mega Bloks Havocfire
INVERNESS #9693 in box
Huge Two-family $35.00
Sale 352-628-4210
Fri-Sat 8a-4p FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
8531 Cresco Ln rear 15ct @ $5.001b,
of Inv. CC, tons of Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
misc. Delivered 352-795-0077
INVERNESS FLAG- U.S. Military, in
MOVING SALE glass/wood display
Saturday 23, 9a-5p case, perfect condi-
9022 E. Island Drive tion-$25- (352)212-1596
FRYER- Hamilton
LECANTO Beach, great shape-$20
Fri, Sat 8am to 3pm (352)-212-1596
"no early birds" Full Sofa Bed, Very
art, antiques, crafts, good condition $25;
paint, sink, furn, Metal filing cabinet,
kitch, appl, tools, drawer, $20.
1284 N. Lombardo (352) 527-0137


W araenracer,
Wheel Horse, 16hp
Hydrostatic dr, fresh
paint, smokes, $675
OBO. Unique signed
Young Hinkle, wood
desk 1 drawer w/
chair 46x30 $125
(352) 341-5053
GERBIL CAGE
$20 352-613-0529
GOODYEAR REGATTA
CAR TIRE P225/60R16
60% TREAD ONLY
35.00 464-0316
GPS Magellan
Roadmate 5220-LM
New $85.00
352-637-5969
Guardian Air Cooled,
Automatic stand by
Generator, by
General Pwr. Systems
Inc.. This model is a
compact, high perfor-
mance, air cooled.
engine driven genera-
or designed to auto-
natically supply elec-
trical power to oper-
ate critical loads
during a utility power
failure. This unit is
factory installed, in an
all weather, metal
enclosure, that is in-
ended exclusively for
outdoor installation.
The generator will
operate using either,
propane, or natural
gas, This unit comes
with product registra-
tion card. Generator
installation guidelines
book and installation
and owners manual.
2013 model, list for
3.900 this is a 2008
model w/ no to low
hours, volts 120/240
amp 130/ 65 W1600
3,600 rmp, suggested
retail value $2,500
Asking $,1,750 obo
(352) 382-1352
GUITAR STAND FOR 3
GUITARS- folds for stor-
age, black, Ex., $25.
352-628-0033

GUN SHOW
Ocala National
Guard Armory
900 SW 20TH Street
Feb. 23, Sat 9-5
Feb. 24, Sun 9-4
Concealed Weap-
ons Classes Daily
*Bring your GUNS
to sell or trade
GunTrader
GunShows.com
352-359-0134
Homemade Quilt
Tops 5/$100;
Anne Geddes
Pictures 6/$100
(352) 795-7254
JUICER- Hamilton
Beach, great
shape-$15-
(352)-212-1596
Kayak $300
and Scaffold $350
352-447-1244
LUGGAGE CARRIER
w/electrical hk/up
$100, Ladies 6 speed
bike, good condition
$100 352-746-9039
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Fulls $50., Qn. $75.
(ings. $125, 621-4500
Mossberg 715T,
22 Long Riffle AR look
alike. 25 round clip
almost new $500.
17HMR Taurus
Revolver 8 shot, super
clean, 400 round
$500. For revolver
nust have concealed
weapons permit
(352) 563-0328
MOTORBIKE HELMET
good condition,
green/white color,
i can e-mail pic, $30
(352)465-1616
NEW SKYLIGHT
BUBBLE TYPE 27+27
SMOKED POLY-
CARBONITE ONLY
50.00 464- 0316
PORCH SWING
HEAVY DUTY IT
NEEDS A (BOARD
REPLACED) ONLY
35.00 464-0316
RYOBI 10" COM-
POUND MITER SAW-
#TS1342, 15 AMP,5500
RPM, dust bag, Ex+.,
$60.352-628-0033
SALMON FISH
MOUNT- Natural skin,
31", Ex., $35.
352-628-0033
SLIDING SHOWER
DOORS Like new
30.00 Linda 341-2271
TRUCK WINDOW
rear solid window,
tinted GMC
$75.00
352-628-4210
Wacker GP 5600
Commercial
Generator 120/240V
Low Hrs. $600.
(352) 563-0328


4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH SEAT AND
BRAKES FOLDS UP
GREAT SHAPE 75.00
464-0316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER BRAND NEW
ONLY 25.00 464- 0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
ADJUSTABLE LEGS
ON BOTH 20.00 EACH
464-0316
CANE ADJ. $5.00 Quad
Cane adj. $10.00.
Crutches $15.00. Alum.
walker w/ basket $20.00
(352)563-6410
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT-
RESTS AND LEG EX-
TENTIONS ONLY
100.00 464 0316
TRAPEZE FOR ANY
BED Free standing,
excellent condition,
$100.00 (352)563-6410



"NEW" ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR,
BLACK W/ABALONE
TRIM $85
352-601-6625
"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR PACKAGE
W/GIGBAG & MANY
EXTRAS $60
352-601-6625
CASIO, ELECTRIC
PIANO/ORGAN
exc. cond. sounds great
comes w/big amplifier,
eve's $200
352-489-4844
EPIPHONE ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR
W/AMP,TUNER,STRAP
& MORE! $90
352-344-6625
EPIPHONE LES PAUL
STUDIO LIMITED EDI-
TION PLAYS &
SOUNDS PERFECT!
$200 OBO
352-601-6625
Kawai, SR 5
ORGAN
$600 obo
616-914-0980 cell
Crystal River
KEYBOARD
Yamaha PSS-12
with adapter
$35.00
352-628-4210
LAP STEEL STRAT
STYLE W/SINGLE
HUMMBUCKING SLIDE
INCLUDED $65
352-601-6625
TUNER Peterson stro-
bostomp floor pedal,
most accurate tuner,
great shape,$25
(212-1596)



LOVE SEAT Like
new/Light tan with
flowers
100.00 linda 341-2271



AB LOUNGER NEARLY
NEW ONLY 30.00
464 -0316, 464-0316
Bowflex Extreme
$600. obo
or Trade for hand guns
(352) 249-7221
EXERCISE BIKE (DP)
UPRIGHT TYPE IT
ALSO WORKS THE
ARMS ONLY 75.00
464-0316
Weslo Cross Cycle w/
upper body workout,
LCD window, WRPM
meter, $75. 382-5883



5 HP, Outboard,
by Force, with Tank
$395.
Will take Gun on trade
Also Remmington
7600 30-06 Pump, with
scope as new condition
$495. (906) 285-1696
1911 GOVT/OFFICER
45 Colt Officers slide,
Armscor Precision full
Govt frame, Black w/SS
buttons, VZ grips, ambi
safety, 2xtra grips. Buy-
ers only, must be 21.
first cash takes it !$625
LV MESSAGE.
352-586-4022
Beautiful Compact
Taurus 22 Caliber
New In Box
$350. obo
(352) 795-0088
After 11 am til 7p
BICYCLE TREK 7500
Womans, Shock Fork,
Fast and Easy, Clean,
24Speeds, $195
341-0450
BIKE RACK purchased
from Santos Bike
shop, holds 3 bikes,
used once. $100.00
firm 352-382-4727


2-22 @ LaughingStock International Inc, Dist by Universal UClIck for UFS, 2013

"The note says, 'When do we land?'"






Thank You For 15 Years, of Votes!V




," wILLA
I'/ / nAU F:U lEaULSI



c -oNsTRUCTION CORP i
NNEI 1988


CAMPING STOVE cole-
man 2 burner camping
stove. NEW. never
used. $50.00 firm
352-527-7840
CLUB CAR
GOLF CART
Electric w/ charger,
refurbished, new
paint. 4 seater, $2500
(803) 842-3072
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
EZ GO GOLF CART
Electric with charger,
2002,
Very good cond.
$1,500
352-564-2756
FISHING TACKLE
Rods, Reels, Lures,
Line, Tackle Box, Lead
Weights-other Items,
$25 to $75
352-257-3288
Freedom Arms
Belt buckle Derringer
5 shot. 22 LR. $400
Buckle & Gun
Winchester Model 94,
lever action. .30.30
Pre 64. $500
(208) 206-2020 Cell

GUN SHOW
Ocala National
Guard Armory
900 SW 20TH Street
Feb. 23, Sat 9-5
Feb. 24, Sun 9-4
Concealed Weap-
ons Classes Daily
wBring your GUNS
to sell or trade
GunTrader
GunShows.com
352-359-0134
NISHIKI 26" RACING
BIKE SEVERAL
SPEEDS LITE.NEEDS
TIRES ONLY 75.00
464-0316
Ruger LCP
new never fired
.380 ACP light weight
for CWP 1 box of
ammo, $450.00
352-637-0844
Schwinn Bicycle
Ladies Red 28 "
cruiser, Used once.
Asking $95
(352) 341-5053
TRADITIONS
Buckhunter inline
50 Caliber, blk powder
$100.
(352) 447-6139
Wanted to buy Gun
Safe Steel, for long
guns, for 20 to 40 Guns
352-303-2525



2009 24 x 9 Trailer,
tandem axel, rear ramp,
side door, AC, 200 mi
$2750 (727) 207-1619


2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1895
call 352-527-0555
Utility Trailer 8'x12'
w/loading gate
exc. cond. $750
352-341-0959
Utility Trailer
with loading ramp
5x 10
$550.
(352) 860-0124




BABY STROLLER
brown/green color,
Safety 1st, in ok condi-
tion, $20 (352)465-1616
BEAUTIFUL CRIB 3 IN
1 BROWN CHERRY
EXCELLENT condition
with mattress $ 75
352-777-1256
EVENFLO-EXER
SAUCER-ACTIVITY
$ 30, 352-777-1256
GIRLS SIZE 12 MOS.
34 pieces in all. Shorts,
shirts,pj's,one piece out-
fits, more $25.00
352-400-5650
JUMPERS HORSE $20
BROWN AND 1 BLUE
352-777-1256
ROCKING HORSE
Black-colored, rocks by
rubber,ok condition, $50
(352)465-1616
STROLLER THE
WINNIE POOH $25
CAR SEAT INFANT $20
AND TODDLER $15
352-777-1256
TODDLER HEAD-
BOARD Brand New
Metal Headboard, $15
(352)465-1616

Sel orSwa


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
I I I I I I I I


CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369
Wanted to buy Gun
Safe Steel, for long
guns. for 20 to 40 Guns
352-303-2525


Robbie Ray

Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"

Make-overs,
Color, Foiling,
Precision Cuts,
Avant Garde
hairstyles and
updo's.

Paul Mitchell
Certified.


ia-

BLUE
Blue, nicknamed
Boo-Boo, is a 7-8 y.o.
Australian cattle
dog mix, with beau-
tiful blue eyes. He
came to the shelter
because his family
lost their home.
He is neutered
and housebroken,
weighs about 50
pounds and is very
easy to handle.
His goal is to be a
"couch potato".
He is very friendly
and affectionate
and gives lots of
kisses. Blue is actu-
ally the perfect dog
for an older person
or couple who
want a gentle
companion dog.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179



Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052
HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping Dr.
appts errands etc Hablo
Espanol 813-601-8199




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


YI 'idl lIrst.
L\^l y UUy

C-i
CHukoNsicLeds
Classified


Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping Dr.
appts errands etc Hablo
Espanol 813-601-8199



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777

DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194

A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lie. & Insured
* 352422-7279**




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777

ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201


Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
A RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
v RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
SFAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE- Free Est
r 352-257-9508 *
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067




Marcia's Best Clean
Experienced Expert
lic+ref, Free Estimates
"call 352-560-7609*
NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate $20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


All Tractor & Tree Work
Household, Equipment
& Machinery Moving
(352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




BEAT ANY PRICE
Paint & Power wash
Lawn & Trees Trim
Jim (352) 246-2585
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up time.
352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from Ato Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374


LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570



30 yrs. Experience!
Int/Ext. Comm/Res.
Lic/Ins. Jimmy
*352-212-9067*
CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
BEAT ANY PRICE
Paint & Power Wash
Lawn & Trees Trim
Jim (352) 246-2585
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300


-I

All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713


DGS SERVICES LLC
Reroofs Metal Roofs
REPAIRS Home
Inspector 414-8693




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn Re-
moval 352-302-6838



SPRINKLERS & SOD
Complete Check &
Adjust, Full System $49
(352)419-2065



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452


All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, licins 302-8852
KING's LAND CLEAR-
ING & TREE SERVICE
Complete tree & stump
removal hauling, demo
& tractor work. 32 yrs.
exp. (352) 220-9819
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
REAL TREE
SERVICE
(352) 220-7418
"Tax Specials*
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


ly L~3~
3-8~/~.


~~P"~~S~r?;S~







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2 Maltese Puppies
Left, 1 female $650.
1 Male $600, CKC reg.
will have Fl. Health
Cert.. Call to come
play with them,
(352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258


8 Month Old
MALE YORKIE
CKC registered all
shots, house trained,
loveable, affection-
ate Silver & brown
$600. (352) 341-4009


CHICKS & DUCKLINGS
Delaware, Buff, Silkie,
Frizzle Chicks $4.50ea
Cayuga, Pekin, Buff
Ducklings $7ea.
all are straight run.
727-517-5337
(Brooksville)


FREE BORDER
COLLIE MIX
2 year old
female, border collie
mix. Free to good
home. Great with
kids and other pets.
Call (352)201-4705


MOXIE
My name is Moxie.
My owner left me,
but I'll never leave
you if you take me
home. You'll never
find a more loyal
companion than
me." Moxie is a 3
y.o. Black Mouth
Cur, weighs 60 Ibs.
He is strong, yet
gentle to his
humans. Likes peo-
ple and seems
good with children.
Neutered & house-
broken. He is ath-
letic, so a fenced
yard is recom-
mended. He needs
room to exercise first
and then he settles
down. Look in his
beautiful eyes and
see the love he is
waiting to give his
forever family.
Call Donna @
352-249-7801.


NICKY
Nicky is a beautiful
black lab/bulldog
mix male, a big,
sweet and loveable
guy. He is 2 y.o. and
is very intelligent, will
sit for treats. He
weighs about 75
pounds and is a
very strong dog,
needing a strong
handler. Would be
a good watchdog.
He is a good
hearted dog who
gets along well with
other dogs. As he is
very active, a
fenced yard is
recommended.
Call 352-746-8400


REMY
Remy is a joyous,
active young terrier
mix who was surren-
dered to the shelter
because of neglect.
Weight about
42 pounds. Dark
golden brown brin-
dle in color, neu-
tered, heartworm
-negative, appears
housebroken. He is
a delightful, happy
dog, very eager to
learn, and very intel-
ligent. Gets along
with other dogs and
loves his human
friends. Tries very
hard to please. A
fenced yard would
be preferred for
him, as he is very
active. Call Joanne
@ 352-795-1288.


Fish Tanks,
and stands,
352-447-1244
Shih-Tzu Pups, Males
Starting@ $400.
Registered
Lots of colors, Beverly
Hills, FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpous.ne



Bermuda Hay 501bs $6
Never been rained on
795-1906 586-1906
SHAMROCK FARM, CR




For Rent
Barn & Pasture
approx. 10 acres
room for 2-4 horses
Lighted, security.
off Citrus Ave/495
(352) 628-0508
LIQUIDATION SALE
Horses & tack, new &
used. 352-873-6033

Livestock


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
*1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 Tax Return Special
$400+dep. 446-6273
HERNANDO
2/2 $450. mo. 1st last
+dep 352-201-2428
HOMOSASSA
2BR/2 BA, No Pets
$500 (352) 628-5696
OLD HOMOSASSA
2 bedroom. 1-1/2 bath.
$475/mo $400 dep pool
and clubhouse
3526284441




must sell!
2006 FLEETWOOD
ENTERTAINER. 32X66.
OWNER MUST SELL!
CALL (352) 795-1272
43,900. 3/2,Dblewide.
Delivered & set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&I W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807
2/ 1,DW, H/A, 12 x20
glass porch Co. water
& sewer, paved rd.
No HOA $49,995 firm
$15,000 down, own fi-
nan. (352) 567-2031

/ THIS OUT!
2br 2ba Single Wide
12years YOUNG
14X66. Trade in.
WILL GO FAST!
$14,900 YOUR BABY
$19,900 Incls Delv,
Set, New A/C, skirt &
steps, Must See!
NO HIDDEN FEES.
CALL (352) 795-1272
BIG
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Hnder $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183


DUDLEY'S






2 AUCTIONS

Thurs: 2/21
Estate Adventure
4000 S Fl Ave
(US 41S)
Inverness 3pm
Outside 4:30pm Irish
Christmas w/400+
Angel & Santa's &
6pm inside w Full
Auction Hall Estate
Furniture, tools &
Wood lathes
Fri: 2/23 11am
Mobile Home 2/2
@ Cloverleaf
Farms MH Park,
238 Middleton St
Brooksville 34601
SOLD ABSOLUTE
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667

HERNANDO
$$ Private Owner $$
Financing Available
New & Used
Manufactured Homes
Call 1-727-967-4230
Homosassa
Dbl. Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop, must-see!
$69,900 (352) 621-0192
INVERNESS
2b/2% ba, '1/ acre
off Turner Camp Rd
a/c, heat pump 3yrs.
old, 30ft scn porch &
48'open porch on other
side, new septic, 18'x31'
building w/ 220 electric,
shed, fenced, on canal
$68,000 352-726-1791
INVERNESS
55+ Park 14 x 58,
2/1'/2, furniture,
appliances, shed,
scrn. porch, $8,500.
(352) 419-5133




NEW 2013

2br 2ba
Doublewide w/10 year
Warranty $39,900
Delivered & setup, a/c,
skirt, steps.
Call(352) 795-1272

NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181

Palm Harbor Factory
liquidation sale
3 stock models must
go. $39k off select
2012 models
John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext 210



WE WILL

BUY YOUR
MANUFACTURED
Home. from 1976-2013
CALL (352) 795-2377




2BR/11/BA, MH &
Land Needs little Work
$17,500 9340 W.Tonto
Dr., Crystal River
Call 352-382-1544 or
813-789-7431
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 4br 2ba MH
READY TO MOVE IN!
+Owner Fin. Avail.+
CALL (352) 795-1272
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Considering
ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498

For Sale o,,
FLORAL CITY
Exceptionally Nice
3/2 on Beautiful 1 V4
AC, treed lot, garage,
shed, dock, Ideal for
Fishing/ Airboats
$95,900 716-523-8730
HERNANDO
2 MH's on 1 acre
Invest 59k, mo. rent
possible @1k, mls#
700425, Cridland RE
S.Smith 352-634-1048

HOME-ON-LAND
Only $59,900, 3/2
like new" on n acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,350
dwon, $319.22/mo
P&l, W.A.C. Owner
can finance. Call
352-621-9182


Wkshop 2/1/den SW,
w/AC,1+acre, $43,500,
Cridland Real Estate
JDesha(352)634-6340

-i I


WORDY GURDYBY TRICKY R ICY KANE
1. Hair mousse plummeted (1) Every answer is a rhyming
1Hairmousseplu e (pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Hockey venue website connection (1) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. "Pleasantly" chubby dowdy dresser (1) syllables in each word.
S12013UFS Dist by Univ UclickforUFS
4. Fashion designer Calvin's clarets (1)


5. More courageous stubble remover (2)


6. Mythical maidens' fluids in nodes (1)


7. Alps or Andes water dispensers (2)


SNIVIN21O SNIVINfION 'L SHdMA'I SHdWAN '9 HAVHS aAVHaf '
SHNIA SNITI'I dInflddITflId INI H XNTIr TA ThIdIO '
2-22-13 SHaASNV


CRYSTAL RIVER
Downtown Citrus Av.
1156 st, off St. Parking
Charlotte G. RIty. Inv.
(352) 795-9123


CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
*Winter Specials *
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
2/2 New Model $59K
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882
FLORAL CITY
DW, 2/2/2 carport
Screen room, shed,
all you need is a tooth-
brush to move in
$17,500. Lot Rent $183.
352-344-2420
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $179/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
In Park, On Lake
Rousseau, furnished,
2BR, 1BA, CHA
tile & laminate floor-
ing 10 x 20 porch,
w/vynil wind., open
deck + 2 outdr. stor-
age sheds, Low lot
rent $11,500.
(828) 260-3146 Cell
LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access, ramp and
shower $25,000.
352-212-6804
LECANTO 55+ PK
MUST SELL
3br/2ba. Furn, Cpt,
Shed, New Roof,
CHA, washer/dryer,
MAKE OFFER
931-210-0581
Melody Pk, INV
2/2cp, splitplan,
roofover, C/H/A,
woodsview, under $10k
Cridland RE, J.Desha
(352) 634-6340
Sandy Oak 55+ RV PK
14x60 split 2/2, new
heat/ac, remodeled,
furn. Ig scnd in FL Rm.
55 ft crpt w/laundry
room, 989-858-0879
STONEBROOK, CR
Pondview/Gourmet
Kitch, 2Br, MSuite,
$51,900, Cridland RE,
Jackie 352-634-6340



HOMOSASSA
RENT-to-OWN
3br 2ba MH
Immediate Occpancy
Owner Financing Avail.
CALL (352) 795-2377






RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounlyHomeRentals.com
HOMOSASSA
2 Balsami Ct S.......................S$1400
0 / P0OOLmIn iNSWinl.pool iawn-se.
2278 Sandburg Pt...................$500
2/1 duplex, inl. lawncare
8140 Miss Maggie Dr. #1 .....$550
2/1 duplex, nd. utilities with caps
41 Birditree St. .................... $800
2/2/2MW spacious 1692sq.ft.hme
HERNANDO
5164 N. Dewey Way.............. $775
3/2 DWnewe mobile on 1/2 ACRE'!
994 E.WinnetkaSt..................$625
2/1.5 mobile on ACE!
CRYSTAL RIVER
9779 W. Cleveland L..............$675
2/2/1 close to Seven Rivers Hosp.
BEVERLY HILLS
9 Daniel St............... ...... $650
2/1 ne clean home on cul-de-soc street.

Chassahowitzka
2/2, fenc. Yd/DW $500
AGENT (352) 382-1000



CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully turn. efficiency
w/ equipped kitchen.
All utilities, cable,
Internet, & cleaning
provided. $699/mo
352-586-1813
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
S. Inverness
Country Cottage for 1
person, all included
$450pr mnth, $300 dep
727-916-1119




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE
CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bedroom
Apartments for Rent
352-465-2985
CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815
INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great
Loc., clean & roomy.
no pets $500.mo 1st. &
Last $300. Sec.
352-341-1847
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/613-6000
SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant
Rd. to So. on Talla-
hasse Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719


20 DOCKABLE
ACRES: St. Lucie
Waterway. $189,500.
45mins boat Atlantic,
5mins boat Lake
Okeechobee.
Beautiful land,
abundant wildlife.
Gated/Privacy.
888-716-2259 Gulf
Atlantic Land RBroker.


EITAI IT ALE Nature
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Developed site with
gazebo & storage bldg,
reduced to $49,500.
Separate storage
lot available. (RV sold).
For info and pictures
Click on
detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013 C L


CLASSIFIED




Oak Tree Plaza,
Office/Retail, CR 486,
900 sf. @ $700+ util. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801




INVERNESS
Whispering Pines Villa
3/2/2 w/ enclosed patio,
$850 F/L/S, BK/CK req
321-303-0346





2/1, $615, month
Charlotte G. Rlty. Inv.
(352) 795-9123

LECANTO 2/2
CHA, W/D, fncd. back
yrd, Pets Ok $625/mo.
(860) 334-1320




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, Fl. rm., CHA, $495
35 Golden St 464-2701
BEVERLY HILLS
1/11/ w/ FL room $450.
mo. (352)897-4447 or
697-1384
Beverly Hills
2/1 $475.00
352-422-2433
BEVERLY HILLS
870 Beakrush Lane
2br1'% ba, 1 car gar.
enclosed screen porch,
$600 mo. leased dep.
no pets. 352-586-3072
BLACK DIAMOND
Home for rent from
$1,100/mo. Bob
Coldwell Banker
634-4286
BLACK DIAMOND
Home for rent from
$1,100/mo. Bob
Coldwell Banker
634-4286
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2 + Carport, Call
Vicky, 352-422-2225
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 $850. Month
352-897-4447,
352-697-1384
Crystal River
2 BR, 2 Full BA, 2-car
gar., enclosed back
porch and pool, shed.
Only $750.
4251 N. Concord Dr.
352-382-1373.
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
Water Incl. CHA $496.
220-2447 or 212-2051
Crystal River North
Lease w/ opt. country
setting 2/1 on /2AC,
$550/ mo $550 dep
Flrm (352)795-0161

Hernando
Rentals
from $425.00 (a MO.
Call A.W.
'Skip' Craven
352-464-1515

HOMASASSA SMW
3/2/3, Ig. pool, dbl. lot
$1,250.mo. incl'd. lawn
maint. (773) 320-1894
HOMOSASSA
3/2, new carpet, appls.
Lg wooden deck,
nice area. off Grover
Cleveland $800.(352)
447-0977/302-3819
INVERNESS
Country Living on
Large %/ acre lot. 3 bd.,
2 ba. home. Garden
and fenced areas. Well
& septic, so no water
bill! $595. 352-476-4964
Sugarmill Woods
2/2/2, 2 MB Rrms
$850. 352-302-4057
SUGARMILL
WOODS 4/2/2
1/3ac. $1100. mo.
727-919-0797




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225
HOMOSASSA, FL
3 bedroom. 2 bath.
Completely remodeled
fully furnished, carport,
& covered dock. House
is in a no wake zone
with beautiful view down
the river. No pets, no
smoking. $1,450. mo.
Long Term Only,
386-527-0126




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/2, privacy/space,
must love dogs, $750
(352) 422-5735




INVERNESS
Pool home to share
w/fem-Priv BR/BA/WlIC.
N/S,Employed w/ref.
$450/mo incl util, $200
sec.726-8982
INVERNESS
Rm. for Rent, furn.
Share large DW, Util.
incl'd, $325 + $100
sec. 352-726-0652



CRYSTAL RIVER
Office & Warehouse
$300-$600, Plantation
Rentals 352-634-0129


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WVVWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.






Estate Sale
344 N. Michaelmas Ter.
Crystal River
Fri. & Sat. 8-4



4 Person Self Contained
Hot Tub





HERNANDO
Building Off Hwy 200,
$800.mo 352-201-2428





2 ACRES
Quiet Country Setting
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area
only 20 Min. to Ocala
$127,000
Call 352-302-6784
for appt.




PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything! 4/3 %
w/7 car
garage/workshop &
in-law suite on 5.83 ac-
res.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164




Beverly Hills
2/1 family room and
carport, investment or
seasonal living $38,900
352-422-2433

HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2/1/1 needs paint &
cosmetics $23k
cash only
352-503-3245




Custom Home,
3 bedroom, 2%/ bath,
w/Master w/DBL
walk-ins + bath +
den/off. 2+ car garage.
1 Acre. MUST SEE!
$249,900.
352-860-0444


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $58,500. Call
352-638-0905

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Phyllis
Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!

I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
gail@citrusrealtor
.corn
www.citrusrealtor
.corn
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner flnanclng
available.

I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.comrn


OPEN HOUSE
Saturday & Sunday
12 Noon 3PM
3/2%/3, Owner
399 E. Keller Court
Citrus Hills




ARBOR LAKES
Fantastic Dream
Home In Active Senior
Community $169,900
2,100 sf, 3BR/2BA/2GA
Split Floor Plan w/Pool
Call (352) 726-6564




FSBO 3/2/2 Scm Porch,
metal roof, appls, CHA,
fans, verticals, shed,
fence, deck, spklrs, near
dog park. $120,000
(352) 586-0872
NICE HOUSE on
Nice Street $79,000
2/1/1, Attached
carport w/ 12 x 32
scrn. por., built in '95
on 1/2 acre lot fenced
12 x14 matching out
building, New roof,
stucco paint, flooring,
upper line appl's,
irrigation & water
system.,
taxes & ins. $1,135 yr
606-425-7832




3BD, 2BA, 2Gar,
Gas fireplace, on
Water, Main Canal,
dock large lot with
fruit trees. $138,000
(321) 303-2875




3b/2ba denMH
on land off US 19
newer c/h/a carpet &
vinyl, furn, clean RV
Hkup. fence **$39.900**
Cridland Real Estate
JDesha 352-634-6340
3BR 2BA 1,500 sq. ft.,
6823 W. Merrivale Ln
Built 2006, Fully
Furnished, by Owner,
$77,000 obo
(260) 348-9667




4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home
$65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell




4/3/2, POOL HOME
3,000 sf, granite coun-
ters, SS appl's., wood
firs., Reduced $25,000
Aelina 25R, 0nnn


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner

Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor












ROD KENNER
352-436-3531
ERA
Suncoast Realty









SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNau-recoast
Properties.com
'To view
great waterfront
properties"




Your World









CHROrNCLE

,, ,, '11," I,, l h -i n i


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515










SANDI

HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.comn

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855





EA






TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant




3/2 pool home on 10
acres w/ FP, zoned
agriculture, walk to all
schools. $179,900
(727) 528-2803 or
727-698-0723



Brooksville Deeded
spacious, shaded cnr
lot, 1BR/1BA, Large FL
room, Large storage
shed & patio. 55+ RV
Park w/ heated pool,
and music activities,
$36,000 352-848-0448,
352- 428-0462 anytime
HOME FOR SALE
NORTON, VA
5Bd/2%/Ba inc. 3 lots
70miles from Bristol
Racetrack $69,000
276-393-0446 OR
276-679-1331




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


microwave, equilizing
hitch, $10,500, reduced
to $9000
(352) 382-1826

KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Licl/Ins.
POP-UP CAMPER
2002 Coleman
Tacoma Exc Cond.
With add a room.
$4500
(352) 726-3919

SOLD
TRAVEL TRAILER
2000 Flagstaff, 25 ft,
sleeps 6, good cond,


2BD 1%'BA 2 Carport
on Lake Rousseau
Dunnellon 1.4 AC,
168 ft on lake, No flood
insurance completely
remodedled, Price
Reduced$169.000
Barney Chilton
352-563-0116




1/ ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact fee
credit, high and dry,
trees, $11,000 obo
(352) 795-3710

INVERNESS, FL
3 miles east of Inv;
5-20ac wooded/some
cleared, owner finance
available.Owner is
licensed Real Estate
Broker,Ed Messer.ed
.messer@yahoo.com





BUY, SELL*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510-

87 PROLINE
17', Deep V haul
Center Console
w/ trailer
315 W. Inverness Blvd

ALUMACRAFT
2012, 1436 LT, tilt
trailer, 8HP, Yam. 4
stroke, motor guide,
40 Ib, battery, swivel
seats, Lowrance Sonar
/GPS, $2,500.
Info. 352-489-2011

ALUMICRAFT
18 ft.,wide rhino lined
inside, 25HP Merc.,
boat mtr. & trailer in
great shape $3,700
(352) 563-0328

ALUMICRAFT
18 ft.,wide, rhino lined
inside, 25HP Merc.,
boat mtr. & trailer in
great shape $3,700
Extras (352) 563-0328

BASS BOAT
1985, 16ft Bayliner
Needs work 85HP
force eng., galvinized
trailer. $800obo
(352) 507-1490

PENN YAN
1979 27' Sports fisher-
man w/ trailer, needs
some work. $4000
OBO (352) 621-0192

TRI PONTOON
BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
WANTED TO BUY
Pontoon Boat
Needing Repair
(352) 637-3983

WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
(352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com




ITASCA
2007 Navaron 23H
Mercedes Diesel, 2.7L,
17 mpg, generator, AC,
one slide out, sleeps 5,
excellent condition,
$55,000 make offer
352-422-1309

SUNNYBROOK
2008, 35FT Fifth Wheel
3 slides, electric awning
fireplace, 2 ac's, 50 amp
king bed, assume
balance of $37,500.
352-279-3544




4 WINDS TRAILER
2006, 26FT
Take Over Payments
352-628-7765

2012 Wildwood TT
26'Ft. sleeps 8,
Elec.Awning and
Jack, bunks $13,999
813-699-2262

'05 CAMPER
29' Holiday Rambler
Alum fr, Ig slide out.
great cond. $10,900
352-795-5310 or
410-474-3454

ALINER
2001, Expedition, 18ftf,
storage for stabilizers,
$3,500. obo
(352) 795-6295

Brooksville Deeded
spacious, shaded cnr
lot, 1BR/1BA, Large FL
room, Large storage
shed & patio. 55+ RV
Parkw/ heated pool,
and music activities,
$36,000 352-848-0448,
352- 428-0462 anytime

CAR HAULER
2007
32 ft Enclosed Goose-
neck w/liv qtrs. $15,500.
For more info call
352-560-7247

CHALLENGER
5TH WHEEL 33FT, 2
slide outs Good cond
$6,000 obo Must Sell
(423) 202-0914

FOREST RIVER
2010, Surveyor, Sport
189, 20 ft. Travel
Trailer,
1 slide, w/AC, qn. bed,
awning, pwr. tonque
jack, corner jacks,


-m







C12 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013


SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, kg bd,like new,
60amp serve. NADA
$29K asking $25K
obo 352-382-3298




350 Chevy Motor
Speed Pro Cam
headers, edelbrock
carb. Approx. Miles
30K $1200 OBO
352-628-4240
LUGGAGE ROOF
CROSSRAILS
will fit any Chevy
Traverse $150
obo 352-503-6414
RV ROADMASTER
Hidden Face Plate
fits Dodge Ram 1500
asking $200,
727-251-7568




"BEST PRICE*
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
"352-426-4267*
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352)771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ




AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE.
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 563-1902
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.
BUICK
'00, Regal, LS, custom
4 DR. Loaded, only
70K stereo, leather, V6
alloys, garaged, clean
$4,850. 352-212-4882
BUICK
1996 Regal 125k
miles,motor rebuilt
@90k. A/C doesn't
work,dents and dings,
but runs good.$1200
obo 563-1638
CADILLAC
1994 DEVILLE
79K MILES, CAR IS
PERFECT $4995
352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2005 STS
LOW MILES
NICE CAR
$9850, 352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2011 CTS, LOADED
ONLY 15K
MILES, SUNROOF
$27,850 352-628-5100
CHEVROLET
1999, Camaro,
Convertible
$6,990.
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2006 PT Cruiser cony....
weather is getting
nice...time to drop the
top...call 352-628-4600
to set appointment
to see
FORD
1995 Escort wagon
4cyl., Auto.
call 352-628-4600
for low price and
appointment
FORD
2005, Focus
$4,850.
352-341-0018
FORD
2010, Pruis,
$17,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
2011 FIESTA SDN
36K MILES, "S"
MODEL, ONE OWNER
$9950, 352-628-5100
FORD
Mustang Cobra, Indy
500 Pace Car-1994,
Convertible, 7100 mi,
Gar. kept 252-339-3897
HONDA
2010 ACCORD LX,
85K MILES, NICE,
$12,850 352-628-5110


LINCOLN
1999 Continental
Exc. Condition, 27mpg
hwy, Garage kept,
$4500 352-422-4548
LINCOLN
Towncar 2010
29,900ml, gold w/beige
vinyl top, white leather
asking, $24,900
352-476-5061
MINI COOPER
2008 2DR, HARDTOP
ONLY 20K MILES,
SUPER CLEAN
$13980, 352-628-5100
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

NISSAN
2005, Altima
$5,895
352-341-0018
PONTIAC
2003 Bonneville, must
SE V6, pw....pl. ..priced
to sell.....call jan at
352-628-4600 for
appointment
and pricing



2002 JAGUAR XJR
4 DR, $7200. Super
Charged 4.0 V-8
engine, auto trans,
leather int, AC, power
sun roof, XJR Sport
Pkg, factory chrome
wheels (352) 637-6443
CHEVY
'87, S10 Blazer, excel.
cond. 87K org. mi. on
body, 22K on engine
$1,700 obo 795-9187






I I I I I I I I
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
I I I I I I I I




CHEVROLET
2001 S10 Pickup Ext.
Cab, no rust, no dents,
very clean, white, low
mileage $5600
352-419-4373 or
614-893-3268
CHEVROLET
98, 1500 ext. cab
4.3 V6, auto, air,14,500
orig. miles, Grg kept,
$8700 352-212-4678
FORD
2004, Ranger
$7,990
352-341-0018
FORD
F150, 1978, 4x4
Runs good, 6" Lift kit,
$1,650 obo
(352) 564-4598
FORD
F-150XL white 1995,
3L, straight 6, 2WD,
6' bed w/ cab $3600
(352) 637-5331 LM
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




BUICK
2005 RANIER
46K MILES, CXL
LIKE NEW
$9850, 352-628-5100
CHEVY TRAIL-
BLAZER LT 05
exc. cond. asking $6000
obo, in Hernando
(904) 923-2902
FORD
2000 Explorer $2,000 or
best offer. 263000 miles
runs god needs rear
main seal. May need
ball joints. 476-7942
HONDA
1997 CRV, priced to
sell...it's a honda
auto, pwr windows
call 352-628-4600 for
special newspaper
pricing
KIA
2012 SOUL
ONLY 7K MILES
$15,800 352-628-5100
SUBARU
2011 FORESTER
29K MILES
ONE OWNER
$17850, 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
1997 RAV 4
ONLY 89K MILES,
NICE $5850,
352-628-5100

iil m:. L."I[ "IIt


JEEP
2000, Grand
Cherokee 4x4, V8
pw, pl, priced to low
to list.....call adam at
352-628-4600 for


BAD BOY BUGGIE
2011 "ready to hunt"
Only $5998.
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS
2002, SPORTSMAN
700 CC 4X4 AUTO
READY FOR THE MUD
ONLY $4288
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS RZR 800 LE
TIME TO PLAY HARD
ONLY $8388
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
new tires, am/fm, CB
250 engine, hitch, 4spd,
auto & reverse, canoe
rack, $750. obo
352-637-4011




CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492

Harley Davidson
2005, 883
LOW MILES
$3,995.

Harley Davidson
2006, STREET GLIDE
EZ FINANCE
$11,500.

HONDA
2009, VT750 AERO,
CLEAN
$4,995.

SUZUKI
2001, VOLUSIA
EZ FINANCE
$2,995.

KAWASAKI
1999, NOMAD
RUNS GREAT
$3,800.

LUCKY U CYCLES
352-330-0047
WWW.LUCKYU
CYCLES.COM


Harley Davidson
2009 Street Glide
Black, 20k, many extras
$18,500 firm, pls call
*352-422-5448*
HARLY DAVIDSON
08, 1200cc Sportster
classic 976mi. show-
room condition, $9500
(352) 447-1244
HONDA
'04, Shadow, Aero,
750 CC, 16k Miles,
Like new $3,995
461-4518 or 586-2807
HONDA BLACK BIRD
CBR 1100 LOW LOW
MILES ONLY $3488.00
(352) 621-3678
Honda Gold Wing
1976,custom,mintcont
low miles $2500
503-6550/810-275-2500
Ask for Mark
HONDA ST1300
2006 MADE TO TOUR
ONLY $7786
(352) 621-3678
KAWASKI NINFA
650
LIKE NEW ONLY
$5488 (352) 621-3678
KYMCO
2009, AJILITY
SCOOTER GREAT
GAS SAVER ONLY
$998 (352) 621-3678
RAMPAGE
Motorcycle lift for p/u
truck. Like new $1800.
(352) 637-0397
SUZUKI
'06, Boulevard 800CC,
Lots of extras, like new
$3,995.352-461-4518
352-586-2807
SUZUKI BURGMAN
AUTOMATIC TWIST
AND GO FUN ONLY
$4686 (352) 621-3678
SUZUKI GSXR 750
195 MILES "HOLD ON"
ONLY $9996
(352) 621-3678
TRIUMPH
1998 Triumph Thunder-
bird Sport 900. 24700
Miles, 150 on Over-
hauled engine. Must
see condition. D&D
Custom exhaust, new
battery. Great rider, su-
per fast. Asking $ 4500
OBO. Dunnellon area.
Some trades. Photos
available Call Rick
352-445-1573 or e-mail
LongShotArmsLLC@
gmail.com
VICTORY CROSS
ROADS
"GREAT American
MADE CRUSIER"
ONLY $12888
(352) 621-3678


893-0301 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 2013 DR 75, DIVISION: FAMILY
ROBERT C. BUCKIUS, Petitioner
and
MARY ANN BUCKIUS, Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
(NO CHILD OR FINANCIAL SUPPORT)
TO: MARY ANN BUCKIUS
6500 E. WILLOW ST, INVERNESS, FLORIDA 34452
YOUARE NOTFIEDthatn actinfor dssolionof mariagehas
beenfiled
against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on ROBERT C. BUCKIUS whose address is 6225 W. LEXINGTON DRIVE, CRYS-
TAL RIVER, FL 34429 on or before MARCH 11,2013, and file the original with the clerk
of this Court at 110 N. APOPKA AVE, INVERNESS, FL 34450, before service on Peti-
tioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the petition.
Copies of dl court documents in this case, induding orders, are avdible at the
Clerk of the Circuit Court's office. You may review these documents upon request.
You must keep he Clerk of he Circut Courts office noifed of your current ad-
dress. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on
record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Rorida Fanily Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings.
DATED: January 23, 2013
QCEIK iF i HEC --I9Ui i(UT


February 8, 15, 22 and March 1,2013


Clerk


CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By:/S/ Kathy Stalbaum, As Deputy


812-0222 FCRN
03-05 Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given, that we will sell or or otherwise dispose of the con-
tents of the following self storage units in order to satisfy the delinquent storage lein
placed in accordance with the State of Florida Statute 83.806. Unit #21, Name: Nina
Shawley, Contents: Miscellaneous Household. The public sale will be conducted at
Nicholson Mini Storage, located at 2442 N. Pennsylvania Ave., Crystal River, FL 34428,
on Tuesday, March 5th, 2013, at 3:00 p.m. or thereafter. Units will be sold to the high-
est bidder. Auction to be conducted by Hammer Down Auctions, Inc. (AB3038) 10%
Buyer's Premium will be charged for all units. Open door sale, cash only. A cleaning
deposit will be taken. (352) 422-6548.
February 15 & 22, 2013.


815-0301 FCRN
Helga A. Whitler File No: 2012-CP-722 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.2012-CP-722
IN RE: ESTATE OF HELGA A. WHITLER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The name of the decedent, the designation of the court in which the administra-
tion of this estate is pending, and the file number are indicated above. The address
of the court is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney
are indicated below.
If you have been served with a copy of this notice and you have any claim or de-
mand against the decedent's estate, even if that claim is unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated, you must file your claim with the court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF A
DATE THAT IS 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
30 DAYS AFTER YOU RECEIVE A COPY OF THIS NOTICE.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingents or liquidated
claims, must file their claims with the court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
EVEN IF A CLAIM IS NOT BARRED BY THE LIMITATIONS DESCRIBED ABOVE, ALL
CLAIMS WHICH HAVE NOT BEEN FILED WILL BE BARRED TWO YEARS AFTER DECEDENT'S
DEATH.
The date of death of the decedents is: November 3, 2012.
The date of first publication of this Notice is February 22,2013.
Personal Representative:
/s/ LAWRENCE H. WHITLER
2425 SW 3rd Avenue, Lot #107, Ocala, FL 34471
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ James L. Richard Florida Bar No. 243477
808 SE Fort King Street, Ocala, FL 34471 (352) 369-1300
jimrichard77@gmail.com
February 22 & March 1,2013.



816-0222 FCRN
Ronald Q. Fake File No: 2012-CP-668 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2012-CP-668 Division
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RONALD Q. FAKE
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Ronald Q. Fake, deceased, whose date of
death was August 15, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida
34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
Al other creditors of the decedent and other persons having daims r demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWilHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is February 15, 2013.
Personal Representative:
/s/Carole E. Fake
3720 W. Cogwood Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida 34465
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/Gregory G. Gay, Esquire, Florida Bar Number: 162024
The Nature Coast Law Offices of Gregory G. Gay, P.A.
5318 Balsam St., New Port Richey, FL 34652, Telephone: (352) 794 0025
Fax: (727) 848 4466, E-Mail: gregg@willtrust.com,
Secondary E-Mail: debora@willtrust.com
February 15& 22, 2013.


802-0301 FCRN
Vs. Patricia A. Clair Case No: 2012CA1527 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.2012CA1527

PLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES, LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
PATRICIA A. CLAIR, JOHN C. LORD, WILLIAM C. RAGER, GULF COAST ASSISTANCE, LLC;
UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION AND ALL OTHER UNRECORDED INTEREST IN THE
REAL PROPERTY,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: WILLIAM C. RAGER

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following
described property located in Citrus County, Florida:

Lot 11, Block G of a Replat of Hourglass Lakes Subdivision, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 114 of the Public Records of Citrus County,
Florida

Property Address: 9631 W. Moss Rose, Crystal River, Florida 34429 ("Property")

You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action, on
Greenspoon Marder, P.A.,Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is 100 West
Cypress Creek Road, Suite 700, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309, and file original with the
Clerk within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, or on or before March 11,
2013; otherwise a default and a judgment may be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.

WITNESS MY HAND AND SEAL OF SAID COURT on this 28th day of January, 2013.
Angela Vick, As Clerk of said Court
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Kathy Stalbaum, Deputy Clerk

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a reasona-
ble accommodation to participate in this proceeding should, no later than seven (7)
days prior, contact the Clerk of the Court's disability coordinator at COURT ADMINIS-
TRATOR, 110 N APOPKA AVENUE, ROOM 1-337, INVERNESS, FL 34450, 352-341-6700. If
hearing or voice impaired, contact (TDD) (800) 955-8771 via Florida Relay System.
February 8 & 15, 2013.



810-0222 FCRN
vs. Melissa S. Deshazo Case No: 2010 CA 1535 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.2010 CA 1535
SUNTRUST BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MELISSA S. DESHAZO a/k/a MELISSA SUE DESHAZO, an individual; et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: Defendant, SHAWN A. JOHNSTON, if living and, if dead, the unknown spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, beneficiaries, or other
persons claiming an interest by, through, under, or against SHAWN A. JOHNSTON
("Mr. Johnston"):

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose the mortgage existing on property
which you may have an interest has been filed against you. The real property or its
address is commonly known as 5792 South Rovan Point, Lecanto, Florida 34461, and
is more particularly described as follows:

THE NORTH V2 OF NORTHWEST /4 OF SOUTHEAST /4 OF SOUTHEAST /4 OF SECTION 34,
TOWNSHIP 19, SOUTH, RANGE 18 EAST, LESS AND EXCEPT THE EAST 31.5 FEET THEREOF,
BEING TRACT 26-D, OF ROVAN FARMS, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to Stovash, Case
& Tingley, P.A., c/o Ana C. Francolin, Esquire, whose address is The VUE at Lake Eola,
220 N. Rosalind Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, within thirty (30) days after the date
of the first publication, which was on February 15, 2013, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereaf-
ter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the
Verified Amended Complaint.

DATED this 4th day of January, 2013.
(SEAL)
CLERK OF THE COURT
By:/s/ Kathy Stalbaum, Deputy Clerk
February 15& 22, 2013.



811-0222 FCRN
Vs. Adam R. Nagel Case No: 09-2012-CA-001937 Notice of Action for Forclosure
Proceeding-Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-2012-CA-001937
SEC.:
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.
Plaintiff,
v.
ADAM R. NAGEL, et al
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR FORECLOSURE PROCEEDING-PROPERTY

TO:
REBECCA L. TERRY, ADDRESS UNKNOWN
BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS:
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS
7725 NORTH CAESAR PORT
DUNNELLON, FL 34433

Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defendants,
if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendant(s) are dead, their re-
spective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees,
and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named
Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the afore-
mentioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown
Defendant(s) as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris.

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a
mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in CITRUS
County, Florida, more particularly described as follows:

PARCEL NO. 24, MINI FARMS, UNIT NO. 6, LEGALLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: THE NORTH
1/2 OF THE NE 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4 OFTHE NW 1/4 OFSECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 17 SOUTH,
RANGE 18 EAST, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA. SUBJECT TO EASEMENT ACROSS THE WEST
25 FEET THEREOF FOR ROAD RIGHT OF WAY.
TOGETHER WITH A 2009 DESTINY 32X76 DOUBLE WIDE MANUFACTURED HOME MODEL #
E804-02-96, LOCATED ON THE PREMISES.

COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 7725 NORTH CAESAR PT, DUNNELLON, FL 34433

This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your
written defense, if any, such Morris Hardwick Schneider, LLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff,
whose address is 5110 Eisenhower Blvd, Suite 120, Tampa, FL 33634on or before
March 18, 2013, and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service
on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately there after; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.

WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 4th day of February,
2013.

Angela Vick, Clerk of the Circuit Court


F S


(SEAL) By:/s/ Kathy StalbaumDeputy Clerk

"If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact John Sullivan, the ADA Coordinator at the Office of
the Trial Court Administrator, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450, Telephone (352) 341-6700, at least 7 days before your
scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time
before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice im-
paired, call 711."
February 15& 22, 2013.


818-0222 FCRN
vs. Christina Brennan Case No: 2012-CA-001201 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUTI, IN
AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.:2012-CA-001201
M & T Bank
Plaintiff
Vs.
CHRISTINA BRENNAN a/k/a CHRISTINE M. BRENNAN, et al
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
To the following Defendant: UNKNOWN HEIRS, SUCCESSORS, ASSIGNS AND ALL PER-
SONS, FIRMS OR ASSOCIATIONS CLAIMING RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST FROM OR UNDER
JAMES BRENNAN AKA JAMES D. BRENNAN, DECEASED 1139 MCKINLEY STREET, HER-
NANDO FL 34442

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following de-
scribed property:

LOT 27, BLOCK CITRUS HILLS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGES 5 AND 6, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDSOF CITUS COUNTY, FL

Has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it, on Udren Law Offices, P.C., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is
4651 Sheridan Street Suite 460, Hollywood, FL 33021 on or before March 18, 2013, a
date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in Citrus
County Chronicle and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before serv-
ice on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint.
You have 30 calendar dys after the first publication of this Notice to file a witten
response to the attached complaint with the clerk of this court. A phone call will not
protect you. Your written response, including the case number given above and the
names of the parties, must be filed if you want the court to hear your side of the
case. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case, and your
wages, money, and property may thereafter be taken without further warning from
the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right
away. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney referral service or a
legal aid office (listed in the phone book).

This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact
the ADA Coordinator at the Office of the Trial Court Administrator, Citrus County
Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, Telephone (352)
341-6700, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hearing impaired call 711.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 4th day of February,
2013.
(SEAL)CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, As Clerk of the Court by:
By:/s/ Kathy Stalbaum, As Deputy Clerk
February 15& 22, 2013.


821-0301 FCRN
Vs, Scott Arthur Case No: 09-2012-CA-001803 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 09-2012-CA-001803
ARCH BAY HOLDINGS, LLC SERIES 2008B,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SCOTT ARTHUR A/K/A SCOTT EVAN ARTHUR A/K/A SCOTT E. ARTHUR; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF SCOTT ARTHUR A/K/A SCOTT EVAN ARTHUR A/K/A SCOTT E. ARTHUR; PAM-
ELA SWAIN A/K/A PAMELA ARTHUR A/K/A PAMELA HELEN SWAIN A/K/A PAMELA H.
SWAIN A/K/A PAMELA H. ARTHUR; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS; FORD MOTOR CREDIT COMPANY LLC, A DELAWARE LIMITED LIABILITY
COMPANY F/K/A FORD MORTOR CREDIT COMPANY, A CORPORATION; CYPRESS VIL-
LAGE PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; WHETHER DISSOLVED OR PRESENTLY
EXISTING, TOGETHER WITH ANY GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR TRUS-
TEES OF SAID DEFENDANTS) AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER, OR AGAINST DEFENDANTSS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: PAMELA SWAIN A/K/A PAMELA ARTHUR A/K/A PAMELA HELEN SWAIN A/K/A
PAMELA H. SWAIN A/K/A PAMELA H. ARTHUR
Whose residences) is/are unknown.
TO: SCOTT ARTHUR A/K/A SCOTT EVAN ARTHUR A/K/A SCOTT E. ARTHUR; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF SCOTT ARTHUR A/K/A SCOTT EVAN ARTHUR A/K/A SCOTT E. ARTHUR; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Whose residences) is/are:
20 WILD OLIVE CT
HOMOSASSA, FL 34446

YOU ARE HEREBY required to file your answer or written defenses, if any, in the
above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon
the plaintiff's attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Drive,
Tampa, FL 33619-1328, telephone (813) 915-8660, facsimile (813) 915-0559, within
thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, the nature of this proceeding being a
suit for foreclosure of mortgage against the following described property, to wit:

LOT 7, BLOCK B-127, CYPRESS VILLAGE, SUGARMILL WOODS, ACCORDING TO THE MAP
OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGES 86 THROUGH 150, PLAT BOOK
10, PAGES 1 THROUGH 150, AND PLAT BOOK 11, PAGES 1 THROUGH 16, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; AS AMENDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 87-A, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

If you fail to file your response or answer, if any, in the above proceeding with
the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiff's attorney, Law
Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Dr., Tampa, Florida 33619-1328, tele-
phone (813) 915-8660, facsimile (813) 915-0559, within thirty days of the first publica-
tion of this Notice, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in
the Complaint or petition.
DATED at CITRUS County this 11th day of February, 2013.

Clerk of the Circuit Court
(Seal) By:/s/ Vivian Cancel, Deputy Clerk

If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in a proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact John Sullivan, ADA Coordinator for the Courts within 2
working days of your receipt of your notice to appear in Court at (352) 341-6700.
You can also use the online Florida State Courts System Title II ADA Accommodation
Request Form. Once submitted, this will go to the appropriate ADA Coordinator in
your county.
February 22 & March 1,2013.


822-0301 FCRN
vs.Unknown/Keith M. Stallings Case No: 2010 CA001750 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILACTION
CASE NO.2010 CA 001750
DIVISION
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVIC-
ING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP,
Plaintiff,
vs.

THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, ORAGAINST
KEITH M. STALLINGS A/K/A KEITH MICHAEL STALLINGS, DECEASED, et al,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, ORAGAINST
KEITH M. STALLINGS A/K/A KEITH MICHAEL STALLINGS, DECEASED

LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN

CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN

ANYAND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD ORALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTERESTS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS

LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN

CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foredose a mortgage on the following property in
CITRUS County, Florida:

LOT 7 AND 8, BLOCK 261, OF INVERNESS HIGHLANDS SOUTH,
A C C O R D I N G
TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 51 TO 65, INCLU-
SIVE, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses
within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L.,
Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida
33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once each week for two consecutive weeks in the Citrus
County Chronicle.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 11th day of February, 2013.

(SEAL) Angela Vick, Clerk of the Court
By:/s/ Vivian Cancel, As Deputy Clerk

F10108057
"See Americans with Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact:Mr. John D. Sullivan, 110 N. Apopka Street, Inverness, FL
34450-4231
Phone: 352-341-6700, Fax: 352-341-7008
February 22 & March 1, 2013.


823-0301 FCRN
Vs. Gina L. Wilson Case No: 092012CA001968 Notice ofAction
PUBLIC NOTICE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.092012CA001968
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GINA L. WILSON; et al,.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: GINAL. WILSON
Last Known Address
9044 N. SANTOS DRIVE
CITRUS SPRINGS FL 34434
Current Residence is Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED hat an action toforecose a mortgage on the follow-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


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NdstCqtm


N t d


FrcourSae


Foelsr a


Forclour SaIi


Foreclosure SaII]e
Action Notices


Foreclosure Sal,]e/
Action Notices


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Self S!ora
Notice







CLASSIFIED


Foeloue-ae


scribed property in Citrus County, Florida:

LOT 17, BLOCK 408, OF CITRUS SPRINGS UNIT 4, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 133 THROUGH 152, INCLUSIVE,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on SHD Legal Group PA., Plaintiff's attorneys, whose address is PO BOX 11438
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339 1438, (954) 564 0071, answers@shdlegalgroup.com, within 30
days from first date of publication, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either be-
fore service on Plaintiff's attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition.
DATED on February 11, 2013.

Angela Vick, As Clerk of the Court
By:/s/ Vivian Cancel, As Deputy Clerk

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing spe-
cial accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the
Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Citrus County
Courthouse. Telephone 352 637 9400 or 1 800 955 8770 via Florida Relay Service.
February 22 & March 1, 2013.


824-0301 FCRN
Vs. Jillian G. Zayas Case No: 09-2012-CA-001424 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 09-2012-CA-001424
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Plaintiff,
vs.
JILLIAN G. ZAYAS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JILLIAN G. ZAYAS; REGIONS BANK, SUCCES-
SOR BY MERGER TO AMSOUTH BANK; UNKNOWN PERSONS) IN POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To the following Defendant(s):

JILLIAN G. ZAYAS
(RESIDENCE UNKNOWN)

UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JILLIAN G. ZAYAS
(RESIDENCE UNKNOWN)

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following de-
scribed property:

LOT 34, BLOCK 82, BEVERLY HILLS UNIT NUMBER FIVE, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGES 2 THROUGH 5, INCLUSIVE, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CIT-
RUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
a/k/a 104 S FILLMORE STREET, BEVERLY HILLS, FLORIDA 34465-

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it, on Kahane & Associates, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose ad-
dress is 8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000, Plantation, FLORIDA 33324 on or before March
25, 2013, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice
in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE and file the original with the Clerk of this Court ei-
ther before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint.

This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the
Court Administrator at 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FI 34450-4299, Phone No.
(352)637-9853 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you
are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call
1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services).

WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 11th day of February, 2013.

Angela Vick, As Clerk of the Court

By:/s/ Vivian Cancel, As Deputy Clerk
February 22 & March 1,2013.


826-0301 FCRN
Vs. Christopher Connelly Case No: 09-2010-CA-001710 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.09-2010-CA-001710
GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORA-
TION,
Plaintiff
vs.
CHRISTOPHER CONNELLY, et al.,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:

CHRISTOPHER CONNELLY
9318 NORTH CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD
CITRUS SPRINGS, FL 34434

CHRISTOPHER CONNELLY
6047 N DECARLO DRIVE
CITRUS SPRINGS, FL 34434

CHRISTOPHER CONNELLY
7222 N VARSITY AVENUE, UNIT 18
CITRUS SPRINGS, FL 34434

AND TO: All persons claiming an interest by, through, under, or against the afore-


FoecosreSae


Foecour e


said Defendant(s).

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the fdlow-
ing described property located in Citrus County, Florida:
LOT 27, BLOCK 159, CITRUS SPRINGS UNIT 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 108 THROUGH 115, INCLUSIVE, OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA

has been filed against you, an you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to this action, on Greenspoon Marder, P.A., Default Department, Attor-
neys for Plaintiff, whose address is Trade Centre South, Suite 700, 100 West Cypress
Creek Road, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309, and the file original with the Clerk within 30
days after the first publication of this notice in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, or on
or before March 25, 2013; otherwise a default and a judgment may be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.

WITNESS MY HAND AND SEAL OF SAID COURT on this 12th day of
February, 2013.

ANGELA VICK, As Clerk of said Court
(SEAL) By:/s/ Vivian Cancel, As Deputy Clerk

IMPORTANT
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a reasona-
ble accommodation to participate in this proceeding should, no later than seven (7)
days prior, contact the Clerk of the Court's disability coordinator at COURT ADMINIS-
TRATOR, 110 N APOPKA AVENUE, ROOM 1-337, INVERNESS, FL 34450, 352-341-6700. If
hearing or voice g impaired, contact (TDD) (800)955-8771 via Florida Relay System.
(26433.1715/RB)
February 22 & March 1,2013.


827-0222 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
City of Crystal River, Florida

Request for Bids Tree Evaluation & Trimming Services
Bid No. 13-B-03

Synopsis: The City of Crystal River is seeking bids from qualified firms for tree evalua-
tion and trimming services associated with the need to perform specialized trimming
and pruning of trees that comprise an historic oak tree canopy.

Submission Requirements: Bids must be received by the City Clerk by no later than 3
PM on March 15,2013. Bids must be enclosed in a sealed envelope clearly marked
as follows:

Attention: City Clerk
Re: Response to Request for Bids/Tree Evaluation &
Trimming Services
Bid# 13-B-03
City of Crystal River
123 NW HWY 19
Crystal River, FL 34428

Bids received after the deadline will not be opened or considered.

Background: A canopy of fourteen (14) oak trees exists along Crystal Street within
Crystal River, extending from approximately NE 1st Avenue to NE 3rd Avenue. The
trees that comprise this canopy were planted in the early 1900's and the canopy has
historical significance to the Crystal River community.

The trees that comprise this canopy were evaluated by a licensed arborist in 2009
and a witten report was generated summarizing the results of that evaluation. (That
report is available at: www.crystalriverfl.org or at City Hall). Eight of the trees were
shown as needing no action at that time, while action on the remaining seven trees
was identified as necessary (please note that tree #11 has been removed).

The City is interested in receiving bids for the following services:

pruring & trimming of branches as reqdred to protect the long-term hedth and
appearance of the trees
removing undesircble vegetanin leaders ) growing on the trunks and within the
limbs of all trees that are affected.
Moss removed as required should also be addressed within the bid response, to
include cost and proposed method of treatment.

Bid Requirements: Firms wishing to be considered for this project must submit a
sealed bid packet by the time and date set forth above which contains the follow-
ing elements:

Information on the firm,to indude information on the qualficatins of thestaff
who would be conducting this work on behalf of the City and the experience of
both the designated staff and the firm overall in providing services of this
nature.
Ccat the City seeks bids on both a per-tree (to allow work on pority trees to go
forward if funding is not available to go forward on the entire project) and total
project basis.
A projected timeline to complete the work addressed within the bid.
Al bids must expldn the management of traffic (MOT) plan that will be utiled
inasmuch as Crystal Street is a main thoroughfare and handles considerable
school-related traffic.

Evaluation of Bids: Bids meeting the requirements set forth above will be evaluated
by City representatives, and those firms determined to be most qualified will be inter-
viewed. The City reserves the right to select the bid that, in its sole discretion, best
meets its needs with respect to the services being sought. The City further reserves
the right to reject any and all bids if it is deemed to be in the best interest of the City
to do so.

Questions or Requests for Additional Information: Questions or requests for additional
information should be directed to City Manager Andy Houston
(ahoustonecrvstalriverfl.ora or 352-795-4216, ext. 302). Paper copies can be ob-
tained at City Hall. Any addendums will be posted at www.crvstalriverfl.ora.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Company Representative:

Signature:
Phone Number:
Date:






819-0222 FCRN
3/05 sales
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that
the undersigned intends to
sell the vehicle described
below under Florida Stat-
utes 713.78. The under-
signed will sell at public
sale by competitive bidding
on Tuesday, March 5, 2013


February 22,2013.


~~-I


at 9:00 am on the premises
where said vehicle has
been stored and which are
located at, Smitty's Auto,
Inc., 4631 W Cardinal St,
Homosassa, Citrus County,
Florida, the following:
Year:1986 Make: Mazda
Model: 626
JM1GC2210G1832594
Year:2001 Make: Olds
Model: Aurora


1G3GS64C614214341
Year: 2001 Make: Pontiac
Model: Grand Am
1G2NV52E81C188431
Purchase must be paid for
at the time of purchase in
cash only Vehicle sold as is
and must be removed at the
time of sale. Sale is subject
to cancellation in the event
of settlement between
owner and obligated party
February 22, 2013.


825-0222 FCRN
Citrus County School Board
PUBLIC NOTICE

The Citrus County School Board will hold an Administrative Hearing and Workshop;
9:00 a.m. on Tuesday, February 26, 2013 in the Board Room of the District Services
Center located at 1007 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida.

The purpose of the Administrative Hearing is to act upon proposed student
expulsion(s). The Workshop is to review miscellaneous topics outlined on the
agenda.

If any person decides to appeal a decision made by the Board, with respect to any
matter considered at this meeting, he may need a record of the proceedings and
may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which rec-
ord should include testimony and evidence upon which his appeal is to be based.

Sandra Himmel

Sandra Himmel

Superintendent

Citrus County School Board
February 22,2013.


820-0222 FCRN
02-28 Workshop
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the City Council of the City of Crystal River, Florida that a
JOINT WORKSHOP will be held with the City Council of the City of Inverness on Thurs-
day, February 28, 2013 @ 6:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers at City Hall, 123 N.W.
Highway 19, Crystal River, Florida.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the City of Crystal River, City Manager's
Office, 123 NW Highway 19, Crystal River, FL 34428, (352) 795-4216, at least two (2)
days before the meeting.
February 22, 2013.


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013 C13




BID RESPONSE SHEET BID #13-B-03 (TREE TRIMMING SERVICES)

Bid Option 1

Total Cost to Provide an Evaluation of Each Tree and All Required Tree Trimming and
Moss Removal Services $

Bid Option 2

Cost to Provide an Evaluation of Every Tree, to include Necessary Trimming and Moss
Removal Services $

Per-Tree Cost to Provide Tree Trimming and Moss Removal Services Identified as Nec-
essary

Tree 1 $
Tree 2 $
Tree 3 $
Tree 4 $
Tree 5 $
Tree 6 $
Tree 7 $
Tree 8 $
Tree 9 $
Tree 10 $
Tree 12 $
Tree 13 $
Tree 14 $
Tree 15 $

Name of Company:
Address of Company:


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Ken Melton
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Community Affairs Graphic Artist
Sarah Gatling
Community Editor
Trista Stokes
Advertising Sales Manager

Citrus Publishing
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
352-563-6363
www.chronicleonline.com


- What's Inside-

Estate planning ................ Page G3
How much
will you need? ............. ........ Page G4
Planning a funeral
or cremation ................................Page G5
Questions for
estate planners................ .....Page G6
Planning for retirement............Page G8
ABCs of life insurance ..........Page G10
Test your money IQ ............Page G12


G2 Friday February 22, 2013


ESTATE PLANING






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Estate planning saves time, money


From the time we all make our
first appearance on earth, we begin
to accumulate the treasures of our
lives.
Baring major disasters or life-
altering occurrences, we hold onto
some of these and add to our overall
collections through time.
From our first piece of "real"
jewelry, to some magical toy from
the past, these items along with our
life purchases of homes, furnishings,
vehicles, collections and all else
acquired, make up the content our
estate.
In addition to these physical ob-
jects, many of us may possess rights
to various types of proprietary items
to include, but not limited to,
patents, copyrights, royalties or
trademarked secrets. While not held
in many instances with the same


level of emotional attachment, these
things may possess marketable value
and are all part of who we are and
what we control, which ultimately
determines our net worth.
When one is working the exercise
of estate planning, it is important
that all the aspects of wealth or per-
sonal accumulation be explored.
In doing so, the individual, family
or trust can have an efficient and ac-
curate plan in place to help deal with
their transfer, sale or final disposi-
tion. The act of doing this in advance
while in a clear state of mind and
without duress will result in a more
accurate directive and successful
estate plan.
Knowing who to turn to and how
the process works will help all those
involved, especially in a time of be-
reavement and emotional challenges.


In making the decisions necessary to
provide a pathway to the most favor-
able outcome in ensuring your direc-
tives are met, it would prudent to
include the advice of a professional.
In the preparation the overall plan,
the assistance of an estate or probate
lawyer and/or estate planning profes-
sional should in most cases prove to
be not only time effective, but an
economic savings in the end.
As for the disposition of personal,
real or proprietary property, it is im-
portant to include in your directive a
plan to utilize the assistance of com-
pany which is experienced, licensed
and educated in such matters.
A firm that understands the ever-
changing values and markets and
can identify with all aspects of
see ESTATE Page G11


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Present

Educational Training:
Estate Planning
"Leaving More Than Your Money"

Plan Your Estate
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March 6th, 2013
800-316-1695

Tickets required; Request your free package today
using the special password: CHRONICLE.
Every participant will receive Lunch, a DVD, and
"Leaving More Than Your Money"
Estate Planning Materials.

Securities offered through Questar Capital Corporation (QCC). Member FINRA/SIPC. Advisory Services offered through Questar Asset
Management (QAM). Registered Investment Advisor. The Financial Sense People, LLC is independent of QCC and QAM.


Friday, February 22, 2013 G3


ESTATE PLANING






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The Magic Number:

How Much Will You

Need?


Is there a goose

egg where your

nest egg should

be? There's no

time like the

present to work

on your financial

future.

By Lori Cullen
CTW Features

Retirement is supposed to
reward a life well planned,


but it won't if you don't have
enough savings. Recent stud-
ies show most of us don't.
About four in 10 adults are
more worried about their
ability to finance a comfort-
able retirement today than
they were at the end of the
Great Recession in 2009, ac-
cording to a survey con-
ducted by the Pew Research
Center.
Another study, by the Em-
ployee Benefit Research In-
stitute, reports that 67 percent
of workers feel behind in re-
tirement savings, and 56 per-
cent don't even know how
much they'll need.
Financial planning experts
say it's never too late to start


saving and investing for re-
tirement or working to im-
prove your outlook. If you're
worried about your financial
future, now is the time to
think and plan ahead.
The financial planning in-
dustry abounds with recom-
mendations for how much
money it costs to finance a
comfortable retirement: 80 to
110 percent of the annual
salary you made during your
peak earning years; 20 to 25
times your final salary for
those who will rely solely on
Social Security and personal
savings.
These rules of thumb make
general assumptions about
post-work years, estimates
that often aren't much help
for individuals. That's exactly
the reason Leonard F. Val-
letta, CFP, of Albany Finan-
cial Group in Albany, N.Y.,
doesn't like them.
"It's not a simple answer,
as much as we'd like it to be,"
says Valletta. "It differs for


everyone and comes down to
what your expenses will be."
Retirement planning is a
balance between financial re-
sources and lifestyle, he says.
For some people retirement
dreams include having time
to take long walks and live a
simple lifestyle. Others might
expand their
lifestyle.
Valletta en-
courages all
clients to
enter retire-
ment totally
debt-free, if
they can, but
not every-
body does.
In retire-
ment, basic
expenses can change. You
may not need business cloth-
ing, or as much insurance,
and if you no longer have
children at home, expenses
such as education might go
away. But home maintenance
and health care costs may in-
crease, and you may pick up
new expenses, like premiums
for long-term-care insurance,
he says.
To know how much you'll
need, add the cost of your de-
sired retirement lifestyle to
your expectations of basic
living expenses.
If you want to determine if
you can live on your pro-
jected budget, take it for a test
drive. If your anticipated re-


tirement lifestyle included
downsizing and you reduce
your income, put the differ-
ence into savings, Valletta
says.
While most Americans will
receive Social Security bene-
fits, these payments were
never intended to support a
comfortable
lifestyle. The
Center on
Budget and
J Policy Priori-
ties in Wash-
Sington, D.C.,
reports that
for people
who worked
all of their
adult lives at
average earn-
ings and retire at 65 in 2012,
Social Security benefits re-
place about 41 percent of past
earnings, far less than even
the lowest replacement ratio
suggested by financial plan-
ning experts.
One of the best planning
strategies is to start now, says
Valletta.
Most employers offer tax-
advantaged workplace retire-
ment plans, which can be
powerful tools to build retire-
ment savings, especially if
they offer matching contribu-
tions. The amounts you're al-
lowed to contribute are
significant, he says.
If you're under 50, in 2012
the maximum contribution


level is $17,000 and $17,500
in 2013. If you are turning 50
in 2013, you can contribute
an additional $5,500 in catch-
up contributions for a total of
$23,000, and it's all pre-tax.
Bill Losey, CFP, owner of
Bill Losey Retirement Solu-
tions in Saratoga, N.Y, says
the best advice to help people
kick-start retirement savings
is that the government and
your company are not going
to take care of you. Gone are
the days of your parents' pen-
sion plans. Your financial
well-being is your responsi-
bility.
Most financial planners say
you need to save 10 to 20 per-
cent of whatever you make.
When consumers who don't
have great cash flow or have
a lot of expenses hear those
things, they just tune out and
say I can't save anything,
Losey says. He combats this
by offering his own 1 percent
rule: Save 1 percent of your
earnings each payday at a
minimum.
"Let's say you get a 3 per-
cent increase at work; save 1
percent and spend the other 2
percent," he says. "That way,
you'll continually increase
your savings rate, but you'll
also enjoy a higher standard
of living."
Losey's second rule: Make
savings automatic, a habit
that will improve your chance
of savings success.
With payroll deduction,
saving is effortless. Pay your-
self first the most impor-
tant rule of personal cash
management. If you don't
have a workplace plan, have
money automatically paid
from your checking account
into an IRA.
"If you automate the
process and you get in the
habit of saving money, all of
a sudden you actually start to
feel better about yourself, and
you will see your net worth
rising," says Losey. "As your
net worth rises, so does your
self-worth and your confi-
dence, and you end up mak-
ing more and saving more."


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A panel of local physicians with expertise in various chronic
illnesses will help you:

o Learn to better manage a chronic illness
4 Navigate the healthcare system to get the care you need

Suggest resources available to caregivers
Several healthcare organizations offering help to caregivers
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March 8
12pm 2pm
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1070 N. Suncoast Blvd. Crystal River
Free light lunch provided. Seating is limited.
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Certified Financial Planner
"Serving Citrus County Since 1983"
Wealth Management
IRA Rollover Specialist*
Investment Services*
Tax Reduction Planning
Estate Planning
Complimentary Consultation
FL Insurance Lic. #A141562
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Securities And Insurance Services Offered Through Royal Alliance Associates,
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Insurance Services MayAlso Be Offered Through King Financial Services Inc.,
Who Is Not Affiliated With Royal Alliance Associates, Inc.


G4 Friday, February 22, 2013


ESTATE PLANING






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Three easy steps to plan funeral or cremation


The value of planning
ahead is one of those les-
sons in life we learn the
hard way. Early on, procras-
tination seems like the way
to go.
But then, the conse-
quences start setting in -
messy room, failing grades,
chores left undone, and a
whole lot of time spent
alone "thinking about what
you did." In the end, you
don't save time; you miss
out on all the fun. If those
early life lessons teach you
anything, it's that the path
of least resistance usually
leads straight to the school
of hard knocks.
The thing about planning
ahead is that it takes effort.
I talk to a lot of people
about planning ahead for
funeral services in my
work. This is one area
where it is particularly diffi-
cult to plan in advance.
It's like packing a suit-
case for a trip someone else
is going to take in 10 to 20
years. That would be hard
for anybody. Plus, there is
the fact that people don't re-
ally like to think about their
own mortality.
Most people, once they
have come to terms with
their own mortality, believe
that planning ahead for fu-
neral services is a good
idea. If you're not sure, all
you have to do is imagine
losing your parent or spouse
and having to take care of
all the arrangements within
three days.
Most people would be a
fan of pre-planning if they
found that everything had
been arranged and paid for
so that they didn't have to
do anything but pick a day
and a time and stay at home
with your loved ones until it
was time for the service.
So then the next question
is, what do you do now?


Here are three easy steps
that will help you get all the
bases covered:
Speak to a licensed fu-
neral prearrangement spe-
cialist. Families often say
when they meet with a pre-
arrangement specialist, they
learn about questions they
didn't even know they
should ask.
You don't know what you
don't know, and a specialist
can help you clarify your
wishes and make sure
everything that you want to
take care of is covered in
your plan. Most funeral
homes will be glad to sit
with you to discuss your
arrangements without cost
or obligation.
Get your wishes and im-
portant information put in
writing. The importance of


this step cannot be over-
emphasized. Whatever
knowledge and information
you are walking around
with in your head right now
will die with you if nothing
is written down.
You can't count on your
loved ones' memory to be
at its best during a time of


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grief. A prearrangement
specialist will help you get
all that knowledge and in-
formation on paper so your
loved ones don't feel pres-
sured to try to remember
something you told them in
passing 12 years ago.
Decide whether advance
payment is right for you.


Not everyone has the
means to pay ahead, and
that is fine. But you can still
come in and go through the
first two steps, typically
without any charge to you.
If you do want to take
care of the financial side of
things, such as burial
spaces, funeral services,
cremation services, catering
and other expenses, then the
prearrangement specialist
can go over all the options
available to you so that you
can make an educated
decision.
Obviously, the more that
can be taken care of ahead
of time, including plans,
wishes and payment, the
less your family will have
to worry about in their time
of grief.
Florida, like most states,


requires that money paid for
a pre-planned service is
held with a third party such
as a trust or an insurance
company. This is done for
your protection to guarantee
that your money is always
safe. It is wise to determine
that your funeral or crema-
tion provider places 100
percent of your money with
the third party.
These are the very basics
of how to get started with a
funeral prearrangement.
But just reading this arti-
cle won't get it done for
you.
Planning doesn't happen
all by itself. It takes action.
Just call your funeral or cre-
mation provider and tell
them you'd like to get
started with your plans, and
they'll take it from there.


For You and

tm0z o AA Your Family!

Taking the time to think about and record -
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plans are in the hands of reliable friends or family.






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Friday, February 22, 2013 G5


ESTATE PLANING






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


9 Smart Questions


Estate Planners


Wish You Would Ask

What you don't know can hurt.

Just ask these estate planners.


By Taniesha Robinson
CTW Features

No question is a dumb question when
it comes to your estate, but if these
queries are on your mind, you may be
ahead of the curve. We talked to the ex-
perts to find out what you should ask to
avoid common pitfalls in estate
planning.


1. What are the
limitations of my will?
Do I need a trust?
Good news: we're living longer. Bad
news: we're more likely to reach a state
of mental incapacity while we're here.
In addition to a will, which only has
power after death, every estate plan
needs a health care directive, for any
time a person can't speak for himself,
says Bonnie Wittenburg, an estate plan-
ning attorney at Wittenburg Law Office,
Minnetonka, Minn.
Also, wills cannot control the terms
for which estate funds are distributed.
Trusts, however, can set the ages at
which children receive their inheritance
and regulate funds to go out periodi-
cally. "That way, if they make any fool-
ish mistakes, they've only received part
of it at a time," Wittenburg says.


2. How can I meet the
real needs of my heirs?
A key element of estate planning is
the idea of"fair versus equal," says Paul
Gullickson, an accredited estate planner
of Gullickson Group, Davenport, Iowa.
Splitting up assets equally among sib-
lings may not be the fairest way to pass
on your estate. Perhaps one is in greater
need of assistance because of a disabil-
ity, greater family size or underemploy-
ment. Also, if there is a business
involved, consider which sibling gains
more joy from managing the day-to-day
operations, Gullickson says. Leaving a
business to all the siblings could lead to
family quarrels.


3. How do all of my
asset documents work
together?
"Beneficiary designations actually
supersede anything you have in a will,"
says Russell McAlmond, an accredited
estate planner with Portland, Ore.-based
Evergreen Capital Management. Con-
sequently, if only one child is a desig-
nated beneficiary on an account (IRA,
401(k), and the like) the funds will go
directly to that child and not to all sib-
lings, despite opposing wishes ex-
pressed in the will. It's important to
review estate-planning documents for
any conflicts that could result in unde-
sired distribution of funds.


4. Are my assets titled
into the name of my
trust?
"People sometimes think that once
they set up a trust with the attorney,
they're done," Wittenburg says.
"They're really not, because assets still
need to be titled into the name of the
trust."
If assets are titled into any name other
than that of the trust even the estate
holder's name a trustee has no legal
right to manage or distribute them ac-
cording to the terms of the trust. And,
the estate will likely be subject to
probate.


5. Do I need more life
insurance?
It's tough to conceptualize your own
death and the impact it would have on
loved ones. It may be best to ponder the
scenario from a different perspective.
"Instead of thinking about how we
would provide for our spouse, we
should be thinking about what would be
the benefits for us if we were the sur-
vivor," says Christine Fahlund, vice
president and senior financial planner of
T. Rowe Price Group, Baltimore, Md.
Thinking critically about personal
needs for survival upon the death of a
spouse and what can be afforded in pre-
miums for life insurance can help a cou-
ple decide together what an appropriate
plan would demand, Fahlund explains.


see QUESTIONS Page G7


G6 Friday, February 22, 2013


ESTATE PLANING







Friday, February 22, 2013 G7


Q: What comes first when
money to save is limited: college
savings or retirement savings?
A: For many parents, especially
those who had children in their
mid-30s and 40s, college and
retirement savings are concurrent
financial goals. If funds for savings
are limited, people often wonder
which financial goal should come
first if they can only save for one.
Experts almost always advise
prioritizing saving for retirement.
For-profit employers often match
employee retirement savings. This
is "free money" that savers should
not pass up. Assets in a tax-deferred
retirement account (such as
an IRA) do not affect a child's ability
to receive financial aid. And
students can get loans for college
but there is no such thing as a
"retirement loan."
Source: extension. For more answers
to your questions on financial security
from your Cooperative Extension
Service, go to www.extension.org/search


QUESTIONS
from page G6



6. What of my estate assets
will be taxed?
It's a common misconception that
money in a revocable living trust is tax-
free. Federal estate tax law is rapidly
changing. In addition, "each state has its
own tricky tax rules for trusts," writes au-
thor Rachel Emma Silverman in "The Wall
Street Journal Complete Estate-Planning
Guidebook," (Crown Business, 2011).
Working with a knowledgeable estate
planner will help minimize what Uncle
Sam will inherit from your estate.


7. What's all this talk 8. Is it a good idea to add 9. How can I prepare my
about probate? Should my my child as joint owner to heirs to receive their
goal be to avoid it? my bank account or my inheritance?


Probate has a reputation for being a
lengthy, expensive court process that holds
assets in limbo instead of transferring them
smoothly to heirs.
"I don't think probate is the worst thing
that can happen to you," McAlmond says.
This is another aspect of estate planning
that varies state by state, but McAlmond
cites two general cases when avoiding pro-
bate should be a priority: if confidentiality
is desired or if multiple properties are
owned in different states.


home?
Many folks do this as a matter of con-
venience, but there are many downsides to
this plan.
"It's not fair to the other siblings because
technically the child who is the joint ac-
count holder owns the money," says Bon-
nie Wittenburg. Even if he or she plans to
fairly distribute the assets to family mem-
bers and organizations designated in the
will, there are other problems. The joint
owner must report these assets in the event
of a divorce, lawsuit and even a child ap-
plying for financial aid, which makes the
estate vulnerable to creditors. What estate
holders need instead is to appoint their
child or another trusted individual as a
durable power of attorney who can make
decisions on their behalf.


Wayne Johnson, a certified financial
planner and accredited estate planner with
Syverson Strege & Company, West Des
Moines, Iowa, tells his clients "it's about
passing along their values, not just their
valuables." To achieve this goal, Johnson
suggests heritage planning, a process in
which family members engage in projects
and activities that build a culture of trust
and communication and establish a form
of family governance. It can be as simple
as regularly coming together to plan a fam-
ily vacation or volunteering together.
"It doesn't matter how good your estate
planning is, how technically strong it is; if
your heirs are not prepared, you will be
disappointed with the outcome of your es-
tate," Johnson says.


ESTATE PLANING






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


a



... ...



Do Yur Heirs A Favor!

Find out what steps to take,
what information you need,
and what decisions to make
when finalizing your personal affairs

By taking steps in advance, you have a
greater say in how these questions are
answered. And, isn't that how it should be'


Office: (352) 621-8013
Cell: (352) 634-0627
www.toddfinservices.com


I-


T- J. Michael Todd FINANCIAL ADVISOR Todd
8546 W Homosassa Trail. Suite 1
SHomosassa, FL 34448 Financial Service
Securities offered through Investors Capital Corporation, Members FINRASIPC AdvisoryServices offered through Investors Capital Adviso


Planning for Retirement

Sufficient savings is only part of the

equation. A smart retirement plan
calls for patience and a sharp pencil.


by Lori Cullen
CTW Features

In his Albany, N.Y. office,
there's one query Terry Jan-
dreau, CFP, hears from al-
most every client, and it
usually starts off like this: "I
just want you to look at my
numbers and look at my as-
sets and let me know if I can
retire today."
So the first vice president
and branch manager at Wells
Fargo Advisors, LLC, goes
through the exercise. He
says it's rare that he would
tell clients they can't retire
today. More often, he tells
them that to do it right now
isn't in their best interest.
"After people have been


working for so many years,
they get fed up," says Jan-
dreau. "They look at things
and say, 'If I cut back here,
and I pull all of my income
together, I can just about
cover my basics."'
Many people focus on the
magic number needed to re-
tire. Just because you can
scrounge together enough to
retire today, however, does-
n't mean you should or that
your savings will last. Suffi-
cient savings is only one of
several key elements of a
smart retirement plan.
One of the most important
retirement planning tasks is
creating an income strategy.
Even if you amass a sizable
fortune, in order to make it


last through retirement,
you'll likely live off interest
rather than tapping into the
actual funds.
In the best scenario, says
Jandreau, workers enter re-
tirement with several
sources of retirement in-
come.
Fixed costs like food,
clothing and shelter should
come from guaranteed


sources, like Social Security,
corporate pension plans and
annuities.
Remaining costs such as
entertainment and travel are
variable lifestyle expenses
and should be financed from
money accumulated in per-
sonal savings and invest-
ments, including savings
see RETIRE Page G9


Saving for

Retirement

by Age

Percent of respondents who have
any money saved for retirement:


AGE 1997 2012


18-24



25-34




35-44



45-54




55+



TOTAL


Source: Consumer Federation of America 2012
Household Financial Planning Survey


G8 Friday, February 22, 2013


ESTATE PLANING


. ". .


I I


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RETIRE
from page G8

accounts, mutual funds and
IRAs, for example.
"It's very, very specific,"
says Jandreau, who stresses
that whether your retire-
ment will consist of garden-
ing, home dining and
neighborhood walks with
the dog or touring the
world's top 100 golf
courses depends not only
on the amount of money
you sock away but also on
how you manage it
thereafter.
According to "Key Find-
ings and Issues:
Longevity," a 2011 report
conducted by the Society of
Actuaries, most Americans
underestimate longevity
and fail to understand the
potential consequences of
living beyond their own
planned life expectancy.
By age 65, U.S. males in
average health have a 40
percent chance of living to
85 while females have a 53
percent chance, more if
you're healthier. Therefore,
financial planning experts
suggest preparing for 25 to
30 years in retirement to
lessen the chance of run-
ning out of money.
A second risk is inflation,
which can corrode the pur-
chasing power of your sav-
ings.
"The income that one
would receive today is
going to fall way short 20
years from now," says Jan-
dreau.
The Bureau of Labor Sta-
tistics' Consumer Price
Index inflation calculator
shows a person who retired
in 1992 with an income of
$50,000 would need almost
$82,437 to maintain the
same lifestyle today.
Because of inflation, So-
cial Security automatically
factors in a cost-of-living
adjustment; some pension
plans do, too. However,


these automatic increases
may not be enough.
"There has to be a hedge
against inflation and a con-
tinual income stream," says
Bill Losey, CFP, owner of
Bill Losey Retirement So-
lutions in Saratoga, N.Y.
The author of "Retire in a
Weekend" and former resi-
dent retirement expert on
CNBC's "On the Money"
television program advises
clients to allocate a mini-
mum of 30 to 40 percent of
a retirement portfolio to
stocks and stock mutual
funds from larger, good-
quality U.S and interna-
tional companies that have
a long-term history of not
only paying dividends but
also raising them annually
at a rate that outpaces
inflation.
Once you are all set with
your smart retirement plan,
all that's left is to wait for
your 62nd birthday to roll
around so you can quit
work, file for Social Secu-
rity and hit the green, right?
Not so fast.

Charles Jeszeck, director
of education, workforce and
income security at the U.S.
Government Accountability
Office in Washington, D.C.,
recommends that individu-
als delay receipt of Social
Security benefits until
reaching at least full retire-
ment age and, in some
cases, continue to work and
save, if possible.
"Claiming Social Secu-
rity benefits early may jeop-
ardize your economic
security because early
claimants receive perma-
nently reduced benefits," he
says.
For example, a person re-
tiring today who begins col-
lecting benefits at age 62
instead of 66 will receive
monthly payments reduced
by 25 percent.
If you can afford to wait
even longer, do, says
Jeszeck, as the monthly So-
cial Security benefit rises


She Plans, He Plans

Who's better at retirement planning? He is, hands down. Fewer women have completed any of the basic retirement planning
activities and just one-third say they actively monitor and manage retirement savings, compared with nearly half of men.


Determined what your income will be in
retirement
47 % female 50%0 male

Determined what your expenses will be in
retirement
39% female 43% male

Calculated the amount of assets and
investments you will have available to
spend in retirement
380 female 47 male


by about 8 percent each
year until age 70.
"One of the big mistakes
I see people make in their
50s or 60s is that they retire
or take an early incentive
offer because they think
they're ready to stop work-
ing, but what they really
wanted was a break," Losey


says.
He suggests they de-
crease the number of days
or hours they work and take
a corresponding pay cut.
But in Losey's opinion,
the ultimate in retirement
planning is never to retire.
"When I meet with
clients, I redefine retire-


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Estimated how many years your assets
and investments will last in retirement
29 % female 36% male

Identified the activities you plan to engage
in and their likely costs
26 % female 33%J male


None of the above
32 % female


280 male


Source: LIMRA survey of 3,763 U.S. adults, May 2012


ment as making work op- to get out of bed in the
tional," he says. "If you find morning that generates cash
a career that you love or a flow, why would you give
calling that gets you excited that up at age 60 or 65?"




Prnii Srnin Thg b I
A& ~ ~ ~ ~ m -n ____ -- -M-- ~ -


tirickland
Funeral Home and Crematory
"Your Trusted Family-Owned Funeral Home Since 1962"
Burial Cremation Pre-Planning

1901 SE Hwy. 19, CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


Friday, February 22, 2013 G9


ESTATE PLANING






G10 Friday February 22, 2013


ESTATE PLANING


r


ABCs of life




insurance


Insurance can play an important

role in a family financial plan if

only we cared to think about it.


By Lindsey Romain
CTW Features

The term "life insurance"
can send a shiver down
even the most resilient
spine. It doesn't matter that
it's a product that guaran-
tees coverage and protec-
tion of loved ones. For all
the goodness life insurance
provides, it means the in-
sured must confront a chill-
ingly inevitable prospect:


their own mortality.
In fact, more than 118
million adults in the United
States age 18 and older
don't have any life insur-
ance coverage, more than
half the adult population
(52 percent). That com-
pares with 2011, when 51
percent of U.S. adults were
uninsured, according to a
Genworth Financial survey
of 25,000 adults.
Experts agree that life in-


G ;st, "


7\C .,r


1i'


Thrivent Financial
for Lutherans-





Wide range of products and services
Retirement strategies
Annuities
Life insurance
Mutual funds
Health insurance
And other benefits of membership
Call today.
Peg Weston
Financial Representative
11486 W. Waterway Dr.
Homosassa, FL 34448
Office: 352-586-2343
Toll free: 855-505-3343
Insurance products issued or offered by Thrivent Financial for Lutherans, Appleton,
WI. Not all products are available in all states. Securities and investment advisory
services are offered through Thrivent Investment Management, Inc.,
625 Fourth Ave. S, Minneapolis, MN 55415, 800-847-4836, a FINRA and SIPC
member and a wholly owned subsidiary of Thrivent Financial for Lutherans.
Thrivent Financial representatives are registered representatives of Thrivent
Investment Management Inc. They are also licensed insurance agents of Thrivent
Financial.
For additional important disclosure information, please visit Thrivent.com/disclosures.
20328PAR11-11 201103348
2011 Thrivent Financial for Lutherans


s


surance is more than just
paying the bills when time
is up. It's about providing
stability for family mem-
bers left behind.
"Life insurance is love
insurance," says Steve
Leimberg, publisher of
Leimberg Information
Services, a Havertown,
Penn. publisher and co-
author of "Tools and Tech-
niques of Life Insurance
Planning," (National Un-
derwriter Company, 2007).
"When a breadwinner dies,
an adequate amount of life
insurance is typically the
major thing that determines
whether his or her sur-
vivors will live with dignity
or despair."
It's still a tantalizing
process, but understanding
the basics is a good start.
Here are some important
bullet points about life in-
surance to know going in.

Types
Life insurance policies
can be divided into two
major categories: term and
permanent.
Term policies are so
named because they pro-
vide for a set number of
years, typically 10, 20 or
30. It does not have an in-
vestment component; it's
paid for at the insured's
death, and only if the in-
sured dies before the term
of the contract runs out.
"No lifetime payments are
possible with term con-
tracts," says Leimberg.
Permanent or whole -
life insurance is kept as
long as the insured lives
and the policy owner wants
to keep it in force by pay-
ing premiums. It builds up
cash values that can be bor-
rowed by the policy owner
or received upon releasing
the insurer from its obliga-
tion to keep the policy in
force, according to Leim-
berg. The interest rate in a
permanent policy is fixed.
There are different ver-
sions of term and perma-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

nent policies, such as uni-
versal life, variable life,
guaranteed level term in-
surance, return of premium
term insurance that are
usually defined by cost.

Which to pick?
Whether term or perma-
nent life insurance is best
for you is determined by a
number of factors, most im-
portantly: what can you af-
ford and what do you need
it to do?
Term insurance is the
less expensive option, usu-
ally only a few hundred
dollars depending on health
or other variables. It's best
applied to short-term prob-
lems, such as paying off a
mortgage or other tempo-
rary debt at death.
Permanent insurance is
more complex and more
expensive. Unlike term
policies, it provides more
than a death benefit. A por-
tion of the premium funds a
separate, tax-free invest-
ment fund.
It's not the type of life in-
surance that matters, but
the dollar amount, argues
Jack Hungelmann, author
of "Insurance for Dum-
mies" (For Dummies,
2009) and proprietor of
Jack Hungelmann Risk
Management & Insurance,
an independent insurance
agency WHERE. "When
you die, your family isn't
going to care about the pol-
icy," he says. "All they
want to know is how much
money they're going to
get."
Hungelmann also notes
that one of the downsides
to cash value policies is
that holders end up paying
a lot in the beginning so
that rates stay level as he or
she ages. "It's good when
you're older, but it's tough
when you're young," he
says. "Some people I've
met are uninsured because
they can't afford to buy all
see INSURANCE Page G11







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Insurance

from Page 10
the life insurance they
need with that type of
policy."

Health matters
Life insurance isn't as
easy as picking up the
phone.
You have to qualify.
"They're going to ask
you ques-


tions about
your
lifestyle,
like 'are
you going
to jump out
of air-
planes?"'
says
Theodore
Affleck, an
independ-
ent life in-
surance
consultant
with over
37 years in
the busi-
ness. "If
so, they
might not
consider
you fit."
Expect
questions
about per-
sonal med-
ical history,
family
health and
employ-
ment, too.
After an as-
sessment,
candidates
are placed
into a risk-
classifica-
tion: super-
preferred,


preferred, standard and
sub-standard.
"A preferred person will
have a lower premium
than a sub-standard," says


ESTATE PLANING


Affleck of the system.
He also points out that
women will have lower
premiums than men since
they tend to live longer,
that an overweight person
will have a higher pre-
mium than a marathon
runner, and so on.
Smoking is also a sig-
nificant factor; non-smok-
ers are almost guaranteed
a lower premium than
smokers, Leimberg says.


Plan ac-
cordingly
Despite the
complicated
process of
applying
and qualify-
ing, experts
stress that
life insur-
ance is still
an impor-
tant part of
any family
plan.
"There
are usually
far too
many inap-
propriate,
unsuitable
replace-
ments,"
warns Af-
fleck.
And don't
just buy it
"because
it's the adult
thing to do,"
says Hun-
gelmann.
Make sure
it's done for
the right
reasons.
He ad-
vises going
back to that
idea of fam-
ily:
"You


don't buy car insurance
when you don't have a
car. Don't buy life insur-
ance when you don't have
someone to care for."


Estate

from Page 3
an estate's value. A cer-
tified estate specialist
such as one designated
by the National Auc-
tioneers Association
(NAA) as well as per-
sonal trained in the val-
uation process through
Graduate Personal
Property Appraiser des-
ignation can be of in-
valuable assistance.
The goals of an estate
plan are to efficiently
and effectively carry
out the wishes of the
draftee. Utilizing a
company that adheres
to a strong code of
ethics such as those es-
tablished and adhered
to by NAA members is
a step in the positive
direction.
Being up to date is
important for individu-
als in helping under-
stand values and the
disposition process of
goods when the time
comes. The emotional
or sentimental value of


one's possessions stops
at the front door. As
such, one needs to real-
ize the economic im-
pact an item with
personal sentiment may
have on the recipient or
the proceeds derived
from its sale on the
estate.
An effective estate
plan should include
contingencies which
may kick in as both the
health and financial sit-
uations of an individual
change over time. It
may be necessary
weather through a per-
sonal decision to down-
size, the loss of
mobility or of financial
support to make a
change.
At this time, having
knowledge of where to
go and how to proceed
is of great importance.
In dealing with this sce-
nario, certain items of
value whether personal
or real may benefit the
situation by being liqui-
dated.
As all estates are dif-
ferent and values or


connectivity of certain
items one to another
can be of little or major
importance, some
thought is required to
maximize the recapture
of wealth.
Many times during
the liquidation process
value is inadvertently
lost due to hasty deci-
sions or misinforma-
tion. Values change in
today's connected mar-
ketplace faster and with
a seeming ignorance of
the established norm of
the past.
It is more important
now more than ever to
work with a knowl-
edgeable firm that is
connected to the market
on a regular and re-
peated basis. There are
many times when the
company tasked with
the job of recapturing
value has been stymied
by family friends or
neighbors who, in a
rush to assist and do
good, have discarded,
destroyed or given
away much of an es-
tate's value.


Provenance for an
important piece of art,
furniture or other items
of the past can greatly
affect value, as can a
well-meaning attempt
to clean and prep from
a unwitting or overzeal-
ous hand can destroy
patina and desirability,
which will affect values
as well.
So keep in mind as
your planning process
proceeds knowledge is
king when you are in
the throes of a liquida-
tion decision.
Estates come in all
shapes and sizes and as
such, the most impor-
tant estate in the world
is yours.
Enlisting the assis-
tance of a qualified pro-
fessional early on in the
process can not only
help the most compli-
cated situation, but can
simplify and maximize
the returns for anyone.
May we all live long
and happy lives knowing
that in the end our accu-
mulated treasures will be
well planned for.


Friday February 22, 2013 Gil


Top Reasons for
Purchasing Life
Insurance



Marriage


Part of
retirement plan


Birth of a child


Home
ownership

Death of some-
one who did not
have a life insur-
ance policy
Death of some-
one who had a
life insurance
policy

College
expenses


Other


Source Northestern Mutual Life Insurance
A awareness online poll of 2,097 adults, 2012


HOw Much Do You

Know About Your Loved

Ones' Insurance?

Location of Important Papers
Laws & Procedures

I CAN HELP!

Bell Family Insurance
S "Where you are treated like family"
iL 352-628-6168
5388 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa Nancy Bell
nancbell@tampabay.rr.com President


Stocks.

Bonds. CDs.

IRAs. Mutual Funds.

Justin E. Rooks
Financial Advisor

4550 South Suncoat Blvd
Homosassa, FL 34446
352-628-3466
www.edwardjones.com



EdwardJones
MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING
00DZU Member SIPC






G12 Friday February 22, 2013


Pop Quiz: Money Matters
Knowledge is power Grab a pencil and see what you know
or don't about some numbers that shape your life.


1. More than half of consumers
think saving for retirement is more
difficult than:
a. Training for a marathon
b. Learning a new language
c. Hitting a hole-in-one
d. Quitting smoking

2. What percentage of U.S. adults
do not have a savings account?
a. 27 percent
b. 57 percent
c. 77 percent

3. What percentage of people 65
to 74 require personal assistance to
manage some activities of daily liv-
ing, such as using the telephone,
shopping, meal preparation or man-
aging money?
a. 35 percent
b. 45 percent


c. 55 percent
d. 65 percent

4. Fifteen years ago half of all
non-retirees said they expected to re-
tire before age 65. About what pro-
portion of non-retirees has that
expectation today?
a. One-third
b. One-quarter

5. Which of the following is the
biggest contributing factor in the cal-
culation of your FICO score, the
measure of consumer creditworthi-
ness?
a. Payment history; consistently
make payments on time
b. Keeping low revolving balances
low; never making out your card
c. Never using credit cards at all
d. Having multiple credit cards


ESTATE PLANING


with high balances

6. A year's stay in a nursing home
is less expensive than a year's tuition
at Harvard University.
True or false?

7. What is the average American's
life expectancy?
a. 75
b. 82
c. 78
d. 86

8. Which age group expresses the
greatest doubt that they will have
enough to live on in retirement?
a. 35 to 44
b. 55 to 64

9. Households headed by adults
35 to 44 lost most wealth in the past
decade. By what percentage did this
group's wealth decline from 2001 to
2010?
a. 58 percent
b. 46 percent
c. 63 percent


d. 25 percent

10. What percent of people with a
401(k) retirement savings account
that allows loans have borrowed
from it?
a. 21 percent
b. 33 percent
c. 12 percent

11. Medicare covers approxi-
mately what percentage of the cost
of health care services (not includ-
ing long-term care) for beneficiaries
65 and older?
a. 40 percent
b. 50 percent
c. 60 percent
d. 70 percent

12. Social Security pays benefits
that are on average equal to what
percent of your pre-retirement
earnings?
a. 40 percent
b. 50 percent
c. 60 percent
d. 70 percent


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

How do you rate?

8-10 correct:
Green eye shades..err...hats off!
5-8 correct:
Less "Dancing With the Stars," more
crunching the numbers!

4 or less correct:
Meh. Keep on learning!

1 a: Training for a marathon (ING)
2 a: 27 percent (Allstate Insurance)
3 d: 65 percent (agingstats.gov)
4 a: about one-third (CFPB)
5 a: Payment history (FICO)
6 False: A year in a nursing home,
$90,000, is nearly double Harvard's
$53,000 tuition/room/board/fees for
2011-2012 (Northwestern Mutual)
7 b: 82 years (Northwestern Mutual)
8 a: 35 to 44 (Pew Research Center)
9 b: 46 percent(Pew Research Center)
10- a: 21 percent (EBRI)
11 c: 60 percent
12 a: 40 percent (Department
of Labor)


Financial Services & Annuities
Sheldon-Palmes Insurance offers a complete line of
financial products and services ranging from annuities
to medicare and retirement plans. These products and
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personal and business financial needs, including:

Annuities & Financial Services


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* 401(k) Retirement Plans
* Buy/Sell Protection
* Flexible Spending Accounts (FSA)
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1037 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.,
S Hernando, FL 34442
352-341-4661


Fr S Ihn I+ l mis u


Insurance
www.sheldonpalmsinsurance.com


Ulpill 01901
10"
1/ D~


8469 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd.,
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-1030


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