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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 02-17-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03034

Full Text


In their grasp: Wrestlers earn state medals /B1


Sunny but cold
and breezy; hard
freeze tonight.
PAGE A4


FEBRUARY 17, 2013 Florida's Best Communit


CITRU-S CO U N T Y





wcRONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


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V *ILo0 *g D


VOL. 118 ISSUE 194


Support system


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Donald Mara speaks with Home Delivered Meals volunteer Joan Soucy following a delivery of his lunch to his
Beverly Hills home.

Senior Care Services help residents remain independent


LANE VICK
Special to the Chronicle

Like older people every-
where, Citrus County
seniors want to main-
tain their independent
living status as long as
possible. Through Senior Care
Services, Citrus County provides
assistance to those who desire to
stay living in their homes even
though circumstances may make
that independent living difficult.
"Our purpose is to keep peo-
ple in their homes, living inde-
pendently," said Nancy Neale,
Senior Care Services supervisor.
"We're kind of a one-stop shop-
ping for senior services."
Services offered are many, in-
cluding Home Delivered Meals,
Pet Meals, Emergency Alert Re-
sponse systems, home making
services, caregiver support
groups, respite care, personal
care, companionship, emergency
home energy assistance for the
elderly, HOPE (a private pay pro-


ADJUSTING
TO LIFE ALONE
Forty-five percent of women
65 and older are widowed,
outnumbering men four to
one. Many times, a widow's
income is less after her
husband's passing,
presenting a lifestyle change.
Five years after they are
widowed, some 9.4 percent
are living below the low-
income threshold.
See story, Page C1
gram) and nutrition counseling.
Range of services
Once a person is referred to
Senior Care Services, often
through a phone call from a wor-
ried adult child or from the
client themselves, a case man-
ager will assess the person's
needs and develop a care plan to
provide the greatest amount of
support. Depending on the
client's needs, services may in-


clude arranging for in-home as-
sistance, providing crisis inter-
vention, assisting with other
available county support serv-
ices, acting as a liaison to family
members and even, if need be,
assisting in moving the person to
a retirement complex or nursing
home.
Homemaking services provide
house cleaning, shopping, put-
ting groceries away and doing
laundry Personal care may in-
clude help with bathing, sham-
pooing, shaving and other
hygiene needs. Sometimes sen-
iors are also caretakers of oth-
ers, and respite care provides
much-needed relief time.
Companion services may in-
clude visitations or arranging
transportation to one of the sen-
ior community centers where a
person may have a meal, partici-
pate in enjoyable programs and
make friends. The Emergency
Alert Response system is an


Page A5


Paddle boarder to make stop in county


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
A man geared to shed light on the
conservation of oceans and water-
ways will paddle by Homosassa on
Monday
Justin Riney of Mother Ocean, an
environmental nonprofit group, will
make a stop on his paddle board at
the Homosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park on Monday afternoon.
Riney launched what he calls Ex-
pedition Florida 500 modern-day
exploration of Florida's coastline,
waterways and aquatic ecosystem -
at the beginning of the year.
Riney is expected to spend the
rest of the year paddle boarding the
coastline of the state and its inland


waterways, covering the coastline
during the first half of the year. The
effort also is in conjunction with
500th anniversary of the arrival of
the Spanish in Florida.
Riney is expected to arrive at the
park's Garden of the Springs at
about 12:30 p.m. Monday
Riney will have a meet and greet
and presentation at the park's Visi-
tor Center from 2 to 4 p.m.
According to a release from
Mother Ocean, the group has part-
nered with Viva Florida 500, the
Florida Department of State, the
Florida Department of Environmen-
tal Protection, Quiksilver Waterman
Collection, Tahoe SUP and various
others to embark on the yearlong
journey, combining the best of ex-


ploration, adventure, stewardship,
science and sport into a package that
will include the full gamut of the wa-
terman's lifestyle.
Riney will be joined by represen-
tatives of partnering organizations.
The Mother Ocean group encour-
ages others to paddle with them, in-
cluding fellow team riders from
Quiksilver and various celebrity
paddlers.
For information, email Cynthia
Trone at cynthia@motherocean.org.
Follow the yearlong journey in detail
at www.facebook.com/XF500, and
learn more online at www.mother
ocean.org.
Contact Chronicle reporter AB.
Sidibe at 352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Federal funding for the Cross Florida Barge Canal
was first approved in 1963. The project, created to
provide commercial-barge traffic access across
the middle of the state, stalled in the early 1970s.


Barge


Canal at 50

Costly project could be

paying offfor county
PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
As the Cross Florida Barge Canal approaches
its golden anniversary, the one-time controver-
sial public works project is poised to play an
even bigger role in Citrus County's economy
It already serves as a recreation attraction for
residents and visitors and is being evaluated as
the site for a port.
This year will mark the In 1567
canal's 50th anniversary of
federal funding for construc- Spanish
tion and the 40th anniversary
of federal legislation filed to explorers
put the project to rest. It is
also the 80th anniversary of Were under
the creation of the Florida instruction
Canal Authority, the agency
formed in 1933 to oversee from King
construction of a canal across
the state. Philip II to
Of course, the cross-state find a route
canal project goes back a lot fn u
further than 50 years. Ac- crossing
cording to a National Water-
ways Study by the U.S. Army the Florida
Corps of Engineers, the con-
cept of a water route across peninsula.
Florida dates back to 1567.
Spanish explorers were under instruction from
King Philip II to find a route crossing the Florida
peninsula.
It was a concept with legs and had numerous
champions as the New World developed and
Florida became a state. In 1826, according to the
study, Congress authorized the first in a long se-
ries of surveys to find a canal route across Florida.
The canal would even have a short life (1935-
36) as a Depression relief project. And it would
almost gain traction in 1942 as a national defense
project, but the funding went elsewhere. Studies
and surveys would continue. Finally, President
John F Kennedy put $1 million for canal con-
struction in a public works budget passed by the
House Appropriations Committee.
Groundbreaking
On Feb. 27, 1964, President Lyndon Johnson
See Page A7


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Weekly ROUNDUP



Week in state gov't: Jim Greer


soap opera, we hardly knew ye


BRANDON LARRABEE
The News Service of
Florida

TALLAHASSEE It
was supposed to be a week
of loud scandal, with much
of the attention of the
Florida political establish-
ment focused not on the
Capitol, but on an Orlando
courtroom where the trial
of former Republican Party
of Florida Chairman Jim
Greer was set to take place.
In the same courtroom
where the sensational
Casey Anthony trial played
out, tales of golf carts
crammed with prostitutes
and stories about the inner
workings of the RPOF
stretching back to the days
when Charlie Crist was
still a Republican were
supposed to unfold.
No one was quite sure
who had more to fear from
the spectacle the RPOF
or Crist, now a Democrat -
but the likelihood was
someone would end up cov-
ered in more sludge than a
powerless cruise ship.
Instead, the courtroom
was filled largely with a
curious audience as pro-
ceedings were set to begin.
Greer, the attorneys and
the judge were elsewhere
-because a plea deal was
being worked out that
could send Greer to jail for
42 months and might have
other, confidential terms.
The closest Tallahassee
came to political scandal
would be the revelation
the state's transportation
secretary had ordered up
a study of the speed limit
on a road where he was
pulled over for driving too
quickly a stretch of
pavement with a top speed
that had driven its fair
share of city residents to
distraction.
And the loudest things
would get were perhaps at
debates over traffic-light
cameras or alimony
Which was somewhat fit-
ting after all, it was a
stop-and-go week of news,
there were suspicions that
someone was getting paid
to go away, and no one was
happy in the end.
NOBODY DIES IN
THE END
Maybe it shouldn't have
been a surprise Greer
would ultimately cop a
plea to four counts of grand
theft and one count of
money laundering; there
were too many people who
wanted it to go away But
the plea came after months
of ominous warnings from
Greer, who promised the
Miami New Times "a
Shakespearean play where
everyone dies in the end."
As it turned out, those
threats were "full of sound
and fury, signifying
nothing."
Democrats believed Re-
publicans "breathed a col-
lective sigh of relief this
morning," but the RPOF
was too busy focusing on
its bate noire: Crist, who
hand-picked Greer to head
the party after Crist's
sweeping win in the 2006
gubernatorial election.
"For the past three
years, Jim Greer has tried
to damage the reputation
of the Republican Party
and its leaders, but the
truth is now known that
Jim Greer broke the law,
stole from RPOF and our
donors, and then said and
did everything he could to
cover up and distract at-
tention from his crimes,"
RPOF Executive Director
Mike Grissom said.
"Everything Jim Greer has
said and done over these
past few years should be
considered in that light."
The case against Greer
centered on allegations he
used his position as party
chairman to steer business
to Victory Strategies, his
fundraising company.
Greer said party leaders
knew what he was doing,
and a secret severance
agreement between him-
self and party leaders
should have protected him


from any criminal liability.
And despite inquiries
from multiple media out-
lets including some who
asked whether Greer was
paid to walk away -


Associated Press
Jim Greer, ousted former Florida GOP chairman, pleads guilty Feb. 11 to four counts of
theft and money laundering in an Orange County courtroom. The plea deal avoids what
would could have been an embarrassing trial for the state GOP.


Damon Chase, who had
fiercely defended Greer
during his legal troubles,
wouldn't elaborate on any
terms of Greer's agree-
ment to plead guilty Chase
said it was confidential.
"Knowing the deal he
got, I don't blame him one
bit for taking it," Chase
told the News Service.
Greer was not the only
figure from the Republi-
can political establish-
ment who settled an
investigation with a plea
deal this week.
On Tuesday, Panhandle
developer and prodigious
GOP contributor Jay Odom
pleaded guilty in federal
court to a scheme to funnel
donations to a presidential
campaign through employ-
ees or their family mem-
bers. The two cases were
not related, and no one
had been threatened with
as much as bodily injury in
the Odom case.
MEANWHILE, BACK
IN TALLAHASSEE
At about the same time
Greer was considering his
future, House Republi-
cans were approving a leg-
islative measure dealing
with an entirely different
kind of fundraising: the
amount individual cam-
paigns can raise and the
kind of third-party groups
that can involve them-
selves in campaigns.
On a 10-2 vote that in-
cluded half the Demo-
cratic minority on the
prevailing side, the House
Ethics and Elections Sub-
committee approved a
measure allowing a candi-
date running for a state
House seat in the Panhan-
dle to raise almost four
times as much money from
each contributor as a can-
didate running for presi-
dent of the United States.
The trade-off for the
new, $10,000 limit is a law
abolishing "committees of
continuous existence,"
often-shady groups that
work as the attack dogs for
candidates who want to ap-
pear above the mud-sling-
ing. The measure (HB 569)
is a key priority of House
Speaker Will Weatherford,
R-Wesley Chapel.
"Let's face it, we would
all like to see less money
in the political process,
but we know that that's not
going to be an option," said
Rep. LarryAhern, R-Semi-
nole. "On balance, and to-
gether, these reforms
address the problem and
provide the solutions."
Others were less san-


guine about the possibility
of 20-tupling the amount of
money a candidate could
raise from each individ-
ual; Florida's current limit
is $500.
"By increasing these lim-
its, (it) does not look out for
the small guy," said Rep.
Alan Williams, D-Tallahas-
see, one of the dissenters.
"It does favor incumbents."
The same panel unani-
mously approved a bill de-
signed to expand early
voting in some areas and
limit the length of ballots,
though Democrats said
they will want more for
their support on the floor
Still, it left some hope the
legal overhaul following the
snafus in November's pres-
idential election will not be
a bitter, partisan fight like
the 2011 battle over HB
1355, which included re-
ducing early voting days.
"You're certainly going
to get Democratic support
if it improves and resolves
the problems we had with
1355," Waldman said.
RED, GREEN LIGHT;
ALIMONY FIGHT
With the big-ticket issues
leading to a spirit of Kum-
baya in the House, and
Senate committee burying
their noses in budget-brief-
ing books, the legislative
fighting was largely con-
fined to issues that could
labor in the background in
the 2013 legislative session,
like a bill to repeal the
state law allowing cameras
at traffic lights.
The cameras are used to
catch and hopefully
deter those who might
run red lights. But they
also bring protests from
those on the right and left
on civil liberties and pri-
vacy grounds.
"We're willing to compro-
mise the Fifth Amendment
of the United States Consti-
tution: the right against self-
incrimination for
self-perceived safety," said
Rep. Carlos Trujillio of
Miami, the bipartisan mea-
sure's Republican sponsor
"That's the road we're going
down. We're willing to tell
somebody, 'You are guilty
until proven innocent"'
But critics of the repeal
bill (HB 4011) some of
whom draw funding from
the cameras say it
would roll back a key
safety feature.
"I think it's obvious that it
does change people's driv-
ing behaviors, and I think it
is obvious that it also helps
to save lives and prevent
people from having serious


injuries," said Haines City
Police Chief Rick Sloan.
Also drawing some con-
troversy: a proposal (HB
231) that would rein in the
amount of time alimony
payments could be re-
quired, try to short-circuit
alimony in marriages of 10
years or less and shield re-
tirees from alimony
requirements.
"I want to make this so
people can get divorced
and move on with their
life," said Rep. Ritch
Workman, R-Melbourne,
who is divorced but indi-
cated he has not paid or
received alimony
Nothing is ever quite so
simple in family law. Rep.
Cynthia Stafford, D-Miami,
promptly slammed the bill
as "anti-woman."
"I think this bill will do
more harm than good," she
said.
And foreshadowing an-
other potential battle in
the Legislature, Sen. Kelli
Stargel, R-Lakeland, filed
a bill that would allow par-
ents to petition their
school board to adopt a
specific turnaround option
for any school that drew an
"F" on state report cards
for two straight years.
"When you give parents
the opportunity to get in-
volved and do what's best
for their kids, it's a win,"
Stargel said.
But Democrats, who
beat back the idea last
year, were already draw-
ing the battle lines, saying
the measure (SB 862)
could end up with private
businesses running many
Florida schools.
"We should focus our ef-
forts on improving public
schools, not giving up on
them by handing the keys
to a for-profit corporation,"
Senate Minority Leader
Chris Smith, D-Fort Laud-
erdale, said in a statement
STORY OF THE
WEEK: Jim Greer pleads
guilty to four counts of
grand theft and one count
of money laundering,
avoiding a trial that could
have brought the secrets of
former Gov Charlie Crist
and the Republican Party
of Florida to light.
QUOTE OF THE
WEEK: "I was one of those
dorky kids in high school
with no girlfriend that sat
in the front row and read a
lot and helped other stu-
dents study for their
exams and read the Con-
gressional Record at
night." Senate Appro-
priations Chairman Joe
Negron, R-Stuart


We Welcome You To


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State BRIEFS


Jets escort plane
from Obama area
STUART Officials say
two F-16 military jets have
escorted a small plane away
from a no-
fly zone
above
where
President
Barack
Obama is
vacation-
ing along
Florida's President
Treasure Obama
Coast. on vacation
U.S. in Florida.
Army Lt.
Col. Mike Humphreys said
the planes forced the
Cessna 152 to land in
Witham Field in Stuart
around noon Saturday. Local
authorities met the plane
when it landed. No other de-
tails were released.
Federal Aviation Adminis-
tration officials said they are
investigating whether the
Cessna entered the tem-
porarily restricted flight area.
Obama is spending the
weekend with some friends
at the Floridian, a secluded
yacht and golf club.
Police officer
found not guilty
PENSACOLA-A Pen-
sacola police K-9 officer has
been found not guilty of bat-
tery after a video showed
him allegedly slamming a
woman into her car while ar-
resting her.
A dash cam video shows
Officer Christopher Geraci
telling hit-and-run suspect
Abbi Bonds repeatedly to get
back into her car in August.
She ignored the command.
Geraci allegedly grabbed
her by her arm and bashed
her into the side of the car,
then grabbed her by her hair.
But Geraci's attorney said
Friday the video that went
viral didn't show the entire
incident.
The Pensacola News
Journal reported 29-year-old
Bonds was not seriously
injured.
Homeless woman
killed by train
TAMPA--Authorities say
a homeless woman has died
after crawling underneath a
stopped train to avoid walk-
ing around it when it sud-
denly began moving again.
Hillsborough County Sher-
iff's officials said the victim
and her boyfriend didn't want


Dr. Michael Welch, UMU & Associates


to walk several thousand
feet around the stopped train
Friday night, so they decided
to duck under it.
The boyfriend went first
and was unharmed. When
the victim crawled under the
train, it began moving
forward.
Authorities said she was
struck by a wheel and died
at the scene. She has not
been identified.
Train officials confirmed
the boyfriend's account, say-
ing they had stopped mo-
mentarily to activate a
manual switch. The train con-
tinued on for several miles,
as operators did not know
someone had been killed.
The investigation
continues.
1 dead, 1 injured
in Tampa shooting
TAMPA- Tampa Police
have identified a man who
was killed in a shooting.
Authorities said 18-year-
old John Edward Browne
was killed Friday night and
18-year-old Reginald John-
son was hospitalized with in-
juries. His condition was not
known.
A911 caller reported a
fight and possible gunshots
were heard in the back-
ground. Authorities arrived to
find Browne dead and John-
son alert and conscious.
No other details were
given.
Official fighting
spitting ordinance
LAKELAND -A Lakeland
City Commissioner wants to
do away with a 69-year-old
ordinance that prohibits peo-
ple from spitting on the side-
walk or grass.
Commissioner Don Sel-
vage said the ordinance is
outdated and was going to
address the issue with the
full board on Friday.
Selvage's plan to nix the
spitting ordinance comes
eight months after a man
was arrested for spitting on
the sidewalk or grass at
2:30 a.m. May 30 near
Florida Southern College.
The charge against
Joseph Stoiber, 29, was
dropped by prosecutors.
The Lakeland Ledger re-
ported police have filed
charges for spitting in 17
cases since 2000.
Selvage said he doesn't
believe bad manners or
even disgusting behavior
raise to the level of illegality.
-From wire reports


Dr. Philip Sherman, UMU Ur. Jay Skipper, UMU


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A2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013


STATE


I







Page A3 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17,2013



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




City council to peruse visionary plans


Officials to compare Crystal River's

plan to county commissioner's ideas


A.B. SIDIBE
Staffwriter

CRYSTAL RIVER The City
Council is having a workshop at
6 p.m. Monday to discuss com-
peting visions for the city's
redevelopment.
Officials scheduled
the workshop in re-
sponse to Citrus County
Commissioner Dennis
Damato' plan which
he unveiled in Decem-
ber called the "Part-
nership for a new /:.o
beginning." In the plan,
Damato calls for divvy- Dei
ing up the city into three Dar
distinct development present
zones or districts: Down- alten
town/historic waterfront, vision
town center/environ-


among other things, the pur-
chase and development of the
old Waddington and now Pe-
trella property on the corner
of Citrus Avenue and U.S. 19.
Damato's plan also envisions
a mix-use town center on the
U.S. 19 corridor outside of the


nnis
nato
nted an
native
ary plan
*ember.


mental and resort. He calls for, works.


downtown zone to draw
in businesses and urban
residents.
However, city officials
cried foul when Damato
revealed his plans, say-
ing they weren't con-
sulted on the front end.
They also claimed he
borrowed liberally from
the city's own plan de-
veloped in 2008. The city
claims a lot of the proj-
ects also have either
been done or are in the


IF YOU GO
WHAT: Crystal River
visioning workshop.
WHEN: 6 p.m. Monday.
WHERE: City Hall, 123 N.W.
U.S. 19, Crystal River.

Monday, city officials intend to
stack the both plans side by side
and eliminate redundancies,
tick off projects already accom-
plished and discuss the portions
of Damato's plan not proposed
by the city, City Manager Andy
Houston said.
The city staff has identified
the following about both plans:
Ten proposed projects ap-
pear in the city's 2008 plan and
Damato's 2012 plan, including
some already completed.
Since both plans advocate the
common projects, it would ap-
pear the only discussion needed
would relate to potential joint
funding plans to accomplish the
projects.


At least four other projects
identified in Damato's plan
should be non-controversial in
terms of discussion between the
city and the county.
Two projects identified in
Damato's plan appear to be con-
ditioned on a specific project
being pursued in the future.
That being the case, there is
no reason to discuss the projects
at this point.
The city also points to four is-
sues of significant differences.
Damato's plan proposes the
vacant lot, or Petrella property,
at the intersection of U.S. 19 and
Citrus Avenue be acquired by
the city, with county park impact
fees as the primary funding
source. It then would be con-
verted into an "event lawn" to
encourage special events and
community gatherings in the
downtown area.
The city's 2008 plan proposes
the property identified as the
"most significant opportunity
identified in the district" -
would be utilized if ultimately


developed for retail purposes. If
the property were acquired uti-
lizing park impact fee funding,
using it as a retail site might be
precluded.
Damato's plan proposes to
put a performance stage on the
"event lawn." The current city
plans call for a performance
stage/gazebo to be installed in
King's Bay Park.
Damato's plan incorporates
a proposed site plan for the
Three Sisters Springs site in-
consistent with either of the two
alternatives developed by the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
(USFWS), as finalized and dis-
tributed in September 2012.
Damato's plan proposes the
city consider allowing a maxi-
mum building height of up to 70
feet as part of the redevelop-
ment of commercial property
within the proposed Resort Re-
development Area. The city lim-
its building height to 50 feet.
Contact Chronicle reporter
A.B. Sidibe at 352-564-2925 or
asidibe@chronicleonline.com.


March 1

deadline

for '13 tax

exemption

Special to the Chronicle
The 2013 deadline for
the filing homestead and
other exemptions and
classifications for Citrus
County is nearing. This
year, the deadline falls
on Friday, March 1.
Property Appraiser
Geoffrey Greene re-
minds residents applica-
tions may either be hand
delivered or mailed and
postmarked no later
than March 1. For eligi-
bility, a complete appli-
cation with all
supporting documenta-
tion is required. The
public is encouraged not
to wait to the last
minute, to be sure they
have the necessary doc-
umentation to submit an
application.
This deadline applies
to:
Homestead exemp-
tion.
Widow/Widower ex-
emption.
All veterans disabil-
ity exemptions.
Deployed military
exemption for duty in
specified active war
zones during 2012.
Other eligible physi-
cal disability exemption.
Portability
applications.
Agricultural or con-
servation classification.
Conservation in Per-
petuity exemption.
Institutional, educa-
tion, religious or charita-
ble exemptions.
Homestead exemption
is the most common ap-
plication. Property own-
ers with an existing
exemption or classifica-
tion should have re-
ceived their annual
renewal postcard during
January 2013. Assuming
there are no changes in
ownership or other sta-
tus, renewal is auto-
matic. In that case, an
existing homeowner
need not apply again. So
the March 1 deadline
does not apply
A new application is
required if you have
bought a new home
and/or moved, or even
recorded a deed from an
individual into a family
trust for tax planning
purposes. Contact the
Property Appraiser's Of-
fice if questionable.
Filings after March 1,
2013, are held and will
be considered for the
2014 tax roll. For good
cause, late filings maybe
eligible for considera-
tion at the discretion of
the property appraiser
upon request
One final remedy for
consideration for the
2013 tax year is to peti-
tion the Value Adjust-
ment Board (VAB).


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Larry Leons held his cup as Jane Vandenbergh dished out one of the 24 different flavors of chilis at the Chili Cook-off and Craft Festival.
However, this one was not his favorite flavor, as his taste buds were screaming for No. 9.


Crockpot





creations

Connoisseurs take bite out ofchili

competition, fund several charities


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
OZELLO Aromas of chili
rippled through the air as 24 di-
verse crock pots bubbled away
Saturday at the seventh annual
Ozello Chili Cook-off and Craft
Festival hosted by the Ozello
Civic Association.
Sweet, spicy, meat and meat-
less variations were among the
selections for connoisseurs
who sampled chilis for $5. Car-
rying a yellow card and pencil
in one hand, they walked
around to each chili dispersing
a "tasting" into a polystyrene
foam cup. Many facial expres-
sions were like words across
their face as it was obvious to
their taste bud's thoughts.
Larry Leons' face described


exactly what he was thinking,
"This one was alright, but I re-
ally liked No. 9."
However, Ruth and Don Lar-
son from Minnesota had a dif-
ferent favorite.
"The hillbilly one was our fa-
vorite," Don Larson said. "It
didn't have a lot fancy stuff in it"
"I'm looking for something
with a real kick," his wife added.
After tasting each of the 24
chilis, connoisseurs voted. Chili
entries competed for a first
prize of $100, second prize of
$50 and a special prize for third
place.
"Several years ago, I won first
place," said Barbara Elvers,
chairman of the Chili Cook-off.
"The judges said mine was so
spicy that they couldn't taste
anyone else's."


Traditional variations of chili were represented as well as chilis with
a twist, such as tequila, at the seventh annual Chili Cook-off and
Craft Festival hosted by the Ozello Civic Association.


No two pots were the same.
Unique or special ingredients
were listed in front of each
chili.
"Their might be people aller-
gic to certain ingredients,"
Elvers said. "Last year, we had
someone put chocolate in their
chili. This year, we have a chili
that contains tequila."
Cold weather moving in Sat-
urday likely prevented some
would-be chili tasters from
coming, Elvers noted. However,
some tasters felt cold weather


and chili go hand in hand.
The craft festival included 35
artists and vendors selling pot-
tery, paintings, photographs
and other items.
The club raised funds by sell-
ing chances for a 14-foot Phoenix
kayak. All proceeds from the
drawing benefited CASA, Toys
for Tots, the Ozello Scholarship
Fund and the Food Bank
Contact Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at 352-563-
5660, ext 1334, or eworthington
@chronicleonline. com.


Around the COUNTY


Sponsors sought for
annual Shrimpapalooza
The Rotary Club of Homosassa
Springs is looking for sponsors for the
upcoming Shrimpapalooza 2013 on
March 23.
Those interested in sponsoring the
event can participate in The Rotary


Club of Homosassa Springs' Shrimpa-
palooza 2013 parade, with a car, float,
trailer, motorcycle or other entry fea-
turing the business. It will be seen by
spectators from Citrus and Hernando
counties and out-of-area visitors.
After the parade, sponsors can use
booths to sell wares or promote their
business.


For more information on how to be-
come a sponsor and the sponsorship
levels, call Tom Feeney at 352-201-
2520 or email amstaff@infionline.net.
Strawberry Festival
around corner
The 26th annual Floral City Straw-
berry Festival will kick off with a Friday,


March 1, "Berries, Brew and BBQ"
event from 5 to 10 p.m. at the Floral
City Library Complex with Bill "the
Sauce Boss" Wharton playing blues
while cooking gumbo. On March 2, the
festival gets under way at 9 a.m.
Admission is $3 for adults and chil-
dren under 12 are free.
-From staff reports


I


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY
SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: Presidents' Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, cereal variety
and toast, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Wednesday: Sausage
and egg biscuit, cereal vari-
ety and toast, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, tater
tots, cereal variety and toast,
juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Presidents' Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Creamy maca-
roni and cheese, corn dog
minis, yogurt parfait plate,
fresh garden salad, steamed
green beans, chilled straw-
berry cups, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Wednesday: Spaghetti
with ripstick, oven-baked
breaded chicken with ripstick,
Very Berry super salad with
roll, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, sweet green peas,
chilled mixed fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds,
chicken alfredo, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh baby carrots,
sweet corn, chilled flavored
applesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Friday: Breaded chicken
sandwich, mozzarella
maxstix, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, steamed broc-
coli, flavored craisins, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Presidents' Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast,


tater tots, milk and juice
variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast
egg and cheese wrap, MVP
breakfast, cereal and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Friday: Breakfast sand-
wich stuffer, ultimate break-
fast round, cereal and toast,
tater tots, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Monday: Presidents' Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Cheese pizza,
pulled pork barbecue on bun,
PB dippers, fresh baby car-
rots, steamed broccoli, chilled
applesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Wednesday: Hamburger,
barbecued chicken with
ripstick, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, baked beans,
potato triangles, chilled
peach cups, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Thursday: Fajita chicken
and rice with ripstick, nacho
rounds, Very Berry super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh garden salad,
Mexicali corn, chilled flavored
applesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Friday: Spaghetti with rip-
stick, mozzarella maxsitx, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
sweet peas, chilled straw-
berry cups, fruit juice, milk
variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Presidents' Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, ultra cin-
namon bun, cereal and
toasts, tater tots, juice and
milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast
egg and cheese wrap, MVP


breakfast, cereal and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco bread, ultimate
breakfast round, cereal and
toast, grits, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sand-
wich stuffer, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety, toast,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Monday: Presidents' Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Chicken nacho
rounds with Spanish rice,
turkey and gravy over noo-
dles with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, Italian
super salad with roll, maxstix,
yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, cold corn salad, celery,
potato triangles, sweet peas,
baby carrots, strawberry cup,
juice, milk.
Wednesday: Fresh turkey
wrap, spaghetti with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken
sandwich, ham super salad
with roll, pizza, yogurt
parfait plate, baby carrots,
baked beans, chilled baked
beans, potato triangles,
flavored craisins, juice,
milk.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken with rice,
macaroni and cheese with
ripstick, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, turkey super salad
with roll, maxstix, yogurt
parfait plate, garden salad,
baby carrots, green beans,
poato roasters, cucumbers,
celery, strawberry cup, juice,
milk.
Friday: Pulled barbecued
pork on bun, chicken alfredo
with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, Very Berry
super salad with roll, pizza,
yogurt parfait plate, baby
carrots, sweet peas, potato
triangles, cold corn salad,
chilled peach cup, juice,
milk.


SENIOR DINING
Monday: Lasagna casse-
role, garlic spinach, Italian
vegetable medley, mixed
fruit, slice whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Tuesday: Grape juice,
Salisbury steak, noodles with
brown gravy, garden peas,
dinner roll with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Chef salad
(ham, cheese, whole boiled
egg, tomato) with French
dressing, carrot-raisin salad,
fresh orange, slice whole-
grain bread with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Thursday: Chicken
parmesan, California vegeta-
bles, Italian flat beans,
peaches, slice whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Friday: Meatballs with
brown gravy, rice pilaf, mixed
vegetables, pears, slice
whole-grain bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
0 Lecanto.
0 East Citrus.
0 Crystal River.
0 Homosassa Springs.
0 Inverness.
0 South Dunnellon.
For information, call
Support Services at 352-
527-5975.


No central agency

oversees cruise ships


Associated Press

MIAMI A byzantine
maze of maritime rules
and regulations, frag-
mented oversight and a
patchwork quilt of nations
that do business with
cruise lines make it tough
for consumers to assess
the health and safety
record of the ship they're
about to board in what for
many is the vacation of a
lifetime.
Want to know about a
ship's track record for
being clean? Want to as-
sess how sanitary the food
is? It's not that easy to find,
in part because there's no
one entity or country that
oversees or regulates the
industry with its fleet of
ships that are like mini
cities floating at sea.
In the case of Carnival
Cruise Lines, the owner of
the Carnival Triumph that
spent days in the Gulf of
Mexico disabled after an
engine fire, the company is
incorporated in Panama,
its offices are based in
Miami and its ships fly
under the Bahamian flag
- a matrix that is not un-
usual in the cruise line
industry
For potential passengers
seeking ship information,


ON THE NET

Coast Guard cruise
ship inspections
database: http://
cgmix.uscg.mil/PSIX/
PSIXSearch.aspx
CDC Vessel
Sanitation Program:
www.cdc.gov/nceh
/vsp/


there's no central data-
base that can be viewed to
determine a track record
of safety or health inspec-
tions. No one agency regu-
lates everything from the
cruise line's mechanical
worthiness to the sanita-
tion of its kitchens.
The U.S. Coast Guard in-
spects each cruise ship that
docks in the U.S. every year
for a range of issues, from
operation ofbackup gener-
ators to the lifeboats. The
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention maintains a
database of recent disease
outbreaks and other health
inspection information for
cruise ships. Had Triumph
vacationers looked up in-
formation about the cruise
ship through those two
agencies before boarding,
they would have found
mostly clean marks and few
red flags.


legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


SBid Notices.................... D7


4 Meeting Notices............D6, D7


Lien Notices..................... D6


..:. Miscellaneous Notices........D6


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
> PR HI PR |HI LO PR
NA | INA NA NA L J 61 43 0.00


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
s
s
s
s
s
s
pc
s
s


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


L F'cast
48 s
27 s
37 s
42 s
34 s
27 s
37 s
38 s
49 s


MARINE OUTLOOK


North winds around 20 knots. Seas 2
to 3 feet. Bay and inland waters will be
choppy. Sunny skies today.


68 46 0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exlusve daily
forecast by:
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 55 Low: 23
Sunny but cold and breezy; hard
freeze tonight
k MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 68 Low: 47
AM freeze; sunny and milder afternoon.

r TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
SHigh: 76 Low: 55
Sunny to partly cloudy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 63/45
Record 85/26
Normal 73/45
Mean temp. 54
Departure from mean -5
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.90 in.
Total for the year 1.00 in.
Normal for the year 4.69 in.
*As of 7 pm at Inverness
UV INDEX: 6
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.00 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 44
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 57%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
juniper, oak, grasses
Today's count: 10.0/12
Monday's count: 9.0
Tuesday's count: 10.7
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
2/17 SUNDAY 11:16 5:04 11:40 5:28
2/18 MONDAY -5:52 12:04 6:16
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
S SUNSET TONIGHT............................6:22 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW ..................... 7:06 A.M.
SMOONRISE TODAY.........................11:37 A.M.
FEB. 17 FEB. 25 MARCH4 MARCH 11 MOONSET TODAY..........................12:41 A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
informationon drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers


City
Chassahowitzka*
Crystal River**
Withlacoochee*
Homosassa***


High/Low
10:39 a/6:12 a
9:00 a/3:34 a
6:47 a/1:22 a
9:49 a/5:11 a


**At King's Bay
Sunday


High/Low
10:01 p/5:31 p
8:22 p/2:53 p
6:09 p/12:41 p
9:11 p/4:30 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
12:01 p7:18 a 11:01 p/6:23 p
10:22 a/4:40 a 9:22 p/3:45 p
8:09 a/2:28 a 7:09 p/1:33 p
11:11 a/6:17 a 10:11 p/5:22 p


Gulf water
temperature


660
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.41 NA 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.87 NA 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 38.77 NA 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.09 NA 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


A e

r'^ f. ; p
y^'-,' .
E- Peso


J *ona luj ,
L/~ *
'


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 33 26 pc 22 10
Albuquerque 58 27 s 60 32
Asheville 35 26 s 35 21
Atlanta 44 35 s 47 31
Atlantic City 41 35 .04 pc 33 18
Austin 67 28 pc 73 54
Baltimore 37 34 .04 pc 35 20
Billings 49 28 rs 45 19
Birmingham 46 33 s 51 34
Boise 57 30 pc 41 23
Boston 38 33 .01 sn 26 13
Buffalo 28 21 sn 16 13
Burlington, VT 32 22 c 17 4
Charleston, SC 54 37 .02 s 49 28
Charleston, WV 33 27 pc 31 22
Charlotte 45 32 .22 s 42 23
Chicago 20 13 trace pc 32 29
Cincinnati 32 17 pc 32 23
Cleveland 28 19 .09 pc 23 20
Columbia, SC 48 37 .26 s 46 26
Columbus, OH 29 19 .04 pc 27 20
Concord, N.H. 38 29 .03 sn 22 9
Dallas 56 30 s 72 57
Denver 58 17 pc 58 24
Des Moines 37 12 pc 51 31
Detroit 27 19 .04 pc 23 18
El Paso 61 29 s 67 44
Evansville, IN 35 22 pc 44 33
Harrisburg 37 30 pc 28 18
Hartford 39 32 .03 pc 28 11
Houston 61 39 s 71 60
Indianapolis 26 19 pc 33 26
Jackson 48 36 s 62 43
Las Vegas 66 42 s 68 46
Little Rock 45 29 s 60 45
Los Angeles 80 54 s 65 53
Louisville 37 23 s 40 31
Memphis 41 29 s 57 45
Milwaukee 20 9 pc 27 24
Minneapolis 20 2 c 30 25
Mobile 53 43 s 58 41
Montgomery 52 43 s 54 32
Nashville 41 24 pc 45 29
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp.FcstH L
New Orleans 54 45 .01 s 61 49
New York City 40 34 .02 pc 31 18
Norfolk 47 35 .17 pc 36 22
Oklahoma City 53 26 .01 s 66 44
Omaha 33 13 pc 52 32
Palm Springs 79 54 s 78 48
Philadelphia 40 35 .02 pc 32 18
Phoenix 80 52 s 73 48
Pittsburgh 28 21 sn 25 14
Portland, ME 38 31 .01 sn 25 11
Portland, Ore 51 41 .02 pc 47 35
Providence, R.I. 36 31 .04 sn 28 12
Raleigh 44 33 .39 s 38 22
Rapid City 57 24 pc 48 24
Reno 55 24 s 55 26
Rochester, NY 31 22 sn 17 12
Sacramento 69 41 s 66 38
St. Louis 38 21 pc 50 37
St. Ste. Marie 14 2 pc 15 8
Salt Lake City 38 24 c 39 22
San Antonio 66 31 pc 72 58
San Diego 78 53 s 64 53
San Francisco 66 48 pc 58 42
Savannah 54 41 .01 s 51 27
Seattle 52 40 c 47 38
Spokane 45 28 pc 40 24
Syracuse 30 22 .02 sn 16 8
Topeka 39 20 .01 s 60 38
Washington 41 37 .03 pc 35 22
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 84 Corona, Calif. LOW -28 Intl Falls,
Minn.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 8874/s
Amsterdam 38/33/c
Athens 54/42/sh
Beijing 39/21/c
Berlin 35/30/c
Bermuda 64/54/sh
Cairo 68/50/s
Calgary 29/9/pc
Havana 72/57/sh
Hong Kong 71/59/c
Jerusalem 56/44/pc


Lisbon 57/49/sh
London 45/31/pc
Madrid 54/43/c
Mexico City 75/45/s
Montreal 18/5/pc
Moscow 24/18/c
Paris 45/30/pc
Rio 89/77/ts
Rome 51/38/pc
Sydney 77/64/sh
Tokyo 41/42/c
Toronto 19/10/pc
Warsaw 29/26/c


SC I T R U S


C 0 U N T Y -*


Feb. 18 to 22 MENUS


RIONICL -E
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To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
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1 year: $121.87*
*Subscription price Includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
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Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
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Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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Where to find us:
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44 office
Bri H 1624 N.
Dunknl,,eld Meadowcrest
'Ie --C3nncindale Dr Blvd.
Ave C o e Crystal River,
A M \eadowcre S1 FL 34429
N 11 :

SInverness
FI Cur ntju~ office
TompkinsSt. g | :iujr
T o n 106 W M ain
/ ~ St.,
41 4 Inverness, FL
> 34450


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G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 63 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold ................................................ .......................... .... Editor, 564 -2 93 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trlsta Stokes......................................................... Online M manager, 564-2946
Trlsta Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Phone 352-563-6363
S POSTMASTER: Send address changes to.
Citrus County Chronicle
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A4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUPPORT
Continued from Page Al

important safety program
and may include a re-
sponse item to be set off in
a crisis.
Services are not only for
indigent populations.
Through a program aptly
titled HOPE Homecare
Options Provided for
Everyone Senior Care
Services will work with in-
dividuals to develop a care
plan to arrange for the de-
livery and monitoring of
home support that is sensi-
tive to the person's needs
as well as cost effective.
Home energy assistance
funds for the elderly, for
clients age 60 or older, are
available if criteria are
met
Popular programs
Among the most popular
programs are Home Deliv-
ered Meals, Pet Meals and
Senior Dining. With Home
Delivered Meals, volun-
teers deliver one meal per
day Monday through Fri-
day with each meal mak-
ing up one-third of a
person's daily nutritional
requirement To qualify, a
person must be 60 years of
age and homebound.
Those who are able to
leave their homes may at-
tend the Senior Dining
Program at one of the com-
munity centers.
Pat Coles, who is in
charge of the meals pro-
gram and is operations su-
pervisor over senior
programs, said they serve
more than 70,000 meals a
year with 100 volunteers
doing the delivery Pet
meals were added when
volunteers noticed clients
saving parts of the deliv-
ered food for their beloved
animals.
"We presently feed 100
dogs and 85 cats cost-free,"
Coles said. Pet food is do-
nated by Walmart and Key
Training Center clients
package it for delivery
Joan and Henry Soucy
have volunteered for the
Home Delivered Meals
program for five years.
They pick up their meal
components at the Com-


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Henry and Joan Soucy volunteer with the Home Delivered Meals program. Not only do they provide food for those in
the program, but they also spend time visiting with participants of the elderly program.


munity Resource Center
and begin their Beverly
Hills route. Henry sets up
the trays and Joan takes
them to the client's door
"Sometimes, we're the
person's only contact,"
said Henry
Quite a team
Client Donald Mara, and
his dog Brenda, appreci-
ate their home delivered
meals. Mara will be 92 in
April. He depends on
neighbors to buy groceries
and for rides to doctor vis-
its. His children live away
and visit as often as possi-


ble, but the home-
delivered meals by the
Soucys are a constant re-
source. The Soucys check
on Mara's welfare as they
make their delivery
If there is no answer at
the front door, if the mail-
box is unreasonably full, if
something seems amiss,
they make a phone call -
and if that call doesn't
solve the mystery, the sher-
iff's office is contacted.
Once inside, Joan Soucy
looks for signs of the
client's status. Do they
need further services?


I A
DAPERY SHAES SUT
VERTI(AIS
72 HOU


While in the home, she
may do little tasks such as
start the washing machine
or bring in the mail. Before
retirement, Joan Soucy
was head of Senior Serv-
ices in Palm Beach County,
so she has a special affinity
for the program.
"We've always been a
team," husband Henry


hUUIVI IU
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said. "We do this as a team.
It's a chance to give back.
Maybe we'll need it some-
day, and someone will do it
for us."
March for Meals
In an effort to offset the
cost of the Home Deliv-
ered Meals program, Su-
pervisor Coles does some


ROOM FOR
EVERYONE,
Our amenities are for everyone
Pets are welcome to visit'


:es and doing
patient and
home
therapy or any
ib Care--
shows a en er
a wllngness of Citrus Coun
iance


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 A5

SENIOR CARE
SERVICES
Call Nancy Neale at
352-527-5930 or
Pat Coles at 352-
527-5977.
See menus for the
week's Senior Dining
facilities every Sunday
in the Chronicle./
Page A4 today
special fundraising efforts
with the annual "March
for Meals" campaign.
On separate Tuesdays
in March, Applebee's in
Crystal River and Inver-
ness will donate 10 per-
cent of the customer's bill
to the program.
On March 15, noted
Citrus County celebrities
will help deliver meals to
homebound seniors.
On March 22, there
will be a March for Meals
Dance at the Citrus County
Resource Center
Finally, on Saturday,
March 30, the Golf for
Meals tournament will
take place at Seven Rivers
Golf & Country Club.
Coles' fundraising is one
of the reasons the home
delivered meals program
is so successful.
More information about
Senior Care Services may
be found by calling Nancy
Neale at 352-527-5930 or
Pat Coles at 352-527-5977.
"We serve our clients in
order of their need," said
Neale, "and we are tasked
with finding a resource for
every need we find."
IU


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Obituaries


Eva
Hawthorne, 94
INGLIS
Born Jan. 28, 1919, in
Livingston, Ill., Eva Ann
Kataiva Hawthorne of In-

the oldest
of five
children
born to im-
migrant
parents
f r o m
Lithuania.
Eva She died
Hawthorne Thursday,
Feb. 14,
2013, at home at the age of
94. Coming to Florida in
1944, she met and married
her husband, Felix
Hawthorne (U.S. Navy) of
Inglis, Fla., on Feb. 14,
1946. Eva was a home-
maker who along with her
husband Felix owned the
old Red and White Food
Store in Crackertown. She
retired as Post Master of
Inglis and was a lifetime
member and Past Worthy
Matron of the Dunnellon
Chapter of Eastern Star.
Eva is survived by her
sons, Wayne and his wife,
Charolette, of Havana,
Fla., and Richard and his
wife, Magdalene, of Inglis,
Fla.; her grandsons, Dean
and Nathan; and her
great-grandsons, Lane,
Foster, Mason, Landon and
Sawyer
Visitation at The Primi-
tive Church ofJesus Christ
at Inglis, Fla., will be from
9:30 to 11 a.m. Monday,
Feb. 18, 2013, with service
following. Burial will be in
Hawthorne Cemetery Ex-
pressions of Sympathy can
be made online at
www.robertsofdunnellon.
com.
Roberts Funeral Home
of Dunnellon in charge of
arrangements.

Ronald
Langan, 55
ST. PETERSBURG
Ronald 0. Langan, 55, of
St. Petersburg, died Thurs-
day, Feb. 14, 2013. Born in
Dover, Del., he came here
in 1962. Graduated from
USF-SP Ronald was the
lighting director at the Ma-
haffey Theatre.
He was preceded in
death by his father, John
M. Langan. He is survived
by his mother, Agnes Lan-
gan; his siblings, Rebecca
and David Gailliot, Timo-
thy and Sir Langan,
Michael and Barbara Lan-
gan, Cynthia and Maurice
Rivenbark, Patrick and
Carol Langan; and many
nieces and nephews.
There will be a celebra-
tion of life Monday, Feb.
18, 2013, with a gathering
from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.,
service to follow at Ander-
son McQueen, 2201 Dr.
MLK St. N., St. Petersburg,
FL 33704.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy per-
mits free and paid
obituaries.


Fay Ropes, 87
MULBERRY, IND.
Faye C. (Collins) Ropes,
87, of Mulberry, Ind., for-
merly of
[- I Lafayette,
passed
away at
S -4 1:30 a.m.
C: Wednes-
< fday, Feb.
13, 2013, at
Mulberry
Fay Health
Ropes and Re-
tirement
Community Born June 8,
1925, in Fitchburg, Mass.,
she was the daughter of
the late Albion B. and
Doris (Rowley) Collins.
She was a 1944 graduate of
Fitchburg Massachusetts
High School.
Faye married Warren C.
Ropes on May 9, 1944, in
New York City, N.Y, and
he preceded her in death
Sept 11, 1997. She enjoyed
dancing, gardening and
was a member of the DAR.
She also was a member of
the Onesquethaw Re-
formed Church. In
Florida, she was active in
the Camellia Society
Surviving is her son,
Kent C. Ropes (wife, Jea-
nine) of Homosassa;
daughter, Bonnie L. Bren-
neman (husband, Dennis)
of Lafayette; brother,
Richard B. Collins (wife,
Mildred) of North Miami
Beach; three grandchil-
dren; and five great-grand-
children. She was
preceded in death by a
son, Blair C. Ropes.
A celebration of life
service will be at a later
date. Hippensteel Funeral
Home is entrusted with
care. Memorial contribu-
tions may be made to the
Alzheimer's Association or
the Jenks Rest
Alzheimer's Support
Group at Columbian Park,
Lafayette, Ind. Share
memories and condo-
lences online at www
hippensteelfuneral
service.com.

Mable
Williamson, 68
HERNANDO
Mable Jean Williamson,
68, died at her residence
in Hernando on Wednes-
day, Feb. 13, 2013.

SO YOU KNOW
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Email obits@
chronicleonline.com
or fax 352-563-3280.
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.



Cai. E. la i
Funeral Home
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For Information and costs,.
call 726-8323


Ruby Smith, 90
INVERNESS
The service of remem-
brance for Mrs. Ruby L.
Sommer Smith, 90, of In-
verness, Fla., will be at
10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 19,
2013, at the Inverness
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
homes with Chaplain
Daniel Lyman officiating.
Interment will follow at
Florida National Ceme-
tery, Bushnell, Fla. The
family will receive friends
from 9:30 a.m. until the
time of service Tuesday at
the chapel. Online condo-
lences may be sent to
wwwhooperfuneralhome.
com.
Mrs. Smith was born
Nov 18, 1922, in Bern,
Kan., daughter of Cor-
nelius and Emma
(Habager) Giesel. She died
Thursday, Feb. 14, 2013, in
Hernando surrounded by
family She was a home-
maker and moved to
Florida from Elgin, Ill. She
will always be remem-
bered for her quick laugh
and her deep compassion
for others and her tremen-
dous devotion to her fam-
ily She made each person
in her presence feel spe-
cial. Mrs. Smith was a part
of the Inverness Clogging
Club, the Illinois Club and
she was a member of Re-
deemer Presbyterian
Church.
Mrs. Smith was pre-
ceded in death by her par-
ents, two husbands,
Charles E. Sommer and
Robert Charles Smith Sr,
and seven siblings. Sur-
vivors include four daugh-
ters, Linda C. (Garre)
Hagen, Kathryn L. (Terry)
Estes and Annette L. Wiley,
all of Taylorsville, N.C.,
and Rebecca D. (Chip)
Beattie of Hernando, Fla.;
11 grandchildren; and 17
great-grandchildren.

OBITUARIES
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S. mili-
tary. (Please note this
service when submit-
ting a free obituary.)
Additionally, all obitu-
aries will be posted
online at www.
chronicleonline.com.


To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Judy
Moseley
at 564-2917
jmoseley@chronicleonline.com


n~~A


Margaret
Schmid, 93
LECANTO
A memorial Eucharist
for Mrs. Margaret M.
Schmid, 93, Lecanto, will
be at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Feb.
19, 2013, at Shepherd of
the Hills Episcopal
Church, 2540 W Norvell
Bryant Highway, Lecanto,
with the Rt. Rev. James
Adams officiating. Crema-
tion will be under the di-
rection of the Inverness
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Home and Crematory The
family requests expres-
sions of sympathy take the
form of memorial dona-
tions to Shepherd of the
Hills Episcopal Church,
PO. Box 1375, Lecanto, FL
34460 or HPH Hospice,
3545 N. Lecanto Highway,
Beverly Hills, FL 34465.
Mrs. Schmid passed
away Wednesday, Feb. 13,
2013, under the care of
HPH Hospice. She was
born in Pittsburgh, Pa., and
moved to Florida in 1951.
Married to her beloved
husband for 71 years, she
was an inspiration and
model to her family Her
most admirable quality
was her love, dedication
and loyalty to each family
member
She was preceded in
death by her husband
William. She was the lov-
ing mother of Patricia
(Dave) Howard of Citrus
Springs and William G.
(Randi) Schmid of St. Au-
gustine and grandmother
of Todd, Brett, Lisa and
Donald and 11 great-
grandchildren.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

* Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of de-
ceased; age; home-
town/state; date of
death; place of death;
date, time and place
of visitation and fu-
neral services.






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00E2E lU ', CI' TY


'Underdog' cartoon


co-creater dies


Associated Press

BOSTON William
Watts Biggers, the co-
creator of the cartoon "Un-


derdog," the mild-
mannered canine
shoeshine boy who
turned into a
caped superhero
to rescue his girl-
friend, Sweet Polly
Purebred, has
died. He was 85.
Family friend
Derek Tague said
Biggers, who went
by "Buck," died
unexpectedly at


Will
Big@
co-crea
cart
'Unde


his Plymouth,
Mass., home Sunday
The native of Avondale
Estates, Ga., worked for
the New York City adver-
tising firm DFS when he
accepted an assignment
from the agency's largest
client, General Mills, to
create television cartoons
to promote its breakfast
cereals. The most famous
was "Underdog," which
debuted on NBC in 1964.
The canine superhero,


voiced by comic actor
Wally Cox, also battled
villains including mad
scientist Simon Bar Sinis-
ter, and a gangster wolf
Riff Raff.
Upon hearing
the cries of Sweet
Polly Purebred,
-- Underdog would
rush into a tele-
phone booth and
transform into
the hero.
iam He spoke in
gers simple rhymes,
ited the his most famous
oon probably "There's
rdog.' no need to fear,
Underdog is
here."
Biggers also helped
create "King Leonardo
and His Short Subjects"
and "Tennessee Tuxedo
and His Tales."
After General Mills
pulled out of the anima-
tion business, Biggers be-
came vice president of
promotion and creative
services at NBC.
Funeral arrangements
will be private.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Python hunt nets 68


Associated Press

MIAMI A public hunt for Burmese
pythons in the Everglades yielded 68 of
the invasive snakes, the longest measur-
ing more than 14 feet long, Florida
wildlife officials said Saturday
That might not seem like a success,
considering roughly 1,600 people signed
up for the state-sponsored Python Chal-
lenge that ended Sunday, but Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion officials said the hunt may have pre-
vented thousands more pythons from
being born in the Everglades.
Female pythons can lay as many as 100
eggs at a time.
"In our view that number the num-


ber that were harvested, taken out of the
ecosystem was an unprecedented
number of samples that will help us an-
swer questions about pythons and make
us more effective at tackling this prob-
lem, removing them from the system.
We're going to learn so much," said Nick
Wiley, executive director of the wildlife
commission.
The highly publicized hunt probably
generated more attention-grabbing head-
lines than snakeskins. Wildlife officials
say that was their goal: to raise aware-
ness about the threat pythons and other
invasive species pose to native wildlife.
Researchers say pythons are eating
their way through the Everglades, deci-
mating populations of native mammals.


Associated Press
Paul Shannon, left, receives his award Saturday for longest python caught by an
unlicensed hunter and Brian Barrows for the most caught which was six, at Zoo
Miami. A hunt for Burmese pythons in the Everglades yielded 68 of the invasive snakes,
the longest measuring more than 14 feet long, Florida wildlife officials said Saturday.


CANAL
Continued from Page Al

dedicated start of con-
struction on the Cross
Florida Barge Canal at a
ceremony in Palatka. So in
February 2014, the Florida
Department of Environ-
mental Protection will of-
ficially recognize the 50th
anniversary of the Cross
Florida Barge Canal, ac-
cording to DEP spokes-
woman Jennifer Diaz. She
said it has not yet been de-
termined what form the
celebration will take, and
details will be available as
it gets closer.
After work on the canal
started, there was an un-
successful attempt to
name it after the late Pres-
ident Kennedy
The vision was the
canal, and the St. Johns-
Indian River Barge Canal,
could offer a quick water
route across Florida by
1971.
Canal project plans in-
cluded three dams, five
locks and 110 miles of
channel that would be 150
feet wide and 12 feet deep.
Twenty-five miles of this
waterway, along with three
locks and three dams,
were complete by 1971.
Plans included the cre-
ation of Rodman Reser-
voir and changes to both
the Withlacoochee and
Ocklawaha rivers.


The project also galva-
nized a coalition of canal
opponents who became
the nucleus of Florida's
environmental movement.
President Richard M.
Nixon killed the project in
1971, after about $74 mil-
lion had been spent on
land acquisition and con-
struction, not including
numerous previous expen-
ditures for state and fed-
eral studies and surveys.
In 1973, U.S. Rep. L.A.
"Skip" Bafalis, R-Fla., in-
troduced legislation to
permanently de-authorize
the canal. Seventeen years
and a $2.5 million restudy
by the Corps of Engineers
finally put the project to
rest, at least in terms of be-
coming a cross-state water
route.
Greenway
The Department of En-
vironmental Protection as-
sumed control of the right
of way for conservation
and recreation use. And
the project would take on
new life as the Marjorie
Harris Carr Cross Florida
Greenway, the state's first
greenway, named for the
woman who led opposition
to the canal. Management
of Lake Rousseau was
transferred to the Green-
way in 1994.
The Citrus County end
of the 110-mile greenway
corridor includes the
Withlacoochee Bay Trail
and the Felburn Park


Image courtesy of www.floridastateparks.org
The Cross Florida Greenway extends from the St. John's River on the Atlantic side of
the state to the Withlacoochee River on the Gulf side. The greenway follows the path
of the former Cross Florida Barge Canal.


Trailhead. The Bay Trail
runs about 5 miles from
just east of U.S. 19 to the
Gulf of Mexico on the
south side of the former
barge canal with an adja-
cent equestrian trail.
"It's an amazing asset for
us," said Marla Chancey,
executive director of Cit-
rus County Convention
and Visitors Bureau. "It's
beautiful, there are recent
improvements, and it's a
beautiful trailhead."
She said it plays right
into the county's strong at-
traction for active tourists
- young retirees and baby
boomers who want to
engage in healthy activi-


ties and experience things
firsthand. It also holds po-
tential for historic and cul-
tural tourism.
"It's an underutilized re-
source," Chancey said.






P lIl ] P
M1.53201

R0BW ta in St.






InensIil


"With improved access it
will get better known."
Port Citrus
In 2011, Citrus County
started to pursue develop-


ment of a seaport on the
barge canal, taking advan-
tage of its access to the
Gulf of Mexico. The Citrus
County Economic Devel-
opment Council views the
potential port and adja-
cent enterprise zone as op-
portunities to diversify the
county's economy
"It was supposed to go
all the way across the
state," longtime resident
and businessman Dixie
Hollins recalled. "When
they stopped building, it
was a huge impact on the
area."
As for recovering some
of the investment in the
canal for future benefit, he
said the county is doing a
feasibility study to deter-
mine if the barge canal is
usable for some type of
port something that
could create some jobs.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. com.


Cr CMACIKE
SPTI CEILING,



Mold Free Easy Clean NeverN


STATE


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 A7










Deadline looms for US budget cuts


Warnings

mayprove

harsher than

reality
ALAN FRAM
Associated Press

WASHINGTON Get
ready for two weeks of in-
tensifying warnings about
how crucial, popular gov-
ernment services are
about to wither. Many of
the threats could come
true.
President Barack Oba-
ma and congressional Re-
publicans made no
progress this past week in
heading off $85 billion in
budget-wide cuts that au-
tomatically start taking ef-
fect March 1.
Lacking a bipartisan
deal to avoid them and
hoping to heap blame and
pressure on GOP lawmak-
ers, the administration is
offering vivid details about
the cuts' consequences:
trimmed defense con-
tracts, less secure U.S. em-
bassies, furloughed air
traffic controllers.
Past administrations
have seldom hesitated to
spotlight how budget
standoffs would wilt pro-
grams the public values.
When a budget fight be-
tween President Bill Clin-
ton and congressional
Republicans led to two
government shutdowns, in
1995 and 1996, some
threats came true, like
padlocked national parks.
Others did not.
Clinton warned that
Medicare recipients might
lose medical treatment,
feeding programs for the
low-income elderly could
end and treatment at vet-
erans' hospitals could be
curtailed. All continued,
thanks to contractors
working for IOUs, local
governments and charities
stepping in and the budget
impasse ending before se-
rious damage occurred.
This time, at stake is not
a federal shutdown but a
range of automatic cuts.
Between March 1 and
Sept. 30, the remainder of
the government's budget
year, it would mean reduc-
tions of 13 percent for de-
fense programs and 9
percent for other pro-
grams, according to the
White House budget office.
The cuts, plus nearly $1
trillion more over the com-
ing decade, were con-
cocted two years ago.
Administration and con-
gressional bargainers pur-
posely made them so
painful that everyone
would be forced to reach a
grand deficit-cutting com-
promise to avoid them.
Hasn't happened.
A look at the cuts and
the chilling impact the ad-
ministration says they
would have, based on let-
ters and testimony to
Congress:
A key reminder: So-
cial Security, Medicare
and veterans' benefits,
Medicaid and a host of
other benefit programs are
exempted. The cuts take
effect over a seven-month
period; they don't all crash
ashore on March 1. If a bi-
partisan deal to ease them
is reached, lawmakers
could restore some or all
the money retroactively.
On the other hand:
Left in effect, these cuts
are real even though their
program-by-program im-
pact is unclear. The law
limits the administration's
flexibility to protect fa-
vored initiatives, but the
White House has told


Associated Press
President Barack Obama waves Feb. 13 as he leaves the White House in Washington. Obama and congressional
Republicans made no progress last week in heading off $85 billion in budget-wide cuts that automatically start
taking effect March 1.


agencies to avoid cuts pre-
senting "risks to life, safety
or health" and to minimize
harm to crucial services.
Defense: Troops at
war would be protected,
but there'd be fewer Air
Force flying hours, less
training for some Army
units and cuts in naval
forces. A $3 billion cut in
the military's Tricare
health care system could
diminish elective care for
military families and re-
tirees. And, in a warning to
the private defense indus-
try, the Pentagon said it
would be "restructuring
contracts to reduce their
scope and cost"
Health: The National
Institutes of Health would
lose $1.6 billion, trimming
cancer research and dry-
ing up funds for hundreds
of other research projects.
Health departments would
give 424,000 fewer tests for
the AIDS virus. More than
373,000 people may not re-
ceive mental health
services.
Food and agriculture:
About 600,000 low-income
pregnant women and new
mothers would lose food
aid and nutrition educa-
tion. Meat inspectors
could be furloughed up to
15 days, shutting meat-
packing plants intermit-
tently and costing up to $10
billion in production
losses.
Homeland Security:
Fewer border agents and
facilities for detained ille-
gal immigrants. Reduced
Coast Guard air and sea
operations, furloughed Se-
cret Service agents and
weakened efforts against
cyberthreats to computer
networks. The Federal
Emergency Management
Agency's disaster relief
fund would lose more than
$1 billion.
Education: Seventy
thousand Head Start
pupils would be removed
from the prekindergarten
program. Layoffs of 10,000
teachers and thousands of
other staffers because of
cuts in federal dollars that
state and local govern-
ments use for schools. Cuts
for programs for disabled
and other special-needs
students.
Transportation: Most
of the Federal Aviation Ad-
ministration's 47,000 em-
ployees would face
furloughs, including air
traffic controllers, for an
average of 11 days.
Environment: Dimin-
ished Environmental Pro-
tection Agency monitoring
of oil spills, air pollution
and hazardous waste. The
color-coded air quality


E2V9 APPOINTMENTS RECOMMENDED
000E2V9 APPOINTMENTS RECOMMENDED MnME


P --
Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, responds
Feb. 13 to President Obama's State of the Union speech
during an interview with The Associated Press at his
Capitol office in Washington.


forecasting system that
keeps schoolchildren and
others inside on bad-air
days would be curtailed or
eliminated. New models of
cars and trucks could take
longer to reach consumers
because the EPA couldn't
quickly validate that they
meet emissions standards.
State Department:
Slow security improve-
ments at overseas facili-
ties, cuts in economic aid
in Afghanistan and
malaria control in Africa.
Internal Revenue
Service: Furloughed work-


ers would reduce the IRS'
ability to review returns,
detect fraud and answer
taxpayers' questions. It of-
fered no specifics.
FBI: Furloughs and a
hiring freeze would have
the equivalent impact of
cutting 2,285 employees,
including 775 agents.
Every FBI employee
would be furloughed 14
workdays.
Interior Department:
Hours and service would
be trimmed at all 398 na-
tional parks, and up to 128
wildlife refuges could be


shuttered. Oil, gas and coal
development on public
lands and offshore waters
would be diminished be-
cause the agency would be
less able to issue permits,
conduct environmental
reviews and inspect
facilities.
Labor: More than 3.8
million people jobless for
six months or longer could
see their unemployment
benefits reduced by as
much as 9.4 percent. Thou-
sands of veterans would
lose job counseling. Fewer
Occupational Safety and
Health Administration in-
spectors could mean 1,200
fewer visits to work sites.
One million fewer people
would get help finding or
preparing for new jobs.
NASA: Nearly $900
million in cuts, including
funds to help private com-
panies build capsules to
send astronauts to the In-
ternational Space Station.
Housing: The Depart-
ment of Housing and Urban
Development said about
125,000 poor households
could lose benefits from the
agency's Housing Choice
Voucher program and risk
becoming homeless.


Cooking



With Stars


Reality TV Show "Meal

Ticket" is filming their Pilot

Episode in Citrus County

and we need Your Help

to make it a success.


You Be The Judge


Joseph "Jo-Jo" Doyle
Executive Chef of
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celebrity events.


General
Admission
Includes Dinner & Cash Bar
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Advanced sales only.
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Includes Dinner, Open Bar,
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Advanced sales only.


Obama

bypasses

Congress

withpitch

Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Weeks before President
Barack Obama's State of
the Union address, White
House aides were lock-
ing down a plan for the
sales pitch that would fol-
low during three days of
travel focused on his
main themes.
The effort to promote
Obama's proposals on
jobs, wages and educa-
tion involved visits to
Asheville, N.C., Decatur
Ga., and Chicago, partic-
ipating in a Google+ chat
and mobilizing the presi-
dent's formidable former
campaign apparatus.
One thing it didn't in-
clude? Congress.
For the White House,
this is a campaign for
public opinion, not one to
write specific legislation.
When it comes to
broadening early educa-
tion or raising the mini-
mum wage, Obama is
not ready to make law-
makers a part of the
process yet.
Instead, Obama is try-
ing to change an eco-
nomic debate that has
been focused on deficits
and on managing the na-
tional debt to one about
middle-class opportuni-
ties and economic
growth. Just into his sec-
ond term, Obama and his
aides want to move away
from the type of budget
confrontations that have
defined the past two
years and take advan-
tage of his re-election to
pressure Republicans.
"If the Republicans
reflexively oppose
everything the president
does, we have to go di-
rectly to the American
people to marshal their
support to get things
done," Obama senior ad-
viser Dan Pfeiffer said.


-
-/


the)

tA protion of the
proceeds will
benefit the YMCA
of Citrus County.


Carlos
Fernandez
of Top Chef Season 2


Platinum Partner
Includes 2 Tickets to each event,
Dinner, Open Bar, VIP Seating,
Preferred Parking, a free gift &
Logo or Name on Program.
$250t
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Full Bar available at both locations. Different menu each night.Ad a cdT ke S ls
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Restoring monument


Havana to

give two pillars

properfacelift
Associated Press
HAVANA It was a lit-
tle before 10 p.m. that Feb-
ruary night in 1898 when a
fiery explosion roiled the
normally calm waters of
Havana Harbor, blowing
out windows in the city
and sinking the USS
Maine to the bottom of the
bay, just the mast and
some twisted metal wreck-
age left to poke above the
waves.
Havana's monument to
the 266 U.S. sailors who
died was dedicated 27
years later as a tribute to
lasting Cuban-American
friendship, a thank-you for
Washington's help in shed-
ding the yoke of Spanish
colonial rule, which was
known for its cruelty
The years since have
been unkind to the twin-
columned monument, and
to U.S.-Cuba ties. But
while relations between
Washington and Havana
remain in deep freeze, the
monument, at least, is now
getting a facelift.
The restoration project
is fraught with symbolism,
with the monument's scars
telling the story of more
than a century of shifts in
the complex relationship
and changing interpreta-
tions of the marble
structure.
"Of the monuments in
Havana, that's one that re-
ally is struggling to contain
all of these different his-
torical episodes," said
Timothy Hyde, a historian
of Cuban architecture at
Harvard University's
Graduate School of De-
sign. "It doesn't just sym-
bolize any longer this
single moment of the sink-
ing of the Maine. It sym-
bolizes all these periodic
moments of antipathy and
hostility and challenges


Associated Press
ABOVE LEFT: A youth rides his bicycle past the restored USS Maine monument in Havana, Cuba. The monument was erected in 1925 in honor
of U.S. sailors who died in 1898 when the USS Maine ship sank off the Havana Harbor. E R : City historian Eusebio Leal shows a book
with a photograph of the USS Maine after it exploded and sank in the Havana Harbor, at his office in Havana, Cuba.


between the two nation-
states."
Soon after the USS
Maine suddenly sank off
the coast of this Caribbean
capital 115 years ago Fri-
day, the United States ac-
cused Spanish colonial
authorities of responsibil-
ity in the blast.
"Remember the Maine!"
became a rallying cry in
the States, and after the
U.S. victory in the brief
Spanish-American war,
Spain ceded control over
Cuba, Puerto Rico, the
Philippines and Guam.
The Maine monument
was inaugurated in 1925
and bears the names of all
266 sailors. Two statues
standing shoulder-to-
shoulder at the base rep-
resent a maternal America
guiding the maiden Cuba
into independence.
Words etched into the
marble quote an 1898 U.S.
congressional resolution
recognizing a free Cuba,
and the massive bronze
eagle that long capped the
monument faced due
north to symbolize Wash-
ington's promise to return
home after helping the is-


land break from Spain.
Following the doomed,
U.S.-backed Bay of Pigs in-
vasion, the more than 3-ton
eagle was ripped from the
monument during an anti-
American protest and
splintered into pieces.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTENTION

FLORIDA

SNOWBIRDS
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New Location Inside Crystal River Mall (Next to K-Mart)


IOALA LOATIN


A10 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013





SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 All


Car of the future


We got a new car a month ago,
and it hit me as we were signing
the papers that we had proba-
bly just bought our last gas-powered car
We usually keep a car six or seven years,
so what will be in the dealer showrooms
in 2020?
Even now, I see more and more hybrid
and electric cars on the road, cars that
were rare only five years ago.
The reason I didn't buy one
this time is that they're still a
little pricey for the way I
drive, and in six or seven
years, who knows how much
the technology will have im-
proved? I don't make enough
money to have the high eco-
principles of wealthy movie
stars and millionaire plastic
surgeons. But by 2020, the hy- JI
brids and electrics will prob- M
ably be the same price as
gas-powered cars.
Did you catch that? "Gas-powered
cars." Ten years ago, that would have
been a silly way to describe an automo-
bile. It would be like saying, "I have to
buy some electric light bulbs," or, "I'm
going to buy a color TV," as if there were
some other kind. What other kind of car
has there been for most of your life but
gas-powered? Ten years from now, we
may not say "electric car," either All ve-
hicles may be electric.
Every year, automakers improve the
capacity of the batteries in these cars
and reduce the time needed to charge
them. How long before there will be an
outlet at your parking spot at work that
you can plug into? How long before
someone starts selling a car that
recharges from the sun as it sits in the
parking lot? Google is supposed to be
working on a driverless car as we speak.
Not only will it get you where you want
to go by GPS, but when the kids ask, "Are
we there yet?" you can tell them to
Google it. They won't like Google's an-
swer any better than yours.
I assume that Apple is working on an
iCar at this very moment. It will fit in
your pocket, and instead of driving you


to work, it will bring your job to wher-
ever you are. Oh, I forgot, we can already
do that.
A lot of people pooh-pooh the electric
car. They say it doesn't go far enough, it
doesn't go fast enough, there are no
"electric stations" where it can be eas-
ily "refueled." They usually say this
while they are sitting in bumper-to-
bumper traffic going nowhere
at 2 mph. And, sure, there are
plenty of times when a vehi-
cle that needs to be recharged
won't be the right choice. But
for running errands and aver-
age commutes, it makes a lot
of sense.
S Eight years ago, my wife
bought a V-8 truck and told
the dealer that she needed
M one with a bed big enough to
.Lcarry sheetrock because we
were renovating the house. As
it turns out, we have never,
ever used the truck to move sheetrock.
It was way too much truck for what we
needed to do. Besides, the supplier
would have delivered the sheetrock to
us for a few thousand times less than
what the truck cost
Likewise, for the few times when an
electric car doesn't fit the bill, I'm sure
the owners could figure out a way
around it: Rent or borrow a gas-pow-
ered vehicle. After all, Americans move
from city to city all the time, but no one
says, "Hey, we should buy a moving van
just in case we move again."
I wonder what we'll miss most about
gas-powered cars the early morning
smog? The ever-rising price of gas?
Those friendly self-serve pumps at the
convenience stores? Standing in line be-
hind someone making 57 different and
extremely complicated bets on tonight's
numbers? The $1 sodas that cost $2.50?
The romance of spending $65 for one
fill-up? Can an electric car ever replace
all that?

ContactJim Mullen at
JimMullenBooks. com.


Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus County Water Resources
Department is offering a free class on
"Florida-Friendly Landscaping" from 2
to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 19, in the Ex-
tension classroom at 3650 W Sovereign
Path, Lecanto.


This workshop teaches design princi-
ples, material selection and establish-
ment techniques to reduce water
consumption while maintaining a suc-
cessful landscape.
Pre-registration is required by calling
Gina Hamilton at 352-527-5707. For
more information, call 352-527-5708.


In SERVICE


Phillip A. Scott
Air Force Airman Phillip A.
Scott graduated from basic
military training at Lackland
Air Force Base, San Antonio,
Texas.

man com-
pleted an
intensive,
eight-week
program that
included
training in
military disci-
Phillip A. line and
cott studies, Air
U.S. Air Force studies, ir
Force core
values,
physical fitness, and basic
warfare principles and skills.
Airmen who complete basic
training earn four credits to-
ward an associate in applied
science degree through the
Community College of the Air
Force. Scott earned distinc-
tion as an honor graduate.
He is a 2009 graduate of
Citrus High School.

Christopher M.
Sizemore
Army Spec. Christopher M.
Sizemore has returned to the
U.S. after being deployed
overseas at a forward operat-
ing base to serve in support of
Operation Enduring Freedom.
Operation Enduring Free-
dom is the official name given
to anti-terrorism military oper-
ations involving U.S. troops
and allied coalition partners.
Active duty and reserve com-
ponent members from all
branches of the U.S. armed
forces have been deployed to
support the war against global
terrorism outside the borders
of the United States. U.S.
troops serve in South, South-
west and Central Asia, the
Arabian Peninsula, the Horn
of Africa, islands in the Pa-
cific, and Europe.
Sizemore is a lightwheel
vehicle mechanic assigned to
the 4th Airborne Brigade
Combat Team, 25th Infantry
Division at Joint Base Elmen-
dorf-Richardson, Alaska. He
has served in the military for
two years.


He is the son of Susan
Sizemore of Inverness, and
grandson of Donna Garrett of
Dunnellon. The specialist is a
2009 graduate of
Crystal River High School.

Donavan M.
Shackelford
Army Pfc. Donavan M.
Shackelford has graduated
from basic infantry training at
Fort Benning, Columbus, Ga.
During the nine weeks of
training, the soldier received
training in drill and cere-
monies, weapons, map read-
ing, tactics, military courtesy,
military justice, physical fit-
ness, first aid, and Army his-
tory, core values and
traditions. Additional training
included development of
basic combat skills and battle-
field operations and tactics,
and experiencing use of vari-
ous weapons and weapons
defenses available to the in-
fantry crewman.
Shackelford is the son of
Sarah Loop of Citrus Springs.
He is a 2012 graduate of
Lecanto High School.

Jacobi T. Dunlap
Air Force Airman Jacobi T.
Dunlap graduated from basic
military training at Lackland
Air Force Base, San Antonio,
Texas.
The airman completed an
intensive, eight-week program
that included training in mili-


tary discipline and studies, Air
Force core
values,
physical fit-
ness, and
basic war-
fare princi-
ples and
skills.
Airmen
Jacobi T. A
Dunlap who com-
U.S. Air Force plete basic
training earn
four credits
toward an associate in ap-
plied science degree through
the Community College of the
Air Force.
Dunlap is the son of
Xaviera Brice of Palmetto and
Joey Dunlap of Lecanto. He is
a 2012 graduate of Palmetto
High School.

Matt Bouthillier III
U.S. Marine Corps Pvt.
Matt
Bouthillier III
graduated
Feb. 1,
2013, from
Marine
Corps Basic
Training at
Parris Island,
Matt S.C.
Bouthillier He is in
Hotel Com-
U.S. Marine pany Pla-
Corps toon 2009.
He is a 2010 graduate of
Lecanto High School and the
son of Matt and Pam
Bouthillier.


Saturday, February 23,2013 9am to Noon
Citrus Memorial Healthcare Center at Sugarmill Woods
7945 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL



FREE SCREENINGS


Free Screenings
Body Mass Index (BMI) Screening
Oxygen Level Saturation Screening
(pulse oximetry)
Blood Pressure & Heart rate Screening
Heart Health Self RiskAssessment
Glucose & Cholesterol Screening
(results to be mailed)


* 12 Lead EKGTesting
* Pulmonary Lung Function Screening
* Carotid Artery &Abdominal Aorta
Vascular Screening
* Smoking Cessation Education &
Support Materials
* Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation
Information


FREE SNACKS & GIVEAWAYS!


RECEIVEVALUABLE INFO
INCLUDING...

* Reducing risks of cardiovascular diseases
* Women's heart disease
* Steps to keep your heart healthy


Register today for a FREE
Heart Center tour
by calling 352.344.6952

Citrus County's Most Comprehensive
Heart & Vascular Center


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Free class on landscaping


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


COMMUNITY


I
Ll





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Register for


pageants at


county fair


Special to the Chronicle
It's time to register for
the children's pageants,
slated for Sunday, March
24, at the 2013 Citrus
County Fair.
The Pre Teen Pageant
for ages 7 to 13 will begin
at 1 p.m., starting with the
13-year-olds. The Little
Miss/Mister, ages 5 and 6,
will start immediately
after the Pre Teen contest,
with the 6-year-olds first.
The Beautiful Baby com-
petition for ages 1 to 4 will
start at 3 p.m. with the 4-
year-olds and ending with
the Decorated Baby pag-
eant for ages 6 to 11
months.
Contestants must be a
resident of Citrus County.
There is a $30 entry fee
and pre-registration is re-
quired. All contestants are
awarded prizes. Applica-
tions must be in the Fair


Office by Friday, Feb. 22.
Applications are available
at wwwcitruscounty
fair.com under the Pag-
eants tab on the left, all
Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce offices or the
Fair Office at 3600 S.
Florida Ave., Inverness.
All pageants are held in
the Citrus County Audito-
rium. General admission
on the day of the pageants
for adults is $5; children
ages 5 to 10 is $3; ages 4
and younger are free.
Family memberships are
$40 per family (one house-
hold with two parents,
children younger than 18).
An individual is $15. Mem-
berships will cover admis-
sion to the baby pageants
and the fair from March 25
through 30. The deadline
to purchase memberships
is Friday, March 1. For
more information, call
352-726-2993.


Divorces 1/28/13 to 2/3/13
Theresa C. DiCamillo,
Inverness vs. Christopher S.
DiCamillo, Inverness
Mark Gillette, Homosassa
vs. Penny Gillette, Floral City
Tara Kennedy, Inverness
vs. Michael Kennedy,
Inverness
Jade Kimberly Martin,
Inverness vs. Jeremy
Lawrence Martin, Lancaster,
Calif.
Lorinda R. McCanna,
Homosassa vs. Richard E.
McCanna III, Homosassa
Springs
Lisa Schnell Morey,
Lecanto vs. Peter Andrew
Morey, Beverly Hills
Claire E. Olsen, Inverness
vs. Lawrence C. Olsen,
Inverness
Joseph S. Pazenski,


Homosassa vs. Cecelia Ann
Pazenski, Peachtree City, Ga.
Todd Ratliff, Dunnellon vs.
Alice Ratliff, Dunnellon
Kevin Lee Reeves, Flager
Beach vs. Jessica Lynn
Reeves, Floral City
Anand Seecharan vs.
Martha Seecharan
Marriages 1/28/13 to 2/3/13
William LindsayAllison,
West Shokan, N.Y/Barbara
Irene Allison, West Shokan,
N.Y.
Robert William Austin,
Citrus Springs/Erin Marie
Tepper, Citrus Springs
John Wesley Huggins,
Lecanto/Audrey Louise Cook,
Lecanto
Terry Lee Nevills Jr.,
Brooksville/Crystal Lynn
Hemmer, Brooksville


Cycling snowbirds
to talk at meeting
Ann and Fred Abeles, cy-
cling snowbirds from Freder-
ick, Md., will speak at the
Thursday, Feb. 21, meeting
of the Rails to Trails of the
Withlacoochee, at 5:30 p.m.
at the Lakes Region Library,
1511 Druid Road, Inverness.
The Abeleses reside in In-
verness during the winter.
They started bicycling in
1998, after careers in science
(Ann at the National Cancer
Institute and Fred at the De-
partment of Agriculture).
They have been coming to
Florida each winter since
1998 to enjoy Inverness and
the Withlacoochee State
Trail.
They are avid cyclists and
enjoy touring in the United


States, as well as making an
overseas trip each year.
This past September, they
spent eight days in Switzer-
land cycling over the Alps
from Lake Constance in the
north to Lake Geneva on the
south.
To relax from that achieve-
ment, they traveled by train
to Provence (France), where
they had rented a small
apartment about an hour's
drive east of Avignon in the
Vaucluse area.
They spent a week enjoy-
ing life in the countryside and
making day trips by bicycle in
the area.
The couple will provide a
slideshow of their overseas
experience.
For more information, call
Bonnie Peterson at 352-341-
4665.


Master gardeners
offer free clinics
Now is the time to prepare
a warm season vegetable
garden.
To learn about growing
vegetables in Citrus County,
which vegetables are consid-
ered warm season vegeta-
bles, what diseases infect
vegetable plants and which
insects benefit gardens and
which destroy them, plan to
attend a February free Mas-
ter Gardener Plant Clinic.
Vegetable gardening in Cit-
rus County is quite different
from that of northern veg-
etable gardening. It is time to
prepare now, and not wait
until April or May.
The remaining schedule
for the free clinics is:
Wednesday, Feb. 20,


1 p.m. at Citrus Springs
Library;
Saturday, Feb. 23,
1 p.m. at Lakes Region
Library;
Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2 p.m.
at Homosassa Library.
Home-grown fruits and
vegetables are generally less
expensive, taste better and
are fresher. The master gar-
deners will answer questions
on this topic or any other
gardening topics.
For more information, call
Citrus County Cooperative
Extension Service at 352-
527-5700.

* Send community
news notes to
community@
chronicleonline.com


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Cardinal Timothy Dolan, archbishop of New York, takes
part in the recessional for Stan Musial during his funeral
Saturday, Jan. 26, at the Cathedral Basilica in St. Louis.
Some Vatican watchers say Dolan, a Ballwin native,
may represent the first real prospect of an American
pontificate.


Could next pope


come from US?


Americans

hold high posts

RACHEL ZOLL
AP religion writer
NEW YORK-Conven-
tional wisdom holds no
one from the United
States could be elected
pope, the superpower has
more than enough
worldly influence without
an American in the seat
of St. Peter.
But after Pope Benedict
XVI's extraordinary abdi-
cation, church analysts
are wondering whether
old assumptions still
apply, including whether
the idea of a U.S. pontiff
remains off the table.
Benedict himself has
set a tone for change with
his dramatic personal ex-
ample. He is the first pon-
tiff in six centuries to step
down.
The conclaves that cre-
ated the last two pontifi-
cates had already
upended one tradition:
Polish-born Pope John
Paul II ended 455 years of
Italian papacies with his
surprise selection in 1978.
Benedict, born in Bavaria,


was the first German pope
since the 11th century
"With the election of
John Paul, with the elec-
tion of Benedict, one
wonders if the former
boundaries seem not to
have any more credibil-
ity," New York Cardinal
Timothy Dolan said, dis-
cussing Benedict's deci-
sion this week at
SiriusXM's "The Catholic
Channel."
The election also follows
a pontificate featuring
Americans in unusually
prominent roles.
Cardinal William Lev-
ada, the former San Fran-
cisco archbishop, was the
first U.S. prelate to lead
the Congregation for the
Doctrine of the Faith, the
Vatican's powerful
guardian of doctrine. Car-
dinal Raymond Burke,
the former St. Louis arch-
bishop, is the first Ameri-
can to lead the Vatican
supreme court. And
Benedict appointed oth-
ers from the U.S. to han-
dle some of his most
pressing concerns, in-
cluding rebuilding ties
with breakaway Catholic
traditionalists and over-
seeing the church's re-
sponse to clergy abuse
cases worldwide.


Early pontiff elections


Conclave may

meet as soon

aspossible
NICOLE WINFIELD
Associated Press
VATICAN CITY The
Vatican raised the possi-
bility Saturday the con-
clave to elect the next
pope might start sooner
than March 15, the earliest
date possible under cur-
rent rules that require a
15- to 20-day waiting pe-
riod after the papacy be-
comes vacant.
Vatican spokesman the
Rev Federico Lombardi
said rules on papal succes-
sion are open to interpre-
tation and "this is a
question that people are
discussing."
"It is possible that
church authorities can
prepare a proposal to be
taken up by the cardinals
on the first day after the
papal vacancy" to move up
the start of the conclave,
he said.
The 15- to 20-day waiting
period is in place to allow
time for all cardinals who
don't live in Rome to ar-
rive, under the usual cir-
cumstance of a pope dying.
But in this case the cardi-
nals already know this
pontificate will end Feb.
28, with the resignation of
Pope Benedict XVI, and
therefore can get to Rome
in plenty of time to take
part in the conclave, Lom-
bardi said.
The date of the con-
clave's start is important
because Holy Week begins
March 24, with Palm Sun-
day Mass followed by
Easter Sunday on March
31. To have a new pope in
place in time for the most
solemn liturgical period
on the church calendar,
he would need to be in-
stalled by Sunday, March
17, because of the strong
tradition to hold installa-
tion Mass on a Sunday
Given the tight time


Associated Press
In this photo released by the Vatican paper L'Osservatore Romano, Pope Benedict XVI,
center, poses for a family picture with Bishops and Cardinals of the Italian Lombardy
region during a private audience Saturday at the Vatican. The conclave to elect the next
pope might start earlier than March 15.


frame, speculation has
mounted some arrange-
ment would be made to
start the conclave earlier
than a strict reading of the
law would allow.
Questions about the
start of the conclave have
swirled since Benedict
stunned the world Feb. 11,
by announcing he would
retire, the first pontiff in
600 years to abdicate
rather than stay in office
until death. His decision


has created a host of ques-
tions about how the Vati-
can will proceed, given
that its plans for the so-
called "sede vacant" or
vacant seat period be-
tween papacies are based
on the process starting
with a papal death.
"In this moment we are
not prepared," said Cardi-
nal Franc Rode, the for-
mer head of the Vatican's
office for religious orders
who will vote in the con-


clave. "We have not been
able to make predictions,
strategies, plans, candi-
dates. It is too early, but we
will get there. In two or
three weeks things will be
put in place."
Meanwhile, a German
journalist who has pub-
lished several long inter-
views with Benedict over
the years suggested the
pope strongly foreshad-
owed his retirement during
an August conversation.


Be there for your heirs by being here.
Attend an estate planning workshop.
Wednesday, February 20th, 10:00am-12:00pm
Citrus Memorial Share Club Auditorium, Inverness
Estate planning is of big importance, whatever the size of your estate. An estate plan is an
ideal way to fulfill your final wishes, whether it's providing income for a spouse or a college
education for your grandchildren or leaving a lasting legacy. The workshop is open to the
public, free to attend, and will include light refreshments & door prizes. Presenters:


Jim McLaughlin, WMS
Senior VP, Investments
The Vaughn McLaughlin Team
of Raymond James
Pat Daxon, CFP@, CFA
VP, Wealth Management Solutions
Raymond James Intemational Headquarters


Jeannette Haag, Attorey
Haag, Haag & Friedrich, P.A.
Sheryll Goedert, CPA
Collier, Jemigan & Goedert, P.A.
Chris Pool, Director
Citrus Memorial Health System


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WoBR2,200 firearms not in gun ban

Turban ban

California senator saysproposed bill does not affect hunting, sporting weapons
Associated Press ___


Associated Press
And Indian Sikh school
student participates in a
protest Friday against the
ban on wearing turban in
public schools in France,
in New Delhi, India, on
the occasion of a two-day
visit of French President
Francois Hollande.


Syria: Outage hits
capital and south
DAMASCUS, Syria -A
power outage plunged
Damascus and southern
Syria into darkness late
Saturday, Syria's state
news agency said, while
anti-regime activists re-
ported a string of tit-for-tat,
sectarian kidnapping in the
country's north.
The news agency, SANA,
quoted Electricity Minister
Imad Khamis as saying the
failure of a high voltage line
had left the country's south
without power.
The blackout affected
Syria's capital, Damascus,
and the southern provinces
of Daraa and Sweida, which
abut the Jordanian border.
Suicide attack
kills 4 in Iraq
BAGHDAD -A suicide
bomber, pretending to ask
for help, assassinated a
senior Iraqi military official
and three bodyguards at his
home Saturday in the north,
officials said.
Brig. Gen. Ali Aouni, the
head of the Iraq Defense
Ministry's intelligence acad-
emy, and his bodyguards
were killed when the
bomber detonated his ex-
plosive vest just as Aouni
was leaving his house in Tal
Afar, 260 miles northwest of
Baghdad, police said.
The suicide bomber, who
was waiting outside of
Aouni's house, told guards
he wanted Aouni to help
him on some matter. When
the guards opened a gate
to let Aouni's car through,
the bomb exploded.
Russian recovers
from meteor fall
CHELYABINSK, Russia
- A small army of workers
set to work Saturday to re-
place acres of windows
shattered by the enormous
explosion from a meteor,
while other residents con-
templated the astonishing
event with pride and humor.
The fireball that streaked
into the sky over Chelyabinsk
at sunrise Friday was unde-
niably traumatic. Nearly
1,200 people were reported
injured by the shock wave
from the explosion, esti-
mated to be as strong as 20
Hiroshima atomic bombs.
But it also brought a sense
of cooperation. Large num-
bers of volunteers came for-
ward to help fix the damage
caused by the explosion.


Respect


Associated Press
Female North Korean
traffic police officers
gather in front of bronze
statues of the late Kim II
Sung and Kim Jong II to
pay their respects in
Pyongyang, North Korea.
-From wire reports


WASHINGTON
Congress' latest crack at
a new assault weapons
ban would protect more
than 2,200 specific
firearms, including a
semi-automatic rifle
that is nearly identi-
cal to one of the guns
used in the bloodiest
shootout in FBI history
One model of that firearm, the
Ruger .223 caliber Mini-14, is on
the proposed list to be banned,
while a different model of the same
gun is on a list of exempted
firearms in legislation the Senate
is considering. The gun that would
be protected from the ban has fixed
physical features and can't be
folded to be more compact Yet the
two firearms are equally deadly
"What a joke," said former FBI
agent John Hanlon, who survived
the 1986 shootout in Miami.
He was shot in the head, hand,
groin and hip with a Ruger Mini-14


Thi
that Mi
had a fol
folding stock. col
Two FBI agents wit
died and five oth-
ers were wounded.
Hanlon recalled
lying on the street as
brass bullet casings showered on
him. He thought the shooter had
an automatic weapon.
Both models of the Ruger Mini-
14 specified in the proposed bill
can take detachable magazines
that hold dozens of rounds of am-
munition.
"I can't imagine what the differ-
ence is," Hanlon said.
President Barack Obama has
called for restoring a ban on
military-style assault weapons
and limiting the size of ammuni-


Associated Press
is undated evidence photo, provided by retired FBI agent Edmund
reles, shows the Ruger Mini-14. New models of this firearm that have
ding stocks and pistol grips would be banned under proposed gun
ntrol legislation under consideration in Congress. But a similar model
:hout a folding stock would be exempted.


tion magazines.
A bill introduced last month by
Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif.
would ban 157 specific firearms
designed for military and law en-
forcement use and exempt others
made for hunting purposes. It also
would ban ammunition magazines
holding more than 10 rounds.
Yet firearms protected under
Feinstein's proposal can take large
capacity magazines like the ones
used in mass shootings enabling a
gunman to fire dozens of rounds of
ammunition without reloading.
Feinstein said in a written re-
sponse to questions from The As-


DEADLY BLAST

TURNS VEGETABLE MARKET INTO MORGUE


Associated r'ress
Smoke rises from the site of a bomb blast in a market Saturday in Quetta, Pakistan. Senior police officer
Wazir Khan Nasir said the bomb went off in a Shiite Muslim-dominated residential suburb of the city of Quetta.


Bomb rips through

Shiite area, killing

at least 65 people
Associated Press
QUETTA, Pakistan A bomb
hidden in a water tank ripped
through a crowded vegetable
market in a mostly Shiite neigh-
borhood in a southwestern Pak-
istani city Saturday, killing at
least 65 people and wounding
nearly 200, officials said.
Police said many of those
wounded in the explosion in
Quetta remain in critical condi-
tion. The blast, which police said
targeted the country's minority
Shiite Muslim sect, left many vic-
tims buried under rubble, but au-
thorities did not know how many
It was the deadliest incident
since bombings targeting Shiites
in the same city killed 86 people
earlier this year, leading to days
of protests that eventually top-
pled the local government.
Shiites have been increasingly
attacked by militant groups who
view them as heretics and non-
Muslims in this Sunni Muslim-
dominated country. Many of the
Shiites in Quetta, including those
in the neighborhood attacked Sat-
urday, are Hazaras, an ethnic
group that migrated to Pakistan
from Afghanistan more than a
century ago.
Quetta police chief Zubair
Mahmood told reporters the
bomb was hidden in a water tank
and towed into the market by a
tractor. He said the blast de-
stroyed shops in the neighbor-
hood and caused a two-story
building to collapse.
"We fear some victims may be
found buried there," he said.
Mahmood said police did not


A Pakistani man comforts another
died in a bomb blast.
know who was behind the bomb-
ing but a local television station
reported Lashker-e-Jhangvi, a
Sunni extremist group that has
targeted Shiites in the past, had
called to claim responsibility
Senior police officer Wazir
Khan Nasir said the bomb, set off
in a residential suburb, was deto-
nated by remote control.
Another officer, Samiullah
Khan, said the bomb was deto-
nated while dozens of women and
children were buying produce for


mourning for a family member who

their evening meal. Local resi-
dents rushed the victims to three
different area hospitals, often in
private vehicles because there
weren't enough ambulances to
transport the victims.
A massive plume of white
smoke rose over the area after the
bomb blast. Television footage of
the scene showed the streets lit-
tered with rubble from destroyed
buildings, mixed with fruits and
vegetables and shattered street
carts.


)ciated Press the list of more
lan 2,200 exempted firearms was
signed to "make crystal clear"
ie bill would not affect hunting
nd sporting weapons.
The December shooting at an
elementary school in Newtown,
onn., that left 26 students and
educators dead forced Washing-
n to focus on curbing gun vio-
ence, a risky political move not
ied in decades.
The gun industry, which is fight-
ig any sort of ban, said gun own-
rship in the U.S. is the highest
's ever been, with more than 100
million firearms owners.




Report


probes


airline


safety


Big airlines not
sharing safety
information

Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
Since a deadly airline
crash in 2009, the gov-
ernment hasn't kept its
promise to ensure major
airlines are holding
their smaller partners to
the same safety stan-
dards, a federal watch-
dog said.
The Transportation
Department's inspector
general faults the Fed-
eral Aviation Adminis-
tration for not taking
steps to encourage the
big airlines "to consis-
tently share safety infor-
mation and best
practices" with regional
airlines operating flights
under contract for them.
That business link is
known as code-sharing,
by which one airline
sells tickets for seats on
a flight operated by an-
other airline United
and United Express, for
example.
More than half of all
airline flights in the U.S.
are operated by regional
airlines using names such
as United Express, Delta
Connection, American
Connection and US Air-
ways Express under code-
sharing arrangements.
A flight operated by
regional carrier Colgan
Air for Continental Air-
lines under the name
Continental Express
crashed in February
2009 near Buffalo, N.Y,
killing 50 people. After
that crash, officials at
the department and the
FAA said they would
begin reviewing code-
share contracts to see if
they impinged on safety
Investigators cited
pilot training lapses by
Colgan as a factor. Col-
gan ended flying in Sep-
tember as part of its
parent company's
restructuring.
A National Trans-
portation Safety Board
investigation and con-
gressional hearings after
the Colgan crash pointed
out the differences in
safety cultures that
sometimes occur be-
tween the two types of
airlines.











EXCURSIONS


1 C 111C I rI C4)ltN I 'Y CII4 4 I N I.E


Veterans Notes can be
found on Page A17.
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Head due


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inspiration

SUSAN BRIDENSTINE
Special to the Chronicle


about Key West. Is
it the allure of
verdant tropical
flora set against a clear
azure sky that blushes
each evening when the
sun kisses the sea?
Could it be the laid-back
lifestyle resultant of
island living without
the inconveniences
of isolation?

Maybe it's just a great place to get
away from it all and hang from
Florida by a thread. Key West is so
far south, it's closer to Havana
than Miami.
Is the petite island a literary mag-
netic vortex or is it the premier
locale for an enclave of authors at-
tempting to escape? Whatever the
reason, writers
are compelled
in Key West and
the historical
city boasts more
writers per
capital than any
other city in the
United States.
Tennessee
Susan Bridenstine Williams,
MOONLIGHT Robert Frost,
Richard Wilbur,
_GYPY eThornton
Wilder, Shel Sil-
verstein, Stuart
Woods and Tom Corcoran, to name a
few, have found inspiration there. In
recognition, the island annually hosts
the Key West Literary Seminar and
the Robert Frost Poetry Festival.
The seaside city's charm wasn't
lost on Ernest and Pauline Pfeiffer
Hemingway. Their enduring pres-
ence is felt at 907 Whitehead St.,
where they lived from 1931 to 1940.
Landmarked by the commanding
Key West Lighthouse across the
street, the Spanish Colonial-style
house was designed and built years
before by Asa Tift, a wealthy marine
architect, merchantman, salvage
wrecker and captain. Tift utilized his
architectural background in the de-
sign and construction of the home,
which has withstood several hurri-
canes, attesting to his skill. He chose
the second highest point in Key West
on which to build in order to use the
limestone dug for an unprecedented
basement in the construction of the
house. It is believed that slaves then
hand-cut the stone used for the walls.
Construction of the home was com-
pleted in 1851.
Pauline, Hemingway's second of
four wives, fell in love with the aban-
doned house despite its sad state of
disrepair. In 1931, her uncle bought
the estate for $8,000 in back taxes
and conveyed it as a wedding gift to
Pauline and Ernest. Renovation be-
came their first order of business.
One notable feature of the property


f --- .. ..
SUSAN BRIDENSTINE/Special to the Chronicle
Ernest Hemingway's historic Key West home is open 365 days a year for visitors to tour. A descendant of
Hemingway's original six-toed cat, Snowball.


is the enormous in-ground swimming
pool dug in rock-hard coral in 1937.
Summoned to cover the Spanish Civil
War as a correspondent, Hemingway
left Pauline to oversee the comple-
tion of the pool. When he returned
and learned that the cost of the pool
had escalated to $20,000, he re-
minded Pauline that the house and
property had cost a mere $8,000. He
reportedly gave her a penny, saying,
"Pauline, you've spent all but my last
penny, so you might as well have
that." If you look closely when visit-
ing, a penny can be seen in the ce-
ment near the pool.
Not to be ignored are the six-toed
cats, bearing names of famous peo-
ple, who roam freely throughout the
property and house. I was told Bela
Lugosi is alive and well and living in
the basement. Many of the felines are
said to be descendants of Snowball, a
white polydactyl gifted to Heming-
way Home to approximately 40 cats,
the estate even has a cat cemetery


Hemingway obtained one of the origi-
nal urinals from Sloppy Joe's Bar dur-
ing a renovation and had it placed on
the property to remind him where his
money had gone.


where James Joyce, Mark Twain and
John Wayne, to name a few, are laid
to rest.
Hemingway obtained one of the
urinals from Sloppy Joe's Bar during
a renovation and had it placed on the
property to remind him where his
money had gone.
Inside the house, numerous photo-
graphs and paintings depict Heming-
way's legendary life as well as his
acquaintances and friends, many of
which he fashioned into the charac-
ters for his stories.
To get the most from a visit, you'll
want to take one of the guided tours,
after which you're free to linger as
long as you like in the garden, home,
book store, studio and property,
where you, too, may find inspiration.
Each colorful guide offers his or her
own unique tour, making the visit a
memorable experience.
The Ernest Hemingway Home and
Museum is a Registered National
Historic Landmark, a Literary Land-


mark and recorded at the Library of
Congress as a Historic American
Building. Hours of operation are
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., 365 days a year.
The admission price of $13 per adult
and $6 per child and includes the
30-minute guided tour Children 5
and younger are free. Group rates
for 12 or more are offered with a
reservation.
For more information, email
info@hemingwayhome.com, or call
305-294-1136, or visit the website:
HemingwayHome.com.
-0
Susan Bridenstine lives in Inverness.
Susan and her husband, Kim, lived
aboard their sailboat for seven years.
Susan sailed and drove during the
night. She earned the nickname
Moonlight Gypsy because she
enjoyed seeing the world in
the moonlight as much as in the
light of day You can reach her at
slbridenstine@gmail. com.


A view of Hemingway's study in his Key West home.


North to Alaska

Judi Teuscher of Homosassa and friend Elaine Harwood took a summertime
tour of Alaska, five days on land and the rest of the time cruising on the Princess
Sun. They saw Glacier Bay, Mount Denali, Talkeetna (where the TV show
"Northern Exposure" was filmed) and other points of interest.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATIONS
raota Co te t

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


'4 --


- K ::.
ti-:


hsllle


... .......


~OFF






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


On persons junk,


another's treasure


SUNDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 17, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/: Comcast Dunnellon & Inglis F Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 I 7:30 18:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 110:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
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0 WEDU PBS 3 3 14 6 PG" Downton Abbey (In Stereo)'PG' Scottis hunting lodge. (N) PG' Goes By Goes By
0 Q WTu PBS 5 5 5 41 Doc Martin 'PG' Masterpiece Classic (In Stereo)'PG' Masterpiece Classic (In Stereo) 'PG' Doc Martin 'PG'
C 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly Dateline NBC (In Off Their Off Their Saturday Night Live in the '90s: Pop Culture News Paid
NB 8 8 8 8 8 News Stereo) 'PG' Rockers Rockers Nation Lorne Michaels. '14, D,L X Program
S AC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time Revenge Sacrifice" (N) Revenge for Real (N) News Sports
S WFT ABc 20 20 News Home Videos'PG' "Manhattan" (N)'PG' 'PG' (In Stereo) o Night
S T C 10 1 PGA Tour Evening 60 Minutes (N) (In The Amazing Race (In The Good Wife (N) (In he Mentalist (N) (In 10 News Paid
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( 52 35 52 19 21 To Be Announced WildWest Alaska "Bear Wild West Alaska (N) GatorBoysGator FindingBifoot (N)(In Finding Bfoot (N) (In
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(CNNj 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents'PG' Piers Morgan CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Bust
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S 1 17 "Elvis Has *** "Walking and Talking" (1996) ** The Prince & Me" (2004) Julia Stiles. A "A Guy Thing" 2003) Jason "Dirty
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[FSNFL1 35 39 35 Car Warriors (N) 14' World PokerTour World PoTour our The Best of Pride (N) College Basketball USC at California.'PG'
X 30 6 3 "Live Free or Die Hard"(2007, Action) ** "Tron:Legacy" (2010) Jeff Brdges. Sam, son of Kevin ** "Tron:Legacy" 2010, Science
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** "Love Begins" ** "Love's Everlasting Courage" (2010, ** "Love Comes Softly"(2003, Drama) Frasier'PG Frasier 'PG'
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(__ __ 303 202 303 Maher'MA' Jason Biggs. (In Stereo) R' Jason Segel. (In Stereo) R'm
HGTyI 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters |Huntlntl Hunters HuntIntl Scoring |Scoring Hawaii Hawaii House Hunters Reno Hunters Hunt Intl
S 51 25 51 3 4 The President's Book Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Ax Men "Gators & Ax Men "Goldmine" (N) Swamp People 'PG' Pawn Stars Pawn Stars
iST 51 25 51 32 42 of Secrets'PG' 'PG' *'PG' Hand Grenades"'14' '14'N 'PG' 'PG'
r ** "My Sister's "Pastor Brown" (2009, Drama) Salli "She Made Them Do It" (2012, Docudrama) "Pastor Brown"
LIE 24 38 24 31 Keeper" (2009) Richardson-Whitfield, Keith David. PG-13' Jenna Dewan Tatum. NR' (2009)'PG-13'
n50 119 Girl Fight" (2011 Docudrama) Anne Heche, "Briing Ashley Home" (2011, Docudrama) ** "My Baby Is Missing"(2007, Drama) Gina
50 119 James upper. (In stereo) 'NR' A.J. Cook. (In Stereo)'NR' Philips. (In Sfereo) 'NR' N
S**"The Chronicles of Riddick" *** "Apollo 13" (1995) Tom Hanks. Based on the true ** "I, Robot" (2004, Science Fiction) Will
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** "Bad Teacher" (2011, Comedy) ** "Van Helsing" (2004) Hugh Jackman. A monster Spartacus: War of the Spartacus: War of the
370 271 370 Cameron Diaz.'R'N hunter battles creatures in Transylvania. 'PG-13' Damned'MA' Damned'MA'
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i** "Sioux City" (1994 Drama) Lou Diamond *** "The School of Rock"(2003, Comedy) "High School"(2010)Adrien ***
S 350 261 350 Phillips. (In Stereo) PG-13' Jack Black. (In Stereo)'PG-13 Brody (n Stereo)'R' "Elegy"
** "Men in Black I" NBA Tip-Off (N) 2013 NBA All-Star Game From the Toyota Center in 2013 NBA All-Star Game From the
( 48 33 48 31 34 (2002)'PG-13' (Live) B Houston. (N) (Live) N Toyota Center in Houston.
T N 38 58 38 33 ** "Ice Age: The Meltdown"(2006) 'PG' Incredible |Looney Oblongs |King/Hill King/Hill Cleveland Fam.Guy Fam.Gu
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U0I 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 VictiUnitnit'14 VictiUnitnit'14 Victims Unit'14 Thirteen" (2007) s
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IWGN-AI A 18 18 18 18 20 Videos |Bloopers! Bloopers! |Mother Mother |Mother Mother Mother News |Replay 30Rock |30Rock


Dear Annie: I re-
cently lost my
spouse and now
attend a grief support
group that has been very
helpful. However, there
are a couple of members
of this group who monop-
olize the conversation for
at least half of the time al-
lotted for the total meet-
ing, and worse, they
repeat the same thing
over and over again. We
also have a
new member
who attends
to support a
friend whose
husband died,
but now we
know all
about her
abusive child-
hood.
G r i e f
groups work
well by shar-
ing pain ANNI
caused by the MAILI
loss of a loved
one. Members
support one another This
is not possible unless
there is an open and car-
ing interchange between
members. Perhaps those
members who are caus-
ing problems will see
this. Southern Griever
Dear Southern: Most
grief support groups in-
clude a moderator of
some type, usually a
trained counselor. Al-
though a certain amount
of off-topic discussion can
be appropriate and heal-
ing, no one should mo-
nopolize the sessions so
often that it prevents oth-
ers from expressing
themselves. If you feel
that your support group is
not fulfilling its purpose,
please speak to the mod-
erator. Another option, of


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
Regal Cinema did not supply
times for Citrus movies.
Please call or visit
fandango.com

Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Safe Haven" (PG-13)
1:30 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 9:40 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"A Good Day to Die Hard"
(R) 2 p.m.,4:45 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 9:45 p.m.,
10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Beautiful Creatures" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,
10:05 p.m.
"Escape from Planet Earth"


(PG) In 3D. 1:05 p.m.,
7:35 p.m. No passes.
"Escape from Planet Earth"
(PG) 4:30 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
No passes.
"Side Effects" (R) 1:40 p.m.,
4:55 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
10:30 p.m.
"Identity Thief" (R) 1:25 p.m.,
4:25 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Warm Bodies" (PG-13)
1:20 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
10:25 p.m.
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch
Hunters" (R) In 3D. 1:50 p.m.,
4:05 p.m. No passes.
"Lincoln" (PG-13)1 p.m.,
4:10 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Give rise to
6 Per aspera ad -
11 Prototype
16 Dressed
20 Hidden supply
21 Begone!
22 Rub out
23 Sharpened
25 Item in a quiver
26 Rich cake
27 Food from heaven
28 Banished one
29 Fragrant necklace
30 Sleeplike state
32 Poppycock
34 Depot (abbr.)
35 Circular current
37 Chief
38 Neutral color
39 Something difficult to
bear
41 The cream
43 Quantity of paper
44 Craze
46 Like agem
49 Ladder parts
50 Melted
54 Forge
55 Be a sponge
56 Platter
57 Tony beach resort
58 The self
59 Fang
60 Funny or spending
61 Rope
for a rancher
62 Tear
64 Stop for a sec
65 Vacillate
66 Take heed
67 Three-spot card
68 Reddish brown
69 Jester
70 Cocktail ingredient
71 Pub drink
72 Run off to wed
74 Patio brick
75 Draft animal
77 Part of speech (abbr.)
80 Maria
81 One with promise
82 Sidewalk's edge, in
London
83 Soften
87 Alloy containing copper
89 Primp


90 in a name?
91 Challenge
92 Score in golf
93 Fakes
94 Loud sound
95 canto
96 Burden
97 Lane
of "Superman"
98 Throttle
99 Puts in shackles
102 Moving unsteadily
105 Raccoon's
South American
cousin
106 Big cat
107 Overact
108 Stage
109 Texas landmark
110 Prepared
for battle
113 Earthquake
114 San Obispo
115 Promontory
119 Pasha
120 Not talkative
123 Music at a revival
meeting
125 Rodent
126 Explorer's ship
of 1492
128 Soap plant
129 Crunchy
130 "The Sheik of-"
132 Atelier item
133 Yearns
134 Eagle's nest
135 Roadside
establishment
136 Act
137 Cubic meter
138 Suit material
139 Love

DOWN
1 Climb
2 Reduced
3 Bitter
4 "The Man Knew Too
Much"
5 Salamander
6 Phoenician
goddess
7 Candlestick
for a wall
8 Flambeau
9 Memory alone


Consumed
Autobiographical writ-
ings
Osage -
- macabre
Serf
Tilt
Word at parting
Smoked salmon
Cordial flavoring
After gamma
Bargain
Wet outside
Whinny
Some children
Holler
"The Brady -
City
in northem Texas
Rest
Repeat
the words of
Skinflint
Pale gray
Not hidden
Beeping gadget
Exclusively
Perch
Modest restaurant
Prospect
One of the Fords
"Lorna -
Mickey -
White cliffs town
Grayish brown
Creator
Wrinkle
Coloring matter
Demonstrate
Interlaced
Tree branches
King Bible
Brooks
of country music
Indolent
Works in verse
Halt
British business abbr.
Monk
Make a buzzing sound
Fashion
Kilborn
or Ferguson
Uniform cloth
Custom
Place of contest
Cardiff residents


Settled snugly
Call
Penned
Narrow opening
Gulf
Move effortlessly
Go after
- and haw
Long, long time
Bright green


Traveled on
Kind of checkers
Cut
Kitchen gadget
Down Under native
Stand wide open
Greek epic
Wash
Food with tea
River in France


A Muse
Sword
Mode
Lights-out signal
Ersatz (abbr.)
Swelled
Dalai -
Links peg
Feline
Steiger or Stewart


Puzzle answer is on Page A18.


course, is to find a differ-
ent group.
Dear Annie: I'd like to
say something to "Don't
Want To Pick Through the
Weeds," whose mother-
in-law is a packrat. Leave
your mother-in-law
alone!
I'm 81 years young, and
I have collected many
things over the years.
These items may not
mean anything to anyone
else, but to me
they are sacred.
That unfin-
ished bird-
house will be
finished when I
have the time.
That cracked
pot was given to
me on my wed-
ding day. That
old newspaper
you can't read
any longer was
E'S a copy of the
BOX L.A. Mirror on
the day World
War II started.
And as for those draw-
ers no one has seen the
contents of in years,
maybe it's because I don't
want anyone to see what
is in those drawers.
As long as my house is
clean (and it is cleaned
once a week by a profes-
sional service) and I am
healthy, leave my stuff
alone. It won't be long be-
fore you can do whatever
you want with all of my
things. Quartz Hill,
Calif.


Email questions to
anniesmailbox@
comcastnet, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St., Hermosa
Beach, CA 90254.


A16 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well
as events to which the public
is invited. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activi-
ties, meals and more for a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.

POST NEWS
VFW Riders Group
meets at 10 a.m. Saturday
(different weeks each month)
at different VFW posts
throughout the year. For infor-
mation, call director Gene
Perrino at 352-302-1037, or
email geneusawo@tampa
bay.rr.com.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Satur-
day monthly at 1 p.m. for
lunch and coffee at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). All Coastie veterans
are welcome. For more infor-
mation, call Charlie Jensen at
352-503-6019.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Lounge open at 11 a.m. Mon-
day through Saturday and
noon on Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The public is welcome
Everyone is invited to lunch
from noon to 3 p.m. Wednes-
days in the lounge. On Mon-
days and Thursdays, lunch is
served in the lounge and
dining hall.
The post will conduct a Le-
gion Day celebration at 5 p.m.
Friday, March 15, to honor the
American Legion and the
service of its volunteers, as
well as hold a dining-in to
honor all the armed services.
There will be a grog bowl cer-
emony, group skids, etc. The
public is invited. All veterans
are encouraged to wear their
respective uniforms whether
class Aor utility to show their
past service.
The event is informal and
casual attire is preferred. To
RSVP, call the post at 352-
795-6526 or the Cmdr. Mike
Klyap at 352-302-6096, so the
post can get accountability for
meals.
The 40/8 will have a St.
Patrick's Day celebration on
March 17 with the cost of the
meal being $10. This will be a
fun day for the family and all
legionnaires. The public is
welcome.
On March 30, the Legion
Riders will have its annual
poker run, which will begin
and end at the post. The
event is open to all motorcy-
cle organizations and regular
vehicles are welcome.
For more information about
the post and its other activi-
ties, call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at
352-302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at
7:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday
of every month at the post. El-
igibility in the Auxiliary is open
to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who
served during war time (also
stepchildren); stepchildren;
and female veterans who
served during wartime. Call
Unit President Sandy White at
352-249-7663, or member-
ship chairman Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
The Unit will serve a shrimp


alfredo dinner Friday, Feb. 27,
at the post home, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway. All
members and the public are
welcome to come and enjoy
dinner with their friends and
families for a donation of $7.
All profits support the many
programs of the American Le-
gion Auxiliary. For more infor-
mation, call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-
249-7663.
0 H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post


10087, Beverly Hills, offers
activities such as meals,
bingo, golf, darts, karaoke,
pool and more for members
and guests. Review the
monthly newsletter for activi-
ties and updates, and call the
post at 352-746-0440. The
VFW Post 10087 is off County
Road 491, directly behind
Cadence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 746-0440. The
Cake Crab Company Golf
League plays at Twisted Oaks
G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.
Check with Jack Gresham for
tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf
League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted
Oaks Golf Club and Citrus
Springs Country Club. Tee
time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Baked pork chop dinner
from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday,
Feb. 22. Cost is $8; children
younger than 6 eat for $4.
Karaoke by Mike. The public
is welcome.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, at the intersection of In-
dependence Highway and
U.S. 41. The chapter hall is on
the corner of Independence
Highway and Paul Drive. We
thank veterans for their serv-
ice and welcome any disabled
veteran to join us from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we
accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to as-
sist disabled veterans and
their families when we are
able. Anyone who knows a
disabled veteran or their fam-
ily who requires assistance is
asked to call Commander
Richard Floyd 727-492-0290,
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207,
or 352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClis-
ter is available to assist any
veteran or dependents with
their disability claim by ap-
pointment. Call 352-344-3464
and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the
veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA med-
ical center in Gainesville may
call the Citrus County Transit
office for wheelchair trans-
portation; call 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
DAV Chapter 70 is offering
a $1,000 scholarship for the
2013 school year. The schol-
arship is offered to a disabled
veteran, veteran, survivor of a
veteran or dependent of a
veteran.
The recipient shall be en-
rolled in a full-time course of
instruction leading to a degree
program or to a vocational
skill. Selection shall be con-
ducted by the scholarship
committee and will be based
on the applications submitted.
The procedure requires that
applicants write a statement
detailing course of study,
goals and why they are de-


serving of this award.
Applications may be picked
up at guidance department of-
fices in area high schools, the
Withlacoochee Technical In-
stitute, Central Florida Com-
munity College guidance
offices, or by calling John
Seaman at 352-860-0123.
All applications must be re-
turned to the DAV Chapter at
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, FL 34453 by March 31.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70


meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant
Lynn Armitage at 352-341-
5334.One of the DAVA's proj-
ects is making lap robes and
ditty, wheelchair and monitor
bags for needy veterans in
nursing homes. All who wish
to help in our projects are wel-
come. We need to make the
items certain sizes, so please
call for information. We also
collect toiletry items for the
veterans. Good, clean mate-
rial and yarn are needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries
are at 906 Highway 44 East,
Inverness. Call the post at
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org for informa-
tion about all weekly post
activities.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Aux-
iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Post and auxiliary meet
the first Wednesday of the
month at 7 p.m. Dunnellon
Young Marines meet 6 p.m.
Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4 p.m.
Everyone is welcome at
free AARP income tax service
through April 10 from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Wednesday. For in-
formation, call Wayne Sloan
at 352-489-5066.
For information about activ-
ities and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
or President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
Any female relative age 16 or
older who is a wife, widow,
mother, mother-in-law, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of an honor-
ably discharged Marine and
FMF Corpsman eligible to join
the auxiliary, and female
Marines (former, active and
reserves) are eligible for
Marine Corps League
membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.


Call or visit the post for regu-
lar events, as well as meet-
ings. Google us at VFW 4252,
Hernando.
The public is welcome at
"Show Me the Money" from
2 to 4 p.m. Thursday at the
post.
Sunday breakfasts are
open to the public from
9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $6.
Everyone is invited to a
special "Speed Bingo" ses-
sion at 10 a.m. Saturday,
Feb. 23. Doors open at 9 a.m.
Food is available. Proceeds
will benefit cancer aid and re-
search. Also, all are welcome
at the "Bonanza Bingo" begin-
ning at 9 a.m. Saturday,
March 2. Cost is $35 for the
bingo package, which in-
cludes lunch.
Call 352-726-5206 for
information.
The public is welcome at
the Sunday buffet breakfasts
from 10 a.m. to noon; cost is
$5.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-
5012 for information. VFW
membership is open to men
and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including
service in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The Korean
Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above for
information.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For
information about the post
and its activities, call 352-637-
0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, in-
vites all eligible veterans to
join or transfer to our Post
237 family. There are many
activities and monthly events,
and our Legion, Sons of the
Legion, Legion auxiliary and
Legion Riders are active in
support of veterans and our
community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org
to view the calendar of up-
coming events and regularly
scheduled activities open to
all members of the Legion,
VFW and AMVETS and their
auxiliaries. Visit or call the
post at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of
the U.S. is eligible for mem-
bership if said service was
within Korea, including territo-


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rial waters and airspace, at
any time from Sept. 3, 1945,
to the present or if said serv-
ice was outside of Korea from
June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77 meet the first
Thursday monthly at the for-
mer Inverness Highlands
S&W Civic Association build-
ing at 4375 Little Al Point, off
Arbor Street. Call Post Cmdr.
Norman Brumett at 352-860-
2981 or Auxiliary president
Marie Cain at 352-697-3151
for information about the post
and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food
available.
The post will do a bus tour
to Miami and Key West Feb.
18 to 24. Profits from the trip
will be used to purchase a
brick for the Fisher House
Walk of Courage and for new
equipment for the Color
Guard of Post 77. The Fisher
House will be a home for the
families of hospitalized veter-
ans at the Malcom Randal
Veterans Hospital in
Gainesville; the Walk of
Courage will be the paved
walkway between the Fisher
House and the hospital. For
more information, call Alice at
352-860-2981.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Dinner is at 6 p.m. and the
meeting follows at 7. All veter-
ans in the Homosassa/Ho-
mosassa Springs area are
invited to be a part of Ameri-
can Legion Post 166. For in-
formation about the post or
the American Legion, call and
leave a message for the post
commander at 352-860-2090.
Your call will be returned
within 24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose
and Crown restaurant, Citrus
Hills. Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the


American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway). For more informa-
tion about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959; or
visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 1 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November at
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. All combat-wounded
veterans, lineal descendants,
next of kin, spouses and sib-
lings of Purple Heart recipi-
ents are invited. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 MOPH, visit the chap-
ter's website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Pur-
ple Heart has announced two
scholarship opportunities for
college-bound students -
Chapter 776's College of
Central Florida (CF) Endowed
Scholarship and the Military
Order of the Purple Heart
(MOPH) Scholarship for Aca-
demic Year 2013/14.
Chapter 776's CF Endowed
Scholarship for Academic
Year 2013/14 awards $500 to
an applicant accepted or en-
rolled at CF as a full-time stu-
dent (12 or more semester
credit hours). Chapter 776
scholarship information and
an application can be ob-
tained at www.citruspurple
heart.org, or by calling 352-
382-3847. Chapter 776 must
receive scholarship applica-
tions no later than 5 p.m. Feb.
28.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-
0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 A17





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Special to the Chronicle
Dessie Cannon of Woodland Terrace in Citrus County cel-
ebrated her 100th birthday on Feb. 10, 2013. She was
feted with several parties with friends, family and neigh-
bors. Here, Arlene Breland, a CNA at Woodland Terrace,
gives Mrs. Cannon her cake.


VETERANS
Continued from Page A17

State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post. Call the post
at 352-447-3495 for informa-
tion about the post and its
activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call Commander Tom
Gallagher at 860-1629 for in-
formation and directions.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.


Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2013 will
be at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill.
Dates are: March 9, April 13
and May 11.
SERVICES & GROUPS
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets the
second Saturday monthly at
the DAV building at 1039 N.
Paul Drive in Inverness. This
is an advocacy group for cur-
rent and future veterans, as
well as for POWs and MIAs.
Florida Chapter 7 welcomes
new members to help pro-
mote public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help vet-
erans in need of help. Full
membership is open to all in-
dividuals 18 years or older
who wish to dedicate time to
the cause. Visit the website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker
for your next meeting or
event. Call club President Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell), or email him at ultraray
1997@yahoo.com.


= Engagement

Liufau/Davies


Mr. and Mrs. William M.
Davies Jr. of Inverness
have announced the en-
gagement of their son,
Bradley J. Davies, to
Katherine (Katie) Liufau,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
James E Liufau of Destin.
The bride-elect is a
2006 graduate of Fort
Walton Beach High
School and a 2010 gradu-
ate of the University of
Florida, where she was a
member of the Chi
Omega sorority. She re-
ceived her master's de-
gree in education from
UF in 2011 and is cur-
rently teaching in West
Palm Beach.
The prospective groom
is a 2006 graduate of Cit-
rus High School and a
2011 graduate of the Uni-
versity of Florida, where
he was a member of the


Tau Kappa Epsilon fra-
ternity. He received his
degree in food and re-
source economics and is
currently employed by
Nestle Corporation in
Jupiter.
A June 2013 wedding in
Destin is planned.


Engagement

Concidine/Boles

Sharon and Roy Conci-
dine have announced the
engagement of their
daughter, Brittney Louise
Concidine of Inverness, to
Nathan Wayne Boles of
Clermont, son of the late
Darlis and Earl Boles.
The bride-elect is a
teachers' aide at Inver-
ness Primary School, A
while pursuing her teach-
ing degree.
Her fiance is an elec-
tronics specialist for
Kmart, while working to-
ward his CDL.-
A February 2014 wed-
ding is planned.



COMMUNITY NEWS and MORE
For more community news, see Page All
in today's Chronicle.
To read Jim Mullen's column, see Page Al1
in today's Chronicle.
Find out how to register children for county fair
pageants on Page A12 in today's Chronicle.


100th BIRTHDAY

Dessie Cannon


2-17


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Engagement

Goldsmith/deMontfort

Glen and Rita Gold-
smith of Beverly Hills
have announced the en- '
gagement of their daugh-
ter, Kimberly Desiree'
Goldsmith, to Brian Gary
deMontfort, son of David
and Sally deMontfort of
Dunnellon. SA
The bride-elect earned
her Bachelor of Science
degree in mathematics
education from Florida
State University in De-
cember 2010. She is a
teacher for Charlotte-
Mecklenburg County
Schools, North Carolina.
Her fiance earned his
Bachelor of Science de- TancTennis, Charlotte,
gree in marketing from North Carolina.
Florida Southern College They will exchange
in April 2011. nuptial vows in Septem-
He is a tennis pro for ber 2013 in Lecanto.

FOR THE RECORD
Divorces and marriages filed in the state of
Florida are a matter of public record, available
from each county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For
Citrus County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or
visit the website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.
For Citrus County News of Record, see Page A12
in today's Chronicle.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A16.
S PAWNA W N AS T RA A MODIE L LIAD
C A C HiEis Co0oTIME R A S EIHION E D
AR R OIWiT OR E MA N N AIE X I L E
LEI TIRIANCE NNONSENSENSTA
EL TE Q RE MAN A
OPAL IE RU NG SD S OL V ED
VA-LLEY M O-O-C-H DI S T-L IDO
EG-O ITOO-THNN NE Y LIAISS
R-EN TD EWJASE A ER IL I SET E"N
TREYRUST JOK ERG I LE
ELOPE UI R CAME L
BR OPONZiE PREEEN WHaADTISIDA R E
B-O-G-E IY S "H-A-MSC R A S B-E-L


GI RDED E IM LU S ESS
A LIIIRIEIT ICE N G O S PIEIL R A T
P I NLTAIAY M0O0LE C R I S PIAHRLA BY
E DA SEILIP NS EREW EER IMIoTOE L
BD E0EIDIsTZ E R EIT w E E DIAT IDSoA E


Prices good
until
2/28/13


4


A18 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013


TOGETHER











SPORTS


NASCAR
season
unofficially
kicks off
Saturday
with
Daytona
shootout./B2
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


UF races by Auburn in 83-52 triumph


No. 7 Gators now 11-1 in

SECplay after big victory

Associated Press
AUBURN, Ala. Mike Rosario, Kenny Boyn-
ton and No. 7 Florida were brutally efficient.


The Gators made the extra
passes, hit a season-high 15 3-point-
ers and pretty much confounded
Auburn's shooters in a systematic
83-52 rout on Saturday
Rosario scored a season-high 22
points, Boynton had 16 and the
Gators (21-3, 11-1 Southeastern


coach Billy Donovan said.
It really was just that simple.
The game matched the worst loss for Auburn
(9-16, 3-9) in coach Tony Barbee's three seasons,
tying a 90-59 defeat against Mississippi on Feb.
16, 2011. It also was the Tigers' worst home loss
since an 88-48 blowout by Kentucky in 1952.
The Gators have won their last three SEC
games by an average of 24 points since their only


Top 25 roundup
* For all of Saturday's
ranked and local
college basketball,
see Page B3.


Conference) raced to a 25-point halftime lead.
"We had 25 assists in the game but you don't
get 25 assists unless the ball goes in the basket,
and the ball went in the basket for us," Florida


league loss at Arkansas.
Rosario had 18 points two shy
of his previous high this season -
by halftime, when the game was ef-
fectively over. Michael Frazier
added 15 points on 5-of-6 shooting
from 3-point range for Florida,
which has won seven straight at
Auburn.


Erik Murphy added 11 points and went 3 of 4 "
from beyond the arc. Associated Press
Florida's Scottie Wilbekin and Auburn's Chris Denson compete for a
See Page B2 loose ball in the second half Saturday in Auburn, Ala.


JOE DiCRISTOFALO/For the Chronicle
Crystal River junior Dylan Ayala tangled with Clay's Jeff Rivers in the 152-pound consolation final Saturday during the 2013 FHSAA
Wresting Finals at the Lakeland Center.


Pirates'Ayala finishes 4th, Panthers'Nightengale claims


TONY CASTRO
Correspondent
LAKELAND The final
elements of Citrus County's
eight-man state contingency
went out with a whimper
following Saturday's second
round in Polk County's
"House of Pain" aka, the
49th annual FHSAA Finals.
Two county grapplers -
Crystal River junior Dylan
Ayala and Lecanto junior
Jonah Nightengale en-
tered the sport's final day two
wins shy of their gold-medal
dreams. Both, however, fell
in the critical semifinals.
Ayala fell to Jacksonville-
Bolles' Harry Glasser via a
10-1 major decision.
From the lethal loser's


bracket, Ayala composed
himself to solve Rockledge
junior Trace Woxberg, 6-2.
In the consolation finals
for third place, Green Cove
Springs-Clay senior Jeff
Rivers folded Ayala into a
2:43 pinfall.
Ayala, who finished 1-2 at
states in 2012, finished 3-2
this weekend to finish his
career-best campaign at 38-
6 with a county-high 26 pins.
"I'm OK with fourth,"
shrugged the 17-year-old
Ayala. "Really any place on
the podium is fine. Now, I
know I've got to work my
butt off to get back here."
On dropping his semifinal
match, "He definitely could
ride me," Ayala said. "And
he's a takedown king.


On his consolation match
setback, "I hurt my arm ear-
lier in the day," he said. "He
cranked on that same arm
and it kinda ruined that
match for me."
On next season's goal, "I
just want to get back here,"
Ayala said. "Between now
and then, I want to get as
much mat time as I can."
Nightengale dropped his
morning semifinal to
Olympic Heights' Ronaldo
See Page B4
Lecanto junior Jonah
Nightengale lifts Olympic
Heights' Ronaldo Abreu in a
195-pound consolation
match Saturday during the
FHSAA Wresting Finals at
the Lakeland Center.


6th at state


Buccheri


memorial


deserving
On Friday night, as the tem-
perature began to drop at
Crystal River High School,
there was a warmth radiating from
around the pitcher's mound of the
Pirates' baseball field.
There, before the game between
Crystal River
and Citrus, the
Joseph Buc-
cheri Founda-
tion was
officially an- -
nounced and
the unveiling of
a plaque com-
memorating Jon-Michael
Buccheri's ac- Soracchi
complishments ON POINT
near the gate to
the baseball
field also occurred.
Buccheri was the Pirates' head
baseball coach from 1987 to 1996,
and was also the head coach at
Dunnellon for one year.
More than just a jock though,
Buccheri enjoyed his work as a
guidance counselor just as much
and having the ability to affect as
many lives as just could through the
power of education and athletics.
Citrus High School alumni
James Martone, now a coach and
teacher at his alma mater, handled
the opening of the ceremony and
was followed by Joe's son, also
named Joe.
Claudia Williams, daughter of
famed Boston Red Sox legend Ted
Williams, surprised the foundation
with a check for $2,000. The foun-
dation will give a total of six schol-
arships a year, two each to a
student at Citrus, Crystal River
and Lecanto High Schools.
The foundation will make a four-
year monetary commitment to
each student, which will benefit
not only student-athletes, but any
student who needs financial help
to attend college.
Williams threw out the first
pitch and like that, the game was
under way
Make no mistake, though: while
it was a humble honoring of a man
who suddenly died at age 64 in Au-
gust 2011 of the rare Creutzfeldt-
Jakob's disease, the gathering and
foundation celebrated a man who
was truly larger than life in the
most positive way


. Page B4


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Haas takes control


Golfers 64 gives

him three-shot

lead at Riviera

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Bill Haas
had no reason to think this round
at Riviera was going to be any-
thing special.
With an iron in his hand, he
failed to make birdie on the par-
5 opening hole, the easiest on the
golf course. Solid iron shots led
to a pair of birdies on the front
nine, and with Riviera playing
tough in warm, dry conditions on
Saturday, he was part of a large
group challenging for the lead.
Three holes changed every-
thing.
Haas made a tough 30-footer
for birdie on No. 9. He pitched in
from 60 feet for eagle on the
scary par-4 10th. And he hit a
good bunker shot with little mar-
gin for error on the par-5 11th
that set up a birdie.
Just like that, he was on his way
to a 7-under 64 and a three-shot
lead going into the final round of
the Northern Trust Open.
His 64 was the best round of a
difficult day by three shots, and it
was nearly eight shots better
than the average score. It put
Haas at 12-under 201, leaving
him in good position to become
only the eighth back-to-back win-
ner in the 76-year history of this
tournament.
All he cares about Sunday is
winning.
"It's very difficult in this game
to just pull away from the rest of
the field," Haas said. "You've
only seen a few guys ever really
do that, and those are guys like
Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods, Phil
Mickelson. So I think I've just got
to stay in the moment, don't let
my emotions get the best of me."
A year ago, Haas was two shots
behind going into the final round
and wound up winning in a play-
off over Mickelson and Keegan
Bradley This time, he has a com-
fortable margin over U.S. Open
champion Webb Simpson and
former Masters champion Charl


Bill Haas chips to the 12th greer
Country Club in Los Angeles.
Schwartzel, who each thought
they did well for a 68.
Langer has 3-shot lead
after 2nd round
NAPLES, Fla. Bernhard Langer
shot a 2-under 70 to take a three-
shot lead after the second round of


Associated Press
Saturday in the third round of the Northern Trust Open at Riviera


the Champions Tour's ACE Group
Classic on Saturday.
Langer, who had a 10-under 62 in
the first round, picked up where he
left off with a birdie on his first hole.
He made 11 straight pars after that,
birdied No. 13, and had a par on the
last five holes in windy conditions. He


is at 12-under 132.
Taiwan's Chien Soon Lu and Tom
Pernice Jr., who was runner-up last
week in Boca Raton, Fla., are tied for
second at 9-under 135.
Lu double bogeyed the first hole,
then birdied seven of the next 10. He
bogeyed No. 18.


Northern Trust


At Riviera
Lc
Purs
Yarda(
T.
Bill Haas
Webb Simpson
Charl Schwartzel
John Merrick
Luke Donald
FredrikJacobson
Josh Teater
Charlie Beljan
Hunter Mahan
Sergio Garcia
Adam Scott
Ryan Moore
Jim Furyk
Graham DeLaet
Ted Potter, Jr.
Sang-Moon Bae
Keegan Bradley
Greg Owen
Phil Mickelson
Stewart Cink
Lee Westwood
Jimmy Walker
Jeremiah Wooding
Luke Guthrie
Seung-Yul Noh
Blayne Barber
Trevor Immelman
Justin Leonard
Kevin Stadler
Ernie Els
Ross Fisher
Greg Chalmers
Matt Kuchar
John Rollins
Angel Cabrera
Charlie Wi
David Lynn
Ben Curtis
Tim Herron
Brian Davis
Bob Estes
Harris English
Marc Leishman
Scott Harrington
K.J. Choi
George McNeill
Fred Couples
Cameron Tringale
Stuart Appleby
MarkWilson
Bryce Molder
Brian Harman
Martin Flores
Brendan Steele
Chris Kirk
Jesper Parnevik
Kevin Streelman
Brandt Jobe
Matt Every
Scott Piercy
Charley Hoffman
Casey Wittenberg
John Mallinger
Jerry Kelly
Ryo Ishikawa
James Hahn
Andres Romero
Vijay Singh
Pat Perez
J.J. Henry
Y.E. Yang
Johnson Wagner
Michael Bradley
Retief Goosen
Jeff Maggert
Michael Block
David Mathis
Peter Hanson
Jason Kokrak


Saturday
Country Club Course,
os Angeles
se: $6.6 million
ge: 7,349, Par: 71
thirdd Round
70-67-64 201
70-66-68 204
69-67-68 204
68-66-70 -204
69-66-70 205
68-65-72 205
70-68-68 206
67-71-68 206
70-69-68 207
65-73-69 -207
71-67-70 -208
70-67-71 -208
68-72-69 209
72-68-69 -209
71-67-71 -209
68-65-76 209
71-70-69 -210
69-71-70 -210
71-67-72 -210
71-72-67 -210
68-68-74 210
70-70-71--211
75-66-70 -211
69-71-71-211
70-70-71 -211
69-70-72 -211
70-69-72 211
70-73-68 -211
72-71-68 -211
70-68-73 -211
72-71-68 211
669-73 -211
64-73-74 211
69-65-77 -211
69-72-71 -212
75-66-71 -212
67-74-71 -212
68-72-72 -212
68-74-70 -212
70-69-73 -212
68-72-72 -212
73-67-72 -212
69-75-68 212
73-71-68 212
71-70-72 -213
71-70-72 213
68-72-73 -213
73-69-71 --213
73-69-71 -213
71-72-70 -213
74-65-74 -213
76-67-70 -213
74-70-69 -213
70-71-73 -214
73-68-73 -214
70-70-74 214
73-69-72 -214
66-75-74 215
70-73-72 -215
72-71-72 215
73-70-72 -215
71-73-71 -215
71-66-78 -215
71-73-71 -215
71-73-71 -215
67-74-75 216
71-71-74 -216
75-68-73 -216
68-73-76 -217
72-69-76 -217
70-72-75 -217
73-71-73 -217
73-71-73 217
71-72-75 -218
72-72-75 -219
69-73-79 -221
71-73-77 -221
69-73-80 -222
71-72-81 -224


Harvick claims Sprint Unlimited Shootout


Exciting start

for NASCAR

at Speedweeks

Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH -
Kevin Harvick won the first
race of Speedweeks, domi-
nating the final two seg-
ments of the exhibition
Sprint Unlimited in the
debut of NASCAR's new
Gen-6 car
"I'm glad we got Speed-
weeks started off the right
way," said Harvick, who
won Saturday night's non-
points race at Daytona In-
ternational Speedway for
the third time in five years.
But with only 19 cars in
the field at the start of the
race and that was whit-
tled down to 12 after an
early accident- there was-
n't a great feel for what the
Feb. 24 season-opening
Daytona 500 will look like
with a full 43-car field.
"We'll have to wait a week




RACES
Continued from Page B1

Chris Denson led
Auburn with 13 points and
Jordan Price had 12.
Barbee said his team
"just ran into a buzz saw."
"We played a veteran,
experienced team and
they proved why they are
one of the best teams in
the league and in the
country," Barbee said. "I
told our guys I was disap-
pointed in the overall de-
fensive intensity and
attention to detail. You
have to learn playing
against teams like that.
They have a veteran
group now that has been
doing it together for a cou-
ple of years, so you see
why they play with such
chemistry on the offensive
and defensive end of the
floor"
It was a precision per-
formance by one of the
SEC's hottest teams against
one that is struggling badly,


and see what the weather is
like," Harvick said.
"There's still a lot to learn
with a full pack of cars."
There wasn't a chance for
that in the 75-lap exhibition
race, which was split into
three segments. Fans got to
vote on the format and de-
cided on 30 laps, 25 laps
then a 20-lap sprint to the
finish.
But several big names
were knocked out a mere 15
laps into the race. Tony
Stewart was running sec-
ond when he cut across the
front of Marcos Ambrose,
making slight contact that
turned Stewart sideways
and required a save to keep
from crashing. Traffic
stacked up behind him, trig-
gering a chain-reaction,
nine-car crash that wiped
out seven cars.
Taken out just 15 laps into
the first segment were de-
fending race winner Kyle
Busch and Denny Hamlin
from Joe Gibbs Racing, Jeff
Gordon and Jimmie John-
son from Hendrick Motor-
sports, Mark Martin and
Kurt Busch.


losing nine of 10.
The Gators hit 31 of 54
shots (57 percent) from the
floor and held Auburn to 19-
of-54 shooting (35 percent).
"We shot a lot of 3s and
when we're shooting like
that, it's hard to beat a
team," Donovan said.
Especially when the stat
sheet also includes num-
bers like this: assists on 25


"I didn't see much. I was
just cruising along and I
saw sparks in front of me -
I knew that wasn't good,"
Johnson said.
It was a costly crash for
Kurt Busch, who also
wrecked in practice Fri-
day and has two damaged
race cars just two days
into Speedweeks. His Fur-
niture Row Racing team
was getting assistance
from Richard Childress
Racing on car repairs to
ensure Busch has enough
in the fleet to get to the
Daytona 500.
Stewart, who took re-
sponsibility for triggering
the crash, went on to "win"
the first segment
Fans then voted for the
drivers to make a four-tire
change during a pit stop be-
tween the first and second
segment, and it was largely
Harvick's race from there.
He dominated the final two
segments, and held offchal-
lenges from Stewart and
Greg Biffle on the final lap
to win in his Richard Chil-
dress Racing Chevrolet
It's a strong opener to


of 31 baskets and 18 points
offAuburn's 14 turnovers.
Boynton broke Andrew
DeClercq's school record
with his 129th career start
and hit four 3-pointers in
nine attempts. Rosario
scored on drives, including
a nifty reverse layup, and
hit a couple of 3s.
Scottie Wilbekin had six
points, 10 assists and three


Associated Press
Tony Stewart sends sparks flying as drivers behind start to wreck in Turns 1 and 2
during NASCAR's Sprint Unlimited Shootout on Saturday night at Daytona International
Speedway in Daytona Beach.


what's going to be Harvick's
final year with RCR. He's
already signed on to drive
for Stewart-Haas Racing in
2014.
"It's about winning
races," Harvick said. "The
politics and everything are


steals for the Gators.
Rosario and the Gators
did pretty much whatever
they wanted in the first
half and jumped ahead 13-
3, making the Tigers look
helpless to defend the out-
side shooters or stop dart-
ing drives. They also kept
Auburn's offense off bal-
ance as it struggled to find
decent shots.


one thing, but when we get
to the race track it's about
sitting in this race car mak-
ing it as fast as it will go. And
those (RCR) guys, they don't
care about anything but
winning and wanting to do
good, so we owe it to them


and everybody at (sponsor)
Budweiser"
Budweiser was the long-
time sponsor of the race,
which was called the Bud-
weiser Shootout until series
sponsor Sprint took over
the rights this year


19h .l9 nn'U




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B2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013


SPORTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Terps shock No. 2 Duke


Florida State

holds on against

Boston College

Associated Press

COLLEGE PARK, Md. Seth
Allen broke a tie by making two
free throws with 2.8 seconds left,
and Maryland stunned No. 2
Duke 83-81 to end a six-game
skid against its bitter rival.
As the final horn sounded,
thousands of fans from the sell-
out crowd charged onto the
court to celebrate the Terrapins'
biggest victory of the season.
The Terrapins (18-7, 6-6 At-
lantic Coast Conference) did not
trail after halftime but never
could pull away from the weary
Blue Devils.
Duke (22-3, 9-3) trailed by 10
with 3:39 left but pulled even
when Rasheed Sulaimon made
three foul shots with 16.7 sec-
onds to go. Quinn Cook then
fouled Allen as the freshman
guard drove through the lane,
and Allen made both shots.
Alex Len had 19 points and
nine rebounds for Maryland,
and Allen scored 16.
Florida State 69,
Boston College 66
TALLAHASSEE Michael Snaer
scored 21 points and Florida State
hung on for a 69-66 win over Boston
College.
The Eagles had a chance to tie at
the buzzer, but Ryan Anderson's 3-
point try bounced off the front rim.
Florida State (14-11, 6-6 Atlantic
Coast Conference) led by as many
as 12 points in the opening half on
its way to a 31-26 lead at the break,
but BC rallied to take a brief 45-42
lead on Patrick Heckmann's 3.
Okaro White joined Snaer in dou-
ble figures for the Seminoles with 13
points to go along with a team-high
eight rebounds. Both were recipi-
ents of some deft passing by fresh-
man point guard Devon Bookert,
who had eight assists and no
turnovers in 31 minutes.
Boston College (11-14, 3-9) was
led by Olivier Hanlan's 19 points..
No. 1 Indiana 83,
Purdue 55
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -Will
Sheehey scored a career-high 22
points and Cody Zeller had 19 as
No. 1 Indiana rolled over Purdue 83-
55, routing the Boilermakers for the
second time in 2 1/2 weeks.
Indiana (23-3, 11-2 Big Ten)
bucked the recent trend of No. 1
teams losing and will likely keep the
top spot for a third straight week. It
also will retain at least a share of the
league lead.
The Hoosiers have won eight of
their last nine games.
Terone Johnson and Anthony
Johnson each had 11 points to lead
Purdue (12-14, 5-8).
No. 5 Gonzaga 71,
San Francisco 61
SAN FRANCISCO Kelly
Olynyk had 26 points and nine re-
bounds and Elias Harris added 17


Associated Press
Duke forward Alex Murphy, left, and Maryland guard Seth Allen chase after a loose ball in the second
half Saturday in College Park, Md. Maryland won 83-81 over the No. 2 Blue Devils.


points and 13 rebounds to help Gon-
zaga snap a three-year losing streak
at War Memorial Gymnasium.
The Bulldogs' frontline tandem
bullied and bruised their way to a
fast start and furious finish. Olynyk
finished 13 for 17 from the floor and
Harris went 7 of 15 as both keyed an
11-0 run in the final minutes that put
the Zags (25-2, 12-0 West Coast
Conference) ahead for good.
Cole Dickerson scored 15 points
and Cody Doolin added 14 to help
the Dons (11-15, 4-9) rally back after
trailing by 15 in the first half. Unlike
the last three years when USF
stunned Gonzaga at home, the Bull-
dogs regrouped and showed why
they're ranked so high.
No. 6 Syracuse 76,
Seton Hall 65
NEWARK, N.J. Brandon Triche
scored a career-high 29 points to go
with six rebounds and five assists,
leading No. 6 Syracuse to a tougher-
than-expected 76-65 victory over
reeling Seton Hall.
C.J. Fair added 19 points and 11
rebounds, and Michael Carter-
Williams had 14 points and nine
boards as the Orange (21-4, 9-3) re-
bounded from a loss to Connecticut
earlier this week and remained tied
with Marquette and Georgetown for
first-place in the Big East Conference.
Fuquan Edwin had 21 points and
Eugene Teague added 14 points
and nine rebounds for Seton Hall
(13-13, 2-11) in its seventh straight
loss and 11th in 12 games.
No. 8 Michigan St. 73,
Nebraska 64
LINCOLN, Neb. Keith Appling
scored 16 points to go over 1,000 for
his career and Adreian Payne added
15 points and 14 rebounds in eighth-
ranked Michigan State's 73-64 vic-
tory over Nebraska.
The win allowed Michigan State
(22-4, 11-2) to remain tied with Indi-
ana for first place in the Big Ten.
The Cornhuskers (12-14, 3-10),
who have lost seven straight against
opponents ranked in the top 10,
never led but were within a point


with 14 minutes left. The Spartans
put away their fifth straight win with a
20-6 run.
Michigan State blocked a season-
high 12 shots, with Branden Dawson
matching his career high with four
swats.
Gary Harris had 10 of his 14
points in the second half and Derrick
Nix had 13 points and 11 rebounds.
No. 11 Butler 68,
Fordham 63
NEW YORK Rotnei Clarke
scored 22 points and Butler handed
Fordham its sixth straight loss and
ninth in the last 10 games.
Clarke was the key figure for the
Bulldogs (21-5, 8-3 Atlantic 10) late
in the game when the Rams (6-20,
2-9) were able to close to 65-63 with
18 seconds to play.
The Bulldogs closed it out by
making four of six free throws the
rest of the way to improve to 36-10
after a loss under coach Brad
Stevens. Butler lost to Charlotte 71-
67 on Wednesday.
The game marked the return of
Andrew Smith, Butler's starting cen-
ter who missed the home loss to
Charlotte because of an abdominal
injury.
No. 18 Marquette 79,
No. 16 Pittsburgh 69
MILWAUKEE Vander Blue
scored 19 points to help Marquette a
share of first place in the Big East.
Blue was 7 of 8 from the field and
3 for 4 on free throws to go with six
rebounds for the Golden Eagles (18-
6, 9-3), who pulled into a tie with
Georgetown atop the conference.
The Golden Eagles, who lost to
the Hoyas, 63-55 on Monday, shot
57 percent (26 for 46) to win their
23rd straight home game the
fourth-longest active streak in the
country.
Lamar Patterson scored 19 points
to lead Pittsburgh (20-6, 8-5), which
entered the game fifth in the nation
in scoring defense (54.4 ppg). Tray
Woodall added 10 points and eight
assists for the Panthers, who lost for
just the second time in their last nine


games.
No. 17 Oklahoma St. 84,
Oklahoma 79, OT
STILLWATER, Okla. Marcus
Smart scored 28 points, Le'Bryan
Nash added a season-high 26 and
Oklahoma State got its third straight
down-to-the-wire win at home.
Smart fed Nash for a right-handed
slam with 53 seconds left in over-
time to put the Cowboys (19-5, 9-3
Big 12) up 80-79, and Oklahoma
couldn't come up with an answer.
Markel Brown's steal led to a fast-
break layup by Michael Cobbins,
and Smart blocked Steven Pledger's
attempt at a tying 3-pointer that gave
Oklahoma State the ball back with
18 seconds to go.
Smart sealed it with two free
throws, and Cowboys fans stormed
the court after winning their seventh
straight game. The Cowboys' last
two home wins were by two points
apiece.
Romero Osby led the Sooners
(16-8, 7-5) with 18 points and 15 re-
bounds, and Sam Grooms had a ca-
reer-best 18 points.
No. 10 Kansas St. 81,
Baylor 61
MANHATTAN, Kan. -Angel Ro-
driguez scored 22 points and Shane
Southwell added 18 on six 3-point-
ers to lead No. 10 Kansas State to
an 81-61 win over Baylor.
The game remained fairly close in
the first half, but the Wildcats (20-5,
9-3 Big 12) took control in the sec-
ond, outscoring the Bears 43-32
after the break.
A.J. Walton led Baylor (16-9, 7-5)
with 14 points and Isaiah Austin
added 13.
Providence 71,
No. 21 Notre Dame 54
PROVIDENCE, R.I. Kadeem
Batts scored 20 points and Vincent
Council had 11 assists to become
Providence's career leader.
Bryce Cotton, the Big East scor-
ing leader, had 19 points and
LaDontae Henton 13 for the Friars


(14-11, 6-7). Providence has won
four straight, including a victory over
then-No. 17 Cincinnati on Feb. 6.
Council also had 11 rebounds and
seven points. His 671 assists sur-
passed the 662 of Ernie DiGregorio
from 1970-73. Council needs two
assists to match the Big East record
of 426 set by Syracuse's Sherman
Douglas from 1985-89..
Jack Cooley led Notre Dame with
12 points and 10 rebounds, and Tom
Knight and Garrick Sherman each
scored 11. It was just the second
loss in seven games for the Fighting
Irish (20-6, 8-5).
No. 22 Memphis 71,
Marshall 59
HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -Adonis
Thomas scored a career-high 23
points and grabbed 10 rebounds to
lead No. 22 Memphis to its 16th
straight victory, 71-59 over Marshall.
Joe Jackson added 12 points and
Geron Johnson had 11 for the Tigers
(22-3, 11-0 Conference USA).
Memphis improved to 7-0 in road
games with the help of its reserves,
who outscored their Marshall coun-
terparts 19-6.
Elijah Pittman and DeAndre Kane
scored 16 points apiece for Marshall
(11-15, 4-7). Dennis Tinnon added
15 points and 13 rebounds for the
Thundering Herd, who committed 20
turnovers and lost for the sixth time
in eight games.
No. 24 Colorado St. 89,
Air Force 86
AIR FORCE ACADEMY, Colo. -
Dorian Green scored 22 points to
help Colorado State get its sixth
straight win.
The Rams led 82-72 with 1:05 re-
maining, but the Falcons pulled
within four twice in the final minute.
Michael Lyons hit a 3-pointer for Air
Force with 2 seconds left, but Col-
orado State inbounded the ball with-
out incident to close the game.
The Rams (21-4, 8-2 Mountain
West) have won eight of nine and
dropped the Falcons to 11-2 at
Clune Arena.
Lyons, the conference's leading
scorer, had a career-high 45 points
for the Falcons (15-9, 6-5), and Todd
Fletcher added 11.
Tennessee 88,
No. 25 Kentucky 58
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. Trae
Golden had 24 points and eight as-
sists as Tennessee got its most lop-
sided win in the 216-game history of
this series.
Kentucky (17-8, 8-4 Southeastern
Conference) was playing its first
game without star center Nerlens
Noel, who tore the anterior cruciate
ligament in his left knee Tuesday
during a loss to No. 7 Florida.
The Wildcats looked like a com-
pletely different team without him.
Jordan McRae scored 15 points
and Kenny Hall had 12 points as
Tennessee (14-10, 6-6) shot 58 per-
cent and won its third straight game.
Jarnell Stokes had nine points and
nine rebounds, ending his string of
six consecutive double-doubles.
Kyle Wiltjer scored 18 points,
Julius Mays had 12 points and Jar-
rod Poison had a career-high 11 for
Kentucky.


Lightning ground Panthers


Bolts take 6-5 win e

in overtime L Y TAT


Associated Press

SUNRISE- Benoit Pouliot
scored two goals, including the
winner in overtime, and Tampa
Bay ended a six-game losing streak
with a 6-5 victory over Florida.
Steven Stamkos also scored
twice, and Teddy Purcell and
Alexander Killorn once each for
the Lightning. Anders Lindback
made 25 saves.
Purcell's goal with 11 seconds
left in regulation tied it 5 as his
shot from the slot hit off the post
and into the net. On the winning
score, the puck bounced off the end
boards and out to Pouliot, who was
open in front. His wrist shot went
into the net 1:19 into overtime.
Tomas Kopecky and Jonathan
Huberdeau scored in the third pe-
riod to put the Panthers ahead.
Maple Leafs 3,
Senators 0
TORONTO Ben Scrivens
stopped 34 shots for his first career
shutout and the Toronto Maple Leafs
defeated the injury-ravaged Ottawa
Senators 3-0 on Saturday night.
Scrivens was making his second
straight start since incumbent James
Reimer injured a knee in Monday
night's 5-2 win over Philadelphia. The
26-year-old Scrivens has been solid as
Reimer's replacement, stopping 96 of


Associated Press
Florida Panthers goalie Jose Theodore blocks a shot by the Tampa Bay
Lightning's Tom Pyatt in the first period as Marcel Goc (57) defends in
Sunrise. The Lightning snagged a 6-5 victory in overtime.


the 100 shots he has faced.
Fraser McLaren, Tyler Bozak and
John-Michael Liles scored for Toronto.
Islanders 5, Devils 1
UNIONDALE, N.Y John Tavares
scored three goals and assisted on an-
other to lead the New York Islanders
over the New Jersey Devils.
Matt Moulson had a goal and three
assists, Michael Grabner scored with
35 seconds left, and Evgeni Nabokov
made 30 saves for the Islanders, who
beat the Rangers 4-3 in a shootout
Thursday night.
The Devils' lone goal was Marek
Zidlicky's power play slap shot 8:47


into the third. Johan Hedberg made 28
saves for New Jersey.
Canadiens 4, Flyers 1
MONTREAL- Rookie Brendan
Gallagher had a goal and assist be-
fore leaving the game with an injury
and the Montreal Canadiens downed
the Philadelphia Flyers for their third
win in a row.
David Desharnais, Tomas Plekanec
and Rene Bourque also scored for the
Canadiens, who outshot the tired-look-
ing Flyers 29-19. Gallagher left four
minutes into the third period after being
hit into the boards by Luke Schenn and
did not return.


No. 1 Baylor


rolls over TCU


Associated Press

WACO, Texas Brittney
Griner had 22 points and 10
rebounds in just 23 minutes
and No. 1 Baylor clinched
at least a share of the Big 12
regular season title with a
78-45 victory against TCU
on Saturday
Griner scored eight of the
Lady Bears' first 10 points
as Baylor won its 53rd
straight home game and
36th in a row in the confer-
ence, both the longest cur-
rent streaks nationally
Baylor (24-1, 14-0) also has a
nation-leading 22-game
winning streak.
No. 3 UConn 65,
Rutgers 45
PISCATAWAY, N.J. Mor-
gan Tuck scored 15 points and
Stefanie Dolson added 14 to
help UConn beat Rutgers,
denying coach C. Vivian
Stringer her 900th victory.
Stringer won No. 899 last
Saturday against Cincinnati
and has lost her first two at-
tempts to become the fourth
women's basketball coach to
reach the milestone. The Hall
of Fame coach was looking to
join Pat Summitt, Jody Conradt
and Sylvia Hatchell, who
reached the mark last week.


UConn (24-1, 11-1 Big East)
will return home to face top-
ranked Baylor on Monday
night.
No. 23 Syracuse 80,
Pittsburgh 39
SYRACUSE, N.Y. Kayla
Alexander scored 19 points,
La'Shay Taft added 11 and
Syracuse exploited 23
turnovers to defeat Pittsburgh
for its fifth straight win.
The Orange (21-3, 9-2 Big
East) scored 18 points off
turnovers. Syracuse, which
came in ranked third nationally
with 13.6 steals per game,
had 14.
No. 25 Okla. St. 80,
Kansas St. 45
STILLWATER, Okla. Toni
Young had 23 points and 18
rebounds to lead Oklahoma
State to an easy win over
Kansas State.
All five starters were in dou-
ble figures for the Cowgirls (18-
6, 7-6 Big 12). Kendra Suttles
also had a double-double with
19 points and 10 rebounds.
Liz Donohoe had 13 points,
eight rebounds and six assists,
and Tiffany Bias had 13 points,
five rebounds and six assists.
Brittney Martin finished with 11.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 B3






B4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 32 18 .640 -
Brooklyn 31 22 .585 2/2
Boston 28 24 .538 5
Philadelphia 22 29 .431 10/2
Toronto 21 32 .396 12/2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 36 14 .720
Atlanta 29 22 .569 7/2
Washington 15 36 .294 21Y/2
Orlando 15 37 .288 22
Charlotte 12 40 .231 25
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 32 21 .604 -
Chicago 30 22 .577 1'/2
Milwaukee 26 25 .510 5
Detroit 21 33 .389 11Y2
Cleveland 16 37 .302 16
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 42 12 .778
Memphis 33 18 .647 7/2
Houston 29 26 .527 13/2
Dallas 23 29 .442 18
New Orleans 19 34 .358 22/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 39 14 .736 -
Denver 33 21 .611 6/2
Utah 30 24 .556 9/2
Portland 25 28 .472 14
Minnesota 19 31 .380 18/2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 39 17 .696 -
Golden State 30 22 .577 7
L.A. Lakers 25 29 .463 13
Sacramento 19 35 .352 19
Phoenix 17 36 .321 20/2
NBA All-Star
Saturday results
Saturday
At Houston
WEST 140, EAST 125
SHOOTING STARS
First Round
East
Team Bosh Chris Bosh, Swin Cash, Do-
minique Wilkins, 50.0.
Team Lopez Tamika Catchings, Brook
Lopez, Muggsy Bogues, 1:07.
West
Team Harden Sam Cassell, Tina Thomp-
son, James Harden, 37.9.
Team Westbrook Russell Westbrook,
Maya Moore, Robert Horry, 29.5
West 20, East 0
Finals
Team Bosh Chris Bosh, Swin Cash, Do-
minique Wilkins, 1:29.
Team Westbrook Russell Westbrook,
Maya Moore, Robert Horry, unable to complete
in a better time.
West 20, East 10
Previous Winners
SKILLS CHALLENGE
First Round
East
Jeff Teague, Atlanta, 49.4.
Brandon Knight, Detroit, 32.2.
Jrue Holiday Philadelphia, 29.3.
Total Time: 1:50.9
West
Jeremy Lin, Houston, 35.8.
Damian Lillard, Portland, 28.8.
Tony Parker, San Antonio, 48.7
Total Time: 1:53.3.
East 30, West 0
Finals
Jrue Holiday Philadelphia, 35.6.
Damian Lillard, Portland, 29.8.
East 30,West 10
THREE-POINT CHALLENGE
First Round
East
Kyrie Irving, Cleveland, 18.
Paul George, Indiana, 10.
Steve Novak, New York, 17.
Total: 45
West
Stephen Curry Golden State, 17.
Ryan Anderson,New Orleans, 18.
Matt Bonner, San Antonio, 19.
Total: 54.
West 40, East 0
Finals
Matt Bonner, San Antonio, 20.
Kyrie Irving, Cleveland, 23.
West 40, East 10
SLAM DUNK
First Round
East
Gerald Green, Indiana, 50-32.
Terrence Ross, Toronto, 50-49.
James White, New York, 45-32.
Total: 258
West
Kenneth Faried, Denver, 39-50.
Eric Bledsoe, L.A. Clippers, 39-50.
Jeremy Evans, Utah, 47-43.
Total: 268
Bonus Points for perfect dunks (10 Points):
Gerald Green, Terrence Ross, Kenneth Faried,
Eric Bledsoe.
West 70, East 20
Finals
Terrence Ross, Toronto, def. Jeremy Evans,
Utah.
East 75,West 70
Men's college
basketball
major scores
EAST
Albany (NY) 75, Hartford 49
Army 56, Navy 55
Butler 68, Fordham 63
Canisius 68, St. Peter's 59
Colgate 64, Lehigh 60
Cornell 69, Brown 66
Harvard 69, Princeton 57
LIU Brooklyn 92, Fairleigh Dickinson 67
La Salle 76, Saint Joseph's 64
Lafayette 63, Bucknell 62
Loyola (Md.) 80, Siena 57
Maine 64, Binghamton 60
Monmouth (NJ) 73, St. Francis (NY) 64
Mount St. Mary's 89, CCSU 80
NJIT 63, Utah Valley 55
Penn 67, Dartmouth 57
Providence 71, Notre Dame 54
Quinnipiac 71, St. Francis (Pa.) 55
Rhode Island 67, Duquesne 62
Robert Morris 68, Sacred Heart 63
Syracuse 76, Seton Hall 65
Temple 83, UMass 82
Towson 57, Hofstra 50
Villanova 70, UConn 61
Wagner 89, Bryant 75
West Virginia 66, Texas Tech 64


Yale 75, Columbia 56
SOUTH
Alabama 68, South Carolina 58
Alabama A&M 72, Alcorn St. 65
Arkansas St. 87, Louisiana-Monroe 54
Campbell 87, VMI 78
Charleston Southern 73, UNC Asheville 65
Coll. of Charleston 69, Georgia Southern 60
Davidson 72, The Citadel 57
Delaware St. 57, Coppin St. 43
E. Kentucky 80, Jacksonville St. 67
Elon 80, W. Carolina 73, OT
FlU 87, W. Kentucky 82
Florida 83, Auburn 52
Florida A&M 46, Howard 45
Florida St. 69, Boston College 66
Gardner-Webb 70, Coastal Carolina 63
Georgia St. 78, George Mason 60
Georgia Tech 57, Wake Forest 56
High Point 73, Liberty 68
Jackson St. 77, Grambling St. 38
LSU 80, Mississippi St. 68
Lipscomb 84, Florida Gulf Coast 74
Longwood 76, Radford 61
Louisiana-Lafayette 58, FAU 57
Maryland 83, Duke 81


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr KULthei record[


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
1-9-7
CASH 3 (late)
4-2-0

PLAY 4 (early)
5-8-1-8
PLAY 4 (late)
9-5-7-4

FANTASY 5
oridaLottery 11- 26 33 34 36

POWERBALL LOTTERY
15-16-46-50-58 8-21-26-27-30-40
POWER BALL XTRA
29 2


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1 p.m. (FOX) Sprint Cup: Daytona 500 Qualifying
8 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA O'Reilly Auto Parts Winternationals
(Same-day Tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (CBS) Ohio State at Wisconsin
1 p.m. (ESPN) Louisville at South Florida
10 p.m. (FSNFL) USC at California
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (SUN) North Carolina at Florida State
1:30 p.m. (FSNFL) LSU at Mississippi State
2 p.m. (MNT) South Carolina at Mississippi
2:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Whip-Around Coverage includes: Ala-
bama at Auburn, Georgia Tech at North Carolina State, Notre
Dame at Marquette and Oklahoma at Kansas
3 p.m. (SUN) Wake Forest at Duke
3:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Texas at Texas Tech
5 p.m. (ESPN2) Whip-Around Coverage includes: Cincinnati
at St. John's, Iowa at Purdue, Maryland at Virginia and Van-
derbilt at Tennessee
NBA
8 p.m. (TNT) 2013 All-Star Game
BOWLING
3 p.m. (ESPN) PBATour League Qualifier, Round 3 (Taped)
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Africa Open, Final
Round (Same-day Tape)
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Northern Trust Open, Final Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour: Northern Trust Open, Final Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour: ISPS Handa Australian Open,
Final Round (Taped)
7 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Ace Group Classic, Final
Round (Taped)
HOCKEY
12:30 p.m. (NBC) Pittsburgh Penguins at Buffalo Sabres
3:30 p.m. (NBC) Los Angeles Kings at Chicago Blackhawks
6 p.m. (NBCSPT) Washington Capitals at New York
Rangers
COLLEGE LACROSSE
1 p.m. (NBCSPT) Denver vs. Penn State
3:15 p.m. (NBCSPT) Jacksonville vs. Ohio State
TRACKAND FIELD
8 p.m. (ESPN) Millrose Games (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Memphis 71, Marshall 59
Mercer 71, ETSU 54
Mississippi 84, Georgia 74, OT
Morehead St. 65, Tennessee Tech 63
Morgan St. 87, Md.-Eastern Shore 55
NC State 90, Virginia Tech 86, OT
North Carolina 93, Virginia 81
North Texas 63, Troy 61
Northwestern St. 84, Nicholls St. 79
Presbyterian 64, Winthrop 57
Richmond 83, St. Bonaventure 80, OT
SC State 72, NC A&T 70
SC-Upstate 79, Kennesaw St. 67
SE Louisiana 54, Stephen F Austin 50
SE Missouri 96, UT-Martin 74
Samford 64, Furman 53
Savannah St. 44, NC Central 36
Southern Miss. 86, East Carolina 82, OT
Southern U. 58, Alabama St. 49
Stetson 62, N. Kentucky 46
Tennessee 88, Kentucky 58
Tulane 78, SMU 67
UAB 80, Rice 57
UNC Wilmington 73, Northeastern 67
VCU 84, George Washington 57
Vanderbilt 63, Texas A&M 56
William & Mary 74, Old Dominion 62
Wofford 78, Chattanooga 58
MIDWEST
Akron 67, Bowling Green 50
Austin Peay 83, SIU-Edwardsville 71
Bradley 80, Indiana St. 68
Buffalo 79, Miami (Ohio) 71
Chicago St. 82, Urbana 74
Creighton 71, Evansville 68
Dayton 70, Xavier 59
DePaul 75, Rutgers 69
Detroit 84, Valparaiso 74
E. Illinois 79, Murray St. 70
E. Michigan 56, Ball St. 50
IPFW 64, South Dakota 51
Indiana 83, Purdue 55
Iowa St. 87, TCU 53
Kansas St. 81, Baylor 61
Loyola of Chicago 69, Ill.-Chicago 60
Marquette 79, Pittsburgh 69
Michigan St. 73, Nebraska 64
N. Arizona 74, North Dakota 72, OT
N. Dakota St. 75, IUPUI 39
N. Iowa 71, Drake 64
Oakland 86, UMKC 74
Ohio 78, Kent St. 75, OT
S. Dakota St. 64, W. Illinois 55
S. Illinois 62, Missouri St. 54
Saint Louis 76, Charlotte 58
Toledo 73, Cent. Michigan 64
W. Michigan 66, N. Illinois 58
SOUTHWEST
Arkansas 73, Missouri 71
Houston Baptist 53, Texas-Pan American 48
McNeese St. 69, Lamar 62
Middle Tennessee 66, UALR 61
Oklahoma St. 84, Oklahoma 79, OT
Oral Roberts 56, Texas A&M-CC 51
Prairie View 80, MVSU 77
Sam Houston St. 80, Cent. Arkansas 75
Texas Southern 75, Ark.-Pine Bluff 69
Tulsa 101, Houston 92, 30T
UTEP73, UCF 58
UTSA 73, Texas St. 62
FAR WEST
BYU 86, Portland 72
Colorado St. 89, Air Force 86
E. Washington 86, S. Utah 72
Gonzaga 71, San Francisco 61
Long Beach St. 75, UC Riverside 35
Montana 61, Idaho St. 54
N. Colorado 78, Sacramento St. 64
Oregon 79, Washington St. 77, OT
Saint Mary's (Cal) 61, Loyola Marymount 50


UCLA 88, Stanford 80
Weber St. 69, Montana St. 61
Wyoming 55, Fresno St. 51, OT


New J
Pittsb
N.Y.
N.Y. I
Philac


NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts G
jersey 15 9 3 3 21 4
urgh 15 10 5 0 20 48
rangers 13 7 5 1 15 3(
slanders 14 6 7 1 13 4!
lelphia 16 6 9 1 13 38


Montreal
Boston
Toronto
Ottawa
Buffalo


Carolina
Tampa Bay
Florida
Washington
Winnipeg
WE


Northeast Division
GP W L OT
14 9 4 1
12 8 2 2
15 9 6 0
15 7 6 2
15 6 8 1
Southeast Division
GP W L OT
13 8 4 1
14 7 6 1
14 4 6 4
14 5 8 1
13 5 7 1


WESTERN CONFERENCE


F GA
1 36
8 35
3 34
5 47
3 49


Pts GF GA
19 40 34
18 34 29
18 43 36
16 35 30
13 43 50

Pts GF GA
17 41 37
15 55 45
12 35 53
11 40 49
11 33 43


Central Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Chicago 14 11 0 3 25 48 29
Nashville 15 7 3 5 19 30 29
St. Louis 14 8 5 1 17 48 45
Detroit 14 7 5 2 16 38 41
Columbus 15 4 9 2 10 34 48
Northwest Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Vancouver 13 8 3 2 18 38 29
Minnesota 14 6 6 2 14 30 36
Edmonton 13 5 5 3 13 29 34
Calgary 12 4 5 3 11 35 44
Colorado 12 5 6 1 11 27 32
Pacific Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Anaheim 14 11 2 1 23 50 37
Dallas 15 8 6 1 17 38 39
San Jose 14 7 4 3 17 37 33
Phoenix 15 7 6 2 16 40 41
LosAngeles 12 5 5 2 12 28 33
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Saturday's Games
Anaheim 3, Nashville 2, SO
Tampa Bay 6, Florida 5, OT
Toronto 3, Ottawa 0
Montreal 4, Philadelphia 1
N.Y. Islanders 5, New Jersey 1
Phoenix 5, Columbus 3
Colorado at Edmonton, late
Today's Games
Pittsburgh at Buffalo, 12:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Chicago, 3:30 p.m.
Boston at Winnipeg, 6 p.m.
Calgary at Dallas, 6 p.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, 6 p.m.
Washington at N.Y Rangers, 6 p.m.
St. Louis at Vancouver, 9 p.m.
Monday's Games
Ottawa at New Jersey, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y Islanders, 1 p.m.
Nashville at Colorado, 3 p.m.
Carolina at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Toronto at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Calgary at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Columbus at Anaheim, 10 p.m.


All-Star competitions



provide excitement
r* v


Associated Press

HOUSTON -Toronto
rookie Terrence Ross
beat defending cham-
pion Jeremy Evans to
win the slam-dunk con-
test during All-Star Sat-
urday night.
The 6-foot-6 Ross
jumped over a ball boy,
whipped the ball be-
tween his legs and threw
down a one-handed
slam to clinch the vic-
tory Earlier, Ross
donned a Vince Carter
jersey, took a lob from
high-school teammate
Terrence Jones off the
edge of the backboard,
spun in the air, and then
slammed home another
one-hander.
Evans jumped over a
painted portrait of him-
self and hurdled Dallas
Mavericks forward Dah-
ntay Jones for a dunk in
his final round. -
Ross earned 58 per-
cent of the fan vote in Former Utah
the championship Jazz forward
round. The first round at NBA bask
was judged by former
Houston Rockets Ha- trio ofChris B
keem Olajuwon, Clyde Cash and Dor
Drexler, Dikembe Mu- Wilkins won t
tombo, Rudy Tom- Stars event.
janovich and Yao Ming. Portland
Cavs' Irving wins has S
3-point contest HOUSTON
HOUSTON Cleveland rookie Damiar
point guard Kyrie Irving Philadelphia g
beat San Antonio's Matt Holiday in the
Bonner to win the 3-point win the Skills
contest during All-Star Sat- during All-Star
urday night, night.
Irving, who will play in his The compe
first All-Star game on Sun- players navige
day, started 7 for 7 in the bling circuit, ta
final round and finished with shot, hitting ta
23 points two shy of the passes and dr
record shared by Craig layup. Lillard s
Hodges and Jason Kapono. first 3-point at
Bonner finished with 20 winning run ai
points in the final round, the obstacle c
Players had one minute seconds. Holi,
to take 25 3-point shots was 35.6 seca
from five positions around Houston po
the arc. Bonner had the remy Lin and
highest score of the six champion Ton
players in the first round were in the fie
(19). Irving, who also come close to
played in Friday night's Ris- the champion;
ing Stars Challenge, had 18 Earlier, a te
points in the first round. Bosh, Swin C
Earlier, Portland rookie minique Wilkir
Damian Lillard won the Shooting Star
Skills Competition and the beating the tri



METTLE
Continued from Page B1

Abreu via a pinfall in 5:28.
From the loser's bracket, Nighten-
gale was twisted into a 19-3 technical
fall against Homestead's Anthony
Wint.
In the consolation finals for fifth,
Nightengale lost by injury default to
Lake Gibson senior Jason Foster
After his first-ever state visit, Night-
engale finished 2-3 overall at Lake-
land and concluded the season at
21-11.
On his semifinal loss, "I don't think
he was that much better than I was,"
noted the 18-year-old Nightengale. "I
wrestled so sloppy Fortunately, I kept
my head together after that."



BUCCHERI
Continued from Page B1

My first real path crossing with Buc-
cheri was over a phone call about
something written in our paper.
The content wasn't the controversy,
rather the grammar used. Either an-
other writer or myself made a mistake
in the use of you're/your.
Buccheri was incredulous that pro-
fessional writers didn't know the dif-
ference, rightly so, but his probing
wasn't at all mean-spirited. Just in-
structional.
A phone call that should have taken
maybe two minutes became about a
half-hour, just about baseball local
high school and some about his time
with the St Louis Cardinals.
I ended up telling him my cousin
Andrew Castorina had been a pretty
good pitcher at Lecanto High School,
which set Joe's mind into a com-
pletely different direction.
He asked me if that meant I was re-
lated to Andrew's mom Susan, who is
my aunt That lit Joe up since he knew
my aunt in her role as an ESE teacher
at CREST, where Joe was a guidance
counselor.


After that, I saw Joe occasionally at
Crystal River High School, where I
think he was a volunteer assistant
baseball coach in the mid-2000s.
By no means did I know Joe Buccheri
very well. Yet in the limited interactions
I had with him, the positive things peo-
ple said about him and are now also
doing in his name seem spot-on.
He struck me as someone who did


-i

Associated Press
Jazz center Mark Eaton hands the ball to
Jeremy Evans during the dunk contest
etball All-Star on Saturday in Houston.


osh, Swin
ninique
he Shooting


I's Lillard
Skills
- Portland
i Lillard beat
luard Jrue
final round to
Competition
r Saturday

tition involves
eating a drib-
iking a 3-point
irgets with
driving for a
swished his
tempt in his
nd finished
course in 29.8
day's time
bonds.
mint guard Je-
defending
ly Parker also
lId, but didn't
i qualifying for
ship round.
am of Chris
ash and Do-
is won the
s competition,
o of Russell


Westbrook, Maya Moore
and Robert Horry.

Bosh's team wins
Shooting Stars
HOUSTON The trio of
Miami's Chris Bosh, WNBA
star Swin Cash and Hall of
Famer Dominique Wilkins
won the Shooting Stars
competition that kicked off
All-Star Saturday night in
Houston.
Bosh's group beat the
team of Oklahoma City
guard Russell Westbrook,
Maya Moore of the WNBA
and former Houston Rocket
Robert Horry.
The teams had two min-
utes to make shots from six
locations on the floor, in-
cluding one from half-court.
Wilkins sank a half-court
shot for a team time of 1
minute, 29 seconds. West-
brook rimmed out several
half-court tries and time ran
out before he and his team-
mates could make one.
The NBA tweaked the
scoring format for this
year's All-Star skills exhibi-
tions, with teams represent-
ing the East and West
competing for charities.


On the technical fall setback, "I got
slammed on my head," Nightengale
said. "I started feeling really weird."
On his forfeit loss, "I wanted to go,
but my dad and my coach (Scot
Roberts) advised me against it. Why
risk further damage?"
On next year's goal, "I'm going to
pick up my weight and wrestle all
summer long," Nightengale said. "I
have no regrets from this year. I left
everything on the mats. But to become
a champion, I've got to put in more
work."
The county's third participant on
Saturday, Crystal River junior heavy-
weight Brandon Martin, was ousted
with his second loss via an 8-2 deci-
sion by Tallahassee-Godby junior
Mashawn Knight.
In his first-ever state event, Martin
finished 23-9 with 23 pins.


genuinely care about not just kids who
stepped onto a baseball or even soft-
ball diamond but just seeing young
people succeed in general and be-
come productive adults.
Joe's son, also named Joe, said with
a smile after the memorial dedica-
tion and scholarships announcement
that everyone who interacted with
his father seemed to have a story like
that.
Jim Manos, who coached the
Lecanto High School baseball team at
the same time his friend was manning
Crystal River, said Joe's favorite say-
ing was, "God draws straight with
crooked lines."
No matter what a person decides
about a divine being, all of us can
agree that our lives never take the
exact path we try to lay out for our-
selves. Joe knew that and was one of
the few people aware enough to revel
in it.
Buccheri's example is one to ad-
mire. He was a passionate person who
was truly beloved by the people who
knew him best.
He made a positive impact on oth-
ers, and those people want to con-
tinue his legacy in a win-win for all
involved.
Most of all, the foundation is poised
to make an impact in the lives of some
of Citrus County's youth.
I think Joe would have liked that.
For more information about the
foundation, visit their website at
www.joebuccheri.org.
Jon-Michael Soracchi is the Chron-
icle sports editor He can be emailed
at jmsora cchi@chronicleonline. cor
or reached at 352-564-2928.


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Men's rec basketball title decided


Black team's

strong second half

enough for win

Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County Parks and
Recreation's Adult Men's Bas-
ketball league finished up on
Wednesday. The final was held
at Citrus Springs Middle School,
with the Blue and Black teams
competing for the league
championship.
Black prevailed 57-37 by
breaking the contest open in the
second half.
The first half was low-scoring
with strong defenses on both
sides. The score at half time was
22-19 in favor of Black. During
the second half, Black never
looked back and finished the
game with the 20-point victory
The next season for Men's
Basketball will begin in the
spring, with registration dates to


be announced. For more infor-
mation, call Citrus County Parks
and Recreation at 352-527-7540
and ask for Maci.
Beach volleyball
to begin in March
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation's inaugural beach volleyball
season was successful and fun. Ten
teams of four players competed.
The new season will start
on/around March 18. Games are
played beginning at 6:30 p.m. Tues-
days at Bicentennial Park in Crystal
River. The team fees, days and
times are dependent on how many
teams sign up.
You don't need to be a star athlete
to play; this league is geared toward
family fun and exercise. For more
information, call 352-527-7547.
The Black team celebrates its
Adult Men's Basketball league
title, which the squad secured
with a 57-37 triumph over Blue
on Wednesday at Citrus Springs
Middle School.
Special to the Chronicle


V


JUNK!
..:11'
I1.,I


i.W!O L R Iwi "
lEEULSI *EEU
~;"~ "


Time to P.L.A.Y.


Special to the Chronicle
The Preparing Little Athletes Youth Program (or P.L.A.Y.) will offer football, basketball and cheerleading for boys
and girls ages 3 to 5. The program is a good introduction for young ones to learn how to play team sports.

As weather warms, youth sports programs return to county

Special to the Chronicle recreation are available to all per- largest and fastest-growing baseball or-
sons without regard to race, color, ganizations. The qualifying tournaments
Citrus County Parks and Recre- handicap, sex, religion or national will be held at Citrus County's Bicenten-
ation is offering a great sports op- origin. For persons with disabilities nial Park in Crystal River on March 30
portunity for your little one, who requiring special accommodations, and 31 and June 15 and 16.
may be too young to join the organ- please contact our office five days For more information, contact Tim
ized sports leagues within the prior to the program so that proper Ramsay and Adam Thomas at 352-287-
county The PL.A.Y Program, which consideration may be given to the 1415 and 786-877-5041.
is an acronym for Preparing Little request.
Athletes Youth Program, was cre- Youth Golf Lessons Underwater Egg Hunt


ated for those children who are
ready to play sports.
The PL.A.Y programs offered in
the upcoming session include: bas-
ketball which will be at the Citrus
County Resource Center on Mon-
days or Wednesdays, flag football lo-
cated at Bicentennial Park on
Tuesday or Thursdays, and cheer-
leading which will be at Bicenten-
nial Park on Thursdays. The next
session will begin the week of April
8. Boys and girls, ages 3 to 5, are en-
couraged to join the six-week pro-
gram. After enrollment, each child
receives age-appropriate sports
equipment and a team t-shirt.
Registration opens on Monday,
March 11 and spots fill up fast and
space is limited. Contact Crysta
Henry, recreation program special-
ist for youth programs, at 352-527-
7543 or visit www.citruscounty
parks.com, for more information.
All programs and activities of-
fered by the division of parks and


Citrus County Parks and Recreation,
in partnership with Pine Ridge Golf
Course, will hold Spring youth golf les-
sons. The lessons are at Pine Ridge
Golf Course on Wednesday evenings
from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. They will begin
on Wednesday, March 27, and run for
five weeks. Children ages 6 to 15 are el-
igible and the cost is $50 per child. In-
struction will be given by golf pro Randy
Robbins and several of his volunteers.
For more information, contact Crysta
Henry, recreation program specialist for
youth programs at 352-527-7543, or
Randy Robbins at 352-746-6177.
Super Series baseball
coming to Citrus County
The Key Training Center's Who's on
First and Florida Premier Prospects (in
conjunction with Citrus County Parks and
Recreation) are proud to present Super
Series Baseball Tournaments. Super Se-
ries Baseball is one of the nation's


Citrus County Parks and Recreation
hosts its next Underwater Egg Hunt. The
event will be Saturday, March 23, from
11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. for children up to
the age of 12. There will be two egg
hunts for different age groups: Children
up to age 6 will hunt from 11 a.m. to
1 p.m., while children age 7 to 12 will
hunt from 1 to 2:30 p.m.
Admission is free and children will
need to bring their own basket, swim-
ming attire and an application of sun-
screen is encouraged.
Eggs will be dispersed throughout the
Bicentennial Park Pool area in Crystal
River. The pool itself will be set up with
different levels of difficulty based on
swimming ability. There will also be a
land-based egg hunt, which is designed
for younger children and non-swimmers.
For more information, call Bicenten-
nial Park Pool at 795-1478, Citrus
County Parks & Recreation at
527-7540, or visit www.citruscounty
parks.com.


On any given day


On any given day,
sportsmen and ath-
letes of every ilk
have a multitude of expe-
riences, whether that good
day is playing under-par
golf, catching your quota of
fish, running your best
mile or swim-
ming your
fastest 100 ever.
Any athlete's
worst day is the
day they are
told they have
cancer,
An athlete by
nature is posi-
tive, passionate,
active and com- Dr. Ron
petitive. Ath- DOCT
letes have more ORD
than the usual
attributes of
commitment, discipline
and that inner will. All of
those attriubtes are neces-
sary to address a bad diag-
nosis and the biggest
game-changer of all.
The above came to light
last weekend while attend-
ing this year's Cattle
Baron's Ball for the Amer-
ican Cancer Society as a
guest of one of the spon-
sors. As his litany of family
members affected by can-
cer were stated and
after hearing a 13-year-old
boy's story of his struggles
with the disease I came
to the realization it is bet-
ter to look at what is
around us as we run, swim,
kayak and bustle through
life.
Also, as we walk those 18
holes, maybe we should
look around and appreci-
ate what we have as op-
posed to the money being
lost on the next hole or
making the business deal
of the day
The trouble with the
word cancer is while a
game changer and life-
altering event, it is not
what it was a few short
years ago. Cancer is an ab-
normal growth of cells that
rapidly multiplies despite
restriction of space shared
by other cells or signals
from the body to stop grow-
ing. Cancer cells do not
function properly and
have a tendency to spread
to other areas of the body
Tumors are the accumula-
tion or clusters of these ab-
normal cells.
At one time, we only
knew that an athlete had
cancer shortly before or at
their death. Today, there
are many athletes who


r
T,


continue to participate in
their chosen sport despite
being diagnosed with can-
cer. As these individuals
are visible to the public,
they set an example of
what one can do despite
this disease.
Brian Piccolo,
Bears running
back and Gayle
Sayers' best
friend, died of
testicular can-
cer in 1970
when it was first
diagnosed but
after his cancer
had spread.
Joseph Today, Lance
OR'S Armstrong, with
ERS the same type of
cancer, having
also spread to
other organs, survived to
win seven Tour de France
titles.
Mario Lemieux, one of
the most naturally talented
hockey players, was diag-
nosed with Hodgkins Lym-
phoma at the height of his
career. Returning to the
sport two years after radia-
tion treatment, he scored
his 500th career goal in his
650th game and became
the second-fastest player to
reach the landmark.
The list goes on in every
sport at every level of par-
ticipation. How do these
people continue in spite of
the diagnosis and the side
effects of treatment? It is
hard to return to training
and participation with the
side effects of fatigue and
the feeling of not being
well.
It goes back to the same
attributes of being an ath-
lete: commitment, disci-
pline and an inner will.
The same attributes neces-
sary to fight and win
against cancer
The development of
newer chemotherapy and
radiation treatments allow
for the resumption of exer-
cise and sport and thus
having an overwhelmingly
positive benefit.
It takes time, patience
and faith that are tough
commodities when you
feel really icky. But when
you win, it is the best day
you will ever have.
Congratulations, you
won!
Ron Joseph, M.D., a
hand and shoulder ortho-
pedic surgeon atSeaSpine
Orthopedic Institute may
be reached at rbjhand@
cox.net.


Recreation BRIEFS


Blackshear outing
slated for Feb. 23
Dan Kern, chairman of the
Citrus County Builders Asso-
ciation's Jim Blackshear Me-
morial Golf Outing, recently
announced Feb. 23's golf
tournament at the Seven
Rivers Golf and Country Club,
will benefit the Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County.
Registration for the event will
begin at 7 a.m. and the shotgun
start is scheduled for 8 a.m. All
teams must pre-register. The
$60 entry fee includes greens
fee, cart, lunch, door prizes and
one free Mulligan ticket.
For more info, contact the
Citrus County Builders Associ-
ation at 352-746-9028 or the
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County office at 352-621-9225.


The Nature Coast U-12 girls soccer club fared
well at North Port for the opening round of the
Florida State Soccer Tournament Region C
Cup. The Lightning beat the Clearwater
Chargers 1-0. The lone goal was scored by
Breise Teitelman and the shutout was due to
the defensive efforts of Kelley Sullivan,
Peyton Burdette, Courtney Dye, Makiya Sem-
inera, sweeper Savannah Bass and goal-
keeper Madi Seidenstucker. In the second
game, the Citrus County girls beat Braden
River Rage 4-0. Goals were scored by Katie
Van Cleef, Teitelman, and two by Kaitlin
Zoucha. Another shutout was credited to the
defensive players. On Sunday, the Lightning
beat the San Carlos Park All-Stars 3-0. Goals
were scored by Courtney Dye, Kaitlin Zoucha,
and Liz-Beth Chiavetta. A third shutout was
led by sweeper Bass, fullbacks Dye and Bur-
dette and goalkeeper Seidenstucker. The
team is coached by Dan Sullivan and Rob Mc-
Dougal and the club is managed by Tracy
Bryson. The team will play in the Region C
Cup quarterfinal on March 10 in Brandon.
Special to the Chronicle


02000,


one
urn..-


ri-
*Bijm I i
E*UIN'


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SPORTS


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Capturing history


Associated Press
This undated publicity photo released by Kino Lorber, Inc. shows co-director Emad Burnat with his five broken cameras. Burnat
and Guy Davidi co-directed the documentary film, "5 Broken Cameras."

Two Oscar-nominated documentaries share first-person accounts ofmoments


CHRISTY LEMIRE
AP movie writer

LOS ANGELES The
Oscar-nominated features "5
Broken Cameras" and "How
to Survive a Plague" repre-
sent documentaries in the
truest, purest form of the
word: They capture a spark, a
moment in history, and they
make us feel as if we were
there, too.
Both films were shot by reg-
ular people who happened to
be witnessing an uprising.
They are by amateur photog-
raphers who had the foresight
to record everything long
before such a practice became
the norm with the advent of
the iPhone and YouTube -
from the mundane moments
of their daily lives to scenes of
violence, upheaval, death and
eventually some sort of victory
They are very different films
from very different directors
on very different topics. "5
Broken Cameras" is a collabo-
ration between Palestinian
farmer Emad Burnat and Is-
raeli director Guy Davidi fea-
turing years of footage Burnat
shot in his occupied village of
Bil'in, a place that became a
sort of symbol for nonviolent


A scene from director David France's documentary film, "How to
Survive a Plague," shows an AIDS protest.


resistance. Each of the five
cameras was destroyed in the
midst of protests or gunfire;
one still has a bullet lodged in
the lens. But it also includes
daily events in the life of this
husband and father of four; he
actually bought the first cam-
era in 2005 for the reason so
many parents do, to record the
first smiles and steps of his
youngest son, Gibreel.
"Plague" is a collection of
archival footage from the late
1980s and early '90s, as mem-
bers of the New York-based
AIDS Coalition to Unleash


Power (ACT UP) fought to find
a cure for the disease as it
quickly spread and claimed
millions of lives. Director
David France, who was in the
middle of many of these bois-
terous planning meetings and
theatrical demonstrations,
culled through thousands of
hours of footage from about
two dozen different sources.
Burnat of "5 Broken Cam-
eras" said he'd always in-
tended to make a movie, but
initially figured it would be
something private to show to
family and friends. He felt it


was his responsibility to de-
pict the fight for territory
through his own eyes.
"Many films were made
about Palestine and the sub-
ject but the story was being
told by people who live out-
side. They didn't feel this feel-
ing, this relation between the
person and the land and how
to live, how to survive in this
situation under occupation,"
Burnat said.
The people whose video ap-
pears in "How to Survive a
Plague" similarly wanted to
share their story with the
world. France said the pho-
tographers had a number of
motivations, from filling in the
gaps of traditional media re-
porting to documenting when
police were excessively rough
during demonstrations to cap-
turing quiet moments with
loved ones before they died.
The result: France often had
the benefit of coverage of the
same event from several dif-
ferent angles.
"It was a true witness-
bearing," said France, who
spent two years cutting the
film.
As in "5 Broken Cameras,"
he wanted to tell a story that
was free of partisanship.


C-SPAN series focuses on first ladies


DAVID BAUDER
AP television writer

NEW YORK- Mark Farkas is
used to his teenage daughters
showing little interest in his
work. After all, he is a producer
at terminally unhip C-SPAN.
This time is different. The
girls are intrigued by some of the
stories Farkas is finding for the
public service network's series
on first ladies. The 35-episode
series begins with an overview
Monday, on President's Day, and
ends with an hour on Michelle
Obama next Feb. 10.
The series gives C-SPAN the
chance to look at political and
social history through a differ-
ent prism, said Farkas, its exec-
utive producer. The White
House Historical Association is
teaming with C-SPAN to make it,
after the idea came from a net-
work historian who had been
working on an oral history of
White House social secretaries.
"The more digging that we
did, we found that so many of
these women were influential


Birthday There's a good chance that in the year
ahead you could become friends with a selective some-
one who doesn't hit it off with just anybody. This alliance
could turn out to be very exciting for both parties.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Be careful, because
some extravagant whims could gain control of your
purse strings. Later, when it's time to pay the bills,
you'll wish you had exercised greater control.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) You are in for a big
surprise if you expect others to drop what they are
doing and cater to your desires. The only person you
should depend on is you.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -Attempting to use hon-
eyed words to manipulate another is likely to backfire.
Any insincerity on your part will be immediately de-
tected and disliked.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -A pal who is an expert at


and had fascinating biogra-
phies," he said.
James Madison's wife, Dolly,
set the tone for the roles played
by presidential spouses and was
sought after for advice by first
ladies who followed her, Farkas
said. He considers Madison and
Eleanor Roosevelt, who held
regular news conferences and
called upon news organizations
to send female reporters, the
most influential first ladies.
All have settled on roles corre-
sponding to their interests, up to
Mrs. Obama's focus on military
families and children's fitness.
Most of the women there's
been no first man yet -get a sin-
gle hour in C-SPAN's series. In a
few cases, a handful of 19th cen-
tury first ladies have their sto-
ries compressed into a single
hour. Anna Harrison, for exam-
ple, never made it to the White
House: She stayed in Ohio re-
covering from an illness and was
packing for Washington when
her husband, William Henry
Harrison, died one month into
his term.


Associated Press
First lady Michelle Obama gestures March 15, 2011, as she speaks
at the National League of Cities Conference about the Let's Move!
initiative in Washington. C-SPAN has teamed up with The White
House Historical Association to produce a series on first ladies.


Today's HOROSCOPE
disappearing when the check is presented will try
again. If you're smart, ask for separate checks up front.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) To succeed, you need
to make a concerted effort to clearly define your ob-
jectives otherwise you could find yourself employ-
ing wishy-washy tactics that don't work.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -You should take care
not to confuse optimism with wishful thinking, because
the results would be catastrophic. The former inspires
and emboldens, while the latter merely dreams.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Be careful and don't take
what is told to you at face value. Someone might try to
draw you into a joint endeavor for reasons more ben-
eficial for him or her than they are for you.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) No one will have to tell
you partnerships have both advantages and disad-
vantages. You will need to figure out whether such an


arrangement would be worthwhile to your cause.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) If there is an important
assignment you need to delegate, make sure your in-
structions are clear about how to go about it and what
results you expect.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) It's good to be helpful
whenever you can, but don't offer any suggestions or
try to manage something for another if you don't know
a thing about it. Mind your own beeswax.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Be extremely selec-
tive about whom you go to for help and advice today.
An ineffective counselor could cause more trouble by
putting you onto a path of "never-never" land.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) When you choose,
you can be a self-directed person who doesn't waste
time getting down to brass. Today, however, your ra-
tionalizing attitude might inhibit this.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15
Mega Money: 6 -14 34 35
Mega Ball: 17
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 6 $1,153.50
3-of-4 MB 29 $523
3-of-4 803 $56
2-of-4 MB 1,169 $26.50
1-of-4 MB 10,862 $2.50
2-of-4 25,195 $2
Fantasy 5:6 15 16 23 27
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 321 $555
3-of-5 10,417 $19
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14
Fantasy 5:4 7 13 15 34
5-of-5 3 winners $72,151.88
4-of-5 279 $125
3-of-5 9,679 $10

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Feb. 17, the
48th day of 2013. There are 317
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Feb. 17, 1913, the Armory
Show, a landmark exhibit of Euro-
pean modern art, opened in New
York City. (One work in the exhibit
that stirred much controversy was
"Nude Descending a Staircase
(No. 2)," an abstract painting by
French artist Marcel Duchamp.)
On this date:
In 1863, the International Red
Cross was founded in Geneva.
In 1865, Columbia, S.C.,
burned as the Confederates evac-
uated and Union forces moved in.
(It's not clear which side set the
blaze.)
In 1897, the forerunner of the
National PTA, the National Con-
gress of Mothers, convened its
first meeting in Washington.
In 1904, the original two-act
version of Giacomo Puccini's
opera "Madama Butterfly" was
poorly received at its premiere at
La Scala in Milan, Italy.
In 1933, Newsweek was first
published by Thomas J.C. Martyn
under the title "News-Week." (The
magazine abandoned its print for-
mat at the end of last year in favor
of an exclusively online edition.)
In 1959, the United States
launched Vanguard 2, a satellite
which carried meteorological
equipment.
In 1964, the Supreme Court, in
Wesberry v. Sanders, ruled con-
gressional districts within each
state had to be roughly equal in
population.
In 1972, President Richard M.
Nixon departed the White House
with his wife, Pat, on a historic trip
to China.
In 1988, Lt. Col. William Hig-
gins, a Marine Corps officer serv-
ing with a United Nations truce
monitoring group, was kidnapped
in southern Lebanon by Iranian-
backed terrorists (he was later
slain by his captors).
In 1993, a ferry carrying some
1,000 people sank off Haiti; at
least 700 of the people on board
drowned.
Ten years ago: Twenty-one
people were killed in a stampede
at the crowded E2 nightclub in
Chicago.
Five years ago: Kosovo de-
clared itself a nation in defiance of
Serbia and Russia.
One year ago: Congress voted
to extend a Social Security payroll
tax cut for 160 million workers and
to renew unemployment benefits
for millions more.
Today's Birthdays: Actor Hal
Holbrook is 88. Mystery writer
Ruth Rendell is 83. Actor-
comedian Barry Humphries (aka
"Dame Edna") is 79. Football Hall-
of-Famer Jim Brown is 77. Actress
Rene Russo is 59. Actor Richard
Karn is 57. Actor Lou Diamond
Phillips is 51. Basketball Hall of


Famer Michael Jordan is 50.
Thought for Today: "It is not
hard to understand modern art. If
it hangs on a wall it's a painting,
and if you can walk around it it's a
sculpture." Tom Stoppard,
Czech-born British playwright
(1937-).












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE





Adjusting to life alone


Widow finds

retaining her

independence

a challenge
LANE VICK
Correspondent

When Sylvia married John
Giese in 1948, they had $162
between them. Things looked
up as he became such a noted
civil engineer and bridge
builder the West Virginia leg-
islature dedicated a bridge to
him.
Sylvia, known to friends as
Sal, was a Fulbright Scholar
and taught French, Spanish
and Italian languages. The
happy couple raised six
bright, healthy children who
built productive careers of
their own.
Five years ago, the Gieses
bought a house in Crystal
River where they planned to
exist as "snow bunnies," sum-
mering in West Virginia and
wintering in Florida. Con-
tentedly, they enjoyed golf,
tennis, the intense Florida
football sports culture and
the tropical sun. Circum-
stances changed, however,
when cancer entered the pic-
ture. Sal was widowed in
2010.
"He was the center of my
universe," she said.
Being suddenly alone is a
difficult adjustment. Forty-
five percent of women older
than the age of 65 are wid-
owed, outnumbering men
four to one (www.sisterhood
ofwidows.com, 2010). Many
times, a widow's income is
less after her husband's pass-
ing, presenting yet another
lifestyle change. Five years
after they are widowed, 9.4
percent are living below the
low-income threshold. Fewer
women than men reach out to
new relationships and
remarry
Giese was fortunate. Her
husband planned well for the
financial future. While there
are many chores she can no
longer do at age 84, such as
yard work, up keep of the
pool and house repairs, she
can afford to hire to have the
work done.
Her children, miles away,
worry about her being alone.
One son, a priest, continues
to send information about re-
tirement homes, but that is a
decision she will make in the
future. She said she will
know when the time is right.
For now, she drives, though
mainly in Citrus County, and
is busy with bridge games,
country club activities,
church and friends. Her two
dogs Manny, 14, and
Romeo, referred to as her 12-
year-old guard poodle -
snore beside her as she
watches football games or
tennis matches.
"I don't mind being alone,"
Giese said. "My health is
good. My doctor says I may
live to be a hundred."
After her husband's death,
Giese chose to stay in Citrus
County rather than return to
West Virginia.
"My last memories of John
are here," she said. "That's
where I want to be."
Retaining independence
as you age is a challenge.
There is controversy about
when people actually be-
come old.
In a 2009 Pew Research
Survey Report, "Growing Old
in America: Expectations vs.
Reality," 18- to 29-year-olds

See Page C3


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
At 84, Sylvia "Sal" Giese remains active with bridge games, country club activities, church and friends. The widow has adjusted
well to life after her husband of many years died.



Making unfamiliar call to family for help


I knew I needed to make
the call. Ray's nose started
bleeding around 11 o'clock
in the morning. When it had
not stopped by 1, we went to
the local (Indiana) emergency
room. The doctor's first words
were to ask Ray if he was on a
blood thinner
"Yes, I am."
"That might make a prob-
lem."
It did.
I watched as he sprayed
the inside of his nose several
times. The bleeding contin-
ued. Then he inserted a pad,
but it still would not stop.
Last, he inserted a larger pad
and the bleeding lessened.
Hoping it would stop, after
five anxious hours there, the
doctor sent us home.
Soon after we were home,
the bleeding increased. It was
not a steady flow, but enough
to be concerned again.
After dealing with the nose
bleed since the morning, I
admit I had a major meltdown.
Finally I pulled myself to-


Soon Tina loaded us in the
van and drove a distance
away to the emergency room
where she works.
I appreciated that Nurse
Tina knew all the folks we
met in the emergency room.
Ray got good care. Soon the
doctor and a nurse arrived,
closed the curtain as they vac-
uumed his nose and inserted
a balloon to stop the flow.
As I sat waiting, I thought of
my feeling of helplessness
that resulted in the call.
I must add that our chil-
dren appreciate the help we
have given them through the
years and are quite willing to
do the same for us. They
helped us with our yard sale
and move from the farm-
stead. Our oldest daughter
and her husband, who are re-
tired, helped put up the
blinds, shelves and fans in
our new place.
Offering to help and ac-
cepting are different.

See Page C3


gether and made
the call.
Our grandson an-
swered.
"Is your Mom
home?"
"No."
"Do you know
when she will be
home?"
Same answer.
"Tell her to call
me when she gets
home."
I figured Tina,


Doris
GUE
COLL


our daughter-in-law, who is a
registered nurse, was teach-
ing an EMT class. After anx-
iously waiting until a little
after (9 p.m.), I called her cell
phone and left a message.
"Dad has a bloody nose and
we don't know what to do."


Ten minutes
later, she called
back. The conver-
sation was short
"Do you want me
to come?"
"Yes."
She was on her


way.
Tina arrived and
Butts surveyed our situa-
EST tion. Ray was hold-
M ing a Kleenex to
his nose. Our waste
paper can was
filled with bloody remnants
of the situation. No doubt,
she read the feeling of des-
peration in the room.
Immediately, she became
Nurse Tina.
"You need to go back to the
emergency room."


Quiet guys get work done in Citrus County


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Good and competent
people don't always
make the newspaper,
but they are often the peo-
ple who get the work done.
One of those folks is John
Siefert, the executive direc-
tor of the county's Eco-
nomic Development
Council.


John announced in 2012
he was retiring from the
EDC job and moving on to a
real retirement. On Thurs-
day, the county EDC board
voted to replace him with
Don Taylor, a recently re-
tired executive from
Progress Energy.
Siefert took over the


county EDC at a time of cri-
sis when he didn't need a
job or the income that came
with it. He retired from a
full career and when he re-
located to Citrus County, he
volunteered to help with
economic development.
When a previous eco-
nomic development execu-


tive got in trouble with the
executive board, Siefert
agreed to step in for a short
period of time. Three years
later, he is still on the job
and getting things done.
Most EDC executives get
fired because the job is very
difficult. And Citrus County
is filled with people who


don't have a lot of patience.
Siefert may actually be
the first person who ever re-
tired from the EDC job. The
tenure is so short for the av-
erage director I'm not sure
they even have a pension
plan or 401K The rumor is,


Page C3


Dad has a bloody nose and we
don't know what to do.

Doris Butts
in a phone call to her daughter-in-law, Tina, who is a nurse.


I


i~;e i







Page C2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013



PINION


"By labor fire is got out of stone."
Dutch proverb


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan ..................... ................ publisher
M ike Arnold ............................................. editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Curt Ebitz ................................ citizen member
S Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


WILLING PARTNERS




Put new



power plant



in Citrus Co.


With the decision to re-
tire rather than re-
pair the nuclear
plant and the planned shut-
down of the two oldest coal-
fired units at the Crystal
River Plant in the next few
years, Duke Energy is shut-
ting down about one-fifth of
the company's generating
capacity.
The company is planning to


replace this gen-
eration with a
state-of-the-art
plant fueled by
natural gas, with
completion
planned for 2018.
To meet regula-
tory requirements
for building a new
plant, the com-
pany needs to


THE IS
Duke p
build ne\
pla

OUR OP
Locate ti
in Citrus


commit to a site and issue a
request for proposals for
building the plant sometime
later this year.
Plant construction is sched-
uled to begin in 2015, with a
workforce of 200 to 300
needed during construction.
Company officials said they
are looking at multiple sites
in Florida and are unwilling
at this point to commit to a
place.
We recognize the final deci-
sion on plant location is
driven by economics, but if
the economics of Citrus
County vs. another location
are a close call, we trust Duke
will choose Citrus County as
a way of meeting its stated
goal of helping the county
mitigate the impact of closing
the nuclear plant and two of
the four coal-fired plants at
the Crystal River site.
But locating the plant in
Citrus County would not be
just an act of generosity by
Duke. Building the new plant
here makes sense from an en-
vironmental and economic
perspective.
Wherever a new plant is lo-
cated, it will require substan-


High pollen count
Every time I read the paper,
which is every day, I always look
at the weather section and the
pollen count. They always have
juniper, maple and oak,
while the pine pollen
has been horrendous v
this year. All the pine
trees have been in full
bloom for weeks.
They're finally dropping
their flowers, but yet
you never hear anything
about it. Now the oaks
are starting, so appar- CA
ently the paper's get- 56 -
ting it pretty close to
right.
Thanks for breakfast
The kindness, caring and gen-
erosity of most of the citizens
of this county never ceases to
amaze me. On Jan. 29, my son-
in-law, Barry, went to Burger
King on (County Road) 486 for
breakfast. A friendly chat en-
sued with another Barry of
Boulderice Roofing, who insisted
on paying for our breakfast.


I
-M


tial amounts of water for
cooling. In a time of fresh
water shortages, establishing
a plant inland and using fresh
water for cooling doesn't
make environmental sense.
Using an existing infrastruc-
ture with access to Gulf
water for cooling makes
sense, environmentally and
economically
Also, locating a plant on the
existing site
SUE*: could make use of
existing high volt-
lans to age transmission
N power lines and switch-
nt. yards, where
power from the
:INION: plant goes
through trans-
he plant former and
County. switching equip-
ment and then is
fed into the transmission
grid.
Finally, with an existing
natural gas line running
down U.S. 19 which could
provide fuel for the plant,
much of the infrastructure
for a new generating plant is
in place.
We recognize the current
tension between our property
appraiser and Duke is a neg-
ative factor, but we hope this
will reach resolution before a
new plant is begun. And we
take Duke officials at their
word that this will not affect
their decision on where to
build a new plant.
With this much at stake for
the county, we urge our EDC
to play a key role in working
with county officials and
knocking down barriers for
building the new plant.
We urge Duke to give Citrus
County the chance to host
this new facility. We have a
long history of working to-
gether cooperatively and
would like to see this rela-
tionship continue into the fu-
ture with the two remaining
coal-fired plants and the new
gas-fired plant.


What a wonderful gesture and
way to start a great day. Thank
you, Barry, and God bless you.
Making world better
The world would be a better
place if we banned peo-
JNMD ple like you who have an
objection to service
pets or any other pets.
Have you no compas-
sion? God have mercy
on the likes of you.
Money well spent
This call is in re-
sponse to the "Wasting
)579 money on roads" piece
in Saturday, Feb. 9's
issue in the Sound Off
column. The individual who
wrote and thought spending
$900 million on County Road
491 is unnecessary. This individ-
ual, I think, probably does not
drive or has never been on (C.R.)
491. That road is a major road
and, you know, the spending of
the money is necessary and the
board is doing absolutely the
right thing. I don't think the indi-
vidual is familiar with the area.


Life is Perfect in Citrus


Editor'snote: This column introduces readers
to Kathy Green, Chronicle Online's newest
contributor
I've lived in Old Homosassa for almost a
decade with my husband Terry and pooch
Maggie. Way back when the house was still in
disrepair and the yard overgrown, a couple of
our friends started calling our home Perfect and
the name stuck.
Terry and I have four children all beautiful
and successful and they all have beautiful and
successful partners. In addition, we have seven
adorable grandkids between the ages of 2 and 11.
Terry's mom lives in Tampa and my sister and
her kids and their families live close by
I get to pursue all of my favorite things -
kayaking, gardening, photography, music and
10,000 other projects I dream up. And I'm living
with my best friend, who quite often has to figure
out the mechanics to finish those 10,000 projects.
I'm blessed with so many great friends here in
Florida and throughout the country And they all
like to visit Perfect!
We lived in Tampa for several years and I
worked in computer and network support. Be-
cause of a great employment opportunity for
Terry, we moved out of the area. After the big
move, I started my first website in 1999, which
was mainly pictures of our adventures. Last year,
the website turned into my blog "Just a Slice of
Life in Perfect."
I enjoy writing the blog and try to post six days
a week. I get to use my technical skills with the
computer software and troubleshooting skills
when problems develop. Plus, I get to use my cre-
ative side with my meanderings, photography
and DIY My niece Michelle aids and abets me
with a weekly post.
We moved to Old Homosassa shortly after our
first granddaughter was born in Tampa. We


TAKE IT
pM RUBIO /
HYDWATE
FIR5T,
TV cl


EAHI1LR
~oLoMI~sC5,o(u 201


Special to the Chronicle
Kathy Green is pictured with her husband, Terry,
and her dog, Maggie.
looked at many areas before deciding to settle in
Citrus County Terry and I love being outdoors
and there are so many activities to do here.
Thanks to the Suncoast Parkway, we can also
visit our family in Tampa frequently Once again,
Perfect!
And that's my story Here in Perfect Loving my
life and sharing the uniqueness on my blog and
now weekly on Chronicle Online.

Kathy Green's blogis available at
www chronicleonline. com. Visit her website at
wwwktgreendesign. com.


Favorite
amendments
Almost daily there's a letter
quoting the Second Amend-
ment, which seems to be the fa-
vorite. The first had been
popular and Nat Hentoff, for-
merly of the ACLU, made a ca-
reer of interpreting it
I have a favorite amend-
ment; it's the fourth: "The right
of the people to be secure in
their persons, houses, papers,
and effects, against unreason-
able searches and seizures,
shall not be violated, and no
warrants shall issue, but upon
probable cause, supported by
oath or affirmation, and partic-
ularly describing the place to
be searched, and the persons
or things to be seized."
"A man's home is his castle"
is a succinct description. If the
founding fathers foresaw vehi-
cles, they would extend the
protection to folks using cars
for shelter and sniffing dogs
would need a warrant.
The Fourth Amendment
doesn't seem to be honored. A
SWAT team can break down
the door of the wrong apart-
ment and just say whoops.
Nobody cares.
My second-favorite amend-
ment is the Sixth Amendment,
the one giving the right to a
speedy public trial with the ac-
cused confronted by witnesses
against him and the assistance
of counsel for the defense. ICE,
Immigration and Customs En-
forcement, doesn't seem to be
under the Constitution at all.
The 14th Amendment states
no state shall deprive any per-
son of life, liberty or property
without the due processes of
the laws. But it also defines a
citizen, so I guess brutality to-


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

ward a non-citizen is OK
The war on drugs and law-
and-order legislators pushing
mandatory minimums made
judges almost irrelevant. In
2003, a Bush appointee handed
down a 55-year sentence, a
judgment he called "unjust,
cruel and irrational." Ironi-
cally, it was a marijuana crime.
When I visited Monticello,
the guide said Thomas Jeffer-
son planted marijuana to keep
the bugs off the cabbage.
Jamestown settlers discovered
Jimson weed in 1607 and it
spread to the other colonies.
The founding fathers were
pretty cool about weed.


The 2003 presiding judge
asked President Bush to par-
don the defendant. It didn't
happen. President Obama has
pardoned a couple dozen, de-
nied 872 pardons and 3,104
commutations. We incarcerate
more people than any other
country We are No. 1 and we
like to keep people locked up.
The only easy presidential par-
don is the one for the Thanks-
giving turkey Who remembers
several of our early amend-
ments laid out the rights of the
people and the quality of
mercy was not strained.
Mary B. Gregory
Homosassa

What's in a lie?
Here we go again with Boy
Scouts vs. homosexuals. Ho-
mosexuals are not allowed to
become Scouts, but some peo-
ple within the Scouts think
homosexuals ought to be
allowed.
Many others say it's God's
will that homosexuals be
banned because "Thou shalt
not lie with mankind, as with
womankind: it is an abomina-
tion (Leviticus 18:22 KJV)."
The problem lies in a misin-
terpretation. You see, the
term "lie with" does not mean
recline with, as do man and
wife. It means you tell a
buddy you had a one-night-
stand with a wonderful
woman you met at Cahoot's
tavern; but, unless you want
the memory to become an
abomination, you tell your
wife or girlfriend you spent
the night playing poker at
Uncle Carl's.
James Mclntosh
Lecanto


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


LETTERS to the Editor


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Getting to know people, making new friends


T o quote this trip involved
Dorothy in the many of the things
Wizard of Oz, we've done previously
"There's no place like and almost always
home! There's no find very enjoyable.
place like home!" I'll get around to
When my Cheryl the excursions and
and I arrived home a sites we saw later, but
few days ago, I did today, I think I'll stick
what I always do. I with the life aboard
kissed the door and Fred Brannen the ship the mag-
made a promise I A SLICE nificent Queen
know I'm not yet OF LIFE Elizabeth.
ready to keep: I'm There's always
never going to go away plenty to do, more
for such an extended trip again, things than one can ever get
No doubt, with the passage of done, but we try anyway-things
time, there will be something such as the onboard evening en-
else my sweetheart and I will tertainment, dancing when our
want to do, a place we will want ever-maturing bodies will allow
to go, and we'll do it once more. it and competing in a myriad of
On this most recent cruise, we cruisers' challenges. We've
saw some exciting places. But pretty much become known as


second-place Cheryl and Fred.
We never win, but we usually
make a pretty good showing.
The other circumstance,
which is always different but in-
variably interesting, is getting
acquainted with our tablemates.
Customarily, Cheryl and I
choose to be seated for dinner
with two other couples, making
a total of six. It is enough to offer
variety, but not so many as to be
totally confusing.
Our group this year consisted
of Jean and John, retirees who
originated in England, but are
now U.S citizens who reside in
California. John and Jean are
newlyweds. They've been mar-
ried for only 57 years.
The other couple, Nelson and
Mary, are retirees living in
Nashville. He spent his working


years as a regional executive for
one of America's industrial gi-
ants, but now seems to have ad-
justed quite well to retirement.
Mary, too, seems to have things
well under control, including
Nelson to whom she has been
married for 46 years just a few
months less than Cheryl has put
up with me.
It took only a short while for us
to get to know one another.
Cheryl and I found the group to
be not only compatible, but in-
teresting and a lot of fun. For ex-
ample, one evening I noticed a
necklace Mary was wearing. It
was a very eye-catching, 1960s-
style piece and I mused, "A gift
from Nelson?"
Mary replied, "Yes, a Christmas
present, but the story's a little bit
more involved. He didn't buy it


for me. He bought it for the other
young lady he was dating without
my knowledge at the same time.
He'd bought me a white sweater
and the boxes got mixed up."
I could tell Nelson was
smooth, but I'm still not sure how
he talked himself out of that one.
But evidently he did. Mary is still
wearing the attractive necklace.
They have no idea whether the
other young woman is still wear-
ing the white sweater Neither of
them seems to care.
Cruises offer much excite-
ment and enjoyment but none of
it tops getting to know people
and making new friends.


Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


Understanding Iran's disdain WINDOW


Nuclear dispute

latest in series of

disagreements

MICHAEL FRANCIS
Special to the Chronicle
he United States
finds itself in a hos-
tile relationship
with oil-rich Iran that ap-
parently is trying to de-
velop a nuclear weapon -
thereby threatening the
state of Israel, an impor-
tant Washington ally in the
volatile Middle East.
During the Cold War,
Washington developed a
strong and profitable rela-
tionship with Iran, a coun-
try that borders Russia.
But in 1979 the Shah, Mo-
hammed Reza, was forced
to flee a rebellion driven
by anti-Americanism and
the country's religious
leadership. This book
helps us understand the
Islamic revolution and
how Washington came to
be seen as the Great Satan.
The reader also needs to
remember Iranians are
Persians (not Arabs) and
seem to feel themselves
"above" their neighboring
Arab states.
The author is a widely
published historian who
lived in Iran for years. The
story he tells starts with an
explanation of how Mo-
hammed Reza's father, a
military dictator, consoli-
dated power in the 1920s
by emphasizing Iranian
nationalism, anti-commu-
nism, the building of a
strong military and land
reform (which failed). Try-
ing to understand our cur-
rent hostile relations with
Iran starts with what went
on under the Shah and
what led to his fall. One
reason for his failure was
that many Iranians felt
they benefited little from
the reforms.
During this period, the
military became deeply
corrupted. The business
community was domi-
nated by foreign interests.
Mixed into this brew was a
politicized group of Mus-
lim religious leaders who
were constant critics of the


Associated Press
Iran's Supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has strongly rejected proposals for direct talks with the United States,
effectively quashing suggestions for a breakthrough one-on-one dialogue on the nuclear standoff and potentially
other issues. A portrait of the late revolutionary founder Ayatollah Khomeini hangs on the wall.


Shah and his tight rela-
tionship with the "Great
Satan" (the U.S.).
The Shah's efforts to sec-
ularize the country were
vehemently opposed by the
religious hierarchy. Partic-
ularly vocal was Ayatollah
Ruhollah Khomeini who
had been expelled from
Iran in 1964, but proved to
be an effective dissenting
voice even from France.
The spreading discon-
tent and serious medical
problems led the Shah into
exile 1979. This opened
the flood gates to political
chaos as the secular
groups battled against the
Muslim leadership. The
student movement, with-
out the approval of the rev-
olutionary leadership,
took over the U.S. Embassy
and captured many staff,
diplomats and CIA person-
nel. At first, there were no
plans to hold the person-
nel, but eventually it
evolved into a hostage sit-
uation that frustrated
Washington.
In the midst of the tur-
moil, a disruptive war was
triggered in 1980 by Iraq's
overly confident leader
Saddam Hussein. This
was a bloody war that did
not end until 1988. Sad-


BOOK REVIEW
James Buchan,
Days of God: The
Revolution in Iran and
Its Consequences
(London Publishers,
2012) 482 pages.

dam had hoped for a
major victory but eventu-
ally lost thousands of
troops (as did Iran). The
conflict ended in a grue-
some stalemate.
In the internal turbu-
lence of Iran after the
Shah left, a vigorous de-
bate erupted as to what
kind of constitution should
be written. Democratic
forces clashed with reli-
gious authorities. But the
clerics were in a good in-
fluential position because
of their highly-publicized
attacks on the Shah. The
constitution tipped against
the secularists. It was a
democracy in that it had a
parliament and a presi-
dent But on top of this sys-
tem was a council of
religious leaders who had
to approve candidates run-
ning for office and could
block legislation it ruled as
contrary to the Koran.
The religious leadership
won because the military


Photo courtesy of Iran Politics
Club/www.iranpoliticsclub.net
In 1943, the CIA forced the
Iranian parliament out of
power and placed
Mohammed Reza on the
throne and supported his
creation of a dictatorship.

and the business interests
were tainted by their links
to the Shah. The student
movement was powerful
but divided. The middle
and lower classes, largely
distrusting the upper and
educated classes, were
willing to believe the
United States was the root
cause of Iran's problems
and therefore were open to
accept the concept of a cler-
ical veto of parliamentary
decisions.
Today, despite some


public protest, the cleric
domination continues and
all Iran's problems are
blamed on America and its
ally Israel. To protect itself
from the forces of evil -
and to assume leadership
in the Muslim world the
ruling clerics believe
Tehran needs to develop
nuclear weapons.
This important book
gives us a deeper under-
standing of our tumul-
tuous relationship with
Tehran. However, under-
standing the situation and
knowing how to change it
are two different things.
The next few months are
going to be interesting.
Whether they will be vio-
lent remains to be seen.


Michael Francis is a
Sugarmill Woods resident
who taught international
politics and U.S. foreign
policy at the University of
Notre Dame for 39 years
prior to retiring. He
served as a chairman of
the Department of
Government and
International Studies for
six years, was director of
Notre Dame's 20 different
foreign studies programs
for five years.


there is an internal
county rule the EDC
chief must be fired every
time the New York Yan-
kees make the playoffs.
(There is a similar policy
saying the Chronicle pub-
lisher gets to stick around
until the Chicago Cubs
win the World Series.
Talk about job security!).
Siefert survived and
thrived because he was a
team player who under-
stood the job. He joined
up with Josh Wooten
from the chamber of
commerce and the two
have worked hard to
help existing businesses
expand and new busi-
nesses feel welcomed.
He is the kind of re-
tiree who is perfect for
Citrus County. He came
here with lots of skills
and instead of playing
golf and fishing, he de-
cided to help improve
our quality of life.
There are lots of folks
like John Siefert in Cit-
rus County who, given
the opportunity, would
love to help with local
business, government
and nonprofit agencies.
The success of our local
SCORE chapter is a great
example of how retirees
can step up and change
things for the better
Don Taylor will now
take over at the EDC after
retiring from Progress.
Taylor was retired two
weeks before agreeing to
take on the job. He never
learned to play golf, so he
wasn't sure what he was
supposed to do after end-
ing his career with the
power company I've got
confidence he is going to
do a good job filling
John's shoes.
With the announce-
ment by Progress/Duke
of the closing of the nu-
clear plant at the Crystal
River energy site, there
has never been a more
important time for Cit-
rus County to pump re-
sources into economic
development. Every
county in America is
working on growing new
jobs and businesses.
We've got to figure out
what makes us special
and attractive to new in-
dustry and business.


ALONE
Continued from Page C1

saw 60 as the average age when
people become old. Middle-aged
survey respondents saw old age as
70. People older than 65 on the av-
erage felt one was old at 74. In the
same survey, 50 percent said they
feel at least 10 years younger than
their true age, and among those 60
to 74, one in six felt at least 20
years younger than their age.
While retirement is seen by
most as a blessing, other things
are considered besides the posi-
tive aspects. There are negative
indicators of "old age." To almost
100 percent of those surveyed,
failing health, an inability to live
independently, not being able to
drive and difficulty with stairs are
seen as indicators of old age.
Eighty-one percent of seniors
own their homes and almost all
want to stay in them. However, for
many older Citrus County resi-
dents, living at home and inde-
pendently is not a certainty It's a
very fragile existence where a sin-
gle event can change everything.
Retired life may be very con-
tented until the death of a spouse,
a slip on the tiled bathroom floor,
or a bout with pneumonia. Events
such as these can make a drastic


BY THE NUMBERS
17.3 percent of Florida's
population are senior citizens.
42.1 percent of people in
Citrus County are 65 years
old or older.
Source: 2010 Census and
Department of ElderAffairs


difference in a person's circum-
stances.
The joy of being able to stay
with your own things in the home
in which you have lived with your
family and known heartache as
well as laughter is dependent on
issues ranging from the state of a
person's health to his or her abil-
ity to manage personal affairs.
Such tasks as shopping for gro-
ceries may become difficult if a
person has health issues. Scrub-
bing floors may become impossi-
ble. The upkeep of a house and
yard may be unmanageable.
Cooking and eating nutritious
foods may be such a demanding
chore that junk food becomes the
diet. Even self-care skills such as
bathing, shaving and shampooing
may be difficult to perform. If a
person is unable to drive, if trans-
portation is a problem, all of the
other challenges will be com-
pounded.


Perhaps the most devastating
challenge of all is loneliness.
Families are not always close
by Children and grandchildren
move away, sometimes across
continents and keep in touch
through visits, phone calls and
technology
As people age, their social con-
tacts dwindle. Friends pass away
Spouses die. If people are not
able to get out in the world and
relate to others, the lack of social
stimulation is likely to cause lone-
liness and depression.
Sylvia "Sal" Giese is an exam-
ple of good planning for an aging
future, luck and a sparkling sense
of humor that carries her through
many difficult times. All are not
so fortunate. Programs are avail-
able through Citrus County Sen-
ior Care Services for those who
need help, whether indigent or
not. Citrus County has dire need
for those services.
According to the 2010 Census,
senior citizens are the fastest
growing sector of the population
in the United States. Florida has
the highest percentage of all the
states at 17.3 percent. Citrus
County in 2011 had the state's sec-
ond highest population of people
older than 65 (42.1 percent), ac-
cording to the Department of
Elder Affairs. Only Charlotte
County has more seniors.


CALL
Continued from Page C1

I thought back to the times
when Ray and I awoke to
calls from my Mom. I remem-
ber the helplessness in her
voice. We quickly were on
our way, not knowing what to
expect. Many times, it ended
with accompanying Dad to
the hospital.
After Dad died, Mom tried
living alone, but soon became
insecure and went to live
with my caring sister, who
had a special room for her.
After a time, there were calls
from my sister. Mom died at
age 91 while visiting me in
Florida. I made the final call.
We never received many
calls concerning Ray's folks.
His Dad died suddenly from
a heart attack at age 65. Later,
I began to appreciate how
often Ray's sister, who lived
nearby, must have responded
to the calls from his mother
who continued to live at the
home place for 15 years. She
died after a short stay in a
nursing home. Ray's sister
made that last call.
We have handled all sorts
of my operations together. We


have no fears as I face knee
replacement in Inverness
this winter. We have our op-
eration routine. Again, our
oldest daughter has offered
to come if we need them. We
will see.
It was a serious nose bleed
that brought us down. Ray
wore the insert in his nose
for five very unpleasant days
before it was removed. Then
he wore a large Band-Aid
mustache for two days before
his nose stopped bleeding
from the irritation because of
the removal of the insert.
Even though I knew of much
worse health issues, it was no
fun to see him in such dis-
comfort. However, that life
trauma is over
When I made that first help
call, I felt our 54 years of in-
dependence made a big lean
toward dependence. Ray and
I may not need to call for
help again for a long time,
but we must admit it is that
time of our lives.
Caring for each other may
not be enough.


Doris Butts and husband
Ray live in Inverness. Doris
is a member of the
Chronicle Ambassadors.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letter to THE EDITOR


Women in combat
hurts society
Kudos on your excellent
editorial and accompany-
ing article by Diana West
on the highly controver-
sial issue of women serv-
ing in military combat.
There are innumerable
problems facing this ex-
tremely important matter
that could adversely af-
fect combatant readiness
and lives; however, the
outgoing Secretary of De-
fense has approved it.
Perhaps it would have
been prudent for him to
delay the approval for
consideration by the new
secretary to be soon
named.
The obvious has been
said about placing women
in frontline combat posi-
tions. Their presence,
among other issues will:
reduce unit cohesiveness;
male soldiers' natural in-
stinct to protect women;
sexual impropriety within
the ranks and of rape
when women are cap-
tured; trouble measuring
up to the great physical
and psychological de-
mands of battle; special
accommodations will
have to be made for fe-
male soldier's personal
concerns; and as the high
pregnancy rate aboard
naval vessels has shown,
having young men and
women operate in close
quarters is folly
One of the most com-
pelling concerns is upper
body strength and speed.
DOD said early on exist-
ing standards for combat


INSIDE UC A CW ACTIONSTO TIVE W GESGMATION,,


TIlNTO CW7E 9 n U YO SAY
GSYONGING ITTO. l? *JG
A C IAM I
To!1


fighting would remain -
but officials have said
that could change.
The directive allows
mothers, sisters, daugh-
ters, wives and all other
eligible females to kill
and be killed in direct
combat, commando raids,
even overseas contin-
gency operations. In
doing so, DOD has de-
stroyed one of the last in-
stitutional protections
that separate men and
women and where civi-
lization once grew. Our
once gracious society has
struggled for years to sur-
vive as social engineers
and radical feminists cut
away at elemental human
instinct, language and
thought. This overhaul of
manners and the family
structure has been some-
what successful in ensur-
ing the cultural argument
against women in combat


finally became a lost
cause.
This matter was not a
great surprise apparently
to those who study such
things as gender-neutral
reforms. For decades now,
children have been raised
seeing women in combat.
Movies and television
shows have long featured
masculinized female char-
acters who talk, act and
fight like men and should
one feature a male hero
today, he almost invari-
ably has to be balanced by
an even tougher heroine.
Common sense and sci-
ence tells us the sexes
have different character-
istic qualities and
strength. The sexes' dif-
ferent proclivities imply
different roles.
As to the big question of
women in combat; if war-
fare isn't a masculine en-
deavor, what is?


Remember old videos of
combat readiness training
where young GIs crawled
on their belly through the
mud and under barbed
wire while machine gun
bullets whizzed overhead,
climbing up 15-foot long
ropes over barricades; all
performed to the shouting
of training officers and in
100-degree weather? I
think it's still a standard.
Then, consider doing this
while pregnant.
This is all inconsequen-
tial actually since it's a
done deal. All we can do
is hope it works since it
involves human lives and
our combatant readiness
in warfare. Although my
grandfather, father and
brother served in
wartime and I spent over
40 years in the Air Force
before and during the Ko-
rean Conflict and as a fed-
eral employee of the


Department of Defense, I
cannot even imagine my
beloved daughter lugging
50 pounds of combat gear
through an enemy-held
jungle, blistering desert
or over mountain ridges.
This missive is not in-
tended to overlook the ex-
traordinary service women
have given to this country
throughout our history
Women have excelled in al-
most all fields of non-com-
bat endeavor and in every
war or in other times of
need. They should always
be recognized, promoted
and rewarded but not by
increasing their chances of
losing their lives.
James W. Willis
Homosassa


SUBMIT LETTERS
TO THE EDITOR
* All letters must be
signed and include a
phone number and
hometown, including
letters sent via email.
Names and home-
towns will be printed;
phone numbers will
not be published.
* Letters must be no
longer than 600 words,
and writers will be lim-
ited to four per month.
a SEND LETTERS TO:
The Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL
34429. Or email to
letters@chronicle
online.com.


President Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation: "All persons held
as slaves within any States... in rebellion against the United States, shall be
then, thenceforward, and forever free."
Sixteen black soldiers won the Congressinal Medal of Honor for their brave


community history literacy

OUT LOUD!


6th Annual

7African

American

Read-In



Sunday, Feb. 24,2013

2:30-4:30 PM

Listen to moving, inspirational and humorous
selections from African-American literature.
Enjoy musical entertainment & refreshments
during this celebration of history & literacy
at CF Citrus Campus. Join us out loud!
Learn More: http://facebook.com/citrusaari

C0IIi:komcE
V ww^chonll"olin"co


Take ,tcck in Cnildren cf Citrus Ccuntyresents........


Tke Stock in
Childrenr


IMADIaJll iir kw iibtJLiS-If"


IRKM--
UlC*OlL


Sunday March 3, 2013-3:00 P.M.
Curtis Peterson Auditorium
3810 West Educational Path, Lecanto
Located in the Lecanto School complex
Tickets $10.00 per person


Jim Blackshear
Memorial
Charitable Partner Golf
Golf Outing
BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS
OF CIUS COU-Y
Seven Rivers Golf & Country Club

A February 23, 2013


L'9E


ii -- ___


Registration 7 a.m.
Shotgun Start 8:00 a.m.

$60 per player or $220 for a
team of four. Includes: Greens
fees, cart, lunch, door prizes
and one Mulligan ticket.
Additional Mulligan tickets
will be available.


For online registration,
forms and
information visit,
www.CitrusBuilders.com
or call 746-9028.


Ci ii )I(:iLE


SCORE 15th
ANNUAL i
Monday, April 8th, 2013
, lll '.'., '-L'.J


Doors Open
at
2:00 PM


Iineine theit te wsts cte and cs.....
7re one & Only ......L la & The Sants

Music, Leather Jackets, Poodle Skirts, Silent Auction and More!
For ticket information, please call Pat Lancaster at 352-422-2348
ALL PROCEEDS WILL BE USED TO PURCHASE SCHOLARSHIPS FOR STUDENTS IN CITRUS COUNTY
Take Stock in Children of Ctrus County is a program sponsored by the Ctrus County Sheriffs Office
OOODPXW


February 17th 4 p.m.
Many Paths, One Destination:
Comparative Religions
Light Shine at Shepherd opf the Hills Episcopal Church
A presentation on comparative religions:Judaism, Christianity,
Islam,and Buddhism which represent the four largest
spiritual paths within the American populace today.
Free Admission. Call 352-527-0052 for more information.



February 23rd 8 a.m.
Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Outing
Citrus County Builders Association
At the Seven Rivers Golf& Country Club
$60 per person or $220 per team..
Annual Golf Outing memorial for CCBA Founder Jim
Blackshear.This year's tournament will donate 50% of
proceeds to the Boys & Girls Club of Citrus County.
Call (352) 746-9028 more information.



February 23rd 9 a.m.- 3 p.m.
Spring Fling Craft Show
Citrus County Craft Council at the Crystal River Armory
Hand made crafts sold by Citrus County Craft Council
members. Free Admission
Call 352-860-2598 more information.



February 23rd 1 p.m.
German American Social Club
of West Central Florida
Citrus County Craft Council at the Crystal River Armory
Live Music and Dancing with the Bavarian Band "Diepolder
Brothers". Finger Sandwiches, Dessert & Coffee included.
B.Y.O.B. $10 entrance fee. Call (352)746-7058 more
information.



February 23rd 8 a.m.
TLC Rehab Blessings 5k/1 Ok & 1 Mi Run
At Nature Coast Bank 2455 North Citrus Hills Blvd.
Variable entry fees for specific run
In it's third year the Blessings 5k/1 Ok & 1 MiRun&Kids Fun Run.
TLC Rehab Blessings is proud to introduce Citrus county's
very first 1 0k(6.2mi)Run this year. Guaranteed to challenge
the more seasoned runner.Visit www.citrusroadrunners.org
to register. Come run through Citrus Hills and support
Blessings.The Blessings program is now packing weekend
backpacks with food for 1,000 school aged children for the 35
weeks they are in school.To learn more about how you can
help visit www.citruscountyblessings.com
Call 352-726-6744 for more information.


Frida, Fbrar 2,21
St. Timothy Lutheran Church

I,







1 o B t v 3
Door Opn 6:0 pm. Sow pr m to9:00p~m


C4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013


COMMENTARY












SIN ESS ONTY CHRONICLE
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


MEANING


MERGER


US Airways, American Airlines combiningforces will not affectflyers yet


SCOTT MAYEROWITZ
AP airlines writer

NEW YORK While
American Airlines and US
Airways announced plans
to merge Thursday, it will
be several months if not
years before passengers
see any significant impact.
Passengers with exist-
ing tickets on American or
US Airways and mem-
bers of both frequent flier
programs shouldn't fret.
No changes will come any-
time soon.
American's parent com-
pany, AMR Corp., is still
under bankruptcy protec-
tion and will need the
court to approve the deal.
US Airways shareholders
also will have to vote for a
merger. Then the Depart-
ment of Transportation
and the Justice Depart-
ment must sign off. Finally,
once a deal closes, the
new company could oper-
ate two separate airlines
for a number of years.
When the airlines fi-
nally do merge, here's
what passengers can ex-
pect:
Airfare
During the past five
years, the airline industry
has seen the combinations
of Delta with Northwest,
United with Continental
and Southwest Airlines
Co. with AirTran. Further
consolidation is likely to
raise airfares. The price of
a domestic round-trip
flight has climbed more
than 11 percent since 2009,
when adjusted for infla-
tion, according to the Bu-
reau of Transportation
Statistics.
The merger will give a
combined American and
US Airways Group Inc. the
ability to increase fares.
United, Delta and South-
west would be likely to fol-
low. Although it could also
pave the way for further
expansion by discount air-
lines such as Spirit Air-
lines Inc. and Allegiant
Travel Co.
Frequent flier miles
Your miles will be safe.
After the merger is ap-
proved, the two airlines
will likely combine the
miles into one program
and elite status from one
airline will likely be hon-
ored on the other. That
puts the occasional trav-
eler closer to rewards.
The merged carrier will
continue American's par-
ticipation in the OneWorld
alliance, which was
founded by American,
British Airways, Cathay
Pacific and Qantas. Today,
it has 12 airlines including
Finnair, Royal Jordanian
and Japan Airlines. US
Airways will leave the Star
Alliance, which includes
rival United Airlines,
Lufthansa, Air Canada
and 24 other airlines. Al-
liances allow passengers
to earn and redeem miles
on partner airlines.
Destinations
A key reason for merg-
ing is to link both airlines'
networks, creating a sys-
tem on par with Delta Air
Lines and United, part of
United Continental Hold-
ings Inc.
There is little overlap
between the two airlines'

See Page D2


Dr. Frederick
Herzog
NONPROFIT
BRIEFS


.i~~ ; J!I.
-r ? J


-.:--- --- ... :.. ---- ----- -- -. -_ .._- ----
-_ --.-__
.:::-- .-- -_.- _- _= --_._ __..... _... .-.--. -___ ... / .. :_---_- _: :_- :-
.-.--= -_ --.-.--. .: --- .
.- ,-. -. .:- -- : -, -_ .
Associated Press
A U.S. Airways jet passes an American Airlines jet Thursday at Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix.
The merger of the two airlines has given birth to a mega airline with more passengers than any other in
the world.


AMR Corp.
* HEADQUARTERS: Fort Worth, Texas.
* HUBS: Dallas-Fort Worth, Chicago, Miami,
New York, Los Angeles.
* CEO: Tom Horton.
* YEAR FOUNDED: 1930, as American Airways;
adopted American Airlines name in 1934.
* EMPLOYEES: 64,550.
* 2012 REVENUE: $24.86 billion.
* DESTINATIONS: 260.
* FLEET: 617. Regional affiliate American
Eagle has another 285.
* DAILY DEPARTURES: About 2,000 plus
another 1,500 by Eagle


US Airways Group Inc.
* HEADQUARTERS: Tempe, Ariz.
* HUBS: Charlotte, Philadelphia and Phoenix.
* CEO: Doug Parker.
* YEAR FOUNDED: 1939 (as All-American
Aviation).
* EMPLOYEES: 31,236.
* 2012 REVENUE: $13.83 billion.
* DESTINATIONS: 198.
* FLEET: 340 mainline airplanes, plus 282
regional planes.
* DAILY DEPARTURES: 3,208 (US Airways
mainline 1,271, Airways express 1,937).


Document donations to nonprofit groups


W hen you do-
nate money
or property
to a nonprofit organi-
zation, you will need
written documentation
describing the contri-
bution to support the
deductibility claim on
your tax return.
The responsibility


of doing this properly
is shared by the donor
and recipient. The
nonprofit organiza-
tion accepting the
money or property
must cooperate in an
IRS-defined process,
allowing the donor to
list contributions as a
deduction. The donor


must see to obtaining
the receipt of a
proper document de-
scribing the gift.
Court upholds
IRS denial
IRS can and has de-
nied the deductibility
of legitimate dona-
tions to a charitable


nonprofit. The US Tax
Court did, in fact,
deny a $25,000 cash
donation made by a
husband and wife in
business to a 501c3
nonprofit. The IRS
stated the initial deci-
sion was because of
the absence of a dona-
tion receipt. With the


absence of the paper-
work, a donor risks
the deductibility.
Rules of
deductibility
There is no re-
quired format for doc-
umenting a donation.

See Page D2


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Be picky


about


number


of IRAs

ear Bruce: My
husband and I
are public school
teachers and are retir-
ing at the end of this
school year. For various
reasons, I have two
403(b) accounts and my
husband has three.
Should we consolidate
our various accounts
into one IRA for me and
one IRA for him, both of
which would be man-
aged by one firm, in-
stead of using multiple
companies? Is it wise to
have one firm oversee
our assets? J.N., via
email
Dear J.N.: In general,
it is smart to have one or
two firms oversee all
your investments as-
suming the companies
are competent. Keeping
track of five different
companies is not neces-
sary or wise.
I don't know how
you've determined this
firm's competency But if
you look over your five
accounts and find one or
two are doing far better
than the others, that's
one way to winnow it
down in a hurry Sit
down and talk to those
companies and see if it
is possible to have the
other accounts trans-
ferred to them. Just re-
member the old saw
about "past experience
is not an indicator of fu-
ture performance."
Dear Bruce: My hus-
band and I are trying to
retire but did not man-
age to save enough to
supplement our Social
Security pensions. We
have three small IRAs,
but they will not last
long enough.
We are contemplating
obtaining a reverse
mortgage on our home.
It is worth about
$300,000, and we have a
line of credit on it of
$49,000, which would be
deducted from the
amount of the reverse
mortgage.
Is this a wise choice
for us? I am 67, and my
husband is 72. We would
need to use only $20,000
a year from this mort-
gage to afford us the
quality of life to which
we are accustomed.
Please advise us on this
matter, as we find your
advice to others very
wise. ED., via email
Dear ED.: You are
considering a reverse
mortgage net of $250,000
($300,000, minus the
$49,000 line of credit),
which would probably
give you no more than
$125,000 on the reverse
mortgage. That would
give you about $20,000 a
year for perhaps eight
years, considering the
interest on the invest-
ment Then what? That's
the problem. A reverse
mortgage could be a
short-term solution, but
it's not a long-term one.
Another option would
be to sell the house, rent
a place instead and walk
out with $250,000. In-
vested at 7 percent, this
could give you $15,000 to
$18,000 a year income
without attacking princi-
pal. While you may not
be happy about selling
the house, it seems to
See Page D2





D2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013


BRIEFS
Continued from Page D1

But there are strict re-
quirements that must be
met and articulated, in
writing, for charitable do-
nations to be deductible.
Nonprofits need to sub-
stantiate donations more
than $250. The donor
needs to receive a "con-
temporaneous confirma-
tion," meaning a timely
and simultaneously rela-
tive receipt to the date of
the contribution. If the
contribution is not sub-
stantiated before the de-
duction is stated on the tax
return, denial can result.
A "Quid Pro Quo" dis-
closure is required if a
nonprofit provides goods
or services in return for
the donation. This means
only the value of the gift
over and above the value
of either services or goods
supplied by the nonprofit
in response to the gift pro-
vided is deductible. This
must be disclosed in a
statement by the nonprofit
Gifts exceeding $75 fall
under this rule.
Substantiation of
charitable gifts
Here are a few basic re-
quirements in a written
document a nonprofit
should follow:
Provide the donor's
name.
State the amount of


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


cash or property
description.
Disclosure and a good
faith estimate must be pro-
vided to the donor by the
nonprofit of the value of
goods or services.
Make a good faith esti-
mate of the value of the
contributionss.
Please note each of the
points stated above are
generic and dependent on
the individual circum-
stances of the donor and
nonprofit Carefully defin-
ing the details and facts of
the donation may be re-
quired for a complete un-
derstanding and
application of the income
tax deductibility
NOTE: Herzogis not a li-
censed attorney, CPA or tax
advisor He provides guid-
ance and counseling
services to nonprofit organ-
izations. He is known for
well-researched and docu-
mentedinformation on non-
profit management. His
credentials include years of
practical experience and a
certification in nonprofit
management He holds
memberships in multiple
national organizations serv-
ing professional nonprofit
organization mangers.
U-
Dr FrederickJ Herzog,
PhD LLC, welcomes all
questions relating to the
management ofa non-
profit organization. He
can be reached at therzog
@tampabayrrcom


Business DIGEST

Posso speaks at ceremony


Special to the Chronicle
Hospice of Citrus County had its 2012 Hospice House Wall of Honor Dedication ceremony Feb. 1. Hospice House
Chaplain Boris Posso delivers encouraging words to family members and friends of those who were inscribed
during the ceremony. The Wall of Honor is a living legacy in honor of someone special and is a meaningful way to
memorialize a loved one. Hospice of Citrus County's 16-bed Hospice House is a licensed inpatient facility on five
acres in Lecanto. Hospice House is a place of comfort and peace which emphasizes a homelike environment,
privacy, dignity and the inclusion of family members for the provision of end-of-life care. Visit Hospice of Citrus
County on Facebook or at www.hospiceofcitrus.org.


Fichtman attends
law certification
review course
Local attorney, Steven D.
Fichtman, of the law office of
Keith R. Taylor, PA, recently
attended the 2013 marital
and family law certification re-
view course sponsored by
the Florida Bar Association


and American Academy of
Matrimonial Lawyers.
Sessions included evi-
dence in family law, all things
child-related and domestic vi-
olence/criminal issues in fam-
ily law cases. There was also
a session reviewing case law
updates which impact marital
and family law cases in 2013.
The course, which took


place at Loews Royal Pacific
Resort in Orlando, was an
advanced level review for the
purpose of preparing for the
certification examination in
the area of marital and family
law. Fichtman chairs the fam-
ily law section of the Citrus
County Bar and has lectured
locally on topics such as al-
imony, practice and proce-


dure and attorney fees.
At the law office of Keith R.
Taylor, Fichtman handles
marital and family law mat-
ters, including dissolution of
marriage, child custody, child
support, alimony, property di-
vision and modification and
enforcement actions. For
more information call
352-795-0404.


MERGER
Continued from Page D1

existing routes. The com-
bined carrier will offer
more than 6,700 daily flights
to 336 destinations in 56
countries, making it more
attractive to companies
seeking to fly employees
around the globe with few
connections.
US Airways passengers
will gain access to Ameri-
can's international destina-
tions, particularly London
and Latin America. Ameri-
can's passengers will be able
to better connect to smaller
U.S. cities that US Airways
serves.
The combined carrier will


have considerable presence
in New York, Philadelphia,
Washington, Charlotte, N.C.,
Miami, Chicago, Dallas,
Phoenix and Los Angeles. It
is unclear how many of
those cities will keep their
levels of service. In past
mergers, airlines have
promised not to close any
hubs but have gone ahead
and dramatically reduced
service in once-key cities.
Passenger
confusion
The merger of two air-
lines often means confusion
and hassle for customers.
Which terminal or ticket
counter do they go to for
check in? If there is a prob-
lem with a ticket, which
company should they call?


For a while, United and
Continental were issuing
two confirmation numbers
for each ticket so either air-
line's staff could make
changes. Problems with the
integration of their frequent
flier programs angered
many loyal road warriors
and computer glitches
caused repeated flight de-
lays. It could be months, if
not years, until all American
and US Airways planes get a
uniform paint job.
"These things are never
as seamless as they seem,"
said Thomas Lawton, a pro-
fessor of business adminis-
tration at Dartmouth
College's Tuck School of
business. "There will proba-
bly be some initial teething
problems."


MONEY
Continued from Page D1

me now would be the time to unload it
and invest the money This might
change your style of living, but would-
n't it be better to consider that now than
to take the reverse mortgage, dissipate
the money and then be out of options?
For a lot of people, a reverse mort-
gage is a good answer, but I don't think
in your case it is the way to go.
Dear Bruce: My daughter is 40
years old and single. She lives in
Michigan and has had a good job for
20 years. She purchased a condo 12
years ago, on which she owes $74,000.
Her condo fees are $160 a month.
There are 40 units in this associa-
tion. She was told only 12 to 15 of
these units pay the dues. Her condo is
now assessed at $20,000. Many people


are subletting or walking away Pretty
soon, I feel the association will bank-
rupt the place.
My question is: Should she keep on
doing what she is doing? Is there any
recourse for her to stop pouring
money into a bad situation? I think
she would be better off taking her
$635 payment and dues and renting a
place. KD., via email
Dear KD.: Your daughter has a seri-
ous problem. If the condo association
is taking back units and is unable to sell
them, the problem of less and less in-
come will continue. You maybe correct
in your observation the association will
eventually have to go bankrupt
She should seek the services of an
attorney to determine precisely what,
if any, steps the condo association
could take against her if she were to
abandon her condo, and what re-
course she may have if the association
chooses bankruptcy


-NCmE G


Christine C. Eck, CPA, PA
910 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 563-2522
Certified Public Accountant Member: Florida Institute of CPAs


i *1] Tax Preparation:
d ; 1,,.i il ,l lli;i .. I F ;.] ,,. ;.i \ 11 1i .l I
11 ,,,11,,,, ...I '.- it r. ,,,I, .I ,
% l I I I,, Fl llh ll' 1, I I,, I ,h ,II I, l ,,,ll
\ii M I u uu .ChlrM~t I...uinl inhllrnll lli,,nl rliili,,


WILLIAMS,
A McCRANIE,
A RRWARDLOW
& CASH, P.A.
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS


2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS to serve you!
Complete Income Tax Service


Crystal River
795-3212


www.wmwccpa.com


Inverness
726-8130


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Accounting & Income Tax Returns
Fixed & Equity Indexed Annuities
(352) 344-2888 (352) 344-2599
(352) 344-2480 Fax (352) 637-5500


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PRICE & COMPANY, P.A.
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Serving Citrus County for over 30 years


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*Federal & Out-of-State Tax Preparation
P Corporate Tax Preparation
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William T. Faine, CPA, PA


SCertified Public Accountant
35 plus years experience
All types of tax returns
Low rates for S Corp & LLC's
Quality service Reasonable fees


In PineView Plaza Shopping Center
Tim Faine,CPA 8012 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River, FL


I


BUSINESS


Form renf


on advertiing aH










CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


Chamber connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Citrus County
Cruisin'


26th annual Strawberry Festival


-promises a berry good time for all
~ A'


Feb. 23 CCBA's An-
nual Jim Blackshear Me-
morial Golf Outing to be
held February 23 at
Seven Rivers Golf &
Country Club with 50% of
proceeds to benefit the
Boys & Girls Club of Cit-
rus County. Entry in-
cludes Greens Fee, Cart,
Lunch, Door Prizes and
one Mulligan Ticket. Put-
ting contest and reverse
draw card game. Call
352-746-9028.
Feb. 28 Business
Leaders of Tomorrow
Membership BBQ. Sun-
coast Plumbing, 6970 W.
Grover Cleveland Blvd.,
Homosassa 6 to 8 p.m.
Feb. 28 -Fourth an-
nual "Bull" & BBQ net-
working event will be at
the CCBA on Thursday,
February 28, 2013 from 5
to 8 p.m.. This year's
cook-off will be a "Master
Chef" competition and
awards will be given for
Best Chili, Best Wings,
Best BBQ and Best Side
dish with the People's
Choice Award to be given
for "Best of Show". Cost
is $10 per person to at-
tend, free to those who
enter the competition.





March 1 to 2 Thir-
teenth annual Luminary
Nights in Old Homosassa
Open House of the gal-
leries and gift shops in
Old Homosassa.FREE
admission, parking and
refreshments! 5 to 9 p.m.
March 1 Berries,
Brew & BBQ kickoff for
the Floral City Strawberry
Festival featuring Bill "the
Sauce Boss" Wharton
cooking gumbo and play-
ing guitar and additional
food provided by the Ag
Alliance. Floral City Li-
brary Complex from 5 to
10 pm, Friday March 1.
March 2 to 3 26th
annual Floral City Straw-
berry Festival brought to
you by the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce
and the Floral City Mer-
chants Association;
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday
and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sun-
day. Park just north of
Floral Park at the Citrus
County Fairgrounds and
ride the shuttle bus back
to the fairgrounds.
March 7 Wine &
Food Pairing Benefit with
Silent Auction supporting
Habitat for Humanity of
Citrus County. This is an
excellent way to support a
vital community resource
- Habitat for Humanity of
Citrus County. Call 352-
746-6727 for information
or to purchase tickets.
Skyview Restaurant,Terra
Vista, 6 to 10 p.m.
March 8 15th an-
nual SCORE Golf Tour-
nament at Sugarmill
Woods Country Club.
This annual event is the
major fundraiser for
SCORE, Counselors to
America's Small Busi-
ness. The tournament is
a flighted scramble for-
mat with a 1 p.m. shotgun
start. A pre-tournament
luncheon will be served
at 11:30 am. Player entry
fee is $60 including
lunch. Prizes and con-
tests;email citruschapter
@live.com or call 352-
249-1236 for details.


Join the Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce and the Floral City
Merchants Association in every-
thing strawberry at this year's
26th annual festival. Floral Park
in Floral City is transformed into
a strawberry wonderland Satur-
day, March 2, and Sunday, March
3, with Ferris Farms strawberry
flats and strawberry shortcakes
for sale. The honored strawberry
is joined with more than 100 ad-
ditional food vendors and more
than 100 arts, crafts and market-
place vendors.
The weekend begins with the
second annual Berries, Brew and
BBQ kickoff party. Friday night,
March 1, from 5 to 10 p.m., the Flo-
ral City Library Complex is trans-
formed into a wine and beer
garden, complete with entertain-
ment and cooking from the Citrus
County Agriculture Alliance fea-
turing pulled pork, chicken and
ribs, baked beans, coleslaw, col-
lard greens and rolls.
A special treat this year is the
headline performer, Bill "the
Sauce Boss" Wharton. Bill Whar-


FLORAL CITY, LORIDA


ton, aka "The Sauce Boss," takes
a novel approach to blues per-
forming, combining his love of
cooking with his passion for gutsy
guitar playing and singing.
Saturday features the Little
Miss Strawberry Princess Pag-
eant for girls ages 4 to 6 at 9 a.m.,
and at 10 a.m. the Miss Strawberry
Princess Pageant for girls 7 to 12.
Saturday's music includes the
"Amazzing" Steel Drum Ensemble
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and country


music by the Dan Story Band from
2 to 5 p.m.
Sunday's music includes
acoustic guitarist Craig Jaworski
from 9 to 11 a.m., local talent So-
phie Robitaille at 11:30, popular
duet Phantastic Sounds from 1 to
2 p.m. and Cajun music from
Neon Leon & Cajun Dave closing
the festival from 2 to 4 p.m.
Childhood Development Serv-
ices will run a children's area
with games and activities both


Saturday and Sunday Both festi-
val days offer a wide selection of
concession food, the return of fa-
vorite as well as introduction to
new crafters and, new this year, a
beer garden.
Admission to the festival is just
$3, and children younger than 12
are no charge. Parking is ex-
tremely limited in downtown Flo-
ral City, so we recommend you
park at the Citrus County Fair-
grounds (3600 S. Florida Ave., In-
verness, FL 34450) and ride the $1
shuttle bus to and from the festi-
val grounds.
The 26th annual Strawberry
Festival is presented by FD.S.
Disposal and Citrus 95.3/96.7 the
Fox with Platinum Sponsorship
from Tampa Bay Times and Sonic.
Sponsored by Hometown Values,
the Florida Lottery, Nature Coast
EMS and the Ted Williams Mu-
seum. The Floral City Strawberry
Festival is brought to you by the
Citrus County Chamber of Com-
merce, the Floral City Merchants
Association and sustaining part-
ner the Citrus County Chronicle.


Store Manager Tom Cooper joins his daughter as she makes the official cut to open the new supercenter in Lecanto. The turnout included
Wal-Mart staff, residents of the community, community/government representatives and Chamber ambassadors. Pictured: Bonnie Hardiman-
Pushee, ambassador; Sarah Fitts, First International Title; Bill Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County; Commissioner Joe Meek; Kelley Paul,
WollinkaWikle Title Insurance; Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast Bank; Mike Bays and Commissioner Rebecca Bays; Jennifer Duca, Comfort
Keepers; Crystal Ashe, Health Center at Brentwood; Tom Chancey, Community Food Bank of Citrus County; Dennis Pfeifer, Orkin Pest Control;
Tom Corocran, Life Care Center of Citrus County; Janet Mayo, Plantation on Crystal River; Nancy Hautop, Cadence Bank; Dan Pushee,
ambassador; Kim Baxter, Cadence Bank; and Betty Murphy, Citrus Archives and Computers.

Welcome Lecanto Wal-Mart as new Chamber member


The newest Wal-Mart Supercenter cele-
brated its Grand Opening and Chamber rib-
bon cutting Jan. 23.
Store manager Tom Cooper, who himself
came up the ranks of Wal-Mart, credited his


Taylor new

executive director of

Citrus County

Economic

Development Council
Don Taylor has
been named Exec-
utive Director of
the EDC effective
March 1 after the
board voted on
Thursday, Feb. 14.
Mr Taylor had
served on the EDC
board as treasurer
in the past and has
an extensive 38-
year career in the Don Taylor, newly
electric utility elected Executive
industry Director for the EDC.I
He brings to the
office, years of training and experience in
finance, administration and negotiations,
as well as skills in long-range financial
and strategic planning.


Upcoming events
Feb. 20 Ribbon Cutting RISE
CONSTRUCTION, Inverness, 4:30 p.m.
Feb. 21 Business After Hours CITRUS
BUYERS GUIDE at HAVANA HOUSE GRILL,
Crystal River, 5 to 7 p.m.
Feb. 28 Ribbon Cutting SOQUILI
STABLES at FAITH HAVEN, Crystal River,
4:30 p.m.


a -% LII [I[ Wherever you go,
M..i Whatever you do,
... : ~ Take Citrus County
r"e%,-.,a Along with you!


employees and managers as key players in the
store's successful launch.
Additionally, Cooper established the store
as an integral part of the county with a semi-
truck donation of food to the Community Food


Bank of Citrus County, as well as donations to
Crestview School and the Lecanto ROTC.
The new store is at 1936 N. Lecanto High-
way, Lecanto, FL 34461, and the phone num-
ber is 352-628-3663.


Citrus County is going to Tallahasseel


BBQ and Legislative Day: Legislative Day (only):
Wednesday and Thursday, March 20 21,2013 Thursday, March 21,2013


* Includes round trip bus transportation to Tallahassee, including transport
to evening BBQ, with food prepared by Citrus Co. Ag Alliance
* Cost: $70/person (includesBBQ and Legislative Day lunch)


* Includes round trip bustransportation to
Tallahassee
* Cost: $55/person (includes lunch)


Reserve your seat online at http://www.citruscountvchamber.com/events/eventdetail.aspx?EventlD=705.
or call Ardath Prendergast, Citrus County Chamber of Commerce, at 352-726-2801.


HOTEL INFORMATION: [Hotel deadline: February 201]
You are responsible making your hotel reservation and costs. We have room blocks underthe Chamber of Commerce at
both the Aloft Hotel acrossthe street from the State Capitol Building, or at the Hampton Inn Central on Apalachee Parkway
(the buswill drive you to the State Capitol Building in the morning).
* To reserve at the Aloft ($149/nlght + tax): https://www.starwoodmeeting.com/StarGroupsWeb/res?
id=1207053407&key=5933A
* To reserve at the Hampton Inn ($129/night + tax): Call 850-402-9400 and request to reserve under the group name of
"Citrus County Chamber". ,, a--..


Presented by Crr US COUNTY EI


AJA ~
^~"~


D3


-- 1 o .


i-







D4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013



Choil


i=


Classifieds


Need A Friend
with same interests
Retired Oriental Lady
No smoking,drinking
or drugs. Healthy
will share
Tsai P.O, Box 895
Waldo, Fl. 32694
Single White Widow
Seeking, 1 healthy
honest, country
gentleman for
companionship.
He Should be 65-80
Love of country and
bluegrass music a
plus. (352) 344-0002




2 ADJACENT PLOTS,
Fero Memorial Military
Gardens of Honor
$2,100. (727) 776-1277
2 DOORS Framed
$40., obo
12 WINDOWS Large
$250 obo
Will separate
(352) 270-8044
CLUB CAR
GOLF CART
Electric w/ charger,
refurbished, new
paint, 4 seater, $2500
(803) 842-3072

FRAMER WANTED

For immediate
employed. Expe
ence Reauired. PT
may lead to FT.
Fax resume to
352-637-4141 or call
(352) 637-4138

HERNANDO
2/1%1, Furn. Lrg. Fm &
Laun. Rm, Cprt, prvt rd.
50+ Area, $650/m. F/L
(352) 746-0850

HOMOSASSA
2BR/2 BA, No Pets
$500 (352) 628-5696
POP-UP CAMPER
2002 Coleman
Tacoma Exc Cond.
With add a room.
$4500
(352) 726-3919

RETAIL, FOOD
ASSOCIATES &
COOKS

APPLY IN PERSON
Saturday 2/23
9:00-11:00 am Only
WILDSIDE CAFE
9225 W. Fishbowl Dr.
Homosassa




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087




Approximately 1 cord
of Hard Wood,
Cut and ready to go
(352) 249-7221
FREE
2 six wk old bunnies,
1 female Golden Lab
spayed, 2 yrs old
house broken
(352) 502-5302
Call after 4:30PM
FREE TOILET WHITE
COMPLETE FULLY
OPERATIONAL
(352) 476-7973
Male Chow
7 yrs old, not
neutered, great dog!
352-302-5468
To Himalayan Cats
Free to good home
Must go together
(352) 419-2728




FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.0lb,
Stone Crabs@ $6.OOlb
Delivered 352-795-0077




2 Lost Dogs
BIk lab mix(Baron),
Blk& White hound
mix (Cracker)
off Dunklin/Citrus
Springs 352-292-2759
32nd Degree
Scottish Right Ring
Lost in Vicinity of Sweet
Bay, Inverness
352-209-1316
Black Labrador
Retriever, about 1% yrs
old, answers to "Buddy",
lost in vicinity of
W. Dunnellon Rd.
Owner is heartbroken.
(352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662

GOLDEN LAB
Name is Shadow,
he's very friendly,
approx. 801bs
Connell Heights
352-364-2646







LOST CAT Long Haired


Orange and White
Tabby Neutered Male
Cat. About 3 years old.
Comes to the name
Peanut. Very Friendly
and has very fluffy tail.
Pupil of left eye has
small scar. Family pet,
kids miss him so much.
Lost in Timberlane Es-
tates, Lecanto near 486
on 2-4-13. Has micro
chip. Please call:
352-697-3402


sung Android w/Hot
Pink Cover. Left in Cab
on 2/8 or 2/9 evening.
Cab ride was from
Beverly Hills to
Homosassa. Pis Call
me (352) 279-5217
or (352) 270-4164
Lost Dog,
Boston Terrier,
Female, Brindle &
White, Gospel Island
Reward(352) 726-7980
Wallet in Homosassa.
Ohio DL, Regions Bank
Card. 503-7279



CLERK OF COURTS
OFFICE ON 2/11
CRYSTAL RIVER
found in parking lot,
please call for
verification of item
352-232-6264



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.00b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb
Delivered 352-795-0077



NEED TO RENT
sml flatbottom boat
in ST Martins River
area, Ozello, S.
Diecidue Dr. around
2/17, 860-949-5318
SDS 2 Work Station
Looking to
Rent or purchase
call Joe 352-503-2108



2 ADJACENT PLOTS,
Fero Memorial Military
Gardens of Honor
$2,100. (727) 776-1277
Fero Memorial Grdns
2 lots for sale. 2 plots
in each lot. $4500/ lot.
(352) 628-4051




SECRETARY
Family owned
and operated
Pest Control Business
Office experience
preferred, but will
train right candidate.
Apply in Person at
8822 E. Moccasin
Slough Rd
Inverness 34450
Wed Fri. 9A-12P
(352) 726-3921
@_qmail.com









IIIIIIII

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966





Avante
At inverness
Is currently looking
for
LPN's
Full time All Shifts
& CNA'S
Apply online at
Avantecenters.com

Dental Assistant
Must be proficient in
crown & bridge
temporizing

Dental Hygienist
Call 352-465-3008
or fax resume to
352-465-3009


FIT Dental
Assistant

Experience required.
Fax Resume To:
352-795-1637 or
Email
casie@rswanson
dental.com


FRONT DESK
SPECIALIST
Full/Part time, for Busy
Office. Only those
w/front desk, health
care exp. considered.
Computer & Insurance
exp. needed.
EMAIL RESUME TO:
billingdept@
nbccdro.com


Full Time/Part
Time/ Per-Diem
LPN & Certified
Nursing Assistants
All Shifts for both.
Customer Service
Oriented/Caring

Contact Lynn @
352-621-8017
Sunflower Springs
ALF
8733 W. Yulee Dr.
Homosassa, Fl 34448


LPN's
All Shifts,
Full Time & Part Time
Exp. Preferred

Life Enrichment
Coordinator
Apply at:
Superior Residences
of Lecanto
Memory Care
4865 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy (352)746-5483
Drug free workplace
dselsavaae@
superioralf.com
mriaaleman@
superioralf.com


PHYSICAL
THERAPY
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center of
Citrus County in
Lecanto
PHYSICAL THERAPIST
PHYSICAL THERAPY
ASSISTANT
PRN positions availa-
ble for qualified
physical therapists
and physical
therapy assistants
with current state
license. We offer
great pay and ben-
efits in a team- ori-
ented environment.
Melanie Reyna
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln
Lecanto, FL 34461
Melanie_Reyna@
LCCA.com
Visit us: LCCA.COM
EOE/M/F/V/D -
38347

Ur*


FIT
Dental Hygienist
Fax Resume To:
352-795-1637 or
Email
casie@rswanson
dental.com

MEDICAL ASST

Excellent opportunity
with benefits
Strong Computer
Skills required. Up to
$15 DOE, contact
Human Resource
Dept. 855-357-6311

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

RN's, LPN's,
CNA's

Are you looking to
advance in your
Health Care
career? Maybe
change lives one
resident at a time?
If so come join
our team!
RN's, LPN's, CNA's
needed FT and PT
for 7-3 & 3-11 shifts.
South Campus Cen-
ter is currently under
new management!
Come experience
our wonderful
changes!!
Apply in person, or
you can send us
your resume at:
Jobs@cacare.com
SOUTH CAMPUS
REHABILITATION
715 E. Dixie Avenue,
Leesburg

RN's, PT & OUT'S
LPN's, Phsych
Nurse, & ST

Office Staff w/medical
background, CITRUS
& HERNANDO
(352) 794-6097




Executive Asst.

Email resume to:
resume2013ncf
(@)qmail.com

INSURANCE
AGENT WANTED

Looking for licensed
220 or 440 customer
service agent,
salary plus benefits.
email resume to:
david@birdinsurance
group.com

NEW YEAR
NEW CAREER!

Tired of dead end
jobs?
Sick of workplace
uncertainty?

New opportunities
with established 35+
year local company
* Looking for goal
oriented individuals
* Training provided
* Average com-
pensation $50k+ yr.
* Company spon-
sored trips and
incentives
2 Positions Open
For immediate hire
Fax Resume to
Karen 352-726-6813
or Call 352-726-7722


Eii rl I U F EE WI r\PLACj
EOE / DRUG FREE WORKPLACE


Squppoirt.


Find out what these values can mean for
your career.

HOSPICE RN OPPORTUNITIES

Weekends, F & PT
Nights, IF & PT
Evenings, FT & PT


OPEN HOUSE
On-site interviews will be conducted

Thursday, February 28th,
3pm-7pm

3545 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465

If you can't make it to our open house
or would like more information,
please call our recruiter, Cynthia at:
800-486-8784 or apply online at:

www.HPH-Hospice.org/careers





HPrhospIce
1 nat~orymmfH argonizafian initenny lie.sed ll
EOE/DFWP
DDE2U5


CLASSIFIED




EXP. LINE COOKS
& SERVERS
Apply In Person
COACH'S PUB
& EATERY
Mon-Fri. 8am-11am
& 2pm-4pm
114 W. Main St.
Inverness
11582 N. Williams St.
Dunnellon
Save-A-Lot Shopping
Center

HIRING COOKS
or Kitchen Help
& SERVERS

Servers Must be 18
or older.
Apply Fisherman's
Restaurant
12311 E Gulf to Lake
(352) 637-5888
Closed Mon. & Tues

RETAIL, FOOD
ASSOCIATES &
COOKS
APPLY IN PERSON
Saturday 2/23
9:00-11:00 am Only
WILDSIDE CAFE
9225 W. Fishbowl Dr.
Homosassa

TWISTED OAKS
GRILL
P/T Exp. Only

that can work all
aspects of a
restaurant, call
between 9 & 11 am
352-746-6682




AC Equipment
Sales Persons

Needed Immedi-
ately. No cold call-
ing $50-$ 100K+ ben-
efits
Email or Fax Resume
mdp@newair.biz
Fax 352-628-4427

AUTOMOTIVE
SALES

CITRUS KIA is hiring
a Sales Professional
to join our growing
staff
Be a part of the
HOTTEST new car
brand in the country
professional training,
competitive pay and
bonuses provided to
the right people. If you
have the skills to give
our customers the best
car buying experience
of their lives, WE
NEED YOU! Apply in
Person
1850 SE Hwy 19
Crystal River

BOAT SALES
F/T 40 hrs. +, com-
puter and market-
ing skills, and local
boating knowledge.
Must have clean
driving record.
Email Resume to
doua@riverhaven
marina.comrn
Call (352) 860-6913


BRAND [JE'. 2013
BUICK LACROSSE
36 11:1

24 MONTH LEASE INCLUDES:
* 2 YEARS MAINTENANCE
*2 YEARS SIRIUS/XM RADIO
* 2 YEARS ONSTAR DIRECTIONS
& CONNECTIONS


SE


0 MAINTENANCE FEES


n=P ER.J EnCUu ==[...I


BRAND NEW 2013

GMC SIERRA

EXT. CAB SLE
20 "77

*V6 AUTO.A/C
AM/FM STEREO
STABILITRAK*
CRUISE CONTROL
*CHROME FRONT BUMPER


0% FINANCING AVAILABLE


MO.
LEASE*


7 Qilvifc


VIEW OUR ENTIRE
INVENTORY ONLINE!


1275 S. Suncoast Blvd. I US Hwy 19 S

Homosassa 352-795-6800 l..A
*2013 GMC Sierra: 39 mo. closed end lease, $3,559 total due at signing. 2013 Buick LaCrosse: 24 mo. closed end lease, $3,139 total due at
signing. Plus tax, tag, title and 499.50 dealer fee. Includes all available incentives and rebates assigned to dealer. 12,000/mi., year, $.20/mile for
overage. Lessee pays for excess wear. WAC. (1) See dealer for details. (2) WAC. See dealer for details. Photos for illustration purposes only.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ENERGETIC
RETAIL SALES

W/Sales Experience
for gift shop in
Inverness, min 30 hrs.
Mail ResumeTo:
PO Box 1282,
Inverness, FL 34451

SALES PERSON
Energetic Sales
Person Needed. Ex-
perience preferred but
not required.
A willingness to
learn all facets of
operations,
Applyv in Person
BADCOCK & MORE
150 S Suncoast
Blvd




CDL CLASS A
WITH TANKER
REQUIRED
Looking to hire
someone to work in
septic industry must
have CDL class A with
Tanker 352-563-2621
FRAMER WANTED

For immediate
employed. Exper-
ence Reauired PT
may lead to FT.
Fax resume to
352-637-4141 or call
(352) 637-4138

Key Training
Center
F/T Human
Resource Specialist.
Computer literate;
knowledge of
automated time-
keeping systems &
HR programs, such
as ABRA, preferred.
Minimum 2 years
exp.; HS Diploma
/GED required
Apply in Person
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto FL
*E.O.E.*

Key Training
Center

has positions
available in group
home setting. Assist
adults with disabili-
ties in daily living.
HS Diploma/ GED
required.
Apply In person at
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto FL
34461 *E.O.E.*

Legal Assistant

For busy Law Firm
Min 5 yr legal asst/
paralegal exp reqd.
Competitive salary/
benefits.
FAX RESUME:
352-726-3180
Only qualified can-
didates considered

RESIDENTIAL
ELECTRICIAN

Must have 5 years
exp. Current on
Codes & DF,
Call (352) 746-6825


mB

*CALL NOW*
Looking to fill
immediate positions
in the CUSTOMER
RELATIONS DEPT
Training, 401(k),
Medical. No Exp.
Necessary. Call
Michelle
352-436-4460

APPT. SETTERS
NEEDED

$500. Sign on Bonus.
Great Commission Pay
and weekly bonuses
Call Bob 352-628-3500

CDL CLASS A
DRIVER

Truss exp. helpful.
Bruce Component
Systems.
352-628-0522


NEWSPAPER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and
other newspapers
for home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per
day.
Must have insured
and reliable
vehicle -
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up
with a cap Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product

Apply in Person
1624 N
Medowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pmr

Newspaper
carriers are
independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle


Cffl 'd' ... d' E
f------ J
SALES PERSON

Energetic Sales
Person Needed. Ex-
perience preferred
but not required.
A willingness to
learn all facets of
operations,
Apply in Person
BADCOCK & MORE
150 S Suncoast Blvd

Secretary/
Receptionist
Needed PIT,
MS Office Suite
Proficient, Experi-
ence, Preferred
Send resume to:
P.O. Box 1630
Lecanto, Fl 34460
Fax 352-513- 4967
Or Call
352-513-4963


a
YARD &
FACILITY HELP
NEEDED

Need dependable
person with flexible
schedule. Must be
able to drive a forklift
& load cable reels
onto flatbeds; main-
tain Shop cleanliness,
mow, weed-eat and
pick-up parts as
needed. Monday
through Friday, 7AM
to 3:30PM; ocassional
Saturday.
Please apply in
person at F&H
Contractors 9250
West Atlas Drive,
Homosassa, 34428.




REGISTERED
TAX PREPARER

Parttime, Wanted for
small Dunnellon
Office. Flex Hours
Email Resume
to:taxtime200@
bellsouth.net

Secretary
Administrator

office exp. preferred
have exceptional
computer skills,
including Quick
books, Excel &
Microsoft Power
point, Send resume
to: janmetcalf
@embarq.mail.com




FLAG -U.S. military in
wood/glass display
case,perfect, never
flown,-$40-
(352)212-1596
HAVILAND CHINA
Forever Spring Pattern
service for 8 people
$75, 352-465-8495
Nascar Team Caliber
dicast collectable
cars $200. Qty 25
various yrs. 97-01
Monster Inc,Capillar
Big Kmart352-201-2120
OCCUPIED JAPAN
AICHI BREAD PLATES
Two gold-trimmed, pink
roses, 7.5", very good.
$5. 352-601-0067



DISHWASHER White
Energy Star Frigidaire
2010 Gallery
Quiet,Clean,Must Sell
$100 341-0450
DRYER$100 With 30
day full warranty Call
or text 352-364-6504
KENMORE DRYER All
Digital 12 settings Good
condition White 2005
model #84092 $100
341-0450
KENMORE DRYER All
Digital 12 settings Good
condition White 2005
model #84092 $100
341-0450


REFRIGERATOR
GE apartment size 3ft
tall, 2ft wide, great
shape-$50-
(352)212-1596
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179
STOVE, GE SPECTRA
Glass Cooktop, self
cleaning, bisque $200
Kenmore Side by Side
Refridg/icemaker/water
in door, bisque $300
352-795-6260
WASHER OR OR DRYER
$145.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like new,
Excellent Condition.
Free Delivery.
352 263-7398
WASHER$100 With 30
day full warranty. Call or
text 352-364-6504
Whirpool Refrigerator
Dishwasher & Stove
$300 for all
352-746-1447



CHAIR-
-desk/computer, grey,
adj height, rocker, good
shape, $25
(352)212-1596
COMMERCIAL DESK
CHAIRS (2) PreOwned
Fabric Covered
Adjustable $45 each
727-463-4411
DESK CHAIRS
(4)Commercial
PreOwned Gray Tweed
Fabric $15 each
727-463-4411
LATERAL FILE
CABINET 3 Drawer
Commercial Metal
PreOwned 40"x36"x18"
$85 727-463-4411
PREOWNED FILE
CABINET 2 Drawer
Lateral Commercial
Metal 30"x28"x18" $45
727-463-4411
SMALL COMPUTER
DESK Formica Top
36"x24" with 2 Drawer
File Cabinet Attached
$25 727-463-4411
STORAGE CABINET
Gray Commercial Metal
4 Shelves Lock and Key
50"x36"x18" $75
727-463-4411




DUDLEY'S






AUCTION
Restaurant
Equip. Liquidation
Tues, 2/19/13
Preview: 9am
Auction: 10am
14 Hwy-19 N (near
SR40) Inglis, FL
34449 Formerly
Backwater Southern
Grill, All Equipment
& d6cor must go!
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667


YOUR CHOICE


EXPERIENCE BUICK -


i







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


t
HAMMER DOWN
AUCTIONEERS
Fri 02/15 Preview @
4pm, Auction@ 6pm
General Merchandise
Sat 02/16 Preview @
4pm, Auction@ 6pm
Antiques/Gen. Merch
Sun, 02/17 Preview @
12:30, Auction@ 1pm
Tailgate/Box lots
"WE BUY ESTATES-
6055 N. Carl G Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
AB3232 (352)613-1389




12" CUT OFF
12x5/32x20mm cut
off wheels
3 metal 1 concrete
$30.00 all 352-586-8657
12"X36" WOOD LATHE
Good working order.
Was $275 new.
Will take $175
352-726-7898
SAWS
Ryobi 9" Band Saw $40;
Skill 10" Table Saw $60
(352) 628-4118
TOOLBOX diamond
plate, locking, great
shape, fits ranger/S10,
$75 (352)212-1596
Wood Lathe
Chizzles Included
$100.
(352) 628-9175




42" MAGNAVOX
PLASMA FLAT
SCREEN TV $150.
Metal stand $25.00.
352-726-0264
SHARP 32" TV WITH
REMOTE $20
352-613-0529
SPEAKER 2-Way
SEAS Center Channel
Home Theatre Speaker,
Danish Quality $100
341-0450
TECHNICS DIRECT
DRIVE TURNTABLE
$5.00 352-344-2321
YAMAHA RECEIVER &
TECHNICS DUAL
STEREO CASSETTE
PLAYER $100
352-613-0529
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 GOOD
CONDITION $100
352-613-0529




2 Doors Framed
$40., obo
12 Windows Large
$250 obo
Will separate
(352) 270-8044
CONCRETE PAVING
CHAIRS 192 Heavy
duty 5" chairs $10. 307
2" #5 chairs $10.
352-489-3931
KODI KLIPS for
concrete work. #525
clips for #5 rebar. 625
count. $25.
352-489-3931

Cm


LAPTOP Dell 640m with
Vista basic power cord
& good battery. $100.00
352-527-9074



3 PERSON PATIO
SWING Heavy duty
Patio swing. Very good
condition. $50.00
352-613-2232
Call in evenings
Patio Furniture Set
14 pieces, 40 x 66
glass top table with
umbrella, 6 chairs,
2 recliners, 2 glass top
side table, 2 ottomans
black, anodized
metal frame w/ taupe
mesh fabric, very
good cond. $400.
Lanai furniture, 38 x 66
table w/ marble oval
insert, can hold um-
brella 4 chairs with
taupe dble thick
cushions anodized
antique bronze metal
frame good cond
$250. (352) 382-2497



2 X-long twin mat-
tresses & box springs w/
adj frames $125; one
Qn Matress & Box Spr-
ing $40. Both in great
Cond. (352) 341-1241
4 Bar Stools
Bar height swivel,
$150, Palm Tree ped-
estal table glass top
$50. 4 Large, Heavy
Oak Chairs
w/ arms $150.
(352) 422-2164
6 Pc. King, Size Set
with boxspring
& mattress
$450.
(352) 860-2792
36" ROUND TABLE(2)
Rugged Formica Top
Sturdy Steel Pedestal
$35 each 727-463-4411
ANTIQUE WASH-
STAND solid wood,
distressed blue drawer
and 2 doors $60
352-897-4154
Beautiful Ethan Allen
Cherry dining room
set, with buffet. $1,650
Bedroom set, glass
top washed wicker,
King headboard,
6 drawer chest,
7 drawer dresser with
mirror, 2 night stands,
excel, cond. $700.
Other Misc. Household
(352) 489-1287
(352) 465-5051
Bedspreads
2 twin, White
Matelasse, w/matching
shams $45 ea. set
352-527-2729
CHERRYWOOD
FRAME CHAIRS (2)
Fabric Upholstery with
Arms PreOwned $35
ea. 727-463-4411
BREAKFAST NOOK
Table & 4 Cushioned
Chairs, 48" Beveled
Glass Top, Rattan
Excellent Condition
call 352-382-3802
Contour Adjustable
Bed, Twin, Premier
Sleep System,
variable speed
massage, w/ waves
& timer & remote
control $1,000
(352) 344-3827


AREA RUG 8X11
$20. 352-422-2164
LARGE SOLID WOOD
ARMOIRE light color
plain modern design
$250 352-897-4154
LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET, In Original
Plastic, Never Used,
ORG $3000, Sacrifice
$975. CHERRY, BED-
ROOM SET Solid
Wood, new in factory
boxes- $895
Can Deliver. Bill
(813)298-0221.
Living Room Set
couch & love seat
neutral colors, glass
top coffee table &
two end tables
like new $750 obo
Bakers Rack w/ glass
shelves $100 obo
Located in Pine Ridge
(419) 307-6100
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500
Oak Dining Room
Table 42" Round
$100, Brown Lazy Boy
Rocker/Recliner $300
352-621-3034
Oak Entertainment
Center, 71" Lx 56" W
10 shelves, tinted glass
doors, fits 36" TV, exc.
cond.$175.
352-503-5011
Oak Sewing Machine
Cabinet w/chair $60
Singer Sewing
Machine $40
352-621-3034
SEAFOAM GREEN
QUEEN SLEEPER
SOFA & 2 CHAIRS
/microfiber fabric with
upgraded queen mat-
tress in sofa. Matching
overstuffed chairs. $600
Call 352-419-4482
Set of Twin Box
Springs & Mattress
w/ rails, $75.
2 Entertainment
Centers, 1 Black, 1
white oak, $125. for
both (352) 795-7254
SMALLER PRETTY
SECTIONAL Florida
print, very clean $150
352-897-4154
SOFA
brown, microsuede
1 yr. old, $275
352-746-6678
SOLID OAK Computer
Desk w/ hutch 58" W
call or text for pics
$100.00 352-302-2004
SQUARE TABLE 36"
Rugged Gray Formica
Top Sturdy Steel Frame
$30 727-463-4411
STACKABLE CHAIRS
PreOwned Fabric Cov-
ered Commercial Metal
Frames 2 for $35
727-463-4411
STACKABLE CHAIRS
with Black Metal
Framed Arms Chocie of
Fabric Color $10 each
727-463-4411
Wicker Etagere
5 ft White
$60
352-746-2329
WINE CABINET,
WOOD, EUC off white
holds 20 bottles of wine
& has one drawer.
352-249-7212 $85.00
WOODGRAIN METAL
FOLDING BANQUET
TABLE 6 Foot Long
PreOwned $35
727-463-4411


Riding Mower
15HP, 38" cut.
$300
(352) 344-2297



7 SAGO PALM Just
dug out of ground. $50
Will deliver and install
for added fee.
352 341 3607



CITRUS SPRINGS
8971 N. Spartan Dr.
Garage Sale-Furniture,
Women clothes(14-18),
shoes, etc. Sat
8am-1pm.
HERNANDO
Moving Sale
Fr, Sa & Sun, 8 to 4
6851 N Castlebury
(Royal Coach Village
off SR 200)
HERRY'S
MARKET DAY
FREE VENDOR
SPACE!
Produce, Seafood,
Floral Needed!
Outdoor Flea Market
held on the grounds
8471 W Periwinkle Ln
HOMOSASSA
(behind Wendy's)
Last Saturday Every
Month 8am -Noon
Saturday, Feb. 23rd
Call Caroline at
352-527-2020
INVERNESS
CLOSING SALE *
CRAFTY LADY
Publix/KMart Shopp-
ing Cntr, Hwy 41
Bairgain's Galore
344-4800 10a-5p M-Sa



BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING SIZES 5 &
6 SHIRTS, PANTS &
JACKETS $25
352-613-0529
CHARLES KLEIN
LEATHER JACKET
LADIES SM. POLYES-
TER LINING. NICE
$45.00 352 527 1193
LEATHER JACKET
COMINT MENS WEST-
ERN FRINGED
MEDIUM $45.00
3525271193
PARADISE BAY CAPRI
PANTS 1 pair, green,
size 14, gently used. $3.
352-601-0067
PARADISE BAY CAPRI
PANTS 4 pair, size 16,
red/beige/blue/green,
gently used. $10 all.
352-601-0067
PROM DRESS
DESIGNER Long, blue,
size 13/14, strapless
$45 call or text
352-302-2004
PROM DRESS Jade
designer collection long,
purple, 1 shoulder,
size 12 $65 call
352-302-2004
PROM DRESS
Red/Black. halter,
size10/12 $35 call or
text 352-302-2004



GPS Magellan
Roadmate 5220-LM
Never used. $90.00/
352-637-5969


DESKTOP COMPUTER Full Size 4 Piece RIaM lo GPS Magellan
Petnium 4 Desktop with Bedroom Set Sp i Roadmate 5220-LM
keyboard, monitor and $100. New $90.00
mouse. $352 75.00 (352) 726-8474 Chipper/Shredder 352-637-5969
GLASS TOP Troy-Bilt Tomahawk,
Diestler Computer END TABLE Briggs & Stratton gas
New & Used systems w/elephant base engine. $700 OBO
repairs. Visa/ MCard good condition $60 (352) 601-3174 !!!!!265/70 R16!!!!!
352-637-5469 352-465-1262 GREEN HOUSE Great tread!!
HP TOWER PC 2GHz Hand Knotted Wool 10X20 W/ shutter fan Only asking $75!
Dual Core,250GB Oriental 4'10"X 6'8" and shade cloth. $500 (352)857-9232
Drive,IGB RAM $270, Old Hand Woven (352) 465-0812 **225/70 R19.5*.****
24xDVD,Card Oriental Wool Murray Rider, Beautiful tread!! Only
Reader,5.1 $100 6'7" x 8'6" $290, 40" Cut, Exc.Cond. asking $100 for the pair!
341-0450 352-527-2729 $425. (352) 637-4718 (352)857-9232


^S^Se M._


CLASSIFIED



----295/40 R20----
Nice tread!! Only asking
$100 for the.pair!
(352)857-9232
4 HORSE STOCK
2006 TRAILER
BUMPER PULL
$3500, 352-637-4864
or 352-410-5406
18 Steel Framed
Folding Tables
30' x 96", $25. ea. obo
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church
(352) 746-7161
1994 S-10 blazer
complete interior.
black and grey great
cond. 100.00 obo call
for details 352-476-9019
2012 PAZZEL
INSPIRATIONAL
CREATIVE CUTTER w/
accessories. New cond.
Cost $725, asking $515
obo (352) 586-4630
5th Wheel Reese
14,000 Ib
Like New $165.
2 Golf Cart wheels &
tires Like new $35.
(315) 466-2268
CHROME WHEELS 6
LUG F-150 18 Inch by
8.5 Inch Used Nice!
$300.00 obo
3527265698
Complete Kitchen Set
white cabinets, rose
counter tops, sink,
trash compactor, built
in whirl pool oven,
center island w/ sink,
$200. obo
(352) 465-1892
DUDLEY'S
AUCTIOR-






AUCTION

Restaurant
Equip. Liquidation
Tues, 2/19/13
Preview: 9am
Auction: 10am
14 Hwy-19 N (near
SR40) Inglis, FL
34449 Formerly
Backwater Southern
Grill, All Equipment
& ddcor must go!
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.comr
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001lb,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077
GARRARD DOUBLE
CASSETTE TAPE
DECK $20 CAN PLAY
AND RECORD
419-5981
GERBIL CAGE
$20
352-613-0529


G
Roa

$90.0
HE
VI N
BOV
CAN
NVEF
Ho
T
A
Pic
(3


excel

KIT

60"
Cherry
2 she
$400
LAR
ZLE
ho
e
LUG(
w/e
$100
bike
$10


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 D5


ressnrae es
Clean and Very Nice
Fulls $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
NEW BLACK LEATHER
PURSE BY ROLF $25
CAN E-MAIL PHOTO
INVERNESS 419-5981
PROP off 250 yamaha-
not stainless-
13.75 x 173 blades
75.00 352-794-3020
cell 586-4987
RIMS 2 16" FOR '06
TOWN&COUNTRY
$50.00 EACH
352 527 1193
VIPER ALARM alarm,
remote start,two key
fobs. $?? $40 obo
352-476-9019
Wheel Chair Lift
Pro Express
Electric, lifts up & down
& encloses inside van
$1000, 2 Trampoline
mats, new springs $50
352-303-0928



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676



"FAT STRAT" STYLE
ELECTRIC GUITAR
PLAYS & SOUNDS
GREAT "NEW" $45
352-601-6625
"NEW" ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR
W/GIGBAG,STRAP,
CORD,ETC $90
352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
NEW CONDITION
FULL DRED SIZE,
PLAYS GREAT $60
352-601-6625
EPIPHONE PR4E
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
W/AMP&ALL
ACCESSORIES $100
352-601-6625
FENDER "LAP
STRAT", BLACK 1/2
SIZE ELECTRIC CON-
VERSION W/SLIDE
$75 352-601-6625
FENDER CHILD SIZE
MINI STRAT BLACK
FINISH PERFECT
CONDITION, $65
352-601-6625
Kawai, SR 5
ORGAN
$600 obo
616-914-0980 cell
Crystal River
TUNER PETERSON
STROBOSTOMP pedal,
best tuner available,
great shape-$50
(352)212-1596

Houshol


JUICER -Hamilton
Beach, good shape-$20
(352)212-1596
SWEEPEZE VACUUM-
ING DUST PAN electric
$10.00 352-344-2321



ALPINE TRACKER
Cross country ski type
machine. $50
352-489-3931
MASSAGE CHAIR
Homedics recliner
destress with massage
& heat. $50.
352-489-3931
TREADMILL Healthrider
variable speed & incline.
$75. 352-489-3931



4HP JOHNSON OUT-
BOARD Model 4R72,
good condition, includes
6 gal gas tank. $175
352 746-7232
leave message
Approximately 100
Golf Clubs,
Pings, MacGregger,
845's & Big Bertha's
$200. take I or all
(315) 466-2268
AR 15, DPMS
w/Reflex Red Dot
2 mag's $1500
352-746-6769
Must Have FL
ConcealedCarry
Permit to Purchase
BICYCLE
Brand new Trek 7200,
ladies, 24 speed, 27"
tires $290 OBO
(352) 586-4630
BICYCLE TREK 7500
Womans, Shock Fork,
Fast and Easy, Clean,
24Speeds, $195
341-0450
CLUB CAR
GOLF CART
Electric w/ charger,
refurbished, new
paint, 4 seater, $2500
(803) 842-3072
CONCEALED
WEAPONS CLASS
EVERY SATURDAY
11 am, $40
132 N. Florida Ave.
(352) 419-4800
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
DAM QUICK REEL
SPINNING REEL AND
POLE (1950s) $65.00
352 527 1193
FISHING TACKLE
Rods, Reels, Lures,
Line, Tackle Box, Lead
Weights-other Items,
$25 to $75
352-257-3288
FOLDING BICYCLES 2
bicycles $99.
352-422-2164
Fredo Arm


3PS Magellan 4 KITCHEN CANIS- Belt buckle De er hitch
Belt buckle Derringer
dmate 5220-LM TERS WITH LIDS $10 5Be shot 22 LR $400
Never used. NEW IRRIDESCENT Buckle & Gun
)0/352-637-5969 QUICHE DISH $10 Winchester Model 94,
EART DESIGN 419-5981 lever action, .30 .30
NRTAGE GLASS 40 PIECES OF STAIN- Pre 64 $500
NL W/COVER $8 LESS FLATWARE $20 (208) 206-2020 Cell
E-MAIL PHOTO DECORATIVE GOLF CLUBS
RNESS 419-5981 HANDLES CAN E-MAIL Men RH Taylor Tour
memade Quilt PHOTO 419-5981 Burner, Senior Flex
Tops 5/$100; ELECTRIC VEGETA- 6-PW, $90,Tour Edge,
nne Geddes BLE STEAMER $5 Men RH Reg. Flex 4PW
ctures 6/$100 NEW LARGE GREEN $80, 352-257-3288
52) 795-7254 MIXING BOWL $10 PELLET RIFLE .177
HUNTER AIR 419-5981 cal. wood stock, power-
PURIFIER FRYER -Hamilton ful-1000 fps, case, 4x R
lent,sacrifice $60. Beach, basket-style, scope, great shape-$75
352-344-2321 good shape-$25 (352)212-1596 Ur
CHEN ISLAND (352)212-1596 POOL TABLE
ree standing KING COMFORTER Bar Room Style Full U
x 34", American SET lite green /leopard Size Pool Table.
y stain, 4 drawers $25.00 352-794-3020 Slate-top. Good bump- "Fro
Ives, 2 dr. cabinet cell 586-4987 ers and felt. $800 OBO t
0, 352-795-6260 KING COMFORTER 352-446-3320
RGE DOG MUZ- SET shiny maroon & Ruger 44 Carbine
S like new, grey- valances used once Rifle Stock C
und size $3.00 $35.00 352-794-3020 $150 Pi
ach 344-2321 cell 586-4987 352-441-0645
GAGE CARRIER MIXER -Waring Taurus 22 Caliber h
electrical hk/up custom-250, 10 speed, New In Box
, Ladies 6 speed stainless steel, great $400. obo
e, good condition shape- $25 (352) 795-0088
0 352-746-9039 (352)212-1596 After 11 am til 7p


^ ^ B B S B ^L III ^ .^ _

QftiM-6i 7 Q


2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1895
call 352-527-0555

SOLD
4X8 Utility Trailer
w/ 16" sideboards
good condition




FISHER-PRICE BABY
GIRL SWING
Plays soothing
music/and lights up.
100$. 352-726-1526

WINNIE THE POOH
All Brand new clothes,
birth to 9 months and
lots of accessories.
352-613-2232 Please
call in evenings




5 to 8 yr old.
Passenger Van
for
Path Shelter
will pay cash
352-527-6500
ext. 4

BUYING Guitars,
Banjos, Violins, Man-
dolins, Saxophones, &
Tube Amplifiers, Top
Dollar Paid Call Mike,
Locally (352) 207-7522

CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492

WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369




BLUE OX RV 6" DROP
RECEIVER Hi-Low, fits
2" receiver hitches tow-
ing, 10,000 lb. capacity.
$75. 352-601-0067

RV BAGGAGE DOOR
CATCH Package of 2,
white, rounded. $5.
352-601-0067

WINEGARD SATEL-
LITE COMPASS Model
SC2000, align dish to
satellite, waterproof, lan-
yard. $8. 352-601-0067




PGH STEELER SKI
JACKET Men's med.
NFL VG Cond. $25.
Dunnellon 465-8495

WHEELCHAIR LIFT
Easily load folded chair
not scooter onto car


$100. Dunnellon
465-8495


Robbie Ray

ban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

'm Cutting Edge
o Care Free"

Make-overs,
Color, Foiling,
recision Cuts,
Avant Garde
airstyles and
updo's.

Paul Mitchell
Certified.


2 Maltese Puppies
Left, 1 female $650.
1 Male $600, CKC reg.
will have Fl. Health
Cert.. Call to come
play with them,
(352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258
8 Month Old
MALE YORKIE
CKC registered all
shots, house trained,
loveable, affection-
ate Silver & brown
$600. (352) 341-4009
DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com






k (352) 634-5039 *














MEEKO
Meeko is a 2-y.o.
terrier mix, who is a
very mellow, perfect
gentleman. He has
quiet dignity, calm
energy, is very low
key. Weight 70
pounds, beige/
white in color,
housebroken, listens
carefully, easily
trained. Pays close
attention to his hu-
man friend. Gets
along well with
other dogs. His kind
and pleading eyes
will win your heart.
He is really a sweet-
heart of a dog.
He waits at Citrus
County Animal
Shelter. Call Karen @
218-780-1808. "
Scottish Terrier
DOB 11/4/13
Black Beauties
Shots, Male & Female
1 year garauntee.
(575) 491-2944 Cell








SKIPPY
Skippy is a
7-8 y.o. Redbone
Coonhound, sweet,
trusting, loving and
non-aggressive.
Fostered since Sep-
tember, he would
do best as the only
dog in a home.
Loves walks and car
rides, RV's, etc. Not
a barker. He wants
a hug before his
morning walk, then
he happily skips
along. He is the
ideal "good dog",
a loving and faithful
companion.
Call Judy @
352-503-3363.



Your World


aORIN.
,qqev* =0Y.


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179



Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052
HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping Dr.
appts errands etc Hablo
Espanol 813-601-8199




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Paios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078


FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lie. #1476, 726-6554



AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping Dr.
appts errands etc Hablo
Espanol 813-601-8199




COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194


WINDOW?
GENIE.
We aeon Windows nd o Whole Lot More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352 422-7279 **




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
VeFAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 3100%Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
et RELIABLE- Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *k
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570


Marcia's Best Clean
Experienced Expert
lic+ref, Free Estimates
"call 352-560-7609"
NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate $20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



BEAT ANY PRICE
Paint & Power wash
Lawn & Trees Trim
Jim (352) 246-2585
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570



AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up time.
352-220-4244



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
All Tractor & Tree Work
Household, Equipment
& Machinery Moving
(352) 302-6955


Add an artistictouch to your existing yard

S o or pool or pn
6 something
:- 0mplelel new!








SPOOL AND PAVER LLC
&I sed 352.400.3188


JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570



CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


BEAT ANY PRICE
Paint & Power Wash
Lawn & Trees Trim
Jim (352) 246-2585
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713




DGS SERVICES LLC
Reroofs Metal Roofs
REPAIRS Home
Inspector 414-8693



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
Repairs
I Small Carpentry
F* encing
Screening
lean Dryer
Vents
S' Allo/dou're & Dependable
E Eq<,ience lifelong
352- 344-0905
cneI' 400-1722
wured- Lic#37761


BATHFITTER

"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old OneT!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


GENERAL -'
Stand Alone 4
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

02 148


DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn Re-
moval 352-302-6838



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Household, Equipment
& Machinery Moving
(352) 302-6955
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, liclins 302-8852
KING's LAND CLEAR-
ING & TREE SERVICE
Complete tree & stump
removal hauling, demo
& tractor work. 32 yrs.
exp. (352) 220-9819

#1 Employment source is

www.chronicleonline.com


AAA ROOFING
Call the "bakbusten
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF
,Any Re-Roof:
Must present coupon at time contract is signed.
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 000DWEQ


LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
REAL TREE
SERVICE
(352) 220-7418
"Tax Specials"
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316


CARPET & .LC
UPHOLSTERY
CLEANING

Specia izing in:
Carpet Stretching & 95
Carpet Repair
* 352-282-1480 cell -
352-547-1636 office
Free In Home Estimates E l
Lic & Ins Lifetime Warranty






NEED SOMEONE TO
GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?

WE MAKE IT




DISAPPEAR FOR LESS

IF YOU WANT IT
TAKEN AWAY...CALL FOR A
FREE ESTIMATE TODAY! I
352-220-9190







D6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013


Pes Cmpes


1----'UP., I-----
Starting@ $400.
Registered
Lots of colors, Beverly
Hills, FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.ne










TRIXIE
Trixie is a very pretty
2-y.o. terrier mix,
weighs 50 pounds, is
heartworm nega-
tive. Beautiful fawn
and white color. She
is friendly, good with
children, and very
loving. She walks
well on a leash, sits
for treats, is easy to
train as she is
treat-motivated.
She loves people
and has just the
right amount of
playfulness. This
lovely girl awaits her
good forever home
while at Citrus
County Animal Shel-
ter. ID # 18728509.
Call Karen @
218-780-1808. *




Bermuda Hay 501bs $6
Never been rained on
795-1906 586-1906
SHAMROCK FARM, CR



LIQUIDATION SALE
Horses & tack, new &
used. 352-873-6033




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*352-563-5510*

87 PROLINE
17', Deep V haul
Center Console
w/ trailer
315 W. Inverness Blvd
BASS BOAT
1985, 16ft Bayliner
Needs work 85HP
force eng., galvinized
trailer. $800obo
(352) 507-1490
GALALEO
Duck Boat 17ft
w/25 HP Longtail
Go Devil, new trailer
Great Shape! $5000
firm 352-341-0336
or 352-586-8946
KAYAK
Current Designs
Shirocco, 16 ft 10"
yellow sea kayak
$600,352-464-4955


















PENN YAN
1979 27' Sports fisher-
man w/ trailer, needs
some work. $4000
OBO (352) 621-0192
SWEETWATER
2008 18 ft. Pontoon,
60HP, Yamaha, 4
stroke, $11,500, no trlr.
(352) 257-9496
TRI PONTOON
BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
(352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com




NATIONAL RV
2006 Tropical One
owner,34ft, 26000
miles,no smoke/pets,
300HP Cummins die-
sel,2 slides, 6 new ti-
res, 3yr
warranty,many extras.
$87000. Well main-
tained. 352-341-4506
SUNNYBROOK
2008, 35FT Fifth Wheel
3 slides, electric awning
fireplace, 2 ac's, 50 amp
king bed, assume
balance of $37,500.
352-279-3544



2012 Wildwood TT
26 Ft. sleeps 8,
Elec.Awning and
Jack, bunks $13.999
813-699-2262
BROOKSIDE
07,By Sunnybrook
32ft, 5th wheel,2 slides
exc. cond. loaded,
stored under cover
ask. 15k,352-795-0787
or 352-208-7651
Brooksville Deeded
spacious, shaded cnr
lot, 1BR/1BA, Large FL
room, Large storage
shed & patio. 55+ RV
Park w/ heated pool,
and music activities,
$36,000 352-848-0448,
352- 428-0462 anytime
CHALLENGER
5TH WHEEL 33FT, 2
slide outs Good cond


$6,000 obo Must Sell
(423) 202-0914
Coleman, 2001
Utah pop-up, new ac &
tires, elect. & gas heat,
slide-out dinette, sleeps
6 to 8, sink, 3 way
fridge, inside/out stove,
awning, 1 owner, ready
to go! $4000.
352-795-9693
FOREST RIVER
2010, Surveyor, Sport
189, 20 ft. Travel
Trailer,
1 slide, w/AC, qn. bed,
awning, pwr. tonque
jack, corner jacks,
microwave, equilizing
hitch, $10,500, reduced
to $9000
(352) 382-1826


KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Licl/ns.
POP-UP CAMPER
2002 Coleman
Tacoma, Exc Cond.
With add a room.
$4500
(352) 726-3919
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, kg bd,like new,
60amp serv. NADA
$29K asking $25K
obo 352-382-3298



LUGGAGE ROOF
CROSSRAILS
will fit any Chevy
Traverse $150
obo 352-503-6414
TRUCK COVER
Silver, Fits Toyota
Tundra Extention Cab
2001- 2006 Good Cond.
$350 (407) 353-2406
Homosassa



"BEST PRICE-
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
**352-426-4267**
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333

MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ




AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE.
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 5 6 3 -1 9 02
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.
BUICK
1996 Regal 125k
miles,motor rebuilt
@90k. A/C doesn't
work,dents and dings,
but runs good.$1200
obo 563-1638
CADILLAC
1994 DEVILLE
79K MILES, CAR IS
PERFECT $4995
352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2005 STS
LOW MILES
NICE CAR
$9850, 352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2011 CTS, LOADED
ONLY 15K
MILES, SUNROOF
$27,850 352-628-5100
CHEVROLET
1999, Camaro,
Convertible
$6,990.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2006 Corvette Victory
Red! Cashm Leather.
LS2 400HP, Auto 6-sp
Pad Shift, All options
inc. Heads-Up display,
heated Seats, Tract
control, XM Sat Radio,
NavSystem. Plus
more.garage-kept. $35K
352-560-7247
CHEVROLET
2009 Cobalt, 19,700,
excel. cond., 38mpg
1 owner local,
(352) 447-2920
CHRYSLER
'01, Sebring LXI,
limited conv., loaded,
low mi., Econ. V6, CD,
Leather, garaged Perf.
cond. $4,950, 212-9383
CHRYSLER
2006 PT Cruiser cony....
weather is getting
nice...time to drop the
top...call 352-628-4600
to set appointment
to see
CRYSLER
'98, Seabring convert-
ible, red, excel. cond.
always garaged
$4,000 (352) 628-1723
FORD
1995 Escort wagon
4cyl., Auto,
call 352-628-4600
for low price and
appointment
FORD
2005, Focus
$4,850.
352-341-0018
FORD
2010, Edge,
10k miles, Loaded,
excellent condition
$18,500. 352-400-6007
FORD
2010, Pruis,
$17,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
2011 FIESTA SDN
36K MILES, "S"


MODEL, ONE OWNER
$9950, 352-628-5100
FORD
Mustang Cobra, Indy
500 Pace Car-1994,
Convertible, 7100 mi,
Gar. kept 252-339-3897
HONDA
2010 ACCORD LX,
85K MILES, NICE,
$12,850 352-628-5110
JEEP
Grand Cherokee ltd.
White, 70k mi. Mint
cond. Auto.$11,000
(305) 619-0282
LINCOLN
Towncar 2010
29,900ml, gold w/beige
vinyl top, white leather
asking, $24,900
352-476-5061


im-
MINI COOPER
2008 2DR, HARDTOP
ONLY 20K MILES,
SUPER CLEAN
$13980, 352-628-5100
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

NISSAN
2005, Altima
$5,895
352-341-0018
PONTIAC
2003 Bonneville, must
SEV6, pw....pl....priced
to sell.....call jan at
352-628-4600 for
appointment
and pricing

SOLD
FORD
2000 Escort ZX2
4cyl. 5 spd, air, runs &
looks good




AUTO SWAP
CORRAL SHOW
20TH ANNUAL
Sumter
Swap Meets
SUMTER COUNTY
Fairgrounds, Bush-
nell
Feb. 15, 16, 17th
1-800-438-8559

FORD
'96, Mustang, garage
kept, 1 owner, 6 cyl.,
5 spd. GT rims, silver,
w/gray interior.
Immaculated cond.
Must See $3,100 obo
Cell 954-294-8979
Beverly Hills



DODGE
2005 Dakota SLT, 4wd,
4door, V8, towing pkg,
BIk, 88k mi, exc cond
$12,500 (352) 341-0725
FORD
2004, Ranger
$7,990
352-341-0018
FORD
F150, 1978, 4x4
Runs good, 6" Lift kit,
$1,650 obo
(352) 564-4598
FORD
F-150XL white 1995,
3L, straight 6, 2WD,
6' bed w/ cab $3600
(352) 637-5331 LM

MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




BUICK
2005 RANIER
46K MILES, CXL
LIKE NEW
$9850, 352-628-5100
CHEVY TRAIL-
BLAZER LT 05
exc. cond. asking $6000
obo, in Hernando
(904) 923-2902
FORD
2000 Explorer $2,000 or
best offer. 263000 miles
runs god needs rear
main seal. May need
ball joints. 476-7942
HONDA
1997 CRV, priced to
sell....it's a honda
auto, pwr windows
call 352-628-4600 for
special newspaper
pricing
KIA
2012 SOUL
ONLY 7K MILES
$15,800 352-628-5100
SUBARU
2011 FORESTER
29K MILES
ONE OWNER
$17850, 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
1997 RAV 4
ONLY 89K MILES,
NICE $5850,
352-628-5100




JEEP
2000, Grand
Cherokee 4x4, V8
pw, pl, priced to low
to list.....call adam at
352-628-4600 for
appointment



DODGE
96, work van. Ram 250
155k, runs excellent
$1,700,
315-272-5393


2011 "ready to hunt"
Only $5998.
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS
2002, SPORTSMAN
700 CC 4X4 AUTO
READY FOR THE MUD
ONLY $4288
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS RZR 800 LE
TIME TO PLAY HARD
ONLY $8388
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
new tires, am/fm, CB
250 engine, hitch, 4spd,
auto & reverse, canoe
rack, $900 obo
352-637-4011




Harley Davidson
2005, 883
LOW MILES
$3,995.

Harley Davidson
2006, STREET GLIDE
EZ FINANCE
$11,500.

HONDA
2009, VT750 AERO,
CLEAN
$4,995.

SUZUKI
2001, VOLUSIA
EZ FINANCE
$2,995.

KAWASAKI
1999, NOMAD
RUNS GREAT
$3,800.

LUCKY U CYCLES
352-330-0047
WWW.LUCKYU
CYCLES.COM


striped-lowered
Chromed-Out, 11k mi.
$10,500,352-634-3990


Harley Davidson
2009 Street Glide
Black, 20k, many extras
$18,500 firm, pls call
*352-422-5448*
HONDA
'04, Shadow, Aero,
750 CC, 16k Miles,
Like new $3,995
461-4518 or 586-2807


CLASSIFIED



CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
HONDA BLACK BIRD
CBR 1100 LOW LOW
MILES ONLY $3488.00
(352) 621-3678
HONDA SCOOTER
2006 SILVERWING
600cc, 50 mpg,
tricycle wheels $4995
352-489-8803
HONDA ST1300
2006 MADE TO TOUR
ONLY $7786
(352) 621-3678
KAWASKI NINFA
650
LIKE NEW ONLY
$5488 (352) 621-3678
KYMCO
2009, AJILITY
SCOOTER GREAT
GAS SAVER ONLY
$998 (352) 621-3678
RAMPAGE
Motorcycle lift for p/u
truck. Like new $1800.
(352) 637-0397
SUZUKI
'06, Boulevard 800CC,
Lots of extras, like new
$3,995. 352-461-4518
352-586-2807
SUZUKI BURGMAN
AUTOMATIC TWIST
AND GO FUN ONLY
$4686 (352) 621-3678




321-0217 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE


SUZUKI GSXR 750
195 MILES "HOLD ON"
ONLY $9996
(352) 621-3678







TOY

HAULER
27' 2005 Work & Play
$14,500.
(352) 634-3990

TRIUMPH
1998 Triumph Thunder-
bird Sport 900. 24700
Miles, 150 on Over-
hauled engine. Must
see condition. D&D
Custom exhaust, new
battery. Great rider, su-
per fast. Asking $ 4500
OBO. Dunnellon area.
Some trades. Photos
available Call Rick
352-445-1573 or e-mail
LongShotArmsLLC@
gmail.com

VICTORY CROSS
ROADS
"GREAT American
MADE CRUSIER"
ONLY $12888
(352) 621-3678

Misc. Notice


On February 10, 2013, an application seeking consent to the assignment of license
of FM Translator Station W266AI, Chassohowitzka, Florida, and Station W280DK, Inver-
ness, Florida from Christian Radio Media, Inc., to Hernando Broadcasting Company,
Inc., was tendered with the Federal Communications Commission, Washington D.C.
Both stations rebroadcast the signal of WEKJ(LP), Chassohowitzka, Florida.
February 17,2013.


323-0217 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Sheriff's Office of Citrus County,
Florida, will begin collective bargaining talks with The Professional Firefighter of Citrus
County, Local 4562 on February 19, 2013 at the Withlacoochee Technical Insitute lo-
cated at 1201 W Main Street Inverness FL, 34450, Room 277 beginning at 1:00 p.m.
These discussions are open to the public.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Human Resources Office, 1 Dr
Martin Luther King Jr Ave, Inverness, Fl 34450, (352)726-4488 a minimum of two days
prior to the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone.
February 17,2013.


324-0217 SUCRN
Elig. To Vote- Kyle Austin Smith
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Kyle Austin Smith
7073 N Lecanto Hwy
Hernando, FL 34442

You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle Feb.17, 2013.


329-0217 SUCRN
February Sales
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC AUCTION
The following vehicles will
be sold at PUBLIC AUC-
TION on the property of
SCALLY'S LUBE & GO TOW-
ING AND RECOVERY, 1185
N. Paul Drive, Inverness, FL
34453; 352-860-0550; in


accordance with Florida
Statute 713.78. Auction
Date as Follows: All Sales
will begin at 8:00 AM. Ve-
hicle may be viewed 30
minutes before sale. For
details call 352-860-0550.

1)21995 FORD MUSTANG
COLOR: GREEN VIN#
1 FALP4441SF156454


Auction Date: 02/21/2013

2) 2001 SATURN
COLOR: GOLD VIN#
1G8ZP12861Z301357 Auc-
tion Date: 02/28/2013

Scally's Lube and Go re-
serves the right to bid on
all vehicles in Auction. All
sales are final at 9:00 AM
February 17,2013.


319-0217 SUCRN

PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION: ORDER TO DEMOLISH HOME & CARPORT

CASE NUMBER: 134199

Description of property: AK: 1623413 and legally described as HERCALA ACRES UNIT 2
PB 8 PG 16 S1/4 OF E 1/2 DESC AS: S 164 FT OF E 132 FT OF TRACT 151 W 15FTTO BE
R/W ESMT
MIKHALL DAVYDOV
1583 E FLETCHER ST
HERNANDO, FL

On December 13, 2012, an order was issued by the Citrus County Certified Building
Official to demolish the structures) on the property located at: 1583 E. Fletcher St.;
Hernando, FL. If the property owners) fail to comply with this order, the Code Com-
pliance Division will issue a work order to abate the nuisance condition.

Any persons) having a legal interest in this property may contact the Code Compli-
ance Office within 30 days of this publication. Board of County Commissioners, Dept.
of Planning and Development, Code Compliance Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, FL. 352-527-5350. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
February 17,2013.

320-0217 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

The public is hereby notified that Citrus County Code Compliance will conduct its
monthly Special Master Hearing on Wednesday, February 20, 2013 @ 9:00AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, Multi purpose Room 166, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any and all persons interested are
invited to attend. The following cases) will be heard by the Code Compliance Spe-
cial Master; however cases may abate prior to hearing date. If you have questions,
contact Code Compliance at (352) 527 5350.

Beach, Tami H. "REPEAT VIOLATION"

4962 N Windy Gap Pt, Crystal River, FI 34428
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any build-
ing or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or
place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory
covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: Fail-
ure to maintain a current permit until final inspection. Permit #200905625

Buck, Daniel Fred

7813 W Laura St, Dunnellon, FI 34433
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal ste or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, car tires, household furniture, bro-
ken glass, household items, truck bed with camper top in poor condition, metal,
plastic debris, and other miscellaneous trash and debris.

Burkhardt, Bradley & Robert

1320 S Estuary Dr, Crystal River, FI 34429
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accurnulations of vegetative waste on agricul-
tural lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Old lumber, furniture, boat parts, household
garbage, plastic buckets, appliances, and miscellaneous items.

Burkhardt, Bradley & Robert

1320 S Estuary Dr, Crystal River, FI 34429
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: Boat trailer, Ford Mustang, Lexus sedan, motorhome, and a blue and white
box truck.

Clifford, Lee A. & Robin L.

7811 W Grove St, Homosassa, FI 34446
Construction of a structure (Gazebo, Shed, etc.) without a valid permit, a violation of
Citrus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part:
No person shall erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or
demolish any building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residen-
tial unit, or set or place a mobile/manufactured home or floating reidentid unit
within the territory covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit
therefore. To Wit: Permit #200614861 for SFD expired on 11/05/2009 and the job was
never completed, only the foundation and 5 rows of block.

Dabney Jr., Archie W.

9490 N Elliot Way, Citrus Springs, FI 34434
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.

Fernandes, Anthony J.


I Misc. No


on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, car tires, car parts, broken furni-
ture, appliances, tvs, lawn parts, household items, metal and plastic debris, and
other miscellaneous trash and debris.

Summers, Timothy

4836 E Fordham PI, Hernando, Fl 34442
Construction of a structure (Porch) without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus
County
Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person
shall
erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any
building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set
or
place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory
covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: A
porch with screen enclosure attached to the front of the mobile home.

Vires, John & Barbara

8898 E Midwater Ct, Inverness, FI 34453
Construction of a structure (3 windows and a sliding glass door) without a valid per-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


m


Metn


.


115 N West Ave, Inverness, Fl34453
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Numerous toys, bricks, plastics, wood, metal, house-
hold items, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.

Ferrera Jr., Joseph J.

7031 W Sedan Ct, Homosassa, FI 34446
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Stove, microwave, tv, bicycle, and an old wood
wagon full of cans.

Genco, Janice

4920 E Parsons Point Rd, Hernando, FI 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: A couch, buckets, construction materials, wood, plas-
tics, metal, debris stacked in an open trailer, cardboard, an appliance, and other
miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.

Genco, Janice

4920 E Parsons Point Rd, Hernando, FI 34442
Construction of a structure (Porches and ramps) without a valid permit, a violation of
Citrus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part:
No person shall erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or
demolish any building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residen-
tial unit, or set or place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit
within the territory covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit
therefore. To Wit: Mobile home #5 has a new porch; #2 has a new ramp, #10 has a
new porch on the front and back of the mobile home.

Johnson, Ruth & Thompson, Kevin

66 N West Ave, Inverness, FI 34453
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: A large pile of debris, plastics, metal, tires, wood,
bricks, cans, crates, cardboard, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in
an unenclosed area.

Massagee, Steve

215 N Country Club Dr, Crystal River, FI 34429
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3102(A), Accessory Uses: Acces-
sory uses or structures may not be placed on residentially zoned property prior to the
establishment of the principal use.

Rowand, Tricia

10 Plaza St, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.

Scarfone, Carmine L.

6637 S Merleing Loop, Floral City, FI 34436
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3210; Except for those premises on
which agricultural activity is allowed, no outside cage, kennel, pen, or other structure
for the containment of animals shall be allowed in a residential zoning district except
asprovided in thissection. Section 3210[(A); h dreidentialland use dsticts,a inglefenceto cn-
tdn dogs cnd/cr cats and a sucture far cntcament not ex-
ceeding fifty square feet of floor or ground area shall be allowed. To Wit: Coop or
pen for hens.

Scarfone, Carmine L.

6637 S Merleing Loop, Floral City, FI 34436
Violation of Land Development Code Section 3730(A 8); The raising of those animals
described in subparagraph 1 above for noncommerical purposes on vacant prop-
erty that meets the minimum acreage requirements by land use, as set forth in this
section, may be allowable as a Conditional Use provided the following provisions
are met: a.) The owner of the properties primary residence is located within a 500
foot distance measured from the closest points between the two properties. To Wit:
Poultry limited to a maximum of 4 hens only. Conditional Use necessary to keep ani-
mals on vacant land.

Schonbrun Trustee, Harvey

2875 N Bucknell Ter, Hernando, FI 34442
Construction of a structure (Pool) without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County
Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall
erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any
building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or
place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory
covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore.

Schonbrun Trustee, Harvey

2875 N Bucknell Ter, Hernando, FI 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materids exceptjunk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Tires, TVs, metal, plastic debris, boxes, bins, household
items, and other miscellaneous trash and debris.

Shahid, Victor B. "REPEAT VIOLATION"

9410 N Milam Way, Citrus Springs, FI 34434
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or
place a mobile/manufactured home or floatng residential unit within the terri-
tory covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit:
Large pre fab wooden shed with no permits issued.

Soracchi, Kathy Ann

465 S Smith Ave, Inverness, FI 34453
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materids exceptjunk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: A tire, plastics, bucket, cups, garbage bags, and
other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.

Starling, Gina G.

9450 W Green Bay Ln, Crystal River, FI 34428
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pur-
suant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.

Starling, Gina G.

9450 W Green Bay Ln, Crystal River, FI 34428
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except
for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out
for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk
stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article Ill, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, broken household furniture, and
other miscellaneous trash and debris.

Stewart, Robert Gregory

5203 W Dunnellon Rd, Dunnellon, FI 34433
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except
for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out
for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




mit, a violation of Citrus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which
states
in pertinent part: No person shall erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, im-
prove, convert, or demolish any building or structure subject to this Code, including
a floating residential unit, or set or place a mobile/manufactured home or floating
residential unit within the territory covered by this article, without first having ob-
tained a permit therefore. To Wit: An addition of 3 windows and a sliding glass door
added to a pre fab shed permitted in 1994.
Wilson, Robert E. & Charlynne E.
819 S Little Leaf Pt, Homosassa, FI 34448
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except
for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out
for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: 20 30 bags of trash in and around shed, miscellane-
ous junk and debris on the porch, and a jungle gym.

NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Code
Compli-
ance Special Master with respect to any matter
considered at this public hearing, he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to
be
based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting
because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact
the County Administrator's Office, Citrus County Court House, 110
North Apopka
Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, phone:
(352) 341 6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hear-
ing or
speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352)
341 6580.
MICHELE LIEBERMAN, SPECIAL
MASTER
CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE
To be advertised one (1) time, Sunday, February 17, 2013.

322-0217 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Citrus County
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
RFP No. 018-13
MEDICAID NON-EMERGENCY MEDICAL TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to provide non-emergency transportation services for eligible Medicaid recipi-
ents. Such services are for Medicaid compensable medical appointments by utiliza-
tion of the following modes of transportation: multi-load vehicles, wheelchair vehi-
cle, stretcher vehicle, and public transportation and escort services.
In accordance with federal regulations (42CFR 431.53), Non-emergency medical
transportation (NEMT) services are defined as medically necessary transportation for
a recipient and a personal care attendant or escort, if required, who have no other
means of transportation available to any Medicaid compensable service to receive
treatment, medical evaluation, or therapy. NEMT services do not include ambulance
transportation.
Minimum Requirements For Submitting A Bid
The transportation operator shall provide verification of 2 years of experience in the
field and shall demonstrate compliance with the rules and regulations found in
Chapter 427 Florida Statutes, Rule 14-90 and Rule 41.2 of the Florida Administrative.
The transportation operator must demonstrate the ability to submit billing data in
electronic format as specified in the Medicaid contract.

SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before March 19, 2013 at 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for March 19, 2013 at 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 283, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at the bid opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing
or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us. At the Home Page, select "BIDS" on the
left hand side of the screen. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Joe Meek, Chairman
February 17,2013.


CLASSIFIED


Meeting~


325-0217 SUCRN
Citrus County School Board
PUBLIC NOTICE

The Citrus County School Board will hold an Administrative Hearing; 2:00 p.m. Regular
Meeting; 4:00 p.m. and a Public Hearing; 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 9, 2013 in the
Board Room of the District Services Center located at 1007 West Main Street, Inver-
ness, Florida.

The purpose of the Administrative Meeting is to act upon proposed student
expulsion(s). The Regular Meeting is to discuss and act upon other business that
needs to come before the Board. The Public Hearing is to approve the 2013-14 At-
tendance Boundary changes to address Class Size Requirements and Proper Facility
Utilization / Levels of Services, the revision of Policy 4.11, Student Progression Plan,
the revision of Policy 7.70, Purchasing and Bidding, the revision of Policy 7.65, Anti-
fraud, and the revision of Policy 4.10, The Curriculum.

If any person decides to appeal a decision made by the Board, with respect to any
matter considered at this meeting, he may need a record of the proceedings and
may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which rec-
ord should include testimony and evidence upon which his appeal is to be based.

Sandra Himmel
Sandra Himmel
Superintendent
Citrus County School Board
February 17,2013.


326-0217 SUCRN
Inv to Bid
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
Sealed bids for furnishing of all labor and materials and performing all work neces-
sary and incidental to Re-roofing Portions of Inverness Middle School will be received
by the Citrus County School Board prior to 2:30p.m. local time March 21, 2013, in the
Purchasing Department, Citrus County School Board, Building 200, 1007 West Main
Street, Inverness, Florida, 34450-4698. Immediately following all bids received will be
opened and read aloud in Building 200, Purchasing Department.
Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond in the amount of
not less than five percent (5%) of the maximum amount of the Bid as a guarantee
that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will within ten (10) calendar days after writ-
ten notice being given of bid acceptance, enter into a written Contract with the
Citrus County School Board, in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a
surety bond satisfactory to the Citrus County School Board equal to one hundred
percent (100%) of the Contract amount.
No Bidder may withdraw his/her Bid for a period of thirty (30) days after the date set
for the opening of the Bids.
All prime contractors must hold a Citrus County School Board Certificate of
Pre-qualification to bid on Citrus County School Board construction projects. Prime
contractors must be pre-qualified by the Citrus County School Board prior to submit-
ting a bid. Prime contractor's bids must be within the bid limits specified on their
pre-qualification certificate. For contractor pre-qualification information call the Cit-
rus County School Board Facilities and Construction Department at 352/726-1931,
ext. 2208.
Pre-bid Conference:
A. A mandatory pre-bid conference for Prime Contractors, and optional for
sub-contractors, will be held at Inverness Middle School, 1950 U.S. Highway 41
North, Inverness, FL 34450, Cafeteria.
B. Conference will occur March 7, 2013, 3:30 pm.
Bidders may obtain a maximum of two (2) sets of Contract Documents from Rogers
& Sark Consulting, Inc., 2021 Palm Lane, Orlando, FL 32803, (407) 228-4242 or (407)
797-4953 upon deposit of a check made payable to the Citrus County School Board
in the amount of $100.00 per set. A refund of this deposit will be made upon the re-
turn of these Documents in satisfactory condition within ten (10) days after the open-
ing of Bids.
The Citrus County School Board reserves the absolute right to award the Bid to the
lowest, responsive Bidder, to waive any informality or irregularity in any Bid, or to re-
ject any and all Bids received based solely on the Board's determination of the best
interests of the School District.

CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
INVERNESS, FLORIDA

BY: Sandra Himmel
Superintendent of Schools
February 17, 24 & March 3, 2013.

327-0217 SUCRN
Inv to Bid
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
Sealed bids for furnishing of all labor and materials and performing all work neces-
sary and incidental to Re-roofing Portions of Lecanto High School will be received by
the Citrus County School Board prior to 2:00p.m. local time March 21, 2013, in the
Purchasing Department, Citrus County School Board, Building 200, 1007 West Main
Street, Inverness, Florida, 34450-4698. Immediately following all bids received will be
opened and read aloud in Building 200, Purchasing Department.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 D7


Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond in the amount of
not less than five percent (5%) of the maximum amount of the Bid as a guarantee
that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will within ten (10) calendar days after writ-
ten notice being given of bid acceptance, enter into a written Contract with the
Citrus County School Board, in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a
surety bond satisfactory to the Citrus County School Board equal to one hundred
percent (100%) of the Contract amount.
No Bidder may withdraw his/her Bid for a period of thirty (30) days after the date set
for the opening of the Bids.
All prime contractors must hold a Citrus County School Board Certificate of
Pre-qualification to bid on Citrus County School Board construction projects. Prime
contractors must be pre-qualified by the Citrus County School Board prior to submit-
ting a bid. Prime contractor's bids must be within the bid limits specified on their
pre-qualification certificate. For contractor pre-qualification information call the Cit-
rus County School Board Facilities and Construction Department at 352/726-1931,
ext. 2208.
Pre-bid Conference:
A. A mandatory pre-bid conference for Pime Contractors, and optional for
sub-contractors, will be held at Lecanto High School, 3810 W. Educational Path,
Lecanto, FL 34461, Cafeteria.
B. Conference will occur March 7, 2013, 1:30 pm.
Bidders may obtain a maximum of two (2) sets of Contract Documents from Rogers
& Sark Consulting, Inc., 2021 Palm Lane, Orlando, FL 32803, (407) 228-4242 or (407)
797-4953 upon deposit of a check made payable to the Citrus County School Board
in the amount of $100.00 per set. A refund of this deposit will be made upon the re-
turn of these Documents in satisfactory condition within ten (10) days after the open-
ing of Bids.
The Citrus County School Board reserves the absolute right to award the Bid to the
lowest, responsive Bidder, to waive any informality or irregularity in any Bid, or to re-
ject any and all Bids received based solely on the Board's determination of the best
interests of the School District.

CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD

INVERNESS, FLORIDA

BY: Sandra Himmel
Superintendent of Schools
February 17, 24 & March 3, 2013.

328-0217 SUCRN
Inv to Bid
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
Sealed bids for furnishing of all labor and materials and performing all work neces-
sary and incidental to Rock Crusher Elementary School Kitchen
Renovation/Remodeling will be received by the Citrus County School Board prior to
2:00 p.m. local time March 14, 2013 in the Purchasing Department, Citrus County
School Board, Building 200, 1007 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida, 34450-4698. Im-
mediately following all bids received will be opened and read aloud in Building 200,
Purchasing Department.
Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond in the amount of
not less than five percent (5%) of the maximum amount of the Bid as a guarantee
that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will within ten (10) calendar days after writ-
ten notice being given of bid acceptance, enter into a written Contract with the
Citrus County School Board, in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a
surety bond satisfactory to the Citrus County School Board equal to one hundred
percent (100%) of the Contract amount.
No Bidder may withdraw his/her Bid for a period of thirty (30) days after the date set
for the opening of the Bids.
All prime contractors must hold a Citrus County School Board Certificate of
Pre-qualification to bid on Citrus County School Board construction projects. Prime
contractors must be pre-qualified by the Citrus County School Board prior to submitt-
ing a bid. Prime contractor's bids must be within the bid limits specified on their
pre-qualification certificate. For contractor pre-qualification information call the Cit-
rus County School Board Facilities and Construction Department at 352/726-1931,
ext. 2208.
Pre-bid Conference:

A. A mandatory pre-bid conference for Prime Contractors, and optional for
sub-contractors, will be held at Rock Crusher Elementary, 814 South Rock
Crusher Road, Homosassa, Florida 34448 in Room 211(Cafeteria).
B. Conference will occur February 27, 2013 at 10:00am.
Bidders may obtain a maximum of two (2) sets of Contract Documents from Donnelly
Architecture, Inc., 1483 West Pine Ridge Blvd, Beverly Hills, Florida, 352.249.1166 upon
deposit of a check made payable to the Citrus County School Board in the amount
of ($ 50.00) per set. A refund of this deposit will be made upon the return of these
Documents in satisfactory condition within ten (10) days after the opening of Bids.
Bidders may also obtain a set of Contract Documents directly from FGE Prints in Crys-
tal River, Florida.
The Citrus County School Board reserves the absolute right to award the Bid to the
lowest, responsive Bidder, to waive any informality or irregularity in any Bid, or to re-
ject any and all Bids received based solely on the Board's determination of the best
interests of the School District.
CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
INVERNESS, FLORIDA
BY: Sandra Himmel
Superintendent of Schools
February 17,2013.


Meeting
I Notices .1


Metn


I BidNotic


I Bi


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


$2,199 due at signing (after all offers). Includes security deposit. Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Mileage charge of $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $35,795.36.








w/ Base Preferred Equipment Group
Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For Qualified
Lessees


S W '1w r/MO.36 MONTH LEASE
$3,319 due at signing (after all offers). Includes security deposit. Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Mileage charge of $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $64,165.165.36.







w/ Luxury Collection Preferred Equipment Group


Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For ualified
Lessees


$2,739 due at signing (after all offers). Includes security deposit. Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Mileage charge of $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $43,405.36.








w/ Preferred Equipment Group
Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For Qualified
Lessees


/MO. 36 MONTH LEASE
$2,839 due at signing (after all offers). Includes security deposit. Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Mileage charge of $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $44,995.36,


S- CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED

2008 BUICK 2005 CHEVROLET 2008 CADILLAC
LUCERNE AVALANCHE SFRX
CXL SE Ve LT 4X4 LUXURY COLLECTION
BURGANDY, LEATHER, SUNROOF, LOCAL TRADE, SILVER, LEATHER SUNROOF, WHITE DIAMOND, NAVIGATION, SUNROOF, 3RD
#200536 EXTRA CLEAN, #C2M442B SEAT, #C2S241 B
s1r4,48o s14,9aa S1 988


) CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED

2008 CADILLAC 2008 CADILLAC 2007 PONTIAC
DTS DTS SOLSTICE
LUXURY COLLECTION LUXURY COLLECTION GXP CONVERTIBLE
GOLD MIST, LUXURY PACKAGE, WHITE DIAMOND, NAVIGATION, SUNROOF, DRIVER BLACK, LEATHER, LOCAL OWNER,
LOCAL ONE OWNER TRADE, #C3821 0OA AWARENESS PKG, #C3X176A EXTRA CLEAN, #C3M108A
Sp18,488 s$10, 908 '18,988


2007 CADILLAC 2007 FORD 2009 CADILLAC 2009 CADILLAC 2010 BUICK 2011 BUICK
STS F-150 DTS CTS LACROSSE LACROSSE CXS
CREW CAB XLT LUXURY COLLECTION LUXURY COLLECTION CXL
GOLD MIST, 31,530 MILES, LUXURY RED, 5.4L, V8, EXTRA CLEAN, GRAY, LUXURY PACKAGE, BLACK DIAMOND, SUNROOF, PERFORMANCE GOLD MIST, LEATHER, BLACK, LOW MILES, CHROME WHEELS,
PERFORMANCE PACKAGE, SUNROOF, #C383130 LOCAL TRADE, #C3X0281 40,175 MILES, #C382230A PACKAGE, ONE OWNER, #C2S245A LOCAL ONE OWNER TRADE, #C3S112A SUNROOF, LOADED, #C2S269G
s-ig G9B ssO, 90B l 90I088 S ,9B08 se1,9008 2, 900g


2010 CADILLAC
SRX
LUXURY COLLECTION
BLACK, LEATHER, SUNROOF,
#C3X028H
S7,4ss00


2000 CADILLAC
DEVILLE
LUXURY COLLECTION
WHITE, LEATHER TOP, EXTRA CLEAN, LOCAL
TRADE, #C3X179A
*S~sas


2005 CHEVROLET
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
BLACK, ONLY 22,000 MILES, ONE OWNER
TRADE WITH NAVIGATION, #55128528
p29,900


2011 FORD
EXPEDITION
LIMITED
WHITE, 11,000 MILES, ONE OWNER, NAVIGATION,
SUNROOF, REAR VIDEO, #C2M271A
*33,900


2011 CADILLAC
DTS
PREMIUM COLLECTION
VANILLA LATTE, 15,000 MILES, SUNROOF,
LOCAL ONE OWNER, #2V609A
s35,a9a


2010 CADILLAC
ESCALADE
LUXURY COLLECTION
WHITE DIAMOND, NAVIGATION, DVDS, SUNROOF,
LOCAL TRADE, #C3M127M
*3 7,.900


2009 FORD
GT 500
BLACK, 27,67 MILES, AWESOME CAR WITH ALL
THE POWER AND LUXURY, #C2S242A
30S,913


I I I I I


2002 CADILLAC
DEVILLE
LUXURY COLLECTION
WHITE DIAMOND, LEATHER, SUNROOF, HEATED/
MEMORY SEATS, ONLY 78K MILES, #C382100A
e6,9as


2000 TOYOTA
4-RUNNER
SR5
SILVER, LEATHER ROOF, LOCAL TRADE-IN,
#C3MO18B
SI a iB e


1999 FORD
RANGER
EXT CAB 4X4
BLACK, 6 CYL, AUTO TRANS, 4X4, XLT TRIM,
FLARESIDE BODY, #C3A200B
,90ass


2005 CADILLAC
DEVILLE
LUXURY COLLECTION
SILKING GREEN, LEATHER TOP ROOF, LOADED,
LOCAL TRADE, #C3S187B
*9, 700


2009 HYUNDAI
SONATA
GLS
BURGANDY, 4 CYL, GLS TRIM PKG, LOCAL
TRADE OUT OF THE VILLAGES, #C3S187G
1 0,4ass


4040 SW COLLEGE ROAD OCALA, FL 352-732-4700 |


D8 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013


/IMO. 36 MONTH LEASE






H Section E SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013


1OME RONT


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE G


- Sikorski's
P Attic
C M PAGE E4


UII I) 1E


BIEAT aBEs, E8
Wlii :h JU Tl!il
WEED CONTHOL, E5


SEE OMPLETE I




A JCPenney emerald green bedding
set. In a new partnership with
Pantone, JCPenney launches a
bedding and bath collection
that includes emerald
green, Pantone's Color
of the Year
for 2013. /
Associated Press


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E2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


.5.
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i II1II


* Island Kt./Lot of Cabs.
* Beautiful Master Bath
* 2nd Bath Leads to Lanai
*3/2/2 Split Plan


* Large Scr. Lanai
*2 Walk-Ins in MBR
* Double Pane Windows
* Close to Hiking Biking Trails


OPEN HOUSE TODAY 1-3PM
1035 S. BROOKFIELD DR.
PRETTY AS A PICTURE
* 3BD/2BA/2CG + POOL Remodeled Kitchen
* Granite Counters New Floonng
* Pool Has Pavers, Waterfall & Large Lanai
Dir Hwy 44 entrance to Crystal Glen (near Hwy 490) and follow
main road to Brookfield Dr on night to home on left
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


5278 W. YUMA LANE
PINE RIDGE
* 3BD/2BA/2CG 2,782 SF Living
S36'x 18' Lanai Gourmet Kitchen
* Luxurious Goldcrest Home Built in 2005
PETER & MARVIA KOROL r
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


S2/2/2 w/Forida Room Self-Cleaning Pool
* Nicely Decorated Split Floor Plan New Roof
* Eat-In Kitchen + Formal Dining Updated NC & Windows
*Tile & Laminate Plank Fooning Beautifully Landscaped
GEILA'gala' ENGLISH 352-249-6961
Email: g.english@remax.net
www.sellingcitruscountyhomes.com









HOME...GARAGE....SHOP....LAND...
1991 doublewide on an acre near town. 2/2 with
breakfast nook, dining area, a front screened
porch, a back enclosed Florida room with
handicap ramp, detached 2-car garage under
H/A with a huge detached workshop that is also
under H/A. Partially fenced.
LUCY BARNES (352) 634-2103
Email: lucybarnes@remax.net
Visual Tours: www.cryslalriverfl.com


NOT A DRIVE BY UPDATES GALORE!!!
* Large 2BR, 2BA, 2 Car Double Pane Windows
* Updated HVAC & Ductwork *Kit. wWood Cabinets
* Extra Insulation New Florida Room
S6" Gutters/Extenor Paint Electrical Panel/Garage Door

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellsfiorid.com


WMI*







REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
1 uyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 uyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


GREAT RIVERHAVEN BUY!
3/2/3 clean bright & cheery home with
breakfast bar & eating nook, glassed &
screened FLA room, split bedroom plan,
Built in 2002 and gently lived in. Drive by
5172 S. Running Brook Dr., Homosassa
or call for appointment.
JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email: remaxgal22@yahoo.com


6489 W. CANNONDALE DRIVE
MEADOWCREST
* Nice 2BR/2BA/2CG Home Lg. Great Room
* Eat-in-Kitchen Enclosed Lanai
* Nicely Landscaped Deep Lot Well Maintained

LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenplmer@remax.net


-_ ^ 2828
( Entr house ,2





JET SKI OFF YOUR BACKYARD!
Excellent location to wide open Inverness chain of lakes Jet
ski off your backyard with minutes to Big Lake Henderson.
Furnishings are negotiable. 2 bedroom 2 1/2 bath
waterfront maintenance-free unit. Two screened porches.
Community pool and short distance to Withlacoochee State
Bike Trail. Motivated seller looking for offers.
ENNIFER STOLTI (352) 637-6200
Email: JenniferSloltz@remax.net
www.CitrusCountyHomes.com


OPEN HOUSE TODAY 11:30-2PM
10919 W. FORT ISLAND TRAIL, CRYSTAL RIVER
Crystal River Waterfront Beauty! This is a beautiful
3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage, pool home on a
canal that is only a short distance to the Crystal River
Home built in 2003
Dir US 19 to Fort Island Trail approx 5 miles to home on the night
RON MCEVOY (352) 586-2663
www.ronmcevoy.remax.com
Certified Distressed Property Expert


A


_- J


2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage block
home, impeccably maintained, newer roof,
central heat/air, vinyl windows, paint,
fixtures, tile, sprinkler system, large den or
office, breakfast nook.


DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682
Email: dimfl@yahoo.com


U


.2421 N. Lecanio Hwy., Beverly Hills 527-7842 www.R~t4AXncom I 10 1 N. Florida Ave., Inverness 637-6200
835S ucns ldHrossa68700 wwHlrIns aIfl cm54N w. 9 rsa Rvr7524


ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 I"- I


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Einil ellesullon lernnx nel -
www.o1ilidulislinglnlo.com









CENTRAL HEAT/AIR
* Nice Bright Colors Great Covered Patio
* Inside Laundry Nice High Elevation
* Privacy Fenced Yard Shed for Storage
*Close to Park Close to Rivers/Gulf
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
Etnuil elliesullon i lernx nel
ww w.nFlot nLis ling Inlo.com






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RealEstate DIGEST


RE/MAX gives
kudos to agent
Realtor Kim DeVane has
hit the $1
million mark
in sales vol-
ume already
for 2013. "'
The associ-
ates and
staff at
RE/MAX
Realty One Kim
are pleased DeVane
to recognize RE/MAX
Kim on this RealtOe.
significant
accomplishment so early in
the year.
Kim is a Realtor in the
Crystal River office of
RE/MAX and a consistent
multi-million dollar producer.
He's been an agent with
RE/MAX for six years and
was previously a successful
agent in California.
The brokers of RE/MAX
would like to congratulate Kim
on this tremendous milestone
and for his dedicated efforts in
accomplishing it.
Citrus
Hills
agents
hit new
heights
Karis
Geistfeld Karis
and Susan Geistfeld
Mas- Villages of
trangelo Citrus Hills.
have been
recognized as the top sales
agents for January 2013 from


the Villages
of Citrus
Hills.
Karis and
Susan con-
sistently
perform ata
very high
level. Susan
Their pro- Mastrangelo
fessional- Villages of
ism and Citrus Hills.
commitment
to each and every customer
are keys to their continued
success.
The welcome center for the
Villages of Citrus Hills is lo-
cated at 2400 N. Terra Vista
Boulevard in Citrus Hills.
More information is
available at www.CitrusHills
.com.

Holder signs on
with Prudential
Prudential Florida Show-
case Prop-
erties is
pleased to
announce
that Jodie
Holder has I /
joined their
Pine Ridge
office as a
Jodie
broker Holder
associate. Prudential
Jodie Florida.
comes to
the firm with many years of
real estate sales experience,
having practiced in Connecti-
cut and Illinois before relocat-
ing to Florida 10 years ago.
Jodie can be reached at
352-527-1820.


Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtor A, Realtor@
302-3179 5ooU RsE ale!
746-6700 287.9022
The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.


3826 N. Briarberry Pt. Villa $44,900
18 S.E. Jackson Tile Galore .$44,900
61 S. Tyler New Roof..............$47,900


Where do you get washing soda?


Sara Noel
FRUGAL
LIVING


Dear Sara: Where can
I find washing soda?
-Janette, Indiana
Dear Janette: Arm and
Hammer Super Washing
Soda can usually be found
in the laundry aisle of your
grocery store; if it isn't
there, ask the manager to
order it. You can check
hardware stores, discount
department stores, drug-
stores or health-food stores
as well. You can also check


armandhammer.com for the
closest retailer that sells it
or call Arm and Hammer's
customer service depart-
ment at 800-524-1328 to
order it directly
Dear Sara: Are there any
other uses for those packets
of ham glaze that come with
a spiral cut ham? Edie,
email
Dear Edie: You can use
the glaze on pork, beef,
seafood, chicken or vegeta-


bles. Many of the glaze pack-
ets contain sugar, cinnamon,
cloves, allspice, ginger and
cardamom. These ingredi-
ents would work well for
baked goods such as fruit
crisps, quick breads or rolls,
too.
Dear Sara: I'm always on
the go after school with my
kids. It's cheerleading, ball-
games, gymnastics, etc.

See FRUGAL/Page E12


Amanda & Ki Johnson Tom Ballour il Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BROKERASSOC. EALTOR GR REALTOR REALTOR-BROKER REALTOR







3946 N. PONY 6262 W SETTLER 3948 N. BUCKWHEAT 4710 W. MUSTANG 4704 W. RANGER
4/3.5/3 359171 $749,900 5/4/3 700993 $379,900 3/2/2 $187,500 3/2/3 359604 $249,900 359371 $249,900


10953 N. TARTAN 2047 W. PARAGON LN. 9328 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD.
4/2/2 355923 $106,900 3/2/2 358792 $149,900 3/2/1 356581 $69,900


-. .4.


45 MELBOURNE 101 S BARBOUR 16 S. ADAMS 2616 E. VENUS 6260 S. CANNA LILY 13290 S. OAKVIEW
354341 $84,900 2/2/2354334 $279,900 2/1 356532 $900 00 3/2 700201 $24,900 3/2 359137 $59,900 4/2358122 $109,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


SR


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 E3






E4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013




HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
.............................. .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information....................352-563-5966
News information........................ ................ 352-563-5660
................................. ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"
CHRIONICLE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Trying to live healthy?


There's an app for that


S is a community of young
S people across America,
J learning leadership, citi-
zenship and life skills. Healthy
living has been at the core of 4-
H and remains a foundation of I
our pledge. Although 4-H be-
lieves that healthy living habits
of young people begin in the -
context of their families and
communities, we strive to
equip youth with healthy living
knowledge and skills that will
prepare them physically, emo-
tionally and socially to meet
the challenges of the 21st Amy I
century YOI
Are you ready to make
healthier choices about eating
and moving? Whether you are
a youth or an adult, check out this new
tool that allows you to compare calories
you eat with the time it takes to burn them
off exercising: Eat-And-Move-O-Matic.
This app (a program or application) is de-
signed for both iPhone and iPad and was
developed by Learning Games Lab, New
Mexico State University.


The Eat-And-Move-O-Matic was devel-
oped to support Youth Voice: Youth
Choice, an exciting national program
from National 4-H Council and
the Wal-Mart Foundation,
which encourages young peo-
ple to develop and maintain
healthy, active lifestyles.
The free app helps you ex-
plore the balance between
S calories eaten in food and the
S calories you burn through dif-
ferent physical activity. Users
spin different wheels to com-
pare calories and the amount
'uncan of time it would take to burn off
JNG each in different exercises.
S Users can choose from a num-
ber of favorite foods, including
potato chips, cake, ice cream,
salad, apples, and chicken nuggets. The
number of calories for such a food is
listed as Calories IN. Select an activity
such as baseball, trampoline, or playing
video games, and app will automatically
calculate the time it would take to burn

See 4-H/Page E5


)
L


Inside...


r"^


Going green
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E5
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Painting looks to be illustration; sake cup collection


Dear John: The photo
below is of a water-
color that is signed
Hagenbaugh
1908. It appears
to be mounted to
a board and is
darker than
shown in this
copy It appears
to be a
watercolor.
The only refer-
ence I could find
was on the Inter- John S
net. They list two SIKOF
different artists,
William and AT
Hugh. The exam-
ple given for William does
not appear to match the
style of the one I have. They
do not give an example for
Hugh Hagenbaugh. Can you
offer any information on the


L


T


artist, its value, or addi-
tional links to research? Any
information would be ap-
preciated. I love
your show and
listen every
chance I get.
Thanks for any
help or informa-
tion. J.P,
S Internet
Dear J.E: The
artist William Ha-
genbaugh was
korski born in 1900, so
SKI'S we can eliminate
him since your
IC painting is signed
1908. The other
artist Hugh Hagenbaugh
was born in 1904 so he can
be eliminated as well. The
watercolor you own, depict-
ing a Viking in the fore-
ground and sailing ship in


the background, has the
look of an illustration, per-
haps for a book series. At
this point, the artist is not
relevant to potential dollar
value. I think the picture
would sell in the $100 to
$200 range based on subject
matter.
DearJohn: I am attaching
pictures of seven sake cups.
I received these cups as a
gift from my mother-in-law
in the latter 1960s or early
1970s. They are in a wooden
box with no information ex-
cept on the bottom of the
box: Written in pencil is "7
Happy Sake Cups." She pur-
chased them from a good
friend just to give them to
me, as I love Asian art. Her
friend told her they were
old.
None of the cups have any


marking, signature, etc.
Each is about 2 inches in di-
ameter and about 1 inch
high. The interesting thing
is that there is some symbol
in the bowl bottom of each
cup. I understand that it
could be seven happy gods.
The only woman cup has
what appears to be a man-
dolin in the bowl. Another
has what looks like a cloth
bag with a rope tie on it. The
others are hard to decipher,
but some look like body or-
gans. They appear to be clay
and the glaze in the bowls is
See ATTIC/Page E13
This watercolor painting of a
Viking has the look of an il-
lustration, perhaps from a
book series. It might sell for
between $100 to $200.
Special to the Chronicle







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


4-H
Continued from Page E4

the calories consumed
with the selected activity.
For example, if you were
to eat a snack of just one
scoop of ice cream, the
total calories that you
would take IN would be
137. Then you can com-
pare to the calories OUT,
or calories burned through
activity, and the time it
takes. There are many ac-
tivities to choose from. Jog-
ging would take 22
minutes to burn the 137
calories from the ice
cream you ate. Or perhaps
you were up for a game of
volleyball instead? It
would take 39 minutes to
burn off that dessert!
Then the app will give
you tips to make a health-
ier choice: "Try nonfat
frozen yogurt. You get the
calcium but not all the
calories."
Eat-and-Move-O-Matic
helps youth and adults un-
derstand more about the
foods they eat and the ef-
fects those foods have on
the body The goal of the
app is to encourage people
to make healthier lifestyle
choices. Big learning mo-
ment? You burn about the
same amount of calories
while watching TV as you
do while resting!
For information about


Jogging would
take 22
minutes to
burn the 137
calories from
the ice cream
you ate.
A game of
volleyball
would take 39
minutes to
burn off that
dessert!

how to start or join a club
in your area, please con-
tact your Citrus County Ex-
tension's 4-H Office by
calling 352527-5712, or
email 4-H Agen Amy Dun-
can at amyduncan
@bocc.citrus.fl.us.
Citrus County Extension
connects the public with
the University of
Florida/IFAS's knowledge,
research and resources to
address youth, family,
community and agricul-
tural needs. Programs and
activities offered by the
Extension Service are
available to all persons
without regard to race,
color, handicap, sex, reli-
gion or national origin.


Jackie Davis
,f American Realty & Investments
MEN 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
ERA (352) 634-2371 cell
REAL ESTA.T jackie@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS: bidavis.com
1 I NOr .i 1\' L BT O T


Basics of lawn weed control


an average year be-
fore Feb. 15, I
would normally broadcast
a pre-emergent herbicide
over the dormant Bahia
grass lawn around my
home. This winter has
been mild and seems to be
short. There is still a pos-
sibility of frost in Cold
Zones 8b and 9a locally
However, lawns have al-
ready begun to green up
and weed seeds are


sprouting. phosphate fer-
Pre-emer- tilizer in it and
gent weed con- only a little
trol is effective potash to carry
when the 0-0-8 the pre-emer-
Pre-M is ap- gent herbicide.
plied before The Pre-M
the soil temper- spreads to
ature warms up blanket the soil
in early Febru- Jane Weber and the myriad
ary A 50-pound of weed seeds
bag treats up to JANE'S lying there
5,000 square GARDEN waiting for
feet of turf. warming soil
There is no nitrogen or temperatures to germi-


nate. The sprouting weed
seeds take in the herbi-
cide, deform, abort and
die. They are not alive to
grow and produce a sec-
ond crop of seeds to infest
your lawn.
This year, some of the
seeds had already
sprouted before most gar-
deners got around to
broadcasting the pre-
emergent granules.

See JANE/Page E12


- U U U U


PINE RIDGE n ial CITRUS HILLS
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd. Pruden al 20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Frida Sh Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 ro ra owcase (352) 746-0744
Properties


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3
pP
Nev "<-:'
Listing iS

-ktvOie 1671 N Dimaggio Path
MLS 700934 $239,000
PRICED TO SELL! 3/2 Great location on
2nd fairway of Skyview Golf Course.
Directions: Rte 486 to Terra Vista Blvd.
thru gate to left at roundabout, quick
right on DiMaggio Path.
Sandra Olear 352-212-4058


7JCidg2 4964W Pine Ridge Blvd
MLS359650 $329,900
Former model home, 3/3/3 with pool.
Lovely!
Richard DeVita 352-601-8273


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3
L. %. :


fl~4'"t" 3378WNaegellaPI
MLS 359406 $94,900
Lovely 3/2/2 home in quiet area.
Priced to sell.
Directions: Rte 491 to Hampshire, right on
Elkcam, left on Naegelhato home on left.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


5585iW Pawnee Ur
MLS 358113 $299,900
Large family pool home, 1 acre, lovely
landscape. Must see!
Joy Holland 352-464-4952


NEW LISTING NEW LISTING





922 W Silver Meadow Loop g S 1566 E St Charles PI
MLS 700994 $225,000 V MLS 700884 $179,900
Maintenance free villa featuring 2bd/ designed for indoor/outdoor
2ba, office/den and heated pool. enjoyment & livability.
Steve Dobbyn 352-634-0499 JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


COMMERCIAL





-tilS$ 5414 N Lecanto Hwy
MLS358598 $239,000
Prime location in Beverly Hills on
CR 491 for your business.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213
PENDING


a 1312 W Sphere PI
MLS 357532 $229,900
4/2/2 pool home on a beautifully
elevated 1 acre.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213
PENDING


7 e 351 W Hillmoor Ln ft LO 335 N Kensington Ave 2284 N Hardee Pt 4182 N Lincoln Ave
MLS 357980 $137,500 MLS359132 $124,000 MLS700246 $84,900 7 t'"e MLS700099 $59,000
2/2/2 + workshop surrounded by 3/2/2 home on an acre, all you need + A Must See!! Lovely 2/2/1 patio villa, Pride of ownership shows-2/1/1 home.
Twisted Oaks Golf Course. new roof! nicelyfurnshed. Priced to sell.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926 Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774 Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213
S2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entitles. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Rnanclal company. Prudential,the j
Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entties, registered in manylurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 E5







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Common questions from beginning gardeners


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press

People new to gardening
ask the darndest ques-
tions: about how seeds
work, about growing the
perfect tomato, about wag-
ing war with insects (many
of them beneficial).
No question is a bad
question, though, since
good gardening requires a
never-ending supply of in-
formation. Beginners can
find it by talking with
neighborhood gardeners,
nurseries, extension
agents or by looking
online.


"I often get questions
dealing with garden prob-
lems like, 'I planted my
winter squash in the win-
ter so why didn't they
grow?"' said Rose Marie
Nichols McGee, owner of
Nichols Garden Nursery
in Albany, Ore. That one
developed into a long con-
versation about plant
hardiness.
Fertilizer is a topic that
intimidates many garden-
ers, McGee said.
"I usually tell them to
put in a cover crop. It adds
a great many nutrients

See Q&A/Page Ell


GREAT CITRUS HILLS AMENITIES! HEATED POOL HOME ON THE BOULEVARD!
S3/2 pool home on 1/2 acre lot 3+office/2/2 custom built home
* Side entry garage with sliding screen Laminate flooring in all main areas
* Tiled front gas fireplace in living room Wood cabinetry with roll out drawers
* Stainless appliances Corian countertops Dual pane windows AND sliders
* Whole house water filtration Gas fireplace in the family room
* NewAC/heat in 2011 2 customized walk-ins in Master
* Tile floors in all main living areas Concrete curbing on all flower beds
* Furnishings available separately Home warranty for the buyers
#353289 $215,000 #358618 $195,000
See.JIirual IIIurs..i. w.reIJ aIJ.I.I.Ie IIB.I..m


TO SETTLE ESTATE-FLORAL CITY, FL
Gorgeous oaks and backdrop on Lake Magnolia.
3BR/2BA DW on large lot. Central water.
$32,500 MLS#359133


BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Waterfront 6BR/3BA home on 2.63 acres.
Fireplace.
S180.000 MLS#700012


DEAN FOSDICK/Associated Press
*- *lhJ B A Blackmail buck looks up after feasting on grapevines in
4Jac e C s a backyard vineyard near Langley, Wash. The area is sur-
, American Realty & Investments rounded by a fence, but it was of little use this time be-
M 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL cause the property owner forgot to close one of the
ERA" (352) 634-2371 cell gates. Some of the most frequently asked questions from
F.s.. iT jackie@bjdavis.com people new to gardening concern wildlife.
For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS: bidavis.com


LOCATION, LOCATION
Zoned GNC
, WW. 7,000 Sq.ft.
!6. .68 Fenced acre
3 C/H/A zones 0 0 O
1] Parking spaces
*- Warehouse, showroom, office
1.5 baths
$275,000 MLS 701038


BRIGHT LIKE A NEWER PENNY
Built in 2007
3 bedroom, 2 bath
New Coritn counters
Formal dining room
New glass windows in FI room
Shedworkshop
SPool, on 1 an.23 acres
$169,900 MLS 359225
LOVE TO GARDEN?
3 Bedrooms, 2 baths
New kitchen with granite,
SSS appliances
Greenhouse
Koi pond
SPool, on an aocre.
$169,900 MLS 359381


SMiel "E AMERICAN
Lou Mieie Realtor MER REA TY [ INVESTMENTS
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU@ 4511 N.LemntoHwy.
Beverly His, FL 34465
Cell (352) 697.1685 o 52-46-36o


CALL Roy Bass TODAY 352)726-2471
Email: roybasstampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 302-6714


E6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


~Ehi1


I1


I HONESTY
I INTEGRITY
I MARKET
KNOWLEDGE
I QUICK SERVICE


I!

II


I BUYER
FOLLOW-UP
I BROAD EXPOSURE
MARKETING


At1 S


AMERICAN REA1m and SUNCOAST REALTY
4511 N. LECANTO HWY. 1206 S.E. HWY. 19 117 S. HWY. 41
BEVERLY HILLS,AMERICAN PLAZA CRYSTAL RIVER INVERNESS
352-746-3600 352-795-6811 352-726-5855


LOU
MIELE
2012
MILLION DOLLAR
PRODUCERS


ALAN
DEMICHAEL

0l
SUE
HARTMAN


JOANNA
MORRIS


BOBBI
DILEGO


JOHN
HOFFMEISTER


BETTY
POWELL


COLEEN FATONE-
ANDERSON


DEB
INFANTINE


DEANNA
RODRICK


DAWN
THEROUX


JEANNE
GASKILL


JIMMY
LEDSOME


GREG
RODRICK


n
KATHY
CANFIELD


SANDI
HART


JENNIFER
LEHMAN


SARAH
SPENCER


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 E7


Success in numbers!
TOP
COMPANY
PRODUCER
STEVE LATIFF
2012
MEGA-MILLION
DOLLAR PRODUCER
JACKIE DAVIS

2012 MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR PRODUCERS



KAREN AND HARRY ECK & THE HOME TEAM:
GARY BAXLEY KAREN STUKES JANICE AYERS, BILL MOORE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Pantone's Color of the Year for 2013
poses dilemmas for designers


KIM COOK
Associated Press
When Pantone LLC an-
nounced that emerald
green was its Color of the
Year for 2013, reaction
among designers and inte-
rior consultants was
mixed.
The company, which creates
and matches colors for the
home and fashion industries,
picks a top hue each year based
on current use and expected
continued popularity.


For New York color consult-
ant Debra Kling, emerald
green's boldness means it
should be used only as an ac-
cent. "Emerald might be one of
those polarizing colors like pur-
ple you either love it or hate
it, and certainly could get tired
of it fast," she says.
Other shelter style arbiters,
however, such as Elle Decor,
heralded the color by featuring
luxe goods in emerald green, in-
cluding fabrics from Scalaman-
dre, Schumacher and Phillip
Jeffries, and Baccarat water
glasses.
Greens have been
strong for a while
because of interest
in nature, Leatrice
.I See Page E10


A Greens Circle Ring
Ovo table lamp, a smart
contemporary emeralc
green accent from
Lamps Plus.





1H








Emerald picture
frames by Home-
Goods. Small ac-
cessories like
picture frames in-
Ov produce new colors
Sowithout a major
Commitment.
Associated Press
*'Associated Press


'\

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'-"'I


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E8 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


II
Relt Ledes


OPN OUE E. 1,1 P


Emerald l
glasses by
HomeGoods.
Baccarat offers
an emerald green
wine glass, but
these glasses
are considerably
less expensive.
Associated Press


ARBOR LAKES GATED 55+ COMMUNITY!
Offers private lake access, boat ramp and fishing
pier. Lots of upgrade to this lovely 3BR, 2BA pool
home with over 2,000 square feet of living
space. A great place to live with clubhouse,
tennis court not to mention a lake for fishing. You
can't find anything better! $189,900
Directions: Rt. 200 North, right into Arbor Lakes
Entrance, left on Cove Park Trail, right on E. Lake
Todd Dr to sign.

Lili Garcia 352-302-9129 E


REALTY GROUP


U


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista

(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
Rii I nFCKFR 2-.fi4-fi47 SIISAN Mill I FN 352-422-213. VICTORIA FRANKI IN 3.2-427-777


DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
Beautiful bright villa, 2 bedrooms, den (or 3rd bedroom), 2 baths, freshly painted new
carpet Open and spacious floor plan Located in the lovely Village of Brentwood
Kitchen contains plenty of cabinets, utility closet and a skylight Neutral tile
everywhere except the newly carpeted living room & bedrooms Top it off with a
screened lanai all nicely situated on a fully landscaped lot A great place for someone
who is looking to live an active and carefree life Minutes to golf course, pool sauna,
hot tub, exercise room at Brentwood recreation center MLS 700872......$139,000


DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2 CAR, SKWIEW VILLAS
Upscale, elegant, executive 2 bed plus den 2.5 bath home offers a split bedroom plan wih an
open foor design. Some of the many features are fully insulated sound-proof media room with
surround sound, projection and a wet bar plus refrigerator. Fabulous kitchen, breakfast room,
Formal dining room has is own wet bar/serving area. This home is just like a model, fully
upgraded wih custom wood cabinets, Coan countertops, lots of ceramic tile, French doors to
anai area. Den could possibly be a third bedroom. This home has an enormous kitchen, dining
room and great room for entertaining at is best. MLS 700904..........................$445,000


DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS Skyview Golf Course, 2 bedroom, 2 bath, plus den home in Terra Vista Maintenance-
Stunning pool home with a breathtaking view of the golf course Perfect for free living at its best Upgrades include Corian countertops, staggered cabinets, built-in
entertaining Upgraded landscaping Hardwood flooring throughout Crown molding, entertainment center, formal dining room plus breakfast nook, lanai with pavers Great
upgraded lighting fixtures and ceiling fans Outdoor kitchen and so much more view of the golf course If you are quality conscious with sophisticated tastes, please
Come see the quality that went into this home MLS700921 ..................$299,000 don't miss seeing this wonderful home MLS 700860...............................$254,900




F7II


TOWN HOME, 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, I CAR, BRENTHOOD TOWNHOMES 11 -F'--- --
DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, PLUS DEN, HILLSIDE VILLAS Ths 3 bedroom 2.5 bath 1 car garage townhome is located in the gated community of Brentwood DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, SOUTHGATE VILLAS BRENTWOOD TOWN HOME, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 1 CAR
This maintenance free Villa is located on one of the prettiest streets in the gated of Citrus Hlls. Downstairs has great room with giving and dining combo, half bath, kitchen with BRAND NEW NEVER LIVED IN -1 YEAR WARRANTY ON EVERYTHING This is maintenance-free, Florida living at its BEST! This 3 bedroom, 25 bath, 1-car
community of Terra Vista Immaculate 2 bedroom plus Den/Office, 2 bath detached wood cabinets and Corian counter tops. Breakfast nook. Large screen lanai. Upstairs has Master Absolutely beautiful 3/2/2 home in premier gated Terra Vista of Citrus Hills Family garage townhome is located in Brentwood of Citrus Hills Great room with living and
villa Home features large family room, open formal dining Open kitchen with bedroom with walk-n doset, dual vanity in master bath with spacious shower, office/den area, room with beautifully appointed large eat-in kitchen Master suite features two walk-in dining combo, eat in kitchen Spacious bedrooms upstairs, master suite with walk-in
breakfast bar and eat-in with golf course view Master has window with view of multi- guest bdrm has plenty of closet space, laundry room and full bath. This townhome is tasteful closets, double sink and huge walk-in tiled shower Neutral colors throughout, large closet Nice open floor plan, screened lanai, professionally decorated, furniture
level water garden waterfall and golf course MLS 700211 .................$229,000 decorated and is sure to make you feel right at home. MLS 700082..................... $115,000 lanai with pavers in a secluded backyard MLS 359385.......................$274,000 negotiable MLS 359587........................................... .................$129,900


Terrab Vista & Brentwood Rentals! Social-Membership included with allRentals


4 BED, 3.5 BATH, 2 CAR, LAKEVIEW VI
Idel with the best view in Terra Vista Extra large
se frontage Custom 4 bedroom 3 1/2 bath, tile thr


| |


P N


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 E9


``
f~- ~jiz
----,_II


~L


=I----~







E10 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013


GREEN
Continued from Page E8

Eiseman, executive direc-
tor of Pantone's research
arm known as the Pantone
Color Institute, has said.
She calls green "a color of
growth, renewal, healing,
unity and regeneration."
So can you decorate
with emerald green with-
out becoming over-
whelmed by it?
New York designer
Elaine Griffin thinks you
can, as long as you're
careful.
"There's no getting
around it, emerald is flat
out dramatic. Which
means it's best used in
small doses, as acces-


So can you decorate with emerald
green without becoming
overwhelmed by it? New York
designer Elaine Griffin thinks you
can, as long as you're careful.


series," she says.
For those liking the
color enough to consider
paint, Griffin has a sugges-
tion. "True emerald
should go in tiny spaces
like foyers or powder
rooms, and then dining
rooms, which always ben-
efit from a theatrical
touch. But it's too harsh a
color for rooms in which
you linger"
Consider malachite ac-
cessories. "Malachite is


emerald at its best, so take
your inspiration from
there. Malachite boxes,
printed fabrics like Tony
Duquette's for Jim Thomp-
son, bedecked plates and
table lamps are all fab,"
Griffin says.
Some colors pair well
with emerald, and can give
a visual pop to a room.
Griffin likes yellow and
brown, "like a sun-dappled
forest." As preppy go-
withs, try raspberry, pea-
cock, Prussian blue, pale
rhubarb and turquoise.
And Kling notes that
emerald pairs well with
other greens: "In contrast
to any other color family,
the human eye perceives
that no two greens clash.
This is because we're ac-
customed to seeing every
variant of green coexisting
harmoniously in nature."
Where shouldn't you use
the hue?
"Avoid upholstering a
long-term piece like a sofa
in emerald I promise
the visual thrill will be
gone in a matter of
months," Griffin says.
At Wayfair, you'll find


Joy Carpet's 3D graphic
Highrise rug in a great
emerald. Glass drawer
knobs and pulls might
be a fun way to intro-
duce this green, too.
(wwwwayfair com)
Launching in Febru-
ary, JC Penney's got a
bedding and bath col-
lection created in part-
nership with Pantone;
there are several
pieces in emerald,
trimmed with white or
cream. (www.jcp.com)
At Lamps Plus, find
Arteriors Home's
Roma emerald cased
glass and Greens Cir-
cle Rings Ovo table
lamps, as well as the
smart Kite pillow in an
emerald ikat print.
(www.lampsplus.com)
At Homegoods, there
are some striking emerald
wine glasses priced quite a
bit less than Baccarat, and
a good selection of emer-
ald throw pillows and pic-
ture frames as well.
(www.homegoods.com)
Emerald is considered
the stone of Venus, and
there may be a little luck
of the leprechaun at work
too more reasons to give
it a try
Arteriors Home's Roma lamp in
emerald green cased glass,
from Lamps Plus, a great addi-
tion that freshens up a spring
room.
Associated Press


rrrr vs
I I
L *. i1 % ( In \ I 1 I i ... .
HOMOSASSA 4 duplexes, side by side All garage home is in cul desac. Has pool &
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2004. Goodconditi.. 11 1 back .. ...... ....
own septc system. ,,I'" ..I, #359466 $104,900





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$198,500 MLS#700716
IIiYLK 0i I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JOANN MARTIN
Y< i PreferredS
REAL .ESTA TE

Broker Associate 352-270-3255






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LAND



LARGEST SELECTION OF
m 1


DEAN FOSDICK/Associated Press
A Halloween display at the Red Lion Inn, in Stockbridge, Mass. Parents new
to gardening often ask how they can get their children interested in the ac-
tivity. Industry reps usually suggest growing plants that have multiple uses,
flavors or fragrances, such as pumpkins, strawberries, sunflowers, radishes
and marigolds, along with others.


Q&A


Continued from Page E6


when you turn it over in the spring.
I'm also a great champion of using
seaweed," she said. "It's the least
likely (fertilizer) to burn plants."
McGee recommends against using
cattle manure to fertilize vegetable
gardens, citing its potential to be in-
fected with harmful strains of E. coli
bacteria.
"I fertilize organically," she said.
"Fertilizers are expensive but com-
posts are cheap."
Some other frequently asked gar-
dening questions:
How to begin?
"They usually start by saying. 'I've
got some lawn,"' said Roger Doiron,
founder and director of Kitchen
Gardeners International in Scarbor-
ough, Maine. "I generally tell them
to get started by using layers and lay-
ers of organic mulch. Smother it
with organic. That will give them a
good base and it's a good way to
start."
Where should I plant?
"The proximity to the kitchen
when they get started makes it eas-
ier to bring in fresh edibles, plus it
provides a strong incentive to make
gardening a daily habit," Doiron
said.
When to plant?
"Beginners know it's sometime in
the spring, but there's no good sense
about what that means," Doiron said.


"There's no single answer, either, so
I suggest they connect with other
gardeners in the area or go online."
What are some easy vegetables
to grow?
"Start small, with perhaps salad
greens and herbs," said Renee
Shepherd, president of Renee's Gar-
den Seeds in Felton, Calif. "Grow
mixed baby lettuce, chives, parsley
and dill. Then, as you learn more,
you can expand into other vegeta-
bles. Don't be afraid to experiment.
Even if everything doesn't work out,
you'll learn from your mistakes."
What can I plant that will inter-
est my kids?
"Anything that makes gardening
fun," Shepherd said. "Grow plants
with playful appeal and multiple
uses and flavor or fragrance." Fa-
vorites include radishes, pumpkins,
sunflowers, zinnias, Alpine straw-
berries and marigolds.
What's eating my plants?
"I had a woman call asking what
disease or insect could strike
overnight and completely destroy
her vegetable plants," said Donna
Coffin, an educator with University
of Maine Extension. "I asked what
the symptoms looked like and she
said the plants were gone. I asked if
she had deer or woodchucks in the
area and she said no. I suggested she
spread flour or cornmeal around the
edge of the garden to see what
comes in to eat the rest of her veg-
gies. When she called back, it was
evident she had deer, and we had a
discussion about control options."


1.6 acres on Lake Nina. 3600 E. Perry. The only address I updating done, some TLC needed, I have amazing potential. I
you need to know! #356550. $174,900 Tonya Koch #359017. 1181 N. Timucuan. $84,000 Debbie Tannery
352-613-6427 352-613-3983.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 Ell







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

Sometimes we're not home until 9 p.m. While I know
it's best to sit down and eat together every night, it's
not always possible. Do you have any suggestions for
some travel-friendly meals and snacks I can make, be-
sides sandwiches? TL., Kentucky
Dear TL.: We're an active family, too. I pack extra
snacks (fruit, popcorn, bagels, etc.) in my kids' school
lunches for them to eat after school and before head-
ing out the door to their activities. In your situation,
I'd pack a cooler, snack box/bin and/or a thermos. This
will take some extra preparation, but it opens up a
wide variety of foods for your family to eat. Most any
meal/snack is portable and can be kept hot or cold. I
would pack foods that are similar to what you'd pack
for lunches, picnics or potlucks. Some examples of
foods that can be kept hot in a thermos include pasta
dishes, meatballs, chicken nuggets, Sloppy Joe meat,
BBQ shredded beef, pork or chicken, soups, stews,
meat/poultry and potatoes or rice. Salads, cheeses, yo-
gurt, cottage cheese, hardboiled eggs, deli meats, etc.
can be kept cold in a cooler. As for snacks that don't
need to be kept hot or cold, tuna packs, rice cakes, ce-
real, trail mix, pretzels, raw or dried fruits and veg-
gies, applesauce, nuts and graham crackers are a few.
For more ideas that include healthy options, please
see my lunch list ideas at frugalvillage.com
/forums/food-kids/134225-mix-match-lunchbox-
ideas.html.
I'd also talk to other parents with kids in these ac-
tivities. I'm sure they will have an idea or two. Maybe
you can work out a plan where you group together and

See FRUGAL/Page E13

I1 0CitrusCounty


SOA HAE1 e OL e E


50 W. HANDING MOSS CT. Well maintained 3BR 2BA
home, featuring great room, formal dining rm, kitchen
with breakfast nook lanai with summer kitchen. A great
home for the value located on a cul-de-sac in the active
community of Oak Ridge. $139,900



185 W. HOLLYFERN PL Come see this spotless home!
2BR 1.5 BA with living rm, dinette area and family rm that
has been freshly painted. Stainless Steel appliances in
move-in condition. Easy to upkeep, can be a winter or full
time home. A great price for this lvel home. $75,000
Lili Garcia 352-302-9129 EW


JANE
Continued from Page E5

Spread it anyway to prevent the rest
of the weed seeds from emerging. I
have lush winter rye for a bright
green lawn during the five winter
months. The Pre-M will not harm
the ryegrass.
This warm winter and early
spring have already caused the tips
of the ryegrass to brown and start to
die.
Once the underlying turf grass
greens up, I can apply a blue bag of
Momemtum post-emergent herbi-
cide to kill the weeds that already
sprouted in my Bahia grass lawn
Momentum is for Bahia. It will kill
St Augustine grass. Always read the
labels and follow the directions of
any agricultural chemicals. Local
supply companies such as John
Deere Landscapes on State Road 44
west of Lecanto have well-trained,
professional experts on staff to an-
swer gardeners' questions. Volun-
teer Master Gardeners may be able
to help at the University of Florida
Cooperative Extension Service on
Sovereign Path in Lecanto. It is un-
likely a store clerk in a big box depot
will have the knowledge to help gar-
deners with chemical queries. It
takes years of experience and ongo-
ing education to keep up with the
lawn chemical rules, regulations
and new products. I prefer to ask the
pros.
St Augustine grass requires differ-
ent chemicals. Atrazine will kill
post-emergent weeds in St Augus-
tine turf. Get the necessary informa-
tion from a professional expert
rather than self-diagnosing and risk-
ing harm to your expensive lawn. All
lawns are high-maintenance areas
of the garden.
For less maintenance, reduce the
lawn area in size. Top dress with
ample organic fine mulch from the


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, 32Sleyas 26.266 2


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chef's kitchen w/double convection ovens, gas stove, island for prep. High ceilings
gas fireplaces in living & master suite. 2 screened porches, outdoor grill, beautiful
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Central Landfill. Spread no more
than an inch to amend the sandy
soil. The grass will grow through.
The fine mulch particles will trickle
down into the root zone to hold
moisture and provide nutrients nat-
urally to the lawn.
My practical lawn surrounding my
new home has been top dressed an-
nually since I bought it. It is a drive-
way, trailer and tractor parking
place, fire break and is wheelchair
accessible. Lawns add real estate
value if well-maintained and kept
well-tended.
MEN
When Helen Springer and Linda
Meyer of Pine Ridge visited my gar-
den, they described the evergreen
viburnum plants landscapers had
installed in their yards. What kind of
viburnum were they?
There are about 150 species, most
originally from Asia and a few from
other temperate northern
continents.
North America has some 15
species, five of which occur in
Florida. Three exotic Viburnum
species are readily available from
local growers. Only one Florida na-
tive, Walter's Viburnum, is tolerant
of local heat zone 10's torrid wet
summers.
Growers concentrate on easily
rooted cuttings that are fast growing
and can be pruned to form a dense
shrub within a year in a 6-inch con-
tainer. As soon as roots fill the pot,
plants are bumped up to 10-inch
pots and pruned again to promote
compactness and density. Growers
use deep well water, daily overhead
irrigation, man-made potting media,
root hormones and growth retar-
dants to force compactness; fungi-
cides, pesticides, fertilizers
manipulate commercial plants. The
business is labor-intensive and re-
quires long workdays from dawn to
dusk.
Sweet Viburnum, V odoratissi-
mum, is a fast growing Asian tree
originally ranging from the Hi-
malayas to the Philippines and
Japan. It can grow 20 feet tall with a
stout, low branching trunk. Thick,
low-luster leaves are 3 to 6 inches
long, arranged in opposite pairs
along the twigs. Sides of the leaves
are folded up along a slightly curved
midrib.
Dead leaves and stems, as well as
bumps in the leaves, indicate pest or
disease problems, often caused by
infected, dirty pruning tools. Sweet
Viburnum is the fastest to grow,


therefore cheap for landscapers to
buy
Four-inch diameter flower heads
of small, star-shaped white flowers
have a pleasant odor. Since the plant
is sheared several times a year, gar-
deners rarely allow flowers to form.
Fruit is a cluster of red berries that
ripen black. Remove overly long
shoots and nip off every tip in Janu-
ary or February to force the stem to
branch out at the leaf nodes. Sweet
Viburnum is a popular screening
and hedging plant along property
lines. It provides nest sites and cover
for birds and wildlife.
Mirror-leaf Viburnum, Vodoratis-
simum 'Awabuki,' is a selected culti-
var with large, round, high-gloss
leaves. It is uncommon, so not often
used as a hedge plant, but makes a
strikingly attractive specimen in a
shrub border or lawn tree ring.
"Awabuki" grows to 12 feet tall and
over 6 feet in diameter if not pruned.
Fragrant white flowers cluster in
large terminal panicles at the twig
ends. Bushescan be totally covered
in flower-heads. Prune immediately
after the flowers fade unless the
decorative fruit clusters are wanted.
Florida birds rarely eat exotic fruits.
Sandankwa Viburnum, V suspen-
sum, grows slowly, so is mostly used
as a foundation plant at least 4 to 5
feet from a building. It can grow 10
feet tall, but is usually pruned into a
small round shrub. Leaves are tex-
tured, opposite and dark green. The
clusters of fragrant white flowers
are pink-tinted.
Compact Viburmun, V tinus
"Spring Bouquet," is an upright
grower that can reach 8 to 10 feet.
Dense, dark green leaves are nar-
row, opposite and closely spaced
along the branches. Scented pink-
white blooms blossom in spring.
Slower-growing tinus responds well
to pruning and can be made into a
column in time.
Helen and Linda's hedge was
Sweet Viburnum. The foundation
plant was likely Sandankwa and the
pretty lawn specimen mirror-leaf.
Read about native viburnums next
week.
U
Jane Weberis a professional
gardener and consultant Semi-
retired, she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors are welcome
to her Dunnellon, Marion County
garden. For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385 @gmail.com.


E12 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

somewhat crazed. I have
searched the Internet end-
lessly and have not seen any-
thing even close to them. I am
hoping to get info on them, but
I am not looking for appraisal
value, although it would be in-
teresting. -J.K, Internet
Dear J.K: I was not able to
find any specific collector in-
terest in your set of sake cups.
They certainly have a fun deco-
rative look. Potential dollar
value is catch-as-catch-can.
Dear John: Thanks so much
for following up on the water-
color I asked you about, signed
only "Parkhurst," dated 1891.
You mentioned on today's show
that you had looked and found
several Parkhursts who would
fit the time period and wanted
a first name or initial. Sadly, I
cannot find one on the front or
on the back. You may recall
that the painting essentially
fell out of its frame, and I found
behind it a newspaper, The
World, dated July 27, 1891, and
full of lurid stories such as "Di-
amonds Were Trumps: Sybella
Jilted the poor but Honest Man


for the Rich Widower" and an-
other story, "His Wife Saw the
Fight: She Left Him, Uncon-
scious and Bleeding in the
Street"
As additional information,
this painting was found in a
closet of my mother's house on
Cape Cod, which we regretfully
recently sold following my par-
ent's passing and having had
the house for 44 years, since I
was six. -PC., Internet
Dear PC.: The photographs
are not very helpful. I was not
able to pin down any informa-
tion about the artist. There are
a few records of sales of land-
scape paintings, oil on canvas,
signed only Parkhurst that are
similar in style to your water-
color. So the end of the story is
left unsure. Without better pho-
tos, my guess is your watercolor
would likely sell in the $75 to
$150 range.


John Sikorski has been a pro-
fessional in the antiques busi-
ness for 30 years. He hosts a
call-in radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to 1 p.m.
Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, PO. Box2513, Ocala, FL
34478 or asksikorski@aol. com.


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E12

provide meals and snacks on
specific assigned days/weeks to
make things easier for all of you.
Dear Sara: My hubby's turkey
is still pretty undercooked. I did-
n't realize this until I started to
carve it. It went from the oven to
the fridge last night. What can I
do with it? Please tell me I can
cook it somehow. Nada,
Canada
Dear Nada: Do not continue to
fully cook it after refrigerating it
Meat and poultry should never be
partially cooked and then cooked
fully later because of bacteria.
You can only continue to fully
cook it if you checked it straight
from the oven and then immedi-
ately continued to cook it In the


future, use a meat thermometer
NOE
Heating citrus such as lemons
and limes in your microwave for
20 seconds will help you get
more juice when squeezing
them. Using a reamer can help
get more juice, too.
The first reader shares how
she squeezes limes:
Clean tough burnt-on stains off
stainless cookware: Here's a
technique for when soaking and
scraping doesn't work! Put a
mixture of water and lots ofAjax
or Comet cleanser (I use a
cleanser with bleach) in the pan
and boil for a while, making sure
the pan doesn't run dry (turn on
the vent fan, because you don't
want to be breathing this). Let it
cool, then wash as usual. You'll
have a sparkling clean pan. -
C.L., Mississippi
Old turtlenecks: You can cut


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 E13

off the collar and use it as a head-
band. No need to sew -just fold
under the side you cut from the
shirt You can attach a silk or fab-
ric flower to it for an added dec-
oration. -Linda, New York
Nail decals or stickers: Nail
decals and stickers can be used
to accessorize most anything.
I've seen them on glasses and
sunglasses, adding personaliza-
tion and some flair Gina, New
York


Sara Noel is the owner of Fru-
gal Village (wwwfrugalvillage
.com), a website that offers
practical, money-savingstrate-
gies for everyday living. To send
tips, comments or questions,
write to Sara Noel, c/o Univer-
sal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St.,
Kansas City MO 64106, or email
sara @frugalvillage. com.


.- 000BOSH


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com


NATURE LOVERS
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very
I .. II I m'
1 .,I..I h.. I ,.Ih ,, I *h ,,
al, i ,,, ,h ,. ,I I II. I .... it
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Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home on a I acre t
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MLS #358397 $169,000 must see! $499,000


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Villages of Citrus Hills, well known for
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BEST KEPT SECRET '" '' ,'""""' '
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$218,000 the garage door were replacedin 2012.


CLASSIC AND LIVING ON THE WATER! 4590 WORLDWIDE DR., INVERNESS
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E14 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013



^^^^Chronicle ^


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classified

In Print

and

Online

All

The Time


30ft 5th Wheel
w/slideout on private
prop. $350 inc. all
electric, call for details
352-228-4303 or
928-379-1945
HERNANDO
211%, Furn. Lrg. Fm &
Laun. Rm, Cprt, prvt rd.
50+ Area, $650/m. F/L
(352) 746-0850
HERNANDO
2/2 $450. mo. 1st last
+dep 352-201-2428
Hernando/41 N
1/1SWMH, remodel
1/2acre, fencd, porch,
paved rd 12x20 wkshp,
$350 m. (352)795-7813
HOMOSASSA
2BR/2 BA, No Pets
$500 (352) 628-5696


-I.

must sell!
2006 FLEETWOOD
ENTERTAINER. 32X66.
OWNER MUST SELL!
CALL (352) 795-1272


43,900. 3/2,Dblewide.
Delivered & set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr, only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P& W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807



THIS OUT!
2br 2ba Single Wide
12years YOUNG
14X66. Trade in.
WILL GO FAST!
$14,900 YOUR BABY
$19,900 Incls Delv,
Set, New A/C, skirt &
steps, Must See!
NO HIDDEN FEES.
CALL (352) 795-1272


BIG
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Hnder $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183


HERNANDO
$$ Private Owner $$
Financing Available
New & Used
Manufactured Homes
Call 1-727-967-4230

Homosassa
Dbl. Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$69,900 (352) 621-0192

INVERNESS
55+ Park 14x 58,

appliances, shed,
scrn. porch, $8,500.
(352) 419-5133





NEW 2013

2br 2ba
Doublewide w/10 year
Warranty $39,900
Delivered & setup, alc,
skirt, steps.
Call(352) 795-1272


Bankruptcy Waterfront Condo Dev

Crystal River, FL

Tuesday, February 26 @ 11:00 AM ET


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* Bid in person or online (during live auction only)
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* Purchase one property or buy them all
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NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181
Palm Harbor Factory
liquidation sale
3 stock models must
go. $39k off select
2012 models
John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext 210

$$$$$$$$

WE WILL

BUY YOUR
MANUFACTURED
Home. from 1976-2013
CALL (352) 795-2377



2BR. 1% BA.on your
own 75x 100 lot.
no fees! new enclosed
sunroom, Ig laundry
room, furn, 2 storage
buildings, 5111 Castle
Lake Ave. S. of
Inverness on SR 41
$39,500 (352) 597-7353
2BRIIBA, MH &
Land Needs little Work
$17,500 9340 W.Tonto
Dr., Crystal River
Call 352-382-1544 or
813-789-7431
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 4br 2ba MH
READY TO MOVE IN!
4Owner Fin. Avail.+
CALL (352) 795-1272
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 602/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
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ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498
FLORAL CITY
Exceptionally Nice
3/2 on Beautiful 1'/4
AC, treed lot, garage,
shed, dock, Ideal for
Fishing/ Airboats
$95,900 716-523-8730
HERNANDO
2 MH's on 1 acre
Invest 59k, mo. rent
possible @1k, mls#
700425, Cridland RE
S.Smith 352-634-1048
HERNANDO/486, Lg.
Wkshop 2/1/den SW,
w/AC,1 +acre, $43,500,
Cridland Real Estate
JDesha(352)634-6340


HOME-ON-LAND
Only $59,900, 3/2
"like new" on % acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,350
dwon, $319.22/mo
P&I, W.A.C. Owner
can finance. Call
352-621-9182





CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
*Winter Specials *
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
2/2 New Model $59K
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

DUNNELLON
LAKE ROUSSEAU MH
Park. Lg. 1/1 w/sliderto
encl. screened porch,
outside shed, CHAfurn.
Nice yard, low lot rent.
Asking$11,900
(207) 347-0531
FLORAL CITY
DW, 2/2/2 carport
Screen room, shed,
all you need is a tooth-
brush to move in
$17,500. Lot Rent $183.
352-344-2420

HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $179/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
In Park, On Lake
Rousseau, furnished,
2BR, 1BA, CHA
tile & laminate floor-
ing 10 x 20 porch,
w/ vynil wind., open
deck + 2 outdr. stor-
age sheds. Low lot
rent $11,500.
(828) 260-3146 Cell
LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access, ramp and
shower $25,000.
352-212-6804
LECANTO 55+ PK
MUST SELL
3br/2ba. Furn, Cpt,
Shed, New Roof,
CHA, washer/dryer,
MAKE OFFER
931-210-0581


Melody Pk, INV
2/2cp, splitplan,
roofover, C/H/A,
woodsview, under $10k
Cridland RE, J.Desha
(352) 634-6340
Sandy Oak 55+ RV PK
14x60 split 2/2, new
heat/ac, remodeled,
furn. Ig send in FL Rm.
55 ft crpt w/laundry
room, 989-858-0879




HOMOSASSA
RENT-to-OWN
3br 2ba MH
Immediate Occpancy
Owner Financing Avail
CALL (352) 795-2377






RENTA MA MENT
SREALY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounityHomeRentals.corn
CITRUS SPRINGS/LECANTO
2330 W. Silver Ln (L)......... $525
2/1 Aptwith opploances
8162 N. Pickinz Way (S)... $850
New home, screened lanai
CRYSTAL RIVER
10350 Deepwoods Dr. (R)... $150
2/2/1 Quiet location, utll room and shed
11280 l shore Dr. (R)..... $1000
2/2 View of canal, furnished,
comm. pool, tennis courts
HOMOSASSA
41 Birchtree St. () ............ $800
2/2/2 MW nice location, spaaous rms, lan
8289W.Periwinkle Ln... ) .$850
3/2/2 Open floor plan, large yard
HERNANDO/INVERNESS
5164 N. Dewey Way (Ier)...... $75
3/ Country eting oony btchen
854 Pritchard Isl. (Inv.)...$800
2/2 Townhouse on waterront, comm. pool















Chassahowitzka
2/2, fenc. Yd/DW $500
AGENT (352) 382-1000


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL

Need a Good Tenant?


3/2/2 Available March. .$800
3/2/2 Available March..$850
2/3/2 Large ............$850
2/11/l ........................ $650


2/2 Townhome ...........$700
2/2/1 Den ...................$900

3/2/2.................. $800
2/1 .............................. $600
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs
Realtor-Associate
S352-726-9010




CRYSTAL RIVER
1Br 2BAComletelv
furn.. Ige scr porch, with
cable tv, W/D,all utilities.
$700 + sec 422-7717
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully furn. efficiency
w/ equipped kitchen.
All utilities, cable,
Internet, & cleaning
provided. $699/mo
352-586-1813
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025


I I M r

ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts, 2 BRI 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apart-
ments for Rent
352-465-2985


I--:~


Fax: 1352) 5il I Toll Free (888) 852-2340 1 Email: classillecistchronicleonlinecom I wetnite: wilivnitil.chronMeonlinexcim I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


L4F-1
.1^ -A


CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815

Government
Subsidized
Two Bedroom
Apartments
for Rent at the
Wildwood
Commons Apts.
in Wildwood,
Florida.

Must meet eligibility
requirements
Please call
352-748-0047 TTY
1-800-233-6694.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great
Loc., clean & roomy.
no pets $500.mo 1st. &
Last $300. Sec.
352-341-1847

Inverness
Homosassa
Government
Subsidized Apts
available.

Must meet eligibility
requirements. Equal
Housing
Opportunity.
Homossassa
(352) 628-6073
Inverness
(352) 726-4397
TTY-800-233-6694





LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/613-6000

SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant
Rd. to So. on Talla-
hasse Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719



S O USIN
OPPORTUNITY






CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret
HarbourApts. Newly
remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incl Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1'/2, Unfurn.$550+sec
Furn. $650 828 5th
Ave. NE, 727-455-
8998, 727-343-3965
CRYSTAL RIVER
LG 2/1 water, sewer,
garbage, w/d hkup,
lawn inc. $475 mo.
(352) 212-9205
or 352-212-7922




CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy 19 Downtown
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000 SF, exc. loc.
$795/mo 352-634-2528




CRYSTAL RIVER
Downtown Citrus Av.
1156 sf, off St. Parking
Charlotte G. RIty. Inv.
(352) 795-9123
CRYSTAL RIVER
Office & Warehouse
$300-$600, Plantation
Rentals 352-634-0129
LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza,
Office/Retail, CR 486,
900 sf. @ $700+ util. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801




CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furn. w member-
ship, 352-476-4242,
352-527-8002
HOMOSASSA
RIVERFRONT, 2/2/1,
Dock & Pool H20 Incl
$950. mo. + $950. sec.
No pets 407-415-0622
www.moverightin.com
INVERNESS
Nice Waterfront, 2 story
Condo 2/2%.Great loc.
First, last, Sec $675 mo.
(352) 302-4546
INVERNESS
Whispering Pines Villa
3/2/2 w/ enclosed patio,
$850 F/US, BK/CK req
321-303-0346




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, $615, month
Charlotte G. RIty. Inv.
(352) 795-9123




HERNANDO

Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
HERNANDO
Lovely Lakeview, Furn.
Cottages 1/1, All Util.
Incl.d, 386-208-2495




INVERNESS
3 bedroom. 3 bath. Log
home. Double lot on ca-
nal. Huge garage. $900
a mo. rent. $750 sec.
(352)476-2282


onuce








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, Fl. rm., CHA, $510
35 Golden St 464-2701
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, FI. Rm., CHA,
$525. mo. +$300 Sec.
352-422-0139
BEVERLY HILLS
21111 w/enc. FL room
**inside like new!**
$575352-464-1950
BEVERLY HILLS
870 Beakrush Lane
2br 1% ba, 1 car gar.
enclosed screen porch,
$600 mo. leased dep.
no pets. 352-586-3072
BEVERLY HILLS
Lg 2/2/2, CH/A, FL Rm,
fncd yrd, W/D, No Pets
$675. mo. + sec.,
352-726-2280
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 $850. Month
352-897-4447,
352-697-1384
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
Water Incl. CHA $496.
220-2447 or 212-2051

DUNNELLON
Rainbow Springs
Rent/Rent To own
Georgous, 2/2/2
Country Club Home
Fireplace, D Washer
Carpeted, lanai,
spotless 1/2 acre
quiet. Special $799.
352-527-0493

Hernando
Rentals
from $425.00 I( MO.
Call A.W.
'Skip' Craven
352-464-1515

HOMASASSA SMW
3/2/3, Ig. pool, dbl. lot
$1,250.mo. incld. lawn
maint. (773) 320-1894
HOMOSASSA
2/1 Like new. Perfect!
(352) 503-3554
HOMOSASSA
312, new carpet, appls.
Lg wooden deck,
nice area. off Grover
Cleveland $800.(352)
447-0977/302-3819
Homosassa
Springs 312 c/h/a
$795/mo, + 850 sec.
(352) 628-3696
INVERNESS
3/2 Brand New,
Granite tops, marble
firs, SS Ap $895
(352) 634-3897
INVERNESS
Country Living on
Large 12 acre lot. 3 bd.,
2 ba. home. Garden
and fenced areas. Well
& septic, so no water
bill! $595. 352-476-4964
Sugarmill Woods
2/2/2, 2 MBdrms
$850. 352-302-4057





HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225


INVERNESS
Rm. for Rent, furn.
share large DW incl'd
Util $350 + $100 sec.
352-726-0652



CRYSTAL RIVER
Office & Warehouse
$300-$600, Plantation
Rentals 352-634-0129




20 DOCKABLE
ACRES: St. Lucie
Waterway. $189,500.
45mins boat Atlantic;
5mins boat Lake
Okeechobee.
Beautiful land,
abundant wildlife.
Gated/Privacy.
888-716-2259 Gulf
Atlantic Land, Broker.

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

WRf
REALTY ONE


Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Developed site with
gazebo & storage bldg,
reduced to $49,500.
Separate storage
lot available. (RV sold).
For info and pictures
Click on
detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441
Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com
TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $58,500. Call
352-638-0905


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classified!


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.





Sun Feb 17th, 1p-4p
2764 N Canterbury
Lake Dr.
Well maintained and
updated home in com-
munity with amenities.
From HWY 486 take
Canterbury Lake Dr &
follow to hse on left

Call Myriam Reulen
Weston Properties,
LLC
352-613-2644


HERNANDO
Building Off Hwy 200,
$800.mo 352-201-2428






Quiet Country Setting
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area
only 20 Min. to Ocala
$129,900 Call
352-302-6784
for appt.





Furnished
Pool Home 3/2/1
Fab.$139.9K
www.coolproperties
.net/florida
PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything! 4/3 %
w/7 car
garage/workshop &
in-law suite on 5.83 ac-
res.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164




2/2/2, REMODELED
NEW: Roof, AC, Kit,
Baths, Windows, Firs,
317 S Harrison.
Reduced $72,900.
Call 352-527-1239
HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2/1/1 needs paint &
cosmetics $23k
"cash only **
352-503-3245



I ;
a.





Brentwood Villa
212/2 cul-de-sac
Completely updated!
1816 W. Jena Ct
OPEN SUN 12-3PM
$96,900
PRICED TO SELL!
FSBO 610-248-2090

Custom Home,
3 bedroom, 21z bath,
w/Master w/DBL
walk-ins + bath +
den/off. 2+ car garage.
1 Acre. MUST SEE!
$249,900.
352-860-0444


OPEN HOUSE
Saturday & Sunday
12 Noon 3PM
3/21/3, Owner
399 E. Keller Court
Citrus Hills




ARBOR LAKES
Fantastic Dream
Home In Active Senior
Community $169,900
2,100 sf, 3BR/2BA/2GA
Split Floor Plan w/Pool
Call (352) 726-6564



Al Move In Condition
2 Bedrm, 2 Full Baths
with convertible
bedroom den, mod-
ern open floor plan,
on small lake, FREE In-
home theater system
2 car garage $129,900
Realtor (941) 356-1456
FSBO 3/2/2 Scrn Porch,
metal roof, appls, CHA,
fans, verticals, shed,
fence, deck, spklrs, near
dog park. $120,000
(352) 586-0872
NICE HOUSE on
Nice Street $79,000
2/1/1, Attached
carport w/ 12 x 32
scr. por., built in '95
on 1/2 acre lot fenced
12 x14 matching out
building, New roof,
stucco paint, flooring,
upper line appl's,
irrigation & water
system.,
taxes & ins. $1,135 yr
606-425-7832
Unique stilt home in
rustic surroundings
off 581. Great loc to
town, shopping, &
hospital. 2brllba, wl
rap around porch.
Needs some TLC.
Sold as is. Make an
offer. Asking $33,900
(352) 419-6227




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE




3b/2ba den MH
on land off US 19
newer c/h/a carpet &
vinyl, furn, clean RV
Hkup. fence **39.900**
Cridland Real Estate
JDesha 352-634-6340


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classified!


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE




4/3/2, POOL HOME
3,000 sf, granite coun-
ters, SS appls., wood
firs.. Reduced $25,000
Asking $235,000


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.













Phyllis
Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503



Your World








CHiRO"NIdLE


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
gail@citrusrealtor
.com
www.citrusrealtor
.corn
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.

I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


I Citrus Countyl
I Homes I


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner

Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com



-- -




Employment
source is.






www chronicleonline corn


YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant




Brooksville Deeded
spacious, shaded cnr
lot, 1BR/1BA, Large FL
room, Large storage
shed & patio. 55+ RV
Park w/ heated pool,
and music activities,
$36,000 352-848-0448,
352- 428-0462 anytime
HOME FOR SALE
NORTON, VA
5Bd/21/Ba inc. 3 lots
70miles from Bristol
Racetrack $69,000
276-393-0446 OR
276-679-1331




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaureCoast
Properties.cor
"To view
great waterfront
properties"




1 ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact fee
credit, high and dry,
trees, $11,000 obo
(352) 795-3710
INVERNESS, FL
3 miles east of Inv;
5-20ac wooded/some
cleared, owner finance
available.Owner is
licensed Real Estate
Broker,Ed Messer.ed
.messer@yahoo.com



HOMOSASSA Wooded
Lot on Lee Woods Dr.,
has Wetlands, with
River access, but not
on river $6,000.
352-621-1664




ga S








How To
Make Your
Dining Room Set
Disappear...
Simply advertise in the
Classifieds and get results
qUicklyl


(352) 563-5966



www.chronicleonlne .comn


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013 E15








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


UPC'N LARK'fHUN I HUMfl "Yi

i. .cfi lc: m :Ilh: h l';: lh,;':; h, .'.,i. I L F s s.
i,,:,,ui ,I,:,,:1 ,,,,, i ,,,,,, ,,, ,:, 1, l O VuER
lllli'ii| lll:ii l ii hili lllli ': P Fi O ia nsiWi u
Mi = iii'I) ASKING $170,000 307 VEt
Call Jim Motion 3524222173 lotr out tout


I OPEN HOUSE TODAY: 12-3PM OPEN HOUSE TODAY: 12-3PM OPEN HOUSE TODAY: 12-3PM OPEN HOUSE TODAY: 12-3PM


LOVELY HOME FOR $85,000 ,i ,,. 1 ..1 ... ,I .... 515 W. Bancroll. Cilius Springs
M. 1,,, .... r 1.... 1 1,,,, ,...... r ii ,,,d ,,,, .57 .B lll. C lllU llo
Din S on OFC Rd litl on Sandpiptn L'L,, .I ... H I... .. .i I r.i... H ..-I(M iM.. ui I ii..i i .,i.l: i.j
lo honmt on L 'I al optn houst sign 1 .. 1 1. ....ih ..d.....i.. M '" $109,9 1
Call Donis Minei 352 422 4627 cell I.I ..6I!. 1 .1.: Si .r. ...i .... i ..., t i MI = :- :i: $109,900
l,, C ,11 l, C it .A ....r. .. ..i .. ; .l:N : Call Isaac Baj'lon 352.6972493


.,, H ..I I.
I MAINTENANCE FREE
.''-"-'''- i'''" n""''" I i 1'ii :'.,,' 3101 S. Franklin Trrii. Inveirness

ihll ,,I ... .. I,,,11 ... ....i h h ,h i'll, i, I F ihl. hiil'll ,, Kllll
rl. i ,,1 S129.900 = i-.l::li PRICED TO SELL 5139,900
n i. i. ... .....eese 3 2 302 7.99
S.-1h I .. ... I............ Call Oade Feeset 352I302699
C.,, II. .... .i ., di ",'!i ,"


OPEN HOUSE TODAY: 2:304PM OPEN HOUSE TODAY: 1-3PM


IPillilli" lil lm: l M i;v :llli ii' -;;1

$105,000
Ten' R. Blanco 352 419 9252









BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY SIDE ESTATES
iCF PA 11. vi iii. i:


N .i.i l..l i iiiil..i Al HT
Mi : =i ',i77ii $140,000
Call Case\ l(eatse 726 6668 for Perteiui


THIS EXCEPTIONAL HOME IS PRICED TO SELL AT S318 900
I 1.. I ,i,,i .,I ii ir it i .i l ,i ...


3254 E. Marcia SI. InveSrness ..
832 Lanark 'i 1106 E. Fox Run Terrace
S i BATH I I .A .... I. A .. H.. C.I .. .. ..6. 110 E I un T.erc
,IH l. .* ,:J ; ..l J l ,.. d. ll ,, ,:.1 i...) I_,:il ; il i '; M.qiI l I I' ( l l.
M i = C.111'i $90,000 I .... .. ... : a...: .. ....j ..1' Mt i = I ": $150,000
Host. Willaid Pickiel 201 9871 ASKING $199,900 Host. Willaid Pickiel 2019871
I:'I'it'. ciltuscounti sold. corn Call Nancl Jenks 352 400 8072 It It'II. citiuscountI'sold. corn

OPEN HOUOPEN HOU:E T2PM OPEN HOUSE TODAY: 14PM OPEN HOUSE TODAY: 1-3PM


2781 N. Churchill Dr.
i ANTI lFi- l ',' iAi., I TL i
_'* _"UA (., i'.,
Ml :, = /:iii::.. $88,900
Host. Jeanne Pickiel
I'1'1I'. citiuscoutII sold. corn


.33 Pl .n l .. C:o0i :o,,
A WEALTH OF LUXURY
iri,,. ,, ,1 -, r iiii ir j HI !iii i-riiirr 40 Robinhood Road. Inverness
,,, ,,, i,,, ,, ,,, ....I, ..........., R ED U C ED S 4 0 .0 0 0 D D D i ,.. :, I ,:,,,I

..., ,. .',,.,/ .. ,, ... ...1 ;i .,,,,, ,. .. i ,.. I nl .71 6 1
I N.. A.I. I I.. I.I. .I.. K V.... I. I ....1...i.. I K.1l HI . .
.... u.... ............... ......... .. M ai tha Sn 'dei cell 476 8727
OPEN HOUSE TODAY: 12-3PM OPEN HOUSE TODAY: 2:30-4PM
ii,, .

i-u


I?' N uOll IalllOl rdli
MAINTENANCE FREE LIVING 3015 S Franklin Ihiact

: 2ii, I, 1: S 27,:900 i., r... ,, : i i,,l $165,000r,,
D... ..:lion H E n n spt l COME SEE!!!! sa, l' 111 l .. l.. 111.11 .


til S $C 127.900 ij 1.. -:.ii A 'j i:. i. $165.000
Dutn:HII ll0 H Hi 1 I t o I Oilo n Gosll IslIaldll l I .. I .... I1 ...'. .~ .1 .1
Roadl lghl on Goll HdaliOl P lh l o l in on Ih ..u i ..i. .. I I ...
&iiln AI ,- 4ki-, l : 1,"I CilAlh i Pi-in. 72S6 668


1864 Monopoly Loop
I .ii'.bi u.up- l.i~-.. ii. II1 hili l Hill- .
b '. .. .i I .II I ,i ....
l5.-. = ?.'ilI. $135.000
Host Jeanne Pickiel
In'I'Ir citiIscontl sold corn


-~X H -*' -_- ^- *""-


GATED EQUESTRIAN COMMUNITY

S1 -I I I, ,I i d ,d I1. d
li iiiiliii- p i INi I' ih in hii I h i- I

$95,000
Call Jim lori ton at 352422 2173 lot
I out personal lout ol Emetald Hills


WIDE OPEN WATERFRONT
I: h '1, 1 ,-, ,h ,Ih ,I h.-6

,I 1 ,-... ,11-,' ii ,-,,,, II. d,, ,

I : =' .-.. ASKING $189,000
Pit lD 352? 22 7280
lisi\ ltrnug .11 II.Ii il .21p.Itda.', i]ni


AMAZING 2007 BUILT
WATERFRONT HOME!




CalMue Fese 35= 30i'i 699
Call Ouade Feese' 352.302.7699


1j mjJ


E16 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2013