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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 02-16-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03033

Full Text


Clean sweep: Lecanto tennis defeats CR /B1


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
62 Partly cloudy,
LOW turning windy.
29 PAGE A4


CITRU-S CO U N T Y





wcRONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


The Standardoft






2013 o Cadllcn


VOL. 118 ISSUE 193


Mother accused of torturing baby


Woman faces 8 counts ofaggravated child abuse


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
A Hernando woman is in
custody and facing charges
stemming from allegations
of starving and severely


abusing her infant daughter,
according to the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office.
Alyssia Skinner, 22, was
arrested Thursday on eight
counts of aggravated child
abuse and torture, and child


negligence with and without
bodily harm. No bond has
been allowed.
According to Skinner's ar-
rest affidavit, she confined
her 17-month-old baby to a
small, cluttered, filthy,


"dimly-lit room" in her mo-
bile home and kept the air
conditioner cranked up. She
also reportedly withheld food
from the child and went for
long periods without chang-
ing the baby, causing rashes
on the child's pelvic area and
causing the room to reek of
urine and feces.


The room was devoid of
toys and the radio was re-
portedly on non-stop.
When investigators finally
had the infant examined by
medical authorities after a
visit for a well-being check
on the home, the conclusion
See Page A2


No quick relief for


pains at the pump

Price ofgasoline may rise through April


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
There is no good news when it
comes to gas prices, but there are
some possible transportation
alternatives.
Public and private sector energy
experts paint a grim outlook for the
immediate future of pump prices.
The U.S. Energy Information Ad-
ministration estimates gasoline ex-
penditures in 2012 for the average
household reached $2,912, or just
less than 4 percent of income
before taxes.
The agency reported this was the
highest percentage of household
income spent on gasoline in nearly
three decades, with the exception
of 2008, when households spent a
similar amount.
"We expected prices to go up,"
said Gregg Laskoski, senior petro-
leum analyst with GasBuddycom.
"But not the rate of increase as ag-
gressive as it's been. Tampa went up
30 cents a gallon in the past month."
Citrus County has followed a
similar trend, tracking closer to the
Ocala area with slightly higher
prices.
Around Citrus County on Friday,
regular gas ranged from $3.75
to $3.83 a gallon, according to
GasBuddycom.
"It exceeds what we are seeing
nationwide," he said. "What we are
seeing here is a bit more severe."
Laskoski blames it on a variety of
factors, including a decline in Gulf
Coast refinery output and higher
crude oil prices. The former is an
annual effect as the industry gets
ready to start summer blend pro-
duction. He linked the latter to

Gasoline prices in Citrus County
and across the nation have risen
steadily during the past few weeks.
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle


CHEAPEST GAS FRIDAY
CRYSTAL RIVER: $3.77,
Chevron 639 N.E. U.S. 19,
near N.E. Third Avenue.
INVERNESS: $3.75,
Hess, 9515 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway at East Gospel Island
Road.
RaceTrac, 2120 E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway and Colonade
Street.
Murphy USA, 2419 E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, near South
Tighe Drive.
BP 1010 N. Florida Ave. at
Davidson Avenue.
-from GasBuddy.com

conditions in the Mideast and the
weak U.S. dollar
"I think we will continue to see
incremental prices increases
through April," he said. "We proj-
ect the national average will hit
$3.52. We probably will hit $3.80
and $3.95, but when it peaks in
April we could be above that."
Mark Jenkins, spokesman for
AAA, agreed.
"Gas prices are increasing at
about the same rate as last year
when it peaked in mid-April just
below $4."
He attributed rising prices to re-
finery issues, the price of crude oil
and economic optimism, which he
said spurs investment in oil as a
commodity, driving up the cost or
crude oil.
Both agreed there is no good
news when it comes to gas prices.
Public transit
"The rising cost of fuel and trans-
portation in general has made pub-
lic transportation a possible
See Page A2


Woman documents her bout with breast cancer in book


Encourages others

to pen their feelings
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS Most everyone at
one time experiences a "9/11 mo-
ment," an event that traumatically
and dramatically alters life and


leaves a person changed forever.
For Inverness winter resident
Teresa Werth, hers happened May 8,
2009.
"I went get my teeth cleaned at
9 a.m. ... and by 4 o'clock I knew I
had breast cancer," she said.
After her dental appointment, she
ran into her longtime radiologist who
said she had time that day for Werth
to stop by for her annual mammo-
gram for convenience sake.


That's when her life was irrevoca-
bly altered diagnosed with Stage
3, triple negative breast cancer, the
most aggressive form of breast can-
cer.
What followed was a radical mas-
tectomy and months of "scary, brutal
treatment that's not even guaranteed
to work," as she fought the "terrify-
ing bully" that is cancer, Werth said
from her winter home in the Royal
Oaks community of Inverness.


A retired communications profes-
sional, Werth documented her feel-
ings, her fears and frustrations,
encouragement received and help-
lessness and hopefulness experi-
enced throughout her treatment in
a book, "Pink-On-Pink: Writing My
Way Through Breast Cancer."
"Writing was my profession, so Teresa
I've always written," she said. "From Werth
motivational
See Page A2 speaker.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Special to the Chronicle
Teresa Werth wrote "Pink-On-Pink:
Writing My Way Through Breast
Cancer" to help her cope with the
disease. She encourages others to
put their feelings on paper.


CANCER
Continued from Page Al

the time I was diagnosed, I had to
put my feelings down on paper"
Also a motivational speaker, Werth
said when she talks to women with
breast cancer she encourages them
to also write down their feelings.
"I tell them, 'You don't write to be
published or even to share it. You
write to get it out of your heart and
your head.' I wanted my book to be
a template for other women this
could be a really healthy part of
their treatment," she said.
On Jan. 21, Werth marked her
third anniversary of finishing her
treatment, although she won't say
she's "cancer free." Instead, she
said her status is "NED" no evi-
dence of disease.
"For cancer survivors, the idea of
recurrence is never far away," she
said. "You never trust your body
again. After all, that day at the den-


tist I actually had stage III can-
cer, yet that day I felt like a million
bucks. I had absolutely no symp-
toms and the tumor couldn't be felt
by an exam. So, when the doctor
says they're going to monitor you by
symptoms and physical exams -
how can you trust that? I had no
symptoms. I felt great!"
Still, she said she's always been a
positive person and is determined
to find meaning in having cancer.
Her book, a CD of some of her writ-
ings put to music, her speaking, she
said, "This is my legacy"
She also said four years after being
diagnosed, she recently had an a-ha
moment while working with the Red
Cross as a disaster volunteer in New
York City after Hurricane Sandy
"I was with all these people
whose homes were destroyed, and
for the first time I felt there were
worse things than breast cancer,
which surprised me that I actually
felt that way I also saw that these
people wanted to be survivors. We
all want to be survivors."


My New Identity
They check my identity at least ten times
Before each infusion. Dryly, I spell my name,
Recite my birth date. Calmly I lay down my tanned left arm
Exposing the bright blue vein, wait for the little needle stick,
Welcome in the poison. Drip by drip by drip,
The price I pay for the rest of my life.
A battle I never wanted to fight,
An arsenal I never wanted to acquire,
A sisterhood to which I never wished to belong.
This bizarre experience has earned me a new identity:
Teresa 61 yrs Central NY
Married to a great guy
Dx 05/08/09
Mastectomy, right 06/04/09
Tumor 1.7 cm
9/49 nodes +
4A/C 4 Taxol 25 Rad
Putting on Martina McBride & combat boots.

* poem excerpted from "Pink-On-Pink: Writing My Way
Through Breast Cancer" by Teresa Schreiber Werth.


ABUSE
Continued from Page Al

was the child suffered
from chronic hypothermia
and starvation. The baby
also was diagnosed by doc-
tors as having about 1/2 to
3/4 of an inch of blood on
the surface of her brain,
which is generally indica-
tive of "shaken baby"
cases.
The baby's legs cannot
be straightened from a



GAS
Continued from PageAl

alternative," said Lon
Frye, operations supervi-
sor with Citrus County
Transit.
Citrus County Transit
has offered para-transit
service since 1978 and de-
mand for the service has
steadily increased each
year. Passengers pay $3 or
$5 per trip, depending on
program eligibility.
"With the support of our
Citrus County BOCC, Cit-
rus Transit has developed
a deviated fixed route sys-
tem," he said, referring to


curled, fetal position due
to having to gird against
the effects of the low tem-
peratures in the room to
preserve body heat.
According to the report,
even while sedated the
child's legs could not be
straightened because of
muscle and tendon
damage.
Doctors also added the
baby suffered from muscle
and brain atrophy, which
means they wasted away
because of food depriva-
tion for prolonged periods.


the Board of County Com-
missioners. It links Floral
City, Inverness and Her-
nando on the Inverness
route; Citrus Springs, Bev-
erly Hills and Lecanto on
the Beverly Hills route;
Crystal River and Lecanto
on the Crystal River route;
and Homosassa, Chassa-
howitzka and Lecanto on
the Homosassa route.
Transfers between these
routes are in Lecanto."
The system runs from
6 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday
through Friday No reser-
vations are necessary Frye
said the goal of the transit
system was to get people to
work, school, shopping
and medical appoint-


When investigators ar-
rived at Skinner's yard,
she initially denied being
the child's mother and
claimed the child was at a
relative's house, according
to the report.
Skinner, then, took off
into the house and locked
the door to deny entry to
law enforcement.
She reportedly was ob-
served entering a back
room and attempting to
clean and feed the baby
When investigators fi-
nally made entry, they


ments. The cost for the
fixed route is $2 per day
for unlimited trips.
"With the relatively
short history of the ex-
panded fixed-route sys-
tem, it is hard to predict
exact trends," Frye said.
"But present ridership
shows a steady increase
with February on track to


found the baby's room
much colder than the rest
of the home. The room was
found to be cluttered with
only a little bare space on
the carpet, which also dou-
bled as the baby's sleeping
area. The bare area
smelled strongly of urine
and was wet to the touch.
Soiled diapers were
strewn around the room.
Investigators said a
neighbor told them they
were unaware there was
an infant in the home be-
cause they had never


be our first 3,000-passen-
ger month."
For more information on
Citrus County Transit, in-
cluding times and sched-
ules, visit www.bocc.citrus.
fl.us or call at 352-527-7630.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. com.


seen her.
Skinner was arrested
and transported to the Cit-
rus County Detention Fa-
cility She reportedly told
investigators her attorney


advised her not to speak to
them.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


i Our Goal Is A


Healthier You

New Patients & Walk-Ins
Are Always Welcome
Humana, Freedom, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted


B.K. Patel, M.D.
Internal Medicine


H. Khan, M.D.
Board Certified Family Pactice


Geriatrics
Family & General Medicine
Internal Medicine
Intensive Care Hospital I
Long-Term Care (Nursing Homei
Active Staff at both Seven Rivers
& Citrus Memorial Hospitals




Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am
Beverly Hills Inverness Homosassa
3775 N. Lecanto Hwy. 308 S. Line Ave. 4363 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Beverly Hills Inverness Homosassa Springs
(352) 746-0600 (352) 344-5511 (352) 503-2011


JlA- Tickets available locally at
Fresh Start DONUTS

S Beverly Hills 527-1996



Only 2 shows remaining before we
say our final farewell to Citrus Cty.


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MAR 24 OCALA 3:00 & 6:00
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March 30 at Lakeland is our last Florida show
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A2 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013







Page A3 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013



TATE &


(


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONI


CLE


Fettes Python not only animal problem


resigns


as vet


officer

Chronicle

As of March 1, Chuck
Fettes will no longer be
the Citrus County veter-
ans service officer. He
submitted his letter of
resignation Thursday,
Feb. 14.
The retired U.S. Navy
master
chief
petty of-
ficer has
been
serving
m o r e
more
than
6,500
Chuck local vet-
Fettes erans as
their ad-
vocate with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs,
helping them obtain ben-
efits for medical treat-
ment, compensation for a
service-related injury or
condition and non-
service connected pen-
sion benefits for war-time
vets disabled by condi-
tions not service-related.
Fettes declined to
comment about the rea-
son for his resignation.
Assistant county admin-
istrator Cathy Pearson
said the county is sad to
see him go.
"I found during my as-
sociation with Chuck
that he was the finest
veterans service officer I
have had the pleasure of
being associated with,"
said John Stewart, vice
chairman of the Citrus
County Veterans Advi-
sory Board. "He helped
many of our veterans, in-
cluding me, and brought
a ton of money into our
county from recoveries
of compensation for our
troops. He will be
missed and the shoes
will be difficult to fill."

Around the
COUNTY

PDC meeting
slated Thursday
The Citrus County Plan-
ning and Development
Commission will meet at
9 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 21, in
Room 166 of the Lecanto
Government Building.
This board reviews de-
velopment applications and
makes recommendations to
the county commission on
changes to the Citrus
County Comprehensive
Plan and Land Develop-
ment Code. The PDC has
final action on Variance and
Conditional Use applica-
tions. The PDC also pro-
vides direction to staff
regarding land use amend-
ments as well as test
amendments on develop-
ment issues.
There will not be a PDC
meeting Thursday, March 7.
The next scheduled PDC
meeting will be March 21.
For information, call 352-
527-5239. To view the
agenda, visit www.bocc.
citrus.fl.us/commissioners/
advboards/pdc/pdc.htm
From staff reports


Correction

Due to an editor's error, a
photo caption on Page C3
of Friday's edition had the
incorrect name of a play.
"My Big Fat Italian Funeral"
is the play being shown at
the Spaghetti Warehouse in
Tampa.
The Chronicle regrets the
error.
Readers can alert The
Citrus County Chronicle to


any errors in news articles
by mailing newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or by
calling 352-563-5660.


Feral cats, Cuban

tree frog and tegu

lizards pose threat

Associated Press

KEY LARGO While hunters
stalked the elusive Burmese python
through Florida's Everglades over
the past month, state and federal
wildlife officials set traps for other
animals menacing native wildlife in
a fragile ecosystem.


The python gets most of the at-
tention in Florida's animal king-
dom and is accused of decimating
populations of native mammals in
the Everglades, but wildlife offi-
cials said other species including
feral cats, black-and-white tegu
lizards and Cuban tree frogs pose
equally serious threats.
And while a state-organized
Python Challenge was this year, a
Kitty Cat Challenge or Lizard
Chase is unlikely Killing or cap-
turing feral cats would be contro-
versial, and other species lack the
daring appeal of pythons.
"A'Cuban Tree Frog Challenge'


wouldn't get anyone excited. I'm
saying that in the context of un-
derstanding how humans respond
to things," said Frank Mazzotti, a
University of Florida professor of
wildlife ecology who is helping
with the python hunt
State wildlife officials said the
monthlong python hunt that
ended Sunday was a success in
raising awareness about invasive
species, even though the number
of snakes killed idled at 50 in the
hunt's last days. The final tally
will be announced at an awards
ceremony Saturday Cash prizes
will be awarded to the hunters


who bagged the longest python
and killed the most snakes.
No one knows for sure how many
pythons live in the Everglades.
Wildlife officials estimate about
10,000 to 100,000, but that's small
compared with the several million
feral and free-ranging cats believed
to be stalking through Florida.
Those cats kill several million
wild animals in Florida each year,
hunting even when they're regu-
larly fed, state officials say. At par-
ticular risk are small mammals
and migratory birds that pass
through the suburban areas
where cats roam.


One oar at a time


-ii, k -


EXPLORE SUMTER COUNTY/Special to the Chronicle
ABOVE: A group of paddlers waits to pass through the locking Wysong-
Coogler Dam on Thursday in Lake Panasoffkee. The group, part of Paddle
Florida's Wild, Wonderful Withlacoochee trip, began its five-day, 60-mile
journey Thursday in Lake Panasoffkee and headed to Potts Preserve in
Citrus County. The route continues to Levy County, where the Withla-
coochee River meets the Gulf of Mexico. RIGHT: Participants get their boats
in the water Thursday in Lake Panasoffkee. The journey took paddlers
through Citrus County later in the day.


Garbage haulers double as crime stoppers


Drivers keep

eyes open on

their routes

ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

It seems gigantic, gawky
and stinky. Just to maneu-
ver around it, one might
have to drive to the other
side of the narrow neigh-
borhood street.
But it could save your
life. Yes, a garbage truck
may be your outlet to 911.
In 2005, Citrus County
Sheriff's Office united
with ED.S. Disposal Inc. in
incorporating a Waste
Watch Program in Citrus
County. Through the na-
tional program, company


SAFETY TIPS FROM SHERIFF'S OFFICE
* Lock your doors at all times.
* Be aware. Look around and don't focus on one thing.
* Drive slowly through neighborhoods. Report
anything unusual.
* Visit sheriffcitrus.org for free crime mapping.


truck drivers support po-
lice, fire departments and
emergency services in pro-
tecting communities. They
report any suspicious ac-
tivity taking place on their
routes.
"We have been able to
work with the sheriff's of-
fice and put some benefits
to our community," said
William Ray, vice presi-
dent of ED.S. Disposal Inc.
"We are paying attention
to what is going on. There
could be a day where we


could report a burglary or
help save your life."
The sheriff's office pro-
vides annual training ses-
sions to companies
interested in becoming a
second pair of eyes to
eliminate crime. A repre-
sentative visits the busi-
ness and offers advice on
safety in the workforce,
key components related to
drug abuse, emergency re-
sponse and spotting un-
usual activity.
"Any organization that


wants to participate just
needs to give us a call,"
Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice Lt. Chris Evan said.
"ED.S. has been proactive.
They cover so many miles
and they know the signs
that we are looking for"
All ED.S employees un-
dergo background checks
and random drug screens
annually Recently, sanita-
tion workers Mark Dye
and Richard Campbell
found an elderly woman
who collapsed in her front
yard.
At first, it was unclear a
body was lying in the yard.
However, their natural in-
stincts alerted them some-
thing was wrong. After
backing their truck, they
discovered an elderly
woman unconscious.
Because of the program,
Dye and Campbell's train-


ing kicked in. They tried to
assist the woman until
emergency services
arrived.
As community members,
Ray explained drivers are
familiar with their routes
and are good candidates to
spot anything out of ordi-
nary, especially when they
are trained on what to look
for.
"We try to be a partner
with the community and
not just a solid-waste
hauler," Ray said. "The
garbage man knows more
about the community than
most people do, because
we are there several times
a week. We even know the
color of your drapes."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Eryn Worthington
at 352-563-5660, ext 1334,
or eworthington@
chronicleonline. com.


tts Preserve


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Lake
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Lake Panasoffkee
Par .asffkte
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
Stephen Giguere, 52, of
East Live Oak Lane, Invemess,a
t 4:42 p.m. Monday on misde-
meanor charges of retail petit
theft and resisting an officerwith-
out violence. Bond $750.
Coryon Nelson, 29, of
Northeast 3rd Avenue, Crystal
River, at 10:42 p.m. Monday on
a misdemeanor charge of less
than 20 grams of cannabis.
Bond $500.
Peggy Abney, 47, of
West Ramm Road, Claremore,
Okla., at 12:40 a.m. on an
Oklahoma warrant for a felony
charge of second-degree rob-
bery. No bond.
Nick Tate, 18, of South Jef-
ferson Street, Beverly Hills, at
10:08 a.m. Tuesday on misde-
meanor charges of possession of
less than 20 grams of cannabis
and possession of drug para-
phernalia. Bond $1,000.
Jeffrey Wagner, 25, of
West Eldridge Drive, Dunnel-
Ion, at 2:51 p.m. Tuesday on a
misdemeanor charge of tres-
passing. Bond $500.
Burglaries
A residential burglary was
reported at 3:15 p.m. Wednes-
day, Feb. 13, in the 3100 blockof
S. Michigan Blvd., Homosassa.
SA residential burglary was


reported at 10:54 a.m. Thurs-
day, Feb. 14, in the 7900 block
of S. Old Floral City Road,
Floral City.
A commercial burglary
was reported at 12:28 p.m.
Feb. 14 in the 6700 block of N.
Florida Ave., Hemando.
SA residential burglary was
reported at 2:11 p.m. Feb. 14 in
the 4400 block of E. Stage
Coach Trail, Floral City.
SA residential burglary was
reported at 6:09 p.m. Feb. 14 in
the 4900 block of S. Roebuck
Way, Homosassa.
Theft
SA grand theft was reported
at 1:11 p.m. Wednesday, Feb.
13, in the 50 block of Byrson-
ima Circle, Homosassa.
A petit theft was reported
at 3:06 p.m. Feb. 13 in the
2400 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Invemess.
SAfelony retail theft was re-
ported at 5:43 p.m. Feb. 13 in
the 2400 block of E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Inverness.
MA grand theft was reported
at 6 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 14, in
the 6600 block of W. Pelican
Lane, Homosassa.
Vandalism
A vandalism was reported
at 9:32 a.m. Wednesday, Feb.
13, in the area of N. Turkey
Oak Drive and N.E. Fifth Av-
enue, Crystal River.


State lobbyists earned




more than $120 million


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE
Florida lobbyists earned
more than $120 million
last year in an effort to
pass and defeat bills in the
Republican-controlled
Legislature, reports show.
An analysis of year-end
reports filed this week
showed some of the
biggest spenders on lobby-
ists were those with the
most to lose or gain in the
halls of the state Capitol.
The 2012 totals don't
match the amount spent
in 2011, the year Gov Rick
Scott took office and Re-
publicans assumed a
supermajority.
But the final total for
2012 which is close to
$124 million is still one
of the highest on record
since Florida started re-
quiring lobbyists to report
how much they get paid.
"The economy has sort
of leveled out," said Brian


velopment spent $965,000.
The company is an arm of
Genting, which wants to
build a large resort casino
on the shores of Biscayne
Bay in Miami. Lawmakers
in 2012 shot down a bill
that would have allowed
the casino to go forward.
Another company
caught up in last year's
gambling fight Interna-
tional Internet Technolo-
gies spent as much as
$740,000. The company
was fighting a proposal to
shut down storefront
sweepstakes operations
known as Internet cafes.
Other large spenders
include business lobbying
outfits such as Associated
Industries of Florida,
which reported spending
at least $600,000. Auto-
mated Healthcare Solu-
tions, a software company
engaged in a bruising fight
over the state's workers'
compensation laws, spent
at least $425,000.


Ballard, who runs one of
the most successful lobby-
ing firms in Tallahassee.
"The whole industry felt a
recovery the year before."
State law requires ran-
dom audits of what lobby-
ing firms report but
legislators have never car-
ried out the requirement
The figures reported by
lobbyists are not exact; in-
stead they report a range
of how much they are paid
by various corporations.
The $124 million total was
derived by taking the me-
dian amount, although
lobbyists must report


exact amounts if they are
paid $50,000 or more from
one company
But while the amounts
may not be exact, the re-
ports shed a light on how
much money is spent by
corporations and others in
an effort to either pass, or
kill, a long list of legislation.
Gambling interests,
telecommunications com-
panies and sugar growers
were among some of the
biggest spenders on
lobbyists.
AT&T spent more than
$1.35 million on lobbyists,
while Bayfront 2011 De-


Landscaping class
set Tuesday
The Citrus County Water
Resources Department will
offer a free class on "Florida-
Friendly Landscaping."
This workshop teaches de-
sign principles, material selec-
tion and establishment
techniques to reduce water
consumption while maintain-
ing a successful landscape.
The class is scheduled
from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday,
Feb. 19, in the Extension
Service classroom at 3650 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto.


Preregistration is required
by calling Gina Hamilton at
352-527-5707. For informa-
tion, call 352-527-5708.
Fort Island dock
being repaired
The floating dock at Fort Is-
land Gulf Beach will be closed
Tuesday, Feb. 19, and Wednes-
day, Feb. 20, for repairs. Crews
will replace floats and secure the
dock after damage because of
inclement weather.
For information, call Bob
Glancy, grounds maintenance
manager, at 352-527-5760.
-From staff reports


jegal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle





Fictitious Name Notices,,..............C.12




'Lien Notices.........................................C 12




yCForeclosure Sale/Action Notices.......C12


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
SPR .HI LO PR HI LO PR
0.10 NA NA NA L, J63 46 Irace


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
c
pc
r
c
r
pc
pc
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
c
r
pc
pc
pc
r
pc
pc
c


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northwest winds from 10 to 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters will be choppy. Cloudy skies
with a chance of rain today.


70 48 NA 70 48 NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Edclusvedally
forecast by:
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
...w, g ow,: High: 62 Low: 29
Partly cloudy; turning windy

SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 54 Low: 25
Mostly sunny but cold

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 66 Low: 45
Cold AM; milder afternoon

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 71/46
Record 87/21
Normal 73/45
Mean temp. 59
Departure from mean +0
PRECIPITATION*
Friday trace
Total for the month 0.90 in.
Total for the year 1.00 in.
Normal for the year 4.60 in.
*As of 7 pm at Inverness
UV INDEX: 7
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.00 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 4
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 450
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, Oak, Grasses
Today's count: 9.6/12
Sunday's count: 9.1
Monday's count: 8.7
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
2/16 SATURDAY 10:27 4:15 10:51 4:39
2/17 SUNDAY 11:16 5:04 11:40 5:28
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
O O ( SUNSET TONIGHT ............................ 6:21 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:07A.M.
SMOONRISE TODAY.........................10:55 A.M.
FEB. 17 FEB. 25 MARCH4 MARCH 11 MOONSET TODAY.................................NONE

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
informationon drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 9:38 a/5:20 a 9:17 p/4:55 p
Crystal River* 7:59 a/2:42 a 7:38 p/2:17 p
Withlacoochee* 5:46 a/12:30 a 5:25 p/12:05 p
Homosassa*** 8:48 a/4:19 a 8:27 p/3:54 p


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
10:39a/6:12 a 10:01 p/5:31 p
9:00 a/3:34 a 8:22 p/2:53 p
6:47 a/1:22 a 6:09 p/12:41 p
9:49 a/5:11 a 9:11 p/4:30 p


Gulf water
temperature


68
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.38 28.41 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.84 37.87 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 38.76 38.77 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.07 40.09 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


Hno~~s,.,


Friday Saturday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 48 34 c 31 15
Albuquerque 52 25 s 53 28
Asheville 58 26 c 34 20
Atlanta 57 37 pc 42 26
Atlantic City 55 27 r 38 23
Austin 64 32 s 64 36
Baltimore 59 29 r 41 23
Billings 40 23 .02 pc 53 29
Birmingham 63 33 pc 43 24
Boise 53 27 pc 51 30
Boston 47 30 rs 39 21
Buffalo 36 27 sn 25 10
Burlington, VT 44 34 c 26 7
Charleston, SC 64 35 r 56 30
Charleston, WV 40 32 .10 c 31 19
Charlotte 62 26 r 44 24
Chicago 33 23 pc 23 17
Cincinnati 43 26 pc 31 18
Cleveland 36 27 .01 sn 26 17
Columbia, SC 66 31 r 48 26
Columbus, OH 37 28 .02 pc 28 16
Concord, N.H. 48 15 c 34 17
Dallas 52 46 pc 55 38
Denver 38 16 pc 57 29
Des Moines 29 17 pc 31 21
Detroit 36 27 sn 24 14
EI Paso 56 37 s 60 32
Evansville, IN 43 31 pc 34 21
Harrisburg 51 30 .01 c 37 22
Hartford 48 32 sn 36 17
Houston 69 39 s 60 38
Indianapolis 39 27 pc 28 16
Jackson 62 33 pc 47 26
Las Vegas 67 43 s 65 44
Little Rock 54 44 .01 pc 44 29
Los Angeles 80 46 s 75 52
Louisville 46 36 pc 32 21
Memphis 55 42 pc 43 31
Milwaukee 30 18 .02 pc 19 12
Minneapolis 18 6 pc 18 10
Mobile 66 34 pc 54 28
Montgomery 66 33 pc 46 26
Nashville 52 38 pc 37 23
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


arms CAV L 'A /
^F"- "---" .^





'o*
--- i










City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 64 42 pc 54 37
Philadelphia 57 31 rs 39 23







Phoenix 77 48 s 75 49
Pittsburgh 39 32 sn 27 16
SATURDAY





Portland, ME 44 21 sn 37 18rday
Portland, Oreans 61 37 r 50 3
Providence,R.I. 48 25 rs 41 20



Raleigh 61 29 r 44 25
Rapid City 34 7 pc 53 34
Omaha 33 15 c 38 25



Rem Springs 79 55 s 61 28
Rochester, NY 39 31 sn 25 11
Sacramento 71 37 s 70 42



St. Louis 42 30 pc 34 22
St. Ste. Marie 21 11 sn 11 -10
Portiand, ME 44 21 sn 37 18



ProvidSalt Lake City 40 25 s 38 24
Raleigh 61 29 r 44 25
Rapid City 34 7 pc 53 34


San Antonio 71 40 s 64 36
Rochester, NY 39 31 sn 25 11
Sacramento 71 37 s 70 42
St. Louis 42 30 pc 34 22
St. Ste. Marie 21 11 sn 11 -10
San Antonio 71 40 s 64 36
San Diego 75 51 s 82 52
San Francisco 68 46 s 61 45
Savannah 53 37 r 55 28
Seattle 56 41 r 47 39
Spokane 50 26 rs 44 27
Syracuse 40 34 sn 26 10
Topeka 41 19 c 42 26
Washington 60 36 r 41 25
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 85 Camanllo, Calif. LOW-17 Fosston,
Minn.
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/72/s
Amsterdam 45/34/c
Athens 56/48/pc
Beijing 33/12/c
Berlin 35/30/c
Bermuda 68/66/sh
Cairo 67/48/s
Calgary 46/27/rs
Havana 80/60/sh
Hong Kong 68/51/sh
Jerusalem 54/43/pc


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


51/50/sh
46/43/c
55/35/pc
72/39/pc
25/10/pc
27/20/c
42/32/c
88/76/ts
50/40/s
75/66/sh
45/30/s
23/7/sf
32/26/pc


C I T R U S


For the RECORD


The economy has sort

of leveled out. The whole

industry felt a recovery the

year before.


Brian Ballard
runs Tallahassee lobbying firm.


Local BRIEFS


C UNTY l


LHRONICLL
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To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
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*Subscription price Includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details.
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affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
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Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
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residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
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Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com


Where to find us:
Meadowcrest
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S rJi,:,,'el Brnr,| HI -,,, 1624 N.
Dunker ield Meadowcrest
ADunker Cannondale Dr Blvd.
A Crystal River,
A '' Meadr.cre;1 FL 34429
N N'

I I Inverness
SC'unu office
TompkinsSt. | oqu3rr
S. 106 W. Main
St St.,
S 44 Inverness, FL
34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 63 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold ................................................ .......................... .... Editor, 564 -2 930
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trlsta Stokes.......................... ................................... Online M manager, 564-2946
Trlsta Stokes ................................... .............. Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ..................................................M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ....................... ................ Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content ................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff .................................................................................. ........................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
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POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


iii_


A4 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013


LOCAL/STATE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Benevolence through beer

Barpledges 100 percent ofprofits go to charity


Associated Press
HOUSTON Call it
benevolence through beer,
donating via daiquiri or
generosity by gin and
tonic.
A new Houston bar is of-
fering its customers not
just a relaxed atmosphere
with good drinks and food,
but a pledge that 100 per-
cent of its profits will be
donated to a different
local charity or social
cause each month.
And patrons can vote for
which charity benefits
from their Merlots and
martinis.
"Where else can you do
good with your drinking?"
said Tom Burgett, 45, as he
sat at the oval-shaped
counter at the center of the
bar with his wife, Kim, and
enjoyed a beer.
The Original OKRA
Charity Saloon is one of
several bars around the
country that are using the
business as a way to give
back to local communities
and also providing people
a creative method of being
philanthropic. There are
similar bars in Washing-
ton, D.C., and Austin and
another being planned in
Portland, Ore.
Houston bar and restau-
rant owner Bobby
Heugel's group, an Organ-
ized Kollaboration on
Restaurant Affairs or
OKRA, runs the charity sa-
loon. Heugel said the idea
was born of a need to high-
light the civic exchange
that occurs between
restaurants and bars and
the communities they op-
erate in.
"And so finding a way for
your establishment to be
part of the community
from which you profit from
I think is really important,"
Heugel said of the group,
which is made up of some
of the city's best-known es-
tablishments, including
Anvil Bar & Refuge, Un-
derbelly and Oxheart.
At the charity saloon -
located in a downtown
brick building that dates
back to the 1880s when-
ever customers order a


Associated Press
A patron drops a ticket into a voting box at the Original
OKRA Charity Saloon in Houston. The new downtown bar
is offering its customers a relaxed atmosphere with good
drinks and food and a pledge that 100 percent of its prof-
its after costs will be donated to a different local charity
or social cause each month. Patrons are given a ticket for


each purchase to vote with.

drink or food, they will get
one ticket for each item.
On each menu is a short
description of the four
charities being featured
that month, said Mike
Criss, the bar's general
manager. Customers vote
by dropping their tickets
into a row of boxes, one for
each charity.
Once the bar, which is
registered as a nonprofit,
pays its operating costs,
100 percent of the remain-
ing profits go to the win-
ning charity Heugel said
the ultimate goal is to do-
nate $10,000 per month.
As they stood at the bar's
counter underneath the
striking, curved wooden-
barrel vault ceiling, Mea-
gan and James Silk
reviewed the list of Janu-
ary's charities. They in-
cluded ones that combat
childhood obesity, provide
services to HIV and AIDS
patients, give furniture to
needy residents and res-
cue neglected and abused
dogs and cats.
With a laugh, Meagan
Silk told her husband
which charity they would
both support.
"I vote for one kind of
charity pretty much. We
are animal people," she
said. The Silks run a Hous-
ton restaurant.
Her choice, Corridor


Rescue, ended up being
the winning charity for
January and will get the
bar's profits for February
Anna Barbosa, Corridor
Rescue's fundraising di-
rector, said the donation
will allow the nonprofit to
support its spay-neuter
program and offer medical
care for more animals.
"It just means the world
to us to get this kind of
community support and
through the charity bar
we're so grateful because
we get more visibility," she
said.
Nick Vilelle, one of the
co-founders of "philan-
thropub" Cause in Wash-
ington, D.C., said showing
how and where the money
is spent is key for bars like
his to succeed.
"It's too easy for someone
to use cause marketing as a
gimmick and say some por-
tion of your proceeds goes
to help some certain
cause," he said of the bar,
which opened in late Octo-
ber "If we're not transpar-
ent about that, people can
obviously abuse that"
Like the Houston bar,
Cause lets customers
choose from four charities.
At the end of a quarter,
votes are tallied and each
charity gets a percentage
of the profits based on
those votes.


You're invited to our 2nd Annual L


C\


FOgit:


ii
10G


4o

S


All proceeds will benefit
Jessie's Place, where
abused children find justice.


Major
Sponsors:


S- -

CRYSTAL RIVER
M-A-L-L

S CITRUS COUNT
CHikrONIC
www.chronicleon


6:00om to 9:00om


S Sponsored by:
Crystal River Mall

Cash Bar Cocktail Attire
Enjoy a variety of delicious Rpofsnpclous ucivi
menu items from Citrus County bycalling-1M-ANY-IPS
restaurants. The restaurants will |
be judged by guest judges in
seven food categories. Proceeds .
help our local children that need |,
Jessie's Place. PROMO ITMS


kE
ine.com


(zip "h r a oBian
"7Op hcf /"a.4"Capital City



L competition, .
( l..v n l<)( i7


* FDS Disposal
SPublix Supermarkets
SCitrus Memorial Health System
SSheldon-Palmes Insurance
* West Central Solutions
* Hometown Values
* Citrus Networking Solutions Group
* Linda S. Lane State Farm Insurance
SArbor Trail Rehab
* Kinnard Chiropractic
* Suncoast Plumbing & Electric
* Park Avenue of Hair Design


SJo Anne R. Brayton, Interior Designer
SCitrus County Life Magazine
DeVane Electric
Dr. Redrick Medical Weight Loss
Lois Thomas
Mary Lou Rothenbohl
SPauline Thomson
SThe Boggus Family-Friends ofJessie's Place
SLeroy and Patricia Kanovsky
SMary Lee Johnson
SMary Pericht


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Re-
publicans have found a
boatload of reasons to try
to sink Chuck Hagel's
hopes of becoming
the next defense
secretary. But the
issue they used
this week to stall
his nomination -
the White House's
handling of last
September's
deadly Benghazi Ch
attack may H
seem entirely un- GOPt
related to Hagel's sta
qualifications be- nomi'
cause, well, it is.
Here are some ques-
tions and answers about
the connection between
President Barack
Obama's choice to lead
the Pentagon and the
campaign by Sen. John
McCain and others in the
Senate to press for more
answers on Benghazi:
Q: How did the Hagel
nomination become en-
tangled with Benghazi?
A: The short answer is
politics. Hagel had no role
in the crisis that took the
lives of four Americans,
including Ambassador
Chris Stevens. Neither
did the Pentagon, al-
though some have ques-
tioned why U.S. troops did
not reach Libya until well
after the crisis was over.
The answer from Defense
Secretary Leon Panetta is
the closest relevant U.S.
forces could not get there
before the killings; he has


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lU
:r
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n


said the Pentagon could
have acted sooner if it had
received intelligence
warnings in advance of
the attack.
Sen. Lindsey Graham,
the South Car-
S olina Republican
who has joined
McCain, R-Ariz., in
temporarily block-
ing the Hagel
Nomination, does
not claim a con-
nection between
ick the two issues. He
gel asserts Obama
ying to was inattentive
his when the Beng-
ation. hazi emergency
was unfolding, and that by
keeping a public focus on
this the Benghazi experi-
ence could be a teaching
tool for future presidents.
Graham, in other words, is
using Hagel as a political
wedge to highlight what he
sees as an exploitable
Obama failure.
Q: What remains to be
uncovered about the ad-
ministration's handling of
the Benghazi attack?
A In a nutshell, McCain,
Graham and other Repub-
licans said the White
House needs to explain
more fully why the four
Americans died and what
the president's role was in
coordinating a response
by the Pentagon and State
Department. The White
House said it has an-
swered all relevant ques-
tions. On Thursday, the
White House responded to
a Republican request that
it say whether Obama


spoke to anyone in the
Libyan government on the
day of the attack, Sept. 11,
to request assistance for
the trapped Americans.
The answer, which had
been stated previously,
was Obama called Libyan
President Mohamed Mag-
ariaf on the evening of
Sept. 12, and that then-
Secretary of State Hillary
Rodham Clinton phoned
Magariaf on Obama's be-
half on Sept 11.
Q: Are there more sub-
stantive reasons for Re-
publicans' opposition to
Hagel?
A Yes. They start with an
assertion Hagel is insuffi-
ciently supportive of Israel
and unreasonably sympa-
thetic to Iran. And Repub-
licans dislike Hagel's
association with an inter-
national movement called
Global Zero, which advo-
cates for sharp reductions
in the number of U.S. nu-
clear weapons and an
eventual elimination of
them worldwide. McCain
has hammered Hagel for
"a disqualifying lack of
professional judgment"
Q: Will Hagel ever be
confirmed?
A Unless new obstacles
emerge, it appears that
Hagel will win confirma-
tion when the Senate re-
turns from recess the week
of Feb. 25. McCain and oth-
ers who sought to prolong
the Senate debate this
week have said they will
be ready to vote to permit
an up-or-down vote when
the Senate reconvenes.


Cr cACIKEi"
PATIO CEILING



Mold Free Easy Clean NeverN


Primary Care Specialists






?ace a Pet4sot





* Lab Bone Density

* EKG Women's Heall

* X-Ray Minor Procedu

* Pulmonary Chelation

Function


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NATION


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013 AS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Charles
Brought, 85
CRYSTAL RIVER
Charles Brough, devel-
oper of social evolution
theory and author of "The
Last Civilization," died
Feb. 3, 2013. Brough was
born Aug. 9, 1927, and was
raised and lived most of
his life in the Los Angeles
area. During his long life,
Brough traveled to 35 na-
tions beginning in his
teens. He lived five years
in Asia, including Indone-
sia at the time of the riot-
ing and burning, leading to
the overthrow of the
Suharto regime. He was a
veteran of the Army, the
Maritime Service and the
Merchant Marine. His six
years of college and a busy
life of independent study,
focused on some 22 natu-
ral and social sciences, en-
abled him to as he put it,
"compile the first objec-
tive and non-theistic the-
ory of social evolution, the
only one accurate enough
to be used for specific and
accurate medium and long
range world social phe-
nomena forecasting." His
last of three books on the
subject of civilization was
published in 2010 and, so
far, has accurately pic-
tured what has and is
happening.
Brought's first marriage
was in Berlin, Germany, to
Marianne Peters. Their di-
vorce was 13 years later.
His second marriage was
to Joanne (Chaves)
Brough, then a prominent
Hollywood TV executive at
CBS and then Lorimar, a
marriage that lasted 37
years until her death in
2005.
Self-diagnosed as having
Asperger Syndrome,
Brough had more than 15
different short-term ca-
reers in his active life, in-
cluding earning a Doctor
of Chiropractic degree and
practicing in California.
Studious and with a keen
understanding of human
nature, he gave numerous
speeches, including at the
Rotary Club in Singapore,
at Missouri Southern State
University in Joplin, the
Institute of Social Realism
in Los Angeles, and the
Plato Society at UCLA. He
spent much of his last two
years bringing his journal-
istic style academic writ-
ing skills to bear in
religious, political, socio-
logical, anthropological,
biological and economic
internet forums.
Those left behind in-
clude his daughter, Mari-
anna Strongheart of San
Francisco; granddaugh-
ters, Brandy and Mercedes
in Tallahassee, by his sec-
ond and since deceased
daughter, Antonia Martin,
then a known professional

CLas. E. avUr
Funeral Home With Crematory
SEAMUS McCARTHY
Service: Sat. 11:00 AM Chapel
THELMA SHEPHERD
Service: Sat. 3:00 PM Chapel
PAULA JO SCHAMEL
Private Arrangements
HELEN COOPER
Arrangements Pending
MICHAEL MASON
Private Arrangements
JOE ANN TALLEY
Private Arrangements
726-8323 000DWD3


animal handler at the
Miami Metro Zoo. Also in-
cluded is Christa Lynne,
his close companion dur-
ing his last five years and
to whom his last two books
were dedicated. Others in-
clude his brother, Harry
Brough III of Virginia; his
step-families, friends
around the world and the
local Meadowcrest late-
afternoon "pool gang."
Brough did not want a
service. He had arranged
for his body to be taken by
the University of Florida,
College of Medicine, to be
used in medical dissection
classes.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Shirley
Allen, 69
COLUMBUS, OHIO
Shirley C. Allen, 69, of
Columbus, Ohio, went to
be with the Lord Tuesday,
Feb. 12, 2013. She was born
in De-
lorme ,
WVa., Oct.
22, 1943, to
the late
Grover
and Leona
(Robinett)
Collins.
In addi- Shirley
tion to her Allen
parents
she was preceded in death
by her brothers, Birchie,
Tarzan, and Charles
Collins; sisters, Hannah
Slone and Loney New; and
step-daughter, Monica
Allen. She is survived by
her loving husband of 38
years, James Allen; daugh-
ters, Lana Wiles, Erica
(Tony) Bell, Jessica Allen,
Ashley Collins, and
Kristina and Mandy
Reyna; step-sons, Tony,
Nick, and Mark Allen; sis-
ters, Cora Autry and Vir-
ginia Terry; eight
grandchildren; 11 great-
grandchildren; and many
nieces and nephews.
Friends and family may
gather from 2 to 4 and 6 to
8 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 17,
2013, at the Strickland Fu-
neral Home, Crystal River,
where a funeral service
will be conducted at 11
a.m. Monday, Feb. 18,2013,
with the Rev Lloyd
Bertine officiating. Inter-
ment will follow at the
Crystal River Memorial
Park Cemetery in Crystal
River.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Betty
Fuentes, 60
INVERNESS
Betty Fuentes, 60, of In-
verness, died Wednesday,
Feb. 13, 2013, in Inverness.
Services for Betty will be
announced at a later date.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Inver-
ness Chapel of Hooper Fu-
neral Home & Crematory












i i I I


Anna
Krause, 86
INVERNESS
Anna Kathryn Krause,
86, Inverness, passed away
Feb. 14, 2013, in Tampa
General Hospital. Mrs.
Krause was born Oct. 7,
1926, in Wellsboro, Pa., to
the late Albert and Matilda
Hunter and moved to Cit-
rus County from Tampa.
She was a former phar-
macy technician at Oak
Park Pharmacy in Tampa
and attended the First
Church of God in Inver-
ness. She was a very socia-
ble person, outgoing and
laughing, truly a "people's
person."
She is survived by her
two sons, Robert (Sonya)
Krause of Zephyrhills and
William (Carol) Krause of
Burnsville, N.C.; 11 grand-
children; 20 great-grand-
children; her brother,
Milford Krause, Inverness;
and sister, Florene Bene-
dict, Wellsboro, Pa. She
was preceded in death by
her husband, Leo J.
Krause, in 2006; her
brother, Arnold; and sister,
Alverta Stout.
Graveside services will
be conducted at 2 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 19, 2013, at
Florida National Ceme-
tery Friends may join the
procession at the Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home at
1:15 p.m.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Kevin Side, 18
CITRUS SPRINGS
Kevin Side, 18, of Citrus
Springs, was called home
to Heaven by our Lord on
Feb. 14,
2013.
Kevin is
survived
by his son,
Jayson
Side; his
mother,
Kimberly
Side; his Kevin
brother, Side
Derek
Side; his grandparents,
George and Virginia Side;
and his uncle, James Side.
Kevin loved and cher-
ished his son and his fam-
ily He was a truly special
person who was loved by
everyone who knew him.
Words cannot express our
deep pain and sorrow and
the gaping hole in our
lives. The world has lost a
truly remarkable son, fa-
ther, brother, grandchild.
Kevin, we know you and
Jane are together in
Heaven. With God's grace,
our family will all be to-
gether again someday
Funeral services will be
private for immediate
family
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home.

U Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
the next day.


James
Brusko, 46
CRYSTAL RIVER
James Stephan Brusko,
46, of Crystal River, Fla.,
died Wednesday, Feb. 13,
2013, as a result of an auto-
mobile accident. He was
born Sept. 10, 1966, in New
Brunswick, N.J., to Paul S.
and Helen (Foley) Brusko
Sr. He was a welder by
trade and he enjoyed fish-
ing, boating and football,
he was an avid Bucs fan.
He was of the Lutheran
faith.
Surviving are his par-
ents, Paul and Helen
Brusko Sr.; two brothers,
Paul Brusko Jr. (Cathy) of
Flowery Branch, Ga., and
William Borrack of In-
diantown; and several
nieces and nephews.
A memorial service will
be conducted at 2 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 18, 2013, at
the Strickland Funeral
Home Chapel in Crystal
River with Hospice of Cit-
rus County Chaplain
Chuck Cooley officiating.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Seamus
'Moose'
McCarthy, 24
INVERNESS
Seamus Hugh "Moose"
McCarthy, 24, Inverness,
died Jan. 31, 2013, at his
residence. Seamus was
born Aug.
20, 1988, in
Syosset,
Long Is-
land, N.Y., '*
to James
Hugh and
Deborah
(Abbon-
dola) Mc- Seamus
C a r t h y. McCarthy
Seamus
was employed at the In-
verness Club as a server, a
job he enjoyed very much
and everyone there loved
him. He was an up-and-
coming musical artist and
vocalist, playing the guitar
and drums. He also played
on ABC. He was an avid
sportsman, loved to camp
and fish. He never had a
"cross-bone" with anyone.
He was loved by all who
knew him and will be
deeply missed.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are his parents, James
and Deborah McCarthy;
his sisters, Sherry Foley
and Danielle McCarthy;
nieces, Autumn Foley and
Journey Ford and
nephews, Jacob Foley and
Iman Ford, all of Inver-
ness; and his maternal
grandfather, Rocco Abbon-
dola, N.Y; several aunts,
uncles and cousins from
New York.
A funeral tribute for
Seamus will be at 11 a.m.
Saturday, Feb. 16, 2013, at
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.


Rosario 'Nick'
Damato, 90
CRYSTAL RIVER
Rosario N. "Nick" Dam-
ato, 90, of Crystal River,
Fla., passed away Thurs-
day, Feb. 14, 2013, at Sug-
armill Manor of
Homosassa. He was born
July 29, 1922, to James and
Elizabeth (Larese) Damato
in Jersey City, N.J., and
came here five years ago
from there. He was a
World War II U.S. Army
veteran. He was the owner
of Nicholas Galvanizing
Company of Jersey City,
N.J., for 50 years. He was
of the Catholic faith.
In addition to his par-
ents he was preceded in
death by brothers, Angelo
and Jimmy Damato. He is
survived by his loving wife
of 61 years, Frances Dam-
ato; three sons, Dennis
Damato (Pat) of Crystal
River, Mark Damato of Liv-
ingston, N.J., and Greg
Damato (Sandy) of Mur-
phy, N.C.; two sisters,
Jenny Giancola (John) of
Neshanic Station, N.J.,
and Marie Piscatello
(Mike) of Hilton Head,
S.C.; three grandchildren,
Danielle Doty (Chris), Gina
Damato and Julia Damato;
and several nieces and
nephews.
Funeral services will be
conducted at 2 p.m. Satur-
day, Feb. 16, 2013, from the
Strickland Funeral Home
Chapel in Crystal River.
Friends are invited to the
visitation from 1 p.m., until
the service time. In lieu of
flowers memorial contri-
butions are requested to
Hospice of Citrus County,
PO. Box 641270 Beverly
Hills, FL 34464.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online, com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
the arrangements.



To Place Your

"In Memory" ad,

Judy
Moseley
at 564-2917
jmoseley@chronicleonline.com

fillI$~F


Helen
Cooper, 89
INVERNESS
Helen Cooper, 89, of In-
verness, Fla., passed away
Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2013,
at Hospice of Citrus
County, Inverness. She was
born Oct. 7,1923, in Wilkin-
son, WVa., to the late
Alexander and Anastasia
(Sharampleo) Huchok.
Helen was a secretary for
Rockwell International,
and arrived in this area in
1992, coming from Ga-
hanna, Ohio. Helen very
much enjoyed dancing and
her animals. A devoted
wife, mother and grand-
mother, she loved taking
care of her family She was
Methodist by faith.
She is survived by one
daughter, Marcia A. Carter
of Worthington, Ohio; two
grandchildren, Nicole
(Kevin) Lykens and Shan-
non (Joel) Hall; and six
great-grandchildren, Ce-
cilia, Mackay, Luke, Eli,
Rhett and Tyler. She was
preceded in death by her
husband, Harding, March
14,2005, and an infant son,
John Daniel Cooper
Funeral services for
Helen are scheduled for
9:30 a.m. Monday, Feb. 18,
2013, at Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home. Burial will
follow at Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell. The
family will receive friends
in visitation from 9 a.m.
until the hour of service.
The family requests dona-
tions in Helen's memory to
Citrus County Animal
Shelter, 4030 S. Airport
Road, Inverness, FL 34450
or Hospice of Citrus
County, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464 in
lieu of flowers.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.
See DEATHS/Page A7

FREE OBITUARIES
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.


Be there for your heirs by being here.

Attend an estate planning workshop.

February 20th, 10:00am, Citrus Memorial Share Club Auditorium, Inverness


Estate planning is of big importance, whatever the size of your estate. An estate plan is an ideal way to fulfill your final wishes,
whether it's providing income for a spouse or a college education for your grandchildren or leaving a lasting legacy. The
workshop is open to the public, free to attend and includes light refreshments & door prizes. Presenters:


Jim McLaughlin, WMS
Senior Vice President, Investments
The Vaughn McLaughlin Team
of Raymond James

Pat Daxon, CFP, CFA
Vice President, Wealth Management Solutions
Raymond James International Headquarters


Jeannette Haag, Attorney
Haag, Haag & Friedrich, P.A.

Sheryll Goedert, CPA
Collier, Jernigan & Goedert, P.A.

Chris Pool, Director
Citrus Memorial Health System


Seating is limited. RSVP today by calling 344-6905 or online at www.citrusmh.comlevents

00E20C Sponsored by the Citrus Memorial Health System, a 501(c)3 charitable organization. Raymond James & Associates, Inc. Member NY Stock Exchange/SIPC.


A6 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013


/EE~






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money&Markets
1,560 ................................. S& P 500
I Close: 1,519.79
Change: -1.59 (-0.1%)
1,480 ........10 DAYS ........
1 ,5 5 0 ... ... .. ... ... .. ...... ... ... ... ... .. ... .. ... ... ..



1,500
1 5 0 ....... ...... .............. .....



1,350 A S O....... ........ .......... N D J F


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE
3,741
3,441
1491
1543
305
29


NASD
1,809
1,830
1145
1253
198
16


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
14000.13
5982.69
473.02
8959.77
3206.22
1524.24
1119.19
16117.11
927.34


A click of the wrist :
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com


- ,:,,
13,800?... 10 DAYS ...
14 ,400 ....... ........................
14,000
13,600 ..........

13,200 \
12,800....
12,800 ........ ........... ............
12,400 .. .. .... ......
A S O


LOW
13908.11
5937.45
471.02
8905.18
3184.03
1514.14
1113.55
16017.03
921.74


Dow Jones industrials
Close: 13,981.76
Change: 8.37 (0.1%)


N


CLOSE
13981.76
5946.45
472.38
8933.22
3192.03
1519.79
1115.75
16069.37
923.15


%CHG.
+0.06%
-0.02%
+0.29%
-0.22%
-0.21%
-0.10%
-0.12%
-0.12%
-0.07%


J F


YTD
+6.70%
+12.05%
+4.26%
+5.80%
+5.71%
+6.56%
+9.34%
+7.16%
+8.69%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR%CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 3.42 -- 8.65 4.33 -.05 -1.1 A V -5.9 -46.3 dd
AT&T Inc T 29.77 -- 38.58 35.36 +.07 +0.2 A A A +4.9 +23.2 29 1.80f
Ametek Inc AME 29.86 42.04 41.91 ... ... A A +11.6 +30.0 22 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 64.08 94.49 92.73 -.03 ... A A A +6.1 +45.4 1.57e
Bank of America BAG 6.72 12.42 12.03 -.10 -0.8 A A A +3.6 +52.5 46 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 6.35 --- 12.23 11.35 -.23 -2.0 V V -0.2 +30.1 cc
CenturyLink Inc CTL 32.05 43.43 33.02 +.75 +2.3 V V -15.6 -7.0 26 2.16m
Citigroup C 24.61 44.68 43.84 -.48 -1.1 A A A +10.8 +38.3 14 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 21.43 17.46 +.10 +0.6 A A A +10.2 -8.4 31 1.00
Disney DIS 40.88 55.50 55.61 +.73 +1.3 A A A +11.7 +33.7 18 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 71.13 68.06 +.06 +0.1 V A A +6.7 +11.3 19 3.06
EPR Properties EPR 40.04 -- 48.92 47.70 +.37 +0.8 A A A +3.4 +16.9 21 3.00
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 77.13 -- 93.67 88.36 -.16 -0.2 V V A +2.1 +7.2 11 2.28
Ford Motor F 8.82 14.30 13.02 -.09 -0.7 V A +0.5 +7.1 10 0.40f
Gen Electric GE 18.02 23.49 23.29 -.12 -0.5 A A A +11.0 +27.3 17 0.76
Home Depot HD 45.45 68.15 67.52 +.18 +0.3 A A A +9.2 +48.7 24 1.16
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 -- 29.27 21.12 -.12 -0.5 A V A +2.4 -17.4 10 0.90
IBM IBM 181.85 -- 211.79 200.98 +1.33 +0.7 7 A A +4.9 +5.6 13 3.40
LKQ Corporation LKQ 14.63 23.99 23.25 +.17 +0.7 V A A +10.2 +45.1 27
Lowes Cos LOW 24.76 39.98 39.14 -.43 -1.1 A A A +10.2 +47.8 23 0.64
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 101.04 93.90 +.34 +0.4 V A A +6.5 -3.1 18 3.08
Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.26 -- 32.95 28.01 -.03 -0.1 A A A +4.9 -5.2 15 0.92
Motorola Solutions MSI 44.49 0 61.40 61.43 +.31 +0.5 A A A +10.3 +30.1 21 1.04
NextEra Energy NEE 59.10 0 72.92 72.50 +.30 +0.4 A A A +4.8 +23.6 16 2.40
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 15.69 -- 42.85 19.80 -.14 -0.7 A A A +0.5 -52.5 dd ...
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 19.71 19.50 +.02 +0.1 A A A +8.0 +14.4 35 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 5.46 0 8.00 7.85 -.06 -0.8 V A A +10.1 +40.7 11 0.04
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 --- 85.90 47.33 -1.13 -2.3 V A A +14.4 +6.9 dd ...
Smucker, JM SJM 70.50 0 92.66 92.40 +.24 +0.3 A A A +7.1 +18.6 21 2.08
Sprint Nextel Corp S 2.20 0 6.04 5.91 +.04 +0.7 A A A +4.2 +154.1 dd ...
Texas Instru TXN 26.06 0 34.29 33.59 -.21 -0.6 V A A +8.7 +4.0 22 0.84
Time Warner TWX 33.62 0 53.89 53.52 -.11 -0.2 A A A +11.9 +44.5 17 1.60f
UniFirst Corp UNF 55.86 88.35 84.18 -.37 -0.4 V A A +14.8 +37.9 17 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 36.80 48.77 44.40 +.07 +0.2 A A A +2.6 +21.9 cc 2.06
Vodafone Group VOD 24.95 -- 30.07 25.95 -.10 -0.4 V A A +3.0 +0.4 1.53e
WalMart Strs WMT 57.18 77.60 69.30 -1.52 -2.1 V A A +1.6 +16.4 14 1.59
Walgreen Co WAG 28.53 42.00 41.15 -.71 -1.7 A A A +11.2 +24.6 19 1.10
Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement I Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates
m uH
UFOr


The yield on the
10-year
Treasury note
held steady at
2.00 percent
Friday. Yields
affect interest
rates on
consumer loans.


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
The price of
gold slumped to
its lowest level
since August
and at one point
fell below
$1,600 per
ounce. Crude
oil fell following
an unexpected-
ly weak report
on industrial
production.


IOi


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .10 0.10 .10
6-month T-bill .12 0.12 ... .12
52-wk T-bill .15 0.15 ... .15
2-year T-note .27 0.27 ... .29
5-year T-note .86 0.85 +0.01 .86
10-year T-note 2.00 2.00 ... 1.98
30-year T-bond 3.18 3.18 ... 3.14


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 2.81 2.76 +0.05 2.66
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.04 4.04 ... 4.57
Barclays USAggregate 1.92 1.95 -0.03 2.06
Barclays US High Yield 5.91 5.95 -0.04 7.31
MoodysAAA Corp Idx 3.90 3.94 -0.04 3.81
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.14 1.14 ... 1.07
Barclays US Corp 2.81 2.85 -0.04 3.33


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 95.86
Ethanol (gal) 2.35
Heating Oil (gal) 3.21
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.15
Unleaded Gas (gal) 3.13
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1608.80
Silver (oz) 29.84
Platinum (oz) 1677.70
Copper (Ib) 3.73
Palladium (oz) 752.75
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.26
Coffee (Ib) 1.37
Corn (bu) 6.99
Cotton (Ib) 0.81
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 399.80
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.29
Soybeans (bu) 14.25
Wheat (bu) 7.42


PVS.
97.31
2.33
3.22
3.16
3.12
PVS.
1634.70
30.34
1710.90
3.73
763.65
PVS.
1.26
1.38
6.95
0.81
395.50
1.31
14.18
7.32


%CHG
-1.49
-0.09
-0.41
-0.32
+0.57
%CHG
-1.58
-1.66
-1.94
+0.03
-1.43
%CHG
+0.48
-0.76
+0.58
+0.37
+1.09
-1.38
+0.46
+1.40


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 21.29 -.02 +4.4 +13.3 +12.2 +5.6
BondA m 12.85 ... -0.5 +3.8 +5.9 +4.0
CaplncBuA m 54.14 +.04 +2.6 +11.8 +10.0 +3.0
CpWIdGrlA m 38.71 ... +4.1 +15.2 +9.9 +1.9
EurPacGrA m 42.44 -.05 +3.0 +11.6 +7.7 +1.0
FnlnvA m 43.17 -.07 +5.9 +15.5 +13.1 +3.7
GrthAmA m 36.29 -.06 +5.6 +15.3 +12.2 +3.6
IncAmerA m 18.71 +.01 +3.6 +13.0 +12.2 +5.2
InvCoAmA m 31.69 -.06 +5.1 +13.8 +11.3 +3.3
NewPerspA m 32.66 -.05 +4.5 +15.4 +11.5 +3.9
WAMutlnvA m 32.84 +.01 +5.2 +14.0 +14.0 +4.1
Dodge & Cox Income 13.86 -.01 0.0 +5.3 +6.4 +6.9
IntlStk 36.05 -.14 +4.1 +14.9 +8.5 +1.1
Stock 131.66 -.25 +8.0 +20.7 +13.7 +2.9
Fidelity Contra 81.10 ... +5.5 +13.2 +14.2 +5.3
GrowCo 98.01 -.12 +5.1 +9.4 +16.1 +7.1
LowPriStk d 42.03 -.02 +6.4 +14.0 +15.3 +7.5
Fidelity Spartan 5001dxAdvtg 53.95 -.05 +6.9 +15.7 +14.6 +4.7
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.29 ... +3.2 +13.4 +11.9 +5.8
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA x 13.48 -.04 +1.3 +9.8 +8.4 +9.5
GIBondAdv x 13.44 -.04 +1.4 +10.1 +8.7 +9.8
Harbor Intllnstl d 63.93 ... +2.9 +11.3 +10.2 +1.9
PIMCO TotRetA m 11.19 ... -0.2 +6.7 +6.7 +7.3
T Rowe Price GrowStk 39.68 +.02 +5.0 +12.4 +15.0 +5.9
Vanguard 500Adml 140.38 -.14 +6.9 +15.7 +14.6 +4.7
5001nv 140.36 -.14 +6.8 +15.6 +14.5 +4.6
GNMAAdml 10.84 +.01 -0.4 +1.3 +5.2 +5.7
MulntAdml 14.39 ... +0.4 +4.0 +5.6 +5.3
STGradeAd 10.82 ... +0.1 +3.5 +3.6 +3.8
TotBdAdml 10.99 ... -0.6 +2.8 +5.4 +5.6
Totlntl 15.38 -.03 +2.7 +9.9 +7.2 -0.4
TotStlAdm 38.24 -.04 +7.3 +15.6 +15.1 +5.4
TotStldx 38.23 -.04 +7.3 +15.5 +15.0 +5.3
Welltn 35.33 -.03 +4.4 +12.4 +11.5 +6.0
WelltnAdm 61.02 -.05 +4.4 +12.5 +11.5 +6.1
-Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
The Standard & Poor's 5
dex inched lower Friday,
loss in four days. The big
drops came from stocks
energy industry, which w
hurt by falling prices for
oil. Markets will be close
day in observance of Pre
dents Day.

CBS
Close: $44.64A1.70 or 4.0'
The media company said th
nue and earnings grew mod
the fourth quarter, helped by
presidential election.
$4:




52-week range
$28.22 L_____
Vol.: 15.7m (2.3x avg.)
Mkt. Cap:$26.44 b Yielc
Herbalife
Close: $38.74A0.47 or 1.2'
A regulatory filing showed th
lionaire investor Carl Icahn
12.98 percent stake in the n
al supplement company.

4,


N D J
52-week range
$24.24
Vol.: 37.8m (3.8x avg.)
Mkt. Cap:$4.18 b Yielc
Transocean
Close: $56.26V-3.04 or -5.
A Deutsche Bank analyst cu
ing on the oil drilling compa
"Sell" partly because of risin
and increasing downtime.



40
40 N D J
52-week range
$39.32
Vol.: 10.3m (3.1x avg.)
Mkt. Cap:$21.03 b Yielc
Orbitz
Close:$3.33A0.18 or 5.7%
The online travel company's
quarter revenue exceeded e
tions, and there were signs
business was improving.
r


Il D J
52-week range
$2.07--- I
Vol.:721.9k (2.7x avg.)
Mkt. Cap:$349.82 m
V.F. Corp.
Close:$157.88A5.07 or 3.:
The clothing company, who
brands include Wrangler an
ca, said that its fiscal fourth-
net income rose 30 percent




Ii iU J
52-week range
$129.53
Vol.:1.6m (1.9x avg.)
Mkt. Cap:$17.39 b Yielc


500 in-
its first
ggest
in the
'ere
crude
d Mon-
esi-


CBS


S&P 500 ends higher


Associated Press

NEW YORK The S&P 500 kept its
winning streak alive, just.
The Standard & Poor's 500 ended the
week nearly two points higher, enough to
give it a seventh straight week of gains.
That's the longest stretch of advances in
more than two years.
The index lost 1.59 points to end at
1,519.79 Friday For the week it held on to
a gain of 1.86 points.
Investors piled into stocks at the be-
ginning of the year after lawmakers
reached a last-minute deal to avoid the
"fiscal cliff" of sweeping tax hikes and
spending cuts. The gains continued as in-
vestors were encouraged by signs the
housing and jobs markets are recovering.
Company earnings have also held up
well.
There are signs, however, that the rally
is running out of steam.
The Dow Jones industrial average rose
8.37 points to close at 13,981.76 Friday, but


ended the week down 11 points. The
index has now edged lower for two
straight weeks.
"We've just had such a fast start to the
year," said John Fox, manager of the FAM
value fund. "It just makes sense that you
are going to have a leveling or a slow-
down."
Walmart was the biggest decline in the
Dow Friday. The stock fell $1.52, or 2.2
percent, to $69.30 after Bloomberg News
published excerpts from an internal
email that said sales in February were a
"total disaster." The retailer, which re-
ports earnings next week, said some-
times internal communications lacked
"proper context" and "are not entirely
accurate."
Energy companies also contributed to
the slump, following the price of crude
oil lower. Chevron dropped 75 cents, or
0.6 percent, to $114.96.
The Nasdaq composite fell 6.63 points
to 3,192.03 and was also down for the
week, dropping 1.84 points.


Facebook says
it was hacked
Facebook Inc. says it was
the target of hackers but no
user information was compro-
mised during the attack.
The social media giant said
Friday on its security blog that
the company discovered in
January its system had been
targeted in a sophisticated
attack.
A handful of the company's
employees visited a devel-
oper's website that had been
compromised, which led to
malware being installed on
the Facebook employee
laptops.
Facebook said it has found
no evidence that user data
was compromised.
The company has fixed the
infected machines, informed
law enforcement and has an
investigation of its own under
way.
Facebook also says it was
not the only company tar-
geted in the attacks but was
one of the first to discover it.
Facebook shares fell 18
cents to close at $28.32 and
dropped another 7 cents in
after-hours trading.




DEATHS
Continued from Page A6


Lucille
Berry, 92
BEVERLY HILLS


% Lucille H. Berry, 92 of
at reve- Beverly Hills, Fla., died
esty in Thursday, Feb. 14, 2013, in
the loving care of her fam-
ily and
Hospice of
Citrus
County. r
Lucille IIe
$45.87 was born
PE:19.2 Saturday,
d: 1.1% Oct. 9,
HLF 1920, in
Fondee, Lucille
at bil- Ky., to Berry
holds a Thomas
utrition- and Stella (Williams) Hud-
dleston. She was a retired
secretary for an oil com-
pany Lucille moved to this
area from Southgate,
F Mich., in 1983. She enjoyed
$73.00 casinos, gambling boats
E:. and traveling.
d: 3.1% Lucille was preceded in
death by her husband,
RIG Thomas E. Berry, in 2000;
1% brother, Roy Huddleston;
ut his rat-
nyto and sister, Viola Temple.
ig costs Survivors include her
sons, David Berry and wife
Patty of Monroe, Mich.,
and Donald Berry of Bev-
erly Hills; brothers, Virgil
F Huddleston of Flat Rock,
Mich., George Huddleston
$59.50 and wife Laila of Beaver
PE:... Creek, Ohio, and Thomas
Huddleston and wife Mar-
oww gret of Woodbridge, Va.;
sisters, Rosetta Heath of
s fourth- Fairfield Glade, Tenn.,
expecta-
its hotel Bobbie Mares and hus-
band Cliff of Macon, Ga.,
and Sonja Miller and hus-
^J band Roy of San Antonio,
Texas; five granddaugh-
F ters; and many nephews
and nieces.
$4.75 Visitation is 1 to 2 p.m.
PE:... Monday, Feb. 18, 2013, at
Yield:... Fero Funeral Home.
VFC Chapel service is at 2 p.m.,
3% with entombment to follow
se at Fero Memorial Gar-
d Nauti- dens. Memorial contribu-
quarter tions may made to Hospice
of Citrus County, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
S34464. Arrangements en-
trusted to Fero Funeral
S Home, wwwferofuneral
$169.82 home.com.
PE:17.5 Sign the guest book at
d: 2.2% ww.chronicleonline.com.


New Yorkers react
to mayor's ban
NEW YORK Barely 24
hours have passed since
Mayor Michael Bloomberg
proposed an all-out ban on
plastic foam food containers
in the city and already New
Yorkers are asking: So what
do we use instead?
Bloomberg's announce-
ment, made Thursday in his
State of the City address, left
consumers and food vendors
big and small wondering what
a city free of plastic foam
might look like.
Polystyrene foam contain-
ers have long been used by
street vendors and take-out
restaurants as a cheap way to
keep in the heat and
sauces of meals sold to
on-the-go customers.
"If they ban it all, we'll have
to use aluminum storage con-
tainers," said Paul Gopaul,
29, owner of the popular Mid-


town food truck Faith's Halal
Food. "Definitely we'd have a
price change."
Gopaul estimated he uses
500 plastic foam food contain-
ers a week, which he buys in
packs of 175 containers that
sell for $15 at a Queens sup-
plier. The aluminum contain-
ers of equal size run about $5
more per pack, he said.
"Right now it's a lot of regu-
lations, but if that's what it
takes to keep us out here,
then we got to do it," he said.
The mayor's proposal is not
an original idea. A number of
cities on the West Coast have
enacted such legislation, in-
cluding San Francisco. Some
states have partial or industry-
specific bans of it's use.
Although commonly re-
ferred to as Styrofoam, that
brand of polystyrene foam
isn't used in food packaging,
according to its manufacturer,
Dow Chemical Co.
-From wire reports


Monday-Thursday
Early Bird 4pm-6pm.... ...........$13.95

Thursday
R ib Eye .........................................$ 19 .9 5
Martini Night 4pm-10pm
Specialty Martinis......................$5.00


Friday


Sunday


1 '/2 lb. Live Maine Lobster.....$19.95


Award Winning Sunday Brunch
ll:30am-2:00pm.......... ...........$15.95


Call for reservations or more information.

o at Plantation on Crystal River
W e t 2 9301 W. Fort Island Trail,
BAR & GRILL Crystal River
BARL L 352-795-4211
www.plantationoncrystalriver.com


0215-SACRN

NOTICE OF HEARING

ON PROPOSED

ORDINANCE

The public is hereby notified that an ordinance to amend Chapter
54 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances has been received by
the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida. The
Application was submitted by the Department of Planning and
Development, Land Development Division. A public hearing is
scheduled to consider an ordinance entitled:

OA-12-02 CLARKA. STILLWELL, ESQUIRE

AN ORDINANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, A
POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, BY THE CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS AMENDING CHAPTER
54, IMPACT FEES, OF THE CITRUS COUNTY CODE
TO ALLOW TRANSFER OF IMPACT FEE CREDITS
OUTSIDE OF A DEVELOPMENT OR DISTRICT IF
APPROVED BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY;
AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

Interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with
respect to the proposed Ordinance Amendment.

A Public Hearing on the proposed ordinance will be held on
February 26, 2013 at 5:01 PM, at the Citrus County Courthouse,
110 N. Apopka Avenue, Room 100, Inverness, Florida.

Copies of the proposed ordinance will be available for inspection
andlor purchase between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M.,
Monday through Friday in the Department of Development
Services, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461. For
more information regarding the proposals discussed herein, please
contact the Land Development Division at (352) 527-5239.

If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the board
with respect to any matter considered at this meeting or hearing, he
or she will need a record of the proceedings and, for such purpose,
he or she may need to insure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings is made, which record includes testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting
because of a disability or physical impairment should contact the
County Administrator's Office, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days before
the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD
telephone (352) 341-6580.

Chairman
000E3E2


StocksRecap


Business BRIEFS


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MO AGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013 A7







Page A8 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ................................ publisher
M ike Arnold ..............................................editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Curt Ebitz ............................... citizen member
SMac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may difer with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


DO NO HARM




Scourge



removed from



our community


he recent multi-agency mark hi
raid led by the Citrus Florida':
County Sheriff's Office As a
(CCSO) that removed a selfish d
scourge from our community Dr. Mcli
is applauded, ing meri
The scourge was a pain agency
clinic operated by osteo- license tl
pathic physician
Daniel Phillip
McIntire of St. Pe- THE ISSUE:
tersburg, who was ain lini
arrested for al- Pain clinic
legedly prescrib- used.
ing 1,567,988 pills
in the past 12 OUR OPINION:
months, which in- Multi-agency
eluded 643,000 raid applauded.
doses of oxy-
codone, with an
estimated street value of $12 prosecute
million, the full p
Three factors made Dr. as any"
McIntire's unregistered pain "drug
clinic in Crystal River a receive.
scourge. In the
Foremost, the "trafficking" tal Rivei
of illegal drugs is an ex- Jeff Da
tremely serious crime since it good peo
results in severe health prob- tion with
lems and even death for fore, arn
those who use them. Addi- alert to
tionally, trafficking poses a clinic m
threat to everyone's safety by their mi
leading drug abusers to com- Among
mit violent crimes in support signs ar
of their addiction, crowds;
Secondly, Dr. McIntire, for people a
the sake of personal gain, not hide; pr
only betrayed society's trust curity
in medicine as the most noble records
of all professions, but also the quested
Hippocratic Oath that coun- scriptiol
sels physicians, "Into what- providing
ever houses I enter, I will go and bus
into them for the benefit of clusively
the sick, and will abstain With t
from every voluntary act of tion drt
mischief and corruption." the welfi
Third, the scope of the ille- commun
gal prescribing of drugs by enforcer
Dr. McIntire and the fact this gether
is the second time since De- message
cember 2011 he has been ar- not be
rested in a raid on a pill mill, County.


Using electric chair
Some stores are nice enough to
provide electric chairs for the
handicapped. If you can get from
your vehicle to a chair, then you
should be able to get from where
you got the chair back to your vehi-
cle and keep it safe, out of the ele-
ments and possible theft, for the
next person.


Confusing taxes
I keep reading about
alternate revenue op-
tions in the Chronicle,
the MSBUs and MSTUs.
Can someone please ex-
plain the difference be-
tween these and regular
property tax? It seems
to me like they are the
same thing with a differ-
ent name. Are the politi-
cians just trying to
confuse the voters again?


C O


563-
CAL5

563-0


Just being lazy
I'm calling Sound Off in refer-
ence to "Get over it," where the
person was complaining about
the handicapped person (who)
left the electric cart by the
handicapped spot where people
can't park. It's a very simple so-
lution. All you have to do is ask
the bagger to come out with you
and help you put the groceries


im as a danger to
s communities.
consequence of his
disregard for others,
entire's drug traffick-
ts not only the emer-
suspension of his
hat followed the raid,
but also the revo-
cation of his li-
cense to practice
medicine in
Florida. Further,
his harmful be-
trayal of the trust
bestowed upon
him by society
and his profes-
sion warrants ag-
gressive criminal
;ion and, if convicted,
penalty of the law just
street trafficker" or
kingpin" would

busting of the Crys-
r pain clinic, Sheriff
wsy noted, "Some
)ple shared informa-
Sus." Citizens, there-
e encouraged to be
the telltale signs a
ay be a pill mill in
dst.
Sthe more obvious
e: Long lines or big
groups of several
arriving in a single ve-
resence of armed se-
guards; medical
and X-rays not re-
or required for a pre-
n; doctors not
ig physical exams;
iness conducted ex-
T in cash.
he cost of prescrip-
ig trafficking being
are and safety of our
lity, citizens and law
nent working to-
can send the clear
* that pill mills will
tolerated in Citrus


into your car so they can return
the cart back to the store. It's
very simple. It don't take a
rocket scientist to figure it out.
They're just being lazy.
Repeat offenders
Something is not right with
our local criminal justice sys-
tem. Almost every day in the
Chronicle, we read about people
being arrested drug
ND dealers, meth-lab opera-
tors, pedophiles. If the
F system was working
S properly, there should
be a constant stream of
people headed towards
jail. Instead, what we
read about are repeat
S offenders doing the
9 same things over and
)579 over again. How are
they getting out? Why
aren't we told by the
Chronicle these various people
have been sentenced to jail, not
in sensationalized murder cases,
but in the standard stuff? Some-
thing's wrong with our system.
Thanks to Larry
Thank you, Larry Johansen,
for your "Think first" letter pub-
lished Feb. 8. It reminds me how
the GOP relentlessly criticizes
and obstructs anything Presi-
dent Obama plans for progress.


Death of small town
Well, it's finally happened.
The bottom had to fall out
sooner or later
One-hundred years ago, it
was the big freeze that turned
thriving communities into
struggling centers of poverty
That time has come again. Un-
fortunately there are no simple
solutions.
Why did this happen? Too
many poor choices have added
up to disaster like elected offi-
cials treating their position,
not as public servants, but as if
they have a license to spend.
They have placed far too
many of our eggs in the
Progress Energy basket.
They continue wasting mil-
lions on unnecessary projects;
especially in tough times. They
have become the enemy of the
people rather than representa-
tives of their needs and desires.
People come here not to em-
brace the beauty and culture of
the area, but to exploit our re-
sources for their personal gain.
And, of course, we have an ap-
athetic public.


"The greatest superstition now entertained
by public men is that hypocrisy is the
royal road to success."
Robert G. Ingersoll, Dec. 13, 1886


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Split sessions in two


One idea floating around
the current legislative
session is to turn
Florida's part-time
Legislature into a
full-time job. To be
fair, in reality, most of
those serving in the
Florida House and
Senate are working
full time and then .
some.
The Florida Legis-
lature meets each
year for a 60-day ses- Paula
sion, generally in FLOI
March and April. VOI
Historically, in non-
election years legis-
lators are also in the state
Capitol for committee meetings
- a week in September, Octo-
ber and November, two weeks
in December and January and
three weeks in February
Special sessions to deal with
redistricting, budget shortfalls,
oil spills and other timely events
add even more Tallahassee time
to legislative schedules.
When not in Tallahassee, leg-
islators are rightfully expected
to spend time in their districts
at events and holding office
hours. District sizes vary
greatly While a House seat
might be contained in one large
county, my Senate district in-
cluded parts of five counties.
Some rural districts had as
many as 13 counties. That's a lot
of travel.
And the job pays a hefty
salary -$29,687.
The case can be made for a
full-time legislature like several
other large states have or a
higher salary, as many other
states pay
But since most Republicans
believe in less, not more, gov-
ernment and many voters be-
lieve their life and liberty are in
peril when the Legislature is in
session, perhaps it makes more
sense for the Legislature to
spend less, rather than more,
time in Tallahassee.
Some states meet only once
every two years, which would
leave more time for legislators
to spend listening to con-
stituents in the district and less


DI


time to tinker with the budget
and policy changes. This not
only allows for greater continu-
ity of policy but
surely would restore
the balance of influ-
ence back to those
they represent.
But Florida is a
big state with com-
plex and capricious
issues. With 19 mil-
lion residents, more
than 80 million
)ockery tourists, a $70 billion
RIDA budget and a volatile
CES hurricane season,
meeting every other
year, while a tempt-
ing thought, would no doubt re-
sult in numerous special
sessions being called by legisla-
tive leaders who are magneti-
cally attracted to Tallahassee.
The real problem is legisla-
tors spend too much time in
Tallahassee. During that time,
lawmakers are formulating pol-
icy and crafting a budget. Of-
tentimes a change in policy
conflicts with current or pro-
posed law, causing the prolifer-
ation of hideous creatures
called conforming bills. Once
used sparingly, they have be-
come prolific last-minute vehi-
cles for all means of chicanery
The budgetary process with
conference committee reports,
conforming bills and proviso
language is ripe for mischief
and anonymous policy and
spending changes. Many of
these wind up as headlines in
the news media, or as lawsuits
in the state courts.
In 2011, the legislative ses-
sion blew up in the wee hours
of the last night on the Senate
floor over the unprecedented
use of so-called conforming
bills in that session, 43 total-
ing 2,200 pages. Experienced
senators, including a former
Senate president, complained
about the misuse of these bills
that allowed little to no scrutiny
of their contents.
The "trust me" plea of the ap-
propriations chair offered little
comfort to those who like to
know what's in the bills before
they cast a vote. "Trust but ver-


ify" is a safe policy The ration-
ale given for these last-minute
changes that avoid committee
scrutiny is these are changes
needed to conform the law to
items in the budget. Unfortu-
nately, on occasion they have
contained unrelated or unnec-
essary special interest favors or
pet projects.
The solution is to split the
session into two parts.
The first session would be for
budget writing only, allowing all
40 senators and 120 representa-
tives to actively participate in
the only requirement legislators
have to pass a balanced an-
nual budget. This session could
be held in April or May as the
fiscal year begins on July 1. An
added benefit would be a later
than usual revenue projection
for more accurate numbers.
The second session would be
held for new issues and policy
changes truly needed to imple-
ment the budget
Separating the time in Talla-
hassee into two distinct ses-
sions would lead to greater
accountability, transparency
and deliberation. It would
allow greater interaction at
home between lawmakers and
their constituents prior to each
session.
But the greatest benefit is it
would allow legislators to vote
their conscience on policy issues
without fear of losing an appro-
priation in the process. Yes, hard
to believe, but deals are made
and votes are traded in order to
bring home the bacon.
While it is impossible to re-
move the politics from politics,
separating the policy from the
money decisions empowers all
legislators to be more involved,
more independent and more
ethical in performing their
elected duties.
Just a thought

Paula Dockery was
term-limited as a Republican
state senator from Lakeland
after 16 years in the Florida
Legislature. She can
be reached at
pdockery@floridavoices. com.


Unfortunately, Citrus County
is a microcosm of the country
and potentially the planet
Too late to stop the
inevitable?
Probably But if nothing is
done, nothing gets done. And
that's just what the present
powers will do. Nothing.
Fred Schirmer
Inverness

It does matter
To answer Hillary Clinton's
question, "What does it matter
now? There are four dead
Americans."
Because there are four dead
Americans under the direction
of the United States of Amer-
ica's government it matters.
Because there are moms and
dads and other family mem-
bers left behind to cope with
the carnage it matters. Be-
cause if this is the support our
government provides for our
men and women in the armed
services and those attached to
our country via the govern-
ment of the United States of


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


America -it matters. Because
if this is the way our govern-
ment views the citizens of our
country- expendable, of little
value it matters!
If our government cannot,
does not stand up for, protect,
value our citizens all over the
world it matters!
Audrey Handy
Floral City


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


LETTERS to the Editor


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to the EDITOR


All is not lost
The containment wall
for the nuclear reactor is
damaged. This wall can be
repaired, but not for nu-
clear use. The new genera-
tor is likely still in place
and a lot of the generating
facilities likely can be
restarted, but they need a
new source of steam gener-
ation to spin the turbine.
Would it be possible to
bring in natural gas and
build a new furnace to
make steam? Would it be
possible to build a new
coal furnace to make
steam?
There are still a lot of
possibilities to keep the
generator here and start it
spinning, but are the
county commissioners and
the tax assessor willing to
work with Duke/Progress
and make it financially
feasible for them to do it?
We live in Citrus County,
but you wouldn't think so
if you wanted to buy and
move in. We act like we
live in a country club and
charge an entrance fee, or
impact fee to live here
and join the club. This is
not conducive to attract-
ing new businesses. If the
county commissioners are
sincere about attracting
new businesses they will
eliminate the impact fee
and start running the
county as a government
agency should.
Right now we are a bed-
room community with a lot
of retired people and it
would be hard to attract a
new industry without


being able to supply a
work force that would be
necessary. We also have
the sink hole problem that
could deter a new industry
from building a business
environment without in-
curring additional costs.
Things can be accom-
plished, but not with the
current thinking. We must
change if we are to suc-
ceed. If the current com-
missioners are not will to
change, then maybe we
will have to replace them.
The system of taxing the
value of an asset has
proven to be a flop. The
Robin Hood principle of
taxing the rich has proved
to be unmanageable and
has created more prob-
lems than it is worth. We
should pay taxes by what
we receive, not what we
are worth.
Alfred E. Mason
Crystal River
America is dying
Be advised political par-
tisans: The National De-
fense Authorization Act
supports military policing
of civilians, warrantless
and indeterminate deten-
tion, extreme rendition,
torture and assassination.
It will be administered by
your Democratic president
and his largely Republican
staff, as authorized by a
Democratic majority Sen-
ate (93 to 7 in favor) and a
Republican majority
House. Both Florida's Re-
publican Sen. Rubio and
Florida's Democrat Sen.
Nelson voted in favor of


the NDAA.
You need to know any
law authorized will in fact
be enforced when such is
propitious to its sponsors
and their government ap-
paratchiks. Any other ra-
tionale is contrived
political deflection for par-
tisan advantage, ambitions
of greed, or ego gratifica-
tion. This law currently
being contested in the
courts is now the law of
the land and every citizen
and his family will be af-
flicted at the will, self-
interest or ego of our gov-
ernment masters. It is diffi-
cult to recall any history
since the dawn of civiliza-
tion, when an in-place
"legal" instrument of in-
timidation has not been ul-
timately put to treach-
erous use. To deny this is
to join in the funeral
march for America.
What to do? This is cer-
tain: We must grasp the
reality that America is
threatened by both the
Republican and Democ-
rat establishments. Then
we need to take off our
Republican shirts and De-
mocrat pants, open our
minds, summon our intel-
ligence, and to muster the
urgency to discard those
partisan trappings and to
seek actually decent gov-
ernance for the American
people, and in fact for the
sake of humanity. Your
recommendations of spe-
cific remedies are invited
and much needed.
Rafe Pilgrim
Crystal River


Dirty roads
Regarding trash on the highways ...
I've lived in Florida all my life and trav-
eled most of the state. Citrus County
has the dirtiest highways that I've ever
seen. The people have no regard for
the roadways and not just around State
Road 44 at the landfill. Go to Walmart
and get a plastic bag and put your
trash in it.


WITH A
TERRIBLE

A PEOPLE
1- [ CR!EAMIN63R
AkCION...


PERFECT
METAPHOR RI


Sound OFF


Wakeup call needed
I'm on (U.S.) 41 right by Inverness
and a funeral procession with the
lights flashing and so forth with prob-
ably 30 cars in it and the ... inconsid-
erate (people) ... on cellphones (are)
passing it ...This country, it really
needs a wakeup call. There's no re-
spect, there's no honor, there's no
faith.


Hot Corner: SOLAR POWER


Get off the grid quick
Best thing to do is to somehow go
solar ... Get you a solar generator. They
are single pound, double pound, goes up
to four different pounds. They will run an
entire house. You've got to get off the
grid quick ... You have to get off the grid.
Quit relying on these people ...
See how far it goes
I'm answering some of the stupid com-
ments in the Sound Off about the power
plant. Yeah, they're going to have to decom-


mission, but that's going to take many,
many years to start because you have to let
everything cool down ... Go ahead, put a
solar panel on your house. See how far that
gets you. And, you know, your fear of the
nuke plant, they're going to end up being
your nemesis. Go ahead, start a solar com-
pany and see how far that gets you.
Call it Solyndra
Response to "Switch to solar power": You
know, we could all do that. We could start a
new solar system manufacturing company.
Oh, by the way, we could call it Solyndra.


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OPINION


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013 A9


8












NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Learning


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Zoom and boom


World BRIEFS

Libya


Associated Press
Five-year-old Kobe
Roberts of Winona,
Minn., skates for the first
time Friday on east Lake
Winona in Winona, Minn.
Mother Makala Roberts
said she took Kobe
skating so he could try
something new.


Hanford nuclear
tank is leaking
OLYMPIA, Wash. The
long-delayed cleanup of the
nation's most contaminated
nuclear site became the
subject of more bad news
Friday, when Washington
Gov. Jay Inslee announced
a radioactive waste tank
there is leaking.
The news raises con-
cerns about the integrity of
similar tanks at south-
central Washington's Han-
ford nuclear reservation and
puts added pressure on the
federal government to re-
solve construction problems
with the plant being built to
alleviate environmental and
safety risks from the waste.
The tanks, which are al-
ready long past their in-
tended 20-year life span,
hold millions of gallons of a
highly radioactive stew left
from decades of plutonium
production for nuclear
weapons.
Army may extend
Afghan tours
WASHINGTON Sol-
diers deployed to Afghan-
istan next year may see
their war tours extended be-
cause budget cuts will dras-
tically limit training for
brigades to replace them,
the top Army general said
Friday.
Gen. Raymond Odierno,
the Army chief of staff, said
the military will be able to
fund training and operations
for combat units in
Afghanistan now and for
those deploying in the sum-
mer and fall. But he said
there will be delays in train-
ing for those deploying in
2014.
If those training delays
can't be made up, Odierno
said he would have to send
forces to war that aren't
ready or extend deploy-
ments of units already
there.
A number of combat
brigades will deploy later
this year and next year,
even as the U.S. winds
down the war.
Admin winds
down health plan
WASHINGTON -The
Obama administration is
quietly winding down one of
the earliest programs cre-
ated by the president's
health care overhaul law.
It's a plan that provides
stopgap coverage for unin-
sured people with medical
problems who have been
turned down by insurers.
Administration officials
broke the news to state
counterparts in a teleconfer-
ence Friday.
They said the Pre-
Existing Condition Insur-
ance Plan will stop taking
new applications because
of funding concerns. The
suspension happens imme-
diately in 23 states where
the federal government ad-
ministers the program, but
states that run their own
plans may have more time,
depending on contract
arrangements.
The more than 100,000
people already in the pro-
gram will not lose coverage.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
In this frame grab of a video Friday from a dashboard camera, on a highway from Kostanai, Kazakhstan, to
Chelyabinsk region, Russia, a meteorite contrail is seen. A meteor streaked across the sky of Russia's Ural
Mountains on Friday morning, causing sharp explosions and reportedly injuring about 1,100 people,
including many hurt by broken glass.

Meteor explodes over Russia; 1,100 injured in shockwave


Associated Press

MOSCOW With a blinding
flash and a booming shock wave,
a meteor blazed across the west-
ern Siberian sky Friday and ex-
ploded with the force of 20 atomic
bombs, injuring more than 1,000
people as it blasted out windows
and spread panic in a city of
1 million.
While NASA estimated the me-
teor was only about the size of a
bus and weighed an estimated
7,000 tons, the fireball it produced
was dramatic. Video shot by star-
tled residents of the city of
Chelyabinsk showed its streaming
contrails as it arced toward the
horizon just after sunrise, looking
like something from a world-
ending science-fiction movie.
The largest recorded meteor
strike in more than a century oc-
curred hours before a 150-foot as-
teroid passed within about 17,000
miles of Earth. The European
Space Agency said its experts had
determined there was no connec-
tion between the asteroid and the
Russian meteor just cosmic
coincidence.
The meteor above western
Siberia entered the Earth's at-
mosphere about 9:20 a.m. local
time (10:20 p.m. EST Thursday) at
a hypersonic speed of at least
33,000 mph and shattered into
pieces about 18 to 32 miles high,
the Russian Academy of Sciences


3S 44


rp


.
,..
.I iup -S"


& t


A circular hole in the ice of Chebarkul Lake is seen Friday where a
meteor reportedly struck near Chelyabinsk, about 930 miles east of
Moscow, Russia.


said. NASA estimated its speed at
about 40,000 mph, said it ex-
ploded about 12 to 15 miles high,
released 300 to 500 kilotons of en-
ergy and left a trail 300 miles long.
"There was panic. People had
no idea what was happening,"
said Sergey Hametov of
Chelyabinsk, about 930 miles east
of Moscow in the Ural Mountains.
"We saw a big burst of light,
then went outside to see what it
was and we heard a really loud,
thundering sound," he told The
Associated Press by telephone.
The shock wave blew in more
than 1 million square feet of glass,


according to city officials, who
said 3,000 buildings in
Chelyabinsk were damaged.
The Interior Ministry said
about 1,100 people sought medical
care after the shock wave and 48
were hospitalized. Most of the in-
juries were caused by flying glass,
officials said. There was no im-
mediate word on any deaths or
anyone struck by space fragments.
Social media was flooded with
video from the many dashboard
cameras that Russians mount in
their cars, in case of pressure
from corrupt traffic police or a
dispute after an accident.


Obama: Gun control hits close to home


Associated Press

CHICAGO President
Barack Obama's support
for gun control has its
roots in a hometown
plagued by deadly shoot-
ings a city, he said Fri-
day, where as many
children die from guns
every four months as were
slaughtered at Sandy
Hook school in Connecti-
cut.
Obama told a Chicago
audience that high-profile
mass shootings are one
part of a national tragedy
created not just by guns
but by communities where
there is too little hope. As a
result, he said, "too many
of our children are being
taking away from us."


It was an emotional re-
turn to a city whose recent
shooting victims have in-
cluded Hadiya Pendleton,
a 15-year-old drum ma-
jorette gunned down a
mile from Obama's
Chicago home just days
after she performed at the
president's inauguration
in Washington. Standing
before Hyde Park Acad-
emy students in their navy
uniform shirts, the presi-
dent said 65 children were
killed by gun violence last
year in Chicago.
"That's the equivalent of
a Newtown every four
months," Obama said.
Twenty children were
among the dead in the
Newtown massacre.
"This is not just a gun


issue," Obama said. "It's
also an issue of the kinds
of communities that we're
building, and for that we
all share responsibility as
citizens to fix it. We all
share a responsibility to
move this country closer to
our founding vision, that
no matter who you were or
where you come from,
here in America, you can
decide your own destiny"
Obama was a reliable
vote in favor of gun control
as a state senator in the
late 1990s, with one impor-
tant exception that con-
tributed to his only
electoral loss. While run-
ning for the Democratic
primary for a House seat
in 1999, Obama missed a
vote on a gun control


measure that narrowly
failed, an episode he later
said cost him any chance
to win.
The lesson for the future
president: Don't sit idly by
in reaction to gun violence.
Obama appears to have
taken that lesson to heart.
Gun control was not on his
agenda in his first term,
but the president re-
sponded quickly to the
Newtown shooting in De-
cember He is pushing
measures including back-
ground checks for all gun
purchases and a ban on as-
sault weapons and high-
capacity ammunition
magazines, even as both
sides in the debate doubt
he'll be able to achieve the
full package.


Stranded cruise passengers

became comrades on trip home


Associated Press

MOBILE, Ala. -When their cruise
ship lost power, passengers aboard
the Carnival Triumph could have
been selfish and looked out only for
themselves and their loved ones.
Instead, they became comrades in
a long, exhausting struggle to get
home.
As ship conditions deteriorated
after an engine fire, travelers
formed Bible study groups, shared
or traded precious supplies and
even welcomed strangers into their
private cabins. Long after they've re-
turned to the everyday luxuries of
hot showers and cold drinks, pas-
sengers said, they will remember the
crew and the personal bonds formed
during a cruel week at sea.
The tired tourists finally reached
land Friday and gave a glimpse into
the intensely uncomfortable journey


they had endured.
Sandy Jackson, of Houston, was
fortunate to have an upper-level
room with a balcony and a breeze
that kept the air in her cabin fresh.
Rooms on the lower decks were too
foul or stifling, so Jackson took in
five people, including four strangers.
"We knew one, the others we're
very good friends with now," Jackson
said. "Everyone was very cordial in
sharing supplies. What you had and
they didn't have, everyone shared as
much as possible."
The ship left Galveston, Texas, on
Feb. 17 for a four-day jaunt to
Cozumel, Mexico. The fire paralyzed
the ship early Sunday, leaving it
adrift in the Gulf of Mexico until tug-
boats towed the massive 14-story ves-
sel to Mobile. It arrived late
Thursday to cheers and flashing
cameras. Passengers had to wait sev-
eral more hours to disembark.


I,
Associated Press
In this photo provided by Carnival
cruise ship passenger Martha Ackley
of Cypress, Texas, passengers wait
around a makeshift charging area
aboard the vessel in the Gulf of
Mexico. Passengers realized the
ATM machines had power, so they
unplugged them and daisy-chained
power strips to charge mobile
devices.


Associated Press
A woman wearing a de-
piction of the Libyan flag
Friday bearing the words,
"hold your head high, you
are Libyan" attends
commemorations to mark
the second anniversary of
the revolution that
ousted Moammar Gadhafi
in Benghazi, Libya.



US: Kidnap threat
for Peru travelers
LIMA, Peru The U.S.
Embassy in Peru is warning
U.S. tourists of a potential
kidnapping threat in the
Cuzco region that includes
the Inca citadel of Machu
Picchu.
The warning triggered
vehement objections from
Peruvian government offi-
cials Friday, but a U.S. Em-
bassy official said there is
evidence of a threat from a
Peruvian terrorist group.
The U.S. official has con-
firmed a report in the Peru-
vian newspaper La
Republican that Peru's mili-
tary intercepted in early
January messages of lead-
ers of the cocaine-financed
Shining Path outlaw band
discussing kidnapping for-
eigners, principally
Americans.
Horsemeat scandal
spurs inspections
LONDON The Euro-
pean Union agreed Friday
to begin random DNA
checks on meat products in
a bid to put a lid on a
spreading scandal over
horsemeat, while British au-
thorities announced traces
of horse had been found in
school meals, restaurant
dishes and hospital food, as
well as supermarket
products.
Europol, the European
Union police agency, is co-
ordinating a continent-wide
fraud investigation, and at
an emergency meeting on
Friday the EU approved a
plan to conduct random
DNA tests to check for
horsemeat, and also to
check for the presence of
"bute," the equine painkiller
phenylbutazone.
The crisis has raised
questions about food con-
trols in the 27-nation Euro-
pean Union and
highlighted how little con-
sumers know about the
complex trading operations
that get food from produc-
ers to wholesalers to
processors to stores and
onto dinner tables.
Islands want UN
to address climate
UNITED NATIONS -
The Marshall Islands and
other low-lying island na-
tions are appealing to the
U.N. Security Council to
recognize climate change
as a threat to international
security that jeopardizes
their very survival.
But Tony deBrum, a min-
ister and assistant to the
Marshall Islands president,
said the island nations are
facing opposition from Rus-
sia, China and a group of
mainly developing nations,
who argue the Security
Council is the wrong place
to address climate change.
The islands are already
being inundated with
seawater.
In the Marshall Islands,
wells have filled with salt
water, making drinking
water scarce and in turn af-
fecting food production.
One small island in a la-
goon is now under water.
-From wire reports


r L-- -- I r







PecT FERUARY 16, 2013


SPORTS


* Prac-
tice at
Daytona
includes
5-car
wreck./B3


0 Baseball/B2
0 Golf/B3
0 Hockey/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 Sports briefs/B4
0 NASCAR/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CR's Ayala, Lecanto's Nightengale retain dream


Pirate heavyweight

Martin remains alive in

consolation round
TONY CASTRO
Correspondent
LAKELAND Polk County's "House of Pain,"
aka the 49th annual FHSAA Finals, concluded
four rounds of action with a couple pleasant sur-
prises for Citrus County's eight-man state
contingency
When the dust settled after 10 hours following
Day 1 action at the Jenkins Arena, three county
grapplers will advance to Saturday's final day.
Crystal River junior heavyweight Brandon Mar-
tin (23-8) enters the 9:30 a.m. wrestleback round
following a 2-1 effort highlighted by two pins.
Martin etched his two falls -his 22nd and 23rd
of the season over Key West junior Kenneth
Sagen in 3:36 and Middleton senior Emanuel


Rivera in 4:23.
More importantly, two locals will head into the
coveted semifinals two precious wins away
from state titles.
Perhaps the least known hero is Lecanto junior
Jonah Nightengale.
Nightengale, in his first-ever state event, turned
the most heads by going 2-0 at 195 pounds in
Class 2A.
Nightengale opened the meet by pressing
Ft. Walton-Choctawatchee junior Christopher
Nash into a pin in 3:27.
In the second round, Nightengale edged Jensen
Beach junior Josh Conroy, 8-7.
With the pair of wins, Nightengale climbed to
21-8 overall.
He'll face Boca Raton-Olympic Heights junior
Ronaldo Abreu (47-6) in Saturday's semifinals.
"Today showed me where I am," Nightengale
said. "I had two tough wins; I have a legitimate
shot (at gold) tomorrow."
On which opponent was tougher, "Well, I
pinned the first guy," Nightengale shrugged. "The
See STATEPage B4


JOE DiCRISTOFALO/For the Chronicle
Citrus High School's Casey Bearden, right, squares up against Fort
Myers' Levi McQuinn in a Class 2A consolation match Friday at the
FHSAA 2013 State Wrestling Championships in Lakeland. Bearden
dropped the bout 3-2.


Lecanto sweeps CR

Lecanto girls

defeat CR on

the hardcourts
JOE KORNECKI III
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER- The
Lecanto girls tennis team
defeated county foe Crystal
River, winning 5-2 on Fri-
day night. The Panthers
won three out of five in sin-
gles and both doubles
matches.
"I was short my No. 3 ...
and everybody played up,"
Lecanto coach Sammie
Hall said. "It's always a
pleasure to play (Crystal
River). It's early in the sea-
son, and my girls played
well."
"I think we played well,
even though we didn't come
out on the winning end,"
Crystal River coach Cindy VR
Reynolds said. "We've got
some things to work on." s isfKSl r'i


S/Page B4


Lecanto boys

blank Pirates
JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER -
Both the Lecanto and Crys-
tal River boys tennis teams
have been hunting for their
first win of the season. The
Panthers had suffered
back-to-back defeats at the
hands of county rival Citrus
followed by district titan
Gainesville, while the Pi-
rates dropped their season
opener to Oak Hall on
Monday
Lecanto (1-2) proved to be
the first to find victory this
season as it swept past host
Crystal River (0-2) on
Friday evening 7-0.
"(The) first win is always
good to get that under your
belt," Lecanto head coach
Jack Hall said. "To do it
against a county team
makes it a little bit nicer.


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Crystal River's Nikki Moynihan returns the ball against Lecanto on Friday afternoon at the Crystal
River High School tennis courts in a non-district match.


Crystal River's No. 1 singles player Matt Allen returns a shot Friday afternoon against Lecanto in a
See SWEEP/Page B4 match at the Crystal River High School tennis courts.


m


Pirates


pitching


stymies


Citrus

SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER Crystal
River junior Kameron Penning-
ton allowed two hits through
4 1/3 innings in his first varsity
start and sophomore reliever
Jordan Humphreys retired all
seven batters he faced as the Pi-
rates made it a home sweep of
their county rivals this week with
a 4-1 victory over Citrus on
Friday
A single by sophomore first
baseman Wesley Bradshaw fol-
lowed by an RBI-double by jun-
ior starting pitcher Ben Wright in
the fourth represented the Hur-
ricanes' (1-1) only hits on the
night
Humphreys entered in relief
after Wright's extra-base hit -
which scored junior designated
hitter Chad Dawson (walk) and
struck out four in 2/3 innings.
Humphreys was also the only
player in the game to register two
hits.
"It's nice to see the kids re-
spond like that in a rivalry
game," Crystal River coach
Bobby Stack said. "I didn't see
anyone pressing.
"After being stressed and wor-
rying about how our pitching's
going to be this year with our in-
experience, Camo (Pennington)
did a great job. He hits his spots."
The junior was effective mix-
ing in his breaking ball no matter
the situation, even unleashing it
for a strikeout on a full count in
the second inning.
"I felt confident out there,"
Pennington said. "I knew my de-
fense had my back"
Junior center fielder Garrett
Lofley (hit by pitch) and senior
second baseman Michael Kidd
(walk) each scored in the first in-
ning for the Pirates (2-0) off a line-
drive double to the left corer by
Austin Wiles in the junior's first
at bat of the season.
Wright, who was also starting
for the first time at the varsity
level, escaped a bases-loaded
jam in the first to avoid any more
damage. The hard-throwing
See ASEBLPage B4


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"B'SOL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Time runs out


Citrus rallyfalls

short in regional

loss to Gainesville

SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

INVERNESS Citrus battled
back from a 16-point second-half
deficit to get within three points
with 1:30 left to play in the 6A boys
regional quarterfinals on Thursday
But the Hurricanes couldn't con-
vert on enough opportunities at the
basket down the stretch as
Gainesville made seven free throws
in the final 78 seconds to put away
the Hurricanes 82-72 in the Citrus
gym.
The visiting 'Canes (19-9) advance
to the regional semifinals for their
fourth meeting with state power-
house Leesburg (26-4), which de-
feated 6A-6 runner-up West Port
83-60 on Thursday and beat
Gainesville for the third time with
a 32-point triumph in the 6A-5
championship on Feb. 8.
Led by 6-foot-5 junior Kevin
Bolen's 13 first-quarter points,
Gainesville was strong out of the
gate feeding the ball inside and
complementing its low-post domi-
nance an 11-3 rebound advantage
in the first quarter-with three
buckets from beyond the arc.
But Citrus answered with a 16-1
run that lasted most of the second
period and put the 'Canes ahead 37-
32 before an up-and-under scoop
shot by junior guard Devin Pryor -
who had a game-high 25 points, four
steals and helped put Gainesville
into some foul trouble with his
drives to the hoop secured a 42-
40 advantage for Citrus at the
break.
"It didn't surprise me that
Gainesville started that way be-
cause they're a team that's used to
the playoffs," Citrus coach Tom
Densmore said. "Other than their
initial onslaught, where it seemed
like they didn't miss a shot, I
thought we'd be all right. And then
we went on the run, so not only did
we weather it, but we went up by
the end of the half."
A renewed Gainesville came out
of the half, however, to assemble a
21-3 rally for a 61-45 lead midway
through the third.
"We've been really starting slow
and giving teams double-digit leads,
so we wanted to come out of the
locker room in both halves and put
points on the board," Gainesville
head coach Kelly Beckham said.
"But Citrus shot the lights out in
the first half," he added on Citrus' 4
of 6 three-point shooting in the first
quarter and 9 for 14 performance
from the floor in the second period.
Nine points by Pryor in the third,
including a 3 before the buzzer, fol-
lowed that Gainesville push to help
keep things within reach until the
final quarter.
While Gainesville began chewing
up clock on its fourth-quarter pos-
sessions, junior center Ben Janicki
(17 points, 10 boards) helped sus-
tain his 'Canes' comeback efforts
with 11 points and seven rebounds
while playing through obvious pain
in the fourth before fouling out with
1:18 remaining.


pt,
"I-


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Citrus junior point guard Devin Pryor draws a foul on Gainesville's Eric Turner
in Thursday night's Class 6A boys basketball regional quarterfinal contest at
Citrus High School. Citrus led 42-40 at halftime but were undone by a big
Gainesville run to start the third quarter en route to an 82-72 loss.


A steal and layup by Citrus soph-
omore Desmond Franklin (12
points, nine boards) made it 73-70
with 1:30 left, but 17 two-point
misses were too much to overcome
in the end.
"Outside of a couple minutes, it
seemed like we were climbing up-
hill in the third," Densmore said.
"Then in the fourth, we couldn't
quite get the same momentum as
we had earlier. If a couple of our
twos go down, then maybe we get it
back."
Bolen had a team-high 24 points
to go with 6-foot-6 junior guard Isa-
iah Jackson's 21 points and sopho-
more Eric Turner's 14 points and 11
boards. Jackson was 6 of 8 at the
foul line in the fourth and had 15
points in the second half.
Citrus junior guard Mitchell Ellis
(15 points) continued his stellar
postseason run with 14 first-half
points.
Densmore took time to remind
his disappointed and relatively
young group of its feat in winning
the District 6A-6 title with victories
over Lecanto and West Port.
"I told them that to come out of a
district that people said could have
been won by any of four teams was
a nice accomplishment for us," he
said. "It was open to anybody and
we just went in and took it."


Citrus High School sophomore for-
ward Desmond Franklin goes in for an
easy layup Thursday night with
Gainesville's Kevin Bolen watching.
Unfortunately, it was not enough as
Gainesville took a 82-72 victory over
Citrus in a Class 6A regional quarter-
final playoff game.


~ ~


Upton brothers excited to be with Braves


Associated Press

KISSIMMEE B.J. and
Justin Upton played on
the same baseball team
just once growing up, a
travel squad in Virginia
that also included future
big leaguers David Wright
and Ryan Zimmerman.
Now the brothers are
being given a chance to
man the same outfield by
the Atlanta Braves.
"I didn't come to Atlanta
expecting to be playing
with Justin, it just hap-
pened," B.J. Upton said.
"It is a really special
thing."
Three years older than
Justin, B.J. signed with the
Braves as a free agent in
November after eight sea-
sons with Tampa Bay
Justin arrived a couple of
months later, in a seven-
player trade with Arizona.
For B.J. it was some-
thing he always wanted: a
chance to play in the same
lineup as his brother. He
always thought it was just
a matter of time.
Both Uptons are soft
spoken, but their bond at
the Braves spring training
camp has been obvious.
They have adjoining lock-
ers in the clubhouse, and
both showed up well be-
fore position players were
required to report.
"I've always been like


that," B.J. said. "I just
wanted to get here. They
don't know me yet and I
want to blend in. It's going
to be fun."
B.J. was the No. 2 pick
in the 2002 amateur draft,
and his brother topped
him in 2005 when he went
first overall to Arizona.
Justin hit .280 with 17
home runs with 67 RBIs
last season for the Dia-
mondbacks. He said he
struggled with the con-
stant trade rumors and
was happy when the deal
finally happened in
January
B.J. had perhaps his
best season in 2012 when
he hit 28 homers, drove in
78 runs and stole 31 bases
for the Rays. But, like his
brother, has always played
with the label of "under-
achiever"
B.J. said he's looking for
big things with his new
team.
"I have always given my
best and I loved Tampa,
but it was time for some-
thing new," he said. "Hav-
ing my brother here just
makes it better."
Braves manager Fredi
Gonzalez has seen Justin
with Arizona, but had
never gotten a good look at
B.J. When the brothers
took their first batting
practice with the Braves
on Tuesday, Gonzalez was


a ." .:.. .. I I ..
Associated Press
Atlanta Brave B.J. Upton, right, balances a ball on his hand Friday as he walks toward
his brother Justin Upton during a spring training baseball workout in Kissimmee.


pleased.
"I am really seeing them
for the first time, and they
can hit," Gonzalez said.
"They came in here in
great shape and ready to
play I have liked every-
thing I have seen from
them. It doesn't matter if
they are brothers, but they
are great players and will
help us."


B.J. and Justin are try-
ing to downplay the fact
that they are finally on the
same team. They are three
years apart in age, so it
was usually Justin looking
up at his older brother,
waiting for the chance to
play together.
"We are teammates now,
but we just want to start
playing baseball," Justin


said. "It's all good but it's
still about what we can do
on the field."
One thing the brothers
aren't doing is living to-
gether B.J. is making the
long commute from
Tampa to Braves camp at
Disney World.
"He's crazy," Justin
Upton said. "We'll see how
long it lasts."


NBAputs

history

online
Associated Press

HOUSTON Sure, Le-
Bron James has been on an
amazing roll, but what
about what Wilt Chamber-
lain did in 1962?
Now fans can study both
in one place.
The NBA put its entire
statistical history online
Friday, launching a website
that allows fans to review
box scores, shot charts,
game logs and newer data
that has changed the way
players are rated.
Previously available only
to teams and league per-
sonnel, and only recently to
media, it's there for every-
one at NBA.com/stats.
The site features every
box score for every game
played since the league's
original season in 194647. It
highlights noted games
such as Chamberlain's
record 100-point outing in
1962, when he averaged
more than 50 points for the
season, and Kobe Bryant's
81-point outburst in 2006.
The NBA plans to have
all the box scores and stats
updated within 15 minutes
after the end of a game.
Users will also be able to
link from the site directly to
social media accounts.


College REPORT
C.J. RISAK
Correspondent

Briahanna Jackson has fueled a two-game winning
streak for the University of Central Florida women's
basketball team, scoring 47 points in that span. Jack-
son, a 5-foot-4 freshman guard who spent her sopho-
more and junior years
at Lecanto High Someone we
School, collected 29
points, 11 rebounds missed?
and seven steals in If you know of a local stu-
the Knights 83-62 vic- dent-athlete playing collegiate
tory over Memphis on or professional sports, send
Sunday. In UCF's 67- their name and information to
5n Feb. 7, she toald sports@chronicleonline.com
on Feb. 7, she totaled
18 points.
For the season, Jackson continues to pace the
Knights in scoring, averaging 15.3 points a game, and
in steals, with a 3.5 average. She is also second in re-
bounding at 5.6 a contest. She has appeared in all 23
games for UCF, starting 22 of them, while averaging
30.7 minutes a game (second most on the team).
UCF is 9-14 overall thus far this season, with a 3-6
mark in Conference USA. Next up for the Knights:
They host University of Texas-El Paso at 2 p.m.
Sunday

Candace Miller (formerly Candace Smith), now a
senior at Northwest Missouri State and a Citrus High
School graduate, played in a pair of season-opening
wins over St. Mary's College on Feb. 9. In the 11-3
opening win, Miller scored one run; in the 10-2 vic-
tory in the second game, she had two hits in four at-
bats, with a run scored and a run batted in. For the
season, she's batting .250 with a run scored and
an RBI.
The 2-0 Bearcats play next at the Arkansas-Monti-
cello 7-State Classic this weekend in Bentonville, Ark.
They play six games in three days at the tournament,
beginning with contests against Concordia St. Paul
and Illinois-Springfield today
ME.
Ryan Labrador, a Citrus High School graduate and
a freshman at Polk State College, has earned two
pitching wins for the Eagles thus far this season. The
right-handed reliever has appeared in six of PSC's 12
games, allowing two earned runs in 7 1/3 innings
pitched.
Labrador has allowed seven hits and no walks with
seven strikeouts in posting a 2-0 record with a 2.45
earned-run average. The Eagles are 10-2 thus far this
season, with a game at Brevard Community College
on Friday and a home game against the University of
Tampa's junior varsity today

Hayden Kelly, a Citrus High School graduate and a
freshman at Pensacola State College, has collected
three hits and four RBIs in eight games for the Pi-
rates' baseball team this season. Kelly, a first base-
man, is batting just .158 with three hits in 19 at-bats,
but in a 6-3 loss to Palm Beach Community College,
he went 2-for-3 with a run batted in.
Pensacola State is 4-5-1 thus far going into a six-
game, four-day tournament at Delgado Community
College which started Thursday and will continue
through Sunday

Adrienne Ramsay, now a sophomore at Jack-
sonville University and a Citrus High School gradu-
ate, has yet to make an appearance for the 3-2
Dolphins softball team this season. Last season, Ram-
say hit .250, with two hits in eight at-bats while mak-
ing an appearance in 28 games, with two starts as an
outfielder. Ramsay scored 12 runs as a freshman.
She also earned a spot on the All-Sun Conference
All-Academics Team and was named to the Dean's
List.
The Dolphins play host to the Jacksonville Univer-
sity Tournament this weekend, meeting Stoneybrook
and Ohio State today

Chelsea Usher, a former standout softball player at
Lecanto High School, was superb as a member of the
Oklahoma Panhandle State University softball team
last year A starting shortstop as a sophomore, Usher
was a team leader in hits with 66, runs scored with 49,
doubles (17), triples (8) and home runs (9).
She batted .423, starting all 49 games for the 19-30
Aggies, 4-11 in the Heartland Conference. She also
had 16 stolen bases in 18 attempts, second most steals
on the team.


B2 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013


SPORTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Adams scores 2 to lift Pens to 3-1 win over Jets


Associated Press

WINNIPEG, Manitoba CraigAdams scored his first
two goals of the season to lift the Pittsburgh Penguins to
a 3-1 win over the Winnipeg Jets.
James Neal scored his 11th goal of the season, while
Pens goalie Marc-Andre Fleury turned aside 25 shots.
Andrew Ladd scored for the Jets and Ondrej Pavelec
stopped 25 shots.
It was Pittsburgh's seventh road win of the season,
while Winnipeg has lost three straight at home and
hosts Boston on Sunday
After a couple swipes at rebounds, Adams recorded
his first goal of the season at 3:19 of the first period. His
second was into an empty net in the final minute of
regulation.
Ducks 5, Red Wings 2
DETROIT-Andrew Cogliano scored two of Anaheim's
three goals in the third period, sending the surging Ducks to a
5-2 victory over the Detroit Red Wings.
Viktor Fasth made 26 saves to become the first goalie in
seven years to win his first seven career starts. The 30-year-
old Fasth is considered a first-year player and not a rookie by
the NHL because he is older than 25.
Cogliano snapped a 2-all tie just 1:02 into the third and
Bobby Ryan connected 48 seconds later. Cogliano capped the
outburst with his fourth of the season at 18:11.
Matt Beleskey and Corey Perry each had a goal and an
assist for Anaheim, which won its third straight.


Associated Press
Pittsburgh Penguins goaltender Marc-Andre Fleury hits
the ice Friday after making a save against the Winnipeg
Jets in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Devils 5, Flyers 3
NEWARK, N.J. David Clarkson scored on a deflection at
10:43 of the third period and the New Jersey Devils rallied
from a two-goal deficit to defeat the Philadelphia Flyers 5-3.
Travis Zajac, Alexei Ponikarovsky and Patrik Elias scored
the Devils' other goals with Ilya Kovalchuk getting the primary
assist on each. Martin Brodeur made 25 saves and had an
assist, while Steve Bernier iced the game with an empty-net
goal.
Wayne Simmonds, Mike Knuble and Matt Read scored in a


2:36 span in a first-period onslaught for the Flyers, who are 2-7
on the road this season. Ilya Bryzgalov had 15 saves.
Sabres 4, Bruins 2
BUFFALO, N.Y. Christian Ehrhoff scored the game-win-
ner with 10:58 remaining and the Buffalo Sabres rallied for
three goals in the third period to beat the Boston Bruins 4-2.
Ehrhoff fired a writer from the slot over goalie Anton Khu-
dobin, who anticipated a low shot and went down early. Cody
Hodgson added an insurance goal less than 3 minutes later
when he tipped in a pass from Tyler Myers.
Myers began the comeback 2 minutes into the third period,
tying the game at 2 by backhanding in a rebound after
Khudobin stoned Jochen Hecht on a 2-on-1 break.
The goals completed a stirring comeback for Buffalo, which
trailed 2-1 going into the third. Entering the game, Boston
(8-2-2) had outscored its opponents 15-5 this season in the
final period.
Blackhawks 4, Sharks 1
CHICAGO Marcus Kruger and Andrew Shaw scored dur-
ing Chicago's strong second period, and the NHL-leading
Blackhawks beat the sliding San Jose Sharks 4-1 for their fifth
win in six games.
Dave Bolland and Niklas Hjalmarsson also scored for the
Blackhawks, who remain the league's only team without a reg-
ulation loss. Jamal Mayers had two assists and backup Ray
Emery made 27 saves for his fourth win in four starts this
season.


Associated Press
Dale Earnhardt Jr. looks under the hood Friday as crew members makes adjustments
to his car after practice for the NASCAR Sprint Unlimited Shootout at Daytona
International Speedway in Daytona Beach.



Practice at Daytona


includes 5-car wreck


Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH It took about 10
minutes to wreck several cars at Daytona
International Speedway on Friday
Matt Kenseth triggered a five-car acci-
dent in the opening practice for the
Sprint Unlimited, the non-points race
that kicks off the season.
Kurt Busch, Carl Edwards, Mark Mar-
tin and Juan Pablo Montoya also were in-
volved in the crash.
Busch's No. 78 Chevrolet sustained the
most damage, forcing the team to switch
to a backup car for Saturday night's exhi-
bition event. Edwards and Martin also
went to backups.
"It's tough," Busch said. "A lot of hard
work goes into these cars, and six weeks
of preparation can be trashed in six laps."
Kenseth took blame for the melee, say-
ing he didn't see Busch gaining ground in-
side his No. 20 Toyota on the 2 1/2-mile
superspeedway
"That was 100 percent driver error, my
driver error," Kenseth said. "I had no idea
anybody was there and he had a run at
the same time and I came down in front of
him and he couldn't get slowed up from
staying out of me. It was a hundred per-
cent my fault"
The accident came less than 10 laps
into the first practice of Speedweeks. It
was supposed to be a learning session for
NASCAR's redesigned race car, the one
dubbed "Generation 6," and a preview of
next weekend's Daytona 500.
Instead, it turned out much like a test
at Daytona last month. Dale EarnhardtJr
caused that big one when he turned Mar-
cos Ambrose, causing a 12-car wreck that
essentially ended the three-day session.
Teams returned to the track this week
in hopes of learning more about the new
cars, which have been tweaked to more


closely resemble those that are in manu-
facturer showrooms. They also have dif-
ferent driving characteristics.
The biggest issue, especially for those
teams with damaged cars, could be a lack
of inventory NASCAR's development
process took time, and outside vendors
struggled early on to keep up with
demand.
That left several teams, including some
of the big-budget ones, trying to play it
safe at a track where side-by-side,
bumper-to-bumper racing at 200 mph
usually leads to massive collisions.
Hendrick Motorsports driver Kasey
Kahne predicted at Media Day on Thurs-
day that practice would be conservative.
"There is definitely a shortage of cars
right now," Kahne said. "There may not
even be an Unlimited practice because
nobody... we can't lose a car. We lost that
one at the test, which you don't expect, so
we need to make it through."
It didn't happen at least not for the
five teams involved.
The wreck caused several teams to sit
out the second practice session Friday
night
"As soon as we saw one wreck, I think
everybody was going to play chicken and
not go out much after that," defending
event winner Kyle Busch said.
The season-opening event used to be
called the Budweiser Shootout NASCAR
changed the name this year along with
the entry rules.
The sanctioning body went back to
race's roots, inviting pole winners from
the previous season and former event
winners who raced at least once during
the previous season to enter.
The result was a made-for-TV event that
included five former Cup champions and
nine former Shootout winners in the
19-car field.


Jacobson, Bae tied



for lead at Riviera


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES A
move down the California
coast hasn't changed a
thing for Fredrik
Jacobson.
One week after his best
finish in more than a year,
Jacobson birdied the two
toughest holes at Riviera
on his way to a 6-under 65
on Friday and a share of
the lead with Sang-Moon
Bae going into the week-
end at the Northern Trust
Open.
The Swede did just
about everything well,
from his tee shots to his
iron play, just what it takes
to get around the classic
design of Riviera. And it
helps to get a little luck,
such as a 55-foot birdie
putt from just off the green
at No. 9 that bumped along
until disappearing for an
unlikely birdie.
"That was probably the
biggest bonus of the day,"
Jacobson said.
Bae played in the morn-
ing and began with four
straight birdies, all of them
from tap-in range until
holing a 25-foot putt on the
13th. He wound up making
birdies on half of his holes
in his round of 65.
They were at 9-under
133, one shot clear of John
Merrick (66) and John
Rollins (65).
Still very much in the
picture was Luke Donald,
who chipped in twice for
birdie and worked his


Associated Press
John Rollins watches Friday as a long putt for eagle on
the 17th green misses the hole during the second round
of the Northern Trust Open at Riviera Country Club in the
Pacific Palisades area of Los Angeles. Rollins settled for
birdie on the hole.


short-game magic around
the course for a 66. Playing
for the first time in two
months, Donald didn't look
as if he had much rust. He
was two shots behind.
Lee Westwood birdied
the last hole for a 68 to join
the group at 6-under 136


that includes a pair of
major champions, Charl
Schwartzel (67) and Webb
Simpson (66).
Phil Mickelson was lurk-
ing, despite a sloppy dou-
ble bogey on the 10th hole.
Mickelson still managed a
67 and was five shots back.


College Basketball BRIEFS


No. 15 Georgetown 62,
Cincinnati 55
CINCINNATI Otto Porter Jr. scored 16
points while playing in foul trouble, and
No. 15 Georgetown wasted a 12-point lead in
the second half before rallying for its seventh
straight win, 62-55 over Cincinnati.
Markel Starks hit a go-ahead 3-pointer with
5:35 left and made five free throws in final
minute, helping the Hoyas (19-4, 9-3) stay
atop the Big East.
WOMEN
No. 6 California 79, UCLA 51
LOS ANGELES Gennifer Brandon
scored 16 points to lead a balanced offense
as No. 6 California beat No. 15 UCLA 79-51,
handing the Bruins their first home loss of the


season.
Brittany Boyd and Layshia Clarendon had
14 points each and Reshanda Gray added
10 to lead the Bears (22-2, 12-1 Pac-12) to
their 10th straight win.
No. 21 Colorado 55,
Arizona 42
TUCSON, Ariz. Jen Reese scored 15
points and No. 21 Colorado never trailed in
beating Arizona 55-42 Friday night.
Lexy Kresl, Chucky Jeffery and Arielle
Robertson each scored eight points for the
Buffaloes (19-5, 8-5 Pac-12), who have won
four in a row. All of Colorado's losses have
been to ranked teams including two each
to Stanford and California.
-From wire reports


Serena Williams back at No. 1


Associated Press

DOHA, Qatar An
emotional Serena
Williams returned to the
top of women's tennis,
overcoming a series of po-
tentially career-ending in-
juries since 2010 to
become the oldest woman
to hold the No. 1 ranking.
The 31-year-old
Williams rallied from 4-1
down in the third to beat
former Wimbledon cham-
pion Petra Kvitova 3-6,
6-3, 7-5 in the quarterfi-
nals of the Qatar Open on
Friday. She needed to
reach the semifinals to re-
place Victoria Azarenka at
No. 1 when the rankings
come out next week.
Williams held up one


finger after clinching the
match with an ace and
wiped away the tears as
she addressed the cheer-
ing crowd.
"I never thought I would
be here again," Williams
said. "Oh my gosh, I've
been through so much. I
never thought I would be
here."
Chris Evert held the top
ranking in 1985 just shy of
her 31st birthday
It has been a long jour-
ney back to the top for
Williams.
Shortly after winning
Wimbledon in 2010, she
cut her feet on broken
glass while on her way out
of a restaurant in Ger-
many. That led to two op-
erations on her right foot.


Later, she had blood clots
in her lungs and needed
to inject herself with a
blood thinner. She needed
to go to the hospital when
those shots led to a pool of
blood under her skin.
Williams lost the top
spot to Caroline Wozni-
acki in 2010 and tumbled
down the rankings. But
she made a comeback
worthy of a No. 1 in 2012,
winning Wimbledon, the
Olympic gold medal, the
U.S. Open and the season-
ending WTA champi-
onships. She lost only one
match in 2012 after her
first-round exit at the
French Open.
She'll face third-ranked
Maria Sharapova in the
semifinals.


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SPORTS


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013 B3






B4 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 32 18 .640
Brooklyn 31 22 .585 2/2
Boston 28 24 .538 5
Philadelphia 22 29 .431 10'2
Toronto 21 32 .396 12/2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 36 14 .720 -
Atlanta 29 22 .569 7Y2
Washington 15 36 .294 21 Y2
Orlando 15 37 .288 22
Charlotte 12 40 .231 25
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 32 21 .604 -
Chicago 30 22 .577 1'/2
Milwaukee 26 25 .510 5
Detroit 21 33 .389 1112
Cleveland 16 37 .302 16
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 42 12 .778 -
Memphis 33 18 .647 7/2
Houston 29 26 .527 13/2
Dallas 23 29 .442 18
New Orleans 19 34 .358 22/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 39 14 .736 -
Denver 33 21 .611 6/2
Utah 30 24 .556 9/2
Portland 25 28 .472 14
Minnesota 19 31 .380 18/2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 39 17 .696 -
Golden State 30 22 .577 7
L.A. Lakers 25 29 .463 13
Sacramento 19 35 .352 19
Phoenix 17 36 .321 20/2
Thursday's Games
Miami 110, Oklahoma City 100
L.A. Clippers 125, L.A. Lakers 101
Friday's Games
No games scheduled
Today's Games
No games scheduled
Sunday's Games
East vs. West, 8 p.m.


NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
New Jersey 14 9 2 3 21 40 31
Pittsburgh 15 10 5 0 20 48 35
N.Y Rangers 13 7 5 1 15 36 34
Philadelphia 15 6 8 1 13 37 45
N.Y Islanders 13 5 7 1 11 40 46
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 12 8 2 2 18 34 29
Montreal 13 8 4 1 17 36 33
Ottawa 14 7 5 2 16 35 27
Toronto 14 8 6 0 16 40 36
Buffalo 15 6 8 1 13 43 50
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Carolina 13 8 4 1 17 41 37
Tampa Bay 13 6 6 1 13 49 40
Florida 13 4 6 3 11 30 47
Washington 14 5 8 1 11 40 49
Winnipeg 13 5 7 1 11 33 43
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 14 11 0 3 25 48 29
Nashville 14 7 3 4 18 28 26
Detroit 14 7 5 2 16 38 41
St. Louis 13 7 5 1 15 43 43
Columbus 13 4 7 2 10 30 41
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 12 8 2 2 18 35 25
Minnesota 14 6 6 2 14 30 36
Edmonton 13 5 5 3 13 29 34
Calgary 11 4 4 3 11 33 39
Colorado 12 5 6 1 11 27 32
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 13 10 2 1 21 47 35
San Jose 14 7 4 3 17 37 33
Dallas 14 7 6 1 15 34 36
Phoenix 14 6 6 2 14 35 38
Los Angeles 11 4 5 2 10 26 32
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Thursday's Games
N.Y Islanders 4, N.Y Rangers 3, SO
Colorado 4, Minnesota 3, SO
Carolina 3, Toronto 1
Washington 4, Tampa Bay 3
Montreal 1, Florida 0, OT
Nashville 3, Phoenix 0
Friday's Games
Buffalo 4, Boston 2
New Jersey 5, Philadelphia 3
Pittsburgh 3, Winnipeg 1
Anaheim 5, Detroit 2
Chicago 4, San Jose 1
St. Louis at Calgary, late
Dallas at Vancouver, late
Columbus at Los Angeles, late
Today's Games
Tampa Bay at Florida, 3 p.m.
Ottawa at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Montreal, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at N.Y Islanders, 7p.m.
Anaheim at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Columbus at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Edmonton, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Pittsburgh at Buffalo, 12:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Chicago, 3:30 p.m.
Boston at Winnipeg, 6 p.m.
Calgary at Dallas, 6 p.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, 6 p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 6 p.m.
St. Louis at Vancouver, 9 p.m.


Northern Trust
Friday
At Riviera Country Club Course
Los Angeles
Purse: $6.6 million
Yardage: 7,349, Par: 71,
Second Round:
Sang-Moon Bae 68-65-133 -9
FredrikJacobson 68-65-133 -9
John Merrick 68-66--134 -8
John Rollins 69-65--134 -8
Luke Donald 69-66--135 -7
CharlSchwartzel 69-67-136 -6
Webb Simpson 70-66 -136 -6
LeeWestwood 68-68-136 -6


John Mallinger 71-66-137 -5
Bill Haas 70-67-137 -5
Ryan Moore 70-67-137 -5
Matt Kuchar 64-73-137 -5
Greg Chalmers 69-69-138 -4
Sergio Garcia 65-73-138 -4
Adam Scott 71-67-138 -4
Ernie Els 70-68-138 -4
Charlie Beljan 67-71 -138 -4
Phil Mickelson 71-67-138 -4
Ted Potter, Jr. 71-67-138 -4
Josh Teater 70-68 -138 -4
Hunter Mahan 70-69-139 -3
Bryce Molder 74-65-139 -3
Blayne Barber 69-70-139 -3
Trevor Immelman 70-69-139 -3
Brian Davis 70-69-139 -3
Bob Estes 68-72-140 -2
Harris English 73-67-140 -2
Greg Owen 69-71 -140 -2
Seung-YulNoh 70-70-140 -2
BenCurtis 68-72-140 -2
Jesper Parnevik 70-70-140 -2
Luke Guthrie 69-71 -140 -2
Graham DeLaet 72-68-140 -2


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


F Or Kthe' rca-ecord


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:
.Z "- CASH 3 (early)
3-4-0
CASH 3 (late)
3-9-5
PLAY 4 (early)
4-6-4-7
: PLAY 4 (late)
1-5-9-8
.FANTASY 5
6-15-16-23-27
MEGA MONEY
6-14-34-35
For Lotty MEGA BALL
17



On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
8 p.m. (FOX) NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: The Sprint Unlim-
ited
10 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing O'ReillyAuto Parts Win-
ternationals, Qualifying (same-day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12 p.m. (ABC, CW) Boston College at Florida State
12 p.m. (ESPN) Villanova at Connecticut
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Xavier at Dayton
1 p.m. (CBS) Kentucky at Tennessee
1 p.m. (NBCSPT) La Salle vs. Saint Joseph's
1:30 p.m. (MNT) Florida at Auburn
2 p.m. (ESPN) Purdue at Indiana
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Virginia Tech at North Carolina State
4 p.m. (MNT) South Carolina at Alabama
4 p.m. (ESPN) Missouri at Arkansas
4 p.m. (ESPN2) UCLA at Stanford
6 p.m. (ESPN) Duke at Maryland
6 p.m. (ESPN2) Detroit Mercy at Valparaiso
6:30 p.m. (SUN) Texas A&M at Vanderbilt
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) Princeton at Harvard
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Georgia at Mississippi
9 p.m. (ESPN) Texas at Kansas
9 p.m. (NBCSPT) San Diego State at UNLV
11 p.m. (FSNFL) Oregon State at Washington
NBA BASKETBALL
8:30 p.m. (TNT) 2013 NBAAII-Star Saturday Night. Featuring
Shooting Stars, Skills Challenge, Three-Point Contest and
Slam Dunk Contest
BOXING
10:30 p.m. (HBO) Adrien Broner vs. Gavin Rees, Lightweights
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour Golf Africa Open, Third
Round (taped)
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Golf Northern Trust Open, Third
Round (taped)
3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour Golf Northern Trust Open, Third
Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour Golf ISPS Handa Australian Open,
Third Round (taped)
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Golf Champions: ACE Group
Classic, Second Round (taped)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE GYMNASTICS
8:30 p.m. (SUN) Alabama at Florida (taped)
NHL HOCKEY
3 p.m. (FSNFL, SUN) Tampa Bay Lightning at Florida Pan-
thers
SOCCER
6 p.m. (UNI) Futbol Mexicano Primera Division Club America
vs Deportivo Toluca FC
WINTER SPORTS
10 a.m. (NBCSPT) Curling U.S. Championships: Women's Fi-
nals
2 p.m. (NBC) Snowboarding USSA Sprint U.S. Halfpipe
Grand Prix (taped)
3 p.m. (NBC) FIS Alpine Skiing World Championships (taped)
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) Curling U.S. Championships: Men's Finals

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



Prep CALENDAR


TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
WRESTLING
FHSAA state finals
9:30 a.m. Crystal River, Lecanto at the Lakeland Center


Jim Furyk
Fred Couples
Jimmy Walker
Charlie Wi
J.J. Henry
Brendan Steele
Angel Cabrera
Brandt Jobe
Pat Perez
Keegan Bradley
K.J. Choi
George McNeill
Chris Kirk
David Lynn
James Hahn
Jeremiah Wooding
Peter Hanson
Cameron Tringale
Andres Romero
Y.E.Yang
Stuart Appleby
Kevin Streelman
Tim Herron
Michael Block
Matt Every
Scott Piercy
MarkWilson
Justin Leonard
Brian Harman
Retief Goosen
Charley Hoffman
Jason Kokrak
Kevin Stadler
Stewart Cink
Vijay Singh
Ross Fisher
Johnson Wagner
Marc Leishman
Jeff Maggert
Scott Harrington
David Mathis
Casey Wittenberg
Michael Bradley
Jerry Kelly
Martin Flores
Ryo Ishikawa
Failed to qualify
Graeme McDowell
Dustin Johnson
Kevin Na
William McGirt
Steve LeBrun
Patrick Cantlay
Charles Howell III


Gary Woodland
Nicolas Colsaerts
Robert Streb
John Senden
Tim Clark
Martin Laird
Jeff Overton
J.B. Holmes
Corey Pavin
Kevin Chappell
Zach Johnson
Brian Gay
Rory Sabbatini
Patrick Reed
Jason Bohn
Colt Knost
Mike Weir
Brendon de Jonge
Ken Duke
Kevin Sutherland
Dicky Pride
Roberto Castro
Chad Campbell
John Huh
Russell Henley
Geoff Ogilvy
D.A. Points
Ryan Palmer
Padraig Harrington
Troy Matteson
Jeff Klauk
D.H. Lee
Bubba Watson
Lucas Glover
Aaron Baddeley
Ricky Barnes
David Hearn
Daniel Summerhays
Scott Verplank
Bo Van Pelt
James Driscoll
Tom Gillis
Bud Cauley
Jonas Blixt
Robert Allenby
Tommy Gainey
Ben Crane
Will Claxton
Troy Kelly
Arron Oberholser
Wes Short, Jr.
Michael Thompson
Chris Stroud
Carl Pettersson
Cameron Beckman
Sean O'Hair


-145 +3
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-146 +4
-146 +4
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-147 +5
-147 +5
-148 +6
-148 +6
-148 +6
-148 +6
-148 +6
-148 +6
-148 +6
-148 +6
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-150 +8
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-151 +9
-151 +9
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-152 +10
-152 +10
-157 +15
-158 +16
76 -WD
77-WD
80-WD
83-WD


I S O R T B I E F -


Pirates can't pull out
game in extra innings
The Crystal River softball team played
nine innings Friday night at Eustis but
couldn't leave Lake County with a win,
falling 3-2 in extra frames.
McCale Wilson was the hard-luck los-
ing pitcher for the Pirates, tossing all nine
innings. Wilson struck out six batters
while giving up six hits and three earned
runs.
Chloe Lane and Danielle Gomez each
scored a run for Crystal River and



STATE
Continued from Page B1

second guy was more skilled."
On his mindset entering Saturday,
"It doesn't matter who I wrestle,"
Nightengale said. "I'm coming in to
win it."
The county's lone returning state
qualifier from last year, Crystal River
junior Dylan Ayala, also went 2-0 at
152 pounds in Class 1A.
Ayala (37-4) opened with a 9-5 deci-
sion over Miami-Pace's Ale Smith be-
fore blanking Marianna's Devin
Combs.
"Winning twice guarantees me plac-
ing at least sixth place," Ayala said.
"No matter what happens tomorrow,
I'll at least be placing at states. My sec-
ond opponent was the toughest. He
knew that (if) he would have won, he
would made the podium."
On the task at hand Saturday begin-
ning at approximately 11 a.m. against
Harry Glasser of Bolles in the semifi-
nals, "I've got an undefeated guy first
thing," Ayala said. "Hopefully, I can
beat him; otherwise I'll drop down
and do the best I can."
Citrus juniors Casey Bearden at 170
and Brandon Taylor at 182 each in
their initial state meets were elim-
inated with 1-2 records.

Crystal River Individual Results:
WGT NAME W L
120 Allen, Michael 0 2
152 Ayala, Dylan 2 0
182 Bilby, Andrew 1 2
220 Valadraros, Geo 0 2
285 Martin, Brandon 2 1
TOTALS 5 7
Citrus Individual Results:
WGT NAME W L
170 Bearden, Casey 1 2
182 Taylor, Brandon 1 2
TOTALS 2 4




PANTHERS
Continued from Page B1

Lecanto's Amber Gamble defeated
the Pirates' Nikki Moynihan 1-6, 6-4, 6-
2 in No. 1 singles. At No. 2 singles,
Madison Gamble, Amber's younger sis-
ter, followed suit with a straight-set vic-
tory over Veronica Williams 6-1, 6-1.
Megan Jervis made it three consecu-
tive wins for Lecanto with a 6-2, 6-1vic-
tory over Crystal Menietti at the No. 3
spot
"The Pirates are great opponents,"


matches we
SWE P others' way a
Eastmond
Continued from Page B1 Patel defeat
River's Mat
"(We've been a) little Devin Ree
rusty to start with (this tively, in st
season)," Hall added. Eastmond
"But tonight was a good while Patel
match." 6-0, 6-3.
In the No. 1 singles No. 1 dout
matchup, Lecanto's Lecanto's d
Rishi Gurnani took the nani and A
win 6-1, 6-4 over Crystal Crystal Ri
River's Matt Allen. Gur- and White i
nani improved to 2-1 on set.
the season in singles Crystal R
play. doubles tear
Lecanto's Sam Alford of Johnson
nabbed his first win of comer Zack
the season in the No. 2 up quite a i
match against Crystal Lecanto's E
River's Ryan Johnson. Harrison K
Alford won in straight Panthers co
sets 6-1, 6-1. meet sweep
Lloyd Justo forced a 5 pro set vic
third set for Lecanto in Crystal I
the No. 3 singles match, coach Bill
pulling ahead for the pleased wi
win over Crystal River's performance
Ben Epstein 4-6, 7-6, 6-0. court, havin
No. 4 and 5 singles the team a




BASEBALL
Continued from Page B1

right-hander who also possesses a
sharp curveball hit three more bat-
ters but settled in for an otherwise solid


three innings into the fourth, yielding
just one more earned run.
An infield error helped Pirates fresh-
man shortstop Zach Pattison bat in
Humphreys in the third for a 3-0 lead.
Crystal River got one more in the fourth
when Humphreys scored Kidd with a
double to the center-field wall.
'Canes freshman left-hander Austin
Bogart allowed a hit, a walk and no runs
while striking out two in two innings of
relief. His only two base runners were
thrown out while attempting to steal
second base after getting fooled by his
deceptive pickoffmove.
Brady Bogart thought his club's pitch-


Samantha Jenkins doubled.
CR (2-3 overall, 0-2 district) plays 7
p.m. Wednesday at Central.
Panthers baseball can't
find footing on road
The Lecanto baseball team suffered
an 11-1 loss at Nature Coast in five in-
nings Friday night.
For the Panthers, the lone highlight
came from Jimmy Mooney, who went 1
for 1 with a sacrifice fly RBI.
Lecanto (0-2 overall) plays 7 p.m.
Wednesday at home against Belleview.


Lecanto Individual Results:
WGT NAME W L
195 Nightengale, Jonah2 0
TOTALS 2 0
FHSAA State Wrestling Tournament
area results
1st Round:
120 Vic Blasucci (SOMER) major dec.
Michael Allen (CR), 11-3.
152 Dylan Ayala (CR) dec. Ale Smith
(MPACE), 9-5.
170 Casey Bearden (CIT) pin Samuel
Massenburg (BRADR), 5:44.
182 Lvavada Warren (GGATE) pin An-
drew Bilby (CR), 3:45.
182 Brandon Taylor (CIT) dec. Addias
Corgelas (FTMY), 3-2.
195 Jonah Nightengale (LEC) pin
Christopher Nash (CHOCT), 3:27.
220 Justin Fountain (CLAY) pin Geo
Valadraros (CR), 0:53.
285 Brandon Martin (CR) pin Kenneth
Sagan (KEYW), 3:36.
2nd Round:
120 Jeremy Andujar (ROB) major dec.
Michael Allen (CR), 14-6.
182 -Andrew Bilby (CR) dec. Austin
Bess (FLH), 5-4.
220 Kenneth Ross (CSC) pin Geo Val-
adraros (CR), 1:26.
3rd Round:
152 Dylan Ayala (CR) dec. Devin
Combs (MAR), 4-0.
170 Casey Bearden (CIT) vs. Chris
Favoroso (JENB),
182 Corey Van Dorn (ORP) dec. Bran-
don Taylor (CIT), 5-1.
195 Jonah Nightengale (LEC) dec.
Josh Conroy (JENB), 8-7.
285 Christopher Griffin (WAK) pin
Brandon Martin (CR),
4th Round:
170 Levi McQuinn (FTMY) dec. Casey
Bearden (CIT), 3-2.
182 Shawn Delong (WAK) pin Andrew
Bilby (CR), 1:23.
182 William Diamond (PAC) dec.
Brandon Taylor (CIT), 7-1.


Madison Gamble said. "Me and my sis-
ter work well as a team...I need to im-
prove on my serve. My entire family
was here except my dad."
The Pirates' (0-1) No. 4 and No. 5
players went on to take the final two
singles matches. Anna Lane had a
straight-set victory over Andrea Dela
Cruz 6-2, 6-3 and Olivia Parker also won
in straight sets 7-5, 6-2 over Kelena
Klippel.
For Lecanto (3-1), the Gamble sisters
defeated Moynihan/Williams in
straight sets 6-1, 6-0 and Jervis/Dela
Cruz followed up with a 6-2, 6-1 victory
to give the Panthers the doubles sweep.


ent the Pan-
is well. Dale
and Dhruv
ited Crystal
t White and
ed, respec-
traight sets.
won 6-3, 6-4
took it home

)les play saw
luo of Gur-
lford defeat
very's Allen
n an 8-3 pro

iver's No. 2
n, consisting
and new-
Brown, put
'ight against
astmond and
ing; but the
included the
with their 8-
tory
River head
Reyes was
th Brown's
e on the
g just joined
few weeks


ago.
'A week into his ama-
teur tennis career and
he comes within three
points of winning his
first doubles match,"
Reyes said.
Reyes is still feeling
out his young team made
up mostly of underclass-
men and first-time ten-
nis players.
"It's a young team,"
Reyes said. "The pro-
gram is building and you
can't expect to win
games at the beginning
of a new program. I am
proud of the guys. The
scores do look better
even though we didn't
get a (point). There is a
little bit of room for
improvement."
Lecanto faces Citrus
for the second time this
season on Tuesday in
the hopes of rectifying
its season-opening loss
to the Hurricanes, while
Crystal River hosts Her-
nando on Wednesday


ing gave Citrus a chance but said its of
fense lacked enough quality at bats to
consistently compete.
"There was no matchup out there
against Crystal River's pitchers," Bogart
said. "It was their pitchers around the
plate and our hitters being passive,
point blank We had 15 outs that were
weak.
"Baseball's about adjustments, and
we didn't make our adjustments," he
continued. "We didn't put the ball in
play on a wet ground and make them
maybe throw the ball away. We're not
going to win with 15 unproductive at
bats."
Before the game, the school held a
ceremony for the dedication of a me-
morial plaque for former Crystal River
baseball coach Joseph Buccheri. A col-
umn on the event will appear in Sun-
day's Chronicle.
Citrus plays at Forest while Crystal
River travels to Central 7 p.m. Tuesday


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPEED FREAKS
A couple of questions we
just had to ask ourselves


- -


Daytona Beach News-Journal file photo
How would it look in Budweiser colors? You
might find out.


and arrogant'


vayulla uca ll evvw-aulla Ie IpJlluu
Milka and ARCA go together
like Danica and NASCAR.
Kinda-sorta.
What is the best gift
for a race fan on
Valentine's Day?
GODSPEAK: I know Dale
Earnhardt Jr. has a line of
potato chips, but does he do
chocolates? He should.
KEN'S CALL: I would suggest
"his and hers" restrictor plates
- in the shape of hearts, of
course.

The Daytona schedule
begins with an ARCA
practice Thursday. Why
does this excite me?
GODSPEAK: It's either the roar
of power-restricted V-8 engines
or, seeing Milka Duno walking
around in her fire suit.
KEN'S CALL: You're a closet
Frank Kimmel fan, or you're
aware that the first NASCAR
practice is just a day away.

ONLINE EXTRAS

news-journalonline.
com/nascar

Sfacebook.com/
nascardaytona


C @nascardaytona

Do you have questions or com-
ments about NASCAR This Week?
Contact Godwin Kelly at godwin.
kelly@news-jrnl.com or Ken Willis
at ken.willis@news-jrnl.com

WHAT'S ON TAP?
Key Speedweeks dates
FEB. 16: Sprint Unlimited At
Daytona, ARCA Series Lucas Oil
200
FEB. 17: Daytona 500 pole
qualifying.
FEB. 18-19: UNOH Battle At The
Beach (short-track nationals)
FEB. 21: Budweiser Duel (qualifying
races)
FEB. 22: NextEra Energy Resources
250 NASCAR truck race
FEB. 23: DRIVE4COPD 300
Nationwide race
FEB. 24: 55th-annual Daytona 500


According to Forbes magazine, which annually ranks
America's 10 most disliked athletes, Kurt Busch has again
held serve in the bad-boy poll.
Topping the list of athletes who people love to hate are
Notre Dame football player Manti Te'o and cyclist Lance
Armstrong. But holding steady down there at No. 8 is
Busch, who had a fan approval rating of just 27 percent.
The feedback from sports fans? Busch was "hot
tempered and arrogant" and "feuded with teammates and
reporters alike."


Sliding down the beach
Glen Wood made the NASCAR Hall of
Fame in 2012 and was joined by his brother,
Leonard, last week. Together, they formed
Wood Brothers Racing, an organization that
has been around since 1953.
The team, historically a single-car
operation, has struggled since the onslaught
of multicar, corporate-driven behemoths.
But the Wood Brothers got a huge measure of
satisfaction after winning the 2011 Daytona
500.
Leonard Wood's favorite story from
the early days of the team Glen was
the driver and Leonard the mechanic
was during a private test session
on the Daytona Beach & Road
Course in 1956.
Leonard wanted to check
engine function at speed
and rode shotgun
with Glen at the
wheel. During \
the run on


the beach, Glen drifted into the water, and the No. 21 Ford
went into a power slide.
"This wave flowed in and we had to hit it because Glen
couldn't stop," Leonard said. "He goes right through this
water, and it just picked up the car and set it sideways.
"I'm looking out the side glass and thinking, 'We're
gonna wreck for sure.' But the car turned back the other
way, and Glen hit the throttle and just pulled that thing out
as straight as an arrow, and I've never been so happy in all
my life."

Elliott gets the message
Bill Elliott, also known as "Awesome Bill from
Dawsonville," has finally gotten the message. The 57-year-
old Elliott said he is done racing in the Sprint Cup Series.
One reason may be that every time he makes a Cup
start, he takes himself out of Hall of Fame
consideration.
According to NASCAR Hall of Fame eligibility
requirements, a driver has to be out of the sport
for three years before his name can appear on
the ballot. Elliott made two starts in 2012, so he's
on the clock for the 2016 class.
Rusty Wallace was part of the 2013 class
after making his last start in 2005. Elliott,
the 1988 champ, and Wallace, who won
the title in '89, have similar career
stats.
Now somebody needs to have
"the talk" with two-time NASCAR
champ Terry Labonte, 56, who
is entered in the Feb.
S 24 Daytona 500.


OK, what's the deal
with the No. 3 car?
When Dale Earnhardt died 12 years ago
(Wow, 12 years ago?), in the aftermath, it
appeared it might be a long time before we saw
a 3 on the side of a Cup car again. And when we
did, it'd likely be a special circumstance. Well,
it's been a long time.

And do we have a
special circumstance?
Yep, money is our guess. Richard Childress,
who still "owns" the number, has a grandson
(Austin Dillon) who will be a Cup driver sooner
than later. Richard also has a current driver
(Kevin Harvick) who's leaving after this season,
and Richard has a sponsor (Budweiser), who
may or may not leave with Kevin. If Anheuser-
Busch's Boys in Marketing are on the fence
about going with Childress or Harvick, the
thought of adorning the new No. 3 might be
enough to keep them with RCR. Business is
business.

) Is it time to buy
Terry Labonte some golf clubs?
Or a fishing pole. Metal detector. Knitting
needles. ANYTHING! The man needs a hobby.
The two-time champ, who outlasted two
generations of Marlins (Coo Coo and Sterling),
Pettys (Richard and Kyle) and even raced
against Buddy Arrington, Connie Saylor and
Janet Guthrie, has been hired again by FAS
Lane Racing to enter the Daytona 500. It would
be Terry's 61st start at Daytona. You probably
can't find anyone with a bad word to say about
Terry Labonte, but honestly, we can't miss you if
you won't stay away.



Ken Willis has been covering
NASCAR for The Daytona Beach
News-Journal for 27 years. Reach
him at ken.willis@news-jrnl.com


FEUD OF THE WEEK


News-Journal/NIGEL COOK
Reason to celebrate? Seven
others finished higher. Or is
it lower?


Smitn


GODWIN'S SPRINT UNLIMITED PICKS
Godwin Kelly is the Daytona WINNER: Denny Hamlin Pablo Montoya
Beach News-Journal's motor- REST OF THE TOP FIVE: Dale FIRST ONE OUT: Joey Logano
sports editor and has covered Earnhardt Jr., Tony Stewart, Carl DON'T BE SURPRISED IF: Earnhardt
NASCAR for 30 years. Reach Edwards, Kasey Kahne is a bit timid at the finish because
Shim atgodwin.kelly@news- DARK HORSE: Kurt Busch of the wreck he caused during
S jrnl.com BIGGEST DISAPPOINTMENT: Juan January's Preseason Thunder test.


Baldwin Jr.


Bruton Smith vs. Tommy Baldwin Jr.:
The veteran track owner said start-and-park
Cup teams were a joke. Baldwin, who owns two
teams, took offense at the comments.
Godwin Kelly gives his take: "This is a classic
David and Goliath tale, only the term slingshot
has a different meaning."


SPRINT CUP
SCHEDULE
A look at the first
10 races of the season
(All Times Eastern)
FEB. 24: Daytona International
Speedway Daytona 500, FOX,
1p.m.

MARCH 3: Phoenix International
Raceway, FOX, 3 p.m.

MARCH 10: Las Vegas Motor
Speedway, FOX, 3 p.m.

MARCH 17: Bristol Motor
Speedway, FOX, 1 p.m.

MARCH 24: Auto Club Speedway,
FOX, 3 p.m.

APRIL 7: Martinsville Speedway,
FOX, 1 p.m.

APRIL 13: Texas Motor Speedway,
FOX, 7:30 p.m.

APRIL 21: Kansas Speedway, FOX,
1p.m.

APRIL 27: Richmond International
Raceway, FOX, 7:30 p.m.

MAY 5: Talladega Superspeedway,
FOX, 1 p.m.


Wallace never closed the deal in 500


Rusty Wallace, the 1989 Sprint
Cup champ, was inducted into
the NASCAR Hall of Fame last
Friday in Charlotte, N.C. Here are
some of Wallace's thoughts from
an interview after the induction
ceremony:

You talked a lot about your
friendships with drivers.
What was your friendship like
with Dale Earnhardt Sr., and
what do you think he would
have said tonight?
"He would have said
something really good. It would
have been something good, and
he'd have slapped me around and
said, 'Let's go get something to
drink,' and been rough and tough
like he always is. But bottom line,
he'd have been real happy for me.
"I've had two of my wildest
encounters with Dale Earnhardt
Sr., and I told that story tonight,
when I wrecked that car at
Bristol, and I look up and he's


standing on the hood ripping
the windshield out. He's the guy
that named me 'Rubber Head,'
because he said anybody who
can survive a wreck like that, his
head must be built out of rubber."

Kyle Petty said he had rarely
seen anybody come into the
sport with as much confidence
as you. What gave you
that confidence?
"Well, sometimes on our
TV shows, I mention the words
'snapshot of greatness,' and I saw
snapshots of different drivers do
different things, and my snapshot
is when I went to Atlanta (in
1980) and finished second right
off the bat. I said, 'Man, if I can
get my car right and if I can get
the right people around me, I
think I can do this."

You won 55 races, the
championship, and I know you
wanted to win every race, but is


there something you did not get
done when you were driving that
you really wanted?
"Yeah, I just desperately
wanted to win a Daytona 500. I
wanted to win that race so bad,
and I got so close so many times
and never could close the deal.
There's a lot of people who talk
about me finishing second three
times at the Brickyard 400 and
leading with 10 laps to go in
almost every single one of them.
That's a big race, but there's
nothing like the Daytona 500, and
that's the one I really wanted."

What was your favorite win
of all time out of your wins?
"My favorite win had to be
my very first win (Bristol, April
6,1986) because I wanted it so
bad, and I won it, and it just blew
me away."


AM/DUDLV LVKULN
Quite likely the first Hall of Famer from any sport who will
answer to "Rubber Head"


HOTTOPCS:3 ISUS GNERTIN A UZ


0


AUTO RACING


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013 B5


JL












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


'Downton' finale


Associated rress
Jai Courtney, left, and Bruce
Willis at the premiere of their
film "A Good Day to Die Hard,"
on Wednesday in New York.
The film, the fifth in the "Die
Hard" series, opened Thursday.


Five great

Bruce Willis


movies

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES By now it's
clear nothing and no one can
kill Bruce Willis, whose fifth
film in the "Die Hard" fran-
chise, the horribly titled "A
Good Day to Die Hard," opens
this week
It is not his finest hour At 57,
he still wreaks havoc and looks
great in a tight T-shirt but he
doesn't seem to be enjoying
himself very much. Still, it's a
good opportunity to look back at
five of the best performances in
Willis' eclectic, enduring
career:
"Die Hard" (1988): That role
set the stage for the character
that would go on to define his
career: wisecracking New York
cop John McClane. Willis is at
his charismatic best in this '80s
action classic: swaggering,
smart-alecky and resourceful,
but, at his core, just a regular
guy trying to outwit the Euro
baddies. The fact that he's not a
superhero actually gives the
character more power
"Pulp Fiction" (1994): One of
the most important and influen-
tial movies of the 1990s, of
course, with Willis in a role that
lets him put all his talents on
display at once. As a boxer
named Butch who's supposed to
throw a fight but ends up win-
ning it instead, Willis is tough
but tender, powerful yet vulner-
able. Quentin Tarantino is in
love with words and Willis is an
excellent fit for his peculiar
brand of verbosity.
"The Sixth Sense" (1999): If
Willis' characters in the '80s
were all about cunning and
bravado, the late '90s and 2000s
frequently found him in a more
introspective mode, especially
in this hell-of-a-twist block-
buster from M. Night Shya-
malan. Willis is the ghost at the
center of this ghost story, a child
psychologist working with a lit-
tle boy (Haley Joel Osment)
who, famously, sees dead
people.
"Sin City" (2005): Willis once
again plays a cop -John Harti-
gan, the last honest cop in this
corrupt town searching for an
11-year-old girl who would go on
to become an exotic dancer
played by Jessica Alba. It's a
performance filled with regret
and determination, much of
which he spells out in dramatic
but understated voiceover
"Moonrise Kingdom" (2012):
Wes Anderson's best live-action
movie since "Rushmore" is all
about the kids: two precocious
pre-teens who fall in love and
run off together but have
nowhere to go on an insular
New England island. Still, the
adults provide an excellent sup-
porting cast, including Willis as
the island's lonely sheriff on the
hunt for the runaways. There's
great subtlety and sadness to his
performance.


Birthday In the year ahead, you should be able to
put to good use much of what you've recently experi-
enced and learned. You'll find it will serve you well when
competing for a position in your field of endeavor.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) If you are placed in a
position of authority, strive to work with your underlings
instead of lording over them. If you start to push, they'll
push back.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Don't think people won't
notice if you attempt to manipulate them using flattery.
Your motives will be readily recognized and resented,
and instead of going along with you, people will rebel.
Aries (March 21-April 19) In search of a good deal,
you could go overboard and make an offer you can't af-
ford, no matter how good a buy it is. Don't give in to this
temptation.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Thinking people should do
things for you will make you a very unpopular person


Associated Press
Hugh Bonneville, forefront, and Elizabeth McGovern portray Lord and Lady Grantham in the
popular BBC series "Downton Abbey." The show, in its third season, focuses on the family and
their servants and is broadcast at 9 p.m. Sunday on PBS.

Third season comes to a close Sunday night


FRAZIER MOORE
AP television writer

NEW YORK The third
season of "Downton Abbey"
ends this Sunday with a bang.
Exactly what that bang is,
we're not going to say, in defer-
ence to the maybe half-dozen
"Downton" fans who still don't
know the shocking truth.
The larger point remains
that after Sunday's "Master-
piece Classic" (airing at 9 p.m.
on PBS), viewers must suffer
"Downton" withdrawal until
next season.
But until then, we'll have our
memories.
And what a season this has
been! The beloved valet Mr
Bates was sprung from jail and
a trumped-up murder charge
to begin married life with his
bride, the plucky lady's maid
Anna. Robert Crawley, Earl of
Grantham, has gotten Downton
Abbey back on its feet finan-
cially with an able assist from
his son-in-law and presumptive
heir, Matthew Crawley
Matthew wed his true love,
Lady Mary Crawley But an-
other of Robert's daughters,
Lady Sybil, died tragically dur-
ing childbirth.
Through it all, Robert's
mother Violet, Dowager Count-
ess of Grantham (played by the
sublimely scene-stealing,
Emmy- and Golden-Globe-
winning Maggie Smith) deliv-
ered a barrage of withering,
hilarious rejoinders to virtually
every narrative twist
"I remember my very first
scene with her in Season One,"
said Hugh Bonneville, who
plays Robert, lord of the manor
"She's complaining about the
new electric lights, and sud-
denly she put her fan up to her
face to shield herself from 'the
glare,' and spent the entire
scene like that It was so funny,
and I was just, All right!
There's no point in my even
being here. She's just marched
off with the scene!"'
Now, as then, "Downton" is a
plush, penetrating peek into
the lives of the aristocratic
Crawley family and their
household servants in an Eng-
lish castle of a century ago.
With a cast that also includes
Michelle Dockery, Elizabeth
McGovern, Dan Stevens, Jim
Carter and Brendan Coyle, the
series this season has drawn an
average 11 million viewers
each week while spurring an-
other surge of "Downton"-
mania, even from first lady
Michelle Obama, who pulled
strings to get episodes of the
new season before it
premiered.
"Downton" has even been
parsed for its political under-


I p.. I
Millions of people have watched Maggie Smith on "Downton
Abbey." But she's not one of them. The 78year-old actress, who
portrays Lady Grantham in the popular PBS series, told "60 Min-
utes" that she hasn't watched the drama because doing so
would only make her agonize over her performance. She said
she may watch it someday.


pinnings. Last month, Fox
News host (and native Brit)
Stuart Varney declared "Down-
ton" celebrates rich people,
who "in America today are re-
viled. They're dismissed as fat
cats who don't pay their fair
share." Yet on "Downton" the
rich people are "generous,"
"nice," "classy" and "they've
got style," he said, "which
poses a threat to the left, does-
n't it?"
It is rare when public televi-
sion is accused of threatening
left-wing orthodoxy, especially
on "Fox & Friends" (whose co-
hosts Gretchen Carlson and
Brian Kilmeade voiced sur-
prise at learning the show isn't
called "Downtown Abbey").
But "Downton" has a way of en-
gaging people, both the 99 per-
cent and the 1 percent alike.
And, yes, as the wealthy, pa-
triarchal Lord Grantham, Bon-
neville does indeed exude
classiness and, at crucial mo-
ments, generosity
But that's not the whole pic-
ture. Robert Crawley is also
confounded by the modern
world of post-World War I as it
upsets the social hierarchy
Meanwhile, despite his indul-
gence of underbutler Thomas
Barrow's shame (it seems
Thomas is gay!), Robert isn't al-
ways the most tolerant of men.
"I don't want thumbscrews or
the rack, but there always
seems to be something of
Johnny Foreigner about the
Catholics," he sniffs to one of
his kind during an exchange
about religion.
"I don't think I'd have a huge
amount in common with
Robert if I met him at a dinner
party," Bonneville said. "But I
like the guy I like the fact that
while he does bluster and he's
pompous sometimes, and he
makes mistakes, there's a de-


Today's HOROSCOPE
and lead to nothing but disappointment. If there's some-
thing that needs doing, you're the one to do it.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Don't take it as a per-
sonal affront if associates aren't in accord with your
viewpoints. Everyone is entitled to his or her beliefs,
the same as you are.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Should you have a minor
misunderstanding with a friend, don't blow things out of
proportion. In your desire to make a point, you could go
too far.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Generosity is one of your no-
bler traits, but you need to be careful not to carry it to
extremes. Don't give out more than you can afford,
especially to an undeserving party.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Even if you are normally a
creative and artistic person, your customary good taste
might not be up to its usual high standards currently.
Listen to people who are more aware of this than you


cency and a love for his family
underneath it all."
Coinciding with his "Down-
ton" duties, he also played the
addled Head of Deliverance
for the Olympics commission in
"Twenty Twelve," a riotous
BBC miniseries that spoofed
preparations for the London
Olympics.
"There are people who think
I've been doing nothing for 25
years, and then suddenly I get
this role on 'Downton Abbey,"'
Bonneville said with a laugh.
"But I've had a really lovely
time for 25 years! I've played
everything from Shakespeare
to sitcoms to period dramas to
modern serial killers. I con-
sider myself a character actor,
and I do love playing different
instruments in the orchestra
when I get the chance."
Of course, Bonneville real-
izes "Downton" is a good bet for
the lead citation in his obituary.
He has finally acknowledged it:
This show is a cultural phe-
nomenon, not just a fleeting
fad. And he has many theories
why
First, the savory writing by
series creator Julian Fellowes.
Besides, the cast is splendid.
The production values are lux-
urious. And the premise re-
mains rich with possibility
Not that he would want to be
part of it. He doesn't sentimen-
talize that long-ago era any
more than "Downton" does.
And yet...
"These days," said Bon-
neville, "we have relationships
that are forged, consummated
and brought to an end within 24
hours. Back then, the pace of
life was slower, and I think we
like to breathe out and enjoy
that world albeit for only an
hour or so, on a Sunday night"
Just one more Sunday night,
for now.


Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Be particularly careful how
you conduct yourself when in public. If you should com-
mit a faux pas and make a big deal apologizing for it,
you'll only draw unnecessary attention to yourself.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Even though you might
mean well, there is a good chance your efforts will only
muddy the waters of a sensitive situation. Think before
opening your mouth.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)- It's good to face chal-
lenges optimistically, but be sure you are firmly based in
reality as well. If you underestimate the odds against
you, you could delude yourself into fantasy.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Do not offer to help an-
other with something you know nothing about. If you
make a mistake, and it turns out to be costly, you'll be
held accountable.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14
Fantasy 5:4 7 13 15 34
5-of-5 3 winners $72,151.88
4-of-5 279 $125
3-of-5 9,679 $10
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13
Powerball: 12 -23- 25 -27 -43
Powerball: 29
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 1 winner $1 million
No Florida winner
Lotto: 5 -12- 25 -29 -33 -34
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 54 $2,848
4-of-6 1,910 $62.50
3-of-6 38,025 $5
Fantasy 5:8 18 20 27 30
5-of-5 No winners
4-of-5 320 $555
3-of-5 10,118 $21


INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, Feb. 16, the
47th day of 2013. There are 318
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Feb. 16, 1968, the nation's
first 911 emergency telephone
system was inaugurated in Ha-
leyville, Ala., as the speaker of the
Alabama House, Rankin Fite,
placed a call from the mayor's of-
fice in City Hall to a red telephone
at the police station that was an-
swered by U.S. Rep. Tom Bevill.
On this date:
In 1862, the Civil War Battle of
Fort Donelson in Tennessee
ended as some 12,000 Confeder-
ate soldiers surrendered.
In 1923, the burial chamber of
King Tutankhamen's recently un-
earthed tomb was unsealed in
Egypt by English archaeologist
Howard Carter.
In 1945, American troops
landed on the island of Corregidor
in the Philippines during World
War II.
In 1959, Fidel Castro became
premier of Cuba a month and a
half after the overthrow of Fulgen-
cio Batista.
In 1961, the United States
launched the Explorer 9 satellite.
In 1988, seven people were
shot to death during an office ram-
page in Sunnyvale, Calif., by a
man who was obsessed with a co-
worker, who was wounded in the
attack. (The gunman, Richard Far-
ley, is under sentence of death.)
In 1998, a China Airlines Airbus
A300-600R trying to land in fog
near Taipei, Taiwan, crashed,
killing all 196 people on board,
plus six on the ground.
Ten years ago: More than
100,000 people demonstrated in
the streets of San Francisco to
protest a possible U.S. invasion of
Iraq.
Five years ago: John McCain,
the presumed Republican presi-
dential nominee, picked up a total
of 50 GOP national convention
delegates from Michigan and
Louisiana.
One year ago: A federal judge
in Detroit ordered life in prison for
Umar FaroukAbdulmutallab, a
young Nigerian man who'd tried to
blow up a packed Northwest jet-
liner with a bomb concealed in his
underwear.
Today's Birthdays: Actor Je-
remy Bulloch is 68. Actor William
Katt is 62. Actor LeVar Burton is
56. Actor-rapper Ice-T is 55. Ac-
tress Lisa Loring is 55. Interna-
tional Tennis Hall of Famer John
McEnroe is 54. Rock musician
Andy Taylor is 52. Actress Eliza-
beth Olsen is 24. Actor Mike


Weinberg is 20.
Thought for Today: "The heart
may think it knows better: the
senses know that absence blots
people out. We have really no ab-
sent friends." Elizabeth Bowen,
Irish-born author (1899-1973).











RELIGION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Watoto Children's Choir


Special to the Chronicle
The Watoto Children's Choirs from Africa are on a tour of the U.S., and will be performing at 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 22, at Cornerstone Bap-
tist Church, 1100 West Highland Blvd, Inverness.

African orphans to bring message ofhope, love to Inverness on Friday


Special to the Chronicle
The Watoto Children's Choir
from Africa began its five-
month Eastern U.S. tour in Oak
Bluffs, Mass., last October and
are continuing their tour
through Florida including a
stop in Inverness with their
performance entitled "Beauti-
ful Africa: A New Generation."
Hosted by Journey Church,
the choir will perform at 7 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 22, at Cornerstone
Baptist Church, 1100 West
Highland Blvd, Inverness. They
will also perform at 6 p.m. Sat-
urday, Feb. 23, at Fort King
Presbyterian Church, 13 N.E.
36th Ave., Ocala.
Performances are free and
open to the public.
The Watoto Children's Choir


act as Watoto ambassadors to
raise awareness about the
plight of the orphaned and vul-
nerable children of Africa. Wa-
toto is a holistic child-care
solution initiated to serve the
dire needs of Africa and its peo-
ple.
Each of the children in the
choir have suffered the loss of
one or both parents. They live
in Watoto Children's Villages,
where they receive the care
and nurture they need to grow
up as productive citizens of
their own countries.
With vibrant, original African
music, dance routines and life-
transforming stories, the tour
showcases the new generation of
leaders emerging out of Watoto.
"Through the choir's Concert
of Hope, we share a message of


transformation by telling the
story of Africa's rescued or-
phans and women. We hope to
reach out to audiences with the
message of Christ's healing
power," said Watoto founder
Gary Skinner
With its genuine appeal, ac-
companied by music and dance
- an energetic fusion of con-
temporary gospel and tradi-
tional African rhythm the
globally acclaimed Watoto Chil-
dren's Choir has traveled inter-
nationally since 1994 as
ambassadors for the millions of
children in Africa orphaned as
a result of HIV/AIDS, war and
poverty.
Since its inception, 56 choirs
have traveled globally, providing
the children with a bigger
worldview, an unusual opportu-


nity they would otherwise never
get. The choirs have been to
Australia, Brazil, China, Europe,
Hong Kong, Japan, Germany,
France and the U.S. Their audi-
ences have included royalty,
presidents, ministers and ordi-
nary people, and they have cap-
tured hearts wherever they go.
"We're excited about hosting
this choir," said Journey
Church Pastor Kevin Brian.
"They were here two years ago,
and they were great. We really
want to get them exposure and
let people know about them
and their ministry"
To preview a performance of
the choir, visit www.watoto.
com/the-choir For the full choir
schedule in the U.S., go to
wwwwatoto. com/the-choir/see-
the-choir


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


When


perfect


isn't


enough

Afew weeks ago, I
watched a movie
on TV called "The
Perfect Family"
Right away, just by the
title, you know they're
not perfect.
The main character is
Eileen, the mother of the
family A devout
Catholic, she attends
Mass every day, and at
confession she confesses
every sin she can think
of down to her gossipy
thoughts.
She serves commun-
ion and delivers food to
the homebound. She's
careful to pray before
meals and keeps a fam-
ily altar in her home.
When she learns she's
been nominated for
Catholic Woman of the
Year, she's surprised, but
honored and desper-
ately eager to win. One
of the "prizes" that
comes with the title is a
prayer of absolution -
forgiveness for all her
sins. She especially
See Page C5


Worship
Grace Bible Church
Missions Conference begins
with a carry-in dinner at 5 p.m.
today. The service starts at
6:30 p.m. with Dr. Peter
Colo'n from Friends of Israel
Missions as special speaker.
He communicates the gospel
by biblical enactments and
Bible prophecy. Sunday
school begins at 9:30 a.m.
with Janis Colo'n speaking in
children's church and Dr.
Colo'n speaking to adults.
The 11 a.m. service speaker
will be with Dr. Colo'n and the
6 p.m. Sunday service with
Missionary Jess Pincus. The
church is at 6380 W. Green
Acres St., Homosassa. Call
352-628-5631.
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church in America invites
the public to attend Great
Vespers at 5 p.m. today and
Divine liturgy at 10 a.m. Sun-
day. Father David Balmer also
invites all to Bible study class
- "The Words of Christ" at
3:30 p.m. Saturday. The
church is at 1277 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness (off U.S. 41
North, across from Dollar
General). The Holy
Myrrhbearers ask attendees
to bring a box or can of food
for distribution at Family Re-
source Center in Hernando.
Call 352-726-4777.
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in
Lecanto will celebrate the first
Sunday of Lent with Holy Eu-
charist services at 5 p.m.
today and 8 and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. A nursery is provided
during the 10:30 a.m. service.
Christian Formation is at 9:15
a.m. Godly Play Sunday
school is at 10 a.m. There is a
healing service at 10 a.m.
Wednesday followed by Bible
study. SOS is from 9 a.m. to
noon Thursday at Good
Shepherd Lutheran Church.


Religion NOTES

Blessing of the Animals


Judi Siegal
JUDI'S
JOURNAL


Special to the Chronicle
Bettina Mulle and her dog Sookie await the start of the "Blessing of the Animals" service at the Nature Coast
Unitarian Universalist Fellowship in Citrus Springs.


Evening Bible study is at
7 p.m. Thursday.
Faith Lutheran Church,
at 935 Crystal Glen Drive in
Crystal Glen Subdivision, off
State Road 44 and County
Road 490 in Lecanto, invites
the public to services at
6 p.m. Saturday and 9:30
a.m. Sunday. This week,
Pastor Stephen Lane's theme
is "Alone in the Wilderness,"
from Luke 4:1-13. On Sun-
days, a time of fellowship fol-
lows the service. Adult Bible
study and children's Sunday
school classes begin at


11 a.m. Lenten midweek serv-
ices are at 5 p.m. Wednes-
days through March 20
followed by a covered dish
supper in the fellowship hall.
Call 352-527-3325 or visit
faithlecanto.com.
The Nature Coast Uni-
tarian Universalist Fellow-
ship of Citrus County
welcomes the Rev. Lauri Gist
to the pulpit Sunday. Rev.
Gist, an ordained Unity minis-
ter's topic, "Harnessing the
Power of Grace Through the
Practice of Love," asks the
question, "If unlimited abun-


dance, joy and prosperity are
gifts of Divine grace, is it pos-
sible to harness this universal
power at all times, even in our
own personal darkness?" The
NCUU fellowship is at 7633
N. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41),
Citrus Springs. Call 352-
465-4225.
First Presbyterian
Church is at 206 Washington
Ave., Inverness. The Sunday
worship schedule includes
traditional services at 8 and
11 a.m., casual service at
9:30 a.m., Sunday school
hour at 9:30 a.m., and coffee


hour from 9 to 11 a.m. The
Rev. Craig S. Davies will
preach. Call the church at
352-637-0770.
St. Anne's Episcopal
Church (a parish in the Angli-
can Communion) is on Fort
Island Trail North. The church
will celebrate the first Sunday
of Lent with services at 8 and
10:15 a.m. Sunday. St. Anne's
will host Our Father's Table
from 11:30 a.m. to
12:30 a.m. today. Overeaters
Anonymous meets at

See Page C2


Stuck


with


stickies
Be happy, it's Adar!
For Jews, Adar,
which falls this
year in February, con-
tains one of the most joy-
ous, if not silliest of
Jewish festivals. I am re-
ferring, of course, to
Purim, that wonderful
holiday where Jews
dress up in costume and
retell the ancient story
of their deliverance
from the evil hand of
Haman through the in-
fluence of the Jewish
Queen Esther
During the reading of
the Book of Esther, as
Haman's name is read,
groggers or noise mak-
ers drown out his name
as worshippers clap
and stamp in complete
antithesis of a tradi-
tional Jewish service.
Silliness is encouraged
on this day, with spoofs
and parodies on all sub-
jects being allowed and
encouraged by Jewish
law and tradition. In
Eastern Europe, the
Purim Spiel, or Purim
Play, was always a de-
light. Now that I have
Jewish law behind me, I
wish to offer the follow-
ing essay on a topic of
importance to me the
stickie.
Now, you ask: What is

See Page C5


..- F -


~





C2 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013


NOTES
Continued from Page C1

10:30 a.m. Wednesday in
the parish library. "Recovering
From Food Addiction" meets
at 1 p.m. Thursday in the
parish library. Alcoholics
Anonymous meets at 8 p.m.
Friday and Mondays in the
parish library. The young
adults meet for a light meal
and Bible study the first Fri-
day monthly at one of the
group member's homes. For
details, call Dave or Kathy
Jackson at 352-344-1167.The
"Widows Network" will meet at
12:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 25,
at the Olive Tree Restaurant.
This group meets the fourth
Monday monthly at various lo-
cations. All widows are in-
vited. The St. Anne's
sing-along is at 6 p.m. Sun-
day, Feb. 24. Annie and Tim's
United Bluegrass Gospel
Band will lead the singing. All
are invited.
St. Margaret's Episco-
pal Church will celebrate
Holy Eucharist Rite 1 at
8 a.m. Sunday and Holy Eu-
charist Rite 2 at 10:30 a.m.
which includes children's
church. Adult Sunday school
is at 9:30 a.m. Youth Sunday
school starts at 12:45 p.m. fol-
lowing lunch. Bible study at
the Radcliffes' home is at
7:30 p.m. Monday. Pastor
Gene will begin his Lenten
Bible study on "Facing the
Cross" on Tuesday. Feed My
Sheep will provide a hot lunch
to those in need at 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday. Stations of the
Cross at noon Friday will be
followed by a "Souper" lunch.
Food pantry hours are from
9:30 to 11:45 a.m. Tuesday
and Wednesdays.
Inverness Church of
God Sunday worship services
are at 8:30 and 10:30 a.m.
Children's church is during the
10:30 a.m. service following
praise and worship on the


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The Special Consensus


Special to the Chronicle
The Florida Fish Hook Tour presents "The Special Consensus" in concert at 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 22, at St. Timothy
Lutheran Church, 1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River. The Chicago-based bluegrass band is celebrating their 35th
anniversary as a professional internationally touring band and has been featured at the Grand Ole Opry. Tickets avail-
able at the door or in advance $10 donation. For more info, call 795-5325 or visit www.specialc.com.


second, third and the fourth
Sunday monthly. Children re-
main in the sanctuary for fam-
ily worship the first Sunday
monthly. Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m. with classes
for everyone. Adult Bible class
is at 7 p.m. Wednesday in
rooms 105 and 106. The
youth group meets at 7 p.m.
Wednesday in the Youth
Ministries Building. K.I.D.
Zone (for children pre-k
through eighth grade) meets
from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday.
This includes K.I.D.'s choir
practice from 6 to 6:30;
K.I.D.'s dinner from 6:30 to 7;
and children's Bible study
classes from 7 to 8 p.m. The
church is at 416 U.S. 41 S.,


Inverness. Call 352-726-4524.
First Baptist Church of
Floral City, 8545 E. Magnolia
St., invites everyone to share
in Sunday's worship services
at the 8:30 a.m. blended serv-
ice and the 11 a.m. traditional
service. Coffee and dough-
nuts are served in the fellow-
ship hall from 9 to 9:45 a.m.
Sunday school classes for all
ages begin at 9:45 a.m. For
more information, www.fbc
floralcity.org or call 352-
726-4296.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church invites the
public to worship at 8:30 and
11 a.m. Sunday. Coffee hour
follows both services. The
church is barrier free and of-


fers a free CD ministry, large-
print service helps and hear-
ing devices. A nursery
attendant is available for pre-
school-age children. The tour-
ing ensemble of "Music,
Gettysburg!" will present a
free public concert, "Gather
us in: Songs and Hymns of
Our Generation," at 1 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 23, at the
church. A freewill offering will
be received to support "Music,
Gettysburg!" The church is on
County Road 486 opposite
Citrus Hills Boulevard in Her-
nando. Call 352-746-7161.
Hernando United
Methodist Church invites
everyone to its various activi-
ties. Adult Bible study with the


Rev. Bob Martin is at
8:45 a.m. Sunday followed by
the 10 a.m. worship service
with the Rev. "Jerry" Carris.
Children's church, a nursery,
and hearing devices for the
hearing impaired are pro-
vided. The Korean worship
service with the Rev. Yoon is
at 2 p.m. Mark Bodenheim
chairs the Men's Connection
at 7 p.m. Monday. Holidaze
Crafters invites all to come
and enjoy crafts and fellow-
ship at 9 a.m. Tuesday. The
HUMW choir meets for prac-
tice at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday
under the direction of Darryl
Frenier. On Wednesdays,
Bible study with Pastor Jerry
Carris is at 1 p.m., Korean


Bible study with the Rev. Yoon
is at 4 p.m., and Bible study
with the Rev. Bob Martin is at
7 p.m. Cub Scouts Pack 452
meets at 6 p.m. Thursday.
The United Methodist Women
meet at 9:45 a.m. the second
Thursday monthly. The United
Methodist Men's breakfast
and meeting takes place the
fourth Saturday monthly.
Share Praise and Fellowship
meets at 6 p.m. the second
and fourth Sunday monthly.
The church welcomes the
"Snow Angels" and invites
them to make our church their
home away from home. The
church is at 2125 E. Norvell
Bryant Highway, Hernando.
Call 352-726-7245.
NorthRidge Church in-
vites the community to its new
location at the Realtors Asso-
ciation of Citrus County Build-
ing at 714 S. Scarboro Ave. in
Lecanto. The new worship
service time is at 10 a.m. Join
us at 9:30 a.m. for a coffee
fellowship, followed by the
worship service. Wednesday
we meet for weekly Bible
study. Doors open at 6:30
p.m. and study begins at 7.
The first Wednesday monthly
is the Faith Journey video les-
sons that gives insight and
understanding to the scrip-
tures as related to the culture
and land of biblical times. On
subsequent Wednesdays, we
are studying the book of Gala-
tians. Call Pastor Kennie
Berger at 352-302-5813.
E If you are looking for a
friend, then Abundant Life of
Crystal River is the church
for you. Abundant Life is a
growing church where you
can find a church home, as
well as a caring church family.
The Sunday morning service
is at 10:30 and the midweek
service is at 7 p.m. Wednes-
day. Both services have un-
compromised and
encouraging Bible-based
teachings that will build your

See Page C3


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!! i

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA i


ST. THOMAS
CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
aturday.....4:30 P.M.
Sunday......8:00 A.M.
................ 0:30 A.M.
I I' ,i i .r ,- t

S- ][ :l1. 1 14. t .1.. 1 .


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
795-4479


Special
Event or
Weekly
Services
Please Call
Beverly at
564-2912

For
Advertising
Information


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship ilh Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Troy Allen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir /Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org




Oa
"The
Church
in the
Heart
of the
Community
with a
Heart
for the
Community"






+ St. Timothy "

Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


THE
SALVATION
ARMY CITRUScoUNTY
CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 AM.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller





Crystal River
CHURCH OF
CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.' 11:00 A.M. -6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239



0 Crystal Diver
Church of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12thAve.) Nursery
Provided


ST. ANNE'S
T1 CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
wwwstannescr.org



Homosassa
First United
Methodist
church
Everyone
Becoming
A Disciple
of Christ

Sunday Worship
8:00 am & 9:30 am
& 11:00 am
Sunday School
9:30 am
Reverend
Kip Younger
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org
Office Hours:
8:30 4:30 M-F
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors


S Crystal
SRiver
Foursquare
Gospel Church

1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager



r West
Citrus
Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352.564.8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr. o






US Hwy. 19



SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
Bob Dickey


. Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon





HERE, YOU'LL FIND
A CAIPJN FAMILY
IN CH KST!

CKYSNTAL
RIVCK
UNITED
,ETHODI ST
CH U CH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
-, A Stephen Ministry Provider .:


RELIGION





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

faith. Abundant Life is a full-
Gospel, nondenominational
church that believes in the
power of Pentecost. Come
and grow with us. Come as
you are and leave forever
changed by the presence of
the Lord. Abundant Life of
Crystal River is at 4515 N.
Tallahassee Road, Crystal
River. Visit www.abundant
lifecitrus.org or call 352-
795-LIFE.
"Time is Getting Short"
(Mark 8:31-9:1) is the topic of
Preacher Dan Wagner's ser-
mon at 10:30 a.m. Sunday
and at the Saturday 5:30 p.m.
contemporary service at First
Christian Church of Ho-
mosassa Springs, 7030 W.
Grover Cleveland Blvd.
Wednesday evening fellow-
ship meal is served at 6 fol-
lowed by prayer and Bible
study at 7 p.m. Mary/Martha
women's meeting is at 7 p.m.
Monday in the fellowship hall.
Call 352-628-5556.
First Presbyterian
Church of Crystal River
meets weekly for worship at


10:30 a.m. Sunday's sermon
by the Rev. Jack Alwood is
"Which God?" and the an-
them is "God and God Alone."
Soloist Doreen Kellman will
sing "Were You There?" Plans
are under way for a Church
World Service CROP Walk at
2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 24. The
church is at 1501 S.E. U.S. 19
across from the Plantation
Inn. Call 352-795-2259 or visit
www.fpccrflorida.org.
Gravity Church will host
a baby dedication service at
11 a.m. Sunday followed by a
post-Valentine's Day sermon
titled "Love: going postal."
Coffee and doughnuts are
available at 10:30 a.m. Visit
www.gravitychurch.org.
Mid-week Lenten service
themes at Peace Lutheran
Church include: Feb. 20 -
"Alone in a Crowd," Luke
5:12-16; Feb. 27 -"Awake at
Night," Luke 6:12-16; March 6
- "The Journey Ahead," Luke
9: 18-24; March 13 -"The
Right Way to Pray," Luke
11:1-4; March 20 "(Un)fin-
ished Business," Luke 23: 34,
46. Lenten services at 4 p.m.
are followed by a potluck
meal. Maundy Thursday and
Good Friday services are at
7 p.m. Easter worship service


is at 10 a.m. Everyone is in-
vited to all services. The
church is at 7201 S. U.S. 41,
five miles north of Dunnellon.
Call the church office at 352-
489-5881 or visit www.Peace-
Lutheran Online.com.
Congregation Beth Is-
rael of Ocala will conduct a
Friday evening Shabbat serv-
ice at 8 p.m. Feb. 22, at the
Collins Resource Center at
Timber Ridge, State Road
200, Building 300 in Ocala.
The service will be led by
Rabbi Karen Allen, who will
give insights into the upcom-
ing holiday of Purim as well
commentary on the weekly
Torah portion. The service will
feature joyous music and con-
gregation participation. All are
welcome to attend and experi-
ence Reconstructionist Ju-
daism. Call Judi at 352-
237-8277 or email bethisrael
ocala@embarqmail.com.
Bring a friend for coffee
and doughnuts at 9:30 a.m.,
then stay for a mini-concert by
Mark and Andrea Forester
and a message by Mark from
God's Word at 10:15 a.m.
Sunday, Feb. 24, at Heritage
Baptist Church, 2 Civic Cir-
cle, Beverly Hills. Call 352-
746-6171.


Special events
For its community out-
reach event this month, Re-
flections Church is collecting
very small stuffed animals
(Beanie Baby-sized) for the
fire and sheriff departments.
These departments have re-
quested that the stuffed ani-
mals be small due to the lack
of storage room inside the
emergency response vehi-
cles. These stuffed animals
will be used to comfort chil-
dren in an emergency situa-
tion. Both departments have
acknowledged the calming ef-
fect for a child. To donate
stuffed animals, drop them off
at Citrus Springs Middle
School from 9:30 a.m. to noon
or 5 to 6:30 p.m. Sunday or
call 352-601-7964.
Children from kinder-
garten through sixth grade are
invited to a "Weekend Bible
Adventure and Concert" for
a fun-filled Saturday of song,
stories and Bible learning at
9:15 a.m. today in the fellow-
ship hall at First United
Methodist Church, 8831 W.
Bradshaw St., Homosassa.
Lunch will be provided as well
and a T-shirt and lots of take-
home art projects. In the after-


noon, we will have punch and
cookies for older youth, par-
ents, grandparents and
friends followed by a concert
by "Light Central," a college
student praise band from Or-
lando. Refreshments served
at 3:30 p.m. followed by the
concert at 4. For information,
visit lumc.org or call 352-
628-4083,
Men and older boys are
invited to the "Jack 'Murph
the Surf' Men's and Boys'
Event" at 10 a.m. today at
North Oak Baptist Church,
9324 N Elkcam Blvd., Citrus
Springs. A complimentary
lunch will be served following
the presentation. Jack Roland
Murphy, aka "Murph the Surf,"
author, artist, sportsman, mu-
sician and Christian motiva-
tional speaker, gained
notoriety in 1964 for the jewel
robbery of the century when
he and a partner stole the J.P.
Morgan Gem collection and
the Star of India, largest Star
Sapphire in the world, from
the American Museum of Nat-
ural History in New York City.
For 22 years Jack was a
speaker, trainer, and the Inter-
national Director for Bill Glass
Champions for Life Prison
Ministry and School of Evan-


RELIGION


Places of worship that


Dffer love, peace


and harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!! !

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


The New Church
Without Walls
"An Exciting & Growing
Multi-Cultural
Non-Denominational
Congregation Ministering to
the Heart of Citrus County"
Senior Pastors & Founders


Cj
k' "


Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr.
& Lady "T" Alexander

Sunday School 9:30 am
Sunday Service 11:00 am
Wednesday Bible Study 7pm

3962 N. Roscoe Rd.
Herando, FL
Ph: 352-344-2425
www.newchurchwithoutwalls.com
Email:cwow@embarqmail.com

"The perfect church for
people who aren't"


SFloral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com

, Homosassa Springs
L .?" ,ITHi 'i. Al ,'ErrmTCHURCH


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com



S Shepherd

of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon offaith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
ofJesus Christ.
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Sunday School
Adult 9:15
Child 10:00
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
um Other' rl

-- ~~


M1 Faith
Lutheran

Church LCM.
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325
COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com

{C9a ,t < F9o oew..





Grace Bible
Church


Sunday
9:30 AM....................Discovery Time
11:00 AM..................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM....................Evening Service
Monday
6:15PM.....................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept.- Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM.....................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
1% mi.east of US. 19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O.Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


, Hernando
( Churchorf
TheNazarene
A Place to Belong

2101 N, Florida Ave,
Hernando FL

726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 PM,
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 am
11:30 am
Saturday
Vigil
4:00 pm
6:00 pm
Weekday
Masses
8:30 am
Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm
(352)746-9422
\_______


S .... ... Chi. dren and Families"
2125 E,Norvell Bryant Hwy, (486)
(1 miles from Hwy.41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Nursery is Provided.
I,, i I i I 1


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
000Y Floral City, FL.


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Lifting Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
S www.fbcfloralcity.org


0


Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA








Worship
Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
SFellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

35 2-76


I


I

I


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013 C3

gelism, based in Dallas,
Texas. Jack and his wife, Kit-
ten, live in Crystal River,
Florida. Their ministry, Son-
shine Adventures, works with
the church to train and de-
velop prison, jail, and youth
ministries. Call the church at
352-489-1688.
Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church in Inverness
announces its 2013 Marriage
Jubilee Celebration Mass
honoring couples celebrating
their silver (25 years) or
golden (50 years) anniver-
sary, as well as couples mar-
ried more than 50 years. This
Mass will take place at 11
a.m. today. All are invited to
attend. There will be reserved
seating in the church for the
registered "honorees" during
the Mass, and a special re-
ception in the parish hall im-
mediately following the Mass.
Call the parish office at 352-
726-1670. The church is at
550 U.S. 41 S., Inverness.
A fashion show will take
place from 1 to 3 p.m. today
in the Dewain Farris Fellow-
ship Hall at Community Con-
gregational Christian Church,
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.,

See NOTES/Page C4


I





C4 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

Citrus Springs. The event will
feature fashions by Bealls,
hair and makeup by "New
Concepts," and delightful
desserts. Cost is $7. Call the
church at 352-489-1260.
First Christian Church of
Inverness will celebrate its
"Friends Day" on Sunday.
The family worship service
will be at 10:15 a.m. in the
sanctuary at 2018 Colonade
St., Inverness. Dr. W. Ray
Kelley and the entire congre-
gation invite all of our friends
to join us for a special time of
praise and worship. The serv-
ice features a blended music
format with both new and old
songs of praise to our Lord.
We also will have special
music presented by Shirley
Kelley, director of music. Pas-
tor Kelley will continue a se-
ries of messages from the
book of James, and on Sun-
day his sermon title is "Living
Faith." Following the family
worship service, we will have
a fellowship meal in our Fam-
ily Life Center. Everyone is in-
vited. The church his just
behind the RaceTrac gas sta-
tion on U.S. 44 W. in Inver-
ness. Call the church office at
352-344-1908.
North Oak Baptist
Church in Citrus Springs will
be host church for a "Gospel
Fest" at 7 p.m. Friday to raise
money for the Relay For Life
Citrus Springs Elementary
School Team. Various area
church choirs and gospel
groups will perform. Everyone
is invited to come and help
support the Relay team's ef-
forts to raise money for can-
cer research and the
American Cancer Society.
More gospel groups and
choirs are invited to partici-
pate, said the Rev. David
Houston, a member of the
team and pastor of Mount
Olive Baptist Church in Dun-
nellon and New Salem Baptist
Church in Holder. Houston is
retired from Citrus Springs El-
ementary after 26 years. "We
would also like to have some
testimonies of cancer sur-
vivors who were helped be-
cause of research, or
because of prayer," Houston
said. The church is at the cor-
ner of Elkcam and Citrus
Springs boulevards. To partici-
pate, or for more information,
call Houston at 352-637-0385,
or the school at 352-
344-4079.
To help those within our
community who are in need,
there will be a free clothes
giveaway from 9 a.m. to


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, at
Inverness First United
Methodist Church, 3896 S.
Pleasant Grove Road, Inver-
ness (two miles south ofAp-
plebee's on County Road
581). All types of clothing for
women, men and children will
be available, including shoes.
St. Paul's Lutheran
Church will provide an
overview of information fami-
lies and friends need to know
as they care for a loved one
with Alzheimer's disease. The
event is from 9 a.m. to noon
Saturday, Feb. 23, in the
church, 6150 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills. Pastor
Curt Seefeldt, director of
church relations for the
Lutheran Home Association
will facilitate the discussion on
Alzheimer's diagnosis, treat-
ment options, answers to spir-
itual questions and family
care. Everyone is invited to
attend this free event. To reg-
ister in advance or for more
information, call the church at
352-489-3027 or email office
@stpauls.edu. Onsite regis-
tration will begin at 8:30 a.m.
Congregation Beth Israel
of Ocala will celebrate the
festival of Purim at 11 a.m.
Sunday, Feb. 24, at the
Collins Center, building 300,
9401 State Road 200 in
Ocala. The celebration with
begin with the reading of the
Megillah, the Scroll of Esther,
followed by a covered-dish
brunch and the telling of jokes
and other Purim frivolities. All
are welcome to join in the fun
and levity. Call Lois at 352-
291-1308 or Janis at 352-861-
6732 and indicate what food
you will bring. Congregation
Beth Israel of Ocala is a lib-
eral, inclusive, progressive
Jewish community affiliated
with the Jewish Reconstruc-
tionist Movement.
St. Benedict Council of
Catholic Women will host a
women's retreat with nation-
ally-known speaker and
award-winning author Patricia
Livingston from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. Thursday, March 7, in
Hilgert Hall at St. Benedict
Catholic Church, 455 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Crystal River.
Lent is a rich time to reflect on
the deepest meaning of our
lives. Join us for the retreat as
we have the opportunity to
honestly look at our struggles
and joys. Come to be heart-
ened in the truth that our own
experiences of suffering and
love, of breakdown and
breakthrough, are sacred.
They are part of the central
Christian mystery of death
and resurrection. Journeying
in God's love, we are all on
our way to Easter. Livingston
is best known for her touch-


Dan Schall


Special to the Chronicle
Floral City United Methodist Church welcomes Dan Schall
at 6:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 24. His music and testimony fo-
cuses on encouragement and God's love for man. Schall
stutters when he speaks, but he has been blessed with a
rich singing voice. His early years were filled with anger
and frustration, feeling that even if there was a God, He
had forsaken him. He shares how under God's direction,
positive changes came to him; he now helps others real-
ize what God has given them. After working 30 years at
a full-time job and giving concerts, he retired and formed
"Dan Schall Ministries" based in Zelienople, Pa.
(www.DanSchall.org) Besides his busy concert schedule,
he spends much of his time following God's direction to
visit people in need. The church welcomes all to this very
positive concert and, afterwards, an offering of strawber-
ries and ice cream during a fellowship time. A freewill of-
fering will be collected. The church is at 8478 E. Marvin
St. Call 352-344-1771.


ing, storytelling style of illumi-
nating the presence of God in
everyday life. She has a
unique gift for opening us to
the beauty of our own stories
with their special truth of
God's present love. Cost to
attend the retreat is $10 per
person, including lunch. All
Catholic women are invited.
Seating is limited. For reser-
vations and payment, call
Jolinda at 352-503-6108.
Sales & such
New Hope United
Methodist Church will have its
annual yard sale at 8 a.m.
today. This yard sale benefits
the scholarship fund for mem-
bers and friends of the
church. The event will have
slightly used items for sale,
homemade jellies and jams,
and great food to buy and eat.
Come bring your friends and
see our old wooden church
that was established in 1830.
The church is at 12725 Is-
tachatta Road in Istachatta,


next to Floral City. Call Linda
at 352-601-3901.
The St. Scholastica
Council of Catholic Women is
hosting their annual "Tricky
Tray" to raise funds for local
charities. Join them today at
the parish hall, 4301 W. Ho-
mosassa Trail, Lecanto.
Doors open at 10 a.m. Light
refreshments and coffee will
be served. A donation of $4
gets you in, including basket
tickets. Call Connie at 352-
527-2599.
The Council of Catholic
Women of Our Lady of Grace
Church will host a "Trash'n
Treasures Fund Raiser"
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday
and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 23, in the Parish Life
Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills. Find household
items, clothing, books, jew-
elry, plants, tools, small furni-
ture, toys, knickknacks and
white elephant items. Pro-
ceeds go to needed items for
the church and charitable


contributions. Call Anna
Panasik at 352-527-3226.
Our Lady of Grace's monthly
flea market will take place out-
side from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. that
Saturday in concert with
"Trash'n Treasures."
Why mess up your
place? Just box up your treas-
ures, bring your table and set
up at Hernando United
Methodist Church on Satur-
day, Feb. 23, from 8 a.m. to
2 p.m. for the semi-annual
"Sell Your Own Treasures
Sale." All are invited to come.
No reservations needed -
first come, first served. Rent a
12-by-12-foot space for $5.
The kitchen will be open for
breakfast and lunch. The
church is at 2125 E. Norvell
Bryant Highway (County
Road 486). Call 352-
726-7245.
Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church in Beverly
Hills will host its monthly out-
door flea market from 8 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Saturday. Feb. 23,
on the church property at 6
Roosevelt Boulevard in Bev-
erly Hills off North Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491).
Shoppers are welcome. Up to
50 commercial and private
vendors are expected to dis-
play their wares. Commercial
vendors and private individu-
als are welcome to bring and
sell goods. Spaces are avail-
able for $10. A mobile kitchen
will serve breakfast and lunch
items. Flea markets take
place the fourth Saturday
monthly except in June, July
and August. Next month's flea


market is March 23. For more
information or to reserve a
space, call Rose Mary at 352-
527-6459 or e-mail wjeselso
@tampabay.rr.com.
Food & fellowship
The Yankeetown Com-
munity Church JOY Circle will
host a "Soup n Salad
Lunch" fundraiser from
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 23. All you care to sam-
ple soup and salad, with cof-
fee, iced tea and water. Cost
is $5 for adults and $3 for chil-
dren. Desserts may be
bought for $1.50.
The church is on State
Road 40 West, about two
miles from the traffic light on
U.S. 19 in Inglis. Come join us
for good food and fellowship.
Floral City United
Methodist Church will have its
"Community Dinner" from 3
to 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, in
the church hall. The menu
consists of pulled pork, baked
beans, Greek salad, apple-
sauce, assorted breads and
desserts. Beverage included.
Cost is $7.50. Proceeds go
toward missions. The church
is at 8478 E. Marvin St.,
across from the elementary
school. Call 352-344-1771.
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church, on the cor-
ner of U.S. 41 and State Road
40 East in Dunnellon, hosts
its fish fry from 4 to 6 p.m.
Friday during lent through
March 22, in the church pavil-
ion. Cost is $7 for adults and
$3.50 for children. The fish fry
is open to the public.


ieuT -AE2013
Presented By Shepherd of theHillsEpiscopal Church


Many Paths, One Destination:

Comparative Religions


Dr. Harry S. Coverston,
Professor of Religion, Law and Philosophy,
University of Central Florida, Orlando
A presentation on comparative religions: Judaism,
Christianity, Islam, and Buddhism which represent
thefourlargest spiritual paths within the American
populace today.
A Hindu proverb observes that there are many
paths, one destination among human religious
traditions. All religions seek to answer certain
questions. We begin by identifying those questions,
and then we focus on how these religions seek to
answer humanity s enduring questions.


SThis presentationishmdedbyhdmeRoidaHumniesCoul un a granfiethNaonlEndowmntfor
r the Humamt (NH). Any views, findgs, cmchion ornmm dating elressedin this pogmn do nt
necessaily reaesenthodseof the FloridaHuman tes Co cilmrNae NlcmalEowmet for iHume anie
ThisLight Shine eventisiproducedby Shepherd of the Hillsas an erichment ii
program forCitrusCounty and co-sponsored by the Citrus County Chronicle


Shepherd of Lhe Hills Episcopal Church.
25-0n H. Nonell Braani Highua. ICR 4-86. Lecano
For More Intformarin. (all- 352-52"'-052 Sam w Ipm


Redemption

hristian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School.............9:00
W orship.................10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(At The Flahins Lisht).h


352-4;22-(>5.35[|^ .. '
;i411)r1
Todd
Langdon


Firs Baptist

ofLake Rtoa6seaw
SBC
Joseph W. (Joe) Schroeder,
Pastor
SERVICES
Sunday 11:00am
& 6:00pm
Wednesday 6:00pm
Magnifying God's name by
bringing people to Jesus
7854 W. Dunnellon Rd (CR 488)
Ph. 352-795-5651
Cell 352-812-8584
E m ail: r. i .r- ... !I ., I,, III -.- -I..
Check us out on Facebook


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca .com


COMMUNITY
CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH


'//i ,1*,,,/, < *///' ,'...*


SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260



Special

Event or

Weekly

Services

Please Call

Beverly at

564-2912

For

Advertising

Information


VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.


SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. & 10:30 A.M.


SPANISH MASS:
12:30 PM.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.i to 3:15 P.. Sat.
orByAppointment


WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.
W W ,ill. I'I ,
6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyfgracefl
-, .catholicweb.com .:


Hwy.44E@ U
* Washington Ave., Inverness U

. Sunday Services
* Traditional
_ 8:00 AM & 11:00 AM U
* Casual Service
* 9:30 AM
11:00 AM Service
Tapes & CD's Available
" Sunday School for all ages
. 9:30 AM
" Nursery Provided
SFellowship & Youth Group
5 to 7 PM
SWeb Site: www.fpcinv.org
Podcast: FPC inv.com

* Church Office637-0770
SPastor Craig Davies


Em


Beverly Hills
Community Church
Where Christ is
Proudly Proclaimed!
Everyone is Welcome
82 Civic Circle
Beverly Hills, Florida 34465
(352) 746-3620
Email bhcchurch@embarqmail.com
Wednesday Bible Study
6 pm
SundayCoffee / Conversation
8:30 am
Sunday Worship Service
10 am
Youth Group Sundays
5 pm
Ladies Guild 3rd Wed.
12 noon
Pastor
Dr. Stewart Jamison
Communion served the
first Sunday of each month
We are a traditional
worshipping church that
sings the old hymns of
the faith.
Choir Rehearsal,
Wednesday, 7pm
Hand Chimes rehearsal,
Thursday, 6:30 pm
Spaghetti Supper,
3rd Friday of the month.


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!! !

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS


RELIGION


rjlrE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

wants this, even more than the
title and any accolades that
come with it.
One of the criteria for winning
the award is having an upstand-
ing family that exemplifies
Catholic values. However,
Eileen's family has a few areas
that may exclude her from being
Catholic Woman of the Year. Her
unmarried pregnant daughter is
marrying a woman, and her son
is cheating on his wife, whom
Eileen had pressured him to
marry in the first place because
she was pregnant The dad of the
family is a recovering alcoholic.
The story follows Eileen's
painful emotional struggle as
she tries to reconcile her real
family situation with the family
she thinks she needs to present


RELIGION


to the nominating committee.
Her daughter had previously
kept her relationship and preg-
nancy a secret from Eileen be-
cause she was afraid of her
mom's judgment and disap-
proval. When Eileen learns of it
she begins lying, saying her
daughter is dating a nice
Catholic man. She lies about her
son's marriage, saying it's fine,
which is difficult for Eileen
since lying is a sin.
Eventually, Eileen's husband
leaves because he can't stand
the pressure Eileen is putting
on the family to be something
they're not, including him.
He's been sober 15 years, yet
Eileen treats him as if he's still
drunk.
Throughout the whole movie I
wanted to ask Eileen, "Why are
you putting yourself and your
family through all this agony just
to win a title? Shouldn't your re-
ligious devotion be because you


love serving God and not be-
cause you want to win an
award?"
Another woman at Eileen's
church is also nominated, and
her family appears to be far
"better" than Eileen's. Her
record of church and commu-
nity work is also more
impressive.
But Eileen wants it more,
deeply, desperately more. It's
not until her daughter suffers a
miscarriage and Eileen con-
fesses a secret of her own that
what's behind her desperation is
revealed.
Years earlier, when her son
and daughter were young and
her husband was still drinking,
she discovered she was preg-
nant with a third child and
her husband said he had fallen
in love with someone else.
She aborted the baby and had
lived with secret, agonizing guilt
ever since. She didn't even tell


her husband.
As the time for the award
presentation nears, Eileen
writes a letter to the nominating
committee. Her letter isn't a
glowing list of her accomplish-
ments and reasons why she
should be Catholic Woman of the
Year, but a confession of her re-
ality, her sin and her fault in her
family's dysfunction.
The day of the awards lunch-
eon arrives and Eileen is alone
at her table her family never
shows up.
With a look that says, "Why
am I doing this?" she walks out
only to see her family in the
parking lot. She ends up recon-
ciling with them and does actu-
ally win Catholic Woman of the
Year and the absolution of
her sins.
As movies go, it wasn't great,
and the theology was Hollywood,
and not biblical absolution
isn't achieved by winning it as a


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013 C5

prize, but simply by faith in
Christ, available to anyone who
believes and asks.
What I found most true about
the movie was Eileen's turmoil
over wanting to be perfect, be-
cause she felt she had to atone
for her own sin. That's what
drove her. That's what drives
many of us.
It's when we stop trying to be
perfect and admit we're not
but Jesus is, that's when we
find absolution. We cannot
bear our own sin, but Jesus al-
ready has.

Nancy Kennedy is the author of
"Move Over Victoria -I Know
the Real Secret," "Girl on a
Swing," and her latest book,
"Lipstick Grace. "She can be
reached at 352-564-2927, Mon-
day through Thursday or via
email at nkennedy @chronicle
onlinecom.


STICKIES
Continued from Page C1

a stickie? A stickie is a
pesky, offensive little piece
of goo that now becomes
semi-permanently at-
tached to avocados,
peaches, pears, plums,
tomatoes, peppers, or-
anges, grapefruit, tanger-
ines, kiwi fruit, star fruit,
tomatoes, Asian pears,
cactus, cucumbers,
lemons, pomegranates,
persimmons, apricots -
well you get the point. Now
in the old days, we used to
stamp our fruits and veg-
etables with a blue rubber
stamp. Worst thing about
that was whatever you
touched would say the
name of the fruit. I ruined
four jerseys because they
all said "Sunkist." But the
best was yet to come.
Enter technology and
the stickie. These little la-
bels just seem to stick to
anything within two miles.
I spend hours getting them
off of cutting boards,


knives, cereal bowls and
counters. And just when I
think they are gone for
good, I find them sticking
to the inside of the trash
barrel. But that is not the
worst of it, nor why I
needed to inform you
about stickies. I must re-
late some incidents that
will surely prove my point
- whatever that is.
First, I once served a
salad to my guests. Some-
how, a stealthy stickie
slithered into the salad.
My guests thought it was a
new kind of vegetable. I
didn't say anything.
Next, there was the time
one disappeared down the
garbage disposal. The
plumber ended up with a
shredded stickie; I got
stuck with a bill for $300.
Then, there was a time
my son thought he could
play a joke on Mom. Unbe-
knownst to me, he stuck a
stickie to my sweater, dan-
gerously close to my
tuchus. He knew what he
was doing. He retrieved it
from a tomato and it said
"plump and juicy"


That's all I needed.
Being a teacher at the
time, I was fair game for
pranks. When I walked
into class, the students
burst into laughter. It took
me two hours to figure out
what was going on, and of
course when I finally re-
moved the stupid stickie,
part of my sweater unrav-
eled. Darren was
grounded for a week for
that caper
But it was the incident
with the rabbi that has so-
lidified my annoyance
with stickies. My congrega-
tion had invited this hot-
shot rabbi from out of town
to a service at my house. I
cleaned the house for two
weeks, but on the last day
before the rabbi was to ar-
rive, I could not find a
stickie that had fallen to
the floor while I was
preparing the salad.
I searched high and low,
even had four of my
friends who don't even
need glasses search for
me, but the elusive gunky
label was nowhere to be
found. I put it all to rest fig-


during it was somewhere in
Stickie Land out of sight
It was during an impor-
tant Torah lesson when
things became apparent.
As the erudite rabbi was
explaining an important
tenet of the holy Torah, I
happened to glance down
at his shoe.
There on the sole was
the stickie for all to see,
and it said "Perro Pep-
pers." Such a shanda (em-
barrassment)! I
immediately offered to re-
move the offensive label
while the rabbi sat there
watching me attacking his
shoe for two hours. Need-
less to say, he never re-
turned to Ocala after that
incident.
Now that I have con-
cluded my expose on stick-
ies, I hoped you have
gleaned much knowledge.
My main lesson I wish to
impart is oops! My
breakfast peach stickie
has stuck to my computer!
I have gone from an Apple
to a peach!
May we always laugh
and find joy in our daily


lives, and may all your
stickies fall off with ease!

Judi Siegal is a retired


teacher and Jewish edu-
cator She lives in Ocala
with her husband, Phil.
She can be reached at
niejudis@yahoo. com.


UI













.5 I
Friday, February 22,2013
St imoty LtheanCurc
100 orh unont lv.Crstl' ivrFL342


d


INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. Larry Powers
Senior Pastor


Sunday Services:
Traditional Service...........8:30 AM
Sunday School .................9:30 AM
Contemporary Service.. .10:30 AM
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes ....................7:00 P
Boys and Girls Brigade... .7:00 PM
Teens ................................. 7:00 p
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726-4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"




"First For Christ"...John 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS
We welcomeyou and inviteyou
to worship with our family.
Dr Ray Kelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study





Special
Event or

Weekly
Services
Please Call
Beverly at
564-2912
For
Advertising
Information


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


g PRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Predica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711


SO ,



All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033


Our Lady of
Fatima
CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy. 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
SWeekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June- August)
9:00 and 11:00 A.M.
726-1670










I road


E1;tist

ch

5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
A Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


Pastor
Tom Walker


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study, Gospel
, .,,, l '..l.-in Dinners, singing
the old hymns? Then you'll enjoy
this Church family.
3 Home of the ,
"Saturday Nite GOSPEL
JUBILEE" A great Nite Out!
Last Saturday of the month 6:00
Fun, Food, Fellowship & Free!






First United

Methodist


(Church
of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor



8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion

9:45 AM
Sunday School

10:00 AM
Contemporary
Praise & Worship


F1 47 Years of
S T ringing Christ
FIRS to Inverness
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am
Sunday School
& Bible Class
9:00 A.M.
726-1637
V Missouri Synod
www.1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson







Vic ory

in


At
Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Smil., Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"Aplace to Io. a1, I l' m, 1,,


NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH


"New Place New Time!"
SUNDAY
10:00 AM
Family Worship
(Coffee Fellowship 9:30-10:00)
WEDNESDAY
7:00 PM
Bible Study
(Fellowship 6:30-7:00pm)
We are a nondenominational church
meeting at the Realtor's Association Building.
714 S. Scarboro Ave.
(on the comer ofSR 44 & Scarboro)
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813




W First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452

Pastor,
S Dairold
Dal
Bettye
Rushing

















OFFICE: (352) 726-1107
6. 00^^HS

S.^^^^^^ul^^^


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and i


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!! i

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS H...








Page C6 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES News NOTES

Donations sought P f 1 Il All welcome to
for center's sale learn about club


The Tri County Commu-
nity Association Association
is taking donations for its
Bi-Annual Yard/Garage
Sale slated for 8 a.m. to
5 p.m. Friday, March 15,
and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Satur-
day, March 16, at the old
firehouse, 28444 Forbes
St., Nobleton.
Proceeds from the sale
will benefit the completion
and operation of the new
community center. Any us-
able donated items are ap-
preciated. Rental space is
available for crafters.
For information, direc-
tions or help with items to
be picked up for Citrus,
Sumter and Hernando
counties, call 352-232-
0859 or 352-587-4014.
Shake, rattle
and roll in Citrus
There will be a "Whole
Lotta Shakin' Goin' On" at
the Citrus Springs Commu-
nity Center starring Billy
Lindsey as Elvis on Satur-
day, March 9. Doors open
at 5:30 p.m. and the show
starts at 6 p.m.
The interactive walk
down memory lane will fea-
ture a night of singing,
dancing and entertainment.
Tickets are $15 and must
be purchased in advance.
The buffet dinner will be
catered by Gruff's Elite
Catering and will include
smoked pulled pork or
chicken, baked beans, po-
tato salad and iced tea. A
cash bar will be available.
For more information,
call 352-465-7007 or 352-
527-7540.
The show is sponsored
by Citrus County Parks &
Recreation.
Learn to defend
yourself
Everyone is welcome to
free self-defense seminars
from 3 to 5 p.m. Saturday
during February.
The seminars are given
by Caged Nation, MMA, at
719 S. Otis Ave., Lecanto
(corner of Otis Avenue and
State Road 44).
For more information,
call 352-228-7515.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA

Brothers


Special to the Chronicle
Ramone and Rocky are a
dynamic duo tall, stat-
uesque and beautiful.
These 2-year-old tabby
brothers are orphaned
not of their own fault, and
would love a home to-
gether. All our adult cat
adoption fees are
presently half price at
$27.50. We also have
many more cats and kit-
tens that need homes
and are all fully vetted
and microchipped. Visi-
tors are welcome from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2
to 4 p.m. Monday
through Saturday at the
Humanitarians' Man-
chester House on the
corner of State Road 44
and Conant Avenue, east
of Crystal River. Please
drop by and enjoy our fe-
lines in their cage-free,
homestyle environment.
Call the Humanitarians at
352-613-1629 for adop-
tions, or view most of the
Hardin Haven's felines
online at www.petfinder.
com/shelters/fl186.html.


Proceeds from inaugural event will benefit cancer research


Special to the Chronicle

Participants are being sought for
the inaugural Relay For Life Pag-
eant to take place at 7 p.m. Friday,
April 12, at the Lecanto High School
football field.
Ages groups will be: 0-12 months,
13-23 months, 2-3 years, 4-6 years, 7-
9 years, 10-12 years, 13-17 years, 18-
30 years and 31-plus years. If there
is only one participant in any age
group, that participant will be
moved up to the next available
grouping.
Contestants should dress in their
"Sunday best" and should dress ap-


propriate to their age. Contestants
will be judged on poise, audience
appeal and overall appearance.
As well as participation awards
and other trophies, bonus trophy
will be given for the contestant in
each age group who raises the most
money for Relay. Fundraising money
must be turned in at the pageant at
sign-in. No funds will be accepted
after the pageant begins.
The pageant is not designed to be
a highly competitive event, but
rather a fun one. Entry fee is $20 per
contestant; no refunds will be given.
Entries are due by March 4. Pictures
and forms may be be emailed to


s_tacey99@yahoo.com, Attn: Pag-
eant. Forms can be mailed to: Attn:
Herndon Relay Pageant, 3800 W Ed-
ucational Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Entrants must arrive by 6:30 p.m.
for check in. Entrants should report
to the pageant tent for their number.
Food and drinks will be available for
purchase.
The pageant is sponsored by Tim
Herndon Plumbing and hosted by
the Lecanto Relay For Life Commit-
tee. For more information, email
s_tacey99@yahoo.com. Visit on
Facebook: Relay For Life Pageant
Lecanto Florida, or on the Web:
www.relayforlife. org/lecantofl.


Watercolor show, sale at Wildlife Park


IL
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& ^i^^^j^ i sB 'X


Special to the Chronicle
Watercolor art enthusiasts browse through the selections of art at a recent Citrus Watercolor Club Show & Sale.
The CWC 21st annual Show & Sale will be staged at the Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park today
and Sunday, Feb. 16 and 17. Original watercolor art by local and regional artists will be on sale and exhibited at the
juried show. The Citrus Watercolor Club contributes a percentage of the receipts from art sales during the show to
the Friends of the Homosassa Wildlife State Park.



Education key at re-enactment


Educators, chaperones, students invited to first day of l4th event


Special to the Chronicle

A Civil War re-enact-
ment, hosted by Crystal
River Raid, will take place
March 9 and 10 at the Hol-
cim Ranch property, seven
miles north of Crystal
River on U. S. 19. This is
the 14th year for the re-en-
actment in Citrus County.

Educational
experience
Education Day is Friday,
March 8, and is dedicated
to students and educators.
Entry is $2 per student;
teachers and chaperones
are admitted for free.
Tours begin at 9:30 a.m.
and continue until 2 p.m.
There will be about 15 dif-
ferent stations where stu-
dents will learn a variety
of things pertinent to the
life in the mid- to late-
1800s, during the time of


the Civil War. Among them
will be a visit to the can-
non and mortar station
where they can see the ar-
tillery up close. Then, they
move on to visit the in-
fantry soldier's camp, a
field hospital where a doc-
tor will explain why there
were so many deaths from
illness and wounds.
Students can also hear a
chaplain tell what the role
of religion played in the
lives of the soldiers, and
see a presentation of civil-
ian life and the tools that
were used in the house-
hold during that time.
There will be a soldier ex-
plaining how the drum
rolls and bugle calls di-
rected the soldiers on the
field. The students will
even get to talk with "Pres-
ident and Mrs. Lincoln."
Educators and parents
who plan to schedule a
field trip with their stu-


dents are asked to contact
Marcie Bruno at mand
jbruno@webtv.net to regis-
ter A study guide will be
available upon request
after registration. Stu-
dents may bring bag
lunches or purchase hot
dogs or sandwiches on the
field. Water and an EMT
will be available.

Reliving
the Civil War
On Saturday and Sun-
day, March 9 and 10, there
will be a few hundred re-
enactors and their families
taking visitors on a trip
through American history
Visit the cavalry camp, the
Union and Confederate
camps, and shop with the
sutlers (merchants). A
church service is open to
the public 10 a.m. Sunday
The battles begin at
2 p.m. each day Prior to


the battle, a band will play
the music of the period
and a historical speaker
will make a presentation.
During the battles, the
field comes alive with cav-
alry, cannons and soldiers
yelling across the battle
lines.
There will be chairs for
rent or visitors can bring
their own to watch the
events. No food may be
brought in, but vendors
will have choices of barbe-
cue, hot dogs, fish platters
and sandwiches; or one
may try authentic sutler
food with Indian fry bread,
sarsaparilla, or kettle corn
Gates open at 9 a.m. and
close at 5 p.m. Entry dona-
tion is $5 per adult, $2 per
youth ages 9 through 17;
ages 8 and younger are ad-
mitted for free.
For more information,
visit online at www.crystal
riverraid.org.


Celtic sounds, beautiful ballads

Hear Castlebay in Homosassa concert as part ofArt Series


Special to the Chronicle

As part of the Homosassa
First United Methodist Church
Art Series for 2013, a concert
of music from the New
England coastline, Ire-
land and Scotland, will
be performed by Castle-
bay at 3 p.m. Sunday,
Feb. 17, in the fellowship
hall at First United
Methodist Church, 8831
W Bradshaw St.,
Homosassa.


Castlebay concerts feature
poignant ballads and joyous
dance tunes played on Celtic
harp, guitar, fiddle and tin whis-
tle. Castlebay treats the au-
dience to a musical
) journey through time.
There is no admission
S charge. A freewill offering
will be collected. For more
information, call the
church office at 352-
628-4083 or Jim Love at
352-746-3674 or Jim Potts
at 352-382-1842.


The general meeting for
the Spanish American Club
of Citrus County will be at
7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 21,
at the Knights of Columbus
Hall on Norvell Bryant
Highway near North
Pinecone Avenue, Lecanto.
All are welcome. The
club meets the third Thurs-
day of the month and is
open to the public. Mem-
bership dues are $15 for
the next 6 months.
For more information,
call 352-746-3599.
Boating Safety
program offered
The U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary, Homosassa
Flotilla 15-4, will conduct an
eight-session boating
safety program March 11 to
April 4, from
7 to 9 p.m. Monday and
Thursday at the West
Citrus Community Center,
8940 Veterans Drive,
Homosassa.
Boating Skills and Sea-
manship is the most com-
prehensive of the Coast
Guard Auxiliary's public
boating education pro-
grams. It covers the sub-
jects of boat design,
equipment, trailering, boat
handling and anchoring,
aids to navigation, naviga-
tion rules, inland boating
and handling emergencies.
Boating Skills and Sea-
manship forms the basis
for the instruction of officer
trainees at the Coast
Guard Academy during the
summer, prior to attending
the Officer Candidate
School. At the completion
of the program, participants
passing the final exam will
be eligible to receive the
Florida boater ID card.
Cost is $30 for materials.
For more information
and registration details, call
Bill Schultz at 352-
382-7281.
Flotilla offers
paddlers program
The U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary of Crystal River
will offer a two-day Paddle-
sports America program for
kayak and canoe enthusi-
asts. This program will help
prepare even experienced
kayakers for a safer day on
the water.
The program will be from
7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, Feb.
26, and Thursday, Feb. 28,
at the USCG Auxiliary
Flotilla 15-01 building at
148 N.E. Fifth St., Crystal
River. Cost is $20.
This program addresses
the unique needs of kayak-
ers and canoeists. The
two-day safety program in-
cludes a variety of demon-
strations, including
handling emergency situa-
tions and paddlecraft
equipment, and several
topics: Know Your Paddle-
craft, Before You Get Un-
derway, Operating Your
Boat Safely, Legal Require-
ments of Boating and Boat-
ing Emergencies.
To register, call Linda at
352-503-6199.
Come experience
African drumming
Internationally known
professional drummer Eric
Bli Bi Gore, from Djsanufla,
Ivory Coast, West Africa,
will bring African drumming
and dancing to Citrus
County from 6 to 8 p.m. Fri-
day, Feb. 22, and 1 to
5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23,
at Hernando Church of the
Living God, 3441 E. Olean-
der Lane, Hernando.
Everyone is welcome.
Classes will be available
for donations of $10 and
$12. There will also be a
drum circle bring drums
and instruments.
For more information,
call 352-270-6148 or 352-
897-4173.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
a Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


a Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


a Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Fast N' Loud "Holy Grail Fast N' Loud (In Gold Rush'The Night Gold Rush "Bedrock Gold Rush "Redemption Gold Rush "Bedrock
(TDCJ 53 34 53 24 26 HotRod"'14' Stereo)'14'N Shift"'PG' Blowout"'PG'N Road"'PG' Blowout"'PG'
(OID 50 46 50 29 30 Lottery Changed Lottery Changed Next Baker Ro Cake Boss: Next Great Baker Cake Next Baker Ro
TMI 350**'21 "Brighton Rock" **a "Barbershop" (2002, Comedy) Ice Cube. "Wes Craven Presents: Dracula *) "Hellraiser: Inferno" (2000)
([( 350 261 350 (2010) 'R (In Stereo) 'PG-13' 2000"(2000, Horror) 'R' Craig Sheffer. 'R'
48 33 48 31 34 The Book ofEli" Open Court (N) NA Tip- NBABasketball 2013 NBA All-Star Saturday Night. (N) Sir Charles at 50 (N)
UD(48 33048 31 34 (210) R'(Live) Off (N) (Live) (Live)
CPONl) 38 58 38 33 Adven |Adven ** "Ice Age: The Meltdown" (2006) 'PG' Venture IFam. Guy Fam. Guy Cleveland Dynamite |Boon
(IRAV1 9 54 9 44 Drive Thru Paradise Bar Food Paradise Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures
itruTV) 25 55 25 98 55 Jokers Jokers Wipeout'PG' ma Wipeout 'PG' Wipeout 'PG' Wipeout 'PG' a Most Shocking
(TVL) 32 49 32 34 24 Cosby Cosby Cosby Cosby Cosby ICosby King IKing King |King Curb |Curb
S17 NCIS Suspect is pre- NCIS A Naw diver is NCIS "Broken Arrow" NCIS "Ships in the NCIS A murder at a Suits "Normandy"
S 47 32 47 17 18 sumed dead.'14' murdered.'PG' 'PG' Night"'14'N college fair.'PG' Scottie returns. 14'
Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Cyndi Cyndi Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne
WE 117 69 117 'G'a 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' Lauper Lauper 'PG' 'G'a 'PG' 'PG'
WG-A) 18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: Cl Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos WGN News at Nine Bones '14' aN


North
4AK
4~ 764
+ 72
J AK
West
483
VK9
SAKQ9865
463


02-16-13
Q
3

94
East
SJ 7 6 5 2
S J 10 8
SJ4
*8 52


South
4 10 9 4
V A Q 5 2
'AQ52
+ 10 3
Q J 10 7

Dealer: West
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
1 + Dbl. Pass
2 V 3 4 V All pass

Opening lead: + A

Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Groucho Marx said, "I find television very ed-
ucating. Every time somebody turns on the set,
I go into the other room and read a book."
That sounds like a good plan. Every time
someone in your house turns on a television set,
go into another room and reread this column!
Good bridge players do a lot of "reading" at
the table. They read the bidding and the played
cards, gaining information from them. A good
reader would find this deal easy, but someone
less literate would struggle.
How should South play in four hearts after
West cashes two top diamonds (East playing
jack-four, high-low, to show his doubleton), then
shifts to a club?
Note South's advance of his partner's takeout
double. Since South was an unpassed hand, his
two-heart single jump showed some 9 to 11
points with four-plus hearts. (If South were a
passed hand, he would have been promising a
good seven to a poor 10 points.)
South has already conceded two tricks, so he
can afford only one more loser. The black suits
are safe, so he must handle trumps carefully
Normally one would either cash the ace, cross
to dummy and lead toward the queen; or imme-
diately finesse the queen. However, can East
have the heart king here?
Not if the bidding is to be believed. West
surely needs that king. So, reading West for king-
doubleton, the right line is to cash the heart ace,
then to continue with a low heart, hoping that
the king appears.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
NEYPN

'7.1-T..,I ., r I Services, Inc

KHINT



CLAOLE



NEBURK


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

I'll update
I'm really you on I'll call
you two. \ Y.

i


--




WHEN THE MASSEUSE
LEFT HER JOB, THEY
WANTEy HER TO ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A: W
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: WIPER ONION BUSHEL AUBURN
S Answer: The billionaire was able to enjoy the new
yacht thanks to OWNERSHIP


ACROSS
1 Knife wound
5 Fierce anger
10 Rub elbows
12 Chinese
exercises
(2 wds.)
13 Suave
14 Toyota Prius,
e.g.
15 Realize, as
profits
16 Hot beverage
18 WSW
opposite
19 Channels
23 Shoulder
enhancer
26 Dory mover
27 Ostrich
relatives
30 Brittle
32 Parka
34 Muzzles
35 1998
Olympics site
36 Stanley
Gardner
37 Solo


38 Meadow
39 Armor
wearers
42 Slangy refusal
45 Sault Marie
46 Paint
containers
50 Tennis star
Andre
53 Gets
acclimated
55 Souvenirs
56 Polo stick
57 Bedside
fixtures
58 Trudge

DOWN
1 Horror flick
staple
2 "Dancing
Queen" group
3 Ginger
cookies
4 Sweetie
5 Method
6 Barbecue
treat


Answer to Previous Puzzle


FAUN ABA|S I IN
INGO TS K ETTLE
TAHITI O BEYED
RAP D ONM
LPS CHEAP MPGG
ORE HONK BOAR

ESSES OYSTERS
STAN OWES LOS
TO W AISLE SLY
MAN PRO
REMA RK ETCHED
ASTROS DETOUR
HAVEN DOWRY


7 Land measure
8 Watery
9 Take cover
10 "Ben- -"
11 Double-
crosses


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


2-16


12 Bangkok
native
17 Hearing aid?
20 Countdown
list (2 wds.)
21 Renter
22 Polluted air
23 Mac rivals
24 "Rule
Britannia"
composer
25 Designer label
28 Europe-Asia
range
29 Mentally
sound
31 Pout
32 Disneyland
site
33 RV haven
37 Alt.
40 Egyptian
goddess
41 Racer's oar
42 Salt, to a
chemist
43 Water, in Baja
44 Injure
47 Woody's son
48 Require
49 Fast flier
51 Tiny taste
52 Plea at sea
54 Doze off


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
* Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


Dear Annie: My parents
and brother live in an-
other state. A few years
ago, my brother went through
a nasty divorce. He and my 11-
year-old niece, "Jenny," are
still estranged from the ex-
wife.
The issue is how
my mother is react-
ing to the divorce.
She was very
shocked by the
events leading up to
their separation,
and I think it has
damaged her trust
in people. She
seems to be trans-
ferring this anxiety
onto Jenny Mom
wants to protect ANN
Jenny from all dis- MAIL
appointments in
life, and together
they have developed an "us
against the world" mentality.
Annie, there are other fam-
ily members who love Jenny
and want to be part of a loving
support system for her, and yet
we feel shut out by the al-
liance with my mother. Jenny
goes to her grandmother al-
most exclusively with all of
her feelings, and I get the
sense that Mom enjoys being
so important to her.
I know that my mother loves
Jenny immensely, but I'm not
sure whether she is helping or
hurting. What do you think? -
Ambivalent in Alabama
Dear Alabama: If your
mother acts as Jenny's confi-
dante and works through the
girl's feelings of abandonment
or grief over the divorce, she is
helping. Jenny may find that
her grandmother is easy to
talk with and seems to under-
stand her best, in which case,
she is more likely to confide in


her exclusively
However, if Mom is deliber-
ately keeping Jenny away
from family members and en-
couraging her to blame her
mother or father, mistrust oth-
ers or behave secretively, she
is doing harm. Your
brother may be pre-
occupied with his
own problems and
grateful that his
mother is taking
charge. We recom-
mend you try to
connect with Jenny
when you can (don't
push), and encour-
age her to speak to
her school coun-
selor as a backup.
IE'S Dear Annie: I'm
BOX 46 and have a hand-
icapped license
plate. I can't believe
how many people have given
me dirty looks for parking in
handicapped spots. One guy
even confronted me at the gro-
cery, saying, "I hear they're
giving out some pretty hefty
fines for that"
I was issued the plate be-
cause I was born with a club-
foot. I've had three
reconstructive surgeries,
acupuncture treatments and
14 cortisone injections. I take
a non-steroidal anti-inflamma-
tory medication daily and Vi-
codin when I absolutely must.
I have arthritis in my foot and
ankle, and part of my Achilles
tendon has calcified.
Please tell your readers that
one doesn't have to be in a
wheelchair to warrant a hand-
icapped plate. Believe me, I
wish I didn't need it. -
Pennsylvania
Dear Pennsylvania: In their
zeal to protect the rights of the
handicapped, many well-in-


tentioned folks mistakenly as-
sume that unless they can see
your disability, you must be
faking. We often hear from
people with emphysema
telling us of the hostility they
encounter when legitimately
using handicapped parking
spaces. Please, folks, when
you see a car with a handi-
capped license plate, sign or
decal, assume there is a good
reason, even if you can't see
what it is. Be kind.
Dear Annie: I feel com-
pelled to write after reading
the letter from "Heartbroken
in New York." I, too, married a
wonderful guy who was an al-
coholic. When sober, he was
kind, funny, intelligent and a
good father. After years of de-
clining health, my husband
made a reality of all of his doc-
tors' predictions. He wasted
away, every organ and every
inch of his body affected by
cirrhosis and myriad compli-
cations, and he died a slow,
painful death in his 60s. The
medical expenses were devas-
tating. I was left an emotional
and physical wreck, isolated
and lonely My "golden" years
are not what I worked for all of
my life. Heartbroken in
Florida
U

Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcastnet, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 7373rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox visit the Cre-
ators Syndicate Web page at
www creators. com.


ENTERTAINMENT


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013 C7


1





C8 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013
Peanuts

BOY. WHAT A I WO
SDA~.THIS -HA LOOK
BEEN THE WORST SPELLI
DAY OF MY LIFE! UP I
OFFIC


jcp 1 ;^
-,- \ ^ -


ON A DAY LIKE TH4, A
PERSON REALLY NEEDS HIS
FAITHFUL 006TO COME
RUNNING OUT TO 6REET HIM...
^ '


HERE'S THE WORLD WAR I
PILOT IN HIS F16HTER
PLANE LOOKING FOR
THE RED BARON !

L6IA o


Pickles


Garfield
I WAS THINKING
ABOUT OS, JON








For Better or For Worse
For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


Dilbert


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Blondie
I'D LIKE TO BORROW YOUR
SNOW SLOWER
\ r BET' OU \
WOULD! THE
o LAST TIME I
S ( LOANED IT TO
YOU, ou
BROKE IT!'


I'M TIRED OF LENDING YOU TOOLS
THAT I HAVE TO GET REPAIRED!
N-- -,




fI


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


Turkeys without a clue


Doonesbury


Big Nate
OKAY, PETER,I T-HINK
YOU'RE READY TO
JOIN THAT PICK-UP
GAME OVER THERE







Arlo and Janis


"Mommy, my shoelaces keep
letting go of each other!"


Betty


Frank & Ernest


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
Regal Cinema did not supply times for Citrus
movies. Please call or visit fandango.com

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Safe Haven" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"A Good Day to Die Hard" (R) 2 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 9:45 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
No passes.
"Beautiful Creatures" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Escape from Planet Earth" (PG) In 3D.
1:05 p.m., 7:35 p.m. No passes.
"Escape from Planet Earth" (PG) 4:30 p.m.,
9:50 p.m. No passes.
"Side Effects" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:55 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Identity Thief" (R) 1:25 p.m., 4:25 p.m.,


7:25 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Warm Bodies" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters" (R) In 3D.
1:50 p.m., 4:05 p.m. No passes.
"Lincoln" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:10 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie list-
ings and entertainment information.


WJUF-FM90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: 3 slenbe H

"B TLNGAPD'R TCI B'W ANNFBDS


YNMZCMP RN AXCPBDS C DNMWCA


ABYX, JXHCGTX


B PND'R FDNZ ZLCR


DNMWCA BT." WCMRBDC


DCEMCRBANEC

Previous Solution: "As an actor there's no autonomy, unless you're prepared to
risk the possibility of starving." Ben Kingsley
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 2-16


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MFYBe 'CBuse
THRTS AWHFRT
HFPE S TO youIR
FEeLIN@S
W OEM-HEU /-


WHAT ABOUT /IT'S JUST SARGE'S
MY ARM? I WAVOF TELLING
NATURE TO /9E
SHUTUP 1-MO




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Today's MOVIES
Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


COMICS


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Classifieds


Need A Friend
with same interests
Retired Oriental Lady
No smoking,dnnking
or drugs. Healthy
will share
Tsai P.O, Box 895
Waldo, Fl. 32694
Single White Widow
Seeking, 1 healthy
honest, country
gentleman for
companionship.
He Should be 65-80
Love of country and
bluegrass music a
plus. (352) 344-0002



8 Month Old
MALE YORKIE
CKC registered all
shots, house trained,
loveable, affection-
ate Silver & brown
$600. (352) 341-4009
2012 PAZZEL
INSPIRATIONAL
CREATIVE CUTTER w/
accessories. New cond.
Cost $725, asking $515
obo (352) 586-4630
ALL OF CITRUS CLEAN
UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
AR 15, DPMS
w/Reflex Red Dot
2 mag's $1500
352-746-6769
Must Have FL
ConcealedCarry
Permit to Purchase
BICYCLE
Brand new Trek 7200,
ladies, 24 speed, 27"
tires $290 OBO
(352) 586-4630
BUYING Guitars,
Banjos, Violins, Man-
dolins, Saxophones, &
Tube Amplifiers, Top
Dollar Paid Call Mike,
Locally (352) 207-7522
CHARLES KLEIN
LEATHER JACKET
LADIES SM. POLYES-
TER LINING. NICE
$45.00 352 527 1193
CITRUS SPRINGS
8971 N. Spartan Dr.
Garage Sale-Furniture,
Women clothes(14-18),
shoes, etc. Sat
8am-1pm.
Contour Adjustable
Bed, Twin, Premier
Sleep System,
variable speed
massage, w/ waves
& timer & remote
control $1,000
(352) 344-3827
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully furn. efficiency
w/ equipped kitchen.
All utilities, cable,
Internet. & cleaning
provided. $699/mo
352-586-1813

Executive Asst.

Email resume to:
resume2013ncf
i@aLmail.com
FLORAL CITY
Exceptionally Nice
3/2 on Beautiful 1'/4
AC. treed lot, garage.
shed. dock. Ideal for
Fishing/ Airboats
$95,900 716-523-8730
HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2/1/1 needs paint &
cosmetics $23k
**cash only **
352-503-3245
HERNANDO
2/1'/, Furn. Lrg. Fm &
Laun. Rm, Cprt, prvt rd.
50+ Area, $650/m. F/L
(352) 746-0850

NEWSPAPER
CARRIER
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and
other newspapers
for home delivery
customers.
3-4 hours per day.
Must have insured
and reliable
vehicle -
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up
with a cap Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product
Apply in Person
1624 N
Medowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am -5pm
Carriers are
independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle
L i i i iii ii


DAM RE
SPINNING REEL AND
POLE (1950s) $65.00
352 527 1193
Hernando/41 N
1/ISWMH, remodel
'/acre, fencd, porch.
paved rd12x20 wkshp,
$350 m. (352)795-7813
HONDA
'04, Shadow, Aero,
750 CC, 16k Miles,
Like new $3,995
461-4518 or 586-2807
INSURANCE
AGENT WANTED

Looking for licensed
220 or 440 customer
service agent,
salary plus benefits.
e-mail resume to:
david@birdinsurance
group.com
JEEP
Grand Cherokee ltd.
White, 70k mi. Mint
cond. Auto.$11,000
(305) 619-0282
LEATHER JACKET
COMINT MENS
WESTERN FRINGED
MEDIUM $45.00
352 527 1193
LINCOLN
Towncar 2010
29,900mi, gold w/beige
vinyl top, white leather
asking, $24,900
352-476-5061
LUGGAGE CARRIER
w/electrical hk/up
$100, Ladies 6 speed
bike, good condition
$100 352-746-9039
Nascar Team Caliber
dicast collectable
cars $200. Qty 25
various yrs. 97-01
Monster IncCapillar
Big Kmart352-201-2120

OPEN HOUSE
Saturday & Sunday
12 Noon 3PM
3/2'/2/3, Owner
399 E. Keller Court
Citrus Hills

OPEN HOUSE
TODAY, 1p-4p
5131 S. Austin Point,
Homosassa $134,900
Move in Condition,
3/2 on 1/2 acre,
updated kitchen,
wood floors,
all appliances.
Gate House Realty
352-382-4500
Call for directions
Patio Furniture Set
14 pieces, 40 x 66
glass top table with
umbrella, 6 chairs,
2 recliners, 2 glass top
side table, 2 ottomans
black, anodized
metal frame w/ taupe
mesh fabric, very
good cond. $400.
Lanai furniture, 38 x 66
table w/ marble oval
insert, can hold um-
brella 4 chairs with
taupe dble thick
cushions anodized
antique bronze metal
frame good cond
$250. (352) 382-2497
SDS 2 Work Station
Looking to
Rent or purchase
call Joe 352-503-2108

Secretary
Administrator

office exp. preferred
have exceptional
computer skills,
including Quick
books, Excel &
Microsoft Power
point, Send resume
to: janmetcalf
@embarq.mail.com
SHARP RECEIVER
Bookshelf set
w/turntable & cassette
30w speakers $35.
Dunnellon 465-8495
SOFA
brown, microsuede
1 yr. old, $275
352-746-6678
SUZUKI
'06, Boulevard 800CC,
Lots of extras, like new
$3,995. 352-461-4518
352-586-2807
Whirpool Refrigerator
Dishwasher & Stove
$300 for all
352-746-1447
Wood Lathe
Chizzles Included
$100.
(352) 628-9175
Yankeetwn
Saturday, 2-4pm
5303 Riverside
Nancy Little Lewis
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 302-6082


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300& UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087




Approximately 1 cord
of Hard Wood.
Cut and ready to go
(352) 249-7221
CATAHOULA CUR
1 YR. OLD FEMALE
Beautiful
both clear blue eyes,
great dog! needs
loving home!
352-795-2347
FREE
2 six wk old bunnies,
1 female Golden Lab
spayed, 2 yrs old
house broken
(352) 502-5302
Call after 4:30PM
FREE TOILET WHITE
COMPLETE FULLY
OPERATIONAL
(352) 476-7973
Male Chow
7 yrs old, not
neutered, great dog!
352-302-5468
To Himalayan Cats
Free to good home
Must go together
(352) 419-2728




FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077




2 Lost Dogs
Blk lab mix(Baron),
Blk & White hound
mix (Cracker)
off Dunklin/Citrus
Springs 352-292-2759
32nd Degree
Scottish Right Ring
Lost in Vicinity of Sweet
Bay, Inverness
352-209-1316
Black Labrador
Retriever, about 1% yrs
old, answers to "Buddy",
lost in vicinity of
W. Dunnellon Rd.
Owner is heartbroken.
(352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662
GOLDEN LAB
Name is Shadow,
he's very fnendly,
approx. 801bs
Connell Heights
352-364-2646







LOST CAT Long Haired
Orange and White
Tabby Neutered Male
Cat. About 3 years old.
Comes to the name
Peanut. Very Fnendly
and has very fluffy tall.
Pupil of left eye has
small scar. Family pet,
kids miss him so much.
Lost in Timberlane Es-
tates, Lecanto near 486
on 2-4-13. Has micro
chip. Please call:
352-697-3402
Lost Cell Phone Sam-
sung Android w/Hot
Pink Cover. Left in Cab
on 2/8 or 2/9 evening.
Cab ride was from
Beverly Hills to
Homosassa. PIs Call
me (352) 279-5217
or (352) 270-4164
Lost Dog,
Boston Terrier,
Female, Brindle &
White, Gospel Island
Reward(352) 726-7980
Medium Size Gold
Hoop Earring
with engraving.
sentimental
Lost From Inverness to
3 sisters springs
REWARD
(313) 458-9589




CLERK OF COURTS
OFFICE ON 2/11
CRYSTAL RIVER
found in parking lot,
please call for
venfication of item
352-232-6264


FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077




Cleaning Person
Needed
by Weekly or Monthly.
(352) 628-1018
NEED TO RENT
sml flatbottom boat
in ST Martins River
area, Ozello, S.
Diecidue Dr. around
2/17, 860-949-5318
SDS 2 Work Station
Looking to
Rent or purchase
call Joe 352-503-2108




Fero Memorial Grdns
2 lots for sale. 2 plots
in each lot. $45001 lot.
(352) 628-4051




SECRETARY

Family owned
and operated
Pest Control Business
Office experience
preferred, but will
train right candidate.
Aoolv in Person at
8822 E. Moccasin
Slough Rd
Inverness 34450
Wed Fri. 9A-12P
(352) 726-3921
idsmithoest
@gmail.com





Avante
At inverness
Is currently looking
for
LPN's
Full time All Shifts
& CNA'S
Apply online at
Avantecenters.com

Dental Assistant
Must be proficient in
crown & bridge
temporizing
&
Dental Hygienist

Call 352-465-3008
or fax resume to
352-465-3009

F/T Dental
Assistant

Experience required.
Fax Resume To:
352-795-1637 or
Email
casie@rswanson
dental.com

FIT
Dental Hygienist

Fax Resume To:
352-795-1637 or
Email
casie@rswanson
dental.com

FRONT DESK
SPECIALIST

Full/Part time, for Busy
Office. Only those
w/front desk, health
care exp. considered.
Computer & Insurance
exp. needed.
EMAIL RESUME TO:
billingdept@
nbccdro.com

Full Time/Part
Time/ Per-Diem
LPN & Certified
Nursing Assistants

All Shifts for both.
Customer Service
Onented/Caring

Contact Lynn @
352-621-8017
Sunflower Spnngs
ALF
8733 W. Yulee Dr.
Homosassa, Fl 34448

LPN's
All Shifts,
Full Time & Part Time
Exp. Preferred

Life Enrichment
Coordinator

Apply at:
Superior Residences
of Lecanto
Memory Care
4865 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy (352)746-5483
Drug free workplace
dselsavaae@
superioralf.com
mriaaleman@
superioralf.com

MEDICAL ASST

Excellent opportunity
with benefits
Strong Computer
Skills required. Up to
$15 DOE, contact
Human Resource
Dept. 855-357-6311

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

RN's, PT & OT'S
LPN's, Phsych
Nurse, & ST

Office Staff w/medical
background, CITRUS
& HERNANDO
(352) 794-6097


CLASSIFIED





Executive Asst.

Emailresume to:
resume2013ncf
.@g.mail.com


INSURANCE
AGENT WANTED

Looking for licensed
220 or 440 customer
service agent,
salary plus benefits.
email resume to:
david@birdinsurance
group.com





EXP. LINE COOKS
& SERVERS

Anoly in Person
COACH'S PUB
& EATERY
Mon-Fri. 8am-11am
& 2pm-4pm
114 W. Main St.
Inverness
11582 N. Williams St.
Dunnellon
Save-A-Lot Shopping
Center


HIRING COOKS
or Kitchen Help
& SERVERS

Servers Must be 18
or older.
Apply Fisherman's
Restaurant
12311 E Gulf to Lake
(352) 637-5888
Closed Mon. & Tues





AC Equipment
Sales Persons

Needed Immedi-
ately. No cold call-
ing $50-$100K + ben-
efits
Email or Fax Resume
mdp@newair.biz
Fax 352-628-4427


AUTOMOTIVE
SALES

CITRUS KIA is hiring
a Sales Professional
to join our growing
staff
Be a part of the
HOTTEST new car
brand in the country
professional training,
competitive pay and
bonuses provided to
the right people. If you
have the skills to give
our customers the best
car buying experience
of their lives, WE
NEED YOU! Aoolv in
Person
1850 SE Hwy 19
Crystal River

BOAT SALES

F/T 40 hrs. +, com-
puter and market-
ing skills, and local
boating knowledge.
Must have clean
driving record.
Email Resume to
doua@riverhaven
marina.com
Call (352) 860-6913

ENERGETIC
RETAIL SALES

W/Sales Experience
for gift shop in
Inverness, mm 30 hrs.
Mail ResumeTo:
PO Box 1282,
Inverness, FL 34451


SALES PERSON

Energetic Sales
Person Needed. Ex-
perience preferred but
not required.
Willingness to
learn all facets of
operations,
Aoolv in Person
BADCOCK & MORE
150 S Suncoast
Blvd


SEEKING Sales
Professionals

For Palm Kia
-*Unlimited Earnings
rPaid Training
rPaid Holidays
r401K, + Benefits
5 day work week,
Closed Sundays
APPLY IN PERSON
2305 SW College Rd
Ocala Fl. 34471
(352) 629-8011





CDL CLASS A
WITH TANKER
REQUIRED
Looking to hire
someone to work in
septic industry must
have CDL class A with
Tanker 352-563-2621

Key Training
Center

F/T Human
Resource Specialist.
Computer literate;
knowledge of
automated time-
keeping systems &
HR programs, such
as ABRA, preferred.
Minimum 2 years
exp.; HS Diploma
/GED required
Apply in Person
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto FL
*E.O.E.*


NOW HIRING FULL-TIME POSITIONS
















BENEFITS PACKAGE
EOE / DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
APPLY -IPE ON

2219 [S[l. a -tBlvd H .-s s


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013 C9


Key Training
Center

has positions
available in group
home setting. Assist
adults with disabili-
ties in daily living.
HS Diploma/ GED
required.
Apply in person at
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto FL
34461 *E.O.E.*

Legal Assistant

For busy Law Firm
Min 5 yr legal asst/
paralegal exp reqd.
Competitive salary/
benefits.
FAX RESUME:
352-726-3180
Only qualified can-
didates considered

RESIDENTIAL
ELECTRICIAN

Must have 5 years
exp. Current on
Codes & DF,
Call (352) 746-6825




APPT. SETTERS
NEEDED

$500. Sign on Bonus.
Great Commission Pay
and weekly bonuses
Call Bob 352-628-3500

CDL CLASS A
DRIVER

Truss exp. helpful.
Bruce Component
Systems.
352-628-0522

SALES PERSON

Energetic Sales
Person Needed. Ex-
perience preferred
but not required.
A willingness to
learn all facets of
operations,
Aopplv in Person
BADCOCK & MORE
150 S Suncoast Blvd

Secretary/
Receptionist

Needed P/T,
MS Office Suite
Proficient, Experi-
ence, Preferred

Send resume to:
P.O. Box 1630
Lecanto, FI 34460
Fax 352-513- 4967
Or Call
352-513-4963

YARD &
FACILITY HELP
NEEDED

Need dependable
person with flexible
schedule. Must be
able to drive a forklift
& load cable reels
onto flatbeds; main-
tain Shop cleanliness,
mow, weed-eat and
pick-up parts as
needed. Monday
through Friday, 7AM
to 3:30PM; ocassional
Saturday.
Please apply in
person at F&H
Contractors 9250
West Atlas Drive,
Homosassa, 34428.





Secretary
Administrator

office exp. preferred
have exceptional
computer skills,
including Quick
books, Excel &
Microsoft Power
point, Send resume
to: janmetcalf
@embarq.mall.com




70'S 6 FT WALL
PLAQUE WOODEN
Don Quixote on
horse.Very cool. $60
352-897-4154

DUDLEY'S






AUCTION

Sat 2/16 Prev: 9am
Auction: 11am
Vtg Doll & Toy Auction
(Live/Online)
Featuring life long
Strawberry Shortcake
Coll, Adult Barbie Coll,
mdme Alexander,
1800-1900's German
& French, Bisque,
Compo & even 33"
China Head Doll, early
erector, steel trucks
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667

FLAG -U.S. military in
wood/glass display
case,perfect, never
flown,-$40-
(352)212-1596
HAVILAND CHINA
Forever Spring Pattern
service for 8 people
$75, 352-465-8495
Nascar Team Caliber
dicast collectable
cars $200. Qty 25
various yrs. 97-01
Monster Inc.Capillar
Big Kmart352-201-2120
OCCUPIED JAPAN
AICHI BREAD PLATES
Two gold-tnmmed, pink
roses, 7.5", very good.
$5.352-601-0067


RETRO GOTHIC
SWAG LAMP. Brushed
gold with crystal glass
inserts. $45
352-897-4154




DISHWASHER White
Energy Star Frigidaire
2010 Gallery
Quiet,Clean,Must Sell
$100 341-0450
DRYER$100 With 30
day full warranty Call
or text 352-364-6504
FREEZER SMALL
CHEST TYPE 24" BY
24" BY 36" HIGH
WORKS GREAT ONLY
85.00 464 0316


DR ERAl 45 8 2

Digital 12 settings Good 9 3 1 7
condition White 2005 7
model #84092 $100 6 7 2- 8
341-0450 2 8 6 1
KENMORE DRYER All
Digital 12 settings Good 7 4 5 3
condition White 2005
model #84092 $100 1 9 3 6
341-0450
KENMORE WASHER 5 2 4 9
white looks good works 3 9
great 100.00 90day
Guaranteee! 8 6 7 4
352-476-9019
REFRIGERATOR
GE apartment size 3ft
tall, 2ft wide, great TslS
shape-$50-
(352)212-1596 32" TV WITH
SMITTYS APPLIANCE REMOTE.(NOT FLAT
REPAIR. Also wanted SCREEN) 45.00
dead or alive washers OBO 464 0316
& dryers. FREE 42" MAGNAVOX
pick up 352-564-8179 PLASMA FLAT
STOVE, GE SPECTRA SCREEN TV $150.
Glass Cooktop, self Metal stand $25.00.
cleaning, bisque $200 352-726-0264
Kenmore Side by Side SHARP 32" TV WITH
Refridg/icemaker/water REMOTE $20
in door, bisque $300 352-613-0529
352-795-6260
SPEAKER 2-Way
WASHER OR DRYER SEAS Center Channel
$145.00 Each. Reliable, Home Theatre Speaker,
Clean, Like new, Danish Quality $100
Excellent Condition. 341-0450
Free Delivery.
352 263-7398 TECHNICS DIRECT
DRIVE TURNTABLE
WASHER$100 With 30 $5.00 352-344-2321
day full warranty. Call or $5.00352-344-2321
text 352-364-6504 YAMAHA RECEIVER &
TECHNICS DUAL
Whirpool Refrigerator STEREO CASSETTE
Dishwasher & Stove PLAYER $100
$300orPLAYER $100
$300 for all 352-613-0529
352-746-1447 352613-0529
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 GOOD
CONDITION $100
352-613-0529
CHAIR- Buli
-desk/computer, grey,
adj height, rocker, good I
shape, $25
(352)212-1596 CONCRETE PAVING
COMMERCIAL DESK CHAIRS 192 Heavy
CHAIRS (2) PreOwned duty 5 chairs $10. 307
Fabnc Covered 2 #5 chais $10.
Adjustable $45 each 352-489-3931
727-463-4411 KODI KLIPS for
DESK CHAIRS concrete work. #525
(4)Commercial clips for #5 rebar. 625
(4)Commercal count. $25.
PreOwned Gray Tweed 352-489-393
Fabric $15 each 3524893931
727-463-4411
LATERAL FILE
CABINET 3 Drawer
Commercial Metal DESKTOP COMPUTER
PreOwned 40"x36"x18" Petnium 4 Desktop with
$85 727-463-4411 keyboard, monitor and
PREOWNED FILE mouse. $75.00
CABINET 2 Drawer 352-527-9074
Lateral Commercial Diestler Computer
Metal 30"x28"x18" $45 New & Used systems
727-463-4411 repairs. Visa/ MCard
SMALL COMPUTER 352-637-5469
DESK Formica Top HP TOWER PC 2GHz
36"x24" with 2 Drawer Dual Core,250GB
File Cabinet Attached Dnve,1GB RAM
$25 727-463-4411 24xDVD,Card
STORAGE CABINET Reader,5.1 $100
Gray Commercial Metal 341-0450
4 Shelves Lock and Key LAPTOP Dell 640m with
50"x36"x18" $75 Vista basic power cord
727-463-4411 & good battery. $100.00
C B352-527-9074



DUDLEY'S
AUCTO 3 PERSON PATIO
SWING Heavy duty
Patio swing. Very good
condition. $50.00
352-613-2232
Call in evenings
Patio Furniture Set
AUCTION 14 pieces 40x66
glass top table with
Restaurant umbrella. 6 chairs.
Equip. Liquidation 2 recliners, 2 glass top
Tues, 2/19/13 side table, 2 ottomans
Preview: 9am black, anodized
Auction: 10am metal frame/ taupe
14 Hwy-19 N (near mesh fabric, very
SR40) Inglis, FL good cond. $400.
34449 Formerly Lanai furniture, 38 x 66
Backwater Southern table w/marble oval
Grill, All Equipment insert, an hold um-
& decor must go! brella 4 chairs with
*check website* taupe dble thick
www.dudleys cushions anodized
auction.com antique bronze metal
637-9588 10%BP frame good cond
Au2267 AB1667 $250. (352) 382-2497

DUDLEY'S i

2 X-long twin mat-
tresses & box spnngs w/
adj frames $125; one
Qn Matress & Box Spr-
ing $40. Both in great
Cond. (352) 341-1241
AUCTION 4 Bar Stools
Bar height swivel,
ati2/16Po: am $150. Palm Tree ped-
Auction: 11am "estal table glass top
Vtg Doll & Toy Auction $50. 4 Large Heavy
(Live/Online) $50.Oak Chairs
Feat. life long w/arms $150.
Strawberry Shortcake (352) 422-2164
Coll, Lrg, Barbie Coll,-
mdme Alexander, 6 Pc. King, Size Set
1800-1900's German with boxspring
& French, Bisque, & mattress
Compo & 33" China $450.
Head, early erector, (352) 860-2792
steel trucks+ 36" ROUND TABLE(2)
*check website* Rugged Formica Top
www.dudleys Sturdy Steel Pedestal
auction.com $35 each 727-463-4411
637-9588 10%BP ANTIQUE WASH
Au2267 AB1667 STAND solid wood,
distressed blue drawer
S it and 2 doors $60
352-897-4154
AREA RUG 8X11
$20. 352-422-2164
Bedspreads
HAMMER DOWN 2 twin, White
AUCTIONEERS Matelasse, w/matching
Fri 02115 Preview @ shams $45 ea. set
4pm, Auction@ 6pm 352-527-2729
General Merchandise CHERRYWOOD
Sat 02116 Preview @ CD
4pm, Auction@ 6pm FRAME CHAIRS (2)
Antques/Gen. Merch Fabnc Upholstery with
Sun 02/17 Preview @ Arms PreOwned $35
Sun, 7 Pre @ ea.727-463-4411
12:30, Auction@ 1pm a. 727463-4411
Tallgate/Box lots BREAKFAST NOOK
**WE BUY ESTATES** Table & 4 Cushioned
6055 N. Carl G Rose Chairs, 48" Beveled
Hwy 200 Hernando Glass Top, Rattan
AB3232 (352)613-1389 Excellent Condition
call 352-382-3802
Contour Adjustable
Bed, Twin, Premier
5.5 Husky Air Sleep System,
Compressor T 7, H.P. variable speed
32 gal. 150 PSI $150 massage, w/ waves
Craftsman 4 drawer, & timer & remote
steel-top work table control $1,000
w/storage $75 (352) 344-3827
352-447-6139 CRAFTER! Braided
10" RIGID TABLE strips for 2 larger area
SAW Model TS24121 rugs. Need sewing.
$200, 14" Abrasive Soft colors $35 each.
Cut-Off Saw 408511T 352-897-4154
$75 352-447-6139 Full Size 4 Piece
12" CUT OFF Bedroom Set


12x5/32x20mm cut $100.
off wheels (352) 726-8474
3 metal 1 concrete GLASS TOP
$30.00 all 352-586-8657 END TABLE
12"X36" WOOD LATHE w/elephant base
Good working order, good condition $60
Was $275 new. 352-465-1262
Will take $175 GRANDMOTHER
352-726-7898 CLOCK NICE LOOK-
SAWS ING BUT NEEDS RE-
Ryobi 9" Band Saw $40; PAIR ONLY 100.00
Skill 10" Table Saw $60 464 0316
(352) 628-4118 Hand Knotted Wool
SMALL ELECTRIC AIR Oriental 4'10"X 6'8"
COMPRESS OR $270, Old Hand Woven
CAMBELLHAUSFIELD Oriental Wool
OLDER ON WHEELS 6'7" x 8'6" $290,
ONLY 60.00 464 0316 352-527-2729
TOOLBOX diamond LARGE SOLID WOOD
plate, locking, great ARMOIRE light color
shape, fits ranger/S10, plain modern design
$75 (352)212-1596 $250 352-897-4154
Wood Lathe LAZY BOY
Chizzles Included leather recliner
$100. 1/2 price, $388
(352) 628-9175 352-637-3394


16379,

54682s
5 93416 2


75934

891-26

42857

3 8 7 6 1
38761

672 48

21 593


LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET, In Onginal
Plastic, Never Used,
ORG $3000, Sacrifice
$975. CHERRY, BED-
ROOM SET Solid
Wood, new in factory
boxes- $895
Can Deliver. Bill
(813)298-0221.
Living Room Set
couch & love seat
neutral colors, glass
top coffee table &
two end tables
like new $750 obo
Bakers Rack w/ glass
shelves $100 obo
Located in Pine Ridge
(419) 307-6100
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500
Oak Dining Room
Table 42" Round
$100, Brown Lazy Boy
Rocker/Recliner $300
352-621-3034
Oak Entertainment
Center, 71" Lx 56" W
10 shelves, tinted glass
doors, fits 36" TV, exc.
cond. $175.
352-503-5011
Oak Sewing Machine
Cabinet w/chair $60
Singer Sewing
Machine $40
352-621-3034
RUG
Round, Natural
beige & olive
100% poly pile
352-527-2729
SEAFOAM GREEN
QUEEN SLEEPER
SOFA& 2 CHAIRS
/microfiber fabric with
upgraded queen mat-
tress in sofa. Matching
overstuffed chairs. $600
Call 352-419-4482
Set of Twin Box
Springs & Mattress
w/ rails, $75.
2 Entertainment
Centers, 1 Black, 1
white oak, $125. for
both (352) 795-7254
SMALLER PRETTY
SECTIONAL Florida
print, very clean $150
352-897-4154
SOFA
brown, microsuede
1 yr. old, $275
352-746-6678
Sofa/Sleeper
+ end table, good
condition, new $995
only $293
352-637-3394
SOLID OAK Computer
Desk w/ hutch 58" W
call or text for pics
$100.00 352-302-2004
SQUARE TABLE 36"
Rugged Gray Formica
Top Sturdy Steel Frame
$30 727-463-4411
STACKABLE CHAIRS
PreOwned Fabric Cov-
ered Commercial Metal
Frames 2 for $35
727-463-4411
STACKABLE CHAIRS
with Black Metal
Framed Arms Chocie of
Fabnc Color $10 each
727-463-4411
Wicker Etagere
5 ft White
$60
352-746-2329
WINE CABINET,
WOOD, EUC off white
holds 20 bottles of wine
& has one drawer.
352-249-7212 $85.00
WOODGRAIN METAL
FOLDING BANQUET
TABLE 6 Foot Long
PreOwned $35
727-463-4411



10 FT. WOOD
STEP LADDER
Type 1,250 duty
$90.
(352) 422-0294
Chipper/Shredder
Troy-Bilt Tomahawk,
Briggs & Stratton gas
engine. $700 OBO
(352) 601-3174
COLEMAN
POWERMATE
5500 GENERATOR
11.0 HP engine
Asking $500.00
352-419-4305
Craftsman
Riding Mower
Briggs & Stratton
Eng., 24 HP, 48"Deck
$700 (352) 746-7357
GREEN HOUSE
10X20 W/ shutter fan
and shade cloth. $500
(352) 465-0812
Murray Rider,
40" Cut, Exc.Cond.
$425. (352) 637-4718
NEW COM POSTER ON
STAND COMPACT
FLIPS OVER TO MIX
ONLY 85.00 464 0316
Sabre by John Deere,
Riding Mower
15HP, 38" cut.
$300
(352) 344-2297
UTILITY TRAILER
5X12
$700 (352) 746-7357



7' SAGO PALM Just
dug out of ground. $50
Will deliver and install
for added fee.
352341 3607




BEVERLY HILLS
Fri, Feb 15 &
Sat. Feb 16
9am to 2pm
Handcrafted Jewelry
Lots of Great Stuff!
240 W Royal Fern Ct
BEVERLY HILLS
Friday & Saturday
915 W. Star Jasmine PI
Off N. Lincoln


1 ,- ,

CITRUS HILLS
Saturday 8:30-4pm
New golf clubs.
Hybrid clubs. Books.


New jewelry: St. silver,
lapis, turquoise.
Pottery, clothing +etc
650 Epson Court









C.0 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013




BOYS WINTER
MOVING TAG SALE CLOTHING SIZES 5 &
Fri. 15 & Sat. 16, 8a-lp 6 SHIRTS, PANTS &
905 W. Sunset Strip Dr. JACKETS $25
CITRUS SPRINGS 352-613-0529
8971 N. Spartan Dr. CHARLES KLEIN
Garage Sale-Furniture, LEATHER JACKET
Women clothes(14-18), LADIES SM. POLYES-
shoes, etc. Sat TER LINING. NICE
8am-1pm. $45.00 352 527 1193
CRYSTAL RIVER LEATHER JACKET
2182 N. Slew Foot Path COMING MEANS WEST-
Feb.16 after 1pm. Es- ERN FRINGED
tate Sale:Living Room MEDIUM $45.00
& bedroom furniture, 352 527 1193
kitchen supplies, kayak, PARADISE BAY CAPRI
dive equipment. Items in PANTS 1 pair, green,
excellent condition. size 14, gently used. $3.
352-601-0067
CRYSTAL RIVER 3526010067
BIG SALE PARADISE BAY CAPRI
Friday & Sat., 8a-2p PANTS 4 pair, size 16,
5 Pc. Thomasville wall red/beige/blue/green,
unit, jewelry, antiques, gently used. $10 all.
collec. glass, precious 352-601-0067
moments, and MUCH PROM DRESS
MORE Behind Olive DESIGNER Long, blue,
Tree Restaurant, US size 13/14, strapless
19, UNITS 80, 81, 82 $45 call or text
352-302-2004
SPROM DRESS Jade
YARD SALE designer collection long,
l w purple, 1 shoulder,
size 12 $65 call
CRYSTAL 352-302-2004
PRIV R ROM DRESS
R IVER Red/Black. halter,
MIDDLE SCHOOL size10/12 $35 call or
"For Relay For Life" text 352-302-2004
Sat Feb. 16 8a-3p
HUGE i
RUMMAGE SALE
Tons to choose from
344 N.E. Crystal St. GPS Magellan
Roadmate 5220-LM
[" ~ Never used. $90.00/
352-637-5969
DUNNELLON
Fri & Sat 9 to 3 GPS Magellan
Roadmate 5220-LM
complete dispursal, Roadme 520
collectibles, lalique, 352 637-5969
toby mugs furn, tools,
tons of glassware, etc,
9768 SW 195th Circle
Estate sale
Fri, Sat, Sun 8 to ? !!!!!265/70 R16!!!!!
completely furn. 4 BR Great tread!!
house everything goes!! Only asking $75!
furn, Linen, tools,dishes (352)857-9232
6092 S Royal Drive, *****225/70 R19.5****
Homosassa Beautiful tread!! Only
HERNANDO asking $100 for the pair!
Fri, Sat 9a to 5p (352)857-9232
tables, chairs, electric ----295/40 R20----
stove, lamps, tools, lawn Nice tread!! Only asking
equip. nerf bars for $100 for the.pair!
2003 Chevy Ext. Cab (352)857-9232
Truck, Lots more..
6446 N Golden RainCir. 4 HORSE STOCK
RiverLake Manor 2006 TRAILER
BUMPER PULL
HERNANDO $3500, 352-637-4864
Moving Sale or 352-410-5406
Fr, Sa & Sun, 8 to 4
6851 N Castlebury 18 Steel Framed
(Royal Coach Village Folding Tables
off SR 200) 30' x 96", $25. ea. obo
Good Shepherd
M -B-O-- S Lutheran Church
(352) 746-7161
HOMOSASSA 330 GALLON SQUARE
SUGARMILL WOODS WATER TANK WITH
31 BEVERLY CT. CAGE AROUND IT
Fri & Sat 9AM-4PM ONLY 100.00 FIRM
LR Furn., 3 pc oak wall 464 0316
unit, 12' boat, 7.5 Honda 1994 S-10 blazer
4 st, kitchenware, tools, complete inter
decor, collectables, complete interior.
misc. black and grey great
cond. 100.00 obo call
INVERNESS for details 352-476-9019
CLOSING SALE 2012 PAZZEL
CRAFTY LADY INSPIRATIONAL
Publix/KMart Shopp- CREATIVE CUTTER w/
ing Cntr, Hwy 41 accessories. New cond.
Bairgain's Galore Cost $725, asking $515
344-4800 10a-5p M-Sa obo (352) 586-4630
INVERNESS 5th Wheel Reese
Estate Sale- all to go! 14,000 Ib
Frl 2/15, Sa 2/16 8 to ? Like New $165.
6070 E Tenison St 2 Golf Cart wheels &
INVERNESS tires Like new $35.
Fri. & Sat. 8A.-4P. (315) 466-2268
Maxwell Place BABY STROLLER
Moving Into RV Brown/green color,
Furniture, clothes, file Safety 1st, in ok condl-
cabinets, etc. tlon, $20 (352)465-1616
INVERNESS CHROME WHEELS 6
Sat, 8 to 12 LUG F-150 18 Inch by
886 S. Rooks Ave. 8.5 Inch Used Nice!
$300.00 obo
3527265698
Complete Kitchen Set
white cabinets, rose
counter tops, sink,
LECANTO trash compactor, built
Fri, Sat, 9am to ? in whirl pool oven,
lots to sell!! center island w/ sink,
4121 W. Glen St. $200. obo
MOVING/STORAGE (352) 465-1892
BOXES- 20 new/4 sizes DUD
26x20x5,22x15x27, DUDL '
27x16x27, 24x24x24
$3 ea. 352-422-0294


DUDLEY'S



AUCTION


AUCTION


AUCTION

Restaurant
Equip. Liquidation
Tues, 2/19/13
Preview: 9am
Auction: 10am
14 Hwy-19 N (near
SR40) Inglis, FL
.Y+'+'w -ruiiiii


Sat 2/16 Pre: 9a-m B 9 orm ery-1 .
Sat 2/16 Pre 9am Backwater Southern CONDITION, $65
Auction 11am n Gll, All Equipment 352-601-6625
Vtg Doll &Toy Auction I
Vtg (ove/Onl && decor must go! Kawai, SR 5
FeaLi eninaw- *check website* ORGAN
Feat. life long Straw- www.dudleys 600 obo
berry Shortcake Coll, www.dudleys $600 obo
berry Shortcake Cl, auction.com 616-914-0980 cell
Adu Alxandre Col, 637-9588 10%BP Crystal River
mdme Alexander, Au2267 AB1667
1800-1900's German 2LARGE BSR STEREO
& French, Bisque, FL. JUMBO SHRIMP SPEAKERS 20" WIDE
Compo & 33" China 15ct @ $5.00lb, BY 36"HIGH.SPEAKER
Head. early erector, Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb ON THE TOP ONLY
steel trucks Delivered 352-795-0077 100.00 464 0316
*check website* GARRARD DOUBLE TUNER PETERSON
www.dudleys CASSETTE TAPE STROBOSTOMP pedal,
auction.com DECK $20 CAN PLAY best tuner available,
637-9588 10%BP AND RECORD great shape-$50
Au2267 AB1667 419-5981 (352)212-1596




^aiS-'8a\f-te^j


ERABIL'AE
$20
352-613-0529
GPS Magellan
Roadmate 5220-LM
Never used.
$90.00/ 352-637-5969
HEART DESIGN
VINTAGE GLASS
BOWL W/COVER $8
CAN E-MAIL PHOTO
INVERNESS 419-5981
Homemade Quilt
Tops 5/$100;
Anne Geddes
Pictures 6/$100
(352) 795-7254
HUNTER AIR
PURIFIER
excellent,sacrifice $60.
352-344-2321
KITCHEN ISLAND
free standing
60" x 34", American
Cherry stain, 4 drawers
2 shelves, 2 dr. cabinet
$400, 352-795-6260
LARGE DOG MUZ-
ZLES like new, grey-
hound size $3.00
each 344-2321
LUGGAGE CARRIER
w/electrical hk/up
$100, Ladies 6 speed
bike, good condition
$100 352-746-9039
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Fulls $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
Maytag Ringer Washer
Excellent Condition
$300 cash Firm
(352) 445-9448
NEW BLACK LEATHER
PURSE BY ROLF $25
CAN E-MAIL PHOTO
INVERNESS 419-5981
PROP off 250 yamaha-
not stainless-
13.75 x 17 3 blades
75.00 352-794-3020
cell 586-4987
RIMS 2 16" FOR '06
TOWN&COUNTRY
$50.00 EACH
352 527 1193
SKYLIGHT BUBBLE
TYPE 27 BY 27
SMOKED POLY-
CARBONITE NEW
ONLY 60.00 464 0316
VIPER ALARM alarm,
remote start,two key
fobs. $?? $40 obo
352-476-9019
Wheel Chair Lift
Pro Express
Electric, lifts up & down
& encloses inside van
$1000, 2 Trampoline
mats, new springs $50
352-303-0928




4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES AND
SEAT FOLDS UP
GREAT SHAPE 75.00
464 0316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER BRAND NEW
ONLY 25.00 464 0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
ADJUSTABLE LEGS
ON BOTH 20.00 EACH
464 0316
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT-
RESTS GOOD SHAPE
ONLY 100.00 464 0316




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676



"FAT STRAT" STYLE
ELECTRIC GUITAR
PLAYS & SOUNDS
GREAT "NEW" $45
352-601-6625
"NEW" ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR
W/GIGBAG,STRAP,
CORD,ETC $90
352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
NEW CONDITION
FULL DRED SIZE,
PLAYS GREAT $60
352-601-6625
EPIPHONE PR4E
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
W/AMP&ALL
ACCESSORIES $100
352-601-6625
FENDER "LAP
STRAT", BLACK 1/2
SIZE ELECTRIC CON-
VERSION W/SLIDE
$75 352-601-6625
FENDER CHILD SIZE
MINI STRAT BLACK
FINISH PERFECT


4 KITCHEN CANIS-
TERS WITH LIDS $10
NEW IRRIDESCENT
QUICHE DISH $10
419-5981
40 PIECES OF STAIN-
LESS FLATWARE $20
DECORATIVE
HANDLES CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 419-5981
ELECTRIC VEGETA-
BLE STEAMER $5
NEW LARGE GREEN
MIXING BOWL $10
419-5981
FRYER -Hamilton
Beach, basket-style,
good shape-$25
(352)212-1596
JUICER -Hamilton
Beach, good shape-$20
(352)212-1596
KING COMFORTER
SET lite green /leopard
$25.00 352-794-3020
cell 586-4987
KING COMFORTER
SET shiny maroon &
valances used once
$35.00 352-794-3020
cell 586-4987
MIXER -Waring
custom-250, 10 speed,
stainless steel, great
shape- $25
(352)212-1596
SWEEPEZE VACUUM-
ING DUST PAN electric
$10.00 352-344-2321




AB-LOUNGER
NEARLY NEW ONLY
30.00 464 0316
ALPINE TRACKER
Cross country ski type
machine. $50
352-489-3931
CARDIO TWISTER
Used 3 times. Video,
menus, etc. $75.00
OBO (352)613-3727
EXERCISE BIKE (DP)
UPRIGHT TYPE IT
ALSO WORKS THE
ARMS ONLY 75.00
464 0316
EXERCISE BIKE BY
LIFESTYLE SMALL
COMPACT ONLY 95.00
352 464 0316
GAZELLE-LIKE EXER-
CISE MACHINE GIVES
A GREAT WORKOUT
ONLY 30.00 464 0316
MASSAGE CHAIR
Homedics recliner
destress with massage
& heat. $50.
352-489-3931
ROWING MACHINE BY
BODY ROW WORKS
THE LEGS TOO ONLY
50.00 464 0316
TREADMILL Healthrder
variable speed & incline.
$75. 352-489-3931

-I/


2 Tins Remmington 22
Long Riffle Shells
Collector's Items
$100 ea. Cash
1 Brick Super X, 22
Long Rifle HP, hallow
point, shells $100 Cash
(352) 445-9448
14 FT JON BOAT
w/Honda Four Stroke
5HSP Motor $1498
352-637-3394
4HP JOHNSON OUT-
BOARD Model 4R72,
good condition, includes
6 gal gas tank. $175
352 746-7232
leave message
Approximately 100
Golf Clubs,
Pings, MacGregger,
845's & Big Bertha's
$200. take 1 or all
(315) 466-2268
AR 15, DPMS
w/Reflex Red Dot
2 mag's $1500
352-746-6769
Must Have FL
ConcealedCarry
Permit to Purchase
BICYCLE
Brand new Trek 7200,
ladies, 24 speed, 27"
tires $290 OBO
(352) 586-4630
BICYCLE TREK 7500
Womans, Shock Fork,
Fast and Easy, Clean,
24Speeds,$195
341-0450

CONCEALED
WEAPONS CLASS
EVERY SATURDAY
11 am, $40
132 N. Florida Ave.
(352) 419-4800

Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
DAM QUICK REEL
SPINNING REEL AND
POLE (1950s) $65.00
352 527 1193
FISHING TACKLE
Rods, Reels, Lures,
Line, Tackle Box, Lead
Weights-other Items,
$25 to $75
352-257-3288


Robbie Ray

Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cuttina Edae
to Care Free"

Make-overs,
Color, Foiling,
Precision Cuts,
Avant Garde
hairstyles and
updo's.

Paul Mitchell
Certified.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED



FOLDING BICYCLES 2
bicycles $99.
352-422-2164
Freedom Arms
Belt buckle Derringer
5 shot, 22 LR, $400
Buckle & Gun
Winchester Model 94,
lever action, .30 .30
Pre 64, $500
(208) 206-2020 Cell
GOLF CLUBS
Men RH Taylor Tour
Burner, Senior Flex
6-PW, $90,Tour Edge,
Men RH Reg. Flex 4PW
$80, 352-257-3288
PELLET RIFLE .177
cal. wood stock, power-
ful-1000 fps, case, 4x
scope, great shape-$75
(352)212-1596
POOL TABLE
Bar Room Style Full
Size Pool Table.
Slate-top. Good bump-
ers and felt. $800 OBO
352-446-3320
Ruger 44 Carbine
Rifle Stock
$150
352-441-0645
Taurus 22 Caliber
New In Box
$400. obo
(352) 795-0088
After 11 am til 7p



5 x 8 Utility Trailer
Plank Floor,
18" sides, drop ramp
Excellent Condition
$500.cash
(352) 445-9448
2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1895
** call 352-527-0555 **
4X8 Utility Trailer
w/ 16" sideboards
good condition
$400 352-564-0157



BABY STROLLER
Brown/green color,
Safety 1st, in ok condl-
tion, $20 (352)465-1616
FISHER-PRICE BABY
GIRL SWING
Plays soothing
music/and lights up.
100$. 352-726-1526
WHITE WOODEN
ROUND BASSINET
Brand new never used
$50 352-422-2719
WINNIE THE POOH
All Brand new clothes,
birth to 9 months and
lots of accessories.
352-613-2232 Please
call in evenings




5 to 8 yr old.
Passenger Van
for
Path Shelter
will pay cash
352-527-6500
ext. 4

BUYING Guitars,
Banjos, Violins, Man-
dolins, Saxophones, &
Tube Amplifiers, Top
Dollar Paid Call Mike,
Locally (352) 207-7522
CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369



BLUE OX RV 6" DROP
RECEIVER HI-Low, fits
2" receiver hitches tow-
ing, 10,000 lb. capacity.
$75. 352-601-0067
RV BAGGAGE DOOR
CATCH Package of 2,
white, rounded. $5.
352-601-0067
WINEGARD SATEL-
LITE COMPASS Model
SC2000, align dish to
satellite, waterproof, lan-
yard. $8. 352-601-0067


MEEKO
Meeko is a 2-y.o.
terrier mix, who is a
very mellow, perfect
gentleman. He has
quiet dignity, calm
energy, is very low
key. Weight 70
pounds, beige/
white in color.
housebroken, listens
carefully, easily
trained. Pays close
attention to his hu-
man friend. Gets
along well with
other dogs. His kind
and pleading eyes
will win your heart.
He is really a sweet-
heart of a dog.
He waits at Citrus
County Animal
Shelter Call Karen @
218-780-1808. "


Scottish Terrier
DOB 11/4/13
Black Beauties
Shots Male & Female
1 year garauntee.
(575) 491-2944 Cell


Shih-Tzu Pups, Males
Starting@ $400.
Registered
Lots of colors, Beverly
Hills, FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.ne










SKIPPY
Skippy is a
7-8 y.o. Redbone
Coonhound sweet,
trusting, loving and
non-aggressive.
Fostered since Sep-
tember, he would
do best as the only
dog in a home.
Loves walks and car
rides, RV's, etc. Not
a barker He wants
a hug before his
morning walk, then
he happily skips
along. He is the
ideal "good dog",
a loving and faithful
companion.
Call Judy @
352-503-3363.


TRIXIE
Trixie is a very pretty
2-y.o. terrier mix,
weighs 50 pounds, is
heartworm nega-
tive. Beautiful fawn
and white color She
is friendly, good with
children, and very
loving. She walks
well on a leash, sits
for treats, is easy to
train as she is
treat-motivated.
She loves people
and has just the
right amount of
playfulness. This
lovely girl awaits her
good forever home
while at Citrus
County Animal Shel-
ter ID #18728509.
Call Karen @
218-780-1808.







Bermuda Hay 501bs $6
Never been rained on
795-1906 586-1906
SHAMROCK FARM, CR


2 16 @ LaughingStock International Inc Dist by Universal UChIck for UFS, 2013

"We're planning a second honeymoon

if I can get an hour off work."


IThank d d FIf arg I ears In I aL~is


[Thank You, For 15 Years, io),Iftbt


LIQUIDATION SALE
Horses & tack, new &
used. 352-873-6033




30ft 5th Wheel
w/slideout on private
prop. $350 inc. all
electric. call for details
352-228-4303 or
928-379-1945

HERNANDO
2/11'/, Furn. Lrg. Fm &
Laun. Rm, Cprt, prvt rd.
50+ Area, $650/m. F/L
(352) 746-0850

HERNANDO
2/2 $450. mo. 1st last
+dep 352-201-2428

Hernando/41N
1/1SWMH. remodel
acrer. fencd. porch,
paved rdl 2x20 wkshp,
$350 m. (352)795-7813





must sell!
2006 FLEETWOOD
ENTERTAINER. 32X66.
OWNER MUST SELL!
CALL (352) 795-1272

43,900. 3/2,Dblewide.
Delivered & set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr
warr, only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&IW.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807


V THIS OUT!
2br 2ba Single Wide
12years YOUNG.
14X66. Trade in.
WILL GO FAST!
$14,900 YOUR BABY
$19,900 Incls Delv,
Set, New A/C, skirt &
steps, Must See!
NO HIDDEN FEES.
CALL (352) 795-1272

BIG
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Hnder $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183

HERNANDO
$$ Private Owner $$
Financing Available
New & Used
Manufactured Homes
Call 1-727-9674230

Homosassa
Dbl. Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$69,900 (352) 621-0192

INVERNESS
55+ Park 14 x 58,
2/1'/2, furniture,
appliances, shed,
scrn. porch, $8,500.
(352) 419-5133


NEW 2013

2br 2ba
Doublewide w/10 year
Warranty $39,900
Delivered & setup, a/c,
skirt, steps.
Ca11(352) 795-1272

NEW 312
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181

Palm Harbor Homes
Demo your mobile
home/free tear down
at Palm Harbor New
mobiles $39k off list
John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext 210

$$$$$$$$

WE WILL

BUY YOUR
MANUFACTURED
Home. from 1976-2013
CALL (352) 795-2377




2BR. 1% BA.on your
own 75x 100 lot.
no fees! new enclosed
sunroom, Ig laundry
room furn, 2 storage
buildings, 5111 Castle
Lake Ave. S. of
Inverness on SR 41
$39,500 (352) 597-7353
2BR/11/2BA, MH &
Land Needs little Work
$17,500 9340 W.Tonto
Dr., Crystal River
Call 352-382-1544 or
813-789-7431
3bdr/2 full baths/2 car
caroort on 1 acre.
split layout, steel roof,
caged pool, 20x25 ft
deck, Ig storage build-
ing, Furnished Modu-
lar $73,900, 5215
Bridget Pt, Castle
Lake Park, Inverness
(352) 597-7353
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 4br 2ba MH
READY TO MOVE IN!
4Owner Fin. Avail.-
CALL (352) 795-1272
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Considering
ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498
FLORAL CITY
Exceptionally Nice
3/2 on Beautiful 1'/4
AC, treed lot, garage,
shed, dock, Ideal for
Fishing/ Airboats
$95,900 716-523-8730
HERNANDO
2 MH's on 1 acre
Invest 59k, mo. rent
possible @1k, mls#
700425, Cridland RE
S.Smith 352-634-1048


HERNANDO/486, Lg.
Wkshop 2/1/den SW,
w/AC,1+acre, $43,500,
Cridland Real Estate
JDesha(352)634-6340

HOME-ON-LAND
Only $59,900, 3/2
"like new" on % acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,350
dwon, $319.22/mo
P&l, W.A.C. Owner
can finance. Call
352-621-9182

NW Citrus County
SWMH on 1 acre, 2/1.5
paved rd., screened
porch, appliances -
$37,700 possible
owner financing
352-795-9908





CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
Winter Soecials *
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
2/2 New Model $59K
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

DUNNELLON
LAKE ROUSSEAU MH
Park. Lg. 1/1 w/slider to
encl. screened porch,
outside shed, CHAfurn.
Nice yard, low lot rent.
Asking$11,900
(207) 347-0531
FLORAL CITY
DW, 2/2/2 carport
Screen room, shed,
all you need is a tooth-
brush to move in
$17,500. Lot Rent $183.
352-344-2420
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $179/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
In Park, On Lake
Rousseau, furnished,
2BR, IBA, CHA
tile & laminate floor-
ing 10 x 20 porch,
w/ vynil wind., open
deck + 2 outdr stor-
age sheds, Low lot
rent $11,500.
(828) 260-3146 Cell
LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access. ramp and
shower $25,000.
352-212-6804
LECANTO 55+ PK
MUST SELL
3br/2ba. Furn, Cpt,
Shed, New Roof,
CHA, washer/dryer,
MAKE OFFER
931-210-0581
Melody Pk, INV
2/2cp, splitplan,
roofover, C/H/A,
woodsview, under $10k
Cridland RE, J.Desha
(352) 634-6340


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179





Adult Family Care
Home Alzhemer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052

HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping Dr.
appts errands etc Hablo
Espanol 813-601-8199





SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518





JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374

THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469





BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078

FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097

ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554





AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755





HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping Dr.
appts errands etc Hablo
Espanol 813-601-8199


COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777

DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907





"BOB BROWN'S*
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
* 352 422-7279 **





Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 "*
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570





Marcia's Best Clean
Experienced Expert
lic+ref, Free Estimates
**call 352-560-7609"


NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate $20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




AIIAROUND TRACTOR

Site Prep, Driveways
Licl/Ins 352-795-5755




BEAT ANY PRICE
Paint & Power wash
Lawn & Trees Trim
Jim (352) 246-2585
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up time.
352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767


ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
All Tractor & Tree Work
Household, Equipment
& Machinery Moving
(352) 302-6955
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570




CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998





CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


BEAT ANY PRICE
Paint & Power Wash
Lawn & Trees Trim
Jim (352) 246-2585
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300





All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713




DGS SERVICES LLC
Reroofs Metal Roofs
REPAIRS Home
Inspector 414-8693




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.





COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn Re-
moval 352-302-6838


Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452

All Tractor & Tree Work
Household, Equipment
& Machinery Moving
(352) 302-6955


DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, liclins 302-8852
KING's LAND CLEAR-
ING & TREE SERVICE
Complete tree & stump
removal hauling, demo
& tractor work. 32 yrs.
exp. (352) 220-9819
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827

REAL TREE
SERVICE
(352) 220-7418
**Tax Specials**
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316


2 Maltese Puppies
Left, 1 female $650.
1 Male $600, CKC reg.
will have Fl. Health
Cert.. Call to come
play with them,
(352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258


8 Month Old
MALE YORKIE
CKC registered all
shots, house trained.
loveable, affection-
ate Silver & brown
$600. (352) 341-4009


~d~~ c~~ c~ ~~j~F








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WORDY GURDYBY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Not any fluorescence (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Factory harangue (1) they will fit in the letter
S squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Wallops Fudd's Bunny enemy (1) syllables in each word.
@ 2013UFS, Dist.by Univ. Ucickfor UFS
4. Blind "language" postal delivery (1)


5. House robbers' "pet" beefs (1)


6. Penny-metal kernel cooker (2)


7. Jumbles thorny berry shrubs (2)

I I I I TTI I I 1 1 1 I
SaTII IAIH ST IaI VSE S 'I ddOd Hdd03'9 SA3d saAIHI 's
rIVM 1T][IVtI SOfI SOflTS INVH i V'd *' MOTD ON 'T
2-16-13 Sa[MSNV


Sandy Oak 55+ RV PK
14x60 split 2/2, new
heat/ac, remodeled,
furn. Ig scnd in FL Rm.
55 ft crpt w/laundry
room, 989-858-0879




HOMOSASSA
RENT-to-OWN
3br 2ba MH
Immediate Occpancy
Owner Financina Avail.
CALL (352) 795-2377





ACTIONt
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
www.CitruslounlyHomeRentals.com
CITRUS SPRINGS/LECANTO
2330 W. Siver Ln ()... $525
2/1 Apt with appliances
8162 N. Pinz Way (CS)..$850
New home, screened lanai
CRYSTAL RIVER
10350 Deepwoods Dr. (CR) .... $750
2/2/1 Quiet location, utility room an sihed
11280 Bayshore Dr. (CR)..... $1000
2/2 View of canal, furnished,
comm. pool, tennis courts
HOMOSASSA
41 Birctree St. (H) ............ $800
2/2/2 SMW nice location, spacious rms, lanai
8289 W. Periwinkle Ln. (H)....$850
3/2/2 Open floor plan, large yard
HERNANDO/INVERNESS
5164 N. Dewey Way (Her). ....$775
3/2 Country seting,roomy kitchen
854 Prit(hard Isl.(Inv.)...$800
2/2 Townhouse on waterfront, comm. pool

Chassahowitzka
2/2, fence. Yd/DW $500
AGENT (352) 382-1000




CRYSTAL RIVER
1 Br 2BA Competely
furn. Ige scr porch, with
cable tv, W/D,all utilities.
$700 + sec 422-7717
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully furn. efficiency
w/ equipped kitchen.
All utilities, cable,
Internet, & cleaning
provided. $699/mo
352-586-1813
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR/ 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE


CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apart-
ments for Rent
352-465-2985

CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815

Government
Subsidized
Two Bedroom
Apartments
for Rent at the
Wildwood
Commons Apts.
in Wildwood,
Florida.
Must meet eligibility
requirements
Please call
352-748-0047 TTY
1-800-233-6694.







INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great
Loc., clean & roomy.
no pets $500.mo 1st. &
Last $300. Sec.
352-341-1847

Inverness
Homosassa
Government
Subsidized Apts
available.
Must meet eligibility
requirements. Equal
Housing
Opportunity.
Homossassa
(352) 628-6073
Inverness
(352) 726-4397
TTY-800-233-6694






LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/613-6000

SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant
Rd. to So. on Talla-
hasse Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719



OPPORTUNITY


CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret
Harbour Apts. Newly
remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incl Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1/2, Unfurn.$550+sec
Furn. $650 828 5th
Ave. NE, 727-455-
8998, 727-343-3965
CRYSTAL RIVER
LG 2/1 water, sewer,
garbage, w/d hkup,
lawn inc. $475 mo.
(352) 212-9205
or 352-212-7922

-i

CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy 19 Downtown
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000 SF, exc. loc.
$795/mo 352-634-2528




Downtown Citrus Av.
1156sf,offSt. Parkng
Charlotte G. Rity. Inv.
(352) 795-9123
CRYSTAL RIVER
Office & Warehouse
$300-$600, Plantation
Rentals 352-634-0129
LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza,
Office/Retail, CR 486,
900 sf. @ $700+ util. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801



CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furn. w/ member-
ship, 352-476-4242,
352-527-8002
INVERNESS
Nice Waterfront, 2 story
Condo 2/21.Great loc.
First, last, Sec $675 mo.
(352) 302-4546
INVERNESS
Whispering Pines Villa
3/2/2 w/ enclosed patio,
$850 F/L/S, BK/CK req
321-303-0346




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, $615, month
Charlotte G. RIty. Inv.
(352)795-9123




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
HERNANDO
Lovely Lakeview, Furn.
Cottages 1/1, All Util.
Incl.d, 386-208-2495
INGLIS
WATERFRONT
Charming eff. /cottage
$645/mo includes
utilities & furnished.
352-422-2994


INVERNESS
3 bedroom. 3 bath. Log
home. Double lot on ca-
nal. Huge garage. $900
a mo. rent. $750 sec.
(352)476-2282



BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, Fl. rm., CHA, $510
35 Golden St 464-2701
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, Fl. Rm., CHA,
$525. mo. +$300 Sec.
352-422-0139
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 w/enc. FL room
**inside like new!**
$575 352-464-1950
BEVERLY HILLS
870 Beakrush Lane
2br 1% ba, 1 car gar.
enclosed screen porch,
$600 mo. leased dep.
no pets. 352-586-3072
BEVERLY HILLS
Lg 2/2/2, CH/A, FL Rm,
fncd yrd, W/D, No Pets
$675. mo. + sec.,
352-726-2280
CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Inverness
352-726-3476
Lecanto
352-746-0373
Crystal River

352-563-0890





CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 $850. Month
352-897-4447,
352-697-1384
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
Water Incl. CHA $496.
220-2447 or 212-2051
DUNNELLON
Rainbow Springs
Rent/Rent To own
Georgous, 2/2/2
Country Club Home
Fireplace, D Washer
Carpeted, lanai,
spotless 1/2 acre
quiet. Special $799.
352-527-0493

Hernando
Rentals
from $425.00 0 MO.
Call A.W.
'Skip'Craven
352-464-1515
HOMASASSA SMW
3/2/3, Ig. pool, dbl. lot
$1,250.mo. incid. lawn
maint. (773) 320-1894
HOMOSASSA
2/1 Like new. Perfect!
(352) 503-3554
HOMOSASSA
3/2, new carpet, appls.
Lg wooden deck,
nice area. off Grover
Cleveland $800.(352)
447-0977/302-3819
Homosassa
Springs 3/2 ,c/h/a
$795/mo, + 850 sec.
(352) 628-3696
INVERNESS
3/2 Brand New,
Granite tops, marble
firs, SS Ap $895
(352) 634-3897
INVERNESS
Country Living on
Large %1 acre lot. 3 bd.,
2 ba. home. Garden
and fenced areas. Well
& septic, so no water
bill! $595. 352-476-4964
Sugarmill Woods
2/2/2, 2 MBdrms
$850. 352-302-4057



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225



INVERNESS
Rm. for Rent, furn.
share large DW incl'd
Util $350 + $100 sec.
352-726-0652



CRYSTAL RIVER
Office & Warehouse
$300-$600, Plantation
Rentals 352-634-0129



20 DOCKABLE
ACRES: St. Lucie
Waterway. $189,500.
45mins boat Atlantic;
5mins boat Lake
Okeechobee.
Beautiful land,
abundant wildlife.
Gated/Privacy.
888-716-2259 Gulf
Atlantic Land, Broker.


Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Developed site with
gazebo & storage bldg,
reduced to $49,500.
Separate storage
lot available. (RV sold).
For info and pictures
Click on
detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


1
EUAL HOU SNG
OPPORTUNITY


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $58,500. Call
352-638-0905


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.






OPEN HOUSE
TODAY, 1 p-4p
5131 S. Austin Point,
Homosassa $134,900
Move in Condition,
3/2 on 1/2 acre,
updated kitchen,
wood floors,
all appliances.
Gate House Realty
352-382-4500
Call for directions


.t


CLASSIFIED


I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


Sun Feb 17th, 1p-4p
2764 N Canterbury
Lake Dr.
Well maintained and
updated home in com-
munity with amenities.
From HWY 486 take
Canterbury Lake Dr &
follow to hse on left

Call Myriam Reulen
Weston Properties,
LLC
352-613-2644

Yankeetwn
Saturday, 2-4pm
5303 Riverside
Nancy Little Lewis
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 302-6082





HERNANDO
Building Off Hwy 200,
$800.mo 352-201-2428





Leek
Quiet Country Setting
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sqftLA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area
only 20 Mm. to Ocala
$129,900 Call
352-302-6784
for appt.






Furnished
Pool Home 3/2/1
Fab.$139.9K
www.coolproperties
.net/florida

PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything! 4/3
w/7 car
garage/workshop &
in-law suite on 5.83 ac-
res.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164




2/2/2, REMODELED
NEW: Roof, AC, Kit,
Baths, Windows, Firs,
317 S Harrison.
Reduced $72,900.
Call 352-527-1239

HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2/1/1 needs paint &
cosmetics $23k
**cash only **
352-503-3245








MOL .


Brentwood Villa
2/2/2 cul-de-sac
Completely updated!
OPEN SUN 12-3PM
$96,900
PRICED TO SELL!
FSBO 610-248-2090

Custom Home,
3 bedroom, 2% bath,
w/Master w/DBL
walk-ins + bath +
den/off. 2+ car garage.
1 Acre. MUST SEE!
$249,900.
352-860-0444

OPEN HOUSE
Saturday & Sunday
12 Noon 3PM
3/2'/2/3, Owner
399 E. Keller Court
Citrus Hills




ARBOR LAKES
Fantastic Dream
Home In Active Senior


Call (352) 726-6564


Al Move In Condition
2 Bedrm, 2 Full Baths
with convertible
bedroom den, mod-
ern open floor plan,
on small lake, FREE In-
home theater system
2 car garage $129,900
Realtor (941) 356-1456
FSBO 3/2/2 Scrn Porch,
metal roof, appls, CHA,
fans, verticals, shed,
fence, deck, spklrs, near
dog park. $120,000
(352) 586-0872
NICE HOUSE on
Nice Street $79,000
2/1/1, Attached
carport w/ 12 x 32
scrn. por., built in '95
on 1/2 acre lot fenced
12 x14 matching out
building, New roof,
stucco paint, flooring,
upper line appl's,
irrigation & water
system.,
taxes & ins. $1,135 yr
606-425-7832
Unique stilt home in
rustic surroundings
off 581. Great loc to
town, shopping, &
hospital. 2br/lba, w/
rap around porch.
Needs some TLC.
Sold as is. Make an
offer. Asking $33,900
(352) 419-6227




3b/2ba den MH
on land off US 19
newer c/h/a carpet &
vinyl, furn, clean RV
Hkup. fence **$39.900t"
Cridland Real Estate
JDesha 352-634-6340




4/3/2, POOL HOME
3,000 sf, granite coun-
ters, SS appl s., wood
firs., Reduced $25,000
Asking $235,000
850-585-4026










Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.













Phyllis
Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503











GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
gail@citrusrealtor
.com
www.citrusrealtor
.com
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNau-reCoast
Properies.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"


"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


Honda BF75 Four Stroke I Vinyl Deck
--- -_._--- 25" Pontoons Full Cover

SRemaininq $9922,995
2012 Price
CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597


100999 POLAR 1780 SKIFF
Very Clean 1999 Polar 1780 Skiff 2002 Evinrude 115
Bimini Top. Dual Batteries w/Switch
SCustom Leaning Post Cooler Garmin 300C Fishfinder
Clarion Stereo- Fuel/Water Separator- Deck Lights
S12v Receptacle Smart Tabs Poling Platf0orm
NOW $9,995
THREE RIVERS MARINE
1038 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 563-5510


0 2007 HONDA SHADOW

--O SPIRIT750
Cober pipes, saddle bags, windshield.
Nice bike and sounds great'
;......... : s3$ |99 5

HONDA OF CRYSTAL RIVER
1917 N. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 352-795-4832


* 2007 CAROLINA SKIFF 1780 DLX



""",,Ih lh ,,, l d.h ,

Now s14,995
THREE RIVERS MARINE
1038 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 563-5510

1994 HONDAGOIDWING SEL

SThis is one clean bike that has been really

s4,995 i



HONDA OF CRYSTAL RIVER
1917 N. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 352-795-4832


T 2003 HURRICANE 260
-* Twin Yamaha F115TXRB Four Strokes
_- Bimini Top Full Cover Tandem Axle Trailer


s29,900
CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597


2002 VTK1800C
This bike is custom and fast.
Priced well below KBB.
S**MANAGER'S SPECIAL!***

$3,995

HONDA OF CRYSTAL RIVER
1917 N. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 352-795-4832


CALL FOR DETAILS



As low As 3-32er a06



As LowAs $18 per ad


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com



'% ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact fee
credit, high and dry,
trees, $11,000 obo
(352) 795-3710
INVERNESS,FL
3 miles east of Inv;
5-20ac wooded/some
cleared, owner finance
available.Owner is
licensed Real Estate
Broker,Ed Messer.ed
.messer@yahoo.com
NORTH CITRUS
1.4 ac. Cleared, fenced,
high & dry. Paved road.
Elec., pump/well, septic.
Owner finan. No
mobiles. $13,900
CALL 352-897-4195



HOMOSASSA Wooded
Lot on Lee Woods Dr.,
has Wetlands, with
River access, but not
on river $6,000.
352-621-1664




** BUY, SELL*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510"*
87 PROLINE
17', Deep V haul
Center Console
w/ trailer
315 W. Inverness Blvd
BASS BOAT
1985, 16ft Bayliner
Needs work 85HP
force eng., galvinized
trailer. $800obo
(352) 507-1490






C DORY
1999 16ft, Angler, with
trailer, Honda 4 stroke,
40HP, $7,800 Floral City
(717) 994-2362 Cell
GALALEO
Duck Boat 17ft
w/25 HP Longtaill
Go Devil, new trailer
Great Shape! $5000
firm 352-341-0336
or 352-586-8946
KAYAK
Current Designs
Shirocco, 16 ft 10"
yellow sea kayak
$600, 352-464-4955
















PENN YAN
1979 27' Sports fisher-
man w/ trailer, needs
some work. $4000
OBO (352) 621-0192
TRI PONTOON
BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, Ttop, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
(352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.corn
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515












TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant




Brooksville Deeded
spacious, shaded cnr
lot, 1 BR/1 BA, Large FL
room, Large storage
shed & patio. 55+ RV
Park w/ heated pool,
and music activities,
$36,000 352-848-0448,
352- 428-0462 anytime
HOME FOR SALE
NORTON, VA
5Bd/2%Ba inc. 3 lots
70miles from Bristol
Racetrack $69,000
276-393-0446 OR
276-679-1331




YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013 C1L









C12 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013


Boas utoPats


ITASCA
2007 Navaron 23H
Mercedes Diesel, 2.7L,
17 mpg, generator, AC,
one slide out, sleeps 5,
excellent condition,
$55,000 make offer
352-422-1309
NATIONAL RV
2006 Tropical One
owner,34ft, 26000
miles,no smoke/pets,
300HP Cummins die-
sel,2 slides, 6 new ti-
res, 3yr
warranty,many extras.
$87000. Well main-
tained. 352-341-4506
SUNNYBROOK
2008, 35FT Fifth Wheel
3 slides, electrc awning
fireplace, 2 ac's, 50 amp
king bed, assume
balance of $37,500.
352-279-3544




2012 Wildwood TT
26'Ft. sleeps 8,
Elec.Awning and
Jack, bunks $13,999
813-699-2262
BROOKSIDE
07,By Sunnybrook
32ft, 5th wheel,2 slides
exc. cond. loaded,
stored under cover
ask. 15k,352-795-0787
or 352-208-7651
Brooksville Deeded
spacious, shaded cnr
lot, 1BR/1BA, Large FL
room, Large storage
shed & patio. 55+ RV
Park w/ heated pool,
and music activities,
$36,000 352-848-0448,
352- 428-0462 anytime
CHALLENGER
5TH WHEEL 33FT, 2
slide outs Good cond
$6,000 obo Must Sell
(423) 202-0914
Coleman, 2001
Utah pop-up, new ac &
tires, elect. & gas heat,
slide-out dinette, sleeps
6 to 8, sink, 3 way
fridge, inside/out stove,
awning, 1 owner, ready
to go! $4000.
352-795-9693
FOREST RIVER
2010, Surveyor, Sport
189, 20 ft. Travel
Trailer,
1 slide, w/AC, qn. bed,
awning, pwr. tonque
jack, corner jacks,
microwave, equalizing
hitch, $10,500, reduced
to $9000
(352) 382-1826
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, kg bd,like new,
60amp serv. NADA
$29K asking $25K
obo 352-382-3298


LUGGAGE ROOF
CROSSRAILS
will fit any Chevy
Traverse $150
obo 352-503-6414
TRUCK COVER
Silver, Fits Toyota
Tundra Extention Cab
2001- 2006 Good Cond.
$350 (407) 353-2406
Homosassa




**BEST PRICE**
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
**352-426-4267**
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not -*
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333

MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.oraM
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ




AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE.
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 5 6 3-19 0 2
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.
BUICK
1996 Regal 125k
miles,motor rebuilt
@90k. A/C doesn't
work,dents and dings,
but runs good.$1200
obo 563-1638
CADILLAC
1994 DEVILLE
79K MILES, CAR IS
PERFECT $4995
352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2005 STS
LOW MILES
NICE CAR
$9850, 352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2011 CTS, LOADED
ONLY 15K
MILES, SUNROOF
$27,850 352-628-5100
CHEVROLET
1999, Camaro,
Convertible
$6,990.
352-341-0018


CHEVROLET
2006 Corvette Victory
Red! Cashm Leather.
LS2 400HP, Auto 6-sp
Pad Shift, All options
inc. Heads-Up display,
heated Seats, Tract
control, XM Sat Radio,
NavSystem. Plus
more.garage-kept. $35K
352-560-7247
CHEVROLET
2009 Cobalt, 19,700,
excel, cond. 38mpg
1 owner local,
(352) 447-2920
CHRYSLER
'01, Sebring LXI,
limited conv., loaded,
low mi., Econ. V6, CD,
Leather, garaged Perf.
cond. $4,950, 212-9383
CHRYSLER
2006 PT Cruiser conv....
weather is getting
nice.. time to drop the
top...call 352-628-4600
to set appointment
to see
CRYSLER
'98, Seabring convert-
ible, red, excel, cond.
always garaged
$4,000 (352) 628-1723
FORD
1995 Escort wagon
4cyl., Auto,
call 352-628-4600
for low price and
appointment
FORD
2005, Focus
$4,850.
352-341-0018
FORD
2010, Edge,
10k miles, Loaded,
excellent condition
$18,500. 352-400-6007
FORD
2010, Pruis,
$17,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
2011 FIESTA SDN
36K MILES, "S"
MODEL, ONE OWNER
$9950, 352-628-5100
FORD
Mustang Cobra, Indy
500 Pace Car-1994,
Convertible, 7100 mi,
Gar. kept 252-339-3897
HONDA
2010 ACCORD LX,
85K MILES, NICE,
$12,850 352-628-5110
JEEP
Grand Cherokee ltd.
White, 70k mi. Mint
cond. Auto.$11,000
(305) 619-0282
LINCOLN
Towncar 2010
29,900mi, gold w/beige
vinyl top, white leather
asking, $24,900
352-476-5061
MINI COOPER
2008 2DR, HARDTOP
ONLY 20K MILES,
SUPER CLEAN
$13980, 352-628-5100

MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

NISSAN
2005, Altima
$5,895
352-341-0018


PONTIAC
2003 Bonneville, must
SE, V6, pw....pl....priced
to sell.....call jan at
352-628-4600 for
appointment
and pricing

SOLD
FORD
2000 Escort ZX2
4cyl. 5 spd, air, runs &
looks good




AUTO SWAP
CORRAL SHOW
20TH ANNUAL
Sumter
Swap Meets
SUMMER COUNTY
Fairgrounds, Bush-
nell
Feb. 15, 16, 17th
1-800-438-8559

FORD
'96, Mustang, garage
kept, 1 owner, 6 cyl.,
5 spd. GT rims, silver,
w/ gray interior.
Immaculated cond.
Must See $3,100 obo
Cell 954-294-8979
Beverly Hills




DODGE
2005 Dakota SLT, 4wd,
4door, V8, towing pkg,
BIk, 88k mi, exc cond
$12,500 (352) 341-0725
FORD
2004, Ranger
$7,990
352-341-0018
FORD
F150, 1978, 4x4
Runs good, 6" Lift kit,
$1,650 obo
(352) 564-4598
FORD
F-150XL white 1995,
3L, straight 6, 2WD,
6' bed w/ cab $3600
(352) 637-5331 LM

MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




BUICK
2005 RANIER
46K MILES, CXL
LIKE NEW
$9850, 352-628-5100
CHEVY TRAIL-
BLAZER LT 05
exc. cond. asking $6000
obo, in Hernando
(904) 923-2902
FORD
2000 Explorer $2,000 or
best offer. 263000 miles
runs god needs rear
main seal. May need
ball joints. 476-7942

HONDA
1997 CRV, priced to
sell....it's a honda
auto, pwr windows
call 352-628-4600 for
special newspaper
pricing


CLASSIFIED



KIA
2012 SOUL
ONLY 7K MILES
$15,800 352-628-5100
SUBARU
2011 FORESTER
29K MILES
ONE OWNER
$17850, 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
1997 RAV4
ONLY 89K MILES,
NICE $5850,
352-628-5100




JEEP
2000, Grand
Cherokee 4x4, V8
pw, pl, priced to low
to list.....call adam at
352-628-4600 for
appointment




DODGE
96, work van. Ram 250
155k, runs excellent
$1,700,
315-272-5393




BAD BOY BUGGIE
2011 "ready to hunt"
Only $5998.
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS
2002, SPORTSMAN
700 CC 4X4 AUTO
READY FOR THE MUD
ONLY $4288
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS RZR 800 LE
TIME TO PLAY HARD
ONLY $8388
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
new tires, am/fm, CB
250 engine, hitch, 4spd,
auto & reverse, canoe
rack, $900 obo
352-637-4011




96 SOFTAIL
striped-lowered
Chromed-Out, 11 k mi.
$10,500, 352-634-3990

Harley Davidson
2005, 883
LOW MILES
$3,995.

Harley Davidson
2006, STREET GLIDE
EZ FINANCE
$11,500.

HONDA
2009, VT750 AERO,
CLEAN
$4,995.

SUZUKI
2001, VOLUSIA
EZ FINANCE
$2,995.

KAWASAKI
1999, NOMAD
RUNS GREAT
$3,800.

LUCKY U CYCLES
352-330-0047
WWW.LUCKYU
CYCLES.COM


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492




A A



Harley Davidson
2009 Street Glide
Black, 20k, many extras
$18,500 firm, pls call


Harley-DAVIDSON
2006 FLHTPI Clean
bike, great looks, 88 ci,
5 speed, low miles 19K,
accident free, never
played down, garage
kept, two tone bk/wt, all
service done by HD
dealer 352 513-4294
asking $10,500
HONDA
'04, Shadow, Aero,
750 CC, 16k Miles,
Like new $3,995
461-4518 or 586-2807
HONDA BLACK BIRD
CBR 1100 LOW LOW
MILES ONLY $3488.00
(352) 621-3678
HONDA SCOOTER
2006 SILVERWING
600cc, 50 mpg,
tricycle wheels $4995
352-489-8803
HONDA ST1300
2006 MADE TO TOUR
ONLY $7786
(352) 621-3678
KAWASKI NINFA
650
LIKE NEW ONLY
$5488 (352) 621-3678
KYMCO
2009, AJILITY
SCOOTER GREAT
GAS SAVER ONLY
$998 (352) 621-3678
RAMPAGE
Motorcycle lift for p/u
truck. Like new $1800.
(352) 637-0397
SUZUKI
'06, Boulevard 800CC,
Lots of extras, like new
$3,995. 352-461-4518
352-586-2807
SUZUKI BURGMAN
AUTOMATIC TWIST
AND GO FUN ONLY
$4686 (352) 621-3678
SUZUKI GSXR 750
195 MILES "HOLD ON"
ONLY $9996
(352) 621-3678






TOY

HAULER
27' 2005 Work & Play
$14,500.
(352) 634-3990
VICTORY CROSS
ROADS
"GREAT American
MADE CRUSIER"
ONLY $12888
(352) 621-3678


208-0221 SU & THCRN
vs Robert N Kramer Case No 09-2012-CA-000337 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.09-2012-CA-000337
DIVISION:
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ROBERT N. KRAMER, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated
November 29, 2012 and entered in Case No 09-2012-CA-000337 of the Circuit Court of the
FIFTH Judicial Circuit in and for CITRUS County, Florida wherein SUNTRUST MORTGAGE
INC is the Plaintiff and ROBERT N KRAMER; HOLLIE A KRAMER; SUNTRUST BANK;
RIVERHAVEN VILLAGE PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC; are the Defendants,
The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash by electronic sale be-
ginning at 10'00 AM on the prescribed date at www citrus realforeclose com at 10'00AM, on
the 28th day of February, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final
Judgment

LOT 22, BLOCK 2, OF RIVERHAVEN VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 31 THROUGH 53, PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

A/K/A 12014 DOLPHIN COURT, HOMOSASSA, FL 34448

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any otherthan the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 30, 2012

Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Circuit Court
By/s/ Kristina Howard, Deputy Clerk

F11035507
**See Americans with Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact: Mr. John D. Sullivan, 110 N. Apopka Street, Inverness, FL
34450-4231, Phone: 352-341-6700, Fax: 352-341-7008
February 16 & 21, 2013


204-0216 SACRN
2/27 sales
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that
the undersigned intends to
sell the vehicle described
below under Florida Stat-
utes 71378 The under-
signed will sell at public
sale by competitive bidding
on Wednesday, February
27, 2013 at 9'00 am on the
premises where said vehicle
has been stored and which
are located at, Smitty's
Auto, Inc, 4631 W Cardinal
St, Homosassa, Citrus







203-0216 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under
Rcl-
tious Name Law, pursuant
to Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN, that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of AN-
OTHER FAMILY AFFAIR, lo-
cated at 11917 North
Goldendale Avenue,
Dunnellon, Florida 34473,
in the County of Citrus,
intends to register said
name with Florida De-
partment of State, Divi-
sion of Corporations, Tal-
lahassee, Florida.
DATED at
Dunellon
this 11 th day of February,
2013.
s/ Rhonda & Tim Teilier
Owners
Published one (1) time in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle. February 16, 2013.


County, Florida, the follow-
ing'
Year:1965Make:
Volkswagon Model:
Beetle Vin 115605379
Purchase must be paid for
at the time of purchase in
cash only Vehicle sold as is
and must be removed at the
time of sale Sale is subject
to cancellation in the event
of settlement between
owner and obligated party
February 16, 2013


205-0216 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law. pursuant to
Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of:
ALL CYCLE SUPPLY
located at 13191 S.
Majestic Point, Floral City,
FL 34436, in the County of
Citrus, intends to register
the said name with the
Division of Corporations of
the Florida Department of
State, Tallahassee, FL.
Dated at Inverness, FL,
this 12TH day of February,
2013.
/s/ Vickie Fleischer
President
Published in Citrus County
Chronicle, February 16,
2013.


206-0216 SACRN
02/27 Sole
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
The following vehicless,
vessels) will be sold at
public auction, Free of all
prior liens, per FL Stat.
713.78, at 10:00 AM On
February 27, 2013, at
Tropical Window Tinting,
1612 Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa, FL 34448,
phone 352-795-3456. No
titles, as is, cash only.
2000 NISSAN
VIN# 1N6ED27T3YC310401
February 16, 2013.







207-0216 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Nolce under
Rcli-
tious Name Law, pursuant
to Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN, that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of RJ
PROPERTIES, located at
3365 East Millwood Lane,
Hernandom Florida
34442, in the County of
Citrus, intends to register
said name with Florida
Department of State, Divi-
sion of Corporations, Tal-
lahassee, Florida.
DATED at
Hernando,
FL, this 11th day of Febru-
ary, 2013.
/s/Richard
Rosenthal
Owner
Published one (1) time in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle. February 16, 2016.


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Forclo ur CO N Y F )CH O LE




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2013 F-150 SUPER CAB STX


$34,745
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2003 TOYOTA SEQUOIA SR5
Loaded
$12,950




2006 FORD RANGER XLT 4X4
Super Cab, 34,000 miles
$17 950




2011 GMC TERRAIN SLT
$23,950


-Q

08 CHEVY MALIBU LT
$13,950


2010 LINCOLN MKS
One Owner
$25,950


ZUUS MIISUDISHI LANILK IA
$6,950


I$9,9ce ouer,u x
$9,950 $10,950


2008 GRAND MARQUIS LS
$13,950


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Loaded
$7,950


2003 LINCOLN TOWNCAR
$8,950
N -Lna I


2010 FORD FOCUS SEL 2009 CHEVY MALIBU LT 08 FORD TAURUS SEL
Loaded
$12,950 $12,950 $12,950
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15,000 Miles
$13,950 $14,950 $15,950


2011 FORD TAURUS 2009 FORD ESCAPE HYBRID
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2013 MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE
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2011 LINCOLN TOWNCAR
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1 Based n 211 CY sales. 2 Based on analysis of data published by EPA, 11/10. *Prices
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2005 SCION XB
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




C14 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013


E)b.


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2013 Chevy Silverado
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AND 0% APR for 72 Mo.
Over 75 Trucks to choose from! Accessorize your truck right on site!
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All-New 2013 Chevy Spark 1LS
Auonatic Transmission
$4n oe


2012 Chevy Sonic 5 Dr. LS
MSRP: S15,560
$4'0 OA


2013 Chevy Equinox LS
Stk. #C13135, Auto, 4cyl. MSRP: $25,030
SAn CM=


2013 Chevy Avalanche
Black Diamond Edtion, Personalized Coffee
Table Book, Own a Legend
MSRP. $37,115, Dealer Discount: 51.720
Rebate: $2,000. USAA Discount $750
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2013 Chevy Tahoe
MSRP. 540,075, Dealer Discount $3,250
Rebate: $750, USAA Discount $750
Bonus Cash: 5750


-l


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m. -


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


--


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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013 C15


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New 2012 Honda Civic LX
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10 Honda CIVIC LX
#H664.....$11,995



10 Honda CIVIC LX
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08 Honda ODYSSEY EX-L
771.....$14,880


12 Honda CIVIC EX
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11 Honda CRV
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11 Honda CRV
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10 Honda CIVIC LX
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11 Honda PILOT LX
7563.....$22.99


08 Honda ACCORD EXL
666.....$15,995



10 HONDA CRV LX
H7722.. ..... R


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


S' > I


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C16 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2013


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AND WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PICTURES FOR ILLUSTRATION ONLY.


I I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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31