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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 02-10-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03027

Full Text


Citrus girls weightlifter takes sixth at state /B1


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
79
LOW Partly cloudy.
56 PAGE A4


CITR U- COUNTY eethenew
-NI Q yota Prius 2013





www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 118 ISSUE 187


Snowed

Engla dig million
New Englan4 New York di outble Ca
tfid


Associated Press
PROVIDENCE, R.I. New
Englanders began the back-
breaking job of digging out from
as much as 3 feet of snow Satur-
day and emergency crews used
snowmobiles to reach shivering
motorists stranded overnight on


New York's Long Island after a
howling storm swept through
the Northeast.
About 650,000 homes and
businesses were left without
electricity, and some could be
cold and dark for days. Many
roads across the New York-to-
Boston corridor of roughly 25


in


people were impassa-
rs were entombed by
A, A enyn a, r lc rani ~nlra


arn ts. Ana some11 p eopi vviewo
up in the morning to find the
snow packed so high they
See Page A9
A sign with icicles hanging from
it indicates "don't walk" Satur-
day after a winter storm in East
Windsor, Conn.
Associated Press


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Registered Nurse Crystal Culbertson, director of surgical services, explains how the new operating rooms
at Oak Hill Hospital's new North Tower will benefit patients when complete. The hospital, part of the HCA
network, of 163 hospitals and 110 freestanding surgery centers in 20 states and England is on State Road
50 in Brooksville.

Brooksville hospital grows with high-tech addition


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
BROOKSVILLE
rystal Culbertson's job
is a bridge between
technology and care.
As director of surgi-
cal services at Oak Hill Hospi-
tal, she has been deeply
involved in the hospital's ex-
pansion, which is defined as
much by new technology as by
concrete and steel.
Oak Hill recently announced
the grand opening of its North
Tower Phase 1. It was five years
in planning, and construction
started 12 months ago. The ex-
pansion created an additional
71 jobs at the hospital, making it
a 262-bed facility.
The two-story tower was con-
structed to accommodate future
expansion up to six stories.
Weber Glass of Inverness pro-
vided the energy-enhanced,
hurricane-rated exterior win-
dows, the new design privacy
windows for patient areas and
the interior glass doors. Weber
also did louvers for the chiller.
The $50 million expansion
added six new surgery suites,


Q&A about


Saturday


mail stoppage

Chronicle staff
On Wednesday, the U.S. Postal Service announced
it plans to cut Saturday mail delivery, but what ex-
actly does that mean for Citrus County residents?
Enola Rice, spokeswoman for the USPS in our re-
gion, supplied answers to questions Chronicle read-
ers may have.
Q: Why is this necessary?
A: The USPS lost $15.9 billion last budget year
and this will save approximately $2 billion annually
Q: When does this take affect?
A: The week of Aug. 5, 2013.
Q: Will my local post office be open Saturday? If
so, will hours be the same?
A: Post offices open on Saturday will continue to
be open on Saturday Customers who receive mail at
a PO. box at a post office open Saturdays will re-
ceive mail delivery Saturday Hours will be the
same.
Q: Are there any plans to reduce hours or serv-
ices other days of the week?
A: There are currently no plans to eliminate ad-
ditional delivery days.
Q: Will there be post office box delivery Satur-
days, or does this just affect home delivery?
A: Mail addressed to street addresses will be de-
livered Monday through Friday Mail addressed to
PO. boxes at post offices open on Saturdays will re-
ceive Saturday delivery
Q: Will mail volume be doubled on Mondays as a
result?
A: No. Saturday has the week's lowest daily mail
volume.
Q: Why will I not get first-class mail (letters) but
packages? Why packages?
A: First-class mail volume has declined signifi-
cantly and continues to decline. Our package busi-
ness has increased 14 percent in the past two
years. Customers have responded that Saturday is a
desirable day for package delivery because more
customers are home on Saturday
Q: What about the regular Saturday mail carriers
- how does this affect their jobs? Will their weekly
hours be reduced? (Or are Saturday carriers getting
overtime on Saturdays?)
See Page A4


The new wing of the hospital, at the rear of the existing complex, will
open soon.


36 intensive care unit private
rooms, 18 recovery rooms and
separate entrance for surgery
patients.
Amenities include a new sur-
gery family lounge and waiting
room with an Internet caf6 and
kids' area, new surgery registra-
tion area and new information
center Family members can
wait in a recliner and people
on the large side can enjoy a
special-wide.
"We've had a tremendous in-


crease in our surgical volume,"
Oak Hill Hospital CEO Mickey
Smith said. "We have more O.R.
capacity now and all intensive
care units consolidated on one
floor."
"By having everything in one
place, it increases the efficiency
in utilization of our personnel,"
the Crystal River resident
added.
And that is where Culbertson


Page A4


Special to the Chronicle
This summer, the U.S. Postal Service will alter its
mail delivery service and not deliver first-class mail
Saturday. Packages, however, will still be delivered
Saturday.


Classifieds ....... D5
Crossword .... .. .A16


Editorial ......... C2
Entertainment . .B6
Horoscope . .B6 Lottery Numbers .B4


Lottery Payouts .B6
Movies ......... .A16
Obituaries ....... .A6


TV Listings ...... A16
Together ........ A18


6 1845


75IIll


' CRYSTAL 800-584-8755 EXT.3 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP RAM HOMOSASSA INVERNESS m BROOKSVILLE
^39 MONTH LEASE WITH $2999 TOTAL DUE AT SIGNING WITH APPROVED CREDIT. *0% APR FOR WELL QUALIFIED BUYERS. NOT ALL WILL QUALIFY. +ALL PRICES LA
PLUS TAX TAG AND DEALER FEES WITH $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE. OFFERS CAN NOT BE COMBINED. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


P.M.I .:-


rj T

0 aSL. .nJL ex& panIil' ,





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Arts, crafts at wildlife park


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
: Mary Yingling is proud to be a volunteer for the Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park. She joined other volunteers and staff at the arts and crafts show
Saturday, sponsored by the wildlife park. Yingling displayed her paintings oil and acrylic. When Cathy Williams isn't volunteering at Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife Park, she is busy taking pictures underwater or within nature. She spent Saturday inside the park's Visitor Center displaying her artwork for the arts and crafts show.


Black Diamond donation


WTI
: ..;:.


DARLENE MANN/For the Chronicle
Judy Johnson and Sandy
VanDervort, representing
Withlacoochee Technical
Institute, received a
$28,000 grant Friday from
Black Diamond Foundation
at the Million Dollar
Celebration. With this
award, the foundation has
given $1 million to Citrus
County charities and
organizations in its quest to
"Make a Difference" in the
community.


You'll lo our Valentine's Dinner at West 822
Chef has
Smnpeial thi


created a
r e ii ours


dinner offering three
entrees to choose from
for $45 per person.
\\e mill alsoI la% e a
S- ltioill oI 's peciallI
S inies iailable.
Our 4 Wiar eii111S Will
0- he a..able.


IpANTATION

Reservations suggested.
at Plantation on Crystal River
9301 W. Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River, FL 352-795-4211
www.plantationoncrystalriver.com


Chest Pain Center, Primary Stroke Center,
Heart Institute with Open Heart Surgery & Pediatric Emergency.


When you need emergency care, Oak Hill Hospital is a short distance up, up and away.
-.. Plus, faster Door-to-Balloon times that consistently beat the National Standard.


/ For super technology, super facilities and super board-certified doctors and nurses...
f insist on the Super Heroes of Oak Hill Hospital.



Insist on Oak Hill Hospital.


1 1375 Cortez Blvd. tSR 50)l,
Spring Hill., FL 34613
352-628-6441 Citrus or
log onto OakHillHospital.com
In an emergency, call 911


Oak Hill
.. Hospital


A2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013


LOCAL


40
du







Page A3 -SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10,2013



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Meadowcrest signal to shine soon


Place for foundation footing

provedproblematic due to soil


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
Work could start within
the next two or three
weeks to build a traffic sig-
nal at the intersection of
Meadowcrest Boulevard
and State Road 44 in Crys-
tal River
The signal became a ne-
cessity last year after the
West Citrus Government
Center opened at 1540 N.


Meadowcrest Blvd., rais-
ing the traffic volume at
the intersection. Traffic
volume also was increased
by the construction of the
Family Dollar store oppo-
site the entrance to Mead-
owcrest, a residential and
commercial development.
On the consent agenda
at Tuesday's meeting of
the Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners,
the BOCC will be asked to


* WHAT: Citrus County Board of County
Commissioners meeting.
* WHEN: 1 p.m. Tuesday.
* WHERE: Room 100, Citrus County Courthouse,
110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness.
* AGENDA: Available on the county's website,
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us, at the Lecanto Government
Building or in the commissioners' suite on the
second floor of the courthouse in Inverness.
* WATCH: The meeting will be televised live on cable
TV on Channel 622 on Bright House and Channel 9
on Comcast. The meeting also can be viewed live
online in a small digital format.


approve the transfer of
$74,000 to cover the cost of
redesigning the footing


foundation for one signal
pole at the intersection.
Ken Frink, assistant


county administrator and
director of public works,
explained when the ground
was drilled for the signal, it
was found to be near a
large cavity configured in
the karst soil conditions in
the region. A redesign of
the footing foundation was
needed because of the po-
tential soil breakdown.
Almost all of Florida is
formed by a karst land-
scape, which has been
formed by the dissolution
of soluble rocks such as
limestone, dolomite and
gypsum. The dissolution
process develops caves,
holes, springs and streams,


requiring tests before
building structures. Such a
test revealed a void deep
below ground at the traffic
signal site.
Discovering that condi-
tion delayed building the
signal, initially expected to
be completed by the end of
last summer, as plans and
the permit went back to
the Florida Department of
Transportation, Frink said.
The BOCC is expected to
discuss the project and its
funding Tuesday
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Chris Van Ormer at
352-564-2916 or cvanormer
@chronicleonline. com.


A SMALL PURPLE Eighth annual Purple Heart Ceremony

I ET fl honors fallen heroes from Citrus County


II I


GRATITUDE


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER-All gave some,
some gave all, some still give.
That was the message Saturday as
heads hung mournfully, tears
streamed and gratitude filled the
standing-room-only crowd as heroes
and veterans were honored at the
eighth annual Purple Heart Ceremony
at the Florida National Guard Armory
in Crystal River.
Hundreds of veterans, family mem-
bers, elected officials and supporters
joined collectively with the combat
wounded Patriots of Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 Military Order of the Pur-
ple Heart to tribute the living and
fallen heroes. Recognition was given
for the sacrifices of the Purple Heart
recipients and veterans everywhere,
including eight Citrus County soldiers.
Their family members were honored
guests at the ceremony
Chapter 776 patriot Don Guard
talked about the history of the Purple
Heart. The medal is awarded to mem-
bers of the U.S. military who are
wounded by an instrument of war in
the hands of an enemy or to the next
of kin in the name of those who are
killed or die of wounds received in
action.
Chapter 776 also gave an award to
Shona Cook, who has overseen and co-
ordinated services to many local me-
morials including the Homosassa


Ihe mural pays tribute to more than 300u Horidians wnho nave fallen during the
Afghanistan/Iraq campaigns and is the first memorial to bear the engraved
names and color portraits of those who sacrificed their lives.


LOCAL FALLEN HEROES
Chief Warrant Officer
Aaron A. Weaver, U.S. Army.
Sgt. Dennis J. Boles, U.S. Army.
Sgt. Dennis J. Flanagan, U.S. Army.
Sgt. Robert A. Surber, U.S. Army.
Cpl. Stanley J. Lapinski, U.S. Army.
Sgt. Jonathan K. Peney, U.S. Army.
Cpl. Johnathan W. Taylor, U.S.
Marine Corps.
Private First Class Michael C. Mahr,
U.S. Army.

Veterans Memorial.
"The military of the Purple Heart
special recognition award is bestowed
with pride to Shona Cook for dedica-
tion and exemplary service," Chapter
776 Commander Bud Allen said.
After a moving patriotic medley and
combination of service songs per-
formed by the students of Phantastic
Sounds under the direction of Paul
and Jackie Stevio, plaques of Gold
Star families were presented. Then
the audience joined hands to sing
"God Bless the U.S.A."
Chapter 776 patriots requested fam-
ilies of the eight local fallen heroes
come forward for the laying of the
wreath in their remembrance.
The audience wept as the ceremony
concluded with prayers, a rifle salute
and "Taps" playing.
TOP: Citrus Detachment
819 Marine Corps
League delivers a rifle
salute at the eighth
annual Purple Heart
Ceremony. Clarence
Peres plays "Taps"
while bagpiper Kevin
Kelly and the Marine
Corps League members
stood at attention.
LEFT: Chapter 776
Patriots Richard Hunt,
left, and Budd Allen
presents Shona Cook
with an award.
ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Oak Hill Hospital Chief Executive Officer Mickey Smith explains some of the new, state-
of-the-art features in the new North Tower intensive care unit.


EXPANDS
Continued from Page Al

and other hospital staff
played a big role in how
the final facilities turned
out.
Culbertson demon-
strated how people were
placed in position as if in a
real situation to develop
the most effective design
and placement in the sur-
gical suites.
"The team can swing
these (overhead) monitors
into any position they
like," she explained.
"Everything is digitally en-
hanced; they can view X-
rays or laparoscopic
pictures."
"I'm proud of the staff
involvement in the proj-
ect," Culbertson said.
"There was input from the
doctors and the nurses."
Doctors can access sep-
arate computers to check
on other patients without
leaving the room or wait-
ing for someone to get off
the main terminal.
There are docking sta-
tions and speakers for
their musical devices and
the suites have low-
temperature LED lighting


to reduce heat.
A high-tech, high-
security, automated med-
ication dispenser and
other futuristic-looking ap-
pliances give the suites a
space-age appearance.
High-tech beds
Bob Linares, director of
Intensive Care Unit, was
also involved in the plan-
ning and showed off some
of the new technology in
the private ICU rooms
where patients are moni-
tored with wireless
scanners.
The new beds come with
a digital display screen on
the side that can display a
patient's weight and other
information.
Linares explained the
bed can provide auto-
mated percussion therapy,
and sensors can shift pres-
sure points on a patient to
prevent bed sores.
And the unit, including
telephones and computers
- even EFG machines -
is wireless.
"We are computerized
as much as possible to
minimize the risk of med-
ical errors," he said.
"Physicians can access a
patient's medical records
24/7 from anywhere with
computer."


But Linares is particu-
larly proud of a new direc-
tion in visiting hours.
"We do 24/7 visiting
hours," he said. "Family
members can use a fold-
down couch in the room."
Smith pointed out tech-
nology has been incorpo-
rated in many other
aspects of patient care,
ranging from self-check-in
kiosks to improving hospi-
tal food service and speed-
ing up lab test results.
Theresa Eatough is pa-
tient access director. The
Homosassa resident
agreed technology has im-
proved her job and service
for the patients.
"Technology has revolu-
tionized many aspects of
patient care," Smith said.
"It is reflected in the hap-
piness of the physicians
and staff."
And while Smith credits
technology with many im-
provements in patient
care, he was emphatic that
his hospital staff was key
in making the hospital ex-
pansion and other im-
provements work for the
benefit of the patients.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. corn.


SFor the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglaries
A residential burglary was
reported at 3:48 p.m. Thurs-
day, Feb. 7, in the 6300 block
of W. Linden Drive,
Homosassa.
A commercial burglary
was reported at 5:57 p.m. Feb.
7 in the 3800 block of S.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Thefts
A petit theft was reported
at 1:59 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 7,
in the 7300 block of S. Old Flo-
ral City Road, Floral City.
M A petit theft was reported
at 3:43 p.m. Feb. 7 in the 2400
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Inverness.
An auto theft was re-
ported at 6:03 p.m. Feb. 7 in




SATURDAY
Continued

A: We are currently work
the employee impact. We v
ing with our unions and r
associations to discuss the e
pact in accordance with oi
bargaining agreements
obligations.
Q: By the way, what is
stamp price? When was the
was raised and are there p
it again?
A: First-class stamps in
penny on Jan. 27, 2013. T
46 cents.


ON THE NET


For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on the Public Information
link, then on Arrest Reports.
Also under Public Information on the CCSO
website, click on Crime Mapping for a view of
where each type of crime occurs in Citrus
County. Click on Offense Reports to see lists of
burglary, theft and vandalism.
For the Record reports are also archived online at
www.chronicleonline.com.
The "Sheriff's 10-43" show airs on TV station
WYKE, digital channel 47 and Bright House cable
channel 16. The show features interviews with
sheriff's office staff from all areas of the agency.

the 100 block of S. Tabitha way, Inverness.
Path, Inverness. 0 A grand theft was re-
S A petit theft was reported ported at 8:44 p.m. Feb. 7 in
at 6:59 p.m. Feb. 7 in the 2400 the 300 block of Hunting
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake High- Lodge drive, Inverness.


r From 2009 until January 2012, the
price was 44 cents. The price increased
one penny in January 2012 to 45 cents.
from Page Al Last year, all first-class stamps sold were
"forever" stamps. Forever stamps are
ing to define good for first-class postage, regardless of
will be meet- the rate at time of mailing. Customers
management who purchased stamps last year can
employee im- continue to use them for first-class mail
ur collective without adding additional postage.
and other The Postal Service does not operate
with tax dollars. We operate from rev-
the current enue received from our products and
e last time it services, as any other business. There
plans to raise are currently no plans for a pricing
change.
creased one Q: Where can I get more information?
'he price is A: Visit online at http://
about.usps.com/news/welcome.htm.


notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle





k- 1Meeting Notices


Hi^^QRrJi H 1111111111111111 rJw Ln


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
SPR | HI LO PR |HI LO PR
0.00 NA NA NA L,, J67 48 0.00


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
PC


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


H L
77 69
76 56
77 58
67 63
78 61
71 58
81 61
77 61
75 68


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
c
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southeast winds around 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a moderate chop.
Skies will be partly cloudy today.


75 49 0.00 76 51 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exdusyvedaly
p TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 79 Low: 56
Partly cloudy

k MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 81 Low: 58
Mostly sunny

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 82 Low: 63
Mostly sunny

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 75/50
Record 88/27
Normal 73/44
Mean temp. 63
Departure from mean +5
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month trace
Total for the year 0.10 in.
Normal for the year 4.00 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 7
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.16 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 50
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 41%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
oak, juniper, maple
Today's count: 9.4/12
Monday's count: 10.9
Tuesday's count: 11.1
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
2/10 SUNDAY 5:13 11:26 5:39 11:52
2/11 MONDAY 6:06 11:50 6:31 12:18
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SSUNSET TONIGHT............................6:17 PM.
S SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:12A.M.
*0/ 4 MOONRISE TODAY ...........................7:08A.M.
FEB. 10 FEB. 17 FEB. 25 MARCH 4 MOONSET TODAY............................ 6:58 P.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


*From mouths of rivers


City
Chassahowitzka*
Crystal River**
Withlacoochee*
Homosassa***


High/Low
5:10 a/1:09 a
3:31 a/11:12 a
1:18 a/9:00 a
4:20 a/12:08 a


TIDES
**At King's Bay
Sunday


High/Low
6:20 p/1:50 p
4:41 p/11:15 p
2:28 p/9:03 p
5:30 p/12:49 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
5:57 a/1:53 a 6:49 p/2:25 p
4:18 a/11:47 a 5:10 p/11:57 p
2:05 a/9:35 a 2:57 p/9:45 p
5:07 a/12:52 a 5:59 p/1:24 p


Gulf water
temperature


65
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.44 NA 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.86 NA 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 38.81 NA 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.12 NA 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


Saturday
City H LPcp.
Albany 26 15 .27
Albuquerque 49 34
Asheville 58 30
Atlanta 55 32 trace
Atlantic City 34 25 .08
Austin 66 52 .03
Baltimore 40 28
Billings 41 22
Birmingham 64 29
Boise 42 30
Boston 20 16 .15
Buffalo 20 15 .01
Burlington, VT 19 9 .01
Charleston, SC 63 38
Charleston, WV 42 28
Charlotte 62 23
Chicago 32 20 .01
Cincinnati 43 22
Cleveland 32 24
Columbia, SC 65 31
Columbus, OH 37 20
Concord, N.H. 19 14 .71
Dallas 54 47
Denver 39 20
Des Moines 39 28
Detroit 30 13 .01
El Paso 64 44
Evansville, IN 46 27
Harrisburg 37 24
Hartford 27 21 .20
Houston 68 49
Indianapolis 39 24
Jackson 63 34
Las Vegas 54 41
Little Rock 47 32
Los Angeles 56 39
Louisville 47 27
Memphis 51 32
Milwaukee 30 10
Minneapolis 29 22
Mobile 66 43
Montgomery 65 32
Nashville 53 34


Sunday
FcstH L
s 30 19
pc 44 21
c 54 43
ts 60 54
s 40 31
ts 75 47
pc 41 35
sn 31 13
ts 62 54
pc 39 20
s 36 25
s 38 32
s 22 15
pc 65 56
pc 56 43
pc 57 47
r 45 34
ts 52 44
r 43 38
pc 63 55
r 47 41
s 32 7
ts 71 41
c 36 13
r 46 26
r 35 33
pc 55 33
ts 54 43
s 37 26
s 36 20
ts 77 59
ts 52 36
ts 69 52
pc 55 38
ts 72 39
pc 58 46
ts 57 45
ts 61 44
r 40 33
sn 35 27
ts 69 62
ts 67 57
ts 59 50


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY

Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 64 54 ts 74 64
New York City 32 25 .40 s 38 35
Norfolk 47 35 pc 51 39
Oklahoma City 45 34 pc 63 31
Omaha 49 29 c 46 25
Palm Springs 62 38 pc 60 42
Philadelphia 35 26 .12 s 39 30
Phoenix 57 45 pc 61 39
Pittsburgh 33 22 pc 51 40
Portland, ME 21 12 .25 s 31 19
Portland, Ore 44 33 pc 50 36
Providence, R.I. 25 18 .18 s 35 21
Raleigh 52 28 pc 54 42
Rapid City 39 19 sn 29 14
Reno 41 22 pc 39 19
Rochester, NY 21 16 1.49 s 37 32
Sacramento 58 34 pc 61 34
St. Louis 43 30 ts 59 36
St. Ste. Marie 2 -5 sn 32 29
Salt Lake City 32 23 .02 sn 27 13
San Antonio 63 53 .03 pc 78 50
San Diego 58 44 pc 58 45
San Francisco 56 41 pc 56 42
Savannah 64 40 pc 66 57
Seattle 47 40 pc 49 38
Spokane 34 27 pc 38 23
Syracuse 21 12 .09 s 34 23
Topeka 54 31 w 55 27
Washington 43 31 pc 44 35
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 85 Laredo, Texas LOW -15 Pellston,
Mich.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/71/s
Amsterdam 34/27/pc
Athens 56/44/pc
Beijing 21/17/pc
Berlin 31/22/c
Bermuda 59/54/pc
Cairo 72/51/pc
Calgary 27/21/pc
Havana 79/64/pc
Hong Kong 68/57/pc
Jerusalem 67/47/s


Lisbon 54/48/sh
London 46/34/sh
Madrid 47/31/sh
Mexico City 73/46/s
Montreal 18/3/pc
Moscow 33/32/sf
Paris 37/36/sh
Rio 87/75/c
Rome 52/36/s
Sydney 84/68/ts
Tokyo 52/36/s
Toronto 34/34/pc
Warsaw 29/26/c


j- C I T R U S


C 0 U N T Y -U--


ARONICL-E
Florida's Best Communit Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
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affect your expiration date. The Viewflinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
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unk.eneld. Meadowcrest
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N I \\ :1"'

SInverness
F I Cuurtiju~ office
TompkinsSt. gQua 106 W.Marn
106 W. Main
SSt.,
41 Inverness, FL
> ^ 34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 63 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold ......................... ........... ................................... Editor, 5 64 -2 93 0
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy .................................................. Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trista Stokes............................................................... Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes .................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ............................................. Mike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .............................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Com m unity content ................................................ Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .............................................. Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ........................... Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper.
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


A4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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FEB 10 OCALA 4:00 & 7:00
FEB 17 INVERNESS 3:00 & 6:00
FEB 24 BRADENTON 3:00 & 6:00
MAR 3 OCALA 3:00 & 6:00
MAR 9 LECANTO 4:00 & 7:00
MAR 16 Not Yet Scheduled
MAR 24 OCALA 3:00 & 6:00
MAR 30 LAKELAND 4:00 & 7:00
March 30 at Lakeland is our last Florida show


5 6 se s its


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50s, 60s, 70s, old-time country & gospel, and some
STAR tributes including a shorter version Elvis tribute.
Evening shows 2 hours or longer Feature a few of the same
song selections as same day's afternoon show, but with longer
Elvis tribute and includes Elvis Teddy Bear/Scarf toss.
Both same day shows will be significantly different.
Meet & Greet with performers at end of evening show ONLY.


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 A5


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


David
Alford, 66
David W Alford, 66, died
Thursday, Feb. 7, 2013, at
Hospice of Citrus County,
Lecanto. Private arrange-
ments by Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Cre-
matory, Inverness.

Glenda
Long, 74
INVERNESS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mrs. Glenda E
Long, age 74, of Inverness,
Florida, will be held 11:00
AM, Tuesday, February 12,
2013 at the Inverness
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes with Pastor Greg
Kell officiating. Interment
will follow at New Hope
Methodist Church Ceme-
tery, Istachatta, Florida.
The family will receive
friends from 10:00 AM until
the time of service, Tues-
day at the Chapel. Online
condolences may be sent to
the family at www.Hooper
FuneralHome.com.
Mrs. Long was born No-
vember 12, 1938 in Ash-
land City, TN, daughter of
the late William and Rose-
bud (Rooks) Hogue. She
died February 8, 2013 in
Inverness, FL.
Mrs. Long was preceded
in death by her parents
and brother, Charles S.
Hogue. Survivors include
her husband, Jerry Long of
Inverness, 4 sons, James E.
"Tommy" Thomason of
Dade City, Darral A.
Thomason of Inverness,
Richard V "Ricky" Thoma-
son of Hernando and Jack
W Buie Jr, of Inverness, 3
step children, Ricky Long
of Crystal River, Gary Long
of Bushnell, and Tammy
Dow of Gainesville, sister,
Yolanda Entrekin of Inver-
ness, 15 grandchildren,
and 9 great grandchildren.

Curtis
Putman, 79
ST. PARIS, OHIO
Curtis Putman, 79, of St
Paris, Ohio, and formerly of
Florida, passed away unex-
pectedly Feb. 8,2013, in his
residence. Born June 16,
1933, in Wewahitchka, Fla.,
he was a son of the late
Homer and Carrie Bell
(McSwain) Putman.
He is survived by three
sons, Wayne (Joy) Putman
of St. Paris, Ohio, David
(Dawn) Putman of New
Plymouth, Ohio, and An-
thony (Rachel) Putman of
Trenton, Fla.; eight grand-
children; and two step-
grandchildren. He is also
survived by a brother,
Daniel Putman, and a sis-
ter, Lilly Mae Putman, of
Crystal River, Fla. In addi-
tion to his parents, he was
preceded in death by his
wife, Carolyn (White) in
1981; and a sister, Viola.
Curtis lived most of his
life in Florida. He was a
self-employed mason.
There will be no funeral
services at this time. Con-
dolences to the family may
be sent to www.shively
funeralhomes.com. Atkins-
Shively Funeral Home, 216
S. Springfield St., St. Paris,
Ohio, is serving the family


CI. E. 2aWv
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation




For Information and costs,
call 726-8323






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Raymer, 91
BEVERLY HILLS
Robert L. Raymer, 91, of
Beverly Hills, Fl., passed
away peacefully under the
loving care of HPH Hos-
pice with
family and .
friends by
his side on
January
28, 2013.
Bob was
born Feb-
ruary 7,
1921 in Be- Robert
loit, WI, Raymer
son of the
late Ray and Ruth (Gen-
srich) Raymer and was an
Army veteran serving dur-
ing WWII. He worked as
an electronics supervisor
for the United States
Navy.
Bob was an active mem-
ber of the Craftsman
Guild, a Ham operator and
had an immense interest
in reading about the Civil
War. He was a long stand-
ing member of the Moose,
VFW and Elks Clubs.
Left to cherish his mem-
ories are his wife, Violet
Raymer of Beverly Hills, 3
daughters, Roberta L.
Hodkowski, Karol Raymer
and Nancy Keyes, 3 step
daughters, Karen (Don)
Bolen, Janice Lippert and
Linda Lippert (James
Amundson) and 3 grand-
children, Abigail, Nicola
and Alexandra.
The Service of Remem-
brance with Military Hon-
ors will be held at 11:00
AM, Thursday, February
14, 2013 at the Beverly
Hills Chapel of Hooper Fu-
neral Homes. The Inurn-
ment will take place at
Florida National Ceme-
tery at 2:00 on February
15, 2013. Online Condo-
lences may be sent to the
family at www.Hooper
FuneralHome.com. In lieu
of flowers, memorials may
be made to HPH Hospice,
3545 N. Lecanto Hwy., Bev-
erly Hills, Fl. 34465.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online. com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.



"Your Trusted Family-Owned
Funeral Home for 50 Years"


Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
1901 SE Hwy. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


IN
tMEMOR)
OF
JOHN (jack)
KUNDMILLER


To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,

Judy
Moseley
at 564-2917
jmoseley@chronicleonline.com


Seamus
'Seamoose'
McCarthy, 24
INVERNESS
Seamus Hugh "Seam-
oose" McCarthy, 24, Inver-
ness, died Jan. 31, 2013, at
his residence. Seamus was
born Aug. 20, 1988, in Syos-
set, Long
Island,
N. Y, to
J a m e s
Hugh and
Deborah

dola) Mc-
Carthy. ..
Se a meu s Seamus
was em- McCarthy
played at
the Inverness Club as a
server, a job he enjoyed
very much and everyone
there loved him. He was
an up-and-coming musical
artist and vocalist, playing
the guitar and drums. He
was an avid sportsman,
loved to camp and fish. He
never had a "cross-bone"
with anyone. He was loved
by all who knew him and
will be deeply missed.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are his parents, James
and Deborah McCarthy; his
sisters, Sherry Foley and
Danielle McCarthy; nieces
Autumn Foley and Journey
Ford and nephews Jacob
Foley and Iman Ford, all of
Inverness; and his mater-
nal grandfather, Rocco
Abbondola, N.Y
A funeral tribute for
Seamus will be at 11 a.m.
Saturday, Feb. 16, 2013, at
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline. com.

Helen
Hermann, 89
HOLDER
Helen Hermann, 89, of
Holder, died Friday, Feb. 8,
2013, at Hospice of Citrus
County Private arrange-
ments by Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Cre-
matory, Inverness.


James Ryan
James J. Ryan's Celebra-
tion of Life Services are
scheduled for 3:30 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 15, 2013, at
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory,
Inverness.
Family will receive
friends from 2:30 p.m. until
the hour of service.




Douglas
Crayton, 69
CRYSTAL RIVER
Douglas M. Crayton, 69,
of Crystal River, died Sat-
urday morning, Feb. 9,
2013, at his residence. He
was born April 14, 1943, to
Earon and Catherine Car-
roll Crayton in Tickfaw,
La., and came here 19
years ago from Hammond,
La. He was a U.S. Army
veteran and was retired
from Occidental Petro-
leum. He was an avid
reader and enjoyed
fishing.
In addition to his par-
ents, he was preceded in
death by two brothers and
one sister. He is survived
by his wife, Bertha Crayton
of Crystal River; stepson
Toby Varnado (Beckie) of
Ocala; brother John Cray-
ton (Mary) of Natalbany,
La.; sister Jane Ormand
(Bill) of Lake Tapps, Wash.;
grandsons Austin and Zan-
der Varnado; one niece;
and five nephews.
Strickland Funeral
Home with Crematory of
Crystal River assisted the
family with arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.
* Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.


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5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. l 1..
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
3 52-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-66941
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New Patient Specials


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Dental Needs, In house denture lab
Including Implants Free Denture Consults
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Located in the Hampton Square Plaza
It is our office policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payment has the
nght to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service,
examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding
to the advertisement for the free discounted-offer or reduced-fee service, examination or
treatment Mmn Fee ADA code D0210, D0150A

N toaC r | |S -





Come join the National Cremation Society for a
FREE Lunch & Informational Seminar
on the benefits of pre-planning your cremation
When the time comes wouldn't you
prefer your loved ones celebrate
your legacy rather than stress about
making arrangements? Give them
the relief they'll need during a
tough time.
We'll discuss:
SAffordable options and savings
Veterans benefits
Worldwide Away-From-Home
Protection
And much more...
RESERVATION REQUIRED
Limited seating available. *
CALL NOW!
1-352-728-0093
First time attendees only please.
*Free cremation does not include Travel Protecdion Plan

..U .


Deaths
ELSEWHERE
Doug
Kenna, 88
QUARTERBACK
JACKSON, Miss. -
Edgar Douglas "Doug"
Kenna II, the quarterback
of West Point's 1944 unde-
feated national champi-
onship team and former
president of the National
Association of Manufac-
turers, has died.
He was 88.
Kenna died Jan. 28 in
North Palm Beach, Fla.,
where he had lived for
years, according to
Nicholas Hollis, a long-
time friend who worked
with him at the National
Association of Manufac-
turers in the 1970s.
Howard-Price Funeral
Home in North Palm
Beach confirmed his
death.
Kenna will be buried
Monday at Lakewood Me-
morial Park in Jackson,
Miss. A memorial service
is May 13 at the U.S. Mili-
tary Academy at West
Point.


James
DePreist, 76
CONDUCTOR
PORTLAND, Ore. -
James DePreist, one of the
first African-American
conductors and a National
Medal of Arts winner, died
Friday at his home in
Scottsdale, Ariz., his man-
ager Jason Bagdade said.
DePreist, who was 76,
had been in and out of the
hospital since a massive
heart attack last March
that was followed by open-
heart surgery, his wife,
Ginette DePreist, told The
Oregonian newspaper
DePreist was director
emeritus of The Juilliard
School's conducting pro-
gram in New York.
He was the Oregon Sym-
phony's music director
from 1980 until 2003, trans-
forming it from a small,
part-time group into a
full-time nationally recog-
nized orchestra with 17
recordings.
DePreist also led or-
chestras in Quebec, Monte
Carlo, Tokyo and Malmo,
Sweden.
-From wire reports


LEND US








YOUR EARS'


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hearing in noise study
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Audiology for a field study of consumer satisfac-
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Voice IQ was designed to maintain speech under-
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In exchange for completing a pre and post-fit-
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Audiologists with advanced university degrees
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At the end of 30 days participants will return
the aids or they may purchase them with gen-
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Call or click GardnerAudiology.com
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352-795-5700






Over 2000 people have participated in
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Gardner Audiology 2012


A6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013


m~i





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


County BRIEFS


Water department
offers free class
The Citrus County Water
Resources Department will
offer a free class on "Favorite
Plants for Citrus County."
The class begins with eval-
uating existing conditions
when planning a landscape.
The class will be from 2 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 4, in
the extension service class-
room at 3650 W. Sovereign
Path, Lecanto.
Preregistration is required
by calling Gina Hamilton at
352-527-5707. For informa-
tion, call 352-527-5708.
Drummer, dancers
to perform Feb. 23
The Hernando Church of
the Living God is celebrating
Black History Month in an ef-
fort to bring the community to-
gether while learning about
African heritage.
Internationally known pro-
fessional drummer Eric Bli Bi
Gore from Djsanufla, Ivory
Coast, West Africa, will join
professional African dancers
at 3441 E. Oleander Lane,
Hernando, from 6 to 8 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 22, and 1 to
5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23.
Gore offers West African
rhythms of drum and dancing
through classes offered to the
public for $10 donations for
drum classes and $12 dona-
tions for dancing. Participants
are encouraged to bring their
own instruments for the drum
circle.
Refreshments will be avail-
able and prize drawings are
planned. Funds from the two-
day event will be used for the
children's department of the
church.
For information or to pre-
register, call 352-270-6148 or
352-897-4173.


Veterans board
meets Thursday
The Citrus County Veterans
Services Advisory Board will
meet at 3:30 p.m. Thursday,
Feb. 14, at the Citrus County
Resource Center, at 2804 W.
Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto.
The advisory board informs
the Veteran's Service Office of
areas of unmet needs in the
veterans' population, advises
local veterans groups of serv-
ices available, provides input
on office policies and proce-
dures and assists other mat-
ters specific to veteran's
services and veteran's
groups.
This meeting is open to the
public. For information, call
352-527-5915.
Nugent to speak to
Republican club
Congressman Rich Nugent
is guest speaker at the North
Suncoast Republican Club,
from 9 to 11 a.m. Saturday,
Feb. 16, at the Sugarmill
Country Club, Homosassa.
Complimentary coffee and
donuts at 8:30 a.m.
For information, go to
www.NSRC-gop.com, or call
Bill Connery at 352-382-0811,
or Bruce Bryn at 352-503-
7375.
Democrats to meet
in Homosassa
The Southwest Citrus Dem-
ocratic Club meets the first
Saturday of the month, at
10:30a.m. at the Sugarmill
Woods Country Club, 1 Dou-
glas St., Homosassa.
All registered Democrats
are welcome to attend.
For information, email
swdems@gmail.com or call
352-382-0343.
-From staff reports


Cooking .



With Stars

Reality TV Show "Meal I *
Ticket" is filming their Pilot
Episode in Citrus County
and we need Your Help
to make it a success. the
tA protion c
proceeds
benefit the Y
You Be The Judge! of Citrus Co

Six up & coming Chefs from the top culinary schools in the US will
compete for their Meal Ticket, Mentored by our Celebrity Chefs.


Joseph "Jo-Jo" Doyle
Executive Chef of
Churchill Downs' & many
celebrity events.


Alex Conant
Personal Chef to
Shaquille O'Neal


General VIP
Admission Admission


Includes Dinner & Cash Bar
$25 pp/per venue
Advanced sales only.
$30* pp/per venue
*At the gate, space permitting.


Includes Dinner, Open Bar,
& VIP Seating.
$50 pp/per venue
Advanced sales only.


Full Bar available at both locations. Different menu e
Tickets Available


of the
will
MCA
unty.


Carlos
Fernandez
of Top Chef Season 2


Platinum Partner
Includes 2 Tickets to each event,
Dinner, Open Bar, VIP Seating,
Preferred Parking, a free gift &
Logo or Name on Program.
$250'
Advanced sales only.
ach night. Advanced Ticket Sales End
S- February 15,2013.


g@@ ( '
Old FI da Kit CITRUS COUNTY CITRUS COUNTY
ori en Chamber of Commerce Chamber of Commerce


10350 W. Yulee Dr. 6301 Riverside Dr., I
Homosassa, FL Yankeetown, FL
352-621-3663 352-447-4899


28 NW, Hwy. 19
Crystal River, FL
352-795-3149


401 W. Tompkins St.
Inverness FL
352-726-2801


BEVERLY HILLS LIQUORS


3898 N. Lecanto Hwy., (Hwy 491) Beverly Hills,

(352) 746-7723


FL 34465


PThvv "b1

^^^H .. *1[ -5-^ 0A0I 0 *^ I i1.L* I* S 1J^J* .^l*I^ ^ LeJ^' .J *^^^^


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LOCAL


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 A7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'Cracker Days' at state park


Special to the Chronicle
Saturday and Sunday,
Feb. 23 and 24, from 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. each day, the life
of the Florida pioneer will
be on display at Rainbow
Springs State Park north of
Dunnellon on State Road
41. Park admission is $2
per person; children 5 and
younger are free.
For information, call
352-465-8555.
The Florida of the late
1800s will come alive
through demonstrators in


period dress, whose skills
include quilting, old print-
ing, weaving and spinning,
shawl-making, pine needle
basketry and jewelry-
making, pottery, wood
turning and wood crafting
fly-tying, corn-grinding,
quilt-making, embroidery,
bobbin weaving, tatting
and more. A cooper, a shelf
crafter, an author and an
artisan who spins thread
from a live bunny on her
lap will be present, as will
Billy Roberson, returning
this year as "the Suwan-


nee Cracker," telling his
pioneer tales.
The sound of music will
be heard at the Felburn
pavilion with Chuck Hard-
wicke, Whitey Markle and
the Swamprooters, the
James Brothers, Lee Kelly,
Mary Young and a barber-
shop quartet.
Children will have a
chance to play active
games of the era in special
areas. The park's conces-
sion stand will be open
and other vendors will
offer treats.


Feb. 11 to 15 MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY
SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast,
cereal variety and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk vairety.
Tuesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, cereal variety
and toast, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, tater tots,
cereal variety and toast, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Cheese pizza,
pulled barbecued pork on
bun, Italian super salad with
roll, fresh garden salad, sweet
corn, chilled applesauce, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Baked chicken
nuggets, hot ham and
cheese, yogurt parfait plate,
fresh baby carrots, steamed
green beans, chilled straw-
berry cups, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Wednesday: Hamburger
sliders, barbecued roasted
chicken with roll, turkey super
salad with roll, PB dippers,
fresh baby carrots, baked
beans, flavored craisins, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds,
Uncrustable PBJ, yogurt par-
fait plate, fresh baby carrots,
sweet green, chilled straw-
berry cups, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Friday: Hot dog, turkey
wrap, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, steamed broccoli,
chilled peach cups, president
cookies, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots and grits, juice and
milk variety.
Tuesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater
tots, milk and juice variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast
egg and cheese wrap, MVP
breakfast, cereal and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, tater
tots, grits, juice and milk vari-
ety.
Lunch
Monday: Pepperoni pizza,
chicken and rice burrito, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
steamed broccoli, chilled ap-
plesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Tuesday: Chicken nuggets
with ripstick, hot ham and
cheese, Italian super salad


with roll, yogurt parfait plate,
fresh baby carrots, sweet
peas, potato smiles, chilled
strawberry cups, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Wednesday: Breaded
chicken sandwich, turkey
wrap, PB dippers, fresh gar-
den salad, baked beans, fla-
vored craisins, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds,
oven-baked breaded chicken,
ham super salad with roll, yo-
gurt parfait plate, fresh baby
carrots, sweet corn, chilled
applesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Friday: Chicken alfredo
with ripstick, hot dog, PB dip-
pers, fresh baby carrots,
steamed green beans, chilled
flavored applesauce, presi-
dent cookies, fruit juice, milk
variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots and grits, juice and
milk variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, ultra cin-
namon bun, cereal and
toasts, tater tots, juice and
milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast
egg and cheese wrap, MVP
breakfast, cereal and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco bread, ultimate
breakfast round, cereal and
toast, grits, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun,
cereal variety, toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken and rice
burrito, macaroni and cheese
with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken super salad with roll,
pizza, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, fresh broccoli,
potato roasters, steamed
broccoli, chilled applesauce,
juice, milk.
Tuesday: Oriental orange
chicken plate, turkey and
gravy over noodles with rip-
stick, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, Italian super salad
with roll, maxstix, yogurt par-
fait plate, garden salad, cold
corn salad, celery, potato tri-
angles, sweet peas, baby car-
rots, strawberry cup, juice,
milk.
Wednesday: Barbecued
roasted chicken with roll,
spaghetti with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich,
turkey super salad with roll,
pizza, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, chilled baked
beans, potato roasters, fla-
vored craisins, juice, milk.
Thursday: Fajita chicken
and rice with ripstick, maca-
roni and cheese with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, ham super salad with
roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, baby car-
rots, celery, green beans, po-
tato triangles, cucumbers,


celery, strawberry cup, juice,
milk.
Friday: Hot ham and
cheese sandwich, chicken al-
fredo with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken super salad with roll,
pizza, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, sweet corn, po-
tato roasters, cold corn salad,
strawberry cup, president
cookies, chilled fruit, juice,
milk.

SENIOR DINING
Monday: Slice meatloaf
with mushroom gravy, scal-
loped potatoes, green peas,
applesauce, slice whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Tuesday: Meatballs with
tomato gravy, rotini noodles,
mixed vegetables, mixed fruit,
slice whole-grain bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Ash Wednes-
day: Macaroni and cheese,
green peas, stewed toma-
toes, peaches, slice whole-
grain bread with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Thursday: Valentine's Day:
tuna pasta salad, marinated
broccoli salad, fresh orange,
Valentine's Day dessert, slice
whole-grain bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Friday: Oven-fried chicken
thigh, black-eyed peas, coun-
try vegetable medley, pineap-
ple, slice wheat bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South Dunnel-
Ion. For information, call Sup-
port Services at
352-527-5975.


Where's Gutenberg when you need him?


I've heard for years that "no good deed
goes unpunished," but it seemed like
a clever phrase being passed off as
wisdom, something you might get in a for-
tune cookie on an off night.
Now that I am trying to
print 50 form letters at home
on behalf of a tiny nonprofit
for which I volunteer, I'm re-
alizing the truth of it. What
should have taken 20 minutes i:
with my state-of-the-art com-
puter and top-of-the-line
printer and should have cost
next to nothing is now on its
third day, and the bills are A
mounting. Midway through
the second frustrating day of MUL
trying to do this simple job -
using the new printer I had to buy after
my old printer broke while removing a
jammed envelope it hit me that I
could have done the whole thing with an
old typewriter in an hour or two.
Why, oh why, did I give away my type-
writer 25 years ago? Because the paper-
less future was here, that's why We'd
never use paper again. Which is puz-
zling, because I buy paper five reams at
a time now, something I never did when
I typed. But with today's high-speed
printers, it takes only 50 "Lost Puppy"
posters here, a few hundred school play
notices there, a few maps to grandma's
new house, and suddenly I am Office
City's new best customer
Losing my old all-in-one printer, scan-
ner and copier was traumatic. It was like
losing an old friend a cranky, ill-
behaved, tantrum-prone old friend, but a
friend none the less. After five years, I fi-
nally had it working exactly the way I
wanted except for color printing,
which it refused to do unless I expected
something to print in black and white.
And except for the cartridges that seemed
to run out exactly when I was in a rush to
get something printed, and that cost more
than the printer itself to replace. And ex-
cept that it copied when I wanted it to
scan, and it scanned when I wanted it to
copy And except for its inability to print


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envelopes without jamming.
But I loved that printer. When it fi-
nally breathed its last, I had three ex-
pensive backup ink cartridges left that
will never fit any new printer. They will
sit in my desk drawer beside
cables and chargers for other
devices I no longer own,
adding to my cemetery of ex-
pensive, obsolete technology
But there was good news.
The new printer I just bought
Swill solve all my problems. It
is wireless and doesn't need
to be tethered to my desk, so
_M it will give me more desktop
space. Sue and I can both use
-LEN it from anywhere in the
house. At least that's what it
said on the box. All I had to do was in-
stall some simple software from the en-
closed disc and I would be in printer
mail-merge heaven.
And that is still the dream. At the mo-
ment, my computer shuts down every
time I hit "print" I have installed a new
driver, new firmware, new settings. I
have even spoken to a Level 2 techni-
cian; still nothing. After two hourlong
sessions, he promised to speak to a Level
3 technician and call me back I think he
was crying something about his wife
and kids and his college loan. I didn't
catch it all, but he sounded like a man at
the end of his tether I hope he gets help.
That was 10 hours ago. I'm still wait-
ing for his call back Maybe the company
fired him because it cost more for him
to help me on the phone than the com-
pany made from selling me the printer.
From now on, every phone conversation
with that company will be a money-loser
for both of us.
I think I'll just take the printing job
over to Office City and let them do it. I
hear they give a break to nonprofits. I
just hope doing a good deed doesn't put
them out of business.

You can reach Jim Mullen at
JimMullenBooks. com.


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A8 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013


COMMUNITY


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


10 THINGS TO KNOW S N OW
ABOUT THE BIG
STORM Continued from Page Al


1. MORE THAN 650,000
LOST POWER IN NEW
ENGLAND: Even the
Pilgrim Nuclear Power
Plant in Plymouth, Mass.,
had to shut down and turn
to backup generators.
2. GUSTS HIT 82 MPH, BUT
OUTAGES COULD HAVE
BEEN WORSE: With leaves
gone, damage to power
lines from falling branches
was less than it might
have been.
3. AT LEAST SEVEN
PEOPLE HAVE DIED: The
deaths include three in
Canada and an 11-year-
old boy who died in
Boston of carbon
monoxide in a running car
as his father tried to
shovel it free.
4. MORE THAN 3 FEET OF
SNOW FELL IN CON-
NECTICUT: Maine and
Long Island recorded
30-plus inches, with
Massachusetts and New
Hampshire not far behind.
5. IT WAS ALL TOO MUCH
FOR THE POSTAL SERV-
ICE: "Neither snow nor
rain nor heat nor gloom
of night stays these
couriers..." was canceled
when New England
delivery was halted.
6. AIR TRAVEL IS COMING
BACK: Flights started
landing at JFK Saturday
morning, and Boston's
Logan hopes to open
partially by 11 p.m.
7. WHERE SNOWMOBILES
BECAME RESCUE VEHI-
CLES: Despite warnings
and highway closings,
hundreds of drivers were
stranded on Long Island.
8. HOW SANDY VICTIMS
WERE HIT AGAIN: Staten
Islanders without power
had only a tent shelter and
tarps for protection.
9. NBA ROAD TRIPS WERE
EXTENDED: The Knicks
were stuck in Minnesota,
the Spurs hunkered down
in Detroit and the
Brooklyn Nets took the
train home from DC.
10. YES, MICHAEL KORS
WORE UGGS TO FASHION
WEEK: "I came in looking
like Pam Anderson," the
designer joked after
trading up for black
leather boots in New York.


couldn't get their doors open.
"It's like lifting cement. They
say it's two feet, but I think it's
more like three feet," said
Michael Levesque, who was
shoveling snow in Quincy, Mass.,
as part of a work crew for a land-
scaping company
At least four deaths in the U.S.
were blamed on the overnight
snowstorm, including an 11-year-
old boy in Boston who was over-
come by carbon monoxide as he
sat in a running car to keep
warm while his father shoveled
Saturday morning.
In Providence, Jason Harrison
had been working for nearly
three hours to clear 3 feet of
snow that blocked his driveway
and front walk and still had more
work to do. His snowblower, he
said, "has already paid for
itself."
But neighbors Rebekah and
John Speck strapped on cross-
country skis and coasted past
snowdrifts 5 feet high and droop-
ing telephone lines encrusted
with snow.
Rhode Island Gov Lincoln
Chafee cautioned that while the
snow had stopped, the danger
hadn't passed: "People need to
take this storm seriously, even
after it's over. If you have any
kind of heart condition, be care-
ful with the shoveling."
Blowing with hurricane-force
winds of more than 80 mph in
places, the storm appeared to hit
hardest along the heavily popu-
lated Interstate 95 corridor be-
tween the New York
metropolitan area and Maine.
Milford., Conn., got 38 inches of
snow, and Portland, Maine,
recorded 31.9, shattering a 1979
record. Several communities in
New York and across New Eng-
land got more than 2 feet.
Still, the storm was not as bad
as some of the forecasts led
many to fear, and not as dire as
the Blizzard of '78, used by long-
time New Englanders as the
benchmark by which all other
winter storms are measured.
By midday Saturday, the Na-
tional Weather Service reported
preliminary snowfall totals of
21.8 inches in Boston, ranking
the storm sixth for all-time snow-
fall. Bradley Airport near Hart-
ford, Conn., got 22 inches, for No.
2 in the record books.
In New York, where Central
Park recorded 11 inches, not
even enough to make the all-time
Top 10 list, Mayor Michael
Bloomberg said the city "dodged


ED BETZ/Newsday
Stranded vehicles litter the roadway Saturday along Route 25 in Lake Grove, N.Y. Many people
abandoned their vehicles along Long Island roadways after they became stuck in the rapidly falling snow.
Frist responders rescued a number of people from stranded cars, some having spent the night.


Associated Press
Ice clings to Ken Anderson's eyebrows and mustache Saturday as he
uses a snowblower during a blizzard in Portland, Maine. The storm
dumped more than 30 inches of snow as of Saturday afternoon.


a bullet" and its streets were "in
great shape." The three major
airports LaGuardia, Kennedy
and Newark, N.J. -were up and
running by late morning after
shutting down the evening
before.
Massachusetts, Connecticut
and Rhode Island imposed
travel bans until 4 p.m. to keep
cars off the road and let plows do
their work, and National
Guardsmen joined state crews in
clearing Connecticut highways.
On Long Island, which got
more than 2 1/2 feet of snow, hun-
dreds of drivers spent a cold and


scary night stuck on the high-
ways. Even snowplows got
bogged down or were blocked by
stuck or abandoned cars, so
emergency workers used snow-
mobiles to try to reach motorists,
many of whom were still waiting
to be rescued hours after the
snow had stopped.
One of those who was eventu-
ally rescued, Priscilla Arena,
prayed as she waited, took out a
sheet of loose-leaf paper and
wrote what she thought might be
her last words to her husband
and children, ages 5 and 9.
Among her advice: "Remember


S s

























Elizabeth Huesman, 10, of Fair
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Saturday after a snowstorm in
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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 A9


I


-,- ^





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


News NOTES


Genealogy seminar
slated for Feb. 16
The Citrus County Ge-
nealogical Society will host a
seminar about "Getting the
Most From Ancestry.com"
from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 16, at the
Crystal River Moose Lodge,
1855 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
Speaker George G. Mor-
gan, nationally recognized
lecturer and author, will give
three one-hour presentations
covering basic and advanced
search techniques, content of
the database, family trees,
and international records.
Cost is $12 for members and
$16 for nonmembers. Bring a
lunch. Free coffee, tea and
cookies will be available.
To register, call Mary Ann
Machonkin at 352-382-5515,
or download a form at
www.citrusgenealogy.com.
Enjoy pasta at
Moose Lodge
Women of the Moose will
host a spaghetti dinner for the
Inverness Relay For Life's ef-
forts from 5 to 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 12, at the
Dunnellon Moose Lodge.
Everyone is invited to the
fundraiser for the American
Cancer Society.
Vietnam vets group
to meet Feb. 13
The Vietnam Veterans
Gathering Inc. will meet at
9:30 a.m. Wednesday,
Feb. 13, at the Village Inn in
Beverly Hills.
The group will discuss the
upcoming golf tournament,
which is the primary
fundraiser for the 11th Veter-
ans Gathering in spring 2014.
All veterans who would like to
participate with the organiza-
tion are welcome. The mis-
sion ofWVVG is to assist
veterans and to keep alive the
memory of fallen comrades
both in Southeast Asia and
other theaters of operation.
For more information,
call Tom Neaman at 352-
586-7126.
Wisconsinites
to gather Feb. 13
The Wisconsin Club will
have its meeting/luncheon at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday,
Feb. 13, at Crystal Point Club
House, north of Crystal River.
Attendees are asked to
bring a dish to pass that
would serve eight to 10 peo-
ple. Many stay to play cards
and board games after lunch.
If you have a fun board game
you wish to play, bring it along
for others to enjoy.
For more information, call
Joyce at 352-860-1292.
Calligraphers to
practice new hand
The Creative Calligraphers
of Citrus Springs will meet at
12:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 14,
at Citrus Springs Memorial Li-
brary, 1826 Country Club
Blvd., in Citrus Springs.
The first half-hour will be a
practice session on a new
hand, the Gothic hand, in
lower case. This will be fol-
lowed by a brief meeting in-
cluding a show and tell of
projects members have
worked on during the past
month. There will be a Valen-
tine exchange among those
who have brought in a card
for that purpose. The program
this month will focus on "flow-
ers," with thoughts of an early
spring.
Those who attend need to
bring some plain paper, card-
stock (plain or colored), trac-
ing paper, colored pencils or
markers and usual calligraphy


tools (pens, plain pencil,
ruler, etc.)
For information, call the
library at 352-489-2313.
New Englanders
meet at Olive Tree
The New Englanders will
meet at 2 p.m. Friday,
Feb. 15, at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Come hear Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy report about what is
happening in Citrus County.
For more information, call
Jack at 352-746-1571.
Relay team plans
fundraiser sale
Inverness Relay For Life
Team Breast Friends Forever
will have a bake sale of sweet
treats in time for Valentine's
Day from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 13, and
Thursday, Feb. 14.
The sale will be at Chicken
King, U.S. 41 and County
Road 486 in Hernando.
Proceeds benefit the Amer-
ican Cancer Society Relay
For Life efforts.
Festival pageant
taking entries
The 25th annual Floral City
Strawberry Festival takes
place Saturday, March 2, and
Sunday, March 3, at Floral
Park, with the Miss Straw-
berry pageants on Saturday.
The Little Miss Strawberry
Pageant is for girls 4 to 6
years and the Miss Straw-
berry Princess pageant is for
girls 7 to 12 years. Entry
forms for the pageants are
available at the Inverness and
Crystal River Chamber of
Commerce offices and on the
website at www.floralcity
strawberryfestival.com.
Entry fee is $5 and applica-
tions and a picture must be
turned in by Feb. 15. Send
pictures to cira@citruscounty
chamber.com. For more infor-
mation, call 352-795-3149.
Salon cut-a-thon
fundraiser for pets
Fifth Street Salon and Spa
will have a Cut-a-thon to ben-
efit the Humanitarians of
Florida and Snippet Citrus
from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 16.
In addition to haircuts (no
appointment necessary),
there will be a car wash and
live music. The salon is at 674
N.E. Fifth St., near Dunkin'
Donuts on State Road 44 in
Crystal River.
All proceeds will go to the
Humanitarians of Florida and
Snippet Citrus, which pro-
vides low-cost spay/neuter
services for those who qualify.
Ozello ready to
cook chili for prizes
The Ozello Civic Associa-
tion will stage its seventh an-
nual Chili Cookoff and Craft
Show from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 16.
There are still openings for
chili entries for a chance to
win a first prize of $100, sec-
ond prize of $50 and a special
prize for third place.
Chili tasting and chili din-
ners are $5 each. To enter
chili, call Barbara Elvers at
352-464-4070. Craft entries
are still being accepted.
Lady Elks slate
market, sale
The Ladies of the West Cit-
rus Elks will have a Flea Mar-
ket & Book Sale from
8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 16, at West Citrus Elks
Lodge, 7890 Grover Cleve-
land Blvd. in Homosassa.
This will be one of the
club's largest shows so far,
featuring lots of books and


small household items, cloth-
ing, shoes, some furniture,
jewelry, children's items, pic-
tures and more.
For more information, call
Kathy at 352-382-4748 or
Sophie at 352-382-7614.
Special Olympics
dinner Feb. 16
Special Olympics will host
an all-you-can-eat spaghetti
dinner and salad bar
fundraiser from noon to 5 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 16, at the Ho-
mosassa Lions Club, 8408
Homosassa Trail (County
Road 490 East), Homosassa.
There will be prizes, raffles


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adults and $4 for children.
Call Irene at the Pooch Parlor
at 352-795-5896.
Learn to prune
roses at demo
Marion County Rose Soci-
ety will have a rose pruning
demonstration at 2:30 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 17, at 2224
Clearwater Run, The Villages.
The society's meetings are
open to all who want to have
fun learning about roses and
sharing their love for them.
Visit www.marioncounty
roses.org or call Howard
Johnson at 352-751-0355.


PFLAG to convene
at Unity Church
PFLAG Lecanto (Parents,
Family and Friends of Les-
bians and Gays) will meet
from 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday,
Feb. 12, at the Unity Church
of Citrus County, 2628 W.
Woodview Lane, Lecanto.
PFLAG's mission is to pro-
mote the health and well-
being of LGBT persons, their
families and friends. Meetings
are open to everyone and
provide an opportunity for dia-
log, discussion and support,
as well as education.
This month, the group will


watch and discuss a short
tribute to Jeanne Manford,
founder of PFLAG, who re-
cently died in her Daly City,
Calif., home. She was 92.
In 1972, following an attack
on her gay son's life at a rally,
Manford walked with him in a
protest through the streets of
Manhattan, carrying a sign
that read "Parents of Gays:
Unite in Support for Our Chil-
dren." Begged by observers
to speak to other parents, she
started support groups that
led to the founding of PFLAG.
Call Linda at 352-419-2738
or email pflag.lecanto@
gmail.com.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Special to the Chronicle
The 13th annual Holcim Ranch Crystal River Raid will take place March 9 and 10 at the Holcim property in Crystal River, six miles north of the Crystal River Mall, on U.S.
19/98. Thirty Sutlers will be on site with 20-plus cannons and 500-plus re-enactors. There will be modern and authentic food vendors. Wander through Union and
Confederate camps. Watch cannon and mortar demonstrations. Pre-battle music will be provided for entertainment. Full-scale battles with pyrotechnics will be featured
at 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Cost is $5 for adults. Education Day will be Friday, March 8, the event is open to public, private and home-school students from 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Cost is $2 per student; teachers and chaperones are admitted free of charge. Bring chairs to watch the battle or rent them at the site. For information and
re-enactor registration, go to www.crystalrvierraid.org.



African drummer to appear at local church


Special to the Chronicle
Internationally known
professional drummer
Eric Bli Bi Gore, from
Djsanufla, Ivory Coast,
West Africa, will bring
African drumming and
dancing to Citrus County


from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday,
Feb. 22, and 1 to 5 p.m. Sat-
urday, Feb. 23, at Her-
nando Church of the
Living God, 3441 E. Olean-
der Lane, Hernando.
Gore was born into a
family of musicians. From
the age of 6, he studied


under the master drum-
mer in his village.
The training laid the
foundation for his travels
around the world, with
performances spanning
across the United States,
Europe, Africa and South
America, with artists such
as the Rolling Stones and


Ludacris.
He is the musical direc-
tor for Folade African
Drum & Dance Ensemble,
and a music professor part
time at Agnes Scott Col-
lege in Decatur, Ga.
Everyone is welcome to
come out and support
African culture in the com-


Stroke seminar on tap |I


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus Memorial
Health System SHARE
Club will offer a free
stroke prevention seminar
at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb.
28, in the auditorium on
the main hospital campus.
"Stroke Prevention:
Choices and Changes" will
feature a presentation
from Citrus Memorial's di-
rector of nursing, Cheryl


Love. She will discuss
lifestyle changes that can
help to prevent stroke, as
well as quick response tips
to prevent lifelong
disability.
Refreshments and edu-
cational materials will be
available during the semi-
nar. Seating is limited; an
RSVP is required to at-
tend. Register online at
www.citrusmh.com/events
or call 352-560-6266.


munity. Drumming classes
will be available for dona-
tions of $10 and $12.
All are welcome to
come learn some West
African rhythms. There


will also be a drum circle
- bring drums and
instruments.
For more information,
call 352-270-6148 or 352-
897-4173.


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newest internet cafe, Lucky 7 Rivers Internet isn't just about games though. A full serv-
Cafe. With lots of smiling faces and an exciting ice cafe including faxing and copies are just l
atmosphere full of exclusive new games. part of the services offered in the full serv-
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Lucky 7 Rivers Internet Cafe is located until midnight. Call 352-228-4916 for more infor-
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Mourners arrive Friday at the Calahan Funeral Home to pay their respects to the
Pendleton family in the death of 15-year-old daughter Hadiya in Chicago.


Chicago remembers


victim of gun violence


First Lady
attends teen
girl'sfuneral

Associated Press
CHICAGO Hundreds
of mourners and digni-
taries, including first lady
Michelle Obama, stood and
applauded the family of a
15-year-old Chicago girl for
their strength Saturday, a
week and a half after her
death brought national at-
tention to the city's stag-
gering gun violence.
One speaker after an-
other at Saturday's funeral
remembered Hadiya
Pendleton as more than a
symbol, but as a girl who
had dreams, joked with
her friends and loved
school and performing as a
majorette with the group
that performed at events


surrounding Presi-
dent Barack
Obama's inaugura-
tion just days be-
fore her death Jan.
29. Police said
Pendleton was an
innocent victim in
a gang-related Ha
shooting. Pend
Her godfather,
Damon Stewart,
said some people on Face-
book asked what made
Hadiya's death noteworthy
when more than 40 people
had been slain in Chicago
this year many without
so much as a mention in
local newspapers. The an-
swer, Stewart told the
packed South Side church,
was obvious.
"She's important be-
cause all those other peo-
ple who died are
important," Stewart said.
"She's important because
all of those lives and voices
of those families who were
ignored, she now speaks


for them.... I don't
believe in coinci-
dence. God
needed an angel.
God needed to
send somebody for
us to change."
Michelle Obama
liya met privately with
leton the family before
the service and
then accompanied
the girl's mother to the
open casket at the front of
the church. Obama, who
grew up on Chicago's South
Side, put her arm around
Cleopatra Pendleton and
patted her back. The
woman threw her head
back and wailed as the lid
of her daughter's flower-
strewn casket was closed.
Moments later, the hun-
dreds in attendance rose
to their feet to begin the
service with a round of ap-
plause "to the strength of
this family" Then, the
choir began to sing so loud
the floor shook.


Eisenhower staff to launch exhibit


Associated Press
TOPEKA, Kan. -A new
World War II exhibit start-
ing this summer at the
Eisenhower Presidential
Library and Museum will
pay tribute to the millions
who fought, but organizers
also have another purpose
for the ambitious three-
year project: getting young
people engaged in the
war's relevance.
Karl Weissenbach, exec-
utive director of the library
and museum in Abilene,
said the "Leaders, Battles
and Heroes" exhibit will
be directed at younger gen-
erations that know little
about the war, its signifi-
cance in world history or
the impact of its outcome.


-].
GT


DEBT?
Bakupc


"It's amazing how little
information and under-
standing they have about
World War II," Weis-
senbach said. "You ask
them questions and often
you get a blank stare."
Eisenhower museum
curator William Snyder
said not every battle will
be depicted, but the hope
is for people to see the war
through the eyes of those
who were there, using
first-person accounts of


what happened from the
late 1930s through the
war's end.
"It continues to impact
our lives on a daily basis,"
Snyder said. "I hope peo-
ple will realize this didn't
happen in the far-off his-
tory books."
The 10,000-square-foot
exhibit opens in June and
runs through the end of
2016. It will rotate artifacts
periodically from a collec-
tion of 78,000 items.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
This image released by NASA on Saturday shows a
fresh drill hole, center, made by the Curiosity rover on
Friday next to an earlier test hole. Curiosity has
completed its first drill into a Martian rock, a huge
milestone since landing in August 2012.

Curiosity rover drills

in Martian rock


ALICIA CHANG
AP science writer
LOS ANGELES In a
Mars first, the Curiosity
rover drilled into a rock
and prepared to dump an
aspirin-sized pinch of
powder into its onboard
laboratories for closer
inspection.
The feat marked yet an-
other milestone for the
car-size rover, which
landed last summer to
much fanfare on an ambi-
tious hunt to determine
whether environmental
conditions were favor-
able for microbes.
Using the drill at the
end of its 7-foot-long ro-
botic arm, Curiosity on
Friday chipped away at a
flat, veined rock bearing
numerous signs of past
water flow. After nearly
seven minutes of pound-
ing, the result was a drill
hole 2 1/2 -inches deep.


The exercise was so
complex engineers spent
several days commanding
Curiosity to tap the rock
outcrop, drill test holes
and perform a "mini-
drill" in anticipation of
the real show. Images
beamed back to Earth
overnight showed a fresh
borehole next to a shal-
lower test hole Curiosity
had made earlier
"It was a perfect execu-
tion," drill engineer Avi
Okon at the NASA Jet
Propulsion Laboratory
said Saturday
Previous Mars landings
carried tools that scraped
away the exterior layers
of rocks and dirt. Oppor-
tunity and Spirit before
it died toted around a
rock grinder. Phoenix,
which touched down near
the Martian north pole in
2008, was equipped with
an ice rasp to chisel
frozen soil.


China tones down celebrations


Lunar New

Year turning

to leaner times

Associated Press
BEIJING Chinese
New Year is traditionally a
time for colorful and noisy
displays of fireworks and
generous-portioned ban-
quets. This year, the festiv-
ities are likely to be a little
more austere.
Authorities have asked
the public to set off fewer
fireworks in Beijing to re-
duce pollution, a new anti-
extravagance drive has
prompted government offi-
cials and state-owned com-
panies to cancel their
banquets at high-end ho-
tels and a campaign against
food waste is leading to
half-portions in restau-
rants. Even ads for luxury
goods were pulled ahead of
Saturday's opening of the
seven-day holiday.
All in all, China's Lunar
New Year is shaping up to
be a Leaner New Year
Following a call by
China's new leader Xi Jin-
ping to oppose waste, a vil-
lage outside of Beijing has
canceled its mass
dumpling festival that has
been taking place for the
past 30 years, involves
hundreds of people and
draws television cameras.
"We planned to make
about 50,000 dumplings
and now the plan has been
canceled," said a woman
surnamed Wang from the
Liuminying village com-


mittee's tourist office. "The
flour bought for the festival
will be distributed to the
villagers and we haven't
bought the meat yet. Vil-
lagers will make dumplings
at home with their own
families and they may feel
like this is a new experi-
ence for them since they
haven't done it that way for
such a long time."
Xi called for people to
be more frugal and oppose
waste following a "Clear
the Plate" campaign by ne-
tizens calling on restau-
rants to cut down food
waste. His words sparked
an anti-food waste cam-
paign in state media.
He had launched a crack-
down against government
extravagance, aimed at cut-
ting corruption by officials,
which angers the general
public.


Associated Press
Restaurant
workers watch
fireworks Saturday
during the eve of
Chinese New Year
in Beijing. Chinese
authorities have
asked the public to
set off fewer
fireworks to reduce
pollution in the
capital. A
Chinese woman
smiles after buying
firecrackers for the
New Year events.


Capsulizing the new
mood, the website of the
Global Times newspaper
on Wednesday displayed a
photo of workers at a
power supply company in
eastern Anhui province
writing "cut down waste"
slogans on balloons.


The Beijing city govern-
ment with catering associ-
ations announced the
restaurant industry should
reduce food waste. Ten
companies with a total of
749 branches have re-
sponded with a plan to
offer half-portions.


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NATION


&


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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE





On fire Obama to focus on economy


President to address issue, more

in State ofthe Union speech
Associated Press such as gun control, immi-
gration policy and climate
WASHINGTON Presi- change.
dent Barack Obama will Obama also may use
focus his State of the Tuesday's prime-time ad-
Union address on boosting dress before a joint ses-
job creation and economic sion of Congress to
growth at a time of high announce the next steps
unemployment, under- for concluding the U.S.-led
scoring the degree to war in Afghanistan by the
which the economy could end of 2014.
threaten his ability to pur- Obama's State of the
sue second-term priorities Union marks his second


high profile
speech to the na-
tion in three
weeks, after his in-
augural address
Jan. 21 that
opened his second
term. White House
aides see the two
speeches as com-
plementary, with
Tuesday's address
aimed at providing
specifics to back
up some of the In-


Barack
Obama
to deliver his
State of the
Union speech
Tuesday.


auguration Day's lofty lib-
eral rhetoric.
The president pre-


viewed the address
during a meeting
Thursday with
House Democrats
and said he would
speak "about mak-
ing sure that we're
focused on job cre-
ation here in the
United States of
America." Obama
said he would try
to accomplish that
by calling for im-
provements in ed-


ucation, boosting clean
energy production, and re-
ducing the deficit in ways


that don't burden the mid-
dle class, poor or elderly
While those priorities
may be cheered by some
Democrats, they are
certain to be met with
skepticism or outright op-
position from many con-
gressional Republicans,
especially in the GOP-
controlled House. The
parties are at odds over
ways to reduce the deficit.
Republicans favor spend-
ing cuts; Obama prefers a
combination of spending
cuts and increasing tax
revenue.


Associated Press
Egyptian protesters throw
fire bombs and stones at
the presidential palace
during a demonstration
Friday in Cairo.

Egyptian court
blocks YouTube
CAIRO -A Cairo court
Saturday ordered the gov-
ernment to block access to
the video-sharing website
YouTube for 30 days for
carrying an anti-Islam film
that caused deadly riots
across the world.
Judge Hassouna Tawfiq
ordered YouTube blocked
for carrying the film, which
he described as "offensive
to Islam and the Prophet
(Muhammad)." He made
the ruling in the Egyptian
capital where the first
protests against the film
erupted last September be-
fore spreading to more than
20 countries, killing more
than 50 people.
The ruling, however, can
be appealed, and based on
precedent, might not be en-
forced. A spokeswoman for
YouTube's parent company,
Google, said in a statement
the firm had "received noth-
ing from the judge or govern-
ment related to this matter."
6.9 deep quake
hits Colombia
BOGOTA, Colombia -A
powerful but deep earth-
quake shook a broad swath
of Colombia and Ecuador
on Saturday, sending fright-
ened people fleeing into the
streets, but no serious in-
juries or major damage
were reported.
The U.S. Geological Sur-
vey said the 9:16 a.m.
quake had a magnitude of
6.9. It was centered about 7
miles from the Colombian
town of Pasto and 92 miles
below the surface.
British man
charged in threat
Reece Elliott, 24, from a
town east of the northern
English city of Newcastle,
has been charged with
making malicious com-
ments, which led to 2,900
children skipping class in
Warren County, Tennessee,
police said. He did not enter
a plea at a 30-minute court
hearing and was ordered to
remain in custody.
The online posting threat-
ening gun violence was
made anonymously on a
memorial page set up for a
Tennessee student who
died in October. Police did
not address the motive be-
hind the posting.

Celebrate


Associated Press
Dancers from the Rosas
de Ouro samba school
perform during a carnival
parade Saturday in Sao
Paulo, Brazil. The Carnival
season culminates on
Tuesday with street
revelry and the pageantry
of the Rex and Zulu
parades.
-From wire reports


Lasting police legacy?


Associated Press
The street in front of the West Los Angeles police station has yellow tape prohibiting cars from parking Friday. This is in response to
threats by former LAPD officer Chris Dorner, who is suspected in a spree of violence as part of a vendetta against law enforcement after
being fired by the department.


Clear sky aids mountain hunt for fugitive ex-cop


BIG BEAR LAKE, Calif. -A scaled-
back search party took advantage of a
break from stormy weather Saturday to
hunt for a former Los Angeles police offi-
cer suspected in three killings, using
heat-sensing helicopters and fanning out
in fresh snow as vacationing families
and weekend skiers frolicked nearby.
The stark blue skies that emerged
after a Friday snowstorm allowed San
Bernardino County sheriff's choppers to
fly low over the forest and SWAT teams


All times Pacific Daylight Time
1. Sunday, Feb. 3
Monica Quan, 28, and Keith
Lawrence, 27, are found shot
to death in their car at an
Irvine, Calif. parking lot.
2. Monday, Feb. 4
Around 9:30 a.m.
Some of Dorner's belongings,
including police equipment, are
found in a trash bin in the San
Diego-area community of
National City, Calif.
3. Wednesday, Feb. 6
Irvine police announce Dormer
is suspected of killing Quan
and Lawrence.
About 10:30 p.m.
A man matching Dorner's
description tries to steal a boat
from a San Diego marina but
the engine wouldn't start. An
81-year-old man was tied up
but not hurt.


to look for tracks and other clues lead-
ing to Christopher Dorner, 33, whose
pickup truck was discovered Thursday.
Authorities suspect Dorner in a series
of attacks in Southern California over
the past several days that left three peo-
ple dead, including a police officer. Au-
thorities said he has vowed revenge
against several former LAPD col-
leagues who he believed cost him his
law enforcement career.
-Associated Press


4. Thursday, Feb. 7,
Around 1:30 a.m.
An LAPD officer protecting a
person named in the
manifesto is injured in a
shootout and chase of a
vehicle believed to be
Dorner's.
5. A short time later
Dorner is believed to have
ambushed two Riverside
police officers, killing one
and injuring the other.
6. Around 2:30 a.m.
A passerby finds a wallet
with a law enforcement
badge and a picture ID of
Dorner near the airport.
7. Around 2:30 a.m.
LAPD officers guarding a
target named in Dorner's
manifesto open fire on a
truck they mistakenly believe
to be Dorner's. Two women
are wounded. A short time


later, Torrance police are
involved in a second
shooting involving a different
truck they also mistake for
Dorner's. No one is hurt.
8. Around 8:30 a.m.
Reports surface that
authorities are investigating
a burned pickup truck. Local
schools are locked down. It's
later confirmed to be
Dormer's.
9. Around 3:30 p.m.
San Bernardino County
Sheriff John McMahon
announces that a
door-to-door search is under
way.
10. Around 4 p.m.
FBI SWAT teams and local
police search Dorner's Las
Vegas-area home.
Authorities leave with boxes
of items from the house. No
weapons are found.


SOURCE: ESRI


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Fugi-
tive ex-Los Angeles police
officer Christopher
Dorner's claim in an on-
line "manifesto" that his
career was undone by
racist colleagues conspir-
ing against him comes at a
time when it's widely held
that the police depart-
ment has evolved well be-
yond the troubled racial
legacy of Rodney King
and the O.J. Simpson trial.
Dorner, who is sus-
pected in a string of
vengeance killings, has de-
picted himself as a black
man wronged, whose
badge was unjustly taken
in 2008 after he lodged a
complaint against a white
female supervisor
"It is clear as day that
the department retaliated
toward me," Dorner said
in online writings author-
ities have attributed to
him. Racism and officer
abuses, he argued, have
not improved at LAPD
since the King beating
but have "gotten worse."
Dorner's problems at
LAPD, which ended with
his dismissal, played out
without public notice
more than four years ago,
as the department gradu-
ally emerged from fed-
eral oversight following a
corruption scandal. At
the time, the officer ranks
were growing more di-
verse and then-Chief
William Bratton was
working hard to mend re-
lations with long-
skeptical minorities.
"This is no longer your
father's LAPD," Mayor
Antonio Villaraigosa de-
clared in 2009, after the
federal clampdown was
ended.
Civil rights attorney
Connie Rice said the de-
partment should review


the Dorner case and his
claims, while stressing
that she is not defending
the suspect in any way and
is shocked by the attacks.
She said the 10,000-
member force headquar-
tered in a glass-walled
high-rise in downtown
Los Angeles has entered
a new era.
"The open racism of
the days before is gone,"
said Rice, who closely
tracks racial issues inside
the department and has
faced off against the
LAPD in court. "The
overall culture has im-
proved enormously"
Police say Dorner shot
and killed a couple in a
parking garage last week-
end in Irvine, the begin-
ning of a rampage he said
was retribution for his
mistreatment at LAPD. A
massive search for him
continued Saturday, cen-
tered on the mountain
town of Big Bear Lake.
The woman who died
was the daughter of a re-
tired police captain who
had represented Dorner
in the disciplinary pro-
ceedings that led to his
dismissal. Hours after au-
thorities identified Dorner
as a suspect in the double
murder, police believe he
shot and grazed an LAPD
officer and later used a
rifle to ambush two River-
side police officers, killing
one and seriously wound-
ing the other
"This is a necessary evil
that I do not enjoy but
must partake and com-
plete for substantial
change to occur within the
LAPD," Dorner wrote in a
14-page online manifesto.
On Friday, a community
of online sympathizers
formed, echoing
complaints against police
who linger in some
communities.


Fugitive s rant spotlights

evolving LAPD legacy











EXCURSIONS
~CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


West Virginia's


pre-Lent bash


done to chase


off winter

VICKI SMITH
Associated Press
MORGANTOWN, WVa.
The Gulf Coast has Mardi
Gras. Deep in the
mountains of West
Virginia, the descendants
of Swiss and German immigrants
have Fasnacht. It's smaller by
thousands and colder by about 40
degrees, but it's more than just a
last hurrah before Lent.
On Saturday, hundreds will make the trek over
winding country roads to Helvetia, a community
now so small it can barely be called a village (pop-
ulation 59 in the 2010 census).
They will don papier-mich6 masks mostly
homemade and scary for a 15-minute candle-
light parade. They'll dine on sausage, sauerkraut
and Swiss cheese imported from Ohio but made
the old-style way, and they'll dance to Appalachian
music at a masked ball.
At midnight, they'll rip Old Man Winter from his
spot above the dance floor and toss his effigy into
a bonfire to chase away winter.
"Of course, usually that backfires," says Debbie
Sayre, who has cooked at the town's only restau-
rant, The Hutte, for 36 years. "It can be 50 degrees
on Saturday and you'll wake up Sunday morning
and there's snow."
The forecast calls for rain and snow Friday, fol-
lowed by colder weather in the 20s to mid-30s Sat-
urday Regardless, Sayre figures she'll serve up at
least 200 Swiss sampler plates, and she'll keep
serving until the food runs out.
"Fasnacht really brings the people out," says
Sayre, the great-granddaughter of Swiss immi-
grants. "It doesn't matter if there's 2 feet of snow.
They love it."
Fasnacht, German for "first night," is also the
name of a doughnut served on Fat Tuesday, a tra-
ditional sweet treat before Ash Wednesday
It's a centuries-old tradition that European im-
migrant Catholics who settled Helvetia in 1869 ini-
tially celebrated privately in their homes, as most
of their neighbors were Protestants.
"But then even that faded out for a long time,"
New Hampshire author David Sutton says. He
grew up in Helvetia and did oral histories with
residents in the 1980s before publishing "Helvetia:
The History of a Swiss Village in the Mountains of
West Virginia."
In the '60s, "when it became kind of a neat thing
to have a culture," Helvetia went through a re-
vival, Sutton says.
People like the late Eleanor Fahrner Mailloux,
who owned The Hutte and died at 93 in 2011,
began exploring and reviving their local history
and customs.
The town's centennial in 1969, Sutton says, "was
sort of a big kick-off to a renaissance."
That's also when the tradition changed to in-
clude folk music and dancing. It was condensed
from several days or a week to a single Saturday,
when most people are off work.
Today, Sutton says, "it's quite an amalgamation
of European and American traditions," more secu-
lar than religious.
It's part reunion, drawing native children back
home for a weekend. Kevin Betler's daughter is a
doctor in Morgantown now and has to work this
weekend, but some of the friends she brought
home with her from college will be at Fasnacht.
Betler runs the Kultur House, a building that
also houses Helvetia's General Store, Post Office
and Mask Museum.
He says Fasnacht is also part tourism.
"It's considerably bigger than it used to be," he
says. "It used to be just the locals, but Eleanor re-
ally got the word out and promoted it"
That's good for the few businesses in town: The
Hutte, the Honey Haus, Alpenglow Handmade
Soaps and the six-bedroom, one-bath Alpen
Lodge.
Typically, people book the town's few rooms a
year or more in advance. Those who don't want to
drive a half-hour to the nearest motel in Mill
Creek can pay $5 to put a cot or sleeping bag on


HelvetiaWV.com/Associated Press
Revelers wear masks and costumes marching in a parade during the 2012 Fasnacht in Helvetia W.Va. Deep
in the mountains of West Virginia, the descendants of Swiss and German immigrants have Fasnacht, which
like Mardi Gras, is a last hurrah before Lent as well as chasing away winter.


The Morgantown Monster Mariachi Band performs Feb. 18, 2012, at the Open Mic Session in the Star Band
Hall at the 2012 Fasnacht in Helvetia W.Va.


the floor of the Star Band Hall after the open mic
session wraps up.
The festival's success has not, however, been
able to consistently sustain the town's cheese-
making tradition.
State legislators tried to help, passing a law in
the late 1990s to exempt cheese-makers in
Helvetia from the requirement to use pasteurized
milk it they were selling less than 5,000 pounds.
But Betler says it's tough to sustain a steady sup-
ply of fresh milk in Helvetia, and cheese-making is


a seven-day-a-week process.
"It's not really feasible to transport milk in," he
says. "You've got to have the milk locally, and
that's hard because there aren't as many farmers
as there used to be."
Still, the other traditions remain. Betler expects
them to neither die nor expand much.
"I look for it to be just the way it is right now," he
says. "As the old ones quit coming, the new ones
start coming ... We like our tradition, and the way
we do it."


DREAM
VACATIONS
t'Xpt0 (oi yes


The Chronicle and The Accent Travel Group If it's selected as a winner, it will be pub- Please avoid photos with dates on the print.
are sponsoring a photo contest for readers of lished in the Sunday Chronicle. Photos should be sent to the Chronicle at
the newspaper. At the end of the year, a panel of judges will 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River,
Readers are invited to send a photograph from select the best photo during the year and that FL 34429 or dropped off at the Chronicle of-
their Dream Vacation with a brief description of photograph will win a prize. fice in Inverness, Crystal River or any
the trip. Accent Travel Office.


* Veterans
Notes can
be found on
Page A17 of
today's
Chronicle.


m






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Abused sister


wants peace


SUNDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 10, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House DI: Comcast Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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Dear Annie: I am 39
years old. For the
past 20 years, I
have had ongoing therapy
to recover from the sexual
abuse I suffered as a child.
My abuser was my half-
brother When I finally
said something at the age
of 13, my family did not be-
lieve or support me. Since
then, family gatherings
have been especially diffi-
cult because
my family ex-
pects me to at-
tend when my
abuser is
present
I can't even
tell you how
difficult it is to
be around
him. The
flashbacks are
unbearable.
Five years ago, AN N
with the sup- MAI
port of my MAIL
counselor, I
decided I didn't need to
subject myself to that kind
of torture and stopped
going to these family
functions.
The problem now is that
no one mentions the
abuse, especially to his
wife and two daughters.
His wife, who is clueless,
sends me Christmas and
birthday presents, which
makes me extremely un-
comfortable, especially
when I see his name on
the card. Is it OK for me to
ask her to stop? I don't
want to insert myself into
their lives or cause prob-
lems, but I can't deal with


this.- Still Healing
Dear Healing: Is there a
risk that your half-brother
would abuse his daugh-
ters? If so, it is imperative
that you inform his wife so
she can protect her chil-
dren. It is OK to ask your
sister-in-law to stop send-
ing gifts and cards, or you
can send a letter to your
half-brother, asking him to
please cease all communi-
cation. If you
cannot bring
yourself to write
to him directly,
please ask a
friend to do it for
you.
Dear Annie:
Your answer to
"Distressed in
Duanesburg,"
the over-
whelmed high
E'S school senior,
was kind and
BOX helpful. I would
like to add that a
little breathing meditation
goes a long way, too. Just 10
minutes a day will reduce
her stress.
I used to feel over-
whelmed, but then started
to meditate. "Distressed"
may think she cannot pos-
sibly add another thing to
her schedule, but medita-
tion actually brings space
to our packed days. It isn't
emptying the brain of
thoughts, as many believe.
Breathing meditation is
about learning to focus on
just your breath and re-
quires practice, like any
skill. Peaceful and Fo-
cused in New York


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Identity Thief'" (R) ID
required. 1 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:15 p.m.
"Warm Bodies" (PG-13)
1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Bullet to the Head" (R) ID
required. 1:10 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7 p.m.
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch
Hunters" (R) ID required.
4:10 p.m.
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch
Hunters" (R) ID required. In
3D. 1:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No
passes.
"Mama" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Zero Dark Thirty" (R) ID
required. 12:45 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
6:50 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Side Effects" (R) ID required.


2 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Identity Thief" (R) ID
required. 1:25 p.m., 4:25 p.m.,
7:25 p.m., 7:55 p.m.
"Warm Bodies" (PG-13)
1:30 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Bullet to the Head" (R) ID
required. 8 p.m.
"Parker" (R) ID required.
1:40 p.m., 4:45 p.m.
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch
Hunters" (R) ID required. In
3D. 1:15 p.m., 7:10 p.m. No
passes.
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch
Hunters" (R) ID required.
4:25 p.m.
"Mama" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Zero Dark Thirty" (R) ID
required. 1:05 p.m., 4:30 p.m.
"Silver Lings Playbook"
(PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 4:35 p.m.,
7:15 p.m.
"Lincoln" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Timepiece
6 Willow rod
11 Threshing debris
16 Kind of skirt
21 Variety show
22 Shelf
23 Of hearing
24 Majestic
25 Form of quartz
26 PR concern
27 donna
28 Die down
29 Make lace
30 Son of Jacob and L
32 Stage sketch
34 Horse race
36 Easy as -
37 School type (abbr.)
39 Hawaiian goose
41 Lose it
43 volente
44 Crooked
45 Ruler's territory
48 Rank
50 Extinct bird
52 Glued
55 Fast-running bird
57 Require
59 Bussed
63 Gracie or Woody
64 Domains
66 Not at all strict
68 Fibber
69 Male hog
70 Not fashionable
72 Line for leading
73 Modern
74 tide
75 Repair
76 Cover with crumbs
78 Burning residue
79 Summer month
80 Swell
82 Tin
83 Landing places
85 Piquant
86 Playing card
87 Baby bear
88 Every
89 Toy gun projectile
90 Fissure
93 Mixed greens
95 An explosive
96 Teased
100 Wait in hiding
101 Western Indian
102 the Riveter
104 Eye part


eah


105 Cut down
106 Assn.
107 Grind together
109 Job for a band
110 Soon
111 Rent
112 Chopped cabbage in
brine
115 Loquacious
117 Danger
118 "Ocean's-"
119 Navigation hazard
121 Floor piece
122 Old hat
123 Prince in opera
125 Strike
127 Theater canopy
129 Salt lake in Asia
132 Marry
134 Island feast
136 Aspersion
137 Fling
141 "- and Peace"
142 Growl
144 Old instrument
146 Man of rank
148 Greek letter
149 Sky blue
151 Discourage
153 Interruption
155 John Jacob-
157 Mechanical man
158 Host at a podium
159 Century plant
160 Irritate
161 Sketches
162 Did a lawn job
163 Famous
164 Glutted


DOWN
1 Shipping container
2 Licit
3 Elliptical
4 Slice
5 On an even-
6 "- Twist"
7 Certain student
8 Princess
in comic opera
9 Breakfast fare
10 Smells
11 Naval officer
12 "Ben--"
13 Dry
14 Notorious
15 Blazed
16 Color of slate


17 Johnny-
18 Standing
wide open
19 Lustrous fabric
20 Icy rain
31 Town
in Oklahoma
33 Loan charge (abbr.)
35 Studious
38 Measure of length
40 Old anesthetic
42 Look furtively
44 Foreman
46 Chess pieces
47 Moray
49 Film spool
51 Kitchen item
52 Grew wan
53 Excuse
54 Thick slices
56 Decorate
58 Dismal
60 Skull cavity
61 Occurrence
62 Decimal
System
64 Carter's
predecessor
65 Take legal action
67 Bulk
69 Poison
71 Spigot
75 Pack of cards
76 Children's book ele-
phant
77 Lane or Keaton
79 -Jacques
Rousseau
81 Nail cousin


- -de-sac
Med. specialty
Greek god
Roman dictator
Ache
At hand
Countrified
Wrangle
with words
Top performer
Pup
Snug
Helen of-
Sharp projection
Uncanny
Lived
Nameless
- passim
Arrange in layers


Kinnear
or Louganis
Colors
Book of maps
Doctrine
Wicked
Discern
Point a weapon
"The Raven" poet
Blamed
Prickly husk


124 Book for
schoolchildren
126 Remuneration
128 Trembled
129 Prize
130 Tonsorial item
131 Island
near Bonaire
133 Play
135 Citified
138 Musical group


Push
Fathered
Hardens
As would
have it
Reasoner's word
Drinks
Use oars
Born (Fr.)
Have a bite
Main


Puzzle answer is on Page A18.


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick


I
.1


A16 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well
as events to which the public
is invited. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activi-
ties, meals and more for a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.

POST NEWS
The Vietnam Veterans
Gathering Inc. will meet at
9:30 a.m. Wednesday, Feb.
13, at the Village Inn in Bev-
erly Hills. The group will dis-
cuss the upcoming golf
tournament, which is the pri-
mary fundraiser for the 11th
Veterans Gathering in spring
2014. All veterans who would
like to participate with the or-
ganization are welcome. The
mission of VVG is to assist
veterans and to keep alive the
memory of fallen comrades
both in Southeast Asia and
other theaters of operation.
For more information, call
Tom Neaman at 352-586-
7126.
VFW Riders Group
meets at 10 a.m. Saturday
(different weeks each month)
at different VFW posts
throughout the year. For infor-
mation, call director Gene
Perrino at 352-302-1037, or
email geneusawo@tampa
bay.rr.com.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Satur-
day monthly at 1 p.m. for
lunch and coffee at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). All Coastie veterans
are welcome. For more infor-
mation, call Charlie Jensen at
352-503-6019.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Lounge open at 11 a.m. Mon-
day through Saturday and
noon on Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
For more information about
the post and its other activi-
ties, call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at
352-302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who
served during war time (also
stepchildren); stepchildren;


and female veterans who
served during wartime. Call
Unit President Sandy White at
352-249-7663, or member-
ship chairman Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
The Unit will serve a fried
fish dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 15, and a shrimp
alfredo dinner Friday, Feb. 27,
at the post home, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway. All
members and the public are
welcome to come and enjoy
dinners with their friends and
families for a donation of $7.
All profits support the many
programs of the American Le-
gion Auxiliary. For more infor-
mation, call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-
7663.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
activities such as meals,
bingo, golf, darts, karaoke,
pool and more for members
and guests. Review the
monthly newsletter for activi-
ties and updates, and call the
post at 352-746-0440. The
VFW Post 10087 is off County
Road 491, directly behind
Cadence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 746-0440. The
Cake Crab Company Golf
League plays at Twisted Oaks
G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.
Check with Jack Gresham for
tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf
League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted
Oaks Golf Club and Citrus
Springs Country Club. Tee
time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Spaghetti dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 15.
Cost is $5; children younger
than 6 eat for $2.50. Karaoke
by Mike. The public is
welcome.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, at the intersection of In-
dependence Highway and
U.S. 41. The chapter hall is on
the corner of Independence
Highway and Paul Drive. We
thank veterans for their serv-
ice and welcome any disabled
veteran to join us from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we
accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to as-
sist disabled veterans and
their families when we are
able. Anyone who knows a


disabled veteran or their fam-
ily who requires assistance is
asked to call Commander
Richard Floyd 727-492-0290,
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207,
or 352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClis-
ter is available to assist any
veteran or dependents with
their disability claim by ap-
pointment. Call 352-344-3464
and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the
veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA med-
ical center in Gainesville may
call the Citrus County Transit
office for wheelchair trans-
portation; call 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant
Lynn Armitage at 352-341-
5334.One of the DAVA's proj-
ects is making lap robes and
ditty, wheelchair and monitor
bags for needy veterans in
nursing homes. All who wish
to help in our projects are wel-
come. We need to make the
items certain sizes, so please
call for information. We also
collect toiletry items for the
veterans. Good, clean mate-
rial and yarn are needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or Ar-
mitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries
are at 906 Highway 44 East,
Inverness. Call the post at
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org for informa-
tion about all weekly post
activities.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Aux-
iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Post and auxiliary meet
the first Wednesday of the
month at 7 p.m. Dunnellon
Young Marines meet 6 p.m.
Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at 4
p.m.
Everyone is welcome at
free AARP income tax service
through April 10 from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Wednesday. For in-
formation, call Wayne Sloan
at 352-489-5066.
The outdoor flea market
and pancake breakfast are
set for Saturday, Feb. 16. All-
you-can-eat breakfast is
served from 7:30 to 10:30
a.m. Cost is $5 for adults and
$3 for children. Everyone is
welcome.
The Four Chaplains memo-
rial Service will be at 4 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 10, followed by
a 94th Legion birthday cele-


bration. The public is invited.
For information about activ-
ities and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets the
second Saturday monthly at
the DAV building at 1039 N.
Paul Drive in Inverness. This
is an advocacy group for cur-
rent and future veterans, as
well as for POWs and MIAs.
Florida Chapter 7 welcomes
new members to help pro-
mote public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help vet-
erans in need of help. Full
membership is open to all in-
dividuals 18 years or older
who wish to dedicate time to
the cause. Visit the website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker
for your next meeting or
event. Call club President Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell), or email him at ultraray
1997@yahoo.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
or President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
Any female relative age 16 or
older who is a wife, widow,
mother, mother-in-law, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of an honor-
ably discharged Marine and
FMF Corpsman eligible to join
the Marine Corps League,
and female Marines (former,
active and reserves) and as-
sociate members are eligible
for MCLA membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
Call or visit the post for regu-
lar events, as well as meet-
ings. Google us at VFW 4252,
Hernando.
The public is welcome at
"Show Me the Money" from 2
to 4 p.m. Thursday at the
post.
Everyone is invited to a
special "Speed Bingo" ses-
sion at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb.
23. Doors open at 9 a.m.
Food is available. Proceeds
will benefit cancer aid and re-
search. Also, all are welcome
at the "Bonanza Bingo" begin-
ning at 9 a.m. Saturday,
March 2. Cost is $35 for the
bingo package, which in-
cludes lunch.
Call 352-726-5206.
The public is welcome at
the Sunday buffet breakfasts
from 10 a.m. to noon; cost
is $5.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-
5012 for information. VFW


membership is open to men
and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including
service in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The Korean
Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above for
information.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For
information about the post
and its activities, call 352-
637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, in-
vites all eligible veterans to
join or transfer to our Post
237 family. There are many
activities (call the post for in-
formation), and monthly din-
ners sell out fast and are a big
hit. Legionnaires, Sons of the
American Legion (SAL), or
American Legion Auxiliary
(ALA) are active helping vet-
erans and the community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org
to view the calendar of up-
coming events. Call the post
at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of
the U.S. is eligible for mem-
bership if said service was
within Korea, including territo-
rial waters and airspace, at
any time from Sept. 3, 1945,
to the present or if said serv-
ice was outside of Korea from
June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77 meet the first
Thursday monthly at the for-
mer Inverness Highlands
S&W Civic Association build-
ing at 4375 Little Al Point, off
Arbor Street.. Call Post Cmdr.
Norman Brumett at 352-860-
2981 or Auxiliary president
Marie Cain at 352-697-3151
for information about the post
and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food
available.
The post will do a bus tour
to Miami and Key West Feb.
18 to 24. Profits from the trip
will be used to purchase a
brick for the Fisher House
Walk of Courage and for new
equipment for the Color
Guard of Post 77. The Fisher
House will be a home for the
families of hospitalized veter-
ans at the Malcom Randal
Veterans Hospital in
Gainesville; the Walk of
Courage will be the paved
walkway between the Fisher
House and the hospital. For
more information, call Alice at
352-860-2981.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the Ameri-


can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Dinner is at 6 p.m. and the
meeting follows at 7. All veter-
ans in the Homosassa/Ho-
mosassa Springs area are
invited to be a part of Ameri-
can Legion Post 166. For in-
formation about the post or
the American Legion, call and
leave a message for the post
commander at 352-860-2090.
Your call will be returned
within 24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose
and Crown restaurant, Citrus
Hills. Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway). For more informa-
tion about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959; or
visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 1 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November at
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. All combat-wounded
veterans, lineal descendants,
next of kin, spouses and sib-
lings of Purple Heart recipi-
ents are invited. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 MOPH, visit the chap-
ter's website at www.citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Unit 776, Ladies Auxiliary,
Military Order of the Purple
Heart will sponsor a Military
Card Party on Saturday, Feb.
16, at the Point O' Woods
clubhouse, 9228 E. Gospel Is-
land Road, Inverness.
Reservations are due by 5
p.m. Monday, Feb. 11. Doors
open at 11:30 a.m. with lunch
at noon and cards to follow.
There will be door prizes, a
raffle and a 50/50 drawing.
Entrance fee is $12 (includes
lunch, coffee, dessert and
door prizes). Make up your
own table of four or come as
a single and organizers will
pair you.
For more information or to
make reservations, call Annie
at 352-249-7827 or Pat at
352-637-3265.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Pur-
ple Heart has announced two
scholarship opportunities for
college-bound students -
See VETERANS/Page A18


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 A17


I


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Five GENERATIONS


Five generations of family
members getting together
recently for a photo are:
Eleanor Muriel Jones, 91,
born in Tampa; Geraldine
Faye Jones Goins, 71, born
in Tampa; Dorinda Faye
Moyer Jones, 46, born in
Tampa; Cierra Leigh
Burgess, 26, born in
Tampa; Raegan Bailey
Burgess, 2, and twins
Noah and Caleb Stevens,
2 months, all born in
Inverness.

Special to the Chronicle


February brings big changes,


friendly neighborhood events


There is a lot of news
to report this
month, so let me get
right to it.
The Change of Com-
mand is now official at the
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition (CCVC). Elec-
tions were held at the Gen-
eral Membership meeting
on Jan. 24. Outgoing Chair-
man Richard Floyd wel-
comed his successor, Ray
Michael, to the helm. Mike
O'Brien re-
tained the posi-
tion of first vice.
The position of
second vice, va-
cated by Ray
Michael becom-
ing chairman,
now belongs to
Wallace Turner.
Daniel Corcoran
remains in the Barbara
secretary posi- VETE
tion. Our new
treasurer is
Richard Floyd.
Membership is still main-
tained by Gary Williamson,
and our judge advocate is
Fred Daniels.
Appointed positions re-
main unchanged: Chap-
lain Andrew Freund;
Sergeant-at-Arms Joel
Smoyer; Food Pantry Man-
ager Gary Williamson; and
the duties of Public Affairs
remains yours truly, Bar-
bara L. Corcoran.
Just as important, our
food bank's operating
hours have changed. In-
stead of being open on
both Tuesdays and Thurs-
days, it is now open on
Tuesday only from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Cash, canned and



VETERANS
Continued from Page A17

Chapter 776's College of
Central Florida (CF) Endowed
Scholarship and the Military
Order of the Purple Heart
(MOPH) Scholarship for Aca-
demic Year 2013/14.
Chapter 776's CF Endowed
Scholarship for Academic
Year 2013/14 awards $500 to
an applicant accepted or en-
rolled at CF as a full-time stu-
dent (12 or more semester
credit hours). Chapter 776
scholarship information and
an application can be ob-
tained at www.citruspurple
heart.org, or by calling 352-
382-3847. Chapter 776 must
receive scholarship applica-
tions no later than 5 p.m. Feb.
28.
The MOPH Scholarship for
Academic Year 2013/14
awards $3,000 to a member
of the MOPH; a spouse,
widow, direct lineal descen-
dant (child, stepchild, adopted
child, grandchild) of a MOPH
member or of a veteran killed
in action, or who died of
wounds before having the op-
portunity to become a MOPH
member. Great-grandchildren
are not eligible. Applicant
must be a U.S. citizen, a
graduate or pending graduate
of an accredited high school;
be accepted or enrolled as a
full-time student (12 semester
credit hours or 18 quarter
hours) at a U.S. college or
trade school and have at least
a 2.75 cumulative GPA based
on an un-weighted 4.0 grad-


I


dry food donations are
welcome, and are an es-
sential part of our ability
to maintain this service to
our veterans in need.
Please be sure to check the
expiration dates on your
food donations.
Currently, our food bank
is mostly in need of the fol-
lowing: In dry goods,
boxed cereals, pasta, rice,
instant mashed potatoes,
biscuit mixes, gravy mixes,
dry soup mixes,
H a m -
burger/Tuna
Helper" and
other "dinner-
in-a-box" casse-
role/stew-type
meals. In
canned goods,
we're very
much in need
Corcoran of canned veg-
etables includ-
ing corn, green
beans, baked
beans, peas,
carrots and beets. We need
a variety of canned soups,
both regular and chunky
styles. Cubed and instant
broth is also always wel-
come. Canned tuna is an-
other important item on
our needs list. Cash dona-
tions designated for the
food bank help us pur-
chase specific items we're
low on and keep those
shelves stocked for our
qualified veterans.
Food bank donations
may be brought to our
meeting headquarters we
share with the Disabled
American Veterans (DAV-
70) at 1039 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness. Besides the


ing system. Scholarship appli-
cations must be received at
MOPH Headquarters in
Springfield, Va., no later than
5 p.m. Feb. 13. MOPH schol-
arship information and an ap-
plication can be obtained by
visiting the MOPH website at
www.purpleheart.org.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-
0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post. Call the post
at 352-447-3495.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,


hours the food bank is
open, donations can be ac-
cepted whenever we have
personnel at the building.
Generally speaking, we
have members ready to ac-
cept donations during both
our board and general
membership meetings the
second and fourth Thurs-
days of the month from
9:30 a.m. until 11 a.m.
In addition, any of our
members manning the
check-in booth at the
CCVC monthly yard sale
can accept food bank or
general donations for the
CCVC, as well. Our yard
sales take place at the Our
Lady of Fatima Church in
Inverness, on U.S. 41,
south of where U.S. 41
splits from State Road 44.
The address is 550 U.S.
Highway 41 S., Inverness,
and our yard sale hours
are from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m.
We generally have our
yard sale the second Sat-
urday of the month, but
this season, we have an ex-
ception that you should
take note of. During the
month of April, the yard
sale has been shifted to
the first Saturday of the
month. We do our best to
remain consistent, but
sometimes changes are
out of our control. Please
make sure to check our
website, www.ccvcfl.org,
frequently to stay up to
date with any last-minute
changes. If you don't have
Internet access, call Dan at
352-400-8952.
We will have an up-to-
the-minute recorded an-
nouncement in case he is


Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call Commander Tom Gal-
lagher at 860-1629 for infor-
mation and directions.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2013 will
be at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill.
Dates are: March 9, April 13
and May 11.

SERVICES & GROUPS
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to
veterans in need. Food dona-
tions and volunteers are al-
ways welcomed and needed.
The CCVC is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the
corner of Paul and Independ-
ence, off U.S. 41 north. Hours
of operation are 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. Tuesday and Thursday.
Appointments are encour-
aged by calling 352-400-
8952. CCVC general
meetings are at 10 a.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly at
the DAV building in Inverness.
Members can renew with
Gary Williamson at 352-527-
4537, or at the meeting.


unable to answer
The next bit of news I
want to share is that our
neighbor, the Christ Way
Fellowship church at 972
N. Christy Way, just to the
west of our headquarters,
is beginning its own yard
sale event from 7 a.m. to 1
p.m. the third Saturday
monthly beginning Feb. 23.
Sellers will have spaces
similar to ours in size and
price, with some spots in-
cluding natural shade. It's
definitely worth calling
Pastor Paul or Pastor
Buddy at 352-726-9768 for
more information. It's sure
to be a winner.
So, until next month,
happy yard sale-ing!
[]
Barbara L. Corcoran is
the public information
officer of the Citrus
County Veterans Coalition
Inc. She may be contacted
via Barbiel@ccvcfl.org.
More information about
this group may be found
at wwwccvcfl.org.


Engagement

Hernandez/Glenn

Mr and Mrs. Luis
Hernandez Sr of Inver-
ness have announced the
engagement of their .
daughter, Elizabeth
Carmen Hernandez, to
Christopher Lee Glenn.









100th BIRTHDAY

Walter Schell

Walter Schell of Citrus
Hills will celebrate his
100th birthday Feb. 13,
2013.
He celebrated with
friends and family at an
early birthday party on
Feb. 9..



FOR THE RECORD
0 Divorces and marriages filed in the state of
Florida are a matter of public record, available
from each county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For
Citrus County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or
visit the website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A16.

C L OC K S I ER C H AF F IG R A S S
R E VU EL E D G EMA U R A L RE G A L
A G A TE I M A G EPR IMA AA B A TE
T A T L E V I SK IT DER BIY P I E
ELE NENE SNANP DE O BENT INT
0EM IRATENT I ER DOD
PAWS RKE NEED KS S E D
A LL EN F I E L DIS iP E RMI S I V E
L I A RIBOA R OUT LEAS S N EW
E BB D N READ ASH JI UN E
B A AS A T A -T---
D I S T END C AIN P I E.RS Z E ST Y
N A CE 0C UB AIN Y P EA
CRACKSA L AD TINTT AUIN TE D
LURKIUTE ROSIREAIRIS H EW
ORG G NASH GIG ANOiN TORE
SAU ERK RAUTICHATTYIPER I L
E LE V EIN REE F0 T I L E BO0 N NE T
I 1GO0R SL A PMAR Q U EE
A RAL WED L"UUA-U S LUR TOSS
WAR SNAR LI YEIEARIL ICH I
A Z UREID A UNTB RE A KIAST OR
R O B OT EMCEE AGAVEE PEE V E
D R A W SRAK E NOTED ATED
2-10 @2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


A18 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013


TOGETHER & VETERANS


*










SPORTS


* No. 8
Miami stays
undefeated
in ACC with
blowout of
UNC./B3


0 Recreational sports/B2
0 Baseball, tennis/B2
0 Basketball/B3
0 Sports briefs/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Golf, hockey/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


No. 2 Gators coast 83-58

Florida routs SEC
worst Mississippi St.
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE- No. 2 Florida
played without forward Will Yeguete,
benched starting point guard Scottie
Wilbekin and got an injury scare from
Erik Murphy
It didn't matter against Mississippi
State.
Mike Rosario scored 18 points, Mur-T A T
phy added 17 before leaving with at
sprained ankle and the Gators bounced
back from a humbling loss earlier in the *. 'g,
week to thump the short-handed Bull-
dogs 83-58 on Saturday. -
The game looked every bit like a
matchup of the Southeastern Confer-
ence's best and worst teams.
Then again, it wasn't nearly as lop-
sided as the 35-point beatdown Florida
handed Mississippi State on its home ,
court two weeks ago.
"When we play like that, it's hard to Associated Press
beat us," guard Kenny Boynton said. Florida guard Mike Rosario tries to get past Mississippi State forward Roquez
Casey Prather, playing in place of Johnson on a drive to the basket during the first half Saturday in Gainesville. Rosario
See Page B4 scored 18 points in Florida's 83-58 win over Mississippi State.





Tough sledding


JOE DiCRISTOFALO/For the Chronicle
Citrus High School's Brandon Taylor, right, took on Nature Coast Technical School's Dylan Savory in the 182-pound divi-
sion final of the Region 2A-2 in St Cloud. Lecanto's Jonah Nightengale (195 pounds) took on Lake Gibson's Jason Foster.

Citrus, Lecanto advance three total wrestlers to Class 24 state meet
TONY CASTRO
Correspondent
ST CLOUD Three Citrus County grap-
plers survived this weekend's "Region of
Doom," aka Region 2A-2 wrestling tourna-
ment, to advance to the Class 2A state in
Lakeland on Feb. 15-16.
Thirteen country grapplers entered Class
2As toughest region Friday in Osceola
County, but by Saturday night only three jun-
iors earned state berths: Citrus High School's
Casey Bearden at 170 pounds and Brandon
Taylor at 182, along with Lecanto junior
Jonah Nightengale at 195. .,
For the third straight winter, Spring Hill
Springstead edged Lakeland Lake Gibson for
its third straight regional crown, 196.0-187.5.
The Class 2A two-time defending state
champion Eagles advanced a meet-best nine
grapplers to next weekend's 49th annual
FHSAA Finals at The Lakeland Center
Springstead, Lake Gibson (8 state quali-
See Page B4


Kanawall


takes sixth


at state

Citrus girls lifter
only local athlete to
place in Kissimmee
LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
KISSIMMEE Samantha Kanawall
had just enough cool to do the job.
The Citrus High School sophomore
earned a sixth-place medal in the 199-
pound class at the FHSAA Class 2A
girls state weightlifting meet Saturday
at the Kissimmee Civic Center.
Kanawall had a bench press of 180
pounds and a clean and jerk of 160
pounds for a 340-pound total.
"I feel like this is a big accomplish-
ment for me,"
Kanawall said.
"I definitely
felt a lot of
pressure on
the last lift. It's
hard to explain how
much pressure there is.
"It's (the state meet) is not as differ-
ent (from local meets) as I was expect-
ing. I stuck with what I knew and didn't
let the pressure get to me. I tried to
play it cool."
Citrus had six girls qualify for the
state meet and the coach enjoyed see-
ing her sophomore medal.
"I'm very happy," Citrus coach Tia
See Page B4


CR grapplers

3rd in region

Five Pirates on way
to Class ]A state meet
JOE KORNECKI III
Correspondent
LAKELAND The Crystal River
wrestling team came to the Region 1A-
2 tournament with visions of perform-
ing well and leaving it all on the mat at
Tenoroc High School -
and the Pirates did
just that
Crystal River _,_ )
(119 points) in a ,:
24-team field. \ -
Orlando Lake
Highland Prep F ;,
- the defending
state champion was
crowned regional champion with a
score of 188, and Pasco (135) finished
in second. It was a big improvement
from last year for the Pirates, as they
finished in 16th place and sent two
grapplers to state.
Five wrestlers will represent Crys-
tal River in the Class 1A state tourna-
ment this year, which is tied for
second-most with Pasco and Hudson-
Fivay Lake Highland Prep had the
most with seven.
"We had five guys qualify for state,"
Pirates head coach Craig Frederick
said. "All our guys wrestled well the
whole tournament ... and it's quite an
accomplishment. Three guys lost in
the last match, which was tough, but
we're looking forward to state."
The Crystal River state qualifiers in-
clude: Michael Allen (120), Dylan
Ayala (152), Andrew Bilby (182), Geo
See Page B4


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Adult recreation leagues set to return


Special to the Chronicle

The men's flag football
league is for adults 18 and
older, and is a very fast-
paced, physical game. If
you're up for the chal-
lenge, the league is start-
ing around March 14.
We look forward to in-
creasing the number of
teams we currently have, to
expand competition. To
register, there is a fee of $50
per team. Registration be-


gins on Feb. 25.For more in-
formation, call 352-527-7540
Men's softball
We encourage all to come
out and witness the talent Citrus
County's adult leagues have to
offer! Games are at Bicenten-
nial Park in Crystal River, with
games at 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
and 8:30 p.m. Monday
The tentative start date for
the next season of this sport is
April 1. To register, there is a fee


of $50 per team. Registration
begins on March 4. For more
information, call 352-527-7540
Kickball
Our exciting co-ed kickball
league can be played by peo-
ple from age 18 and up. It's a
great way to meet new peo-
ple and get a little exercise
while having fun.
Game times are at 6:30
p.m., 7:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.
at Bicentennial Park in Crystal


River, lasting one hour or nine
innings, whichever occurs first.
The tentative start date is
April 16. To register, there is
a fee of $50 per team.
Registration begins on
March 1. For more informa-
tion, please call 352-527-7540.
Beach volleyball
Our first-ever beach volley-
ball season was extremely
successful, and not to mention
fun! We had 10 teams of four,


and we are really looking
forward to having even more
next season, which will start
around April 23. Games are
played at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday
at Bicentennial Park in Crystal
River.
The team fees, days and
times are dependent on how
many teams we have sign
up. You don't need to be a
star athlete to play; this
league is geared toward
family fun and exercise.


Registration begins on
March 11 .For more informa-
tion, call 352-527-7540.
Co-ed softball
Co-ed softball is beginning
again on April 11. Games are
played at Bicentennial Park in
Crystal River on Thursdays,
starting at 6:30 p.m.. Registra-
tion begins on March 11, and
there is a $50 fee per team.
For more information, please
call 352-527-7540.


Associated Press
Home clubhouse assistant Tyler Loehr, 23, of Brighton, Mich., moves bags from a cart as the Detroit Tigers
clubhouse staff packs up gear Wednesday at Comerica Park in Detroit, to be shipped to the club's spring training
complex in Lakeland.




Swinging away


Leyland's 50th

year, shifting

players in

springfocus

Associated Press

Before heading to
Florida for his 50th season
in professional baseball,
Jim Leyland thought about
all the deals that were
made since he walked off
the field as the World Se-
ries ended last October
"Toronto probably was
the big boy in the offseason
as far as the moves they
made," the Detroit Tigers
manager said. "That's
going to be just one heck of
a division, obviously
Toronto, they actually were
my sleeper team last year
until they had all those in-
juries to the pitching staff."
From Joker Marchant
Stadium in Lakeland, Fla.,
to HoHoKam Park in
Mesa, Ariz., bats and balls
will be broken out next
week when teams report
for spring training extra
early because of the third
World Baseball Classic.
For an offseason with a
lackluster free-agent mar-
ket, a whole lot of move-
ment took place.
While the Los Angeles
Dodgers and Angels
flashed their cash, putting
Zack Greinke in Dodger
blue and Josh Hamilton in
Orange County red, Toronto
general manager Alex An-
thopoulos flipped players
in the trade market as if
they were baseball cards.
NL Cy Young Award win-
ner R.A. Dickey was ac-
quired from the Mets, and
2011 NL batting champion
Jose Reyes arrived with
pitchers Mark Buehrle and


Josh Johnson from Miami,
which seemed to jettison
virtually every veteran
other than mascot Billy the
Marlin.
"There's pressure to win
for everybody," said man-
ager John Gibbons, back
running the Blue Jays'
dugout for the first time
since 2008. "It's survival of
franchises. They've got to
win sooner or later. That
forces some teams to do
some things if you're going
to keep up."
Players and fans are
looking forward to sun in
Florida and Arizona over
the next 11/2 months, with
the exhibition schedule
starting Feb. 21 when the
Boston Red Sox host
Northeastern University at
Fort Myers, Fla. But the
cloud of drugs remains
over the game. Alex Ro-
driguez, Gio Gonzalez and
others were alleged to have
obtained substances on
baseball's banned list from
a Florida clinic, charges
the players denied.
Who did what will take
months to sort out, per-
haps years. Teams are
more focused on the now.
The Atlanta Braves,
minus retired star Chipper
Jones, were busy this win-
ter bringing in brothers
B.J. and Justin Upton to
play alongside each other
in a stacked outfield.
The Washington Nation-
als, who brought postsea-
son baseball to the nation's
capital last year for the
first time since 1933, look
primed for a run at the
World Series. They re-
signed Adam LaRoche and
added Dan Haren, Denard
Span and Rafael Soriano
to a deep and talented ros-
ter highlighted by young
phenoms Stephen Stras-
burg and Bryce Harper.
At the other end of the


Toronto shortstop Jose Reyes joined the Blue Jays in an
offseason trade from the Miami Marlins.


spectrum, Houston, which
hosts Texas in the March
31 major league opener,
stripped down as it moved
into the American League
and left itself with just five
players on the big league
roster who have three sea-
sons or more in the majors.
With a payroll in the $25
million range less than
Rodriguez alone will earn
- the Astros could become
the first team to get the top
draft pick for three straight
years. They also could be-
come just the second team,
according to STATS, to lose
106 or more games in three
consecutive seasons. The
1962-65 New York Mets are
the other
"I'm optimistic. I think
we're going to have a much
better year than people
think, and I don't think it
has anything to do with pay-
roll," general manager Jeff
Luhnow said. "I think it has
to do with the coaching staff
that we have and the young
players that have a tremen-
dous amount of upside."
Spending doesn't always
work. Exhibit A is the
Miami Marlins.
Moving into their new
ballpark last spring, the
Marlins thought they had a
good chance to win the
World Series for the first
time since 2003. Showtime
even followed the team


around for a reality series,
"The Franchise."
But Miami skidded out
of contention, stars were
traded, the TV show was
cut short an episode early
and manager Ozzie Guillen
was fired after one season.
A payroll that bulked up to
about $97 million last April
was sliced in half, leading
to harsh criticism of owner
Jeffrey Loria.
"It's not a lot of fun,"
Marlins president of base-
ball operations Larry Be-
infest said.
The San Francisco Gi-
ants had the most convivial
offseason after sweeping
Detroit to win their second
World Series title in three
seasons following a 56-year
drought. San Francisco
kept its core together, re-
signing outfielder Angel
Pagan, infielder Marco
Scutaro and left-hander
Jeremy Affeldt for a com-
bined $78 million.
"We're very proud that
our players want to return
and we can embrace
them," Giants President
Larry Baer said. "It's also
comforting that so many
players are returning by
virtue of youth and not for
free agency So, yes, I'm
very appreciative in a
world of lots of movement
in pro sports that we can
essentially stay together."


-- Recreation BRIEFS

Blackshear outing Throw shoes in
slated for Feb. 23 Beverly Hills


Dan Kern, chairman of the
Citrus County Builders Asso-
ciation's Jim Blackshear Me-
morial Golf Outing, recently
announced its annual golf
tournament, on Feb. 23
at the Seven Rivers Golf and
Country Club, will benefit the
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County.
Registration for the event
will begin at 7 a.m. and the
shotgun start is scheduled
for 8 a.m. All teams must
pre-register. The $60 entry
fee includes greens fee, cart,
lunch, door prizes and one
free Mulligan ticket. Signing
up a team for $220 saves $5
per person.
Eagle Buick and Harley-
Davidson, both of Crystal
River, are hole-in-one spon-
sors. Sponsorships for other
components of the event at
all levels are available by
registering online at www.Cit-
rusBuilders.com, or by con-
tacting the Citrus County
Builders Association at 352-
746-9028 or the Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County office
at 352-621-9225.
Sugarmill plans
School-astic event
The Women of Sugarmill
Woods will stage its 17th
snnual School-astic Classic
Golf Tournament Monday,
Feb. 25, at Sugarmill Woods
Country Club.
Entrance fee is $55. All
net proceeds go to scholar-
ships for Citrus County stu-
dents. Registration starts at
7:30 a.m., with shot gun start
at 9 a.m. Fee includes cart
fees, breakfast, snacks,
lunch and a Chinese auction.
For more information, call
352-586-8021.
Scramble to
benefit Special
Olympics
Special Olympics of Florida
- Citrus County will host its
second annual golf scramble
March 2 at Seven Rivers Golf
and Country Club. Shotgun
start is 8:30 a.m.
Registration begins at 7
a.m. Cost is $60 per player
or $240 for a four-person
team. Mulligans are three for
$15, with a maximum of 12
per team.
There will be a putting
contest, 50/50 drawing and
more. Snacks will be avail-
able and lunch will follow the
tournament.
Registration forms must be
turned in by Feb. 26. For
information, call Duane Acha,
events coordinator, at
352-746-3262, ext. 231, or
email duane.dustin@
gmail.com,or Mary Louise
at 352-422-0819.
The scramble will benefit
year-round support for a va-
riety of Special Olympics
sports for children and adults
with intellectual disabilities.


Beverly Hills Horseshoe
Club meets at 8:30 a.m.
each Wednesday. Men,
women and juniors age 10
and older can join.
There are all levels of
play; handicapped method.
Call Ron Fair 352-746-3924,
or email rfair3@
tampabay.rr.com.
SilverSneakers
location at YMCA
Citrus County YMCA is an
official SilverSneakers loca-
tion for their group exercise
program in Homosassa.
SilverSneakers is the
nation's leading exercise
program designed exclu-
sively for older adults and is
available at little or no addi-
tional cost through Medicare
health plans, Medicare
Supplement carriers and
group retiree plans.
Group exercise classes
meet at the First United
Methodist Church in Ho-
mosassa on Mondays,
Wednesday and Fridays.
Classes include cardio inter-
val, Pilates, and stability and
strength. To find out if you
are eligible for SilverSneak-
ers, call your health plan
provider.
For more information,
call the YMCA office at
352-637-0132.
Free yoga class
at Unity Church
Unity Church of Citrus
County, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto, is host site
for a community Divine Yoga
class at 10 a.m. Thursday.
The class is free of
charge and is open to all
ages and physical abilities.
Some of the benefits of
yoga are improved balance,
coordination, strength and
flexibility. Yoga is also help-
ful in counteracting stress
and anxiety.
For more information, call
Sheila Abrahams at
352-270-8019 or email
divineyogas@gmail.com.
YMCA offers
exercise program
The Citrus County YMCA
offers group exercise in Cit-
rus Springs at the Hope
Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 9425 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd.
The location offers classes
in Pilates and cardio circuit
on a regular basis beginning.
The Y currently has three
other areas in the county
where group exercise
classes are offered, including
Homosassa, Inverness and
Crystal River. Financial as-
sistance is available to all
those who qualify. For more
information, call the YMCA
office in Beverly Hills at
352-637-0132, or visit online
at www.ymcasuncoast.org.


American Lepchenko beats Vinci to tie Fed Cup


Associated Press
The United States' Varvara Lepchenko returns the ball to Italy's
Roberta Vinci on Saturday during a Fed Cup first round match at the
105 stadium in Rimini, Italy.


Associated Press

RIMINI, Italy American
Varvara Lepchenko won in her
Fed Cup singles debut to lift the
U.S. team to a 1-1 tie against
Italy on Saturday, after Sara
Errani beat Jamie Hampton
6-2, 6-1.
Lepchenko rallied past
Roberta Vinci 2-6, 6-4, 7-5 after
the Italian struggled with a leg
cramp in the final set, which fea-
tured seven breaks of serve. She
had treatment on her left thigh
and rallied from 5-1 down in the
third to tie it 5-5.
Then Lepchenko broke back
and served out the match.
"I really lost my focus and got
a bit distracted, which happens
a lot to a lot of players," Lep-


chenko said. "I just kept on fight-
ing, said to myself it's not the
end of the match, you can still
win it."
The doubles today will feature
Melanie Oudin and Liezel
Huber against Nastassja Burnett
and Karin Knapp. Lepchenko
will play Errani in reverse
singles.
Lepchenko, who is originally
from Uzbekistan, moved to the
U.S. in 2001 and claimed politi-
cal asylum. She officially be-
came a U.S. citizen in 2011 and
was part of the team at the Lon-
don Olympics.
"I feel amazing to be part of
this team, to have so much spir-
itual support behind me," Lep-
chenko said. "There's this
feeling that I can't let my team


down, so I try even harder, more
than if I was playing for myself.
The team is really important
for me.
"I wasn't that nervous, because
of my experience in the Olympics,
where I was super nervous. I told
myself I wasn't going to let emo-
tions ruin my chances here. I was
a bit stiff at the beginning, but
then I got into it"
The seventh-ranked Errani
needed just over an hour to beat
the 64th-ranked Hampton.
With Serena and Venus
Williams and Sloane Stephens
injured, Hampton and Lep-
chenko made their Fed Cup sin-
gles debuts. Veterans Francesca
Schiavone and Flavia Pennetta,
who have struggled lately, were
left off Italy's squad.


B2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No. 8 Miami slams UNC 87-61


Wisconsin stuns

No. 3 Michigan

in overtime

Associated Press

CORAL GABLES Shane
Larkin had 18 points and a ca-
reer-high nine assists to lead
Miami to its 11th straight win,
87-61, over North Carolina.
The Hurricanes made a
school record-tying 15 3-pointers
as they improved to 11-0 at
home, where each of the past
four wins have been by at least
22 points.
The Hurricanes (19-3, 10-0 At-
lantic Coast Conference) set a
school record for ACC victories
in a season with eight games still
to go. They are the last unbeaten
team in league play among the
major conferences.
Reggie Bullock had 14 points
for North Carolina (16-7, 6-4),
which began the season 18-2
against the Hurricanes and lost
to them for the second time in
four weeks.
Wake Forest 71,
Florida State 46
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. -
Travis McKie scored 15 points to
help Wake Forest beat Florida State
71-46, snapping a four-game losing
streak.
C.J. Harris added 14 for the
Demon Deacons (11-12, 4-7 Atlantic
Coast Conference), who led the en-
tire afternoon on the way to match-
ing their league win total for all of
last season. Wake Forest was in
complete control almost from the tip,
leading by 11 points in the first half
before blowing the game open in a
surprisingly easy finish.
The Demon Deacons dominated
the boards and finished with a 45-25
advantage, which led to a 19-1 edge
in second-chance points and helped
them shoot 49.1 percent (26 of 53).
Michael Snaer and Okaro White
each scored 13 for the Seminoles
(13-10, 5-5).
Villanova 68,
South Florida 40
VILLANOVA, Pa. Darrun
Hilliard scored 17 points to lead Vil-
lanova to a 68-40 victory over cold-
shooting South Florida.
The Wildcats (15-9, 6-5 Big East)
led by as many as 34 points against
the short-handed Bulls (10-13, 1-
10), who were without leading scorer
and rebounder Victor Rudd, who
was out with a groin injury.
JayVaughn Pinkston finished with
10 points for Villanova.
Javontae Hawkins had 11 points
for South Florida, which lost its sixth
straight and 10th in 11 games.
Central Florida 83,
East Carolina 73
ORLANDO Isaiah Sykes
scored 20 points, grabbed a career-
high 16 rebounds and had 11 assists
as Central Florida defeated East
Carolina 83-73.
It was the junior guard's second
triple-double this season. He had 16
points, 11 rebounds and 10 assists
in an 83-66 win over Stetson on
Dec. 20.
The Knights (17-6, 7-2 Confer-
ence USA) led by 16 points early in


Associated Press
Miami's Kenny Kadji rejects a shot by North Carolina forward James Michael McAdoo during the first half
Saturday in Coral Gables.


the second half, but the Pirates, who
beat UCF 88-85 in overtime on Jan.
2, closed the gap to 77-73, with 1:31
remaining.
Spurlock finished with 16 points
and Keith Clanton 14 for UCF. Clan-
ton also had six rebounds, becoming
the Knights' career leader with 948.
Wisconsin 65,
No. 3 Michigan 62, OT
MADISON, Wis. Ben Brust hit
a shot from just inside midcourt to tie
the game at the end of regulation
and added a tie-breaking 3 with less
than 40 seconds left in overtime as
Wisconsin beat No. 3 Michigan
65-62 on Saturday.
Brust scored 14 points for the
Badgers (17-7, 8-3 Big Ten), while
Jared Berggren added 13.
Trey Burke scored 19 points for
Michigan (21-3, 8-3), while Tim
Hardaway Jr. added 18.
Oklahoma 72,
No. 5 Kansas 66
NORMAN, Okla. Romero Osby
scored 17 points, Steven Pledger
added 15 and Oklahoma held off
No. 5 Kansas 72-66 to give the Jay-
hawks their first three-game losing
streak in eight years.
The Sooners (15-7, 6-4 Big 12)
snapped a 10-game losing streak in
the series and took down a top 5 op-
ponent for the first time since beat-


ing No. 4 Texas on Jan. 28, 2006.
Freshman Je'lon Hornbeak went
4 for 6 at the free throw line in the
final minute, just enough to keep the
Jayhawks (19-4, 7-3) at bay.
Cameron Clark hit two free throws to
finish it off, and fans stormed the
court after Buddy Hield came up
with a steal and then dunked as the
final buzzer sounded.
No. 12 Michigan St. 78,
Purdue 65
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. Bran-
den Dawson scored 20 points and
Keith Appling added 17, leading No.
12 Michigan State past Purdue 78-65.
The Spartans (20-4, 9-2 Big Ten)
have won nine of their last 10 games
and will have at least a share of the
league lead regardless of what hap-
pens Sunday when No. 1 Indiana
visits No. 10 Ohio State.
Purdue (12-12, 5-6) was led by
Terone Johnson with 20 points and
Ronnie Johnson with 15, but it
wasn't enough to avoid a fourth loss
in five games or a fifth straight loss
in the series.
No. 13 Kansas St. 79,
Iowa St. 70
MANHATTAN, Kan. Rodney
McGruder scored 22 points and
Angel Rodriguez added 20 as No.
13 Kansas State knocked off Iowa
State 79-70 to take sole possession


of first place in the Big 12.
Korie Lucious led the Cyclones
(16-7, 6-4) with 16 points and re-
serve Tyrus McGee had 15.
The Wildcats (19-4, 8-2) held a
slim 33-32 lead at the break in a
game that remained close most of
the way.
No. 14 Butler 59,
George Washington 56
WASHINGTON Rotnei Clark
scored 14 points and Butler nearly
blew a 17-point lead, going the last
7 1/2 minutes without a field goal
before holding on.
The Colonials cut the lead to one
in the final minute and had several
3-point looks in the final 10 seconds
that could have sent the game into
overtime. Joe McDonald had the
final chance, but he was stripped as
he went up for the shot just before
time expired.
Roosevelt Jones had 12 points for
the Bulldogs (20-4, 7-2 Atlantic 10),
who broke a two-game road losing
streak.
Isaiah Armwood had 14 points
and 11 rebounds for George Wash-
ington (11-11, 5-4).
No. 23 Pittsburgh 62,
No. 17 Cincinnati 52
CINCINNATI Tray Woodall
scored 14 points and led a late
surge that sent No. 23 Pittsburgh to


a 62-52 victory over No. 17 Cincin-
nati, keeping the momentum going
for one of the Big East's hottest
teams.
The Panthers (20-5, 8-4) have
won seven of their last eight games
overall and four of their past five on
the road. They beat No. 6 Syracuse
65-55 a week ago, vaulting them
into the Top 25.
Woodall hit a pair of free throws
and a 3-pointer during a 7-0 run that
put Pitt ahead to stay with 3:21 left.
The conference's stingiest defense
held Cincinnati (18-6, 6-5) without a
field goal over the final 9:21, allow-
ing seven free throws.
Sean Kilpatrick led Cincinnati with
16 points, but had only one free
throw in the second half. Kilpatrick
came into the game averaging 18.3
points, third-best in the Big East.
No. 19 Oregon 73,
Utah 64
EUGENE, Ore. E.J. Singler
had 21 points and No. 19 Oregon
overcame a poor start to end its
three-game losing streak with a
73-64 victory over Utah.
Damyean Dotson added 16 points
for the Ducks (19-5, 8-3 Pac-12),
who had been on a slide after open-
ing conference play with seven
straight victories.
Oregon trailed 30-22 after the first
half but pulled in front midway
through the second and extended its
lead to 53-45 on Carlos Emory's tip-
in with 6:32 left. The Ducks led by as
many as 13 points down the stretch.
Jason Washburn had 20 points
and seven rebounds for the Utes
(10-13, 2-9).
No. 20 Georgetown 69,
Rutgers 63
PISCATAWAY, N.J. Markel
Starks scored 20 points and Otto
Porter took over down the stretch for
Georgetown.
Porter had 15 of his 19 points in
the second half and grabbed 14 re-
bounds for the Hoyas (17-4, 7-3 Big
East), who have won five straight
and seven of their last eight.
Eli Carter had 23 points for the
Scarlet Knights (12-10, 3-8).
No. 21 Missouri 98,
Mississippi 79
COLUMBIA, Mo. -Alex Oriakhi
had a career-high 22 points to go
with 18 rebounds, three blocks and
a central role in a second-half fracas
for Missouri.
Phil Pressey had four assists to
break Anthony Peeler's career
school record and had 22 points for
Missouri (17-6, 6-4 Southeastern
Conference), which bounced back
nicely from its latest discouraging
road loss, a 1-point setback at Texas
A&M on Thursday. The Tigers are
14-0 at home and 0-5 on the road.
Marshall Henderson had 16 points
on 4-for-15 shooting for Mississippi
(18-5, 7-3).
No. 22 Oklahoma St. 72,
Texas 59
AUSTIN, Texas Marcus Smart
scored 23 points and Oklahoma
State got its fifth straight win.
Markel Brown added 17 points for
the Cowboys (17-5, 7-3 Big 12), who
sputtered offensively for long
stretches but used their own tough
defense to clamp down on the Long-
horns. The Cowboys shot 38 per-
cent from the field.


Nuggets run by Cavs


Philadelphia

deals Charlotte

7th loss in a row

Associated Press

CLEVELAND Danilo Galli-
nari scored 19 points, Kenneth
Faried added 17 and the Denver
Nuggets won their ninth straight
game with a 111-103 victory over
the Cleveland Cavaliers on
Saturday night
The Nuggets, who have won 15
of 17, are on their longest win-
ning streak since posting 10
straight victories from March
30-April 15, 2005.
Kyrie Irving led Cleveland
with 26 points, but was plagued
by foul trouble. The All-Star
guard picked up his fourth foul
with 5:20 remaining in the third
quarter and went to the bench
with the Nuggets leading 72-61.
Irving returned to start the
fourth quarter with Denver
ahead 84-73. He scored 12 points
in the period, but Cleveland's
rally fell short.
The loss ended Cleveland's
three-game winning streak that
matched a season high. The
Cavaliers haven't won four
games in a row since March 17-


Associated Press
Cleveland Cavaliers point guard Kyrie Irving drives the lane on the
Denver Nuggets' Andre Iguodala during the fourth quarter Saturday in
Cleveland. The Nuggets won 111-103.


24, 2010, which was LeBron
James' final campaign with the
franchise.
76ers 87, Bobcats 76
PHILADELPHIA- LavoyAllen
had 14 points and a career-high 22
rebounds, and Jrue Holiday scored
20 points to lead the Philadelphia
76ers to an 87-76 win over the Char-
lotte Bobcats.
Evan Turner had 16 points and
10 rebounds, and Jeremy Pargo
scored 12 points in his Sixers


debut. Pargo signed a 10-day con-
tract this week after he was waived
by Cleveland.
The Sixers improved to 5-2 on
their eight-game homestand that
ends Monday against the Los Ange-
les Clippers. The solid showing at
home has helped the Sixers inch
closer to the eighth seed in the East-
ern Conference.
Ramon Sessions scored 20 points,
Byron Mullens had 16 and Gerald
Henderson 13 as the NBA-worst
Bobcats lost their seventh straight.


No. 1 Baylor rolls


over rival Texas

Associated Press 49 on Saturday for the Fighting
Irish's 17th straight victory.
AUSTIN, Texas Odyssey Notre Dame (22-1, 10-0 Big
Sims scored 18 points and East) trailed 2-0 before scoring
Brittney Griner sparked No. 1 17 of the next 19 points.
Baylor's game-clinching sec- Achonwa had seven points dur-
ond-half run with her 13th ca- ing the run, including back-to-
reer dunk, leading the Lady back layups.
Bears to an easy 75-48 win
over Texas to an Saturday night Seton Hall trailed by 14 before
Griner's dunk was the lone going on a 13-4 spurt to close to
highlight for the 6-foot-8 All- 33-28 on Tabatha Richardson-
American forward, who other- Smith's 3-pointer with 2:29 left in
wise had a mostly forgettable the first half. The Irish led 35-28
game. Griner had just two at the break.
points in the first half and did- The Pirates (8-15, 3-7) got
n't have a rebound until mid- within eight in the second half be-
way through the second half. fore Notre Dame put the game
Griner finished with 14 away with a 12-2 run keyed by
points and three rebounds. Braker.
Jordan Madden scored 11
points for Baylor (22-1, 12-0 No. 11 Louisville 78,
Big 12). Pittsburgh 45
Freshman Imani McGee- PISburg h
Stafford had 13 points and 18 LOUISVILLE, Ky. Shoni
rebounds to lead Texas (9-13, Schimmel led five players in dou-
2-9). ble figures with 22 points and re-
No. 2 Notre Dame 69, serve Megan Deines added 17 to
help Louisville rout Pittsburgh for
Seton Hall 49 its sixth straight win.
SOUTH ORANGE, N.J. Deines made 7 of 11 shots in
Ariel Braker matched her career just 22 minutes, Bria Smith had
high with 15 points and Natalie 11 points, and Antonita Slaughter
Achonwa added 11 points and and Sara Hammond chipped in
nine rebounds to help No. 2 10 apiece for the Cardinals
Notre Dame beat Seton Hall 69- (20-4, 8-2 Big East).


SPORTS


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 B3






B4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013



Men's college
basketball scores
EAST
American U. 70, Colgate 55
Boston U. 79, Binghamton 58
Bucknell 60, Army 58
Buffalo 59, N. Illinois 54
Butler 59, George Washington 56
Georgetown 69, Rutgers 63
lona 78, Rider 71
La Salle 89, Fordham 53
Lafayette 70, Navy 47
Lehigh 68, Holy Cross 61
Maine 66, Albany (NY) 52
Mount St. Mary's 69, St. Francis (Pa.) 58
Penn 71, Brown 48
Robert Morris 83, Wagner 79, OT
St. Bonaventure 67, Rhode Island 61
UMass 80, Saint Joseph's 62
Vermont 67, UMBC 55
Villanova 68, South Florida 40
Xavier 73, Duquesne 65
Yale 69, Princeton 65
SOUTH
Alabama 60, LSU 57
Alabama St. 69, Alabama A&M 62
Arkansas St. 67, W. Kentucky 49
Belmont 78, Austin Peay 65
Charleston Southern 86, Campbell 68
Coll. of Charleston 71, Chattanooga 68
Davidson 87, Appalachian St. 52
Delaware 79, George Mason 72
E. Kentucky 68, Morehead St. 47
ETSU 62, Stetson 61
Elon 64, Furman 60
Florida 83, Mississippi St. 58
Florida Gulf Coast 74, SC-Upstate 49
Gardner-Webb 71, Liberty 68
Georgia 52, Texas A&M 46
Georgia Tech 64, Virginia Tech 54
High Point 74, Coastal Carolina 62
Hofstra 65, UNC Wilmington 56
Houston Baptist 75, New Orleans 68, OT
Howard 63, Md.-Eastern Shore 44
Kennesaw St. 75, Jacksonville 68
Kentucky 72, Auburn 62
Longwood 62, Winthrop 56
Louisiana Tech 84, Texas St. 69
MVSU 80, Alcorn St. 75
Memphis 89, Southern Miss. 76
Mercer 64, North Florida 44
Miami 87, North Carolina 61
Middle Tennessee 93, Troy 41
Morgan St. 80, Coppin St. 51
Murray St. 69, Tennessee St. 48
NC A&T 65, Bethune-Cookman 55
NC Central 51, Florida A&M 43
Norfolk St. 74, Delaware St. 56
Northeastern 79, Old Dominion 74, OT
Northwestern St. 93, Cent. Arkansas 73
Prairie View 63, Grambling St. 53
Radford 76, Presbyterian 65
SE Louisiana 73, Nicholls St. 62
Saint Louis 56, Richmond 46
Samford 79, The Citadel 67
Savannah St. 50, SC State 46
South Alabama 72, FAU 71
Tennessee Tech 78, Jacksonville St. 64
Texas Southern 61, Jackson St. 54
Towson 90, Georgia St. 82, OT
UAB 75, Marshall 61
UCF 83, East Carolina 73
UT-Martin 77, SIU-Edwardsville 68
VCU 68, Charlotte 61
Vanderbilt 67, Arkansas 49
W. Carolina 71, Georgia Southern 62
Wake Forest 71, Florida St. 46
Wofford 59, UNC Greensboro 50
MIDWEST
Akron 54, Miami (Ohio) 50
Ball St. 65, W. Michigan 62
Green Bay 68, Detroit 59
Indiana St. 66, S. Illinois 65
Iowa 71, Northwestern 57
Kansas St. 79, Iowa St. 70
Kent St. 87, Cent. Michigan 72
Marquette 89, DePaul 78
Michigan St. 78, Purdue 65
Missouri 98, Mississippi 79
N. Dakota St. 58, IPFW 54
NJIT 63, Chicago St. 58
Nebraska-Omaha 85, IUPUI 78
Oakland 88, S. Dakota St. 83
Ohio 72, Bowling Green 63
Pittsburgh 62, Cincinnati 52
SE Missouri 77, E. Illinois 64
Temple 72, Dayton 71
Toledo 60, E. Michigan 52
UMKC 80, South Dakota 65
Valparaiso 80, Cleveland St. 72
Wichita St. 79, Missouri St. 50
Wisconsin 65, Michigan 62, OT
Wright St. 64, Milwaukee 49
SOUTHWEST
Ark.-Pine Bluff 55, Southern U. 52
Baylor 75, Texas Tech 48
North Texas 77, FlU 67
Oklahoma 72, Kansas 66
Oklahoma St. 72, Texas 59
SMU 61, Rice 39
Sam Houston St. 78, Lamar 40
Stephen F Austin 77, Oral Roberts 67
Texas A&M-CC 61, McNeese St. 58
Texas-Arlington 68, UTSA 63
Tulane 88, Houston 85
West Virginia 63, TCU 50
FAR WEST
Boise St. 68, Wyoming 61
Denver 74, Idaho 58
E. Washington 77, N. Arizona 74, OT
Gonzaga 74, Loyola Marymount 55
Montana 78, North Dakota 58
N. Colorado 85, Montana St. 72
Nevada 74, Air Force 69
Oregon 73, Utah 64
Pepperdine 72, Portland 68, OT
San Diego St. 75, Fresno St. 53
Stanford 62, Arizona St. 59
Utah Valley 66, Texas-Pan American 49
Weber St. 75, S. Utah 58
NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 32 16 .667 -
Brooklyn 29 21 .580 4
Boston 26 23 .531 612
Philadelphia 22 27 .449 1012
Toronto 18 32 .360 15
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 33 14 .702 -
Atlanta 27 22 .551 7
Washington 14 35 .286 20
Orlando 14 36 .280 2012
Charlotte 11 39 .220 2312
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 31 20 .608 -
Chicago 30 20 .600 12
Milwaukee 25 24 .510 5
Detroit 20 32 .385 1112


Cleveland 16 35 .314 15
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 39 12 .765 -
Memphis 31 18 .633 7
Houston 28 24 .538 111Y2
Dallas 22 28 .440 1612
New Orleans 17 33 .340 2112
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 38 12 .760 -
Denver 33 18 .647 512
Utah 28 23 .549 1012
Portland 25 25 .500 13
Minnesota 18 29 .383 1812
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 35 17 .673 -
Golden State 30 21 .588 412
L.A. Lakers 24 27 .471 10Y2
Sacramento 17 33 .340 17
Phoenix 17 34 .333 17Y2
Friday's Games
L.A. Lakers 100, Charlotte 93


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fo r^^ 'Ithe -recod ft rs.f-


Sports BRIEFS


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TODAY'S SPORTS
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (CBS) Indiana at Ohio State
1 p.m. (44 CW) North Carolina State at Clemson
1 p.m. (SUN) Tennessee at South Carolina
3 p.m. (ESPN) St. John's at Syracuse
10 p.m. (FSNFL) Washington at USC
NBA
1 p.m. (ABC) Los Angeles Clippers at New York Knicks
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Los Angeles Lakers at Miami Heat
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Portland Trail Blazers at Orlando Magic
8 p.m. (ESPN) San Antonio Spurs at Brooklyn Nets
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Houston at Rice
2 p.m. (MNT) Mississippi State at Missouri
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Michigan State at Penn State
3 p.m. (FSNFL) Tulane at Tulsa
3 p.m. (SUN) Florida at Auburn
4 p.m. (ESPN2) Kentucky at Vanderbilt
BOYS HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL
6 p.m. (ESPN2) Chester (Pa.) at Neumann-Goretti (Pa.)
BOWLING
1 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Tour League Qualifier Round 2 (Taped)
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Joburg Open, Final
Round (Taped)
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: AT&T Pebble Beach National
Pro-Am, Final Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour: AT&T Pebble Beach National
Pro-Am, Final Round
7 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Allianz Championship,
Final Round (Taped)
HOCKEY
12:30 p.m. (NBC) Los Angeles Kings at Detroit Red Wings
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) New Jersey Devils at Pittsburgh Penguins
7:30 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Lightning at New York Rangers
RUGBY
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) Sevens World Series: Las Vegas
4 p.m. (NBC) USA Sevens
WINTER SPORTS
1 p.m. (ESPN2) Snowboarding Air and Style: Innsbruck (Taped)
3 p.m. (NBC) FIS Alpine Skiing World Championships (Taped)
5 p.m. (NBCSPT) Luge Lake Placid World Cup: Women's
Event (Taped)
6 p.m. (NBCSPT) Biathlon World Championship: Men's
Pursuit (Same-day Tape)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Toronto 100, Indiana 98, OT
Washington 89, Brooklyn 74
New Orleans 111, Atlanta 100
Cleveland 119, Orlando 108
Detroit 119, San Antonio 109
Houston 118, Portland 103
Memphis 99, Golden State 93
New York 100, Minnesota 94
Oklahoma City 127, Phoenix 96
Miami 111, L.A. Clippers 89
Chicago 93, Utah 89
Saturday's Games
Denver 111, Cleveland 103
Philadelphia 87, Charlotte 76
Dallas 116, Golden State 91
Detroit 105, Milwaukee 100
Utah at Sacramento, late
Today's Games
L.A. Clippers at New York, 1 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Miami, 3:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Memphis, 6 p.m.
Denver at Boston, 6 p.m.
New Orleans at Toronto, 6 p.m.
Portland at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Brooklyn, 8 p.m.
Houston at Sacramento, 9 p.m.
Monday's Games
Minnesota at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Boston at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Brooklyn at Indiana, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Washington at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Atlanta at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
New Jersey 11 7 1 3 17 30
Pittsburgh 12 8 4 0 16 40
Philadelphia 12 5 6 1 11 29
N.Y. Rangers 10 5 5 0 10 24
N.Y. Islanders 11 4 6 1 9 32
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
Boston 9 7 1 1 15 26
Ottawa 12 6 4 2 14 31
Toronto 12 7 5 0 14 34
Montreal 11 6 4 1 13 31
Buffalo 12 5 6 1 11 38
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
Tampa Bay 10 6 4 0 12 42
Carolina 10 5 4 1 11 28
Winnipeg 11 5 5 1 11 30
Florida 11 4 6 1 9 25
Washington 12 3 8 1 7 30
WESTERN CONFERENCE


Chicago
Nashville
Detroit
St. Louis
Columbus

Vancouver
Edmonton
Minnesota
Calgary
Colorado


Central Division
GP W L OT PtsGF
11 9 0 2 20 39
11 5 2 4 14 24
11 6 4 1 13 30
11 6 4 1 13 38
11 3 6 2 8 23
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
10 6 2 2 14 28
11 4 4 3 11 25
11 5 5 1 11 24
8 3 3 2 8 24
10 4 6 0 8 21


Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 11 8 2 1 17 39 31
San Jose 11 7 2 2 16 34 22
Dallas 12 6 5 1 13 26 28
Phoenix 12 5 5 2 12 32 33
Los Angeles 9 3 4 2 8 20 28
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Friday's Games
Dallas 3, Anaheim 1
Saturday's Games
Phoenix 1, San Jose 0, SO
Anaheim 6, St. Louis 5, SO
New Jersey 3, Pittsburgh 1
Philadelphia 4, Carolina 3, OT
Detroit 2, Edmonton 1
Winnipeg 1, Ottawa 0
Buffalo 3, N.Y. Islanders 2
Washington 5, Florida 0
Toronto 6, Montreal 0
Minnesota 2, Nashville 1, OT
Tampa Bay at Boston, ppd., snow
Calgary at Vancouver, late
Today's Games
Los Angeles at Detroit, 12:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Columbus, 6 p.m.
Boston at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Philadelphia at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Carolina at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Minnesota at Calgary, 9p.m.


BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX-Agreed to terms with
RHP Anthony Carter, INF Jonathan Diaz,
INF-OF Mark Hamilton, INF Lyle Overbay
and OF Ryan Sweeney to minor league
contracts.
CLEVELAND INDIANS-Named Steve Lu-
bratich director of pro scouting and Dave Miller,
Michael Calitri and Bryan Corey pro scouts.
Promoted Victor Wang to assistant director of
pro scouting and Trey Hendricks to pro scout.
Named Bo Hughes a national crosschecker
and Carlos Muniz and John Heuerman area
scouts. Promoted Scott Barnsby to a national
crosschecker, Paul Cogan to scouting advi-
sor/crosschecker and Jason Smith to west
coast srosschecker. Promoted Jason Lynn to
assistant director, international scouting, Anto-
nio Caballero to Venezuelan scouting supervi-
sor and Allen Lin to Pacific Rim scouting
supervisor. Named Clinton Matsuzawa area
scout in Japan, Luis Camacho and Rafael
Cariel area scouts in Venezuela, Arnold Elles
area scout in Colombia and Daniel Kim area
scout in South Korea.
National League
CINCINNATI REDS-Agreed to terms with
RHP Armando Galarraga on a minor league
contract.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NEW ORLEANS SAINTS-Named Rob
Ryan defensive coordinator and Stan Kwan as-
sistant special teams coach.


The Crystal River baseball team de-
feated Springstead 4-3 on Thursday be-
fore routing Lecanto 14-2 on Friday at the
Dunnellon preseason tournament.
On Thursday, Pirates sophomore Derrick
Rogers pitched four strong innings to pick
up the victory, which coach Bobby Stack
said his team controlled from the start.



GATORS
Continued from Page B1

Yeguete, chipped in 12 points and
five rebounds. Yeguete had arthro-
scopic surgery Friday to remove
loose bodies in his right knee and
will miss at least the rest of the regu-
lar season.
The Gators (19-3, 9-1 SEC) went 4-5
without him last season, but handled
his absence much better against the
Bulldogs.
"Obviously, he's a big piece of our
team that we lost," said Michael Fra-
zier II, who finished with 11 points
and six rebounds in his first career
start. "But we've got to play together,
play hard and try to make up for what
he brought to the team."
Mississippi State (7-15, 2-8) played
without guard Jalen Steele, who did-
n't make the trip after being sus-
pended indefinitely for violating
team rules.
It was a big blow for a team already
down three players.



STATE
Continued from Page B1

Nelson said. "Hannah (Evans) proba-
bly could have had a sixth if she had a
good day It happens. She (Kanawall)
actually went up 10 pounds from sec-
tionals. She was calm and cool and
that's what really helped her She did-
n't overthink things and she is a soph-
omore. She's going to continue on and
bring that positive attitude. To make it
into the top 10 is good."
Citrus had one point and finished in
a three-way tie for 29th out of 32
teams. Navarre High won the state
title with 24 points. Spruce Creek was
second with 23 points.
Citrus's Hannah Evans had a 300-
pound total with a 160-pound bench
press and a 140-pound clean and jerk.
She was competing in the 154-pound
class and is a junior.
Another 'Cane, Leslie Mena, had a
185-pound bench and a 125-pound



CR
Continued from Page B1

Valdares (220) and Brandon Martin
(285). The top four in each of the 14
respective weight classes go to state.
Crystal River had four advance to
the consolation final: Allen (29-7) fin-
ished in the third by defeating Frost-
proof's Domonick Paterson (44-13) by
decision in the consolation semifinal,
and he defeated Duke Padilla of
Weeki Wachee by a 13-8 score in the
consolation final.
"I'm so excited to go to state," Allen
said. "It's the best feeling in the world
... I had to beat the kid that beat me at
districts."
Bilby (24-12) was victorious over
Kim Mack of Port Orange Atlantic (de-
cision) in the semifinals, but fell via



TOUGH
Continued from Page B1

qualifiers) and Auburndale (3 state
qualifiers) all crowned a meet-high
three regional champions.
Citrus finished 11th in the 28-team
IBT (individually bracketed tourna-
ment) with 58.5 points while Lecanto
placed 20th with 30 points.
CHS's eight-member crew went 14-
14, registering eight pins.
Taylor was one of two Citrus
County grappler to reach any of the
14 individual tourney finals.
On Friday, Taylor stuffed
Dunedin's Michael Dunlap (3:11) and
Harmony's Chase Lord with his sec-
ond pin fall to reach the semifinals.
On Saturday, Taylor nipped Se-
bring's Ty Johnson 5-4 to reach the fi-
nals.
But in a rematch of last week's Dis-
trict 2A-7 tournament at Spring Hill,
Nature Coast's Dyland Savoury stuck
Taylor in 4:31. The week before,
Savoury had edged Taylor at the
wire, 14-13.
Taylor will enter his first state
tournament at 32-15.
Bearden actually etched the most
victories (four) in Osceola County


Like Taylor, Bearden impressed
early with a pair of pin falls against
River Ridge's Jordan Harris (0:50)
and Edgewater's Trenton Erisman
(1:59).
In Saturday's semifinals, Bearden
lost via injury default to eventual
champion, senior Dorian Spradlin of
Lake Gibson.
From the lethal loser's bracket,
Bearden eliminated Lecanto's
De'Andre Horton by a convincing 20-
5 technical fall.
In the consolation finals for third,


Senior Michael Kidd hit a home run,
Crystal River's first of the season, during
the five-inning victory over Lecanto.
Kameron Pennington got the start and
the triumph for the Pirates on the mound;
at one point, Crystal River had four fresh-
men on the field.
The Pirates open the regular season at
6:30 p.m. Tuesday at home against
Lecanto.
From staff reports

Freshmen Andre Applewhite and
Jacoby Davis are out for the season
with knee injuries, and senior Wen-
dell Lewis is sidelined with a frac-
tured right patella.
So the Bulldogs came to
Gainesville with six scholarship play-
ers and two walk-ons, not exactly the
ideal roster to upset the league's
highest-ranked team.
The scoreboard proved it.
Gavin Ware led the Bulldogs, who
have lost eight in a row, with 16
points. Colin Borchert added 14 and
Trivante Bloodman had 10.
"It's really hard to take a loss,"
Borchert said. "We fought hard and
we are a no-excuse team."
Florida took a double-digit lead
midway through the first half. Frazier
had a lot to do with it, hitting his first
three 3-pointers.
The Gators made it 36-18 on Mur-
phy's baseline hook shot with 4:27 re-
maining before halftime. Murphy
finished 7-of-10 shooting, including 3
of 5 from 3-point range. It was a stark
contrast to his last game, a 2-for-7
performance against Arkansas on
Tuesday night.


clean and jerk for a 310-pound total in
the 183-pound class.
Citrus's Virginia Venero totaled 300
pounds, also in the 183-pound class.
The 'Canes' Ashley Nichols was
13th in the 119-pound class. She had a
bench press of 140 pounds. She had a
clean and jerk of 115 pounds for a 255-
pound total.
Citrus's Aaron McIntyre was 13th in
the 129-pound class. She had a 130-
pound bench and a 155-pound clean
and jerk to total 285 pounds.
Crystal River's Madison Farrior
had a 275-pound total in the 154-
pound class. She had a bench of 130
pounds and a clean and jerk of 145
pounds.
Pirate lifter Emily Laga was 19th in
the 110-pound class. She had a bench
press of 115 pounds, a clean and jerk
of 115 pounds and a 230-pound total.
Dunnellon's Nastasia Johnson fin-
ished ninth in the 139-pound class.
She had a 145-pound bench press and
a clean and jerk of 150 for a 295-pound
total.


fall to Space Coast's Matt Lorenzi
(42-7) in the final.
Valdares (15-8) defeated Ivan
Pacheco (Rockledge) by fall to ad-
vance, but was defeated in the final by
Lake Highland Prep's Carter Shipley
(40-7).
Martin (20-8) had a rematch with
Pasco's Josh Burt (20-10) and defeated
him by fall just as he did a week ago
in the district tournament
Ayala (34-4 overall) was the lone Pi-
rate to compete in a championship
match, but he was beaten by Lake
Highland Prep's Jake Spengler (50-2)
by tech fall. Ayala won his first three
matches, including a win via fall over
Trace Woxberg (Rockledge) in the
championship semifinal.
"Our team did great," Ayala said. "I
lost to the No. 1 in the state... I'll have
to work extra hard and hopefully beat
him at state."


Bearden smothered another tough
customer Land 0' Lakes senior
Bobby Austin -via an 11-2 major de-
cision.
Bearden had mixed feelings with
garnering third place.
"Yes and no," said the 16-year-old
Bearden, who climbed to 35-9 over-
all. "By finishing third, I set myself
up better at states. I thought I left
some points out there.
"From here on out I've got to work
on finishing my shots," Bearden
lamented.
On going to states for the first time,
"Out of 10, I'd give it an 11," Bearden
said. "I'm going there to win. My
toughest guy this weekend was
Spradlin. He wrestled non-stop. I'll
see what I can do next time."
Lecanto's five-man regional squad
went 8-9 overall led by Nightengale's
outstanding 3-1 run.
Nightengale opened with a pair of
clutch decisions on Friday over
Kathleen's Del Baldwin, 9-3, and
Edgewater's Peterson Joseph, 9-4.
In Saturday's semifinals, Nighten-
gale solved Zephyrhills' Josh Shaffer
in match repeatedly halted by the
Bulldogs' dripping bloody nose, 6-2.
In the finals, Lake Gibson senior


Jason Foster (34-8) topped Nighten-
gale (19-8), 5-3.
Nightengale refused to allow his
second-place finish to dominate the
post-meet discussion.
"Going to states tastes pretty
good," smiled the 18-year-old Night-
engale. "I've worked really hard for
this.
"I learned never to give up. You
have to finish moves in the third pe-
riod," Nightengale said. "If you do
that, you're going to win a bunch of
matches. I really enjoyed beating the
Zephyrhills kid this time; I whipped
him. Last time we met, he beat me."


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


In position for the victory
In position for the victory


Snedeker, Hahn

tied for the lead

at Pebble

Associated Press

PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. -At
least this time, Brandt Snedeker
feels it's a fair fight.
He started the final round at
Torrey Pines seven shots behind
Tiger Woods. A week later in the
Phoenix Open, he went into the
final round six shots behind Phil
Mickelson.
Snedeker, the hottest player in
golf this year without a win to
show for it, put matters into his
own hands Saturday by running
off four straight birdies along the
prettiest part of Pebble Beach for
a 4-under 68 that gave him a
share of the lead with 31-year-old
rookie James Hahn in the Pebble
Beach National Pro-Am.
"You never know what tomor-
row holds, but I feel like I'm in
great position, and I'm going to
be surely more prepared, no
matter who is around me in the
last group," said Snedeker, who
posted his ninth straight round
in the 60s. "I'm probably going to
have the most experience of any-
body in those last couple groups
of winning a golf tournament."
That won't make Sunday any
easier.
Snedeker made a detour to the
CBS Sports booth after his round,
and then headed straight to the
practice green. He was irritated
by missing four birdie putts in-
side 10 feet, including on the last
two holes that cost him some
room for error on the final day
Hahn birdied his last three
holes for a 66 at Spyglass Hill,
putting him in the final group for
the first time. They were at 12-
under 202, one shot ahead of
Chris Kirk, who had a 64 on the
super-fast greens of Monterey


Associated Press
Brandt Snedeker follows his drive from the second tee of the Pebble Beach Golf Links on Saturday during
the third round of the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am golf tournament in Pebble Beach, Calif.


Peninsula.
Mickelson tumbled down the
rocks and down the leaderboard
on the final hole at Pebble Beach.
The defending champion hit a
tee shot on the par-5 18th that ran
over the cliff and down toward
the beach. Mickelson went down
to see if the ball could be found -
and possibly played when his
right foot gave way and he
handed hard on his back side,
bracing for the fall with his hands.
For all the celebrity antics that
are part of the show Saturday at
Pebble, this is the one video that
might go viral.
"I got lucky," Mickelson said. "I
didn't get hurt."
Not physically, anyway Mick-
elson hit his next shot into the
Pacific Ocean and had to scram-
ble for a triple bogey, leaving him


11 shots behind and ending his
hopes of a record-tying fifth win
at Pebble Beach.
All the attention now shifts to
Snedeker, who has shot in the 60s
in 15 out of his 18 rounds this year
Mickelson had a good look at
Snedeker last week in Phoenix
when he finally put him away
with late birdies on the back nine.
"He's been playing great golf
these last couple of weeks ... and
it looks like this could be his
week," Mickelson said. "But
final round at Pebble Beach, a
lot of things happen and he has
to play one more good round. I
know he has it in him, but he still
has to go do it."
Mediate leads Allianz
Champ. by three shots
BOCA RATON Rocco Mediate


shot an 11-under 61 on Saturday,
setting a course record and building
a three-shot lead over Tom Pernice
Jr. heading into the final round of the
Allianz Championship.
Mediate is trying to become the
16th player to win his first start on the
Champions Tour. He won six times
on the PGA Tour and is probably best
remembered for losing a playoff to
Tiger Woods in the 2008 U.S. Open.
Mediate had five consecutive
birdies on the front nine, highlighted
by a drive to the green at the par-4
seventh hole. He added three more
birdies after the turn and closed with
a birdie at the 17th and a 10-foot
eagle at the 18th. It was the lowest
round of Mediate's career, one better
than his 62 at Colonial in 2001, and it
snapped the tournament record of 63
set by Craig Stadler in 2007.


Lightning snowed out


Devils cast aside

Penguins 3-1

Associated Press

BOSTON The game be-
tween the Tampa Bay Lightning
and the host Bruins was post-
poned because of the blizzard
that dumped more than 2 feet of
snow on the Boston area.
No makeup date had been
scheduled yet. Originally sched-
uled for 1 p.m., the game was
pushed back until 7 p.m. to allow
the storm to pass. But public
transportation was not expected
to resume on Saturday, and roads
were still being cleared.
Devils 3, Penguins 1
NEWARK, N.J. -Adam Henrique
and Bobby Butler scored power-play
goals 2:12 apart in the third period,
and the New Jersey Devils extended
their winning streak to four games
with a 3-1 victory over Pittsburgh on
Saturday that snapped the Penguins'
five-game winning streak.
Ilya Kovalchuk assisted on the late
goals, and defenseman Andy
Greene had two assists, including
the primary one on rookie Stefan
Matteau's first NHL goal.
Martin Brodeur made 24 saves
and provided a little humor by chas-
ing his stick late in the second period
of his 1,200th career game. He be-
came the first NHL goalie to reach
the milestone.
Penguins captain Sidney Crosby
had a six-game point streak
snapped, his longest since a career-
high, 25-game run in 2010.
Brandon Sutter scored early for
the Penguins, who gave the Devils
10 power-play chances. The teams
will play again Sunday in Pittsburgh.
Flyers 4,
Hurricanes 3, OT
PHILADELPHIA- Danny Briere
scored 1:47 into overtime to lift
Philadelphia over Carolina.
Jakub Voracek, Matt Read and
Brayden Schenn also scored for
Philadelphia, which went 3-0-1 on a
four-game homestand.
Joe Corvo scored the tying goal
in the third period, and Jiri Tlusty
and Jeff Skinner also had goals for
the Hurricanes, who had won two in
a row.
The Flyers have gone 24-4-4
against the Hurricanes since Nov.
28, 2003. Philadelphia is 5-6-1 at the
quarter point of the lockout-short-
ened 48-game schedule. Carolina
fell to 5-4-1.
Ilya Bryzgalov made 30 saves in
the victory and earned his third assist
of the season.


Associated Press
New Jersey Devils goaltender Martin Brodeur makes a save as the Pittsburgh Penguins' Zach Boychuk
skates in while looking for a rebound during the first period Saturday in Newark, N.J. The Devils won 3-1.


Red Wings 2, Oilers 1
DETROIT Niklas Kronwall's
third-period goal broke a tie, and
Pavel Datsyuk had a goal and an as-
sist in Detroit's narrow win over Ed-
monton.
Henrik Zetterberg had two assists,
and Jimmy Howard made 23 saves
for Detroit (6-4-1).
Rookie defenseman Justin Schultz
scored the lone goal for Edmonton
(4-4-3), and 40-year-old Nikolai
Khabibulin stopped 28 shots in his
first game of the season
The Red Wings killed off a two-
man disadvantage that lasted 1:07
early in the third period.
Jets 1, Senators 0
OTTAWA-Al Montoya made 33
saves, and Alex Ponikarovsky
scored the only goal in Winnipeg's
win over Ottawa.
Ponikarovsky broke the scoreless
deadlock 5:57 into the third period.
The Senators had no answer against
Montoya, who replaced an ailing On-
drej Pavelec (flu) and posted his first
shutout of the season and third of his
NHL career.
The Jets (5-5-1) won for the sec-
ond time in six games and snapped
a three-game road skid.
Ottawa backup Ben Bishop made
his second start of the season and
was solid in stopping 36 shots. The
Senators (6-4-2) have scored just
seven goals in past five games, in-
cluding four in a 4-3 win over the
Buffalo Sabres on Tuesday.


The Senators have lost a pair of 1-
0 decisions in that span. Ottawa has
allowed only 15 goals in eight games.
Coyotes 1,
Sharks 0, SO
SAN JOSE, Calif. Mike Smith
made 33 saves through overtime
and then turned aside two more
shots in the shootout to carry
Phoenix past San Jose.
The only offense in the entire
game was provided by Phoenix's
Mikkel Boedker and Radium Vr-
bata, who both netted shootout
goals against Sharks goalie Antii
Niemi.
Smith, who recorded his fourth
shutout of the season, made several
acrobatic saves, including one in the
shootout. Smith has 21 career NHL
shutouts.
Niemi stopped 21 shots before the
shootout to earn his first shutout of
the season and 20th in the NHL.
Smith improved to 14-19 in
shootouts, and Niemi fell to 19-13.
San Jose, which has gone to a
shootout in four of six games,
dropped its second straight
tiebreaker.
Smith, who shut out the Sharks
three times last season, improved to
6-3-1 in his career against them.
Capitals 5 Panthers 0
WASHINGTON Troy Brouwer
scored two goals and Braden Holtby
stopped 27 shots and assisted on
Brouwer's second goal and the
Washington Capitals shut out the


Florida Panthers 5-0 in the opener of
a home-and-home series.
Mathieu Perreault and Joel Ward
each added a goal and an assist,
and Alex Ovechkin also scored for
Washington (3-8-1), which snapped
a three-game losing streak.
It was the first time Washington
has scored more than three goals in
a game this season.
The two teams play at Florida
(4-6-1) on Tuesday.
Sabres 3, Islanders 2
UNIONDALE, N.Y. Ryan Miller
made 41 saves, and Alexander
Sulzer scored the tiebreaking goal
midway through the third period for
the Buffalo Sabres, who earned a
3-2 victory over the New York
Islanders despite being badly
outshot.
Thomas Vanek and Christian
Ehrhoff added goals for the Sabres,
who won their second straight
game. Buffalo was outshot 43-15 by
the Islanders, who dropped their
fourth straight.
John Tavares and Colin McDon-
ald scored for New York, and Brian
Strait had two assists. Evgeni
Nabokov made 12 saves for the Is-
landers, who erased a pair of one-
goal deficits but couldn't overcome
a third even after Tavares was
awarded a penalty shot with 3:53
remaining.
The teams were tied 2-2 after two
periods largely because of Miller, who
made 27 saves through 40 minutes.


SPORTS


Heath Slocum
Mike Weir
Ryuji Imada
Scott Langley
John Mallinger
Nick O'Hern
Cameron Tringale
Stuart Appleby
Bob Estes
Jason Bohn
Peter Tomasulo
Seung-Yul Noh
Jim Furyk
Pat Perez
Bryce Molder
Kelly Kraft
Ken Duke
Doug LaBelle II
J.B. Holmes
Rod Pampling
Phil Mickelson
J.J. Henry
Brian Stuard
Tim Clark
Brad Fritsch
Troy Kelly
Sam Saunders
Jeff Maggert
Cameron Percy
Matt Jones
Greg Owen


69b-71m-71s
75b-65m-71s
65m-73s-73b
65m-77s-69b
68m-75s-69b
70b-66m-76s
71s-71b-70m
70b-71 m-71s
69s-71b-72m
71b-70m-71s
71m-75s-66b
67s-73b-72m
75s-69b-68m
69m-69s-74b
71m-72s-69b
69m-71s-72b
71s-72b-69m
69s-75b-69m
72s-70b-71m
71 m-70s-72b
69m-71s-73b
72s-71b-70m
69b-72m-72s
76s-67b-70m
69m-73s-71b
73b-68m-72s
76s-71b-66m
67m-73s-73b
74b-68m-71s
69s-72b-72m
65m-75s-73b


Kevin Streelman 69b-69m-75s
Failed to qualify
Tag Ridings 69m-72s-73b
Ryan Palmer 72m-73s-69b
Alexandre Rocha 72b-72m-70s
Vaughn Taylor 70s-74b-70m
Steven Bowditch 76b-68m-70s
Morgan Hoffmann 70b-72m-72s
Henrik Norlander 71b-72m-71s
Joe Durant 71b-69m-74s
Ben Kohles 69b-72m-73s
CamiloVillegas 67m-75s-72b
Charlie Beljan 69s-75b-70m
D.A. Points 68m-76s-70b
Casey Wittenberg 70s-73b-71m
Jerry Kelly 73m-73s-69b
Justin Bolli 70m-75s-70b
Lee Williams 66m-76s-73b
Padraig Harrington 72s-71b-72m
Kevin Chappell 74b-70m-71s
Jason Kokrak 70b-72m-73s
Kevin Sutherland 70b-68m-78s
Woody Austin 75s-69b-72m
Erik Compton 71 m-72s-73b
Jason Gore 71s-72b-73m
Jeff Gove 69b-71 m-76s
Shawn Stefani 72b-68m-76s
Steve LeBrun 74s-74b-68m
Tommy Gainey 71s-70b-75m
Dustin Johnson 73m-69s-74b
Chris Stroud 78b-67m-71s
Todd Hamilton 71s-73b-72m
Jim Herman 71s-70b-76m
Dicky Pride 69b-74m-74s
Robert Karlsson 74b-70m-73s
Daniel Summerhays74m-73s-70b
Geoff Ogilvy 73s-74b-70m
Eric Meierdierks 68m-74s-75b
Ricky Barnes 71 m-74s-72b
Darron Stiles 72b-73m-72s
Cameron Beckman 70b-74m-74s
Andres Romero 74b-70m-74s
Arjun Atwal 69b-76m-73s
Nathan Green 72s-76b-70m
Andrew Svoboda 75m-70s-73b
Donald Constable 74s-72b-72m
Tim Petrovic 68m-75s-75b
Brendon Todd 68m-72s-78b
Nicholas Thompson 73s-76b-69m
Neal Lancaster 67m-75s-76b
Steve Flesch 75b-69m-75s
Jin Park 73m-74s-72b
Rory Sabbatini 74s-75b-70m
Matt Bettencourt 71 m-76s-72b


Robert Streb
Si Woo Kim
NickWatney
Roberto Castro
Bobby Gates
Billy Mayfair
Chris Riley
Fabian Gomez
Michael Letzig
Lee Janzen
Chris DiMarco
Michael Bradley
John Daly
Johnson Wagner
Derek Ernst
Scott McCarron
David Duval
Alex Cejka
Gary Christian
R. Cabrera Bello
Bret Nutt
Brian Davis
Joe Ogilvie
Aaron Watkins
Billy Andrade
D.J.Trahan
Steve Marino
Harris English
David Lingmerth
Tom Gillis
Andres Gonzales
Luke List
Mitch Lowe
Paul Haley II


-213 -1


73s-74b-72m
75s-72b-72m
68m-75s-76b
71b-75m-73s
76s-72b-71m
73s-77b-70m
73m-74s-73b
73b-71 m-76s
73s-78b-69m
77s-71b-72m
72b-76m-72s
73m-76s-71b
77b-70m-73s
71s-75b-74m
74s-73b-75m
75s-72b-75m
79s-73b-70m
70b-75m-77s
75b-71 m-76s
73s-79b-70m
74m-78s-70b
73b-76m-73s
76b-74m-74s
78s-76b-70m
79s-75b-70m
73b-77m-74s
77b-74m-74s
75m-75s-75b
70m-75s-81b
71m-81s-75b
77b-74m-77s
73m-76s-81b
77b-77m-76s
78s-82b-74m


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 B5

Pebble Beach Pro-Am
Saturday
Pebble Beach, Calif.
Purse: $6.5 million
b-Pebble Beach GL; 6,816 yards; par 72,
m-Monterey Peninsula CC, sore Course;
6,838 yards; par 70, s-Spyglass Hill GC;
6,953 yards; par 72
Third Round
Brandt Snedeker 66m-68s-68b 202 -12
James Hahn 71b-65m-66s-202 -12
Chris Kirk 71s-68b-64m-203 -11
Patrick Reed 68s-69b-67m 204 -10
Richard H. Lee 68m-71s-66b 205 -9
Retief Goosen 71s-68b-67m-206 -8
Robert Garrigus 71m-69s-66b -206 -8
Jason Day 68m-68s-70b 206 -8
James Driscoll 72m-67s-67b 206 -8
Jimmy Walker 68m-71s-67b -206 -8
Sean O'Hair 70b-67m-70s 207 -7
Luke Guthrie 68b-70m-69s-207 -7
Kevin Stadler 69b-69m-69s-207 -7
Webb Simpson 71m-71s-65b-207 -7
FredrikJacobson 71s-66b-70m -207 -7
Ted Potter, Jr. 67b-67m-73s 207 -7
Charlie Wi 70m-70s-68b 208 -6
Hunter Mahan 66b-69m-73s-208 -6
Alistair Presnell 68s-72b-68m 208 -6
Matt Every 67b-70m-71s-208 -6
William McGirt 72s-69b-67m 208 -6
Kevin Na 68s-72b-68m 208 -6
Russell Knox 64m-73s-71b -208 -6
Billy Horschel 70s-71b-67m -208 -6
Patrick Cantlay 66m-70s-72b -208 -6
Jordan Spieth 70m-70s-68b 208 -6
Bill Lunde 71s-70b-68m -209 -5
Aaron Baddeley 69s-71b-69m -209 -5
Scott Brown 72b-68m-69s -209 -5
John Merrick 68b-67m-74s 209 -5
Justin Hicks 71s-68b-70m-209 -5
Chez Reavie 70b-72m-68s-210 -4
Josh Teater 70m-72s-68b 210 -4
Vijay Singh 72b-72m-66s-210 -4
Scott Gardiner 73s-69b-68m -210 -4
Brian Harman 68m-73s-70b-211 -3
Lee Westwood 68b-70m-73s-211 -3
Brendon de Jonge 67m-71s-73b-211 -3












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Guitarist Dan Auerbach, center, and drummer Patrick Carney of The Black Keys perform at the Global Citizen Festival in Central
Park, in New York. The band is nominated for the top two awards album of the year and record of the year at the Grammys.





Grammy winners?


Two AP writers predict outcome at annual music awards


CHRIS TALBOTT
AND MESFIN FEKADU
AP music writers

NEW YORK Adele dominated last
year's Grammy Awards, but this year
there isn't a clear winner in sight.
That's because a slew of acts are up for
top prizes, from fun. to Frank Ocean to
Mumford & Sons. Those performers are
nominated for six trophies, as are Kanye
West, Jay-Z and Dan Auerbach of the
Black Keys.
We here at The Associated Press let
you know who to put money on when the
awards show airs live Sunday from the
Staples Center in Los Angeles at 8 p.m.
EST on CBS. Now if only we could agree.
ALBUM OF THE YEAR: "El
Camino," The Black Keys; "Some
Nights," fun.; "Babel," Mumford & Sons;
"channel ORANGE," Frank Ocean;
"Blunderbuss," Jack White.
FEKADU: I want to say that because
there are four rock-based acts nominated
here, they'll split the vote, leaving R&B
singer Frank Ocean with album of the
year His album should win, but he won't
take the prize. This is The Black Keys'
year, and they're deserving. The Ohio
rockers have released back-to-back
amazing albums and The Recording
Academy can't deny that. And they'll
want to reward it
RECORD OF THE YEAR: "Lonely
Boy," The Black Keys; "Stronger (What
Doesn't Kill You)," Kelly Clarkson; "We
Are Young," fun. featuring Janelle
Monae; "Somebody That I Used to
Know," Gotye featuring Kimbra;
"Thinkin Bout You," Frank Ocean; "We
Are Never Ever Getting Back Together,"
Taylor Swift
TALBOTT: This category has been
especially hard to predict over the last
decade, with no real trend among the
winners. And this year's overstuffed field
makes it no easier. If"Thinkin Bout You"
wins here, there will be no doubt these
are Ocean's Grammys. And "Stronger"
and "We Are Young" were nominated for
song of the year as well, a sign voters
pretty much universally loved them. But
we're going with something of an upset as
The Black Keys horn in on Ocean's fun.
SONG OF THE YEAR (songwriters):
"The A Team," Ed Sheeran; "Adorn,"
Miguel Pimentel; "Call Me Maybe," Carly
Rae Jepsen, Tavish Crowe and Josh Ram-
say; "Stronger (What Doesn't Kill You),"
Jorgen Elofsson, David Gamson, Greg
Kurstin and Ali Tamposi; "We Are
Young," Jack Antonoff, Jeff Bhasker,
Andrew Dost and Nate Ruess.
FEKADU: Call you to the stage Carly
Rae? Maybe not. Miguel and Ed Sheeran,
I'm happy to see your epic tracks get at-
tention here, but it's not likely that either
of your songs will take the Grammy gold.
Instead, fun. whose anthemic song,
"We Are Young," has a great balance of
edge and mainstream appeal will be
named song of the year.
NEW ARTIST: Alabama Shakes;


Birthday When you establish a few realistic goals
in the year ahead, you could easily receive a lot of
support from unexpected people. Fortunately, success
is likely when you are teamed up with strong allies.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -Your greatest asset is
your ability to take bits and pieces of various ideas
and bring them together in the service of a specific
objective. Use your mind like a scanner.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -You won't have any
trouble rejecting persons who make demands of you.
However, should you be moved by a sense of com-
passion for one of them, you'll be generous to a fault.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Don't ignore your
instincts concerning dealings with others. Allow your
intuition to dominate so your logic can go to work in
the right areas.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Since you're strongly


fun. members, from left, Jack Antonoff, Nate Ruess and Emily Moore perform onstage
at the "Teachers Rock" concert at the Nokia Theatre in Los Angeles. The band is up
for six Grammy Awards, including album, song and record of the year, and best new
artist.


fun.; Hunter Hayes; The Lumineers;
Frank Ocean.
TALBOTT: This is an especially
strong group. You could envision each of
these acts still at it 15 years from now.
The category has been full of pleasant
upsets over the last few years, but there
will be nothing surprising about this
year's winner because these are turning
out to be the Frank Ocean Grammys.
POP SOLO PERFORMANCE: "Set
Fire to the Rain (Live)," Adele; "Stronger
(What Doesn't Kill You)," Kelly Clarkson;
"Call Me Maybe," Carly Rae Jepsen;
"Wide Awake," Katy Perry; "Where Have
You Been," Rihanna.
FEKADU: Adele: All day Every day.
TALBOTT: Enough said.
ROCKPERFORMANCE: "Hold On,"
Alabama Shakes; "Lonely Boy," The
Black Keys; "Charlie Brown," Coldplay;
"I Will Wait," Mumford & Sons; "We Take
Care of Our Own," Bruce Springsteen.
FEKADU: The Boss? False. "Lonely
Boy" wins here.
COUNTRY SOLO PERFORMANCE:
"Home," Dierks Bentley; "Springsteen,"
Eric Church; "Cost of Livin'," Ronnie
Dunn; "Wanted," Hunter Hayes; "Over,"
Blake Shelton; "Blown Away," Carrie
Underwood.
FEKADU: A country song about
Bruce Springsteen? Yeah, you win, Eric
Church.
TALBOTT: Hey, now, wait a minute,
don't go handing that trophy away so eas-
ily ... just kiddin'. That's pretty unassail-
able logic. I wonder if Church will wear
his sunglasses onstage? That'd be pretty
boss.


= Today's HOROSCOPE
motivated to fulfill a certain ambitious objective, let
your cleverness guide you. Use your wits to convince
the right people to work with you.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Because you and
someone with whom you enjoy warm emotional ties
care so much about each other, you'll stand by his or
her efforts. Good for you.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) If you want a winning
group endeavor, make sure the people involved
respect each other. Only then will truly good work be
done.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) There's no need to dodge
difficult decisions, because your judgment is likely to
be keener than usual. Weigh your alternatives and
trust your evaluations.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -You are presently in a
cycle where your work is being noticed, evaluated and


Adele is nominated for pop solo
performance at the Grammys.


With six nominations, Frank Ocean is
among the top nominees for the Grammy
Awards show Sunday in Los Angeles.


even rewarded. This could be your chance to pick up
a few extra bucks.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) If the person whom you
have been yearning to get to know better seems reti-
cent about opening up communication, take matters
in your own hands and initiate a conversation.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -You could be extremely
successful at finalizing an important, materially mean-
ingful situation. Make the most of it.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Owing to the con-
siderate way you've been treating people lately, your
popularity is trending upward. You make everyone
feel special.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Your financial as-
pects are looking rather strong, with one possible ex-
ception: involvements with questionable people who
expect to reap what you sow. Avoid them.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8
Mega Money: 3 15 17 29
Mega Ball: 17
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 8 $1,011.50
3-of-4 MB 81 $219
3-of-4 1,402 $37.50
2-of-4 MB 1,999 $18
1-of-4 MB 14,353 $2.50
2-of-4 36,278 $2
Fantasy 5:9 10 12 14 36
5-of-5 1 winner $235,927.98
4-of-5 321 $118.50
3-of-5 11,254 $9
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7
Fantasy 5:19 26 29 31 32
5-of-5 2 winners $106,956.82
4-of-5 241 $143
3-of-5 7,968 $12

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Feb. 10, the
41st day of 2013. There are 324
days left in the year. This is the
Chinese New Year of the Snake.
Today's Highlight:
On Feb. 10, 1763, Britain,
Spain and France signed the
Treaty of Paris, ending the Seven
Years' War (also known as the
French and Indian War in North
America).
On this date:
In 1840, Britain's Queen Victo-
ria married Prince Albert of Saxe-
Coburg and Gotha.
In 1841, Upper Canada and
Lower Canada were proclaimed
united under an Act of Union
passed by the British Parliament.
In 1863, showman P.T. Barnum
staged the wedding of General
Tom Thumb and Mercy Lavinia
Warren both little people in
New York City.
In 1933, the first singing
telegram was introduced by the
Postal Telegram Co. in New York.
Ten years ago: At a NATO
meeting in Brussels, France, Ger-
many and Belgium jointly vetoed a
U.S.-backed measure to authorize
the alliance to make plans to pro-
tect Turkey if Iraq attacked it.
Five years ago: Democratic
presidential hopeful Hillary Rod-
ham Clinton replaced campaign
manager Patti Solis Doyle with
longtime aide Maggie Williams.
One year ago: President
Barack Obama, under fierce
election-year fire, abruptly aban-
doned his stand religious organi-
zations had to pay for free birth
control for workers, demanding in-
surance companies step in to pro-
vide the coverage instead.
Today's Birthdays: Cine-
matographer Douglas Slocombe
("Raiders of the Lost Ark") is 100.
Opera singer Leontyne Price is
86. Actor Robert Wagner is 83.
Rock musician Don Wilson (The
Ventures) is 80. Singer Roberta
Flack is 76. Singer Jimmy Mer-
chant (Frankie Lymon and the
Teenagers) is 73. Rock musician
Bob Spalding (The Ventures) is
66. Olympic gold-medal swimmer
Mark Spitz is 63. Walt Disney Co.
chairman and chief executive
Robert Iger is 62. Rock musician
and composer Cory Lerios (Pablo
Cruise) is 62. World Golf Hall of
Famer Greg Norman is 58. Ac-
tress Kathleen Beller is 57. Coun-
try singer Lionel Cartwright is 53.
Movie director Alexander Payne is
52. ABC News correspondent
George Stephanopoulos is 52.
Retired MLB All-Star Lenny Dyk-
stra is 50. Political commentator
Glenn Beck is 49. Actress Laura
Dern is 46. Country singer Dude
Mowrey is 41. Actress Elizabeth
Banks is 39. Pop singer Rosanna
Taverez (Eden's Crush) is 36. Ac-
tress Julia Pace Mitchell is 35.
Country musician Jeremy Baxter
(Carolina Rain) is 33. Rock singer
Eric Dill is 31. Rock musician Ben


Romans (The Click Five) is 31.
Actress Emma Roberts is 22.
Thought for Today: "Be nice to
people on the way up. They're the
same people you'll pass on the
way down." Jimmy Durante,
American comedian (born this day
in 1893, died 1980).












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


SCE


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Duke Energy announced last week it would retire its nuclear power plant, CR3, which employs more than 600 people. The power plant
has been a major part of the community since 1977.


Citrus County Commission


his has been a dif-
ficult week for
our community.
We learned the nuclear
power plant in our
county will not be fixed,
and Duke Energy will
start the process of re-
tiring and decommis-
sioning the facility.
The nuclear plant
employs more than 600
people di-
rectly, with
hundreds
more subcon-
tractors and
support per-
sonnel. It has
provided jobs
and revenue
for our com-
munity for
many years, Joe
and the real- GUI
ity is it is
coming to an COL
end. While
the decommissioning
process will be long and
produce jobs, the oper-
ational days of the plant
are over.
Our first concern is
with the 600-plus indi-
viduals who work there
and the families they
support. They have
been an integral part of
our community, and any
support as a community
we can give we will. We
are grateful to the men
and women who have
worked at the nuclear
facility and as a commu-
nity we fully support
them.
The impact of this de-
cision will be felt by nu-
merous businesses in
our community that
support the nuclear
plant operations and
provide goods and serv-
ices to the people who
work at the plant. From
insurance businesses
and small businesses to
restaurants, the effects
will be felt, and they are
real.
While these issues
can be overwhelming,
we must remember and
know our community
will get through this.
The news and issues
presented are huge, and
to the emotions of our
community, it is another


M
E
AU


punch to the gut; but we
will get through this.
I can say this, and
know this to be true, be-
cause I know this com-
munity. I was born and
raised here, my family
is from here, and this
county is a special place
to call home. We are so
blessed to have so many
wonderful people in
our county,
who truly
care about
the future of
our commu-
nity and are
willing to do
everything
possible to
ensure we are
successful.
[eek We have a
"ST great story to
tell the world!
IMN We are the
gem of the
Nature Coast. On the
west side of our county,
we have seven Florida
Outstanding Waterways.
On the east side, we
have a beautiful lake
system. We are home to
more beautiful natural
resources than almost
anywhere in the state or
the nation, for that
matter.
Our school system is
ranked as one of the
best in the state, and we
have one of the lowest
crime rates in Florida.
We are home to a four-
year accredited college,
and have one of the best
technical vocational in-
stitutes in the state.
We are home to some
of the best golf courses
in the entire nation. We
are home to the largest
concentration of mana-
tees in the world, and
we have cities such as
Crystal River and Inver-
ness that epitomize
small-town America. We
have developments
such as Sugarmill
Woods, Citrus Hills,
Black Diamond, Pine
Ridge, Citrus Springs
and many other won-
derful places to live.
We have multiple hos-
pitals that provide ex-
cellent, state-of-the-art
medical care and doc-


chairman: We will overcome challenges


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
A great blue heron suns itself on a stump in the middle of Lake Rousseau. Cit-
rus County Commission Chairman Joe Meek reminds local residents they have
many things to be proud of, including an abundance of natural resources. "We
are home to more beautiful natural resources than almost anywhere in the state,
or the nation, for that matter," he said.


tors who provide excel-
lent services to our
residents.
We have a workforce
that has been
tested and been ,.
through a lot,
but is some of
the hardest
working any-
where. We have '(
churches woven
into the fabric of our
community, providing a
bedrock for our county.
We have thousands of
small businesses manu-
facturing goods and
providing services to


D
r


our residents. We have
businesses manufactur-
ing state-of-the-art tech-
nology sold throughout
the world and
employing hun-
dreds of local
residents.
We are home
to one of the
largest military
veteran popula-
tions in the country and
have extremely strong
veterans support groups.
We have organiza-
tions such as United
Way, YMCA, Salvation
Army, food banks and


many more working
every day to support
our community and
help those in need. We
have civic and commu-
nity groups and individ-
uals that work every day
to improve our county.
We have agriculture
farms winning awards
for being some of the
best in the country We
have recreational activ-
ities rivaling any com-
munity, anywhere. The
list of positives can go
on and on.


Page C3


Loss of

Progress

people

to hurt

the most
Much has been
said this week
about the clos-
ing of Progress Energy's
nuclear plant in Crystal
River.
The economic loss to
our community is
tremendous. The tax
dollar loss to local gov-
ernment is staggering.
The closing of CR3,
as it is known, will
greatly reduce power
production of the Crys-
tal River energy site,
thus reducing the over-
all importance of the
energy site.
But to me, the most
significant loss will be
the employees and their
families and what they
mean to the fabric of our
community.
According to company
officials, about 600 em-
ployees have been work-
ing at CR3. With the
decommissioning of the
plant, many employees
and their families even-
tually will leave our
community.
These aren't 600 indi-
viduals, they are 600
families. Their spouses
work in our schools, hos-
pitals and nursing
homes. Their children
go to our schools and
play football and win
science fair competi-
tions. They are our
neighbors and friends.
They volunteer for the
Boys & Girls Clubs and
raise money for the
United Way They coach
the Little League teams
and volunteer for the
Boy Scouts. They donate
time and energy to the
YMCA and volunteer as
tutors in our schools.
I can remember the
very first United Way
campaign we ran in Cit-
rus County in 1986.
Progress Energy em-
ployees contributed
nearly 70 percent of the
funds pledged that year.
The United Way would
not have succeeded
here if not for Progress
employees.
They run for political
offices. They lend an ed-
ucated voice to the pub-
lic debate of the
important issues facing
our community.
Much will be dis-
cussed in the coming
weeks about job loss and
economic turmoil.
There inevitably will be
some finger-pointing
over who was responsi-
ble for this disaster. No
matter how you look at
it, this decision by
Progress/Duke will
cause a titanic shift in
the future of Citrus
County
But the larger loss will
be our friends and
neighbors who will
slowly scatter to other
communities to find
meaningful employment
in their highly special-
ized fields.
Today the overwhelm-
ing feeling is one of sad-
ness. In one swoop, we
are losing friends and
neighbors who have
been important to us.

Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the
Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicle
online. com.







Page C2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ................ ............ publisher
M ike Arnold ..................... .................. editor
Charlie Brennan..................... managing editor
Curt Ebitz ............... ............ citizen member
1 Mac Harris ............................. citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ......... ............. guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ................. ............ copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


IT'S TIME





Paddling




no longer




good option

Ask a roomful of aging from causes not easily diag-
adults about school nosed. Examples: A child is
paddling and many dyslexic or has a learning dis-
will fondly recol- ability that's not
lect stories of THE ISSUE: been identified;
their youth and or a child was
how school offi- Paddling given medicine
cials tamped un- students. causing him to be
ruly spunk with a wired up, lose
swift swat to the OUR OPINION: concentration or
keister. School board be drowsy. There
In this day and makes right are several sce-
age, however, decision narios that could
many people may become after-the-
be surprised pad- fact knowledge
dling is still a disciplinary op- creating strife between edu-
tion in the Citrus County cators and parents and/or
School System. leave students psychologi-
Alas, times have changed cally marred from a paddling
and so have views on the pad- received for behavior beyond
dling of students. The Citrus their control.
County School Board has Then again, there are trou-
agreed to remove the disci- blemakers whose attention
plinary option from their stu- needs to be snatched and ac-
dent code of conduct. tions halted for the benefit of
While some will begrudge fellow students and school
modern times as being too staff. While lots of good chil-
politically correct and dren likely have realized they
touchy-feely, it is time to hang had best straighten up and fly
up the paddling policy. right after a paddling, some
Even though, in recent unruly youngsters know the
times, paddling hasn't been paddling routine and choose
permitted without parental to push their luck on most any
authorization, the policy occasion. That is to say, they
could carry a potential for li- don't care if they are paddled.
ability for educators and re- It's prudent for the Citrus
morse for parents and others County School Board to leave
if, for example, inattentive or paddling to nostalgia and ad-
unruly behavior is later de- here to contemporary forms
termined to have resulted of student discipline.


Handicapped
explanation
I'd like to respond to the
Sound Off from someone who
claimed there is a wheelchair on
the handicapped signs and only
wheelchair people can park
there. This person is mistaken.
The wheelchair on the handi-
capped sign is an international
worldwide-recognized
sign when you're in a
country that you don't 0
speak the language.
That includes all those
(who) are not in wheel-
chairs. My husband's
problem is in his back,
not in his legs, and
mine is my heart. So do
we all have to have a CAL
different sign now for 563Q
wheelchairs, for hearts tU)
and for canes? I don't
think so. This man or woman
was totally mistaken.
Cut everything
by percentages
$3.7 million is what percent-
age of the Citrus School Sys-
tem's budget? Solution: Cut
every expense, including all
salaries, by that percentage, so
no one has to lose their job un-
less they want to. Having less is
better than having nothing at all.
If workers from top to bottom
are not ready to do this, then
they are thinking only of them-
selves and not of the children.
Strange move for
energy company
Imagine a wagon wheel with
the spokes going out in all direc-
tions from the wheel hub. That
is what the power transmission
lines remind me of leaving the


Progress Energy generating
complex at Crystal River. Now
with more than adequate owned
land for expansion at Crystal
River, and all the infrastructure
in place, why would the power
company move a major part of
its operation a few miles north?
To me, that would be like Geor-
gia giving up on Atlanta, known
as the hub of the South, and re-


locating to Macon.
Could it be Levy County
promised the power
company lower taxes
and better working
relationships?
Puzzled by
Sound Off posts


B I don't quite under-
stand the philosophy
)579 the Chronicle does
579 ( about printing stuff into
the article that you put
in for I guess it's called the
Sound Off. The question I have
is, I've submitted several of
them that I thought were good,
clean comments to make and
yet they never get printed. But
then they print something as idi-
otic as somebody's talking about
mustard on a toasted manatee.
That has got to be the stupidest
thing I've heard. Is the Chronicle
that sadistic that they've got to
print stuff like that? Why even
print it? It is the most dumbest
thing I've ever heard. So I guess
it would be nice to know what
your rationale was on that, if
you even care to print anything.
Editor's note: We place higher
priorities on local and state issues.
While toasted manatees might
seem sadistic to some, others find
humor in it. Regardless, the post
has people talking and public dis-
course is a good thing.


Thanks to caring
staff and doctors
I would like to thank Dr.
Gelin and his wonderful staff.
We have been Dr. Gelin's pa-
tients for 23 years. He has the
best staff. His nurses and the
girls working the front desk
are wonderful. My husband
Jim Ryan had Parkinson's dis-
ease since 2001. As the disease
progressed, the nurse always
made his visits pleasant.
Phyliss and Susan always kept
him smiling.
Also, I want to thank the
staff of Hospice of Citrus
County, for the wonderful care
he was given his last nine
days. Pam, Renee, Maureen,
Kathy, Linda, Mary, Sheri and
Chuck. All of you are angels
and I don't know how you do
what you do every day
My husband Jim passed
away Jan. 5, 2013, with me
knowing he was taken care of
with love and dedication.
Thanks to all of you.
Eileen Ryan
Inverness


"A bank is a place that will lend
you money ifyou can prove that
you don't need it."
Bob Hope,
"Life in the Crystal Palace," 1959


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Bankbuster legislation


WASHINGTON
W ith his
chronically
gravelly
voice and relent- r 'i
lessly liberal agenda,
Sherrod Brown /
seems to have e-
stepped out of "Les
Miserables," hoarse
from singing revolu- Georg
tionary anthems at 0Tl
the barricades. OT
Today, Ohio's senior VOI
senator has a project
worthy of Victor Hugo and of
conservatives' support. He
wants to break up the biggest
banks.
He would advocate this even
if he thought such banks would
never have a crisis sufficient to
threaten the financial system.
He believes they are unhealthy
for the financial system even
when they are healthy This is
because there is a silent subsidy
- an unfair competitive advan-
tage relative to community
banks inherent in being
deemed by the government, im-
plicitly but clearly, too big to fail.
The Senate has unanimously
passed a bill offered by Brown
and Sen. David Vitter, a
Louisiana Republican, direct-
ing the Government Accounta-
bility Office to study whether
banks with more than $500 bil-
lion in assets acquire an "eco-
nomic benefit" because of their
dangerous scale. Is their debt
priced favorably because, being
Too Big Too Fail, they are con-
sidered especially creditwor-
thy? Brown believes the 20
largest banks pay less 50 to 80
basis points less when bor-
rowing than community banks
must pay
In a sense, TBTF began
under Ronald Reagan with the
1984 rescue of Continental Illi-
nois, then the seventh-largest
bank. In 2011, the four biggest
U.S. banks (JPMorgan Chase,
Bank of America, Citigroup and


ge Will
IER
CES


Wells Fargo) had 40
percent of all feder-
ally insured deposits.
Today, the 5,500 com-
munity banks have 12
percent of the bank-
ing industry's assets.
The 12 banks with
$250 billion to $2.3
trillion in assets total
69 percent. The 20
largest banks' assets
total 84.5 percent of
the nation's GDP
Such banks, which


have become bigger relative to
the economy since the financial
crisis began, are not the only
economic entities becoming
larger. Last year, The Econo-
mist reported in the past 15
years the combined assets of
the 50 largest U.S. companies
had risen from 70 percent of
GDP to 130 percent. And banks
are not the only entities desig-
nated TBTF because they are
systemicallyy important." Gen-
eral Motors supposedly re-
quired a bailout because a
chain of parts suppliers might
have failed with it.
But this just means the perni-
cious practice of socializing
losses while keeping profits pri-
vate is not quarantined in the
financial sector
To see why TBTF also can
mean TBTM too big to man-
age read "What's Inside
America's Banks?" in the Janu-
ary/February issue of The At-
lantic. Frank Partnoy and Jesse
Eisinger argue banks are not
only bigger but also "more
opaque than ever." And regula-
tions partake of the opacity:
The landmark Glass-Steagall
Act of 1933, separating com-
mercial from investment bank-
ing, was 37 pages long; the 848
pages of the 2010 Dodd-Frank
law may eventually be supple-
mented by 30 times that many
pages of rules. The "Volcker
rule" banning banks from spec-
ulating with federally insured


deposits is 298 pages long.
There is no convincing con-
sensus about a correlation be-
tween a bank's size and
supposed efficiencies of scale.
And any efficiencies must be
weighed against management
inefficiencies associated with
complexity and opacity. Thirty
or so years ago, Brown said,
seven of the world's 10 largest
banks were Japanese, which
was not an advantage sufficient
to prevent Japan's descent into
prolonged stagnation. And he
said when Standard Oil was
broken up in 1911, the parts of
it became, cumulatively, more
valuable than the unified cor-
poration had been.
Brown is fond of the maxim
"banking should be boring." He
suspects within the organiza-
tional sprawl of the biggest
banks, there is too much excite-
ment. Clever people with the
high spirits and adrenaline ad-
dictions of fighter pilots con-
tinue to develop exotic
financial instruments and
transactions unknown even in
other parts of the sprawl. He is
undecided about whether the
proper metric for identifying a
bank as "too big" should be if its
assets are a certain percentage
of GDP he suggests 2 percent
to 4 percent or simply the
size of its assets (Richard
Fisher, president of the Federal
Reserve Bank of Dallas, has
suggested $100 billion).
By breaking up the biggest
banks, conservatives will not be
putting asunder what the free
market has joined together.
Government nurtured these be-
hemoths by weaving an improv-
ident safety net and by
practicing crony capitalism.
Dismantling them would be a
blow against government that
has become too big not to fail.

George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost com.


Losing country on
all levels
America is at one of its low-
est points in history Record
number of people on food
stamps, no budget for years,
out-of-control spending, high
unemployment, out-of-control
federal debt, no space pro-
gram, reduced rankings on ed-
ucation in the world, lower
standard of living, lost home
values, almost zero interest on
our savings accounts, high-
energy costs, political corrup-
tion, no control on illegal im-
migration, our military spread
all over the world, class war-
fare, by race, social class, reli-
gion, financial status and
political beliefs, but good job
mister president.
Let's pretend for a moment
for the past four years Presi-
dent George Bush was at the
helm. Would he be getting all
the kudos that Obama gets?
Wake up America, we are los-
ing our great country
Claude Strass
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


LETTERS to the Editor


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
* Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters sent
via e-mail. Names and home-
towns will be printed; phone
numbers will not be
published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


I


-(





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


How much are a few red pins really worth?


Make no secret
about how much
my Cheryl and I
enjoy traveling, most
especially cruising.
Our very first cruise
was during Septem-
ber 1991 to celebrate
our 25th wedding an-
niversary. Honestly,
even though it was Fred E
only a four-night trip A SI
to the Bahamas, that OF
first one still ranks as
my favorite cruise of
them all.
Nonetheless, we have made a
score or more of additional
cruises since then and have
found them all to be fabulous.
Prior to retiring, I allowed my-
self to fantasize about doing a
full-world cruise, starting at a


Br
L
L


certain point, sailing
away and returning to
that same place after
'I. having circumnavi-
gated the entire
earth. That was my
fantasy, but not one
Cheryl shared. She
said three or more
months away from
rannen home was too much.
LICE She was right, of
course. Also, I knew
LIFE full well the cost of
such an adventure,
all in one fell swoop, was not
something we should take on.
So, I put the thought away and
she and I sought a compromise.
We found one. We would do it in
pieces.
We bought a fancy world map
and a box of red pins to keep


track of our exploits. We con-
tinue to snicker at our exciting
obsession with putting pins in
the map once we return from
wherever it is we have been. It's
more fun than you might think.
If all goes as planned, Cheryl
and I just recently will have re-
turned from the third leg of our
ongoing cruise around the world
when this column is published
today
In January 2011, we sailed
from New York City down the
eastern seaboard of the USA,
along the eastern coast of South
America, then headed due east
until we arrived at Cape Town,
South Africa, and flew back
home. The total time away from
home was 33 days.
In February 2012, we em-
barked in San Francisco, cruised


to Hawaii, then continued south
and west through the paradise of
the South Pacific islands, finally
coming to the end of the voyage
in Sydney, Australia, and flying
back home. Total time away from
home was 32 days.
Last summer, we looked at our
pin-studded map and realized
there were still two connecting
segments remaining before we
had been all the way around.
One was from side-to-side of the
United States; the other was be-
tween Cape Town and Sydney
This year we chose to do the
stretch from Fort Lauderdale to
Los Angeles. We left on Jan. 19,
visited some of the exotic
Caribbean islands, passed
through the Panama Canal, then
came up the western side of Cen-
tral America and Mexico before


disembarking in Los Angeles and
flying home after spending a cou-
ple of days there. The total time
away from home was 18 days.
During the next few weeks, as
has become customary, I plan to
share with you patient readers
some of our experiences while
on this most recent excursion.
There's now only one leg left.
Will we do that fourth piece? As
far as I can tell, there's nothing
really notable between Cape
Town and Sydney, just 6,800
miles of water. And, really, just
how much are a few more red
pins in a map worth? It remains
to be seen.


Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


Book REVIEW


e cs-Tes LL oT aoe a
t-jGN^TZA-. aVTreR aj, ?irr
w~u- aowaefQ ccAa~aosG isw


Jeff Klinkenberg


Seasons of


Real Florida


Letters to THE EDITOR


Call on pioneer spirit
Citrus County has a rich history
of pioneers, businessmen and cit-
rus farmers (who) made the area a
great place to live and raise a fam-
ily to make roots. Today, Citrus
County is dependent upon an out-
of-state run company Duke En-
ergy to carry the weight of its
economy Unfortunately for the
residents, this relationship is
coming to an end.
The county officials who were
elected by the people to uphold
their best interests have not fore-
shadowed this event to minimize
the impact this closure will pose
to the county and surrounding
areas. I worry for the residents
and their families who put their
trust in officials (who) have not
tried to the best of their ability to
attract manufacturing or other
competitive-wage businesses to
start-up or move to Citrus County
Instead, more low-wage, low-qual-
ity employment is being brought to
the county in the form of discount
superstores and corner stores that
pop up in every community. The
county can't boom again if the only
opportunities for its citizens are
minimum-wage employment that
offer little or no benefits.
Citrus County must be aware of
its strong points cheap land,
skilled laborers, easy coastal ac-
cess, central location in the state
of Florida, etc. It must also work
on promoting education for a
more skilled workforce to offer


potential businesses. This is a call
to action for citizens to care
enough about each other to lobby
local government officials to find
alternative industries for the
county, and officials to channel
the pioneer spirit that the county
and its most successful residents
had and have to turn Citrus into a
desirable locale for people to live
and visit and businesses to thrive.
Charnelle Bacchus
Spring Hill

Solutions to Duke crisis
With Duke Power ready to pick
up their marbles and go home it is
obvious the brunt of the gap left in
the wake will be filled by the
property owners of Citrus County.
Many years ago, a bed tax was
instituted to cover various ex-
penses incurred paid by those
who use our county's hotels and
motels. Those paying this tax,
even if staying in Citrus County
for a day or two, contribute to the
services provided by local govern-
ment. I would suggest a 'Renter's
Tax' to help fill this void based on
the same principle.
When an individual or family
rents a dwelling, whether it be a
house or apartment, the property
owner is responsible for the ad
valorem taxes. This includes many
services with millage rates such as
schools, transportation, fire dis-
tricts, libraries, health depart-
ment, mosquito control and the


hospital board. A family of four
renting a property in Citrus
County uses many more of these
services than a homeowner who is
a retiree. Yet those residing in
rental units do not contribute to
these services.
A 'Rental Tax' of $25 a month for
each occupied unit would add mil-
lions to our county coffers and
take a large burden off the prop-
erty owners while having those
(who) use these services pay their
fair share for the services they
use.
Bernie Leven
Citrus Springs

Running red lights
Greg Wood, in his letter to the
editor, is concerned about the
"many people running red lights"
in Citrus County (Citrus County
Chronicle, Sunday, Feb. 3).
Mr. Wood does not even "try to
make turns on the yellow" lights.
Moreover, he does not "take off
right away on green lights."
Having lived in Citrus County
for 15 years, I know there are
many drivers who proceed
through intersections as does Mr.
Wood, and it's my belief such as
they are a cause of people running
red lights.
James McIntosh


Lecanto


Hot Corner: POWER PLANT


No incentive to stay
On considering the power plant
options, I can't see why Duke would
have any enthusiasm of building a
gas plant here in Citrus County. The
way the taxes are being ripped off
on those large amounts of money, I
just cannot believe the millions and
millions of dollars the county is
charging that plant to be in the
county with all the benefits we have.
I'm a businessman myself and I am
being ripped off on taxes, real es-
tate taxes, to an extent that it's al-
most hard to pay it. And the
business is down. I just can't believe
the county is using this as an issue
to raise taxes on the people.
Who's running the plant?
Am I missing something? The
nuke plant is about to lose 600 em-
ployees because Duke is shutting
down the nuclear plant, which has
not been in operation since 2009. If
the nuke plant has been out of serv-
ice since 2009, what have we been
paying 600 employees to do for the
past four years?
Needed to work with Duke
Maybe, just maybe, if the Citrus
County Board of Commissioners
had worked with Duke Energy in-
stead of immediately suing them,
600 people might not be joining the


ranks of the unemployed.
Ideal spot for a port
Now that we know the fate of the
power plant, I would think Citrus
County just received its new port
site. There's already rail, high volt-
age, port road away from residential
and nature-sensitive areas. We're
going to need a storm-water and
sewage and treatment complex. A
little engineering in expanding the
existing dock site, accommodating
new warehousing from rail to water,
and buy steam from the coal plant
- it's ideal. Let's get busy, people.
Influx of jobs as it closes
On the nuclear power plant: Why
all the fear? This is a blessing in dis-
guise. Think of all the hundreds of
jobs for years to come as Duke must
deconstruct this monstrosity. These
will be labor jobs, removal and
transport jobs, and our county and
surrounding counties have the un-
employed workforce to meet these
demands. Let's get positive about
this. The tax revenue will merely
change from property taxes to in-
come and sales taxes, as the unem-
ployed will decrease dramatically.
No bad words for Duke
Rich Nugent, the House of Repre-
sentatives in Washington, and Char-
lie Dean, the state Senate here in


Florida, and Jimmie T Smith, the
House of Representatives in Florida,
I haven't heard one of them say any-
thing bad about Duke Energy doing
what they're doing. Not one thing.
Switch to solar power
It seems everybody's kind of
freaking out Duke has pulled the
plug on the nuclear power plant.
That's really a blessing. People just
don't know it. It was an unsafe situ-
ation to start with. If that thing had
of broke down in the crack and con-
taminated everything up here, then
people would have really been cry-
ing in their soup. Don't worry about
it. You've got solar panels. Let's put
solar systems on all our buildings
and rooftops. You know, we could all
do that. We could start a new solar
system manufacturing company.
We want money now
This is in regards to Duke Energy.
Well, the only thing I'd like to say, it's
our money. It's my money and I want
it now, like the commercial says.
Make up loss with fines
We can make up a lot of the rev-
enue that we're losing from Duke
power plant by enforcing our Florida
vehicle noise laws. If we would just
start to enforce the laws and fine
the lawbreakers, that would bring in
a lot of revenue to Citrus County.


Book chronicles

state characters

Special to the Chronicle

This collection of es-
says records the voices
and souls of many of
Florida's greatest person-
alities naturalists, writ-
ers, photographers,
cooks, entrepreneurs,
artists and just plain
"country folks." Most im-
portant, meet some "real
Florida characters."
Jeff Klinkenberg has
the ability to make you
feel as if you are sitting on
that front porch, in that
diner or on that canoe
talking with the person
yourself. You are capti-
vated. His words come
alive. You can almost
smell the ambience -
often old and smelly, but
authentic Florida.
Some gems from the
book:
He refers to fall as
our spring, as we have
survived the harshest
season. Watch for birds
and fish swarming re-
newal time in Florida.
Talks about flamin-
goes being ugly and beau-
tiful, clumsy and graceful,
everything that is nerdy
and beautiful about our
state.
Highwayman artist Al
Black painted fast and
sold cheap. He made dol-
lars as quick as possible,
as he was not here to do
farm work.
Renowned black-
and-white photographer


Clyde Butcher set out to
take photos of places
folks will never visit. He
takes 60 photos a year
using a 1945 Deardorff
camera. Yes, I said 60
photos a year.
Describes bear coun-
try 20 miles between
Weeki Wachee and Ho-
mosassa just west of U.S.
19.
Come and meet
Wayne Hartley, Eustis,
Banks, Brutus and
Stormy the last four are
manatees.
Frog leg heaven at
Cross Creek.
Remarks that some
people said Ybor City
made Tampa.
Helps us understand
fire in Florida is really a
manager fires open
pine cones and spread
seeds. Burning under-
brush clears ground for
new growth for wildlife.
Jeff Klinkenberg has
been writing about
Florida for the Tampa
Bay Times since 1977. His
articles continue to ap-
pear in the paper with de-
lightful regularity. Aren't
we lucky?
If you wish to purchase
this book, it is available
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday through Friday in
the Best Little Bookstore
in Inverness in the Histor-
ical Courthouse Museum.
Call 352-341-6427.
The Citrus County His-
torical Society regularly
submits book reviews of
titles they have available
at the bookstore in the
Historical Courthouse
Museum, Inverness.


Sound OFF

High priced?
I wonder what our high-priced commissioners are
going to do now that they have announced the clos-
ing of the nuke plant. Our high-priced commission-
ers. Maybe somebody will wake up. But I think it's
kind of like locking the door after the horse has been
stolen. You know the old story? Scott Adams, give
'em hell.



TROUBLES
Continued from Page Cl

While times are tough and issues can seem over-
whelming, our community will get through this. As the
chairman of the County Commission, I can tell you
your local government will do everything possible to
make sure our community is a successful and thriving
place to call home.
While everyone will not always agree with all the
decisions we make, we are dedicated and determined
to make our county better. We have been and will con-
tinue to work hard every day to diversify our economy,
keep your costs low and ensure our quality of life re-
mains high.
The closing of this plant is an opportunity for us to
redefine our identity and focus on priorities to ensure
we are a sustainable, thriving community for genera-
tions to come.
So while we face big issues, be proud to live in Cit-
rus County. The nuclear plant does not define us and
its closing will not devastate us.
We are a community made up of more than 140,000
people, thousands of businesses, hundreds of chari-
table groups and thousands of individuals that refuse
to give up on making this county a better place to call
home. So while we pray for the families affected by
this decision and work hard to help them, I ask you
join me in the journey to make this county better, and
together, as a community, we can, we will and we must
succeed. We are Citrus County.


Joe Meek is the current chairman of the Citrus
County Board of County Commissioners.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


More guns?
I think not
I read an article that
stated if the slaves had
been armed, then there
would be no slavery If
that statement is true,
then there would be no
crime if police were
armed. These two state-
ments are examples of
wrong thinking. Police
are armed, and there is
crime.
We are the most heavily
armed country in the
world, and yet we are en-
slaved by the 1 percent
and corporate America.
Weapon escalation does
nothing but make millions
for the gun manufactur-
ers. There are 60 million
gun owners and 300 mil-
lion guns in this country
Yet the NRA, which is the
gun manufacturer's lobby,
not gun owners, says to be
safe we need "more"
guns. Each owner has at
least an average of five
guns. How many can you
safely shoot at once?
We all know police and
military people are highly
trained shooters. So why
was it one event in Tuc-
son comes to mind in
which there was a
shootout between several
cops and a robber in a
convenience store with
more than 260 rounds ex-
changed and nobody was
injured? They were able
to apprehend the perpe-
trator because everybody
ran out of ammunition.
These people are trained
and they hit nothing. How
do you figure some no-


body without combat
training and without suffi-
cient training to watch
what you might hit be-
yond the target you are
shooting at is going to be
another Ralphie from
Christmas story and get
all the bad guys? Depend-
ing on the ammunition,
you might be able to shoot
more than one person
with one round.
Suppose you come
upon two or even three
people shooting it out in a
crowd. You whip out your


mighty piece and you
shoot at who? Who is the
bad guy? Most times cops
won't be wearing uni-
forms. Some look more
like perps than the perps.
What if you shoot at the
wrong person? If you
don't know what you are
doing, you might take out
more people than the bad
guy! If you do end up
shooting at the cop, you
may be charged as an ac-
complice, if you don't get
shot and killed first.
So tell me how great it


is to have that piece after
you have shot and killed
several people including
a cop and you are in jail
while the bad guy gets
away because everybody
started shooting at you?
Roger Dobronyi
Inverness

Unions increase
our prices
This is in response to
Chuck Weiler's letter
published Feb. 4.


History tells us there
was a need for unions 100
years ago. However, we no
longer have sweat shops,
unfair wages and no days
off. Chuck said unions gave
workers income equality.
Chuck and the unions do
not realize income equality
is one of the best ways to
eliminate a person's incen-
tive to improve and get
ahead. Why would anyone
want to do a better job if
there was no way to in-
crease their wages and get
ahead other than just


showing up for the job?
Here is my personal ex-
perience with union's ex-
cesses.
Back in the 1970s I was
sales manager for "the
smallest computer com-
pany in the world" (14 em-
ployees). We developed a
new product and it was
my job to promote our
product. Since this was a
small company, I person-
ally ran the trade shows
in which we exhibited. I
could set up our booth
with the equipment in
less than one hour
At a trade show in New
York City, I was required
to use union labor. This
entailed two men to move
the boxes and unpack our
display Two different
union men then assem-
bled the booth. After that,
a union electrician was
needed to plug in the
lights. Each person was
billed for a minimum of
one hour, which resulted
in us being billed for five
man-hours at union rate
to do the work anyone can
do in less than one hour.
Of course, the same sce-
nario was necessary at
the end of the trade show
for another five hours
billed at union rate.
Do you think that is
ridiculous? I do.
This is just a simple ex-
ample of how unions in-
crease the cost of doing
business. Of course, the
price we pay for what we
buy must reflect the cost
of this ridiculousness.
Jack Flynn
Lecanto


Jim Blackshear
... MemorI al
Charitable Partner
SGolf Outing
BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS
OF OTVRS COUN-
Seven Rivers Golf & Country Club

February 23, 2013
Registration 7 a.m.
Shotgun Start 8: a.m.

S$60 per player or $220 for a
"...". -C team of four. Includes: Greens
fees, cart, lunch, door prizes
'Sif',, I ^and one Mulligan ticket.
Additional Mulligan tickets
will be available.


For online registration,
forms and
information visit,
www.CitrusBuilders.com
or call 746-9028.

(D Ci iik(!Lj!,;i'E





SCOPEIT5C

Run/Walk for Colon Cancer Awareness















Saturday, March 9, 2013 8:00AM
CREST School
Lecanto, Florida
Register at www.debbys5k.org
Debby Hudson Colon Cancer Foundation 501(c)(3)
Proceeds to benefit The Prevent Cancer Foundation
and Colon Cancer Alliance
OODUJB


Take tck in Children cf Citrus Ccuntypresents........


O0


Tok. Stock
Children


(iqDr -.4/(Dti u
L4liBim I W B)ilm f


Ci44LRP*=
V A 6


Sunday March 3, 2013-3:00 P.M.
Curtis Peterson Auditorium
3810 West Educational Path, Lecanto
Located in the Lecanto School complex
Tickets S10.00 oer person


Doors Open
2:00 PM


Sineino the hits cfthe es anda *s......
The )ne & C nly ......Ida & The Saints

Music, Leather Jackets, Poodle Skirts, Silent Auction and More!
For ticket information, please call Pat Lancaster at 352-422-2348
ALL PROCEEDS WILL BE USED TO PURCHASE SCHOLARSHIPS FOR STUDENTS IN CITRUS COUNTY
Take Stock in Children of Citrus County is a program sponsored by the Citrus County Sheriffs Office
OOODPXW

i community history literacy

OUT LOUD!


6th Annual

SAfrican

American

SRead-In



Sunday, Feb. 24,2013

2:30-4:30 PM

Listen to moving, inspirational and humorous
selections from African-American literature.
Enjoy musical entertainment & refreshments
during this celebration of history & literacy
at CF Citrus Campus. Join us out loud!
Learn More: http://facebook.com/citrusaari
cij ..i1


February 10th 2 p.m.
NCFB Music Scholarship Recital
Nature Coast Friends of Blues, Inc.
At the Old Courthouse Herritage Museum
The Nature Coast Friends of Blues are honoring our 2012-
2013 scholarship applicants with a recital giving the teen
musicians the opportunity to invite family and friends to
see them perform. Call 352-503-3498 for more information.

February 10th 2 p.m.- 4 p.m.
Key Training Center Fashion Show
At the Chet Cole Life Enrichment Center
15th annual KeyTraining Center Fashion Show and Tea.
Priize for Most beautiful hat, Most creative hat,Table with
the best collection of hats. Fashions provided by Belk & Key
Training Center thrift stores. Call 352-795-5541 ext. 311 for
tickets and more information.

February 13th 14th 9 a.m.
"Singing Valentines"
$40 Donation to the Barbershop Harmony Society
A quartet will sing two love songs,and give a rose and
Valentine's Day card anywhere in Citrus County.
Must make Reservations.
Call 352-382-0336 or 352-637-4369

February 14th 7 p.m. music starts
"Jazzy Valentines"
featuring Southern Exposure with Kim Evans
Tickets: $25 at the Museum at the Historic Courhouse
email jdavis330@tampabay.rr.com for more information.

February 15th 7 p.m.
3rd Annual Love Your Library Evening
$20 Entrance Fee
Come enjoy an evening of live music,wine, hors d'oeuvres
and a silent auction. This special fundraising event for
Citrus County Library System is sponsored by the Library
Advisory Board,and proceeds benefit all five Citrus County
libraries.
Call 352-746-9077

February 16th 7 p.m.
George Washington Carver Community Center
A Red Carpet Affair
At the Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club
Donations: $75 Single or $125 Couple
A Red Carpet Affair, Dinner and Dance, Silent Auction with
all profits to benefit the George Washington Carver
Community Center's Building Fund. For more information
call 352-257-8388 or 352-586-3230

February 16th 10 a.m.
Ozello Chili & Crafts Show
Ozello, Citrus County
Donations: $75 Single or $125 Couple
Chili tasting contest plus vendors displaying and selling
their crafts. Call 352-634-0563 for more information.


AWV^Rkc-A HAS A NOIeW F'oiNT oF Vi W N s.


C4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013


COMMENTARY


ODZBG












BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


A


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/Low
a hon
-7 rental:
vestor
Thro
ingma
poolin
closure
them
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ing sig
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nation
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Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


A I iI i'


tips on buying, renting home for extra income

ALEX VEIGA 2. Buy in area with a history
AP business writer _.._ .... A,.. --_ --


mortgage rates have made buying
ie more affordable and turned
s into an attractive option for in-
s.
)ughout the downturn in the hous-
arket, average investors, sometimes
.g their money, have bought fore-
es at a sharp discount and turned
into rentals. Many homeowners
ave purchased a second home and
d out their first property.
ough the housing market is show-
ns of recovery, demand for rental
ig is expected to remain strong. The
al unemployment rate remains
t 7.9 percent, banks are still working
,h a backlog of foreclosures and
ending requirements prevent many
s from becoming homeowners.
the Fed has said it will keep its
term interest rate, the federal
rate, at a record low until U.S. un-
yment falls below 6.5 percent,
hil laun. econollits donll't e\pect
pen iintl lte 201.15 at the earliest
tiis ilar-ket. at tiis ,point. It's
spot." s.- id Chris Princis. a senior
tl\e at flil llla l ad\II'so \ f 'Il
-Hollom Fininctial and miner off
nt Il properties in Chli( L', ol're
. thie illarket w here it's Ist startinL'
)iind. hlit still at thie bottom. with
Slooki n to e a L'ret re:,\ er. "
e are si\ tips Oln bec 11111ini1 a land-
* In est,1 in renLta I pr)pert.\
understand what it means
to be a landlord
identlil real estate .enerall\ I )ro-
three ipossiIle \wa s to :get a return
1" inlestinent whenn it's sold. as-
I' t h is Iro\ in \ii a lle. b). collect-
it and thro,:llh t\ sa\ 1,i S. silch s
rta Le interest (dedllitin1
\ iiAll elect to Ili i.\ p)ro ert for the
el nll I Inestment potential. thile 'al
I be to ensure thie rental incoIlle
the cst ,f A iiir illrtLa.Le and
I, illaintenante c sts
11 bii1 a f,:ret Ised li, lle. .c,:,llI
Sfctor- in IIthe cost of repairs to
the hlille for rent And if .11 hal\ e
_a_ on lthe propert.\.. ,\ I'll need to
pl)ared to o,\er the costs for ho, -
In. it takes t-- find a tenant
.1l estate is a reat IIln estienllt if
Share p iln' their rent." Prnc-i
If the,\ re not pI. uiI their rent. it'
blile in estlllent


Neighborhoods near universities are a
good option. For homes in residential
areas, proximity to schools can be a good
draw for families.
Condominiums and similar properties
in communities with a homeowners' as-
sociation can be a great option, because
the association arranges for upkeep on
the property.
But check the fine print on your mort-
gage and homeowners' association rules
to make sure turning your property into a
rental isn't forbidden.
If you're going to buy a foreclosure, be
prepared to compete with other in-
vestors, many of them paying in cash. And
because many require upgrades and re-
pairs, expect it will take longer until
you'll be generating rental income.
Websites like Zillow.com and
Trulia.com list foreclosures, as well as
rentals in a given area.
Foreclosure tracker RealtyTrac Inc. re-
centl.\ ranked UT S illetr, arejs. with a
popIlation f 500.000 1111 r 1 o I ,re. a i ccordin
t the isippl f i iilble fih ret lsiires fr-
s:Ale and their disoint \erslls otlherl
hiiies. jiiilnI other critenla A.iiinLl the
top 210 cities deelled thie best places tc
bi l.\ Milmii Chica'o.i. Philidelphia. El
Paso. Te\as. and PoliL.hkeepsie. N Y
Claire Thllams. a retiree in Ph,:eni\
\v om I ns 11 rental condt s in Lias \e,'s.
s.id landlords I,,,ki n. to keep their prop-
erties as incoie-LeneratinL[ rentals for-
iiian ears s ,li iild k int1O i reas nI t tc,,
e\pensli\e
A" i'illd rather hl \e Ia iIIddle-of-the-
riad rental thlit stAis rented tlin .a
Il.ller-end property I." she sa id
3. Consider using a
management firm
Deterlline \ whether .,\ ii \ Want to se-
lett thie tenant and handle property \ is-
siles 1' hire a cOIl)II l .\ t,( dk. it If \r ii
take on the responsibility. ,ii are
hobliLed to f-i\ an\ Iproble,,s leakk\
lctrets. broken fiirnaite. ett or imnd
prtessinaIs t,, d,. it
".\re ii p)rep)red to do all of thlis ,on
. \ilr weekends ,-r e\eninL.s ,,-r .Let calls
\hli le .l i're at work beci ise a pipe bu lrst
ind it' i' dinL'" asked Jimll \\anren..
hief iiimrketinL oft'icerfor prp)erb iiIaIn-
a.ellientt opiiian FirstSer itce Residen-
til Realt. "\\lit's that thresh ld w\ rth

.: Page D4


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4


Don't get mad, get educated about computers


M y grandmother saw 10 years ago?
received a Kin- Unfortunately, her
dle Fire for reaction wasn't the
Christmas. What an l same as mine. She was,
awesome gift, I of course, very grateful
thought. Now she can for the gift, but is super
take her books with her frustrated because she
everywhere. No prob- doesn't know a thing
lems with books being about computers and is
too big or too heavy, convinced she is a com-
She can email her chil- Danielle Kerese puter jinx. She once
dren and grandchil- IN THE pressed a single button
dren, Skype with MEME TIME on my grandfather's
friends and family and computer and it coinci-
look up all the things dentally crashed and
she's forgotten on Google. Who lost everything on it. Just so every-
was that man in that movie we one knows there is not one sin-


gle button you can press that will
crash a computer, it takes more
than that.
I know my grandmother isn't
the only one out there with this
problem and I am setting out to
help as much as I can. In fact, re-
cently I helped Grandma figure
out how to play solitaire. Hey, it's
a start.
If you have a basic question
about how to do something with
your computer, iPad, iPod, Kindle,
tablet, laptop or cellphone; or, if
you are wondering what Skype is,
or how to use Facebook, Twitter,
LinkedIn or what is Pinterest -


email me at dkerese@chronicle
online.com. If you can't figure out
how to do that, mail me at 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River,
FL 34429. I will take your ques-
tions and answer them in the Sun-
day business section.
Until then, I want to let you all
know of some great resources.
First, ask someone you know,
your son or daughter who might
have given you the Kindle, or
iPad; after all they would not have
given it to you if they didn't want
you to learn how to use it, so ask.

See .Page D4


Page D4


. . .. . . ..-- - --


|iit|My*Huyit>>iyiii|^|.|in..^> i...iho tyn||~ n t~


Take an


interest


gamble

Dear Bruce: Can
you please ex-
plain what an
interest-only mortgage
is? -VS., via email
Dear VS.: An interest-
only mortgage is a loan
on which, for a set term,
the borrower pays only
the interest due on the
principal. The principal
balance remains un-
changed. Interest-only
loans represent a some-
what higher risk for
lenders, and therefore
they carry a slightly
higher interest rate. The
reason most people take
out interest-only mort-
gages is these loans re-
quire the smallest
monthly payments.
The troublesome
thing about this kind of
mortgage is equity does
not build unless the
house rises in value,
which in many markets
is not happening these
days. Interest-only mort-
gages tempt people to
buy more house than
they can afford and gam-
ble on the outcome,
meaning they are hop-
ing the house will rise in
value, their income will
increase, etc.
Dear Bruce: I had a
judgment against me a
few years ago. Today,
most of my bills are paid
except for a judgment I
can't really pay How
long can it be held
against me? What can I
do? Reader, via email
Dear reader: If the
judgment has been re-
newed according to the
laws of the state in
which it was granted, it
could stay with you until
the day you die, with the
interest meter continu-
ing to run. Furthermore,
one holder could sell it
to another, who could
sell it to another, with all
of them making their
best effort to try to col-
lect from you.
Ignoring the judgment
almost surely will not
make it go away Sooner
or later, someone will
pick up on it, renew it
and come after you.
Your best shot is to try
to negotiate with the
current holder of the
judgment to see if you
can reach some kind of
settlement in which you
pay less than the
amount outstanding.
Dear Bruce: I have
read your column for
years. I have some old
stocks from the 1930s
and would like to know
if they have any value. I
have tried to look up the
companies online, and
they are out of business.
- WS., Lexington, Ky.
Dear WS.: Since you
have access to a com-
puter, you can search
out companies that will
research old stocks for
you. A good place to start
is the Securities and Ex-
change Commission's
website (www.sec.gov). It
offers suggestions for
how to go about tracking
down additional
information.
Also, the Internet has
all kinds of websites
where you can go for
help, sometimes for a
fee. By doing some
homework, you should
be able to find out if the
stocks have any value.
Dear Bruce: My hus-
band and I decided we


. .. ............... "


311 It





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Yellico joins
The Hagar Group
Veronica Yellico has joined
The Hagar Group as a life,
health and
annuity
agent.
Yellico
brings ex-
tensive
banking and
insurance
Veronica industry ex-
Yellico perience.
She will
work with Hagar Group clients
to help them secure life,
health and annuity products.
"We are excited to have
Veronica join our firm," said
Greg Hagar Senior, vice presi-
dent of The Hagar Group. "We
know she put her experience
to work to assist our clients."
Yellico has lived in Citrus
County since 1995. Call her at
352-794-6594 or email
vyellico@thehagargroup.com
Eldridge, McNeal
earn awards
Brandel Eldridge and Linda
McNeal were recognized as
two of 15
top prod-
cuers in the
nation for
Southern
Financial
and Allegis
Advisors
Brandel group.
Eldridge "We are
so pleased
that Brandel
and Linda
were recog-
nized for
this tremen-
dous
achieve-
ment," the
Linda Hagar
IVMcNeal Group re-
lease said.
'I see how hard they work for
our clients every day, so it is
nice that they are recognized
by their peers."


This award recognizes the
top 15 life, annuity and securi-
ties producers for 2012.
Southern Financial Consult-
ants and Allegis Advisors
Group are nationwide finan-
cial services firms.
Eldridge is vice president of
sales for the Hagar Group
and has been with the firm
since 1994. McNeal joined the
firm in 2010.
Established in 1929, the
Hagar Group is the area's old-
est and largest continuous in-
surance agency. With offices
in Inverness and Crystal
River, it offers a full range of
homeowners, auto, financial
services and business insur-
ance products.
Big Kmart receives
mall recognition
Big Kmart was awarded
business of the month for De-
cember at Crystal River Mall.
Big Kmart was recognized
for its charity work with Toys
for Tots, St. Jude's, March of
Dimes, Rotary and Progress
Energy. The store also came
up with ideas to help raise
money for charities, such as
using one of the mall's kiosks
to decorate and promote the
charity.
Big Kmart was also recog-
nized for its customer service,
attractive store appearance,
use of signage for promotions
and customers awareness.
Crystal River Mall is honor-
ing a businesses of the month
every month.
For information, call the
mall office at 352-795-2585;
visit www.thecrystalrivermall.
com or like the mall on Face-
book at The Crystal River
Mall.
CCA celebrates 30
years of business
Throughout 2013, Correc-
tions Corporation of America
(CCA) will celebrate its 30th
anniversary as the founder of
the corrections management
industry and the nation's


Crystal River Mall manager Millie Bresnahan awards
Kmart manager David Kellner with the December
business of the month at the Crystal River Mall.


largest provider of partnership
corrections services to
federal, state and local
governments.
"As we observe this mile-
stone of 30 years in business,
we are humbly thankful for
our people, our passion and
our partnerships," said
Damon Hininger, president
and chief executive officer at
CCA. "For three decades,
CCA has pursued future-
focused, forward-thinking so-
lutions to create programs
that have become industry
best practices."
In its first year, CCA oper-
ated fewer than 700 beds.
Today, the company has
grown to operate more than
90,000 beds in more than 60
facilities, including more than
40 company-owned facilities,
in 20 states and the District of
Columbia. CCA oversees the
Citrus County Jail.


Some of CCA's proudest
achievements have been in
the realm of rehabilitation and
working to decrease recidi-
vism. These evidenced-based
re-entry focused programs in-
clude educational, vocational
and faith-based offerings.
For example, every year
CCA helps more than 3,000
inmates earn their GED cer-
tificates. Studies have shown
inmates who earned their
GED are more likely to find
meaningful, full-time employ-
ment upon release and are
less likely to return to prison
within three years.
CCA's faith-based offerings,
such as its Life Principles pro-
gram, are another example of
innovative CCA programs.
Life Principles teaches in-
mates basic values, anger
management and responsibil-
ity. Participants are much less
likely to commit an infraction


while incarcerated and have
drastically reduced recidivism
rates.
CCA is also dedicated to
helping those men and
women who serve our nation
through the Armed Forces.
More than 1,600 of CCA's
employees -fully 10 percent
of its workforce have mili-
tary backgrounds. The com-
pany is perennially ranked by
G.I. Jobs magazine as one of
the "Top 100 Military Friendly
Employers" in America and is
the only corrections company
to earn this distinction.
Doctor attends
conference
Dr. Cheryl McFarland-
Bryant attended the Maxi-
mized Living Momentum
Conference on the Life
Changing 5 essentials of
health.
The conference in Orlando
emphasized how chiropractic
allows and restores vital nerv-
ous system health and how
the nervous system controls
the body's use of nutrients,
the immune system, the
growth and maintenance of all
organs and tissues.
It was taught by and at-
tended by doctors from all
across North America.
Bryant received coaching
from her sister, Dr. Holland of
Michigan, who attended as
well.
To hear about the five es-
sentials or to invite McFar-
land-Bryant to speak about
them, call Better Health Chiro-
practic 352-795-8911.
Win Valentine's
gift basket at mall
When you spend $100 at
any Crystal River Mall stores
from Jan. 1 to Feb. 13, you
may register to win a Valen-
tine's Day gift basket with
great prizes.
Gifts up for grabs include:
brunch at the Plantation on
Crystal River, a chauffeur-
driven Lincoln MKT to and


from brunch provided by Nick
Nicholas Ford Lincoln of Crys-
tal River, a gift basket for him
and her from Belk, his-and-
her outfits from JCP, and a gift
basket from Kmart.
For information, call the
mall office at 352-795-2585,
visit www.thecrystalrivermall.
com or Like us on Facebook.
Assisted Transition
opens office
Senior living placement as
well as referral and advisory
services will be easier with the
grand opening of a new office
from 2 to 5 p.m. Friday,
Feb. 8, at 711 N. Third St.in
Leesburg. The office will
serve Lake, Sumter, Citrus
and Marion counties.
To kick off the celebration,
The October Mountain Wash-
tub Band will perform as
guests experience a truly
southern grits bar. The ribbon
cutting ceremony is sched-
uled for 4:30 p.m.
David and Angela Wilkins,
owners of Assisted Transi-
tion-The Villages to the Gulf,
are proud to invite everyone
to the opening. The newest
office is committed to provid-
ing personalized, best-in-
class service free to clients
and their families.
Specializing in assisted and
independent living communi-
ties, a certified senior advisor
(CSA) will escort participants
on a tour of locations to meet
personal, financial and geo-
graphic preferences. A trade-
marked transition plan
provides assistance from start
to finish. Memory care, contin-
uing care and home care
services are also options
provided.

BUSINESS DIGEST
Submit information
via email to newsdesk
@chronicleonline.com
or fax to 352-563-
3280, attn: Business
Digest.


BOB LANE,Accountant
Accounting & Income Tax Returns
Fixed & Equity Indexed Annuities
(352) 344-2888 (352) 344-2599
(352) 344-2480 Fax (352) 637-5500

400 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL. 34450
43 Years in Business 31 Years in Inverness


William T. Faine, CPA, PA


Certified Public Accountant
35 plus years experience
All types of tax returns
Low rates for S Corp & LLC's
SQuality service Reasonable fees


In Pine View Plaza Shopping Center
Tim Faine, CPA 8012 W.Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River, FL




IT'S TAX TIME!


There's Still Time Left

To Place Your Ad Call

563-5592



PRICE & COMPANY, P.A.
Certified Public Accountants

795-6118
Serving Citrus County for over 30 years


Charles E. Price, EA

Federal & Out-of-State Tax Preparation
*' Corporate Tax Preparation
SBusiness Accounting Services
QuickBooks Consulting
Payroll Services

www.pwprice.com


Christine C. Eck, CPA, PA
910 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 563-2522
Certified Public Accountant Member: Florida Institute of CPAs


Tax Preparation:


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D2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013


BUSINESS











D3


CITRUS CITRUS COUNTY
Economic DeveIop..- j CITRUS Of UmN
Council, Inc. jy p Chamber of Commerce


numberr connectionn

28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


News you
can use

Make reservation
now for BWA
luncheon
Take a moment now
to make your reservation
for The Business Women's
Alliance lunch on
Wednesday, Feb. 20, at
Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club. Reserva-
tions are required by
Monday, Feb. 18. Call
795-3149 to make your
reservation.
Strawberry
Festival looking
for volunteers
and princesses
The 26th annual Floral
City Strawberry Festival
takes place Saturday,
March 2, and Sunday,
March 3 at Floral Park.
The Miss Strawberry
pageants will be held
on Saturday. Entry
forms are available at
the Inverness and
Crystal River Chamber
offices and at www.
floralcitystrawberry
festival.com. The entry
fee is $5 and applica-
tions and picture must
be turned in by Feb. 15.
Please send pictures to
reception@citruscounty
chamber.com. For more
information, please
call 352-795-3149.
Call the Chamber
and volunteer to help
out at the 26th annual
Floral City Strawberry
Festival. Contact
Megan Bramlett at
352-795-3149.
Reserve tickets
for filming of
chef's TV pilot
The reality TV show
"Meal Ticket" is filming
its pilot episode right
here in Citrus County
and you can be the
judge! The event will be
held first on Feb. 22 at
Neon Leon's Zydeco
Steakhouse in Old Ho-
mosassa, and again on
Feb. 23 at Ike's Old
Florida Kitchen at
Izaak Walton Lodge in
Yankeetown.
m General admission
is $25 per person/per
venue. Tickets are $30
at the door, space per-
mitting. Includes din-
ner and cash bar.
VIP tickets, at $50
per person/per venue,
include dinner, VIP
seating and open bar.
Advance purchase only
by Feb. 15.
m Platinum Partner
Packages, at $250 for
two people, include
VIP tickets to both ven-
ues, dinner, open bar,
VIP seating, VIP park-
ing, a gift card to each
of the restaurants and
your names listed on
the programs. Advance
purchase only by Feb. 15.
Purchase tickets at
either restaurant or ei-
ther Chamber office.


Chamber of Commerce, Economic Development

Council respond to Progress Energy announcement

N OW IS ONE OF THOSE TIMES WHEN YOUR MEMBERSHIP AND PARTICIPATION IN THE CHAMBER AND EDC IS CRITICAL.
TOGETHER, WE PROVIDE A COLLECTIVE VOICE TO HELP OUR COUNTY THROUGH THIS TRANSITION. BELOW ARE
RESPONSES AND PROACTIVE MEASURES THE CHAMBER AND EDC ARE TAKING FOR OUR MEMBERS AND OUR COUNTY.
UPON BEING ADVISED BY PROGRESS ENERGY FLORIDA THAT IT HAS DECIDED TO CLOSE THE CRYSTAL RIVER NUCLEAR
PLANT (CR3), JOHN SIEFERT, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE CITRUS COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL, AND
JOSH WOOTEN, PRESIDENT/CEO OF THE CITRUS COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, ISSUED THE FOLLOWING STATEMENT:
CCrp his morning (Tuesday, Feb. 5), we received official word
1 from Progress Energy / Duke Energy that they will
retire the Crystal River nuclear plant (CR3). While we regret
their business decision and the effects that it will have on our
economy, we should remember that they still have four major
power plants here and that Duke will continue to be a force
here in Citrus County. We will encourage them to proceed with
plans to investigate alternatives to replace the power produced
by the unit, particularly the construction of a new, state-of-the-
art natural gas-fueled plant in Citrus County. Additionally, we
will encourage Progress to engage their business development e
team to bring business to Citrus County and will work with their --
consultant in promoting significant new business opportunities
in the area. __ "
"In the meantime, the Chamber and EDC will partner with
Workforce Connection to find alternative employmentfor any
displaced workers.
"While the closing of the plant is a disappointment, the EDC
and Chamber reiterate that they will continue to support
Progress Energy's promised efforts to enhance the economic
development of Citrus County."

ADDITIONALLY, JOSH WOOTEN SENT THE FOLLOWING MEMO TO CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP:


SD) y now you may be aware of
1) the decision Progress Energy/
Duke made to decommission CR 3.
"The Chamber and EDC already
had a scheduled meeting with Alex
Glenn, state president of Florida for
Progress Energy Florida, Inc. the
first week in March. The executive
director of the EDC and I will be in
attendance.
"In light of the news and the many
issues that business owners may
face, we want to take your questions


Crystal River

Chamber

office hires

new employee
Please join us in welcoming our
newest staff member, Megan
Bramlett.
Megan, a seventh-generation
Floridian, is a graduate of Crystal
River High School and holds a
degree in
business
commu-
nications
S a n d
market-
ing from
I the Uni-
e tversity of
I Miami as
s well as
an LPN
degree.
Having traveled extensively in her
days of competitive cheerleading as
well as in her career in human re-
sources, Megan returns to Citrus
County eager to re-establish ties.
"I'm excited to be a part of the
Chamber, to have the opportunity to
share my love and knowledge of the
community with visitors and to as-
sist the Chamber in meeting the
needs of its membership," Megan
told us upon accepting the position
of receptionist/office assistant.


If you have a specific question or concern, please email it to
Cindi Fein, public relations coordinator at the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce, at cindi@citruscountychamber.com.


with us so that we convey the business
community's concerns as we look at
plans to move Citrus County forward
without the nuclear power plant.
If you have a specific question or
concern, please email it to CindiFein,
public relations coordinator at the
Citrus County Chamber of Commerce,


at cindi@citruscountychamber.com.
She will make sure that I have it for
the meeting so that I represent the
collective voice of our members.
Citrus County is a great place to
LIVE WORK and PLAY and we are
confident that the business community
will work through this transition.


"We are keeping each email sent
in a dedicated binder," says Cindi
Fein, "and that binder will be pro-
vided to Mr. Wooten prior to his
scheduled meeting with Mr. Glenn.
After the meeting, we will provide
the response information back to
the members."


Welcome new January Chamber members


These businesses chose to invest in Citrus County
with a membership in the Chamber, and we
thank them. We hope you will support these new
members and consider them when you have need.
The Chamber of Commerce and Economic Devel-
opment Council encourage you to Shop Citrus First!
All phone numbers listed are in the 352 area code.


Affiliated Health Insur-
ers
111 W. Main St.,
No. 202
Inverness
302-3532

BB&T Bank,
Beverly Hills
3527 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills
527-8110

BB&T Bank,
Inverness
2107 E. Gulf-to-Lake Hwy.
Inverness
637-4741


Citrus Buyers Guide
1241 N. Timucan Trail
Inverness
344-4777

Citrus Youth
Conference/
Crystal River Sharks
9595 W. Pimpernal
Lane
Crystal River
257-0596

Clementine Boutique
521 W. Fort Island Trail
Crystal River
794-6146


Glasswerx
4318 N. Suncoast Blvd.
Crystal River
512-6945

Fred Hale,
associate member
chef8465@
tampabay.rr.com
746-2545

Inside Citrus
Meredith@
insidecitrus.com
212-4077

Pure Elements Yoga
Wellness Center
1925 S.E. U.S. 19
Crystal River
220-3469

Rise Construction
109 W. Main St.
Inverness
419-8900


Saltface Charters, Inc.
5571 S. Victoria Place
Homosassa
628-9848
Sassified Salon
& Boutique
430 N.E. Third St., No. 4
Crystal River
464-2731
Tammy's Eatery and
Sub Shop
7781 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa
503-2046
Wal-Mart Supercenter
Lecanto
1936 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto
228-6000
Whetstone Oil Co.
1017 S.E. U.S. 19
Crystal River
795-3469


Upcoming Citrus County Chamber events


BI Feb. 19 Citrus
Today features
Dudley Calfee and
ri Cindi Fein discussing
M Strawberry Festival
2013
Feb. 20 BWA February Lunch, 11
a.m. to 1 p.m. at Citrus Hills Golf
and Country Club
Feb. 20- Ribbon-cutting, 4:30 p.m. at
RISE CONSTRUCTION, Inverness


Feb. 21 Business After Hours,
5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at SUNFLOWER
SPRINGS ASSISTED LIVING
FACILITY
Feb. 28- Ribbon-cutting, 4:30 p.m.
at SOQUILI STABLES at Faith Haven,
Crystal River
March 3 Berries Brew and Bar-
beque kickoff party, 5 p.m. to 10
p.m. in downtown Floral City
March 2 and 3 Floral City Straw-


berry Festival; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Satur-
day and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday
March 20 and 21 Legislative Days
in Tallahassee; details to follow.
Remember, coupons and discounts
also appear on the mobile and regu-
lar website!
Check out our complete calendar for
community, entertainment and
fundraising events.


9h "like" us on
facebook


7


Sara Bargiel-- Program Director for the YMCA Suncoast-- co-
hosts Chamber Chat this week and shares information about
their Diabetes Prevention Program. Find out how losing
weight and increasing physical activity can reduce your risk
of Type 2 Diabetes by 58 percent! It's the 2nd Annual
Cooking for a Cause coming up on February 24th from
6-9pm. Melissa Bowermaster from Jessie's Place tells us how
we can get tickets to this great event that features chance
auctions, live music, fantastic food and so much more!
When we think about "quitting" we thing about giving up
cigarettes, but what about smokeless tobacco? Melissa
Wood-- Health Educator for the Citrus County Health
Department-- returns to talk about Through with Chew week
February 17th-23rd. Find out which local dentists are
offering free oral cancer screenings. Dudley Calfee from
Ferris Farms brings some berries for us to sample and gets
our mouth watering for the 26th Annual Floral City
Strawberry Festival on March 2nd and 3rd in Floral Park. Be
sure to come out to the kick-off, Berries Brew & BBQ on
Friday March 1st in downtown Floral City. The fun begins at 5
and goes until 10pm!
You have 3 chances to watch Chamber Chat-- Monday
6pm-- Thursday 8am-- Friday 1pm-- every week!
If you would like your business or local event featured on
Chamber Chat-- at no cost to you-- Email Melissa Benefield
at Spotlightmelissa@aol.com. "LIKE" Chamber Chat on
Facebook for clips of past segments and updates on our
weekly show!
"LIKE" Chamber Chat on Facebook for clips of past
segments and updates on our weekly show!


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Use


Workforce as local resource


Even as we see
signs of a
strengthening
economy expan-
sion of the labor
force, uptick in the
numbers of those
with jobs, drop in the
number of unem-
ployed we know
there are still far too
many Citrus Coun-
tians without the ben-
efit of a full-time


Laura I
WORK
CONNE


paycheck.
If you've never used Work-
force Connection's job seeker
services, if you have never had a
need to use Workforce Connec-
tion, please do so now. If you
know someone who is out of
work, who may have recently
lost his or her job or has been
searching for a long time, please
share this column with him or
her.
Why? Simply put, Workforce
Connection has the resources
and staff to help pave the way
back to employment.
It starts with registering with
the Employ Florida Market-
place (EFM) at www.Employ
Florida.com. EFM serves as the
hub of the state's workforce
services system. When you reg-
ister, you can set up a personal
file folder containing: informa-
tion on saved searches, system
settings and other information
unique to your needs; career as-
sessment tools, including skills
matching the identify occupa-
tions for which your qualifica-
tions are a good fit; your own
homepage with customized
news content; ability to create
professional-looking resumes
and cover letters; and auto-
mated job searches through
your own virtual recruiter that
delivers employment opportuni-
ties to a system message box,
your own email address, or both.
EFM is free and can be ac-
cessed from home, the library,
our Workforce Connection re-
source center in Inverness or
any place you have Internet
access.
Once you are registered, book
an appointment with a trained
placement specialist. Think of
them as your personal employ-
ment advocate. They will work
with you to assess your skills
and determine which might
transfer to other occupations
you may not have considered.
They can review your resume
and help you fine-tune it. They
also can analyze your employa-
bility skills and suggest work-
shops, training opportunities
and online resources to get you
ready to compete in today's


MONEY
Continued from Page D1

were going to build the
home of our dreams for
our retirement. We hired a
builder. During the build-
ing process, we noticed
several things we didn't
like. We talked to the
builder about them, and
he assured us everything
would be all right. Well,
everything isn't all right,
and now problems have
arisen as a result.
We spent a lot of money
on this house, and we want
it to be right. Can we take
the builder to court and
force him to make these
changes? Sam and
Elaine, via email
Dear Sam and Elaine:
You can take someone to
court for almost any rea-
son. Whether you prevail
is another question.
The first thing you
should do is get a second
opinion from someone
who is qualified, such as a
private home inspector, to



KERESE
Continued from Page D1

Second, contact the
company that makes the
product you are using.
They have help lines. So
give them a call, that's
what they are there for.
Third, the Citrus County
library system is amazing.
Not only do they have free
classes teaching you how
to do all the very basics of
becoming computer liter-
ate, but they also have free
books you can download
on your Kindle, tablet and
phone, providing you have
the appropriate apps,
which they also will tell
you about if you ask nicely
Fourth, if you can figure
out how to get to
www.google.com or www.
bing.com or www.yahoo.


marketplace. For
training or retrain-
ing, they may be able
to line up financial
assistance.
Let's face it, navi-
gating the new world
of work is tough on
your own. Let us help.
In fact, we have a
Byrnes very informative,
FORCE two-day workshop,
CTION "Navigating the New
World of Work," that
may be a great place
to start. It is one of the 65 work-
shops, hiring events and resume
labs this month alone through-
out our three-county region. I
invite you to visit www.
WorkforceConnectionFL.com
and click on the Calendar of
Events to see the full array of
free offerings. Many take place
in Citrus County at our one-stop
resource center in Inverness as
well as at the College of Central
Florida's campus in Lecanto
and at area library branches.
You are welcome to attend any
workshop at any location to
meet your needs.
Here is a sample of upcoming
workshops:
Targeted R6sum6 is at 1:30
p.m. Feb. 12, 19 and 26 at the
one-stop resource center, 1103 E.
Inverness Blvd., in Inverness.
This is designed for individu-
als who have created basic r6-
sum6s and are ready for
advanced resume development
Nail That Interview will be
at 1:15 p.m. Feb. 15 at the Work-
force Connection resource cen-
ter in Inverness.
This workshop is designed for
individuals who are committed
to improving their interviewing
skills.
Navigating the New World
of Work is a two-day workshop
set for 1:15 p.m. Feb. 21 and 22.
It is designed to help partici-
pants identify employment abil-
ities and transferable skills,
develop job search strategies,
such as creation of targeted re-
sumes, and sharpen interview
skills/follow up techniques.
To register for any of the
above workshops, call 352-291-
9552 or 800-434-JOBS, ext. 1410
or sign up online at wwwtime
center com/workshop.
In addition, Workforce Con-
nection often holds recruiting
events for local employers as
well as career and job fairs.
Here are some to keep in mind:
Caregiver Services Job Fair
on Feb. 28 at the Inverness
one-stop.
Workforce Connection is coor-
dinating this recruiting event for
Caregiver Services to fill posi-


see if your complaints are
legitimate. You also should
determine how much it
would cost to have these
problems fixed. In a law-
suit of this type, the plain-
tiff asks for a dollar
amount as a remedy,
rather than requiring the
builder do specific work.
If the costs involved in
fixing the problems are
modest, it might be to your
advantage to pay to have
the work done and put the
matter behind you. If it's a
significant amount of
money, a small-claim ac-
tion certainly is warranted.
You should know, how-
ever, even if you receive a
judgment, collecting it may
prove difficult.

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.
com or to Smart Money,
P.O Box 7150, Hudson, FL
34674. Questions of gen-
eral interest will be an-
swered in future columns.
Owing to the volume of
mail, personal replies
cannot be provided.


com, anything you want to
know is at your fingertips.
Just type it in and search
away For example, if I
searched "how do I add a
picture to my road runner
email" the answer is there.
"What is Craig's List?" -
the answer is there.
Finally, there is me. I'm
willing to help. Whether
you are young or old, tech
savvy or tech tardy, hipster
or hippy everyone has
questions. Remember,
there are no dumb ques-
tions; but please make sure
your computers are plugged
in before asking why your
computer won't turn on.

Danielle Kerese is the
multimedia designer for
the Chronicle and the
go-to person for all things
related to online products
and services.


tions for Home Health Aides
(HHAs), Certified Nursing Assis-
tants (CNAs), Registered Nurses
(RNs) and Licensed Practical
Nurses (LPNs). No appointment
is necessary, but interested job
candidates must be registered
with Employ Florida and refer
to Job Order No. 9629726. For
more information, call 352-637-
2223 or 800-434-JOBS.
Spring Fling Job and Career
Fair is from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
March 27 at CF's Citrus County
Learning and Conference Cen-
ter in Lecanto.
The event will offer job seek-
ers a great mix of hiring employ-
ers and employers there to
network and share perspective.
The Veteran's "Retooling
and Refueling" workshop is
March 5 through March 7.
The three-day workshop fea-
tures instruction and career
tools to help vets develop strate-
gies and maintain focus during
career transitions. Participants
will also explore talent and ca-
reer options, learn how to pre-
pare an effective resume and
sharpen interview skills and
how to develop strategic career
campaigns.
There is no charge to partici-
pate. Interested veterans should
call 800-434-JOBS (5627) to
speak to a Local Veterans Em-
ployment Representative
(LVER).
"Land That Job" will be
from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. March
8 at CF in Lecanto.
Workshop sessions include
best practices for preparing for
job interviews, how to overcome
barriers to employment, tips for
finding where the jobs are hid-
ing and one-on-one interview
coaching. Doors opens at 8 a.m.
and breakfast and lunch are in-
cluded at no charge.
To register call 352-795-5483 or
visit www.citrusunitedway.org/
land-job.
This just scratches the sur-
face. When we say "Your em-
ployment solution starts here,"
it's more than a tagline; we
mean it. Make us prove it
Give us a call today at 352-637-
2223 or 800-434-JOBS, or visit
our one-stop center in Inverness
at 1103 E. Inverness Blvd., to
find out how Workforce Connec-
tion can help.


Laura Byrnes, APR is a
Certified Workforce
Professional and
communications manager a t
Workforce Connection. Contact
her at 352-291-9559 or
800-434-5627, ext. 1234 or
lbyrnes@clm workforce., com.


LANDLORD
Continued from Page Dl

Property management firms can
charge a percentage of the rent,
sometimes 10 percent or more.
Hiring out the hands-on landlord
job also makes sense if your rental
property is not in the same city
where you live.
4. Do the math
Although prevailing rental
prices will go a long way toward
determining what you can charge,
getting the best return on your in-
vestment starts with making sure
you're going to get enough rent to,
ideally, cover expenses and costs.
Princis' formula is charging 15
percent above monthly mortgage
and maintenance costs. So if those
costs add up to $1,000, he'll look to
charge $1,150.
Of course, flexibility might be
called for if you're unable to get a
tenant in for months and months.


JOSEPH PISANI
AP business writer

NEW YORK The next
Lay's potato chip will taste like
chicken and waffles. Or cheesy
garlic bread. Or Sriracha, a hot
sauce often used in Thai dishes.
Lay's is letting potato chip
lovers decide which one of the
three will be its newest flavor.
All of them will be sold at re-
tailers nationwide starting next
week. After trying them, fans
have until May to vote for their
favorites. The flavor with the
most votes will stay on store
shelves.
But if the other two flavors
sell well, they may remain in
stores, too, said Ann Mukher-
jee, chief marketing officer at
Frito-Lay
"Who knows, we don't know
what's going to happen," she
said. "Our intent is to keep the
one that people vote for."


Experts recommend starting
with popular rental listings in
newspapers or on Web sites such as
Craigslist.com, Trulia and Zillow,
to see what comparable apart-
ments or rooms are going for. An-
other option is rent analysis
website Rentometer.com.
The good news: Rents for single-
family homes rose 2.3 percent last
year from 2011, according to
Trulia.
5. Screen tenants
thoroughly
Once your rental starts drawing
inquiries, it pays off to screen
prospective tenants by asking for
previous landlord references and
running a credit and a criminal
records check.
Experts also recommend asking
for a deposit equal to one month's
rent, plus extra if the tenant has
pets. That will help cover any dam-
age to the property and protect you
if a tenant moves without paying
rent.
Also, have a walkthrough of the


It's the latest promotional
stunt trying to engage cus-
tomers through social media
and direct interaction, much as
Hasbro's Monopoly did with its
recent contest that ended with
the addition of a cat game token
and the demise of the iron.
Lay's Chicken & Waffles,
Cheesy Garlic Bread and
Sriracha were suggested by
three people through the com-
pany's "Do Us a Flavor" cam-
paign. A panel of chefs and
flavor experts looked though
about 3.8 million submissions
and selected about 20 flavors to
prototype. From there, the
judges picked the three finalists.
Fans will have three ways to
vote for their favorites. They
can do it though Lay's Facebook
page, by texting "VOTE" to
24477 or through Twitter using
the hashtags #SaveChicken
Waffles, #SaveGarlicBread or
#SaveSriracha.


unit with the tenant and ask they
sign off on the condition of the
property before they move in. That
will help avoid conflicts over the
security deposit if there are dam-
ages once they're ready to move
out.
6. Get familiar
with landlord laws
As a neophyte landlord, it's im-
portant to know your exact respon-
sibilities under the law.
Two good resources for rental
rules are the U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development's
website (www.hud.gov), and The
Landlord Protection Agency
(www.thelpa.com), which includes
state-specific rental guidelines and
standardized forms for rental
agreements.
An attorney or the Landlord Pro-
tection Agency also can help you
craft a well-written lease, which is
crucial to protect your property It
will help you evict a tenant or hold
them accountable for damage if
necessary


OTARYcL u The Rotary Club of

0 -I r Sugarmill Woods presents...
Ot IBILACr1 & w'Hilflt
'S SARMILLVAI N Iii [

Proceeds to promote literacy in Citrus County

February 24th, 2013
Sugarmill Woods Golf & Country Club
1 Douglas St, Homosassa '

Tickets are $85 for this magical
evening of gourmet dining,
complimentary cocktails & dinner
wine, silent auction, balloon prizes,
dancing and entertainment by the
first class singing and celebrity
impressions of Sally Langwah. .

For more info: v
RotarySMW.com
or Angela Tanzer 352.382.4700
e-mail: angela@APDevents.com

Sponsored by:

CE CitrusC 3
ww -ctntenln con


Associated Press
Lay's shows a bag of their Chicken & Waffles-flavored potato chips.
The new flavor, along with two others Cheesy Garlic Bread and
the Thai-inspired Sriracha will be sold at retailers nationwide soon.



Lay's unleashes



new chip flavor


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O Do""i $4,
per recipient.


D4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013


BUSINESS














To place an ad, call 563-5966


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 D5


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fax:352563566 I oll ree (88) 52-340 Emil:clasifeds~hroiclonlne~om Iweb it: ww~cron clen Ii n~co


YOU'LL THIS!
Remember
Valentine's Day
is Thursday,
February 14th.


Let your significant
other know how
much you love them
with a special mes-
sage from you in the
Chronicle Classi-
fieds.
$14.95
Includes 20 lines of
copy or 10 lines of
copy and a photo.
Call 563-5966
Deadline is Monday
February 13th at
1:00pm.


















How

To Make
Your

Car

Disappear...

Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!


(352) 563-5966


www.chroniclonline.co.


Cute, sweet, petite,
intelligent women
looking for a SWM,
well groomed, with lots
of energy. Age 70-80
and looking for
companionship.
(352) 212-6157 LM.







2 X-long twin mat-
tresses & box springs w/
adj frames $125; one
Qn Matress & Box Spr-
ing $40. Both in great
Cond. (352) 341-1241



FORD
F-150XL white 1995,
3L, straight 6, 2WD,
6' bed w/ cab $3600
(352) 637-5331 LM



FOREST RIVER
2010, Surveyor, Sport
189, 20 ft. Travel
Trailer,
1 slide, w/AC, qn. bed,
awning, pwr. tonque
jack, corner jacks,
microwave, equilizing
hitch, $10,500, reduced
to $9000
(352) 382-1826




YOU'LL v THIS!
Remember
Valentine's Day
is Thursday,
February 14th.




Let your significant
other know how
much you love them
with a special mes-
sage from you in the
Chronicle Classi-
fieds.
$14.95
Includes 20 lines of
copy or 10 lines of
copy and a photo.
Call 563-5966
Deadline is Monday
February 13th at
1:00pm.
fiioAfifiwT


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389

BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087




Male Chow
5 yrs old
neutered, great dog
w/kids & other animals
352-422-2719 or
352-302-5468

Male Chow
8 yrs old, not
neutered, great dog
w/kids & other animals
352-422-2719 or
352-302-5468




FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb
Delivered 352-795-0077




Black Labrador
Retriever, about 1% yrs
old, answers to "Buddy",
lost in vicinity of
W. Dunnellon Rd.
Owner is heartbroken.
(352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662


LOUb LI PT Long -Hairea
Orange and White
Tabby Neutered Male
Cat. About 3 years old.
Comes to the name
Peanut. Very Friendly
and has very fluffy tail.
Pupil of left eye has
small scar. Family pet,
kids miss him so much.
Lost in Timberlane Es-
tates, Lecanto near 486
on 2-4-13. Has micro
chip. Please call:
352-697-3402


on 2/6 a brown and
black Pug. Adult
neutered male
answers to Baxter.
(352) 212-4459
MALE BLACK CHOW
his name is Bear
lost in vicinity of
Harrison & Roosevelt
St. Beverly. If found
please call Jane
352-464-5845

( and read
Please help us find
Slater, our black and
white miniature Aus-
sie. He is about 30 Ibs
of lovable fluff. My son
is missing him terribly.
Last seen in Lecanto
on Hills pt, in Leasure
Acres. Please Call
352-586-6737 or
352-302-9404.




Beagle
found in Leisure Acres
Lecanto
Call to identify
(352) 628-5005
Found
Diamond Pendant
Ocala
Ross Parking Lot
Call to describe
(352) 489-3120





YOU'LL v THIS!
Remember
Valentine's Day
is Thursday,
February 14th.




Let your significant
other know how
much you love them
with a special mes-
sage from you in the
Chronicle Classi-
fieds.
$14.95
Includes 20 lines of
copy or 10 lines of
copy and a photo.
Call 563-5966
Deadline is Monday
February 13th at
1:00pm.
(o Y2wi


FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077




a and read
High School Student
looking for someone
to carpool to Ocala
with Mon- Fri a.m.. Will
share gas expense.
352-257-1794
Looking For House
KeepingJobs
in Citrus Hills area. De-
pendable and available
most weekdays.
352-400-8584 or
gritsarchie@gmail.com.


DATA ENTRY
LAW OFFICE
Data Entry technologist
or Paralegal with ad-
vanced technology
skills for high volume
law office case load.
Office management ex-
perience a plus. Email
resume: Lawoffdeu@
embarqmail.com




OFFICE PERSON
Wanted, must have
good computer
skills, self motivated
goal oriented and
dependable Hrly+
bonus & benefits,
Send resume to
mdp@newair.biz
or Fax to
352-628-4427




Veterinarian
Receptionist
Must have outstand-
ing organizational
skills, busy phones &
superior customer
service skills,
Veterinarian
exp. preferred.
Please Call
352-843-8387
to Arrange for an
Interview


SNow

HIRING


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
On[y $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966


IIIIIII


of Citrus County

CNA's
3pm-11
Full time and PRN
Apply in person
Woodland Terrace
124 Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando
352-249-3100


Q-H -


One of the top home health care companies in
America is currently interviewing candidates for the
following positions in Ocala,FL:




Exeln dvneetOpotnt
rAn tieves







( 6 4 t )
Apl nieat www.anmahodigscom


Chronicle


Classifieds /


In Print 1


& Online


CHpONICLE


(352) 563-5966


'c C IT wU a a 4


CHkRpNJ


I


Dental Assistant
Must be proficient in
crown & bridge
temporizing
Dental Hygienist
Call 352-465-3008
or fax resume to
352-465-3009


F/T RECEPTIONIST
BILLERR
Exp. req'd for very
busy medical
office. Computer
skills a must.
Includes benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 563-2512


Full Time/Part
Time/ Per-Diem
LPN & Certified
Nursing Assistants
All Shifts for both.
Customer Service
Oriented/Caring
Contact Lynn @
352-621-8017
Sunflower Springs
ALF
8733 W. Yulee Dr.
Homosassa, Fl 34448







HOME
HEALTH
REGISTERED
NURSE

For established
agency with strong
interdisciplinary
teamwork. Experi-
enced preferred,
willing to mentor.
Must be passionate
about patient care.
Up to $250 towards
health insurance or
healthcare expense
reimbursement, PTO
/Holiday time, and
competitive pay.
CONTACT
SET Home Health
352-564-2738
or email resume to
sethomehealth@
embarqmail.com
EOE #HHA299993458


IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS
RN's & LPN's
Hospital Experience
ICU, ER, CCU, Med.
Surge, Tele, Labor
& Delivery, Daily
Pay,
Apply onine at www.
nurse-temis.com
352-344-9828


LPN's
All Shifts,
Full Time & Part Time
Exp. Preferred
Life Enrichment
Coordinator
Apply at:
Superior Residences
of Lecanto
Memory Care
4865 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy (352)746-5483
Drug free workplace
dselsavaae@
superioralf.com
mriaaleman@
superioralf.com


NURSING
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center of
Citrus County
in Lecanto

RN I LPN
Full-time and PRN
positions available
for Florida-licensed
nurses. Full-time shifts
are 7 a.m.-3 p.m., 3
p.m.-11 p.m. and 11
p.m.-7 a.m. PRN po-
sitions available for
all shifts. Long-term
care experience
preferred.
CNA
Full-time and PRN
positions available
for Florida-certified
nursing assistants.
Full-time shifts are 3
p.m.-11 p.m. and 11
p.m.-7 da.m. PRN po-
sitions available for
all shifts. Long-term
care experience
preferred.
We offer great pay
and benefits for
full-time associates,
including medical
coverage, 401(k)
and paid vacation,
sick days and holi-
days.
Hannah Mand
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln
Lecanto, FL 34461
HannahMand@
LCCA.com
Visit us online at
LCCA.COM.
EOE/M/F/V/D -
37764




CkmCari


FIT Dental
Assistant
Experience required.
Fax Resume To:
352-795-1637 or
Email
casie@rswanson
dental.com

MEDICAL ASST

Excellent opportunity
with benefits
Strong Computer
Skills required. Up to
$15 DOE, contact
Human Resource
Dept. 855-357-6311

MEDICAL
OPPORTUNITIES

* Billing Clerk
* Receptionist
* Medical Asst.
* Scanning Asst.
Blind Box 1792P
c/o Citrus
County
Chronicle, 1624
N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal
River, FL 34429

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

RN's, PT & OT'S

Office Staff w/medical
bkgrnd, CITRUS &
HERNANDO
(352) 794-6097

SUNSHINE GARDENS
Assisted Living
Facility

CNA's
For All Shifts
No Phone Calls
Please
Apply in Person at
311 NE 4th Ave.
Crystal River or
online at www.
sawseniors. com
Click On "About Us"
Application
may be faxed to
352-563-0239




Draftsman

Custom home builder
seeking part time
draftsman with the
potential for full time
position. The ideal
candidate will have
at least 5 years
of experience
designing and
modifying custom
homes and be
familiar with local and
state building codes.
Auto Cad 2013
experience required.
Please email
resumes to mcorson
@citrushills.com.

LIVE IN ONLY
PERSONAL
ASSISTANT
ELDERLY COUPLE
NEEDS MATURE
LADY, NON SMOK-
ING TO ASSIST
HOUSE KEEPER/
MANAGER.
FINE PRIVATE
ROOM AND BOARD
IN BEAUTIFUL
HOME ON
HOMOSASSA RVR.
GENEROUS WAGES
AND TIME OFF.
DUTIES INCLUDE
CARE GIVER
ASSISTANCE
CNA LIC. HELPFUL,
BUT NOT
REQUIRED.
GOOD COOKING
SKILLS A PLUS.
SUPPLY RESUME
WITH EASILY VERI-
FIABLE REFER-
ENCES, HIGH
SCHOOL GRAD.
IN GOOD HEALTH
INCLUDE CURRENT
FLA. DRIVERS
LICENSE AND
SMALL PHOTO
IF AVAILABLE
Please send replies
to PO Box 369
Homosassa Springs
Fl. 34447 or EMail to
jprothtwo@aol.com
FAX 352-628-5351

NEW YEAR
NEW CAREER!
**-***
Tired of dead end
jobs?
Sick of workplace
uncertainty?
New opportunities
with established 35+
year local company

* Looking for goal
oriented individuals
* Training provided
* Average com-
pensation $50k+ yr.
* Company spon-
sored trips and
incentives
2 Positions Open
For immediate hire
Fax Resume to
Karen 352-726-6813
or Call 352-726-7722


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


0 u N T Yv '









D6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013


EXP. LINE COOKS
Apply in Person
COACH'S PUB
& EATERY
Mon-Fri. 8am-11am
& 2pm-4pm
114 W. Main St.
Inverness
11582 N. Williams St.
Dunnellon
Save-A-Lot Shopping
Center


HIRING COOKS
or Kitchen Help
& SERVERS

Servers Must be 18
or older.
Apply Fisherman's
Restaurant
12311 E Gulf to Lake
(352) 637-5888
Closed Mon. & Tues


Pizza Makers &
Delivery Drivers

APPLY IN PERSON
2492 N. Essex Ave.,
Hernando






AC Equipment
Sales Persons

Needed Immedi-
ately. No cold call-
ing $50-$ 100K + ben-
efits
Email or Fax Resume
mdp@newair. biz
Fax 352-628-4427


SALES PERSON

Energetic Sales
Person Needed. Ex-
perience preferred but
not required.
Willingness to
learn all facets of
operations,
Apply in Person
BADCOCK & MORE
150 S Suncoast
Blvd


SEEKING Sales
Professionals

For Palm Kia
sOUnlimited Earnings
r*Paid Training
ePaid Holidays
d401K, + Benefits
5 day work week,
Closed Sundays
APPLY IN PERSON
2305 SW College Rd
Ocala, Fl. 34471
(352) 629-8011






Body Shop Person

Exp Needed. Apply in
Person. Como RV






CUSTOMER
RELATIONS
*Call Now!* Looking
to fill immediate
positions. Training,
401(k), medical.
No exp. necessary.
$550-$800 a week.
Call Karen
352-436-4460


C fONI*E

PART TIME
CUSTOMER
SERVICE REP

* Are you a customer
service champion?
* Have exceptional
computer skills
Including Excel. &
MS Word
* Organized &
detailed oriented?
* Enjoy a fast paced
challenging work
environment?
*Avail. weekdays
& weekends?

Join the Citrus
County Chronicle's
Circulation team!

Send Resume to:
djkamlot@chronicle
online.com

CITRUS COUNTY
CHRONICLE
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
FL 34429

EOE, drug screening
for final applicant

SALES PERSON

Energetic Sales
Person Needed. Ex-
perience preferred
but not required.
A willingness to
learn all facets of
operations,
Apply in Person
BADCOCK & MORE
150 S Suncoast Blvd

Sports/Events
Coordinator
Announcement
#13-06

Performs routine to
difficult professional
and intermediate
administrative work
in planning, organiz-
ing, implementing
and supervising
comprehensive
athletic, sports and
event based pro-
grams on a year
round basis; does
related work as
required. Works
closely with the Visi-
tors & Convention
Bureau to enhance
sports and tourism
in Citrus County.
Must be available
to work a flexible
schedule to include
nights and week-
ends. Combination
of education and
experience equiva-
lent to graduation
from an accredited
college or university
with major course
work in recreation/
leisure events or
related field.
Starting pay
$1255.32 biweekly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by

Friday, February 15,
2013. EOE/ADA


el






THRIFT STORE
MANAGER in
Crystal River

Applicants must have
at least five (5)
successful years of
work experience in a
supervisory, retail
position.

$37,000 Annually
Full-Time
EXCELLENT
BENEFITS

APPLY BY EMAIL TO:
Jeremy Buzbee
Sheriffs Ranches
Enterprises
Director of Thrift Stores


vouthranches.orq

Deadline to apply is
Friday 2/15/2013.
EOE/DFWP





Choir Piano
Accompanist

P/T: 1 hr Thursday choir
rehearsal; Sun a.m
warm up plus one
service. Organ a plus.
Fax resume to
352-489-5222.
Hope Lutheran Citrus
Springs. Questions- call
Diane 352-598-4919

REGISTERED
TAX PREPARER

Parttime, Wanted for
small Dunnellon
Office. Flex Hours
Email Resume
to:taxtime200@
bellsouth.net




3 ft. Tall Beer Bottle,
exact glass replica of
a pilsner bottle $100
(352) 628-1723
Antique American
Cast Iron Toys 20+,
oriental carvings,
wood & stone 30+
2 Remmingtons, org.
size (352) 637-5958

A

II


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


DRYER $100 Works
great with 90 day full
warranty Call/text
352-364-6504
KENMORE DRYER All
Digital 12 settings Good
condition White 2005
model #84092 $100
341-0450
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179
STOVE, GE SPECTRA
Glass Cooktop, self
cleaning, bisque $200
Kenmore Side by Side
Refridg/icemaker/water
in door, bisque $300
352-795-6260
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
WASHERS & DRYERS
(352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$145.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like new,
Excellent Condition.
Free Delivery.
352 263-7398
WASHER$100 Works
great with 90 day full
warranty Call/text
352-364-6504



Office/Home furnishings
for sale. Great Prices!!
Lecanto 772-932-8939



5.5 Husky Air
Compressor T 7, H.P.
32 gal. 150 PSI $150
Craftsman 4 drawer,
steel-top work table
w/storage $75
352-447-6139
10" RIGID TABLE
SAW Model TS24121
$200, 14" Abrasive
Cut-Off Saw 408511T
$75 352-447-6139
AIR COMPRESSOR
craftsman-12 gallon ,
3hp. $75.00
352-527-7840
Auto-Repair
Manuals 1981,
1977- 1983
352-447-6139
BENCH GRINDER
ashland- 5", 3450 rpms.
$35.00 352-527-7840
SAWS
Ryobi 9" Band Saw $40;
Skill 10" Table Saw $60
(352) 628-4118
SAWS
Ryobi 9" Band Saw $40;
Skill 10" Table Saw $60
(352) 6284118
Trailer loaded w/tools
4x8x2, table saw
w/joiner, radial arm &
band saw, 40gal elec.
wat. htr, shop vac, exer-
cise bike, all for $700
352-419-8365
Vermont American
Router Table $10;
(352) 628-4118
VICE,GRINDER,4
WHEEL DOLLYALUM
LADDER, TOOLS,
Dremel Sets,Tool Box
with drawers,Vector 3M
Candel light, Jigsaw,
Weller Soldering
Gun,and Miscellaneous
All like new. Some still in
original packages.
Everything for $175.00
Phone 352-585-5351



GARRARD DOUBLE
CASSETTE DECK $25
PLAYS AND REC-
ORDS INVERNESS
419-5981
SHARP 32" TV
WITH REMOTE $20
352-613-0529


TV TV 26inch Sharp.
excellent picture $15
352 220 4158
YAMAHA RECEIVER &
TECHNICS DUAL
STEREO CASSETTE
PLAYER $100
352-613-0529
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 GOOD
CONDITION $100
352-613-0529



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
TABLET tablet 9 inch
screen..Android..Used
only 2 times...$99-
352 220 4158



Oblong GlassTable
66x40 w/6 reclining
chairs; small side table,
2 footstools, beige w/
tiny flowers. $350 Call
John (352) 422-2317



-DINETTE SET**
4 ft Glass top w/4
chairs on casters,
good. cond. $200
(352) 897-4739
2 X-long twin mat-
tresses & box springs w/
adj frames $125; one
Qn Matress & Box Spr-
ing $40. Both in great
Cond. (352) 341-1241
CHROME/GLASS
CART 3TIER,WHEELS,
FOR PLANTS OR
BATHRM STORAGE
$25 634-2004
Furniture For Sale
Appliances &
Home Furnishing,
352-527-9030
GLASS TOP
END TABLE
w/elephant base
good condition $60
352465-1262
King Bed
Head/Footboard/frame
rattan. Excell
cond.$100. 564-4202.
Pics avail
LAZY BOY
leather recliner
1/2 price, $388
352-637-3394
LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET, In Original
Plastic, Never Used,
ORG $3000, Sacrifice
$975. CHERRY, BED-
ROOM SET Solid
Wood, new in factory
boxes- $895
Can Deliver. Bill
(813)298-0221.
LG Leather Sectional
Couch, Mustard Color
Good Condition
$350 352-746-1447
LIVING ROOM CHAIR
living room chair with ot-
toman in very good con-
dition $35 352 220 4158
Living Room Set
couch & love seat
neutral colors, glass
top coffee table &
two end tables
like new $750 obo
Bakers Rack w/ glass
shelves $100 obo
Located in Pine Ridge
(419) 307-6100
MATTRESS AND
BOX SPRINGS
Great condition.
$100 Ph 621-1267
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500


alntertanmen
Center, 71" Lx 56" W
10 shelves, tinted glass
doors, fits 36" TV, exc.
cond. 352-503-5011
OAK HUTCH
COMPUTER DESK 58"
home desk call or text
for pics $100.00
352-302-2004
Richardson Solid Oak
Din. Rm, seat up to 14,
2 captain, 4 regular,
dlb. lighted hutch,
New $5,500 Asking
$2,500. obo, 746-6664
Round Coffee Table
Bamboo and glass $45
860-2475
Sectional Brown Sofa
7 months old
Like New
$500.
(352) 465-6830
SECTIONAL COUCH
12' x 10' 7 piece couch.
Black w/ turquoise, navy
blue. Very good Cond.
$325; 6 Panel Oriental
Black Lacquer & Gold
Screen $325
(352) 503-9494
Set of Twin Box
Springs & Mattress
w/ rails, $75.
2 Entertainment
Centers, 1 Black, 1
white oak, $125. for
both (352) 795-7254
SM SIDE TABLE
19X14X21H,WOOD,
GLASS TOP INSERT
$10 634-2004
Sofa/Sleeper
+ end table, good
condition, new $995
only $293
352-637-3394
STIFFEL BRASS LAMP
3-WAY SWITCH, 30"
TALL,PLEATED IVORY
SHADE $50 634-2004
TV STAND WALNUT
STAIN,SHELVESORAWERS
FOR LARGE TV
CALL FOR PIC. $95
634-2004



10 FT. WOOD
STEP LADDER
Type 1,250 duty
$90.
(352) 422-0294
COLEMAN
POWERMATE
5500 GENERATOR
11.0 HP engine
Asking $500.00
352-419-4305
CRAFTSMAN
GT 5000 MOWER
25 HP, $1,200.
(352) 344-2268
Craftsman
Riding Mower
Briggs & Stratton
Eng., 24 HP, 48"Deck
$700 (352) 746-7357
CYCLONE
Yard Vac,
with extra attach-
ments $1,100
(352) 344-2268
GREEN HOUSE
10X20 W/shutter fan
and shade cloth. $500
(352) 465-0812
UTILITY TRAILER
5X12
$700 (352) 746-7357



INVERNESS
2882 E. Fox Ct. MOV-
ING SALE-Everything
must go!Sat & Sun(Feb
9&10)8-4.Furniture,
tools, chipper shredder,
rv generator, household
items. 352-344-3839
MOVING/STORAGE
BOXES- 20 new/4 sizes
26x20x5, 22x15x27,
27x16x27, 24x24x24
$3 ea. 352-422-0294


MOW ING
SALE
Sat,2/9 & Sun 2/10
8am to 4pm
furn, tools, paint-
ings, dolls, toys, etc.
4 SYCAMORE CT W.


MO VIN G14.
SALE
SugarMill Woods
Fn, Sat, Sun, 9 to 1
furn, kitchenware,
clothes, books, etc.
2 Balsam Ct South




BEVERLY HILLS
Feb 9, 10,11 8a-3p
Complete household
and lawn care eq.
5301 N Carnation




3 Pairs of Women's
51/2 Wide
New SAS Shoes
$150.
(352) 465-0812
Black Leather
Biker Vest,
New, Never worn,
Size 44
$55. (352) 637-7124
PROM DRESS Long
blue size 13/14
strapless $45.00 call or
text 352-302-2004
PROM DRESS Long
red/black, halter, size
10/12 $35.00 call or text
352-302-2004
PROM DRESS long,
purple, 1 shoulder, size
12 $65.00 call or text
352-302-2004
TUXEDO BLACK SIZE
52. Excellent cond. 27"
inseam 46 48" waist
$75. (352)563-6410
TUXEDO WHITE
JACKET, BLACK
PANTS. SIZE 52 Excel-
lent cond. Inseam 27",
waist 46 48" $75.
(352)563-6410




GPS Magellan
Roadmate 5220-LM
Never used.
$90.00/ 352-637-5969




!!!!!33X10.5 R15 !!!!!
Good tread!! Only ask-
ing $75 for the pair!
(352)857-9232
***LT 235\85 R16***
Nice tread!! Only asking
$75 for the pair!
(352)857-9232
---225\70 R15---
Good tread!! Only ask-
ing $70 for the pair!
(352)857-9232
40 PIECE STAINLESS
FLATWARE $20 DEC-
ORATIVE HANDLES
LIKE NEW CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 419-5981
2" TRAILER HITCH
BALLMOUNT 3 1/4
DROP, 2" SS BALL,
PIN & CLIP. $25 CALL
352 344-2821
3X2 GALVANIZED
ECONOMY WIRE
FENCING 36in high x
22ft long $10 Call
352 344-2821
BIRD CAGE medium.
Good shape $15.00 Call
352-613-4279


BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING SIZES 5 &
6 SHIRTS, PANTS &
JACKETS $30
352-613-0529
CARPET: plush style
w/padding very
slightly used, mauve,
23 x 33 ft.
$350, burgundy,
17x 19ft, $250, aqua
11 x 14 ft, $100,
green grass, 2 pc's,
7 x 12 ea. $25
352-566-8814,
352-212-6918
352-249-8092
CASIO ELECTRONIC
KEYBOARD CTK 571
with stand. Like New!
$99.99 Call
352-613-4279
Chest Freezer
Kenmore, 7.1 cu ft.
perfect Cond. $100.
Sauder computer
amoir, lots of storage,
light ash finish,
like new $200
(352) 489-6761
COCA COLA CLOCK
50's look, old cars,
drive-in $20.00
352-344-2321
Complete Kitchen Set
white cabinets, rose
counter tops, sink,
trash compactor, built
in whirl pool oven,
center island w/ sink,
$200. obo
(352) 465-1892
COMPUTER DESK
L-Shape Black and
Gray $25.00 Call
352-613-4279
DOUBLE BASIN
KITCHEN SINK with
Moen faucet and spray.
Good shape. $35.00
Call 352-613-4279
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001lb,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077
FREE TOILET WHITE
COMPLETE FULLY
OPERATIONAL
(352) 476-9773
GERBIL CAGE
$20
352-613-0529
GPS Magellan
Roadmate
Never Used
$90.00/ 352-637-5969
HUNTER PURIFIER
good condition.
Extra filters $65.00
352-344-2321
INDIAN RINGNECK
100.00, CALL
352-637-6967 LEAVE
MESSAGE IF NO
ANSWER
KITCHEN ISLAND
free standing
60" x 34", American
Cherry stain, 4 drawers
2 shelves, 2 dr. cabinet
$400, 352-795-6260
LARGE (FERRET)
CAGE
H 51", L 32", W 20"
VG condition $75 OBO
(352) 795-3388
LARGE LIVE TRAP-
Trap size is 11-1/2
inches by 32 inches by
12 inches tall, $20.
352-628-0033
LOVE BIRDS 40.00,
COCKATIELS 35.00
352-637-6967 LEAVE
MESSAGE IF NO
ANSWER
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Fulls $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
Maytag Ringer Washer
Excellent Condition
$300 cash Firm
(352) 445-9448
MOVING SALE
EVERYTHING MUST
GO!
(352)220-1440


NEW BLACK LEATHER
PURSE BY ROLF $25
CAN E-MAIL PHOTO
INVERNESS 419-5981
PVC FLOOR QUILT
FRAME
40"L x 30"W x 30"H.
Very Nice. $40.00
352-628-3585
Sears Pressure
Washer, 2000 PSI,
6 HP $100; White
Westinghouse frost
free Refrigerator $100
(352) 507-1490
SOFT & CRAFTY
FIBER FILL
Three 5 Lb. boxes. New
$10.00 Each
352-628-3585
SWEEPEZE VACUUM-
ING DUST PAN Electric
$10.00 352-344-2321
TARPAULIN 30 X 20'
USED. NO HOLES.
GOOD CONDITION.
$25 CALL 352
344-2821
Wheel Chair Lift
Pro Express
Electric, lifts up & down
& encloses inside van
$1000, 2 Trampoline
mats, new springs $50
352-303-0928
WOODEN CRADLE
AND HIGH CHAIR,
great cond. $150
TWIN BOX SPRING/
MAT $50
(352) 795-7254



ADJUSTABLE QUAD
CANE 4 prong. Only
$15.00 Call
352-613-4279
COMMODE BEDSIDE -
One 16" high ($35.),
One 20" high ($40.). 18"
width. Excellent cond.
(352)563-6410
Humner Scooter Lift
Mounts on back of
vehicle $150
(352) 344-9580
TRAPEZE FOR ANY
BED Free standing,
Used very little.
$100.00 (352) 563-6410



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676



"NEW" ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR
DREDNAUGHT,BLACK
W/ABALONE TRIM $90
352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
W/GIGBAG,STRAP,
PICKS,EXTRA
STRINGS,ETC"NEW"
$75 352-601-6625
EPIPHONE ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR
W/AMPGIGBAG,
STRAPMTUNER,CORD
$100 352-601-6625



4 LOAF PANS-4 MINI
MUFFIN TINS-ANGEL
FOOD CAKE PAN ALL
FOR $10 INVERNESS
419-5981
6 GLASS CANDLE-
STICKS $5 NEW
FLUTED WHITE
QUICHE DISH $10
CAN E-MAIL PHOTOS
419-5981
ELECTRIC VEGETA-
BLE STEAMER $5
KITCHEN 4
CANNISTERS WITH
LIDS $10 419-5981


TflS Dnflaroy


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179







Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052



HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping Dr.
appts errands etc Hablo
Espanol 813-601-8199








SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518


JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




Diesler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


-ZS3I N


GENIE
We Cleon Windows and a Whole tot More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping Dr.
appts errands etc Hablo
Espanol 813-601-8199




COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907


NEED SOMEONE TO
GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?

WE MAKE IT




DISAPPEAR FOR LESS
IF YOU WANT IT
TAKEN AWAY...CALL FOR A
FREE ESTIMATE TODAY!
352-220-9190





BATHFITTER

"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194

**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352422-7279**




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777

ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201


Affordable Handyman
* FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 A*
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *k
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570




NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
$20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


GENERAL' p i
Stand Alone ..:
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac- Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377








AAA ROOFING
Call the "t ak6usters
Free Written Estimate

$ 100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof
SMust present coupon at time contract is signed .
ic/ns. 4CCC055 7 DWEQ


Cleaning Svc-Home,
office,windows,
pressure washing &
more. 352-322-1799



AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



BEAT ANY PRICE
Paint & Power wash
Lawn & Trees Trim
Jim (352) 246-2585
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570



AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up time.
352-220-4244



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767


Add an arlisic ouc to your existing yard





"POften imitated,



OUR 'INTERLOCINOBRIICK PA VESPKIAUSr
COPES
POOL AND PAVER LLC
& Ired352-400-3188





Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
SRepairs
\ -, Small Carpentry
Fencing
Screening
Aean Dryer
Vents
lto'd,'jae & Dependable
Exprience lifelong
352-344-0905
c ll 400-1722
o ured -Lic#37761


All Tractor & Tree Work
Househid, Equipment
& Machinery Moving
(352) 746-7318
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570




CHRIS SATCHEL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
BEAT ANY PRICE
Paint & Power Wash
Lawn & Trees Trim
Jim (352) 246-2585
Cleaning Svc-Home,
office,windows,
pressure washing &
more. 352-322-1799
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713





DGS SERVICES LLC
Reroofs Metal Roofs
REPAIRS Home
Inspector 414-8693




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


CARPET & c
UPHOLSTERY
CLEANING

Specia RziNgin: Certificates
Carpet Stretchin Available
Carpet Repair
352-282-1480 cell
352-547-1636 office
Free In Home Estimates
Lic & Ins LfetimeWarranty


COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn Re-
moval 352-302-6838





A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452

All Tractor & Tree Work
Household, Equipment
& Machinery Moving
(352) 746-7318

DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852

KING's LAND CLEAR-
ING & TREE SERVICE
Complete tree & stump
removal hauling, demo
& tractor work. 32 yrs.
exp. (352) 220-9819

LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570

R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827

RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825





344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


ALL EXTERIOR

ALUMINUM, INC.


352-621-0881
FAX 352-621-0812
6" Seamless Gutters
Screen Rooms Car Ports
Hurricane Protection
allextalum13@yahoo.com
Citrus Lic. #2396 LICENSED & INSURED


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) C




PARTS 120 Gallon
Retention/Contact Tank
2Yr old garage kept like
new. Pd 625, best offer.
Chlorine tank and at-
tached pump $200
352-270-3253


-I
2 Tins Remmington 22
Long Riffle Shells
Collector's Items
$100 ea. Cash
1 Brick Super X, 22
Long Rifle HP, hallow
point, shells $100 Cash
(352) 445-9448
14 FT JON BOAT
w/Honda Four Stroke
5HSP Motor $1498
352-637-3394
1997 EZGO ELECTRIC
GOLF CART Current
batteries dead needs 6
good ones and electrical
rewiring. Motor runs
great. Has horn, full new
rain enclosure, rear
lights, ball/club cleaner,
ice chest holder, 2 sand
holders. Could use a
repainting. Steal at
$689.00. 352.746.2214
orjpastok@aol.com
5HP, Game Fisher
Outboard, with Tank
Just tuned up
$450
Will take Gun on trade
(906) 285-1696
CLUB CAR
2000, Burgundy
curtain, lights, exc.
condition $1800.
352-382-3928
CONCEALED
WEAPONS CLASS
EVERY SATURDAY
11 am, $40
132 N. Florida Ave
(352) 419-4800
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
DRIVER Callaway
RAZR Driver senior flex
13.5 premium RIP shaft
excellent
$95.00 352.503.7740
Driver Callaway RAZR
Senior flex 13.5
Premium RIP shaft
excellent $95.00
352.503.7740
DRIVER CALLAWAY
RAZR
Senior flex Premium
RIP shaft
$95.00 352-503-7740
DRIVERS Lefty NIKE,
CALLAWAY, COBRA
less than 2 yrs old,
$50.00 & up
352-220-3492
EASY GO GOLF
CART, 98, Exc Cond,
w/ Charger, good tires,
almost new batteries,
enclosure, in garage
$1500 352-527-3125
KEL-TEC .380 auto
$325; Davis .380 auto
$300. Testing
available
(352) 447-6139 or
352-228-7585
LADIES COBRA S3
Max Excellent
$95.00
1 year old
352-220-3492
PISTOL GSG 1911
.221r pistol. NIB. 5"
barrel, includes five 10
round mags. FL. ID
and over 21 required.
$400.00 firm.
352-527-4352
POOL TABLE
Bar Room Style Full
Size Pool Table.
Slate-top. Good bump-
ers and felt. $800 OBO
352-446-3320
REMINGTON WING
MASTER 870, improved
cylinder .20 gage w/ 2
stocks. $450. Testing
available, bring clays.
(352) 447-6139


CHRONICLE




Max excellent
1 year old $95.00
352-220-3492
Ruger 44 Carbine
$400, Sig Sauer
Revolution Compact
C3, night sights 45acp
$800 352-441-0645
Set of Left Handed
Golf Clubs, plus bag,
good condition
$200
(352) 795-4942
Smith & Wessen
Revolver, model 638,
J frame, .38 cal. + P
perfect for conceal
carry, weigh 15 oz.
New In Box, $525.
352-637-0844
TRADITIONS
Buckhunter inline 50
Caliber, blk pow. $125.
High point C9 9mm
$350 Testing available.
(352) 447-6139

Leek
Wanted: EAGLE
642C GPS or EAGLE
502C GPS in good
working condition
(414) 550-2464



5 x 8 Utility Trailer
Plank Floor,
18" sides, drop ramp
Excellent Condition
$500. cash
(352) 445-9448
2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1895
call 352-527-0555 *
HITCH BALL ON
MOUNT, 2 INCH AND 1
7/8 EACH ON 1 1%
INCH MOUNT $20
EACH 353 726 9983
UTILITY TRAILER
5X8 w/ stake sides,
1%x4 in tongue &
grove floor, new tires,
spare, wheel bearings
w/ bearing buddies
$575 (269) 532-8100

Sel r wa


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111



CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
FREE PUPPY
would like medium
size dog, pls call
352-489-3016
Good Used Electric
Golf Cart w/backset,
reasonable will throw in
5000 watt generator to
be subtracted from price
of cart. 352-564-0726
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


CLASSIFIED


Wanted: EAGLE
642C GPS or EAGLE
502C GPS in good
working condition
(414) 550-2464




1 Sweet Little Male
Yorkie,
CKC reg., $375. Fl.
health certs.,
Call
(352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258
2 Maltese Puppies
Left, 1 female $650.
1 Male $600, CKC reg.
will have Fl. Health
Cert.. Call to come
play with them,
(352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258


Baby Girl
Baby Girl is a 3-y.o.
spayed terrier mix,
weighs 48 Ibs,
heartworm-negatve,
housebroken.
Friendly, likes chil-
dren, other dogs,
lived with a cat,
which she liked.
Walks well on a
leash, is a fun-loving,
active girl,
well-mannered.
Sweet, energetic girl
is waiting to meet
her forever family.
IDC# is 15902545.
Call 352-746-8400.


MEEKO
Meeko is a 2-y.o.
terrier/pit mix, a
perfect gentleman.
Very mellow, with
quiet dignity, calm
energy, very low
key. Weighs 70
pounds, beige and
white in color,
housebroken, easily
trained,. Gets along
with other dogs. His
kind and pleading
eyes will win your
heart, a perfect
dog to join you on a
walk. He is a sweet-
heart of a dog,
patiently waiting
at Citrus County
Animal shelter.
Call Karen @
218-780-1808.


Starting@ $400.
Registered
Lots of colors, Beverly
Hills, FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.ne







SKIPPY
Skippy is a
7-8 y.o. Redbone
Coonhound, sweet,
trusting, loving and
non-aggressive.
Fostered since Sep-
tember, he would
do best as the only
dog in a home.
Loves walks and car
rides, RV's, etc. Not
a barker. He wants
a hug before his
morning walk, then
he happily skips
along. He is the
ideal "good dog",
a loving and faithful
companion.
Call Judy @
352-503-3363.



Bermuda Hay 501bs $6
Never been rained on
795-1906 586-1906
SHAMROCK FARM, CR



LIQUIDATION SALE
Horses & tack, new &
used. 352-873-6033

Livestock


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111



FREEDOM 12
FISHING KAYAK
w/ elec trolling motor,
battery, & accessories.
$800. (419) 871-2210



** BUY, SELL**
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
"352-563-5510"







C DORY
1999 16ft, Angler, with
trailer, Honda 4 stroke,
40HP, $7,800 Floral City
(717) 994-2362 Cell


For more information on how to reach H I(O N IC L
Citrus County readers call C ITRUS CO
352-563-5592. www-chronicleonline.com


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 D7


I 1


It s your right to know.



NOTICE what s going on in your community.






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Property Auctions




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YOUR CHOICE


EXPERIENCE BUICK-

BRAND NEW 2013


32 MPG

24 MONTH LEASE INCLUDES: -
2 YEARS MAINTENANCE
.2 YEARS SIRIUS/XM RADIO
.2 YEARS ONSTAR DIRECTIONS
& CONNECTIONS





0 MAINTENANCE FEES


Jl E I C U 1 1 l -I


BRAND NEW 2013
IGMC TERRAIN SLT-1
32 MPG A


* AM/FM/CD/XM/MP3
* REAR BACKUP CAMERA
* CRUISE POWER OPTIONS
* BEST IN CLASS


0% FINANCING AVAILABLE


MO.
LEASE*


VIEW OUR ENTIRE
INVENTORY ONLINE!


BUICK 1C"KI IlVH

1275 S. Suncoast Blvd./ US Hwy 19
Homosassa 352-795-6800
*2013 GMC Terrain: 39 mo. closed end lease, $3,499 total due at signing. 2013 Buick Verano: 24 mo. closed end lease, $2,619 total due at
signing. Plus tax, tag, title and 499.50 dealer fee. Includes all available incentives and rebates assigned to dealer. 12,000/mi., year, $.20/mile for
overage. Lessee pays for excess wear.WAC. (1) See dealer for details. (2) WAC. See dealer for details. Photos for illustration purposes only.


a inn.Pu atg ttead495 elrfe.Icue l vialeicnie n eae asge odae.I,00mya,$2/ieb









D8 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013


BAYLINER 175
2007, Bownder, garage
kept, Bimini top, custom
cover, depth finder, only
44 hrs on motorpristine
condition! $14,000.
352-560-7377
CRYSLER
'98, Seabring convert-
ible, red, excel. cond.
always garaged
$4,000 (352) 628-1723
DOCK SPACE
AVAILABLE
In Crystal River
Deep Water Canal
(352) 212-4839
GALALEO
Duck Boat 17ft
w/25 HP Longtail
Go Devil, new trailer
Great Shape! $5000
firm 352-341-0336
or 352-586-8946
KAYAK
Current Designs
Shirocco, 16ft 10"
yellow sea kayak
$600, 352-464-4955

















PENN YAN
1979 27' Sports fisher-
man wi trailer, needs
some work. $4000

PONTOON
'97, Suntracker, 21ft.
50HP, 4 stroke, Merc.
alum. deck, kept un-
der roof. clean, no
trailer $5,500 637-5958
SWEETWATER
2008 18 ft. Pontoon,
60HP, Yamaha, 4
stroke, $11,500, no trlr
(352) 257-9496
TRI PONTOON
BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
(352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
WELLCRAFT 1989
18' Sport C/C, T top,
150 Yam. Alum TIr,
Great Cond. $5800
Cr Rvr (513) 260-6410




ITASCA
2007 Navaron 23H
Mercedes Diesel, 2.7L,
17 mpg, generator, AC,
one slide out, sleeps 5,
excellent condition,
$55,000 make offer
352-422-1309


ITASCA MERIDIAN
36 Ft, 2005 Motor Home
350HP Cat Diesel 55K
miles, no smoke/pets
6 Michelin Tires, New
2010 qn w/ sleep No.
mattress & overhead
fan. W/D combo
$71,000 obo.
(352) 419-7882
NATIONAL RV
2006 Tropical One
owner,34ft, 26000
milesno smoke/pets,
300HP Cummins die-
sel,2 slides, 6 new ti-
res, 3yr
warranty,many extras.
$87000. Well main-
tained. 352-341-4506
SUNNYBROOK
2008, 35FT Fifth Wheel
3 slides, electric awning
fireplace, 2 ac's, 50 amp
king bed, pmts assum-
able @ $424 per mnth.
352-279-3544




5TH WHEEL
33FT
GOOD CONDITION
MUST SELL
(423) 202-0914
BROOKSIDE
07,By Sunnybrook
32ft, 5th wheel,2 slides
exc. cond. loaded,
stored under cover
ask. 15k,352-795-0787
or 352-208-7651
Brooksville Deeded
spacious, shaded cnr
lot, 1BR/1BA, Large FL
room, Large storage
shed & patio. 55+ RV
Park w/ heated pool,
and music activities,
$36,000 352-848-0448,
352- 428-0462 anytime
Coleman, 2001
Utah pop-up, new ac &
tires, elect. & gas heat,
slide-out dinette, sleeps
6 to 8, sink, 3 way
fridge, inside/out stove,
awning, 1 owner, ready
to go! $4000.
352-795-9693
FOREST RIVER
2010, Surveyor, Sport
189, 20 ft. Travel
Trailer,
1 slide, w/AC, qn. bed,
awning, pwr. tonque
jack, corner jacks,
microwave, equilizing
hitch, $10,500, reduced
to $9000
(352) 382-1826
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
POP-UP CAMPER
FOR SALE
$2500 obo
352-302-6838
ROCKWOOD
'04, 29 ft., Ultra Lite,
SS. Appls Qn. Bd., Full
Bath, all equip, incl'd
$8,500 obo, 382-0153
RV Liquidation Sale at
TP Tire on HW 200 in
Ocala. Wed Sun.
352-476-1702


SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, kg bd,like new,
60amp serv. NADA
$29K asking $25K
obo 352-382-3298
WE BUY RVS,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945



**BEST PRICE-
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
"352-426-4267"**
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everbody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE.
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 5 6 3 -1902
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.
BUICK
1996 Regal 125k
miles,motor rebuilt
@90k. A/C doesn't
work,dents and dings,
but runs good.$1200
obo 563-1638
CADILLAC
1994 DEVILLE
79K MILES, CAR IS
PERFECT $4995
352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2005 STS
LOW MILES
NICE CAR
$9850, 352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2011 CTS, LOADED
ONLY 15K
MILES, SUNROOF
$27,850 352-628-5100
CHEVROLET
2002, Camaro Z28
$9,495.
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2006 PT Cruiser conv....
weather is getting
nice.. .time to drop the
top...call 352-628-4600
to set appointment
to see
FORD
1995 Escort wagon
4cyl., Auto,
call 352-628-4600
for low price and
appointment


2000 Escort ZX2
4cyl. 5 spd, air, runs &
looks good asking
$1775 352-637-2588
or 845-588-0759
FORD
2011 FIESTA SDN
36K MILES, "S"
MODEL, ONE OWNER
$9950, 352-628-5100
FORD
Mustang Cobra, Indy
500 Pace Car-1994,
Convertible, 7100 mi,
Gar. kept 252-339-3897
HONDA
'06, Civic LX, 27K mi,
Almost like new, with
extras $11,500.
(352) 419-2924
HONDA
2010 ACCORD LX,
85K MILES, NICE,
$12,850 352-628-5110
LINCOLN
1998 Continental
FULLY LOADED, New
tires, new battery.
$2,000.00 OBO
352-503-7922
MINI COOPER
2008 2DR, HARDTOP
ONLY 20K MILES,
SUPER CLEAN
$13980, 352-628-5100
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
MUSTANG
1985, coupe, 58k mile
new tires, 4 cyl, auto
$2000 obo
(352) 228-4012
MUSTANG GT 03
63k,ShowCar,Super
charger, lots of goodies!
Chrome, $18k OBO
(352) 228-4012
PONTIAC
2003 Bonneville, must
SE, V6,pw....pl....priced
to sell.....call jan at
352-628-4600 for
appointment
and pricing




AUTO SWAP
CORRAL SHOW
20TH ANNUAL
Sumter
Swap Meets
SUMTER COUNTY
Fairgrounds, Bush-
nell
Feb. 15, 16, 17th
1 -800-438-8559




BLj- J


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


CLASSIFIED




CHEVROLET
1994,C/K 2500
$2,880
352-341-0018

CHEVROLET
2005, Silverado
2500 HD, Diesel crew
cab, $13,880
352-341-0018

DODGE
1997 Ram 2500 Truck
Cummins Diesel, 2WD,
Auto Trans,116,000
miles. Garage kept.
Well maintained. Has
been used as a com-
mute vehicle. $7,800
firm. 352-464-4690

DODGE
2005 Dakota SLT, 4wd,
door, V8, towing pkg,
BIk, 88k mi, exc cond
$13,400 (352) 341-0725

FORD
1999 F150 Good
condition, 4 new tires
$4200 352-270-7420

FORD
2003 F150
Ex Cab, $8,990
352-341-0018

FORD
F150, 1978, 4x4
Runs good, 6" Lift kit,
$1,650 obo
(352) 564-4598

FORD
F-150XL white 1995,
3L, straight 6, 2WD,
6' bed w/ cab $3600
(352) 637-5331 LM

MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.org
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

TOYOTA
2002, Tacoma,
Crew Cab, $8,770.
352-341-0018




BUICK
2005 RANIER
46K MILES, CXL
LIKE NEW
$9850, 352-628-5100

CHEVY TRAIL-
BLAZER LT 05
exc. cond. asking $6000
obo, in Hernando
(904) 923-2902

HONDA
1997 CRV, priced to
sell.... it's a honda
auto, pwr windows
call 352-628-4600 for
special newspaper
pricing

KIA
2012 SOUL
ONLY 7K MILES
$15,800 352-628-5100

SUBARU
2011 FORESTER
29K MILES
ONE OWNER
$17850, 352-628-5100

TOYOTA
1997 RAV 4
ONLY 89K MILES,
NICE $5850,
352-628-5100


JEEP
2000, Grand
Cherokee 4x4, V8
pw, pl, priced to low
to list.....call adam at
352-628-4600 for
appointment
JEEP
2001 4cyl "TJ" Auto.,
A/C, soft top with lift kit.
not a mudder, real pretty
Low miles $10,000
352-220-4634




DODGE
96, right nm 250
155k, runs excellent
$1900, 315-272-5393




BAD BOY BUGGIE
2011 "ready to hunt"
Only $5998.
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS
2002, SPORTSMAN
700 CC 4X4 AUTO
READY FOR THE MUD
ONLY $4288
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS RZR 800 LE
TIME TO PLAY HARD
ONLY $8388
(352) 621-3678




96 SOFTAIL
striped-lowered
Chromed-Out, 11k mi.
$10,500, 352-634-3990
CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492

Harley Davidson
2005, 883
LOW MILES
$3,995.

Harley Davidson
2006, STREET GLIDE
EZ FINANCE
$11,500.

HONDA
2009, VT750 AERO,
CLEAN
$4,995.

SUZUKI
2001, VOLUSIA
EZ FINANCE
$2,995.

KAWASAKI
1999, NOMAD
RUNS GREAT
$3,800.

LUCKY U CYCLES
352-330-0047
WWW.LUCKYU
CYCLES.COM








Harley-DAVIDSON
2006 FLHTPI Clean
bike, great looks, 88 ci,
5 speed, low miles 19K,
accident free, never
played down, garage
kept, two tone bk/wt, all
service done by HD
dealer 352 513-4294
asking $10,500


Harley Davidson
2009 Street Glide
Black, 20k, many extras
$18,500 firm, pls call
**352-422-5448*

HONDA
2002, Shadow Aero,
1100CC,
great cond. $3,200.
(352) 586-6325

HONDA
2003 SilverWing
Scooter, 582cc,
low miles, good cond
$2700. 352-621-0435

Meeting1
rNoices.^


Motorcycles


HONDA BLACK BIRD
CBR 1100 LOW LOW
MILES ONLY $3488.00
(352) 621-3678

HONDA ST1300
2006 MADE TO TOUR
ONLY $7786
(352) 621-3678

KAWASKI NINFA
650
LIKE NEW ONLY
$5488 (352) 621-3678

KYMCO
2009, AJILITY
SCOOTER GREAT
GAS SAVER ONLY
$998 (352) 621-3678

SUZUKI BURGMAN
AUTOMATIC TWIST
AND GO FUN ONLY
$4686 (352) 621-3678

Meeting^
Notices


315-0210 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION: ORDER TO DEMOLISH HOME & SECURE POOL
CASE NUMBER: 134197
Description of property: AK: 1484308 and legally described as BEVERLY HILLS UNIT 6
SEC 1 PB 11 PG 89 LOT 6 BLK 100
DIANA L GREENLEAF
222 S BARBOUR ST
BEVERLY HILLS, FL
On December 13,2012, an order was issued by the Citrus County Certified Building
Official to demolish the structures) on the property located at: 222 S. Barbour St.;
Beverly Hills, FL. If the property owners) fail to comply with this order, the Code Com-
pliance Division will issue a work order to abate the nuisance condition.
Any persons) having a legal interest in this property may contact the Code Compli-
ance Office within 30 days of this publication. Board of County Commissioners, Dept.
of Planning and Development, Code Compliance Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, FL. 352-527-5350. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
February 10, 2013.


316-0210 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will
meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, February 14, 2013 in Room 166 of the Lecanto Gov-
ernment Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Engi-
neering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352)
527-5446.
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes)
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days be-
fore the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
February 10,2013.


317-0210 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Public Safety Coordinating Coun-
cil will meet on Friday, February 15, 2013 at 2:00 P.M. at the Citrus County Court-
house, 110 North Apopka Avenue, 2nd Floor Administration Conference Room, In-
verness, Florida, to discuss business of the Public Safety Coordinating Council which
may properly come before them.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two (2) days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Telephone
(352) 341-6580.
If a person decides to appeal any dedsion made by the Public Safety Coordi-
nating Council with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY:
Tobey Phillips
Executive Assistant to the Board
February 10, 2013.


Save Now On All 2012 And 2013 Models In Stock


*$299 mo at 39 months.$2,628 Cash Cap Reduction, 12k miles per year Plus tax,tag,title and dealer fees.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUZUKI GSXR 750
195 MILES "HOLD ON"
ONLY $9996
(352) 621-3678



VI-^


TOY

HAULER
27' 2005 Work & Play
$14,500.
(352) 634-3990

VICTORY CROSS
ROADS
"GREAT American
MADE CRUSIER"
ONLY $12888
(352) 621-3678

Meeting^f
Notices^




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DOWN

PAYMENT'

IstMONTH'S'

PAYMENT


DUEAT

SIGNING'

MAINTENANCE2

'PLAN


IU.....i ExiumleDeal: 2013ESCAPESE I $278 MO./36mo. Red Carpet lease
] jlSecurity deposit waived; taxes, title and license fees extra.
I 2. Not all buyers will qualify for Ford Credit Red Carpet Lease. Payments may vary; dealers determine prices. Residency restrictions apply. First month's payment paid by Ford:
Fiesta up to $275; Focus up to $300; Fusion up to $350; Escape up to $350; Edge up to $400; Explorer up to $425. Cash due at signing on Fiesta is after $500 cash back; Focus is
after $750 cash back; Fusion is after $250 cash back; Escape is after $750 cash back; Edge is after $1,500 cash back; Explorer is $2,000 cash back. 3-year/45,000 mile Basic
Maintenance Plan on eligible featured vehicles includes a maximum of 4 regularly scheduled maintenance services. Take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 4/1/13. See dealer
for qualifications and complete details. Vehicle shown may have optional equipment not included in payment.

YOU'LL FALL IN LOVE WITH THESE DEALS
A -A A


2013 ESCAPE SE
36 mo. Red Carpet lease


2013 FIESTA SE
26 mo. Red Carpet lease2

$198 MO
$0.00 Down Payment $0.00 Due At Signing
Security Deposit Waived, tax, title & license tees extra


tified Pre-Owned


2013 EDGE SE


2013 FOCUS SE
16 mo. Red Carpet lease


$0.00 Down Payment $0.00 Due At Signing
Security Deposit Waived, tax, title & license tees extra


2013 EXPLORER XLT
16 mo. Red Carpet lease


2013 FUSION SE
06 mo. Red Carpet lease

$278 MO
0.00 Down Payment $0.00 Due At Signing
Security Deposit Waived, tax, title & license tees extra


* 172-point inspection by factory-trained technicians
*7-year/100,000-mile powertrain warranty coverage**
* 12-month/12,000-mile Ford Comprehensive Limited Warranty Coverage**
*Vehicle history report *24/7 Roadside Assistance


2009 FORD FUSION SE
Extra clean sunroof. NPR632
$18,968


2011 FORD FIESTA SES
Loaded, loaded, loaded. N3C057D
$ 19,668


2010 FORD ESCAPE XLT
The right size SUV. NP5767A
$19,968


2009 FORD FUSION SEL
The import beater for real. N2T247A
$19,668


2011 FORD ESCAPE XLS
Only 10k miles. NN2T313A
$21,668


2008 FORD EDGE LIMITED
One owner limited. N3TO99A
$22,668


2011 FORD FLEX SEL
Room for the whole family. N2C292A
$25,668


2010 FORD MUSTANG GT 2009 FORD ESCAPE XLT
Just reduced. NP5748 Just reduced. N2T257B
$25,968 $18,668


2010 FORD EDGE LIMITED
Vista roof and nav. N2T351 F
$29,968


2010 FORD F150 LARIAT SUPER CREW
Extra sharp lariat crew cab. N2T296A
$31,668


2010 FORD EDGE LIMITED Certified Pre-Owned
Don't miss this loaded limited. N2T374A "Not all buyers will qualify for Ford Credit limitedterm financing on select vehicles APR
$3 1,968 See dealer f plete qualificati d program details **Seeyourdealer
^ ^ s ^ y V Ofor limited-warranty coverage details. Vehicle availability varies by dealership.


2005 CHEVROLET MALIBU 1995 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE ORVIS4X4 2003 FORD CROWN VICTORIA LX 2007 CHEVY UPLANDER EXT LT 2006 FORD EXPLORER XLS 2005 FORD MUSTANG 2003 JEEP WRANGLER 4X4
Great starter car. NP5740B Great SUVw/Iots of options. N2T386B Great car. N2C294B Roomrn for the whole family NP5642B Nice explorer for not much money. N3CO32A Low mileage pony car. N2T410A Extra clean and ready to tow NP5777D
$7,868 $7,968 $9,868 $12,668 $13,968 $13,968 $14,968



2008 SATURN VUE XE 1965 FORD MUSTANG 2007 MAZDA MX.5 MIATA CONVT 2009 PONTIAC TORRENT 2006 FORD F15O LARIAT SUPER CREW 2010 CHEVY MALIBU LT 2006 GMC SIERRA CI1500 CREW
Extra clean. N2C249A First time offered for sale in 33years. N2C033M Affordable top down fun. N3T056P Looking for new home & loves kids.N2T215M This one has the wow factor N2T209P Only 22k miles and loaded. N2C161A Loaded one owner. N3T206M
$15,668 $18,000 $18,668 $18,968 $19,968 $19,968 $22,668



2008 FORD MUSTANG BULLITT 2008 FORD FISO SUPER CREW 2010 FORD F ISO STX SUPER CAB 2011 DODGE RAM 1500 BIG HORN 2008 FORDF350 LARIAT DUALLY CREW 2011 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER 2012 HISSAH FRONTIER SV 4X4 CREW
Limited and collectible Bullitt N2T153E One owner local trade. N2T307B Only 16k miles. N3T228A Loaded SLT, CREW CAB. NP5786D Loaded 24k mile dually. NP5744A One owner and loaded. N3T145A Only 7k miles. N2T302A
$23,968 $23,968 $24,668 $25,668 $30,668 $33,668 $27,968
Inglis Dunnellon
200 Ocala
Cya Beverly Hills4
3 Crystal
River "WY.44 nverness
Floral City
49 Nick Nicholas -
Homosass 4WI. -X
a Springs Hwy.98
Brad Hill
Salesperson SpringHwy.50
of the Month Hill Brooksville


All Ford Certified
Pre-Owned Vehicles
Come With:
- KL_


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 D9


I


I


I


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PIP Z~L


$2,199 due at signing (after all offers). Includes security deposit. Tax, tille, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Mileage charge of $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $35,795.36.






w/ Base Preferred Equipment Group
Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For Qualified
Lessees -


-'dam -,WW /MO. 36 MONTH LEASE
$3,319 due at signing (after all offers eIncludes security deposit Tax, tile, license dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Mileage charge of $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $64,165,165.36,






w/ Luxury Collection Preferred Equipment GroupA W0


Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For Qualified
Lessees


-W 3 l.e ai. ;.:,?.a ite,1:Ffers) Includes security deposit. Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
,- -' -,, le 30,000 miles MRSP $43,40.536.






Ul.ew/ Preferred Equipment Group
UltraLow-Mileage
vda Lease For Qusalified


'W W /MO. 36 MONTH LEASE
$2,839 due at signing (after all offers), Includes security deposit. Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Mileage charge of $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $44,995.36,


(C- CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED


2005 CHEVROLET
AVALANCHE
LT 4X4
SILVER, LEATHER SUNROOF,
EXTRA CLEAN, #C2M442B
ps4,98O


2008 CADILLAC
DTS
LUXURY COLLECTION
GOLD MIST, LUXURY PACKAGE,
LOCAL ONE OWNER TRADE, #C382160A
s -719r as


2007 CADILLAC
STS
GOLD MIST. 31,530 MILES, LUXURY
PERFORMANCE PACKAGE. SUNROOF, #C383130
STB,gB 8


(), CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED


2007 PONTIAC
SOLSTICE
GXP CONVERTIBLE
BLACK, LEATHER. LOCAL OWNER.
EXTRA CLEAN. #C3M108A
I8 ag a


2008 CADILLAC
STS
LUXURY COLLECTION
VANIULLATTE. 30,800 MILES, LEATHER,
SUNROOF, HEATED SEATS.NE OWNER, #C3X179A
syg ggaa


2007 FORD
F-150
CREW CAB XLT
RED. 5.4L, V, EXTRA CLEAN.
LOCAL TRADE, #C3X0281
a20y 9B


2010 BUICK 2009 CADILLAC 2009 CADILLAC 2011 BUICK 2010 CADILLAC 2012 TOYOTA
LACROSSE CTS DTS LACROSSE CXS SRX VENZA
CXL LUXURY COLLECTION LUXURY COLLECTION LUXURY COLLECTION XLE
GOLD MIST. LEATHER. BLACK DIAMOND, SUNROOF, PERFORMANCE GRAY, LUXURY PACKAGE, BLACK, LOW MILES, CHROME WHEELS, BLACK, LEATHER, SUNROOF, RED, ONLY 8,200 MILES, TAN, LEATHER.
LOCAL ONE OWNERTRAOE #C3S112A PACKAGE, ONE OWNER. #C2S245A 40.175 MILES, #C382230A SUNROOF, LOADED. #C2S269G #03X028H SUNROOF LOCAL OWNER, #C3SI60A
g,g988 Egg9B8 ggg 1,988 B,9S 7,4ggBgg g27,gBB


2012 CADILLAC
CTS
LUXURY COLLECTION
RADIANT SILVER, LUXURY PACKAGE,
SUNROOF, LOADED. #C383100
s 2,488B


2005 CHEVROLET
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
BLACK, ONLY 22,000 MILES, ONE OWNER
TRADE WITH NAVIGATON, #55128528
aSps29s


2011 FORD
EXPEDITION
LIMITED
WHITE, 11.000 MILES. ONE OWNER, NAVIGATION.
SUNROOF, REAR VIDEO, #C2M271A
s33,988


2011 CADILLAC
DTS
PREMIUM COLLECTION
VANILLA LATTE, 15,000 MILES. SUNROOF,
LOCAL ONE OWNER, #2V609A
535,itS


2009 FORD
GT 500
BLACK, 27,67 MILES, AWESOME CAR WITH ALL
THE POWER AND LUXURY, #C2S242A
s3B, g98


2011 CADILLAC
ESCALADE
LUXURY COLLECTION
BLACK, 22' CHROME WHEELS, SUNROOF,
NAVIGATION, #C382870
s4 9g 9


000DXE34040 SW COLLEGE ROAD OCALA, FL 352-732-4700


r


---I


D10 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013


/MO. 36 MONTH LEASE







Sikorski's
-- Attic PAGE E6


HOMEFRONT
.CITRITS COITNTY CHRNICI F RFAT .STATF GrID


ON THE COVER:


Associated Press
Judy Anderson irons a dress Feb. 7 at the Sewing
Basket in Montpelier, Vt. When toymaker Hasbro
axed the clothes iron token from its Monopoly game
at the suggestion of online voters replacing it with
a cat the company implied the small household
appliance was passe: something your grandmother
once used to ease the wrinkles out of socks and
handkerchiefs. Even with the rise of "wrinkle-free,"
the iron, it seems, is holding its own. While sales in
the U.S. declined in volume 1 percent last year, they
were up nearly 3 percent overall between 2007 and
2012, according to Euromonitor International.


REAL ESTATE:









E2 SUNDA~~ FEBRUARY 10, 2013 Cimus Cou2wrY (FL) CHRONICLE
24I7:~Fo LINE


COUNTRY CLUB WORTHY!!
SIsland Kt./Lots of Cabs. Beautiful Screen Pool!!
'Great Master with Bath 'Over an Acre of Land!
*Loads of Updates Central Water
' Irrigation Well Fantastic Equestrian Comm.
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
EmIuil elliesullon i lemlax nel D
www.FloideuLisinglnlo.coim


* Oversized Corner Lot Bay Window in GR
* 3/2 Split BR Plan Sliders off DR
* 22 Ton Updated AC New HW Heater
* Near S Deltona 2 Car Garage
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
Elilll elliesulloni lei i ax ne|
www.FlonideLisling nlo.col I 3


(352)637.282






1035 S. BROOKFIELD DR.
PRETTY AS A PICTURE
* 3BD/2BA/2CG + POOL Remodeled Kitchen
* Granite Counters New Flooring
* Pool Has Pavers, Waterfall & Large Lanai
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875









426 N. FRESNO AVE.
HERNANDO
*3BD/2BA/2CG Built in 2003
* Nearly 1,800 SF Living Updated Kitchen
* Beautifully Maintained Lovely Wooded Lot
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


POOL HOME
3BR/2BA home with caged pool.
Fenced backyard, tile floors and
Florida room with vinyl windows. A
total of 2241 sq. ft. under roof.
Fresh paint, move-in condition.
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-62001 I
Email: barbrimi s@earthlink.net


NOT A DRIVE BY UPDATES GALORE!!!
* Large 2BR, 2BA, 2 Car Double Pane Windows
* Updated HVAC & Ductwork Kit. w/Wood Cabinets
* Extra Insulation New Florida Room
* 6" Gutters/Exterior Paint Electrical Panel/Garage Door

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellslorida.com


-- 'l'IlI
3889 N. PASSION FLOWER WAY
BEVERLY HILLS
Nice 3BR/2BA/2G Home Lg. Kit. w/ Newer Appliances
Ceramic Tile Floors Throughout New Roof 2007
Caged Pool w/Solar Panels
Nicely Landscaped on 1VA Lots
*Well Maintained/Lots of Upgrades
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net f


WOWI Describes this beautiful Pine Ridge home No expenses
spared Large 3/2/2 split plan home with separate office space
Intenor features boast light & bright spaces, gourmet upgraded
kitchen, travertine tile throughout, formal dining, bar/sitting area,
window treatments and much more Extenor offers fresh paint,
solar heated pool, fenced rear yard, large patio area, workshop,
fenced garden to name a few
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460
Email: davidsivory@hotmail.com


REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


* 1.5 Baths Inside Laundry
'Close to Shopping Nice Florida Room
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINOGHAM E
(352) 637-6200
Emil: kcunningham@remax.ne
Emi:keunmnaghamc~remax.nef r |^


* Better than New! Sauna
* Tile Roof Updated EVERYTHING!
* Hardwood & Marble Floors
* 35 R. Pool w/spa Full Summer Kitchen
* Attached Workshop Newer Zoned HVAC
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sheryIpots@naoI.comi
Website: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


5 HIBISCUS CT., SUGARMILL WOODS
* Elegant 3BR/2BA/2CG Pool Home
]* Great Room w/Tray Ceilings & Fireplace
* Formal DR & Den/Office
* Corian Counters & Maple Wood Cabinets
* Stainless Steel Appliances
* Heated Pool & Spa
LOU HALLEY (352) 257-9016
Email: Iounalley@tampabay.rr.com


Spacious & Open 2/2/2 Villa In Mint Conditionl
Features Include Updated Kitchen w/Maple Cabinets
& Laminate Flooring, Ceramic Tile Thru, Office/Den
W/Closet, Huge Master Bedroom, Master Bath Dual
Marble Top Sinks, Covered Screened Lanai Close By
Community Clubhouse, Pools, Walking Trail Enjoy
The Maintenance Free Lifestylel
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929
Email: martha.sather@remax.net
www.martha.sather.remax.com


.2 4 2 N L e c nI H w B e e l i l 2 8 2w w R t A ~ o 1 .F o i a A e ,I v r e s 6 7 6 0


JI i runA nULLUw V iLLJ1l
Maintenance Free Living.. open floor plan w/
split bedrooms, large kitchen w/ nook and pantry,
formal dining area, large master suite w/ hobby
room, a Murphy bed in BR #3, and covered
lanai and extended screened patio. Community
has 2 pools, 2 sets of tennis courts, a
fitness trail around the lake, and more.
WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575 J
Email: Weyne@WeyneHemmerich.com


MINI FARMS!! 10 ACRES!!
3 bedroom, 2 bath doublewide, fenced and
cross-fenced, large open kitchen with lots of
cabinets, above ground pool, 20x24 metal
building with roll-up doors, irrigation system.

DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682
Email: djmfil@yahoo.com


i


E2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


e






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Vegetable preparations

in February clinics


Special to the Chronicle

Now is the time to pre-
pare a warm season veg-
etable garden.
To learn about growing
vegetables in Citrus
County, which vegetables
are considered warm sea-
son vegetables, what dis-
eases infect vegetable
plants and which insects
benefit gardens and which
destroy them, plan to at-
tend a February free Mas-
ter Gardener Plant Clinic.
Vegetable gardening in
Citrus County is quite dif-
ferent from that of north-
ern vegetable gardening.


It is time to prepare now,
and not wait until April or
May
The remaining sched-
ule for the free clinics is:
Tuesday, Feb. 12,
1 p.m. at Lakes Region Li-
brary, Inverness.
Wednesday, Feb. 13,
1:30 p.m. at Central Ridge
Library, Beverly Hills.
Wednesday, Feb. 20,
1 p.m. at Citrus Springs
Library
Saturday, Feb. 23,
1 p.m. at Lakes Region
Library
Call Citrus County Co-
operative Extension
Service at 352-527-5700.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 E3


Real Estate DIGEST


EXIT spotlights top agents
for January 2013
EXIT Realty Leaders is proud to an-
nounce that the following agents have
received honors for
their production in .
January 2013. P
The top listing agent Steve Al
was Nancy Ayres, MicClory Ma
with the Beverly Hills EXIT Realty EXI
Leaders. Le


omce. i The Lop selling 1 ,
agents were Steve
McClory and Alison Nancy
Markham, with the Ayres
Crystal River Office. EXIT Realty
The offices are fully Leaders.
equipped with inte-
grated networks of computer and com-
munication systems for instant access
to all multiple listing services, public


Top Performance
welcomes Pauelsen


lison
rkham
F Realty
aders.


record searches and other tools and
services agents need in order to better
serve customers.

* Email high-resolution JPEG
(.jpg) photos to newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com, attn:
HomeFront.


Top Performance Real Estate Con-
sultants is pleased to
announce that Tony
Pauelsen has joined
the company. -
Tony Started in the
construction industry
and formed his own
company in 1981. He
built many homes, Tony
restaurants and cus- Pauelsen
tom store fixtures and Top
was featured in na- Performance
tional magazines. Real Estate
Starting in real estate Consultants.
was an easy fit.
Pauelsen can be reached at 352-
303-0619.


REAL ESTATE, INC. r r
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
MLJnS CRYSTAL RIVER,FL 34429
OFFIE: (352) 795-6633 Ror


CRYSTAL MANOR
2/2.5 + Den, 4 CG on over an
Sacred. Exquisitely maintained
property with many upgrades.
$169,000
Text221683 to35620 for eledronic brochure
Directions: Hwy. 19, to East on


Antoni eA, lor AMERICAN
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU 4511 N.LeaNto
re ^ Cell: (352) 220-8143 I-rsFL35
I lantoni@era.com ;,


5810 CINNAMON RIDGE DR. HOMOSASSA
a 2/2/2, Large fenced in
"t corner lot, hardwood &
i. tile floors throughout.
Super clean.
Move in ready.
MLS #358314 $84,500
Direction: Rt. 44 to Rock
Crusher Rd, left on
Cinnamon Ridge, home on
right comer of Spicey Hill
|A PINE RIDGE ESTATES
S A. 3/2/2 Pool home
2005 built, 1814sf
.'living, great room, split
't floor plan, Self cleaning,
aIf heated, salt pool with
Outdoor summer kitchen.

MLS #358981
$209,000


OPEN HOUSE FEB. 10 1-4PM
9533 Pelican Cove Court -
YOU'LL DALLY AT THIS DILLY! See for yourself: A free-standing 3/2/2
home in the no-maintenance community of the Moorings. Original owner-
builder lavished details such as kitchen wine cooler and marble baths.
Current owner has done even more: solar-heated pool, stunning brick pav-
ers, reverse osmosis water treatment, new double-paned windows: the list
goes on! Northern owners pine for their winter home, but say sell, sell!
MLS 353024 $147,000
Host & Hostess: Tim Donovan 220-0328 & Marilyn Booth 637-4904
Directions: 41 N to R. on Vine, curve to L on Gospel Island Rd., proceed
to entrance to Moorings on L, then L on 1st St., Pelican Cove.


TO SETTLE ESTATE-FLORAL CITY, FL
Gorgeous oaks and backdrop on Lake Magnolia.
3BR/2BA DW on large lot. Central water.
$32,500 MLS#359133


BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Waterfront 6BR/3BA home on 2.63 acres.
Fireplace.
S180,000 MLS#700012


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 3521302-6714


I


I











Ask a Designer: Let winter inspire your rooms


MELISSA RAYWORTH
Associated Press

It's cold out there. In much of the
country, now's the time when home
serves as a cozy refuge from the ice
and snow. We light our fireplaces
and wish for springtime.
But what if we took the opposite
approach, using the inspiration of
frosty winter colors and shimmer-
ing, icy textures to create rooms that
look gorgeous year-round? A winter-
inspired room can celebrate the
beauty of this season, and also pro-
vide a cooling refuge perfect for the
spring and summer ahead.
"My clients usually think I've lost
my mind when I suggest using win-
ter as a source of inspiration for a
cozy bedroom," says designer Brian
Patrick Flynn, founder of decorde-
mon.com. But, he says, "when done
right, a combination of layered
whites, blue-grays and touches of
metallic can add a wintry look that's
chic, inviting, surprisingly warm and
totally timeless."
Here, Flynn and two other inte-
rior designers Betsy Burnham of
Los Angeles' Burnham Design and
Kyle Schuneman of Live Well De-
signs offer advice on using winter
as a decorating inspiration.
GET REFLECTIVE
Start with the reflective sheen of
ice as your main inspiration, says
Flynn. "Use a plethora of reflective
surfaces and metallic touches," he
says, including mirrored accent ta-
bles and nightstands, as well as mir-
rored lamps.
Flynn and Schuneman both rec-
ommend metallic wallpaper. "One
bedroom I designed in California


was completely inspired
by Candice Olsen's birch
bark wallpaper from York
Wallcovering," Flynn says.
"The paper is made
from white-toned birch
bark, and has a metallic
backing which just
screams 'winter chic."'
If you'd prefer painted
walls, Schuneman sug-
gests choosing a shade of
pale gray or icy blue and
buying it in two different
finishes one with a high
sheen that almost looks
metallic and the other
matte. Paint the walls with
alternating stripes of each
finish.
This use of just a few
metallic or mirrored items
is a great way to bring in
some icy glamour, Schune-
man says, "without it be-
coming the ice princess'
dungeon."
Mirrored and metallic


items also maximize light,
warming a room even in
winter.
"Since trees lose their
leaves in the winter, the
amount of light that
streams in through the
window can be double the
amount in the spring or
summer," Flynn says. "By
the time that gorgeous
light hits the reflective sur-
faces and metallics, the
room instantly warms up."
Burnham also likes mir-
rored items. A mirrored
table "adds a dimension to
See DESIGNER/Rage E5

This publicity photo pro-
vided by courtesy of Live
Well Designs shows a
with a bedside table remi-
niscent of a melting chunk
of ice, bringing some frosty
winter style to a southern
California home.
Associated Press


Jackie Davis
, American Realty & Investments
I E 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
ERA (352) 634-2371 Cell
.RAL ESTATE jackie@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS: bidavis.co

Here's a steel industrial building, 40' x ..




residential use as well. There's a 20'x 18' coined set up for living with a sleeping loft above and it was
actually homesteaded for thee previous years. An adjoining acae (MtS 100182), also fenced on 3
sides, is available $159,000 MS h 00776
sides, is available. $159,000 MLS 700776


mM GITTA BARTH
SH^ REALTOR
Investors Realty REALTOR
of Citrus County, Inc. Cell: (352) 220-0466
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com gbarth@myflorida-house .com


MOVE RIGHT IN -
NATURE LOVERS BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS!!
3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home on a 1 acre
i R i o comer lot with mature oak trees and lots
Sof privacy! Very well maintained, new
1 ,- I ,11, I 1 -.. roof 05/O09. Justbringyour suitcase and
al I I i .1 uI .. It move right in! Community features
golf, tennis, clubhouse.
i ,,4. $400,000 MLS #358397 $169,000







QUICK TRIP OUT INTO
THE GULF OF MEXICO! NATURE'S
3/3/1 Spanish style home, seawall and BEST KEPT SECRET
boat slip on deep water canal no 3/2 5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River
bridges to the Crystal River! Tile floors, Oaks East, a gated waterfront
bonus room, fireplace, newer roof and community on the Withlacoochee River
windows; great income potential, too! $218,000


CLASSIC AND LIVING ON THE WATER!
CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is
the right setting for living the Florida
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront lifestyle Open and airy with the
estate w/pool and separate apartment A plantation shutters diffusing the
true masterpiece in a park like setting sunlight. 190 ft. of seawall gives you
off Lake Tsala Apopka, waiting for plenty of room to dock all the water
., ,, ,4 '$425,000 i ; 4 $489,000


A BOATER'S DREAM
COME TRUE!
Sailboat water (no bridges); 240
feet of seawall; stationary &
floating dock; spacious modem 3/
2.5 home sits high and dry (never
flooded) on 2 lots. This meticu-
lously maintinined property is a
must see! $499,000





NORTHRIDGE ESTATES -
Villages of Citrus Hills, well known for
an active Florida lifestyle! 3/2/2 home on
1 acre, open floor plan, wood burning
fireplace, a sparkling pool and spacious
covered lanai will make you feel at home
right away. A recent facelift included new
paint and flooring, and A/C, range and
the garage door were replaced in 2012.
MLS700472 $142,500






4590 WORLDWIDE DR., INVERNESS
Completely updated 3/2 home! New. roof
10/12, A/C & e-panel 01/12, windows
01/11, W/H 2009! Florida room, fenced
backyard, 2 sheds, comer lot, quiet
location with lots of green Close to town,
medical and shopping What's left for
11 $62.000


WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
For a FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
$1.8 million already closed and under contract.
Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
B Tob Learn More
Lo(352) 746-9924 T.


E4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


lit.







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


S Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
RealtorI Realtor@
302-3179 SOLe Raelt
746-6700 SL n 287-9022
The Golden Gid WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.


HOI.ES UNDER $ 50,0


111


3826 N. Briarberry Pt. 2 BR, 1.5 BA, 1 Car.$44,900
18 S.E. Jackson 2 BR, 1 BA, 1 Car ..........$44,900
61 S. Tyler 2 BR, 1 BA, 1 Car ....................$49,900


mom American Al BARBARA
X Realty & B BAN
E.- Investments BA KS
117 S. Hwy. 41 .
Inverness, FL
352-726-5855 cell: 352-476-3232
Please visit website www.barbarabanks.net
SEVEN LAKES
3/2/2, .98 Ac. Over 1500 sq. ft. living
on .50 acre fenced. PLUS additional lot
w 10x20 shed/workshop, .48 acre.
Offers neutral colors, large rooms, gas
fireplace, fenced yard, sprinklers, *
12x14 screen room, close to golf and illk
shopping. Excellent curb appeal.
MLS #700419
ASKING $126,500
INVERNESS UPPER HIGHLANDS
3/2/2 Pool Home on 253 acre Tluhis
immaculate well built & well kept home
offers formal having room, formal dimng,
family room, county style eat-in kitchen,

fireplace, cathedral ceiling,newer
appliances,RV port, shed, solar heated
pool, newer roof, friot trees and completely
fenced yard w/ electric gate, workshop in
S .l ASKING 1,224,900
Zechariah 4:6 10EoJ2


DESIGNER
Continued from Page E4

a room that wood just doesn't," she
says. But she cautions against taking
the look too far. If you're buying mir-
rored end tables, she says, put a ce-
ramic lamp on top rather than a
mirrored or glass lamp. Or mix mir-

This publicity photo shows a detail
of a guest bedroom by Designer
Brian Patrick Flynn for HGTV.com
with wintry appeal, where Flynn had
a flea-market dresser updated with a
sprayed coat of blue-gray lacquer,
then accessorized it with all white
pieces.
Associated Press


rors and chrome with warm shades
of ivory, rather than stark whites.
USE A RANGE OF COLORS
"The biggest trick to doing a win-
try palette right is to layer, layer,
layer," Flynn says. "I like to stick
with an overall white palette, but
bring in ultra-white, off-white,
cream, blue-white and then add
touches of blue-gray This makes a
space soothing and sophisticated,
while adding depth."
Burnham's favorite wintry wall
color right now is a shade called
"Silver Spoon" by Dunn-Edwards.
"It's a really, really pale gray-blue,
and I cannot tell you how many
rooms I've used it in," she says. It
contrasts well with white for a mod-
ern look or with warm shades of


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 E5
brown for a more "organic and
earthy" feel.
Schuneman loves mixing wintry
whites, silvers and grays accented
with shades of purple. Or he some-
times pairs "a gray that has blue as
its base, and a blue that has gray in
its base" and brings in "hard edges,
like crystal lamps" for a chic, "win-
try feeling."
WORK IT ANYWHERE
Winter-inspired design can work
in any climate, from a Vermont ski
house to a California beach condo.
"I did a bedroom in the Hollywood
Hills with icy blue walls, and the
headboard wall was all metal ceiling
tiles," Schuneman says. For the bed-
side tables, he chose pale blue glass
See DESIGNER/Page E7


- U U U U


PINE RIDGE p p nd I CITRUS HILLS
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd. i LPr u l 20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Flrida Showcase Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 oria owcas (352) 746-0744
Properties


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3





Picturesque 3/2.5/2 vlla in a much
sought-after neighborhood
Directions: Rte 486 to Terra Vista Entrance, right
on Fenway Dr, left on Lake Marie Dr, right on
Skyview Landing
Paula Fuhst 352-613-7553


S5395 N Allamandra Dr
MLS#358165 $299,900
Hidden treasures! 3/2.5/2 pool home on
one acre.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3
Af t.-


-tll, ou Ireiana tu
1 U MLS#700370 $249,70(
New 2013 construction on the
Oaks Golf Course.
Directions: 486 to south on Citrus Hills
Blvd, right on Ireland to last home on left
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


3889 N Indianriver Dr
MLS#359154 $248,000
Top-notch neighborhood + private park-
like setting.
Mark Casper 352-476-8136


LU
*9 i


,7)IiSA 1390 W Double Eagle Ct
MLS#358364 $615,000
On Skyview's 15th Fairway in Foxfire, a
very prestigious cul-de-sac.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


--?iae 5215 N Carnation Dr
' MLS#359357 $199,000
New roof 2013. Pride of ownership
shows throughout!
Tami Mayer 352-476-1507
PENDING
w ~ "='= --


6742 W Sentinel Post Path
MLS#357704 $517,500
BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY ESTATE ON 10
ACRES!! 6/4/3 pool home.
Brian Murray 352-212-5913


MLS#359601 $184,90(
Stunning views overlooking 9th green
on The Oaks Golf Course.
Matt Robinson 352-502-3501


4pin$g 3378WNaegeliaPI 20 E Gilchrinsl C 25 3a 7 O 6152 N Silver Palm Way
MLS#359406 $94,900 MLS#355589 $63,900 MLS#358583 $118,900 631 W W0057d Pine C99
Lovely 3/2/2 home in quiet area priced Furnished 2/2 ground floor unit close to MUST SEE, charming, well maintained Well maintained 2/2/1 villa, maintenance
to sell. community pool 3/2/2 pool home. free 55+ community.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478 Matt Robinson 352-502-3501 Tami Mayer 352-476-1507 Richard DeVita 352-601-8273
0 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Rnancial company. Prudential, the
Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related enttles, registered in manylurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


111


B-






E6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
.............................. .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information................. 352-563-5966
News information.......................................... 352-563-5660
................................. ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
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CiHRoNICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Go red for Valentine's


Since February is American Heart
Month and in honor of Valentine's
Day, why not incorporate some red
fruits and vegetables into your (and your
Valentine's) meals and snacks?
Red fruits and vegetables
contain many health-promot-
ing phytochemicals, including
lycopene and anthocyanin.
Many Americans do not eat -
enough red, orange, and dark
green fruits and vegetables. .
Therefore, the dietary guide-
lines of 2010 recommend get- .....
ting more variety and including
these colors in our diets more
often. Go to www.ChooseMy Monica
Plate.gov for more information CONS
on how many fruits and vegeta- CONS
bles to consume per day based SCIE
on your calorie level.
Eating from this red color group may
help to promote a healthy heart, a good
memory, a healthy urinary tract, and a
lower risk of some cancers.
Some examples of red fruits are: red
apples, blood oranges, cherries, cranber-
ries, red grapes, pink/red grapefruit, red
pears, pomegranates, raspberries, straw-
berries, and watermelon. Red vegetables
include: beets, red peppers, radishes,
radicchio, red onions, red potatoes,


rhubarb, and tomatoes.
Some creative ways to get your red
fruits and vegetables, especially for
Valentine's Day include:
Make heart-shaped pizza for your
loved ones. Roll out the dough
and use a heart-shaped cookie
cutter to make individual
hearts. Spread with your fa-
vorite tomato pizza sauce. Add
your favorite toppings.
Add red bell peppers,
cherry or grape tomatoes, red
onions, or beets to a tossed salad.
Make coleslaw out of red
cabbage and red onions.
Payne U Oatmeal topped with a
heart shape of dried cranber-
JMER ries or dried cherries.
MCE U Raspberry or Strawberry
smoothie: Half a cup of fat-free
milk, half a cup of low-fat vanilla yogurt, 1
cup of frozen strawberries or raspberries,
1 teaspoon of honey, 2 to 4 ice cubes. Mix
everything except the ice, then add the
ice and puree again until rich and
creamy An alternative to using the honey
is to use 1 teaspoon of no-calorie
sweetener or sugar. This recipe makes
one serving.

See RED/Page E11


L


Inside...




*11* r


Ironing irony
PAGE E8
Frugal Living
PAGE E14
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3

For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Rose bowl used as air freshener; sizing up painting


Dear John: I would ap-
preciate an appraisal
of my rose petal bowl
in the attached
photos, with ruf-
fled edge. It is 3 1/2
inches tall by 4
inches wide in a
dull blue. The lady
who gave it to my
mother-in-law was
a schoolteacher,
born in 1880. She
said it belonged to
her grandmother. John S
Thanks for your SIKOF
great columns. AT
M.L.P, Homosassa
Dear M.L.P: To
help freshen the air in par-
lors, rose bowls were typically
filled half full of water with
rose petals floated on top or
sometimes completely filled
with rose petals. They were


I-


1


made by numerous
glasshouses in America, Eng-
land, and Europe throughout
the middle Victo-
rian era and on
into the 20th cen-
tury 19th century
rose bowls were
often tri-footed or
on a foot ring and
are the most sought
after by collectors.
They have been re-
produced for
ikorski decades. Your art
SKI'S glass rose bowl is
TIC finished with an
_C_ acid bath and is
called Satin Glass,
having a soft smooth feel to
the touch. Potential dollar
value is below $100.
Dear John: I am writing to
you to ask you about a paint-
ing I purchased from a nearby


consignment shop about six
years ago. The picture is of a
landscape of trees with white
bark and the season is fall. It
is signed "Longseth 1963." I
have never been able to find
anything out about the artist.
I suspect it may just have
been someone with a God-
given gift to paint. Have you
ever heard of an artist with
the last name Longseth? It is,
in my opinion, a beautiful
painting. It is a large painting
and I only paid $6 for it. The
frame is vintage and the can-
vas is attached to the frame,
See ATTIC/Page Ell
Rose bowls such as this one
were filled with rose petals to
help freshen the air in homes.
This one is finished with an
acid bath called Satin Glass.
Special to the Chronicle







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DESIGNER
Continued from Page E5

lamps that resemble melting
chunks of ice.
"You can really go for it" and
do a full-on winter-inspired
style, Schuneman says, or use
just touches of it as "the thing
that gives a room an edge."
In southern California or
other warm locations, Burnham
says, it may work best to mix
winter-inspired items with
something more reminiscent of
the local weather.
"Think of a beautiful driftwood
table with something sparkly on
it. That brings it back to the sand
and the beach, and keeps it relat-
able" to your warm-weather lo-
cation, but also includes a bit of
icy beauty, she says.


BALANCE ICY WITH COZY
Along with shimmery, mir-
rored surfaces, be sure to in-
clude soft, cozy ones: Look for
"beautiful cable-knit cashmere
throws," Burnham says, or "a big
faux-fur coyote blanket on a bed.
It's wintry, but it's also so luxe, so
high-end hunting lodge, and that
works at the beach, too."
Layers of soft fabric on furni-
ture and floors bring a welcome
feeling of warmth. If you choose
a "fluffy, white flokati rug for the
floor, you're still having a kind of
wintry moment," Schuneman
says, "but it's just not hard-
edged."
WHAT NOT TO DO
Just don't get silly, Flynn says.
"First and foremost, I let my
client know that just because
we're going wintry, it doesn't
mean we're going to pop out
igloos, snowflakes and polar


bears. In other words, we com-
pletely avoid themes and cliches
altogether."
Instead, he says, "we just think
of different ways to use whites,
grays, metallics and textures in
a manner which fits their per-
sonal style and makes a room
feel airy and open. That's usu-
ally my trick to getting winter-in-
spired design right."
Melissa Rayworth writes the
Ask a Designer column monthly
for The Associated Press. Follow
her on Twitter at https://
twitter com/mrayworth.

This publicity photo provided
by Burnham Design shows a
bedroom designed by
Betsy Burnham, with walls of
pure white and frosty blue com-
plemented by a fluffy,
snow-white flokati rug.
Associated Press


U


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This open floor plan courtyard home has an enormous kitchen, dining room and great roorr
for entertaining at its best A beautiful private courtyard entrance covered with brick pavers
that surround the gas heated pool and spa Home features a detached guestlin-law suite
Bright & spacious, home has neutral tile throughout with carpet in the bedrooms Very energy
efficient with extra insulation Master suite features huge walk-in closets, double sink, Iettec
garden tub and walk-in shower Large lanai in a secluded backyard Hurricane shutters, lo
of outdoor giving space, huge walk in pantry, plantation shutters The list goes on and on
M LS 700517.................................................................................. .. $ 5 3 5 ,0 0 0


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W.i Bright and cheerful maintenance-free villa in this gated community of Terra Vista
DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, SOUTHGATE VILLAS This light and bright 2 bedroom, 2-bath home with a den Decorated with all neutral
SHORT SALE Lovely Lantana model with popular open floor plan, nice tile and colors Totally open floor plan with an expansion of tile leading to a triple sliding door
Corian counter tops, situated on a large corner lot in Terra Vista that takes you to the extended lanai with lots of privacy All combine to make this an
MLS 700438................................. ....... $184,000 outstanding Villa Value! MLS 700224..... ................................. $214,900


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DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, SOUTHGATE VILLAS In prestigious gated community of Terra Vista Immaculate 3/25/2 w/ den private brick SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH
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Absolutely beautiful 3/2/2 home in premier gated Terra Vista of Citrus Hills Family Come and see this really nice custom Windward on the 5th hole of Skyview Gollf and painted, gourmet kitchen, formal dining incorporated with an open floor plan is great for room, open kitchen with breakfast bar, screened lanai and a 2-car attached garage
room with beautifully appointed large eat-in kitchen Master suite features two walk-in Course Both guest bedrooms boast their own full baths The expanded lanai has a entertaining Lots of tile, and wet Bar Large master suite has hardwood floor TWO custom Dining area overlooking private backyard Upgrades include Corian countertops,
closets, double sink and huge walk in tiled shower Neutral colors throughout, large beautiful view overlooking the golf course and has a summer kitchen The garage is walk-in closets You'll be proud to return to this elegant home w/ lush landscaping & on a ceramic tile, plantation shuttered windows, lots of cabinets in the kitchen Corner lot
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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 E7


Seazg i ist.












Hot under the collar


Cast out of

Monopoly, the

iron endures
ERIKA NIEDOWSKI
Associated Press
PROVIDENCE, R.I.
When online voters
nixed the clothes
iron token from
Hasbro's Monopoly
game, the appliance was held
up as pass, as something your
grandmother once used to ease
the wrinkles out of linens and
handkerchiefs.
"Despite being an integral
part of life when the token was
added to the game in the 1930s,
the iron has fallen out of favor
with today's fans," the Rhode
Island-based company said in
announcing its replacement -
with a cat
But even with the rise of
wrinkle-free fabrics, the iron, it
seems, is holding its own.
While U.S. iron sales de-
clined in volume 1 percent last
year, they were up nearly 3 per-
cent overall from 2007 to 2012,
according to the market re-
search group Euromonitor In-
ternational. Over the same
period, steam generator irons
- which make more steam
than traditional ones, speeding
up the process experienced
what the firm called "enormous
growth." Sales were $368 mil-
lion last year.
Kim Kalunian irons nearly
everything: sweaters, dresses,
pants, even jeans. The 23-year-
old digital producer at WPRO
Radio in East Providence in-
herited her distaste for wrin-
kles from her mother, whom
she describes as a "fierce
ironer." She finds the chore -
and the hiss of the steam -
therapeutic.
"It's sort of magical," says
Kalunian, who irons in the
morning before work and at
night if she's donning a new


Associated Press
An iron sits on the shelf at Aubuchon Hardware in Montpelier, Vt. Even with the rise of "wrinkle-free,"
the iron, it seems, is holding its own. While sales in the U.S. declined in volume 1 percent last year, they
were up nearly 3 percent overall between 2007 and 2012, according to Euromonitor International.


it -


$2000


PA. 1rt" -" t% 1900


The Monopoly iron token that was replaced by the new cat token
rests on a Boardwalk deed next to a die and houses Tuesday at Has-
bro Inc. headquarters in Pawtucket, R.I.


outfit and going out. "There's
these wrinkles there, and
they're annoying, and you whip
out this iron and you can ban-
ish them."


When she travels, she always
checks her hotel room to make
sure it has an iron, but draws
the line at adding creases to
pants or ironing sheets, pil-


lowcases or underwear.
Rowenta, a manufacturer of
high-end irons whose U.S.
headquarters is in West Orange,
N.J., says the appliance is as
relevant as ever.
The company, whose prod-
ucts have been used to keep
wrinkles out of the clothing on
"Project Runway," is constantly
updating technology to make
ironing easier, faster and better
for clothes, spokeswoman
Michele Lupton says. Its regu-
lar models, ranging in price
from $70 to $175, now include
an "eco-friendly" one that uses
less energy
Hasbro nixed the iron after it
got the fewest votes in a Face-
book poll; it is being replaced
with a cat. As a nod to its serv-
ice, Rowenta plans to give away
10 board games with the iron
token along with a real iron
- before the piece is discontin-
ued. People will be asked to


An antique flat iron rests on dis-
play Thursday at a flea market in
Montpelier, Vt.

weigh in on Rowenta's Face-
book page with their "fondest"
ironing memories.
There are those, of course,
who will go to any length to
avoid ironing throwing dry
clothes into the dryer to soften
wrinkles, using special sprays,
buying no-wrinkle fabrics or
paying to have it done at the
dry cleaner.
A man in Leicester in the
United Kingdom in 1997 de-
cided to spice up his dreaded
ironing by doing it while rock
climbing. Phil Shaw nick-
named Steam says in his book
on so-called extreme ironing-
also done with skiing, snow-
boarding and canoeing that it
"combines the danger and ex-
citement of an 'extreme' sport
with the satisfaction of a well-
pressed shirt" Long extension
cords hooked to generators
were used at first, before the ad-
vent of battery-powered irons.
Consumer Reports noted this
week, after the death of the
iron token, that it had recently
conducted tests to name the 10
best steam irons. Some, it said,
cost "just a bit more than a
Monopoly game."


E8 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










Winter: Some seeds need coaxing to sprout


LEE REICH
Associated Press

You wouldn't think that
the dead of winter would
be a good time to sow
seeds. But it is, for plants
whose seeds need some
kind of long-term treat-
ment before they will
sprout
Such is the case for the
tree peony seeds I recently
planted.
Well, "planted" may not
be quite the right word.
After soaking them in
water for a few hours, I
merely tossed them into a
plastic sandwich bag with
a handful of moist potting
soil.
The bag will sit on the
kitchen counter for a cou-
ple of months, then go into
the refrigerator for a cou-
ple more.
HOLDING BACK
FORA REASON
Such treatment is
needed because tree
peony seeds must lay
down roots before any
shoot growth takes place.
To grow, the roots need
some rain (or a good soak-
ing) to leach out inhibitors,
and some warmth.
The shoots, however,
won't sprout until they've
been exposed to a period
of cool, moist conditions -
outdoors or in my refriger-
ator. Under natural condi-
tions, all this might take
two years. In my house, all
systems should be go by
spring.
Lily and viburnum seeds


also respond to this
treatment.
For tender young
seedlings, a reluctance to
sprout as soon as they hit
moist soil often makes
sense. In a climate charac-
terized by cold winters and
periodic drought, a wild
tree peony seedling does
well not to rear its head
until it's sure that winter is
over and it's got the sup-
port of an established root
system.
DORMANCY REFLECTS
NATURAL CONDITIONS
Other germination
quirks reflect other natu-
ral environments. Some
seeds have a double dor-
mancy, one for the seed-
coat and one for the
embryo. Still others -
goldenseal, for example -
ripen with underdevel-
oped embryos. That warm
then cold treatment also
prepares seeds with either
of these quirks for
germination.
In places with consistent
moisture throughout the
year, it is winter cold that
would snuff out any young
sprout that began growing
in the fall. So seeds of
many of our native plants
won't sprout until they feel
winter is over, a condition
that could be mimicked by
a couple of months in the
refrigerator in a sandwich
bag along with moist pot-
ting soil. While doing time
in the refrigerator, it's not
unusual for a whole batch
of seeds to sprout in uni-
son, as if a switch has been


Yellowhorn seeds sprout Jan. 26 after spending some tim
bag in some moist potting soil in New Paltz, N.Y.


turned on, even before
they're released into
warmth.
Hormones in seeds are
what bring them to life at
the appropriate moment.
Although the seeds appear
to be lying lifeless in a bag
on a refrigerator shelf, all
sorts of things are going on
hormonally
Levels, for instance, of a
germination inhibitor
called abscisic acid are de-
creasing, while levels of


another hormone, gib-
berellic acid, are increas-
ing. These hormones have
been extracted from seeds
or synthesized, and some
seeds shed their normal
reluctance to sprout with
nothing more than a dip in
an appropriate concentra-
tion of gibberellic acid.
All is not so simple,
though, because other hor-
mones also are at work
and other compounds,
such as potassium nitrate,


E KEY Office 382-17001
. REE ZALTY INC -ir.-i | i..
'4kj r -~ -f-U[W


S. -" And a seed that remains
Sr. dry inside will not sprout.
In nature, these tough
coats are eventually soft-
ened as soil microbes
chew away at them, by cy-
cles of freezing and thaw-
ing, by abrasion and by
passage through animals.
Microbes work best at
warm temperatures, so a
couple of months in a
sandwich bag along with
some moist potting soil
o could awaken these seeds
just as they do those of tree
peonies.
The potting soil, in this
case, should contain some
real soil or compost to sup-
ply living organisms to
work on the seedcoats.
Nicking seeds with a file
Associated Press or carefully nipping at
e refrigerated in a sandwich them with a wire cutter
also lets water penetrate.
The easiest pretreat-
can, for unknown reasons, ment is that needed by
also promote germination, many grasses and most an-
MECHANICAL nual flowers and vegeta-
INHIBITION bles. Seeds of these plants
Let's not blame dor- need nothing more than a
mancy only on hormones; period of dry storage of
some seeds stay asleep for from one to six months be-
purely mechanical fore they'll germinate.
reasons. Cold is not needed, but
The tough seedcoats of does keep them fresh
honeylocust, black locust longer, so my vegetable
and black cohosh are and flower seeds are wait-
among those that cannot ing out winter sitting in
imbibe water as soon as airtight plastic boxes in my
their seeds hit the ground. garage.

JOAmN MARTIN




Broker Associate 352-270-3255
OPEN HOUSE SU DA 1-4P' Ml ] lE] JJ


U 3/2/2 on 1 acre7 4




I 2007 Pool homI e


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Elegant Stand Alone Villa in "The Fabulous Value : Very clean ranch
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& 2 car garage. Best Views of Golf 2 car garage. Lots of storage!
Course! Fireplace! Vaulted Ceilings! Freah paint inside & out. New
$165,000. carpets. Family & Formal Living rm/
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Directions: 486 to South on Annapolis to
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-I--

535 E Charleston Court
Hernando
2007 Sanderson Bay Built Home
4/3/3 with den and office 2975 sf. ft. of
living. Possible in-law set up. Needs TLC
Motivated Seller MLS#342358 $269,900
Directions: 486 to South on Annapolis to
right on Charleston


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 E9


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










Illinois woman's collages turn heads


MELISSA MERLI
The (Champaign) News-Gazette

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Camelia Mc-
Neal saw lots of collages when she
toured New York in the early 1990s
with a Hinds Community College
choir. She was particularly struck by
one she saw inside the Apollo The-
ater in Harlem.
She decided then, when she was
20, that she would make collages
some day She didn't get started until
2001, though. Marriage, two children
and other things got in the way
Later, while attending Eastern
Illinois University, McNeal made
history-theme collages for the
courses she took with Professor
Roger Whitlow, who has a Ph.D. in
American civilization.
He gave her credit for her re-
search-based collages. And this past
year, he urged her to submit work for
the juried 19th Biennial Draw-
ing/Watercolor: Illinois exhibition at
the Tarble Arts Center at EIU.
It was the first time McNeal en-
tered some of her pieces in an exhi-
bition. The judge, Carmon
Colangelo, dean of the Sam Fox
School of Design & Visual Arts at
Washington University, accepted two
and gave one, "American Bigotry,"
the Roc's Blackfront Merit Award.
It carries a cash prize of $150.
For the exhibition catalog, Colan-
gelo wrote that McNeal's collage
work "presents a powerful
palimpsest of magazine cutouts, re-
vealing repetitive themes related to
serious issues of racism and bigotry


Camelia McNeal talks about her collages Jan. 29 at her home in Champaign, III.


in America as they are played out in
the media."
Tarble Arts Center director Michael
Watts calls her collages "arresting."
"They're just loaded with con-
tent" he said. "It takes a while to ab-
sorb all the images and text that she
incorporates into the work."
Though her collages have no sin-
gle focal point, they are cohesive.
Watts compared them to the "all-
over" style of painting in which the
artist deliberately tries not to make
any one element the focus.
McNeal probably has never heard
of "all-over" painting. She has not
taken any art courses, and she
doesn't paint or draw.


Instead, she's compelled to
collage, and does so from 5:30
to 8 p.m. every day at her
home near Judah Christian
School in Champaign.
Her process: She does re-
search first and then scans
images and headlines she
likes in history textbooks,
journals, magazines, websites


and other sources.
She prints them out and
uses "preschool scissors" to
shape them into the forms she
wants. Then she lays them on
the floor, moving them around
before transferring them to a
heavy construction board.
As she tacks down the im-
ages using a glue stick, she


leaves the edges free so she
can insert more pictures
under them.
If the paper develops wrin-
kles, she smoothes them out
on the back using a little
water on a paintbrush.
She does not leave any gaps
- negative spaces between
the pictures. She prefers
them being "close knit"
She also wants to tell stories,
no matter what her subject.
She loves history and making
history collages the Harlem
Renaissance and the Civil War
are among her subjects but
also has created pieces for rel-
atives, baby showers, anniver-
saries and other events.
She made two large collages
for Bundles of Joy, the Cham-
paign preschool where she
works as a teacher. One meas-
ures 6 feet, 3 inches across
and features photographs of
more than 200 students.
"I see myself collaging a
whole wall," McNeal said. "I
want to be able to collage a
wall of black history but have
the images appear bigger. I
See GE/Page Ell


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beautiful lot, many special
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when you can have new??
$228,000
E07N Call Joe 302-0910


E10 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RED
Continued from Page E6

Pink/red grapefruit topped with
a sprinkle of brown sugar.
Red grapes as a snack or as a
side dish to your favorite sandwich.
Call Monica Payne at the Exten-
sion office at 352-527-5713.
Citrus County Extension links the
public with the University of
Florida/IFAS' knowledge, research
and resources to address youth, fam-
ily, community and agricultural
needs. All programs and related ac-
tivities sponsored for, or assisted by,
the Institute of Food and Agricul-
tural Sciences are open to all per-
sons with non-discrimination with
respect to race, creed, color, religion,
age, disability, sex, sexual orienta-
tion, marital status, national origin,
political opinions or affiliations.

Monica Payne is the Family and
Consumer Sciences Agent for
Citrus County Extension.


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

so I am assuming it is the
original frame? Also, the
paint is cracking and the can-
vas has a tear in it. I do not
know much about those
kinds of things; any com-
ments, or suggestions would
greatly be appreciated. -
K.G.M., Internet
Dear KG.M.: Yes, defi-
nitely send good clear photo-
graphs and make sure to
examine the back of the
painting for notations about
the artist or painting title, etc.
I was not able to find any in-
formation on the artist
Longseth or any track record
of sales. That does not mean
the painting has no decora-
tive value, just that the artist
does not add any monetary
value.
Dear John: I would like to


know more about the mask in
the photo. It stands alone, is
about 10 inches tall and 7
inches wide. It is pretty
heavy. It has eight teeth that
look to be real teeth. The
ticket on the back of the mask
is just a man's name and ad-
dress. I understand that this
man was a world traveler and
collected things from all over
the world; that is all I know.
- B.G., Weirsdale
Dear B.G.: The photograph
is not very clear. I do not rec-
ognize the carved wood
mask; my guess is perhaps
the country of origin is Bali. I
suggest you take it to the Mu-
seum of Natural History at
the University of Florida.
They may be able to help
identify the mask.
Dear John: I wrote to you
in the past about some furni-
ture that was given to me by
family members and my wife
and I are trying to decide
what to do with it. Some of


the pieces I love very much,
but do not know if I can af-
ford to have them profession-
ally refinished and others I
would like to sell if I think
the price makes sense. -
K.H., Internet
Dear KH.: I would be glad
to help. Make sure your pho-
tographs are good and clear.
Include photos of the sides
and backs, with dimensions,
and if possible close-ups of
any carving. Be sure to pull
out a drawer and photograph
the sides and any notations
inside. Then I will finish the
story

John Sikorski has been a
professional in the antiques
business for 30 years. He
hosts a call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from
noon to 1 p.m. Send
questions to Sikorski's Attic,
PO. Box 2513, Ocala 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 Ell


COLLAGE
Continued from Page E10

want to teach young people how to
do it"
She generally works on two or
three collages at a time. It takes her
about six months to finish one.
She's now putting together col-
lages about Michael Jordan she
hopes to get in touch with him so he
can see the finished product and
Martin Luther King Jr
At college, she studied voice,
music education and general stud-
ies and met the man she would
marry After graduating in 1991, she
remained in Utica, Miss., for a
while, acting and singing in com-
munity theater (She sings here with
Noah Brown & Company)
She eventually moved with her
husband to his hometown of
Toledo, Ohio. There they had two
children (Jawuan Braddy, now 20,
and Camesha Braddy, 18). After 10
years of marriage, she divorced.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


FLORAL CITY
55+ 1/1, Newly re-
modeled Ig. liv. rm.,
part. furn., tiled scrn.
por. 2 car carport,
W/D, $450 Mo. Incld's
lot rent, water, sewer,
trash, 352-897-4449

HERNANDO
2/11%, Furn. Lrg. Fm &
Laun. Rm, Cprt, prvt rd.
50+ Area, $650/m. F/L
(352) 746-0850

HOMOSASSA
2/1+, $550. mo. + sec.
(352) 344-5457


LECANTO
1BR SW, $500. mo.
(352) 628-2312


LECANTO
3/2 First mo. free w/
approved application.
Year's lease $600
(352) 628-5990


HOMOSASSA 2/1
Fenced acre, Addition
Huge Deck, Shed
$500.mo 352-628-5244


must sell!
2006 FLEETWOOD
ENTERTAINER. 32X66.
OWNER MUST SELL!
CALL (352) 795-1272


43,900. 3/2,Dblewide.
Delivered & set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&I W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807


V THIS OUT!
2br 2ba Single Wide
12years YOUNG
14X66. Trade in.
WILL GO FAST!
$14,900 YOUR BABY
$19,900 Incls Delv,
Set, New A/C, skirt &
steps, Must See!
NO HIDDEN FEES.
CALL (352) 795-1272
HERNANDO
$$ Private Owner $$
Financing Available
New & Used
Manufactured Homes
Call 1-727-967-4230


BIG
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Hnder $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183

Homosassa
Dbl. Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$69,900 (352) 621-0192


INVERNESS
55+ Park 14x 58,
2/1 /2, furniture,
appliances, shed,
scrn. porch, $8,500.
(352) 419-5133



NEW 2013
2br 2ba
Doublewide w/10 year
Warranty $39,900
Delivered & setup, alc,
skirt, steps.
Call(352) 795-1272


NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181


Palm Harbor Homes
Demo your mobile
homelfree tear down
at Palm Harbor New
mobiles $39k off list
John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext 210


$$$$$$$$

WE WILL
BUY YOUR
MANUFACTURED
Home. from 1976-2013
CALL (352) 795-2377

-'I-I

CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 4br 2ba MH
READY TO MOVE IN!
4Owner Fin. Avail.*
CALL (352) 795-1272


2BR. 1% BA.on your
own 75x 100 lot.
no fees! new enclosed
sunroom, Ig laundry
room furn, 2 storage
buildings, 5111 Castle
Lake Ave. S. of
Inverness on SR 41
$39,500 (352) 597-7353


2BR%/2BA, MH &
Land Needs little Work
$17,500 9340 W.Tonto
Dr., Crystal River
Call 352-382-1544 or
813-789-7431


Chronicle








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


3bdr/2 full baths/ 2 car
carport on 1 acre.
split layout, steel roof,
caged pool, 20x25 ft
deck, Ig storage build-
ing, Furnished Modu-
lar $73,900, 5215
Bridget Pt, Castle
Lake Park
Inverness
(352) 597-7353
CASTLE LAKE
Floral City
2/2 S/W Fully furnished
move in condition.
2 screen rooms,
2 sheds. Landscaped
with sprinkler on quiet
cul-de-sac. $38,900.
352-212-1883

FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Considering
ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498


HERNANDO
2 MH's on 1 acre
Invest 59k, mo. rent
possible @1k, mls#
700425, Cridland RE
S.Smith 352-634-1048

HERNANDO/486
1+acre, 2br SWMH+
den/flp, ManCave/Work
Shop w/AC, 28x40,
$43,500, J. Desha
Cridland Real Estate
(352)634-6340


HOME-ON-LAND
Only $59,900, 3/2
"like new" on % acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,350
dwon, $319.22/mo
P&I, W.A.C. Owner
can finance. Call
352-621-9182


HOMOSASSA 2/1
Fenced Quiet Country
Setting, Addition, Shed,
Lg.Deck, new drain
field, as is $29,900 obo
*(352) 628-5244**


NW Citrus County
SWMH on 1 acre, 2/1.5
- paved rd., screened
porch, appliances -
$37,700 possible
owner financing
352-795-9908






2/2 $15,000 On Lake
Rousseau Lot Rent
$240/mo. BETTER
THAN NEW! Owner fi-
nancing. Lee Harris
RE (352) 817-1987


CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
*Winter Specials
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
2/2 New Model $59K
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

DUNNELLON
LAKE ROUSSEAU MH
Park. Lg. 1/1 w/sliderto
encl. screened porch,
outside shed, CHAfurn.
Nice yard, low lot rent.
Asking$11,900
(207) 347-0531


HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $179/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977


Home Finder

www.chroniclehorr ..finder.comrn


Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.chroniclehomefinder.com

*5352


INVERNESS
Move In Ready,
Beautiful 1/1 SW,
Mobile, Harbor Lights
55+ park, on Big Lake
Henderson. Fully furn.,
very updated, view of
lake, Cen. HVAC, W/D,
A Must See! Asking
$7,000, 352-344-1828
LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access, ramp and
shower $25,000.
352-212-6804
LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access, ramp and
shower $25,000.
352-212-6804
Melody Pk, INV
2/2cp, splitplan,
roofover, C/H/A,
woodsview, $10k
Cridland RE, J.Desha
(352) 634-6340
Sandy Oak 55+ RV PK
14x60 split 2/2, new
heatlac, remodeled,
furn. Ig scnd in FL Rm.
55 ft crpt w/laundry
room, 989-858-0879




INVERNESS
RV Spaces. Bring your
own boat and fishing
gear. AGE 55+ commu-
nity. Lot rent only
$360-$375 including
electric. Edge Water
Oaks 352-344-1380




HOMOSASSA
RENT-to-OWN
3br 2ba MH
Immediate Occpancy
Owner Financina Avail.
CALL (352) 795-2377





J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL

Need a Good Tenant?


2/2/1................... $650
4/2 On a Canal .......... $750
2/1 Apartment ...........$525


2/2 Townhome........... $700

3/2/2....................$800
2/1 ..................... $600


3/2 ........ ......... $650
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010

Chassahowitzka
3/2 waterfrnt/DW $500
2/2, fence. Yd/DW $500
2/2 house w/gar. $600
AGENT (352) 382-1000


AMTION 3
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALf,1 INC.
352-795-7368
ww.CitrusCountyHonmeRentals corn
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
9 Daniel St. (BH)................ $650
2/1 Clen, quiet home on culesac
7733 Darby Dr. ((S)........... $700
3/2/2 Nice home
CRYSTAL RIVER
226 NE 5th St. (CR) ............... $800
3/2/2 Large home in downtown CR
11246 Freshwater Path ((R) $1200
2/2/1 Screened lanai, nice
furnishings, uhlies inl.
HOMOSASSA
41 Birchlree St. (H) ............ $800
2/2/2 SMW nice local n, sp aiousms, lana
5818 Power Terr. (H).. $850
3/2 Large DW on 5 acres
HERNANDO/INVERNESS
6315 N. Shorewood Dr. (Her)... $650
2/1 Cute home wth FL roomand great bckyard
854 Pritchard Isl. (Inv.)...$800
2/2 Townhouse on waterfront, comm. pool





-In













CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025

HOMOSASSA
1 bdrm. nice apt, furn.
$425. inc. utilities
+ sec.(352) 621-5265
INVERNESS
Rm. for Rent, furn.
share w/ 3 men,
$350, + $100 sec.
352-726-0652




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts, 2 BRi 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apart-
ments for Rent
352-465-2985
CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815

INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great
Loc., clean & roomy.
no pets $500.mo 1st. &
Last $300. Sec.
352-341-1847


SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant
Rd. to So. on Talla-
hasse Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719



& OPPORTUNITY





CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret
HarbourApts. Newly
remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incl Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037




CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy 19 Downtown
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000 SF, exc. loc.
$795/mo 352-634-2528





CRYSTAL RIVER
Downtown Citrus Av.
1156 sf, off St. Parkng
Charlotte G. RIty. Inv.
(352) 795-9123


CRYSTAL RIVER
Office & Warehouse
$300-$600, Plantation
Rentals 352-634-0129

HERNANDO
4 BR, 2 BA, Playroom &
office, fenc. yard, on
over 21AC, or Comm.
Office on Hwy 200
$875 + Sec. 344-3084

HERNANDO
APROX. 1100SQ FT
OFFICE ON OVER 1/2
ACRE ON HWY 200
$725mo. 352-344-3084

LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza,
Office/Retail, CR 486,
900 sf. @ $700+ util. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801





CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furn. w/ member-
ship, 352-476-4242,
352-527-8002

INVERNESS
Whispering Pines Villa
3/2/2 w/ enclosed patio,
$850 F/L/S, BK/CK req
321-303-0346





CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, $615, month
Charlotte G. RIty. Inv.
(352) 795-9123

INVERNESS
clean, attractive 2/2/1
Duplex, family neigh.
3619 Theresa Lane,
Terry Houston, Foxfire
Realty (352) 528-3314


HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
INGLIS
WATERFRONT
Charming eff. /cottage
$645/mo includes
utilities & furnished.
352-422-2994




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1- Sm house $400
+elec. 1st/last/sec
Call for application.
352-628-1062
INVERNESS
3 bedroom. 3 bath. Log
home. Double lot on ca-
nal. Huge garage. $900
a mo. rent. $750 sec.
(352)476-2282
SUGARMILL
3B/2.5 Baths.Yard serv-
ice incl. No pool.$1050
month.$600DD.Small
Pet ok. 727-580-1083




BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, Fl. rm., CHA, $510
35 Golden St 464-2701
BEVERLY HILLS
1/1/CP + Fl. Rm $450
(352) 897-4447,
697-1384
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, Fl. Rm., CHA,
$525. mo. +$300 Sec.
352-422-0139
BEVERLY HILLS
870 Beakrush Ln
2br 1% ba, 1 car gar.
enclosed screen porch,
$600 mo. leased dep.
no pets. 352-586-3072

HOMASASSA SMW
3/2/3, Ig. pool, dbl. lot
$1,250.mo. incld. lawn
maint. (773) 320-1894


Bankruptcy Waterfront Condo Dev

Crystal River, FL

Tuesday, February 26 @ 11:00 AM ET


No Minimum Bid subject to court approval
* Bid in person or online (during live auction only)
* 9+ Condos waterfront and interior
* 33 lots and acreage o t
* Purchase one property or buy them all


Please see website for full details.
Tranzon Driggers Walter J. Triggers, I11, Lic. Real
Estate Broker, FL Lic# AU707 & AB3145 I 10% BP
Case No. 6:10-bk-07720-KSJ


*,NZN.O 877-34-443


E12 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013


IM


oD,








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Start ng@$433/mo
Inverness
352-726-3476
Lecanto
352-746-0373
Crystal River

352-563-0890



EOUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

CITRUS HILLS
AREA, HERITAGE
55+ Gated Community
3/2 builders model,
never lived in, no pets
$1000mo 352-270-8953
HERNANDO
4 BR, 2 BA, Playroom &
office, fenc. yard, on
over '/AC, or Comm.
Office on Hwy 200
$875 + Sec. 344-3084

Hernando
Rentals
from $425.00 @ MO.
Call A.W.
'Skip' Craven
352-464-1515

HOMOSASSA
2/1 Like new. $725neg
(352) 503-3554
Invern. Highlands
2/2/1, City Water, Great
Loc. Quiet Neighrhood
$650. 352-860-2554

INVERNESS
2/2, modern, $575m
FILLS. walk to Publix,
P.O. 352-634-1141

INVERNESS
3/2 Brand New,
Granite tops, marble
firs, SS Ap $895
(352) 634-3897
INVERNESS
Country Living on
Large 1/ acre lot. 3 bd.,
2 ba. home. Garden
and fenced areas. Well
& septic, so no water
bill! $595. 352-476-4964
INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/1/1
$590mo.1st & Sec
(352) 344-2560
INVERNESS
Large 1 BR home in
55+ community, Great
location just off the
water. Bring boat &
fishing gear. $585
(352) 344-1380
Sugarmill Woods
2/2/2, 2 MBdrms
$875. 352-302-4057




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2 Very clean, 1800sq
ft Dixie Shores $950
Neg. 352-795-0102
Leave Messge

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225


S
INVERNESS
Share a house, Ig pool
Incl 'ds util. Lakeside
C.C. lots of amenities
$775. 1st/sec 419-2924




Citrus Hills/Condo
m/bdrm w/ba, htd pool
$435 352-249-7804

CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfront Priv.
Rm./Ba. share kit. $400
everything Included
352-875-5998




CRYSTAL RIVER
Office & Warehouse
$300-$600, Plantation
Rentals 352-634-0129





20 DOCKABLE
ACRES: St. Lucie
Waterway $189,500.
45mins boat Atlantic;
5mins boat Lake
Okeechobee.
Beautiful land,
abundant wildlife.
Gated/Privacy
888-716-2259 Gulf
Atlantic Land, Broker.

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Developed site with
gazebo & storage bldg,
reduced to $49,500.
Separate storage
lot available. (RV sold).
For info and pictures
Click on
detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441

LAND FOR SALE
LAND LIQUIDATION
20 acres St. Lucie
Waterway, $189,500.
3 miles boat Lake
Okeechobee, 45 min
boat Atlantic. Private
/ gated. Deer, turkey,
hogs, fishing.
(888)716-2259 Gulf
Atlantic Land,
Broker.


TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $58,500. Call
352-638-0905


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com







Uwe -h


-U
UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crossland realty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.







Quiet Country Setting
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area
only 20 Min. to Ocala
$129,900 Call
352-302-6784
for appt.





Furnished Pool Home
3/2/1 Fab. $139.9K
www.coolproperties.net
PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything! 4/3
w/7 car
garage/workshop &
in-law suite on 5.83 ac-
res.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164




2/2/2, REMODELED
NEW: Roof, AC, Kit,
Baths, Windows, Firs,
317 S Harrison.
Reduced $72,900.
Call 352-527-1239




Custom Home,
3 bedroom, 21/ bath,
w/Master w/DBL
walk-ins + bath +
den/off. 2+ car garage.
1 Acre. MUST SEE!
$249,900.
352-860-0444


Brentwood Villa
2/2/2 cul-de-sac
Completely updated!
1816 W. Jena Ct
OPEN SUN 12-3PM
$96,900
PRICED TO SELL!
FSBO 610-248-2090




ARBOR LAKES
Fantastic Dream
Home In Active Senior
Community $169,900
2,100 sf, 3BR/2BA/2GA
Split Floor Plan w/Pool
Call (352) 726-6564




Al Move In Condition
2 Bedrm, 2 Full Baths
with convertible
bedroom den, mod-
ern open floor plan,
on small lake, FREE In-
home theater system
2 car garage $129,900
Realtor (941) 356-1456
FSBO 3/2/2 Scrn Porch,
metal roof, appls, CHA,
fans, verticals, shed,
fence, deck, spklrs, near
dog park. $120,000
(352) 586-0872
Unique stilt home in
rustic surroundings
off 581. Great loc to
town, shopping, &
hospital. 2br/lba, wl
rap around porch.
Needs some TLC.
Sold as is. Make an
offer. Asking $33,900
(352) 419-6227




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE




3b/2ba den MH
on land off US 19
newer c/h/a carpet &
vinyl, furn, clean RV
Hkup. fence **$39.900-
Cridland Real Estate
JDesha 352-634-6340

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

REfMIC
REALTY ONE


SOLD
The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.






MU SELL

4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell



4/3/2, POOL HOME
3,000 sf granite coun-
ters, SS appl's., wood
firs., Reduced $25,000
Asking $235,000
850-585-4026


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.
Sugarmill Woods
2/2/2, 1st & last $750
(850) 776-7528
Sugarmill Woods
House for Sale
2/2/2, Call for More
Info. 334-691-4601
(850) 776-7528


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.comn
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
gail@citrusrealtor
cornn
www.citrusrealtor
.corn
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.





I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!







DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant


CirsCut


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near
KINGS BAY $425,000.
Make Offers
352-563-9857




YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaf'reCoast
Properties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"


Brooksville Deeded
spacious, shaded cnr
lot, 1BR/1BA, Large FL
room, Large storage
shed & patio. 55+ RV
Park w/ heated pool,
and music activities,
$36,000 352-848-0448,
352- 428-0462 anytime







"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Will Trade 1% dry
acreage in Inverness
Chambers Way Rte 44
for small house or gar-
age w/ apt in Citrus
County (304) 650-6558



1/ ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact fee
credit, high and dry,
trees, $11,000 obo
(352) 795-3710
INVERNESS, FL
3 miles east of Inv;
5-20ac wooded/some
cleared, owner finance
available.Owner is
licensed Real Estate
BrokerEd Messer.ed
.messer@yahoo.com
NORTH CITRUS
1.4 ac. Cleared, fenced,
high & dry. Paved road.
Elec., pump/well, septic.
Owner finan. No
mobiles. $13,900
CALL 352-897-4195



HOMOSASSA Wooded
Lot on Lee Woods Dr.,
has Wetlands, with
River access, but not
on river $6,000.
352-621-1664











\our\world lirst




Need ajob


ora


qualified


employee?





This area's


#1


employment


source!




Ci ,r^Nidi


11MT1111INICT1 i M],


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 E13










Swap or sell unwanted gift cards online


Dear Sara: For my birthday, my
mother-in-law got me some
gift cards. One of the gift
cards was for Regal Cinemas. Un-
fortunately, there is not a
Regal Cinemas theater
within three hours of
where I live, so the gift
card is useless to me.
Do you know of a good
website that buys, sells
and/or trades gift cards? I
hear rumors that they're
out there, but I've never
used one before, and I
don't want to get ripped Sara
off' KR.J, email FRU
Dear KLJ.: There are LVI
plenty of sites to choose
from. Some of the most
popular sites include Plasticjungle.
com, Cardpool.com, ABCGiftCards.
com, GiftCardGrannycom, GiftCard
Rescue.com and Swapagift. com.
Please compare the exchange op-
tions involved, such as shipping
costs, maximum payout, minimum
and maximum balance, and whether
or not you get instant payment.
Dear Sara: Would you use a wee-
wipe? A wee-wipe is an old towel or
nappy cut up into small squares to
use instead of toilet paper (just for
wees). You then toss them into your
machine for washing with your
other clothes.
It isn't something I would want to
use, but I am interested in your
opinion.
I have old towels I use for the dogs
when they have an accident, but I'm





I gggg


That's right, new carpet, paint, tile, MOVE IN
READY. Bring your flats boat, kayak, canoes, and have
a Florida's picture perfect ride to the Halls River and the
Homosassa River. Located at the end of the canal with
great privacy. This waterfront delight is great for the
angler or water lover who wants peace and quiet, yet
close to town and all the amenities. 700250
Visit
WWW.8880WWHITEDOGWOOD.INFO
for more Dhotos and info!


not too fond of the thought of han-
dling my own wee-wipes. Brilly,
email
Dear Brilly: Many Frugal Living
readers have shared that
they use wee-wipes for
their baby, or for their en-
tire family. They some-
times refer to them as
family cloth.
, They make wee-wipes
from velour, flannel, terry
cloth, etc., and prepare
them like baby wipes, or
use them coupled with a
Noel peri/squirt bottle.
GAL After using, many peo-
NG ple place them in a zip-
pered wet bag or a small
plastic waste can contain-
ing bleach and water (similar to a
cloth-diaper pail) until laundry
time.
I'm not interested in swapping out
toilet paper not even part-time.
I understand the reasoning be-
hind finding alternatives to dispos-
able paper products, but as the
person who does the laundry, no
thank you. But my opinion is, to each
his or her own. If you use them, I'd
appreciate knowing before you have
me as a guest. I don't like surprises!
Dear Sara: I want to add healthier
snacks to my daughter's lunch. I'm
not sure what to try to give her. I
don't want her to feel as if she's eat-
ing rabbit food every day
What do your kids enjoy in their
lunches? Linda, New York
See FRUGAL/Page E15











COME AND SEE THIS GEM! Move-in condition
2BR 1.5 Bath, Solar heated pool home. Interior
recently painted. Newer stainless steel
appliances, laminate flooring. This home is
spotless and in a great location. Could be a year
round home or part-time winter home. Easy
access to library, medical facilities and shopping.
$87,500
Directions: From 491 to Forest Ridge Blvd. to Left
on Camomile, left on Hollyfern to home on left.
Lili Garcia 352-302-9129 ,


E14 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


(
I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E14

Dear Linda: At my
house, clementines, snap
peas, string cheese, apple-
sauce, yogurt and cucum-
ber are lunch-box snack
favorites. There are also
some helpful lunch box
ideas at frugalvillage.
com/forums/food-kids
/134225-mix-match-
lunchbox-ideas.html.
If your daughter is open
to eating salads, soups,
pasta dishes, breakfast
foods, dinner leftovers,
etc., she might not even
need a snack in her lunch.
New uses for
baby socks
If your baby has grown
out of his or her socks, why
not repurpose them?
Make cat toys: Insert cat-
nip and sew the opening
closed. You can add yarn
or ribbon to drag or dangle
the toy, or put a jingle bell
inside, too. Catnip is a
perennial herb; you can
grow it indoors or outdoors
for added savings.
Craft cute ornaments for
next year: Stuff a baby
sock with poly-fil and
make minisnowmen. For
instructions, visit spoon-
ful. com/crafts/baby-sock-
snowmen or crafts.
kaboose.com/sock-snow
man-ornament.html.
Other uses: Baby socks


can be used a body scrub-
ber with soap slivers in-
side. Polish leather shoes
or purses, or use them to
dust and clean around
your home.
The first reader shares
how she reuses baby
socks:
Reuse baby socks: I
use baby socks to cover the
hot things in my car, like
the gearshift and the glow-
plug pull. My mechanic
laughed his head off when
he first saw them and then
asked me where to buy
them when I came back to
pick the car up. Edna,
Texas
Re-purpose clothing:
Our family's worn-out
clothes get a second life as
rags. I cut the tips off the
socks so they don't acci-
dentally wind up back in
the sock drawer, and I cut
the T-shirts into smaller,
more manageable pieces.
All these rags of varying
sizes are kept in a small
plastic trash bin under the
kitchen sink. The kids
know exactly where to go
and what to do when
there's a spill.
We also reuse our plastic
grocery bags as garbage
bags. They fit perfectly
over the kitchen trash bin
when the handles of the
grocery bag are gently
stretched and secured
over the sides of the trash
bin. There's really no need
to buy plastic trash bags. -
Connie, Rhode Island


SKEY "Always There For You"
PEJLri GAIL COOPER
*06 4 1lii ll'illini 'l i Doillr I. Re ,i
SER Cell: (352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3,,mindspring.com
1Lf


KING SIZE OPPORTUNITY! NEXT DOOR TO EVERYTHING!
* 3+large office/2.5/2 2584 sqft living 3+office/2/2 pool home
* Vaulted Great Room with fireplace Salt water heated pool 2 waterfalls
* Dual pane windows well for the yard Granite kitchen SS appliances
* Set on 2 cul de sac lots Hardwood flooring in main living areas
* Updated appliances Dual pane windowsAND sliders
* 2 AC/heat units Home warranty for the buyers
#359712 $124,900 #354824 $209,900
See.JVirItu .IIIou ,.i..UJJIJr II.I.I..Ie IIB.I..m


Fels-Naptha rave: I
found two bars packed to-
gether in a bag at a thrift
store for $1. I bought it be-
cause I remember my
grandmother and mother
using it. I recently mois-
tened the bar and rubbed
it on a grease spot on a
gray sweater. It took the
stain out! I am so happy,
this was a dollar well-
spent Elena, email
New laundry soap
recipe: I decided to try dry
soap, so here is what I did:
1 large plastic cat litter
tub
2 boxes Borax


2 boxes washing soda
8 pounds baking soda or
OxiClean
6 bars Fels-Naptha soap
(fine ground in food
processor)
1 bottle Purex scent
crystals (I used lavender),
32-load size
1 small box Gain pow-
der, optional (I just added
this for the scent.)
Stir in some of each and
continue adding in layers
as it fills the tub and gets
hard to mix. I ended up
using my hands. I put some
in the Purex bottle and use
the little cap to measure


out about two tablespoons.
It should last the year. I
used it last night and was
very happy with it. Total
cost was about $30-35, or
$2.91 a month, which
equates to roughly 10 cents
per load. Cricket, Texas
Lye soap for stains: I
made some lye soap re-
cently and just used some
on one of my ruined new
tops. The soap took out the
grease stains, and my top
is good as new again! It
even rescued one of my
husband's T-shirts. Be
careful what you use it on,
but it worked great for me!


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013 E15
Both of the shirts I used it
on were cotton or cotton
blend. C.H., South
Carolina
U -
Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (www
frugalvillage.com), a
website that offers
practical, money-saving
strategies for everyday
living. To send tips,
comments or questions,
write to Sara Noel, c/o
Universal Uclick, 1130
Walnut St., Kansas City
MO 64106, or email
sara@frugalvillage. com.


Amanda & Kiik Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty -69
BROKEi/ASSC. REALTOR GB REACTOR REALTOR-BROKER REACTOR







3946 N. PONY 3948 N. BUCKWHEAT 4710 W. MUSTANG 4704 W. RANGER
4/35/3 359171 $749900 3/2/2 $187,500 3/2/3359604 $249,900 359371 $249,900





8410 N. SAXON WAY 10953 N. TARTAN 2047 W. PARAGON LN. 9328 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD.
3/2/2 700484 $110,000 4/2/2 355293 $106,900 3/2/2 358792 $149,900 3/2/1 356581 $69,900





8182 N. POCONO 6560 N. DELTONA BLVD. 375 W. CRESTMONT 6121 N. SILVER PALM
3/2/2 700103 $86,900 3/2.5/2 700080 $119,900 2/2/2 700617 $124,900 3/2.5/2 358309 $148,500


70BEELYHIL
*Ao


7239 COTTAGE 31 MELBOURNE 750 N. HONEYLOCUST 210 ROYAL FERN CT. 7170 N. GRACKLE
3/2/CPDet./4+CPDet. 357796 $139,900 2/2/2 700838 $45,000 3/2/2 358885 $87,900 2/2/2 700461 $79,000 3/2/2 700780 $109,900





29 WASHINGTONT 16S. ADAMS 2616 E. VENUS 6260 S. CANNA LILY 4210 E. LAKE PARK DR.
2/1 356448 $39,900 3242,90 3/2 700201 $24,900 3/2 359137 $59,900 2 39138 $81,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


CRYSTALL RIVER
M1,

JK1


'UEVERLY HILLS








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I I v- I .ii--
* ,,, i. ,1 ,NG INVERNESS GOLF & COUNTRY HOME












LOTS OF LAND FOR FAIR MARKET PRICE BIG PRICERREDUCTION PRIVATE AND BEAUTIFUL ABUNDANT AMENITIES .I C WINTERETWAY
'i O IVERESS HOE! WATERFRONT ACREAGE TO _i I i ...I i COZY WINTER GETAWAY






.. .... '.. :,1. :,, ....1 1,, I,, cII BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME ON ,.... noh r lI. ,i I....1 ',llI ON SPACIOUS CORNER LOT


BARGAIN AT= $119,900 OFFERED AT ONLY S71,900 l, 1:11. $ 119900' "',1hi ',-,-,, ',',,,"
P.it D.nis S2 212 280 Ch"n.- E Giit counl5so2 2635 Cill Sccr Bargeson 302 5656 i ='. '-1 $147,000 ASKING 3452,900 7
I'e isisng 111111 c2iiid.ni s cam infor -Usij "n' inti. i'on.U oin u Ii ihis siice ofpa.irdise Man/j n Booth 63/ 4904 20/ 1/21 Cn teiii fii.r ii Ji??U? i'.. li'm pii'r'.i'
LOTS OF LAND FOR FAIR MARKET PRICE BIG PLEASANT GROVE RD SPACIOUS 2/2/1 END UNITMENITIES








NONCOMMERCIAL BUILDING 1.12 NVACRELOT NESS ITHALL IMPROVEMENTS SECLUDEDHOMEON OER 1 ACRE Ac ., D
p,,: :, i ,,,, ,,,, ....h. 1, ", i .. I.... ....50E R A C R EA G E TO*$9
HiI Hl f in h .....il) I -10 .5 p i c. IH .:..:.6 .'I',,,II.. .6 1, ,,,b ,,,,, ,,
I p .i, 1 I.' .l .I.&. 1 .1.., 1s . i .... i 1ll, I, .h.I u .B II I,:35 0 ,0 A "

















M l.i = ..h :'. Al .I".F $119,900 i tFu,,iD Mi Nii. $71,l.i =O NY :./'l $264,500 Jebine Pich ei 1 i.1d Piche1 1 22 3 iO Pi. D I ,352'2/2 7280
Ca.ll Jim lon a3 12221/3 oi alou Caillida Cl ano 352 270 0202 Cal CChailes K/ell 352 542262356 iuin ClusCouniin oldcorn I'.3.i I0: 0-i4 cl0i0iAK c$.m
l,,::J ,, :i ,J 1 '_ ~ li:l: I :I ,:l I I ,, I, .: ,,,,, 'I l6 .... j -,I mh lmii ll :,-' ,, l l h : sl 'I : ] ] ). 1 l-, ],i .',-i.'.-. .. ., -.iA.,,.hi,-,-.


Call Jim Notion a1 422.2173 lot a lout Call Nuida Cane 352.270.020 CafllChailes Kelly 352.422.2367 11 II I CillusCegall~Sold cem I ',qo illnp 21piltdio. zo,s.


WITH CITY WATER AND SEWER
II ., I I l I...... I I ". I

i Vh I l.. I h ,. Vo l 1'. h 1. 1 i h I. m h,, I ,.

l s = 'c.I ASKING ONLY S75,000
C.ill D.n id Kuil Cell 954 383 8786
lori tour personal tour


$59,900
Loiaine 0 Regan 352 586 0075


HUGE PRICE REDUCTION 1001 LOUNDS


,, A 4 ":, I_,,,..1, '' ,,.l 1',1 h ,,v,,,,.. M I = /iiiiu'i $ 6 9 ,0 0 0
PRICED TO SELL a $249,000 Call Stelan StuaI .,'352 212 0211
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699 oi Isaac Ba/ lon '352 697 2493


* H l.l ,i I i ,,i:,d
* N .- ,:1 1 ,: j. : i


* VV.,l I il. i ,I I -.l pIilp
Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
it'i'it'. ciliiuscounilrsold. corn


E16 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2013