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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 02-03-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03020

Full Text


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VOL. 118 ISSUE 180


2013SERIES




Shielding our innocents


Advocates:

Child safety

top priority

MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
"Can we honestly say that
we're doing enough to keep our
children all of them safe
from harm? ... If we're honest
with ourselves, the answer is
no. We're not doing enough. "-
President Barack Obama,
speaking at a prayer vigil in
Newtown, Conn., two days after
the Dec. 15 Sandy Hook Ele-
mentary School massacre.
ME.
Citrus County's little children
laugh, play, dream. They go to
school, learn to read and write,
and make hand puppets for
their moms and dads.
Youngsters evolve into
teenagers who become moody,
curious and opinionated. They
explore themselves and others,
garner relationships, evolve in
their own form of creativity
Some will draw, or sing, or play
quarterback on Friday nights in
the fall.
If all goes well, they grow up
with supportive teachers, loving
family and a strong sense of
right and wrong.
But are they safe?
Is harm lurking around each
corner? Harm from abusive par-
ents, drunken drivers, gun-toting
thugs or even classmates?
Are they victims of
circumstance?
Some children have mental-
health issues that make them
unruly, despondent, unpre-
dictable. Parents place hope on
a system designed to protect
their children from hurting
themselves or others.
And so the question, asked by
President Obama two days after
the slaughter of 20 children and
six educators at Sandy Hook El-
ementary School, remains: Are
we doing our best to keep chil-
dren the innocents free
from harm?
See Page A9


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Tiffany Davenport, center, has recently become legal guardian of her brother Joey, 16, and sister Savanna, 14. The three siblings live to-
gether in a deed-restricted community that is home mainly to residents 60 years of age and older. The adults in the community have ral-
lied around the youngsters in the wake of a family tragedy.

IChildren pick up pieces after death of parents


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
, On Aug. 1, 2012, the lives of
three children were radically
altered in an instant with the
tragic death of their parents.
Early that Wednesday morn-
ing, Joseph Davenport, 48, shot
and killed his estranged wife,
Deborah, 47, then killed him-
self, leaving the three children
Tiffany, now23; Joey, now 16;
and Savanna, 14 alone.
They're not alone, however.
In the wake of this tragedy, the


community has stepped in to
help raise these three young
people in a true example of the
proverb, "It takes a village to
raise a child."
MEN
One day this past summer,
someone called the sheriff's of-
fice to report a stranger in the
neighborhood.
Since their parents' deaths,
Tiffany, Joey and Savanna have
lived in their mother's two-
bedroom condo in a deed-
restricted housing area where
the average age of the residents


is older than 60.
Tiffany and Savanna were
out and Joey was at a football
game and came home earlier
than expected. When he discov-
ered he was locked out of the
house, he started pacing up and
down the street in front of the
house.
"The cops came, lights and
all," Tiffany said, laughing. "But
as soon as they saw his ID, they
knew, 'Oh, that's Tiffany's
brother.'"


Holocaust stories retold by holograms


Associated Press
LOS ANGELES For years,
Holocaust survivor Pinchus
Gutter has told the tragic story
of watching his parents and 10-
year-old twin sister herded into
a Nazi death camp's gas cham-
bers so quickly he had no time
to even say goodbye.
He was left instead with an
enduring image he has carried
with him through 70 years: that
of his sister vanishing into a sea
of people doomed to die.
Only this time the elderly,
balding man wasn't really there
as he recounted the horror of
the Holocaust to an audience
gathered in an auditorium at the


University of Southern Califor-
nia's School of Cinematic Arts.
It was the 80-year-old sur-
vivor's digital doppelganger,
dressed in a white shirt, dark
pants and matching vest, that
was doing the talking as it gazed
intently at its audience, some-
times tapping its feet as it
paused to consider a question.
Over the years, elderly Holo-
caust survivors like Gutter have
been leaving behind manu-
scripts and oral histories of
their lives, fearful that once
they are gone there will be no
one to explain the horror they
lived through or to challenge
the accounts of Holocaust de-
niers like Iranian President


Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.
For the past 18 months, a
group led by USC's Shoah
Foundation has been trying to
change that by creating three-
dimensional holograms of
nearly a dozen people who sur-
vived Nazi Germany's system-
atic extermination of 6 million
Jews during World War II.
Like the digital librarian por-
trayed by Orlando Jones in the
2002 movie "The Time Ma-
chine," the plan is for Gutter
and others to live on in perpe- Associated Press
tuity, telling generations not University of Southern California Institute for Creative Technologies
born yet the horror they wit- manager Lori Weiss relaxes to music synchronized with color LEDs
nessed and offering their on Jan. 29 inside the Lighting Stage X, the institute's latest LED-
filled sphere used to help create realistic virtual characters in Playa
See Page A2 Vista area of Los Angeles.


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A2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013

HOLOGRAM
Continued from Page Al

thoughts on how to avoid
having one of history's
darkest moments repeated.
Although people at this
week's event saw Gutter as
only a two-dimensional fig-
ure, he has been painstak-
ingly filmed for hours in
3-D and, perhaps as early as
next year according to
those involved in the proj-
ect, his hologram could be
talking face-to-face with
visitors at the U.S. Holo-
caust Memorial Museum in
Washington, D.C.
Certainly it will be within
five years, said Stephen
Smith, the Shoah Founda-
tion's executive director,
and Paul Debevec, associ-
ate director of the univer-
sity's Institute for Creative
Technologies, which is cre-
ating the hologram pro-
ject's infrastructure.
"Having actually put it
together, it's clear this will
happen," said Debevec,
whose institute has part-
nered with Hollywood on
such films as "Avatar" and
"The Curious Case of Ben-
jamin Button," winning a
special Academy Award
for the latter
Indeed, it already has al-
most happened.
More than 15 years after
his death, rapper Tupac
Shakur made a 3-D holo-
gram-like appearance at
last year's Coachella Valley
Music and Arts Festival,
performing alongside a real
Snoop Dogg. Technically,
Shakur wasn't a hologram,
however, because his image
was projected onto a thin
screen that was all but in-
visible to the audience.
"This takes it one step
further as far as you won't
be projecting onto a screen,
you'll be projecting into
space," Smith said of the
project, called New Dimen-
sions in Testimony
It comes just in time, said
Rabbi Marvin Hier, direc-
tor of the Simon Wiesenthal
Center, which is dedicated
to keeping alive the history
of the Holocaust
"This generation is com-
ing to an end, unfortu-
nately," Hier said of


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Holocaust survivors, whose
average age is estimated at
79. "Within the next decade
or so there won't be many
survivors alive anywhere in
the world."
Given the prominence of
Holocaust deniers like
Iran's Ahmadinejad, Hier
said, it's crucial to record
survivors' accounts in a way
that future generations can
easily access and relate to.
"The Holocaust is well
documented, and we have
confessions of the major
war criminals," he said.
"But there's nothing like
the human witness who
can look you in the eye
and say, 'Look, this is what
happened to my husband.
This is what happened to
my children. This is what
happened to my
grandparents."'
Developing a technology
capable of that has been
painstakingly time consum-
ing. But in the past two
years, researchers say, it
has come together faster
than they once imagined.
To help in the effort, Gut-
ter had to sit under an
array of hot stage lights
and in front of a green
screen for hours at a time
over the course of five
days, answering some 500
questions about himself
and his experiences.
Research scientists at


Associated Press
University of Southern California Institute for Creative Technologies computer scientist
David Traum, left, interacts Jan. 29 with Holocaust survivor Pinchas Gutter, seen on a
"Virtual Survivor Visualization," at the USC campus in Los Angeles.


USC are still editing them
and working with voice-
recognition software so
that his hologram will not
only be able to tell his story
but recognize questions
and answer them suc-
cinctly Being able to do
that often required asking
as many as 50 follow-up
questions to one of the
original ones, Smith said.
While researchers have
found there is generally a


range of about 100 ques-
tions people ask survivors
of the Holocaust, if some-
one in the future comes up
with one Gutter's holo-
gram can't answer, it will
simply say so and refer
them to someone who
might know.
For the demonstration
shown this week, he sat be-
fore seven cameras. For the
final hologram, more than
20 will be placed at every


angle possible, so he will
appear to people standing
or sitting anywhere in the
audience just as he would if
he was really there.
No pepper screen will
be used to display his holo-
gram, as was the case with
Shakur. Instead, it will be
broadcast into open space,
allowing people to ap-
proach and interact with
the hologram just as they
would a real person.


Eventually, according to
Debevec and other re-
searchers, holograms
could come to have nu-
merous uses. Among them
would be teaching classes,
taking part in business
conferences and providing
expert opinion on subjects
when real people can't be
there to do so. They could
even be used as teaching
tools for people studying to
become therapists who
aren't quite ready to work
with a real, emotionally
troubled person.
For now, however, re-
searchers are working
strictly with Holocaust sur-
vivors, creating a list of
nine other people with the
help of the private group
Conscience Display, which
records survivors' stories
and suggested the project
Given that every person
interviewed has been 80 or
older, Smith said, it may
prove difficult to find sub-
jects with the stamina to
participate. Still, no one
approached so far has said
no to the idea.
Perhaps Gutter's digital
presence summed up the
reason for that best when
it was asked the other day
why he chose to take part.
It replied: "I tell my
story for the purpose of
improving humanity"


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TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Paddle way down regional rivers


Canoe group extends deadline to take

trip from Withlacoochee to the Gulf


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
Paddlers have until Monday to
register for the "Wild Wonderful
Withlacoochee" trip.
Organized by Paddle Florida,
the roughly 60-mile river trip is
set for Feb. 13 through Feb. 18. It
will take paddlers up the With-
lacoochee River from Marsh
Bend Outlet Park at Lake Pana-


soffkee through Citrus County to
Levy County's Bird Creek Park
on the Gulf of Mexico. After a
second-day rest stop at the Rut-
land Park boat ramp on State
Road 44, paddlers will head to
the riverside campsite at Potts
Preserve.
Participants will spend a day
exploring Gum Slough, a four-
mile spring near the Sumter-Cit-
rus County border It flows into


the Withlacoochee, east of Potts
Preserve.
The next leg of the trip is Potts
Preserve to Rainbow Springs
where participants may paddle
up the Rainbow River or be
shuttled. The organization has a
tradition of visiting a state park
on each trip.
Paddlers will ride the current
down the Rainbow River, then
head back on the Withlacoochee
to Lake Rousseau. Boats and
paddlers will be shuttled to the
spillway for the next day's
launch.
On the final day, the group will


paddle through Yankeetown to
the Gulf of Mexico.
"We have 45 signed up and it
could go to 50," Paddle Florida
executive director Bill Richards
said. "Registration was ex-
tended through Feb. 4."
The nonprofit organization
works to raise awareness about
conservation and promote
Florida as a destination for na-
ture-based tourism.
Evening entertainment on the
trip includes the music duo
Tammerlin on Feb. 14. On Feb.
16, Dr Bob Knight, director of
the Howard T Odum Florida


Springs Institute, will talk to the
paddlers about Florida's springs
and efforts to restore and pro-
tect them.
Richards said the trip is open
to all types of paddlers including
canoes, kayaks, paddleboards
and similar craft. Trip details,
fees and entry information are
online at www.paddleflorida.org.
He said the group's next trip
will on the little known Ochlock-
onee River in Florida's Panhan-
dle in March.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Pat Faherty at 352-564-2924 or
pfaherty@chronicleonline. com.


Troops


rally to


speak


for park


Meetingfor

Wekiva set

for Feb. 16
Special to the Chronicle
All concerned with the
health and protection of
Florida's springs are en-
couraged to meet from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 16, at Wekiva Springs
State Park to raise aware-
ness about the need to re-
store the impaired
Wekiva River, the trou-
bled springs that feed it,
and all of Florida's treas-
ured waterways.
Attending the meeting
will be former U.S. Sen.
Bob Graham and Semi-
nole County Commis-
sioner Lee Constantine,
the Florida Conserva-
tion Coalition (FCC),
Friends of the Wekiva
River, League of Women
Voters of Orange County
and St. Johns River-
keeper
Through the event -
Speak Up Wekiva the
coalition aims to edu-
cate the public and gal-
vanize support for
protecting and restoring
Florida's imperiled
aquatic resources.
Speak Up Wekiva will
feature remarks by Gra-
ham, Constantine and
other notable speakers,
as well as educational
exhibits, live animals
from the Central Florida
Zoo, artists with original
artwork from the
Wekiva, live music,
guided hikes and food.
Speak Up Wekiva fol-
lows on the success of
the Speak Up Silver
Springs rally in June
2012 at Silver River
State Park to voice con-
cerns about the declin-
ing health of Silver
Springs and Silver River
"Water is the lifeblood
of Florida," said Gra-
ham, a longtime environ-
mental advocate who
founded the nonpartisan
FCC with other conser-
vationists in 2011. "It ties
our state together, pro-
vides untold recreational
opportunities and draws
millions of visitors each
year to our state, sup-
porting jobs and eco-
nomic growth. The
pollution and usage is-
sues affecting every facet
of our water supply are
serious and immediate,
and we must address
them in order to protect
our heritage and pre-
serve our quality of life."


Princess for a day


Teens search for

prom dresses, feel

like Cinderella

ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
INVERNESS Every girl
who entered the doors had the
opportunity to look and feel
like a princess Saturday, in-
cluding 17-year-old Melissa
Manning.
"I had this picture in my
mind and this is the like the
epitome of it," Manning said in
excitement as she stared at the
prom dress she selected. "It
took about 10 minutes for me
realize that this was the one for
me."
An estimated 200 girls from
different Citrus County high
schools descended on Cin-
derella's Closet to make their
dreams come true. During the
free one-day event, teenage
girls hoped to find their
"dream" prom dress from the
1,092 dresses available. Man-
ning, a Seven Rivers Christian
School senior, found a floor-
length, blue-beaded dress along
with accessories at the prom
dress giveaway
Cinderella's Closet was mag-
ically created with a sprinkle of
pixie dust, a lot of organization
and a fairy-godmother spirit.
The prom dress giveaway is a
ministry created by the Work-
ing Christian Women group,
under the umbrella of Corner-
stone Baptist Church at 1100 W
Highland Blvd., Inverness.
Cinderella's Closet founder
Dana Davis formed the idea of
a prom dress giveaway when
she and her college-age daugh-
ter, Rachel, were sorting
through Rachel's closet. As a
single mom, Davis remembered
how she scrimped, saved and
struggled to buy Rachel a prom
dress. Every year, she said, she
is overwhelmed and pleased
with the response to the need.
"The community and volun-
teers have been amazing,"
Davis said. "We had 180 volun-
teers who helped make this
process a success. When setting
up last night, we had so many
volunteers that we were done
four hours ahead of schedule."
In addition to the long and
short dresses, the girls chose
from the selection of 357 pairs
of shoes along with purses and
jewelry. All were donated by
the community Onsite alter-
ations were also available.
Cinderella's Closet has be-
come a memorable production
for the single mom and teacher
However, due to her wanting to
spend more time being a
mother and teacher, she has de-
cided to pass off the crown.
Lindsey Taylor will take over as
the lead fairy godmother at Cin-
derella's Closet next year
"All of the teams are working
together so well," Taylor said.
"It is an overwhelming feeling


ww-


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Seven Rivers Christian School
senior Melissa Manning, above,
looked into the mirror and was
ecstatic about finding her dream
prom dress at Cinderella's
Closet. She had an image in her
mind of what the perfect dress
looked like and this one fit it per-
fectly. Manning, right, also
found accessories to accent her
blue prom dress. Cinderella's
Closet helped her find her dream
prom dress.

to realize how many people
came together who don't even
know each other"
Businesses, schools,
churches and individuals par-
ticipated, resulting in a
"community-building" event.
This year, Davis offered a spe-
cial thanks to Windmill Self
Storage, Paul and Jerry's Self
Storage, Quality Cleaners,
Winn-Dixie, Buddy's Home
Furnishing, MaryBeth's Bridal
and Formal Wear, Profile T-
shirts, Dunkin' Donuts and the
schools' culinary departments.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at 352-563-
5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington
@chronicleonline. com.


Around THE COUNTY


City managers to
speak to GOP
Nature Coast Republican Club
and Citrus Republican Womens
Club will host a presentation on city
government Saturday, Feb. 9.
Guest speakers will be Inverness
City Manager Frank DiGiovanni and
Crystal River City Manager Andy


Houston.
The 9 a.m. meeting at American
Legion Post 155 in Crystal River will
be preceded by an 8:30 a.m. social.
Rotary Club auction
Saturday
From noon to 5 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 9, WYKE will feature a live
broadcast of the Rotary Club of In-


verness auction to provide scholar-
ships to Citrus High School and
Withlacoochee Technical Institute
students. WYKE-TV airs on cable
channel 16.
The auction raises funds for
scholarships. Last year, $7,000 were
raised.
Those wishing to lend support by


until Feb. 9, however. The Rotary
Club of Inverness has a website
continually being updated and al-
lows password-protected bidding.
Visit www.rotaryinverness.com.
Winning bidders will be an-
nounced live Saturday, Feb. 9. Par-
ticipants can watch live or check
back online to see if they are the


bidding on items do not need to wait final bidder.


Democratic Club
to meet Saturday
The Central Citrus Democratic
Club will meet at 11 a.m. Saturday,
Feb. 10, at the Central Ridge Li-
brary, at the corner or Forest Ridge
and Roosevelt boulevards, Beverly
Hills. All Democrats are welcome.
From staff reports












Legislature puts salaries online


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Floridians
will finally get a chance on their
own to find out how much peo-
ple are getting paid to work for
the Florida Legislature.
The two Republican leaders
of the Florida House and
Florida Senate quietly this week
added links on legislative web-
sites that allow people to look up
legislative employee salaries.
The two chambers are also post-
ing copies of contracts.
The move to post the informa-


tion comes nearly two years
after Gov Rick Scott posted
salaries of most state workers.
Scott eventually posted the
salaries of professors and other
university employees even
though it drew the ire of some of
those working for the schools.
Florida also has information
regarding state contracts posted
online.
Ryan Duffy, a spokesman for
House Speaker Will Weather-
ford, said the records are the
ones most frequently requested.
"We thought it would be easi-


ON THE NET

www.myfloridahouse.gov
www.flsenate.gov

est for access by putting them
online," Duffy said Friday
The House website shows, for
example, that 32 employees in
the House earn $100,000 or more
a year, while the Senate website
also lists 32 employees earning
at least $100,000.
The decision by lawmakers
comes after a decision by Scott


to shutter a budget-tracking
website the Senate paid $5 mil-
lion to develop.
The Florida Senate hired a
contractor to build the site, but
the contract to use the website
called Transparency 2.0 expired
Dec. 31. The vendor wanted $1
million to renew it.
The Legislature appropriated
$2.5 million to transfer the web-
site to Scott's office and make it
public. But Scott declined, be-
cause it was developed through
a no-bid contract.
Scott's office then announced


it would seek competitive bids
for a Florida budget website
open to all citizens. Open gov-
ernment and ethics advocacy
groups had urged keeping the
Transparency 2.0 website and
making it public.
The governor already has his
own website, www.FloridaHasA
RightToKnow, which gives the
public access to state employee
salary information. It also allows
the public to view six-figure re-
tirement benefits for state and
local employees with personal
information redacted.


State BRIEFS


Police: Man killed 2 sons,
himself at wife's home
BOYNTON BEACH -A South Florida man
killed two of his sons early Saturday before
killing himself at his estranged wife's home,
police said.
Officers were called at 1:50 a.m. to the
Boynton Beach home of Victoria Flores
Zavala, who had been separated for some
time from her husband, Isidro Zavala, police
spokeswoman Stephanie Slater said.
Victoria Zavala told detectives she was
watching TV when she heard a commotion.
She went to check on the boys and saw
Zavala, dressed all in black, choking one of
them.
She tried fighting off Isidro Zavala, begging
him to kill her and not the children, Slater said.
"He told her she was going to stay alive and
suffer the loss of them," Slater said.
Police identified the children as 12-year-old
Eduardo Zavala and 11-year-old Mario Zavala.
One boy was found dead in a screened patio
area, and the other was in the kitchen.
Both boys had been strangled with a rope,
Slater said.
Zavala was discovered in the kitchen with a
self-inflicted gunshot wound. He had shot
Mario several times before turning the gun on
himself, Slater said.
The couple also has a 19-year-old son, who
does not live at the home.
The slaying were reported to Florida's De-
partment of Children and Families. There was
no history of domestic violence or abuse re-
ported at Victoria Zavala's home, police said.


Traffic crash in Panhandle
kills Alabama man
MILTON -Authorities said an Alabama
man died from injuries he suffered in a traffic
crash in the Florida Panhandle.
The Florida Highway Patrol said David M.
Kicker of Repton, Ala., was driving a Ford Ex-
plorer on a state road southeast of Jay when
he failed to stop for a turning vehicle.
Troopers told the Northwest Florida Daily
News that Kicker's SUV rear-ended a car that
then struck a third vehicle. Neither of the other
drivers was injured in the accident Wednes-
day afternoon.
Kicker's vehicle went into a ditch and rolled
over. He was not wearing a seat belt.
Authorities said Kicker was taken to a Pen-
sacola hospital, where he died Thursday.
Miami International Map Fair
returns for 20th year
MIAMI The Miami International Map Fair
returns for its 20th year.
HistoryMiami, a cultural institution that cele-
brates the city's rich history, is hosting the fair
that runs Saturday and Sunday. The annual
event features antique maps, rare books,
panoramas and atlases from around the
world. Visitors will be able to purchase antique
maps and learn about cartography through a
series of lectures.
A statement from HistoryMiami bills the
event as the "largest map fair in the world."
The fair will also mark the 500th anniver-
sary of Juan Ponce de Leon's exploration in
Florida as part of the statewide campaign Viva


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
> PR 1HI O PR |HI LO PR
0.00 NA NA NA L,, J67 29 0.00


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


ON THE NET

HistoryMiami:
www.historymiami.org/


Florida 500.
Lectures will explore Florida's cultural her-
itage. On display will be a pre-Colombian map
of the world and the first map of the continen-
tal United States.

Next Mega Money jackpot
an estimated $800,000
TALLAHASSEE No tickets matched the
four winning numbers plus the Mega Ball in the
Mega Money game, so the jackpot rolled over
to an estimated $800,000 in the Mega Money
game, the Florida Lottery said Saturday.
Nine tickets won $808.50 each for picking
4-of-4; 44 tickets won $362.50 each for pick-
ing 3-of-4 plus the Mega Ball number; 969
tickets won $49 each for picking 3-of-4; 1,218
tickets won $27 each for picking 2-of-4 plus
the Mega Ball; 11,291 won $2.50 each for
matching one number plus the Mega Ball;
27,452 tickets won $2 each for picking 2-of-4;
and 26,612 won a free Quick Pick ticket for
matching the Mega Ball.
The numbers drawn Friday night were 4-15-
26-40 and the Mega Ball was 21.
One Fantasy 5 player wins
$244,020.22 top prize
TALLAHASSEE One ticket matching all
five numbers in the "Fantasy 5" game is worth
$244,020.22, the Florida Lottery said Saturday.


F'cast
s
s
s
s
s
s
pc
s
s


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northwest winds from 10 to 15 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a moderate chop. Skies will be
sunny today.


73 33 0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK E xclusvedally
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 72 Low: 35
Mostly sunny

k MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 68 Low: 37
Mostly sunny

. TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 74 Low: 55
Sunny to partly cloudy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 70/32
Record 85/25
Normal 72/43
Mean temp. 51
Departure from mean -7
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.00 in.
Total for the year 0.10 in.
Normal for the year 3.31 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 5
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.20 in.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
2/3 SUNDAY 11:24 5:10 11:52 5:38
2/4 MONDAY 6:06 12:20 6:35
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
O O 0 SUNSET TONIGHT ............................ 6:11 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:17A.M.
4^O L MOONRISE TODAY.........................12:42A.M.
FEB. 3 FEB. 10 FEB. 17 FEB. 25 MOONSET TODAY ..........................11:50A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers


City
Chassahowitzka*
Crystal River**
Withlacoochee*
Homosassa***


High/Low
11:04 a/6:32 a
9:25 a/3:54 a
7:12 a/1:42 a
10:14 a/5:31 a


**At King's Bay
Sunday


High/Low
10:32 p/6:09 p
8:53 p/3:31 p
6:40 p/1:19 p
9:42 p/5:08 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
12:46 p/7:51 a 11:41 p/7:21 p
11:07 a/5:13 a 10:02 p/4:43 p
8:54 a/3:01 a 7:49 p/2:31 p
11:56 a/6:50 a 10:51 p/6:20 p


Gulf water
temperature


64
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.51 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.95 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 38.90 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.22 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


~~~l1


. ..
,,. 7 S E 92 1 '- -.

, 70s d **


70s '.. I
FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 27 8 sf 29 16
Albuquerque 56 32 c 56 33
Asheville 43 20 sf 42 23
Atlanta 55 27 .04 s 53 31
Atlantic City 29 14 sn 36 25
Austin 77 35 pc 70 48
Baltimore 29 17 .01 sn 38 24
Billings 50 24 pc 50 28
Birmingham 53 26 .06 s 55 33
Boise 43 23 pc 46 23
Boston 30 19 sn 32 24
Buffalo 19 12 .26 sn 26 16
Burlington, VT 22 9 sn 27 13
Charleston, SC 60 28 s 60 34
Charleston, WV 30 7 .14 sn 32 18
Charlotte 48 23 s 53 27
Chicago 23 11 .12 pc 20 16
Cincinnati 31 14 .01 pc 28 15
Cleveland 23 13 .20 sn 21 14
Columbia, SC 57 22 s 59 30
Columbus, OH 28 11 .09 sn 26 11
Concord, N.H. 26 11 c 29 15
Dallas 67 44 pc 69 47
Denver 58 21 s 56 30
Des Moines 28 17 .01 pc 30 19
Detroit 24 14 .05 sn 25 12
El Paso 68 31 pc 67 43
Evansville, IN 41 25 pc 37 23
Harrisburg 25 14 sn 34 17
Hartford 30 19 sn 32 19
Houston 76 46 pc 71 51
Indianapolis 28 17 .08 pc 24 11
Jackson 69 33 s 62 40
Las Vegas 66 47 pc 66 45
Little Rock 60 28 s 57 38
Los Angeles 74 56 pc 70 52
Louisville 36 20 .07 pc 32 21
Memphis 52 31 s 53 37
Milwaukee 14 9 .08 pc 16 9
Minneapolis 9 0 .01 pc 16 0
Mobile 66 34 s 65 38
Montgomery 66 26 s 60 37
Nashville 44 23 .05 pc 43 26
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp.FcstH L
New Orleans 68 43 s 66 45
New York City 29 19 sn 32 23
Norfolk 41 24 pc 47 27
Oklahoma City 59 30 pc 59 42
Omaha 32 24 pc 38 25
Palm Springs 78 53 pc 78 53
Philadelphia 30 18 sn 36 23
Phoenix 76 48 c 69 51
Pittsburgh 23 7 .05 sn 26 9
Portland, ME 27 12 sn 31 16
Portland, Ore 55 34 c 48 38
Providence, R.I. 31 19 sn 34 21
Raleigh 44 19 pc 52 26
Rapid City 47 27 pc 55 25
Reno 49 28 pc 56 26
Rochester, NY 21 15 sn 26 17
Sacramento 64 40 s 64 37
St. Louis 45 30 pc 39 28
St. Ste. Marie 12 -3 sn 16 1
Salt Lake City 35 14 pc 40 24
San Antonio 75 43 pc 72 51
San Diego 74 52 pc 70 49
San Francisco 56 47 pc 59 43
Savannah 62 27 s 61 35
Seattle 43 39 c 47 40
Spokane 35 24 c 38 30
Syracuse 21 14 .10 sn 28 15
Topeka 51 27 s 43 30
Washington 33 18 .01 sn 40 25
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 81 Harlingen, Texas
LOW-39 International Falls, Minn.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/73/s
Amsterdam 42/40/sh
Athens 63/53/pc
Beijing 32/18/pc
Berlin 37/33/c
Bermuda 67/62/sh
Cairo 72/55/s
Calgary 41/25/pc
Havana 78/61/pc
Hong Kong 67/66/sh
Jerusalem 61/51/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


58/45/s
45/43/sh
50/33/s
71/45/pc
21/16/sf
39/25/sn
45/38/sh
90/72/c
50/40/sh
75/66/pc
46/39/sh
25/16/sf
32/29/c


The winning ticket was purchased in
Tampa, lottery officials said.
The 295 tickets matching four numbers won
$133 each. Another 8,987 won $12 and
98,882 tickets won a Quick Pick ticket for pick-
ing two numbers. The numbers drawn Friday
night were 1-9-15-32-35.
Montana police investigating
missing Spanish coin
BILLINGS, Mont. -The Red Lodge Police
Department is investigating the disappearance
of a 300-year-old silver Spanish coin originally
found by an amateur treasure hunter diving off
the Florida coast.
Harold Holden died Jan. 10 at age 88 at the
Cedar Wood Villa nursing home in Red
Lodge, Mont. His sister, Evelyn Grovenstien of
Billings, said the next day she went to collect
his belongings, but the coin Holden wore daily
on a chain around his neck was gone.
The Billings Gazette reported in a story
published Saturday that Holden found the coin
in an area where a fleet of Spanish ships sank
in a hurricane in 1715.
The Florida construction supervisor often
dived in the area for treasure and found sev-
eral coins and relics through the years.
-From wire reports

l notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


Meeting Notices
.... ........................ D 6


Z- C I T R U S


COUNTY -U--


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 28
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 21%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
juniper, maple, oak
Today's count: 10.2/12
Monday's count: 9.5
Tuesday's count: 9.6
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


HRONICLLE
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To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $36.65* 6 months: $64.63*
1 year: $116.07*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of. 14 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment tor the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
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Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com


Where to find us:
Meadowcrest
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SrjrrlBr,,ir. i H.*, 1624 N.
Drunken leld Meadowcrest
Ie-- Cinnocndale Dr Blvd.
Ave | Cao e Crystal River,
A M eadowcresl FL 34429
N I \\ 1:1 :,

SInverness
IE Cuurltwjup office
T o in s t .u g1 0 6 W M a i n
St.,
41 Inverness, FL
> ^ 34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 63 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold ......................... ........... ................................... Editor, 5 64 -2 93 0
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy .................................................. Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trista Stokes............................................................... Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes .................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ............................................. Mike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .............................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Com m unity content ................................................ Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .............................................. Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ........................... Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper.
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Phone 352-563-6363
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SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


A4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013


STATE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


UIJ





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Surgeon at center of Sen. Menendez trips


Associated Press
WEST PALM BEACH -
To some, Dr Salomon Mel-
gen was a miracle worker
who brought sight to the
blind. To others, he was a
smooth political player
known for rubbing elbows
and jet-setting.
Whichever version of
Melgen roused the interest
of the FBI, which raided
his offices this week, their
investigation has illumi-
nated the surgeon's ability
to build ties to a host of
Democratic lawmakers.
Foremost among them is
Sen. Robert Menendez of
New Jersey, whose friend-
ship with Melgen has
yielded fundraisers, cam-
paign contributions and
trips on a private plane.
Menendez said this week
he did nothing wrong and
flatly denied allegations
reported by The Daily
Caller, a conservative web-
site, that he traveled on
Melgen's plane to the Do-
minican Republic for sex
with prostitutes.
Though facts remain
piecemeal, a fuller por-
trait of Melgen has
emerged. There are pho-
tos of the beaming doctor
sandwiched between
Menendez and former
House Speaker Nancy
Pelosi, a trail of checks
written to politicians and a
web of business interests
that apparently fueled his
wealth.
Melgen, 58, is a native of
the Dominican Republic
who has lived in the U.S.
since at least 1980, holding
medical posts around the
country while building a
reputation as a top oph-
thalmologist He has a wife
and two children.
Calls to his home and of-
fice were not answered,
but his attorney has said
he did nothing wrong.
On the website for his
Vitreo-Retinal Consultants
Eye Center practice, he is
called a pioneer and an in-
novator, a front-runner in
treatment of macular de-
generation, a common eye
disorder. He has treated


Associated Press
Dr. Salomon Melgen is seen
July 20, 2009, at his office in
West Palm Beach. Sen.
Robert Menendez's office
said he reimbursed Melgen,
a prominent Florida political
donor, $58,500 on Jan. 4 of
this year for the full cost of
two of three trips Menendez
took Melgen's plane to the
Dominican Republic in 2010.
"presidents, governors,
politicians, celebrities and
actors," according to his
website.
Patricia Goodman, his
office manager and per-
sonal assistant for a
decade until cancer forced
her to quit in 1999, remem-
bers an endless stream of
patients coming from all
over the world for his care.
"He was just the best
surgeon," she said, "and
we had people that would
come in that were blind
and told they would never


see again and he brought
back their sight."
When Goodman was suf-
fering through cancer, her
paychecks never stopped,
nor did Melgen's concern.
He would often provide his
services for free to people
who could not afford it.
She's reluctant to say
anything negative about
him, except to say he was a
"ladies man" and liked
"living on the edge." She
refused to elaborate.
As Goodman remembers
it, a single big-name intro-
duction appeared to fuel
Melgen's entrance into the
world of politics. Then-
Gov Lawton Chiles of
Florida, a Democrat, went
to Melgen for eye surgery
in 1997 and later tapped
the doctor for a state panel
on HMOs. Not long after-
ward, he became a reli-
able donor to Democratic
power brokers and a fre-
quent host of fundraisers
at both his waterfront,
6,500-square-foot home
near North Palm Beach
and his house in the Do-
minican Republic in the
exclusive residential re-
sort community of Casa de
Campo.
Goodman coordinated
logistics for the fundrais-
ers buffets, bands and a
huge patio where revelers
could dance. She remem-
bers events with former
Sens. Christopher Dodd


and Bob Graham and for-
mer Dominican President
Leonel Fernandez. Melgen
basked in the newfound
attention.
"He loved the limelight,
he loved it," Goodman
said. "He loved being with
the politicians."
Last year, Melgen's prac-
tice gave $700,000 to Ma-
jority PAC, a super
political action committee
set up to fund Democratic
candidates for Senate.
Aided by Melgen's dona-
tion, the super PAC be-
came the largest outside
political committee con-
tributing to Menendez's re-
election, spending more
than $582,000 on the sena-
tor's behalf, according to
an analysis of federal elec-
tion records.


Melgen and his immedi-
ate family have given tens
of thousands more to other
political causes, including
directly to Menendez.
Even as Melgen culti-
vated a political profile in
the U.S., he was never gone
long from his homeland.
Fernandez, the ex-
Dominican president,
named him as an alternate
delegate to the United Na-
tions during his first term
and an ambassador as-
signed to the Foreign Min-
istry in his second.
Meanwhile, a private
plane owned by Melgen's
company, DRM Med Assist
LLC, made more than 100
trips to the Dominican Re-
public since July 2009, an
Associated Press review of
flight records found. Nearly


a dozen of those trips
showed brief stopovers at
Washington, D.C.-area air-
ports, although it's unclear
who was on board because
Federal Aviation Adminis-
tration rules don't require
private aircraft to file flight
manifests.
Menendez repaid Mel-
gen $58,500 for two 2010
trips he characterized as
personal. The reimburse-
ment was made Jan. 4 in
response to the ethics
complaint, but there was
no public disclosure of it
until this week. The reim-
bursement is significant
for a politician who's not
wealthy by Washington
standards. Disclosure
forms show Menendez's
net worth as less than
$700,000.


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Beyond Carpet Cleaning
CARPET I TILE GROUT I HARDWOOD I UPHOLSTERY I AIR DUCT


CITRUS 726N-446

MARION 22-585U


-LN '1 -
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r ..3 i, ,3 h. a 1 L- rh :, i3 z:,:, i e,3 ,:,,:,,i .:. er .l. i ,l i : :,:, 1,3I.. 1 ,3 -. ,p I i ri e, ,a.
1, r.,] '.3 11 .,,, 1 .: .I: ,'l ,'u '] I: 3 i, tr ,,: i ,3 rhl~ l, liltt-, ,3,:,^ .:.I ,,, 1: lu re, 1 ,' 3:1, :1,: ," l, ,-,,, e-,u ,.-,
,:., dr' .3u :l i e.l ,,,,ai ri luil [.rc en jl ,:.:.up' :. .. i1 h,,e .: c er.,,:, C2 .r31 ,, rB.'i'ii: .:.'; ii1, |:.:.l, di1 l:.31 1, e l r i


Nature Coast Republican Club
and
Citrus Republican Women's Club
invite you to
CITY GOVERNMENT
from
City Manager Frank Di Giovanni
and City Manager Andy Houston
February 9,2013 9am
American Legion Post #155
6585 W Gulf to Lake, Crystal River


Hwy. 44 W. Inverness- CR486
3"WY.44 Inverness
(352) 726-1231
Snicknicholasford.com Ni Nicholas
SAI LE HOURSiD. M Fi: 8-7 4. S .t 830


CARPET CLEANING


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Insulation Upgrade I


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STATE


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 A5


OOODV8M


: on r : a : : -


MEN





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Jacqueline
Lea, 60
INVERNESS


Jessica Ann Michelle Jacqueline Edr
Bond, 22, of Dunnellon, 60, Inverness, died
died Friday, Feb. 1, 2013, at Feb. 1, 2013, und(
Tampa General Hospital. Hospice care.
She was born Feb. 2, 1991, Private cre
in Inverness, Fla., and was arrangements are
a lifelong Citrus County the care of Chas. I
resident. She was a loving, Funeral Home
big-hearted person who Crematory
loved animals, enjoyed
music and being outdoors.
She is survived by her
daughter, whom she loved
most of all, Kayleigh Alma
Marie Malatt; her parents, Lee Noble,
Jennifer Ocasio and Mick H E RN A N D
Bond; brothers, Robert Lee Bernard Nol
Matthew Bond and ofLHernando, pass
Jonathan Taylor Bond peacefully at hon
(Renee); maternal grand- rounded by his fain
parents, John Klinkbeil urday, Jan. 26, 2(
and Tambrea Smith; was born in Fores
aunts, Weejie Haag Pa., to the
(Daniel), Susan Mulligan late Jesse
and Kerry Smith; uncles, and Lottie
David Klinkbeil, Justin i C n k)
McFarland (Shannon) and Noble.
Tyson Klinkbeil (Crystal); S u r
great aunts, Jody Schnei- v u r -
der (Big John) and Brenda vivors in-
Lake (Bob); several clude 33
cousins; and many loving wife of 33
friends. years, N
Martha A. Nc
Funeral services will be Noble; his
at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. three stepchildren
5, at Strickland Funeral Anderson, Mary Ka
Home Chapel in Crystal "Polly" Anderson a
River with Pastor Lloyd othy Anderson;
Bertine of Gulf to Lake grandson,
Church presiding. Friends Anderson; and
of the family are invited to Linette Hilary Han
visitation at the chapel Lee was a de
from 6 p.m. until service World War II vete
time. Strickland Funeral worked as a vice pr
Home with Crematory of for County Natiom
Crystal River assisted the in Montrose, Pa., fu
family with arrangements. years. He was a
Sign the guest book at member of the M
www.chronicleonline.com. Lions Club, a mei
Jerry the Ayres-Stone VF
5642, Montrose, Pa
Honaker, 47 75-year member
OCALA Warren F&AM 1


Jerry L. Honaker, 47, of
Ocala, passed away Tues-
day, Jan. 29, 2013, in Ocala.
He was n
b ornn
March 9,
1965, in In-
verness
and moved
to Ocala
with his
family in
1975. Jerry
He was Honaker
preceded
in death by his father, Earl
D. Honaker. Jerry is sur-
vived by his mother, Shel-
lia M. Honaker; his
brothers, James Taylor,
Jeffrey Honaker and
Jerome Honaker; and
many uncles, aunts,
nieces, nephews and
friends.
A visitation will take
place from 6 to 8 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013, fol-
lowed by a graveside serv-
ice at 2 p.m. Wednesday,
Feb. 6, 2013, at Forest
Lawn Funeral Home and
Memory Gardens, 5740 S.
Pine Ave. Ocala, FL 34480.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,

Judy
Moseley
at 564-2917
jmoseley@chronicleonline.com
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A requiem mass will be
said Saturday, Feb. 9,2013,
at St. Anne's Episcopal
Church in Crystal River.
Memorial services will be
at a later date in Montrose,
Pa.
Donations in Lee's
memory can be made to
the Hospice of Citrus
County, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464.

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HOMOSASSA
A Funeral Mass for Mrs.
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will be held 11:00 AM,
Tuesday,
February
5, 2013 at
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the Apos-
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Catholic
Church,
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mosassa. Loretta
Cremation Pearsall
will be
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ness, Florida. The family
will receive friends from
2:00 PM until 4:00 PM,
Monday, February 4, 2013
at the Homosassa Chapel
of Hooper Funeral Homes.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com.
Mrs. Pearsall was born
January 29, 1933 in De-
troit, MI, daughter of the
late Patrick and Gertrude
(Curley) Donovan. She
died January 31, 2013 in
Homosassa, FL under the
loving care of her family
and the staff of Sugarmill
Manor and Hospice of Cit-
rus County She was a


homemaker and moved to
Homosassa from Detroit,
MI. She was Past Presi-
dent of St. Vincent de Paul
Society, Eucharistic Minis-
ter at St. Thomas the Apos-
tle Catholic Church and a
member of the Ladies
Auxiliary of Knights of
Columbus, Council #6954.
Mrs. Pearsall was a mem-
ber of St Thomas the Apos-
tle Catholic Church,
Homosassa.
Survivors include her
husband, Donald R.
Pearsall of Homosassa,
FL, son, Paul (Patricia)
Pearsall of Riverview, FL,
5 daughters, Karen (An-
gela Andrews) Pearsall of
NC, Carol (Rob) Achen-
berg of West Union, SC,
Kathleen Halvorson of CA,
Margaret "Peggy" (Stanley)
Parker of Lecanto, FL,
Lori (Lloyd) Krosser of
Ocala, FL, brother, John
(Dolores) Donovan of Hol-
iday, FL, 2 sisters, Sister
Adele Donovan, C.S.J. of
Nazareth, MI and Patricia
Stanley of New Port
Richey, FL, brother-in-law,
Gilbert Keaton of Davie,
FL, sister-in-law, Evelyn
"Marie" Pearsall of
Pasadena, TX, 11 grand-
children, 4 great grand-
children and numerous
nieces and nephews.
Friends who wish may
send memorial donations


to Hospice of Citrus
County, PO Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464.




Raymond
Girard, 91
BEVERLY HILLS
Raymond Rene Girard,
91, of Beverly Hills, has
died.
A memorial service will
be at 2 p.m. Monday, Feb. 4,
2013, at Fero Funeral
Home.
See Page A7

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online, corn or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
the arrangements.


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Obituaries


Deaths
ELSEWHERE

Ceija
Stojka, 79
ROMA ARTIST
VIENNA- Ceija Sto-
jka, who survived three
Nazi death camps and
went on to raise the
awareness of the Nazi
persecution of the
Roma in her art and
writings, died Jan. 28.
She was 79.
Stojka carried the
horrors of the camps
with her for decades,
speaking out in words
and pictures only
decades after she was
liberated from the
Bergen-Belsen camp at
age 12. While her
mother and four siblings
also survived, her father
and one brother were
killed in Auschwitz.
The Budapest-based
European Roma Cul-
tural Foundation de-
scribes Stojka's death-
camp-themed paintings
as reflecting "the en-
trenched sorrow in the
bodies and spirit of the
victims."
-From wire reports


A6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from PageA6

Waldemar
'Walter'
Pruss, 76
LECANTO
Waldemar W "Walter"
Pruss, 76, of Lecanto, Fla.,
went home to be with his
Lord and Savior, Jesus
Christ, on Friday, Feb. 1,
2013, under the loving care
of Hospice of Citrus
County.
He was born May 23,
1936, in Manhattan, N.Y
Walter received his mas-
ter's degree from Steven's
University and became
senior engineer for Lock-
heed, designing electrical
equipment for submarines
and submersibles. Walter
and his loving wife of 30
years, Linda, arrived in
this area 10 years ago, with
the guidance of the Lord,
coming from Long Island,
N.Y He enjoyed photogra-
phy and woodworking, and
was an avid speed reader.
"I have finished the race. I
have kept the faith" (2
Timothy 4:7). With an un-
wavering faith in his Lord,
he finished the race well,
and encourages others to
accept the gift of God's
love.
Private arrangements
are under the care of Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory, Inverness,
Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

FREE OBITUARIES
* Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.


Martha
Westphal, 67
LOUISVILLE, KY.
Martha R. Westphal, 67,
of Louisville, Ky., passed
into the arms of her heav-
enly father on Feb. 1, 2013.
She was the daughter of
the late Warren and
Louise Rosbottom. Martha
was a member of Kentucky
Court No. 1 Order of the
Amaranth and Louisville
Shrine No. 1 Order of the
White Shrine of
Jerusalem. Martha had
many loves that included
sewing, cooking and bingo.
But her biggest love was
her grandchildren and
grand dogs.
She will be missed by all
of her friends in Ho-
mosassa, Fla., where she
lived for the past 13 years,
until February 2012. She
will also be missed by all of
her friends at Farmdale
Senior Community.
She was preceded in
death by her grandmother,
Gladys Kortz; and aunt,
Doris Kortz.
She is survived by her
daughter, Beth Fouts
(David); son Todd West-
phal (Laura); and grand-
children Caroline and
Matthew Fouts. There are
also a host of cousins.
The family would like to
thank her home health
nurse, Tamera, for the lov-
ing care that was given to
Martha. Also, many thanks
to the ICU staff at
Audubon Hospital.
A memorial celebration
of Martha's life will be at
2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 9,
2013, at Highland's Baptist
Church.
Expressions of sympa-
thy can be sent to
Hosparus of Louisville or
Hospice of Citrus County.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online. com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.


Deaths
ELSEWHERE


Associated Press
This undated photo from
by Ohio Art shows a
classic Etch A Sketch,
first introduced in 1960.

Andre
Cassagnes, 86
INVENTOR
BRYAN, Ohio -
Andre Cassagnes, the in-
ventor of the Etch A
Sketch toy that genera-
tions of children drew
on, shook up and started
over, has died in France,
the toy's maker said.
Cassagnes died Jan. 16
in a Paris suburb at age
86, said the Ohio Art Co.,
based in Bryan in north-
west Ohio. The cause of
death wasn't disclosed.
"Etch A Sketch has
brought much success to
the Ohio Art Company,
and we will be eternally
grateful to Andre for that
His invention brought joy
to so many over such a
long period of time," said
Larry Killgallon, presi-
dent of Ohio Art.
Then an electrical
technician, Cassagnes
came upon the Etch A
Sketch idea in the late
1950s when he peeled a
translucent decal from a
light switch plate and
found pencil mark im-
ages transferred to the
opposite face, the Toy In-
dustry Association said.
Ohio Art saw his idea
at the Nuremberg Toy
Fair in 1959. The toy,
with its gray screen, red
frame and two white
knobs that are twisted
back and forth to create
drawings, was launched
in 1960 and became the
top seller that holiday
season. More than 100
million have been sold
worldwide since.
-From wire reports


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OBITUARIES


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 A7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Feb. 4 to 8 MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
All schools' meals include juice and milk.
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots.
Tuesday: Breakfast sausage pizza, cereal
variety and toast, grits.
Wednesday: Sausage and egg biscuit, ce-
real variety and toast, tater tots.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon bun, cereal vari-
ety and toast, grits.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast round, cheese
grits, tater tots, cereal variety and toast.
Lunch
Monday: Hamburger sliders, pepperoni
pizza, Italian super salad with roll, fresh baby
carrots, baked beans, chilled applesauce.
Tuesday: Creamy macaroni and cheese,
corn dog minis, yogurt parfait plate, fresh gar-
den salad, steamed green beans, chilled
strawberry cups.
Wednesday: Cheese pizza, chicken al-
fredo with ripstick, turkey super salad with roll,
PB dippers, fresh baby carrots, sweet green
peas, chilled mixed fruit.
Thursday: Nacho rounds, oven-baked
breaded chicken, yogurt parfait plate, fresh
baby carrots, sweet corn, flavored applesauce.
Friday: Breaded chicken sandwich,
spaghetti with ripstick, mozzarella maxstix, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots, steamed broccoli,
flavored craisins.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, MVP
breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots
and grits.
Tuesday: Sausage and egg biscuit, ultra
cinnamon bun, cereal and toast, tater tots.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap,
MVP breakfast, cereal and toast, tater tots.
Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultra
cinnamon bun, cereal and toast, tater tots.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich stuffer, ultimate
breakfast round, cereal and toast, tater tots, grits.
Lunch
Monday: Cheese pizza, pulled pork barbe-
cued pork on bun, PB dippers, fresh baby car-
rots, steamed broccoli, chilled applesauce.
Tuesday: Oriental orange chicken plate,
macaroni and cheese with roll, turkey super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh garden
salad, steamed green beans, flavored craisins.
Wednesday: Hamburger, barbecued
chicken, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots,
baked beans, potato triangles, peach cups.
Thursday: Fajita chicken and rice with rip-
stick, nacho rounds, Italian super salad with
roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh garden salad,
Mexicali corn, chilled flavored applesauce.
Friday: Spaghetti with ripstick, mozzarella
with maxstix, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots,
sweet peas, chilled strawberry cups.
High school
Breakfast


Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, MVP
breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots
and grits.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and cheese bis-
cuit, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal and toasts,
tater tots.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap,
MVP breakfast, cereal and toast, tater tots.
Thursday: Ham, egg and cheese loco
bread, ultimate breakfast round, cereal and
toast, grits, tater tots.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich stuffer, ultra
cinnamon bun, cereal variety, toast, tater tots.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken tenders with rice, maca-
roni and cheese with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, fajita chicken super salad
with roll, pizza, yogurt parfait plate, baby car-
rots, fresh broccoli, potato triangles, steamed
broccoli, chilled applesauce.
Tuesday: Nacho rounds with Spanish rice,
turkey and gravy over noodles with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich, Italian super
salad with roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait plate, gar-
den salad, cold corn salad, celery, Mexicali corn,
potato roasters, baby carrots, strawberry cup.
Wednesday: Fresh turkey wrap, spaghetti
with ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich,
ham super salad with roll, pizza, yogurt parfait
plate, baby carrots, baked beans, chilled baked
beans, potato triangles, flavored craisins.
Thursday: Oven-baked breaded chicken
with rice, macaroni and cheese with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich, turkey super
salad with roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait plate, gar-
den salad, baby carrots, green beans, potato
roasters, cucumbers, celery, strawberry cup.
Friday: Pulled barbecued pork on bun,
chicken alfredo with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, fajita chicken salad with
roll, pizza, yogurt parfait plate, baby carrots,
sweet peas, potato triangles, cold corn salad,
chilled peach cup, chilled fruit.

SENIOR DINING
Monday: Cream of tomato soup, apple
juice, meatloaf sandwich on whole-grain bun
with ketchup, raisins, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Frankfurter on bun with mustard,
baked beans with tomato, carrot coins,
coleslaw, graham crackers, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Birthday celebration: Beef
and macaroni with cheese, green beans, corn
with red pepper, yellow cake, slice Italian
bread, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Chicken thigh with coq au vin
sauce, herb mashed potatoes, spinach,
peaches, slice whole-grain bread, low-fat milk.
Friday: Barbecued pork riblet, green peas,
mashed potatoes, chunky cinnamon apples,
slice whole-grain bread, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include: Lecanto, East
Citrus, Crystal River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
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A8 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013


COMMUNITY





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SAFETY
Continued from PageAl

The Citrus County Chronicle
today begins a yearlong series
that will explore that question.
Every few weeks, we will ex-
plore safety in the area of
schools, mental health, courts,
crime and the home. We'll see
whether programs designed to
protect children work or not.
The series will draw on experi-
ences from experts, advocates,
parents and children.
The question is not an easy
one to answer, even with some of
Citrus County's leading child
advocates.
"You can't legislate safety,"
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy said. "That
has to be driven by the commu-
nity That's where we're very
lucky in this county."
Dawsy's office partners with
the Citrus County School Dis-


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 A9


trict and other agencies to cre-
ate a mix of programs designed
to keep children from harm.
School resource officers give
the sheriff's office a presence in
schools. The Teen Driving Chal-
lenge teaches young drivers how
to avoid traffic accidents. The
Safe School Teen Protection
program STP for short -
opens dialogue between the
sheriff's office, school district
and social agencies to pinpoint
children whose unstable home
environment may lead to prob-
lems in school and elsewhere.
Dawsy knows those programs
are effective in keeping schools
safe. But they aren't perfect.
"There's always new stuff to
do," he said. "Every Friday af-
ternoon I have a sigh of relief
and every Monday my anxiety
goes up."
Veteran school board member
Pat Deutschman said children
in the U.S. seem at risk more
now than ever before.


"Too many children are dying.
Too many children are being
killed," she said. "Children get
in the way of violence too often."
Schools have spent millions of
dollars tightening security, par-
ticularly after the April 1999
shootings at Columbine High


School in Colorado.
"I feel like we go overboard in
overreacting to situations," she
said. '"After Columbine, there
were more SROs in school. That
was a good thing. Then we started
putting up fences around schools.
A lot of money is spent in chang-
ing the way schools operate in so
far as entry and exit Video cam-
eras in hallways and on buses. It's
been at an enormous expense.
And there have been very few in-
cidences that would have caused
us to spend this money"
She added, though: "I guess
it's also preventative."
Something must be working be-
cause the school board is seeing
fewer student expulsions related
to weapons, Deutschman said.
"In the last year, I think we
haven't had an expulsion of a kid
using a weapon," she said. '"A lot
of things are put in place. We're
teaching awareness of the se-
vere penalties. It must be getting
to them."


Mental health advocates also
say programs protect children
from harm.
Diane Daniels, chief clinical
officer for the Centers in Ocala
and Lecanto, said about 30 per-
cent to 40 percent of the pro-
gram's 13,000 clients last year
were younger than 18.
Daniels, who has 43 years in
the profession including 19
years at the Centers, said there
is a much greater awareness of
issues involving children in the
past 20 years. Child abuse, for
example, is reported much more
today than in earlier decades.
"Forty years ago, it was just
not something that was urged
and promoted in the commu-
nity," she said. "We're more alert
and aware today and there are
more safeguards. The down side
is there are more children to
deal with."
Contact Chronicle reporter
Mike Wright at 352-563-3228 or
m wrigh t@chronicleonline. com.


CHILDREN
Continued from Page Al

Many of the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office
deputies know Tiffany
from Beef 'O'Brady's
where she works. Many
people in the community
knew her parents, espe-
cially her mother. They
know the kids.
The family has lived in
Inverness since the mid-
1990s, involved in every-
thing soccer and Girl
Scouts and school events.
The Davenports were
known as a friendly, open,
giving, boisterous family
To know the Davenports is
to love them.
Some weeks later, at a
social event in the neigh-
borhood where the Daven-
port kids were clearly the
youngest ones in atten-
dance, they met a woman
who confessed it was her
husband who had called
the cops.
"The lady told us, After
8 p.m. nothing happens
around here,' and her hus-
band thought it was suspi-
cious," Tiffany said.
"When we moved here, I
knew that because we're
so young that the people
here would have an eye on
us. So my whole goal was
to put ourselves out there.
I told the kids if they ever
see anybody, wave at them.
Be nice, because I knew
we'd be under a watchful
eye."'
They began raking
neighbors' yards and being
their extra-friendly, help-
ful selves.
"We've met the neigh-
bors here and there and
it's turned out that they
love us and we love being
here," Tiffany said. "They
say, 'If you ever want to be
spoiled or need some
grandparents, come on
over.' So, we feel like we
have a whole bunch of
grandparents here."
Next-door neighbor Mil-
lie Reph said when the
neighbors first learned
three young people were
going to be living in their
quiet neighborhood, there
was some apprehension.
"People were thinking,
'What are they going to be
like? How much noise are
they going to make?' But
they're great kids. They're
friendly, they hug every-
body, talk to everybody
And the girls come and
play bingo."

In the days following the
events of Aug. 1, Debbie
Davenport's only sister,
Cyndi Weber, and brother-
in-law, Jake Weber, came
from Cinnaminson, N.J.,
and stayed for a month with
the newly orphaned kids. In


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I have a financial adviser and a
lawyer. Before, I was living with
my parents. I only had
a few bills that weren't
that big of a deal. Now
I'm responsible for
everything.
Tiffany Davenport
legal guardian of her teenage brother and sister.
Joey has his own room
and bathroom, and Savanna
and I share a room and bathroom.
I thought it would be awful
sharing a room, but it hasn't
been that bad. It's actually
been really good, and we've
grown because of it. We're
closer now. The three of us -
we're a package now.


that month, the Webers
guided Tiffany through a
maze of legal stuff, helping
her make the transition
from carefree college stu-
dent to head of household.
"Right away, we did
guardianship stuff and got
the kids signed up for So-
cial Security, which they'll
get until they're 18 or grad-
uate high school," Tiffany
said. "They already had
Florida Kid Care health
insurance my parents
had that set up and I
had to get everything
transferred into my name.
A friend whose son is on
Joey's football team works
at the health department
and she helped me out."
Tiffany signed up for a
Kinship Care program
through Kids Central, a
support program for non-
parent relatives raising
children.
"I have a financial ad-
viser and a lawyer," Tiffany
said. "Before, I was living
with my parents. I only had
a few bills that weren't that
big of a deal. Now I'm re-
sponsible for everything."
Tiffany said she has help
and support everywhere.
In the weeks immedi-
ately after her parents'


deaths, Beef 'O'Brady's
hosted fundraising events
for the kids. This past
Christmas, CASA gave them
a gift and the teachers from
Citrus High School raised
$750 for them. Bealls,
where Debbie Davenport
worked as a visual fashion
merchandiser, also gave the
kids gifts.
Joey and Savanna par-
ticipated in "Shop with a
Vet," sponsored by the
American Legion Post in
Crystal River. Neighbors
and their friends' parents
drop food off at the house.
"We have so much sup-
port, it's crazy," Tiffany
said.
mEN
Cyndi Weber said it was
extremely difficult to re-
turn to New Jersey when
the month was up, although
knowing of the commu-
nity's involvement in her
nieces' and nephew's lives
made it easier
"The day her parents
died, Tiffany made the de-
cision to stay in Florida to
finish raising the kids,"
Weber said. "But that
doesn't mean that can't
change. Any one or two or
all three of them are wel-
come to come here and al-


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ways will be ... by the time
we left for New Jersey, we
were sure they could man-
age financially and be able
to sustain a home.
"They were ready to get
their new lives started,
and while I thought that
was a good thing it was
time it also scared me. I
was still reeling from my
sister's death and I
thought, 'How are these
kids going to deal with the
everyday things on top of
the grief and the horror of
this tragedy?' But they've
done so well so far"
Weber said she and her
husband have stepped in
as surrogate parents and
she keeps in constant con-
tact with them, especially
Tiffany Sometimes Tiffany
calls just to blow off steam.
For the first several
months, Savanna and
Tiffany butted heads.
There was a lot of, "You're
not my mom; you can't tell
me what to do."
"It was awful at first,"
Tiffany said. "But some-
thing just clicked and we
started figuring out how to
do it"
Savanna admitted the
transition was, indeed, ter-
rible at first
"It's weird, but she's
good at it," she said, refer-
ring to Tiffany now being


I tell her every day that I love
her. She doesn't have that any
more. I tell her, 'I'm not your
mother, but I'll do what I can to
help you.'
Tamara Berry
Tiffany Davenport's boss at at Beef 'O'Brady's in Inverness.


her legal guardian.
Tiffany's boss at Beef
'O'Brady's, Tamara Berry,
said she and the staff and
regular customers have all
taken the kids under their
wings. Berry gives Tiffany
flexibility with her sched-
ule to accommodate the
kids' school and soccer,
football, track and tennis
schedules.
Savanna recently
started working there, too.
"What do you do in a sit-
uation like this?" Berry
said. "You do the only
thing you can do to help
take care of them. Tiffany
has grown up a lot it
amazes me. She had a
great role model in her
mother, and I've always
seen a lot of Debbie in
Tiffany, and now even
more.
"I tell her every day that
I love her," Berry said.
"She doesn't have that any


more. I tell her, 'I'm not
your mother, but I'll do
what I can to help you."'
MEN
When the Davenport
kids first moved from their
larger home in the Inver-
ness Highlands where they
had grown up (and where
their parents had died) to
where they are now, they
were apprehensive.
"Joey has his own room
and bathroom, and Sa-
vanna and I share a room
and bathroom," Tiffany
said. "I thought it would be
awful sharing a room, but
it hasn't been that bad. It's
actually been really good,
and we've grown because
of it. We're closer now. The
three of us we're a pack-
age now."
Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy can be
reached at nkennedy@
chronicleonline.com or
352-564-2927.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Unwrapping a mystery


Museum scans

mummy for

answers
Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. -
Using modern technology,
a Virginia museum is
working to unwrap the
story behind one of the
earliest surviving Egypt-
ian mummies.
The Virginia Museum of
Fine Arts in Richmond
partnered this week with a
medical imaging center to
complete a CT scan on
Tjeby, its 4,000-year-old
mummy, in hopes of piecing
together more information
about the mummy itself
and better understanding
the early history of the
mummification process.
While it isn't the first
time a mummy has gone
under the digital knife,
only a handful from the
time period have been ex-
amined in this fashion.
The information gathered
will help provide greater
detail of the body, create a
3-D digital model and even
reconstruct the face of the
mummy that has been on
display off and on since
being acquired by the mu-
seum in 1953.
Little is known about
Tjeby, who was buried in a
rock-cut tomb at a site
known as Sheikh Farag in
upper Egypt and
excavated in 1923.
What museum officials
do know is, he dates to be-
tween 2150 and 2030 BCE,
a time of instability in
Egypt, with the breakdown
of central authority and
economic decline. Previ-
ous research suggests
Tjeby was 25 to 40 years
old when he died.
Experts hope a closer
look at data will help piece
together more biographi-
cal information, such as
Tjeby's specific age, diet
and cause of death. They
also will look at the mate-
rials used to mummify the
body and the amount of
soft tissue that has sur-
vived, and will determine
whether organs have been
removed, as they were in
mummies from later
periods.
Researchers said the
technology allows them to
learn about the mummy in
remarkable detail without
invasive or damaging
procedures.
"It's easier to unlock
that door of mystery to dis-
cover the secrets of the
past," said Alex Nyerges,
the museum's director.
He anticipates incorpo-
rating information gleaned
from the scan into the dis-
play of the mummy, which
includes its coffin and
other artifacts from inside,
such as a model of a boat
and a granite statue.
The first mummy CT
scan took place in 1977.
But back then and even
when Tjeby had his first
imaging scan in 1986 the
technology was fairly prim-
itive, and little could be
seen, said Jonathan Elias,
director of the Akhmim
Mummy Studies Consor-
tium, a Pennsylvania-
based organization that
has collected imaging data


Associated Press
CT technicians Marion Price, right, and Tesha Reid, front, and Virginia Museum of Fine
Arts art handler Tim Harriss, left, along with object conservator Kathy Gillis, middle
center, prepare a 4,000-year-old Egyptian mummy called Tjeby, from the Virginia
Museum of Fine Arts, for a CT scan Friday, Feb. 1, at the HCA Virginia Imaging center
in Richmond, Va.


on 30 mummies and of-
fered to help the Virginia
museum analyze its
information.
"We're really at the be-
ginning of the process,
even with modern technol-
ogy, to unravel what's gone
on in this culture," Elias
said. "Compared with
1986,2013 is just like going
to another planet in terms
of what we're now able to
do."
On Friday, museum em-
ployees removed the
mummy, wrapped in
preservation material,
from his coffin and used
Velcro ties to secure him to
a platform, readying him
for the 15-minute van ride
from the museum to sub-
urban Richmond for the
scan.


When he arrived at
HCAs Independence Park
Imaging Center, Tjeby was
carefully rolled in on a gur-
ney, placed on a sliding
table head-first and uncov-
ered, revealing aged,
brown-tinted cloth wrap-
ping. A group of techni-
cians, doctors and museum
employees began snapping
photos to personally docu-
ment the occasion.
Then, with the click of a
button, an automated
voice urged the patient to
lie still and not breathe for
the CT scan.
"He's the ideal patient,"
joked Peter Schertz, cura-
tor of ancient art at the
museum. "If he only
stopped fidgeting."
Within seconds, thou-
sands of images began to


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LEFT: CT technician Marion
Price operates equipment
during a CT scan of the
Tjeby. ABOVE: The CT scan
produced a detailed 3-D
image of the mummy.
flash on the computer
monitors.
"He's like a jigsaw puz-
zle," said Dr. Jim Synder, a
diagnostic radiologist who
assisted the museum with
the scan.
Immediately apparent
to the group was some of
Tjeby's bones had fallen or
moved into the mummy's
chest cavity at some point
in his history likely after
he had been mummified.


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Punxsutawney


Phil predicts


early spring


Associated Press
PUNXSUTAWNEY, Pa.
- An end to winter's bit-
ter cold will come soon,
according to Pennsylva-
nia's famous groundhog.
Following a recent
stretch of weather that's
included temperatures
well below freezing as
well as record warmth,
tornadoes in the South
and Midwest and torren-
tial rains in the mid-
Atlantic, Punxsutawney
Phil emerged from his
lair Saturday in front of
thousands but didn't see
his shadow.
Legend has it if the
furry rodent sees his
shadow Feb. 2 on Gob-
bler's Knob in west-
central Pennsylvania,
winter will last six more
weeks. But if he doesn't,
spring will come early
The prediction is made
during a ceremony over-
seen by a group called the
Inner Circle. Members
don top hats and tuxedos
for the ceremony on
Groundhog Day each year
Bill Deeley, president
of the Inner Circle, says
that after "consulting"


with Phil, he makes the
call in deciphering what
Punxsutawney Phil has to
say about the weather.
Phil is known as the
"seer of seers" and "sage
of sages." Organizers pre-
dicted about 20,000 peo-
ple this weekend, a
larger-than-normal crowd
because Groundhog Day
falls on a weekend this
year.
"I just hope he's right
and we get warmer
weather soon," said Mike
McKown, 45, an X-ray
technician who drove up
from Lynchburg, Va., with
his mother
Phil's got company in
the forecasting depart-
ment. There's Staten Is-
land Chuck, in New York;
General Beauregard Lee,
in Atlanta; and Wiarton
Willie, in Wiarton, On-
tario, among others noted
by the National Climactic
Data Center "Groundhog
Day" Web page.
"Punxsutawney can't
keep something this big to
itself," the Data Center
said. "Other prognosticat-
ing rodents are popping
up to claim a piece of the
action."


Associated Press
Groundhog Club Co-handler Ron Ploucha holds the
weather-predicting groundhog, Punxsutawney Phil,
after the club said Phil did not see his shadow and there
will be an early spring during the Groundhog Day
ceremony Saturday in Punxsutawney, Pa.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Conservatives


make gun issue


new rallying cry
Associated Press


Tow




Associated Press
In this photo released by the White House, President Barack Obama shoots clay targets on the range Aug. 4, 2012,
at Camp David, Md. The White House released the photo of Obama firing a gun, two days before he heads to
Minnesota to discuss gun control.


Surprising shot of Obama


press secretary Jay Carney
said he didn't know how
often. Pictures may exist,
he said, but he hadn't seen
any
"Why haven't we heard
about it before?" Carney
was asked.
"Because when he goes
to Camp David, he goes to
spend time with his family
and friends and relax, not
to produce photographs,"
Carney said.
Obama is accompanied
almost everywhere by at
least one White House
photographer
Carney did not immedi-
ately respond Saturday
when asked to comment
on the decision to release
the photo. But it could be
part of an effort to portray
Obama as sympathetic to
gun owners and opponents
of his gun-control meas-
ures who argue the pro-
posals would infringe on
an individual's Second
Amendment right to bear
arms.


In the interview, which
appears in the Feb. 11
issue of The New Repub-
lic, Obama said gun-
control advocates should
be better listeners in the
latest debate about
firearms in the U.S. He also
declared his deep respect
for the tradition of hunting
in this country, which dates
back generations.
"I have a profound re-
spect for the traditions of
hunting that trace back in
this country for genera-
tions," Obama said.






IP, lli


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Two
days before President
Barack Obama's first trip
outside Washington to pro-
mote his gun-control pro-
posals, the White House
tried to settle a brewing
mystery when it released a
photo to back his claim to
be a skeet shooter.
Obama had set inquiring
minds spinning when, in
an interview with The
New Republic magazine,
he answered "yes" when
asked if he had ever fired
a gun. The admission
came as a surprise to
many
"Yes, in fact, up at Camp
David, we do skeet shoot-
ing all the time," Obama
said in the interview re-
leased last weekend, refer-


ring to the official presi-
dential retreat in rural
Maryland, which he last
visited in October while
campaigning for re-elec-
tion. Asked whether the
entire family participates,
the president said: "Not
the girls, but oftentimes
guests of mine go up
there."
Few could recall Obama
ever talking about firing a
gun or going skeet shoot-
ing "all the time."
The official White
House photo released Sat-
urday is dated Aug. 4, 2012.
The caption said Obama is
shooting clay targets on
the range at Camp David.
Asked at Monday's press
briefing how frequently
Obama shoots skeet and
whether photos of the out-
ings existed, White House


CONCORD, N.H. An
immigration debate is rag-
ing and a budget crisis
looms in Congress, but con-
servative activists gathered
outside the New Hamp-
shire Statehouse had one
thing on their minds: guns.
"The Second Amend-
ment is there to protect us
from losing the rest of
them," said Adam Brise-
bois, 34, of Hudson, who
cradled his 3-year-old
daughter on his right
shoulder and a rifle on
the left. "If we don't fight,
we'll lose our rights."
Thursday's rally, organ-
ized by tea party leaders,
drew nearly 500 people,
many of them carrying
loaded weapons, to the
state capital. Conserva-
tive leaders elsewhere re-
port a wave of similar
protests as grass-roots ac-
tivists from Florida to
Colorado seize on a new
rallying cry
Many activists aren't
happy with the GOP's
sudden embrace of more
lenient immigration pro-
posals and they're moni-
toring the approaching


If we
don't fight,
we'll lose our
rights.
Adam Brisebois
opponent of gun control laws.
congressional deadline to
avoid massive cuts to mil-
itary programs. But for
now at least, the debate
over guns and the per-
ceived threat of losing
them tops their list.
It's an "organic" move-
ment with little coordina-
tion from national
conservative organiza-
tions, according to Amy
Kremer, chairman of the
Tea Party Express.
"It's happening by it-
self," she said.
It doesn't matter neither
President Barack Obama
nor Democrats are calling
for a wholesale repeal of
gun rights. Tea partyers
are enraged by the possi-
bility of any erosion of the
Second Amendment's
"right of the people to
keep and bear arms."


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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Alabama man still holds boy hostage


Town grieves for bus driver killed five days ago a


Associated Press
Elaine Hamberg, 10, of
Alton, III., has her head
shaved Friday at
Marquette Catholic High
School in Alton, III., to
raise money for childhood
cancer research.


Associated Press
MIDLAND CITY, Ala. -
As the police standoff with
an Alabama man accused
of holding a 5-year-old boy
hostage continued Satur-
day, a nearby community
prepared to bury the bus
driver who was shot to
death trying to protect chil-
dren on his bus when the
episode began days earlier
Charles Albert Poland
Jr, 66, who was known
around town as Chuck,
was described by folks in
his hometown of Newton
as a humble hero. Hun-
dreds of people attended


visitation services for
Poland on Saturday
Mourners said they were
proud of Poland for his act
of selflessness, and for lay-
ing down his life for the
children on the bus. His
funeral was set for Sunday
afternoon.
"I believe that if he had
to do it all over again to-
morrow, he would," said
Poland's sister-in-law, Lav-
ern Skipper, earlier Satur-
day "He would do it for
those children."
Authorities said Jim Lee
Dykes boarded a stopped
school bus filled with 21
children Tuesday and de-


manded two boys between
6 and 8 years old. When
Poland tried to block his
way, the gunman shot him
several times and took one
5-year-old boy who po-
lice say remains in an un-
derground bunker with
Dykes.
Dale County Sheriff
Wally Olson said in a brief-
ing with reporters Satur-
day that Dykes has told
them he has blankets and
an electric heater in the
bunker on his property Au-
thorities have been com-
municating with Dykes
through a ventilation pipe
to the underground bunker


Associated Press
Alabama state trooper Kevin Cook, center, speaks to
media Saturday in Midland City, Ala. Authorities said they
still have an open line of communication with an Alabama
man accused of abducting a 5-year-old child and holding
him hostage in a bunker since Tuesday.


Mistakenly freed
killer captured
CHICAGO Two days
after a stunning series of er-
rors allowed a convicted
murderer to walk out of a
Chicago
S. jail where
he did not
need to
be in the
first place,
police re-
captured
the man
Steven L. the man
Robbins at a north-
ern Illinois
home where he was found
watching TV.
Steven L. Robbins, 44,
put up no resistance Friday
night as police burst through
the door of a townhome in
Kankakee, about 60 miles
south of Chicago, said Cook
County Sheriff's Office
spokesman Frank Bilecki.
The mistaken release of
the prisoner, who was serv-
ing a 60-year sentence in In-
diana for murder, focused
attention on an antiquated
corner of the criminal justice
system that relies extensively
on paper documents instead
of computers in moving de-
tainees around and keeping
tabs on their court status.
Nebraska Lt. Gov.
Sheehy resigns
LINCOLN, Neb. Ne-
braska Lt. Gov. Rick

resigned
Saturday
after
"breaking
"' J the public
trust,"
Gov.
Rick Dave
Sheehy Heine-
man said.
Heineman announced
Sheehy's resignation in a
hastily called news confer-
ence Saturday morning.
Heineman said the resigna-
tion followed disclosures
made in a public records re-
quest, but declined to dis-
cuss what those were.
The Omaha World-Herald
reported Sheehy resigned
after it raised questions
about improper cellphone
calls to four women, none of
whom were his wife, during
the past four years. The
World-Herald said in its on-
line additions Saturday it dis-
covered Sheehy made
thousands of late-night calls
to the women on his state-
issued cellphone.
Hackers target
Twitter, Post
SAN FRANCISCO-
Social media giant Twitter is
among the latest U.S. com-
panies to acknowledge it is
among a growing list of vic-
tims of Internet security at-
tacks, saying hackers may
have gained access to in-
formation on 250,000 of its
more than 200 million active
users.
And now, The Washing-
ton Post is joining the cho-
rus, saying it discovered it
was the target of a sophisti-
cated cyberattack in 2011.
Twitter said a blog post
Friday it detected attempts
to gain access to its user
data earlier in the week. It
shut down one attack mo-
ments after it was detected.
-From wire reports


Protest protectors


Associated Press
Egyptian volunteers of Tahrir Bodyguard, an anti-harassment group, work at a rally Friday, Feb. 1, in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt. Patrolling
on Friday, the men and women have joined Tahrir Bodyguard one of several informal groups that have arisen to protect female
demonstrators after women were stripped, groped and assaulted in a string of attacks this past year.


Egypt bodyguards

take stand against

sexualassault
Associated Press
CAIRO With bright neon
vests and hardhats gleaming at
dusk, a dozen Egyptian volun-
teers fanned out through
Cairo's crowded Tahrir Square.
Their project: end a surge in
sexual assaults on women that
activists say has become the
darkest stain on the country's
opposition street movement.
Patrolling on Friday, the men
and women have joined Tahrir
Bodyguard one of several in-
formal groups that have arisen
to protect female demonstrators
after women were stripped,
groped and assaulted in a string
of attacks this past year During
the past week alone, while mass
protests filled city squares
around the country, more than
two dozen new sexual attacks
have been reported a wave
activists call the worst in years.
Soraya Bahgat said she
founded the group using social
media after seeing television
footage last November of a mob


An Egyptian protester sits next to a burning advertisement banner
during clashes with riot police near to the presidential palace
Friday in Cairo, Egypt.


of men attacking a woman and
tearing off her clothes. She had
been on the way to a demon-
stration at Tahrir herself, but
instead stayed in, gripped with
fear
"It was sickening. They were
dragging her through the
street," said the 29-year-old,


who works as a human re-
sources manager "I couldn't
imagine something so horrific,
and something that fundamen-
tally would keep women from
exercising their right to assem-
bly like anyone else. No one
should be prevented from
demonstrating."


Video of police abuse
stokes anger in Egypt
CAIRO Egypt's Interior
Minister vowed Saturday to in-
vestigate the beating of a naked
man by riot police that threat-
ened to further inflame popular
anger against security forces,
but suggested initial results ab-
solve the police of direct abuse.
The beating was caught on
camera by The Associated
Press and the video was broad-
cast live on Egyptian television
late Friday as protests raged in
the streets outside the presiden-
tial palace. The AP video
showed police trying to bundle
the naked man into a police van
after beating him.
Less than 24 hours after the
incident, several thousand anti-
government demonstrators
marched again Saturday de-
nouncing the police and Islamist
President Mohammed Morsi
after a week of violent protests.
Speaking to reporters after Fri-
day's assault, Interior Minister
Mohammed Ibrahim said initial re-
sults from the public prosecutor's
investigation show 48-year-old
Hamada Saber was undressed
by "rioters" during skirmishes.


World BRIEFS
I


New Notre Dame
bells installed
PARIS The cathedral of
Notre Dame French for
"our lady" has got the prima
donna worthy of its name.
Weighing 6 1/2 tons of glis-
tening bronze, this lady is no
ordinary person: she's a bell
named Mary.
Mary is the largest and
loudest of nine new, gargan-
tuan Notre Dame bells being
blessed Saturday in the cathe-
dral's nave by Archbishop
Andre Armand Vingt-Trois.
The nine casts were or-
dered for the cathedral's
850th birthday to replace


Associated Press
A new bell known as Gabriel is hoisted from a flatbed
truck in front of the Notre Dame cathedral Thursday in
Paris. Nine enormous bronze bells have made their way on
flatbed trucks from a Normandy foundry to what is hoped
will be their home for centuries to come.


the discordant "ding dang" of
the previous four 19th century
chimes. After the originals
bells including the original
Mary were destroyed in the
French Revolution, the re-
placements were widely said
to be France's most out-of-
tune church bells.
Strong quake hits
northern Japan
TOKYO -A strong earth-
quake struck Japan's northern
island of Hokkaido, but au-
thorities said there was no
danger of a tsunami and no
immediate reports of injuries
or damage.
Japan's Meteorological


Agency said the quake had a
magnitude of 6.4 and hit at
11:17 p.m. Saturday in the
Tokachi region in southern
Hokkaido.
NYC woman found
dead in Turkey
ANKARA, Turkey-
Turkey's state-run news
agency said a missing New
York City woman has been
found dead in Istanbul.
Sarai Sierra, a 33-year-old
mother of two, went missing
while vacationing alone in Is-
tanbul. She was last heard
from Jan. 21, the day she was
due back home.
From wire reports











EXCURSIONS


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Travelers enjoy

wildlife, color and

culture ofBrazil


The eight-hour
flight south
from Miami
passed quickly
for our early
morning landing. Rio
is only one hour ahead
of Eastern time, so we
suffered no jet lag.
Our hotel was on the beach along
the Copacabana. We have been to
many of the great cities of the world,
but the geography makes Rio one of
the most stunning places we have
seen, with incredible 1,000-foot rock
formations towering over the city.
Brazil has about 200 million people
and is the largest Roman Catholic
country in the world. It occupies
about 50 percent of all of South
America and is mostly in the tropics.
From 1500 to 1822, it was a colony of
Portugal. The economy is fueled by
sugar cane, gold, coffee, oil and
tourism.
When the early Portuguese explor-
ers first sailed into the Bay in the
1500s, they thought it was the mouth
of a river, so they named it Rio (river)
Janeiro (Janu-
ary, for when
they arrived). In
reality, what
they discovered
was just an
enormous bay,
like Tampa Bay.
There are few
indigenous In-
dians remain-
Barry Schwartzing; people are
ROAD LESS mostly a light-
TAKEN skinned mix of
European, In-
dian and
African. We had been warned by
many about rampant street crime,
but the government has been ex-
panding police coverage and we felt
safe, mostly staying in the main
tourist areas.
We visited Corcovado (the moun-
tain with the Christ the Redeemer
Statue) and Sugarloaf (the mountain
peak you see at the end of the beach
area). One morning during our stay, it
was a national holiday and the boule-
vard along the beach was closed to
traffic. We were able to rent bikes
and ride along the boardwalk to
Ipanema Beach.
This area of the city is like Miami
Beach except for the mountains
guarding the city, skimpier bathing
suits and it seems like everyone is
about 20 years old. The Copa and
Ipanema areas face the Atlantic, so
they get lots of waves and many peo-
ple were out surfing.
The Brazilian economy has been
growing and the large middle class
earns about $35,000 per year Even
houses in the favelas can cost more
than $150,000. You can get a home
mortgage, but most people save and
put 70 percent down when they buy a
house, usually with family help.
From our perspective, costs for lodg-
ing and food are about the same as
we would spend in the United States.
They have federal taxes that vary
with income brackets, a Social Secu-
rity system similar to ours and every-
one must buy medical insurance.
As we traveled through villages, it
was clear people have the basics:
health care, education, TV and trans-
portation. Poverty is not nearly as ev-
ident as when you travel through
Mexico.
Can you name the two countries
that Brazil does not touch in South
America?

Birds, beasts in Pantanal
The Pantanal is the world's largest
wetland, 20 times larger than the
Everglades. To fly there, we went


DREAM
VACATIONS
rfopo Ce t


BARRY SCHWARTZ/Special to the Chronicle
Bette Schwartz poses with a Salvadoran woman dressed in traditional costume.


Our guides were amazing. They
could identify a small bird as it
zipped across the sky or just hear a
sound and know what it is. Some of
the highlights were the macaws, tou-
cans, several species of owl, many
types of hawks and lots
of small,
colorful birds.
Fall is considered the
end of the dry season, so
the animals are more
concentrated around the
water In a few months,
the entire area around
where we were staying
would under about two
feet of water
Many animals wan-
dered around our lodge;
capybara were every-
where, as well as hun-
dreds of caiman. We did
an evening hike and saw
three types of monkeys
and an anteater, as well
as a tapir, coati and
agouti.

To the Amazon
When we flew from
Cuiaba to Brasilia, our Boats awai


plane was late and we missed our
connection to Manaus. A ticket agent
was waiting at the gate with new tick-
ets to get us to Manaus, but there was
a major thunderstorm and the Man-
aus flight was two hours late. After a
call to our Rio travel agent, we finally
got to Manaus at 2 a.m. and our
driver was waiting.
We stayed at the Tropical Manaus,
an old classic jungle hotel where
presidents and kings stayed 100 years
ago. Manaus is where the white and
black rivers of the Amazon join to
form the main Amazon River
We traveled three hours upstream


i


t visitors on the Amazon River.


The Chronicle and The Accent Travel Group If it's selected as a winner, it will be pub-
are sponsoring a photo contest for readers of lished in the Sunday Chronicle.
the newspaper. At the end of the year, a panel of judges will
Readers are invited to send a photograph from select the best photo during the year and that
their Dream Vacation with a brief description of photograph will win a prize.
the trip.


Please avoid photos with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent to the Chronicle at
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River,
FL 34429 or dropped off at the Chronicle of-
fice in Inverness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


* Veterans
Notes can
be found on
Page A15 of
today's
Chronicle.


-'I G-~
a ., ,


*-- -





Where the Schwartzes went.
on the Rio Negro to the Anivilhanus
Jungle Lodge. The Rio Negro is al-
most black with tannic acid so no
mosquitoes breed. Our jungle lodge
was beautiful, had good food, clean
water, satellite TV and Internet. Our
guide, Landro, was an indigenous In-
dian from the northern part of Brazil.
Hiking with him through the rain for-
est was a wonderful education.
On a night game run, we saw four
sloths and several boas in the trees.
During the day we fed the Amazon
pink dolphins and fish for piranhas.

Rhythms of Salvadore
Salvadore is on a huge bay and is
the third largest city in Brazil. We
stay in the old, well-preserved his-
toric section, Pelourinho. Amerigo
Vespuci sailed into the bay in 1501
and claimed the area for Portugal.
Sugar cane was the cash crop and it
was the capital until the mid 1800s
when they moved it to Rio.
In the 1960s they built a new capi-
tal city, Brasilia, to encourage people
to move inland. Salvadore was the
slave center and they imported 5 mil-
lion African slaves to work the fields
until the mid 1800s. Now it is the cen-
ter of Afro-Brazilian culture.
Music and art keep the city's
streets vibrating with energy. The
young men practice copoeina, which
is a mix of martial arts and dance, I
am sure it is where American break
dancing started.

Booming Brazil
Brazil is booming and the upcom-
ing 2014 World Cup Soccer and 2016
summer Olympics will bring a tourist
bonanza to the country The economy
is creating many of middle class op-
portunities and there is a big empha-
sis on preserving the environment.
They understand the importance of
the natural resources found in Brazil
and they are getting control of street
crime.
Walking through the dense jungle
can be an adventure in removing
ticks afterward. But, until we see any
gross worms wiggling out of our bod-
ies, we are healthy and ready for
more adventures.
I miss hearing the racket that the
chaco chachalacas make in the morn-
ing. And, yes, in Ipanema, they really
do say "Ah.."
By the way, in answer to my earlier
question, the two countries Brazil
does not touch in South America are
Chile and Ecuador
To see the YouTube slideshow:
http://bschwartz.net/brazil.
-0

Barry Schwartz and his wife, Bette,
live at the end of Ozello Trail with
their mountain-climbing dog, Rowdy.
They are retired teachers who now
split their time between Ozello and
the Colorado Mountains. During the
past 30-plus years, they have been
hiking, climbing, scuba diving, sailing
or driving through at least 50
countries around the world. Email
him atschwartzbb@gmail.com.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Dad knows best


about move


Dear Annie: My
family wants to
move to another
state. The only reason we
haven't is because of my
dad's job. He has worked
for the same company for
18 years and doesn't want
to lose his retirement
benefits. I understand
how important the job is,
but the company could
easily allow a transfer to
another
branch.
Whenever
we try to talk
to Dad about
moving, he
gets angry
and yells at us
or leaves the
room in frus-
tration. It's
causing a lot
of tension at
home. We feel
stuck and un- ANN
happy here, MAIL
and that
makes me
upset with my father for
not putting any effort into
moving. He has told us
many times that he wants
to go somewhere else, yet
he doesn't do anything to
make it happen.
Dad was looking at real
estate prices in a city we
vacationed in this year,
but seems to have forgot-
ten about it. How do we
help him see that moving
is best for all of us? There
is no downside. Other
branches of the company
pay better than the one
he works at now, and


I
.1


there's also the possibil-
ity that he could find a job
with an entirely different
company that's even bet-
ter for him.
I think Dad is worried
about selling the house,
but how will he know
whether he can sell it if
he doesn't try? He is so
resistant to change. How
can we help him? His
Daughter
Dear Daugh-
ter: Moving
away may seem
like a simple
thing to you, but
for your father,
it is fraught
with uncer-
tainty You don't
know that his
company would
offer to transfer
him. You don't
know that he
E'S could find a
BOX better, or even
an adequate,
job somewhere
else and start from
scratch to support his
family You don't know
that he could sell the
house for enough to buy
another one. All of these
things weigh on his mind,
and your constant pres-
sure adds to his unhappi-
ness and stress.
Here's how you can
help Dad: Tell him you
love him and you know he
is doing what he thinks is
best for the family Don't
bring up the subject
again. He knows how you
feel.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Warm Bodies" (PG-13)
1:20 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Bullet to the Head" (R) ID
required. 1 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch
Hunters" (R) ID required.
4 p.m. No passes.
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch
Hunters" (R) ID required. In
3D. 1:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No
passes.
"Mama" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Broken City" (R) ID required.
4:10 p.m.
"Les Miserables" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 6:50 p.m.
"Zero Dark Thirty" (R) ID re-
quired. 12:50 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
7p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Warm Bodies" (PG-13)
1:30 p.m., 2 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,


7:30 p.m., 8 p.m.
"Bullet to the Head" (R) ID
required. 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:45 p.m.
"Parker" (R) ID required.
1:40 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Movie 43" (R) ID required.
5 p.m.
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch
Hunters" (R) ID required. In
3D. 1:15 p.m., 7:10 p.m. No
passes.
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch
Hunters" (R) ID required.
4:25 p.m. No passes.
"Mama" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Zero Dark Thirty" (R) ID
required. 1:05 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7 p.m.
"Silver Lings Playbook"
(PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 4:35 p.m.,
7:15 p.m.
"Lincoln" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Out of bed and moving
about
6 Musical symbol
10 Story
14 Buck or doe
18 Diving duck
20 Puerto -
21 Sword handle
22 Horse opera
24 ER prioritization
25 Love god
26 Exude
27 Raggedy child
29 Bun
30 Stupefy
32 -de-lance
34 Kind of cherry
36 Detest
37 Work in verse
38 Yearn
39 Object
from antiquity
41 Young horse
43 Flying mammal
44 Dressed
45 Sheer fabric
47 Cry
49 Spill the beans
52 Dart
53 Jumping insect
55 Baffles
59 Involving word play
60 Opposing,
poetically
62 Daring
64 Sluggish
65 "- She Sweet"
66 River in France
67 Attention-getter
69 Dog
71 Elaborate song
72 Hwy.
73 Barren
74 Favorite -
75 Severity
77 TV's "-: NY"
78 Provide food and drink
80 Negotiate
82 Writer
84 firma
85 First king of Israel
87 Summit
88 Wash
89 Metallic element
90 Sudden increase
92 Luster
93 Owns
94 Entice
96 Foot digit


97 Scheming ways
99 Papa
102 Right away! (abbr.)
104 Payable
105 Parrot
of New Zealand
106 Enciphered
107 Charter
108 Worth
110 and bear it
112 Impaired
114 Liking
115 Hitchcock thriller
117 Headless nail
119 Church service
120 Coercion
121 Horseless
carriage
123 Obvious
125 Gentle
126 Palmas
129 Avoid
131 The cream
132 Denomination
133 Trend
136 Settled after flight
138 Son of Aphrodite
140 Fire residue
141 Begone!
142 Hari
143 Particular
145 Ark
147 Join
149 Public speaker
151 Holiday song
152 Sea eagle
153 Twirl
154 "Casino-"
155 Town in Nevada
156 Direct
157 Pavilion
158 Playthings


DOWN
1 Texas player
2 Young cod
3 Linen fabric
4 Type style (abbr.)
5 Gas pump abbr.
6 Mania
7 Juicy fruit
8 Environmental
prefix
9 Loses
10 Law officer
11 Intention
12 Smooth-talking
13 Storage area
14 Fairbanks


or MacArthur
Pinna
Engrave
Renovate
Button on a phone
Coolidge
or Hayworth
Snood
Plus
Imaginary
creature
Here and -
Drama
River
to the North Sea
Mild cheese
Monkey
Penny
Hoosegow
- -impressionism
Kind of moth
Box
Resign
Not needed
Impartial
Of high mountains
Goods
Penitentiary
Step
Wheel with teeth
Norse god
Excavated
Cooked
a certain way
Hire
Took game
illegally
Swagger
Military greeting
Edge
Governs
"Exodus"
character
Coach
High card
Golf peg
Pesters in fun
Excellent
Fitting
Titleholder,
for short
Rove
Vehicle
on runners
Cup
Least favorable
- of March
Bachelor of -
Letters
Typewriter type


105 Scoundrel
106 Leggy bird
107 Stag
109 In this manner
111 Wrath
113 Gemstone
114 Dense clump
116 Play
by Shakespeare
118 Grew wider
120 Sawbones


"- Town"
Not (prefix)
Ocean
Youngster
One
of the Baldwins
Indian instrument
Dynamite inventor
Smell
Deadly
Coral island


135 Is bold enough
137 Vetch seed
139 Angry
141 Peel
142 Famed clinic
144 Charged particle
146 Literary collection
148 Unclose,
poetically
150 Pole


Puzzle answer is on Page A16.


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick


Todays MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


A14 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT





CImus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well
as events to which the public
is invited. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activi-
ties, meals and more for a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.

POST NEWS
The Vietnam Veterans
Gathering Inc. will meet at
9:30 a.m. Wednesday, Feb.
13, at the Village Inn in Bev-
erly Hills. The group will dis-
cuss the upcoming golf
tournament, which is the pri-
mary fundraiser for the 11 th
Veterans Gathering in spring
2014. All veterans who would
like to participate with the or-
ganization are welcome. The
mission of VVG is to assist
veterans and to keep alive the
memory of fallen comrades
both in Southeast Asia and
other theaters of operation.
Call Tom Neaman at 352-
586-7126.
VFW Riders Group
meets at 10 a.m. Saturday
(different weeks each month)
at different VFW posts
throughout the year. Call di-
rector Gene Perrino at 352-
302-1037, or email geneusa
wo@tampabay.rr.com.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Satur-
day monthly at 1 p.m. for
lunch and coffee at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). All Coastie veterans
are welcome. Call Charlie
Jensen at 352-503-6019.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East. For more infor-
mation about the post and its
activities, call 352-447-1816;
email mvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Lounge open at 11 a.m. Mon-
day through Saturday and
noon on Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
Call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at
352-302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who
served during war time (also
stepchildren); stepchildren;
and female veterans who
served during wartime. Call
Unit President Sandy White at
352-249-7663, or member-
ship chairman Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
activities such as meals,
bingo, golf, darts, karaoke,
pool and more for members
and guests. Review the
monthly newsletter for activi-
ties and updates, and call the
post at 352-746-0440. The
VFW Post 10087 is off County
Road 491, directly behind Ca-
dence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 746-0440. The
Cake Crab Company Golf
League plays at Twisted Oaks
G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.
Check with Jack Gresham for
tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf
League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted
Oaks Golf Club and Citrus
Springs Country Club. Tee
time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to


join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Country fried steak chicken
dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 8. Cost is $8;


children younger than 6 eat
for $4. Karaoke by Mike. The
public is welcome.
Call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, at the intersection of In-
dependence Highway and
U.S. 41. The chapter hall is on
the corner of Independence
Highway and Paul Drive. We
thank veterans for their serv-
ice and welcome any disabled
veteran to join us from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we
accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to as-
sist disabled veterans and
their families when we are
able. Call Commander
Richard Floyd 727-492-0290,
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207,
or 352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClis-
ter is available to assist any
veteran or dependents with
their disability claim by ap-
pointment. Call 352-344-3464
and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the
veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA med-
ical center in Gainesville may
call the Citrus County Transit
office for wheelchair trans-
portation; call 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant
Lynn Armitage at 352-341-
5334. One of the DAVA's proj-
ects is making lap robes and
ditty, wheelchair and monitor
bags for needy veterans in
nursing homes. All who wish
to help in our projects are wel-
come. We need to make the
items certain sizes, so please
call for information. We also
collect toiletry items for the
veterans. Good, clean mate-
rial and yarn are needed.
Call Brice at 352-560-3867
or Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries
are at 906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness. Call the post at
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Aux-
iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Post and auxiliary meet
the first Wednesday of the
month at 7 p.m. Dunnellon
Young Marines meet 6 p.m.
Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo at 6 p.m. Thursday.
Doors open at 4 p.m.
All are welcome at free
AARP income tax service
through April 10 from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Wednesday begin-
ning Feb. 6. Call Wayne
Sloan at 352-489-5066.
The outdoor flea market
and pancake breakfast are
set for Saturday, Feb. 16. All-
you-can-eat breakfast is
served from 7:30 to 10:30
a.m. Cost is $5 for adults and
$3 for children. Everyone is
welcome.
The Four Chaplains memo-
rial Service will be at 4 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 10, followed by
a 94th Legion birthday cele-
bration. The public is invited.
For information about activ-
ities and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
or President Elaine Spikes at


352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
Any female relative age 16 or
older who is a wife, widow,
mother, mother-in-law, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of an honor-
ably discharged Marine and
FMF Corpsman eligible to join
the Marine Corps League,
and female Marines (former,


active and reserves) and as-
sociate members are eligible
for MCLA membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com. Call or visit
the post for regular events, as
well as meetings. Google us
at VFW 4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at
"Show Me the Money" from 2
to 4 p.m. Thursday.
Sunday breakfasts are
open to the public from 9:30
to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $6.
Everyone is invited to a
special "Speed Bingo" ses-
sion at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb.
23. Doors open at 9 a.m.
Food is available. Proceeds
will benefit cancer aid and re-
search. Also, all are welcome
at the "Bonanza Bingo" begin-
ning at 9 a.m. Saturday,
March 2. Cost is $35, which
includes lunch. Call 352-726-
5206 for information.
The public is welcome at
Sunday buffet breakfasts from
10 a.m. to noon; cost is $5.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-
5012 for information. VFW
membership is open to men
and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including
service in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The Korean
Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above for
information.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For
information about the post
and its activities, call 352-
637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, in-
vites all eligible veterans to
join or transfer to our Post
237 family. There are many
activities (call the post for in-
formation), and monthly din-
ners sell out fast and are a big
hit. Legionnaires, Sons of the
American Legion (SAL), or
American Legion Auxiliary
(ALA) are active helping vet-
erans and the community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org
to view the calendar of up-
coming events. Call the post
at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of
the U.S. is eligible for mem-
bership if said service was
within Korea, including territo-
rial waters and airspace, at
any time from Sept. 3, 1945,
to the present or if said serv-
ice was outside of Korea from
June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob


Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77 meet the first
Thursday monthly at the for-
mer Inverness Highlands
S&W Civic Association build-
ing at 4375 Little Al Point, off
Arbor Street. Call Post Cmdr.
Norman Brumett at 352-860-
2981 or Auxiliary president
Marie Cain at 352-697-3151.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food
available.
The post will do a bus tour
to Miami and Key West from
Feb. 18 to 24. Profits from the
trip will be used to purchase a
brick for the Fisher House
Walk of Courage and for new
equipment for the Color
Guard of Post 77. The Fisher
House will be a home for the
families of hospitalized veter-
ans at the Malcom Randal
Veterans Hospital in
Gainesville; the Walk of
Courage will be the paved
walkway between the Fisher
House and the hospital. For
more information, call Alice at
352-860-2981.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Dinner is at 6 p.m. and the
meeting follows at 7. All veter-
ans in the Homosassa/Ho-
mosassa Springs area are
invited to be a part of Ameri-
can Legion Post 166. For in-
formation about the post or
the American Legion, call and
leave a message for the post
commander at 352-860-2090.
On Feb. 4, American Le-
gion Post 166 will celebrate
the 60th anniversary of the
end of the Korean War by
honoring Korean War mem-
bers with a Certificate of Ap-
preciation at the regular
meeting at 7 p.m. at the Olive
Tree. Dinner is at 6 p.m.
The meeting is open to all
veterans who served during
times of conflict and who live
in the area from Homosassa
Springs, Homosassa and
Lecanto, to Sugarmill Woods
and Chassahowitzka. Call
Robert Scott, commander, at
352-860-2090.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose
and Crown restaurant, Citrus
Hills. Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway). For more informa-
tion about the 40/8, call the


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Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959; or
visit www.Postl 55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 1 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November at
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. All combat-wounded
veterans, lineal descendants,
next of kin, spouses and sib-
lings of Purple Heart recipi-
ents are invited. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 MOPH, visit www.
citruspurpleheart.org or call
352-382-3847.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Pur-
ple Heart has announced two
scholarship opportunities for
college-bound students-
Chapter 776's College of
Central Florida (CF) Endowed
Scholarship and the Military
Order of the Purple Heart
(MOPH) Scholarship for Aca-
demic Year 2013/14.
Chapter 776's CF Endowed
Scholarship for Academic
Year 2013/14 awards $500 to
an applicant accepted or en-
rolled at CF as a full-time stu-
dent (12 or more semester
credit hours). Chapter 776
scholarship information and
an application can be ob-
tained at www.citruspurple
heart.org, or by calling 352-
382-3847. Chapter 776 must
receive scholarship applica-
tions no later than 5 p.m. Feb.
28.
The MOPH Scholarship for
Academic Year 2013/14
awards $3,000 to a member
of the MOPH; a spouse,
widow, direct lineal descen-
dant (child, stepchild, adopted
child, grandchild) of a MOPH
member or of a veteran killed
in action, or who died of
wounds before having the op-
portunity to become a MOPH
member. Great-grandchildren
are not eligible. Applicant
must be a U.S. citizen, a
graduate or pending graduate
of an accredited high school;
be accepted or enrolled as a
full-time student (12 semester
credit hours or 18 quarter
hours) at a U.S. college or
trade school and have at least
a 2.75 cumulative GPA based
on an un-weighted 4.0 grad-
ing system. Scholarship appli-
cations must be received at
MOPH Headquarters in
Springfield, Va., no later than
5 p.m. Feb. 13. MOPH schol-
arship information and an ap-
plication can be obtained by
visiting the MOPH website at
www.purpleheart.org.
The order invites all veter-
ans and the public, especially
families, to attend the Eighth
Annual Purple Heart Cere-
mony at 11 a.m., Saturday,
Feb. 9, at the Florida National
Guard Armory, Crystal River.
The patriotic ceremony will
commemorate the proud
legacy of the Purple Heart
and pay tribute to Florida's
fallen heroes and America's
wounded warriors.
The ceremony will also fea-


ture the MOPH Department of
Florida Afghanistan/Iraq War
Memorial Portrait Mural. The
mural honors more than 300
Floridians who have fallen
during the Afghanistan/Iraq
campaigns and is the first me-
morial to bear both the en-
graved names and color
portraits of those who fell. Vo-
calists Paul and Jackie Stevio
will provide patriotic music.
For more information, visit
the Chapter 776 website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-
0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post. Call the post
at 352-447-3495.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call Commander Tom
Gallagher at 860-1629.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2013 will
be at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill.
Dates are: Feb. 9, March 9,
April 13 and May 11.


SERVICES & GROUPS
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets the
second Saturday monthly at
the DAV building at 1039 N.
Paul Drive in Inverness. This
is an advocacy group for cur-
rent and future veterans, as
well as for POWs and MIAs.
Florida Chapter 7 welcomes

See VETERANS/Page A16


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 A15


wwwtrnitvitraelco


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A16 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013


You are what



you watch


On the evening news
last night, one of
the commercials
ended with, "If you're be-
tween the ages of 50 and
75, you may be eligible
...," and I started to laugh.
Who else do they think
is watching the evening
news? Teenagers? New-
lyweds? Or do I repeat
myself? How else could
you explain all the com-
mercials for Cialis,
facelifts, hearing aids,
AARP, understanding
Medicare, vitamins just
for men, vitamins just for
women, hair
dye and "ma-
ture" singles
dating services
that run be-
tween the sto-
ries about the
national debt
and the
Mideast car
bomb o' the
day? JI
And how MUL
many times do MU
they think peo-
ple between the ages of
50 and 75 have to see the
same ad before it gets re-
sults? Fifty? Seventy-
five? Three hundred and
sixty-five? Infinity? Is
there a man alive who
needs Cialis who hasn't
heard about it? If he's
that out of touch, he's
probably not dating on
the Internet, either.
It's like all those beer
ads during the Super
Bowl- what do advertis-
ers think most of the fans
are drinking already? Do
they really have to spend
a million dollars a second
to sell viewers something
they already have in their
hands? Do they think
beer drinkers are that
stupid? Yes, they do.
Maybe the nightly news
gets older viewers only
because of the ads. To
anyone younger than 50,
the commercials are a
peek into their future at
Hip Replacement Vil-
lage, which scares them
silly
For all my complain-
ing, the good news is that
we can get hip replace-
ments and facelifts and
Cialis. In the old days,
you had to play the cards
you were dealt. No
longer. Bad liver? Get a
new one. Don't like your
face? Get a new one.
Not long ago, my wife
bought an old photo
album at a garage sale
that was full of newspa-
per clippings of the do-
ings in our town 60 years
ago. As she flipped
through the yellowed
pages, she stopped and
asked me to look at a
photo of a group of
women. There were


about 20 of them, some
kind of club, the front row
sitting and the back row
standing.
"How old do you think
they are?" she asked.
Sensing that it might be
one of those trick ques-
tions Sue asks that al-
ways make me look
stupid and foolish like
asking when I'm going to
clean out my office right
after I've cleaned out my
office, or have I forgotten
to gas up the car again, or
whose turn is it to wash
the dog I took my time
looking at the
photo, be-
cause they can
be hard to
interpret.
Every now
and then, I'll
read a true
story about
some famous
figure in his-
M tory, a person
described as a
LEN great beauty
or as devil-
ishly handsome, and then
I'll turn the page and look
at the photograph and
cringe. The guy's hair is
plastered to his head
with bear grease, yet part
of it manages to pop up
and curl around in an un-
attractive way His eyes
look beady because the
camera flash washed out
his eyebrows, and his
clothes look ratty. There's
an expression on his face
that screams "Why am I
here?" because they told
him not to move or blink
for 30 seconds, and what-
ever you do, don't smile. I
look at this old portrait
and wonder, "If that's
good-looking, what was
stone-cold ugly back
then?"
I looked the group of
women again.
"I'm guessing about
75."
Sue took her hand off
the caption. The oldest
woman in the group was
55, the youngest, 42. Even
overlooking the long-
unfashionable clothing
and the dated hairstyles,
they looked worn out long
before their time. No
doubt a similar picture of
a group of men would
have fooled me, too.
It was a time before
pacemakers, hip and
knee replacements, laser
eye surgery all this
wonderful stuff that can
make us feel young again.
But can a hip replace-
ment make our faces look
younger? Or are we just
smiling more when they
take our photographs?


Contact Jim Mullen at
JimMullenBooks. com.


Senior Foundation
to do talent show
The Senior Foundation of
Citrus County is hosting the
fifth annual Citrus Has Talent
Show Friday, Feb. 8, at Cur-
tis Peterson Auditorium.
The event is the annual
fundraiser to help provide
vital services for seniors in


VETERANS
Continued from Page A15


new members to help pro-
mote public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help vet-
erans in need of help. Full
membership is open to all in-
dividuals 18 years or older
who wish to dedicate time to
the cause. Visit the website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker
for your next meeting or
event. Call club President Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell), or emailultrarayl997
@yahoo.com.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to
veterans in need. Food dona-
tions and volunteers are al-
ways welcomed and needed.
The CCVC is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the
corner of Paul and Independ-


need. The show starts at
6:30 p.m.; doors open at
6 p.m. Tickets are $10, with
children younger than 10 ad-
mitted free. Tickets are for
sale at the Citrus County
Resource, West Citrus Com-
munity Center and East Cit-
rus Community Center.
For information, call 352-
527-5905 352-527-4600.


ence, off U.S. 41 north. Hours
of operation are 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. Tuesday and Thursday.
Appointments are encour-
aged by calling 352-400-
8952. CCVC general
meetings are at 10 a.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly at
the DAV building in Inverness.
All active duty and honorably
discharged veterans, their
spouses, widows and widow-
ers, along with other veterans'
organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. Members can renew
with Gary Williamson at 352-
527-4537, or at the meeting.
Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran
in need of food, haircut, voter
ID, food stamps, medical as-
sistance or more blankets is
asked to call Ed Murphy at
the Hunger and Homeless
Coalition at 352-382-0876.
Open spots still remain
for those couples and individ-
uals interested in taking a trip
to Hawaii with a group of vet-


TOGETHER & COMMUNITY


Engagement

Crawford/Clark


Judy and Lindsay Clark
announce the engagement
of their son, Stephen Cas-
sidy Clark, to Hannah
Marie Crawford, the
daughter of Elizabeth and
Col. Grant Crawford.
The prospective groom
is a graduate of Lecanto
High School and has
grown up in Inverness. He
is currently a student at
the University of South
Florida -Tampa campus.
The bride-elect is a
graduate of James I.
O'Neill High School and
she has grown up in West
Point, N.Y She is currently
a student at the University
of Arkansas Fort Smith
campus.
When the prospective
groom graduates with a
degree in exercise science,
and his fiancee graduates


with a degree in middle
school math and science
education, they plan to
marry and reside in Col-
orado. The wedding date is
yet to be determined. For-
mal invitations will be sent
out at that time.


In SERVICE

Paul S. Mihalko Jr. and basic warfare principles
and skills.


Air Force Airman
1st Class Paul S. Mi-
halko Jr. graduated
from basic military
training at Lackland
Air Force Base, San
Antonio, Texas.
The airman com-
pleted an intensive,
eight-week program
that included training
in military discipline
and studies, Air Force


Paul S.
Mihalko Jr.
U.S. Air Force


core values, physical fitness, Invernes


Airmen who com-
plete basic training
earn four credits to-
ward an associate in
applied science de-
gree through the
Community College
of the Air Force.
Mihalko is the son
of Paul Mihalko of
Inverness. He is a
2012 graduate of
Citrus High School,
sS.


News NOTES


Button enthusiasts
get together Feb. 9
Manatee Button Club will
meet at 9:30 a.m. to noon
Saturday, Feb. 9, at Marion
Oaks Club House.
Refreshments served.
Guests welcome; members
collect antique and vintage
buttons.
Call Laura or Dwight at
352-787-5945 for more infor-
mation and directions.
Primary school
to honor veterans
Inverness Primary School
invites the public to its 18th
Annual Dinner to thank veter-
ans for their service. The
event will be at 5 p.m. Friday,
Feb. 8, at Inverness Primary
School Cafe, 206 S. Line Ave.
The dinner is free for veter-
ans and a guest. On the
menu is a ziti dinner from
Joe's Family Restaurant, to
be served until the food is
gone. There will also be a pro-
gram "This Land is Your Land"
to be presented by the stu-
dents of IPS at 6 p.m.
No reservations are neces-
sary, but for more information,
call 352-726-2632.
Shuffleboarders
to meet in B.H.
The next Beverly Hills Shuf-
fleboard Club officers' meet-
ing will be at 3 p.m. Tuesday,
Feb. 5, at the library.
The members' meeting will
be at 3 p.m. Thursday, Feb.
14, at the community building.
All members are asked to
dress with some red and bring
a signed Valentine card.
Cakes for the meeting will be
donated by Pauline Eafrati
and Ken Wood.
The club is still looking for


erans, their families and
friends. The annual trek, coor-
dinated and led by Don
McLean, a U.S. Navy veteran,
is scheduled this year for
Sept. 17 to Oct. 4.
Participants will visit the is-
lands of Oahu (Hale Koa
Hotel), Kauai (Marriott),
Hawaii (stay in the KMC in-
side the volcano) and Maui
(Royal Lahina Resort). Call
McLean at 352-637-5131, or
email dmclean8@
tampabay.rr.com.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency Ser-
viceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, of email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org.
The local Service Source
office is at 2071 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto.
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored with
centerpieces with their names
on them at The Old Ho-
mosassa Veterans' Memo-


new members and some are
shuffling when weather per-
mits. Any person interested
may call Vice President
Sharon Pineda at 352-
527-8488.
Flotilla offers
paddlers program
The U.S. Coast Guard Aux-
iliary of Crystal River will offer
a two-day Paddlesports
America program for kayak
and canoe enthusiasts. This
program will help prepare
even experienced kayakers
for a safer day on the water.
The program will be from 7
to 9 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 26,
and Thursday, Feb. 28, at the
USCG Auxiliary Flotilla 15-01
building at 148 N.E. Fifth St.,
Crystal River. Cost is $20.
This program addresses
the unique needs of kayakers
and canoeists. The two-day
safety program includes a va-
riety of demonstrations, in-
cluding handling emergency
situations and paddlecraft
equipment. It will cover sev-
eral topics such as: Know
Your Paddlecraft, Before You
Get Underway, Operating
Your Boat Safely, Legal Re-
quirements of Boating and
Boating Emergencies.
Call Linda to register or for
more information, 352-
503-6199.
Everyone invited
to Pickin' Party
Everyone is invited to an
Acoustic Bluegrass and Old-
time Pickin' Party beginning at
1 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 3, at Na-
ture's Resort on Halls River
Road in Homosassa.
The Pickin' Party will be
staged every Sunday and the
event is free and open to the
public.


rial. Call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092.
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are needed
to assist the U.S. Coast
Guard Auxiliary to help the
Coast Guard with non-military
and non-law enforcement pro-
grams. Criminal background
check and membership are
required. Email Vince Maida
at vsm440@aol.com, or call
917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the De-
partment of Veterans Affairs
(VA), provides tailored care
for veterans and their families.
The program is provided in
private homes, assisted living
facilities and nursing homes,
and staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to ill-
nesses and conditions unique
to each military era or war.
It also provides caregiver
education and a recognition
program to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. HPH
Hospice care and programs
do not affect veterans' bene-
fits. Call 352-527-4600.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


69th ANNIVERSARY

The Cammaratas


Giuseppe and Mary
Cammarata of Pine Ridge
celebrated their 69th
wedding anniversary at
Olive Garden in Inver-
ness with their daughter,


Vincenza, and her hus-
band, George Breniak
and son, Frank, and his
wife, Rita Cammarata.
They were married
Jan. 28,1944, in Italy


65th ANNIVERSARY


The Chapmans


Virgil and Ina Chap-
man of Inverness will
celebrate their 65th an-
niversary Feb. 14, 2013.
The couple were mar-
ried Feb. 14, 1948, in
Blue Mound, Ill., in First
Christian Church.
They have five chil-
dren: David and Sara,
Mount Zion, Ill.; Tom and
Brenda, Tuttle, Okla.;
Cindy and Bob, Moore
Okla.; and daughter-in-


law Nicki of Crestview.
Two of their children are
deceased.
The couple have 11
grandchildren and 26
great-grandchildren.
The Chapmans cele-
brated their 65 years to-
gether with 40 family
members at a get-
together in July
They have been Inver-
ness residents since
1984.


For the RECORD


Divorces 1/21/1
to 1/27/13
Jessica A Gutierrez,
Citrus Springs vs. Hernan
Gutierrez, Citrus Springs
Nina Klee, Inverness vs.
Jerry W. Klee, Auburndale
Michael Larosa,
Inverness vs. Jerri Larosa,
Inverness
Andrea Decarlo
Muzzupappa, Inverness vs.
John Fabian Muzzupappa,
Inverness
Sharon L. Nachbauer,
Hernando vs. Thomas M.
Nachbauer, Hernando


Kimberley A Reichbach
vs. Jay A. Reichbach,
Brooksville
Cindy B. Savino, Floral
City vs. Andy L. Morris,
Inverness
Lori Ann Walker, Fort
Worth, Texas vs. Jerry Dean
Walker, Hernando
Marriages 1/21/13
to 1/27/13
Jason Richard Golding,
Hernando/Jo Ellen Isbell,
Hernando
Robert Louis Stewart,
Crystal River/Tara Rochelle
Smith, Crystal River


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A14.

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SPORTS


No. 4 Florida
keeps rolling in
SEC play
against No. 16
Ole Miss./B5


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Recreational sports/B2
0 Golf/B2
0 Football/B3
0 Hockey, tennis/B3
0 Basketball/B4, B5
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Entertainment/B6


CR wrestling finishes 2nd in district


JOE KORNECKI III
Correspondent
HOLIDAY The Crystal
River Pirates wrestling team
was cheerful after all the
matches were finished
Saturday night at An-
clote High School.
The Pirates fin-
ished third at the
District 1A-8
wrestling tourna- ,
ment and sent nine ---
grapplers to the regionals
last year. This year, the Pirates
did even better. Crystal River
finished second out of nine


teams with a score of 167, and
they send 11 grapplers to com-
pete in the Region 1A-2 tourna-
ment at Lakeland Tenoroc High
School starting Friday
Pasco (207.5) was crowned
district champion, and
Mk Hudson Fivay (160)
V finished third.
.i "They knew what
they had to do, and
they did it" Crystal
., River coach Craig
'- Frederick said of his
grapplers.
Crystal River had five
wrestlers advance to the cham-
pionship round and qualify for


region in the process. The Pi-
rates had four wrestlers finish
in the runner-up position: Nick
Hooper (132 pounds), Jose Aday
(138), Robert Brooker (160) and
Andrew Bilby (182).
Dylan Ayala (152) was the
only Pirate individual to win
the district championship in his
respective weight class. Ayala
started off slowly against An-
clote's Jonte Scott and ap-
peared to be in trouble in a
physical match as the two grap-
plers battled all over the mat.
Ayala recovered well, though,
and took a 10-3 victory
"He surprised me .... and his
name wasn't even on the board
for state," Ayala said. "Hope-
fully .... I place in regionals and


No gold garnered by
TONY CASTRO
Correspondent
SPRING HILL Citrus
County was represented by
26 grapplers 13 each from
Citrus and Lecanto High -
in Saturday's 7-team, 6 1/2-
hour District 2A-7 wrestling
tournament at Springstead
High School.
When the dust settled, to no
one's amazement, the host
Springstead Eagles hoisted
their ninth straight district
championship and their North
Suncoast-best 27th district title
in the sport dating to 1980.
As expected, Nature Coast


'Canes or Panthers
Technical finished as district
runners-up, 222.0-165.5.
The Spring Hill mat men
advanced a tourney-high 12
grapplers including a tour-
ney-best seven district cham-
pions from nine finals bouts
- to next week's Region 2A-2,
aka "the Region of Doom"
at St. Cloud.
Citrus, which had finished
as district runner-up each of
the past three winters,
slipped to fourth behind up-
start Land 0' Lakes, 115.5-97.
Brooksville-Hernando (82.0),
Brooksville-Central (77.0) and
See Page B4


See Page B4


S -- .. -.




STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Citrus attacker Austin Wilcoxon, left, tests Eastside's goalkeeper Cody Peterson as fellow Ram teammate Kim Mueller looks on.
The Hurricanes lost 2-0 in a Class 3A regional semifinal match to Eastside, ending Citrus' season at 10-6-4 overall.






Can't break throu h


Citrus' stellar season ends at home in Class 3A regional semifinals


DAVID PIEKLIK
Correspondent
INVERNESS They wanted re-
venge, they wanted the win and they
wanted the FHSAA Class 3A regional
boys soccer championship banner. For
Citrus High School, the shots that just
missed the goal Saturday became
metaphoric in its 2-0 season-ending
semifinal game to Gainesville Eastside.
The Hurricanes looked to avenge last
season's 6-0 semifinal loss to the Rams
but history repeated itself, and they
were blanked at Hurricane Stadium in a
physical, hard-fought contest. Tyler
Miller-Jones and Joseph Malu netted
goals for Eastside, who hosts unde-
feated Sunlake in the championship
match Tuesday
Rams head coach Ron Messick cred-
ited the 'Canes and head coach Phil
Journey for the job they did preparing
for the match, and causing his team to
panic in the first half and make mis-
takes. Messick is excited to get a chance
at the regional title, saying his team is
battle-tested.
"With the young team we have," Mes-
sick added, "to get to this point... it was
a huge boost of confidence for us."
The Hurricanes played the game they
wanted to against the Rams, keeping the


We have a lot of
fond memories this
year. We've
accomplished a lot,
and it's just the
beginning.

Phil Journey
Citrus boys soccer coach said following
his team's 2-0 loss to Gainesville
Eastside on Saturday night in Inverness.
The Hurricanes' season ends at 10-6-4
overall and as District 3A-6 champions.
Eastside's offense to the outside and
controlling possession. Aggressive play
from a strong backfield frustrated the
visitors into poor passing and numerous
fouls.
However, Citrus failed to convert on a
handful of shot opportunities and the
teams entered halftime tied at 0-0. Just
shy of two minutes into the second half,
Malu took a center pass left of Hurri-
canes goalkeeper Alan Verone and beat
him for the 1-0 lead.
The goal settled the Rams down and
into their style of play and as time


ticked off the clock -the 'Canes got red-
carded twice, when frustrations started
to mount.
Miller-Jones put the game away with
16 minutes remaining on a right side
shot past Verone for the 2-0 lead. The
Citrus keeper finished with 15 saves on
17 shots.
As his team headed into the locker
room for the final time this season,
Journey said his players gave it their
best and played their hearts out.
Saying it was a wonderful season -
which included winning the District
3A-6 championship Journey added,
"We have a lot of fond memories this
year. We've accomplished a lot, and it's
just the beginning."
Senior defender Michael Hetland
reflected on the season and leaving the
team.
"It's sad just thinking it's going to be
our last game," Hetland said.
Junior forward Austin Wilcoxon will
have one last shot next season to get the
school's first soccer regional champi-
onship banner. Though that didn't hap-
pen, he pointed to the team's district
title.
"We made history with that. Step by
step, we worked night after night to get
that championship" Wilcoxon said. "Win
or lose, we're champions."


Super Bowl


finally here

Wild NFL season to

get to the big game

Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS The journey to
this Super Bowl wound through boun-
ties and replacement refs, eventually
bringing the big game back to the Big
Easy with a replacement quarter-
back, a sibling rivalry and a grand exit
for one of the NFEs greatest players,
clouded by the obscure healing pow-
ers of deer-antler spray
It is a Super
Bowl of come- Super Bowl
backs, of firsts
and lasts, and XLVII
- if San Fran-
cisco wins Baltimore
the best. Ravens vs.
A win over San Francisco
the Baltimore
Ravens on 49ers
Sunday gives Kickoff:
the 49ers six 6:25 p.m. today.
cham p i -t TV:CBS.
on s h i p s TV B
matching Pitts-
burgh's titles in the Super Bowl era.
Unlike the Steelers, the Niners have
never lost one.
Of course, they haven't won one in 18
years, either
"There's a tradition with the San
Francisco 49ers, but I think these guys
are paving their own way," said Hall of
Fame receiver and three-time cham-
pion Jerry Rice. "They're playing with
a lot of swagger"
Or as owner Denise DeBartolo York
said, "We've come full circle and the
dynasty will prevail."
New Orleans has come full circle,
too. Ravaged by Hurricane Katrina in
August 2005, losing a quarter of its
population, abandoned by the Saints
for an entire season, the city couldn't
imagine hosting another Super Bowl.
But as New Orleans recovered and re-
built, it envisioned staging what Patri-
ots owner Robert Kraft calls "the
pre-eminent sporting event."
The NFL agreed it was time to re-
turn. And even if Commissioner Roger
Goodell is despised here after slap-
ping the Saints with suspensions and
fines in the bounty scandal, the vibes
from the French Quarter and Ware-
house District this week have been
supportive, even uplifting.
"It's also terrific for us to be back
here in New Orleans," Goodell said,
joking about voodoo dolls in his like-
ness. "Our 10th Super Bowl here, the
See Page B4


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Ayala lone Pirates'individual

champion at District 1A-8 event









Elite Roofing team wins co-ed softball title


Special to the Chronicle

The adult co-ed softball
fall/winter season came to a
close Thursday night Gary
Altman and the Plain White
T's went head-to-head for
the championship against
John Sanders and the Elite
Roofing.
The game started off
with both teams scoring
runs at the beginning of the
game, but the Elite Roofing
team pulled ahead after
the second inning. Al-
though the Plain White T's
fought until the end, Elite
Roofing went on to win the
championship with a final
score of 19-5.
Both teams had a great
night hitting, and belted a
few home runs.
This league is for adults
18 and older and is a slow-


pitch, competitive league.
Come join us as a player or
bring a team and start your
own rivalry The new
league will begin in April.
We are looking to expand
this league, so if you would
like to join a team, call and
register today
For more information,
please call the Parks &
Recreation Department at
352-527-7540.
Kids can fish
with Parks & Rec
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission and Citrus County
Parks & Recreation will host
the ninth annual Kid's Fishing
Clinic on Feb. 23.
The clinic will be available
to preregistered children be-
tween the ages of 5 to 15.


Clinic times will be 9 a.m.,
10 a.m., 11 a.m., noon and
1 p.m. at Fort Island Trail
Park in Crystal River. The
free clinic enables young
people to learn the basics of
environmental stewardship,
fishing ethics, angling skills
and safety.
In addition to a free Kid's
Fishing Clinic T-shirt, rods and
reels will be supplied for the
children to use during the
clinic and to take home with
them. Space is limited; call
352-527-7540 to register. To
become a sponsor, call Andy
Smith at 352-400-0960.

The Elite Roofing co-ed
softball team poses with the
championship trophy after
winning the league Thursday
against Plain White T's.
Special to the Chronicle


Rockin' in Phoenix


Associated Press
Phil Mickelson hits from a bunker on the third hole Saturday during the third round of the Waste Management
Phoenix Open in Scottsdale, Ariz.

Largest crowd in PGA event's history watches Lefty keep lead


Associated Press


SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -
Phil Mickelson drew the
loudest roars from the
biggest crowd in golf his-
tory Saturday at the
Phoenix Open.
Mickelson nearly aced
the par-3 16th, hitting a 9-
iron to a foot to set up a
birdie on the stadium
hole packed with nearly
20,000 screaming fans.
Estimated at 179,022,
the third-round crowd
broke the record of


173,210 set last year, also
on a Saturday at fan-
friendly TPC Scottsdale.
The event has drawn
467,030 for the week and is
in position to break the
mark of 538,356 set in 2008.
Mickelson birdied the
final four holes and five of
the last six for a 7-under
64 and a six-stroke lead
over Brandt Snedeker.
The 42-year-old former
Arizona State star has led
after each round, opening
with a 60 and shooting a 65
on Friday He fell a stroke


short of the tour record for
the first 54 holes, and
matched the tournament
mark set by Mark
Calcavecchia in 2001.
Making his 24th appear-
ance in the event that he
won in 1996 and 2005,
Mickelson is trying to
complete his third career
wire-to-wire victory and
first since the 2006 Bell-
South Classic a 13-
stroke blowout the week
before the second of his
three Masters victories.
He also is in position to


match the tournament
record of three victories
set by Arnold Palmer and
matched by Gene Littler
and Calcavecchia.
The left-hander played
the first 12 holes in 2
under, making a 20-foot
birdie putt on the par-4
first and a 25-footer on the
par-4 fifth. He got up and
down from greenside
bunkers for birdies on the
par-5 13th and 15th holes,
followed with the tap-in
on 16, then chipped to 2
feet on the 337-yard 17th.


Super Bowl and


super injuries


After a day of surgery
last week in Jack-
onville, my wife and
I struck up a conversation
with the wife and kids of
new Jacksonville Jaguars
head coach Gus Bradley
What struck both my wife
and me in talk-
ing with her was _
the myriad of in-
juries that occur
during the
Super Bowl that
can easily end (
dreams even V
after the best
possible season. amM
The pressure
generated by Dr. Ron
being a partici- DOCT
pant in the na- ORD
tion's biggest
and most cele-
brated professional sports
championship is immense.
The buzz injury at this
year's Super Bowl is head
injuries, and concussions
in particular. Most impor-
tantly, the greatest ramifi-
cation of concussions is the
risk of permanent brain in-
juries resulting in prema-
ture dementia and bizarre,
life-altering behaviors.
From its beginning, foot-
ball has been a game of ag-
gression, contact and
violent collisions. The hel-
met's origin started with a
leather helmet more than
100 years ago in the 1893
Army-Navy game worn by
Admiral Joseph Mason
Reeves. He had been ad-
vised by a Navy doctor he
would be risking death or
"instant insanity" if he
took another kick to the
head. Wow, we seem to
have come full circle.
Most noteworthy about
football is not only the na-
ture of the contact be-
tween players, but the
immense size of the play-
ers and the speeds at
which they collide. A 250-
pound running back col-
liding with a 325-pound
defensive player, both run-
ning about 4.2-to-5.0-
second 40-yard sprints,
from greater than 1,000 to
almost 2,000 pounds.
The fundamental laws of
physics and the laws of
motion govern tackles,
even if they do not appear
orderly on the football
field. This is reflected in
the 1989 Super Bowl in
which defensive player


r
)


Tim Krumrie of the
Cincinnati Bengals sus-
tained a fractured tibia,
just above the ankle in the
opening few plays.
In spite of the immense
forces necessary to gener-
ate a fracture of this na-
ture, he was
fortunate
enough to have
a rod surgically
implanted in
the tibia and
S went on to play
six more years.
Not to be out-
done in this
Super Bowl,
Joseph Steve Wallace-
OR'S the offensive
ERS tackle for the
opposing 49ers
fractured his
leg a few plays before
Krumrie.
Remember Johnny Uni-
tas, Hall of Fame quarter-
back for the
then-Baltimore Colts, who
in Super Bowl V ab-
sorbed a rib-crushing
tackle that knocked him
out of the game. Unitas,
viewed by many as the
most valuable NFL player
of the league's first 50
years, was traded as a re-
sult of his rib injury, plus
earlier muscle tears in his
arm, essentially bringing
his career to a close.
In 1993, Troy Aikman
sustained a concussion a
week prior in the NFC
Championship game and
still notes he does not re-
member much of the Super
Bowl win a week later
Lin Dawson, the tight
end of the New England
Patriots in Super Bowl
XX, ruptured his Achilles
tendon in the first play
Today is Super Bowl
Sunday, many of us will be
watching a great sporting
event, albeit with different
motives. Some will watch
the game, others will love
the hard-hitting contact.
Still others watch for the
commercials.
Most importantly, it is
America and you can watch
for whatever reason you
want. I'm going to watch to
diagnose the injuries.
Ron Joseph, M.D., a
hand and shoulder ortho-
pedic surgeon atSeaSpine
Orthopedic Institute, may
be reached at rbjhand@
cox.net.


Race for Kids
set for Feb. 9
Covenant Children's Home sec-
ond annual Race for the Kids will be
Saturday, Feb. 9, at Spruce Creek
Preserve, State Road 200, Marion
County.
The 5K race, one-mile walk and
Kids' Fun Run will begin with regis-
tration at 7 a.m., the run starting at
8 a.m. and the walk starting at 8:30.
Pre-registration is $20; day of
race, $25.
Register at www.cchfl.org or
www.drcsports.com. All pre-
registered runners and walkers are
guaranteed a T-shirt and gift bag.
Awards will be presented to the top
finishers in each age group. All par-
ticipants in the Kids Fun Run will re-
ceive a Participation Medallion.
The event helps provide funding
for operation of the Covenant Chil-
dren's Home of Dunnellon, in part-
nership with Kids Central Inc.
For more information, call Dee
Winey at 352-861-4502, or


cbwiney@yahoo.com.
Flotilla offers kayak,
canoe learning program
The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary of
Crystal River will offer a two-day
Paddlesports America program for
kayak and canoe enthusiasts. This
program will help prepare even ex-
perienced kayakers for a safer day
on the water.
The program will be from 7 to
9 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 26, and
Thursday, Feb. 28, at the USCG
Auxiliary Flotilla 15-01 building at
148 N.E. Fifth St., Crystal River.
Cost is $20.
This program addresses the
unique needs of kayakers and ca-
noeists. The two-day safety program
includes a variety of demonstrations,
including handling emergency situa-
tions and paddlecraft equipment,
and several topics:
Know Your Paddlecraft
Before You Get Underway
Operating Your Boat Safely
Legal Requirements of Boating


Recreation BRIEFS

Boating Emergencies
Call Linda to register or for more
information, 352-503-6199.
B.H. shuffleboard
club to meet Feb. 5
The next Beverly Hills Shuffle-
board Club officers' meeting will be at
3 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 5, at the library.
The members' meeting will be at
3 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 14, at the
community building. All members
are asked to dress with some red
and bring a signed Valentine card.
Cakes for the meeting will be do-
nated by Pauline Eafrati and Ken
Wood.
The club is still looking for new
members and some are shuffling
when weather permits. Any person
interested may call Vice President
Sharon Pineda at 352-527-8488.
Adult flag football
to begin in March
The Adult Flag Football League is
for adults age 18 and older, and is a
very fast-paced, physical game. If


you're up for the challenge, Citrus
County Parks & Recreation will be
looking to start up the new league
on/around March 14.
Parks & Rec hopes to increase
the number of teams, so as to ex-
pand competition. To pre-register, or
for more information, call recreation
program specialist Jess Sandino at
352-527-7547.
Men's softball played
Monday in C.R.
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ations Men's Softball League games
are played Mondays at Bicentennial
Park in Crystal River, with games at
6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.
The tentative startup date for the
next season of this sport is March 11.
To pre-register, or for more infor-
mation, call Jess Sandino at 352-
527-7547.
Experience thrill
of co-ed kickball
Kickball is an exciting game that
can be played by people from age
18 and older. It's a great way to


meet new people and get a little ex-
ercise while having fun.
Adult game times will be at 6:30
p.m., 7:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.;
games will last one hour or nine in-
nings, whichever occurs first.
Games are played at Bicentennial
Park in Crystal River. Tentative
startup date is March 13.
For more information, call Jess
Sandino at 352-527-7547.
Beach volleyball
to begin in March
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation's inaugural beach volleyball
season was successful and fun. Ten
teams of four players competed.
The new season will start
on/around March 18. Games are
played beginning at 6:30 p.m. Tues-
days at Bicentennial Park in Crystal
River. The team fees, days and
times are dependent on how many
teams sign up.
You don't need to be a star athlete
to play; this league is geared toward
family fun and exercise.
For more information, call Jess


B2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


/ A C,


,1 J, *I


4w*





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sapp in Hall of Fame


Former Bucs DT

among seven

inductees picked

Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS Bill Parcells
was a winner everywhere he
coached. Time and time again, he
took over struggling franchises and
showed them what it takes to be a
success, including a pair of Super
Bowl titles with the New York Giants.
Parcells pulled off another vic-
tory Saturday- election to the Pro
Football Hall of Fame.
Getting in on his fourth try, Par-
cells led an induction class that also
included mouthy defensive lineman
Warren Sapp, prolific receiver Cris
Carter and a pair of stalwarts from
the trenches, offensive linemen
Jonathan Ogden and Larry Allen.
The class of 2013 also included a
pair of senior selections, Curley
Culp and Dave Robinson. The an-
nouncement was made in New Or-
leans, site of Sunday's Super Bowl.
Almost as noteworthy were the fi-
nalists who didn't get in, including
running back Jerome Bettis and
owners Art Modell and Edward De-
Bartolo Jr. Players and coaches
from the Baltimore Ravens, who
will face the San Francisco 49ers in
the Super Bowl, spent all week lob-
bying for Modell, their former
owner who died last year, to claim a
place in the hall.
It didn't work out, no doubt pleas-
ing fans in Cleveland who remain
bitter about Modell moving the orig-
inal Browns to Baltimore.
Parcells had to wait a while, earn-
ing a bust in Canton on his fourth
try He thought he might get in the
previous year in tandem with one of
his former players, Curtis Martin.
"It was a little less stressful than
last year," Parcells said in a tele-
phone interview from Florida. "I
was kind of hoping we could do it
together, but as fate would have it,
it didn't work out."
Giants president and CEO John
Mara said Parcells' selection for the
hall was "long overdue," but his
candidacy stirred plenty of debate
- a one-hour discussion among the
selection committee members, by


Associated Press
Former Tampa Bay Buccaneers defensive tackle Warren Sapp, seen here in
2006 as a member of the Oakland Raiders, was selected Saturday to the
Pro Football Hall of Fame.


far the longest amount of time ded-
icated to any finalist
"He's one of the best coaches in
NFL history," Mara said. "He turned
our franchise around. We went
through a long period in the 1960's
and 70's when we were a laughing-
stock. When Bill took over in 1983,
he survived a very difficult first year,
but then turned us into a perennial
playoff contender and won two
Super Bowls for us. He coached
three other teams and everywhere
he went, he had great success."
No one was more emotional than
Carter, who took six years to get in de-
spite putting up some of the best re-
ceiving numbers in NFL history. He
broke down in tears but quickly
pointed out "it's not because I'm sad."
"This is the happiest day of my
life," he said. "When people said,
'Aw, you know, it really doesn't mat-
ter, you're a Hall of Famer in my
eyes,' I said, 'It's more important
that I'm a Hall of Famer in the
Hall's eyes.' And I really, really


wanted this. "
Sapp said his stomach was churn-
ing all day
He doesn't have to fret anymore.
Next stop, Canton.
"My feet haven't touched the
ground in about 30 minutes," Sapp
said. "This is unbelievable."
Parcells reversed the fortunes of
four teams, also coaching the New
England Patriots, New York Jets
and Dallas Cowboys, during 19
years as a head coach. He finished
with a record of 172-130-1, most no-
tably leading the Giants to Super
Bowl titles in 1987 and 1991.
Sapp got in on his first year of el-
igibility after playing 13 seasons
with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers
and Oakland Raiders. He amassed
9612 career sacks despite playing on
the interior of the defensive line,
including double-digit sack totals in
four seasons. He was the 1999 NFL
Defensive Player of the Year after
helping Tampa Bay claim its first
division title in 18 years.


Vikings' Peterson double winner


RB takes NFL

MVP, Offensive

Player of the Year

Associated Press


NEW ORLEANS -Adrian Peter-
son called it a blessing in disguise.
Strange way to describe career-
threatening major knee surgery
The Minnesota Vikings' star came
back better than ever, just missing
Eric Dickerson's longstanding rush-
ing record and closing out the sea-
son with two of the top NFL awards
from The Associated Press: Most
Valuable Player and Offensive
Player of the Year
As sort of an added bonus, he
beat Peyton Manning for both of
them Saturday night.
"My career could have easily
been over, just like that," the sensa-
tional running back said. "Oh man.
The things I've been through
throughout my lifetime has made
me mentally tough.
"I'm kind of speechless. This is
amazing," he said in accepting his
awards, along with five others at the
"2nd Annual NFL Honors" show on
CBS saluting the NFEs best players,
performances and plays from the
2012 season. The awards are based


Associated Press
Minnesota Vikings running back
Adrian Peterson won the NFL's MVP
and Offensive Player of the Year
awards Saturday in New Orleans.
on balloting from a nationwide
panel of 50 media members who
regularly cover the NFL.
Manning's own sensational recov-
ery, from four neck surgeries, earned
him Comeback Player honors.
"This injury was unlike any
other," said the only four-time
league MVP "There really was no
bar or standard, there were no
notes to copy We were coming up
with a rehab plan as we went."
Before sitting out 2011, Manning
had never missed a start in his first


13 seasons with Indianapolis. But he
was released by the Colts last winter
because of his neck issues, signed
with Denver and guided the Broncos
to the AFC's best record, 13-3.
"Certainly you have double vari-
ables of coming off injury, not play-
ing for over year and joining a new
team. That certainly added a lot to
my plate, so it was hard to really
know what to expect," Manning said.
"I can't tell you how grateful and
thankful I am. I can't tell you how
happy I am to be playing the game of
football we all love so much."
Also honored were:
-Washington's Robert Griffin III,
who beat out a strong crop of quar-
terbacks for the top offensive rookie
award.
Houston end J.J. Watt, who
took Defensive Player of the Year,
getting 49 of 50 votes.
Bruce Arians, the first interim
coach to win Coach of the Year after
leading Indianapolis to a 9-3 record
while head man Chuck Pagano was
being treated for leukemia. Arians
became Arizona's head coach last
month.
-Carolina linebacker Luke
Kuechly, the league's leader in tack-
les with 164, who won the top de-
fensive rookie award.
Peterson returned better than
ever from the left knee surgery,
rushing for 2,097 yards, 9 short of
breaking Dickerson's record.


Brazil pulls within 2-1 of U.S.


Bryan brothers

upset at

Davis Cup

Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE -
Brazil's doubles team of
Marcelo Melo and Bruno
Soares upset the top-ranked
Mike and Bob Bryan 7-6 (6),
6-7 (7), 64, 3-6, 6-3 and kept
the United States from
clinching the first-round
Davis Cup match.
The Bryan brothers have
been the most successful
doubles duo in Davis Cup
history, with a record 20
wins and only two losses
when playing together. But
Melo and Soares beat the
U.S. duo for the third time
in four meetings overall.
The tone of the match


three chances as the
Brazilians gained momen-
tum and won five consecu-
tive points for the set win.
With neither side able to
break the other's serve, the
second set also went to a
tiebreaker Brazil looked as
if it would jump to a 2-0 set
lead when it had three set-
point opportunities at 6-3.
But this time the Brazil-
ians couldn't convert on any
of their chances and when
Melo and Soares hit consec-
utive shots into the net with
a 7-7 score, the U.S. team
evened the match at one set
Brazil rebounded and
went on to win the third
and fifth sets to record a
win that Soares called, "this
ranks number one for sure.
It's very special."
The Bryans entered the
match with momentum,
having captured their 13th
Grand Slam title two weeks
earlier by winning the
Australian Open.


may have been established
in the first set when the
Bryan brothers held a 5-1
lead in the tiebreaker.
They lost the next couple


points but won the next
point for a 6-3 lead and a
triple-set advantage.
But they failed to con-
vert on any of the next


Lightning struck


down by Rangers


Associated Press

TAMPA Rick Nash
scored a go-ahead goal
early in the third period
and the New York Rangers
beat the Tampa Bay Light-
ning 3-2 on Saturday night.
The Rangers took a 2-1
lead on Nash's second goal
of the season, coming at
3:04 of the third period. He
skated in from the right
wing boards, eluded
Tampa Bay defenseman
Victor Hedman and
jammed the puck past
goalie Mathieu Garon.
Steven Stamkos scored
both goals for the Light-
ning, who went 4-1 on a
five-game homestand. The
center, who cut the deficit
to 3-2 with 21 seconds re-
maining, has seven goals
and 16 points during a sea-
son-opening eight-game
point streak.
Penguins 5,
Devils 1
PITTSBURGH Sidney
Crosby and Chris Kunitz each
had a goal and two assists,
and the Pittsburgh Penguins
picked up their first home vic-
tory of the season, beating
the New Jersey Devils 5-1.
Penguins defenseman
Robert Bortuzzo scored his
first NHL goal, Brandon Sutter
got his first with Pittsburgh
and Kris Letang also found
the back of the net for the
Penguins, who handed the
Devils their first loss in regula-
tion this season.
Marc-Andre Fleury stopped
15 shots for the win, while
Evgeni Malkin and Pascal
Dupuis had two assists apiece.
Canadiens 6,
Sabres 1
MONTREAL Rene
Bourque and David Deshar-
nais each scored twice to lead
Montreal to a win over Buffalo.
Carey Price made 30 saves
for the Canadiens for his fifth
win of the season. Lars Eller
added a goal and two and two assists,
while rookie Brendan Gal-
lagher also scored.
Ryan Miller stopped 17
shots over two periods for
Buffalo before being replaced
in the third by backup Jhonas
Enroth.
Avalanche 3,
Oilers 1
DENVER PA. Par-
enteau and Jamie McGinn
scored goals 3 minutes, 29
seconds apart in the second
period to help Colorado rally
past Edmonton.
Paul Stastny also scored
and Semyon Varlamov made


25 saves for Colorado, which
remained unbeaten in three
home games. Matt Duchene
and McGinn added assists.
Devan Dubnyk stopped 37
shots and Nail Yakupov
scored for the Oilers.
Bruins 1,
Maple Leafs 0
TORONTO Chris
Bourque scored his first goal
with the Bruins and Boston
held on to edge the Toronto
Maple Leafs 1-0.
The Bruins threatened
throughout the tightly played
game, but James Reimer
stopped 33 shots from all an-
gles as Boston came at him
in waves.
The Bruins (6-1-1) limited
the Leafs to 21 shots and
killed off two penalties in the
last nine minutes to hang on
to beat Toronto (4-4).
Flyers 5,
Hurricanes 3
PHILADELPHIA- Claude
Giroux and Danny Briere
each had a goal and an assist
to help the Philadelphia Flyers
beat the Carolina Hurricanes.
Kurtis Foster, Brayden
Coburn and Mike Knuble also
scored for the Flyers, who
won for just the third time in
nine games.
Joni Pitkanen, Eric Staal
and Patrick Dwyer had
Carolina's goals.
Ilya Bryzgalov made sev-
eral tough saves among his
39 stops.
Blue Jackets 4,
Red Wings 2
COLUMBUS, Ohio-
Artem Anisimov scored twice
in the second period, and
Steve Mason stopped 32
shots to lead the Columbus
Blue Jackets past the Detroit
Red Wings 4-2.
Mark Letestu added a
short-handed goal, and
James Wisniewski also
scored for the Blue Jackets
before leaving with an injury
after he struck the end boards
with his back early in the sec-
ond period. Fedor Tyutin had
two assists.
Coyotes 2,
Stars 0
GLENDALE, Ariz. Mike
Smith stopped 17 shots and
the Phoenix Coyotes were at
their tight-checking best in a
2-0 win over the Dallas Stars
Saturday night.
Nick Johnson scored his
third goal of the season and
Mikkel Boedker his second for
the Coyotes, who have points
in four straight games.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning center Dana Tyrell loses control of
the puck in front of New York Rangers goalie Martin Biron
during the second period Saturday in Tampa.
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Associated Press
The United States' Mike Bryan returns at the net during
the fifth set as Brazil's Marcelo Melo covers Saturday
during their Davis Cup doubles match in Jacksonville.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 B3


I m






B4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013



Phoenix Open
Saturday
At TPC Scottsdale, Scottsdale, Ariz.,
Purse: $6.2 million
Yardage: 7,216, Par: 71
Third Round
Phil Mickelson 60-65-64 -189 -;
Brandt Snedeker 64-66-65 -195 -
Padraig Harrington 64-70-63-197 -
Ryan Moore 66-66-65-197 -1
Troy Matteson 67-65-66-198 -1
Brendan Steele 69-65-65-199 -1
Bill Haas 65-64-70 -199 -
Scott Piercy 70-66-64-200 -1
Brendon de Jonge 66-67-67-200 -1
Gary Woodland 67-66-67-200 -1
Roberto Castro 65-68-67-200 -1
Hunter Mahan 67-67-67-201 -
Bryce Molder 67-67-67-201 -
Billy Horschel 69-68-64-201 -1
Ted Potter, Jr. 64-69-68-201 -1
John Rollins 66-66-69-201 -1
Matt Every 65-67-69-201 -1
Robert Garrigus 66-66-69-201 -
Angel Cabrera 66-65-70-201 -
Jeff Klauk 67-68-67-202 -1
Greg Chalmers 68-68-66 -202 -1
Justin Leonard 65-71-66-202 -1
William McGirt 67-66-69-202 -1
Ben Crane 67-71-64-202 -1
Charlie Wi 68-63-71 -202 -1
BrinrmaHarman 70-65-68- 203 -
John Mallinger 65-69-69- 203 -
Ryan Palmer 64-73-66-203 -1
Brian Gay 65-66-72- 203 -
Keegan Bradley 67-63-73 203 -1
NickWatney 65-71-68-204
Charles Howell III 67-68-69 -204
Casey Wittenberg 67-67-70 204
Rory Sabbatini 68-66-70 -204
Cameron Tringale 69-67-69-205
Kevin Stadler 68-68-69-205
Chris Kirk 67-69-69-205
Kevin Chappell 66-68-71 -205
Bubba Watson 67-67-71 205
Jeff Maggert 64-70-71-205
Tim Clark 69-68-68 -205
Lucas Glover 68-70-67-205
Kevin Na 69-64-72-205
David Hearn 67-65-73-205
K.J. Choi 71-67-67-205
Ken Duke 66-69-71 -206
Bo Van Pelt 68-67-71 206
Carl Pettersson 72-65-69-206
Chris Stroud 71-66-69 -206
Bud Cauley 71-67-68 -206
George McNeill 70-68-68 206
David Toms 69-67-71 -207
Boo Weekley 69-66-72 -207
Harris English 67-67-73- 207
Colt Knost 71-65-71 -207
David Mathis 72-65-70-207
James Driscoll 72-66-69 207
Hank Kuehne 65-71-72-208
Martin Flores 65-71-72 -208
Richard H. Lee 68-68-72 -208
Sang-Moon Bae 72-64-72 208
John Merrick 69-69-70 -208
James Hahn 71-67-70 -208
Aaron Baddeley 69-67-73-209
Jimmy Walker 68-69-72-209
Scott Verplank 66-72-71-209
Chad Campbell 73-65-71 209
Russell Henley 69-67-74 210
Jeff Overton 66-69-75 -210
Jason Day 70-68-72 210
Dicky Pride 67-71-73 -211
J.J. Henry 70-68-73-211
Kyle Stanley 67-71-74 -212
YE.Yang 65-73-74-212



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct G
NewYork 30 15 .667 -
Brooklyn 28 19 .596
Boston 23 23 .500 7
Philadelphia 20 26 .435 10
Toronto 17 30 .362 1
Southeast Division
W L Pct G
Miami 29 14 .674 -
Atlanta 26 20 .565 4
Orlando 14 33 .298 1
Charlotte 11 35 .239 19
Washington 11 35 .239 19
Central Division
W L Pct G
Chicago 29 18 .617
Indiana 28 19 .596
Milwaukee 24 21 .533
Detroit 18 29 .383 1
Cleveland 14 34 .292 15
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct G
San Antonio 38 11 .776 -
Memphis 30 16 .652 6
Houston 26 23 .531 1
Dallas 20 27 .426 -
New Orleans 15 33 .313 22
Northwest Division
W L Pct G
Oklahoma City 35 12 .745
Denver 30 18 .625 5
Utah 26 21 .553
Portland 23 23 .500 11
Minnesota 18 26 .409 15
Pacific Division
W L Pct G
L.A. Clippers 34 14 .708
Golden State 29 17 .630
L.A. Lakers 21 26 .447 12
Sacramento 17 32 .347 17
Phoenix 16 31 .340 17
Friday's Games
Toronto 98, L.A. Clippers 73
Indiana 102, Miami 89
Boston 97, Orlando 84
New York 96, Milwaukee 86
Brooklyn 93, Chicago 89
Philadelphia 89, Sacramento 80
Detroit 117, Cleveland 99
Memphis 85, Washington 76
Denver 113, New Orleans 98
Utah 86, Portland 77
Dallas 109, Phoenix 99
LA. Lakers 111, Minnesota 100
Saturday's Games
Chicago 93, Atlanta 76
New York 120, Sacramento 81
Cleveland 115, Oklahoma City 110
Houston 109, Charlotte 95
Minnesota 115, New Orleans 86
San Antonio 96, Washington 86
Milwaukee 107, Orlando 98
Utah at Portland, late
Phoenix at Golden State, late
Sunday's Games


L.A. Clippers at Boston, 1 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Miami at Toronto, 2p.m.
Monday's Games
Orlando at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Washington, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Indiana, 7p.m.
Detroit at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Portland at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Utah, 9 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GC
Pittsburgh 8 5 3 0 10 24 1
N.Y Islanders 7 4 2 1 9 27
NewJersey 7 3 1 3 9 17 1
N.Y Rangers 8 4 4 0 8 19 2
Philadelphia 9 3 6 0 6 21 2


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the record Bucks stomp Magic


/oriaa LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
3-4-1
CASH 3 (late)
7-4-5

PLAY 4 (early)
4-6-0-8
PLAY 4 (late)
8-9-3-8

FANTASY 5
r Lottery 10 -13- 25 26 27

POWERBALL LOTTERY
11-16-33-40-41 1 2- 31-40- 46 52
POWER BALL XTRA
34 4


On the AIRWAVES=


TODAY'S SPORTS
NFL
6:25 p.m. (CBS) Super Bowl XLVII: Baltimore Ravens vs.
San Francisco 49ers
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
2 p.m. (MNT) Georgia at Kentucky
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
2 p.m. (ESPN) Marquette at Louisville
NBA
2 p.m. (SUN) Miami Heat at Toronto Raptors
GOLF
6 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Omega Dubai Desert
Classic, Final Round
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Waste Management Phoenix
Open, Final Round
3 p.m. (NBC) PGATour: Waste Management Phoenix
Open, Final Round
WOMEN'S COLLEGE GYMNASTICS
9:30 a.m. (SUN) Missouri at Florida (Taped)
6 p.m. (ESPN2) Auburn at Florida (Taped)
HOCKEY
12:30 p.m. (NBC) Pittsburgh Penguins at Washington Capitals
3 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida Panthers at Buffalo Sabres
RUGBY
5 p.m. (NBCSPT) Sevens World Series (Same-day Tape)
TENNIS
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Champions Series: Agassi vs. Courier
(Taped)
TRACKAND FIELD
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Track and Field New Balance Indoor Grand
Prix. From Boston. (Taped) (CC)
SKIING
1 p.m. (NBCSPT) VISA International Aerials (Taped)
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) VISA U.S. Grand Prix FS Pipe (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Northeast Division
GP W L OT PtsGF
8 6 1 1 13 24
8 5 2 1 11 24
l 7 5 2 0 10 24
8 4 4 0 8 21
8 3 4 1 7 24
Southeast Division
GP W LOT PtsGF
lay 8 6 2 0 12 39
g 8 3 4 1 7 24
7 3 4 0 6 18
gton 8 2 5 1 5 18
7 2 5 0 4 16
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W LOT PtsGF
8 6 0 2 14 25
8 6 2 0 12 31
8 4 3 1 9 22
us 9 3 5 1 7 18
S 7 22 3 712
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
er 8 4 2 2 10 21
on 8 4 3 1 9 20
ta 8 4 3 1 9 20
0 8 4 4 0 8 19
5 1 3 1 3 14
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF


Baltimore 28, New England 13
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 27
At Honolulu
NFC 62, AFC 35
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 3
At New Orleans
Baltimore vs. San Francisco, 6:30 p.m. (CBS)
Super Bowl Records
INDIVIDUAL RECORDS
SCORING
Most Points, Career-48, Jerry Rice, San Fran-
cisco-Oakland, 4 games.
Most Points, Game 18, Roger Craig, San
Francisco vs. Miami, 1985; Jerry Rice, San Fran-
cisco vs. Denver, 1990 and vs. San Diego, 1995;
Ricky Watters, San Francisco vs. San Diego, 1995;
Terrell Davis, Denver vs. Green Bay, 1998.
MostTouchdowns, Career-8, Jerry Rice, San
Francisco-Oakland, 4 games.
Most Touchdowns, Game 3, Roger Craig,
San Francisco vs. Miami, 1985; Jerry Rice, San
Francisco vs. Denver 1990 and vs. San Diego,
1995; Ricky Watters, San Francisco vs. San Diego,
1995; Terrell Davis, Denver vs. Green Bay, 1998.
Most Points After Touchdown, Career 13
Adam Vinatieri, New England-Indianapolis, (13 at-
tempts, 5 games).
Most Points AfterTouchdown, Game 7, Mike
Cofer, San Francisco vs. Denver, 1990 (8 attempts);
Lin Elliott, Dallas vs. Buffalo, 1993 (7 attempts);
Doug Brien, San Francisco vs. San Diego, 1995 (7
attempts).
Most Field Goals, Career 7, Adam Vinatieri,
New England-Indianapolis, (10 attempts, 5 games).
Most Field Goals, Game 4, Don Chandler,
Green Bay vs. Oakland, 1968; Ray Wersching, San
Francisco vs. Cincinnati, 1982.
Longest Field Goal 54, Steve Christie, Buf-
falo vs. Dallas, 1994.
Most Safeties 1, Dwight White, Pittsburgh vs.
Minnesota, 1975; Reggie Harrison, Pittsburgh vs.
Dallas, 1976; Henry Waechter, Chicago vs. New
England, 1986; George Martin, NewYork vs. Den-
ver, 1987; Bruce Smith, Buffalo vs. NewYork, 1991.
RUSHING
Most Attempts, Career 101, Franco Harris,
Pittsburgh.
Most Attempts, Game 38, John Riggins,
Washington vs. Miami, 1983.
MostYards Gained, Career-354, Franco Har-
ris, Pittsburgh, 4 games.
Most Yards Gained, Game 204, Tim Smith,
Washington vs. Denver, 1988.
Longest Gain -75, Willie Parker, Pittsburgh vs.
Seattle, 2006.
Most Touchdowns, Career- 5, Emmitt Smith,
Dallas, 3 games.
Most Touchdowns, Game 3, Terrell Davis,
Denver vs. Green Bay, 1998.
PASSING
MostAttempts, Career- 197, Tom Brady New
England, 5 games.
Most Attempts, Game 58, Jim Kely, Buffalo
vs. Washington, 1992.
Most Completions, Career 127, Tom Brady,
New England, 5 games.
Most Completions, Game 32, Tom Brady,
New England vs. Carolina, 2004; Drew Brees, New
Orleans vs. Indianapolis, 2010.
Highest Completion Percentage, Career (mini-
mum 40 attempts) 70.0 (56-of-80), Troy Aikman,
Dallas (3 games).
Highest Completion Percentage, Game-88.0,
Phil Simms, NewYork Giants vs. Denver, 1987.
MostYards Gained, Career-1,277, Tom Brady,
New England, 5 games.
MostYards Gained, Game -414, Kurt Warner,
St. Louis vs. Tennessee, 2000.
Most Touchdowns, Career- 11, Joe Montana,
San Francisco, 4 games.
Most Touchdowns, Game 6, Steve Young,
San Francisco vs. San Diego, 1995.
Most Had Intercepted, Career-8, John Elway,
Denver, 5 games.
Most Had Intercepted, Game 5, Rich Gan-
non, Oakland vs.Tampa Bay, 2003.
Longest Completion 85, Jake Delhomme (to
Muhsin Muhammad), Carolina vs. New England,
2004.


Boston
Ottawa
Montrea
Toronto
Buffalo

Tampa B
Winnipeg
Carolina
Washing
Florida


Chicago
St. Louis
Detroit
Columbu
Nashville


Vancouv
Edmonto
Minneso
Colorado
Calgary


San Jose 7 7 0 0 14 29 12
Anaheim 6 4 1 1 9 20 18
Phoenix 9 3 4 2 8 27 26
Dallas 9 3 5 1 7 17 23
LosAngeles 6 2 2 2 6 12 16
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Friday's Games
Dallas 4, Phoenix 3, SO
Vancouver 2, Chicago 1, SO
Washington 3, Philadelphia 2
Carolina 1, Ottawa 0
Tampa Bay 8, Winnipeg 3
Detroit 5, St. Louis 3
Anaheim 3, Minnesota 1
Saturday's Games
Pittsburgh 5, New Jersey 1
Montreal 6, Buffalo 1
Colorado 3, Edmonton 1
Boston 1, Toronto 0
Philadelphia 5, Carolina 3
N.Y. Rangers 3, Tampa Bay 2
Columbus 4, Detroit 2
Phoenix 2, Dallas 0
Chicago at Calgary, late
Los Angeles at Anaheim, late
Nashville at San Jose, late
Today's Games
Pittsburgh at Washington, 12:30 p.m.
Ottawa at Montreal, 2 p.m.
Florida at Buffalo, 3 p.m.
New Jersey at N.Y. Islanders, 3 p.m.
Monday's Games
Carolina at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Minnesota at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Vancouver at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
San Jose at Anaheim, 10 p.m.


NFL playoffs
All Times EST
Wild-card Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 5
Houston 19, Cincinnati 13
Green Bay 24, Minnesota 10
Sunday, Jan. 6
Baltimore 24, Indianapolis 9
Seattle 24, Washington 14
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 12
Baltimore 38, Denver 35, 20T
San Francisco 45, Green Bay 31
Sunday, Jan. 13
Atlanta 30, Seattle 28
New England 41, Houston 28
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 20
San Francisco 28, Atlanta 24


Associated Press

MILWAUKEE --Monta Ellis scored
21 points and Brandon Jennings had
20 as the Milwaukee Bucks handed
the Orlando Magic their ninth straight
loss, 107-98 on Saturday night.
Ellis added 11 assist, and Larry
Sanders had 17 points, 13 rebounds
and six blocked shots for Milwaukee.
Ersan Ilyasova chipped in with 16
points and eight rebounds. Mike Dun-
leavy scored 11 points, hitting all
three of four 3-pointers.
Nikola Vucevic had 20 points, 12 re-
bounds and six assists for Orlando,
and Maurice Harkless had 19 points
and 14 rebounds.
Cavaliers 115, Thunder 110
CLEVELAND Kyrie Irving scored 35
points, including 13 in the final 2:52, and
the Cleveland Cavaliers stunned the Okla-
homa City Thunder 115-110 on Saturday.
One night after saying he was "disinter-
ested" during a loss in Detroit, Irving was
simply spectacular down the stretch. He
single-handedly closed out one of the
NBA's best teams, making his last five
shots and showing why he's an All-Star at
20. Irving's biggest shot was a 3-pointer
with 42 seconds left to make it 113-108.
Kevin Durant scored 32 points and Rus-
sell Westbrook had 28 for the Thunde.
Knicks 120, Kings 81
NEW YORK -Amare Stoudemire was
10 for 10 from the field for 21 points, and
the Knicks unleashed a 38-4 run on Sacra-
mento in the first half and went on to their
fourth straight victory.
The Knicks actually trailed by 10 when
Stoudemire entered in the first quarter,
then went on to challenge the franchise-
record victory margin of 48 points.
DeMarcus Cousins had 25 points and
nine rebounds for the Kings.

Rockets 109, Bobcats 95
HOUSTON James Harden had 21



SUPER BOWL
Continued from Page B1

first since Katrina, and it's clear this city
is back bigger and better than ever"
There's the tale of the head coaching
brothers, Baltimore's John and San
Francisco's Jim, the first siblings to
face off in a Super Bowl. And Ray
Lewis, the pre-eminent linebacker of
his generation on his self-proclaimed
last ride. (His farewell party was some-
what sidetracked for two days this
week when Lewis waved off a report
that he tried to get unusual products
like deer-antler spray to speed his re-
covery from an arm injury that side-
lined him for 10 games.)
The Harbaughs plot about sons of a
lifetime coach who took different paths
to the top of the NFL.
John, older by 15 months, has made his
career standing on the sideline with a



CR
Continued from Page B1


go to state."
The Pirates had six wrestlers qualify
in the consolation round, which deter-
mines third and fourth place. Tristan
Corbett (106) qualified for the regional
level, finishing in fourth place. Corbett
defeated North Marion's Travis Cic-
chella, but lost to Weeki Wachee's Bran-
don Smith.
Michael Allen (120) defeated Pasco's
Brandon Rasmussen, as he was in con-
trol and cruised to a 10-3 victory Kris
Caraballo (126) defeated Brandon
Enoch of Weeki Wachee by a 15-8 score.
Then, the Pirates got three consecu-
tive wins by pin to end their festive day
in grand fashion. Carlos Sanabria got in
early trouble, but recovered and de-
feated Tyler Hoyne of Ocala Trinity
Catholic via pin in the 195-pound class.
"It felt good in my first year to place
at districts," Sanabria said. "I could
have got first or second ... but I



GOLD
Continued from Page B1l

Lecanto rounded out the remainder
of the team standings.
NCT and LO'L are each advancing
10 grapplers to regionals followed by
Citrus (8), Hernando (6), and Central
and Lecanto (5).
Neither of the Citrus County pro-
grams produced a top-of-the-podium
performance.
Hurricanes head coach Jeff Wood
watched his team fizzle, going 0-for-5
in its finals matches and 0-for-3 for
third place in its consolation bouts.
CHS began the day on the wrong
foot when senior Chris Mosher failed
to make weight at 106 (actually 108


pounds, including the tourney's two-
pound allowance).
Instead, Mosher competed at 113,
replacing freshman David Myrick.
After a bye, he folded Hernando
sophomore Bailey Mosher (no rela-
tion) via a 13-4 major decision to reach
the finals.
But top-seeded Eagle sophomore
Michael McDonald of Springstead (41-
3 overall) needed 91 seconds to earn
his second straight district crown.
"I didn't let missing weight destroy
my day," said the 18-year-old Mosher,


points, 11 rebounds and 11 assists for his
first career triple-double, leading the Rock-
ets to the victory.
Bobcats rookie Michael Kidd-Gilchrist
was taken off the court on a stretcher in
the fourth quarter after teammate Jeff Tay-
lor collided with him going for a rebound.
Kidd-Gilchrist was fitted with a neck brace
and taken to the hospital.
Chandler Parsons and Patrick Patterson
scored 24 points apiece for the Rockets.

Bulls 93, Hawks 76
ATLANTA- Luol Deng had 25 points
and 14 rebounds, and the short-handed
Bulls used their stifling defense to shut
down the Hawks.
Taj Gibson had 19 points and a career-
high 19 rebounds. Jimmy Butler added an-
other double-double with 16 points and 10
rebounds. Robinson scored 20 points.
Josh Smith led Atlanta with 19 points
and 13 rebounds but he scored only three
points in the second half.

T'wolves 115, Hornets 86
MINNEAPOLIS Dante Cunningham
scored a season-high 18 points, Nikola
Pekovic added 14 and Minnesota snapped
a six-game losing streak.
Cunningham hit all nine of his shots to
set a franchise record for most consecu-
tive field goals without a miss.
Anthony Davis scored 18 points for the
Hornets.

Spurs 96, Wizards 86
SAN ANTONIO Tim Duncan sprained
his left knee and right ankle in the first half
of the San Antonio Spurs' 96-86 victory
over the Washington Wizards.
Tony Parker scored 19 points, Danny
Green added 15 and Tiago Splitter had 12
for San Antonio (38-11), which has won 18
straight at home.
John Wall scored 21 points and Martell
Webster had 14 for Washington (11-35),
which has lost 13 straight to San Antonio.


headset He's the only head coach to win
playoffgames in his first five seasons; his
quarterback, Joe Flacco, has the same
distinction as he heads into his first
Super Bowl. Jim Harbaugh was a first-
round draft pick and quarterbacked four
teams in 14 pro seasons before going into
coaching. He was an immediate success
at San Diego -the Toreros in the college
Pioneer League, not the Chargers in the
NFL and Stanford before the 49ers
won a bidding war for him in 2011.
This week's family reunion has been
light-hearted, though that figures to
change today
"It's probably a little tougher emo-
tionally," John Harbaugh said of facing
his brother. "It's a little tougher just
from the sense of I don't think you
think about it when you're coaching
against somebody else; it's more about
the scheme and the strategy. There's a
little bit of a relationship element
that's more strong than maybe coach-
ing against someone else."


messed up."
Geo Valdares (220) pinned Bryan
Garcia of North Marion, and Brandon
Martin closed it out with a pin of
Pasco's Josh Burt
"I had to work hard in practice ... and
coach got me ready for this match ...
and I'm looking forward to regionals,"
Valdares said.
Teammate Martin agreed.
"I thought we performed well ... and
glad it is an individual sport," Martin
said afterwards. "I'm proud of going to
regionals ... and hope to get to state."
Crystal River was second in players
behind Pasco (12), and the Pirates had
the most wins by pin with 18; Pasco was
second with 17 victories via pin.
The Pirates were second in total
match victories with 27, as they com-
piled a 27-15 match record. Pasco fin-
ished with 31 match victories and
13 losses.
Anclote- the host- finished fourth
(116.5) in the final standings followed
by North Marion (66), Dunnellon (48.5),
Weeki Wachee (48.5), Trinity Catholic
(32) and Hudson (30).


who dipped to 31-13. "I disappointed
myself by not making weight. I'm at
113 now and I've got to fight my way
back to states."
Besides Mosher, Citrus' regional
qualifiers included second-place fin-
ishers: seniors Jacob Nolen at 145 and
Nick Fernandez at 195, juniors Casey
Bearden at 170 and Brandon Taylor at
182; and fourth-place finishers: senior
Dalton Tinsley at 132, and juniors
Tarique Cabanas at 138 and Bradley
Wisenauer at 220.
"The good news was we had eight
kids placing," Wood said. "The bad
news was we didn't have anyone fin-
ish first or third. No one did anything
perfect today; we all had some mo-
ments. We have to understand region-
als aren't going to be any easier"
Lecanto captured 10-of-33 matches,


featuring five pins.
Last winter, four Panthers advanced
to regionals.
This time, LHS will be represented
in Osceola County by a trio of third-
place finishers: sophomore Joel Pel-
ton at 132, senior Brian Scorria at 138
and junior Jonah Nightengale at 195
and two fourth-place finishers: jun-
iors Jon Fillinger at 126 and De'Andre
Horton at 170.
Fillinger, Pelton, Scorria, Horton
and Nightengale each won two bouts.


SCOREBOARD


I -





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No. 4 UF stymies No. 16 Ole Miss


No. 3 Indiana

knocks off

No. 1 Michigan

Press

GAINESVILLE Erik Mur-
phy scored 19 points and was in-
strumental on the defensive end,
helping No. 4 Florida beat 16th-
ranked Mississippi 78-64 on
Saturday night
Murphy made 7 of 8 shots, in-
cluding 5 of 6 from 3-point range,
and added six rebounds and
four assists. Defensively, he took
a charge, had a block and al-
tered several shots in the paint.
Pat Young added 13 points and
12 rebounds for the Gators (18-2,
8-0 SEC), who won their 10th
consecutive game. Mike Rosario
(14 points) and Scottie Wilbekin
(13) also reached double figures.
Kenny Boynton had nine
points and 10 assists, just shy of
his first double-double.
Marshall Henderson, the
Southeastern Conference's
leading scorer, led the Rebels
(17-4, 6-2) with 25 points on 8-of-
15 shooting. Henderson was 7 of
11 from behind the arc, hitting
several shots with defenders in
his face.
No. 3 Indiana 81,
No. 1 Michigan 73
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -Cody
Zeller scored 19 points and Victor
Oladipo had 15, leading No. 3 Indi-
ana to an 81-73 victory over No. 1
Michigan.
It's the third time in school history
the Hoosiers (20-2, 8-1 Big Ten)
have beaten the No. 1 team at
home, and it's the first time they've
done it in back-to-back seasons.
The win gives Indiana sole posses-
sion of the Big Ten lead and likely
the No. 1 ranking it held for the first
seven weeks this season when the
new poll comes out Monday.
The Wolverines (20-2, 7-2) were
led by Trey Burke with 25 points and
Tim Hardaway Jr. with 18, but they
couldn't extend their four-game win-
ning streak.
No. 5 Duke 79, FSU 60
TALLAHASSEE Seth Curry
scored 21 points, Quinn Cook added
18 and Duke cruised past defending
Atlantic Coast Conference champion
Florida State.
The Blue Devils (19-2, 6-2 ACC)
scored the game's first 11 points,
raced to an 18-2 lead and never
looked back, building a 26-point ad-
vantage on the way to a 42-22 cush-
ion at halftime. Curry, who had 13
points at the break, was 7 of 11 from
the field and 5 of 7 from behind the
arc. Cook was 4 of 6 from long range.
Aaron Thomas led the Seminoles
(12-9, 4-4) with 14 points.
No. 14 Miami 79,
No. 19 N.C. State 78
RALEIGH, N.C. Reggie John-
son tipped in a missed shot with 0.8
seconds left to lift Miami over North
Carolina State.
Johnson's left-handed tip in traffic
off a miss by Shane Larkin capped a
back-and-forth second half and kept
the Hurricanes (17-3, 8-0 Atlantic
Coast Conference) unbeaten in ACC
play. Johnson finished with 15 points.
Durand Scott led Miami with 18
points and Julian Gamble added 16
to help the Hurricanes win their ninth
straight game.
C.J. Leslie had 18 points and 12
rebounds to lead the Wolfpack (16-
6, 5-4).
Oklahoma State 85,
No. 2 Kansas 80
LAWRENCE, Kan. Markel
Brown scored 28 points, Marcus
Smart added 25 and Oklahoma


Associated Press
Florida forward Erik Murphy shoots a three-pointer as Mississippi
guard Marshall Henderson defends during the first half Saturday in
Gainesville. No. 4 Florida easily dispatched No. 16 Ole Miss 78-64.


State held on to upset No. 2 Kansas
85-80, ending the Jayhawks' nation-
leading 18-game winning streak.
Smart had a pair of key putbacks
in the closing minutes, helping the
Cowboys (15-5, 5-3 Big 12) go on a
13-2 run that turned a 66-62 deficit
into a 73-68 lead with just over a
minute left.
The Jayhawks (19-2, 7-1) took
advantage of a couple missed free
throws, trimming Oklahoma State's
lead to 81-80 on a layup by Elijah
Johnson with 18.8 seconds left.
Ben McLemore had 23 points to
lead the Jayhawks.
Pittsburgh 65,
No. 6 Syracuse 55
PITTSBURGH Tray Woodall
had 13 points, four assists and three
steals as Pittsburgh continued its
mastery of top 10 teams at home by
pulling away from Syracuse.
Trey Zeigler added six points, four
rebounds and four assists off the
bench for the Panthers (18-5, 6-4
Big East).
C.J. Fair led Syracuse (18-3, 6-2)
with 20 points and Brandon Triche
scored 14 but the Orange never led
in the second half while losing two
straight games for the first time in
nearly two years.
No. 9 Butler 75,
Rhode Island 68
INDIANAPOLIS Rotnei Clarke
scored 23 points and Roosevelt
Jones added 18 to lead Butler past
Rhode Island.
Clarke scored 12 points in the first
11 minutes of the second half. The
Bulldogs (18-4, 5-2 Atlantic 10)
trailed 32-30 at the break, then went
on a 15-3 run.
Nikola Malesevic led Rhode Is-
land (6-14, 1-6) with 18 points in the
Rams' fourth straight loss.
California 58,
No. 10 Oregon 54
BERKELEY, Calif. Justin Cobbs
made an 18-foot jumper with 1:35 re-
maining and then added a pair of
free throws as California hung on to
hand Oregon its second straight loss
to an unranked team this week.
Allen Crabbe and Richard


Solomon scored 13 points apiece,
and Tyrone Wallace added 12 while
helping the Golden Bears (13-8, 5-4
Pac-12) win back-to-back games for
the first time since December.
Tony Woods had 14 points and
eight rebounds for Oregon (18-4, 7-2).
No. 11 Ohio State 63,
Nebraska 56
LINCOLN, Neb. Lenzelle Smith
Jr. had 21 points and No. 11 Ohio
State held off a late Nebraska surge
for a 63-56 victory.
Ohio State (17-4, 7-2 Big Ten) led
53-38 after a pair of free throws by
Aaron Craft with 9:05 left. Nebraska
(11-12, 2-8) then made its come-
back, outscoring the Buckeyes 15-5
and cutting the lead to 58-53 on
David Rivers' free throws with 2:40
remaining.
Following an Ohio State miss, Ne-
braska's Brandon Ubel and Andre
Almeida each missed shots at the
rim and Ubel missed a 3-point at-
tempt. Craft hit a pair of free throws
with 56 seconds left to put the Buck-
eyes up seven.
Northern Iowa 57,
No. 15 Wichita St. 52
CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -Anthony
James scored 16 points and North-
ern Iowa beat Wichita State, sending
the Shockers to their first losing
streak of the season.
Seth Tuttle had eight points, eight
rebounds and four blocks for the
Panthers (12-11, 5-6 Missouri Val-
ley Conference). They took control
with a 14-0 run in the second half
and became the fourth Valley team
in the last 23 games to beat Wichita
State at home.
The Shockers (19-4, 8-3) pulled to
52-50 on Carl Hall's steal and
bucket with 1:18 left, but Tuttle
blocked Nick Wiggins' try that would
have tied it and then sealed the win
with a breakaway dunk.
No. 17 Missouri 91,
Auburn 77
COLUMBIA, Mo. Keion Bell
scored 24 points and Earnest Ross
added 23, both season highs, as
Missouri used another strong sec-
ond half to beat Auburn.


Ross hit five 3-pointers off the
bench in his first game against his
former team. The 6-foot-5, 222-
pound guard played two seasons at
Auburn, leading the team with 13.1
points and 6.6 rebounds per game.
The teams combined for 49 fouls
and 69 free throws but the sluggish
pace didn't seem to affect Missouri
(16-5, 5-3 SEC).
Frankie Sullivan led Auburn (8-13,
2-6) with 12 points.
No. 18 Kansas St. 52,
Oklahoma St. 50
NORMAN, Okla. -Angel Ro-
driguez hit two free throws with 5.6
seconds remaining to give No. 18
Kansas State a 52-50 victory over
Oklahoma.
The free throws ended an 8-0 run
by the Sooners in the final two min-
utes that tied the game with 13 sec-
onds to play.
Will Spradling led the Wildcats
(17-4, 6-2) with 12 points.
Osby had 13 points and seven re-
bounds for the Sooners (14-6, 5-3).
No. 20 New Mexico 75,
Nevada 62
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. Chad
Adams hit two 3-pointers during a
key second-half run to spur No. 20
New Mexico to a 75-62 victory over
Nevada.
With the Lobos (19-3, 6-1 Moun-
tain West) trailing 51-50, Adams
started a 10-2 surge and then
capped it as New Mexico went
ahead to stay at 60-53.
Hugh Greenwood led New Mex-
ico with 15 points, while Malik Story
had 20 for the Wolf Pack (11-10, 2-
5). Nevada's Deonte Burton, who
came into the game leading the con-
ference in scoring at 18.5 per game,
finished with 13 points, 11 of those in
the second half.
The teams combined to go 21 for
47 from behind the arc. The differ-
ence for the Lobos, however, was
the bench play as Adams scored 10
and Demetrius Walker 12 to own a
32-6 advantage.
No. 21 Creighton 75,
Bradley 58
OMAHA, Neb. Doug McDer-
mott scored 25 points, including
nine during a decisive 12-0 run,
and Creighton overcame poor 3-
point shooting in the first half to de-
feat Bradley.
The Bluejays (20-3, 9-2 Missouri
Valley Conference) beat Bradley for
the 15th straight time at home and
have won 20 games for the 14th
time in 15 seasons.
Dyricus Simms-Edwards had 18
points for the Braves (13-10, 5-6).
Air Force 70,
No. 22 S. Diego St. 67
AIR FORCE ACADEMY, Colo. -
Michael Lyons scored 20 points and
Air Force beat San Diego State,
overcoming a 25-point performance
by Aztecs star Jamaal Franklin.
Franklin and James Rahon
missed potential game-tying 3-point-
ers in the waning seconds.
The Falcons (14-6, 5-2 Mountain
West Conference) won their fifth
straight at Clune Arena, while the
Aztecs (16-5, 4-3) lost for only the
second time in their last 10 games
against Air Force.
No. 24 Cincinnati 65,
Seton Hall 59
NEWARK, N.J. Sean Kilpatrick
scored 21 points, Cashmere Wright
added 17 and Cincinnati held off
Seton Hall after blowing nearly all of
a 20-point lead.
Cincinnati (18-4, 6-3 Big East) was
up 48-28 just 5 minutes into the sec-
ond half but twice allowed the Pirates
(13-9, 2-7) to get within four. The
Bearcats, who entered 14th in the
15-team conference in free throw
shooting at 64.9 percent, finished 21
of 27 (77.8 percent) from the line,
making eight of their last nine.


Top 3 women's teams in nation cruise


Associated Press

STILLWATER, Okla. Brit-
tney Griner had 30 points, 10 re-
bounds and a career-high seven
assists to lead top-ranked Baylor
to its 19th straight win Saturday
night, 81-62 over No. 19 Okla-
homa State.
The Lady Bears (20-1, 10-0 Big
12) took control with an 18-2 run
immediately after coach Kim
Mulkey called timeout and put
her five starters back on the
floor with 10:03 remaining, just
after Liz Donohoe's scoop shot
put Oklahoma State (15-5, 4-5)
up 21-16.
Griner had three baskets and
also assisted on a 3-pointer by
Jordan Madden and a Kimetria
Hayden's layup during the
stretch, which featured two shot-
clock violations by the Cowgirls.


No. 2 Notre Dame 64,
Cincinnati 42
SOUTH BEND, Ind. Kayla
McBride scored 17 of her 19 points
in the first half and No. 2 Notre
Dame jumped out to an early 23-
point lead to beat Cincinnati 64-42
for its 15th straight victory.
The winning streak matches the
fourth-longest in school history, also
accomplished in 2009-10 and 1990-
91. The victory also was the 699th in
31 seasons for coach Muffet Mc-
Graw, 26 coaching Notre Dame (20-
1, 8-0 Big East).
Cincinnati (8-13, 0-8) fell to 0-9
all-time against the Fighting Irish.
No. 3 Connecticut 71,
St. John's 65
NEW YORK Kaleena
Mosqueda-Lewis scored 19 points
and Kelly Faris added 17 to help


lead Connecticut to a win over St.
John's.
The Huskies (20-1, 7-1 Big East)
had to work for the entire game to
earn this one. With the game tied
at 57, Mosqueda-Lewis took over,
scoring UConn's next seven
points. She had a three-point play
and then hit four free throws to
give UConn a 64-59 lead with
1:55 left.
Shenneika Smith led St. John's
(10-10, 4-4) with 21 points.
No. 12 Louisville 74,
Georgetown 60
LOUISVILLE, Ky.- Antonita
Slaughter scored 22 points and
Louisville held Georgetown's Sugar
Rodgers to only six points in a win
over the Hoyas.
Rodgers, the nation's second-lead-
ing scorer at 23.7 points per game,
made just 2 of 17 shots and missed


all seven of her 3-point attempts.
Slaughter scored 14 first-half
points, then began the second with a
3-pointer to give the Cardinals (19-4,
7-2) a 36-29 lead en route to their
fifth consecutive win.
Katie McCormick led the Hoyas
(13-9, 4-5) with 21 points, 18 in the
second half.
No. 23 Iowa St. 67,
Texas Tech 52
AMES, Iowa Chelsea Poppens
had 18 points and nine rebounds
to help Iowa State rally past Texas
Tech.
Hallie Christofferson added 15
points, 10 rebounds and four blocks
for the Cyclones (15-5, 6-4 Big 12),
who trailed 20-12 just past the mid-
way point of the first half.
Chynna Brown led the Red
Raiders (16-6, 6-4) with 18 points
and eight rebounds.


BASKETBALL


Top 10 Fared
Saturday
1. Baylor (20-1) beat No. 19 Oklahoma State
81-62. Next: vs. Kansas, Wednesday
2. Notre Dame (20-1) beat Cincinnati 64-42.
Next: at Villanova, Tuesday.
3. UConn (20-1) beat St. John's 71-65. Next:
vs. Marquette, Tuesday.
4. Stanford (19-2) did not play. Next: at Ore-
gon State, Sunday
5. Duke (19-1) did not play. Next: at No. 11
North Carolina, Sunday
6. California (18-2) did not play. Next: at Ore-
gon, Sunday.
7. Penn State (17-3) did not play Next: vs.
No. 14 Purdue, Monday.
8. Kentucky (19-2) did not play Next: vs. No.
13 Georgia, Sunday.
9. Tennessee (17-4) did not play. Next: at Mis-
souri, Sunday
10. Maryland (17-3) did not play. Next: vs.
Boston College, Sunday.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 B5

Saturday's
College Basketball
Men's Scores
EAST
Albany (NY) 79, Binghamton 46
American U. 68, Lafayette 64
Boston College 75, Clemson 68
Bryant 77, Monmouth (NJ) 62
Bucknell 69, Navy 54
CCSU 80, Fairleigh Dickinson 71
Canisius 77, lona 74
Cincinnati 65, Seton Hall 59
Colgate 63, Holy Cross 45
Cornell 71, Penn 69
Dartmouth 71, Yale 62
Delaware 71, UNC Wilmington 56
Georgetown 68, St. John's 56
Hartford 66, Boston U. 58
Harvard 89, Brown 82, 20T
La Salle 80, George Washington 71
Loyola (Md.) 89, Niagara 87, 20T
Mount St. Mary's 91, Sacred Heart 82
Northeastern 59, Drexel 52
Pittsburgh 65, Syracuse 55
Princeton 72, Columbia 66
Quinnipiac 74, Wagner 69
Robert Morris 60, LIU Brooklyn 57
Saint Joseph's 70, Temple 69
St. Bonaventure 68, Duquesne 60
St. Francis (Pa.) 64, St. Francis (NY) 61
Stony Brook 56, New Hampshire 54
UMBC 68, Maine 67
SOUTH
Alabama 58, Vanderbilt 54
Alabama A&M 65, MVSU 64
Appalachian St. 74, W. Carolina 65
Ark.-Pine Bluff 81, Alabama St. 77
Belmont 74, Tennessee Tech 52
Bethune-Cookman 67, Florida A&M 65, OT
Charlotte 66, UMass 65
Coastal Carolina 62, Radford 52
Coll. of Charleston 81, UNC Greensboro 59
Davidson 68, Wofford 57
Duke 79, Florida St. 60
ETSU 90, Lipscomb 88, OT
Elon 77, Samford 66
FlU 76, Louisiana-Monroe 73
Florida 78, Mississippi 64
Florida Gulf Coast 81, Jacksonville 78
Gardner-Webb 76, Longwood 65
George Mason 74, James Madison 63
Georgia 67, South Carolina 56
Georgia Southern 59, Chattanooga 57
Georgia St. 83, Old Dominion 63
Hampton 64, Morgan St. 62
High Point 78, Presbyterian 68
Jackson St. 84, Alcorn St. 71
Jacksonville St. 70, Morehead St. 59
LSU 69, Mississippi St. 68
Louisiana Tech 64, Texas-Arlington 51
Marshall 75, UCF 71
Maryland 86, Wake Forest 60
Memphis 94, Tulsa 64
Miami 79, NC State 78
Middle Tennessee 73, FAU 56
Murray St. 75, Austin Peay 68, OT
N. Kentucky 70, SC-Upstate 65
NC A&T 46, Md.-Eastern Shore 44
NC Central 54, Delaware St. 43
Norfolk St. 80, Coppin St. 70
North Carolina 72, Virginia Tech 60, OT
North Florida 64, Stetson 59
Richmond 73, Xavier 71
Savannah St. 52, Howard 42
Southern Miss. 79, UAB 75
Southern U. 59, Grambling St. 31
The Citadel 84, Furman 79
Troy 71, Louisiana-Lafayette 52
UNC Asheville 78, Campbell 61
VCU 81, Fordham 65
William & Mary 72, Hofstra 59
Winthrop 66, Liberty 56
MIDWEST
Akron 86, Ohio 72
Bowling Green 70, Ball St. 59
Butler 75, Rhode Island 68
Cleveland St. 77, Ill.-Chicago 66
Creighton 75, Bradley 58
Drake 74, Indiana St. 71, OT
E. Kentucky 81, SE Missouri 72
Green Bay 73, Loyola of Chicago 65
Illinois St. 83, S. Illinois 47
Iowa St. 79, Baylor 71
Kent St. 77, E. Michigan 62
Miami (Ohio) 70, Cent. Michigan 61
Missouri 91, Auburn 77
Missouri St. 62, Evansville 61
N. Dakota St. 65, South Dakota 46
N. Iowa 57, Wichita St. 52
North Dakota 69, Idaho St. 52
Northwestern 75, Purdue 60
Notre Dame 79, DePaul 71, OT
Oakland 96, Nebraska-Omaha 81
Ohio St. 63, Nebraska 56
Oklahoma St. 85, Kansas 80
S. Dakota St. 88, UMKC 57
SIU-Edwardsville 49, E. Illinois 45
Saint Louis 81, Dayton 52
Toledo 69, N. Illinois 64
W. Illinois 68, IUPUI 59
W. Michigan 71, Buffalo 60
SOUTHWEST
Arkansas 73, Tennessee 60
Arkansas St. 75, North Texas 66, OT
Cent. Arkansas 79, Nicholls St. 76
Denver 79, Texas St.64
East Carolina 79, Rice 63
Houston 84, SMU 80, OT
Houston Baptist 66, NJIT 57
Kansas St. 52, Oklahoma 50
Kentucky 72, Texas A&M 68, OT
New Mexico St. 75, UTSA 62
Oral Roberts 65, SE Louisiana 59
Sam Houston St. 55, Texas A&M-CC 51
South Alabama 70, UALR 66
Stephen F Austin 65, Lamar 51
Texas 60, TCU 43
Texas Southern 84, Prairie View 48
Texas-Pan American 68, Chicago St. 65
UTEP 62, Tulane 50
West Virginia 77, Texas Tech 61
FAR WEST
Air Force 70, San Diego St. 67
California 58, Oregon 54
Colorado St. 65, Wyoming 46
Long Beach St. 50, Cal Poly 48
Montana 65, E. Washington 46
New Mexico 75, Nevada 62
S. Utah 78, N.Arizona 67
Saint Mary's (Cal) 77, Portland 42
San Francisco 86, Pepperdine 78
Utah 58, Colorado 55
Weber St. 85, N. Colorado 64
Women's












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Actress


wins three


honors at


NAACP


awards

Washington takes

home best actress,

supporting actress,

President's trophy

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Kerry
Washington was a triple threat
at the NAACP Image Awards.
The star of ABC's "Scandal"
picked up a trio of trophies at
the 44th annual ceremony:
outstanding actress in a drama
series for "Scandal," support-
ing actress in a motion picture
for "Django Unchained" and
the President's Award, which
is given in recognition of spe-
cial achievement and excep-
tional public service.
"This award does not belong
to me," said Washington, who
plays a slave separated from
her husband in "Django Un-
chained," as she picked up her
first trophy of the evening for
her role in the film directed by
Quentin Tarantino. "It belongs
to our ancestors. We shot this
film on a slave plantation, and
they were with us along every
step of the way"
Washington, who plays crisis
management consultant Olivia
Pope on "Scandal," serves on
President Barack Obama's
Committee on the Arts and the
Humanities.
Don Cheadle was awarded
the outstanding actor in a com-
edy series trophy for his role
as a management consultant
in Showtime's "House of Lies."
"This doesn't belong just to
me, but I am taking it home
tonight," Cheadle said jokingly
A few winners weren't pres-
ent at the Shrine Auditorium
to pick up their trophies, in-
cluding Denzel Washington for
outstanding actor in a motion
picture for "Flight," Viola
Davis for outstanding actress
in a motion picture for "Won't
Back Down" and Omar Epps
for supporting actor in a drama
series for Fox's "House."
"Red Tails," the drama
about the Tuskegee Airmen,
was honored as outstanding
motion picture.
"Look! I beat Quentin
Tarantino," beamed "Red
Tails" executive producer
George Lucas as he accepted
the award.


Associated Press
Kerry Washington accepts the
President's award at the 44th
annual NAACP Image Awards
Friday at the Shrine Auditorium
in Los Angeles.


Associated Press
The cast of "30 Rock" celebrates its last episode at the wrap party Dec. 20 in New York. From
left are Jane Krakowski, Judah Friedlander, Tina Fey, Scott Adsit and Jack McBrayer.



Post-'30 Rock' world


Outlook grim

for future

sitcoms

JAKE COYLE
AP entertainment writer

NEW YORK The void
you're looking at on your DVR
is the sitcom landscape
post-"30 Rock."
When Tina Fey's bright,
bouncy, irreverent showbiz
send-up aired its last episode
Thursday night, a light
(Kenneth's toothy grin?) went
out in broadcast television.
"30 Rock" was not perfect:
It sometimes spun its wheels
and its writing was often too
showy. But "30 Rock" was the
clear sitcom heir to "Sein-
feld," pushing comedy for-
ward by fusing the
relationship set-up of "The
Mary Tyler Moore Show" with
the flashback jump-cutting of
the single-camera "Arrested
Development." Its snappy,
joke-packed universe was
tightly controlled and capable
of going anywhere a fiction
funhouse version of Fey's
"Weekend Update" social
satire. Oh, and it had Alec
Baldwin.
With "30 Rock" leaving the
air, the sitcom again finds it-
self at a crossroads. Though


acclaimed and award-
winning, "30 Rock" was never
highly rated. Sitcom fans and
creators alike can reasonably
wonder if such a show as "30
Rock" had trouble finding
viewers, what chance do
other quality sitcoms have?
The end of "30 Rock" her-
alds a sitcom shift, particu-
larly in NBC's long-running
Thursday night block a
grand tradition that includes
"Cheers," "The Cosby Show"
and "Seinfeld." "Park and
Recreation" and "Commu-
nity" have cloudy futures, and
the long-running "The Office"
will finally end soon. Else-
where, CBS's "How I Met
Your Mother," a studio audi-
ence vestige, is preparing its
final season.
But actually quite a lot of
broadcast sitcoms are run-
ning now, including "The Big
Bang Theory," "Whitney,"
"Happy Endings," "2 Broke
Girls," "The Mindy Project"
and the recently premiered
and somewhat promising
White House farce "1600
Penn."
Whatever the value of the
shows, it's a great time for in-
dividual comedic perform-
ances: Rainn Wilson on "The
Office"; Julia-Louis Dreyfus
on "Veep"; Chris Pratt on
"Parks"; Neil Patrick Harris
on "How I Met Your Mother";
Julie Bowen on "Modern
Family."


The flight to cable hasn't
been as pronounced in sit-
coms as it has been in
hourlong dramas, but the
trend is going that way On
cable, niche sitcoms like "It's
Always Sunny in Philadel-
phia," "The League" and
"Archer" have pushed the
boundaries of taste, reveling
in their freedom.
But there are only two
must-watch comedies on TV
now that "30 Rock" is over
Both are on cable and both
draw more from independent
film than from sitcom history:
Louis C.K.'s "Louie" (cur-
rently on hiatus for FX) and
Lena Dunham's "Girls" on
HBO (maybe you've heard a
thing or two about it).
"30 Rock" always skewered
its own small stature at NBC
and it went out that way, too.
In the finale, Fey's Liz Lemon
pitches the newly minted
NBC president Kenneth Par-
cell (Jack McBrayer) a show
exactly like "30 Rock." He has
no interest, though, in a show
about "an angry New York
crankypants."
The episode ends with a vi-
sion of a future with flying
cars where a network execu-
tive (an age-defying Kenneth)
happily bankrolls a show such
as "30 Rock" from Lemon's
great-granddaughter
If that's what it will take for
a successor to "30 Rock," we
better start making cars fly.


Women's TV marathon


Super Bowlprogramming shows ID's irreverence


DAVID BAUDER
AP television writer

NEW YORK Men might
want to take note if their loved
one turns to the Investigation
Discovery network Sunday for
Super Bowl counterprogram-
ming, where a marathon of
"Wives With Knives" episodes
will run during the game.
It is a typically colorful pro-
gramming choice by a young net-
work that has grown quickly
because of them.
Five years into its life, the net-
work devoted to true crime and
mystery stories has attracted
new fans so rapidly its chief ex-
ecutive, Henry Schleiff, boldly
predicts it will be the top-rated
cable TV network within three
or four years.
The five "Wives With Knives"
episodes tell stories of five dif-
ferent women who stabbed their
husbands or boyfriends, some-
times killing them, sometimes
not. The women are all inter-
viewed by criminologist Casey


Birthday You might find yourself far more restless
in the year ahead than you've been in the past, which
in most cases should work to your advantage.
Sometimes, however, it could cause you to be
inconsistent.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Don't kid yourself
about certain goals you'd like to achieve. If you do,
there's a good chance you'll establish some targets
beyond your abilities.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) The one thing you def-
initely don't want to be is your own worst enemy.
When your better judgment tells you not to do
something, you darn well better take heed.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -Avoid putting yourself in
an uncomfortable position of being obligated to an-
other. You could easily buckle under the pressure and
agree to do something that's counterproductive
for you.


Jordan.
Judging by the titles of ID's
programs, the free-wheeling
meetings where titles are pro-
posed would make a fascinating
program itself. Schleiff claims
credit or blame for "Wives
With Knives."
ID's audience is 61 percent
women, perhaps counterintu-
itive given the nature of its pro-
gramming. But many women are
big fans of mystery and suspense
novels, Schleiff said.
Investigation Discovery began
life five years ago this week,
after parent Discovery
Communications bought out the
stake of the then-Discovery
Times network it shared with
The New York Times. That net-
work averaged some 80,000
viewers at any point during the
day, according to the Nielsen
company Since its relaunch, ID
has grown viewers each month
to the point where it averaged
669,000 viewers in January,
Nielsen said. In 55 million
homes five years ago, it will be


Today's HOROSCOPE =
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Be extremely careful not
to make a promise you won't want to keep, such as
agreeing to share with a friend some rewards that you
have coming to you.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) You need to be selec-
tive about who you ask to help you complete a critical
task. Avoid anybody who has a tendency of telling
everybody else what to do and when.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Your ability to judge
character is a bit iffy at present. If you're not careful,
you could easily make yourself vulnerable by placing
your faith in someone who doesn't warrant it.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) If you hope to maintain har-
mony on the home front, both you and your mate
must be prepared to make some painful concessions.
Sacrifice mustn't be one-sided.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -You're the type of person
who often goes out of your way to be helpful or of


in 85 million by the end of
March.
With its female, primarily
older audience, Investigation
Discovery has done a good job
reaching a group of people who
watches TV heavily, said Brad
Adgate, an analyst for Horizon
Media. It reaches for reality-
based programming the same
type of people interested in
CBS' prime-time shows, he said.
It has the chance to become
one of Discovery Communica-
tions' most profitable networks,
Adgate said. He believes the
prediction of the network being
No. 1 in cable over the next few
years is too optimistic, though.
ID scores high in Nielsen's
measurement of "length of view-
ing," an obscure statistic adver-
tisers love: it means the
network's viewers tend to hang
around longer than they do at
other places. It also indicates
the network has an attractive
identity in itself, that viewers
are tuning in more to ID than to
specific shows.


service to another. However, today you might reverse
that and select pals for what they can do for you.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) If you're not budget- con-
scious, you fail to manage your resources as wisely
as you should. Avoid spending money that you know
you'll need later.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Be careful not to treat
subordinates in an arrogant manner. If you do, it'll
make them eager to even the score, and they'll find a
way to do so as soon as possible.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) To your credit,
you're usually tolerant of anybody who isn't in accord
with your thinking. Today, however, you might have to
be even more understanding than usual.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Don't let yourself be
pressured by friends into making a commitment or
doing something you really can't afford. If you do,
you'll end up being angry with everyone involved.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1
Mega Money: 4 15 26 40
Mega Ball: 21
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 9 $808.50
3-of-4 MB 44 $362.50
3-of-4 969 $49
2-of-4 MB 1,218 $27
1-of-4 MB 11,291 $2.50
2-of-4 27,452 $2
Fantasy 5:1 9 15 32 35
5-of-5 1 winner $244,020.22
4-of-5 295 $133
3-of-5 8,987 $12
THURSDAY, JANUARY 31
Fantasy 5:3 15 16 29 33
5-of-5 2 winners $105,631.70
4-of-5 279 $122
3-of-5 8,355 $11

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Feb. 3, the
34th day of 2013. There are 331
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Feb. 3, 1913, the 16th
Amendment to the U.S.
Constitution, providing for a
federal income tax, was ratified.
On this date:
In 1783, Spain formally recog-
nized American independence.
In 1865, President Abraham
Lincoln and Confederate Vice
President Alexander H. Stephens
held a shipboard peace confer-
ence off the Virginia coast; the
talks deadlocked over the issue of
Southern autonomy.
In 1924, the 28th president of
the United States, Woodrow Wil-
son, died in Washington, D.C., at
age 67.
In 1930, the chief justice of the
United States, William Howard
Taft, resigned for health reasons.
(He died just over a month later.)
In 1943, during World War II,
the U.S. transport ship Dorch-
ester, which was carrying troops
to Greenland, sank after being hit
by a German torpedo; of the more
than 900 men aboard, only some
230 survived.
In 1953, the Batepa Massacre
took place in Sao Tome as Por-
tuguese troops killed some 1,000
striking plantation workers.
In 1959, rock-and-roll stars
Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and
J.P. "The Big Bopper" Richardson
died in a small plane crash near
Clear Lake, Iowa.
An American Airlines Lock-
heed Electra crashed into New
York's East River, killing 65 of the
73 people on board.
In 1966, the Soviet probe Luna
9 became the first manmade ob-
ject to make a soft landing on the
moon.
In 1991, the rate for a first-class
postage stamp rose to 29 cents.
Ten years ago: President
George W. Bush sent lawmakers
a $2.23 trillion budget for 2004.
Five years ago: The New York
Giants scored a late touchdown to
win Super Bowl XLII, 17-14, end-
ing the New England Patriots' run
at a perfect season.
One year ago: Susan G.
Komen for the Cure abandoned
plans to eliminate funding for
Planned Parenthood, following a
three-day furor that resounded
across the Internet, in Congress
and among Komen affiliates.
Today's Birthdays: Comedian
Shelley Berman is 88. Former
Sen. Paul Sarbanes, D-Md., is 80.
Football Hall-of-Famer Fran
Tarkenton is 73. Actress Bridget
Hanley is 72. Actress Blythe
Danner is 70. Singer Dennis
Edwards is 70. Football Hall-of-
Famer Bob Griese is 68. Singer-
guitarist Dave Davies (The Kinks)
is 66. Singer Melanie is 66. Ac-
tress Morgan Fairchild is 63. Ac-
tress Pamela Franklin is 63. Actor


Nathan Lane is 57. Rock musician
Lee Ranaldo (Sonic Youth) is 57.
Thought for Today: "When
there is an income tax, the just
man will pay more and the unjust
less on the same amount of in-
come." Plato, Greek
philosopher.












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


a -


Chronicle file
Celebrating the completion of the South Citrus Avenue streetscape project in 2011, from left, are: Councilman Mike Gudis,
Councilwoman Paula Wheeler, Mayor Jim Farley and former councilman Ron Kitchen.


Crystal River's past, present


Mayor Jim Farley outlines city's 2012 accomplishments and 2013 goals


As we look forward to a
new year and what we
want to accomplish, it's
important to review
where we have been
and the goals we set
for this city.
In 2008, the city
contracted with the
firm MYTOWN
TEAM Consultants .
Inc. for the develop-
ment of "A Visioning \
Plan for the Down-
town." The firm has
more than 40 years Jim
combined govern- Gl
ment and private sec- COI
tor experience
specializing in,
among other things, commu-
nity planning and revitaliza-
tion, visioning, and citizen
involvement and participation.
The purpose of the plan was
to identify constraints and op-
portunities for the downtown
area that were of importance
to the local business commu-
nity, residents, visitors, the City
and the CRA.
An extensive effort was
made to draw input from resi-
dents, business people, visitors
and city officials. To that end,
the consultants conducted 38
interviews with stakeholders,
online surveys with 19 partici-
pants, community open houses
with 70 participants, Manatee
Festival visitor questionnaires
with 577 respondents, and a
"Day of Visioning" charrette
involving 45 participants.
Based on the research gath-
ered, the consultants' final
plan contained a list of recom-
mended projects:


F
LJ
LL


Install signage.
Decorative signage includ-
ing the city's logo has been
completed in the
.. downtown area.
This includes at-
tractive wayfaring
signage clearly
identifying the visi-
tor opportunities
available. Addition-
V A ally in 2012, the city
began a historic
marker program,
which uses the
barley same sign design
EST and coloration as
U MN the wayfaring signs.
S Enhance
streetscape on
Citrus Avenue.
Work is complete on South
Citrus. The road was re-
engineered to create a traffic
calming curve. Decorative
streetlights were installed with
the city logo. Sidewalks were
redone with pavers. Trees
were planted and decorative
benches, trash cans and bicycle
stands installed. Also, work is
planned to make the ambiance
of North Citrus as similar as
possible to the south side.
A bid award recommenda-
tion will be given to council in
April. Construction will begin
in June and be completed in
September.
Create inviting sidewalks
and storefronts.
As mentioned, paver tile
sidewalks have been installed
on South Citrus. The CRA has
a facade improvement grant
program. We should make a
greater effort to urge down-
town business owners to take


advantage of it.
Walkability, hiking and
safety.
A pedestrian crosswalk has
been installed on North Citrus
by Heritage Village. Decora-
tive crosswalks are planned
for the intersection of U.S. 19
and Citrus Avenue.
It has long been planned
once construction has been
completed on Cutler Spur, a
multi-use trail will be con-
structed connecting the Cross-
Town Trail with Fort Island
Trail. The contract to approve
construction should be ap-
proved this month, and work is
expected to take up to a year
In 2012, the city partnered
with a private citizen to de-
velop her concept of a Historic
Cell Phone Walking Tour. The
tour went operational Oct. 2
and has had 122 hits since
then.
The consultants posed the
question, "What kind of events
and physical changes are
needed to encourage more use
of the parks and connect them
to the downtown?"
In 2012, the CRA conducted
a field trip workshop where
members physically went to
each of our parks and con-
ducted a visioning session at
each. The CRA determined the
restrooms and a kayak launch
were needed at King's Bay
Park, and construction has
been completed on both.
The CRA also agreed the
park is an ideal setting for a
band shell/performance stage.
This is also envisioned as a
way to draw more people to
the park. Construction is ex-


pected to begin in August.
At Hunter's Spring Park,
CRA members envisioned raz-
ing the unattractive restrooms
that block a view of the water
and locating more esthetic
restrooms away from the water
line. Also, expanded parking
and improvements to the
swimming area were
discussed.
This year, shoreline harden-
ing will begin to combat ero-
sion. The design process will
also commence this year.
The consultant report
pointed out the city code did
not provide for mixed-use de-
velopment. In 2012, the code
was changed to allow mixed
use in the CRA area and along
the U.S. 19 business corridor.
In 2012, the city purchased
property on Northwest First
Avenue for $160,000 for River-
walk parking. We have in-
stalled 22 parking spaces
there.
So, much has been accom-
plished by following our Vi-
sioning Plan, yet much
remains to be done. Going for-
ward, this plan will continue to
be our guiding force.
Recently, Commissioner
Dennis Damato went public
with a plan suggesting many
things we have already accom-
plished or have in the plan-
ning stages. Yet there are some
new ideas, as well. A city coun-
cil workshop is scheduled to
review both plans in detail.
For projects that appear in
both, we will welcome addi-
tional funding.


Page C3


Janet Masaoy inspiring woman with a cause


Hang around here
long enough and
one meets all sorts
of people with all sorts of
causes. Some people find a
cause and ram it into the
ground. Others use their
cause for political or finan-
cial gain.
Oftentimes, the cause is
really terrific but doesn't
exactly go against the
grain. There are people in
our community, for exam-
ple, who are tireless advo-
cates for the hungry,


homeless and poor.
It is rare indeed, how-
ever, when someone comes
along and leads a cause
that touches a nerve. The
person rallies supporters,
shows up at meetings with
handwritten signs, opposes
politicians and the well-
financed, and conducts re-
search like a graduate stu-
dent.
I've known a few of those
throughout the years. One
stands out: Janet Masaoy
I don't recall when I met


Janet, but I really don't re-
member a time when I did
not know her. Janet, a pe-
tite Pine Ridge woman,
founded a group in the mid-
1990s called Citizens Op-
posed to the Suncoast
Tollway, or COST
COST wasn't just another
"anti" group. It didn't raise
a stink because it enjoyed
the attention. No, COST
was smack in the middle of
one of the biggest debates
this county has ever seen,
one that raged off and on


for a decade: whether or
not to build the Suncoast
Parkway 2 through Citrus
County.
Janet, who died Jan. 25,
was more than the COST
founder. She was its face
and field general. Hun-
dreds of people, attracted
to the cause and Janet's ge-
nial but forceful demeanor,
followed in her steps. The
group at one time had 5,000
signatures on a petition

See Page C03


Let's


not


be so


vague

he world of politi-
cal correctness
has now reached
across all social and cul-
tural barriers.
Even the fortune
cookies at my favorite
Crystal River Chinese
restaurant have become
lame and non-offensive.
Instead of offering a for-
tune or giving direction,
today's fortune cookies
offer wimpy and obtuse
messages.
No wonder the coun-
try is such a mess.
My most recent for-
tune cookie message
told me: "The eye of the
master will do more
work than both his
hands."
Hey, I just finished
two egg rolls, some pork
fried rice and a beer. I
don't have any idea what
this fortune cookie
writer is talking about
My wife's message
was even less clear:
"Freed from desire, then
you can see the hidden
mystery"
I don't see any mys-
tery I just see two dogs
that want their share of
the pork and fried rice.
This is Citrus County.
We're not good with
these vague messages
and nonsensical
innuendos.
We need concise di-
rections and recommen-
dations. We need you to
get to the point.
Remember, this is the
place where we elected
Scott Adams to the
county commission, be-
cause he says just what
he thinks. When the
county administrator
presents a budget that
needs cutting, Adams
immediately recom-
mends getting rid of the
administrative staff that
created the budget.
That would save
money and it is certainly
clear. You may not agree
with his conclusion, but
you definitely know
what he's talking about.
We need fortune cook-
ies that get right to the
point.
So in the name of
being clear and concise,
here are the top 10 rec-
ommendations for Chi-
nese restaurant fortune
cookies for Citrus
County
1. Get off the couch,
turn off the TV and go
get a job. (Very clear
with good direction).
2. Quit cheating when
you write down your golf
score. All your friends
are sick of you. (Big
problem in Citrus
County).
3. Don't wear that
dress again, it makes
you look fat. (You know
you've wanted to say
that).
4. You should not try
to speak on your cell-
phone and drive at the
same time. You are not a
good driver without the
cellphone. (This covers
about 25 percent of our
population).
5. Be nice to your chil-
dren or they won't visit
you when you get older.
(Makes the conse-
quences very clear).
See Page C3


Mike Wright
WRIGHT ON
TARGET







Page C2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .......................publisher
Mike Arnold ............... ................. editor
Charlie Brennan ....................editor at large
Curt Ebitz ................... ........ citizen m ember
M 00 Mac Harris ......................... citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ........................ guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ..................... ........ copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


BEST PLAN






Welcome





tourists





off US 19


he U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service is
moving forward with
plans to improve the Three
Sisters Springs property in
Crystal River.
After the successful public
purchase of the property two
years ago, the federal agency
- which offi-
cially leases the THE I
property from the
city of Crystal Three
River needs to Spring:
complete a devel-
opment plan so OUR 01
citizens can ac- U.S. 19
cess and enjoy center
the property. sen
We want to go
on record as sup-
porting the proposal to build
an official Three Sisters
Springs welcome center on
U.S. 19 as opposed to locat-
ing it on the actual spring's
property.
In our view, the best option
is to buy one of the under-
utilized shopping centers on
U.S. 19 and turn it into a
parking area and welcome
center for Three Sisters.
Tourists then could walk or
be shuttled to the property.
The proposal makes sense
for a number of reasons.
It would protect the envi-
ronmentally sensitive prop-
erty from having a concrete
footprint on the land.
It also would provide a
better technique of handling
traffic congestion that would
inevitably take place during
heavy tourist times. The
shopping center location
would demonstrate FWS is
acting in a sensitive way to-
ward residents who live in
the area.
From a tourism stand-
point, the U.S. 19 location
makes even better sense. As
we have learned with the
Homosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park, a welcome and
information center on U.S.
19 is the best way to pull the


S

s

P


n


largest number of visitors to
the park. The same would
hold true for Three Sisters.
With an upcoming display
in National Geographic Mag-
azine, we all know Three
Sisters Springs will become
one of the hottest eco-
tourism destinations in the
country. We need
ISUE: to be prepared
for the tourism
Sisters and economic
future. impact.
From an eco-
'INION: nomic stand-
velcome point, building a
makes visitor center at
an underutilized
ise. shopping center
off U.S. 19 on the
front and Cutler Spur on the
back would build momentum
for redevelopment of the city.
The concept of building a
tourism welcome center on
U.S. 19 for Three Sisters will
have to be endorsed by FWS.
But it will most likely re-
quire a combination of fed-
eral, state and local dollars
to make this happen. It will
also require the current
owners of the shopping cen-
ters to have realistic sale
prices based on the 2013 real
estate market.
For the record, we think
the welcome center pro-
posal for U.S. 19 makes good
sense.
And for the record, plans
need to be in place to have
Three Sisters open to the
public by the end of 2013.
Tourists from all over are
looking for access. The
Southwest Florida Water
Management District should
be complete with its storm
water project by the end of
the summer and the city's
Cutler Spur improvement
work should be done by the
end of 2013.
Public access is needed
and a U.S. 19 partnership
with the City of Crystal River
is the best way to go.


= Hot Corner: TOASTED MANATEE =


Keep printing
stupid stuff
This is Tuesday (Jan. 29). I
was reading all the comments
about the "Toasted manatees."
Don't blame the Chronicle for
printing such funny stuff. We
need a good laugh. God knows
there's not much to laugh about
nowadays and they say laughter
is the best medicine. Keep on
printing stupid stuff and show
people how stupid they are and
give us a good laugh.
As Gilda would say:
'Nevermind'
I wanted to say I got a big
kick out of the "Toasted mana-
tee" article the first time it ap-
peared. It was obviously a joke,
to me. I was surprised to see so
many people in Citrus County
couldn't recognize it was a joke.
I don't think there was a need to


apologize for it at all. As
"Roseanne Roseannadanna" on
"Saturday Night Live" would say,
"Nevermind," to all the people
that didn't understand the joke.
Time to get over it
Now I see in today's paper
(Jan. 29) where people are com-
plaining about you guys at the
Sound Off putting in the
"Toasted manatee" caller or
writer or whatever he did. I read
that one. That one was funny. I
got a very good chuckle out of
that. So these people (who)
can't understand the guy was
obviously joking, they are the
ones (who) need to go back
where they came from. We
don't need stick in the muds
here in Citrus County. We need
people with a sense of humor
(who) can go with the flow of
things. They just need to get
over themselves.


"A tourist is an ugly human being."
Jamaica Kincaid,
"A Small Place" 1966


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Moral grandstanding's price


WASHINGTON
Politics becomes amusing
when liberalism becomes
theatrical with high-
minded gestures.
Chicago's government, which
is not normally known
for elevated thinking, is
feeling so morally up-
right and financially
flush it proposes to rise
above the banal busi-
ness of maximizing the ,
value of its employees'
and retirees' pension
fund assets. Although
seven funds have cu- .
mulative unfunded lia-
bilities of $25 billion, Geo
Chicago will sacrifice 01
the growth of those as- Vc
sets to strike a political
pose so pure, it is un-
tainted by practicality.
Emulating New York and Cal-
ifornia, two deep blue states
with mammoth unfunded pen-
sion liabilities, Chicago Mayor
Rahm Emanuel has hectored a
$5 billion pension fund into di-
vesting its holdings in compa-
nies that manufacture firearms.
Now, he is urging two large
banks to deny financing to such
companies "that profit from
gun violence." TD Bank pro-
vides a $60 million credit line to
Smith & Wesson, and Bank of
America provides a $25 million
line to Sturm, Ruger &
Company
Chicago's current and retired
public employees might wish
the city had invested more in
both companies.
Barack Obama, for whom
Emanuel was chief of staff, has
become a potent gun salesman
because of suspicions he wants
to make gun ownership more
difficult. Since he was inaugu-
rated four years ago, there have
been 65 million requests for
background checks of gun pur-
chasers. Four years ago, the
price of Smith & Wesson stock
was $2.45. Last week, it was
$8.76, up 258 percent. Four


years ago, the price of Sturm
Ruger stock was $6.46.
Last week, it was $51.09, up 691
percent.
The Wall Street Journal re-
ports even before "a $1.2 billion
balloon payment
for pensions comes
due" in 2015,
"Chicago's pension

projected to run
dry by the end of
the decade, are
scraping the bot-
toms of their
barrels."
Nevertheless,
rge Will liberals are feeling
rHER good about them-
ICES selves the usual
point of liberalism
because New
York state's public pension fund
and California's fund for teach-
ers have, The New York Times
said, "frozen or divested" gun
holdings. In February, Calpers,
the fund for other California
public employees, may join this
gesture jamboree. All this is
being compared to the use of di-
vestment to pressure South
Africa to dismantle apartheid
in the 1980s. Well.
Apartheid was a wicked prac-
tice. Guns are legal products in
America, legally sold under fed-
eral, state and local regulations.
Most of the guns sold to Ameri-
cans are made by Americans.
Americans have a right a
constitutional right to own
guns, and 47 percent of Ameri-
can households exercise that
portion of the Bill of Rights by
possessing at least one firearm.
For Emanuel to say gun mak-
ers "profit from gun violence" is
as sensible as saying automo-
bile manufacturers "profit from
highway carnage" which, by
the way, kills more Americans
than guns do. Emanuel, who is
more intelligent than he sounds
(just as many think Wagner's
music is better than it sounds),
must know not one fewer gun


ER


will be made, sold or misused
because Chicago is wagging its
finger at banks.
Moral grandstanding, how-
ever, offers steady work and
The Chronicle of Higher Edu-
cation reports a new front in
"the battle against climate
change": "Student groups at al-
most 200 colleges and universi-
ties are calling on boards of
trustees to divest their colleges'
holdings in large fossil-fuel
companies."
Of course, not one share of
those companies' stock will go
unsold because academia is so
righteous. Others will profit
handsomely from such holdings
and from being complicit in
supplying what the world
needs. Fossil fuels, the basis of
modern life, supply 82 percent
of U.S. energy, and it is pro-
jected they will supply 78 per-
cent of the global increase in
energy demand between 2009
and 2035, by which time the
number of cars and trucks on
the planet will have doubled to
1.7 billion.
Institutions of higher educa-
tion will, presumably, warn
donors their endowments will
be wielded in support of the po-
litical agenda du jour, which
might include divesting from
any company having anything
to do with corn, source of the
sweetener in many of the sodas
that make some people fat and
New York's mayor cranky Or
anything to do with red meat,
sugar, salt, trans fats, chickens
not lovingly raised.
Liberal ethicists may decide
the only virtuous investments
are in electric cars. The Obama
administration said 1 million
will be sold by 2015. Maybe
70,000 have been so far. Just
imagine how pension funds will
prosper by betting on the next
930,000.

George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost com.


p




I
I


LETT

Gun control won't
stop murders


As one of your dedicated
constituents, I would like to
take a moment to express my
opinion on the concerns over
gun control.
For 35 years, I was a deputy
sheriff with the Hillsborough
County Sheriff's Office, retir-
ing as the master sergeant of a
detective squad. During my
time of service, 10 of those
years were in the position of
homicide detective. In that po-
sition, my investigations re-
sulted in sending two serial
murderers to death row for
separately killing 13 young
ladies and several mass killers
to Florida prisons for life.
Let me explain just one of
the mass murders to help de-
fine my opinion on the new
gun control movement.
During the Fourth of July
holiday in 1982, a criminal
walked into a grocery store,
splashed a bucket of gasoline
on one of the checkout lanes
and set it on fire. Five young
ladies were within the area of
explosion and received the
most serious of burn injuries.
The ladies, who were from the
ages of 4 years old to 28 years
old, suffered indescribable in-
tense pain as they died, one by
one, during the next 30 days.


Nearly 30 others were injured
in this senseless criminal act
I lack the ability to create a
written document that can de-
scribe the atrocity of this viola-
tion of criminal and moral
laws. Had these ladies been
shot to death, they would not
have been in a hospital bed for
days, for weeks, for nearly a
month, screaming in pain and
begging to die to end their suf-
fering. Even the 4-year-old cry-
ing and screaming, as she
continually pulled out the
tubes connected to her charred
body while she called for her
mother, who was screaming in
pain in the next room, would
not have suffered until death.
No firearm was used in this


horrible crime, just as none
was used in the Oklahoma Fed-
eral Building bombing that
took 168 lives, including 19
children under the age of 6.
One does not need a firearm to
commit a mass murder.
When I look over my years in
homicide, the tools to kill others
covers a wide range of items in-
cluding yard tools, kitchen uten-
sils, knives, swords, bare hands,
drowning and firearms. I do not
believe changing our laws that
cover the ownership of firearms
and their accessories will do
anything to help reduce our
murders. Those using these
tragedies to fuel their personal
desire for firearm restrictions
should look at the need to iden-
tify and assist those in our soci-
ety who have the mental health
issues that create the reason for
these incidents. We need to
help identify those in need and
stop the crime before it can
occur
My request on this issue is
for you to please oppose any of
these bills being presented
that would place restrictions
on our firearms. There is no
need to amend the Constitu-
tion; it should continue to
stand strong. Thank you for
your assistance.
Jake Little
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


>' to the Editor


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429.


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Meet my brand-new buddy, Bertie


A s I've disclosed
in previous
columns, I con-
tinue to work on my
novel, At the Bottom
of Biscayne Bay. I've
already learned much
from this experience
and continue to learn
more.
The two most com- Fred B
spelling things I now A SI
know is, just how OF
much fun writing a
book is and just how
exasperating finding a publisher
can be. I've written to dozens of
agents and have received sev-
eral marvelously complimen-
tary letters, which have all
ended with kind rejections.
I know I'm prejudiced, but it's
a pretty good book. It's autobio-
graphical fiction. I'm the protag-
onist and the dramatic core is a


saga of the state
banking department
throwing a bad guy
out as owner of a
bank in Miami. This
core is wrapped in a
love story and the en-
tire book carries a
muted inspirational
theme as to how God
rannen remains in control of
LICE all things, regardless.
IFE Cheryl speaks
softly, but not long
ago, she pulled out a
big stick.
And, I quote, "I'm tired of
watching you work and hearing
you talk about your book. I'm
ready to see it in print."
It can be done. With modern
technology, self-publication can
be done professionally and per-
haps even profitably. To keep
Cheryl from using her stick, I've


begun to explore the possibili-
ties of forming my own publica-
tion company It's easy enough to
engage folks to do almost every-
thing from edits to layouts to
printing a final copy and even
making the finished product
ready for sale as an ebook.
What gives me the heebie-jee-
bies is the permissionss"
process. The First Amendment
to the U.S. Constitution is a god-
send for writers. It is highly un-
usual for a case to ultimately be
won by a plaintiff; still, the legal
fees can kill you.
I've started to study what is
commonly done to address
things such as the use of a per-
son's name and to avoid violat-
ing copyrights. I've found many
sources suggest simply contact-
ing folks and asking for permis-
sion. In this regard, while I'm
still fishing in the big publisher


pond, I've begun to systemati-
cally seek permissions. Thus far,
without exception, I've been
pleasantly surprised by rapid
and positive responses. But one
reply in particular thrilled me.
"Wrapped around each other,
trying so hard to stay warm, that
first cold winter together,
lying in each others arms,
watching old movies, falling in
love desperately, honey, I was
your hero,
you were my leading lady! We
had it all...." Key Largo, Bertie
Higgins, 1981.
My chapter 36 is entitled
Wrapped Around Each Other. It
not only quotes Bertie Higgins'
lyrics, but elaborates on how the
first winter my Cheryl and I
shared was so very much like
the song Higgins would write 15
years later.
With less difficulty than I ex-


pected, I found Higgins' email
address. I brazenly forwarded to
him a copy of the chapter with a
letter politely asking permission
to use his work in my novel. I
thought it would take several
days for a response and I wasn't
at all sure he'd agree. To my
amazement, within 24 hours, he
sent back a most personable
reply, wishing me well with the
book and giving me absolute au-
thority to use his material.
I fully anticipate during the
permissions process I will meet
with some disappointments and
when I do, I'll deal with them.
But, at least in this case, I feel as
though I've made a friend in my
brand-new buddy, Bertie!


Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


Letters to THE EDITOR


Military veterans vso citr
in relati(
receiving support eredwa
The Citrus County Veter- expended
ans Advisory Board significa
(CCVAB), appointed by Cit- into con
rus County Commissioners recover
to represent our 22,000 mil- with awe
itary, recently convened for approve
its monthly meeting at the ans. The
Citrus County Veterans ment of
Service Office (VSO). Mr (VA) rep
Chuck Fettes, head of the veterans
VSO, provided an informa- $63,000,(
tive briefing regarding awards,
their office's activities for been int
fiscal year 2011-12. local ec(
The statistics provided amount
by Fettes are startling on VSO 1
when you consider the astound:
VSO is staffed by only each $1
three officers and for most budget.
of the fiscal year by two. 0 Vete
The staff conducted distance
5,766 interviews with mil- in grants
itary veterans. CCVAB i
Over 21,500 phone Hunt, Jo
calls were returned to vet- ton McCa
erans and family mem- las and C
bers seeking assistance., wereast
Coordinating with Dis- consider
abled American Veterans budget a
(DAV) Chapter 76 in Inver- culties p
ness, 1,174 veterans were by an ev
transported to VA medical tional of
facilities in Gainesville "This
and The Villages. able per
The staff helped vet- port of o
erans recover $13,296,188 veterans
in new compensation lies," CC
claims (does not include Richard
unreported DAV dollar ticularly
amounts). sider th(
The return for funds disarray
spent from the allocated system,



TARGET
Continued from Page Cl

My co-worker, Nancy Kennedy,
wrote a splendid "Postscript" on
Janet in Thursday's paper, so I won't
repeat all that here. But I can't let
Janet go without mentioning her im-
pact on Citrus County
This is a great place we call home.
Many, many people help shape this
community into what it is today
These folks don't always get along
and that's OK. Sometimes one side
wins, sometimes the other side wins.
Politically, I call that the pendulum.
County commissions tend to swing
based on the collective will of the
majority Some years the commis-
sion is pro-growth. Other years it's
pro-environment. And then
pro-growth.
Janet had her political views, I'm
sure. We never discussed them.
What we did discuss, on occasions
too numerous to recall, were her
views on the parkway
(By the way, Janet never used that
word. She thought "parkway" was a
feel-good euphemism for 26 miles of
asphalt and concrete plowing


rus County budget
on to that recov-
s $93 for each $1
ed. This is truly
nt when taking
sideration new
es in conjunction
yards previously
d for local veter-
Florida Depart-
Veterans Affairs
orts Citrus County
s have received
000 in total
most of which has
produced into the
onomy This huge
increases return
funds spent to an
ing $443.50 for
from their sparse

*rans in need of as-
received $26,200
s from the VSO.
members Richard
hn Stewart, Carl-
leod, Steve Miku-
Chris Gregoriou
wounded by Fettes'
specially when
ring the small VSO
location and diffi-
resented to them
er-reducing opera-
fice area.
is a truly remark-
'formance in sup-
ur military
s and their fami-
"VAB Chairman
Hunt said. "Par-
y when you con-
e complete
within the VA
causing nearly 70


percent of filed compen-
sation and benefits claims
to be delayed.
"In many instances, vet-
erans must wait several
years until a claim deci-
sion is made," he
continued.
The difficulties in
achieving rapid VA action
to filed claims, particu-
larly those delayed
through the St Peters-
burg Regional Office,
were also discussed at
this meeting and led the
CCVAB to take action by
preparing a 28-page
White Paper that clearly
describes historical and
current problems in the
claims system with board
recommendations for
improvement.
"I was tasked to prepare
the White Paper," CCVAB
Vice Chairman John Stew-
art said. "In doing so, I
was shocked during my
research to see VA statis-
tics, as they repeatedly
failed in the support of
our veterans. I hope this
paper we are releasing to
the public, our legislators
and media outlets initi-
ates an outcry from every-
one in our country
demanding improvement
in support of America's
military veterans.
"For example, accord-
ing to VA figures released
Dec. 29, there are over
900,000 veterans' compen-
sation and benefit claims


through the county's midsection.)
Janet flat-out thought the project
was wrong. And, if you had about
three hours, she would describe in
detail exactly why she carried that
opinion. In a nutshell: Not needed,
too expensive, an environmental
disaster and would bring wild
growth.
While Janet and her group spent
God knows how many hours study-
ing the state reports, parkway pro-
ponents pretty much had a simple
response: It is common sense that
the parkway is needed to relieve
traffic on U.S. 19.
When Janet noted the state's own
study showed a net 6,000 cars a day
would be using the parkway from
one end of Citrus to the other, proj-
ect backers said they believed the
study except that part.
The state, hoping to find some
common ground, decided in 2002 to
form a citizens group to help deter-
mine a parkway corridor The group
had 10 parkway supporters and 10
opponents, including Janet Not sur-
prising, it couldn't even pick a chair-
man let alone turnpike routes.
Some might suggest Janet was
bullheaded and unapproachable.
Personally, I found her courageous.


pending action and 68.5
percent exceed the 125-
day goal established by
VA to process a claim.
This is a complete failure
in helping those who
served our country with
honor.
'At his second inaugural
address President Abra-
ham Lincoln said our coun-
try would care for those
who have borne the battle.
Our board firmly believes it
is time to fulfill that prom-
ise and it is time to honor
those who defended Amer-
ica's freedom."
Monthly CCVAB meet-
ings are open to the pub-
lic and to attend, call the
VSO at 352-527-5915 for
more information.
John Stewart
CCVAB vice chairman

Most dangerous
game
Just averted another car
wreck today I don't try to
make left turns on the yel-
low (use green arrow
when I can) and I don't
take off right away on
green lights. I have never
seen so many people run-
ning red lights as I do in
Citrus County Is there a
game going on for who can
run the most red lights? I
don't want to play
Greg Wood
Inverness


She simply believed in a cause and
refused to budge an inch. There was
no compromise. The road would ei-
ther be built or it wouldn't. Details
beyond that were immaterial.
When the economy bottomed out
in 2009 and the state announced it
was indefinitely suspending the
parkway project, Janet was de-
lighted with the news. But she knew
it was only a matter of time for the
road plans to return.
And that's exactly what is happen-
ing. In a very low-key approach, the
state is buying right of way and it
seems the parkway is a foregone con-
clusion sometime in the future. I won-
der now what will happen with COST
and its anti-parkway campaign.
A Janet Masaoy comes along very
infrequently Whether you think the
parkway idea is great or lousy, we
are better off to have had Janet
there to lead a crusade. She brought
issues out, ignited debates and
forced discussion.
Janet Masaoy mattered in Citrus
County She mattered big time.


Contact Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright at 352-563-3228 or
mwright@chronicleonline. com.


Delve into history


of Citrus County


JOHN GRANNAN
Special to the Chronicle

For those wanting to
know more about Citrus
County history, a book
written almost 60 years
ago will introduce the
reader to some memo-
rable characters from the
county's past.
The most interesting one
has to be the author, Judge
Ellis Connell May, who ar-
rived in the county in 1892
and authored two books,
which give the reader a re-
alistic look at the frontier
atmosphere and the peo-
ple who created it
The book is titled
"Gaters, Skeeters &
Malary" with a subtitle of
"Recollections of a
Florida Pioneer Judge."
E. C. May served as
county judge for 24 years
with a stint as a state rep-
resentative and state at-
torney Before he became
a judge, he was a popular
merchant in Hernando,
Dunnellon and Inverness.
He begins his story
with a vivid description of
his humble beginnings on
a farm in South Georgia
where he said he re-
ceived a better-than-
average education for the
time. He began teaching
school at age 15 and did
so until he was 17. He left
teaching when he de-
cided to become a pho-
tographer. He left home
for good when he was 20
and ended up living in
the rough North Florida
frontier towns of Bran-
ford and High Springs.
After arriving in the
new town of Inverness in
1892, he found different
ways to make a living,



WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

6. Do not ever think
about running for public
office in Citrus County
You didn't play well in the
sandbox as a child, and
you still don't know how
to get along with anyone.
(These are special for-
tune cookies that should
be handed out at public
buildings).
7. Read your Chronicle
every day, because it will
make you a smart and in-
formed citizen. Your
friends will be very im-
pressed. (This is a blatant
commercial. I want to
make sure you're paying
attention.)
8. You should not call in


mostly farming, but soon
found success as a mer-
chant in the roughneck
mining town of Her-
nando. He later moved
his store to Dunnellon,
which was even rougher
and wilder than Her-
nando and full of interest-
ing characters. After a
move to California, he re-
turned to Citrus County
where he had a store in
Inverness and decided to
study law in 1915.
Being the self-made
man he was, he read law
books and took corre-
spondence courses. He
passed the Florida Bar in
1919 and began a formal
practice of law. Before
that happened, he was
elected county judge in
1916 over the opposition
of the "Courthouse Ring,"
which had been control-
ling county politics since
the county's creation. Un-
fortunately, he doesn't
give the names of those
individuals who were in
power and who he had to
overcome to get elected.
Readers will enjoy
reading about some of the
people and situations he
encountered in his mem-
orable life. The book is
available for purchase at
the Old Courthouse Her-
itage Museum in "the best
little bookstore in Inver-
ness." Hours are from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday For more
information on this book
and other publications in
the museum store, call
352-341-6427.


John Grannan is a mem-
ber of the Citrus County
Historical Society


sick tomorrow, because
there are five other peo-
ple who would love your
job and your boss is keep-
ing track of how many
Monday you have
missed. (Good career ad-
vice from a fortune
cookie. You will never
have a fortune if you don't
work on Mondays).
9. Do not run red lights.
It's bad for your health.
(Short and very clear).
And in conclusion ...
10. Treat people as you
would like to be treated.
(Short, direct and a nice
biblical ring to it.)


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the
Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicle
online. com.


PATHWAY
Continued from Page C1

This council is dedicated to working together to not
only keep Crystal River as special as it is, but to con-
tinue to make it better. City staff is equally dedicated,
and the men and women who work here deserve
recognition for all they do every day to make city gov-
ernment efficient and welcoming to residents and vis-
itors. City council, the city manager and his staff, and
the CRA will continue to provide the leadership to
make our vision plan a reality and Crystal River the
best city of its size in the state.
I've said it many times, and I'll say it many times
again: I've lived in many places in my life, but
nowhere like Crystal River I would never want to live
anywhere else.


Jim Farley is the mayor of Crystal River


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 C3


I
1

L





C4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013


In honor of women in
the military
Thank you for the very in-
formative Jan. 26 Associated
Press article, "Women In Com-
bat," describing little known in-
stances of women who have
served and died on our nation's
battlefields.
These women served as
nurses, cooks, laundresses and
spies in the Revolutionary War
and they carried George Wash-
ington's messages across enemy
lines to his generals. A few hun-
dred disguised themselves as
men to fight during the Civil War
The creation of the Army
Nurse Corps came in response


m @ i onki ai


to the struggle against disease
in the Spanish-American War,
Navy nurses followed in 1908.
World War II was the turning
point that earned women full-
fledged military status. In 1948,
after fierce debate, Congress
approved allowing women to
serve in the regular forces of all
branches of the service.
Also, there are more than
200,000 women serving in the
U.S. military now 15 percent
of a force of 1.4 million. Sadly,
152 U.S. women in uniform have
died in Iraq and Afghanistan.
As a member of the American
Legion Auxiliary, Post 155, I am
making a request to the public
if any of these deceased mili-


tary women had roots in Citrus
County, such as living here and
going to school, and were killed
by enemy fire in the Gulf wars,
Afghanistan, World War I, World
War II, the Korean War and the
Vietnam War then they will
be honored by the American
Legion Auxiliary and at the
local Fallen Heroes Monument.
If you know of any U.S. woman
military patriot killed please
write to: PO. Box 2084, Crystal
River FL. 34423.

Renee
Christopher-McPheeters
American Legion Auxiliary
Blanton-Thompson Unit No. 155
Inc.


COMMENTARY


Not politically correct
It's time we stopped 1
this political correct- 0
ness stuff. It only helps
those (who) are cheat-
ing, (who) are crimi-
nals. (Why do) you have !
to be extra good to
them? Forget it. They
need to toe the line like CAL
everybody else. No 56Q
more political correct- UU"
ness stuff. I'm quitting
it.
Cholesterol primer
A family member was re-
cently diagnosed with low good
cholesterol and was told it was
(a) serious condition. Would
possibly one of the doctors
write an article about that?
Satan law on the
move
Oklahoma law passed 37-9
to place the Ten Command-
ments on the front entrance to
the state capitol as findings in
D.C., along with the ACLU, said
it would be a mistake. A mis-
take for who? Satan? Lots of
states are following Satan law,
but guess what? Oklahoma did
it anyway. Yes! Will Florida be
next? It appears the South can
rise up once again.


More Sound Off
please
I wanted to thank you for ex-
panding the space allotted to
Sound Off in the newspaper.
My mom and I were talking just
yesterday; it's our favorite part
of the paper. Thanks again.
Orwell's reality exists
To the caller who wants to
ban digital cameras: First of all
... where do you think you live?
Do you live in George Orwell's
"1984" Utopia where Big
Brother is watching? It's never
going to happen.


.


F Amazing Items
www.rotaryinverness.com






Watch final bidding live
Saturday, February 9th
Noon
WYKE Channel 47 or 16

sponsored in part by:
> I u s hronlc.onie o ..


Rotary Club of T
Inverness l
Charitable Foundation. Inc. _
OOODS6B


Eighth Annual
Purple Heart Ceremony
Florida National Guard Armory, Crystal River
Saturday, February 9,2013,11:00 a.m.
Commemorating the proud legacy of the Purple Heart
& Honoring Florida's fallen heroes of the Global War on
Terror and America's wounded warriors














All Gave Some, Some Gave All
Hosted by The combat wounded Patriots of
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776
Military Order of the Purple Heart
Featuring The Afghanistan/Iraq Memorial
Portrait Mural with Patriotic
music by Paul and Jackie Stevio and Marleigh Miller
VETERANS AND PUBLIC ARE CORDIALLY INVITED


T5TH ANNUAL

~: ITS..I TALENT
Ferur 8, 01


6:30 P.M. (Doors open at 6pm)
at the Curtis Peterson Auditorium
Tickets $10 per person Children under 10 are free
Masters of Ceremonies:
Brad Thorpe County Administrator and
Cathy Pearson Assistant County Administrator


For ticket information call
527-5900


Ci IR$)NICIJE


5th Annual Citrus Has Talent Show
Senior Foundation of Citrus County, Inc
Entrance Fee: $10 per person Children under 10 Free
At the Curtis Peterson Auditorium
Citrus Has Talent is a family friendly night of entertainment
for a great cause Citrus County Seniors in need.
For more information call 352-527-5905.

February 9th 11 a.m.
8th Annual Purple Heart Ceremony
Aaron A.Weaver Chapter 776 Military Order Purple Heart
At the National Guard Armory
Eighth Annual Purple Heart Ceremony at the National Guard
Armory in Crystal River, commemorating the proud legacy
of the Purple Heart and Honoring Florida's fallen heros of
the Global War on Terror and America's wounded warriors.
Hosted by The combat wounded Oatriots of Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776. Featuring The Afghanistan/Iraq
Memorial Portrait Mural with Patriotic music by Paul and
Jackie Stevio.Veterans and Public arre cordially invited.

February 9th
Fitness in Citrus Jazzercise
8 a.m. Low Impact 9 a.m. High Impact
At the Jazzercise Lecanto Fitness Center
Free class to support Fitness in Citrus program.
Call 352-634-5661 for more information.

February 9th 12 p.m. 5 p.m.
Rotary Club of Inverness Charity Auction
Rotary Club of Inverness
Online and Watch Live on WYKE channel 47 or 16.
Live television auction fundraising event with over 200
items are available for the auction and you can begin the
bidding now online.www.rotaryinverness.com
Items range form European vacation extravaganza to
amazing dining packages to Citrus Counties' finest
restaurants.

February 10th 2 p.m.
NCFB Music Scholarship Recital
Nature Coast Friends of Blues, Inc.
At the Old Courthouse Herritage Museum
The Nature Coast Friends of Blues are honoring our 2012-
2013 scholarship applicants with a recital giving the teen
musicians the opportunity to invite family and friends to see
them perform. Call 352-503-3498 for more information.

February 10 Oth 2 p.m.- 4 p.m.
Key Training Center Fashion Show
At the Chet Cole Life Enrichment Center
15th annual KeyTraining Center Fashion Show and Tea.
Priize for Most beautiful hat, Most creative hat,Table with
the best collection of hats. Fashions provided by Belk& Key
Training Center thrift stores. Call 352-795-5541 ext. 311 for
tickets and more information.


"I still don't see why the Pentagon's announcement is
such a big deal...it's not like we haven't seen combat before."

Letter to THE EDITOR


Jim Blackshear
Memorial

-L ;S Golf Outing
BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS
OF C1TRS ON
Seven Rivers Golf & Country Club
February 23, 2013
Registration 7 a.m.
Shotgun Start 8: a.m.

2 N$60 per player or $220 for a
team of four. Includes: Greens
fees, cart, lunch, door prizes
ua8'& l 'M .-and one Mulligan ticket.
"1 ," W1 V s Additional Mulligan tickets
will be available.


For online registration,
forms and
information visit,
www.CitrusBuilders.com
or call 746-9028.


ClI (f i (


ODWBT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Jobs available
ND^ I'm calling in regards
JN to the Workforce Con-
A nection and the 600 jobs
and people not under-
standing people aren't
qualified for a lot of the
jobs on there. A lot of
the jobs are for nursing
and rehab specialists
57Q9 and things of that na-
) i 7 ture. Yes, there's a lot of
jobs open in this county,
but a lot of people don't have
nursing degrees or the type of
degrees needed. So, yes, there is
a gap in the experience of people
and what jobs they can fill. But
the jobs are out there. There are
many nursing homes and hospi-
tals and rehab places that do
need the help, but nobody goes
to these places. So the jobs are
out there and if you look on the
One Stop Workforce's website,
you'll see how many jobs are
available in Citrus County.
Bloated government
I live on approximately
$13,000 a year Social Security
and out of that, the bloated
government takes $1,500 a
year for health insurance. But
the governor and his wife only
paid $400 a year or less? It's
time for reform and the Afford-
able Care Act does not address
these inequities.
Full of pork
This is in response to the
item in Tuesday's paper, Tues-
day, Jan. 29. Someone's com-
plaining Rich Nugent voted
"no" on the Hurricane Sandy
aid relief bill. If this person
had read that bill, they would
have voted "no" also. The ma-
jority of this bill had nothing at
all to do with Hurricane Sandy.
Millions and millions were put
in there as pork for other
things. And I would advise
them to look up this bill and
they would change their mind.












BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Associated Press
A man buys gas Thursday at a station in Los Angeles. Gasoline prices are climbing as rising economic growth boosts oil prices and
temporary refinery outages crimp supplies on the East and West coasts.


Gasoline prices get early start on spring surge


Associated Press


NEW YORK
Gasoline prices are get-
ting an early start on
their annual spring
march higher.
The average U.S. retail price
rose 13 cents over the past two
weeks to $3.42 per gallon, and
within a few days it will likely
set a record for this time of
year.
The culprits: Rising crude
oil prices, slowing output at re-
fineries undergoing mainte-
nance and low supplies of
gasoline.
These are the kinds of things
pushing gasoline prices higher
every spring after what is nor-
mally a lull in gasoline prices
in the late fall and early winter.
But a heavy schedule of Janu-
ary maintenance at West
Coast refineries has led to
sharply higher prices
there. Meanwhile, low in-
ventories have pushed
prices higher on the
East Coast.
And rising crude oil
prices have pushed
prices higher
throughout the
country
"I'm not
surprised
at what


I'm seeing, but I am surprised
it's coming early," said Tom
Kloza, chief oil analyst at the
Oil Price Information Service.
Hopes of stronger economic
growth in the U.S. and abroad
helped push the U.S. stock
market to a five-year high in
January and sent crude prices
up. When economies expand,
more gasoline, diesel and jet
fuel are consumed by shippers
and travelers.
Crude oil has risen 14 percent
since mid-December, to $97.49
on Thursday Brent crude, the
benchmark used to price oil
most U.S. refineries use to make
gasoline, is up 9 percent since
then to
$115.55


But gasoline wholesale
prices are rising even faster.
That's the price distributors
and service stations pay to buy
the gasoline they then sell to
drivers. Wholesale prices in
California are up 56 cents a
20 percent jump -to $3.32 per
gallon, in two weeks, according
to Kloza. Many California driv-
ers soon will see $4 a gallon at
local stations. Smaller but still
substantial jumps are being
seen throughout the country
Retail gasoline prices have
risen for 14 days straight, ac-
cording to AAA. The average
price for the month of January
was $3.32, the second highest
January average ever,
al-





though a nickel
cheaper than last year's
record. In each of the
past two years, gasoline
prices rose sharply at the
beginning of the year, be-
cause tensions in the Middle
East raised fears oil supplies
would be disrupted. In 2011, it
was the Libyan uprising; in
2012, it was Iran's threat to close
a key shipping lane.
So far in 2013, gas has been
cheaper than it was last year.
But that could change by this
weekend as stations pass along
the cost of the higher-priced
gasoline to drivers.
The national average price
has risen in nine of the past 10


February. Last year, gasoline
prices jumped 28 cents, or 8
percent, in February and aver-
aged $3.55 for the month.
Analysts still don't expect
prices to follow last year's
steep path through March that
brought them to a high of $3.94
on April 6. Crude oil supplies
are high, oil production is
booming and the economy isn't
growing very fast. Also, ten-
sions in the Middle East seem
to have eased somewhat.
And consider this as you fill
up on your way to a Super
Bowl party this weekend: The
oil and gas analyst Stephen
Schork notes while gasoline
prices may seem high, they
haven't risen nearly as fast as
tickets to
the big
S game.
"* When
the first
Super
Bowl was played 46 years ago,
gasoline cost about 32 cents
per gallon and Super Bowl
tickets cost $10. Now gasoline
is $3.42 and a seat in a distant
corner of the Superdome costs
$2,236 on the ticket-reselling
site StubHub.
Put another way, a ticket to
the Super Bowl in 1966 was
worth about 31 gallons of gaso-
line then, enough for 2 fill-ups.
A ticket to Sunday's game be-
tween the Baltimore Ravens
and San Francisco 49ers in
New Orleans is worth 650 gal-
lons enough to fill a mid-size
sedan 43 times.
Which makes gasoline, ac-
cording to Schork, "a bargain."


Developing a small business brand


brand is not only a
box of your favorite
cereal. If you're a
small business owner, it can
be the perception the
community has about your
company
Remember the old saying:
Perceptions are everything.
It's true!
If you own a small busi-
ness, your brand is you. It
develops as a result of how
you conduct your business.
It's the image you have in


the public's eyes.
Here are some important
qualities to foster that will
help establish a positive
community impression.
Be unique
There are fundamental
qualities to positive brand
attributes and identity To-
gether, they sum up how
your business is judged by
the audience you serve.
Just as all people are
unique, so your business


brand should be, too. Create
a distinct value in the mind
of the public. Uniqueness is
something you can work to-
ward and own. It can be the
reason your services or
product line instill value and
gain community recognition.
Brand believability
Believability starts with
how well you communicate
the features of your prod-
ucts or service.
Well-articulated advertis-


ing copy and graphics is a
great start. Keep in mind
there are various form of
advertising. Determine
which form works best for
your business i.e., which of
them bring customer re-
sponse. Carry the important
elements of advertising
through all of your sales
conversations.
Reinforce positive serv-
ice and product features

See Page D2


Dr. Frederick
Herzog
EXPERIENCE
MATTERS


Invest in


financial


education
Dear Bruce: My
mother passed
away in October.
I was the sole benefici-
ary of all her life insur-
ance policies, which
total more than $40,000.
My question is, what
should I do with the
money? I am 50 years
old and have a fairly de-
cent job, with a retire-
ment and a deferred
comp in place of a
401(k). I can retire in six
years. My house will be
paid for by then, and the
only other payment I
have is a car payment
Should I pay off these
loans or invest? I don't
know anything about in-
vesting. Can you point
me in the right direc-
tion? T.M., via email
Dear TM.: You men-
tion you have a mortgage
and it will be paid off
within six years when
you retire. Assuming
your mortgage interest
rate may be higher than
what is available now, I
would pay off the mort-
gage. You mention
you don't know anything
about investing. The best
thing to do is to educate
yourself. If there is any
money left over, put it
into a six-month CD. You
will get almost nothing
for it, but in that six
months, start reading the
investment section of
your local newspaper.
Pick up copies of Money
magazine and Forbes. If
you do this on a regular
basis, you will be sur-
prised how much you
can learn.
With a relatively mod-
est amount of money to
invest, there is no place
you can go to get advice
without some cost If you
choose to use a broker,
make sure you tell him
or her what your toler-
ance for risk is if you
don't know, the broker
will help you decide.
The broker can make up
a sample portfolio show-
ing how your money
would be invested.
Just a note: If you are
risk-averse, you will be
condemned to almost no
return on your
investment.
Dear Bruce: I read
your column each week
in the Atlanta Journal-
Constitution. Your ad-
vice seems to be right on
the money
I am paying off my
mortgage. After the
mortgage company re-
ceives my final payment,
what do I need to do to
ensure it files the
proper paperwork with
the county registrar,
courthouse records,
etc.? Do you have any
advice? ER, Atlanta
Dear EH.: About two
months before your final
payment, contact the
mortgage company, say-
ing you want to make
sure it fills out the
proper paperwork to re-
lease the mortgage. Tell
the mortgage company
you want the paid-off
deed in your possession
when you make the last
payment
When it's time to
make the final payment,
go to the bank in person,
talk to the mortgage rep-
resentative and explain
this is your last payment
and you want to make
sure everything is in
place. Congratulations!
See Page D2





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Gelinas and Royalty named
champion surgeons
Vascular surgeons William R. Gelinas,
D.O., and John W. Royalty, D.O., have been
identified as Fistula First
Champion Surgeons for
their outstanding efforts to
increase the utilization of
arteriovenous fistula (AVF)
placement rates.
AVFs are considered the
best long-term vascular ac-
cess for hemodialysis, a
William common method used to
Gelinas treat advanced and perma-
nent kidney failure. AVFs
last a long time and have a
lower complication rate
than other types of vascu-
lar access.
FMQAI: The Florida
ESRD Network recognized
Drs. Gelinas and Royalty
John as champions upon a nom-
Royalty nation by Crystal River
Dialysis as team players in
achieving high AVF placement rates.
FMQAI: The Florida ESRD Network is a
federal contractor that works to provide qual-
ity monitoring of dialysis and transplant facili-
ties while supporting the government in
assuring appropriate care for end-stage renal
disease patients. Through the Fistula First
Breakthrough Initiative, the Network asks
Florida dialysis providers to achieve an AVF
rate of 66 percent or greater. The Champion
Surgeon designation is awarded to surgeons
who achieve an AVF rate of 60 percent or
greater.
For more information, visit
www.fmqai.com/fistula-first.aspx.
Local pharmacist recognized
for patient counseling
Local pharmacist Richard P. Hoffmann
was recently awarded an honorable mention
in the 2013 Pharmacy Today One-To-One
Patient Counseling Recog-
nition Program by the
American Pharmacists As-
sociation.
This award is presented
to an outstanding pharma-
cist who has performed ex-
ceptional one-to-one
patient counseling, result-
Richard P. ing in better health, supe-
Hoffmann rior communications and
improved outcomes for
patients.
Dr. Hoffmann received the award in 2005,
2011 and 2013, primarily based on his "Ask
The Pharmacist" column, which has been
published in the Citrus County Chronicle for
the past 17 years.


Special to the Chronicle
Trafalgar Tours sales manager Ellen
Houghton presents an award to Debbie
Muir, manager of Tally Ho Vacations.
Tally Ho receives a premier
agency recognition
Tally Ho vacations was just awarded a
Premier Agency with Trafalgar Tours.
Operating in 60 countries, their exceptional
portfolio offers an extensive selection of
award-winning international travel and
tourism companies. Catering to all travel
styles and budgets, the collection includes a
variety of guided travel experiences, inde-
pendent holiday package companies, bou-
tique river cruising, luxury hotels and other
leisure options.
The Tally Ho Vacation staff must be trained
and specialized in the tours offered with Trafal-
gar tours to qualify for the Premier Agency.
For more information, contact Tally HO
Vacations at 352-860-2805 dmuir@tallyho
vacations.com.
Oak Hill Hospital to hold
grand opening for north tower
Oak Hill Hospital announced the grand
opening of its North Tower Phase 1 expan-
sion. The ribbon cutting ceremony was at
11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 26, on its campus at
11375 Cortez Boulevard, Spring Hill.
The opening ceremony included com-
ments from hospital and HCA officials and a
Keynote Address from Congressman
Richard Nugent. Those who attended re-
ceived personalized tours of the new operat-
ing rooms and intensive care unit rooms.
Phase 1 is the completion of the new con-
struction which adds a North Tower to the fa-
cility for the expansion of the Operating
Rooms, Recovery Rooms, and private pa-
tient care rooms. The North Tower is a two
story building which is stressed to accommo-
date future expansion up to six stories. The
second floor of the new tower contains 36
private ICU (Intensive Care Unit) rooms.
The expansion also includes an additional
18 Post-Anesthesia Recovery beds. To ac-
commodate this growth additional parking
has been added for patients, guests, and
families. Oak Hill Hospital is now a 262 bed
facility making it the largest hospital in Her-
nando and Citrus Counties.


Business DIGEST


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

Dear Bruce: I am execu-
tor of my father's estate,
and I live overseas. My fa-
ther passed away, and the
estate has not been pro-
bated. I have been attempt-
ing to transfer some
outstanding shares of stock,
approximately $10,000
worth, into my name so
they can be sold and split
between the siblings. The
company holding the
shares wants some verify-
ing documents, such as a
"gold medallion," which I
can't get where I live.
To alleviate this prob-
lem, I want to transfer the
executorship of the will to
my brother so he can take
care of it What is involved
in changing the executors
on a will? Reader, via
email
Dear Reader: I don't be-
lieve you can transfer the
executorship of a will in the



HERZOG
Continued from Page Dl

during the delivery phase.
This further supports the
believability factor.
Brand benefits
Say what matters. Cover
the important benefits of
your service or product
with a personal appeal.
If you sell a high-quality
product or service, then
say so. If it will last longer
and is more attractive or
functional, explain why
Consumers are known to
pay higher prices if greater
benefits are built into deliv-
erable service or products
with superior performance
outcomes. You can offset
the higher-price complaint
with benefits that appeal to
common sense.
Attractiveness
Everyone senses what is
attractive to them. Some-
times, it is a great smile,
high-quality features, sen-
sible pricing and always a
well-informed sales con-
versation, etc.


way you would like. What
you can do is renounce the
executorship. Ask the sur-
rogate court in the state
where your father lived and
where the will was filed to
see if such a renouncement
could be accomplished.
Your brother then can
apply to the surrogate court
to be the administrator of
the estate, with all of the
rights and responsibilities
you now have.
It sounds complicated,
but you should be able to
get this done with reason-
able promptness and at lit-
tle cost.
Dear Bruce: Several
years ago when our econ-
omy tanked, I filed bank-
ruptcy against several
credit card companies for
$50,000. I had no other op-
tion and did so with
tremendous regret.
Now I am determined to
attempt to reconcile this
situation. Although I have
no assets to do so, I feel I
must try Can you advise
me on the best way to do


Small businesses need
to have an attractiveness
appeal to a core audience.
Demonstrate the essence
of your offerings. Make
them attractive. Potential
customers will be moti-
vated to try you. If they are
pleased, they will come
back for more.
Return business is the
best chance of long term
survival and profitability
Sustainability
What loses customers
over time is the lack of sus-
tainability Whether it is
the quality of product or
service that goes off track,
both spell disaster. A small
business must learn to sus-
tain those elements of
their operation that
brought customers to them
in the first place.
This may not be easy in
a complicated and ever-
changing business envi-
ronment, but it works.
Mentor of Month
Starting soon Experi-
ence Matters columns will
periodically highlight one
of our chapter's volunteer-
certified business men-


S Christine C. Eck, CPA, PA
910 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 563-2522
Certified Public Accountant Member: Florida Institute of CPAs


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this, or would I just be
opening up a can of
worms? S.S., via email
Dear S.S.: I congratulate
you for having this moral
sense. I understand the
pangs of regret, but the re-
ality is the companies in-
volved have long since
written off the bankruptcy
discharges.
In my opinion, it would
be best to let this dead dog
lie. I wouldn't make any ef-
fort to contact the compa-
nies. Maybe when you get
a few extra bucks, you
could help out a charity At
least you'd be giving some-
thing back, albeit it in a
different way

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.
corn or to Smart Money,
PO. Box 7150, Hudson, FL
34674. Questions of gen-
eral interest will be an-
swered in future columns.
Owing to the volume of
mail, personal replies
cannot be provided.


tors. Each has different
backgrounds, work experi-
ence and special business
skills.
SCORE mentors are
screened by national
SCORE, take training pro-
grams and become certi-
fied Mentors. All are to
better serve our audience
of entrepreneurs and/or
business owners.
Our chapter members
have years of experience
in such fields as: account-
ing, banking, human re-
sources, project
engineering, sales, mar-
keting, advertising, non-
profit management,
administration and
budgeting.
SCORE offices are on
the Citrus campus of the
College of Central Florida.
Office hours are 10 a.m. to
1 p.m. Tuesday through
Thursday. Call 352-249-
1236 for an appointment.


Dr Frederick J. Herzogis
the immediate past
president of SCORE Citrus.
He can be reached at
Therzog@tampabay.rrcom


AWILLIAMS, =
A McCRANIE,
W WARDLOW
& CASH, P.A.
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS


2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS to serve you!
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For more information

on advertising call

Judy Moseley at

352-564-2917 or

Yvonne Shepard at

1 352-563-3273 1


D2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013


BUSINESS











D3


CITRUS CITRUS COUNTY
Economic DeveIop.- j BCITRUS f CO mN
Council, Inc. jy p Chamber of Commerce


numberr connectionn

28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


NEWS YOU

CAN USE

Strawberry
Festival pageant
applications
The 25th annual Floral
City Strawberry Festival
takes place Saturday,
March 2, and Sunday,
March 3, at Floral Park.
The Miss Strawberry
pageants will be held
Saturday. The Little Miss
Strawberry Pageant is
for girls aged 4 to 6 and
the Miss Strawberry
Princess pageant is for
girls aged 7 to 12. Entry
forms for the pageants
are available at the In-
verness and Crystal
River Chamber of Com-
merce offices and on
www.floralcitystrawberry
festival.com. The entry fee
is $5 and applications
and picture must be
turned in by Feb. 15.
Please send pictures to
reception@citruscounty
chamber.com. For more
information, please call
352-795-3149.
Luncheons
You have until Thursday
morning to reserve your
seat for the Feb. 8
Chamber members'
lunch at the Plantation
on Crystal River. Brad
Thorpe, county admin-
istrator, and Cathy Taylor,
management and
budget director, will dis-
cuss the Citrus County
budget. The February
lunch is sponsored by
Premier Vein. Log in to
the Members Only section
at www.citruscounty
chamber.com to receive
prepay discounted mem-
ber pricing. Seating is
limited and reservations
are required. Call the
Chamber office at 352-
795-3149 to reserve
your spot.
Take a moment now to
make your reservation for
The Business Women's
Alliance lunch on
Wednesday, Feb. 20, at
Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club. This
meeting of the Chamber's
BWA committee is spon-
sored by Kumon Math
and Reading Center.
Reservations required.
Prepay price for lunch
and networking is $20;
at-the-door price is $25.


Celebrity chefs team ul

local restaurants to film'


Taping slated for
Feb. 22 & 23
Imagine rubbing elbows
with famous chefs, tasting
creations of up-and-coming
chefs and havingthe possibility
to appear on television. Well,
get your taste buds ready!
ChefJoseph"Jo Jo" Doyle,
executive chef at the world-
famous Churchill Downs,
home ofthe Kentucky Derby,
is filming the debut episode
to be used as a pilot for his
new reality series "Meal
Ticket." The series is a cook-
ing competition inviting up-
and-coming interns to be
judged by celebrity chefs as
well as by the audience. And
the filming of the debut
episode happens right here
in Citrus and Levy counties!


Chef Jo Jo, a Florida native,
not only chose his home
state for the first episode, he
chose two local restaurants
because of their unique con-
cepts and commitment to ex-
cellence. Congratulations to
Neon Leon's Zydeco Steak
House in Homosassa and Ike's
Old Florida Kitchen at Izaak
Walton Lodge in Yankeetown.
Chef Jo Jo will be accom-
panied by colleagues Carlos
Fernandez, of the second
season of "Top Chef," Alex
Conant, personal chef to
Shaquille O'Neal, and oth-
ers as they critique the
dishes. Then attendees,
after tasting the gourmet
cuisine, will choose their fa-
vorite selections. This
unique interaction, which
adds to the excitement and
festivities, is a major compo-


RE/MAX Inverness

moves to new office
Your leader in Citrus County real estate,
RE/MAX Realty One has moved its Inver-
ness office. They are located just around the cor-
ner at 1101 U.S. 41 North, Inverness 34450 and
are ready to meet your real estate needs. Ready
to buy or sell? Give them a call at 352-637-6200.


Ambassadors for the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce join
with Karen Cunningham and the RE/MAX staff to officially
"open" the new office. In the back row are, from left: John
Seifert, executive director of the EDC; George Bendtsen, In-
surance by George; Dan Pushee, chairman; and Tom Corco-
ran, Life Care Center of Citrus County. Front row, from left:
Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast Bank; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin
Pest Control; Janet Mayo, Plantation on Crystal River; Karen
Cunningham, RE/MAX; Kim Baxter, Cadence Bank; Sarah
Fitts, First International Title; John Holloway, RE/MAX; Jen-
nifer Stoltz, RE/MAX; Brogan Cunningham, RE/MAX; Cheryl
Lambert, RE/MAX; and Linda Meahl, RE/MAX.


nent of the competition. The
final selection of the atten-
dees gets added to the
restaurant's menu.
Add in live entertainment,
special guest celebrity ap-
pearances, the chance to be
a part of the filming, and the
fact that a portion of the pro-
ceeds will be contributed to
the YMCA of the Suncoast,
and you have an opportunity
to "shine with the stars" not
only once, but twice. The
event will be held first on
Feb. 22 at Neon Leon's Zy-
deco Steakhouse in Old Ho-
mosassa, and then again on
Feb. 23 at Ike's Old Florida
Kitchen at Izaak Walton
Lodge in Yankeetown.
Advance ticket purchase
is recommended. Tickets are
available in three packages:
General admission is $25


p with

TV pilot
per person/per venue. $30 at
the door, space permitting.
Includes dinner and cash bar
VIP tickets are $50 per
person/per venue and in-
clude dinner, VIP seating and
open bar VIPticelts available
by advance purchase only by
Feb. 15.
Platinum Partner Pack-
ages are $250 for two people,
which include VIP tickets to
both venues, dinner, open bar,
VIP seating, VIP parking, a gift
card to each ofthe restaurants
and names listed on the bal-
lots. Platinum Partner Pack-
ages available by advance
purchase only by Feb. 15.
Purchase tickets at either
restaurant location or at either
office of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce.
Bon app6tit!


Working to close the skills gap


The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce and
Economic Development Council have created a
joint committee to address the skills gap in Citrus
County and to establish concrete steps to fill the
available jobs. This group met Jan. 29 at the Cham-
ber office to move discussion forward. Pictured,
from left, are: Bob Bratz, SCORE; Superintendent
Sam Himmel and Patrick Simon with the Citrus
County School Board; Denise Willis, director at
Withlacochee Technical Institute; and Lee
Glotzbach, human resources director with Citrus
Memorial Health System. Also in attendance were
John Seifert, executive director of the EDC; Josh
Wooten, president and CEO of the Chamber; Ar-
dath Prendergrast with the Chamber and EDC; Re-
becca Martin, consultant; Rob Adamiak, Marian
Regional Manufacturing Association; Brenda Chris-
man, Workforce Connection; Ray Chirayath, Busi-
ness Cost Management; and Vinnie DeRosa,
associated with Citrus County Fallen Heroes.

Upcoming Chamber events
Feb. 6 Ribbon-cutting, 4:30 p.m. at ALIKAT
FASHION/RIDING DIRTY, Crystal River.
Feb. 7 Ribbon-cutting, 4:30 p.m. at TAMMY'S
EATERY AND SUB SHOP, Homosassa.
Feb. 7-Business After Hours, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
NATURE COAST MINISTRIES/FRIENDS OFTHE BLUES.
Feb. 8 February Chamber
SLunch, 11:30 a.m. at Plantation.
Feb. 20 BWA February Lunch,
r[i~r 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Citrus Hills
Golf and Country Club.
Feb. 20 Ribbon-cutting, 4:30
p.m. at RISE CONSTRUCTION, Inverness.
Remember, coupons and discounts also appear
on the mobile and regular website! Check out our
complete calendar for community, entertainment
and fundraising events.


It's that
time again...

These Chamber
members may be
able to assist you in
tax preparation and
financial planning.

Tax preparation
Hallmann
Tax Group LLC
3 Carl Court, Beverly
Hills FL 34465
Chuck A. Hallmann
352-400-4800
H & R Block
6742 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River
FL 34429
Mike Mitchell
850-234-6369

Tax service
Bob Lane's Complete
Accounting & Tax
Service
400 Tompkins St.,
Inverness FL 34450
352-344-2888
Calabro Financial
Management
35 South Melbourne St.,
Beverly Hills FL 34465
Amy Zaengle-Calabro
352-527-2866
Jackson Hewitt Tax
Service
637 S.E. U.S. 19,
Crystal River FL 34428
Kelly L. Davis
888-282-1040
Liberty Tax Service
7887 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Hwy., Crystal River FL
34429
Michael Gearhart
352- 563-2777
Michelle's Accounting
and Tax Services
2541 N. Reston Terrace,
Hernando FL 34442
352-746-1855
Rita Weckesser, EA PA
10 N Melbourne Street,
Beverly Hills FL 34465
Rita Weckesser
352-746-1705
Tamara Young EA, Tax
& Accounting Service
10321 N. Dauphine Ter-
race
Dunnellon FL 34423
352-795-2496
Williams, McCranie,
Wardlow & Cash, RA.
450 S. Pleasant Grove
Road, Inverness FL
34453
Rob Wardlow
352-726-8130
Williams, McCranie,
Wardlow& Cash, RA.
154 S.E. Seventh Ave.,
Crystal River FL 34429
J. Paul Cash


Eldridge, McNeal earn


national production honors


...^il ^B ^ ..,, ^ &. ..... ....... i. ..: .




--h








of 'f am ly Tun!! Im T_ -.....
._ -.- .

-u --I -IA I ---' f -'SL w










-Stra ewyberry-SPru ar. Citrus
--.. -- ........
A a









1 iiaant, strawberry IS..._I..-1_ ---flos


Greg Hagar is pleased
to announce that Brandel
Eldridge and Linda Mc-
Neal were recognized as
two of the 15 top produc-
ers in the nation for
Southern Financial and
Allegis Advisors group.
"We are so pleased
that Brandel and Linda
were recognized for this
tremendous achievement
I see how hard they work
for our clients every day,


so it is nice that they are
recognized by their
peers," Hagar said.
This award recognizes
the top 15 life, annuity
and securities produc-
ers for 2012. Southern
Financial Consultants
and Allegis Advisors
Group are nationwide fi-
nancial services firms.
Brandel Eldridge is
vice president of sales
for the Hagar Group and


has been with the firm
since 1994. Linda Mc-
Neal joined the firm in
2010. Established in
1929, the Hagar Group is
the area's oldest and
largest continuous in-
surance agency With of-
fices in Inverness and
Crystal River, they offer
a full range of home-
owners, auto, financial
services and business
insurance products.


Yellico joins The Hagar Group

Veronica Yellico has joined The Hagar Group
as a Life, Health and Annuity agent. Veronica
brings extensive banking and insurance industry
experience. She will work with Hagar Group
clients to help them secure life, health and
L. _annuity products.
"We are excited to have Veronica join our firm,"
said Greg Hagar, senior vice president. "We
know she will put her experience to work to assist
S our clients."
Veronica has lived in Citrus County since 1995.
Contact her at 352-794-6594 or vyellico@
Veronica Yellico thehagargroup.com.


YOU CAUGHT f 7
MY EYE ...
Jamie Bannon
Cadence Bank, Homosassa
... FOR
OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER
SERVICE!


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.












To place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


F: (6mai m lini m


Choice -otMeia-Mdia -- --Sle el rae/ eerl Ani- i


Cute, sweet, petite,
intelligent women
looking for a SWM,
well groomed, with lots
of energy. Age 70-80
and looking for
companionship.
(352) 212-6157 LM.



4/3/2, POOL HOME
3,000 sf, granite coun-
ters, SS appl's., wood
firs., Reduced $25,000
Asking $235,000
850-585-4026
Bedroom Suite,
cherry, queen size
mattress & spring,
headboard, 2 night
stands, dresser, bu-
reau and mirror, very
good cond. $375.
(352) 566-8814,
(352) 249-8092
Cute, sweet, petite,
intelligent women
looking for a SWM,
well groomed, with lots
of energy. Age 70-80
and looking for
companionship.
(352) 212-6157 LM.
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
FREEDOM 12
FISHING KAYAK
w/ elec trolling motor,
battery, & accessories.
$800. (419) 871-2210
HOMOSASSA 2/1
Fenced Quiet Country
Setting, Addition, Shed,
Lg.Deck, new drain
field, as is $29,900 obo
*(352) 628-5244**
SECTIONAL COUCH
12'x 10' 7 piece couch.
Black w/turquoise, navy
blue. Very good Cond.
$325; 6 Panel Oriental
Black Lacquer & Gold
Screen $325
(352) 503-9494



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087



2 Very Nice Dogs
Golden Retriever/Lab
Mix, chestnut color
& Black Lab, both
nice watch dogs,
very gentle,
Like to go together
(352) 637-6310
5 Month Old Kittens
to good home. Have
both males & females
(352) 476-5230
FREE KITTENS
(352) 860-0964



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077



Black Labrador
Retriever, about 1a yrs
old, answers to "Buddy",
lost in vicinity of
W. Dunnellon Rd.
Owner is heartbroken.
(352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662
GREY FEMALE
CALICO CAT
female, approx. 2
yrs.old, her kittens
miss her! grey, orange
& tan lost in the
Humanitarians, Rt 44,
parking lot
(352) 476-1878

Ix iI


HELP!
Find our lost CAT.
Last seen: Standish
Dr & Battle Cr. near
Mason Cr. Black &
White. Has a black
mustache.
352-503-7928




Your World


LOSI I iger marKings
Brindle Pit Bull Mix
751bs, long tail, very,
timid. Afraid of People.
Lost near 486/Pine
Ridge near construction.
(352) 601-0339
LOST Mens
Brushed Yellow Gold
Wedding Band in Inver-
ness. Please call
(352) 637-2273
REWARD
Lost Pomeranian
Female, 10yrs old
Near California St.
Beverly Hills
REWARD
352-476-0583
Lost Set of Keys
Blue & Silver light
on Chain
Crystal River or
Beverly Hills Area
(352) 527-1322


MALAMUTE
belongs to my little boy
he's heartbroken, 5 yr
old female. Her name is
Foxxy, fawn and white,
missing from Turner
Fish Camp, Potts
Preserve area. Please
call 352-201-2540
MINI PINCHER MIX
black, approx 2 yrs old,
brown eyes, answers to
Oscar, lost in the vicinity
of Cardinal St.
Homosassa. pis call
352-212-1931 or
352-419-2650, if no
answer, pls Iv msg w/
name & number




DOG LONG HAIR
BLACK & GREY,
W/HARNESS,
FOUND IN
INVERNESS OFF OF
TURNERCAMP RD.
(352) 344-4006




Not Looking for
Someone, just trying
to help people. If you
are Bored, Lonely,
Need Answers. Call
someone who cares.
24-7 (352) 426-1821




FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077




Cleaning Person
Needed bi-weekly
Call (352) 503-5002




TEACHER

Fulltime/Part time,
Exp. Req. CDA Pref.
TADPOLES
EARLY LEARNING
(352) 560-4222





SENIOR
SECRETARY
Announcement
#13-05

Advanced Secretar-
ial work performing
general clerical
duties in the
Department of
Water Resources.
Must possess a
current valid Florida
driver license. $10.77
hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us .
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, February 8,
2013. EOE/ADA.




Domestic





Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII


EXPERIENCED
CERTIFIED
SURGICAL TECH

Wanted for
fast-paced outpa-
tient surgery center.
Flexible scheduling.
Excellent pay and
benefits. No nights,
weekends, no call
or holidays.
Apply at:
110 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto
or fax resume to:
352-527-1827.

EXPERIENCED
OPERATING
ROOM RN

Wanted for
fast-paced outpa-
tient surgery center.
Flexible scheduling.
Excellent pay and
benefits. No nights,
weekends, no call
or holidays.
Apply at:
110 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto or fax
resume to:
352-527-1827.

HOME HEALTH
OPPORTUNITIES

BayCare HomeCare
provides
high-quality, com-
passionate care
right at home. Join
us for great career
opportunities, a
special way to work,
and the chance to
be the kind of pro-
fessional you want
to be.
Crystal River
* Home Health Clini-
cians (RNs) -PRN
- MSW Social
Worker II PRN
Spring Hill
* Patient Care
Supervisor (RN) -
Full-Time
* Home Health
Clinicians (RNs) -
Full-Time & PRN


Contact

Amy Wright

at

727-519-176

8or

apply nine


BayCaiJob
&com
&COm


Vr BayCare
HomeCare

EOE/AA/M/F

/D/V

DF/TFWP

NURSING
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center of
Citrus County
in Lecanto

RN I LPN
Full-time and PRN
positions available
for Florida-licensed
nurses. Full-time shifts
are 7 a.m.-3 p.m. 3
p.m.-11 p.m. and 11
p.m.-7 a.m. PRN po-
sitions available for
all shifts. Long-term
care experience
preferred.
CNA
Full-time and PRN
positions available
for Florida-certified
nursing assistants.
Full-time shifts are 3
p.m.-11 p.m. and 11
p.m.-7 a.m. PRN po-
sitions available for
all shifts. Long-term
care experience
preferred.
We offer great pay
and benefits for
full-time associates,
including medical
coverage. 401 (k)
and paid vacation,
sick days and holi-
days.
Hannah Mand
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln
Lecanto, FL 34461
Hannah Mand@
LCCA.com
Visit us online at
LCCA.COM.
EOE/M/F/V/D -
37764


Cam
Center"JHr
1-13,u--


. ..- I I -+ Ti- -Li- I I


DOCTORS ASSIST
Needed

Must Draw Blood
EKG & Injections
SEND RESUME TO:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1825M
1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd
Crystal River Fl. 34429

EXPERIENCED
RECEPTIONIST
For fast pace
medical office. Must
be able to work
under pressure &
handle multiple
phone lines. Medical
terminology &
insurance
knowledge required.
Send resume to:
reply2013@
hotmail.com

FIT RN

IV Exp. preferred
For physicians office
with benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1787M
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River,
Forida 34429

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885






Physical
Therapist and
Physical Therapy
Assistant

For established
therapy team of
PT's and PTA's.
Willing to train or
mentor. Must be
passionate about
patient care. With
a strong emphasis
on orthopedics.
CONTACT
SET Home Health
352-564-2738
or email resume to
sethomehealth@
embarqmail.com
EOE #HHA299993458

RECEPTIONIST

Needed for busy
Medical Office.
Experience preferred.
Includes benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1787M
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River,
Florida 34429

RN or RN OCN
MED. ASST.
W/ PHLEBOTOMY

DETAILS AT
www.flcancer.com
Florida Cancer
Specialists





.NET Developer

with C++ and .NET
experience.
Design & develop-
ment of .NET based
components and
features for our
Industrial SCADA
and HMI software
products.
Other desirable
experience -
Web Services,
ASPNET, HTML5,
Javascript, XMLSVG
Other domain
expertise -
SCADA, HMI, Manu-
facturing Execution,
CRM, or related.
Resumes may be
e-mailed to:
kokeefe@
b-scada.com

Draftsman

Custom home builder
seeking part time
draftsman with the
potential for full time
position. The ideal
candidate will have
at least 5 years
of experience
designing and
modifying custom
homes and be
familiar with local and
state building codes.
Auto Cad 2013
experience required.
Please email
resumes to mcorson
@citrushills.com.

Social Services
Assistant

Looking for ener-
getic detail oriented
person who is
comfortable taking
initiative. And enjoy
working with peo-
ple. Exp. preferred
NO PHONE CALLS
Apply in Person
CYPRESS COVE
CARE CENTER
700 SE8TH AVENUE
Crystal River EOE


LIC 440 CUST.
SERVICE REP/or
220 Agent

Needed for busy
Insurance office.
Apply in person
9am-12N
SHELDON PALMES
INSURANCE
8469 W Grover
Cleveland,
Homosassa




SOUS CHEF

needed for upscale
private Country
Club in Citrus Co.
Previous kitchen
management re-
quired with casual
and fine dining
culinary experience.
Send Resume to:
swiley@
citrushills.com






CmkpoNicE


INSIDE SALES
REPRESENTATIVE
Citrus Publishing
Citrus County, FI
Job Summary
This position is de-
signed to increase
our market share of
retail and classified
display advertising in
all of Citrus Publish-
ing's products.
The position will
consist of receiving
incoming calls and
making outbound
service/cold calls.
The position will also
handle walk-in
advertisers from
our Meadowcrest
office.

Essential Functions
Answering incom-
ing calls for our Re-
tail and Classified
display ads
Facilitating the
display advertising
needs of walk in
customers
Making outbound
service calls to exist-
ing accounts
Develop new
customers through
prospecting and
cold calling
Develop new op-
portunities for adver-
tisers to do business
with Citrus Publish-
ing, Inc,
Consistently meet
or exceed monthly
and annual sales
goals
Increase Citrus
Publishing's Market
share through the
development of
on-line advertising
revenue
Communicate
effectively orally
and in writing with
customers and
coworkers
Problem solving,
analytical abilities
and interpersonal
skills re d
Maintain score
cards on progress
toward established
goals
Perform daily func-
tions with a minimal
amount of direction

Minimum
Qualifllcatlons
at least two years
of sales experience;
advertising experi-
ence preferred
Demonstrate per-
suasiveness and/or
sales abilities
Proper business
attire
Professional tele-
phone presence
Ability to work well in
a team environment

Administrative
This is a 40 hour a
week position

Send resume to
dJkamlot@chronl-
cleonllne.com. Dead-
line for applications
Is Feb. 12, 2013

Drug Screen
Required
for Final Applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer


rrwr


How

To Make

Your

Dining

Room

Set

Disappear...

Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!


-A -

(352) 563-5966



www.chronicleonline.com


M71 ".


Acct Specialist
Filling Immediate
Openings;
benefits offered and
training provided.
Call 352-436-4460
to Schedule an
Interview

IN-HOME SALES

One call close.
Leads provided.
DFWP/Call Charles
352-314-3625
Real Estate
Agents

Busy real estate office
needs Realtors and
Buyers Agents Call
PLANTATION REALTY
352-634-0129
SALES PERSON
WANTED

For sales of manu-
factured & modular
homes. Must be
very motivated &
have a proven sales
background. Knowl-
edge of housing &
real estate helpful.
Prior experience
helpful. E-mail re-
sume to group-
erman@
aol.com or fax to
352-621-9171




Automotive
Consultant/
Advisor

Eagle Buick GMC
Inc is in need of
experienced
Automotive Service
Consultants/Advisors
Minimum 2 yrs, deal-
ership experience.
Aggressive pay plan
and strong com-
pensation package
that includes health
insurance, paid
vacation, paid train-
ing, certification
reimbursement and
many other perks.
Drug free workplace
Application Avail. @
Eagle Buick GMC
Inc. Homosassa, Fl.
34448 Send Resume:
Fax (352) 417-0944
Email:
robbcole@eagle
buickgmc.com

Cabinet
Service Tech

Pt Time position
to start. Exp. needed.
Customer Service
Oriented. Needs to lift
minimum of 50 Ibs.
Clean driving record
license will be
checked. Wages
based on experience.
Apply in person
Deem Cabinets
3835 S Pittsburgh
Ave. Homosassa


FULL TIME
OFFICE
MANAGER

Heavy Construction
Contractor, exp. in
construction,
AR/AP/PR, Quick
Books, Excel, Word,
Preferred. Salary doe
email or fax resumes:
croftcontractinginc.@
earthlink.net
fax 352-860-2716
DFWP/EEO


Key Training
Center
has positions
available in group
home home setting.
Assist adults with
developmental
disabilities in daily
living skills. HS
Diploma/GED
required.
P/T Instructor
Assistant,
working in class-
room setting with
adults with develop-
mental disabilities.
HS Diploma/
GED required.
Apply in person at
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto FL
34461 *E.O.E.*


MANATEE
TOUR
CAPTAIN
NEEDED

Full Time
(352) 777-1796


Senior Lending
Officer/Office
Manager

Brannen Bank,
a banking institution in
central Florida,
is seeking a Senior
Lending Officer/ Office
Manager for the Citrus
county area. Re-
quires a bachelors
degree in business or
finance, residential
and commercial
lending experience
and at least four
year's Office Manager
Experience.
Duties include man-
agement of daily
branch operations
and originating a
variety of consumer
loan's. Offer's a
competitive salary and
benefit package. If
interested, please
forward resume' to

Brannen Banks of
Florida, Inc.
Attn: Carol Johnson
PO Box 1929
Inverness, FL
34451-1929
EEO/M/F/V/D/DFWP






APPT. SETTERS
NEEDED

Sign on Bonus.
Great Commission Pay
and weekly bonuses
Call Bob 352-628-3500


CHINA CLOSET
VINTAGE Deco, real
wood,show glass door,
photo upon request.
100.00 513-4473



Antique American
Cast Iron Toys 20+,
oriental carvings,
wood & stone 30+
2 Remmingtons, org.
size (352) 637-5958


CAREGIVERS
NEEDED

All Shifts Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto


Exp. appt. setters

Top Pay, Hrly. Clean
work enviontment
Dave (352) 794-6129

r-N m m
NEWSPAPER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and other
newspapers for
home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per day.

Must have insured
and reliable vehicle
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up with
a cap-Large enough
Sto hold our Sunday
product

Apply in Person
1624 N Medowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pm

Newspaper carriers
are independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle


iCH 0o-ILEi
l- -- --J .





CASUAL
LIFEGUARD
(12 POSITIONS
AVAILABLE)

Skilled duties life-
guarding at Bicen-
tennial Park Pool
and Central Ridge
Pool. May guard for
swim lessons, birth-
day parties and
special events.
MUST POSSESS
AND MAINTAIN THE
FOLLOWING
CERTIFICATIONS:
CURRENT RED
CROSS LIFEGUARD,
FIRST AID AND
CPR/AED FOR THE
PROFESSIONAL
RESCUER. *WE
WILL NOT TRAIN *
Must possess a valid
Florida Driver
License. Flexible
schedule, 10 -30
hours weekly.
Pay range: $7.79-
$8.50 hourly.
Casual labor
applications may
be completed
on line at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
and returned to the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
This position is open
until filled. EOE/ADA.


11111111
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111



2 DR WHITE MAYTAG
REFRIG. w/Ice Maker
21.8 cu ft.
Less than 2yrs old.
$350
(352) 726-8021
Amish Heat Surge
Electric Heater
will fit in Fire Place
No cabinet,
$75. (352) 341-7741
ELECTRIC STOVE
SELF CLEANING
Westinghouse, Almond,
looks good, works good
$100.00 513 -4473
KENMORE 25'CU
STAINESS STEEL side
by side, w/water & ice,
4yrs old, Super Buy!
$750 352-897-4196
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
WASHERS & DRYERS
(352) 209-5135



Office/Home furnishings
for sale. Great Prices!!
Lecanto 772-932-8939









Fri. 02/01 Preview @
4pm, Auction@ 6pm
General Merchandise
Sat. 02/02 Preview @
4pm, Auction@ 6pm
Antiques/Gen. Merch
Sun. 02/03 Preview @
12:30, Auction@ 1pm
Tailgate/Box lots
**WE BUY ESTATES**
6055 N. Carl G. Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
AB3232 (352)613-1389


D4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


12 GALLON SEARS
AIR COMPRESSOR
WITH HOSE $100
464-0316



YAMAHA RECEIVER &
TECHNICS DUAL
STEREO CASSETTE
PLAYER BOTH FOR
$100 352-613-0529
YAMAHA SET OF 5
SPEAKERS GOOD
CONDITION $100
352-613-0529


-I
DOUBLE & SINGLE
garage doors, both for
$250 352-601-7911



DIESTLER COM-
PUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
MAGELLAN
ROAD MATE GPS -
5220-LM. Never used.
$90 352-637-5969



Chipper/Shredder
Troy-Bilt Tomahawk,
Briggs & Stratton gas
engine. $700 OBO
(352) 601-3174



"DINETTE SET-
4 ft Glass top w/4
chairs on casters,
good.cond.$200
(352) 897-4739
*TV STAND
40WX18DX28H,
3-SHELVES
4- DRAWERS $95
634-2004
48" Believed Glass
Dining Room Table, 4
chairs, upholstered
seats, decorative
painting back & legs
$150. Lazy Boy Rocker
Recliner $75. Pine
Ridge (352) 270-8116
AIR COMPRESSOR
Devillbiss, twin cyl 4
hp, 20 gal. $150
352-628-4360
Bedroom Suite,
cherry, queen size
mattress & spring,
headboard, 2 night
stands, dresser, bu-
reau and mirror, very
good cond. $375.
(352) 566-8814,
(352) 249-8092
CHROME & GLASS
UTILITY CART,14"
DIA,28"H
3 SHELVES $25
634-2004
DINING TABLE & 4
SWIVEL CHAIRS
46"L 35"W 29"T
2 12" leaf
picture available
$95 352-422-7646


,it,.111 ,4l L

Y)our \\iorlil fhrst.

o y) Da)



CHikNiiE


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179



Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052
CNA
Available for Private
Duty in you home.
References avail, on
request. (352) 453-7255
HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping
Dr. appts, errands,
etc. Hablo Espanol
813-601-8199




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump
Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




Your World












i b f ,
0.- l I J ,l l ,,h



4CM've "&


Entertainment Ctr
Oak w/ 2 drawers and 4
doors, will ft a 36" TV,
very good cond $150;
off white love seat,
like new $175
(765) 336-9590
Futon
Very good cond.
org. $300
sell for $125.
(352) 270-8772
KING SIZE
PILLOW TOP
Mattress, Box Spring
& Frame.
Excel. Cond. $550
315-723-5353
KING SIZE WICKER
HEAD BOARD Good
cond. $75.00 photo
upon request 513-4473
LG Leather Sectional
Couch, Mustard Color
Good Condition
$350 352-746-1447
Living Room/
Dining Room
Lg 6 pc sectional
w/recliner & Sofa.
Loden Grn Must see!
$500 obo; Dining Rm
table w/ beveled glass
top, 4 char/blue velour
chairs, $225 746-0817
LOVE SEAT
Tan, 64 inches. Never
Used, Moving must
sell. Asking $350
(352) 746-2479
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500
Moving Sale
27" Magnavox TV $75
15" Quasar TV w/
Stand, $25,
6 Tray tables $15.
(352) 489-5669
OAK ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER with T.V.
$95.00 NICE. Dunnellon
352-875-5134
QUEEN MATTRESS,
BOX SPRING &
FRAME with all linens.
$150 (352) 287-6601
SECTIONAL COUCH
12' x 10' 7 piece couch.
Black w/ turquoise, navy
blue. Very good Cond.
$325; 6 Panel Oriental
Black Lacquer & Gold
Screen $325
(352) 503-9494
Sectional Sofa, light
color, like new
$500
Small secretary Desk
$100
(352) 212-3352
STIFFEL BRASS LAMP
30"H, 3WAY
CREAM PLEATED
SHADE
$50 634-2004
WATERBED king sized
waveless waterbed in
excellent condition.
$85.00 352-564-8915



CRAFTSMAN
GT 500 MOWER
25 HP, $1,200.
(352) 344-2268
CYCLONE
Yard Vac,
with extra attach-
ments $1,100
(352) 344-2268
Torro Weed Eater
$25
352-726-7789
Troybuilt Pusher
w/ Honda Engine $90
Lawnboy Pusher
w/bagger $25
352-726-7789


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



DIESTLER COM-
PUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lice #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping
Dr. appts, errands,
etc. Hablo Espanol
813-601-8199




COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL
25 yrs exp. lic.2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala |
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


-m"ui


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscap-
ing
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
*k 352422-7279**

-I

Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



1 CALL & RELAX!
25vrs Exp in 100%
property maint & all
repairs, call
H&H Services today!
lic#37658
352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
e FAST. 100%Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 **
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
P RELIABLE. Free Est
*" 352-257-9508 *


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
S Repairs
Small Carpentry
Fencing
Screening
*l dean Dryer
Vents
4rdJle & Dependable
|Eq f Lc nce lifelong
352- 344-0905
cell- 400-1722
SLicensed & Insured- Lic.#37761


Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




Cleaning Svc-Home,
office,windows,
pressure washing &
more. 352-322-1799




AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat.&Sun HUGE SALE
8584 W. Candleglow St.




Black Leather
Biker Vest,
New, Never worn,
Size 44
$55. (352) 637-7124
LINESMAN BOOTS 16"
Carolina 923. Size 9.
NEW condition. $100.
352/566-8066
PGH STEELER SKI
JACKET Mens Med
NFL Very Good Cond.
$25. Dunnellon
465-8495




PHONE/FAX MACHINE
Panasonic plain paper
Fax/Copier
excellent condition
$30.00352-628-2150




!!!!!225/70 R19.5!!!!!
Great read!! Only asking
$100 for the pair!
(352)857-9232
:::::275/70 R16.5:::::
Good tread!! Only ask-
ing $100 for the pair!
(352)857-9232
--~~~33X10.5 R15~~--
Good tread!! Only ask-
ing $100 for the pair!
(352)857-9232
4 WHEEL WALKER-
hand brakes & wheel
locks, seat, basket,
folds for storage, Ex.,
$50. 352-628-0033
12 ft. Aluminum John
Boat, no paper work
$165.
Trailer, spare tire and
wheel, fits 10" 15"
$35. (315) 466-2268
2" BALL MOUNT. 3 1/4
INCH DROP. 2" STAIN-
LESS STEEL BALL,
PIN AND CLIP. $35.00
CALL 352 344-2821
6' USED CHAIN LINK
FENCE 2 15' SEC-
TIONS. 2 END & LINE
POSTS & HARD-
WARE. $95.00
352 344-2821
BIRD CAGE
32x21x36high. 62" high
with stand. Bar spacing
1/2". Excellent condi-
tion.$80.00. 726 5753
CHAIN LINK FENCE
FABRIC. 22' X 4'
UNUSED CHAIN LINK
FENCE FABRIC.
$18.00 352 344-2821
Darkroom Equipment
Beseler 4 x 5 enlarger
inc. trays, stand & other
accessories $350 for all
352-746-6504
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077
JIGSAW PUZZLES
63 jigsaw puzzles
$45.00 obo
352-746-3799
LARGE (FERRET)
CAGE
H 51", L 32", W 20"
VG condition $75 OBO
(352) 795-3388
LINESMAN BOOTS 16"
Carolina 923. Size 9.
NEW condition. $100.
352/566-8066


BEAT ANY PRICE
Paint & Power wash
Lawn & Trees Trim
Jim (352) 246-2585
LAWNCARE N
MORE
Yard Clean-up,
leaves
bushes, hauling
352-726-9570
Winter Clean Up,
Leaves, Power Wash-
ing & More Call
Coastal Lawn Care
(352) 601-1447



AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up time.
352-220-4244



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, lawn maint.
furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from Ato Z
352-628-6790


.t-4 -11,.I Iust.
L L I,


Classifiedsd


Carpet Repair '
S 352-282-1480 cell
352-547-1636 office
Free In Home Estimates
Lic & Ins Lifetime Warranty






AAA ROOFING
Call Ae ",eak6usteas
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF:
,Any Re-Roof:
iMust present coupon at time contract is signed 1
|Lic/ins. CCC057537DWEQ


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 D5


Clean and Very Nice
Fulls $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
MOVING SALE
EVERYTHING MUST
GO!
(352)220-1440
NEW SKYLIGHT
BUBBLE TYPE
SMOKED
POLYCARBONATE
27 X 27 $60 464-0316
SNAPPER 42" RIDING
MOWER/GENERAC
4"000W GENERATOR
Mower $1000. incl
mulch attachment
GenSet $375.BOTH
LIKE NEW
352-489-6465
Stallion Cow Boy Hat,
by Stetson, wool, sz 6 1
& Boots, black 11% /D.
both New $100.
Glass Top Table w/ 4
chairs $100.
352-795-7254
Two Clip- on Towing
Mirrors $20
30 lb full propane
bottle w/carrying box
$40 352-341-1649
WOODEN CRADLE
AND HIGH CHAIR,
great cond. $150
TWIN BOX SPRING/
MAT $50
(352) 795-7254



COPIER HP 150 color
copier/printer, works
great. $35.00
352-628-2150
PRINTER Epson Stylus
Photo R200 color printer
in excellent condition
$30.00352-628-2150



4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES AND
SEAT FOLDS UP
GREAT SHAPE 75.00
464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
ADJUSTABLE LEGS
ON BOTH 20.00 EACH
464-0316
CRUTCHES ADJUST-
ABLE $10. Cane w/ 4
feet $10. Reach ex-
tender $5. Ultra grabber
$10. (352) 563-6410
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT
RESTS GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $100 464-0316
WALKER FOLDING
ALUMINUM Excellent
condition. $15.00
(352) 563-6410
WALKER FOUR
WHEELS WITH SEAT
AND BRAKES Excellent
condition. $49.00
(352) 563-6410
WHEEL CHAIR LIFT
Easily load folding chair
(not scooter)onto
vehicle hitch $100.
Dunnellon 465-8495
WHEELCHAIR MAN-
UAL WITH LEG RESTS
Brand new. Never used.
$75.00 (352) 563-6410
WHEELCHAIR OVER-
SIZED MANUAL Brand
new. Never used.
$100.00 (352) 563-6410



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676


CLASSIFIED




BSR LARGE STEREO
HOME SPEAKERS 20"
WIDE BY 30" HIGH
ONLY $100 NICE
464-0316




HAVILAND CHINA
Forever Spring Pattern
Service for 8 people
$100 352-465-8495




Body Fit,
Gravity Machine,
$50.
Circle Glide
$25. Both Like New
(352) 447-1553
ELECTRIC TREADMILL
COMPACT (FOLDS
UP) LIFESTYLE ALL
ELECTRONICS $100
464-0316
EXERCISE BIKE (DP)
UPRIGHT TYPE
WORKS THE ARMS
TOO. ONLY 85.000
464-0316
EXERCISE BIKE
LIFESTYLE SMALL
COMPACT ONLY 95.00
464-0316
ROWING MACHINE BY
BODY ROW. WORKS
THE LEGS TOO $60.00
464-0316




5HP, Game Fisher
Outboard, with Tank
Just tuned up
$450
Will take Gun on trade
(906) 285-1696
BROWNING BUCK
MARK 22 L.R. RIMFIRE
PISTOL includes 6000
rounds of 22 ammo,
and 3 spare magazines.
Will sell as a total pack-
age only. $680.00 cash
only Call 352-465-4373
CLUB CART GOLF
CART, Exc Cond, w/
Charger, good tires,
almost new batteries,
enclosure, $1500
352-527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF CLUBS
Two sets, clubs, carts
and accessories.
$40.00 each set.
726-1495
Ping G2 Iron, S/W-3
Irons, graphite reg.
shaft $175., Taylor
Made R7, Irons, G/W -
4 Irons Graphite, Sr.
shaft $195. 860-0048
REMINGTON 700 BDL
270cal exc cond. $495.
will take lever action
30-30 on trade.
(906) 285-1696




2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1895
call 352-527-0555
UTILITY TRAILER
5X8 w/ stake sides,
1%1x4 in tongue &
grove floor, new tires,
spare, wheel bearings
w/ bearing buddies
$575 (269) 532-8100


JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump
Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374



CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Robert G. Vigliotti LLC
Painting
Int/Ext FREE
ESTIMATES 35 yrs
exp.
call 508-314-3279



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
BEAT ANY PRICE
Paint & Power Wash
Lawn & Trees Trim
Jim (352) 246-2585
Cleaning Svc-Home,
office,windows,
pressure washing &
more. 352-322-1799


GENERAL -
Stand Alone 1
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377


Add an artislidc touch to your existing yard
IE^ or pool or plan
Something
S- omplelely new!
"Often imitated,
nevei dupikated"


YOUR INTEPI OCKING BRICKPA VIR SPECIAIIST


POOL AND PAVER LLC
Licensed 352-400-3188
& Insured 352-400-3188


_eSa


MEEKO
Meeko is a 2-y.o.
terrier/pit mix, a
perfect gentleman.
Very mellow, with
quiet dignity, calm
energy, very low
key. Weighs 70
pounds, beige and
white in color,
housebroken, easily
trained,. Gets along
with other dogs. His
kind and pleading
eyes will win your
heart, a perfect
dog to join you on a
walk. He is a sweet-
heart of a dog,
patiently waiting
at Citrus County
Animal shelter.
Call Karen @
218-780-1808.

Shih-Tzu Pups,
ACA, Males
starting@ $400. Lots
of colors, Beverly
Hills, FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net





Bermuda Hay 501bs $6
Never been rained on
795-1906 586-1906
SHAMROCK FARM, CR


* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300
Robert G. Vigliotti LLC
Painting
Int/Ext FREE
ESTIMATES 35 yrs
exp.
call 508-314-3279
Winter Clean Up,
Leaves, Power Wash-
ing & More Call
Coastal Lawn Care
(352) 601-1447




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713




DGS SERVICES LLC
Reroofs Metal Roofs
REPAIRS Home
Inspector 414-8693



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only%$28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII





CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492

WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369





1 Sweet Little Male
Yorkie,
CKC reg., $375. Fl.
health certs.,
Call
(352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258


Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.
COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
k 352-302-6838 k

#1 Employment source is

www.chronicleonline.com


ALL EXTERIOR
// \


ALUMINUM Ic.


352-621-0881
.1FAX 352-621-0812T
6" Seamless Gutters
Screen Rooms Car Ports
Hurricane Protection
allextalum13@yahoo.com
ICitrus tic. #2396 LICENSED & INSURED


BLUE
Blue is an approxi-
mately 8-y.o. neutered
male Cattle Dog mix,
Came to the shelter
because his family
lost their home. Blue
is white and tan,
weighs about 50
pounds, is a bit
chubby for his size,
which is medium. He
is housebroken, very
friendly and affection-
ate. The most striking
thing about him is that
he has very beautiful
blue eyes, which
catch your attention
immediately. He loves
people and wants to
be by your side Is
very obedient and
walks well on a leash.
He is quite laid-back
and would make a
great companion for
an older person.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.

DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com
R] M.?j ?R]


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's LAND
CLEARING & TREE
SERVICE
Complete tree &
stump removal haul-
ing, demo & tractor
work. 32 yrs. exp.
(352) 220-9819
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call an ime!


NEED SOMEONE TO
GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?

WE MAKE IT




DISAPPEAR FOR LESS
IF YOU WANT IT
TAKEN AWAY...CALL FOR A
FREE ESTIMATE TODAY! |
352-220-9190 -







GENIE I
We (lean Windows ond a Whole Lot More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES x
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


IIII11II

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
wit a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Onl $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111





FREEDOM 12
FISHING KAYAK
w/ elec trolling motor,
battery, & accessories.
$800. (419) 871-2210




AIRBOAT
13ft x 7ft, 500 HP Cad-
illac, turn key boat
$9,500 obo Call Jim for
details (813) 361-4929,

BAYLINER 175
2007, Bowrider, garage
kept, Bimini top, custom
cover, depth finder, only
44 hrs on motor,pristine
condition! $14,000.
352-560-7377



BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motor,AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth
finder, 2001 Rolls
float on trailer worth
$1000. Comes
w/spare motor Has
service manual,
2nd owner $2250
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855

C DORY
1999 16ft, Angler, with
trailer, Honda 4 stroke,
40HP, $7,800 Floral City
(717) 994-2362 Cell


















LL BEAN
16 ft, ABS, canoe,
with paddle &
jackets, $650 obo
(352) 628-3194


I Livesto


PONTOON
'97, Suntracker, 21ft.
50HP, 4 stroke, Merc.
alum. deck, kept un-
der roof. clean, no
trailer $5,500 637-5958
STAR CRAFT
'09 Pontoon, 20 ft w/
trailer, 50hp, like new
condition $11,400 OBO
(618) 444-9425
TRI PONTOON
BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
(352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
WELLCRAFT 1989
18' Sport C/C, T top,
150 Yam. Alum TIr,
Great Cond. $5800
Cr Rvr (513) 260-6410




ITASCA
2007 Navaron 23H
Mercedes Diesel, 2.7L,
17 mpg, generator, AC,
one slide out, sleeps 5,
excellent condition,
$55,000 make offer
352-422-1309
ITASCA MERIDIAN
36 Ft, 2005 Motor Home
350HP Cat Diesel 55K
miles, no smoke/pets
6 Michelin Tires, New
2010 qn w/sleep No.
mattress & overhead
fan. W/D combo
$71,000 obo .
(352) 419-7882
MONTEGO BAY 35ft
5th wheel '06, 3 slides
kept undercover, Exc
cond. Truck Avail.
LOADED
$27,000 (352) 564-2756
NATIONAL RV
2006 Tropical One
owner,34ft, 26000
miles,no smoke/pets,
300HP Cummins die-
sel,2 slides, 6 new ti-
res, 3yr
warranty,many extras.
$87000. Well main-
tained. 352-341-4506
SUNNYBROOK
2008, 35FT Fifth Wheel
3 slides, electric awning
fireplace, 2 ac's, 50 amp
king bed, pmts assum-
able @ $424 per mnth.
352-279-3544
WASTE TANK
Thetford 27 Gallon.
4 wheel smart tote,
premuim portable
Waste Tank $110 obo
(352) 746-9851




5TH WHEEL
33FT
GOOD CONDITION
MUST SELL
(423) 202-0914
Brooksville Deeded
spacious, shaded cnr
lot, 1BR/1BA, Large FL
room, Large storage
shed & patio. 55+ RV
Park w/ heated pool,
and music activities,
$36,000 352-848-0448,
352- 428-0462 anytime


Baby Girl
Baby Girl is a 3-y.o.
spayed terrier mix,
weighs 48 lbs,
heartwonrm-negative,
housebroken.
Friendly, likes chil-
dren, other dogs,
lived with a cat,
which she liked.
Walks well on a
leash, is a fun-loving,
active girl,
well-mannered.
Sweet, energetic girl
is waiting to meet
her forever family.
ID # is 15902545.
Call 352-746-8400.




BIRD SUPPLY SALE
Sun, Feb. 3, 9a-3p,
Cages, Seed, Toys,
Playstands, Milletspray
& more! Save! Cage
wire, Chicks & duck-
lings! 8260 Adrian Dr.,
Brooksville
727-517-5337


PME 4,ir e o







DG SNDA, FBRURY 3 203 CAS IF ED CIRUSCOUNY (L) HROICL


32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Licl/Ins.
ROCKWOOD
'04, 29 ft., Ultra Lite,
SS. Appls Qn. Bd., Full
Bath, all equip, incl'd
$8,500 obo, 382-0153
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, kg bd,like new,
60amp serv. NADA
$29K asking $25K
obo 352-382-3298
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945



TOPPER
8 ft Red Fiberglass
must sell $200 obo
Lecanto 941-504-0899



"BEST PRICE*
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
*352-426-4267**
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT CR
461-4518 & 795-4440



AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE.
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 563-1902
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.
BUICK
2007, Lucerne, CXL
55K miles, Leather
$13,500. obo
Call Troy (352)621-7113
CHEVROLET
'01 Corvette Corvette
6 speed, black on
black, $14,500
(352) 613-2333
CHEVROLET
2002, Camaro Z28
$9,495.
352-341-0018
FORD
'01, Taurus, 140K miles
Ice cold Air, good tires,
brakes, runs good,
$2,200, 352-201-6958
FORD
2005, Five Hundred
LMT, 40K miles,
leather, V6 $9,980
Call Troy 352-621-7113
FORD
2006 Focus ZXW, SE
4DR, WGN. 85k miles
$5,800 obo Call Troy
(352) 621-7113
FORD
Mustang Cobra, Indy
500 Pace Car-1994,
Convertible, 7100 mi,
Gar. kept 252-339-3897
Harley Davidson
'03, Super Glide,
low miles, $7,500
(352) 613-2333
HONDA
2011 CRV LX, 19K mi-
les, likenew, 4 Cyl.
$19,950
Call Troy 352-621-7113
HYUNDAI
2006 Elantra, GLS 90K
miles, likenew, 4 DR,
auto. $6,800
Call Troy 352-621-7113
MAZDA
2007, RX8 Looking for
A sports Car, Look No
Further!l This is A Must
See...Call for an Appt.
and Pricing
352-628-4600
MERCURY
2004, Grand Marquis,
Leather and Loaded
To Many Options to
List. Call Today
Before It's Gone
Call 352-628-4600
MITSUBISHI
2011 Galant Low Mi.
Great fuel economy,
Priced to sell
Call 352-628-4600
For Appointment
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
MUSTANG
1985, coupe, 58k mile
new tires, 4 cyl, auto
$2000 obo
(352) 228-4012
MUSTANG GT 03
63k,ShowCar,Super
charger, lots of goodies!
Chrome, $18k OBO
(352) 228-4012
NISSAN
'04, 350 Z, Convertible,
2 Door, automatic, sil-
ver, 53k miles, $12,500
obo (352) 382-4239
OLDSMOBILE '99
Cutlass, custom, 4 DR,


loaded, good mi., V6,
cruise, tilt, gar. clean
$3,375. (352) 212-9383
PONTIAC
2008, G6,
4 Door, Cold AC
Call 352-628-4600
For Pricing
SATURN
2002 SL Low mileage!
Interior is in excellent
condition. Come see for
yourself. 352-423-3836
SATURN
2002 SL Low mileage!
Interior is in excellent
condition. Come see for
yourself. 352-423-3836
TOYOTA
2000, Camry LE
V6, 183K miles Super
Clean $5,800. obo
Troy (352) 621-7113
TOYOTA
2007, Yaris, 59K miles,
2 DR, H/B $7,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113


AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR Show
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. FEB. 3. 2013
1-800-438-8559
CHEVY
89 Corvette, White
needs trans $3250
352-601-0355






Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966




CHEVROLET
1994,C/K 2500
$2,880
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2005, Silverado
2500 HD, Diesel crew
cab, $13,880
352-341-0018
DODGE
1997 Ram 2500 Truck
Cummins Diesel, 2WD,
Auto Trans,116,000
miles. Garage kept.
Well maintained. Has
been used as a com-
mute vehicle. $7,800
firm. 352464-4690
FORD
1999 F150 Good
condition, 4 new tires
$4200 352-270-7420
FORD
2003 F150
Ex Cab, $8,990
352-341-0018
FORD
'98, Ranger Splash,
very well kept, cold AC,
6 cyl., auto, Tires like
new, $3,200 obo
(352) 601-0572
FORD
F150, 1978, 4x4
Runs good, 6" Lift kit,
$1,650 obo
(352) 564-4598
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
TOYOTA
2002, Tacoma,
Crew Cab, $8,770.
352-341-0018
TOYOTA
2004, 4 Runner Sport
2WD, 94K mi, Leather
$12,800. obo
Call Troy 352-621-7113


CADILLAC
2007, Escalade,
44k miles, Luxury
NAV, $29,500.
Call Troy (352)
621-7113
CHEVY TRAIL-
BLAZER LT 05
exc. cond. asking $6000
obo, in Hernando
(904) 923-2902
DODGE
1998 Durango, 4 WD
SLT, 5.2L, 103K orig mi.
All options, one owner
$1000 352-527-8636



JEEP
2001 4cyl TJ" Auto.,
A/C, soft top with lift kit.
not a mudder, real pretty
Low miles $10,000
352-220-4634
JEEP
2004, Wrangler X 4WD,
Only 57K miles,
Hard Top $13,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113



DODGE
1999, Work Van
138k miles, mechani-
cally sound $2,500
obo (352) 344-2132
KIA
2006 Sedona,
Great Family Van,
7 Pass, low mi. Call
today for Low Price
352-628-4600



BAD BOY BUGGIE
2011 "ready to hunt"
Only $5998.
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS
2002, SPORTSMAN
700 CC 4X4 AUTO
READY FOR THE MUD
ONLY $4288
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS RZR 800 LE
TIME TO PLAY HARD
ONLY $8388
(352) 621-3678



Harley Davidson
2005, 883
LOW MILES
$3,995.
Harley Davidson
2006, STREET GLIDE
EZ FINANCE
$11,500.
HONDA
2009, VT750 AERO,
CLEAN
$4,995.
SUZUKI
2001, VOLUSIA
EZ FINANCE
$2,995.
KAWASAKI
1999, NOMAD
RUNS GREAT
$3,800.
LUCKY U CYCLES
352-330-0047
WWW.LUCKYU
CYCLESCOM


Harley-DAVIDSON
2006 FLHTPI Clean
bike, great looks, 88 ci,
5 speed, low miles 19K,
accident free, never
played down, garage
kept, two tone bk/wt, all
service done by HD
dealer 352 513-4294
asking $10,500
HARLEY-Davidson
Leather Jacket LG as
New, $300. OBO
Two shorty motorcycle
Helmets S/M & L/XL
$50ea 352-746-6125
HONDA
'04, 750 Shadow Aero.
Runs & looks great!
$2,995. Firm
(352) 344-0084
HONDA BLACK BIRD
CBR 1100 LOW LOW
MILES ONLY $3488.00
(352) 621-3678
HONDA SPIRIT
2002, ExcTires, Bags,
WS, Sissy Bar, Cobra
Pipes. 28k miles.
$2,000 (352) 476-3688
HONDA ST1300
2006 MADE TO TOUR
ONLY $7786
(352) 621-3678
KAWASKI NINFA
650
LIKE NEW ONLY
$5488 (352) 621-3678
KYMCO
2009, ABILITY
SCOOTER GREAT
GAS SAVER ONLY
$998 (352) 621-3678
SCOOTER
Lifan Industries, 2008
50cc, looks & runs
great. $750 obo
(352) 436-5036
SUZUKI BURGMAN
AUTOMATIC TWIST
AND GO FUN ONLY
$4686 (352) 621-3678
SUZUKI GSXR 750
195 MILES "HOLD ON"
ONLY $9996
(352) 621-3678
VICTORY CROSS
ROADS
"GREAT American
MADE CRUSIER"
ONLY $12888
(352) 621-3678






Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?

This area's
#1
employment
source!


SClassifieds

M~,vi, e [ etingal .


312-0203 SUCRN
02-13 CC Tourist Development Council Meeting
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
will hold a regular meeting on Wednesday, February 13, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. at the
Lecanto Government Building, Room 166, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Ex-
ecutive Offices of the Board of County Commissioners, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, In-
verness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
N. Apopka Avenue, Room 102, Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560, at least one
day before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
Governing Body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based (Section 286.0101, Florida Statute).
February 3, 2013.

314-0203 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
2/14/13 Meeting of the Citrus County Economic Development Council, Inc.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Thursday, February 14, 2013 at 8:30 am. at the College of Central
Florida, Lecanto, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: John Siefert, Executive Director
February 3, 2013.

313-0203 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Citrus County
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB 010-13
NEIGHBORHOOD STABILIZATION PROGRAM
NSP3 B-I 1-UN-12-0020
Housing Rehabilitation Services
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to furnish all labor and materials to rehabilitate three (3) single family homes for its
Neighborhood Stabilization Program. The three (3) homes are as follows:
79 S. Adams, Beverly Hills, FL
75 Rose, Beverly Hills, FL
46 S. Jeffrey, Beverly Hills, FL
The scope of the work for the above shall be provided to potential Bidders at the
mandatory pre-bid conference scheduled for February 12, 2013 @ 10:00 am. Addi-
tional information concerning the pre-bid conference is provided below
All prices shall include all labor, supervision, materials, equipment and services nec-
essary to do a workman like job. No contractor or subcontractor may participate in
this work if ineligible to receive federal or state funded contracts. Financing of the
work will be provided, in whole or in part by the Neighborhood Stabilization Program.
Citrus County and their agent will act as agent for the owner in preparing contract
documents, inspecting, and issuing payments. However, the contract will be be-
tween the owner and contractor. Bids, work performed and payments must be ap-
proved by the owner and the agent.
All Bidders must complete an application, submit such to the County's consultant,
Meridian Community Services Group, Inc., and be pre-approved by them prior to
bid submittal. Contact Meridian Community Services Group, Inc., Phone (866)
484-1975 (Toll Free) or Fax (352) 381-8270 for an application.
A Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference: A Pre-Bid Conference will be held on February 12,
2013 at 10:00 AM at the Lecanto Government Building in Room 280 located at 3600
W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461, this meeting will be followed by a Man-
datory Walk through of each location.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before February 28, 2013 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for February 28, 2013 @ 2:15 PM at 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at these meetings because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management & Budget
at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Documents for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "PURCHASING/BIDS" on the left
hand side of the Home Page then select "BIDS". Or, call the Office of Management
& Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
Joe Meek, Chairman
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
February 3, 2013.


VILLAGE TOYOTA


CUSTOMER SATISFACTION


Sales Department



Service Department



Vehicle Delivery Quality


VILLAGE TOYOTA


OF CRYSTAL RIVER


Is The Only Dealer In The 5-State


Area To Achieve This Ranking.









THANK YOU



CITRUS COUNTY




FOR VOTING US #1








Why Take A Chance With Other Dealers


When You Don't Have To!


VILLAGE TOYOTAi




OF CRYSTAL RIVER





3www.villagelovoa.com 3 f l2- 28-o10
WWW.illagetoyta.com *picture for illustration purposes only.


D6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2013 FIESTA SE


N3C024


2012 FUSION SE


N2C272


2012 FOCUS SE


M SRP.................. ....................... 19,180
Nick Nicholas Ford Discount................-280
Retail Customer Cash..........................$500
3 Payments On Us Special
Retail Customer Cash.................... $1,000

$ 17400O
',47


M SRP ....................................................25,900
Special Added Discount..............................-450
Nick Nicholas Ford Discount.... ...........-......1,201
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash...-1,750
3 Payments on Us Special
Retail Bonus Cash.............. ............ -1,500

$20o,999


M SRP ........................ ............ 20,2 15
S ecial Added Discount........................-35
Nck Nicholas Ford Discount...........-...1,181
Retail Customer Cash.... ...........-1,000
3 Payments On Us Special
Retail Customer Cash...... .........-1,000

$ 16999


2013 EDGE SE


N3T125 2012 F-150 4X4 SUPER CREW 2012 F-250 LARIAT 4X4 CREW CAB


M SRP......... .................................... 29,795
Nick Nicholas Ford Discount........ ........-796
i Retail Customer Cash.... ........................-500
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash......-1,000
Retail Bonus Customer Cash....... ..........-500
3 Payments On Us Special
Retail Customer Cash........ ................$1,500

$25,499
"OTi fAll Ford
Pre-Owne
Certified Pre-Owned Corn


M SRP..................................................... 38,335
Nick Nicholas Ford Discount......................1,936
Retail Customer Cash........... ............-........ 1,250
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash.....-1,250
3 Payments On Us Special
Retail Customer Cash .......................-........ 1,500
<^^ ^00-------------

Sas^aeo


i Certified
ed Vehicles
e With:


M SRP........... .................................... 54,735
XLT Diesel Discount...................................-1,500 ,-
Nick Nicholas Ford Discount.....................-3,636
Retail Customer Cash.......... ................ -1,500
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash......-1,000
3 Payments On Us Special
Retail Custom er Cash.........................................-1,500

$45,599


* 172-point inspection by factory-trained technicians
*7-year/100,000-mile powertrain warranty coverage**
* 12-month/12,000-mile Ford Comprehensive Limited Warranty Coverage**
*Vehicle history report *24/7 Roadside Assistance


2009 FORD FUSION SE
Extra clean sunroof. NPR632
$18,968
0.0^J


2011 FORD FIESTA SES
Loaded loaded, loaded. N3C057D
$ 19,668


2010 FORD ESCAPE XLT
The right size SUV. NP5767A
$19,968


2009 FORD FUSION SEL
The import beater for real. N2T247A
$19,668


2011 FORD ESCAPE XLS
Only 10k miles. NN2T313A
$21,668


2010 FORD MUSTANG GT 2009 FORD ESCAPE XLT 2010 FORD EDGE LIMITED 2010 FORDF150 LARIAT SUPER CREW 2010 FORD EDGE LIMITED
Just reduced. NP5748 Just reduced. N2T257B Vista roof and nav. N2T351 F Extra sharp lariat crew cab. N2T296A Don't miss this loaded limited. N2T374A
$25,968 $18,668 $29,968 $31,668 $31,968


2008 FORD EDGE LIMITED 2011 FORD FLEX SEL
One owner limited. N3TO99A Room for the whole family. N2C292A
$22,668 $25,668




Certified Pre-Owned


2006 FORD EXPLORER XL5 I
Nice explorer for nol much money. N3CO32A
$ 13,968


2005 FORD MUSTANG
Low mileage pony car. N2T410A
$13,968


2003 JEEP WRANGLER 4X4
" Extra clean and ready to tow. NP5777D
$14,968


N2C281


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 D7


2005 CHEVROLET MALIBU 1995 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE ORVIS 4X4 2003 FORD CROWN VICTORIA LIX 2007 CHEVY UPLANDER EXT LT
Great starter car. NP5740B Great SUV w/lob of options. N2T386B Great car. N2C294B Room for the whole family. NP5642B
$7,868 $7,968 $9,868 $12,668





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


$2,199 due at signing (after oil offers) Includes security deposil. Tax, lille, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Mileage charge of $0 25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $35,795.36.






w/ Base Preferred Equipment Group
Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For OuaIfHed
Lessees

a/MO. 36 MONTH LEASE
$3,319 due at signing (ofter all offers)] Includes security deposit. Tax, lille, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extro.
Mileage charge of $025/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $64,165.165.36.


w/ Luxury Collection Preferred Equipment Group


Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For Qualified
Lessees


/MO. 36 MONTH LEASE


$2,739 due a' '..ny g I.lh r ,IIl .Her] I..I.j A '.,s ,r, deposit Tax, lille, license, dealer fees and optional equipment exira.
Mileage char.e.. I :. n-,,.-, ..., < rr,, mle; I. iSP $43,405.36,


Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For Gualified
Lessees


w/l Preferred Equipment Group


RW 1W /MO. 36 MONTH LEASE
$2,839 due at signing (after all offers). Includes security deposil, Tax, lille, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Mileage charge of $0 25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $44,995 36,


^) CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED CERTIFIED PRE-0 WNED

2005 CHEVROLET 2007 CADILLAC 2007 HONDA 2008 CADILLAC 2007 CADILLAC 2007 PONTIAC
AVALANCHE DTS ODYSSEY DTS STS SOLSTICE
LT 4X4 LUXURY COLLECTION EX-L LUXURY COLLECTION GXP CONVERTIBLE
SILVER, LEATHER SUNROOF, GOLD MST, LUXURY PACKAGE, BURGANDY, LEATHER, SUNROOF, GOLD MIST, LUXURY PACKAGE, GOLD MIST. 31530 MILES, LUXURY BLACK, LEATHER, LOCAL OWNER,
EXTRA CLEAN, #C2M4428 LOCAL ONE OWNER TRADE,#C3X042A ONE OWNER TRADE, 1C2S270B LOCAL ONE OWNER TRADE, C382160A PERFORMANCE PACKAGE. SUNROOF, #383130 EXTRA CLEAN, #C3M108A
*s14,g98 s548 s18,98a *1,4BB Ig9ss *S s18,g8s
2007 FORD 2010 BUICK 2009 CADILLAC 2009 CADILLAC 2011 BUICK 2010 CADILLAC
F-150 LACROSSE CTS DTS LACROSSE CXS SRX
CREW CAB XLT CXL LUXURY COLLECTION LUXURY COLLECTION LUXURY COLLECTION
RED, 5.4L, VIEXTRA CLEAN, GOLD MIST, LEATHER, BLACK DIAMOND, SUNROOF, PERFORMANCE GRAY, LUXURY PACKAGE, BLACK( LOW MILES, CHROME WHEELS, BLACK, LEATHER, SUNROOF,
LOCAL TRADE. RC3X0281 LOCAL ONE OWNER TRADE, #C3Si 12A PACKAGE, ONE OWNER, #C2S245A 40.175 MILES, .C382230A SUNROOF, LOADED, #C2S269G #C3XO28H
2sa,9BB s27,BB s2gSB 2s,g0 gE as,2BSgBB sa27,4BB
2012 CADILLAC 2005 CHEVROLET 2011 FORD 2011 CADILLAC 2009 FORD 2011 CADILLAC
CTS CORVETTE EXPEDITION DTS GT 500 ESCALADE
LUXURY COLLECTION CONVERTIBLE LIMITED PREMIUM COLLECTION LUXURY COLLECTION
RADIANT SILVER, LUXURY PACKAGE, BLACK, ONLY 22,000 MILES, ONE OWNER WHITE, 11000 MILES, ONE OWNER, NAVIGATION, VANILLA LATTE, 15,000 MILES, SUNROOF BLACK, 27,67 MILES, AWESOME CAR WITH ALL BLACK. 22 CHROME WHEELS. SUNROOF,
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sg ,488 *2S,988 a33,988 a35, 9833 s83,9SBB 49qs





4040 SW COLLEGE ROAD OCALA, FL 352-732-4700


F


D8 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013






H Section E SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013




OMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUlD


Sikorski's

-- Attic PAGE E4


I .


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9-j


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a j















A Felt
Pillow,
availa
Impor
decor
long b
favor
and
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la
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AP


Roses
$39.95,
ble at Pier 1
ts. In home
, roses have
'een a
te pattern
motif, in
Ipapers,
ce, chintz
nd soft silk
furnishings
uch as
curtains,
bedding
and carpet.
Associated Press/
'ier 1 Imports







E2 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EnIj h~ RENTALS i

AVAILABLE

J_ ____ B I __ ... Visit


EZ CARE HOME!
*New Roof Shingles Cool A/C in 2011!
* New Dbl. Door Ext. Paint & Lawn 2011
* Inviting Entryway Relaxing Master Suite
* On Greenbelt Area Very Upscale Comm.
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 -
Eimuill elliesulloni leimux nel he
www.FoinidilsilngInlo.com I


5BR, 3.5 BATH ON 10 ACRES!!!
*2004 Goldcrest Home *3-Car Garage
* Mother-In-Law Suite 15x30 Heated, Salt, Pool
* Kitchen w/Corian Counters 2 HVAC Units
* Over 4,500 Sq. Ft. Living Horses Welcome

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorid.com











REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
m 637-2828


S 2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


,i'4U n. inUIAAnNAU nfu.
HERNANDO
* Gogeous 4BR3B2CG Home Lg. Kitchen w/Lots of Cabinets
* Quartz Countertops Beautiful Master Suie
* Lg. Ceramic Tile in Main Area Extra Lg. Screened Lanai Area
* Fenced Backyard Beautiful Landscaped 1.24 Acres
* Move-In Ready w/Lots of Upgrades
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


2BR/2BA home located in Hernando on
short canal to open lake. 1,290 sq. ft. of
living area, newer roof, carport, and
parquet flooring. Hot tub, workshop with
power and fenced backyard.

BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 [ I
Email: barbarlmims@earthink.lnet -


3/2/2+ DEN
Skyline 1,700+ sq ft mobile on 2 fully fenced
acres just blocks from Lake Rousseau's fabulous
fishing Wide open floor plan, HUGE island
kitchen with tons of cabinets, large master with
jetted tub Attached 2 car garage with 4 doors
and attached potential MAN CAVE Also, an
attached "safe house" for storms Unbelievable
property Must see
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


6489 W. CANNONDALE DR.
MEADOWCREST
* Nice 2BR/2BA/2CG Home Lg. Great Room
* Eat-In Kitchen Enclosed Lanai
* Nicely Landscaped Deep Lot Well Maintained

LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net e i


TQ2417 INFOLfE



(32 37282


BEVERLY HILLS
* Clean *2 Bedroom
* 1.5 Baths Inside Laundry
* Close to Shopping Nice Florida Room

KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


' oz.o wiin uversizeu garage LoaUS OT oiorage
* Open Floor Plan Convenient Location
* Backs Up to Conservation Area Large Master w/Sitting Area
* .7 Acre Lot Room for Boat/RV
* Prce Slashed Don't Miss This One!
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylposts@aol.comi
Website: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


FISHERMAN'S DELIGHT PRICE REDUCTION!
* Built 2000 3/2/2 Car Garage Owner Financing Possible
* 115 Ft. Waterfront Lush Landscaping
* 53x9 Screened Lanai Picturesque Winding Drive
* New Air Conditioner 2011 Kevlar Hurricane Shutters
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpolls@eol.com
Website: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


A HOME OF DISTINCTION
* Many Upgrades in Kit. Gorgeous Tile
* Custom Paint/Decor Pool Area w/Pavers
* Walk-Thru Shower in MB Great Soak. Tub
* CS has 2 Golf Courses Peaceful Area!!
ELLIE SUTTON 3 52-287-3997 I-
Einill eillesullon*_ leinox nel
www.FlonidnLisiinginlo.coiu


6145 W. RIO GRANDE DR.
PINE RIDGE
*3BD/2BA/2CG Under Construction
Dream Custom Home Builder Feature
2,464 SF Living
Call Listing Agent for Details
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


GORGEOUS FAMILY HOME
IN POPULAR COMMUNITY
Very spacious 3 or 4 bedroom home with huge
family room for activities. Beautifully updated
interior with very large great room and stone
fireplace. 2 ornate baths, inside laundry, granite
counters and large garage. Community pool,
dubhouse, trails and more.
STEVE VARNADOE 795-2441 OR 795-9661
Email: stevevarnadoe@remax.iet


2763 BEAMWOOD DR., PINE RIDGE
WOWII Descnbes this beautiful Pine Ridge home No expenses
spared Large 3/2/2 split plan home with separate office space
Interior features boast light & bright spaces, gourmet upgraded
kitchen, travertine tile throughout, formal dining, bar/sitting area,
window treatments and much more Exterior offers fresh paint,
solar heated pool, fenced rear yard, large patio area, workshop,
fenced garden to name a few
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460 10
Email: davidsivory@hotmail.com


.2 4 2 N L e c nI H w B e e l i l 2 8 2w w R t A ~ o 1 .F o i a A e ,I v r e s 6 7 6 0


IM UICWNS ls.comI







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Realtors Association of Citrus County


The Realtors Association of
Citrus County includes, from
left: Isaac Baylon, director;
Gary Baxley, director; Sarah
Spencer, past president;
Greg Younger, president
elect; Ron Tessmer Jr., sec-
retary; Debbie Rector, direc-
tor; Cheryl Lambert,
president; Debbie Beltz, di-
rector; Bonnie Rosenberger,
executive officer; Linda Crid-
land, treasurer; Marvia
Korol, director; and John
Maisel, director.
Special to the Chronicle


Real Estate

EXIT Realty hits
high notes
The Wade Team is proud
to announce that EXIT Realty
Leaders has placed in every
category in the monthly bro-
ker report for Exit Realty
Florida in December.
Categories include No. 8 in
top 25 offices in new listings


DIGEST


taken, No. 4 in top 25 offices
for total listings, No. 15 in top
25 offices for total agent count,
No. 11 in top 25 offices in sales
volume, No. 9 in top 25 offices
in sales volume per agent, No.
8 in top 25 offices in closed
sides, No. 7 in top 25 offices in
closed sides per agent and No.
11 in top 25 offices in gross
closed commissions.


MEET AND GREET
* Clubs are invited to submit information about
regular meetings for publication on the Commu-
nity page each weekday.
* Include the name of the organization, the time,
day and place of the meeting, whether it meets
weekly, biweekly or monthly, and whom to call for
details.
* Send in information attn: Community Page Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429, or fax to 352-563-3280, attention: Club
meetings.
* E-mail to community@chronicleonline.com.
Include "Club Meetings" in the subject line.



rjJ^JIIJ.I!^J.UJ~l4U'.I^!K.,.


Amnda & Kiik Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BROKERIAM(. -REATOR CRI 7 EALTOR REALTOR -BROKER REALTOR 0

IL ALI& r =S--1 1


3946 N. PONY 375 W. CRES1
4/3.5/3 359171 $749,900 2/2/2 700617 $1





10953 N. TARTAN 3750 N. HONEYLOCUST
42 35523 $106,900 3/2/2 358885 $87,900





047 W PARAGON LN. 842 W. COCKATIEL LP.
3/2/2 358792 $149,900 3/2/2 357166 $99,900





2616 E. VENUS S. CANNA LILY
3/2 700201 $24,900 3/2 359137 $59,900


8061 N. GOLFVIEW DR.
3/2/2 700033 $89,000





8410 N. SAXON WAY
3/2/2 700484 $110,000





9328 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD.
3/2/1 356581 $69,900


29 S. WASHINGTON ST 16 S.ADAMS 101 S BARBOUR ST. 8182 N. POCONO 6560 N. DELTONABLVD.
2/1 356448 $39,900 2/ 356532 $2,00 2/2/2 354334 $59,900 3/2/2 700103 $86,900 2 70000 $11,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 E3


-- -- -- m


m


206 S. JACKSON ST.
2/3/2 700709 $69,000






E4 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
.............................. .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................352-563-5966
News information.......................................... 352-563-5660
................................. ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

Ci fM)N WCLE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Guide to Florida plums


Few plants herald the approach of
spring-like weather as do wild
plums. Clothed in their mantle of
snow-white petals, they beckon acknowl-
edgement of the rebirth of a new growing
season.
Florida native plums are
small deciduous trees or
shrubs with rather short trunks
and rounded crowns. Although .
their branches are not thorny,
like some other members of
the rose family (to which they
belong), they commonly pro- B
duce thorny spur shoots. This -
trait, coupled with their dense Joan B]
branches and foliage, makes FLOE
them very useful as hedges or FR|E
screens and valuable as cover
for birds and other wildlife. All LIV
species also exhibit some ten-
dency to spread by root suckers and de-
velop a thicket.
The following is a brief description of
the three plums native to central Florida.
Each of these species can be successfully
grown in our area, but it is necessary to
plant them in a location that will satisfy
their growing requirements.
Chickasaw plum (P angustifolia) is
the toughest and most widely adaptable
member of this threesome. Generally a


multi-trunked shrubby tree, this 20-foot
tall plum occurs throughout north and
central Florida in sandy well-drained
soils.
In Pinellas, it is most frequently seen in
turkey oak/longleaf pine sand-
Shill areas. In the Panhandle,
however, it also occurs in
coastal scrubs and clearly ex-
hibits its moderate tolerance
of salt.
Chickasaw plum is the
species most prone to sucker-
ing and it commonly produces
a thicket in areas where it is al-
adshaw lowed to do so. This trait is
tIDA- ideal if you are growing it as a
IDLY privacy screen or for wildlife
cover, but it can be a nuisance
ING if you are attempting a more
formal look. Flowers bloom in
early spring and the reddish to reddish-
yellow plums ripen by early summer Pro-
duction of the half-inch diameter fruit is
variable each year. They are quite tart,
but are eaten by a wide variety of wildlife
and make a good jelly
Flatwoods plum (P umbellata) is
sometimes called the "forgotten" plum
because it is often overlooked or simply

See PUMS/Page E11


I


Inside...


~.


Room for roses
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E5
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Use magnet to test sculpture; sizing up a side table


Dear John: This be cast iron that originally
sculpture may be had a bronze finish. Use a
bronze or cast iron. magnet to check if it is cast
It is 3 inches iron. If it sticks,
high by 4 inches it is cast iron. I
long. It weighs think it was
11 ounces. This made in Japan
sculpture was in the 19th cen-
given to me by' tury, perhaps
an elderly earlier I.M.
J apanese Chait Auction
woman in 1962 Gallery special-
while I was at- izes in Asian
tending a uni- and Oriental
versity in Tokyo, John Sikorski antiques. I sug-
Japan. SIKORSKI'S gest you contact
Any informa- ATTI-C them and see
tion you could what they think
provide regard- it might sell for
ing this sculpture would through their auction serv-
be greatly appreciated. ice. The website is
L.S., Homosassa www.chait.com. Let us
Dear L.S.: Your photo- know what you discover.
graphs are not very clear, Dear John: We have a
but the metal appears to table. Enclosed is a photo.


It says Cochran Chair Co.,
Aurora, Ind. It is 31 3/4
inches long by 15 inches
deep and 30 inches high.
What might be a price I
could sell it for? H.K.,
Beverly Hills
Dear H.K: You have a
good-looking small side-
board in the Colonial Re-
vival style of the early 20th
century During the first
two decades or so of the
See ATTIC/Page E7
This sculpture appears to
be cast iron with what re-
mains of a bronze finish.
The metal content can be
tested with a magnet; if
the magnet sticks, it's
iron. The sculpture proba-
bly dates from 19th-
century Japan.
Special to the Chronicle






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Strawberry a good choice for ground cover


D during winter
in cooler
parts of
Florida, many
plants go dormant
and shed their -
leaves. The garden -
looks uninviting
and sad. The trail-
ing stems of native
Sunshine Mimosa, Jane !
Mimosa strigillosa,
appear dead on the JAN
bare ground be- GAR
neath the naked
stems of Crape Myrtle trees.
Another ground cover in my
garden, Peacock Ginger, a
Kaempferia species, lost its
leaves early in November Its


bed has a 2-inch
blanket of pine nee-
dles to protect the
surface nodes and
shallow roots from
the 15 to 20 ex-
pected frosts in
Marion County's
Zone 8B. Citrus
County, Z9A, gener-
Weber ally has 10 to 15
frosty mornings be-
E'S tween November
DEN and March.
Flanking a paved
patio off my lanai, there is a 4-
foot wide planting bed where
the sandy soil is amended with
well-decayed fine mulch from
Central Landfill on State Road


44 between Inverness and
Lecanto.
The 12-inch-deep 50/50 mix
is well-drained. A retaining
wall of 8 inch by 8 inch recy-
cled pavers contains the soil.
The pavers are backed by
strong, commercial woven,
black ground cover fabric to
prevent soil and roots from
creeping out. Below a 20-foot-
wide fire break lawn sports
lush emerald green rye grass
See JANE/Page E6
Strawberry plants, known for
their large, fleshy fruit, are an
excellent choice to provide
evergreen ground cover.
JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle


REALTY G RO UP
RELT GROUPoo Resale


n iis one is exceptional ieganr maintenance Tree fome in lerra visia i nis 3 Dearoom zL
bath 2 car garage heated pool/spa home is on the 8th green of Skyview If you are quality
conscious with sophisticated tastes, please don't miss seeing this home with neutral colors
throughout This is surely the kitchen of your dreams, with cabinetry countertops and
appliances of the highest quality Membership required MLS 357018 $339,000


U


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
Ril I nFCKFR 352.46B4-047 SuSAN Mill I FN 35-.499.9-133 VICToRIA FRANKI IN 352-497-3777


SPECTACULAR 3/3/5 with gorgeous Golf Course View in premiere country
club community of Terma Vista. Home has all of the upgrades of a custom home
including a 12x24 pool, gas fireplace, built-in entertainment center, upgraded DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH
maple cabinets, upgraded stainless steel appliances, crown moldings and Well maintained 2 bedroom 2 bath 2 car garage plus den a expanded Very popular Windward model 3 bedroom plus den 2.5 baths ,
double glazed insulated windows/sliders, tray ceilings, tile floors and more, plus Laurel model, extensive oak molding around windows, crown molding great room floor plan, expanded and loaded with upgrades.
one of a kind, additional 2nd garage with expanded area for workshop, special in tray ceiling, master extra large pantry oak cabinets with crown Situated on Sky view golf course with breathe taking views.
car or boat. In prestigious condition, this a beautiful home, with great room molding extra footage in bedrooms and den, a must see at this price in Over sized lanai with lush landscape. Located in the premiere
design. CH Membership Required MLS 357110.....................$469,000 Terra Vista. MLS 357742........ ............................... $232,000 community of Terra Vista. MLS 357971................. $339,000

"'-- 1-- ~ .-


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS- !- .- --
Featuring an excellent view ofthe 5th hole ofthe championship Skyview Golf Course this 3/2/2 This home is all about outdoor living. Great Lanai overlooking the Skyview Golf DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, LAKEVIEW VILLAS SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2 BATH, FOXFIRE
maintenance free villa is a fantastic buy atthis price. The villa has a therapeutic step in tub in the Course is expanded with an open patio complete with lots of room foryour grill, Elegance, simplicity describes this 3 bedroom, 2 bath 2 car home. One of Enjoy the lifestyle in elegance & luxury. 3/2 plus den. This home
guest bathroom, the latest in secure bathing. The Butler's pantry was redesign as a kitchen desk outdoor patio furniture, and open fire pit. Open floor plan features lots of Terra Vistas most popular floor plans. Enter the foyer and be instantly includes a gas fireplace, plantation shutters. From the paver drive,
for easy intemet access while cooking. The covered lanai faces south for cool evening breezes. upgrades including maple cabinets, solid surface countertops and an expanded captivated by the charm and tasteful decor of this gracious home. Enjoy professionally landscaped home site, feel transformed as you enter the
The best of all words including all the amenities that comewith membership, especially use of the shower in the master bath. Professional decorator touches finish off this lovely looking at the garden from the tiled Lanai to see the glorious array of doors where beauty and upgrades surround you. Relax in peace &
excing Bella Vita Spa & Fitness Center. MLS 354569 .................................$224,900 home. Truly the best of Florida living. MLS 354017 ................$219,900 flowers, shrubbery & a waterfall. MLS 358547..................$234,000 tranquility in the "lagoon look" lanai area. MLS 358725...$385,000

Terrab .ista & .-entwood mentals! Social Membership included-with allRentals


DETACHED VILLA, 2
Fully Furnished 2/2/,
decorated. Enjoy m;
Open Great room,


free living s,
a sunny atm


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 ES


!
I
I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A new use for old pillowcases


P i 1llo w sweaters from
cases can dust. The fabric
be used can be repur-
for creative and posed, too.
practical proj- The first
ects around reader shares
your home. her ideas for
They can serve reusing pillow-
as durable stor- cases:
age bags for S Noel Uses for pil-
craft items, ara lowcases: I
lone sock bags FRUGAL made super-
in the laundry LIVING cute curtains
room or to store from old pil-
and protect purses or lowcases that were start-


ing to get a bit thin. I just
cut them open along the
seam, folded over the
edges, and pinned them
down, then let the sewing
machine do all the work! I
inserted the rod through
the cuff at the edge of the
pillowcase. I keep all of
my old linens and have
made jewelry bags and
cases for cellphones, sun-
glasses and even a GPS. -
Carolyn, email
Cheeseburger sand-


wiches: We love this recipe!
1 pound lean ground
beef.
1 teaspoon garlic-pep-
per blend.
1 8-ounce package
pasteurized processed
cheese spread, diced.
2 tablespoons milk.
1 green bell pepper,
chopped.
1 small onion,
chopped.

See FRUGAL/Page E11


- U U U U


PINE RIDGE *tg CITRUS HILLS
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd. )W(,j PrlUdefltlal 20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 Florida Showcase (352) 746-0744
Properties



www.Forid Sho cse ropertis co


s MLS#359346 $149,900
3/2/2 w/Large Entrywelcomes you to
this spacious home.
Directions: East on EHartford St, Left on ESt James
Loop, straightaheadto#1412.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086
NEW LISTING


'-"-" MLS#700569 $195,000
Beautiful 3/2/2 home on the 2nd hole of
the Meadows Golf Course.
Matt Robinson 352-502-3501
BACK ON THE MARKET


NEW LISTING

~. --- .


if~ i,.i -
2772 N Crosswaler Palh
MLS#358137 $995,000
Custom built property with endless
views of The Ranch Course.
Jodie Holder 352-302-2036


2493 N Brentwood Cir
MLS# 700534 $123,000
3/2/2 open plan The perfect Florida
lifestyle home.
Mark Casper 352-476-8136
*- ^T ,


NEW LISTING
S1


3077 N Caves Valley Path
MLS #345067 $370,000
Spacious, well maintained home
with expansive views of #9 on
The Ranch Course.
Jodie Holder 352-302-2036
NEW LISTING


1--. 631 W Wild Pine Cir
OV' UA60j MLS# 700571 $54,999
Well maintained 2/2/1 villa, maintenance
free 55+ community.
Richard DeVita 352-601-8273
PENDING


1, I82 E Keller CI
i.- i,-- r.l,.:-,-,- $324.900
Fully furnished home overlooking the
11th green of the Oaks.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926
NEW LISTING
..... ... ,. I- IfT


9 Taft St
4tt't* MLS#700478 $24,000
HANDYMAN SPECIAL; 1 bedroom,
1 bath and carport.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523
PENDING


-iUs 1820 E Gale Dancer Cir i 771 E Hartlord St30.5a <" $S 6328 W Glory Hill St tateS 2605W Sunrise St
.11 =li :. i- S 283.60u MLS#357326 $59,500 MLS# 355794 $349,900 MLS#355961 $174,500
Quality 3/2.5/3 home with many feature Move-in-ready upper unit in a Custom 4/3/3 pool home. Nice 3/2/2 home in quiet community
& greatviews great building. Many upgrades. 3+ acres, w/tile roof
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146 Mark Casper 352-476-8136 Mike McHale 352-302-3203 Mark Casper 352-476-8136
0 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Rnancial company. Prudential, the
Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in manylurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


JANE
Continued from Page E5

for the cooler months from
October to March.
Off the southeast and
southwest patio edges,
two standard-form "Ma-
jestic Beauty" Indian
Hawthorn trees are grow-
ing for summer shade.
They mature to 15 feet tall
with a diameter of 10 feet
in 10 to 15 years. These
large-leaved, evergreen
exotic plants have clusters
of pink flowers from
March to December. Be-
tween the future umbrella
trees are three single red
"Knock Out" roses. If
deadheaded, they also
flower from frost to frost.
Initially, I used pine nee-
dles as a top-mulch until
the persistent, pernicious
nutsedge finally suc-
cumbed to repeated doses
of glyphosate herbicide.
This raised bed needed
a strong-growing, peren-
nial, low-maintenance
evergreen ground cover. A
practical and useful choice
is the strawberry plant
Strawberries have been
selected and grown to pro-
duce large sweet fruit.
There are about 12 species
in the Fragaria genus from
temperate northern hemi-
spheres and one from
South America. All need
free-draining, acidic soil
and full sun more than
eight hours a day to flower
well and set fruit No flow-
ers occur if days are longer
than 14 hours. Plants have
been developed to yield
berries over many months.
Wet soil promotes botrytis
fungus. Remove dead
leaves.
Modern garden straw-
berries, FragariaX
ananassa, were bred by
crossing native plants.
Small, bare root runners
are commercially planted
in fall. Potted plants if
fully hardened by being
grown outdoors locally -
can be planted anytime.
Trifoliate leaves have


three leaflets. Margin
edges are toothed. Lush
green and hairy on top,
leaves are whiter beneath.
Leaves form a basal
rosette up to 10 inches di-
ameter. Running stems
shoot from the parent and
plantlets and take root at
the nodes beyond the par-
ent plant's territory Sev-
eral plantlets develop
along the stem. Bags of
bare root plantlets are
available in March and
April.
Flowers are white and
five-petaled, appearing
from December to April lo-
cally in cyme bunches atop
slender stems. The first
terminal flower opensm,
then other flowers develop
on side buds.
Provided there are in-
sects for pollination, a
large, fleshy receptacle
with pits holding a single
seed each will develop.
Pits and seed are clus-
tered heavily toward the
end. The receptacle ripens
as bright red "fruit."
Botanically, fruits have the
seeds on the inside, but
any sweet, fleshy plant re-
productive part is com-
monly considered fruit.
Tomatoes and green pep-
pers are fruit but consid-
ered veggies as they aren't
sweet.
Strawberry plants can
live several years. Remove
year-old plants. Best fruit-
ing is on young plants.
Evergreen strawberries
are a low-growing plant
that will provide total
ground cover without any
decorative top-mulch. The
seasonal fruit is an added
bonus in winter and spring
locally


Jane Weber is a
professional gardener
and consultant.
Semi-retired, she grows
thousands ofnative
plants. Visitors are
welcome to her Dunnel-
lon, Marion County gar-
den. For an appointment,
call 352-249-6899 or email
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


E6 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

20th century, new inventions were
pushing society faster than ever be-
fore, causing people to idealize the
Colonial era, when things were
thought to be slower and quieter and
peaceful. As a result, furniture man-
ufacturers started referring to 16th
and 17th century reproductions as
Colonial Revival. The Cochran
Chair Company is listed as a manu-
facturer that sold furniture to other
retail furniture companies.
The name is not yet a manufac-
turer that is sought after in the mar-
ketplace, but that may change in
time. Your piece has a quality look
and represents styles taken from
Dutch furniture of the 17th century
Current potential dollar value is
below $500.
Dear John: I have an old sugar
bowl missing the lid. Sorry I was not
able to get a good photograph. If I
describe it, perhaps you can help. It
is white porcelain with dark blue
flowers on the edge, base, and han-
dles. The flower decoration is not
clear; it almost looks like a factory
flaw, because all the dark blue deco-
ration is completely smeared. The
marks on the bottom are the same;
the only word I can make out is Eng-
land. Can you help with its age and
value? EM., Crystal River
Dear F.M.: As they say, a photo-
graph is worth many words. How-
ever, in this case you have described
it quite well. I am 90 percent sure
you have Flow Blue porcelain. It
was produced in huge quantities in


$169,900
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T. Paduano (352) 212-1446
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England and exported to the United
States and other countries. The
smeared looked was intentionally
created in the firing process. Flow
Blue porcelain has been a specific
category of collecting for a long time.
Your sugar bowl was produced in
England as marked about 100 years
ago. If you had the lid, it would sell
in the $150-plus range; as is, the
value is catch-as-catch-can.
Dear John: What should I do with
a trunk full of old toys? You often
suggest it is better to pass things
onto family members, but since
there is no one left, where do I begin
to find out what they might be worth
to collectors? A while back, a friend
of a friend said he would pay $200
for the trunkful. At that point, I al-
most sold the bunch of them but was
just not able to part with it. Please
help me if you can. M.M.,
Homosassa
Dear M.M.: I often suggest passing
things on in the family for two rea-
sons: There is sentimental attach-
ment to the items or often a lack of
current interest by collectors. First,
you need to make a photographic in-
ventory of the toys, along with di-
mensions and any maker's labels
you find. Then send me the photos
and I will point you in the right
direction.


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for
30 years. He hosts a call-in radio
shonw Sikorski' Attic on WJUF T


(90.1
1 p.m.
Attic, P
01


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IM[


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Send questions to Sikorski's j -
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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 E7


(






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Flowers provide perfect complement to range ofdecor


KIM COOK
Associated Press

Floral fads may ebb and flow,
but the rose's appeal remains
constant, well beyond a Valen-
tine's Day vaseful.
In home decor, roses have long
been a favorite motif, in wallpa-
pers, lace, chintz, and soft silk fur-
nishings such as curtains, bedding
and carpet The versatile rose flo-
ral can impart old-fashioned cot-
tage-y charm, cosmopolitan
elegance, even a certain sexy chic.


English drawing rooms were
rife with rose patterns through-
out the Victorian era, and the
Shabby Chic heyday of the 1990s
saw countless rooms decorated
with faded country roses.
While the rose is quite at home
in traditional spaces, there is an
architectural quality to its
petaled form that fits well with
modern decor, too, and the colors
can be extraordinary
Lindsey Harris of Ann Arbor,
Mich., photographs roses against
white backgrounds, creating


striking, sometimes quirky botan-
ical portraits. In one composi-
tion, she turns the flower heads
upside down; in another she
places a soft plump rose amid
See Page E9
Ann Arbor, Mich., based photogra-
pher, Lindsey Harris, captures
roses in interesting architectural
compositions, then prints them as
frameable art available
at www.etsy.com/shop/
APeacefulLeaf.
Associated Press/Lindsey Harris


E8 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
19th century silk manufacturer Brunet-LeCompte's Lyons
Silk roses reproduced on watercolor paper by L.A. art-
house, Natural Curiosities. The original silk designs were
used on hankies and pocket squares.


ROSES
Continued from Page E8

spiky dried fern leaves. Harris
arranges rows of blowsy blooms in
candy hues of cherry, lemon and
bubble gum pink, printed on 8-by-
10-inch frame-able paper. (www.
etsy.com/shop/APeacefulLeaf)
Artist Kathleen Finlay's Agnaryd
rose photoprint is available in
poster format at Ikea.
(www.ikea.com)
Decorative garden goods retailer
Terrain offers a selection of water-
color prints reproduced by the Los
Angeles art house Natural Curiosi-
ties of rose patterns created for
hankies and pocket squares in the
19th century by French silk manu-
facturer Brunet-LeCompte.
(www.shopterrain.com)
A modern triptych of Paulownia
wood panels with hand-carved gray

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E-mail: kemorton@tampab ay rrcon
I S i. & I Website: kare mor ton con
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PRICED TO SELL $159,900. KM/WMS -- "_.::'"-_*,",-..,*-*,".- :-_o $127,900 MIS #700705 KM/HNS




1^_ BWITHLACOOCHEE RIVER ** DUVAL ISLAND" ALL NEW**
BASS BITING AT YOUR BACK DOOR! ALL UPDATED ** INCREDIBLE VIEW
LOCATION N MA NTAN EE LIVING AT TS F Nestled under the majestic oaks this Hlorida 2 story 2000 FROM MASTER BEDROOM
LOCATION *LOCATION LOCATION MAINTENANCE FREE LIVING AT ITS FINEST sqft. stilt home is a fisherman's dream Spotless and 3 bedrooms, 2 baths Garage PLUS detached
Enjoy peace and quiet on Lake Nina Check out te igh syleanlo maintenance pectacularweriews! sparking, this home features OPEN GREAT ROOM ITH garage/workshop NE KITCHEN NE FLOORING *
great views from your GREAT ROOM and lare This home has been ded throughout 2 bedroom, beautiful stone fireplace, fully equipped updated kitchen. NEW ROOF NEW HEAT AND AIR CHECK OUT THE
COUNTRY KITCHEN 3 BR BA Inside laundry ath, -car, den plus screen lanai. Upgraded CAGED INGROUND POOL, lots and lots of storage. WORKSHOP. HUGE DECK/DOCK RIGHT ON THE WATERFRONT *
Basement for storage and workshop!!! ONLY appliances.Thisthomeimove-inready!MLS #359051 MOVE-INREADY.AdditionallotoptionalforS1Z5.000. MOVE-IN READY** YOU CAN EAT OFF THE FLOORS!"
ti M r M READY. Additional lot optional for $125,000 MOVE-IN READY YOU CAN EAT OFF THE FLOORS!!
$116,900 MLS #700570 PRICED RIGHT $129,900 NOW $264,900 MLS #354170 MLS #700436




INlERNESS GOLF COUNTRYCLVB ATERFRONT PL HOllM INVERNESS HORSE/CATTLE RANCH WOODWORKERS -
Timeless elegance and comfort. This 3BR, 25BA pool home One of the larger tracts in the city limis. One ownercustom GATED NEIGHBORHOOD CAR ENTHUSIASTS OR HOBBYISTS
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POL are with summer kit Huge master suite with corner riding. Super convenient to twn-just around the corner. 2700+ 3 BR, 2 BA PLUS den/office. Volume ceilings throughout 32x48 Destiny DW mobile home is MVE-IN
office areo, split BRs, fam rm with wood burning fpl I sq. f liv. area. Great rm. beautiful beamed ceiling, stone walk-in cloets* glimmering wood floor andhigh tyle 4 Dn y mB i o e is M
1ie u P e l e plclet wo a n ing, 3 dedrmms (one currently throughout this home *Caged inground heated pool *READY 3BR, 2A large covered
iide lau PUS climate coolldletor loset a'a studio) wrap around porches, fencing, pastures, Elegat mater uite Showi like a MODEL HOME with all carport, PLUS 2 detached metal buildings for
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and white roses are on offer at
www.ChristineBurkelnteriors.com.
Throw pillows lend themselves to
floral interpretations; you'll find
feminine rose-petaled pillows in
pretty hues and soft materials at
www.pierl.com, www.pbteen.com
and www.blisslivinghome.com.
Thomas Paul applies his edgy
sensibility to an illustrated version
at www.allmodernm.com.
Traditional-looking, rose-pat-
terned wallpaper isn't difficult to
find, but you might want to check
out a unique collection from Target
that's not offered in stores: In tau-
pes, teals, browns and golds, the
wallcoverings have a rose print
reminiscent of a vintage French
negligee, which would be fun in a
bedroom or powder room.
(www.target.com)
At www.wayfair.com, there's a
textural, tonal, rose-print wallcov-
ering evocative of an Old World


art print.
And California designer Phyllis
Morris' dramatic Vie en Rose, an
overscale photoprint of carmine
blooms on a black background,
turns a bedroom into a boudoir.
(www.phyllismorris.com)
Small accessories are an easy
way to introduce rose motifs. Caf6
Press has a clever wall clock em-
blazoned with a purple rose image.
(www.cafepress.com) At Pier 1, red
felt roses lend drama to a picture
frame. And finally, Habidecor's
Abyss Rose bath rug is a luxurious
way to put the flower underfoot.
(www.gracioushome.com)


H ] | CitrusCounty


i GITTA BARTH
Investors Realty REALTOR
of CitrusCounty,Inc. Cell: (352) 220-0466
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com gbarth@ myflorida-house.com






ELEGANT MOVE RIGHT IN A BOME TREAM
CUSTOM BUILT HOME BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS Sailboat water (no bridges); 240
Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home on a I acre ,
In the equestrian section of Pine comer lot with mature oak trees and lots feet of seawall; stationary &
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roof 05/09. Just bring your suitcase and 25 home sits high and dry (never
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NORTHRIDGE ESTATES -
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4, I ,$425.000 ii j $489,000 1i.,' $62,000


ii ^--


---2"1:t


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 E9







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fast food: Tips for a quicker vegetable harvest


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press

Vegetable gardening is
an exercise in patience.
Sweet potatoes can take
more than 100 days to
ripen; some tomato and
watermelon varieties re-
quire five months.
But there are ways to
shorten the wait.
The easiest is choosing
plants that taste best when
harvested young.
"The one thing you will
miss out on with speedy
growing is bulk, but what
you will get in return is


layers of flavor; a sprinkle
of hot and peppery micro-
green radish here, a sweet
and nutty, barely cooked
new potato there, a gar-
nish of cucumber-y borage
flowers to finish a dish,"
writes Mark Diacono in
the new "The Speedy Veg-
etable Garden" (Timber
Press). "These are the
crops that will mark out
your cooking as distinctly
and unquestionably
homegrown."
Timing is everything.
"Be slow to harvest and


Page Ell


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-5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
MLS CRYSTAL RIVER,FL34429
OFFICE: (352) 795-6633 eaor


RYSTAL RIVER Woodland Estates, cozy 3 LECANTO "SHORT SALE" 3 bedroom,
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)orch. #700540 REDUCED PRICE $65,900 ... .. ... ...... $48,000






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lear by to new wal-mart; paved road ,, 1..... n your own dock in the
"700665 $75,000 i '11 $69,000


Associated Press
Heirloom tomatoes, rear, can take more than 100 days to ripen, while the smaller cherry tomatoes, foreground,
need only 65 days. Grow both varieties to stagger the dates of your harvest.


* MLS#359575 Enjoy this beautiful back yard view The homi
backs up to a large tract of open land so you have no homes right
behind you' Neighbors, on both sides, have chain link fencing, so
wouldn't take much to fence in your back yard area, as well' Barn
style shed, in back, for additional workshop or storage' $56,501
NancyAyres 352-279-5058


MLS#f700566 -This spacious, beautiful Pine Ridge Pool Home has 3
Sedrms, 3 bathrms, 3-car attached garage and 2-car detached garage/
workshop' Enjoy the large pool & lanai with privacy You'll have a place
for everything in this home with walk-in closets, roomy laundry room,
Spantry & plant shelves in nearly every room' This open/split floor plan
is bright & airy with sliding glass doors from the master bdrm, dining &
Great room areas to the pool/lanail New 13-seer HVAC in 2006 The
perfect Florida home in this prestigious equestrian & golf community'
$229,900 Nancy Ayres 352-279-5058
:zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz:T


Beets for sale are seen at the Farmer's Market in Dupont Circle, Washington.
Many vegetables get woodier, less succulent and lose some of their sweet-
ness as they grow more mature. Some, however, like new potatoes, radishes,
baby carrots, zucchini, miniature cucumbers, spring peas, turnips and beets
offer up their best flavors while young.


E10 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HARVEST
Continued from Page E10

you'll miss their best moments," says
Diacono, who does his gardening on
a 17-acre plot in Devon, England.
"These are fresh, lively and zingy
flavors, flavors that can either fade
or become bitter and overly strong
as the plant grows on toward
maturity."
Many plants notably fruits -
are genetically wired for late
development.
"Tomatoes, strawberries and ap-
ples all want to be left on the plant
until they are fully ripe to get the
fullest, lushest flavors out of them,"
Diacono says. "Vegetables are a lit-
tle different. Many get woodier, less
succulent and lower in sweetness as
they grow more mature, so really are
at their loveliest picked young."
That would include new potatoes,
radishes, baby carrots, zucchini,


PLUMS
Continued from Page E4

ignored. It is a beautiful and useful
tree, however, and it deserves more
use and recognition.
Unlike the chickasaw, flatwoods
plums are single-trunked trees that
normally reach about 15 feet in
height. Other differences are that
the leaf blades tend to be flat (not
partly folded in half) and the flower-
ing and fruiting tend to occur about
two weeks later. Flatwoods plums
are not tolerant of salt.
This plum is one of the best
choices for landscapes that require
a more formal look or for areas de-
signed as woodland settings. This
tree does well in areas of average
drainage with filtered or partial sun
and its beauty is highlighted at the
edge of a woodland planting when it
is planted in small groups. The red
to yellow plum fruit are tart, yet are
attractive to wildlife and make good
jelly Flatwoods plums are not
widely grown by native plant nurs-
eries at this time, but they are avail-
able if you are willing to shop
around a bit.
Scrub plum (P geniculata) is a
rare plum that occurs naturally only
around the Lake Wales Ridge scrub
area of central Florida.
Listed as an endangered species,
this 4- to 6-foot tall shrub does not


miniature cucumbers, spring peas,
turnips and beets.
Cut-and-come-again salad leaves
can be clipped in as little as 21 days.
Sprouted seeds mungg beans, mus-
tard, lentils) can become table fare
in just three days.
Check the maturity dates on seed
packets as you shop. Heirloom toma-
toes take 100 days or more to de-
velop while cherry tomatoes need
only about 65 days.
The same goes for squash. Winter
squash (acorn, butternut) generally
require 110 days before they are
kitchen-ready. Summer squash
(crookneck, zucchini), by compari-
son, can be eaten in 55 days or less.
There are many ways to jumpstart
the growing season so you can be
harvesting a meal while other gar-
deners are just beginning to turn the
ground. Among them:
Choose the warmest site possi-
ble if you're planting early "Even a
small change in temperature can
make a difference during spring and

occur naturally in our area, but will
grow well here if planted in deep,
well-drained sandy soils. Its dense
zig-zag branching pattern creates
good wildlife cover for small ani-
mals that spend time near the
ground, but this is offset somewhat
by its tiny leaves. The leaves also
tend to be shed during periods when
the plant becomes water-stressed.
Tiny white flowers bloom profusely
in the early spring and these are fol-
lowed by 1/3-inch long purple fruit
in the early summer.
Scrub plum produces the sweetest
fruit of any of our natives, and these
are eagerly sought by all kinds of
wildlife. This is an interesting shrub
that is reasonably adaptable, but it
must be used in sunny sandy loca-
tions.
For more information on native
shrubs, please contact Citrus County
Extension at 352-527-5700.
Citrus County Extension links the
public with the University of
Florida/IFAS's knowledge, research,
and resources to address youth, fam-
ily, community, and agricultural
needs. Programs and activities of-
fered by the Extension Service are
available to all persons without re-
gard to race, color, handicap, sex, re-
ligion, or national origin.


Dr Joan Bradshaw is the director
of University of Florida/IFAS
Citrus County Extension.


fall frosts," says Jo Ann Robbins, an
extension educator with the Univer-
sity of Idaho.
Use enclosures. Covering plants
moderates temperature, wind and
humidity. "Air and soil temperatures
are warmer, and the cover will con-
serve heat radiation from the soil
during the night," Robbins says in a
fact sheet.
Start vegetable plants inside
from seed, and transplant them
eventually into the garden. "Re-
search shows the older the trans-
plants, the better they will resist
cold weather," Robbins says.
Warm the soil early. "Throw a
piece of black or clear polyethylene
over the soil in early spring, pin it
down with tent pegs or bricks, and
wait," Diacono says. "The sun will
warm it and excessive water will be
kept off, leaving it in a fantastically
workable state a few weeks later and
conducive to quick plant growth."


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E6

2 cloves garlic,
minced.
8 sandwich buns.
In a large skillet, brown
ground beef and garlic-
pepper blend until thor-
oughly cooked. Drain. In
a 3- or 4-quart slow
cooker, combine cooked
ground beef and all re-
maining ingredients ex-
cept buns; mix well.
Cover; cook on low setting
for 6 to 7 hours. To serve:
Spoon mixture onto sand-
wich buns. Denise,
Illinois
Dust high shelves: A
window washing service
will do it. My window


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 Ell

washer routinely dusts
my high ceiling fans and
other hard-to-reach
places. He will also
change light bulbs and
smoke detector batteries
that are beyond the reach
of a normal ladder! He
helps with these small
jobs when he is here for
his "real job" of window
washing. He has the ap-
propriate ladders and
equipment to do the jobs
that most of us can't
reach. Wendi, Arizona
Replacing paper tow-
els: Several years ago, I
paid about $7 for a pack
of about a dozen white
terrycloth auto-detailing
rags from Walmart. The
Walmart website lists a


See FRUGALUPage E12






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page Ell

25-pack of mechanics shop towels
and a 12-pack of blue terrycloth de-
tailer towels. I keep a bunch of these
durable towels on hand in the
kitchen to save on paper towels. -
Lloyd, Washington
Reuse glass jars: I keep all glass
jars and large containers that come
into my house. I've used some for
gifts and storing everything from dog
food to sewing/crafting supplies and
homemade laundry detergent. The
recycling value on glass in my area
is basically nothing, and I find a new
use for glass containers almost every
day! Leigh, California
Toothbrush tip: Pour boiling
water over your toothbrushes or
soak them in hydrogen peroxide.
This cleans them and also straight-
ens the bristles so they look like new.
This will increase the life of your
brushes and save you some cash! -
Brilly, Australia
Wax your own eyebrows: I wax my
own eyebrows, which saves me
about $15 a month! The
wax/strips/sticks are inexpensive
compared to the cost of having it
done by a pro, and they last a long
time. I have had the same tub of wax
for close to two years! Holly,
Tennessee
MEN
Dear Sara: My friend informed me
that although she and her husband
are beyond tight with money, they
are going on a trip to Europe. She
just spent the past year slowly up-
dating her wardrobe, swapping all of
her items for newer versions. But


even with her new wardrobe, she
says she MUST go buy more clothes
to wear while away I'm just baffled
why she can't pack what she's al-
ready got in her closet. Do you shop
for new outfit(s)/wardrobe just for
travel? Libby Canada
Dear Libby: I wouldn't buy much
for a trip anywhere. I wouldn't want
to look too flashy while traveling
abroad for fear of being a target for
crime. Plus, packing light is ideal
when traveling. I would want some
extra spending money to possibly
buy some clothing while I am there.
For example, maybe my baggage
gets lost and I'm stuck in track pants
and an oversized T-shirt. I'd proba-
bly buy a new bathing suit or com-
fortable shoes before my trip, but
that's because these are items I need
to replace at the moment and would
use during and after my trip. So no,
I wouldn't buy an entire wardrobe
for a trip, but in a healthy budget sit-
uation, I don't see any problem with
buying a couple of new things (or
even more if it's in the budget). I'm
sure many people would put to-
gether a new travel kit of essentials
such as toothpaste, toothbrush, etc.
If the climate is different, then I can
certainly understand buying other
new items, too.
In your friend's situation, with
money being tight, a trip to Europe
is not a wise decision, and buying an
entirely new wardrobe makes it an
even worse decision. If I were in her
situation, I wouldn't buy anything
new for a trip that was already a fi-
nancial strain and since she has new
clothing in her closet, she should go
without.
But as we all know, people make
their own decisions and get to live


with them. As a friend, I'd ask her if
she still wanted all of her clothes in
her closet with tags on them. I'm kid-
ding! This is a situation where I
don't think you can say much of any-
thing without appearing envious,
and I doubt she'd change anything,
anyway I'd wish her a safe and en-
joyable trip.
Dear Sara: What do you think of
the SodaStream? I want one, but I'm
on the fence. Can you talk me out of
it? -Diana W, Wisconsin
Dear Diana: From a frugal per-
spective, it's not much of a money-
saver (to be fair, it actually never
claims to be). If you're a pop drinker,
it's nice to have reusable bottles and
control over the ingredients. I do
like the actual product itself, and I
can see the appeal for home and
camping use. I have a SodaStream.
It was a gift, and my kids enjoy it I'm
not sure how much use it will get
when we run out of syrups and car-
bonation; it definitely won't be a
high priority on my shopping list. If I
was considering buying a new appli-
ance myself, I have to admit that I
would prefer saving a bit more
money and investing in a Breville
juicer or a Vitamix. I love home ap-
pliances and kitchen gadgets, but I
prefer to have appliances that multi-
task and promote healthier choices.


Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal
Village (wwwfrugalvillage. com), a
website that offers practical,
money-saving strategies for every-
day living. To send tips, comments
or questions, write to Sara Noel, c/o
Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St.,
Kansas City MO 64106, or email
sara @frugalvillage. com.


D 0 0
Digging into



old heirloom



potatoes


LAWRENCE
DAVIS-HOLLANDER
GRIT magazine

Potatoes are the most
widely consumed veg-
etable in the United
States and, after corn,
wheat and rice, the fourth
most consumed food crop
in the world. While the
West has been the biggest
producer of potatoes, that
distinction now belongs
to the developing world
with China leading the
pack.
In the United States,
per capital consumption
fluctuates and is cur-
rently on the decline, but
we each still manage to
wolf down around 130
pounds of potatoes each
year However, when it
comes to really enjoying
potatoes, that distinction
goes to Belarus, where
350 pounds are eaten per
person annually In 2003,
the United States ranked
38th in per-capita con-


sumption, trailing Russia,
the other countries of the
former Soviet Union,
England and many more.
The potato, Solanum
tuberosum, is a member
of the Solanaceae, or
nightshade family, which
includes many poisonous
species and some com-
mon edible crops like
tomatoes, peppers, egg-
plants and tomatillos, all
of which are fruits. Other
edible solanaceous fruits
include wonderberry,
Turkish eggplant, tree
tomato and naranjilla.
The exact origin of the
potato remains contro-
versial today The domes-
ticated potato had its
origins possibly between
7,000 and 10,000 years ago
at elevations ranging
from 4,000 to 12,000 feet
in the Andes Mountains
of South America, proba-
bly in Peru and Bolivia in
the Lake Titicaca region.

See HEIRLOOM/Page E13


KEY "Always There For You"
PEJL r GAIL COOPER
R62111 iuill".in llio. DoI.la Realiof
ER t Cell: (352) 634-4346
S Office: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3.rmnindspring.com
baa352 382-1700x309 *


"Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods"

i NANCY Direct:
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Multi-Million $$$ Producer K1 KEY1 REALTYINC.
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TO SETTLE ESTATE-FLORAL CITY, FL
Gorgeous oaks and backdrop on Lake Magnolia.
3BR/2BA DW on large lot. Central water.
$32,500 MLS#359133


BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Waterfront 6BR/3BA home on 2.63 acres.
Fireplace.
S180,000 MLS#700012


FRESHLY PAINTED INTERIOR!
* 2/2/1 villa on lot and a half
* Large pantry with new shelving
* Master walk-in has new shelving
* Dual pane sliding doors to lanai
* Southern exposure in rear
* Escape the winter cold!
#359666 $69.900


PRIVATE END UNIT LOCATION!
* 2/2/1 rare one story condo
* Updated kitchen has stainless steel
* Views of #3 green on Cypress course
* Hardwood floors in Great Room/dining area
* Updated Master bath vanity
* Home warranty for the buyers
#354159 $66.000


HEATED, SELF-CLEANING POOL HOME! FABULOUS 3rd FLOOR CYPRESS RUN CONDO
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$188,000 MLS#356074 $70,000 MLS#358077
Take ImyFi UfX tous o__


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 302-6714 i


E12 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013


See.JVirtual .IIIr @,..i resalehomesI..I IIB.omI.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HEIRLOOM
Continued from Page E12

While some archeologi-
cal evidence points to an
even earlier consumption
of wild species, many au-
thorities believe that solid
evidence of domesticated
varieties does not occur
until 4,000 years ago. In the
Andes region, there are lit-
erally thousands of vari-
eties in all different
shapes and colors, and
here is the greatest diver-
sity of both wild species
and cultivated varieties.
What we do know is that
Spanish explorers intro-
duced the Andean variety
of potatoes to their home-
land by 1570, and soon
thereafter the potato
reached southern Europe.
The plant quickly spread
across much of Europe,
and it was illustrated in
many of the 16th century
herbals.
Around 1851, Chauncy
Goodrich, a minister from
Utica, N.Y, decided to
find a better potato. He ob-
tained a number of clones
through the consulate in
Panama. One of these va-
rieties, Rough Purple
Chili, was the most prom-
ising. It is likely this vari-
ety originated from Chile,
possibly brought to
Panama on California-
bound ships.
Working over a number
of years, Goodrich devel-
oped many new varieties,
notably Garnet Chili and
Early Rose. Rough Purple
became the progenitor for
more than 100 North
American cultivars.
Most potato varieties on
the commercial market
today are not heirlooms. A
number of 19th century va-
rieties are still available -
seed exchanges are good
places to find such culti-
vars. Be aware that if you
are not getting certified
virus-free potatoes, there
is a good chance that yields
may be reduced and the
variety may "run down."


Most potato
varieties
on the
commercial
market today
are not
heirlooms. A
number of
19th-century
varieties are
still available.

Below are just a few:
Green Mountain is a
wonderful, irregularly ob-
long, buff-skinned and un-
usually flavorful variety
bred in 1885 by O.H.
Alexander in the Green
Mountains of Vermont.
One of the varieties used
for the original potato
chip, it is well worth grow-
ing even though it is fairly
susceptible to a host of po-
tato diseases.
Burbank potatoes were
bred by Luther Burbank in
1874 from seeds found on a
plant of Early Rose, which
he then sold to John Gre-
gory of the J.J.H. Gregory
Seed Co. of Marblehead,
Mass., for $150. Gregory
named that strain "Bur-
bank's Seedling." Today,
Burbank is by far the most
widely grown potato in the
United States, mainly for
french fries. What is typi-
cally grown is Russet Bur-
bank, which is not the
original type but a chance
mutation discovered in
1914. Russet Burbank also
is known as the Idaho
potato.
The original Burbank is
long, with smooth brown
skin, and is relatively
mealy, ideal for baking.
The original and the Rus-
set variety are late matur-
ing and heavy yielding
under ideal conditions.
Irish Cobbler (or just
Cobbler) is a small, round,
early-producing variety
that is great for roasting or


mashing, as it possesses a
wholesome, creamy tex-
ture. It supposedly was de-
veloped by an Irish
shoemaker in Massachu-
setts. It was introduced in
1876 and was selected
from seeds produced by
Early Rose.
Several heirloom finger-
lings worth noting include
a French variety, La Ratte,
which originated in the
late 19th century La Ratte
boasts yellow skin and
smooth, firm flesh with a
kind of tapering, chunky
shape. It produces
medium-low yields, yet is
well worth growing for its
superb texture. This one
originated in the late 19th
century in France.
Russian Banana, also
with yellow skin and flesh,
is said to have originated
in the Baltic region, and
this variety yields more
heavily than La Ratte, with
fat fingerlike tubers.
Among my personal fa-
vorites is Ruby Crescent,
also known as Rose Finn
Apple, which has a rosy
yellow skin, yellow flesh,
and an excellent rich but-
tery taste. It tends to pro-
duce "wings," or knobs,
giving the tubers an odd
appearance. It is a late-
season plant, producing
small yields.
Be careful when seeking
out heirloom potatoes:
They are so relatively easy
to grow and keep, and they


Broker Associate


Seed Savers Exchange
The French Fingerling is sometimes known as Nosebag and is a late-maturing, low-
yielding variety.


have such varied tastes
and textures that you may
find yourself with a collec-
tion one that grows and
grows.
Excerpted from GRIT,
Celebrating Rural Amer-
ica Since 1882. To read
more articles from GRIT,
visit www Grit. com or call
866-624-9388 to subscribe.
Copyright 2013 by Ogden
Publications Inc.


Preferred
REAL ESTA TE

352-270-3255 rH


241 W. Hollyfern Pt. 3117 N Woolflower Ter.
Beverly Hills Beverly Hills
1604 sq ft of living -2/2/2, Eat-in kitchen Windsor model 2/1.5/1 in excellent
with lots of cabinets. Home needs TLC. condition. Nothing to do but move in.
Motivated Seller MLS# 357605 Priced to sell $62,900. MLS #356403
Directions: 491 to Forest Ridge Blvd. to Directions: 491 to Forest Ridge Blvd. to
eft on Camo mile. Home on corner of left on Sugarmaple to left on Woolflower


Jackie Davis
I American Realty & Investments
OEM 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
ERA (352) 634-2371 Cell
S.F.A.rS. jackie@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS: bidavis.com



SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 E13








E14 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013






Real Estate

Classifieds

k& jaucar ,.;


To place an ad, call 5635966


.- ..Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


HOMOSASSA
2 & 3 Br homes w/ stor-
age sheds. Starting at
$550/mo + $800/Sec -
ONLY $1350 total to
move in. We pay trash,
lawn, water & sewer.
Close to Walmart,
Publixs& Suncoast PKY
No pets 352-584-1831
INVERNESS
Close In, 1 & 2 BR MH
Clean, Quiet & Com-
fortable 352-212-6182
ISTACHATTA
2/1 $500. mo. + Sec.
Fruit Trees Cul-de-sac
Withlacoochee River
16354 Daviston Ln.
No Pets 813-935-4996
LECANTO
LEISURE ACRES
3/2 water & garbage
incl. $600mo.
(352) 628-5990
LECANTO
SM 2/2 S/W, 1 ac w/ rm
for a horse 746-7595
HOMOSASSA 2/1
Fenced acre, Addition
Huge Deck, Shed
$500.mo 352-628-5244





must sell!
2006 FLEETWOOD
ENTERTAINER. 32X66.
OWNER MUST SELL!
CALL (352) 795-1272

V THIS OUT!
2br 2ba Single Wide
12years YOUNG.
14X66. Trade in.
WILL GO FAST!
$14,900 YOUR BABY
Set, New A/C, skirt, &
steps, Must See!
NO HIDDEN FEES.
CALL (352) 795-1272

BANK
FORECLOSURE
Land-n-Home, 312
1500 sq. ft. On 12
Acre, paved rd.
LOOKS GOOD, Have
financing if needed,
only $2,500 down,
$381.44mo. P&I
W.A.C. OR $69,900.
Call 352-613-0587
or 352-621-9183


Crystal River 55+
Park. 2BR/1BA Car-
port & Screened
Porch. Heat/Air
$9,500. 352-746-4648
Ask for Brit
HERNANDO
$$ Private Owner $$
Financing Available
New & Used
Manufactured Homes
Call 1-727-967-4230

HOME-ON-LAND
3/2 Great Shape.
%2Acre. Move In Now
$59,900.
Call 352-401-2979,
352-621-3807




NEW 2013

2br 2ba
Doublewide w/10 year
Warranty $39,900
Delivered & setup, a/c,
skirt, steps.
Call(352) 795-1272
Palm Harbor Retire-
ment Community
homes. $8500 off of
any home, 2/2 & 3/2
from $39,900
Call John Lyons 0
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details

REPO'S- REPO'S
REPO'S
WE HAVE REPO'S
CALL 352-621-9181



WE WILL

BUY YOUR
MANUFACTURED
Home. from 1976-2013
CALL (352) 795-2377


-U

2BR. 1% BA.on your
own 75x 100 lot.
no fees! new enclosed
sunroom, Ig laundry
room furn, 2 storage
buildings, 5111 Castle
Lake Ave. S. of
Inverness on SR 41
$39,500 (352) 597-7353


2BR/1/2BA, MH &
Land Needs little Work
$17,500 9340 W.Tonto
Dr., Crystal River
Call 352-382-1544 or
813-789-7431
3bdr/2 full baths/ 2 car
carport on 1 acre.
split layout, steel roof,
caged pool, 20x25 ft
deck, Ig storage build-
ing, Furnished Modu-
lar $73,900, 5215
Bridget Pt, Castle
Lake Park
Inverness
(352) 597-7353
CASTLE LAKE
Floral City
2/2 S/W Fully furnished
move in condition.
2 screen rooms,
2 sheds. Landscaped
with sprinkler on quiet
cul-de-sac. $38,900.
352-212-1883

CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 4br 2ba MH
READY TO MOVE IN!
4Owner Fin. Avail.
CALL (352) 795-1272
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Considering
ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498
HERNANDO 2/2 DW
On lot, with Shed &
Deck Seeforyour-
self at 2562 N. Treas-
ure Pt. $28,500 obo
352-464-0719

HERNANDO/486
1+acre, 2br SWMH+
den/flp, ManCave/Work
Shop w/AC, 28x40,
$43,500, J. Desha
Cridland Real Estate
(352)634-6340

HOMOSASSA 2/1
Fenced Quiet Country
Setting, Addition, Shed,
Lg.Deck, new drain
field. as is $29,900 obo
**(352) 628-5244**

HOMOSASSA
2ba 1 % ba MH needs
complete rehab. Good
shed, well & septic.
6524 W. Akazian
$12,500 (603) 860-6660


NW Citrus County
SWMH on 1 acre, 2/1.5
paved rd., screened
porch, appliances -
$37,700 possible
owner financing
352-795-9908




CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
*Winter Specials*
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
2/2 New Model $59K
2/2 waterfront. $31K.
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882
DUNNELLON
LAKE ROUSSEAU MH
Park. Lg. 1/1 w/sliderto
encl. screened porch,
outside shed, CHAfurn.
Nice yard, low lot rent.
Asking$11,900
(207) 347-0531
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $179/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS
3/2 MH, Furn. Ig screen
lanai, shed & lot. All appl
inc Ig scn TV,55+ PK
Asking $12,000. Call
(352)364-3747
INVERNESS
Move In Ready,
Beautiful 1/1 SW,
Mobile, Harbor Lights
55+ park, on Big Lake
Henderson. Fully furn.,
very updated, view of
lake, Cen. HVAC, W/D,
A Must See! Asking
$7,000, 352-344-1828
INVERNESS PARK
55+, 14X60, 2/2, new
roof, all appliances,
partly furn. screen
room, shed,
352-419-6476

MOBILE HOME,
Fully
Furnished. Everyth-
ing stays. Just move
in. 2 Sheds,
washer/dryer all ap-
pliances. Must See!
$7,500. (708) 308-3138


PALM TERRACE
55+ Community,
1997 3BR/2BA 14 x 66,
excel. cond. Shed,
Fl. Rm. Carport &
Deck $16,000. (352)
400-8231
REDUCED 2/2 $17,500
On Lake Rousseau
Lot Rent $240/mo.
BETTER THAN NEW!
Owner financing. Call
LEE (352) 817-1987
Singing Fores t
FLORAL CITY
14 x 70, Mobile, 2 Irg.
bedrooms, furnished &
remodeled, heat & air,
carport & shed, Wash/
Dryer, Lot rent $176.
$14,500. 352-344-2420
STONEBROOK, CR
2bd/2ba,gourmet kitch,
master suite,encl porch
pond, crprt+ patio
$51,900, Cridland RE,
Jackie 352-634-6340




INVERNESS
RV Spaces. Bring your
own boat and fishing
gear. AGE 55+ commu-
nity. Lot rent only
$360-$375 including
electric. Edge Water
Oaks 352-344-1380




HOMOSASSA
RENT-to-OWN
3br 2ba MH
Immediate Occpancy
Owner Financing Avail.
CALL (352) 795-2377




Rea Estate

For k Rent[fS
CASTRO RE [ool &ALT


-AMTION_
.-z7
RENTAL MANAGEMENT 1
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
ww.CitrusCountyHoomeRentals.comn
CITRUS SPRINGS
8160 N. Dueval Dr. ((CS)....$1,300
3/2/2 Pool home,full furn.w/uhities
water/seweran elec.caps
CRYSTAL RIVER
10350 Deepwoods Dr. (CR) ...$750
2/2/1 ose to mall, Ig. utility room
11255W. Bayslre Dr. (CR).. $850
2/2 Hteront condo, amentles
HOMOSASSA
2278S. SandburgP. (H).....$500
2/1 Nice Duplex
2 Balsam Ct. S (H)..... $1,400
3/3/2 SMW pool home wir guest quarters
HERNANDO/INVERNESS
994 E. Winnetka St. (Her).... $625
2/1.5 on 1 acre wh coiport
6315 N. Shorewood Dr. (Her $650
2/1 Cute ho e th R moomr ni graut bacc rd
854 Pritchard Isl. (Inv.)...$800
2/2 Townhouse on waterfront, comm. pool

Chassahowitzka
3/2 waterfrnt/DW $500
2/2, fenc. Yd/DW $500
2/2 house w/gar. $600
Suaarmil IWoods
3/2/2, Furnished, $900.
AGENT (352) 382-1000


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL

Need a Good Tenant?


2/2/2....................$725
2/2/1.....................$650
4/2 Oanal .............. $750
3/2/2 Availble Md h...$850
1/1..........................$375
2/1.........................$450

3/2........................$650

2/2 aterfront.............$1,300

3/2/2------ ....................$800
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
SCheryl Scruggs,
2 Realtor-Associate
S352-726-9010


-Ij

CRYSTAL RIVER
1Br 2BA Comletely
furn.. Ige scr porch, with
cable tv, W/D,all utilities.
$700 + sec 422-7717
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Studio Apartment
Completely Furn. Ca-
ble TV W/D rm. All util.
incl'd.+ boat dock.
$700 mo 352-372-0507
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
1/1 Remodeled, Near
New Wal-Mart on
Cardinal $425. + Sec.
(352) 621-5265




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR/ 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE
CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apart-
ments for Rent
352-465-2985
CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2 CHA, W/D
hk-up $575/mo.lst Mo.
FREE with $600. no
dogs 352-726-9570
INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great
Loc., clean & roomy.
no pets $500.mo 1st. &
Last $300. Sec.
352-341-1847


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classified!


SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant
Rd. to So. on Talla-
hasse Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719



OPPORTUNITY




CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret
Harbour Apts. Newly
remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incl Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037
CRYSTAL RIVER
LG 2/1 .water, sewer,
garbage, w/d hkup,
lawn inc. $475 mo.
(352) 212-9205
or 352-212-7922




CITRUS HILLS
2/212% Townhouse
Condo, full appl's,
carport, Citrus Hills
membership incld'd
Prudential Florida
Showcase Properties
call 352-476-8136




CITRUS SPRINGS
2/2 Duplex, nice private
area, near shopping &
schools. Wtr, sewer incl
$600mo 352-558-4477
INVERNESS
2/1, W/D Hk -up, No
Pets, $550 mo. + Util
(352) 220-4818


CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2 CHA, W/D
hk-up $575/mo.1st Mo.
FREE with $600. no
dogs 352-726-9570
INVERNESS
Clean, Attrative 2/2/1
Duplex, family neigh.
3619 Theresa Lane,
Terry Houston, Foxfire
Realty (352) 528-3314



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
INGLIS
WATERFRONT
Charming eff. /cottage
$645/mo includes
utilities & furnished.
352-422-2994



CRYSTAL RIVER
**RENT REDUCED**
3/1 Country Home on
stilts,w/fenced yard.
$565 + Utilities.
Call 920-922-6800
Sugarmill Woods
3BR, 21/2BA, Super
Clean 3,100 sf, large
priv. shaded lot,
2 covered, porches,
sm. pet ok. $1,150.
mo. yrly Ise., sec. dep
$700. $3,000 move in
(727) 580-1083



BEVERLY HILLS
1/1/CP + Fl. Rm $450
(352) 897-4447,
697-1384
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, Scrn. Rm. $400.
Laun. Rm. 697-1457
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1+ Florida Room,
106 S. Fillmore $550
mo. 352-422-2798
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2/2,$750, 3/1/1 $600.
352-464-2514
BEVERLY HILLS
870 Beakrush Ln
2br 1 '2 ba, 1 car gar.
enclosed screen porch,
$600 mo. leased dep.
no pets. 352-586-3072
CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Inverness
352-726-3476
Lecanto
352-746-0373
Crystal River

352-563-0890





CITRUS HILLS
AREA, HERITAGE
55+ Gated Community
3/2 builders model,
never lived in, $1000
mnth. 352-270-8953
Sugarmill Woods
2/2/2, 2 MBdrms
$875. 352-302-4057


F.=1352) 5W-5666 I.Toll ill JJ8ll=52-23, 1 Emal:lassified sgchronMclelln,IJJJ,. WsiJ.lle wwchoictiiie^o


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
Water Incl. CHA, $496.
352-220-2447
212-2051
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1.5, fncd yrd, 1 blk to
King's Bay. Boat tie-up;
$650/mo, 1st/L/$300
sec (352)794-0811
Invern. Highlands
2/2/1, City Water, Great
Loc. Quiet Neighrhood
$650. 352-860-2554
INVERNESS
3/2 Brand New,
Granite tops, marble
firs, SS Ap $895
(352) 634-3897
INVERNESS
3/2/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352- 601-2615 OR
352-201-9427
INVERNESS
3BR/2BA/I, $795. mo
885 Duck Cove Path
(352) 895-0744 Cell
INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/1/1
$590mo.1st & Sec
(352) 344-2560
INVERNESS
Large 1 BR home in
55+ community, Great
location just off the
water. Bring boat &
fishing gear. $585
(352) 344-1380



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225



INVERNESS
Share a house, Ig pool
Lakeside C Club, Golf
Course, Lots amenities
$875. 1st/sec 419-2924



BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV &
W/D WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611
Citrus Hills/Condo
m/bdrm w/ba htd pool
$450 352-249-7804
Older women looking
for female to share
home. Rural setting.
Private BR/BA &
computer room.
All utilities included.
$800 (352) 584-6481




CRYSTAL RIVER
Warehouse for Rent
Free standing, garage
area, 1,440sf,
$100-$550
352-634-0129




TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $58,500. Call
352-638-0905


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE






ESTATE SALE in Na-
ture Coast Landings
RV Resort. Large de-
veloped site and a
separate gated storage
lot; plus almost new
5th-wheel with slides,
screened gazebo, and
storage building. All for
$79,900. For more info
and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441


Lb IAI z bALL- iaiure
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Developed site with
gazebo & storage bldg,
reduced to $49,500.
Separate storage
lot available. (RV sold).
For info and pictures
Click on
detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441

LAND FOR SALE
LAND LIQUIDATION
20 acres St. Lucie
Waterway, $189,500.
3 miles boat Lake
Okeechobee, 45 min
boat Atlantic. Private
/gated. Deer, turkey,
hogs, fishing.
(888)716-2259 Gulf
Atlantic Land,
Broker.

MOTIVATED SELLER
Wants This Gone!!!
6 Acres w Big SHOP,
Nice 2/2/2 House,
Porches Barns, pond,
pvd rd, Concrete dr.
Reduced! $114,900
MLS 357108. www.
crosslandrealty.com
352 726 6644


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial






A
Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY




UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.








INVERNESS
Sunday 1/27 lp-4pm
3/2 MH, Furn. Ig screen
lanai, shed & lot. All apple
incl Ig scn TV,55+ PK
Asking $12,000.
911 Hoffmann Lane
Melody MH Park
(352) 364-3747


EMi
HOMOSASSA
GNC Commercial
7311 Grover Cleveland
Blvd. 3/2 MH $69,900.
(603) 860-6660










CITRUS

SPRINGS
3/2/2, 2 yr old Pool
home in imacculate
condition,
Landscaped backyard.
$125.000 Priced to
sell!
CALL (570) 412-5194



Quiet Country Setting
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area
only 20 Min. to Ocala
$129,900 Call
352-302-6784
for appt.



PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything! 4/3 1
w/7 car
garage/workshop &
in-law suite on 5.83 ac-
res.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164



2/2/2, REMODELED
NEW: Roof, AC, Kit,
Baths, Windows, Firs,
317 S Harrison.
Reduced $72,900.
Call 352-527-1239










Brentwood Villa
22/2/2 cul-de-sacd
Completely updated
1816 W. Jena Ct
OPEN SUN 12-3PM
$96,900
PRICED TO SELL!
FSBO 610-248-2090


Custom Home,
3 bedroom, 21% bath,
w/Master w/DBL
walk-ins + bath +
den/off. 2+ car garage.
1 Acre. MUST SEE!
$249,900.
352-860-0444
HERNANDO
Citrus Hills Pool
Home
4/3/2+, circular
drive,
1 acre lot, below
$200k 352-527-7856



ARBOR LAKES
Fantastic Dream
Home In Active Senior
Community $169,900
2,100 sf, 3BR/2BA/2GA
Split Floor Plan w/Pool
Call (352) 726-6564



Unique stilt home in
rustic surroundings
off 581. Great loc to
town, shopping, &
hospital. 2br/lba, w/
rap around porch.
Needs some TLC.
Sold as is. Make an
offer. Asking $33,900
(352) 419-6227




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-28282
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE




3b/2ba den, MH
on land off US 19
newer c/h/a carpet &
vinyl, clean RV Hkup.
fence **$39.900*
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie 352-634-6340
AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE
The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo
Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classified!


MUST SELL

4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell






4/2/3 HEATED POOL
lots of extras!
SELLER MOTIVATED!
reduced to 210k
352-688-6500 or
352-212-5023
4/3/2, POOL HOME
3,000 sf, granite coun-
ters, SS appl's., wood
firs., Reduced $25,000
Asking $235,000
850-585-4026


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Sugarmill Woods
House for Sale
2/2/2, Call for More
Info. 334-691-4601
(850) 776-7528

1 1^^^^
Citrus ount


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
gail@citrusrealtor
.com
www.citrusrealtor
.corn
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.


I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMESA MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515







El




TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant





Brooksville Deeded
spacious, shaded cnr
lot, 1BR/1BA, Large FL
room, Large storage
shed & patio. 55+ RV
Park w/ heated pool,
and music activities,
$36,000 352-848-0448,
352- 428-0462 anytime


"FREE
Foreclosure
and Short Sale
Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA VANDEBOE
Broker (R)
Owner
Plantation Re-
alty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near
KINGS BAY $425,000.
Make Offers
352-563-9857













Tweet


YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFureC-oast
Properties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"




% ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact fee
credit, high and dry,
trees, $11,000 obo
(352) 795-3710
INVERNESS, FL
3 miles east of Inv;
5-20ac wooded/some
cleared, owner finance
available.
Owner is licensed Real
Estate Broker,
Ed Messer.
ed.messer@yahoo.com
NORTH CITRUS
1.4 ac. Cleared, fenced,
high & dry. Paved road.
Elec., pump/well, septic.
Owner finan. No
mobiles. $13,900
CALL 352-897-4195


HOMOSASSA Wooded
Lot on Lee Woods Dr.,
has Wetlands, with
River access, but not
on river $6,000.
352-621-1664


Get


Results


In The


Homefront


Classifieds!


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 E15








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


*- ... .... . I ... ..
F 2 bi,, 2 v -I v 2,, -,, i
* I n uliii l..liinil.i H ,l.., I fIl
Ml = 11112.i $189,900
Jeanne Pichiel 212 3410
Ii II II CiliusCounl Sold corn


COUNTRY LIVING CLOSE TO CITY
.I.il aKid tJeanne PicAt- l cl 20 1.... ..-I.

Il.-: = /I.I../ $55,000
Wllaid o0 Jeanne Pickitel cell 2019871


.' f. .. I. l .l .. .ill .I ..J f l ..

Ih ,il I .Jl ..I f, h ..ij .i 1 J .ij ... il.l
A ll l .. h .i' l ] I i ... jl
Mri.i = ... $236,000
Call Tenl R Blanco 352 4/19 9252
Ln .L o n<..


A 1. .1l .... III II ..-... I'l..... .l I..I
REALISTICALLY PRICED AT
$49,500
Call Willaid ot Jeanne Pickiel
201 9871 ot 212 3410 oIn youl
appointment to see this lovely home


ONLY $132,000

I ..I h, |.. ,1 l. ....ie. .i .....), .n.....I I......,
.... .. h 1 .. .I' ..' l ... I" a... .I



Call Dois MAeM, 352 4224621 Ior appi


FLORAL CITY



Ml. 10. 3 11-1/.
lonamaine 0 Regan 586 0075


Cheap, Cheap, Cheap!!
BANK OWNED COMMERCIAL
li il.,l d i. ll 1..I l il l :ilpiu ; ; ii H inqy 11
i., :,,l1.1,, I.' .,i ONLY $64,900!!
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


* .i- ', _' I.. ia, I ll l. I, ,


Mt i = ;'I/:'h $115,000
Jeanne 8 Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
Iw'i'i'. cilt uscounlt sold corn


CRYSTAL RIVER COMMERCIAL
INSIDE CITY LIMITS

bu r'--,h : '',. 1 .1 i i.... vl.i.. ., bu- -..: l
.._ ... ..I
$65,000
Call Ma tha Snj de tlodaj 352 476 8727
ask lot ile = 700553c


LOTS OF VALUE HERE
" I I II I|TH uJ ll. HR-_-01 HHMI .I .- I:I-l:
irl: l-kIll.lrIl:l :l-I-1. IIllTH I I:H : 111-11.1 ;I rl. i ki:_I


I '-f.i.' ASKING $228,000
Pa. Da is 352 212 1280
I'[el listing .i c2L1.pld.nis corn


ONLY UNIT AVAILABLE IN
REGENCY PARK CONDOS
* I.. i ', I ll, I 1 I. l .li.: .l .. .lI
, l l .jnf I .i; I _f h il td i ll l ,.il

$54,800
Call Maitha Snidei 352 476 8727
ask lot file MIS =700625


I ._ .: .. h .. .. .....
.h f I I).. .. 1 I .,,l1, ..II .I H/ I "_"

Mi = I ..11 ASKING $275,000
Call N/ancy Jenks 352 400 8072


H III. _I IIII: I..un i y l yl Ih .... i ill.l

II.:.iii II. llst lI llj, h l ll

$175K
Call Quade Feesei 352 302 7699


I:B, I BA in,,,,,i,I I ,:,, 1 ,,:i nil.




Mils = :.:s.'. $73,900
Stelan Stuart 352 212 0211


2/2/2 SPACIOUS GREAT ROOM



:..... l, ll.i l. .)h1 l n ), l ,,.

$134,900
Oriieren I- 4lj. PArs.r.is 362 63- 1273


MULTI FAMILY

Cal .hill J I Mo .l' to 1 .t.I ... I 2i l /h ,.i.
Ml3 = ,QlF, $349,900
Call Jim Motion to pieview 422 2173


I., r111 ,, 1 .. 1 1,, ,,, l ,11 1.,,,,,, ,,

I P1.. ..1D ',,1 H .i 21..,, l. 2,8 .,I

S 1 1 h h i 1 d,, ,i., rll = I iii-
Pit Dil 352?' 212 7280
I .. -iites .1.1.1 l;2/pud cioij e.


FLORIDA LAKEFRONT PARADISE
d1, ..1 1 i ,,l,, ... .. I
,, .. ... ... 1 ,,, ,, I'" nh ,


Ml = -.IF.I ASKING $235,000
C.ill Jim lotion 422 2113 io see this
be.iuiiul .icre.ige


* ... o ri..
* 111,,**i '''a'"''''- I .-

OFFERED AT ONLY $71,900
Cill Ehls G K(.ill.h i.i 352 400 2635
Ito sholl nlo nrmanllon


LOTS OF LAND FOR FAIR MARKET PRICE

I II ,,,.I' ,,,I 1,,, ... l 1,, ...I ,, ,...


r1: = .:i $119.900
Pit D,,s 3522112 7280
[''*?i ristnf i.1.1.1 cl 2/p d il d m ,


E16 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013