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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 02-02-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03019

Full Text


Basketball: Citrus can't grab district crown /Bl


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Morning frost,
then mostly
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PAGE A4


C I T R U- COU N TY Y





RONICLE.
www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


See it on Pg. C12

FEUUREDI I


VOL. 118 ISSUE 179


Cash, control separate boards


Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, CCHB trustees still searching for resolution


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
INVERNESS Past
feuds may have died, but the
two boards connected to Cit-
rus Memorial hospital still
don't see eye to eye on the
two biggest issues: control
and money
The Citrus County Hospi-
tal Board (CCHB), whose


five members are ap-
pointed by the governor, of-
fered Thursday to provide
$4 million in cash to the
hospital in exchange for
greater influence in major
decisions, such as hiring or
retention of the chief exec-
utive officer.
The Citrus Memorial
Health Foundation board,
whose members are self-


appointed and operate the
hospital by lease, met in
closed session Friday and
came away without a vote on
the CCHB offer.
Hospital spokeswoman
Katie Mehl said in a state-
ment the foundation hopes
to find resolution with
CCHB trustees.
She also said the founda-
tion wants more informa-


tion from trustees on their
interest in fronting tax dol-
lars to the county for aspects
of the C.R. 491 widening and
medical corridor project,
which would be repaid with
impact fees. Trustees said
they are only exploring the
idea and no decision has
been reached.
The two boards are work-
ing to settle the final two of


numerous lawsuits filed
since 2009, when a dispute
over hospital control
erupted. The dispute effec-
tively ended in 2012 when
Gov Rick Scott replaced all -
but one member of the
CCHB.
In one lawsuit, the foun- Jim
dation demanded about $11 Sanders
foundation
See Page A2 board member.


County Road 491 plan gains traction


Officials want

to create

medical corridor
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
LECANTO The big pic-
ture seems lofty, but the plans
make sense.
That was the general feel-
ing of those who attended a
public meeting Thursday
night for the County Road 491
project which, as officials ex-
plained, is much more than
adding two lanes of roadway
County officials plan sev-
eral firsts for the road project
that would save millions of
dollars and create a medical
and business community to
attract interest from miles
away
Nearby residents, physi-
cians and property owners
seemed supportive of the
idea, though they await the
details.
"Everything I hear sounds
good," said Justin Brashear,
manager of Brashear's Phar-
macy north of the Allen
Ridge medical center.
Morris Stevenson, who
owns a home and electrical
shop on C.R. 491, said the
county is on the right track.
"I think it's great planning
and great to invite the people
to participate," he said.
The C.R. 491 project in-
volves three components:
Widening the roadway
from two lanes to four lanes
between C.R. 486 and State
Road 44.
Instead of buying rights


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
County officials plan to combine the eventual widening of C.R. 491 in Lecanto with a medical corridor they say could
attract interest from universities in Gainesville, Orlando or Tampa. On the left is the entrance to the Allen Ridge medical complex.


of way, the county wants
property owners to donate
land in exchange for regional
drainage ditches they could
share.
Setting up a medical cor-
ridor, complete with property
land-use designations and a
potential system of intercon-
necting streets within med-
ical complexes.
Tampa attorney Fred Bu-
sack, whose firm Pennington,


Moore, Wilkinson, Bell &
Dunbar has been paid
$271,902 by the county from
impact fees for consulting on
See Page A4

Attorney Fred Busack
discusses the C.R. 491
project Thursday night with
lifelong Lecanto resident
Pearl Maynard.
MIKE WRIGHT/Chronicle


Volunteers pitch in to fix disabled veteran's home


Foundation helps

with major overhaul

CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer

CITRUS SPRINGS The house on
West Eric Drive was bursting with fire-
fighters Thursday, without a wisp of
smoke in sight.


"What started out as a sand and paint
ended up as a major overhaul," said
John Keith, past commander of the Bev-
erly Hills Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 10087.
At least a dozen firefighters and a
dozen Home Depot associates had been
updating and refreshing the Citrus
Springs home of Tony Lemarquais, a 34-
year-old disabled veteran who uses a
wheelchair, during a three-day project
that initially was a smaller request.
"John came into the store last Novem-


FOUNDATION INFO
www.homedepotfoundation.org;
866-593-7019; The Home Depot
Foundation, 2455 Paces Ferry Road,
C-17, Atlanta, GA 30339.

ber and wanted to know if we would be
able to help out with about $150 so that
Tony could get his bedroom carpet re-
placed," said Julie Shutt, assistant man-
ager at Crystal River Home Depot. "And


I asked him how much time he had."
Since the request had no time limit,
Shutt said, "Let's see if we can do a little
better for you," and applied for help
through The Home Depot Foundation,
Keith said the request was brought to
him by a VFW post member, because he
is the manager for such projects for
veterans.
"I just did the paperwork," Keith said.
He gave high praise to Shutt and to
See Page A2


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HELP
Continued from Page Al

Valerie Winslip, the foun-
dation contact in Atlanta.
Keith also spoke in awe
of the volunteers.
"They painted the out-
side of this house in two
hours," he said.
Shutt said volunteers
had a prep day last Sun-
day, when she and two
"Team Depot" volunteers
did the pressure washing
of the exterior
"We pressure washed
the driveway and the
screen enclosure so that it
would be ready to paint
today," Shutt said. "And
with the Citrus County
Fire Rescue volunteers,
along with Home Depot
associates, who are also
volunteers, we've already
painted the exterior We've
put in the retaining wall
here so that when Tony
comes out with his puppy,
the chair doesn't continue
to go off the porch."
Inside, the volunteers
painted all of the walls
and baseboards. Lemar-
quais' bedroom walls were
newly coated in a bright
shade of beige, while the
bedroom of his 3-and-a-
half-year-old son, Joseph,
was treated to a nice hue
of blue for a boy
All the flooring was re-
moved during the prep day
so the home could be fin-
ished Friday with new
floor covering throughout.
The improvements will
be a great help to the
homeowner
"Tony is 34 years old,"
Shutt said. "He's a dis-
abled vet. His primary
caretakers are his mother
and Uncle Bob. They


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CHRIS VAN ORMER/Chronicle
Kenneth Clamer, battalion chief with Citrus County Sheriff's RFire Rescue, scrapes vinyl
floor covering in the kitchen of the Citrus Springs home of Tony Lemarquais. Clamer was
among more than two dozen volunteers who spent three days as Team Depot making
household improvements to assist the 34-year-old disabled veteran.


needed to get to a point
where they could more
easily maintain the home,
which is why we're here.
We will get them to the
point where they can
maintain the house."
Funding for the supplies
came from the Home
Depot Foundation.
"We apply for grants
and request dollars based
on the amount of work
that we need to do," Shutt
said. "And they graciously
approved the grant here
for us to be able to do
this."
Volunteers provide all
the labor.
"We actually had 12 fire-
men from Citrus County
Fire Rescue here with us


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today, along with Chief
(Kenneth) Clamer, who is
the battalion chief," Shutt
said. "We had 12 Home
Depot volunteers. Tomor-
row, we will have more Cit-
rus County Fire Rescue
volunteers as well as
Home Depot associates
from the Ocala store join-
ing us to finish it up."
Lemanquais was to get
his house back on Friday
"It will be completely
done tomorrow," Shutt
said Thursday afternoon.
"They'll be ready to go.
We're going to put up a
flagpole for them and a
few finishing touches out-
side, and put in the new
flooring."
Shutt also thanked


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Chronicle reporter
Chris Van Ormer can be
reached at cvanormer@
chronicleonline.com or
352-564-2916.


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BOARDS
Continued from Page Al

million in tax money it
said the CCHB was
holding illegally. Foun-
dation officials say
about $7 million is still
available.
While both boards
agreed in a joint work-
shop last week to drop
the lawsuit, they did not
discuss a settlement
amount. Foundation
members said the hospi-
tal needs the tax support.
"You guys have these
funds. That came from
county taxpayers to take
care of sick people in this
hospital and not pay
lawyers," foundation
board member Jim
Sanders said. "And those
funds, we need to move
those funds."
Trustees, meeting
Wednesday, offered $4
million, according to a
letter CCHB Chair-
woman Debbie Ressler
sent the foundation on
Thursday.


Both boards also want
a unified foundation,
with at least five mem-
bers from each board
plus the hospital chief of
medical staff. In its letter,
Ressler said the board
would need a seven-vote
supermajority to approve
capital expenditures
above $50,000 and hiring
the CEO, among other
things.
She said the $4 mil-
lion payment, which
would include all char-
ity care and expenses
through this year, is con-
tingent on the change of
control.
Though the foundation
board didn't discuss the
offer publicly Friday,
Mehl said talks will
continue.
"We are moving for-
ward to settle all of
these matters," she said,
"but it will take some
time to evaluate all of
the associated legal
issues."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at
352-563-3228 or mwright
@chronicleonline. com.


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March 30 at Lakeland is our last Florida show
The 7:00 show will have many special features!







Page A3 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2,2013



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




COUNTY Columbia remembered


Learn about U.S. 41
project at meeting
The Engineering Division
of Citrus County Depart-
ment of Public Works and
the Florida Department of
Transportation (FDOT), Dis-
trict 7, plans an informa-
tional meeting at 6 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 6, at the
Floral City Library, 8360 E.
Orange Ave., Floral City.
The meeting will be to
discuss the upcoming U.S.
41 resurfacing project,
which includes plans to
resurface the two-lane undi-
vided roadway, drainage
improvements; and im-
provements to the County
Road 48 intersection, which
includes a left-turn lane and
upgrading of pedestrian
safety features.
Staff will present the pro-
posed design, as well as
construction scheduling and
will invite input and ques-
tions from concerned citi-
zens. Maps of the proposed
project will be on display.
For information, call the
county engineering depart-
ment at 352-527-5446.
Administrator to
speak to chamber
County Administrator
Brad Thorpe will be the
guest
speaker
at the Cit-
rus
County
Chamber
of Com-
merce
luncheon
meeting Brad
Friday, Thorpe
Feb. 8. county
Hewill administrator.
He will
discuss
the county budget. Net-
working begins at 11:30
a.m. and the meeting will
conclude at about 1 p.m.
Non-members interested
in attending should call the
chamber office at 352-795-
3149 prior to Wednesday,
Feb. 6, to make and pay for
reservations.
Honor wounded
warriors at ceremony
The combat wounded
Patriots of Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 Military Order
of the Purple Heart (MOPH)
cordially invites all veterans
and the public to attend the
eighth annual Purple Heart
Ceremony at 11 a.m. Satur-
day, Feb. 9, at the Florida
National Guard Armory in
Crystal River.
The patriotic ceremony
will commemorate the proud
legacy of the Purple Heart
and pay tribute to Florida's
fallen heroes of the global
war on terror and America's
wounded warriors.
The ceremony will also
feature the MOPH Depart-
ment of Florida Afghan-
istan/Iraq War Memorial
Portrait Mural. The mural
honors more than 300
Floridians who have fallen
during the Afghanistan/Iraq
campaigns and is the first
memorial to bear the en-
graved names and color
portraits of those who fell.
For information, visit the
Chapter 776 website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org
or call 352-382-3847.


NASA marks 10 years since

loss ofshuttle, crew


Associated Press

CAPE CANAVERAL -
Schoolchildren joined
NASA managers and rela-
tives of the lost crew of
space shuttle Columbia on
Friday to mark the 10th an-
niversary of the tragedy
and remember the seven
astronauts who died.
More than 300 people
gathered at Kennedy
Space Center for the out-


door ceremony, just a few
miles from where Colum-
bia was supposed to land
Feb. 1, 2003, following a 16-
day science mission. It
never made it, bursting
apart in the sky over
Texas, just 16 minutes
from home.
Representing the fami-
lies of the Columbia seven,
the widow of commander
Rick Husband told the
hushed audience that the


Associated Press
Debris from the space shuttle Columbia streaks across
the sky Feb. 1, 2003, over Tyler, Texas.
accident was so unex- "They would come in
pected and the shock so in- the weeks, months and
tense, "that even tears years to follow in waves
were not freely able to and in buckets," said Eve-
fall." lyn Husband Thompson.


Hen picked


Chickens

are service

animals
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer

INVERNESS
o, you're
not seeing
things -
that's a
chicken riding in a
stroller.
Henny Pen, or
"Henny," is a rescue
chicken that's part of a
trio of service animals
adopted and trained by
Ed Brown and his 9-
year-old son, Austin.
"We take them out for
walks everywhere,"
Brown said. "Oreo, the
black-and-white one,
sits on the handle and
we go out on the trail or
shopping at Lowe's."
Henny has leg paraly-
sis. Oreo had been left
for dead.
Brown couldn't resist
rescuing them. You
could say he's chicken-
hearted.
"I'd seen (videos) of
chickens being tor-
tured, horrible stuff,"
he said.
Henny has to be car-
ried, but Oreo and Vic-
toria come running
when called. And
they're good car travel-
ers, too.
Oreo is the "watch
chicken." One time
Brown had some french
fries burning in the
oven and Oreo pecked
at him until he got up to
see what was wrong.
"We brought Oreo to
the fireworks and she
loved it," Brown said.
"She spread her wings
and looked like an
angel."
This past Christmas
the chickens had their
photo taken while sit-
ting on Santa's lap.
"People love to see
them," Brown said.
"They get real 'chicken-
eyed.'"
Trained as service
animals, the hens wear
service vests and go
into nursing homes.
"Chickens are easily
trained as service ani-


She assured everyone,
though, that healing is pos-
sible and that blessings
can arise from hardships.
She attended the cere-
mony with her two chil-
dren, her second husband
and Sandra Anderson,
widow of Columbia astro-
naut Michael Anderson.
"God bless the families
of STS-107," said Thomp-
son, referring to the mis-
sion designation for
Columbia's last mission.
"May our broken hearts
continue to heal and may
beauty continue to replace
the ashes."



Aerial

survey

counts

manatees

Special to the Chronicle

Staff from the Crystal
River National Wildlife
Refuge conducted an aer-
ial survey of manatees
Wednesday
In total, 428 manatees
were counted along the
survey route, stretching
from the Cross Florida
Barge Canal, near Inglis,
south to the Homosassa
River.
Included along this
route are the Crystal River,
King's Bay, the discharge
canal of the Progress En-
ergy power plant, Salt
River and the Homosassa
River, which includes the
Blue Waters.
The Cross Florida Barge
Canal, the discharge canal
of the power plant and
western sections of the
Homosassa, Crystal and
Salt Rivers could not be
flown due to low sea fog
rolling in.
"After what's been one
of the warmest months of
January in the past 10
years, and the lowest man-
atee counts for Citrus
County in the past five
years for January," said
Ivan Vicente, visitor serv-
ices specialist for the Crys-
tal River National Wildlife
Refuge, "this last cold
spell has certainly
changed the manatee dy-
namics we've seen over
the past four weeks, bring-
ing in the highest count for
Citrus County so far this
manatee season.
"However, today's count
is still over 150 manatees
short of the high count last
winter season for the
county, which occurred in
February 2012, which is
not necessarily a bad
thing. It is a good thing for
manatees to spread out
and venture around other
natural wintering sites
across the Gulf during
warm winters hosting mild
cold fronts," such as this
winter season, Vicente
said.
"The more spread out
the manatees are near
other springs outside the
county, the more familiar
they'll become with other
essential areas for mana-
tee survival," he added.
Wednesday's count:
King's Bay 264
adults and 19 calves -
283.
Crystal River 3
adults.
Salt River-0.
Power plant discharge
canal -38 adults.
Cross Florida Barge
Canal -0.
Homosassa River
(Blue Waters) 87 adults
and 8 calves 95.
Lower Homosassa
River 7 adults and 2
calves 9.
Total- 399 adults and
29 calves -428.
The U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service is the
principal federal agency
responsible for conserv-
ing, protecting, and en-


hancing fish, wildlife and
plants and their habitats
for the country


mals," said Floral City
animal rescuer Lisa
Jones, "especially the
ones that Ed has, be-
cause he spends so
much time with them."
Henny is one of the
chickens Jones had res-


cued. He and Austin
often visit Jones and
her rescue chickens at
Frog Holler in Floral
City.
Each chicken has its
own personality, Brown
said. Henny is the most


huggable. Oreo is sassy
and full of energy and
likes to be the center of
attention and she
growls.
Victoria is quiet and
polite, "queenly," like
Queen Victoria.
Brown has a total of
12 chickens, but Henny,
Oreo and Victoria are
the rulers of the roost.
"We have a lot of
sponsors and we're in
the process of building
a chicken condo,"
Brown said. "It'll be air
conditioned and
everything."
He said people ask
him all the time why he
does this, why he loves
chickens.
"It's rewarding," he
said. "People say, 'When
I was a kid growing up
on a farm, I used to have
to go get the eggs every
day' People get tears."


-From staff reports



Learn to leave no trace' while enjoying outdoors


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

YANKEETOWN Two teams
of professional mentors are trav-
eling the United States in efforts
to preserve the outdoors.
Naturalist and educator Susan
Pratt will conduct two free "Leave
No Trace" training sessions at 10
a.m. today and Feb. 9 at the With-
lacoochee Gulf Preserve, 1001 Old
Rock Road, Yankeetown.
Leave No Trace is a nonprofit
organization instructing individ-
uals of all ages how to enjoy
recreation in the outdoors
responsibly
"Our population is growing and
we are running out of wilder-


ness," Pratt said. "If we don't take
better care of our available
wilderness there will be none for
the future generations."
The family-friendly program
helps individuals develop prac-
tices that reduce the impact of
their presence in parks, refuges
and preserves. They encourage
people to leave these locales in
the same condition or better than
when they arrived.
Seven principles will be taught
through interactive activities that
will encourage participation in
indoor and outdoor settings.
Their goal is to raise awareness of
people's impact on the environ-
ment when they enjoy outdoor ac-
tivities like hiking, camping,


boating, hunting or fishing.
"Our parks have become so
popular," Pratt said. "If we don't
learn the seven principles on
how to preserve them, nothing
will change."
The seven principles that
Leave No Trace highlights are:
1. Plan ahead and prepare.
2. Travel and camp on durable
surfaces.
3. Dispose of waste properly
4. Leave what you find.
5. Minimize campfire impacts.
6. Respect wildlife.
7. Be considerate of other
visitors.
Reservations are suggested but
not required. For details, call 352-
447-5439 or visit www


* WHO: Withlacoochee Gulf
Preserve.
WHAT: Leave No Trace.
WHEN: 10 a.m. today and
Feb. 9.
WHERE: 1001 Old Rock
Road, Yankeetown.
COST: Free.
INFO: 352-447-5439 or
www.withlacoocheegulf
preserve.com.

withlacoocheegulfpreserve.com.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at 352-563-
5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington@
chronicleonline. com.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Edward Brown watches two of his chickens in his Inverness yard Thursday af-
ternoon. Brown owns many chickens, but three of them he takes out and about
the community.


Edward Brown holds Henny, a chicken that cannot
easily walk. When he takes the bird out, he places
her in a stroller, right.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MIKE WRIGHT/Chronicle
About 70 people attended a meeting Thursday night to hear plans and offer suggestions
for the C.R. 491 widening project in Lecanto. Tampa attorney Fred Busack, center, ex-
plained Lecanto could draw significant interest for a medical center from the Universi-
ties of Florida, Central Florida or South Florida.


ROAD
Continued from Page Al

the C.R. 491 project, out-
lined a scenario that sug-
gests Lecanto could be a
hub of medical activity.
Busack said he and
county officials met with
presidents or top deans
with the universities of
Florida, Central Florida
and South Florida to
gauge interest in Citrus
County. He said the draw
is the county's central
statewide location, plus an
influx of older residents in
the county and region. Bu-
sack also said the Suncoast


ON THE NET

Maps available at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us.


Parkway corridor, just to
the west of C.R. 491, is a
significant draw.
Busack said the county
has $9 million in gasoline
tax revenue enough to
build the road or buy right
of way, but not both. He
said property owners
would donate their right of
way in a land exchange
with the county.
Stevenson said he's will-
ing to listen to the right-of-
way plan.
"I don't mind working


out a compromise in some
areas," he said.
Dr. Gustavo Fonseca,
who owns an oncology
clinic and other property
along the highway, said he
likes the road plan but is
skeptical about Busack's
vision of a medical center.
"That pie in the sky? I
don't think that's going to
happen," he said.
County Development
Services Director Vince
Cautero said he expects to
have a report to the county
commission in the next 60
to 75 days.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


State BRIEF


State lottery increased
education funding by $130M
TALLAHASSEE -A new report said edu-
cation proceeds from the Florida Lottery in-
creased by $130 million, or nearly 11 percent,
in the last budget year.
The annual audit by the Legislature's Office
of Program Policy Analysis & Government Ac-


countability on Friday also suggested some
options for increasing those returns.
The Lottery transferred $1.3 billion to the
Educational Enhancement Trust Fund in the
budget year ending June 30. State econo-
mists are estimating a more modest increase
of $48 million for the current budget year.

-From wire reports


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic
battery arrest
Sandy Ashman, 46, of
Dunnellon, at 8:02 p.m. Thurs-
day on a misdemeanor charge
of domestic battery. No bond.
Other arrests
Zachary Garger, 18, of
Homosassa, at 4:28 p.m.
Wednesday on felony charges
of trafficking or endeavoring to
traffic in stolen property and
grand theft. Bond $8,000.
Dustin Warlick, 24, of
East Live Oak Lane, Inver-
ness, at 4 p.m. Thursday on
two Citrus County warrants for
violation of probation on an
original felony charge of pos-
session of marijuana. No
bond.
Dwayne Wiggins, 48, of
North 14th Street, Leesburg,
at 4:56 a.m. Thursday on a
Citrus County warrant for vio-
lation of probation on an origi-
nal felony charge of
possession of cocaine with in-
tent to sell. No bond.
James Shye, 27, of
South Bob White Drive, Ho-
mosassa, at 4 p.m. Thursday
on a Citrus County warrant for
a misdemeanor charge of sim-
ple stalking. No bond.
Jesse Harvey, 30, of


Beverly Hills, at 4:09 p.m. Jan.
24 on felony charges of ag-
gravated battery using a
deadly weapon and battery.
According to his arrest affi-
davit, he is accused of at-
tempting to stab a woman with
scissors. No bond.
Burglaries
A residential burglary was
reported at 7:10 a.m. Thurs-
day, Jan. 31, in the 6200 block
of E. Amity St., Inverness.
A commercial burglary
was reported at 5:05 p.m. Jan.
31 in the 3100 block of N. Carl
G. Rose Highway, Hemando.
A vehicle burglary was
reported at 5:48 p.m. Jan. 31
in the 8700 block of W. Mayo
Drive, Crystal River.
A residential burglary was
reported at 6:51 p.m. Jan. 31
in the 11300 block of S. Ann
Point, Homosassa.
A residential burglary was
reported at 7:23 p.m. Jan. 31
in the 10 block of S. Harrison
St., Beverly Hills.
Thefts
An auto theft was re-
ported at 8:10 a.m. Thursday,
Jan. 31, in the 6300 block of N.
Tamarind Ave., Hemando.
A petit theft was reported
at 1:22 p.m. Jan. 31 in the
2100 block of N. Brentwood
Circle, Lecanto.


A larceny petit theft was
reported at 1:51 p.m. Jan. 31
in the 7000 block of W. Walden
Woods Drive, Homosassa.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 2:44 p.m. Jan. 31 in
the 2800 block of E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Inverness.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 4:39 p.m. Jan. 31 in
the 5400 block of S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa.
A petit theft was reported
at 8 p.m. Jan. 31 in the 2400
block of E. Gulf-to Lake High-
way, Inverness.
Vandalisms
A vandalism was re-
ported at 1:38 p.m. Thursday,
Jan. 31, in the 2300 block of
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Inverness.
A vandalism was re-
ported at 5:59 p.m. Jan. 31 in
the 20 block of N. Fillmore St.,
Beverly Hills.

ON THE NET

For information about
arrests made by the
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the
Public Information
link, then on Arrest
Reports.


legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle



Meeting Notices............................C012




A Lien Notices.................................. I 2




Notice to


SCreditors/Administration ........C12


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PR HI LO PR |HI LO PI
70 30 NA LNA NA NA JP,66 29 NA


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
s
c

PC
pc
s
pc
s
s


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


L F'cast
61 pc
37 s
48 s
48 s
50 s
35 s
52 s
47 s
55 pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northeast winds around 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a moderate chop.
Mostly sunny skies today.


69 33 NA 71 38 NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK E l dusvebdaily
B TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 69 Low: 36
AM frost; mostly sunny.

S-SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
i High: 71 Low: 37
i Sunny to partly cloudy

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 66 Low: 32
Sunny to partly cloudy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 68/36
Record 85/28
Normal 72/43
Mean temp. 52
Departure from mean -6
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.00 in.
Total for the year 0.10 in.
Normal for the year 3.20 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 6
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.30 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 1
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 16%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, Maple, Oak
Today's count: 9.2/12
Sunday's count: 10.4
Monday's count: 9.8
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES


DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING)
2/2 SATURDAY 6:00 11:30


MINOR MAJOR
(AFTERNOON)
-- 6:00


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
O O 0 SUNSET TONIGHT ............................6:10P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:17A.M.
SM OONRISE TODAY................................NONE
FEB. 3 FEB. 10 FEB. 17 FEB. 25 MOONSET TODAY ..........................11:04A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 9:45 a/5:29 a 9:38 p/5:19 p
Crystal River" 8:06 a/2:51 a 7:59 p/2:41 p
Withlacoochee* 5:53 a/12:39 a 5:46 p/12:29 p
Homosassa*** 8:55 a/4:28 a 8:48 p/4:18 p


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
11:04 a/6:32 a 10:32 p/6:09 p
9:25 a/3:54 a 8:53 p/3:31 p
7:12 a/1:42 a 6:40 p/1:19 p
10:14 a/5:31 a 9:42 p/5:08 p


Gulf water
temperature


63
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.58 28.51 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.97 37.95 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 38.92 38.90 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.24 40.22 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


o S/..... H ..u
' -csz 80s
'4S 80's


Friday Saturday
City H LPcp. Fcst H L
Albany 28 20 c 25 18
Albuquerque 55 26 s 56 32
Asheville 43 22 sh 41 29
Atlanta 44 35 pc 51 37
Atlantic City 31 24 .11 c 33 28
Austin 72 35 s 74 45
Baltimore 31 22 .01 c 33 27
Billings 46 28 pc 44 22
Birmingham 46 30 pc 52 36
Boise 43 26 pc 41 21
Boston 34 27 c 33 22
Buffalo 23 18 .01 sn 22 18
Burlington, VT 24 14 .01 sn 23 11
Charleston, SC 59 38 s 58 40
Charleston, WV 29 12 .13 sn 31 27
Charlotte 42 30 pc 45 32
Chicago 12 1 c 26 20
Cincinnati 19 8 sn 29 24
Cleveland 18 12 .05 sn 22 21
Columbia, SC 52 36 pc 51 35
Columbus, OH 18 8 .01 sn 25 23
Concord, N.H. 30 19 c 25 12
Dallas 59 29 s 64 37
Denver 49 21 pc 51 28
Des Moines 17 -5 c 30 18
Detroit 19 12 .05 sn 23 18
El Paso 64 27 s 63 39
Evansville, IN 22 10 pc 38 28
Harrisburg 28 21 c 26 22
Hartford 33 24 c 29 19
Houston 70 43 pc 74 48
Indianapolis 16 5 sn 30 23
Jackson 52 36 pc 67 41
Las Vegas 66 42 pc 66 47
Little Rock 38 23 s 55 34
Los Angeles 73 51 pc 74 54
Louisville 21 9 pc 33 28
Memphis 38 22 pc 51 35
Milwaukee 8 -1 c 20 14
Minneapolis 2 -13 .03 sn 17 7
Mobile 62 39 s 64 46
Montgomery 53 39 s 57 38
Nashville 32 17 pc 40 28
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Adana -
--o'- B *-- *,3 ,

70ou.o .

'os
FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY

Friday Saturday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 64 45 pc 65 48
New York City 31 26 c 30 27
Norfolk 43 31 pc 40 32
Oklahoma City 51 19 s 59 34
Omaha 27 -3 pc 37 22
Palm Springs 75 48 pc 77 53
Philadelphia 32 26 c 31 26
Phoenix 73 44 pc 74 53
Pittsburgh 21 12 sn 23 21
Portland, ME 31 21 c 27 14
Portland, Ore 53 41 s 50 36
Providence, R.I. 33 25 c 33 19
Raleigh 40 30 pc 43 32
Rapid City 41 6 pc 45 24
Reno 57 25 s 56 27
Rochester, NY 23 18 .05 sn 22 18
Sacramento 66 35 s 64 38
St. Louis 29 9 pc 41 28
St. Ste. Marie 10 -2 c 14 6
Salt Lake City 46 30 pc 40 21
San Antonio 72 42 s 74 50
San Diego 73 50 pc 70 51
San Francisco 63 44 s 58 45
Savannah 61 37 s 60 39
Seattle 53 43 .05 s 53 40
Spokane 39 31 trace c 36 28
Syracuse 23 19 .14 sf 24 17
Topeka 29 6 pc 46 25
Washington 36 24 .01 c 34 30
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 79 Temecula, Calif. LOW -35 Bigfork,
Minn.
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/72/pc
Amsterdam 40/37/sh
Athens 62/56/s
Beijing 34/21/sn
Berlin 36/27/sf
Bermuda 59/58/pc
Cairo 65/52/s
Calgary 43/30/pc
Havana 73/65/sh
Hong Kong 72/67/sh
Jerusalem 59/46/pc


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


56/43/pc
41/30/pc
51/33/pc
76/43/pc
12/7/c
30/19/c
41/31/sh
85/74/ts
57/49/sh
68/63/sh
64/40/pc
19/16/sf
33/30/sn


C I T R U S


COUNTY N T Y


)HRONICLL
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To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
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*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
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Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
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residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com


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C ir- Inverness
office

E 106 W. Main
IA Inverness, FL
34450


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Report a news tip:
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S o u n d O ff ................................................................. ......................................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
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A4 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2013


STATE/LOCAL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Clinton out, Kerry in as secretary of state


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Hillary
Rodham Clinton formally re-
signed Friday as America's
secretary of state, capping a
four-year tenure that saw her
shatter records for the number
of countries visited. John
Kerry was sworn in to replace
her.
In a letter sent to President
Barack Obama shortly before
she left the State Department
for the last time in her official
capacity, Clinton thanked her
former opponent for the 2008
Democratic presidential nomi-
nation for the opportunity to
serve in his administration.
Clinton said it had been an
honor to be part of his Cabinet.
"I am more convinced than
ever in the strength and staying
power of America's global lead-
ership and our capacity to be a
force for good in the world," she
said in the letter.
Her resignation became ef-
fective at 4 p.m. when
Supreme Court Justice Elena
Kagan swore in John Kerry as
the top U.S. diplomat. The for-
mer Massachusetts senator
and 2004 presidential candi-
date is the 68th secretary of
state.
"I'm just very, very honored to
be sworn in and I'm very anx-
ious to get to work," Kerry told
reporters after the private cere-
mony at the Capitol. "I'll be re-
porting Monday morning at 9
o'clock to do my part," he said,
but he refused to say what global
hotspot he would visit first.


Associated rress
Hillary Rodham Clinton poses for a picture with an employee Friday as she leaves the State Department
for the final time as secretary of state.


In the State Department's
main lobby, Clinton pushed
through a throng of American
foreign service workers who
clamored for handshakes and
smartphone photos with her and
gave an emotional goodbye
speech.
She told them to continue to
"serve the nation we all love, to
understand the challenges, the
threats and the opportunities
that the United States faces and
to work with all our heart and all
of our might to make sure that


America is secure, that our in-
terests are promoted and our
values are respected."
Clinton, however, also left of-
fice with a slap at critics of the
Obama administration's han-
dling of the September attack on
a U.S. diplomatic mission in
Libya. She told The Associated
Press in an interview Thursday
that critics of the administra-
tion's handling of the attack
don't live in an "evidence-based
world," and their refusal to "ac-
cept the facts" is unfortunate


and regrettable for the political
system.
Clinton told the AP the attack
in Benghazi was the low point of
her time as America's top diplo-
mat. But she suggested that the
furor over the assault would not
affect whether she runs for pres-
ident in 2016.
Although she insisted she has
not decided what her future
holds, she said she "absolutely"
still plans to make a difference
on issues she cares about in
speeches and in a sequel to her


2003 memoir, "Living History,"
that will focus largely on her
years as secretary of state.
Clinton spoke to the AP Thurs-
day in her outer office on the
seventh floor of the State De-
partment less than 24 hours be-
fore she walks out for a final
time as boss. She was relaxed
but clearly perturbed by allega-
tions from Republican lawmak-
ers and commentators that the
administration had intentionally
misled the public about whether
the attack was a protest gone
awry or a terrorist attack, or in-
tentionally withheld additional
security for diplomatic person-
nel in Libya knowing that an at-
tack could happen.
An independent panel she
convened to look into the inci-
dent was scathing in its criticism
of the State Department and sin-
gled out four officials for serious
management and leadership
failures. But it also determined
that there was no guarantee that
extra personnel could have pre-
vented the deaths of the U.S. am-
bassador to Libya, Chris
Stevens, and three other Ameri-
cans. Clinton herself was not
blamed, although she has said
she accepted responsibility for
the situation.
"I was so unhappy with the
way that some people refused to
accept the facts, refused to ac-
cept the findings of an inde-
pendent Accountability Review
Board, politicized everything
about this terrible attack," she
said. "My job is to admit that we
have to make improvements and
we're going to."


Negotiators procede with caution as standoff reaches day four


Associated Press

MIDLAND CITY, Ala. -
After four anxious days,
only the slimmest of details
has come to light in a po-
lice standoff with an Ala-
bama man who is accused
of holding a 5-year-old boy
hostage in a bunker, a sign
of just how delicate the ne-
gotiations are.
Police have used a venti-
lation pipe in the under-
ground bunker to talk to
the man and deliver the
boy medication for his
emotional disorders, but
they have not revealed
how often they are in touch
or what the conversations
have been about. And au-
thorities waited until Fri-
day four days after the
siege began to confirm
what so many in this age of
instant communication al-
ready knew: The man ac-
cused of killing a school
bus driver and abducting
the boy Tuesday was 65-
year-old Jimmy Lee Dykes,
a Vietnam-era veteran who
was known to neighbors as
a menacing figure.
While much of what is
going on inside the bunker
remains a mystery, local of-
ficials who have spoken to
police or the boy's family
have described a small
room with food, electricity
and a TV And while the
boy has his medication, an
official also said he has
been crying for his parents.
Meanwhile, Midland
City residents held out


hope the standoff ,
would end safely
and mourned for
the slain bus
driver and his fam-
ily Candlelight vig-
ils have been held
nightly at a gazebo
in front of City Jim
Hall. Residents Dyl
prayed, sang songs susp
such as "Amazing kill
Grace" and nailed
homemade wooden
crosses on the gazebo's
railings alongside signs
that read: "We are praying
for you."
"We're doing any little


I thing that helps
show support for
him," said 15-year-
old Taylor Ed-
wards said.
S Former hostage
negotiators said
authorities must be
imy cautious and pa-
kes tient as long as
ect in they are confident
ing. that the boy is un-
harmed. Ex-FBI
hostage negotiator Clint
Van Zandt advised against
any drastic measures, such
as cutting the electricity to,
or putting sleep gas inside,
the bunker because it


your Valentine's Dinner.at West 82' "

S l ld I.,l LI. lUJ .
Sli in n L n* II irLI
LoI ,, i ,ll di.Lr L ,, Im
Ilir %45? [ir [i ,r i
,* V ^ il *l1..Ii.i'


Il


W e t8 4Reservations suggested.
V e LL at Plantation on Crystal River
BAR & GRILL 9301 W. Fort Island Trail,
SCrystal River, FL 352-795-4211
www.plantationoncrystalriver.com


could agitate Dykes.
The negotiator should
try to ease Dykes' anxi-
eties over what will hap-
pen when the standoff
ends, and refer to both the
boy and Dykes by their
first names, he said.
"I want to give him a rea-
son to come out," Van
Zandt said, "and my rea-
son is, 'You didn't mean
that to happen. It was un-
intentional. It could have
happened to anyone. It


was an accident. People
have accidents, Jimmy
Lee. It's not that big a
thing. You and I can work
that out."'
Police seemed to be fol-
lowing that pattern. At a
brief news conference to re-
lease a photo of Dykes, they
brushed off any questions
about possible charges.
"It's way too early for
that," said Kevin Cook, a
spokesman for the Ala-
bama state troopers.


The shelter is about 4
feet underground, with
about 6-by-8 feet of floor
space and there is a PVC
pipe that negotiators were
speaking through.
One of Dykes' next-door
neighbors said he spent
two or three months con-
structing the bunker, dig-
ging several feet into the
ground and then building
a structure of lumber and
plywood, which he cov-
ered with sand and dirt


he Fruits an
.....her -D-e-









Plns
0 D


THEY POURED THEIR HEARTS

OUT IN LOVE LETTERS FOR OUR

VALENTINE'S DAY CONTEST.

www.chronicleonline.com/valentinesday2013

They are counting on you to vote

for them so they can...


GET PUBLISHED!
V AI N' .-,


VVN "RIZ E !
RECEIVE AWARDS!



VOTE NOW!


I


NATION


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2013 A5


cy/ e


,/ ^ywv~


hC$ kie~tW.


I / e 0


yCcl %- I OM T

CHROIP L


. .. .. /





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Dennis
Delmain, 68
LECANTO
Dennis Duane Delmain,
68, of Lecanto, (aka Pops,
Papa, Uncle Denny) went
to join his parents; his old-
est son,
John; his
nephews,
Ivan Jr
a and Sean;
and sister-
in-law,
Judy, on
Jan. 25,
Denis 2013.
Delmain This is a
summary of the life of one
of the funniest, most hon-
orable, talented, best-look-
ing (he paid me to write
that) men we have ever
had the privilege of know-
ing. He was a devoted hus-
band, father, brother, son,
uncle and grandfather He
taught us you have to have
a sense of humor about the
good times and the bad,
the importance of hard
work and family
He was born
Feb. 8, 1944, joining his
parents, Ivan Dan and
Mary Delmain and big
brother, Ivan, in St. Louis,
Miss. At age 18 a happy,
hard-working young man
faced the first of many
challenges in his life. An
accident in gym class dur-
ing senior year left him
with a broken neck. Dur-
ing his recovery he still
managed to keep his sense
of humor. He graduated
Dunedin High School and
became a firefighter with
the Safety Harbor Fire
Department and also was
a master brick mason like
his father and brother
The best day of his life
was the day he met Joyce
"Annette." She gave him
what he craved the most, a
wonderful family, a solid
marriage, friendship, part-
nership and a life that few
people will ever witness.
He always wanted to try
new things. With his wife
by his side, they were suc-
cessful business owners,
and owned Fireside
Fireplaces and Dan-D
Radiator in Homosassa
and J&D Surplus in
Carrabelle.
An avid poker player, he
won as much as he lost but
always had fun. He was a
knowledgeable and tal-
ented fisherman until his
health failed him. He
taught several generations
of Delmains' the finer
points of card-playing and
he schooled a few on some
of the best fishing spots.
He is survived by his ex-
traordinary wife of 42
years and cornerstone of
the family, Joyce Annette
Delmain; sons, Wayne
(Cheryl) and Joe (Laura);
grandchildren, Blake
(Stephanie), Samantha,
John, Dennis (Shelly),
Sean, Gianna and Niklas;
great-grandchildren,
Michael, Travis, Oliver
and Faith; brother, Ivan;
his special niece, Mari-
anne; nephew, Duane
(Donna); great-nephew,
Matthew; cousin, Mike
McCool; "second son,"
James Conley
He will always be on the
tips of our rods and in our
hearts.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. cornm.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online, corn or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.


To Place Your

"In Memory" ad,

Judy


Moseley
at 564-2917
jmoseley@chronicleonline.com


Lawrence
'Larry' Smith,
76
INVERNESS
Lawrence D. "Larry"
Smith, 76, of Inverness,
Fla., passed away Friday,
Jan. 18, 2013, at HPH
Hospice in Lecanto. He
was born June 3, 1936, in
Fruithurst, Ala., to the late
Marshall 0. and Leila
(Brown) Smith. Larry was
a plate machine operator
in the battery manufactur-
ing industry, and arrived
in this area in 2008, com-
ing from Erin, Tenn. He
was a Baptist, and member
of the National Rifle Asso-
ciation. Larry enjoyed
fishing, riding his motorcy-
cle, and was an avid "Poet
of Women."
Survivors include three
sons, Lawrence D.
(Rhonda) Smith Jr. of
Inverness, Samuel M.
(Carolyn) Smith of Seffner,
and Marshall K. (Joyce)
Smith of Inverness; one
stepdaughter, Tina (Steve)
Barton of Zephyrhills; two
sisters, Patricia Nixon and
Susane Moffit; seven
grandchildren; and 10
great-grandchildren.
A graveside committal
service will be 3 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 4, 2013, at
Hills of Rest Cemetery in
Floral City The family will
receive friends in visita-
tion at 2 p.m., at the Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory until 2:45
p.m., when the procession
will leave for the cemetery
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.





Christopher
Tillie, 53
HERNANDO
Christopher R. Tillie, 53,
Hernando, died Jan. 30,
2013, at Citrus Memorial
Hospital surrounded by
his family Chris was born
Sept. 12, 1959, in Traverse
City, Mich., to John G. and
Beverly (Burkholder)
Tillie. He served our coun-
try in the United States
Army during Desert Storm
and was an active member
of the DAV No. 101 and
Eagles Aerie No. 3482 in
Nokomis, Fla.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are his children,
Christopher Tillie and
Holly Willis, both of
Venice; his mother, Bev-
erly Nyland and sister,
Lynda Tillie, both of Her-
nando; brothers, John B.
Tillie and his wife Connie
of Lampasas, Texas and
Tim Tillie of North
Carolina.
A celebration of life me-
morial service will be at
1 p.m. Feb. 17, 2013, at the
DAV No. 101 in Nokomis.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is
assisting the family with
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

8aa. .. zavu
Funeral Home With Crematory
ALICE SEAMAN
Service: Mon. 1:00 PM
PEGGY WALLER
Private Arrangements
RICHARD HOLM
Private Arrangements
DOROTHY HALL
Private Arrangements
LAURENCE SMITH
Viewing: Mon. 2:00 PM
Graveside Service: 3:00 PM
Hills of Rest
CHRISTOPHER TILLIE
Private Arrangements
726-8323 .DWD3


Ed Koch inspired NYC


MICHAEL ORESKES
Associated Press

NEW YORK Con-
fronted by an irate con-
stituent, an event which
occurs reasonably often in
the life of a New York
mayor any New York
mayor Edward Irving
Koch had, of course, an
answer. I will get a better
job, he would reply, but
you won't get a better
mayor.
The story is often of-
fered as emblematic of
the Koch bravura, illustra-
tive of his shtick, his show-
manship, his hubris. But
that misses the key point
about Ed Koch.
Koch's bravura wasn't
something he did. It is
who he was. He didn't put
on a show. He WAS the
show.
In my years as a New
York political reporter, I
had a ringside seat to the
Koch phenomenon. To
quote myself (something
Ed Koch taught me how to
do) from a review of one of
Koch's books years ago:
"There was a time in my
life when I had occasion
to spend hours every day
with Edward I. Koch. He
was a first-term mayor. I
was City Hall bureau chief
of the city's largest news-
paper. There were days
when he spent so much
time talking to me and
to my journalistic col-
leagues in the famous
Room 9 that I won-
dered where he found the
time to be mayor. Then I
came to understand that
for Edward I. Koch (there
were those who put the
emphasis on the 'I'), talk-
ing to me was being
mayor."
Well, not just talking to
me, of course. But talking.
Endlessly Relentlessly To
everyone and anyone, and
of course especially to
journalists who would am-
plify his message. I still re-
member the first time I
ever saw Ed Koch talking
to a TV crew. At first he
spoke to the TV reporter
Then, slowly, his eyes
turned away from the re-
porter and toward the
camera and finally
straight into the lens. He
was speaking directly to
all the New Yorkers
watching on the other end
without even a pretense
that the journalist was
doing anything more than
holding the microphone.
I later learned that
David Garth, his leg-
endary media adviser,
taught him to do that.
Koch's catch phrase -
"How'm I doing" was
not a question. It was a
demand to engage with
his presence as embodi-
ment of the city. He came
along at just the moment
when a shot of spiritual
renewal was needed to












fi I a "I


Associated Press
In this Sept. 11, 1985, file photo, New York Mayor Ed Koch raises his arms in vic-
tory at the Sheraton Centre in New York after winning the Democratic primary in his
bid for a third four-year term. Koch died Friday, Feb. 1, from congestive heart failure,
spokesman George Arzt said. He was 88.


mend New York's badly
bruised self-confidence.
Koch's years as mayor
overlapped with another
leader who understood
communication wasn't
just how you explained
governing communica-
tion was governing.
Ronald Reagan and his
team understood that
memorable images and
moments could trump
more complex details.
Koch was less calculat-
ing than Reagan about
fashioning those mo-
ments. He worked from
his gut, perhaps even too
much, he himself would
acknowledge.
The results were enter-
taining and legendary
And, as with Reagan, the
full story was often more
complex than the memo-
rable moment
The 1980 transit strike
is remembered for Koch's
stand on the Brooklyn
Bridge. But while Rea-
gan's stand against the air
traffic controllers
changed the direction of
labor relations, the transit
workers in New York ac-


tually ended up winning a
pretty expensive deal the
city probably could have
gotten without the
confrontation.
Koch is sometimes de-
scribed as pulling the city
back from bankruptcy Ac-
tually, Gov Hugh L. Carey
did that before Koch took
office.
What Koch did was re-
store spirit to the city, not
a small thing after a very
dire time.
New York is such a dif-
ferent city today that it is
hard sometimes to re-
member what it was like
in the 1970s.
It is a city so resilient
that neither the attacks of
9/11 nor the Great Reces-
sion deterred the city's
boom for long.
But in the '70s, the talk
was of crime and racial
strife, of burning neigh-
borhoods and empty mu-
nicipal coffers.
Koch's purpose was to
be cheerleader-in-chief-
a cheerleader in that par-
ticularly New York style,
of course. He could be po-
larizing and an insuffer-


able egoist. But then this
was New York and some-
how he had such passion
for his work, this work of
talking about his city, that
most New Yorkers could
not help but appreciate
him (until they finally got
fed up with him and
turned him out after three
terms).
But up close, there was a
sadness his acquaintances
and friends could feel.
Koch never married or ac-
knowledged a long-term
partner He always
slapped aside questions
about his private life.
"I'm well aware of the
occasional speculation re-
garding my sexual orienta-
tion," he once wrote, "but
it doesn't matter to me
whether people think I'm
straight or gay"
Koch governed through
the worst years of the
AIDS epidemic and there
were those in the gay com-
munities who felt he
could have helped by
coming out. But that, of
course, was based on a


See KOCH/Page A7


S S -





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SU CI TY


Obituaries


A6 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2013






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money&Markets
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Dow Jones industrials
Close: 14,009.79
Change: 149.21 (1.1%)


1 ,5 5 0 ............. ......................... ............. ............. ............ 14 4 0 0 .............. ............. ............. .............. ............ ........ ....
1,500 14,000since
, 5 o o . . . . . .. . ... . . . . ... . .... . . . | 4 . . . ... . .... .
S .13,600 .................. .... ............ i............. ........... .
1,450 ............ 13,600 ....O ctober2007
13,200. ................
1,400 12,800 Associated Press


N Nk *, 6
1, 5 .... ..... 6...... ........6 ...... 1 00 A E 66


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
14019.78
5871.63
476.12
8970.32
3183.14
1514.41
1103.54
15992.68
912.76


LOW
13860.58
5804.23
474.00
8919.97
3154.91
1498.11
1093.40
15824.32
905.39


CLOSE
14009.79
5857.23
474.53
8965.12
3179.10
1513.17
1101.59
15979.16
911.20


CHG.
+149.21
+53.00
+0.53
+81.34
+36.97
+15.06
+8.19
+154.84
+9.11


%CHG.
+1.08%
+0.91%
+0.11%
+0.92%
+1.18%
+1.01%
+0.75%
+0.98%
+1.01%


YTD
+6.91%
+10.37%
+4.73%
+6.18%
+5.29%
+6.10%
+7.95%
+6.56%
+7.28%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 3.42 -0-- 10.00 4.09 +.09 +2.3 V V V -11.1 -56.6 dd
AT&T Inc T 29.02 -0- 38.58 35.51 +.72 +2.1 A A A +5.3 +24.3 29 1.80f
Ametek Inc AME 29.86 0 41.55 41.47 +.48 +1.2 A A A +10.4 +31.5 22 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 60.52 0 94.49 92.28 +3.68 +4.2 A A A +5.6 +47.9 1.57e
Bank of America BAC 6.72 0 12.20 11.71 +.39 +3.4 A V A +0.9 +59.3 45 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 6.35 0 12.23 12.01 +.81 +7.2 A A A +5.6 +28.0 cc
CenturyLink Inc CTL 36.50 -0- 43.43 41.15 +.70 +1.7 A A A +5.2 +17.1 37 2.90
Citigroup C 24.61 0 43.34 43.02 +.86 +2.0 A A A +8.7 +37.4 13 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 -0- 21.43 16.93 +.49 +3.0 A A A +6.9 -8.8 30 1.00
Disney DIS 38.38 0 54.87 54.59 +.71 +1.3 A A A +9.6 +40.4 17 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 0- 71.13 68.84 +.10 +0.1 A A A +7.9 +12.3 19 3.06
EPR Properties EPR 40.04 0- 48.92 47.48 +.62 +1.3 A A A +3.0 +12.1 21 3.00
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 77.13 93.67 90.04 +.07 +0.1 V A A +4.0 +10.0 11 2.28
Ford Motor F 8.82 --- 14.30 13.02 +.07 +0.5 V V A +0.5 +6.3 10 0.40f
Gen Electric GE 18.02 -0- 23.18 22.62 +.34 +1.5 A A A +7.8 +22.8 16 0.76f
Home Depot HD 44.22 0 68.15 67.30 +.38 +0.6 V A A +8.8 +53.4 24 1.16
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 -- 29.27 21.36 +.32 +1.5 A A A +3.6 -17.1 10 0.90
IBM IBM 181.85 211.79 205.18 +2.11 +1.0 A A A +7.1 +7.1 14 3.40
LKQ Corporation LKQ 14.63 0 23.51 23.06 +.67 +3.0 V A A +9.3 +37.4 27
Lowes Cos LOW 24.76 0 39.26 38.56 +.37 +1.0 V A A +8.6 +44.7 23 0.64
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 101.29 95.95 +.66 +0.7 A A A +8.8 -0.9 18 3.08
Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.26 -- 32.95 27.93 +.48 +1.7 A A A +4.6 -4.2 15 0.92
Motorola Solutions MSI 44.49 0 59.48 58.87 +.48 +0.8 A A A +5.7 +27.9 20 1.04
NextEra Energy NEE 59.10 0 72.87 72.28 +.23 +0.3 V A A +4.5 +24.4 16 2.40
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 15.69 -0-- 43.18 19.88 -.45 -2.2 A V A +0.9 -50.6 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 16.10 -0- 19.71 19.32 -.01 -0.1 V A A +7.0 +8.7 17 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 5.12 0 7.88 7.88 +.10 +1.3 A A A +10.5 +49.8 11 0.04
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 -0-- 85.90 47.55 +.60 +1.3 A A A +15.0 +19.9 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 70.50 0 90.31 89.79 +1.16 +1.3 A V A +4.1 +15.0 21 2.08
Sprint Nextel Corp S 2.10 0 6.04 5.69 +.06 +1.1 A V A +0.4 +165.6 dd
Texas Instru TXN 26.06 0 34.24 33.72 +.64 +1.9 A A A +9.2 +4.5 22 0.84
Time Warner TWX 33.62 0 51.29 50.88 +.36 +0.7 A A A +6.4 +39.1 19 1.04
UniFirst Corp UNF 55.86 0- 88.35 82.01 +.27 +0.3 A V A +11.9 +35.6 16 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 36.80 --- 48.77 44.56 +.95 +2.2 A A A +3.0 +21.2 cc 2.06
Vodafone Group VOD 24.95 -0- 30.07 27.30 -.02 -0.1 A A A +8.4 +6.4 1.53e
WalMart Strs WMT 57.18 -0- 77.60 70.49 +.54 +0.8 A A A +3.3 +16.6 15 1.59
Walgreen Co WAG 28.53 0 40.31 40.31 +.35 +0.9 A A A +8.9 +22.8 18 1.10
Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement I Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd -Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates




flu
The yield on the
10-year
Treasury note
rose to 2.02
percent Friday.
Yields affect
interest rates on
consumer loans.


Commodities
The price of
crude oil, cop-
per and other
metals rose
alongside global
stock markets.
Expectations for
demand in the
commodities in-
creased follow-
ing encouraging
economic re-
ports.





lt


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .06 0.07 -0.01 .08
6-month T-bill .10 0.11 -0.01 .09
52-wk T-bill .13 0.13 ... .12
2-year T-note .27 0.27 ... .23
5-year T-note .89 0.88 +0.01 .71
10-year T-note 2.02 1.99 +0.03 1.82
30-year T-bond 3.22 3.17 +0.05 3.00


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 2.80 2.76 +0.04 2.49
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.00 4.00 ... 4.54
Barclays USAggregate 1.90 1.91 -0.01 2.08
Barclays US High Yield 5.87 5.77 +0.10 7.47
MoodysAAA Corp Idx 3.90 3.93 -0.03 3.80
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.13 1.13 ... .96
Barclays US Corp 2.82 2.83 -0.01 3.41


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 97.77
Ethanol (gal) 2.49
Heating Oil (gal) 3.16
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.30
Unleaded Gas (gal) 3.05
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1669.40
Silver (oz) 31.94
Platinum (oz) 1687.70
Copper (Ib) 3.78
Palladium (oz) 756.00
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.27
Coffee (Ib) 1.48
Corn (bu) 7.36
Cotton (Ib) 0.83
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 362.70
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.22
Soybeans (bu) 14.74
Wheat (bu) 7.65


PVS.
97.49
2.46
3.13
3.34
3.03
PVS.
1660.60
31.34
1675.40
3.72
745.30
PVS.
1.28
1.47
7.41
0.83
352.70
1.20
14.69
7.80


%CHG
+0.29
+0.85
+1.34
-1.14
+0.72
%CHG
+0.53
+1.94
+0.73
+1.40
+1.44
%CHG
-0.41
+0.68
-0.61
+0.04
+2.84
+1.71
+0.39
-1.86


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 21.27 +.14 +4.3 +14.2 +11.9 +5.0
BondA m 12.84 -.02 -0.7 +3.8 +5.8 +3.7
CaplncBuA m 54.48 +.24 +3.2 +13.5 +9.6 +2.6
CpWIdGrIA m 39.04 +.36 +4.9 +17.9 +9.1 +1.4
EurPacGrA m 43.17 +.41 +4.7 +15.8 +7.1 +0.8
FnlnvA m 43.14 +.39 +5.8 +16.8 +12.4 +3.2
GrthAmA m 36.28 +.39 +5.6 +17.8 +11.9 +3.1
IncAmerA m 18.73 +.09 +3.7 +13.3 +11.7 +4.6
InvCoAmA m 31.70 +.28 +5.1 +15.3 +10.8 +2.7
NewPerspA m 33.11 +.40 +5.9 +18.8 +11.4 +3.6
WAMutlnvA m 32.81 +.28 +5.1 +14.7 +13.5 +3.5
Dodge & Cox Income 13.86 ... 0.0 +5.8 +6.2 +6.7
IntlStk 36.63 +.26 +5.7 +18.1 +7.7 +0.6
Stock 130.63 +1.23 +7.2 +22.0 +12.7 +2.0
Fidelity Contra 81.40 +.80 +4.9 +15.4 +13.8 +4.9
GrowCo 97.94 +.85 +5.1 +13.4 +16.2 +6.5
LowPriStk d 41.70 +.21 +5.6 +15.5 +14.9 +6.8
Fidelity Spartan 5001dxAdvtg 53.64 +.54 +6.2 +16.8 +13.9 +3.9
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA x 2.30 ... +3.7 +14.4 +11.1 +5.4
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.42 +.03 +0.6 +10.0 +8.4 +9.4
GIBondAdv 13.37 +.02 +0.5 +10.2 +8.6 +9.6
Harbor Intllnstl d 64.69 +.74 +4.1 +14.6 +9.3 +1.5
PIMCO TotRetA m 11.18 -.01 -0.4 +6.8 +6.6 +7.1
T Rowe Price GrowStk 39.59 +.38 +4.8 +15.9 +14.8 +5.4
Vanguard 500Adml 139.57 +1.39 +6.2 +16.9 +14.0 +4.0
5001nv 139.56 +1.39 +6.2 +16.7 +13.8 +3.8
GNMAAdml 10.85 +.02 -0.4 +1.6 +5.2 +5.6
MulntAdml 14.40 ... +0.4 +3.9 +5.8 +5.2
STGradeAd 10.82 ... +0.1 +3.6 +3.6 +3.8
TotBdAdml 10.98 -.01 -0.8 +2.5 +5.3 +5.3
Totlntl 15.59 +.11 +4.1 +12.8 +6.5 -0.8
TotStlAdm 37.98 +.37 +6.5 +16.7 +14.5 +4.6
TotStldx 37.97 +.37 +6.5 +16.6 +14.4 +4.5
Welltn 35.20 +.17 +4.0 +12.6 +10.9 +5.5
WelltnAdm 60.79 +.30 +4.0 +12.7 +10.9 +5.6
Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
Encouraging economic reports
sent the Dow Jones industrial
average above the 14,000 level
for the first time since 2007. The
Dow is now just 1.1 percent
below its record, set on Oct. 9,
2007, which was two months
before the start of the Great
Recession.

Merck MRK
Close: $41.83 V-1.42 or -3.3%
The drugmaker said that its fourth-
quarter profit fell 7 percent because
of hits from generic competition and
one-time charges.





52-week range
$36.91 $48.00
Vol.: 37.6m (2.8x avg.) PE:19.1
Mkt. Cap:$127.17 b Yield: 4.1%
Panasonic PC
Close: $6.88A0.27 or 4.1%
The Japanese electronics maker re-
turned to the black in the third quar-
ter as it cut costs. A weaker yen also
helped results.
$7



4 N D J
52-week range
$4.61 $9.46
Vol.:1.5m (2.1x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap:$15.9 b Yield:...
National Oilwell NOV
Close: $71.26V-2.88 or -3.9%
Shares of the oil rig parts and servic-
es firm fell after saying that its
fourth-quarter profit rose 16.4 per-
cent on higher demand.




Il L J
52-week range
$59.07 $89.95
Vol.: 12.6m (3.3x avg.) PE:12.7
Mkt. Cap:$30.42 b Yield: 0.7%
Legg Mason LM
Close: $26.79 V-0.86 or -3.1%
The money manager posted a loss
for its fiscal third quarter after it
wrote down the value of some of its
assets.
$30
28


4 N D J
52-week range
$22.36 $29.49
Vol.: 3.4m (2.1x avg.) PE:21.1
Mkt. Cap:$3.53 b Yield: 1.6%
LyondellBasell LYB
Close: $61.37V-2.05 or -3.2%
The company, which refines oil and
makes chemicals and plastics, said
that it returned to a profit in its fourth
quarter.



4'

52-week range
$35.97 $64.20
Vol.: 8.4m (2.Ox avg.) PE: ...
Mkt. Cap:$35.3 b Yield: 2.6%


StocksRecap


replied, "conducting the
affairs of the city and pro-
viding services to more
than seven million New


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE
3,813
3,863
2345
708
422
13


NASD
1,962
2,105
1796
684
274
23


NEW YORK-The Dow
closed above 14,000 on Fri-
day for the first time in
more than five years.
It was just a number on
a board, but it was enough
to raise the hopes of some
investors and cause others
concern about an over-
heated market. And it
brought reminders of a dif-
ferent era, back before the
financial crisis rocked the
world economy
The Dow Jones indus-
trial average, a stock mar-
ket index that is
traditionally considered a
benchmark for how the en-
tire market is faring, had
been rising fairly steadily
for about a month. On Fri-
day, strong auto sales and
optimism about U.S. job
growth pushed it over the
mark. The Dow is now just
155 points away from its
record close.
"There's a newfound en-
thusiasm for the equity
market," said Jim Russell,
regional investment direc-
tor at U.S. Bank
Wealth Management in
Minneapolis.
But market watchers
were divided over what
the Dow milestone or
even what a potential new
all-time high really
means. To some, it's an im-
portant booster to hearts
and minds, making in-
vestors feel optimistic and
thus more willing to bet on
the market.
"The Dow touching
14,000, it matters psycho-
logically," said Peter
Cardillo, chief market
economist at Rockwell
Global Capital in New
York. "It attracts smaller
investors."
And those investors,
until recently, had been
shying away from stocks.
Since April 2011, investors
have pulled more cash out
of U.S. stock mutual funds
than they've put in, ac-
cording to the Investment
Company Institute. In the
past three weeks, though,
that trend has reversed,
which could make January
the first month in nearly
two years where stock-
focused funds had a net
inflow.
To others, though, Dow
14,000 is nothing but a
number, a sign more of
how traders feel than of
the economy And it's not
even the best number on
the board, some traders
say Professional investors




KOCH
Continued from Page A6

premise he never
acknowledged.
"Those who seek to 'out'
people who may or may
not be gay can be de-
scribed as comparable to
the Jew catchers of Nazi
Germany," he said.
This can seem a little
antique from the vantage
of New York in 2013,
where one of the candi-
dates for mayor of New
York is married to another
woman and another, a
male, is married to a
woman who says she was a
lesbian.
But Koch was very much
a man of his time and very
much his own man. He
maintained his refusal to
discuss his personal life to
the very end. He was close
to his sister and her kids
and grandkids. He had
lunch every weekend with
a circle of staff members
from his administration. I
joined them for their
weekly lunch not long ago;
without a break, they man-
aged to flit between pres-
ent-day politics and
reminiscences of past
grudges and battles. Koch
reveled in it all.
Just weeks before he
died, a journalist asked
Koch when in his life he
had been happiest.
"At City Hall," he


Yorkers."
And always, always talk-
ing about it.


Michael Oreskes is sen-
ior managing editor of The
Associated Press.


Dow tops 14,000


First time


Associated Press
A screen Friday on the trading floor of the New York Stock
Exchange shows the Dow Jones industrial average above
14,000 for the first time since October 2007.



A DAY ON WALL STREET
F e b 1, 2 0 13 .................................................................. 14 ,5 0 0
Dow Jones
industrials 13,500
12,500
+149.21
........... I ......... r......... I......... ....... .. i .......... 1 1,5 0 0
14,009.79 A S 0 N D J
Pct. change from previous: +1.08% High 14,019.78 Low 13,860.58

F e b 1, 2 0 13 .................................................................. 3 ,5 0 0
N a s d a q .................................................................. 3 ,250
composite 3,200

+ 36 .97 ................... .... .................... ................ 2,750
3 ,1 7 9 .1 0 .............. ........ ......................... ...i ... ..... 2 ,5 0 0
A S O N D J
Pct. change from previous: +1.18% High 3,183.14 Low 3,154.91

F e b 1, 2 0 13 .................................................................. 1 ,6 0 0
Standard & ................. ......... 1,500
Poors 500 1,400

+ 1 5 .0 6 .................................................................. 1 ,3 0 0
1 1 7 -......*... ".....i......... i .. ........ r ......... f ........ i .... .... ... 1 ,2 0 0
1,513.17 A S 0 N D J
Pct. change from previous: +1.01% High 1,514.41 Low 1,498.11


usually pay more heed to
the Standard & Poor's
main index, which tracks
500 companies compared
to the Dow's 30. The Dow
garners attention, they say,
because it's more familiar
to the general public.
Joe Gordon, managing
partner at Gordon Asset
Management in North Car-
olina, wasn't celebrating
Friday He thinks the gains
won't last. The fact that
small investors are finally
piling back in the stock
market, he said, is not a
reason for optimism but a
sign that it's getting over-
hyped and due to fall.
After the Dow hit its all-
time record in 2007, it fell
almost steadily for the
next year and a half. It lost
more than half its value
before starting to tick back
up again.
"It is good trivia to talk
about on television and
the radio," Gordon said,
referring to the 14,000
mark. "It's meaningless to
the average professional."
And for workers still un-
employed by the financial
crisis, he said, "it really
means nothing to them."
If there is dissent over
what Dow 14,000 signifies,
what's undeniable is that


it's a rarefied event. Be-
fore Friday, the Dow had
closed above 14,000 just
nine times in its history.
The first time was in July
2007; the rest were in Oc-
tober of that year
The last time the Dow
closed that mark was Oct.
12, 2007, when it settled at
14,093.08. It had reached
its all-time record,
14,164.53, three days be-
fore that.
For the average investor,
that was all back when the
stock market still seemed
like a party. Housing
prices were starting to ebb
but hadn't cratered. Jobs
were abundant, with un-
employment at 4.7 percent
- compared to 7.9 percent
now. Lehman Brothers
still existed. So did Bear
Stearns, Wachovia and
Washington Mutual.
The Dow ended Friday
149.21 points higher to
14,009.79.
The other indexes were
also up.
The S&P 500 rose 15.06
to 1,513.17. The Nasdaq
composite index was up
36.97 to 3,179.10.
Auto sales helped. Toy-
ota, Ford, GM and Chrysler
all reported double-digit
gains for January


Associated Press
Koch says goodbye to reporters Dec. 10, 2012, as he
gets in his car after being released from the hospital in
New York.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


25% OFF

4 Valentine's

*i 1 Jewelry
._ ...._ n, ^ *



t is in the air!
Give her something shell cherish.


O 1 Jim Green Jewelers "..T
Crystal River Shopping Center 1665 SE Hwy. 19 "-
Mnt"Fi.am-Spm 352-563-0633


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2013 A7







Page A8 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2,2013



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .........................publisher
Mike Arnold ................. .................. editor
Charlie Brennan ....................editor at large
Curt Ebitz .......................citizen member
mNw Mac Harris ...........................citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ...... ................. guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista .........................copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


CARROT OR STICK




ACA causes



angst among



smokers


It made nationwide head-
lines recently: Under the
new Affordable Care Act
(ACA), starting next year in-
surers may significantly in-
crease premiums for smokers
buying individual health poli-
cies. The hope,
presumably, is
that the financial THE I
penalty will dis- New he
courage smoking law m&
and thus lead smok
to a healthier higher i
population. r
The uproar that prenr
followed this news
featured strong OUR O
arguments on all Is this
sides of the issue. rot
Adult smoking is
legal and it's a
lifestyle choice, as are drink-
ing and eating to excess. So
why, some ask, are smokers
singled out for punitive treat-
ment by insurance compa-
nies, versus drunks and
gluttons?
Smoking is the No. 1 cause
of preventable death in the
U.S. today, and it's implicated
in a wide range of diseases.
Smokers typically have shorter
lifespans, and they are more
frequent users of health serv-
ices, so naturally health in-
surance risk managers have a
keen interest.
But if smokers die sooner,
some argue, they actually
spare the insurance compa-
nies from having to pay treat-
ment costs. However, the U.S.
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention (CDC) said
that for every smoking-
related death, another 20
people suffer with a smoking-
related disease.


The higher premiums also
will hit population groups
that can least afford it. The
CDC's 2011 National Health
Interview Survey shows peo-
ple on Medicaid and those
currently without health in-


SSUE:
alth care
ay mean
ers pay
insurance
1iums.

PINION:
the best
ute?


surance smoke
at much higher
rates than others.
Under the ACA,
everyone will be
expected to buy
insurance not
good news for
those on tight
budgets, especially
if there's a
punitive charge
involved.
However, with
the ACA's ex-


panded coverage, those with
insurance may have access to
tobacco screening and help
in quitting the carrot in-
stead of the stick.
It's not a done deal yet.
However, Florida's leaders
still haven't agreed to expand
Medicaid coverage, which
would allow nearly a million
people now without coverage
to enroll. Additionally,
Florida still has no certain
plans for the mandated
health exchange market that
should provide a path for
those without employer-
provided health coverage.
Although the ACA requires
that certain preventive ef-
forts, including tobacco ces-
sation services, must be
covered, there is no agree-
ment on what services are in-
cluded. Lots of details for the
devil to hide in with the Af-
fordable Care Act.
Stay tuned.


WANT TO QUIT? HERE'S HOW.
* In a program funded by the Florida Department of Health, the
Citrus County Library System is partnering with Gulfcoast
North Area Education Center to provide free two-hour tobacco
dependence seminars at library branches. Enrollees also may
receive nicotine replacement therapy.
* The next scheduled programs are Feb. 18, at the Coastal
Region Library; March 27, at the Central Ridge Library; and
March 30, at the Homosassa Library.
* To register, or to find out about other scheduled seminars in
the area, call 813-929-1000, ext. 204, or visit www.gnahec.org.
Space is limited.


Free dental clinic
I was reading in the paper about a
free dental clinic in Homosassa.
Would someone please publish the
number? God bless all who had a
hand in this.
Editor's note: The Nature Coast
Ministries Dental and Med-
ical Clinic is not yet open.
The Knights of Columbus i
donated its building at 9020
W Atlas Drive in Homosassa
to Catholic Charities to use
for the clinic. Nature Coast f
Ministries can be reached at
352-563-1860.


I


Do not call CAL
r (J


Awhile back, you printed OUt)
a number to call to stop the
calls from coming into the house. I get
calls 50 times a day about air condition-
ers and safety things and everything
else. There was a number you printed
that we could call to have our name
taken off the list of crank calls and sales


*"


people. Can you please print it again?
Editor's note: The toll-free number
for the National Do Not Call Registry is
888-382-1222.
Show consideration
It is difficult for people using a walker
to get in and out of stores
IND where there are manually
JND open doors. Even someone
Ml pushing an individual in a
Kjrr wheelchair finds it a real
j chore pushing that wheel-
chair and at the same time
opening or closing a door.
You would be amazed at the
7 lack of consideration on the
part of those nearby at offer-
) 79 ing their help.
Thanks for help
My husband and I would like to
thank the good Samaritan who
stopped and pulled us out of the
ditch on (U.S.) 41 the other day. We
didn't get his name. (He) got us out
and left. Thank you.


"A wise man will make more
opportunities than he finds."
Francis Bacon, 1625


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


'60 Minutes' missed opportunity


In the days of the late Mike
Wallace, "60 Minutes" was
known for hard-hitting, ag-
gressive journalism
that asked the
questions viewers
wanted answered
and held the power-
ful accountable.
The Jan. 27 pro-
gram on which Steve
Kroft interviewed
President Obama (at
his request, no less)
and outgoing Secre- Cal T
tary of State Hillary OTI
Clinton fell far short VOI
of that high standard.
It was the kind of
softball toss you might have ex-
pected if Oprah Winfrey or Bar-
bara Walters had conducted the
interview.
The president said of Clinton,
"... a lot of the successes we've
had internationally have been
because of her hard work."
Kroft should have asked if one
of those successes included
Russia, a nation with which
Clinton promised to push the
"reset button." Yet, as the Wash-
ington Postreported, '"A poison-
ous unraveling of U.S. relations
with Russia in recent months
represents more than the fail-
ure of President Obama's first-
term attempt to 'reset' badly
frayed bilateral relations. It
threatens pillars of Obama's
second-term foreign policy
agenda as well." And how about
the Middle East, which is not
exactly headed toward peace
and stability?
Late in the interview, the
president rattled off his admin-
istration's foreign policy suc-
cesses. He mentioned Egypt
and said, "... had it not been for
the leadership we showed, you
might have seen a different out-
come there."
Kroft should have followed
up with: "Different from Mo-


h
H
I1


hamed Morsi, Egypt's president
and Muslim Brotherhood pro-
ponent, who agrees with the
Koran that Jews '...
are descendants of
apes and pigs"'?
Kroft brought up
the 2008 presidential
campaign during
which Clinton had
some tough things to
say about Barack
Obama, including
that he had little or
iomas no accomplishments
HER to speak of. That
CES would have been a
good moment to re-
mind viewers what
she said. Instead, Kroft said,
"I'm going to spare you reading
some of the things that you said
about each other ..." Why? He
might have asked, "Did you
mean it then, or was this a po-
litical game?"
Kroft did concede that there
had been no big foreign policy
achievement in Obama's first
four years in office, though the
president maintained that
winding down two wars, keep-
ing pressure on terrorists and
"dismantling" al-Qaida's core
leadership constituted success.
Kroft could have countered
with: "Terrorism appears not to
be about leaders, but followers
of an ideology Is your policy sim-
ply to keep killing terrorists? Do
you think you can kill them all?"
Kroft mentioned the terrorist
attack on the U.S. mission in
Benghazi, Libya and properly
called it "... the biggest diplo-
matic disaster of this adminis-
tration," but the question he put
to Clinton was limp: "Do you
blame yourself that you didn't
know or that you should have
known?"
Before conducting the inter-
view, Kroft should have read
several questions tweeted by
CBS News' investigative re-


porter Sharyl Attkisson. As pub-
lished on Breitbart.com, At-
tkisson wanted to know, "Who is
the highest-ranking official who
was aware of pre-9/11 security
requests from U.S. personnel in
Libya?" "Who is/are the offi-
cial(s) responsible for removing
reference to al-Qaida from the
original CIA notes?" "What is
your response to the president
stating that on Sept. 12, he called
9/11 a terrorist attack, in light of
his CBS interview on that date
in which he answered that it was
too early to know whether it was
a terrorist attack?"
Politicians go on shows that
won't confront them with hard
questions they don't want to an-
swer If those questions are
asked, they'll likely not appear
on those shows again. The
media need ratings and to get
them they need high-profile
guests. Politicians know this.
That's the unholy alliance be-
tween much of big media and
political leaders.
Something similar occurred
on Sunday's edition of ABC's
"The Week." Reporter Martha
Raddatz interviewed Sen. Bob
Menendez (D-N.J.) for six min-
utes and never asked him about
reports in The Daily Caller al-
leging that he has frequented
underage prostitutes in the Do-
minican Republic, sometimes
flying there on private planes
paid for by a campaign contrib-
utor Menendez's spokeswoman
has called the report "unsub-
stantiated garbage." Still, Rad-
datz should have asked him
about it.
The primary role of journal-
ists is to question authority. In
these two instances, Kroft and
Raddatz fell short.

Readers may email
Cal Thomas at
tmseditors@tribune. com.


LETTERS > to the Editor


Looking out for us
I think the mass shooting in
our schools is because we have
taken God out of the schools.
I say this because I know
God was with my husband in
World War II. He was a first
scout and God sent his angels
to watch over him, many times.
My husband Lloyd went in
the service when our son was
three days old. But I felt in my
heart he would return to our
family and myself. He did have
some close calls, but God took
care of him.
My husband and I had 70
good years together. God was
always with us. Lloyd went
home in 2011.
It's the sick people that kill
and have guns. We need to find
them and give them help
needed.
Georgia Inman
Inverness

Regarding taxes
In relation to your article in
the Jan. 23 edition of your publi-
cation titled "Commissioners
debate spending per resident," I
have two inquiries.
The first is, does the $1,655
per resident include just tax-
paying households, or does
this figure include every man,
woman and child in the
county?
Second, this county is not re-
sponsible for garbage collec-


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

tion or water and sewer, it is
only responsible for police
protection, fire protection, ed-
ucation, road maintenance,
and health care, so why does it
cost so much per resident (de-
pending on the answerto t he
first question)?
Gregory N. Harsin
Homosassa

Drowning in debt
Well, we put them in office to
run the country for us. Instead
they have learned how to not
run the country and steal us
blind. They do not even try to
hide the stealing. The country
is dying in debt while we get
next to nothing from it. Wash-
ington is draining the life's


blood from the treasury while
the country sleeps.
What has happened to the
American people? What does
it take to wake them up? We
need to gather in groups of vot-
ers who demand that Washing-
ton stop the waste and do the
job they were sent there to do.
I don't think they will wake
up until they go to the store
and find out the dollar is use-
less paper. I warn you the day
is very, very close.
Gerald Ruble
Inverness

Misplaced energies
It appears that President
Obama is going to get his way
and punish successful Ameri-
cans when he raised their
taxes. Obama believes that get-
ting 51 percent of the vote
gives him a mandate to con-
tinue to expand his plan of in-
come redistribution and to
grow the programs that make
more people dependent on
government programs. Obama
needs to be reminded that 49
percent of the vote was not for
him or his programs. Obama's
time would be better spent
staying in Washington and
working to cut spending, get-
ting our financial house in
order, a budget, and a budget
that balances our spending.
Claude Strass
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to the EDITOR


Was the
apprai
I have been f
the Progress E:
kerfuffle and it
embarrassment
county.
Seems to me
county represe
have acted child
unprofessional
Progress Energ
acted with fool
counter-produc
churlishness te
county that the
the same thing
next year.
I have read t
to and from the
appraiser and t
affected parties
commission, sc
board, the sher
and Progress E
a monumental
finger pointing
calling. But thr
I am missing so
fundamental to
Was there or w
not an appraise
Progress Energ
properties for 1
2013? And if th
one that the pr
praiser relied
to send Progres
bill, why now is
erty appraiser
$100,000 to hav
else perform ai
praisal? Isn't p
appraisals the
basic task? Isn'
someone else t
an appraisal a
mission by the
that he hasn't d
can't do the job
What am I m


Video tr
investing
As we watch t
we have to look
poor officer saf
lack of legal kni
and hostile den
played by the d(
glaring as these
we should not a
to distract us fr


re an issue just as important
isal? Why is the sheriff only now
finding out about this?
allowing There are two scenarios,
energy tax neither of which is very
t is truly an appealing.
t for this First, the arrested per-
son or the state attorney
several made the sheriff's office
ntatives aware of this incident and
ldishly and they chose to sweep it
1, and under the rug until the
gy has re- video went viral in Citrus
ish and County. Or they just found
actively out about the incident
lling the thanks to this video's pop-
y will do ularity. In a truly "profes-
, or worse, sional" law enforcement
agency, the latter would
he letters be hard to believe. How-
e property ever, it has been my expe-
the mainly rience that our sheriff's
s, i.e., the office's report review
'hool process is that in name
riff's office only It is more akin to a
energy It is verification that "a re-
exercise in port" was done, and not
, and name that the report docu-
rough it all mented a thorough and
)mething complete investigation,
the issue: documenting all the ele-
as there ments of the crime.
al of If the deputy's docu-
gy's taxable mentation of this arrest
tax year followed what was seen
ere was on the video, this case
operty ap- should have been flagged
on in order by the supervisor as a
ss Energy a false arrest. The supervi-
s the prop- sor's first duty would have
spending been to determine if the
e someone person was still in cus-
n ap- tody If so, take immediate
performing steps to secure his re-
appraiser's lease. Their next action
t paying should have been to no-
o perform tify his/her superior offi-
tacit ad- cers and to start an
appraiser investigation of the
lone or deputy's actions. Even
)? with a failure in the re-
issing? port review process, the
sheriff's leadership team
Tom Fallon had another opportunity
Lecanto to at least discover, and
address this incident.
iggers The state attorney's of-
t o fice sends out notification
action letters to the sheriff's of-
this video, fice when they decline
beyond the prosecution. In this inci-
ety tactics, dent, either they didn't
owledge, bother to review the case
neanor dis- to see why it wasn't filed,
eputy As or they chose to ignore it
issues are, Whichever scenario is in
illow them play here, the egregious
om another actions of the deputy are


overshadowed by our sher-
iff office's inability or un-
willingness to address this
colossal violation of civil
rights in a timely manner
Steven Burch
retired chief of police
Beverly Hills

Time to draw
line in sand
Thank you for the com-
mentary and debate
about gun control, this is
a very important issue we
now face.
Please continue to put
the facts forward, because
I noticed a letter stating
four handguns were used
in the Newtown murders
when in fact it was an as-
sault rifle the children and
teachers were shot with,
and a handgun was used
by the murderer to take
his own life. Translation-
the Newtown shooter
knew what weapon would
kill more kids and it wasn't
the handgun.
Some people were de-
ceived by a "Today" show
article generated on Face-
book that was a hoax.
Also, many ARs have dif-
ferent names but are es-
sentially the same thing,
e.g. an AR-15 and AR .223
- it's very confusing ex-
cept for one thing, the AR
part. They are not called
assault rifles for nothing.
The sheriff of Newtown
has spoken about the
weapons used and the de-
structiveness of the assault
rifle each child was shot
at least three times and
one was shot 11 times. It
doesn't take an expert on
guns to realize how deadly
assault rifles are in a
crowd. This time children
were the victims and many
of us have said enough
doing nothing it's time
to act and do whatever we
can to stop this from con-
tinually happening.
The line in the sand has
been drawn.
E. G. Yerian
Homosassa


Age of chivalry
I would just like to say that it's won-
derful to see gentlemen opening the
doors for ladies and pumping their fuel
and doing all those wonderful things.
There should be more gentlemen like
that out there.


Tip on hunting ammo
Did you know that it is illegal to hunt
with ammunition that is armor piercing
or metal-jacketed, as is commonly used
in military assault rifles and that type
that was used at Newtown? Page 16
Florida Hunting Regulations 2013.


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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2013 A9


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NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Barney


Associated Press
In this June 25, 2001, file
photo, President Bush
does his best to salute
while holding his dog
Barney as they get off of
Air Force One at Andrews
Air Force Base, Md.
Barney, former White
House Scottish Terrier
and star of holiday videos
shot during President
George W. Bush's
administration, has died
after suffering from
cancer. He was 12.


Detroit freeway
pileup kills three
DETROIT It took only
seconds for the light snow
to turn into a blinding cur-
tain of white. Drivers
slammed on their brakes,
others swerved to avoid
tractor-trailers jackknifed
across a busy Detroit free-
way that quickly turned into
a mile-long string of wrecks.
Three people were killed,
including two children. The
maze of mangled vehicles
closed Interstate 75 for sev-
eral hours after the Thurs-
day morning chain-reaction
wrecks that sent more than
a dozen people to hospitals.
The children who died, a
7-year-old boy and 9-year-
old girl from Windsor, On-
tario, were believed to be
siblings whose parents
were injured in the accident,
Michigan State Police Lt.
Michael Shaw said.
Menelaos Manolis, 54, of
nearby Allen Park, also was
killed.
I killed, 3 hurt in
Phoenix drive-by
PHOENIX -A woman
was killed and three other
people wounded Friday in a
drive-by shooting in a south
Phoenix neighborhood, po-
lice said.
Authorities were search-
ing for a dark green Ford
Expedition after four men in
the vehicle pulled up to the
home around 2:30 p.m. and
someone fired multiple
rounds.
The four victims were sit-
ting in plastic chairs in the
driveway just a few feet
from the road, Phoenix po-
lice Sgt. Steve Martos said.
A woman in her 60s and
another in her 20s were
transported from the scene
in critical condition. Martos
said one woman later died.
Another woman and a man
in his 20s suffered non-life-
threatening injuries in the
shooting, he said.
Secret Service
chief resigns
WASHINGTON Secret
Service Director Mark Sulli-
van announced his retire-
ment Friday, bringing to a
close a turbulent period for
the law enforcement
agency that included a
South American prostitution
scandal
and a pair
of White
House
gate- 0 ,
crashers.
Last
May, in
testimony
before Mark
Con- Sullivan
gress, director of
Sullivan Secret Service.
apolo-
gized for the conduct of Se-
cret Service employees
caught in a prostitution
scandal in Colombia.
Sullivan's retirement is
effective Feb. 22. His re-
placement has not been
announced.
-From wire reports


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Suicide bomber in Turkey


Guard killed

at US Embassy

Associated Press

ANKARA, Turkey In
the second deadly assault
on a U.S. diplomatic post
in five months, a suicide
bomber struck the Ameri-
can Embassy in Ankara on
Friday, killing a Turkish
security guard in what the
White House described as
a terrorist attack.
Washington immedi-
ately warned Americans to
stay away from all U.S.
diplomatic facilities in
Turkey and to be wary in
large crowds.


Turkish officials said the
bombing was linked to left-
ist domestic militants.
The attack drew con-
demnation from Turkey,
the U.S., Britain and other
nations and officials from
Turkey and the U.S.
pledged to work together
to fight terrorism.
"We strongly condemn
what was a suicide attack
against our embassy in
Ankara, which took place
at the embassy's outer se-
curity perimeter," said
White House spokesman
Jay Carney
"A suicide bombing on
the perimeter of an em-
bassy is by definition an
act of terror," he said. "It is
a terrorist attack."
Turkish Prime Minister


Embassy bombing
A suspected suicide bomber
killed himself and an embassy
guard outside the U.S. em-
bassy in Ankara, Turkey.
Black Sea RUSSIA
Ista l EO..
Ankara
TURKEY

S* SYRIA IRAQ

200 km
SOURCES: ESRI AP

Recep Tayyip Erdogan
said police believe the
bomber was connected to
a domestic leftist militant
group. Carney, however,
said the motive for the at-


tack and who was behind it
was not known.
A Turkish TV journalist
was seriously wounded in
the 1:15 p.m. blast in the
Turkish capital, and two
other guards had lighter
wounds, officials said.
The state-run Anadolu
Agency identified the
bomber as Ecevit Sanli. It
said the 40-year-old Turkish
man was a member of the
outlawed Revolutionary
People's Liberation Party-
Front, or DHKP-C, which
has claimed responsibility
for assassinations and
bombings since the 1970s.
The group has been des-
ignated a terrorist organi-
zation by the United States
but had been relatively
quiet in recent years.


Military misconduct?


Associated Press
Malian soldiers mill around Friday with residents in Timbuktu, Mali. French President Francois Hollande is
scheduled to arrive Saturday in Timbuktu for a short visit.

Malijihadists in custody say military tortured them


Associated Press

TIMBUKTU, Mali -Three sus-
pected jihadists arrested in the
days since the liberation of Tim-
buktu said Friday that Malian sol-
diers were torturing them with a
method similar to waterboarding.
The three are being
held in an earthen cell in
what remains of the mili-
tary camp in the town,
which was freed this
week by French and
Malian soldiers after
nearly 10 months under
radical Islamist rule.
Their allegations came Frar
as French President Holl.
Francois Hollande pre- preside
pared to fly to Mali on Sat- Fra
urday, nearly four weeks
after the French-led operation
began in the vast West African
country
The three suspects, who were
tied together with a turban and
one handcuff, all acknowledged
to The Associated Press having
been members of the al-Qaida-


linked group known as Ansar
Dine, or Defenders of the Faith.
"To force me to talk, they
poured 40 liters (85 pints) of water
in my mouth and over my nostrils,
which made it so that I could not
breathe anymore. For a moment I
thought I was even going to die,"
said one of the men, who
gave his name as Ali
Guindo and said he was
from a village near the
central Malian town of
Niono.
"I sleep in the cold and
every night they come
pour freezing water over
ncois me."
ande All three prisoners de-
dent of scribed similar treatment.
nce. Their account could not
be independently veri-
fied. Soldiers holding the three
asked reporters to leave after ini-
tially allowing journalists to
speak with them.
Army Col. Mamary Camara told
reporters the three were arrested
by Malian forces in the town of
Lere. He said one of the men was


from Libya and was caught wear-
ing a foreign military uniform.
The allegations of torture came
as Human Rights Watch and
Amnesty International released
reports outlining other allega-
tions of misconduct by the Malian
military and Islamists over the
last month.
Both groups said they had doc-
umented cases of Malian soldiers
killing suspected Islamist sup-
porters in Sevare on the eve of
the French-led intervention.
Human Rights Watch cited at
least 13 killings, while Amnesty
said the number could be two
dozen.
Human Rights Watch said the
witnesses described seeing sol-
diers at a bus station in Sevare in-
terrogate passengers suspected of
links to extremist groups. Those
without proper identification
were taken away, the witnesses
said.
The Associated Press had ear-
lier reported killings of civilians
by the Malian army in Sevare,
with bodies dumped into a well.


Report: US job market looks strong


Associated Press


WASHINGTON The
U.S. job market is proving
surprisingly strong and rais-
ing hopes the economy will
be resilient enough this
year to withstand a budget
standoff in Washington and
potentially deep cuts in fed-
eral spending.
Employers added 157,000
jobs last month, and hiring
turned out to be healthier
than previously thought at
the end of 2012 just as the
economy faced the threat of
the "fiscal cliff."
Still, unemployment re-
mains persistently high.
The unemployment rate
ticked up to 7.9 percent last
month from 7.8 percent in
December
Many economists,
though, focused on the


steady job growth espe-
cially the healthier-than-
expected hiring late last
year. The Labor Depart-
ment revised its estimates
of job gains for November
from an initial 161,000 to
247,000 and for December
from 155,000 to 196,000.
The department also re-
vised its figures for all of
2012 upward to an aver-
age of 180,000 new jobs a
month from a previously es-
timated 150,000.
"The significantly
stronger payroll gains tell
us the economy has a lot
more momentum than
what we had thought,"
Joseph LaVorgna, chief
U.S. economist at
Deutsche Bank, said in a
research note.
The government fre-
quently revises the


monthly job totals as it col-
lects more information.
Sometimes the revisions
can be dramatic, as in No-
vember and December.
The January jobs report
helped fuel a powerful
rally on Wall Street. Stock
averages all jumped more
than 1 percent. The Dow
Jones industrial average
closed above 14,000 for the
first time since October
2007, two months before
the Great Recession offi-
cially began.
Beyond the job market,
the economy is showing
other signs of health. Facto-
ries were busier last month
than they have been since
April 2012. Ford, Chrysler
and General Motors all re-
ported double-digit sales
gains for last month, their
best January in five years.


Jobless rate ticks up
The U.S. unemployment
rate rose to 7.9 percent in
January, up from 7.8 percent
in December.
8 .4 percent .....................................
8.3 ................ ........ ...............
8 .2 .. ....... ..... ........................
8.1............ .........January
8............................ ....... 7 .9%



7. ..... ... ........... .. .
JFMAMJ JASONDJ
'12 '13
SOURCE: Labor Dept. AP
Home prices have been
rising steadily Higher home
values tend to make Ameri-
cans feel wealthier and
more likely to spend.


World BRIEFS

Climber


Associated Press
Alain Robert, known as
"Spider-Man," practices
climbing a section of the
Habana Libre hotel Friday
in Havana, Cuba. Robert,
from France, plans to
climb the 27-story hotel
on Monday, without any
safety instruments.


Seven stabbed
in Vancouver
VANCOUVER, British
Columbia Police say a
man ran through the hall-
ways of a Vancouver apart-
ment building, slashing
seven people in what they
believe was a completely
random attack.
Sgt. Randy Fincham said
Friday seven people were
injured in the high-rise
building on the city's west
end during the attack
Thursday night.
The 33-year-old male
suspect, who was not a res-
ident of the building, was
taken into custody Thurs-
day night.
India urges tough
laws for rape
NEW DELHI India's
Cabinet accepted most of
the recommendations of a
commission for toughening
laws for crimes against
women, including increas-
ing the penalty for rape.
The panel was set up in
response to the fatal gang
rape in December of a
young woman on a moving
bus in New Delhi. The Cab-
inet recommended Friday
the president issue an ordi-
nance to turn the proposals
into law, Law Minister Ash-
wini Kumar said.
The commission recom-
mended an increase in the
penalty for rape to 20 years
and suggested life terms for
gang rape.
The Cabinet also recom-
mended including crimes
like stalking, cyber stalking
and voyeurism and impos-
ing stiff punishments for
such crimes.
Egypt protesters
reach palace
CAIRO Protesters de-
nouncing Egypt's Islamist
president hurled stones and
firebombs through the
gates of
his palace
gates
Friday,
clashing
with secu-
rity forces
who fired
tear gas Mohammed
and water Morsi
cannons, president of
as more Egypt.
than a
week of political violence
came to Mohammed
Morsi's symbolic doorstep
for the first time.
The streets outside the
presidential palace were a
scene of mayhem for hours
into the night.
Security forces pumped
volley after volley of tear
gas, set fire to protester
tents and at one point
dragged a protester to the
ground, stripped him and
beat him. Protesters burned
tires and hurled stones and
fireworks. A 23-year-old
died when he was shot in
the chest and forehead, the
Health Ministry said.
-From wire reports








SSATUR T S FEBRUARY 2,2013
SPORTS


* Akers
hopes to
make good
on Super
Bowl
stage/B3


0 Basketball/B2
0 Hockey/B2
0 Golf/B3
0 Tennis/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 Super Bowl/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Citrus and Eastside prep for semifinal showdown


DAVID PIEKLIK
Correspondent
They vowed to make history instead of
become history and tonight, the boys soc-
cer team from Citrus High School hopes
to continue that history lesson in a
FHSAA Class 3A regional semifinal
home match against Gainesville
Eastside.
The matchup is at Citrus High School,
with the winner moving on to the re-
gional final. The Hurricanes and Rams
took similar paths to get to the semifinals
match that by all accounts should be
a competitive one.
Citrus (10-5-4) enters the game riding
the momentum of its District 3A-6 cham-
pionship win over Leesburg, and a rela-
tively easy 3-1 regional quarterfinal win
over Belleview on Wednesday With a
young team and new coach, the 'Canes
have surprised themselves with how far
they've come.


Goalkeeper Alan Verone remarked
after the Belleview match that the team
never thought it would make it as far
"We just wanted to make history,"
Verone said.
The 'Canes have a chance to do just
that a shot at its first regional champi-
onship banner but they face a strong
team in Eastside.
Citrus head coach Phil Journey credits
the Rams with being well-disciplined
and not panicking when they're trailing
in a game.
"They do their style of play regardless
of whether they're winning or losing,"
Joruney said.
That style of play according to East-
side head coach Ron Messick is a very
aggressive attack with a strong defense
that plays a possession game. The Rams
(21-2-2) took the District 3A-5 title last
week despite being a young team itself,
and lacking a team leader that Journey
has also wanted.


FHSAA Class 3A regional
soccer semifinal
Gainesville Eastside (21-2-2)
at Citrus (10-5-4)
Time: 6 p.m. tonight
Place: Citrus High School football
stadium
What's at stake: The winner moves into
the Class 3A, Region 2 final Tuesday. If Cit-
rus wins, it would be the first time in school
history the boys soccer team has advanced
that far. Should the 'Canes beat Eastside,
the team will play the winner between Sun-
lake and Pasco. The Hurricanes would host
Pasco, but have to travel to Sunlake in that
scenario.

The teams haven't faced each other
since the Rams' 6-0 routing of the 'Canes
in the regional semifinals last season.
Messick hasn't seen any game tape of Cit-
rus from this season, and other than talk-


ing to other coaches, doesn't have a scout-
ing report to go on.
Based on what he's heard and read -
including box scores he said the
'Canes are a scrappy team that can be hot
or cold scoring, adding, "If they play their
game, it will be a tough match."
For Citrus, part of that game will be
containing Eastside forwards Cheyne
Lehinck and TJ Fillmer; Lehinck led the
Rams with 20 goals and three assists,
while Fillmer tallied 14 goals and 13 as-
sists. Journey said his team has to contain
them and keep the ball to the outside, re-
main calm and when there are great
scoring chances, convert them.
Journey said his team has the skill and
he told them at the beginning of the sea-
son they will go as far as they want as long
as they try hard.
With regional title talk beginning, he
isn't looking past the semifinal match.
"We have not played our best game in
the tournament yet," Journey said.


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Citrus guard Shally Morales and West Port's Kori Hanks go after a loose ball Friday night in the District 6A-6 girls
basketball championship game at Citrus High School. West Port overcame an 11-point fourth-quarter deficit to down the
Hurricanes 61-58 for the title.




'Canes can't hold on


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
INVERNESS Liz Lynch
sat slumped on the Citrus bas-
ketball court with tears in her
eyes, very near the spot where,
a few minutes earlier, she had
swiped a West Port inbounds
pass and quickly converted it
into a basket, cutting the Wolf
Pack lead to a single point with
20 seconds left in the game.
It was the last time in her
prep career she would get a
shot at a district title. This time
was closer than any of the oth-
ers, but just like the three pre-
vious years in which Lynch
served as starting point guard
for the Hurricanes, this one
ended in disappointment.
A furious fourth-quarter
rally that saw the Wolf Pack
overcome an 11-point deficit
carry them to the school's
ninth straight district champi-
onship, 61-58, at Citrus on Fri-
day in the District 6A-6 title
game.
West Port, now 19-8, hosts the
loser of the 6A-5 district final


between Gainesville and Lees-
burg, while Citrus (20-7) must
travel to play the winner of that
district. The regional quarter-
finals is tentatively scheduled
for 7 p.m. Thursday
"This one was the best," said
West Port coach Corey Roller-
son, comparing this to his pre-
vious district titles, "because
they've never been so close
before."
Ninety seconds into the
fourth quarter, it didn't look
like this one would be all that
close, either, only this time it
seemed the West Port district
stranglehold would be ended.
A basket by Shenelle Toxen
and two free throws by Micah
Jenkins had allowed Citrus to
increase its 50-43 lead after
three quarters to 54-43.
See /Page B4
Citrus senior guard Lindsay
Connors attempts to block
West Port's Navondra Dubois'
shot at Friday's District 6A-6
girls basketball championship
at Citrus High School.


- iw


Ice-cold


shooting


dooms CR
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
BROOKSVILLE A 5-for-53 shooting night
undermined the Crystal River girls' effort at the
District 5A-7 basketball title on Friday
The No. 1 seed Pirates were 1-of-24 for the
opening 14 minutes of regulation and never
found their footing on offense as third-seeded
Tavares rode its defense and rebounding to a
50-23 victory at the Nature Coast Technical gym.
Crystal River (15-10 overall) will play on the
road this Thursday in the opening round of the
regional playoffs against the winner of District
5A-8, which plays its tournament championship
tonight. The Bulldogs (13-9) play host to the 5A-
8 runner-up on the same night.
The Pirates trailed 9-2 after a quarter, and 18-
9 at the half, but it was a 10-0 run by Tavares to
end the third quarter that really dampened
Crystal River's hopes and gave the Bulldogs a
See E/Page B4




Survival of


the fittest

41 Citrus County

grapplers begin state quest
TONY CASTRO
Correspondent
The FHSAA's 49th state series in wrestling be-
gins this weekend.
Three Citrus County mat programs Citrus,
Crystal River and Lecanto will take part in
two separate district tournaments.
The reality of the state series is every grap-
pler walking into districts starts 0-0 and has just
as much of a chance as their first opponent to
advance in the double-elimination IBT (indi-
vidually bracketed tournament) format.
Citrus and Lecanto are the two Northern-
most members of the seven-team District 2A-7
Tournament beginning at 11 a.m. today along
two mats at Springstead High School in Spring
Hill.
The remainder of 2A-7 features: 26-time dis-
trict champion Springstead, Brooksville-Her-
nando, Brooksville-Central, Brooksville-Nature
Coast Technical and Land O' Lakes.
See 3L/Page B3


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Celtics stop Magic 97-84


Associated Press

BOSTON Paul Pierce and
Kevin Garnett each had a double-
double, and the Boston Celtics re-
sponded to yet another blow to
their lineup with a 97-84 win over
the Orlando Magic, who lost their
eighth straight game.
Pierce had 14 points, 11 re-
bounds and seven assists despite
sitting out the fourth quarter Gar-
nett finished with 14 points and 10
rebounds for the Celtics, who
learned early in the day that
promising rookie Jared Sullinger
will miss the rest of the season fol-
lowing back surgery
The short-handed Celtics also
lost All-Star point guard Rajon
Rondo this week, yet won their
third straight and got back to .500
at 23-23.
Pacers 102, Heat 89
INDIANAPOLIS David West
scored 30 points and Paul George
added 15, leading Indiana to a 102-89
victory over Miami.
The Pacers (28-19) have won 13 in
a row at home and two straight overall
since losing three straight on the road.
Indiana and the New York Knicks are
the only teams in the league to beat
the defending NBA champs twice this
season.
Miami (29-14) was led by LeBron
James with 28 points and Dwayne
Wade with 17 and this time the
Heat were beaten at their own game.
Indiana shot a season-high 55.7
percent from the field.
Nets 93, Bulls 89
NEW YORK Brook Lopez
scored 20 points through three quar-
ters, then the Brooklyn Nets turned to
their bench to beat the short-handed
Chicago Bulls 93-89.
Andray Blatche scored all of his 11
points in the fourth quarter and
MarShon Brooks had nine of his 13 as


Associated Press
Boston Celtics forward Jeff Green drives past Orlando Magic forward
Gustavo Ayon during the second quarter Friday in Boston.


the reserves scored the Nets' first 20
points. A starter didn't score until Joe
Johnson's 3-pointer gave Brooklyn an
86-80 lead with 2 minutes to play.
Johnson finished with 13 points for
the Nets, who bounced back from a
loss to Miami on Wednesday by beat-
ing another top Eastern Conference
team.
Luol Deng scored 18 points and Taj
Gibson had 16 points and nine re-
bounds for the Bulls.
76ers 89, Kings 80
PHILADELPHIA- Thaddeus
Young had 23 points and 15 re-
bounds, and Jrue Holiday scored 21
to lead the Philadelphia 76ers to an
89-80 win over the Sacramento Kings.
Nick Young scored 20 points to help
the Sixers win consecutive games for
the first time since they had a three-
game winning streak from Nov. 25-30.
They beat Washington and the
Kings this week for the rare winning
streak. The Sixers won for only the
fifth time in 14 games and eighth in 25.
The Sixers beat Phoenix, Dallas
and Charlotte in the last three games
of November the last time they had a
winning streak.


Tyreke Evans scored 29 points and
Isaiah Thomas had 24 for the Kings.
Knicks 96, Bucks 86
NEW YORK Carmelo Anthony
scored 25 points, Amare Stoudemire
had 17 points and seven rebounds off
the bench, and the New York Knicks
extended their winning streak to four
games with a 96-86 victory over the
Milwaukee Bucks.
J.R. Smith had 17 points and Tyson
Chandler pulled down 20 rebounds in
New York's fourth straight win over
Milwaukee.
Ersan Ilyasova led the Bucks with
19 points and seven rebounds. Monta
Ellis added 16 points and Brandon
Jennings had 14.
The Knicks trailed for the majority of
the game until late in the third quarter
when they stormed back.
Raptors 98, Clippers 73
TORONTO Rudy Gay wowed a
sellout crowd by scoring 20 points in
his Toronto debut, leading the Raptors
to a 98-73 rout of the short-handed
Los Angeles Clippers.
Amir Johnson had 19 points and
matched his career high with 16 re-


bounds for the Raptors. DeMar
DeRozan also scored 19 as Toronto
welcomed Gay with a winning effort
two days after he was acquired from
the Memphis Grizzlies in a three-team
trade that also included Detroit.
John Lucas scored 17 and Aaron
Gray had seven points and 12 re-
bounds for the Raptors, who handed
the Clippers their fourth straight loss in
Toronto. Los Angeles has dropped
five of its past eight overall.
Pistons 117, Cavs 99
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. Brandon
Knight had 20 points and 10 assists,
and the Detroit Pistons never trailed in
a 117-99 victory over the Cleveland
Cavaliers.
Greg Monroe added 18 points and
16 rebounds for the Pistons, who
played without newly acquired point
guard Jose Calderon. After being
traded from Toronto to Detroit earlier
this week, the Spanish-born Calderon
needed to resolve visa issues before
he could play.
Knight, himself a point guard, might
play off the ball more once Calderon
is in the lineup. He made his first four
shots against Cleveland, more than
holding his own against Cavaliers star
Kyrie Irving.
Tristan Thompson led Cleveland
with 19 points.
Grizzlies 85, Wizards 76
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Mike Conley
scored 18 points and Tayshaun Prince
added 14 in his Memphis debut, in-
cluding a pair of key fourth-quarter
jumpers, as the Grizzlies defeated the
Washington Wizards 85-76.
Marc Gasol added 13 points and 15
rebounds for the Grizzlies, while Tony
Allen and Jerryd Bayless finished with
11 points each. Allen also grabbed
eight rebounds, and Conley also had
six assists. Prince hit his first three
shots of the game, finishing 7 of 11
from the field.


James not worried
about being
top-paid player
INDIANAPOLIS Le-
Bron James has been an
NBA champion once, an
Olympic gold medalist
twice and the league's
MVP three times.
The Miami Heat star said
there's one title he's not
worried about holding -
NBA's biggest salary.
"It doesn't matter to me
being the highest-paid
player in the league,"
James said. "I think my
value shows on the floor."
He added: "If this was
baseball,
it (the
salary)
would be
up, I
mean
way up
there."
James
spoke LeBron
after the James
team's
shootaround in Indianapolis
leading to Friday night's
Heat-Pacers game.
Initially, the questions
were about whether the
league's new collective bar-
gaining agreement would
allow other teams to build
the same way Miami did, by
signing three top players.
James was the top prize
on the free-agent market in
2010 but acknowledged he
took less money to play
with Miami and pursue
NBA championships with
Dwyane Wade and Chris
Bosh. James and Bosh
each reportedly signed six-
year deals worth $110 mil-
lion. Wade's deal was for
six years and $107 million.
From wire reports


Doing it with D


UFpiling up

wins with

stingy defense

Associated Press

GAINESVILLE Billy
Donovan has coached
plenty of good defensive
teams in his 17 seasons at
Florida.
None of them quite like
this.
The fourth-ranked
Gators have been ridicu-
lously stingy this season,
especially in Southeastern
Conference play
Florida (17-2, 7-0 SEC)
ranks second in the nation
in scoring defense, giving
up a paltry 50.4 points a
game. The Gators have
held 15 teams under 60
points, 11 under 50 and
three under 40.
The latest defensive
masterpiece came
Wednesday night against
South Carolina. In winning
its ninth consecutive
game, Florida allowed the
program's fewest points
(36) in conference play
during the shot-clock era.
For an encore, the
league's top scoring team,
Mississippi visits
Gainesville today to test
Florida's defense.
The 16th-ranked Rebels
(17-3, 6-1) are averaging 80
points a game and should
provide a tough test for
Florida's stout D.
No SEC team has really
challenged the Gators so
far. Florida has won seven
games by an average of
28.3 points, looking like
the class of the field in a
watered-down league.
"We're just consistent,"
forward Will Yeguete said.
"We have a couple of
breakdowns a game, but
we stay consistent. We
keep guarding teams every
single time, possession
after possession. ... It's
good to say that you're a re-
ally good defensive team."
Few Donovan-coached
teams even compare.
The back-to-back na-
tional champions the
ones led by Corey Brewer,
Taurean Green, Al Hor-
ford and Joakim Noah -
used to be considered
Donovan's best defensive
group. And the 1999-2000
team, which advanced to
the NCAA final, had top-
notch defenders in guard
Justin Hamilton and for-


Associated Press
Led by senior guard Kenny Boynton, right, the No. 4 University of Florida men's
basketball team has been racking up victories behind a stout defense.


ward Brent Wright.
But none of those teams
had as much defensive
depth as this year's unit.
Between guards Scottie
Wilbekin and Kenny
Boynton, swingman Casey
Prather, Yeguete and cen-
ter Pat Young, the Gators
have five players who
take as much pride in
stops and steals as dunks
and jumpers.
"When you're a kid
growing up playing the
game of basketball, or if
you're a kid growing up
playing the game of foot-
ball, I can't imagine that
many guys that want to go
to the park today and play
and say, 'I'm not going to
take my ball, but I'm going
to do defensive slides for
two hours. I'm going to
work on running back in
transition. I'm going to


grab some people in the
school yard to run me over
and take charges,"' Dono-
van said. "Those things
that you're talking about
doing are not things that
are enjoyable.
"But I often find that the
things that make teams
successful are the players
that have the desire to do
the things that are uncom-
fortable."
Making opponents un-
comfortable starts with
Wilbekin and Boynton,
both aggressive, on-ball
defenders who have the
quickness and stamina to
run the press, the length to
affect perimeter shots and
the kind of experience that
makes it easy to get them
on the same page.
Wilbekin kept Georgia's
Kentavious Caldwell-Pope
(season-low 11 points),


Texas A&M's Elston
Turner (4 points on 1-of-10
shooting) and Missouri's
Phil Pressey (2 points, 10
turnovers) in check last
month. And Boynton was
equally effective the last
two games against Missis-
sippi State's Jalen Steele
(scoreless) and South Car-
olina's Bruce Ellington (7
points on 2-of-9 shooting).
Maybe the most over-
looked part of what
Wilbekin and Boynton have
done is how they have made
everyone around them
want to play better defense.
Young, forward Erik Mur-
phy and guard Mike
Rosario are playing the best
defense of their careers.
"It's contagious," Rosario
said. "We're all feeding off
those guys and what they're
doing in the press and on
the defensive end."


Lightning



up the lamp


Tampa Bay

scores eight

goals in rout

Associated Press

TAMPA Cory
Conacher had two goals
and an assist to lead the
Tampa Bay Lightning
past the Winnipeg Jets 8-3
on Friday night.
Tampa Bay also got
goals from Steven
Stamkos, Vincent Lecava-
lier, Nate Thompson,
Teddy Purcell, Ryan Mal-
one and Benoit Pouliot.
Stamkos and Lecavalier
both added two assists.
The Lightning, 6-1-0
this season, have scored
five or more goals in four
consecutive games.
Tobias Enstrom, Paul
Postma and Andrew Ladd
scored third-period goals
for Winnipeg, which has
lost three in a row. The
Jets were coming off a 6-3
loss at Florida on Thurs-
day night in which the
Panthers scored five
third-period goals.
Stamkos has five goals
and 14 points during a
season-opening seven-
game point streak.
Red Wings 5,
Blues 3
DETROIT Henrik
Zetterberg scored three
goals, and his second assist
of the game set up Pavel
Datsyuk's tiebreaking goal at
9:38 of third period to help
the Detroit Red Wings beat
the St. Louis 5-3.
Zetterberg scored the first


two goals and set up
Jonathan Ericsson's tying
goal early in the third period.
Detroit's captain missed
practice on Thursday be-
cause he wasn't feeling well,
but he was at the top of his
game Friday.
Detroit's Jimmy Howard
made 23 saves for his 114th
victory, tying Dominik Hasek
for seventh place on the
team's career list.
Capitals 3,
Flyers 2
WASHINGTON -Troy
Brouwer and Wojtek Wolksi
scored third-period goals,
and Braden Holtby made 29
saves in the Washington
Capitals' 3-2 victory over the
Philadelphia Flyers.
Niklas Backstrom had a
goal and an assist for Wash-
ington (2-5-1), which had lost
two straight.
Defenseman Bruno Ger-
vais, and Brayden Schenn
scored for the Flyers (2-6),
who have lost three in a row.
Hurricanes 1,
Senators 0
RALEIGH, N.C. Dan
Ellis made 33 saves for his
first shutout in more than two
years and Eric Staal scored
to lead the Carolina Hurri-
canes to a 1-0 victory over
the Ottawa Senators on Fri-
day night.
Ellis, making only his sec-
ond start of the season in
place of Cam Ward, earned
his 13th career shutout and
first since Nov. 9, 2010,
against Toronto when he
was with Tampa Bay.
Carolina improved to 9-0-
1 in its last 10 home games
against the Senators.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning defenseman Victor Hedman slams
Winnipeg Jets right wing Blake Wheeler into the boards
on a check during the first period Friday in Tampa.


B2 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2013


SPORTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Mickelson misses chance


Associated Press

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -
Phil Mickelson birdied
the ninth hole a day too
late and missed a chance
to break the PGA Tour's
36-hole scoring record
when he finished with a
double bogey after driving
into the water
Mickelson followed his
opening 60 with a 65 on
Friday in the Phoenix
Open to reach 17-under
125, a stroke off the tour
record for the first two
rounds of a tournament
set by Pat Perez in the
2009 Bob Hope Classic
and matched by David
Toms at Colonial in 2011.
"Unfortunately, I made
a double on the last hole
and didn't finish the way I
wanted to," Mickelson
said. "But I think it's a
good example of what can
happen on this course.
You can make a lot of
birdies and eagles, make
up a lot of ground, but
there's a lot of water and
trouble there that if you
misstep you can easily
make bogeys and double."
He still tied the
Phoenix Open record set
by Mark Calcavecchia in
2001, but history slipped
through his hands for the
second straight day on the
last hole.
On Thursday, Mickelson
had a 25-foot birdie putt
for a 59 on No. 9 that
caught the right edge,
curled 180 degrees and
stayed out. A day later
with little at stake on the
par-4 hole, he hit to 4 feet
and rolled the downhill
putt into the center of the
cup.
"You always remember
kind of the last hole, the
last putt," Mickelson said.
"But I think it's very pos-


sible that's going to help
me because it's got me re-
focused, that I cannot
ease up on a single shot.
I've got to be really fo-
cused. These guys are
going to make a lot of
birdies and I've got to get
after it and cannot make
those kinds of mistakes."
Mickelson parred the
first six holes, and played
the next 11 in 8 under be-
fore making a mess of the
par-4 18th. His drive
bounced into the left-side
water hazard and, after a
penalty drop, he hit an ap-
proach that landed on the
green and rolled off the
front edge. His chip ran 7
feet past and his bogey
putt slid by to the left
"I hit a good shot, I
thought," Mickelson said.
"I tried to start it right
down the middle and hold
it into the wind. It just
leaked a little bit left. I
still thought it was up. ...
Then I hit a poor wedge
from there. But the tee
shot I didn't think was
going to be in the water at
any point."
The double bogey left
him four strokes ahead of
Bill Haas and five in front
of Keegan Bradley and


Brandt Snedeker. Haas
shot 64, Bradley 63, and
Snedeker 66.
Mickelson will play
alongside Haas and
Bradley in the third
round.
Dubai Desert
Classic
DUBAI, United Arab Emi-
rates Overnight leader
Richard Sterne made a birdie
on the 18th hole Friday to
take a one-shot lead over
Thorbjorn Olesen and two
others after the second round
of the Dubai Desert Classic.
Sterne, a South African
who has struggled with in-
juries, finished with a 2-under
70 and 12-under 132 total.
Olesen (66), Tommy Fleet-
wood (68) and Stephen Gal-
lacher (70) were a shot back.
Chris Doak (69), Andreas
Harto (67) and Maximilian Ki-
effer (68) were two shots off
the pace.
Sergio Garcia (67) was
three strokes back despite
struggling with shoulder prob-
lems that required treatment
midway through his round.
Lee Westwood, ranked
No. 8 in the world, shot a 71
to trail by six shots.


US has 2-0 lead over Brazil


Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE John Isner and
Sam Querrey each won their matches on
Friday to give the United States a 2-0
lead over Brazil in the first round of the
Davis Cup.
Isner earned a straight-set win over
Brazil's Thiago Alves 6-3, 7-6 (4), 6-3.


Isner's win came two hours after
Querrey earned a 6-3, 6-4, 6-4 victory
over Thomaz Bellucci.
The United States is one win away
from advancing. Bob and Mike Bryan,
the world's No. 1 ranked doubles team,
will take on Brazil's Marcelo Melo and
Bruno Soares on Saturday, followed by
Sunday's reverse singles.


Associated Press
John Isner of the United States returns a shot from Brazil's Thiago Alves Friday
during a first-round Davis Cup tennis match in Jacksonville. Isner won 6-3, 7-6 (4),
6-3.


Associated Press
Keegan Bradley tees off at the fifth hole Friday during
the second round of the Waste Management Phoenix
Open golf tournament in Scottsdale, Ariz.


WRESTLE
Continued from Page B1

Springstead has captured
districts the past eight win-
ters. Last year, SHS estab-
lished a new Hernando
County record (snapping the
2009 mark of 263.5 points) by
solving runner-up Citrus by
73 points, 294.0-221.0.
Trophies will be awarded
to the two top teams.
The top four players in
2A-7's 14 weight classes will
receive a ribbon and ad-
vance to the rugged Feb. 8
and 9 28-team, Region 2A-2,
aka "The Region of Doom"
at St Cloud.
In West Pasco County,
nine local teams will partic-
ipate in the District 1A-8
event including: host Holi-
day-Anclote, Crystal River,
Dunnellon, Citra-North
Marion, Hudson-
Fivay, Hudson, Dade City-
Pasco, Ocala-Trinity
Catholic and Weeki Wachee.
Fivay is the defending
district champion. Pasco is
the defending district
runner-up.
The top four players will
advance to the Feb. 8 and 9
30-team, Region 1A-2 Tour-
nament at Lakeland-
Tenoroc.
Only the top four players
from Feb. 9's regionals ad-
vance to the Jenkins Arena
at The Lakeland Center for
the state's ultimate litmus
test the 49th annual State
Finals set for Feb. 15-16.
1A-8: Close
meet expected
It's been a week since the
disputed photo finish dur-
ing the Sunshine Athletic
Conference Tournament at
Hudson-Fivay
How close was the Pasco
County event? The top five
teams were separated by
nine points as Fivay barely
repeated as conference
champs.
Defending district champ
Fivay, Pasco and host An-
clote appear to be in a dog
fight with Crystal River
The Pirates finished
third to Fivay and Pasco in
1A-8 last winter at Fivay
"I'm looking at districts
with a glass half-full ap-
proach," explained tourney
director and Anclote head
coach Nick Radner "Sure,
I'm disappointed we fin-
ished fifth in the SAC. But
we had 10 players and two
champs that's really good.
What's encouraging was we
were in the (title) hunt. A
couple of breaks and we
should've finished second."
Veteran Crystal River
mentor Craig Frederick be-
lieves the Pirates are
primed for districts.
The Pirates arrive with
momentum after capturing
first place in the TD. Talbott
Tournament last weekend
at The Villages.
"We're a little banged
up," Frederick said, without
releasing any details. "But
who's not at this point in the
season? We've wrestled the
last three weekends in a
row."
The Pirates, according to


Frederick, will have a suc-
cessful weekend if, "We get
seven kids to place. If we get
over seven, it'll be a great
weekend."
CRHS returns one dis-
trict champion, junior
Dylan Ayala at 152. Ayala, a
2012 state qualifier, enters
with a team-best 29-3 record
highlighted by a county-
high 23 pins.
The Pirates' 13-man 1A-8
lineup (every weight class
covered except 113 pounds)
features another returning
state qualifier: junior Nick
Hooper at 132 (21-7 overall,
13 pins).
Senior Kris Caraballo is
second on the team in wins
(25) followed by junior Jose
Aday at 138 (23) and junior
Michael Allen at 120 (20).
2A-7 tourney
In the 2A-7 tourney in
Spring Hill, Citrus is seek-
ing to improve on its trio of
second-place trophies from
2010-12 while Lecanto is
seeking to improve on its
sixth-place finish last
winter
The Hurricanes, who
have collected nine first-
place blue ribbons over the
past three winters, enter
districts with a 14-man ros-
ter and five returning grap-
plers from this meet last
winter
The 'Canes are led by sen-
ior Jacob Nolen at 145
pounds.
Nolen, who leads all Cit-
rus County grapplers in
wins (33) this winter, arrives
with a career-best 114-40
won-lost slate. He's seeking
his third regional
appearance.
Central junior Jesus
Nieves (25-10) appears to
have the best shot to oppose
Nolen in the district final.
Senior Chris Mosher at
106 and junior Casey Bear-
den at 170 are tied for sec-
ond in victories (30). Mosher
is the team's lone returning
state qualifier from 2012.
Mosher's path to the top
of the podium is crowded
with competition from 2012
state players Sean Nguyen


(36-1) from Nature Coast
Technical and Matt Land-
graff(40-6) from Springstead
and dangerous sophomore
Dominic Telesco (32-3) from
Land O' Lakes.
Bearden's weight class is
no picnic either featuring
Class 2A's defending state
runner-up, sophomore
Conor Ross (39-3) from
Springstead, along with
Land 0' Lakes senior cap-
tain Bobby Austin (26-10)
and Hernando senior Con-
nor Haitz (14-13).
Two other Hurricanes
with legitimate title aspira-
tions include: junior Bran-
don Taylor (28-13,20 pins) at
182 and senior Nick Fer-
nandez (20-10,9 pins) at 195.
On the Hurricanes'
chances, "It's a different
year than in the (recent)
past," noted first-year skip-
per and CHS alumnus Jeff
Wood. "We lost four poten-
tial state qualifiers from last
year That takes away from
us significantly"
On the tourney favorites,
"Springstead is still the
team to beat but they're
beatable," described Coach
Wood. "I see this as a three-
team race with Nature
Coast There will be a lot of
pivotal matches."
For their part, the 14-
member Panthers would
like to improve on its four
regional qualifiers from a
year ago.
LHS juniors Dylan Sny-
der (15-3) at 113 and Night-
engale (14-6) at 195 are
coming off impressive wins
at The Villages.
Junior Chris Ewing (15-7)
was fourth at the recent Kil-
patrick IBT at Inverness,
while junior Jon Fillinger
(14-13) at 126 and freshman
Austin Hartman (13-12) at
106 have each reached dou-
ble figures in wins.
"I'll be happy if we get 4 to
5 kids to regionals," ex-
plained LHS head coach
Scot Roberts, whose team
finished 10-11 overall.
"We've been absolutely av-
erage all season long. I'll be
real happy if we can get a
kid in the finals."


Akers hopes to make


Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS David Akers
dropped his head in disbelief and
embarrassment as another field goal
strayed wide, this one clunking
loudly off the upright for all to hear
A far too familiar scene for the San
Francisco 49ers, except this time it
didn't cost them a victory They man-
aged to win at Atlanta and capture
the NFC championship and a Super
Bowl berth despite yet another mon-
umental miss by the once spot-on
Akers.
"As a kicker, you don't want to
miss," he said.
This indoor Super Bowl between
Baltimore and San Francisco on
Sunday could come down to the kick-
ers the inconsistent 15-year vet-
eran, Akers, in one of the worst
seasons of his career just a year after
his best, and an undrafted rookie
named Justin Tucker who kicked the
game-winning field goal in double-
overtime at Denver in the divisional
playoffs.
Akers hopes it's now his turn in the
NFEs showcase. He booted a 63-
yarder in the season opener at Green
Bay back in September that bounced
off the crossbar and through the up-
rights, so why not do something dra-
matic again to win a championship?
"I started the season with a big
high and it would be awesome to fin-
ish the season with a huge high,"
Akers said.
Tucker can hang on the big stage,
too.
He kicked a 47-yard field goal 1:42
into the second overtime of the
Ravens' 38-35 victory over Peyton


Manning and Co.
Tucker insists he has long forgot-
ten that kick. No time to get compla-
cent with so much on the line
Sunday
Short memories especially matter
in the kicking business. Akers would
like to forget his shaky 2012 season
altogether
The 38-year-old pro missed an
NFL-worst 13 field goals during the
regular season and another in the
playoffs.
That left coach Jim Harbaugh and
the 49ers with quite a kicking
quandary
"There's really nothing that's been
consistent this season at all, from the
performance to all the craziness of
everything that's gone on," Akers
said. "I'm just going to fall back on 14
years of experience, and I kind of
have to throw out 2012 and look for-
ward to positive things hopefully
in 2013."
As fans called for Akers' release -
and one even made a threat on his
life San Francisco signed Billy
Cundiff on Jan. 1 as insurance and
to give Akers a push in practice be-
fore releasing Cundiff two days
ahead of the NFC championship
game, on Jan. 18.
Then, at Atlanta, Akers missed
again, but Cundiff was no longer
around as a backup plan.
"I started the season hitting a 55
and a 50 in the first preseason game,
a 63 in the first regular-season game,
and we've had some games that have
been flat-out head scratchers for
me," Akers said. "It's been disap-
pointing in some aspects. It's been
the highs of highs and the lows of


good on St

lows at times. ...The whole season's
been kind of mind-boggling."
Day after day on the practice field,
there's Akers going through his ex-
tensive routine of kicking field goals
from all distances. Even safety
Donte Whitner takes note of the
volume.
"I haven't figured out anything,"
Akers said. "I keep trying to do what
I've done over the years and keep
the muscle memory firing how it
used to."
Like last year, for example. Akers
kicked a single-season record
44 field goals.
"You're going to have your ups
and your downs, it's about being
able to get over the hump," Tucker
said. "I've always said the hardest
kick to make is the one after a miss
and being able to bounce back from
an adverse situation. Being able to
bounce back is kind of a hallmark of
what it means to be a professional
athlete."
Tucker found his groove back in
training camp and took off, winning
the job after no team took a chance
on him in the draft
"I never had the option of coming
in and acting or feeling like a
rookie," he said. "I was never able to
ever think like that. If I did, I would
be doing everybody in our building
a disservice, because when you're a
placekicker you're on an island. It
doesn't matter if you're a rookie or a
15-year veteran, you have to per-
form. You don't have that luxury to
study behind somebody for an ex-
tended amount of time. You're just
thrown into the fire and you've got to
do well."


iper Bowl stage


".'- .'. ."
Associated Press
San Francisco 49ers kicker David Akers walks off the
field after missing a field goal during the second half of
the NFC Championship game on Jan. 20 against the At-
lanta Falcons.


Citrus County postseason lineups
Citrus' 2A-7 lineup
106- Chris Mosher$, Sr., 30-12; 113- David Myrick, Fr., 0-
0; 120 Willie Wallen, Fr., 9-12; 126 Victor Segarra, So., 8-
12; 132 Dalton Tinsley, Sr., 7-15; 138 Tarique Cabanas,
Jr., 14-20; 145 Jacob Nolen, Sr., 33-11; 152 Devon Car-
mack, So., 0-2; 160 -Austin Renaud, Jr., 22-11; 170 Casey
Bearden, Jr., 30-7; 182 Brandon Taylor, Jr., 28-13; 195 -
Nick Fernandez, Sr., 20-10; 220 Bradley Wiesenhauer,
Jr., 8-5; 285 Eric Woods, Fr., 2-4.
$ Denotes returning state qualifier
Crystal River's 1A-8 lineup
106 Tristan Corbett, So., 6-12; 120 Michael Allen, Jr.,
20-7; 126 Kris Caraballo, Sr., 25-9; 132 Nick Hooper$,
Jr., 21-7; 138 Jose Aday, Jr., 23-5; 145 Justin Burcroft,
Jr., 6-4; 152 Dylan Ayala$, Jr., 29-3; 160 Robert Brooker,
Sr., 9-12; 170 Eddie Bennis, Fr., 16-15; 182-Andrew Bilby,
Jr., 19-9; 195 Carlos Sanabria, Jr., 8-11; 220 Gio Val-
adraros, Sr., 9-5; 285 Brandon Martin, Jr., 13-5.
$ Denotes returning state qualifier
Lecanto's 1A-8 lineup
106 Austin Hartman, Fr., 13-12; 113 Dylan Synder,
Jr., 15-3; 120 Jacob Kortendick, Jr., 5-1; 126 Jon Fillinger,
Jr., 14-13; 132 Joel Pelton, So., 3-6; 138 Brian Scorria,
Sr., 5-6; 145 Bryce Hickey, Jr., 9-16; 152 Rio Lumapas,
Jr., 2-11; 160 Chris Ewing, Jr., 15-7; 170 De'Andre Horton,
Jr., 4-3; 182 Derrick Steele, Jr., 4-9; 195 Jonah Nighten-
gale, Jr., 14-6 ; 220 David McNall, Sr., 5-6; 285 Dalton
Collins, Jr., 3-11.
Compiled by Tony Castro


SPORTS


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2013 B3






B4 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2013



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 29 15 .659 -
Brooklyn 28 19 .596 2Y2
Boston 23 23 .500 7
Philadelphia 20 26 .435 10
Toronto 17 30 .362 13Y2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 29 14 .674 -
Atlanta 26 19 .578 4
Orlando 14 32 .304 16Y2
Charlotte 11 34 .244 19
Washington 11 34 .244 19
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 28 18 .609 -
Indiana 28 19 .596 Y2
Milwaukee 24 21 .533 3Y2
Detroit 18 29 .383 10Y2
Cleveland 13 34 .277 15Y2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 37 11 .771 -
Memphis 30 16 .652 6
Houston 25 23 .521 12
Dallas 19 27 .413 17
New Orleans 15 31 .326 21
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 35 11 .761 -
Denver 29 18 .617 612
Utah 25 21 .543 10
Portland 23 22 .511 111Y2
Minnesota 17 25 .405 16
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 34 14 .708 -
Golden State 29 17 .630 4
L.A. Lakers 20 26 .435 13
Sacramento 17 31 .354 17
Phoenix 16 30 .348 17
Thursday's Games
Oklahoma City 106, Memphis 89
Golden State 100, Dallas 97
Friday's Games
Toronto 98, L.A. Clippers 73
Indiana 102, Miami 89
Boston 97, Orlando 84
New York 96, Milwaukee 86
Brooklyn 93, Chicago 89
Philadelphia 89, Sacramento 80
Detroit 117, Cleveland 99
Memphis 85, Washington 76
New Orleans at Denver, late
Portland at Utah, late
Dallas at Phoenix, late
L.A. Lakers at Minnesota, late
Saturday's Games
Chicago at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Houston, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Washington at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Orlando at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Utah at Portland, 10 p.m.
Phoenix at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
L.A. Clippers at Boston, 1 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Miami at Toronto, 2 p.m.


NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
N.Y Islanders 7 4 2 1 9 27 23
New Jersey 6 3 0 3 9 16 14
Pittsburgh 7 4 3 0 8 19 18
N.Y Rangers 7 3 4 0 6 16 20
Philadelphia 8 2 6 0 4 16 23
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 7 5 1 1 11 23 19
Ottawa 8 5 2 1 11 24 14
Montreal 6 4 2 0 8 18 15
Toronto 7 4 3 0 8 21 22
Buffalo 7 3 3 1 7 23 23
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Tampa Bay 7 6 1 0 12 37 18
Winnipeg 8 3 4 1 7 24 32
Carolina 6 3 3 0 6 15 18
Washington 8 2 5 1 5 18 27
Florida 7 2 5 0 4 16 27
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 7 6 0 1 13 24 16
St. Louis 8 6 2 0 12 31 19
Detroit 7 4 2 1 9 20 20
Nashville 7 2 2 3 7 12 19
Columbus 8 2 5 1 5 14 26
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Edmonton 7 4 2 1 9 19 18
Minnesota 7 4 2 1 9 19 19
Vancouver 7 3 2 2 8 19 19
Colorado 7 3 4 0 6 16 19
Calgary 5 1 3 1 3 14 21
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 7 7 0 0 14 29 12
Anaheim 5 3 1 1 7 17 17
LosAngeles 6 2 2 2 6 12 16
Dallas 7 2 4 1 5 13 18
Phoenix 7 2 4 1 5 22 22
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Thursday's Games
Nashville 2, Los Angeles 1, SO
San Jose 3, Edmonton 2, SO
Buffalo 7, Boston 4
Toronto 3, Washington 2
N.Y Islanders 5, New Jersey 4, OT
Pittsburgh 3, N.Y Rangers 0
St. Louis 4, Columbus 1
Florida 6, Winnipeg 3
Colorado 6, Calgary 3
Friday's Games
Washington 3, Philadelphia 2
Carolina 1, Ottawa 0
Tampa Bay 8, Winnipeg 3
Detroit 5, St. Louis 3
Phoenix at Dallas, late
Chicago at Vancouver, late
Minnesota at Anaheim, late
Saturday's Games
New Jersey at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at Montreal, 2 p.m.
Edmonton at Colorado, 3 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
N.Y Rangers at Tampa Bay 7p.m.
Detroit at Columbus, 7 p.m.


Dallas at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Calgary, 10 p.m.
Los Angeles at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Nashville at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Pittsburgh at Washington, 12:30 p.m.
Ottawa at Montreal, 2 p.m.
Florida at Buffalo, 3p.m.
New Jersey at N.Y Islanders, 3 p.m.


Phoenix Open
Friday, At TPC Scottsdale
Stadium Course, Scottsdale, Ariz.,
Purse: $6.2 million
Yardage: 7,216, Par: 71
Second Round:
Phil Mickelson 60-65 -125 -17
Bill Haas 65-64-129 -13
Keegan Bradley 67-63 -130 -12
Brandt Snedeker 64-66-130 -12
Angel Cabrera 66-65-131 -11
Charlie Wi 68-63 -131 -11


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr KULthei record[


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:
.- CASH 3 (early)
4-0-6
CASH 3 (late)

PLAY 4 (early)
0-6-5-0
PLAY 4 (late)
7-8-7-3
FANTASY 5
1-9-15-32-35
MEGA MONEY
4-15-26-40
l Loty MEGA BALL
21



On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12 p.m. (CW) Virginia Tech at North Carolina
12 p.m. (ESPN) Syracuse at Pittsburgh
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Purdue at Northwestern
12:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Women: Texas at Texas Christian
1:30 p.m. (MNT) Georgia at South Carolina
1:30 p.m. (FOX) Auburn at Missouri
2 p.m. (ESPN) Duke at Florida State
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Notre Dame at DePaul
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) Dayton at St. Louis
2 p.m. (SUN) Wake Forest at Maryland
2:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Colorado at Utah
4 p.m. (CBS) Miami at North Carolina State
4 p.m. (MNT, FOX) Alabama at Vanderbilt
4 p.m. (ESPN) Tennessee at Arkansas
4 p.m. (ESPN2) Wichita State at Northern Iowa
5:30 p.m. (FSNFL) LSU at Mississippi State
6 p.m. (ESPN) Kentucky at Texas A&M
6 p.m. (ESPN2) Kansas State at Oklahoma
6 p.m. (NBCSPT) Columbia at Princeton
8 p.m. (ESPN2) Baylor at Iowa State
8 p.m. (NBCSPT) Nevada at New Mexico
9 p.m. (ESPN) Michigan at Indiana
NBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Bulls at Atlanta Hawks
8:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Orlando Magic at Milwaukee Bucks
BOXING
11:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Golden Boy Live: Frankie Gomez vs.
Lanard Lane
GOLF
6 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Omega Dubai Desert
Classic, Third Round
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Waste Management Phoenix Open,
Third Round
3 p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour: Waste Management Phoenix Open,
Third Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Waste Management Phoenix Open,
Spotlight Coverage
12 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Omega Dubai Desert
Classic, Third Round. (Taped)
4 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Omega Dubai Desert
Classic, Final Round
GYMNASTICS
4:30 p.m. (SUN) Women: Kentucky at Alabama. (Taped)
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m. (SUN) New York Rangers at Tampa Bay Lightning
RODEO
1 p.m. (CBS) Bull Riding Sacramento Invitational. (Taped)
SKATING
1 p.m. (NBC) U.S. Championships: Skating
Spectacular. (Taped)
SOCCER
7:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Queens Park Rangers FC vs.
Norwich City FC.
WINTER SPORTS
12 p.m. (NBCSPT) FIS Freestyle Skiing: Visa International
Moguls. (Taped)
1 p.m. (NBCSPT) Snowboarding: Sprint U.S. Grand Prix SB
Pipe. (Taped)
Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BOYS SOCCER
FHSAA Class 3A regional semifinals
6 p.m. Eastside at Citrus
WRESTLING
District 2A-7 tournament
9 a.m. Citrus, Lecanto at Springstead High School
in Springstead
District 1A-8 tournament
10:30 a.m. Crystal River at Holiday High School in Anclote


Brian Gay
Robert Garrigus
Ryan Moore
John Rollins
Matt Every
David Hearn
Troy Matteson
Kevin Na
Roberto Castro
Brendon de Jonge
Gary Woodland
Ted Potter, Jr.
William McGirt
Jeff Maggert
Rory Sabbatini
Bubba Watson
Brendan Steele
John Mallinger
Casey Wittenberg
Harris English
Kevin Chappell
Hunter Mahan
Padraig Harrington
Bryce Molder
Charles Howell III
Bo Van Pelt
Boo Weekley
Brian Harman
Ken Duke
Jeff Overton
Jeff Klauk
Hank Kuehne
Martin Flores
Aaron Baddeley
David Toms
Russell Henley
NickWatney
Richard H. Lee
Cameron Tringale
Sang-Moon Bae
Kevin Stadler
Greg Chalmers
Scott Piercy


Chris Kirk 67-69-136 -
Justin Leonard 65-71 -136 -
Colt Knost 71-65-136 -
Carl Pettersson 72-65-137 -
Chris Stroud 71-66-137 -
David Mathis 72-65-137 -
Billy Horschel 69-68-137 -
Ryan Palmer 64-73-137 -
Jimmy Walker 68-69- 137 -
Tim Clark 69-68-137 -
Jason Day 70-68 -138 -
Bud Cauley 71-67-138 -
Lucas Glover 68-70-138 -
Kyle Stanley 67-71 -138 -
Scott Verplank 66-72- 138 -
George McNeill 70-68-138 -
John Merrick 69-69-138 -
Chad Campbell 73-65-138 -
Dicky Pride 67-71 -138 -
James Hahn 71-67-138 -
J.J. Henry 70-68-138 -
K.J. Choi 71-67-138 -
Ben Crane 67-71 -138 -
Y.E. Yang 65-73-138 -
James Driscoll 72-66-138 -
Dubai Desert
Classic
Friday At Emirates Golf Club, Doha, Qatar
Purse: $2.5 million
Yardage: 7,344, Par: 72
Second Round (Top 10):
Richard Sterne, South Africa 62-70 13
Thorbjorn, Olesen, Denmark 67-66 -13
Stephen Gallacher, Scotland 63-70 13
Tommy Fleetwood, England 65-68 -13
Maximilian Kieffer, Germany 66-68 13
Chris Doak, Scotland 65-69 -13
Andreas Harto, Denmark 67-67-13
Scott Jamieson, Scotland 65-69 -13
RomainWattel, France 68-67 -13
Jeev Milkha Singh, India 68-67-13


Celtics' Sullinger has



surgery, out for season


Associated Press

BOSTON For the
second time in less than
a week, Boston Celtics
coach Doc Rivers had to
tell his team that they
would be without a key
contributor for the re-
mainder of the season.
The Celtics an-
nounced Friday that
first-round draft choice
Jared Sullinger under-
went successful lumbar
disk surgery and will
miss the rest of the sea-
son. He is expected to be
ready in time for next
season's training camp.
"He was playing
great," Rivers said. "I
think the good news is
we know he can play and
we know he will be a
very good player. In the
long run, this will make
him healthier."
The announcement
came five days after All-
Star point guard Rajon
Rondo was diagnosed
with a torn ACL that will
keep him out for the rest
of the season.
"Losing Rondo was
big enough for us and
now we're losing Sully,
one of the best rebound-
ers on the team," guard
Courtney Lee said. "It
was definitely shocking.
We didn't know how se-
rious (his) injury was
when he left the game."
Rivers told his team
after Friday morning's
shootaround that
Sullinger would be out
for the season.
"(It was) one of those
moments where it's,
'Man, it can't get much
worse than this,"' said
Lee, who was unaware
Sullinger had the sur-


Associated Press
Boston Celtics rookie forward Jared Sullinger, right,
will be out the remainder of the season after
undergoing lumbar disk surgery.


gery. "We want to stay
positive. We need to con-
tinue to fight and con-
tinue to push."
For the Celtics,
ranked 29th in the
league in rebounds en-
tering Friday night's
game, the injury means
others will need to con-
tribute on the glass. In 45
games, Sullinger aver-
aged six points and 5.9
rebounds, which was
third-best on the team.
"We will have to play
differently again,"
Rivers said. "We will
definitely have to be a
small-ball team. We'll
have to be creative. Our
perimeter guys are going
to have to rebound


more. The guy I will put
the most pressure on,
and it's a little unfair be-
cause he's never been a
great rebounder, is Jeff
(Green). When he's in
the game, he will have to
rebound."
Sullinger had been
tabbed as a lottery pick
before health concerns
dropped him to 21st
overall in the draft.
"We're very happy to
have drafted him,"
Rivers said. "We felt that
this would happen at
some point, but we just
thought it would be dur-
ing the summer where
we could just say it is
time to do it. It just hap-
pened now."


I S O R T B I E F -


Ex-NBA player's son gets
60-year term for murder
DALLAS -A Texas jury sentenced the
son of former NBA player Nick Van Exel
to 60 years in prison Friday in the shoot-
ing death of a longtime friend.
Nickey Maxwell Van Exel, 22, received
the punishment after his father wept on
the witness stand and apologized to the
family of the victim, Bradley Bassey Eyo.
The same jury found the younger Van
Exel guilty of murder on Thursday.
Prosecutors had sought a capital mur-
der conviction.
Nickey Van Exel fatally shot Eyo in De-
cember 2010 and dumped his body at




CITRUS
Continued from Page BI

But it was about then that West Port
went back to doing what it does best,
and the difference was immediate.
"We switched defenses at halftime
because we thought they were getting
too many inside shots," Rollerson ex-
plained. "We switched to a zone to try
and take them outside, but that didn't
work either.
"So we changed up again. We de-
cided to go out and do what we do
best We went to our pressure man-to-
man and I thought, one more push
and we'd have it."
A combination of missed shots and
turnovers by Citrus fueled a 10-0 Wolf
Pack run over the next three minutes,
a basket by Navondra Dubois trim-
ming the Hurricane lead to 54-53 with
3:41 left. Toxen answered for Citrus
with a score inside, but two buckets by
Kori Hanks sandwiched around an-
other Dubois score put West Port up
59-56 with just 43 seconds left.
Citrus still had several chances to
pull out the victory in those final sec-
onds, including after Lynch's steal


PIRATES
Continued from Page B1

21-point cushion head-
ing into the fourth.
"When the ball won't
go in the hole, there's not
much you can do," said
head coach Jason
Rodgers, whose Pirates
twice defeated Tavares
in the regular season.
"Sometimes you have
those nights.
"The girls played with
a lot of heart. As bad as
we shot, we still only
gave up 50. But you've
got to score to win and,
unfortunately, the girls
couldn't buy a shot."
The Bulldogs were
just 34 percent from the


Lake Ray Hubbard on the eastern out-
skirts of Dallas. His attorney had said the
two were playing with a shotgun at
Nickey Van Exel's Garland home and that
Van Exel didn't know the gun was loaded.
Miles' pay raise
approved by LSU board
BATON ROUGE, La. LSU football
coach Les Miles has a new seven-year
contract that pays him a $4.3 million an-
nual salary and keeps him in Tiger Sta-
dium through the 2019 season.
The university system's Board of Su-
pervisors backed the contract extension
Friday, giving Miles a $549,000 or 15
percent increase.



and basket with 20 seconds to go. Des-
tiny Lawson hit two free throws to
make it a three-point edge for West
Port, but the front ends of two other
one-and-one chances were missed.
After each, however, the Hurricanes
turned the ball over.
"That was a tough game," Citrus
coach Brian Lattin said. 'At the end of
the day, we just didn't get it done in
the fourth quarter.
"Even when they cut (the lead) to
three and to one, I still felt like we
were going to win it."
Perhaps that's because until the
fourth quarter, Citrus had been in con-
trol. Indeed, West Port's only lead be-
fore its late rally was 3-0 on Lawson's
game-opening three-pointer. The
Hurricanes led 16-8 with two minutes
left in the first quarter before settling
for an 18-14 lead at quarter's end, then
took a 32-26 advantage into the half.
Five straight points by Lindsay Con-
nors midway through the third quar-
ter gave Citrus its biggest lead, 44-32.
Toxen topped Citrus with 17 points,
with Jenkins adding 15 and Treleasha
Simmons getting eight. Lawson and
Hanks each scored 17 for West Port,
with Dubois getting 15 and Aaliyah
High 10.


field and 7-of-16 at the
foul line but a strong
rebounding perform-
ance, led by 6-foot fresh-
man forward Shakera
Williams (11 points, 17
boards), freshman guard
Cierra Evans (game-high
12 points, 12 rebounds)
and 6-foot-3 sophomore
center Leah Henigan
(nine boards, eight
points), helped them
take advantage of second
chances.
Tavares, which beat
No. 2 seed Dunnellon in
its semifinal contest on
Wednesday, was also bol-
stered by junior guard
Sanderica Hutto's six
steals.
"I think our girls had
quite a bit of hustle,
tonight," said 20-year


Bulldogs head coach
Connie Solomon, who
was surprised at the ex-
tent of Crystal River's of-
fensive struggles. "I
guess we had the mo-
mentum going and our
adrenaline was high."
Pirates sophomore
forward Jasmyne Eason
had 10 rebounds and
four blocks, and junior
guard Katelyn Hannigan
led Crystal River with
seven points.
Junior guard Megan
Wells led the game with
15 points in Wednesday's
semifinal victory over
Nature Coast, but was
held to five Friday
The Pirates were
much better at the line
than from the floor, going
12-of-21 on free throws.


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


________.___l'_l_,____I_____ll_____ _lI___li."S U PE R B O W L
AFCCAMPI ON- BATIM R E :AVENS


BALTIM


RAVE
Regular-season Po
OFFENSE
Total yards (avg.):
Passing

Postseason: 424.7

First downs: (314)
Rushing Passing

Postseason: (64)

:.. 19
DEFENSE
Yards allowed (av
Passing

Postseason: 415.C


SCORING (PPG)
I Points f
-, Points all
Postseason
* Points
- Points allo

PLAY SELECTION
Regular season
Pass Rush




04


ORE




NS
stseason stats

352.5
Rushing

7


Penalty
...34




/g.): 350.9
Rushing

0



or
owed


for
)wed
I (PCT.)
Postseason
Pass Rush



0


COACHES CORNER
Big bro
MV_ Career record
(Reg. season)
W 54
L 26
SJohn
Harbaugh
Record-setting pro resume:
the only coach with wins in
his first five postseasons.
Selected over Rex Ryan and
several others to take over the
Ravens in 2008 after making
his mark as Philadelphia's
special teams coordinator.


Field goals
YARDS Justin
1-19 Tucker
20-29 0 000
30-39 00000
40-49 **O Er
50+ *0**

Made 0
Missed 0
Regular
season



Boldin has been 1
sensational on every
route in the postseason
(16 catches, 17.3-yard
average, 3 TDs). Powerful,
versatile and can outleap
defenders for balls. CBs
will have a difficult time with
the smart, physical Boldin.


Building blocks
Team makeup
Current 53-man roster
Draft Trades 1 -


Free agents


In the red
Production inside the 20-yard
line, includes postseason:
OFFENSE Field No score
Touchdowns goals 11.9%/


Fa


IF CHA -MPIONS ANFRANC I. SCO49R

SAN FRANCISCO



Affair ES
49ERS


Rice-man cometh
Ray Rice has been the hub of the Ravens' offense
throughout his career. One of his best attributes
is his ability to pick up yardage both inside and
outside. He's a threat
to break long gains Regular season
on runs or screen ATT YDS AVG LONG TD
passes V 257 1,143 4.4 46 9


Rice


T. Brown
i 25 CB


REJECTED
STARTERS


D. Pitta
T. Smith 88 TE
82 WR
V.
S4
SPECIALISTS
S. Koch




SJ. Tucker






J. Jones
12 PR


emboldened wideout
Total catches
Regular season (TDs)
WR Anquan
.... Boldin (4) Boldin

TE
Dennis
.... Pitta (7)

RB Ray
.... Rice (1)

WR Torre, *
.... Smith (8)

WR JacLo.,
.... Jones (1i PR

ST)


R. Moss S
84 WR


V. Davis
85 TE


F. Gore
21 RB C. Ka
7

SPECIALISTS


DEFENSE 12.7%/


D. Akers
No ordinary Joe 2. K
Passing yds: 3,817 (reg.) 853 (postseason)
Touchdowns: 22 (reg.) 8 (postseason)
M Win Loss
WEEK :-TDS YARDS
1 299
2 232
3 382
4 356
5 187
6 234
7 147
8 Bye
9 153-.
10 l 341
11 I 164
12 355
13 188
14 182
15 254
16 309
17 U 34

WC 282
DIV 331
CONF 240

SOURCES: National Football League; STATS LLC


49ERS OFFENSE w
The Niners have by far, the best running
back in Frank Gore, best running QB in
Colin Kaepernick, and best run blocking,
led by left guard Mike lupati and left tackle
Joe Staley that the Ravens have faced.
Kaepernick isn't just a threat to use his Usain
Bolt-style strides to break down defenses.
His arm is strong and accurate, and he isn't
timid about letting go into tight spots.

A* Touchdown passes
by distance
YDS TDS
1-19 15

1 20-29 I 7
-3
30-39M 4
30-39 2 Flacco (30)
lacco 0-49 Kaepernick (13) E
40-49 1
1 Total TDs in
50+ 3 parentheses;
1 0 includes postseason


Guts and Gore
Frank Gore is the career rushing leader for the
franchise, as dependable as they come
Strong, can pound through the line a-.:. / f
has quick feet to cut to open space t*
Effective out of backfield as receiver ,
Regular season Gore
ATT YDS AVG LONG TD
258 1,214 4.7 37 8


A. Smitn
99 LB


SP. Will


J. Smith


RAVENS OFFENSE
QB Joe Flacco will be seeing
the fiercest defense he's faced all season
because the Niners are more versatile than
the D presented by the Colts, Broncos and
Patriots in the postseason. Flacco and his
targets WRs Anquan Boldin ar,.:i Torrey
Smith, TE Dennis Pitta and c,!.I -
everything RB Ray Rice -
should be encouraged
by what the
Falcons
accomplished in
the first half. They
found seams and gaps
everywhere, and the
49ers' secondary must
be stingier this time.

IL C. Williams
29 CB


I
is
B


D. Goldson
38 FS


D. Whitner
N. Bowman 31 SS
53 LB



aga
agaT A. Brooks
NIT 55 LB



C. Rogers
22 CB
McDonald
91 DT

49ERS DEFENSE
The league's best linebacking
corps, feature two All-Pros in
Patrick Willis and NaVorro
Bowman. Aldon Smith is
considered a linebacker, but is a
hybrid LB-DE and he led the NFC
with 19 1/2 sacks. Ahmad Brooks
comes off a spectacular second
half in Atlanta.



Crabtree


Golden receiver
Total catches
Regular season (TDs)

WR I
Michael ....
Crabtree (9)

if i.lario 4
1 ,,i ,,ni. r, ir. (1) .... 42
bec
TL .ernon be
DF ,-. (5) --....
VVR Randy
Moss (3) ***. 28 c
RB Frank .... in
Gore (1) i

p. Blue


Regular-sea
OFFENSE
Total yards
Passing

Postseaso


son Postseason stats

s (avg.): 361.8
Rushing
S155.7
n: 476.0


236.0


First downs: (322)
Rushing Passing Penalty
172 .-. 22
Postseason: (50)
I| 5
23-- 22
DEFENSE
Yards allowed (avg.): 294.4
Passing Rushing
S94.2


Postseason: 414.5


92.5


SCORING (PPG)
Points for
17.1 Points allowed
Postseason
SPoints for
27.5 Points allowed

PLAY SELECTION (PCT.)
Regular season Postseason
Pass Rush Pass Rush

53.0 58.1



COACHES CORNER
Little bro
Career record
(Reg. season)
WM 24
L [7
TI 1
Jim
Harbaugh
Quarterbacked 14 seasons
with four teams after being
selected in the first round of
the 1987 draft by the Bears.
Was the 2011 NFL Coach of
the Year as a rookie, guiding
the Niners to the conference
title game.


Field goals
YARDS David
1-190 Akers
20-29 OOO
30-39OOO00
OO****0
40-49 0000000
000000
50+ **000O

Made 0
Missed 0
Regular
season



I Michael Crabtree has
matured this season and
came a true No. 1 receiver.
Somehow finds way to get
wide open several times a
game. He's good after the
atch, but needs better ball
security; fumbled at Atlanta
conference championship.

print for success


Team makeup
Current 53-man roster


_-- ;'J T. Suggs
f' 55.*LB


C. Graham
ee 24*CB


RAVENS DEFENSE
The most physical and fundamentally
sound front seven that the 49ers
have seen in the playoffs, led by
Ray Lewis. Pass rushers Terrell
Suggs, DE Paul Kruger and
Pernell McPhee will need help
containing Kaepernick, so watch for
frequent blitzes from the secondary.




SKae pe


Draft


Free agents -


Zoning
Production
line, include
OFFENSE
Touchdo\


DEFENSE


Trades 1

23
Waivers 2


in
inside the 20-yard
es postseason:


wns


No
Field score
goals 12.5%
I I
32.8%
7.1%
S33.3%


Armed and tatted
Pass yds: 1,814 (reg.) 496 (post.)
Touchdowns: 10 (reg.) 3 (post.)
S Win Loss M Tie
WEEK TDS 0 YARDS
1 -


3 -
4 0
5 1 7
6
7 -


NOTE: Replaced
former starting
QB Alex
2 Smith who
suffered a


ssion
k 10.


8 concur
9 Bye in Wee
10 I 117
11 243
12 231
13 208
14 I 185
15 9 221
16 o 244
17 276


\


r- WC -
DIV 263
CONF 233


SUPER BOWL


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2013 B5


S uper Bowl XLVII features a set of brothers known around the NFL as fierce competitors
unafraid to make a bold move during the season. Unafraid to upset anyone who stands
in their way, John Harbaugh fired his offensive coach midseason and Jim changed quarterbacks,
moves that factored in the recent surges.
Raven's John and little brother Jim of the 49ers will become the first siblings to square off
from opposite sidelines when their teams play for the NFL Championship.
Both teams rallied from halftime deficits on the road in the Conference Championship series
to earn berths in the Super Bowl, which will be played at the Superdome in New Orleans.

Mercedes-Benz Superdome, New Orleans Feb. 3 6:30 p.m. EST (CBS)


I












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


V -. IV =
Michael Emerson and
Carrie Preston

Emerson 'giggly'
over on-screen kiss
NEW YORK Michael
Emerson has played a serial
killer, a mysterious, villainous
Island leader and currently
stars as a billionaire com-
puter genius on "Person of In-
terest." But he said playing
the romantic interest for his
real-life wife has been his
most unsettling role.
Emerson plays the off-beat
Harold Finch in "Person of
Interest," which airs Thurs-
days at 10 p.m. Eastern. His
wife Carrie Preston has a re-
curring role as Finch's former
fiance, who believes he is
dead.
The couple has acted to-
gether in a few independent
films and Preston even
played Emerson's mother in
an episode of ABC's "Lost,"
but this was their first roman-
tic pairing. This season even
showed the characters' first
kiss.
Emerson said having his
wife play his love interest can
be tricky.

Actor London
arrested after fight
PHOENIX -Authorities
said actor Jason London has
been arrested on suspicion of
assault and disorderly con-
duct after an Arizona bar
fight.
Scottsdale police said
London allegedly sneezed on
a man who then asked him to
apologize, but London re-
fused and instead hit the man
in the face.
The Arizona Republic said
the two men were escorted
out of the bar, but London
began pushing and cursing at
firefighters trying to treat him
and appeared extremely
drunk. He was arrested early
Monday
London's Twitter account
said "some guy thought I was
hitting on his girl" and sev-
eral large bouncers beat him,
breaking bones in his face.
London added, "the truth will
win" and "I hate Arizona."

Travis admits
driving drunk
SHERMAN, Texas -
Randy Travis pleaded guilty
to driving while intoxicated
Thursday in a case that began
last summer when the coun-
try music star was found
naked after
crashing his
Pontiac Trans
Am.
Travis re-
ceived two m
years of pro-
bation, he will face the jail
$2,000 fine
and a 180-day Randy
suspended red to spend at
jail sentence.
If he doesn't
successfully complete the
probation, he will face the jail
time.
He was ordered to spend at
least 30 days at an alcohol
treatment facility, complete
100 hours of community
service and have an ignition
interlock device on any vehi-
cle he operates while on
probation.
The misdemeanor was pun-
ishable by up to one year in
jail and a $4,000 fine.
-From wire reports


Birthday In coming months, go out of your way to
make an effort to develop good relationships with all
of your co-workers. Although it may not be apparent to
you at first, they could be of enormous help in
furthering your ambitions.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You are about to enter
a profitable cycle for ideas. Chances are, you will con-
ceive something that will be quite ingenious and which
could make ample amounts of money.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Try to keep your day
as loosely structured as possible, because something
spontaneous could develop in which you'll want to
participate. It will have a lot of potential for success.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Utilize your gift of being
able to sense a problem before it occurs. It'll not only
help you avoid a tight spot, but will keep you one step
ahead of any other problems.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -A willingness to adapt is


Super singers


Associated Press
While Beyonce will be the main attraction during halftime Sunday at the Super Bowl, other
singers will show off their vocal talents on Super Bowl weekend.

Beyonce one of many stars headlining Super Bowl


Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS The en-
tertainment leading up to the
Super Bowl is so A-list, Bey-
once may not even have the
most anticipated perform-
ance surrounding the big
game.
Justin Timberlake is due to
give his first major musical
performance in four years.
Stevie Wonder is performing
for the masses at an outdoor
concert. CeeLo Green is re-
uniting with his old hip-hop
clique, Goodie Mob, and
Rascal Flatts is teaming up
with Journey for a concert.
Those represent only a frac-
tion of the all-star events to
celebrate the Super Bowl.
"The Super Bowl has be-
come such a big event in it-
self. So many people come
from everywhere, looking to
not only be a part of the Super
Bowl but also the festivities
leading up to the game," said
CeeLo, who is performing at
ESPN's Next event. "There's
so much to do, from parties,
concerts and events."
Indeed, until the Baltimore
Ravens and the San Francisco
49ers meet at the Superdome
on Sunday, much of the em-
phasis in the days leading up
to the event has very little to
do with the game.
Lil Wayne is throwing a
major bash in his hometown,
Jay-Z is holding court at an-
other event the evening be-
fore his wife, Beyonce,


performs at halftime, and
Jamie Foxx is due to give a
private concert and that's
just the lineup for Saturday
Director Michael Bay is
holding court at a private es-
tate for a celebrity dinner for
charity. Santigold, Solange
and producer/DJ Diplo will
perform at Audi's two parties
during the weekend, and
Playboy and Maxim are plan-
ning blowout parties with
their trademark models.
"I've never seen anything
like this," said Gary Solomon
Jr., co-founder of Solomon
Group, the local company
hired to help setup the stages
and lighting for the outdoor
concerts and broadcasting
areas in the French Quarter
and near the Superdome.
"When you look at the mas-
ter calendar of all the events,
it's pretty daunting," he said.
"This Super Bowl is like hav-
ing 30 events in the same
weekend."
Perhaps the most hotly an-
ticipated event features
Timberlake. He will perform
during "DIRECTV Super
Saturday Night," an invita-
tion-only concert featuring
Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson
of The Roots as DJ. Questlove
is a friend of Timberlake's
who served as DJ at the pop
star's wedding to Jessica Biel
in October.
Questlove said he's hon-
ored he was asked to DJ
Timberlake's return to the
stage on Super Bowl week-


end. Timberlake is expected
to perform his new single,
"Suit & Tie," which features
Jay-Z, and other tracks from
his upcoming album, "The
20/20 Experience."
"The album is incredible,"
Questlove said. "I'm a huge
supporter, and I'm there to
make sure the audience has a
good time."
"Mum's the word," Quest-
love said. "All that is under
wraps."
Stevie Wonder is also per-
forming Saturday night. The
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
legend, whose classic hit "Su-
perstition" will be featured in
two of this year's Bud Light
Super Bowl commercials, is
headlining an outdoor concert
Rising guitarist Gary Clark Jr
is also scheduled to perform.
Besides the Timberlake
concert, Questlove is per-
forming with The Roots at
three Super Bowl parties, in-
cluding the 49ers after-game
party "or funeral, depend-
ing on the outcome of the
game," he said with a laugh.
OneRepublic and Matchbox
Twenty will perform as part of
the Super Bowl pregame
show.
Much of the entertainment
kicks off Friday VH1 is host-
ing a concert headlined by
rock band Train while
Grammy-winning R&B singer
Fantasia leads a pack of
Christian and gospel singers
for the NFLs Super Bowl
Gospel Celebration.


Justin Timberlake, above left, and Stevie Wonder will perform at concerts before the Super Bowl.


Today's HOROSCOPE
your best asset, which will help you fit comfortably into
most any group or situation you encounter. You'll be a
welcome addition to any venture.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) You have a strong de-
sire to be first in everything, which is all the motivation
you'll need to stand out from the pack. Your
competitive spirit should bolster your performance.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Try to break away from
your usual routine and engage in something different.
Experiment with activities that bring you in contact
with people who'll stimulate you.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Your greatest asset is likely
to be an ability to solve most any problem you en-
counter. In situations where others see no solution,
you'll come up with several ingenious fixes.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You'll function best as
one of the troop instead of as a self-appointed chief.
Show others how to be an exemplary team player,


and you'll come out ahead.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Something you possess,
which could be knowledge, a product or a method, will
be of more value to others than it is to you. You'll find
a great market waiting for it.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) This could be the per-
fect day for you to get together with two individuals
who can help you further an ambition. Present your
proposal with enthusiasm, and don't leave anything
out.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -An important situa-
tion, whose slowness to develop has caused you con-
siderable concern, could suddenly start to turn in a
favorable direction.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -An individual you're
about to meet will play a significant role in your plans.
The two of you will have an instant rapport and should
be quite successful together.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 31
Fantasy 5:3 15 16 29 33
5-of-5 2 winners $105,631.70
4-of-5 279 $122
3-of-5 8,355 $11
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30
Powerball: 14 16 32 47 52
Powerball: 16
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 3 winners $1 million
1 Florida winner
Lotto: 7 9 10 42 45 49
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 26 $5,732.50
4-of-6 1,571 $72.50
3-of-6 34,256 $5
Fantasy 5:12 13 14 27 36
5-of-5 1 winner $235,711.29
4-of-5 327 $116
3-of-5 9,897 $10.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, Feb. 2, the
33rd day of 2013. There are 332
days left in the year. This is
Groundhog Day.
Today's Highlight:
On Feb. 2, 1913, New York
City's rebuilt Grand Central
Terminal officially opened to the
public at one minute past
midnight.
On this date:
In 1536, present-day Buenos
Aires, Argentina, was founded by
Pedro de Mendoza of Spain.
In 1653, New Amsterdam-
now New York City was
incorporated.
In 1848, the Treaty of
Guadalupe Hidalgo, ending the
Mexican-American War, was
signed.
In 1870, the "Cardiff Giant,"
supposedly the petrified remains
of a human discovered in Cardiff,
N.Y., was revealed to be nothing
more than carved gypsum.
In 1882, Irish poet and novelist
James Joyce was born near
Dublin.
In 1887, Punxsutawney, Pa.,
held its first Groundhog Day
festival.
In 1912, Frederick R. Law
parachuted from the torch of the
Statue of Liberty in a stunt filmed
by Pathe News.
In 1922, the James Joyce novel
"Ulysses" was published in Paris
on Joyce's 40th birthday.
Ten years ago: The search
continued for pieces of the space
shuttle Columbia, a day after the
spacecraft disintegrated during re-
entry over Texas, killing all seven
astronauts.
Five years ago: A gunman
killed five women at a Lane Bryant
store in Tinley Park, Ill., in an ap-
parent botched robbery attempt
(the case remains unsolved).
One year ago: Egyptian secu-
rity forces clashed with stone-
throwing protesters enraged by
the failure of police to prevent a
soccer riot that killed 74 people.
Today's Birthdays: Actress
Elaine Stritch is 88. Former
French President Valery Giscard
d'Estaing is 87. Actor Robert
Mandan is 81. Comedian Tom
Smothers is 76. Rock singer-
guitarist Graham Nash is 71. Actor
Bo Hopkins is 71. Television exec-
utive Barry Diller is 71. Country
singer Howard Bellamy (The
Bellamy Brothers) is 67. TV chef
Ina Garten is 65. Actor Jack
McGee is 64. Actor Brent Spiner is
64. Rock musician Ross Valory
(Journey) is 64. Sen. John
Cornyn, R-Texas, is 61. Model
Christie Brinkley is 59. Actor
Michael Talbott is 58. Actress Kim
Zimmer is 58. Actor Michael T.
Weiss is 51. Actor-comedian
Adam Ferrara is 47. Rock musi-
cian Robert DeLeo (Army of Any-


one; Stone Temple Pilots) is 47.
Actress Jennifer Westfeldt is 43.
Rock musician Ben Mize is 42.
Thought for Today: "Absence
is to love what wind is to fire; it ex-
tinguishes the small, it inflames
the great." Bussy-Rabutin,
French soldier and writer
(1618-1693).









RELIGION
.L EIGION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Flu affects churches


I;;


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


Awe-full


living
he other day I lis-
tened to an inter-
view with
Alexandra Horowitz as
she discussed her book,
"On Looking: Eleven
Walks with Expert
Eyes."
She lives in New York
City with a dog and a tod-
dler, and frequently
walks around her neigh-
borhood, traveling the
same route, passing the
same buildings and busi-
nesses and trees and
traffic.
After taking the same
walk many hundreds of
times, she realized she
never noticed where she
was going. So, the next
time out she decided to
notice as much as she
could.
With notebook in
hand, she noted the
trash bags left out on the
curbs, one with spaghetti
spilling out. She noted
newspapers on the front
steps and a fallen honey
locust tree.
The next time she
walked with her dog and
paid attention to what he
paid attention to and no-
ticed her dog's experi-
ence was vastly different
from hers; her dog
walked with his nose,
See Page C5


Judi Siegal
JUDI'S
JOURNAL


Congregations, clergy take steps to help prevent spread of illness


JAMIE STENGLE
Associated Press
DALLAS
Texas churches are taking
precautions to try to help
congregants avoid the flu
- keeping hand sanitizer at
the ready, telling them they
can skip the shared commun-
ion chalice and encouraging a
bow, nod or even fist bump in-


stead of shaking hands.
As people left a morning
Mass on Sunday at St. Rita
Catholic Community in Dallas,
many stopped at a table in the
vestibule to bathe their hands
in hand sanitizer. Church lead-
ers also are advising parish-
ioners they can take just bread
for Holy Communion and skip
the wine, which is sipped from
a shared cup. During the sign


of peace when parishioners
greet each other, they can nod
or bow instead of shaking
hands.
"There's a lot of head bow-
ing or nodding toward your
neighbor," the Rev Edwin
Leonard said.
The annual flu season hit ear-
lier than normal this year and
has been unusually vigorous.
Health officials say the best way


to protect yourself is to get a flu
shot People also should wash
their hands frequently, cover
coughs and sneezes and stay
home when sick
At King of Glory Lutheran
Church in Dallas, senior pas-
tor Jon Bustard encouraged
young and old in the congrega-
tion to bump fists instead of
See Page C5


Silver Ring Thing comes to Cornerstone Church


Special to the Chronicle
On TV movies and in
music, the message our
youth are getting is sex
equals love and everyone
is doing it. But the truth is,
the number of teens choos-
ing abstinence is growing.
Less than half of all high
school students have had
sex; 47.8 percent in 2007,
down from 54.1 percent in
1991.
Silver Ring Thing helps
teens and parents of teens
develop strategies to adopt
and maintain a Biblical
worldview about sexual
purity and abstinence be-
fore marriage. Last year's


event drew a crowd of 748
students and 147 parents.
At the end of the show, 267
students put on the silver
ring, promising purity
until marriage.
This year, Life Choice
Care Center is again host-
ing the nationwide tour ti-
tled "Rewind, Begin With
the End in Mind." It will
take place at 7 p.m. Mon-
day, Feb. 4, at Cornerstone
Church, 1100 W Highland
Blvd., Inverness. Registra-
tion begins at 6:15 p.m.
The tour team is made
up of college-age guys and
girls. They are able to con-
nect with teens in a way
moms and dads cannot.


They'll present a multime-
dia event of drama, com-
edy, music, video and
testimonies that have in-
spired students world-
wide. The SRT's vision is
to "create a culture shift in
America where abstinence
is the norm again rather
than the exception." The
organization promotes this
idea by encouraging teens
who are saving sex for
marriage and talking
about the concept of start-
ing over for those who
have not.
"Starting over is the idea
that when a person has
been sexually active, they
can stop making those


choices and choose absti-
nence," said Holly Dou-
glas, SRT's promotions
director. "We meet so
many students who think
because they had sex once,
they have to keep doing it
Our tour team share their
own stories of waiting, as
well as starting over for
students to be encouraged
there are second chances."
Following the event,
SRT's staff offers multi-
dimensional support for
teens who have questions
or are struggling with the
decision to stay abstinent
SRT offers their "Until
Marriage" follow-up so
"students can keep in


touch with us through so-
cial media, texting, email
and our other follow-up re-
sources," Douglas said.
The event is free of
charge. However, space is
limited, so online registra-
tions are encouraged. An
optional $20 ring will be
available for purchase
after the show. There is
also a separate parent ses-
sion to inform parents
about today's youth cul-
ture and how they can sup-
port their teens'
commitment to wait.
For more information,
call Life Choice Care Cen-
ter at 352-341-5176 or visit
www. silverringthing. com.


Jewish


Super


Bowl


heroes
For my friend, Ed,
whose love of sports is
eclipsed only by his love
of Judaism.
Pretzels, salsa, na-
chos and franks in
a blanket Beer,
soda and pizza. East plays
West. It's time for the Big
Game, the XLVII Super
Bowl, the football game
of the year And there
were Jews who helped
their respected teams on
the way to victory
There was Josh Miller,
who grew up in East
Brunswick, N.J., to a
Conservative Jewish
family He played for the
New England Patriots
and was part of the win-
ning team for the Super
Bowl XXXIX. He said
there was much pres-
sure playing in a game
with so much at stake.
He also felt great
pride in being a Jewish
athlete, and he likes to
feel he is a role model
for other Jewish ath-
letes. He spent 12 years
in the NFL, also playing
for the Steelers and the
Titans. He anchors a
drive-time sports talk
show in Pittsburgh and
speaks to kids' groups

See Page C5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Religion NOTES


Worship
"Open the Eyes of my
Heart" is theme for the First
Christian Church of Ho-
mosassa Springs "Faith
Promise Mission Rally." The
public is invited to attend all
activities. Jeff Brown, Brown
Family Mission, will speak
during Saturday's Men's Mis-
sionary breakfast at 8 a.m.
His wife, Tammy, will share
with ladies at their salad
luncheon at noon. Mark and
Deborah Clark from Lake Au-
rora Christian Camp will lead
the Sunday school service at
9:30 a.m. Bob Devoe of Life-
line Christian Mission is the
guest speaker at the
10:30 a.m. Sunday worship
service followed by a potluck
luncheon. The church is at
7030 W. Grover Cleveland
Blvd. Dan Wagener is the
minister. Call the church office
at 352-628-5556.
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church in America invites
the public to attend Great
Vespers at 5 p.m. today and
Divine Liturgy at 10 a.m. Sun-
day. The church is at 1277 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness (off U.S.
41 North, across from Dollar
General). The Holy
Myrrhbearers ask attendees
to bring a box or can of food
for distribution at Family Re-
source Center in Hernando.
Call 352-726-4777. The public
is also invited to attend Great
Vespers at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday
in The Villages at St. George
Episcopal Church, 1250
Paige Place, Lady Lake.
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in
Lecanto will celebrate the
fourth Sunday after the
Epiphany with Holy Eucharist
services at 5 p.m. today and 8
and 10:30 a.m. Sunday. A
nursery is provided during the
10:30 a.m. service. Christian
Formation is at 9:15 a.m.


Godly Play Sunday school is
at 10 a.m. There is a healing
service at 10 a.m. Wednes-
day followed by Bible study.
SOS is from 9 a.m. to noon
Thursday at Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church. Evening
Bible study is at 7 p.m.
Thursday.
Faith Lutheran Church
invites the public to services
at 6 p.m. Saturday and
9:30 a.m. Sunday. The church
is in Crystal Glen Subdivision
off State Road 44 and County
Road 490 in Lecanto. Pastor
Lane's sermon is "Jesus
Who?" from Luke 4 31-44.
Following the Sunday service
is a time of fellowship and at
11 a.m., adult Bible study and
children's Sunday school take
place. The church is wheel-
chair accessible, offers assis-
tance for the hearing impaired
and has a cry room for small
children where parents can
see and hear the service in
progress. Large-print bulletins
are also available. Feb. 13
begins Lenten services on
Ash Wednesday with Holy
Communion. Wednesday
services continue Feb. 20 and
27, and March 6, 13 and 20.
Services begin at 5 p.m. fol-
lowed by a potluck supper.
North Oak Baptist
Church in Citrus Springs of-
fers a Saturday night worship
service at 7 p.m. A"come-as-
you-are" atmosphere com-
bined with timely messages
and contemporary praise and
worship makes this a positive
experience for people of all
ages. Childcare is provided
for birth through 4 years of
age and a children's group for
kids through third grade meet
at the same time. All are in-
vited to attend. The church is
at the intersection of North
Elkcam Boulevard and North
Citrus Springs Boulevard. Call
352-489-1688 or 352-746-
1500 for more information.


The Nature Coast Uni-
tarian Universalist Fellow-
ship of Citrus County
welcomes the Rev. Suzanne
Nazian from the Unitarian
Universalists of Lakeland to
the pulpit at 10:30 a.m. Sun-
day. The Rev. Nazian's topic
is, "UU Sacred Scriptures:
Loren Eisley," which speaks
to the question, "What are sa-
cred scriptures to UUs and
how does scientist/poet Loren
Eisley fit the bill?" The NCUU
meets at 7633 N. Florida Ave.
(U.S. 41), Citrus Springs. Call
352-465-4225.
NorthRidge Church
moves this Sunday to the Re-
altors Association of Citrus
County Building at 714 S.
Scarboro Ave., Lecanto. The
new worship service time will
begin at 10 a.m. Everyone is
invited to join us at 9:30 a.m.
for a coffee fellowship, fol-
lowed by the worship service.
NorthRidge is a non-denomi-
national church where you will
experience a friendly, loving
and casual atmosphere; a
place where you can come as
you are. Home Bible study
meets at 7 p.m. Wednesday.
The first Wednesday monthly
is the "Faith Journey" video
lessons that give insight and
understanding to the Scrip-
tures as related to the culture
and land of biblical times. On
subsequent Wednesdays, the
weekly Bible study meets for
a time of study and prayer.
For directions or more infor-
mation, call Pastor Kennie
Berger at 352-302-5813.
St. Margaret's Episco-
pal Church will celebrate
Holy Eucharist Rite 1 at
8 a.m. Sunday and Holy Eu-
charist Rite 2 at 10 a.m. which
includes children's church.
Adult Sunday school is at
9:30 a.m. Youth Sunday
school starts at 12:45 p.m. fol-
lowing lunch.
St. Paul's Lutheran


Church, at 6150 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills, contin-
ues Sunday worship at 8 and
10:30 a.m. Sunday school is
at 9:15 a.m. Adult Bible class
this week will discuss Scrip-
tural qualifications for elected
leaders in the church. The fol-
lowing Sunday Bible class will
resume a study on the book
of Revelation. "Bible Informa-
tion Class" is at 8:15 a.m.
Monday and 3:45 p.m.
Wednesday. Choir rehearsal
is at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. The
Ladies Guild meets at 3 p.m.
Wednesday. Senior Fellow-
ship is at 3 p.m. Thursday. St.
Paul's Lutheran School stu-
dents in grades 6 through 8
will have a car wash to help
raise funds for a class trip.
The community is invited to
bring in their car for a freewill
donation. Call 352-489-3027.
First Presbyterian
Church is at 206 Washington
Ave., Inverness. The Sunday
worship schedule includes
traditional services at 8 and
11 a.m., casual service at
9:30 a.m., Sunday school
hour at 9:30 a.m., and coffee
hour from 9 to 11 a.m. The
Rev. Craig S. Davies will
preach on the topic, "Why Is
Going To Church So Impor-
tant," with readings from Isa-
iah 6:1-8. Call the church at
352-637-0770.
St. Anne's Episcopal
Church (a parish in the Angli-
can Communion) will cele-
brate the fourth Sunday after
the Epiphany with services at
8 and 10:15 a.m. tomorrow.
Due to scheduling conflicts,
St. Anne's will not host Our
Father's Table today. The nor-
mal schedule will resume
Feb. 9. Overeaters Anony-
mous meets at 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday in the parish li-
brary. "Recovering From Food
Addiction" meets at 1 p.m.

See NOTES/Page C3


Helping the needy


Special to the Chronicle
Nature Coast Unitarian Universalist Junior members Jay-
den and Rylea Anacleto gather bags of warm coats,
gloves, hats and clothes donated by the fellowship's mem-
bers and friends, to take to the Resource Center of Her-
nando to be distributed to homeless members of the
community. The girls thought of the idea when they were
driving in Atlanta, Ga., with their mother, Denise Valle, dur-
ing the Thanksgiving holiday. They passed many homeless
men sleeping on park benches, cold and shivering. They
wanted their mother to stop the car and give their own
coats to the people. When they got back home and at-
tended Sunday school at the NCUU, they told their teacher,
Helen Springer, they wanted to ask members and friends
to donate warm clothes for the Resource Center in Her-
nando, to be distributed to the needy during the winter sea-
son. Jayden and Rylea acted upon their understanding of
the Unitarian Universalist principle that "we believe in the
inherent worth and dignity of every human being."


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES --
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
795-4479


ST. ANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org |


ST. THOMAS
CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
aturday.....4:30 P.M.
unday-......8:00 A.M.
...............10:30 A.M.



-28700


Crystal River
CHURCH OF
CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M. 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday i
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


t St. Timothy "t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor

THE
SALVATION
ARMY CIRUSCOUNTY
CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 AM.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A.M.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 AM.
Lt. Vanessa Miller


SB Crystal
E River
Foursquare
Gospel Church

1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager


^ Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon


Special
Event or
Weekly
Services
Please Call
Beverly at
564-2912
For
Advertising
Information


MO 0


The
Church

Heart
of the
Community
with a
Heart
for the
Community"








SWest
Citrus



Crystal River, FL 34465
352-564-8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.






US Hwy. 19 6




Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00
EVANGELIST
Bob Dickey


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship i hib Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Troy Allen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children'sAwanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org





HEKE, YOU'LL FIND
A CkPJNC FAMILY
IN CHPKST!

CKySTNL
RIVEC K-
VJNITIED
MN-ATHODI5ST
CHUKi C H
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
:., A Stephen Ministry Provider .:


(j Crystal Qiver
Church of Cod
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
x (12th Ave.) Nurser
Provided



Homosassa
First United
Methodist
church
Everyone
Becoming
A Disciple
of Christ

Sunday Worship
8:00 am & 9:30 am
& 11:00 am
Sunday School
9:30 am
Reverend
Kip Younger
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org
Office Hours:
8:30 4:30 M-F
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors
STPIRN MINISTRY.


C2 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2013


RELIGION





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

Thursday in the parish li-
brary. Alcoholics Anonymous
meets at 8 p.m. Friday and
Monday in the parish library.
Everyone is invited to a Blue-
grass Gospel sing-along at
6 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 24. Annie
and Tim's Bluegrass Gospel
Band will lead the singing.
Inverness Church of
God Sunday worship services
are at 8:30 and 10:30 a.m.
Children's church is during the
10:30 a.m. service following
praise and worship on the
second, third and the fourth
Sunday monthly. Children re-
main in the sanctuary for fam-
ily worship the first Sunday
monthly. Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m. with classes
for everyone. Adult Bible class
is at 7 p.m. Wednesday in
rooms 105 and 106. The
youth group meets at 7 p.m.
Wednesday in the Youth
Ministries Building. K.I.D.
Zone (for children pre-k
through eighth grade) meets
from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday.
This includes K.I.D.'s choir
practice from 6 to 6:30;


K.I.D.'s dinner from 6:30 to 7;
and children's Bible study
classes from 7 to 8 p.m. The
church is at 416 U.S. 41 S.,
Inverness. Call 352-726-4524.
First Baptist Church of
Floral City, 8545 E. Magnolia
St., invites everyone to share
in Sunday's worship services
at the 8:30 a.m. blended serv-
ice and the 11 a.m. traditional
service. Coffee and dough-
nuts are served in the fellow-
ship hall from 9 to 9:45 a.m.
Sunday school classes for all
ages begin at 9:45 a.m. For
more information, www.fbc
floralcity.org or call 352-
726-4296.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church invites the
public to worship at 8:30 and
11 a.m. Sunday. A coffee hour
follows both services. The
church is barrier free and of-
fers a free CD ministry, large-
print service helps and
hearing devices. A nursery at-
tendant is available for pre-
school-age children. Ash
Wednesday worship services
are at noon and 7 p.m. Feb.
13. The touring ensemble of
"Music, Gettysburg!" will pres-
ent a free concert, "Gather us
in: Sings and Hymns of Our
Generation," at 1 p.m. Satur-


day, Feb. 23, at the church. A
freewill offering will be re-
ceived to support "Music, Get-
tysburg!" The church is on
County Road 486 opposite
Citrus Hills Boulevard in Her-
nando. Call 352-746-7161.
Peace Lutheran Church
has Sunday morning Bible
classes for children and
youths at 9. Adult Bible study
groups meet at 9 a.m. Sun-
day and 10 a.m. and
6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Sun-
day morning worship service
is at 10. The church is five
miles north of Dunnellon at
the junction of U.S. 41 and
State Road 40. Call the
church office at 352-489-5881
or visit www.PeaceLutheran
Online.org.
The Rt. Rev. Gregory
Brewer, Bishop of the Episco-
pal Church of Central Florida,
will visit Holy Faith Episcopal
Church in Dunnellon. Bishop
Brewer will officiate at the 10
a.m. service Sunday. Every-
one is welcome to attend.
E If you are looking for a
friend, then Abundant Life of
Crystal River is the church
for you. Abundant Life is a
growing church where you
can find a church home, as
well as church family that will


accept you as you are. The
Sunday morning service is at
10:30 and the midweek serv-
ice is at 7 p.m. Wednesday.
Both services have uncom-
promised and encouraging
Bible-based teachings that
will build your faith. Abundant
Life is a full-Gospel, nonde-
nominational church that be-
lieves in the power of the
Gospel of Jesus Christ. Come
and grow with us. Come as
you are and leave better than
you came in. Abundant Life of
Crystal River is at 4515 N.
Tallahassee Road, Crystal
River. Visit www.abundant
lifecitrus.org or call 352-
795-LIFE
First Presbyterian
Church of Crystal River
meets for worship at
10:30 a.m. Sunday. Two
adult Bible studies and chil-
dren's class begin at 9 a.m.
The Rev. Allwood's sermon
for tomorrow is "Pardon Me
While I Offend You." The
Presbyterian Women's lunch
is Thursday in Webster Hall.
The church will have its
130th-year celebration at
10:30 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 10.
Email pastorjack34429
@gmail.com or call 352-
795-2259.


Ash Wednesday begins
the Lenten season on Feb. 13.
Joy Evangelical Church will
have a worship service at
6:45 p.m. The theme for Lent
for the Wednesday services is
"The Baggage We Carry."
Wednesday at 2:45 and 6:45
p.m. during Lent, Senior Pastor
Edward Holloway, Jr. will pro-
vide the message on such top-
ics as fear, doubt, discontent,
intolerance, and self-image.
The theme for the Sunday wor-
ship services at 8:15 and 11
a.m. is "The Road to Holiness."
All are welcome to attend. The
church is on S.W. State Road
200 at 83rd Place, Ocala. Call
the church office at 352-854-
4509, ext. 221.
Crystal River United
Methodist Church will con-
duct its annual Ash Wednes-
day service at 7 p.m. Feb. 13.
Call 352-795-3148.
Food & fellowship
The annual Valentine
luncheon of the United
Methodist Women will take
place from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Friday at Crystal River United
Methodist Church. The
chicken casserole dinner in-
cluding tea or coffee and
dessert will be served for a


RELIGION


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!


SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY,


HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


Community Church




Sunday 10:00am
New Location
1196 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto
Rev. Brian Baggs Pastor
(352) 527-4253
www.qenesiscommunitvchurch.ora
* Authentic Love* Relevant Faith
Embracing Community





Grace Bible
Church


Sunday
9:30 AM....................Discovery Time
11:00 AM...................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM.....................Evening Service
Monday
6:15PM.................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept. Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM.................... Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
1/ mi.east of US. 19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O.Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


First Baptist
Church
'of Floral City
Lifting Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
Swww.fbcfloralcity.org

Floral City
SUnited Methodist
U Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


The New Church
Without Walls
"An Exciting & Growing
Multi-Cultural
Non-Denominational
Congregation Ministering to
the Heart of Citrus County"
Senior Pastors & Founders


Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr.
& Lady "T" Alexander

Sunday School 9:30 am
Sunday Service 11:00 am
Wednesday Bible Study 7pmr

3962 N. Roscoe Rd.
Hemando, FL
Ph: 352-344-2425
www.newchurchwithoutwalls.comr
Email:cwow@embarqmail.com

"The perfect church for
people who aren't"


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
000DJ8Y Floral City, FL.

HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church

Ope w
Hears,
opft

Opew,
Voors (

..... .. Children and Families"
2125 E,Norvell Bryant Hwy, (486)
(1/ miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl arg
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM -9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
n, h h ,l n.. ...T i ,


" Faith
Lutheran

Church LCM)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325
COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com
,.. w r,,m /wo..




- Shepherd

of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon of faith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Sunday School
Adult 9:15
Child 10:00
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
n u .50 TH E('.nr'

H. ***^ ..


Hernando
Churchor
TheNazarene
A Place to Belong

2101 N. Florida Ave,
Hernando FL

726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 am
11:30 am
Saturday
Vigil
4:00 pm
6:00 pm
Weekday
Masses
8:30 am
Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm
(352)746-9422


SHomosassa Springs
L, SEVEm-DAYWADVEISr'CHURCH


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


0


Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA









Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

3 6


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2013 C3

donation of $8. The proceeds
will go toward mission work in
Citrus County. Tickets are
available from UMW mem-
bers, call 352-795-5187, and
at the Connection Point at the
church.
The Men's Ministry of
Abundant Life, Men of Pur-
pose, will meet at 8:30 this
morning at Oyster's Restau-
rant on U.S. 19 in Crystal
River. The breakfast is open
to all men in the community.
Men of Purpose is focused on
developing the whole man -
spirit, soul and body while
providing opportunities to fel-
lowship and participate in
teachings from the Scriptures.
Call the church at 352-795-
LIFE or visit www.abundant
lifecitrus.org.
The Red Level Baptist
Church Youth group will spon-
sor a chili cook-off at 5 p.m.
today at Red Level Baptist
Church, 11025 W. Dunnellon
Road, Crystal River. Everyone
is invited to come out and
enjoy all you can eat for $5.
All proceeds will go to send
the youth on a mission trip
this summer. Call 352-
795-2086.

See NOTES/Page C4





C4 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2013


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

The Crystal River UMW
will host its annual "Sweet-
heart Luncheon" from
11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, at
Crystal River United Metho-
dist Church. Tickets are $8
and must be purchased be-
fore Tuesday. Call 352-
795-3148
The public is invited to a
baked steak dinner from
4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Friday at
Parsons Memorial Presbyte-
rian Church, 5850 Riverside
Drive, Yankeetown. A $7 do-
nation includes dinner,
dessert and drink. There will
be a $50 money tree raffle.
Takeout available by calling
352-447-2506.
The Homosassa First
United Methodist Church
pancake breakfast will take
place from 8 to 10 a.m. Satur-
day, Feb. 9, at the church's
fellowship hall, 8831 W. Brad-
shaw St., Homosassa. A do-
nation of $4 for all you can
eat. Come and enjoy.
Everyone is invited to
Saturday night supper from
4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Feb. 9 in the
Dewain Farris Fellowship Hall
at Community Congregational
Christian Church, 9220 N. Cit-
rus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs. Menu includes meat-
loaf, vegetable, coleslaw,
dessert, coffee and tea. Tick-
ets are $10 for adults, $5 for
children and can be pur-
chased at the door. Takeouts
available. Call the church at
352-489-1260.
Sales & such
There is a big yard sale
and clothes giveaway from
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. today at Cal-
vary Chapel in Inverness, 960
S. U.S. 41. Afree men's
breakfast will also be served
at 9 a.m. Call 352-726-1480.
Everyone is invited to the
annual tag sale from 8 a.m.
to 2 p.m. today at Good Shep-
herd Lutheran Church, 439 E.
Norvell Bryant Highway, Her-
nando. Thrivent Financial for
Lutherans will provide supple-
mental funding for this event
through the Citrus County
Chapter and its members at
Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church. Many household
items will be available.
Floral City United
Methodist Church hosts its
annual "Used Treasure
Sale" from 8:30 a.m. to noon
today. Proceeds from the sale
are used to send youth to
summer camp and various
mission projects.
The Beverly Hills Com-
munity Church Youth Group


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R.Jamison, III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday CoffeelConversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion- 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


COMMUNITY
CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH



2 ,,,


SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


will host an indoor yard sale
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. today in
the fellowship hall at 82 Civic
Circle.
The Episcopal Church
Women of St. Anne's Church
will host their 25th annual
rummage sale from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. today in the Parish
Hall,9870 W. Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River. There are many
treasures for sale. Near
1 p.m., most items will be re-
duced to less than half price.
The Altar and Rosary So-
ciety of St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church will host a
Chinese auction from
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. today in Fa-
ther Stegeman Hall at the cor-
ner of U.S. 41 and State Road
40 East in Dunnellon. Draw-
ings for the items will begin at
1 p.m. An envelope of 20 tick-
ets is $5 and can be pur-
chased at the door. Also
included is a free ticket for
coffee and dessert. Food and
drinks are available at a nomi-
nal charge. Call Pat at 352-
489-1984.
The Episcopal Church
Women of Shepherd of the
Hills Episcopal Church will
have their "Trash to Treas-
ure Sale from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. Friday in the parish
hall. There will be lots of
books. The church is on
County Road 486 in Lecanto
on the right-hand side just
east of the County Road 491
traffic light. Call Francine at
352-794-0070.
The women of the ELCA
at St. Timothy Lutheran Church
in Crystal River will host their
"Grannie's Attic" sale from
8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and
Saturday Feb. 8 and 9. The
sale will include the popular
Men's Tent, homemade baked
goodies, and the fellowship hall
filled to the rafters with treas-
ures. Hotdog lunches will be
available for sale. Call Marcia
Treber at 352-794-3217 or the
church at 352-795-5317. The
church is on U.S. 19, across
from the airport.
First Lutheran Church in-
vites the public to its annual
rummage sale from 8 a.m. to
2 p.m. Friday and Saturday,
Feb. 8 and 9. Bring your
friends and neighbors. There
will be treasures for everyone.
The church is at 1900 W.
State Road 44, Inverness.
The Ladies of Faith will
host the "17th annual Trash
'N' Treasure Sale" from
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and
Saturday, Feb. 8 and 9, at
Faith Lutheran Church in
Crystal Glen Subdivision,
Lecanto (off County Road 490
and State Road 44). Find all
kinds of "stuff' for the kitchen,
the home, the garden and
garage, clothing, shoes,


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School.............9:00
Worship...........10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School.............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(At The Flanhin ULish


35-41->.
PIllor I
Todd 4
Langdon


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca .comr


books and some jewelry and
Christmas items. Also in-
cludes a bake sale. Beautiful
handmade quilts will be fea-
tured. Proceeds from this sale
support local, state, national
and international missions.
This is a Thrivent event.
Why mess up your
place? Just box up your treas-
ures, bring your table and set
up at Hernando United
Methodist Church on Satur-
day, Feb. 23, from 8 a.m. to
2 p.m. for the semi-annual
"Sell Your Own Treasures
Sale." All are invited to come.
No reservations needed -
first come, first served. Rent a
12-by-12-foot space for $5.
The kitchen will be open for
breakfast and lunch. The
church is at 2125 E. Norvell
Bryant Highway (County Road
486). Call 352-726-7245.
Music & more
The Diggles Family, full-
time Southern Gospel record-
ing artists, will perform at
4 p.m. today at First Christian
Church of Inverness at 2018
Colonade St. (behind the
RaceTrac gas station on State
Road 44). The Diggles Family
is led by Doug Diggles, who
sings lead, tenor, baritone,
bass and plays the piano.
Christina sings, plays the vio-
lin, viola, guitar, classical gui-
tar, piano, mountain dulcimer
and mandolin. She helps in ar-
ranging songs and picking out
parts for Katie on her instru-
ments. Katie adds the third
part in their family harmony.
She also plays the violin, man-
dolin, piano and mountain dul-
cimer, and is beginning to
arrange musical pieces. Diane
Diggles brings an extra beauty
to many of the songs by inter-
preting them through sign lan-
guage. She also runs the
soundboard. Call the church
at 352-344-1908. All are wel-
come to attend this perform-
ance and a freewill offering will
be collected.
Sheila Raye Charles,
daughter of singer Ray
Charles, will perform during a
"Community Worship Event,"
at 11 a.m. Sunday at Wild-
wood United Methodist
Church, 300 Mason St., Wild-
wood. Singer/songwriter
Sheila Raye Charles will be
on hand to sign her book,
"Behind the Shades," after the
service. Everyone is invited to
attend. Call the church at 352-
748-1275 or Michael Beck at
352-203-7258.
The Churchmen, a blue-
grass gospel group from
Collinsville, Va., will appear in
concert at 7 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 9, at Crystal River United
Methodist Church. Doors
open at 6 p.m. Admission is


F urs c t"
CkuycMk
ofLake, ktoaseaw
SBC
Joseph W. (Joe) Schroeder,
Pastor
SERVICES
Sunday 11:00am
& 6:00pm
Wednesday 6:00pm
Magnifying God's name by
bringing people toJesus
7854 W. Dunnellon Rd (CR 488)
Ph. 352-795-5651
Cell 352-812-8584
Check us or... on Facebook....
Check us out on Facebook


free. All are welcome. Visit
www.thechurchmen.com.
The Burchfield Broth-
ers will perform Wednesday,
Feb. 13, at Hernando Church
of the Nazarene, 2101 N.
Florida Ave., Hernando.
These men are geniuses with
instruments, including classi-
cal guitar, midi-marimba, Irish
whistles and recorders. The
concert will open at 6:45 p.m.
with the Celebrations Sounds
orchestra and choir of the
Hernando Nazarene church.
There is no cost to attend; a
love offering will be collected.
Everyone is invited.
As part of the Ho-
mosassa First United
Methodist Church Art Series
for 2013, a concert of music
from the New England coast-
line, Ireland and Scotland will
be performed by Castlebay
at 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 17, in
the fellowship hall at First
United Methodist Church,
8831 W. Bradshaw St., Ho-
mosassa. Castlebay concerts
feature poignant ballads and
joyous dance tunes played on
Celtic harp, guitar, fiddle and
tin whistle. Castlebay treats
the audience to a musical
journey through time and
across the Atlantic. No admis-
sion charge for the concert. A
freewill offering will be col-
lected. Call the church office
at 352-628-4083 or Jim Love
at 352-746-3674 or Jim Potts
at 352-382-1842.
For Black History Month, a
well-known drummer from the
Ivory Coast, West Africa, will
bring African drumming and
dancing to Citrus County from
6 to 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 22, and
1 to 5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, at
Hernando Church of the Living
God, 3441 E. Oleander Lane,
Hemando. Come out and sup-
port African culture in your com-
munity. Drumming classes will
be provided for a donations of
$10 and $12. Come out to learn
some West African rhythms.
Preregistration is available and
tickets are for sale. Call 352-
270-6148 or 352-897-4173.
Fun & games
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church will host a Military
Card Party on Monday,
Feb. 11. Lunch will be served
at 12:15 p.m. followed by card
play at 1 p.m. Enjoy fun,
prizes and a raffle. Cost is
$12 per player. Make up your
table of four or come as a sin-
gle and we will pair you. Call
Dottie at 352-382-3656 or
Marilyn at 352-746-6583 for
reservations by Thursday. The
church is at 114 N. Osceola
Ave., Inverness.
The Ladies Auxiliary
Knights of Columbus Council
6168 will host a "Valentine


Riding a Hard Trail
Join us at

t CROSS AT THE RIVER


COWBOY CHURCH

Greater Dunnellon
Historical Train Depot

12061 S. Williams St.
(Hwy 41)
Dunnellon, FL 34432


Sunday Church Service:
10:00am to 11:00am

Ladies Bible Study
2nd & 4th Wednesday's
7:00pm


Contact
Pastor E. Patrick Anthony
352-465-6223
or
cell 352-445-5171

crossattheriverl@gmail.com
website:
www.crossattheriver.org


Bunco Bonanza" at
10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12,
at the K of C Hall, 2389 W.
Norvell Bryant Highway
(County Road 486), Lecanto.
Two levels of play will be fea-
tured, a competitive level for
seasoned players and a so-
cial level for beginners and
persons with disabilities. The
$12 ticket includes a brunch.
Door prizes, raffle prizes and
cash prizes will be awarded.
Reservations must be made
in advance by calling Char at
352-746-9490 or Bernita at
352-344-0235. Funds raised
will benefit the Auxiliary Schol-
arship Fund and charitable or-
ganizations in the community.
Upward Youth Soccer
registration for boys and girls
in kindergarten through sixth
grade will take place from
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday
through Saturday, Feb. 13-16
at Joy Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 7045 S.W. 83rd
Place at State Road 200,
Ocala. Registration fee of $65
per child includes a reversible
jersey, water bottle, socks, car
magnet and an end-of-season
reward. Scholarships are
available. All players must at-
tend one soccer evaluation
that promotes equal and com-
petitive teams, as well as a
substitution system, to com-
plete the registration process.
Practice begins Tuesday,
Feb. 26 and Thursday, Feb.
28. The first game is Satur-
day, March 9. All events will
occur at Hope Field at Joy
Lutheran Church. Volunteers
are needed to help with
coaching, registering the par-
ticipants and organizing the
players. Call Pastor Ed Hol-
loway at 352-854-4509, ext.
223, or Fran Johnson at 352-
854-4509, ext. 221.
Live & learn
A new "Coffee Talk for
College and Young Adults"
begins at 6:30 p.m. Monday
at Genesis Community
Church, which meets at the
Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway (County
Road 491). Join other young
adults for an informal discus-
sion of the book "Blue Like
Jazz" by Donald Miller. "Blue
Like Jazz" portrays Donald
Miller's quest for meaning, a
depth of faith, the realization
that humanity is broken and
imperfect, explorations of
childhood misconceptions of
faith, and the desire to live
into his true identity. So, grab
a cup of coffee and a dessert
and share your thoughts
about this intriguing book
chapter by chapter. You can
purchase your own book on-
line through Amazon, Barnes
and Noble, etc., and we will


Hwy.44 E @
* Washington Ave., Inverness U

* Sunday Services *
* Traditional *
8:00 AM & 11:00 AM U
* Casual Service
* 9:30 AM
11:00 AM Service
Tapes & CD's Available
" Sunday School for all ages
0 9:30 AM
" Nursery Provided
l Fellowship & Youth Groupm
* 5 to 7 PM 0
Web Site: www.fpcinv.org
Podcast: FPC inv.com

* Church Office 637-0770
* Pastor Craig Davies U
Em


have a few books available
for loan. Genesis Community
Church meets at 10 a.m. Sun-
days and is led by the Rev.
Brian Baggs. Call 352-464-
0983 for more information or
email Kathy Baggs at kathy
baggs@hotmail.com.
Two self-improvement
and spiritual development
opportunities are offered
Sunday, Feb. 10, and Mon-
day, Feb. 11, at Unity of Citrus
County, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto. The first, from
12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Feb. 10, is
a lecture by award-winning
actor and acclaimed author
John Maxwell Taylor, titled
"The Power of I Am." This lec-
ture describes techniques to
give strength and confidence
to your personality, permitting
you to reflect the beauty and
strength of your soul. The
techniques presented will en-
able you to connect easily
with others and to hold your
own with everyone you meet.
The second, from 7 to 9 p.m.
Feb. 11, is a workshop led by
John Maxwell Taylor and his
wife, Emily Taylor, titled "Heal-
ing with the Tao." This work-
shop will teach simple,
time-tested Taoist techniques
to heal your internal organs,
boost your immune system,
and fill yourself with vibrant
life energy and happiness.
Call 352-746 1270 for more
information. A love offering of
$20 is suggested.
The ladies of Lecanto
Church of Christ meet for
Bible study at 10 a.m. the
second Tuesday monthly.
Bible study is followed by a
luncheon. Studies have in-
cluded such subjects as
prayer, love and patience. All
ladies are invited to attend
and enjoy Christian fellowship.
Special events
Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church in Inverness
announces its 2013 Marriage
Jubilee Celebration Mass
honoring all couples celebrat-
ing their silver (25 years) or
golden (50 years) anniver-
sary, as well as couples mar-
ried more than 50 years. This
Mass will take place at
11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 16. All
are invited to attend. There
will be reserved seating in the
church for the "honorees" dur-
ing the Mass, and a special
reception in the parish hall im-
mediately following the Mass.
Registration is required. An-
niversary couples must notify
the parish office of their
names by Monday. After Mon-
day, no other names may be
accepted. Call the parish of-
fice at 352-726-1670. The
church is at 550 U.S. 41 S.,
Inverness.


I.







VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.


SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. & 10:30 A.M.


SPANISH MASS:
12:30 P.M.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.M. to 3:15 P.M. Sat.
or By Appointment


WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.
1 IM"ll *'.; ,
6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
p. .catholicweb.com .-


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS


RELIGION





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GRACE
Continued from Page Cl

sniffing his way in curly-Q cir-
cles and not a straight line; he
paused and stopped and started,
taking his time.
Then she walked with her 19-
month-old son, letting him lead
her. She noted his walk encom-
passed all he could touch and
even lick; it was stomping and
marching and skipping and lots
of tilting his head back and
pointing.
At the time her son was learn-
ing the letter "0," so every 0 and
O-shaped object he saw he'd
stop, point and cry, "O!"
Later, Horowitz walked with
nine others, including a psy-
chologist, an entomologist, even
a blind person, letting each one
tell her what they saw and expe-
rienced while walking with her,
and each person's walk was
uniquely different.
She said so much of life goes
by unappreciated, because we
fail to pay attention.
The same day I heard the
Horowitz interview, I read a col-
umn about living without awe
and wonder The author, Paul
Tripp, wrote humans were cre-
ated to "live our lives in the
shadow of awe" every word
we speak, every action, every de-
cision, every desire meant to be
"colored by awe and wonder."
Our eyes were meant to be
wide open, our heads tipped up-
ward, always looking outward,
to have vision and scope, seeing
the possible and the impossible,
ever being surprised and
inspired.
Tripp wrote, "Bad things hap-
pen when human beings lose
their sense of awe. Bad things
happen when we have no won-
der inside of us ...when we're no
longer amazed ... when we look
around and nothing impresses
us anymore.
"When sin takes awe away
from you, that sense of divine
wonder that is meant to shape
every person's life, you look for
ways to fill the void," Tripp
wrote.


RELIGION


He added the awe and won-
der we experience in the enjoy-
ment of creation should draw us
to the Creator. If it doesn't, we
will either grow dull or look for
the "buzz of wonder" in things
that can never satisfy.
Author Anne Lamott said
when her son Sam was about 6,
he explained to her why we call
God "God." Sam said, "Because
when you see something great
you just go, 'God!"'
Truly, it's as simple as that.
You see the multi-pastel sher-
bet shades of dawn and you go,
"God!"
A hawk swoops through the
sky; a fish flies out of the water,
does a flip and splashes back
into the lake or river all before
you can blink. A baby stares at
you and then smiles with her en-
tire body. An ocean wave
crashes on the rocks as the sun
beats down on your head and
thaws the coldest part of your
soul until you just go, "God!"
That's awe. That's wonder.
That's worship and that's what
we were created for
Often you gasp. Sometimes
you cry. When it's great, too
great for words, you just go,
"God!"
Horowitz told the woman in-
terviewing her she still walks
the same route, but she walks it
differently now. She walks in-
tentionally, one day setting out
to notice a specific color or to
pay attention to lettering on
signs or to whatever is at knee
height.
When I heard that, my heart
stirred I want to live inten-
tionally, too. I want to see every-
thing God wants me to see, to
experience wonder and awe, to
just go "God!"
I want to live an awe-full life,
and I want that for you, too.

Nancy Kennedy is the author of
"Move Over, Victoria -I Know
the Real Secret," "Girl on a
Swing," and her latest book,
"Lipstick Grace." She can be
reached at 352-564-2927, Mon-
day through Thursday, or via
email at nkennedy@chronicle
online.com.


FLU
Continued from Page C1

shaking hands Sunday. The an-
nouncement brought chuckles,
but many indeed fist bumped,
while others waved to each
other as part of their greeting to
start the service.
Later, during the point in the
service when churchgoers say
"peace be with you" and usually
shake hands with those seated
nearby, Bustard said, "Let us
carefully share that peace with
one another."
As Donielle Graham and her
family members left Mass at St.
Rita, they all covered their
hands in sanitizer. Graham said
her family decided to stop
drinking from the communion
chalice around Christmas.
"Just for right now just in
case," she said, noting even
though they had all gotten flu
shots, the virus could quickly
run through a family with four
young children.


HEROES
Continued from Page C1

about Jewish pride and Jewish
sportsmanship.
Miller joins a rather short list
of Jewish players to be part of
Super Bowl history Pittsburgh
Steelers tight end Randy "the
Rabbi" Grossman won a Jewish-
record four times in 1975, '76,
'79 and '80.
Grossman grew up in a sub-
urb of Philadelphia, Haverford.
He was given his nickname by
defensive end Dwight White. It
was a fitting name for a Jewish
boy from Philly, Grossman said.
Today Grossman works as a fi-
nancial advisor for Wealth Man-
agement Strategies.
"The Rabbi" went undrafted
after a fine career at Temple
University, but the NFL consid-
ered him "undersized" for the
big leagues. He stayed with the
Steelers, overcoming the odds
against him, riding the wave to
victory when the Steelers cap-


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2013 C5


Texas Department of State
Health Services spokesman
Chris Van Deusen said the same
advice should be given to any
other large gathering of people.
"Everybody needs to be tak-
ing precautions," Van Deusen
said.
Dr. Jeffrey Kahn, chief of pe-
diatric infectious diseases at
UT Southwestern Medical Cen-
ter and Children's Medical Cen-
ter, noted someone can be
contagious for a day or so be-
fore developing symptoms.
Annette Gonzales Taylor, di-
rector of communications for
the Roman Catholic Diocese of
Dallas, said the diocese has
sent out recommendations for
priests for the flu season, urg-
ing them to wash their hands
frequently, use soap and hot
water to clean the communion
chalice and have those who
serve the communion use hand
sanitizer.
In the San Angelo diocese,
which covers 29 counties in
West and Central Texas, Bishop
Michael D. Pfeifer said he has
tured the Super Bowl title in
1975 in Grossman's rookie sea-
son. It was at that time Gross-
man felt a pull to the Pittsburgh
Jewish community. He felt it
was good the active Jewish com-
munity of the area had "one of
its own."
In 1999, Grossman was in-
ducted into the Philadelphia
Jewish Sports Hall of Fame. Al-
though he grew up Conserva-
tive, Grossman considers
himself a Reform Jew. At his bar
mitzvah, the rabbi was not sure
he would show, but he knew
where to find the young man -
in the back of the synagogue,
playing football.
Dallas Cowboys offensive
lineman Alan "Sholomo" Vein-
gard's life took an entirely dif-
ferent turn after his football
days ended. He now tours the
country talking about his trans-
formation into an observant
Jew, having embraced the
Chabad-Lubavitch Hasidic
movement. He notes it is diffi-
cult being shomer Shabbos, a
Sabbath-observing Jew, while


not received any complaints
about his advice parishes stop
using a shared chalice during
communion. He took the same
step during the swine flu epi-
demic of 2009.
The Episcopal Diocese of
Texas in Houston, which repre-
sents an area sprawling from
Houston to Austin, is using so-
cial media and emailed
newsletters to encourage
parishioners to follow basic
medical advice, including fre-
quently washing hands, said
spokesman Luke Blount.
"It's of course something
we're always mindful of," said
Jimmy Grace, an Episcopal
priest at Christ Church Cathe-
dral in Houston. "We have hand
sanitizers around cathedral."
And while the church hasn't
changed its process for com-
munion, Grace said parish-
ioners can decide not to drink
from the shared cup.
And, he said, "They know if
they're not feeling well, they're
not going to be coming to
church."
being on a team.
Friday night meetings and
Saturday games would be out,
but he feels if you are a great
player, exceptions could be
made for you. Veingard still
loves the game, but these days
sports a yarmulke instead of a
football helmet
Other Jews who were on the
winning teams include San
Francisco 49ers offensive line-
man Harris Barton (1989,'90,
'95), 49ers tight end John Frank
(1985,'89) Kansas City Chiefs
linebacker Bobby Stein (1970)
and Los Angeles Raiders defen-
sive end Lyle Alzado (1984). And
while the list is short, it is
significant.
And yes, please pass me a
kosher hot dog with mustard.
Source: Connecticut Jewish
Ledger

Judi Siegal is a retired teacher
and Jewish educator She lives
in Ocala with her husband,
Phil. She can be reached at
niejudis@yahoo. com.


Come To SE
ST.
MARGARET'
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer 2
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor

g -PRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Prbdica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bfblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711


Special
Event or
Weekly
Services
Please Call
Beverly at
564-2912
For
Advertising
Information


M Pastor
Tom Walker


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study, Gospel
Sht'.I -in Dinners, singing
the old hymns? Then you'll enjoy
this Church family.
ra- Home of the
"Saturday Nite GOSPEL
JUBILEE" A great Nite Out!
Last Saturday of the month 6:00
Fun, Food, Fellowship & Free!




"First For Christ"...John 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESSII
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr Ray Kelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study










All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033


S46 Years of
IRST Bringing Christ
FIR I Ito Inverness
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am
Sunday School
& Bible Class
8:45 AM.
726-1637
- y Missouri Synod
www.1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


At
Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Siid.i, Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"Aplacetooi' "'a \,i, i.,. ,,' ,


INVERNESS
/\CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. Larry Powers
Senior Pastor
Sunday Services:
Traditional Service ...........8:30
Sunday School.................9:30
Contemporary Service.. .10:30 -
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes....................7:00 P
Boys and Girls Brigade... .7:00 P
Teens.............................. 7:00 P
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy.41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726-4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"


5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


Our Lady of
Fatima
CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy, 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
/ Weekday Mass: 8 A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June August)
\ 9:00 and 11:00A.M. /
726-1670


First United

Methodist


of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
SeniorPastor


8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion

9:45 AM
Sunday School

10:00 AM
Contemporary
Praise & Worship


NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH




"New Place New Time!"
SUNDAY
10:00 AM
Family Worship
(Coffee Fellowship 9:30-10:00)
WEDNESDAY
7:00 PM
Home Bible Study
(Call for directions)
We are a nondenominational church
meeting at the Realtor's Association Building.
714 S. Scarboro Ave.
(on the corner ofSR 44 & Scarboro)
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813




First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452


Dairold

Bettye
Rushing

















OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS


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Page C6 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2,2013



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NewsNOTES Honoring Korea vets
Novelists look at


'hero's journey'
At the Feb. 2 meeting of
The Florida Chapter of the
Historical Novel Society,
Rick Seymour will use
Christopher Vogler's "The
Writer's Journey: Mythic
Structure for Writers" to
guide members in explor-
ing the "hero's journey," by
providing examples from
"Ender's Game," "Harry
Potter," "Terminator," "Lord
of the Rings," "Star Wars"
and "The Matrix."
The meeting will con-
tinue with a presentation by
Carol Megge on How to
Start Writing a Novel.
Handouts will be provided
that cover examples of
character development,
motivation and goals.
FCHNS meets at 1 p.m.
the first Saturday of every
month in the Community
Room of the Central Ridge
Library, 425 W. Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills. Every-
one is welcome.
Call Marian Fox at 352-
726-0162.
Camera Club
looks at yellow
How interesting is the
color yellow? You might be
surprised at how that color
will be interpreted at the
next meeting of the Cam-
era Club, which is a part of
the Art Center of Citrus
County.
Each member can sub-
mit two photos, either as a
print or as a digital image,
which will be judged on
specific criteria. Each pic-
ture is critiqued and points
are awarded; an award is
given to those achieving
enough points within their
expertise level.
The meeting is to be at
7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 4.
Come early for the social
time at 6:30. Interested per-
sons may come one time
as a guest before joining
the club.
Call the Art Center at
352-400-4466.
Model A club
meets Feb. 5
The Citrus A's Model A
Car Club will meet at 7:30
p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 5, at
the Floral City Lions Club
on East Orange Avenue,
Floral City.
Call Patty Tompkins at
352-688-3931 or visit
www.citrusas.com.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA

Giselle


Special to the Chronicle
On Feb. 4, American Legion Post
166 will celebrate the 60th anniver-
sary of the end of the Korean War by
honoring Korean War members with
a Certificate of Appreciation at the
regular meeting at 7 p.m. at the Olive
Tree Restaurant in the Airport Plaza


in Crystal River
Dinner is served at 6 p.m.
The meeting is open to all veter-
ans who served during times of con-
flict and who live in the area from
Homosassa Springs, Homosassa and
Lecanto, to Sugarmill Woods and
Chassahowitzka.
Any interested eligible veteran


can attend general meetings at the
Olive Tree Restaurant the first Mon-
day monthly
Eligible veterans also may attend
executive meetings at 9 a.m. the
third Wednesday monthly at the
Olive Tree.
Call Robert Scott, commander, at
352-860-2090 for reservations.


Foster parents needed for dogs


Special to the Chronicle
Foster parents are needed for
homeless dogs. Adopt A Rescued
Pet Inc. has no shelter and is de-
pendent upon a fostering net-
work to provide temporary
homes. Fostering a dog can ab-
solutely save a life.
Adopt A Rescued Pet Inc. is an
all-volunteer organization with
limited resources. The dogs are
kept in foster homes until they
are placed in permanent happy
homes of their own.
Foster homes provide the love
and shelter while Adopt A Res-


f
a
t

s1


cued Pet Inc. pays for all ap-
proved medical expenses. A fos-
ter home is invaluable, becuiise
the foster parent gains insi.Lht
to the dog's personality to
help better match them
with the perfect home.
Fostering can range
from a few days to sev-
eral weeks. Volunteers to
provide any length of fos-
tering are needed.
To help save more dogs.
visit www.adoptarescued-
pet.com for more detailed
information about fostering
or call 352-795-9550.


I
. .


'Snack Attack' on tap today in B.H.


Tickets will be available at door for fundraiser, Strfler fete

Special to the Chronicle tired Clerk of the Circuit both, scalloped potatoes, erly Hills Civic Associa-
Court Betty Strifler, the green beans, coleslaw, tion, 1 Civic Circle, 352-
Melissa Miller, club di- Beverly Hills Civic Associ- brownie and ice cream for 746- 2657; Central Ridge
rector at the Central Ridge ation will host a "Snack At- dessert and coffee. Boys & Girls Club, 901 W
Boys & Girls Club, said tack Dinner" today, Feb. 2, Incoming Clerk Angela Roosevelt Blvd., 352-270-
when her 45 kids come in at the Beverly Hills Lions Vick, along with Thomas, 8841; and Home Again Re-
from school, they all want Club. The doors open at 4 Strifler and several county sale Store, 1980 N. Future
a "pick-me-up snack" and p.m. and Judge Patricia commissioners, will be at Terrace, 352-270-8861.
he cupboards are running Thomas will make an the head table. A limit of Tickets will be also be
bare. award presentation to Stri- 200 tickets at $9 each are available at the Beverly
To provide money for fler at 5:30. The menu will being sold. Hills Lions Club at 4 p.m.
snacks and to honor re- offer ham or turkey or Sales outlets are: Bev- today


News NOTES


Railroaders to meet Feb. 5
The Citrus Model Railroad Club will
meet at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 5, at the
Robinson Horticulture Building of the Cit-
rus County Fairgrounds.
The program for that evening will be a
presentation by Rob Stevely, who is the
proprietor of Rob's Hobbies in Ocala.
The ins and outs of running a hobby-ori-
ented business and dealing with both
customers and suppliers will be
discussed.
For more information, call Robert
Penrod at 352-797-6315.

New Yorkers to gather
The New York Club of Citrus County
will meet at noon Thursday, Feb. 14, at
Inverness Golf and Country Club. There
will be a white elephant sale.
On the menu are pot roast or chicken
marsala, mashed potatoes, carrots, din-
ner rolls and carrot cake for dessert. Tea,


soda and coffee provided. Cost is $12,
which includes tax and tip. Lunch reser-
vations must be made by Wednesday,
Feb. 6. Mail your check to: New York
Club, P.O. Box 641261, Beverly Hills, FL
34464. Write your menu choice on your
check.
Meetings are normally conducted at
noon the second Thursday monthly. Visi-
tors are welcome, but must join after two
visits. Annual dues are $6.
For more information, call Dorothy or
Ed at 352-527-2332.
Improve cemetery pics
The Camera Club at the Art Center will
have a unique opportunity at its field trip
Tuesday, Feb. 5, to the National Ceme-
tery at Bushnell, according to Bud Smart,
co-chairman of field trips.
Before traveling to the cemetery, there
will be a special session at 1:45 p.m.
presented by Chris Heisey, America's
leading Civil War/cemetery photogra-


pher. He has published more than 150
publications worldwide and won awards
in 15 international photo contests.
Following the session at the Art Cen-
ter, the group will travel to Bushnell and
the cemetery. After receiving maps and
suggestions for capturing great photos,
everyone will be free to roam the entire
cemetery. Heisey and Camera Club
guides will be available to offer sugges-
tions. An art Center/field trip fee of $3 will
be collected at registration, to be done at
the Feb. 4 monthly meeting.
Call the Art Center at 352-400-4466
for more information.
MSBU to convene Feb. 6
The Citrus Springs Municipal Services
Benefit Unit meeting will be at 9 a.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 6, at Citrus Springs
Community Center, 1570 W. Citrus
Springs Blvd.
For more information, call Larry Brock
at 352-527-5478.


S Donors are winners for Boys & Girls Clubs


F. l!
Special to the Chronicle
Giselle is not as serious
as she looks, except
about finding a home.
She is a manx-calico mix,
short haired with a purr
button that is always on.
However, if you are look-
ing for a more mature fe-
line, adult cat adoption
fees are half price at
$27.50. Visitors are wel-
come from 10 a.m. to
1 p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m.
Monday through Satur-
day at the Humanitari-
ans' Manchester House
on the corner of State
Road 44 and Conant Av-
enue, east of Crystal
River. Drop by and enjoy
the felines in their cage-
free, homestyle environ-
ment. Call 352-613-1629
for adoptions, or view
most of the Hardin
Haven's felines online at
www.petfinder.com/
shelters/fl186.html.


This story is about a 14-year-old
boy named Jim who joined his
Citrus County Boys & Girls
Club in September. As a middle
school student, things were some-
times rough for Jim. He
lived with his father and
stepmother, very busy
people working hard to
make ends meet
On Jim's first report
card of the school year,
he received an "F" in sci-
ence. The club director
was keeping a close eye
on Jim. She knew he was
troubled, as well as hav- Lane
ing a hard time in school. BOY
She asked a volunteer, GIRLS
Mr. Dan, to help Jim with
his school work.
As time passed, Mr. Dan and Jim
began looking forward to their
shared time together. Jim pro-
gressed to the point that Mr Dan felt
he could challenge him to reach
higher standards. Jim's science proj-
ect, which would be worth more
than the final exam in his science
class, could give him 200 points to-
ward a class grade. Mr. Dan dared


(


Jim to do the work to earn those 200
points.
With Mr Dan pushing him, Jim did
the work. On Dec. 14, Jim proudly
showed his science project to the
club staff. He had not only
received the desired 200
points, he also earned 25
points of extra credit. The
club director, the club
staff members, Mr. Dan,
and Jim himself felt pride
in the accomplishment.
Not only is Jim finding
success in academics, but
he is also blossoming into
Vick other areas such as lead-
S & ership and community
CLUBS spirit.
There are a lot of win-
ners here: One is the club
director, who was responsible for
Jim being a club member Club staff
members, who work with Jim every
day, are also winners. The volunteer,
Mr. Dan, who was so glad he had
begun giving his free time to the kids
is a big winner, and Jim, of course,
who learned he could achieve and
that hard work pays, is a winner.
And, don't forget Jim's parents, who


are so glad Jim attends the Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County. All are
big-time winners.
You, as a donor, are the biggest
winner of all because your gift to the
Boys & Girls Club not only helps Jim,
but other boys and girls as well. It's
an investment that will pay forward
for years to come, touching many
lives and giving many rewards. You
deserve and get a big bang for your
buck!
The Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County are partially funded through
the United Way and grants from
Kids Central Inc., and the Florida
Department of Education. However,
we still need the support of the com-
munity to make magic happen. Go
online to www.citrusbgc.com or call
352-621-9225 to make a donation or
mail a check to the Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County at PO. Box
907, Lecanto, FL 34460. When you
give to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Cit-
rus County, you win big!

Lane Vick is grant coordinator
of the Boys & Girls Clubs
of Citrus County


American Legion to celebrate 60th anniversary of end of war


For more information,
call 527-3568.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.


News NOTES

Scouts to host
spaghetti dinner
Boy Scout Troop 462 will
host its 16th annual
Spaghetti Dinner and Chi-
nese Auction from 4 to
7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, at
Hope Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 9425 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs.
Donation is $6 per per-
son at the door or $5 for
presale tickets, and $3 for
children younger than 11.
Dinner includes salad,
spaghetti with sauce (meat
or plain), drink and home-
made dessert.
For more information,
call Scoutmaster Steven
Jenks at 352-422-4741.
Native plant
group to meet
The Citrus Native Plant
Society will meet at 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 5, at the
Lion's Club in Beverly Hills,
72 Beverly Circle, Beverly
Hills.
Speaker will be Kristin
Wood, administrative assis-
tant at the Dade Battlefield
Historic State Park.
All are welcome to join
the club for a brief business
meeting, speaker, plant do-
nation raffle and refresh-
ments. For more
information, email citrus
nps@gmail.com.
Woman's club
plans card party
Crystal River Woman's
Club will host a Military
Card Party and luncheon
on Thursday, Feb. 21, at
the clubhouse, 320 N. Cit-
rus Ave. in Crystal River.
Doors open at
11:30 a.m. Tickets are $12
and it is recommended to
make reservations for ta-
bles of four. First, second
place and third table win-
ners receive money. Two
entry tickets will be drawn
for two free tables to the
next scheduled card party.
Other prizes will be
awarded.
For tickets, call Lois at
352-382-0777. Proceeds
from the event benefit the
club's community projects.
Sign up now for
festival pageants
The 25th annual Floral
City Strawberry Festival
takes place on Saturday,
March 2, and Sunday,
March 3, at Floral Park,
with the Miss Strawberry
pageants on Saturday.
The Little Miss Straw-
berry Pageant is for girls 4
to 6 years and the Miss
Strawberry Princess pag-
eant is for girls 7 to 12
years. Entry forms for the
pageants are available at
the Inverness and Crystal
River Chamber of Com-
merce offices and on the
website at www.floralcity
strawberryfestival.com.
Entry fee is $5 and appli-
cations and a picture must
be turned in by Feb. 15.
Send pictures to cira@
citruscountychamber.com.
For more information, call
352-795-3149.
Jersey club
to gather Feb. 4
The New Jersey and
Friends Club of Citrus
County will meet at 1 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 4, at VFW
Post 4252 on State Road
200, Hernando. Speaker
will be Amy Freeman from
Citrus Memorial Health
System on the topic of
Heart and Diabetic Care.
Activities for February in-
clude attending the Show
Palace in Hudson for the
production of "9 To 5" at
11:30 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 9.
The club bowls at
10 a.m. Thursday at
Sportsmen's Bowl, 100
Florida Ave (U.S. 41) in In-
verness.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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S 36 31 36 Gymnastics the Ropes Way Way Heat Heat HEAT Heat 365
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FY) 31 59 31 26 29 A diplomats adopted son is pure evil.'R' Thierot, John Magaro. Premiere.'R' (2006) Liev Schreiber.
(TR$) 49 23 49 16 19 King King King |Fam.Guy BigBang IBigBang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang |Big Bang Cougar |The
TM 169 53 169 30 35n "***' "White Heat" Tales From the Warner **** "Casablanca" (1942, Drama) Humphrey **** "The Maltese Falcon" (1941) Humphrey
1 69 53 169 30 35 (1949)'NR' Brothers Lot (N) Bogart.'PG' (DVS) Bogart.'NR' a (DVS)
Shipwreck Men (In Moonshiners "Adios, Moonshiners (In Moonshiners "Hat in Moonshiners "Last Moonshiners "Hat in
53 34 53 24 26 Stereo)'14' c Mr Still"'14'm Stereo)'14'B Hand" a Shiner Standing" Hand" N
(1L0 50 46 50 29 30 Undercover Boss 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid.
*** "Source Code" *)i "The Three Musketeers" (2011, Action) "The Tortured" (2010) Erika "Circle" 2010, Horror) Gail
(T]i) 350 261 350 (2011) 'PG-13' Matthew MacFadyen.'PG-13' a Christensen.'R' aO'Grady In Stereo) 'NR'
S"Watchmen" (2009, Action) Billy Crudup, ** "The Dark Knight" (2008, Action) Christian Bale. Batman battles (** "The Mummy"
(*J 48 33 48 31 34 Malin Akerman.'R' A a vicious criminal known as the Joker.'PG-13' a (DVS) (1999) N
CTD14 38 58 38 33 Regular [Regular ** "Planet 51" (2009, Comedy)'PG' Venture |Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Cleveland Dynamite |Boon
(HI AV) 9 54 9 44 Extreme RVs 'G' Trip of a Lifetime 'G' Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures
QiiTVJ 25 55 25 98 55 Most Shocking'14' Wipeout'PG' a Wipeout 'PG' a Wipeout 'PG' a Wipeout 'PG' a Most Shocking
[TV1 32 49 32 34 24 Cosby |Cosby Cosby ICosby Cosby ICosby Raymond |Raymond Raymond |Raymondmond o King
Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special ** "The Game Plan"
(115J 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14 (2007) 'PG'
S 117 117 Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Cyndi Cyndi Cyndi Cyndi Cyndi Cyndi Cyndi Cyndi
j 117 69 117 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' Lauper Lauper Lauper Lauper Lauper Lauper Lauper Lauper
WOLA) 18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: Cl NBA Basketball Chicago Bulls at Atlanta Hawks. (N) Videos WGN News at Nine Bones'14' cc


North
* J 7 4
V J 8 7 3 2
* 72


West
4 82
SA 9 6 4
* 10 9 8 6
* 8 7 3


South
2 NT
3V
4V


4 Q 10o


West
Pass
Pass
Pass


North
3,
3 NT
Pass


02-02-13


9
East
* K 10 9 5
V 5
* AK 5 4 3
* 6 5 2


East
Pass
Pass
Pass


Opening lead: 10

Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Sun Tzu, an ancient Chinese general and
strategist, wrote, "To win 100 victories in 100 bat-
tles is not the acme of skill. To subdue the enemy
without fighting is the acme of skill."
At the bridge table, sometimes your judgment
of the opponents' skill will influence your play
- as in this deal. South is in four hearts. West
leads the diamond 10. East takes the first two
tricks in the suit, then shifts to the club six. De-
clarer wins on the board and plays a trump to
his king. West takes the trick and returns a dia-
mond. How should South continue?
North's transfer bid followed by three no-
trump showed five hearts and game values.
South starts with three top losers and only
nine winners (one spade, four hearts and four
clubs). He seems to need the spade finesse to
work. However, after West's diamond lead at
trick five, if hearts are splitting 3-2, declarer
could discard a spade from the dummy, ruff in
his hand, cash his last trump, cross to dummy
with a club, draw trumps and claim. Note,
though, that this fails here because West gains a
second trump trick.
If West is a beginner, South must guess what to
do. But if East and West are experts, West cannot
have the spade king. If he did, he would have
dropped the diamond nine at trick two as a suit-
preference signal and East would have shifted
to spades, subduing the contract.
West's defense strongly suggests that hearts
are 4-1. Declarer should ruff on the board, cash
his two top hearts, return to dummy with a club,
draw the last trump, and take the spade finesse.

I ;jS 0 THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, Heads! No, tails
one letter to each square, Heads!No,ails!
to form four ordinary words. Call it heads.
inthe air.
REAPO
*
-T I ... I Services, Inc

PNTES _
I I plp -



SOOPEP P
SZ WHETHER OR NOT
THE &OIN WOULP LANP
HEAPS 0R TAIL-5
CURPSE WA ---
L-- H ] Now arrange the circled letters
S to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Print answer here: A
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday'sI Jumbles: HUMID ANKLE URCHIN FEDORA
I Answer: The trail through the swamp caused the
cross-country race to RUN "A-MUCK"


ACROSS
1 Jay-Z's genre
4 One, in
combos
7 Viking name
11 Morn's
counterpart
12 Hightailed it
13 Juan's home
14 Feud
16 Sketch
17 Nasty laugh
18 Inflates
19 Sunshine st.
20 Taro product
21 Carlo
24 Actress
Hepburn
27 Be in debt
28 Mounties
30 Did laps
32 Jai -
34 Genuine
36 Blunder
37 Motto
39 Rakes in
41 Lab or boxer


42 Cosmo or GQ
43 Latch onto
45 Use
48 Hang around
49 Intermission
52 Perry's
creator
53 Outward
appearance
54 Kind of
system
55 Did Easter
eggs
56 "Masterpiece"
channel
57 Starry vista

DOWN
1 Step on
the gas
2 Roman
greetings
3 Quaker
colonist
4 UHF part
5 Volleyball
need


Answer to Previous Puzzle


L 0 MLU G F I
LOA ISLEA JOSH
I CZ EA D UL S
P IO AD S AORT AU



T HABIT NICERT A

CHINA HEW C
LEON BOLSTERS
A CME E K ES PE A


PIE
P-


6 Ms. Lupino
7 Bakery treats
8 Plunder
9 Belief
systems
10 Colo. neighbor


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


S|A TIE E EE K
JY EISlELIL


12 Antenna
15 Adroit
18 Okra morsel
20 Immature
butterfly
21 Extinct bird
22 Night flyers
23 "Hud" Oscar
winner
24 Word from the
pews
25 Jug
26 Knitter's need
29 Rocky ledge
31 "- Doubtfire"
33 Like table salt
35 Yeast
38 Swabbie
40 Culture dish
goo
42 Tarzan and
Jane
43 Indiana town
44 Annoy
46 Currier's
partner
47 Shortage
48 Marry
49 Bratty kid
50 Pen part
51 Actress
Myrna -


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


Dear Annie: I am mar-
ried to an absolute
angel. Unfortunately,
her mother has been living
with us for the past two years.
Mom doesn't work, doesn't do
much of anything around the
house, doesn't cook
or clean, and sleeps
until nearly noon.
We have to ask her .
to do things, just as
we would a child,
and then she re-
sponds as if we're
scolding her.
Mom is only 54
and has no medical
or physical prob-
lems that would
keep her from
working. She has ANN
worked, but can't MAIL
keep a job. When
her husband died,
she lost everything because
she never bothered to ask for
help or advice. She believes
that God will make a way for
her. I have no problem with
that, but God expects you to be
willing to take the first step
forward.
We don't want her on the
street, obviously, and will con-
tinue to let her stay here. But
we have no privacy and re-
quire extended trips just to
feel normal. How do we en-
courage her to move on? -
Need Mother-in-Law Help
Dear Need: Mom is too
young to be so useless around
the house. Does she have men-
tal health issues? Adult Atten-
tion Deficit Disorder might
explain why she has so much
trouble keeping a job. But re-
gardless, she is not going to do
anything about it if you and
your wife don't set some rules
and stick to them. Even volun-
teer work would give Mom a


L


sense of purpose and a place
to go every day Your wife
needs to be frank with her
mother, saying that she loves
her but needs her to con-
tribute to the household in
some form. Insist that she get
counseling as a con-
dition of staying,
and your wife
should ask to go
with her for the
first session to ex-
plain the issues to
the counselor.
Dear Annie: Two
years ago, my wife
developed breast
cancer. The cancer
was removed, and
we've been told she
IE'S will be fine. We
.BOX have been married
for 41 years, and I
am hoping for an-
other 41. I love my wife more
than words can say
Since her brush with cancer,
I have noticed that things that
once might have incited a
"discussion" no longer seem to
matter. And I have discovered
a number of maladies of my
own.
I have, for instance, become
"deaf" to certain things in our
marriage. For instance, she
used to say "you know" a lot.
You know? Now I am just
thrilled to hear her voice.
Blindness has also invaded
our house. Neither of us no-
tices the petty annoyances
that used to bug us. Our mar-
riage is better now that we
don't see so well.
We both have lost our ability
to talk, as well. Once in a
while, certain words hurtful
words used to be thrown
around carelessly But now,
neither one of us has the abil-
ity to say such things anymore.


And I had no idea that cancer
could make a person forgetful.
I can no longer recall any of
my wife's faults.
One thing that has not been
affected, though, is my heart.
It still races when I see her It
still flutters when I hear her
voice. And it still skips a beat
when we kiss. Why must we
wait until it is almost too late
to appreciate what we have -
and could have lost? -A Lit-
tle Wiser
Dear Wiser: We love this.
Your words should remind all
couples of what is truly impor-
tant. Thank you so much for
sharing your thoughts with our
readers.
Dear Annie: I have another
suggestion for "Not Anti-So-
cial or Addicted to the Inter-
net." A good place to meet
folks is at a bowling alley We
have a lot of fun at our local
one. They offer bowling, coffee
and some prizes. It's not a reg-
ular league, just a fun time. He
should check it out. It includes
folks of all ages, although most
range from 50 to 80. Bowler
from Florida


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcast net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and car-
toonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www.creators.com.


South
SA Q 6 3
V K Q 10
QJ
A KJ 4
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both


ENTERTAINMENT


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2013 C7






CS SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2013

Peanuts

NOBROTHINK- I I NOT ONLY KNOW A LOT
CAN WIN THE CITi' OF HARP WiORKS, BUT I
SPELLING BEE, KNOl EVERYt WLLIN6
,P', 1UT I 'M RULE IN THE BOOK.


.,...i!^


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Garfield


-THE ONLY ONE I HAVE
TROUBLE REMEMBERIN6 16,
"I BEFORE E EXCEPT
AFTER D"...OR is IT,"E
BEFORE I EXCEPT AFTER 6"?


"I BEFORE B EXCEPT
AFTER T"? V BEFORE Z
EXCEPT AFTER E'?

-- 60o


Pickles

SOME00PEOMCE UA19
A PERSOl S.rOOLO
"O 3- 65 INt5 N
114EIR LIFeTlM6E.,





3710 'ti
:* b^ ^.")'!.-I


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


Dilbert


Beetle Bailey

It WONDER WHAT
r aKILLEP THIS TREE?









The Grizzwells


The Born Loser


WR A?' G6OU~ROG Ba, RUTUs! UNrOKTUNMTEL, L S 5UNY, 50 WAT'S WORSE, I 5AV, YOUs
I FEW TRE GIOU1 NOOG TIRLE E.5IADOW TWS
Aw> WE1L E.UBWro | j "'* FORALORG C>A


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Blondie
(O NO! I JUST ACCIDENTALLY
CUT Occ ONE OC


----




) ..
_- 1.- *. -=


( I STILL CAN'T GET OVER THE)
ELECTION LAST YEAR


i _- ,
5 '.iUL11


I KNOW, I KNOW! I WOULD'VE CUT
;OFF BOTH COWLICKS, UT I'M
SCONF:LICTED ..r.



._ '-I : -.


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


Big Nate
I HAVE TO GO. ARTUL'S
WALKING ME HOrhE, AND
THEN T HAVE TO
FIN SH PACKlNG,
OH. OKan Y.,n,







Arlo and Janis


"CANNMR,WILON PLN, *ATHIGAE,fI'NAFPRAIP
LEAPFRO& WVJITH ME?' HE MIG1HTCROAK."


Today ysMOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Warm Bodies" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Bullet to the Head" (R) ID required. 1 p.m., 3:50
p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters" (R) ID re-
quired. 4 p.m. No passes.
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters" (R) ID
required. In 3D. 1:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
No passes.
"Mama" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:25 p.m.
"Broken City" (R) ID required. 4:10 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Les Miserables" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 6:50 p.m.
"Zero Dark Thirty" (R) ID required. 12:50 p.m.,
3:45 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:45 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Warm Bodies" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 2 p.m., 4:20


p.m., 7:30 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Bullet to the Head" (R) ID required. 1:45 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Parker" (R) ID required. 1:40 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Movie 43" (R) ID required. 5 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters" (R) ID
required. In 3D. 1:15 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:45 p.m.
No passes.
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters" (R) ID
required. 4:25 p.m. No passes.
"Mama" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:50 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"Zero Dark Thirty" (R) ID required. 1:05 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Silver Linings Playbook" (PG-13) 1:50 p.m.,
4:35 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Lincoln" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:30 p.m.


Betty


Frank & Ernest


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: ( slenbae


"WA AWY XYRGGF SRWLD LA RCKEL


LMYF RXY


GAWYGF ... E MRZY


OYGL


GAWYGF KRWF LEKYD EW KF GEOY."


PEGG KIXXRF

Previous Solution: "It is a funny thing about life; if you refuse to accept anything
but the best, you very often get it." W. Somerset Maugham
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 2-2


H..LL
f y vfII'I ^


Doonesbury


WELL...
EYE, '
JENNY. E'1'( E,
a~~- VATE
o \ o 0


COMICS









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2013 C9


I _To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fa ( 25 5 5. 0 T lr (0a*40a: a ie c0cnn o I 0 0


5HP, Game Fisher
Outboard, with Tank
Just tuned up
$450
Will take Gun on trade
(906) 285-1696

Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052

Black Leather
Biker Vest,
New, Never worn,
Size 44
$55. (352) 637-7124

C DORY
1999 16ft, Angler, with
trailer, Honda 4 stroke
40HP, $7,800 Floral City
(717) 994-2362 Cell

Citrus Hills/Condo
m/bdrm w/ba htd pool
$450 352-249-7804

CRYSTAL RIVER
Saturday 2, 8a-lp Lots
of Baby Items & More
8737 N. Catapane Lp.

CRYSTAL RIVER
Saturday 2/2 at 8:00am
BOY SCOUT YARD
SALE. Something
for everyone!!
4801 N Citrus Ave
Crystal Riv. UM Church


DINING TABLE & 4
SWIVEL CHAIRS
46"L 35"W 29"T
2 12" leaf
picture available
$95 352-422-7646


HERNANDO
Saturday 9-5
Tools, Jon boats, Misc
and More!
Next to Wishing Well
on Rte 200.

INVERNESS -
GOSPEL ISLAND
360 S Myna Terr Sat


INVERNESS
Sat. Feb. 2, Lots of
Baby Items & More
745 S.Rooks Ave.


INVERNESS
Sunday 1/27 lp-4pm
3/2 MH, Furn. Ig screen
lanai, shed & lot. All appl
ncl Ig scn TV,55+ PK
Asking $12,000.
911 Hoffmann Lane
Melody MH Park
(352) 364-3747

LARGE (FERRET)
CAGE
H 51", L 32", W 20"
VG condition $75 OBO
(352) 795-3388

LOVE SEAT
Tan, 64 inches. Never
Used, Moving must
sell. Asking $350
(352) 746-2479

Office/Home furnishings
for sale. Great Prices!!
Lecanto 772-932-8939

OPEN HOUSE
Suaarmill Woods 4/3/2
Saturday 12-4PM
211 Pine Stree
(352) 503-5233

PONTOON
'97, Suntracker, 21ft.
50HP, 4 stroke, Merc.
alum. deck, kept un-
der roof. clean, no
trailer $5,500 637-5958


Toshiba,
50" Big Screen TV
You Move
(352) 447-1553
UTILITY TRAILER
5X8 w/ stake sides,
1'/x4 in tongue &
grove floor, new tires,
spare, wheel bearings
wl bearing buddies
$575 (269) 532-8100



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087



2 Very Nice Dogs
Golden Retriever/Lab
Mix, chestnut color
& Black Lab, both
nice watch dogs,
very gentle,
Like to go together
(352) 637-6310
5 Month Old Kittens
to good home. Have
both males & females
(352) 476-5230
FREE KITTENS
(352) 860-0964
Free to Good Home
English Mastiff
In need of forever
home, very sweet and
gentle couch potato
Must Spay,
Call for Interview
(352) 637-4322
Mission in Citrus has
a FREE garage sale to
those in need.
No resale agents! Lots
of baby items, house-
hold items and kids
toys.
A little bit of everything.
If you are in need or
know someone who is,
please tell them.
2488 N. Pennsylvania
Crystal River
(near Manatee Lanes)
Fri & Sat all day



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077



Black Labrador
Retriever, about 1% yrs
old, answers to "Buddy",
lost in vicinity of
W. Dunnellon Rd.
Owner is heartbroken.
(352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662
CHIHUAHUA
lost Jan 26
His name is Chico,
male, long white hair,
face, ears are brown,
3 to 4 Ibs, last seen
Hunter Spnrings trailer
pk, next to the PO.
in Crystal River
352-364-1663
GREY FEMALE
CALICO CAT
female, approx. 2
yrs.old, her kittens
miss her! grey, orange
& tan lost in the
Humanitarians, Rt 44,
parking lot
(352) 476-1878


HELP!
Find our lost CAT.
Last seen: Standish
Dr & Battle Cr. near
Mason Cr. Black &
White. Has a black
mustache.
352-503-7928
Lost: Tiger markings
Bnndle Pit Bull Mix
751bs, long tail, very,
timid. Afraid of People.
Lost near 486/Pine
Ridge near construction.
(352) 601-0339
Lost Pomeranian
Female, 10yrs old
Near California St.
Beverly Hills
REWARD
352-476-0583
Lost Set of Keys
Blue & Silver light
on Chain
Crystal River or
Beverly Hills Area
(352) 527-1322
MALAMUTE
belongs to my little boy
he's heartbroken, 5 yrs
old female. Her name is
Foxxy, fawn and white,
missing from Turner
Fish Camp, Potts
Preserve area. Please
call 352-201-2540
MINI PINCHER MIX
black, approx 2 yrs old,
brown eyes, answers to
Oscar, lost in the vicinity
of Cardinal St.
Homosassa. pis call
352-212-1931 or
352-419-2650, if no
answer, pis Iv msg w/
name & number



DOG LONG HAIR
BLACK & GREY,
W/HARNESS,
FOUND IN
INVERNESS OFF OF
TURNERCAMP RD.
(352) 344-4006
Older Puppy Found
in Crystal River
Call to identify
(352) 697-1258



Not Looking for
Someone, just trying
to help people. If you
are Bored, Lonely,
Need Answers. Call
someone who cares.
24-7 (352) 426-1821




FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.OOlb,
Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb
Delivered 352-795-0077




Cleaning Person
Needed bi-weekly
Call (352) 503-5002




TEACHER

Fulltime/Part time,
Exp. Req. CDA Pref.
TADPOLES
EARLY LEARNING
(352) 560-4222


DomIIIes

Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fled ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII






DOCTORS ASSIST
Needed

Must Draw Blood
EKG & Injections
SEND RESUME TO:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1825M
1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd
Crystal River Fl. 34429


EXPERIENCED
CERTIFIED
SURGICAL TECH

Wanted for
fast-paced outpa-
tient surgery center.
Flexible scheduling.
Excellent pay and
benefits. No nights,
weekends, no call
or holidays.
Apply at:
110 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto
or fax resume to:
352-527-1827.


EXPERIENCED
OPERATING
ROOM RN

Wanted for
fast-paced outpa-
tient surgery center.
Flexible scheduling.
Excellent pay and
benefits. No nights,
weekends, no call
or holidays.
Apply at:
110 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto or fax
resume to:
352-527-1827.


EXPERIENCED
RECEPTIONIST
For fast pace
medical office. Must
be able to work
under pressure &
handle multiple
phone lines. Medical
terminology &
insurance
knowledge required.
Send resume to:
reply2013@
hotmail.com


F/T RN

IV Exp. preferred
For physicians office
with benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1787M
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River,
Forida 34429


HHC AGENCY

Looking for
RN & Psych RN
(352) 794-6097


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885







Physical
Therapist and
Physical Therapy
Assistant

For established
therapy team of
PT's and PTA's.
Willing to train or
mentor. Must be
passionate about
patient care. With
a strong emphasis
on orthopedics.
CONTACT
SET Home Health
352-564-2738
or email resume to
sethomehealth@
embarqmail.com
OE HHA299993458


I RECEPTIONIST


Needed for busy
Medical Office.
Experience preferred.
Includes benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1787M
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River,
Florida 34429


LIC 440 CUST.
SERVICE REP/or
220 Agent

Needed for busy
Insurance office.
Apply in person
9am-12N
SHELDON PALMES
INSURANCE
8469 W Grover
Cleveland,
Homosassa


Social Services
Assistant

Looking for ener-
getic detail oriented
person who is
comfortable taking
initiative. And enjoy
working with peo-
ple. Exp. preferred
NO PHONE CALLS
Apply in Person
CYPRESS COVE
CARE CENTER
700 SE 8TH AVENUE
Crystal River EOE






Exp. Servers &
Bartenders

APPLY IN PERSON
LakeSide Bar & Grill
4543 E. Windmill Dr.
Inverness, 419-6511


SOUS CHEF

needed for upscale
private Country
Club in Citrus Co.
Previous kitchen
management re-
quired with casual
and fine dining
culinary experience.
Send Resume to:
swiley@
citrushills.com










INSIDE SALES
REPRESENTATIVE
Citrus Publishing
Citrus County, Fl

Job Summary
This position is de-
signed to increase
our market share of
retail and classified
display advertising in
all of Citrus Publish-
ing's products.
The position will
consist of receiving
incoming calls and
making outbound
service/cold calls.
The position will also
handle walk-in
advertisers from
our Meadowcrest
office.

Essential Functions
* Answeringin com-
ing calls for our Re-
tail and Classified
display ads
* Facilitating the
display advertising
needs of walk in
customers
* Making outbound
service calls to exist-
ing accounts
* Develop new
customers through
prospecting and
cold calling
* Develop new op-
portunities for adver-
tisers to do business
with Citrus Publish-
ing, Inc,
* Consistently meet
or exceed monthly
and annual sales
goals
* Increase Citrus
Publishing's Market
share through the
development of
on-line advertising
revenue
* Communicate
effectively orally
and in writing with
customers and
coworkers
* Problem solving,
analytical abilities
and interpersonal
skills required
* Maintain score
cards on progress
toward established
goals
* Perform daily func-
tions with a minimal
amount of direction

Minimum
Qualifications
* at least two years
of sales experience;
advertising experi-
ence preferred
* Demonstrate per-
suasiveness and/or
sales abilities
* Proper business
attire
* Professional tele-
phone presence
Ability to work well in
a team environment

Administrative
* This is a 40 hour a
week position

Send resume to
djkamlot@chroni-
cleonline.com. Dead-
line for applications
is Feb.12, 2013

Drug Screen
Required
for Final Applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer


IN-HOME SALES

One call close.
Leads provided.
DFWP/Call Charles
352-314-3625

Real Estate
Agents

Busy real estate office
needs Realtors and
Buyers Agents Call
PLANTATION REALTY
352-634-0129





Automotive
Consultant/
Advisor

Eagle Buick GMC
Inc is in need of
experienced
Automotive Service
Consultants/Advisors
Minimum 2 yrs, deal-
ership experience.
Aggressive pay plan
and strong com-
pensation package
that includes health
insurance, paid
vacation, paid train-
ing, certification
reimbursement and
many other perks.
Drug free workplace
Application Avail. @
Eagle Buick GMC
Inc. Homosassa, Fl.
34448 Send Resume:
Fax (352) 417-0944
Email:
robbcole@eagle
buickgmc.com

FULL TIME
OFFICE
MANAGER

Heavy Construction
Contractor, exp. in
construction,
AR/AP/PR, Quick
Books, Excel, Word,
Preferred. Salary doe
email or fax resumes:
croftcontractinginc.@
earthlink.net
fax 352-860-2716
DFWP/EEO

Key Training
Center

has positions
available in group
home home setting.
Assist adults with
developmental
disabilities in daily
living skills. HS
Diploma/GED
required.
P/T Instructor
Assistant,
working in class-
room setting with
adults with develop-
mental disabilities.
HS Diploma/
GED required.
Apply in person at
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto FL
34461 *E.O.E.*


MANATEE
TOUR
CAPTAIN
NEEDED

Full Time
(352) 777-1796

Senior Lending
Officer/Office
Manager

Brannen Bank,
a banking institution in
central Florida,
is seeking a Senior
Lending Officer/ Office
Manager for the Citrus
county area. Re-
quires a bachelors
degree in business or
finance, residential
and commercial
lending experience
and at least four
year's Office Manager
Experience.
Duties include man-
agement of daily
branch operations
and originating a
variety of consumer
loan's. Offer's a
competitive salary and
benefit package. If
interested, please
forward resume' to

Brannen Banks of
Florida, Inc.
Attn: Carol Johnson
PO Box 1929
Inverness, FL
34451-1929
EEO/M/F/V/D/DFWP


APPT. SETTERS
NEEDED

Sign on Bonus.
Great Commission Pay
and weekly bonuses
Call Bob 352-628-3500

CAREGIVERS
NEEDED

All Shifts Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto


Exp. appt. setters

Top Pay, Hrly. Clean
work enviontment
Dave (352) 794-6129


NEWSPAPER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and other
newspapers for
home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per day.

Must have insured
and reliable vehicle
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up with
a cap-Large enough
to hold our Sunday
product

Apply in Person
1624 N Medowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pm

Newspaper carriers
are independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle









CHINA CLOSET
VINTAGE Deco, real
wood,show glass door,
photo upon request.
100.00 51334473

TEA LEAF COPPER
LUSTER PLATE 9"
1853 to 1871, $35
352-628-3899




4 VINTAGE GLASS
FROGS FOR FLORAL
Display $20 can email
Photos INVERNESS
352419-5981

6 VINTAGE TEA CUP
AND SAUCER SETS
$45 BONE CHINA
England All Different
352419-5981

i

1


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
wit a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




2 DR WHITE MAYTAG
REFRIG. w/Ice Maker
21.8 cu ft.
Less than 2yrs old.
$350
(352) 726-8021

Amish Heat Surge
Electric Heater
will fit in Fire Place
No cabinet,
$75. (352) 341-7741


NOW HIRING FULL-TIME POSITIONS
















BENEFITS PACKAGE
EOE / DRUG FREE WORKPLACE

APL INPR O


48 1679523,

2 5 6 1 3 8 7 9 41
7395246E81:
893451276

612387945
547296318

368942157

975813462
1247658399


DRYER $100 with 90
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504
ELECTRIC STOVE
SELF CLEANING
Westinghouse, Almond,
looks good, works good
$100.00 513 -4473
GE Refrigerator
side by side w/ water
dispenser Bisque $380,
GO CART 5HP, 2s eats
built by Manco $275
(352) 503-6641
GE STOVE, coil top, self
cleaning, bisque $125;
MICROWAVE Over the
Range GE Spacemaker
$75 (352)503-6641
HOOVER UPRIGHT
SWEEPER 6 yrs old, all
attachments, Exc Con
$75 352-628-3899
KENMORE 25'CU
STAINESS STEEL side
by side, w/water & ice,
4yrs old, Super Buy!
$750 352-897-4196
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
WASHERS & DRYERS
(352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Exc.
Cond. Free Delivery
352-263-7398
WASHER$100 with 90
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504




Office/Home furnishings
for sale. Great Prices!!
Lecanto 772-932-8939




DUDLEY'S






AUCTION

Sunday 2/3/13
Antique preview @
11am. Auction lpm
furniture, art, prints,
vintage books, china,
silver & coins, jew-
elry, cased knives, &
straight razors
more+++

*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267AB1667






Fri. 02/01 Preview @
4pm, Auction@ 6pm
General Merchandise
Sat. 02/02 Preview @
4pm, Auction@ 6pm
Antiques/Gen. Merch
Sun. 02/03 Preview @
12:30, Auction@ 1pm
Tailgate/Box lots
**WE BUY ESTATES**
6055 N. Carl G. Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
AB3232 (352)613-1389




12 GALLON SEARS
AIR COMPRESSOR
WITH HOSE $100
464-0316




SHARP 32" TV WITH
REMOTE $20
352-613-0529
YAMAHA RECEIVER &
TECHNICS DUAL
STEREO CASSETTE
PLAYER BOTH FOR
$100 352-613-0529
YAMAHA SET OF 5
SPEAKERS GOOD
CONDITION $100
352-613-0529




DOUBLE & SINGLE
garage doors, both for
$250 352-601-7911



DIESTLER COM-
PUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
MAGELLAN
ROADMATE GPS -
5220-LM. Never used.
$90 352-637-5969
MS OFFICE 2010, 1st
COURSE BOOK $40.
book only. Univ.level.
Excellent learning tool.
352-513-4027


Chipper/Shredder
Troy-Bilt Tomahawk,
Briggs & Stratton gas
engine. $700 OBO
(352) 601-3174




Oblong glass table
66x40 w/6 reclining
chairs; small side table,
2 footstools, beige w/
tiny flowers. Never
been outside. $400
Call John (352)
422-2317




"DINETTE SET**
4 ft Glass top w/4
chairs on casters,
good. cond. $200
(352) 897-4739
*TV STAND
40WX18DX28H,
3-SHELVES
4- DRAWERS $95
634-2004
2 Table Lamps,
33" H, white ceramic,
Sq. bamboo design,
excel. $50
Broyhill Dining Rm Set.
Table, Parquet Top,
Rectangular shape, 2
leaves, 6 Caine High-
back chairs, china
hutch, 3 glass panels
3 shelves, med. fruit-
wood color, excel.
$550. (718) 666-6624
48" Believed Glass
Dining Room Table, 4
chairs, upholstered
seats, decorative
painting back & legs
$150. Lazy Boy Rocker
Recliner $75. Pine
Ridge (352) 270-8116
AIR COMPRESSOR
Devillbiss, twin cyl 4
hp, 20 gal. $150
352-628-4360
Blue glider rocker and
matching foot
stool.$65.00 great
condition 352-726-2572
CHROME & GLASS
UTILITY CART,14"
DIA,28"H
3 SHELVES $25
634-2004

DINING TABLE & 4
SWIVEL CHAIRS
46"L 35"W 29"T
2 -12" leaf
picture available
$95 352-422-7646

DUDLEY'S






** AUCTION-


Sunday 2/3/13
Antique preview @
11am. Auction 1pm
furniture, art, prints,
vintage books, china,
silver & coins, jew-
elry, cased knives, &
straight razors
more+++

*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.corn
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB 1667

Entertainment Ctr
Oak w/ 2 drawers and 4
doors, will ft a 36" TV,
very good cond $150;
off white love seat,
like new $175
(765) 336-9590
Futon
Very good cond.
org. $300
sell for $125.
(352) 270-8772
KING SIZE BED
mattress,box spring,
and frame all in good
condition $100obo call
or text 352-464-4280
KING SIZE
PILLOW TOP
Mattress, Box Spring
& Frame.
Excel. Cond. $550
315-723-5353
KING SIZE WICKER
HEAD BOARD Good
cond. $75.00 photo
upon request 513-4473
LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET, In Onginal
Plastic, Never Used,
ORG $3000, Sacrifice
$975. CHERRY, BED-
ROOM SET Solid
Wood, new in factory
boxes- $895
Can Deliver. Bill
(813)298-0221.
Living Room/
Dining Room
Lg 6 pc sectional
w/recliner & Sofa.
Loden Grn Must see!
$500 obo; Dining Rm
table w/ beveled glass
top, 4 char/blue velour
chairs, $225 746-0817
LOVE SEAT
Tan, 64 inches. Never
Used, Moving must
sell. Asking $350
(352) 746-2479


CLASSIFIED









ClO SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2013


Couch, Mustard Color
Good Condition
$350 352-746-1447
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500
Moving Sale
27" Magnavox TV $75
15" Quasar TV w/
Stand, $25,
6 Tray tables $15.
(352) 489-5669
OAK ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER with T.V.
$95.00 NICE. Dunnellon
352-875-5134
Old secretary desk dark
wood 2 drawers and fold
down top.$85.
352-726-2572
QUEEN MATTRESS,
BOX SPRING &
FRAME with all linens.
$150 (352) 287-6601
ROCKER old
upholstered rocker with
wood arms.$65.
352-726-2572
Sectional Sofa, light
color, like new
$500
Small secretary Desk
$100
(352) 212-3352
STIFFEL BRASS LAMP
30"H, 3WAY
CREAM PLEATED
SHADE
$50 634-2004
WATERBED king sized
waveless waterbed in
excellent condition.
$85.00 352-564-8915
WICKER ROCKER
Small old wicker rocker.
$50. 352-726-2572




CRAFTSMAN
GT 500 MOWER
25 HP, $1,200.
(352) 344-2268
CYCLONE
Yard Vac,
with extra attach-
ments $1,100
(352) 344-2268
LAWNMOWER YARD
WAGON 6 cubic feet
with new tires $60.
Call 382-3280..
SEARS 2 WHEEL
GARDEN WHEELBAR-
ROW 4 cubic feet ca-
pacity $10 Call
382-3280 to see.
Torro Weed Eater
$25
352-726-7789
Troybuilt Pusher
w/ Honda Engine $90
Lawnboy Pusher
w/bagger $25
352-726-7789


-U
CRYSTAL RIVER
SAT ONLY 9am to 4pm
**MULTI-FAMILY**
f. poles, reels, tools,
hshld, items, lots more
410 NW Fern Drive
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat.&Sun HUGE SALE
8584 W. Candleglow St.
CRYSTAL RIVER
Saturday 2, 8a-lp Lots
of Baby Items & More
8737 N. Catapane Lp.
CRYSTAL RIVER
Saturday 2/2 at 8:00am
BOY SCOUT YARD
SALE. Something
for everyone!!
4801 N Citrus Ave
Crystal Riv. UM Church
DUNNELLON
Fri, Feb 1 & Sat, Feb 2
8 to 4, Multi-Family
tools, electronics, clths,
2866 W Cypress Drive
FLORAL CITY
All Park Rummage
Sale. Singing Forest
M.H. Park
Keating Park St.
Community Building
Sat. Feb. 2, 8a-2pm

FLORAL CITY
UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCH
Used Treasure Sale
Feb 2nd 8:30 till noon.
8478 E. Marvin St.

HERNANDO
Saturday 9-5
Tools, Jon boats, Misc
and More!
Next to Wishing Well
on Rte 200.
HERNANDO
Saturday Only Feb 2,
9AM-2PM
Major Appliances,
Antiques,
Jewelry, Valentine
Gifts,etc
2927 N.Carl G.Rose
Hwy(Hwy 200)
VYVVVVV ,


Sat 2/2, Sun 2/3
8 5, entire hshld
4088 S Washington Pt

INVERNESS
6079 RECTOR,
Off South Apopka
Fri. 1 & Sat. 2, 9a-2p
Complete Contents
of House, Including
Garage & 2 Sheds
Also 3/2/2 Home,
Everything Must Go!
Way too Much to
List, Cash Only,
Deb, 634-2656
Offered by Parsley
Real Estate

INVERNESS -
GOSPEL ISLAND
360 S Myna Terr Sat

INVERNESS
Sat. Feb. 2, Lots of
Baby Items & More
745 S. Rooks Ave.

PALM TERRACE
VILLAGE.
Annual Community
Yard Sale.
Sat Feb 2, 8a-2p
S. 491 next to
Brighthouse
PINE RIDGE
Fri. 1 & Sat. 2, 8a-2p
Furn., Clothes, Hsehld.
5227 W Pine Ridge Blv.




2X&3X BLOUSES &
SLACKS-TSHIRTS
AND capns $2.00 ea
352-794-3020
352-5864987
Black Leather
Biker Vest,
New, Never worn,
Size 44
$55. (352) 637-7124
BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING SIZES 5 &
6 SHIRTS, PANTS &
JACKETS $30
352-613-0529
LINESMAN BOOTS 16"
Carolina 923. Size 9.
NEW condition. $100.
352/566-8066
PGH STEELER SKI
JACKET Mens Med
NFL Very Good Cond.
$25. Dunnellon
465-8495




PHONE/FAX MACHINE
Panasonic plain paper
Fax/Copier
excellent condition
$30.00 352-628-2150




!!!!!225/70 R19.5!!!!!
Great read!! Only asking
$100 for the pair!
(352)857-9232
:::::275/70 R16.5:::::
Good tread!! Only ask-
ing $100 for the pair!
(352)857-9232
--~~~33X10.5 R15~~--
Good tread!! Only ask-
ing $100 for the pair!
(352)857-9232
12 ft. Aluminum John
Boat, no paper work
$165.
Trailer, spare tire and
wheel, fits 10" 15"
$35. (315) 466-2268
2" BALL MOUNT. 3 1/4
INCH DROP. 2" STAIN-
LESS STEEL BALL,
PIN AND CLIP $35.00
CALL 352 344-2821
6' USED CHAIN LINK
FENCE 2 15'SEC-
TIONS. 2 END & LINE
POSTS & HARD-
WARE. $95.00
352 344-2821
BARBIE HOUSE/FURN.
& DISNEY CASTLE
BOTH 32X36 $35
ea/both $75
352-794-3020 5864987
BEDDING Queen
comforter, dust ruffle &
pillow shams. Beige,
gray, brown. $20 obo
352-5134536
BIRD CAGE
32x21x36high. 62" high
with stand. Bar spacing
1/2". Excellent condi-
tion.$80.00. 726 5753
BLINDS 1 PLEATED
64WX63L 1 PLASTIC
64WX60L OFF WHITE
$30 352-613-0529
CHAIN LINK FENCE
FABRIC. 22' X 4'
UNUSED CHAIN LINK
FENCE FABRIC.
$18.00 352 344-2821
Darkroom Equipment
Beseler 4 x 5 enlarger
inc. trays, stand & other
accessories $350 for all
352-746-6504
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077


352-613-0529
JIGSAW PUZZLES
63 jigsaw puzzles
$45.00 obo
352-746-3799
LARGE (FERRET)
CAGE
H 51", L 32", W 20"
VG condition $75 OBO
(352) 795-3388
LINESMAN BOOTS 16"
Carolina 923. Size 9.
NEW condition. $100.
352/566-8066
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Fulls $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
MOVING SALE
EVERYTHING MUST
GO!
(352)220-1440
NEW SKYLIGHT
BUBBLE TYPE
SMOKED
POLYCARBONATE
27X 27 $60 464-0316
RYOBI TABLE SAW
Good condition. First
$50 can have it. Hurry
won't last long at this
price. 6284429
SNAPPER 42" RIDING
MOWER/GENERAC
4"000W GENERATOR
Mower $1000. Incl
mulch attachment
GenSet $375.BOTH
LIKE NEW
352489-6465
Stallion Cow Boy Hat,
by Stetson, wool, sz 6 %
& Boots, black 11% D.
both New $100.
Glass Top Table w/ 4
chairs $100.
352-795-7254
Two Clip- on Towing
Mirrors $20
30 lb full propane
bottle w/carrying box
$40 352-341-1649
WOODEN CRADLE
AND HIGH CHAIR,
great cond. $150
TWIN BOX SPRING/
MAT $50
(352) 795-7254



COPIER HP 150 color
copier/printer, works
great. $35.00
352-628-2150
PRINTER Epson Stylus
Photo R200 color printer
in excellent condition
$30.00 352-628-2150



4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES AND
SEAT FOLDS UP
GREAT SHAPE 75.00
464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
ADJUSTABLE LEGS
ON BOTH 20.00 EACH
464-0316
CRUTCHES ADJUST-
ABLE $10. Cane w/4
feet $10. Reach ex-
tender $5. Ultra grabber
$10. (352) 563-6410
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT
RESTS GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $100 464-0316
WALKER FOLDING
ALUMINUM Excellent
condition. $15.00
(352) 563-6410
WALKER FOUR
WHEELS WITH SEAT
AND BRAKES Excellent
condition. $49.00
(352) 563-6410
WHEEL CHAIR LIFT
Easily load folding chair
(not scooter)onto
vehicle hitch $100.
Dunnellon 465-8495
WHEELCHAIR MAN-
UAL WITH LEG RESTS
Brand new. Never used.
$75.00 (352) 563-6410
WHEELCHAIR OVER-
SIZED MANUAL Brand
new. Never used.
$100.00 (352)563-6410



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676



"NEW" ELECTRIC
GUITAR "FAT STRAT"
STYLE FINISH CHIP-
PED PLAYS PERFECT
$45 352-601-6625
BSR LARGE STEREO
HOME SPEAKERS 20"
WIDE BY 30" HIGH
ONLY $100 NICE
464-0316
EPIPHONE ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR
W/AMPGIGBAQTUNER,ST
RAP,DVD,ETC
$100 352-601-6625


FULLSIZE ACOUSTIC
GUITAR PACK "NEW"
W/GIGBAG
STRAP,STRINGS,ETC.
$65, 352-601-6625
JUSTICE SING & PLAY
ELECTRIC GUITAR
PINK never used
pd$150.sell $75
352-794-3020 586-4987
NEW CUTAWAY
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
GUITAR TRANS
BLACK/ABALONE $90
352-601-6625




3 MINI MUFFIN TINS
$5 NEW WHITE
QUICHE DISH $10
LARGE GREEN BOWL
$10 352419-5981
40 PIECE STAINLESS
STEEL UTENSIL SET
$20 DECORATIVE
HANDLES NEVER
USED 352-419-5981
COFFEE GRINDER $5
ELECTRIC VEGETA-
BLE STEAMER $5
CANNISTER SET $10
352-419-5981
HAVILAND CHINA
Forever Spring Pattern
Service for 8 people
$100 352-465-8495
LIGHTED MAKE UP
MIRROR 1x5 times
magnification low & high
light$25. 352-794-3020
352-5864987




Body Fit,
Gravity Machine,
$50.
Circle Glide
$25. Both Like New
(352) 447-1553
ELECTRIC TREADMILL
COMPACT (FOLDS
UP) LIFESTYLE ALL
ELECTRONICS $100
464-0316
EXERCISE BIKE (DP)
UPRIGHT TYPE
WORKS THE ARMS
TOO. ONLY 85.000
464-0316
EXERCISE BIKE
LIFESTYLE SMALL
COMPACT ONLY 95.00
464-0316
ROWING MACHINE BY
BODY ROW. WORKS
THE LEGS TOO $60.00
464-0316




.308 AMMO 100
Rds-$60- SP& HP
352-503-2792
16' BASS BOAT, 48hp
Johnson, smooth runn-
ing, T&T, electric motor,
depth finder, 2 batteries
& gas tanks, rough
trailer. $800.00. Inglis
352-447-0217
5HP, Game Fisher
Outboard, with Tank
Just tuned up
$450
Will take Gun on trade
(906) 285-1696
BROWNING BUCK
MARK 22 L.R. RIMFIRE
PISTOL includes 6000
rounds of 22 ammo,
and 3 spare magazines.
Will sell as a total pack-
age only. $680.00 cash
only Call 3524654373
CLUB CART GOLF
CART, Exc Cond, w/
Charger, good tires,
almost new batteries,
enclosure, $1500
352-527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF CLUBS
Two sets, clubs, carts
and accessories.
$40.00 each set.
726-1495
Ping G2 Iron, S/W-3
Irons, graphite reg.
shaft $175., Taylor
Made R7, Irons, G/W -
4 Irons Graphite Sr.
shaft $195. 860-0048
REMINGTON 700 BDL
270cal exc cond. $495.
will take lever action
30-30 on trade.
(906) 285-1696
Winchester Model 70
Super grade, 300 Win.
Mag.. Nikkon scope,
+ ++ extras,
$,1200
(352) 628-5355




UTILITY TRAILER
5X8 w/ stake sides,
1%2x4 in tongue &
grove floor, new tires,
spare, wheel bearings
w/ bearing buddies
$575 (269) 532-8100


CLASSIFIED



2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1895
** call 352-527-0555 **




GRACO PACKNPLAY
GOOD CONDITION
$35 352-613-0529
WHITE WOOD ROUND
BASSINET Brand new
$60. 352-422-2719


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369




1 Sweet Little Male
Yorkie,
CKC reg., $375. Fl.
health certs.,
Call
(352) 2124504
or (352) 212-1258


Baby Girl
Baby Girl is a 3-y.o.
spayed terrier mix,
weighs 48 Ibs,
heartwam-negative,
housebroken.
Friendly, likes chil-
dren, other dogs,
lived with a cat,
which she liked.
Walks well on a
leash, is a fun-loving,
active girl,
well-mannered.
Sweet, energetic girl
is waiting to meet
her forever family.
ID #is 15902545.
Call 352-746-8400.


BLUE
Blue is an approxi-
mately 8-y.o. neutered
male Cattle Dog mix,
Came to the shelter
because his family
lost their home. Blue
is white and tan,
weighs about 50
pounds, is a bit
chubby for his size,
which is medium. He
is housebroken, very
friendly and affection-
ate. The most striking
thing about him is that
he has very beautiful
blue eyes, which
catch your attention
immediately. He loves
people and wants to
be by your side Is
very obedient and
walks well on a leash.
He is quite laid-back
and would make a
great companion for
an older person.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BIRD SUPPLY SALE
Sun, Feb. 3, 9a-3p,
Cages, Seed, Toys,
Playstands, Milletspray
& more! Save! Cage
wire, Chicks & duck-
lings! 8260 Adrian Dr.,
Brooksville
727-517-5337


MEEKO
Meeko is a 2-y.o.
terrier/pit mix, a
perfect gentleman.
Very mellow, with
quiet dignity, calm
energy, very low
key. Weighs 70
pounds, beige and
white in color,
housebroken, easily
trained,. Gets along
with other dogs. His
kind and pleading
eyes will win your
heart, a perfect
dog to join you on a
walk. He is a sweet-
heart of a dog,
patiently waiting
at Citrus County
Animal shelter.
Call Karen @
218-780-1808.

Shih-Tzu Pups,
ACA, Males
starting@ $400. Lots
of colors, Beverly
Hills, FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net




Bermuda Hay 501bs $6
Never been rained on
795-1906 586-1906
SHAMROCK FARM, CR

^^^^^^I


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII





HOMOSASSA
2 & 3 Br homes w/ stor-
age sheds. Starting at
$550/mo + $800/Sec -
ONLY $1350 total to
move in. We pay trash,
lawn, water & sewer.
Close to Walmart,
Publixs& Suncoast PKY
No pets 352-584-1831

INVERNESS
Close In, 1 & 2 BR MH
Clean, Quiet & Com-
fortable 352-212-6182

ISTACHATTA
2/1 $500. mo. + Sec.
Fruit Trees Cul-de-sac
Withlacoochee River
16354 Daviston Ln.
No Pets 813-935-4996

LECANTO
LEISURE ACRES
3/2 water & garbage
incl. $600mo.
(352) 628-5990

LECANTO
SM 2/2 S/W, 1 ac w/ rm
for a horse 746-7595





must sell!
2006 FLEETWOOD
ENTERTAINER. 32X66.
OWNER MUST SELL!
CALL (352) 795-1272


"This one's 10 percent real food."


CASTLE LAKE
Floral City
2/2 S/W Fully furnished
move in condition.
2 screen rooms,
2 sheds. Landscaped
with sprinkler on quiet
cul-de-sac. $38,900.
352-212-1883

CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 4br 2ba MH
READY TO MOVE IN!
4Owner Fin. Avail.
CALL (352) 795-1272

FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Considering
ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498

HERNANDO 2/2 DW
On lot, with Shed &
Deck See for your-
self at 2562 N. Treas-
ure Pt. $28,500 obo
352-464-0719

HERNANDO/486
1+acre, 2br SWMH+
den/flp, ManCave/Work
Shop w/ AC, 28x40,
$43,500, J. Desha
Cndland Real Estate
(352)634-6340

HOMOSASSA
2ba 1 '/2 ba MH needs
complete rehab. Good
shed, well & septic.
6524 W. Akazian
$12,500 (603) 860-6660

NW Citrus County
SWMH on 1 acre, 2/1.5
- paved rd., screened
porch, appliances -
$37,700 possible
owner financing
352-795-9908




2/2 on Lake Rous-
seau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent
$240/mo. 2003. Used
Seasonally
Owner bought a
house. 207-546-6115,
cell

CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
Winter Soecials*
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
2/2 New Model $59K
2/2 waterfront. $31K.
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

DUNNELLON
LAKE ROUSSEAU MH
Park. Lg. 1/1 w/sliderto
encl. screened porch,
outside shed, CHAfurn.
Nice yard, low lot rent.
Asking$11,900
(207) 347-0531


HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $179/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977

INVERNESS
3/2 MH, Furn. Ig screen
lanai, shed & lot. All apple
mcl Ig scn TV,55+ PK
Asking $12,000. Call
(352)364-3747

INVERNESS
Move In Ready,
Beautiful 1/1 SW,
Mobile, Harbor Lights
55+ park, on Big Lake
Henderson. Fully furn.,
very updated, view of
lake, Cen. HVAC, W/D,
A Must See! Asking
$7,000, 352-344-1828

INVERNESS PARK
55+, 14X60, 2/2, new
roof, all appliances,
partly furn. screen
room, shed,
352-419-6476

MOBILE HOME,
Fully
Furnished. Everyth-
ing stays. Just move
in. 2 Sheds,
washer/dryer all ap-
pliances. Must See!
$7,500. (708) 308-3138

PALM TERRACE
55+ Community,
1997 3BR/2BA 14 x 66,
excel. cond. Shed,
Fl. Rm. Carport &
Deck $16,000. (352)
400-8231

REDUCED 2/2 $17,500
On Lake Rousseau
Lot Rent $240/mo.
BETTER THAN NEW!
Owner financing. Call
LEE (352) 817-1987

Singing Forest
FLORAL CITY
14 x 70, Mobile, 2 lrg.
bedrooms, furnished &
remodeled, heat & air,
carport & shed, Wash/
Dryer, Lot rent $176.
$14,500. 352-344-2420

STONEBROOK, CR
2bd/2ba,gourmet kitch,
master suite,encl. porch
pond, crprt+ patio
$51,900, Cridland RE,
Jackie 352-634-6340

Waterfront/Homosassa
Westwind Village 55+
Beautifully furnished
Move In Ready, 2/2
2 Scrn rms, dbl door,
refng./Ice maker
Washer Dryer, Low
monthly payments,
$19000 obo
(850) 449-1811 Cell


BANK
FORECLOSURE
Land-n-Home, 3/2
1500 sq. ft. On /2
Acre, paved rd.
LOOKS GOOD, Have
financing if needed,
only $2,500 down,
$381.44mo. P&
W.A.C. OR $69,900.
Call 352-613-0587
or 352-621-918for Brit

Crystal River 55$$
Park. 2BR/1BA Car-
port & Screened
Porch. Heat/Air
$9,500. 352-746-4648
Ask for Brit

HERNANDO
$$ Private Owner $$
Financing Available

Manufactured Homes
Call 1-727-9674230

HOME-ON-LAND
3/2 Great Shape.
%Acre. Move In Now
$59,900.
Call 352-401-2979,
352-621-3807





NEW 2013

2br2ba
Doublewide w/10 year
Warranty $39,900
Delivered & setup, a/c,
skirt, steps.
Call(352) 795-1272

REPO'S- REPO'S
REPO'S
WE HAVE REPO'S
CALL 352-621-9181




WE WILL

BUY YOUR
MANUFACTURED
Home. from 1976-2013
CALL (352) 795-2377




2BR/1'/2BA, MH &
Land Needs little Work
$17,500 9340 W.Tonto
Dr., Crystal River
Call 352-382-1544 or
813-789-7431
3bdr/2 full baths/ 2 car
carport on 1 acre.
split layout, steel roof,
caged pool, 20x25 ft
deck, Ig storage build-
ing, Furnished Modu-
lar $73,900, 5215
Bridget Pt, Castle
Lake Park
Inverness
(352) 597-7353


Tans Di atr


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179



Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052
CNA
Available for Private
Duty in you home.
References avail, on
request. (352) 453-7255
HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping
Dr. appts, errands,
etc. Hablo Espanol
813-601-8199




SHADYVIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




Your World





CiIR--I -i
CII ONic-i


JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump
Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374

THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




DIESTLER COM-
PUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078

CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120

FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097

ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping
Dr. appts, errands,
etc. Hablo Espanol
813-601-8199




COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL
25 yrs exp. lic.2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
** 352-302-6838 **




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777




"BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscap-
ing
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352 422-7279 *


Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



1 CALL & RELAX!
25vrs Exp in 100%
property maint & all
repairs, call
H&H Services today!
lic#37658
352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
s FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
s FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
& AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *k
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




Cleaning Svc-Home,
office~windows,
pressure washing &
more. 352-322-1799




All AROUND
TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120




BEAT ANY PRICE
Paint & Power wash
Lawn & Trees Trim
Jim (352) 246-2585
LAWNCARE N
MORE
Yard Clean-up,
leaves
bushes, hauling
352-726-9570
Winter Clean Up,
Leaves, Power Wash-
ing & More Call
Coastal Lawn Care
(352) 601-1447


AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up time.
352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, lawn maint.
furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump
Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998

Robert G. Vighotti LLC
Painting
Int/Ext FREE
ESTIMATES 35 yrs
exp.
call 508-314-3279


CALL STELLAR
BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins.
FREE EST (352)
586-2996

BEAT ANY PRICE
Paint & Power Wash
Lawn & Trees Trim
Jim (352) 246-2585

Cleaning Svc-Home,
office,windows,
pressure washing &
more. 352-322-1799

* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570

PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300

Robert G. Vigliotti LLC
Painting
Int/Ext FREE
ESTIMATES 35 yrs
exp.
call 508-314-3279

Winter Clean Up,
Leaves, Power Wash-
ing & More Call
Coastal Lawn Care
(352) 601-1447





All chases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713


DGS SERVICES LLC
Reroofs Metal Roofs
REPAIRS Home
Inspector 414-8693




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
k 352-302-6838 k




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, liclins 302-8852
KING's LAND
CLEARING & TREE
SERVICE
Complete tree &
stump removal haul-
ing, demo & tractor
work. 32 yrs. exp.
(352) 220-9819
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


I = [ L Lq kJ I i 1 Irei'UlbJL I lL m k I [ I


AddIIl IIitions -l[l 4- GariamI I r [1 11Icn eI J


m


m








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


INVERNESS
RV Spaces. Bring your
own boat and fishing
gear. AGE 55+ commu-
nity. Lot rent only
$360-$375 including
electric. Edge Water
Oaks 352-344-1380




HOMOSASSA
RENT-to-OWN
3br 2ba MH
Immediate Occpancy
Owner Financing Avail.
CALL (352) 795-2377





ACTIONS
-

RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounlyHomeRentals.com
CITRUS SPRINGS
8160 N. Duval Dr. (S)....$1,300
3/2/2 Pool home, fully furn. w/uilities
water/sewer andelec. caps
CRYSTAL RIVER
10350 Deepwoods Dr. (CRI.... $750
2/2/1 Close to mi l, I utilty room
11255W. Bayslre Dr.(CR).. $850
2/2 Waterfront condo, amenities
HOMOSASSA
2278S. Sadburg Pt. H) ..... 500
2/1 Nice Duplex
2 Balsam CI. S (H)..... $1,400
3/3/2 SMW poolhomewit guestquarters
HERNANDO/INVERNESS
994 E.Winneltka St.(Her).... $625
2/1.5 on 1 acre with carport
6315 N. ShoewodDr.(Her)...$650
2/1 Cute homewith FL roomandgreatbackard
854 Pritchard Isl. (Inv.)...$800
2/2 Townhouse on waterfiont, comm. pool



; 5 ;

3/2 Citrus Sorings $975
Furn W/FHome $2500
Furn Stilt wfit Hm $1700
3/2 furn wit/f condo$1500
More rentals:
c21 naturecoast.com
835 NE Hwy 19Crystal
River, Fl(352) 795-0021

Chassahowitzka
3/2 waterfrnt/DW $500
2/2, fenc. Yd/DW $500
2/2 house w/gar. $600
Suparmill Woods
3/2/2, Furnished, $900.
AGENT (352) 382-1000




CRYSTAL RIVER
1 Br 2BA Completely
furn. Ige scr porch, with
cable tv, W/D,all utilities.
$700 + sec 422-7717

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857

CRYSTAL RIVER
Studio Apartment
Completely Furn. Ca-
ble TV W/D rm. All util.
incl' d.+ boat dock.
$700 mo 352-372-0507

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025

HOMOSASSA
1/1 Remodeled, Near
New Wal-Mart on
Cardinal $425. + Sec.
(352) 621-5265




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
C stal River
Apf, 2 BR/ 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant
Rd. to So. on Talla-
hasse Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719


(gcpo u:


CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apart-
ments for Rent
352-465-2985
CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2 CHA, W/D
hk-up $575/mo.1st Mo.
FREE with $600. no
dogs 352-726-9570
INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great
Loc., clean & roomy.
no pets $500.mo 1st. &
Last $300. Sec.
352-341-1847



CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret
Harbour Apts. Newly
remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incl Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1/2, 828 5th Ave. NE
Furn $650 or Unfurn.
$550+sec 727-455-
8998, 727-343-3965




CITRUS HILLS
2/2'/2 Townhouse
Condo, full apple's,
carport, Citrus Hills
membership ncld'd
Prudential Florida
Showcase Properties
call 352-476-8136




CITRUS SPRINGS
2/2 Duplex, nice private
area, near shopping &
schools. Wtr, sewer mncl
$600mo 352-558-4477
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2 CHA, W/D
hk-up $575/mo.1st Mo.
FREE with $600. no
dogs 352-726-9570
INVERNESS
2/1 W/D Hk-up, No
Pets, $550 mo. + Util
(352) 220-4818
INVERNESS
Clean, Attrative 2/2/1
Duplex, family neigh.
3619 Theresa Lane,
Terry Houston, Foxfire
Realty (352) 528-3314



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



CRYSTAL RIVER
**RENT REDUCED**
3/1 Country Home on
stilts,w/fenced yard.
$565 + Utilities.
Call 920-922-6800
Sugarmill Woods
3BR, 21/2BA, Super
Clean 3,100 sf, large
priv. shaded lot,
2 covered, porches,
sm. pet ok. $1,150.
mo. yrly Ise., sec. dep
$700. $3,000 move in
(727) 580-1083



BEVERLY HILLS
1/1/CP + Fl. Rm $450
(352) 897-4447,
697-1384
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, Scrn. Rm. $400.
Laun. Rm. 697-1457
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1+ Florida Room,
106 S. Fillmore $550
mo. 352-422-2798
BEVERLY HILLS
870 Beakrush Ln
2br 1% ba, 1 car gar.
enclosed screen porch,
$600 mo. leased dep.
no pets. 352-586-3072
CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Inverness
352-726-3476
Lecanto
352-746-0373
Crystal River
352-563-0890





CITRUS HILLS
AREA, HERITAGE
55+ Gated Community
3/2 builders model,
never lived in, $1000
mnth. 352-270-8953


Water Incl. CHA, $496.
352-220-2447
212-2051
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1.5,fncdyrd, 1 blkto
King's Bay. Boat tie-up;
$650/mo, 1st/L/$300
sec (352)794-0811
Invern. Highlands
2/2/1, City Water, Great
Loc. Quiet Neighrhood
$650. 352-860-2554
INVERNESS
3/2 Brand New,
Granite tops, marble
firs, SS Ap $895
(352) 634-3897
INVERNESS
3/2/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352- 601-2615 OR
352-201-9427
INVERNESS
3BR/2BA/1, $795. mo
885 Duck Cove Path
(352) 895-0744 Cell
INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/1/1
$590mo.1st & Sec
(352) 344-2560
INVERNESS
Large 1 BR home in
55+ community, Great
location just off the
water. Bring boat &
fishing gear. $585
(352) 344-1380
Sugarmill Woods
2/2/2, 2 MBdrms
$875. 352-302-4057



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225



INVERNESS
Share a house, Ig pool
Lakeside C Club, Golf
Course, Lots amenities
$875. 1st/sec 419-2924



BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV &
W/D WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611
Citrus Hills/Condo
m/bdrm w/ba htd pool
$450 352-249-7804



CRYSTAL RIVER
Warehouse for Rent
Free standing, garage
area, 1,440sf,
$100-$550
352-634-0129

Rea Estate
ForSal


ture Coast Landings
RV Resort. Large de-
veloped site and a
separate gated storage
lot; plus almost new
5th-wheel with slides,
screened gazebo, and
storage building. All for
$79,900. For more info
and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com


ES IAlEb SALE Nature
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Developed site with
gazebo & storage bldg,
reduced to $49,500.
Separate storage
lot available. (RV sold).
For info and pictures
Click on
detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441
LAND FOR SALE
LAND LIQUIDATION
20 acres St. Lucie
Waterway, $189,500.
3 miles boat Lake
Okeechobee, 45 min
boat Atlantic. Private
/ gated. Deer, turkey,
hogs, fishing.
(888)716-2259 Gulf
Atlantic Land,
Broker.

MOTIVATED SELLER
Wants This Gone!!!
6 Acres w Big SHOP,
Nice 2/2/2 House,
Porches Barns, pond,
pvd rd, Concrete dr.
Reduced! $114, 900
MLS 357108. www.
crosslandrealty.com
352 726 6644


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY



Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches
&
Commercial






AL
Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments,
Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $58,500. Call
352-638-0905


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


CLASSIFIED




INVERNESS
Sunday 1/27 lp-4pm
3/2 MH, Furn. Ig screen
lanai, shed & lot. All apple
mncl Ig scn TV,55+ PK
Asking $12,000.
911 Hoffmann Lane
Melody MH Park
(352) 364-3747
OPEN HOUSE
Suaarmill Woods 4/3/2
Saturday 12-4PM
211 Pine Stree
(352) 503-5233



HOMOSASSA
GNC Commercial
7311 Grover Cleveland
Blvd. 3/2 MH $69,900.
(603) 860-6660










CITRUS
SPRINGS
3/2/2, 2 yr old Pool
home in imacculate
condition,
Landscaped backyard.
$125.000 Priced to
sell!
CALL (570) 412-5194



Quiet Country Setting
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area
only 20 Mm. to Ocala
$129,900 Call
352-302-6784
for appt.



PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat,
horses, in-laws; there
is room for everyth-
ing! 4/3 w/7 car
garage/workshop &
in-law suite on 5.83 ac-
res.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164



2/2/2, REMODELED
NEW: Roof, AC, Kit,
Baths, Windows, Firs,
317 S Harnson.
Reduced $72,900.
Call 352-527-1239











Completely updated!
1816 W. Jena Ct
OPEN SUN 12-3PM
$96,900
PRICED TO SELL!
FSBO 610-248-2090


QFD JEN: mLi
SAUDYI ERUR


Custom Home,
3 bedroom, 21/ bath,
w/Master w/DBL
walk-ins + bath +
den/off. 2+ car garage.
1 Acre. MUST SEE!
$249,900.
352-860-0444
HERNANDO
Citrus Hills Pool
Home
4/3/2+, circular
drive,
1 acre lot, below
$200k 352-527-7856




ARBOR LAKES
Fantastic Dream
Home In Active Senior
Community $169,900
2,100 sf, 3BR/2BA/2GA
Split Floor Plan w/Pool
Call (352) 726-6564




Unique stilt home in
rustic surroundings
off 581. Great loc to
town, shopping, &
hospital. 2br/lba, w/
rap around porch.
Needs some TLC.
Sold as is. Make an
offer. Asking $33,900
(352) 419-6227




3b/2ba den, MH
on land off US 19
newer c/h/a carpet &
vinyl, clean RV Hkup.
fence **$39.900"
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie 352-634-6340
The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo
Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558






MUST SELL

4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell






4/2/3 HEATED POOL
lots of extras!
SELLER MOTIVATED!
reduced to 210k
352-688-6500 or
352-212-5023


Irtf I


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Sugarmill Woods
House for Sale
2/2/2, Call for More
Info. 334-691-4601
(850) 776-7528













Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2013 CIL





Every aswersh
yy vRiU 1 ItUR BY TRICKY RICKY KANE

1. Taint and ruin planting earth (1) Evpair answers (like Fa rhymiT gAT
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Animal doc's menacing statements (1) they will fit in the letter
_ I I squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. From a catalog buy a rug edging (2) syllables in each word.


4. Sink teeth into a pixie (1)


5. The Cable Guy's NFL rushing plays (2)


6. Wall paintings' non-singular words (2)


S2013UFS,Dist by Univ UclickforUFS


7. French bubbly advertising series (2)


NOIVdwVJ aNOVdVHtD SI flSId SlTVfl '9 lSHIHV3 SA XHV'I
RI3HdS HUl RT HluH[of (O *E sIVaRHi SJIA g sw'HO OdS 1
2-2-13 SH3MSNV


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
352-422-4298
aail@citrusrealtor
.com
www.citrusrealtor
.com
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.


I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant


Brooksville Deeded
spacious, shaded cnr
lot, 1 BR/1 BA, Large FL
room, Large storage
shed & patio. 55+ RV
Park w/ heated pool,
and music activities,
$36,000 352-848-0448,
352- 428-0462 anytime


Waerrnt-
^Homes~l


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNatureCoast
Properties.com
"o view
great waterfront
properties"


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near
KINGS BAY $425,000.
Make Offers
352-563-9857





% ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact fee
credit, high and dry,
trees, $11,000 obo
(352) 795-3710


INVERNESS, FL
3 miles east of Inv;
5-20ac wooded/some
cleared, owner finance
available.
Owner is licensed Real
Estate Broker,
Ed Messer.
ed.messer@yahoo.com


NORTH CITRUS
1.4 ac. Cleared, fenced,
high & dry. Paved road.
Elec., pump/well, septic.
Owner finan. No
mobiles. $13,900
CALL 352-897-4195





HOMOSASSA Wooded
Lot on Lee Woods Dr.,
has Wetlands, with
River access, but not
on river $6,000.
352-621-1664






AIRBOAT
13ft x 7tt, 500 HP Cad-
iliac, turn key boat
$9,500 obo Call Jim for
details (813) 361-4929,


BAYLINER 175
2007, Bownrider, garage
kept, Bimini top, custom
cover, depth finder, only
44 hrs on motor,pristine
condition! $14,000.
352-560-7377




BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motor,AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth
finder, 2001 Rolls
float on trailer worth
$1000. Comes
w/spare motor Has
service manual,
2nd owner $2250
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855


EXCURSION X25E
TRITON
The Ultimate Entertainment Tritoon
-- *__ F225 Yamaha VMAX Four Stroke 40+ MPH
Teak Deck
CALL FOR DETAILS!

CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597



2012 ALIUMACRAFT
1436 iON
S Suzuki DF15 Four Stroke Bimini Top
S Rod Holders* 6 Gallon Fuel Tank

NOW. 3,995 Was$ 250 2 Fishing Seats* Anchor Galvanized Trailer
THREE RIVERS MARINE
1038 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 563-5510



2013 HONDA CRF 250L
The "All New" CRF 250L makes going from
the street to the dirt and back to the street
while averaging 73 MPG all worth it.

MSRP14,490
HONDA OF CRYSTAL RIVER
1917 N. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 795-4832


2013 NAUTIC STAR
203 DECK BOAT
. Yamaha F115 Four Stroke Front/Rear Swim Ladders
Full Cover* Aluminum Trailer
CALL FOR DETAILS


CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River


795-2597


2005 G31860 TUNNEL
SYamaha o707TLRA oil injected
Flip back cooler seat
Built-in fuel tank* Manual jack plate
REDUCED T0 $10,500 |

CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597



2013 HONDA PCX 150
Experience this "All New" Freeway Capable
Scooter from Honda. At 102 MPG & over 60 MPH,
you can afford to go anywhere you want.
MSRP $3,449

HONDA OF CRYSTAL RIVER
1917 N. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 795-4832


SNEW 2012 PANGA
MARINE 18' SKIFF DEMO
Si i ...... Offshore* All Composite Construction
Bimini Top Large Front Deck w/Storage
R elable & Fuel Efficient Honda BF60 EEI Four Stroke
ouniii with a 5 Year Non-Declining Warranty
NOW 018 ,995 was S21,995 Self Bailing Deck Galvanized Trailer Included
THREE RIVERS MARINE
1038 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 563-5510



2012 HONDA NC700X
Honda's new "Adventure" Bike that's
.......averaging 64 MPG's. Has most BMW
buyers thinking twice.

MSRP $6,995

HONDA OF CRYSTAL RIVER
1917 N. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 795-4832



CALL FOR DETAILS

563-3206


As LowAs $18 r ad


As Low As 8 per ad


Citrus Coun
Homes I









C012 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2013


C DORY
1999 16ft, Angler, with
trailer, Honda 4 stroke,
40HP, $7,800 Floral City
(717) 994-2362 Cell

















LL BEAN
16ft, ABS, canoe
with paddle &
jackets, $650 obo
(352) 628-3194
PONTOON
'97, Suntracker, 21ft.
50HP 4 stroke, Merc.
alum. deck, kept un-
der roof. clean, no
trailer $5,500 637-5958
STAR CRAFT
'09 Pontoon, 20 ft w/
trailer, 50hp, like new
condition $11,400 OBO
(618) 444-9425
TRI PONTOON
BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
(352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
WELLCRAFT 1989
18' Sport C/C, T top,
150 Yam. Alum TIr,
Great Cond. $5800
Cr Rvr (513) 260-6410



ITASCA MERIDIAN
36 Ft, 2005 Motor Home
350HP Cat Diesel 55K
miles, no smoke/pets
6 Michelin Tires, New
2010 qn w/ sleep No.
mattress & overhead
fan. W/D combo
$71,000 obo.
(352) 419-7882

MONTEGO BAY 35ft
5th wheel 06, 3 slides
kept undercover, Exc
cond. Truck Avail.
LOADED
$27,000 (352) 564-2756
NATIONAL RV
2006 Tropical One
owner,34ft, 26000
miles,no smoke/pets,
300HP Cummins die-
sel,2 slides, 6 new ti-
res, 3yr
warrantymany extras.
$87000. Well main-
taned. 352-341-4506
SUNNYBROOK
2008, 35FT Fifth Wheel
3 slides, electnc awning
fireplace, 2 ac's, 50 amp
king bed, pmnts assum-
able @ $424 per month.
352-279-3544


Thetford 27 Gallon.
4 wheel smart tote,
premuim portable
Waste Tank $110 obo
(352) 746-9851



5TH WHEEL
33FT
GOOD CONDITION
MUST SELL
(423) 202-0914
Brooksville Deeded
spacious, shaded cnr
lot, 1BR/1BA, Large FL
room, Large storage
shed & patio. 55+ RV
Park w/ heated pool,
and music activities,
$36,000 352-848-0448,
352- 428-0462 anytime
HI-LO TRAVEL
TRAILER 2003, tow lite
model 22-03t,
excellent condition
$6000 obo
352-422-8092
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
ROCKWOOD
'04, 29 ft., Ultra Lite,
SS. Appls Qn. Bd., Full
Bath, all equip. incl'd
$8,500 obo, 382-0153
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, kg bd,like new,
60amp serve. NADA
$29K asking $25K
obo 352-382-3298
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945



TOPPER
8 ft Red Fiberglass
must sell $200 obo
Lecanto 941-504-0899



**BEST PRICE**
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
**352-426-4267**
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition, Ti-
tle, No Title, Bank
Lien,
No Problem, Don't
Trade it in. We Will
Pay up to $25K Any
Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ


BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191



AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE.
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 5 6 3 -19 0 2
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Horosassa Fl.
BUICK
2007, Lucerne, CXL
55K miles, Leather
$13,500. obo
Call Troy (352)621-7113

wvvvvvv
CADILLAC
1997 De Ville Tan with
black imitation rag
top, fully loaded ,
good runner-norstar
engine,only 97000
miles, good
tires-$2999.00. jim
(941)-705-1795
CHEVROLET
'01 Corvette Corvette
6 speed, black on
black, $14,500
(352) 613-2333
CHEVROLET
2002, Camaro Z28
$9,495.
352-341-0018
FORD
'01, Taurus, 140K miles
Ice cold Air, good tires,
brakes, runs good,
$2,200, 352-201-6958
FORD
2005, Five Hundred
LMT, 40K miles,
leather, V6 $9,980
Call Troy 352-621-7113
FORD
2006 Focus ZXW, SE
4DR, WGN. 85k miles
$5,800 obo Call Troy
(352) 621-7113
FORD
Mustang Cobra, Indy
500 Pace Car-1994,
Convertible, 7100 mi,
Gar. kept 252-339-3897
Harley Davidson
'03, Super Glide,
low miles, $7,500
(352) 613-2333
HONDA
2011 CRV LX, 19K mi-
les, likenew, 4 Cyl.
$19,950
Call Troy 352-621-7113
HYUNDAI
2006 Elantra, GLS 90K
miles, likenew, 4 DR,
auto. $6,800
Call Troy 352-621-7113
MAZDA
2007, RX8 Looking for
A sports Car, Look No
Further!!! This is A Must
See...Call for an Appt.
and Pricing
352-628-4600
MERCURY
2004, Grand Marquis,
Leather and Loaded
To Many Options to
List. Call Today
Before It's Gone
Call 352-628-4600


MITSUBISHI
2011 Galant, Low Mi.
Great fuel economy,
Priced to sell
Call 352-628-4600
For Appointment

MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

MUSTANG
1985, coupe, 58k mile
new tires, 4 cyl, auto
$2000 obo
(352) 228-4012
MUSTANG GT 03
63k,ShowCar,Super
charger, lots of goodies!
Chrome, $18k OBO
(352) 228-4012
NISSAN
'04, 350 Z, Convertible,
2 Door, automatic, sil-
ver, 53k miles, $12,500
obo (352) 382-4239
OLDSMOBILE '99
Cutlass, custom, 4 DR,
loaded, good mi., V6,
cruise, tilt, gar. clean
$3,375. (352) 212-9383
PONTIAC
1999 TransAm 5.7Llter
V8, 62,700 mi,
Show Quality, $7500.
(352) 726-8336
Cell 352-302-5569
PONTIAC
2008, G6,
4 Door, Cold AC
Call 352-628-4600
For Pricing
PORSCHE
'99, 911 Carrera, black
exterior, black interior
62,600 org. mi $25,900
386-334-2559 CELL
TOYOTA
2000, Camry LE
V6, 183K miles Super
Clean $5,800. obo
Troy (352) 621-7113
TOYOTA
2007, Yaris, 59K miles,
2 DR, H/B $7,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113




AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR Show
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. FEB. 3. 2013
1-800-438-8559






I I I I I I I II

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


CLASSIFIED



CHEVY
89 Corvette, White
needs trans $3250
352-601-0355




CHEVROLET
1994,C/K 2500
$2,880
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2005, Silverado
2500 HD, Diesel crew
cab, $13,880
352-341-0018
DODGE
1997 Ram 2500 Truck
Cummins Diesel, 2WD,
Auto Trans,116,000
miles. Garage kept.
Well maintained. Has
been used as a com-
mute vehicle. $7,800
firm. 352-464-4690
FORD
1999 F150 Good
condition, 4 new tires
$4200 352-270-7420
FORD
2003 F150
Ex Cab, $8,990
352-341-0018
FORD
'98, Ranger Splash,
very well kept, cold AC,
6 cyl., auto, Tires like
new, $3,200 obo
(352) 601-0572
FORD
F150, 1978, 4x4
Runs good, 6" Lift kit,
$1,650 obo
(352) 564-4598

MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

TOYOTA
2002, Tacoma,
Crew Cab, $8,770.
352-341-0018
TOYOTA
2004, 4 Runner Sport
2WD, 94K mi, Leather
$12,800. obo
Call Troy 352-621-7113




CADILLAC
2007, Escalade,
44k miles, Luxury
NAV, $29,500.
Call Troy (352)
621-7113
CHEVY TRAIL-
BLAZER LT 05
exc. cond. asking $6000
obo, in Hernando
(904) 923-2902
DODGE
1998 Durango, 4 WD
SLT, 5.2L, 103K ong mi.
All options, one owner
$1000 352-527-8636




JEEP
2001 4cyl "TJ" Auto.,
A/C, soft top with lift kit.
not a mudder, real pretty
Low miles $10,000
352-220-4634


JEEP
2004, Wrangler X 4WD,
Only 57K miles,
Hard Top $13,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113




DODGE
1999, Work Van
138k miles, mechani-
cally sound $2,500
obo (352) 344-2132
KIA
2006 Sedona,
Great Family Van,
7 Pass, low mi. Call
today for Low Price


BAU BUY BUjGIt
2011 "ready to hunt"
Only $5998.
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS
2002, SPORTSMAN
700 CC 4X4 AUTO
READY FOR THE MUD
ONLY $4288
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS RZR 800 LE
TIME TO PLAY HARD
ONLY $8388
(352) 621-3678




CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492

Harley Davidson
2005, 883
LOW MILES
$3,995.

Harley Davidson
2006, STREET GLIDE
EZ FINANCE
$11,500.

HONDA
2009, VT750 AERO,
CLEAN
$4,995.

SUZUKI
2001, VOLUSIA
EZ FINANCE
$2,995.

KAWASAKI
1999, NOMAD
RUNS GREAT
$3,800.

LUCKY U CYCLES
352-330-0047
WWW.LUCKYU
CYCLES.COM


Harley-DAVIDSON
2006 FLHTPI Clean
bike, great looks, 88 ci,
5 speed, low miles 19K,
accident free, never
played down, garage
kept, two tone bk/wt, all
service done by HD
dealer 352 513-4294
asking $10,500
HARLEY-Davidson
Leather Jacket LG as
New, $300. OBO
Two shorty motorcycle
Helmets S/M & L/XL
$50ea 352-746-6125


HONDA
'04, 750 Shadow Aero.
Runs & looks great!
$2,995. Firm
(352) 344-0084
HONDA BLACK BIRD
CBR 1100 LOW LOW
MILES ONLY $3488.00
(352) 621-3678
HONDA SPIRIT
2002, ExcTires, Bags,
WS, Sissy Bar, Cobra
Pipes. 28k miles.
$2,000 (352) 476-3688
HONDA ST1300
2006 MADE TO TOUR
ONLY $7786
(352) 621-3678


KYMCO
2009, AJILITY
SCOOTER GREAT
GAS SAVER ONLY
$998 (352) 621-3678

SCOOTER
50 CC, like new, 400
miles, runs great
$850 OBO
(352) 746-0167
(315) 439-6005

SCOOTER
Lifan Industries, 2008
50cc, looks & runs
great. $750 obo
(352) 436-5036


1 I1'I 11 It'lW


KAWASKI NINFA
650
LIKE NEW ONLY
$5488 (352) 621-3678
SUZUKI BURGMAN
AUTOMATIC TWIST
AND GO FUN ONLY
$4686 (352) 621-3678
SUZUKI GSXR 750
195 MILES "HOLD ON"
ONLY $9996
(352) 621-3678
VICTORY CROSS
ROADS
"GREAT American
MADE CRUSIER"
ONLY $12888
(352) 621-3678


200-0209 SACRN
John Haines File No: 2012-CP-633 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.:2012-CP-633
IN RE: ESTATE OF JOHN HAINES a/k/a JOHN H. HAINES a/k/a JOHN HARRY HAINES
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The name of the decedent, the designation of the court in which the administra-
tion of this estate is pending, and the file number are indicated above. The address
of the court is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and
addresses of the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
If you have been served with a copy of this notice and you have any claim or de-
mand against the decedent estate, even if that claim is unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated, you must file your claim wit the court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF A
DATE THAT IS 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
30 DAYS AFTER YOU RECEIVE A COPY OF THIS NOTICE.
Al other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims
must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
EVEN IF A CLAIM IS NOT BARRED BYTHE LIMITATIONS DESCRIBED ABOVE, A;; CLAIMS
WHICH HAVE NOT BEEN FILED WILL BE BARRED TWO (2) YEARS AFTER DECEDENT'S
DEATH.
The date of death of the decedent is August 24th, 2012
The date of the first publication of this Notice is February 2, 2013.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ JOANNE S. WILBURNE, ESQUIRE, Attorney for Estate, Florida Bar No.: 0125164
Joanne S. Wilburne, P.A., 305 North Apopka Avenue
Inverness, Florida 34450, Telephone: (352) 344-1313, Facsimile: (352) 344-4050
Personal Representative:
/s/ KRISTOPHER J. HAINES, 941 Brookridge Drive, Fayetteville, NC 28314
February 2 & 9, 2013.


202-0202 SACRN
2/13 sales
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that
the undersigned intends to
sell the vehicle described
below under Florida Stat-
utes 71378 The under-
signed will sell at public
sale by competitive bidding


on Wednesday, February
13, 2013 at 9'00 am on the
premises where said vehi-
cle
has been stored and which
are located at, Smitty's
Auto, Inc, 4631 W Cardinal
St, Homosassa, Citrus
County, Florida, the follow-
ing'
Year:1994Make: Dodge


^Meeting^
Notices^^


Model: B250 Ram Vin
2BH6HB21Y8RK542606
Purchase must be paid for
at the time of purchase in
cash only Vehicle sold as is
and must be removed at the
time of sale Sale is subject
to cancellation in the event
of settlement between
owner and obligated party
February 2, 2013

Meeting^
Notices^


201-0202 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Citrus County Hospital Board Meeting
NOTICE
There will be a meeting on Wednesday, February 20, 2013 at 9:00am with Citrus
County Hospital Board Chairman Debbie Ressler and Chairman Robert Collins of the
Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc., in the Annex Building Conference Room lo-
cated at 123 S. Pine Ave., Inverness. FL 34452 to discuss:
Global Settlement Agreement, inclusive of all disputes between the parties in
volving Governance and Litigation.
Other.
Copies of the Agenda are available by calling the Citrus County Hospital Board at
352-341-2250. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by this Board, with
respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that a verbatim rec-
ord of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Persons who require special accommodations under the American with Disabilities
should contact the Citrus County Hospital Board Office, 123 S. Pine Ave., Inverness,
Florida, 34452 (352) 341-2250.
February 2, 2013.


C


www.villagetovota.coi


ILLAG E TOYOTI





CRYSTAL RIVER





m 352-628-5100


*Payments are with $2,000 cash down or trade equity and with approved credit. See dealer for details.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


w WA W G3T048w
2013 EDGE SE
$28,890 MSRP
-400 Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
-1,500 Bonus Cash

*27,990


2013 EXPLORER XLT
$36,005 MSRP
-1,010 Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
-2,000 Bonus Cash

*32,995


2013 F-150 SUPER CAB XL
$29,265 MSRP
-800 Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
-3,500 Customer Cash

*24,965


=kIlA Bi P l I II ;


II VY RUKU ISI U ALl DUUI UUUI LAUKAVAN t
$5,950 $6,950


2003 GMC YUKON SLT
$ 10,950



08 CHEVY MALIBU LT
$13,950


2010 FORD E250 CARGO VAN
32,000 miles
$15,950


2008 NISSAN XTERRA
$13,950


2009 GRAND MARQUIS LS
$13,950


2008 CHRYSLER SEBRING TOURING 2010 FORD FOCUS SEL
20,000 Miles Loaded
$12,950 $12,950


2UI I NISAN VEKSA L
15,000 Miles
$13,950


08 FORD TAURUS SEL
$12,950


2010 FORD EDGE SE 2010 LINCOLN MKZ
$19,950 $19,950


NICk Nicholas

Call Toll Free Nick
77-7771 Crystal River


Hwy. 19 N. 795-7371
1 Based on 211CY sales. 2 Based on analysis of data published by EPA, 11/10. *Prices
and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory rebates with approved credit. Plus
tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. Ford Credit Financing required. Not all buyers
will qualify. See dealer for details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors.
Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prices and payments good through 2/4/13.


2010 LINCOLN MKS
One Owner
$25,950

LINCOLN


S.R.44


Ofl I -I l 7 -I Pl I
or Visit Us Online
www.nicknicholasfordLINCOLN.com


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2013 C13




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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2012 Chevy Volt
Now's the time to GO GREEN!!!


AND 0% APR


AIl-New 2013 Chevy SpliadLS
AuomaicTransmission
$4n moo


2912 Chevy Sonic 5 Dr. LS
MSRP: $15o60
$ 4 o oaIA


J


213 Chevy Malhu LS
MSRP: $23,440
$40 In


2013 Chevy Euinox LS
Stk. #C13135, Auto, 4cyl. MSRP: S25,030


2012 Chevy Traverse LS
Stk #Cl 232, Aut, Seats 7!. Was $30,750


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C14 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2013


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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urn


New 2012 Honda Civic LX
AUTOMATIC


I


New 2013 Honda FIt -3
MOOEL GESH3CEXW. EQUIPPED NOT STRIPPED
WITH AUTOMATIC. A/C AND CRUISE o



New 2012 Honda Accord LX Sedan
MODEL CP2F3CEW, AUTOMATIC.POWER PKG.
CRUISE.TRACTUIN CONTROL AND SO MUCH MORE



New 2012 Honda CR-V LX 2WD
MODEL FaH3WCEW, COME SE E V THE CR.-V THE BEST
SEMG COMPACT SIuv IN AMEIW SAVE WHifTHEY LAST


4"


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*10 ,


New 2013 Honda Odyssey Lx
MODEL RL5H2DEW


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New 2012 Honda Ridgellne RT
IOELYKI1FCEW. OWDfrHTHE TRUNK hTHE BED. POWER PRG,
CFRIS CA ONTR. V4 POWER MO A RIDE UNE NO OTHER


New 2012 Honda Csslour 2WD 2A .4A EX
MODEL1TF3IM AOMATIC HATOIBACK WXI STYLE AND COMFORT
ALT LUXULR AM ET"ESANOROW TODX WltT T NEED.

WA~i.^N si 4W


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0011


08 Honda ODYSSEY EX-L
H7719 .....$14,880


10 Honda CIVIC LX 12 Honda CIVIC EX
#H7691..$1 6295 #H7712.....1 95


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11 Honda CRV
#H7641.....$1 .995


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11 Honda CRV
#H7747....$19.985


10 Honda CIVIC LX 08 Honda ACCORD EXL
7668.....$14995 #H666....$15,995



11 Honda PILOT LX 10 HONDA CRV LX
7M.....S22995 H7722.......CM FMR


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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2013 CS15


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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, NOW THROUGH TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5th 8:30AM-7PM


S .. .


-!6i.


iTKsP '- 'i. 3-
.. . .. . .. . ..


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TKts l i, i'-. '-- .


2008
KIA RONDO
S299/mo*


iTKtsP "A :.: /


2005
BUICK LACROSSE
s129/mo *


STK~7~.477i7A,/"


IIIE


Must be in attendance to win.
Drawing date will be given when registered.


3:
Si
i


-


RECEIVE UP TO A 500
L WALMART GIFT CARD A


2011
SUZUKI SX4
s250/mo


2002
CHEVY TRACKER
SO89/mo*


i.TSIEI]I EC O
WWW.GETFASTCREDITHERE.COM


1850 S.E. Hwy. 19
Crystal River, FL


itru... A
S KIA, "WE JUST DON'T "' The Power to Surprise"'
^ nf l Ci nIA, nAi0 fl 'iA _,niUITh P wr o Suri i l


Vva-Wv-I-vvvv -s


*Payments are with $3000 cash or trade equity at72 4% interest rate Not everyone wll quality for offer Plus tax tag title license & d fee Manufacturers rebates and incentives applied WAC
*Payments are with $3,000 cash or trade equity at 72 mo. 4% interest rate. Not everyone will quality for offer. Plus tax, tag, title, license & doc. fee. Manufacturers rebates and incentives applied.. WAC.


AT CITRU,
', ri n I'.


C16 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2013


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