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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 02-01-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03018

Full Text


Lady Warriors repeat as district champions /B1


I IR IDAY


Mostly sunny.
PAGE A4


wC I Tr RoCc U N rT Y



H cnNICL
www.chronicleonline.com


Florida's Best Community LNlewspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VOL. 118 ISSUE 178


Homosassa man arrested in murder case


WENDY
BIDDLECOMBE
Hernando Today
A Homosassa man is in
custody and facing
charges in the murder of
a Brooksville teen.
Byron Lee Boutin, 44,
was arrested Wednesday
evening by Citrus County



Spent

nuke

fuel to

stay put


Waste now

stored onsite
PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
Whether the
Progress Energy nu-
clear plant north of
Crystal River is re-
tired or repaired,
spent nuclear fuel is
expected to remain
on site for years into
the future.
With no national
nuclear waste storage
site, the only option
would be for the plant
owner to ship the fuel
to another licensed
nuclear site.
The Nuclear Regu-
latory Commission
authorizes two meth-
ods for storing spent
fuel after it is re-
moved from the reac-
tor core. It can be
placed in spent fuel
pools at the site. And
if capacity is reached,
fuel that has been
cooled at least a year
can be moved to dry-
cask steel-cylinder
- storage.
Since the power
plant went online in
1977, all of the fuel
used has been stored
onsite in steel-lined
pools, approximately
43 feet deep from top
to bottom.
"Nuclear safety is
our top priority,"
Progress Energy
Florida spokesperson
Sterling Ivey said.
"The pool has exten-
sive leak-monitoring
equipment in place.
In addition to the
spent-fuel cooling sys-
tem, several other
supplemental systems
enhance cooling in
the spent-fuel pools."
He said spent-fuel
cooling pumps at the
plant also have multi-
ple sources of backup
power, including
emergency diesel
generators.
See Page A4


Sheriff's Office investiga-
tors in Lecanto and
charged with murder in
the second degree in the
death of DeAnna Lee
Stires, 18. He also is
charged with possession
of a firearm by a con-
victed felon. Boutin is
being held at the Citrus
County Detention Facility.


Special to me unronicle
Craig Englund is Round Eye's lead vocalist and guitar player. Englund, who also plays bass guitar, grew up
in Crystal River.


Stires was reported
missing on New Year's
Day to the Hernando
County Sheriff's Office.
Her body was found Jan.
18 in a wooded area off
State Road 24 in the Levy
County community of
Otter Creek.
"It was extremely im-
portant to this agency and


both the Hernando
County and Levy County
Sheriff's Offices that we
bring closure to the fam-
ily of Ms. Stires," Sheriff
Jeff Dawsy said in a
release.
"No one should have to
experience what they've
gone through. This was a
particularly heinous


crime done to such a
young woman. I'm ex-
tremely grateful to my
staff, who worked on this
case around the clock to
make an arrest."
According to the Citrus
County arrest affidavit,
a witness told law
See Page A2


local ties makes

name in Orient
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
s the U.S. economy was
tanking a few years ago,
coupled with introspec-
tive life decisions, former
Crystal River resident Craig
Englund decided to take a
leap all the way to China.
A year and a half later, in
big, bad Shanghai, Englund
would find himself sucked
back into a music scene remi-
niscent of something he first
cottoned onto in little, sleepy
Citrus County.
Englund, 29, who grew up
in Crystal River in the late
1980s and 1990s, discovered
an angst-addled genre of
music wildly popular
among teens but purely al-
ternative: Punk rock.
Englund's neighbor and
childhood friend Ryan Pagan
turned him on to the music
years ago, and Englund is
still at it, with a new band in
China called Round Eye.
When Englund and Pagan
were at Lecanto High School,
they helped form a band
called Libyan Hit Squad
(LHS), which ultimately
broke up. However, when En-
glund started Round Eye, he
incorporated some LHS
music in the creation of a fu-
sion album, "Full Circle" -
released Jan 8. Greg Ginn of
Black Flag contributed to the
album.
See Page A5

ROUND EYE
Craig "Chachy" Englund:
Lead vocals/guitar.
Lewis Maplethorpe:
Saxophone.
Bob Brown: Bassist.
Jimmy Jack: Drums.


Gov. Scott unveils $74.2 billion state budget


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Florida Gov.
Rick Scott who just two years
ago said it was time to slash state


spending and return government
to its "core functions" is now
asking state lawmakers for a 6
percent hike in spending.
Scott on Thursday unveiled a


$74.2 billion budget for the coming
year that calls for higher spending
on schools and universities, in-
cluding an across-the-board $2,500
pay raise for school teachers and a


$1,200 one-time bonus for state
workers.
The Republican governor also
See Page A2


A II 1




e" CRYSTAL 800-584-8755 EXT.6 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
N INISSAN 937 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
2 DISCOUNTS FROM RETAIL PRICE.


SIll8 llllll4l ll1|78200 5


Com ics .......... C7
Community ...... .C5
Crossword ....... .C6


Editorial ........A14
Entertainment . . .B6
Horoscope ....... .B6


Lottery Numbers . .B4


Lottery Payouts .... B6
M ovies .......... .C7
Obituaries ....... .A6


Classifieds ........ C8
TV Listings ....... C6


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
65
LOW
30


FEBRUARY 1, 2013


Punk rocker in China

Musician with





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


High court eases lawyers' ad rules


Justices: Performance claims OK if based on 'objective' data


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE A divided
Florida Supreme Court on Thursday
loosened regulations on advertising by
lawyers but also extended those rules
to websites and other information.
A majority of at least four of the
seven justices agreed to permit pre-
viously prohibited ads that charac-
terize the quality of legal services
being offered, information about
past results and testimonials.
All advertising, though, must be
"objectively verifiable," whether
distributed over the Internet or
through traditional media such as
print, outdoor and broadcast.
That means, for example, an ad
can say a lawyer obtained acquittals
on all charges in four criminal cases,
but a spot simply saying an attorney
has been "successful" may not be al-
lowed. Making an entirely subjective
claim such as being "the best trial
lawyer in Florida" would be mis-
leading and prohibited, the majority
said in an unsigned opinion.
"If the attorney can show, by ob-
jective facts, that the statement is


MURDER
Continued from Page Al

enforcement that he had
been with Stires from Dec.
23 through Christmas Day,
and took drugs with her at
multiple locations in Cit-
rus and Hernando coun-
ties, including at Boutin's
house in Homosassa.
The report said Boutin
and his girlfriend, Crystal
Brinson, argued with
Stires on Dec. 25 over
missing methampheta-
mine, which they believed
Stires stole.
The witness told law en-
forcement personnel that
on Dec. 26, Boutin and
Brinson said Stires became
enraged and crazy, pulling
Boutin's belongings out of
cabinets, and he attempted
to subdue her with a "hot
shot" an "unknown in-
jectable narcotic."
Stires was reportedly
bleeding, and Boutin and
Brinson transported her to
Boutin's father's barn in
Brooksville.
The pair believed Stires
was either "dead or not
doing well," according to
the witness at the barn.
Evidence collected by
investigators from Boutin's
house and car include
blood samples and several
guns, one of which had
hair similar to the victim's
hair color and shade.
On Tuesday, the Florida
Department of Law En-
forcement's crime lab con-
firmed the samples as
being blood.
During interviews on Jan.
18 and 20, Boutin report-
edly gave conflicting stories
to investigators and denied
involvement in Stires' death
and disappearance.
However, Boutin did say


For example, an ad can
say a lawyer obtained
acquittals on all
charges in four criminal
cases, but a spot
simply saying an attor-
ney has been
"successful" may not
be allowed.
true, then he has presented an ob-
jectively verifiable statement in the
advertisement," the justices wrote.
With some modifications, the high
court adopted recommendations
from the Florida Bar. They are
based on state and federal court rul-
ings, as well as input from the bar's
Citizen's Forum, lawyers and others
and a survey on public attitudes to-
ward lawyer advertising.
"The proposals are designed to
make the advertising rules more co-
hesive, easier for lawyers who ad-


he picked up Stires off
Mitchell Road in
Brooksville and took her
back to his home in Ho-
mosassa.
Boutin said Stires
stayed at his house for a
day, and when he left her
alone in the house for a
period of time, Stires ran-
sacked the house and left,
according to the report.
That was Christmas Day
On Wednesday of this
week, Boutin reportedly
said he wanted to tell Cit-
rus County detectives "the
truth," in a sworn and
recorded statement.
Boutin said after he and
his girlfriend picked up
Stires in Brooksville, they
used drugs with her on
Christmas Day Boutin said
he left Stires alone in his
home on Dec. 25, and
when he came back she
had "torn up" the house
and was "acting crazy," ac-
cording to the report.
Stires, said Boutin, ac-
cused him of stealing
clothing; and, Boutin later
noticed a bag of his
methamphetamine and a
pipe missing. The bag was
later found, but the pipe
was never recovered.
After some argument
over the meth, Boutin said
Stires eventually calmed
down, and that he saw
Brinson give Stires what
appeared to be a shot of
morphine. A short time
later, Boutin said Stires
started "flipping out" and
screaming as they were
getting ready to leave for
Brooksville and drop her
off.
According to the report,
information received from
Boutin's neighbors indi-
cated that some time
Christmas Day or in the
early hours the day after
Christmas, they heard a fe-


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male screaming an
peared to come f
side Boutin's trai
screaming re]
stopped abruptly
only other sou
neighbor heard w
Boutin left abou
Dec. 26 in his blue
Continental.
Boutin told inve
he witnessed his g:
hit Stires in the he
a pistol several tir
After the fight,
said he put Stire
back seat of his
decided to take h
father's Brooksvill
off Centralia Roa
arrival, Boutin pu
in a garage, saying
snoring and swea
he didn't think a
was wrong because
had been up for a f
on methamphetam
At that time, Bou
he and Brinson
Stires with duct
case she woke
started to "freak ou
Boutin and Brins
put a rag in her mo
duct taped it shut.
Leaving Stires
they reportedly
house and return
hour later and fo
deceased.
He reportedly a
other witness fo
cluded area to di
body


vertise to understand and less cum-
bersome for the bar to apply and en-
force," the majority wrote.
The rules also attempt to balance
lawyers' First Amendment right of
free speech with protecting legal
consumers and maintaining public
trust in the judicial system.
Four justices concurred with the
majority opinion and two dissented.
The seventh justice, Peggy Quince,
dissented in part but did not explain
which portion of the ruling she dis-
agreed with.
In a lengthy dissent, Justice Bar-
bara Pariente wrote that she would
have exempted websites and re-
sponses to requests for information
from the rules except to require that
they be "truthful and not
misleading."
Pariente called the new rules a
"one-size-fits all approach" that has
an unnecessary and "potentially
chilling effect" on lawyers' ability to
communicate with the public
through those two channels.
Justice Charles Canady expressed
the opposite view in a separate dis-
sent.

nd it ap- Boutin said a witness
from in- advised him to get rid of
ler. The Stires' body, and they used
portedly materials in the garage to
and the do so.
nd the Boutin said they put
as when Stires' body in the trunk of
t 6 a.m. his car for two days, spend-
Lincoln ing that time seeking a se-
cluded spot to dump it.
stigators Boutin said he had court
girlfriend the morning of Dec. 27,
ead with and afterward, drove up
nes. U.S. 19 and ultimately left
Boutin her body in a secluded
s in the hunting area, "where he
car, and knew she would eventu-
er to his ally be discovered," ac-
le house cording to the affidavit.
d. Upon The CCSO's major
ut Stires crimes Lt Brad Smith said
she was the investigation continues.
eating but "As you can see by the
anything arrest, this was a compli-
se Stires cated situation that in-
few days volved many different
nine. witnesses and locations.
itin said, Bringing this case to a
tied up complete resolution con-
tape in tinues to be a priority."
up and Chronicle reporter A.B.
it" again. Sidibe contributed to this
son also report
south and

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ump her


BUDGET He wants to
BUDGET slash payments
Continued from PageA l to hospitals,
to hospitals,


called for spending more
on key environmental
programs such as Ever-
glades restoration and in-
creasing money available
for school safety pro-
grams by 16 percent.
But Scott's third pro-
posed budget was also no-
table for what it did not
include: A recommenda-
tion on whether the state
should accept federal aid
and expand Medicaid a
key part of the Affordable
Care Act
Instead Scott continued
to insist there were too
many "unanswered ques-
tions" about how the Med-
icaid expansion would
work. If Florida were to
expand the safety-net pro-
gram, an estimated 900,000
residents would become
eligible for coverage.
"Today is not the day
for that decision," said
Scott, a former health
care executive who has
been a strong critic of
President Barack
Obama's overhaul. Scott
last summer had vowed
the state would not ex-
pand Medicaid, but he
softened his stance after
Obama's re-election.
Scott did call for spend-
ing money to offer insur-
ance to part-time
employees to avoid po-
tential penalties under
the Affordable Care Act.
His budget also includes
spending on mandatory
items under the health
care overhaul, including
paying primary care doc-
tors more.
In other areas, Scott is
sticking to his position that
university and community
college tuition should re-
main at its current levels.
He also wants state legis-
lators to freeze tuition for
the next four years for in-
coming freshmen.
His budget calls for
spending more to pro-
mote tourism and bor-
rowing money in order to
pay for improvements to
the state's seaports.
But Scott did include
plenty of cuts in his


cut off some
services now
offered to
Medicaid
patients, and
eliminate nearly
4,000 jobs,
many of them in
the state's
prison system.

budget proposal.
He wants to slash pay-
ments to hospitals, cut off
some services now of-
fered to Medicaid pa-
tients, and eliminate
nearly 4,000 jobs, many of
them in the state's prison
system. He wants to close
eight driver's licenses of-
fices, including ones in
Gainesville, Lakeland,
Sebring and Orlando.
During a brief presen-
tation to announce his
budget focused primarily
on two areas: His pro-
posed $1.25 billion budget
boost for public schools
and new tax cuts for busi-
nesses, including the
elimination of sales taxes
on equipment used for
manufacturing.
"This budget is aimed
at making strategic, tar-
geted investments to keep
our economy on track and
moving," Scott said.
Scott justified the in-
creased spending this
coming year by noting the
"tough choices" that the
state had made when he
first came into office in
2011. The state's economy
has improved since then
and state tax collections
are beginning to grow
again.
Shortly after he was
sworn in, Scott had rec-
ommended billions in
spending cuts, including
cuts to schools.
On Thursday Scott said:
"Now we have the where-
withal to make more
investments."


I


A2 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013


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Page A3 -FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1,2013



TATE&


(


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONI


CLE


Around the
COUNTY

Elections office does
list maintenance
The Citrus County Super-
visor of Elections office is
conducting list maintenance
of the voter records as re-
quired by law. Some voters
will receive an address con-
firmation card in the mail
during the next three to four
weeks.
E If your name and ad-
dress are correct on the
card, you do not need to do
anything.
If your address or
name has changed, com-
plete the card and return it
to the elections office.
If you receive a card
and the addressee no
longer resides there, return
the card to your mail carrier.
For other changes to
your voter record, contact
the elections office at 352-
341-6740 or www.vote
citrus.com.
GOP clubs host city
managers Saturday
Nature Coast Republican
Club and Citrus Republican
Womens Club will host a
presentation on city govern-
ment at 9 a.m. Saturday,
Feb. 9.
Guest speakers will be
Inverness City Manager
Frank DiGiovanni and Crys-
tal River City Manager Andy
Houston.
The meeting, atAmerican
Legion Post 155, Crystal
River, will be preceded by an
8:30 a.m. social.
Rotary auction to be
broadcast live
From noon to 5 p.m. Sat-
urday, Feb. 9, WYKE will
feature a live broadcast of
the Rotary Club of Inver-
ness' auction to provide
scholarships to Citrus High
School and Withlacoochee
Technical Institute students.
WYKE-TV airs on cable
channel 16.
This auction is a major
fundraiser for the scholar-
ships, raising $7,000 last
year.
Those who want to bid
on items do not have to
wait until Feb. 9, however.
The Rotary Club of Inver-
ness has a dedicated web-
site that's continually
updated. It shows items
and allows password-
protected bidding. It is
www.rotaryinverness.com.
Winning bidders will be
announced live Saturday,
Feb. 9. Participants can
watch live or check back
online to see if they are the
final bidder.
Democrats meet
Saturday at library
The Central Citrus Dem-
ocratic Club will meet at 11
a.m. Saturday, Feb. 9, at
the Central Ridge Library,
located at the corner or For-
est Ridge and Roosevelt
Boulevards, Beverly Hills.
All Democrats are
welcome.
Kids' fishing clinic
slated for Feb. 23
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation, in association
with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission,
presents a free kids' fishing
clinic Saturday, Feb. 23, for
pre-registered children be-
tween the ages of 5 and 15.
Clinics will start at 9 a.m.,
10a.m., 11 a.m., noon and
1 p.m.
Kids will learn the basics
of environmental steward-
ship, fishing ethics, angling
skills and safety. This is a
catch-and-release event.
Participants must be ac-
companied by an adult.
Each child will receive a
free fishing rod and reel.
Food and drinks will be
available for purchase from
the Nature Coast Volunteer
Center.


The clinic will be at Fort
Island Trail Park at 12073
W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal
River.
Registration is now open.
For more information, call
352-7540.
-From staff reports


Justices say Legislature can set tuition


But lawmakers can't tell

schools how to run institution


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE The
Florida Legislature not
the Board of Governors -
has the power to set tuition
rates and fees at public
universities, but lawmak-
ers cannot tell the panel
how to manage those insti-
tutions, the state Supreme
Court ruled Thursday
The unanimous decision


was mostly a defeat for for-
mer Gov Bob Graham and
other plaintiffs who had
challenged lawmakers'
authority over tuition and
fees. They argued that
a state constitutional
amendment creating the
board also transferred
those functions to the new
panel, but the high court
disagreed.
"That's very disappoint-


ing," Graham said when
informed by The Associ-
ated Press of the decision.
However, the plaintiffs'
lawyer, Robin Gibson, said
a finding that the Legisla-
ture's taxing power -
rather than its legislating
authority lets it set tu-
ition and fees also means
lawmakers cannot dictate
academic policies such as
creating new law or med-
ical schools.
"That's none of their
business," Gibson said.
"The Board of Governors
can do that"


Graham, also a former
U.S. senator, led a petition
drive that put the amend-
ment on the ballot after
the Legislature abolished
the Board of Regents,
which previously had
overseen the State Univer-
sity System. Voters ap-
proved the amendment in
2002.
Its avowed purpose is to
reduce the influence of
politics on higher educa-
tion by giving the board,
with most of its 17 mem-
bers appointed by the gov-
ernor, responsibility to


operate, regulate and con-
trol the 12 universities and
"be fully responsible for
the management of the
whole university system."
However, Justice Bar-
bara Pariente wrote for the
court that the amendment
"is devoid of any indication
of an intent" to turn over to
the board the "quintessen-
tially legislative power" to
set tuition and fees. That
authority is part of the Leg-
islature's "constitutional
duty to raise and appropri-
ate state funds," Pariente
wrote


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer

INVERNESS Whether you
want to adopt a dog or cat or
not, it could be hard to stay
away from Saturday's Best
Friend Fest at the Citrus
County Auditorium. It's going to
be a party for pets from the
shelter at Citrus County Animal
Services.
"The dogs and cats will be
brought back and forth by vol-
unteers from the shelter," said
Kelly Gill, volunteer outreach
coordinator, on Wednesday
"The dogs will get to walk
around and get some exposure.
The cats will be staying on the
stage, where a few of our volun-
teers will be with them to assist
people interested in adopting
them."
Adoptable animals will come
not only from the county shel-
ter, but also from pet rescue
groups for this "adoption ex-
travaganza." Groomers, train-
ers and veterinarians will be
present to talk about pet care.
The event also will be like a
fair, with food vendors, face
painting and a silent auction to
benefit Animal Services' Spe-
cial Needs Fund that pays for
animal medical care. People
who bring in and donate pet
food for needy pet owners will
be entered into a drawing for a
prize. A bloodmobile will be
there. Citrus 95.3 will do a live
broadcast.


* WHAT: Second Annual Best Friend Fest.
* WHEN: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.
* WHERE: Citrus County Auditorium, 3601 S. Florida Ave.,
Inverness.
* INFORMATION: 352-746-8400.
* ON THE NET: www.citruscritters.com.


"Oreo will be there, of
course," Gill said, aboutAnimal
Services' dog ambassador, or
ambassadorg."
"She just passed her Canine
Good Citizen's test this morn-
ing," Gill said.
Passing the test means Oreo,
who was surrendered to the
shelter because she was an es-
cape artist, is now a well-
behaved pet.
"Which is the case with a lot
of our surrender dogs here,"
Gill said. "They're fence
climbers or they dig out."
When owners can't keep dogs
safe, they give them to the shel-
ter, where new owners are en-
couraged to train them.
"We don't feel they are not
adoptable," Gill said. "I would
suggest they always walk their
dog on a leash and don't leave
it in the yard unattended.
That's when they escape.
They're bored. They're lonely
That's when they get into mis-
chief."
Adoptions at the event will
follow the same procedure as
adoptions at the shelter, which
is nearby. Those dogs that are


going to the auditorium will be
tested ahead of time for such
problems as heartworm and ob-
served to make sure they will
behave in public. Anyone who
doesn't find a dog or cat to
adopt at the event can go to the
shelter at 4030 S. Airport Road.
"That's our goal to bring
more awareness and say that if
the dog of your dreams is not
here, we have more wonderful
dogs in the shelter that's right
around the corner," Gill said.
Animal Services used its new
bus, a mobile adoption unit, for
the first time at the recent
grand opening of the Walmart
in Lecanto.
"We adopted out seven ani-
mals at that event," Gill said.
"Five dogs and two cats. We
brought the bus, set up a tent.
All the dogs and cats we had at
that event were already spayed
and neutered, so people
adopted right on site and took
their animals home."
A few of the adopters asked if
their new pet could stay on the
adoption bus while they went
inside Walmart to shop.
"They'd get their pet's food


and toys and whatever they
needed and come back," Gill
said. "One lady adopted a small
puppy, put the puppy in the cart
and pushed her little dog in her
cart with all her supplies."
That day, Animal Services
had a total of 14 animals
adopted, seven from the shelter
and seven from the bus.
"We did as well as the shelter
did," Gill said. "We doubled our
numbers because we were able
to get out and get into the com-
munity That's our goal."
The bus will be at the Best
Friends Fest. The goal for the
bus at Saturday's event will be
to fill it up with donated dog
and cat food for needy families.
Adoption fees will be the
same as those at the shelter.
Cats, which have been spayed
or neutered by Dr Julie Rosen-
berger, shelter director and vet-
erinarian, will be available for
a $5 county license fee.
Dogs, which are spayed or
neutered through a voucher
program, have a fee of $60 that
includes the voucher to have
the pet spayed or neutered by a
participating veterinarian. The
adopter chooses the veterinar-
ian and the shelter schedules
the appointment. The voucher
covers the cost of the surgery.
Dogs that already are spayed or
neutered are half price, at $30.
Chronicle reporter Chris Van
Ormer can be reached at
cvanormer@chronicleonline.
corn or 352-564-2916.


Around the STATE


Man sentenced
to death in 2002 slaying
MIAMI -A judge has imposed the
death penalty on a man convicted in
the 2002 abduction of a young cou-
ple and slaying of the teenage
woman.
Circuit Judge William Thomas
agreed Thursday with a jury's recom-
mendation that 34-year-old Joel
Lebron should die.
Prosecutors said Lebron was the
leader of a group of men who ab-


ducted 17-year-old Nelson Porto-
banco and 18-year-old Ana Maria
Angel as they were walking back to
their car on South Beach. The couple
was forced into a pickup truck.
The men gang-raped Angel and
Portobanco was stabbed and left for
dead, but survived. Angel was fatally
shot alongside an Interstate 95 retain-
ing wall in Palm Beach County.
The other four men have also been
convicted. One man's death sentence
was tossed by the state Supreme
Court.


Fla. unveils new economic
development brand
TALLAHASSEE Florida is bank-
ing on a catchy new slogan and a
logo featuring an orange necktie to at-
tract more businesses to the state.
Gov. Rick Scott and Enterprise
Florida, a public-private partnership
that promotes economic development,
announced the state's new business
brand on Thursday in Tallahassee.
The slogan is "Florida is the perfect
climate for business."


The logo is the word "FLORIDA" in
green capital letters except for the "1,"
which is orange and in the shape of a
tie.
Enterprise Florida is seeking $3 mil-
lion from the state and $1.5 million
from private donors for a campaign
based on the new brand.
It's a brand the state, though, must
share with University of Miami football
coach Al Golden, whose trademark is
the orange tie he wears on the
sidelines.
-From wire reports


Pets party, people adopt


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Kelly Gill, volunteer outreach coordinator for the Citrus County Animal Shelter, plays with a couple of the puppies that will be up for adop-
tion Saturday at the second annual Best Friend Fest. The event will be at the Citrus County Auditorium in Inverness and will include pet
rescues, groomers, veterinarians and many other animal-friendly activities.

Animal shelter hosts event to pair cats and dogs with prospective owners






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Boy, 14, charged



in sex assault


Alleged victim was years old


Chronicle

A Homosassa teen is fac-
ing a charge of sexual bat-
tery for allegedly violating
a 6-year-old girl, according
to the Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office.
The juvenile male, 14,
was arrested Wednesday
after investigators were
told details of an assault,
according to the report. It
is the practice of the
Chronicle not to name ju-



FUEL
Continued from PageAl

The spent-fuel pool is
designed to withstand tor-
nado-generated missiles.
In addition, the Crystal
River area nuclear plant
is 30.5 feet above sea level
and can withstand storm
surge from a Category 5
hurricane up to 40.5 feet.
All piping and compo-
nents in the cooling por-
tion of the loops are
seismically qualified
components.
"Duke Energy has more
than 40 years of experi-
ence handling used nu-
clear fuel," Ivey said,
referring to Progress En-
ergy's parent company
"Our employees are well-
trained, environmentally
conscious professionals
who take pride in their
work."
He added if all the used
fuel produced in nearly 50
years of U.S. nuclear
power plant operations
was stacked end to end, it
would cover a football


venile defendants unless
they are charged as adults.
The girl reportedly de-
scribed to investigators the
teen kissed and sexually
violated her. She also al-
leges he exposed himself
to her.
The report also notes
that the teen admitted to
the allegations during an
interview with investiga-
tors. He was transported to
the Juvenile Detention
Center in Ocala.

field to a depth of less than
10 yards. And 96 percent of
this "waste" could be
recycled.
A dry-storage site has
been considered for Crys-
tal River. Ivey said it is
premature to speculate on
what future storage needs
will be until a decision on
whether to repair or retire
the plant is made.
"As of right now, spent
fuel is stored at the oper-
ating reactors," NRC pub-
lic affairs officer Roger
Hannah confirmed. "If a
plant were to be decom-
missioned some fuel
would probably remain on
site. Some (stored fuel) has
been moved to other
plants, but it is not a sim-
ple process."
In 2011, Progress Energy
reported if the plant is de-
commissioned in 2016,
maintaining spent fuel
through 2057 will cost ap-
proximately $129 million,
excluding staffing and
security.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty
@chronicleonline. com.


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic battery
arrests
Larry McDonald, 31, of
Homosassa, at 9:16 p.m.
Tuesday on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery. No
bond.
Joseph Long, 32, of
Crystal River, at 12:24 p.m.
Wednesday on a misde-
meanor charge of domestic
battery. No bond.
Other arrests
Brian Sterling, 20, and
Roger Campbell Jr., 22, both
of West Oaklawn Street, Ho-
mosassa, at 7:15 p.m. Tues-
day each on felony charges of
conspiring to commit a crime
and burglary of an occupied
conveyance. According to their
arrest affidavits, one of the
men attempted to open the
door of an unmarked sheriff's
office vehicle on Brady Lane in
Homosassa while a deputy sat
inside the vehicle conducting
surveillance. The two men
were seen talking before and
after the incident. Bond for
each was set at $20,000.
Kristy Leslie, 36, of Sun
Road, Brooksville, at 11:48
a.m. Wednesday on Hemando
County warrants for failure to
appear in court for an original
felony charge of possession of


ON THE NET

* For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on the Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports.
* Also under Public Information on the CCSO
website, click on Crime Mapping for a view of
where each type of crime occurs in Citrus County.
Click on Offense Reports to see lists of burglary,
theft and vandalism.
* For the Record reports are also archived online at
www.chronicleonline.com.
* The "Sheriff's 10-43" show airs on TV station
WYKE, digital channel 47 and Bright House cable
channel 16. The show features interviews with
sheriff's office staff from all areas of the agency. It
also features Sheriff Jeff Dawsy taking live calls
during the entire show on the last Wednesday
monthly.
* The Sexual Predator Unit is responsible for track-
ing all registered sexual offenders and predators in
the county. Click on the Sexual Offender Informa-
tion link on the CCSO website.


a controlled substance and
failure to appear in court for
two original misdemeanor
charges of driving while li-
cense suspended or revoked.
No bond.
Jamie Surles, 36, of
South Twist Road, Floral City,
at 12:31 p.m. Wednesday on a
Sumter County warrant for
felony charges of possession
of a controlled substance, sell-
ing, manufacturing or deliver-


ing or possession with intent to
sell, manufacture or deliver a
controlled substance, two
felony charges of sale of a
substance in lieu of a con-
trolled substance, unlawful use
of a two-way communication
device and possession of a
structure/conveyance for traf-
ficking a controlled substance.
Bond $65,500.
Kenton Thompson, 24,
of Northwest 27th Avenue,


Citra, at 2:44 p.m. Wednesday
on a Citrus County warrant for
violation of probation on origi-
nal felony charges of burglary
and forgery of altered bank
bill/passing forged bank bill. No
bond.
Burglaries
o A vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 10:44 p.m. Jan. 29 in
the 500 block of N. McGowan
Ave., Crystal River.
A commercial burglary
was reported at 1:45 a.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 30, in the
3700 block of W. Homosassa
Trail, Lecanto.
A residential burglary was
reported at 2:02 a.m. Jan. 30
in the 7800 block of E. North-
lake Drive, Floral City.
Thefts
A petit theft was reported
at 12:23 p.m. Jan. 29 in the 200
block of Clark St., Inverness.
A petit theft was reported
at 1:48 p.m. Jan. 29 in the 300
block of N. Suncoast Blvd.,
Crystal River.
A petit theft was reported
at 4:32 p.m. Jan. 29 in the
7600 block of W. Homosassa
Trail, Homosassa.
Vandalism
A vandalism was reported
at 10:44 a.m. Tuesday, Jan.
29, in the 80 block of S. Lee
St., Beverly Hills.


legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle

Bid Notices ............. ..................C12

Meeting Notices .......................................C12


Lien Notices.................................................. C12

7W. Miscellaneous Notices............................ 12

Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices.................C11

Notice to Creditors/Administration............ C11

.... .. ;Self Storage Notices ......................C11
,,,,,il ., "I " " " " " " " "


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
> PR HI LO PR |HI LO PR
0.06 NA NA NA J 61 49 0.11


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES
City H L F'cast City H
Daytona Bch. 66 42 s Miami 72
Ft. Lauderdale 72 61 s Ocala 67
Fort Myers 71 47 s Orlando 67
Gainesville 66 31 s Pensacola 59
Homestead 74 55 s Sarasota 69
Jacksonville 64 31 s Tallahassee 63
Key West 70 63 pc Tampa 67
Lakeland 67 43 s Vero Beach 69
Melbourne 68 46 s W. Palm Bch. 71


F'cast
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s


MARINE OUTLOOK


North winds from 10 to 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 4 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a moderate chop.
Mostly sunny skies today.


64 52 0.10 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK E xclusvebdaily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 65 Low: 30
Mostly sunny

k SATURDAY & SUNDAY MORNING
High: 67 Low: 36
Mostly sunny

SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 67 Low: 33
Mostly sunny

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Thursday 64/52
Record 86/21
Normal 72/43
Mean temp. 58
Departure from mean +1
PRECIPITATION*
Thursday 0.10 in.
Total for the month 0.10 in.
Total for the year 0.10 in.
Normal for the year 3.09 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 6
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Thursday at 3 p.m. 30.18 in.


DEW POINT
Thursday at 3 p.m. 26
HUMIDITY
Thursday at 3 p.m. 27%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, Maple, Oak
Today's count: 10.0/12
Saturday's count: 9.3
Sunday's count: 10.0
AIR QUALITY
Thursday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
2/1 FRIDAY -
2/2 SATURDAY
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
3 SUNSET TONIGHT............................6:10 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:18A.M.
M OONRISE TODAY .........................11:40 PM.
FEB. 3 FEB. 10 FEB. 17 FEB. 25 MOONSET TODAY ..........................10:23A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers


City
Chassahowitzka*
Crystal River**
Withlacoochee*
Homosassa***


High/Lov
8:45 a/4:37
7:06 a/1:59
4:53 a/11:4
7:55 a/3:36


**At King's Bay
Friday
w High/Low
a 8:56 p/4:38 p
a 7:17 p/2:00 p
8 a 5:04 p/--
a 8:06 p/3:37 p


***At Mason's Creek
Saturday
High/Low High/Low
9:45 a/5:29 a 9:38 p/5:19 p
8:06 a/2:51 a 7:59 p/2:41 p
5:53 a/12:39 a 5:46 p/12:29 p
8:55 a/4:28 a 8:48 p/4:18 p


Gulf water
temperature


65
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Wed. Thu. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.56 28.58 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.98 37.97 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 38.93 38.92 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.25 40.24 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


a


A Denver W2I, uC.ly '--- '0-"'s-

BOO --- l lCft ,i--- 2M '6
d
BO S Da 2r

Hon.Iu.. i i "sw -
H, elus .S T 70s8 .*

FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
FRIDAY


Thursday Friday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 54 27 .38 c 25 12
Albuquerque 53 22 s 53 29
Asheville 44 29 s 32 18
Atlanta 49 33 s 44 26
Atlantic City 59 36 .38 c 36 21
Austin 69 26 s 70 47
Baltimore 63 32 .73 pc 37 22
Billings 27 1 .05 c 42 18
Birmingham 51 32 s 45 28
Boise 47 29 pc 42 19
Boston 60 37 .31 c 36 19
Buffalo 40 23 .12 sn 23 15
Burlington, VT 56 28 .22 c 17 5
Charleston, SC 56 45 .06 s 58 29
Charleston, WV 41 28 .10 c 22 16
Charlotte 51 39 .03 s 43 21
Chicago 21 12 pc 15 12
Cincinnati 33 25 pc 19 16
Cleveland 35 21 .02 sn 22 15
Columbia, SC 56 41 s 49 25
Columbus, OH 35 24 .07 pc 18 14
Concord, N.H. 58 32 .51 c 30 10
Dallas 69 31 s 61 46
Denver 43 19 pc 51 29
Des Moines 15 4 c 19 15
Detroit 32 20 .02 pc 21 10
El Paso 56 24 s 62 34
Evansville, IN 37 27 .06 pc 24 23
Harrisburg 55 29 .48 c 31 17
Hartford 62 35 .91 c 34 16
Houston 67 33 s 70 52
Indianapolis 30 19 pc 17 16
Jackson 59 31 s 54 35
Las Vegas 65 41 s 64 44
Little Rock 61 27 s 46 31
Los Angeles 72 43 s 74 52
Louisville 37 27 pc 23 20
Memphis 55 30 pc 36 30
Milwaukee 18 10 pc 9 4
Minneapolis 7 -4 pc 6 4
Mobile 59 33 s 58 33
Montgomery 57 36 s 52 30
Nashville 47 33 pc 29 23
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Thursday Friday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 60 37 s 61 44
New York City 61 33 .90 c 34 22
Norfolk 70 44 .34 s 43 22
Oklahoma City 59 27 s 51 34
Omaha 13 3 c 24 18
Palm Springs 75 44 s 78 52
Philadelphia 63 34 .63 c 36 22
Phoenix 69 43 s 71 47
Pittsburgh 38 22 .02 sn 20 11
Portland, ME 54 34 .24 c 29 12
Portland, Ore 52 43 pc 50 35
Providence, R.I. 62 38 .62 c 36 17
Raleigh 58 41 .12 s 38 22
Rapid City 16 -1 .01 c 39 26
Reno 58 26 s 56 24
Rochester, NY 54 23 .11 sn 23 15
Sacramento 64 36 s 63 38
St. Louis 33 19 c 26 25
St. Ste. Marie 10 2 sn 11 0
Salt Lake City 44 33 pc 35 17
San Antonio 68 31 s 70 50
San Diego 69 48 s 72 50
San Francisco 62 42 s 60 45
Savannah 57 44 .03 s 59 28
Seattle 49 45 .13 pc 51 38
Spokane 40 33 c 38 27
Syracuse 56 28 .31 sn 23 14
Topeka 23 12 c 34 25
Washington 65 36 .28 pc 39 24
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 81 Fullerton, Calif. LOW-28 Bottineau,
N.D.
WORLD CITIES


FRIDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 86/73/s
Amsterdam 42/37/sh
Athens 57/43/s
Beijing 39/18/pc
Berlin 42/33/sh
Bermuda 64/58/sh
Cairo 60/47/sh
Calgary 41/25/pc
Havana 74/62/c
Hong Kong 73/65/pc
Jerusalem 55/50/r


Lisbon 56/49/c
London 41/34/r
Madrid 56/42/s
Mexico City 75/46/s
Montreal 10/0/pc
Moscow 39/21/sf
Paris 54/38/r
Rio 83/72/pc
Rome 55/52/c
Sydney 77/59/ts
Tokyo 57/41/sh
Toronto 21/14/pc
Warsaw 36/33/sh


- C I T R U S.


C 0 U N T Y -


(ARONICLE
Florida's Best Community Newspaper ServingFlorida's Best Community
To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $36.65* 6 months: $64.63*
1 year: $116.07*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of. 14 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

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Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
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To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
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FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
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Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com


Where to find us:
Meadowcrest
44 office
~rJ r ,:, Br I.rii H 1624 N.
k I Meadowcrest
Ave""1^ ^ -- Cannondale Dr Blvd.
A'l'Il e VCrystal River,
A 'Me adouw.:reil FL 34429
N \ -- '

SI Inverness
C r office

T ki n si S t .,10 6 W M a in
41 44- Inverness, FL
> A 34450
F NN

Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 63 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold ......................... ........... ................................... Editor, 5 64 -2 93 0
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy .................................................. Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trista Stokes............................................................... Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes ............. ................................ Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ............................................. Mike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .............................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Com m unity content ................................................ Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content ... .................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...........................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ... . .............................................................................................. 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper.
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
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g POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


A4 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Round Eye is touring in Asia and is currently based in Sha


PUNK
Continued from Page Al

Englund's journey in the
punk rock world had an
unlikely start when his
parents Dr. Craig and
Noris Englund moved
Craig and his sister Veron-
ica to Citrus County in the
late 1980s from Miami.
Englund recalls Crystal
River as a perfect place
"for a kid to grow up," but
it had a dearth of alterna-
tive music sources.
In the mid-'90s, Englund
remembers his mother
started him on piano, for
which he is grateful, but
hated.
He remembers a variety
of musical influences in
his household, including
his mother's cultural ties
to merengue and bachata.
However, it was punk rock
that grabbed him.
He describes his best
friend Pagan as his biggest
musical influence.
"He showed me and a
friend, Nick Thompson,
everything and everything
he showed us felt deli-


Waterbody


Plant


Inverness Pool Floating / Nuphar /
Hydrilla /Torpedograss /
Willows
Floral City Duckweed / Floating /
Hydrilla
Hernando Pool Floating / Nuphar / Hydrilla /
Willows / Pickerelweed


ciously dangerous to listen
to," Englund said.
"When all the kids were
listening to Korn, Nine
Inch Nails, and Marilyn
Manson, Ryan and myself
were listening to Ra-
mones, Black Flag, The
Clash, and Dead
Kennedys."
Englund said LHS was
the first band he'd ever
been in.
Pagan named the group
after hearing an '80s com-
pilation of hardcore acts
from the San Francisco
area called "Not So Quiet
on the Western Front."
On that CD was a band
called Tongue Avulsion,
and they had a song called
"Libyan Hit Squad."
Pagan moved down to
Miami and another friend,
Jordan Wiseman, filled in
on bass. The band then
went through numerous
changes and through a lot
of crazy gigs crisscrossing
mostly central Florida.
Many band members even-
tually moved on to college
or other pursuits, and it
went on hiatus.
But when Englund
moved to China, he was al-


Herbicide Used
Diquat / Glyphosate /
Aquathol / Super K/
2,4D
Diquat / Clipper/Quest/
Super K /Aquathol
Diquat / Glyphosate /
Aquathol / Super K/
2,4D


MECHANICAL HARVESTING


Hernando Pool Tussocks
Inverness Pool Tussocks / Cabomba


Harvesting
Harvesting


All treatments are contingent upon weather conditions and water quality. Treated areas will be identified
with "Warning Signs" indicating the date of treatment and the necessary water use restrictions. For
further information, please call 352-527-7620 or view our website at httn.//www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/
oubworks/aauatics/aauatic services.htm. Citrus County Division of Aquatic Services

NM ww.dudleysauction.com
ANTIQUE & COLLECTIBLE
AUCTION
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013-
PREVIEW IOAM AUCTION I PM
,-.y ,col l ecti on of tem rang, *B,,,
l.a rr mahogany, maple, ,,I ir
,r. that ranges from I-. 1 ...r....
1 -carved to mid-centur i
I i.. i Tobies, Orienta[ carp. i ,.
,r- i figures, estate jewelry, 1. r oi .
vintage to Longaberger baskets, iTHIl Er
items, [ots and lots of art, coins tr,,,,, ,I.
ver do[[ars toproofs sets, great collection .11, I
decoys, co[[ection of 50s TV
lamps, crystal, and china. TI. r.
will[[ be over 400 lots of quality
items to choose from. Visit the
website as 100 [ots will be sold
[ive and on-[ine, including the Fear not..
signed guitars & the pre-e o
Co[umbian fertility god. A befo okic k ff!
DUDLEY'S AUCTION
4000 S. Florida Ave., Inverness, FL (1/2 mile S. of the Fairgrounds)
S. 4 I BE SURE TO WATCH THE WEBSITE.
Absentee and phone bids always accepted. 352-637-9588. lUptodate photos on web.
Personal Property sold Dudley's Auction Ab1667. 12% bp, 2% ca/chk discount.
Announcements from the block take precedent.


Special to the Chronicle
nghai, China.
most immediately thrown
into what he would soon
recognize to be the Chi-
nese punk scene.
"It was and still is thriv-
ing with ex-pat and native
bands of all calibers and
genres. I was reluctant to
join it, seeing as I didn't
want to do what I did with
Libyan all over again. But
seeing then that I could
start refreshed and fo-
cused, not have to go
through the follies of igno-
rance and trial and error
- to be able to start know-
ing everything I've learned
the hard way was in-
credibly inviting. So I did
it and never looked back."


Craig "Chachy" Englund.


Ticket" is filming their Pilot

Episode in Citrus County

and we need Your Help .

to make it a success.



You Be The Judge


they

tA protion of the
proceeds will
benefit the YMCA
of Citrus County.


Six up & coming Chefs from the top culinary schools in the US will
compete for their Meal Ticket, Mentored by our Celebrity Chefs.


Joseph "Jo-Jo" Doyle
Executive Chef of
Churchill Downs' & many
celebrity events.


General
Admission
Includes Dinner & Cash Bar
$25 pp/per venue
Advanced sales only.
$30* pp/per venue
*At the gate, space permitting.


Alex Conant
Personal Chef to
Shaquille O'Neal


VIP
Admission
Includes Dinner, Open Bar,
& VIP Seating.
$50 pp/per venue
Advanced sales only.


Full Bar available at both locations. Different menu e
Tickets Available


Carlos
Fernandez
of Top Chef Season 2


Platinum Partner
Includes 2 Tickets to each event,
Dinner, Open Bar, VIP Seating,
Preferred Parking, a free gift &
Logo or Name on Program.
$250'
Advanced sales only.
ach night.
ach night. Advanced Ticket Sales End
S- February 15,2013.


S l Flria Kin CITRUS COUNTY CITRUS COUNTY
-T ^Old Florida Kitchen Chamber of Commerce Chamber of Commerce
10350 W. Yulee Dr. 6301 Riverside Dr., 28 NW, Hwy. 19 401 W. Tompkins St.
Homosassa, FL Yankeetown, FL Crystal River, FL Inverness FL
352-621-3663 352-447-4899 352-795-3149 352-726-2801


Cooking



With Stars


Reality TV Show "Meal


WEEKLY AQUATIC TREATMENT
SCHEDULE FOR CITRUS COUNTY
Citrus County's Aquatic Services Division plans the following aquatic
weed control activities for the week beginning February 4, 2013
HERBICIDE TREATMENTS


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013 A5


.MO' .,


^*^^


A "'





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hadley Arnett with
mom, Brittany Arnett
Hadley Arnett,
6 months
INVERNESS
Hadley Charles Thomas
Arnett, 6 months, of
Inverness, Fla., passed
away Jan. 28,2013.
Hadley is survived by
his mother, Brittany
Arnett; father, Joseph
Powlette; grandmother,
Jessica Arnett; grand-
father, Eugene Arnett,
grandfather, Bobby An-
derson; grandmother,
Kathy Kaldeneberg,
grandparents, Brian and
Chrissy Powlett; aunt and
uncles, Keith, Chris and
Michelle Arnett. He is also
survived by his great-
grandparents, Sandra
Campbell, Danny
Campbell and Thomas
Butzer, Marion and
Whiley
Visitation will be from 5
to 7 p.m., with service
starting at 7 p.m. Monday,
Feb. 4, 2013, at Brown
Funeral Home &
Crematory in Lecanto.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Angela
Mandat, 49
HERNANDO
Angela Marie Mandat,
49, of Hernando, Fla., died
Jan. 29, 2013, at Citrus
Memorial Hospital,
Inverness. Angela was
born June 3, 1963, in New
Brunswick, N.J., the
daughter of James and
Phyliss Brady She worked
as a waitress. She moved
to Hernando in 2000 from
Marion Oaks. Angela was a
catholic.
Angela was preceded in
death by her father, James
Brady Survivors include
her mother, Phyliss Brady;
her baby girl and best
friend, Nichole Mandat of
Hernando; son Leon
Mandat Jr, of Hernando;
daughter Gianna Mandat
of Port St. Lucie; beloved
fiance Donald Coiro of
Hernando; grandchildren
Montanna Reed, Makenzie
Massey, Rio Nalley, Colton
Mandat, Ethan Scull and
Elayne Scull; two broth-
ers; one sister; and many
other friends and family
A memorial service for
Ms. Mandat will be at 11
a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013,
at Heinz Funeral Home.
The family will receive
friends from 10 until the
hour of services. Heinz
Funeral Home & Crema-
tion, Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Valentina
'Lucy' Carre,
88
INVERNESS
Valentina "Lucy" Carre,
88, of Inverness, Fla., died
Jan. 30,2013, at Hospice of
Citrus County Care Unit in
Inverness. She was born
July 25, 1924, in Riga,
Latvia, daughter of
Waldemar and Helen
Zalevskis. Valentina
worked as a nurse. She
spent many years in Brazil
and then France before
moving to Inverness in
1997. She was a Lutheran.
Survivors include her
husband of 56 years,
Robert E Carre of
Inverness; children, Mar-
got Carre of Kissimmee
and Claudio Carre of
Paris, France; and grand-
son, Arnaud Carre of Paris,
France.
Private burial will be at
Osceola Memory Gardens
in Kissimmee. Heinz
Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. cornm.

Glas. E. 2,,au
Funeral Home With Crematory
ALICE SEAMAN
Service: Mon. Feb 4,1:00 PM
PEGGY WALLER
Private Arrangements
SHERWOOD POTTER
Service: Fri. 1:00 PM


RICHARD HOLM
Private Arrangements
DOROTHY HALL
Private Arrangements
LAURENCE SMITH
Pending
726-8323 000DOS2


Sherwood
Potter, 85
HERNANDO
Sherwood Melvin
Potter, 85, Hernando, died
Jan. 28, 2013, under the
care of his family and
Hospice of Citrus County.
Mr. Potter was born in
Menomonee, Wisc., on Jan.
13, 1928, to the late Myron
and Flora
..^ Bell Potter
Sand came
to this
area in
1980 from
Wisconsin,
where he
worked on
Sherwood the assem-
Potter bly line for
Chrysler Corporation and
the United Auto Workers.
He served our country in
the U.S. Army
He is survived by his
wife, Ovida Neel Potter,
Hernando; his daughters,
Sharon Waters of Euclair,
Wisc.; Vonnie Roberg
of Sturdevant, Wisc.;
Deborah Willis of
Cleveland, Ga.; brother,
Harold in Greeley, Colo.,
several step-children,
grandchildren, and great-
grandchildren. There are
also several nieces and
nephews.
Funeral services will be
conducted at 1 p.m. Friday,
Feb. 1, 2013, from Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home of
Inverness with Dr. Paul
Hall, Hospice Chaplain of-
ficiating. Burial with mili-
tary honors will follow
at Florida National
Cemetery. Visitation is at
the time of services.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Carmen
Hernandez, 84
OCALA
Carmen Hernandez, 84,
of Ocala, died Jan. 30,2013.
Local arrangements are
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home &
Crematory in Lecanto.

Deaths ELSEWHERE

Patty
Andrews, 94
SINGER


LOS ANGELES


Patty


Andrews, the last surviv-
ing member of the singing
Andrews Sisters trio
whose hits such as the rol-
licking "Boogie Woogie
Bugle Boy of Company B"
and the poignant "I Can
Dream, Can't I?" captured
the home-front spirit of
World War II, died
Wednesday She was 94.
Andrews died of natural
causes at her home in the
Los Angeles suburb of
Northridge, said family
spokesman Alan Eichler
in a statement
Patty was the Andrews
in the middle, the lead
singer and chief clown,
whose raucous jitterbug-
ging delighted American
servicemen abroad and
audiences at home.
She could also deliver
sentimental ballads like
"I'll Be with You in Apple
Blossom Time" with a sin-
cerity that caused hard-
ened GIs far from home to
weep.
Their only movie hit was
"Buck Privates," which
made stars of Abbott and
Costello and included the
trio's blockbuster "Boogie
Woogie Bugle Boy from
Company B."
LaVerne died in 1967 of
cancer and Maxene died
in 1995 of a heart attack.
Patty Andrews is sur-
vived by her foster daugh-
ter, Pam DuBois, a niece
and several cousins. Her
husband, Walter Weschler,
died in 2010.
A memorial service was
planned in Los Angeles,
with the date to be
determined.


For young couples, tradition still



reigns, though sometimes in vain


Associated Press

NEW YORK Propos-
ing marriage has become
an industry of its own with
professional planners,
flash mobs for hire and
elaborate, homegrown
surprises to make the mo-
ment memorable. And
let's not forget YouTube,
and our steadfast resolve
to share.
So what happens to the
best laid plans when the
ring goes missing, the liq-
uid courage is out of con-
trol or romance is ruined
by unforeseen disaster?
"More complicated
equals more possible
problems, and more pres-
sure," said Anja Winikka,
director of the wedding
site TheKnot.com.
Val Hunt Beerbower, 29,
learned that the hard way
She was a mess the night
her husband, Mike, pro-
posed during what he en-
visioned as a special
evening taking in the
sights of Washington, D.C.
The Labor Day weekend
weather was sweltering,
she was exhausted from a
full day on her feet and
she stepped in a huge
stagnant pool of foul-
smelling water on the Na-
tional Mall.
Her jeans wet and
stinky, they pressed on to-
ward the Jefferson Memo-
rial, the proposal site he
had scouted days before.
Halfway around the Tidal
Basin, her allergies kicked
in, her glasses steamed up
from the heat and humid-
ity and she was begging
to return to their hotel.
"So in an unlitparking lot,
within sight of the Jefferson
Memorial, Mike popped
the question," Beerbower,


Associated Press
Valerie Beerbower and her husband Mike are pictured at Maumee Bay State Park in
Oregon, Ohio. Beerbower was a mess the night her husband, Mike, proposed during
what he envisioned as a special evening taking in the sights of Washington, D.C.


YouTube and social media
are full of big proposals gone
wrong. There's the girl who
swallowed the ring buried in a
strawberry milkshake. ... And
there's the brain surgeon who
buried the ring on a Florida beach,
only to forget where he put it.


who works for a conserva-
tion group in Dayton, Ohio,
recalled of their 2008 trek.
While they were still bask-
ing in her "yes," a driver
pulled up, opened his car
door and threw up all over
the place.
"Mike was crushed, but
I couldn't stop laughing,"
she said.
YouTube and social media
are full of big proposals
gone wrong. There's the
girl who swallowed the ring


buried in a strawberry
milkshake, eventually ac-
cepting while holding her
X-ray with a perfect view
of her new rock. And
there's the brain surgeon
who buried the ring on a
Florida beach, only to for-
get where he put it when
the time came.
Preserving a proposal
on camera is an important
moment, Winikka said:
"These days we're not shy
to share. We're all exposed


to one another's lives."
And what better way than
creating a public event or
sweeping a beloved off to
a romantic destination -
two strong trends, she said.
Social scientists haven't
spent much time studying
marriage proposals, but
Winikka said tradition still
reigns amid the madness
to go big and go public.
She said 71 percent of
about 10,000 newly marrieds
who used her site noted
their betrothed asked a
parent for permission be-
fore popping the question,
and 77 percent of grooms
went down on bended
knee. More couples live
together before they get
hitched, she said, adding
to the desire for meaning-
ful proposals.
"Couples are looking to
create something really
special and create a mo-
ment," Winikka said.


Small merchants find victory over


credit card companies bittersweet


Associated Press

NEW YORK- Gretel-
Ann Fischer already told
customers that she won't
accept credit cards for
purchases under $5 at
her Vermont bakery The
last thing she wants to do
is anger them by passing
along the transaction fee
she has to pay each time
they use plastic.
Fischer is one of thou-
sands of retailers in 40
states who now have the
right to charge customers
the fees that come along
with using credit cards.
They won that right as
part of a settlement of a
class action lawsuit
brought by merchants
against the credit card
companies Visa and
MasterCard and major
banks that issue credit
cards. But many small
retailers say customers
will bolt if they tack on a
surcharge that could range
from 1.5 percent and 4
percent of purchases
made with plastic.
"It's just not going to
happen. It's hard enough
to get them to accept the
$5 minimum," said Fis-
cher, who owns Cupps Cafe
and Bakery in Winooski,
Vt She imposed the min-
imum because of a 17-
cent per transaction fee
that's in addition to the
2.5 percent that Visa and
MasterCard charge for
the entire purchase. Sev-
enteen cents on a $2 cup
of coffee was too much
for the bakery to absorb.
Credit card transac-
tion fees cost the bakery
$10,000 a year, a big bite
for a company with an-
nual revenue of about
$400,000. But Fischer
and her husband, Brian,
say passing the fees
along just isn't an option.


Credit card transaction fees cost Cupps Cafe and
Bakery $10,000 a year, a big bite for a company
with annual revenue of about $400,000. But
Gretel-Ann Fischer and her husband, Brian, say passing
the fees along just isn't an option. "I think you'd
alienate a bunch of customers," says Brian Fischer.


"I think you'd alienate a
bunch of customers," said
Brian Fischer.
The surcharges are the
result of a settlement lastJuly
of a long-running federal
antitrust lawsuit brought
by nine retailers against
Visa, MasterCard and major
banks. Before the agree-
ment, the credit card com-
panies prohibited retailers
and other businesses that
accept credit cards from
charging customers for the
right to use plastic. The set-
tlement gave merchants
the right to pass along the
fees as of Jan. 27.
The plaintiffs in the law-
suit ranged from Leon's
Transmission, a California
auto repair company with
seven locations, to Payless
ShoeSource.















To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Judy
Moseley
at 564-2917
jmoseley@ chronicleonline.com


The surcharges can't be
slipped in without telling
customers. The agreement
requires retailers to notify
customers before and
after a purchase.
But the number of re-
tailers who pass along the
transaction fee is likely to
be relatively small. Big re-
tailers like Walmart and
Target have already said
they won't do it. The sur-
charges are also illegal in
California, Colorado, Con-
necticut, Florida, Kansas,
Maine, Massachusetts,
Oklahoma and Texas.


of


Citrus County,
Citrus Counlty, I


The lawsuit's intent was
to lower the transaction
fees that merchants pay,
said Mallory Duncan, a
senior vice president at
the National Retail Feder-
ation, a trade group that is
opposed to the settlement.
In the end, the terms of
the settlement created a
dilemma. Many retailers
could go ahead and pass
on the fees to shoppers.
But by doing so they risk
angering customers.
"That's exactly opposite
where we want to be,"
Duncan said.





Inc.


TEXTJ ... CITRUS + Your Tip to 274637 (CRIMES)

CLICK.... www.CrimeStoppersCitrus.com

CAM ... 1-888-ANY-TIPS (1-888-269-8477)

Funded by the Office of the Attorney General, Crime Stoppers Trust Fund


~gII


Obituaries


A6 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013


[ BiG GAME
4Ts
UNys PA T
Fe.I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


!S--LLi FURNITURE


I'50 OFFI
FREE ANY RECLINER
DELIVERY WITH COUPON

se3 Sofas And Loveseats On Sale!


All Recliners On Sale!
S349 9 WITH COUPON
o~r~t& UP


JUST ARRIVED!


TOP QUALITY
NEW MEMORY FOAM
CORONA

GEL BEDS


FREE SAME DAYDE LIVERY
ON ALL IN STOCK ITEMS


MATTRESS


SALE


FIRM OR PLUSH POSTURE COMFORT SETS FIRM OR PLUSH DOUBLE-SIDED SETS


Twin ........99 Queen .....139995
Full ............299 King ......... s49995


AFTER COUPON DISCOUNT


King .... 699 Queen $4999
Full ...........399
AFTER COUPON DISCOUNT


EXTRA FIRM SETS HARMONY Gel Memory Style
Twin 2999 Queen 4999 Full ........ s69995 Queen S999"
Full ................ s39995 King .............. s699 King ...........1099
AFTER COUPON DISCOUNT AFTER COUPON DISCOUNT


Made in America Proud of It!


FURNITURE PALACE
& MATTRESS WAREHOUSE


Queen Sets
King Sets


99995


AFTER COUPON DISCOUNT


All Wood
Dresser, Mirror, Nightstand,
Queen Headboard,
Footboard and Rails

S1299"

s40OFFSET
S WITH COUPONS
ANY
S FULL
L WITH COUPON
ANY
QUEEN

n OFF SET
L WITH COUPON
L------------------------- J
NEW HOURS:
MON.-FRI. 9AM-7PM
SAT. 9AM-5PM SUN. 11AM-5PM
3106 S. Florida Ave., Inverness
(Hwy. 41) North of Fairgrounds
352-726-2999
www.furniturepalacecc.com -


HOME OF


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013 A7


I* 4


3DXAB





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MI L I 1 $H* IONS IN igF l

oI A 0 1

p1

S l l


GOLD
ANY TYPE NEW OR OLD
10K 14K 18K 22K 24K
WE BUY ALL SOLID GOLD ITEMS-
NEW, USED OR BROKEN
High School Rings up to .-*.. $100.00
Old Mountings up to **....*$150.00
Wedding Bands up to *+**+ $200.00
Charms up to ***++*******$200.00
Old Watch Cases up to +*+*++ $200.00
Bracelets up to ***+*****$1,500.00
Necklaces up to ******* *$$1,500.00
Dental Gold *+**** *Bring in for Cash
Broken Chains ****** Bring in for Cash


DIAMONDS
1/4 Carat Diamond up to **** $225.00
1/2 Carat Diamond up to *** $1,100.00
1 Carat Diamond up to *+***$4,500.00
2 Carat Diamond up to **** $14,000.00
3 Carat Diamond up to ***$22,000.00
5 Carat Diamond up to *** $950,000.00


We will pay you CA$H for your Diamonds with or
without GIA Certificates. If you have larger stones than
listed please bring them in for a FREE evaluation.
Remember WE PAY THE MOST!


Silver Coins Gold Coins Silver Coins
We Will Buy All U.S. Minted Coins


GOLD COINS
$1.00 Gold Coins (US)
$2.50 Gold Coins (US)
$3.00 Gold Coins (US)
$5.00 Gold Coins (US)
$10.00 Gold Coins (US)
$20.00 Gold Coins (US)
Also Buying Foreign Gold Coins.
Prices are subject to change due to
fluctuations in precious metals market.


SILVER COINS
Silver Dollars (before 1936)
Half Dollars (before 1965)
Quarters (before 1965)
Dimes (before 1965)
Nickels (before 1938)
War Nickels (1942-1945)
Indian Head Pennies
These prices listed are for U.S. coins only!
We also buy Proof Sets, Commemoratives,
Mint Sets, 40% Silver Coins.


BRING IN FOR BEST OFFERS! ABSOLUTE HIGHEST PRICES PAID!

At GET OLD WATCHES IA FORUN I A I


up p o W ,oUUU.UU up LU U U5U Up W i,9UU up ut o',iUUU U
> Prices quoted arefor actual watches pictured. All prices are based on condition of watch.
CONSIDER BRINGING EVERYTHING YOU MAY HAVE THOU-
SANDS OF DOLLARS WORTH OF ITEMS GATHERING DUST.
We have surprised many people who thought their items were not valuable enough to consider.
The expert evaluators we have gathered together offer you a wealth of knowledge and experi-
ence. We are accustomed to paying thousands of dollars for valuable items. Don't miss this op-
portunity. Perhaps we'll help you find a real treasure in those hidden away pieces. There's never
a charge for our consultation or service.
Almost everyone has something of value they no longer need or want: Inherited items, jew-
elry that doesn't fit your style, watches that are old or even broken, silver pieces. Several Items that
might be useless to YOU... may be considered treasures by the collectors from our vast international
network.

ONE LOCATION
V Plantation on Crystal River
9301 West Fort IslandTrail
Crystal River, FL 34429
203-410-4709
For Directions ONLY Call 352-795-4211

*HOUSE AND/OR BANK CALLS SECURITY PROVIDED
AVAILABLE BYAPPOINTMENT


CORUM




Up to $2,51


REASONS TO SELL
1. Blackthorn Estate Buyers specializes In evaluating
and buying New and Antique jewelry. Our generations
of experience qualify us to evaluate everything from
small pieces to the finest and most valuable estate
jewelry.
2. Blackthorn Estate Buyers has an undisputed reputa-
tion. We work Incompliance with your Local and State
Government.
3. Owners of rare pieces say that it is extremely difficult
to find buyers who have the experience and knowledge
to pay top market prices most jewelry stores won't
even make you a credible offer.
4. This Is an Ideal opportunity to have your valuables eval-
uted (especially If you Inherited them) by experts right
here in this area. Come in for a free appraisal and
cash offer NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY.
5. If you are not wearing or enjoying the Items that you
have, then this is a great chance for you to convert
them to CASH. This is much better than just holding
hard to sell diamonds, jewelry & coins.


STERLING & SILVER = n


CHECK TO SEE IF YOU
HAVE ANY OF THESE
ITEMS WE
ARE BUYING?
Rare & Important Jewelry
Diamond Bar Pins
Antique Bracelets
Diamond Bow Pins
Pocket Watches
Sapphire & Diamond Jewelry
Patek Phillipe Watches
Ruby & Diamond Jewelry
Emerald & Diamond Jewelry
Vacheron & Constantin Watches
Jewelry from the 20's, 30's, & 40's
Silver & Gold Boxes
Nicely Carved Old Cameos
R. Chaarus Statues
Diamond Earrings
Hamilton Watches
R. Lalique Glass
Rolex Watches
Diamonds from 1 to 20 CTS.
Antique Lockets


Cartier & Ififany items
Art Deco Jewelry
Gold or Silver Mesh Purses
BLACKTHORN Railroad Watches
ESTATE B U Y E R S
9858 Clintmoore Rd Suite CA$H
Boca Raton, Florida 33496'
"Over 30years of experience with integrity" -FOR
www.blackthorngold.com ANTIQUES

203-410-4709Th n.tFi.FbIT St.*Feb2
02004BLACKITHONESTATEBUTERS,SNC *REPAODUCTIONOOA USE OFTHISANNOUONCEMENTINANYWAYESPFROTECTED UNDER FEDERAL COPYGHTATWSANDANYRE-CREATION, INWHOLE ORINPARTYANYMEANS ELECTRONIC ORPHOTOGRAPHICISSTSCTLYPROHEBITEDAND WlLaBECRLMINALLYPROSECUTEDSOTHE FULLJEXTENTOFTHEAW


A8 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Winter weather wreaks havoc

Three dead after storms rake South, move to Northeast
Associated Press
ADAIRSVILLE, Ga. -A
violent storm system that
spawned deadly tornadoes
in the South delivered tor-
rential rain and dangerous
winds to the Mid-Atlantic
and Northeast, leaving at
least three people dead
and tens of thousands
without electricity as
swollen rivers threatened
flooding.
Two people were killed
by tornadoes Tuesday and
Wednesday, while a third
was found dead Thursday
in a flooded homeless
camp.
In the Georgia city of
Adairsville, many homes
were splintered by the m a a
massive storm front as it
punched across the South-
east on Wednesday. Associated Press
The vast storm front Penn State senior Mike Hricik fights the wind and snow as he walks along Bigler Road,
shattered homes and busi- on the Penn State campus. Severe wind and heavy snow squalls moved through Cen-
nesses around the Mid- tre County.
west and South with
tornadoes and high winds. Thursday morning in a out parts of a big manufac- Once the worst had passed,
By Thursday, it had spread flooded homeless camp turning plant. Insulation she called her family in
tens of thousands of power near the Patuxent River. dangled from trees and Adairsville and was re-
outages from Georgia to Officials have opened power poles. A bank lost a lived to hear they'd all
Connecticut, triggered flood gates to ease pres- chunk of its roof. made it to a cinderblock
flash floods and forced sure on dams. In Adairsville, Kandi storm shelter under her
water rescues in areas out- Some flooding also was Cash tried to salvage pho- grandparents' home.
side Washington. Evacua- reported in North Car- tos and other keepsakes "I just told them that the
tions were ordered in olina and West Virginia. from the debris of her Lord was watching after
parts of Virginia and Mary- Frigid air blanketed the grandparents' destroyed them," she said. "The
land with river levels on nation's midsection Thurs- home. On the same lot was houses can be rebuilt. The
the rise. In Laurel, Md., day, with subzero temper- a mobile home where her most important thing was
outside Washington, offi- atures and wind chills aunt lived and another that they were safe."
cials were opening some recorded in the Dakotas. small house her cousin Anthony Raines, 51, was
dams to ease pressure In Detroit, icy roads were was fixing up to move into killed when a tree crashed
after the heavy rains, blamed for a massive after a planned May wed- down on his mobile home,
Near the nation's capi- chain reaction wreck in- ding. All three homes were crushing him on his bed,
tal, emergency responders volving about 30 vehicles demolished: Christmas or- Bartow County Coroner
in Virginia's Loudoun on Interstate 75. At least naments, children's toys, Joel Guyton said. Nine
County said they con- three people died there, clothing, household items other people were hospi-
ducted water rescues early and another pileup involv- and just about everything talized for minor injuries,
Thursday after some flash ing more than 40 vehicles else that makes up a home authorities said.
floods. One Virginia mo- near Indianapolis closed a were strewn about The other death re-
torist was plucked from a stretch of Interstate 70 in "I'm just picking up pic- ported from the storms oc-
van's rooftop after veering both directions. tures," said Cash, 28. "I've curred in Tennessee,
into a water-filled ravine, Some of the fiercest found the most important where an uprooted tree
WTOP radio reported. damage occurred in ones, like when my cousin fell Tuesday onto a storage
Water rescues also were Adairsville, a town some 60 was born and her late shed where a man had
reported in the Washing- miles northwest ofAtlanta. daddy, the ones that matter taken shelter
ton suburb of Montgomery WSB-TV in Atlanta aired most." Near Adairsville, the
County, Md. footage of an enormous Cash, who lives in storm was powerful
Anne Arundel County funnel cloud bearing down nearby Cartersville, rode enough to flip cars, includ-
Police Lt. TJ. Smith said a on Adairsville. Winds flat- out the violent weather in ing one turned upside
person was found dead tened homes and wiped a neighbor's basement. down onto its roof.


NY Times says

Chinese hacked

paper's computers


Associated Press
BEIJING Chinese
hackers repeatedly pene-
trated The New York
Times' computer systems
over the past four months,
stealing reporters' pass-
words and hunting for
files on an investigation
into the wealth amassed
by the family of a top Chi-
nese leader, the newspa-
per reported Thursday
Security experts hired
to investigate and plug the
breach found the attacks
used tactics similar to
ones used in previous
hacking incidents traced
to China, the report
stated. It said the
hackers routed the attacks
through computers at U.S.
universities, installed a
strain of malicious soft-
ware, or malware, associ-
ated with Chinese hackers
and initiated the attacks
from Chinese university
computers previously
used by the Chinese mili-
tary to attack U.S. military
contractors.
The attacks, which
began in mid-September,
coincided with a Times
investigation into how the
relatives and family of
Premier Wen Jiabao built


a fortune worth over $2
billion. The report, which
was posted online Oct. 25,
embarrassed the Commu-
nist Party leadership,
coming ahead of a fraught
transition to new leaders
and exposing deep-
seated favoritism at a
time when many Chinese
are upset about a wealth
gap.
During the months of
cyber-incursions, the
hackers eventually lifted
the computer passwords
of all Times employees
and used them to get into
the personal computers
of 53 employees.
The report stated none
of the Times' customer
data was compromised
and information about
the investigation into the
Wen family remained
protected, though it left
unclear what data or
communications the infil-
trators accessed.
"Computer security ex-
perts found no evidence
that sensitive emails or
files from the reporting of
our articles about the
Wen family were ac-
cessed, downloaded or
copied," the report
quoted executive editor
Jill Abramson as saying.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Super Bowl ads enlist viewers this year


Football fans get in the game

with Coca-Cola advertisement


Associated Press

NEW YORK You don't
have to be a football player
to be a part of the action on
Super Bowl Sunday.
Coca-Cola is asking peo-
ple to vote for an online
match between three
groups competing in a
desert for a Coke on Game
Day Pepsi and Toyota are
using viewers' photos in
their ads. Audi let people
choose the end of its Super
Bowl ad, while Lincoln
based its spot on more
6,000 tweets from fans
about their road trips.
"We drove passed an al-
paca farm, a few of them
were meandering on the
highway and my sister
screamed, 'It's the Alpaca-
lypse!"' reads one tweet in
Lincoln's Super Bowl ad
featuring rapper Joseph
"Rev Run" Simmons and
Wil Wheaton, who acted in
the iconic science-fiction
series "Star Trek: The
Next Generation."
Advertisers have found
new ways to get viewers
into the game online. And
they're going well beyond
encouraging fans to tweet
or "like" their ads on web-
sites such as Twitter Face-
book.
They're trying to get the
most of their Super Bowl
ads, which cost nearly $4
million a pop. Companies
that advertise during the
Super Bowl get a 20 per-
cent increase in Web traf-
fic on the day of the game,
according to the analytics
arm of software maker
Adobe. They also have a
higher online audience
than average in the week
after.
"We're seeing better and
more unique ways of get-
ting people involved," said
Robert Kolt, an advertising
instructor at Michigan
State University. "You
want people to be en-
gaged."
PepsiCo, which is spon-
soring the Super Bowl
halftime show, said its goal
was to create buzz online
with a monthlong cam-


paign that went well be-
yond a voiceover saying
"brought to you by Pepsi."
For about two weeks,
Pepsi asked fans online
and via a digital billboard
in New York's Times
Square to submit their pic-
tures for a chance to ap-
pear in a 30-second "intro"
spot to air right before the
halftime show.
The company said the
effort was more popular
than it expected: Pepsi ex-
pected to get 2,000 photos,
but got 100,000 instead.
About 1,000 photos were
chosen to be a part of the
intro, one in each frame of
the spot, 15 frames a sec-
ond, stitched together in
"flipbook" style video that
appears to show one per-
son jumping to the tune of
Beyonce's "Countdown"
song.
"We don't just want
(viewers) on pepsi.com, we
want them telling their
friends 'I just did some-
thing with Pepsi,"' said An-
gelique Krembs, vice
president of trademark
Pepsi marketing. "You
want the friend to tell the
friend about Pepsi. You
don't want Pepsi to always
be the one talking about
Pepsi."
Coca-Cola created an
online campaign that pits
three groups a troupe of
showgirls, biker-style bad-
landers and cowboys -
against each other in a
race through a desert for a
Coca-Cola.
Starting Jan. 23 and con-
tinuing until the end of the
Super Bowl, viewers can
vote online for their fa-
vorite group. The group
with the most votes will be
revealed in an ad after the
Super Bowl ends. And the
first 50,000 voters will get a
free Coke if they register
for Coke's loyalty program.
The campaign is more
interactive than Coca-
Cola's online effort last
year, which featured a
real-time animation of
Polar Bears reacting to
what was happening dur-
ing the Super Bowl.


*~~


V


, [I 'i-


UiL


Associated Press
This frame grab provided by Coca Cola, shows a moment in the Super Bowl 2013 Coca Cola campaign. The
drinkmaker is asking people to vote for an online match between three groups a troupe of showgirls, cowboys
and biker-style badlanders competing for a Coke during the game.

10 SPOTS TO LOOK OUT FOR DURING SUPER BOWL SUNDAY


1. Samsung Mobile's 2-minute ad in the fourth quar-
ter called "The Big Pitch" stars "Knocked Up" actors
Paul Rudd and Seth Rogen and was directed by Jon
Favreau ("Iron Man"). The company has not released
details about the ad's plot other than to say it shows
Rogen and Rudd on a "quest to become the next big
thing." A teaser ad shows Rogen and Rudd trying to
talk about a Super Bowl ad without saying the words
"Super Bowl."
2. Best Buy's 30-second ad in the first quarter stars
Amy Poehler, star of NBC's "Parks and Rec," asking
a Best Buy employee "lots of questions."
3. Kraft enlists Tracy Morgan from NBC's "30 Rock" to
introduce its new Mio Fit water enhancing drops in a
30-second ad during the third quarter.
4. Hyundai Motor Group's Kia invents a fanciful way
that babies are made, blasting in from a baby planet
in its "Space babies" ad for the 2014 Sorento
crossover.
5. First-time advertiser Paramount Farms is touting
its Wonderful Pistachios brand of nut in a 30-second
ad in the third quarter in its "Get Crackin'" cam-
paign that stars Korean pop sensation Psy.
6. First-time advertiser Axe's 30-second ad in the
third quarter of the game shows a woman in the
ocean getting rescued by a sexy lifeguard, but going
for an astronaut instead. It promotes Axe's new
cologne "Apollo" and its contest to send someone on
the first suborbital space tour in 2014.
7. Audi's 60-second ad in the first quarter, with an
ending voted on by viewers, shows a boy gaining
confidence from driving his father's Audi to the
prom, kissing the prom queen and getting decked by
the prom king.
8. PepsiCo's Frito-Lay's Doritos "Crash the Super
Bowl" ads are back for the seventh straight year. Two
30-second commercials made by consumers will
make it on the air. Fans voted for one winner and


This undated image provided by Best Buy, shows Amy
Poehler on the set of the Company's Super Bowl
commercial. Poehler, star of NBC's "Parks and Rec,"
asks a Best Buy employee "lots of questions."

Doritos chose the other.
9. Ford Motor Co. enlisted late-night talk show host
Jimmy Fallon to choose road trip stories submitted
by Twitter with the hashtag #steerthescript to base
its Super Bowl commercial for Lincoln. The story line
for the 30-second ad was developed from 6,117
Tweets about road trips and features rapper Joseph
"Rev Run" Simmons, Wil Wheaton, who acted in the
iconic science-fiction series "Star Trek: The Next
Generation."
10. The Milk Processor Education Program, known as
MilkPep and popular for its "Got Milk?" print ads, is fea-
turing actor and professional wrestler Dwayne "The
Rock" Johnson in a 30-second ad in the second quarter
that is directed by Peter Berg ("Friday Night Lights.")
-Associated Press


Athletes help charities before game


Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS -
Some athletes and
celebrities headed to
New Orleans for Super
Bowl weekend are pick-
ing up hammers and
packaging food for the
homeless in the big
game's host city.
The downtown area
where most Super Bowl
festivities will take place
has arguably never
looked better, with a reno-
vated Superdome and
resurfaced streets and
sidewalks. But a closer
look reveals homeless-
ness, crime and outer-
lying neighborhoods that
still bear the scars of 2005,
when levees collapsed
during Hurricane Katrina
and inundated more than
80 percent of the city with
floodwater.
One of the city's biggest


areas of need is housing.
In some areas, flood-
damaged houses remain
untouched, gutted homes
have been abandoned,
and many lots are over-
grown with weeds where
houses once stood.
While in town, some
athletes and celebrities
are working with Habitat
for Humanity and Re-
building Together to help
the city's rebuilding ef-
fort. Others are working
with the Make-A-Wish
Foundation and Second
Harvest, a New Orleans-
based nonprofit commu-
nity food bank.
"Every ounce of sup-
port helps," said Jon
Luther, vice president of
the Home Builders Asso-
ciation of Greater New
Orleans, which has been
working with the NFL
Players Association for
months to build homes in


the city's Lower 9th Ward
neighborhood, which saw
some of the worst flooding
after Katrina.
"For them to show such
interest and generosity of
their time to our city, we
are so grateful," Luther
said.
Through the NFL's
Touchdown for Homes
program, three homes
have been built not far
from actor Brad Pitt's
Make It Right houses. A
ribbon-cutting will be
Friday
This week, more NFL
players are getting to
work on homes in other
parts of the city. Some
worked Thursday with
Habitat for Humanity to
build a new home for a
New Orleans resident in
the Central City area. On
Friday, they will work on
another home in the same
area for a local family


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Review: BlackBerry Z10 good stab at rebirth


New smartphone is company's

attempt at at a turnaround


Associated Press
NEW YORK- Are you
ashamed to have a Black-
Berry? It's not exactly a
status symbol any more, at
least not in the U.S., after
it got left in the dust by the
iPhone. Now, there's a new
BlackBerry that wants to
get back into the cool club:
the Z10.
It's the first phone to run
the new BlackBerry 10 op-
erating system, and it is, at
first blush, a very good
stab at regaining at least
some of the cachet of the
BlackBerry


The problem is that no
one has ever succeeded in
turning around a failing
smartphone maker. Re-
member the Palm, any-
one? It's simply a brutal
industry So even if the Z10
does everything it set out
to do, it might not be
enough to save Research
In Motion Ltd., the home of
the BlackBerry. The com-
pany is changing its name
to BlackBerry, but that
could just be the prelude
to riding the brand into the
sunset once and for all.
It doesn't exactly help,
that the Z10 looks like


Associated Press
The Z10 is BlackBerry's first phone to run its new
operating system, which the company hopes will turn
around the failing smartphone maker.


every other smartphone on
the shelf. It's a flat black
slab with a touch screen,
nearly indistinguishable at
15 feet from the iPhone 5 or
a bevy of Android smart-
phones. The screen meas-
ures 4.2 inches diagonally,


a bit bigger than the iPhone
but smaller than most An-
droid phones. It will go on
sale in the U.S. in March,
probably for about $200
with a two-year service
contract, in line with the
iPhone and other rivals.


Turn it on, and the dif-
ferences become more evi-
dent. Older BlackBerrys
are great communications
devices, but are poor at
multimedia and at running
third-party apps, some-
thing the iPhone excels at.
The new BlackBerry 10
software is a serious at-
tempt at marrying these
two feature sets, and after
a few hours of use, it looks
like it succeeds.
BlackBerry 10 was de-
layed for about a year, and it
seems as if the extra time
was put to good use. The
software is, for a first re-
lease, uncommonly slick
and well thought out
The Z10 is easier to use
than an Android phone. It
is more difficult to use


than the iPhone, but it is
also more powerful.
It's also completely
touch-oriented, which isn't
what you'd expect from a
BlackBerry You don't use
a hardware buttons to nav-
igate the phone at all:
They're just to turn the
phone on or off, or adjust
the volume. To get around,
you swipe across the
screen. Up, down, right
and left swipes all do dif-
ferent things, but they're
fairly easy to remember.
The Z10 will have a re-
placeable battery, some-
thing lacking on the iPhone.
Screen quality will be good,
too, at 356 pixels per inch,
compared with 326 for the
iPhone 5 and 306 for Sam-
sung's Galaxy S III.


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t,4 0 0 ......................................................
1 0 .. ........... ........... .......... .... ...... ................ ........... 0. . ... .... .. .. ................................

1 ,3 2 0 ......................... ................ ......... .......... ...... 1 2 ,4 0 0 ...... ...... .... ......... .......... .......... .... ..... ......
1.. S 0N D 12 S O N D J.


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
13941.06
5825.00
474.55
8910.66
3154.18
1504.19
1095.09
15862.65
902.90


LOW
13860.58
5757.05
471.47
8872.97
3136.82
1496.76
1087.75
15796.10
895.75


CLOSE
13860.58
5804.23
474.00
8883.79
3142.13
1498.11
1093.40
15824.32
902.09


%CHG.
-0.36%
+0.35%
+0.20%
-0.23%
-0.01%
-0.26%
+0.40%
-0.09%
+0.58%


YTD
+5.77%
+9.37%
+4.61%
+5.21%
+4.06%
+5.04%
+7.15%
+5.53%
+6.21%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE *CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 3.42 0- 10.00 4.00 +.03 +0.8 V V V -13.0 -57.7 dd
AT&T Inc T 29.02 --0 38.58 34.79 +.31 +0.9 A V A +3.2 +23.6 29 1.80f
Ametek Inc AME 29.86 0 41.55 40.99 +.07 +0.2 V A A +9.1 +31.0 22 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 60.52 94.49 88.60 -5.54 -5.9 V A A +1.4 +56.2 1.57e
Bank of America BAC 6.72 12.20 11.32 -.06 -0.5 V V V -2.5 +61.5 44 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 6.35 12.23 11.20 -.30 -2.6 V V V -1.5 +30.2 cc
CenturyLink Inc CTL 36.50 -0- 43.43 40.45 +.05 +0.1 A A A +3.4 +17.1 36 2.90
Citigroup C 24.61 0 43.34 42.16 +.22 +0.5 7 A A +6.6 +38.9 13 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 -0-- 21.43 16.44 -.48 -2.8 V A A +3.8 -5.9 29 1.00
Disney DIS 38.38 0 54.87 53.88 +.09 +0.2 7 A A +8.2 +39.9 17 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 71.13 68.74 +.30 +0.4 A A A +7.7 +12.7 19 3.06
EPR Properties EPR 40.04 48.92 46.86 +.19 +0.4 V A A +1.6 +11.6 21 3.00
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 77.13 93.67 89.97 -.70 -0.8 V A A +4.0 +8.6 11 2.28
Ford Motor F 8.82 14.30 12.95 +.02 +0.2 V V ... +7.2 10 0.40f
Gen Electric GE 18.02 23.18 22.28 +.05 +0.2 A A +6.1 +21.3 16 0.76f
Home Depot HD 44.22 68.15 66.92 -.32 -0.5 V A A +8.2 +52.8 24 1.16
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 -- 29.27 21.04 -.33 -1.5 A V A +2.0 -16.8 10 0.90
IBM IBM 181.85 211.79 203.07 -.45 -0.2 7 A A +6.0 +7.4 14 3.40
LKQ Corporation LKQ 14.63 --0- 23.51 22.39 -.19 -0.8 V A A +6.1 +38.4 26
Lowes Cos LOW 24.76 0 39.26 38.19 -.02 -0.1 V A A +7.5 +44.8 23 0.64
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 --0 101.29 95.29 +.62 +0.7 A A A +8.0 -1.2 18 3.08
Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.26 -0-- 32.95 27.45 -.40 -1.4 V A A +2.8 -3.1 15 0.92
Motorola Solutions MSI 44.49 0 59.48 58.39 -.30 -0.5 V A A +4.9 +29.8 19 1.04
NextEra Energy NEE 59.10 0 72.87 72.05 +.05 +0.1 V A A +4.1 +24.1 16 2.40
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 15.69 -- 43.18 20.33 -.30 -1.5 A A A +3.1 -50.2 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 16.10 --0- 19.71 19.33 -.24 -1.2 V A A +7.1 +11.5 17 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 5.12 0 7.88 7.78 -.03 -0.4 A A A +9.1 +51.8 11 0.04
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 -0-- 85.90 46.95 +.56 +1.2 A A A +13.5 +13.4 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 70.50 0 90.31 88.63 -.25 -0.3 V V A +2.8 +16.0 21 2.08
Sprint Nextel Corp S 2.10 6.04 5.63 -.02 -0.4 V V V -0.7 +161.6 dd
Texas Instru TXN 26.06 34.24 33.08 +.26 +0.8 A A A +7.1 +4.4 21 0.84
Time Warner TWX 33.62 0 51.29 50.52 +.38 +0.8 A A A +5.6 +36.7 19 1.04
UniFirst Corp UNF 55.86 88.35 81.74 -.40 -0.5 A V A +11.5 +37.5 16 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 36.80 -0- 48.77 43.61 ... ... A V A +0.8 +21.4 cc 2.06
Vodafone Group VOD 24.95 -0- 30.07 27.32 -.06 -0.2 A A A +8.5 +6.2 1.53e
WalMart Strs WMT 57.18 --0 77.60 69.95 +.20 +0.3 A A A +2.5 +16.4 14 1.59
Walgreen Co WAG 28.53 0 40.31 39.96 +.09 +0.2 A A A +8.0 +21.5 18 1.10
Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates





The yield on the
10-year Treasury
note held steady
at 1.99 percent
Thursday. Yields
affect interest
rates on con-
sumer loans.


PRIME FED
RATE FUNDS
YEST 3.25 .13
6 MO AGO 3.25 .13
1 YR AGO 3.25 .13


Commodities
The price of
crude oil fell on
worries about
weakening de-
mand. A govern-
ment report said
that the number
of workers ap-
plying for unem-
ployment bene-
fits rose more
than expected
last week.




EMI


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .07 0.06 +0.01 .06
6-month T-bill .11 0.10 +0.01 .08
52-wk T-bill .13 0.13 ... .11
2-year T-note .27 0.27 .23
5-year T-note .88 0.88 ... .72
10-year T-note 1.99 1.99 ... 1.83
30-year T-bond 3.17 3.18 -0.01 2.99


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 2.76 2.79 -0.03 2.50
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.00 4.00 ... 4.56
Barclays USAggregate 1.91 1.91 ... 2.05
Barclays US High Yield 5.77 5.69 +0.08 7.52
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 3.93 3.91 +0.02 3.72
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.13 1.13 ... .95
Barclays US Corp 2.83 2.82 +0.01 3.39


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 97.49
Ethanol (gal) 2.46
Heating Oil (gal) 3.13
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.34
Unleaded Gas (gal) 3.03
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1660.60
Silver (oz) 31.34
Platinum (oz) 1675.40
Copper (Ib) 3.72
Palladium (oz) 745.30
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.28
Coffee (Ib) 1.47
Corn (bu) 7.41
Cotton (Ib) 0.83
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 352.70
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.20
Soybeans (bu) 14.69
Wheat (bu) 7.80


PVS.
97.94
2.46
3.12
3.34
3.04
PVS.
1679.90
32.16
1689.30
3.74
751.00
PVS.
1.28
1.48
7.40
0.83
342.70
1.19
14.79
7.87


%CHG
-0.46
+0.08
+0.40
+0.12
-0.42
%CHG
-1.15
-2.54
-0.82
-0.44
-0.76
%CHG
-0.30
-0.51
+0.03
-0.01
+2.92
+0.34
-0.69
-0.95


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 21.13 -.07 +3.6 +14.1 +12.0 +5.1
BondA m 12.86 +.01 -0.5 +3.9 +5.8 +3.8
CaplncBuA m 54.24 -.07 +2.8 +14.0 +9.8 +2.7
CpWIdGrIA m 38.68 -.19 +4.0 +18.4 +9.3 +1.5
EurPacGrA m 42.76 -.11 +3.7 +16.6 +7.4 +0.9
FnlnvA m 42.75 -.14 +4.8 +16.8 +12.6 +3.3
GrthAmA m 35.89 -.12 +4.5 +17.5 +12.1 +3.2
IncAmerA m 18.64 -.07 +3.2 +13.4 +11.8 +4.7
InvCoAmA m 31.42 -.21 +4.2 +15.4 +10.9 +2.7
NewPerspA m 32.71 -.08 +4.6 +18.9 +11.5 +3.6
WAMutlnvA m 32.53 -.18 +4.2 +14.5 +13.6 +3.5
Dodge & Cox Income 13.86 +.01 0.0 +5.7 +6.2 +6.7
IntlStk 36.37 +.09 +5.0 +19.5 +8.1 +0.8
Stock 129.40 -.76 +6.2 +22.5 +12.9 +2.1
Fidelity Contra 80.60 -.16 +3.9 +15.0 +13.9 +4.8
GrowCo 97.09 +.07 +4.1 +13.7 +16.6 +6.6
LowPriStk d 41.49 -.05 +5.0 +17.2 +15.1 +7.0
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.30 -.01 +3.2 +14.5 +11.0 +5.5
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.39 -.01 +0.4 +10.4 +8.5 +9.3
GIBondAdv 13.35 -.01 +0.4 +10.8 +8.7 +9.6
Harbor Intllnstl d 63.95 -.33 +2.9 +15.4 +9.8 +1.5
PIMCO TotRetA m 11.19 ... -0.3 +6.9 +6.6 +7.1
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 27.84 -.08 +5.3 +18.3 +13.3 +3.5
GrowStk 39.21 -.04 +3.8 +15.6 +15.0 +5.5
Vanguard 500Adml 138.18 -.34 +5.2 +16.8 +14.1 +4.0
5001nv 138.17 -.34 +5.2 +16.6 +14.0 +3.9
GNMAAdml 10.83 +.01 -0.6 +1.4 +5.1 +5.6
MulntAdml 14.40 +.01 +0.4 +3.9 +5.8 +5.2
STGradeAd 10.82 ... +0.1 +3.6 +3.5 +3.8
TotBdAdml 10.99 ... -0.7 +2.5 +5.3 +5.4
Totlntl 15.48 -.01 +3.3 +13.8 +6.9 0.6
TotStlAdm 37.61 -.04 +5.5 +16.8 +14.7 +4.7
TotStldx 37.60 -.04 +5.5 +16.7 +14.5 +4.6
Welltn 35.03 -.07 +3.5 +12.8 +10.9 +5.6
WelltnAdm 60.49 -.14 +3.5 +12.9 +11.0 +5.7
*-Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
The Dow Jones industrial aver-
age fell a second straight day
Thursday. United Parcel Service
warned that economic growth
looks to be slow, and the world's
biggest package delivery compa-
ny gave a 2013 profit forecast
that fell short of analysts' expec-
tations.

ConocoPhillips COP
Close: $58.00V-3.09 or -5.1%
The Houston-based oil company
said that earnings during the fourth
quarter fell as prices for oil and nat-
ural gas declined.



Ii I, J
52-week range
$50.62 L_ $78.29
Vol.:16.9m (2.8x avg.) PE:7.6
Mkt. Cap:$70.41 b Yield: 4.6%
Under Armour UA
Close: $50.87A2.74 or 5.7%
The athletic clothing and shoe com-
pany said that it expected revenue
growth of at least 20 percent in
each of the next two years.



40
4 N w D e
52-week range
$38.56 $60.96
Vol.:5.4m (2.8x avg.) PE:48.5
Mkt. Cap:$4.23 b Yield:...
AutoNation AN
Close: $48.50A3.75 or 8.4%
The country's largest auto dealer-
ship chain said its fourth-quarter net
income rose almost 20 percent as
U.S. auto sales rose.

45

N D J
52-week range
$31.57 $48.56
Vol.:2.2m (2.4x avg.) PE:20.6
Mkt. Cap:$5.91 b Yield:...
Whirlpool WHR
Close:$115.38 A6.66 or 6.1%
The appliance maker's fourth-quar-
ter net income fell 40 percent, but
its results still beat Wall Street esti-
mates for the quarter.
$120 ---------7---------T--
$120

110
90 N D J
52-week range
$54.08 $s L 115.67
Vol.: 2.9m (2.4x avg.) PE:18.7
Mkt. Cap:$8.98 b Yield: 1.7%
Blackstone Group BX
Close:$18.50A1.06 or 6.1%
Financial markets near record levels
helped boost the investment man-
agement firm's results during the
fourth quarter.




Ii i J
52-week range
$11.13 $18.95
Vol.:11.9m (2.7x avg.) PE: 108.8
Mkt. Cap:$9.71 b Yield: 2.2%


Dow logs best January



in nearly two decades


Associated Press

NEW YORK The Dow logged its
best start to the year in almost two
decades.
Stocks rallied in the first week of the
year after U.S. lawmakers reached a
deal to avoid the "fiscal cliff," and then
pushed higher toward record levels as
optimism about the housing market re-
covery grew. Decent company earnings
for the fourth quarter and an improving
job market also helped lift markets.
The Dow Jones indus-
trial average ended the The Dov
month up 5.8 percent, its industrial
strongest January since
1994, according to S&P fell 49 p
Capital IQ data. The Stan-
dard & Poor's 500 finished 13,860
the month 5 percent
higher, its best start to the the inde
year since 1997.
"There's not a whole lot 304 poi
of bears left here," said its all-tin
Jeff Hirsch, the editor of
the Stock Trader's Almanac, adding that
the market may struggle to gain further
in February
Stocks have also benefited as in-
vestors have put money into equities in
January By one measure, the monthly
flow into stock funds was the largest in
nine years.
About $51 billion in net deposits was
moved into stock funds and so-called hy-
brid funds, which invest in a mix of
stocks and bonds, consultant Strategic
Insight said Thursday That's the most
since $56 billion flowed in during Janu-
ary 2004.
On Thursday, stocks drifted lower as
investors digested more earnings results
and reports on the economy
The Dow Jones industrial average fell
49 points to 13,860.58. The S&P 500 dropped
4 points to 1,498.11 and the Nasdaq com-
posite was little changed at 3,142.13.


Associated Press
Firefighters and workers dig for survivors
Thursday after an explosion at Mexico's
state-owned oil company in Mexico City.


Explosion at Pemex

HQ; workers injured
Associated Press

MEXICO CITY -An explosion at the
main headquarters of Mexico's state-
owned oil company in the capital
Thursday heavily damaged three floors
of the building, sending hundreds into
the streets and a large plume of smoke
over the skyline. Local media reported
that at least one person had died and
about 40 were injured.
There was no immediate cause given
for the explosion which occurred in the
basement of an administrative building
next to the iconic, 52-story tower of
Petroleos Mexicanos, or Pemex.
The tower, where several thousand
people work, was evacuated. The main
floor and the mezzanine of the auxil-
iary building, where the explosion oc-
curred, were heavily damaged, along
with windows as far as three floors up.
In an earlier Tweet, the company
said it had evacuated the building as a
precautionary measure because of a
problem with the electrical system in
the complex.


I







r


StocksRecap


Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln would like to recognize the following
Technicians for their achievements in the ford Certification Program.


Bill Townshend
* Sr. Master Technician
* Engine Master
* Drive Train Master
* Chassis Master


Jeff Carroll
* Engine Master
* Chassis Master


Ralph Huggins
* Engine Master
* Chassis Master


Dave Sekulski
* Engine Master
* Chassis Master


NICK NICHOLAS LINCOLN

IN CRYSTAL RIVER

Hwy. 19 N.* Crystal River 795 'I0 I1
Parts & Service: Mon-Fri 8 AM to 5:30 PM; Sat 8 AM to 4 PM ...DVus


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE
3,863
3,601
1581
1461
198
14


NASD
2,105
1,912
1515
945
132
26


The Dow is just 304 points from its all-
time high.
Among companies reporting earnings
Thursday, UPS Inc., the world's biggest
package-delivery company and an eco-
nomic bellwether, fell 2.4 percent to
$79.29. The company's fourth quarter was
hurt by weak global trade, and it fore-
cast 2013 results below expectations.
January's rally started to slow
Wednesday after a report showed that
the economy unexpectedly contracted
in the fourth quarter of last year
Stocks have gained
V Jones against a backdrop of low
]average borrowing costs and a
average slow, but steady, economic

points to recovery. However, the
market may struggle to
58, but build on those gains in the
immediate future as
X is just traders and investors turn
their attention back to
nts from Washington, said Ernie Ce-

ne high. cilia, chief investment offi-
cer at Bryn Mawr Trust.
More government reports Thursday
also gave investors a better picture of the
health of the economy
The number ofAmericans seeking un-
employment aid rose sharply last week
but remained at a level consistent with
moderate hiring.
Investors will look for further clues
about the strength of the jobs market
Friday, when the closely followed monthly
nonfarm payrolls report is published.
Among stocks making big moves:
Under Armour gained $2.74, or 5.7
percent, to $50.87.
CononcoPhillips fell $3.09, or 5.1
percent, to $58 after the oil company
said earnings fell as prices for oil and
natural gas declined.
Qualcomm Inc., a maker of chips for
mobile devices, rose 3.9 percent to
$66.02 after it said late on Wednesday
that its earnings surged.



Brokerage head

gets 50 years for

$215M theft

Associated press

CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa For years,
Russ Wasendorf Sr. enjoyed the perks
of being a successful businessman: a
corporate jet, a fancy swimming pool at
his mansion, an extensive wine collec-
tion and top chefs who made him meals
at the restaurant and office buildings
he owned.
Then last summer
he admitted his lavish
it lifestyle was a lie, built
with money he stole
''' from customers at
S:- Peregrine Financial
Group, the Cedar
Falls-based brokerage
Russ he founded. Prosecutors
Wasendorf said he took $215 mil-
lion over 20 years.
Wasendorf is now being held in iso-
lation at a county jail in a cell where he
sleeps on a concrete pad without a pil-
low, his pastor said. On Thursday, the
64-year-old learned he will likely spend
the rest of his life in federal prison.
A judge sentenced Wasendorf to 50
years in prison. He must serve at least
42 1/2 years of the sentence.
U.S. District Judge Linda Reade gave
Wasendorf the maximum prison sen-
tence available for the fraud and em-
bezzlement charges to which he
pleaded guilty in September She cited
the "staggering losses" his theft caused
to 13,000 commodities investors who
lost money and hundreds of employees
who lost jobs.


BUSINESS


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013 A13







Page A14 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .........................publisher
Mike Arnold ................. .................. editor
Charlie Brennan .....................editor at large
Curt Ebitz .......................citizen member
SMac Harris ..........................citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ............... ..........copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


FAIR AND SIMPLE




Fee schedule



input helps



bring buy-in


In establishing a new fee
schedule for four divi-
sions falling under the
county's Department Plan-
ning and Development, offi-
cials sought input from
concerned organ-
izations and -
despite identify- THE I,
ing a need to hike Revam
fees in some in- build
stances the sche
move won general
buy-in from stake- OUR OF
holders and the
county commis- Input in
sion. bene
In telling com-
missioners why it was an ap-
propriate time to craft a new
fee schedule, Department of
Planning and Development
Director Vince Cautero ex-
plained multiple documents
comprise what he proposed
to revise.
The fees are levied on
those doing business with the
Building Division which is
a self-supporting entity as
well as Code Compliance,
Graphic Resources and Com-
munity Planning and Land
Development, which are
funded by property taxes.
"The public has a hard
time, from time to time, work-
ing with our fee schedules be-
cause they can't find them,"
he told the commission at a
recent meeting, where the
board signed off on the


Support area churches
Recently, a caller opined the
churches were doing too much
to help those in need. His opin-
ion was too many people were
taxing the generosity
and largesse of the 0
area churches' food
pantries, clothing
caches, et al. He opined
it was the job of govern-
ment to aid and assist
those in need. Frankly, j
my opinion is, he is )
completely wrong. It is CALI
the calling of our area
churches to reach out 563-
to the hungry, the
homeless, the needy, in
order to alleviate their distress.
What has the government, state
or federal done that has been
truly effective and efficient,
timely and trustworthy, persist-
ent and praiseworthy?
Name just one government in-
stitution other than our military
that has shown the above attrib-
utes as has the generous mem-
bers of our churches. You
cannot. So support our areas
churches and their missions of
mercy.
Deer hunting tip
I did not make myself quite
clear. You cannot hunt deer in
Florida with a .223.
Take responsibility
Maybe the person living near
the fire hydrant overgrown with
grass could cut the grass
around it. If the person who has
called in is physically unable to
do that, then there must be
somebody else that can. It's im-
portant in the neighborhood to
have your fire hydrants accessi-


changes. Now, there will be
one fee document instead of
several.
In reviewing the fees in
place, the Department of
Planning and Development
reached out to the
Governmental Af-
SSUE: fairs Committee
ping of of the Citrus
ng fee County Builders
dule. Association, the
Governance Com-
|INION: mittee of the Cit-
rus County
crafting Council, the Real-
ficial. tors Association,
the Code Review
and Appeals Board, the Con-
tracting and Licensing Advi-
sory Board and others.
Builder Randy Clark, rep-
resenting the Builders Asso-
ciation, said while he and his
peers don't like to see fees in-
crease, there were areas cov-
ered by ad valorem taxes
more suitable to be covered
by user fees.
He did encourage officials
to consider reducing the fees
when the economy rebounds.
As the existing fees and mul-
tiple schedules had been the
status quo for several years, it
was time for an update.
It's good to know input from
those directly impacted was a
priority in tweaking and
streamlining the new struc-
ture for both simplicity sake
and fairness.


ble to the fire department, but
why leave everything up to the
government?
Pay tax like rest of us
This is in regards to
Progress Energy prop-
UND eerty taxes. We, as resi-
FF dential property
owners, if we have a
problem with our taxes,
U we have to go get an
appraisal of our prop-
erty and then fight it
out with Mr. Greene. So
.00F what makes Progress
) 579 Energy any different?
) They should go out and
get their property ap-
praised and then bring
that to the property appraiser.
They should have to do the
same things we do. We have to
pay all our taxes; so do do they.
And if we have a problem with
it, we go get an appraisal and
take it to the property appraiser.
That's what they should do.
They should pay all of their
taxes.
End double dipping
What is a state double-dipper?
It's one who retires from a state
position and then a while later
applies to fill the vacated posi-
tion himself.
If successful, this gives that
person two salaries for the same
or less work. From then on, this
refilled position is not open to
the public or anyone else. This
also means a lot of employees
down the line are blocked from
promotion ... A cure for the
state double-dipping: Let the
newly retired employee get out
in the open market to compete
with the general public for an-
other position.


ir
H

p


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"When you reach the end ofyour rope,
tie a knot in it and hang on."
Thomas Jefferson, 1743-1826


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


South still out of step with nation


P people keep
saying the
United States
is being torn apart by 4
angry words and es-
calating divisions /
that will destroy the
nation.
I'm undecided.
On the one hand,
remember 1861-65, Mark 4
the Civil War, blood- FLOI
shed and killing VO1
galore? VOI
We're not there yet,
although this time the target
may be poor people and folks
who can't get jobs, and the
weapons may be laws and polit-
ically inspired bureaucracy.
The rich have always been de-
monized by some, but the cur-
rent bashing of the poor and
unemployed seems to be gain-
ing steam among people look-
ing for someone anyone to
blame.
Still, we're not as divided as
we were only 60 years ago,
when segregation was manda-
tory in 17 states and the District
of Columbia.
It didn't have to be that way,
of course. After the Civil War,
blacks in the South played sig-
nificant parts in the economy
and politics for a while.
But by 1890 whites had estab-
lished Jim Crow laws that sub-
jugated blacks to separate and
unequal lives. It wasn't just a
"Southern thing," either Jim
Crow laws started in the North
in the 1840s, when politicians
ordered the railroads segre-
gated, as historian C. Vann
Woodward pointed out in The
Strange Career of Jim Crow.
But Jim Crow prospered es-
pecially in the South, where
race was a great tool for the rul-


F
R
(c


ing class. It would
"keep the Southern
masses divided and
Southern labor
cheapest in the
land," as Dr Martin
Luther King Jr.
noted.
Meanwhile, many
Southern blacks fled
>'Brien to the North, where
UDA they formed potent
DES voting blocs after
CES World War II and got
some respect. As
Woodward notes, there also was
a sea change in public opinion
beginning about 1960, with pub-
lic attitudes on race gradually
changing nationwide. Courts
began to see through the "sepa-
rate but equal" charade.
Florida was one of the last
eight states to desegregate, just
a few behind Mississippi.
Some things endure. The
South still has the cheapest
labor in the land also the
least educated and most un-
healthy, according to many
studies.
The South keeps clinging to
"conservative values" against
minorities, women, immigrants
and gays, to name a few scape-
goats. Even now, the red state-
blue state divide is largely
geographic, a South out of step
with most of the country
But if we can't pick on mi-
norities, women, immigrants
and gays, who can we pick on?
The poor After all, they're
poor because they want to be
poor Everyone knows that.
To people with this mindset,
poverty is a moral failing, and
pay no attention to circum-
stances such as families,
schools, public safety, the in-
creasingly costly "War on


SARE \
SUPPORTING
OAAA'Ks PORTION,
OR WERE YOU
JUST LIP-
SYNCINO? )


Drugs" and an economic recov-
ery that has been much better
for some than for most.
It's not just the poor The mid-
dle class is shrinking; many of
us are holding on by our finger
tips as property values stagnate
and wages drop. No new cars,
no vacations, maybe even no
health insurance.
Check out the job market,
such as it is. Many Baby
Boomers are overqualified and
unwanted for the mediocre jobs
to be found in this state, where
tourism rules. Tourism is good,
but it produces little in the way
of high-skill, high-paying jobs.
In my hometown, the school
board is advertising a job as a
teacher's assistant for less than
$9 an hour It spells out lots of
qualifications required for the
job, and rightfully so. But it
even requires the successful
applicant to pay the $55 cost of
a criminal background check.
That's your first day's pay -
gone.
And the Republican "solu-
tion" is to cut some more, on the
misguided concept that less
government spending and
fewer services will make life
better for the majority. Oh, it
will make life better, but only
for a few.
Meanwhile, the middle class
and the low-income crowds can
fight each other for the scraps.
Welcome to "The New South."

Formerly a columnist for the
Pensacola News Journal, Mark
O'Brien is a writer in
Pensacola and the author of
"Pensacola on My Mind" and
"Sand in My Shoes. "He can be
reached at markobrien usa
@gmail.com.


LETTERS to the Editor


Feeling safe
Living in Inverness since
1994, I saw our sheriff's office
in action and up front for the
first time. Not to say I haven't
seen traffic accidents and
other things that they handle,
but this was a first for us.
We were leaving Sonny's on
Main Street on Saturday after-
noon around 4:30 p.m., and
blocking the entrance lane
(going in the wrong direction)
was a truck with two water skis
being towed behind. I had to
walk around the water skis to
get to our vehicle and heard
very loud conversation from
the driver of the vehicle.
My daughter was urging me
to just get into the car It was
getting very disruptive, and
she feared the driver might re-
ally give the deputy a hard
time. But listening to the con-
trol the officer had of the situa-
tion, I felt quite safe.
We couldn't see into the vehi-
cle, but the driver was very
loud and belligerent. I did get
into the car, but heard the
deputy get very firm with the
driver insisting he exit the ve-
hicle and it appeared the
driver was going to try to start
the vehicle and drive away
The deputy had been on a mo-
torcycle and it appeared he
had chased the driver to where
he finally stopped. There was


OPINIONS INVITED
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Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
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hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
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Letters must be no longer than
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month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

also another squad car work-
ing with him.
My compliments to the well-
trained officers who handled the
whole matter in a way that made
me feel safe, being right next to
all of this commotion. They re-


ally got it under control fast The
officer spoke firmly, but not ob-
noxiously, like the driver I know
if he told me to get out of the ve-
hicle and get down on the
ground, I would have listened.
He was so in control.
We were pinned in by the
truck and trailer, and the offi-
cer was nice enough to ask if
we were OK when things set-
tled down. We were in our ve-
hicle and out of harm's way,
but the concern was appreci-
ated.
I've had occasion to call 911
and always received prompt at-
tention, but this was interest-
ing, and keeps me feeling safe.
The bad guys are out there, but
the good guys can handle them.
Roslie Greenwell-Kilgus
Inverness

Family grateful
I would like to express my
gratitude on behalf of myself,
Cheryl German, and the Ger-
man family, for all the prayers
and financial support at the
passing of my son, Brandon
German.
We were able to pay the fu-
neral in full and purchase a
nice headstone thank you all
so much.

Cheryl German
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LETTERS to the Editor


Lopsided figures
In a recent letter, the
writer expounded how
well gun removal worked
in the United Kingdom as
only 64 or so people were
killed with guns. This is a
lopsided use of informa-
tion, as is so often used to
slant a losing argument!
The UK's total popula-
tion is just over 63 million
while the U.S. population
is over 307 million. That is
a factor of 4.8 times larger
and what is also left out of
their "facts" is the mas-
sive increase in other vio-
lent crimes since the guns
were taken. The U.S. actu-
ally rates very low world-
wide in the accurate way
of measurement, the mur-
der rates per 100,000 citi-
zens. The startling factor
is that scores of nations
that rate much higher on
this world murder scale
have 100 percent total gun
removal from their citi-
zens. That alone should
bust the gun control bub-
ble, but the gun grabbers
still do not see or use
facts! They are still blind
to the fact that the most
crime-ridden places are
Chicago, Washington,
D.C., and New York, yet
they have the strictest gun
laws in the nation. Per-
haps the bad guys just do
not read the laws? I am
sure the criminals will
only carry seven bullets
in their guns from now on
due to the knee-jerk law
recently passed in New
York. But God help the
poor law-abiding citizen
who is caught with 10 bul-
lets in his gun.
Liberals never change;
they somehow feel they
know what is good for you
and me, and what you
should do in life, and how
you should do it. I fear
them greatly as they have
controlled Chicago for
many years, the crime
capital of the U.S. And it
goes back before Al
Capone's days. Yet they
want to instill their think-
ing and methods else-
where? I say keep their
proven failed methods to
where the voters are stu-
pid enough to retain this
approach to government.
They vote the same
crooks in year after year.
The lamestream news is
so slanted that they never
report the facts from the
same crime reports avail-
able to anyone with a com-
puter They are anti-gun
across the board, yet will
never publish actual crime
statistics or truly cover the
subject, and this includes
the Chronicle with their
day after day of anti-gun
cartoons. Do they have an
agenda? Do they actually
feel that the liberal objec-
tive is to register, then tax
and then confiscate all
guns in the U.S.?
One would hope we
learn from history But
sadly we don't. No one
will ever admit they sup-
ported Adolf Hitler, but
they all did. He took their
guns to make Germany a
safer country Go figure?
Seems I remember that
did not go well.
Why doesn't the Chroni-
cle publish the FBI crime
figures and our ranking in
the world with gun


deaths, versus those car-
toons they feed us? That
seems simple enough to
fair reporting!
John Cassell
Homosassa
Editor's note: The FBI
does not publish a coun-
try-by-country compari-
son of the number of
deaths using firearms, nor
does the CDC, which typi-
cally tracks all deaths for
the United States. The
CDC tracks U.S. firearm-
related deaths and lists
3.6 firearm homicides per
100,000 in the U.S. and 6.6
firearm suicides per
100,000. A recent survey
in Europe by the World
Health Organization,
which tracks death statis-
tics for Europe and other
countries, lists the United
Kingdom as having.04
firearm homicides and .17
firearm suicides per
100,000; and Germany as
having.06 firearm homi-
cides and.94 firearm sui-
cides per 100,000.
A point of historical
correction is needed on
gun control in Germany.
Following World War I,
the German government,
following terms set in the
Treaty of Versailles, set
about confiscating guns
and ammunition from the
German people. In 1928,
the German government
passed new laws relaxing
those restrictions while
allowing German citizens
to own guns and ammuni-
tion if they obtained a
permit. In 1938, under
Hitler's regime, the gov-
ernment further deregu-
la ted gun laws for the
German people, but took
guns away from the
Jewish people.

Ending violence
No amount of new laws
to ban assault weapons or
register gun owners will
change anything about
gun violence. The prob-
lem goes much deeper
and has been growing for
many, many years.
The far-left liberals
have promulgated a cul-
ture of violence in our
American society. This
has been done over the
past 50 years through our
education system, first by
taking away the ability to
discipline students by
teachers (under the guise
of children's rights, sup-
ported by liberal courts),
then making service in
the military voluntary
rather than required, and
then taking away parents'
rights to discipline their
own children. These ac-
tions have guaranteed
that future generations of
adults have grown up
with no discipline, take
no responsibility for their
actions, have no work
ethic, and have no other
code of ethics or moral
conduct to teach and to
pass on to their children.
Of course, the increas-
ing level of violence de-
picted in Hollywood
movies and video games,
and suggested in rap
music (as freedom of
speech) has only con-
tributed to the culture of
violence being manifested
in our society
Having grown up in the


1 -. -. ThVIVX /IiI

2019 1kTrs~ug~R POST- GAZfTt


'50s and '60s within a
somewhat liberal family, I
can say unequivocally my
experience in the military
(though only two years as
a reservist) was the best
thing that ever happened
for my life. You become
part of a group that de-
pends on you, and you de-
pend on them. You must
take responsibility for all
your actions or face the
consequences. You may
have the opportunity to
travel other parts of the
world and be exposed to
other cultures, which is
eye-opening. Having al-
ways been an individual-
ist, the military life did
not appeal to me, but it
did make me want to be
more self-reliant.
My inspiration for
learning and excellence
came from my teachers,
learning to be responsible
and a strong work ethic
came from my dad, and
ethics, tolerance, humil-
ity, religion came from my
family Only a return to
these values will effect a
reduction of violence in
our society.
Paul Dion
Crystal River


THEY POURED THEIR HEARTS
OUT IN LOVE LETTERS FOR OUR
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www.chronicleonline.com/valentinesday2013
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for them so they can...


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OPINION


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013 A15


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NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Clear view


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Iran says it will speed



up nuclear program


World BRIEFS

Released


Associated Press
Erasmo Lara, left,
Edgardo Mejia and
Santiago Guzman dress
as superheroes to wash
windows Thursday at
Levine Children's Hospital
in Charlotte, N.C. Work-
ers from Joffie Contract-
ing Service spent the day
as in costume to the de-
light of the young pa-
tients inside.


Teen wounded at
Ga. middle school
ATLANTA-Authorities
said a shooting at an At-
lanta middle school that left
one teen wounded was not
random and the boy's injury
does not appear to be life-
threatening.
Atlanta police spokes-
man Carlos Campos said
investigators believe some-
thing occurred between the
two people involved that
may have led to Thursday's
shooting.
The suspect is also a stu-
dent at Price and has been
taken into custody.
Campos said the
wounded boy was shot in
the back of the neck. He said
a teacher received minor in-
juries in the "disorder" that
followed the shooting.
No-gays policy
angers both sides
NEW YORK-The Boy
Scouts of America faces criti-
cism from the left and right
over its proposal to move
away from a mandatory no-
gays membership policy and
allow troop sponsors to decide
the matter for themselves.
The Human Rights Cam-
paign, a gay-rights group
that initially welcomed the
possible shift, said Thurs-
day that it was inadequate
and urged the Scouts to
adopt a nationwide policy to
accept gays as scouts and
adult leaders.
The Human Rights Cam-
paign said any corporation
that continued to donate
funds to the Scouts if any
troops were allowed to dis-
criminate would lose points in
an annual evaluation of how
corporations deal with gay-
related workplace issues.
Meanwhile, conservative
groups which support the
no-gays policy asked their
followers to flood Scout
headquarters with phone
calls opposing any change.
Standoff enters
second full day
MIDLAND CITY-- Ne-
gotiators have been talking
through a 4-inch-wide venti-
lation pipe to a man holding
a 5-year-old boy hostage in
an underground shelter in
rural Alabama.
The standoff entered its
second full day Thursday
after authorities said a gun-
man pulled the boy off a
school bus and killed the
driver Tuesday.
The police chief of the adja-
cent town of Pinckard, James
Arrington, said the two are in a
bunker about 4 feet under-
ground and has about 6-by-8
feet of floor space.


Senator
hemp g
LOUISVILLE
forts to re-esta
trial hemp in th
where it once f
winning suppo
Senate Minorit
Mitch McConn
Connell said its
in his home sta
tucky would be
and produce jo
the plants into


supports
rowing
E, Ky. Ef-
blish indus-
ie state
lourished are
rt from U.S.
y Leader
ell. Mc-
s legalization
ate of Ken-
3nefit farmers
)bs to convert
products.
-From wire reports


Associated Press file
An Iranian technician works at the uranium conversion facility just outside the city of Isfahan, 255 miles
south of the capital Tehran, Iran. Iran has floated specific dates for reopening talks with the U.S. and other
world powers about its nuclear program. At the same time, Tehran has left U.N. nuclear inspectors empty-
handed when it comes to addressing Western suspicions that it's conducting tests related to nuclear
weapons.

Former official describes plan as a potential 'game-changer'


Associated Press
VIENNA In a defiant move
ahead of nuclear talks, Iran has an-
nounced plans to vastly increase
its pace of uranium enrichment,
which can make both reactor fuel
and the fissile core of warheads.
Eager to avoid scuttling those ne-
gotiations, world powers are keep-
ing their response low-key
Iran told the International
Atomic Energy Agency of its in-
tentions last week, and the IAEA
informed member nations in an
internal note seen by The Associ-
ated Press on Thursday
The brief note quoted Iran as
saying new-generation IR2m
"centrifuge machines ... will be
used" to populate a new "unit" -
a technical term for an assembly
that can consist of as many as


3,132 centrifuges.
It gave no timeframe. A senior
diplomat familiar with the issue
said work had not started, adding
that it would take weeks, if not
months, to have the new ma-
chines running once technicians
started putting them in. He de-
manded anonymity because he
was not authorized to divulge con-
fidential information.
Mark Fitzpatrick, a non-
proliferation expert and former
senior official at the U.S. State
Department, described the
planned upgrade as a potential
"game-changer"
"If thousands of the more effi-
cient machines are introduced, the
timeline for being able to produce
a weapon's worth of fissile mate-
rial will significantly shorten," said
Fitzpatrick, of the International In-


stitute for Strategic Studies.
"This won't change the several
months it would take to make ac
tual weapons out of the fissile ma
trial or the two years or more tha
it would take to be able to mount
nuclear warhead on a missile, so
there is no need to start beating,
the war drums," he said. "But i
will certainly escalate concerns.'
The planned upgrade could
burden international efforts to
coax Tehran into scaling back it
nuclear activities and cooperal
ing with the agency's attempts to
investigate its suspicions of secre
weapons work. Talks are tenta
tively set for next month with
date and venue still open.
Iran insists it does not want nu
clear arms and argues it has a
right to enrich uranium for a civil
ian nuclear power program.


Congress sends


Obama debt bill


Associated Press
Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., right, asks a question of
former Nebraska Sen. Chuck Hagel, center, President
Barack Obama's choice for defense secretary, Thursday
in Washington, during the Senate Armed Services Com-
mittee hearing on his nomination. Sen. James Inhofe, R-
Okla., the ranking member of the committee, listens at
left.


Republicans


hammer Hagel


Associated Press


WASHINGTON Re-
publican senators ham-
mered former GOP Sen.
Chuck Hagel at his confir-
mation hearing Thursday
on issues ranging from Is-
rael and Iran to his support
for a group that advocates
the elimination of nuclear
weapons. But with most
Democrats in his comer, an
unflustered Hagel seems
headed for approval as de-
fense secretary
Hagel described his
views as mainstream and
closely aligned with those
of President Barack
Obama, the Democrat who
nominated him. But sev-
eral GOP members of the
Armed Services Commit-
tee sought to portray him as
radical and unsteady Sen.
Deb Fischer, R-Neb., called
his ideas "extreme" and
"far to the left" of Obama.
Hagel said he believes
America "must engage -


not retreat in the world,"
and insisted that his record
is consistent on that point
He pointed to Iran and
its nuclear ambitions as
an example of an urgent
national security threat
that should be addressed
first by attempting to es-
tablish dialogue with Iran-
ian rulers, although he
said he would not rule out
using military force.
"I think we're always on
higher ground in every
way international law,
domestic law, people of the
world, people of the region
to be with us on this if
we have ... gone through
every possibility to resolve
this in a responsible,
peaceful way, rather than
going to war," he said.
He pushed back on the
notion first raised by
one of his harshest Re-
publican critics, Sen.
James Inhofe of Okla-
homa that he favors a
policy of appeasement.


Averts gov't

default

Associated Press
WASHINGTON Con-
gress sent President
Barack Obama drama-free
legislation on Thursday
raising the debt ceiling,
averting a government de-
fault and putting off the
next tax-and-spending
clash between the White
House and Republicans
until later in the year
The measure cleared
the Senate on a
vote of 64-34 after The
winning House
approval late last li n
week. It permits
the Treasury to mea
borrow above the
current $16.4 tril- came
lion debt limit only
through May 18.
The White House stri
has said Obama
will sign it. attack
"Failure to
pass this bill will set off an
unpredictable financial
panic that would plunge
not only the United States
but much of the world
back into recession," Sen.
Max Baucus, D-Mont.,
said before the vote.
"Every single American
would feel the economic
impact."
But Republican leader
Mitch McConnell said in
remarks on the Senate
floor that "government
spending is completely out
of control and it's pro-
jected to get much worse in
years to come." His office
issued a statement shortly


after the vote saying he
had opposed the legisla-
tion after Democrats tor-
pedoed several GOP
attempts to rein in spend-
ing before final passage.
The legislation reflects a
switch in strategy by Re-
publicans, whose insis-
tence on deep spending
cuts as a trade-off for a
higher debt limit more
than a year ago pushed the
government to the brink of
an unprecedented default.
With polls showing their
public support lagging,
they now look ahead to a
new season of potential
showdowns, with a
debt reshuffled batting
order that moves
nit the threat of a de-
fault to the back of
SU re a line that includes
March 1 across-
with the-board spend-
ing cuts and the
one March 27 expira-
Ping tion of funding for
most federal
:hed. agencies.
The debt limit
measure came with only
one string attached by
House Republicans, a
provision that would tem-
porarily withhold the pay
of lawmakers in either
house that failed to pro-
duce a budget this year
That was designed as a
prod to the Senate, where
majority Democrats have
failed to bring a budget to
a vote in any of the past
three years. This year,
they say they will. Repub-
licans say they are eager
for a comparison of plans,
rather than a long year
spent defending one of
their own.


Associated Press
Frenchwoman Florence
Cassez, left, is greeted by
her mother Charlotte
Thursday after landing at
Roissy airport, north of
Paris. Cassez, who spent
seven years in prison in
Mexico on kidnapping
charges, returned to a
hero's welcome, declar-
ing she had been cleared
by the Mexican court
that ordered her freed.

Chavez ally
travels to Cuba
CARACAS, Venezuela
- The president of
Venezuela's National As-
sembly has traveled to
Cuba to visit President
Hugo Chavez, who is re-
covering on the island more
than seven weeks after un-
dergoing cancer surgery.
Vice President Nicolas
Maduro announced in a tel-
evised speech that National
Assembly President Dios-
dado Cabello departed for
Cuba on Thursday.
Maduro said Cabello is
taking a message from al-
lies for Chavez and will con-
sult with the president on
political matters.
Chavez hasn't appeared
or spoken publicly since be-
fore his Dec. 11 operation
for an unspecified type of
pelvic cancer. The govern-
ment has said recently that
Chavez's condition has
been improving and that he
has overcome a severe res-
piratory infection.
Sticky seabirds
wash up in UK
LONDON -Animal pro-
tection groups in Britain
said they are trying to res-
cue more than 100 seabirds
that have washed up on the
coast covered in an uniden-
tified sticky substance.
The Royal Society for the
Protection of Birds said a
team is cleaning up the guille-
mots, but the effort is ham-
pered because it's unclear
what the white substance is.
It is urging the govern-
ment to find the pollution
source.
Many of the birds were
found near Weymouth in
the south of England on
Thursday. Others appeared
up to 200 miles away in
Cornwall in the southwest,
and more are expected to
wash up overnight.
Peter Venn, an official
with the Royal Society for
the Protection of Animals,
said the sticky substance is
not fuel but could be a man-
ufacturing byproduct.
Sacrificial skulls
puzzle experts
MEXICO CITY--Ar-
chaeologists said they have
turned up at least 130 skulls
of human sacrifice victims
in a field in central Mexico,
one of the first times that
such a large accumulation
of severed heads has been
found outside of a major
pyramid or temple complex
in Mexico.
Georgia State University ar-
chaeologist Christopher More-
hart said as many as 200
adult skulls or their equivalent
in bones parts have been ex-
cavated so far.
The find in a communal
farm field just north of Mex-
ico City has experts puzzled.
Morehart said this week
he was startled to see such
a large number of skulls at
what was a small shrine be-
tween 660 and 860 A.D.,
and is today no more than a
bump in a farmer's field.
-From wire reports











SPORTS


* Willis
will
carry on
No. 52
legacy/
B3


0 Basketball/B2
0 Hockey/B2
0 Golf/B2
0 Super Bowl/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 Sports briefs/B4
0 Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Citrus County Speedway points season Week 1 preview


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
While the football season culminates
with the Super Bowl this weekend, a
local sports season, one that has been
around longer than that NFL showcase,
will be just getting started.
Inverness' Citrus County Speedway, lo-
cated at the county's fairgrounds,
launches its points season Saturday, with
the first heat race green flag waving
at 5:30 p.m.
This marks the 58th year for the track,
which opens its Grandstand gates at 4
p.m. Saturday The season lasts through
Nov 9, with three scheduled weeks off in
March and two weeks off in both July and
August, barring cancellations due to
weather Later start times will be consid-
ered during the hotter months.
On the race card this week are Open


More racing information
For more information on the Citrus
County Speedway's points season,
visit www.citruscountyspeedway.com.

Wheel Modified, Sportsman, Pure Stock,
Mini Stock and Pro Challenge divisions.
Citrus County Speedway owner Mike
Reed and general manager Don "Critter"
Cretty said they expect a return of many
familiar faces for the upcoming races,
with possible switches in division for a
few drivers.
"I think once you get sucked into the
race track, you're pretty much there,"
Reed said.
The Sportsman, Pure Stock and Mini
Stock classes were each claimed by a
county driver last season, with other local
See Page B4


--.





Special to the Chronicle
Seen in this July 2012 file photo, Floral City's Karlin Ray finished sixth in Pure Stocks
last season at the Citrus County Speedway. The 2013 points season opens Saturday
in Inverness.


Out of the break


Third quarter

run propels

GCitrus into

title game
C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
INVERNESS A strong
finish to the first half enabled
Lecanto's girls basketball
team to at least partially offset
an otherwise dominating per-
formance by Citrus in the Dis-
trict 6A-6 semifinals, played at .:...
Citrus. The Panthers put to-
gether an 8-0 run in the final
2:09 before the break to nar-
row a 20-point deficit to a .
dozen.
A momentum swing, right?
That's not the way it worked C
out for Lecanto.
A three-point field goal by
Citrus' Lindsay Connors -
her fourth of the game got
the her team started and, with
Shenelle Toxen scoring six
more, the Hurricanes con-
structed a 13-0 counter to the
Lecanto's first-half finish,
sending them to a 66-46
triumph.
Citrus (20-6 overall) will
meet West Port in the District
6A-6 final at 7 p.m. tonight at
Citrus. The Wolf Pack ad-.......
vanced behind their pressure
defense, which was too much -
for Springstead to handle in
Thursday's first game at Cit-
rus, West Port winning 51-31.
"Focus on doing the little 4
things," Toxen said when "
asked what Hurricanes coach
Brian Lattin told the team at
half, "because that would be
what would win the game."
That start to the second half
led to a 22-5 third-quarter
surge by Citrus. There was ,
only 2:41 left in the third pe-
riod when Megan Straight fi-
nally scored for the Panthers,
who were 2-for-7 from the
field and 1-of-5 from the free- --
throw line in the quarter
They also had six turnovers
during the Citrus run.
"We were in foul trouble,"
said Lecanto coach Brittany
Szunko, her team finishing at
12-13. "And they made their
free throws and we didn't." .
Free throws did help Citrus ..
more, the 'Canes knocking
down 22-of-31 at the line to STEPHEN E. LASKO/Forthe Chronicle
Lecanto's 13-of-28. But that Citrus forward Shenelle Toxen works her way around Lecanto's Paige Richards for two points in
wasn't the only factor favoring the District 6A-6 girls basketball tournament semifinals Thursday night at Citrus High School.
Citrus. The second-seeded Hurricanes earned a 67-47 victory over No. 3 seed Lecanto to advance to
See Page B4 tonight's district title game against No. 1 West Port.


Seven Rivers 42
St. John 40
| The Warriors'
next game is 7 p.m.
Thursday at home
in a regional
quarterfinal game
against the district
2A-4 runner-up.



Repeat


performance

Warriors clinch

back-to-back district

championships
ANDY MARKS
Special to the Chronicle
OCALA The Zachar sisters stood
tall both literally and figuratively.
It seemed like everything the St.
John Lutheran girls basketball team
tried to do Thursday night was denied
by one of the Seven Rivers Christian
towering sister act of Alexis and An-
drea Zachar, who stand 6-foot-3 and 6-
foot-2 respectively
The duo teamed up for 18 points, 34
rebounds and 12 blocked shots as the
visiting Warriors frustrated top-
seeded St John from start to finish in
a 42-40 thriller in the District 2A-3
championship game.
Alexis Zachar, a junior, sunk two
free throws with 9 seconds remaining
to put No. 2 Seven Rivers ahead, then
swatted a Tameria Johnson shot out of
bounds at the other end with 4
seconds left.
After a Saints inbounds pass, An-
drea Zachar, a senior, blocked Jen-
nifer Bollinger's short jumper at the
buzzer to seal it and send the Warriors
into a frenzied celebration.
Seven Rivers (17-6) claimed its sec-
ond straight district crown and will
host the loser of tonight's 2A-4 cham-
pionship game between Winter Park
Geneva and Deltona Trinity Christian
in next Thursday's regional playoff
opener
The district championship victory
was a shocking reversal of Seven
Rivers' 26-point loss to the Saints in
the teams' lone regular season meet-
ing on Dec. 21. According to Warriors
coach Gary Dreyer, that ugly loss
served as a turning point for his team.
"St. John is a good team and will be
good for a very long time," Dreyer
said. "Their game against us last time
changed our whole philosophy It re-
ally made us realize that the way we're
going to win is by playing good
defense."
The Zachar sisters thoroughly con-
trolled the paint and harassed usually

See Page B4


I S O R S B IES-


Winter X Games
snowmobiler dies
DENVER Caleb Moore, an in-
novative freestyle snowmobile rider
who was hurt in a crash at the Winter
X Games in Colorado, died Thurs-
day morning. He was 25.
Moore was being treated at a hos-
pital in Grand Junction since the Jan.
24 crash. Family spokeswoman
Chelsea Lawson confirmed his
death, the first in the 18-year history
of the X Games.
"He lived his life to the fullest. He
was an inspiration," Lawson said.
Former all-terrain vehicle racer,
Moore switched over to snowmobiles
as a teenager and quickly rose to the


top of the sport. He won four Winter
X Games medals, including a bronze
last season when his younger
brother, Colten, captured gold.
Caleb Moore was attempting a
backflip in the freestyle event in
Aspen when the skis on his 450-
pound snowmobile caught the lip of
the landing area, sending him flying
over the handlebars. Moore landed
face first into the snow with his snow-
mobile rolling over him.
Moore stayed down for quite
some time, before walking off with
help and going to a hospital to treat a
concussion. Moore developed bleed-
ing around his heart and was flown
to a hospital in Grand Junction for
surgery. The family later said that


Moore, of Krum, Texas, also had a
complication involving his brain.
FSU starting pitcher
to miss 2013 season
TALLAHASSEE Florida State's
Mike Compton, who led freshman
pitchers nationally with 12 wins last
year, will miss the 2013 season due
to an arm injury.
Seminoles coach Mike Martin said
Thursday that Compton will undergo
Tommy John surgery to repair a
damaged ligament in his right elbow.
The sophomore from Branson,
Mo., posted a 12-2 record with a
2.87 ERA in 18 starts last year. His
record included wins against Sam-
ford in NCAA regional play and


Stony Brook in the College World
Series.
Compton was slated to be Florida
State's No 2 starter this year.
The Seminoles open their season
on Feb. 15 with a three-game series
against Rhode Island in Tallahassee.
Isner leads
US Davis Cup team
JACKSONVILLE -John Isner
will play the No. 1 singles spot for
the U.S. team against Brazil in the
first round of Davis Cup World
Group matches.
Team captain Jim Courier made
the announcement Thursday at the
draw ceremony.


Isner has not played competi-
tively since withdrawing from his
opening-round match at the APIA
International Sydney three weeks
ago with a knee injury.
Sam Querrey will play the No. 2
position. Mike and Bob Bryan will
be the doubles team.
The Brazilian team will consist of
singles players Thomaz Bellucci
and Thiago Alves and the doubles
team of Marcelo Melo and Bruno
Soares. Querrey will play Bellucci in
Friday's opening match followed by
the Isner-Alves match.
The three-day event begins Fri-
day at the Jacksonville Veterans
Memorial Arena.
-From wire reports





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lights-out Lefty


Associated Press

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -
Phil Mickelson pointed his
putter at the cup and
started to walk toward the
hole, ready to celebrate
golf's magic number.
Right at the end, though,
the ball caught the right
edge of the cup, curled 180
degrees to the other side of
the hole and stayed out. A
fraction of inch turned
cheers to gasps and cost him
a 59 on Thursday in the first
round of the Phoenix Open.
"Six feet to go, it was in
the center," Mickelson
said. "Three feet to go, it
was in the center. A foot to
go, it was in the center, and
even as it's approaching


the hole, I couldn't envi-
sion which side of the hole
it could possibly miss on,
and it ended up somehow
just dying off at the end,
catching the lip."
His caddie, Jim Mackay,
fell to his knees and stayed
there several seconds.
"He could not have hit a
better putt," Mackay said.
Playing partners Jason
Dufner and Rickie Fowler
also watched in disbelief
when the 25-foot birdie
putt lipped out.
"Unlucky," Dufner said.
"He was walking it in."
"I thought it was in,"
Fowler said. "I was pulling
for him."
Mickelson settled for an
11-under 60 at TPC Scotts-


Mickelson fires 60 to lead

incomplete Phoenix Open


dale, matching the tourna-
ment record he already
shared with Grant Waite
and Mark Calcavecchia.
"Well, 60 is awesome,"
Mickelson said. "Last time I
shot 60 here in '05, I birdied
like the last three or four
holes just to do that, and I
was ecstatic, and I'm ec-
static to shoot 60. But
there's a big difference be-
tween 60 and 59. Not that
big between 60 and 61,
there really isn't But there's
a big barrier, a Berlin Wall
barrier, between 59 and 60.
"I shot it in the PGA
Grand Slam of Golf. I shot
58 in a practice round. But
to do it in a tournament
would have been historic
for me, something I'd al-
ways remember, and I'll al-
ways remember that putt on
the last hole probably, too."
Finishing his round on
the front nine, the 42-year-


Panthers' flurry of goals


Florida nets five

in thirdperiod

for 6-3 triumph

Associated Press

SUNRISE Alex Kovalev
scored the go-ahead goal during
Florida's five-goal outburst in
the third period, helping the
Panthers rally for a 6-3 victory
over the Winnipeg Jets on
Thursday night.
Kris Versteeg, Peter Mueller,
Jonathan Huberdeau and Tomas
Kopecky also scored in the final
frame for the Panthers, who
scored four answered goals in the
final 8:40 after falling behind 3-2.
Brian Campbell also scored and
Jose Theodore stopped 21 shots to
help Florida snap a five-game los-
ing streak with its first win since
the season opener on Jan. 19.
Tobias Enstrom, Olli Jokinen
and Grant Clitsome scored as the
Jets dropped their second in a
row following a three-game win
streak. Ondrej Pavelev had 28
saves for Winnipeg.
Penguins 3,
Rangers 0
NEW YORK Tomas Vokoun
stopped 28 shots for his 49th NHL
shutout, and the Pittsburgh Pen-
guins scored on the first shot of the
first and third periods in a 3-0 victory
over the New York Rangers.
Evgeni Malkin gave the Penguins
the lead just 1:24 in, James Neal
added a power-play goal 28 sec-
onds into the third after another
costly too many men on the ice
penalty for the Rangers and
Simon Despres netted his second
NHL goal to give Pittsburgh (4-3) its
second win in five games.
Malkin added an assist, as did cap-
tain Sidney Crosby, on Neal's goal.
Despres came out of the penalty box
to score at 10:23 of the third right
after Rangers defenseman Anton
Stralman hit the post at the other end.
Islanders 5,
Devils 4, OT
NEWARK, N.J. Brad Boyes
scored a power-play goal on a re-


I

Associated Press
Florida Panthers center Drew Shore attempts a shot at Winnipeg Jets goalie Ondrej Pavelec during the
first period Thursday in Sunrise.


bound at 2:01 of overtime and the
New York Islanders beat the Devils
5-4, handing New Jersey its third
straight loss in overtime.
John Tavaras scored twice, and
Keith Aucoin and Mark Streit once
for the Islanders, who avenged an
opening-night loss to the Devils.
Evgeni Nabokov made 28 saves for
New York, including a big one on an
early Devils power play in overtime.
Adam Henrique Steve Bernier,
Ryan Carter and Henrik Tallinder
tallied for the Devils, who three
times rallied to tie it. Martin Brodeur
made 30 saves, but had the puck
stolen from him by Boyes, setting
up the game winner.
Boyes banged in Frans Nielsen's
rebound, while Tavares also picked
up an assist.
Maple Leafs 3,
Capitals 2
TORONTO Nikolai Kulemin
and Matt Frattin scored third-period
goals to give the Toronto Maple
Leafs their first home win of the sea-
son with a 3-2 comeback victory


over the Washington Capitals.
Kulemin tied it 2-all at 7:40 of the
third, poking in a puck that squeezed
through Michal Neuvirth's legs fol-
lowing Michael Kostka's shot from
the point. As the Washington goalie
tried in vain to squeeze his pads,
Kulemin reached behind and nudged
the puck in for his first of the year.
Frattin made it 3-2, capping a
nice passing play with Nazem Kadri
at 9:53 by tapping in the puck for
his fourth goal and sixth point -
in four games.
Sabres 7,
Bruins 4
BOSTON Thomas Vanek had
three goals and two assists, setting
up the tiebreaking score with 13:06
left in the third period to lead the Buf-
falo Sabres to a 7-4 victory over the
Boston Bruins.
Vanek opened the scoring 98 sec-
onds into the game, then had a goal
and an assist to tie it after Boston
took a 3-1 lead in the second. The
Bruins went up 4-3 in the third before
Alexander Sulzer tied it on a writer


from the faceoff circle, and then
Vanek helped give Buffalo the lead
when he kept the puck in the zone,
faked a shot and slid it over to Cody
Hodgson for the game-winner.
Ryan Miller made 38 saves for
Buffalo, which ended a four-game
winless streak.
Blues 4,
Blue Jackets 1
COLUMBUS, Ohio-- Barret
Jackman, Patrik Berglund and
Vladimir Tarasenko each scored in
the opening 14 minutes, Brian Elliott
made 24 saves and the St. Louis
Blues won their fourth straight game
with a 3-1 victory over the Colum-
bus Blue Jackets.
David Backes, who also had an
assist, added an empty-netter. T.J.
Oshie had two assists.
Derick Brassard scored for
Columbus, which played on even
terms over the final 46 minutes but
couldn't overcome the early blitz.
Steve Mason, who came on in relief
of Sergei Bobrovsky after the early
goals, stopped all 14 shots he faced.


No. 13


MSU


holds off


Illini
Associated Press

EAST LANSING, Mich. -
Keith Appling led a pivotal
run early in the second half
and finished with 24 points
and seven assists to help No.
13 Michigan State beat Illi-
nois 80-75 on Thursday night.
The Spartans (18-4, 7-2 Big
Ten) scored the first 14
points of the
second half
to take their
first lead.
The Fight-
ing Illini
(15-7, 2-6)
lost for the
fifth time in
six games. Keith
They had a Appling
chance to be Spartans PG
the first had 24 points.
team with
four wins over currently
ranked teams.
Illinois started strong and
responded to rallies with
shots and stops in the first
half. Michigan State played
with a lot of energy in the
second half. Appling alter-
nated making shots and set-
ting up teammates to score
in helping turn a 10-point
deficit into a 41-37 lead.

NBA BRIEF

Thunder 106,
Grizzlies 89
OKLAHOMA CITY Kevin
Durant scored 27 points, Russell
Westbrook added 21 points and
nine assists and the Oklahoma
City Thunder beat Memphis
106-89 Thursday night in the
Grizzlies' first game since trading
away leading-scorer Rudy Gay.
Memphis struggled mightily in
the first half and trailed by 26 in
the third quarter before a
mini-implosion by the Thunder.


No. 5 Duke women run away from Miami 82-43


Associated Press

DURHAM, N.C. Tri-
cia Liston scored 17 points,
Chelsea Gray added 16
and No. 5 Duke used a
huge run early in the sec-
ond half to rout Miami 82-
43 on Thursday night.
Miami led 33-31 follow-
ing a layup from Shawnice
Wilson with 18:17 left be-
fore the Blue Devils scored
20 straight points coming
from five different players.
Williams hit two free
throws with 12:14 left but
that's as close as Miami got
Alexis Jones had 10
points and 10 rebounds for
the Blue Devils (19-1, 9-0
ACC). Elizabeth Williams
added 12 points and Haley
Peters 10 to give the Blue
Devils five in double figures.
Krystal Saunders scored
15 points to lead Miami (14-
7, 5-5). Wilson added eight
points and eight rebounds.
No. 11 UNC 72,
No. 20 FSU 62
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. -
Xylina McDaniel scored 19
points and Waltiea Rolle


added 18 and 10 rebounds as
North Carolina held off Florida
State, giving coach Sylvia
Hatchell her 899th win.
The Tar Heels (20-2, 8-1 At-
lantic Coast Conference)
reached 20 wins before the
end of January for the first
time since 2006-07.
North Carolina led by 19 in
the first half, thanks to 14
points by Rolle. But the Semi-
noles (17-4, 7-3) held the Tar
Heels scoreless the final 4:01
leading into intermission, then
climbed back to take their first
lead of the game at 53-52
with 9:01 remaining.
North Carolina answered
with a 10-2 run. After a 3-
pointer by Florida State's Alex
Deluzio, McDaniel made back-
to-back jumpers and Tierra
Ruffin-Pratt sank two free
throws with 2:15 remaining.
Leonor Rodriguez scored
18 points and Deluzio 16 for
the Seminoles, who saw their
five-game winning streak end.
Wisconsin 63,
No. 7 Penn St. 61
MADISON, Wis. Morgan
Paige scored a career-high 33


Associated Press
North Carolina's Xylina McDaniel looks to the basket as
Florida State's Natasha Howard defends Thursday in
Chapel Hill, N.C.


points to lead Wisconsin to an
upset over Penn State.
Tiera Stephens scored the
game-winner on a putback
with 5 seconds left to end the
Nittany Lions' 11-game win-
ning streak.
Stephens scored five points
and had 11 rebounds and
Jacki Gulczynski added 16 for


Wisconsin (10-11, 2-6 Big
Ten). The victory against a
ranked opponent was the
Badgers' first since a 48-45
win against Michigan State on
January 14, 2010.
Maggie Lucas scored 18
points and Mia Nickson
added 11 for Penn State
(17-3, 7-1).


The Badgers came into the
game having lost seven of
their last eight games.
The Lady Lions routed the
Badgers 84-40 at home two
weeks ago for their most lop-
sided victory since 2001.
No. 9 Tenn. 88,
Miss. State 45
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. -
Kamiko Williams scored 10
points and grabbed a career-
high 13 rebounds in her first
start of the season Thursday
as Tennessee routed Missis-
sippi State for its 10th win in
its last 11 games.
Williams started in place of
injured center Isabelle Harri-
son, who will undergo surgery
Friday on her left knee. The
senior guard had six assists
and six steals to go along with
her double-double.
Meighan Simmons scored
21 points, Taber Spani added
15 points and Bashaara
Graves had 10 points as the
Lady Vols (174, 8-0 SEC) led
from start to finish. Martha
Alwal had 16 points and nine
rebounds for Mississippi State
(9-12, 1-7), which has never


beaten Tennessee in 34
attempts.
Tennessee forward Cierra
Burdick returned to action
Thursday after missing eight
games with a broken right
hand. Burdick, normally a
starter, had four points and
five rebounds off the bench.
No. 13 Georgia 65,
Alabama 59
ATHENS, Ga. Khaali-
dah Miller scored 11 points
off the bench as Georgia held
off Alabama.
Jasmine Hassell added 10
points and eight rebounds for
the Bulldogs (18-3, 6-2), who
won for the 850th time in pro-
gram history, becoming just
the 10th Division I school to
reach the mark.
The Crimson Tide (12-9, 2-
6) went scoreless for the first
3 1/2 minutes, and after the
teams exchanged baskets for
the ensuing 10 minutes,
Georgia went on an 8-0 run to
take a 20-11 lead.
Hassell's jumper and Grif-
fin's 3-pointer in the final
minute put Georgia ahead
32-25 at halftime.


old former Arizona State
star birdied the par-3 sev-
enth to reach 11 under.
"Probably the best shot
of the day because it's a
tucked little pin over that
bunker and I hit a 6-iron to
4 or 5 feet," Mickelson
said. "It was really a good
shot from 196 yards."
He parred the par-4
eighth, leaving an 18-footer
a rotation short
"That putt is so fast down
to that right pin because it's
going toward the valley, it's
downhill and down grain,"
Mickelson said. "I thought,
'I can't leave it short' So, I
just got it right on line and
it was tracking and it
pulled up short"
Phil Mickelson chips to the
15th green Thursday during
the first round of the
Phoenix Open in
Scottsdale, Ariz.
Associated Press


B2 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013


SPORTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Willis will carry on No. 52 legacy


Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS Two
of the league's most im-
posing inside linebackers
both happen to wear
No. 52.
This story is about the
other one.
Patrick Willis of the San
Francisco 49ers already
has done plenty to prove
his is the dominant 52 on
the left coast and beyond,
having been an All-Pro in
five of his six NFL sea-
sons. After enduring years
of losing, he finally gets to
flaunt his talent on the
NFEs biggest stage at Sun-
day's Super Bowl, where
he'll meet up with ... you
guessed it ...
No. 52 of the Baltimore
Ravens, retiring Ray
Lewis.
"I think in a couple
years, people are going to
come along and say, 'Is that
52 Patrick Willis?'" 49ers
linebacker Aldon Smith
said. "He's his own guy
He's making his own
name."
Aside from the number,
Lewis and Willis are as dif-
ferent as they come. Lewis
is emotional, loud and
brash. Willis is soft-spoken
and happy to stay behind
the scenes.
"That's a whole different
guy That's Patrick Willis,"
Smith said. "No disrespect
to Ray Lewis. Ray's a great
guy and he's done so much
for this league and it's
much-appreciated, but
that's Patrick Willis."
On the field, they each
deliver pain the same way
They make quarter-
backs quiver. Ask 49ers
backup Alex Smith. He
doesn't even like seeing
Willis on the practice field.
And alongside San Fran-
cisco's 52 is No. 53 Na-
Vorro Bowman. Together,
they deliver an All-Pro 1-2
linebacking punch.
"That 52 and 53 are


going to be around a long
time," Ravens running
back Ray Rice said.
"They're going to be a
force to reckon with. Sort
of like our guys."
Nobody has to remind
Lewis what Willis brings
on game day
"I think he is one of the
up-and-coming young stars
who plays the game the
right way," Lewis said. "He
plays the game with a cer-
tain passion, and plays
with a certain discipline.
Honestly, I really enjoy
watching the young man
play."
Willis, the 11th overall
draft pick in 2007 out of
Mississippi, is the center-
piece of a San Francisco
defense that returned
everyone from the 2011
team that came so close to
making the Super Bowl.
The Niners lost 20-17 in
overtime of the NFC title
game to the eventual
champion New York
Giants.
Willis and his team-
mates used that loss as mo-
tivation and ultimately got
the franchise back to the
NFL title game for the first
time in 18 years.
Getting back to No. 52,
Willis said he was given a
choice of numbers when
he was drafted -51,57,59
or 52.
"I said to myself: 'Why
don't I get the number 52?
I know a guy right now who
wears that number who is
one of the best It will be a
great number to play up
to.' That's kind of how it
came about."
He's actually pretty
friendly with Lewis, a
bond that has grown with
time together at Pro Bowls
and regular text messages.
"That's a young one, a
young lion I talk to a lot,"
Lewis said. "I've been talk-
ing to Patrick since his
rookie year, and I got into
his story a little bit, why he


Associated Press
San Francisco 49ers linebacker Patrick Willis sacks
Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers on Jan.
12 during the third quarter of an NFC divisional playoff
game.


wears 52 and all that. It is
actually humbling to know
him as a man because
when we started talking at
Pro Bowls, he would al-
ways tell me all of these
stories, and we would just
have conversations. My job
is now, every time I call
him, every time I tell him
something, I always try to
give him good advice,
whether it's to stretch
more or to do more to have
the longevity that you are
trying to have in this
game."
Willis calls it an honor
to share a field with
Lewis.
"I see a man that plays
with passion. I see a man


that plays with enthusi-
asm every play," he said. "I
see a man who's a leader.
I see a man who made a
difference by the way he
played the middle line-
backer position. That's
one of those things that
someday, when a young
kid looks at me, when an-
other teammate looks at
me, and they watch the
film, I hope to have that
kind of feel to the game. I
hope to have that kind of
eye. He's the Mufasa of
this league right now."
For now, yes.
Willis' teammates al-
ready consider this his
time. They have for a
while.


Super BowlBRIEFS


Hudson to sing
with Sandy Hook
chorus
NEW ORLEANS Jen-
nifer Hudson will join the
chorus from Sandy Hook El-
ementary School to sing
"America the Beautiful" be-
fore Sunday's Super Bowl.
NFL spokesman Brian
McCarthy said Thursday the
Grammy and Oscar-winning
singer would join the Sandy
Hook chorus. It features 26
children from the school in
Newtown, Conn., where 20
first-graders and six adults
were killed in a Dec. 14
shooting rampage.
The performance will be
part of CBS's pre-game
show before the game be-
tween the San Francisco
49ers and the Baltimore
Ravens, and will be broad-
cast live. Alicia Keys will
sing the national anthem.
Jerry Rice to
Randy Moss:
check the stats
NEW ORLEANS Hall
of Famer Jerry Rice has no
interest in a
back-and-
forth de-
bate with
Randy
Moss dur-
ing Super
Bowl week
about Randy
who's the Moss
greatest
NFL wide receiver of all


time.
Rice has a strong opinion
on the matter, yet insists he
won't come out and say he
is the best ever. The former
San Francisco 49ers star
turned television man will
offer one thought to Moss:
Check the stats.
During media day Tues-
day at the Superdome,
Moss declared himself "the
greatest receiver ever to
play this game." Rice said
there's a "big difference" be-
tween his body of work com-
pared to that of the
35-year-old Moss, who re-
turned to the league this
season after a year off.
Rice gives Moss the nod
of "most talented," but
added, "you've got to work
hard."
49ers' Culliver
apologizes for
anti-gay remarks
NEW ORLEANS San
Francisco 49ers cornerback
Chris Culliver has apolo-
gized for anti-gay comments
he made to a comedian dur-
ing Super Bowl media day.
Culliver said Thursday
that's "not what's in my
heart" and he was "just kid-
ding around."
He also apologized to the
city of San Francisco and
added he would welcome a
gay teammate to the 49ers,
a reversal of his remarks to
comedian Artie Lange two
days ago. San Francisco
and the Bay Area are home


TICKETI
,E Si


( )


to a large gay community.
During an interview Tues-
day at the Superdome, Cul-
liver
responded
to ques-
tions from
Lange by
saying he
wouldn't
welcome a
gay player
in the Chris
locker Culliver
room. He
said the 49ers didn't have
any gay players, and if they
did those players should
leave.
Culliver's apology reiter-
ated his statement of regret
released by the team
Wednesday night.
Flacco's expiring
contract not
an issue
NEW ORLEANS Joe
Flacco's expiring contract
doesn't seem to concern
anyone with the Baltimore
Ravens, including the quar-
terback himself.
Flacco practically
shrugged Thursday when
asked about potentially being
a free agent after the Ravens
play the San Francisco 49ers
in the Super Bowl.


The fifth-year pro and only
quarterback to win a playoff
game in each of his first five
seasons could not reach a
deal with the team before
2012 kicked off. He could be
on the market in March, al-
though the Ravens could
franchise-tag him at about
$14.6 million for next year.
Feds: $13.6M in
phony sports
goods confiscated
NEW ORLEANS Inves-
tigators have confiscated
more than $13.6 million
worth of phony sports mer-
chandise over the past five
months and expect to seize
more in New Orleans during
Super Bowl week, a federal
law-enforcement official said
Thursday.
U.S. Immigration and Cus-
toms Enforcement Director
John Morton said authorities
also have shut down more
than 300 websites selling
counterfeit goods as part of
an enforcement effort
dubbed "Operation Red
Zone." The operation tar-
geted international ship-
ments of jerseys, hats and
other souvenirs entering the
U.S. for sale by stores, flea
markets and street vendors.


2nd Annual

T est o hend est
an adoption extravaganza


February 2,2013
9 a.m.to 3 p.m.
Citrus County Auditorium

COME HAVE FUN!


-Pet Rescues


-Groomers


-Veterinarian -Food Cart
-Face Painting -Silent Auc


C-IR N L Citrus County Animal Services
l 0DNNJ Humanitarians of FL., Inc.


Last ride a rocky


one for Ray Lewis


TIM DAHLBERG
AP Sports Columnist

NEW ORLEANS-A lot
of this Super Bowl was
going to be about Ray
Lewis anyway, even before
strange tales of deer-antler
spray and magic hologram
chips came to light He
made sure of it by starting
his retirement tour early,
and bringing along the
dances and inspirational
speeches that TV cameras
eat up.
If his oratorical skills are
great, so, too, is the player
His teammates love him as
much for what he does in
the locker room as on the
field, and fans in Baltimore
may one day even erect a
statue to his greatness.
Seventeen years fronting
one of the most dominating
defenses in the NFL
should be enough to get
him in the Hall of Fame. A
Super Bowl win on Sunday
would give him a second
ring to cherish the rest of
his life.
Like the player, though,
the act has grown old.
When Lewis talks and
he talks incessantly it's
hard to take anything he
says seriously
That was the case
Wednesday when he had
the stage to himself and
everyone in a packed in-
terview room wanted to
know: Just what is deer-
antler spray and why
would you want to take it?
Turns out he wouldn't
And, says Lewis, anyone
who suggests otherwise
must be doing so with evil
intent
"That's the trick of the
devil," he said. "The trick
of the devil is to kill, steal
and destroy That's what he
comes to do. He comes to
distract you from every-
thing you're trying to do."
Enough. Please. The real
trick for Ray Lewis is ob-
fuscation and if he does it
well, it's because he's had
plenty of practice.
The day before, a re-
porter had the temerity to
ask him about a night 13
years ago in Atlanta that
left two men dead after a
Super Bowl party and put
Lewis in jail on charges of
double murder. Old news,
maybe, but the circum-
stances surrounding the
deaths have never been
fully explained, especially
by Lewis.
Instead of invoking the
devil, Lewis went the other
way
"Nobody here is really
qualified to ask those ques-
tions," he said. "I just truly
feel that this is God's time,


and whatever his time is,
let it be his will. Don't try to
please everybody with
your words, try to make
everybody's story sound
right"
What?
Lewis pleaded guilty to
obstruction of justice and
got probation, along with a
$250,000 fine from the NFL
for violating its conduct
policy The murders re-
main unsolved after the
case against his co-defen-
dants fell apart
He's been nothing but a
model citizen since and as
the years go by and memo-
ries fade he's become an
inspirational figure to
those who enjoy his prose-
lytizing and his play on the
football field. His team-
mates respect him as their
leader, and his coach
seems to regard him as
larger than life.
"We have already used
him as our team chaplain,
so Ray could double up
anytime he wants," Ravens
coach John Harbaugh said.
"He can coach. He can do
whatever he wants. I think
Ray's got big plans. Ray's
that kind of guy and when
he's done playing he's al-
ways a guy trying to affect
people and change the way
that people think and make
an impact on the world."
He's certainly making an
impact on this Super Bowl,
though his last ride has
turned out to be bumpier
than he might have imag-
ined. Lewis surely under-
stood the murders would
be mentioned, but after
years of deflecting ques-
tions about his connection
to them, he was probably
also sure it would be no
more than a minor
annoyance.
It's not so easy with deer-
antler spray and pills.
Sports Illustrated said
Lewis hoped to repair a
torn right triceps by seek-
ing help from an Alabama
company that says its prod-
ucts contain a banned sub-
stance connected to human
growth hormone. Lewis de-
nied taking anything ille-
gal, but danced around any
connection to the company
Life as a football player
will end for Lewis on Sun-
day in the Super Bowl, and
if he has mixed emotions
about it, so must we.
It's hard to root against
one of the greatest line-
backers ever, a man who
has played with the inten-
sity of 10 men for 17 years
now, and a man who is a
towering figure in the
locker room,
After today, it's even
harder to root for him.


Associated Press
Baltimore Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis speaks Thurs-
day at a Super Bowl news conference in New Orleans.

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SUPER BOWL


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013 B3






B4 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 28 15 .651 -
Brooklyn 27 19 .587 2Y2
Boston 22 23 .489 7
Philadelphia 19 26 .422 10
Toronto 16 30 .348 13Y2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 29 13 .690 -
Atlanta 26 19 .578 4Y2
Orlando 14 31 .311 16Y2
Washington 11 33 .250 19
Charlotte 11 34 .244 19Y2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 28 17 .622 -
Indiana 27 19 .587 1Y2
Milwaukee 24 20 .545 3Y2
Detroit 17 29 .370 11Y2
Cleveland 13 33 .283 15Y2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 37 11 .771 -
Memphis 29 16 .644 612
Houston 25 23 .521 12
Dallas 19 26 .422 1612
New Orleans 15 31 .326 21
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 35 11 .761 -
Denver 29 18 .617 612
Utah 25 21 .543 10
Portland 23 22 .511 111Y2
Minnesota 17 25 .405 16
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 34 13 .723 -
Golden State 28 17 .622 5
L.A. Lakers 20 26 .435 1312
Sacramento 17 30 .362 17
Phoenix 16 30 .348 1712
Wednesday's Games
Philadelphia 92, Washington 84
Indiana 98, Detroit 79
Boston 99, Sacramento 81
New York 113, Orlando 97
Atlanta 93, Toronto 92
L.A. Clippers 96, Minnesota 90
Chicago 104, Milwaukee 88
Miami 105, Brooklyn 85
San Antonio 102, Charlotte 78
Denver 118, Houston 110
Utah 104, New Orleans 99
Phoenix 92, L.A. Lakers 86
Thursday's Games
Oklahoma City 106, Memphis 89
Dallas at Golden State, late
Friday's Games
L.A. Clippers at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Miami at Indiana, 7p.m.
Orlando at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Memphis, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Denver, 9 p.m.
Portland at Utah, 9 p.m.
Dallas at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Minnesota, 9:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Chicago at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Houston, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Washington at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Orlando at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Utah at Portland, 10 p.m.
Phoenix at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
N.Y Islanders 7 4 2 1 9 27 23
New Jersey 6 3 0 3 9 16 14
Pittsburgh 7 4 3 0 8 19 18
N.Y Rangers 7 3 4 0 6 16 20
Philadelphia 7 2 5 0 4 14 20
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 7 5 1 1 11 23 19
Ottawa 7 5 1 1 11 24 13
Montreal 6 4 2 0 8 18 15
Toronto 7 4 3 0 8 21 22
Buffalo 7 3 3 1 7 23 23
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Tampa Bay 6 5 1 0 10 29 15
Winnipeg 7 3 3 1 7 21 24
Carolina 5 2 3 0 4 14 18
Florida 7 2 5 0 4 16 27
Washington 7 1 5 1 3 15 25
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 7 6 0 1 13 24 16
St. Louis 7 6 1 0 12 28 14
Detroit 6 3 2 1 7 15 17
Columbus 8 2 5 1 5 14 26
Nashville 6 1 2 3 5 10 18
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Minnesota 7 4 2 1 9 19 19
Edmonton 6 4 2 0 8 17 15
Vancouver 7 3 2 2 8 19 19
Colorado 6 2 4 0 4 10 16
Calgary 4 1 2 1 3 11 15
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 6 6 0 0 12 26 10
Anaheim 5 3 1 1 7 1717
Dallas 7 2 4 1 5 13 18
LosAngeles 5 2 2 1 5 11 14
Phoenix 7 2 4 1 5 22 22
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Wednesday's Games
Minnesota 3, Chicago 2, SO
Ottawa 5, Montreal 1
Edmonton 2, Phoenix 1, OT
Vancouver 3, Colorado 0
Thursday's Games
Buffalo 7, Boston 4
Toronto 3, Washington 2
N.Y Islanders 5, New Jersey 4, OT
Pittsburgh 3, N.Y Rangers 0
St. Louis 4, Columbus 1
Florida 6, Winnipeg 3
Colorado at Calgary, late
Nashville at Los Angeles, late
Edmonton at San Jose, late
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Washington, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Carolina, 7p.m.


Winnipeg at Tampa Bay 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Chicago at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Minnesota at Anaheim, 10p.m.
Saturday's Games
New Jersey at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at Montreal, 2 p.m.
Edmonton at Colorado, 3 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 7p.m.
Carolina at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
N.Y Rangers atTampa Bay, 7p.m.
Detroit at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Calgary, 10p.m.
Los Angeles at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Nashville at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.



BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX-Promoted Pam Kenn
to senior director of public affairs. Named Kevin
Gregg director of media relations.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For thli r cord [ Boys BasketballBRIEFS


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Thursday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
2-4-6
CASH 3 (late)

9-1-7
PLAY 4 (early)
0-3-7-7
PLAY 4 (late)
0-9-5-1

FW" LoFANTASY 5
3-15-16-29-33



On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
NBA
7 p.m. (ESPN, SUN) Miami Heat at Indiana Pacers.
7:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Orlando Magic at Boston Celtics.
9:30 p.m. (ESPN) Los Angeles Lakers at Minnesota
Timberwolves.
BOXING
9 p.m. (ESPN2) Boxing Friday Night Fights. Carlos Molina
vs. Cory Spinks.
GOLF
6 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour Golf Omega Dubai
Desert Classic Second Round.
4 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Golf Waste Management Phoenix
Open Second Round.
4 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour Golf Omega Dubai
Desert Classic Third Round.
COLLEGE HOCKEY
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Dartmouth at Union (N.Y.).

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



Prep CALENDAR


TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
GIRLS BASKETBALL
District 6A-6 tournament at Citrus High School
7 p.m. No. 2 Citrus vs. No. 1 West Port
District 5A-7 tournament at
Nature Coast Technical School
7 p.m. No. 1 Crystal River vs. No. 3 Tavares
SOFTBALL
Lecanto Preseason Classic at Lecanto High School
7:30 p.m. Lecanto vs. Hudson


CLEVELAND INDIANS-Signed RHP Matt
Capps to a minor league contract.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS-Agreed to terms
with INF Bill Hall on a minor league contract.
Named Omar Vizquel roving infield instructor.
NEW YORK YANKEES-Signed OF Matt
Diaz, INF Dan Johnson, OFThomas Neal, OF
Juan Rivera and C Bobby Wilson to minor
league contracts.
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS-Agreed to
terms with INF/OF Martin Pradoon a four-year
contract through 2016.
CINCINNATI REDS-Agreed to terms with
OF Chris Heisey and RHP Alfredo Simon On
one-year contracts.
NEW YORK METS-Signed RHP LaTroy
Hawkins to a minor league contract.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
EDMONTON OILERS-Assigned LW Mag-
nus Paajarvi to Oklahoma City (AHL).
FLORIDA PANTHERS-Acquired F Zach
Hamill from Washington for F Casey Wellman.
NEW JERSEY DEVILS-Activated C Adam
Henrique. Assigned RW Cam Janssen to Al-
bany (AHL).
TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS-Claimed F
Frazer McLaren off waivers from San Jose.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
FC Dallas-Agreed to transfer MF Brek
Shea to Stoke City F.C. (English Premier).
NEW YORK COSMOS-Signed G Kyle
Reynish.


Phoenix Open
Thursday
At TPC Scottsdale, Stadium Course,
Scottsdale, Ariz.
Purse: $6.2 million
Yardage: 7,216, Par: 71 (35-36)
Partial First Round:
Phil Mickelson 31-29-60 -11
Ryan Palmer 32-32 64 -7
Brandt Snedeker 31-33- 64 -7
Padraig Harrington 31-33-64 -7
Ted Potter, Jr. 29-35- 64 -7
Jeff Maggert 31-33 64 -7
Matt Every 31-34-65 -6
Nicolas Colsaerts 33-32 65 -6
Bill Haas 34-31 65 -6
Y.E. Yang 33-32 -65 -6
Brian Gay 30-35 65 -6
Justin Leonard 33-32-65 -6
Hank Kuehne 32-33- 65 -6
Martin Flores 32-33 65 -6
NickWatney 32-33-65 -6
Kevin Chappell 32-34 66 -5
Ken Duke 33-33- 66 -5
Brendon de Jonge 32-34 66 -5
Jeff Overton 34-32 66 -5
Robert Garrigus 32-34 66 -5
Angel Cabrera 36-30 66 -5
Ryan Moore 31-35 66 -5
Harris English 34-33 67 -4
Gary Woodland 34-33-67 -4
Chris Kirk 30-37-67 -4
Hunter Mahan 34-33 67 -4
Ben Crane 34-33 67 -4
Bryce Molder 33-34 67 -4
Troy Matteson 33-34 67 -4
David Hearn 33-34 67 -4
Jeff Klauk 34-33 67 -4
William McGirt 34-33- 67 -4
Charles Howell III 35-32-67 -4
D.A. Points 35-32 67 -4
Bubba Watson 33-34 67 -4
Bo Van Pelt 36-32- 68 -3
Kevin Stadler 34-34 -68 -3
CharlieWi 31-37-68 -3
Greg Chalmers 34-34-68 -3
Jimmy Walker 32-36-68 -3
Jason Dufner 34-34 68 -3
Rickie Fowler 34-34 68 -3
Will Claxton 34-34 68 -3
Lucas Glover 33-35 68 -3
Rory Sabbatini 34-34 68 -3
Richard H. Lee 32-36 68 -3
Jason Bohn 33-36 69 -2
Boo Weekley 36-33-69 -2
Michael Thompson 34-35-69 -2
Tim Clark 35-34 69 -2
Mike Weir 32-37-69 -2
FredrikJacobson 34-35-69 -2


Shawn Stefani 34-35- 69 -2
Aaron Baddeley 33-36 69 -2
Russell Henley 35-34 69 -2
Kevin Na 34-35 -69 -2
David Toms 34-35 69 -2
Brian Harman 34-36-70 -1
Tommy Gainey 36-34 -70 -1
J.J. Henry 35-35-70 -1
Wes Short, Jr. 36-34- 70 -1
Scott Piercy 35-35-70 -1
Marc Leishman 35-35-70 -1
Greg Owen 36-34 -70 -1
Daniel Summerhays 37-33 -70 -1
Jesper Parnevik 34-36 -70 -1
Kevin Streelman 36-34 -70 -1
Jason Day 34-36-70 -1
J.B. Holmes 34-37-71 E
Stewart Cink 34-37-71 E
K.J. Choi 35-36 71 E
MarkWilson 36-35-71 E
Charley Hoffman 33-38 -71 E
Colt Knost 36-35 -71 E
D.H. Lee 35-36-71 E
Josh Teater 35-36 -71 E
Bud Cauley 35-36 -71 E
Troy Kelly 33-39 -72 +1
Davis Love III 36-36-72 +1
John Huh 32-40-72 +1
Stephen Ames 37-35 -72 +1
Joey Snyder III 36-36-72 +1
James Driscoll 35-37-72 +1
Luke Guthrie 37-35-72 +1
Brad Fritsch 36-36 -72 +1
John Hurley 34-38-72 +1
Pat Perez 35-37-72 +1
Jason Kokrak 35-37-72 +1
Ryo Ishikawa 34-38-72 +1
Johnson Wagner 36-36-72 +1
Carl Pettersson 36-36- 72 +1
Edward Loar 36-37-73 +2
Kevin Sutherland 36-37-73 +2
David Lynn 36-37-73 +2
Sean O'Hair 37-36 -73 +2
Geoff Ogilvy 37-37-74 +3
Ross Fisher 37-37-74 +3
Ricky Barnes 37-37-74 +3
Kris Blanks 35-39 74 +3
Leaderboard at time of suspended play
SCORE THRU
1. Phil Mickelson -11 F
2. Padraig Harrington -7 F
2. Brandt Snedeker -7 F
2. Ted Potter, Jr. -7 F
2. Jeff Maggert -7 F
2. Ryan Palmer -7 F
7. Bill Haas -6 F
7. Y.E.Yang -6 F
7. Matt Every -6 F
7. Nicolas Colsaerts -6 F
7. Brian Gay -6 F
7. Martin Flores -6 F
7. Hank Kuehne -6 F
7. ScottVerplank -6 16
7. Justin Leonard -6 F
7. John Rollins -6 13
Dubai Desert Classic
Thursday
At Emirates Golf Club
Doha, Qatar
Purse: $2.5 million
Yardage: 7,344; Par: 72
First Round
Richard Sterne, South Africa 31-31 62
Stephen Gallacher, Scotland 30-33 63
Tommy Fleetwood, England 33-32 65
Scott Jamieson, Scotland 33-32 65
Chris Doak, Scotland 31-34 65
Maximilian Kieffer, Germany 34-32 66
Matteo Manassero, Italy 32-34 66
Paul Casey, England 32-34 66
Ricardo Santos, Portugal 32-34 66
Noh, Seung-yul, South Korea 31-35 66
Peter Lawrie, Ireland 32-34 66
Mark O'Meara, United States 33-34 67
Lee Westwood, England 34-33 67
Emiliano Grillo, Argentina 33-34 67
Marcus Fraser, Australia 33-34 67
F. Andersson Hed, Sweden 34-33 67
Andreas Harto, Denmark 33-34 67
Marc Warren, Scotland 33-34 67
Jamie Donaldson, Wales 32-35 67
Gregory Bourdy, France 33-34 67
Thorbjorn, Olesen, Denmark 31-36 67
Also
Sergio Garcia, Spain 34-34 68
Colin Montgomerie, Scotland 34-35 69


Makros breaks record
in Lecanto win
Lecanto senior guard Mikey Makros
broke a Panthers' school record for three-
pointers in a single game with 12 treys
during a 65-39 victory at Weeki Wachee
on Thursday night.
Makros broke former Lecanto guard
Stephen Buckley's prior mark of 11 in the
effort.
Thomas Vilardi (six points, 10 assists)
and Ronnie Crowe (6 points, 11 rebounds)
also contributed for the Panthers.
Panthers assistant coach Marc Grasso
added Connor Dupler held Weeki Wachee
standout Tyler Wiley to 11 points in the
contest, which also saw Lecanto pitch a
fourth-quarter shutout.
Now 19-6 overall to end the regular sea-





SPEEDWAY
Continued from Page BI

names lurking near the top of the
standings.
Beverly Hills' Jay Witfoth claimed
the Sportsman title in 2012, with Tom
Posavec, of Dunnellon, and Crystal
River's Ernie Reed finishing fifth and
sixth, respectively
Happy Florian, of Lecanto, sat atop
the Pure Stocks final standings last
November, while Floral City's Karlin
Ray climbed to sixth by season's end.
In Mini Stocks, it was Floral City's
Jeremy Sharrone comfortably taking
the top spot, and Lecanto's Carson
Taylor holding on at No. 6.
Largo's Doug Miller narrowly held
off Troy Robinson, of Wesley Chapel,
for the Open Wheel Modified class
last season.
Drivers are awarded 100 points for


son, the Panthers play Citrus in the District
6A-6 semifinals Wednesday at Central
High School in Brooksville.

Warriors storm The
Villages, leave with victory
Led by junior guard Adam Gage's 33
points, 10 rebounds and five assists, the
Seven Rivers Christian boys baseball
team to a 67-47 triumph at The Villages on
Thursday.
Also factoring in for the Warriors were
Jared Bogart (13 points) and Liam Cash
(11 points, 7 rebounds).
Seven Rivers ends its regular season at
11-10 overall; the Warriors are District
2A-3 hosts next week and will play St.
John Lutheran in the semifinals Tuesday at
home.



a first-place finish, with the remain-
der of the top finishers receiving two
fewer points for every car they finish
behind. Ten points are also given to
winners of heat races, while the next
best heat finishers earn one fewer
point for every spot lower they fall.
The Pro Challenge points are tal-
lied by region in the U.S. and Canada,
with the Citrus County Speedway
joining Archer's Bronson Speedway
in alternating throughout the season
as host to the Sunshine Region
bracket.
Saturday is the first race of the
region's season.
Admission prices are $13 for adults
and $9 for seniors over 60 and stu-
dents between the ages 12 and 17.
Children under 12 are $5, while
smaller children get in free.
There are annual and family passes
available, as well as higher rates for
admission to the pits and skyboxes.


Special to the Chronicle
The Seven Rivers Christian School girls basketball team celebrates after its 42-
40 victory over St. John Lutheran for the District 2A-3 tournament championship
Thursday night in Ocala. The feat was the second consecutive district crown for
the Warriors, who will host a Class 2A regional quarterfinal game Thursday.


REPEAT
Continued from Page B1

dominant Saints center
Jalaysha Thomas -
ranked by recruiting
services as the No. 1
eighth grader in Florida
and No. 4 in the United
States into a five-
point game on 2-for-10
shooting.
Thomas was routinely
double-teamed in a very
physical game inside,
but the Saints got to the
line just 11 times com-
pared to 30 for Seven
Rivers.
Despite all those trou-
bles, St. John still nearly
won thanks to Bollinger,
who connected on a
clutch 3-pointer with
1:25 remaining for a
39-37 lead.
Johnson hit a free
throw with 35 seconds
left for a 40-38 lead, but
Alexis Zachar tied it
back up with a bank shot
at the 20-second mark.
Alexis Zachar then got
fouled on the defensive
boards at the other end


to set up her game-
winning free throws.
"Alexis has a ton of
heart," Dreyer said.
"She's not going to leave
anything on the court no
matter who we're
playing."
Alexis Zachar finished
with 10 points, 17 re-
bounds and nine
blocked shots for Seven
Rivers, while Andrea
Zachar had eight points,
17 rebounds and three
blocks.
Alyssa Gage scored a
game-high 18 points for
the Warriors and got to
the foul line 18 total
times seven more
than St. John's entire
team.
"She's just aggres-
sive," Dreyer said.
"She's not afraid to miss
a shot."
The Warriors' ability
to draw fouls allowed
them to lead nearly the
entire first half despite
shooting just 4-for-28
from the field.
Johnson broke out for
nine points and four
steals in the third quar-
ter alone when St. John


CITRUS
Continued from Page B1

The Hurricanes connected on 8-of-
16 first-quarter shots, including a pair
of threes by Connors in the final two
minutes of the period, to open up a 24-
11 lead. Toxen who paced Citrus
with 21 points and Connors each
scored nine points in the first half.
Connors and Michah Jenkins each fin-
ished with 13 points and Marissa
DuBois had 11. Straight's 16 points
was best for Lecanto; Marie Buckley
was next best with nine.
"I thought at the end of the second
quarter, we didn't execute the way we
should have," Lattin said. "In the sec-
ond half, it was imperative for us to
come out strong.
"This was a nice win for us, it puts
us in a position to play a great West
Port team that we have a ton of re-


surged to a 31-26 lead.
Then Johnson's 3 to start
the fourth quarter
opened a game-high
eight-point lead, but
after a St. John timeout,
the Warriors flipped the
script with an 10-0 run
that changed the tone of
the game. Gage scored
six of those points, while
the Warriors were 6-of-6
from the line during the
run, which covered four
full minutes of the
fourth quarter.
Johnson led the Saints
with 17 points and seven
steals, while Hallie
Linville scored nine and
grabbed eight boards.
Despite her offensive
struggles, Thomas still
finished with 11 re-
bounds and five blocked
shots before fouling out
with 1:11 left.
"It was a little frustrat-
ing because of their
size," St. John coach
Kim Pompey said.
"...With all their blocks,
it made us fall back a lit-
tle bit. We had to try and
readjust and drive to the
basket. Their height was
just overpowering."




ve're taking it


one game at

a time.


Shenelle Toxen
Citrus girls basketball forward.

spect for. We played well tonight, but
at times we were a little sloppy. We
can't have those stretches against
West Port."
The Wolf Pack and Citrus could not
be more evenly matched. During the
season, the two teams split their two
games, each winning by 10 points on
their home court.
"I haven't even thought about that,"
was Toxen's answer when asked about
West Port. "I was worried about
tonight's game. We're taking it one
game at a time."


SCOREBOARD





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ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Barbara Walters is
out of the hospital
LOS ANGELES-ABC
said Barbara Walters is out
of the hospital and recover-
ing from chicken pox at
home.
ABC said Tuesday the 83-
year-old host
on "The
View" is rest- // .
ing comfort- r .
ably and 4
"getting ,
stronger"
There was no
indication of
when she Barbara
might return Walters
to work.
Walters was
hospitalized after falling and
cutting her head at a pre-in-
augural party in Washington
on Jan. 19. The news veteran
later was diagnosed with
chicken pox, which typically
hits people when they are
children.

Singer charged
with hit-and-run
LOS ANGELES Los
Angeles prosecutors have
charged country star
Emmylou Harris with misde-
meanor hit-and-run related
to an accident last year
The Grammy-winning
singer was
charged
Wednesday
for failing to 0, 0-
exchange in-
formation
with a driver
whose car she
hit on a free-
way Oct. 1. Emmylou
A criminal Harris
complaint
filed in Beverly Hills did not
contain additional details
about the accident or how
much damage occurred.
A publicist for the 65-year-
old singer didn't immedi-
ately return a message
seeking comment.
Harris has won a dozen
Grammys for her solo work
and collaborations with
artists such as Dolly Parton,
Linda Ronstadt, Alison
Krauss and others.
Harris continues to tour
and is scheduled to release
an album of duets in late
February

Romano performs at
Garden of Laughs event
NEW YORK While
everybody loves Raymond,
it's stand-up comedy that Ray
Romano loves most.
The 55-year-old actor-
comedian said performing
live is his passion, so he
jumped at the chance to par-
ticipate in the "Garden of
Laughs" event at The The-
ater at Madison Square Gar-
den on Saturday
Adam Ferrara and Darrell
Hammond are also sched-
uled to perform in the com-
edy event, which will benefit
the Garden of Dreams
Foundation.
Romano, who starred in
the long-running TV series
"Everybody Loves Raymond"
and the short-lived "Men of a
Certain Age," said he feels
more comfortable onstage.
He calls performing with
old friends a "win-win situa-
tion."
'A ballplayer reaches a
certain age that he can no
longer hit the ball out of the
park. Then he retires. But
with stand-up he can keep
doing it. Yes, you have to
learn to adjust and you have
to be more current and hope-
fully you hold up for some
time."
From wire reports


Birthday Knowledge you gain in the year ahead
will prove to be of enormous value. It is likely to be the
thing that will tip the scales on a major venture.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Because you've been
in the thoughts of someone dear to you and who re-
sides at a considerable distance, there's an excellent
possibility you'll get a call from him or her.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) It's imperative you
keep quiet about what you've been told in strict confi-
dence. If you promised you wouldn't breathe a word
to anyone, don't break your vow.
Aries (March 21-April 19) The enthusiasm and
optimism you show will have a contagious effect on
your associates, which will help you in return. You
need others' feedback as much as they need your
input.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) One of the reasons
you're likely to do better than most of your peers is


Funny guy?


From left, Christopher Walken as Doc, Alan Arkin as Hirsch, and Al Pacino as Val are in a scene
from "Stand Up Guys."

Pacino's late comedic turn also a homecoming


JAKE COYLE
AP entertainment writer

NEW YORK Al Pacino,
energized by a conversation
that has inevitably turned to
the intricacies of acting, is
snapping his fingers.
The 72-year-old may be
gray-haired and a little worn,
but he remains, like a dancer,
always on his toes, and still
enamored of the "crazy, crazy,
crazy thing" that is acting:
"You're always looking for
what's going to feed you,
what's going to feed the spirit
and get you going."
And Pacino is still getting
going. Yet the subject of time
- how much is needed to find
a character (years in some
cases, he says) and how it dic-
tates the parts he chooses now
- played a large role in a re-
cent interview with the actor
at the Waldorf Astoria in New
York.
"Sometimes I'm tempted to
say, 'Why am I doing this? Why
am I still doing this?"' he said.
"Then, after I don't do it for a
while, I say: 'Oh, now I know
why I still do it.' If I suddenly
didn't want to do it anymore,
that'd be fine, too. I'd probably
be an usher again in a
playhouse."
If Pacino is feeling reminis-
cent of his early days as a
Bronx-born aspiring thespian
knocking around in 1960s
downtown New York theaters
and cafes, it's partly because
his recent work reflects on his
beginnings. Not many know
Pacino started out as a come-
dian. He jokes though he did
a movie with Robin Williams
("Insomnia"), "he didn't know
that I really wanted to be
him."
Pacino, funny guy, has cer-
tainly been glimpsed before.
But after a career better
known for gangsters, crooks
and Shakespearean villains,
Pacino has lately been exer-
cising his comedy chops. After
finishing a revival run on
Broadway of "Glengarry Glen
Ross" in which he played up
the laughs as the desperate,
over-the-hill salesman Shel-
ley, Pacino stars in the crime
comedy "Stand Up Guys,"
which Lionsgate will release
Friday.
In it, he plays a former gang-
ster, Val, released from prison
after 28 years and taken
around town to celebrate by


his old friend, Doc (Christo-
pher Walken), who does it re-
morsefully knowing their boss
wants Val killed by sunup.
Their pal Richard (Alan
Arkin) joins in the romp.
As he showed in "Scent of a
Woman," Al Pacino is good
company for a last-hurrah.
Part of his enduring appeal,
after all, is his pulsating zest
for life. Whether firing a ma-
chine gun at the hip ("Scar-
face"), pursuing a story ("The
Insider") or whipping a crowd
into an "Attica"-chanting
protest ("Dog Day Afternoon"),
Pacino is the great agitator of
American movies. Critics will
make claims of overacting, but
no one ever slept through an
Al Pacino performance.
"Some actors aren't con-
nected and they don't invest,"
said "Stand Up Guys" director
Fisher Stevens, a veteran
New York actor and documen-
tary producer. "Al is commit-
ted to everything he does,
even if it's just playing poker
He does everything that way."
Stevens first met Pacino
when he came to see him in a
play two decades ago. It's the
way many encounter Pacino;
there are countless careers
he's helped propel, from
Kevin Spacey (whom he sug-
gested for the 1992 film
"Glengarry Glen Ross") to
Jessica Chastain (whom he
cast in his Los Angeles pro-
duction of Oscar Wilde's
"Salome"). Pacino made a film
about the production, "Wilde
Salome," but it like Pa-
cino's beloved, largely unseen
"The Local Stigmatic" re-
mains unreleased.
"That's what Al does with
his movies, he just holds on to
them like he's keeping his
kids," Stevens said.
Pacino and Walken hadn't
worked together before (ex-
cept for separate scenes in -
get ready for it the Ben
Affleck, Jennifer Lopez film
"Gigli"), but they've been
friends for decades, going
back to the Actors Studio,
where the long-involved
Pacino is co-president. Read-
ing through the parts, the two
decided to switch roles in
"Stand Up Guys."
While Pacino's "Godfather,
Part II" co-star and cinematic
counterpart Robert De Niro
has focused on comedy late in
his career, Pacino has been
more scattershot. His most no-


Today's HOROSCOPE
you'll be cognizant of the small but significant details
others totally ignore. Good for you.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) What makes life more
comfortable and enjoyable during this cycle is associ-
ating with people whose political and religious views
parallel yours. They'll make you feel more at ease.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -With your natural ability
to ferret out information others are reluctant to reveal,
you'll need to be especially mindful to keep things to
yourself.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Because partnerships are
favored, you could find yourself involved in several
such arrangements for different purposes. Each one
should work out fairly well.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Follow the sage advice:
"A penny saved is a penny earned." Cut corners wher-
ever you can, because small amounts can add up to a
hefty sum.


table work in recent years was
playing Shylock in an ac-
claimed 2010 production of
"The Merchant ofVenice" and
an Emmy-winning turn as Dr
Jack Kevorkian in the HBO
film "You Don't Know Jack."
(In March, Pacino will return
to HBO in another high-
profile biopic, this time on
Phil Spector.)
His fondness for broad com-
edy, though, helps explain the
most inscrutable credit in Pa-
cino's filmography: the 2011
Adam Sandler film 'Jack and
Jill," in which he, among other
things, rapped a pseudo
Dunkin' Donuts ad as
"Dunkaccino."
It's ironic the greatest ac-
complishment of an actor so
well known for his bigness (de-
spite his 5-foot-7 inch frame)
was a performance of utter
control: Michael Corleone.
The strain of the titanic per-
formance the maturation of
an armchair despot through
the "Godfather" films left a
mark on Pacino, who though
nearly 32 at the time, had only
two previous movies under his
belt
"That character was so con-
suming," Pacino said. "Part of
the reason why was because
of its restraint, because of
what is demanded of it in that
style. The innards of that char-
acter, what his psyche was
going through. To portray that
probably affected me in some
way."
Since then, the knock on
Pacino has always been that
he sometimes chews scenery,
or rather, swallows it whole.
That's somewhat unfair,
Stevens said, who notes Pa-
cino tries many degrees of a
character, leaving it to the di-
rector to calibrate.
But if Pacino sometimes
veers into cartoon, it makes
him all the more suited to
comedy. In conversation, he's
every bit as lively, erratic and
funny as you'd expect
"I'm throwing images at
you!" he bursts between re-
flections.
He grins mischievously
when he brags that he got
Stevens to open up his collar
And when the question of
whether he'll take up that
Shakespearean mountain that
signifies the autumn of an
actor's career, he said, yes,
perhaps in a movie, but not on
stage.


Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Little things could take on
special significance, and your peers could be making
big judgments about you based on small details.
Fortunately, you'll give a good account of yourself.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Both your intuition and
logic will be especially keen at this point. It's a good
thing, too, because each will be instrumental in
helping you resolve critical issues.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -A line of communi-
cation could be opened to someone you've been anx-
ious to contact, though it may not be an easy one. Be
prepared to make a concerted effort.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Do not get discour-
aged if your achievements do not necessarily meas-
ure up to your expectations. The important thing is
you're moving forward, even if it's only one step at a
time.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30
Powerball: 14 16 32 47 52
Powerball: 16
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 3 winners $1 million
1 Florida winner
Lotto: 7 9 10 42 45 49
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 26 $5,732.50
4-of-6 1,571 $72.50
3-of-6 34,256 $5
Fantasy 5:12 13 14 27 36
5-of-5 1 winner $235,711.29
4-of-5 327 $116
3-of-5 9,897 $10.50
TUESDAY, JANUARY 29
Mega Money: 3 14 22 39
Mega Ball: 17
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 2 winners $3,379.50
3-of-4 MB 43 $344.50
3-of-4 820 $53.50
2-of-4 MB 1,314 $23
1-of-4 MB 11,769 $2.50
2-of-4 26,277 $2
Fantasy 5:2 3 5 17 24
5-of-5 6 winners $34,687.24
4-of-5 373 $89.50
3-of-5 11,974 $7.50


INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Friday, Feb. 1, the
32nd day of 2013. There are 333
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Feb. 1, 2003, the space
shuttle Columbia broke up during
re-entry, killing all seven of its
crew members.
On this date:
In 1790, the U.S. Supreme
Court convened for the first time in
New York. (However, since only
three of the six justices were pres-
ent, the court recessed until the
next day.)
In 1861, Texas voted to leave
the Union at a Secession
Convention in Austin.
In 1862, "The Battle Hymn of
the Republic," a poem by Julia
Ward Howe, was published in the
Atlantic Monthly.
In 1922, in one of Hollywood's
most enduring mysteries, movie
director William Desmond Taylor
was shot to death in his Los
Angeles home; the killing has
never been solved.
Ten years ago: At least 50 peo-
ple were killed in a Zimbabwe
train collision.
Five years ago: Exxon Mobil
posted the largest annual profit by
a U.S. company $40.6 billion
and the biggest quarterly profit
to that time, breaking its own
records.
One year ago: Facebook an-
nounced plans to go public with a
stock offering. (The social network
priced its IPO at $38 per share,
but the stock started to fall soon
after the first day of trading.)
Today's Birthdays: Gospel
singer George Beverly Shea is
104. Actor Stuart Whitman is 85.
Singer Don Everly is 76. Actor
Garrett Morris is 76. Singer Ray
Sawyer (Dr. Hook and the Medi-
cine Show) is 76. Bluegrass
singer Del McCoury is 74. Jazz
musician Joe Sample is 74. TV
personality-singer Joy Philbin is
72. Comedian Terry Jones is 71.
Sen. Mike Enzi, R-Wyo., is 69.
Opera singer Carol Neblett is 67.
Rock musician Mike Campbell
(Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers)
is 63. Blues singer-musician
Sonny Landreth is 62. Actor-
writer-producer Bill Mumy is 59.
Rock singer Exene Cervenka is
57. Actor Linus Roache is 49.
Princess Stephanie of Monaco is
48. Country musician Dwayne
Dupuy (Ricochet) is 48. Actress
Sherilyn Fenn is 48. Lisa Marie
Presley is 45. Comedian-actor


Pauly Shore is 45. Actor Brian
Krause is 44. Jazz musician
Joshua Redman is 44.
Thought for Today: "Happi-
ness is a by-product. You cannot
pursue it by itself." Sam Leven-
son, American humorist
(1911-1980).












SCENE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Heather Foster
FOSTER
ON FILM


Associated Press
Jeremy Renner, left, portrays Hansel while Gemma Arterton portrays his sister Gretel in "Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters."

FAIRY-TALE CHARACTERS HANSEL AND GRETEL IN


t seems Hollywood re-
cently has gone into a
phase I particularly
like. This new phase
involves taking classic
fairy tales and revamping
them in unique ways for the
big screen.
This started with Tim Bur-
ton's "Alice in Wonderland" a
few years ago and has contin-
ued with other films such as
"Red Riding Hood" and
"Snow White and the Hunst-
man" by reimagining classic
characters in more intense
ways.
The latest film to follow
this trend is "Hansel and
Gretel: Witch Hunters," an
intense action flick recount-
ing the story of the classic
siblings as grownups.
But, of course, the film be-
gins with the classic tale. The
brother and sister are lost in
a forest until they come
across a house made of
candy It is only when they
step inside the house they re-
alize its inhabitant is a man-
eating witch. You know the
rest. Witch tries to eat kids,
kids burn witch, happily
every after ... but not quite.
It turns out Hansel (Jeremy
Renner) and Gretel (Gemma
Arterton) have made a pros-
perous career of hunting
down witches and turning in
their corpses for gold.
The movie really begins
when the two witch hunters
come to a small village where
almost all the children have


LOCAL MOVIE REVIEW


been taken by --
you guessed it -
witches. But these
witches are a little
more powerful, be-
cause they have
discovered a plan
to make them im-
mortal. If they suc-
ceed, it will mean
bad news for hu- Liamn
mans everywhere, CASH|
plus no paycheck
for Hansel and MO'
Gretel.
There are three words I
can use to sum up this film:
big, bloody fun. Allow me to
elaborate.
I went to this film expect-
ing a cheesy, popcorn-action
film with lots of guns and ex-
plosions. And I got my wish.
"Hansel and Gretel" is what
many would refer to as a
guilty pleasure film. You
don't really want to like it,
and you don't want to tell
people you liked it, but in
your heart, you like it a lot.
The most recent example
of a guilty pleasure I can
share was "Van Helsing" with
Hugh Jackman, a film with
terrible dialogue, over-the-
top plot lines and great ac-
tion. But I loved it. "Hansel
and Gretel" is very much the
same.
But in terms of cheese fac-
tor, this film is really not as
bad as I expected. OK, so the


[C
M
V


main characters
are carrying shot-
guns, automatic
crossbows and
Gatling guns in
fairy-tale world
(not to mention
spewing f-bombs).
However, there is
barely any of what
Cash I would call
ONEY "cringeworthy" di-
alogue and no plot
IES lines or set pieces
were wildly over
the top. And because of that, I
can totally enjoy watching an
automatic crossbow fire
away at witches as they ex-
plode in 3D.
Again let me stress, this
film is not for those who want
to see some complex story
complete with engaging char-
acter development. This film
is for a specific audience, an
audience who wants 90 min-
utes of fast-paced, fun action
sequences with a lot of guns
and a lot of witches who bite
the dust, some in more brutal
ways than other.
If this kind of film sounds
good to you, then I will guar-
antee you will thoroughly
enjoy yourself in "Hansel
and Gretel: Witch Hunters."
It's an intense, comedic spin
on a classic fairy tale. But in
terms of all the action films
released on a yearly basis, it's
a forgettable guilty pleasure


Famke Janssen plays Muriel in
"Hansel & Gretel: Witch
Hunters."

at most. I give it two stars out
of four
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch
Hunters" has a running time
of 88 minutes and is rated R
for strong fantasy horror vio-
lence and gore, brief nudity/
sexuality and language.

Liam Cash is a senior at
Seven Rivers Christian
School in Lecanto. For more
from his blog, "Cashmoney
Movies," visit http://cash
moneymovies.blogspot.com.


B E S T B E T S T H IS W E E K N DI


Lecanto
Whispering Tree
to perform Friday
Whispering Tree brings its con-
temporary folk music to Woodview
Coffee House at 8 p.m. Friday,
Feb. 1, at Woodview Coffee House
concerts at Unity Church's of Citrus
County's Fellowship Hall, 2628
Woodview Lane, Lecanto.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Talent
showcase begins at 7 p.m. Whis-
pering Tree will perform at 8 p.m.
Admission is $7. Homemade
baked goods, coffee, and assorted
beverages are available. Call 352-
726-9814 or visit www.woodview
coffeehouse.org for information.

Beverly Hills

Arts, crafts and farmers
market this weekend
Beverly Hills Arts, Crafts and
Farmers Market will be from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. the first and third Fridays
of each month at Lake Beverly
Park. This month's dates are Feb.
1 and Feb. 15.


Special to the Chronicle
Whispering Tree will play at
8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 1, at
Woodview Coffee House.

Vendor spaces cost $10.
Visit www.bhcivicassociation.
com or call 352-746- 2657.

Homosassa
Teen singer, guitarist
headline concert Saturday
Haley Schroeder, 15, and singer-
songwriter and guitarist Brett Smith


are the featured
performers at the
Nature Coast
Friends of Blues
"2013 Live Music
Series" at Mu-
seum Cafe,
10466 W. Yulee
Drive, Old Ho- Haley
mosassa. Schroeder
Schroeder will
perform at 2 p.m. and Smith will
play at 3 p.m.
Admission is $7 nonmembers
and $5 members. Bring a chair, but
no pets.
Join for $15 individual or $10
family at any series event and get
in free. www.ncfblues.com.

Dunnellon

Village Market in Historic
District this weekend
Dunnellon's First Saturday Vil-
lage Market including a variety of
street vendors will be from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, in Dun-
nellon's Historic District on West
Pennsylvania Avenue, Cedar and
Walnut streets.


Call 352-465-2225 for more
information.

Crystal River


Band to fill mall with
music Saturday
Dueling Banjos is schedule to
play from 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 2, at Crystal River Mall. The
concert is free.

Ocala
Cedar Key artist's work on
display at museum
"Chick Schwartz: Cedar Key
Artist," will be on display Jan. 19
through March 17 atAppleton Mu-
seum of Art, College of Central
Florida, 4333 E. Silver Springs
Blvd., Ocala.
Trained as an engineer,
Schwartz is a sculptor and master
at modeling.
Admission is $6 for adults; $4 for
seniors 55 or older and students 19
and older; $3 for youths ages 10 to
18.
From staff reports


'Pitch


Perfect'


hits high,


witty note
honestly, "Pitch Per-
fect" looked like a
straight-up "High
School Musical"-grade "Hair-
spray" ripoff. I was not at all
intrigued.
Nonetheless, my family was
interested enough to rent
"Pitch Perfect," and I was
compelled to watch the musi-
cal flick.
Perhaps "Pitch Perfect"
lacks "Hairspray's" idiosyn-
cratic vibe, but it really tick-
led me. Hysterical, grotesque
situations and sharp little wit-
ticisms give "Pitch Perfect"
such a golden, comedic edge.
After laughing so much, I re-
ally do not mind some of
"Pitch's" dialogue echoes
anti-clique PSAs.
We follow Beca (Anna
Kendrick), a college freshman
who loves singing a cap-
pella singing. Understand-
ably, Beca joins the Bellas, an
all-girls a cappella troop on
campus. Beca butts heads
with Aubrey (Anna Camp), the
super-controlling, yellow-
haired dynamo who rules the
Bellas. Still, Beca enjoys be-
friending Bella oddballs, like
the super-sarcastic Fat Amy
(Rebel Wilson). A not-so-tragic
"Romeo and Juliet" romance
arises when Beca falls for
Jesse (Skylar Astin), a mem-
ber of the all-male Treble
Makers singing group, the
Bellas' sworn enemy
Yes, "Pitch Perfect" is
packed with tropes. Beca's fa-
ther discourages her singing
aspirations so she can have a
career. A pot-bellied, jerky
jock makes fun of Fat Amy's
physique. Benji, a weird, un-
popular kid with secret
singing talents, shines at a cli-
matic moment
The Bellas start out as
closed-in misfits, but duress
makes them best friends.
Thankfully though, delicious
comedy, wit, allusions and
pathos (surprisingly!) smother
the stringy plot and make it
worthwhile.
For me, "Pitch's" comedy
reigns supreme. If you have
ever reveled in sadistic play-
ground fantasies and cooked
up wacky, over-the-top carica-
tures of peers and foes, "Pitch
Perfect" probably tops them.
The barely human dragoness
of Aubrey spews vomit when
nervous or enraged. Lilly
(Hanna Mae Lee), the super-
quiet, doll-like, saucer-eyed
girl, mumbles absurd, violent,
intensely personal things (e.g.
"I ate my twin in the womb").
Beca's unfriendly Asian
roommate grunts, "Oh the
white girl is here" when she
enters their dorm.
Topping these zany situa-
tions and hyperbolic charac-
ters is Fat Amy's piercing
commentary. When con-
fronting two-faced biddies
and man-boob hypocrites,
Amy delivers these spectacu-
lar, gratifying one-liners.
Even though "Pitch Per-
fect's" highlights appeal to
lower, retaliatory sensibili-
ties, this flick is so bad, it is
good. I laughed so hard I
cried.
I may never sit through
"Pitch Perfect" again, but I am
happy I saw it I give it a B-.
With a running time of 112
minutes, "Pitch Perfect" is
rated PG-13 for sexual mate-
rial, language and drug refer-
ences. "Pitch Perfect" is
available for rent at Redbox
kiosks.
[]
Heather Foster is a senior at
the University of Florida.


In Saturday Classifieds A 5
Shop in our
Garage and Yard Sales Category r
SAVE BIG! 'i
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C2 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013

ARTS & CRAFTS
Stoneridge Snow-
birds Art Group exhibits at
Lakes Region Library in re-
search and computer area
for viewing during regular
business hours.
Florida Artists
Gallery's extended hours,
10 a.m. to4 p.m. seven
days a week, and later Fri-
days and Saturdays for spe-
cial events.
All Day Art Club, 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday,
Old Homosassa Civic Cen-
ter, 5530 S. Mason Creek
Drive, behind the fire station.
$10. Bring supplies. Interme-
diate and advanced artists
welcome. 352-795-8774.
Needlework Fun
Groups, 2 to 4 p.m. first and
third Saturdays monthly,
Wildwood Public Library,
310 S. Palmer Drive, Wild-
wood. 352-748-1158.
els34785@yahoo.com.
Nature Coast Decora-
tive Artists Chapter of the
Society of Decorative Artists
meets at 9 a.m. first Satur-
day monthly at Weeki
Wachee Senior Center off
U.S. 19 and Toucan Trail,
Spring Hill. Short meeting,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Snowbirds work out in the open


special to tre unronicle
Stoneridge Snowbirds Art Group includes, from left: back row, Joan Mensch, Joan
Meredith, Caroline Frary, Shirley and Mac Stewart; and front row, Audrey
Bunchkowski, Sylvia Heymans and Jude Caborn.


show-and-tell and birthday
raffle. Project is a mono-
chromatic floral in acrylic
taught by Pat Landry. It can
be done as a chapter note-
book cover or surface of you
choice. On Feb. 4 and 5, the
chapter will host Maureen
McNaughton for all-day
seminars. 352-688-0839 or
352-666-9091. www.nature
coastdecorativeartists.com.
Community Needle-
works Crafters meet at
10 a.m. first Wednesday. All
quilters, knitters and crochet
crafters are welcome. Call
Terri at 352-746-1973.
Sandhill Crane Chap-
ter of the Embroiderers'
Guild of America, 10 a.m. to
2 p.m., first Wednesday
monthly at Faith Evangelical
Presbyterian Church, 200 Mt.
FairAve., Brooksville. Bring
lunch. 352-621-6680 (Citrus),
352-666-8350 (Hernando).
Mary Aiuto exhibit,
Monday, Feb. 4, through
Thursday, Feb. 28, in up-
stairs exhibition hall in
Dorothea G. Jerome Build-
ing, 3800 S. Lecanto High-
way, Lecanto. Reception
5 to 7 p.m. Thursday,
Feb. 7. Exhibit hours are
8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Mon-


day through Thursday;
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Fri-
day. Free. 352-746-6721,
ext. 6131, or www.CF.edu.
Artist Suzette Urs'
open house and show Fri-
day, Feb. 8, at 7212 E.
Manchester Court, Floral
City. Refreshments served.
Tours at 5:30, 6:30 and
7:30 p.m. 561-734-6926.
Citrus Watercolor
Club meeting, noon second
Friday monthly, United
Methodist Church on
County Road 581, Inver-
ness. Demonstrations by
well-know artists at each
meeting. $5. 352-382-8973
or 352-622-9352. www.
citruswatercolorclub.com.
Manatee Haven Dec-
orative Artists chapter of
the National Society of Dec-
orative Painters, meets sec-
ond Saturday monthly at
North Oak Baptist Church,
9324 N. Elkcam Blvd., Cit-
rus Springs. 352-270-3256
or dynamite71@juno.com
or manateehavendecorative
artists.org.
Art Center of Citrus
County's regular gallery
hours are 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday to Friday, at 2644 N.
Annapolis Ave., Hernando.


il


Dan's 1iL I LIS 4 J


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With two convenient locations in im
Crystal River and Homosassa, Dan's
Clam Stand has made it easy to enjoy
fresh seafood any time of the week.
Since opening eighteen years ago, the
restaurant has earned the distinction for IF .
providing ample portions of quality -
prepared seafood at a reasonable price. The
casual atmosphere, reasonable prices and
kid's menu has made it the perfect place to bring
the entire family or to socialize with good friends.
The diverse menu features local and New England
seafood at its best. Popular taste pleasers include fried oysters, scallops, shrimp and whole
belly clams, New England steamers, freshly-made New England and Manhattan Clam
Chowder, and fresh fish such as grouper that can be prepared fried, blackened or grilled.
Dan's Famous Hamburger is the recipient of the "Pearly Mae Award," a Chronicle contest
that awarded the title to the best hamburger in Citrus County. Try it with fries for only
$5.95. Entree prices range from 55.95 to $25.99.
Dan's offering: 10 Extra Large Shrimp with 1 Side 57.99; 15 Extra Large Shrimp -
511.99; 20 Extra Large Shrimp 514.99; 1 lb. Snow Crab 59.99 all day, everyday add an
additional 1/2 lb. for 54.00; and Maine Lobster 514.99.
Dan's offers a new Lunch Crunch Menu served daily from 11 am-2 pm, featuring specials
starting at 54.99.
The restaurant also features nightly Sundown Specials from 3 to 6 pm. Choose from
fried clam strips, chicken fingers, fried haddock, popcorn shrimp, or Fish Tacos served with
your choice of regular fries, coleslaw, or hush puppies, tossed salad or chowder. Offered
for dine-in service only, no substitutions allowed.
In Homosassa, Dan's Clam Stand is located at 7364 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd., and on
Hwy.44 in Crystal River. Open 11 am Tuesday-Saturday. Closed Sunday and Monday.
For more information call 795-9081 Crystal River, 628-9588 Homosassa.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ART CLASSES
Garden Shed classes:
Basket-weaving class,
10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 2.
Make a wall basket with
leather handle. $25. Materi-
als and supplies provided.
Calligraphy class, 1 to
2:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 7,
for five-week session. Bring
calligraphy pen set or buy
one here.
Scrapbooking class,
10 a.m. to noon Saturday,
Feb. 9. Bring at least 20
photos. $20. Supplies and
materials provided.
Origami class, 6 to
8 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12.
Materials and supplies in-
cluded. $25. Make an
origami ornament.
Full kitchen available for
you to bring food and drink.
The Garden Shed is at 2423
S. Rock Crusher Road in
Homosassa. Call 352-503-
7063 to register. Preregistra-
tion required. All major credit
cards accepted.
The Florida Artists
Gallery, historic Knight
House, 8219 Orange Ave.,
Floral City, offers classes.
352-344-9300. www.
Floridaartistsgallery.com.
February classes:
Introduction to Paper-
making, 9 a.m. to noon Sat-
urday, Feb. 2. Instructor
Keith Gum. Learn basic
methods of handmade
paper production using cot-
ton rag and abaca fibers.
Materials and equipment
provided. Dress for wet,
messy activity. $50 for class
and materials. 352-344-
9300 or ifugaopapercraft
@gmail.com.
The Painted Journal,
9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. with
lunch from noon to 1 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 2 and Feb.
9. Instructor Lisa Jennings.
One-day workshop for two
weekends in February. Cre-
ate and use the painted jour-
nal as a visual tool for self
expression. $65. Materials
included. 352-344-9300 and
sculptorgal@yahoo.com.


Mixed Water Media,
noon to 3 p.m., Sunday,
Feb. 3, Instructor Carol
Kreider. Complete a paint-
ing. Learn design, texture,
color and adding collage.
$25. Materials $5. 352-344-
9300 or 352-597-6639 or
ckreider@tampabay.rr.com.
Mask Making, 10 a.m.
to 12:15 p.m. Wednesday,
Feb 6. Instructor Keith
Gum. Learn paper mache
techniques appropriate for
mask making. Materials and
tools provided. $35. ifugao
papercraft@gmail.com and
352-344-9300.
Vision Board for 2013,
9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. with
lunch from noon to 1 p.m.
Saturday, Feb 6. Instructor
Lisa Jennings. In one-day
workshop, create vision
board for goals, dreams and
inspirations. $45. Materials
included. 352-344-9300 or
sculptorgal@yahoo.com.
Fearless Painting with
Acrylics, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
with lunch noon to 1 p.m.
Thursday, Feb 7. Instructor
Susi LaForsch. Create an
18-inch-by-24-inch acrylic
painting. $75 per workshop.
Materials included. Deposit
required. laforsch@tampa
bay.rr.com, 352-726-8710
or 352-344-9300.
Japanese Bookbind-
ing, 1 to 4 p.m. Wednesday,
Feb. 13. Instruction Keith
Gum. Create a hand-bound
Japanese book with original
stamped cover. Those who
have not attended the pa-
permaking workshop may
purchase handmade sheets
for $10. Materials and
equipment provided. $35
plus $5 material fee. ifugao
papercraft@gmail.com or
352-344 9300.
Bird photography and
creative post processing for
images of distinction, 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16.
Instructor Larry Jordan. De-
signed for digital SLR own-
ers who want to improve
their skills in capturing bird
images. Learn where to


Zeoli works on display


Special to the Chronicle
Mel Zeoli exhibits his landscape and ocean works
during February at Home Again Resale Store across
from the Chevron on County Road 486. A wine and
cheese open house will be from 4 to 6 p.m. Feb. 20.
Store hours are from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through
Saturday. Call 352-270-8861 for information.


shoot, when to shoot and how
to shoot birds standing, nest-
ing or flying. $95. larry.jordan.
pe@gmail.com or 352-344-
9300.
Relief Printmaking,
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday,
Feb. 20. Instructor Keith Gum.
Learn basic methods of cut-
ting and printing an edition of
single color linoprints. Tools
and materials provided. $65.
ifugaopapercraft@gmail.
com or 352-344-9300.
Beginning Arduino work-
shop, 6 to 7:30 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 23. Instructor Keith Gum.
Begin with basic projects and
progress to more complex ro-
botics. $15. 352-344-9300 or
352-400-9778.
Ongoing classes:
Painting with Acrylics,
1 to 3 p.m. every Friday. In-
structor Connie Townsend.
For beginners to advanced.
$15 per session. 352-400-
9757 or ConnieTown@
aol.com.


0 Painting with Oils, 1 to 3
p.m. every Tuesday. Instruc-
tor Connie Townsend. For
beginners to advanced. $15
per session. 352-400-9757
or ConnieTown@aol.com.
The Gallery is open from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednes-
day through Saturdays, and
noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday and
Sunday. 352-344-9300 or
www.floridaartistsgallery.com.
Hobby Haven classes:
Acrylic painting with
Lois, noon every Friday.
$15.
Classes are at Hobby
Haven & gifts, 1239 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., (U.S. 19), Ho-
mosassa, in Nottingham
Square next to GMC Buick.
352-794-6032.
Lorna Jean Gallery art
classes:
Learn to Draw, for ages
8 and older. $15 for group
lessons. Pay for four, re-
ceive one free. Materials in-
cluded. Group and private


lessons available. Call
Joseph at 352-564-2781.
Watercolor painting for
beginners, 1 to 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday. $15 per class.
Limit of six students. Materi-
als list and some supplies
available.
Lorna Jean Gallery is at
6136 W. Gulf-to-Lake Hwy.,
Crystal River. 352-564-2781.
Watercolor classes
with instructor Pat Sistrand,
9 a.m. Tuesday, Citrus
Springs Community Center.
$10. www.citruscountyfl.org,
click on Parks & Recreation
to register. 352-465-7007.
Floral City Needle
Artists instructs in quilting,
embroidery, knitting and
crochet for beginners to ad-
vanced levels, 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. Tuesday at Floral
City Community House be-
tween the library and the
museum on Orange Av-
enue. Free. 352-344-5896.
Jewelry making,
1 p.m. every second
Wednesday at Citrus
Springs Library, 1826 W.
Country Club Blvd. in Citrus
Springs. Instructor Edna
Mikel. Learn to make
bracelets, necklaces and
earrings. 352-489-2313.
MUSEUMS
Coastal Heritage Mu-
seum tours, 10 a.m. to


SCENE


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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013 C3

2 p.m. Tuesday through
Saturday, Coastal Heritage
Museum, 532 Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River. Extended
hours 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. the
second Saturday monthly.
Free. 352-795-1755.
Olde Mill House
Gallery & Printing Mu-
seum "Pulp to Print"
workshops, 1 to 5 p.m.
third week of every month
at 10466 W. Yulee Drive,
Old Homosassa. Next work-
shop is Saturday, Feb. 23.
Instructors Master Printer
Jim Anderson and Paper-
maker Keith Gum. $40 per
class two-hour class. Lunch
available in Museum Cafe
from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. 352-628-9411. gemini
graphics30@yahoo.com.
"Chick Schwartz:
Cedar Key Artist," Jan. 19
through March 17 at Apple-
ton Museum of Art, College
of Central Florida, 4333 E.
Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala.
Trained as an engineer,
Schwartz is a sculptor and
master at modeling. $6 for
adults; $4 for seniors 55 or
older and students 19 and
older; $3 for youths ages 10
to 18. Hours are 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. Tuesday through
Saturday, noon to 5 p.m.
Sunday and closed Mon-
days. 352-291-4455 or
www.AppletonMuseum.org.





C4 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013

SPECIAL INTEREST
27th annual Hogge-
towne Medieval Faire, Fri-
day, Feb. 1 through Sunday,
Feb. 3, atAlachua County
Fairgrounds. Special School
Day celebration Friday,
Feb. 1, features half-price
tickets. Experience a world
of medieval magic with
jousting knights, dancing
gypsies and historic heroes.
Hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Saturday and Sundays,
and 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Fri-
day, Feb. 1. $14 for adults,
$7 for children ages 5 to 17
and free for children younger
than 5. www.gvlcultural
affairs.org or 352-334-ARTS.
The Florida Chapter of
the Historical Novel Soci-
ety meeting, 1 p.m. first Sat-
urday monthly, Central
Ridge Library, 425 W. Roo-
sevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills.
Rick Seymour will use
Christopher Vogler's "The
Writer's Journey: Mythic
Structure for Writers" to
guide us in exploring the
"hero's journey," by providing
examples from "Ender's
Game," "Harry Potter," "Ter-
minator," "Lord of the Rings,"
"Star Wars" and "The Ma-
trix." Carol Megge will dis-
cuss how to start writing a
novel. Handouts provided.
352-726-0162. fchns.org.
Friends book sale,
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 2, in library meeting
room at 20351 Robinson
Road, Dunnellon. Books 50
cents. 352-438-2520.
Florida State Fair,
Feb. 7 through Feb. 18, at
Florida State Fair, 4800 U.S.
301 North, Tampa. Tickets
available at www.florida
statefair.com, Walgreens
stores or Florida State Fair-
grounds Box Office through
Feb. 6. Parking free.
Stand-up comedian
Kathleen Madigan, 8 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 8, Ruth Eckerd
Hall. $59, $49 and $39.
727-791-7400 or
www.rutheckerdhall.com.
"Red Tails," 6 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 8, at College of
Central Florida's Hampton
Center, 1501 W. Silver
Springs Blvd., Ocala. Free.
The film is the second of
the year in the Hampton
Center Film Series, which is


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


a cultural and educational
outreach program spon-
sored by the college. A brief
discussion follows each
movie. "Firelight" will be fea-
tured March 8.
For information or to re-
serve a seat, call 352-873-
5881 or visit www.CF.edu.
Music
Nature Coast Friends
of Blues "2013 Live Music
Series" at Museum Cafe,
10466 W. Yulee Drive, Old
Homosassa. $7 nonmem-
bers and $5 members.
Bring a chair, but no pets,
food or outside drink permit-
ted. Join for $15 individual
or $10 family at any series
event and get in free.
www.ncfblues.com.
Lineup includes:
0 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb.
16 13-year-old Sophie
Robitaille on vocals, key-
board and guitar followed
by performer Juniper Trio
performing lively Celtic
music.
Monthly events at
Crystal River Mall:
Southern Heart Duo, 2
to 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 9;
Doug Nicholson 3 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 14;
Drum Circle, 2 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 16;
Frankie Valli and the
Four Seasons, 8 p.m. Sat-
urday, Feb. 9, Ruth Eckerd
Hall. 727-791-7400. www.
rutheckerdhall.com.
Sunday Sampler con-
cert series, 2:30 to
4:45 p.m. Sunday, historic
Dunnellon Depot, 12061 S.
Williams St. $10 donation.
Free refreshments at inter-
mission. Proceeds support
artists who educate through
writing and singing about
Florida. 352-465-2167.
Concert dates are:
Feb. 10 Patchwork,
a five-woman band from
Gainesville.
DANCE
Sumter Singles and
Couples dinner dance,
7:30 to 10:30 p.m. the first
and third Fridays monthly
at Lake Panasoffkee Recre-
ation Park in blue building at
1582 County Road 459 off
County Road 470. Dances
open to married, couples,
singles and groups from


Cairns to meet public





LhI


Special to the Chronicle
"Cracker Cow" author Barbara Cairns announces the
publication of her new picture book series, "Gatsby's
Grand Adventures." Cairns will have Meet the Author
sessions at the following library locations: Central
Ridge Library, 3 to 5 p.m. Monday, Feb. 18; Floral City
Library, 3 to 5 p.m. Friday, Feb. 22; Homosassa
Library, 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 26; Lakes
Region Library, 4 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, March 5; and
Coastal Region Library, 3 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, March
12. For more information, contact Barbara at word
painter@tampabay.rr.com or visit www.crackercow.
com.


churches and RV parks. All
ages welcome. No alcohol.
Finger foods or soda wel-
come. 352-424-1688.
Ronnie's Academy of
Dance Musical Theatre
Workshops for children ages
7 and older, noon to 4 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 9. Deadline to
register Feb. 2. Upcoming
workshop dates March 9, April
13 and May 11. No experience
necessary. 352-795-1010.
Allan O'Neal sings and
deejays first Saturday of the
month at Citrus County
Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Hwy. (County Road
491 across from Havana
House Cafe) Lecanto. Next
dance is Saturday, Feb. 2.
Dances are from 6 to 10 p.m.
with a free dance lesson at
5:30 p.m. $5 at the door. No
food included or available.
Participants may their your
own. 352-464-0004. www.
eventsolutionsbylinda.com.
Afternoon tea dances
and classical ballroom music,
twice monthly at community
centers, hosted by deejay


Sapphire. On the second
Wednesday monthly, the
tea dance is 1:30 to 4 p.m.
at Central Citrus Community
Center, 2804 W. Marc
Knighton Court, Lecanto.
352-527-5993. On the last
Friday monthly, tea dance is
from 2 to 3 p.m. at West Cit-
rus Community Center,
8940 W. Veterans Drive, Ho-
mosassa. $5, with a portion
of the proceeds going to in-
home senior services. 352-
527-5993 or 352-795-3831.
Ballroom dancing
classes, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays, at
Citrus County Canning Cen-
ter, Lecanto. Instructor Dr.
Fred Spurlock. $5 for sin-
gles or $7 for couple. 352-
465-7007 or 352-527-7540.
Sunday Night Dances
every week at Knights of
Columbus, 2389 W. Norvell
Bryant Hwy., Lecanto.
Doors open at 6 p.m. Music
starts at 7 p.m. Coffee, tea
and soda available.
Line dancing classes
with Kathy Reynolds, 1 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday, East
Citrus Community Center,
9907 E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Inverness. $3 per


class. 352-344-9666.
Inverness Square
Dance Club's beginner
square dance lessons,
7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Tuesday,
East Citrus Community Cen-
ter, 9907 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, east of Inverness
on State Road 44. 352-860-
2090 or 352-465-700.
Country Line dancing
classes, 9 to 11 a.m.
Thursday, Beverly Hills
Recreation Center. $3 non-
members. 352-746-4882 or
352-527-3738.
Citrus Squares, 7 p.m.
Thursday, fellowship hall of
First United Methodist
Church of Dunnellon, 21501
W. State Road 40, Dunnel-
Ion. 352-489-1785 or 352-
465-2142.
African dance
classes at Central Ridge
Library. Free. 352-249-
7283.

BUZZ LISTINGS
For the festivals,
theater and farmers'
markets listing, see
Page C8.


F Stroll Down Memory Lane

With The Songs Of The 60's.


,Kenny Vance & The Planotones
iCome a Lile Bit Closer", "ora ia", "This magic omenti


Tommy Mara & the Crests
"16 Candles", "Step By Step", "Gee", "The Angels Listened In"


Sun., March 10, 2013 at 2:00 PM
Curtis Peterson Auditorium
3810 West Educational Path Lecanto, FL 34461


To benefit
Citrus Memorial Health System


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Page C5 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1,2013



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Shriners to host
spring picnic
Citrus Shrine Club will
host the spring picnic for
Melha Temple of Massa-
chusetts at 2 p.m. Satur-
day, Feb. 2, at Citrus
Shrine Club, 468 Woodlake
Ave., Inverness.
Barbecued chicken with
all the trimmings will be
served while folks enjoy
live music. Shriners, Ma-
sons and friends are wel-
come. Donation is $12.
For more information,
call Marcy or Cliff at 352-
419-7088, or Malcom at
413-775-2555.
Relay team
plans yard sale
Lecanto Primary School
Relay For Life Team "Hip-
pies" (Heroes In Playing
Praying Inspiring Encour-
aging Supporting) will
stage a yard sale
fundraiser from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, to
raise money for the Ameri-
can Cancer Society effort.
The sale will be at Don
Crigger Real Estate, 2950
W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Lecanto.
Learn to act,
sing, dance
Ronnie's Academy of
Dance will offer Musical
Theatre Workshops for chil-
dren ages 7 and older from
noon to 4 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 9. Deadline to register
is Saturday, Feb. 2.
Upcoming workshop
dates are March 9, April 13
and May 11.
No experience is neces-
sary to participate. Call
352-795-1010.
Native plant
group to meet
The Citrus Native Plant
Society will meet at 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 5, at the
Lion's Club in Beverly Hills,
72 Beverly Circle, Beverly
Hills.
Speaker will be Kristin
Wood, administrative assis-
tant at the Dade Battlefield
Historic State Park in Bush-
nell.
All are welcome. For
more information, email
citrusnps@gmail.com.
Scouts to host
spaghetti dinner
Boy Scout Troop 462 will
host its 16th annual
Spaghetti Dinner and Chi-
nese Auction from 4 to
7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, at
Hope Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 9425 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs.
Donation is $6 at the
door or $5 for presale tick-
ets, and $3 for children
younger than 11. Dinner in-
cludes salad, spaghetti with
sauce (meat or plain), drink
and homemade dessert.
For more information,
call 352-422-4741.


Still working hard PosNstes
ost e77 sluatse
open house


Even after holiday season, Salvation Army continues its efforts


Special to the Chronicle

Nearly half of all Americans now
rate as poor or low income, accord-
ing to the U.S. Census Bureau.
"With persistently high unemploy-
ment and underemployment, rising
living costs and stagnating wages,
there are many in our community
who are hurting. That's why our An-
nual Find Drive Campaign is so im-
portant," Lt. Vanessa Miller of The
Salvation Army of Citrus County.
"After the holiday season some
people think The Salvation Army
takes a break," Miller said. "No
more bell ringing. No more Christ-
mas kettles. No more Angel Trees.
We just wait until next year to help
those in need. But nothing could be


further from the truth."
"Every day The Salvation Army is
there to assist those in need with
food, shelter, budgetary classes and
emergency assistance among other
services. With the help of our sup-
porters, in 2012, we provided life-
saving services to 1,377 Citrus
County families in desperate need,"
she said.
The Salvation Army needs help
from the community. "Our goal is to
raise $17,000 to support 150 people
in the next 30 days," Miller said. "We
want to be ready to respond to those
who need our help in 2013 and, with
the support of our friends in Citrus
County we will."
Miller said that within the coming
year, The Salvation Army expects to:


Provide grants for rent, utility
assistance, medicine and food for
more than 1,800 families in desper-
ate need.
Visit more than 1,567 lonely,
hurting people in nursing homes
and correctional facilities through
its Community Care Program.
Provide more than 10,000 meals
to hungry men, women and chil-
dren.
Give 30 disadvantaged children
the opportunity to experience sum-
mer camp at Camp Keystone.
To donate to The Salvation Army,
call 352-513-4960, mail a gift to PO.
Box 1630, Lecanto, FL 34460-1630, or
make a donation online at www.
uss.salvationarmyorg/uss/www uss
citruscounty.nsf.




Feeding
the county

Tom Chancey, executive
director for the Community
Food Bank, recently spoke
to the Rotary Club of
Homosassa Springs about
411' how the operation
distributes food to
organizations in Citrus
County. Pictured are Tom
Chancey, right, and
immediate Past President
Luke Todd. For more
information about the
Rotary Club of Homosassa
Springs, visit on the Web
at www.homosassa
springsrotary.org, and see
the calendar for a listing of
guest speakers. Visitors
are welcome at the
meetings at 7 a.m.
Thursday at Luigi's in the
Sweetbay shopping plaza
in Homosassa.
Special to the Chronicle


Something for everyone at Art Center


Whether you are a painter, death discover a book of rare stamps
photographer, theater pa- that contains an extremely rare pair.
tron or just interested in If the stamps are authentic, they are
theater or the visual arts, there is worth millions, but it is not clear
something for you at the which sister owns the
Art Center during Febru- stamps.
ary One sister wants to sell
Eighty paintings from the stamps, while the
the recent show are on other resists for sentimen-
display through the tal reasons.
month in the AE building Three seedy, high-
of the Art Center of Cit- stakes collectors become
rus County, 2644 N. An- aware of the stamps and
napolis Ave. in Citrus seek to acquire them for
Hills. their own personal gain,
These paintings in- Sharon Harris and the tension builds as
clude abstracts, realistic ART TALK the characters struggle to
art and mixed media. gain control of the stamps.
The show attracted art- Also during February,
work from Citrus and surrounding the Camera Club will begin weekly
counties, and was judged by artists training sessions in Photoshop, and
from Tampa and from the Appleton the club will hold competitions.
Museum in Ocala. The regular meeting of the Cam-
On Feb. 15, the season play "Mau- era Club is at 7 p.m. the first Monday
ritius" opens for a three-weekend of each month and anyone inter-
run. ested in photography is welcome.
The play is about two estranged The Art Center Academy of the
half-sisters, who after their mother's Arts is offering classes in acrylic


painting, abstract art, acting, choral
music and youth theater, and the
youth theater group will present 'A
Midsummer Night's Dream" in May
On March 4 and 5, works will be
received for a member's exhibit of
art, which will be on display during
March.
There are many opportunities for
education, participation and appre-
ciation of the arts on the Art Center
campus.
Visitors are welcome, whether it is
to view the art on display or attend
one of our plays. You are always wel-
come to drop by, join in our activities
and explore the many opportunities
that are available on the campus.

Sharon Harris is an artist and
former president of the Art Center
and currently serves as the director
of the Art Center's Academy of the
Arts. For show tickets or more
information, call the box office
at 352-746-7606 or visit
www.artcenterofcitruscoun tyorg.


American Legion Allen
Rawls Post 77 will have an
open house and dedication
ceremony of its newly ac-
quired building, formerly In-
verness S&W Highlands
Civic Center, at 4375 Little
Al Point, Inverness, at 10
a.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, with
the open house to follow
until 3 p.m.
Both the dedication and
open house are open to the
public. For more informa-
tion, call the post at 352-
860-2981 or 352-476-2134.
Sign up now for
DAR card party
The Fort Cooper Chap-
ter, Daughters of the Ameri-
can Revolution, will host a
Military Card Party
Wednesday, Feb. 20, at the
Crystal River Woman's
Club, 320 S. Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
and play begins at 7 p.m.
Cost is $12.
There will be refresh-
ments and door prizes. For
tickets and information, call
Carol Weiser at 352-
726-8071.
Society to do
a 'Class Act'
Local educational
women's society Delta
Kappa Gamma will spon-
sor a "Class Act" on Thurs-
day evening, Feb. 7, at
The Grove.
Women's fashions will
be provided by Karma re-
sale shop. Proceeds from
the fashion show will sup-
port CASA and educational
scholarships that benefit
local teachers.
The models will feature
notable women from the
community, from business
and educational areas.
Master of ceremonies will
be Scott Adams. Vendors
will present door prizes, as
well as promote their
wares.
The $10 ticket includes
hors d'oervres, chances on
a raffle basket and door
prizes. There will be a so-
cial hour from 6:30 to
7:30 p.m. before the fash-
ion show begins.
For information, call
Bonnie Ignico at 352-
726-4236.
Chorus seeks
male singers
The Citrus County
Chapter "Chorus of the
Highlands" of the Barber-
shop Harmony Society
seeks men to join the
group, which has been in
the area for more than
27 years.
The chorus meets at
6:30 p.m. Tuesday in In-
verness. Although the abil-
ity to read music is an
asset, it's not a priority.
Call 352-382-0336 for
more information.


religion NOT


Hernando SDA
Hernando Seventh-day Adventist services
start at 11 a.m. Saturday. A fellowship lunch-
eon will follow the worship service; all are
welcome.
The adult Sabbath school program begins
at 9:15 a.m. Saturday, followed at 10 a.m. by
Bible study. Classes for children are available
at 9:30 a.m.
There is a mid-week meeting at 6 p.m.
each Wednesday.
The church is at 1880 N. Trucks Ave.,
Hernando; phone 352-344-2008.
Glad Tidings SDA
Sabbath school begins at 9 a.m. Saturday
with song, then study, at Glad Tidings SDA
Church. Divine hour follows at 11 a.m.
Elder Marks will bring the bread of life this
Sabbath. A vegan lunch follows the service.
Bible study is at 6 p.m. Thursday.
CHIP (Coronary Health Improvement Pro-
gram) alumni meet at 5 p.m. the first Monday
monthly. Interested persons welcome.
For more information, call Bob at 352-
628-1743. The church is at 520 N.E. Third
Ave. (next to the BP station), Crystal River.


Homosassa SDA
Pastor Dale Wolfe will lead the worship
service at 11 a.m. Saturday. He will also lead
the 10 a.m. adult Bible class.
The 9:30 a.m. Sabbath school will be led by
Bob Halstead. Wally Zollins will talk about
"Creation and Morality" at 10 a.m. Sabbath
school on Sunday.
Tuesday Bible study is at 7 p.m.
Study group is at 10 a.m. Thursday. The
men's study group meets at 6:30 p.m.
Thursday. The food pantry will be open from
3:30 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 5.
The public is welcome at all events. The
church is at 5863 Cardinal St. For more infor-
mation, call Bob Halstead at 352-382-7753.

Inverness SDA
Sabbath school song service starts at 9:10
a.m. Saturday. Children's classes begin at 9:30;
toddler class is at 9:45; adult bible study is at
9:50 a.m.
Sabbath services are at 11 a.m. Saturday
and Clyde Thomas will be speaker.
The Revelation Seminar continues at 7 p.m.
Monday and at 7 p.m. Wednesday.
The Thrift Store is open 9 a.m.


to noon Wednesday.
The church is at 638 S. Eden Gardens,
4.5 miles east of Inverness off State Road 44.
The church phone number is 352-726-
9311. See www.sda-inverness.org.
Advent Hope
Bible study is at 10 a.m. Saturday for all
ages. The worship service begins at
11:30 a.m. Saturday.
After the service, there is a weekly potluck.
Vegetarian store is open from 10 a.m. to
noon each Wednesday.
The church is at 428 N.E. Third Ave.,
Crystal River. Call 352-794-0071 or visit
online at www.adventhopechurch.com.
Congregation Beth Sholom
The Genesis Project continues as class re-
sumes Feb. 4. An intensive, in-depth analysis
and discussion of the entire text of the Book of
Genesis conducted in English. We will employ
the classical ancient, medieval and modern
commentators of the biblical text; we will uti-
lize archaeology, anthropology, history, linguis-
tics, comparative literature; we will consult
traditional texts of Jewish mysticism and the
stories and legends of other near-eastern civi-


lizations; and we will use drama and literary
analysis to study both the prose and poetry of
the biblical narrative. It is expected that this
course will continue over several semesters. It
is offered from 7 to 8 p.m. Monday for
17 sessions. Fee is $5 per session, plus
textbook.
History of Zionism & Israel class begins
Feb. 4. How did a tiny, backwater province of
the Ottoman Empire become the modern
state of Israel we know today in about 100
years? The course will examine the origins of
modern political Zionism, the development of
the Jewish community during the British Man-
date period, the struggle for independence
and the history of Israel since the establish-
ment of the state in 1948. It is offered from
8:15 to 9:15 p.m. Monday for 17 sessions.
Fee is $5 per session, plus textbook.
Congregation Beth Sholom with Hazzan
Mordecai Kamlot as cantor/spiritual leader, is
at 102 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, and offers
spirited and participatory-style Friday (7:30
p.m.) and Saturday (9:30 a.m.) Shabbat serv-
ices, as well as social and cultural activities.
Call 352-643-0995, or email mkamlot@
gmail.com.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.


IA


ES






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRIDAY EVENING FE BRUARY 1,20133 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House Dl: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:0017:30 8:00 1 8:30 1 9:00 1 9:30 10:00110:30 11:00 11:30
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North 02-01-13
J 10 3
V A J 10 5 4
Q J 10
6 3
West East
8 852 4974
V 7 6 V K 2
K952 A 8 6 3
4 9 8 7 4 4 A 10 5 2
South
SAK Q 6
V Q 9 8 3
+ 7 4
K QJ
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
1 NT Pass 2 Pass
3 V Pass 4 V All pass

Opening lead: 4 9

SBridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

J. William Fulbright, a senator from Arkansas
for 30 years and the longest-serving chairman of
the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, said,
"We must dare to think 'unthinkable' thoughts.
We must learn to explore all the options and
possibilities that confront us."
That certainly applies to bridge players. In
today's deal, look at the North and East hands.
South is in four hearts. West leads the club nine:
three, ace, jack. How should East plan the de-
fense?
North's two-diamond response was a transfer
bid, showing five or more hearts. South's jump
to three hearts, a superaccept, promised a max-
imum with four hearts and a doubleton some-
where.
Bridge is full of little ditties that were de-
signed to help the less capable players. Here,
many Easts will think of "return partner's lead."
Yesterday we learned that playing a club back
at trick two is not necessarily fatal. A crafty
South will win that trick and cash his third club,
discarding a spade from the dummy before tak-
ing the heart finesse. But the defense can still
triumph.
However, at trick one, East should analyze his
partner's lead. It must be top of nothing. So why
continue clubs? It cannot help. Instead, East
should shift to a spade or diamond, and given
the dummy, a spade seems the natural choice.
South does best to win with his ace and cash
his two clubs, discarding a spade from the
dummy But East should note his partner's dis-
couraging spade two. Then, when in with the
heart king, East should cash the diamond ace
and (seeing West's encouraging nine) continue
with another diamond to defeat the contract.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
MUDIHI

.'1-T, r I., Services, Inc

LAKEN



CRUNHI'



FRADEO
| ^^T


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


--



.
route.





THE TRIAL THROUGH THE
SWAMP CAU5EP THE
CRO055-COUNTRY
RACE TO ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer he "
here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday Jumbles: DIRTY KNELT BROKEN FATHOM
Yesterday Answer: When developing a new armored military vehicle dur-
ing World War One, they formed a THINKTANK


ACROSS
1 Diner
sandwich, for
short
4 Coffee holder
7 In shape
10 Mauna -
11 "La Bonita"
13 Kid
14 Here, to Henri
15 Felt remorse
16 Celestial bear
17 Swiped
19 Astonish
20 Clairvoyance,
briefly
21 Ms.Lauder
23 Interrogate
26 Some nobles
28 Boxing stat
29 Commercials
30 Main artery
34 "If I Ran the
Zoo" author
36 Beret
38 Tin Man's
need
39 Regular
routine


41 Warm-hearted
42 Porcelain
44 Chop down
46 Revolutionary
Trotsky
47 Pillows for
daybeds
52 Crowning
point
53 out a living
54 Potpie veggie
55 Wharf
56 Glut
57 Comic strip
scream
58 Tissue layer
59 Of course!
60 Cotton gin
name

DOWN
1 Object on
radar
2 Focal points
3 Shadow
4 Thick muds
5 Seized the
throne


Answer to Previous Puzzle


M1 1 U- I N I =- I M L r
ARN AMO
CIAO MEMO TWO
ASTRO RIE F U HS
A L I A D AiF E L
NE EO L TOR 0


: A I NO
\ U N T I IE
3 E C ON

6 Great
merriment
7 Strong suit
8 Debate topic
9 "Faster a
speeding
bullet"


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


E R E

ATLL
SEAMYY
12 Viper
13 Precisely
(2 wds.)
18 Shriner's hat
22 dunk
23 Gal. fractions
24 Luau
strummer
25 Promise
to pay
27 spumante
29 Big -
elephant
31 Louis XIV, e.g.
32 Involuntary
movement
33 Stein filler
35 Black eye
37 Jock
40 Infants
41 RCMP patrol
zone
42 B. DeMille
43 Comfy and
cozy
45 Winding
curves
46 Reindeer
herder
48 Fine
49 Fencer's
weapon
50 Stagger
51 H.H. Munro


2-1 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS

WANT MORE PUZZLES?
Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


Dear Annie: Two years
ago, my son's fiancee
recommended we ro-
tate who hosts Christmas din-
ner. That year, she and my son
went to her mom's house, and
last year they were supposed
to come to mine. In-
stead, they went to
her mom's again
and were upset I
didn't want to tag
along. Annie, at the
time, my 73-year-
old mother was in a
rehab facility.
There was no way I
could bring her
along for dinner,
and I refused to
leave her alone for ANN
the holiday MAIL
A week before
Christmas, my
future daughter-in-law sent
me a text asking me to recon-
sider I again said no. She ac-
cidentally texted me instead
of my son and said, "Your mom
is a nasty liar." I was dumb-
founded. I immediately got an-
other text saying, "I'm sorry,
but my feelings are hurt." I for-
warded both of these to my
son, who said he was at work
and didn't have time to deal
with this.
Right after the holiday, my
mother fell and broke her hip.
She ended up needing two
surgeries. She refused addi-
tional treatment, saying she'd
had enough. She went into
hospice care and died a few
days later.
My son became angry with
me, saying I deliberately
shortened Mom's life by put-
ting her into hospice. My son's
fiancee still has not apolo-
gized for what she texted. I
haven't heard from either of
them since.


I am hurt and upset. I not
only lost my mother, but it
seems I've lost my son, as well.
How do I handle this mess?
My husband and I are both los-
ing sleep. Hurt
Dear Hurt: Our condolences
on the loss of your
mother. Your son
may be feeling
guilty for pressur-
ing you to abandon
Grandma for his fi-
ancee's Christmas
dinner, not realiz-
ing how short her
time was. It is not
uncommon to de-
flect that by blam-
ing someone else.
IE'S And his fiancee
BOX may be encourag-
ing his anger to-
ward you, because
it gets her off the hook entirely
Please forgive them so you
can work on your grieving
process without this addi-
tional sadness. Keep the lines
of communication open and
try to maintain a certain su-
perficiality. We hope this will
allow the relationship to move
forward.
Dear Annie: We are getting
tired of people telling us the
use of capital letters in our
emails means we are "shout-
ing" at them. This idea should
be tossed out.
We are visually impaired
and have friends who have
glaucoma, eye cancer and de-
veloping cataracts or are post
cataract surgery And some of
us have macular degeneration
in various stages. We are
blessed we can still use our
computers, but are unable to
read the small print of most
messages. We need and appre-
ciate the larger capital letters.
Please tell your readers to


think outside the box before
criticizing those of us with lim-
ited vision. Windows to the
Soul
Dear Windows: We are sym-
pathetic to your plight, but
using all caps looks like shout-
ing to most people. Of course,
if that's the only way you can
see the type, by all means con-
tinue. However, please know
there are other ways to in-
crease the type size. Try hold-
ing CTRL while pressing the
plus sign or rolling your
mouse wheel forward. Or hit
"reply," and then highlight the
text and increase the font size.
Your browser may offer other
options in the manual or
online.
Dear Annie: Please tell "No
Name, No Location" to get in
touch with a local Cub Scout
or Boy Scout troop for help
shoveling snow or cutting
their grass. Both groups of
scouts are required to perform
community service. When I
was a Cubmaster, we organ-
ized children to rake leaves
for some elderly residents.
Paying it back by volunteering
is a win-win. Problem
Solved


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate, 737
3rd Street, Hermosa Beach,
CA 90254. To find out more
aboutAnnie's Mailbox and
read features by other Cre-
ators Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www crea tors. com.


--I-- I


Im


m


C6 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT


I
41





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


Pickles
EARL, sTOP CMAN NGN
T1E CHIAMNEL! ;JU6-T
ICK ONE ANM7 LEAVE
If fl4nRe -


PS$T...OU'RE CRAZY...
DON'T DO IT... YOU'LL
JUST MAKE A FOOL
OUT OF YOURSELF...


I WILL NOT!











CHA01MG CHAN0ELE






..' .r- '.


Sally Forth


EVENTUALLY SHE'LL HAVE EXCEPT FOR THE FACT SHE CARRIES
TO GET BOOKS FOR HER ALL HER TEXTBOOKS WITH HER
NEXT CLASS AND THEN BECA~ e SHE LOVES TO CROSS-
SHE AND I CAN T .L, . r THINGS.
jTINFO I COULD&
HAVE USED
1iL .. ,\45 MINUTES


Dilbert


EXCUSE ME, MA'AM...
I WA$ ANSWERING
ONE OF MY
.1 ANq DETRACTORS...


For Better or For Worse


FOMoRRO J, L'rM STRRITNG
fR STORY HOUR FOR
B RElSBOiLEy.









Beetle Bailey


LET'S SEE..,YOU
HAD ONE FOR
YOUR POOR
RATING (
BY THEi
PENTAGON


) ONE FOR THE STOCK
MARKET DIPANP ONE
FOR YOUR GOLFSCORE


The Grizzwells


NOW, I SU6GEST
YOU HAVE A COFFEE
FOR THE ROAD










YtP,,..CKILY, I TRN1HK 15 TT
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The Born Loser


JTELiT YI(OU'RE 6 NA\LIRNG TOT T'S NOT REALLY GAL LIUNG
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Doonesbury


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Arlo and Janis


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BUT... I JUST WANT
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TodasM MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Warm Bodies" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Bullet to the Head" (R) ID required. 1 p.m., 3:50
p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters" (R) ID re-
quired. 4 p.m. No passes.
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters" (R) ID re-
quired. In 3D. 1:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:05 p.m. No
passes.
"Mama" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:25 p.m.
"Broken City" (R) ID required. 4:10 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Les Miserables" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 6:50 p.m.
"Zero Dark Thirty" (R) ID required. 12:50 p.m.,
3:45 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:45 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Warm Bodies" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 2 p.m., 4:20


p.m., 7:30 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Bullet to the Head" (R) ID required. 1:45 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Parker" (R) ID required. 1:40 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Movie 43" (R) ID required. 5 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters" (R) ID re-
quired. In 3D. 1:15 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:45 p.m. No
passes.
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters" (R) ID re-
quired. 4:25 p.m. No passes.
"Mama" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:50 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"Zero Dark Thirty" (R) ID required. 1:05 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Silver Lings Playbook" (PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 4:35
p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Lincoln" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:30 p.m.


Blondie
I'M SICK OF GREEDY CEOs RAKING IN
PROFITS ON THE BACKS OF
S"US LITTLE
PEOPLE" WELL,
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-- "8NEVER
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the gym as long as he has us."


Betty


Frank & Ernest


T'M $ORRY, 51R, THAT LOOPHOt -

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INIFOPMATION LOO)P!





WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: 7 slenb yV


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Previous Solution: "A bad review is like baking a cake with all the best ingredi-
ents and having someone sit on it." Danielle Steel
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 2-1


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COMICS


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013 C7






C8 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013

THEATER
Auditions for Boeing-
Boeing will be at 7 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 4 and Tues-
day, Feb. 5, at Ocala Civic
Theatre.
Bernard, an American ar-
chitect in Paris, has a girl in
every airport. He's juggling
three glamorous flight atten-
dants at once: Gloria the
American, Gabriella the Ital-
ian, and Gretchen the Ger-
man. Although Bernard is
meticulous in keeping the
three women in the dark
about each other, his
housekeeper Berthe really
masterminds the deception,
even though she heartily
disapproves. When his old
college chum Robert comes
to visit, he too is swept into
Bernard's scheme.
Then technology inter-
venes: The introduction of
the newer and faster Boeing
jet throws off Bernard's
carefully orchestrated
timetables, and all three
women arrive at once. It
takes the frantic combined
efforts of Bernard, Robert,
and Berthe to keep up the
charade as this comedy
takes flight into farce with
international flair.
Roles available are:
Bernard (35-45)-
American architect living in
Paris with a standard Ameri-
can accent.
Robert (35-45) -
Friend of Bernard's visiting
from Wisconsin with a Mid-
western accent.
Gloria (25-35)-
American TWA air hostess
with New York accent.
Gabriella (25-35) -
Italian Alitalia air hostess
with heavy Italian accent.
Gretchen (25-35) -
German Lufthansa air host-
ess with heavy German
accent.
Berthe (45-60) -
Bernard's disdainful French
cook and housekeeper with
heavy French accent.
Play requires all actors
(except Berthe) to be com-
fortable engaging in a lot of
displays of affection and
passion. Copies of the script
are available at the Theatre
and may be checked out
with a $10 refundable de-
posit. Those auditioning will
be asked to do cold read-
ings. The director wants to
hear auditioners attempt the
appropriate accent.


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Rehearsals begin at 7 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 11, and are
generally Monday through
Friday from 7 to 10 p.m. at
the Theatre. Bring a list of po-
tential conflicts to auditions.
Performances of Boeing-
Boeing will be from March 21
to April 14. For more informa-
tion, call the box office at
352-236-2274 or visit
www.ocalacivictheatre.com.
"Funny Money," dinner
theater, Feb. 6 through Feb.
10, Webber center at Col-
lege of Central Florida's
Ocala campus, 3001 S.W.
College Road. Dinner at 5:45
p.m. Wednesday through
Sunday. Matinee perform-
ances at 12:15 p.m. Satur-
day and Sunday. Doors open
15 minutes before the meal.
$55 per person or $440 for a
table of eight.
"Funny Money" features a
middle-aged businessman
who picks up the wrong
briefcase on his subway trip
home from work to celebrate
his birthday dinner. When he
reaches into the briefcase
for his gloves and scarf, he
finds an unexpected stash of
used currency.
For information or tickets,
call Laura Wright at 352-
854-2322, ext. 1416, in
Marion County; 352-746-
6721, ext. 1416, in Citrus
County; or 352-493-9533,
ext. 1416, in Levy County.
Ruth Eckerd Hall
performances:
"A Chorus Line," 8 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 26, and 2
and 8 p.m. Wednesday,
Feb. 27.
UNITY Mystery Dinner
Theater Team mysteries:
Friday, March 15, and
Saturday, March 16 -
"Murder Most Green."
$20 per play or $60 for
season tickets. UNITY Mys-
tery Dinner Theater at 2628
W. Woodview Lane,
Lecanto. Doors open at
6:30 p.m. Call 352-746-
1270 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tues-
day through Friday.
FESTIVALS
24th annual Will
McLean Music Festival
featuring more than 50 of
Florida's finest acoustic
singer/songwriters, Friday,
March 8, through Sunday,
March 10, at Sertoma
campground, 85 Myers
Road, Brooksville. This year,
festival will honor Guy
LaBree, the state's foremost


Death and dinner


Special to the Chronicle
MurderS She Wrote Inc. presents My Big Fat Italian
Funeral at 6:15 p.m. Feb. 28, at Spaghetti
Warehouse, 1911 N. 13th St., Tampa. Dinner and show
costs $34.95. Call 813-248-1720 for information.


painter of Florida subjects.
Performances begin at 10
a.m. Saturday and Sunday.
Free workshops offered
include:
Basic fingerstyle guitar
with Pete Price;
Mandolin with Red and
Chris Henry;
Harmonica with Stan
Geberer;
Fiddle with Katie Bailey;
Advanced fingerstyle with
Clyde Walker;
Wooden flutes with Ray
Wood;
Dulcimer with Aaron
O'Rourke; and
Voice with Amy Carol
Webb.
$32 in advance and $37 at
gate. One-day tickets $17 Fri-
day; $20 Saturday; $17 Sun-
day. Children younger than 12
free. Camping is $25 a night
with electricity and water; $10
for tent camping. www.will
mclean.com or 352-465-2167.
The Cedar Key Spring
Fine Arts Festival, April 13
and 14. www.cedarkeyarts
festival .com.
Florida Elvis Festival,
April 26 through 28, including
the original stage production of
"When Elvis Came to Town,"
at the Old Courthouse Heritage
Museum in Inverness. Week-
end activities include:
Elvis in concert featuring
Ted Torres, 7 p.m. Friday, April
26. $25.
"When Elvis Came to
Town" production, 2 and 7:30
p.m. Saturday, April 27. $25.
Gospel music and


brunch, noon Sunday, April
28, at Historic Citrus County
Courthouse. $25. Limit of
120 people.
Stumpknockers Elvis
Blue Suede Shoes 5K Run/
Walk, 8 a.m. Saturday, April
27. www.Elvis5Krun.com.
Pre-registration $20. or $25
on race day.
All-Day Elvis Festival,
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday,
April 27, Courthouse
Square in Inverness.
All You Wanted to
Know about Elvis, 11 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, April
27, Historic Citrus County
Courthouse. $5 donation.
Question-and-answer ses-
sions with David English,
Marion Cocke and local ex-
tras who participated in the
filming of Elvis's ninth
movie. 352-341-6427, 352-
341-6488, www.elvisin
florida.com or www.citrus
countyhistoricalsociety.org.
FARMERS' MARKETS
Inverness Farmers'
Market, about 30 vendors,
fresh produce, homemade
crafts, baked goods and
more, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every
Saturday, Inverness Gov-
ernment Center parking lot.
352-726-2611.
Beverly Hills Arts,
Crafts and Farmers Mar-
ket, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. first
and third Fridays of each
month at Lake Beverly Park.
Vendor spaces $10. www.
bhcivicassociation.com.
352-746-2657.
Dunnellon's First Sat-


MUSIC REHEARSALS
IN-COUNTY GROUPS
* Second Sunday Sunset Drum Circle, two hours
before sunset, Sundays, Fort Island Trail Beach
Park, Crystal River, at far end of beach. Circle be-
gins an hour and a half before sunset. Bring
drums and percussion instruments. Chair neces-
sary; beverages optional. 352-344-8009 or 352-
746-0655.
* Chorus of The Highlands, the Citrus County
chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society, re-
hearses at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday weekly at First
United Methodist Church, 3896 S. Pleasant Grove
Road, Inverness, 34452. Male singers welcome.
352-382-0336.
* Citrus County chapter of "Chorus of the High-
lands" Barbershop Harmony Society, 6:30 p.m.
every Tuesday in Inverness. 352-382-0336.
* The Nature Coast Community Band, rehearses
from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday at Citrus County
Canning Plant Auditorium on Southern Street,
Lecanto. 352-746-7567. nccommunityband@
earthlink.net.
* Citrus Community Concert Choir Inc., rehearse
at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Faith Lutheran Church Fel-
lowship Hall, Lecanto. New members welcome to
audition beginning at 6:30 p.m. 352-628-3492.
* Sugarmill Chorale rehearses from 7 to 9 p.m.
Thursday in choir room at First Baptist Church,
North Citrus Avenue, Crystal River. Enter the
building through the door under the black canopy
by the big trees and exit the same way. sugarmill
choraledirector@yahoo.com. 352-697-2309.
OUT-OF-COUNTY GROUPS
* Hernando Harmonizers, part of Men's Barber-
shop Harmony Society, open its doors at 6:45 p.m.
and start rehearsals at 7 p.m. Monday, Nativity
Lutheran Church fellowship hall, 6363 Commer-
cial Way, Spring Hill. Written arrangements, train-
ing techniques and professional direction
provided. 352-556-3936 or 352-666-0633.
BASSharmonySingR@aol.com.
* Summer Springs Sweet Adelines Chorus invites
women to rehearse from 1:30 to 4 p.m. Monday
at St. John's Lutheran Church, 10495 Sunset
Harbor Road, Summerfield. Membership not re-
quired. Carpool available from Inverness. 352-
726-3323.
* Nature Coast Festival Singers' rehearsals, 7
p.m. Monday, Nativity Lutheran Church, 6363
Commercial Way (State Road 50), Weeki Wachee.
352-597-2235.
Music rehearsals run at least once a month, space permitting.


urday Village Market, in-
cludes a variety of street
vendors, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
first Saturday monthly, Dun-
nellon's Historic District on
West Pennsylvania Avenue,
Cedar and Walnut streets.
352-465-2225.
Floral City Market
Day, 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.,
second Saturday monthly,
Floral City, U.S. 41. Pro-
duce, homemade crafts,
plants, baked goods, etc,
available. frugalfrogdiva@
gmail.com or 352-344-
1000.
Market Day with Art &


Treasures, an outdoor
event with plants, produce,
arts, crafts, collectibles and
more, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. sec-
ond Saturdays on the
grounds of Heritage Village,
657 N. CitrusAve., Crystal
River. 352-564-1400.
Herry's Market Day,
8 a.m. to noon, last Satur-
day of the month at Hospice
Thrift Shoppe, 8471 W.
Periwinkle Lane, Ho-
mosassa (behind Wendy's,
east of U.S. 19). Herry's
Market Day is offering free
vendor space. Space is lim-
ited. 352-527-2020.


To place an ad, call 563-5966




Classifieds

In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fa: 35)56-565 1Tol.re:(88)82-34 1E ai:*lasf0dschoi 0eol 0eco Iwbste w wchonclolie 0o


**DINETTE SET**
4 ft Glass top w/4
chairs on casters,
good cond. $200
(352) 897-4739

CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397

16' BASS BOAT, 48hp
Johnson, smooth runn-
ing, T&T, electric motor,
depth finder, 2 batteries
& gas tanks, rough
trailer. $800.00. Inglis
352-447-0217

$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389

48" Believed Glass
Dining Room Table, 4
chairs, upholstered
seats, decorative
painting back & legs
$150. Lazy Boy Rocker
Recliner $75. Pine
Ridge (352) 270-8116


AUCTION
Every Friday
Night @ 6pm
Estate Liquidations
and Auctions LLC
628 SE HWY 19
Crystal River
352-228-4920
estateliauidations
andauctions.com
AU 4381 /AB 3202


BEAT ANY PRICE
Paint & Power wash
Lawn & Trees Trim
Jim (352) 246-2585


BEVERLY HILLS
Fri & Sat 8am-2pm
HH items, Jewelry, Furn
44 S Jackson St
Beverly Hills
Fri. 2/1 & Sat. 2/2
8:00AM-Until
98 S Columbus St
Brooksville Deeded
spacious, shaded cnr
lot, 1BR/1BA, Large FL
room, Large storage
shed & patio. 55+ RV
Park w/ heated pool,
and music activities,
$36,000 352-848-0448,
352- 428-0462 anytime
Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245
CHEVROLET
'01 Corvette Corvette
6 speed, black on
black, $14,500.
(352) 613-2333
CITRUS HILLS
AREA, HERITAGE
55+ Gated Community
3/2 builders model,
never lived in, $1000
mnth. 352-270-8953
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfront Priv.
Rm./Ba. share kit. $400
everything Included
352-875-5998
Custom Home,
3 bedroom, 2%/ bath,
w/Master w/DBL
walk-ins + bath +
den/off. 2+ car garage.
1 Acre. MUST SEE!
$249,900.
352-860-0444
DODGE
1999, Work Van
138k miles, mechani-
cally sound $2,500
obo (352) 344-2132


GT 500 MOWER
25 HP, $1,200.
(352) 344-2268
EASY GO Golf Cart
Excellent Condition,
good tires, almost new
batteries, enclosure,
$1500
352-527-3125
FLORAL CITY
UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCH
Used Treasure Sale
Feb 2nd 8:30 till noon.
8478 E. Marvin St.
FORD
'01, Taurus, 140K miles
Ice cold Air, good tires,
brakes, runs good,
$2,200, 352-201-6958
FORD
1999 F150 Good
condition, 4 new tires
$4200 352-270-7420
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
KENMORE 25'CU
STAINESS STEEL side
by side, w/water & ice,
4yrs old Super Buy!
$750 352-897-4196
MANATEE
TOUR
CAPTAIN
NEEDED
Full Time
(352) 777-1796
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500


MUSTANG
1985, coupe, 58k mile
new tires, 4 cyl, auto
$2000 obo
(352) 228-4012
MUSTANG GT 03
63k,ShowCar,Super
charger, lots of goodies!
Chrome, $18k OBO
(352) 228-4012
NISSAN
'04, 350 Z, Convertible,
2 Door, automatic, sil-
ver, 53k miles, $12,500
obo (352) 382-4239
OLDSMOBILE '99
Cutlass, custom, 4 DR,
loaded, good mi., V6,
cruise, tilt, gar. clean
$3,375. (352) 212-9383
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300
PINE RIDGE
Fri. 1 & Sat. 2, 8a-2p
Furn., Clothes, Hsehld.
5227 W Pine Ridge Blv.
ROCKWOOD
'04, 29 ft., Ultra Lite,
SS. Appls Qn. Bd., Full
Bath, all equip, incd
$8,500 obo, 382-0153
ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
-k 352 422-7279**
Toshiba,
50" Big Screen TV
You Move
(352) 447-1553
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369
WELLCRAFT 1989
18' Sport C/C, T top,
150 Yam. Alum TIr,
Great Cond. $5800
Cr Rvr (513) 260-6410
WOODEN CRADLE
AND HIGH CHAIR,
great cond. $150
TWIN BOX SPRING/
MAT $50
(352) 795-7254


246978531
957413826
183625974
429167358
531842769
678539142
892354617
364781295
715296483


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087



2 Very Nice Dogs
Golden Retriever/Lab
Mix, chestnut color
& Black Lab, both
nice watch dogs,
very gentle,
Like to go together
(352) 637-6310
Free to Good Home
English Mastiff
In need of forever
home, very sweet and
gentle couch potato
Must Spay,
Call for Interview
(352) 637-4322


FREE KITTENS
(352) 860-0964
Mission in Citrus has
a FREE garage sale to
those in need.
No resale agents! Lots
of baby items, house-
hold items and kids
toys.
A little bit of everything.
If you are in need or
know someone who is,
please tell them.
2488 N. Pennsylvania
Crystal River
(near Manatee Lanes)
Fri & Sat all day



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077



CHIHUAHUA
lost Jan 26
His name is Chico,
male, long white hair,
face, ears are brown,
3 to 4 Ibs, last seen
Hunter Springs trailer
pk, next to the PO.
in Crystal River
352-364-1663


SCENE









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



o11-_ 1, _I h- _-- -


Retriever, about 1' yrs
old, answers to "Buddy",
lost in vicinity of
W. Dunnellon Rd.
Owner is heartbroken.
(352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662
GREY FEMALE
CALICO CAT
female, approx. 2
yrs.old, her kittens
miss her! grey, orange
& tan lost in the
Humanitarians, Rt 44,
parking lot
(352) 476-1878
Lost Pomeranian
Female, lOyrs old
Near California St.
Beverly Hills
REWARD
352-476-0583
Lost Set of Keys
Blue & Silver light
on Chain
Crystal River or
Beverly Hills Area
(352) 527-1322
MALAMUTE
belongs to my little boy
he's heartbroken, 5 yrs
old female. Her name is
Foxxy, fawn and white,
missing from Turner
Fish Camp, Potts
Preserve area. Please
call 352-201-2540



DOG LONG HAIR
BLACK & GREY,
W/HARNESS,
FOUND IN
INVERNESS OFF OF
TURNERCAMP RD.
(352) 3444006
Older Puppy Found
in Crystal River
Call to identify
(352) 697-1258






Precious Paws
Rescue, Inc.
pre-
ciouspawsflorida.
com
726-4700





"RESCUING PETS
FOUR PAWS AT A
TIME"








ADOPTIONS
CRYSTAL RIVER
MALL
U.S. Hwy. 19
Crystal River
THurs. Fri. Sat &
Sun Noon-4pm



PETSUPERMARKET
2649 E. Gulf to
Lake Hwy.
Inverness
(cats only)
Regular store
hours


Adopt a
gescUed Pet .


View our adoptable
dogs @ www.
adootarescuedoet
.com or call
352-795-9550

ADOPTIONS
are held every
Saturday
10am-12pm
PetSupermarket
(exceptions listed
below)

BEST FRIENDS
FESTIVAL
Citrus County
Fairgrounds
Saturday 2/2
9am-3pm

We are in NEED
of FOSTERS
to help save
more dogs. To foster
or volunteer please
contact us or come
to visit us at
Pet Supermarket
Inverness


CAT
ADOPTIONS










COME SEE
our adorable cats
and kittens that are
available for
adoption. In their
cage free home
style environment.
WE ARE OPEN
10:00 AM. till 1:00
PM.
& 200 PM 4PM
Monday-Saturday.
All Cats and Kit-
tens are
micro-chipped, al-
tered, & tested for
Feline Luk and
Aids. Up to date
on vaccines for
age
appropriate.
Phone 352-613-1629
Visit us at
www.hofspha.ora.
or stop by our of-
fices at 1149 N Co-
nant Ave. Corner of
44 and
Conant.
Look for the big
white building with
the bright paw
prints.




Not Looking for
Someone, just trying
to help people. If you
are Bored, Lonely,
Need Answers. Call
someone who cares.
24-7 (352) 426-1821



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077



Cleaning Person
Needed bi-weekly
Call (352) 503-5002




TEACHER

Fulltime/Parttime,
Exp. Req. CDA Pref.
TADPOLES
EARLY LEARNING
(352) 560-4222









IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII











Need a job

or a

qualified

employee?



This area's

#1

employment

source!



(CUD


DOCTORS ASSIST
Needed

Must Draw Blood
EKG & Injections
SEND RESUME TO:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1825M
1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd
Crystal River Fl. 34429


EXPERIENCED
CERTIFIED
SURGICAL TECH

Wanted for
fast-paced outpa-
tient surgery center
Flexible scheduling.
Excellent pay and
benefits. No nights,
weekends, no call
or holidays.
Apply at:
110 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto
or fax resume to:
352-527-1827.


EXPERIENCED
OPERATING
ROOM RN

Wanted for
fast-paced outpa-
tient surgery center
Flexible scheduling.
Excellent pay and
benefits. No nights,
weekends, no call
or holidays.
Apply at:
110 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto or fax
resume to:
352-527-1827.


EXPERIENCED
RECEPTIONIST
For fast pace
medical office. Must
be able to work
under pressure &
handle multiple
phone lines. Medical
terminology &
insurance
knowledge required.
Send resume to:
reply2013@
hotmail.com


F/T RN

IV Exp. preferred
For physicians office
with benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1787M
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River,
Forida 34429


HHC AGENCY

Looking for
RN & Psych RN
(352) 794-6097


RECEPTIONIST

Needed for busy
Medical Office.
Experience preferred.
Includes benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1787M
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River,
Florida 34429






LIC 440 CUST.
SERVICE REP/or
220 Agent

Needed for busy
Insurance office.
Apply in person
9am-12N
SHELDON PALMES
INSURANCE
8469 W Grover
Cleveland,
Homosassa


Social Services
Assistant
Looking for ener-
getic detail oriented
person who is
comfortable taking
initiative. And enjoy
working with peo-
ple. Exp. preferred
NO PHONE CALLS
Apply in Person
CYPRESS COVE
CARE CENTER
700 SE 8TH AVENUE
Crystal River EOE


Exp. Servers &
Bartenders

APPLY IN PERSON
LakeSide Bar & Grill
4543 E. Windmill Dr.
Inverness, 419-6511





SOUS CHEF

needed for upscale
private Country
Club in Citrus Co.
Previous kitchen
management re-
quired with casual
and fine dining
culinary experience.
Send Resume to:
swiley@
citrushills.com












CH kONICE


INSIDE SALES
REPRESENTATIVE
Citrus Publishing
Citrus County, Fl

Job Summary
This position is de-
signed to increase
our market share of
retail and classified
display advertising in
all of Citrus Publish-
ing's products.
The position will
consist of receiving
incoming calls and
making outbound
service/cold calls.
The position will also
handle walk-in
advertisers from
our Meadowcrest
office.

Essential Functions
* Answering incom-
ing calls for our Re-
tail and Classified
display ads
* Facilitating the
display advertising
needs of walk in
customers
* Making outbound
service calls to exist-
ing accounts
* Develop new
customers through
prospecting and
cold calling
* Develop new op-
portunities for adver-
tisers to do business
with Citrus Publish-
ing, Inc,
* Consistently meet
or exceed monthly
and annual sales
goals
* Increase Citrus
Publishing's Market
share through the
development of
on-line advertising
revenue
* Communicate
effectively orally
and in writing with
customers and
coworkers
* Problem solving,
analytical abilities
and interpersonal
skills required
* Maintain score
cards on progress
toward established
goals
* Perform daily func-
tions with a minimal
amount of direction

Minimum
Qualifications
* at least two years
of sales experience;
advertising experi-
ence preferred
* Demonstrate per-
suasiveness and/or
sales abilities
* Proper business
attire
* Professional tele-
phone presence
Ability to work well in
a team environment

Administrative
* This is a 40 hour a
week position

Send resume to
djkamlot@chroni-
cleonline.com. Dead-
line for applications
is Feb.12, 2013

Drug Screen
Required
for FinalApplicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer


CLASSIFIED




IN-HOME SALES

One call close.
Leads provided.
DFWP/Call Charles
352-314-3625
Real Estate
Agents

Busy real estate office
needs Realtors and
Buyers Agents Call
PLANTATION REALTY
352-634-0129




Automotive
Consultant/
Advisor

Eagle Buick GMC
Inc is in need of
experienced
Automotive Service
Consultants/Advisors
Minimum 2 yrs, deal-
ership experience.
Aggressive pay plan
and strong com-
pensation package
that includes health
insurance, paid
vacation, paid train-
ing, certification
reimbursement and
many other perks.
Drug free workplace
Application Avail. @
Eagle Buick GMC
Inc. Homosassa, Fl.
34448 Send Resume:
Fax (352) 417-0944
Email:
robbcole@eagle
buickgmc.com

Senior Lending
Officer/Office
Manager

Brannen Bank,
a banking institution in
central Florida,
is seeking a Senior
Lending Officer/ Office
Manager for the Citrus
county area. Re-
quires a bachelors
degree in business or
finance, residential
and commercial
lending experience
and at least four
year's Office Manager
Experience.
Duties include man-
agement of daily
branch operations
and originating a
variety of consumer
loan's. Offer's a
competitive salary and
benefit package. If
interested, please
forward resume' to

Brannen Banks of
Florida, Inc.
Attn: Carol Johnson
PO Box 1929
Inverness, FL
34451-1929
EEO/M/F/V/D/DFWP


-B
MANATEE
TOUR
CAPTAIN
NEEDED

Full Time
(352) 777-1796





APPT. SETTERS
NEEDED

Sign on Bonus.
Great Commission Pay
and weekly bonuses
Call Bob 352-628-3500

CAREGIVERS
NEEDED

All Shifts Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto


COMMUNITY
HOSTESS

Seeking high-energy
hostesses for
seasonal part-time
position shuttling
potential homeowners
around country club
community's
amenities. Must be
articulate, upbeat and
service oriented.
Apply at Terra Vista
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd., Hernando, FL


Exp. appt. setters

Top Pay, Hrly. Clean
work enviontment
Dave (352) 794-6129

NEWSPA-
PER
CARRIER

WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and other
newspapers for
home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per
day.

Must have insured
and reliable vehicle
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up
with a cap-Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product

Apply in Person
1624 N
Medowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pm

Newspaper carriers
are independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle



--- --J El





TEA LEAF COPPER
LUSTER PLATE 9"
1853 to 1871, $35
352-628-3899


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013 C9

F 11


L 2-1 CLaughgstocknteratonaln,Dst byU ersalUCI oUFS 20 J

"He keeps me in the style to which
I've become accustomed ...
abject poverty."





Thank You For 15 Yearof Vtes

I BE.Au FuL RES iL.


F 2WILLIAdL21





.... Q B J
caii~~~~~ .g-~-ZT^ ~ L


4 VINTAGE GLASS
FROGS FOR FLORAL
Display $20 can e-mail
Photos INVERNESS
352-419-5981

6 VINTAGE TEA CUP
AND SAUCER SETS
$45 BONE CHINA
England All Different
352-419-5981


11111111
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
On[y $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




2 DR WHITE MAYTAG
REFRIG. w/Ice Maker
21.8 cu ft.
Less than 2yrs old.
$350
(352) 726-8021
3'/2 Ton $100.
and 2/2 $75.
Used Copeland Scroll
AC COMPRESSORS
R22
John 352-208-7294
DRYER $100 with 90
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504
GE Refrigerator
side by side w/ water
dispenser Bisque $380,
GO CART 5HP, 2s eats
built by Manco $275
(352) 503-6641
GE STOVE, coil top, self
cleaning, bisque $125;
MICROWAVE Over the
Range GE Spacemaker
$75 (352)503-6641

HOOVER UPRIGHT
SWEEPER 6 yrs old, all
attachments, Exc Con
$75 352-628-3899
KENMORE 25'CU
STAINESS STEEL side
by side, w/water & ice,
4yrs old, Super Buy!
$750 352-897-4196


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
WASHERS & DRYERS
(352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Exc.
Cond. Free Delivery
352-263-7398
WASHER$100 with 90
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504
Whirlpool Heavy Duty
Super Capacity,
LP Gas Dryer,
Almond $125.
3V'/2 Ton New Replace-
ment Carlyle Scroll AC
Compressor R22 $300
John 352-208-7294


AuctionsB


Thursday 1/31/13
Full Auction Line up
in walk about setting
starting @ 3pm
preview @12 noon..
From furniture to
tools.

Sunday 2/3/13
Antique preview @
11am. Auction 1pm
furniture, art, prints,
vintage books, china,
silver & coins, jew-
elry, cased knives, &
straight razors
more+++

*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267AB 1667






Fri. 02/01 Preview @
4pm, Auction@ 6pm
General Merchandise
Sat. 02/02 Preview @
4pm, Auction@ 6pm
Antiques/Gen. Merch
Sun 02/03 Preview @
12:30, Auction@ 1pm
Tailgate/Box lots
*WE BUY ESTATES**
6055 N. Carl G. Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
AB3232 (352)613-1389


SAWS
TABLE SAW,
JOINTER,
10 inch craftsman
table saw $70,
Craftsman 6 inch
jointer $125,
352-201-1082 or
352-560-3354
before 7PM






50 Inch Hitachi HD TV
Projection console
Exc cond. $100
(352) 621-0405


AM/FM, Stereo
Cassette and
Turn Table $65.
TV, Toshiba,
19" color, $35.
(484) 547-9549


SHARP 32" TV WITH
REMOTE $20
352-613-0529


YAMAHA RECEIVER &
TECHNICS DUAL
STEREO CASSETTE
PLAYER BOTH FOR
$100 352-613-0529


YAMAHA SET OF 5
SPEAKERS GOOD
CONDITION $100
352-613-0529






DOUBLE & SINGLE
garage doors, both for
$250 352-601-7911






MAGELLAN
ROADMATE GPS -
5220-LM. Never used.
$90 352-637-5969


MS OFFICE 2010, 1st
COURSE BOOK $40.
book only. Univ.level.
Excellent learning tool.
352-513-4027






Chipper/Shredder
Troy-Bilt Tomahawk,
Briggs & Stratton gas
engine. $700 OBO
(352) 601-3174


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179



CNA
Available for Private
Duty in you home.
References avail, on
request. (352) 453-7255
HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping
Dr. appts, errands,
etc. Hablo Espanol
813-601-8199





SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518










#1Employment


www chronicleonline corn
ii


JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump
Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557






BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120


FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097


ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


All AROUND TRAC-
TOR
Land clearing, Haul-
ing Site Prep, Drive-
ways Lic/Ins
352-795-5755



HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping
Dr. appts, errands,
etc. Hablo Espanol
813-601-8199



COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
k 352-302-6838 k



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777



**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscap-
ing
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352 422-7279 ***


Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



1 CALL & RELAX!
25vrs Exp in 100%
property maint & all
repairs, call
H&H Services today!
lic#37658
352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
*e FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handvman
* FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
* FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



Cleaning Svc-Home,
office,windows,
pressure washing &
more. 352-322-1799



All AROUND
TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120



BEAT ANY PRICE
Paint & Power wash
Lawn & Trees Trim
Jim (352) 246-2585
LAWNCARE N
MORE
Yard Clean-up,
leaves
bushes, hauling
352-726-9570
Winter Clean Up,
Leaves, Power Wash-
ing & More Call
Coastal Lawn Care
(352) 601-1447


AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up time.
352-220-4244




A-I Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, lawn maint.
furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump
Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Robert G. Vigliotti LLC
Painting
Int/Ext FREE
ESTIMATES 35 yrs
exp.
call 508-314-3279


CALL STELLAR
BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins.
FREE EST (352)
586-2996

BEAT ANY PRICE
Paint & Power Wash
Lawn & Trees Trim
Jim (352) 246-2585

Cleaning Svc-Home,
office,windows,
pressure washing &
more. 352-322-1799

* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570

PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300

Robert G. Vighotti LLC
Painting
Int/Ext FREE
ESTIMATES 35 yrs
exp.
call 508-314-3279

Winter Clean Up,
Leaves, Power Wash-
ing & More Call
Coastal Lawn Care
(352) 601-1447





All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713


DGS SERVICES LLC
Reroofs Metal Roofs
REPAIRS Home
Inspector 414-8693




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAIN.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
k 352-302-6838 k




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, liclins 302-8852
KING's LAND
CLEARING & TREE
SERVICE
Complete tree &
stump removal haul-
ing, demo & tractor
work. 32 yrs. exp.
(352) 220-9819
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


LNOW HIRING FULL-TIME POSITIONS
















BENEFITS PACKAGE
EOE / DRUG FREE WORKPLACE

AP L IN PER-SO


gh
MA

,qw
a rw.
ALL
Inta QO









ClO FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013


Oblong glass table
66x40 w/6 reclining
chairs; small side table,
2 footstools, beige w/
tiny flowers. Never
been outside. $400
Call John (352)
422-2317




"DINETTE SET"
4 ft Glass top w/4
chairs on casters,
good.cond.$200
(352) 897-4739
*TV STAND
40WX18DX28H,
3-SHELVES
4- DRAWERS $95
634-2004
2 Table Lamps,
33" H, white ceramic,
Sq. bamboo design,
excel. $50
Broyhill Dining Rm Set.
Table, Parquet Top,
Rectangular shape, 2
leaves, 6 Caine High-
back chairs, china
hutch, 3 glass panels
3 shelves, med. fruit-
wood color, excel.
$550. (718) 666-6624
48" Believed Glass
Dining Room Table, 4
chairs, upholstered
seats, decorative
painting back & legs
$150. Lazy Boy Rocker
Recliner $75. Pine
Ridge (352) 270-8116
AIR COMPRESSOR
Devillbiss, twin cyl 4
hp, 20 gal. $150
352-628-4360
Blue glider rocker and
matching foot
stool.$65.00 great
condition 352-726-2572
Broyhill Wall Unit
$750.
Bassett Cabinet
with Drawers
$500.
(484) 547-9549
Cherry Desk,
credenza, file cabinet,
$600.
Oak TV Cabinet $300
(352) 212-9507
637-2921, 861-9448
CHROME & GLASS
UTILITY CART,14"
DIA,28"H
3 SHELVES $25
634-2004
Couch, Clean,
brown, excel. cond.
$200. Entertainment
Center Large, Cherry
Traditional, Like new
$600 (352) 270-9025
Dinning Room Set,
6 captain chairs,
& Hutch maple
$200
(352) 726-1081

DUDLEY'S






"TWO AUCTIONS**

Thursday 1131/13
Full Auction Line up
in walk about setting
starting @ 3pm
preview @12 noon..
From furniture to
tools.

Sunday 2/3/13
Antique preview @
11am. Auction 1pm
furniture, art, prints,
vintage books, china,
silver & coins, jew-
elry, cased knives, &
straight razors
more+++
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.corn
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB 1667

Entertainment Ctr
Oak w/ 2 drawers and 4
doors, will ft a 36" TV,
very good cond $150;
off white love seat,
like new $175
(765) 336-9590
Futon
Very good cond.
org. $300
sell for $125.
(352) 270-8772
KING SIZE BED
mattress,box spring,
and frame all in good
conditonn $100obo call
or text 352-464-4280
KING SIZE
PILLOW TOP
Mattress, Box Spring
& Frame.
Excel. Cond. $550
315-723-5353
LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET, In Original
Plastic, Never Used,
ORG $3000, Sacrifice
$975. CHERRY, BED-
ROOM SET Solid
Wood, new in factory
boxes- $895
Can Deliver. Bill
(813)298-0221.
LG Leather Sectional
Couch, Mustard Color
Good Condition
$350 352-746-1447
Living Room/
Dining Room
Lg 6 pc sectional
w/recliner & Sofa.
Loden Grn Must see!
$500 obo; Dining Rm
table w/ beveled glass
top, 4 char/blue velour
chairs, $225 746-0817
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500
Moving Sale
27" MagnavoxTV $75
15" Quasar TV w/
Stand, $25,
6 Tray tables $15.
(352) 489-5669
OAK ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER with T.V.
$95.00 NICE. Dunnellon
352-875-5134
Oak Table 6 chairs,
hutch, Nice $750,.
Cherry Curio Cabinet
Pair $150 ea
(352) 212-9507
637-2921, 861-9448


Old secretary desk dark
wood 2 drawers and fold
down top.$85.
352-726-2572
QUEEN MATTRESS,
BOX SPRING &
FRAME with all linens.
$150 (352) 287-6601
ROCKER old
upholstered rocker with
wood arms.$65.
352-726-2572
Sectional Sofa, light
color, like new
$500
Small secretary Desk
$100
(352) 212-3352
STIFFEL BRASS LAMP
30"H, 3WAY
CREAM PLEATED
SHADE
$50 634-2004


Frames, boxspnngs, &
mattresses exc cond.
$125
Cell (734) 355-2325
local 352-503-9452
Washed Oak Table 4
chairs, like new, $750
White antique iron
Bed, w/ mattress, $500
(352) 212-9507
637-2921, 861-9448
WICKER ROCKER
Small old wicker rocker.
$50. 352-726-2572




CRAFTSMAN
GT 500 MOWER
25 HP, $1,200.
(352) 344-2268
CYCLONE
Yard Vac,
with extra attach-
ments $1,100
(352) 344-2268
LAWNMOWER YARD
WAGON 6 cubic feet
with new tires $60.
Call 382-3280..
SEARS 2 WHEEL
GARDEN WHEELBAR-
ROW 4 cubic feet ca-
pacity $10 Call
382-3280 to see.

SOLD
John Deere Riding
Mower, L130, 23HP,
VPTwin, 48" cut Hydro
Static, very good
cond. recent service
$600.
Torro Weed Eater
$25
352-726-7789
Troybuilt Pusher
w/ Honda Engine $90
Lawnboy Pusher
w/bagger $25
352-726-7789




BEVERLY HILLS
Fn & Sat 8am-2pm
HH items, Jewelry, Furn
44 S Jackson St
Beverly Hills
Fri. 2/1 & Sat. 2/2
8:00AM-Until
98 S Columbus St
BEVERLY HILLS
Thurs & Fri 9a-2p
Books, prints, tools,
china, holsters
10 New Florida Ave

YARD SALE
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fnri-Sat 8am till all sold.
Fpoles,elec,baby &
hh items and furn.
352-302-7576
9569 W. Berry Lane



DUNNELLON
Feb 2 8AM to 3PM.
Something for
everyone!!
Located 4 miles from
Hwy. 19 off of Citrus
Ave. (Badger Acres).
8104 N Princess Ave.
DUNNELLON
Fn, Feb 1 & Sat, Feb 2
8 to 4, Multi-Family
tools, electronics, clths,
2866 W Cypress Drive
FLORAL CITY
8400 E. Gobbler Dr,
Friday, Feb 1, 9A-12P
N Scale & HO scale
Model trains & accesso-
nes. No Early Birds

FLORAL CITY
All Park Rummage
Sale. Singing Forest
M.H. Park
Keating Park St.
Community Building
Sat. Feb. 2, 8a-2pm

FLORAL CITY
UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCH
Used Treasure Sale
Feb 2nd 8:30 till noon.
8478 E. Marvin St.

HOMOSASSA
CHURCH OF GOD
YARD SALE
Fri. 1 & Sat. 2, 8AM
just off Hwy 19
on Bradshaw

HOMOSASSA
LIONS CLUB
INDOOR SALE.
Sat.Feb2, 8a-lp
Free Diabetes& Pedi
Vision Screenings
SR490

HOMOSASSA
Sat 2/2, Sun 2/3
8 5, entire hshld
4088 S Washington Pt
INVERNESS
6079 RECTOR,
Off South Apopka
Fri. 1 & Sat. 2, 9a-2p
Complete Contents
of House, Including
Garage & 2 Sheds
Also 3/2/2 Home,
Everything Must Go!
Way too Much to
List, Cash Only,
Deb, 634-2656
Offered by Parsley
Real Estate

INVERNESS
Fn & Sat 8a-3p
218 Poinsettia Ave
PALM TERRACE
VILLAGE.
Annual Community
Yard Sale.
Sat Feb 2, 8a-2p
S. 491 next to
Brighthouse
PINE RIDGE
Fri. 1 & Sat. 2, 8a-2p
Furn., Clothes, Hsehld.
5227 W Pine Ridge Blv.




2X&3X BLOUSES &
SLACKS-TSHIRTS
AND capns $2.00 ea
352-794-3020
352-586-4987
BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING SIZES 5 &
6 SHIRTS, PANTS &
JACKETS $30
352-613-0529
LINESMAN BOOTS 16"
Carolina 923. Size 9.


NEW condition. $100.
352/566-8066



!!!!!225/70 R19.5!!!!!
Great read!! Only asking
$100 for the pair!
(352)857-9232
:::::275/70 R16.5:::::
Good tread!! Only ask-
ing $100 for the pair!
(352)857-9232
---33X10.5 R15---
Good tread!! Only ask-
ing $100 for the pair!
(352)857-9232
10 FT. WOOD
STEP LADDER
Type 1, 250 duty
$90
(352) 422-0294


CLASSIFIED


Boat, no paper work
$165.
Trailer, spare tire and
wheel, fits 10" 15"
$35. (315) 466-2268
2" BALL MOUNT. 3 1/4
INCH DROP. 2" STAIN-
LESS STEEL BALL,
PIN AND CLIP. $35.00
CALL 352 344-2821
6 USED CHAIN LINK
FENCE 2 15'SEC-
TIONS. 2 END & LINE
POSTS & HARD-
WARE. $95.00
352 344-2821
BARBIE HOUSE/FURN.
& DISNEY CASTLE
BOTH 32X36 $35
ea/both $75
352-794-3020 586-4987
BEDDING Queen
comforter, dust ruffle &
pillow shams. Beige,
gray, brown. $20 obo
352-513-4536
BLINDS 1 PLEATED
64WX63L 1 PLASTIC
64WX60L OFF WHITE
$30 352-613-0529
CHAIN LINK FENCE
FABRIC. 22' X 4'
UNUSED CHAIN LINK
FENCE FABRIC.
$18.00 352 344-2821
Darkroom Equipment
Beseler 4 x 5 enlarger
inc. trays, stand & other
accessories $350 for all
352-746-6504
Fish Aquarium
50 gallons, cabinet
stand, lights & filter
$250
(352) 621-0392
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001lb,
Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb
Delivered 352-795-0077
GERBIL CAGE $20
352-613-0529
JIGSAW PUZZLES
63 jigsaw puzzles
$45.00 obo
352-746-3799
LINESMAN BOOTS 16"
Carolina 923. Size 9.
NEW condition. $100.
352/566-8066
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Fulls $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
RYOBI TABLE SAW
Good condition. First
$50 can have it. Hurry
won't last long at this
price. 628-4429
SNAPPER 42" RIDING
MOWER/GENERAC
4"000W GENERATOR
Mower $1000. mcl
mulch attachment
GenSet $375.BOTH
LIKE NEW
352-489-6465
Stallion Cow Boy Hat,
by Stetson, wool, sz 6 %
& Boots, black 11% D.
both New $100.
Glass Top Table w/ 4
chairs $100.
352-795-7254
Two Clip- on Towing
Mirrors $20
30 Ib full propane
bottle w/carrying box
$40 352-341-1649
WOODEN CRADLE
AND HIGH CHAIR,
great cond. $150
TWIN BOX SPRING/
MAT $50
(352) 795-7254



WALKER FOLDING
ALUMINUM Excellent
condition. $15.00
(352) 563-6410
WALKER FOUR
WHEELS WITH SEAT
AND BRAKES Excellent
condition. $49.00
(352) 563-6410
WHEELCHAIR MAN
UAL WITH LEG RESTS
Brand new. Never used.
$75.00 (352) 563-6410
WHEELCHAIR OVER-
SIZED MANUAL Brand
new. Never used.
$100.00 352)563-6410



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676







$45 352-601-6625
EPIPHONE ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR
W/AMPGIGBAQTUNER,ST
RAPDVD,ETC
$100 352-601-6625
FULLSIZE ACOUSTIC
GUITAR PACK "NEW"
W/GIGBAG
STRAP, STRINGS,ETC.
$65, 352-601-6625
JUSTICE SING & PLAY
ELECTRIC GUITAR
PINK never used
pd$150.sell $75
352-794-3020 5864987
NEW CUTAWAY
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
GUITAR TRANS
BLACK/ABALONE $90
352-601-6625
UPRIGHT PLAYER
PIANO W/BENCH.
Ampico reproducing.
Walnut wood, good
cond. $600 OBO
(352) 382-1885



3 MINI MUFFIN TINS
$5 NEW WHITE
QUICHE DISH $10
LARGE GREEN BOWL
$10 352-419-5981
40 PIECE STAINLESS
STEEL UTENSIL SET
$20 DECORATIVE
HANDLES NEVER
USED 352-419-5981
COFFEE GRINDER $5
ELECTRIC VEGETA-
BLE STEAMER $5
CANNISTER SET $10
352419-5981
LIGHTED MAKE UP
MIRROR lx5 times
magnification low & high
light$25. 352-794-3020
352-586-4987


Body Fit,
Gravity Machine,
$50.
Circle Glide
$25. Both Like New
(352) 447-1553
ELLIPTICAL MACHINE
PRO-FORM 490 LE
with users manual.
Heavy duty, I-Pod
compatible w/fan.
Less than 2 yrs old.
$300 527-8276
Proform Crosswalk 480
excel. cond. less than
50 mi. walk on it in-
clines, preset ifit
trainer workout,
built in fan, $275.
352-382-5208


.308 AMMO 100
Rds-$60- SP&HP
352-503-2792
14 Assorted Golf
Clubs,
left handed
$200
(352) 795-4942
22 Colt Woodsmen
early model orgin.
$700 OBO.
352-258-1740
30 cal. Carbine
1943 Inland mfg orgin.
Korea war bring home.
$1000. OBO
352-258-1740
16' BASS BOAT, 48hp
Johnson, smooth runn-
ing, T&T, electric motor,
depth finder, 2 batteries
& gas tanks, rough
trailer. $800.00. Inglis
352-447-0217
22LR ammo $16per
100. 525 rds $80
(352) 533-2228
BROWNING BUCK
MARK 22 L.R. RIMFIRE
PISTOL includes 6000
rounds of 22 ammo,
and 3 spare magazines.
Will sell as a total pack-
age only. $680.00 cash
only Call 352-465-4373
CLUB CART GOLF
CART, Exc Cond, w/
Charger, good tires,
almost new batteries,
enclosure, $1500
352-527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF CLUBS
Two sets, clubs, carts
and accessories.
$40.00 each set.
726-1495
Ping G2 Iron, S/W-3
Irons, graphite reg.
shaft $175., Taylor
Made R7, Irons, G/W -
4 Irons Graphite. Sr.
shaft $195. 860-0048
REMINGTON 700 BDL
270cal exc cond. $495.
will take lever action
30-30 on trade.
(906) 285-1696
Winchester Model 70
Super grade, 300 Win.
Mag., Nikkon scope,
+ ++ extras,
$,1200
(352) 628-5355



2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1895
** call 352-527-0555 **




GRACO PACKNPLAY
GOOD CONDITION
$35 352-613-0529
WHITE WOOD ROUND
BASSINET Brand new
$60. 352-422-2719


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


Baby Girl
Baby Girl is a 3-y.o.
spayed terrier mix,
weighs 48 lbs,
heartworm-negative
housebroken.
Friendly, likes chil-
dren, other dogs,
lived with a cat,
which she liked.
Walks well on a
leash, is a fun-loving,
active girl,
well-mannered.
Sweet, energetic girl
is waiting to meet
her forever family.
ID # is 15902545.
Call 352-746-8400.


BLUE
Blue is an approxi-
mately 8-y.o. neutered
male Cattle Dog mix,
Came to the shelter
because his family
lost their home. Blue
is white and tan,
weighs about 50
pounds, is a bit
chubby for his size,
which is medium. He
is housebroken, very
friendly and affection-
ate. The most striking
thing about him is that
he has very beautiful
blue eyes, which
catch your attention
immediately. He loves
people and wants to
be by your side Is
very obedient and
walks well on a leash.
He is quite laid-back
and would make a
great companion for
an older person.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


1 Sweet Little Male
Yorkie,
CKC reg., $375. Fl.
health certs.,
Call
(352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258



BIRD SUPPLY SALE
Sun, Feb. 3, 9a-3p,
Cages, Seed, Toys,
Playstands, Milletspray
& more! Save! Cage
wire, Chicks & duck-
lings! 8260 Adrian Dr.,
Brooksville
727-517-5337


MEEKO
Meeko is a 2-y.o.
terrier/pit mix, a
perfect gentleman.
Very mellow, with
quiet dignity, calm
energy, very low
key. Weighs 70
pounds, beige and
white in color,
housebroken, easily
trained. Gets along
with other dogs. His
kind and pleading
eyes will win your
heart, a perfect
dog to join you on a
walk. He is a sweet-
heart of a dog,
patiently waiting
at Citrus County
Animal shelter.
Call Karen @
218-780-1808.

Shih-Tzu Pups,
ACA, Males
starting@ $400. Lots
of colors, Beverly
Hills, FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofoups.net




Bermuda Hay 501bs $6
Never been rained on
795-1906 586-1906
SHAMROCK FARM, CR

^^^^^^-I


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII





HOMOSASSA
2 & 3 Br homes w/ stor-
age sheds. Starting at
$550/mo + $800/Sec -
ONLY $1350 total to
move in. We pay trash,
lawn, water & sewer.
Close to Walmart,
Publixs& Suncoast PKY
No pets 352-584-1831

INVERNESS
Close In, 1 & 2 BR MH
Clean, Quiet & Com-
fortable 352-212-6182
ISTACHATTA
2/1 $500. mo. + Sec.
Fruit Trees Cul-de-sac
Withlacoochee River
16354 Daviston Ln.
No Pets 813-935-4996
LECANTO
LEISURE ACRES
3/2 water & garbage
incl. $600mo.
(352) 628-5990

LECANTO
SM 2/2 S/W, 1 ac w/ rm
for a horse 746-7595





must sell!
2006 FLEETWOOD
ENTERAINER.
OWNER MUST SELL!
CALL (352) 795-1272

BANK
FORECLOSURE
Land-n-Home, 3/2
1500 sq. ft. On /2
Acre, paved rd.
LOOKS GOOD, Have
financing if needed,
only $2,500 down,
$381.44mo. P&I
W.A.C. OR $69,900.
Call 352-613-0587
or 352-621-9183

Crystal River 55+
Park. 2BR/1BA Car-
port & Screened
Porch. Heat/Air
$9,500. 352-746-4648
Ask for Brit

HERNANDO
$$ Pnvate Owner $$
Financing Available
New & Used
Manufactured Homes
Call 1-727-967-4230

HOME-ON-LAND
3/2 Great Shape.
%Acre. Move In Now
$59,900.
Call 352-401-2979,
352-621-3807





NEW 2013

2br2ba
Doublewide w/10 year
Warranty $39,900
Delivered & setup, a/c,
skirt, steps.
Ca11(352) 795-1272



WE WILL

BUY YOUR
MANUFACTURED
Home. from 1976-2013
CALL (352) 795-2377


REPO'S- REPO'S
REPO'S
WE HAVE REPO'S
CALL 352-621-9181




2BR/11/2BA, MH &
Land Needs little Work
$17,500 9340 W.Tonto
Dr., Crystal River
Call 352-382-1544 or
813-789-7431
3bdr/2 full baths/ 2 car
carport on 1 acre.
split layout, steel roof,
caged pool, 20x25 ft
deck, Ig storage build-
ing, Furnished Modu-
lar $73,900, 5215
Bridget Pt, Castle
Lake Park
Inverness
(352) 597-7353
CASTLE LAKE
Floral City
2/2 S/W Fully furnished
move in condition.
2 screen rooms,
2 sheds. Landscaped
with sprinkler on quiet
cul-de-sac. $38,900.
352-212-1883
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 4br 2ba MH
READY TO MOVE IN!
4Owner Fin. Avail.-
CALL (352) 795-1272
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Considering
ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498
HERNANDO 2/2 DW
On lot, with Shed &
Deck See for your-
self at 2562 N. Treas-
ure Pt. $28,500 obo
352-464-0719
HERNANDO/486
1+acre, 2br SWMH+
den/flp, ManCave/Work
Shop w/AC, 28x40,
$43,500, J. Desha
Cndland Real Estate
(352)634-6340
HOMOSASSA
2ba 1 '/2 ba MH needs
complete rehab. Good
shed, well & septic.
6524 W. Akazian
$12,500 (603) 860-6660
NW Citrus County
SWMH on 1 acre, 2/1.5
paved rd., screened
porch, appliances -
$37,700 possible
owner financing
352-795-9908



2/2 on Lake Rous-
seau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent
$240/mo. 2003. Used
Seasonally
Owner bought a
house. 207-546-6115,
cell
Adult Park 2/1,
Mobile, heat and air,
nicely furn. large
shed, sreen rm. car-
port, $8,200
Lot Rent $160 mo.
(352) 287-3729
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
Winter Soecials*
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
2/2 New Model $59K
2/2 waterfront. $31 K.
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882
DUNNELLON
LAKE ROUSSEAU MH
Park. Lg. 1/1 w/sliderto
encl. screened porch,
outside shed, CHAfurn.
Nice yard, low lot rent.
Asking$11,900
(207) 347-0531
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $179/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS
3/2 MH, Furn. Ig screen
lanai, shed & lot. All appl
mcl Ig scn TV,55+ PK
Asking $12,000. Call
(352)364-3747
INVERNESS
Move In Ready,
Beautiful 1/1 SW,
Mobile, Harbor Lights
55+ park, on Big Lake
Henderson. Fully furn.,
very updated, view of
lake, Cen. HVAC, W/D,
A Must See! Asking
$7,000, 352-344-1828
INVERNESS PARK
55+, 14X60, 2/2, new
roof, all appliances,
partly furn. screen
room, shed,
352-419-6476
MOBILE HOME,
Fully
Furnished. Everyth-
ing stays. Just move
in. 2 Sheds,
washer/dryer all ap-
pliances. Must See!
$7,500. (708) 308-3138
PALM TERRACE
55+ Community,
1997 3BR/2BA 14 x 66,
excel, cond. Shed,
Fl. Rm. Carport &
Deck $16,000. (352)
400-8231
REDUCED 2/2 $17,500
On Lake Rousseau
Lot Rent $240/mo.
BETTER THAN NEW!
Owner financing. Call
LEE (352) 817-1987
Singing Fores t
FLORAL CITY
14 x 70, Mobile, 2 Irg.
bedrooms, furnished &
remodeled, heat & air,
carport & shed, Wash/
Dryer, Lot rent $176.
$14,500. 352-344-2420
STONEBROOK, CR
2bd/2ba,gourmet kitch,
master suite,encl. porch
pond, crprt+ patio
$51,900, Cridland RE,
Jackie 352-634-6340
Waterfront/Homosassa
Westwind Village 55+
Beautifully furnished
Move In Ready, 2/2
2 Scrn rms, dbl door,
refrig./Ice maker
Washer Dryer, Low
monthly payments,
$19000 obo


(850) 449-1811 Cell



INVERNESS
RV Spaces. Bring your
own boat and fishing
gear. AGE 55+ commu-
nity. Lot rent only
$360-$375 including
electric. Edge Water
Oaks 352-344-1380




HOMOSASSA
RENT-to-OWN
3br 2ba MH
Immediate Occpancy
Owner Financing Avail.
CALL (352) 795-2377


CITROnus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

In


Mobile Homelss
For Sale


6. (With 7) War-losing nations' compensatory...


7.... payments' readying processes (4)


SNOIL HVd3Id 'L SNOlVIIvVd3 9 UHIWIVlUI TVd '
fIv n8 01aa *I' (laAVaIS aVMRA' AdO3AddOd's SAVId SAHA '
2-1-13 SHAMSNV


-AcTION3
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALLY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounlyHomeRentals.com
CITRUS SPRINGS
8160 N. Duval Dr. ((S).... $1,300
3/2/2Pool home, full furn. w uilijes
water/sewer an elec. caps
CRYSTAL RIVER
10350 Deepwoods Dr. ((R).... $750
2/2/1 dose to mall, Is. utility room
11255W.Bayshore Dr. ((R).. $850
2/2 Waterfront condo, amenities
HOMOSASSA
2278 S. Sandburg Pt. (H) .....$500
2/1 Nice Duplex
2 Balsam Ct. S (H)..... $1,400
3/3/2 SMW pool nonewithguestquarters
HERNANDO/INVERNESS
994 E. Winnetka St. (Her)....$625
2/1.5 on I aoe with carpot
6315 N. Siorewood Dr. (Her).. $650
2/1 Cute home th FL roomandgreat backward
854 Pritchard Isl. (Inv.)...$800
2/2 Townhouse onwaterfront, comm. pool






3/2 Citrus Sprinas $975
Furn W/FHome $2500
Furn Stilt w/f Hm $1700
3/2 furn w/f condo$1500
More rentals:
c21 naturecoast.com
835 NE Hwy 19Crystal
River, Fl(352) 795-0021




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Studio Apartment
Completely Furn. Ca-
ble TV W/D rm. All util.
incl'd.+ boat dock.
$700 mo 352-372-0507
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025

HOMOSASSA
1/1 Remodeled, Near
New Wal-Mart on
Cardinal $425. + Sec.
(352) 621-5265




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts, 2 BRI 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apart-
ments for Rent
352-465-2985

CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815

CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2 CHA, W/D
hk-up $575/mo.1st Mo.
FREE with $600. no
dogs 352-726-9570

INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great
Loc., clean & roomy.
no pets $500.mo 1st. &
Last $300. Sec.
352-341-1847

SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant
Rd. to So. on Talla-
hasse Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719



OPPORTUNITY





CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1V2, 828 5th Ave. NE
Furn $650 or Unfurn.
$550+sec 727-455-
8998, 727-343-3965





CITRUS HILLS
2/2%2 Townhouse
Condo, full apple's,
carport, Citrus Hills
membership incld'd
Prudential Florida
Showcase Properties
call 352-476-8136


CITRUS SPRINGS
2/2 Duplex, nice private
area, near shopping &
schools. Wtr, sewer mncl
$600mo 352-558-4477
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2 CHA, W/D
hk-up $575/mo.1st Mo.
FREE with $600. no
dogs 352-726-9570

INVERNESS
2/1, W/D Hk -up, No
Pets, $550 mo. + Util
(352) 220-4818




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
"RENT REDUCED**
3/1 Country Home on
stilts,w/fenced yard.
$565 + Utilities.
Call 920-922-6800

Sugarmill Woods
3BR, 2/2BA, Super
Clean 3,100 sf, large
priv. shaded lot,
2 covered, porches,
sm. pet ok. $1,150.
mo. yrly Ise., sec. dep
$700. $3,000 move in
(727) 580-1083




BEVERLY HILLS
1/1/CP + Fl. Rm $450
(352) 897-4447,
697-1384

BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, Scrn. Rm. $400.
Laun. Rm. 697-1457

BEVERLY HILLS
2/1+ Florida Room,
106 S. Fillmore $550
mo. 352-422-2798

BEVERLY HILLS
870 Beakrush Ln
2br 1% ba, 1 car gar.
enclosed screen porch,
$600 mo. leased dep.
no pets. 352-697-3133

CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Inverness
352-726-3476
Lecanto
352-746-0373
Crystal River

352-563-0890



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

CITRUS HILLS
AREA, HERITAGE
55+ Gated Community
3/2 builders model,
never lived in, $1000
mnth. 352-270-8953

CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
Water Incl. CHA, $496.
352-220-2447
212-2051

CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1.5, fncd yrd, 1 blkto
King's Bay. Boat tie-up;
$650/mo, 1st/L/$300
sec (352)794-0811

HERNANDO
Forest Ridge Village
Nice 2/2 home *
w/garage, screened
patio, & pool/clubhouse
privileges. $750 mo
Call 980-285-8125

HOMOSASSA
2/1 Duplexe $450
3/2/2 House $625
River Links Realty
352-628-1616

INVERNESS
3/2 Brand New,
Granite tops, marble
firs, SS Ap $895
(352) 634-3897

INVERNESS
3/2/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352- 601-2615 OR
352-201-9427

INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/1/1
$590mo.1st & Sec
(352) 344-2560

OPEN HOUSE
12-3
Friday, Feb. 1
1591 N. Bath Road
352-634-4641
and
1285 N Selkirk Pt
352-422-4137
in Meadowcrest,
Crystal River
Presented by
WAYBRIGHT
Real Estate, Inc
352-795-1600


Large 1 BR home in
55+ community, Great
location just off the
water. Bring boat &
fishing gear. $585
(352) 344-1380
Sugarmill Woods
2/2/2, 2 MBdrms
$875. 352-302-4057




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225




INVERNESS
Share a house, Ig pool
Lakeside C Club, Golf
Course, Lots amenities
$875. Ist/sec 419-2924




CRYSTAL RIVER
3950 sq ft Lt MFG
w/office @ $1200/mo
1155 sq ft storage @
450/mo
600 sq ft office @
450/mo
352-302-1935
CRYSTAL RIVER
Warehouse for Rent
Free standing, garage
area, 1,440sf,
$100-$550
352-634-0129


ESTATE SALE in Na-
ture Coast Landings
RV Resort. Large de-
veloped site and a
separate gated storage
lot; plus almost new
5th-wheel with slides,
screened gazebo, and
storage building. All for
$79,900. For more info
and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441







ESTATE SALE Nature
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Developed site with
gazebo & storage bldg,
reduced to $49,500.
Separate storage
lot available. (RV sold).
For info and pictures
Click on
detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441
LAND FOR SALE

LAND LIQUIDATION
20 acres St. Lucie
Waterway, $189,500.
3 miles boat Lake
Okeechobee, 45 min
boat Atlantic. Private
/ gated. Deer, turkey,
hogs, fishing.
(888)716-2259 Gulf
Atlantic Land,
Broker.

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discnrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


WORDY GURDYTRICKYRICKY KANE
1. "30 Rock" star Tina's stage dramas (1) Everyanswer is aerhyming
n pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Opium flower duplicate (2) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. NBA star Dwyane veered off path (1) syllables in each word.

I 12013UFS Dist byUniv UclckforUFS
4. Current French currency agency (2)


5. Less brightly hued U-Haul attachment (2)









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MOTIVATED SELLER
Wants This Gone!!!
6 Acres w Big SHOP,
Nice 2/2/2 House,
Porches Barns, pond,
pvd rd, Concrete dr.
Reduced! $ 114, 900
MLS 357108. www.
crosslandrealty.com
352 726 6644


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches
&
Commercial









Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments,
Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com

TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $58,500. Call
352-638-0905

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.







Citrus Hills

Estate Sale
4032 Monadnock Dr.
Hernando, E 34442
Thurs, Jan. 31-
Sat., Feb. 2
8-3
Contents of 3BR
Home, furniture,
washer/dryer,
curio cabinets,
| crystal, china,
pottery & more.





HOMOSASSA
GNC Commercial
7311 Grover Cleveland
Blvd. 3/2 MH $69,900.
(603) 860-6660












CITRUS

SPRINGS
3/2/2, 2 yr old Pool
home in imacculate
condition,
Landscaped backyard.
$125.000 Priced to
sell!
CALL (570) 412-5194




Quiet Country Setting
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area
only 20 Mm. to Ocala
$129,900 Call
352-302-6784
for appt.




PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat,
horses, in-laws; there
is room for everyth-
ing! 4/3 w/7 car
garage/workshop &
in-law suite on 5.83 ac-
res.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164




2/2/2, REMODELED
NEW: Roof, AC, Kit,
Baths, Windows, Firs,
317 S Harrison.
Reduced $72,900.
Call 352-527-1239











Brentwood Villa
2/2/2 cul-de-sac
CompletelY updated!
1816 W. Jena Ct
OPEN SUN 12-3PM
$96,900
PRICED TO SELL!
FSBO 610-248-2090

Custom Home,
3 bedroom, 2% bath,
w/Master w/DBL
walk-ins + bath +
den/off. 2+ car garage.
1 Acre. MUST SEE!
$249,900.
352-860-0444.


HERNANDO
Citrus Hills Pool
Home
4/3/2+, circular
drive,
1 acre lot, below
$200k 352-527-7856


-oms
ARBOR LAKES
Fantastic Dream
Home In Active Senior
Community $169,900
2,100 sf, 3BR/2BA/2GA
Split Floor Plan w/Pool
Call (352) 726-6564




3/2 Move In Ready Villa
in Windemere. Beauti-
fully Maintained with up-
graded features. Prem-
ier location close to boat
ramp, trail & downtown.
MLS#359594 $229,500
Call Mynam Reulen
(352) 613-2644
Weston Properties, LLC
Unique stilt home off
581. Great loc to town,
shopping, & hospital.
2br/lba, w/ rap around
porch. Needs some
TLC. Sold as is.
$33,900 (352) 419-6227




3b/2ba den MH
on land off US 19
newer c/h/a carpet &
vinyl, clean RV Hkup.
fence **$39900**
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie 352-634-6340
The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo
Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558






MUST SELL

4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell






4/2/3 HEATED POOL
lots of extras!
SELLER MOTIVATED!
reduced to 210k
352-688-6500 or
352-212-5023


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Sugarmill Woods
House for Sale
2/2/2, Call for More
Info. 334-691-4601
(850) 776-7528














Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!

I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503












GAIL STERNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
352-422-4298
aail@citrusrealtor
.corn
www.citrusrealtor
.com
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.

I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!








DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


LI



TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant




Brooksville Deeded
spacious, shaded cnr
lot, 1 BR/1BA, Large FL
room, Large storage
shed & patio. 55+ RV
Park w/ heated pool,
and music activities,
$36,000 352-848-0448,
352- 428-0462 anytime

Waerfront
^Homes^I


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA VANDEBOE
Broker (R)
Owner
Plantation Re-
alty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near
KINGS BAY $425,000.
Make Offers
352-563-9857

YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor












ROD KENNER
352-436-3531
ERA
Suncoast Realty









SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFure oast
Properlies.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"




% ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact fee
credit, high and dry,
trees, $11,000 obo
(352) 795-3710
INVERNESS, FL
3 miles east of Inv;
5-20ac wooded/some
cleared, owner finance
available.
Owner is licensed Real
Estate Broker,
Ed Messer.
ed.messer@yahoo.com
NORTH CITRUS
1.4 ac. Cleared, fenced,
high & dry. Paved road.
Elec., pump/well, septic.
Owner finan. No
mobiles. $13,900
CALL 352-897-4195




HOMOSASSA Wooded
Lot on Lee Woods Dr.,
has Wetlands, with
River access, but not
on river $6,000.
352-621-1664




AIRBOAT
13ft x 7ft, 500 HP Cad-
ilIac, turn key boat
$9,500 obo Call Jim for
details (813) 361-4929,
BAYLINER 175
2007, Bownder, garage
kept, Bimini top, custom
cover, depth finder, only
44 hrs on motor,pnstine
condition! $14,000.
352-560-7377



MUST SELL


BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motor,AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth
finder, 2001 Rolls
float on trailer worth
$1000. Comes
w/spare motor Has
service manual,
2nd owner $2500
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855

LL BEAN
16 ft, ABS, canoe,
with paddle &
jackets, $650 obo
(352) 628-3194
McKee
Fishing Boat 14ft,
60H Mercury Motor
plus trailer, $2200
352-270-3332


STAR CRAFT
'09 Pontoon, 20 ft w/
trailer, 50hp, like new
condition $11,400 OBO
(618) 444-9425
TRI PONTOON
BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
(352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
WELLCRAFT 1989
18' Sport C/C, T top,
150 Yam. Alum TIr,
Great Cond. $5800
Cr Rvr (513) 260-6410



ITASCA MERIDIAN
36 Ft, 2005 Motor Home
350HP Cat Diesel 55K
miles, no smoke/pets
6 Michelin Tires, New
2010 qn w/sleep No.
mattress & overhead
fan. W/D combo
$71,000 obo.
(352) 419-7882
MONTEGO BAY 35ft
5th wheel '06, 3 slides
kept undercover, Exc
cond. Truck Avail.
LOADED
$27,000 (352) 564-2756
NATIONAL RV
2006 Tropical One
owner,34ft, 26000
miles,no smoke/pets,
300HP Cummins die-
sel,2 slides, 6 new ti-
res, 3yr
warranty,many extras.
$87000. Well main-
tained. 352-341-4506
SUNNYBROOK
2008, 35FT Fifth Wheel
3 slides, electric awning
fireplace, 2 ac's, 50 amp
king bed, pmts assum-
able @ $424 per mnth.
352-279-3544
WASTE TANK
Thetford 27 Gallon.
4 wheel smart tote,
premuim portable
Waste Tank $110 obo
(352) 746-9851




5TH WHEEL
33FT
GOOD CONDITION
MUST SELL
(423) 202-0914
Brooksville Deeded
spacious, shaded cnr
lot, 1BR/1BA, Large FL
room, Large storage
shed & patio. 55+ RV
Park w/ heated pool,
and music activities,
$36,000 352-848-0448,
352- 428-0462 anytime
HI-LO TRAVEL
TRAILER 2003, tow
lite model 22-03t,exc.
cond.
$6000 obo
352-422-8092
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
ROCKWOOD
'04, 29 ft., Ultra Lite,
SS. Appls Qn. Bd., Full
Bath, all equip. incl'd
$8,500 obo, 382-0153
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, kg bd,like new,
60amp serve. NADA
$29K asking $25K
obo 352-382-3298
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945



TOPPER
8 ft Red Fiberglass
must sell $200 obo
Lecanto 941-504-0899



**BEST PRICE**
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
**352-426-4267**
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition, Ti-
tle, No Title, Bank
Lien,
No Problem, Don't
Trade it in. We Will
Pay up to $25K Any
Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ



AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE.
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 563-1 9 0 2
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.


Homosassa Fl.
BUICK
2007, Lucerne, CXL
55K miles, Leather
$13,500. obo
Call Troy (352)621-7113

vvvvvvv
CADILLAC
1997 De Ville Tan with
black imitation rag
top, fully loaded ,
good runner-norstar
engine,only 97000
miles, good
tires-$2999.00. Jim
(941)-705-1795
CHEVROLET
'01 Corvette Corvette
6 speed, black on
black, $14,500
(352) 613-2333


CLASSIFIED



CHEVROLET
2002, Camaro Z28
$9,495.
352-341-0018
FORD
'01, Taurus, 140K miles
Ice cold Air, good tires,
brakes, runs good,
$2,200, 352-201-6958
FORD
2005, Five Hundred
LMT, 40K miles,
leather, V6 $9,980
Call Troy 352-621-7113
FORD
2006 Focus ZXW, SE
4DR, WGN. 85k miles
$5,800 obo Call Troy
(352) 621-7113
FORD
Mustang Cobra, Indy
500 Pace Car-1994,
Convertible, 7100 mi,
Gar. kept 252-339-3897
GAS SAVER!
1999 Saturn SL $2000
Tan/Gold. Auto. Engine
and Trans are solid.
196,000 miles. Clean in-
side and out. Call Steve:
352-613-0746
Harley Davidson
'03, Super Glide,
low miles, $7,500
(352) 613-2333
HONDA
2011 CRV LX, 19K mi-
les, likenew, 4 Cyl.
$19,950
Call Troy 352-621-7113
HYUNDAI
2006 Elantra, GLS 90K
miles, likenew, 4 DR,
auto. $6,800
Call Troy 352-621-7113
MAZDA
2007, RX8 Looking for
A sports Car, Look No
Further!!! This is A Must
See...Call for an Appt.
and Pricing
352-628-4600
MERCURY
2004, Grand Marquis,
Leather and Loaded
To Many Options to
List. Call Today
Before It's Gone
Call 352-628-4600
MITSUBISHI
2011 Galant, Low Mi.
Great fuel economy,
Priced to sell
Call 352-628-4600
For Appointment
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

MUSTANG
1985, coupe, 58k mile
new tires, 4 cyl, auto
$2000 obo
(352) 228-4012
MUSTANG GT 03
63k,ShowCar,Super
charger, lots of goodies!
Chrome, $18k OBO
(352) 228-4012
NISSAN
'04, 350 Z, Convertible,
2 Door, automatic, sil-
ver, 53k miles, $12,500
obo (352) 382-4239
OLDSMOBILE '99
Cutlass, custom, 4 DR,
loaded, good mi., V6,
cruise, tilt, gar. clean
$3,375. (352) 212-9383
PONTIAC
1999 TransAm 5.7Llter
V8, 62,700 mi,
Show Quality, $7500.
(352) 726-8336
Cell 352-302-5569
PONTIAC
2008, G6,
4 Door, Cold AC
Call 352-628-4600
For Pricing
PORSCHE
'99, 911 Carrera, black
exterior, black interior
62,600 org. mi $25,900
386-334-2559 CELL
TOYOTA
2000, Camry LE
V6,183K miles Super
Clean $5,800. obo
Troy (352) 621-7113
TOYOTA
2007, Yaris, 59K miles,
2 DR, H/B $7,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113




AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR Show
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. FEB. 3. 2013
1-800-438-8559

CHEVY
89 Corvette, White
needs trans $3250
352-601-0355







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
wth a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966





CHEVROLET
1994,C/K 2500
$2,880
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2005, Silverado
2500 HD, Diesel crew
cab, $13,880
352-341-0018
DODGE
1997 Ram 2500 Truck
Cummins Diesel, 2WD,
AutoTrans,116,000


miles. Garage kept.
Well maintained. Has
been used as a com-
mute vehicle. $7,800
firm. 352-464-4690
FORD
1999 F150 Good
condition, 4 new tires
$4200 352-270-7420
FORD
2003 F150
Ex Cab, $8,990
352-341-0018
FORD
'98, Ranger Splash,
very well kept, cold AC,
6 cyl., auto, Tires like
new, $3,200 obo
(352) 601-0572
FORD
F150, 1978, 4x4
Runs good, 6" Lift kit,
$1,650 obo
(352) 564-4598


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013 CIL


a
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
TOYOTA
2002, Tacoma,
Crew Cab, $8,770.
352-341-0018
TOYOTA
2004, 4 Runner Sport
2WD, 94K mi, Leather
$12,800. obo
Call Troy 352-621-7113




CADILLAC
2007, Escalade,
44k miles, Luxury
NAV, $29,500.
Call Troy (352)
621-7113
CHEVY TRAIL-
BLAZER LT 05
exc. cond. asking $6000
obo, in Hernando
(904) 923-2902
DODGE
1998 Durango, 4WD
SLT, 5.2L, 103K ong mi.
All options, one owner
$1000 352-527-8636




JEEP
2001 4cyl "TJ" Auto.,
A/C, soft top with lift kit.
not a mudder, real pretty
Low miles $10,000
352-220-4634
JEEP
2004, Wrangler X 4WD,
Only 57K miles,
Hard Top $13,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113




KIA
2006 Sedona,
Great Family Van,
7 Pass, low mi. Call
today for Low Price


BADlBU OlUY lultata
2011 "ready to hunt"
Only $5998.
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS
2002, SPORTSMAN
700 CC 4X4 AUTO
READY FOR THE MUD
ONLY $4288
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS RZR 800 LE
TIME TO PLAY HARD
ONLY $8388
(352) 621-3678




CF MOTO
2008, 250 Trike
772 miles, $2,495.
(352) 726-6128
FASHION
2007 250 cc;
1,500 miles; $1,200
(352) 726-6128
GOLDWING
1985 Blue;
39,155 miles; $2,495
(352) 726-6128
GOLDWING
1985 Limited Edition -
Gold; Fuel injected;
53,012 miles; $3,000
(352) 726-6128
GOLDWING
1998, SE with Voyager
Trike Kit Tan;
55,200 miles; $9,000
(352) 726-6128

Harley Davidson
2005, 883
LOW MILES
$3,995.

Harley Davidson
2006, STREET GLIDE
EZ FINANCE
$11,500.

HONDA
2009, VT750 AERO,
CLEAN
$4,995.

SUZUKI
2001, VOLUSIA
EZ FINANCE
$2,995.

KAWASAKI
1999, NOMAD
RUNS GREAT
$3,800.

LUCKY U CYCLES
352-330-0047
WWW.LUCKYU
CYCLES.COM


Harley-DAVIDSON
2006 FLHTPI Clean
bike, great looks, 88 ci,
5 speed, low miles 19K,
accident free, never
played down, garage
kept, two tone bk/wt, all
service done by HD
dealer 352513-4294
asking $10,500
HARLEY-Davidson
Leather Jacket LG as
New, $300. OBO
Two shorty motorcycle
Helmets S/M & L/XL
$50ea 352-746-6125
HONDA
'04, 750 Shadow Aero.
Runs & looks great!
$2,995. Firm
(352) 344-0084
HONDA BLACK BIRD
CBR 1100 LOW LOW
MILES ONLY $3488.00
(352) 621-3678
HONDA SPIRIT
2002, ExcTires, Bags,
WS, Sissy Bar, Cobra
Pipes. 28k miles.
$2,000 (352) 476-3688
HONDA ST1300
2006 MADE TO TOUR
ONLY $7786
(352) 621-3678
KAWASKI NINFA
650
LIKE NEW ONLY
$5488 (352) 621-3678
KYMCO
2009, AJILITY
SCOOTER GREAT
GAS SAVER ONLY
$998 (352) 621-3678
SCOOTER
50 CC, like new, 400
miles, runs great
$850 OBO
(352) 746-0167
(315) 439-6005
SCOOTER
Lifan Industries, 2008
50cc, looks & runs
great. $750 obo
(352) 436-5036
SUZUKI
1999,1400 Intruder
with Lealman Trike Kit -
24,283 miles; $10,000
(352) 726-6128


SUZUKI BURGMAN
AUTOMATIC TWIST
AND GO FUN ONLY
$4686 (352) 621-3678


CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492

SUZUKI GSXR 750
195 MILES "HOLD ON"
ONLY $9996
(352) 621-3678


VICTORY CROSS
ROADS
"GREAT American
MADE CRUSIER"
ONLY $12888
(352) 621-3678


875-0208 FCRN 02-21 sale Diamond Self Storage
PUBLIC NOTICE Notice of Public Sale
Diamond Self Storage wishing to avail itself of the provisions of applicable laws of this
state, Civil Code Section 83.801 83.809, Hereby gives notice of sale under said law,
to wit:

On February 21.2013. Diamond Self Storage located at 4239 N Modelwood Dr, Bev-
erly Hills, FL 34465, phone 352-746-6997, at 10:00 am of that day. Diamond Self Stor-
age will conduct a public sale to the highest bidder, for cash, of household goods,
business property, personal property and misc. items, etc.
Tenant Name Unit#
Contents (as listed by tenant)
Chris Chapman 437
Household Goods
Donna Collins 556
Household Goods
Ann Delicate 446
Household Goods
Troy Hilton 712
Household Goods
Nathan Roberts 406
Household Goods
Reidina Rome 411
Household Goods
The sale is being made to satisfy an owner's lien.
The public is invited to attend.
Units will be open for visual inspection at time of sale.
Owner reserves the right to bid and to refuse and reject any and all bids.
A $100 (cash) refundable cleaning deposit is required to bid.
February 1 & 8, 2013.


AdinitainI


879-0208 FCRN
Richard J. Kuter File No: 2072-CP-629 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2012-CP-629 Division
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RICHARD J. KUTER
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Richard J. Kuter, deceased, whose date of
death was March 8, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida
34450 4299. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
Al other creditors of the decedent and other persons having daims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WIHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is February 1, 2013.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Gregory G. Gay, Esquire
Florida Bar Number: 162024
The Nature Coast Law Offices of
Gregory G. Gay, PA.
5318 Balsam St.
New Port Richey, FL 34652
Telephone: (352) 794 0025, Fax: (727) 848 4466
E-Mail: gregg@willtrust.com, Secondary E-Mail: debora@willtrust.com
Personal Representative:
Anne N. Kuter
215 S. Jeffery Street
Beverly Hills, Florida 34465
February 1 & 8, 2013.


856-0208
Keesling Mikayla, 2012-DR-1445 NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY FLORIDA
Case No. 2012-DR-1445
IN RE: ADOPTION OF MIKAYLA JESSE KEESLING
A minor child
NOTICE OF ACTION
(No Property)
TO; MATTHEW RYAN MORRISON, Address unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that a PETITION FOR ADOPTION BY RELATIVES has been filed
against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to
wit, on THOMAS C. RANEW, JR., Thomas C. Ranew, Jr., P.A., the Plaintiff's attorney,
whose address is Post Office Box 956, Silver Springs, Florida, 34489, on or before
February 18, 2013, and file the original with the Clerk of this court either before serv-
ice on the Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be
enterered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition.
DATED ON January 7, 2013.
(SEAL)
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk
Circuit and County Courts
By: /s/ Kathy Stalbaum, Deputy Clerk
Published four (4) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 18 & 25 &
February 1,8, 2013.


867-0201 FCRN
vs. Seymour, Kathleen 2072-CA-1940 NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.:2012-CA-1940
CITIMORTGAGE, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
KATHLEEN M. SEYMOUR, et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE KMS TRUST, DATED DECEMBER 4, 2007
Last Known Address Unknown
Also Attempted At: 5585 S. PLANTAIN POINT, LECANTO, FL 34461
Current Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following
described property:

LOT 4, BLOCK "L" OF LEISURE ACRES, UNIT 5, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 88, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it, on Choice Legal Group, Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is
1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or before February 25,
2013, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in
the (Please publish in CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE) and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the
complaint.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN OR-
DER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO
THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINATOR,
TELEPHONE (352) 341-6700, 110 N APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS FL, 34450, AT LEAST 7
DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIV-
ING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN
7 DAYS. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 18th day of January, 2013.
(SEAL)
BETTY STRIFLER, As Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ Kathy Stalbaum, As Deputy Clerk
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 25 & February 1,
2013


868-0201
Vs. Parlier Frederick 112011CA004044)0OOO(XNOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO 112011CA004044XXXXXX
BANK OF AMERICA, N A, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP,
Plaintiff,
vs
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, CREDITORS, AND ALL
OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST FREDERICK
PARLIER A/K/A FREDERICK W PARLIER, DECEASED, et al Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO VICKI PARLIER
Last Known Address
708 GREYSTONE LANE, APT 2C
NEWARK, DE 19711
Current Residence is Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to forecose a mortgage on the following described
property in Citrus County, Florida
LOT 52, BLOCK "F", OF OAK RIDGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,
AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 14, AT PAGE 62 THROUGH 65, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on SHD LEGAL GROUP PA, Plaintiffs attorneys, whose address is 2691 East
Oakland Park Blvd, Suite 303, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33306, within 30 days from first
date of publication. and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition
DATED on January 15, 2013
(SEAL)
ANGELA VICK, As Clerk of Courts
By/s/ Kathy Stalbaum, As Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing spe-
cial accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the
Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Gadsen County
Courthouse. Telephone 850 875 8601 or 1 800 955 8770 via Florida Relay Service.
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle two (2) times January 25 & February 1, 2013


869-0201 FCRN
vs. Johnson, Craig 2012 CA 001574A Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No.:2012 CA 001574A
Bank of America, N.A.
Plaintiff
Vs.
CRAIG M. JOHNSON A/K/A CRAIG MICHAEL JOHNSON, DEDRIE E. JOHNSON


Nofices to Creditors/
Administration I


Notices to Creditors/
Administration I


Fore l l


Foreclosure Sale]
Action Notices


Foreclosure Sale]
Action Notices








C12 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013


F g I -


A/K/A DEDRIE ELIZABETH JOHNSON et al
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
To the following Defendant:
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DEDRIE E. JOHNSON A/K/A DEDRIE ELIZABETH JOHNSON
507 LAKE STREET
INVERNESS, FL 34450;
9702 E GOLDFINCH LANE
INVERNESS, FL 34450
937 S SHARD TERRACE
INVERNESS, FL 34450
17 NORTH ARCHWOOD DRIVE
INVERNESS, FL 34450
DEDRIE E. JOHNSON A/K/A DEDRIE ELIZABETH JOHNSON
507 LAKE STREET
INVERNESS, FL 34450
9702 E GOLDFINCH LANE
INVERNESS, FL 34450
937 S SHARD TERRACE
INVERNESS, FL 34450
17 NORTH ARCHWOOD DRIVE
INVERNESS, FL 34450
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following
described property:
COMMENCE AT THE SE CORNER OF THE NI2 OF S '2 OF SE40OF SECTION 4, TOWN-
SHIP 19 SOUTH, RANGE 20 EAST, THENCE N 0 DEG. 02'10" E., ALONG THE EAST LINE OF
SAID SECTION 4, A DISTANCE OF 82.26 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION OF THE NORTH
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO 478 AND THE EAST LINE OF LOT 3, OF R.G.
HOBBS SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 1, PAGE 22, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA,
THENCE 89 DEG. 48' 30" W., ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 1021.47
FEET, THENCE .0 DEG. 11'30" W. 150 FEET TO THE P.C. OF A CURVE CONCAVE SOUTH-
WESTERLY, HAVING CENTRAL ANGLE OF 16 AND A RADIUS OF 348 FEET, THENCE
NORTHWESTERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, A DISTANCE OF 94.94 FEET TO
THE P.T. OF SAID CURVE, AND RADIUS OF 325 FEET, THENCE NORTHWESTERLY,
ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, A DISTANCE OF 79.41 FEET TO THE P.T. OF SAID
CURVE, THENCE N. 2 DEG. 1'30" W. 375.59 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE
CONTINUE N. 2 DEG 11'30" W. 207.49 FEET, THENCE N. 87 DEG. 48'30" E., 209.91 FEET,
MORE OR LESS, TO THE WATERS OF A CANAL, THENCE ALONG SAID WATERS THE
FOLLOWING COURSE AND DISTANCES; S. 1 DEG.15'21" W.33.82 FEET, THENCE S. 4 DEG.
56'41" E, 173.94 FEET TO A POINT THAT BEARS N. 87 DEG. 48'30" E. FROM THE POINT
OF BEGINNING, THENCE S.87 DEG. 48'30" W. 216.24 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING, BEING LOT 7, OF ARCHWOOD ESTATES AN UNRECORDED
SUBDIVISION
A/K/A 17 North Archwood Drive, Inverness, FL 34450
Has been filed against yon and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it, on Udren Law Offices, P.C., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is
4651 Sheridan Street, Suite 460, Hollywood, FL 33021 on or before February 25, 2013.
a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in Citrus
County Chronicle and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before serv-
ice on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint.
You have 30 calendar days after the first publication of this Notice to file a written re-
sponse to the attached complaint with the clerk of this court. A phone call will not
protect you. Your written response, including the case number given above and the
names of the parties, must be filed if you want the court to hear your side of the
case. If you do not file your response on tine, you may lose the case, and your
wages, money, and property may thereafter be taken without further warning from
the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right
away. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney referral service or a
legal aid office (listed in the phone book).
This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a
disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,
you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please con-
tact the ADA Coordinator at the Office of the Trial Court Administrator, Citrus County
Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, telephone (352)
341-6700, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hearing impaired call 711.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 15th day of January,
2013.
(SEAL)
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
As Clerk of the Court by:
By: /s/ Kathy Stalbaum, As Deputy Clerk
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 25 & February 1,2013


877-0208 FCRN
V. Alexander Schramm Case No: 2011 CA 004261
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2011 CA 004261
DIVISION: A
LOUISE V. CONRAD, an individual
Plaintiff,
v.
ALEXANDER SCHRAMM, ETAL.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: SUNIL TALWAR, Trustee of the Sunil Talwar Revocable
Trust,
SUNIL TALWAR, individually,
RAJ PROPERTIES & INVESTMENTS, LLC, a Florida limited lia-
bility
company:
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an aclon to foredose a mortgage on the following
property in Citrus County, Florida:
Lots 6, 7,8, 9, 10, 11, and 12, Block "J", U.S. 19, No. 3 ADDITION, according to the plat
thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 123, Public Records of Citrus County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on Mercer Law, PA., Attn.: Matt Mercer, Esq., the plaintiff's attor-


CLASSIFIED



ney, whose address is 2804 North 5th Street, Suite 102, St. Augustine, Florida 32084,
on or before the 4th day of March, 2013, and file the original with the clerk of this
court either before service on the plaintiff s attorney or immediately thereafter; oth-
erwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
DATED ON this 18th day of January, 2013
Angela Vick, As Clerk of the Court
By:/s/ Kathy Stalbaum, As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
February 1 & 8,2013.


878-0208 FCRN
vs Unknown/Sergio Ortiz Case No 09-2012-CA-001767 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.09-2012-CA-001767
DIVISION
NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS,DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY THROUGH,UNDER, OR AGAINST
SERGIO L LOPEZ, JR A/K/A SERGIO LOUIS LOPEZ, JR A/K/A SERGIO LOUIS LOPEZ
A/K/A SERGIO LUIS LOPEZ ORTIZ, DECEASED et al,
Defendants)
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO'
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS,DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,UNDER, ORAGAINST
SERGIO L. LOPEZ, JR. A/K/A SERGIO LOUIS LOPEZ, JR. A/K/A SERGIO LOUIS LOPEZ
A/K/A SERGIO LUIS LOPEZ ORTIZ, DECEASED
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS UNKNOWN
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD ORALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTERESTS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an acton to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in
CITRUS County, Florida'
LOT 21, BLOCK 318, INVERNESS HIGHLANDS
WEST, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 19 THROUGH 33, IN-
CLUSIVE, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses
within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, PL,
Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida
33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint or petition
Thi notice shall be published once each week fortwo consecutive weeks in the Citrus
County Chronicle
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 23rd day of January,
2013
(SEAL) Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Court
By'/s/ Kathy Stalbaum, As Deputy Clerk
F12014122-F12014122
**See Americans with Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact:Mr. John D. Sullivan, 110 N. Apopka Street, Inverness, FL
34450-4231
Phone:352-341-6700, Fax: 352-341-7008
February 1 & 8, 2013


851-0208
Citation, D.M.
PUBLIC NOTICE
CITATION
IN THE JUVENILE COURT OF LAURENS COUNTY
STATE OF GEORGIA
IN THE INTEREST OF:
D.M. SEX: Male FILE# 34.13920.1233
DOB: 12/24/11 CASE # 2012J-0641
A Child Under Eighteen (18) Years of Age
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN, RACHEL EAVES, and anyone clawing to have a pa-
rental interest in the minor child named above. The father of said child is LEONARD
MORALS.
YOU ARE FURTHER NOTIFIED that the above syled action seeking custody in the
Department of Family and Children Services of the named child was filed against
you in said Court on the 27th day of November, 2012, and that by reason of an Or-
der for Service by Publication entered by the Court on the 10th day of January,
2013;
YOU ARE HEREBYCOMMANDED AND REQUIRED to appear before the Juvenile
Court of Laurens County, Georgia, in Dublin, Georgia, on the 3rd day of April, 2013,
at 9:00 o'clock A.M. The hearing is for the purpose of custody in the Department.
WITNESS THE HONORABLE SAMUEL A. HILBUN, Judge of said Court, this
10th day
of January, 2013.
SAMUEL A. HILBUN, JUDGE
LAURENS COUNTY JUVENILE COURT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DUBLIN JUDICIAL COURT
Presented by: Charles C. Butler, Attorney for
Laurens County Department of Family and Children Services
PO Drawer 4430, Dublin GA 31040-4430
State Bar No. 099517, 34.13920.1233
Published four (4) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January18, 25 &
February 1, 8. 2013


873-0201 FCRN
2/13 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
ED'S AUTO & TOWING
INC gives Notice of Fore-
closure of Lien and intent
to sell these vehicles on

Meeting "IB
Notfices


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY
13, 2013@ 9 AM at 4610 S
FLORIDA AVE INVERNESS
FL 34450 pursuant to sub-
section 713.78 of the Flor-
ida Statutes. ED'S
AUTO & TOWING INC
reserves the right to ac-
cept or reject any and/or

Meeting^^
Notjices^


all bids.
1984 LANDA VESSEL
VIN # LB010620M84H
along with Year:
unknown
Boat trailer with no VIN#.
February 1,2013


Meeing^^
Notices^


876-0201 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER AN ORDINANCE TO ESTABLISH OR CHANGE
REGULATIONS AFFECTING THE USE OF LAND
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners (BCC) proposes to adopt the fol-
lowing by ordinance:
AN ORDINANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, A POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE
OF FLORIDA, AMENDING THE CITRUS COUNTY LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE ATLAS AND
THE MASTER PLAN OF CRYSTAL GLEN BY REDESIGNATING THE ZONING
OFAPPROXIMATELY 3.7 ACRES FROM PLANNED RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT
(RECREATION AREA) TO PLANNED RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT (PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES/OFFICE WITH A TELECOMMUNICATIONS TOWER); REVISING CONDITIONS OF
APPROVAL FOR CRYSTAL GLEN REGARDING THE RECREATION AREA; PROVIDING FOR
APPLICABILITY; PROVIDING FOR MODIFICATION; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND
PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
AA- 12-05 Timothy C. Pitts for Crystal Glen Proerties LLC is requesting to amend the
Crystal Glen Master Plan and the Land Development Code Atlas from PDR, Planned
Residential Development (Recreation Area), to PDR, Planned Residential Develop-
ment (Professional Services/Office) with provision for a telecommunications tower,
pursuant to Section 3750., Commercial Wireless Telecommunications Towers, Struc-
tures, and Antennas, of the LDC.
Property Location: Section 4, Township 19 South, Ranae 18 East, Crystal Glen Tract A,
as recorded in Plat Book 14, Pages 21-27, public records of Citrus County, FL
(Lecanto area). A complete legal description of the property is on file with the Land
Development Division.
The public hearing on the Ordinance will be held on Tuesday, February 12, 2013 at
5:01 P.M., in Room 100, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida.
Interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the pro-
posed ordinance amendment.
A copy of the proposed application and supporting materials is available for public
inspection and copying between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. at the Land
Development Division, Suite 141, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida. For
more information about this application please contact a Planner at the Depart-
ment of Planning and Development, Land Development Division, (352) 527-5239.
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the board with respect to
any matter considered at this hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceed-
ings and, for such purpose, he or she may need to insure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings is made, which record includes testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352)
341-6565, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech im-
paired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Chairman
Board of County Commissioners
Citrus County, Florida
February 1,2013.


862-0208 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
COLLEGE OF CENTRAL
FLORIDA


It is the College of Central
Florida's intent to pursue
establishing a SUBWAY
eatery at the College of
Central Florida's Citrus


Campus.
Published 3 times in the
Citrus County Chronicle
January 25, 2013
February 1 & 8, 2013


874-0201 FCRN
02-04 Workshop
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the City Council of the City of Crystal River, Florida that a
JOINT WORKSHOP with the WATERFRONTS ADVISORY BOARD has been scheduled for
Monday, February 4, 2013 @ 6:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers at City Hall, 123 N.W.
Highway 19, Crystal River, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the City of Crystal River, City Manager's
Office, 123 NW Highway 19, Crystal River, FL 34428, (352) 795-4216, at least two (2)
days before the meeting.
February 1,2013.


201R TOYOTA


A Bold Design. An Inviting Interior. Intelligent Excellence.


Entune
Makes life on the road more convenient,
entertaining and informative.




Available Blid Spot Monitor (BSM)
with Rear Cross-traffic Alert (RCTA)
Radar technology designed to detect and
identify vehicles that may not be visible


www.villagetovota.com


SeBinTM
A non-slip surface for your cell phone
or MP3 device.




IntelliTouchTM
Touch to operate elegant, low-profile controls
for climate control and audio systems.


VILLAGE TOYOTA ta


CR YSTAL RI EWER 352-628-5100


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