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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 01-30-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03016

Full Text


Getting even: Lecanto looks for win at CR /B1


03 I


Partly cloudy,
slight chance of
thunderstorms.
PAGE A4


CITRU-S CO U N T Yl





wwhcRONICLE.
www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


T IIY


VOL. 118 ISSUE 176


NATIONAL NEWS:


Jury recommends death penalty


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer


Personalized
The idea of making
guns with technology
that keeps them from
firing if they ever get
into the wrong hands
has been around for
years./Page A8
WALL STREET:
Stocks up
Strong earnings
from Pfizer
push Dow close
to 14,000./
Page All
OPINION:
The
nation feels
Florida is a
joke when it
comes to
elections.


WORLD NEWS:


Egypt unrest
An Egyptian army
general demands the
ouster of the country's
president./Page A13
WORLD NEWS:


*P INVERNESS Death was
l ,, the recommendation of the
jury in the case of John
William Campbell for the
slaying of his father John
Henry Campbell, 68, with a
John hammer-like hatchet
Campbell It took jurors less than an


hour to return with the rec-
ommendation to Circuit
Court Judge Ric Howard.
The vote was 8-4 in favor of
death.
On Friday, the same jury
convicted the younger Camp-
bell of first-degree murder in
his father's death. While the
12-person panel had to be
unanimous in deciding a


guilty verdict, a simply ma-
jority vote was needed to rec-
ommend to Howard whether
Campbell should head to
death row or be handed life
without parole. The ultimate
decision of life or death is
Howard's, but he is required
by law to give "great weight"
to the jury recommendation.
From the start of the trial,


Campbell and his attorneys,
public defenders Devon
Sharkey and Michael Lam-
berti, never denied he killed
his father in August 2010 by
chopping him in the head
multiple times, afterward
leading police on a high-
speed chase on U.S. 19,
See Page A4


Ride to live, live to ride


Nuke test
If North Korea tests a
nuclear explosive, no
one might be able to
confirm it./Page A14


Tablet time
Middleschoolers like
their iPads./Page C1
SIGN UP NOW:


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Rick and Pam Northrop of the Gold Wing Road Riders Association cruise along State Road 44 in Lecanto last week on their Honda Gold
Wing motorcycle. The couple ride regularly and travel throughout Florida on their bike.

Couple works to educate motorcyclists and drivers on safety issues


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
-LECANTO
Pam and Rick Northrop
are motorcyclists with a
mission: safety.
While they enjoy two-wheel
travel on their Honda Gold
Wing, they approach motorcy-
cle riding with a certain
knowledge and attitude.
"We dress for the slide,"
Rick Northrop said. "Not for
the ride."
And their safety apparel -
helmets, protective clothing
and reflective colors is just
part of the equation.
Their bright white bike has a
pulsating headlight, adjustable
air shocks, intercom, cruise
control and other extras.
As district educator for the
state of Florida for the Gold
Wing Road Riders Associa-
tion, he teaches motorcycle
safety by example in addition


The Honda Gold Wing is a well-known touring motorcycle that provides riders a quiet ride on the open
road, Northrop said.


to holding seminars.
He has held the position
since January after being as-
sistant director for a year and
has been involved with the as-
sociation since 2005. But he
has been riding considerably
longer, starting on dirt bikes as
a teen.
With 35 chapters in the


state, the couple travels from
Pensacola to Miami. They also
attend out-of-state national
rallies. Last week, they
headed to Fort Myers then
over to Miami to teach a CPR
first-aid class.
Their role as motorcycle
safety instructors was a natu-
ral fit, since both of them have


previous education careers.
Both are former teachers. He
is also a retired minister and
has been a school principal
and seminary professor.
"So education is no change
for us, it's just been part of the
evolution," he said.
See Page A5


Fishing clinic
FWC, Citrus County
teaming up again to
offer youth fishing
clinic./Page C4

Comics . . .C6
Community ...... .C4
Crossword ....... .C5
Editorial ........ A12
Entertainment . .B6
Horoscope ....... .B6
Lottery Numbers .B4
Lottery Payouts .B6
Movies .......... .C6
Obituaries ....... .A6
Classifieds ....... .C7
TV Listings ....... C5


6 1l iilil 8578 2002


Tightrope walker


wows Sarasota crowd


Wallenda walks wire suspended 200 feet up
Associated Press
SARASOTA Famed
daredevil Nik Wallenda
glided 500 feet across a
wire suspended 200 feet
above the ground Tues-
day, wowing several thou-
sand people below in his
hometown of Sarasota.
Without a tether or
safety net, Wallenda was
the lone figure against a
blue sky, aided only by a
balancing pole. He made Associated Press
the death-defying stunt Barb Renaud of Bradenton, center, cheers with other
spectators Tuesday as aerialist Nik Wallenda finishes
See Page A5 his skywalk over U.S. 41 in downtown Sarasota.


Board looks to cut


$2M from budget


Members fret

about impact

on students
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
INVERNESS Citrus
County School Board
members are looking to
cut $2 million from next
year's budget with mini-
mal impact on classrooms.
The school board is fac-
ing a $3.7 million deficit,
based on a drop in student
enrollment, impacts of the
reduced Progress Energy


Florida
tax pay-
ment, and
an ex-
pected in-
crease in
S property

Thomas ance.
Kennedy Board
said proposed members
cuts could hit expect to
thousands of make up
students. $1.7 mil-
lion of that
deficit from the district's
reserve funds. The rest,
they said, should come in
areas that have the least


Page A5


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
78
LOW
56




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Come in today and discover your
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I


A2 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013







Page A3 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Pink paper effective in breast cancer fight


Fourteen women

needed folow-up

testing, treatment

ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
The figures are in, and women
responded to a free life-saving
opportunity.
As a result of the Chronicle's
Oct. 2 "Pink Paper" edition,
about 200 women received free
mammograms from Citrus Me-
morial Health System (CMHS).
The mammograms were offered
to women age 40 and older who
had no health insurance, had
not had a mammogram in the


THE AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY'S
ESTIMATES IN 2013 IN THE UNITED STATES:
* About 232,340 new cases of invasive breast cancer will be
diagnosed in women.
* About 64,640 new cases of carcinoma in situ (CIS) will be
diagnosed (CIS is non-invasive and is the earliest form of
breast cancer).
* About 39,620 women will die from breast cancer.


past year and were not pregnant
Fourteen women needed fur-
ther follow-up testing and
treatment.
CMHS Chief Executive Officer
Ryan Beaty and diagnostic im-
aging director David Wells of-
fered the free service to
qualified women who brought in
a Pink Paper to Citrus Memorial
Medical Office Building in In-


verness, Citrus Memorial
Healthcare Center at Allen
Ridge in Lecanto and Citrus Me-
morial Healthcare Center at
Sugarmill Woods in Homosassa.
As many of the uninsured
women who participated in the
free program had no primary
care physician to receive results
of their screenings, Joseph Ben-
nett, M.D., with Robert


Boissoneault Oncology
Institute, took on that
responsibility
"I volunteered to con-
tact patients with abnor- i,
malities and facilitate
the scheduling of any ap- .t
pointments needed," he
said. "With a lot of these Dr. J
women not having insur- Ben
ance, I wondered what volunt
their next step was." co
Breast cancer survivor patier
Lori Dyer understands abnor
the importance of early in*
detection. Thirteen years mamm
ago, she was stricken
with breast cancer and
commended Bennett for his
efforts and dedication to the
community.
"If we caught one person early,
it would be so worth it," Dyer


oseph
inett
eered to
intact
its with
malities
their
lograms.


said. "I am so grateful to
him for what he did."
For those who could
not get an appointment
through CMHS, another
resource is the National
Breast and Cervical
Cancer Early Detection
Program, which pro-
vides breast and cervi-
cal cancer early
detection testing to
women without health
insurance. To learn
more, call the Centers
for Disease Control and
Prevention at 800-232-


4636 or visit www.cdc.gov/cancer.
Chronicle reporter Eryn
Worthington can be contacted at
352-563-5660, ext. 1334, or
e worth ington @chronicle
online, com.


Pitch-perfect fundraiser for injured soldiers


Special to the Chronicle
High Octane Saloon in Homosassa recently hosted a Heart Strings for Heroes fundraiser, which was attended by Cpl. Joshua Langston White, a 2009 Crystal River
High School graduate who was the victim of an improvised explosive device in August 2012 while on patrol in the Kajaki District in the Helmand Province,
Afghanistan. Heart Strings for Heroes is a nonprofit corporation that provides the gift of music to military, firefighter and public servicemen and women who have
been injured in the line of duty. The organization assists in their rehabilitation through music therapy. High Octane's event raised $1,635 and had more than 100
riders participate in its poker run Jan. 13. The winner of the drawing for the electric guitar was Pattie Dermedi. Pictured are Josh White, left, and Cpl. John Michael
Vail, right, from Mississippi, who was paralyzed in a Humvee incident on Iraqi-Kuwaiti border.


Demolishing former funeral home site


MIKE WRIGHT/Chronicle
Inverness Public Works heavy-equipment operator Ron Hodges razes the Cason Funeral Home near
Wallace Brooks Park on Tuesday morning. The city purchased the property in 2007 for $475,000. The
building sat on the property since 1969, when Eli White built what was then the Dampier Funeral Home.
Luther Cason, of Brooksville, bought the funeral home in 1993 and changed the name. A nearby home,
built in the 1920s, was part of the city's purchase and razed in 2011 when officials determined it was
too damaged to save.


Correction
A listing on the weekly events calendar on Page C4
of Sunday's edition contained incorrect information. The
second annual Best Friend Fest from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Saturday at the Citrus County Auditorium is free.
Readers can alert The Citrus County Chronicle to any
errors in news articles by mailing newsdesk@chronicle
online.com or by calling 352-563-5660.


State's veterans receive French honor
DAYTONA BEACH Twenty-three World War II veterans are
being given France's highest honor in a ceremony in Daytona
Beach.
The veterans were awarded medals Tuesday at the Interna-
tional Motorsports Center deeming them knights in the National
Order of the Legion of Honor for their service liberating France.
-Associated Press


Around the COUNTY

MSBU to convene Feb. 6 in Citrus Springs
The Citrus Springs Municipal Services Benefit Unit will meet
at 9 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 6, at Citrus Springs Community
Center, 1570 W. Citrus Springs Blvd.
For information, call Larry Brock at 352-527-5478.
Democratic Club meets in Beverly Hills
The Central Citrus Democratic Club will meet at 11 a.m. Sat-
urday, Feb. 10, at the Central Ridge Library, at the corner or
Forest Ridge and Roosevelt boulevards in Beverly Hills.
Chamber luncheon set for Feb. 8
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce will have its
member lunch Friday, Feb. 8, at the Plantation on Crystal
River. Guest speakers are Citrus County Administrator Brad
Thorpe and Cathy Taylor, county management and budget di-
rector, who will discuss the Citrus County budget.
Networking begins at 11:30 a.m. Cost is $20 unless prepaid
at $18. Cost for nonmembers, who are welcome, is $22.
Reservations are required. To make reservations, call 352-
795-3149 or visit www.citruscountychamber.com.
C.R. 491 corridor workshop Thursday
Residents are invited to participate in a community work-
shop to guide the development of a segment of County Road
491 (North Lecanto Highway).
Citrus County is preparing a planning study for a segment of
the road designated as the C.R. 491 Corridor Planning Project
- which extends from State Road 44 north to County Road 486.
The study will identify needed infrastructure improvements
to provide a strategic planning approach, which will guide de-
velopment along the corridor and its future widening. The
study will include travel necessities, public water and sewer
amenities, comprehensive storm water management systems
and other essential utility services.
The workshop has been scheduled from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 31, at Lecanto Government Building, 3600 W.
Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto.
For information, call Jenette Collins at 352-527-5239 or
email Jenette.Collins@bocc.citrus.fl.us.


-From staff reports






A4 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013



DEATH
Continued from Page Al

culminating in his arrest.
The defense insisted
Campbell, 39, was de-
pressed and had an uneasy
relationship with his father
The prosecution team of
Rich Buxman and Pete
Magrino dismissed those
notions and said Campbell
planned his crime, then
executed his father and
robbed his corpse to go on
a spending spree and
smoke crack cocaine.
In Tuesday's penalty
phase, the defense's por-
trait of their client's men-
tal state and stress came to
the fore.
The prosecution coun-
tered by painting Camp-
bell as a calculating and
cruel person with a history
of violence and crime who
murdered his father in
cold blood just so he could
spend his money
The prosecution had to
present aggravating fac-
tors to jurors to convince
them to recommend death
for Campbell.
Two of their witnesses
helped make the case for
them. Angela Thatcher was
Campbell's sister-in-law
and testified that she was
attacked by him in 1998.
Thatcher recounted a har-
rowing story to jurors about
finding Campbell hiding in
her closet and the ensuing
struggle to wrest a hammer
from Campbell's control.
Detective Sam Ruby
told jurors "the closest he
came to dying" was when
Campbell, leading a high-
speed chase down U.S. 19,
turned up the speed and
barreled toward his squad
vehicle, which was parked
on the shoulder. Ruby was
outside the vehicle and
tried to run for his life, but
was hurt in the subse-
quent crash. Campbell
was hurt and had to be air-
lifted for medical treat-


The prosecution

had to present

aggravating

factors to jurors

to convince

them to

recommend

death for

Campbell.

ment after the crash.
Lamberti used Camp-
bell's actions, including
the crash, to illustrate
what he called a man with
severe "mental and emo-
tional disturbances" and
who lacked the capacity to
appreciate the criminality
of his actions.
He offered those miti-
gating factors with hopes
the jury would vote to
spare Campbell's life.
Lamberti also presented
several witnesses, includ-
ing Campbell's sister
Donna Sheffield and his
mother, Kathy Husted, to
highlight his familial dys-
function and how that pur-
portedly led to his attack
on his father.
The defense also pre-
sented a forensic psychol-
ogist, Peter Bursten, who
characterized Campbell as
having an antisocial per-
sonality and borderline
personality disorder.
In the end, the jury
opted for death, and now
Howard will begin a series
of hearings in which the
defense will have opportu-
nities to present further
evidence as to why Camp-
bell's life should be spared,
according to Magrino.
Sharkey said the fact
four jurors voted for life is
important in the appellate
process.
"But that is assuming
Judge Howard is going to
impose death. He may
choose life without parole."


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic battery
arrests
Sheila Soles, 53, of Her-
nando, at 11:50 p.m. Friday on
misdemeanor charges of do-
mestic battery and battery. No
bond.
Ladd Elkington, 48, of
Crystal River, at 8:06 p.m. Sat-
urday on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery. No
bond.

DUI arrests
Ryan Webb, 25, of West
Express Lane, Lecanto, at
4:28 p.m. Saturday on misde-
meanor charges of driving
under the influence and resist-
ing an officer without violence.
According to his arrest affi-
davit, he was stopped after a
law enforcement officer saw
the vehicle he was driving a
truck pulling a trailer and Jet
Skis swerving on West
Main Street in Inverness.
There was an open bottle of
beer in the vehicle and, when
ordered to get out of the vehi-
cle, Webb attempted to start
the truck. He also attempted to
remain inside the truck when
the officer tried to get him out.
He refused to submit to a test
of his breath. Bond $1,000.
Sergio Petrucci, 24, of
West Colbert Court, Beverly
Hills, at 1:55 a.m. Sunday on a
misdemeanor charge of driv-
ing under the influence. Ac-
cording to his arrest affidavit,
he was stopped after a law en-
forcement officer saw his vehi-
cle swerving on South
Suncoast Boulevard in Ho-
mosassa north of West Cardi-
nal Street. He admitted to
having "a lot to drink" and tests
of his breath showed his blood
alcohol concentration was
0.190 percent and 0.198 per-
cent. The legal limit is 0.08 per-
cent. Bond $500.
Victor Cordero, 69, of
South Palm Avenue, Ho-
mosassa, at 10:33 p.m. Sun-
day on a misdemeanor charge
of driving under the influence.
According to his arrest affidavit,


he admitted to consuming two
cans of beer before driving. He
had difficulty performing sobri-
ety tasks and tests of his breath
showed his blood alcohol con-
centration was 0.098 percent
and 0.094 percent.
Other arrests
Brian Murphy, 32, of
East Finland Lane, Dunnellon,
at 10:13 p.m. Friday on a Cit-
rus County warrant for failure
to appear in court for original
felony charges of burglary to a
structure (five counts), theft
(four counts) and burglary to
an unoccupied dwelling and
original misdemeanor charges
of driving while license sus-
pended, resisting an officer
without violence, failure to re-
deliver leased property and
petit theft. No bond.
Necole Hastings, 28, of
East Buck Court, Inverness, at
9:41 a.m. Saturday on a Citrus
County warrant for a misde-
meanor charge of obtaining
property by means of worth-
less check. Bond $150.
Leonard Archer, 33, of
60th Avenue North, St. Peters-
burg, at 12:48 p.m. Saturday
on a felony charge of driving
while license suspended or re-
voked. Bond $500.
Nikki Butrick, 24, of
Leonard Road, Lutz, at
3:05 p.m. Saturday on a felony
charges of possession of a
controlled substance (hydro-
morphone hydrochloride) and
charges of possession or pos-
session with intent to sell, dis-


Segal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle

.. Meeting Notices................................C 11


Notice to Creditors/Administration....C11



Self Storage Notices........................C11


i.. Tax Deed Notices.................................C 11
" "


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


pense, or deliver, any habit-
forming, toxic, harmful, or new
drug or legend drug and pos-
session of drug paraphernalia.
Bond $2,000.
Krystal Spindler, 26, at
6:07 p.m. Saturday on a mis-
demeanor charge of retail petit
theft and a Citrus County war-
rant for violation of probation
on original felony charges of
dealing in stolen property and
giving false information to a
pawnbroker. No bond.
Kristopher Lovar, 20, of
East Shawnee Trail, Inver-
ness, at 8:08 p.m. Saturday on
a felony charge of grand theft.
According to his arrest affi-
davit, he is accused of stealing
a boat motor. Bond $2,000.
Patricia Hall, 24, of North
Shado Wood Drive, Inverness,
at 12:24 a.m. Sunday on a
misdemeanor charge of disor-
derly intoxication. Bond $150.
Gary Marquis Jr., 50, of
West Ponce DeLeon Boule-
vard, Homosassa, at 3:29 p.m.
Sunday on a felony charge of
driving while license sus-
pended or revoked (habitual
offender) and a misdemeanor
charge of attaching a tag to a
vehicle not assigned to it.
Bond $10,250.
Burglary
A commercial burglary
was reported at 1:41 p.m.
Monday, Jan. 28, in the 1900
block of Piper Lane, Inverness.
Thefts
M A petit theft was reported
at 8:39 a.m. Monday, Jan. 28,


in the 6700 block of W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River.
A petit theft was reported
at 11:22 a.m. Jan. 28 in the
6100 block of W. Cardinal St.,
Homosassa.
A petit theft was reported
at 11:52 a.m. Jan. 28 in the
900 block of N.E. 7th Ave.,
Crystal River.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 1:56 p.m. Jan. 28 in
the 2300 block of State Road
44 West, Inverness.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 2:57 p.m. Jan. 28 in
the 1700 block of Forest Drive,
Inverness.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 3:10 p.m. Jan. 28 in
the 6600 block of N. Tram
Road, Hemando.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 3:14 p.m. Jan. 28 in
the 2200 block of S. Sandburg
Point, Homosassa.
A larceny petit theft was
reported at 4:14 p.m. Jan. 28
in the 3800 block of N. Roscoe
Road, Hemando.
A petit theft was reported
at 4:43 p.m. Jan. 28 in the 400
block of N.E. Crystal St., Crys-
tal River.
Vandalisms
A vandalism was reported
at 12:14 p.m. Monday, Jan. 28,
in the 4200 block of S. Rain-
bow Drive, Inverness.
A vandalism was reported
at 8:41 p.m. Jan. 28 in the 800
block of W. Main St.,
Inverness.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
LO PR HI LO PR HI LO PR
60 0.00 INA NA NA U J80 57 0.00


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
ts
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
ts
pc
ts
pc
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


South winds around 15 knots. Seas 2
to 3 feet. Bay and inland waters will be
choppy. Partly cloudy today.


85 63 0.00 85 59 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK E lusvedaly
forecast by:H: L :
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 78 Low: 56 *
Partly cloudy with a slight chance
of thunderstorms late.
I- THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
High: 63 Low: 32
Partly to mostly sunny.

I FRIDAY & SATURDAY MORNING
High: 69 Low: 36
Mostly sunny.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Tuesday 84/62
Record 85/20
Normal 71/43
Mean temp. 73
Departure from mean +16
PRECIPITATION*
Tuesday 0.00 in.
Total for the month trace
Total for the year trace
Normal for the year 2.88 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 7
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Tuesday at 3 p.m. 30.14 in.


DEW POINT
Tuesday at 3 p.m. 61
HUMIDITY
Tuesday at 3 p.m. 49%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, Maple, Oak
Today's count: 9.0/12
Thursday's count: 9.4
Friday's count: 9.8
AIR QUALITY
Tuesday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
1/30 WEDNESDAY 7:47 1:35 8:10 1:58
1/31 THURSDAY 8:39 2:27 9:03 2:51
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
3 SUNSET TONIGHT............................6:08 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:19A.M.
4 L 2 MOONRISE TODAY...........................9:41 P.M.
FEB. 3 FEB. 10 FEB. 17 FEB. 25 MOONSET TODAY............................ 9:09 A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Wednesday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 7:12 a/3:13 a 7:50 p/3:29 p
Crystal River" 5:33 a/12:35 a 6:11 p/12:51 p
Withlacoochee* 3:20 a/10:39 a 3:58 p/11:03 p
Homosassa*** 6:22 a/2:12 a 7:00 p/2:28 p


***At Mason's Creek
Thursday
High/Low High/Low
7:56 a/3:53 a 8:21 p/4:02 p
6:17 a/1:15 a 6:42 p/1:24 p
4:04 a/11:12 a 4:29 p/11:47 p
7:06 a/2:52 a 7:31 p/3:01 p


Gulf water
temperature


660
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Mon. Tues. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder n/a n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando n/a n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness n/a n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City n/a n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY


Tuesday Wednesday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 37 25 .03 ts 53 36
Albuquerque 38 29 s 43 24
Asheville 71 35 ts 61 33
Atlanta 73 46 ts 65 35
Atlantic City 56 36 ts 56 45
Austin 85 62 .01 s 63 29
Baltimore 66 37 .02 ts 63 41
Billings 28 11 sn 23 8
Birmingham 72 51 ts 65 35
Boise 39 30 .10 sn 35 22
Boston 34 27 .01 ts 59 48
Buffalo 54 35 .53 ts 59 29
Burlington, VT 34 23 ts 51 36
Charleston, SC 78 45 c 71 50
Charleston, WV 71 52 ts 64 31
Charlotte 72 40 ts 70 42
Chicago 63 39 .98 rs 43 14
Cincinnati 67 41 ts 61 24
Cleveland 61 39 .20 ts 57 28
Columbia, SC 76 0 ts 77 45
Columbus, OH 64747 ts 61 26
Concord, N.H. 32 9 .05 ts 49 39
Dallas 80 55 .39 s 57 36
Denver 30 17 .03 pc 42 24
Des Moines 59 34 .02 sn 24 6
Detroit 57 37 .66 sh 57 22
El Paso 53 34 s 51 29
Evansville, IN 67 54 sh 52 26
Harrisburg 56 35 ts 60 36
Hartford 36 28 ts 54 44
Houston 77 72 s 67 40
Indianapolis 62 52 .01 sh 56 20
Jackson 78 63 ts 65 34
Las Vegas 56 37 s 59 41
Little Rock 72 66 .04 s 58 31
Los Angeles 58 44 s 65 48
Louisville 67 55 ts 61 28
Memphis 76 61 pc 56 32
Milwaukee 61 37 1.21 sn 34 10
Minneapolis 34 30 .03 sf 14 -3
Mobile 77 66 .01 ts 68 37
Montgomery 78 53 ts 68 37
Nashville 67 54 ts 60 29
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Tuesday Wednesday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 79 66 .07 ts 70 43
New York City 49 36 .02 ts 58 42
Norfolk 70 50 c 74 48
Oklahoma City 68 45 .73 pc 47 29
Omaha 41 33 sf 23 8
Palm Springs 65 42 s 71 48
Philadelphia 54 35 ts 62 43
Phoenix 58 41 s 62 42
Pittsburgh 64 49 .01 ts 60 26
Portland, ME 33 22 .01 ts 48 42
Portland, Ore 48 44 .48 sh 46 40
Providence, R.I. 35 28 ts 56 46
Raleigh 73 44 ts 74 45
Rapid City 35 13 sn 21 8
Reno 50 36 s 50 24
Rochester, NY 54 32 .39 ts 59 30
Sacramento 60 34 s 63 37
St. Louis 68 55 .53 rs 41 23
St. Ste. Marie 34 25 .06 sn 32 4
Salt Lake City 30 24 .07 rs 36 27
San Antonio 86 66 s 66 35
San Diego 59 47 s 64 48
San Francisco 56 45 s 56 45
Savannah 78 48 c 79 50
Seattle 46 41 .38 sh 48 42
Spokane 35 25 .02 rs 37 32
Syracuse 40 32 .19 ts 58 32
Topeka 70 36 .07 pc 31 19
Washington 70 41 ts 66 42
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 94 Cotulla, Texas
LOW -15 Big Piney, Wyo.
WORLD CITIES


WEDNESDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/71/s
Amsterdam 49/39/sh
Athens 53/45/pc
Beijing 41/21/pc
Berlin 43/36/sh
Bermuda 66/63/pc
Cairo 65/49/pc
Calgary 16/15/sf
Havana 82/70/pc
Hong Kong 68/66/pc
Jerusalem 55/42/sh


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


62/52/c
49/38/sh
60/43/c
74/44/s
49/36/sh
20/16/c
47/39/sh
81/71/sh
56/48/pc
79/66/sh
49/38/pc
55/23/sh
36/30/sn


-1 C I T R U S


C 0 U N T Y -"--1


For the RECORD


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RIDE
Continued from Page Al

"But we want to educate
the general public, as well
as motorcycle riders," she
added. "The helmet law is
not in the state of Florida,
but we don't even go to the
corner without a helmet
on."
"It's ATG, ATT," he said.
"All the gear, all the
time."
He approaches motorcy-
cle safety from a position
of experience, having
walked away from two ac-
cidents where his motor-
cycle was totaled. "If I
hadn't had the helmet on, I
wouldn't be here today," he
said, recalling his
accidents.
He is an instructor for
all the safety classes the
association puts on, in-
cluding medical first-aid
classes and parking lot
practice. "It's one thing


WALKER
Continued from Page Al

look easy, but the perform-
ance was anything but
simple: it took dozens of
circus workers to pull and
release the thick black ca-
bles that controlled Wal-
lenda's wire as he walked.
The morning was windier
than expected, and at one
point near the end, Wal-
lenda dipped down to one
knee on the wire, which
led to loud gasps among
the crowd.
"I have to get into a zone
where I kind of forget
about everything else and
just focus on what I'm
doing," he said shortly be-
fore he stepped on the
wire. "Fear is a choice but
danger is real, and that's
very, very true for my line
of work"
When Wallenda went to
one knee, the drama
reached a fever pitch.
"Scary," said Neil Mont-
ford, a vacationer from
the United Kingdom,
while wiping sweat from
his brow and looking
skyward.
Wallenda, 34, wore a


jumping on this bike and
heading down the road,"
he said. "But now get into
Walmart parking lot, it's all
slow practice."
Raising public aware-
ness is another part of
their mission. "We have di-
vision in GWRRA called
Motorist Awareness," he
said, "making the four-
wheeling public aware of
the fact that there are two-
wheelers out there and
three-wheelers out there
on the road.
"So many accidents hap-
pen because they didn't
see you."
The Northrops are also
gearing up for the Florida
District Gold Wing Con-
vention March 21-23 in
Kissimmee. They are also
selling tickets for a new a
Gold Wing, with the pro-
ceeds paying for the safety
program.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty
@chronicleonline. com.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Rick and Pam Northrop are no strangers to motorcycles. Rick Northrop is a certified seminar presenter and instructs
riders on safety.


MIKE LANG/Sarasota Herald-Tribune
Aerialist Nick Wallenda walks the high wire Tuesday
200 feet over U.S. 41 in Sarasota without a safety har-
ness. The Sarasota City Commission allowed him to do
the stunt without a tether.


gold cross around his
neck and prayed with his
wife, children and par-
ents prior to the walk.
"It's my job, it's my ca-
reer, it's my passion, it's
what I love to do," he said.
The Sarasota City Com-
mission allowed the stunt
without a tether Wallenda
wore a tether last summer
when he walked across Ni-
agara Falls because the
television network that
was paying for the per-
formance insisted on it
Wallenda is a seventh-
generation high-wire
artist and is part of the fa-
mous "Flying Wallendas"


circus family His great-
grandfather, Karl Wal-
lenda, fell during a
performance in Puerto
Rico and died.
But Wallenda wasn't fo-
cused on the possibility
of tragedy. In the hours
before the stunt, Wal-
lenda walked under-
neath the wire, which
was suspended between
a crane and a condo in
downtown Sarasota. He
spoke of his city, of the
nearby sparkling bay and
how he loved to hear the
cheers of the crowd
while hundreds of feet
up in the air.


SCHOOLS
Continued from Page Al

impact on students.
They reviewed and ulti-
mately rejected a pro-
posed list of cuts during a
workshop Tuesday after-
noon. Board members had
reviewed a similar list last
year but were never forced
to make cuts when the
state increased its funding.
"Every one of these pro-
grams hits thousands of
students," board member
Thomas Kennedy said.
They agreed to further
investigate revamping the
high school schedule to
eliminate one teacher-
planning period during
the school year. Assistant
superintendent of schools
Kenny Blocker estimated
that could save $1 million
in staff reductions, though
board members said they
wanted more information
to back up that estimate.
They also agreed to con-
sider reducing supplemen-
tal pay awarded to
teachers for additional du-
ties-by $250,000. However,
that pay is part of the negoti-
ated contract with teachers.


Other items on the list-
including closing the Ma-
rine Science Station
($200,000 savings), elimi-
nating media specialists at
elementary and middle
schools ($500,000 savings)
and eliminating ridership
for students who live
within two miles of a
school ($500,000 savings) -
were quickly dismissed by
board members.
"I cannot see those chil-
dren in the Beverly Hills
area walking two miles
carrying their book bags,"
board Chairwoman Ginger
Bryant said.
Board member Pat
Deutschman suggested the
district remove a significant
perk for employees who are


paid for unused sick and va-
cation days when they re-
tire or resign. Blocker said
that amounts to about $1
million annually.
"I was shocked at the
amount of money we're
going to pay people who
are walking out the door,"
Deutschman said. "This is
just unheard of in private
industry"
Blocker said the district
pays up to 60 days unused
vacation and up to 90 per-
cent of unused sick time.
Any reduction or elimina-
tion of that pay would be
part of collective bargain-
ing with employees.
The board is expected to
have its next budget work-
shop Feb. 26.


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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Helen
Kauffman, 67
INVERNESS
Helen Marie Kauffman
(Garcia), 67, of Inverness,
passed away peacefully at
10:14 p.m., Jan. 28, 2013, at
her residence. She was
born May 20, 1945, in
LaJunta, Colo., to Clarence
a n d
Almeda
Kauffman.
Survivors
include
her daugh-
ter, Erika
Garcia of
Peoria,
Helen Ill.; her
Kauffman son, David
Garcia of Morton, Ill.; sis-
ter, Clarice (Gale) Bevans
of Twin Falls, Idaho; and
two grandchildren, Aysia
Graham, 15, and Zared
Garcia, 13, both of Peoria,
Ill.
Helen was a stewardess
for United Airlines, but
after moving to Illinois,
she worked as an adminis-
trative assistant for
Caterpillar, was a senior
systems analyst for IBM,
and also worked senior ad-
ministration for Cullian
Properties. She later re-
turned to Caterpillar be-
fore retiring in the '90s and
moving to the sunny state
of Florida.
Helen was the quintes-
sential Elvis fan. She was a
huge Chicago Bears fan,
known to skip church on
Sunday if the Bears were
playing. She was also a
hardcore Chicago Bulls
fan and loved baseball as
well. She adored cats, gar-
dening and tinkering in
her workshop with tools
and making shelves, etc.
Helen was a Christian
woman who took her rela-
tionship with God very se-
riously She also loved
Dale Earnhardt and racing
in general, which was re-
flected in her choice of
cars, including a red
Corvette, a Dodge Stealth
and a souped-up Trans
Am. She was out of control
if a coconut cream pie en-
tered the room and she
loved beers in the evening
with friends on the porch.
Helen had the best laugh
in the world and was a
generous, sweet-natured
daughter, sister, and
mother who enhanced
every life she touched. A
finer woman would not be
found.
Memorial services will
be at 1 p.m. Friday,
Feb. 1, 2013, at Heinz
Funeral Home in
Inverness. The family will
receive friends from noon
until the hour of service. A
reception will follow at the
Inverness Country Club

To Place Your

"In Memory" ad,'

Saralynne
Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller@chronicleonline.com
fill
ffI fir Pi ,-


for food and fellowship. In
lieu of flowers, donations
can be made to the
Humane Society. Heinz
Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.





Earl
Smith, 70
HERNANDO
Earl Smith, 70,
of Hernando, died
Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013,
at Avante at Inverness. He
was born July 1, 1942, in
Hernando to Alzo and Al-
berta
Smith. He
was a U.S.
Army vet-
eran. He
was a re-
tired com-
puter
program-
Earl mer for
Smith the federal
government.
He leaves to cherish his
memories two sisters,
Eddie Lee Riley of Erie,
Pa. and Ruth Twiggs
(Alfred) of Hernando; two
caregivers, sister-in-law,
Lucile Smith of Hernando
and Sheri Cannon of
Inverness; sister-in-law
Alwillie Smith of Inver-
ness; and a host of
nephews, nieces and
friends.
Funeral services for
Earl Smith will be con-
ducted at 11 a.m.
Thursday, Jan. 31, 2013, at
the Mt Carmel Missionary
Baptist Church of
Hernando, 3451 E. Lemon
Dr, Hernando, Pastor
Demetrius Franklin Sr of-
ficiating. Interment will
follow in the Hernando
Community Cemetery,
Hernando. Friends may
call at the Mt. Carmel
Missionary Baptist Church
Thursday, 9 to 11 a.m.
Arrangements entrusted
to Cason Funeral and
Cremation Services,
352 726-2931.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.


SO YOU KNOW
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.







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Rose
Fredericks, 63
DUNNELLON
Rose Christina
Fredericks, 63, of
Dunnellon, died Jan. 27,
2013. Private cremation
will take place under the
direction of Brown Fu-
neral Home & Crematory
in Lecanto.

Franziska
Bachmann, 90
BEVERLY HILLS
Franziska Bachmann,
90, of Beverly Hills,
passed away Jan. 27, 2013,
at home while under the
care of Hospice. A native
of Germany, she came to
the area in
1999 from
New York,
N.Y. Mrs.
Bachh-
mann re-
tired from
Chase
Manhattan
Franziska Bank and
Bachmann attended
Heritage Baptist Church.
She is survived by her
son, Oskar Bachmann of
Beverly Hills; two sisters,
Elizabeth and Anita, both
of Germany; three grand-
children; and five
great-grandchildren.
The family will receive
friends at the funeral
home Thursday evening at
4 p.m., and funeral service
will follow at 6 p.m. Com-
mittal Service will take
place 10 a.m. Friday, at
Fero Memorial Gardens
Mausoleum Chapel. In
lieu of flowers donations
may be made to Hospice of
Citrus Co., 3350 W
Audubon Park Path,
Lecanto, in memory of
Franziska. www.fero
funeralhome. com.

Carolyn
Bartalis, 74
CRYSTAL RIVER
The celebration of life
memorial for Carolyn E.
Bartalis, 74, of Crystal
River, will be held at
1 p.m., Saturday,
Feb. 2, 2013, from the


Strickland
Home Chapel
River


Funeral
in Crystal



-


Michael
Preston Sr., 55
FLORAL CITY
Michael L. Preston Sr,
55, Floral City, died Satur-
day, Jan. 26, 2013, at Citrus
Memorial Hospital sur-
rounded by his family
Mike was born July 21,
1957, in
Lansing,
Mich., to
Ernest
'"Jack" and
Phyllis
Preston.
Mike
served our
Midhael country in
Preston Sr. the United
States Army He was an au-
tomobile mechanic who
enjoyed working on cars,
loved NASCAR racing and
was an avid Dale Earn-
hardt fan. He loved riding
his motorcycle and fishing.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory is his wife and com-
panion of 30 years, Robin
Kartune; his mother, Phyl-
lis Preston of Michigan
and Florida; sons Scott
(Krystal), Michael Preston
Jr and Aaron Preston, all
of Inverness; grandchil-
dren Alyssa, Brianna,
Scotty Jr and Caitlynn;
brothers Jimbo, David,
Steve and Jerry; sisters
Derose, Sherry and Susan;
Robin's family, Linda,
Shelley, Dona, John,
Sarah, Cathy and Ron. He

_arl E. aau
Funeral Home With Crematory
DENISE HUNTER
Graveside Wed. 3:00 PM
Hills of Rest -Floral City
MARGARET ROGERS
Viewing: Wed. 6:00 8:00 PM
Mass: Thurs. 10:00 AM
Our Lady of Fatima
ALICE SEAMAN
Service: Mon. Feb 4,1:00 PM
RAY QUINTANA
Private Arrangements
PEGGY WALLER
Private Arrangements
726-8323 00DOS2.


was preceded in death by
his father, Jack; a
brother, Harold; and
brother-in-law, Stephen.
A celebration of life me-
morial service will be an-
nounced at a later date.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is
assisting the family with
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Helen
Schmid, 76
HERNANDO
Mrs. Helen M. Schmid,
age 76 of Hernando,
Florida, died Saturday,
January 26, 2013 in
Hernando, FL. She was
born January 22, 1937 in
Scranton,
PA, daugh-
1 ter of the
SI a t e
A '. Joseph
and Rose
(Flanni-
gan) Lof-
tus. She
Helen worked as
Schmid a waitress
and moved to Hernando,
Florida from Pompano
Beach in 1992. Her hob-
bies included gambling
(slot machines), traveling,
and spending mornings
with her friends at the Vil-
lage Inn in Beverly Hills.
She was a member of Our
Lady of Grace Catholic
Church, Beverly Hills.
Mrs. Schmid was


Remembering
Jonathan Shoemaker
1/30/79 11/22/07
I thank my God upon every
remembrance of you Phil 1:3
We feel honored and privileged
to have been your parents and
will forever cherish those
memories.
Happy 34th Birthday!
No farewell is forever
Eternal Love,
Mom & Dad,
Bo & Sherry Shoemaker


CraIUJ% MEMORIAL


preceded in death by her
parents, son, Joseph
Schmid, brother, Joseph
Loftus and sister, Patricia
Johnson. Survivors in-
clude 4 sons, James
Schmid of South Plain-
field, NJ, Michael (Leslie)
Schmid of Dunellen, NJ,
Robert (Lisa) Schmid of
Queens, NY, Paul (Robbie)
Schmid of Keeseville, NY,
3 daughters, Evelyn
(Richard) Schenck of Her-
nando, FL, Arlene Schmid
of Bound Brook, NJ, Linda
(Drew) De lonno of
Middletown, DE, 3 broth-
ers, Albert Loftus of NY,
James (Mary) Loftus of CA,
Thomas (Regina) Loftus of
NY, sister, Laurana (Phil)
Heery, NY, 9 grandchil-
dren, David, Matthew,
Kalli, Cassandra, Joseph,
Alexis, Brennen, Kristina
and Connor, and 7 great
grandchildren.
Services for Mrs.
Schmid will be held in
New Jersey at a later date.
Friends who wish may
send memorial donations
to the Hospice of Citrus
County, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com. Arrangements
by the Beverly Hills
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes & Crematory


See Page A7


~Pet Rescues


~Groomers


-Veterinarian ~Food Cart
~Face Painting ~Silent Auc


Citrus County Animal Services
CODNNJ Humanitarians of FL., Inc.


Dr. Wright Hernandez
Board Certified in Geriatrics
and Family Practice














SrI*M ,,I ,


A6 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from PageA6




Alfred
Verhoeven, 83
CRYSTAL RIVER
Alfred P Verhoeven, 83,
of Crystal River, passed
away Sunday, Jan. 27, 2013,
at the Health Center at
Brentwood in Lecanto. He
was born Aug. 22, 1929, in
New York, N.Y, to Alfred
and Juliette (Sperber)
Verhoeven. He came to
Crystal River 17 years ago
from Old Bridge, N.J. He
was a retired insurance
agent with New York Life
with 25 years of service.
He was a U.S. Army vet-
eran, a member of St.
Benedict's Catholic
Church in Crystal River,
the St. Benedict's Catholic
Men's Club and he was a
former Catechist teacher
at St Benedict's.
He was preceded in
death by his loving wife of
45 years, Margot
Verheoven, Dec. 12, 1997.
He is survived by his
daughter Gretchen
McCarthy (Keith) of
Monroe, N.J.; his sister
Gloria Apfel of Crystal
River; two grandsons,
Keith Schauer Jr and John
Henry Schauer III.
A funeral mass will be
celebrated at 10 a.m.
Friday, Feb. 1, 2013, at
St. Benedict's Catholic
Church in Crystal River
with Father Ryszard
Stradomski as celebrant.
In lieu of flowers the fam-
ily suggests that those who
wish may make a memo-
rial contribution to
Hospice of Citrus County,
PO. Box 641270 Beverly
Hills, FL 34464. Strickland
Funeral Home with
Crematory assisted the
family with arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.


Roy
Lolly, 67
CRYSTAL RIVER
Roy Raymond Lolly, 67,
of Crystal River, passed
away Saturday, Jan. 26,
2013, at HPH Hospice
Care Center in Lecanto.
He was born April 22,1945,
in Crystal River to Flana-
gan and Mildred (Roland)
Lolly He was a lifelong
resident of Crystal River.
He was a carpenter, fisher-
man and oysterman and
he was loved by all.
Roy was preceded in
death by three sisters and
three brothers. Surviving
are two daughters, Connie
Bishop of Inglis and Dar-
lyn Beam of Homosassa;
one stepdaughter, Brenda
Johnson of Dunnellon;
three stepsons, Aaron Beam
of Inglis, Jimmy Beam of
Crystal River and Daniel
Beam of Starke; three
brothers, Charlie Lolly
(Cheri), Jimmy Lolly (Flo)
and Elvin Lolly (Evelyn),
all of Crystal River; four
grandchildren; three great-
grandchildren; and nu-
merous step-grandchildren
and great-grandchildren.
Strickland Funeral
Home with Crematory
Crystal River assisted the
family with cremation
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.



Efstarious
'Bill' W.
Savas, 89
HERNANDO
Bill Savas, 89, of
Hernando, Fla., died
Jan. 26, 2013. The service
of remembrance will be
12 p.m. Thursday,
Jan. 31, 2013, at the Fero
Memorial Gardens
Mausoleum Chapel, 5955
N. Lecanto Hwy, Beverly
Hills, FL 34465. The family
will receive friends at the
funeral home Thursday at
11 a.m.


OBITUARIES
* Call 352-563-5660 for details. Deadline is 3 p.m.
for obituaries to appear in the next day's edition.


Janet
Masaoy, 76
BEVERLY HILLS
Janet F Masaoy, 76, of
Beverly Hills, Fla., died
Jan. 25, 2013, at Seven
Rivers Hospital. A service
of remembrance will be at
2 p.m. Thursday,
Jan. 31, 2013, at
Nature Coast Unitarian
Universalists, 7633 North
Florida Ave. Citrus
Springs, FL 34434. Fero
Funeral Home provided
information.
Marie
Nowicke, 89
BEVERLY HILLS
A funeral Mass for Mrs.
Marie L. Nowicke, 89, of
Beverly Hills, will be 9
a.m., Monday, Feb. 4,2013,
at Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church, Beverly
Hills. She died Thursday,
Jan. 24, 2013, in Her-
nando. Cremation will be
under the direction of
Hooper Crematory, Inver-
ness. The family will re-
ceive friends from 2 to 4
p.m., Sunday, Feb. 3, 2013,
at the Beverly Hills
Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Homes.
Carolyn
Bartalis, 74
CRYSTAL RIVER
The celebration of life
memorial for Carolyn E.
Bartalis, 74, of Crystal
River, will be held at
1 p.m., Saturday,
Feb. 02, 2013, from the
Strickland Funeral Home
Chapel in Crystal River.

SO YOU KNOW
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
the arrangements.
A flag will be in-
cluded for free for
those who served in
the U.S. military.
(Please note this
service when submit-
ting a free obituary.)
Obituaries will
be posted at www.
chronicleonline.com.


Feds warn public about


misleading flu treatment


Associated Press


WASHINGTON Federal regulators
say a Florida company has been mar-
keting an untested inhaled formula as a
flu remedy in violation of
drug safety regulations. The Ger
The Food and Drug Ad-
ministration and the Fed- IS sold
eral Trade Commission retail
issued a warning letter to retalle
Flu and Cold Defense LLC CVS.c(
for making misleading,
unproven claims about its at a h
GermBullet inhaler.
The Boca Raton, Fla.- Of s
based company advertises
the product as a "propri- pharma
etary blend of 11 organic nature
botanicals." The com-
pany's website claims that stores ir
"an FDA recognized virol-
ogy lab" tested the formula and "con-
firmed that it has the potential
capability to kill cold and flu viruses."
But FDA regulators say the mixture
has never been reviewed as safe and ef-
fective and the company is violating
drug safety regulations. All new drugs
marketed in the U.S. must be submitted


rl
t
I


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for approval to the FDA before they can
be sold to consumers. The GermBullet is
sold online through retailers like CVS.com
and at a handful of small pharmacies
and natural food stores in Florida.
The warning comes
mBullet amid a worse-than-usual
flu season that has hit the
through elderly particularly hard.
rs like CSo far, half of confirmed
rs like flu cases are in people 65
)m and and older
Flu and Cold Defense
handful issued a news release
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mall GermBullet "may help
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Il food whelmed as the flu
reaches epidemic levels."
Florida. FDA and FTC regulators
take issue with that state-
ment and a number of others from the
company's website, including that the
inhaler is "shown to reduce illness-caus-
ing bacteria, cold and flu viruses and
fungi."
Regulators gave the company 15 busi-
ness days to correct the problematic
statements.


FDA OKs inhaler for COPD


Associated Press
WASHINGTON A
panel of federal health
experts on Tuesday
overwhelmingly recom-
mended approval for a
long-acting inhaler to
treat people suffering from
chronic lung disease.
The Food and Drug
Administration panel
voted 15-1, with one ab-
stention, that
Boehringer Ingelheim's
once-daily Striverdi
Respimat inhaler is safe
and effective for chronic
obstructive pulmonary
disease, a condition that
causes bronchitis and
emphysema.
The disease affects
about 24 million people
in the U.S. and is most
commonly caused by cig-
arette smoking. Symptoms
include cough, phlegm
and shortness of breath.


The FDA is not required
to follow the guidance of
its panels, though it often
does.
German drugmaker
Boehringer is also asking
the agency to approve the
drug, known chemically as
olodaterol, with labeling
stating that it increased
patients' ability to exer-
cise. If approved, the drug
would be the first inhaler
with that claim.


Boehringer studied the
drug in patients for up to
48 weeks, measuring their
lung capacity based on vol-
ume of air they could
expel.
"The positive vote
from the advisory commit-
tee marks an important
step towards making
olodaterol available,"
said Boehringer vice pres-
ident Tunde Otulana in a
statement.


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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013 A7


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Push for futuristic guns builds on embattled past


ADAM GELLER
AP national writer

NEW YORK It
sounds, at first, like a bold,
next-generation solution:
personalizing guns with
technology that keeps
them from firing if they
ever get into the wrong
hands.
But when the White
House called for pushing
ahead with such new tech-
nology as part of President
Obama's plan to cut gun vi-
olence, the administration
did not mention the con-
cept's embattled past. As
with so much else in the
nation's long-running divi-
sions over gun rights and
regulation, what sounds
like a futuristic vision is, in
fact, an idea that has been
kicked around for years,
sidelined by intense suspi-
cion, doubts about feasibil-
ity and pressure tactics.
Now proponents of so-
called personalized or
smart guns are hoping the
nation's renewed attention
on firearms following the
Newtown school massacre
will kick start research
and sale of safer weapons.
But despite the Obama ad-
ministration's promise to
"encourage the develop-
ment of innovative gun
safety technology," advo-
cates have good reason to
be wary
In the fiery debate about
guns, personalized
weapons have long occu-
pied particularly shaky
ground an idea criti-
cized both by gun rights
groups and some gun con-
trol advocates.
To the gun groups, the
idea of using technology to
control who can fire a gun
smacks of a limitation on
personal rights, particu-
larly if it might be man-
dated by government. At
the same time, some gun
control advocates worry
such technology, by mak-
ing guns appear falsely
safe, would encourage
Americans to stock up on
even more weapons than
they already have in their
homes.
Without the politics, the
notion of using radio fre-
quency technology, bio-
metric sensors or other
gadgetry in a gun capable
of recognizing its owner
sounds like something
straight out of James
Bond. In fact, it is. In the
latest Bond flick, "Skyfall,"
Agent 007's quartermaster
passes him a 9 mm pistol
coded to his palm print.
"Only you can fire it,"
the contact tells the agent.
"Less of a random killing
machine. More of a per-
sonal statement."
In real life, though,
there's no getting around
the politics, and the de-
bate over personalized
guns long ago strayed well
beyond questions of
whether the technology
will work.
MEI
Those were the first
questions asked in 1994
when the research arm of
the Justice Department
began studying prospects
of making a police gun that
a criminal would not be
able to fire if he wrestled it
away during a struggle.
Scientists at Sandia Na-
tional Laboratories exam-
ined available technology
in 1996 and found it prom-
ising, but wanting.
By then, the notion of a
safe gun had long capti-
vated Stephen Teret, a for-
mer attorney and public
health expert at Johns
Hopkins University in Bal-
timore who had gone after
automakers for not includ-
ing air bags in their cars.
In 1983, he got a call that
the 22-month-old son of a
couple he knew had been
killed by a 4-year-old who
found a loaded gun in a
nightstand drawer.
"Very definitely, that
was the genesis," said
Teret, who went on to
found Hopkins' Center for
Gun Policy and Research.
"Because when one thinks


of something as a public
health person, the first
thing is you're sick with
grief and the second thing
that comes to mind is why
in the world would there
be a handgun operable by
a 4-year-old?"
Teret began trying to get
lawmakers and gun mak-
ers interested in the con-
cept of personalized
weapons. He convinced
U.S. Rep. Pat Schroeder,


Associated Press
This photo provided by the New Jersey Institute of Technology shows a 9 mm semi-automatic handgun configured
with transducers in its handle to detect the grasp of an authorized user. To gun-rights groups, the idea of using tech-
nology to control who can fire a gun smacks of a limitation on personal rights, particularly if it might be
mandated by government. At the same time, some gun control advocates worry such technology, by making guns
appear falsely safe, would encourage Americans to stock up on even more weapons then they already have in their
homes.


D-Colorado, to earmark
funding for the Justice
study And in the mid-
1990s, he voiced support
for a project at Colt's Man-
ufacturing Co., the leg-
endary but beleaguered
gun maker that saw an op-
portunity to sell safe guns
to police officers and par-
ents of young children.
Colt's developed a gun
equipped with a mi-
crochip that would pre-
vent it from firing unless
the user was wearing an
enabling device in a spe-
cial wristband. But gun
rights activists were skep-
tical, partly because the
government was funding
research of the concept
and because gun control
advocates like Teret em-
braced it. At about the
same time, New Jersey
lawmakers began dis-
cussing a measure requir-
ing all new handguns sold
in the state to be personal-
ized, three years after the
technology came to mar-
ket. The measure passed
in 2002.
MEN
Owners' skepticism was
heightened in 1997 when
Colt's CEO Ronald Stewart
wrote an editorial in
American Firearms Indus-
try magazine calling on fel-
low manufacturers to
parry gun control efforts
by backing a federal gun
registry and developing
personalized weapons.
"While technology such
as this should not be man-
dated it should be an op-
tion for the consumer,"
Stewart wrote. "If we can
send a motorized computer
to Mars, then certain we
can advance our technol-
ogy to be more childproof."
Stewart did not respond
to a message seeking com-
ment left at a Connecticut
company where he now
serves on the board of
directors.
Soon after, the Coalition
of New Jersey Sportsmen
- a state affiliate of the
National Rifle Association
- began calling for a boy-
cott of Colt's. It warned
that personalized technol-


If a smart gun did exist, what
would its effect be, taking into
consideration the nature of gun
violence in this country?
Would you place families at risk
or people at risk by giving this
impression that this is a safe
gun? You know, people who
wouldn't normally buy a gun,
would they buy one now?
Josh Sugarmann
executive director, Violence Policy Center.


ogy might make it difficult
for gun owners to defend
themselves and called the
company's conduct "detri-
mental to American-style
freedoms and liberties."
Stewart was replaced as
CEO of Colt's in 1998 and
the company eventually
abandoned development
of a personalized gun.
MIE
In 1999, New Jersey's
lawmakers approved a
grant to researchers at
New Jersey Institute of
Technology to study per-
sonalized gun technology.
Those efforts focused on
adding transducers to a
gun's handle to detect the
grasp of an authorized
user. Meanwhile, the Jus-
tice Department offered a
challenge grant to gun
makers and although two
responded, they made lim-
ited headway by the time
$7 million in funding ran
out
Work on personalized
weapons suffered another
setback after gun rights'
groups boycotted Smith &
Wesson over a 2000 agree-
ment it signed with the
Clinton administration in
which the manufacturer
made numerous promises,
including one to develop
smart guns.
Meanwhile, the New
Jersey school, funded by
Congressional earmarks,
tried repeatedly to find a
commercial partner for its


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CHpICLE Citrusc(


work. But even as NJIT
bolstered the reliability of
its prototype, which now
has a recognition rate of
about 97 percent, it found
it a hard sell. Talks with a
Florida gun maker at first
seemed productive until
industry activists pres-
sured the company to back
away, said Donald Sebast-
ian, NJIT's senior vice
president for research and
development.
"Their claim that these
are just blue state liberals
looking to take your guns
away, it just inflames peo-
ple to not think a little
more rationally," Sebast-
ian said.
"Yes, it's a frustrating
experience, but we have to
be adults," he said. "I think
it's been a long lesson to
learn that this intermin-
gling of the concepts of gun
safety and gun control are
ultimately poison."
MEN
Mike Bazinet, a
spokesman for the Na-
tional Shooting Sports
Foundation, which repre-
sents gun manufacturers,
said questions remain
about whether the tech-
nology has been improved
enough to assure police of-
ficers and civilians a per-
sonalized weapon would
fire when they need pro-
tection. But there are also
concerns "about individ-
ual consumers' ability to
choose the firearm that


they think is best for
them," Bazinet said.
But gun makers and
owners have not been the
only critics. Activists from
the Violence Policy Center,
an outspoken gun control
group, also spoke against
personalized weapons.
"If a smart gun did exist,
what would its effect be,
taking into consideration
the nature of gun violence
in this country?" said Josh
Sugarmann, the group's
executive director "Would
you place families at risk
or people at risk by giving
this impression that this is
a safe gun? You know, peo-
ple who wouldn't normally
buy a gun, would they buy
one now?"
NJIT's Sebastian, who
joined a group of person-
alized gun advocates who
met recently with Attorney
General Eric Holder to
push for their develop-
ment, said his school has
seen some renewed inter-
est and is talking with offi-


cials at Picatinny Arsenal,
which develops weapons
for the U.S. military
Meanwhile, two Euro-
pean companies working
on personalized gun tech-
nology have their eyes on
the U.S. market. One of
those firms, TriggerSmart
Ltd. of Limerick, Ireland,
has developed a system
using Radio Frequency
Identification that would
be built into the handle of
a gun and triggered by a
device the size of a grain of
rice inside a user's ring or
bracelet.
Co-founder Robert Mc-
Namara said he is seeking
to license the technology
to a U.S. manufacturer, but
is looking at the possibility
of producing kits for retro-
fitting existing guns.
Another venture, Ar-
matix GmbH of Unter-
foehring, Germany, says it
has developed a personal-
ized gun, with settings
based on radio frequency
technology and biometrics,
that was approved by the
Bureau of Alcohol, To-
bacco and Firearms in late
2011. Armatix said it hopes
to begin selling the gun as
well as accompanying
safety and locking systems
in the U.S. this year, but
would not provide details.
MEI
Teret, who long ago
launched the campaign for
personalized guns, ac-
knowledged much has to
happen before they be-
come a reality But the
White House has prom-
ised to issue a report on
the technology and award
prizes to companies that
come up with innovative
and cost-effective person-
alized guns, and its inter-
est has rejuvenated hopes
that the gun of the future
may actually have one.
"For 30 years, at best
we've been inching for-
ward at a glacial pace," he
said. "And now this puts it
up to warp speed."
Associated Press writer
David Rising in Berlin
contributed to this report.
Adam Geller, a New York-
based national writer, can
be reached at fea-
tures(a t)ap. org. Follow
him on Twitter at http://
twittercom/AdGeller


love your library.


3rd Annual
Love Your Library Evening

Friday, February 15, 2013
7:00 prn 9:00 prn
Central Ridge Library in Beverly Hills

Enjoy an evening of live music, wine,
hors d'oeuvres, and a silent auction.
Tickets are $20 per person.
Available at all libraries

LEARN MORE:
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or call 746-9077
All proceeds benefit the
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Yo cn e LneSpnsr orony 10A o


A8 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013


NATION


\





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Reid: Replace
automatic cuts
WASHINGTON -The top
Democrat in the Senate said
Tuesday lawmakers should
redouble their efforts to re-
place looming across-the-
board cuts to the Pentagon
and domestic programs with
alternative
spending
cuts and tax
hikes.
The com-
ments by
Majority
Leader
Harry Reid
came amid Sen. Harry
increasing
resignation among both De-
mocrats and Republicans that
the across-the-board cuts will
soon take effect. The cuts
were an element of the so-
called fiscal cliff that was par-
tially averted this month with
the extension of Bush-era tax
cuts.
But the reprieve from
spending cuts of 7 percent to
the Pentagon and 5 percent
to domestic programs was
only temporary and will expire
March 1.
The cuts are known as se-
questration in Washington-
speak.
Reid said the cuts should
be replaced "in short incre-
ments" with spending cuts
and revenues like repealing
oil and gas subsidies that
were discussed in earlier
negotiations.
"There are many low-
hanging pieces of fruit out
there that Republicans have
said they agreed on previ-
ously," Reid said. "There's a
lot of things we can do out
there, and we're going to
make an effort to make sure
that there is sequestration
is involves revenue."
San Francisco
nudity ban upheld
SAN FRANCISCO--A
federal judge has cleared the
way for San Francisco's ban
on most displays of public nu-
dity to take effect Feb. 1.
U.S. District Court Judge
Edward Chen ruled Tuesday


the city ordinance prohibiting
adults from displaying their
genitals does not violate the
free speech rights of people
who like going out in the buff.
The San Francisco Board
of Supervisors voted 7-4 last
month in favor of the ban in-
troduced in response to a
group of nudists that regularly
gathers in the city's predomi-
nantly gay Castro District.
The activists who had chal-
lenged the measure also ar-
gued the ordinance was unfair
because it grants exceptions
for public nudity at permitted
public events such as the
city's gay pride parade.
Chen also rejected that
argument.
Billionaire makes
NYC mayor bid
NEW YORK Business-
man John Catsimatidis has
made it official he's in the
race to follow fellow billionaire
Michael Bloomberg as New
York City's mayor.
Catsima-
tidis an-
nounced his
candidacy
Tuesday.
The Repub-
lican joins
an increas-
ingly John
crowded Catsimatidis
field of
GOP, Democratic and other
candidates seeking to suc-
ceed the term-limited, Democ-
rat-turned-
Republican-turned independ-
ent Bloomberg.
Catsimatidis' family left
Greece for the United States
when he was an infant. He
began his career in the gro-
cery business and branched
out into oil, real estate and
other areas.
He praised Bloomberg for a
city that has attracted busi-
nesses and seen crime drop
during his 12 years in office.
Catsimatidis said New York
can't afford to "go in the
wrong direction" now.
But he also said he's a
Harlem-raised, regular New
Yorker, "not a Mike
Bloomberg billionaire."
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Associated Press
LAS VEGAS Declar-
ing "now is the time" to fix
the nation's broken immi-
gration system, President
Barack Obama on Tues-
day outlined broad pro-
posals for putting millions
of illegal immigrants on a
clear path to citizenship
while cracking down on
businesses that employ
people illegally and tight-
ening security at the bor-
ders. He hailed a
bipartisan Senate group
on a similar track but left
unresolved key details
that could derail the com-
plex and emotional effort.
Potential Senate road-
blocks center on how to
structure the avenue to cit-
izenship and on whether
legislation would cover
same-sex couples and
that's all before a Senate
measure could be debated,
approved and sent to the
Republican-controlled
House where opposition is
sure to be stronger


Associated Press
President Barack Obama turns to leave Tuesday after
shaking hands and speaking about immigration at Del
Sol High School in Las Vegas.


Obama, who carried Ne-
vada in the November
election with heavy His-
panic support, praised the
Senate push, saying Con-
gress is showing "a gen-
uine desire to get this done
soon." But mindful of pre-
vious immigrations efforts
that have failed, he warned
the debate would be diffi-
cult and vowed to send his
own legislation to Capitol


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Hill if lawmakers don't act
quickly
"The question now is
simple," Obama said dur-
ing a campaign-style event
in Las Vegas, one week
after being sworn in for a
second term in the White
House.
"Do we have the resolve
as a people, as a country,
as a government to finally
put this issue behind us? I


believe that we do."
Shortly after Obama fin-
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emerged between the
White House and the
group of eight senators,
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posals one day ahead of
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Sen. Marco Rubio, a po-
tential 2016 presidential
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for not making a citizen-
ship pathway contingent
on tighter border security,
a central tenet of the law-
makers' proposals.
"The president's speech
left the impression that he
believes reforming immi-
gration quickly is more
important than reforming
immigration right," Rubio
said in a statement.
Despite possible obsta-
cles to come, the broad
agreement between the
White House and biparti-
san lawmakers in the Sen-
ate represents a drastic
shift in Washington's will-
ingness to tackle
immigration.


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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013 All


Money&Markets
1,520 ................................. S& P 500
1,0 ,:,, Close: 1,507.84
Change: 7.66 (0.5%)
1,440 .........10 DAYS .........
1, 5 2 0 ." ............. ............ ............ ........... ........... .. ..........
1,520 .... ... ..... .........


1 ,4 0 0 ..........................
1 ,3 6 0 .............. ...... ........ ........... .. ............

1,32 A S....... ..... .... 0 N D J........... ......


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE
3,844
3,278
1762
1269
302
12


NASD
2,003
1,890
1333
1094
177
6


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
13969.82
5878.28
473.27
8941.14
3156.94
1509.35
1095.46
15918.00
907.31


A click of the wrist
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com


'"' 10 DAYS
14,000 .........................

13,600.

13,200.i .. ..' .


Dow Jones industrials
Close: 13,954.42
Change: 72.49 (0.5%)


LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. YTD
13881.29 13954.42 +72.49 +0.52% +6.49%
5840.50 5874.60 -0.96 -0.02% +10.70%
469.03 472.88 +3.63 +0.77% +4.37%
8882.90 8935.64 +55.62 +0.63% +5.83%
3133.11 3153.66 -0.64 -0.02% +4.44%
1498.09 1507.84 +7.66 +0.51% +5.72%
1090.65 1095.35 +0.36 +0.03% +7.34%
15817.51 15909.10 +51.04 +0.32% +6.10%
902.62 907.31 +0.60 +0.07% +6.82%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE *CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 3.42 0- 10.00 4.03 -.08 -1.9 V V V -12.4 -57.5 dd
AT&T Inc T 29.02 -0- 38.58 34.68 +.55 +1.6 A A A +2.9 +23.1 29 1.80f
Ametek Inc AME 29.86 0 41.55 41.29 +.30 +0.7 A A A +9.9 +32.8 22 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 60.52 0 92.54 93.24 +1.43 +1.6 A A A +6.7 +51.3 1.57e
Bank of America BAC 6.72 -- 12.20 11.49 +.01 +0.1 V V V -1.0 +58.0 44 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 6.35 0 12.23 11.93 +.02 +0.2 A A A +4.9 +32.2 dd
CenturyLink Inc CTL 36.50 --0 43.43 40.73 +.47 +1.2 A A A +4.1 +15.8 37 2.90
Citigroup C 24.61 0 43.34 42.16 -.18 -0.4 V A A +6.6 +37.3 13 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 -0- 21.43 16.97 +.12 +0.7 A A A +7.1 -7.1 30 1.00
Disney DIS 38.38 0 54.87 53.99 -.37 -0.7 7 A A +8.4 +40.4 17 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 71.13 67.98 +.35 +0.5 A A A +6.6 +11.2 19 3.06
EPR Properties EPR 40.04 48.92 47.17 -.23 -0.5 V A A +2.3 +12.8 21 3.00
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 77.13 93.67 91.76 +.65 +0.7 A A +6.0 +8.7 12 2.28
Ford Motor F 8.82 14.30 13.14 -.64 -4.6 7 A A +1.5 +14.9 11 0.40f
Gen Electric GE 18.02 23.18 22.50 ... ... A A A +7.2 +21.9 16 0.76f
Home Depot HD 44.22 0 68.15 67.20 -.38 -0.6 V A A +8.6 +53.2 24 1.16
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 --- 29.27 21.28 +.23 +1.1 A A A +3.2 -18.0 10 0.90
IBM IBM 181.85 211.79 203.90 -1.03 -0.5 7 A A +6.4 +9.3 14 3.40
LKQ Corporation LKQ 14.63 0 23.51 23.26 -.14 -0.6 V A A +10.2 +43.2 27
Lowes Cos LOW 24.76 0 39.26 38.23 -.12 -0.3 V A A +7.6 +44.8 23 0.64
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 --0 101.29 94.92 +.56 +0.6 A A A +7.6 -1.5 18 3.08f
Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.26 --- 32.95 28.01 +.10 +0.4 A A A +4.9 -1.7 15 0.92
Motorola Solutions MSI 44.49 0 59.48 58.94 -.07 -0.1 A A A +5.9 +30.9 20 1.04
NextEra Energy NEE 59.10 0 72.85 72.61 +.21 +0.3 A A A +4.9 +24.8 14 2.40
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 15.69 -- 43.18 21.01 +1.79 +9.3 A A A +6.6 -53.1 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 16.10 0 19.56 19.65 +.17 +0.9 A A A +8.9 +9.6 17 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 5.12 0 7.85 7.71 ... ... A A A +8.1 +46.0 11 0.04
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 -0-- 85.90 47.39 -.53 -1.1 A A A +14.6 +17.1 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 70.50 0 90.31 88.65 -.15 -0.2 V A A +2.8 +15.5 21 2.08
Sprint Nextel Corp S 2.10 6.04 5.64 +.08 +1.4 V V -0.5 +156.2 dd
Texas Instru TXN 26.06 34.24 32.67 -.16 -0.5 A A A +5.8 +3.0 21 0.84
Time Warner TWX 33.62 0 51.29 50.06 -.03 -0.1 V A A +4.7 +36.2 18 1.04
UniFirst Corp UNF 55.86 88.35 82.22 +.32 +0.4 A A A +12.1 +35.6 16 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 36.80 -0- 48.77 43.50 +.73 +1.7 A A A +0.5 +20.4 cc 2.06
Vodafone Group VOD 24.95 -0- 30.07 27.31 +.26 +1.0 A A A +8.4 +5.2 1.53e
WalMart Strs WMT 57.18 --0 77.60 69.89 +.54 +0.8 A A A +2.4 +16.9 14 1.59
Walgreen Co WAG 28.53 0 40.31 40.06 -.04 -0.1 A A A +8.2 +20.1 18 1.10
Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e Amount declared or paid in last
12 months i Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates
M uH




The yield on the
10-year Trea-
sury note rose
to 2.00 percent
Tuesday. Yields
affect interest
rates on con-
sumer loans.


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
The price of
crude oil rose
on expectations
for stronger de-
mand following
an encouraging
report on U.S.
home prices.
Natural gas fell
on worries mild
weather will
lead to weaker
demand.




Ili


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .06 0.06 ... .05
6-month T-bill .11 0.11 ... .07
52-wk T-bill .13 0.14 -0.01 .10
2-year T-note .28 0.28 ... .21
5-year T-note .88 0.86 +0.02 .74
10-year T-note 2.00 1.96 +0.04 1.85
30-year T-bond 3.19 3.14 +0.05 3.00


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 2.76 2.75 +0.01 2.48
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 3.99 3.98 +0.01 4.61
Barclays USAggregate 1.90 1.88 +0.02 2.10
Barclays US High Yield 5.62 5.62 ... 7.50
MoodysAAA Corp Idx 3.87 3.85 +0.02 3.85
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.13 1.14 -0.01 .95
Barclays US Corp 2.81 2.80 +0.01 3.46


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 97.57
Ethanol (gal) 2.40
Heating Oil (gal) 3.11
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.23
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.97
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1660.70
Silver (oz) 31.16
Platinum (oz) 1677.40
Copper (Ib) 3.68
Palladium (oz) 749.05
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.28
Coffee (Ib) 1.50
Corn (bu) 7.30
Cotton (Ib) 0.82
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 352.30
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.14
Soybeans (bu) 14.52
Wheat (bu) 7.77


PVS.
96.44
2.40
3.06
3.29
2.93
PVS.
1652.40
30.76
1661.20
3.65
739.80
PVS.
1.29
1.49
7.29
0.81
352.70
1.14
14.48
7.79


%CHG
+1.17

+1.55
-1.92
+1.32
%CHG
+0.50
+1.31
+0.98
+0.78
+1.25
%CHG
-0.53
+0.54
+0.03
+1.65
-0.11
+0.22
+0.28
-0.29


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 21.24 +.05 +4.1 +14.6 +12.2 +5.4
BondA m 12.85 -.02 -0.6 +4.1 +5.7 +3.7
CaplncBuA m 54.36 +.29 +3.0 +14.1 +9.8 +2.9
CpWIdGrIA m 38.93 +.19 +4.7 +18.5 +9.5 +1.8
EurPacGrA m 42.77 +.26 +3.8 +15.4 +7.4 +1.1
FnlnvA m 42.99 +.15 +5.4 +16.9 +12.9 +3.6
GrthAmA m 36.10 +.06 +5.1 +18.0 +12.3 +3.5
IncAmerA m 18.75 +.08 +3.8 +13.9 +12.0 +5.0
InvCoAmA m 31.77 +.13 +5.3 +16.4 +11.3 +3.2
NewPerspA m 32.81 +.14 +5.0 +18.6 +11.6 +3.8
WAMutlnvA m 32.80 +.18 +5.1 +15.3 +13.9 +3.9
Dodge & Cox Income 13.86 ... 0.0 +6.0 +6.2 +6.8
IntlStk 36.34 +.15 +4.9 +18.1 +8.1 +0.9
Stock 130.40 +.50 +7.0 +22.9 +13.2 +2.5
Fidelity Contra 80.97 +.30 +4.4 +15.5 +14.1 +5.2
GrowCo 97.49 -.02 +4.6 +13.8 +16.7 +7.0
LowPriStk d 41.66 -.02 +5.5 +17.2 +15.3 +7.4
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.31 ... +3.6 +15.0 +11.1 +5.7
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.42 +.03 +0.6 +10.3 +8.6 +9.5
GIBondAdv 13.37 +.03 +0.5 +10.6 +8.8 +9.7
Harbor Intllnstl d 64.36 +.60 +3.6 +14.7 +10.0 +1.8
PIMCO TotRetA m 11.19 -.01 -0.3 +7.3 +6.6 +7.2
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 28.04 +.15 +6.0 +18.7 +13.5 +3.8
GrowStk 39.39 -.02 +4.3 +16.1 +15.1 +5.8
Vanguard 500Adml 139.03 +.71 +5.8 +17.1 +14.3 +4.4
5001nv 139.02 +.71 +5.8 +17.0 +14.2 +4.3
GNMAAdml 10.83 ... -0.6 +1.6 +5.1 +5.6
MulntAdml 14.41 -.01 +0.4 +4.4 +5.8 +5.3
STGradeAd 10.82 ... +0.1 +3.7 +3.5 +3.9
TotBdAdml 10.99 -.01 -0.7 +2.9 +5.3 +5.4
Totlntl 15.51 +.13 +3.5 +13.3 +6.9 -0.5
TotStlAdm 37.82 +.16 +6.1 +17.1 +14.9 +5.1
TotStldx 37.80 +.15 +6.1 +16.9 +14.7 +4.9
Welltn 35.20 +.10 +4.0 +13.3 +11.1 +5.9
WelltnAdm 60.80 +.18 +4.0 +13.4 +11.2 +6.0
*-Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
The Dow Jones industrial aver-
age rose Tuesday for the sev-
enth time in eight days and
reached its highest level since
October 2007. The Dow is now
just 1.5 percent below its record
high, set in October 2007 two
months before the start of the
Great Recession.

Ford F
Close: $13.14V-0.64 or -4.6%
The automaker reported better-
than-expected 2012 profits, but
warned that it expects to lose more
money than expected in Europe.

"I,

II I J
52-week range
$8.82 iL $14.30
Vol.: 130.9m (2.4x avg.) PE:3.0
Mkt. Cap:$49.17 b Yield: 3.0%
DR Horton DHI
Close: $23.82A2.51 or 11.8%
Thanks to improving home prices
and better sales, the homebuilder
said that its first-quarter net income
more than doubled.



A ^
Ii D J
52-week range
$13.45 $24.03
Vol.: 22.3m (3.8x avg.) PE: 8.6
Mkt. Cap:$7.65 b Yield: 0.6%
Beazer Homes BZH
Close: $19.20A1.02 or 5.6%
The homebuilder slid to a loss in its
fiscal first quarter, but the loss was
smaller than Wall Street analysts
had anticipated.



I ,
I: II i J
52-week range
$10.90 $20.15
Vol.: 2.5m (1.7x avg.) PE: ...
Mkt. Cap: $474.12 m Yield:...

Tupperware TUP
Close: $73.75 A3.42 or 4.9%
The seller of plastic storage contain-
ers said that its fourth-quarter net in-
come fell, but adjusted results still
beat expectations.




Ii I J
52-week range
$50.90 $74.24
Vol.:1.1m (2.3x avg.) PE:20.8
Mkt. Cap: $4.08 b Yield: 2.0%
VMware VMW
Close: $77.14V-21.18 or -21.5%
The software company posted an
outlook that disappointed and said
that it was cutting 900 jobs, or about
7 percent of its workforce.
$100
.o

N D J
52-week range
$76.33 $118.79
Vol.: 27.7m (12.6x avg.) PE:45.1
Mkt. Cap:$9.86 b Yield:...


Stocks advance


Dow aims for 14,000

Associated Press

NEW YORK Pfizer helped keep the
stock market rally alive Tuesday. The
drugmaker's stock gained after posting
strong earnings, pushing the Dow closer
to 14,000.
The Dow Jones industrial average rose
73 points to close at 13,954.42 points, end-
ing higher for the seventh day in eight.
The Standard and Poor's 500 also rose,
adding eight points to 1,507.84 points. The
Nasdaq composite dropped less than a
point to 3,153.66.
The January rally looked as if it was
running out of steam Monday as stocks
pulled back from their highs, but Tuesday
they resumed their ascent toward record
levels. Demand was bolstered at the start
of the year after lawmakers reached a
deal to avoid the "fiscal cliff" and was
sustained by reports that have added to
evidence showing the U.S. housing mar-
ket is recovering and the jobs market is
slowly healing.


The Dow is 6.5 percent higher this
month and the S&P 500 is up 5.7 percent.
Both indexes are at their highest levels
in more than five years.
Pfizer was the biggest gainer in the
Dow, advancing 86 cents, or 3.2 percent,
to $27.70 after the company said its
fourth-quarter profit more than quadru-
pled because of a $4.8 billion gain from
selling its nutrition business and despite
competition from generic drugs hurting
sales. Homebuilder D.R. Horton gained
$2.51, or 11.8 percent, to $23.82 after it
said net income more than doubled as
the housing recovery took hold. Improv-
ing home prices and better sales bol-
stered profits.
"The earnings season is not stellar, it's
not gangbusters, but it's better than last
quarter," said Quincy Krosby, a market
strategist at Prudential.
Currently, analysts expect fourth-
quarter earnings for 2012 to increase by
an average of 4.7 percent for S&P 500
companies, according to the latest data
from S&P Capital IQ. That's an improve-
ment on the previous quarter when profit
grew by 2.4 percent.


Associated Press
A woman shops Jan. 20 at a Nordstrom store in Chicago. Consumer confidence in the
United States plunged in January to its lowest level in more than a year, reflecting
higher Social Security taxes that left Americans with less take-home pay.



US consumers less


optimistic after tax increase

Associated Press shock to confidence, the hit to income is
also likely to show up in a slower pace of
WASHINGTON An increase in So- consumer spending in the first half of this
cial Security taxes is leaving Americans year," said Thomas Feltmate, an econo-
with less take-home pay and a more mist at TD Economics, in a note to
negative outlook for the U.S. economy clients.
The Conference Board said Tuesday The index has declined for three
that its index of consumer con- straight months since hitting a
fidence plunged 8.1 points in The index nearly five-year high of 73.1 in
January from December to 58.6. October 2012. It's still above the
That's the lowest reading in 14 has post-recession low of 40.9
months and the third straight reached in October 2011.
decline, declined Consumers began to feel less
Congress and the White optimistic at the end of the year
House reached a deal in Janu- for three when it appeared congressional
ary to keep income taxes from straight Republicans and President
rising on most Americans. But Barack Obama were at an im-
the agreement did not extend a months passe over sharp spending cuts
temporary cut in the Social Se- and tax increases.
curity taxes. since Obama reached a deal with
The tax increase will leave a hitting Republicans on Jan. 1 that kept
household earning $50,000 a hitting a most Americans from seeing
year with about $1,000 less to nearly higher income taxes. But they
spend in 2013. A household with postponed decisions on spend-
two high-paid workers will have five-year ing cuts and raising the nation's
up to $4,500 less. debt limit until later in the year.
The private research group high of And they allowed the Social Se-
said the tax hike was the key curity tax cut to expire.
reason consumers felt less con- 731 in "All the negative news about
fident in January The survey October the dysfunction in Washington
was conducted through Jan. 17, surrounding the fiscal cliff ne-
at which point most people 2012. gotiations contributed to the De-
began to realize their paychecks cember plunge, and ongoing
were lighter, shenanigans concerning the
"It may take a while for confidence to re- debt ceiling and fiscal sanity in general
bound and consumers to recover from continued to weigh in January," said
their initial paycheck shock," said Lynn Joshua Shapiro, chief U.S. economist at
Franco, the Conference Board's economist MFR Inc., in a note to clients.
Consumers also said they felt less opti- Many economists predict economic
mistic about their job prospects over the growth slowed in the October-December
next six months. quarter to an annual rate of around 1.2
Taxes are rising at a time when hiring percent. That would be much weaker
is limited and wages are barely growing. than the 3.1 percent rate in the July-
The combination is expected to hurt con- September quarter.
summer spending and slow economic Most economists say the tax increase
growth, will hold back growth in the first quarter
"Perhaps more important than the of 2013.


Business BRIE FS


Ford shares down
in fourth quarter
DEARBORN, Mich. Ford
is posting record profits in
North America, but it's not
enough to quell unease about
the company's prospects
elsewhere.
Ford's shares dropped
nearly 5 percent Tuesday
after the company said it ex-
pects to lose more money in
Europe this year and break
even in Asia and South Amer-
ica. The final straw for in-
vestors: Ford said sales will
increase next year but profits
should remain about the
same, dashing hopes that
margins will continue to grow.
The No. 2 U.S. automaker
posted record pretax profit of
$8.3 billion in North America
in 2012, the result of a six-
year turnaround orchestrated
by CEO Alan Mulally.


Fed to stick to Hostess to list
low-rate message bidder for Twinkles


WASHINGTON When
the Federal Reserve meets
this week, it's likely to affirm
the message it intends to help
lift the economy, and con-
sumers and businesses will
be able to borrow cheaply
well into the future even
after unemployment has
dropped sharply.
Last month, the Fed sig-
naled for the first time it will tie
its policies to specific eco-
nomic barometers.
It said as long as the infla-
tion outlook is mild, it could
keep short-term rates near
zero until the unemployment
rate dips below 6.5 percent
from the current
7.8 percent.
That could take until the
end of 2015, the Fed pre-
dicted last month.


NEW YORK -The inde-
structible Twinkie appears to
be one step closer to a
comeback.
Hostess Brands is close
to announcing it has picked
two investment firms -
C. Dean Metropoulos & Co.
and Apollo Global Manage-
ment as the lead bidders
for its Twinkies and other
snack cakes, according to a
source close to the situation
who was not authorized to
comment publicly on the
talks.
The joint "stalking horse"
bid would set the floor for an
auction process that lets com-
petitors make better offers.
A judge would have to ap-
prove any final sale.

-From wire reports


StocksRecap


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


41







Page A12 -WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .............. ...........publisher
Mike Arnold ................. .................. editor
Charlie Brennan .....................editor at large
Curt Ebitz .......................citizen member
mN w Mac Harris ...........................citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ........................copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


CHANGING TIDE




Governor does



about-face on



voter access


It is a fortunate turn of
events for Florida's vot-
ers that Gov. Rick Scott's
favorability numbers con-
tinue to plummet.
Scott recently reversed his
decision on early voting, pro-
posing more days for the
process and in-
creasing the num-
ber of early voting THE I1
locations. Scott c
In fewer than mind c
two months, Scott vot
has moved from
defiance to defer- OUR 01
ence. Voters and
politicos across Better Il
the nation criti- ne'
cized Scott in No-
vember for obstructing voters'
access to the polls a charge
Scott denied. Since then, he
has backed off the unpopular
bill he signed in 2011, blaming
the mess on legislators.
What has changed?
Scott's polling numbers
show 33 percent of Florida's
voters approve of Scott's per-
formance while 57 percent
disapprove. That is com-
pared to a 37/48 spread in No-
vember. According to Public
Policy Polling, Scott's num-
bers have dropped to 49/38
among Republicans and vot-


Deals on used books
This is in response to the call
in today's paper (Jan. 21),
"Shopping for used books." I
also am an avid reader
and I'm on a budget. I
have found at the fair- ,co
grounds flea market
there is a lady in the
back corner of the
snack bar building who
has very reasonably
priced used books, 25
cents for paperbacks.
There are several other CAL
dealers out there (who) 563-
also have very good 56
quality used books for
25 and 50 cents. The caller
might like to shop out there.
Need more like 'em
It is nice to know we have one
commissioner, Scott Adams,
who is for the people and not the
special interests. A while back,
we had Gary Bartell in District 2,
Vicki Phillips, District 3, and
Joyce Valentino, District 5, who
were all for the people, not
bought and paid for by builders,
developers and special interests.
Unfortunately, it was a sad day
when they were voted out and
look what we have today. Shame,
shame on the people of Citrus
County for this wrongdoing.
Thank goodness for Scott
Adams, for the people. We need
more commissioners like him.
Lost $250
I hope the person who found
the envelope in the Regions
parking lot with $250 in it en-
joys it or needs it because I cer-
tainly appreciate the fact. I lost
it and nobody turned it in.
Thanks for everything.
Small town, big hearts
The beauty of being a Citrus
County resident: I was broke
down at the Sweetbay in Crystal
River this afternoon (Jan. 23)
and couldn't figure out what


ers favor former Gov. Charlie
Crist 53 percent to 39 percent
in a head-to-head battle for
the governorship.
Scott exercised phenome-
nally poor judgment when he
signed his name to that legis-
lation. He could have vetoed
the bill if he truly
felt it was a bad
SSUE: law. Now he is
changes dealing with the
n early fallout.
ng. The nation feels
Florida is a joke
>INION: when it comes to
elections. Ironi-
ate than cally, Florida
'er. moved its presi-
dential primary
from March to January last year,
because it wanted to be a bigger
player in national elections. Yet
days after the General Election,
the state was still counting votes
even though the rest of the
nation had already decided the
outcome.
Regardless of the motiva-
tion for Scott's mea culpa, it
could be a boon for Florida's
voters. We encourage legisla-
tors to take Scott's plan and
expand on it by empowering
voters. His ideas are not the
ceiling, merely the ground
floor for change.


was going on. I had a gentleman
I never knew, with his small little
girl, try to help me jump off my
truck. It didn't work. Another
guy next to him, he said we'll try
his truck. We tried dif-
JND ferent jumper cables.
Another gentleman
OFF came and that gentle-
S man's name was Larry.
He was waiting on his
wife. Another gentleman
came up, offered his
help. We figured out it
'60F was my starter and a
7 gentleman named
)579 George came up and an
old neighbor of mine,
Fred, tried to help ... I
had five to six different people
take the time out of their day to
make sure I made it back to the
bus stop to get my little girl. I
would like to thank Lenny,
George, Fred, their wives and an-
other gentleman whose name I
did not get, and a little girl who
helped me get my car started at
the Sweetbay in Crystal River.
Citrus County and Crystal River
are beautiful. Never forget to say
thank you to all of your neigh-
bors and to be kind to everyone.
Do unto others as you want
done unto you.
Thanks for bread
I want to thank Rutabagas Nat-
ural Food Market in Inverness for
being able to get me gluten-free
bread. I was able to get this up
North but had not found it in
Florida. They ordered it for me.
They are wonderful. Thank you.
Why have a port?
You print a lot of letters for
and against having the port. But
why isn't there any reason why
we need a port? Nobody seems
to know why we really need one.
Please print that. Somebody tell
us why we need a port.
Editor's note: Proponents of
the port believe it will create jobs
and become an economic engine
for the area.


i


a


I
0


Ammo restrictions
I read Mr McIntosh's letter
on regulating gun magazine ca-
pacity in Tuesday's Chronicle
and fail to see the correlation
between preventing overhunt-
ing of ducks and banning high-
capacity magazines. Banning
the manufacture or importa-
tion of high-capacity maga-
zines had zero effect during
the time the last so-called "as-
sault weapons ban" was in ef-
fect and would have even less
now it would be just one
more useless politically cor-
rect law that only punishes law
abiding citizens. It's like ban-
ning chrome wheels to stop
street racing. There are ap-
proximately 100 million semi-
automatic weapons in civilian
hands in this country and con-
servatively at least 10 maga-
zines per weapon many
people who own semi auto
weapons possess many more,
because they stocked up after
the last ban expired. That
would yield at least 1 billion -
yes billion with a "b" maga-
zines in this country (probably
more). Banning the sale of new
magazines would be useless
and confiscating existing mag-
azines only would be possible
with house-to-house searches,
such as in the Iraq war
To top it all off, anyone with
access to a 3-D printer can just
print all the parts for a high
capacity magazine (with the
exception of the spring). 3-D
printers are still in the $1,500-


"To show resentment at a reproach is
to acknowledge that one may have
deserved it."
Tacitus, 55-120 A.D.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Health care uncertainty


We are inch-
ing toward
the hour
when the Affordable
Care Act the
health care law
known as Obamacare
- will become real-
ity. And some of us
have more than a
passing interest in
what that is going to
mean for our own
specific family
situations.


Cary McMullen
FLORIDA
VOICES


The law calls for each state to
have a health insurance ex-
change set up beginning next
January so individuals without
coverage can find affordable
policies. Florida's state leaders,
Republicans all, were counting
on the November 2012 elections
to sweep away the necessity of
complying with the mandate
and have done nothing to set up
an exchange. That means it's
virtually certain the federal
government will set it up and
run it for Florida.
This background has led to
an interesting dilemma for the
Republicans, who live by the
motto the states know much
better than the feds how to run
things. There's not a shred of
evidence to support the claim,
of course, but it makes them
feel better to believe it.
At a hearing last Tuesday
(Jan. 22) in Tallahassee, two Re-
publican senators on the Sen-
ate Select Committee on the
Affordable Care Act posed
questions that capture both
sides of the dilemma.
"Why should we turn over
control of our health care to the


Feds instead of
Floridians running it
for Floridians?"
asked Sen. Joe Ne-
gron of Palm City.
"Why on Earth
would Florida want
to run an exchange
when it's just the fed-
eral government
telling us what to do
with very, very little
flexibility?" asked
Sen. Aaron Bean of
Fernandina Beach.


The committee heard testi-
mony from two witnesses who
gave very different reasons for
the same conclusion let the
feds run the show for now.
Professor Jonathan Gruber of
MIT, who designed much of the
state program in Massachusetts
that was the model for Oba-
macare, argued the point is ex-
panding Medicaid and
providing insurance for every-
one, never mind the cost.
Michael Cannon, director of
health policy at the libertarian
Cato Institute, said cost is the
point and the more responsibil-
ity read "blame" gets
shifted to the federal govern-
ment, the better
Either way, many Floridians
will look to the new exchange
for affordable health care in-
surance come January That in-
cludes an adult son in our
family who turns 26 in Decem-
ber and is therefore going to be
on his own for medical cover-
age. He's employed as a teacher
in a private school, but doesn't
have benefits.
My question is: Just how af-
fordable will the affordable cov-


erage be? Even those like me
who have coverage through an
employer pay a share of the cost
that can run upward of $600
a month. A high-
deductible policy paid out of his
own pocket would cost much
more and I'm sure our son
wouldn't be able to afford it
I know, there are supposed to
be subsidies to ease the burden
for those who earn below a cer-
tain level, but the devil is in the
details. How much will the sub-
sidy be? How will it be applied?
How good will the coverage be?
Who knows?
All should have to pay some-
thing for their own health care.
But the cost of health care has
always been the unequal side of
the equation in Obamacare.
There have been no attempts to
rein in for-profit Big Medicine
and Big Pharma, and the solu-
tion of Obamacare is just for
everyone some with govern-
ment help to pay them what
they want.
That's better than the solu-
tion offered by Republicans,
which is for everyone to pay
them what they want without
government help. And Medi-
caid, what's that?
We may yet get to a point
where the equation is balanced,
but the next year will be full of
anxiety as we wait for answers
about how the medical bills will
get paid.

Cary McMullen is a journalist
and editor who lives in Lake-
land. He can be reached at
cmcmullen@florida
voices, comn.




GOCOMKhS Com2013


'pM


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

$2,000 price range, roughly
equivalent to laser printers
when they first came out, but
prices are falling fast. In fact,
there are even programs out
there now allowing you to
print handgun and rifle re-
ceivers. Of course, there is the
usual slate of attempts to re-
strict the open-source publica-
tion of software to do this, but


does anyone think in a couple
of years, when 3-D printers are
as common as laser printers
are today, that government
bans on particular uses of soft-
ware will be effective? For
someone my age maybe, but
not for most 14-year-olds. It's
like passing a law forbidding
"sexting" how's that work-
ing out?
Although he didn't say it, I'm
assuming Mr McIntosh would
not expect similar restrictions
to be placed on police
weapons. He should reflect on
the fact that while police usu-
ally operate in groups and train
in rapid magazine swaps, logi-
cally they have less need for
larger-capacity magazines than
do "civilians" who must face
criminals alone and subse-
quently may need the larger
ammunition capacity.
Earnest J. Gallion
Crystal River

Praise for Greene
The purpose of this letter is
to publicly thank Geoff Greene
for his outstanding column in
the Jan. 20 Chronicle. He
clearly and concisely identified
the problem between Duke and
the county property appraiser,
laid out the facts and advised
his anticipated course of ac-
tion. The Chronicle should take
note of this approach. Well
done, Geoff Greene!
Scott Ebert
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


LETTERS > to the Editor


I


mia
L OR SKa


L





WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013 A13


Associated Press
Egyptian riot police fire tear gas at protesters, not seen, during clashes Tuesday in
front of the Semiramis Intercontinental hotel, background near Tahrir Square, Cairo.


Egypt army chief warns


state could collapse


Associated Press

PORT SAID, Egypt -
Residents of this Mediter-
ranean coastal city burying
their dead from Egypt's
wave of political violence
vented their fury at Egypt's
Islamist president and the
Muslim Brotherhood on
Tuesday, demanding his
ouster and virtually de-
claring a revolt against his
rule, as the head of the mil-
itary warned Egypt may
collapse under the weight
of its turmoil.
Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-
Sissi's strongly worded
comments, his first since
the crisis began, appeared
aimed at pushing both
sides in Egypt's political
divide to reconcile and
find a solution to the rap-
idly spreading protests and
riots across much of the
country the past six days.
But his breaking of his
silence falls heaviest on
President Mohammed
Morsi, who has been un-
able to contain the unrest
by trying a tough hand, as
protesters defied his dec-
laration of a month-long
state of emergency and
curfew in Port Said and
two neighboring cities.
At least 60 people have
been killed and hundreds
injured since Thursday in


clashes between police
and protesters angry about
what they call Islamists'
moves to monopolize
power and failure to ad-
dress the country's multi-
ple woes. In his comments,
el-Sissi signaled the mili-
tary would not move to put
down protesters, saying
troops are in a "grave
predicament," forced to
balance between "avoid-
ing confrontation" with cit-
izens and protecting state
institutions.
Trouble in Cairo
In Cairo on Tuesday,
rock-throwing protesters
clashed with police firing
tear gas for another day in
battles that escalated after
nightfall near Tahrir
Square. The mayhem
forced the nearby U.S. Em-
bassy to suspend public
services Tuesday, and the
night before masked men
tried to rob the neighbor-
ing five-star Semiramis
Hotel, a Cairo landmark,
trashing the lobby before
being forced out.
Protesters in many cities
around the country have
battled police, cut off roads
and railway lines and be-
sieged government offices
and police stations. But the
most dramatic fraying of
state control has been in
the three cities along the


Suez Canal, particularly
Port Said, at the canal's
Mediterranean end.
Death in Port Said
Violence exploded in
Port Said on Saturday, leav-
ing more than 40 dead
since. The provincial gov-
ernor has gone into hiding.
Police are hunkered down.
Tanks are in the streets by
government buildings, but
army troops have balked at
enforcing Morsi's curfew
order Residents in all
three cities flouted the re-
strictions with huge
marches in the streets
Monday and Tuesday night
"The independent state
of Port Said," proclaimed
one protester's sign as
thousands marched
through the city Tuesday in
funeral processions for two
of those killed in the unrest
"Down, down with the
rule of the Guide," mourn-
ers chanted, referring to
the Brotherhood's top
leader, known as the gen-
eral guide, who opponents
see as the real power be-
hind Morsi's government.
Tuesday evening,
Morsi's office issued a
statement saying the cur-
few and state of emergency
could be lifted or short-
ened if the security situa-
tion improves, apparently
trying to ease the anger.


WorldBRIEFS


UN warned: Mali rebels
may head for Libya
UNITED NATIONS The U.N.'s special
representative for Libya warned the Security
Council on Tuesday that France's military of-
fensive in northern Mali may drive Islamic in-
surgents out and across the porous borders
with Algeria and back into Libya.
U.N. officials including peacekeeping chief
Herve Ladsous said last year the hard-line
Islamic occupation of northern Mali was
partly triggered by the downfall of Libyan dic-
tator Moammar Gadhafi in 2011, as well-
trained militiamen fled into Mali with
looted-heavy weapons, driving back the
Malian army.
U.N. special representative for Libya Tarek
Mitri told the Security Council "the opposition
of armed radical groups to the military inter-
vention in Mali may exacerbate the situation
(in Libya) given ideological and/or ethnic affil-
iations as well as porous borders in Libya."
French and African land forces are battling
al-Qaida-linked Islamists in northern Mali,
while a renewed bout of unrest has gripped
Egypt following the two-year anniversary of
the revolution that toppled strongman Hosni
Mubarak.
Sunday Times apologizes
'unreservedly' for cartoon
LONDON The acting editor of Rupert
Murdoch's Sunday Times newspaper apolo-
gized "unreservedly" Tuesday for a cartoon
depicting Israeli leader Benjamin Netanyahu
building a wall using blood-red mortar that
sparked outrage in the Jewish community.
Jewish leaders have said the cartoon was
reminiscent of anti-Semitic propaganda,
which is often blood-drenched. Anger was
heightened by the timing: The cartoon was
published on Holocaust Memorial Day.
Murdoch on Monday said the paper owed
a "major apology" for publishing the cartoon
by Gerald Scarfe, which shows Netanyahu
wielding a long, sharp trowel and depicts ag-
onized Palestinians bricked into the wall's
structure.
His newspaper's editor, Mark Ivens, met
Tuesday with Jewish community leaders to
express regret over the cartoon's publication.
He called the cartoon a "terrible mistake" and
apologized "unreservedly" for any offense
caused, saying the timing was "inexcusable"
and the associations "grotesque."
Mexico's new president
mum on drug violence
MEXICO CITY Two months after Presi-
dent Enrique Pena Nieto took office promis-
ing to reduce violent crime, the killings linked
to Mexico's drug cartels continue unabated.
Only the government's talk about them
has dropped.
Eighteen members of a band and its ret-


Mali fighting


.- : I
Associated Press
Chadian troops patrol the streets of Gao,
northern Mali, on Tuesday, days after
Malian and French military forces closed
in and retook the town from Islamist
rebels. Earlier Tuesday, four suspected
extremists were arrested after being
found by a youth militia calling
themselves the "Gao Patrolmen."

inue were kidnapped and apparently slain
over the weekend in the northern border
state of Nuevo Leon by gunmen who asked
them to name their cartel affiliation before
they were shot and
dumped in a well. Fourteen
prisoners and nine guards
died in an attempted prison
escape in Durango state.
Nine men were slain
Christmas eve in Sinaloa.
In the state of Mexico,
which borders the capital, Enrique
more than a dozen bodies Pena Nieto
were found last week, president of
some dismembered. Mexico.
The difference under this
administration is there have been no major
news conferences announcing more troops
or federal police for drug-plagued hotspots.
Gone are the regular parades of newly ar-
rested drug suspects before the media with
their weapons, cash or contraband.
Pena Nieto has been mum, instead touting
education, fiscal and energy reforms. On
Monday, he told a summit of Latin American
and Caribbean leaders in Chile he wants
Mexico to focus on being a player in solving
world and regional problems.
-From wire reports


-^/ /


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Nuclear news


World BRIEFS

Contest


Associated Press
Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass.,
emerges Tuesday after a
unanimous vote by the
Senate Foreign Relations
Committee approving him
to become America's
next top diplomat.

Senate confirms
Kerry nomination
WASHINGTON -The
Senate has confirmed Mas-
sachusetts Sen. John Kerry
as the next secretary of
state.
The vote was 94-3. Once
sworn in, Kerry will replace
Hillary Rodham Clinton,
who is stepping down after
four years.
The vote came just hours
after the Foreign Relations
Committee approved his
nomination by voice vote.
Kerry has led the committee
for the past four years.
The 69-year-old Kerry is
a decorated Vietnam
veteran and the 2004
Democratic presidential
candidate.
9/11 fund makes
first payments
NEW YORK -A special
fund set up by Congress to
compensate people who
got sick after being exposed
to toxic World Trade Center
dust following Sept. 11 is
making its first round of
payments, with the initial
payouts going to a group of
15 first responders with res-
piratory problems.
The administrator who
oversees the 9/11 Victim
Compensation Fund, Sheila
Birnbaum, announced
Tuesday the fund was fi-
nally poised to process pay-
outs, after a deliberate start
in which officials figured out
how the program would
work and lawyers pieced to-
gether documentation for at
least 16,000 applications.
The first round of pay-
ments, most of which have
been offered to firefighters,
range from $10,000 to a
high of $1.5 million.
Judge OKs $4B
BP settlement
NEW ORLEANS BP
PLC closed the book on the
Justice Department's crimi-
nal probe of its role in the
Deepwater Horizon disaster
and Gulf oil spill Tuesday,
when a federal judge
agreed to let the London-
based oil giant plead guilty
to manslaughter charges for
the deaths of 11 rig workers
and pay a record $4 billion
in penalties.
The judge noted the
company already has
racked up more than $24
billion in spill-related ex-
penses and has estimated
it will pay a total of $42 bil-
lion to fully resolve its liabil-
ity for the disaster in the
Gulf of Mexico.
Microsoft retools
Office software
SAN FRANCISCO Mi-
crosoft is selling a retooled
version of its Office software
to consumers as an online
subscription service for the
first time in an attempt to ex-
tend one of the company's
key franchises beyond per-
sonal computers.
Tuesday's release comes
six months after Microsoft
previewed the new-look Of-
fice, which includes popular
word processing, spread-
sheets and email programs.
The revamped Office
boasts touchscreen con-
trols, just like the re-
designed version of the
Windows operating system
released three months ago.
-From wire reports


Hagel supports

nuclear arms cuts,

then elimination

Associated Press

WASHINGTON Chuck
Hagel, the likely next secretary of
defense, would be the first to
enter the Pentagon as a public ad-
vocate for sharply reducing the
number of U.S. nuclear weapons,
possibly without equivalent cuts
by Russia. He supports an inter-
national movement called Global
Zero that favors eliminating all
nuclear weapons.
That puts him outside the or-
thodoxy embraced by many of his
fellow Republicans but inside a
widening circle of national secu-
rity thinkers including Presi-
dent Barack Obama who


believe nuclear weapons
are becoming more a lia-
bility than an asset, less
relevant to 21st century
security threats like ter-
rorism.
"Sen. Hagel certainly
would bring to office a
more ambitious view on Chu
nuclear reductions than Hag
his predecessors," said Reput
Steven Pifer, a senior fel- favy
low at the Brookings In- elimin
stitution. "While he nucl
would likely take a less weap
dramatic position in of-
fice, it might not be a bad thing to
have a secretary of defense ques-
tion what nuclear deterrence re-
quires today"
The customary stance of de-
fense secretaries in the nuclear
age has been that the weapons
are a necessary evil, a required
ingredient in American defense
strategy that can be discarded
only at the nation's peril.


bli

na
le
E0


Hagel, 66, takes a subtly
different view one
shared by Obama but op-
posed by those in Congress
1' who believe disarmament
is weakness and that an
outsized American nu-
clear arsenal must be
ck maintained indefinitely as
el a counterweight to the nu-
ican clear ambitions of anti-
rs Western countries like
eating North Korea and Iran.
ar Hagel argues for doing
ons. away with nuclear
weapons entirely, but not
immediately and not unilaterally
Hagel, a Republican from Ne-
braska whose nomination has
drawn heated criticism for his
past statements on Israel, Iran
and gays, is likely to face ques-
tions on nuclear issues at his Sen-
ate confirmation hearing
scheduled for Thursday A Viet-
nam war veteran, he served in the
Senate from 1997 to 2009.


Associated Press
A girl looks at a display Tuesday assessing the impact of supposed nuclear attack on Seoul at the Korea
War Memorial Museum in Seoul, South Korea. North Korea appears all set to detonate an atomic device,
but confirming the explosion when it takes place will be virtually impossible for outsiders, specialists said.

UN experts poised to confirm any North Korean blast


Associated Press
SEOUL, South Korea With
North Korea appearing set to det-
onate an atomic device, the U.N.
agency that detected two previous
tests says it is prepared to confirm
an explosion when it takes place.
But experts say it might be diffi-
cult to establish whether the blast
is nuclear in nature.
The best indication of a test
will be seismic tremors and gases
released into the air, phenomena
that the Preparatory Commission
for the Comprehensive Nuclear-
Test-Ban Treaty identified from
previous testing.
The Vienna-based organiza-
tion's most potent detection tools
are more than 150 seismic sta-
tions across the globe. Although
very small in yield, North Korea's
first test in 2006 was picked up by
the CTBTO, as was a second test
in 2009.
Last week, North Korea warned
that it plans a third nuclear test to
protest toughened international
sanctions meant to punish it for
firing a long-range rocket in De-
cember The world sees the
launch as a ballistic missile test
banned by the U.N., while Py-
ongyang says it launched a satel-
lite into orbit as part of a peaceful
space development program.


UN nixes rep
Iranian nuke
VIENNA- The U.
agency is dismissing
major explosion at Ira
underground nuclear
International Atomi
Agency spokeswoman
told The Associated P
Tuesday that Iran's d
incident" at the Fordo
richment plant is "con
our observations."
Some news organi
cited Israeli intelligence
a blast at Fordo. Iran
uranium at Fordo to a
just a technical step a
nuclear warhead mat
Tehran contends it
only for reactor fuel a
tific purposes and dei
tions it wants nuclear
-F

The U.S., South
their allies have
North to scrap its
plans, saying it will
the country's decade
national isolation.
The threats have ]
tists and experts in
on high alert, as any


to aggravate tensions on the Ko-
ports of rean Peninsula.
e blast South Korea's Defense Min-
istry said Tuesday it believes
N. nuclear North Korea has nearly com-
reports of a pleted its nuclear test prepara-
in's fortified tions, confirming satellite
facility, analysis last week by the U.S.-
c Energy Korea Institute, a research group
an Gill Tudor at the Johns Hopkins School of
'ress on Advanced International Studies.
enial of "an Its satellite images of the
) uranium en- Punggye-ri site where the pre-
isistent with vious two tests were conducted -
show that the North Koreans may
zations have have been sealing a tunnel into a
ce reports of mountain where a nuclear device
is enriching would be detonated.
level that is In the event of such an under-
iway from ground nuclear test, both the
erial. CTBTO facilities and earthquake
is enriching monitoring stations in South
d for Korea can detect seismic tremors.
nd for scien- But although this is a strong in-
nies accusa- dication of a test, it is not an ab-
arms. solute confirmation.
From wire reports North Korea could also try to
deceive and give the impression
Korea and that it exploded a nuclear device
pressed the by simply exploding sophisticated
nuclear test conventional weapons that would
only worsen trigger the same seismic waves
les-old inter- produced by a nuclear test, said
Chi Heoncheol, an earthquake
placed scien- specialist at the government-
South Korea funded Korea Institute of Geo-
test is likely science and Mineral Resources.


Texas woman's execution halted


Associated Press
HUNTSVILLE, Texas -
The first woman sched-
uled to be executed in the
U.S. since 2010 won a re-
prieve Tuesday, mere
hours before she was
scheduled to be taken to
the Texas death chamber.
State District Judge
Larry Mitchell, in Dallas,
rescheduled Kimberly Mc-
Carthy's punishment for
April 3 so lawyers for the
former nursing home ther-
apist could have more time
to pursue an appeal fo-
cused on whether her pre-


dominantly white "We want to
jury was improp- make sure every-
erly selected on thing is done cor-
the basis of race. rectly," he said.
McCarthy is black. The 51-year-old
Dallas County McCarthy was con-
prosecutors, who victed and sent to
initially contested death row for the
the motion to Kimerly 1997 stabbing, beat-
reschedule, chose McCarthy ing and robbery of
to not appeal the execution a 71-year-old neigh-
ruling. delayed. bor She learned of
DistrictAttorney the reprieve less
Craig Watkins said the 60- than five hours before she
day delay was "appropri- was scheduled for lethal
ate." If no irregularities injection, already in a
are discovered, he said small holding cell a few
he'd move forward with feet from the death cham-
the execution. ber at the Texas Depart-


ment of Criminal Justice
Huntsville Unit.
"I'm happy right now
over that," she told prison
agency spokesman John
Hurt. "There's still work to
be done on my case."
Hurt said McCarthy was
in good spirits and "didn't
seem tense or nervous"
even before she learned
she would live.
A Dallas County jury
convicted her of killing
neighbor Dorothy Booth at
the retired college psy-
chology professor's home
in Lancaster, about 15
miles south of Dallas.


Associated Press
French chef Paul Bocuse
drinks Tuesday as he
tastes a dish during the
"Bocuse d'Or" (Golden
Bocuse) trophy, at the
14th World Cuisine con-
test, in Lyon, central
France. The contest, a
sort of world cup of the
cuisine, was started in
1987 by chef Bocuse to
reward young culinary
talents.


Sinn Fein issues
apology to widow
DUBLIN Sinn Fein
party leader Gerry Adams
apologized for past Irish
Republican Army killings of
police officers and soldiers
in the Republic of Ireland.
Adams expressed re-
morse during a parliamen-
tary debate Tuesday about
last week's fatal shooting of
a policeman in the border
town of Dundalk.
Detective Adrian Dono-
hoe was shot in the head
as he tried to stop a gang
robbing a cash collection
van outside a bank. An IRA
faction based in neighbor-
ing Northern Ireland is sus-
pected of involvement.
Venezuelan prison
violence 'alarming'
CARACAS, Venezuela
- Venezuela's government
is facing mounting criticism
from activists and the U.N.
human rights office for its
handling of the country's
overcrowded and violent
prisons following a clash
between inmates and
troops that left at least 58
dead at Uribana prison in
the city of Barquisimeto.
Rupert Colville, a
spokesman for the office of
the U.N. High Commis-
sioner for Human Rights,
expressed concern Tues-
day about "an alarming pat-
tern of violence in
Venezuelan prisons, which
is a direct consequence of
poor conditions."
Economic growth
slowed in Poland
WARSAW, Poland -
Government statistics show
Poland's economic growth
likely slowed to 2 percent in
2012, down from 4.3 per-
cent the year before, under-
lying concerns one of
Europe's fastest growing
economies has fallen victim
to the region's economic
troubles.
The figure, a preliminary
estimate published Tuesday
by the Central Statistical Of-
fice, was in line with the ex-
pectations of many
economists.
Peace envoy
talks about Syria
UNITED NATIONS -The
joint U.N.-Arab League
envoy to Syria has told the
Security Coundl that Syria "is
being destroyed bit by bit."
Peace envoy Lakdar
Brahimi also told the council
Tuesday the peace process
he has been engaged in is
at an impasse and "cannot
be implemented as it is."
But he said he is not walk-
ing away from the process,
saying "I am not a quitter."
The president of the Se-
curity Council, Pakistan's
Ambassador Masood Khan,
came out from the closed-
door talks to say Brahimi
told the council that in Syria,
"The situation is very grim."
-From wire reports











SPORTS


Teaching kids
to play golf at
an early age
could set them
up with a sport
for the rest of
their lives./B2

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 Golf/B2, B3
0 Tennis, bowling/B3
0 Super Bowl/B4
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Basketball, hockey/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Back for the first time in a long time


FHSAA Class 3A
regional quarterfinal
boys soccer game
Belleview (8-8-5)
at Citrus (9-5-4)
* Time: 7 p.m. today.
* Place: Citrus High School.
* What's at stake: The
winner moves on to the
regional semifinals
Saturday to face either
Gainesville Eastside or
Leesburg.
* Did you know? Citrus is a
district champion for the
first time in 13 years; the
'Canes' last crown came
in 2000.


'Canes boys soccer

hosts Belleview

for playoffgame
JON-MICHAEL SORACCHI
Staff writer
For the first time in over a
decade, the Citrus High School
boys soccer team will host an
FHSAA regional contest
The Hurricanes (9-5-4 over-
all) claimed the District 3A-6
title Saturday night with a 3-0
win over Leesburg, earning Cit-
rus a 7 p.m. home game today
against District 3A-5 runner-up
Belleview (8-8-5 overall).
Citrus the No. 1 seed in its


district went 3-0 in the tour-
nament, winning its games by
scores of 7-0, 4-1 and 3-0. The
'Canes did not meet Belleview
during the regular season.
The Hurricanes are not a fin-
ished product, but first-year
head coach Phil Journey said
his squad is in a great place
mentally and physically
"We're very relaxed right
now," Journey said. "We've got
our first district title in quite a
few years. They're ready for
(tonight)."
Citrus' last district title was
13 years ago in 2000, when
then-sophomore forward Alex
Posta scored all three goals to
push the Hurricanes past Lees-
burg 3-2. That was also the last
time Citrus advanced out of a


We're very
relaxed right
now.
Phil Journey
Citrus boys soccer coach said of his
team's demeanor heading into match
against Belleview tonight.

regional quarterfinal contest,
something the 2012-13 squad is
eager to best.
As has been the case all sea-
son, how far Citrus goes will be
determined by the back end.
Journey credited the defensive
quartet of seniors Justin
Carnevale and Tyler Beagan,
junior Sean Flaherty and soph-
omore Noah MacGinnis.
Those defensive starters have


made sophomore goalkeeper
Alan Verone's life easier
"Because of them, we're able
to do things on offense that we
wouldn't be able to if they
weren't playing so well,"
Journey said.
It's hard to criticize a Hurri-
cane unit averaging 4.7 goals in
its past three outings, but Jour-
ney would like to see his attack-
ers (led by junior forward
Joshua Marsden) keep up their
scoring ways.
"We need to concentrate on
our passing and our finishing,"
he said. "We've been in front of
the opponent's goal quite a few
times this season and shot wide
or over the bar"

See Page B4


Getting revenge


Lecanto boys

basketball returns

favor to CR
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER -
Lecanto High School avenged
an overtime home loss to
Crystal River three weeks ago
with a strong defensive effort
in the Pirates gym Tuesday
Leading 25-22 at the half, the
Panthers widened their ad-
vantage to nine before the end
of the third quarter They sus-
tained at least a seven-point
edge for the remainder to
hand Crystal River High
School (11-11) a 58-47 defeat
and secure at least one win
over each of their county foes.
Ten second-half points by
senior Mikey Makros (team-
high 18 points), who was 6-of-8
at the foul line
in the fourth,
as well as
seven apiece
from sopho-
For more more Darius
photos, click Sawyer (15
on this story at points) and
www.chronicle junior for-
online.com. ward Ronnie
Crowe (nine
points) down the stretch were
enough to outlast a Pirate of-
fense that missed 22 shots from
the floor in the half after strug-
gling with a field-goal percent-
age below 30 in the opening
two periods.
"Our kids were definitely
chomping at the bit and didn't
like the taste in their mouths
from our loss to Crystal
River," said Lecanto coach
Frank Vilardi, whose team im-
proved to 16-6. "We did a re-
ally good job controlling the
tempo and moving the ball
around and making them
come out and guard us."
Crystal River coach Steve
Feldman hoped for better for-
tunes in the second half after
his group struggled on offense
early
"We were surprised at half-
time that we were only down
by three, as bad a half as that
was shooting," Feldman said.
"Lecanto did a good job shad-


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Lecanto's 6-foot-7 forward Ronnie Crowe attempts to block Crystal River forward Sam Franklin's
layup Tuesday night at Crystal River. The Panthers evened up the season series by winning 58-47.


owing (Pirates junior guard)
Ty Reynolds (game-high 22
points). Other than very early
in the game, we didn't have
anything working from the
outside plenty of looks, but
nothing going down."
"Ty's a great player and I
thought (junior guard) Thomas


Vilardi did a great job on him,
making him work for every-
thing," Frank Vilardi said.
"We've been running that
defense all year it's man-to-
man but we're helping a lot
with our two big 6-7 kids
(Crowe and sophomore for-
ward Brandon Burich). Those


Yankees'A-Rod linked to PEI

Player implicated

in drug use as

MLBprobes

Associated Press


NEW YO
was ensnar
gation once
an alternate
reported b
star was am
ers listed ii


RK Alex Rodriguez
ed in a doping investi-
e again Tuesday when
ive weekly newspaper
baseball's highest-paid


long a half-dozen play-
n records of a Florida


two did a good job of throwing
to the open guys and closing
out and rebounding.
"Normally, we're pressing
and running, but this year
we're hanging our hat on
defense a little bit," Vilardi


Page B4


)s -again
clinic the paper said sold
performance-enhancing drugs.
The Miami New Times said the
three-time AL MVP bought human
growth hormone and other per-
formance-enhancing substances
during 2009-12 from Biogenesis of
America LLC, a now-closed anti-
aging clinic in Coral Cables near
Rodriguez's offseason home.
The new public relations firm
for the New York Yankees third
baseman issued a statement deny-
r ing the allegations.
The newspaper said it obtained


Page B4


Major League Baseball said it is "extremely disappointed" about a new
report that said records from an anti-aging clinic in the Miami area link New
York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez and other players to the
purchase of performance-enhancing drugs.
Associated Press


Kelly doesn't
know if hoax
affected Teo
SOUTH BEND, Ind.-
Notre Dame football coach
Brian
Kellyasaid
he didn't
see any
sign
linebacker ,
Manti Te'o
was
affected
by the Brian Kelly
girlfriend ND coach
hoax didn't think Te'o
leading up was affected.
to the
BCS game, but said in
hindsight it may have been
a factor.
Kelly said Te'o didn't
play his best, adding
Alabama played a role. He
said Tuesday only Te'o
knows how it affected him.
Also, Kelly said his inter-
view with the Philadelphia
Eagles was mainly to get
more information about
coaching in the NFL and
his heart remains in college
football. Kelly interviewed
with the Eagles on Jan. 8,
a day after the Irish were
beaten 42-14 by Alabama
in the title game.
Moss: From star
to afterthought
with 49ers
NEW ORLEANS -
Randy Moss used to be a
star. Now, he's just an af-
terthought with the San
Francisco 49ers.
It's a role he's still strug-
gling to accept.
Moss spent much of his
career as one of the NFL's
top receivers. During Super
Bowl media day Tuesday,
he called himself "the
greatest receiver ever to do
it." That's a claim sure to
be debated in NFL circles.
One thing is certain: the
35-year-old Moss is no
longer an elite receiver.
This season with the 49ers,
he caught 28 passes for
434 yards and three
touchdowns.
Cavs explore
signing former
No. 1 pick Oden
CLEVELAND -A per-
son with knowledge of the
situation said the Cleve-
land Cavaliers are explor-
ing the possibility of signing
center Greg Oden, the for-
mer No. 1 overall pick
whose NBA career has
been sabotaged by
injuries.
The Cavs are doing their
due diligence while looking
at Oden, said the person
who spoke to The Associ-
ated Press on condition of
anonymity because the
team's interest is contingent
upon the center's health.
CBSSports.com first
reported the Cavs and
Miami Heat were pursuing
Oden, who hasn't played
since 2009.
Oden has undergone
three major knee surgeries.
From staff reports













Teach kids to tee off early


In my opinion, golf is the
single-greatest game ever in-
vented, and every child
should have the opportunity to
learn the wonderful sport. Many
sports give children skills they
can carry into everyday life, but
no other sport allows children to
continue playing the game for
their entire life.
Consider the nine core values
taught by The First Tee (our
county's largest junior golf pro-
gram): Honor, integrity, sports-
manship, respect, confidence,
responsibility, perseverance,
courtesy
and judg-
ment. As
parents,
we all
strive to
Instill
these val-
ues in our
children

Wayne Larsen andintro-
ducing a
LINKS WITH child to
LARSEN the game
of golf will
only re-enforce the values.
Golf is the only sport where
the player is responsible for
keeping his or her own score,
calls penalties on himself or her-
self and ensures other competi-
tors do the same. In golf, the
biggest and strongest do not
have a distinct advantage.
To that point, I recently at-
tended the annual PGA Mer-
chandise show in Orlando, and
walked past Gary Player, who -
at only 5-foot-6 (maybe) won
nine major championships
while Arnold Palmer and Jack
Nicklaus were in their prime.
Also at the show, I had the pleas-
ure of meeting LPGA legend
Nancy Lopez, who is a walking,
talking billboard for the nine
core values mentioned earlier
Golf is a difficult game to
learn, and initially I encourage
parents to get children involved
through group golf clinics or
camps. The camaraderie will be


Special to the Chronicle


Children can learn the game of golf at an early age and play for their lifetime.

a fun adventure for a child. After ball, hockey and gymnastics. I if I attempted them today How-
they show a genuine interest or was a three-sport athlete in high ever, I am physically able to play
aptitude, consider private school and played collegiate golf as often as I like, and by using
instruction, football. the USGAs handicap system, I
Golf is truly the game of a life- Now, as another birthday has can compete with players of dif-
time. I did not grow up playing passed, I realize it has been more ferent abilities, age and gender.
the game of golf. Rather, as a than 25 years since I hit a curve- If you are looking to get your
child, I played every organized ball, attempted a single-leg take- child involved in an activity, our
sport under the sun and was down or tackled a running back I club hosts a junior camp every
lucky to have my father as a can only imagine the physical June and almost every course
coach and mentor. Recreation- pain or embarrassment any one has some sort of program during
ally, I dabbled in tennis, basket- of those activates would result in the summer months.


Use the next few months to
stoke the flames of a child's in-
terest in the game of golf and
sign up a child when the time
comes. You will be glad you did.
And so will they!


Wayne Larsen is a golf
professional at Skyview. He can
be reached at
golf@citrushills. com.


Local LEADERS


BRENTWOOD
Jan. 23, Wednesday Afternoon Point
Quota Group results.
First +9
Jack Gresham and Jim Pearson
Second + 7
Morris Frank
Most over quota at +5
Mike Mitchell
Closest to the Pin:
No. 2 Possum Lindsey
No. 4 Kenny McCabe
50/50 winner Herm Gardner
Jan. 26, Saturday Morning Scramble
results.
First
Art Miller, Morris Frank,
Jesse Lewis and Robert Haden
Second
Jennie Diaz, Vaughn Thornton
and Clair Lockwood
Third
Neil Swanton, Gene Moff,
Pete lacobelli and Al Fabrico
Closest to the Pin:
No. 2 Pete Krol
No. 4 Jesse Lewis
Jan. 27, Sunday Morning Scramble
results.
First 6 under
(MOC) Birdie No. 5
Kenny McCabe, Chuck Curtis,
Dave McLaughlin and Ann McLaughlin
Second 6 under
Bruce Liston, Wayne Brooks
and Rolf Kettenburg
Third 5 under
(MOC) Birdie No. 5
Anita McCabe, Ron Cart,
Floyd Lincoln and George Batson
Closest to the Pin:
No. 2 Don Gittings
No. 4 Joe Goyette
50/50 winner Glenora Hilton
Jan. 28, Monday Morning Mens Group
results.
First George Jones +5
Second Bob Flegel +2
(MOC) Par No. 5
Most over quota +2 (MOC) Bogey No. 6
Russ Kauffman
Closest to the Pin:
No. 2 Freddie Krattiger
No. 4 Stephan Franz
WOMEN
Jan. 29, Brentwood Tuesday Ladies
League standings
Team:
First 51.5
Glenora Hilton and Dorothy Gratien
Second 47.5
Cathy Foody and Clarita Parado
Third 43
Penny Magliano and Jane Vandenbergh
Individuals:
First Glenora Hilton 22.5
Second Cathy Foody 22.0
Third Dorothy Gratien 21.0
(Tie) Penny Magliano 21
Low Gross Dorothy Gratien 43
Low Net Dorothy Gratien 31
Chip-ins:
No. 5 Barbara Ouellette
Birdies:
No. 9 Jane Vandenbergh
Game of the Day, Best Score on Par 5's (tie
- 11 each):
Kay Fitzsimmons, Penny Magliano
and Bonnie Vandenbergh
Closest to the Pin:
No. 4 Joan Minnelli
Jan. 22, Brentwood Tuesday Ladies
League standings.
Team:
First 39.5
Cathy Foody and Clarita Parado
Second 38
Glenora Hilton and Dorothy Gratien
Third 31


Penny Magliano and Jane Vandenbergh
Individuals:
First Cathy Foody 19
Second Glenora Hilton 17.5
Third Penny Magliano 15
Low gross Dorothy Gratien 48
Low net Clarita Parado -34
(Tie) Mary Ann Barch -34
Chip-ins:
Birdies:
No. 4 Dianne Joyner
Game of the Day Most 1 Putts:
Gigi Haltom 5
Closest to the Pin:
No. 2 Dorothy Gratien

BRENTWOOD
FARMS
Jan. 29, Beverly Hills Men's Nine Hole
Golf League results.
George Patrode 22
Walter Novak 31
Frank Delucia 34
Birdies:
Nos. 2 and 4 George Patrode
Closest to the Pin:
No. 2 Seamus Graham
SSH award Frank Hughes
Jan. 22, Beverly Hills Men's Nine Hole
Golf League results.
Hal Snider 31
Gene Gorczyca 33
Seamus Graham 34
Chuck Boho 34
Birdies:
Nos. 2 and 4 Mr.Bemiis
Golfers of any age or ability, snowbirds and
those new to the area, may join a friendly
round of nine holes of handicap golf. We
play every Tuesday morning at Brentwood
Farms Golf Course. Tee time is 7:45 a.m.
For information, call Frank Hughes at 352-
746-4800 or email new216@tampabay.
rr.com.

CITRUS SPRINGS
MEN
Jan. 29 -The Citrus Springs Men's As-
sociation played 2 bb on 4's & 5's and 1
on Par 3's.
First 102
Jerry Feher, Rick Hancock,
Russ Woodworth and Bob Malloy (blind)
Second 102
Walt Norton, Jack Williamson,
Leon Smith and Emil Colletti
Third 105
Bill Curry Don Gonczi,
Bob Malloy and Rocky Marziani
Closest to the Pin:
No. 4 Dave Balas
No. 8 Leon Smith
No. 11 Bob Geci
No. 14 Russ Woodworth
No. 16 Woody Miner
Jan. 26, The Citrus Springs Men's Asso-
ciation played game team points.
First 157
Pete Clutter, Bob Geci,
Emil Colletti and JackWilliamson
Second 149
Jerry Feher, Don Gonczi,
Dave Balas and Bob Hunt
Closest to the Pin:
No. 4 Dave Balas
No. 8 Bob Geci
No. 11 Bob Geci
No. 14 Pete Clutter
No. 16 JackWilliamson
WOMEN
Jan. 25, Points Quota "Chicks with
Sticks" results.
Janet Lillvik +7
Carole Seifert +7
Linda Miller +5
Lois Bump +4
May Forsythe +3
Mary McConnell +3
Judy Hodgins +1


CALLING ALL GOLFERS
Get a foursome together for the inaugural Tee Off for
Tourette Celebrity Golf Tournament on Saturday, Feb. 2.
Mingle with players from the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and
Tampa Bay Rays, along with other celebrities at this
fundraiser at Plantation on Crystal River.
The event is $100 per person and includes greens fee, a
cart and a goody bag. Proceeds benefit the Florida Tourette
Association. Sponsorships are still available.
Kick off cocktail party is Friday, Feb. 1, along with a live
auction and music by Dave Pittman, an American Idol a
contestant.
For more information and to register, call Gary D'Amico
at 352-601-8980, or visit www.teeoffforts.com.


Leanne Feher +1
Closest to the Pin:
No. 4 Judy Hodgins
No. 8 Carole Seifert
No. 11 Marj Sibley
No. 16 Janet Lillvik
"Chicks with Sticks," a ladies points quota
league, meets every Friday morning at Cit-
rus Springs. Interested players with GHIN
handicaps should call Carole at 352-746-
2082.

CITRUS HILLS
MEN
Jan. 23, The Citrus Hills Men's Golf Asso-
ciation played "Texas Scramble" on the
Oaks golf course.
First -42
Tom Halloran, Harvey Schrank,
Bob Jones and Harold Cipollone
Second -34
Rod Pavilionis, Len Feutz,
Joe Matt and "Blind"
Third -32
Mac McDuff, Ed Jones,
John Balais and John Rowan
Fourth -30
Paul Perregaux, Bob Prince,
Dick Olsen and "Blind"
WOMEN
Jan. 22, The Citrus Hills Ladies Golf As-
sociation participated in a game called
"Cart Golf." The team score consisted of
two best net balls of the foursome. One
best net ball was used from each cart
and the cart teams were assigned.
First 122
Kathy Stefani, Sharon Fowler,
Sherry Robertson, Blind Draw
Second 124
Pat Laskowski, Linda Fick,
Judy Stone and Blind Draw
Third 127
Marti Jones, Kate Yazbak,
Ruth Rosenow and Fran Geyer
Birdies:
No. 2 Carol Moon
No. 16 Marti Jones
No. 12 KateYazbak
No. 10 Kay Closest
No. 12 Judy Stone
Nos. 3 and 6 Sherry Robertson
Nos. 10 & 15 Brenda Lindsay

DUNES
Jan. 17, the Dunes Women's Golf League
had its Sweet & Simple Invitational.
Overall low gross
Joy Figueredo (The Dunes)
Overall low net
Kathy Butler (East Bay CC)
(Tie) Jean Berezuk (The Dunes)
Flight One
Low gross, low net
Nancy Mink (East Bay CC)
(Tie) Colleen Seabrook (The Dunes)
(Tie) Patty Kennedy (East Bay CC)
Third low net
Judy Davis (Southern Hills)


Flight


From staff reports

tTwo


First low gross
Diedra Howard (Toscana Crossing)
First low net
Ro Newsome (The Dunes)
Second low net
Karen Stacy (The Dunes)
Third low net
Cheryl Ferris (Hernando Oaks)
Flight Three
First low gross
Cathi Willmore (Brookridge CC)
First low net
Sally Esposito (The Dunes)
(Tie) Nancy Fisher (The Dunes)
(Tie) Phyllis Kendrick (Magnolia Valley)
Fourth low net
Judy Dalhaus (The Dunes)
Flight Four
First low gross
Angela Roberts (Meadow Oaks)
First low net
Rose Marie Smith (Timber Pines)
Second low net
Donna Rayne (The Dunes)
Third low net
Pat Faulks (Meadow Oaks)
Fourth low net
Connie Lowe (Meadow Oaks)
(Tie) Rosemarie Porteus (Timber Pines)
Sixth Low Net
Sue Um (The Dunes)
Flight Five
First low gross
Carol Allivato (The Dunes)
First low net
Betty Seeley (The Dunes)
(Tie) Joan Guilfoyle (Ridge Manor)
Third low net
Anita Flood (The Ridges at Mountain Har-
bour)
Fourth low net
Jean Berardi (Timber Pines)
(Tie) Sue Gripton (The Dunes)
Flight Six
First low gross
Mo Sullivan (The Dunes)
First low net
Bonnie Lamrouex (Scotland Yards)
Second low net
Pat McMullen (Beacon Woods)
The Dunes Women's Golf League holds a
number of special events each year, in addi-
tion to the weekly Thursday game. If inter-
ested, call Karen Berch on 352-382-2867.

EL DIABLO
Jan. 27, Greensomes Stableford results.
First 80
John and Hattie Townsend
Bob and Pat Lampasona
Second 79 points
Tony Borgia and Juanita Emrich
John and Maryanne Conroy
Third 74
Jon and Gaby Thompson
Ron and Valerie Ostrander
Closest to the Pin:
No. 2 Jon and Gaby


Thompson
No. 5 Tony Borgia and
Juanita Emrich
No. 17 Tony Borgia and
Juanita Emrich
Jan. 28, Nine-hole scramble results.
First 29/22.5
Dale Rasmussen, Bryan Bittaker,
Bob Marino and Juanita Emrich
Second 29/22.5
Mitchell Moore, Jon Townsend,
Rory Natzke and Kaye Cansler
Third 31/23.25
Doc Freer, Ric Dias,
Clint Fisher and Wendy Rasmussen
Fourth 33/25.25
Kevin Holler, Ray Humphreys,
Dave Whitaker and Dale Montgomery
Fifth 33/22.50
Andrew Latham, Jack Durden,
Fred Marshall and Bob Montgomery
Sixth 33/25.50
Randy Congdon, Pete Palmer,
Hattie Townsend and Ed Stup
Seventh 33/25.87
Barry Payne, Curtis Karr,
Mike Pombier and Stan Webber
Closest to the Pin:
No. 3 Pete Palmer
No. 6 Stan Webber
No. 8 Team of Doc, Ric


Clint and Wendy
No. 9 Team of Barry,
Curtis, Mike and
Stan
Birdies: 14
Team of Dale, Bryan, Bob and Juanita

INVERNESS
Jan. 22, the Inverness Golf & Country
ClubWomen's Golf Association played


Criss-Cross.
Net winners only
First
Second
Third
Fourth
Fifth
Sixth
Seventh
(Tie)
Birdie:
No. 14
Chip-Ins:
No.1
No. 6
No. 8
No. 12
No. 15


Marilyn Kirkpatrick
Jean Carley
Jean Neil
Sally Staton
Nancy Purcell
Sue Sasso
Di Arnell
Julie Carpenter

Bev Black

Tere Wood
Carole Hubbard
Lavera Sasser
Betsy Jordan
Nancy Purcell


LAKESIDE
Jan. 24, LakeSide Ladies Points Quota
League results.
Amy Thomas +6
Joyce Smith +5
Carole Seifert +3
Marlene Friberg +2
Linda Miller +1
Closest to the Pin:
No. 2 Marj Sibley
No. 8 Rosalie Gosselin
No. 15 Essie McLane
LakeSide Ladies Points Quota League
meets every Thursday morning at 9 a.m.
and is open to all women. No membership
dues are required. Interested players with
GHIN handicaps should call Jan at 352-
344-9550.

SEVEN RIVERS
Jan. 24, Today the 7Rivers Men's Golf As-
sociation played a "Net Points" tourna-
ment.
First 227
Dave Stanley, Fred Plushanski,
Joe Muscara and Alex Stevens
Second 211 (MOC)
Don Eddy, Gene Kelly,
Al Silliman and Dick Van Poucker


Closest to the Pin:
No. 7
No. 11


FrankWade
Dave Stanley


SOUTHERN WOODS
Jan. 23, Southern Woods Men's Golf As-
sociation played Team Points Quota.
First +14
Ken Moody, Phil Jasper,
Bill Bachman and Paul Malarkey
Second +8
Carl Pedersen, Erv Koch,
Soc Hiotakis and Tom Hendrickson
Third +6
Rod Fortune, Brian Hadler,
Rich Galasso and draw
Fourth +4
Rich Tuxbury Rich Johnson,
Frank Nolan and Gene Askins
(Tie) Mike Taylor, Al Mayer,
Jack Sandlas and Barry Turska
(Tie) Tony Schmid, Ken Leo,
Bob Chadderton and Jim Lunsford
Closest to the Pin:
No. 4 Gary Mosey
No. 8 Roc Fortune
No. 17 Geo. Lentowicz

SUGARMILL
WOODS
MEN
Jan. 24, Sugarmill Woods Country Club
Men's Golf Association played 1 on 5's, 2
on 4's, 3 on 3's.
First -25
Carl Pedersen, Ron Broadbent, Phil Run-
fola,
Curt Hare, Stan Fleming, John Rada and
Kyle Muzina
Second -20
John Holden, Art Gennero,
Sid Kaplowitz and John Lawrey
Third -18
Fred Dibattista, Gary Enman,
Tony Schmid and Bill Moreau
(Tie) Dennis Borras, Bob Capuano,
John Rada and Paul Domino
(Tie) Larry Mantle, Mel Schroeder,
Zane Megos and Rod Woodbury
Golfers of the week:
Low gross Carl Pedersen 79
Low net John Holden 65
Low net senior John
Lawrey 64
(Tie) Bill Moreau 64
Closet to the Pin:
Pine No. 4 Hank Robinson
Pine No. 7 Hank Robinson
Cypress No. 3 Bob Maeder
Oak No. 6 Dick Tuxbury
Jan. 22, Sandblasters Men's Group played
team point quota.
First +8
Felix Tarorick, Chuck Reeb,
Barry Turska and Frank Vanzin
Jim Turner, Jim Duller,
Tom Jones and Roger Kessinger
Third +2
Tony Valente, Joe Gannon
and Zane Megos
Notable rounds:
Roger Kessinger +6

TWISTED OAKS
Jan. 22, Results for the game Best 15
Holes, 1/2 Handicap for Twisted Oaks
Ladies Association.
A Flight


First
Second
Third

First
Second
(Tie)

First
Second
(Tie)


Sue Kang
Mia Husler
Joan Ruggere
B Flight
Wink O'Brien
Shirley Young
Nancy Stewart
C Flight
Claire Moran
Pat Milburn
Rosemary Spencer


B2 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013


GOLF


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ts


c,





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A winning direction


Tiger tentative after

victory in California

Associated Press

SAN DIEGO Tiger Woods hates
the question, even though the an-
swer should be simple enough.
Is he back?
Woods was asked that when he
ended his 749-day drought by win-
ning his World Challenge at the end
of 2011. The question came up in
various forms last year after each of
his wins at Bay Hill, Memorial and
the AT&T National at Congres-
sional. And it was inevitable after
winning for a record eighth time at
Torrey Pines.
Woods will be "back" when no
else is in front of him.
The answer he gave Monday after
a four-shot win in the Farmers In-
surance Open was he "never left."
But that's not entirely accurate, be-
cause Woods was the undisputed
No. 1 player in golf for the better
part of five years and now he's not.
Everything he did last year, Rory
McIlroy did better.
You can believe Woods when he
said he is excited about the year.
Torrey Pines was his fourth win
in his last 16 starts on the PGA Tour.
Perhaps a better indication of his
game is consistency He has fin-
ished in the top 10 in six of his last
seven tournaments around the
world, which doesn't sound like that
big of a deal except he hasn't had a
stretch like that since he "left" at
the end of 2009.
So where is he now? It's too early
to say
Golf is off to a quirky start this
year. Four weeks into the season,
one tournament finished Tuesday
because of wind and another tour-
nament finished Monday because
of fog. It becomes even more stilted
with the schedule of the two biggest
stars.
The Pebble Beach National Pro-
Am tournament director told the
San Francisco Chronicle that
Woods will not be playing next
week. Woods' caddie told the Los
Angeles Daily News he tried to talk
him into playing Riviera but to no
avail. So Woods has 23 days off until
playing the Match Play Champi-
onship. That's not a surprise. Mcll-
roy, meanwhile, is in the middle of a
four-week break and he won't show
up until Match Play, either.
So right when Woods generates a
buzz by winning Torrey Pines, golf
will have to do without him until the
end of next month.
It's tempting to make bold decla-
rations about the rest of the year
based on how Woods played last
week, though the finish left just as
many questions. And remember, it


Associated Press
Tiger Woods celebrates after his victory in the Farmers Insurance Open on
Monday at Torrey Pines Golf course in San Diego.


was only a week ago that Woods
missed the cut in Abu Dhabi. Give it
time.
Still, there was something in-
evitable about this win, beyond the
location. Woods took over the tour-
nament during a four-hole stretch
in the second round when he rolled
in a 25-foot birdie putt, hit 5-iron to
5 feet for eagle, had a two-putt
birdie and then one-hopped his
wedge off the flag for another
birdie.
His lead went from two shots
after 36 holes, to four shots after 54


holes, to six shots at the close of
business Sunday with 11 holes left.
'"After last week, I think he was ir-
ritated and I think he was a little
upset at how he played," Hunter
Mahan said Monday morning. "I
think he wanted to make a state-
ment, and there's not many guys in
golf who can go to a tournament and
make a statement, but he is. I think
he's making one this week, and I
think he's going to do everything he
can to make this a double-digit win
for himself and just kind of reclaim
his dominance on the tour."


Three record-breaking 278 bowling rounds


C congratulations to Sean
Fugere, a familiar figure in
the local bowling community.
On Monday, Jan. 21, during the Mon-
day Night Special League at
Parkview Lanes in Holder, Fugere
rolled the highest triplicate set ever
bowled in Citrus County with three
278 games in a row for an 834 series.
Non-bowlers might not realize
just how difficult an achievement
this was until they count the total
number of strikes bowled. In a
three-game match, Sean threw 33
strikes. That is 11 strikes out of a
possible 12 strikes in each game.
Then on Wednesday, during the
Wednesday Night Men's League,
Sean added yet another accom-
plishment when he rolled his third
300 game at Parkview Lanes.
MEN
The Citrus County Youth Bowling
Tournament, sponsored by the


Greater Citrus USBCA, was held
last weekend at Beverly Hills Bowl
with bowlers from the Youth Bowl-
ing leagues at Manatee and Beverly
Hills Bowl. The two-day event in-
cluded team, singles and doubles
matches.
Tournament director Brian Car-
ney announced the results of the
tournament Monday
In the team matches Sunday, first
place went to The Furious Four,
consisting of Jenna Williams, Addi-
son Littlefield, Kayla Micali and
Paul Micali. Coming in second was
Team BLNT (Better Luck Next
Time) with Joshua Cook, Matthew
Alt, Alexander Alt and Cody Miller
Doubles winners were Cook and
Alex Alt with Claude Beckett and
Hunter Brown taking second place.
Singles matches bowled Saturday
were split between bowlers 12 and
under and those 13 and older In the


12-under division, Tyler Sandak
took first place and Jenna Williams
claimed second. In the 13-older di-
vision, Alex Alt won first and
Matthew Allen took second.
High-single games bowled during
the tournament were by Tyler San-
dak with a 258 and Jenna Williams
with a 256. Alex Alt bowled the
highest series with a 650 scratch
score.
In addition to the team, singles
and doubles events, bowlers who
competed in all of the matches are
eligible for scholarships, which will
be awarded to the high boy and high
girl bowler.
Winners are the two bowlers
whose total handicap score for all
nine games bowled during two days
were the highest. Alex Alt took the
All Events title for the boys and
Chandler Carney rolled the highest
handicap score for the girls.


Singles players


ready for spotlight


Spring is the singles
player's time to
shine. Competition
pretty much has been play-
ing the same players each
week no more.
Several opportunities
will allow you to see how
you measure up to others.
This is the only time of the
year the USTA leagues will
have two singles players in
each team.
Each team will
be on the look-
out for singles K
players, be-
cause there are
not many. y
If you want to
get in on this
deal, start look-
ing for a team.
Contact regular Eric vw
USTA players Hoc
and find out ON C
who needs you.
In the mean-
time, fine-tune your skills
before the USTA leagues
start by entering the sec-
ond annual Spring Classic
at Crystal River High
School. The tournament is
the only one to offer sin-
gles in A, B and C divisions
for men and women as
well as men's, women's
and mixed doubles divi-
sions in A, B and C.
Entry fee will be $20 per
person for a single event
and an extra $10 for a sec-
ond event. Proceeds will
go to youth missions for In-
verness First United
Methodist Youth and Chil-
dren's Ministry
Each participant will be
guaranteed two matches
and a "thank-you" gift.
Prizes will be awarded to
division champions.
Organizers want to
stress, as usual, they will
adjust the schedule any
way possible to allow you
to participate if you have
other commitments, tennis
or otherwise.
Tournament directors
are Cindy Reynolds, AJ
Glenn at 352-697-3089 or
ajglenn03@gmail.com;
Sally deMontfort at 352-
795-9693 or deMont@
embarqmail.com; and Eric
van den Hoogen at 352-
382-3138 or hoera@juno.
com.
Tuesday Team
Tennis
The women-only league is
geared toward players rated
3.0 to 3.5. If interested in play-
ing or want to captain a team,
contact chairwoman Candace
Charles at 352-563-5859 or
candacecharles@
tampabay.rr.com.
Citrus Area Senior
Ladies 3.0 to 3.5
Tuesday League
Results for Jan. 22:
Pine Ridge Mustangs
def. Crystal River, 4-0;
Riverhaven Ospreys vs.
Meadowcrest Racquettes, 2-2;
Sugarmill Woods def.
Citrus Hills, 3-2.
Session 2 ended with this
rain make-up and the Pine
Ridge Mustangs in the lead
with 30 points. Next session
will start Jan. 29.
To play in this league, a
player must be at least 50
years of age or older, with a
3.0/3.5 rating. The league is
always looking for players to


m
[a
0
1


sub for teams.
For information, email
chairwoman Lucy Murphy at
wjlrmurphy@embarqmail.com
or 527-4239.
Thursday Morning
Citrus Area
Doubles League
Results for Jan. 24:
Bicentennial Babes def.
Skyview, 6-3;
0 Sugarmill
Woods def. The
Bratz, 7-3;
Pine Ridge
Mustangs vs.
SkyviewAces, 5-5;
Skyview Ad-
vantage def. Pine
Ridge Fillies, 8-1.
an den For information,
gen contact chair-
genT woman Diane
OURT Halloran at 352-
527-7763 or
tdhfla@tampabay.rr.com
Ladies
on the Court
Results for Jan. 24: Barbara
and Sally, Mary and Sallie.
Ladies on The Court play at
8:30 a.m. Thursday at Le
Grone Park courts in Crystal
River. Bring a new can of
balls and 50 cents. Two out of
three tiebreak sets are
played.
For information, contact
Barbara Shook at dshook@
tampabay.rr.com or 352-
795-0872.
Friday Senior
Ladies Doubles
3.0 to 3.5 League
Results for Jan. 25:
Sugarmill Woods vs. Cit-
rus Hills Hot Shots, 2-2;
Pine Ridge Mustangs
def. Riverhaven Eagles, 4-1;
Bicentennial Flyers def.
Meadowcrest Aces, 4-0.
All players must be at least
50 years of age or older with
a 3.0-3.5 rating. Players can-
not be a member of a team
and a sub.
For information, email
chairwoman Sue Doherty at
suedoherty@prodigy.net.
USTA Leagues
3.5 Adult 55+ Women:
Skyview def. The Villages,
3-0. Record 3-0.
April Manley/Ruth Bran-
son, 6-2, 6-1;
Jacqueline Bennett
/Marti Little, 6-3, 6-2;
Ann Sulinski/Michelle
Jones, 6-2, 6-2.
7.0 Adult 65+ Women:
Skyview lost to The Villages,
2-1. Record 0-1.
Bicentennial Park lost to
Fort King, 3-0. Record 0-1.
For information in our Dis-
trict 4 (south) call or e-mail
Leigh Chak at 352-572-7157
or vacocala@gmail.com or
ustaflorida.com.
Tournaments
Feb. 9 and 10: JCT Tour-
nament of Champions at
SMW. Deadline to register is
9 p.m. Feb. 6.
March 2-3: Second An-
nual Spring Classic at Crystal
River High School.

Eric van den Hoogen,
Chronicle tennis colum-
nist, can be reached at
hoera@juno.com.


IMFTMWN

Monday,
February 25, 2013
Sugarmill Woods
Country Club
Registration 7:30 a.m.
Shotgun 9 a.m.
$55 per lady golfer
(includes cart, greens fees,
breakfast, luncheon,
auction and prizes)


Come out for a day of play and
ELP 2 A KI TOCOU.E


Golfer Game Pack
Hire-A-Pro Gimme Putt Mulligan
For more information call Vicki Budd 352-382-5216.
Registration forms available at www.womenofsugarmillwoods.com

CHIk)NI(IE
DOODMIW www.chronicleonne.com


Tee off for Tourette
Tee Off for Tourette Celebrity Golf Tournament
Saturday, February 2, 2013
Shotgun start at 9:00am Registration 8:00am
Plantation on Crystal River.






Kick off Cocktail party
Friday, February 1
music from American Idol contestant Dave Pittman,
live auction and meet and greet with
sports celebrities and door prizes.

All proceeds from this event will go to help
adults and children who suffer from Tourette Syndrome.

For more information and to register,
go to our website, www.teeoffforts.com,
or email Gary D'Amico at gary78@tampabay.rr.com.

)wwwchmr~cleolnio OOODS6M


Jim Blackshear
CCA Memorial
Charitable Partner
SGolf Outing
BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS
OF C- USCO
Seven Rivers Golf & Country Club

February 23, 2013
Registration 7 a.m.
Shotgun Start 8:00 a.m.

fi u ---- $60 per player or $220 for a
5UIft "/ /M team of four. Includes: Greens
fees, cart, lunch, door prizes
VN A and one Mulligan ticket.
Additional Mulligan tickets
will be available.


For online registration,
forms and
Information visit,
www.CitrusBuilders.com
or call 746-9028.


SPORTS


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013 B3






B4 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013



Super Bowl facts
and figures
AT STAKE National Football League
Championship for the Vince Lombardi Trophy.
PARTICIPANTS- Baltimore Ravens (AFC)
and San Francisco 49ers (NFC). This the sec-
ond appearance for the Ravens (1-0) and the
sixth appearance for the 49ers (5-0).
SITE Mercedes-Benz Superdome, New
Orleans.This will be the 10th Super Bowl played
in New Orleans and the seventh at the Super-
dome.
SEATING CAPACITY -76,468
DATE-Feb.3, 2013.
KICKOFF- 6:30 p.m. EST
NETWORK COVERAGE By CBS-TV to
more than 200 stations throughout the United
States.
Dail Global Radio to 600 stations within the
United States. The Armed Forces Television will
also provide broadcast to 175 countries
throughout the world.
The game will be distributed internationally
by the NFL and NFL International to more than
185 countries and broadcast in 30 different lan-
guages.
PLAYERS SHARE -Winners: $88,000 per
man. Losers: $44,000 per man.
PLAYER UNIFORMS San Francisco will
be the home team and has its choice of wear-
ing its colored or white jersey.
OVERTIME -oAt the end of regulation play-
ing time, the referee will immediately toss a coin
at the center of the field, according to rules per-
taining to the usual pre-game toss. The captain
of NFC team (the visiting team) will call the toss.
Following a three-minute intermission after the
end of the regular game, play will continue by
15-minute periods with a two-minute intermis-
sion between each such overtime period with
no halftime intermission. The teams will change
goals between each period, there will be a two-
minute warning at the end of each period.
Both teams must have the opportunity to pos-
sess the ball once during the extra period, un-
less the team that receives the opening kickoff
scores a touchdown on its initial possession, in
which case it is the winner. If the team that pos-
sesses the ball first scores a field goal on its ini-
tial possession, the other team shall have the
opportunity to possess the ball. If (that team)
scores a touchdown on its possession, it is the
winner. If the score is tied after (both teams
have a) possession, the team next scoring by
any method shall be the winner.
OFFICIALTIME-The scoreboard clock will
be official.
OFFICIALS There will be seven officials
and five alternates appointed by the Commis-
sioner's office.
TROPHY The winning team receives per-
manent possession of the Vince Lombardi Tro-
phy a sterling silver trophy created by Tiffany &
Company and presented annually to the winner
of the Super Bowl. The trophy was named after
the late coach Vince Lombardi of the two-time
Super Bowl champion Green Bay Packers be-
fore the 1971 Super Bowl. The trophy is a reg-
ulation-size silver football mounted in a kicking
position on a pyramid-like stand of three con-
cave sides. The trophy stands 20/4 inches tall,
weighs 6.7 pounds and is valued more than
$25,000. The words "Vince Lombardi" and
"Super Bowl XLVII" are engraved on the base
along with the NFL shield.
ATTENDANCE -To date, 3,581,385 have
attended Super Bowl games. The largest crowd
was 103,985 at the 14th Super Bowl at the
Rose Bowl in Pasadena, Calif.
Super Bowl
champions
2012-N.Y Giants (NFC) 21, New England
(AFC) 17
2011-Green Bay (NFC) 31, Pittsburgh
(AFC) 25
2010- New Orleans (NFC) 31, Indianapolis
(AFC) 17
2009-Pittsburgh (AFC) 27, Arizona (NFC)
23
2008-N.Y Giants (NFC) 17, New England
(AFC) 14
2007-Indianapolis (AFC) 29, Chicago
(NFC) 17
2006-Pittsburgh (AFC) 21, Seattle (N FC) 10
2005-New England (AFC) 24, Philadelphia
(NFC) 21
2004-New England (AFC) 32, Carolina
(NFC) 29
2003-Tampa Bay (NFC) 48, Oakland (AFC)
21
2002-New England (AFC) 20, St. Louis
(NFC) 17
2001-Baltimore Ravens (AFC) 34, N.Y. Gi-
ants (NFC) 7
2000-St. Louis (NFC) 23, Tennessee (AFC)
16
1999-Denver (AFC) 34, Atlanta (NFC) 19
1998-Denver (AFC) 31, Green Bay (NFC)
24
1997-Green Bay (NFC) 35, New England
(AFC) 21
1996-Dallas (NFC) 27, Pittsburgh (AFC) 17
1995-San Francisco (NFC) 49, San Diego
(AFC) 26
1994-Dallas (NFC) 30, Buffalo (AFC) 13
1993-Dallas (NFC) 52, Buffalo (AFC) 17
1992-Washington (NFC) 37, Buffalo (AFC)
24
1991-N.Y. Giants (NFC) 20, Buffalo (AFC)
19
1990-San Francisco (NFC) 55, Denver
(AFC) 10
1989-San Francisco (NFC) 20, Cincinnati
(AFC) 16
1988-Washington (NFC) 42, Denver (AFC)
10
1987-N.Y. Giants (NFC) 39, Denver (AFC)
20
1986-Chicago (NFC) 46, New England
(AFC) 10
1985-San Francisco (NFC) 38, Miami (AFC)


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For thel irec ard BACK


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Tuesday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
8-4-9
CASH 3 (late)

SAPLAY 4 (early)



A FANTASY 5
2-3-5-17-24
MEGA MONEY
3-14-22-39
Fr Loty MEGA BALL
17


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
6 p.m. (ESPN2) Villanova at Notre Dame
8 p.m. (MNT) South Carolina at Florida
8 p.m. (ESPN2) Texas at Kansas State
NBA
7:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Orlando Magic at New York Knicks
8 p.m. (ESPN, SUN) Miami Heat at Brooklyn Nets
10:30 p.m. (ESPN) Los Angeles Lakers at Phoenix Suns
GOLF
5 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Waste Management Phoenix
Open Pro Am (Taped)
4:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour: Omega Dubai
Desert Classic, First Round
HOCKEY
8 p.m. (NBCSPT) Chicago Blackhawks at Minnesota Wild
SOCCER
2:55 p.m. (ESPN2) English Premier League: Manchester
United vs. Southampton
10 p.m. (ESPN2) Mexico vs. Denmark

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Continued from Page Bl


The winner between Citrus and
Belleview advances to the Region 3A-
2 semifinals to face either Gainesville
Eastside or Leesburg on Saturday Cit-
rus, if they moved on, would host.
If the Citrus advances and wins Sat-
urday, the Hurricanes will play for the


REVENGE
Continued from Page B1

added on his team's re-
cent strong defensive
play, which held Seven
Rivers to 33 points last
week.
"We had four starters
out, tonight, and we
started two juniors and
two sophomores. You
hear about other juniors
and sophomores in the
county and our younger
guys proved they can
play as well."
Pirates sophomore
forward Sam Franklin
had 11 points before
fouling out with nearly
five minutes to play in
the game.
"I knew I was going to
have to attack the rim -
with Crystal River only
having eight kids to get
them, especially Sam
(Franklin), into foul trou-
ble," Makros said. "Once
he's out of the game, we
can pretty much attack
the rim anytime we want"
Crystal River cele-
brates its senior night
tonight with a 7 p.m.


Prep CALENDAR A-ROD


16
1984-L.A. Raiders (AFC) 38, Washington
(NFC) 9
1983-Washington (NFC) 27, Miami (AFC)
17
1982-San Francisco (NFC) 26, Cincinnati
(AFC) 21
1981-Oakland (AFC) 27, Philadelphia
(NFC) 10
1980-Pittsburgh (AFC) 31, L.A. Rams
(NFC) 19
1979-Pittsburgh (AFC) 35, Dallas (NFC) 31
1978-Dallas (NFC) 27, Denver (AFC) 10
1977-Oakland (AFC) 32, Minnesota (NFC)
14
1976-Pittsburgh (AFC) 21, Dallas (NFC) 17
1975-Pittsburgh (AFC) 16, Minnesota
(NFC) 6
1974-Miami (AFC) 24, Minnesota (NFC) 7
1973-Miami (AFC) 14, Washington (NFC) 7
1972-Dallas (NFC) 24, Miami (AFC) 3
1971-Baltimore Colts (AFC) 16, Dallas
(NFC) 13
1970-Kansas City (AFL) 23, Minnesota
(NFL) 7
1969-N.Y. Jets (AFL) 16, Baltimore Colts
(NFL) 7
1968-Green Bay (NFL) 33, Oakland (AFL)
14
1967-Green Bay (NFL) 35, Kansas City
(AFL) 10


BASEBALL
American League
LOS ANGELES ANGELS-Agreed to terms
with RHP Robert Coello on a minor league con-
tract.
National League
COLORADO ROCKIES-Agreed to terms
with RHP Jhoulys Chacin on a two-year con-
tract.
NEWYORK METS-Agreed to terms with 2B
Daniel Murphy on a one-year contract and RHP
Scott Atchison on a minor league contract.


PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES-Agreed to terms
with RHP Chad Durbin on a one-year contract.
SAN DIEGO PADRES-Agreed to terms with
RHP Luke Gregerson on a one-year contract
and RHP Freddy Garcia, RHPTim Staufferand
LHP Arturo Lopez on minor league contracts.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CHICAGO BEARS-Named Tim Tibesar
linebackers coach.
CINCINNATI BENGALS-Announced the re-
tirement of running backs coach Jim Anderson.
CLEVELAND BROWNS-Named Bobby
Babich assistant defensive backs coach and
Daron Roberts defensive quality control coach.
PITTSBURGH STEELERS-Named Jack
Bicknell Jr. offensive line coach.
ST. LOUIS RAMS-Named Frank Bush line-
backers coach.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
DALLAS STARS-Assigned F Colton Sce-
viour to the Texas (AHL).
FLORIDA PANTHERS-Recalled C Drew
Shore from San Antonio (AHL).
NEW JERSEY DEVILS-Recalled RW Matt
Anderson from Albany (AHL).
American Hockey League
PROVIDENCE BRUINS-Signed F Graham
Mink.
LACROSSE
National Lacrosse League
COLORADO MAMMOTH-Released G
Chris Levis. Re-signed G Dan Lewis.
COLLEGE
BERRY-Announced the resignation of
men's basketball coach Jeff Haarlow. named
Derek Taylor men's interim basketball coach.
STANFORD-Promoted Mike Bloomgren to
offensive coordinator, Mike Sanford to quarter-
backs and wide receivers coach, and Tavita
Pritchard from defensive assistant to running
backs coach.
VIRGINIA-Announced the resignation of of-
fensive coordinator Bill Lazor.


C


regional final Tuesday but aren't guar-
anteed to host.
Regardless of the possible scenarios,
the 'Canes are focused on only what
they can control their own play
"I really concentrate on what we do
in practice," Journey said, "inward
rather than what's going on outward."
Jon-Michael Soracchi is the Chron-
icle sports editor He can be emailed
at jmsora cchi@chronicelonline. com
or reached at 352-564-2928.


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Lecanto junior point guard Thomas Vilardi harasses
Crystal River counterpart Ty Reynolds on Tuesday
night at Crystal River High School. Lecanto won a
hard-fought game 58-47.
game versus Weeki to face the Hornets at
Wachee. Lecanto travels 6:30 p.m. on Thursday


continuedd from Page Bl


records detailing purchases by Ro-
driguez, 2012 All-Star game MVP
Melky Cabrera, 2005 AL Cy Young
Award winner Bartolo Colon and 2011
AL championship series MVP Nelson
Cruz of Texas.
Cabrera left San Francisco after the
season to sign with Toronto, while
Oakland re-signed Colon.
Other baseball players the newspa-
per said appeared in the records in-
clude Washington pitcher Gio
Gonzalez, who finished third in last
year's NL Cy Young Award voting, and
San Diego catcher Yasmani Grandal.
Biogenesis, which the New Times
said was run by Anthony Bosch, was
located in a beige, nondescript office
park. The former clinic is no longer
listed as a business in its directory,
"There was a flier put out by the


building management a couple
weeks ago. It was put on all the doors
and windows of all the offices," said
Brad Nickel, who works in a group
cruise planning company on the floor
above where the clinic was located.
"It just said this guy's not really a
doctor, he doesn't belong here, he's
no longer allowed here, call the po-
lice or the building management if
you see him."
David Sierra, who works in his
aunt's real estate office in the same
building, kept a picture of the flier on
his iPhone. He recognized the doctor
in the picture from passing him in the
hallway
Sierra said while he never recog-
nized any of the clients at the clinic,
"there were always really nice cars in
front I'm not talking just Mercedes.
Range Rovers, Bentleys."
The New Times posted copies of
what it said were Bosch's handwritten
records, obtained through a former
Biogenesis employee it did not identify


Associated Press
San Francisco Giants outfielder Melky Cabrera is linked with records from an
anti-aging clinic in the Miami area to the purchase of performance-enhancing
drugs in a story reported Tuesday by The Miami New Times. Other players named
by the publication as appearing in the records include Gio Gonzalez, Bartolo
Colon and Nelson Cruz.


Ravens LB Suggs stars at Super Bowl media day


Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS -
Scenes and observations
from the NFEs annual
Super Bowl media day -
interviews with players
and team personnel from
the Baltimore Ravens and
the San Francisco 49ers on
the field at the Superdome:
Terrell Suggs stood up,
threw down his micro-
phone, kicked over his
chair with a back heel as
he stepped down from his
podium, and then kicked
over a cooler.
Onlookers laughed, sat-
isfied that the Baltimore
Ravens' mischievous line-
backer had properly punc-
tuated the frenetic,
free-for-all known as
Super Bowl media day
Suggs plays a central
role in one of the more in-
timidating defenses in the
NFL, and at least some of
the conversation involved


football, and what it would
take to slow down San
Francisco quarterback
Colin Kaepernick in Sun-
day's NFL championship
game.
But media day is never
just about football, not
even when the players are
interviewing each other.
Posing as a reporter, de-
fensive end Arthur Jones
asked Suggs which staple
of Louisiana cuisine he
preferred, gumbo or
jambalaya.
"That's a good question,
and I'm glad you asked
that, Arthur," Suggs said.
"Definitely gumbo."
Suggs also was asked if
he is the best dancer in the
locker room: "No way 'Be
Nasty,' (safety) Bernard
Pollard he's definitely
the best dancer. And I
think if we get this done
come Sunday, you all will
get to see a good dose of it."
And maybe even get a


Associated Press
Baltimore Ravens linebacker Terrell Suggs (55) reacts
Tuesday during the team photo at media day for Super
Bowl XLVII in New Orleans.


song from Suggs. He wasn't
shy about serenading
everyone with a rendition
of Meatloaf's "I Would Do
Anything For Love," mo-
ments after he took his seat
behind the microphone.

For the second year in a
row, Super Bowl media


day was open to fans for
the price of a $25 ticket.
They were allowed to sit
in sections of seats along
the sideline with good
views of players on the
field, and paid attendance
was 5,479, according to
NFL spokesman Michael
Signora.


When fans walked in,
they were given gift bags
that included small radios
so they could listen to in-
terviews. Other items
were mostly product sam-
ples from sponsors, in-
cluding chips and laundry
detergent.
Among the fans were
John Grimsley and Lisa
Wyatt of Baltimore, sitting
together a few rows from
the field wearing purple
jerseys with the No. 52 of
star Ravens linebacker
Ray Lewis. They said the
ticket price was worth it.
"This is a very rare ex-
perience," said Grimsley,
who has Ravens season
tickets and tickets to Sun-
day's big game. "I've never
been to anything like this.
To be able to see all the
Ravens being interviewed,
to see some of these guys
up close, you don't really
get to see that when you go
to the games. They're there


and then they're gone."

The NFL says 5,205 re-
porters from 24 countries
have credentials for the
game, and some chose to
work in costume at media
day
There was a correspon-
dent from the Nickelodeon
television network dressed
as a super hero called Pick
Boy, wearing black tights
with a cape and trim of flu-
orescent orange and green.
Pick Boy approached
49ers practice squad line-
backer Nate Stupar, asking
him if he wanted to race.
Stupar declined, saying he
wasn't about to risk pulling
any muscles for something
like that.
"I would say that's the
first time I got interviewed
by a guy with a cape on,"
Stupar said. "It's enter-
tainment and it's going to
be fun to be around the en-
tire week."


TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BOYS SOCCER
Class 3A regional quarterfinal
7 p.m. Belleview at Citrus
BOYS BASKETBALL
7 p.m. Citrus at South Sumter
7 p.m. Weeki Wachee at Crystal River
GIRLS BASKETBALL
District 5A-7 tournament at Nature Coast High School
7:30 p.m. No. 1 Crystal River vs. No. 4 Nature Coast
SOFTBALL
Lecanto Preseason Classic at Lecanto High School
5:30 p.m. Crystal River vs. South Sumter
7:30 p.m. Citrus vs. Hudson


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Warriors' shots sink Cavaliers


Associated Press
Golden State Warriors center Andris Biedrins, left, fouls
the Cleveland Cavaliers' Alonzo Gee during the first
quarter Tuesday in Cleveland.


Associated Press

CLEVELAND Klay
Thompson scored a ca-
reer-high 32 points and
the short-handed Golden
State Warriors beat the
Cleveland Cavaliers
108-95 on Tuesday night.
The Warriors were
missing three starters -
guard Stephen Curry
(ankle), center Andrew
Bogut (ankle) and forward
Harrison Barnes (knee).
Also, Carl Landry, one of
the first players off
Golden State's bench, did-
n't play because of a
shoulder injury


Still, Golden State shot
54 percent and was 11 for
16 on 3-pointers, hitting
the first nine from be-
yond the arc. Golden
State took control in the
second quarter and built
a 16-point lead in the
second half.
Jarrett Jack, starting at
point guard in place of
Curry, had 26 points and
12 assists, and David Lee
had 20 points and 13
rebounds.
Tristan Thompson had
18 points and 11 re-
bounds for Cleveland,
and Dion Waiters also
scored 18 points.


Bucks 117,
Pistons 90
AUBURN HILLS, Mich.-
Brandon Jennings scored
20 of his 30 points in the
third quarter, leading the Mil-
waukee Bucks to a 117-90
victory over the Detroit
Pistons.
Mike Dunleavy had 17
points and Monta Ellis added
14 for the Bucks, who led by
as much as 29 points.
Rookie Andre Drummond
had 18 points and 18 re-
bounds for Detroit, while
Greg Monroe scored
14 points.


Light up the night


Stamkos 'fourth

goal spurs TB

to 5-2 triumph

Associated Press

TAMPA Steven Stamkos
scored his fourth goal of the sea-
son and the Tampa Bay Light-
ning beat the Florida Panthers
5-2 on Tuesday night.
Tampa Bay, which has won
five of six to start the year, also
got goals from Cory Conacher,
Tom Pyatt, Dana Tyrell and Vin-
cent Lecavalier. Stamkos, who
led the NHL with 60 goals last
season, has 11 points during a
season-opening six-game point
streak this year.
Peter Mueller and Tomas
Fleischmann scored for the Pan-
thers, who have lost five in a row
after a season-opening win over
Carolina. Florida has been
outscored 23-5 during its skid.
Islanders 4, Penguins 1
PITTSBURGH Matt Moulson
scored a goal and assisted on an-
other, Evgeni Nabokov stopped 37
shots and the New York Islanders
dominated the listless Pittsburgh
Penguins 4-1.
John Tavares scored for the sec-
ond straight game for New York
while Michael Grabner collected his
fourth goal of the season and Casey
Cizikas found the net for the first
time in his career.
It was more than enough to send
the Penguins to their third loss in
four games. Pascal Dupuis scored
with just over a minute remaining to
avoid the shutout.
Marc-Andre Fleury stopped 13
shots before being pulled after the
second period. The Penguins gave it
away 11 times, with two of the
turnovers leading to New York goals.
Rangers 2, Flyers 1
NEW YORK Ryan Callahan
scored a power-play goal before
leaving with an injury in the third pe-
riod, and Henrik Lundqvist made 26
saves to lift the New York Rangers to
a 2-1 victory over Philadelphia.
Defenseman Michael Del Zotto
had a goal and assist for the Rangers
(3-3), who have won two straight for
the first time this season. Philadelphia
(2-5) has dropped two in a row.
Kimmo Timonen ended
Lundqvist's shutout bid 7:09 into the
third with a power-play goal after the
Rangers were caught with too many
men on the ice.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning left wing Cory Conacher gets past Florida Panthers defenseman Mike Weaver
during the second period Tuesday in Tampa, Fla. Conacher scored a goal in the Lightning's 5-2 victory.


Bruins 2, Devils 1, SO
BOSTON Brad Marchand
scored the decisive shootout goal
after teammate Nathan Horton forced
overtime late in the third period and
the Boston Bruins rallied for a 2-1 win
over the New Jersey Devils.
Boston's Tyler Seguin and New
Jersey's Ilya Kovalchuk scored on
their teams' first shot during the
shootout. Then both teams failed on
their next four attempts.
But Marchand put the puck be-
tween goalie Johan Hedberg's
pads and the Bruins won when
Marek Zidlicky's shot hit Tuukka
Rask's left pad.
David Clarkson had put New Jer-
sey ahead with his fourth goal of the
season on a power play at 8:30 of
the second period.
Maple Leafs 4,
Sabres 3, OT
BUFFALO, N.Y. Matt Frattin
scored his second goal of the game
with 1.5 seconds left in overtime, lift-
ing the Toronto Maple Leafs to a 4-3
win over the Buffalo Sabres.
Frattin skated in from the left circle
and wristed a shot over the shoulder
of Sabres goalie Ryan Miller.
Jay McClement and Cody Fran-
son also scored for Toronto, which
snapped a two-game skid. James
Reimer made 29 saves for the
Maple Leafs.
Jason Pominville, Andrej Sekera


and Mikhail Grigorenko scored for
Buffalo, which lost its fourth straight.
Miller stopped 20 shots.
Red Wings 4, Stars 1
DETROIT Valtteri Filppula
scored two goals both off nifty
passes from Pavel Datsyuk and
the Detroit Red Wings beat the Dal-
las Stars 4-1.
Henrik Zetterberg scored on a
two-man advantage in the final
minute of the second period to give
the Red Wings a 2-1 lead, and
Damien Brunner and Filppula scored
23 seconds apart in the third.
The Red Wings rallied after Loui
Eriksson opened the scoring in the
second period for Dallas.
Jimmy Howard made 25 saves for
Detroit.
Senators 3, Capitals 2
OTTAWA-- Sergei Gonchar
scored on the power play with 2:30
left in regulation as the Ottawa
Senators battled back from a slug-
gish start to defeat the Washington
Capitals 3-2.
Jim O'Brien and Milan Michalek
also scored for the Senators (4-1-
1), who got 31 saves from Craig
Anderson.
Troy Brouwer and Matt Hendricks
scored for the Capitals (1-4-1).
Michal Neuvirth stopped 24 shots in
taking the loss for Washington,
which blew a 2-0 lead.
Gonchar's winner came after Erik
Karlsson wove through the Capitals'


defense on a man advantage before
finding his partner, who fired a one-
timer that deflected of Hendricks in
front and past Neuvirth.
Wild 3, Blue Jackets 2
ST. PAUL, Minn. Pierre-Marc
Bouchard scored the go-ahead goal
late in the third period and the Min-
nesota Wild snapped a three-game
losing streak by beating the Colum-
bus Blue Jackets 3-2.
With the Wild seemingly on their
heels after giving up a two-goal lead,
Bouchard took a pass from Torrey
Mitchell near the blue line, zoomed
past two Columbus defenders and
beat goalie Steve Mason above his
right glove.
After Columbus beat Dallas to
snap a four-game skid, the Blue
Jackets' flight to the Twin Cities on
Monday night was canceled be-
cause of fog, forcing the team to
leave on Tuesday at 11 a.m.
Canadiens 4, Jets 3
MONTREAL Tomas Plekanec
scored a tiebreaking goal on a
power play at 5:31 of the third pe-
riod to lift the Montreal Canadiens to
their fourth straight win, 4-3 over the
Winnipeg Jets.
Canadiens rookies Alex
Galchenyuk and Brendan Gallagher
each had two points in their first
game since it was confirmed they
would stay with the NHL club.
Galagher scored for a second
straight game for Montreal.


No. 11 Buckeyes stretch by Badgers 58-49


Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio -Deshaun
Thomas scored 25 points, 10 dur-
ing a game-breaking 15-0 sec-
ond-half run, to lead No. 11 Ohio
State past Wisconsin 58-49 on
Tuesday night.
The leading scorer in the Big
Ten, Thomas took over the game
as both teams tried to gain lever-
age in a typically physical
matchup between them.
The victory moved Ohio State
(16-4, 6-2 Big Ten) into third
place in the Big Ten and
dropped Wisconsin (14-7, 5-3)
two games off the pace set by co-
leaders Indiana and Michigan
(6-1).
Traevon Jackson, the son of
Buckeyes great Jimmy Jackson,
led the Badgers with 12 points in
the arena where his dad's jersey
hangs from the rafters.
Jared Berggren added 11
points for Wisconsin.
Aaron Craft had 13 points for
the Buckeyes.
Indiana State 68,
No. 15 Wichita State 55
WICHITA, Kan. MannyArop
scored 17 points, including a cele-


Associated Press
Ohio State's Lenzelle Smith drives to the basket against Wisconsin's
Ryan Evans during the second half Tuesday in Columbus, Ohio. The
No. 11 Buckeyes defeated the Badgers 58-49.


bratory slam in the final minute, and
Indiana State snapped Wichita
State's 19-game home winning
streak.
The Sycamores (14-7, 7-3 Mis-
souri Valley) stayed in the confer-
ence race with their first victory over
a ranked team in five tries this sea-


son. Davonte Brown and Jake
Odum both added 10 points.
Cleanthony Early had 15 points
and Demetric Williams added 14 for
first-place Wichita State (19-3, 8-2),
which shot 27.1 percent from the
field. The Shockers had just six field
goals in the second half.


Indiana State ended the half on a
17-3 run over the last 4:12, taking a
39-28 lead. Wichita State got within
50-48 with 7:26 remaining, but never
pulled even.
Virginia 58,
No. 19 N.C. State 55
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. Joe
Harris scored 22 points, seven dur-
ing a game-ending 13-6 run, and Vir-
ginia won its fourth straight.
Akil Mitchell added 14 points for
Virginia (15-5, 5-2 Atlantic Coast
Conference), including an 18-foot
jumper that put them ahead to stay,
as the second-stingiest defense in
the country put the clamps on.
North Carolina State (16-5, 5-3),
which arrived averaging nearly 80
points per game, became the 17th
team, including all seven ACC oppo-
nents, to be held under 60 points by
Virginia.
C.J. Leslie, playing despite being
under the weather, led the Wolfpack
with 20 points and 14 rebounds.
Richard Howell had 12 points, 11 re-
bounds and six assists. Jontel
Evans hit two from the line with 26
seconds left to make the lead three.
The Wolfpack never got off a good
shot in the closing seconds.


SPORTS


New J
N.Y. Is
N.Y. Re


NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
ersey 5 3 0 2 8 12 9
landers 6 3 2 1 7 22 19
angers 6 3 3 0 6 16 17


6 3 3 0
7 2 5 0
Northeast Division
GP W L OT
6 5 0 1
6 4 1 1
5 4 1 0
6 3 3 0
6 2 3 1
Southeast Division
GP W L OT
6 5 1 0
6 3 2 1
5 2 3 0
6 1 4 1
6 1 5 0


WESTERN CONFERENCE


Central Division
GP W L OT F
6 6 0 0
6 5 1 0
6 3 2 1
7 2 4 1
6 1 2 3
Northwest Division
GP W L OT F
6 3 2 1
5 3 2 0
6 2 2 2
5 2 3 0
4 1 2 1
Pacific Division
GP W L OT F
5 5 0 0
4 3 1 0
7 2 4 1
5 2 2 1
6 2 4 0


Pittsburgh
Philadelphia

Boston
Ottawa
Montreal
Toronto
Buffalo

Tampa Bay
Winnipeg
Carolina
Washington
Florida


Chicago
St. Louis
Detroit
Columbus
Nashville

Minnesota
Edmonton
Vancouver
Colorado
Calgary

San Jose
Anaheim
Dallas
Los Angeles
Phoenix


NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Tuesday's Games
Boston 2, New Jersey 1, SO
Toronto 4, Buffalo 3, OT
N.Y. Rangers 2, Philadelphia 1
Montreal 4, Winnipeg 3
Ottawa 3, Washington 2
N.Y. Islanders 4, Pittsburgh 1
Tampa Bay 5, Florida 2
Detroit 4, Dallas 1
Minnesota 3, Columbus 2
Anaheim at San Jose, late
Today's Games
Montreal at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Minnesota, 8mp.m.
Edmonton at Phoenix, 9:30 p.m.
Colorado at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Buffalo at Boston, 7 p.m.
Washington at Toronto, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at New Jersey, 7p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Colorado at Calgary, 9 p.m.
Nashville at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Edmonton at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Men's AP Top 25
The top 25 teams in The Associated Press'
college basketball poll, with first-place votes in
parentheses, records through Jan. 27, total
points based on 25 points for a first-place vote
through one point for a 25th-place vote and last
week's ranking:
Record Pts Prv
1. Michigan (51) 19-1 1,611 2
2. Kansas (13) 18-1 1,572 3
3. Indiana 18-2 1,457 7
4. Florida (1) 16-2 1,420 8
5. Duke 17-2 1,328 1
6. Syracuse 18-2 1,322 3
7. Gonzaga 19-2 1,177 10
8.Arizona 17-2 1,160 6
9. Butler 17-3 1,023 9
10. Oregon 18-2 969 16
11. Ohio St. 15-4 945 14
12. Louisville 16-4 905 5
13. Michigan St. 17-4 897 13
14. Miami 15-3 894 25
15. Wichita St. 19-2 621 20
16. Mississippi 17-2 473 23
17. Missouri 15-4 464 22
18. Kansas St. 15-4 463 11
19. NC State 16-4 431 18
20. New Mexico 17-3 333 15
21. Creighton 18-3 312 17
22. San Diego St. 16-4 302 -
23. Minnesota 15-5 281 12
24. Cincinnati 16-4 220 21
25. Marquette 14-4 216 -
Others receiving votes: Georgetown 121,
UNLV 56, Wisconsin 45, UCLA 34, Arizona St.
14, Notre Dame 12, Pittsburgh 10, Louisiana
Tech 8, Villanova 6, Baylor 5, Iowa St. 4, Mem-
phis 4, VCU 4, La Salle 3, Saint Mary's (Cal) 2,
Colorado St. 1.


Pts GF GA
10 29 15
7 18 18
4 14 18
3 13 22
2 10 24


Pts GF GA
12 22 13
10 24 13
7 15 17
5 13 22
5 10 18
Pts GF GA
7 16 17
6 15 14
6 16 19
4 10 13
3 11 15
Pts GF GA
10 23 8
6 15 14
5 13 18
5 11 14
4 21 20


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013 B5

NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 27 15 .643 -
Brooklyn 27 18 .600 11Y2
Boston 21 23 .477 7
Philadelphia 18 26 .409 10
Toronto 16 29 .356 1212
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 28 13 .683 -
Atlanta 25 19 .568 412
Orlando 14 30 .318 1512
Washington 11 32 .256 18
Charlotte 11 33 .250 1812
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 27 17 .614 -
Indiana 26 19 .578 112
Milwaukee 24 19 .558 212
Detroit 17 28 .378 1012
Cleveland 13 33 .283 15
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 36 11 .766 -
Memphis 29 15 .659 512
Houston 25 22 .532 11
Dallas 19 25 .432 1512
New Orleans 15 29 .341 1912
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 34 11 .756 -
Denver 28 18 .609 612
Utah 24 21 .533 10
Portland 22 22 .500 111Y2
Minnesota 17 24 .415 15
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 33 13 .717 -
Golden State 28 17 .622 412
L.A. Lakers 19 25 .432 13
Sacramento 17 29 .370 16
Phoenix 15 30 .333 1712
Tuesday's Games
Golden State 108, Cleveland 95
Milwaukee 117, Detroit 90
Dallas at Portland, late
New Orleans at L.A. Lakers, late
Today's Games
Washington at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Indiana, 7p.m.
Sacramento at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Orlando at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Toronto at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Miami at Brooklyn, 8 p.m.
Charlotte at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Houston at Denver, 9p.m.
New Orleans at Utah, 9 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Memphis at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Houston's mother
tells all in memoir
NEW YORK-Cissy
Houston has a few words, and
a few more, for Bobby Brown.
In "Remembering
Whitney," the mother of the
late Whitney Houston writes
that from the
start she had
doubted
whether
Brown was
r right for her
daughter And
she thinks
that Whitney
Cissy might not
Houston have ended
up so "deep" into drugs had
they not stayed together.
The memoir was released
Tuesday, two weeks short of
the first anniversary of
Houston's death. She
drowned in a hotel bathtub in
Beverly Hills, Calif., at age 48.

Actor Diggs captures
burglary suspect
LOS ANGELES Los
Angeles police say actor Taye
Diggs chased down and cap-
tured a burglary suspect he
found rummaging through his
garage.
It hap-
pened after
the "Private
Practice" star
and his wife
returned to
their Studio
City home
Taye from the
Diggs Screen Actors
Guild Awards, where Diggs
was a presenter
LAPD spokesman Richard
French says shortly before
11:30 p.m. Sunday, Diggs saw a
man in his garage, apparently
looking for items to steal.
French says the man ran off,
but Diggs followed him down
the street and held him for
police. Neither man was hurt
Twenty-year-old Hassan
Juma was arrested and held
on $50,000 bail.

Divorce on tap
after Stewart affair
LOS ANGELES Rupert
Sanders' wife has filed for di-
vorce five months after it was
revealed the director had a
brief affair with actress
Kristen Stewart
Liberty Ross, Sanders' wife
of more than nine years, filed
for divorce Friday in Los
Angeles citing irreconcilable
differences.
They have two children, an
8-year-old daughter and 6-
year-old son. The model-
actress is seeking joint custody
of the children and spousal
support from her estranged
husband.

Kid Rock: Harley deal
'just makes sense'
MADISON, Wis. -Kid
Rock says his new partner-
ship with Harley-Davidson is
a dream deal, and as the owner
of multiple Harley bikes, he
didn't feel like he was com-
promising his integrity or
risking a backlash from fans.
The Milwaukee-based mo-
torcycle maker is sponsoring
Kid Rock's upcoming tour,
named for his most recent re-
lease, "Rebel Soul."
The partnership an-
nounced Monday also in-
cludes an exclusive line of
limited-edition, cobranded
"Rebel Soul" merchandise
featuring a line from the song:
"I can't hear you over the
rumble of my freedom."
The tour begins Friday in
Kansas City and will end Aug 31
at Harley's 110th anniversary
celebration in Milwaukee.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
Dogs play on the field during "Puppy Bowl IX" in New York. The "Puppy Bowl" is an annual two-
hour TV special that mimics a the year's biggest football game with canine players.





The Big Woof


Animal shelters the real winners of 'Puppy Bowl'


Associated Press


LOS ANGELES There
will be a winner and a loser
every Super Bowl Sunday
But at the "Puppy Bowl," it's
always a win for animal
shelters.
The show provides na-
tional exposure to the shel-
ters across the country that
provide the puppy athletes
and the kittens that star in
the halftime show, and intro-
duces viewers to the differ-
ent breeds and animals that
need homes, animal workers
say Many shelters see bumps
in visits from viewers who
are inspired to adopt a pet.
The "Puppy Bowl," an an-
nual two-hour TV special
that mimics a football game
with canine players, made its
debut eight years ago on Ani-
mal Planet Dogs score touch-
downs on a 10-by-19-foot
gridiron carpet when they
cross the goal line with a toy
There is a Most Valuable Pup
award, a water bowl cam, a
new lipstick cam (it's in the
lips of the toys), slow-motion
cameras, hedgehog referees,
a puppy hot tub and a blimp
with a crew of hamsters. Bios


The kitty halftime show during "Puppy Bowl IX."


on each puppy player flash
across the screen during
close-ups of the action, let-
ting viewers know how to find
each animal for adoption.
Madeline Bernstein, presi-
dent and CEO of the Society
for the Prevention of Cruelty
to Animals Los Angeles, said
they try to find rambunctious,
energetic puppies to enter in
the bowl, though if a dog falls
asleep on its way to the end
zone, it can be funny Puppies
chosen for the show have to
be between 10 and 15 weeks
old, healthy and sturdy


enough to be on the field with
playmates. All breeds are
considered because "we try
to reflect what's out there in
the adoption world. A lot of
those breeds are mixed,"
Toporoff said.
"Some dogs like to play
more than others. But don't
come in thinking every Chi-
huahua can play football,"
she said.
The "Puppy Bowl" airs on
Feb. 3 from 3 to 5 p.m. and
will keep repeating until 3
a.m. The Super Bowl starts at
6:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.


Swift talks new look, new tour


Associated Press

NEW YORK Taylor Swift
has been turning heads with her
new, sexy wardrobe, but the 23-
year-old says it's just a reflection
of getting older.
Swift has people buzzing about
her recent red-carpet choices,
which have included plunging
necklines and shorter skirts.
While her choices may be de-
mure compared with the Kim
Kardashians of the world, for
Swift, a former teen sweetheart,
it's raised eyebrows, and she ac-
knowledges that it's been a bit of
a shock for some people who are
accustomed to seeing her wear
long dresses. She recalled how
her decision to wear shorts at
last year's MTV Video Music
Awards caused a stir.
"It was like, 'Gasp, Taylor wears
shorts.' And I thought it was hi-
larious," she said, adding: "I'm
not going to be like taking my
clothes off or that sort of thing."
Swift said fans should expect


Birthday Don't be surprised if, in the year ahead,
you find yourself going through a sifting process re-
garding the objectives you are setting. If you want to
be successful, you must be extremely selective about
your aims.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Guard against an in-
clination to do things the hard way, especially where
your work is concerned. If you're using an ineffective
procedure, try something different.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Even if your hunches
are usually correct, if they are more negative than
positive, dump them as quickly as you can. Your
imagination may be playing tricks on you.
Aries (March 21-April 19) It's time to phase out
something that isn't living up to its potential in terms of
profits. The longer you stay with it, the more money it
will end up costing you.


Associated Press
Taylor Swift arrives at the Cannes festival palace Jan. 26 to take part
in the NRJ Music awards ceremony in Cannes, France.


more surprises during her up-
coming tour, which kicks off
March 13. She's partnering with
Diet Coke for the tour, and she's
signed on to be a pitchwoman
for the beverage.
While a recent op-ed piece in
The New York Times questioned


Today's HOROSCOPE

Taurus (April 20-May 20) When pursuing an ob-
jective, take care not to walk over others. It might end
up costing you far more than just time and money.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Don't make the mistake
of thinking that aggressiveness is the same as vision.
Before imposing any of your ideas on your
co-workers, make sure they're feasible.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Watch out for any little
changes that may have been made to something
without your or anybody else's knowledge. They could
alter matters greatly.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) It isn't likely that you'll be
proud of your efforts if you're more interested in get-
ting things done than you are in getting them done
right. Quality over quantity is your mantra, today.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -Although you will be a
keen observer, unfortunately your focus is likely to be


whether pop stars should be en-
dorsing soft drinks, Swift said
the beverage is part of her life.
"I think my lifestyle plays a part
into what I choose to endorse,"
Swift said. "Diet Coke is some-
thing that is a part of my life. ...
Also a part of my life is exercise."


more on others' failings than on their many positive
qualities.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) It would be a huge mis-
take on your part to spend funds you have earmarked
for something essential. If you're not disciplined in the
handling of money, you'll never get ahead.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Remember the adage:
"If it isn't broke, don't try to fix it," and your life will be
much easier. Don't needlessly ask for trouble.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -You're not likely to
look good in the eyes of others if you try to shirk or
displace blame. Spend your energy making
corrections, not accusations.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Unless you pay close
attention to what you're spending, you won't be a
good manager of your money. Don't shell out what
you can't afford to lose.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

MONDAY, JANUARY 28
Fantasy 5: 12- 15- 16-27-31
5-of-5 2 winners $103,202.25
4-of-5 287 $115.50
3-of-5 8,670 $10.50
SUNDAY, JANUARY 27
Fantasy 5: 10- 11 13-20-35
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 212 $555
3-of-5 7,998 $22

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY
Today is Wednesday, Jan. 30,
the 30th day of 2013. There are
335 days left in the year.
Today's Highlights:
On Jan. 30, 1933, Adolf Hitler
became chancellor of Germany.
The first episode of the "Lone
Ranger" radio program was broad-
cast on station WXYZ in Detroit.
On this date:
In 1649, England's King
Charles I was beheaded.
In 1862, the ironclad USS Moni-
tor was launched from the Conti-
nental Iron Works in Greenpoint,
N.Y., during the Civil War.
In 1882, the 32nd president of
the United States, Franklin Delano
Roosevelt, was born in Hyde
Park, N.Y.
In 1948, Indian political and
spiritual leader Mohandas K.
Gandhi, 78, was shot and killed in
New Delhi by Nathuram Godse, a
Hindu extremist. (Godse and a co-
conspirator were later executed.)
In 1962, two members of "The
Flying Wallendas" high-wire act
were killed when their seven-person
pyramid collapsed during a per-
formance at the State Fair Coli-
seum in Detroit.
In 1964, the United States
launched Ranger 6, an unmanned
spacecraft carrying television cam-
eras that crash-landed on the moon,
but failed to send back images.
In 1968, the Tet Offensive
began during the Vietnam War as
Communist forces launched sur-
prise attacks against South Viet-
namese provincial capitals.
In 1972, 13 Roman Catholic
civil rights marchers were shot to
death by British soldiers in North-
ern Ireland on what became
known as "Bloody Sunday."
In 1981, an estimated 2 million
New Yorkers turned out for a
ticker-tape parade honoring the
freed American hostages from Iran.
In 1993, Los Angeles inaugu-
rated its Metro Red Line, the city's
first modern subway.
Ten years ago: President
George W. Bush put allies on no-
tice that diplomacy would give
way to a decision on war with Iraq
in "weeks, not months."
Five years ago: John Edwards
bowed out of the race for the Dem-
ocratic presidential nomination.
One year ago: All European Union
countries except Britain and the
Czech Republic agreed to sign a new
treaty designed to stop overspend-
ing in the eurozone and put an end
to the bloc's crippling debt crisis.
Today's birthdays: Actress
Dorothy Malone is 88. Producer-
director Harold Prince is 85. Actor
Gene Hackman is 83. Actress
Tammy Grimes is 79. Actress
Vanessa Redgrave is 76. Chess
grandmaster Boris Spassky is 76.
Country singer Jeanne Pruett is
76. Country singer Norma Jean is
75. Former Vice President Dick
Cheney is 72. Rock singer Marty
Balin is 71. Singer Phil Collins is
62. Actor Charles S. Dutton is 62.
World Golf Hall of Famer Curtis
Strange is 58. Actress-comedian
Brett Butler is 55. Singer Jody
Watley is 54. Actor-filmmaker Dex-
ter Scott King is 52. The King of
Jordan, Abdullah II, is 51. Actor
Norbert Leo Butz is 46. Country
singer Tammy Cochran is 41.
Actor Christian Bale is 39. Pop-


country singer-songwriter Josh
Kelley is 33. Actor Wilmer Valder-
rama is 33.
Thought for Today: "The ex-
cellent becomes the permanent."
- Jane Addams, American social
worker and Nobel Peace laureate
(1860-1935).


.Ag a











E DUCATTION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Looking For
Something Unique?
Check out today's Classified ads.
SHOP NOW!


Teachers flip for new class model


Lectures, exercises go to homework, leaving class time for practice -


Associated Press
SANTA ANA, Calif. When
Timmy Nguyen comes to his pre-
calculus class, he's already learned
the day's lesson he watched it on a
short online video prepared by his
teacher for homework.
So without a lecture to listen to, he
and his classmates at Segerstrom
Fundamental High School spend
class time doing practice problems
in small groups, taking quizzes, ex-
plaining the concept to other stu-
dents, reciting equation formulas in


a loud chorus, and making their own
videos while teacher Crystal Kirch
buzzes from desk to desk to help
pupils who are having trouble.
It's a technology-driven teaching
method known as "flipped learning"
because it flips the time-honored
model of classroom lecture and ex-
ercises for homework the lecture
becomes homework and class time is
for practice.
"It was hard to get used to," said
11th-grader Nguyen. "I was like,
'Why do I have to watch these
videos? This is so dumb.' But then I


stopped complaining and I learned
the material quicker My grade went
from a D to an A."
Flipped learning apparently is
catching on in schools across the na-
tion as a younger, more tech-savvy
generation of teachers is moving into
classrooms. Although the number of
"flipped" teachers is hard to ascer-
tain, the online community Flipped
Learning Network now has 10,000
members, up from 2,500 a year ago,
and training workshops are being
See Page C2


Eleventh-grader Noah Reyes watches as teacher
Crystal Kirch solves a problem in a pre-calculus class
at Segerstrom High School in Santa Ana, Calif.


iPads make their mark


.Tablets ease workflow

for middle-schoolers
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
CITRUS SPRINGS It's a simple,
routine writing assignment.
Students in Dan Koch's Citrus Springs
-Middle School seventh-grade class read
40,an essay and then answer a series of
questions.
The essay isn't found in a textbook,
though. Students access it by scanning a
,bar code on their iPads.
"They're awesome!" Aidan Ellis said
of the iPads, issued to CSMS seventh-
graders this year as part of a $150,000
federal Race to the Top grant. "They've
really helped us out in class."
Along with reading bar codes, iPads
have replaced some- but not all- text-
books. They allow students and teachers
..to interact outside the classroom. It lets
students email homework assignments
and receive lesson plans when they're
out sick, or even in detention.
"It doesn't replace what we do," Koch
said. "If I did all this without an iPad, I'd
have a ton of paper The workflow is
much easier"
Principal David Rowland said the use
of iPads tends to increase the turning in
.-- of homework assignments. Teachers are
seeing higher grades on quizzes and
tests.
.. "The engagement level of kids is
.higher than ever in the seventh grade,"
he said. "The student learning should
rise."
The grant provided 275 students with
iPads. Students take the iPads home
with them and are responsible for their
upkeep. Rowland said only a few have
been lost and five or six have cracked
screens from being mishandled.
There are a few downsides. For one,
not all textbooks are available on the
S. .. ..... ... .. .. iP a d .
.; ....... Another problem is whenever the iPad
installs an update, the memory is
cleared. Students lost their work until
See Page C2

Ashton Williamson, 13, uses her iPad
and a workbook to complete a class
project in her Citrus Springs Middle
School classroom.
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle


Tutor helps students


learn formula for success


Engineer writes

math books
SHAWN LEWIS
The Detroit News
RIVERVIEW, Mich. -
Nicholas Aggor says he
can turn struggling math
students into "walking
calculators."
He's not a math teacher,
but he understands stu-
dents' difficulties with
equations and fractions.
Several years ago, his two
sons were removed from
their fifth-grade math
classes and placed in the
lowest-performing classes
because they were
struggling.
The senior automotive
industry engineer faced a
tough decision: Go for the
promotion with a six-
figure salary, or quit his
job to help his sons.


"I was on track to be-
come a vice president, and
know I could have gotten
the position, but I want the
best for my sons and they
needed my help," he said.
"I looked at the math text-
books they were using and
realized why they weren't
learning. There were re-
search-based textbooks,
but lacked engineering
built-in quality controls."
Aggor, 54, quit his job
and began writing his own
math chapters for Joshua,
now 18, and Samuel, 19, to
study He also taught them
to chant their multiplica-
tion tables 10 minutes
every day, like a song.
Their failing grades be-
came As, and they re-
joined their classmates in
general education classes.
Both young men now are
enrolled at Wayne State
University's medical
school, studying to become
surgeons. Their success fu-


Associated Press
Nicholas Aggor quit his job
as an automotive engineer
to devote more time to his
two sons who were strug-
gling in math, and then
wrote his own math books
to help.
eled Aggor's passion to
continue writing chapters
to help other students.
See Page C2


State senate president says

teacher evaluation not working


Associated Press
FORT WALTON BEACH -
Florida's new teacher evaluation sys-
tem isn't working, and lawmakers
should stop making major changes in
the state's schools until that plan and
other key initiatives are fixed and im-
plemented, Florida Senate President
Don Gaetz said.
The former Okaloosa County school
superintendent said the test-based
evaluation system and a related per-
formance pay plan are too compli-
cated and fail to draw clear
distinctions between the best and
worst teachers.
The Florida Department of Educa-
tion last month released the first pre-
liminary evaluation results. They
showed nearly 97 percent of teachers
across Florida were rated "effective"
or "highly effective." Those are the
top two out of five possible ratings.
"How can you have a C- or D-
ranked school in which 85 percent, or
90 or 95 percent of the teachers are
classified as effective or highly effec-
tive?" the Republican from nearby
Niceville said during an interview
Monday "It seems to me that those


... if I had $480
million, I would try to
figure out a way to
pay our best
teachers more.
Don Gaetz
Florida senate president.

two data points have to have some re-
lationship to each other"
Besides the evaluation system and
pay plan, Florida's schools also are
phasing in far-reaching national Com-
mon Core State Standards, a new test
for assessing student performance
based on those standards and end-of-
course exams.
These changes are "all like rockets
that have been shot in the air," Gaetz
said.
"We need to quit shooting rockets
into the air We need to give schools
and school districts, teachers and


Page C7





C2 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013

HONORS
Crystal River High
School students Ashley John-
son and Kohlton Bendowski
have been named the West
Citrus Elks Lodge students
of the month for January.
Ashley Johnson is the
daughter of Kerry and Michael
Johnson. She has attended
the Crystal
River
schools
since third
grade.
Throughout
high school,
she has
Ashley maintained
Johnson a weighted
GPA of 4.4
while taking a majority of hon-
ors and AP courses. She has
earned two English college
credits. She has 178 hours of
community service, mainly as
a volunteer at Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center in the
women's center during the
summers off 2011 and 2012.
Her other hours came from
participating in school clubs,
National Honor Society and
Student Government. Johnson
is the vice president of Na-
tional Honor Society and a stu-
dent representative for the
class of 2013.


EDUCATION


Johnson is a member of
the Health Academy. Through
this program she was able to
become a Certified Nursing
Assistant. She has 56 clinical
hours experience in nursing
homes and doctors' offices.
She has also been involved
with Junior Achievement at
the primary school and
Key/Crest Kiwanis Olympic
days. She has been the sec-
retary of Health Occupations
Students of America since
2011. She made it to state-
level competition last year.
After high school, Johnson
plans to attend Florida State
University and major in biol-
ogy. She hopes to attend
medical school to become an
OB/GYN and open her own
practice.
Kohlton Bendowski is the
son of Thomas and Lynette
Bendowski.
Bendowski began high
school at the Academy of En-
vironmental Sciences. He at-
tended the Florida State
Science and Engineering Fair
twice and the Intel Interna-
tional Science and Engineer-
ing Fair at the age of 14.
In his junior year, Ben-
dowski was the program man-
ager of the academy's
S.P.R.I.N.G.S. program. He


was in charge of numerous
student researchers who had
the task of monitoring chemi-
cal levels in Three Sister's
Springs and
King's Bay.
Ben-
dowski is an
Assistant
tae kwon do
instructor.
Some of his
Kohiton duties in-
Bendowski clude help-
ing the
head instructor teach new
techniques and helping to
promote self discipline. He
has been in tae kwon do for
more than five years and has
been a black belt for more
than one year.
Bendowski plans to major
in engineering and physics at
the University of West Florida.
Zach Alford, of Inver-
ness, was named to the Fall
2012 dean's list at Taylor
University in Indiana.
Full-time students are
named to the Dean's List
when they have earned a


GPA of 3.60 or higher for the
term and taken at least 12
hours of classes.
FUNDRAISERS
The Rotary Club of Sug-
armill Woods and the Rotary
Interact Club of Lecanto High
School have joined together
to support the Box Tops for
Education fundraiser for
Lecanto Primary School. Box
Tops for Education labels can
be found on more than 300
products that families pur-
chase and use on a daily
basis.
There are two drop boxes
- one in the lobby of the
Sugarmill Woods Country
Club and the other in the Mil-
itary Outlet Store on West
Citrus Avenue in Crystal
River.
For a complete listing of the
products, go to www.Rotary
SMW.com.
The labels can also be
mailed to the Sugarmill
Woods Rotary Club. P.O. Box
8, Homosassa Springs, FL
34447.


SCHOLARSHIPS
AND CONTESTS
The Hernando-Citrus
County Farm Bureau will
award one or more scholar-
ships up to $1,000. To be eli-
gible for the scholarship,
students must be a senior,
carry at least a 2.5 grade
point average and plan to
major in an agricultural-
related field in college.
Application forms are avail-
able in the guidance offices of
all Hernando and Citrus
County high schools and in
private schools.
All applications must be
postmarked or hand delivered
to the Farm Bureau office in
Citrus County or in Hernando
County by April 1. For infor-
mation, call 352-796-2526 or
800-282-8317.
The BFF Society is offer-
ing a minimum of two $1,000
scholarships.
The scholarships are avail-
able to all U. S. citizens at-
tending Citrus County schools
or Citrus County residents
seeking a professional career.
Students must have a cu-
mulative GPA of 3.0 or above.
Applicants may be subject to
an interview. The scholarship
must be used to attend an ac-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

credited college, junior col-
lege or professional school.
Applicants may be graduating
high school seniors or adult
students seeking to further
their education.
Candidates will be judged
on academic achievement
and financial need. Scholar-
ships will be awarded for the
2012-13 school year and are
to be used for tuition and
books only. The check will be
made payable to the educa-
tional institution for the benefit
of the scholarship recipient.
Scholarship winners will be
notified by April 2013. It will be
necessary for the scholarship
winners) to attend the BFF
Society Awards Banquet on
May 13 or forfeit the scholar-
ship. If the monies for the
scholarships are not used as
indicated, all monies will be
rescinded to the founding
chapter.
Applications must be post-
marked by March 31. The ap-
plication must be in its entirety
or it will not be considered for
review.
For more information or an
application, contact Dianne
Micklon at 352-527-7442 or
trechuck@tampabay.rr.com.
The Daughters of the
See Page C7


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Aidan Ellis, 12, a seventh-grader at the Citrus Springs Middle School, discusses the-
class project he is working on utilizing an iPad.


iPAD
Continued from Page C1

figuring out they should send the work to
their own email accounts.
Aidan said working on an iPad is much
easier than using paper and pencil.
"We can just type it up," he said. "It has
autocorrect."
Sabrina Mora said the iPads are a
huge help.


"You can access more information,"
she said. "If you need help, just look it
up."'
Rowland said the decision hasn't been
made yet whether this batch of iPads will
follow students to the eighth grade or
stay with next year's seventh-graders.
"The mobility of these devices makes
them a great learning tool," he said. "It's
the wave of the future."
Contact Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright at 352-563-3228 or
m wrigh t@chronicleonline. com.


MATH
Continued from Page Cl

He since has written 800- to 900-page
math books for grades five through eight
and Algebra 1. His most recent book is
"How to Make Successful Students."
He also produced a series of DVDs to
help children learn their multiplication
tables by chanting equations such as 3
times 2 is 6,3 times 3 is 9 in a sing-song
manner
Aggor said the books "A Step-By-
Step Math Teaching Series for Students,
Teachers and Parents" conform to the
state's core standards.
They're used as supplementary texts
in the Riverview School District, as well
as in the Ann Arbor Public Library and
in several Detroit Public Library
branches. Aggor said the Duval County
School District in Florida also uses his
math books as a supplement to standard
math texts.
Aggor is corresponding with several
national education groups, trying to in-
corporate the books in curricula across
the country For now, this is how he
makes his living.
Joshua Aggor attributes his father's
textbooks to his success.
"His books, videos and programs
helped me to enter pre-medicine, and
I would like to become a surgeon to
help people with injuries and ill-
nesses all around the world," he said.
"My dad could have been making a


six-figure salary now if he had re-
mained as a senior engineer, but he
never complained. What an amazing
grace."
The principal at Memorial Elemen-
tary School in Riverview, where both
sons attended, said the books could be
helpful for parents.
"The books can be a benefit to stu-
dents but maybe even more to parents
because they're very user-friendly," said
Nancy Holloway. "A lot of times parents
forget the math, and I can definitely see
how they'd be helpful."
Nicholas Aggor is paying forward
the sacrifices made by his father while
growing up in the remote village of
Peki in the Volta region of Ghana in
West Africa.
"My father was a farmer, and he spent
all the money he had for me to come to
America to further my education," said
Aggor. "He told my mother but he
never told me he wanted to do that for
me because I never gave them any
trouble."
His goal is to have toddlers singing
their multiplication tables in the same
manner they sing the alphabet when
they're learning to talk.
Aggor chokes up when describing his
desire to help all children duplicate
those results.
"My only moral regret is that I could
not help the many other students the
same way I helped my sons," he said. "I
see many innocent children failing their
math tests every year, but nobody is
there to fix the problem."


LEARN
Continued from Page C1

held all over the country,
said executive director
Kari Afstrom.
Under the model, teach-
ers make eight- to 10-
minute videos of their
lessons using laptops, often
simply filming the white-
board as the teacher makes
notations and recording
their voice as they explain
the concept The videos are
uploaded onto a teacher or
school website, or even
YouTube, where they can
be accessed by students on
computers or smartphones
as homework
For pupils lacking easy
access to the Internet,
teachers copy videos onto
DVDs or flash drives. Kids
with no home device
watch the video at school.
Class time is then de-
voted to practical applica-
tions of the lesson often
more creative exercises
designed to engage stu-
dents and deepen their
understanding. On a re-
cent afternoon, Kirch's
students stood in pairs
with one student forming a
cone shape with her hands
and the other angling an
arm so the "cone" was cut
into different sections.
"It's a student-focused
classroom, where the re-
sponsibility for learning
has flipped from me to the
students," said Kirch, who
has been taking this ap-
proach for two years.
The concept emerged
five years ago when a pair
of Colorado high school
teachers started videotap-
ing their chemistry classes
for absent students.
"We found it was really
valuable and pushed us to
ask what the students
needed us for," said one of
the teachers, Aaron Sams,
now a consultant who is de-
veloping an online educa-


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


#The Mini Pa i


Betty Debnam, Founding Editor and Editor at Large


Exploring the Stuff Around Us


What Is Matter?


Do you ever wonder what the
universe is made of? What makes
it work? People have been trying to
answer these questions for thousands
of years.
Scientists often use two different
words to describe everything
around us: matter and
energy.
To learn more
about matter
7 and energy, The
Mini Page talked
with a scientist from
the National Science
Foundation. In this issue,
we will talk about matter.
In a future issue, we will talk about
energy.
Matter is the
stuff all around
us. Planets,
butterflies,
mountains,
viruses, cats, dirt, skyscrapers,
ffrogs, air,
bones, flowers,
chocolate, rivers,
S',.. dinosaurs, dogs
and people are
all made of
'":-- 7 matter.


The Hubble Space Telescope is made of
matter. It is a tool we use to expand the
reach of our senses, searching out matter
throughout the universe.

What is matter?
Everything we can
detect with our five
senses is matter. If
we can hear, touch,
taste, see or smell
something, it is
matter. Matter also
includes a bunch of stuff we can't hear,
touch, taste, see or smell. Sometimes
we need special instruments to "see"
matter. We might need a microscope, a
telescope or even more powerful tools.


from The Mini Page 2013 Universal Uclick


Taking up space
Experts say we can think of matter
as anything that takes up space. We
often describe matter by talking about
its mass. Mass is how much stuff
there is in something. It is not the
same as weight.
For example, on Earth, a 1-pound
box of cereal might hold 600 puffed
corn pieces. If you take it to the moon,
it would only weigh about one-sixth of
a pound.* But there would still be 600
puffed corn pieces. The mass would
stay the same. It would still take up
the same amount of space.
*The gravity on the moon is about one-
sixth as much as it is on Earth, so things
weigh about one-sixth as much on the
moon.


The Galileo spacecraft took this picture of
the moon.


Meet the Bailey Sisters
Sisters Chloe and Halle Bailey,
who are singers and actors, recently
won the Season 5 Radio Disney
talent competition, "Next Best
Thing."
Chloe, 14, and Halle, 12, are from
Atlanta. These songwriters and
Chloe (left) and Halle performers have had more than
10 million views on YouTube. Chloe plays piano, and Halle
plays guitar. They have appeared in several movies, including
"Joyful Noise" and the Disney Channel's "Let It Shine."
Chloe began acting when she was 2 years old; Halle began
when she was 3 years old. Chloe loves science and electronics.
Halle loves to swim, run and ride her bike.
fmThe Mini Page 2013 Unvrsl U cick
Sfrm Th Mini Page 2013 Unn...al Ucck
Goodsport's Rep
Supersport: J.J. Watt
Height: 6-5 Birthdate: 3-22-89
Weight: 295 Hometown: Pewaukee, Wis.
Houston Texan fans are ecstatic that J.J. Watt is
playing on their team. Opponents no doubt wish he
had raised cattle or gone into the oil business.
In his second NFL season, J.J. (Justin James) is an
all-star caliber defensive end and wrecking machine. In the first 14
games, "Mega Watt" recorded a team-record 19.5 sacks.
Putting quarterbacks on their back is his specialty. A football All-
American and honor student at Wisconsin, Watt was picked in the
first-round NFL draft choice.
Houston, division champs again, have given him a big contract
and are getting a Texas-size return for their investment.


fromA Fine Mi State of 2013UnrAffairsUclck


A Fine State of Affairs


Forms of matter
Matter can take several
forms. We are most
familiar with three of these
forms, or states, of matter:
gas, liquid and solid.
Matter can change from
one state to another, but it
is still the same substance.
For example, the water we drink is
liquid. Water in
rivers and lakes is W
liquid. But when
that water freezes,
it turns to ice. It
becomes solid.
When we heat
water to a certain temperature, it
turns to gas, or water vapor.
It becomes steam.
But in all these
f forms, it is still
water. The type
of matter doesn't
change.


The elements
An element (EL-uh-muhnt) is
a substance that cannot be broken
apart into different substances. For
example, water is not an element.
It can be divided into oxygen and
hydrogen. But hydrogen is an
element. Oxygen is an element.
Each element stays the same no
matter how much of it there is and
no matter where it is.


This iceberg is part of
Antarctica's ice sheet.
All three states of matter
are in this view of our
southernmost continent.
Liquid water is in the
ocean and clouds. Solid
water is in the ice and
snow. Solid ice crystals are
in the clouds too. The land
S is solid. And although we
can't see it in the photo,
S water vapor, or gas, is in
the sky. Other gases, such
as oxygen and carbon
dioxide, are also in the sky.


Elements here and beyond
We know of about 120 elements
in our universe. Scientists have
discovered most of them and created
others.
tGold is an
element. It
is still gold
whether
it's in a
nugget,
a coin or
jewelry.


Atom icTh Min W orlge 2013 Unal Ucick


Atomic World


Atomic building blocks
Atoms are the
basic building
blocks of matter.
Buses, beetles,
1 braids, blood, bells,
berries, books and
burgers are all
made of atoms.
An atom is the smallest part of
an element that keeps the same
characteristics as when it is bigger.
For example, an atom of gold has
the same 1,
characteristics i t '
as a mountain 1q'
of gold. If we --
could see it, it --
would be shiny
and yellowish.
The gold in the
mountain would melt at the same
temperature as the gold atom would
melt. The atom is still gold.
-^ -_- Atoms are
S 4 very, very tiny.
Billions could
7 -K fit on the period
N, \ at the end of
this sentence.

The Mini Page thanks Dr. Bradley Keister,
program director, National Science
Foundation, for help with this issue.
Look through your newspaper for pictures
of things made of matter. How many
different kinds of things can you spot?
Next week, The Mini Page is all about ballet.


The making of an atom
Itty bitty atoms are made of even
tinier particles: protons, electrons
and neutrons. These particles are
the same no matter what element
they are in. For example, a proton in
a gold atom is just like a proton in an
oxygen atom. Hydrogen Alorn
The number of
protons in each / "
atom is electron proton
what turns
that atom into a
certain element.
For example, __ |
hydrogen The hydrogen atom has
atoms have one proton, one electron
one proton. and no neutrons.
Gold atoms have 79 protons.
Protons and electrons have an
electrical charge. Protons have a positive
charge. Electrons have a negative charge.
There are always the same number of
protons and electrons in a stable atom.
They balance each other out.
Neutrons have no charge. The
number of neutrons per atom varies.


These scientists are
studying a giant-sized
model of a hydrogen
atom. A special machine
called an AlloSphere
magnifies tiny atoms so
they are big enough for
scientists to view what is
going on.





Atomic structure
The
protons
and
neutrons
are in the
center, or
nucleus
(NOO-klee-
uhs), of
the atom.
Electrons
whiz This is the older, planetary-
around the type model of an atom. It is
still the image we usually
nucleus, picture.
When
people first pictured the atom, they
thought electrons orbited the nucleus
just like the planets orbit the sun.
We now know that electrons don't
follow the same regular path over
and over. Instead, they speed around
the nucleus in a kind of cloud.
Protons and neutrons are made of
even smaller bits called quarks. We
don't know yet if electrons are made
of smaller parts.


The Mini Page Staff
Betty Debnam Founding Editor and Editor at Large Lisa Tarry Managing Editor Lucy Lien Associate Editor Wendy Daley Artist


from The Mini Page 2013 Univrsl U click
t 3TM MIGHTY m 20 T3
Ck^. FUNNY'S Mono
All the following jokes have something in common.
Can you guess the common theme or category? s S-IusIN
Sarah: Why did the escargot go to the beauty
salon?
Sally: It needed to get its snails done! '-

'i r Samson: What is a very slow ship called?
Simon: A snailboat!

Samantha: What did the snail say when it
jumped on the turtle for a ride?
Senneth: "Slow down!"


/ Basse B .. TRY'N
1 %7Jueias Matter FIND
Words that remind us of matter are hidden in the block below. Some words
are hidden backward or diagonally. See if you can find: AIR, ATOM,
CLOUD, ELECTRON, ELEMENT, GAS, GOLD, HEAR, LIQUID, MASS,
MICROSCOPE, NEUTRON, NUCLEUS, PROTON, QUARK, SEE,
SENSES, SMELL, SOLID, STATE, SUN, TASTE, TELESCOPE, TOUCH.
WE'REALL AT T L L E M S T N EM E L E
MADE UP OF E T O AS D I LO S S S AM P
MATTER L N O U S T V R I A D L O G R
E U S MCT AM L K RAU QO
C C E G S H E T D I U Q I L T
/ T L N H A E K L E D U O L C O
R E S E S S E N O R T U E N N
O U E A U E P OC S O R C I M
N S S R NV E P OC S E L E T

rom The Mini Page 2013 Uni esal Uclck

Ready Resources
The Mini Page provides ideas for
websites, books or other resources that will help
you learn more about this week's topics.
On the Web:
youtube.com/watch?v=yQP4UJhNnOI
nyu.edu/pages/mathmol/textbook/whatismatter.html
youtube.com/watch?v=RsAR9RdE2JY
At the library:
"What Is the World Made Of? All About Solids,
Liquids and Gases" by Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld
"Scholastic Discover More: The Elements" by
Dan Green


The Mini Page

Guide to the Constitution
The popular nine-part series on the Constitution, written in
collaboration with the National Archives, is now packaged as a
colorful 32-page softcover book. The series covers:
* the preamble, the seven articles and 27 amendments
* the "big ideas" of the document
* the history of its making and the signers


To order, send $9.95 plus $3.50 postage and handling for each copy. Send check or money
order (U.S. funds only) payable to: Andrews McMeel Universal, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood,
KS 66206 or call toll-free 1-800-591-2097.
Please send copies of The Mini Page Guide to the Constitution (Item #0-7407-6511-6) at
$13.45 each, total cost. (Bulk discount information available upon request.) www.smartwarehousing.com
Name:
Address:
City: State: Zip:


Mini Spy... C
Mini Spy and her friends are playing marbles, which are
made of matter. See if you can find: exclamation mark
* bread loaf tooth banana ruler
* pencil letter A ladder letter H
* strawberry letter D leaf kite letter E
* arrow bell cheese wedge letter T


fm ,The.Min Pge. 2013 Un.. ue k

TMRookie Cookie's Recipe

IT Meat and Cheese Roll-Ups
You'll need:
* 4 mozzarella cheese sticks
* 8 thin-sliced sandwich pickles
* 24 thin slices of deli meat (turkey, ham or roast beef)
* mustard or mayonnaise (optional)
What to do:
1. Slice mozzarella cheese sticks in half lengthwise, making
8 sticks.
2. Wrap pickle slices around cheese sticks.
3. Next, wrap 3 slices deli meat around pickle, forming a long
cylinder.
4. Serve with mustard or mayonnaise as a dip.
You will need an adult's help with this recipe.
from The Mini Page 2013 U niersal Uchick


I


EDUCATION


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013 C3


-- - - - - - - - - - --I







C Page C4 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Ne NOTES Make it to the market News NOTES


Transit retirees
convene in B.H.
New York City Transit
Retirees of Florida Chapter
9, Citrus County, will meet
at 1 p.m. Friday, Feb. 1, in
the Beverly Hills Commu-
nity Building, 1 Civic Circle.
Those retired from the
New York City Transit Sys-
tem, residing in Citrus
County, are welcome, as
are retirees from the NYC
Transit System visiting lo-
cally. After the meeting, re-
freshments will be served.
For information, call
Clarence Redd at 352-527-
8418, or Clarisse D'Adamo
at 352-527-2508.
Historical society
to meet Feb. 1
The annual meeting of
the Citrus County Historical
Society will be Friday, Feb.
1, as the society celebrates
its 50th anniversary.
The meeting starts with a
luncheon at 11:30 a.m.
Cost is $10. There is no
charge to attend the busi-
ness portion of the meet-
ing. The luncheon will be
followed by the election of
officers and directors for
the coming year.
The highlight of the
meeting is the presentation
of awards to those who
have greatly contributed to
the mission of the society
to preserve the history of
the county. There will also
be a drawing for a copy of
"Back Home, A History of
Citrus County" by Hampton
Dunn, and "'Gaters,
Skeeters & Malary" by
Judge E.C. May.
The meeting and lunch-
eon will be in the courtroom
of the Old Courthouse Her-
itage Museum. Call 352-
341-6427.
Post 77 slates
open house
American Legion Allen
Rawls Post 77 will have an
open house and dedication
ceremony of its newly ac-
quired building, formerly In-
verness S&W Highlands
Civic Center, at 4375 Little
Al Point, Inverness, at 10
a.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, with
the open house to follow
until 3 p.m.
Both the dedication and
open house are open to the
public. For more informa-
tion, call the post at 352-
860-2981 or 352-476-2134.
Shriners to host
spring picnic
Citrus Shrine Club will
host the spring picnic for
Melha Temple of Massa-
chusetts at 2 p.m. Satur-
day, Feb. 2, at Citrus
Shrine Club, 468 Woodlake
Ave., Inverness.
Barbecued chicken with
all the trimmings will be
served while folks enjoy
live music. Shriners, Ma-
sons and friends are wel-
come. Donation is $12.
Call Marcy or Cliff at
352-419-7088, or Malcom
at 413-775-2555.
Senior Foundation
to do talent show
The Senior Foundation
of Citrus County is hosting
the fifth annual Citrus Has
Talent Show Friday, Feb. 8,
at Curtis Peterson
Auditorium.
The event is the annual
fundraiser for The Senior
Foundation to help provide
vital services for seniors in
need. The show starts at
6:30 p.m., with doors open-
ing at 6 p.m. Tickets are
$10, with children younger
than 10 admitted free. Tick-
ets are for sale at the Citrus
County Resource Center,
West Citrus Community
Center and East Citrus
Community Center.
For more information,
call Amy Engelken, execu-
tive director, at 352-527-
5905, orAnne Black at
352-527-4600.


Enjoy refreshments, learn about healthy living in Beverly Hills


Special to Chronicle

Free coffee and cocoa will greet
those attending the Friday, Feb. 1,
Beverly Hills Farmers Market.
Although the market opens at 9
a.m., there will be a "healthy living
tour" at 10 a.m. with a talk by Ron
Hipner on the healthful benefits of
alkaline water. Other highlights
will be:
At 10:15, Sarah Meyer will talk
about Soap Nuts.
At 10:30 a.m., Jonathan of
Gipetto's Bakery will discuss the


benefits of using all-natural
ingredients.
At 10:45, Snow's Produce will
talk about Amish Country healthy
products.
At 11 a.m., Randy Hobson will
discuss "Herbs & Edible
Landscaping."
And at 11:15, Karen Esty will
speak on essential oils.
A recent feature at the market is
the ability to use EBT cards at the
primary produce vendor's tables.
The market will offer: oven-fresh
baked items including pies, bread,


rolls and cookies, handmade jew-
elry, essential natural oils and fra-
grances, special floral
arrangements and many craft
items.
The market needs community
support of the local vendors in Feb-
ruary because the markets in De-
cember and January did not allow
vendors to earn a reasonable
amount of money for their time and
trouble.
The Farmers Market is staged at
77 Civic Circle at the east end of
Beverly Hills Boulevard.


Fourth of
'Anna'

Marilyn Williams of Crystal
River, along with her
sister, Barbara Bailey
Caspersen of Hamilton,
Ontario, Canada, have
collaborated to produce
book No. 4, the final book in
the "Anna" series. The book
is "Empty Nest, the
continuing Story of Anna,"
and was recently
published. All four of the
"fiction based on fact"
books center around or are
inspired by their mother
Anna's life in southeast
Maine. Anna lost her mother
at a very early age and was
raised by an angry and often
abusive father. "Reading the
books shows that even in
the darkest of times, with
faith, light will come if you
just hold on long enough,"
said Williams. Book No. 1 is
"No Time for Tears;" book
No. 2 is "Anna's Ocean of
Dreams;" book No. 3 is
"Whispers of Hope." All four
books can be found in the
Citrus County libraries. They
are available at Barnes &
Noble, Amazon and as
eBooks.
Special to the Chronicle


Senior Friends plan activities


Special to the Chronicle

Senior Friends for Life will have
lunch at 11:30 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 31,
at the Ocean Buffet Restaurant, 3425
S.W. College Road, State Road 200,
Ocala. Cost of the buffet is $7.25, with
a 10 percent discount for all seniors.
On Friday, Feb. 8, the Friends will
meet for lunch at 11 a.m. at Abigail's
Cafe & Coffee Shop, 20607 W Penn-
sylvania Ave. (across from the fire
station) in Dunnellon. After lunch,
the group will have time to shop at


the Historic Center of Dunnellon.
Lunch will be ordered from the
menu.
The Friends will meet Monday,
Feb. 11, at the Inverness Golf &
Country Club, 3150 S. Country Club
Blvd. Registration will begin at 11
a.m. Lunch will follow at noon. The
menu will be strawberry pecan
salad and rolls. Entrees are rasp-
berry chicken or baked haddock.
The dessert is red velvet cake. A pro-
gram will follow.
On Tuesday, Feb. 19, will tour the


Fishing clinic


Don Garlits Car Museum, at 10 a.m.
The museum is at Exit 341 off 1-75 on
County Road 484, 13700 S.W 16th
Ave., Ocala. After the tour, the group
will have lunch at the Cracker Bar-
rel, at 13581 S.W 17th Court, Ocala.
Cost of the museum is $10. As well as
cars, visitors can see such memora-
bilia as the scrub board, the wringer
washer, an old juke box and more.
Reservations must be made for all
activities by calling Myrna Hocking
at 352-860-0819, or Teddie Holler at
352-746-6518.


Special to the Chronicle
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and Citrus County Parks & Recreation have teamed up again
to host the ninth annual Kid's Fishing Clinic on Feb. 23. The clinic will be available to preregistered children between
the ages of 5 to 15. Clinic times will be 9 a.m., 10 a.m., 11a.m., noon and 1 p.m. at Fort Island Trail Park in Crys-
tal River. The free clinic enables young people to learn the basics of environmental stewardship, fishing ethics, an-
gling skills and safety. In addition, environmental displays will provide each participant with a unique chance to
experience Florida's marine life firsthand. Kid's Fishing Clinics strive toward several goals, but the main objective
is to create responsible marine resource stewards by teaching children about the vulnerability of Florida's marine
ecosystems. The clinics also aspire to teach fundamental saltwater fishing skills and provide participants with a pos-
itive fishing experience. In addition to a free Kid's Fishing Clinic T-shirt, rods and reels will be supplied for the chil-
dren to use during the clinic and to take home with them. Space is limited; call 352-527-7540 to register. To become
a sponsor, call Andy Smith at 352400-0960.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


Embroiderers
to stitch Feb. 6
The Sandhill Crane
Chapter of the Embroider-
ers' Guild of America will
meet from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 6, at
Faith Evangelical Presbyte-
rian Church, 200 Mount
Fair Ave., Brooksville.
Groups of members will
be taking classes, but open
stitching for others will
occur until 2 p.m. Bring a
lunch. Membership is open
to anyone who is interested
in stitching, from the most
experienced, to those who
would like to learn to stitch.
Mentors are available.
For more information,
call 352-666-8350.
Novelists to look
at 'hero's journey'
At the Feb. 2 meeting of
The Florida Chapter of the
Historical Novel Society,
Rick Seymour will use
Christopher Vogler's "The
Writer's Journey: Mythic
Structure for Writers" to
guide members in explor-
ing the "hero's journey," by
providing examples from
"Ender's Game," "Harry
Potter," "Terminator," "Lord
of the Rings," "Star Wars"
and "The Matrix."
The meeting will con-
tinue with a presentation by
Carol Megge on How to
Start Writing a Novel.
Handouts will be provided
that cover examples of
character development,
motivation and goals.
FCHNS meets at 1 p.m.
the first Saturday of every
month in the Community
Room of the Central Ridge
Library, 425 W. Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills. Every-
one is welcome.
For information, call Mar-
ian Fox at 352-726-0162 or
visit www.fchns.org.
Act, sing, dance
at workshops
Ronnie's Academy of
Dance will offer Musical
Theatre Workshops for
children ages 7 and older
from noon to 4 p.m. Satur-
day, Feb. 9. Deadline to
register is Saturday, Feb. 2.
Upcoming workshop
dates are March 9, April 13
and May 11.
No experience is neces-
sary to participate. Call
352-795-1010 for more
information.
Crystal Oaks
plans card party
Crystal Oaks Civic Asso-
ciation will have its annual
military card party
fundraiser Tuesday, Feb.
12, at the clubhouse, 4858
Crystal Oaks Drive.
Doors open at 11:15
a.m. Light lunch will be
served at noon and card
playing begins at 1 p.m.
Ticket are $12. There will
be lots of fun, prizes, lunch
and a raffle. Reservations
are required. Call Anthea at
352-2494415, or Edie at
352-7464216.
Spaghetti special,
comedy hour
The American Legion
Riders third annual Super
Spaghetti Special and
Comedy Hour will take
place Wednesday, Feb. 6.
Sit-down dinner is from 5 to
6:30 p.m., followed by the
Comedy Hour featuring co-
median Berri Lee at 7 p.m.
Enjoy all the spaghetti you
can eat, plus salad and
dessert.
Tickets are $15; only 125
tickets are available. Pro-
ceeds go to the American
Legion Legacy Run, help-
ing to further the education
of the children of veterans
who were killed in action
since 9/11.
Post 155 is at 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River. For more
information, call 352-
795-6526.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WEDNESDAY EVENING JANUARY 30, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D11: Comcast, Dunnellon, &Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 I 9:30 10:00 110:30 11:00 11:30
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World Nightly PBS NewsHour (N) (In Nature (N) 'PG' NOVA Charles Life on Fire "Ash Secrets of the Dead (In
3 (WED PBS 3 3 14 6 News Business Stereo) Na (DVS) Undbergh's baby. (N) '14' Runners" (N) 'G' Stereo) 'PG' a
0 CWU~F PBS 5 5 5 41 Journal Business PBS NewsHour (N) Nature (N)PG' NOVA (N)'14'B Life on Fire (N)'G' World T. Smiley
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0 CWFL NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News 8 Ton. (N) 14' Kids Victims Unit'14 and Dead" (N)'14'
News World Jeopardy! Wheel of The Middle Neighbors Modern Suburgatory Nashville Teddy tells Eyewit. Jimmy
0 CWF ABC 20 20 20 News (N) G' Fortune 'PG' Family 'PG' Rayna the truth.'PG' News Kimmel
CBS 10 10 10 10 10 10 News, Evening Wheel of Jeopardy! Super Bowl's Greatest Criminal Minds "The CSI: Crime Scene 10 News Letterman
SWTP)CBS 10 10 10 10 10 6pm (N) News Fortune (N)'G' Commercials Pact" (In Stereo)'14' Investigation'14' 11pm (N)
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0E (WFT ABC 11 11 11 News (N)'PG' America 'PG' Family 'PG' Rayna the truth.'PG' Kimmel
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EB (WiViM IND 12 12 16 14' 14' Theory Theory Intent '14' N Intent '14' N 'PG' 'PG'
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M (WACi TBN 21 21 Studio The 700 Club (N)'G' Victor M. Child IMoore Paid 1TV55 Studio Direct Healing Paid
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S WYl EFAM 16 16 16 15 Coast Today Court 10-43 10-43 TalkMed Tour'G' Tour
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55 64 55 Guilty" '14' Swim"'14' dad poses as a nanny to be with his children. 'PG' a 'PG'
SRattlesnake Republic Swamp Wars (In Call- Call of Gator Boys "Gatorzilla" Gator Boys (In Stereo) Call- Call of
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S 27 61 27 33 MA' '14', Report '14' MA' (N) 14' Report
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302 201 302 2 2 Treader" Kevin Kline. PG-13'1 Bryant Gumbel'PG' Reese Witherspoon. PG-13' Land Maher'MA'm
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24 38 24 31 'PG 'PG' 'PG'a 'PG 'PG' C Divas Divas
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West
I 85
VA 9 4
* J 10 9 8
4 K 8 5 2


South
2 NT
34


North 01-30-13
4K Q 9 4
VJ 7 5 2
+ 742
* 6 3
East
4 J 2
V K 10 6
6 5 3
4 J 10 9 7 4
South
4 A 10 7 6 3
V Q 8 3
SAK Q
SA Q


Dealer: South
Vulnerable: North-South
West North East
Pass 3 40 Pass
Pass 44 All pass


Opening lead: + J

Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Mark Twain said, "There are several good
protections against temptation, but the surest is
cowardice."
At the bridge table, though, it is not cowardice
to avoid temptation if that would risk your going
down in a contract that must succeed with an al-
ternative line of play.
This deal features one of the strongest lures
in bridge. How should South play in four spades
after West leads the diamond jack?
Two no-trump is the right opening bid with
that South hand. If North had raised to three no-
trump, there would have been nine easy tricks.
But it was normal to use Stayman.
South starts with four potential losers: three
hearts and one club. He has nine top tricks: five
spades, three diamonds and one club. It is
tempting to draw trumps and to try the club fi-
nesse. If it wins, declarer is trying for an over-
trick, but what happens when it loses? Unless
West unwisely shifts to hearts, South should lose
three hearts and go down one.
The club finesse should be avoided. Instead,
at trick two, declarer should play a spade to
dummy's queen. When the suit does not break
4-0, South draws trumps, cashes his two re-
maining diamond winners and the club ace,
then leads the club queen.
West wins but is endplayed. If he shifts to a
heart, declarer plays second hand low and loses
only two tricks in the suit. Alternatively, if West
returns a diamond or a club, South ruffs in the
dummy (gaining a sixth spade trick) and sluffs a
heart from his hand.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
ASCEE

.'7.1-T..I .. r I. Services, Inc

PILEX



TINSEV_
nn "n


DOUSTI
7rT^^^


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
She is sweet! I'm
going to ask her out. Well, aren't
ihyu nice!
"/ his looks
delicious.
Here you
S go, Ma am.





'--


THE NEW EMPLOYEE
AT THFE AKERY
WAS --
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print your A
answer here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: PRUNE UPPED PERMIT RESUME
I Answer: When the math teacher ended the lesson,
she SUMMED IT UP


ACROSS
1 Entertain
6 Abilities
12 Dainty
14 Dues payer
15 Chirps
16 Pops up
17 Space
18 PC monitor
19 Montana or
Pesci
21 Annoy
23 Happy sighs
26 Long
sandwich
27 Drink with
scones
28 To any degree
(2 wds.)
30 Feel sick
31 Inquire
32 "Walk
Away -"
33 More remote
35 Charged
particle
37 Lion's
quarters


38 Ballerina
painter
39 Weathervane
dir.
40 British inc.
41 Sun. homily
42 Unit of
resistance
43 Bandleader
Brown
44 Banned bug
spray
46 Fish-to-be
48 Team cheer
51 public
55 Furrow
56 Vacillate
57 Disposition
58 Bargains

DOWN
1 Quick to learn
2 Kitten's cry
3 Pass near
Pikes Peak
4 Long bout
5 Blues singer
James


Answer to Previous Puzzle


PVC SIG N SMOG
I I I USMC HARE
0 N RICO UIR G
EL ECTS SIL K
ASEA DAT AA
D I0S IRU
~N
D T S TRI S MU
IDEE LCD CENT
MEL ELAINEM
SLAB UNDO
TUBS BLEACH
LEAD WOOL FEE
PALI AN INE OAR
STET BAND ENN


6 Loud kiss
7 Deborah of
old films
8 Copy
9 Flour sack
abbr.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


10 Bruce of
kung fu
11 Almost grads
13 Glimpses
19 Fruit drinks
20 Do a favor for
22 Dashing
24 Manage
25 Rains ice
26 Spoke up
27 Resurfaces a
road
28 Drury Lane
composer
29 Advance, as
money
34 Pendant
jewelry
36 "Paper
Roses" singer
Marie
42 Different
43 Coffee order
45 Kevin Kline
movie
47 Empty
48 Elev.
49 Suffix for
forfeit
50 CD- -
52 Gleeful shout
53 Fam. member
54 Mo. multiples


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
* Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


Dear Annie: I've been
with a wonderful guy
for five years. After two
abusive marriages, I am fi-
nally being treated right.
"Bud" and I have only two is-
sues: money and kids. We have
broken up a few
times over our
problems, but hon-
estly, I can't live P-
without him.
Bud is 44 years
old and owns his
own business, but
he does not save
money When I met
him, he had noth-
ing. Now he has
$20,000 in a retire-
ment account and
another $5,000 in ANN
savings. He finally MAIL
has his two kids
pretty well straight-
ened out, although they will
never be exactly normal.
Bud still doesn't manage his
money well. He needs so many
things in his house, yet he
went out and bought a truck
he doesn't need. He now has
six years of payments on it, his
auto insurance went up, and if
he ever needs new tires, we
are talking thousands of dol-
lars. I want him to sell it and
get a reasonably priced truck.
He says he will lose money on
the sale, which is true, but why
sink even more into it?
Both of my marriages in-
volved men who overspent on
themselves, so I know I have a
tendency to be extra cautious.
How can I convince Bud that
he did the wrong thing by buy-
ing the truck, but that he still
has time to fix it? I won't
marry a man I can't trust with
my money Not again. -
Thrice Shy
Dear Thrice: You can't treat


Bud like a child, even if he
makes poor financial deci-
sions. He will resent it and
push back. Instead, approach
all such matters jointly, being
respectful of each other's
opinions, even when you dis-
agree. You also
could offer to take
over the handling of
finances for the
household, keeping
everyone within a
reasonable budget.
But you are wise
not to commingle
your money if you
don't trust Bud's
ability to handle it.
Before marrying,
consider financial
IE'S counseling together
.BOX through your bank
or the National
Foundation for
Credit Counseling (nfcc.org).
Dear Annie: My husband
and I have been married
27 years. We each have
grown children from previous
marriages.
My husband's 42-year-old
unmarried son lives out of
state. "Mike" is self-support-
ing, but the only time we hear
from him is when he needs
some extra money He lives
alone except for his dogs. For
the past three years, Mike has
spent Christmas with us, stay-
ing three or four days. We are
always happy to see him, even
though we only have two bed-
rooms and he brings the
dogs even one who is
incontinent.
Last year, my daughter (who
also lives out of state) visited
with her two children. We had-
n't seen her in two years. My
husband also was scheduled
for knee replacement surgery
the following week. So when


Mike asked to come with his
dogs and a new puppy, we ex-
plained that it wasn't a good
time. We asked him to come in
February or March, while his
father recuperated and
hopefully, the puppy would be
housebroken.
We have not heard from him
since, even though I have left
numerous messages on his
voicemail. What more can I do
to mend this fragile relation-
ship? In the Middle
Dear Middle: Not much.
You have explained, and you
have called. We trust you will
keep all of the kids informed
of Dad's progress, including
Mike. But it is up to him to
make the next move. We sus-
pect when he needs money, he
will get in touch again.
Dear Annie: Most women
who responded to "Your Hus-
band" do not understand men
very well. Without sex, men
feel incomplete. It's part of
how we feel loved. Women
should realize how important
sex is to a man simply by see-
ing that he is willing to risk
everything his wife, family
and assets to fill this void. -
Feeling the Void in Indiana


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate, 737
3rd Street, Hermosa Beach,
CA 90254. To find out more
aboutAnnie's Mailbox and
read features by other
Creators Syndicate writers
and cartoonists, visit the
Creators Syndicate Web page
at www creators. com.


ENTERTAINMENT


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013 C5


41






CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C6 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013

Peanuts


I SHOULD ENTER IT..THATS
THE 50RT OF THIN NEED
T7 DO TO 6AIN CONFlPENCE
AND 5ELF-ESTEEM...


A SPELLING BEE?
THEY'RE 601N6TO
HAVE A CITW-WiDE
PELLIN6 BEE 7?



c s


~TMA
ThRTLE

0
C
0

~


MY HAND WON'T 60 UP,,.
IT's SMARTER
THAN I AM!










791 00 EAR -
-r" RoEcoe?
IE MU E
I.ELA.,',e )
R .:i..r ..'
1 ..
fif' -.X ,. _.
-. IV(


Sally Forth


)KAY, IF WE'RE GOING TO FIX THINGS LIKE YOUR NO, NO.
WITH NONA, MAYBE WE NEED THE MOM? SHE'LL JUST
ADVICE OF SOMEONE OLDER... GIVE US ADULT
ADVICE. WE NEED
SOMEONE WHO
,,RIDES THAT FINE
LINE BETWEEN
GROWN-UP AND


r FUNNY, I THOUGHT WE WOULD
HAVE CUT TO YOUR DAD BY NOW.
'ME TOO. MAYBE IN OUR
HEARTS WE KNOW HE'LL
JUST REFERENCE A MOVIE
MADE 20 YEARS
BEFORE OUR


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser


E- Oq t T OIT rLET' 55E.E.,IT5A%5,TAKE
JATCR, u ST AR' WITR PLE&IT'( OF WATE_.!

MT[C, TION5TC-


Big Nate
4ERE'S MY MASTER,
PLAN JENNY MOVES
TO SEATTLE, OKAY,
BUT SHE AND I STAY
SN VERY CLOSE
ArOTACnd Janis







Arlo and Janis


Rubes


THEN, SIX '(EARS
FROM NOW, WE
BOTH GET ACCEPTED
AT THE VERY SAME
COLLEGE!

ii'is(II
IIP^s y


"You see, son? There really is
a Santa Claus."


WHEN SHE SEES ME
ON CAMPUS DURING
FRE5HMAIN ORIENT-
ATION, SHE REALIZES
SHE'S SEEN MADLY
IN LOVE WITH ME
THE WHOLE TIME!


Blondie
SLONDIE, VOUL WHY, 1.
HAVE THE FINEST HANK YOU
SANDWICHES
S IN TOWN -
-' .""----^ ,- '"-
'. ;Z- kM-
( I ,\


I DO TRY TO MAINTAIN
(VERY HIGH STANDARDS...



(---.---'', -'/ "d
- _i^ p '
- ^ .''-j 30111


HERE COMES MY QUALITY CONTROL
'P CONSULTANT RIGHT NOW'


-0 .' 'GT
,,


- ,, _


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"I'LL LOOK FORWARD To 'IOUR
FAREWELL 7TUR."


"No, I don't like drums.
They only play one note."


Betty


THEN, AND
TRIAICALLY, SHE
YOU ELOPES
FLUNK WITH A
OUT HUNKYI
AFTEP, ECON
TWO MAJO0K1
WEEKS/


Frank & Ernest


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters" (R) ID re-
quired. In 3D. 12:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m. No passes.
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters" (R) ID re-
quired. 4:20 p.m. No passes.
"Mama" (PG-13) 12:40 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Broken City" (R) ID required. 12:20 p.m.,
3:50 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"The Last Stand" (R) ID required. 12:30 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7:25 p.m.
"Les Miserables" (PG-13) 12 p.m., 3:30 p.m.,
7p.m.
"Zero Dark Thirty" (R) ID required. 12:10 p.m.,
3:40 p.m., 7:05 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Parker" (R) ID required. 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:15 p.m.
"Movie 43" (R) ID required. 2 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,


8 p.m.
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters" (R) ID re-
quired. In 3D. 1:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m. No passes.
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters" (R) ID re-
quired. 4 p.m. No passes.
"Mama" (PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:35 p.m.
"Broken City" (R) ID required. 1:55 p.m.,
4:55 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"The Last Stand" (R) ID required. 1:20 p.m.,
4:05 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Zero Dark Thirty" (R) ID required. 1 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Silver Lings Playbook" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Lincoln" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie list-
ings and entertainment information.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: A slenbe 3


"KFZ JUZBK UBEL YFBSABU FBY TZNK


KFZ ICLTXLSJ. BS BWBRLSJ


KBTZSK


BSX KFZ WBAZU HN B IZBCKLNCT


YHCSX." KLW ICUJZYY

Previous Solution: "What we have once enjoyed we can never lose. All that we
love deeply becomes a part of us." Helen Keller
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-30


For Better or For Worse -

-U-'SL LWORKING- '1 THISMOgNINiG,SHE
IS SORF OIlN- r TOoKoFF RT 8-30.
To CHRNG&E -- HAD-FO MAKE-M
THINGS RBODUD J OWON LUNCH ,


Garfield


Pickles


ZIP i',
s:-:; _., -


Beetle Bailey


Dilbert


Kit 'N' Carlyle


Doonesbury


9 N IERNI 15 GIVING PROOF THAT
S "I THIN, THEREFORE
I AM" IS NOT


(C2


COMICS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CHALK
Continued from Page C2

American Revolution are of-
fering scholarships at three
different levels local, state
and national.
The local Fort Cooper
chapter offers a $500 award
for a graduating senior girl
who has at least a 3.0 grade
point average and is accepted
at an accredited college or
university.
The Florida state society
DAR provides $500 scholar-
ships for male or female high
school graduates and post-
graduates with a minimum 3.0
GPAwho has been accepted
at an accredited college or
university. Guidelines and ap-
plications are available at Cit-
rus County public and private
high schools.
The national DAR has
many scholarships available
for high school and college
graduates. For information
about them, visit the website
www.dar.org. Click on Schol-
arships and follow the
prompts.
For more information, con-
tact Shirley Hartley, DAR


scholarship chairman, at 352-
270-8590 or www.rootsweb.
ancestry.com/-flfccdar/.
The SECO Board of
Trustees has voted to con-
tinue SECO's scholarship
program for 2013. The board
has authorized an increase in
the scholarship amount from
$2,500 to $3,000 per student
in recognition of the ever in-
creasing cost of higher educa-
tion. Up to 12 high school
seniors from the cooperative's
service territory will receive
assistance to go on to a col-
lege or technical school after
graduation.
To qualify, graduates must
reside in a home being served
by SECO and be enrolled in
an accredited college, univer-
sity or vocational/technical
school by the end of 2013. Ap-
plications are now available at
area high school guidance of-
fices and at any of SECO's
customer service centers in
Marion, Lake, Citrus and
Sumter counties. They must
be returned to SECO no later
than March 29.
The Homosassa Civic
Club is offering the Beri
Hagerty-Phelps Scholar-
ships to graduating high
school students and adults


who live within the boundaries
of the Homosassa Elemen-
tary School District and/or the
Homosassa Special Water
District.
Information and applica-
tions are available through
guidance counselors at Crys-
tal River High School,
Lecanto High School, Withla-
coochee Technical School, or
College of Central Florida.
They are also available at
www.homosassaseafood
festival.org
Applications must be received
by March 31. For more informa-
tion, call 352-628-9333
Take Stock in Children is
offering college scholarships.
To be considered for a
scholarship, a child must be in
public school in the sixth, sev-
enth or eighth grade, meet the
financial eligibility require-
ments, agree to remain drug-,
alcohol- and crime-free and
get good grades.
Applications are now avail-
able in the guidance offices of
Citrus County School District's
middle schools.
For more information, call
Take Stock in Children Cit-
rus/Levy at 352-344-0855.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Purple


Heart is offering two scholar-
ships for college-bound stu-
dents Chapter 776's College
of Central Florida (CF) Endowed
Scholarship and the Military
Order of the Purple Heart
(MOPH) Scholarship for the ac-
ademic year 2013-14.
Chapter 776's CF Endowed
Scholarship awards $500 to
an applicant accepted or en-
rolled at CF as a full-time stu-
dent (12 or more semester
credit hours). Chapter 776
scholarship information and
an application can be ob-
tained at www.citruspurple
heart.org, or by calling 352-
382-3847. Chapter 776 must
receive scholarship applica-
tions no later than 5 p.m. Feb.
28, 2013.
The MOPH Scholarship
awards $3,000 to a member
of the MOPH; a spouse,
widow, direct lineal descen-
dant (child, stepchild, adopted
child, grandchild) of a MOPH
member or of a veteran killed
in action, or who died of
wounds before having the op-
portunity to become a MOPH
member. MOPH scholarship
information and an application
can be obtained by visiting
the MOPH website at
www.purpleheart.org.


TEACHER
Continued from Page C1

parents time to institu-
tionalize the reforms that
have already been made.
We need about a two-year
cooling off period."
The evaluations will be
used to determine
teacher salaries under
the performance pay
plan, which is supposed
to go into effect next year.
Both are part of a 2011
law that also ended
tenure for newly hired
teachers. The law is being
challenged in court by the
Florida Education Asso-
ciation, the statewide
teachers union.
Gaetz blamed the De-
partment of Education
and former Education
Commissioner Gerard
Robinson for failing to
adequately support and
help school districts in
implementing the new
law. He said he's counting
on Robinson's successor,
Tony Bennett, to simplify
the evaluation system
and pay plan and make
them understandable.
"If you can't explain it,


then you can't defend it,"
Gaetz said. He added that
lawmakers who passed it,
including himself, would
be hard-pressed "to ex-
plain how this system
works and how it's fair
and rational."
In many cases, teachers
are evaluated on the
basis of students they've
never taught because
their own students aren't
tested or due to turnover.
Bennett, who was
hired as Florida's
schools chief after los-
ing a bid for re-election
as Indiana's superinten-
dent of public instruc-
tion in November,
recently told the Senate
Education Committee
that the 2011 law may
need to be tweaked.
Gaetz also was cool to
Gov Rick Scott's latest
education proposal, a
$2,500 across-the-board
pay raise for teachers,
which would cost $480
million.
"I believe that teachers
in this state are under-
paid, but if I had $480 mil-
lion I would try to figure
out a way to pay our best
teachers more," Gaetz
said.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


a, s


l...

0 ti.- J- K-~.


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


I a: 32)53-65 ol.re:(88 82230 1 m il*lasfid rnilo*ie o Iwbst: w crnilonie0o


2BR/12%BA, MH &
Land Needs little Work
$17,500 9340 W.Tonto
Dr., Crystal River
Call 352-382-1544 or
813-789-7431
AIR COMPRESSOR
Devillbiss, twin cyl 4
hp, 20 gal. $150
352-628-4360
INVERNESS
A GOTTA GO SALE!
Tues. Wed. & Thur.
8a-4p Make Offer
Generator, Roto
Tiller, Mower, utility
trailers, plumbing,
electrical, fishing
& household. Misc.
Turn at Applebees
Restuarant,
4 miles, S. on 581
Look for Signs

INVERNESS
FORT COOPER
Mobile Home Park
ANNUAL YARD &
BAKE SALE
Jan. 30 thru Feb. 2
4318 S. Florida Ave.
INVERNESS, FL
3 miles east of Inv;
5-20ac wooded/some
cleared, owner finance
available.
Owner is licensed Real
Estate Broker,
Ed Messer.
ed.messer@yahoo.com


HOMOSASSA
Sat 2/2, Sun 2/3
8 5, entire hshld
4088 S Washington Pt
John Deere Riding
Mower, L130, 23HP,
VPTwin, 48" cut Hydro
Static, very good
cond. recent service
$600. (352) 527-8618
KING SIZE
PILLOW TOP
Mattress, Box Spring
& Frame.
Excel. Cond. $550
315-723-5353
McKee
Fishing Boat 14ft,
60H Mercury Motor
plus trailer, $2200
352-270-3332
Moving Sale
27" Magnavox TV $75
15" Quasar TV w/
Stand, $25,
6 Tray tables $15.
(352) 489-5669
RAKE
Commercial Cyclone
6hp, vacuum pk up,
Ready for Spring
Clean up. $650
(352) 795-8986
SUNNYBROOK
2008, 35FT Fifth Wheel
3 slides, electric awning
fireplace, 2 ac's, 50 amp
king bed, pmts assum-
able @ $424 per mnth.
352-279-3544
TABLE SAW, JOINTER,
STAINED GLASS KIT
10 inch craftsman table
saw $70, Craftsman 6
inch jointer $125, Every-
thing to get started a
stained glass project
$200 Phone
352-201-1082 or
352-560-3354 before
7PM


SCOOTER
Lifan Industries, 2008
50cc, looks & runs
great. $750 obo
(352) 439-5039
TOPPER
8 ft Red Fiberglass
must sell $200 obo
Lecanto 941-504-0899
Toshiba,
50" Big Screen TV
You Move
(352) 447-1553
Troybuilt Pusher w/
Honda Engine $90
Lawnboy Pusher
w/bagger $25
352-726-7789



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Washers,Dryers,Riding
Mowers, Scrap
Metals, Antena
towers 270-4087



2 Very Nice Dogs
Golden Retriever/Lab
Mix, chestnut color
& Black Lab, both
nice watch dogs,
very gentle,
Like to go together
(352) 637-6310


000DM1S

SudOKU ****** 4puz.com

4896


12 5 6


57 4 3


1 4


7 3 4 5


8 3


2 9 68


8 3 14




3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.



/ 5C^ /tC~~ -withstand
Installations by Brian CBC1253853 -,win5

Sp352-628-7519


-BEST-r Ji
PermitAnd o T | ,
I Engineering Fees I .,
Up to $200 value -

*Siding*Soffn itFascia. Skirting -Roofovers Carports 'Screen Rooms'Decks*Windows'Doors*Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


FREE KITTENS
18 wks old
Calico, litter trained
(352) 212-4061
Free to Good Home
English Mastiff
In need of forever
home, very sweet and
gentle couch potato
Must Spay,
Call for Interview
(352) 637-4322



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb
Delivered 352-795-0077
FRESH CITRUS
@BELLAMY GROVE
Strawberries/Cabbage
Gift Shipping,
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378



Black Labrador
Retriever, about 1% yrs
old, answers to "Buddy",
lost in vicinity of W.
Dunnellon Rd. Owner is
heartbroken.
(352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662
CHIHUAHUA
lost Jan 26
His name is Chico,
male, long white hair,
face, ears are brown,
3 to 4 Ibs, last seen
Hunter Springs trailer
pk, next to the PO.
in Crystal River
352-364-1663
LOST MALTI-POO
White female 1 yr old
named "Chloe" last
seen on W Starjasmine
PI, Beverly Hills.
Two little girls miss
her! Please call
(352) 249-0846
Lost Set of Keys
Blue & Silver light
on Chain
Crystal River or
Beverly Hills Area
(352) 527-1322



DOG LONG HAIR
BLACK & GREY,
W/HARNESS,
FOUND IN
INVERNESS OFF OF
TURNERCAMP RD.
(352) 344-4006
Older Puppy Found
in Crystal River
Call to identify
(352) 697-1258



FREE REMOVAL
Wants to Thank
All of You for
making 2012 Possible,
See You In 2013





SPRING HILL
CLASSES
COSMO DAYS
February 25, 2013
BARBER NIGHTS
February 25, 2013

SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only
********
BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING


Not Looking for
Someone, just trying
to help people. If you
are Bored, Lonely,
Need Answers. Call
someone who cares.
24-7 (352) 426-1821




FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.00lb,
Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb
Delivered 352-795-0077








I I I I I I I I

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966





ARNP or PA
Wanted Part Time
for a busy Pediat-
ric
Practice in Crystal
River, Send Re-
sume
to:
lindapracticemar
dtamoabav.rr.com

DOCTORS ASSIST
Needed
Must Draw Blood
EKG & Injections
SEND RESUME TO:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1825M
1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd
Crystal River Fl. 34429

EXPERIENCED
CERTIFIED
SURGICAL TECH
Wanted for
fast-paced outpa-
tient surgery center.
Flexible scheduling.
Excellent pay and
benefits. No nights,
weekends, no call
or holidays.
Apply at :
110 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto
or fax resume to:
352-527-1827.

EXPERIENCED
OPERATING
ROOM RN
Wanted for
fast-paced outpa-
tient surgery center.
Flexible scheduling.
Excellent pay and
benefits. No nights,
weekends, no call
or holidays.
Apply at:
110 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto or fax
resume to:
352-527-1827.


F/T RN

IV Exp. preferred
For physicians office
with benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1787M
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River,
Forida 34429

HHC AGENCY

Looking for
RN & Psych RN
(352) 794-6097

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

RECEPTIONIST

Needed for busy
Medical Office.
Experience preferred.
Includes benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1787M
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River,
Florida 34429




AIRLINES ARE
HIRING -
Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid if
qualified Housing
available CALL Aviation
Institute of Maintenance
(866)314-3769

LIC 440 CUST.
SERVICE REP/or
220 Agent

Needed for busy
Insurance office.
Apply in person
9am-12N
SHELDON PALMES
INSURANCE
8469 W Grover
Cleveland,
Homosassa

Nursing Careers
BEGIN HERE -
TRAIN IN MONTHS,
NOT YEARS. FINAN-
CIAL AID IF QUALI-
FIED. HOUSING
AVAILABLE. JOB
PLACEMENT
ASSISTANCE. CALL
CENTURY INSTI-
TUTE ORLANDO
(877) 206-6559





SOUS CHEF
needed for upscale
private Country
Club in Citrus Co.
Previous kitchen
management re-
quired with casual
and fine dining
culinary experience.
Send Resume to:
swiley@
citrushills.com


CHSeONICLE


INSIDE SALES
REPRESENTATIVE
Citrus Publishing
Citrus County, FI
Job Summary
This position is de-
signed to increase
our market share of
retail and classified
display advertising in
all of Citrus Publish-
ing's products.
The position will
consist of receiving
incoming calls and
making outbound
service/cold calls.
The position will also
handle walk-in
advertisers from
our Meadowcrest
office.
Essential Functions
* Answering incom-
ing calls for our Re-
tail and Classified
display ads
* Facilitating the
display advertising
needs of walk in
customers
* Making outbound
service calls to exist-
ing accounts
* Develop new
customers through
prospecting and
cold calling
* Develop new op-
portunities for adver-
tisers to do business
with Citrus Publish-
ing, Inc,
* Consistently meet
or exceed monthly
and annual sales
goals
* Increase Citrus
Publishing's Market
share through the
development of
on-line advertising
revenue
* Communicate
effectively orally
and in writing with
customers and
coworkers
* Problem solving,
analytical abilities
and interpersonal
skills required
* Maintain score
cards on progress
toward established
goals
* Perform daily func-
tions with a minimal
amount of direction
Minimum
Qualifications
* at least two years
of sales experience;
advertising experi-
ence preferred
* Demonstrate per-
suasiveness and/or
sales abilities
* Proper business
attire
* Professional tele-
phone presence
Ability to work well in
a team environment
Administrative
* This is a 40 hour a
week position
Send resume to
djkamlot@chroni-
cleonllne.com. Dead-
line for applications
Is Feb.12, 2013
Drug Screen
Required
for Final Applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer


#1 Employment source is

www.chronicleonline.corm


489673521


57642 1893
315862479
7 9 2 3 14 6 8 5
6 4 8 5 9 7 1 3 2:
25 1 749368


Customer
Service/Sales
Assit.
Must have exp., com-
puter skills, good atti-
tude and be a self
starter, Call (352)
628-4656
Real Estate
Agents
Busy real estate office
needs Realtors and
Buyers Agents Call
PLANTATION REALTY
352-634-0129


Your World





CHIPNICIE1


Automotive
Consultant/
Advisor
Eagle Buick GMC
Inc is in need of
experienced
Automotive Service
Consultants/Advisors
Minimum 2 yrs, deal-
ership experience.
Aggressive pay plan
and strong com-
pensation package
that includes health
insurance, paid
vacation, paid train-
ing, certification
reimbursement and
many other perks.
Drug free workplace
Application Avail. @
Eagle Buick GMC
Inc. Homosassa, Fl.
34448 Send Resume:
Fax (352) 417-0944
Email:
robbcole@eagle
buickgmc.com


Senior Lending
Officer/Office
Manager
Brannen Bank,
a banking institution in
central Florida,
is seeking a Senior
Lending Officer/ Office
Manager for the Citrus
county area. Re-
quires a bachelors
degree in business or
finance, residential
and commercial
lending experience
and at least four
year's Office Manager
Experience.
Duties include man-
agement of daily
branch operations
and originating a
variety of consumer
loan's. Offer's a com-
petitive salary and
benefit package. If in-
terested, please f
forward resume' to
Brannen Banks of
Florida, Inc.
Attn: Carol Johnson
PO Box 1929
Inverness, FL
34451-1929
EEO/M/F/V/D/DFWP





APPT. SETTERS
NEEDED
Sign on Bonus.
Great Commission Pay
and weekly bonuses
Call Bob 352-628-3500


CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
All Shifts Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto


Classifieds

.--


EDUCATION


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013 C7







C8 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013


Exp. appt. setters

Top Pay, Hrly. Clean
work enviontment
Dave (352) 794-6129

F/T Maintenance
/Grounds

Skills required:
Electrical, Plumbing,
Painting, Mechani-
cal and Grounds
Maintenance HVAC
certification
preferred

River Reach
Apartments
2151 River Reach Cr
Crystal River, FL
34428
PHONE/FAX
352-795-8024, EOE


NEWSPA-
PER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and other
newspapers for
home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per
day.

Must have insured
and reliable vehicle
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up
with a cap-Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product

Apply in Person
1624 N
Medowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pm

Newspaper carriers
are independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle


CHoNICLE
---mmmmm--

SECRETARY/
HOSTESS

P/T for Builders
Model. Thur, Fri, Sat.
$7.79hr. Please
Email Resume to:
dreamcitrusi
yahoo.com
(352) 527-7171





ATTEND COLLEGE
ONLINE from Home.
*Medical
*Business
*Criminal Justice
*Hospitality
Job placement
assistance.Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified.
SCHEV
authorized. Call
800-203-3179
www.Centura
Online.com


SPRING HILL
CLASSES

COSMO DAYS
February 25, 2013

BARBER NIGHTS
February 25, 2013

SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING




CHINA CLOSET DECO
TYPE glass door,good
wood.Picture upon req.
looks good
$100.789-5770
TEA LEAF COPPER
LUSTER PLATE 9"
1853 to 1871, $35
352-628-3899




4 VINTAGE GLASS
FROGS FOR FLORAL
Display $20 can email
Photos INVERNESS
352419-5981
6 VINTAGE TEA CUP
AND SAUCER SETS
$45 BONE CHINA
England All Different
352419-5981
N.Y. YANKEES MEMO-
RABILIA signed
hats,Jersey (Jeters)#2
and more $100. or best
offer 789-5770

A


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111
Victorian
BATH,PICHER,BOWEL
wood pedestal type.
$100. 789-5770




2 DR WHITE MAYTAG
REFRIG. w/Ice Maker
21.8 cu ft.
Less than 2yrs old.
$350
(352) 726-8021


and 2V2 $75.
Used Copeland Scroll
AC COMPRESSORS
R22
John 352-208-7294
DISHWASHER GE
white, works good, looks
good,$100.
352-789-5770
DRYER $100 with 90
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504
GE Refrigerator
side by side w/ water
dispenser Bisque $380,
GO CART 5HP, 2s eats
built by Manco $275
(352) 503-6641
GE STOVE, coil top, self
cleaning, bisque $125;
MICROWAVE Over the
Range GE Spacemaker
$75 (352)503-6641
HOOVER UPRIGHT
SWEEPER 6 yrs old, all
attachments, Exc Con
$75 352-628-3899
Refrigerator/Freezer,
GE, Side-by-Side,
White, 21.7 cubic feet
$100. Runs good
352-489-7393
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive wash-
ers & dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
WASHERS & DRYERS
(352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Exc.
Cond. Free Delivery
352-263-7398
WASHER$100 with 90
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504
WESTINGHOUSE
STOVE Almond
continuouss clean,works
good looks good. $100.
789-5770
Whirlpool Heavy Duty
Super Capacity,
LP Gas Dryer,
Almond $125.
3V2 Ton New Replace-
ment Carlyle Scroll AC
Compressor R22 $300
John 352-208-7294


** TWO AUCTIONS**

Thursday 1/31/13
Full Auction Line up
in walk about setting
starting @ 3pm
preview @12 noon..
From furniture to
tools.

Sunday 2/3/13
Antique preview @
11am. Auction 1pm
furniture, art, prints,
vintage books, china,
silver & coins, jew-
elry, cased knives, &
straight razors
more+++

*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667


Fri. 02/01 Preview @
4pm, Auction@ 6pm
General Merchandise
Sat 02/02 Preview @
4pm, Auction aM6pm
Antiques/Gen. Merch
Sun. 02/03 Preview @
12:30, Auction 1pm
Tailgate/Box lots
**WE BUY ESTATES**
6055 N. Carl G. Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
AB3232 (352)613-1389

Estate Sale





itus Hills Esktt Sale
4032 Monadnock Dr.
Hernando, FL 34442
Thurs.-Sat.,31st-2nd, 8-3
Contents of 3BR Home,furniture,


811 SW US Hwy. 19
Crystal River, FL
352-795-2061
Swww.charliefudge.com




TABLE SAW, JOINTER,
STAINED GLASS KIT
10 inch craftsman table
saw $70, Craftsman 6
inch jointer $125, Every-
thing to get started a
stained glass project
$200 Phone
352-201-1082 or
352-560-3354 before
7PM



50 Inch Hitachi HD TV
Projection console
Exc cond. $100
(352) 621-0405
AM/FM, Stereo
Cassette and
Turn Table $65.
TV, Toshiba,
19" color, $35.
(484) 547-9549
SHARP 32" TV WITH
REMOTE $20
352-613-0529


DOUBLE & SINGLE
garage doors, both for
$250 352-601-7911



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
MS OFFICE 2010, 1st
COURSE BOOK $40.
book only. Univ.level.
Excellent learning tool.
352-513-4027


CLASSIFIED




Chipper/Shredder
Troy-Bilt Tomahawk,
Briggs & Stratton gas
engine. $700 OBO
(352) 601-3174




Oblong glass table
66x40 w/6 reclining
chairs; small side table,
2 footstools, beige w/
tiny flowers. Never
been outside. $400
Call John (352)
422-2317




*TV STAND
40WX18DX28H,
3-SHELVES
4- DRAWERS $95
634-2004
2 Table Lamps,
33" H, white ceramic,
Sq. bamboo design,
excel. $50
Broyhill Dining Rm Set.
Table, Parquet Top,
Rectangular shape, 2
leaves, 6 Caine High-
back chairs, china
hutch, 3 glass panels
3 shelves, med. fruit-
wood color, excel.
$550. (718) 666-6624
AIR COMPRESSOR
Devillbiss, twin cyl 4
hp, 20 gal. $150
352-628-4360
Blue glider rocker and
matching foot
stool.$65.00 great
condition 352-726-2572
Broyhill Wall Unit
$750.
Bassett Cabinet
with Drawers
$500.
(484) 547-9549
Cherry Desk,
credenza, file cabinet,
$600.
Oak TV Cabinet $300
(352) 212-9507
637-2921, 861-9448
CHROME & GLASS
UTILITY CART,14"
DIA,28"H
3 SHELVES $25
634-2004

DUDLEY'S






** TWO AUCTIONS"

Thursday 1/31/13
Full Auction Line up
in walk about setting
starting @ 3pm
preview @12 noon..
From furniture to
tools.

Sunday 2/3/13
Antique preview @
11am. Auction 1pm
furniture, art, prints,
vintage books, china,
silver & coins, jew-
elry, cased knives, &
straight razors
more+++

*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


i-
Couch, Clean,
brown, excel. cond.
$200. Entertainment
Center Large, Cherry
Traditional, Like new
$600 (352) 270-9025
Dinning Room Set,
6 captain chairs,
& Hutch maple
$200
(352) 726-1081
KING SIZE BED
mattress,box spring,
and frame all in good
condition $100obo call
or text 352-464-4280
KING SIZE
PILLOW TOP
Mattress, Box Spring
& Frame.
Excel. Cond. $550
315-723-5353
LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET, In Original
Plastic, Never Used,
ORG $3000, Sacrifice
$975. CHERRY, BED-
ROOM SET Solid
Wood, new in factory
boxes- $895
Can Deliver. Bill
(813)298-0221.
LIVING ROOM CHAIR
large living room chair
and ottoman in very
good condition. $35.
352-220-4158
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500
Moving Sale
27" Magnavox TV $75
15" Quasar TV w/
Stand, $25,
6 Tray tables $15.
(352) 489-5669
Oak Table 6 chairs,
hutch, Nice $750,.
Cherry Curio Cabinet
Pair $150 ea
(352) 212-9507
637-2921, 861-9448
Old secretary desk dark
wood 2 drawers and fold
down top.$85.
352-726-2572
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg
$75. 352-628-0808
QUEEN MATTRESS,
BOX SPRING &
FRAME with all linens.
$150 (352) 287-6601
ROCKER old
upholstered rocker with
wood arms.$65.
352-726-2572
Sectional Sofa, light
color, like new
$500
Small secretary Desk
$100
(352) 212-3352
STIFFEL BRASS LAMP
30"H, 3WAY
CREAM PLEATED
SHADE
$50 634-2004
TWIN BEDS
Frames, boxsprings, &
mattresses exc cond.
$125
Cell (734) 355-2325
local 352-503-9452
Washed Oak Table 4
chairs, like new, $750
White antique iron
Bed, w/ mattress, $500
(352) 212-9507
637-2921, 861-9448
WICKER ROCKER
Small old wicker rocker.
$50. 352-726-2572


3 MOWERS
Craftsman 5000
Craftsman 3000
White B&S Engine
Call (352) 341-1569
John Deere Riding
Mower, L130, 23HP,
VPTwin, 48" cut Hydro
Static, very good
cond. recent service
$600. (352) 527-8618
LAWNMOWER YARD
WAGON 6 cubic feet
with new tires $60.
Call 382-3280..
RAKE
Commercial Cyclone
6hp, vacuum pk up,
Ready for Spring
Clean up. $650
(352) 795-8986
SEARS 2 WHEEL
GARDEN WHEELBAR-
ROW 4 cubic feet ca-
pacity $10 Call
382-3280 to see.
Torro Weed Eater
$25
352-726-7789
Troybuilt Pusher
w/ Honda Engine $90
Lawnboy Pusher
w/bagger $25
352-726-7789




INVERNESS
FORT COOPER
Mobile Home Park
ANNUAL YARD &
BAKE SALE
Jan. 30 thru Feb. 2
4318 S. Florida Ave.




2X&3X BLOUSES &
SLACKS-TSHIRTS
AND capris $2.00 ea
352-794-3020
352-586-4987
BEAUTIFUL WOOL
WOMEN SUITE tan
Isenhower style, and
blouse to match sz.10
$25. 789-5770
BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING SIZES 5 &
6 SHIRTS, PANTS &
JACKETS $30
352-613-0529
SILVER FOX COAT fin-
ger tip length beautiful .
sacrifice $100. sz m-l
789-5770




SECURITY CAMERAS
2 wireless B&W
cameras/transmitters to
your TV $50. Dunnellon
465-8495




4 WHEEL WALKER-
hand brakes & wheel
locks, seat, basket,
folds for storage, Ex.,
$50, 352-628-0033
10 FT. WOOD
STEP LADDER
Type 1, 250 duty
$90
(352) 422-0294
12 ft. Aluminum John
Boat, no paper work
$165.
Trailer, spare tire and
wheel, fits 10" 15"
$35. (315) 466-2268


-m-
BARBIE HOUSE/FURN.
& DISNEY CASTLE
BOTH 32X36 $35
ea/both $75
352-794-3020 586-4987
BEDDING Queen
comforter, dust ruffle &
pillow shams. Beige,
gray, brown. $20 obo
352-513-4536
BLINDS 1 PLEATED
64WX63L 1 PLASTIC
64WX60L OFF WHITE
$30 352-613-0529
BSR LARGE HOME
STEREO SPEAKERS
20" WIDE BY 30" HIGH
ONLY $100. NICE
352464-0316
Fish Aquarium
50 gallons, cabinet
stand, lights & filter
$250
(352) 621-0392
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001lb,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001lb
Delivered 352-795-0077
GERBIL CAGE $20
352-613-0529
JIGSAW PUZZLES
63 jigsaw puzzles
$45.00 obo
352-746-3799
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Fulls $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
NEW SKYLIGHT BUB-
BLE TYPE SMOKED
POLYCARBONITE 27
BY 27 ONLY $60.
352-464-0316
RYOBI 10"
COMPOUND SAW-
#TS1342 15 AMPs,
5500 RPMs, dust bag,
EX+, $60, 628-0033
RYOBI TABLE SAW
Good condition. First
$50 can have it. Hurry
won't last long at this
price. 628-4429
SNAPPER 42" RIDING
MOWER/GENERAC
4"000W GENERATOR
Mower $1000. incl
mulch attachment
GenSet $375.BOTH
LIKE NEW
352-489-6465
Stallion Cow Boy Hat,
by Stetson, wool, sz 6 1
& Boots, black 11% D.
both New $100.
Glass Top Table w/ 4
chairs $100.
352-795-7254
Target GIFT CARD Bal
is $67.79 selling for
$55.00 OBO.WILL
VERIFY. LINDA
352-341-2271
WICKER TEA CART,
Vintage, excellent cond.
useful and decorative,
$80, (Dunnellon) (352)
465-1813



4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES & SEAT
$75. 352464-0316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER BRAND NEW
WITH HANDLES ONLY
$25. 352-464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
ADJUSTABLE LEGS
ON EACH $20.00
EA.352 464 0316
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT-
RESTS GREAT SHAPE
$100. 352-464-0316


SHOWER CHAIR WITH
BACK WHITE FIBER-
GLASS WITH ADJUST-
ABLE LEGS $30.
352-464-0316
WHEEL CHAIR LIFT
Easily load a folding
manual chair (not
scooter)to vehicle hitch
$100. Dunnellon
465-8495



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676



"NEW" ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR
TRANS BLACKCORD
INCLUDED $95
601-6625
"NEW" ELECTRIC
GUITAR "FAT STRAT"
STYLE FINISH CHIP-
PED PLAYS PERFECT
$45 352-601-6625
EPIPHONE ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR
W/AMP,GIGBAQTUNERST
RAP,DVD,ETC
$100 352-601-6625
FULLSIZE ACOUSTIC
GUITAR PACK "NEW"
W/GIGBAG
STRAP,STRINGS,ETC.
$65, 352-601-6625
JUSTICE SING & PLAY
ELECTRIC GUITAR
PINK never used
pd$150.sell $75
352-794-3020 586-4987
NEW CUTAWAY
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
GUITAR TRANS
BLACK/ABALONE $90
352-601-6625
UPRIGHT PLAYER
PIANO W/BENCH.
Ampico reproducing.
Walnut wood, good
cond. $600 OBO
(352) 382-1885



3 MINI MUFFIN TINS
$5 NEW WHITE
QUICHE DISH $10
LARGE GREEN BOWL
$10 352-419-5981
40 PIECE STAINLESS
STEEL UTENSIL SET
$20 DECORATIVE
HANDLES NEVER
USED 352419-5981
COFFEE GRINDER $5
ELECTRIC VEGETA-
BLE STEAMER $5
CANNISTER SET $10
352419-5981
LIGHTED MAKE UP
MIRROR 1x5 times
magnification low & high
light$25. 352-794-3020
352-586-4987



Body Fit,
Gravity Machine,
$50.
Circle Glide
$25. Both Like New
(352) 447-1553
ELLIPTICAL MACHINE
PRO-FORM 490 LE
with users manual.
Heavy duty, I-Pod
compatible w/fan.
Less than 2 yrs old.
$300 527-8276


Im uc


won







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EXERCISE BIKE (DP)
UPRIGHT TYPE
WORKS THE ARMS
TOO $85.
352-464-0316
EXERCISE BIKE
PURSUIT ALL
ELECTRONICS $100.
352-464-0316
Proform Crosswalk 480
excel, cond. less than
50 mi. walk on it in-
clines, preset ifit
trainer workout,
built in fan, $275.
352-382-5208
ROWING MACHINE BY
BODY ROW WORKS
THE ARMS AND LEGS
$50. 352-464-0316


-I
.308 AMMO 100
Rds-$60- SP& HP
352-503-2792
14 Assorted Golf
Clubs,
left handed
$200
(352) 795-4942
22 Colt Woodsmen
early model orgin.
$700 OBO.
352-258-1740
30 cal. Carbine
1943 Inland mfg orgin.
Korea war bring home.
$1000. OBO
352-258-1740
22LR ammo $16per
100. 525 rds $80
(352) 533-2228
BROWNING BUCK
MARK 22 L.R. RIMFIRE
PISTOL includes 6000
rounds of 22 ammo,
and 3 spare magazines.
Will sell as a total pack-
age only. $680.00 cash
only Call 352-465-4373
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF CLUBS
Two sets, pull carts and
accessories. $60.each
726-1495
REMINGTON 700 BDL
270cal exc cond. $495.
will take lever action
30-30 on trade.
(906) 285-1696


BIRD SUPPLY SALE
Sun, Feb. 3, 9a-3p,
Cages, Seed, Toys,
Playstands, Milletspray
& more! Save! Cage
wire, Chicks & duck-
lings! 8260 Adrian Dr.,
Brooksville
727-517-5337







BLUE
Blue is an approxi-
mately 8-y.o. neutered
male Cattle Dog mix,
Came to the shelter
because his family
lost their home. Blue
is white and tan,
weighs about 50
pounds, is a bit
chubby for his size,
which is medium. He
is housebroken, very
friendly and affection-
ate. The most striking
thing about him is that
he has very beautiful
blue eyes, which
catch your attention
immediately. He loves
people and wants to
be by your side Is
very obedient and
walks well on a leash.
He is quite laid-back
and would make a
great companion for
an older person.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.
MINIATURE POO-
DLES miniature poodle
pups born 10/16/12
Health Cert 1 apricot &
1 black female & 1
black male almost
potty trained, raised in
our home. $500 cash
call 352-419-5662 or
karaluv3@yahoo.com
Shih-Tzu Pups,
ACA, Males
starting@ $400. Lots
of colors, Beverly
Hills, FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofouos.net


BANK
FORECLOSURE
Land-n-Home, 3/2
1500 sq. ft. On /2
Acre, paved rd.
LOOKS GOOD,
Have financing if
needed, only
$2,500 down,
$381.44mo. P&l
W.A.C. OR $69,900.
Call 352-613-0587
or 352-621-9183
Crystal River 55+
Park. 2BR/1 BA Car-
port & Screened
Porch. Heat/Air
$9,500. 352-746-4648
Ask for Brit
HERNANDO
$$ Private Owner $$
Financing Available
New & Used
Manufactured Homes
Call 1-727-967-4230

HOME-ON-LAND
3/2 Great Shape.
%Acre. Move In
Now
$59,900.
Call 352-401-2979,
352-621-3807




NEW 2013

2br 2ba
Doublewide w/10 year
Warranty $39,900
Delivered & setup, a/c,
skirt, steps.
Call(352) 795-1272

REPO'S- REPO'S
REPO'S
WE HAVE REPO'S
CALL 352-621-9181



WE WILL

BUY YOUR
MANUFACTURED
Home. from 1976-2013
CALL (352) 795-2377


--ifmi.fiH


CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 4br 2ba MH
READY TO MOVE IN!
+-Owner Fin. Avail.+
CALL (352) 795-1272
W. of 19 in Homosassa
1994, 2/2 Doublewide,
Move In Condition
Corner Lot $44,900.
Tradewinds Realty
(352) 400-0089



2/2 on Lake Rous-
seau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent
$240/mo. 2003. Used
Seasonally
Owner bought a
house. 207-546-6115,
cell
Adult Park 2/1,
Mobile, heat and air,
nicely furn. large
shed, screen rm. car-
port, $8,200
Lot Rent $160 mo.
(352) 287-3729
DUNNELLON
LAKE ROUSSEAU MH
Park. Lg. 1/1 w/slider to
encl. screened porch,
outside shed, CHAfurn.
Nice yard, low lot rent.
Asking$11,900
(207) 347-0531
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $179/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS
3/2 MH, Furn. Ig screen
lanai, shed & lot. All appl
incl Ig scn TV,55+ PK
Asking $12,000. Call
(352)364-3747
INVERNESS
Move In Ready,
Beautiful 1/1 SW,
Mobile, Harbor Lights
55+ park, on Big Lake
Henderson. Fully furn.,
very updated, view of
lake, Cen. HVAC, W/D,
A Must See! Asking
$7,000, 352-344-1828
INVERNESS PARK


CLASSIFIED




Chassahowitzka
3/2 waterfrnt/DW $500
2/2, fenc. Yd/DW $500
2/2 house w/gar. $600
SuaarmillWoods
3/2/2, Furnished, $900.
AGENT (352) 382-1000




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Studio Apartment
Completely Furn. Ca-
ble TV W/D rm. All util.
incl'd.+ boat dock.
$700 mo 352-372-0507
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1
Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
1/1 Remodeled, Near
New Wal-Mart on
Cardinal $425. + Sec.
(352) 621-5265


.3#


h





w


+-5-- "5, 14X60AU, 2/2, Inew p
Winchester Model 70 r 2BR, 1% BA.on your roof, all appliances,
Super grade, 300 Win. ~i i own 75x 100 lotsed partly furn. screen
Mag., Nikkon scope, no fees! new enclosed room, shed,
+++ extras, sunroom, Ig laundry 352-419-6476
$, 1200 Bermuda Hay 501bs $6 room furn, 2 storage
(352) 628-5355 Never been rained on buildings, 5111 Castle MOBILE HOME,
795-1906* 586-1906 LakeAve. S. of Fully
UtitT SHAMROCK FARM, CR Inverness on SR 41 Furnished. Everyth-
Tr ier -1 $39,500 (352) 597-7353 ing stays. Just move
Li e 2BR/ll'/BA, MH & washer/dryer all ap-
2013 ENCLOSED Land Needs little Work pliances. Must See!
TRAILERS, 6x12 $17,500 9340 W.Tonto $7,500. (708) 308-3138
with ramp, $1895 C Dr., Crystal River
call 352-527-0555 Call 352-382-1544 or PALM TERRACE
S 813-789-743155+ Community,
813-789-7431 1997 3BR/2BA 14 x 66,
3bdr/2 full baths/ 2 car excel. cond. Shed,
carport on 1 acre. Fl. Rm. Carport &
GRACO PACKNPLAY split layout, steel roof, Deck $16,000. (352)
GOAOD CONDTO caged pool, 20x25 ft 400-8231
$35 352-613-0529 decng, FurnIg storage build- REDUCED 2/2 $17,500
WHITE WOOD ROUND ing, Furnhed5 Modu- On Lake Rousseau
WHITE WOOD ROUND lar $73,900, 5215 Lot Rent $240/mo
BASSINET Brand new Bridget Pt, Castle BETTERTHAN NEW
$60. 352-422-2719 Lake Park Owner financing. Call
I I I I I I I I Inverness LEE (352) 817-1987
Sa Tell that special ( C3A)TE LA5E Singing Forest Li.
Tell that special CASTLE LAKE FLORAL CITY
person Floral City 14 x 70, Mobile, 2 Irg.
Happy Birthday 2/2 S/W Fully furnished bedrooms, furnished &
Sfied ad und er 2 scree in edition, remodeled, heat & air, n
Hap under 2 screen rooms, carport & shed, Wash/
Happy Notes. 2 sheds. Landscaped Dryer, Lot rent $176.
Onl' $28.50 with sprinkler on quiet $14,500. 352-344-2420
includes a photo cul-de-sac. $38,900. $14,500. 352-344-2420
352-212-1883 STONEBROOK, CR
Call our Classi- 2bd/2ba,gourmet kitch,
fied Dept for de- FLORAL CITY master suite,encl. porch
tails By Owner, 14x 60 2/2 pond, crprt+ patio
352-563-5966 Split Plan w/dbl roof $51,900, Cridland RE,
over, w/ porch & carport Jackie 352-634-6340
I I I I I I I I on fenced 1 acre, Very Waterfront/Homosassa
IIII I Nice Quiet, Considering Westwind Village 55+ssa
Tell that special Aff ers. 352-586-9498 Beautifully furnished
personoeMove In Ready, 2/2
Hapy Birthday HERNANDO 2/2 DW 2 Sc rms, dbl door,
"IHat ssi CRYSTAL RIVER On lot, with Shed & refrig./Ice maker
with a classi- 6851 W. Vanaman Ct Deck See for your- Washer Dryer, Low
fied ad under 2/2 $425/$400 dep. self at 2562 N. Treas- monthly pyments,
Onp $2 DUNNELLON2/2 ure Pt. $28,500 obo $19000 obo
in $28.50 5159W Disney Lane 352-464-0719 (850) 449-1811 Cell
includes a photo $400/ $400 dep.

Call our Classi- (727) 480-5512 1+acre, 2br SWMH+
fied Dept for de- HOMOSASSA den/flp, ManCave/Work
tails 2 & 3 Br homes w/ stor- Shop w/ AC, 28x40,
352-563-5966 age sheds. Starting at $43,500, J. Desha HOMOSASSA
1 1 11 11 $550/mo + $800/Sec Cridland Real Estate RENT-to-OWN
ONLY $1350 total to (352)634-6340 3br 2ba MH
move in. We pay trash, Immediate Occpancy
lawn, water & sewer. HOMOSASSA Owner Financing Avail.
Close to Walmart, *3/2, Fenced Yard,** CALL (352) 795-2377
Publixs& Suncoast PKY NEW Flooring, NEW 2
WANT TO BUY No pets 352-584-1831 AC $5,000 Down. R2E
HOUSE $435. mo
or MOBILE Any Area. HOMOSASSA (352) 302-9217
Condition or Situa- 2BR, $475. mo. Nice
tion. Call Fred, Area (352) 422-1932 HOMOSASSA
352726-9369 2ba1 ba MH needs
352-726-9369 ISTACHATTA complete rehab. Good 06-I
2/1 $500. mo. + Sec. shed, well & septic.
Fruit Trees Cul-de-sac 6524 W. Akazian NUES
Withlacoochee River $12,500 (603) 860-6660 3/2 Citrus Springs $975
16354 Daviston Ln.
1 Sweet Little Male No Pets 813-935-4996 NW Citrus County Furn W/FHome $2500
Yorkie, SWMH on 1 acre, 2/1.5 Furn Stilt w/f Hm $1700
CKC reg., $375. Fl. LECANTO paved rd., screened 3/2 furn w/f condo$1500
health certs., LEISURE ACRES porch, appliances More rentals:
Call 3/2 water & garbage $37,700 possible c21 naturecoast.com
(352) 212-4504 incl. $600mo. owner financing 835 NE Hwy 19Crystal
or (352) 212-1258 (352) 628-5990 352-795-9908 River, FI(352) 795-0021


ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR/ 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apart-
ments for Rent
352-465-2985

CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2 CHA, W/D
ik-up $575/mo.1st Mo.
FREE with $600. no
dogs 352-726-9570

CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 2/1, lawn,
water, sewr & garb. W/D
hk up $500.mo $250
dep No Pets
352-212-9205
352-212-7922

INVERNESS
2 B/R's Availa-
ble
KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOMES
Rental Assistance
Available For
Qualified Appli-
cants
Call 352-344-1010
MWF, 8-12 & 1-5
307 Washington
Ave
Inverness Florida
Equal Housing
Opp.

1
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY





INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great
Loc., clean & roomy.
o pets $500.mo 1st. &
Last $300. Sec.
352-341-1847












Available Now!



also available

Recent Foreclosures Welcome
(352)489-1021
2 This Institution s an equal
S opportunityproder & employer

CRYSTAL RIVER
/1V2, 828 5th Ave. NE
Furn $650 or Unfurn.
$550+sec 727-455-
8998, 727-343-3965


II *I


CITRUS SPRINGS
2/2 Duplex, nice private
area, near shopping &
schools. Wtr, sewer inc
$600mo 352-558-4477
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2 CHA, W/D
hk-up $575/mo.1st Mo.
FREE with $600. no
dogs 352-726-9570




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


CRYSTAL RIVER
**RENT REDUCED**
3/1 Country Home on
stilts,w/fenced yard.
$565 + Utilities.
Call 920-922-6800
Sugarmill Woods
3BR, 2V2BA, Super
Clean 3,100 sf, large
priv. shaded lot,
2 covered, porches,
sm. pet ok. $1,150.
mo. yrly Ise., sec. dep
$700. $3,000 move in
(727) 580-1083



BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, Scrn. Rm. $400.
Laun. Rm. 382-3525
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 + Florida Room,
106 S. Fillmore $550
mo. 352-422-2798
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/Carport. CHA
$550. mo. & 1/1/CP
+ Fl. Rm $450 (352)
897-4447, 697-1384
CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Inverness
352-726-3476
Lecanto
352-746-0373
Crystal River

352-563-0890






CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
Water Incl. CHA, $496.
352-220-2447
212-2051
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1.5, fncd yrd, 1 blk to
King's Bay. Boat tie-up;
$650/mo, 1st/L/$300
sec (352)794-0811
HERNANDO
Forest Ridge Village
Nice 2/2 home *
w/garage, screened
patio, & pool/clubhouse
privileges. $750 mo
Call 980-285-8125

HOMOSASSA
2/1 Duplexe $450
3/2/2 House $625
River Links Realty
352-628-1616
INVERNESS
3/2 Brand New,
Granite tops, marble
firs, SS Ap $895
(352) 634-3897
INVERNESS
3/2/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352- 601-2615 OR
352-201-9427
INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/1/1
$590mo.1st & Sec
(352) 344-2560
INVERNESS
Large 1 BR home in
55+ community, Great
location just off the
water. Bring boat &
fishing gear. $585
(352) 344-1380
Sugarmill Woods
2/2/2, 2 MBdrms
$875. 352-302-4057



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013 C9

II. .


1-30 Q Laughngstock nterraitoalInc Dst byUnersalUCIck or -S,2013

"I'll just have a cup of coffee."


a



Thank Y'ou For 15 Years, of Votes!





co C STRUCTION COn R


CRYSTAL RIVER
Warehouse for Rent
Free standing, garage
area, 1,440sf,
$100-$550
352-634-0129



20 ACRES FREE!
Own 60 acres for 40
acre price/payment. $0
Down, $168/mo. Money
Back Guarantee, NO
CREDIT CHECKS.
Beautiful Views, West
Texas. (800)843-7537


Eoi>l E o 6LE. in iNa-
ture Coast Landings
RV Resort. Large de-
veloped site and a
separate gated storage
lot; plus almost new
5th-wheel with slides,
screened gazebo, and
storage building. All for
$79,900. For more info
and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441


Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Developed site with
gazebo & storage bldg,
reduced to $49,500.
Separate storage
lot available. (RV sold).
For info and pictures
Click on
detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441
LAND FOR SALE

LAND LIQUIDATION
20 acres St. Lucie
Waterway, $189,500.
3 miles boat Lake
Okeechobee, 45 min
boat Atlantic. Private
/ gated. Deer, turkey,
hogs, fishing.
(888)716-2259 Gulf
Atlantic Land,
Broker.

MOTIVATED SELLER


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. "Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY



Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches
&
Commercial


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.






HOMOSASSA
GNC Commercial
7311 Grover Cleveland
Blvd. 3/2 MH $69,900.
(603) 860-6660













CITRUS

SPRINGS
3/2/2, 2 yr old Pool
home in imacculate
condition,
Landscaped backyard.
$125.000 Priced to
sell!
CALL (570) 412-5194



L -

Quiet Country Setting
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great


IT WanLL ts This Gone "" ichard (KICK) for boat storage, etc.
CITRUS HILLS CRYSTAL RIVER 6 Acres w Big SHOP, Couch, Broker Fenced and cross-
2/2% Townhouse 3950 sq ft Lt MFG Nice 2/2/2 House, Co h R oalt & fenced, Built in 2003
Condo, full appl's, w/office @ $1200/mo Porches Barns, pond, Couch Realty & feNice Oaks, Wooded,
carport, Citrus Hills 1155 sq ft storage @ pvd rd, Concrete dr. Investments, Citrus Springs area
membership incld'd 450/mo Reduced! $114, 900 Inc. only 20 Min. to Ocala
Prudential Florida 600 sq ft office @ MLS 357108. www. (352) 344-8018 $129,900 Call
Showcase Properties 45600 sq ft offi/mce @ crosslandrealty.com (352)344-8018 $129,900 Call2-6784
call 352-476-8136 352-302-1935 3527266644 RCOUCH.com for appt.


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive wash-
ers & dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179



CNA
Available for Private
Duty. Prefer afternoons
& evenings. Refer-
ences avail, on re-
quest. (352) 453-7255
HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping
Dr. appts, errands,
etc. Hablo Espanol
813-601-8199



JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump
Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic.. Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469

,,if, -111- 11 .

Y, LII \ 11 It I ll'St.




CiRONICLE


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Drive-
ways tear outs Trac-
tor work, Lic. #1476,
726-6554




All AROUND TRAC-
TOR
Land clearing, Haul-
ing Site Prep, Drive-
ways Lic/Ins
352-795-5755




HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping
Dr. appts, errands,
etc. Hablo Espanol
813-601-8199




COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
k 352-302-6838 k


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777

DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscap-
ing
352-795-0188/220-3194

A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENC-
ING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

ROCKY'S FENC-
ING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
H 352 422-7279 H




Install, Restretch,
Repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent,
Lic#4857 Mitch, (352)
201-2245




1 CALL & RELAX!
25vrs Exp in 100%
property maint & all
repairs, call
H&H Services today!
lic#37658
352-476-2285


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handy-
man
4 FAST 100% Guar.
4 AFFORDABLE
4 RELIABLE-
Free Est
H 352-257-9508 H
Affordable Handy-
man
4 FAST- 100% Guar.
4 AFFORDABLE
4 RELIABLE-
Free Est
H 352-257-9508 H
Affordable Handy-
man
4 FAST 100% Guar.
4 AFFORDABLE
4 RELIABLE-
Free Est
H 352-257-9508 H
Affordable Handy-
man
4 FAST- 100% Guar.
4 AFFORDABLE
4 RELIABLE-
Free Est
H 352-257-9508 H
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


Cleaning Svc-Home,
office,windows,
pressure washing &
more. 352-322-1799






The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lic/Ins.
#2441.352-634-1584





All Tractor Work
Service specializing in
clean up Tree Re-
moval, General
prop. maint. 302-6955

All AROUND TRAC-
TOR
Landclearing, Haul-
ing Site Prep, Drive-
ways Lic/Ins
352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120




LAWNCARE N
MORE
Yard Clean-up,
leaves
bushes, hauling
352-726-9570


Winter Clean Up,
Leaves, Power Wash-
ing & More Call
Coastal Lawn Care
(352) 601-1447




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up
time. 352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, lawn maint.
furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790

JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump
Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




Chris Satchell
Painting ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref.
Ins. 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998


Robert G. Vigliotti LLC
Painting
Int/Ext FREE
ESTIMATES 35 yrs
exp.
call 508-314-3279




CALL STELLAR
BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins.
FREE EST (352)
586-2996
Cleaning Svc-Home,
office,windows,
pressure washing &
more. 352-322-1799
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300
Robert G. Vigliotti LLC
Painting
Int/Ext FREE
ESTIMATES 35 yrs
exp.
call 508-314-3279
Winter Clean Up,
Leaves, Power Wash-
ing & More Call
Coastal Lawn Care
(352) 601-1447




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie.
#2713ic


DGS SERVICES LLC
Reroofs Metal Roofs
REPAIRS Home
Inspector 414-8693





MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.





Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
k 352-302-6838 k



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Tractor Work
Service specializing in
clean up Tree Re-
moval, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding,
bulk mulch, lic/ins
302-8852
KING's LAND
CLEARING & TREE
SERVICE
Complete tree &
stump removal haul-
ing, demo & tractor
work. 32 yrs. exp.
(352) 220-9819
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


I








I


I







CL0 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013




WORDY GURDY BY TRICKY RICY ANE
1. Agent 007 put on clothes (1) Every answer is a rhyming
-|-| pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Holy chalice story (1) they will fit in the letter
I squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Throw water on one's wedded mate (1) syllables in each word.
2013UFS Dist.byUniv. Ucllckfor UFS
4. Actor McGregor enjoyin' gum (2)


5. Actress Streep's green minerals (2)


6. Masters' papers on Homo sapiens, e.g. (2)


7. Painful removal from the starting lineup (2)


ONIHON99ONIHONHM'iL SHS3HI S13adS '9 S81u113 SUI3Xa *s
NIMAHt NVA T' HSfOdS SfOU tV aT IVw l H9O t 9 NNOG UNOR t
1-30-13 SlAMSNV


PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat,
horses, in-laws; there
is room for everyth-
ing! 4/3 % w/7 car
garage/workshop &
in-law suite on 5.83 ac-
res.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164




2/2/2, REMODELED
NEW: Roof, AC, Kit,
Baths, Windows, Firs,
317 S Harrison.
Reduced $72,900.
Call 352-527-1239











Brentwood Villa
2/2/2 cul-de-sac
Completely updated!
1816 W. Jena Ct
OPEN SUN 12-3PM
$96,900
PRICED TO SELL!
FSBO 610-248-2090

HERNANDO
Citrus Hills Pool
Home
4/3/2+, circular
drive,
1 acre lot, below
$200k 35527-7856




ARBOR LAKES
**OPEN HOUSE**2/2/2
+ Den or 3 BR &
fenced back yard!
Gated Comm. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista TrI
(352) 419-7418
ARBOR LAKES
Fantastic Dream
Home In Active Senior
Community $169,900
2,100 sf, 3BR/2BA/2GA
Split Floor Plan w/Pool
Call (352) 726-6564




3/2 Move In Ready Villa
in Windemere. Beauti-
fully Maintained with up-
graded features. Prem-
ier location close to boat
ramp, trail & downtown.
MLS#359594 $229,500
Call Myriam Reulen
(352) 613-2644
Weston Properties, LLC
INVERNESS
Block home 2br, 1ba
w/ 2porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + ac-
res. $130,000 Call
Buzz 352-341-0224 or
David 607-539-7872
Unique stilt home off
581. Great loc to town,
shopping, & hospital.
2br/1 ba, w/ rap around
porch. Needs some
TLC. Sold as is.
$33,900 (352) 419-6227




3b/2ba den MH
on land off US 19
newer c/h/a carpet &
vinyl, clean RV Hkup.
fence **$39.900*
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie 352-634-6340
The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo
Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558






MOST SELL
'I ,( ,("i f"I r ,i
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell






4/2/3 HEATED POOL
lots of extras!
SELLER MOTIVATED!
reduced to 210k
352-688-6500 or
352-212-5023


-I lE


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Sugarmill Woods
House for Sale
2/2/2, Call for More
Info. 334-691-4601
(850) 776-7528


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!

I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


GAIL
STEARNS
Realtor


Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298

Low overhead =
Low
Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available

I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.comr

--I


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


L4




TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

Buy or Sell
Call NOW

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Realestate
Consultant




"FREE
Foreclosure
and Short Sale
Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA VANDEBOE
Broker (R)
Owner
Plantation Re-
alty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near
KINGS BAY $425,000.
Make Offers
352-563-9857
YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


llj [S V- IMl,

SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNatureCoast
Properties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"




INVERNESS, FL
3 miles east of Inv;
5-20ac wooded/some
cleared, owner finance
available.
Owner is licensed Real
Estate Broker,
Ed Messer.
ed.messer@yahoo.com
NORTH CITRUS
1.4 ac. Cleared, fenced,
high & dry. Paved road.
Elec., pump/well, septic.
Owner finan. No
mobiles. $13,900
CALL 352-897-4195



Your World









C*ONicLE


HOMOSASSA Wooded
Lot on Lee Woods Dr.,
has Wetlands, with
River access, but not
on river $6,000.
352-621-1664




AIRBOAT
13ft x 7ft, 500 HP Cad-
iliac, turn key boat
$9,500 obo Call Jim for
details (813) 361-4929,
BAYLINER 175
2007, Bowrider, garage
kept, Bimini top, custom
cover, depth finder, only
44 hrs on motor,pristine
condition! $14,000.
352-560-7377



MUST SELL


BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motor,AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth
finder, 2001 Rolls
float on trailer worth
$1000. Comes
w/spare motor Has
service manual,
2nd owner -$2500
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855

LL BEAN
16 ft, ABScanoe,
with paddle &
jackets, $650 obo
(352) 628-3194
McKee
Fishing Boat 14ft,
60H Mercury Motor
plus trailer, $2200
352-270-3332
TRI PONTOON
BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
(352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com


CLASSIFIED




ITASCA MERIDIAN
36 Ft, 2005 Motor Home
350HP Cat Diesel 55K
miles, no smoke/pets
6 Michelin Tires, New
2010 qn w/sleep No.
mattress & overhead
fan. W/D combo
$71,000 obo .
(352) 419-7882
MONTEGO BAY 35ft
5th wheel '06, 3 slides
kept undercover, Exc
cond. Truck Avail.
LOADED
$27,000 (352) 564-2756
NATIONAL RV
2006 Tropical One
owner,34ft, 26000
miles,no smoke/pets,
300HP Cummins die-
sel,2 slides, 6 new ti-
res, 3yr
warranty,many extras.
$87000. Well main-
tained. 352-341-4506
SUNNYBROOK
2008, 35FT Fifth Wheel
3 slides, electric awning
fireplace, 2 ac's, 50 amp
king bed, pmts assum-
able @ $424 per mnth.
352-279-3544




5TH WHEEL
33FT
GOOD CONDITION
MUST SELL
(423) 202-0914
FOREST RIVER
2010, Surveyor, Sport
189, 20 ft. Travel
Trailer,
1 slide, w/AC, qn. bed,
awning, pwr. tonque
jack, corner jacks,
microwave, equilizing
hitch, $10,500, reduced
to $9000
(352) 382-1826
HIGH LINE
1999, 32ft, Deluxe, 12'
slide out, new 22' awn-
ing, 55+ park, can be
moved. Was asking
$9,000, Sell $6,900
excel. shape
231-408-8344
HI-LO TRAVEL
TRAILER 2003, tow
lite model 22-03t,exc.
cond.
$6000 obo
352-422-8092


KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Licl/Ins.
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, kg bd,like new,
60amp serv. NADA
$29K asking $25K
obo 352-382-3298
WE BUY RVS,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945




TOPPER
8 ft Red Fiberglass
must sell $200 obo
Lecanto 941-504-0899




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot LARRY'S
AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352
564-8333

MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition, Ti-
tle, No Title, Bank
Lien,
No Problem, Don't
Trade it in. We Will
Pay up to $25K Any
Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ


AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everbod6Rides
$495 D6WN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE.
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 5 6 3 -1902
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.
BUICK
2007, Lucerne, CXL
55K miles, Leather
$13,500. obo
Call Troy
(352)621-7113

vvvvvvv
CADILLAC
1997 De Ville Tan with
black imitation rag
top, fully loaded ,
good runner-norstar
engine,only 97000
miles, good
tires-$2999.00. jim
(941)-705-1795
CHEVROLET
'01 Corvette Corvette
6 speed, black on
black, $14,500
(352) 613-2333
CHEVROLET
2002, Camaro Z28
$9,495.
352-341-0018
FORD
2001 COBRA MUS-
TANG CONV. 5
SPEED, LEATHER
MUST SEE
CALL 352-628-4600
For More Info
FORD
2005, Five Hundred
LMT, 40K miles,
leather, V6 $9,980
Call Troy
352-621-7113
FORD
2006 Focus ZXW, SE
4DR, WGN. 85k miles
$5,800 obo
Call Troy (352)
621-7113
FORD
Mustang Cobra, Indy
500 Pace Car-1994,
Convertible, 7100 mi,
Gar. kept 252-339-3897


GAS SAVER!
1999 Saturn SL $2000
Tan/Gold. Auto. Engine
and Trans are solid.
196,000 miles. Clean in-
side and out. Call Steve:
352-613-0746
Harley Davidson
'03, Super Glide,
low miles, $7,500
(352) 613-2333
HONDA
2011 CRV LX, 19K
miles, likenew, 4 Cyl.
$19,950
Call Troy
352-621-7113
HYUNDAI
2006 Elantra, GLS
90K miles, likenew, 4
DR, auto. $6,800
Call Troy
352-621-7113
MAZDA
2007, RX8 Looking for
A sports Car, Look No
Further!l This is A Must
See...Call for an Appt.
and Pricing
352-628-4600
MERCURY
2004, Grand Marquis,
Leather and Loaded
To Many Options to
List. Call Today
Before It's Gone
Call 352-628-4600
MITSUBISHI
2011 Galant, Low Mi.
Great fuel economy,
Priced to sell
Call 352-628-4600
For Appointment
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

PONTIAC
1999 TransAm 5.7Llter
V8, 62,700 mi,
Show Quality, $7500.
(352) 726-8336
Cell 352-302-5569
PONTIAC
2008, G6,
4 Door, Cold AC
Call 352-628-4600
For Pricing
PORSCHE
'99, 911 Carrera, black
exterior, black interior
62,600 org. mi $25,900
386-334-2559 CELL


TOYOTA
2000, Camry LE
V6, 183K miles Super
Clean $5,800. obo
Call Troy (352)
621-7113
TOYOTA
2007, Yaris, 59K mi-
les,
2 DR, H/B $7,800.
Call Troy
352-621-7113




AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR Show
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. FEB. 3. 2013
1-800-438-8559
CHEVY
89 Corvette, White
needs trans $3250
352-601-0355







Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966





CHEVROLET
1994,C/K 2500
$2,880
352-341-0018
DODGE
1997 Ram 2500 Truck
Cummins Diesel, 2WD,
Auto Trans,116,000
miles. Garage kept.
Well maintained. Has
been used as a com-
mute vehicle. $7,800
firm. 352464-4690


110V


CITRUS "-` COUNTY

For more information on how to reach
Citrus County readers call C H 1Ic L E
352-563-5592. www.chronicleonline.com
Scarborough 2010


OIOBXH2


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CHEVROLET
2005, Silverado
2500 HD, Diesel crew
cab, $13,880
352-341-0018
FORD
2003 F150
Ex Cab, $8,990
352-341-0018
FORD
'98, Ranger Splash,
very well kept, cold AC,
6 cyl., auto, Tires like
new, $3,200 obo
(352) 601-0572

MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

TOYOTA
2002, Tacoma,
Crew Cab, $8,770.
352-341-0018
TOYOTA
2004, 4 Runner Sport
2WD, 94K mi,
Leather $12,800.
obo
Call Troy
352-621-7113




CADILLAC
2007, Escalade,
44k miles, Luxury
NAV, $29,500.
Call Troy (352)
621-7113
CHEVY TRAIL-
BLAZER LT 05
exc. cond. asking $6000
obo, in Hernando
(904) 923-2902




FORD
F150, 1978, 4x4
perfect, father/son,
project $1,650 obo
(352) 564-4598
JEEP
2004, Wrangler X
4WD, Only 57K mi-
les,
Hard Top $13,800.
Call Troy
352-621-7113




KIA
2006 Sedona,
Great Family Van,
7 Pass, low mi. Call
today for Low Price
352-628-4600




2370-0213 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-293
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
WELLS FARGO BANK OBO
TAX LIENS SECURITIZATION
TRUST 2010-1 R2
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-2732
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
COM AT CONCRETE MON-
UMENT MARKING SE COR
OF LANDS AS DESC IN OR
BK 323 PG 627, TH N 88
DEG 44M 10S E AL E PROJ
OF S LN OF SD LANDS 250
FT, THS 1 DEG 15M 50S E
238.38 FT TO S LN OF N
EI/4 OF NEI/4, TH N 89
DEG 33M 8S E AL S LN
50.01 FT TO POB POB BE-
ING ON E R/W LN OF 50 FT
WIDE ESMT, TH N 89 DEG
33M 8S E 100.28 FT, TH N 1
DEG 15M 50S W 430.32 FT
TO PT ON S R/ W LN OF A
50 FT WIDE CO RD AS
DESC IN OR BK 113 PG
336, (STA N D ISH DR), TH
N 85 DEG 18M 40S W AL S
R/W LN 100.81 FT TO PT O
N E R/W LN OF AFRMTD 50
FT ESMT, TH S 1 DEG 15M
50S E A L R/W LN 439.35 FT
TO POB DESC IN OR BK
1414 PG 1271 & OR BK
1633 PG 1095
NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED: ALLEN F CRONN
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on February 27, 2013
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtax
deed.com.
Dated January 8, 2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
January 23, 2013
January 30, 2013
February 6, 2013
February 13, 2013

2371-0130 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-307
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
JOSEPH G CAPPUCCILLI
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 09-1464
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2009
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
LOT 7: COM AT SW COR
OF SE1/4 OF NE1/4 OF
NE1/4, TH S89 DEG55M
7S E AL S LN OF SE1/4 OF
NE1/4 OFNE1/4353.18 FT
TO POB TH S 89 DEG 55M
7S E AL S LN 153.5 FT, TH N
0 DEG 20M 43S E 300 FT,
TH N 89 DEG 55M 7S W
153.5 FT, TH S 0 DEG 20M
43S W 300 FT TO POB DESC
IN OR BK 1335 PG 1203
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
LAWRENCE M KURUC


Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be
reauctioned to the high-
est bidder on line, on
February 6, 2013 at 9:30
A.M. at www. citrus.
realtaxdeed.com.
Dated January 23, 2013
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Bonnie C. Tenney,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 5, 2012
December 12, 2012
December 19, 2012
December 26, 2012
Readvertised 1 time:
January 30, 2013


CLASSIFIED


BAU D UBY BIIUIl
2011 "ready to hunt"
Only $5998.
(352) 621-3678

POLARIS
2002, SPORTSMAN
700 CC 4X4 AUTO
READY FOR THE MUD
ONLY $4288
(352) 621-3678

POLARIS RZR 800 LE
TIME TO PLAY HARD
ONLY $8388
(352) 621-3678





CF MOTO
2008, 250 Trike
772 miles, $2,495.
(352) 726-6128

FASHION
2007 250 cc;
1,500 miles; $1,200
(352) 726-6128


Harley-DAVIDSON
2006 FLHTPI Clean
bike, great looks, 88 ci,
5 speed, low miles 19K,
accident free, never
played down, garage
kept, two tone bk/wt, all
service done by HD
dealer 352 5134294
asking $10,500


-ef I .oag '


GOLDWING
1985 Blue;
39,155 miles; $2,495
(352) 726-6128
GOLDWING
1985 Limited Edition-
Gold; Fuel injected;
53,012 miles; $3,000
(352) 726-6128
GOLDWING
1998, SE with Voyager
Trike Kit Tan;
55,200 miles; $9,000
(352) 726-6128
HARLEY-Davidson
Leather Jacket LG as
New, $300. OBO
Two shorty motorcycle
Helmets S/M & L/XL
$50ea 352-746-6125
HONDA
'01, Goldwing,
100k + miles,
$9,500
(352) 419-4606
HONDA
'04, 750 Shadow Aero.
Runs & looks great!
$2,995. Firm
(352) 344-0084
HONDA
1997, GOLDWING
ASPENCADE, 24K mi,
Lots a Extras! $6000.
(352) 212-6450
HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley,1100CC,
Chrome, bags, trade?,
70mpg $2,800. Crystal
River
(727) 207-1619
HONDA BLACK BIRD
CBR 1100 LOW LOW
MILES ONLY $3488.00
(352) 621-3678


HONDA SPIRIT
2002, ExcTires, Bags,
WS, Sissy Bar, Cobra
Pipes. 28k miles.
$2,000 (352) 476-3688
HONDA ST1300
2006 MADE TO TOUR
ONLY $7786
(352) 621-3678
KAWASKI NINFA
650
LIKE NEW ONLY
$5488 (352) 621-3678
KYMCO
2009, AJILITY
SCOOTER GREAT
GAS SAVER ONLY
$998 (352) 621-3678
SCOOTER
50 CC, like new, 400
miles, runs great
$850 OBO
(352) 746-0167
(315) 439-6005
SCOOTER
Lifan Industries, 2008
50cc, looks & runs
great. $750 obo
(352) 439-5039
SUZUKI
1999,1400 Intruder
with Lealman Trike Kit -
24,283 miles; $10,000
(352) 726-6128
SUZUKI BURGMAN
AUTOMATIC TWIST
AND GO FUN ONLY
$4686 (352) 621-3678
SUZUKI GSXR 750
195 MILES "HOLD ON"
ONLY $9996
(352) 621-3678
VICTORY CROSS
ROADS
"GREAT American
MADE CRUSIER"
ONLY $12888
(352) 621-3678


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013 Cll


VILLAGE TOYOTA

CRYSTAL RIVER


-SelSEor
lNotice I


784-0206 WCRN
2/14 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property
described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property under The Florida Self
Storage Facility Act Statutes (Sections 83.801- 83.809). The undersigned will sell at
public sale by competitive bidding on Thursday, the 14th day of February, 2013,
scheduled to begin at 9:00 A.M., on the premises where said property has been
stored and which is located at StoreRight Self Storage, 1227 S. Lecanto Hwy., City of
Lecanto, County of Citrus, State of Florida, the following:
Name: Unit: Contents-
Margaret Bjorum A006 Household Goods
Melody Rodriguez C022 Household Goods
Monica Gail Moore C074 Household Goods
James Hiers D022 Household Goods
Sherry Henderson E041 Household Goods
Purchases must be paid for at the time of purchase by cash only. All purchased
items are sold as is, where is, and must be removed at the time of the sale. Sale is
subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated
party.
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 30 & February 6, 2013


782-0206 WCRN
Lapinski, Irene 2012-CP-000568 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OR THE 7TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FLAGLER
COUNTY,FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2012-CP-000568
IN RE: ESTATE OF LEONARD D. MATTA,
DECEASED,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of LEONARD D. MATTA, deceased, whose date of
death was October 30,2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for FLAGLER County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1769 E. Moody Blvd, Bldg 1, Bunnell, FL
32110. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT' S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is January 30, 2013.
/s/ Leornard M. Matta, Petitioner,
2432 Davidsonville Road, Gambrills, MD 21054
/s/ Erick P. Steffens, Esq., Attorney for Petitioner
Florida Bar Number: 059553
Joseph E. Seagle, P.A. 924 West Colonial Drive, Orlando, FL 32804
T: (407) 770-0100, F: (407) 770-0200 E-Mail: erick@seaglelaw.com
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 30 & February 6, 2013


785-0206 WCRN
Cole, Charles A 2012CP747 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORI-
DA
PROBATE DIVISION, FILE NO.
2012-CP-747
IN RE: ESTATE OF CHARLES ALBERT COLE,
DECEASED.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The name of the decedent, the designation of the court in which the administra-
tion of this estate is pending, and the File Number are indicated above. The address
of the court is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney
are indicated below.
If you have been served with a copy of this notice and you have any claim or
demand against the decedent's estate, even if that claim is unmatured, contingent,
or unliquidated, you must file your claim with the court on or before the later of a
date that is three months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or 30 days
after you receive a copy of this Notice.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or de-
mands against the decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliqui-
dated claims, must file their claims with the court within three months after the date
of the first publication of this Notice.
All claims not so filed will be forever barred.
Even if a clam is not barred by Ihe limitdions described above, dl clams which
have not been filed will be barred two years after decedent's death.
The date of death of the decedent is October 16, 2012.
The date of first publication of this Notice is January 30, 2013
/s/ Charlotte Dougherty
7160 N. Fernandina Ave, Dunnellon, FL 34433
/s/Adam A. Czaya, Esq., Attorney for Personal Representative
FL Bar No. 90989, Law Office of Keith R. Taylor, PA
P.O. Box 2016, Lecanto, FL 34460, (352) 795-0404
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 30 & February 6, 2013


786-0206 WCRN
Damron 111, Leonard. A 2012CP638 NTC
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2012-CP-638
IN RE: ESTATE of LEONARD A. DAMRON, 111,
DECEASED,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of LEONARD A. DAMRON, 111, deceased, whose
date of death was August 10, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inver-
ness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the co-personal representative and
the co- personal representatives' attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is January30, 2013.
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 30 & February 6, 2013
Co-Personal Representatives:
/S/ DIANE DAMRON
P.O. Box 2349, Hwy, 486,Crystal River, FL 34423
/s/ MICHAEL ("CHAD") DAMRON
3195 W. Pebble Beach Court, Lecanto, FL 34461
/s/CASEY L. DAMRON
3415 W Shadow Creek Lp, Lecanto, FL 34461
Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives:
/s/ KENNETH J. CROTTY, ESQUIRE
Florida Bar No. 0016476
Gassman Law Associates, P.A
1245 Court Street, #102, Clearwater, Florida 33756
Telephone: (727) 442-1200, E-Mail: ken@aassmanoa.com
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 30 & February 6, 2013


783-0130 WCRN
2/6 Citrus Springs Advisory Council
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus Spings Advisory Council vill meet on
Wednesday, February 6, 2013 at 9:00 o'clock A.M., at the Citrus Springs Community
Center, 1570 W. Citrus Springs Boulevard, Building "B", Citrus Springs, Florida, to con-
duct business of the Citrus Springs Municipal Service Benefit Unit.
Any person requirng reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two (2) days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TTY Telephone
(352) 341-6580.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Advisory Council with
respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testi-
mony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
By: Joan Dias, Chairwoman
CITRUS SPRINGS MSBU
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle January 30, 2013


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www.villageta.cm28-5100
picture for illustration purposes only.


Nodces to Creditors
Administration 9


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C12 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1ODWSH