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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 01-29-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03015

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Butcher still plies his dying trade Editors note: In this economic climate where jobs are at a premium, the Chronicle is featuring an occasional series, Citrus County Works, profiling local Citrus County people and the jobs they perform. Today: Old-time butcher Klaus Menke. N ANCY K ENNEDY Staff writerINVERNESS As a boy growing up in post-war Germany, Klaus Menkes father did as most German fathers did when a son reached a certain age. Back in those days when I grew up, you only went to school for eight years, and you graduated when you were 14 or 15, Menke said. About a year prior to your graduation, your dad would pull you aside to talk to you about the birds and the bees. At the same time, it was time to decide what youre going to do with your life. When his time came, Menke chose to become a butcher. The rule over there was you had to learn a trade, he said. You were a baker or plumber or mason. You learned the entire trade from the ground up, and by age 18 you have a profession under your belt you know what youre doing. Menke, 71, who owns Klaus Deutsche Korner inside Eyepoppin Cheesesteaks & Hoagies in Inverness, still has his 1955 trade manual, his butchers bible. First thing you learn is the bone structure of all the different animals lambs, sheep, cows and all the different breeds, he said. You learn about animal diseases, about every piece of equipment. After the first year you learn meat processing. Menke said in the U.S., butchering is a dying trade, although its still being taught in Germany. Today, supermarkets employ meat cutters, but not necessarily butchers. A butcher knows the animal from the time its born until its salami hanging from a hook, Menke said. He said upon graduating from trade school in Germany, a person received a graduation book, much like a passport, with a photo and credentials stamped inside. It served as an employment report card that a person would take from job to job. Each employer would write comments about INSIDE JANUARY 29, 2013 Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community VOL. 118 ISSUE 175 50 CITRUS COUNTY Showdown set: Warriors breeze by First Academy /B1 www.chronicleonline.com HEALTH & LIFE: Exchanges This fall, new insurance markets called exchanges will open in each state./ Page C1 INDEX Comics . . . . .C8 Community . . . .C6 Crossword . . . .C7 Editorial . . . . .A8 Entertainment . . .B4 Horoscope . . . .B4 Lottery Numbers . .B3 Lottery Payouts . .B4 Movies . . . . . .C8 Obituaries . . . .A6 Classifieds . . . .C9 TV Listings . . . .C7 HIGH 80 LOW 61 Patchy fog early, then party cloudy. PAGE A4 TODAY& next morning TUESDAY HEALTH & LIFE: Zimbabwe Dr. Ed Dodge writes of adventures at Africa University in Zimbabwe. / Page C2 ASK THE EXPERTS: Health & Life Doctors Bennett, Gandhi, Grillo and Kumar share their expertise./ Page C1 at VILLAGE TOYOTA NEW 2013 TOYOTA COROLLA 000DOSR $ 1 4 9 9 5 $ 1 4 9 9 5 $ 14,995 State leaders pay less for insurance Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott and state legislators will soon decide whether Florida should extend health insurance coverage to nearly 1 million residents, and those officials all get their plans from the state, many paying less than state workers. Scott, as well as the three other Republican members of the Cabinet, and nearly all state lawmakers are enrolled in Floridas health insurance plan. For Scott, the cost to cover him and his wife is less than $400 a year. A total of 107 out of 120 members of the Florida House pay the same or less for coverage. The 40 members of the Florida Senate also are covered by the state, but this month they started paying the same as rank-and-file career service employees under a proposal pushed by Sen. Joe Negron, RStuart. Career service workers pay $50 a month for individual coverage and $180 a month for family coverage. The people who work here at night and clean our offices are valuable people, said Senate President Don Gaetz, RNiceville. We shouldnt be paying less for our health insurance while they are paying more. Scott and legislative leaders will decide over the next few months whether the state implements key portions of the Affordable Care Act. One of the biggest decisions will be whether to expand Medicaid coverage to roughly 900,000 Floridians who are just above the poverty line. Florida Officials to decide soon whether to implement key portions of federal Affordable Care Act Citrus County WORKS Sharp skills keep him on cutting edge Board to start over A.B. SIDIBE Staff writerDuring its meeting Jan. 18, the Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) Governing Board subcommittee, charged with reviewing best-use proposals for the Flying Eagle Nature Center near Inverness, decided to reject all four plans. Instead, the panel, which is comprised of board members Doug Tharp, Albert Joerger, George Mann and Wendy Griffin, chose a process called invitation to negotiate. Basically this starts things over. The companies that submitted proposals before can use this new process, but it also opens it up to the public as well, said Terri Behling, SWFWMD external affairs manager. Behling said the reason for rejection is because the original request for proposals contained some ambiguity. The districts full governing board will take up the matter today during its 9 a.m. meeting in Tampa. The center, located at 12650 East Boy Scout Road within the 16,438-acre Flying Eagle Nature Center, has been the focus of potential joint ventures since the water districts lease with Gulf Ridge Council of the Boy Scouts County gets canine ambassador C HRIS V AN O RMER Staff writerOreo, one of the countys newest employees, is earning her keep. In fact, shes a superstar. The Catahoula leopard mix dog is the canine ambassador for Citrus County Animal Services and was chosen for her job as an example of the well-behaved animals available for adoption at the shelter. People may think the dogs at the shelter are just strays and not well behaved. Id like to take an example of a well-behaved dog, said Kelly Gill, the shelters volunteer outreach coordinator, when she selected Oreo a couple of months ago. As a Catahoula mix, Oreo is partly a Native American breed from Louisiana and partly other breeds brought to the United States by human immigrants. Last week, the spotted dog helped track an adopted German shepherd that jumped over the new owners 6-foot fence and ran away. Animal Services Operations Manager Patricia Amon described Oreos role in retrieving the wayward shepherd. A customer, who had two days prior adopted a German shepherd from our shelter, frantically called our office to say Karah had scaled her 6-foot fence and she couldnt catch her, Amon said. While I was on the phone See HEALTH / Page A5 LOCAL: In the mix Crystal River Kmart manager bullish on future./ Page A3 WORLD: Nightclub fireDetails emerge in blaze that killed 231 people./ Page A10 MATTHEW BECK /Chronicle Lifelong butcher Klaus Menke slices a Delmonico cut of beef at his Inverness butcher shop Friday morning. His shop, Klaus Deutsche Korner inside Eyepoppin Cheesesteaks & Hoagies in Inverness, is an authentic butcher shop. See BUTCHER / Page A5 New hire smart cookie See DOG / Page A5 Water district rejects Flying Eagle proposals See LAND / Page A5

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A2 T UESDAY, J ANUARY29, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE 000DWDK 352.795-EARS (3277) 352.795-EARS (3277) 6441 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy. 352.795-EARS (3277) Cigna Care, Empire, Federal Employees, State Employees, Retirees, City & County Teachers: You have Excellent hearing aid benefits. We are Preferred Provider for BlueC ross & BlueShield. We honor ALL insurances. www.hearmoresolutions.com

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Because of editor error, a story on Page A1 of Mondays edition, Kevin the cop, warrants a correction. Kevin Travis is a resident of Riverhaven. An incorrect community was given in the story. Readers can alert The Citrus County Chronicle to any errors in news articles by emailing newsdesk@ chronicleonline.com or by calling 352-563-5660. Around the COUNTY Fire claims remote home A two-story house fire Saturday night caused extensive damage to the residence, but no injuries, according to the Citrus County Sheriffs Fire Rescue. Firefighters were reportedly stymied by bad roads and the remoteness of the address for a timely response, according to a report by Battalion Chief Ken Clamer. Crews from Pine Ridge were the first to arrive at the scene, 6240 E. Forest Trail, 28 minutes after the call to dispatch 8:03 p.m. When firefighters arrived, they found the 1,600square-foot home completely involved and commenced a defensive attack. Other responding fire units included: Citrus Springs, Kensington Avenue, Connell Heights and Inverness. Water was obtained from a fire rescue well site on West Withlacoochee Trail near State Road 200 and transported to the fire scene by fire trucks. Damages were estimated at $80,000 to the structure and approximately $40,000 to the contents. Thorpe to talk to Chamber County Administrator Brad Thorpe will be the guest speaker at the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce luncheon meeting Friday, Feb. 8. He will discuss the county budget. Networking begins at 11:30 a.m. and the meeting will conclude at about 1 p.m. Non-members interested in attending should call the chamber office at 352-7953149 prior to Wednesday, Feb. 6, to make and pay for reservations. From staff reports S TATE & L OCAL Page A3 TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Correction P AT F AHERTY Staff writerThe Nuclear Regulatory Commission is seeking public comment on the safe handling of spent nuclear fuel. According to a request for comment notice in the Federal Register, the agency is considering changes to its regulations for the separate activities of storing, and packaging and transporting spent nuclear fuel. Spent nuclear fuel is a solid byproduct of the fission process used to generate electricity in nuclear power plants According to Duke Energy, used nuclear fuel is stored at its facilities in two ways: in steel-lined, concrete storage pools filled with water, and in large, airtight steel canisters (dry cask storage). Progress Energy Florida submitted a strategy to NRC for managing spent fuel from the Crystal River nuclear plant following the permanent shutdown of the reactor until the Department of Energy is able to accept the fuel for disposal. That strategy was linked to CR3s application or license renewal rather than current shutdown. A potential new nuclear power plant in Levy Countywould include water-filled vaults to store spent fuel. According to Progress Energy, the plants fuel-storage facilities would be among the most secure in the world, designed to withstand earthquakes, tornadoes and hurricanes. NRC staff is reviewing potential policy issues and requirements related to safe handling of spent fuel as the lead issue for evaluating the compatibility of storage and transportation regulations. The review is intended to improve the agencys efforts on how it regulates after more than 20 years of experience approving dry casks for spent fuel storage and transportation. Plus, the agency anticipates longer storage durations with more nuclear power plants storing more used fuel. The agency will also address issues of compatibility between spent fuel storage and transportation regulations. According to NRC website, most nuclear fuel shipments occur between different reactors owned by the same utility to share storage space for spent fuel, or they may be shipped to a research facility to perform tests on the spent fuel itself. In the near future, because of a potential high-level waste repository being built, the number of these shipments by road and rail is expected to increase. Public comments will be accepted through March 18. They may be submitted online through the federal governments rulemaking website www.regulations.gov using Docket ID NRC-2013-0004. Contact Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty at 352-564-2924 or pfaherty@chronicleonline.com. NRC seeks public comment on nuke fuel Changes could affect CR plant, proposed Levy plant P AT F AHERTY Staff writerCRYSTAL RIVER David Kellner is excited about shopping. That is not unexpected for a Kmart store manager, but his enthusiasm goes well beyond store walls. Kellner manages Kmart in the Crystal River Mall. He has been there nine years and has 21 years with the company. The store has about 75 employees; that can swell to 95 for the holiday season. Kmart was named the malls Business of the Month for December. Ashley McDermott, mall marketing director, said the designation was based on visual appearance of the store, use of creative displays, use of advertising, thinking outside the box to attract customers and customer service and in Kmarts case, working with the local community, which Kmart did in a big way for Christmas. Weve done a lot of community service items this year, Kellner said. The key program for us is the Kmart Cares program, where Kmart actually gives you 10 percent on dollars you put on gift cards and is tax free. He said many organizations participated, including the Crystal River Lions Club, Progress Energy and all the Rotary clubs. Weve done it the past three years, he said. The holiday season also meant helping a lot of other local organizations a lot of customary things we do every year, he said It seems it gets bigger and bigger every year, because there is always a need in the community, he said. I was born in Citrus County, Im kind of a native and take the community to heart in this county were all family. And just as hes seen Citrus grow and change, his industry has changed as well. Kmart has gotten real good with what they call integrated retail, he said. We do a lot now with ship to home, ship to store. There are numerous options for ordering from in-store kiosks or online at home. There are so many options available, its grown a lot, he said. Its good stuff, I love the technology. He is especially excited about the companys social media-style approach to online shopping called Shop Your Way. Users can access it with a computer or iPhone app and track all aspects of their online or in-store shopping experiences, access special deals, follow a particular store and gain points for purchases. And like a chronic Facebook user, Kellner is always signed in posting photos and updates. Its a lot of cool stuff, he said. You have to embrace the technology, thats the future. Looking ahead, the biggest thing is our integrated retail; were pushing ahead, he said. This year youre going to see a lot more online retail with instore pickup. It makes the retailer a bigger part of the online game. With that movement, he found a pleasant surprise as to just how many county residents are embracing online technology. One of the big new attractions in his store was the addition of Nathans. The full-scale local version of the famous hot chain is a favorite with shoppers. The fries are a winner, he said. The fries and the plain hot dog. Were one of the two stores in the whole company right now doing Seattles Best and the Cheesecake Factory, he added. We carry their cheesecakes and their muffins right here in Crystal River, its kind of an unknown secret, its just like youre getting from the Cheesecake Factory. And Starbucks owns Seattles Best, so its basically Starbucks Coffee, he said. Retail has gotten a lot more fun, he said. PAT FAHERTY /Chronicle Kmart Manager David Kellner stands in the sporting goods section of his store in the Crystal River Mall. Kmart was named Crysta l River Mall Business of the Month for December. Embracing technology Crystal River Kmart manager enthusiastic about online, social media Around the STATE Miami All 23 state colleges OK $10K degrees Gov. Rick Scott said all 23 state colleges offering fouryear degrees in Florida have accepted his $10,000 tuition challenge. The Republican governor made the announcement at Miami-Dade College on Monday. Scott in November challenged the schools to hold tuition to $10,000 for selected four-year degrees. Thats more than $3,000 under the average for the state colleges. They already charge about half as much as Floridas public universities. Florida has 28 state and community colleges but five of the schools offer only twoyear degrees. Scott wanted the low-cost degrees to be in fields that will provide the graduates with the best opportunity for employment. The governor also has opposed college and university tuition increases. Tuition rates have gone up in recent years due to cuts in state funding. Big Pine Key Traps set for exotic species in Keys Officials said theyll be removing feral cats and other exotic predators from federal wildlife refuges in the Florida Keys. According to a pest management plan released Monday by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, traps will be set in national wildlife refuges from Key Largo to the islands off Key West. Officials said snakes, iguanas, feral cats and other nonnative species prey on threatened and endangered species in the refuges. Cats caught in the traps will be transferred to a Monroe County animal control shelter. Other non-native animals found in the traps will be killed. Raccoons and other native wildlife caught by the traps will be released. Boca Raton Driver dies after car collides with train Boca Raton police want to speak to anyone who saw an SUV crash into a train, killing one person in the car. Police said 49-year-old Anthony Carter was driving his SUV Saturday afternoon when he crashed through the downed railroad crossing gate. A Tri-Rail train rammed into the side of his car, pushing it along the tracks. Carter was pronounced dead at the scene. Clearwater Giant $185K cigar sold to collector A giant cigar sitting in a Clearwater warehouse has been sold for $185,000. The cigar is 19 feet long and three feet wide. Its covered in 16,000 wrapper leaves enough to make 25,000 regular size cigars and weighs 1,600 pounds. Juan Panesso told the Tampa Tribune a collector asked him to find the rare cigar. Panesso said the private buyer got a good deal on the cigar that had a recommended retail price tag of $200,000. The cigar, called El Gigante (The Giant), comes in its own carrying case. From wire reports

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE L OCAL /S TATE HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR 80 58 NA HI LO PR 81 56 NA HI LO PR 78 58 NA HI LO PR 83 58 NA HI LO PR 79 54 NA YESTERDAYS WEATHER Patchy fog early, then partly cloudy.THREE DAY OUTLOOK Partly cloudy with a slight chance of showers. Clearing skies. High: 80 Low: 61 High: 79 Low: 55 High: 65 Low: 35 TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING Exclusive daily forecast by: TEMPERATURE* Monday 81/56 Record 85/20 Normal 71/43 Mean temp. 69 Departure from mean +12 PRECIPITATION* Monday 0.00 in. Total for the month trace Total for the year trace Normal for the year 2.77 in.*As of 7 p.m. at Inverness UV INDEX: 6 0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Monday at 3 p.m. 30.25 in. DEW POINT Monday at 3 p.m. 57 HUMIDITY Monday at 3 p.m. 44% POLLEN COUNT** Trees and weeds were light and grasses were absent. ** Light only extreme allergic will show symptoms, moderate most allergic will experience symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience symptoms. AIR QUALITY Monday was good with pollutants mainly particulates. ALMANAC CELESTIAL OUTLOOK SUNSET TONIGHT ............................6:07 P.M. SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:20 A.M. MOONRISE TODAY ...........................8:43 P.M. MOONSET TODAY ............................8:33 A.M. FEB. 3FEB. 10FEB. 17FEB. 25 WATERING RULES BURN CONDITIONS For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestrys Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdiTodays Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.City H L Fcast Daytona Bch. 80 62 pc Ft. Lauderdale 80 71 pc Fort Myers 85 64 pc Gainesville 80 58 pc Homestead 82 67 pc Jacksonville 79 59 pc Key West 79 72 pc Lakeland 82 63 pc Melbourne 80 68 pc City H L Fcast Miami 80 69 pc Ocala 82 63 pc Orlando 81 61 pc Pensacola 73 67 c Sarasota 82 64 pc Tallahassee 78 63 pc Tampa 83 66 pc Vero Beach 79 65 pc W. Palm Bch. 80 70 pc FLORIDA TEMPERATURESSoutheast winds from 10 to 15 knots. Seas 1 to 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will have a moderate chop. Partly cloudy and warm today. Gulf water temperature64 LAKE LEVELS Location Sun. Mon. Full Withlacoochee at Holder n/a n/a 35.52 Tsala Apopka-Hernando n/a n/a 39.25 Tsala Apopka-Inverness n/a n/a 40.60 Tsala Apopka-Floral City n/a n/a 42.40Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the meanannual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211. MARINE OUTLOOK Taken at Aripeka THE NATION Albany 30 16 .15 r 39 37 Albuquerque 55 38 pc 37 21 Asheville 64 33 pc 66 53 Atlanta 59 43 c 70 60 Atlantic City 37 20 .07 pc 51 44 Austin 78 69 ts 80 45 Baltimore 41 30 .17 pc 52 44 Billings 37 24 sn 24 -1 Birmingham 67 50 c 74 62 Boise 34 21 .07 rs 39 24 Boston 31 21 .09 c 40 36 Buffalo 43 26 .44 r 49 48 Burlington, VT 23 3 .21 c 38 36 Charleston, SC 65 41 pc 71 60 Charleston, WV 61 34 .42 pc 66 52 Charlotte 50 34 .02 pc 67 56 Chicago 48 37 .44 ts 64 36 Cincinnati 52 37 .12 c 66 53 Cleveland 49 31 .20 r 58 49 Columbia, SC 63 0 pc 72 59 Columbus, OH 51 33 .35 sh 60 51 Concord, N.H. 24 5 .17 c 37 32 Dallas 78 66 ts 77 41 Denver 57 31 .01 pc 36 24 Des Moines 40 35 sf 43 21 Detroit 47 30 .27 sh 56 41 El Paso 66 41 pc 49 31 Evansville, IN 59 47 .21 c 68 45 Harrisburg 35 27 .20 pc 48 41 Hartford 32 15 .18 pc 44 35 Houston 81 70 ts 79 50 Indianapolis 52 37 .34 ts 63 48 Jackson 72 56 ts 78 57 Las Vegas 50 44 pc 55 41 Little Rock 76 59 .01 ts 73 48 Los Angeles 60 50 s 63 47 Louisville 57 49 .22 c 68 60 Memphis 73 58 .01 c 73 50 Milwaukee 44 33 .06 sh 54 29 Minneapolis 33 30 sn 33 13 Mobile 75 54 fg 74 66 Montgomery 71 50 c 77 64 Nashville 60 48 c 70 59 New Orleans 77 55 ts 77 64 New York City 34 29 .20 pc 48 43 Norfolk 51 28 .02 pc 65 51 Oklahoma City 74 60 ts 66 33 Omaha 46 33 c 41 22 Palm Springs 62 44 s 64 46 Philadelphia 36 28 .11 pc 51 45 Phoenix 60 50 .14 pc 57 40 Pittsburgh 48 28 .40 r 57 49 Portland, ME 27 9 .06 c 36 34 Portland, Ore 45 39 .46 r 45 40 Providence, R.I. 33 19 .09 c 43 36 Raleigh 50 32 .01 pc 68 56 Rapid City 32 26 .09 pc 34 8 Reno 39 21 c 47 23 Rochester, NY 40 24 .23 r 49 49 Sacramento 57 32 s 59 37 St. Louis 74 52 ts 68 39 St. Ste. Marie 34 27 .47 rs 39 31 Salt Lake City 32 21 .03 sn 28 21 San Antonio 76 69 ts 82 44 San Diego 59 52 trace s 60 46 San Francisco 56 46 s 54 44 Savannah 72 45 pc 74 59 Seattle 43 38 .05 r 45 42 Spokane 31 28 .05 c 33 25 Syracuse 30 19 .22 r 46 42 Topeka 77 48 c 54 26 Washington 44 33 .13 pc 54 48YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HIGH & LOW HIGH 88 Laredo, Texas LOW -13 Ely, Nev. TUESDAY CITY H/L/SKY Acapulco 88/70/s Amsterdam 49/39/sh Athens 55/41/c Beijing 43/18/pc Berlin 42/25/sh Bermuda 63/61/pc Cairo 65/50/pc Calgary -4/-12/pc Havana 82/66/pc Hong Kong 66/64/pc Jerusalem 50/44/sh Lisbon 56/43/s London 52/47/sh Madrid 51/34/s Mexico City 72/43/s Montreal 27/23/pc Moscow 17/8/c Paris 51/35/sh Rio 83/72/ts Rome 51/40/s Sydney 81/70/pc Tokyo 46/31/s Toronto 36/33/r Warsaw 32/20/sn WORLD CITIES Monday Tuesday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Monday Tuesday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Weather Central, Madison, Wi. Tuesday WednesdayCity High/Low High/Low High/Low High/LowChassahowitzka* 6:32 a/2:35 a 7:23 p/2:58 p 7:12 a/3:13 a 7:50 p/3:29 p Crystal River** 4:53 a/12:20 p 5:44 p/ 5:33 a/12:35 a 6:11 p/12:51 p Withlacoochee* 2:40 a/10:08 a 3:31 p/10:23 p 3:20 a/10:39 a 3:58 p/11:03 p Homosassa*** 5:42 a/1:34 a 6:33 p/1:57 p 6:22 a/2:12 a 7:00 p/2:28 p TIDES *From mouths of rivers **At Kings Bay ***At Masons CreekKEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy. SOLUNAR TABLESDATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR (MORNING) (AFTERNOON) 1/29 TUESDAY 6:56 12:44 7:19 1:07 1/30 WEDNESDAY 7:47 1:35 8:10 1:58 FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M. TUESDAY HI LO PR 80 60 NA Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday. ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday. Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time. Citrus County Utilities customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional watering allowances. To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352527-7669. For the RECORD A4 T UESDAY, J ANUARY29, 2013 To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $36.65* 6 months: $64.63* 1 year: $116.07* *Subscription price includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year. For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655 Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers: Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com Meadowcrest office 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 Inverness office Whos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................ Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Mike Arnold..........................................................................................Editor, 564-2930 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 John Murphy........................................................Circulation Director, 563-3255 Trista Stokes..................................................................Online Manager, 564-2946 Trista Stokes..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-2946 Report a news tip:Opinion page questions .................................................. Mike Arnold, 564-2930 To have a photo taken .......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660 News and feature stories....................................Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660 Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista,563-5660 Sports event coverage................................Jon-Michael Soracchi,563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579 The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc. 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community Where to find us:1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. Crystal River, FL 34429 Blvd. Today's active pollen: Juniper, Maple, Oak Todays count: 9.4/12 Wednesdays count: 11.3 Thursdays count: 9.0 Citrus County Sheriffs OfficeDomestic battery arrest Holleigh Chaney 22, of Homosassa, at 12:47 p.m. Thursday on a misdemeanor charge of domestic battery. No bond. Other arrests Clarence Pearson 60, of South New Hampshire Drive, Homosassa, at 1 p.m. Thursday on a Citrus County warrant for a felony charge of obtaining property by means of worthless check. Bond $1,000. Mark Andrus 29, of Southeast Fourth Terrace, Webster, at 3:25 p.m. Thursday on a Hernando County warrant for failure to appear in court for two original felony charges of possession of a controlled substance. No bond. Glenn Hackney 21, of Frances Drive, Daytona Beach, at 7:10 a.m. Friday on a Citrus County warrant for violation of probation on original felony charges of burglary of an unoccupied structure and grand theft. No bond. Christopher Williams 29, of East Robin Lane, Inverness, at 5:56 p.m. Thursday on a felony charge of driving while license suspended or revoked (habitual offender). He was released on his own recognizance. Denise Schippers 42, of West Mink Lane, Homosassa, at 9:02 p.m. Thursday on a felony charge of retail theft and a misdemeanor charge of resisting a law enforcement officer or merchant during or after theft. According to her arrest affidavit, she is accused of taking grocery and clothing items from Walmart. Bond $2,500. Joshua Betsch 22, of Castello Court, Clermont, at 8:26 a.m. Friday on a Sumter County warrant for a felony charge of grand theft. Bond $2,000. Robbie Sanders 27, of County Road 414, Lake Panasoffkee, at 11:40 a.m. Friday on a Citrus County warrant for failure to appear in court for an original felony charge of theft and two felony charges of burglary of an unoccupied structure or conveyance. No bond. Natanael Martinez 24, of Floral City, at 11:59 p.m. Jan. 16 on a felony charge of child abuse. According to his arrest affidavit, he is accused of using a belt to injure a 5-year-old girl. He denied the causing the injury. Bond $5,000. Chad Beaver 30, of Beverly Hills, at 4:01 p.m. Friday on a misdemeanor charge of violation of a domestic violence/protective injunction. No bond. Burglaries A commercial burglary was reported at 10:08 a.m. Friday, Jan. 25, in the 2300 block of E. Hercala Lane, Hernando. A vehicle burglary was reported at 4:32 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 27, in the 500 block of S. Stone Way, Inverness. A residential burglary was reported at 3:22 p.m. Jan. 27 in the 600 block of N. Indianapolis Ave., Hernando. A residential burglary was reported at 7:36 p.m. Jan. 27 at Esskay St., Beverly Hills. Thefts A grand theft was reported at 10:18 a.m. Friday, Jan. 25, in the 7100 block of W. Riverbend Road, Dunnellon. A grand theft was reported at 10:21 a.m. Jan. 25 in the area of N. Florida Avenue and N. Citrus Springs Boulevard, Dunnellon. A grand theft was reported at 5:03 p.m. Jan. 25 in the 6100 block of W. Minuteman St., Homosassa. A grand theft was reported at 8:33 p.m. Jan. 25 in the 8700 block of S. Lakeshore Drive, Floral City. A grand theft was reported at 9:55 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 26, in the 8800 block of E. Moonrise Lane, Floral City. A petit theft was reported at 10:19 a.m. Jan. 26 in the 600 block of Turner Camp Road, Inverness. A grand theft was reported at 11:30 a.m. Jan. 26 in the 11400 block of S. Rosewater Point, Homosassa. A petit theft was reported at 2:32 p.m. Jan. 26 in the 3900 block of S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. A grand theft was reported at 2:41 p.m. Jan. 26 in the 13300 block of E. Shawnee Trail, Inverness. A grand theft was reported at 3:55 p.m. Jan. 26 in the 2300 block of S. Pelt Terrace, Inverness. A petit theft was reported at 5:29 p.m. Jan. 26 in the 2400 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness. A grand theft was reported at 7:05 p.m. Jan. 26 in the 6800 block of S. Straight Ave., Homosassa. A grand theft was reported at 11:41 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 27, in the 800 block of S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. An auto theft was reported at 1:23 p.m. Jan. 27 in the 4400 block of W. Pinto Loop, Beverly Hills. A petit theft was reported at 3:19 p.m. Jan. 27 in the 4400 block of E. Arlington St., Inverness. A petit theft was reported at 3:42 p.m. Jan. 27 in the 6100 block of S. Sundial Drive, Floral City. A petit theft was reported at 5:38 p.m. Jan. 27 in the 4000 block of S. Alabama Ave., Homosassa. A petit theft was reported at 8:23 p.m. Jan. 27 in the 300 block of N.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River.Vandalism A vandalism was reported at 10:55 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 27, in the 6200 block of E. Wingate St., Inverness. Legal notices in todays Cit rus C ounty Chronicle 000DM1W Meeting Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C12 Notices to Creditors/Administration . . . . C11, C12 Priest gets 15 years in sex abuse case Associated PressFORT LAUDERDALE A retired Roman Catholic priest accused of sexually abusing dozens of boys for decades was sentenced to 15 years in prison Monday. Earlier this month, Father Neil Doherty pleaded no contest in a deal that reduced the sex abuse charges from capital felonies to second-degree felonies. He will also have to register as a sex offender. The plea comes after several more alleged victims came forward and were planning to testify in the case. Doherty, who maintains his innocence, is now 69, appears frail and struggles with health problems. His attorney, David Bogenschutz said he disputed the facts of the states case but declined to elaborate. Attorneys for the victims said Doherty befriended troubled young boys for years, plied them with drugs and alcohol and paid them to run errands and do odd jobs. But the relationships often turned to sexual acts. The victim in this case was about 10 years old when he said he first walked over to the church from his home, passed out after drinking a druglaced soda and awoke with sodomy wounds. The scenario repeatedly occurred over a five-year period in the late 1990s, attorney Jeff Herman said. The victim, who is now in his early 20s, planned to take his secret to the grave, but was emboldened after several other victims came forward in lawsuits against Doherty. The victim was living in an institution when Herman met him, but is now married with a child. Today ends the saddest chapter of my life. A very evil man is where he belongs. Neil Doherty has hurt more children that we will ever know. I hold the Catholic Church solely responsible for what has happened, the victim said in a statement read by his lawyer. The Associated Press does not identify victims of sexual abuse. Herman alleges the Archdiocese of Miami turned a blind eye to Dohertys behavior and moved him to another church each time a new allegation surfaced. At one point, another priest complained to the archbishop that Doherty had a boy living with him in the rectory, but it was swept under the rug, Herman said. A spokeswoman for the Archdiocese of Miami said Doherty has not been in active ministry since 2002 and noted the church has policies to handle abuse allegations. In 2011, a Miami jury returned a $100 million verdict in a civil suit against Doherty in a different sex abuse case, although the amount is unlikely to ever be collected. The Archdiocese of Miami was not named in that lawsuit, but has been targeted by more than 20 other lawsuits over allegations of sexual abuse by Doherty. Many have been settled. ON THE NET Citrus County Sheriffs Office arrest info: www.sheriff citrus.org

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has one of the highest uninsured rates in the nation, according to U.S. census data. But Scott, a vocal critic of the federal legislation, has raised questions about the potential cost of the Medicaid expansion. House Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, echoed the governor and said hes not sure the federal government will keep its promise to pick up most of the share of Medicaid expansion. Everyone wants to see the citizens of our state have insurance ... but theres a question whether we are going to be able to trust that (the federal government) will pay for it long term, Weatherford said. Another key decision related to the Affordable Care Act will be whether the state revamps its own health insurance program to start spending money to cover part-time employees. The state would have to pay a $300 million penalty if it does not cover these workers. Florida already spends $1.9 billion to cover roughly 170,000 state workers, university employees and retirees. Most of the money comes from taxpayers, not premiums paid by employees. Scott, who has turned down a salary while serving as governor, has defended the decision to enroll in the state insurance plan by noting that its the same coverage offered to roughly 24,000 state employees in management positions. Those employees pay $8.34 a month for individual coverage and $30 a month for family coverage. Still the governor has recommended and plans to recommend again this week when he rolls out his 2013 budget proposals that all state employees pay the same. Weatherford agreed that there were inequities depending on who you are and what position you hold. Gaetz said he generally agreed state workers should pay the same for health insurance, but he added that it was more important to make sure that elected officials do not pay less. Public officials particularly need to be mindful of how the comparisons are drawn between the benefits they themselves have and the benefits other people have, Gaetz said. C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE T UESDAY, J ANUARY29, 2013 A5 527-0012 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY FAUX WOOD BLINDS, TOP TREATMENTS DRAPERY, SHADES, SHUTTERS VERTICALS The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! BLIND S TREETOPS PLAZA 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO 2012 2012 2012 2012 www.72-hourblinds.com WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE 000DTAE 000DUDE Mon-Fri 8:30-6 Sat 8:30-1 PHARMACY www.BrashearsPharmacy.com 471 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto . . . . . . . . . 746-3420 Hwy. 491 Next To Suncoast Dermatology 206 W. Dampier Street, Inverness . . . . 637-2079 One Block Behind City Hall On Seminole Ave., Inverness Brashears OFFERING A GREAT SELECTION OF MEDICAL EQUIPMENT Walkers Wheelchairs Specialty Items & More 000DRGJ an employee excellent job performance or always shows up on time. After his graduation, Menke came to America. He was 18 and arrived with one suitcase and $10 in his pocket. I didnt even know what $10 could buy, he said. I couldnt speak a word of English. When I came to the States as an immigrant, you had to have a written job promise in your hand and present it to the American Embassy you had to prove that you had a job waiting for you. His job was with a business in New Jersey, where he worked for 10 years. My employer had his own slaughterhouse in the back and a huge sausage kitchen, and up front was the store, he said. For most of his career, Menke owned his own butcher shop. He and his family moved to Florida in 1996, where he worked as a butcher at Gannons Meat Market, which his daughter and son-in-law owned. After that he worked for Angus Meats for a few years. Now he has his own business inside the sandwich shop his daughter owns. Menke said the meat processing industry has gone through dramatic changes over the years. For example, at one time upon being slaughtered, an animal hung in a cooler for at least 10 days. As the water in the cells would drain, enzymes in the meat would break down and naturally tenderize it. Today the big slaughterhouses kill as many as 1,600 steers a day theyre cooled overnight and out the door the next day, he said. Today, everything is block ready; meat comes into the supermarket meat department in boxes ready to be cut up with electric band saws. Menke said he still uses his knives the tools of his trade but he no longer uses a cleaver or hand saw or shaving knife to shave fine hairs from a hogs armpits. Now his obsolete tools hang in the back room as decorations. In a past generation, a butcher took a whole animal and would remove its hide, take out its intestines, split the carcass, wash it. He would take special orders from customers and cut chops and steaks and roasts to their specifications, make his own sausages and meat products. He knew his animals. In the old days, youd stand at an old wooden cutting block and cut your pork chops individually, he said. Now everything is mass produced. Chronicle reporter Nancy Kennedy can be reached at nkennedy@ chronicleonline.com or 352-564-2927. What the new health care market means for Florida Associated PressMIAMI Floridas Republican lawmakers are reluctantly acknowledging that the Affordable Care Act is the law of the land and are taking steps to determine exactly what that will look like. The Sunshine State has one of the highest numbers of uninsured residents in the country, some of the most stringent eligibility requirements for health care safety nets, a large number of legal immigrants and a proposal to privatize its Medicaid program statewide. So how will the federal health overhaul impact that? There are still a lot of unanswered questions, perhaps the biggest being whether Gov. Rick Scott will expand Floridas Medicaid rolls. The Republican governor was a vocal opponent of socalled Obamacare but softened his stance after the November election. He remains wary of the increased cost a Medicaid expansion could bring to Florida taxpayers and has been accused of playing politics with numbers after he referenced figures showing costs could be as high as $26 billion over a decade. The state health agency later revised that figure to $3 billion. Here are some questions and answers about how the Affordable Care Act could play out in Florida. Q: How many Floridians are uninsured and how many of those are projected to get insurance under the exchange? A: Nearly 1 million people are estimated to take advantage of the state exchange, including residents who are employed and the unemployed. Many would be eligible for federal subsidies to help pay for it. Q: How many Floridians are currently served by Medicaid and how many more will be served if lawmakers choose Medicaid expansion? A: Floridas Medicaid program currently costs more than $21 billion a year, with the federal government picking up roughly half the tab. It covers nearly 3 million people about half are children and consumes about 30 percent of the state budget. About 900,000 more residents could be covered if Florida decides to expand its Medicaid rolls. Q: Is it true that U.S.born residents below the poverty line will not be able to get coverage in the exchanges but legal immigrants below the poverty line will be able to get coverage through the exchanges? A: Yes. The Affordable Care Act assumes that states would expand Medicaid coverage, so the only provision for a subsidy below 100 percent of the federal poverty level is for aliens who are in the country legally but are ineligible for Medicaid because of their alien status. Q: How many small businesses are likely to take advantage of the health insurance offered on the state exchange? A: Many small business owners are still in wait and see mode. Florida led the country in challenging the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act, but the Supreme Court upheld it. Thats left Florida scrambling at the 11th hour to make decisions about how the state wants to implement the law and many unanswered questions. Jon Urbanek, a senior vice president with Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, said about 50 percent of the small businesses his company talked with initially indicated they would opt out and pay a penalty for not providing coverage. But as Blue Cross Blue Shield of Florida is working with employers, that number has fallen below 20 percent, he said. He also anticipated between 15 to 18 percent of small businesses will stop offering health coverage and allow their employees to seek their own individual coverage under an exchange. Q: How is the exchange going to be set up in Florida and which agency will be responsible for overseeing it? A: Florida has three options. It can run the exchange itself, partner with federal health officials or allow federal officials to run the program entirely. At this point, Florida has defaulted into allowing the feds to run the program because leaders missed key deadlines, but the door is still open for lawmakers to consider a partnership or run the program themselves in the future. The Department of Children and Families currently determines Medicaid eligibility and the Agency for Health Care Administration oversees the program. Q: How much money has Florida received so far from the federal government to do the initial work in setting up an exchange? A: Florida was awarded $1 million in a planning grant in 2010, but never drew down the funds so they expired in 2011, according to federal health officials. Q: How will the changes under the Affordable Care Act affect Floridas plans to privatize Medicaid statewide? A: In an effort to cut costs, Florida lawmakers passed sweeping legislation in 2011 to privatize Medicaid. Rather than having government insurance, patients would be assigned to for-profit insurance companies, which would receive a per-person fee from the state and decide what services and prescriptions to cover. with her giving her suggestions to help which involved tasty treats in walked Joanne Peters and Lorraine Clark from Courtroom Dogs for Kids, and they offered to drive to the womans house to assist. Peters and Clark are the founders of a nonprofit organization that provides registered and trained therapy dogs to serve as calming companions for youngsters who will testify in court cases. Clark suggested they take a dog to catch a dog. We offered up Oreo, our newly appointed shelter ambassador dog, to accompany them, Amon said. Within an hour they had returned to the shelter to tell of their success story. They said Oreo was a superstar and made it so easy to tempt Karah to return. The happy ending effort went beyond Oreos original job description, which is to visit public facilities and public events to raise awareness about the shelter. Such an event is coming up during the hours of 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at the Citrus County Auditorium at 3610 S. Florida Ave., Inverness, when the shelter will sponsor its second Best Friend Fest, a pet adoption extravaganza. Happy ending stories abound at the shelter. Many adopters have taken the opportunity of telling the tale of finding their perfect pet on a page on the shelters website, www.citruscritters.com/ adoption_stories/adoption_stories.htm. of America was dissolved in May 2012. The agency ended up with the following four proposals: Sumswift Shotgun Sports Inc. was proposing to renovate the existing onsite facilities, construct a shooting (i.e., shotgun) sports complex and provide youth training and community recreational events. Giovanni Van den Abbeele wanted a multiyear renovation project, initially establishing a camping operation. Once renovations were complete, the proposal was to have the facility open to local youth and citizen organizations. The Path of Citrus County Inc. wanted to renovate the facilities and use them as shelter for homeless or displaced individuals and families. The proposal was to expand The Paths current farming and wood shop operations. As proposed, access by the public would have been limited. River Builders Inc. sought a multi-year renovation project initially establishing a camping/RV operation. Once renovations were complete, the proposal was for the facility to be open to cultural events along with local youth and citizen organizations. District officials said oral presentationsJan. 18 by eachof the four respondentswere heard by the selectioncommittee. However, the presentations could not be effectively utilized to provide the district the best possible lease under the current process. Therefore, the subcommittee determinedit was in thebest interest of the district to reject all bids and pursue aninvitation to negotiate (ITN). TheITN process, district officials believe, will provide flexibility for the agency to negotiate withone or morerespondents to obtain the best value to the district based upon criteria contained in the ITN. Special to the Chronicle Joanne Peters, CEO and founder of Courtroom Dogs for Kids, and Oreo, foreground, a Catahoula leopard mix dog, were successful last week in returning Karah to her new home after the German shepherd scaled a 6-foot fence. HEALTHContinued from Page A1 MATTHEW BECK/ Chronicle Klaus Menke learned his trade as a youngster growing up in Germany. BUTCHER Continued from Page A1 DOG Continued from Page A1 LAND Continued from Page A1

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Efstarious Bill Savas, 89 HERNANDO Bill Savas, 89, of Hernando, Fla., passed from this earth to our Lords embrace Jan. 26, 2013, one year to the day after the death of his best friend and lovely wife, Helen. The service of remembrance will be noon Thursday, Jan. 31, 2013, at the Fero Memorial Gardens Mausoleum Chapel, 5955 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills, FL 34465. The family will receive friends at the funeral home Thursday at 11 a.m. Bill was born in Springfield Gardens, Queens, N.Y., Sept. 18, 1923, and served in the Navy for four years during World War II. After leaving the Navy as a decorated hero, he joined the NYC Police Department, where he enjoyed a colorful career, rising from patrolman to detective, ultimately retiring from the department as a decorated officer. Upon his retirement, Bill and Helen moved to Florida to enjoy this beautiful state. He loved to fish, travel, and recount his days in the police force. He is survived by his daughter, Electra Paskett and son-in-law, Howard Paskett as well as grandsons, James, William, and Jonathan Paskett of Dublin, Ohio; his son, Peter Savas of Salt Lake City, Utah; and his brother Jerry Savas and his wife, Marion of Spring Hill, Fla. Eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither have entered into the heart of (them), the things which God hath prepared for them that love him. (1 Corinthians 2:9) Bill loved our God, as we all do, so there should be no tears, only loving memories of him. Bill looked forward to the day when he would be together again, with his sweetheart, who has been waiting for him. The family request that in lieu of flowers, donations in Bills memory be made to the American Society of Preventive Oncology-Presidents Fund at www.aspo.org or 330 WARF Bldg., 610 Walnut St., Madison WI 53726. www.ferofuneral home.com. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Elisabeth Juhasz, 88 BEVERLY HILLSElisabeth Klara Juhasz, 88, of Beverly Hills, died Jan. 28, 2013. Private cremation will take place under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto. Ray Quintana Jr., 57Ray Quintana Jr., 57, died Jan. 25, 2013, at Citrus Memorial Hospital. Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory is in charge of private arrangements. Mary Peggy Hoopengarner, 92 HOMOSASSA Mary L. Peggy Hoopengarner, 92, of Homosassa, died Jan. 24, 2013. Graveside service eill be at 10 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 31, 2013, from Stage Stand Cemetery, Homosassa Springs. Wilder Funeral Home, Homosassa. Bradley Scoop Driggers Sr., 51 BEVERLY HILLSBradley Scoop William Driggers Sr., passed away at Citrus Memorial Hospital, Inverness, Fla., Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013, after a long battle with a real rare nerve degeneration (CBGD). He was born in Beirut, Lebanon, Dec. 17, 1961, came to the states when he was six months old and was in heart failure. He was not supposed to live more than two years at the most, but had Tetrology of Fellot surgery in 1970, when he was eight years old. His last job was a customer support technician with Verizon Wireless in Houston, Texas, which he gave up in July 2008, due to illness. He previously, lived in Maderia Beach where he worked for MCI before moving to Spring, Texas in 2006. He moved to Dunnellon and Beverly Hills in 2010. Some of his achievements were organizing the MADD Chapter in Gainesville, which was chartered in 1987, in memory of his sister, Kim Elizabeth Driggers Corbin who was killed by a drunk driver in Virginia in 1982. He was sports editor in Williston for the Williston Pioneer in the s where he went by the name of Brad (Scoop) Driggers. He got many awards while working for MCI and Verizon Wireless. He also, organized the Rainbow Singles Club in 1995. He was preceded in death by his father, Jack Owen Driggers Sr.; and sister, Kim Elizabeth Driggers Corbin. He is survived by his son, Bradley William Driggers Jr., who lives in Brunei with his mom. Also, his mother, Rheta Irby Driggers of Citrus Springs; brother, Jack Owen Driggers Jr., of Gainesville; nieces, Sherry Lyn Driggers Downes and husband, Tony of Rainbow Lake Estates and Leslie Anne Corbin Clary and husband, Alex of Athens, Tenn.; great-nieces and great-nephews, Connie and Shawn Downes, Kimberly and Hunter Clary. Bucket List: He wanted to go down on the field and meet the Rays players and coaches, Buckaneer players and coaches and Dolphin players and coaches. He also, had on his bucket list to meet the University of Florida players and coaches, which was fulfilled Nov. 17, 2012. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to Hospice of Citrus County, P .O. Box 641270 Beverly Hills, FL 34464. Arrangements entrusted to Fero Funeral Home,www.ferofuneral home.com. Denise Hunter, 59BEVERLY HILLSDenise R. Hunter, 59, of Beverly Hills, Fla., passed away Saturday, Jan. 26, 2013, at Hospice of Citrus County, Lecanto. She was born Dec. 13, 1953, in Muskegon, Mich., to Robert M. and June (Garvey) LaFond. She was a waitress in the restaurant business. Survivors include three sons, Danny Scrima of Orlando, Jeremy Hunter of Crystal River and Anthony Scrima of Castleberry; one brother, Rob LaFond; and five grandchildren. The family will be receiving friends in visitation at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013, at Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home, Inverness, with a graveside service to follow at 3 p.m. in Hills of Rest Cemetery, Floral City, Pastor Leary Willis officiating. Janet Masaoy, 76 BEVERLY HILLSJanet F. Masaoy, 76, of Beverly Hills, Fla., passed away Jan. 25, 2013, at Seven Rivers Hospital. A native of Boston, Mass., she came to the area in 1992 from Carlisle, Mass. She was a wonderful mother, friend, homemaker and tutor. Mrs. Masaoy was a founding member of Nature Coast Unitarian Universalists, and was the founding member and president of C.O.S.T. (Citizens Opposed to the SunCoast Tollway). Janet was preceded in death by her husband, Jose. Survivors include two sons, Keith Given and Todd Given; daughter, Heidi Given and her child, A beloved granddaughter, Jacqueline Given; sister, Kaye Harvie; several grandchildren; two greatgrandchildren; and two nieces, Kim Crawford Harvie and Lisa Drew McIlwain. A service of remembrance will be at 2 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 31, 2013, at Nature Coast Unitarian Universalists, 7633 N. Florida Ave. Citrus Springs, FL 34434. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to Hospice of Citrus Co. PO Box 641270 Beverly Hills, FL 34464 in memory of Janet. Fero Funeral Home provided information. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Walter Koch Jr., 68LEESBURG Walter Koch Jr., 68, of Leesburg, died Jan. 24, 2013. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto with services taking place at a later date in Cliffside Park, N.J. Irene Doefler, 96SPRING HILL Irene Doerfler, 96, of Spring Hill, died Jan. 25, 2013. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto, with services taking place at a later date in Livonia, Mich. Margaret Rogers, 83 INVERNESS Margaret Teresa Rogers 83, Inverness, passed away Jan. 28, 2013, under the loving care of her family and Hospice of Citrus County. Mrs. Rogers was born in Rochester, N.Y., June 18, 1929, to the late John and Catherine (OConnor) Blake and moved to Florida from Delaware. She raised her family in Brentwood Long Island, N.Y., where she lived for over 25 years. She was a retired registered nurse and worked in nearly every different area of nursing. She was a member of Our Lady of Fatima Parish. Margarets passion was her family, her community, and her faith. Left to mourn her loss are seven children, Regina Epple of Inverness; Teresa McCarthy of Medford, N.Y.; Christopher McCarthy of Lake Ronkonkoma, N.Y.; Martin McCarthy of Wilmington, Del.; Jane McFarland of East Islip, N.Y.; Brian Rogers of West Hampton Beach, N.Y.; Colleen Witherell of Glen Mills, Pa.; one brother, Dennis Blake; three sisters, Eileen Patrizio, Julia Mikos, and Nora Jane Steenson; 12 grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by two children, Matthew and Margaret McCarthy; two loving husbands, Charles J. McCarthy and James J. Rogers; two brothers and two sisters, Patrick, Thomas, Anna Mae Kelleher and Kathleen Benison. The Mass of Christian Burial will be offered at Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church at 10 a.m. Thursday, Jan 31, 2013, Fr. James Johnson, celebrant.Interment will be in St. Charles Cemetery, Long Island, N.Y. Reposing hours Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m., at Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Wake Vigil Service at 7 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorials are being accepted by the March of Dimes or Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Madelyn Brown, 86MOUNT DORAMadelyn Brown, 86, of Mount Dora, died Jan. 24, 2013. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto, with services taking place at a later date in Peoria, Ill. Alice Seaman, 89 INVERNESS Alice Julia Seaman 89, Inverness, died Jan. 26, 2013, at Always There Assisted Living Facility. Alice was born Dec. 20, 1923, in Attleboro, Mass., to the late Valentine and Sophie Machowski. She was employed as a title clerk for an automobile club. Alice relocated to this area in 1985 from Pinellas County. She enjoyed feeding and watching the birds in her yard and gardening with her husband. Left to cherish her memory is her son, Jeffrey G. Seaman, Inverness; daughters, Cheryl L. Seaman (Bill Bissell) Inverness, and Cynthia M. Bethell, Westminster, Colo.; six grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband of 63 years, Frank, Jan. 16, 2010. A celebration of Alices life will be 1 p.m. Monday, Feb. 4, 2013, at the Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory. Inurnment will be private at the Florida National Cemetery. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Robert Geraghty, 78FLORAL CITYRobert B. Geraghty, 78, of Floral City, Fla., died Jan. 27, 2013, under the loving care of his family at his home. Robert was born Dec. 16, 1934, in Jersey City, N.J., son of Robert and Jane Geraghty. He served in the U.S. Air Force. Robert received his masters degree in engineering andretired from Lockheed Martin. He moved to Floral City in 2011 from Steinhatchee. Robert was a lifetime member of the NRA and an avid sportsman. He was a gourmand and enjoyed life to the fullest. Mr. Geraghty was preceded in death by his parents, his brother Peter, and grandson Matthew R. Beni. Survivors include his daughter, Jane Tiger of Hayesville, N.C.; son, Robert L. Geraghty of Steinhatchee; sisters, Bette Jane Geraghty of Hollywood, Fla., Patricia G. Erickson of Fort Lauderdale, Linda G. Crane of Leesburg, Michelle G. Hunt of Floral City, and Susan J. Geraghty of Orlando; grandchildren, John R. Beni II,and Peter C. Tiger, both of North Carolina, Maggie Renee Geraghty and Robert Ian Geraghty, both of Lady Lake; and greatgrandchildren, Bradley, Madison and Alana. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to Hospice of Citrus County, Lecanto, Florida. Heinz Funeral Home & Cremation, Inverness. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Robert Caswell, 74 THE VILLAGES Robert Wallace Caswell, 74, of The Villages, died Jan. 26, 2013. Private cremation will take place under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto. Clara White, 93 INVERNESS Clara Brunner White 93, Inverness, died peacefully at home Jan. 25, 2013. Clara was born in Enola, Pa., Oct. 16, 1919, one of 13 children. She moved to this area in 1989 from south Florida where she retired from the food service business. She leaves to cherish her memory two daughters, Linda Sutton and her husband, Don, of Beverly Hills, and Beverly Dearden of Inverness; four grandchildren, Miles, Karen, Kevin and Kelly; four great-grandchildren, Savannah, Milo, Lindsey, and Abby. She was preceded in death by her husband, Bruce White, June 27, 2005. The Chas E Davis Funeral Home with Crematory is assisting the family with private arrangements. Nancy Drouin, 55INVERNESS Nancy E. Drouin, 55, of Inverness, died Sunday, Jan. 27 2013, at her residence in Inverness. Private arrangements by Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory, Inverness. A6 T UESDAY, J ANUARY29, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE Closing time for placing ad is 4 business days prior to run date. There are advanced deadlines for holidays. To Place Your In Memory ad, Saralynne Miller at 564-2917 scmiller@chronicleonline.com 0 0 0 D S M Q 000DN0W A Hearing Loss Is A Lot More Noticeable Than A Hearing Aid SEE US BEFORE YOU BUY! Advanced Family Hearing Aid Center A Unique Approach To Hearing Services Jerillyn Clark Board Certified Licensed Hearing Aid Specialist 2027 N. DONOVAN AVE., CRYSTAL RIVER 795-1775 FREE 2nd Opinion SERVING CITRUS COUNTY FOR 28 YEARS 000DOS2 Funeral Home With Crematory C h a s E D a v i s Chas. E. Davis 726-8323 MICHAEL PRESTON Private Arrangements DENISE HUNTER Graveside: Wed, 3:00 PM Hills of Rest -Floral City NANCY DROUIN Private Arrangements ALICE SEAMAN Service: Mon, Feb 4, 1:00 PM RAY QUINTANA Private Arrangements FERO FERO Memorial Gardens & Memorial Gardens & Funeral Home Funeral Home 000DM73 352 746-4646 352 746-4646 www.dignitymemorial.com S ERVING F AMILIES FOR S ERVING F AMILIES FOR 37 YEARS WITH 37 YEARS WITH D IGNITY & R ESPECT D IGNITY & R ESPECT Beverly Hills Beverly Hills CRYSTAL RIVER INVERNESS 352-795-5700 GARDNERAUDIOLOGY.COM 000DS9Y what? HEAR WHAT YOUVE BEEN MISSING. 1901 SE H WY 19 C RYSTAL R IVER 352-795-2678 Your Trusted Family-Owned Funeral Home for 50 Years trickland S Funeral Home and Crematory www.stricklandfuneralhome.com 000DU38 Funeral Directors C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace 000DH1U Serving Our Community... Meeting Your Needs! Richard T. Brown Licensed Funeral Director Fax: 352-795-6694 5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lecanto, FL 34461 352-795-0111 brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com Homosassa 621-7700 Crystal River 795-8600 Inverness 860-1037 000D0QW Toll Free 1-877-345-BUSH www.bushhomeservices.com PEST CONTROL T ERMITE S PECIALISTS S INCE 1967 F REE I NSPECTIONS Obituaries Bill Savas Janet Masaoy OBITUARIES The Citrus County Chronicles policy permits both free and paid obituaries. SO YOU KNOW The Citrus County Chronicles policy permits free and paid obituaries. Email obits@chronicle online. com. Alice Seaman Deaths ELSEWHERE Leroy Sugarfoot Bonner, 69OHIO PLAYERS FRONTMAN DAYTON, Ohio Leroy Sugarfoot Bonner, frontman for the hit-making funk music band the Ohio Players, has died in southwest Ohio. He was 69. A spokeswoman for a Dayton-area funeral home confirmed he died Saturday and said the family has not scheduled any public services yet. There is also a posting about his death on his current bands Facebook page. The Ohio Players topped music charts in the 1970s with hits such as Love Rollercoaster, Fire, Skin Tight and Funky Worm. They were known for their brassy dance music, catchy lyrics and flamboyant outfits. Born in Hamilton, Ohio, Bonner helped form the Ohio Players in the 1960s. He had remained active in recent years with a spinoff called Sugarfoots Ohio Players. SO YOU KNOW Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next days edition.

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Moodys nicks Canada banks TORONTO Moodys Investors Service downgraded six of Canadas major financial institutions on Monday on concerns over high levels of consumer debt among Canadians and elevated house prices. The ratings affect TorontoDominion Bank, Scotiabank, Bank of Montreal, Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, National Bank and the Desjardins caisse populaire. Moodys vice president David Beattie noted Monday that the banks still rank among the highest-rated banks in the world. Canadas commodity-rich economy has fared better than other nations, and its banks have long been rated among the soundest in the world. There was no mortgage meltdown or subprime lending crisis. But there are fears of a housing bubble fueled by historic low interest rates. Barnes & Noble plans more closingsNEW YORK Barnes & Noble plans to continue to shrink its store base. The head of Barnes & Nobles retail group, Mitchel Klipper, said in an interview published Monday in The Wall Street Journal that the company will have 450 to 500 stores in a decade. Thats down from about 689 currently. Klipper said the chain plans to close about 20 stores a year over the period. The largest traditional U.S. bookstore has been facing tough competition from online retailers and discounters that sell books and has been focusing on its Nook tablet, ebook reader and e-book business for growth. A spokeswoman for Barnes & Noble said Klippers remarks dont mark any change in its store closing plan. We have historically closed approximately 15 stores per year for the past 10 years, said spokeswoman Mary Ellen Keating. Some closings are due to the fact that stores are unprofitable and others are stores moving to better locations. Hess to sell terminal networkNEW YORK Hess Corp. said Monday that it plans to sell its U.S. terminal network and shutter its New Jersey refinery, completing its exit from the refining business and continuing its shift in focus toward exploration and production. The New York-based company also disclosed that Elliott Associates LP and one of its affiliates plan to ask federal regulators for permission to buy a major stake in the company and may seek board seats at the annual meeting in May. The investment firm did not conduct talks with Hess before notifying the company of its plans. It could ask to buy shares worth more than $800 million, Hess said. The news sent Hess shares up more than 6 percent Monday, making it one of the markets biggest gainers.Hostess: Little Debbie for Drakes NEW YORK Hostess has picked the maker of Little Debbie as the lead bidder for its Drakes cakes. According to a filing in U.S. bankruptcy court, McKee Foods has offered $27.5 million in cash for the cake brands, which include Devil Dogs, Funny Bones and Yodels. The fate of Twinkies and other Hostess cakes are still being negotiated with other bidders. Hostess also said United States Bakery Inc. agreed to pay $28.9 million for its remained bread brands, which include Sweetheart, Eddys, Standish Farms and Grandma Emilies. That offer includes four bakeries, 14 depots and equipment. Earlier this month, Hostess picked Flowers Foods, which makes Tastykake and Natures Own and Bunny bread, as the lead bidder for six of its major bread brands, including Wonder.J.C. Penney brings back sales NEW YORK J.C. Penney is bringing back sales. The struggling department store chain this week will begin adding back some of the hundreds of sales it ditched last year in hopes of luring shoppers who were turned off when the discounts disappeared, CEO Ron Johnson told The Associated Press. Penney also plans to add price tags or signs for more than half of its merchandise to show customers how much theyre saving by shopping at the chain a strategy used by a few other retailers. For store-branded items such as Arizona, Penney will show comparison prices from competitors. The reversal comes on the eve of the one-year anniversary of its original vow to almost completely get rid of the sales that Americans covet but that cut into a stores profits. B USINESS C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE T UESDAY, J ANUARY29, 2013 A7 Money & MarketsAclick of the wrist gets you moare at www.chronicleonline.com 1,320 1,360 1,400 1,440 1,480 1,520 J ASOND 1,440 1,480 1,520 S&P 500 Close: 1,500.18 Change: -2.78 (-0.2%) 10 DAYS 12,400 12,800 13,200 13,600 14,000 J ASOND 13,400 13,680 13,960 Dow Jones industrials Close: 13,881.93 Change: -14.05 (-0.1%) 10 DAYSAdvanced1308 Declined1725 New Highs338 New Lows19 Vol. (in mil.)3,278 Pvs. Volume3,381 1,890 1,871 1392 1069 215 11 NYSE NASD DOW13915.7213862.5713881.93-14.05-0.10%+5.94% DOW Trans.5884.555837.825875.56+5.51+0.09%+10.72% DOW Util.470.26467.01469.25-0.80-0.17%+3.57% NYSE Comp.8911.668858.178880.01-24.51-0.28%+5.17% NASDAQ3161.833144.903154.30+4.59+0.15%+4.46% S&P5001503.231496.331500.18-2.78-0.19%+5.19% S&P4001097.421090.541094.99-1.71-0.16%+7.31% Wilshire 500015886.1115809.6115858.06-20.66-0.13%+5.75% Russell 2000907.91900.88906.71+1.47+0.16%+6.75% HIGH LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. YTD Stocks Recap AK Steel Hold AKS3.422 10.00 4.11-.33 -7.4 ttt-10.7-54.8dd... AT&T Inc T29.026 38.58 34.13+.11 +0.3 sss+1.2+18.5281.80f Ametek Inc AME29.860 41.55 40.99-.08 -0.2 tss+9.1+32.3220.24 Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD60.520 91.78 91.81+.10 +0.1 sss+5.0+49.61.57e Bank of America BAC6.729 12.20 11.48-.14 -1.2 ttt-1.1+58.6440.04 Capital City Bank CCBG6.350 12.23 11.91+.14 +1.2 sss+4.7+20.7dd... CenturyLink Inc CTL36.506 43.43 40.26+.13 +0.3 sss+2.9+14.7362.90 Citigroup C24.610 43.34 42.34-.57 -1.3 tss+7.0+43.4130.04 Commnwlth REIT CWH13.465 21.43 16.85+.01 +0.1 sss+6.4-6.9301.00 Disney DIS38.380 54.87 54.36-.02 ... rss+9.2+39.4170.75f Duke Energy DUK59.637 71.13 67.63-.29 -0.4 tss+6.0+10.7193.06 EPR Properties EPR40.049 48.92 47.40+.03 +0.1 sss+2.8+14.5213.00 Exxon Mobil Corp XOM77.139 93.67 91.11-.62 -0.7 tss+5.3+7.7122.28 Ford Motor F8.820 14.30 13.78+.20 +1.5 sss+6.4+7.3110.40f Gen Electric GE18.029 23.18 22.50+.21 +0.9 sss+7.2+20.2160.76f Home Depot HD44.220 68.13 67.58-.24 -0.4 tss+9.3+52.4241.16 Intel Corp INTC19.232 29.27 21.05+.09 +0.4 sss+2.1-18.8100.90 IBM IBM181.858 211.79 204.93-.04 ... rss+7.0+8.6143.40 LKQ Corporation LKQ14.630 23.51 23.40+.02 +0.1 sss+10.9+43.528... Lowes Cos LOW24.760 39.26 38.35-.23 -0.6 tss+8.0+45.7230.64 McDonalds Corp MCD83.317 101.29 94.36+.64 +0.7 sss+7.0-2.7183.08f Microsoft Corp MSFT26.263 32.95 27.91+.03 +0.1 sss+4.5-2.9150.92 Motorola Solutions MSI44.490 59.48 59.01+.41 +0.7 sss+6.0+32.5201.04 NextEra Energy NEE59.100 72.52 72.40-.10 -0.1 tss+4.6+24.7142.40 Penney JC Co Inc JCP15.692 43.18 19.22-.13 -0.7 ttt-2.5-43.0dd... Piedmont Office RT PDM16.100 19.56 19.48-.02 -0.1 tss+7.9+11.2170.80 Regions Fncl RF5.120 7.85 7.71+.02 +0.3 sss+8.1+45.3110.04 Sears Holdings Corp SHLD38.403 85.90 47.92+2.80 +6.2 sss+15.9+8.2dd... Smucker, JM SJM70.500 90.31 88.80-.46 -0.5 tss+3.0+12.4212.08 Sprint Nextel Corp S2.109 6.04 5.56-.08 -1.4 ttt-1.9+156.4dd... Texas Instru TXN26.069 34.24 33.04+.24 +0.7 sss+7.0+2.2210.84 Time Warner TWX33.620 51.29 50.09-.31 -0.6 tss+4.7+34.6181.04 UniFirst Corp UNF55.869 88.35 81.90+1.10 +1.4 sss+11.7+33.8160.15 Verizon Comm VZ36.805 48.77 42.77+.10 +0.2 stt-1.2+18.6cc2.06 Vodafone Group VOD24.955 30.07 27.05-.02 -0.1 tss+7.4+3.51.53e WalMart Strs WMT57.186 77.60 69.35+.35 +0.5 sss+1.6+14.8141.59 Walgreen Co WAG28.530 39.81 40.10+.43 +1.1 sss+8.3+17.2181.10 52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIVStocks of Local Interest Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b Annual rate plus stock. c Liquidating dividend. e Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i Sum of dividends paid after s tock split, no regular rate. j Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative iss ue with dividends in arrears. m Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yie ld not shown. r Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown. cc P/E exceeds 99. dd Loss in last 12 months. A Nomura analyst downgraded shares of the pet food retailer citing increased competition from Internet retailer Amazon.com. A Citi analyst downgraded the real estate investment trust and lowered its price target, citing the end of a major tenants lease. A Citi analyst upgraded the electronic makers stock to a Buy, saying that the weakening Japanese yen will help the company. A Goldman Sachs analyst downgraded the steel companys stock to Sell, saying the stock may fall after its recent rise. The energy company plans to sell its U.S. terminal network and close its New Jersey refinery, exiting from the refining business. The Standard & Poors 500 index fell modestly Monday following a pair of mixed economic reports, putting an end to its longest winning streak since 2004. Drops for stocks of raw materials producers offset gains for technology stocks. 40 50 60 $70 J ND Hess HES Close: $62.48 3.58 or 6.1% $39.67$67.86 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 14.4m (3.8x avg.) $21.34 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 14.0 0.6% 3 4 5 $6 J ND AK Steel AKS Close: $4.11 -0.33 or -7.4% $3.42$10.00 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 14.0m (1.5x avg.) $545.11 m 52-week range PE: Yield: ... 4.9% 5 10 15 $20 J ND Sony SNE Close: $15.12 0.71 or 4.9% $9.57$22.35 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 8.2m (2.4x avg.) $15.17 b 52-week range PE: Yield: ... 2.0% 15 16 17 $18 J ND Brookfield Office BPO Close: $16.61 -0.41 or -2.4% $15.25$18.60 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 3.4m (1.6x avg.) $8.39 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 29.7 3.4% 60 65 70 $75 J ND PetSmart PETM Close: $63.64 -6.35 or -9.1% $52.82$72.75 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 7.6m (7.6x avg.) $6.84 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 19.8 1.0% The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 1.96 percent Monday. Yields affect interest rates on consumer loans. NET 1YR TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO 3.25 3.25 3.25 .13 .13 .13 PRIME RATE FED FUNDS 3-month T-bill.060.07-0.01.06 6-month T-bill.110.10+0.01.07 52-wk T-bill.140.13+0.01.10 2-year T-note.280.28....21 5-year T-note.860.85+0.01.75 10-year T-note1.961.95+0.011.89 30-year T-bond3.143.13+0.013.06 NET 1YR BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO Barclays LongT-BdIdx2.752.72+0.032.55 Bond Buyer Muni Idx3.983.97+0.014.61 Barclays USAggregate1.881.82+0.062.13 Barclays US High Yield5.625.61+0.017.52 Moodys AAACorp Idx3.853.76+0.093.88 Barclays CompT-BdIdx1.141.09+0.05.97 Barclays US Corp2.802.74+0.063.49 YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO Commodities Crude oil rose on expectations for stronger demand following an encouraging report on manufacturing. Demand for longlasting goods rose more than economists expected in December. Crude Oil (bbl)96.4495.88+0.58+5.0 Ethanol (gal)2.402.38-0.04+9.7 Heating Oil (gal)3.063.06+0.16+0.5 Natural Gas (mm btu)3.293.44-4.50-1.9 Unleaded Gas (gal)2.932.88+2.07+4.4 FUELS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Gold (oz)1652.401656.40-0.24-1.3 Silver (oz)30.7631.18-1.36+1.9 Platinum (oz)1661.201693.90-1.93+8.0 Copper (lb)3.653.64+0.26+0.2 Palladium (oz)739.80740.25-0.06+5.3 METALS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Cattle (lb)1.291.26+2.10-0.7 Coffee (lb)1.491.48+0.47+3.6 Corn (bu)7.297.21+1.18+4.4 Cotton (lb)0.810.81+0.66+7.9 Lumber (1,000 bd ft)352.70358.80-1.70-5.7 Orange Juice (lb)1.141.13+0.57-1.7 Soybeans (bu)14.4814.41+0.47+2.0 Wheat (bu)7.797.77+0.35+0.2 AGRICULTURE CLOSE PVS. %CHG%YTD American Funds BalAm 21.19-.08 +3.9+14.3+11.9+5.4 BondAm 12.87-.01 -0.5+4.3+5.8+3.7 CapIncBuAm 54.07-.07 +2.5+13.5+9.5+2.9 CpWldGrIAm 38.74-.10 +4.1+17.9+9.1+1.8 EurPacGrAm 42.51-.20 +3.1+14.7+6.9+1.0 FnInvAm 42.84-.19 +5.1+16.5+12.3+3.7 GrthAmAm 36.04-.17 +4.9+17.8+11.8+3.6 IncAmerAm 18.67-.03 +3.4+13.4+11.7+5.0 InvCoAmAm 31.64-.06 +4.9+16.0+10.8+3.2 NewPerspAm 32.67-.22 +4.5+18.1+11.1+3.8 WAMutInvAm 32.62-.11 +4.5+14.6+13.4+3.9 Dodge & Cox Income 13.86-.01 0.0+6.0+6.2+6.8 IntlStk 36.19-.18 +4.5+17.6+7.7+1.1 Stock 129.90-.21 +6.6+22.4+12.7+2.7 Fidelity Contra 80.67-.23 +4.0+15.1+13.6+5.1 GrowCo 97.51-.24 +4.6+13.8+16.1+7.0 LowPriStk d 41.68-.05 +5.5+17.3+15.0+7.5 FrankTemp-Franklin Income Am 2.31... +3.6+15.0+11.1+5.8 FrankTemp-Templeton GlBond Am 13.39-.04 +0.4+10.1+8.5+9.4 GlBondAdv 13.34-.05 +0.3+10.3+8.7+9.7 Harbor IntlInstl d 63.76-.49 +2.6+13.6+9.4+1.8 PIMCO TotRetAm 11.20-.01 -0.2+7.4+6.7+7.2 T Rowe Price EqtyInc 27.89-.06 +5.4+18.1+12.9+3.9 GrowStk 39.41-.16 +4.3+16.1+14.7+5.9 Vanguard 500Adml 138.32-.25 +5.3+16.5+13.8+4.4 500Inv 138.31-.25 +5.3+16.4+13.6+4.3 GNMAAdml 10.83-.01 -0.6+1.5+5.2+5.5 MuIntAdml 14.42-.02 +0.5+4.5+5.9+5.2 STGradeAd 10.82... 0.0+3.7+3.6+3.8 TotBdAdml 11.00-.01 -0.6+3.0+5.4+5.4 TotIntl 15.38-.09 +2.7+12.3+6.3-0.5 TotStIAdm 37.66-.06 +5.6+16.6+14.3+5.1 TotStIdx 37.65-.06 +5.6+16.5+14.2+5.0 Welltn 35.10-.09 +3.7+13.0+10.9+5.9 WelltnAdm 60.62-.16 +3.7+13.1+10.9+6.0 TOTALRETURN FAMILYFUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*Mutual Funds Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week. Interest rates 000DVFJ Crystal River 305 S.E. US 19 352-795-7223 Associated PressU.S. stocks meandered between small gains and losses Monday, cooling off after a rally that had pushed the Standard & Poors 500 index above 1,500 for the first time since December 2007. Encouraging news about manufacturing provided an early boost, but stocks fell later after a report on the pace of home sales fell short of expectations. The government said before trading began that orders for long-lasting goods rose in December by 4.6 percent, helped by a 10 percent gain in orders for new aircraft. The report was a sign of strength for the manufacturing sector, a crucial driver of economic growth. Heavy equipment maker Caterpillar said separately that its fourth-quarter net income exceeded analysts expectations, after adjusting for the cost of a soured deal to buy a Chinese maker of roofing supports for mines. Caterpillar said it took a big charge in the quarter because the Chinese company had misrepresented its finances. Caterpillar Inc. said it expects growth in China to improve without regaining the levels seen in 2010 or 2011. The stock was the biggest gainer in the Dow Jones industrial average, closing up $1.87, or 2 percent, at $97.45. The Dow Jones transportation index, a proxy for future economic activity, edged higher, notching its tenth straight increase and its twelfth gain in the past 13 trading days. A half-hour after trading began, the National Association of Realtors said that its index of pending home sales fell in December, suggesting that sales of previously occupied homes may slow in the coming months. The report, which was weaker than many economists had expected, helped push stocks lower for much of the morning. They were roughly flat by midday, and spent the afternoon swapping small bumps and dips. The Dow closed down 14.05 points, or 0.1 percent, at 13,881.93. The S&P 500 fell 2.78, or 0.2 percent, to 1,500.18. The Nasdaq composite index added 4.59, or 0.2 percent, to 3,154. The Dow and the S&P 500 are rapidly approaching their all-time closing highs, reached on Oct. 9, 2007. The Dow is about 282 points below its high of 14,164.53; the S&P 500 is 65 points shy of its record of 1,565. Stocks mixed on shaky economic data Associated PressWASHINGTON Interest rates on short-term Treasury bills were mixed in Mondays auction with rates on three-month bills unchanged and rates on sixmonth bills rising to the highest level in four weeks. The Treasury Department auctioned $32 billion in three-month bills at a discount rate of 0.075 percent, unchanged from last week. Another $28 billion in six-month bills was auctioned at a discount rate of 0.110 percent, up from 0.095 percent last week. The six-month rate was the highest since those bills averaged 0.120 percent on Jan. 2. The discount rates reflect that the bills sell for less than face value. For a $10,000 bill, the threemonth price was $9,998.10, while a six-month bill sold for $9,994.44. That would equal an annualized rate of 0.076 percent for the threemonth bills and 0.085 percent for the six-month bills. Separately, the Federal Reserve said Monday that the average yield for oneyear Treasury bills, a popular index for making changes in adjustable rate mortgages, edged up to 0.15 percent last week from 0.14 percent the previous week. Rates mixed at T-bill auction Business BRIEFS From wire reports

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O PINION Page A8 TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2013 Gun control vs. people control In the mideast, most of Africa, and parts of southeast Asia, every lunatic over the age of 10 brandishes an AK or similar weapon. Im sure there are no registration or background checks in place to acquire one of these weapons. But the amazing part of this is that there are no school shootings, matricides or patricides, no theater shootings and probably almost non-existent convenience store shootings. Could it be that any thought of such a crime would be punished immediately, without thought to political correctness? Mentally deficient people are classified as such, without the benefit of excuses being made for their condition. Violent repeat offenders are called corpses over there. No one cares that the offender didnt have a normal childhood, didnt know his father, or never made first string on the baseball team. If you dont fit into society, then youre not in society. Here excuses are made for whatever the offense is, and lawyers are lined up to defend the perpetrator even when guilt is indisputable. Liberal (left wing) politicians wait with pen in hand to enact new legislation to protect the offenders (potential voters), while the innocent live in fear and the victims suffer. Useless laws are passed to control inanimate objects (firearms), while little is done to control the lunatic fringe that walks freely among us, planning, plotting and scheming to do unspeakable things. Im told that a 30-round magazine is more dangerous than 30 people standing in line at a methadone clinic. I dont think so. Paul Loeb Crystal River Most Americans want gun control Harry Cooper is mistaken if he thinks someone wants to take his freedom away ... all because the majority of Americans want gun control, and want it now. To quibble about the amount of shots fired per minute on an assault weapon is just a waste of time. I never said it fired 240 rounds per minute and you bringing it up was misinformation, so I would respectfully ask if you want to school someone, you should be truthful and factual. I got my information from the AP and the bottom line is that the AR-15 is a military assault-type killing machine and is used in most mass shootings. If the ban on assault weapons would never have expired, the mother of the Newtown murderer would not have been allowed to own and register one and the teachers and children would still be alive. I think any sensible person would rather face a knife, a hammer, and even a simple gun before they would any assault-type rifles. What is it going to take for people to see how destructive they really are? A ring side seat at the next massacre apparently. Its a new era, Mr. Cooper, and times have changed. Your freedom is intact so please, relax. E.G. Yerian Homosassa I ts not been a good couple of weeks for unions. Actually, its not been a good couple of decades. But lets take it one shock at a time. Earlier this month the Florida Supreme Court ratified the Florida Legislatures 3 percent garnishing of state workers wages, ostensibly to make workers contribute to their Florida Retirement System pension, but in fact to plug state budget holes at workers expense. Besides breaking a promise to workers, who were hired under one set of rules only to see the rules change without their say, the decision rewrites law to mean that a contract is whatever the Legislature says it is, whenever it chooses to say it. A good politician is quite as unthinkable as a good burglar, author H.L. Mencken once said. Hed never met some of our Florida justices. Last week, the House Government Operations Subcommittee doubled down on the demise of the Florida Retirement System. As if recent market history was a dream worthy of Bobby Ewing, the panel is proposing that starting next year, state workers definedbenefit pension plan be replaced by a 401(k)-like defined-contribution plan. The change would not only shift all the risk to workers. It would create risk: betting ones retirement stash on the stock, bond and money markets has been a twice-repeated disaster for those who saw their savings vanish in the 2001 and 2008 equity-market collapses. Thats not the Legislatures concern. Its loyalty to workers, such as it is, ends once the state is done with their service, if not before. House Government Operations Subcommittee Chairman Jason Brodeur, the Sanford Republican, summed up the insult to workers last week when he crudely and falsely equated workers current retirement system with a handout: There will no longer be a blank check written by the taxpayers. Brodeur was 6 years old when Ronald Reagan busted the air traffic controllers strike, so he came of age just as America was making the vilification of unions national policy again. Hes part of a generation of Reagan-suckled politicians to whom degrading workers comes naturally. He might as well have said that Florida was doing a teacher or a firefighter a favor to let either slave for relative poverty wages for 40 years, and that neither had earned that retirement check. How revolting that a legislator could be so cavalier about the states most valuable laborers, and get away with it. He can, because workers dont have much leverage to counter the slurs. The same day Brodeur began making funeral arrangements for the state retirement system, the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics announced that union membership fell by 400,000 in 2012, even as the economy added 2.4 million jobs. Just 11.3 percent of workers are unionized. Thats the lowest level since 1916 (when Upton Sinclairs Jungle was every corporate executives favorite book to ban). Take public sector workers out of the equation, and the proportion of unionized workers falls to 6.6 percent. In Florida, just 5.8 percent of workers are unionized, one of the lowest rates in the country, though 7.3 percent of workers are actually represented by unions. Thats a consequence of the so-called right-to-work rule written in the Constitution, one of the great heists of language and labor that gives unionbusters the cover of law. It gives a worker the right to profit from a unions collective bargaining power to ensure fairer work conditions, wages and benefits, without having to belong to the union or pay it dues. And still, unions are vilified, often by the same workers whove seen their wages and benefits erode precisely as union membership has declined. Between 1979 and 2007, earnings for almost all workers but those in the top 10 percent have either stagnated or declined, in inflation-adjusted dollars, according to the Congressional Budget Office. For the top 10 percent, earnings have jumped 33 percent. That was before the Great Recession, which decimated workers standing; for those lucky enough to have held on to jobs, pay has either declined or become stuck below inflationadjusted levels, especially in Florida (where teachers have gone without a raise for six years and where vibrant job sectors are tourisms burgerflippers and health cares bedpan-cleaners). Benefits have been slashed. Job security is a museum piece. The union-busting era has paid fantastic dividends for the busters. But it wouldnt have been as lucrative without three decades of indoctrination that painted unionized workers as the enemy and the rich as job creators. The numbers and the wreckage wrought by those job creators ridicule the fantasy. Pierre Tristam is editor and publisher of FlaglerLive.com, a nonprofit news service based in Palm Coast. He can be reached at editor@flaglerlive.com It is fair to judge peoples by the rights they will sacrifice most for. Clarence Day, 1920 Workers deserve better treatment CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARD Gerry Mulligan .................................... publisherMike Arnold .............................................. editor Charlie Brennan .......................... editor at largeCurt Ebitz .................................. citizen member Mac Harris ................................ citizen member Rebecca Martin .......................... guest member Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief CULTURE OF EXCESS Time for Gov. Scott to clean Citizens house L ast August, a Miami Herald article detailed exorbitant hotel stays with $600-per-night rooms and $200-plus dinners by the board members and senior management of Citizens Property Insurance Corporation, the states insurer of last resort. Following the news story, Gov. Rick Scott directed his inspector general to look into Citizens travel spending. What the governors inspector general found should raise the ire of every Floridian. In a 25-page report released Jan. 17, Chief Inspector Melinda Miguel found that Citizens board members and senior management spent more than $1.3 million in travel-related expenses last year between January and August. Although none of the lavish spending violated Citizens existing policies, it was excessive compared to the travel spending rules for state workers. Responding to the inspector generals report, Gov. Scott firmly declared, Any egregious expenses, unethical behavior or violation of the law must be grounds for dismissal. Florida Chief Financial Officer (CFO) Jeff Atwater also weighed in, condemning Citizens culture of excess and calling its lavish spending inexcusable. With the Citizens board members having behaved more like a private corporation than responsible stewards of a not-for-profit, tax-exempt government corporation supported by hardworking Florida families, the strong words of Gov. Scott and CFO Atwater must not be allowed to ring hollow. At a minimum, Citizens board members and senior management must be held to the same travel rules as all other state employees. Also, given Citizens earlier disbandment of its Office of Integrity, Citizens should follow 31 other state agencies by establishing its own inspector general to guard against excessive travel spending in the future. Furthermore, as correctly noted by Rep. Mike Fasano, the only way to change the Citizens culture of excess is to clean house. Accordingly, Gov. Scott is urged to back up his strong public words by supporting Rep. Fasanos call for all seven Citizens board members to resign immediately. While the en masse resignation of all seven board members would be extraordinary, strong action is warranted to send the unmistakable message that Citizens egregious culture of excess and blatant disregard of the public trust will no longer be tolerated. THE ISSUE: Rep. Fasanos call for Citizens board to resign.OUR OPINION: Strong action is warranted. OPINIONS INVITED The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the newspapers editorial board. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and hometown, including letters sent via email. Names and hometowns will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352563-3280 or email to letters@chronicleonline.com LETTERS to the Editor Report TV commercialsThe Sound Off caller who was disturbed by the loud television commercials should know that its been illegal since Dec. 13 for TV ads to exceed the average volume of the accompanying programs. To report violations of the Commercial Advertising Loudness Mitigation (Act) or CALM Act, call the Federal Communications Commission at 800-225-5322 or fill out an online complaint form at fcc.gov/complaints.What if it were Citrus?Rich Nugent voted no on the Hurricane Sandy aid relief. I wonder how he would have voted if it had been Citrus County that got hit.Looking for sense I was just curious. If the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners says that there are no new jobs in the county, why in the last two weeks have they been advertising for positions? Doesnt make a lot of sense.Looking for 600 jobs The front page of todays Chronicle (Jan. 22) says there are 600 jobs available in Citrus County. My question is, why is there only less than 25 listed in the paper as needed positions? Why not do a special feature on those positions and whats needed to apply to those in the Chronicle ? Great idea.Down South we used to Well, here we go again in todays Sound Off of Jan. 22; another, Up North we used to do it this way. I guess Im just getting to be an irritable 83-year-old born in the South who wishes I could read a column that says we should do what we used to do down South. Good use for old books At various books sales, flea markets, etc., there are tons of books that remain unsold. There are assisted living and nursing homes In the lower economic bracket where the residents have very little reading material. It would be a kind gesture if some of these leftover unsold books were contributed to these homes. Also, homeless shelters and shelters for abused women might also appreciate some reading material.Paying fair shareThis is in response to Ted Laportes letter regarding taxes. In that article he states, Does a not-wealthy, non-taxpaying teacher pay a fair share, (adding) to the intellect of our nation? I would like him to know that I am a teacher and I pay $1,138 a month in federal taxes, Social Security, retirement and Medicare. So we do pay our fair share. THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and h ave less than a minute to record. COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. S OUND OFF CALL 563-0579 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Pierre Tristam FLORIDA VOICES

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Deserving a raiseIn Saturdays paper (Jan. 19) a lady called complaining, because she worked the same job for six years, $5 an hour, and said she thinks she deserves a raise. I agree with her, but Ill bet you $1,000 shes anti-union.Credit costsThis is answer to the Cash or check only, please. I can totally relate to that as a small business owner. I do take debit cards and credit cards, but its definitely more cost efficient for us to take checks or cash, because the credit card and debit card companies are charging small businesses such exorbitant fees were paying anywhere from $3,000 to $7,000 a year in just fees. So needless to say, we have to charge or our prices have to go up to compensate (for) it. So I totally understand small businesses wanting to take checks and cash. But I dont understand the doctors offices, because for what they charge, they should take anything.Thanks for help This is a very belated but very heartfelt thank you to Mr. Ed Warren, of Warren Pools in Lecanto. In early December, my car broke down in front of his place of business. Not only did he allow me to leave my car on his property until my husband could go fix it, but he also insisted on driving me to work and got me there on time. Mr. Warren, you may think what you did was a small thing. To me, it was huge, and I want to thank you so much. May God bless you with a peacefilled New Year. Thank you.Look for work The Sound Off has more people complaining about their pay, havent got a pay raise in six years working for the county. Tough. If you think youre better, take your resume and your experience and go out into the real marketplace and see what youre worth. You might be pleased youre getting what you got for the past six years. So if youre not happy where you are, dont sit there and complain. Get off your butt and move. Go somewhere else. Get better pay. Get exactly what youre worth. You may find out its a lot less.Dwindling? To me and to a lot of other people, the best part of the Chronicle is the Sound Off and you seem to be printing less and less of the Sound Off. I dont understand why, especially since all the snowbirds are down. Give me an answer and let me know why youre printing less and less of the Sound Off. Editors note: Actually, we have expanded the space allotted for letters and Sound Off. O PINION C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE T UESDAY, J ANUARY29, 2013 A9 000DOU4 Next to ACE in Homosassa ( 352 ) 628-3443 License #DN 17606 Ledgerdentistry.com FREE SECOND OPINION. We Cater to Cowards! General & Cosmetic Dentistry HONEST PROFESSIONAL COMPASSIONATE Most Insurance Accepted Se Habla Espaol 000DTC7 1 Regina Blvd., Beverly Hills (Across From Fire Station) 746-0330 Beverly Hills DENTAL CENTER Dentures, Partials & Bridges Invisalign (Removable Braces) Children Welcome Veneers, Bonding, & Extractions One Visit Root Canals Gum Surgery Implants One Hour Whitening Open Fridays Raphael C. Lewis, D.D.S. P.A. 000DQZY NEW PATIENT SPECIAL! $ 150 00 Must Present Coupon At Time Of Visit FMX 00210 Prophy 01110 Initial Oral Exams 00150 The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination, or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination, or treatment. Need A Second Opinion? FREE Consultation With the Dentist Senior Citizens Discount (Ask For Details) Value $ 215 EXAM, X-RAYS & CLEANING ALL INCLUSIVE IMPLANTS $ 1,995 Dont mess with our guns In my view, the pro-gun rallies held across the country on Saturday, Jan. 19, are precisely what gun owners need, and what we should keep on doing to promote our pro-gun rights. Honest, lawabiding gun owners coming together to defend an all-out assault on our Second Amendment. In my opinion, the antigun minority, that includes the president and vice president, have now shown their true colors, and their woefully misguided intentions. The intent to pass sweeping firearms legislation while tap dancing on the graves of those innocent children who were killed in Connecticut by a mentally unstable individual, speaks volumes. They could care less about real public safety, and in the words of Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, Never let a good opportunity go to waste, are following that advice to the letter. What they have done in the last week is trample on my rights, and your rights protected by the Second Amendment, and if we let them get away with it, they will become even more emboldened to be ever more restrictive. In my opinion, absolutely none of the legislation or executive orders issued by the president this past week, will do anything to promote public safety none. It is becoming more apparent that this is nothing more than a sham, and the actions taken this week aimed at continuing to advance an anti-gun, liberal agenda, 45 years in the making. If you are a law-abiding gun owner, and are just sitting on your duff, its time to get off of it, and start writing letters to your newspapers, sending emails, and contacting your legislators. Tell them you are not going to put up with any of this any longer. We have the U.S. Constitution on our side. We should have grown sick and tired of what I consider to be anti-American political antics. We should also say enough is enough when it comes to them getting away with using tragedy, and suffering, for political purposes. By the way, TheNew York Times, Chicago Tribuneand L.A. Timeshavent even mentioned the rally in their newspapers. Goes to show how truly biased they can be. Lastly, this is not, nor will it ever be Nazi Germany, and we should steadfastly refuse to put up with a liberal, elitist minority, who think they know whats best for the majority of gun owners all across America. Wayne C. Sessa Beverly Hills Thanks to sponsors The Council of Catholic Women at Our Lady of Grace Church in Beverly Hills would like to thank the following businesses and artisans for their contributions to our Tricky Tray, Jan. 19: Anastasias; Applebees; Bangkok Thai Restaurant; Beef OBradys; Bentlys Restaurant; Beverly Hills Bowl; Beverly Hills Discount Liquors; Black Diamond Ranch Pro Shop; Brentwood Golf Course; Brooklyn Deli Too!; Car Wash of Beverly Hills; Cattle Dog Coffee Roasters; Chicken King; Citrus Springs Golf & Country Club; Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club at Skyview; Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club at Meadow or Oaks; Citrus County Chronicle ; Color Country Nursery; Countryside Animal Clinic; Curves; CVS, Beverly Hills; Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park; Garys Automotive; El Ranchito Mexican Restaurant; Ferraras; Fresh Start Donut; Golf Club Outlet-Jack Reagle; Heidis Italian Restaurant; Inverness Moose Lodge No. 2112; Knights of Columbus No. 6168; Kristys Salon; Lakeside Country Club; Little Golf Shop; Little Joeys; Main Street Restaurant; Mango Grill; McLeod House Bistro; New England Pastry & Caf; Olive Garden; Outback Steakhouse; Publix Super Markets; Reds; Rosemarys Hallmark; Rustic Ranch; Seven Rivers Golf and Country Club; Skeets Family Barbeque; Solar Nails & Spa; TJ Maxx; The Art Center Theatre; The Greenery Nursery; Torrellis Pizza; Twisted Oaks Golf Club; Twisted Oaks Grill; Walmart; and Winn-Dixie, Meadowcrest. Bernita Becker president, Council of Catholic Women Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church Beverly Hills Looking for Workforce studyRe: Forum to help job seekers What study did the Workforce Connection do and when. I read the Chronicle every day lets see the study. Its hard to believe there is a job skills deficiency in Citrus County. If fact I would like to see the job list. This sounds like the EDC, funding time rolls around, they come up with business negotiations with companies to move or add jobs in the county. But they are secret, cant reveal who the negotiations are with for fear they will pull out. Sure this isnt a ploy to justify their existence, Workforce Connection that is. Print the study. Let us see it. Give us some background concerning the study. Lets see the job list. Oh, I got a bridge to sell you, too. Kim Cloud Lecanto Editors note: The report is too long to print in the newspaper; however, those interested can access it at www.clmwork force.com/default.asp. Scroll down to the story, Workforce Connection to convene Skills Gap task force, and read the attached Addressing the Skills Gap report. A second report, Occupations for Aspirational Industries, also contains information on the skills gap. Going green means independence In November 2012, I took a trip to North Carolina to see these powerful windmills which I thought were amazing. To witness these beautiful mills, aware production will do little harm to humans and something beneficial for future generations is being generated, was breathtaking. When I learned there was a new study from the University of North Carolina that proves the state of North Carolina can have 100 percent power coming from off-shore wind turbines, with out environmental impacts, I knew others saw similar values, like Duke Energy, who plans to build three pilot-off-shore wind turbines? Perhaps there is more to the diversity of Duke/Progress merger, like off-shore wind turbines in the Gulf, since they probably will not fix an old fractured nuclear plant? Going green concerns from letter Port or Green, such as; operational cost-benefit ratios, pocketing profit CEOs, high maintenance, taxpayers footing the bill, doesnt make Duke any better or BOCCs Port any different. We live these concerns in every day life with many present day corporations and governmental leadership, besides there are many hidden nuclear costs, such as biological health issues, waste product removal, court environmental cases, which are very costly. As for Port Citrus, will this industry ever produce anything more than, Cost? So what is quality life and honesty? That nuclear alone, will always support Americas electrical demands, can Earth, forever have plenty of oil, does jobs and total profit completely come from present day existing old businesses, should feasibility studies go on and on maintaining resolution to false conclusions, are government grants really free and did American Taxpayers never, produced, the largest Global Industry that could have been, entitled, Federal, State and Local Manufacturing Tax Inc.? Character and superiority belongs to tax paying uninfluenced homeowners who know true values of solar paneled roofs. The old proverb, Dont put all your eggs in one basket, suggests concentrating all prospects or resources in one thing, produces disadvantages. Heterogeneity is more than going green, its creating independency. Sandra Brasmeister Inverness Relief bill bloated Wasnt it Obama who mentioned cutting unnecessary spending? Then why was almost $600 million in pork barrel funds put in the New Jersey storm victim bill by the Democratic Senate and shamefully signed by the president? Claude Strass Homosassa Letters to the EDITOR Do you live here?This is for the Toasted manatee write-in: I was wondering, does this person even live in this state?Should be ashamed I just read the article called Toasted manatees in your paper. The person who wrote this has to be utterly stupid and the Chronicle has to be more stupid to even print such a thing. You ought to be ashamed of yourselves. Go back where youre fromThis is in reference to the Toasted manatee (Sound Off). Two days ago we toasted the president of the United States and we did not eat him. I was just curious what state this clown is from or if he is serious. If so, please go back to wherever you came from. The manatees are a wondrous source of tourist attraction here and some people just shouldnt take things literally. Outrageous Sound OffI am a Citrus County resident for 20 years. I have never saw anything so outrageous in Sound Off as I read today. How can you print something so stupid as to Toast the manatees? Some person had to be a hoax calling in and saying, Where can I find toasted manatees, Ive never eaten any? Thats outrageous. I just cant believe that you would print something like that unless you were just looking to rile all of us up or to give us a good laugh. I dont find anything funny in the thought. Im very, very, very disturbed.Editors note: Obviously, the person calling in Toast the manatees? was poking fun at our unfortunate Jan. 16 headline with a double-meaning Time to toast manatees.I am sure the caller regrets the angst they have caused. We sure do. Hot Corner: TOASTED MANATEE Hot Corner: HEATER REPAIR Send heater back This is in reference to the EdenPURE heater someone repaired. We had to send our whole heater back to the company. They said they had no repair people locally and they sent us a new heater. Check battery in remoteHeater repair Sound Off: Check your battery in the remote of your EdenPURE. If its under warranty, they will repair it for free, including shipping. Sound OFF

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Wheeee! Associated Press Ashlyn Stalcup, 2, calls for her grandmother Lisa Huff to push her Monday during a visit to the playground in Sevierville, Tenn. Chicago hits 40 murders in 2013CHICAGO A bloody weekend in which seven people were killed and six wounded has put an abrupt end at least for now to hopes that Chicago was at least putting a lid on its frightening homicide rate. With a few days left in the month, the nations thirdlargest city now finds itself on the cusp of its deadliest January in more than a decade. The news comes just after Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy had announced that after several violent months, Chicago had seen a drop in homicides at the end of 2012 and for the first few weeks of 2013. Police say the homicide rate is a reflection of the citys gang problem and a proliferation of guns. Chicago has for years tried to cut off the flow of guns. It has what city officials have called the strictest handgun ordinance in the U.S. Missile launcher at gun buyback SEATTLE Seattle police worked with Army officials Monday to track down the history of a nonfunctional missile launcher that showed up at a weapons buyback program and determine whether it was legal or possibly stolen from the military. A man standing outside the event Saturday bought the military weapon for $100 from another person there, according to Detective Mark Jamieson. The single-use device is a launch tube assembly for a Stinger portable surfaceto-air missile and already had been used. As a controlled military item, it is not available to civilians through any surplus or disposal program offered by the government, according to Jamieson. Scouts mull lifting ban on gays NEW YORK The Boy Scouts of America may soon give sponsors of troops the authority to decide whether to accept gays as scouts and leaders a potentially dramatic retreat from an exclusionary nationwide policy that has provoked relentless protests. Under the change now being discussed, the different religious and civic groups that sponsor Scout units would be able to decide for themselves how to address the issue either maintaining an exclusion of gays, as is now required of all units, or opening up their membership. Gay-rights activists were elated at the prospect of change, sensing another milestone to go along with recent advances for samesex marriage and the end of the ban on gays serving openly in the military. However, Southern Baptist leaders who consider homosexuality a sin were furious about the possible change and said its approval might encourage Southern Baptist churches to support other boys organizations instead of the BSA. From wire reports Nation BRIEFS N ATION & W ORLD Page A10 TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE In space Associated Press Scientists in Iran surround a monkey ahead of a space launch. Iran said Monday it had successfully sent the monkey into space, describing the launch as another step toward Tehrans goal of a manned space flight. Mali military enters TimbuktuSEVARE, Mali Backed by French helicopters and paratroopers, Malian soldiers entered the fabled city of Timbuktu on Monday after al-Qaida-linked militants who ruled the outpost by fear for nearly 10 months fled into the desert, setting fire to a library that held thousands of manuscripts dating to the Middle Ages. French Col. Thierry Burkhard, chief military spokesman in Paris, said that there had been no combat with the Islamists but that the French and Malian forces did not yet control the town. Still, there was celebration among the thousands of Timbuktu residents who fled the city rather than live under strict and pitiless Islamic rule and the dire poverty that worsened after the tourist industry was destroyed. Egyptians protest Islamist leader CAIRO Protesters battled police for hours in Cairo on Monday and thousands marched through Egypts three Suez Canal cities in direct defiance of a nighttime curfew and state of emergency, handing a blow to the Islamist President Mohammed Morsis attempts to contain five days of spiraling political violence. Nearly 60 people have been killed in the wave of unrest, clashes, rioting and protests that have touched cities across the country but have hit the hardest in the canal cities, where residents have virtually risen up in outright revolt. Dutch Queen abdicating THE HAGUE, Netherlands The Netherlands Queen Beatrix announced Monday that she is ending her reign after 33 years and passing the crown to her eldest son, who has long been groomed to be king but who will have to work hard to match his mothers popularity. The widely expected abdication comes at a time of debate over the future of the largely ceremonial Dutch monarchy, but also as calm has descended upon the Netherlands after a decade of turmoil that saw Beatrix act as the glue that held together an increasingly divided society.British granny appeals sentence BALI, Indonesia A court official said a convicted British grandmother will appeal the death sentence she received from an Indonesian court for smuggling cocaine worth $2.5 million into the resort island of Bali. Lindsay June Sandiford was found guilty last week in Denpasar District Court. She was accused of damaging the image of Bali as a tourism destination and weakening the governments drug prevention program. World BRIEFS From wire reports Associated PressWASHINGTON Side by side, leading Democratic and Republican senators pledged Monday to propel far-reaching immigration legislation through the Senate by summer providing a possible path to citizenship for an estimated 11 million people now in the U.S. illegally. The senators acknowledged pitfalls that have doomed such efforts in the past, but they suggested that Novembers elections with Hispanics voting heavily for President Barack Obama and other Democrats could make this time different. Passage of the emotionally charged legislation by the Democratic-controlled Senate is far from assured, and a taller hurdle could come later in the House, which is dominated by conservative Republicans whove shown little interest in immigration overhaul. Obama will lay out his own proposals Tuesday, most of which mirror the Senate plans. Besides the citizenship provision, including new qualifications, the Senate measure would increase border security, allow more temporary workers to stay and crack down on employers who would hire illegal immigrants. The plans are still short on detail, and all the senators conceded that months of tedious and politically treacherous negotiations lie ahead. But with a re-elected Obama pledging his commitment, the lawmakers argued that six years after the last sustained congressional effort at an immigration overhaul came up short in the Senate, chances for approval this year are much better. Other bipartisan groups of senators have stood in the same spot before, trumpeting similar proposals, said Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y. But we believe this will be the year Congress finally gets it done. The politics on this issue have been turned upside down, Schumer said, arguing that polls show more support than ever for immigration changes and political risk in opposing it. Elections. Elections, said Sen. John McCain, RAriz. The Republican Party is losing the support of our Hispanic citizens. And we realize that there are many issues on which we think we are in agreement with our Hispanic citizens, but this is a preeminent issue with those citizens. Obama got 71 percent of the Latino vote in November compared to 27 percent for Republican Mitt Romney. Senators vow immigration change Bipartisan group says reform will go forward, despite obstacles Associated PressSANTA MARIA, Brazil The nightclub Kiss was hot, steamy from the press of beer-fueled bodies dancing close. The Brazilian country band on stage was whipping the young crowd into a frenzy, launching into another fast-paced, accordion-driven tune and lighting flares that spewed silver sparks into the air. It was another Saturday night in Santa Maria, a university town of about 260,000 on Brazils southernmost tip. Then, in the pre-dawn hours of Sunday, it turned into a scene of indescribable horror as sparks lit a fire in the soundproofing material above the stage, churning out black, toxic smoke as flames raced through the former beer warehouse, killing 231 people. I was right there, so even though I was far from the door, at least I realized something was wrong, said Rodrigo Rizzi, a firstyear nursing student who was next to the stage when the fire broke out and watched the tragedy unfold, horror-stricken and helpless. Others, who couldnt see the stage, never had a chance. They never saw it coming. There was no fire alarm, no sprinklers, no fire escape. In violation of state safety codes, fire extinguishers were not spaced every 1,500 square feet, and there was only one exit. As the city buried its young Monday, questions were raised about whether Brazil is up to the task of ensuring the safety in venues for the World Cup next year, and the Olympics in 2016. Four people were arrested for questioning, including two band members and the nightclubs co-owner. Rizzi hadnt even planned on going out that night. He was talked into it by friends and knew dozens at the club. He said the first sign of a problem was insulation dripping above the stage. The flames at that point were barely noticeable, just tiny tongues lapping at the flammable material. The bands singer, Marcelo dos Santos, noticed it and tried to put out the smoldering embers by squirting water from a bottle. The show kept going. Then, as the ceiling continued to ooze hot molten foam, dos Santos grabbed the drummers water bottle and aimed it at the fire. That didnt work either, Rizzi said. A security guard handed the band leader a fire extinguisher. He aimed, but nothing came out; the extinguisher didnt work. At that point, Rizzi said, the singer motioned to the band to get out. Rizzi calmly made his way to the door the clubs only exit still thinking it was a small fire that would quickly be controlled. The cavernous building was divided into several sections, including a pub and a VIP lounge and hundreds of the college students and teenagers crammed in couldnt see the stage. They continued to drink and dance, unaware of the danger spreading above them. Then, the place became an inferno. The band members who headed straight for the door lived. One, Danilo Brauner, went back to get his accordion, and never made it out. No alarms, one exit Details emerge in Brazil nightclub fire that killed 231 Associated Press A police officer places flowers Monday outside the Kiss nightclub in Santa Maria, Brazil. A fast-moving fire roared through the crowded, windowless nightclub early Sunday, killing 231 people. Many of the victims were under 20 years old, including some minors. Associated PressOn Facebook, he describes himself as a wounded warrior ... very wounded. Brendan Marrocco was the first soldier to survive losing all four limbs in the Iraq War, and doctors revealed Monday that hes received a double-arm transplant. Those new arms already move a little, he tweeted a month after the operation. Marrocco, a 26-year-old New Yorker, was injured by a roadside bomb in 2009. He had the transplant Dec. 18 at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, his father said Monday. Alex Marrocco said his son does not want to talk with reporters until a news conference Tuesday at the hospital, but the younger Marrocco has repeatedly mentioned the transplant on Twitter and posted photos. Ohh yeah today has been one month since my surgery and they already move a little, Brendan Marrocco tweeted Jan. 18. Responding to a tweet from NASCAR driver Brad Keselowski, he wrote: dude I cant tell you how exciting this is for me. I feel like I finally get to start over. The infantryman also received bone marrow from the same dead donor who supplied his new arms. That novel approach is aimed at helping his body accept the new limbs with minimal medication to prevent rejection. The military sponsors operations like these to help wounded troops. About 300 have lost arms or hands in Iraq or Afghanistan. Unlike a life-saving heart or liver transplant, limb transplants are aimed at improving quality of life, not extending it. Quality of life is a key concern for people missing arms and hands prosthetics for those limbs are not as advanced as those for feet and legs. He was the first quad amputee to survive, and there have been four others since then, Alex Marrocco said. The Marroccos want to thank the donors family for making a selfless decision ... making a difference in Brendans life, the father said. Soldier gets double-arm transplant

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Basketball/ B2 Hockey/ B2 Scoreboard/ B3 Entertainment/ B4 Magic without tricks as Orlando, Brooklyn extend their respective streaks./ B2 Section B TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE SPORTS BRIEFS Aresco: Big East wants 12th school CROMWELL, Conn. The Big East conference is looking to add another school, commissioner Mike Aresco said Monday. Aresco spoke at a local chamber of commerce breakfast, and talked to reporters afterward. He said the Big East wants to keep its name, and no longer has any plans to expand west of Texas. We probably at some point will add a 12th team, Aresco said. We are going to have 11 when Navy comes in ... Theres no urgency, but we think well probably think about adding a 12th team. Jeter back on field taking groundersTAMPA Derek Jeter worked out on a baseball field Monday for the first time since breaking his left ankle last October. The 38-year-old New York Yankees captain fielded 55 grounders on the grass in front of the infield dirt at shortstop at the teams minor-league complex. He also hit in a batting cage. Everything went well, Jeter said as he drove out of the complex. Jeter, who spent 90 minutes at the complex, did not run he may not until spring training starts in midFebruary. The 13-time AllStar expects to start in New Yorks opener against Boston on April 1. Yankees pitchers and catchers are scheduled to report for spring training two weeks from Tuesday.Michigan moves to No. 1 in AP poll Michigan is No. 1 in The Associated Press college basketball poll for the first time since its Fab Five days 20 years ago. For the second straight week the No. 1 team lost. This time it was Duke, which was routed 90-63 by Miami in the third-worst defeat by a top-ranked team. Michigan received 51 first-place votes from the 65-member national media panel Monday. Kansas moved up one spot to No. 2. They are the only one-loss teams in the poll. Indiana, Florida, which drew the other first-place vote, and Duke complete the top five. For the complete poll, see Page B3 Baylor still reigns in womens poll Baylor remained No. 1 in The Associated Press womens basketball poll for a fourth straight week after two more Big 12 wins. Baylor had 37 first-place ballots Monday. Notre Dame and UConn stayed second and third. The Huskies received the other three first-place votes. For the complete poll, see Page B3 Police: Ratliffs BAC twice the limit GRAPEVINE, Texas Police said Dallas Cowboys defensive lineman Jay Ratliff had a blood-alcohol level twice the legal limit the night he was arrested after a car accident. Grapevine police said Monday Ratliffs blood-alcohol level was measured at 0.16 percent. Ratliff was arrested last week after a late-night accident. Ratliffs pickup truck sideswiped a semitrailer truck. Ratliff refused a breath test, but police obtained a warrant for a blood sample. His arrest came weeks after fellow Cowboy Josh Brent was indicted on an intoxicated manslaughter count in the Dec. 8 crash that killed his friend and Cowboys practice squad player Jerry Brown. From wire reports Associated Press Tiger Woods hits out of a bunker on the 10th hole Monday during the fourth round of the Farmers Insurance Open at the Torrey Pi nes Golf Course in San Diego. J IM L ITKE Associated PressSuper Bowl week is beginning to resemble one of those family reunions where your crazy uncle says something outrageous, but just true enough to spark a discussion worth having. Two years ago, it was Steelers linebacker James Harrison ripping the NFL and commissioner Roger Goodell for excessive fines on the violent hits that were his specialty, and generally trying to make the game too safe. Well lay a pillow down where Im going to tackle them, he said mockingly at one point, so they dont hit the ground too hard, Mr. Goodell. This time around, the provocateur was Bernard Pollard, the Ravens notoriously punishing safety. Covering much of the same ground Harrison had, Pollard said he didnt think the NFL would be around in 30 years because rule changes designed to make it even safer would eventually drive away fans if something tragic didnt hasten the games end even sooner. The only thing Im waiting for ... and, Lord, I hope it doesnt happen ... is a guy dying on the field, Pollard told CBSSports .com. It may be easy to dismiss a handful of players exaggerated views, but the notion that the Concussions? We all signed up for it Associated Press SAN DIEGO T iger Woods was so good for so long at Torrey Pines that it didnt matter how bad it looked at the end. In a finish that was fitting for such a long and exasperating week, Woods built an eightshot lead with five holes to play on Monday until he lost patience with the slow play and started losing shots that only determined the margin of victory. Despite two bogeys and a double bogey in the final hour, he closed with an even-par 72 for a four-shot victory in the Farmers Insurance Open. Im excited the way I played all week, Woods said. I hit the ball well pretty much did everything well and built myself a nice little cushion. I had some mistakes at the end, but all my good play before that allowed me to afford those mistakes. He won for the 75th time in his PGA Tour career, seven behind the record held by Sam Snead. Woods won this tournament for the seventh time, and he set a PGA Tour record by winning at Torrey Pines for the eighth time, including his 2008 U.S. Open. Woods also has won seven times at Bay Hill and at Firestone. Torrey Pines is a public course that he has turned into his private domain. I dont know if anybody would have beaten him this week, said Nick Watney, who got within five shots of Woods when the tournament was still undecided until making three Tiger afire at Torrey Pines bogeys on his next five holes. Hes definitely on his game. Defending champion Brandt Snedeker (69) and Josh Teater (69) tied for second. As much as Woods got off to a good start, equal attention was given to slow play, an increasing problem on the PGA Tour. It got a little ugly toward the end, Woods said. I started losing patience a little bit with the slow play. I lost my concentration a little bit. He made bogey from the bunker on No. 14. He hooked a tee shot off the eucalyptus trees and into a patch of ice plant on the 15th, leading to double bogey. After another long wait on the 17th tee, he popped up his tee shot and made another bogey. With a four-shot lead on the 18th Kyle Stanley blew a three-shot lead a year ago he hit wedge safely behind the hole for a two-putt par. Woods finished with a 14-under 274 for his 14th win in California, and 11th in San Diego County. I think a win always makes it special, especially the way I played, Woods said. To have not won would have been something else because I really played well. Playing the way I did for most of this tournament, until the very end, the last five holes, I felt like I should have won this tournament. I put myself in a position where I had a big enough lead, and thats basically how I felt like I played this week. I know I can do that, and it was nice to be able to do it. See LITKE / Page B3 J OE K ORNECKI III CorrespondentLECANTO The Seven Rivers Christian Warriors boys basketball team played stifling defense in a 48-9 rout of the Branford Buccaneers on Monday. Junior Adam Gage and sophomore guard Cory Weiand had 19 points apiece to lead the Warriors in the contest. Weiand hit five 3-pointers on the evening and Gage pulled down seven rebounds while hitting three 3-pointers. We played solid defense ... everybody played hard ... and we boxed out pretty good, Seven Rivers assistant coach Ed Wilson said. It was like a practice game ... and we were trying to work on some things with districts coming up. We accomplished what we wanted to accomplish. In the first half, the Warriors (10-10) dominated right from the get-go behind hot shooting beyond the arc from Gage and Weiand en route to a 32-4 lead at intermission. The Warriors defense didnt allow a single point in the second quarter, as they outscored the Buccaneers 20-0. In the second-half, the Warriors crippling defense held the Buccaneers (2-19) to only five points. Weiand led the Warriors with eight second-half points. We came out firing, and we played good defense, Weiand said. Buccaneers sunk Seven Rivers routs Branford 48-9 See SUNK / Page B3 Eagles dispatched, Lady Warriors eye Saints C.J. RISAK CorrespondentOCALA The preliminaries are over. The stage is set for the main event in the District 2A-3 girls basketball tournament. Seven Rivers Christian confirmed its berth in the 2A-3 final with a resounding 52-18 victory against overmatched Leesburg First Academy on Monday at Ocala St. John Lutheran. Combine that with host St. Johns easy 57-3 win over Gainesville Cornerstone Academy, and the expected pairing is set. Seven Rivers vs. St. John will be at 7 p.m. Thursday at St. John. St. John is a very good team, said Seven Rivers coach Gary Dreyer, his team now 16-6. Well have to play a real strong defense and shoot well. Certainly the Warriors will need better shooting than they displayed against First Academy. Despite the blowout score, Seven Rivers missed more than a dozen easy shots from inside the paint. In the first half, while the Warriors did build a 2812 halftime score, they connected on just 11 of 45 shots, or 24.4 percent. We shot that well? was Dreyers reply, only half in jest. Their second-half shootingwas even worse just 11 of 52, or 21.2 percent. Add to that some horrible free-throw shooting (7 of 25, 28 percent) and Dreyer can only hope he wont see a repeat. 52-18 shellacking sets up district title showdown Woods hits his second shot on the fairway of the 13th hole during the fourth round. See WARRIORS / Page B3

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Associated PressNEW YORK Deron Williams had 20 points and nine assists, and the Brooklyn Nets beat the Orlando Magic 97-77 on Monday night for their eighth straight home victory. The Nets rebounded from their first two-game losing streak under P .J. Carlesimo, finishing off a four-game sweep of the Magic, who dropped their sixth straight. Brook Lopez scored 16 points and Joe Johnson had 13 for the Nets, who tied a franchise record with their 11th victory in January and can break it when they host the NBA champion Miami Heat on Wednesday. Nikola Vucevic had 18 points and nine rebounds for the Magic, who lost for the 17th time in 19 games. Their last two losses had each been by two points, but they were blown out of this one early. The Nets completed their first four-game sweep of the Magic since 2003-04, the season before Orlando drafted Dwight Howard. Brooklyn led by at least 20 points in all four games and is now 17-0 against teams that were under .500 when they played them. Bulls 93, Bobcats 85 CHICAGO Jimmy Butler scored a career-high 19 points and Nate Robinson added 15 as the Chicago Bulls defeated the Charlotte Bobcats 93-85 on Monday night. Luol Deng returned to the Bulls lineup after missing five games with a hamstring injury, and scored 12 points in 31 minutes. The Bulls won three of five without Deng as his absence was eased by the strong play of Butler, who returned to a reserve role. Joakim Noah finished with 13 points, 18 rebounds and seven assists to help Central Division-leading Chicago win for the seventh time in its last nine games. Kemba Walker and Ben Gordon led the Bobcats with 18 points apiece. Charlotte has lost nine of its last 11 games. Kings 96, Wizards 94WASHINGTON Isaiah Thomas made a floater with a second to play, capping a seesaw finish as the Sacramento Kings broke a fourgame losing streak with a 96-94 win over the Washington Wizards on Monday night. Thomas dribbled down the clock after the Wizards tied the game on Martell Websters short jumper with 7.9 seconds to play, then drove down the middle and put the ball in with a soft touch from 9 feet. Thomas had 10 of his 22 points in the fourth quarter and also had seven assists. Francisco Garcia scored 17 points for the Kings in a game that included 16 ties and 11 lead changes. Emeka Okafor scored a season-high 23 points and grabbed 15 rebounds, and John Wall had 19 points and six assists for the Wizards. Grizzlies 103, 76ers 100 PHILADELPHIA Marc Gasol scored a season-high 27 points and Rudy Gay had 26 to lead the Memphis Grizzlies to a 103-100 win over the Philadelphia 76ers on Monday night. Jerryd Bayless scored a season-high 21 points to help the Grizzlies win without point guard Mike Conley, out with a sprained left ankle. The Grizzlies rallied from 17 down to take control late in the fourth. Bayless missed a jumper, Gay grabbed the rebound and made it 101-100 on a bucket with 13.3 seconds left. Philadelphias Thaddeus Young missed a short attempt in front of the basket and the Grizzlies grabbed the rebound. Gay was fouled and made both free throws for a threepoint cushion. Nick Young couldnt get the tying shot off at the buzzer for the Sixers. Evan Turner scored a season-high 27 points. Warriors 114, Raptors 102 TORONTO David Lee had 21 points and 12 rebounds, Stephen Curry scored 17 points before leaving with a injury, and the Golden State Warriors beat the Toronto Raptors 114-102 on Monday night. Klay Thompson scored 19 points, Carl Landry had six of his 12 points in the fourth quarter and Andrew Bogut returned from an injury to also score 12 as the Warriors earned their first victory in four games against Eastern Conference opponents this month. Harrison Barnes and Jarrett Jack each scored 14 for Golden State. Aaron Gray had a careerhigh 22 points and 10 rebounds, DeMar DeRozan scored 21 points and Ed Davis had 12 for the Raptors. B2 T UESDAY, J ANUARY29, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S PORTS SPORTS BRIEFS Florida man pleads guilty LOS ANGELES A Florida man has pleaded guilty to a fraud charge in a Los Angeles courtroom in connection with swindling about $2.3 million from Indianapolis Colts defensive end Dwight Freeney. Michael Stern of Miami entered his plea Monday to a single count. He faces up to 10 years in prison when hes scheduled to be sentenced May 6. Prosecutors said Stern and his lover, Eva Weinberg, a financial adviser to Freeney, bilked more than $2 million from the football player via wire transfers. The money went into an account belonging to Sterns company without Freeneys approval. A criminal complaint was filed against Weinberg, accusing her of wire fraud. Her case is pending. L.A. Dodgers network LOS ANGELES The Los Angeles Dodgers have announced the launch of SportsNet LA, their regional sports network with Time Warner Cable for the 2014 season. The team said Monday its ownership group created an American Media Productions LLC subsidiary in December 2012 to launch the network. TWC will make payments and have the exclusive advertising and affiliate sales rights. The Dodgers said the agreement is subject to closing conditions. The Los Angeles Times reported last week the nations second-largest cable operator will pay around $7 billion to carry the games. The Dodgers will remain on Foxs Prime Ticket, a division of News Corp., this year.Big 12 ADs talk numbers IRVING, Texas Big 12 athletic directors spent several hours Monday discussing the pros and cons of maintaining their 10-team configuration or eventually making additions to the conference or maybe doing something in between. Commissioner Bob Bowlsby said the current setup is financially beneficial for each school, but he wanted to run through what-if scenarios. Among the possibilities they discussed was a possible alliance with other conferences. Bowlsby said there was unanimity for that approach that allows some of the benefits and value of expansion without actually adding members. The ADs plan to discuss football scheduling and bowl alliances when they wrap up their regular scheduled two-day meeting today.McHale ousts ParmentierPARIS Christina McHale of the United States broke Pauline Parmentiers serve four times in a 6-4, 6-1 win in the first round of the Open GDF Suez on Monday. McHale has a secondround match against No. 3 Marion Bartoli of France. In other matches, eighth-seeded Klara Zakopalova of the Czech Republic beat Anabel Medina Garrigues 2-6, 75, 6-0. Zakopalova needed 2 hours, 17 minutes to get the better of the Spaniard, who had won seven of their previous 10 matches. Mona Barthel of Germany also advanced with a 7-6 (1), 6-0 win against Urszula Radwanska of Poland. From wire reports Associated Press Brooklyn Nets forward Keith Bogans drives to the basket as Orlando Magic forward Hedo Turkoglu defends in the first half Monday at the Barclays Center in New York. Associated Press Carolina Hurricane Tim Gleason hits Bostons Milan Lucic Monday during the first period of their game in Raleigh, N.C. Bruins upend Hurricanes 5-3 Nets rout Magic 97-77 Associated PressRALEIGH, N.C. David Krejci scored a tiebreaking goal with 1:50 left and the Boston Bruins beat the Carolina Hurricanes 5-3 on Monday night. Zdeno Chara had a goal and two assists, Nathan Horton had a goal and an assist, Tyler Seguin had an empty-net goal and an assist and Brad Marchand scored a short-handed goal for the Bruins. The Northeast Division leaders remained unbeaten in regulation and opened the season by earning points in five straight games for the first time since 1990-91. Eric Staal had a goal and an assist, and he and Jeff Skinner scored 50 seconds apart late in the second period to help the Hurricanes erase a two-goal deficit. Jamie McBain added a goal and Cam Ward made 33 saves for the Hurricanes. Blue Jackets 2, Stars 1 COLUMBUS, Ohio Vinny Prospal scored from a hard angle at 1:22 of the third and Sergei Bobrovsky had 24 saves to lead the Columbus Blue Jackets past the Dallas Stars 2-1 on Monday night, ending a four-game losing streak. It was the Blue Jackets first victory since opening night in Nashville in a shootout. They had been outscored 16-6 since while mustering just a point in a shootout loss to Detroit in the home opener a week ago. Derek Dorsett also scored for the Blue Jackets. Philip Larsen had the Stars goal with Kari Lehtonen stopping 25 shots. The Blue Jackets took the lead for good when Prospal collected the puck in the right corner and fired a shot along the goal line that appeared to catch Lehtonen by surprise, slipping into the net. Associated PressNEW ORLEANS Frank Gore never lost hope. Not through all the injuries, all the losing early in his career. That perseverance finally paid off this season for the San Francisco running back. The 29-year-old Gore helped the 49ers reach the Super Bowl for the first time since 1995, a triumph that is especially sweet given all hes been through. He tore up both knees in college. He underwent major surgery on both shoulders after he got to the pros. He lost part of another season to a hip injury. Not to mention, Gore didnt experience winning in the NFL until his seventh year. It was tough, real tough, he said Monday. It was tough coming to work, especially for me coming from a winning program (Miami) in college. I was never used to losing. I used to take it hard. One of his teammates, fullback Bruce Miller, has noticed the determination in Gores eyes as the team prepares to face the Baltimore Ravens in the title game Sunday. It means a lot to him, Miller said. In meetings and at practice, you can see how intense and focused he is. Hes worked hard for it. The Ravens have their own threat out of the backfield. Like Gore, Baltimores Ray Rice has been overshadowed by more prominent teammates on the run to the title game, namely quarterback Joe Flacco and retiring linebacker Ray Lewis. But both Gore and Rice have the potential to take control with their contrasting styles. Gore is a power back, someone who can churn out the tough yards between the tackles. That style has served him well; hes run for more than 1,000 yards six of the last seven seasons and become San Franciscos career leader in rushing touchdowns. We always credit Frank with the tough yards, Miller said. He doesnt get the easy runs. Its up the middle, three or four yards a carry. But he just continues to move the chains. Thats why were here. Rice is more of a slasher, a player who can dart through the smallest of openings and break off a big gain. Hes also a major weapon in the passing game, hauling in more than 300 throws his first five years in the league. Gore said hes impressed by his Ravens counterpart. He does it all, Gore said of Rice. I love to watch him. I watched him in college. When I saw him in college, I knew he was going to be a pretty good back in the league. No. 25 Marquette beats USF 63-50 Associated PressMILWAUKEE Vander Blue scored a career-high 30 points to lead No. 25 Marquette to a 63-50 victory over South Florida on Monday night as the Golden Eagles moved into a first-place tie with Syracuse in the Big East. Blue, who came into the game as the Golden Eagles leading scorer at 13.9 points per game, made 13 of 20 shots from the field and scored 11 points during the big run that spanned both halves. The junior guard repeatedly sliced through the South Florida defense, driving to the basket and scoring on layups. The Golden Eagles (15-4, 6-1 Big East), who have won eight of nine games, returned to the Top 25 on Monday after being out of the rankings last week. South Florida (10-10, 1-7) opened the season 93 but has faltered since conference play began. No. 12 Louisville 64, Pittsburgh 61LOUISVILLE, Ky. Russ Smith and Gorgui Dieng combined for 34 points and sealed the game with four free throws in the final 12 seconds as No. 12 Louisville ended a three-game losing streak with a 64-61 victory over Pittsburgh on Monday night. Top 25 Women No. 2 N. Dame 77, No. 9 Tenn. 67KNOXVILLE, Tenn. Skylar Diggins scored a career-high 33 points and No. 2 Notre Dame built a 19point lead in the second half before withstanding a late Tennessee rally in a 77-67 victory Monday night over the ninth-ranked Lady Vols. Associated Press San Francisco running back Frank Gore talks with reporters Monday during a news conference in New Orleans. The 49ers play the Baltimore Ravens Sunday in the Super Bowl. 49ers Gore kept hope through all the adversity

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S COREBOARD C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. (ESPN) Wisconsin at Ohio State 7 p.m. (ESPN2) North Carolina State at Virginia 9 p.m. (ESPN) Kentucky at Mississippi HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. (FSNFL) (SUN) Florida Panthers at Tampa Bay Lightning 7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) New York Islanders at Pittsburgh Penguins SOCCER 9 p.m. (ESPN2) United States vs. Canada. From BBVA Compass Stadium in Houston Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. Prep CALENDAR TODAYS PREP SPORTS BOYS BASKETBALL 7:30 p.m. Lecanto at Crystal River Glantz-Culver Line for Jan. 29 NFL Sunday Super Bowl at New Orleans FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG San Francisco53(47) Baltimore NCAA Basketball FAVORITELINEUNDERDOG at Tennessee10Vanderbilt at Virginia1NC State at Clemson5Georgia Tech at Ohio St.6Wisconsin at Wichita St.12Indiana St. at Evansville1N. Iowa Illinois St.3at Bradley North Carolina4at Boston College at MississippiPkKentucky at Minnesota20Nebraska at UNLV14Nevada NBA FAVORITELINEUNDERDOG Golden State4at Cleveland at Detroit1Milwaukee at Portland3Dallas at L.A. Lakers6New Orleans NHL FAVORITELINEUNDERDOGLINE at Boston-150New Jersey+130 at N.Y. Rangers-145Philadelphia+125 at Buffalo-155Toronto+135 at Pittsburgh-220N.Y. Islanders+180 at Montreal-140Winnipeg+120 at Tampa Bay-170Florida+150 at Ottawa-150Washington+130 at Detroit-155Dallas+135 at Minnesota-180Columbus+160 at San Jose-170Anaheim+150Farmers Insurance Open par scoresMonday at Torrey Pines, San Diego n-North Course: 7,053 yards, par-72 s-South Course: 7,698 yards, par-72 Purse: $6.1 million Final (FedExCup points in parentheses): T. Woods (500), $1,098,00068s-65n-69s-72s 274-14 B. Snedeker (245), $536,80065n-75s-69s-69s 278-10J. Teater (245), $536,80066s-70n-73s-69s 278-10 J. Walker (123), $268,40067n-69s-72s-71s 279-9N. Watney (123), $268,40069s-68n-71s-71s 279-9 R. Garrigus (92), $204,35072s-69n-72s-67s 280-8R. Fowler (92), $204,35077s-65n-70s-68s 280-8A. Baddeley (92), $204,35071n-72s-68s-69s 280-8B. Haas (68), $146,40069s-69n-72s-71s 281-7 G. DeLaet (68), $146,40068n-70s-72s-71s 281-7C. Howell III (68), $146,40066n-72s-71s-72s 281-7K.J. Choi (68), $146,40065s-73n-71s-72s 281-7 J. Day (68), $146,40073n-70s-72s-66s 281-7 B. Fritsch (68), $146,40069n-67s-70s-75s 281-7 H. Mahan (54), $94,55069s-72n-69s-72s 282-6 B. de Jonge (54), $94,55074s-66n-73s-69s 282-6 Tag Ridings (54), $94,55067s-70n-71s-74s 282-6 E. Compton (54), $94,55071s-65n-71s-75s 282-6 S. Marino (54), $94,55068s-68n-73s-73s 282-6C. Wittenberg (54), $94,55069s-67n-72s-74s 282-6C. Reavie (48), $61,00071s-70n-74s-68s 283-5N. Thompson (48), $61,00069n-70s-72s-72s 283-5P. Perez (48), $61,00072s-67n-70s-74s 283-5 Charlie Wi (48), $61,00071s-66n-75s-71s 283-5 Ross Fisher (48), $61,00066n-71s-73s-73s 283-5 L. Guthrie (48), $61,00068s-69n-71s-75s 283-5 Vijay Singh (41), $41,48068n-73s-70s-73s 284-4G. Woodland (41), $41,48072s-69n-69s-74s 284-4B. Steele (41), $41,48067n-73s-71s-73s 284-4 C. Tringale (41), $41,48068n-72s-69s-75s 284-4 Jerry Kelly (41), $41,48067n-71s-78s-68s 284-4 S. Noh (41), $41,48071s-72n-72s-69s 284-4 J. Senden (41), $41,48069s-68n-74s-73s 284-4 B. Weekley (35), $31,47674s-67n-73s-71s 285-3 C. Hoffman (35), $31,47670n-72s-74s-69s 285-3 Jonas Blixt (35), $31,47670n-72s-72s-71s 285-3 David Lynn (35), $31,47667n-75s-73s-70s 285-3 M. Flores (35), $31,47669s-69n-76s-71s 285-3 J.J. Henry (30), $25,01069n-71s-75s-71s 286-2 P. Reed (30), $25,01073s-69n-74s-70s 286-2 L. Glover (30), $25,01069s-73n-70s-74s 286-2 B. Stuard (30), $25,01068n-74s-73s-71s 286-2 B. Horschel (30), $25,01066n-69s-76s-75s 286-2 J. Rollins (24), $18,00470s-71n-75s-71s 287-1 B. Harman (24), $18,00474s-68n-72s-73s 287-1 R. Castro (24), $18,00471s-68n-75s-73s 287-1 P. Tomasulo (24), $18,00467n-75s-75s-70s 287-1 Jin Park (24), $18,00472s-70n-74s-71s 287-1 Jeff Klauk (24), $18,00471s-72n-72s-72s 287-1 N. Colsaerts (24), $18,00469n-74s-75s-69s 287-1 D. Johnson (16), $14,12569n-72s-75s-72s 288E H. Kuehne (16), $14,12568n-74s-76s-70s 288E Justin Bolli (16), $14,12572s-67n-74s-75s 288E Greg Owen (16), $14,12574s-68n-71s-75s 288E Jim Herman (16), $14,12569n-69s-76s-74s 288E J. Driscoll (16), $14,12568n-75s-77s-68s 288E Ben Curtis (16), $14,12572s-71n-73s-72s 288E P. Mickelson (16), $14,12572n-71s-75s-70s 288EE. Meierdierks (16), $14,12569n-74s-72s-73s 288EM. Letzig (8), $12,99368s-73n-75s-73s 289+1 John Huh (8), $12,99369s-71n-77s-72s 289+1 Tom Gillis (8), $12,99369s-73n-73s-74s 289+1 Jeff Overton (8), $12,99371n-69s-75s-74s 289+1 T. Immelman (8), $12,99372s-71n-71s-75s 289+1 Martin Laird (8), $12,99372s-71n-73s-73s 289+1 Matt Every (8), $12,99369s-74n-73s-73s 289+1 D. LaBelle II (8), $12,99372s-71n-75s-71s 289+1 Mike Weir (2), $12,20066n-75s-73s-76s 290+2 Bryce Molder (2), $12,20068n-72s-78s-72s 290+2 Luke List (2), $12,20066n-75s-78s-71s 290+2 R. Karlsson (2), $12,20069n-74s-77s-70s 290+2D. Summerhays (2), $12,20072n-71s-74s-73s 290+2Colt Knost (1), $11,59069n-71s-73s-78s 291+3 Will Claxton (1), $11,59069n-69s-79s-74s 291+3 H. English (1), $11,59068s-70n-75s-78s 291+3 Justin Hicks (1), $11,59067s-70n-80s-74s 291+3 S. Gardiner (1), $11,59070n-73s-74s-74s 291+3 J. Mallinger (1), $10,91967n-74s-77s-74s 292+4 M. Thompson (1), $10,91971n-71s-75s-75s 292+4 Bo Van Pelt (1), $10,91967n-72s-72s-81s 292+4 J. Leonard (1), $10,91968n-71s-77s-76s 292+4 N. Lancaster (1), $10,91972n-71s-73s-76s 292+4 James Hahn (1), $10,91971s-72n-70s-79s 292+4 D.H. Lee (1), $10,43168n-74s-78s-73s 293+5 Steve LeBrun (1), $10,43168n-75s-74s-76s 293+5 S. Bae (1), $10,24870s-72n-76s-76s 294+6 Adam Hadwin66n-74s-69s-WDNHL standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA New Jersey43017117 Pittsburgh532061514 N.Y. Islanders522151818 N.Y. Rangers523041416 Philadelphia624041318 Northeast Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Boston540191711 Ottawa531171610 Montreal43106137 Buffalo523041315 Toronto523041417 Southeast Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Tampa Bay541082413 Winnipeg531171514 Carolina523041418 Washington513131119 Florida51402819 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Chicago6600122213 St. Louis6510102413 Columbus623151119 Detroit522151116 Nashville511351014 Northwest Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Minnesota522151315 Vancouver522151416 Colorado4220499 Edmonton422041113 Calgary412131115 Pacific Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA San Jose550010238 Anaheim431061514 Dallas623151214 Los Angeles41213812 Phoenix514021720 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Sundays Games Pittsburgh 2, Ottawa 1, SO Washington 3, Buffalo 2 Montreal 4, New Jersey 3, OT Tampa Bay 5, Philadelphia 1 Chicago 2, Detroit 1, OT St. Louis 5, Minnesota 4, OT Winnipeg 5, N.Y. Islanders 4, OT San Jose 4, Vancouver 1 Mondays Games Boston 5, Carolina 3 Columbus 2, Dallas 1 Nashville at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Colorado at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m. Vancouver at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. Tuesdays Games New Jersey at Boston, 7 p.m. Toronto at Buffalo, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. Winnipeg at Montreal, 7:30 p.m. Washington at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m. Florida at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m. Dallas at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Columbus at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Anaheim at San Jose, 10:30 p.m. Wednesdays Games Montreal at Ottawa, 7 p.m. Chicago at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Edmonton at Phoenix, 9:30 p.m. Colorado at Vancouver, 10 p.m.NBA standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division WLPctGB New York2715.643 Brooklyn2718.6001 Boston2123.4777 Philadelphia1826.40910 Toronto1629.35612 Southeast Division WLPctGB Miami2813.683 Atlanta2519.5684 Orlando1430.31815 Washington1132.25618 Charlotte1133.25018 Central Division WLPctGB Chicago2717.614 Indiana2619.5781 Milwaukee2319.5483 Detroit1727.38610 Cleveland1332.28914 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division WLPctGB San Antonio3611.766 Memphis2915.6595 Houston2522.53211 Dallas1925.43215 New Orleans1529.34119 Northwest Division WLPctGB Oklahoma City3411.756 Denver2818.6096 Utah2421.53310 Portland2222.50011 Minnesota1724.41515 Pacific Division WLPctGB L.A. Clippers3313.717 Golden State2717.6145 L.A. Lakers1925.43213 Sacramento1729.37016 Phoenix1530.33317 Sundays Games Boston 100, Miami 98,2OT L.A. Lakers 105, Oklahoma City 96 New Orleans 91, Memphis 83 Detroit 104, Orlando 102 New York 106, Atlanta 104 Dallas 110, Phoenix 95 L.A. Clippers 96, Portland 83 Mondays Games Memphis 103, Philadelphia 100 Golden State 114, Toronto 102 Sacramento 96, Washington 94 Brooklyn 97, Orlando 77 Chicago 93, Charlotte 85 Denver 102, Indiana 101 Houston 125, Utah 80 Tuesdays Games Golden State at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Milwaukee at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Dallas at Portland, 10 p.m. New Orleans at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. Wednesdays Games Washington at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Detroit at Indiana, 7 p.m. Sacramento at Boston, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at New York, 7:30 p.m. Toronto at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Chicago at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Miami at Brooklyn, 8 p.m. Charlotte at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. Houston at Denver, 9 p.m. New Orleans at Utah, 9 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m. Mondays womens basketball scoresEAST Brooklyn 71, York (NY) 20 John Jay 75, Lehman 57 Marist 75, Siena 64 Monmouth (NJ) 61, Fairleigh Dickinson 53 Mount St. Marys 73, Wagner 58 Quinnipiac 82, CCSU 73 Sacred Heart 62, Bryant 44 St. Francis (NY) 69, LIU Brooklyn 58 St. Francis (Pa.) 72, Robert Morris 63 SOUTH Austin Peay 78, Jacksonville St. 71 Belmont 88, Morehead St. 45 Bethune-Cookman 55, Md.-Eastern Shore 54 Davidson 65, W. Carolina 56 Delaware St. 57, Florida A&M 53 E. Kentucky 62, Tennessee St. 54 ETSU 74, Jacksonville 57 Elon 70, Georgia Southern 59 Furman 80, Coll. of Charleston 71 Hampton 67, Howard 45 Jackson St. 70, Ark.-Pine Bluff 59 Kennesaw St. 55, Lipscomb 39 MVSU 50, Grambling St. 48 Martin Methodist 73, Fisk 55 Mercer 77, N. Kentucky 67 Miles 48, Lane 37 Morgan St. 55, NC Central 39 Murray St. 68, Tennessee Tech 52 NC A&T 70, Coppin St. 64 Notre Dame 77, Tennessee 67 SC-Upstate 64, North Florida 52 Samford 66, Appalachian St. 64 UNC-Greensboro 87, Wofford 75 Xavier (NO) 76, Mobile 58 MIDWEST Aquinas 65, Lourdes 44 Concordia (Mich.) 67, Indiana Tech 53 Cornerstone 63, Lawrence Tech 60 Davenport 70, Siena Heights 66 E. Illinois 84, UT-Martin 79 Green Bay 70, Wright St. 48 Northwestern 53, Indiana 39 SIU-Edwardsville 78, SE Missouri 65 SOUTHWEST Prairie View 68, Alabama A&M 59 Texas Southern 74, Alabama St. 40Mondays mens basketball scoresEAST Brooklyn 81, York (NY) 80 Delaware 66, Drexel 64 John Jay 86, Lehman 78 Montclair St. 78, Staten Island 73 SOUTH Bethune-Cookman 58, Md.-Eastern Shore 57 Delaware St. 57, Florida A&M 48 Jackson St. 82, Ark.-Pine Bluff 67 James Madison 63, UNC Wilmington 56 Kentucky St. 78, LeMoyne-Owen 67 Louisville 64, Pittsburgh 61 MVSU 65, Grambling St. 50 Martin Methodist 72, Fisk 70 NC A&T 63, Coppin St. 62 NC Central 69, Morgan St. 61 SC-Upstate 88, ETSU 71 Xavier (NO) 57, Mobile 53, OT MIDWEST Cornerstone 69, Lawrence Tech 45 Davenport 80, Siena Heights 48 Marquette 63, South Florida 50 SOUTHWEST Prairie View 65, Alabama A&M 46 Texas Southern 97, Alabama St. 65 FAR WEST E. Washington 76, Portland St. 65 Utah Valley 84, Peru St. 49Top 25 FaredMonday 1. Michigan (19-1) did not play. Next: vs. Northwestern, Wednesday. 2. Kansas (19-1) beat West Virginia 61-56. Next: vs. Oklahoma State, Saturday. 3. Indiana (18-2) did not play. Next: at Purdue, Wednesday. 4. Florida (16-2) did not play. Next: vs. South Carolina, Wednesday. 5. Duke (17-2) did not play. Next: at Wake Forest, Wednesday. 6. Syracuse (18-2) did not play. Next: at Pittsburgh, Saturday. 7. Gonzaga (19-2) did not play. Next: at Loyola Marymount, Thursday. 8. Arizona (17-2) did not play. Next: at Washington, Thursday. 9. Butler (17-3) did not play. Next: at St. Louis, Thursday. 10. Oregon (18-2) did not play. Next: at Stanford, Wednesday. 11. Ohio State (15-4) did not play. Next: vs. Wisconsin, Tuesday. 12. Louisville (17-4) beat Pittsburgh 64-61. Next: vs. No. 25 Marquette, Sunday. 13. Michigan State (17-4) did not play. Next: vs. Illinois, Thursday. 14. Miami (15-3) did not play. Next: at Virginia Tech, Wednesday. 15. Wichita State (19-2) did not play. Next: vs. Indiana State, Tuesday. 16. Mississippi (17-2) did not play. Next: vs. Kentucky, Tuesday. 17. Missouri (15-4) did not play. Next: at LSU, Wednesday. 18. Kansas State (15-4) did not play. Next: vs. Texas, Wednesday. 19. N.C. State (16-4) did not play. Next: at Virginia, Tuesday. 20. New Mexico (17-3) did not play. Next: at Wyoming, Wednesday. 21. Creighton (18-3) did not play. Next: vs. Missouri State, Wednesday. 22. San Diego State (16-4) did not play. Next: at Air Force, Saturday. 23. Minnesota (15-5) did not play. Next: vs. Nebraska, Tuesday. 24. Cincinnati (16-4) did not play. Next: vs. Rutgers, Wednesday. 25. Marquette (15-4) beat South Florida 63-50. Next: at No. 12 Louisville, Sunday. The AP Top 25The top 25 teams in The Associated Press college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Jan. 27, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last weeks ranking: RecordPtsPrv 1. Michigan (51)19-11,6112 2. Kansas (13)18-11,5723 3. Indiana18-21,4577 4. Florida (1)16-21,4208 5. Duke17-21,3281 6. Syracuse18-21,3223 7. Gonzaga19-21,17710 8. Arizona17-21,1606 9. Butler17-31,0239 10. Oregon18-296916 11. Ohio St.15-494514 12. Louisville16-49055 13. Michigan St.17-489713 14. Miami15-389425 15. Wichita St.19-262120 16. Mississippi17-247323 17. Missouri15-446422 18. Kansas St.15-446311 19. NC State16-443118 20. New Mexico17-333315 21. Creighton18-331217 22. San Diego St.16-4302 23. Minnesota15-528112 24. Cincinnati16-422021 25. Marquette14-4216 Others receiving votes: Georgetown 121, UNLV 56, Wisconsin 45, UCLA 34, Arizona St. 14, Notre Dame 12, Pittsburgh 10, Louisiana Tech 8, Villanova 6, Baylor 5, Iowa St. 4, Memphis 4, VCU 4, La Salle 3, Saint Marys (Cal) 2, Colorado St. 1.USA Today/ESPN Top 25The top 25 teams in the USA Today-ESPN mens college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Jan. 27, points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last weeks ranking: RecordPtsPvs 1. Kansas (16)18-17602 2. Michigan (14)19-17573 3. Indiana18-26868 4. Florida (1)16-26857 5. Duke17-26441 6. Syracuse18-26244 7. Gonzaga19-258010 8. Arizona17-25576 9. Michigan State17-445911 10. Butler17-34479 11. Ohio State15-443815 12. Oregon18-243519 13. Louisville16-44225 14. Wichita State19-234021 15. Miami15-3326 16. Mississippi17-225224 17. Creighton18-324912 18. Missouri15-423422 19. N.C. State16-419418 20. San Diego State16-417125 21. Kansas State15-416613 22. New Mexico17-315917 23. Cincinnati16-413420 24. Minnesota15-58714 25. Marquette14-475 Others receiving votes: Georgetown 33, UNLV 32, VCU 27, Wisconsin 25, Pittsburgh 18, Notre Dame 13, UCLA 10, Baylor 7, Southern Miss. 7, Colorado State 6, Saint Marys 5, La Salle 3, Oklahoma State 3, Arizona State 2, Middle Tennessee 2, Louisiana Tech 1.The Womens AP Top 25The top 25 teams in the The Associated Press womens college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Jan. 27, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last weeks ranking: RecordPtsPrv 1. Baylor (37)18-19971 2. Notre Dame18-19532 3. UConn (3)18-19303 4. Stanford18-28536 5. Duke18-18344 6. California17-27907 7. Penn St.17-27688 8. Kentucky19-26955 9. Tennessee16-36919 10. Maryland17-367410 11. North Carolina19-249511 12. Louisville17-449113 13. Georgia17-347014 14. Purdue17-344615 15. South Carolina18-344218 16. Texas A&M16-543516 17. Dayton17-135717 18. UCLA15-433919 19. Oklahoma St.15-331512 20. Florida St.17-325322 21. Oklahoma15-421120 22. Colorado15-420520 23. Iowa St.14-410224 24. Iowa16-579 25. Delaware15-366 Others receiving votes: Michigan 42, UTEP 21, Villanova 11, Texas Tech 10, Syracuse 6, Duquesne 4, Green Bay 4, Michigan St. 4, Kansas 2, Nebraska 2, Vanderbilt 2, LSU 1. BASEBALL National League PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Agreed to terms with INF Yuniesky Betancourt on a minorleague contract. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS Agreed to terms with INF Ronny Cedeno on a one-year contract and C Rob Johnson, C J.R. Towles and OF Justin Christian on minor-league contracts. Named Bengie Molina assistant hitting coach. Designated LHP Barret Browning for assignment. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association DALLAS MAVERICKS Signed G Mike James for the remainder of the season. HOUSTON ROCKETS Recalled F-C Donatas Motiejunas from Rio Grande Valley (NBADL). PHILADELPHIA 76ERS Signed G Shelvin Mack to a second 10-day contract. FOOTBALL National Football League BUFFALO BILLS Named Kurt Anderson and Jason Vrable offensive quality control coaches. CHICAGO BEARS Signed C Cyhl Quarles to a a reserve/future contract. CLEVELAND BROWNS Named Fred Nance senior advisor and special counsel. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS Signed OL Ryan Durand. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS Reassigned G Frederik Andersen to the Danish national team and F Ryan Lasch from Norfolk (AHL) to Vaxjo (Swedish Elite). NEW JERSEY DEVILS Assigned LW Mattias Tedenby to Albany (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS Recalled F Mika Zibanejad from Binghamton (AHL). Florida LOTTERY Here are the winning numbers selected Monday in the Florida Lottery: CASH 3 (early) 0 7 8 CASH 3 (late) 0 0 2 PLAY 4 (early) 3 9 1 9 PLAY 4 (late) 1 6 6 5 FANTASY 5 12 15 16 27 31 T UESDAY, J ANUARY29, 2013 B3 NFL is in real trouble as well as football at every level isnt as hard a sell as it seems. Sure, the game has never been more popular. The league is taking in nearly $10 billion annually, breaking its own record TV telecasts almost on a weekly basis, and could repeat the feat again Sunday in New Orleans, when the 49ers tee it up against the Ravens. But just a few weeks later, arguments are scheduled to begin in Philadelphia in one lawsuit brought on behalf of former players and their families contending the league failed to warn them about the dangers of concussions and then concealed those risks even in the face of mounting evidence. Yet even lawsuits may not represent the most serious threat to the NFL s long-term existence. The concussion issue is forcing people to choose sides and yet the real challenge, I think, will be holding together the coalition that made the game so popular players, coaches, parents and fans, said attorney Robert Boland, who teaches sports law at New York Universitys Tisch Center, and has worked previously as an agent. Theres already a bar for young players to get into the game; the cost of equipment, the staffing it requires, and if the insurers get nervous and drive up the costs even further, that might be the biggest short-term threat. President Obama tackled that issue in a recent interview with The New Republic, saying that he anticipated less exciting pro football as safety concerns change the way its played. What really worried him, though, was whether those changes at the top would filter down to the lower levels of the sport soon enough. Im a big football fan, but I have to tell you if I had a son, Id have to think long and hard before I let him play football, Obama said. I tend to be more worried about college players than NFL players in the sense that the NFL players have a union. Theyre grown men. They can make some of these decisions on their own, and most of them are well-compensated for the violence they do to their bodies, he added. You read some of these stories about college players who undergo some of these same problems with concussions and so forth and then have nothing to fall back on. Thats something that Id like to see the NCAA think about. Dont expect action from the NCAA anytime soon, but the NFL and its players union may not have the luxury of time. A quick sampling of comments during media day showed many players still favor the status quo, risks and all. Thats what we all know coming into the game, 49ers linebacker Aldon Smith said. We all signed up for it. Its not like we signed up and thought we were going to play tennis, you know? His coach, one-time NFL quarterback Jim Harbaugh, took that cavalier attitude a step further, when asked to respond to the presidents remarks. Well, I have a 4-month-old almost, soon-tobe 5-month-old son, Jack Harbaugh, and if President Obama feels that way, then (there will) be a little less competition for Jack Harbaugh when he gets older, Harbaugh chuckled. Thats the first thing that jumps into my mind, if other parents are thinking that way. Keep in mind that the NFLs nightmare scenario played out on a football field an hour from Boston only a few months ago. In a Pop Warner game between longtime rivals, five kids between the ages of 10 and 12 were concussed, all on the losing team, three in the first quarter and the last one on the final play. I think its being taken seriously, but as far as young people starting to play, we need better and smarter instruction than ever before, said former Saints quarterback Archie Manning. You only get so many chances and weve let a lot slip past. We cant afford too many more misses, he said finally, Weve got to get it right.Jim Litke is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at jlitke@ap.org and follow him at Twitter.com/JimLitke. Senior Jared Bogart (six rebounds) converted a three-point play with a kiss off the glass as he was fouled. Bogart made the free throw to give Seven Rivers a 40-4 cushion in the third quarter. Senior center Liam Cash contributed six points on the evening. The lone Branford highlight of the night was a 3pointer by Jose Barron in the fourth quarter. The Warriors travel to The Villages for a 7 p.m. showdown Thursday night. SUNK Continued from Page B1 LITKE Continued from Page B1 Still, the game after two meetings during the season in which Seven Rivers outscored the Eagles a combined 104-7 was not a true test for the Warriors, particularly with the starters on the bench for most of the second half and sizable portions of the first. Seven Rivers led 15-5 after one quarter, and then despite an 8-for-35 thirdquarter shooting performance shut out First Academy, outscoring the Eagles 17-0 to take a 4512 advantage into the final eight minutes. Once again, the Zachar sisters paced Seven Rivers, Andrea scoring 19 points and Alexis contributing 15. Tyne Amos topped First Academy (6-11) with six points. St. John coach Kimberly Pompey knows the Zachar sisters are where the Saints must concentrate their defensive efforts. We have to be patient with the ball and make decisions when to run a fast game and when to slow it down (against Seven Rivers), Pompey said. The last time we played them we beat them by a good margin. Normally we play a manto-man defense, but against them we played a 23 zone and packed it inside and didnt go outside. They have those twin towers, she added, referring to the Zachars, 6-foot-1 Andrea and 6foot-3 Alexis. We have to make it difficult for them to make inside shots. Its a strategy many teams have tried, but few have pulled off. Another option is to apply fullcourt pressure, a strategy that seemed to take the Warriors out of their game early in the season but something that hasnt worked so well lately. Against Lecantos pressure attempts, Seven Rivers got easy baskets in constructing a 22-9 lead after one quarter while committing just three turnovers. One thing that cant be taken too seriously is St. Johns 12-10 record. We played a lot of higher-level teams, Pompey said. Dreyer is well aware of his district final opponents ability, a team that beat Seven Rivers 68-42 on Dec. 21. If you look at that game, we lost three of the four quarters by six points, he said, admitting, They killed us in the third quarter. We certainly have to play better defense, Dreyer said. Well have to be ready to play a 32-minute game, and well have to play a very good game. That much is certain. WARRIORSContinued from Page B1

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Todays HOROSCOPE Spotlight on PEOPLE Florida LOTTERIES Today in HISTORY Birthday You need not be fearful of having more than one major objective in the year ahead. Even if others might be unable to handle multiple ventures simultaneously, you should be able to do so with grace and aplomb. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) An involvement where you share a mutual interest with another should work out quite smoothly today in some dealings you have with a person who is very difficult to please. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) The timing could be unusually good for you to make a request of someone who doesnt readily grant favors. Point out to this person what would be in it for him or her. Aries (March 21-April 19) By cleaning out the basement, attic or garage, you might discover some gems that you put aside in the past and forgot about. Be sure to open all those old boxes. Taurus (April 20-May 20) A social gathering could pair you with someone whom youve been very eager to approach. Dont be hesitant to introduce the reason why you wanted to get in touch. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Certain financial or commercial matters can be successfully concluded to your satisfaction if youre willing to take the time and effort to do so. Dont coast when you can run. Cancer (June 21-July 22) Someone older or more experienced might point out a new direction for you. It could be some of the best advice youve received in a long time. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Youre in a favorable cycle for profiting from situations initiated by someone else. Be on the alert for anything different that sounds enticing. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Even if some of your present expectations seem to be a bit outlandish to some of your friends, they really arent that far-fetched from your perspective. Your view is clearer than theirs. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Something extremely constructive could develop through the efforts of another, which will give you the assistance you need to get ahead. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Youre likely to get an opportunity to cultivate a new friendship. It might even be with someone whom youve been anxious to get to know better. This could be the start of something beautiful. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) A little extra effort where your career is concerned could put you out in front of the pack. Be assertive and conscientious when pursuing your objectives. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) If you allow a past educational experience to guide you, everything should work out quite beautifully in your dealings with someone who is very difficult to please. SUNDAY, JANUARY 27 Fantasy 5: 10 11 13 20 35 5-of-5No winner 4-of-5212$555 3-of-57,998$22 SATURDAY, JANUARY 26 Powerball: 3 22 26 41 49 Powerball: 18 5-of-5 PBNo winner No Florida winner 5-of-56 winners$1 million No Florida winner Lotto: 3 4 5 38 39 41 6-of-6No winner 5-of-627$6,066.50 4-of-61,755$76 3-of-638,577$5 Fantasy 5: 6 7 9 17 24 5-of-52 winners$135,609.03 4-of-5542$80.50 3-of-515,166$8 Today is Tuesday, Jan. 29, the 29th day of 2013. There are 336 days left in the year. Todays Highlight: On Jan. 29, 1963, poet Robert Frost died in Boston at age 88. On this date: In 1820, Britains King George III died at Windsor Castle. In 1845, Edgar Allan Poes poem The Raven was first published in the New York Evening Mirror In 1861, Kansas became the 34th state of the Union. In 1863, the Bear River Massacre took place as the U.S. Army attacked Shoshone in present-day Idaho. In 1919, the ratification of the 18th Amendment to the Constitution, which launched Prohibition, was certified by Acting Secretary of State Frank L. Polk. In 1929, The Seeing Eye, a New Jersey-based school which trains guide dogs to assist the blind, was incorporated by Dorothy Harrison Eustis and Morris Frank. In 1936, the first inductees of baseballs Hall of Fame, including Ty Cobb and Babe Ruth, were named in Cooperstown, N.Y. In 1958, actors Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward were married in Las Vegas. In 1979, President Jimmy Carter formally welcomed Chinese Vice Premier Deng Xiaoping to the White House, following the establishment of diplomatic relations. In 1998, a bomb rocked an abortion clinic in Birmingham, Ala., killing security guard Robert Sanderson and critically injuring nurse Emily Lyons. (The bomber, Eric Rudolph, was captured in May 2003 and is serving a life sentence.) Ten years ago: The Congressional Budget Office predicted the federal deficit for fiscal 2003 would soar to $199 billion even without President George W. Bushs new tax cut plan or a war against Iraq. Five years ago: John McCain won a breakthrough triumph in the Florida primary, easing past Mitt Romney for his first-ever triumph in a primary open only to Republicans. One year ago: Eleven people were killed when smoke and fog caused a series of fiery crashes on I-75 in Florida. Todays birthdays: Actor Noel Harrison is 79. Author Germaine Greer is 74. Actress Katharine Ross is 73. Actor Tom Selleck is 68. Rhythm-and-blues singer Bettye LaVette is 67. Rock musician Tommy Ramone is 61. Singer Charlie Wilson is 60. Talk show host Oprah Winfrey is 59. Country singer Irlene Mandrell is 57. Actress Diane Delano is 56. Actress Judy Norton Taylor (The Waltons) is 55. Rock musician Johnny Spampinato is 54. Olympic gold-medal diver Greg Louganis is 53. Rock musician Eddie Jackson (Queensryche) is 52. Actor Nicholas Turturro is 51. Actor-director Edward Burns is 45. Actress Heather Graham is 43. Actor Sharif Atkins is 38. Actress Sara Gilbert is 38. Blues musician Jonny Lang is 32. Pop-rock singer Adam Lambert is 31. Thought for Today: And were an epitaph to be my story Id have a short one ready for my own. I would have written of me on my stone: I had a lovers quarrel with the world. Robert Frost (18741963). INSIDE THE NUMBERS To verify the accuracy of winning lottery numbers, players should double-check the numbers printed above with numbers officially posted by the Florida Lottery. Go to www. flalottery.com, or call 850487-7777. SO YOU KNOW Last nights winning numbers, Page B4 Page B4 TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Brown investigated for possible assault WEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif. Authorities are investigating allegations that Grammywinning singer Chris Brown assaulted a man in a West Hollywood parking lot. The Los Angeles County Sheriffs Department says deputies responded to a report Sunday night of six men fighting. Witnesses told deputies that the brief fight was over a parking space. The department says the altercation allegedly led to Chris Brown punching the victim. The victim wasnt identified, but the celebrity website TMZ, which first reported the incident outside a recording studio, says the fight also involved Frank Ocean a nominee in the upcoming Grammy Awards. He later tweeted that he got jumped by (Brown) and a couple guys and suffered a finger cut.. Randy Travis to enter drunken-driving plea SHERMAN, Texas A prosecutor says country music star Randy Travis is expected to enter a guilty plea in a drunken-driving case in North Texas. Grayson County District Attorney Joe Brown says details of the agreement will be released following Travis court appearance Thursday in Sherman. Travis was naked when he was arrested following a singlevehicle accident Aug. 7 near Tioga, about 60 miles north of Dallas. Authorities have said his blood-alcohol level was more than 0.15. The legal limit for driving is 0.08. Brown says Travis will plead guilty to misdemeanor drunken driving, punishable by up to two years in jail and a $4,000 fine. The 53-year-old Travis also faced a retaliation charge for allegedly threatening officers, though that charge is no longer in court files. His attorney wasnt available for comment. Star Wars prequel remakes postponed LOS ANGELES The force isnt with the 3-D versions of the Star Wars prequels. Lucasfilm said in a statement Monday that its postponing the scheduled 3-D releases of Star Wars: Episode II Attack Of The Clones and Episode III Revenge of the Sith this fall to instead focus its efforts on Star Wars: Episode VII. The Walt Disney Co. confirmed Friday that J.J. Abrams creator of the TV series Lost and director of 2009s Star Trek movie, will direct the seventh installment of the franchise, set for a 2014 release. Disney bought Star Wars maker Lucasfilm last month for $4.06 billion. Episode I The Phantom Menace was released in 3-D last February and earned $22.4 million domestically its opening weekend. The original prequels were released from 1999 to 2005. From wire reports Chris Brown Randy Travis Associated Press President Barack Obama listens Jan. 21 as Beyonce sings the national anthem at the ceremonial swearing-in at the U.S. Capitol during the 57th Presidential Inauguration in Washington, D.C. Whether Beyonce actually sang at the inauguration is a tempest in a teapot, but dig deeper and it reveals something about American society at this moment. T ED A NTHONY Associated Press PITTSBURGH T he breathtaking model on your magazine cover: Of course shes not that thin and unblemished. That reality show you never miss? Youre shocked shocked that its real-life drama isnt 100 percent unscripted. And that diva who may or may not have mouthed the words to the national anthem to her own prerecorded voice? Yeah, well, so what? It was a big moment, and she wanted to sound her best. In America these days, in countless tiny ways, much of what we see and experience isnt exactly what it seems. We know it, too. And often we dont care, because what were getting just seems to pop more than its gardenvariety, without-the-specialsauce counterpart. Whether Beyonce actually sang at last weeks presidential inauguration the jurys still out, and shes kept silent is, on the surface, the textbook teapot tempest. Dig deeper, though, and the conversation or lack of it reveals something important about society at this moment. The big question is no longer whether reality matters. That ship sailed long ago. More to the point is this: Can reality compete? Its as if the fakery has become satisfactory, says Jonathan Vankin, co-writer of Forever Dusty, a musical that takes events from the life of the late soul singer Dusty Springfield and carefully dramatizes them. I think almost everyone knows that were constantly being fed unreality. And yet there seems to be very little curiosity about figuring out whats really going on, says Vankin. Many, including some of Beyonces fans and friends, consider the inauguration debate ridiculous because, after all, even if she was lipsyncing she was doing it to her own powerful voice. Fair enough. That ignores, however, two aspects of live performance. First is what some consider an implicit contract between a performer and a live audience the expectation that the audience deserves a performance thats in the moment and that might, just might, even be affected by the presence of the crowd. If none of that happens, then why not stay home, skip the hassle and listen to your iPod? And second, the version of Beyonces voice that might be recorded in a studio with potential help from digital enhancement and sweetening could be quite different from the one produced live on a windy, wintry January day. Reality is complicated, messy, and uncertain. We want it to be shrink-wrapped and labeled clearly, says Mark Carnes, general editor of Past Imperfect: History According to the Movies and a historian at Barnard College. We prefer the crisp clarity of sound bites and slogans to the blaring cacophony of the world around us. Its hardly just music. These examples of artifice in miniature pop up everywhere in American culture so much so that we hardly even notice it. We take it for granted that our Cheetos and Doritos are bright orange because thats the color that says really cheesy to us. We purchase Yankee Candles called Home Sweet Home that evoke a heartwarming blend of cinnamon, baking spices and a hint of freshly poured tea even if we have no intention of doing any baking or brewing whatsoever. Fundraisers sending out bulk mail now commonly use envelopes shaped like personal greeting cards and do their utmost to make the address look like its handwritten expressly to you, sometimes even adding personal notes that are written diagonally across the back. And at Walt Disney W orld, ground zero of artifice, you can go for a Caribbean vacation or a visit to Morocco without ever encountering the inconvenient realities of the actual locations such as, say, upset stomachs and poor people. And digital photo retouching: The tools of artifice, once accessible only to professionals, have gone democratic. Now manipulators by the millions can use something called a clone tool to erase blemishes, unwanted features and entire people. With the tap of a smartphone touchscreen, you can make an image taken seconds ago look like a vintage snapshot from a 1972 Polaroid or a 19th-century tintype. But it is in entertainment a realm custom built for artifice that this notion plays out most broadly. In a nation already disgusted by media bias a September Gallup poll showed 60 percent of Americans have little or no trust in the mass media to report the news accurately and fairly does this stuff that dances at the edges have any effect in the long run? Its a difficult thing to measure, but just consider: If little things in life arent what they seem, how well does that bode for our society? Maybe, just maybe, were all a little tired of being tricked, be it great trickery or be it small trickery, says Virginia Lee Blood, a musician and singer in Nashville, Tenn. More than that, though, are we setting up unrealistic expectations about the world, piece by tiny piece? How could that boring slice of real cheese be any good if its not bright orange and doesnt pop with artificial Cheetos flavor? How can you be satisfied with your romantic partner when every smidgen of media in the checkout line hands you ridiculously unattainable images of human perfection? And how can you persuade a young girl who wants to grow up to sing like Beyonce that, yes, with practice and hard work she might belt out the national anthem at the inauguration or sing in a Super Bowl halftime show one day if such performances turn out to be not entirely what they seem? Even Kurt Cobain, whose music was welcomed by many as a burst of show-business authenticity, struggled with the issue. In his 1994 suicide note he weighed in once more, this time about pretending to be enthusiastic on stage. The worst crime I can think of, Cobain wrote, would be to rip people off by faking it. Of course, his band Nirvana also produced, much more famously, six words that encapsulated the era in which we live and give us what is perhaps the ultimate verdict on this issue. Here we are now, he sang. Entertain us.Ted Anthony writes about American culture for The Associated Press. Beyonce brouhaha: Should we really prefer unreality?

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Consumer alertH EALTH & L IFE I n the past couple of years, I have discussed the growing body of evidence that supports a link to obesity and the risk of cancer. Every day, we learn more and more about this link, and the many cancers related to obesity, including those of the pancreas, colon, breast, esophagus, kidney, uterus and gallbladder. As a matter of fact, after smoking, being overweight or obese is the biggest risk factor for Less alcohol for healthy weight See BENNETT / Page C5 Dr. Sunil Gandhi CANCER & BLOOD DISEASE Everything in excess is poison R ecently, I saw a 70-year-old white male patient. He went to see his primary care physician for routine follow-up. He had blood work that included a completed blood count (CBC). It showed he had too many red blood cells (RBCs) in his blood. This condition is called polycythemia. RBCs transport oxygen from the lungs to all over the body. So one may think that the more RBCs, the merrier. This will provide more oxygen to the body and that can only be good for the person. I am sure you have A lmost everybody knows what gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is. Old terminology used to be heartburn. But I would be willing to bet not many people are familiar with laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is, as it is a relatively new diagnosis. Reflux is a word that comes from the Greeks and it means backflow in this case, the contents usually from the stomach. In normal situations, the things we eat dont back up into the throat, but if there is a problem, that is where it usually ends up. Laryngopharyngeal reflux refers to an area of the throat and voice box that can be affected by this backflow, and it can occur day or night, even if you havent eaten recently. Some people suffer with the real, obvious discomfort called heartburn. But most people with LPR do not have heartburn, because the material that backflows from the stomach Signs of silent reflux M any of our bodily functions are subject to the influence of the circadian rhythm. This rhythm is related to the biological clock which dictates the mental, physical and behavioral changes that follow a roughly 24-hour cycle of light and darkness. The circadian rhythm can be observed in most living organism including animals, plants and even tiny microbes. This natural oscillation influences the sleep-wake cycles, hormonal secretion, body temperature and kidney function. The master clock that regulates the various circadian rhythms of the body resides in a group of nerve cells in the brain called the suprachiasmatic nucleus, or SCN, in the hypothalamus. See KUMAR / Page C4 See GRILLO / Page C5 Dr. Denis Grillo EAR, NOSE & THROAT Section C TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE INSIDE Dr. Ed Dodge / Page C2 Dr. Richard Hoffmann / Page C3 Dr. C. Joseph Bennett NAVIGATING CANCER So you know: The information contained in the Health & Life section is not intended to cover all possible directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects and is not intended to replace consultation with a physician. See GANDHI / Page C5 Dr. Udaya Kumar UROLOGY TODAY Does the bladder have a clock? New health care markets on the way R ICARDO A LONSOZ ALDIVAR Associated Press WASHINGTONB uying your own health insurance will never be the same. This fall, new insurance markets called exchanges will open in each state, marking the long-awaited and muchdebated debut of President Barack Obamas health care overhaul. The goal is quality coverage for millions of uninsured people in the United States. What the reality will look like is anybodys guess from bureaucracy, confusion and indifference to seamless service and satisfied customers. Exchanges will offer individuals and their families a choice of private health plans resembling what workers at major companies already get. The government will help many middle-class households pay their premiums, while lowincome people will be referred to safety-net programs they might qualify for. Most people will go online to pick a plan when open enrollment starts Oct. 1. Counselors will be available at call centers and in local communities, too. Some areas will get a storefront operation or kiosks at the mall. Translation to Spanish and other languages spoken by immigrants will be provided. When you pick a plan, youll no longer have to worry about getting turned down or charged more because of a medical problem. If youre a woman, you cant be charged a higher premium because of gender. Middle-aged people and those nearing retirement will get a price break: They cant be charged more than three times what younger customers pay, compared with six times or seven times today. If all this sounds too good to be true, remember that nothing in life is free and change isnt easy.Sticker shock Starting Jan. 1, 2014, when coverage takes effect in the exchanges, virtually everyone in the country will be required by law to have health insurance or face fines. The mandate is meant to get everybody paying into the insurance pool. Obamas law is called the Affordable Care Act, but some people in the new markets might experience sticker shock over their premiums. Smokers will face a financial penalty. Younger, well-to-do people who havent seen the need for health insurance may not be eligible for income-based assistance with their premiums. Many people, even if they get government help, will find that health insurance still doesnt come cheaply. Monthly premiums will be less than the mortgage or rent, but maybe more than a car loan. The coverage, however, will be more robust than most individual plans currently sold. Consider a hypothetical family of four making $60,000 and headed by a 40-year-old. Theyll be eligible for a government tax credit of $7,193 toward their annual premium of $12,130. But theyd still have to pay $4,937, about 8 percent of their income, or about $410 a month. A lower-income family would get a better deal from the governments sliding-scale subsidies. Consider a similar four-person family making $35,000. Theyd get a $10,742 tax credit toward the $12,130 annual premium. Theyd have to pay $1,388, about 4 percent of their income, or about $115 a month. The figures come from the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundations online Health Reform Subsidy Calculator. But while the government assistance is called a tax credit and computed through the income tax system, the money doesnt come to you in a refund. It goes directly to insurers. Information needed Obamas law is the biggest thing thats happened to health care since Medicare and Medicaid in the 1960s. But with open enrollment for exchange plans less than 10 months away, theres a dearth of consumer information. Its as if the consumer angle got drowned out by the political worlds dispute over Obamacare, the dismissive label coined by Republican foes. Yet exchanges are coming to every state, even those led by staunch GOP opponents of the overhaul, such as Govs. Rick Perry of Texas and Nikki Haley of South Carolina. In their states and close to 20 others that are objecting, the exchanges will be operated by the federal government, over state opposition. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius has pledged that ON THE NET For an interactive map showing the type of exchange and the number of uninsured residents in each state: http://hosted.ap.org/interactives/ 2012/healthcare Associated Press Business developer Robert Schultz poses for a photo Jan. 8 outside his home office in Newton, Mass. Buying your own health insurance will never be the same. This fall, new insurance markets called exchanges will open in each state, the long-awaited and much-debated debut of President Barack Obamas health care overhaul. Schultz is a Boston-area startup business consultant who got his MBA in 2008, when the economy was tanking. Yet he was able to find coverage when he graduated and hang on to his insurance through job changes since. See ALERT / Page C4 000DMNW Little to no out of pocket expense for most Medicare Patients with secondary insurances. For Appointment Call Toll Free 1-855-Gulfcoast (1-855-485-3262) www.gulfcoastspine.net G e t B a c k I n t o G e t B a c k I n t o Get Back Into T h e S w i n g O f L i f e T h e S w i n g O f L i f e The Swing Of Life W i t h W i t h With M i n i m a l l y M i n i m a l l y Minimally I n v a s i v e I n v a s i v e Invasive S p i n e S p i n e Spine S u r g e r y S u r g e r y Surgery Failed Laser Spine Surgery Spinal Stenosis Herniated Disc Degenerative Disc Disease Scoliosis Spinal Fractures due to Trauma or Osteoporosis Board Certified Spine Surgeons Specializing in the Treatment of Back and Leg Pain Due to: Minimally Invasive Spine Surgeons James J. Ronzo, D.O. Frank S. Bono, D.O. Board Certified, Fellowship Trained

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LifeSouth Community Blood Centers : Three blood types remain in emergency demand: O-negative, Opositive and A-negative. LifeSouth urges all eligible donors who are feeling healthy to come out and support their communities by donating blood as soon as possible. Donors in January will be entered in a drawing to win an iPad mini. To find a donor center or a blood drive near you, call 352-527-3061. Donors must be at least 17, or 16 with parental permission, weigh a minimum of 110 pounds and be in good health to be eligible to donate. A photo ID is required. The Lecanto branch office is at 1241 S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491), open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays (7 p.m. Wednesdays), 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays. The Inverness branch is at 301 W. Main St., open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays, (6:30 p.m. Wednesdays), 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturdays and closed Sundays. Visit www.lifesouth.org. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 29, Walmart Supercenter, West Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness. 2 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 30, Citrus County Chronicle Meadowcrest Boulevard, Crystal River. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 30, Crystal River Village Home Owners Association, Southeast Eighth Avenue, Crystal River. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 31, Lecanto High School, West Educational Path, Lecanto. Flu shot clinics areofferedby B&W Rexall Drugs in Inverness. Call Donna Stevenson at 352-726-1555. Nature Coast EMS offer flu shots for $28; however, the flu shot is free with valid Medicare Part B, and many other insurance providers are also accepted. Flu shots are available 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, (except holidays), at the Nature Coast EMS administration office on Homosassa Trail at Country Hill Drive in Lecanto. If your organization, business, ALF or other group would like to schedule a flu clinic at your location, call Jane Bedford at 352-2494751 or email JaneB@ naturecoastems.org. SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospital H2U Partners Club events during January. The hospital is at 11375 Cortez Blvd., Spring Hill, 1.9 miles east of U.S. 19 on State Road 50. Visit OakHill Hospital.com. 10 a.m. Jan. 29 Blood pressure screening. 10:30 a.m. Jan. 29 Buddys Band. 12:30 p.m. Jan. 30 Meet & Eat. CRYSTAL RIVER Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center offers the following health education programs presented by board-certified physicians and licensed medical professionals. Website: SevenRivers Regional.com. Call 352-7951234 to register. Prostate Cancer Screening During January, men older than 40 who have not had a prostate cancer screening in the past 12 months are welcome to register for a free prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and physical exam on Wednesday, Jan. 30, in the hospitals Ambulatory Surgery Center. Appointments are limited and will be scheduled between 4 and 7 p.m. Call 800-436-8436 to schedule your appointment. Good News About Knee & Hip Pain Attend this program to find out how you may be able to relieve your knee or hip pain, 1 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 13, in the Medical Offices Building Community Room at Seven Rivers Regional. Program is free; registration requested. Code Blue: Heart Emergencies Workshop Learn about emergency cardiac care, interventional procedures and other potentially life-saving heart emergency treatments, 1 to 3 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 27, at Nature Coast EMS in Lecanto. Program is free; registration requested. Pre-Surgery Ortho Camp Having knee or hip replacement surgery? Attend this program to learn preand post-surgery exercises, how to use a walker, knee and hip precautions and adaptive equipment that may be needed for activities of daily living. Offered at 1 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 5, at Seven Rivers Regional. Program is free; registration required. Breastfeeding/Infant Care Expectant or new mothers learn helpful techniques for successful breastfeeding as well as basic infant care at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12, in the Medical Offices Building Community Room. Program is free; registration required. Four-week Childbirth Education Expectant couples learn about labor, delivery and relaxation techniques, exercising, newborn characteristics and breastfeeding. Begins at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 7, in the Medical Offices Building Community Room. Cost is $30; registration required. Free eight-week Griefs Journey workshop from 10:30 a.m. to noon Wednesdays beginning Jan. 30 for those who have experienced the death of a loved one, hosted by Paul Winstead, licensed mental health counselor and grief counselor with the Citrus team of HPH Hospice, at the First United Methodist Church of Homosassa. The experience of grieving and mourning the death of a loved one may be the most profound and intense emotional experience we have. Each individual experiences grief differently, but we can often identify with those who have also experienced the death of a loved one and not feel so alone. This educational and supportive course shows grief as a process in which the timing, intensity and order of each persons experiences are unique. Preregistration is required. For information, call Winstead at 352-527-4600. HPH Healing Peoples Hearts in Citrus County offers care, comfort and support for community members. Visit HPH-Hospice.org. HPH Hospice, Healing Peoples Hearts, two-day new volunteer orientation from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 30, and Friday, Feb. 1, at the HPH Team offices, 3545 N. Lecanto Highway in the Winn-Dixie shopping plaza in Beverly Hills. HPH staff believe if you want to do more with your own life, there is no volunteer opportunity more rewarding than working with hospice. Qualifications needed: Caring heart, positive attitude, extra love to share and a big smile that appears on demand. RSVP or receive information by calling Debi Shields, volunteer coordinator, at 352-527-4600. PORT RICHEY The Alzheimers Family Organization will present its 13th annual Gong Show at 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, at the Jewish Community Center in Port C2 T UESDAY, J ANUARY29, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE H EALTH& L IFE Dr. Dodge sets off on Zimbabwe adventures I flew out of San Antonio on Friday, Jan. 11, for the first leg of my trip to Zimbabwe. At Dulles airport in Washington, D.C., I connected with South African Airways for the long flight to Africa. My re-entry into Zimbabwe the next day reminded me how interesting life in Africa can be. The driver from Africa University was not at the airport to pick me up when I arrived at 9:30 p.m. After waiting until 10, I decided to take a taxi to the Holiday Inn. The taxi driver turned out to be a personable young pastor of a church in a low-income suburb of Harare. He drove a taxi parttime in order to make a living. I enjoyed talking with him and appreciated his good driving! After breakfast the next morning, the Africa University driver picked me up for the four-hour drive to the campus. He was deeply apologetic for missing me at the airport, having misunderstood the time of my arrival. He went to the airport at 1:30 a.m. to meet me! How could I not forgive him? It rained steadily all the way from Harare to Mutare, the rainy season having arrived a couple of weeks before I did. The countryside is lush, and the campus, in the rolling hills of Zimbabwes Eastern Highlands, is especially pretty now because of all the rain, though it also makes many walking paths muddy and slippery. Housekeeping adventures The AU Guest House keys were not available when I arrived Sunday night, so I was put up at the old farmhouse. Monday morning, I was greeted with smiles, hugs and handshakes everywhere on campus. By Monday evening, the personnel office transferred me to the Faculty Guest House, but my room had not been readied as thought, and all the help had gone home. Fortunately, I still knew how to make a bed! Electric power is often intermittent in Zimbabwe. We had no lights and I couldnt use the guest house stove for the first couple of days. Happily, candlelight needs no electricity, and I was thankful for the traditional sadza, greens and brown-bean dinners at the dining hall. When power came on at the guest house again, I was able to start cooking my own meals. If youre interested in reading about my culinary adventures, please read my blog. As you may gather from this quick sketch, one never knows what the next day will bring in Zimbabwe, but that keeps us on our toes. Even though many of these challenges are minor, every day is an adventure. Unfortunately, there are also more serious difficulties that Africa University is wrestling with. Ill touch on these briefly to give you an inkling of the problems it faces. Academic adventures There are serious challenges at Africa University, primarily due to the worsening economic situation here. A number of major businesses in town have folded in the past year, and costs of services have escalated sharply due to inflation. All of this has an impact on the university. Support from abroad has been dwindling as costs have been rising. As a result, faculty and staff pay is flat, not keeping pace at all with the cost of living. Some faculty members are leaving for better pay elsewhere. Of course, this adds to alreadyimpaired morale for those remaining. It is a cloudy picture. Yet Africa University is a bright spot for many reasons. It provides a sound ethical and academic grounding for many young people who graduate from this university to provide valuable leadership in business, education, health services and other fields in Zimbabwe and in other countries across Africa. The fact that AU has been panAfrican from the beginning makes it of value to all of Africa. Although this is only the third year Ive taught in the faculty of health sciences as a visiting adjunct professor, students Ive taught are already making contributions in the health field in Zimbabwe, Mozambique and Malawi, and that is exciting. One of our second-year MPH students from Malawi is doing a major health survey there that will help guide Malawians toward healthier ways of life. Many of the students Ive taught come back to tell me what Ive taught them has made the kind of impact in their own lives that they want to share with others. That is rewarding! Ed Dodge, M.D., MPH, is a retired physician now living in Texas. Visit his website, www.thepoweroflifestyle.com. Google Maps Africa University is north of the city of Mutare in Zimbabwe in eastern Africa. Health NOTES See NOTES / Page C3 Happy hounds for Oak Hill Hospital Special to the Chronicle Oak Hill Hospitals Pediatric ER recently received a gift of 150 of Beaus Happy Hounds presented to the nurses. LifeSouth Community Blood Centers began distributing Happy Hounds four years ago. From left are Kyoko Kraus, R.N.; Linda Ballie, R.N.; and Tom Davis, LifeSouths district community development coordinator. The organization provides the plush toys to hospitals that treat children, as well as EMTs and law enforcement, who carry them for children in their patrol cars and ambulances. They are all individually wrapped. With your new Pediatric ER unit, this is the perfect place for Beaus Happy Hounds, Davis said. Dr. Ed Dodge POWER OF LIFESTYLE www.chronicleonline.com Get Published Win Prizes Receive Awards! They poured Their Hearts Out in love letters for our Valentines Day contest.www.chronicleonline.com/valentinesday2013 They are counting on you to votefor them so they can...VOTE NOW! 000DVGY 000DTL3 6151 N. Suncoast Blvd., Suite 1C Next to Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center Mon.-Fri. 8:30 A.M. 4:30 P.M. Accepting New OB/GYN Patient s Geriatrics Family & General Medicine Internal Medicine Intensive Care (Hospital) Long-Term Care (Nursing Home) Homosassa 4363 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa Springs (352) 503-2011 Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am B.K. Patel, M.D Internal Medicine H. Khan, M.D. Board Certified Family Pactice Beverly Hills 3775 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills (352) 746-0600 Inverness 308 S. Line Ave. Inverness (352) 344-5511 000DQZI New Patients & Walk-Ins Are Always Welcome Humana, Freedom, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted Our Goal Is A Healthier You Active Staff at both Seven Rivers & Citrus Memorial Hospitals Primary Medical Care Centers

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Richey, Pasco County. Tickets are $40 (preferred seating), $30 and $25. This event is BYOB, and dinner will be catered by Carrabbas Italian Grill. It will include door prizes, auctions and drawings, snacks and soft drinks. Call the Alzheimers Family Organization at 727-848-8888 or 888-496-8004. Florida Department of Elder Affairs SHINE program offers free and unbiased information and assistance for all your health insurance issues. In Citrus County, there are four locations ready to serve your needs. For an appointment at any center, call 352527-5956. Leave your name, telephone number and a short message. A SHINE counselor will return the call. Citrus County Resource Center, 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto. First United Methodist Church, 8831 W. Bradshaw St., Homosassa. St Annes Episcopal Church, 9870 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River. Inverness Library, 1511 Druid Road, Inverness. Support GROUPS Support for People with Oral and Head and Neck Cancer (SPOHNC), at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute at the Allen Ridge CMHS campus, 522 N. Lecanto Highway in Lecanto. Next meeting at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 29. Quarterly meetings offer information, support and encouragement to newly diagnosed patients, survivors, family members and friends in a friendly and non-threatening forum. Call Wendy Hall, LCSW, at 352-527-0106 or whall@rboi.com. PINELLAS PARK Connections fireside-discussion-style support group for cancer patients, 7 p.m. the last Thursday monthly, WellSpring Oncology, 6600 66th St. N., Pinellas Park, 727343-0600; www.wellspring oncology.org. Families Against Multiple Sclerosis Support Group, 11 a.m. the first Saturday monthly at Sandy Oaks RV Resort, 6760 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills, for families, friends and anyone affected by MS. Call 352-422-5868. BROOKSVILLE Man to Man prostate cancer support group, 6 to 7 p.m. the first Monday monthly at the Florida Cancer Institute-New Hopes Brooksville Center, 7154 Medical Center Drive. Call Mary Capo at 352596-1926. Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Support Group 10 a.m. to noon the first Monday monthly at the Citrus County Resource Center, 2804 W Marc Knighton Court in Lecanto. Pam Hall from Kids Central Inc. will facilitate the meeting. Call Pam at 352-387-3540. OCALA The Alzheimers and Memory Disorders support group of Ocala, 3 to 5 p.m. the first Monday monthly at the Medical Office Building at West Marion Community Hospital, 4600 S.W. 46th Court, second-floor Community Room. Call 352-401-1453. Alzheimers Association -Florida Gulf Coast Chapter support group are attended by caregivers of loved ones with dementia or Alzheimers Disease. The support group provides the caregivers an opportunity to reduce their isolation and receive support and knowledge from other caregivers. It helps to share experiences, increase feelings of self-worth, decrease a sense of isolation, learn from others in your situation, learn about community resources, and receive encouragement from other caregivers. All support groups are free of charge to caregivers.Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, 550 U.S. 41 S., Inverness, 11 a.m. first Tuesday monthly. Call Anne Black at 352-527-4600. BROOKSVILLE Womens breast cancer support group 6 to 7:30 p.m. the first Tuesday monthly at Florida Cancer InstituteNew Hope Center at 7154 Medical Center Drive, Spring Hill. Call Tambra Randazzo, R.T., at 352-592-8128. Weekly meetings Together We Grow Nar-Anon Family Group 6:45 p.m. Wednesdays at Dunnellon Presbyterian Church, 20641 Chestnut St., Room 204 in office building, use right-side entrance across from the Memorial Garden; Nar-Anon is for family and friends of addicts. Find a free local support group in your area: call 888947-8885 or go to www.NARANONFL.org. Recovery from Food Addiction 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. Thursdays at St. Annes Church, 9870 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River, in the parish hall library. Call Peg at 410-903-7740. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) is a free 12-step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, undereating or bulimia. For details or a list of meetings, call 352-270-8534 or visit www.foodaddicts.org. 7 to 8:30 p.m. Sundays at Queen of Peace Catholic Church Main Hall, 6455 S.W. State Road 200, Ocala. Depression and anxiety peer support group meets at 10 a.m. Thursdays at Central Ridge Library. Bereavement Group, 1:30 to 3 p.m. Thursdays in the back hall, St. Thomas Church, off U.S. 19 south of Cardinal Street. Group is composed of men and women who are experiencing grief and are convinced Life can be good again. Open to all. Come or call Anne at 352212-0632. Al-Anon groups meet regularly in Citrus County. Call 352-697-0497. Inverness AFG: 8 p.m. Mondays, Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S. 41. Crystal River AFG: 8 p.m. Tuesdays, St. Benedict Catholic Church, 455 S. Suncoast Blvd. Last Resort AFG: 11:30 a.m. Wednesdays, First United Methodist Church, 3896 S. Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness. Lecanto AFG: 8 p.m. Thursdays, Unity Church of Citrus County, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Crystal River AFG: 11:30 a.m. Thursdays at YANA Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Avenue), Crystal River. Awareness Lunch Bunch AFG: 12:30 p.m. Fridays, St. Margaret Episcopal Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave., Inverness. Beginners Al-Anon: 10 a.m. Saturdays at Yana Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Avenue), Crystal River. Tuesday Morning Serenity: 10 a.m. Tuesday at Unity Church, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Alcoholics Anonymous : If you drink, and want to stop, call Alcoholics Anonymous Nature Coast Intergroup at 352-6210599. Visit the website: www.ncintergroup.com. AC Group 7 p.m. Tuesdays at Church Without Walls, 3962 N. Roscoe Road, Hernando. Call Laverne at 352637-4563. Visit the website: www.alcoholicsforchrist.com. A 12-step Christian support group meets at 6 p.m. every Wednesday at Living Waters Ministries, 12 N. Melbourne St., Beverly Hills. Call Meg at 352-527-2443. Free and open to the public. DUNNELLON Grief support group 6 p.m. Thursdays at the First Baptist Church of Dunnellon, 20831 Powell Road. Call the church at 352-489-2730. Narcotics Anonymous : Easy Does It, 8 p.m. Monday and Saturday, Lions Den, U.S. 41, Floral City. It Works How and Why, 7 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday and noon Sunday, YANA Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River. Focus on Recovery, 8 p.m. Thursday, First Christian Church, Grover Cleveland Boulevard, Homosassa. Recovery on the River, 8 p.m. Monday and Friday, Lecanto Church of Christ, State Road 44 and County Road 491, Lecanto; 8 p.m. Sunday 797 S. Rowe Terrace, Lecanto, east of C.R. 491 and S.R. 44. Narcotics Anonymous is not affiliated with any of the meeting facilities listed. Information line: 352-382-0851. Overeaters Anonymous : 5 p.m. Wednesdays at St. Annes Episcopal Church. Call Rita at 352-382-8503. Voices of Recovery, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Mondays at the Senior Center (V.A. building) on County Road 491, Lecanto. Call Dolores at 352746-5019. The Circle of Love, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Thursdays at Our Lady of Grace Church in Beverly Hills, 6 Roosevelt Blvd. Call Carolyn at 352-341-0777. The New Beginning, 7 p.m. Fridays at Our Lady of Grace, Roosevelt Boulevard, Beverly Hills. Call Carolyn at 352-341-0777. The Encouragers Support Group has been helping people deal with depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder and more. Weekly meeting. Call 352-637-3196. Anorexia and bulimia anonymous 12-step support group, 5:45 p.m. Mondays at the Yana Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River (behind the police station). Call Charmaine at 352-422-3234. Citrus Abuse Shelter Association (CASA), 1100 Turner Camp Road, Inverness, offers two free weekly womens domestic abuse support groups: 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays and 10:30 a.m. to noon Wednesdays. Child care available. Call CASA at 352344-8111. Celebrate Recovery : 7 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays at the Christian Recovery Fellowship Church, 2242 W. State Road 44. Call 352-726-2800. 7 to 9 p.m. Fridays at Seven Rivers Presbyterian Churchs Student Ministries Building. Dinner available before the meeting from 6 to 7 p.m. for $4 donation and a coffee house after. Call 352746-6200. Gulf to Lake Church Ministry Complex, West Gulf-toLake Highway in Crystal River. Dinner at 6 p.m. Fridays, followed by largeand small-group time and a Coffee Caf at 9. Call 352-586-4709. Nature Coast Ministries seeks to help the homeless and hurting of Citrus County. We offer referrals to Celebrate Recovery, call 352-563-1860. Overcomers Group for people recovering from addictions to drugs, alcohol or other out-of-control habits, 8 p.m. Mondays at the Sanctuary, 7463 Grover Cleveland Blvd. Call Paul at 352628-2874. Dunnellon Life Recovery group for adults where addiction, compulsion and codependency issues are dealt with, at 7 p.m. Mondays at Rainbow Springs Village Church, 20222 S.W. 102nd St. Road, Dunnellon. Call Char at 352-465-1644 or Nancy at 352-794-0017. SPRING HILL Parkinsons Tai Chi Group 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays in the private dining room at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Spring Hill. Call Charissa Haffner at 352-346-8864. Organizations Alzheimers Association -Florida Gulf Coast Chapter affiliated support groups are for family members, caregivers and others interested in learning more about Alzheimers disease. Meetings are open to everyone and free of charge. To arrange free respite care so you can attend a group, call the Hernando office at 352688-4537 or 800-772-8672. Website: www.alz support.com Live chat every Wednesday at noon. Message boards open at all times to post questions and leave replies. Join the Alzheimers Association online community at www.alz. org/living_with_alzheimers_ message_boards_lwa.asp. Brooksville: Lykes Memorial County Library, 238 Howell Ave.; 2:30 p.m. first Friday monthly. Call Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537. Brooksville: Oak Hill Hospital Senior Partners, 11361 Cortez Blvd.; 2:30 p.m. first Thursday monthly. Call Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537. Spring Hill: The Residence at Timber Pines, 3140 Forest Road; 2 p.m. third Monday monthly. Call Diane Koenig at 352-683-9009 or The Residence at 352-6839009. Free respite care provided, call to reserve. First United Methodist Church of Homosassa has several support groups that run on a monthly basis. All groups are open to the public and free of charge, and meet at 1 p.m. in Room 203 in the Administration Building: First Monday: diabetic support group. Second Monday: Alzheimers/dementia caregivers support group. Fourth Monday: stroke survivors support group. Memory Lane Respite offered weekly for people with Alzheimers/dementia. Anyone bringing a loved one for the first time is encouraged to come early to fill out information forms. Call 352-628-4083 for meeting dates. Citrus Memorial Health System is a 198-bed, not-forprofit community hospital that provides health care services to residents of Citrus County and surrounding communities. Support group meetings are in the CMHS Administration Building unless indicated. ACS Man to Man Prostate Support and Education Program, 11:30 a.m. the second Wednesday monthly. Meetings are in the conference room at the Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute at 522 N. Lecanto Highway in the Allen Ridge Medical Mall. Call 352-527-0106. AHEC Quit Smoking Group: 3 p.m. Tuesdays at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Call 813929-1000, ext. 213. Breast Cancer Support Group: 11:30 a.m. the second Friday, Robert Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Call Judy Bonard at 352-527-4389. Citrus Cancer Support: 4:30 p.m. the third Tuesday, cafeteria meeting room. Call Carol at 352-726-1551, ext. 6596 or ext. 3329. Cancer Support: at Cancer Treatment Center. Call Jeannette at 352-746-1100 for date and time. H EALTH& L IFE C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE T UESDAY, J ANUARY29, 2013 C3 How safe is bottled water? FDA sets rules Q : Does the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) monitor the safety of bottled water? A: Yes, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are both responsible for the safety of drinking water. The EPA regulates public drinking water (tap water), while the FDA regulates bottled drinking water. Under FDA labeling rules, bottled water includes products labeled: Bottled water. Drinking water. Artesian water. Mineral water. Sparkling bottled water. Spring water. Purified water (distilled, demineralized, deionized, reverse osmosis water). Waters with added carbonation, soda water (or club soda), tonic water and seltzer historically are regulated by FDA as soft drinks. The FDA has set Current Good Manufacturing Practices (CGMPs) specifically for bottled water. They require bottled water producers to: Process, bottle, hold, and transport bottled water under sanitary conditions. Protect water sources from bacteria, chemicals, and other contaminants. Use quality control processes to ensure the bacteriological and chemical safety of the water. Sample and test both source water and the final product for contaminants. The FDA monitors and inspects bottled water products and processing plants under its food safety program. When the FDA inspects plants, the agency verifies: That the plants product water and operational water supply are obtained from an approved source. Inspects washing and sanitizing procedures. Inspects bottling operations. Determines whether the companies analyze their source water and product water for contaminants. New types of flavored and/or nutrient-added water beverages have begun to appear in stores and on food service menus. Some are simply bottled water with flavoring, others may also contain added nutrients such as vitamins, electrolytes like sodium and potassium, and amino acids. The bottled water ingredients of these flavored and nutrientadded water beverages must meet the bottled water requirements if the term water is highlighted on the label, as in, for example, a product named Berry Flavored Spring Water Beverage. In addition, the flavorings and nutrients added to these beverages must comply with all applicable FDA safety requirements and they must be identified in the ingredient list on the label. According to the International Bottled Water Association, bottled water was the second most popular beverage in the United States in 2005, with Americans consuming more than 7.5 million gallons of bottled water an average of 26 gallons per person. Today, only carbonated soft drinks outsell bottled water. Richard P Hoffmann, Pharm.D., has been a pharmacist for more than 40 years. Send questions to him at 2960 E. Coventry Court, Hernando, FL 34442. Richard Hoffmann ASK THE PHARMACIST See GROUPS / Page C4 NOTES Continued from Page C2 HEALTH NOTE GUIDELINES Support group information will list monthly meetings first, as space is available, then weekly meetings. It is the responsibility of each organization to inform the Chronicle about changes to existing listings. To submit information about upcoming seminars, health-related events open to the public or support group meetings, email newsdesk@chronicleonline .com attn: Health Notes; fax 352-563-5660 or write to: Health Notes c/o Citrus County Chronicle 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Information relating to professional training or seminars attended by those in the health care industries are considered business briefs, and would appear in the Business Digest listings of Sundays Business section. To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 362-563-5660. Be prepared to leave a detailed message with your name, phone number and the address of the news event. Approval for story ideas must be granted by the Chronicles editors before a reporter is assigned. The Chronicle reserves the right to edit submissions. Publication of submitted information or photos on specific dates or pages cannot be guaranteed. LEND US YOUR EARS TM ACT NOW! Deadline Jan. 31st Participants sought for hearin g in noise study Office Locations: Crystal River & Inverness 352-795-5700 802924-01 Over 2000 people have participated in Gardner Audiology Research Studies Gardner Audiology 2012 Starkey, Americas largest manufacturer of hearing instruments is partnering with Gardner Audiology for a field study of consumer satisfaction with newly patented hearing aid technology. Voice IQ was designed to maintain speech understanding in noise and relieve the strain of hearing conversation in a crowd and other difficult listening situa tions. In exchange for complet ing a pre and post-fitting questionnaire Gardner will loan these hearing aids for a free 30 day field study. Audiologists with advanced university degrees will provide all exams and followup care free of charge. At the end of 30 days par ticipants will return the aids or they may purchase them with generous field study dis counts. Call or click GardnerAudiology.com to join the study 000DHA9 CATTLE BARONS BALL SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2013 Citrus Springs Community Center FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 813-949-0291 TICKETS ON SALE NOW! HOLLER! AUCTION HUSH! AUCTION G AMES! AND MORE

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Diabetes Support Group: Call Carol McHugh, R.N., at 352-341-6110 for details. Head and Neck Cancer Support: Robert Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Contact Wendy Hall at 352-527-0106. Heart-Healthy Eating Workshop: 1:30 to 3 p.m. second Wednesday every other month, CMHS Medical Office Building. Call 352-560-6266 or 352-344-6538 to register. Look Good Feel Better Group: monthly at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, sponsored by the American Cancer Society, the Cosmetology Association and the Personal Care Products Council. A licensed cosmetologist is present to advise women about many issues. For dates, times, more information or to register, call the American Cancer Society at 800-395-5665. Mended Hearts Support Group: 10 a.m. second Friday, Gulf Room at CMHS Historic Building. Call Cardiovascular Services at 352-344-6416. Ostomy Support: 2 p.m. third Sunday, Cypress Room at CMHS Historic Building. Call Steve Spielman at 352229-4202, Sue Penner at 352-560-7918, Sharon Brummer at 352-382-4446 or Betty or Mel Shipley at 352341-0005. Stroke Support Group of Citrus County: 3 p.m. third Wednesday monthly, CMHS Annex Building conference room, State Road 44 across from Walgreens. Call 352-344-6596 or 352344-1646. Hospice of Citrus County support groups and workshops. Call 866-6420962 or 352-527-2348 for information. Grief workshops: 1 p.m. Thursday Hospice of Citrus County Clinical Office, 326. S. Line Ave., Inverness. 2 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday Newly Bereaved Grief Workshop, Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. Grief support groups: 11 a.m. Tuesday Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church Parish Life Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. 9 a.m. Wednesday Griefs Journey ... A Walking Group, Whispering Pines Park (Parking Area E). 10 a.m. Thursday Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. 2 p.m. second Thursday Hospice of the Nature Coast Levy Office, 24-B County Road 40 E., Inglis. 10:30 a.m. Saturday First United Methodist Church, 831 Bradshaw St., Homosassa. Evening support groups (for working people): 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays, newly bereaved Hospice of Citrus County Clinical Office, 326 Line Ave., Inverness. Social support: 10 a.m. Tuesday Franks Family Restaurant, 2780 N. Florida Ave., Hernando. 1 p.m. first Thursday Mulligans Grill (formerly Mango Grill), 1305 Norvell Bryant Highway (C.R. 486), Hernando. 11:30 a.m. third Tuesday LIFT luncheon (for widows/widowers), Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club; call 352-621-1500, ext. 1728 for reservations. Wings education series: th Tuesdays @ 2 Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. Teen Encounter and Camp Good Hope Camps for grieving children/teens offered in April and October. Suicide Survivors Support Group, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Mondays at the Hospice of Citrus County Hospice House, 3350 W. Audubon Park Path, Lecanto. The group is free and open to the public. Participants need not be hospice families. For information, call Lynn Miller at 352-527-2020. Hospice of Citrus County/ Hospice of the Nature Coast licensed 1985, is a not-forprofit charitable organization providing comprehensively responsive and compassionate end-of-life services to the terminally ill and their families in 12 counties of North Central Florida. It also provides grief support services for children and adults in the community. HPH Hospice, in partnership with the Alzheimers Association Florida Gulf Coast Chapter, offers Caregivers Support Groups for caregivers of dementia or Alzheimers patients to provide information, education and emotional support in a safe, comforting and confidential environment. There is no charge, and everyone is welcome to join. Call Sue Piatek at 352-5274600 with questions. First Tuesday, 11 a.m., Our Lady of Fatima, 550 S. U.S. 41, Inverness. Second Monday, 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church of Homosassa, 8831 W. Bradshaw St., Homosassa. Free respite care provided, call to reserve. Fourth Tuesday, 5 p.m., Emeritus at Barrington Place, 2341 W. Norvell Bryant Highway (County Road 486 east of C.R. 491), Lecanto. Free respite care provided, call to reserve. Weekly ongoing Bereavement Group from HPH Hospice and St. Timothys Evangelical Lutheran Church, available to anyone who has experienced the loss of a loved one, 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Thursdays at St. Timothys Evangelical Lutheran Church, 1071 N. Suncoast Blvd. (U.S. 19), Crystal River. There is no cost to attend. Call Paul Winstead at 352-527-4600. HPH Hospice, a nonprofit agency initially licensed in 1984, provides, care, comfort and support to individuals affected by a life-limiting illness in Citrus County. In addition to its office in Beverly Hills, it has a Hospice House on Norvell Bryant Highway in Lecanto for patients with limited caregiving assistance and a Hospice Care Center in Citrus Health & Rehabilitation Center in Inverness for patients with complicated pain and symptoms. SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospital H2U Partners Club support groups meet on the campus of Oak Hill Hospital, 11375 Cortez Blvd., Spring Hill. Diabetes Support Group 10 am. second Monday monthly, Kim Palmer, facilitator. Multiple Myeloma Support Group 5:30 p.m. third Wednesday monthly, Diane Terry, facilitator. Kidney Education Support Group 2 p.m. third Wednesday monthly, Mary Jane Talty, facilitator. ALS Support Group 2 p.m. the third Thursday monthly, Katie Mitchell, facilitator. Epilepsy Support Group 3 p.m. fourth Saturday monthly, Lillian Rojas, facilitator. Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Support Group 6 p.m. fourth Wednesday monthly, Lordes Arvelo, facilitator. Crohns Disease Support Group 6 p.m. the last Thursday monthly, Isaiah Del Pilar, facilitator. H2U Partners Club events and activities are open to members only. Membership is open to Hernando, Pasco, and Citrus County residents for $20 a year. Oak Hill Hospital has been serving the Nature Coast since 1984. It is the largest medical facility in Hernando and Citrus County (234 acutecare beds), is one of the areas largest private employers, and offers Hernando Countys only comprehensive cardiovascular program, C4 T UESDAY, J ANUARY29, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE H EALTH& L IFE Imbalances or disruption to these circadian rhythms have been linked to several problems, including sleep disorders, obesity, depression and diabetes. It has long been observed that kidney functions including urine production exhibit daily oscillations. Urine production is influenced by a hormone called anti-diuretic hormone (ADH), which also fluctuates according to the circadian rhythm. Sleep deprivation and other imbalances can cause a reversal of the pattern of urine production, causing increased nighttime urine production with resulting nocturia, or nighttime urinary frequency. Increased nighttime urinary frequency, or nocturia, is often the most bothersome symptom of bladder problems experienced by men and women. Nocturia and poor sleep can adversely affect the quality of life, productivity at work and may even result in falls and fractures among the elderly. While change in the circadian rhythm in anti-diuretic hormone pro duction and increased urine production at night is one of the main causes of nocturia, several other conditions have to be considered by the physicians treating nocturia. Reduced capacity of the bladder, enlarged prostate in men, congestive heart failure, the use of diuretics (water pills), poorly controlled diabetes, sleep apnea, kidney disease and edema are some of the other conditions that may influence urinary frequency at night. Recoding the urinary frequency and volume for a oneto three-day period may help the physician diagnose excessive production of urine at night and treat accordingly. The PER2 gene (Period 2 gene) that regulates the circadian rhythm in the brain has also been identified in various body tissues such as the liver, heart and endocrine organs. Now researchers in the United Kingdom have identified the PER2 gene in mice bladders and found that the activity of the gene oscillated with the 24-hour light/dark cycle. It has been suggested that derangement in the regulation of the PER2 gene may have a role to play in bladder overactivity and increased nighttime frequency. Further research on the bladder-clock gene may provide us clues to better manage nocturia and overactive bladder. Perhaps we could turn the clock off before going to bed! Udaya Kumar. M.D., FRCS Urol, Dip. Urol (London), is certified by the American Board of Urology and the Board of Urology of U.K. and Ireland. He is a former professor of urology with University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Contact him at 3475 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34448 or 352-628-7671. KUMAR Continued from Page C1 GROUPS Continued from Page C3 every citizen will have access to an exchange come next Jan. 1, and few doubt her word. But whats starting to dawn on Obama administration officials, activists and important players in the health care industry is that the lack of consumer involvement, unless reversed, could turn the big health care launch into a dud. What if Obama cut the ribbon and nobody cared? The people who stand to benefit the most are the least aware of the changes that are coming, said Rachel Klein, executive director of Enroll America, a nonprofit thats trying to generate consumer enthusiasm. My biggest fear is that we get to Oct. 1 and people havent heard there is help coming, and they wont benefit from it as soon as they can, she added. I think it is a realistic fear. Even the term exchange could be a stumbling block. It was invented by policy nerds. Although the law calls them American Health Benefit Exchanges, Sebelius is starting to use the term marketplaces instead. Polls underscore the concerns. A national survey last October found that only 37 percent of the uninsured said they would personally be better off because of the health care law. Twentythree percent said they would be worse off in the Kaiser poll, while 31 percent said it would make no difference to them. Taking the leadInsurers, hospitals, drug companies and other businesses that stand to benefit from the hundreds of billions of dollars the government will pump in to subsidize coverage arent waiting for Washington to educate the public. Blue Cross and Blue Shield plans, for example, are trying to carve out a new role for themselves as explainers of the exchanges. Somewhere around 12 million people now purchase coverage individually, but the size of the market could double or triple with the new approach, and taxpayers will underwrite it. Consumers are expecting their health insurance provider to be a helpful navigator to them, said Maureen Sullivan, a senior vice president for the Blues national association. We see 2013 as a huge year for education. One goal is to help consumers master the metals, the four levels of coverage that will be available through exchange plans bronze, silver, gold and platinum. Blue Cross is also working with tax preparer H&R Block, which is offering its customers a health insurance checkup at no additional charge this tax season. Returns filed this year for 2012 will be used by the government to help determine premium subsidies for 2014. This tax season is one of historical significance, said Meg Sutton, senior advisor for tax and health care at H&R Block. The tax return you are filing is going to be key to determining your health care benefits on the exchange.Real-world example Only one state, Massachusetts, now has an exchange resembling what the administration wants to see around the country. With six years in business, the Health Connector enrolls about 240,000 Massachusetts residents. It was created under the health overhaul plan passed by former Republican Gov. Mitt Romney and has gotten generally positive reviews. Connector customer Robert Schultz is a Boston area startup business consultant who got his MBA in 2008, when the economy was tanking. Yet he was able to find coverage when he graduated and hang on to his insurance through job changes since. Schultz says thats freed him to pursue his ambition of becoming a successful entrepreneur a job creator instead of an employee. Its being portrayed by opponents as being socialistic, Schultz said.. It is only socialistic in the sense of making sure that everybody in society is covered, because the cost of making sure everybody is covered in advance is much less than the cost of putting out fires. The Connectors executive director, Glen Shor, said his state has proven the concept works and hes confident other states can succeed on their own terms. There is no backing away from all the challenges associated with expanding coverage, Shor said. We are proud in Massachusetts that we overcame what had been years of policy paralysis. ALERTContinued from Page C1 See GROUPS / Page C5 SPEAKERS AVAILABLE Seven Rivers Regional Speakers Bureau brings customized programs to clubs, churches and other community organizations. Contact Amy Kingery at 352-795-8344 or amy.kingery@hma.com. The Alzheimers Family Organization has speakers available for your organization or club. This presentation will include basic Alzheimers information and the services and programs that the organization offers to the Central Florida community. Call 888-496-8004 or 727-848-8888. SPRING HILL Health Matters Home Care has a Registered Nurse available to do free speaking engagements for your group, club, church or organization. Call 352-686-4493 or 352-686-5593. The Citrus Team of HPH Hospice and its not-forprofit Homecare affiliate, HPH Homecare, provide free, ongoing education to Citrus County residents about their many programs, services and volunteer opportunities. There is no charge for a speaker and the solicitation of funds is never involved. Educational materials are provided at no charge. Call Anne Black, community liaison, at 352-527-4600. Seven Days A Week Rain or Shine Call to see how you can receive 2 Weeks Free 352-563-5655 769452 The #1 Provider of News and Advertising Information in Citrus County 000DNNJ 2nd Annual 000DS6F 5TH ANNUAL February 8, 2013 6:30 P.M. (Doors open at 6pm) at the Curtis Peterson Auditorium Tickets $10 per person Children under 10 are free Masters of Ceremonies: Brad Thorpe County Administrator and Cathy Pearson Assistant County Administrator For ticket information call 527-5900

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usually doesnt have enough time in the esophagus or food tube to cause the typical heartburn pain and ends up quickly in the throat, causing its problem there. Also, many times, especially if the patient hasnt eaten recently, the contents are not acidic. You may or may not know that gastroesophageal reflux disease puts the esophagus or food tube at risk for cancer, but likewise LPR puts the throat at risk, because it is much more sensitive to injury and irritation from the stomachs contents. Here are the warning signs of LPR: Chronic hoarseness or voice changes. Repetitive throat clearing. The sensation of too much mucous in the throat. The feeling of having a lump in the throat. Chronic cough. Too much mucous or phlegm in the nose. The above-mentioned warning signs may seem like rather minor problems, but LPR can lead to more serious issues such as bronchitis, initiating asthma attacks, causing patients to choke, and predisposing patients and putting them at risk for cancer of the esophagus, lung, throat and voice box. I want to caution my readers, these are not common problems associated with LPR, but if left untreated for many years could result in one of these serious issues. The age of onset of LPR is usually in the middleaged adult. But as you will see in the upcoming paragraph, this disease can affect children and infants, as well, because of lifestyle issues. Evaluation and treatment of LPR is done typically by ear, nose and throat doctors and can include a 24-hour test for acid in the throat, barium swallow, and looking down the throat with a lighted tube. These tests are usually easy to do and performed as an outpatient. Each one of those tests is different and has a specific reason for being done and in some cases all three are combined to reach a diagnosis and treatment plan. Treatment for LPR is of course dependent on the severity and damage found. Treatment usually consists of several different approaches. Most commonly, it includes changes in habits and diet combined with medication and very infrequently surgery. Medications include antacids and more sophisticated medications to control acid from the stomach. This particular group of medications include H2 receptor blockers such as Zantac and proton pump inhibitors such as Nexium, to name two of many. Some tips and guidelines for reducing the symptoms of LPR include control of your lifestyle and diet; discontinuing use of tobacco products, smoke and smokeless; not eating within four hours of bedtime; sitting in a chair as opposed to lying down on a couch, especially after a meal; and a low-fat healthy diet with the proper levels and intake of meat, dairy products and particularly offending items that put you at high risk of LPR that include fried foods, chocolate, cheese, caffeine. Avoid strong teas, highly carbonated soda pop, acidic juices and mint candies or beverages, and limit alcoholic beverages, particularly in the late evening hours. Is LPR a diagnosis for life? Not in all cases. In fact, in most cases patients recover and do not require full-time treatment. However, recovery may be for periods of months to years and there is a chance that a relapse can occur and at that time, resumption of treatment is usually successful. So just remember that the nagging little sensation in your throat may be a bigger problem than you think it is. It is always worth getting checked out and getting a professional opinion. Denis Grillo, D.O., FOCOO, is an ear, nose and throat specialist in Crystal River. Call him at 352-795-0011 or visit CrystalCommunity ENT.com. including open heart surgery. Approximately 300 physicians, 950 associates and more than 350 volunteers comprise Oak Hill Hospitals health care delivery team. Visit OakHillHospital.com. Monthly GROUPS SPRING HILL Caregiver Support Group 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. the first Wednesday monthly, at the Florida Cancer Institute-New Hopes Spring Hill Center, 10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203 in the Medical Arts Building next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call Pamela McGee, facilitator, at 352-688-7744. Alzheimers caregiver support group by Alzheimers Family Organization, 2:30 p.m. the first Thursday monthly at Superior Residences of Lecanto, 4865 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway. RSVP by Jan. 29 if you require respite. Call Debbie Selsavage at 352-746-5483. NEW PORT RICHEY Community Chatterboxes support group to assist individuals suffering from communication deficits (i.e., aphasia, apraxia, dysarthria, etc.) as a result of a cerebral vascular accident or other neurological disorders, 3 to 4 p.m. every other Thursday at Community Hospital, 5637 Marine Parkway, New Port Richey, FL 34652. Caregivers and spouses are encouraged to attend. Call 727-845-0757. Friends of the Blind 9 a.m. to noon the second Friday monthly. Call Butch Shultz at 352-344-2693 for location. H EALTH& L IFE C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE T UESDAY, J ANUARY29, 2013 C5 Reader embarrassed by mouth and needs job Q : I hope you can help me. I am so embarrassed by my mouth not to mention the pain I am in because of continuous infections. I am 45 years old and have gotten to the point where I have to get my mouth taken care of. My husband and I have just moved to Citrus County and before I start looking for a job I want to get my teeth fixed. All of my back teeth have already been removed two years ago. All I have left are my front teeth on the top and stubs for my bottom front teeth. The top teeth are badly decayed and the bottom ones get all the infections. I am afraid to take the first step to go to the dentist, so I thought I would write to you first. I want my teeth out and dentures made. I might want implants in the future, but have to figure out how to afford this first. I hope you can help me get over my nervousness. A: First of all, thanks for sending this question in. It is the start of something very exciting for you. I know the thought of all of this can be overwhelming to you. However, I have seen many people with your exact circumstances have a life-changing event surrounding the restoration of their mouth. The end result can be incredible. Patients have gone from ignoring their appearance to wearing makeup, going to the hair stylist and starting a whole new wardrobe. As far as the implants go dont worry about them yet. In the event you need or want them, they can easily be incorporated in the future. You have the right idea: focus on the dentures for now. From what you have described, it sounds as though the best plan for you will be to have what we call immediate dentures made. What this means for you is your dentist takes impressions of your teeth and gums as they are and makes you a set of teeth. You and your dentist will choose the color and shape of your teeth. Pictures of you with your teeth before the decay you now have can be very helpful. You can point out things that you liked about them and things you would like to see different. You can also bring in magazine photos you like and show them to your dentist. In many cases, things you like about smiles and appearance can be incorporated into your smile. Once all of the details are worked out, your teeth will be removed and the dentures put in. By doing things this way, you never go without teeth. There will be a period of adjustment to your new teeth. During this time, your dentist will make any necessary adjustment to the dentures for your comfort. At some time in the future, your dentist will either reline or remake your teeth. This decision depends on many factors. I hope this has helped put you at ease. If you focus on the end result and not the steps to get there, you will do great. I have been witness to so many success stories. Like so many things in life, if you know where you are and where you want to be, all you have to do it take the right steps in between and before you know it you are there. The neat thing here is your dentist can help you with the steps necessary. Dont worry you can have an awesome smile and feel great about yourself! Dr. Frank Vascimini is a dentist practicing in Homosassa. Send your questions to 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446 or email them to him at info@MasterpieceDental Studio.com. Dr. Frank Vascimini SOUND BITES heard everything in excess is poison or too much of a good thing can be bad, too. That is the case in this, too. There are three kinds of blood cells: red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs or fighter cells), and platelets (clotters). WBCs are in the thousands, platelets are in the hundred-thousands and RBCs are in the millions in each millimeter of blood. So, if RBCs increase in number significantly, it causes an effect similar to sludge in a pipe. It blocks the blood vessels, which are like a pipe transferring blood to various parts of the body. This can cause blockage, leading to an effect such as a stroke, heart attack or clot in the lung or leg, etc., depending on where the blood clots. For diagnosis, I usually do a blood test called a JAK2 gene test. This is positive in more than 95 percent of the patients with Polycythemia Rubra Vera. This is a condition where bone marrow makes too many RBCs. It was positive in my patient. RBC count is measured by a component in CBCs called hemoglobin and hematocrit. These patients risk of clot is significantly less if hematocrit is kept below 45. This has shown to reduce the risk of stroke, heart attack, etc. This can be done by periodic phlebotomy or by an oral drug called Hydroxyurea. Phlebotomy is done periodically by removing almost 500 milliliters of blood. It is recommended when hematocrit is above 45. The goal of treatment is to keep the patients hematocrit below 45. We should also aim to keep platelet count below 400,000 or so. Studies have shown that one aspirin (adult or baby) a day helps reduce the risk of clotting, too. My patient is on Hydroxyurea and is tolerating it well without any undue side effects. This has cut down the necessity of doing phlebotomy significantly. He has not had any complication of polycythemia, either. Dr. Sunil Gandhi is a hematologist and oncologist. He is volunteer medical adviser of the Citrus Unit of American Cancer Society. Write to 521 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461, email sgandhi@tampabay.rr. com or call 352-746-0707. GANDHI Continued from Page C1 developing cancer. And these calories dont just come from food. For those who consume alcohol, the calories in alcoholic drinks account for a significant proportion of a drinkers calorie consumption while providing little, if any, nutritional benefit. So, if you are following my recommendations and trying to lose weight, cutting down on drinking can have a big effect on weight loss or maintaining a healthy weight. Now, this is not a cutand-dry discussion, since there is some evidence suggesting that, when consumed in small amounts, alcohol can protect the heart. However, the benefits only outweigh the risks for people who are at higher risk for heart disease, such as women after menopause and men older than 40. You must all remember there is also strong evidence alcohol is a cancer risk factor itself, possibly because it damages DNA. This has been suggested in studies of breast, colon, mouth, throat, esophagus and liver cancer. So how much ingestion of alcohol is safe? There is an easy to understand alcohol calorie calculator to help you see how many calories there are in different amounts of different drinks. The calculator also shows how many chocolate cookies you would have to eat to consume the same number of calories, and how many miles you would have to walk to burn off those calories. Once you read this, the amount of calories in alcohol will clearly come into view. Here are some examples: A 16-ounce glass of beer contains about 250 calories, roughly the equivalent of three chocolate cookies, and would take the average 165pound adult 53 minutes of brisk walking to burn off. A small glass of wine contains 178 calories, the same as around two chocolate cookies, and would take 38 minutes of brisk walking to burn off. Finally, one cocktail, such as vodka and orange juice, contains 109 calories, the same as around one chocolate cookie, and would take 23 minutes of brisk walking to burn off. In a recent study that found showing miles per calorie helped people choose healthier meals, the participants said they preferred to see calorie information include the miles of walking required to burn them off. So, in order to lose or maintain a healthy weight, do you have to stop drinking completely? No, but if you drink alcohol, I recommend you limit your intake to no more than two drinks a day if you are a man, and one a day if you are a woman. To help with this, choose the smallest serving size of drink, dilute alcoholic drinks with soda water or low-calorie soft drinks, alternate alcoholic and nonalcoholic drinks, and, avoid alcohol altogether on a few nights per week. In 2012, Oxford University researchers who analyzed the link between alcohol consumption and 11 chronic diseases, concluded 4,600 more lives would be saved every year if people in England were to cut the amount they drink to no more than about a quarter of a glass of wine or a quarter of a pint of beer per day. Imagine the benefit we could see in this country if we followed this recommendation, as well. Dr. C. Joseph Bennett is a board-certified radiation oncologist and a member of the Citrus County Unit of the American Cancer Society. Watch Navigating Cancer on WYKE TV at 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays and at 10 a.m. Thursdays. If you have any suggestions for topics, or have any questions, contact him at 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461, or email cjbennett@rboi.com. BENNETT Continued from Page C1 GROUPS Continued from Page C4 GRILLO Continued from Page C1 000DPI3 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34446 352-628-0012 www.MasterpieceDentalStudio.com Always Welcoming New Patients FRANK J. VASCMINI, DDS 000DNMQ 000DVG3 Please be a part of this years Junior Achievement Bowl-A-Thon You can be a Lane Sponsor for only $100 or donate a Gift Basket or Gift Certificate to help support local students in Citrus County. Call Rose Strawn for details: 352-427-6006 S a t u r d a y S a t u r d a y Saturday, F e b 2 n d F e b 2 n d Feb. 2 nd 2 0 1 3 2 0 1 3 2013 W e W e We N e e d Y o u r N e e d Y o u r Need Your S u p p o r t S u p p o r t Support!

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Submit information at least two weeks before the event. Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an event. Publication on a special day cant be guaranteed. News NOTES Hospice slates dementia programHPH Hospice, in partnership with the Alzheimers Association, Gulf Coast Chapter, will offer a presentation from 2 to 3 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 29, at the HPH administrative offices at 3545 N. Lecanto Highway (Winn-Dixie shopping plaza) in Beverly Hills. Jerry Fisher, program specialist with the Alzheimers Association, will discuss what happens to driving ability during the Alzheimers disease process. He will provide tips for dealing with someone who refuses to give up their driver license and present available options. Reservations are required. Call 352-527-4600. F.C. Heritage meeting today The quarterly meeting of the Floral City Heritage Council will be today, Tuesday, Jan. 29, at the Floral City Community House, 8370 E. Orange Ave. Member and guest potluck dinner starts at 7 p.m., followed by the quarterly meeting at 7:30 pm. No Snippet of History program is planned, since this is the general membership meeting for the election of the 2013 leadership officers and steering committee. Members are reminded to bring a food item for the potluck, their own plate and table service and a nonperishable food items or a grocery store gift card for the Citrus County Veterans Coalition Food Pantry. Visitors are welcome. Visit www.floralcityhc.org, or call 352-860-0101, or email fchc@hotmail.com for more information. Come learn about hospice Hospice of Citrus County will provide orientation training for individuals who are interested in learning more about hospice and hospice volunteer opportunities. The class will be from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 31, at the Hospice of Citrus County Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Suite A, Homosassa. The class provides an overview of hospice philosophy and history. Participants will become acquainted with services provided by Hospice of Citrus County for patients and families. They will become familiar with the concept of palliative care, learn the importance of confidentiality and more. To register or to request training for a group, call Director of Volunteer Services Cathi Thompson at 352-527-2020, or email: cthompson@hospiceof citruscounty.org.Money show on tap in Ocala The Ocala Coin Collectors will present its annual show from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday, Feb. 1, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 3, at the Circle Square Cultural Center at Top of the World on State Road 200. Nature Coast students of numismatics, seasoned collectors and sellers are invited to bring treasures for appraisal and for slabbing. There will be free parking and admission to meet 56 dealers and learn, as well as hourly door prizes and gold and silver raffles. For information, call Chairman Rick Seivar at 352-748-5225 or Jim Carper at 352-726-3545. C OMMUNITY Page C6 TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE R ecently, the annual Celebration of Life Gala was held in Inverness at the Cornerstone Baptist Church, sponsored by the Life Choice Care Center of Citrus. Sol Pitchon, president and CEO of New Life Solutions, was the guest speaker. Sol is a Greek Jew, born in Thessalonica, Greece, who immigrated to America in 1951 and accepted Christ in 1981. Before joining the ministry, he was a Christian psychotherapist with five years of private practice. He also worked in a psychiatric hospital for Rapha, a Christian in-patient program. As a Jewish-Christian whose parents were Holocaust survivors, he counts it a privilege and his destiny to work the Pregnancy Center Movement. Music was provided by the Mast Brothers, who performed Victory in Jesus and Thank God for the Lighthouse, then donned their black leather jackets for a Fabulous Fifties set including One Fine Day and a jovial parody of the Beatitude Attitudes. Youths from several Baptist churches countywide were excellent servers for the elegant banquet prepared with the direction of Chef Hap Hough of the Withlacoochee Technical Centers Culinary Arts Department. Church youths from Floral City, Crystal River, Beverly Hills, North Oak, Shepherds Way of Citrus Hills and Stage Coach of Bushnell, as well as the Cornerstone Church, participated. In introducing Kathy Davis, director of the Life Choice Care Center, the remark was made by a Cornerstone member that Davis, as director the Center, is who Davis is and not just what she does. Davis spoke passionately of another year of blessings at the center with more than 100 applicants, 133 new clients, 63 pregnancy tests and 16 babies born, nine adoptions and nine clients accepting Christ, seven for the first time. With 86 professions of faith, teens have come to know they are not alone in their health choices. Davis noted that 60 Life Choice Relay walkers raised $9,000. We learned that a satellite facility is in the future for Crystal River with a possible August 2013 dedication. The goal of the center is to change hearts and it is a facility worth our time, talent and financial support. Speaker Pitchon and his mother, Charmaine, 86, a Holocaust survivor of Spanish heritage, had the audiences rapt attention. He spoke of Jewish mothers admirably helping families stay together, remarking that Life Choice Center clients have many other issues besides an unplanned pregnancy. We learned that 29 states now have Choose Life license plates available. He laid out the difference in depression and anxiety: Depression involves regrets of the past and anxiety fears the future. Pitchon challenged us to watch what happens when pastors and churches take a stand for life and stand in the gap. He noted that nationally, the Knights of Columbus have donated sonograms and Citrus County is a mission field for transforming lives in preventing teen pregnancy. Volunteer physicians and nurses are needed who will be hired later. A sonogram machine and a nurse trained to administer it are also needed. The cost to care for a young woman until she gives birth is usually $1,200, including crisis intervention with prayer and counseling, parenting and relationship classes offered at the center. Following the recognition of several young mothers and their babies in attendance, an offering for the center was taken and the closing prayer was given by Greg Kell. To volunteer, call Kathy Davis, director, at 352-341-5176. Ruth Levins participates in a variety of projects around the community. Let her know about your groups upcoming activities by writing to P .O. Box 803, Crystal River, FL 34423. Another successful Celebration of Life Ruth Levins AROUND THE COMMUNITY D OUG L OBEL Special to the ChronicleEach year for the past seven years, a group of individuals representing various organizations, as well as area religious institutions, has gathered in the living room of Inverness Mayor Bob Plaisteds home for several months prior to Thanksgiving. The group of about 30 people spends an hour once a month beginning in August, and an hour each week starting in October to plan how to make sure every family in Citrus County can have a homecooked turkey dinner on Thanksgiving Day. On any given year, that can mean identifying those in need based on standards of as developed by the Salvation Army, then getting the word out those that fall within the guidelines need to go to the Salvation Army office (or in the case of this year Daystar and We Care Food Pantry) to register to receive a turkey and all the fixings at the Inverness Walmart on Saturday prior to Thanksgiving Day. In recent years, a computer software system has been made available by the Mid-Florida Homeless Coalition to be used in all registration locations so no double dipping can take place. Each year, Inverness Walmart closes down the parking lot in front of its Garden Shop for thes event. The steering committee of the group, the Thanksgiving Feeding Alliance (TGFA), arranages for the distribution of 1,200 to 1,500 turkeys ordered months in advance from Publix. They work with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to arrange for the donation of anywhere from $20,000 to $27,000 worth of corn, green beans, rice and other foods from its Bishops Storehouse to create boxes of food based on the size of each registered family. In addition to the donation of food from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, for the past several years Publix has arranged for customers in five stores in Citrus County to be able to purchase a turkey to be given to the TGFA to replace one of the turkeys the alliance has to raise money to pay for. For the past three years, Publix customers have purchased enough turkeys to cover most of the cost of the turkeys. This allows the committee to use some cash donations solicited from the public through the free placement of 60,000 fliers in the Citrus County Chronicle to purchase items like canned sweet potatoes to add to the boxes. This year, the committee ordered 2,000 cans of sweet potatoes from Inverness Walmart, which then donated 1,000 of those cans of potatoes and only charged the committee for 1,000 cans. Also this year, due to an additional donation by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints of 120 turkey loaves, another community organization was able to help local organizations that cook and feed families in need during Thanksgiving week. Feeding Citrus families Groups work together in special alliance Special to the Chronicle Members of the Thanksgiving Feeding Alliance (TGFA) Committee are, in back, from left: Bishop Rick Sampson, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; Charlie Richer, Suncoast Business Masters; Richard Floyd, Veterans Coalition; DuWayne Sipper, The Path Shelter; Deputy Michele Tewell, CCSO; Lt. Vanessa Miller, Salvation Army; Jay Joines, Black Diamond Foundation; Danette Williams, Church Stake Relief president, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; George Bendtsen, Inverness Sertoma; Terry Lucente, Serving Our Savior (SOS); and Bob Plaisted, Inverness mayor. Front, from left, are: Cookie Plaisted and grandchild; Denise Kennard, Daystar; Janet Ferguson, Inverness Publix store manager; Diane Toto, We Care Food Pantry; Karen Evans, Daystar; Angie Howland, Salvation Army; Paula Hotsclaw, Mid-Florida Homeless Coalition (MFHC); and Barbara Wheeler, MFHC. Committee members not pictured are: Pastor Doug Alexander, New Church Without Walls; Pastor Donnie Seagle, First Baptist Church of Inverness; Duane Dueker; Doug Lobel, TGFA volunteer executive director; Britton Mitchel, Citrus County Legal Services; and Barbara Johnson and John Bourdeaux, SOS. Special to the ChronicleAre you a cat person? Do you have room in your heart and home and the ability to provide the daily care for a live in feline? If you answered yes to these questions, Precious Paws Rescue has the perfect feline partner for you. PPR has several adult and special needs cats that would love to be in a home. They miss living with a special person, curling up on a lap or just gazing out a window. They are up to date on all veterinary care, litterbox trained and socialized. In an effort to move these cats into a more personal home environment, preferably as the only pet in the household, PPR is looking for long-term foster families. Each cat will remain an official PPR foster. All necessary veterinary care, food and litter will be provided by PPR. The foster family will provide shelter and love. These cats are homeless for a variety of reasons the death of an owner, family relocation, or changes in the family structure. If you are a cat lover and unable to adopt or foster, you can help by sponsoring one of the rescued felines with an $18 monthly donation in the selected felines name to Precious Paws Rescue. PPR is an all-volunteer charity organization dedicated to decreasing the number of homeless pets through rescuing, fostering and adopting. PPR sponsors a low-cost spay/neuter program for cats and dogs to further help reduce the number of unwanted pets. For more information, call 352726-4700 and a volunteer will return your call. Stop by the Crystal River Mall Adoption Center from noon to 4 p.m. Thursday through Sunday, and view PPR pets with their individual stories by going to preciouspawsflorida.com. Wanted: Cat people to be foster parents Special to the Chronicle Precious Paws Rescue needs foster parents for many of its homeless felines.

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T UESDAY, J ANUARY29, 2013 C7 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE E NTERTAINMENT P HILLIP A LDER Newspaper Enterprise Assn. Benjamin Franklin said, An investment in knowledge pays the best interest. At the bridge table, we try to use the knowledge gleaned from the bidding and the play (as it progresses) to make informed decisions. How should the play go in this three-no-trump contract after West leads the spade queen? What is the key piece of knowledge declarer wants and East must keep hidden? South starts with seven top tricks: two spades, one heart, three diamonds and one club. He could attack either hearts or clubs, but the minor suit offers much better chances for three tricks. Declarer ducks the first trick, takes the second spade with his king, plays a diamond to dummys queen, and leads a club to his nine. West wins this with, say, the queen (he should vary his play in this situation) and continues with another spade to dummys ace. Now comes dummys last club. What happens next? If East carelessly plays his eight, South should put up his ace, dropping Wests king and collecting 11 tricks. Why should he drop the king? Given that East is known to have the club 10 from the first round of the suit, when East plays the club eight second, he started with 10-8-5 or K-10-8-5. In the second case, the contract is unmakable. However, on the second round of clubs, East should follow the excellent principle of playing the card he is known to hold. If he puts up the 10, declarer will place him with K-10-5, finesse his club jack, and go down three. (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53 Di ggers PG Di ggers PG D ooms d ay P reppers D ooms d ay P reppers D ooms d ay P reppers Di ggers (N) PG Di ggers (N) PG D ooms d ay P reppers (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25Sponge.Sponge.DrakeDrakeFull HseFull HseFull HseFull HseNannyNannyFriendsFriends (OWN) 103 62 103 I MarriedI MarriedOur AmericaOur AmericaOur AmericaOur AmericaOur America (OXY) 44 123 Bad Girls ClubBad Girls ClubBad Girls ClubBad Girls ClubBad Girls ClubBad Girls Club (SHOW) 340 241 340 4 The Twilight Saga: Eclipse (2010) Kristen Stewart. PG-13 The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1 (2011) Kristen Stewart. PG-13 House of Lies MA CalifornicationShameless (In Stereo) MA (SPEED) 732 112 732 NASCAR Race Hub Pinks PG, L Pass TimePass TimeDumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff Hard PartsHard PartsMy Ride Rules My Ride Rules Dumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36The Joe Schmo Show The Joe Schmo Show The Joe Schmo Show The Joe Schmo Show The Joe Schmo Show (N) The Joe Schmo Show (STARZ) 370 271 370 Zookeeper PG Moneyball (2011) Brad Pitt. A baseball manager challenges old-school traditions. PG-13 The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo (2011, Suspense) Daniel Craig, Rooney Mara. (In Stereo) R Laws (SUN) 36 31 36 American Ski Seminole Sports Lightning Live! (N) NHL Ho ckey Florida Panthers at Tampa Bay Lightning. Tampa Bay Times Forum in Tampa, Fla. (Live) Lightning Live! (N) Inside the Lightning American Ski Classic (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29Destination Truth Face Off Make It Reign The artists create goblin kings. Face Off Contestants create a superhero. Face Off When Hell Freezes Over (N) Total Blackout Total Blackout Face Off When Hell Freezes Over (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19KingSeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangCougarBig BangConan (N) (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35 Not With My Wife, You Dont! (1966) Tony Curtis, Virna Lisi. NR The Italian Job (1969, Action) Michael Caine, Noel Coward. Premiere. G The Lavender Hill Mob (1951) Alec Guinness. NR TheyRob (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Dual Survival On the Menu Dual Survival Into the Frying Pan Dual Survival Untamed: Hawaii Dual Survival The Green Hell (N) Africa Cape (N) (In Stereo) G Dual Survival The Green Hell (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30Long Island MediumPlastic Wives The Sisterhood The Sisterhood PGStarter WivesThe Sisterhood PG (TMC) 350 261 350 Rare Birds (2001, Comedy) William Hurt, Andy Jones. (In Stereo) R Barb Wire (1996) Pamela Anderson Lee. R BloodRayne: The Third Reich (2010) Natassia Malthe. Super (2010) Rainn Wilson. (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34Castle Den of Thieves PG Castle Food to Die For PG Castle Demons (In Stereo) PG Castle Cops & Robbers PG Castle Heartbreak Hotel PG CSI: NY Forbidden Fruit (TOON) 38 58 38 33 AdvenAdvenGumballLooneyLevel UpAdvenKing/HillKing/HillAmericanAmericanFam. GuyFam. Guy (TRAV) 9 54 9 44Bizarre FoodsFoodFoodBizarre FoodsEdgeEdgeNo ReservationBizarre Foods (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55Cops PGCops PGWorlds Dumbest...PawnPawnPawnHardcorePawnPawnWorlds Dumbest... (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HCosbyCosbyCosbyRaymondRaymondRaymondRaymondKingKing (USA) 47 32 47 17 18Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit White Collar Brass Tracks (N) Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (WE) 117 69 117 Charmed Charmed and Dangerous Charmed (In Stereo) PG CSI: Miami Long Gone CSI: Miami Crowned CSI: Miami Friendly Fire CSI: Miami Terminal Velocity PG (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20ChrisChrisFunny Home VideosMotherMotherMotherMotherWGN News at NineFunny Home Videos D ear Annie : I am an associate in a law firm with two offices. Each office has three associate attorneys and is managed by a partner. During my first year, I was the only associate in my office, and I received a Christmas bonus. The second year, we hired two additional associates. I was devastated when all of the staff but none of the associates received a bonus that year, as Id planned to use the money to buy gifts for my family. I wasnt surprised last month when, once again, the associates received nothing. I did discover, however, that all of the associates in the other law office received bonuses. I understand that a Christmas bonus is not something I am entitled to receive, and if I bring it up to my boss, it would make me sound selfish and greedy. We do get extra money each month if we exceed a specific number of billable hours. However, that is a part of my compensation agreement and a variable portion of my salary, not a bonus. I also think my boss has decided that the office staff, most of whom are single parents, need the bonus more than the associates do. But my law degree came with six figures of student loan debt. This is less about the money than it is about the disparate treatment, especially between the two law offices. Is there any way to bring this up to my boss for next season without sounding like a spoiled child? Struggling Young Professional Dear Struggling : We understand why this seems unfair, but unless a yearly bonus is part of your compensation package, such money is given at the discretion of the managing partner. It is possible that the associates in the other office have a different compensation agreement that includes a Christmas bonus or that there are other factors involved. You could ask what you can do to increase the likelihood that you will merit additional pay at the end of the year, or whether something about your performance has been disappointing. Beyond that, youre out of luck. Dear Annie : My friend Harry has had an on-again, off-again girlfriend for the past year. They have broken up many times, but claim theyre right for each other. Most of our friends think their relationship is a waste of time. Well, now they are on again, but this time it is different. Harry is totally head over heels, but she isnt into him so much. I used to talk to him every day, and now I barely get a hello. His girlfriend says Im bugging him and never lets him hang around long enough to talk to me. We all know its only a matter of time before it ends badly. How can I help Harry realize whats going on? I want my friend back. Worried in California Dear California : Unless there is abuse, it is pointless for you to involve yourself in Harrys relationship. He could benefit from counseling to work on the reasons he pursues such a self-destructive romance, but until he admits that he makes bad choices, your words will have little effect. Since the relationship is likely to end sooner than later, you will have other opportunities to discuss this with him. Dear Annie : I read the letter from Ormond Beach, Fla. Last year, I went to a male doctor with a gynecological problem. He said I had menopause, and that was it. I made an appointment with a female nurse practitioner, who sent me to a gynecologist. The gynecologist discovered I had cancer and referred me to an oncologist. Fortunately, the surgeon was able to get it all. Im glad I didnt listen to the first doctor. Keep trying until you get some help. Thankful in Southern Indiana Annies Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Email your questions to anniesmail box@comcast.net, or write to: Annies Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 Third St., Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annies Mailbox and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com. ANNIES MAILBOX Bridge (Answers tomorrow) PROWLPURGE SEESAW CHANGE Yesterdays Jumbles: Answer: What do you call a rabbit on the lawn? AGRASS HOPPER Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. NURPE DPUPE RIPTEM SUEERM Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble Ans: TUESDAY EVENING JANUARY 29, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsEntAccessBettyBettyGo On (N)NormalDateline NBC PGNewsJay Leno # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) (In Stereo) Pioneers of Television (N) PG Henry Ford: American Experience Innovator Henry Fords influence. (N) PG, L New Tricks (In Stereo) PG % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41JournalBusinessPBS NewsHour (N)Pioneers, TelevisionHenry Ford: American Experience PG, LWorldT. Smiley ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly NewsNewsChannel 8 Entertainment Ton.Off Their Rockers Off Their Rockers Go On (N) PG The New Normal Dateline NBC (N) (In Stereo) PG NewsJay Leno ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 NewsWorld News Jeopardy! (N) G Wheel of Fortune The Taste Auditions (N) PG Happy Endings Happy Endings Body of Proof Mind Games Eyewit. News Jimmy Kimmel (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 1010 News, 6pm (N) Evening News Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) G NCIS Hit and Run PG (DVS) NCIS: Los Angeles (N) (DVS) Vegas Road Trip (N) 10 News, 11pm (N) Letterman ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13FOX13 6:00 News (N) (In Stereo) TMZ (N) PG omg! Insider (N) Raising Hope Mindy Project New Girl (N) Mindy Project FOX13 10:00 News (N) (In Stereo) NewsAccess Hollywd 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 NewsABC EntInside Ed.The Taste (N) PGHappyHappyBody of Proof NewsJ. Kimmel 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Christian Fitness TodayKenneth Hagin Great AwakeningWord ofPlace for Miracles A. Wommack Perry Stone Life TodayPurpose for Life Great Awaken < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11NewsWorld News The List (N) PG Lets Ask America The Taste Auditions (N) PG Happy Endings Happy Endings Body of Proof Mind Games NewsJimmy Kimmel @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent How I MetHow I MetThe Office PG The Office PG F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9RaymondSeinfeldFamFeudFamFeudHouse Detox House SeinfeldScrubsBaggageExcused H (WACX) TBN 21 21 StudioThe 700 Club (N) GBabersAmazing MannaVoicePaidStudio DirectHealingPaid L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12King of Queens King of Queens Two and Half Men Engagement Hart of Dixie Lovesick Blues (N) PG Emily Owens, M.D. (N) PG Two and Half Men Engagement Friends Friends PG O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15CrosswordsCitrus Today County Court CancerEvery Minute B. CosbyCrook & Chase (In Stereo) G Windy City PokerMobil 1 The GridS. Rasmussen S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7SimpsonsSimpsonsBig BangBig BangRaisingMindyNew GirlMindyFOX 35 News at 10TMZ PGAccess (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14NoticiasNotic.Corona de LgrimasPor Ella Soy Eva Amores VerdaderosAmor Bravo (N)NoticiasNoticiero (WXPX) ION 17 Criminal Minds Criminal Minds PGCriminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Flashpoint PG (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG StorageTexas StorageTexas Southie Rules Southie Rules (N) Southie Rules Southie Rules (AMC) 55 64 55 Escape From New York (1981, Action) Kurt Russell, Ernest Borgnine. R Predator (1987) Arnold Schwarzenegger. A team is stalked by an intergalactic trophy hunter. R Predator 2 (1990) Danny Glover, Gary Busey. R (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21Rattlesnake Republic The Albino Wild Japan (In Stereo) PG Wild Deep PG Wild Deep PG Wild Deep PG Wild Deep PG River Monsters (In Stereo) PG Wild Deep PG Wild Deep PG (BET) 96 19 96 106 & Park: BETs Top 10 Live Top 10 Countdown (N) PG SecondSecondHusbandsHusbandsHusbandsSecondHusbandsSecond (BRAVO) 254 51 254 MatchmakerReal HousewivesReal HousewivesMatchmakerMatchmakerHappensMatchmkr (CC) 27 61 27 33South Park MA Tosh.0 Colbert Report Daily ShowThe BurnJeff Tosh.0 Kroll Show Tosh.0 Tosh.0 The BurnJeff Daily ShowColbert Report (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG My Big Redneck Vacation PG Swamp Pawn (In Stereo) PG My Big Redneck Vacation PG (CNBC) 43 42 43 Mad Money (N)The Kudlow ReportTarget: Inside60 Minutes on CNBCAmerican GreedMad Money (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46The Situation RoomErin Burnett OutFrontAnderson CooperPiers MorganAnderson CooperErin Burnett OutFront (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5GoodCharlie Jessie G Austin & Ally Shake It Up! G GoodCharlie 16 Wishes (2010) Debby Ryan. (In Stereo) G Jessie G GoodCharlie Austin & Ally G Jessie G (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17SportsCenter (N)College Basketball Wisconsin at Ohio State.College Basketball Kentucky at Mississippi.SportsCenter (N) (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49AroundPardonCollege BasketballSoccer United States vs. Canada. (N) (Live)NFL Live (N) (EWTN) 95 70 95 48ChoicesRebuildDaily MassMother Angelica LiveReligiousRosaryThreshold of HopePriestWomen (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28Pretty Little Liars Mona-Mania! Pretty Little Liars (In Stereo) Pretty Little Liars (N) (In Stereo) The Lying Game (N) (In Stereo) Pretty Little Liars (In Stereo) The 700 Club (In Stereo) PG (FLIX) 118 170 Monty Pythons The Meaning of Life (1983) Graham Chapman. R All Night Long (1981, Comedy) Gene Hackman. R Once Around (1991) Richard Dreyfuss, Holly Hunter. (In Stereo) R Im Losing You (FNC) 44 37 44 32Special ReportFOX ReportThe OReilly FactorHannity (N)Greta Van SusterenThe OReilly Factor (FOOD) 26 56 26 ChoppedChopped GChoppedChopped GChopped (N)Chopped G (FSNFL) 35 39 35 Game 365ShipPanthersNHL Ho ckey Florida Panthers at Tampa Bay Lightning.PanthersFameThe Best of Pride (FX) 30 60 30 51Two and Half Men The Other Guys (2010, Comedy) Will Ferrell, Mark Wahlberg, Eva Mendes. PG-13 The Ultimate Fighter (N) D,L,V Justified This Bird Has Flown (N) MA Justified This Bird Has Flown MA (GOLF) 727 67 727 CentralPGA TourGolfLearningPGA Tour Golf Waste Management Phoenix Open, Final Round.CentralGolf (HALL) 59 68 59 45 54Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Happy Days G Happy Days G Happy Days G Happy Days G Frasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PG (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2 Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone (2001) Daniel Radcliffe. PG Wrath of the Titans (2012) Sam Worthington. PG-13 Identity Thief Girls MA Unknown (2011) Liam Neeson. PG-13 (HBO2) 303 202 303 Something Borrowed (2011) Ginnifer Goodwin. (In Stereo) PG-13 New Years Eve (2011) Halle Berry, Jessica Biel. (In Stereo) PG-13 Real Time With Bill Maher MA Enlightened Girls MA (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52IncomeIncomeHunt IntlHuntersPropertyPropertyIncome Property GHuntersHunt IntlIncomeIncome (HIST) 51 25 51 32 42Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Top Gear College Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Ancient Aliens (LIFE) 24 38 24 31Dance Moms PG Dance Moms PG Dance Moms PG Dance Moms (N) Americas Supernanny (N) PG Teen Trouble Dayne (LMN) 50 119 Teenage Bank Heist (2012, Suspense) Maeve Quinlan, Abbie Cobb. No One Would Tell (1996, Drama) Candace Cameron, Fred Savage. Shes Too Young (2004, Drama) Marcia Gay Harden, Alexis Dziena. (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3 The Hurricane (1999, Drama) Denzel Washington. (In Stereo) R Rocky (1976, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire. PG Tower Heist (2011) Ben Stiller. PG-13 Girls in Bed (MSNBC) 42 41 42 PoliticsNation (N)Hardball MatthewsThe Ed Show (N)Rachel MaddowThe Last WordThe Ed Show WANT MORE PUZZLES? Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.

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C8 T UESDAY, J ANUARY29, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE C OMICS Pickles Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters (R) ID required. In 3D. 12:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m. No passes. Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters (R) ID required. 4:20 p.m. No passes. Mama (PG-13) 12:40 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:40 p.m. Broken City (R) ID required. 12:20 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:15 p.m. The Last Stand (R) ID required. 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:25 p.m. Les Miserables (PG-13) Noon, 3:30 p.m., 7 p.m. Zero Dark Thirty (R) ID required. 12:10 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7:05 p.m. Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 Parker (R) ID required. 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m. Movie 43 (R) ID required. 2 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 8 p.m. Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters (R) ID required. In 3D. 1:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m. No passes. Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters (R) ID required. 4 p.m. No passes. Mama (PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:35 p.m. Broken City (R) ID required. 1:55 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:50 p.m. The Last Stand (R) ID required. 1:20 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:10 p.m. Zero Dark Thirty (R) ID required. 1 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7 p.m. Silver Lings Playbook (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m. Lincoln (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings and entertainment information. Peanuts Garfield For Better or For Worse Sally Forth Beetle Bailey Dilbert The Grizzwells The Born Loser Blondie Doonesbury Kit N Carlyle Rubes Dennis the Menace The Family Circus Betty Big Nate Arlo and Janis Frank & Ernest Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead. Todays MOVIES WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies WFJV-FM 103.3 s to s WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix Local RADIO MCJZ MW CJNW YFKW WFIYBWT MW KJF FWNWX VYDW. JVV ZCJZ MW VYNW TWWHVB SWKYRWD J HJXZ YL AD. CWVWF EWVVWX Previous Solution: Theres no tragedy in life like the death of a child. Things never get back to the way they were. Dwight D. Eisenhower (c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-29

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T UESDAY,J ANUARY29,2013C 9 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS Fax: (352) 563-5665 l Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 l Email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com l website: www.chronicleon line.com To place an ad, call563-5966 Chronicle Classifieds Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time699186 000DM1J 000DM1S LIVING ROOM CHAIR large living room chair and ottoman in very good condition. $35. 352-220-4158 Mattress Sets Beautiful Factory Seconds twin $99.95 full $129.95 qn $159.95, kg $249.95 352-621-4500 MATTRESS SETS Beautiful Factory Seconds Twin $99.95, Full $129.95 Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95 352-621-4500 Oak Table 6 chairs, hutch, Nice $750,. Cherry Curio Cabinet Pair $150 ea (352) 212-9507 637-2921, 861-9448 Old secretary desk dark wood 2 drawers and fold down top.$85. 352-726-2572 Preowned Mattress Sets fromTwin $30; Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75. 352-628-0808 QUEEN MATTRESS, BOX SPRING & FRAME with all linens. $150 (352) 287-6601 ROCKER old upholstered rocker with wood arms.$65. 352-726-2572 Sectional Sofa, light color, like new $500 Small secretary Desk $100 (352) 212-3352 TWIN BEDS Frames, boxsprings, & mattresses exc cond. $125 Cell (734) 355-2325 local 352-503-9452 Washed Oak Table 4 chairs, like new, $750 White antique iron Bed, w/ mattress, $500 (352) 212-9507 637-2921, 861-9448 WICKER ROCKER Small old wicker rocker. $50. 352-726-2572 3 MOWERS Craftsman 5000 Craftsman 3000 White B&S Engine Call (352) 341-1569 Extension ladder 17 fl Alluminum ladder $200; Pressure Washer with wand, 16 ft extension $350 (352) 726-8931 LAWN MOVERS TORO self propelled, 6.5 HP$150; 0 Turn GRAVELYriding mower. 12 HP$500 (352) 726-8931 LAWNMOWERYARD WAGON 6 cubic feet with new tires $60. Call-382-3280.. SEARS 2 WHEEL GARDEN WHEELBARROW 4 cubic feet capacity $10 Call 382-3280 to see. Troybuilt Pusher w/ Honda Engine $90 Lawnboy Pusher w/bagger $25 352-726-7789 2X&3X BLOUSES & SLACKS-TSHIRTS AND capris $2.00 ea 352-794-3020 352-586-4987 BEAUTIFULWOOL WOMENS SUITE tan Isenhower style, and blouse to match sz.10 $25. 789-5770 BOYS WINTER CLOTHING SIZES 5 & 6 SHIRTS, PANTS & JACKETS $30 352-613-0529 PROM DRESS Long blue size 13/14, strapless $45. call or text 352-302-2004 PROM DRESS Long, Purple, 1 shoulder, size 12 $65. call or text 352-302-2004 PROM DRESS Long, red / black, halter, size 10/12 $35.call or text 352-302-2004 SILVER FOX COATfinger tip length beautiful sacrafice $100. sz m-l 789-5770 WESTERN BOOTS Brown marble leather made in usa by ACMEsize 8.5EW $40 call text 352-302-8529 SECURITYCAMERAS 2 wireless B&W cameras/transmitters to yourTV $50. Dunnellon 465-8495 4 WHEELWALKERhand brakes & wheel locks, seat, basket, folds for storage, Ex., $50, 352-628-0033 10 FT. WOOD STEPLADDER Type 1, 250 duty $90 (352) 422-0294 12 ft. Aluminum John Boat, no paper work $165. Trailer, spare tire and wheel, fits 10 -15 $35. (315) 466-2268 BARBIE HOUSE/FURN. & DISNEYCASTLE BOTH 32X36 $35 ea/both $75 352-794-3020 586-4987 BEDDING Queen comforter, dust ruffle & pillow shams. Beige, gray, brown. $20 obo 352-513-4536 BLINDS 1 PLEATED 64WX63L1 PLASTIC 64WX60LOFF WHITE $30 352-613-0529 BSR LARGE HOME STEREO SPEAKERS 20 WIDE BY30 HIGH ONLY$100. NICE 352-464-0316 DIGITALPHOTOALBUM Brookstone holds 500 pics like new great brag book $40 call or text 352-746-0401 Fri, 02/01 Preview @ 4pm, Auction@ 6pm General Merchandise Sat, 02/02 Preview @ 4pm, Auction@ 6pm Antiques/Gen. Merch Sun, 02/03 Preview @ 12:30, Auction@ 1pm Tailgate/Box lots **WE BUY ESTATES** 6055 N. Carl G. Rose Hwy 200 Hernando AB3232 (352)613-1389 50 Inch Hitachi HD TV Projection console Exc cond. $100 (352) 621-0405 AM/FM, Stereo Cassette and Turn Table $65. TV, Toshiba, 19 color, $35. (484) 547-9549 SHARP32 TV WITH REMOTE $20 352-613-0529 DOOR JAMBONLY new 3/0 x 6/8 with weather stripping and aluminum threshold $20 call text 352-746-0401 DOUBLE & SINGLE garage doors, both for $250 352-601-7911 DIESTLER COMPUTER New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 HPDESKJETF4100 PRINTER computer printer in good condition with 1 new ink cartridge Price $40 628-3418 MS OFFICE 2010, 1st COURSE BOOK $40. book only. Univ.level. Excellent learning tool. 352-513-4027 SIXTYGALLONTANK ONTRAILER, $70. 352-746-6931 Chipper/Shredder Troy-BiltTomahawk, Briggs & Stratton gas engine. $700 OBO (352) 601-3174 Oblong glass table 66x40 w/6 reclining chairs; small side table, 2 footstools, beige w/ tiny flowers. Never been outside. $400 Call John (352) 422-2317 2 Table Lamps, 33 H, white ceramic, Sq. bamboo design, excel. $50 Broyhill Dining Rm Set. Table, Parquet Top, Rectangular shape, 2 leaves, 6 Caine Highback chairs, china hutch, 3 glass panels 3 shelves, med. fruitwood color, excel. $550. (718) 666-6624 Blue glider rocker and matching foot stool.$65.00 great condition 352-726-2572 Broyhill Wall Unit $750. Bassett Cabinet with Drawers $500. (484) 547-9549 Cherry Desk, credenza, file cabinet, $600. Oak TV Cabinet $300 (352) 212-9507 637-2921, 861-9448 Couch Clean, brown, excel. cond. $200. Entertainment Center Large, Cherry Traditional, Like new $600 (352) 270-9025 Dinning Room Set, 6 captain chairs, & Hutch maple $200 (352) 726-1081 DUDLEYS AUCTION **TWO AUCTIONS ** Thursday 1/31/13 FullAuction Line up in walk about setting starting @ 3pm preview @12 noon.. From furniture to tools. Sunday 2/3/13 Antique preview @ 11am.Auction 1pm furniture, art, prints, vintage books, china, silver & coins, jewelry, cased knives, & straight razors more+++ *check website www.dudleys auction.com 637-9588 10%BP Au2267AB1667 Maine-ly Real Estate #381384 KING SIZE BED mattress,box spring, and frame all in good condition $100obo call or text 352-464-4280 LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET, In Original Plastic, Never Used, ORG $3000, Sacrifice $975. CHERRY, BEDROOM SET S olid Wood, new in factory boxes$895 Can Deliver. Bill (813)298-0221. DOLLCLOTHES build-a-bear clothes, outfits, tops, bottoms, 31 pc total. $50. all 352-422-1309 BOOK ENDS pr Zebra black and gold porcilin by Lipper and Mann $65. call or text 352-746-0401 CHINACLOSETDECO TYPE glass door,good wood.Picture upon req. looks good $100.789-5770 TEALEAF COPPER LUSTER PLATE 9 1853 to 1871, $35 352-628-3899 4 VINTAGE GLASS FROGS FOR FLORAL Display $20 can email Photos INVERNESS 352-419-5981 6 VINTAGETEACUP AND SAUCER SETS $45 BONE CHINA EnglandAll Different 352-419-5981 KISSING FACES Sculpture By John Cultrone with stand $65. call or text 352-746-0401 N.Y.YANKEES MEMORABILIAsigned hats,Jersey (Jeters)#2 and more $100. or best offer 789-5770 Victorian BATH,PICHER,BOWEL wood pedestal type. $100. 789-5770 2 DR WHITE MAYTAG REFRIG. w/Ice Maker 21.8 cu ft. Less than 2yrs old. $350 (352) 726-8021 3 Ton $100. and 2 $75. Used Copeland Scroll AC COMPRESSORS R22 John 352-208-7294 DISHWASHER GE white, works good, looks good,$100. 352-789-5770 DRYER $100 with 90 day warranty call/text 352-364-6504 GE Refrigerator side by side w/ water dispenser Bisque $380, GO CART5HP, 2s eats built by Manco $275 (352) 503-6641 GE STOVE, coil top, self cleaning, bisque $125; MICROWAVE Over the Range GE Spacemaker $75 (352)503-6641 HOOVER UPRIGHT SWEEPER 6 yrs old, all attachments, Exc Con $75 352-628-3899 Refrigerator/Freezer, GE, Side-by-Side, White, 21.7 cubic feet $100. Runs good 352-489-7393 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also wanted dead or alive washers & dryers. FREE pick up 352-564-8179 WANTED DEAD OR ALIVE WASHERS & DRYERS (352) 209-5135 WASHER OR DRYER $135.00 Each. Reliable, Clean, Like New, Exc. Cond. Free Delivery 352-263-7398 WASHER$100 with 90 day warranty call/text 352-364-6504 WESTINGHOUSE STOVEAlmond ,continous clean,works good looks good. $100. 789-5770 Whirlpool Heavy Duty Super Capacity, LP Gas Dryer, Almond $125. 3 Ton New Replacement Carlyle Scroll AC Compressor R22 $300 John 352-208-7294 DUDLEYS AUCTION **TWO AUCTIONS ** Thursday 1/31/13 FullAuction Line up in walk about setting starting @ 3pm preview @12 noon.. From furniture to tools. Sunday 2/3/13 Antique preview @ 11am.Auction 1pm furniture, art, prints, vintage books, china, silver & coins, jewelry, cased knives, & straight razors more+++ *check website www.dudleys auction.com 637-9588 10%BP Au2267AB1667 Maine-ly Real Estate #381384 RESIDENTIAL ELECTRICIANS Rough, Trim, & Service Full Benefits /EOE APPL Y A T : Exceptional Electric 4070 CR 124A Unit 4 Wildwood Senior Lending Officer/Office Manager Brannen Bank a banking institution in central Florida, is seeking a Senior Lending Officer/ Office Manager for the Citrus county area. Requires a bachelors degree in business or finance, residential and commercial lending experience and at least four years Office Manager Experience. Duties include management of daily branch operations and originating a variety of consumer loans. Offers a competitive salary and benefit package. If interested, please f orward resumeto Brannen Banks of Florida, Inc. Attn: Carol Johnson PO Box 1929 Inverness, FL 34451-1929 EEO/M/F/V/D/DFWP APPT. SETTERS NEEDED Sign on Bonus. Great Commission Pay and weekly bonuses Call Bob 352-628-3500 CAREGIVERS NEEDED All Shifts Apply At HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE 4224 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Lecanto NEWSPAPER CARRIER WANTEDNewspaper carrier wanted for early morning delivery of the Citrus County Chronicle and other newspapers for home delivery customers. 3 to 4 hours per day. Must have insured and reliable vehicle preferable a van SUV, or pick up with a cap-Large enough to hold our Sunday product Apply in Person 1624 N Medowcrest Blvd, Crystal River Monday to Friday 8am-5pm Newspaper carriers are independent contractors, not employees of the Citrus County Chronicle SECRETARY/ HOSTESS P/T for Builders Model. Thur, Fri, Sat. $7.79hr. Please Email Resume to: dreamcitrus@ yahoo.com (352) 527-7171 SPRING HILL CLASSES COSMO DA YS February 25, 2013BARBER NIGHTS February 25, 2013SKIN & NAILS Day School Only BENES International School of Beauty 1-866-724-2363 STATEAPPROVED FOR VATRAINING Your Worldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com SOUS CHEF needed for upscale private Country Club in Citrus Co. Previous kitchen management required with casual and fine dining culinary experience. Send Resume to: swiley@ citrushills.com Customer Service/Sales Assit. Must have exp., computer skills, good attitude and be a self starter, Call (352) 628-4656 INSIDE SALES REPRESENTATIVECitrus Publishing Citrus County, Fl Job Summary This position is designed to increase our market share of retail and classified display advertising in all of Citrus Publishings products. The position will consist of receiving incoming calls and making outbound service/cold calls. The position will also handle walk-in advertisers from our Meadowcrest office. Essential Functions Answering incoming calls for our Retail and Classified display ads Facilitating the display advertising needs of walk in customers Making outbound service calls to existing accounts Develop new customers through prospecting and cold calling Develop new opportunities for advertisers to do business with Citrus Publishing, Inc, Consistently meet or exceed monthly and annual sales goals Increase Citrus Publishings Market share through the development of on-line advertising revenue Communicate effectively orally and in writing with customers and coworkers Problem solving, analytical abilities and interpersonal skills required Maintain score cards on progress toward established goals Perform daily functions with a minimal amount of direction Minimum Qualifications at least two years of sales experience; advertising experience preferred Demonstrate persuasiveness and/or sales abilities Proper business attire Professional telephone presence Ability to work well in a team environment Administrative This is a 40 hour a week position Send resume to djkamlot@chronicleonline.com Deadline for applications is Feb.12, 2013 Drug Screen Required for Final Applicant. Equal Opportunity Employer Real Estate AgentsBusy real estate office needs Realtors and BuyersAgents Call PLANTATION REALTY 352-634-0129 Automotive Consultant/ Advisor Eagle Buick GMC Inc is in need of experienced Automotive Service Consultants/Advisors Minimum 2 yrs, dealership experience. Aggressive pay plan and strong compensation package that includes health insurance, paid vacation, paid training, certification reimbursement and many other perks. Drug free workplace Application Avail. @ Eagle Buick GMC Inc. Homosassa, Fl. 34448 Send Resume: Fax (352) 417-0944 Email: robbcole@eagle buickgmc.com Older Puppy Found in Crystal River Call to identify (352) 697-1258 FREE REMOVALWants to Thank All of You for making 2012 Possible, See You In 2013 SPRING HILL CLASSES COSMO DA YS February 25, 2013BARBER NIGHTS February 25, 2013SKIN & NAILS Day School Only BENES International School of Beauty 1-866-724-2363 STATEAPPROVED FOR VATRAINING Not Looking for Someone just trying to help people.If you are Bored, Lonely, Need Answers. Call someone who cares. 24-7 (352) 426-1821 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP 15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb Delivered 352-795-0077 ARNPor PAWanted Part Time for a busy Pediatric Practice in Crystal River, Send Resume to: lindapracticemgr @t amp abay .rr .com DOCTORS ASSIST Needed Must Draw Blood EKG & Injections SEND RESUME TO: Citrus Co. Chronicle Blind Box 1825M 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd Crystal River Fl. 34429 EXPERIENCED OPERATING ROOM RN Wanted for fast-paced outpatient surgery center. Flexible scheduling. Excellent pay and benefits. No nights, weekends, no call or holidays. Apply at : 110 N. Lecanto Hwy. Lecanto or fax resume to: 352-527-1827. EXPERIENCED RECEPTIONIST For fast pace medical office. Must be able to work under pressure & handle multiple phone lines. Medical terminology & insurance knowledge required. Send resume to: reply2013@ hotmail.com HHCAGENCY Looking for RN & Psych RN (352) 794-6097 NEEDED Experienced, Caring & Dependable CNAs/HHAsHourly & Live-in,flex schedule offeredLOVING CARE (352) 860-0885 LIC 440CUST. SERVICE REP/or 220AgentNeeded for busy Insurance office. Apply in person 9am-12N SHELDON PALMES INSURANCE 8469 W Grover Cleveland, Homosassa Experienced Bartender AcceptingApplication 10a-11:30 & 2P-4p Apply In Person Only Lollygaggers 744 SE US Hwy 19 Next to Mr. Bs C.R. Drug Free Work Place FREE REMOVAL Washers,Dryers,Riding Mowers, Scrap Metals,Antena towers 270-4087 FREE KITTENS 18 wks old Calico, litter trained (352) 212-4061 Free to Good Home English Mastiff In need of forever home, very sweet and gentle couch potato Must Spay, Call for Interview (352) 637-4322 Free to loving home 2 yr old male Beagle (352) 726-4678 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP 15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb Delivered 352-795-0077 FRESH CITRUS @BELLAMY GROVE Strawberries/Cabbage Gift Shipping, 8:30a-5p Closed Sun. 352-726-6378 Black Labrador Retriever, about 1 yrs old, answers to Buddy, lost in vicinity of W. Dunnellon Rd. Owner is heartbroken. (352) 400-3302 (352) 795-8662 CHIHUAHUA lost Jan 26 His name is Chico, male, long white hair, face, ears are brown, 3 to 4 lbs, last seen Hunter Springs trailer pk, next to the PO. in Crystal River 352-364-1663 LOST MAL TI POO White female 1 yr old named Chloe last seen on W Starjasmine Pl, Beverly Hills. T wo little girls miss her! Please call (352) 249-0846 Wedding Band Gold & White gold lost at Publix forest Ridge, OR Movie Theater shopping plaza Inverness, Sentimental REWARD (352) 637-2458 Todays New Ads INVERNESS 2/1, Tri-plex, Great Loc., clean & roomy. no pets $500.mo 1st. & Last $300. Sec. 352-341-1847 INVERNESS A GOTTA GO SALE! Tues. Wed. & Thur. 8a-4p Make Offer Generator, Roto Tiller, Mower, utility trailers, plumbing, eclectrical, fishing & household. Misc. Turn at Applebees Restuarant, 4 miles, S. on 581 Look for Signs INVERNESS A GOTTA GO SALE! Tues. Wed. & Thur. 8a-4p Make Offer Generator, Roto Tiller, Mower, utility trlrs., plumbing, eclectrical, fishing & hshold. Misc. Turn at Applebees Restuarant, 4 miles, S. on 581 look for signs KOHLER CASTIRON dbl SINK REDUCED $50. Standard size, white. Excel condition. 352-513-4027 LL BEAN 16 ft, ABS, Canoe, with paddle & jackets, $650 obo (352) 628-3194 MS OFFICE 2010, 1st COURSE BOOK $40. book only. Univ.level. Excellent learning tool. 352-513-4027 SNAPPER RIDER W/BAGGER, good cond. $275 Torro Weed Eater $25 352-726-7789 Toshiba, 50 Big Screen TV You Move (352) 447-1553 $$ TOPDOLLAR $$ For Wrecked, Junk or Unwanted Cars/Trucks $$ (352) 201-1052 $$ $$ CASH PAID $$for junk vehicles. 352-634-5389 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 FREE PICK UP JunkAppliances, Scrap Metal, Mowers, Autos, (352) 220-3138 Todays New Ads BAYLINER 1752007, Bowrider, garage kept, Bimini top, custom cover, depth finder, only 44 hrs on motor,pristine condition! $14,000. 352-560-7377 BEDDING Queen comforter, dust ruffle & pillow shams. Beige, gray, brown. $20 obo 352-513-4536 Body Fit, Gravity Machine, $50. Circle Glide $25. Both Like New (352) 447-1553 CHEVY 89 Corvette, White needs trans $3250 352-601-0355 CRYSTALRIVERLarge 2/2 CHA, W/D hk-up $575/mo. 1st Mo. FREE with $600. no dogs 352-726-9570 ESTATE SALE Nature Coast Landings RV Resort. Developed site with gazebo & storage bldg, reduced to $49,500. Separate storage lot available. (RV sold). For info and pictures Click on detailsbyowner.com 352-843-5441 INVERNESS 6079 RECTOR, Off South Apopka Fri. 1 & Sat. 2, 9a-2p Complete Contents of House, Including Garage & 2 Sheds Also 3/2/2 Home, Everything Must Go! Way too Much to List Cash Only, Deb, 634-2656 Your Worldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com

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C10 T UESDAY,J ANUARY29,2013 C LASSIFIEDS C ITRUS C OUNTY ( FL ) C HRONICLE 000D5A Y WINDOW TINTING W orld Class Window TintingReduce Heat, Fade, Glare AUTO HOME OFFICEMarion & Citrus 352-465-6079 Free Estimates CARPET CARE C O M P L E T E C A R P E T C A R E C O M P L E T E C A R P E T C A R E COMPLETE CARPET CARE Lic & Ins Specializing in: Specializing in: Carpet Stretching Carpet Stretching Carpet Repair Carpet Repair 000DD16 Gift Certificates AvailableC ARPET & U PHOLSTERY C LEANING LLC 352-282-1480 cell 352-547-1636 officeFree In Home Estimates Lifetime Warranty ELECTRICAL REPAIR 352-621-1248 Thomas Electric, LLC Residential/Commercial ServiceGenerac Centurion Guardian Generators Factory Authorized Technicians ER0015377 Stand Alone Generator 000DNDF ALUMINUM 6 Seamless Gutters Screen Rooms Car Ports Hurricane Protectionallextalum13@yahoo.com Citrus Lic. #2396 LICENSED & INSURED352-621-0881 FAX 352-621-0812 A L L E X T E R I O R A L L E X T E R I O R ALL EXTERIOR A L U M I N U M I N C A L U M I N U M I N C ALUMINUM, INC. 000DNDR CLEAN UPS & CLEAN OUTS NEED SOMEONE TO GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?IF YOU WANT IT TAKEN AWAY...CALLFOR A FREE ESTIMATE TODAY!352-220-9190 W E M A K E I T DISAPPEAR FOR LESS Licensed & Insured352-400-3188YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST Often imitated, never duplicated IS IT TIME TO REFINISH YOUR POOL? POOLS AND P A VERS Add an artistic touch to your existing yard or pool or plan something completely new! QUALITY WORK AT A FAIR PRICE! COPES POOL AND PAVER LLC000DTAG Copes Pool & Pavers 000DMZO ROOFING AAA ROOFING Call the LeakbustersLic./Ins. CCC057537Free Written Estimate Crystal River563-0411 Inverness726-8917 www.aaaroofingfl.homestead.com $ 100 OFF Any Re-RoofMust present coupon at time contract is signed One Day Bath Remodeling In Just One Day,We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub or Shower Right Over Your Old One!!! Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!! Visit our Ocala Showroom or call1-352-624-8827 For a FREE In-Home Estimate! BATHFITTER.COM BATH REMODELING BATHFITTER000DNL6 PAINTING 352-465-6631 Ferraros PaintingInterior & Exterior PressureWashing FREE ESTIMATES Repaint Specialist000DMI0 0 0 0 D N C S HANDYMAN Rons Affordable Handyman Services All Home Repairs Small Carpentry Fencing Screening Clean Dryer Vents Affordable & Dependable Experience lifelong 352-344-0905 cell: 400-1722 Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761 000DO9L WINDOW CLEANING Window Cleaning Window Tinting Pressure Washing Gutter Cleaning FREE ESTIMATES352-503-8465 Bonded & Insured www.windowgenie.com/springhill ATREE SURGEON Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates Free est. (352)860-1452 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Tractor Work Service specializing in clean up Tree Removal, General prop. maint. 302-6955 DOUBLE J Tree Serv. Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 KINGs LAND CLEARING & TREE SERVICE Complete tree & stump removal hauling, demo & tractor work. 32 yrs. exp. (352) 220-9819 R WRIGHT TREE Service Tree Removal & Trimming. Ins. & Lic.# 0256879 352-341-6827 RON ROBBINS Tree Service Trim, Shape & Remve, Lic/Ins. Free est. 352-628-2825 344-2556, Richard Water Pump Service & Repairs-all makes & models. Call anytime! MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. Attention Consumers! Please make sure you are using a licensed and insured service professional. Many service advertisers are required by state law to include their state license number in all advertisements. If you dont see a license number in the ad, you should inquire about it and be suspicious that you may be contacting an unlicensed business.The Citrus County Chronicle wants to ensure that our ads meet the requirements of the law. Beware of any service advertiser that can not provide proof that they are licensed to do business. For questions about business licensing, please call your city or county government offices. COUNTYWIDE DRYWALL25 ys exp lic2875 all your drywall needs Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal k 352-302-6838 k CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREEEST. (352) 586-2996 Cleaning Svc -Home, office,windows, pressure washing & more. 352-322-1799 HANDYMAN DAVE Pressure Wash homes & drive-ways, Hauling, Odd Jobs 352-726-9570 PIC PICARDS PRESSURE CLEANING& PAINTING 352-341-3300 Robert G. Vigliotti LLC Painting Int/Ext FREE ESTIMATES 35 yrs exp. call 508-314-3279 Winter Clean Up, Leaves, Power Washing & More Call Coastal Lawn Care (352) 601-1447 All phases of T ile Handicap Showers, Safety Bars, Flrs. 422-2019 Lic. #2713 DGS SERVICES LLC Reroofs Metal Roofs REPAIRS Home Inspector 414-8693 ATYOUR HOMEMower and small engine Its Tune Up time.352 220 4244 A-1 Hauling, Cleanups, garage clean outs, trash, lawn maint. furn. & misc. Mark (352) 287-0767 ALLOF CITRUS Clean Ups, Clean Outs Everything from Ato Z 352-628-6790 JEFFS Cleanup/Hauling Clean outs/Dump Runs Lawns/Brush Removal Lic. (352) 584-5374 Chris Satchell PaintingASAP 30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins. 352-464-1397 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 INTERIOR/EXTERIOR & ODD JOBS. 30 yrs J. Hupchick Lic./Ins. (352) 726-9998 Robert G. Vigliotti LLC Painting Int/Ext FREE ESTIMATES 35 yrs exp. call 508-314-3279 Cleaning Svc -Home, office,windows, pressure washing & more. 352-322-1799 All Tractor Work Service specializing in clean up Tree Removal, General prop. maint. 302-6955 AllAROUND TRACTORLandclearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352 795-5755 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 LAWNCARE N MORE Yard Clean-up, leaves bushes, hauling 352-726-9570 Winter Clean Up, Leaves, Power Washing & More Call Coastal Lawn Care (352) 601-1447 Need a JOB? #1 Employment source is www.chronicleonline.com Classifieds ANDREW JOEHL HANDYMAN. Gen. Maint/Repairs Pressure Cleaning. 0256271 352-465-9201 Affordable Handy man 4 FAST 100% Guar. 4AFFORDABLE 4 RELIABLE Free Est H 352-257-9508 H Affordable Handy man 4 FAST 100% Guar. 4AFFORDABLE 4 RELIABLE Free Est H 352-257-9508 H Affordable Handy man 4 FAST 100% Guar. 4AFFORDABLE 4 RELIABLE Free Est H 352-257-9508 H Affordable Handy man 4 FAST 100% Guar. 4AFFORDABLE 4 RELIABLE Free Est H 352-257-9508 H HANDYMAN DAVE Pressure Wash homes & drive-ways, Hauling Odd Jobs 352-726-9570 THE KLEEN TEAM Residential/Comm. Lic., Bonded, Insured (352) 419-6557 DUN-RITE ELECTRIC Since / Free Est. lic EC 13002699 352-726-2907 **BOB BROWNS** Fence & Landscaping 352-795-0188/220-3194 A 5 ST AR COMP ANY GO OWENS FENC ING All Types. Free Est. Comm/Res. 628-4002 ROCKYS FENC ING Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,H 352 422-7279 H Install, Restretch, Repair Clean, Sales, Vinyl Carpet, Laminent, Lic#4857 Mitch, (352) 201-2245 1 CALL & RELAX! 25yrs Exp in 100% property maint & all repairs, call H&H Services today! lic#37658 352-476-2285 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic.(352) 364-2120 ROBS MASONRY& CONCRETE Driveways tear outs Tractor work, Lic. #1476, 726-6554 AllAROUND TRACTORLand clearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 HELPING HANDS Transport, shopping Dr. appts, errands, etc. Hablo Espanol 813-601-8199 COUNTYWIDE DRYWALL25 ys exp lic2875 all your drywall needs Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal k 352-302-6838 k #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic.#5863 352-746-3777 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also wanted dead or alive washers & dryers. FREE pick up 352-564-8179 CNA Available for Private Duty. Prefer afternoons & evenings. References avail. on request. (352) 453-7255 HELPING HANDS Transport, shopping Dr. appts, errands, etc. Hablo Espanol 813-601-8199 JEFFS Cleanup/Hauling Clean outs/Dump Runs Lawns/Brush Removal Lic. (352) 584-5374 THE KLEEN TEAM Residential/Comm. Lic., Bonded, Insured (352) 419-6557 DIESTLER COMPUTER New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 BIANCHI CONCRETE INC.COM ins/lic #2579 Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk. Pool deck repair /stain. 352257-0078 FA THER & SON Decorative Concrete Textures, Stamp,Spray Crack repair, Staining, driveways, pool decks, Lic/Ins 352-527-1097 Your world first.Every Day v automotive Classifieds 000DM1M 2/2 on Lake Rousseau. NOW $17,500 Low Lot Rent $240/mo.2003. Used Seasonally Owner bought a house. 207-546-6115, cell Adult Park 2/1, Mobile, heat and air, nicely furn. large shed, sreen rm. carport, $8,200 Lot Rent $160 mo. (352) 287-3729 DUNNELLON LAKE ROUSSEAU MH Park. Lg. 1/1 w/slider to encl. screened porch, outside shed, CHAfurn. Nice yard, low lot rent. Asking$11,900 (207) 347-0531 HOMOSASSASBest Housing Value Modern homes from $8,400 or Lease to Own from $179/mo. $1000.down + Lot rent at Evanridge Community an exceptional 55+Park 352 628-5977 Your world first.Every Day v automotive Classifieds HERNANDO 2/2 DW On lot, with Shed & Deck See for yourself at 2562 N. Treasure Pt. $28,500 obo 352-464-0719 HERNANDO/486 1+acre, 2br SWMH+ den/flp, ManCave/Work Shop w/AC, 28x40, $43,500, J. Desha Cridland Real Estate (352)634-6340 HOMOSASSA **3/2, Fenced Yard,**NEW Flooring, NEW AC $5,000 Down, $435. mo (352) 302-9217 HOMOSASSA 2ba 1 ba MH needs complete rehab. Good shed, well & septic. 6524 W.Akazian $12,500 (603) 860-6660 NW Citrus County SWMH on 1 acre, 2/1.5 -paved rd., screened porch, appliances $37,700-possible owner financing 352-795-9908 W. of 19 in Homosassa 1994, 2/2 Doublewide, Move In Condition Corner Lot $44,900. Tradewinds Realty (352) 400-0089 3bdr/2 full baths/ 2 car carport on 1 acre. split layout, steel roof, caged pool, 20x25 ft deck, lg storage building, Furnished Modular $73,900, 5215 Bridget Pt, Castle Lake Park Inverness (352) 597-7353 CASTLE LAKE Floral City 2/2 S/W Fully furnished move in condition. 2 screen rooms, 2 sheds. Landscaped with sprinkler on quiet cul-de-sac. $38,900. 352-212-1883 CRYSTALRIVERLarge 4br 2ba MH READYTO MOVE IN Owner Fin. Avail. CALL(352) 795-1272 FLORALCITY By Owner, 14x 60 2/2 Split Plan w/dbl roof over, w/ porch & carport on fenced 1 acre, Very N ice Quiet, Considering ALL reasonalble Cash offers. 352-586-9498 www.twitter.com/ citruschronicle Follow the HOMOSASSA 2 & 3 Br homes w/ storage sheds. Starting at $550/mo + $800/Sec ONL Y $1350 total to move in. We pay trash, lawn, water & sewer. Close to Walmart, Publixs& Suncoast PKY No pets 352-584-1831 HOMOSASSA 2BR, $475. mo. Nice Area (352) 422-1932 LECANTOLEISUREACRES 3/2 water & garbage incl. $600mo. (352) 628-5990 14 x 60, 2BR, 1 BA, Carport, Shed, appliances, W/D, clean, move in condition Near new Walmart on 486, $4,800. (352) 387-7824 BANK FORECLOSURE Land-n-Home, 3/2 1500 sq. ft. On Acre, paved rd. LOOKS GOOD, Have financing if needed, only $2,500 down, $381.44mo. P&I W.A.C. OR $69,900. Call 352-613-0587 or 352-621-9183 Crystal River 55+ Park. 2BR/1BACarport & Screened Porch. Heat/Air $9,500. 352-746-4648 Ask for Brit HERNANDO $$Private Owner $$ FinancingAvailable New & Used Manufactured Homes Call 1-727-967-4230 HOME-ON-LAND 3/2 Great Shape. Acre. Move In Now $59,900. Call 352-401-2979, 352-621-3807 NEW 2013 2br 2ba Doublewide w/10 year Warranty $39,900 Delivered & setup, a/c, skirt, steps. Call(352) 795-1272 REPOS-REPOS REPOS WE HA VE REPOS CALL352-621-9181 WE WILL BUYYOURMANUFACTURED Home. from 1976-2013 CALL(352) 795-2377 2BR, 1 BA,on your own 75x 100 lot, no fees! new enclosed sunroom, lg laundry room furn, 2 storage buildings, 5111 Castle LakeAve. S of Inverness on SR 41 $39,500 (352) 597-7353 1 Sweet Little Male Yorkie, CKC reg., $375. Fl. health certs., Call (352) 212-4504 or (352) 212-1258 BIRD SUPPLYSALE Sun, Feb. 3, 9a-3p, Cages, Seed, Toys, Playstands, Milletspray & more! Save! Cage wire, Chicks & ducklings! 8260 Adrian Dr., Brooksville 727-517-5337 MINIATURE POODLES miniature poodle pups born 10/16/12 Health Cert 1 apricot & 1 black female & 1 black male almost potty trained, raised in our home. $500 cash call 352-419-5662 or karaluv3@yahoo.com Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA, Malesstarting@ $400. Lots of colors, Beverly Hills, FL(352)270-8827 www .aceof pup s.net Bermuda Hay 50lbs $6 Never been rained on 795-1906 586-1906 SHAMROCK FARM, CR I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I CRYSTALRIVER6851 W. Vanaman Ct 2/2 $425/$400 dep. DUNNELLON 2/2 5159 W Disney Lane $400/ $400 dep. (727) 480-5512 FLORALCITY2/1$450 mo + sec. (352) 637-6554: 422-1562 HERNANDO 2BR/1BA, acre AllAppls $395 mo (No Pet s) (352) 860-0904, (Cell) 352-212-6815 TRAILER 4 x6, has spare tire, garage kept; Good Condition $500 (352) 726-8931 GRACO PACKNPLAY GOOD CONDITION $35 352-613-0529 WHITE WOOD ROUND BASSINETBrand new $60. 352-422-2719 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I WANT TO BUY HOUSE or MOBILE AnyArea Condition orSitua tion. Call Fred, 352-726-9369 Will Buy Block House In Citrus County, Any Condition, Agents welcome (315) 466-2268 BLUE Blue is an approximately 8-y.o. neutered male Cattle Dog mix, Came to the shelter because his family lost their home. Blue is white and tan, weighs about 50 pounds, is a bit chubby for his size, which is medium. He is housebroken, very friendly and affectionate.The most striking thing about him is that he has very beautiful blue eyes, which catch your attention immediately. He loves people and wants to be by your side Is very obedient and walks well on a leash. He is quite laid-back and would make a great companion for an older person. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. Body Fit, Gravity Machine, $50. Circle Glide $25. Both Like New (352) 447-1553 ELLIPTICALMACHINE PRO-FORM 490 LE with users manual. Heavy duty, I-Pod compatible w/fan. Less than 2 yrs old. $300 527-8276 EXERCISE BIKE (DP) UPRIGHTTYPE WORKSTHEARMS TOO $85. 352-464-0316 EXERCISE BIKE PURSUITALL ELECTRONICS $100. 352-464-0316 Proform Crosswalk 480 excel. cond. less than 50 mi. walk on it inclines, preset ifit trainer workout, built in fan, $275. 352-382-5208 ROWING MACHINE BY BODYROW WORKS THEARMSAND LEGS $50. 352-464-0316 $$ REDUCED $$ EZ GO GOLF CART Electric, exc cond. incl. charger. $1,500 (352) 503-2847 .308AMMO 100 Rds-$60-SP& HP 352-503-2792 14 Assorted Golf Clubs, left handed $200 (352) 795-4942 22 Colt Woodsmen early model orgin. $700 OBO. 352-258-1740 30 cal. Carbine 1943 Inland mfg orgin. Korea war bring home. $1000. OBO 352-258-1740 22LR ammo $16per 100. 525 rds $80 (352) 533-2228 BROWNING BUCK MARK 22 L.R. RIMFIRE PISTOLincludes 6000 rounds of 22 ammo, and 3 spare magazines. Will sell as a total package only. $680.00 cash only Call 352-465-4373 Concealed Weapons Permit Course DANS GUN ROOM (352) 726-5238 GOLF CLUBS Two sets, pull carts and accessories. $60.each 726-1495 HOLSTER Uncle Mikes camo belt style size 10 $7 call or text 352-746-0401 REMINGTON 700 BDL 270cal exc cond. $495. will take lever action 30-30 on trade. (906) 285-1696 Winchester Model 70 Super grade, 300 Win. Mag., Nikkon scope, + ++ extras, $,1200 (352) 628-5355 2013 ENCLOSED TRAILERS, 6x12 with ramp, $1895 ** call 352-527-0555 ** SHOWER CHAIR WITH BACK WHITE FIBERGLASS WITH ADJUSTABLE LEGS $30. 352-464-0316 WHEELCHAIR LIFT Easily load a folding manual chair (not scooter)to vehicle hitch $100. Dunnellon 465-8495 BUYING US COINS Top $$$$ Paid. We Also Buy Gold Jewelry Beating ALL Written Offers. (352) 228-7676 NEWACOUSTIC ELECTRIC GUITAR TRANS BLACK,CORD INCLUDED $95 601-6625 NEW ELECTRIC GUITAR FAT STRAT STYLE FINISH CHIPPED PLAYS PERFECT $45 352-601-6625 EPIPHONEACOUSTIC ELECTRIC GUITAR W/AMP,GIGBAG,TUNER,ST RAP,DVD,ETC $100 352-6O1-6625 FULLSIZEACOUSTIC GUITAR PACK NEW W/GIGBAG STRAP,STRINGS,ETC. $65, 352-601-6625 JUSTICE SING & PLAY ELECTRIC GUITAR PINK never used pd$150.sell $75 352-794-3020 586-4987 NEW CUTAWAY ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC GUITARTRANS BLACK/ABALONE $90 352-601-6625 UPRIGHT PLAYER PIANO W/BENCH. Ampico reproducing. Walnut wood, good cond. $600 OBO (352) 382-1885 2 VERTICALBILNDS 6Wx4Lea. w/covers, almond slats.All hdwe. inc. exc. cond. $100. both 352-560-7857 3 MINI MUFFIN TINS $5 NEW WHITE QUICHE DISH $10 LARGE GREEN BOWL $10 352-419-5981 40 PIECE STAINLESS STEELUTENSILSET $20 DECORATIVE HANDLES NEVER USED 352-419-5981 BLINDS 1 PLEATED 64WX63L1 PLASTIC 64WX60LOFF WHITE $40 352-613-0529 COFFEE GRINDER $5 ELECTRIC VEGETABLE STEAMER $5 CANNISTER SET$10 352-419-5981 KOHLER CASTIRON dbl SINK REDUCED $50. Standard size, white. Excel condition. 352-513-4027 LIGHTFIXTURE chandelier, 5 frosted glass shades, bronzed color metal, nice $50.352-422-1309 LIGHTED MAKE UP MIRROR 1x5 times magnification low & high light$25. 352-794-3020 352-586-4987 FishAquarium 50 gallons, cabinet stand, lights & filter $250 (352) 621-0392 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP 15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb Delivered 352-795-0077 GERBILCAGE $20 352-613-0529 Mattress Trade In Sets Clean and Very Nice Fulls $50., Qn. $75. Kings. $125, 621-4500 NEW SKYLIGHTBUBBLETYPE SMOKED POLYCARBONITE 27 BY27 ONLY$60. 352-464-0316 PICK-UPTOOLBOX 56 wide, silver alum, 2 latch, 1 locking, great shape. $65. 352-422-1309 RYOBI 10 COMPOUND SAW#TS1342 15 AMPs, 5500 RPMs, dust bag, EX+, $60, 628-0033 RYOBITABLE SAW Good condition. First $50 can have it. Hurry wont last long at this price. 628-4429 SMALLBLOCK CHEVY STARTER new staggered bolt pattern $25 call or text 352-746-0401 SNAPPER 42 RIDING MOWER/GENERAC 4W GENERATOR Mower $1000. incl mulch attachment GenSet $375.BOTH LIKE NEW 352-489-6465 Stallion Cow Boy Hat, by Stetson, wool, sz 6 & Boots, black 11 D. both New $100. GlassTopTable w/ 4 chairs $100. 352-795-7254 TAILGATE FOR 1986 CHEVYSilverado F10 PickupTruck $50. Ruth 352-382-1000 Target GIFTCARD Bal is $67.79 selling for $55.00 OBO.WILL VERIFY. LINDA 352-341-2271 VERIZON LG ENV TOUCH V X11000 cell phone full key board $25 call or text 352-746-0401 VERIZON SAMSUNG BRIGHTSIDETOUCH cell phone full key board $35.call or text 352-746-0401 WICKERTEACART, Vintage, excellent cond. useful and decorative, $80, (Dunnellon) (352) 465-1813 4 WHEELED WALKER WITH BRAKES & SEAT $75. 352-464-0316 4TOILETSEAT RISER BRAND NEW WITH HANDLES ONLY $25. 352-464-0316 BEDSIDE COMMODE &ALUMINUM WALKER ADJUSTABLE LEGS ON EACH $20.00 EA.352 464 0316 MANUALWHEELCHAIR WITH FOOTRESTS GREATSHAPE $100. 352-464-0316

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T UESDAY,J ANUARY29,2013C 11 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS 517-0129 TUCRN Simmons, Robert C. 2012-CP-715 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.2012-CP-715 IN RE: ESTATE of ROBERT C. SIMMONS DECEASED, NOTICE TO CREDITORS 000DM1Q TOYOTA2002, Tacoma, Crew Cab, $8,770. 352-341-0018 TOYOTA2004, 4 Runner Sport 2WD, 94K mi, Leather $12,800. obo Call Troy 352-621-7113 CADILLAC 2007, Escalade, 44k miles, Luxury NAV, $29,500. Call Troy (352) 621-7113 CHEVYTRAILBLAZER LT 05exc. cond. asking $6000 obo, in Hernando (904) 923-2902 FORD F150, 1978, 4 x 4 perfect, father/son, project $1,650 obo (352) 564-4598 JEEP 2004, Wrangler X 4WD, Only 57K miles, Hard Top $13,800.Call Troy 352-621-7113 KIA 2006 Sedona Great Family Van, 7 Pass, low mi. Call today for Low Price 352-628-4600 BAD BOYBUGGIE 2011 ready to hunt Only $5998. (352) 621-3678 POLARIS 2002 SPORTSMAN 700 CC 4X4 AUTO READYFORTHE MUD ONLY$4288 (352) 621-3678 POLARIS RZR 800 LE TIMETO PLAYHARD ONLY$8388 (352) 621-3678 CF MOTO 2008, 250 Trike 772 miles, $2,495. (352) 726-6128 FASHION2007 250 cc; 1,500 miles; $1,200 (352) 726-6128 GOLDWING 1985 Blue; 39,155 miles; $2,495 (352) 726-6128 GOLDWING 1985 Limited Edition Gold; Fuel injected; 53,012 miles; $3,000 (352) 726-6128 GOLDWING 1998, SE with Voyager Trike Kit -Tan; 55,200 miles; $9,000 (352) 726-6128 Harley-DAVIDSON2006 FLHTPI Clean bike, great looks, 88 ci, 5 speed, low miles 19K, accident free, never layed down, garage kept, two tone bk/wt, all service done by HD dealer 352 513-4294 asking $10,500 HARLEY-Davidson Leather Jacket LG as New, $300. OBO Two shorty motorcycle Helmets S/M & L/XL $50ea 352-746-6125 HONDA Goldwing, 100k + miles, $9,500 (352) 419-4606 HONDA 750 Shadow Aero. Runs & looks great! $2,995. Firm (352) 344-0084 HONDA 1997, GOLDWING ASPENCADE, 24K mi, Lots a Extras! $6000. (352) 212-6450 HONDA 2007 Full Size Shadow. Harley,1100CC, Chrome, bags, trade?, 70mpg $2,800. Crystal River (727) 207-1619 HONDABLACK BIRD CBR 1100 LOW LOW MILES ONLY$3488.00 (352) 621-3678 HONDASPIRIT2002, ExcTires, Bags, WS, Sissy Bar, Cobra Pipes. 28k miles. $2,000 (352) 476-3688 HONDAST13002006 MADE TO TOUR ONLY$7786 (352) 621-3678 KAWASKI NINFA650 LIKE NEW ONLY $5488 (352) 621-3678 KYMCO 2009,AJILITY SCOOTER GREAT GAS SAVER ONLY $998 (352) 621-3678 SCOOTER 50 CC, like new, 400 miles, runs great $850 OBO (352) 746-0167 (315) 439-6005 SUZUKI 1999,1400 Intruder with Lealman Trike Kit 24,283 miles; $10,000 (352) 726-6128 SUZUKI BURGMAN AUTOMATICTWIST AND GO FUN ONLY $4686 (352) 621-3678 SUZUKI GSXR 750195 MILES HOLD ON ONLY$9996 (352) 621-3678 VICTORYCROSS ROADS GREATAmerican MADE CRUSIER ONLY$12888 (352) 621-3678 CHRYSLER, PT Cruiser, loaded, 53k miles, $4,800 (352) 464-4304 FORD 2001 COBRAMUSTANG CONV. 5 SPEED, LEATHER MUSTSEE CALL352-628-4600 For More Info FORD 2005, Five Hundred LMT, 40K miles, leather, V6 $9,980Call Troy 352-621-7113 FORD 2006 Focus ZXW, SE 4DR, WGN. 85k miles $5,800 obo Call Troy (352) 621-7113 FORD Mustang Cobra, Indy 500 Pace Car-1994, Convertible, 7100 mi, Gar. kept 252-339-3897 GAS SAVER!1999 Saturn SL$2000 Tan/Gold.Auto. Engine andTrans are solid. 196,000 miles. Clean inside and out. Call Steve: 352-613-0746 Harley Davidson Super Glide, low miles, $7,500 (352) 613-2333 HONDA 2011 CRV LX, 19K miles, likenew, 4 Cyl. $19,950 Call Troy 352-621-7113 HYUNDAI 2006 Elantra, GLS 90K miles, likenew, 4 DR, auto. $6,800Call Troy 352-621-7113 MAZDA 2007, RX8 Looking for A sports Car, Look No Further!!! This is A Must See...Call for an Appt. and Pricing 352-628-4600 MERCURY2004, Grand Marquis, Leather and Loaded To Many Options to List. Call Today Before Its Gone Call 352-628-4600 MITSUBISHI 2011 Galant Low Mi. Great fuel economy, Priced to sell Call 352-628-4600 For Appointment MONEYS TIGHT! PRICES R RIGHT! BUY-SELL-RENTCar-Truck-Boat-RV consignmentusa.or g US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 PONTIAC 1999TransAm 5.7Llter V8, 62,700 mi, Show Quality, $7500 (352) 726-8336 Cell 352-302-5569 PONTIAC 2008, G6, 4 Door, Cold AC Call 352-628-4600 For Pricing PORSCHE 911 Carrera, black exterior, black interior 62,600 org. mi $25,900 386-334-2559 CELL TOYOTA2000, Camry LE V6, 183K miles Super Clean $5,800. obo Call Troy (352) 621-7113 TOYOTA2007,Yaris, 59K miles, 2 DR, H/B $7,800. Call Troy 352-621-7113 AUTO SWAP/ Corral CAR Show Sumter County Fairgrounds SUMTER SWAPMEETS SUN. FEB. 3, 2013 1-800-438-8559 CHEVY 89 Corvette, White needs trans $3250 352-601-0355 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I CHEVROLET 1994,C/K 2500 $2,880 352-341-0018 CHEVROLET 2005, Silverado 2500 HD, Diesel crew cab, $13,880 352-341-0018 DODGE 1997 Ram 2500 Truck Cummins Diesel, 2WD, AutoTrans,116,000 miles. Garage kept. Well maintained. Has been used as a commute vehicle. $7,800 firm. 352-464-4690 FORD 2003 F150 Ex Cab, $8,990 352-341-0018 FORD 98, Ranger Splash, very well kept, cold AC, 6 cyl., auto, Tires like new, $3,200 obo (352) 601-0572 MONEYS TIGHT! PRICES R RIGHT! BUY-SELL-RENTCar-Truck-Boat-RV consignmentusa.or g US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 AIRBOAT13ft x 7ft, 500 HP Cadillac, turn key boat $9,500 obo Call Jim for details (813) 361-4929, LL BEAN 16 ft, ABS, canoe, with paddle & jackets, $650 obo (352) 628-3194 TRI PONTOON BOAT27 Ft., Fiberglass 250 HP,Ttop, trailer included $17,000. 352-613-8453 WE HAVE BOATSGULF TO LAKE MARINE We Pay CASH For Used Clean Boats Pontoon, Deck & Fishing Boats (352)527-0555 boatsupercenter.com ITASCAMERIDIAN36 Ft, 2005 Motor Home 350HPCat Diesel 55K miles, no smoke/pets 6 Michelin Tires, New 2010 qn w/ sleep No. mattress & overhead fan. W/D combo $71,000 obo (352) 419-7882 MONTEGO BAY35ft 5th wheel 3 slides kept undercover, Exc cond.TruckAvail. LOADED $27,000 (352) 564-2756 NATIONALRV2006Tropical One owner,34ft, 26000 miles,no smoke/pets, 300HPCummins diesel,2 slides, 6 new tires, 3yr warranty,many extras. $87000. Well maintained. 352-341-4506 5TH WHEEL 33FT GOOD CONDITION MUST SELL (423) 202-0914 FOREST RIVER2010, Surveyor, Sport 189, 20 ft. Travel Trailer, 1 slide, w/AC, qn. bed, awning, pwr. tonque jack, corner jacks, microwave, equilizing hitch, $10,500, reduced to $9000 (352) 382-1826 HIGH LINE1999, 32ft Deluxe, 12 slide out, new 22awning, 55+ park, can be moved. Was asking $9,000, Sell $6,900 excel. shape 231-408-8344 HI-LO TRAVELTRAILER 2003,tow lite model 22-03t,exc. cond. $6000 obo 352-422-8092 KZ Toyhauler,0732 like new, full slide new tires, Owan Gen., gas tank, Lrg living area separate cargo $18,000. 352-795-2975 MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. SUNNYBROOK 36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides, kg bd,like new, 60amp serv. NADA $29K asking $25K obo 352-382-3298 WE BUYRVS, Travel Trailers, 5th Wheels, Motor Homes Call US 352-201-6945 $$ TOPDOLLAR $$ For Wrecked, Junk or Unwanted Cars/Trucks $$ (352) 201-1052 $$ BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 CASH BUYERS Buying Used Cars Trucks & Vans, For used car lot LARRYS AUTO SALES, Hwy 19... 352 564-8333 MONEYS TIGHT! PRICES R RIGHT! BUY-SELL-RENTCar-Truck-Boat-RV consignmentusa.or g US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 WE BUY ANYVEHICLEInAny Condition, Title, No Title, Bank Lien, No Problem, Dont Trade it in. We Will Pay up to $25K Any Make,Any Model. 813-335-3794 813-237-1892 Call AJ AFFORDABLE AUTOS & VANS Everybody Rides $495 DOWN $49 PER WEEK BUYHERE PAY HERE. Lots of clean-safedependable rides CALLDAN TODAY (352) 5 6 3 -1 9 0 2WE BUYS CARS DEAD OR ALIVE 1675 Suncoast Hwy. Homosassa Fl. BUICK 2007, Lucerne, CXL 55K miles, Leather $13,500. obo Call Troy (352)621-7113 CADILLAC 1997 De Ville Tan with black imitation rag top fully loaded good runner-norstar engine,only 97000 miles, good tires-$2999.00. jim (941)-705-1795 CHEVROLET Corvette Corvette 6 speed, black on black, $14,500 (352) 613-2333 CHEVROLET 2002, Camaro Z28 $9,495. 352-341-0018 MICHELE ROSE Realtor Simply put I ll work harder 352-212-5097 isellcitruscounty@ yahoo.com Craven Realty, Inc. 352-726-1515 TONY Pauelsen Realtor 352-303-0619 Buy or Sell Call NOW TOP PERFORMANCE Realestate Consultant FREE Foreclosure and Short Sale Lists Office Open 7 Days a Week LISAVANDEBOE Broker (R) Owner Plantation Realty 352-634-0129 www.plantation realtylistings.com CRYSTALRIVER2 Story, 5BR/3Bath 2 boat slips near KINGS BAY$425,000. Make Offers 352-563-9857 DUNNELLON Here is that home on Lake Rousseau that you have always wanted! 2br 1 ba on 1.43 acres w/168ft lake frontage. Completely remodeled all new interior & windows. No Flood Insur ance! Priced reduced from $369,000 to $169,000 Call Bernie (352) 563-0116 YOUR High-Tech Water Front Realtor ROD KENNER 352-436-3531 ERA Suncoast Realty SCAN OR GO TOwww. BestNatur eCoast Pr operties.com To view great waterfront properties NORTH CITRUS 1.4 ac. Cleared, fenced, high & dry. Paved road. Elec., pump/well, septic. Owner finan. No mobiles. $13,900 CALL352-897-4195 HOMOSASSA Wooded Lot on Lee Woods Dr., has Wetlands, with River access, but not on river $6,000. 352-621-1664 BAYLINER 1752007, Bowrider, garage kept, Bimini top, custom cover, depth finder, only 44 hrs on motor,pristine condition! $14,000. 352-560-7377 BAYLINER 1984cuddy cabin, hard top, Volvo motor,AQ125A, needs tune-up. Has 2 props, fish/depth finder, 2001 Rolls float on trailer worth $1000 Comes w/spare motor Has service manual, 2nd owner $2500 call Doug after 4pm352-212-8385 or 352-564-0855 ARBOR LAKES **OPEN HOUSE**2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR & fenced back yard! Gated Comm. 10a-3p 4695 N. Lake Vista Trl (352) 419-7418 ARBOR LAKES Fantastic Dream Home In Active Senior Community $169,900 2,100 sf, 3BR/2BA/2GA Split Floor Plan w/Pool Call (352) 726-6564 3/2 Move In Ready Villa in Windemere. Beautifully Maintained with upgraded features. Premier location close to boat ramp, trail & downtown. MLS#359594 $229,500 Call Myriam Reulen (352) 613-2644 Weston Properties, LLC INVERNESS Block home 2br, 1ba w/ 2porches, oversized gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres. $130,000 Call Buzz 352-341-0224 or David 607-539-7872 Unique stilt home off 581. Great loc to town, shopping, & hospital. 2br/1ba, w/ rap around porch. Needs some TLC. Sold as is. $33,900 (352) 419-6227 3b/2ba, den MH on land off US 19 newer c/h/a carpet & vinyl, clean RV Hkup. fence ** $39,900** Cridland Real Estate Jackie 352-634-6340 The Meadows Sub. 2/2/1, New roof, NewAC & Appliances Move In, clean cond. 3876 S. Flamingo Terr. Asking $58,000 (352) 382-5558 4/2 BLOCK HOME, mother in law apt, nice home $65,000. (305) 619-0282, Cell 4/2/3 HEATED POOL lot s of extras SELLER MOTIVATED! reduced to 210k 352-688-6500 or 352-212-5023 Buying or Selling REALESTATE, Let Me Work For You!BETTYHUNTREALTORERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc. 352 586-0139 hunt4houses68 @yahoo.com www.bettyhunts homes.com. Sugarmill WoodsHouse for Sale 2/2/2, Call for More Info.334-691-4601 (850) 776-7528 Phyllis Strickland Realtor Best Time To Buy! I have Owner Financing and Foreclosures TROPIC SHORES REALTY. (352) 613-3503 GAIL STEARNS Realtor Tropic Shores Realty (352) 422-4298 Low overhead = Low Commissions Waterfront, Foreclosures Owner financing available I NEED LISTINGS! I SOLD ALMOST 2HOMES A MONTH IN 2012 Lets BREAK that record together!DEB INFANTINERealtor (352) 302-8046 Real Estate!... its what I do. ERAAmerican Realty Phone: 352-726-5855 Cell: 352-302-8046 Fax: 352-726-7386 Email:debinfantine@ yahoo.com ESTATE SALE Nature Coast Landings RV Resort. Developed site with gazebo & storage bldg, reduced to $49,500. Separate storage lot available. (RV sold). For info and pictures Click on detailsbyowner.com 352-843-5441 LAND FOR SALE LAND LIQUIDATION 20 acres St. Lucie Waterway, $189,500. 3 miles boat Lake Okeechobee, 45 min boatAtlantic. Private / gated. Deer, turkey, hogs, fishing. (888)716-2259 Gulf Atlantic Land, Broker. MOTIV A TED SELLER W ant s This Gone!!! 6Acres w Big SHOP, Nice 2/2/2 House, Porches Barns, pond, pvd rd, Concrete dr. Reduced! $ 114, 900 MLS 357108. www. crosslandrealty.com 352 726 6644 Specializing in Acreage Farms/Ranches & Commercial Richard (Rick) Couch, Broker Couch Realty & Investments, Inc. (352) 344-8018 RCOUCH.com UNIQUE & HISTORIC Homes, Commercial Waterfront & Land Small Town Country Lifestyle OUR SPECIALTY SINCE 1989LET US FIND YOU AVIEW TO LOVE www. crosslandrealty.com(352) 726-6644Crossland Realty Inc. HOMOSASSA GNC Commercial 7311 Grover Cleveland Blvd. 3/2 MH $69,900. (603) 860-6660 CITRUS SPRINGS 3/2/2, 2 yr old Pool home in imacculate condition, Landscaped backyard. $125,000 Priced to sell! CALL (570) 412-5194 Quiet Country Setting 3/2 on 2 acres mol Approx. 1750 sq ft LA front porch, Lg rear screened porch, Patio, 24x30 Steel Building, Steel Carport -great for boat storage, etc. Fenced and crossfenced, Built in 2003 Nice Oaks, Wooded, Citrus Springs area only 20 Min. to Ocala $129,900 Call 352-302-6784 for appt. PINE RIDGE THIS IS THE PROPERTYYOUVE BEEN LOOKING FOR! Bring your boat, horses, in-laws; there is room for everything! 4/3 w/7 car garage/workshop & in-law suite on 5.83 acres. Mostly wooded w/large backyard. Beautiful & serene. High end finishes; immaculate home in equestrian community. www .centralflest ate.com for pictures/more info. 352-249-9164 2/2/2, REMODELED NEW: Roof, AC, Kit, Baths, Windows, Flrs, 317 S Harrison. Reduced $72,900. Call 352-527-1239 Brentwood Villa 2/2/2 cul-de-sac Completely up dated! 1816 W. Jena Ct OPEN SUN 12-3PM $96,900 PRICED T O SELL! FSBO 610-248-2090 HERNANDO Citrus Hills Pool Home 4/3/2+, circular drive, 1 acre lot, below $200k 352-527-7856 BEVERLYHILLSLg 1/1, Extras, E-Z Terms $425. 697-1457 CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1Water Incl. CHA, $496. 352-220-2447 212-2051 HERNANDO Forest Ridge V illage Nice 2/2 home w/garage, screened patio, & pool/clubhouse privileges. $750 mo Call 980-285-8125 HOMOSASSA 2/1 Duplexe $450 3/2/2 House $625 River Links Realty 352-628-1616 INVERNESS 3/2 Brand New, Granite tops, marble flrs, SS Ap $895 (352) 634-3897 INVERNESS 3/2/2 Starting @ $750. www.relaxfl.com 352-601-2615 OR 352-201-9427 INVERNESS Highlands, 2/1/1 $590mo.1st & Sec (352) 344-2560 INVERNESS Large 1 BR home in 55+ community, Great location just off the water. Bring boat & fishing gear. $585 (352) 344-1380 Sugarmill Woods2/2/2, 2 MBdrms $875. 352-302-4057 HERNANDO Affordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352)726-2225 CRYSTALRIVER3950 sq ft Lt MFG w/office @ $1200/mo 1155 sq ft storage @ 450/mo 600 sq ft office @ 450/mo 352-302-1935 CRYSTALRIVERWarehouse for Rent Free standing, garage area, 1,440sf, $100-$550 352-634-0129 ESTATE SALE in Nature Coast Landings RV Resort. Large developed site and a separate gated storage lot; plus almost new 5th-wheel with slides, screened gazebo, and storage building. All for $79,900. For more info and pictures, click on www.detailsbyowner.com 352-843-5441 PUBLISHERS NOTICE: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair HousingAct which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1800-669-9777.The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. CRYSTALRIVERLarge 2/2 CHA, W/D hk-up $575/mo. 1st Mo. FREE with $600. no dogs 352-726-9570 CRYSTALRIVERSpacious 2/1 lawn, water, sewr & garb. W/D hk up $500.mo $250 dep No Pets 352-212-9205 352-212-7922 INVERNESS 2 B/RsAvailable KNOLLWOOD TOWNHOMESRentalAssistance Available For QualifiedApplicants Call 352-344-1010 MWF, 8-12 & 1-5 307 Washington Ave Inverness Florida Equal Housing Opp. INVERNESS 2/1, Tri-plex, Great Loc., clean & roomy. no pets $500.mo 1st. & Last $300. Sec. 352-341-1847 CRYSTAL RIVER2/1, 828 5th Ave. NE Furn $650 or Unfurn. $550+sec 727-4558998, 727-343-3965 CITRUS HILLS2/2 Townhouse Condo full appls, carport, Citrus Hills membership incldd Prudential Florida Showcase Properties call 352-476-8136 CITRUS SPRINGS 2/2 Duplex nice private area, near shopping & schools. Wtr, sewer incl $600mo 352-558-4477 CRYSTALRIVERLarge 2/2 CHA, W/D hk-up $575/mo. 1st Mo. FREE with $600. no dogs 352-726-9570 HERNANDO Affordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 CRYSTALRIVER**RENT REDUCED** 3/1 Country Home on stilts,w/fenced yard. $565 + Utilities. Call 920-922-6800 Sugarmill Woods3BR, 2BA, Super Clean 3,100 sf, large priv. shaded lot, 2 covered, porches, sm. pet ok. $1,150. mo. yrly lse., sec. dep $700. $3,000 move in (727) 580-1083 BEVERLYHILLS1/1, Fresh paint, appls Flooring $475. mo. 352-302-3987 BEVERLY HILLS2/1 + Florida Room 106 S. Fillmore $550 mo. 352-422-2798 BEVERLY HILLS2/2/Carport. CHA $550. mo. & 1/1/CP + Fl. Rm $450 (352) 897-4447, 697-1384 BEVERLYHILLS870 Beakrush Ln 2br 1 ba, 1 car gar. enclosed screen porch, $695mo. leased dep. no pets. 352-697-3133 CITRUS COUNTYBeautiful 3-4 Bedrm Homes & Duplexes w/1 car garage. St arting@$433/mo Inverness 352-726-3476 Lecanto 352-746-0373 Crystal River 352-563-0890 INVERNESS 3/2 MH, Furn. lg screen lanai, shed & lot. All appl incl lg scn TV,55+ PK Asking $12,000. Call (352)364-3747 INVERNESS Move In Ready, Beautiful 1/1 SW, Mobile, Harbor Lights 55+ park, on Big Lake Henderson. Fully furn., very updated, view of lake, Cen. HVAC, W/D, AMust See! Asking $7,000, 352-344-1828 INVERNESS PARK55+ 14X60, 2/2, new roof, all appliances, partly furn. screen room, shed, 352-419-6476 MOBILE HOME, Fully Furnished. Everything stays. Just move in. 2 Sheds, washer/dryer all appliances. Must See! $7,500. (708) 308-3138 PALM TERRACE 55+ Community, 1997 3BR/2BA14 x 66, excel. cond. Shed, Fl. Rm. Carport & Deck $16,000. (352) 400-8231 REDUCED 2/2 $17,500 On Lake Rousseau Lot Rent $240/mo. BETTER THAN NEW! Owner financing. Call LEE (352) 817-1987 Singing Fores t FLORALCITY 14 x 70, Mobile, 2 lrg. bedrooms, furnished & remodeled, heat & air, carport & shed, Wash/ Dryer, Lot rent $176. $14,500 352-344-2420 STONEBROOK, CR 2bd/2ba,gourmet kitch, master suite,encl. porch pond, crprt+ patio $51,900, Cridland RE, Jackie 352-634-6340 Waterfront/Homosassa Westwind Village 55+ Beautifully furnished Move In Ready, 2/2 2 Scrn rms, dbl door, refrig./Ice maker Washer Dryer, Low mnthly pyments, $19000 obo (850) 449-1811 Cell HOMOSASSA RENT-to-OWN 3br 2ba MH Immediate Occpancy Owner Financing A vail CALL(352) 795-2377 3/2 Citrus S prings $975 Furn W/FHome $2500 Furn S tilt w/f Hm $1700 3/2 furn w/f condo $1500 More rentals: c21naturecoast.com 835 NE Hwy 19Crystal River, Fl(352) 795-0021 Chassahowitzka 3/2 waterfrnt/DW $500 2/2, fenc. Yd/DW $500 2/2 house w/gar. $600Sugarmill W oods 3/2/2, Furnished, $900. AGENT (352) 382-1000 CRYSTALRIVER1Br 2BACompletely furn., incl utilities, W/D, $700 mo + deposit (352) 422-7717 CRYSTALRIVER2/BR $550. 3BR $750 Near Town 563-9857 CRYSTALRIVERStudio Apartment Completely Furn. Cable TV W/D rm. All util. incld.+ boat dock. $700 mo 352-372-0507 FLORALCITYLAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm. AC, Clean, No Pets (352) 344-1025 HOMOSASSA 1/1 Remodeled, Near New Wal-Mart on Cardinal $425. + Sec. (352) 621-5265 Alexander Real Estate (352) 795-6633Crystal River Apts2 BR/1 BA$400-$500 ALSO HOMES & MOBILES AVAILABLE CRYSTALRIVER1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments for Rent 352-465-2985

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C12 T UESDAY,J ANUARY29,2013 C LASSIFIEDS C ITRUS C OUNTY ( FL ) C HRONICLE 525-0129 TUCRN 02/01 Meeting PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Directors of the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc., a Fla. not for profit corporation will meet in Special Meeting for the purpose of conducting an ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION on Friday, February 1, 2013, at 12:00 P.M., in the Board Room, Administration Annex Building, Citrus Memorial Hospital, 502 W. Highland Boulevard, Inverness, Florida, for the purpose of commencing an attorney/client session pursuant to Section 286.011(8), Florida Statutes. The purpose of the ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION will be to discuss all pending Citrus County Hospital Board litigation cases. Pursuant to said statute, the Board will meet in open session and subsequently commence the attorney/client session which is estimated to be approximately one and half (1.5) hours in duration. At the conclusion of the ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION the meeting shall be reopened per public notice. Those persons to be in attendance at this ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION are as follows: Citrus Memorial Health Foundation Board Members:Joseph Brannen David LangerJames Sanders Carlton Fiarbanks, DMDSandra Chadwick V. Reddy, MD Robert Collins V. Alugubelli, MD Ryan Beaty, Chief Executive Officer Clark A. Stillwell, Esquire, Attorney for Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc. James J. Kennedy, Esquire, Attorney for Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc. Richard Oliver, Esquire, Attorney for Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc. Court Reporter January 29, 2013 520-0205 TCRN Estate of Deforge, Stanley 2012-CP-673, NTC Public Notice 521-0205 WCRN Estate of Fisher, Lasine, 2012-CP-698 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.: 2012-CP-698 IN RE: ESTATE OFLASINE M. FISHER, Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Lasine M. Fisher, deceased, whose date of death was October 14, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is January 29, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/Stephanie M. Murphy 157 McKay Street, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Megan T. Fitzpatrick, Esq. 213 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450-4239 352-726-1821, Florida Bar No. 84987 Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 29 & February 5, 2013 522-0205 FCRN Baker, Donaldson, Joseph, 2012CP745 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE I N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION, FILE NO.: 2012-CP-745 IN RE:ESTATE OF JOSEPH DONALDSON BAKER, A/K/A JOSEPH D. BAKER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JOSEPH DONALDSON BAKER A/K/A JOSEPH D. BAKER, deceased, whose date of death was August 9, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Flroida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate must file thier claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is January 29, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/ DEBORAH HUBBARD BAKER DEBORAH ANNE BAKER 8280 North Pine Haven Point, Crystal River, FL 34428 Attorney for Personal Representative: 523-0205 WCRN Young, Malcom Mickey 2012-CP-753 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL COURT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA Probate Division Case No. 2012-CP-753 IN RE: ESTATE OF MICKEY MALCOLM YOUNG a/k/a MICKEY M. YOUNG, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The Administration of the Estate of MICKEY MALCOLM YOUNG a/k/a MICKEY M. YOUNG deceased, whose date of death was November 14, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives Attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the Decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the Decedents estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is January 29, 2013. Personal Representative: MELODY ANN YOUNG 6712 West Penny Court, Homosassa, FL 34446 Attorney for Personal Representative: James David Green ESQ., FBN 0241430 GREEN & GREEN, P.A. 9030 W. Fort Island Trail #5,Crystal River, FL 34429 Tel:(352) 795-4500 Fax: (352) 795-3300 Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 29 & February 5, 2013 524-0205 WCRN Lapinski, Irene 2012-CP-763 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.2012-CP-763 IN RE: ESTATE of IRENE LAPINSKI DECEASED, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of IRENE LAPINSKI, deceased, whose date of death was NOVEMBER 2, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is January 29, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/ Christina I. Skinner 5829 W. Pine Ridge Blvd, Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Attorney for Personal Representative: BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A., /s/ Michael Mountjoy, Esquire. 209 Courthouse Square, Inverness, FL 34450 Florida Bar Number: 157310 Telephone (352) 726-1211 Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 29 & February 5, 2013 /s/HAROLD B. STEPHENS 825 North Citrus Ave, Crystal River, FL 34428 (352) 795-2088, Florida Bar No. 095562 har oldstephens@tampabay.rr .com Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 29 & February 5, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.: 2012-CP-673 IN RE: THE ESTATE OF: STANLEY M. DEFORGE Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The Administration of the Estate of STANLEY M. DEFORGE, deceased, whose date of death was September 22, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives Attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents Estate on whom a copy of this Notice has been served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents Estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is January 29, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/ Anne Marie Stone 8826 E. Skye Drive, Inverness, FL 34450 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/KAREN O. GAFFNEY, Esquire Karen O. Gaffney, P.A., 205 West Dampier Street, Inverness, FL 34450 Telephone: (352)726-9222, Florida Bar No. 500682 Attorney for the Personal Representative Published two times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 29 & February 5, 2013 519-0129 TUCRN Anderson, Jerry Keith 2012CP716. NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 2012CP716 IN RE: THE ESTATE OF JERRY KEITH ANDERSON DECEASED NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of Jerry Keith Anderson, deceased, whose date of death was February 26,2011 is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is January 22, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/TIFFANY CHRISTY c/o 452 Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness, Florida 34452 Attorney for Personal Representative: HAAG, HAAG & FRIEDRICH, P.A. 452 Pleasant Grove Rd, Inverness, Florida 34452 (352)726-0901, (352)726-3345 (Facsimile), Florida Bar No. 0196529 /s/JEANNETTE M. HAAG, Attorney for the Estate jmhaag1@tampabay.rr .com -Primary Email jmhaag@tampabay.rr .com -Secondary Email Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 22 & 29, 2013 518-0129 TUCRN Haefele, Edward 2012-CP-000723 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE CASE NO. : 2012-CP-000723 IN RE: THE ESTATE OF EDWARD W. HAEFELE, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Edward W. Haefele,, deceased, whose date of death was April 16, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, File Number 2012 CP000723; the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is January 22, 2013. Personal Representative: Diane Mason, 1247 NW 2nd Terrace Crystal River, FL 34428 Thomas M. VanNess, Jr., Esq. Florida Bar No. 0857750 VanNess & VanNess, P.A. 1205 North Meeting Tree Blvd Crystal River, FL 34429, 352-795-1444, tmv@vannesspa.com Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 22 & 29, 2013 The administration of the estate of Robert C. Simmons, deceased, whose date of death was October 30, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is January 22, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/ Hollis Ann Simmons 32R Hurlbutt Circle, Gales Ferry, CT 06335 Attorney for Personal Representative: BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A., /s/ Michael Mountjoy, Esquire. 209 Courthouse Square, Inverness, FL 34450 Florida Bar Number: 157310 Telephone (352) 726-1211 Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 22 & 29, 2013 000DRWU



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Butcher still plies his dying trade Editors note: In this economic climate where jobs are at a premium, the Chronicleis featuring an occasional series, Citrus County Works, profiling local Citrus County people and the jobs they perform. Today: Old-time butcher Klaus Menke. NANCYKENNEDY Staff writerINVERNESS As a boy growing up in post-war Germany, Klaus Menkes father did as most German fathers did when a son reached a certain age. Back in those days when I grew up, you only went to school for eight years, and you graduated when you were 14 or 15, Menke said. About a year prior to your graduation, your dad would pull you aside to talk to you about the birds and the bees. At the same time, it was time to decide what youre going to do with your life. When his time came, Menke chose to become a butcher. The rule over there was you had to learn a trade, he said. You were a baker or plumber or mason. You learned the entire trade from the ground up, and by age 18 you have a profession under your belt you know what youre doing. Menke, 71, who owns Klaus Deutsche Korner inside Eyepoppin Cheesesteaks & Hoagies in Inverness, still has his 1955 trade manual, his butchers bible. First thing you learn is the bone structure of all the different animals lambs, sheep, cows and all the different breeds, he said. You learn about animal diseases, about every piece of equipment. After the first year you learn meat processing. Menke said in the U.S., butchering is a dying trade, although its still being taught in Germany. Today, supermarkets employ meat cutters, but not necessarily butchers. A butcher knows the animal from the time its born until its salami hanging from a hook, Menke said. He said upon graduating from trade school in Germany, a person received a graduation book, much like a passport, with a photo and credentials stamped inside. It served as an employment report card that a person would take from job to job. Each employer would write comments about INSIDE JANUARY 29, 2013Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best CommunityVOL. 118 ISSUE 175 50 CITRUS COUNTYShowdown set: Warriors breeze by First Academy/B1 www.chronicleonline.com HEALTH & LIFE:ExchangesThis fall, new insurance markets called exchanges will open in each state./ Page C1 INDEX Comics . . . . .C8 Community . . . .C6 Crossword . . . .C7 Editorial . . . . .A8 Entertainment . . .B4 Horoscope . . . .B4 Lottery Numbers . .B3 Lottery Payouts . .B4 Movies . . . . . .C8 Obituaries . . . .A6 Classifieds . . . .C9 TV Listings . . . .C7 HIGH80LOW61Patchy fog early, then party cloudy.PAGE A4TODAY& next morning TUESDAY HEALTH & LIFE:ZimbabweDr. Ed Dodge writes of adventures at Africa University in Zimbabwe. /Page C2 ASK THE EXPERTS:Health & LifeDoctors Bennett, Gandhi, Grillo and Kumar share their expertise./ Page C1 at VILLAGE TOYOTA NEW 2013 TOYOTA COROLLA 000DOSR $ 14,995 $ 14,995 $ 14,995 State leaders pay less for insurance Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott and state legislators will soon decide whether Florida should extend health insurance coverage to nearly 1 million residents, and those officials all get their plans from the state, many paying less than state workers. Scott, as well as the three other Republican members of the Cabinet, and nearly all state lawmakers are enrolled in Floridas health insurance plan. For Scott, the cost to cover him and his wife is less than $400 a year. A total of 107 out of 120 members of the Florida House pay the same or less for coverage. The 40 members of the Florida Senate also are covered by the state, but this month they started paying the same as rank-and-file career service employees under a proposal pushed by Sen. Joe Negron, RStuart. Career service workers pay $50 a month for individual coverage and $180 a month for family coverage. The people who work here at night and clean our offices are valuable people, said Senate President Don Gaetz, RNiceville. We shouldnt be paying less for our health insurance while they are paying more. Scott and legislative leaders will decide over the next few months whether the state implements key portions of the Affordable Care Act. One of the biggest decisions will be whether to expand Medicaid coverage to roughly 900,000 Floridians who are just above the poverty line. Florida Officials to decide soon whether to implement key portions of federal Affordable Care Act Citrus County WORKS Sharp skills keep him on cutting edge Board to start overA.B. SIDIBE Staff writerDuring its meeting Jan. 18, the Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) Governing Board subcommittee, charged with reviewing best-use proposals for the Flying Eagle Nature Center near Inverness, decided to reject all four plans. Instead, the panel, which is comprised of board members Doug Tharp, Albert Joerger, George Mann and Wendy Griffin, chose a process called invitation to negotiate. Basically this starts things over. The companies that submitted proposals before can use this new process, but it also opens it up to the public as well, said Terri Behling, SWFWMD external affairs manager. Behling said the reason for rejection is because the original request for proposals contained some ambiguity. The districts full governing board will take up the matter today during its 9 a.m. meeting in Tampa. The center, located at 12650 East Boy Scout Road within the 16,438-acre Flying Eagle Nature Center, has been the focus of potential joint ventures since the water districts lease with Gulf Ridge Council of the Boy Scouts County gets canine ambassadorCHRISVANORMER Staff writerOreo, one of the countys newest employees, is earning her keep. In fact, shes a superstar. The Catahoula leopard mix dog is the canine ambassador for Citrus County Animal Services and was chosen for her job as an example of the well-behaved animals available for adoption at the shelter. People may think the dogs at the shelter are just strays and not well behaved. Id like to take an example of a well-behaved dog, said Kelly Gill, the shelters volunteer outreach coordinator, when she selected Oreo a couple of months ago. As a Catahoula mix, Oreo is partly a Native American breed from Louisiana and partly other breeds brought to the United States by human immigrants. Last week, the spotted dog helped track an adopted German shepherd that jumped over the new owners 6-foot fence and ran away. Animal Services Operations Manager Patricia Amon described Oreos role in retrieving the wayward shepherd. A customer, who had two days prior adopted a German shepherd from our shelter, frantically called our office to say Karah had scaled her 6-foot fence and she couldnt catch her, Amon said. While I was on the phone See HEALTH/ Page A5 LOCAL:In the mixCrystal River Kmart manager bullish on future./Page A3 WORLD:Nightclub fireDetails emerge in blaze that killed 231 people./Page A10 MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleLifelong butcher Klaus Menke slices a Delmonico cut of beef at his Inverness butcher shop Friday morning. His shop, Klaus Deutsche Korner inside Eyepoppin Cheesesteaks & Hoagies in Inverness, is an authentic butcher shop. See BUTCHER/ Page A5 New hire smart cookie See DOG/ Page A5 Water district rejects Flying Eagle proposals See LAND/ Page A5

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A2TUESDAY, JANUARY29, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000DWDK 352.795-EARS (3277) 352.795-EARS (3277) 6441 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy. 352.795-EARS (3277) Cigna Care, Empire, Federal Employees, State Employees, Retirees, City & County Teachers: You have Excellent hearing aid benefits. We are Preferred Provider for BlueC ross & BlueShield. We honor ALL insurances. www.hearmoresolutions.com

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Because of editor error, a story on Page A1 of Mondays edition, Kevin the cop, warrants a correction. Kevin Travis is a resident of Riverhaven. An incorrect community was given in the story. Readers can alert The Citrus County Chronicle to any errors in news articles by emailing newsdesk@ chronicleonline.com or by calling 352-563-5660.Around theCOUNTY Fire claims remote homeA two-story house fire Saturday night caused extensive damage to the residence, but no injuries, according to the Citrus County Sheriffs Fire Rescue. Firefighters were reportedly stymied by bad roads and the remoteness of the address for a timely response, according to a report by Battalion Chief Ken Clamer. Crews from Pine Ridge were the first to arrive at the scene, 6240 E. Forest Trail, 28 minutes after the call to dispatch 8:03 p.m. When firefighters arrived, they found the 1,600square-foot home completely involved and commenced a defensive attack. Other responding fire units included: Citrus Springs, Kensington Avenue, Connell Heights and Inverness. Water was obtained from a fire rescue well site on West Withlacoochee Trail near State Road 200 and transported to the fire scene by fire trucks. Damages were estimated at $80,000 to the structure and approximately $40,000 to the contents.Thorpe to talk to ChamberCounty Administrator Brad Thorpe will be the guest speaker at the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce luncheon meeting Friday, Feb. 8. He will discuss the county budget. Networking begins at 11:30 a.m. and the meeting will conclude at about 1 p.m. Non-members interested in attending should call the chamber office at 352-7953149 prior to Wednesday, Feb. 6, to make and pay for reservations. From staff reports STATE& LOCAL Page A3TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Correction PATFAHERTY Staff writerThe Nuclear Regulatory Commission is seeking public comment on the safe handling of spent nuclear fuel. According to a request for comment notice in the Federal Register, the agency is considering changes to its regulations for the separate activities of storing, and packaging and transporting spent nuclear fuel. Spent nuclear fuel is a solid byproduct of the fission process used to generate electricity in nuclear power plants. According to Duke Energy, used nuclear fuel is stored at its facilities in two ways: in steel-lined, concrete storage pools filled with water, and in large, airtight steel canisters (dry cask storage). Progress Energy Florida submitted a strategy to NRC for managing spent fuel from the Crystal River nuclear plant following the permanent shutdown of the reactor until the Department of Energy is able to accept the fuel for disposal. That strategy was linked to CR3s application or license renewal rather than current shutdown. A potential new nuclear power plant in Levy Countywould include water-filled vaults to store spent fuel. According to Progress Energy, the plants fuel-storage facilities would be among the most secure in the world, designed to withstand earthquakes, tornadoes and hurricanes. NRC staff is reviewing potential policy issues and requirements related to safe handling of spent fuel as the lead issue for evaluating the compatibility of storage and transportation regulations. The review is intended to improve the agencys efforts on how it regulates after more than 20 years of experience approving dry casks for spent fuel storage and transportation. Plus, the agency anticipates longer storage durations with more nuclear power plants storing more used fuel. The agency will also address issues of compatibility between spent fuel storage and transportation regulations. According to NRC website, most nuclear fuel shipments occur between different reactors owned by the same utility to share storage space for spent fuel, or they may be shipped to a research facility to perform tests on the spent fuel itself. In the near future, because of a potential high-level waste repository being built, the number of these shipments by road and rail is expected to increase. Public comments will be accepted through March 18. They may be submitted online through the federal governments rulemaking website www.regulations.gov using Docket ID NRC-2013-0004. Contact Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty at 352-564-2924 or pfaherty@chronicleonline.com. NRC seeks public comment on nuke fuel Changes could affect CR plant, proposed Levy plant PATFAHERTY Staff writerCRYSTAL RIVER David Kellner is excited about shopping. That is not unexpected for a Kmart store manager, but his enthusiasm goes well beyond store walls. Kellner manages Kmart in the Crystal River Mall. He has been there nine years and has 21 years with the company. The store has about 75 employees; that can swell to 95 for the holiday season. Kmart was named the malls Business of the Month for December. Ashley McDermott, mall marketing director, said the designation was based on visual appearance of the store, use of creative displays, use of advertising, thinking outside the box to attract customers and customer service and in Kmarts case, working with the local community, which Kmart did in a big way for Christmas. Weve done a lot of community service items this year, Kellner said. The key program for us is the Kmart Cares program, where Kmart actually gives you 10 percent on dollars you put on gift cards and is tax free. He said many organizations participated, including the Crystal River Lions Club, Progress Energy and all the Rotary clubs. Weve done it the past three years, he said. The holiday season also meant helping a lot of other local organizations a lot of customary things we do every year, he said It seems it gets bigger and bigger every year, because there is always a need in the community, he said. I was born in Citrus County, Im kind of a native and take the community to heart in this county were all family. And just as hes seen Citrus grow and change, his industry has changed as well. Kmart has gotten real good with what they call integrated retail, he said. We do a lot now with ship to home, ship to store. There are numerous options for ordering from in-store kiosks or online at home. There are so many options available, its grown a lot, he said. Its good stuff, I love the technology. He is especially excited about the companys social media-style approach to online shopping called Shop Your Way. Users can access it with a computer or iPhone app and track all aspects of their online or in-store shopping experiences, access special deals, follow a particular store and gain points for purchases. And like a chronic Facebook user, Kellner is always signed in posting photos and updates. Its a lot of cool stuff, he said. You have to embrace the technology, thats the future. Looking ahead, the biggest thing is our integrated retail; were pushing ahead, he said. This year youre going to see a lot more online retail with instore pickup. It makes the retailer a bigger part of the online game. With that movement, he found a pleasant surprise as to just how many county residents are embracing online technology. One of the big new attractions in his store was the addition of Nathans. The full-scale local version of the famous hot chain is a favorite with shoppers. The fries are a winner, he said. The fries and the plain hot dog. Were one of the two stores in the whole company right now doing Seattles Best and the Cheesecake Factory, he added. We carry their cheesecakes and their muffins right here in Crystal River, its kind of an unknown secret, its just like youre getting from the Cheesecake Factory. And Starbucks owns Seattles Best, so its basically Starbucks Coffee, he said. Retail has gotten a lot more fun, he said. PAT FAHERTY/ChronicleKmart Manager David Kellner stands in the sporting goods section of his store in the Crystal River Mall. Kmart was named Crystal River Mall Business of the Month for December. Embracing technology Crystal River Kmart manager enthusiastic about online, social media Around theSTATE MiamiAll 23 state colleges OK $10K degreesGov. Rick Scott said all 23 state colleges offering fouryear degrees in Florida have accepted his $10,000 tuition challenge. The Republican governor made the announcement at Miami-Dade College on Monday. Scott in November challenged the schools to hold tuition to $10,000 for selected four-year degrees. Thats more than $3,000 under the average for the state colleges. They already charge about half as much as Floridas public universities. Florida has 28 state and community colleges but five of the schools offer only twoyear degrees. Scott wanted the low-cost degrees to be in fields that will provide the graduates with the best opportunity for employment. The governor also has opposed college and university tuition increases. Tuition rates have gone up in recent years due to cuts in state funding.Big Pine KeyTraps set for exotic species in KeysOfficials said theyll be removing feral cats and other exotic predators from federal wildlife refuges in the Florida Keys. According to a pest management plan released Monday by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, traps will be set in national wildlife refuges from Key Largo to the islands off Key West. Officials said snakes, iguanas, feral cats and other nonnative species prey on threatened and endangered species in the refuges. Cats caught in the traps will be transferred to a Monroe County animal control shelter. Other non-native animals found in the traps will be killed. Raccoons and other native wildlife caught by the traps will be released.Boca RatonDriver dies after car collides with trainBoca Raton police want to speak to anyone who saw an SUV crash into a train, killing one person in the car. Police said 49-year-old Anthony Carter was driving his SUV Saturday afternoon when he crashed through the downed railroad crossing gate. A Tri-Rail train rammed into the side of his car, pushing it along the tracks. Carter was pronounced dead at the scene.ClearwaterGiant $185K cigar sold to collectorA giant cigar sitting in a Clearwater warehouse has been sold for $185,000. The cigar is 19 feet long and three feet wide. Its covered in 16,000 wrapper leaves enough to make 25,000 regular size cigars and weighs 1,600 pounds. Juan Panesso told the Tampa Tribune a collector asked him to find the rare cigar. Panesso said the private buyer got a good deal on the cigar that had a recommended retail price tag of $200,000. The cigar, called El Gigante (The Giant), comes in its own carrying case. From wire reports

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLELOCAL/STATE HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR 80 58 NA HI LO PR 81 56 NA HI LO PR 78 58 NA HI LO PR 83 58 NA HI LO PR 79 54 NA YESTERDAYS WEATHER Patchy fog early, then partly cloudy.THREE DAY OUTLOOK Partly cloudy with a slight chance of showers. Clearing skies.High: 80 Low: 61 High: 79 Low: 55 High: 65 Low: 35TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING Exclusive daily forecast by: TEMPERATURE* Monday 81/56 Record 85/20 Normal 71/43 Mean temp. 69 Departure from mean +12 PRECIPITATION* Monday 0.00 in. Total for the month trace Total for the year trace Normal for the year 2.77 in.*As of 7 p.m. at InvernessUV INDEX: 6 0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Monday at 3 p.m. 30.25 in. DEW POINT Monday at 3 p.m. 57 HUMIDITY Monday at 3 p.m. 44% POLLEN COUNT** Trees and weeds were light and grasses were absent.**Light only extreme allergic will show symptoms, moderate most allergic will experience symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience symptoms.AIR QUALITY Monday was good with pollutants mainly particulates. ALMANAC CELESTIAL OUTLOOK SUNSET TONIGHT ............................6:07 P.M. SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:20 A.M. MOONRISE TODAY ...........................8:43 P.M. MOONSET TODAY ............................8:33 A.M. FEB. 3FEB. 10FEB. 17FEB. 25 WATERING RULES BURN CONDITIONS For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestrys Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdiTodays Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.City H L Fcast Daytona Bch. 80 62 pc Ft. Lauderdale 80 71 pc Fort Myers 85 64 pc Gainesville 80 58 pc Homestead 82 67 pc Jacksonville 79 59 pc Key West 79 72 pc Lakeland 82 63 pc Melbourne 80 68 pc City H L Fcast Miami 80 69 pc Ocala 82 63 pc Orlando 81 61 pc Pensacola 73 67 c Sarasota 82 64 pc Tallahassee 78 63 pc Tampa 83 66 pc Vero Beach 79 65 pc W. Palm Bch. 80 70 pc FLORIDA TEMPERATURESSoutheast winds from 10 to 15 knots. Seas 1 to 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will have a moderate chop. Partly cloudy and warm today. Gulf water temperature64 LAKE LEVELSLocation Sun. Mon. Full Withlacoochee at Holder n/a n/a 35.52 Tsala Apopka-Hernando n/a n/a 39.25 Tsala Apopka-Inverness n/a n/a 40.60 Tsala Apopka-Floral City n/a n/a 42.40Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the meanannual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211. MARINE OUTLOOKTaken at Aripeka THE NATION Albany 30 16 .15 r 39 37 Albuquerque 55 38 pc 37 21 Asheville 64 33 pc 66 53 Atlanta 59 43 c 70 60 Atlantic City 37 20 .07 pc 51 44 Austin 78 69 ts 80 45 Baltimore 41 30 .17 pc 52 44 Billings 37 24 sn 24 -1 Birmingham 67 50 c 74 62 Boise 34 21 .07 rs 39 24 Boston 31 21 .09 c 40 36 Buffalo 43 26 .44 r 49 48 Burlington, VT 23 3 .21 c 38 36 Charleston, SC 65 41 pc 71 60 Charleston, WV 61 34 .42 pc 66 52 Charlotte 50 34 .02 pc 67 56 Chicago 48 37 .44 ts 64 36 Cincinnati 52 37 .12 c 66 53 Cleveland 49 31 .20 r 58 49 Columbia, SC 63 0 pc 72 59 Columbus, OH 51 33 .35 sh 60 51 Concord, N.H. 24 5 .17 c 37 32 Dallas 78 66 ts 77 41 Denver 57 31 .01 pc 36 24 Des Moines 40 35 sf 43 21 Detroit 47 30 .27 sh 56 41 El Paso 66 41 pc 49 31 Evansville, IN 59 47 .21 c 68 45 Harrisburg 35 27 .20 pc 48 41 Hartford 32 15 .18 pc 44 35 Houston 81 70 ts 79 50 Indianapolis 52 37 .34 ts 63 48 Jackson 72 56 ts 78 57 Las Vegas 50 44 pc 55 41 Little Rock 76 59 .01 ts 73 48 Los Angeles 60 50 s 63 47 Louisville 57 49 .22 c 68 60 Memphis 73 58 .01 c 73 50 Milwaukee 44 33 .06 sh 54 29 Minneapolis 33 30 sn 33 13 Mobile 75 54 fg 74 66 Montgomery 71 50 c 77 64 Nashville 60 48 c 70 59 New Orleans 77 55 ts 77 64 New York City 34 29 .20 pc 48 43 Norfolk 51 28 .02 pc 65 51 Oklahoma City 74 60 ts 66 33 Omaha 46 33 c 41 22 Palm Springs 62 44 s 64 46 Philadelphia 36 28 .11 pc 51 45 Phoenix 60 50 .14 pc 57 40 Pittsburgh 48 28 .40 r 57 49 Portland, ME 27 9 .06 c 36 34 Portland, Ore 45 39 .46 r 45 40 Providence, R.I. 33 19 .09 c 43 36 Raleigh 50 32 .01 pc 68 56 Rapid City 32 26 .09 pc 34 8 Reno 39 21 c 47 23 Rochester, NY 40 24 .23 r 49 49 Sacramento 57 32 s 59 37 St. Louis 74 52 ts 68 39 St. Ste. Marie 34 27 .47 rs 39 31 Salt Lake City 32 21 .03 sn 28 21 San Antonio 76 69 ts 82 44 San Diego 59 52 trace s 60 46 San Francisco 56 46 s 54 44 Savannah 72 45 pc 74 59 Seattle 43 38 .05 r 45 42 Spokane 31 28 .05 c 33 25 Syracuse 30 19 .22 r 46 42 Topeka 77 48 c 54 26 Washington 44 33 .13 pc 54 48YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HIGH & LOW HIGH 88 Laredo, Texas LOW -13 Ely, Nev. TUESDAY CITY H/L/SKY Acapulco 88/70/s Amsterdam 49/39/sh Athens 55/41/c Beijing 43/18/pc Berlin 42/25/sh Bermuda 63/61/pc Cairo 65/50/pc Calgary -4/-12/pc Havana 82/66/pc Hong Kong 66/64/pc Jerusalem 50/44/sh Lisbon 56/43/s London 52/47/sh Madrid 51/34/s Mexico City 72/43/s Montreal 27/23/pc Moscow 17/8/c Paris 51/35/sh Rio 83/72/ts Rome 51/40/s Sydney 81/70/pc Tokyo 46/31/s Toronto 36/33/r Warsaw 32/20/sn WORLD CITIES Monday Tuesday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Monday Tuesday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Weather Central, Madison, Wi. Tuesday WednesdayCity High/Low High/Low High/Low High/LowChassahowitzka* 6:32 a/2:35 a 7:23 p/2:58 p 7:12 a/3:13 a 7:50 p/3:29 p Crystal River** 4:53 a/12:20 p 5:44 p/ 5:33 a/12:35 a 6:11 p/12:51 p Withlacoochee* 2:40 a/10:08 a 3:31 p/10:23 p 3:20 a/10:39 a 3:58 p/11:03 p Homosassa*** 5:42 a/1:34 a 6:33 p/1:57 p 6:22 a/2:12 a 7:00 p/2:28 p TIDES *From mouths of rivers **At Kings Bay ***At Masons CreekKEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy. SOLUNAR TABLESDATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR (MORNING) (AFTERNOON) 1/29 TUESDAY 6:56 12:44 7:19 1:07 1/30 WEDNESDAY 7:47 1:35 8:10 1:58 FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M. TUESDAY HI LO PR 80 60 NA Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday. ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday. Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time. Citrus County Utilities customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional watering allowances. To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352527-7669. For theRECORD A4TUESDAY, JANUARY29, 2013 To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $36.65* 6 months: $64.63* 1 year: $116.07**Subscription price includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year.For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers:Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.comMeadowcrest office 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 Inverness officeWhos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Mike Arnold..........................................................................................Editor, 564-2930 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 John Murphy........................................................Circulation Director, 563-3255 Trista Stokes..................................................................Online Manager, 564-2946 Trista Stokes..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-2946Report a news tip:Opinion page questions ..................................................Mike Arnold, 564-2930 To have a photo taken ..........................................Rita Cammarata, 563-5660 News and feature stories....................................Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 Community content ......................................................Sarah Gatling,563-5660 Wire service content ....................................................Brad Bautista,563-5660 Sports event coverage................................Jon-Michael Soracchi,563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc.1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community Where to find us:1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. Crystal River, FL 34429 Blvd. Today's active pollen: Juniper, Maple, Oak Todays count: 9.4/12 Wednesdays count: 11.3 Thursdays count: 9.0 Citrus County Sheriffs OfficeDomestic battery arrest Holleigh Chaney 22, of Homosassa, at 12:47 p.m. Thursday on a misdemeanor charge of domestic battery. No bond.Other arrests Clarence Pearson 60, of South New Hampshire Drive, Homosassa, at 1 p.m. Thursday on a Citrus County warrant for a felony charge of obtaining property by means of worthless check. Bond $1,000. Mark Andrus, 29, of Southeast Fourth Terrace, Webster, at 3:25 p.m. Thursday on a Hernando County warrant for failure to appear in court for two original felony charges of possession of a controlled substance. No bond. Glenn Hackney, 21, of Frances Drive, Daytona Beach, at 7:10 a.m. Friday on a Citrus County warrant for violation of probation on original felony charges of burglary of an unoccupied structure and grand theft. No bond. Christopher Williams 29, of East Robin Lane, Inverness, at 5:56 p.m. Thursday on a felony charge of driving while license suspended or revoked (habitual offender). He was released on his own recognizance. Denise Schippers, 42, of West Mink Lane, Homosassa, at 9:02 p.m. Thursday on a felony charge of retail theft and a misdemeanor charge of resisting a law enforcement officer or merchant during or after theft. According to her arrest affidavit, she is accused of taking grocery and clothing items from Walmart. Bond $2,500. Joshua Betsch, 22, of Castello Court, Clermont, at 8:26 a.m. Friday on a Sumter County warrant for a felony charge of grand theft. Bond $2,000. Robbie Sanders, 27, of County Road 414, Lake Panasoffkee, at 11:40 a.m. Friday on a Citrus County warrant for failure to appear in court for an original felony charge of theft and two felony charges of burglary of an unoccupied structure or conveyance. No bond. Natanael Martinez, 24, of Floral City, at 11:59 p.m. Jan. 16 on a felony charge of child abuse. According to his arrest affidavit, he is accused of using a belt to injure a 5-year-old girl. He denied the causing the injury. Bond $5,000. Chad Beaver 30, of Beverly Hills, at 4:01 p.m. Friday on a misdemeanor charge of violation of a domestic violence/protective injunction. No bond.Burglaries A commercial burglary was reported at 10:08 a.m. Friday, Jan. 25, in the 2300 block of E. Hercala Lane, Hernando. A vehicle burglary was reported at 4:32 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 27, in the 500 block of S. Stone Way, Inverness. A residential burglary was reported at 3:22 p.m. Jan. 27 in the 600 block of N. Indianapolis Ave., Hernando. A residential burglary was reported at 7:36 p.m. Jan. 27 at Esskay St., Beverly Hills.Thefts A grand theft was reported at 10:18 a.m. Friday, Jan. 25, in the 7100 block of W. Riverbend Road, Dunnellon. A grand theft was reported at 10:21 a.m. Jan. 25 in the area of N. Florida Avenue and N. Citrus Springs Boulevard, Dunnellon. A grand theft was reported at 5:03 p.m. Jan. 25 in the 6100 block of W. Minuteman St., Homosassa. A grand theft was reported at 8:33 p.m. Jan. 25 in the 8700 block of S. Lakeshore Drive, Floral City. A grand theft was reported at 9:55 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 26, in the 8800 block of E. Moonrise Lane, Floral City. A petit theft was reported at 10:19 a.m. Jan. 26 in the 600 block of Turner Camp Road, Inverness. A grand theft was reported at 11:30 a.m. Jan. 26 in the 11400 block of S. Rosewater Point, Homosassa. A petit theft was reported at 2:32 p.m. Jan. 26 in the 3900 block of S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. A grand theft was reported at 2:41 p.m. Jan. 26 in the 13300 block of E. Shawnee Trail, Inverness. A grand theft was reported at 3:55 p.m. Jan. 26 in the 2300 block of S. Pelt Terrace, Inverness. A petit theft was reported at 5:29 p.m. Jan. 26 in the 2400 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness. A grand theft was reported at 7:05 p.m. Jan. 26 in the 6800 block of S. Straight Ave., Homosassa. A grand theft was reported at 11:41 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 27, in the 800 block of S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. An auto theft was reported at 1:23 p.m. Jan. 27 in the 4400 block of W. Pinto Loop, Beverly Hills. A petit theft was reported at 3:19 p.m. Jan. 27 in the 4400 block of E. Arlington St., Inverness. A petit theft was reported at 3:42 p.m. Jan. 27 in the 6100 block of S. Sundial Drive, Floral City. A petit theft was reported at 5:38 p.m. Jan. 27 in the 4000 block of S. Alabama Ave., Homosassa. A petit theft was reported at 8:23 p.m. Jan. 27 in the 300 block of N.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River.Vandalism A vandalism was reported at 10:55 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 27, in the 6200 block of E. Wingate St., Inverness. Legal notices in todays Cit rus C ounty Chronicle 000DM1W Meeting Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C12 Notices to Creditors/Administration . . . . C11, C12 Priest gets 15 years in sex abuse case Associated PressFORT LAUDERDALE A retired Roman Catholic priest accused of sexually abusing dozens of boys for decades was sentenced to 15 years in prison Monday. Earlier this month, Father Neil Doherty pleaded no contest in a deal that reduced the sex abuse charges from capital felonies to second-degree felonies. He will also have to register as a sex offender. The plea comes after several more alleged victims came forward and were planning to testify in the case. Doherty, who maintains his innocence, is now 69, appears frail and struggles with health problems. His attorney, David Bogenschutz said he disputed the facts of the states case but declined to elaborate. Attorneys for the victims said Doherty befriended troubled young boys for years, plied them with drugs and alcohol and paid them to run errands and do odd jobs. But the relationships often turned to sexual acts. The victim in this case was about 10 years old when he said he first walked over to the church from his home, passed out after drinking a druglaced soda and awoke with sodomy wounds. The scenario repeatedly occurred over a five-year period in the late 1990s, attorney Jeff Herman said. The victim, who is now in his early 20s, planned to take his secret to the grave, but was emboldened after several other victims came forward in lawsuits against Doherty. The victim was living in an institution when Herman met him, but is now married with a child. Today ends the saddest chapter of my life. A very evil man is where he belongs. Neil Doherty has hurt more children that we will ever know. I hold the Catholic Church solely responsible for what has happened, the victim said in a statement read by his lawyer. The Associated Press does not identify victims of sexual abuse. Herman alleges the Archdiocese of Miami turned a blind eye to Dohertys behavior and moved him to another church each time a new allegation surfaced. At one point, another priest complained to the archbishop that Doherty had a boy living with him in the rectory, but it was swept under the rug, Herman said. A spokeswoman for the Archdiocese of Miami said Doherty has not been in active ministry since 2002 and noted the church has policies to handle abuse allegations. In 2011, a Miami jury returned a $100 million verdict in a civil suit against Doherty in a different sex abuse case, although the amount is unlikely to ever be collected. The Archdiocese of Miami was not named in that lawsuit, but has been targeted by more than 20 other lawsuits over allegations of sexual abuse by Doherty. Many have been settled. ON THE NET Citrus County Sheriffs Office arrest info: www.sheriff citrus.org

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has one of the highest uninsured rates in the nation, according to U.S. census data. But Scott, a vocal critic of the federal legislation, has raised questions about the potential cost of the Medicaid expansion. House Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, echoed the governor and said hes not sure the federal government will keep its promise to pick up most of the share of Medicaid expansion. Everyone wants to see the citizens of our state have insurance ... but theres a question whether we are going to be able to trust that (the federal government) will pay for it long term, Weatherford said. Another key decision related to the Affordable Care Act will be whether the state revamps its own health insurance program to start spending money to cover part-time employees. The state would have to pay a $300 million penalty if it does not cover these workers. Florida already spends $1.9 billion to cover roughly 170,000 state workers, university employees and retirees. Most of the money comes from taxpayers, not premiums paid by employees. Scott, who has turned down a salary while serving as governor, has defended the decision to enroll in the state insurance plan by noting that its the same coverage offered to roughly 24,000 state employees in management positions. Those employees pay $8.34 a month for individual coverage and $30 a month for family coverage. Still the governor has recommended and plans to recommend again this week when he rolls out his 2013 budget proposals that all state employees pay the same. Weatherford agreed that there were inequities depending on who you are and what position you hold. Gaetz said he generally agreed state workers should pay the same for health insurance, but he added that it was more important to make sure that elected officials do not pay less. Public officials particularly need to be mindful of how the comparisons are drawn between the benefits they themselves have and the benefits other people have, Gaetz said.CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, JANUARY29, 2013 A5 527-0012 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY FAUX WOOD BLINDS, TOP TREATMENTS DRAPERY, SHADES, SHUTTERS VERTICALS The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! BLIND S TREETOPS PLAZA 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO 2012 2012 2012 2012 www.72-hourblinds.com WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE 000DTAE 000DUDE Mon-Fri 8:30-6 Sat 8:30-1 PHARMACY www.BrashearsPharmacy.com 471 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto . . . . . . . . . 746-3420 Hwy. 491 Next To Suncoast Dermatology 206 W. Dampier Street, Inverness . . . . 637-2079 One Block Behind City Hall On Seminole Ave., Inverness Brashears OFFERING A GREAT SELECTION OF MEDICAL EQUIPMENT Walkers Wheelchairs Specialty Items & More 000DRGJ an employee excellent job performance or always shows up on time. After his graduation, Menke came to America. He was 18 and arrived with one suitcase and $10 in his pocket. I didnt even know what $10 could buy, he said. I couldnt speak a word of English. When I came to the States as an immigrant, you had to have a written job promise in your hand and present it to the American Embassy you had to prove that you had a job waiting for you. His job was with a business in New Jersey, where he worked for 10 years. My employer had his own slaughterhouse in the back and a huge sausage kitchen, and up front was the store, he said. For most of his career, Menke owned his own butcher shop. He and his family moved to Florida in 1996, where he worked as a butcher at Gannons Meat Market, which his daughter and son-in-law owned. After that he worked for Angus Meats for a few years. Now he has his own business inside the sandwich shop his daughter owns. Menke said the meat processing industry has gone through dramatic changes over the years. For example, at one time upon being slaughtered, an animal hung in a cooler for at least 10 days. As the water in the cells would drain, enzymes in the meat would break down and naturally tenderize it. Today the big slaughterhouses kill as many as 1,600 steers a day theyre cooled overnight and out the door the next day, he said. Today, everything is block ready; meat comes into the supermarket meat department in boxes ready to be cut up with electric band saws. Menke said he still uses his knives the tools of his trade but he no longer uses a cleaver or hand saw or shaving knife to shave fine hairs from a hogs armpits. Now his obsolete tools hang in the back room as decorations. In a past generation, a butcher took a whole animal and would remove its hide, take out its intestines, split the carcass, wash it. He would take special orders from customers and cut chops and steaks and roasts to their specifications, make his own sausages and meat products. He knew his animals. In the old days, youd stand at an old wooden cutting block and cut your pork chops individually, he said. Now everything is mass produced.Chronicle reporter Nancy Kennedy can be reached at nkennedy@ chronicleonline.com or 352-564-2927. What the new health care market means for Florida Associated PressMIAMI Floridas Republican lawmakers are reluctantly acknowledging that the Affordable Care Act is the law of the land and are taking steps to determine exactly what that will look like. The Sunshine State has one of the highest numbers of uninsured residents in the country, some of the most stringent eligibility requirements for health care safety nets, a large number of legal immigrants and a proposal to privatize its Medicaid program statewide. So how will the federal health overhaul impact that? There are still a lot of unanswered questions, perhaps the biggest being whether Gov. Rick Scott will expand Floridas Medicaid rolls. The Republican governor was a vocal opponent of socalled Obamacare but softened his stance after the November election. He remains wary of the increased cost a Medicaid expansion could bring to Florida taxpayers and has been accused of playing politics with numbers after he referenced figures showing costs could be as high as $26 billion over a decade. The state health agency later revised that figure to $3 billion. Here are some questions and answers about how the Affordable Care Act could play out in Florida. Q: How many Floridians are uninsured and how many of those are projected to get insurance under the exchange? A: Nearly 1 million people are estimated to take advantage of the state exchange, including residents who are employed and the unemployed. Many would be eligible for federal subsidies to help pay for it. Q: How many Floridians are currently served by Medicaid and how many more will be served if lawmakers choose Medicaid expansion? A: Floridas Medicaid program currently costs more than $21 billion a year, with the federal government picking up roughly half the tab. It covers nearly 3 million people about half are children and consumes about 30 percent of the state budget. About 900,000 more residents could be covered if Florida decides to expand its Medicaid rolls. Q: Is it true that U.S.born residents below the poverty line will not be able to get coverage in the exchanges but legal immigrants below the poverty line will be able to get coverage through the exchanges? A: Yes. The Affordable Care Act assumes that states would expand Medicaid coverage, so the only provision for a subsidy below 100 percent of the federal poverty level is for aliens who are in the country legally but are ineligible for Medicaid because of their alien status. Q: How many small businesses are likely to take advantage of the health insurance offered on the state exchange? A: Many small business owners are still in wait and see mode. Florida led the country in challenging the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act, but the Supreme Court upheld it. Thats left Florida scrambling at the 11th hour to make decisions about how the state wants to implement the law and many unanswered questions. Jon Urbanek, a senior vice president with Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, said about 50 percent of the small businesses his company talked with initially indicated they would opt out and pay a penalty for not providing coverage. But as Blue Cross Blue Shield of Florida is working with employers, that number has fallen below 20 percent, he said. He also anticipated between 15 to 18 percent of small businesses will stop offering health coverage and allow their employees to seek their own individual coverage under an exchange. Q: How is the exchange going to be set up in Florida and which agency will be responsible for overseeing it? A: Florida has three options. It can run the exchange itself, partner with federal health officials or allow federal officials to run the program entirely. At this point, Florida has defaulted into allowing the feds to run the program because leaders missed key deadlines, but the door is still open for lawmakers to consider a partnership or run the program themselves in the future. The Department of Children and Families currently determines Medicaid eligibility and the Agency for Health Care Administration oversees the program. Q: How much money has Florida received so far from the federal government to do the initial work in setting up an exchange? A: Florida was awarded $1 million in a planning grant in 2010, but never drew down the funds so they expired in 2011, according to federal health officials. Q: How will the changes under the Affordable Care Act affect Floridas plans to privatize Medicaid statewide? A: In an effort to cut costs, Florida lawmakers passed sweeping legislation in 2011 to privatize Medicaid. Rather than having government insurance, patients would be assigned to for-profit insurance companies, which would receive a per-person fee from the state and decide what services and prescriptions to cover. with her giving her suggestions to help which involved tasty treats in walked Joanne Peters and Lorraine Clark from Courtroom Dogs for Kids, and they offered to drive to the womans house to assist. Peters and Clark are the founders of a nonprofit organization that provides registered and trained therapy dogs to serve as calming companions for youngsters who will testify in court cases. Clark suggested they take a dog to catch a dog. We offered up Oreo, our newly appointed shelter ambassador dog, to accompany them, Amon said. Within an hour they had returned to the shelter to tell of their success story. They said Oreo was a superstar and made it so easy to tempt Karah to return. The happy ending effort went beyond Oreos original job description, which is to visit public facilities and public events to raise awareness about the shelter. Such an event is coming up during the hours of 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at the Citrus County Auditorium at 3610 S. Florida Ave., Inverness, when the shelter will sponsor its second Best Friend Fest, a pet adoption extravaganza. Happy ending stories abound at the shelter. Many adopters have taken the opportunity of telling the tale of finding their perfect pet on a page on the shelters website, www.citruscritters.com/ adoption_stories/adoption_stories.htm. of America was dissolved in May 2012. The agency ended up with the following four proposals: Sumswift Shotgun Sports Inc. was proposing to renovate the existing onsite facilities, construct a shooting (i.e., shotgun) sports complex and provide youth training and community recreational events. Giovanni Van den Abbeele wanted a multiyear renovation project, initially establishing a camping operation. Once renovations were complete, the proposal was to have the facility open to local youth and citizen organizations. The Path of Citrus County Inc. wanted to renovate the facilities and use them as shelter for homeless or displaced individuals and families. The proposal was to expand The Paths current farming and wood shop operations. As proposed, access by the public would have been limited. River Builders Inc. sought a multi-year renovation project initially establishing a camping/RV operation. Once renovations were complete, the proposal was for the facility to be open to cultural events along with local youth and citizen organizations. District officials said oral presentationsJan. 18 by eachof the four respondentswere heard by the selectioncommittee. However, the presentations could not be effectively utilized to provide the district the best possible lease under the current process. Therefore, the subcommittee determinedit was in thebest interest of the district to reject all bids and pursue aninvitation to negotiate (ITN). TheITN process, district officials believe, will provide flexibility for the agency to negotiate withone or morerespondents to obtain the best value to the district based upon criteria contained in the ITN. Special to the ChronicleJoanne Peters, CEO and founder of Courtroom Dogs for Kids, and Oreo, foreground, a Catahoula leopard mix dog, were successful last week in returning Karah to her new home after the German shepherd scaled a 6-foot fence. HEALTHContinued from Page A1 MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleKlaus Menke learned his trade as a youngster growing up in Germany. BUTCHERContinued from Page A1 DOGContinued from Page A1 LANDContinued from Page A1

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Efstarious Bill Savas, 89HERNANDOBill Savas, 89, of Hernando, Fla., passed from this earth to our Lords embrace Jan. 26, 2013, one year to the day after the death of his best friend and lovely wife, Helen. The service of remembrance will be noon Thursday, Jan. 31, 2013, at the Fero Memorial Gardens Mausoleum Chapel, 5955 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills, FL 34465. The family will receive friends at the funeral home Thursday at 11 a.m. Bill was born in Springfield Gardens, Queens, N.Y., Sept. 18, 1923, and served in the Navy for four years during World War II. After leaving the Navy as a decorated hero, he joined the NYC Police Department, where he enjoyed a colorful career, rising from patrolman to detective, ultimately retiring from the department as a decorated officer. Upon his retirement, Bill and Helen moved to Florida to enjoy this beautiful state. He loved to fish, travel, and recount his days in the police force. He is survived by his daughter, Electra Paskett and son-in-law, Howard Paskett as well as grandsons, James, William, and Jonathan Paskett of Dublin, Ohio; his son, Peter Savas of Salt Lake City, Utah; and his brother Jerry Savas and his wife, Marion of Spring Hill, Fla. Eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither have entered into the heart of (them), the things which God hath prepared for them that love him. (1 Corinthians 2:9) Bill loved our God, as we all do, so there should be no tears, only loving memories of him. Bill looked forward to the day when he would be together again, with his sweetheart, who has been waiting for him. The family request that in lieu of flowers, donations in Bills memory be made to the American Society of Preventive Oncology-Presidents Fund at www.aspo.org or 330 WARF Bldg., 610 Walnut St., Madison WI 53726. www.ferofuneral home.com.Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Elisabeth Juhasz, 88BEVERLY HILLSElisabeth Klara Juhasz, 88, of Beverly Hills, died Jan. 28, 2013. Private cremation will take place under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto. Ray Quintana Jr., 57Ray Quintana Jr., 57, died Jan. 25, 2013, at Citrus Memorial Hospital. Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory is in charge of private arrangements. Mary Peggy Hoopengarner, 92HOMOSASSAMary L. Peggy Hoopengarner, 92, of Homosassa, died Jan. 24, 2013. Graveside service eill be at 10 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 31, 2013, from Stage Stand Cemetery, Homosassa Springs. Wilder Funeral Home, Homosassa. Bradley Scoop Driggers Sr., 51BEVERLY HILLSBradley Scoop William Driggers Sr., passed away at Citrus Memorial Hospital, Inverness, Fla., Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013, after a long battle with a real rare nerve degeneration (CBGD). He was born in Beirut, Lebanon, Dec. 17, 1961, came to the states when he was six months old and was in heart failure. He was not supposed to live more than two years at the most, but had Tetrology of Fellot surgery in 1970, when he was eight years old. His last job was a customer support technician with Verizon Wireless in Houston, Texas, which he gave up in July 2008, due to illness. He previously, lived in Maderia Beach where he worked for MCI before moving to Spring, Texas in 2006. He moved to Dunnellon and Beverly Hills in 2010. Some of his achievements were organizing the MADD Chapter in Gainesville, which was chartered in 1987, in memory of his sister, Kim Elizabeth Driggers Corbin who was killed by a drunk driver in Virginia in 1982. He was sports editor in Williston for the Williston Pioneer in the s where he went by the name of Brad (Scoop) Driggers. He got many awards while working for MCI and Verizon Wireless. He also, organized the Rainbow Singles Club in 1995. He was preceded in death by his father, Jack Owen Driggers Sr.; and sister, Kim Elizabeth Driggers Corbin. He is survived by his son, Bradley William Driggers Jr., who lives in Brunei with his mom. Also, his mother, Rheta Irby Driggers of Citrus Springs; brother, Jack Owen Driggers Jr., of Gainesville; nieces, Sherry Lyn Driggers Downes and husband, Tony of Rainbow Lake Estates and Leslie Anne Corbin Clary and husband, Alex of Athens, Tenn.; great-nieces and great-nephews, Connie and Shawn Downes, Kimberly and Hunter Clary. Bucket List: He wanted to go down on the field and meet the Rays players and coaches, Buckaneer players and coaches and Dolphin players and coaches. He also, had on his bucket list to meet the University of Florida players and coaches, which was fulfilled Nov. 17, 2012. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to Hospice of Citrus County, P .O. Box 641270 Beverly Hills, FL 34464. Arrangements entrusted to F ero Funeral Home,www.ferofuneral home.com. Denise Hunter, 59BEVERLY HILLSDenise R. Hunter, 59, of Beverly Hills, Fla., passed away Saturday, Jan. 26, 2013, at Hospice of Citrus County, Lecanto. She was born Dec. 13, 1953, in Muskegon, Mich., to Robert M. and June (Garvey) LaFond. She was a waitress in the restaurant business. Survivors include three sons, Danny Scrima of Orlando, Jeremy Hunter of Crystal River and Anthony Scrima of Castleberry; one brother, Rob LaFond; and five grandchildren. The family will be receiving friends in visitation at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013, at Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home, Inverness, with a graveside service to follow at 3 p.m. in Hills of Rest Cemetery, Floral City, Pastor Leary Willis officiating. Janet Masaoy, 76BEVERLY HILLSJanet F. Masaoy, 76, of Beverly Hills, Fla., passed away Jan. 25, 2013, at Seven Rivers Hospital. A native of Boston, Mass., she came to the area in 1992 from Carlisle, Mass. She was a wonderful mother, friend, homemaker and tutor. Mrs. Masaoy was a founding member of Nature Coast Unitarian Universalists, and was the founding member and president of C.O.S.T. (Citizens Opposed to the SunCoast Tollway). Janet was preceded in death by her husband, Jose. Survivors include two sons, Keith Given and Todd Given; daughter, Heidi Given and her child, A beloved granddaughter, Jacqueline Given; sister, Kaye Harvie; several grandchildren; two greatgrandchildren; and two nieces, Kim Crawford Harvie and Lisa Drew McIlwain. A service of remembrance will be at 2 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 31, 2013, at Nature Coast Unitarian Universalists, 7633 N. Florida Ave. Citrus Springs, FL 34434. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to Hospice of Citrus Co. PO Box 641270 Beverly Hills, FL 34464 in memory of Janet. Fero Funeral Home provided information. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Walter Koch Jr., 68LEESBURGWalter Koch Jr., 68, of Leesburg, died Jan. 24, 2013. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto with services taking place at a later date in Cliffside Park, N.J. Irene Doefler, 96SPRING HILLIrene Doerfler, 96, of Spring Hill, died Jan. 25, 2013. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto, with services taking place at a later date in Livonia, Mich. Margaret Rogers, 83INVERNESSMargaret Teresa Rogers, 83, Inverness, passed away Jan. 28, 2013, under the loving care of her family and Hospice of Citrus County. Mrs. Rogers was born in Rochester, N.Y., June 18, 1929, to the late John and Catherine (OConnor) Blake and moved to Florida from Delaware. She raised her family in Brentwood Long Island, N.Y., where she lived for over 25 years. She was a retired registered nurse and worked in nearly every different area of nursing. She was a member of Our Lady of Fatima Parish. Margarets passion was her family, her community, and her faith. Left to mourn her loss are seven children, Regina Epple of Inverness; Teresa McCarthy of Medford, N.Y.; Christopher McCarthy of Lake Ronkonkoma, N.Y.; Martin McCarthy of Wilmington, Del.; Jane McFarland of East Islip, N.Y.; Brian Rogers of West Hampton Beach, N.Y.; Colleen Witherell of Glen Mills, Pa.; one brother, Dennis Blake; three sisters, Eileen Patrizio, Julia Mikos, and Nora Jane Steenson; 12 grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by two children, Matthew and Margaret McCarthy; two loving husbands, Charles J. McCarthy and James J. Rogers; two brothers and two sisters, Patrick, Thomas, Anna Mae Kelleher and Kathleen Benison. The Mass of Christian Burial will be offered at Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church at 10 a.m. Thursday, Jan 31, 2013, Fr. James Johnson, celebrant.Interment will be in St. Charles Cemetery, Long Island, N.Y. Reposing hours Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m., at Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Wake Vigil Service at 7 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorials are being accepted by the March of Dimes or Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Madelyn Brown, 86MOUNT DORAMadelyn Brown, 86, of Mount Dora, died Jan. 24, 2013. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto, with services taking place at a later date in Peoria, Ill. Alice Seaman, 89INVERNESSAlice Julia Seaman 89, Inverness, died Jan. 26, 2013, at Always There Assisted Living Facility. Alice was born Dec. 20, 1923, in Attleboro, Mass., to the late Valentine and Sophie Machowski. She was employed as a title clerk for an automobile club. Alice relocated to this area in 1985 from Pinellas County. She enjoyed feeding and watching the birds in her yard and gardening with her husband. Left to cherish her memory is her son, Jeffrey G. Seaman, Inverness; daughters, Cheryl L. Seaman (Bill Bissell) Inverness, and Cynthia M. Bethell, Westminster, Colo.; six grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband of 63 years, Frank, Jan. 16, 2010. A celebration of Alices life will be 1 p.m. Monday, Feb. 4, 2013, at the Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory. Inurnment will be private at the Florida National Cemetery. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Robert Geraghty, 78FLORAL CITYRobert B. Geraghty, 78, of Floral City, Fla., died Jan. 27, 2013, under the loving care of his family at his home. Robert was born Dec. 16, 1934, in Jersey City, N.J., son of Robert and Jane Geraghty. He served in the U.S. Air Force. Robert received his masters degree in engineering andretired from Lockheed Martin. He moved to Floral City in 2011 from Steinhatchee. Robert was a lifetime member of the NRA and an avid sportsman. He was a gourmand and enjoyed life to the fullest. Mr. Geraghty was preceded in death by his parents, his brother Peter, and grandson Matthew R. Beni. Survivors include his daughter, Jane Tiger of Hayesville, N.C.; son, Robert L. Geraghty of Steinhatchee; sisters, Bette Jane Geraghty of Hollywood, Fla., Patricia G. Erickson of Fort Lauderdale, Linda G. Crane of Leesburg, Michelle G. Hunt of Floral City, and Susan J. Geraghty of Orlando; grandchildren, John R. Beni II,and Peter C. Tiger, both of North Carolina, Maggie Renee Geraghty and Robert Ian Geraghty, both of Lady Lake; and greatgrandchildren, Bradley, Madison and Alana. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to Hospice of Citrus County, Lecanto, Florida. Heinz Funeral Home & Cremation, Inverness. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Robert Caswell, 74THE VILLAGESRobert Wallace Caswell, 74, of The Villages, died Jan. 26, 2013. Private cremation will take place under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto. Clara White, 93INVERNESSClara Brunner White 93, Inverness, died peacefully at home Jan. 25, 2013. Clara was born in Enola, Pa., Oct. 16, 1919, one of 13 children. She moved to this area in 1989 from south Florida where she retired from the food service business. She leaves to cherish her memory two daughters, Linda Sutton and her husband, Don, of Beverly Hills, and Beverly Dearden of Inverness; four grandchildren, Miles, Karen, Kevin and Kelly; four great-grandchildren, Savannah, Milo, Lindsey, and Abby. She was preceded in death by her husband, Bruce White, June 27, 2005. The Chas E Davis Funeral Home with Crematory is assisting the family with private arrangements. Nancy Drouin, 55INVERNESSNancy E. Drouin, 55, of Inverness, died Sunday, Jan. 27 2013, at her residence in Inverness. Private arrangements by Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory, Inverness.A6TUESDAY, JANUARY29, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE Closing time for placing ad is 4 business days prior to run date. There are advanced deadlines for holidays. To Place Your In Memory ad, Saralynne Miller at 564-2917 scmiller@chronicleonline.com 000DSMQ 000DN0W A Hearing Loss Is A Lot More Noticeable Than A Hearing Aid SEE US BEFORE YOU BUY! Advanced Family Hearing Aid Center A Unique Approach To Hearing Services Jerillyn Clark Board Certified Licensed Hearing Aid Specialist 2027 N. DONOVAN AVE., CRYSTAL RIVER 795-1775 FREE 2nd Opinion SERVING CITRUS COUNTY FOR 28 YEARS 000DOS2 Funeral Home With Crematory Chas. E. Davis Chas. E. Davis 726-8323 MICHAEL PRESTON Private Arrangements DENISE HUNTER Graveside: Wed, 3:00 PM Hills of Rest -Floral City NANCY DROUIN Private Arrangements ALICE SEAMAN Service: Mon, Feb 4, 1:00 PM RAY QUINTANA Private Arrangements FERO FERO Memorial Gardens & Memorial Gardens & Funeral Home Funeral Home 000DM73 352 746-4646 352 746-4646 www.dignitymemorial.com S ERVING F AMILIES FOR S ERVING F AMILIES FOR 37 YEARS WITH 37 YEARS WITH D IGNITY & R ESPECT D IGNITY & R ESPECT Beverly Hills Beverly Hills CRYSTAL RIVER INVERNESS 352-795-5700 GARDNERAUDIOLOGY.COM 000DS9Y what? HEAR WHAT YOUVE BEEN MISSING. 1901 SE H WY 19 C RYSTAL R IVER 352-795-2678 Your Trusted Family-Owned Funeral Home for 50 Years trickland S Funeral Home and Crematory www.stricklandfuneralhome.com 000DU38 Funeral Directors C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace 000DH1U Serving Our Community... Meeting Your Needs! Richard T. Brown Licensed Funeral Director Fax: 352-795-6694 5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lecanto, FL 34461 352-795-0111 brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com Homosassa 621-7700 Crystal River 795-8600 Inverness 860-1037 000D0QW Toll Free 1-877-345-BUSH www.bushhomeservices.com PEST CONTROL T ERMITE S PECIALISTS S INCE 1967 F REE I NSPECTIONS Obituaries Bill Savas Janet Masaoy OBITUARIES The Citrus County Chronicles policy permits both free and paid obituaries. SO YOU KNOW The Citrus County Chronicles policy permits free and paid obituaries. Email obits@chronicle online. com. Alice Seaman Deaths ELSEWHERE Leroy Sugarfoot Bonner, 69OHIO PLAYERS FRONTMAN DAYTON, Ohio Leroy Sugarfoot Bonner, frontman for the hit-making funk music band the Ohio Players, has died in southwest Ohio. He was 69. A spokeswoman for a Dayton-area funeral home confirmed he died Saturday and said the family has not scheduled any public services yet. There is also a posting about his death on his current bands Facebook page. The Ohio Players topped music charts in the 1970s with hits such as Love Rollercoaster, Fire, Skin Tight and Funky Worm. They were known for their brassy dance music, catchy lyrics and flamboyant outfits. Born in Hamilton, Ohio, Bonner helped form the Ohio Players in the 1960s. He had remained active in recent years with a spinoff called Sugarfoots Ohio Players. SO YOU KNOW Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next days edition.

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Moodys nicks Canada banksTORONTO Moodys Investors Service downgraded six of Canadas major financial institutions on Monday on concerns over high levels of consumer debt among Canadians and elevated house prices. The ratings affect TorontoDominion Bank, Scotiabank, Bank of Montreal, Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, National Bank and the Desjardins caisse populaire. Moodys vice president David Beattie noted Monday that the banks still rank among the highest-rated banks in the world. Canadas commodity-rich economy has fared better than other nations, and its banks have long been rated among the soundest in the world. There was no mortgage meltdown or subprime lending crisis. But there are fears of a housing bubble fueled by historic low interest rates.Barnes & Noble plans more closingsNEW YORK Barnes & Noble plans to continue to shrink its store base. The head of Barnes & Nobles retail group, Mitchel Klipper, said in an interview published Monday in The Wall Street Journal that the company will have 450 to 500 stores in a decade. Thats down from about 689 currently. Klipper said the chain plans to close about 20 stores a year over the period. The largest traditional U.S. bookstore has been facing tough competition from online retailers and discounters that sell books and has been focusing on its Nook tablet, ebook reader and e-book business for growth. A spokeswoman for Barnes & Noble said Klippers remarks dont mark any change in its store closing plan. We have historically closed approximately 15 stores per year for the past 10 years, said spokeswoman Mary Ellen Keating. Some closings are due to the fact that stores are unprofitable and others are stores moving to better locations.Hess to sell terminal networkNEW YORK Hess Corp. said Monday that it plans to sell its U.S. terminal network and shutter its New Jersey refinery, completing its exit from the refining business and continuing its shift in focus toward exploration and production. The New York-based company also disclosed that Elliott Associates LP and one of its affiliates plan to ask federal regulators for permission to buy a major stake in the company and may seek board seats at the annual meeting in May. The investment firm did not conduct talks with Hess before notifying the company of its plans. It could ask to buy shares worth more than $800 million, Hess said. The news sent Hess shares up more than 6 percent Monday, making it one of the markets biggest gainers.Hostess: Little Debbie for DrakesNEW YORK Hostess has picked the maker of Little Debbie as the lead bidder for its Drakes cakes. According to a filing in U.S. bankruptcy court, McKee Foods has offered $27.5 million in cash for the cake brands, which include Devil Dogs, Funny Bones and Yodels. The fate of Twinkies and other Hostess cakes are still being negotiated with other bidders. Hostess also said United States Bakery Inc. agreed to pay $28.9 million for its remained bread brands, which include Sweetheart, Eddys, Standish Farms and Grandma Emilies. That offer includes four bakeries, 14 depots and equipment. Earlier this month, Hostess picked Flowers Foods, which makes Tastykake and Natures Own and Bunny bread, as the lead bidder for six of its major bread brands, including Wonder.J.C. Penney brings back salesNEW YORK J.C. Penney is bringing back sales. The struggling department store chain this week will begin adding back some of the hundreds of sales it ditched last year in hopes of luring shoppers who were turned off when the discounts disappeared, CEO Ron Johnson told The Associated Press. Penney also plans to add price tags or signs for more than half of its merchandise to show customers how much theyre saving by shopping at the chain a strategy used by a few other retailers. For store-branded items such as Arizona, Penney will show comparison prices from competitors. The reversal comes on the eve of the one-year anniversary of its original vow to almost completely get rid of the sales that Americans covet but that cut into a stores profits.BUSINESSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, JANUARY29, 2013 A7 Money&MarketsAclick of the wrist gets you moare at www.chronicleonline.com 1,320 1,360 1,400 1,440 1,480 1,520 J ASOND 1,440 1,480 1,520 S&P 500Close: 1,500.18 Change: -2.78 (-0.2%) 10 DAYS 12,400 12,800 13,200 13,600 14,000 J ASOND 13,400 13,680 13,960 Dow Jones industrialsClose: 13,881.93 Change: -14.05 (-0.1%) 10 DAYSAdvanced1308 Declined1725 New Highs338 New Lows19 Vol. (in mil.)3,278 Pvs. Volume3,381 1,890 1,871 1392 1069 215 11 NYSE NASD DOW 13915.7213862.5713881.93-14.05-0.10%+5.94% DOW Trans.5884.555837.825875.56+5.51+0.09%+10.72% DOW Util.470.26467.01469.25-0.80-0.17%+3.57% NYSE Comp.8911.668858.178880.01-24.51-0.28%+5.17% NASDAQ3161.833144.903154.30+4.59+0.15%+4.46% S&P5001503.231496.331500.18-2.78-0.19%+5.19% S&P4001097.421090.541094.99-1.71-0.16%+7.31% Wilshire 500015886.1115809.6115858.06-20.66-0.13%+5.75% Russell 2000907.91900.88906.71+1.47+0.16%+6.75% HIGH LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. YTD StocksRecap AK Steel Hold AKS3.42210.00 4.11-.33 -7.4ttt-10.7-54.8dd... AT&T Inc T29.02638.58 34.13+.11 +0.3sss+1.2+18.5281.80f Ametek Inc AME29.86041.55 40.99-.08 -0.2tss+9.1+32.3220.24 Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD60.52091.78 91.81+.10 +0.1sss+5.0+49.61.57e Bank of America BAC6.72912.20 11.48-.14 -1.2ttt-1.1+58.6440.04 Capital City Bank CCBG6.35012.23 11.91+.14 +1.2sss+4.7+20.7dd... CenturyLink Inc CTL36.50643.43 40.26+.13 +0.3sss+2.9+14.7362.90 Citigroup C24.61043.34 42.34-.57 -1.3tss+7.0+43.4130.04 Commnwlth REIT CWH13.46521.43 16.85+.01 +0.1sss+6.4-6.9301.00 Disney DIS38.38054.87 54.36-.02 ...rss+9.2+39.4170.75f Duke Energy DUK59.63771.13 67.63-.29 -0.4tss+6.0+10.7193.06 EPR Properties EPR40.04948.92 47.40+.03 +0.1sss+2.8+14.5213.00 Exxon Mobil Corp XOM77.13993.67 91.11-.62 -0.7tss+5.3+7.7122.28 Ford Motor F8.82014.30 13.78+.20 +1.5sss+6.4+7.3110.40f Gen Electric GE18.02923.18 22.50+.21 +0.9sss+7.2+20.2160.76f Home Depot HD44.22068.13 67.58-.24 -0.4tss+9.3+52.4241.16 Intel Corp INTC19.23229.27 21.05+.09 +0.4sss+2.1-18.8100.90 IBM IBM181.858211.79 204.93-.04 ...rss+7.0+8.6143.40 LKQ Corporation LKQ14.63023.51 23.40+.02 +0.1sss+10.9+43.528... Lowes Cos LOW24.76039.26 38.35-.23 -0.6tss+8.0+45.7230.64 McDonalds Corp MCD83.317101.29 94.36+.64 +0.7sss+7.0-2.7183.08f Microsoft Corp MSFT26.26332.95 27.91+.03 +0.1sss+4.5-2.9150.92 Motorola Solutions MSI44.49059.48 59.01+.41 +0.7sss+6.0+32.5201.04 NextEra Energy NEE59.10072.52 72.40-.10 -0.1tss+4.6+24.7142.40 Penney JC Co Inc JCP15.69243.18 19.22-.13 -0.7ttt-2.5-43.0dd... Piedmont Office RT PDM16.10019.56 19.48-.02 -0.1tss+7.9+11.2170.80 Regions Fncl RF5.1207.85 7.71+.02 +0.3sss+8.1+45.3110.04 Sears Holdings Corp SHLD38.40385.90 47.92+2.80 +6.2sss+15.9+8.2dd... Smucker, JM SJM70.50090.31 88.80-.46 -0.5tss+3.0+12.4212.08 Sprint Nextel Corp S2.1096.04 5.56-.08 -1.4ttt-1.9+156.4dd... Texas Instru TXN26.06934.24 33.04+.24 +0.7sss+7.0+2.2210.84 Time Warner TWX33.62051.29 50.09-.31 -0.6tss+4.7+34.6181.04 UniFirst Corp UNF55.86988.35 81.90+1.10 +1.4sss+11.7+33.8160.15 Verizon Comm VZ36.80548.77 42.77+.10 +0.2stt-1.2+18.6cc2.06 Vodafone Group VOD24.95530.07 27.05-.02 -0.1tss+7.4+3.51.53e WalMart Strs WMT57.18677.60 69.35+.35 +0.5sss+1.6+14.8141.59 Walgreen Co WAG28.53039.81 40.10+.43 +1.1sss+8.3+17.2181.10 52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIVStocks of Local Interest Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b Annual rate plus stock. c Liquidating dividend. e Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yie ld not shown. r Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown. cc P/E exceeds 99. dd Loss in last 12 months. A Nomura analyst downgraded shares of the pet food retailer citing increased competition from Internet retailer Amazon.com. A Citi analyst downgraded the real estate investment trust and lowered its price target, citing the end of a major tenants lease. A Citi analyst upgraded the electronic makers stock to a Buy, saying that the weakening Japanese yen will help the company. A Goldman Sachs analyst downgraded the steel companys stock to Sell, saying the stock may fall after its recent rise. The energy company plans to sell its U.S. terminal network and close its New Jersey refinery, exiting from the refining business. The Standard & Poors 500 index fell modestly Monday following a pair of mixed economic reports, putting an end to its longest winning streak since 2004. Drops for stocks of raw materials producers offset gains for technology stocks. 40 50 60 $70 J ND Hess HES Close: $62.48 3.58 or 6.1% $39.67 $67.86 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 14.4m (3.8x avg.) $21.34 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 14.0 0.6% 3 4 5 $6 J ND AK SteelAKS Close: $4.11 -0.33 or -7.4% $3.42$10.00 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 14.0m (1.5x avg.) $545.11 m 52-week range PE: Yield: ... 4.9% 5 10 15 $20 J ND SonySNE Close: $15.12 0.71 or 4.9% $9.57$22.35 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 8.2m (2.4x avg.) $15.17 b 52-week range PE: Yield: ... 2.0% 15 16 17 $18 J ND Brookfield OfficeBPO Close: $16.61 -0.41 or -2.4% $15.25 $18.60 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 3.4m (1.6x avg.) $8.39 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 29.7 3.4% 60 65 70 $75 J ND PetSmartPETM Close: $63.64 -6.35 or -9.1% $52.82 $72.75 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 7.6m (7.6x avg.) $6.84 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 19.8 1.0% The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 1.96 percent Monday. Yields affect interest rates on consumer loans.NET 1YR TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO 3.25 3.25 3.25 .13 .13 .13 PRIME RATE FED FUNDS 3-month T-bill.060.07-0.01.06 6-month T-bill.110.10+0.01.07 52-wk T-bill.140.13+0.01.10 2-year T-note.280.28....21 5-year T-note.860.85+0.01.75 10-year T-note1.961.95+0.011.89 30-year T-bond3.143.13+0.013.06 NET 1YR BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO Barclays LongT-BdIdx2.752.72+0.032.55 Bond Buyer Muni Idx3.983.97+0.014.61 Barclays USAggregate1.881.82+0.062.13 Barclays US High Yield5.625.61+0.017.52 Moodys AAACorp Idx3.853.76+0.093.88 Barclays CompT-BdIdx1.141.09+0.05.97 Barclays US Corp2.802.74+0.063.49 YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO Commodities Crude oil rose on expectations for stronger demand following an encouraging report on manufacturing. Demand for longlasting goods rose more than economists expected in December.Crude Oil (bbl)96.4495.88+0.58+5.0 Ethanol (gal)2.402.38-0.04+9.7 Heating Oil (gal)3.063.06+0.16+0.5 Natural Gas (mm btu)3.293.44-4.50-1.9 Unleaded Gas (gal)2.932.88+2.07+4.4 FUELS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Gold (oz)1652.401656.40-0.24-1.3 Silver (oz)30.7631.18-1.36+1.9 Platinum (oz)1661.201693.90-1.93+8.0 Copper (lb)3.653.64+0.26+0.2 Palladium (oz)739.80740.25-0.06+5.3 METALS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Cattle (lb)1.291.26+2.10-0.7 Coffee (lb)1.491.48+0.47+3.6 Corn (bu)7.297.21+1.18+4.4 Cotton (lb)0.810.81+0.66+7.9 Lumber (1,000 bd ft)352.70358.80-1.70-5.7 Orange Juice (lb)1.141.13+0.57-1.7 Soybeans (bu)14.4814.41+0.47+2.0 Wheat (bu)7.797.77+0.35+0.2 AGRICULTURE CLOSE PVS. %CHG%YTD American Funds BalAm 21.19-.08 +3.9+14.3+11.9+5.4 BondAm 12.87-.01 -0.5+4.3+5.8+3.7 CapIncBuAm 54.07-.07 +2.5+13.5+9.5+2.9 CpWldGrIAm 38.74-.10 +4.1+17.9+9.1+1.8 EurPacGrAm 42.51-.20 +3.1+14.7+6.9+1.0 FnInvAm 42.84-.19 +5.1+16.5+12.3+3.7 GrthAmAm 36.04-.17 +4.9+17.8+11.8+3.6 IncAmerAm 18.67-.03 +3.4+13.4+11.7+5.0 InvCoAmAm 31.64-.06 +4.9+16.0+10.8+3.2 NewPerspAm 32.67-.22 +4.5+18.1+11.1+3.8 WAMutInvAm 32.62-.11 +4.5+14.6+13.4+3.9 Dodge & Cox Income 13.86-.01 0.0+6.0+6.2+6.8 IntlStk 36.19-.18 +4.5+17.6+7.7+1.1 Stock 129.90-.21 +6.6+22.4+12.7+2.7 Fidelity Contra 80.67-.23 +4.0+15.1+13.6+5.1 GrowCo 97.51-.24 +4.6+13.8+16.1+7.0 LowPriStk d 41.68-.05 +5.5+17.3+15.0+7.5 FrankTemp-Franklin Income Am 2.31... +3.6+15.0+11.1+5.8 FrankTemp-Templeton GlBond Am 13.39-.04 +0.4+10.1+8.5+9.4 GlBondAdv 13.34-.05 +0.3+10.3+8.7+9.7 Harbor IntlInstl d 63.76-.49 +2.6+13.6+9.4+1.8 PIMCO TotRetAm 11.20-.01 -0.2+7.4+6.7+7.2 T Rowe Price EqtyInc 27.89-.06 +5.4+18.1+12.9+3.9 GrowStk 39.41-.16 +4.3+16.1+14.7+5.9 Vanguard 500Adml 138.32-.25 +5.3+16.5+13.8+4.4 500Inv 138.31-.25 +5.3+16.4+13.6+4.3 GNMAAdml 10.83-.01 -0.6+1.5+5.2+5.5 MuIntAdml 14.42-.02 +0.5+4.5+5.9+5.2 STGradeAd 10.82... 0.0+3.7+3.6+3.8 TotBdAdml 11.00-.01 -0.6+3.0+5.4+5.4 TotIntl 15.38-.09 +2.7+12.3+6.3-0.5 TotStIAdm 37.66-.06 +5.6+16.6+14.3+5.1 TotStIdx 37.65-.06 +5.6+16.5+14.2+5.0 Welltn 35.10-.09 +3.7+13.0+10.9+5.9 WelltnAdm 60.62-.16 +3.7+13.1+10.9+6.0 TOTALRETURN FAMILYFUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*MutualFunds* Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week. Interestrates 000DVFJ Crystal River 305 S.E. US 19 352-795-7223 Associated PressU.S. stocks meandered between small gains and losses Monday, cooling off after a rally that had pushed the Standard & Poors 500 index above 1,500 for the first time since December 2007. Encouraging news about manufacturing provided an early boost, but stocks fell later after a report on the pace of home sales fell short of expectations. The government said before trading began that orders for long-lasting goods rose in December by 4.6 percent, helped by a 10 percent gain in orders for new aircraft. The report was a sign of strength for the manufacturing sector, a crucial driver of economic growth. Heavy equipment maker Caterpillar said separately that its fourth-quarter net income exceeded analysts expectations, after adjusting for the cost of a soured deal to buy a Chinese maker of roofing supports for mines. Caterpillar said it took a big charge in the quarter because the Chinese company had misrepresented its finances. Caterpillar Inc. said it expects growth in China to improve without regaining the levels seen in 2010 or 2011. The stock was the biggest gainer in the Dow Jones industrial average, closing up $1.87, or 2 percent, at $97.45. The Dow Jones transportation index, a proxy for future economic activity, edged higher, notching its tenth straight increase and its twelfth gain in the past 13 trading days. A half-hour after trading began, the National Association of Realtors said that its index of pending home sales fell in December, suggesting that sales of previously occupied homes may slow in the coming months. The report, which was weaker than many economists had expected, helped push stocks lower for much of the morning. They were roughly flat by midday, and spent the afternoon swapping small bumps and dips. The Dow closed down 14.05 points, or 0.1 percent, at 13,881.93. The S&P 500 fell 2.78, or 0.2 percent, to 1,500.18. The Nasdaq composite index added 4.59, or 0.2 percent, to 3,154. The Dow and the S&P 500 are rapidly approaching their all-time closing highs, reached on Oct. 9, 2007. The Dow is about 282 points below its high of 14,164.53; the S&P 500 is 65 points shy of its record of 1,565. Stocks mixed on shaky economic data Associated PressWASHINGTON Interest rates on short-term Treasury bills were mixed in Mondays auction with rates on three-month bills unchanged and rates on sixmonth bills rising to the highest level in four weeks. The Treasury Department auctioned $32 billion in three-month bills at a discount rate of 0.075 percent, unchanged from last week. Another $28 billion in six-month bills was auctioned at a discount rate of 0.110 percent, up from 0.095 percent last week. The six-month rate was the highest since those bills averaged 0.120 percent on Jan. 2. The discount rates reflect that the bills sell for less than face value. For a $10,000 bill, the threemonth price was $9,998.10, while a six-month bill sold for $9,994.44. That would equal an annualized rate of 0.076 percent for the threemonth bills and 0.085 percent for the six-month bills. Separately, the Federal Reserve said Monday that the average yield for oneyear Treasury bills, a popular index for making changes in adjustable rate mortgages, edged up to 0.15 percent last week from 0.14 percent the previous week. Rates mixed at T-bill auction BusinessBRIEFS From wire reports

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OPINION Page A8TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2013 Gun control vs. people controlIn the mideast, most of Africa, and parts of southeast Asia, every lunatic over the age of 10 brandishes an AK or similar weapon. Im sure there are no registration or background checks in place to acquire one of these weapons. But the amazing part of this is that there are no school shootings, matricides or patricides, no theater shootings and probably almost non-existent convenience store shootings. Could it be that any thought of such a crime would be punished immediately, without thought to political correctness? Mentally deficient people are classified as such, without the benefit of excuses being made for their condition. Violent repeat offenders are called corpses over there. No one cares that the offender didnt have a normal childhood, didnt know his father, or never made first string on the baseball team. If you dont fit into society, then youre not in society. Here excuses are made for whatever the offense is, and lawyers are lined up to defend the perpetrator even when guilt is indisputable. Liberal (left wing) politicians wait with pen in hand to enact new legislation to protect the offenders (potential voters), while the innocent live in fear and the victims suffer. Useless laws are passed to control inanimate objects (firearms), while little is done to control the lunatic fringe that walks freely among us, planning, plotting and scheming to do unspeakable things. Im told that a 30-round magazine is more dangerous than 30 people standing in line at a methadone clinic. I dont think so.Paul Loeb Crystal River Most Americans want gun controlHarry Cooper is mistaken if he thinks someone wants to take his freedom away ... all because the majority of Americans want gun control, and want it now. To quibble about the amount of shots fired per minute on an assault weapon is just a waste of time. I never said it fired 240 rounds per minute and you bringing it up was misinformation, so I would respectfully ask if you want to school someone, you should be truthful and factual. I got my information from the AP and the bottom line is that the AR-15 is a military assault-type killing machine and is used in most mass shootings. If the ban on assault weapons would never have expired, the mother of the Newtown murderer would not have been allowed to own and register one and the teachers and children would still be alive. I think any sensible person would rather face a knife, a hammer, and even a simple gun before they would any assault-type rifles. What is it going to take for people to see how destructive they really are? A ring side seat at the next massacre apparently. Its a new era, Mr. Cooper, and times have changed. Your freedom is intact so please, relax.E.G. Yerian Homosassa Its not been a good couple of weeks for unions. Actually, its not been a good couple of decades. But lets take it one shock at a time. Earlier this month the Florida Supreme Court ratified the Florida Legislatures 3 percent garnishing of state workers wages, ostensibly to make workers contribute to their Florida Retirement System pension, but in fact to plug state budget holes at workers expense. Besides breaking a promise to workers, who were hired under one set of rules only to see the rules change without their say, the decision rewrites law to mean that a contract is whatever the Legislature says it is, whenever it chooses to say it. A good politician is quite as unthinkable as a good burglar, author H.L. Mencken once said. Hed never met some of our Florida justices. Last week, the House Government Operations Subcommittee doubled down on the demise of the Florida Retirement System. As if recent market history was a dream worthy of Bobby Ewing, the panel is proposing that starting next year, state workers definedbenefit pension plan be replaced by a 401(k)-like defined-contribution plan. The change would not only shift all the risk to workers. It would create risk: betting ones retirement stash on the stock, bond and money markets has been a twice-repeated disaster for those who saw their savings vanish in the 2001 and 2008 equity-market collapses. Thats not the Legislatures concern. Its loyalty to workers, such as it is, ends once the state is done with their service, if not before. House Government Operations Subcommittee Chairman Jason Brodeur, the Sanford Republican, summed up the insult to workers last week when he crudely and falsely equated workers current retirement system with a handout: There will no longer be a blank check written by the taxpayers. Brodeur was 6 years old when Ronald Reagan busted the air traffic controllers strike, so he came of age just as America was making the vilification of unions national policy again. Hes part of a generation of Reagan-suckled politicians to whom degrading workers comes naturally. He might as well have said that Florida was doing a teacher or a firefighter a favor to let either slave for relative poverty wages for 40 years, and that neither had earned that retirement check. How revolting that a legislator could be so cavalier about the states most valuable laborers, and get away with it. He can, because workers dont have much leverage to counter the slurs. The same day Brodeur began making funeral arrangements for the state retirement system, the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics announced that union membership fell by 400,000 in 2012, even as the economy added 2.4 million jobs. Just 11.3 percent of workers are unionized. Thats the lowest level since 1916 (when Upton Sinclairs Jungle was every corporate executives favorite book to ban). Take public sector workers out of the equation, and the proportion of unionized workers falls to 6.6 percent. In Florida, just 5.8 percent of workers are unionized, one of the lowest rates in the country, though 7.3 percent of workers are actually represented by unions. Thats a consequence of the so-called right-to-work rule written in the Constitution, one of the great heists of language and labor that gives unionbusters the cover of law. It gives a worker the right to profit from a unions collective bargaining power to ensure fairer work conditions, wages and benefits, without having to belong to the union or pay it dues. And still, unions are vilified, often by the same workers whove seen their wages and benefits erode precisely as union membership has declined. Between 1979 and 2007, earnings for almost all workers but those in the top 10 percent have either stagnated or declined, in inflation-adjusted dollars, according to the Congressional Budget Office. For the top 10 percent, earnings have jumped 33 percent. That was before the Great Recession, which decimated workers standing; for those lucky enough to have held on to jobs, pay has either declined or become stuck below inflationadjusted levels, especially in Florida (where teachers have gone without a raise for six years and where vibrant job sectors are tourisms burgerflippers and health cares bedpan-cleaners). Benefits have been slashed. Job security is a museum piece. The union-busting era has paid fantastic dividends for the busters. But it wouldnt have been as lucrative without three decades of indoctrination that painted unionized workers as the enemy and the rich as job creators. The numbers and the wreckage wrought by those job creators ridicule the fantasy. Pierre Tristam is editor and publisher of FlaglerLive.com, a nonprofit news service based in Palm Coast. He can be reached at editor@flaglerlive.com It is fair to judge peoples by the rights they will sacrifice most for.Clarence Day, 1920 Workers deserve better treatment CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARDGerry Mulligan ....................................publisherMike Arnold ..............................................editorCharlie Brennan ..........................editor at largeCurt Ebitz ..................................citizen memberMac Harris ................................citizen memberRebecca Martin ..........................guest memberBrad Bautista ....................................copy chief CULTURE OF EXCESS Time for Gov. Scott to clean Citizens house Last August, a Miami Heraldarticle detailed exorbitant hotel stays with $600-per-night rooms and $200-plus dinners by the board members and senior management of Citizens Property Insurance Corporation, the states insurer of last resort. Following the news story, Gov. Rick Scott directed his inspector general to look into Citizens travel spending. What the governors inspector general found should raise the ire of every Floridian. In a 25-page report released Jan. 17, Chief Inspector Melinda Miguel found that Citizens board members and senior management spent more than $1.3 million in travel-related expenses last year between January and August. Although none of the lavish spending violated Citizens existing policies, it was excessive compared to the travel spending rules for state workers. Responding to the inspector generals report, Gov. Scott firmly declared, Any egregious expenses, unethical behavior or violation of the law must be grounds for dismissal. Florida Chief Financial Officer (CFO) Jeff Atwater also weighed in, condemning Citizens culture of excess and calling its lavish spending inexcusable. With the Citizens board members having behaved more like a private corporation than responsible stewards of a not-for-profit, tax-exempt government corporation supported by hardworking Florida families, the strong words of Gov. Scott and CFO Atwater must not be allowed to ring hollow. At a minimum, Citizens board members and senior management must be held to the same travel rules as all other state employees. Also, given Citizens earlier disbandment of its Office of Integrity, Citizens should follow 31 other state agencies by establishing its own inspector general to guard against excessive travel spending in the future. Furthermore, as correctly noted by Rep. Mike Fasano, the only way to change the Citizens culture of excess is to clean house. Accordingly, Gov. Scott is urged to back up his strong public words by supporting Rep. Fasanos call for all seven Citizens board members to resign immediately. While the en masse resignation of all seven board members would be extraordinary, strong action is warranted to send the unmistakable message that Citizens egregious culture of excess and blatant disregard of the public trust will no longer be tolerated. THE ISSUE:Rep. Fasanos call for Citizens board to resign.OUR OPINION:Strong action is warranted. OPINIONS INVITED The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the newspapers editorial board.All letters must be signed and include a phone number and hometown, including letters sent via email. Names and hometowns will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out.SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352-563-3280, or email to letters@chronicleonline.com .LETTERSto the Editor Report TV commercialsThe Sound Off caller who was disturbed by the loud television commercials should know that its been illegal since Dec. 13 for TV ads to exceed the average volume of the accompanying programs. To report violations of the Commercial Advertising Loudness Mitigation (Act) or CALM Act, call the Federal Communications Commission at 800-225-5322 or fill out an online complaint form at fcc.gov/complaints.What if it were Citrus?Rich Nugent voted no on the Hurricane Sandy aid relief. I wonder how he would have voted if it had been Citrus County that got hit.Looking for senseI was just curious. If the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners says that there are no new jobs in the county, why in the last two weeks have they been advertising for positions? Doesnt make a lot of sense.Looking for 600 jobsThe front page of todays Chronicle (Jan. 22) says there are 600 jobs available in Citrus County. My question is, why is there only less than 25 listed in the paper as needed positions? Why not do a special feature on those positions and whats needed to apply to those in the Chronicle? Great idea.Down South we used toWell, here we go again in todays Sound Off of Jan. 22; another, Up North we used to do it this way. I guess Im just getting to be an irritable 83-year-old born in the South who wishes I could read a column that says we should do what we used to do down South. Good use for old booksAt various books sales, flea markets, etc., there are tons of books that remain unsold. There are assisted living and nursing homes In the lower economic bracket where the residents have very little reading material. It would be a kind gesture if some of these leftover unsold books were contributed to these homes. Also, homeless shelters and shelters for abused women might also appreciate some reading material.Paying fair shareThis is in response to Ted Laportes letter regarding taxes. In that article he states, Does a not-wealthy, non-taxpaying teacher pay a fair share, (adding) to the intellect of our nation? I would like him to know that I am a teacher and I pay $1,138 a month in federal taxes, Social Security, retirement and Medicare. So we do pay our fair share. THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record. COMMENTSwill be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. SOUND OFFCALL563-0579 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Pierre TristamFLORIDA VOICES

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Deserving a raiseIn Saturdays paper (Jan. 19) a lady called complaining, because she worked the same job for six years, $5 an hour, and said she thinks she deserves a raise. I agree with her, but Ill bet you $1,000 shes anti-union.Credit costsThis is answer to the Cash or check only, please. I can totally relate to that as a small business owner. I do take debit cards and credit cards, but its definitely more cost efficient for us to take checks or cash, because the credit card and debit card companies are charging small businesses such exorbitant fees were paying anywhere from $3,000 to $7,000 a year in just fees. So needless to say, we have to charge or our prices have to go up to compensate (for) it. So I totally understand small businesses wanting to take checks and cash. But I dont understand the doctors offices, because for what they charge, they should take anything.Thanks for help This is a very belated but very heartfelt thank you to Mr. Ed Warren, of Warren Pools in Lecanto. In early December, my car broke down in front of his place of business. Not only did he allow me to leave my car on his property until my husband could go fix it, but he also insisted on driving me to work and got me there on time. Mr. Warren, you may think what you did was a small thing. To me, it was huge, and I want to thank you so much. May God bless you with a peacefilled New Year. Thank you.Look for workThe Sound Off has more people complaining about their pay, havent got a pay raise in six years working for the county. Tough. If you think youre better, take your resume and your experience and go out into the real marketplace and see what youre worth. You might be pleased youre getting what you got for the past six years. So if youre not happy where you are, dont sit there and complain. Get off your butt and move. Go somewhere else. Get better pay. Get exactly what youre worth. You may find out its a lot less.Dwindling?To me and to a lot of other people, the best part of the Chronicle is the Sound Off and you seem to be printing less and less of the Sound Off. I dont understand why, especially since all the snowbirds are down. Give me an answer and let me know why youre printing less and less of the Sound Off. Editors note: Actually, we have expanded the space allotted for letters and Sound Off. OPINIONCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, JANUARY29, 2013 A9 000DOU4 Next to ACE in Homosassa ( 352 ) 628-3443 License #DN 17606 Ledgerdentistry.com FREE SECOND OPINION. We Cater to Cowards! General & Cosmetic Dentistry HONEST PROFESSIONAL COMPASSIONATE Most Insurance Accepted Se Habla Espaol 000DTC7 1 Regina Blvd., Beverly Hills (Across From Fire Station) 746-0330 Beverly Hills DENTAL CENTER Dentures, Partials & Bridges Invisalign (Removable Braces) Children Welcome Veneers, Bonding, & Extractions One Visit Root Canals Gum Surgery Implants One Hour Whitening Open Fridays Raphael C. Lewis, D.D.S. P.A. 000DQZY NEW PATIENT SPECIAL! $ 150 00 Must Present Coupon At Time Of Visit FMX 00210 Prophy 01110 Initial Oral Exams 00150 The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination, or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination, or treatment. Need A Second Opinion? FREE Consultation With the Dentist Senior Citizens Discount (Ask For Details) Value $ 215 EXAM, X-RAYS & CLEANING ALL INCLUSIVE IMPLANTS $ 1,995 Dont mess with our gunsIn my view, the pro-gun rallies held across the country on Saturday, Jan. 19, are precisely what gun owners need, and what we should keep on doing to promote our pro-gun rights. Honest, lawabiding gun owners coming together to defend an all-out assault on our Second Amendment. In my opinion, the antigun minority, that includes the president and vice president, have now shown their true colors, and their woefully misguided intentions. The intent to pass sweeping firearms legislation while tap dancing on the graves of those innocent children who were killed in Connecticut by a mentally unstable individual, speaks volumes. They could care less about real public safety, and in the words of Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, Never let a good opportunity go to waste, are following that advice to the letter. What they have done in the last week is trample on my rights, and your rights protected by the Second Amendment, and if we let them get away with it, they will become even more emboldened to be ever more restrictive. In my opinion, absolutely none of the legislation or executive orders issued by the president this past week, will do anything to promote public safety none. It is becoming more apparent that this is nothing more than a sham, and the actions taken this week aimed at continuing to advance an anti-gun, liberal agenda, 45 years in the making. If you are a law-abiding gun owner, and are just sitting on your duff, its time to get off of it, and start writing letters to your newspapers, sending emails, and contacting your legislators. Tell them you are not going to put up with any of this any longer. We have the U.S. Constitution on our side. We should have grown sick and tired of what I consider to be anti-American political antics. We should also say enough is enough when it comes to them getting away with using tragedy, and suffering, for political purposes. By the way, TheNew York Times, Chicago Tribuneand L.A. Timeshavent even mentioned the rally in their newspapers. Goes to show how truly biased they can be. Lastly, this is not, nor will it ever be Nazi Germany, and we should steadfastly refuse to put up with a liberal, elitist minority, who think they know whats best for the majority of gun owners all across America.Wayne C. Sessa Beverly HillsThanks to sponsorsThe Council of Catholic Women at Our Lady of Grace Church in Beverly Hills would like to thank the following businesses and artisans for their contributions to our Tricky Tray, Jan. 19: Anastasias; Applebees; Bangkok Thai Restaurant; Beef OBradys; Bentlys Restaurant; Beverly Hills Bowl; Beverly Hills Discount Liquors; Black Diamond Ranch Pro Shop; Brentwood Golf Course; Brooklyn Deli Too!; Car Wash of Beverly Hills; Cattle Dog Coffee Roasters; Chicken King; Citrus Springs Golf & Country Club; Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club at Skyview; Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club at Meadow or Oaks; Citrus County Chronicle; Color Country Nursery; Countryside Animal Clinic; Curves; CVS, Beverly Hills; Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park; Garys Automotive; El Ranchito Mexican Restaurant; Ferraras; Fresh Start Donut; Golf Club Outlet-Jack Reagle; Heidis Italian Restaurant; Inverness Moose Lodge No. 2112; Knights of Columbus No. 6168; Kristys Salon; Lakeside Country Club; Little Golf Shop; Little Joeys; Main Street Restaurant; Mango Grill; McLeod House Bistro; New England Pastry & Caf; Olive Garden; Outback Steakhouse; Publix Super Markets; Reds; Rosemarys Hallmark; Rustic Ranch; Seven Rivers Golf and Country Club; Skeets Family Barbeque; Solar Nails & Spa; TJ Maxx; The Art Center Theatre; The Greenery Nursery; Torrellis Pizza; Twisted Oaks Golf Club; Twisted Oaks Grill; Walmart; and Winn-Dixie, Meadowcrest. Bernita Becker president, Council of Catholic Women Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church Beverly HillsLooking for Workforce studyRe: Forum to help job seekers What study did the Workforce Connection do and when. I read theChronicleevery day lets see the study. Its hard to believe there is a job skills deficiency in Citrus County. If fact I would like to see the job list. This sounds like the EDC, funding time rolls around, they come up with business negotiations with companies to move or add jobs in the county. But they are secret, cant reveal who the negotiations are with for fear they will pull out. Sure this isnt a ploy to justify their existence, Workforce Connection that is. Print the study. Let us see it. Give us some background concerning the study. Lets see the job list. Oh, I got a bridge to sell you, too.Kim Cloud LecantoEditors note: The report is too long to print in the newspaper; however, those interested can access it at www.clmwork force.com/default.asp. Scroll down to the story, Workforce Connection to convene Skills Gap task force, and read the attached Addressing the Skills Gap report. A second report, Occupations for Aspirational Industries, also contains information on the skills gap. Going green means independenceIn November 2012, I took a trip to North Carolina to see these powerful windmills which I thought were amazing. To witness these beautiful mills, aware production will do little harm to humans and something beneficial for future generations is being generated, was breathtaking. When I learned there was a new study from the University of North Carolina that proves the state of North Carolina can have 100 percent power coming from off-shore wind turbines, with out environmental impacts, I knew others saw similar values, like Duke Energy, who plans to build three pilot-off-shore wind turbines? Perhaps there is more to the diversity of Duke/Progress merger, like off-shore wind turbines in the Gulf, since they probably will not fix an old fractured nuclear plant? Going green concerns from letter Port or Green, such as; operational cost-benefit ratios, pocketing profit CEOs, high maintenance, taxpayers footing the bill, doesnt make Duke any better or BOCCs Port any different. We live these concerns in every day life with many present day corporations and governmental leadership, besides there are many hidden nuclear costs, such as biological health issues, waste product removal, court environmental cases, which are very costly. As for Port Citrus, will this industry ever produce anything more than, Cost? So what is quality life and honesty? That nuclear alone, will always support Americas electrical demands, can Earth, forever have plenty of oil, does jobs and total profit completely come from present day existing old businesses, should feasibility studies go on and on maintaining resolution to false conclusions, are government grants really free and did American Taxpayers never, produced, the largest Global Industry that could have been, entitled, Federal, State and Local Manufacturing Tax Inc.? Character and superiority belongs to tax paying uninfluenced homeowners who know true values of solar paneled roofs. The old proverb, Dont put all your eggs in one basket, suggests concentrating all prospects or resources in one thing, produces disadvantages. Heterogeneity is more than going green, its creating independency. Sandra Brasmeister InvernessRelief bill bloatedWasnt it Obama who mentioned cutting unnecessary spending? Then why was almost $600 million in pork barrel funds put in the New Jersey storm victim bill by the Democratic Senate and shamefully signed by the president?Claude Strass Homosassa Letters to theEDITORDo you live here?This is for the Toasted manatee write-in: I was wondering, does this person even live in this state?Should be ashamedI just read the article called Toasted manatees in your paper. The person who wrote this has to be utterly stupid and the Chronicle has to be more stupid to even print such a thing. You ought to be ashamed of yourselves. Go back where youre fromThis is in reference to the Toasted manatee (Sound Off). Two days ago we toasted the president of the United States and we did not eat him. I was just curious what state this clown is from or if he is serious. If so, please go back to wherever you came from. The manatees are a wondrous source of tourist attraction here and some people just shouldnt take things literally. Outrageous Sound OffI am a Citrus County resident for 20 years. I have never saw anything so outrageous in Sound Off as I read today. How can you print something so stupid as to Toast the manatees? Some person had to be a hoax calling in and saying, Where can I find toasted manatees, Ive never eaten any? Thats outrageous. I just cant believe that you would print something like that unless you were just looking to rile all of us up or to give us a good laugh. I dont find anything funny in the thought. Im very, very, very disturbed.Editors note: Obviously, the person calling in Toast the manatees? was poking fun at our unfortunate Jan. 16 headline with a double-meaning Time to toast manatees.I am sure the caller regrets the angst they have caused. We sure do. Hot Corner: TOASTED MANATEE Hot Corner: HEATER REPAIRSend heater backThis is in reference to the EdenPURE heater someone repaired. We had to send our whole heater back to the company. They said they had no repair people locally and they sent us a new heater. Check battery in remoteHeater repair Sound Off: Check your battery in the remote of your EdenPURE. If its under warranty, they will repair it for free, including shipping. Sound OFF

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Wheeee! Associated PressAshlyn Stalcup, 2, calls for her grandmother Lisa Huff to push her Monday during a visit to the playground in Sevierville, Tenn. Chicago hits 40 murders in 2013CHICAGO A bloody weekend in which seven people were killed and six wounded has put an abrupt end at least for now to hopes that Chicago was at least putting a lid on its frightening homicide rate. With a few days left in the month, the nations thirdlargest city now finds itself on the cusp of its deadliest January in more than a decade. The news comes just after Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy had announced that after several violent months, Chicago had seen a drop in homicides at the end of 2012 and for the first few weeks of 2013. Police say the homicide rate is a reflection of the citys gang problem and a proliferation of guns. Chicago has for years tried to cut off the flow of guns. It has what city officials have called the strictest handgun ordinance in the U.S.Missile launcher at gun buybackSEATTLE Seattle police worked with Army officials Monday to track down the history of a nonfunctional missile launcher that showed up at a weapons buyback program and determine whether it was legal or possibly stolen from the military. A man standing outside the event Saturday bought the military weapon for $100 from another person there, according to Detective Mark Jamieson. The single-use device is a launch tube assembly for a Stinger portable surfaceto-air missile and already had been used. As a controlled military item, it is not available to civilians through any surplus or disposal program offered by the government, according to Jamieson.Scouts mull lifting ban on gaysNEW YORK The Boy Scouts of America may soon give sponsors of troops the authority to decide whether to accept gays as scouts and leaders a potentially dramatic retreat from an exclusionary nationwide policy that has provoked relentless protests. Under the change now being discussed, the different religious and civic groups that sponsor Scout units would be able to decide for themselves how to address the issue either maintaining an exclusion of gays, as is now required of all units, or opening up their membership. Gay-rights activists were elated at the prospect of change, sensing another milestone to go along with recent advances for samesex marriage and the end of the ban on gays serving openly in the military. However, Southern Baptist leaders who consider homosexuality a sin were furious about the possible change and said its approval might encourage Southern Baptist churches to support other boys organizations instead of the BSA. From wire reports Nation BRIEFS NATION& WORLD Page A10TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE In space Associated PressScientists in Iran surround a monkey ahead of a space launch. Iran said Monday it had successfully sent the monkey into space, describing the launch as another step toward Tehrans goal of a manned space flight. Mali military enters TimbuktuSEVARE, Mali Backed by French helicopters and paratroopers, Malian soldiers entered the fabled city of Timbuktu on Monday after al-Qaida-linked militants who ruled the outpost by fear for nearly 10 months fled into the desert, setting fire to a library that held thousands of manuscripts dating to the Middle Ages. French Col. Thierry Burkhard, chief military spokesman in Paris, said that there had been no combat with the Islamists but that the French and Malian forces did not yet control the town. Still, there was celebration among the thousands of Timbuktu residents who fled the city rather than live under strict and pitiless Islamic rule and the dire poverty that worsened after the tourist industry was destroyed.Egyptians protest Islamist leaderCAIRO Protesters battled police for hours in Cairo on Monday and thousands marched through Egypts three Suez Canal cities in direct defiance of a nighttime curfew and state of emergency, handing a blow to the Islamist President Mohammed Morsis attempts to contain five days of spiraling political violence. Nearly 60 people have been killed in the wave of unrest, clashes, rioting and protests that have touched cities across the country but have hit the hardest in the canal cities, where residents have virtually risen up in outright revolt.Dutch Queen abdicatingTHE HAGUE, Netherlands The Netherlands Queen Beatrix announced Monday that she is ending her reign after 33 years and passing the crown to her eldest son, who has long been groomed to be king but who will have to work hard to match his mothers popularity. The widely expected abdication comes at a time of debate over the future of the largely ceremonial Dutch monarchy, but also as calm has descended upon the Netherlands after a decade of turmoil that saw Beatrix act as the glue that held together an increasingly divided society.British granny appeals sentenceBALI, Indonesia A court official said a convicted British grandmother will appeal the death sentence she received from an Indonesian court for smuggling cocaine worth $2.5 million into the resort island of Bali. Lindsay June Sandiford was found guilty last week in Denpasar District Court. She was accused of damaging the image of Bali as a tourism destination and weakening the governments drug prevention program. World BRIEFS From wire reports Associated PressWASHINGTON Side by side, leading Democratic and Republican senators pledged Monday to propel far-reaching immigration legislation through the Senate by summer providing a possible path to citizenship for an estimated 11 million people now in the U.S. illegally. The senators acknowledged pitfalls that have doomed such efforts in the past, but they suggested that Novembers elections with Hispanics voting heavily for President Barack Obama and other Democrats could make this time different. Passage of the emotionally charged legislation by the Democratic-controlled Senate is far from assured, and a taller hurdle could come later in the House, which is dominated by conservative Republicans whove shown little interest in immigration overhaul. Obama will lay out his own proposals Tuesday, most of which mirror the Senate plans. Besides the citizenship provision, including new qualifications, the Senate measure would increase border security, allow more temporary workers to stay and crack down on employers who would hire illegal immigrants. The plans are still short on detail, and all the senators conceded that months of tedious and politically treacherous negotiations lie ahead. But with a re-elected Obama pledging his commitment, the lawmakers argued that six years after the last sustained congressional effort at an immigration overhaul came up short in the Senate, chances for approval this year are much better. Other bipartisan groups of senators have stood in the same spot before, trumpeting similar proposals, said Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y. But we believe this will be the year Congress finally gets it done. The politics on this issue have been turned upside down, Schumer said, arguing that polls show more support than ever for immigration changes and political risk in opposing it. Elections. Elections, said Sen. John McCain, RAriz. The Republican Party is losing the support of our Hispanic citizens. And we realize that there are many issues on which we think we are in agreement with our Hispanic citizens, but this is a preeminent issue with those citizens. Obama got 71 percent of the Latino vote in November compared to 27 percent for Republican Mitt Romney. Senators vow immigration change Bipartisan group says reform will go forward, despite obstacles Associated PressSANTA MARIA, Brazil The nightclub Kiss was hot, steamy from the press of beer-fueled bodies dancing close. The Brazilian country band on stage was whipping the young crowd into a frenzy, launching into another fast-paced, accordion-driven tune and lighting flares that spewed silver sparks into the air. It was another Saturday night in Santa Maria, a university town of about 260,000 on Brazils southernmost tip. Then, in the pre-dawn hours of Sunday, it turned into a scene of indescribable horror as sparks lit a fire in the soundproofing material above the stage, churning out black, toxic smoke as flames raced through the former beer warehouse, killing 231 people. I was right there, so even though I was far from the door, at least I realized something was wrong, said Rodrigo Rizzi, a firstyear nursing student who was next to the stage when the fire broke out and watched the tragedy unfold, horror-stricken and helpless. Others, who couldnt see the stage, never had a chance. They never saw it coming. There was no fire alarm, no sprinklers, no fire escape. In violation of state safety codes, fire extinguishers were not spaced every 1,500 square feet, and there was only one exit. As the city buried its young Monday, questions were raised about whether Brazil is up to the task of ensuring the safety in venues for the World Cup next year, and the Olympics in 2016. Four people were arrested for questioning, including two band members and the nightclubs co-owner. Rizzi hadnt even planned on going out that night. He was talked into it by friends and knew dozens at the club. He said the first sign of a problem was insulation dripping above the stage. The flames at that point were barely noticeable, just tiny tongues lapping at the flammable material. The bands singer, Marcelo dos Santos, noticed it and tried to put out the smoldering embers by squirting water from a bottle. The show kept going. Then, as the ceiling continued to ooze hot molten foam, dos Santos grabbed the drummers water bottle and aimed it at the fire. That didnt work either, Rizzi said. A security guard handed the band leader a fire extinguisher. He aimed, but nothing came out; the extinguisher didnt work. At that point, Rizzi said, the singer motioned to the band to get out. Rizzi calmly made his way to the door the clubs only exit still thinking it was a small fire that would quickly be controlled. The cavernous building was divided into several sections, including a pub and a VIP lounge and hundreds of the college students and teenagers crammed in couldnt see the stage. They continued to drink and dance, unaware of the danger spreading above them. Then, the place became an inferno. The band members who headed straight for the door lived. One, Danilo Brauner, went back to get his accordion, and never made it out. No alarms, one exit Details emerge in Brazil nightclub fire that killed 231 Associated PressA police officer places flowers Monday outside the Kiss nightclub in Santa Maria, Brazil. A fast-moving fire roared through the crowded, windowless nightclub early Sunday, killing 231 people. Many of the victims were under 20 years old, including some minors. Associated PressOn Facebook, he describes himself as a wounded warrior ... very wounded. Brendan Marrocco was the first soldier to survive losing all four limbs in the Iraq War, and doctors revealed Monday that hes received a double-arm transplant. Those new arms already move a little, he tweeted a month after the operation. Marrocco, a 26-year-old New Yorker, was injured by a roadside bomb in 2009. He had the transplant Dec. 18 at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, his father said Monday. Alex Marrocco said his son does not want to talk with reporters until a news conference Tuesday at the hospital, but the younger Marrocco has repeatedly mentioned the transplant on Twitter and posted photos. Ohh yeah today has been one month since my surgery and they already move a little, Brendan Marrocco tweeted Jan. 18. Responding to a tweet from NASCAR driver Brad Keselowski, he wrote: dude I cant tell you how exciting this is for me. I feel like I finally get to start over. The infantryman also received bone marrow from the same dead donor who supplied his new arms. That novel approach is aimed at helping his body accept the new limbs with minimal medication to prevent rejection. The military sponsors operations like these to help wounded troops. About 300 have lost arms or hands in Iraq or Afghanistan. Unlike a life-saving heart or liver transplant, limb transplants are aimed at improving quality of life, not extending it. Quality of life is a key concern for people missing arms and hands prosthetics for those limbs are not as advanced as those for feet and legs. He was the first quad amputee to survive, and there have been four others since then, Alex Marrocco said. The Marroccos want to thank the donors family for making a selfless decision ... making a difference in Brendans life, the father said. Soldier gets double-arm transplant

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Basketball/B2 Hockey/B2 Scoreboard/B3 Entertainment/ B4 Magic without tricks as Orlando, Brooklyn extend their respective streaks./ B2 Section BTUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE SPORTS BRIEFSAresco: Big East wants 12th schoolCROMWELL, Conn. The Big East conference is looking to add another school, commissioner Mike Aresco said Monday. Aresco spoke at a local chamber of commerce breakfast, and talked to reporters afterward. He said the Big East wants to keep its name, and no longer has any plans to expand west of Texas. We probably at some point will add a 12th team, Aresco said. We are going to have 11 when Navy comes in ... Theres no urgency, but we think well probably think about adding a 12th team.Jeter back on field taking groundersTAMPA Derek Jeter worked out on a baseball field Monday for the first time since breaking his left ankle last October. The 38-year-old New York Yankees captain fielded 55 grounders on the grass in front of the infield dirt at shortstop at the teams minor-league complex. He also hit in a batting cage. Everything went well, Jeter said as he drove out of the complex. Jeter, who spent 90 minutes at the complex, did not run he may not until spring training starts in midFebruary. The 13-time AllStar expects to start in New Yorks opener against Boston on April 1. Yankees pitchers and catchers are scheduled to report for spring training two weeks from Tuesday.Michigan moves to No. 1 in AP pollMichigan is No. 1 in The Associated Press college basketball poll for the first time since its Fab Five days 20 years ago. For the second straight week the No. 1 team lost. This time it was Duke, which was routed 90-63 by Miami in the third-worst defeat by a top-ranked team. Michigan received 51 first-place votes from the 65-member national media panel Monday. Kansas moved up one spot to No. 2. They are the only one-loss teams in the poll. Indiana, Florida, which drew the other first-place vote, and Duke complete the top five. For the complete poll, see Page B3.Baylor still reigns in womens pollBaylor remained No. 1 in The Associated Press womens basketball poll for a fourth straight week after two more Big 12 wins. Baylor had 37 first-place ballots Monday. Notre Dame and UConn stayed second and third. The Huskies received the other three first-place votes. For the complete poll, see Page B3.Police: Ratliffs BAC twice the limitGRAPEVINE, Texas Police said Dallas Cowboys defensive lineman Jay Ratliff had a blood-alcohol level twice the legal limit the night he was arrested after a car accident. Grapevine police said Monday Ratliffs blood-alcohol level was measured at 0.16 percent. Ratliff was arrested last week after a late-night accident. Ratliffs pickup truck sideswiped a semitrailer truck. Ratliff refused a breath test, but police obtained a warrant for a blood sample. His arrest came weeks after fellow Cowboy Josh Brent was indicted on an intoxicated manslaughter count in the Dec. 8 crash that killed his friend and Cowboys practice squad player Jerry Brown.From wire reports Associated PressTiger Woods hits out of a bunker on the 10th hole Monday during the fourth round of the Farmers Insurance Open at the Torrey Pi nes Golf Course in San Diego. JIMLITKE Associated PressSuper Bowl week is beginning to resemble one of those family reunions where your crazy uncle says something outrageous, but just true enough to spark a discussion worth having. Two years ago, it was Steelers linebacker James Harrison ripping the NFL and commissioner Roger Goodell for excessive fines on the violent hits that were his specialty, and generally trying to make the game too safe. Well lay a pillow down where Im going to tackle them, he said mockingly at one point, so they dont hit the ground too hard, Mr. Goodell. This time around, the provocateur was Bernard Pollard, the Ravens notoriously punishing safety. Covering much of the same ground Harrison had, Pollard said he didnt think the NFL would be around in 30 years because rule changes designed to make it even safer would eventually drive away fans if something tragic didnt hasten the games end even sooner. The only thing Im waiting for ... and, Lord, I hope it doesnt happen ... is a guy dying on the field, Pollard told CBSSports .com. It may be easy to dismiss a handful of players exaggerated views, but the notion that the Concussions? We all signed up for it Associated Press SAN DIEGO Tiger Woods was so good for so long at Torrey Pines that it didnt matter how bad it looked at the end.In a finish that was fitting for such a long and exasperating week, Woods built an eightshot lead with five holes to play on Monday until he lost patience with the slow play and started losing shots that only determined the margin of victory. Despite two bogeys and a double bogey in the final hour, he closed with an even-par 72 for a four-shot victory in the Farmers Insurance Open. Im excited the way I played all week, Woods said. I hit the ball well pretty much did everything well and built myself a nice little cushion. I had some mistakes at the end, but all my good play before that allowed me to afford those mistakes. He won for the 75th time in his PGA Tour career, seven behind the record held by Sam Snead. Woods won this tournament for the seventh time, and he set a PGA Tour record by winning at Torrey Pines for the eighth time, including his 2008 U.S. Open. Woods also has won seven times at Bay Hill and at Firestone. Torrey Pines is a public course that he has turned into his private domain. I dont know if anybody would have beaten him this week, said Nick Watney, who got within five shots of Woods when the tournament was still undecided until making three Tiger afire at Torrey Pines bogeys on his next five holes. Hes definitely on his game. Defending champion Brandt Snedeker (69) and Josh Teater (69) tied for second. As much as Woods got off to a good start, equal attention was given to slow play, an increasing problem on the PGA Tour. It got a little ugly toward the end, Woods said. I started losing patience a little bit with the slow play. I lost my concentration a little bit. He made bogey from the bunker on No. 14. He hooked a tee shot off the eucalyptus trees and into a patch of ice plant on the 15th, leading to double bogey. After another long wait on the 17th tee, he popped up his tee shot and made another bogey. With a four-shot lead on the 18th Kyle Stanley blew a three-shot lead a year ago he hit wedge safely behind the hole for a two-putt par. Woods finished with a 14-under 274 for his 14th win in California, and 11th in San Diego County. I think a win always makes it special, especially the way I played, Woods said. To have not won would have been something else because I really played well. Playing the way I did for most of this tournament, until the very end, the last five holes, I felt like I should have won this tournament. I put myself in a position where I had a big enough lead, and thats basically how I felt like I played this week. I know I can do that, and it was nice to be able to do it. See LITKE/ Page B3 JOEKORNECKIIII CorrespondentLECANTO The Seven Rivers Christian Warriors boys basketball team played stifling defense in a 48-9 rout of the Branford Buccaneers on Monday. Junior Adam Gage and sophomore guard Cory Weiand had 19 points apiece to lead the Warriors in the contest. Weiand hit five 3-pointers on the evening and Gage pulled down seven rebounds while hitting three 3-pointers. We played solid defense ... everybody played hard ... and we boxed out pretty good, Seven Rivers assistant coach Ed Wilson said. It was like a practice game ... and we were trying to work on some things with districts coming up. We accomplished what we wanted to accomplish. In the first half, the Warriors (10-10) dominated right from the get-go behind hot shooting beyond the arc from Gage and Weiand en route to a 32-4 lead at intermission. The Warriors defense didnt allow a single point in the second quarter, as they outscored the Buccaneers 20-0. In the second-half, the Warriors crippling defense held the Buccaneers (2-19) to only five points. Weiand led the Warriors with eight second-half points. We came out firing, and we played good defense, Weiand said. Buccaneers sunk Seven Rivers routs Branford 48-9 See SUNK/ Page B3 Eagles dispatched, Lady Warriors eye Saints C.J. RISAK CorrespondentOCALA The preliminaries are over. The stage is set for the main event in the District 2A-3 girls basketball tournament. Seven Rivers Christian confirmed its berth in the 2A-3 final with a resounding 52-18 victory against overmatched Leesburg First Academy on Monday at Ocala St. John Lutheran. Combine that with host St. Johns easy 57-3 win over Gainesville Cornerstone Academy, and the expected pairing is set. Seven Rivers vs. St. John will be at 7 p.m. Thursday at St. John. St. John is a very good team, said Seven Rivers coach Gary Dreyer, his team now 16-6. Well have to play a real strong defense and shoot well. Certainly the Warriors will need better shooting than they displayed against First Academy. Despite the blowout score, Seven Rivers missed more than a dozen easy shots from inside the paint. In the first half, while the Warriors did build a 2812 halftime score, they connected on just 11 of 45 shots, or 24.4 percent. We shot that well? was Dreyers reply, only half in jest. Their second-half shootingwas even worse just 11 of 52, or 21.2 percent. Add to that some horrible free-throw shooting (7 of 25, 28 percent) and Dreyer can only hope he wont see a repeat. 52-18 shellacking sets up district title showdown Woods hits his second shot on the fairway of the 13th hole during the fourth round. See WARRIORS/ Page B3

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Associated PressNEW YORK Deron Williams had 20 points and nine assists, and the Brooklyn Nets beat the Orlando Magic 97-77 on Monday night for their eighth straight home victory. The Nets rebounded from their first two-game losing streak under P .J. Carlesimo, finishing off a four-game sweep of the Magic, who dropped their sixth straight. Brook Lopez scored 16 points and Joe Johnson had 13 for the Nets, who tied a franchise record with their 11th victory in January and can break it when they host the NBA champion Miami Heat on Wednesday. Nikola Vucevic had 18 points and nine rebounds for the Magic, who lost for the 17th time in 19 games. Their last two losses had each been by two points, but they were blown out of this one early. The Nets completed their first four-game sweep of the Magic since 2003-04, the season before Orlando drafted Dwight Howard. Brooklyn led by at least 20 points in all four games and is now 17-0 against teams that were under .500 when they played them.Bulls 93, Bobcats 85CHICAGO Jimmy Butler scored a career-high 19 points and Nate Robinson added 15 as the Chicago Bulls defeated the Charlotte Bobcats 93-85 on Monday night. Luol Deng returned to the Bulls lineup after missing five games with a hamstring injury, and scored 12 points in 31 minutes. The Bulls won three of five without Deng as his absence was eased by the strong play of Butler, who returned to a reserve role. Joakim Noah finished with 13 points, 18 rebounds and seven assists to help Central Division-leading Chicago win for the seventh time in its last nine games. Kemba Walker and Ben Gordon led the Bobcats with 18 points apiece. Charlotte has lost nine of its last 11 games.Kings 96, Wizards 94WASHINGTON Isaiah Thomas made a floater with a second to play, capping a seesaw finish as the Sacramento Kings broke a fourgame losing streak with a 96-94 win over the Washington Wizards on Monday night. Thomas dribbled down the clock after the Wizards tied the game on Martell Websters short jumper with 7.9 seconds to play, then drove down the middle and put the ball in with a soft touch from 9 feet. Thomas had 10 of his 22 points in the fourth quarter and also had seven assists. Francisco Garcia scored 17 points for the Kings in a game that included 16 ties and 11 lead changes. Emeka Okafor scored a season-high 23 points and grabbed 15 rebounds, and John Wall had 19 points and six assists for the Wizards.Grizzlies 103, 76ers 100PHILADELPHIA Marc Gasol scored a season-high 27 points and Rudy Gay had 26 to lead the Memphis Grizzlies to a 103-100 win over the Philadelphia 76ers on Monday night. Jerryd Bayless scored a season-high 21 points to help the Grizzlies win without point guard Mike Conley, out with a sprained left ankle. The Grizzlies rallied from 17 down to take control late in the fourth. Bayless missed a jumper, Gay grabbed the rebound and made it 101-100 on a bucket with 13.3 seconds left. Philadelphias Thaddeus Young missed a short attempt in front of the basket and the Grizzlies grabbed the rebound. Gay was fouled and made both free throws for a threepoint cushion. Nick Young couldnt get the tying shot off at the buzzer for the Sixers. Evan Turner scored a season-high 27 points.Warriors 114, Raptors 102TORONTO David Lee had 21 points and 12 rebounds, Stephen Curry scored 17 points before leaving with a injury, and the Golden State Warriors beat the Toronto Raptors 114-102 on Monday night. Klay Thompson scored 19 points, Carl Landry had six of his 12 points in the fourth quarter and Andrew Bogut returned from an injury to also score 12 as the Warriors earned their first victory in four games against Eastern Conference opponents this month. Harrison Barnes and Jarrett Jack each scored 14 for Golden State. Aaron Gray had a careerhigh 22 points and 10 rebounds, DeMar DeRozan scored 21 points and Ed Davis had 12 for the Raptors.B2TUESDAY, JANUARY29, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SPORTS SPORTS BRIEFSFlorida man pleads guiltyLOS ANGELES A Florida man has pleaded guilty to a fraud charge in a Los Angeles courtroom in connection with swindling about $2.3 million from Indianapolis Colts defensive end Dwight Freeney. Michael Stern of Miami entered his plea Monday to a single count. He faces up to 10 years in prison when hes scheduled to be sentenced May 6. Prosecutors said Stern and his lover, Eva Weinberg, a financial adviser to Freeney, bilked more than $2 million from the football player via wire transfers. The money went into an account belonging to Sterns company without Freeneys approval. A criminal complaint was filed against Weinberg, accusing her of wire fraud. Her case is pending.L.A. Dodgers networkLOS ANGELES The Los Angeles Dodgers have announced the launch of SportsNet LA, their regional sports network with Time Warner Cable for the 2014 season. The team said Monday its ownership group created an American Media Productions LLC subsidiary in December 2012 to launch the network. TWC will make payments and have the exclusive advertising and affiliate sales rights. The Dodgers said the agreement is subject to closing conditions. The Los Angeles Times reported last week the nations second-largest cable operator will pay around $7 billion to carry the games. The Dodgers will remain on Foxs Prime Ticket, a division of News Corp., this year.Big 12 ADs talk numbersIRVING, Texas Big 12 athletic directors spent several hours Monday discussing the pros and cons of maintaining their 10-team configuration or eventually making additions to the conference or maybe doing something in between. Commissioner Bob Bowlsby said the current setup is financially beneficial for each school, but he wanted to run through what-if scenarios. Among the possibilities they discussed was a possible alliance with other conferences. Bowlsby said there was unanimity for that approach that allows some of the benefits and value of expansion without actually adding members. The ADs plan to discuss football scheduling and bowl alliances when they wrap up their regular scheduled two-day meeting today.McHale ousts ParmentierPARIS Christina McHale of the United States broke Pauline Parmentiers serve four times in a 6-4, 6-1 win in the first round of the Open GDF Suez on Monday. McHale has a secondround match against No. 3 Marion Bartoli of France. In other matches, eighth-seeded Klara Zakopalova of the Czech Republic beat Anabel Medina Garrigues 2-6, 75, 6-0. Zakopalova needed 2 hours, 17 minutes to get the better of the Spaniard, who had won seven of their previous 10 matches. Mona Barthel of Germany also advanced with a 7-6 (1), 6-0 win against Urszula Radwanska of Poland.From wire reports Associated PressBrooklyn Nets forward Keith Bogans drives to the basket as Orlando Magic forward Hedo Turkoglu defends in the first half Monday at the Barclays Center in New York. Associated PressCarolina Hurricane Tim Gleason hits Bostons Milan Lucic Monday during the first period of their game in Raleigh, N.C. Bruins upend Hurricanes 5-3 Nets rout Magic 97-77 Associated PressRALEIGH, N.C. David Krejci scored a tiebreaking goal with 1:50 left and the Boston Bruins beat the Carolina Hurricanes 5-3 on Monday night. Zdeno Chara had a goal and two assists, Nathan Horton had a goal and an assist, Tyler Seguin had an empty-net goal and an assist and Brad Marchand scored a short-handed goal for the Bruins. The Northeast Division leaders remained unbeaten in regulation and opened the season by earning points in five straight games for the first time since 1990-91. Eric Staal had a goal and an assist, and he and Jeff Skinner scored 50 seconds apart late in the second period to help the Hurricanes erase a two-goal deficit. Jamie McBain added a goal and Cam Ward made 33 saves for the Hurricanes.Blue Jackets 2, Stars 1COLUMBUS, Ohio Vinny Prospal scored from a hard angle at 1:22 of the third and Sergei Bobrovsky had 24 saves to lead the Columbus Blue Jackets past the Dallas Stars 2-1 on Monday night, ending a four-game losing streak. It was the Blue Jackets first victory since opening night in Nashville in a shootout. They had been outscored 16-6 since while mustering just a point in a shootout loss to Detroit in the home opener a week ago. Derek Dorsett also scored for the Blue Jackets. Philip Larsen had the Stars goal with Kari Lehtonen stopping 25 shots. The Blue Jackets took the lead for good when Prospal collected the puck in the right corner and fired a shot along the goal line that appeared to catch Lehtonen by surprise, slipping into the net. Associated PressNEW ORLEANS Frank Gore never lost hope. Not through all the injuries, all the losing early in his career. That perseverance finally paid off this season for the San Francisco running back. The 29-year-old Gore helped the 49ers reach the Super Bowl for the first time since 1995, a triumph that is especially sweet given all hes been through. He tore up both knees in college. He underwent major surgery on both shoulders after he got to the pros. He lost part of another season to a hip injury. Not to mention, Gore didnt experience winning in the NFL until his seventh year. It was tough, real tough, he said Monday. It was tough coming to work, especially for me coming from a winning program (Miami) in college. I was never used to losing. I used to take it hard. One of his teammates, fullback Bruce Miller, has noticed the determination in Gores eyes as the team prepares to face the Baltimore Ravens in the title game Sunday. It means a lot to him, Miller said. In meetings and at practice, you can see how intense and focused he is. Hes worked hard for it. The Ravens have their own threat out of the backfield. Like Gore, Baltimores Ray Rice has been overshadowed by more prominent teammates on the run to the title game, namely quarterback Joe Flacco and retiring linebacker Ray Lewis. But both Gore and Rice have the potential to take control with their contrasting styles. Gore is a power back, someone who can churn out the tough yards between the tackles. That style has served him well; hes run for more than 1,000 yards six of the last seven seasons and become San Franciscos career leader in rushing touchdowns. We always credit Frank with the tough yards, Miller said. He doesnt get the easy runs. Its up the middle, three or four yards a carry. But he just continues to move the chains. Thats why were here. Rice is more of a slasher, a player who can dart through the smallest of openings and break off a big gain. Hes also a major weapon in the passing game, hauling in more than 300 throws his first five years in the league. Gore said hes impressed by his Ravens counterpart. He does it all, Gore said of Rice. I love to watch him. I watched him in college. When I saw him in college, I knew he was going to be a pretty good back in the league. No. 25 Marquette beats USF 63-50 Associated PressMILWAUKEE Vander Blue scored a career-high 30 points to lead No. 25 Marquette to a 63-50 victory over South Florida on Monday night as the Golden Eagles moved into a first-place tie with Syracuse in the Big East. Blue, who came into the game as the Golden Eagles leading scorer at 13.9 points per game, made 13 of 20 shots from the field and scored 11 points during the big run that spanned both halves. The junior guard repeatedly sliced through the South Florida defense, driving to the basket and scoring on layups. The Golden Eagles (15-4, 6-1 Big East), who have won eight of nine games, returned to the Top 25 on Monday after being out of the rankings last week. South Florida (10-10, 1-7) opened the season 93 but has faltered since conference play began.No. 12 Louisville 64, Pittsburgh 61LOUISVILLE, Ky. Russ Smith and Gorgui Dieng combined for 34 points and sealed the game with four free throws in the final 12 seconds as No. 12 Louisville ended a three-game losing streak with a 64-61 victory over Pittsburgh on Monday night.Top 25 Women No. 2 N. Dame 77, No. 9 Tenn. 67KNOXVILLE, Tenn. Skylar Diggins scored a career-high 33 points and No. 2 Notre Dame built a 19point lead in the second half before withstanding a late Tennessee rally in a 77-67 victory Monday night over the ninth-ranked Lady Vols. Associated PressSan Francisco running back Frank Gore talks with reporters Monday during a news conference in New Orleans. The 49ers play the Baltimore Ravens Sunday in the Super Bowl. 49ers Gore kept hope through all the adversity

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SCOREBOARDCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. (ESPN) Wisconsin at Ohio State 7 p.m. (ESPN2) North Carolina State at Virginia 9 p.m. (ESPN) Kentucky at Mississippi HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. (FSNFL) (SUN) Florida Panthers at Tampa Bay Lightning 7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) New York Islanders at Pittsburgh Penguins SOCCER 9 p.m. (ESPN2) United States vs. Canada. From BBVA Compass Stadium in Houston Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. Prep CALENDAR TODAYS PREP SPORTS BOYS BASKETBALL 7:30 p.m. Lecanto at Crystal River Glantz-Culver Line for Jan. 29NFL Sunday Super Bowl at New Orleans FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG San Francisco53(47) Baltimore NCAA Basketball FAVORITELINEUNDERDOG at Tennessee10Vanderbilt at Virginia1NC State at Clemson5Georgia Tech at Ohio St.6Wisconsin at Wichita St.12Indiana St. at Evansville1N. Iowa Illinois St.3at Bradley North Carolina4at Boston College at MississippiPkKentucky at Minnesota20Nebraska at UNLV14Nevada NBA FAVORITELINEUNDERDOG Golden State4at Cleveland at Detroit1Milwaukee at Portland3Dallas at L.A. Lakers6New Orleans NHL FAVORITELINEUNDERDOGLINE at Boston-150New Jersey+130 at N.Y. Rangers-145Philadelphia+125 at Buffalo-155Toronto+135 at Pittsburgh-220N.Y. Islanders+180 at Montreal-140Winnipeg+120 at Tampa Bay-170Florida+150 at Ottawa-150Washington+130 at Detroit-155Dallas+135 at Minnesota-180Columbus+160 at San Jose-170Anaheim+150Farmers Insurance Open par scoresMonday at Torrey Pines, San Diego n-North Course: 7,053 yards, par-72 s-South Course: 7,698 yards, par-72 Purse: $6.1 million Final (FedExCup points in parentheses):T. Woods (500), $1,098,00068s-65n-69s-72s 274-14 B. Snedeker (245), $536,80065n-75s-69s-69s 278-10J. Teater (245), $536,80066s-70n-73s-69s 278-10 J. Walker (123), $268,40067n-69s-72s-71s 279-9N. Watney (123), $268,40069s-68n-71s-71s 279-9 R. Garrigus (92), $204,35072s-69n-72s-67s 280-8R. Fowler (92), $204,35077s-65n-70s-68s 280-8A. Baddeley (92), $204,35071n-72s-68s-69s 280-8B. Haas (68), $146,40069s-69n-72s-71s 281-7 G. DeLaet (68), $146,40068n-70s-72s-71s 281-7C. Howell III (68), $146,40066n-72s-71s-72s 281-7K.J. Choi (68), $146,40065s-73n-71s-72s 281-7 J. Day (68), $146,40073n-70s-72s-66s 281-7 B. Fritsch (68), $146,40069n-67s-70s-75s 281-7 H. Mahan (54), $94,55069s-72n-69s-72s 282-6 B. de Jonge (54), $94,55074s-66n-73s-69s 282-6 Tag Ridings (54), $94,55067s-70n-71s-74s 282-6 E. Compton (54), $94,55071s-65n-71s-75s 282-6 S. Marino (54), $94,55068s-68n-73s-73s 282-6C. Wittenberg (54), $94,55069s-67n-72s-74s 282-6C. Reavie (48), $61,00071s-70n-74s-68s 283-5N. Thompson (48), $61,00069n-70s-72s-72s 283-5P. Perez (48), $61,00072s-67n-70s-74s 283-5 Charlie Wi (48), $61,00071s-66n-75s-71s 283-5 Ross Fisher (48), $61,00066n-71s-73s-73s 283-5 L. Guthrie (48), $61,00068s-69n-71s-75s 283-5 Vijay Singh (41), $41,48068n-73s-70s-73s 284-4G. Woodland (41), $41,48072s-69n-69s-74s 284-4B. Steele (41), $41,48067n-73s-71s-73s 284-4 C. Tringale (41), $41,48068n-72s-69s-75s 284-4 Jerry Kelly (41), $41,48067n-71s-78s-68s 284-4 S. Noh (41), $41,48071s-72n-72s-69s 284-4 J. Senden (41), $41,48069s-68n-74s-73s 284-4 B. Weekley (35), $31,47674s-67n-73s-71s 285-3 C. Hoffman (35), $31,47670n-72s-74s-69s 285-3 Jonas Blixt (35), $31,47670n-72s-72s-71s 285-3 David Lynn (35), $31,47667n-75s-73s-70s 285-3 M. Flores (35), $31,47669s-69n-76s-71s 285-3 J.J. Henry (30), $25,01069n-71s-75s-71s 286-2 P. Reed (30), $25,01073s-69n-74s-70s 286-2 L. Glover (30), $25,01069s-73n-70s-74s 286-2 B. Stuard (30), $25,01068n-74s-73s-71s 286-2 B. Horschel (30), $25,01066n-69s-76s-75s 286-2 J. Rollins (24), $18,00470s-71n-75s-71s 287-1 B. Harman (24), $18,00474s-68n-72s-73s 287-1 R. Castro (24), $18,00471s-68n-75s-73s 287-1 P. Tomasulo (24), $18,00467n-75s-75s-70s 287-1 Jin Park (24), $18,00472s-70n-74s-71s 287-1 Jeff Klauk (24), $18,00471s-72n-72s-72s 287-1 N. Colsaerts (24), $18,00469n-74s-75s-69s 287-1 D. Johnson (16), $14,12569n-72s-75s-72s 288E H. Kuehne (16), $14,12568n-74s-76s-70s 288E Justin Bolli (16), $14,12572s-67n-74s-75s 288E Greg Owen (16), $14,12574s-68n-71s-75s 288E Jim Herman (16), $14,12569n-69s-76s-74s 288E J. Driscoll (16), $14,12568n-75s-77s-68s 288E Ben Curtis (16), $14,12572s-71n-73s-72s 288E P. Mickelson (16), $14,12572n-71s-75s-70s 288EE. Meierdierks (16), $14,12569n-74s-72s-73s 288EM. Letzig (8), $12,99368s-73n-75s-73s 289+1 John Huh (8), $12,99369s-71n-77s-72s 289+1 Tom Gillis (8), $12,99369s-73n-73s-74s 289+1 Jeff Overton (8), $12,99371n-69s-75s-74s 289+1 T. Immelman (8), $12,99372s-71n-71s-75s 289+1 Martin Laird (8), $12,99372s-71n-73s-73s 289+1 Matt Every (8), $12,99369s-74n-73s-73s 289+1 D. LaBelle II (8), $12,99372s-71n-75s-71s 289+1 Mike Weir (2), $12,20066n-75s-73s-76s 290+2 Bryce Molder (2), $12,20068n-72s-78s-72s 290+2 Luke List (2), $12,20066n-75s-78s-71s 290+2 R. Karlsson (2), $12,20069n-74s-77s-70s 290+2D. Summerhays (2), $12,20072n-71s-74s-73s 290+2Colt Knost (1), $11,59069n-71s-73s-78s 291+3 Will Claxton (1), $11,59069n-69s-79s-74s 291+3 H. English (1), $11,59068s-70n-75s-78s 291+3 Justin Hicks (1), $11,59067s-70n-80s-74s 291+3 S. Gardiner (1), $11,59070n-73s-74s-74s 291+3 J. Mallinger (1), $10,91967n-74s-77s-74s 292+4 M. Thompson (1), $10,91971n-71s-75s-75s 292+4 Bo Van Pelt (1), $10,91967n-72s-72s-81s 292+4 J. Leonard (1), $10,91968n-71s-77s-76s 292+4 N. Lancaster (1), $10,91972n-71s-73s-76s 292+4 James Hahn (1), $10,91971s-72n-70s-79s 292+4 D.H. Lee (1), $10,43168n-74s-78s-73s 293+5 Steve LeBrun (1), $10,43168n-75s-74s-76s 293+5 S. Bae (1), $10,24870s-72n-76s-76s 294+6 Adam Hadwin66n-74s-69s-WDNHL standingsEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA New Jersey43017117 Pittsburgh532061514 N.Y. Islanders522151818 N.Y. Rangers523041416 Philadelphia624041318 Northeast Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Boston540191711 Ottawa531171610 Montreal43106137 Buffalo523041315 Toronto523041417 Southeast Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Tampa Bay541082413 Winnipeg531171514 Carolina523041418 Washington513131119 Florida51402819 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Chicago6600122213 St. Louis6510102413 Columbus623151119 Detroit522151116 Nashville511351014 Northwest Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Minnesota522151315 Vancouver522151416 Colorado4220499 Edmonton422041113 Calgary412131115 Pacific Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA San Jose550010238 Anaheim 431061514 Dallas 623151214 Los Angeles41213812 Phoenix 514021720 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Sundays Games Pittsburgh 2, Ottawa 1, SO Washington 3, Buffalo 2 Montreal 4, New Jersey 3, OT Tampa Bay 5, Philadelphia 1 Chicago 2, Detroit 1, OT St. Louis 5, Minnesota 4, OT Winnipeg 5, N.Y. Islanders 4, OT San Jose 4, Vancouver 1 Mondays Games Boston 5, Carolina 3 Columbus 2, Dallas 1 Nashville at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Colorado at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m. Vancouver at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. Tuesdays Games New Jersey at Boston, 7 p.m. Toronto at Buffalo, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. Winnipeg at Montreal, 7:30 p.m. Washington at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m. Florida at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m. Dallas at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Columbus at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Anaheim at San Jose, 10:30 p.m. Wednesdays Games Montreal at Ottawa, 7 p.m. Chicago at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Edmonton at Phoenix, 9:30 p.m. Colorado at Vancouver, 10 p.m.NBA standingsEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division WLPctGB New York2715.643 Brooklyn2718.6001 Boston2123.4777 Philadelphia1826.40910 Toronto1629.35612 Southeast Division WLPctGB Miami2813.683 Atlanta2519.5684 Orlando1430.31815 Washington1132.25618 Charlotte1133.25018 Central Division WLPctGB Chicago2717.614 Indiana2619.5781 Milwaukee2319.5483 Detroit1727.38610 Cleveland1332.28914 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division WLPctGB San Antonio3611.766 Memphis2915.6595 Houston2522.53211 Dallas1925.43215 New Orleans1529.34119 Northwest Division WLPctGB Oklahoma City3411.756 Denver2818.6096 Utah2421.53310 Portland2222.50011 Minnesota1724.41515 Pacific Division WLPctGB L.A. Clippers3313.717 Golden State2717.6145 L.A. Lakers1925.43213 Sacramento1729.37016 Phoenix1530.33317 Sundays Games Boston 100, Miami 98,2OT L.A. Lakers 105, Oklahoma City 96 New Orleans 91, Memphis 83 Detroit 104, Orlando 102 New York 106, Atlanta 104 Dallas 110, Phoenix 95 L.A. Clippers 96, Portland 83 Mondays Games Memphis 103, Philadelphia 100 Golden State 114, Toronto 102 Sacramento 96, Washington 94 Brooklyn 97, Orlando 77 Chicago 93, Charlotte 85 Denver 102, Indiana 101 Houston 125, Utah 80 Tuesdays Games Golden State at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Milwaukee at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Dallas at Portland, 10 p.m. New Orleans at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. Wednesdays Games Washington at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Detroit at Indiana, 7 p.m. Sacramento at Boston, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at New York, 7:30 p.m. Toronto at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Chicago at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Miami at Brooklyn, 8 p.m. Charlotte at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. Houston at Denver, 9 p.m. New Orleans at Utah, 9 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m. Mondays womens basketball scoresEAST Brooklyn 71, York (NY) 20 John Jay 75, Lehman 57 Marist 75, Siena 64 Monmouth (NJ) 61, Fairleigh Dickinson 53 Mount St. Marys 73, Wagner 58 Quinnipiac 82, CCSU 73 Sacred Heart 62, Bryant 44 St. Francis (NY) 69, LIU Brooklyn 58 St. Francis (Pa.) 72, Robert Morris 63 SOUTH Austin Peay 78, Jacksonville St. 71 Belmont 88, Morehead St. 45 Bethune-Cookman 55, Md.-Eastern Shore 54 Davidson 65, W. Carolina 56 Delaware St. 57, Florida A&M 53 E. Kentucky 62, Tennessee St. 54 ETSU 74, Jacksonville 57 Elon 70, Georgia Southern 59 Furman 80, Coll. of Charleston 71 Hampton 67, Howard 45 Jackson St. 70, Ark.-Pine Bluff 59 Kennesaw St. 55, Lipscomb 39 MVSU 50, Grambling St. 48 Martin Methodist 73, Fisk 55 Mercer 77, N. Kentucky 67 Miles 48, Lane 37 Morgan St. 55, NC Central 39 Murray St. 68, Tennessee Tech 52 NC A&T 70, Coppin St. 64 Notre Dame 77, Tennessee 67 SC-Upstate 64, North Florida 52 Samford 66, Appalachian St. 64 UNC-Greensboro 87, Wofford 75 Xavier (NO) 76, Mobile 58 MIDWEST Aquinas 65, Lourdes 44 Concordia (Mich.) 67, Indiana Tech 53 Cornerstone 63, Lawrence Tech 60 Davenport 70, Siena Heights 66 E. Illinois 84, UT-Martin 79 Green Bay 70, Wright St. 48 Northwestern 53, Indiana 39 SIU-Edwardsville 78, SE Missouri 65 SOUTHWEST Prairie View 68, Alabama A&M 59 Texas Southern 74, Alabama St. 40Mondays mens basketball scoresEAST Brooklyn 81, York (NY) 80 Delaware 66, Drexel 64 John Jay 86, Lehman 78 Montclair St. 78, Staten Island 73 SOUTH Bethune-Cookman 58, Md.-Eastern Shore 57 Delaware St. 57, Florida A&M 48 Jackson St. 82, Ark.-Pine Bluff 67 James Madison 63, UNC Wilmington 56 Kentucky St. 78, LeMoyne-Owen 67 Louisville 64, Pittsburgh 61 MVSU 65, Grambling St. 50 Martin Methodist 72, Fisk 70 NC A&T 63, Coppin St. 62 NC Central 69, Morgan St. 61 SC-Upstate 88, ETSU 71 Xavier (NO) 57, Mobile 53, OT MIDWEST Cornerstone 69, Lawrence Tech 45 Davenport 80, Siena Heights 48 Marquette 63, South Florida 50 SOUTHWEST Prairie View 65, Alabama A&M 46 Texas Southern 97, Alabama St. 65 FAR WEST E. Washington 76, Portland St. 65 Utah Valley 84, Peru St. 49Top 25 FaredMonday 1. Michigan (19-1) did not play. Next: vs. Northwestern, Wednesday. 2. Kansas (19-1) beat West Virginia 61-56. Next: vs. Oklahoma State, Saturday. 3. Indiana (18-2) did not play. Next: at Purdue, Wednesday. 4. Florida (16-2) did not play. Next: vs. South Carolina, Wednesday. 5. Duke (17-2) did not play. Next: at Wake Forest, Wednesday. 6. Syracuse (18-2) did not play. Next: at Pittsburgh, Saturday. 7. Gonzaga (19-2) did not play. Next: at Loyola Marymount, Thursday. 8. Arizona (17-2) did not play. Next: at Washington, Thursday. 9. Butler (17-3) did not play. Next: at St. Louis, Thursday. 10. Oregon (18-2) did not play. Next: at Stanford, Wednesday. 11. Ohio State (15-4) did not play. Next: vs. Wisconsin, Tuesday. 12. Louisville (17-4) beat Pittsburgh 64-61. Next: vs. No. 25 Marquette, Sunday. 13. Michigan State (17-4) did not play. Next: vs. Illinois, Thursday. 14. Miami (15-3) did not play. Next: at Virginia Tech, Wednesday. 15. Wichita State (19-2) did not play. Next: vs. Indiana State, Tuesday. 16. Mississippi (17-2) did not play. Next: vs. Kentucky, Tuesday. 17. Missouri (15-4) did not play. Next: at LSU, Wednesday. 18. Kansas State (15-4) did not play. Next: vs. Texas, Wednesday. 19. N.C. State (16-4) did not play. Next: at Virginia, Tuesday. 20. New Mexico (17-3) did not play. Next: at Wyoming, Wednesday. 21. Creighton (18-3) did not play. Next: vs. Missouri State, Wednesday. 22. San Diego State (16-4) did not play. Next: at Air Force, Saturday. 23. Minnesota (15-5) did not play. Next: vs. Nebraska, Tuesday. 24. Cincinnati (16-4) did not play. Next: vs. Rutgers, Wednesday. 25. Marquette (15-4) beat South Florida 63-50. Next: at No. 12 Louisville, Sunday. The AP Top 25The top 25 teams in The Associated Press college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Jan. 27, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last weeks ranking: RecordPtsPrv 1. Michigan (51)19-11,6112 2. Kansas (13)18-11,5723 3. Indiana18-21,4577 4. Florida (1)16-21,4208 5. Duke17-21,3281 6. Syracuse18-21,3223 7. Gonzaga19-21,17710 8. Arizona17-21,1606 9. Butler17-31,0239 10. Oregon18-296916 11. Ohio St.15-494514 12. Louisville16-49055 13. Michigan St.17-489713 14. Miami15-389425 15. Wichita St.19-262120 16. Mississippi17-247323 17. Missouri15-446422 18. Kansas St.15-446311 19. NC State16-443118 20. New Mexico17-333315 21. Creighton18-331217 22. San Diego St.16-4302 23. Minnesota15-528112 24. Cincinnati16-422021 25. Marquette14-4216 Others receiving votes: Georgetown 121, UNLV 56, Wisconsin 45, UCLA 34, Arizona St. 14, Notre Dame 12, Pittsburgh 10, Louisiana Tech 8, Villanova 6, Baylor 5, Iowa St. 4, Memphis 4, VCU 4, La Salle 3, Saint Marys (Cal) 2, Colorado St. 1.USA Today/ESPN Top 25The top 25 teams in the USA Today-ESPN mens college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Jan. 27, points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last weeks ranking: RecordPtsPvs 1. Kansas (16)18-17602 2. Michigan (14)19-17573 3. Indiana18-26868 4. Florida (1)16-26857 5. Duke17-26441 6. Syracuse18-26244 7. Gonzaga19-258010 8. Arizona17-25576 9. Michigan State17-445911 10. Butler17-34479 11. Ohio State15-443815 12. Oregon18-243519 13. Louisville16-44225 14. Wichita State19-234021 15. Miami15-3326 16. Mississippi17-225224 17. Creighton18-324912 18. Missouri15-423422 19. N.C. State16-419418 20. San Diego State16-417125 21. Kansas State15-416613 22. New Mexico17-315917 23. Cincinnati16-413420 24. Minnesota15-58714 25. Marquette14-475 Others receiving votes: Georgetown 33, UNLV 32, VCU 27, Wisconsin 25, Pittsburgh 18, Notre Dame 13, UCLA 10, Baylor 7, Southern Miss. 7, Colorado State 6, Saint Marys 5, La Salle 3, Oklahoma State 3, Arizona State 2, Middle Tennessee 2, Louisiana Tech 1.The Womens AP Top 25The top 25 teams in the The Associated Press womens college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Jan. 27, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last weeks ranking: RecordPtsPrv 1. Baylor (37)18-19971 2. Notre Dame18-19532 3. UConn (3)18-19303 4. Stanford18-28536 5. Duke18-18344 6. California17-27907 7. Penn St.17-27688 8. Kentucky19-26955 9. Tennessee16-36919 10. Maryland17-367410 11. North Carolina19-249511 12. Louisville17-449113 13. Georgia17-347014 14. Purdue17-344615 15. South Carolina18-344218 16. Texas A&M16-543516 17. Dayton17-135717 18. UCLA15-433919 19. Oklahoma St.15-331512 20. Florida St.17-325322 21. Oklahoma15-421120 22. Colorado15-420520 23. Iowa St.14-410224 24. Iowa16-579 25. Delaware15-366 Others receiving votes: Michigan 42, UTEP 21, Villanova 11, Texas Tech 10, Syracuse 6, Duquesne 4, Green Bay 4, Michigan St. 4, Kansas 2, Nebraska 2, Vanderbilt 2, LSU 1. BASEBALL National League PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Agreed to terms with INF Yuniesky Betancourt on a minorleague contract. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS Agreed to terms with INF Ronny Cedeno on a one-year contract and C Rob Johnson, C J.R. Towles and OF Justin Christian on minor-league contracts. Named Bengie Molina assistant hitting coach. Designated LHP Barret Browning for assignment. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association DALLAS MAVERICKS Signed G Mike James for the remainder of the season. HOUSTON ROCKETS Recalled F-C Donatas Motiejunas from Rio Grande Valley (NBADL). PHILADELPHIA 76ERS Signed G Shelvin Mack to a second 10-day contract. FOOTBALL National Football League BUFFALO BILLS Named Kurt Anderson and Jason Vrable offensive quality control coaches. CHICAGO BEARS Signed C Cyhl Quarles to a a reserve/future contract. CLEVELAND BROWNS Named Fred Nance senior advisor and special counsel. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS Signed OL Ryan Durand. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS Reassigned G Frederik Andersen to the Danish national team and F Ryan Lasch from Norfolk (AHL) to Vaxjo (Swedish Elite). NEW JERSEY DEVILS Assigned LW Mattias Tedenby to Albany (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS Recalled F Mika Zibanejad from Binghamton (AHL). Florida LOTTERY Here are the winning numbers selected Monday in the Florida Lottery: CASH 3 (early) 0 7 8 CASH 3 (late) 0 0 2 PLAY 4 (early) 3 9 1 9 PLAY 4 (late) 1 6 6 5 FANTASY 5 12 15 16 27 31TUESDAY, JANUARY29, 2013 B3 NFL is in real trouble as well as football at every level isnt as hard a sell as it seems. Sure, the game has never been more popular. The league is taking in nearly $10 billion annually, breaking its own record TV telecasts almost on a weekly basis, and could repeat the feat again Sunday in New Orleans, when the 49ers tee it up against the Ravens. But just a few weeks later, arguments are scheduled to begin in Philadelphia in one lawsuit brought on behalf of former players and their families contending the league failed to warn them about the dangers of concussions and then concealed those risks even in the face of mounting evidence. Yet even lawsuits may not represent the most serious threat to the NFLs long-term existence. The concussion issue is forcing people to choose sides and yet the real challenge, I think, will be holding together the coalition that made the game so popular players, coaches, parents and fans, said attorney Robert Boland, who teaches sports law at New York Universitys Tisch Center, and has worked previously as an agent. Theres already a bar for young players to get into the game; the cost of equipment, the staffing it requires, and if the insurers get nervous and drive up the costs even further, that might be the biggest short-term threat. President Obama tackled that issue in a recent interview with The New Republic, saying that he anticipated less exciting pro football as safety concerns change the way its played. What really worried him, though, was whether those changes at the top would filter down to the lower levels of the sport soon enough. Im a big football fan, but I have to tell you if I had a son, Id have to think long and hard before I let him play football, Obama said. I tend to be more worried about college players than NFL players in the sense that the NFL players have a union. Theyre grown men. They can make some of these decisions on their own, and most of them are well-compensated for the violence they do to their bodies, he added. You read some of these stories about college players who undergo some of these same problems with concussions and so forth and then have nothing to fall back on. Thats something that Id like to see the NCAA think about. Dont expect action from the NCAA anytime soon, but the NFL and its players union may not have the luxury of time. A quick sampling of comments during media day showed many players still favor the status quo, risks and all. Thats what we all know coming into the game, 49ers linebacker Aldon Smith said. We all signed up for it. Its not like we signed up and thought we were going to play tennis, you know? His coach, one-time NFL quarterback Jim Harbaugh, took that cavalier attitude a step further, when asked to respond to the presidents remarks. Well, I have a 4-month-old almost, soon-tobe 5-month-old son, Jack Harbaugh, and if President Obama feels that way, then (there will) be a little less competition for Jack Harbaugh when he gets older, Harbaugh chuckled. Thats the first thing that jumps into my mind, if other parents are thinking that way. Keep in mind that the NFLs nightmare scenario played out on a football field an hour from Boston only a few months ago. In a Pop Warner game between longtime rivals, five kids between the ages of 10 and 12 were concussed, all on the losing team, three in the first quarter and the last one on the final play. I think its being taken seriously, but as far as young people starting to play, we need better and smarter instruction than ever before, said former Saints quarterback Archie Manning. You only get so many chances and weve let a lot slip past. We cant afford too many more misses, he said finally, Weve got to get it right.Jim Litke is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at jlitke@ap.org and follow him at Twitter.com/JimLitke. Senior Jared Bogart (six rebounds) converted a three-point play with a kiss off the glass as he was fouled. Bogart made the free throw to give Seven Rivers a 40-4 cushion in the third quarter. Senior center Liam Cash contributed six points on the evening. The lone Branford highlight of the night was a 3pointer by Jose Barron in the fourth quarter. The Warriors travel to The Villages for a 7 p.m. showdown Thursday night. SUNKContinued from Page B1 LITKEContinued from Page B1 Still, the game after two meetings during the season in which Seven Rivers outscored the Eagles a combined 104-7 was not a true test for the Warriors, particularly with the starters on the bench for most of the second half and sizable portions of the first. Seven Rivers led 15-5 after one quarter, and then despite an 8-for-35 thirdquarter shooting performance shut out First Academy, outscoring the Eagles 17-0 to take a 4512 advantage into the final eight minutes. Once again, the Zachar sisters paced Seven Rivers, Andrea scoring 19 points and Alexis contributing 15. Tyne Amos topped First Academy (6-11) with six points. St. John coach Kimberly Pompey knows the Zachar sisters are where the Saints must concentrate their defensive efforts. We have to be patient with the ball and make decisions when to run a fast game and when to slow it down (against Seven Rivers), Pompey said. The last time we played them we beat them by a good margin. Normally we play a manto-man defense, but against them we played a 23 zone and packed it inside and didnt go outside. They have those twin towers, she added, referring to the Zachars, 6-foot-1 Andrea and 6foot-3 Alexis. We have to make it difficult for them to make inside shots. Its a strategy many teams have tried, but few have pulled off. Another option is to apply fullcourt pressure, a strategy that seemed to take the Warriors out of their game early in the season but something that hasnt worked so well lately. Against Lecantos pressure attempts, Seven Rivers got easy baskets in constructing a 22-9 lead after one quarter while committing just three turnovers. One thing that cant be taken too seriously is St. Johns 12-10 record. We played a lot of higher-level teams, Pompey said. Dreyer is well aware of his district final opponents ability, a team that beat Seven Rivers 68-42 on Dec. 21. If you look at that game, we lost three of the four quarters by six points, he said, admitting, They killed us in the third quarter. We certainly have to play better defense, Dreyer said. Well have to be ready to play a 32-minute game, and well have to play a very good game. That much is certain. WARRIORSContinued from Page B1

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TodaysHOROSCOPE Spotlight onPEOPLE FloridaLOTTERIES Today inHISTORY Birthday You need not be fearful of having more than one major objective in the year ahead. Even if others might be unable to handle multiple ventures simultaneously, you should be able to do so with grace and aplomb. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) An involvement where you share a mutual interest with another should work out quite smoothly today in some dealings you have with a person who is very difficult to please. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) The timing could be unusually good for you to make a request of someone who doesnt readily grant favors. Point out to this person what would be in it for him or her. Aries (March 21-April 19) By cleaning out the basement, attic or garage, you might discover some gems that you put aside in the past and forgot about. Be sure to open all those old boxes. Taurus (April 20-May 20) A social gathering could pair you with someone whom youve been very eager to approach. Dont be hesitant to introduce the reason why you wanted to get in touch. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Certain financial or commercial matters can be successfully concluded to your satisfaction if youre willing to take the time and effort to do so. Dont coast when you can run. Cancer (June 21-July 22) Someone older or more experienced might point out a new direction for you. It could be some of the best advice youve received in a long time. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Youre in a favorable cycle for profiting from situations initiated by someone else. Be on the alert for anything different that sounds enticing. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Even if some of your present expectations seem to be a bit outlandish to some of your friends, they really arent that far-fetched from your perspective. Your view is clearer than theirs. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Something extremely constructive could develop through the efforts of another, which will give you the assistance you need to get ahead. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Youre likely to get an opportunity to cultivate a new friendship. It might even be with someone whom youve been anxious to get to know better. This could be the start of something beautiful. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) A little extra effort where your career is concerned could put you out in front of the pack. Be assertive and conscientious when pursuing your objectives. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) If you allow a past educational experience to guide you, everything should work out quite beautifully in your dealings with someone who is very difficult to please. SUNDAY, JANUARY 27 Fantasy 5: 10 11 13 20 35 5-of-5No winner 4-of-5212$555 3-of-57,998$22 SATURDAY, JANUARY 26 Powerball: 3 22 26 41 49 Powerball: 18 5-of-5 PBNo winner No Florida winner 5-of-56 winners$1 million No Florida winner Lotto: 3 4 5 38 39 41 6-of-6No winner 5-of-627$6,066.50 4-of-61,755$76 3-of-638,577$5 Fantasy 5: 6 7 9 17 24 5-of-52 winners$135,609.03 4-of-5542$80.50 3-of-515,166$8 Today is Tuesday, Jan. 29, the 29th day of 2013. There are 336 days left in the year. Todays Highlight: On Jan. 29, 1963, poet Robert Frost died in Boston at age 88. On this date: In 1820, Britains King George III died at Windsor Castle. In 1845, Edgar Allan Poes poem The Raven was first published in the New York Evening Mirror In 1861, Kansas became the 34th state of the Union. In 1863, the Bear River Massacre took place as the U.S. Army attacked Shoshone in present-day Idaho. In 1919, the ratification of the 18th Amendment to the Constitution, which launched Prohibition, was certified by Acting Secretary of State Frank L. Polk. In 1929, The Seeing Eye, a New Jersey-based school which trains guide dogs to assist the blind, was incorporated by Dorothy Harrison Eustis and Morris Frank. In 1936, the first inductees of baseballs Hall of Fame, including Ty Cobb and Babe Ruth, were named in Cooperstown, N.Y. In 1958, actors Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward were married in Las Vegas. In 1979, President Jimmy Carter formally welcomed Chinese Vice Premier Deng Xiaoping to the White House, following the establishment of diplomatic relations. In 1998, a bomb rocked an abortion clinic in Birmingham, Ala., killing security guard Robert Sanderson and critically injuring nurse Emily Lyons. (The bomber, Eric Rudolph, was captured in May 2003 and is serving a life sentence.) Ten years ago: The Congressional Budget Office predicted the federal deficit for fiscal 2003 would soar to $199 billion even without President George W. Bushs new tax cut plan or a war against Iraq. Five years ago: John McCain won a breakthrough triumph in the Florida primary, easing past Mitt Romney for his first-ever triumph in a primary open only to Republicans. One year ago: Eleven people were killed when smoke and fog caused a series of fiery crashes on I-75 in Florida. Todays birthdays: Actor Noel Harrison is 79. Author Germaine Greer is 74. Actress Katharine Ross is 73. Actor Tom Selleck is 68. Rhythm-and-blues singer Bettye LaVette is 67. Rock musician Tommy Ramone is 61. Singer Charlie Wilson is 60. Talk show host Oprah Winfrey is 59. Country singer Irlene Mandrell is 57. Actress Diane Delano is 56. Actress Judy Norton Taylor (The Waltons) is 55. Rock musician Johnny Spampinato is 54. Olympic gold-medal diver Greg Louganis is 53. Rock musician Eddie Jackson (Queensryche) is 52. Actor Nicholas Turturro is 51. Actor-director Edward Burns is 45. Actress Heather Graham is 43. Actor Sharif Atkins is 38. Actress Sara Gilbert is 38. Blues musician Jonny Lang is 32. Pop-rock singer Adam Lambert is 31. Thought for Today: And were an epitaph to be my story Id have a short one ready for my own. I would have written of me on my stone: I had a lovers quarrel with the world. Robert Frost (18741963). INSIDE THE NUMBERS To verify the accuracy of winning lotter y numbers, players should double-check the numbers printed above with numbers officially posted by the Florida Lottery. Go to www. flalottery.com, or call 850487-7777. SO YOU KNOW Last nights winning n umbers, Page B4 Page B4TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Brown investigated for possible assaultWEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif. Authorities are investigating allegations that Grammywinning singer Chris Brown assaulted a man in a West Hollywood parking lot. The Los Angeles County Sheriffs Department says deputies responded to a report Sunday night of six men fighting. Witnesses told deputies that the brief fight was over a parking space. The department says the altercation allegedly led to Chris Brown punching the victim. The victim wasnt identified, but the celebrity website TMZ, which first reported the incident outside a recording studio, says the fight also involved Frank Ocean, a nominee in the upcoming Grammy Awards. He later tweeted that he got jumped by (Brown) and a couple guys and suffered a finger cut..Randy Travis to enter drunken-driving pleaSHERMAN, Texas A prosecutor says country music star Randy Travis is expected to enter a guilty plea in a drunken-driving case in North Texas. Grayson County District Attorney Joe Brown says details of the agreement will be released following Travis court appearance Thursday in Sherman. Travis was naked when he was arrested following a singlevehicle accident Aug. 7 near Tioga, about 60 miles north of Dallas. Authorities have said his blood-alcohol level was more than 0.15. The legal limit for driving is 0.08. Brown says Travis will plead guilty to misdemeanor drunken driving, punishable by up to two years in jail and a $4,000 fine. The 53-year-old Travis also faced a retaliation charge for allegedly threatening officers, though that charge is no longer in court files. His attorney wasnt available for comment.Star Wars prequel remakes postponedLOS ANGELES The force isnt with the 3-D versions of the Star Wars prequels. Lucasfilm said in a statement Monday that its postponing the scheduled 3-D releases of Star Wars: Episode II Attack Of The Clones and Episode III Revenge of the Sith this fall to instead focus its efforts on Star Wars: Episode VII. The Walt Disney Co. confirmed Friday that J.J. Abrams, creator of the TV series Lost and director of 2009s Star Trek movie, will direct the seventh installment of the franchise, set for a 2014 release. Disney bought Star Wars maker Lucasfilm last month for $4.06 billion. Episode I The Phantom Menace was released in 3-D last February and earned $22.4 million domestically its opening weekend. The original prequels were released from 1999 to 2005. From wire reports Chris Brown Randy Travis Associated PressPresident Barack Obama listens Jan. 21 as Beyonce sings the national anthem at the ceremonial swearing-in at the U.S. Capitol during the 57th Presidential Inauguration in Washington, D.C. Whether Beyonce actually sang at the inauguration is a tempest in a teapot, but dig deeper and it reveals something about American society at this moment. TEDANTHONY Associated Press PITTSBURGHThe breathtaking model on your magazine cover: Of course shes not that thin and unblemished. That reality show you never miss? Youre shocked shocked that its real-life drama isnt 100 percent unscripted. And that diva who may or may not have mouthed the words to the national anthem to her own prerecorded voice? Yeah, well, so what? It was a big moment, and she wanted to sound her best. In America these days, in countless tiny ways, much of what we see and experience isnt exactly what it seems. We know it, too. And often we dont care, because what were getting just seems to pop more than its gardenvariety, without-the-specialsauce counterpart. Whether Beyonce actually sang at last weeks presidential inauguration the jurys still out, and shes kept silent is, on the surface, the textbook teapot tempest. Dig deeper, though, and the conversation or lack of it reveals something important about society at this moment. The big question is no longer whether reality matters. That ship sailed long ago. More to the point is this: Can reality compete? Its as if the fakery has become satisfactory, says Jonathan Vankin, co-writer of Forever Dusty, a musical that takes events from the life of the late soul singer Dusty Springfield and carefully dramatizes them. I think almost everyone knows that were constantly being fed unreality. And yet there seems to be very little curiosity about figuring out whats really going on, says Vankin. Many, including some of Beyonces fans and friends, consider the inauguration debate ridiculous because, after all, even if she was lipsyncing she was doing it to her own powerful voice. Fair enough. That ignores, however, two aspects of live performance. First is what some consider an implicit contract between a performer and a live audience the expectation that the audience deserves a performance thats in the moment and that might, just might, even be affected by the presence of the crowd. If none of that happens, then why not stay home, skip the hassle and listen to your iPod? And second, the version of Beyonces voice that might be recorded in a studio with potential help from digital enhancement and sweetening could be quite different from the one produced live on a windy, wintry January day. Reality is complicated, messy, and uncertain. We want it to be shrink-wrapped and labeled clearly, says Mark Carnes, general editor of Past Imperfect: History According to the Movies and a historian at Barnard College. We prefer the crisp clarity of sound bites and slogans to the blaring cacophony of the world around us. Its hardly just music. These examples of artifice in miniature pop up everywhere in American culture so much so that we hardly even notice it. We take it for granted that our Cheetos and Doritos are bright orange because thats the color that says really cheesy to us. We purchase Yankee Candles called Home Sweet Home that evoke a heartwarming blend of cinnamon, baking spices and a hint of freshly poured tea even if we have no intention of doing any baking or brewing whatsoever. Fundraisers sending out bulk mail now commonly use envelopes shaped like personal greeting cards and do their utmost to make the address look like its handwritten expressly to you, sometimes even adding personal notes that are written diagonally across the back. And at Walt Disney W orld, ground zero of artifice, you can go for a Caribbean vacation or a visit to Morocco without ever encountering the inconvenient realities of the actual locations such as, say, upset stomachs and poor people. And digital photo retouching: The tools of artifice, once accessible only to professionals, have gone democratic. Now manipulators by the millions can use something called a clone tool to erase blemishes, unwanted features and entire people. With the tap of a smartphone touchscreen, you can make an image taken seconds ago look like a vintage snapshot from a 1972 Polaroid or a 19th-century tintype. But it is in entertainment a realm custom built for artifice that this notion plays out most broadly. In a nation already disgusted by media bias a September Gallup poll showed 60 percent of Americans have little or no trust in the mass media to report the news accurately and fairly does this stuff that dances at the edges have any effect in the long run? Its a difficult thing to measure, but just consider: If little things in life arent what they seem, how well does that bode for our society? Maybe, just maybe, were all a little tired of being tricked, be it great trickery or be it small trickery, says Virginia Lee Blood, a musician and singer in Nashville, Tenn. More than that, though, are we setting up unrealistic expectations about the world, piece by tiny piece? How could that boring slice of real cheese be any good if its not bright orange and doesnt pop with artificial Cheetos flavor? How can you be satisfied with your romantic partner when every smidgen of media in the checkout line hands you ridiculously unattainable images of human perfection? And how can you persuade a young girl who wants to grow up to sing like Beyonce that, yes, with practice and hard work she might belt out the national anthem at the inauguration or sing in a Super Bowl halftime show one day if such performances turn out to be not entirely what they seem? Even Kurt Cobain, whose music was welcomed by many as a burst of show-business authenticity, struggled with the issue. In his 1994 suicide note he weighed in once more, this time about pretending to be enthusiastic on stage. The worst crime I can think of, Cobain wrote, would be to rip people off by faking it. Of course, his band Nirvana also produced, much more famously, six words that encapsulated the era in which we live and give us what is perhaps the ultimate verdict on this issue. Here we are now, he sang. Entertain us.Ted Anthony writes about American culture for The Associated Press. Beyonce brouhaha: Should we really prefer unreality?

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Consumer alertHEALTH& LIFE In the past couple of years, I have discussed the growing body of evidence that supports a link to obesity and the risk of cancer. Every day, we learn more and more about this link, and the many cancers related to obesity, including those of the pancreas, colon, breast, esophagus, kidney, uterus and gallbladder. As a matter of fact, after smoking, being overweight or obese is the biggest risk factor for Less alcohol for healthy weight See BENNETT/ Page C5 Dr. Sunil GandhiCANCER & BLOOD DISEASE Everything in excess is poison Recently, I saw a 70-year-old white male patient. He went to see his primary care physician for routine follow-up. He had blood work that included a completed blood count (CBC). It showed he had too many red blood cells (RBCs) in his blood. This condition is called polycythemia. RBCs transport oxygen from the lungs to all over the body. So one may think that the more RBCs, the merrier. This will provide more oxygen to the body and that can only be good for the person. I am sure you have Almost everybody knows what gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is. Old terminology used to be heartburn. But I would be willing to bet not many people are familiar with laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is, as it is a relatively new diagnosis. Reflux is a word that comes from the Greeks and it means backflow in this case, the contents usually from the stomach. In normal situations, the things we eat dont back up into the throat, but if there is a problem, that is where it usually ends up. Laryngopharyngeal reflux refers to an area of the throat and voice box that can be affected by this backflow, and it can occur day or night, even if you havent eaten recently. Some people suffer with the real, obvious discomfort called heartburn. But most people with LPR do not have heartburn, because the material that backflows from the stomach Signs of silent reflux Many of our bodily functions are subject to the influence of the circadian rhythm. This rhythm is related to the biological clock which dictates the mental, physical and behavioral changes that follow a roughly 24-hour cycle of light and darkness. The circadian rhythm can be observed in most living organism including animals, plants and even tiny microbes. This natural oscillation influences the sleep-wake cycles, hormonal secretion, body temperature and kidney function. The master clock that regulates the various circadian rhythms of the body resides in a group of nerve cells in the brain called the suprachiasmatic nucleus, or SCN, in the hypothalamus. See KUMAR/ Page C4 See GRILLO/ Page C5 Dr. Denis GrilloEAR, NOSE & THROAT Section CTUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE INSIDE Dr. Ed Dodge /Page C2Dr. Richard Hoffmann /Page C3 Dr. C. Joseph BennettNAVIGATING CANCER So you know: T he information contained in the Health & Life section is not intended to cover all possible directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects and is not intended to replace consultation with a physician. See GANDHI/ Page C5 Dr. Udaya KumarUROLOGY TODAY Does the bladder have a clock? New health care markets on the wayRICARDOALONSOZALDIVAR Associated Press WASHINGTONBuying your own health insurance will never be the same. This fall, new insurance markets called exchanges will open in each state, marking the long-awaited and muchdebated debut of President Barack Obamas health care overhaul. The goal is quality coverage for millions of uninsured people in the United States. What the reality will look like is anybodys guess from bureaucracy, confusion and indifference to seamless service and satisfied customers. Exchanges will offer individuals and their families a choice of private health plans resembling what workers at major companies already get. The government will help many middle-class households pay their premiums, while lowincome people will be referred to safety-net programs they might qualify for. Most people will go online to pick a plan when open enrollment starts Oct. 1. Counselors will be available at call centers and in local communities, too. Some areas will get a storefront operation or kiosks at the mall. Translation to Spanish and other languages spoken by immigrants will be provided. When you pick a plan, youll no longer have to worry about getting turned down or charged more because of a medical problem. If youre a woman, you cant be charged a higher premium because of gender. Middle-aged people and those nearing retirement will get a price break: They cant be charged more than three times what younger customers pay, compared with six times or seven times today. If all this sounds too good to be true, remember that nothing in life is free and change isnt easy.Sticker shockStarting Jan. 1, 2014, when coverage takes effect in the exchanges, virtually everyone in the country will be required by law to have health insurance or face fines. The mandate is meant to get everybody paying into the insurance pool. Obamas law is called the Affordable Care Act, but some people in the new markets might experience sticker shock over their premiums. Smokers will face a financial penalty. Younger, well-to-do people who havent seen the need for health insurance may not be eligible for income-based assistance with their premiums. Many people, even if they get government help, will find that health insurance still doesnt come cheaply. Monthly premiums will be less than the mortgage or rent, but maybe more than a car loan. The coverage, however, will be more robust than most individual plans currently sold. Consider a hypothetical family of four making $60,000 and headed by a 40-year-old. Theyll be eligible for a government tax credit of $7,193 toward their annual premium of $12,130. But theyd still have to pay $4,937, about 8 percent of their income, or about $410 a month. A lower-income family would get a better deal from the governments sliding-scale subsidies. Consider a similar four-person family making $35,000. Theyd get a $10,742 tax credit toward the $12,130 annual premium. Theyd have to pay $1,388, about 4 percent of their income, or about $115 a month. The figures come from the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundations online Health Reform Subsidy Calculator. But while the government assistance is called a tax credit and computed through the income tax system, the money doesnt come to you in a refund. It goes directly to insurers.Information neededObamas law is the biggest thing thats happened to health care since Medicare and Medicaid in the 1960s. But with open enrollment for exchange plans less than 10 months away, theres a dearth of consumer information. Its as if the consumer angle got drowned out by the political worlds dispute over Obamacare, the dismissive label coined by Republican foes. Yet exchanges are coming to every state, even those led by staunch GOP opponents of the overhaul, such as Govs. Rick Perry of Texas and Nikki Haley of South Carolina. In their states and close to 20 others that are objecting, the exchanges will be operated by the federal government, over state opposition. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius has pledged that ON THE NET For an interactive map showing the type of e xchange and the number of uninsured residents in each state: http://hosted.ap.org/interactives/ 2012/healthcare Associated PressBusiness developer Robert Schultz poses for a photo Jan. 8 outside his home office in Newton, Mass. Buying your own health insurance will never be the same. This fall, new insurance markets called exchanges will open in each state, the long-awaited and much-debated debut of President Barack Obamas health care overhaul. Schultz is a Boston-area startup business consultant who got his MBA in 2008, when the economy was tanking. Yet he was able to find coverage when he graduated and hang on to his insurance through job changes since. See ALERT/ Page C4 000DMNW Little to no out of pocket expense for most Medicare Patients with secondary insurances. For Appointment Call Toll Free 1-855-Gulfcoast (1-855-485-3262) www.gulfcoastspine.net Get Back Into Get Back Into Get Back Into The Swing Of Life The Swing Of Life The Swing Of Life With With With Minimally Minimally Minimally Invasive Invasive Invasive Spine Spine Spine Surgery Surgery Surgery Failed Laser Spine Surgery Spinal Stenosis Herniated Disc Degenerative Disc Disease Scoliosis Spinal Fractures due to Trauma or Osteoporosis Board Certified Spine Surgeons Specializing in the Treatment of Back and Leg Pain Due to: Minimally Invasive Spine Surgeons James J. Ronzo, D.O. Frank S. Bono, D.O. Board Certified, Fellowship Trained

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LifeSouth Community Blood Centers: Three blood types remain in emergency demand: O-negative, Opositive and A-negative. LifeSouth urges all eligible donors who are feeling healthy to come out and support their communities by donating blood as soon as possible. Donors in January will be entered in a drawing to win an iPad mini. To find a donor center or a blood drive near you, call 352-527-3061. Donors must be at least 17, or 16 with parental permission, weigh a minimum of 110 pounds and be in good health to be eligible to donate. A photo ID is required. The Lecanto branch office is at 1241 S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491), open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays (7 p.m. Wednesdays), 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays. The Inverness branch is at 301 W. Main St., open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays, (6:30 p.m. Wednesdays), 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturdays and closed Sundays. Visit www.lifesouth.org. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 29, Walmart Supercenter, West Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness. 2 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 30, Citrus County Chronicle, Meadowcrest Boulevard, Crystal River. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 30, Crystal River Village Home Owners Association, Southeast Eighth Avenue, Crystal River. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 31, Lecanto High School, West Educational Path, Lecanto. Flu shot clinics areofferedby B&W Rexall Drugs in Inverness. Call Donna Stevenson at 352-726-1555. Nature Coast EMS offer flu shots for $28; however, the flu shot is free with valid Medicare Part B, and many other insurance providers are also accepted. Flu shots are available 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, (except holidays), at the Nature Coast EMS administration office on Homosassa Trail at Country Hill Drive in Lecanto. If your organization, business, ALF or other group would like to schedule a flu clinic at your location, call Jane Bedford at 352-2494751 or email JaneB@ naturecoastems.org. SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospital H2U Partners Club events during January. The hospital is at 11375 Cortez Blvd., Spring Hill, 1.9 miles east of U.S. 19 on State Road 50. Visit OakHill Hospital.com. 10 a.m. Jan. 29 Blood pressure screening. 10:30 a.m. Jan. 29 Buddys Band. 12:30 p.m. Jan. 30 Meet & Eat. CRYSTAL RIVER Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center offers the following health education programs presented by board-certified physicians and licensed medical professionals. Website: SevenRivers Regional.com. Call 352-7951234 to register. Prostate Cancer Screening During January, men older than 40 who have not had a prostate cancer screening in the past 12 months are welcome to register for a free prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and physical exam on Wednesday, Jan. 30, in the hospitals Ambulatory Surgery Center. Appointments are limited and will be scheduled between 4 and 7 p.m. Call 800-436-8436 to schedule your appointment. Good News About Knee & Hip Pain Attend this program to find out how you may be able to relieve your knee or hip pain, 1 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 13, in the Medical Offices Building Community Room at Seven Rivers Regional. Program is free; registration requested. Code Blue: Heart Emergencies Workshop Learn about emergency cardiac care, interventional procedures and other potentially life-saving heart emergency treatments, 1 to 3 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 27, at Nature Coast EMS in Lecanto. Program is free; registration requested. Pre-Surgery Ortho Camp Having knee or hip replacement surgery? Attend this program to learn preand post-surgery exercises, how to use a walker, knee and hip precautions and adaptive equipment that may be needed for activities of daily living. Offered at 1 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 5, at Seven Rivers Regional. Program is free; registration required. Breastfeeding/Infant Care Expectant or new mothers learn helpful techniques for successful breastfeeding as well as basic infant care at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12, in the Medical Offices Building Community Room. Program is free; registration required. Four-week Childbirth Education Expectant couples learn about labor, delivery and relaxation techniques, exercising, newborn characteristics and breastfeeding. Begins at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 7, in the Medical Offices Building Community Room. Cost is $30; registration required. Free eight-week Griefs Journey workshop from 10:30 a.m. to noon Wednesdays beginning Jan. 30 for those who have experienced the death of a loved one, hosted by Paul Winstead, licensed mental health counselor and grief counselor with the Citrus team of HPH Hospice, at the First United Methodist Church of Homosassa. The experience of grieving and mourning the death of a loved one may be the most profound and intense emotional experience we have. Each individual experiences grief differently, but we can often identify with those who have also experienced the death of a loved one and not feel so alone. This educational and supportive course shows grief as a process in which the timing, intensity and order of each persons experiences are unique. Preregistration is required. For information, call Winstead at 352-527-4600. HPH Healing Peoples Hearts in Citrus County offers care, comfort and support for community members. Visit HPH-Hospice.org. HPH Hospice, Healing Peoples Hearts, two-day new volunteer orientation from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 30, and Friday, Feb. 1, at the HPH Team offices, 3545 N. Lecanto Highway in the Winn-Dixie shopping plaza in Beverly Hills. HPH staff believe if you want to do more with your own life, there is no volunteer opportunity more rewarding than working with hospice. Qualifications needed: Caring heart, positive attitude, extra love to share and a big smile that appears on demand. RSVP or receive information by calling Debi Shields, volunteer coordinator, at 352-527-4600. PORT RICHEY The Alzheimers Family Organization will present its 13th annual Gong Show at 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, at the Jewish Community Center in PortC2TUESDAY, JANUARY29, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE HEALTH& LIFE Dr. Dodge sets off on Zimbabwe adventures Iflew out of San Antonio on Friday, Jan. 11, for the first leg of my trip to Zimbabwe. At Dulles airport in Washington, D.C., I connected with South African Airways for the long flight to Africa. My re-entry into Zimbabwe the next day reminded me how interesting life in Africa can be. The driver from Africa University was not at the airport to pick me up when I arrived at 9:30 p.m. After waiting until 10, I decided to take a taxi to the Holiday Inn. The taxi driver turned out to be a personable young pastor of a church in a low-income suburb of Harare. He drove a taxi parttime in order to make a living. I enjoyed talking with him and appreciated his good driving! After breakfast the next morning, the Africa University driver picked me up for the four-hour drive to the campus. He was deeply apologetic for missing me at the airport, having misunderstood the time of my arrival. He went to the airport at 1:30 a.m. to meet me! How could I not forgive him? It rained steadily all the way from Harare to Mutare, the rainy season having arrived a couple of weeks before I did. The countryside is lush, and the campus, in the rolling hills of Zimbabwes Eastern Highlands, is especially pretty now because of all the rain, though it also makes many walking paths muddy and slippery. Housekeeping adventures The AU Guest House keys were not available when I arrived Sunday night, so I was put up at the old farmhouse. Monday morning, I was greeted with smiles, hugs and handshakes everywhere on campus. By Monday evening, the personnel office transferred me to the Faculty Guest House, but my room had not been readied as thought, and all the help had gone home. Fortunately, I still knew how to make a bed! Electric power is often intermittent in Zimbabwe. We had no lights and I couldnt use the guest house stove for the first couple of days. Happily, candlelight needs no electricity, and I was thankful for the traditional sadza, greens and brown-bean dinners at the dining hall. When power came on at the guest house again, I was able to start cooking my own meals. If youre interested in reading about my culinary adventures, please read my blog. As you may gather from this quick sketch, one never knows what the next day will bring in Zimbabwe, but that keeps us on our toes. Even though many of these challenges are minor, every day is an adventure. Unfortunately, there are also more serious difficulties that Africa University is wrestling with. Ill touch on these briefly to give you an inkling of the problems it faces. Academic adventures There are serious challenges at Africa University, primarily due to the worsening economic situation here. A number of major businesses in town have folded in the past year, and costs of services have escalated sharply due to inflation. All of this has an impact on the university. Support from abroad has been dwindling as costs have been rising. As a result, faculty and staff pay is flat, not keeping pace at all with the cost of living. Some faculty members are leaving for better pay elsewhere. Of course, this adds to alreadyimpaired morale for those remaining. It is a cloudy picture. Yet Africa University is a bright spot for many reasons. It provides a sound ethical and academic grounding for many young people who graduate from this university to provide valuable leadership in business, education, health services and other fields in Zimbabwe and in other countries across Africa. The fact that AU has been panAfrican from the beginning makes it of value to all of Africa. Although this is only the third year Ive taught in the faculty of health sciences as a visiting adjunct professor, students Ive taught are already making contributions in the health field in Zimbabwe, Mozambique and Malawi, and that is exciting. One of our second-year MPH students from Malawi is doing a major health survey there that will help guide Malawians toward healthier ways of life. Many of the students Ive taught come back to tell me what Ive taught them has made the kind of impact in their own lives that they want to share with others. That is rewarding!Ed Dodge, M.D., MPH, is a retired physician now living in Texas. Visit his website, www.thepoweroflifestyle.com. Google MapsAfrica University is north of the city of Mutare in Zimbabwe in eastern Africa. HealthNOTES See NOTES/ Page C3 Happy hounds for Oak Hill Hospital Special to the ChronicleOak Hill Hospitals Pediatric ER recently received a gift of 150 of Beaus Happy Hounds presented to the nurses. LifeSouth Community Blood Centers began distributing Happy Hounds four years ago. From left are Kyoko Kraus, R.N.; Linda Ballie, R.N.; and Tom Davis, LifeSouths district community development coordinator. The organization provides the plush toys to hospitals that treat children, as well as EMTs and law enforcement, who carry them for children in their patrol cars and ambulances. They are all individually wrapped. With your new Pediatric ER unit, this is the perfect place for Beaus Happy Hounds, Davis said. Dr. Ed DodgePOWER OF LIFESTYLE www.chronicleonline.com Get Published! Win Prizes! Receive Awards! They poured Their Hearts Out in love letters for our Valentines Day contest.www.chronicleonline.com/valentinesday2013 They are counting on you to votefor them so they can...VOTE NOW! 000DVGY 000DTL3 6151 N. Suncoast Blvd., Suite 1C Next to Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center Mon.-Fri. 8:30 A.M. 4:30 P.M. Accepting New OB/GYN Patient s Geriatrics Family & General Medicine Internal Medicine Intensive Care (Hospital) Long-Term Care (Nursing Home) Homosassa 4363 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa Springs (352) 503-2011 Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am B.K. Patel, M.D Internal Medicine H. Khan, M.D. Board Certified Family Pactice Beverly Hills 3775 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills (352) 746-0600 Inverness 308 S. Line Ave. Inverness (352) 344-5511 000DQZI New Patients & Walk-Ins Are Always Welcome Humana, Freedom, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted Our Goal Is A Healthier You Active Staff at both Seven Rivers & Citrus Memorial Hospitals Primary Medical Care Centers

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Richey, Pasco County. Tickets are $40 (preferred seating), $30 and $25. This event is BYOB, and dinner will be catered by Carrabbas Italian Grill. It will include door prizes, auctions and drawings, snacks and soft drinks. Call the Alzheimers Family Organization at 727-848-8888 or 888-496-8004. Florida Department of Elder Affairs SHINE program offers free and unbiased information and assistance for all your health insurance issues. In Citrus County, there are four locations ready to serve your needs. For an appointment at any center, call 352527-5956. Leave your name, telephone number and a short message. A SHINE counselor will return the call. Citrus County Resource Center, 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto. First United Methodist Church, 8831 W. Bradshaw St., Homosassa. St Annes Episcopal Church, 9870 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River. Inverness Library, 1511 Druid Road, Inverness.Support GROUPS Support for People with Oral and Head and Neck Cancer (SPOHNC), at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute at the Allen Ridge CMHS campus, 522 N. Lecanto Highway in Lecanto. Next meeting at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 29. Quarterly meetings offer information, support and encouragement to newly diagnosed patients, survivors, family members and friends in a friendly and non-threatening forum. Call Wendy Hall, LCSW, at 352-527-0106 or whall@rboi.com. PINELLAS PARK Connections fireside-discussion-style support group for cancer patients, 7 p.m. the last Thursday monthly, WellSpring Oncology, 6600 66th St. N., Pinellas Park, 727343-0600; www.wellspring oncology.org. Families Against Multiple Sclerosis Support Group, 11 a.m. the first Saturday monthly at Sandy Oaks RV Resort, 6760 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills, for families, friends and anyone affected by MS. Call 352-422-5868. BROOKSVILLE Man to Man prostate cancer support group, 6 to 7 p.m. the first Monday monthly at the Florida Cancer Institute-New Hopes Brooksville Center, 7154 Medical Center Drive. Call Mary Capo at 352596-1926. Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Support Group 10 a.m. to noon the first Monday monthly at the Citrus County Resource Center, 2804 W Marc Knighton Court in Lecanto. Pam Hall from Kids Central Inc. will facilitate the meeting. Call Pam at 352-387-3540. OCALA The Alzheimers and Memory Disorders support group of Ocala, 3 to 5 p.m. the first Monday monthly at the Medical Office Building at West Marion Community Hospital, 4600 S.W. 46th Court, second-floor Community Room. Call 352-401-1453. Alzheimers Association -Florida Gulf Coast Chapter support group are attended by caregivers of loved ones with dementia or Alzheimers Disease. The support group provides the caregivers an opportunity to reduce their isolation and receive support and knowledge from other caregivers. It helps to share experiences, increase feelings of self-worth, decrease a sense of isolation, learn from others in your situation, learn about community resources, and receive encouragement from other caregivers. All support groups are free of charge to caregivers.Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, 550 U.S. 41 S., Inverness, 11 a.m. first Tuesday monthly. Call Anne Black at 352-527-4600. BROOKSVILLE Womens breast cancer support group 6 to 7:30 p.m. the first Tuesday monthly at Florida Cancer InstituteNew Hope Center at 7154 Medical Center Drive, Spring Hill. Call Tambra Randazzo, R.T., at 352-592-8128. Weekly meetings Together We Grow Nar-Anon Family Group 6:45 p.m. Wednesdays at Dunnellon Presbyterian Church, 20641 Chestnut St., Room 204 in office building, use right-side entrance across from the Memorial Garden; Nar-Anon is for family and friends of addicts. Find a free local support group in your area: call 888947-8885 or go to www.NARANONFL.org. Recovery from Food Addiction 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. Thursdays at St. Annes Church, 9870 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River, in the parish hall library. Call Peg at 410-903-7740. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) is a free 12-step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, undereating or bulimia. For details or a list of meetings, call 352-270-8534 or visit www.foodaddicts.org. 7 to 8:30 p.m. Sundays at Queen of Peace Catholic Church Main Hall, 6455 S.W. State Road 200, Ocala. Depression and anxiety peer support group meets at 10 a.m. Thursdays at Central Ridge Library. Bereavement Group, 1:30 to 3 p.m. Thursdays in the back hall, St. Thomas Church, off U.S. 19 south of Cardinal Street. Group is composed of men and women who are experiencing grief and are convinced Life can be good again. Open to all. Come or call Anne at 352212-0632. Al-Anon groups meet regularly in Citrus County. Call 352-697-0497. Inverness AFG: 8 p.m. Mondays, Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S. 41. Crystal River AFG: 8 p.m. Tuesdays, St. Benedict Catholic Church, 455 S. Suncoast Blvd. Last Resort AFG: 11:30 a.m. Wednesdays, First United Methodist Church, 3896 S. Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness. Lecanto AFG: 8 p.m. Thursdays, Unity Church of Citrus County, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Crystal River AFG: 11:30 a.m. Thursdays at YANA Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Avenue), Crystal River. Awareness Lunch Bunch AFG: 12:30 p.m. Fridays, St. Margaret Episcopal Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave., Inverness. Beginners Al-Anon: 10 a.m. Saturdays at Yana Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Avenue), Crystal River. Tuesday Morning Serenity: 10 a.m. Tuesday at Unity Church, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Alcoholics Anonymous: If you drink, and want to stop, call Alcoholics Anonymous Nature Coast Intergroup at 352-6210599. Visit the website: www.ncintergroup.com. AC Group, 7 p.m. Tuesdays at Church Without Walls, 3962 N. Roscoe Road, Hernando. Call Laverne at 352637-4563. Visit the website: www.alcoholicsforchrist.com. A 12-step Christian support group meets at 6 p.m. every Wednesday at Living Waters Ministries, 12 N. Melbourne St., Beverly Hills. Call Meg at 352-527-2443. Free and open to the public. DUNNELLON Grief support group 6 p.m. Thursdays at the First Baptist Church of Dunnellon, 20831 Powell Road. Call the church at 352-489-2730. Narcotics Anonymous: Easy Does It, 8 p.m. Monday and Saturday, Lions Den, U.S. 41, Floral City. It Works How and Why, 7 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday and noon Sunday, YANA Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River. Focus on Recovery, 8 p.m. Thursday, First Christian Church, Grover Cleveland Boulevard, Homosassa. Recovery on the River, 8 p.m. Monday and Friday, Lecanto Church of Christ, State Road 44 and County Road 491, Lecanto; 8 p.m. Sunday 797 S. Rowe Terrace, Lecanto, east of C.R. 491 and S.R. 44. Narcotics Anonymous is not affiliated with any of the meeting facilities listed. Information line: 352-382-0851. Overeaters Anonymous : 5 p.m. Wednesdays at St. Annes Episcopal Church. Call Rita at 352-382-8503. Voices of Recovery, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Mondays at the Senior Center (V.A. building) on County Road 491, Lecanto. Call Dolores at 352746-5019. The Circle of Love, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Thursdays at Our Lady of Grace Church in Beverly Hills, 6 Roosevelt Blvd. Call Carolyn at 352-341-0777. The New Beginning, 7 p.m. Fridays at Our Lady of Grace, Roosevelt Boulevard, Beverly Hills. Call Carolyn at 352-341-0777. The Encouragers Support Group has been helping people deal with depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder and more. Weekly meeting. Call 352-637-3196. Anorexia and bulimia anonymous 12-step support group, 5:45 p.m. Mondays at the Yana Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River (behind the police station). Call Charmaine at 352-422-3234. Citrus Abuse Shelter Association (CASA), 1100 Turner Camp Road, Inverness, offers two free weekly womens domestic abuse support groups: 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays and 10:30 a.m. to noon Wednesdays. Child care available. Call CASA at 352344-8111. Celebrate Recovery : 7 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays at the Christian Recovery Fellowship Church, 2242 W. State Road 44. Call 352-726-2800. 7 to 9 p.m. Fridays at Seven Rivers Presbyterian Churchs Student Ministries Building. Dinner available before the meeting from 6 to 7 p.m. for $4 donation and a coffee house after. Call 352746-6200. Gulf to Lake Church Ministry Complex, West Gulf-toLake Highway in Crystal River. Dinner at 6 p.m. Fridays, followed by largeand small-group time and a Coffee Caf at 9. Call 352-586-4709. Nature Coast Ministries seeks to help the homeless and hurting of Citrus County. We offer referrals to Celebrate Recovery, call 352-563-1860. Overcomers Group for people recovering from addictions to drugs, alcohol or other out-of-control habits, 8 p.m. Mondays at the Sanctuary, 7463 Grover Cleveland Blvd. Call Paul at 352628-2874. Dunnellon Life Recovery group for adults where addiction, compulsion and codependency issues are dealt with, at 7 p.m. Mondays at Rainbow Springs Village Church, 20222 S.W. 102nd St. Road, Dunnellon. Call Char at 352-465-1644 or Nancy at 352-794-0017. SPRING HILL Parkinsons Tai Chi Group 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays in the private dining room at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Spring Hill. Call Charissa Haffner at 352-346-8864. Organizations Alzheimers Association -Florida Gulf Coast Chapter affiliated support groups are for family members, caregivers and others interested in learning more about Alzheimers disease. Meetings are open to everyone and free of charge. To arrange free respite care so you can attend a group, call the Hernando office at 352688-4537 or 800-772-8672. Website: www.alz support.com Live chat every Wednesday at noon. Message boards open at all times to post questions and leave replies. Join the Alzheimers Association online community at www.alz. org/living_with_alzheimers_ message_boards_lwa.asp. Brooksville: Lykes Memorial County Library, 238 Howell Ave.; 2:30 p.m. first Friday monthly. Call Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537. Brooksville: Oak Hill Hospital Senior Partners, 11361 Cortez Blvd.; 2:30 p.m. first Thursday monthly. Call Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537. Spring Hill: The Residence at Timber Pines, 3140 Forest Road; 2 p.m. third Monday monthly. Call Diane Koenig at 352-683-9009 or The Residence at 352-6839009. Free respite care provided, call to reserve. First United Methodist Church of Homosassa has several support groups that run on a monthly basis. All groups are open to the public and free of charge, and meet at 1 p.m. in Room 203 in the Administration Building: First Monday: diabetic support group. Second Monday: Alzheimers/dementia caregivers support group. Fourth Monday: stroke survivors support group. Memory Lane Respite offered weekly for people with Alzheimers/dementia. Anyone bringing a loved one for the first time is encouraged to come early to fill out information forms. Call 352-628-4083 for meeting dates. Citrus Memorial Health System is a 198-bed, not-forprofit community hospital that provides health care services to residents of Citrus County and surrounding communities. Support group meetings are in the CMHS Administration Building unless indicated. ACS Man to Man Prostate Support and Education Program, 11:30 a.m. the second Wednesday monthly. Meetings are in the conference room at the Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute at 522 N. Lecanto Highway in the Allen Ridge Medical Mall. Call 352-527-0106. AHEC Quit Smoking Group: 3 p.m. Tuesdays at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Call 813929-1000, ext. 213. Breast Cancer Support Group: 11:30 a.m. the second Friday, Robert Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Call Judy Bonard at 352-527-4389. Citrus Cancer Support: 4:30 p.m. the third Tuesday, cafeteria meeting room. Call Carol at 352-726-1551, ext. 6596 or ext. 3329. Cancer Support: at Cancer Treatment Center. Call Jeannette at 352-746-1100 for date and time.HEALTH& LIFECITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, JANUARY29, 2013 C3 How safe is bottled water? FDA sets rules Q:Does the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) monitor the safety of bottled water? A: Yes, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are both responsible for the safety of drinking water. The EPA regulates public drinking water (tap water), while the FDA regulates bottled drinking water. Under FDA labeling rules, bottled water includes products labeled: Bottled water. Drinking water. Artesian water. Mineral water. Sparkling bottled water. Spring water. Purified water (distilled, demineralized, deionized, reverse osmosis water). Waters with added carbonation, soda water (or club soda), tonic water and seltzer historically are regulated by FDA as soft drinks. The FDA has set Current Good Manufacturing Practices (CGMPs) specifically for bottled water. They require bottled water producers to: Process, bottle, hold, and transport bottled water under sanitary conditions. Protect water sources from bacteria, chemicals, and other contaminants. Use quality control processes to ensure the bacteriological and chemical safety of the water. Sample and test both source water and the final product for contaminants. The FDA monitors and inspects bottled water products and processing plants under its food safety program. When the FDA inspects plants, the agency verifies: That the plants product water and operational water supply are obtained from an approved source. Inspects washing and sanitizing procedures. Inspects bottling operations. Determines whether the companies analyze their source water and product water for contaminants. New types of flavored and/or nutrient-added water beverages have begun to appear in stores and on food service menus. Some are simply bottled water with flavoring, others may also contain added nutrients such as vitamins, electrolytes like sodium and potassium, and amino acids. The bottled water ingredients of these flavored and nutrientadded water beverages must meet the bottled water requirements if the term water is highlighted on the label, as in, for example, a product named Berry Flavored Spring Water Beverage. In addition, the flavorings and nutrients added to these beverages must comply with all applicable FDA safety requirements and they must be identified in the ingredient list on the label. According to the International Bottled Water Association, bottled water was the second most popular beverage in the United States in 2005, with Americans consuming more than 7.5 million gallons of bottled water an average of 26 gallons per person. Today, only carbonated soft drinks outsell bottled water. Richard P. Hoffmann, Pharm.D., has been a pharmacist for more than 40 years. Send questions to him at 2960 E. Coventry Court, Hernando, FL 34442. Richard HoffmannASK THE PHARMACIST See GROUPS / Page C4 NOTESContinued from Page C2 HEALTH NOTE GUIDELINES Support group information will list monthly meetings first, as space is available, then weekly meetings. It is the responsibility of each organization to inform the Chronicle about changes to existing listings. To submit information about upcoming seminars, health-related events open to the public or support group meetings, email newsdesk@chronicleonline .com attn: Health Notes; fax 352-563-5660 or write to: Health Notes c/o Citrus County Chronicle 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Information relating to professional training or seminars attended by those in the health care industries are considered business briefs, and would appear in the Business Digest listings of Sundays Business section. To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 362-563-5660. Be prepared to leave a detailed message with your name, phone number and the address of the news event. Approval for story ideas must be granted by the Chronicles editors before a reporter is assigned. The Chronicle reserves the right to edit submissions. Publication of submitted information or photos on specific dates or pages cannot be guaranteed. LEND US YOUR EARS TM ACT NOW! Deadline Jan. 31st Participants sought for hearin g in noise study Office Locations: Crystal River & Inverness 352-795-5700 802924-01 Over 2000 people have participated in Gardner Audiology Research Studies Gardner Audiology 2012 Starkey, Americas largest manufacturer of hearing instruments is partnering with Gardner Audiology for a field study of consumer satisfaction with newly patented hearing aid technology. Voice IQ was designed to maintain speech understanding in noise and relieve the strain of hearing conversation in a crowd and other difficult listening situa tions. In exchange for complet ing a pre and post-fitting questionnaire Gardner will loan these hearing aids for a free 30 day field study. Audiologists with advanced university degrees will provide all exams and followup care free of charge. At the end of 30 days par ticipants will return the aids or they may purchase them with generous field study dis counts. Call or click GardnerAudiology.com to join the study 000DHA9 CATTLE BARONS BALL SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2013 Citrus Springs Community Center FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 813-949-0291 TICKETS ON SALE NOW! HOLLER! AUCTION HUSH! AUCTION G AMES! AND MORE

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Diabetes Support Group: Call Carol McHugh, R.N., at 352-341-6110 for details. Head and Neck Cancer Support: Robert Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Contact Wendy Hall at 352-527-0106. Heart-Healthy Eating Workshop: 1:30 to 3 p.m. second Wednesday every other month, CMHS Medical Office Building. Call 352-560-6266 or 352-344-6538 to register. Look Good Feel Better Group: monthly at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, sponsored by the American Cancer Society, the Cosmetology Association and the Personal Care Products Council. A licensed cosmetologist is present to advise women about many issues. For dates, times, more information or to register, call the American Cancer Society at 800-395-5665. Mended Hearts Support Group: 10 a.m. second Friday, Gulf Room at CMHS Historic Building. Call Cardiovascular Services at 352-344-6416. Ostomy Support: 2 p.m. third Sunday, Cypress Room at CMHS Historic Building. Call Steve Spielman at 352229-4202, Sue Penner at 352-560-7918, Sharon Brummer at 352-382-4446 or Betty or Mel Shipley at 352341-0005. Stroke Support Group of Citrus County: 3 p.m. third Wednesday monthly, CMHS Annex Building conference room, State Road 44 across from Walgreens. Call 352-344-6596 or 352344-1646. Hospice of Citrus County support groups and workshops. Call 866-6420962 or 352-527-2348 for information. Grief workshops: 1 p.m. Thursday Hospice of Citrus County Clinical Office, 326. S. Line Ave., Inverness. 2 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday Newly Bereaved Grief Workshop, Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. Grief support groups: 11 a.m. Tuesday Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church Parish Life Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. 9 a.m. Wednesday Griefs Journey ... A Walking Group, Whispering Pines Park (Parking Area E). 10 a.m. Thursday Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. 2 p.m. second Thursday Hospice of the Nature Coast Levy Office, 24-B County Road 40 E., Inglis. 10:30 a.m. Saturday First United Methodist Church, 831 Bradshaw St., Homosassa. Evening support groups (for working people): 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays, newly bereaved Hospice of Citrus County Clinical Office, 326 Line Ave., Inverness. Social support: 10 a.m. Tuesday Franks Family Restaurant, 2780 N. Florida Ave., Hernando. 1 p.m. first Thursday Mulligans Grill (formerly Mango Grill), 1305 Norvell Bryant Highway (C.R. 486), Hernando. 11:30 a.m. third Tuesday LIFT luncheon (for widows/widowers), Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club; call 352-621-1500, ext. 1728 for reservations. Wings education series: th Tuesdays @ 2 Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. Teen Encounter and Camp Good Hope Camps for grieving children/teens offered in April and October. Suicide Survivors Support Group, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Mondays at the Hospice of Citrus County Hospice House, 3350 W. Audubon Park Path, Lecanto. The group is free and open to the public. Participants need not be hospice families. For information, call Lynn Miller at 352-527-2020. Hospice of Citrus County/ Hospice of the Nature Coast licensed 1985, is a not-forprofit charitable organization providing comprehensively responsive and compassionate end-of-life services to the terminally ill and their families in 12 counties of North Central Florida. It also provides grief support services for children and adults in the community. HPH Hospice, in partnership with the Alzheimers Association Florida Gulf Coast Chapter, offers Caregivers Support Groups for caregivers of dementia or Alzheimers patients to provide information, education and emotional support in a safe, comforting and confidential environment. There is no charge, and everyone is welcome to join. Call Sue Piatek at 352-5274600 with questions. First Tuesday, 11 a.m., Our Lady of Fatima, 550 S. U.S. 41, Inverness. Second Monday, 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church of Homosassa, 8831 W. Bradshaw St., Homosassa. Free respite care provided, call to reserve. Fourth Tuesday, 5 p.m., Emeritus at Barrington Place, 2341 W. Norvell Bryant Highway (County Road 486 east of C.R. 491), Lecanto. Free respite care provided, call to reserve. Weekly ongoing Bereavement Group from HPH Hospice and St. Timothys Evangelical Lutheran Church, available to anyone who has experienced the loss of a loved one, 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Thursdays at St. Timothys Evangelical Lutheran Church, 1071 N. Suncoast Blvd. (U.S. 19), Crystal River. There is no cost to attend. Call Paul Winstead at 352-527-4600. HPH Hospice, a nonprofit agency initially licensed in 1984, provides, care, comfort and support to individuals affected by a life-limiting illness in Citrus County. In addition to its office in Beverly Hills, it has a Hospice House on Norvell Bryant Highway in Lecanto for patients with limited caregiving assistance and a Hospice Care Center in Citrus Health & Rehabilitation Center in Inverness for patients with complicated pain and symptoms. SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospital H2U Partners Club support groups meet on the campus of Oak Hill Hospital, 11375 Cortez Blvd., Spring Hill. Diabetes Support Group 10 am. second Monday monthly, Kim Palmer, facilitator. Multiple Myeloma Support Group 5:30 p.m. third Wednesday monthly, Diane Terry, facilitator. Kidney Education Support Group 2 p.m. third Wednesday monthly, Mary Jane Talty, facilitator. ALS Support Group 2 p.m. the third Thursday monthly, Katie Mitchell, facilitator. Epilepsy Support Group 3 p.m. fourth Saturday monthly, Lillian Rojas, facilitator. Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Support Group 6 p.m. fourth Wednesday monthly, Lordes Arvelo, facilitator. Crohns Disease Support Group 6 p.m. the last Thursday monthly, Isaiah Del Pilar, facilitator. H2U Partners Club events and activities are open to members only. Membership is open to Hernando, Pasco, and Citrus County residents for $20 a year. Oak Hill Hospital has been serving the Nature Coast since 1984. It is the largest medical facility in Hernando and Citrus County (234 acutecare beds), is one of the areas largest private employers, and offers Hernando Countys only comprehensive cardiovascular program, C4TUESDAY, JANUARY29, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE HEALTH& LIFE Imbalances or disruption to these circadian rhythms have been linked to several problems, including sleep disorders, obesity, depression and diabetes. It has long been observed that kidney functions including urine production exhibit daily oscillations. Urine production is influenced by a hormone called anti-diuretic hormone (ADH), which also fluctuates according to the circadian rhythm. Sleep deprivation and other imbalances can cause a reversal of the pattern of urine production, causing increased nighttime urine production with resulting nocturia, or nighttime urinary frequency. Increased nighttime urinary frequency, or nocturia, is often the most bothersome symptom of bladder problems experienced by men and women. Nocturia and poor sleep can adversely affect the quality of life, productivity at work and may even result in falls and fractures among the elderly. While change in the circadian rhythm in anti-diuretic hormone pro duction and increased urine production at night is one of the main causes of nocturia, several other conditions have to be considered by the physicians treating nocturia. Reduced capacity of the bladder, enlarged prostate in men, congestive heart failure, the use of diuretics (water pills), poorly controlled diabetes, sleep apnea, kidney disease and edema are some of the other conditions that may influence urinary frequency at night. Recoding the urinary frequency and volume for a oneto three-day period may help the physician diagnose excessive production of urine at night and treat accordingly. The PER2 gene (Period 2 gene) that regulates the circadian rhythm in the brain has also been identified in various body tissues such as the liver, heart and endocrine organs. Now researchers in the United Kingdom have identified the PER2 gene in mice bladders and found that the activity of the gene oscillated with the 24-hour light/dark cycle. It has been suggested that derangement in the regulation of the PER2 gene may have a role to play in bladder overactivity and increased nighttime frequency. Further research on the bladder-clock gene may provide us clues to better manage nocturia and overactive bladder. Perhaps we could turn the clock off before going to bed!Udaya Kumar. M.D., FRCS Urol, Dip. Urol (London), is certified by the American Board of Urology and the Board of Urology of U.K. and Ireland. He is a former professor of urology with University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Contact him at 3475 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34448 or 352-628-7671. KUMARContinued from Page C1 GROUPSContinued from Page C3 every citizen will have access to an exchange come next Jan. 1, and few doubt her word. But whats starting to dawn on Obama administration officials, activists and important players in the health care industry is that the lack of consumer involvement, unless reversed, could turn the big health care launch into a dud. What if Obama cut the ribbon and nobody cared? The people who stand to benefit the most are the least aware of the changes that are coming, said Rachel Klein, executive director of Enroll America, a nonprofit thats trying to generate consumer enthusiasm. My biggest fear is that we get to Oct. 1 and people havent heard there is help coming, and they wont benefit from it as soon as they can, she added. I think it is a realistic fear. Even the term exchange could be a stumbling block. It was invented by policy nerds. Although the law calls them American Health Benefit Exchanges, Sebelius is starting to use the term marketplaces instead. Polls underscore the concerns. A national survey last October found that only 37 percent of the uninsured said they would personally be better off because of the health care law. Twentythree percent said they would be worse off in the Kaiser poll, while 31 percent said it would make no difference to them.Taking the leadInsurers, hospitals, drug companies and other businesses that stand to benefit from the hundreds of billions of dollars the government will pump in to subsidize coverage arent waiting for Washington to educate the public. Blue Cross and Blue Shield plans, for example, are trying to carve out a new role for themselves as explainers of the exchanges. Somewhere around 12 million people now purchase coverage individually, but the size of the market could double or triple with the new approach, and taxpayers will underwrite it. Consumers are expecting their health insurance provider to be a helpful navigator to them, said Maureen Sullivan, a senior vice president for the Blues national association. We see 2013 as a huge year for education. One goal is to help consumers master the metals, the four levels of coverage that will be available through exchange plans bronze, silver, gold and platinum. Blue Cross is also working with tax preparer H&R Block, which is offering its customers a health insurance checkup at no additional charge this tax season. Returns filed this year for 2012 will be used by the government to help determine premium subsidies for 2014. This tax season is one of historical significance, said Meg Sutton, senior advisor for tax and health care at H&R Block. The tax return you are filing is going to be key to determining your health care benefits on the exchange.Real-world exampleOnly one state, Massachusetts, now has an exchange resembling what the administration wants to see around the country. With six years in business, the Health Connector enrolls about 240,000 Massachusetts residents. It was created under the health overhaul plan passed by former Republican Gov. Mitt Romney and has gotten generally positive reviews. Connector customer Robert Schultz is a Boston area startup business consultant who got his MBA in 2008, when the economy was tanking. Yet he was able to find coverage when he graduated and hang on to his insurance through job changes since. Schultz says thats freed him to pursue his ambition of becoming a successful entrepreneur a job creator instead of an employee. Its being portrayed by opponents as being socialistic, Schultz said.. It is only socialistic in the sense of making sure that everybody in society is covered, because the cost of making sure everybody is covered in advance is much less than the cost of putting out fires. The Connectors executive director, Glen Shor, said his state has proven the concept works and hes confident other states can succeed on their own terms. There is no backing away from all the challenges associated with expanding coverage, Shor said. We are proud in Massachusetts that we overcame what had been years of policy paralysis. ALERTContinued from Page C1 See GROUPS / Page C5 SPEAKERS AVAILABLE Seven Rivers Regional Speakers Bureau brings customized programs to clubs, churches and other community organizations. Contact Amy Kingery at 352-795-8344 or amy.kingery@hma.com. The Alzheimers Family Organization has speakers available for your organization or club. This presentation will include basic Alzheimers information and the services and programs that the organization offers to the Central Florida community. Call 888-496-8004 or 727-848-8888. SPRING HILL Health Matters Home Care has a Registered Nurse available to do free speaking engagements for your group, club, church or organization. Call 352-686-4493 or 352-686-5593. The Citrus Team of HPH Hospice and its not-forprofit Homecare affiliate, HPH Homecare, provide free, ongoing education to Citrus County residents about their many programs, services and volunteer opportunities. There is no charge for a speaker and the solicitation of funds is never involved. Educational materials are provided at no charge. Call Anne Black, community liaison, at 352-527-4600. Seven Days A Week Rain or Shine Call to see how you can receive 2 Weeks Free 352-563-5655 769452 The #1 Provider of News and Advertising Information in Citrus County 000DNNJ 2nd Annual 000DS6F 5TH ANNUAL February 8, 2013 6:30 P.M. (Doors open at 6pm) at the Curtis Peterson Auditorium Tickets $10 per person Children under 10 are free Masters of Ceremonies: Brad Thorpe County Administrator and Cathy Pearson Assistant County Administrator For ticket information call 527-5900

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usually doesnt have enough time in the esophagus or food tube to cause the typical heartburn pain and ends up quickly in the throat, causing its problem there. Also, many times, especially if the patient hasnt eaten recently, the contents are not acidic. You may or may not know that gastroesophageal reflux disease puts the esophagus or food tube at risk for cancer, but likewise LPR puts the throat at risk, because it is much more sensitive to injury and irritation from the stomachs contents. Here are the warning signs of LPR: Chronic hoarseness or voice changes. Repetitive throat clearing. The sensation of too much mucous in the throat. The feeling of having a lump in the throat. Chronic cough. Too much mucous or phlegm in the nose. The above-mentioned warning signs may seem like rather minor problems, but LPR can lead to more serious issues such as bronchitis, initiating asthma attacks, causing patients to choke, and predisposing patients and putting them at risk for cancer of the esophagus, lung, throat and voice box. I want to caution my readers, these are not common problems associated with LPR, but if left untreated for many years could result in one of these serious issues. The age of onset of LPR is usually in the middleaged adult. But as you will see in the upcoming paragraph, this disease can affect children and infants, as well, because of lifestyle issues. Evaluation and treatment of LPR is done typically by ear, nose and throat doctors and can include a 24-hour test for acid in the throat, barium swallow, and looking down the throat with a lighted tube. These tests are usually easy to do and performed as an outpatient. Each one of those tests is different and has a specific reason for being done and in some cases all three are combined to reach a diagnosis and treatment plan. Treatment for LPR is of course dependent on the severity and damage found. Treatment usually consists of several different approaches. Most commonly, it includes changes in habits and diet combined with medication and very infrequently surgery. Medications include antacids and more sophisticated medications to control acid from the stomach. This particular group of medications include H2 receptor blockers such as Zantac and proton pump inhibitors such as Nexium, to name two of many. Some tips and guidelines for reducing the symptoms of LPR include control of your lifestyle and diet; discontinuing use of tobacco products, smoke and smokeless; not eating within four hours of bedtime; sitting in a chair as opposed to lying down on a couch, especially after a meal; and a low-fat healthy diet with the proper levels and intake of meat, dairy products and particularly offending items that put you at high risk of LPR that include fried foods, chocolate, cheese, caffeine. Avoid strong teas, highly carbonated soda pop, acidic juices and mint candies or beverages, and limit alcoholic beverages, particularly in the late evening hours. Is LPR a diagnosis for life? Not in all cases. In fact, in most cases patients recover and do not require full-time treatment. However, recovery may be for periods of months to years and there is a chance that a relapse can occur and at that time, resumption of treatment is usually successful. So just remember that the nagging little sensation in your throat may be a bigger problem than you think it is. It is always worth getting checked out and getting a professional opinion.Denis Grillo, D.O., FOCOO, is an ear, nose and throat specialist in Crystal River. Call him at 352-795-0011 or visit CrystalCommunity ENT.com. including open heart surgery. Approximately 300 physicians, 950 associates and more than 350 volunteers comprise Oak Hill Hospitals health care delivery team. Visit OakHillHospital.com. Monthly GROUPS SPRING HILL Caregiver Support Group 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. the first Wednesday monthly, at the Florida Cancer Institute-New Hopes Spring Hill Center, 10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203 in the Medical Arts Building next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call Pamela McGee, facilitator, at 352-688-7744. Alzheimers caregiver support group by Alzheimers Family Organization, 2:30 p.m. the first Thursday monthly at Superior Residences of Lecanto, 4865 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway. RSVP by Jan. 29 if you require respite. Call Debbie Selsavage at 352-746-5483. NEW PORT RICHEY Community Chatterboxes support group to assist individuals suffering from communication deficits (i.e., aphasia, apraxia, dysarthria, etc.) as a result of a cerebral vascular accident or other neurological disorders, 3 to 4 p.m. every other Thursday at Community Hospital, 5637 Marine Parkway, New Port Richey, FL 34652. Caregivers and spouses are encouraged to attend. Call 727-845-0757. Friends of the Blind 9 a.m. to noon the second Friday monthly. Call Butch Shultz at 352-344-2693 for location.HEALTH& LIFECITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, JANUARY29, 2013 C5 Reader embarrassed by mouth and needs job Q:I hope you can help me. I am so embarrassed by my mouth not to mention the pain I am in because of continuous infections. I am 45 years old and have gotten to the point where I have to get my mouth taken care of. My husband and I have just moved to Citrus County and before I start looking for a job I want to get my teeth fixed. All of my back teeth have already been removed two years ago. All I have left are my front teeth on the top and stubs for my bottom front teeth. The top teeth are badly decayed and the bottom ones get all the infections. I am afraid to take the first step to go to the dentist, so I thought I would write to you first. I want my teeth out and dentures made. I might want implants in the future, but have to figure out how to afford this first. I hope you can help me get over my nervousness. A: First of all, thanks for sending this question in. It is the start of something very exciting for you. I know the thought of all of this can be overwhelming to you. However, I have seen many people with your exact circumstances have a life-changing event surrounding the restoration of their mouth. The end result can be incredible. Patients have gone from ignoring their appearance to wearing makeup, going to the hair stylist and starting a whole new wardrobe. As far as the implants go dont worry about them yet. In the event you need or want them, they can easily be incorporated in the future. You have the right idea: focus on the dentures for now. From what you have described, it sounds as though the best plan for you will be to have what we call immediate dentures made. What this means for you is your dentist takes impressions of your teeth and gums as they are and makes you a set of teeth. You and your dentist will choose the color and shape of your teeth. Pictures of you with your teeth before the decay you now have can be very helpful. You can point out things that you liked about them and things you would like to see different. You can also bring in magazine photos you like and show them to your dentist. In many cases, things you like about smiles and appearance can be incorporated into your smile. Once all of the details are worked out, your teeth will be removed and the dentures put in. By doing things this way, you never go without teeth. There will be a period of adjustment to your new teeth. During this time, your dentist will make any necessary adjustment to the dentures for your comfort. At some time in the future, your dentist will either reline or remake your teeth. This decision depends on many factors. I hope this has helped put you at ease. If you focus on the end result and not the steps to get there, you will do great. I have been witness to so many success stories. Like so many things in life, if you know where you are and where you want to be, all you have to do it take the right steps in between and before you know it you are there. The neat thing here is your dentist can help you with the steps necessary. Dont worry you can have an awesome smile and feel great about yourself! Dr. Frank Vascimini is a dentist practicing in Homosassa. Send your questions to 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446 or email them to him at info@MasterpieceDental Studio.com. Dr. Frank VasciminiSOUND BITES heard everything in excess is poison or too much of a good thing can be bad, too. That is the case in this, too. There are three kinds of blood cells: red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs or fighter cells), and platelets (clotters). WBCs are in the thousands, platelets are in the hundred-thousands and RBCs are in the millions in each millimeter of blood. So, if RBCs increase in number significantly, it causes an effect similar to sludge in a pipe. It blocks the blood vessels, which are like a pipe transferring blood to various parts of the body. This can cause blockage, leading to an effect such as a stroke, heart attack or clot in the lung or leg, etc., depending on where the blood clots. For diagnosis, I usually do a blood test called a JAK2 gene test. This is positive in more than 95 percent of the patients with Polycythemia Rubra Vera. This is a condition where bone marrow makes too many RBCs. It was positive in my patient. RBC count is measured by a component in CBCs called hemoglobin and hematocrit. These patients risk of clot is significantly less if hematocrit is kept below 45. This has shown to reduce the risk of stroke, heart attack, etc. This can be done by periodic phlebotomy or by an oral drug called Hydroxyurea. Phlebotomy is done periodically by removing almost 500 milliliters of blood. It is recommended when hematocrit is above 45. The goal of treatment is to keep the patients hematocrit below 45. We should also aim to keep platelet count below 400,000 or so. Studies have shown that one aspirin (adult or baby) a day helps reduce the risk of clotting, too. My patient is on Hydroxyurea and is tolerating it well without any undue side effects. This has cut down the necessity of doing phlebotomy significantly. He has not had any complication of polycythemia, either.Dr. Sunil Gandhi is a hematologist and oncologist. He is volunteer medical adviser of the Citrus Unit of American Cancer Society. Write to 521 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461, email sgandhi@tampabay.rr. com or call 352-746-0707. GANDHIContinued from Page C1 developing cancer. And these calories dont just come from food. For those who consume alcohol, the calories in alcoholic drinks account for a significant proportion of a drinkers calorie consumption while providing little, if any, nutritional benefit. So, if you are following my recommendations and trying to lose weight, cutting down on drinking can have a big effect on weight loss or maintaining a healthy weight. Now, this is not a cutand-dry discussion, since there is some evidence suggesting that, when consumed in small amounts, alcohol can protect the heart. However, the benefits only outweigh the risks for people who are at higher risk for heart disease, such as women after menopause and men older than 40. You must all remember there is also strong evidence alcohol is a cancer risk factor itself, possibly because it damages DNA. This has been suggested in studies of breast, colon, mouth, throat, esophagus and liver cancer. So how much ingestion of alcohol is safe? There is an easy to understand alcohol calorie calculator to help you see how many calories there are in different amounts of different drinks. The calculator also shows how many chocolate cookies you would have to eat to consume the same number of calories, and how many miles you would have to walk to burn off those calories. Once you read this, the amount of calories in alcohol will clearly come into view. Here are some examples: A 16-ounce glass of beer contains about 250 calories, roughly the equivalent of three chocolate cookies, and would take the average 165pound adult 53 minutes of brisk walking to burn off. A small glass of wine contains 178 calories, the same as around two chocolate cookies, and would take 38 minutes of brisk walking to burn off. Finally, one cocktail, such as vodka and orange juice, contains 109 calories, the same as around one chocolate cookie, and would take 23 minutes of brisk walking to burn off. In a recent study that found showing miles per calorie helped people choose healthier meals, the participants said they preferred to see calorie information include the miles of walking required to burn them off. So, in order to lose or maintain a healthy weight, do you have to stop drinking completely? No, but if you drink alcohol, I recommend you limit your intake to no more than two drinks a day if you are a man, and one a day if you are a woman. To help with this, choose the smallest serving size of drink, dilute alcoholic drinks with soda water or low-calorie soft drinks, alternate alcoholic and nonalcoholic drinks, and, avoid alcohol altogether on a few nights per week. In 2012, Oxford University researchers who analyzed the link between alcohol consumption and 11 chronic diseases, concluded 4,600 more lives would be saved every year if people in England were to cut the amount they drink to no more than about a quarter of a glass of wine or a quarter of a pint of beer per day. Imagine the benefit we could see in this country if we followed this recommendation, as well.Dr. C. Joseph Bennett is a board-certified radiation oncologist and a member of the Citrus County Unit of the American Cancer Society. Watch Navigating Cancer on WYKE TV at 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays and at 10 a.m. Thursdays. If you have any suggestions for topics, or have any questions, contact him at 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461, or email cjbennett@rboi.com. BENNETTContinued from Page C1 GROUPSContinued from Page C4 GRILLOContinued from Page C1 000DPI3 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34446 352-628-0012 www.MasterpieceDentalStudio.com Always Welcoming New Patients FRANK J. VASCMINI, DDS 000DNMQ 000DVG3 Please be a part of this years Junior Achievement Bowl-A-Thon You can be a Lane Sponsor for only $100 or donate a Gift Basket or Gift Certificate to help support local students in Citrus County. Call Rose Strawn for details: 352-427-6006 Saturday, Saturday, Saturday, Feb. 2 nd Feb. 2 nd Feb. 2 nd 2013 2013 2013 We We We Need Your Need Your Need Your Support! Support! Support!

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Submit information at least two weeks before the e vent. Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. Submit material at Chronicle of fices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an e vent. Publication on a special day cant be guaranteed. News NOTES Hospice slates dementia programHPH Hospice, in partnership with the Alzheimers Association, Gulf Coast Chapter, will offer a presentation from 2 to 3 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 29, at the HPH administrative offices at 3545 N. Lecanto Highway (Winn-Dixie shopping plaza) in Beverly Hills. Jerry Fisher, program specialist with the Alzheimers Association, will discuss what happens to driving ability during the Alzheimers disease process. He will provide tips for dealing with someone who refuses to give up their driver license and present available options. Reservations are required. Call 352-527-4600.F.C. Heritage meeting todayThe quarterly meeting of the Floral City Heritage Council will be today, Tuesday, Jan. 29, at the Floral City Community House, 8370 E. Orange Ave. Member and guest potluck dinner starts at 7 p.m., followed by the quarterly meeting at 7:30 pm. No Snippet of History program is planned, since this is the general membership meeting for the election of the 2013 leadership officers and steering committee. Members are reminded to bring a food item for the potluck, their own plate and table service and a nonperishable food items or a grocery store gift card for the Citrus County Veterans Coalition Food Pantry. Visitors are welcome. Visit www.floralcityhc.org, or call 352-860-0101, or email fchc@hotmail.com for more information.Come learn about hospice Hospice of Citrus County will provide orientation training for individuals who are interested in learning more about hospice and hospice volunteer opportunities. The class will be from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 31, at the Hospice of Citrus County Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Suite A, Homosassa. The class provides an overview of hospice philosophy and history. Participants will become acquainted with services provided by Hospice of Citrus County for patients and families. They will become familiar with the concept of palliative care, learn the importance of confidentiality and more. To register or to request training for a group, call Director of Volunteer Services Cathi Thompson at 352-527-2020, or email: cthompson@hospiceof citruscounty.org.Money show on tap in OcalaThe Ocala Coin Collectors will present its annual show from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday, Feb. 1, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 3, at the Circle Square Cultural Center at Top of the World on State Road 200. Nature Coast students of numismatics, seasoned collectors and sellers are invited to bring treasures for appraisal and for slabbing. There will be free parking and admission to meet 56 dealers and learn, as well as hourly door prizes and gold and silver raffles. For information, call Chairman Rick Seivar at 352-748-5225 or Jim Carper at 352-726-3545. COMMUNITYPage C6TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Recently, the annual Celebration of Life Gala was held in Inverness at the Cornerstone Baptist Church, sponsored by the Life Choice Care Center of Citrus. Sol Pitchon, president and CEO of New Life Solutions, was the guest speaker. Sol is a Greek Jew, born in Thessalonica, Greece, who immigrated to America in 1951 and accepted Christ in 1981. Before joining the ministry, he was a Christian psychotherapist with five years of private practice. He also worked in a psychiatric hospital for Rapha, a Christian in-patient program. As a Jewish-Christian whose parents were Holocaust survivors, he counts it a privilege and his destiny to work the Pregnancy Center Movement. Music was provided by the Mast Brothers, who performed Victory in Jesus and Thank God for the Lighthouse, then donned their black leather jackets for a Fabulous Fifties set including One Fine Day and a jovial parody of the Beatitude Attitudes. Youths from several Baptist churches countywide were excellent servers for the elegant banquet prepared with the direction of Chef Hap Hough of the Withlacoochee Technical Centers Culinary Arts Department. Church youths from Floral City, Crystal River, Beverly Hills, North Oak, Shepherds Way of Citrus Hills and Stage Coach of Bushnell, as well as the Cornerstone Church, participated. In introducing Kathy Davis, director of the Life Choice Care Center, the remark was made by a Cornerstone member that Davis, as director the Center, is who Davis is and not just what she does. Davis spoke passionately of another year of blessings at the center with more than 100 applicants, 133 new clients, 63 pregnancy tests and 16 babies born, nine adoptions and nine clients accepting Christ, seven for the first time. With 86 professions of faith, teens have come to know they are not alone in their health choices. Davis noted that 60 Life Choice Relay walkers raised $9,000. We learned that a satellite facility is in the future for Crystal River with a possible August 2013 dedication. The goal of the center is to change hearts and it is a facility worth our time, talent and financial support. Speaker Pitchon and his mother, Charmaine, 86, a Holocaust survivor of Spanish heritage, had the audiences rapt attention. He spoke of Jewish mothers admirably helping families stay together, remarking that Life Choice Center clients have many other issues besides an unplanned pregnancy. We learned that 29 states now have Choose Life license plates available. He laid out the difference in depression and anxiety: Depression involves regrets of the past and anxiety fears the future. Pitchon challenged us to watch what happens when pastors and churches take a stand for life and stand in the gap. He noted that nationally, the Knights of Columbus have donated sonograms and Citrus County is a mission field for transforming lives in preventing teen pregnancy. Volunteer physicians and nurses are needed who will be hired later. A sonogram machine and a nurse trained to administer it are also needed. The cost to care for a young woman until she gives birth is usually $1,200, including crisis intervention with prayer and counseling, parenting and relationship classes offered at the center. Following the recognition of several young mothers and their babies in attendance, an offering for the center was taken and the closing prayer was given by Greg Kell. To volunteer, call Kathy Davis, director, at 352-341-5176.Ruth Levins participates in a variety of projects around the community. Let her know about your groups upcoming activities by writing to P.O. Box 803, Crystal River, FL 34423. Another successful Celebration of Life Ruth LevinsAROUND THE COMMUNITY DOUGLOBEL Special to the ChronicleEach year for the past seven years, a group of individuals representing various organizations, as well as area religious institutions, has gathered in the living room of Inverness Mayor Bob Plaisteds home for several months prior to Thanksgiving. The group of about 30 people spends an hour once a month beginning in August, and an hour each week starting in October to plan how to make sure every family in Citrus County can have a homecooked turkey dinner on Thanksgiving Day. On any given year, that can mean identifying those in need based on standards of as developed by the Salvation Army, then getting the word out those that fall within the guidelines need to go to the Salvation Army office (or in the case of this year Daystar and We Care Food Pantry) to register to receive a turkey and all the fixings at the Inverness Walmart on Saturday prior to Thanksgiving Day. In recent years, a computer software system has been made available by the Mid-Florida Homeless Coalition to be used in all registration locations so no double dipping can take place. Each year, Inverness Walmart closes down the parking lot in front of its Garden Shop for thes event. The steering committee of the group, the Thanksgiving Feeding Alliance (TGFA), arranages for the distribution of 1,200 to 1,500 turkeys ordered months in advance from Publix. They work with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to arrange for the donation of anywhere from $20,000 to $27,000 worth of corn, green beans, rice and other foods from its Bishops Storehouse to create boxes of food based on the size of each registered family. In addition to the donation of food from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, for the past several years Publix has arranged for customers in five stores in Citrus County to be able to purchase a turkey to be given to the TGFA to replace one of the turkeys the alliance has to raise money to pay for. For the past three years, Publix customers have purchased enough turkeys to cover most of the cost of the turkeys. This allows the committee to use some cash donations solicited from the public through the free placement of 60,000 fliers in the Citrus County Chronicleto purchase items like canned sweet potatoes to add to the boxes. This year, the committee ordered 2,000 cans of sweet potatoes from Inverness Walmart, which then donated 1,000 of those cans of potatoes and only charged the committee for 1,000 cans. Also this year, due to an additional donation by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints of 120 turkey loaves, another community organization was able to help local organizations that cook and feed families in need during Thanksgiving week. Feeding Citrus families Groups work together in special alliance Special to the ChronicleMembers of the Thanksgiving Feeding Alliance (TGFA) Committee are, in back, from left: Bishop Rick Sampson, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; Charlie Richer, Suncoast Business Masters; Richard Floyd, Veterans Coalition; DuWayne Sipper, The Path Shelter; Deputy Michele Tewell, CCSO; Lt. Vanessa Miller, Salvation Army; Jay Joines, Black Diamond Foundation; Danette Williams, Church Stake Relief president, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; George Bendtsen, Inverness Sertoma; Terry Lucente, Serving Our Savior (SOS); and Bob Plaisted, Inverness mayor. Front, from left, are: Cookie Plaisted and grandchild; Denise Kennard, Daystar; Janet Ferguson, Inverness Publix store manager; Diane Toto, We Care Food Pantry; Karen Evans, Daystar; Angie Howland, Salvation Army; Paula Hotsclaw, Mid-Florida Homeless Coalition (MFHC); and Barbara Wheeler, MFHC. Committee members not pictured are: Pastor Doug Alexander, New Church Without Walls; Pastor Donnie Seagle, First Baptist Church of Inverness; Duane Dueker; Doug Lobel, TGFA volunteer executive director; Britton Mitchel, Citrus County Legal Services; and Barbara Johnson and John Bourdeaux, SOS. Special to the ChronicleAre you a cat person? Do you have room in your heart and home and the ability to provide the daily care for a live in feline? If you answered yes to these questions, Precious Paws Rescue has the perfect feline partner for you. PPR has several adult and special needs cats that would love to be in a home. They miss living with a special person, curling up on a lap or just gazing out a window. They are up to date on all veterinary care, litterbox trained and socialized. In an effort to move these cats into a more personal home environment, preferably as the only pet in the household, PPR is looking for long-term foster families. Each cat will remain an official PPR foster. All necessary veterinary care, food and litter will be provided by PPR. The foster family will provide shelter and love. These cats are homeless for a variety of reasons the death of an owner, family relocation, or changes in the family structure. If you are a cat lover and unable to adopt or foster, you can help by sponsoring one of the rescued felines with an $18 monthly donation in the selected felines name to Precious Paws Rescue. PPR is an all-volunteer charity organization dedicated to decreasing the number of homeless pets through rescuing, fostering and adopting. PPR sponsors a low-cost spay/neuter program for cats and dogs to further help reduce the number of unwanted pets. For more information, call 352726-4700 and a volunteer will return your call. Stop by the Crystal River Mall Adoption Center from noon to 4 p.m. Thursday through Sunday, and view PPR pets with their individual stories by going to preciouspawsflorida.com. Wanted: Cat people to be foster parents Special to the ChroniclePrecious Paws Rescue needs foster parents for many of its homeless felines.

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TUESDAY, JANUARY29, 2013 C7CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEENTERTAINMENT PHILLIPALDER Newspaper Enterprise Assn.Benjamin Franklin said, An investment in knowledge pays the best interest. At the bridge table, we try to use the knowledge gleaned from the bidding and the play (as it progresses) to make informed decisions. How should the play go in this three-no-trump contract after West leads the spade queen? What is the key piece of knowledge declarer wants and East must keep hidden? South starts with seven top tricks: two spades, one heart, three diamonds and one club. He could attack either hearts or clubs, but the minor suit offers much better chances for three tricks. Declarer ducks the first trick, takes the second spade with his king, plays a diamond to dummys queen, and leads a club to his nine. West wins this with, say, the queen (he should vary his play in this situation) and continues with another spade to dummys ace. Now comes dummys last club. What happens next? If East carelessly plays his eight, South should put up his ace, dropping Wests king and collecting 11 tricks. Why should he drop the king? Given that East is known to have the club 10 from the first round of the suit, when East plays the club eight second, he started with 10-8-5 or K-10-8-5. In the second case, the contract is unmakable. However, on the second round of clubs, East should follow the excellent principle of playing the card he is known to hold. If he puts up the 10, declarer will place him with K-10-5, finesse his club jack, and go down three. (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53 Di ggers PG Di ggers PG D ooms d ay P reppers D ooms d ay P reppers D ooms d ay P reppers Di ggers (N) PG Di ggers (N) PG D ooms d ay P reppers (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25Sponge.Sponge.DrakeDrakeFull HseFull HseFull HseFull HseNannyNannyFriendsFriends (OWN) 103 62 103 I MarriedI MarriedOur America Our America Our America Our America Our America (OXY) 44 123 Bad Girls ClubBad Girls ClubBad Girls ClubBad Girls ClubBad Girls ClubBad Girls Club (SHOW) 340 241 340 4 The Twilight Saga: Eclipse (2010) Kristen Stewart. PG-13 The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1 (2011) Kristen Stewart. PG-13 House of Lies MACalifornicationShameless (In Stereo) MA (SPEED) 732 112 732 NASCAR Race Hub Pinks PG, L Pass TimePass TimeDumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff Hard PartsHard PartsMy Ride Rules My Ride Rules Dumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36The Joe Schmo Show The Joe Schmo Show The Joe Schmo Show The Joe Schmo Show The Joe Schmo Show (N) The Joe Schmo Show (STARZ) 370 271 370 Zookeeper PG Moneyball (2011) Brad Pitt. A baseball manager challenges old-school traditions. PG-13 The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo (2011, Suspense) Daniel Craig, Rooney Mara. (In Stereo) R Laws (SUN) 36 31 36 American Ski Seminole Sports Lightning Live! (N) NHL Hockey Florida Panthers at Tampa Bay Lightning. Tampa Bay Times Forum in Tampa, Fla. (Live) Lightning Live! (N) Inside the Lightning American Ski Classic (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29Destination Truth Face Off Make It Reign The artists create goblin kings. Face Off Contestants create a superhero. Face Off When Hell Freezes Over (N) Total Blackout Total Blackout Face Off When Hell Freezes Over (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19KingSeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangCougarBig BangConan (N) (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35 Not With My Wife, You Dont! (1966) Tony Curtis, Virna Lisi. NR The Italian Job (1969, Action) Michael Caine, Noel Coward. Premiere. G The Lavender Hill Mob (1951) Alec Guinness. NRTheyRob (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Dual Survival On the Menu Dual Survival Into the Frying Pan Dual Survival Untamed: Hawaii Dual Survival The Green Hell (N) Africa Cape (N) (In Stereo) G Dual Survival The Green Hell (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30Long Island MediumPlastic Wives The Sisterhood The Sisterhood PGStarter WivesThe Sisterhood PG (TMC) 350 261 350 Rare Birds (2001, Comedy) William Hurt, Andy Jones. (In Stereo) R Barb Wire (1996) Pamela Anderson Lee. R BloodRayne: The Third Reich (2010) Natassia Malthe. Super (2010) Rainn Wilson. (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34Castle Den of Thieves PG Castle Food to Die For PG Castle Demons (In Stereo) PG Castle Cops & Robbers PG Castle Heartbreak Hotel PG CSI: NY Forbidden Fruit (TOON) 38 58 38 33 AdvenAdvenGumballLooneyLevel UpAdvenKing/HillKing/HillAmericanAmericanFam. GuyFam. Guy (TRAV) 9 54 9 44Bizarre FoodsFoodFoodBizarre FoodsEdgeEdgeNo ReservationBizarre Foods (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55Cops PGCops PGWorlds Dumbest...PawnPawnPawnHardcorePawnPawnWorlds Dumbest... (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HCosbyCosbyCosbyRaymondRaymondRaymondRaymondKingKing (USA) 47 32 47 17 18Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit White Collar Brass Tracks (N) Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (WE) 117 69 117 Charmed Charmed and Dangerous Charmed (In Stereo) PG CSI: Miami Long Gone CSI: Miami Crowned CSI: Miami Friendly Fire CSI: Miami Terminal Velocity PG (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20ChrisChrisFunny Home VideosMotherMotherMotherMotherWGN News at NineFunny Home Videos Dear Annie: I am an associate in a law firm with two offices. Each office has three associate attorneys and is managed by a partner. During my first year, I was the only associate in my office, and I received a Christmas bonus. The second year, we hired two additional associates. I was devastated when all of the staff but none of the associates received a bonus that year, as Id planned to use the money to buy gifts for my family. I wasnt surprised last month when, once again, the associates received nothing. I did discover, however, that all of the associates in the other law office received bonuses. I understand that a Christmas bonus is not something I am entitled to receive, and if I bring it up to my boss, it would make me sound selfish and greedy. We do get extra money each month if we exceed a specific number of billable hours. However, that is a part of my compensation agreement and a variable portion of my salary, not a bonus. I also think my boss has decided that the office staff, most of whom are single parents, need the bonus more than the associates do. But my law degree came with six figures of student loan debt. This is less about the money than it is about the disparate treatment, especially between the two law offices. Is there any way to bring this up to my boss for next season without sounding like a spoiled child? Struggling Young Professional Dear Struggling: We understand why this seems unfair, but unless a yearly bonus is part of your compensation package, such money is given at the discretion of the managing partner. It is possible that the associates in the other office have a different compensation agreement that includes a Christmas bonus or that there are other factors involved. You could ask what you can do to increase the likelihood that you will merit additional pay at the end of the year, or whether something about your performance has been disappointing. Beyond that, youre out of luck. Dear Annie: My friend Harry has had an on-again, off-again girlfriend for the past year. They have broken up many times, but claim theyre right for each other. Most of our friends think their relationship is a waste of time. Well, now they are on again, but this time it is different. Harry is totally head over heels, but she isnt into him so much. I used to talk to him every day, and now I barely get a hello. His girlfriend says Im bugging him and never lets him hang around long enough to talk to me. We all know its only a matter of time before it ends badly. How can I help Harry realize whats going on? I want my friend back. Worried in California Dear California: Unless there is abuse, it is pointless for you to involve yourself in Harrys relationship. He could benefit from counseling to work on the reasons he pursues such a self-destructive romance, but until he admits that he makes bad choices, your words will have little effect. Since the relationship is likely to end sooner than later, you will have other opportunities to discuss this with him. Dear Annie: I read the letter from Ormond Beach, Fla. Last year, I went to a male doctor with a gynecological problem. He said I had menopause, and that was it. I made an appointment with a female nurse practitioner, who sent me to a gynecologist. The gynecologist discovered I had cancer and referred me to an oncologist. Fortunately, the surgeon was able to get it all. Im glad I didnt listen to the first doctor. Keep trying until you get some help. Thankful in Southern Indiana Annies Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Email your questions to anniesmail box@comcast.net, or write to: Annies Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 Third St., Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annies Mailbox and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com. ANNIES MAILBOX Bridge (Answers tomorrow) PROWLPURGE SEESAW CHANGE Yesterdays Jumbles: Answer: What do you call a rabbit on the lawn? AGRASS HOPPER Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. NURPE DPUPE RIPTEM SUEERM Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble Ans: TUESDAY EVENING JANUARY 29, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsEntAccessBettyBettyGo On (N)NormalDateline NBC PGNewsJay Leno # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) (In Stereo) Pioneers of Television (N) PG Henry Ford: American Experience Innovator Henry Fords influence. (N) PG, L New Tricks (In Stereo) PG % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41JournalBusinessPBS NewsHour (N)Pioneers, TelevisionHenry Ford: American Experience PG, LWorldT. Smiley ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly NewsNewsChannel 8 Entertainment Ton.Off Their Rockers Off Their Rockers Go On (N) PG The New Normal Dateline NBC (N) (In Stereo) PG NewsJay Leno ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 NewsWorld News Jeopardy! (N) G Wheel of Fortune The Taste Auditions (N) PG Happy Endings Happy Endings Body of Proof Mind Games Eyewit. News Jimmy Kimmel (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 1010 News, 6pm (N) Evening News Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) G NCIS Hit and Run PG (DVS) NCIS: Los Angeles (N) (DVS) Vegas Road Trip (N) 10 News, 11pm (N) Letterman ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13FOX13 6:00 News (N) (In Stereo) TMZ (N) PG omg! Insider (N) Raising Hope Mindy Project New Girl (N) Mindy Project FOX13 10:00 News (N) (In Stereo) NewsAccess Hollywd 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 NewsABC EntInside Ed.The Taste (N) PGHappyHappyBody of Proof NewsJ. Kimmel 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Christian Fitness TodayKenneth Hagin Great AwakeningWord ofPlace for Miracles A. Wommack Perry Stone Life TodayPurpose for Life Great Awaken < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11NewsWorld News The List (N) PG Lets Ask America The Taste Auditions (N) PG Happy Endings Happy Endings Body of Proof Mind Games NewsJimmy Kimmel @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent How I MetHow I MetThe Office PG The Office PG F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9RaymondSeinfeldFamFeudFamFeudHouse Detox House SeinfeldScrubsBaggageExcused H (WACX) TBN 21 21 StudioThe 700 Club (N) GBabersAmazing MannaVoicePaidStudio Direct HealingPaid L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12King of Queens King of Queens Two and Half MenEngagementHart of Dixie Lovesick Blues (N) PG Emily Owens, M.D. (N) PG Two and Half MenEngagementFriends Friends PG O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15CrosswordsCitrus Today County Court CancerEvery Minute B. CosbyCrook & Chase (In Stereo) G Windy City PokerMobil 1 The GridS. Rasmussen S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7SimpsonsSimpsonsBig BangBig BangRaisingMindyNew GirlMindyFOX 35 News at 10TMZ PGAccess (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14NoticiasNotic.Corona de LgrimasPor Ella Soy Eva Amores VerdaderosAmor Bravo (N)NoticiasNoticiero (WXPX) ION 17 Criminal Minds Criminal Minds PGCriminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Flashpoint PG (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG StorageTexas StorageTexas Southie Rules Southie Rules (N) Southie Rules Southie Rules (AMC) 55 64 55 Escape From New York (1981, Action) Kurt Russell, Ernest Borgnine. R Predator (1987) Arnold Schwarzenegger. A team is stalked by an intergalactic trophy hunter. R Predator 2 (1990) Danny Glover, Gary Busey. R (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21Rattlesnake Republic The Albino Wild Japan (In Stereo) PG Wild Deep PG Wild Deep PG Wild Deep PG Wild Deep PG River Monsters (In Stereo) PG Wild Deep PG Wild Deep PG (BET) 96 19 96 106 & Park: BETs Top 10 Live Top 10 Countdown (N) PG SecondSecondHusbandsHusbandsHusbandsSecondHusbandsSecond (BRAVO) 254 51 254 Matchmaker Real HousewivesReal HousewivesMatchmaker Matchmaker HappensMatchmkr (CC) 27 61 27 33South Park MA Tosh.0 Colbert Report Daily ShowThe BurnJeff Tosh.0 Kroll Show Tosh.0 Tosh.0 The BurnJeff Daily ShowColbert Report (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG My Big Redneck Vacation PG Swamp Pawn (In Stereo) PG My Big Redneck Vacation PG (CNBC) 43 42 43 Mad Money (N)The Kudlow ReportTarget: Inside60 Minutes on CNBCAmerican GreedMad Money (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46The Situation RoomErin Burnett OutFrontAnderson CooperPiers MorganAnderson CooperErin Burnett OutFront (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5GoodCharlie Jessie G Austin & Ally Shake It Up! G GoodCharlie 16 Wishes (2010) Debby Ryan. (In Stereo) G Jessie G GoodCharlie Austin & Ally G Jessie G (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17SportsCenter (N)College Basketball Wisconsin at Ohio State.College Basketball Kentucky at Mississippi.SportsCenter (N) (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49AroundPardonCollege Basketball Soccer United States vs. Canada. (N) (Live)NFL Live (N) (EWTN) 95 70 95 48ChoicesRebuildDaily Mass Mother Angelica LiveReligiousRosaryThreshold of HopePriestWomen (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28Pretty Little Liars Mona-Mania! Pretty Little Liars (In Stereo) Pretty Little Liars (N) (In Stereo) The Lying Game (N) (In Stereo) Pretty Little Liars (In Stereo) The 700 Club (In Stereo) PG (FLIX) 118 170 Monty Pythons The Meaning of Life (1983) Graham Chapman. R All Night Long (1981, Comedy) Gene Hackman. R Once Around (1991) Richard Dreyfuss, Holly Hunter. (In Stereo) R Im Losing You (FNC) 44 37 44 32Special ReportFOX Report The OReilly FactorHannity (N) Greta Van SusterenThe OReilly Factor (FOOD) 26 56 26 Chopped Chopped G Chopped Chopped G Chopped (N) Chopped G (FSNFL) 35 39 35 Game 365ShipPanthersNHL Hockey Florida Panthers at Tampa Bay Lightning.PanthersFameThe Best of Pride (FX) 30 60 30 51Two and Half Men The Other Guys (2010, Comedy) Will Ferrell, Mark Wahlberg, Eva Mendes. PG-13 The Ultimate Fighter (N) D,L,V Justified This Bird Has Flown (N) MA Justified This Bird Has Flown MA (GOLF) 727 67 727 CentralPGA TourGolfLearningPGA Tour Golf Waste Management Phoenix Open, Final Round.CentralGolf (HALL) 59 68 59 45 54Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Happy Days G Happy Days G Happy Days G Happy Days G Frasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PG (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2 Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone (2001) Daniel Radcliffe. PG Wrath of the Titans (2012) Sam Worthington. PG-13 Identity Thief Girls MA Unknown (2011) Liam Neeson. PG-13 (HBO2) 303 202 303 Something Borrowed (2011) Ginnifer Goodwin. (In Stereo) PG-13 New Years Eve (2011) Halle Berry, Jessica Biel. (In Stereo) PG-13 Real Time With Bill Maher MA EnlightenedGirls MA (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52IncomeIncomeHunt IntlHuntersPropertyPropertyIncome Property GHuntersHunt IntlIncomeIncome (HIST) 51 25 51 32 42Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Top Gear College Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Ancient Aliens (LIFE) 24 38 24 31Dance Moms PG Dance Moms PG Dance Moms PG Dance Moms (N) Americas Supernanny (N) PG Teen Trouble Dayne (LMN) 50 119 Teenage Bank Heist (2012, Suspense) Maeve Quinlan, Abbie Cobb. No One Would Tell (1996, Drama) Candace Cameron, Fred Savage. Shes Too Young (2004, Drama) Marcia Gay Harden, Alexis Dziena. (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3 The Hurricane (1999, Drama) Denzel Washington. (In Stereo) R Rocky (1976, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire. PG Tower Heist (2011) Ben Stiller. PG-13 Girls in Bed (MSNBC) 42 41 42 PoliticsNation (N)Hardball MatthewsThe Ed Show (N)Rachel MaddowThe Last WordThe Ed Show WANT MORE PUZZLES? Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.

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C8TUESDAY, JANUARY29, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLECOMICS Pickles Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters (R) ID required. In 3D. 12:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m. No passes. Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters (R) ID required. 4:20 p.m. No passes. Mama (PG-13) 12:40 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:40 p.m. Broken City (R) ID required. 12:20 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:15 p.m. The Last Stand (R) ID required. 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:25 p.m. Les Miserables (PG-13) Noon, 3:30 p.m., 7 p.m. Zero Dark Thirty (R) ID required. 12:10 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7:05 p.m. Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 Parker (R) ID required. 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m. Movie 43 (R) ID required. 2 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 8 p.m. Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters (R) ID required. In 3D. 1:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m. No passes. Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters (R) ID required. 4 p.m. No passes. Mama (PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:35 p.m. Broken City (R) ID required. 1:55 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:50 p.m. The Last Stand (R) ID required. 1:20 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:10 p.m. Zero Dark Thirty (R) ID required. 1 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7 p.m. Silver Lings Playbook (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m. Lincoln (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings and entertainment information. Peanuts Garfield For Better or For Worse Sally Forth Beetle Bailey Dilbert The Grizzwells The Born Loser Blondie Doonesbury Kit N Carlyle Rubes Dennis the Menace The Family Circus Betty Big Nate Arlo and Janis Frank & Ernest Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead. TodaysMOVIES WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies WFJV-FM 103.3 s to s WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix LocalRADIO MCJZ MW CJNW YFKW WFIYBWT MW KJF FWNWX VYDW. JVV ZCJZ MW VYNW TWWHVB SWKYRWD J HJXZ YL AD. CWVWF EWVVWXPrevious Solution: Theres no tragedy in life like the death of a child. Things never get back to the way they were. Dwight D. Eisenhower (c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-29

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TUESDAY,JANUARY29,2013C 9 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS Fax: (352) 563-5665 l Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 l Email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com l website: www.chronicleonline.comTo place an ad, call563-5966 ChronicleClassifiedsClassifieds In Print and Online All The Time699186 000DM1J 000DM1S LIVING ROOM CHAIR large living room chair and ottoman in very good condition. $35. 352-220-4158 Mattress Sets Beautiful Factory Seconds twin $99.95 full $129.95 qn $159.95, kg $249.95 352-621-4500 MATTRESS SETS Beautiful Factory Seconds Twin $99.95, Full $129.95 Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95 352-621-4500 Oak Table 6 chairs, hutch, Nice $750,. Cherry Curio Cabinet Pair $150 ea (352) 212-9507 637-2921, 861-9448 Old secretary desk dark wood 2 drawers and fold down top.$85. 352-726-2572 Preowned Mattress Sets fromTwin $30; Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75. 352-628-0808 QUEEN MATTRESS, BOX SPRING & FRAME with all linens. $150 (352) 287-6601 ROCKER old upholstered rocker with wood arms.$65. 352-726-2572 Sectional Sofa, light color, like new $500 Small secretary Desk $100 (352) 212-3352 TWIN BEDS Frames, boxsprings, & mattresses exc cond. $125 Cell (734) 355-2325 local 352-503-9452 Washed Oak Table 4 chairs, like new, $750 White antique iron Bed, w/ mattress, $500 (352) 212-9507 637-2921, 861-9448 WICKER ROCKER Small old wicker rocker. $50. 352-726-2572 3 MOWERS Craftsman 5000 Craftsman 3000 White B&S Engine Call (352) 341-1569 Extension ladder 17 fl Alluminum ladder $200; Pressure Washer with wand, 16 ft extension $350 (352) 726-8931 LAWN MOVERS TORO self propelled, 6.5 HP$150; 0 Turn GRAVELYriding mower. 12 HP$500 (352) 726-8931 LAWNMOWERYARD WAGON 6 cubic feet with new tires $60. Call-382-3280.. SEARS 2 WHEEL GARDEN WHEELBARROW 4 cubic feet capacity $10 Call 382-3280 to see. Troybuilt Pusher w/ Honda Engine $90 Lawnboy Pusher w/bagger $25 352-726-7789 2X&3X BLOUSES & SLACKS-TSHIRTS AND capris $2.00 ea 352-794-3020 352-586-4987 BEAUTIFULWOOL WOMENS SUITE tan Isenhower style, and blouse to match sz.10 $25. 789-5770 BOYS WINTER CLOTHING SIZES 5 & 6 SHIRTS, PANTS & JACKETS $30 352-613-0529 PROM DRESS Long blue size 13/14, strapless $45. call or text 352-302-2004 PROM DRESS Long, Purple, 1 shoulder, size 12 $65. call or text 352-302-2004 PROM DRESS Long, red / black, halter, size 10/12 $35.call or text 352-302-2004 SILVER FOX COATfinger tip length beautiful sacrafice $100. sz m-l 789-5770 WESTERN BOOTS Brown marble leather made in usa by ACMEsize 8.5EW $40 call text 352-302-8529 SECURITYCAMERAS 2 wireless B&W cameras/transmitters to yourTV $50. Dunnellon 465-8495 4 WHEELWALKERhand brakes & wheel locks, seat, basket, folds for storage, Ex., $50, 352-628-0033 10 FT. WOOD STEPLADDER Type 1, 250 duty $90 (352) 422-0294 12 ft. Aluminum John Boat, no paper work $165. Trailer, spare tire and wheel, fits 10 -15 $35. (315) 466-2268 BARBIE HOUSE/FURN. & DISNEYCASTLE BOTH 32X36 $35 ea/both $75 352-794-3020 586-4987 BEDDING Queen comforter, dust ruffle & pillow shams. Beige, gray, brown. $20 obo 352-513-4536 BLINDS 1 PLEATED 64WX63L1 PLASTIC 64WX60LOFF WHITE $30 352-613-0529 BSR LARGE HOME STEREO SPEAKERS 20 WIDE BY30 HIGH ONLY$100. NICE 352-464-0316 DIGITALPHOTOALBUM Brookstone holds 500 pics like new great brag book $40 call or text 352-746-0401 Fri, 02/01 Preview @ 4pm, Auction@ 6pm General Merchandise Sat, 02/02 Preview @ 4pm, Auction@ 6pm Antiques/Gen. Merch Sun, 02/03 Preview @ 12:30, Auction@ 1pm Tailgate/Box lots **WE BUY ESTATES** 6055 N. Carl G. Rose Hwy 200 Hernando AB3232 (352)613-1389 50 Inch Hitachi HD TV Projection console Exc cond. $100 (352) 621-0405 AM/FM, Stereo Cassette and Turn Table $65. TV, Toshiba, 19 color, $35. (484) 547-9549 SHARP32 TV WITH REMOTE $20 352-613-0529 DOOR JAMBONLY new 3/0 x 6/8 with weather stripping and aluminum threshold $20 call text 352-746-0401 DOUBLE & SINGLE garage doors, both for $250 352-601-7911 DIESTLER COMPUTER New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 HPDESKJETF4100 PRINTER computer printer in good condition with 1 new ink cartridge Price $40 628-3418 MS OFFICE 2010, 1st COURSE BOOK $40. book only. Univ.level. Excellent learning tool. 352-513-4027 SIXTYGALLONTANK ONTRAILER, $70. 352-746-6931 Chipper/ShredderTroy-BiltTomahawk, Briggs & Stratton gas engine. $700 OBO (352) 601-3174 Oblong glass table 66x40 w/6 reclining chairs; small side table, 2 footstools, beige w/ tiny flowers. Never been outside. $400 Call John (352) 422-2317 2 Table Lamps, 33 H, white ceramic, Sq. bamboo design, excel. $50 Broyhill Dining Rm Set. Table, Parquet Top, Rectangular shape, 2 leaves, 6 Caine Highback chairs, china hutch, 3 glass panels 3 shelves, med. fruitwood color, excel. $550. (718) 666-6624 Blue glider rocker and matching foot stool.$65.00 great condition 352-726-2572 Broyhill Wall Unit $750. Bassett Cabinet with Drawers $500. (484) 547-9549 Cherry Desk, credenza, file cabinet, $600. Oak TV Cabinet $300 (352) 212-9507 637-2921, 861-9448 Couch, Clean, brown, excel. cond. $200. Entertainment Center Large, Cherry Traditional, Like new $600 (352) 270-9025 Dinning Room Set, 6 captain chairs, & Hutch maple $200 (352) 726-1081 DUDLEYS AUCTION **TWO AUCTIONS ** Thursday 1/31/13 FullAuction Line up in walk about setting starting @ 3pm preview @12 noon.. From furniture to tools. Sunday 2/3/13 Antique preview @ 11am.Auction 1pm furniture, art, prints, vintage books, china, silver & coins, jewelry, cased knives, & straight razors more+++ *check website www.dudleys auction.com 637-9588 10%BP Au2267AB1667 Maine-ly Real Estate #381384 KING SIZE BED mattress,box spring, and frame all in good condition $100obo call or text 352-464-4280 LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET, In Original Plastic, Never Used, ORG $3000, Sacrifice $975. CHERRY, BEDROOM SET S olid Wood, new in factory boxes$895 Can Deliver. Bill (813)298-0221. DOLLCLOTHES build-a-bear clothes, outfits, tops, bottoms, 31 pc total. $50. all 352-422-1309 BOOK ENDS pr Zebra black and gold porcilin by Lipper and Mann $65. call or text 352-746-0401 CHINACLOSETDECO TYPE glass door,good wood.Picture upon req. looks good $100.789-5770 TEALEAF COPPER LUSTER PLATE 9 1853 to 1871, $35 352-628-3899 4 VINTAGE GLASS FROGS FOR FLORAL Display $20 can email Photos INVERNESS 352-419-5981 6 VINTAGETEACUP AND SAUCER SETS $45 BONE CHINA EnglandAll Different 352-419-5981 KISSING FACES Sculpture By John Cultrone with stand $65. call or text 352-746-0401 N.Y.YANKEES MEMORABILIAsigned hats,Jersey (Jeters)#2 and more $100. or best offer 789-5770 Victorian BATH,PICHER,BOWEL wood pedestal type. $100. 789-5770 2 DR WHITE MAYTAG REFRIG. w/Ice Maker 21.8 cu ft. Less than 2yrs old. $350 (352) 726-8021 3 Ton $100. and 2 $75. Used Copeland Scroll AC COMPRESSORS R22 John 352-208-7294 DISHWASHER GE white, works good, looks good,$100. 352-789-5770 DRYER $100 with 90 day warranty call/text 352-364-6504 GE Refrigerator side by side w/ water dispenser Bisque $380, GO CART5HP, 2s eats built by Manco $275 (352) 503-6641 GE STOVE, coil top, self cleaning, bisque $125; MICROWAVE Over the Range GE Spacemaker $75 (352)503-6641 HOOVER UPRIGHT SWEEPER 6 yrs old, all attachments, Exc Con $75 352-628-3899 Refrigerator/Freezer, GE, Side-by-Side, White, 21.7 cubic feet $100. Runs good 352-489-7393 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also wanted dead or alive washers & dryers. FREE pick up 352-564-8179 WANTED DEAD OR ALIVE WASHERS & DRYERS (352) 209-5135 WASHER OR DRYER $135.00 Each. Reliable, Clean, Like New, Exc. Cond. Free Delivery 352-263-7398 WASHER$100 with 90 day warranty call/text 352-364-6504 WESTINGHOUSE STOVEAlmond ,continous clean,works good looks good. $100. 789-5770 Whirlpool Heavy Duty Super Capacity, LP Gas Dryer, Almond $125. 3 Ton New Replacement Carlyle Scroll AC Compressor R22 $300 John 352-208-7294 DUDLEYS AUCTION **TWO AUCTIONS ** Thursday 1/31/13 FullAuction Line up in walk about setting starting @ 3pm preview @12 noon.. From furniture to tools. Sunday 2/3/13 Antique preview @ 11am.Auction 1pm furniture, art, prints, vintage books, china, silver & coins, jewelry, cased knives, & straight razors more+++ *check website www.dudleys auction.com 637-9588 10%BP Au2267AB1667 Maine-ly Real Estate #381384 RESIDENTIAL ELECTRICIANSRough, Trim, & Service Full Benefits /EOE APPL Y A T : Exceptional Electric 4070 CR 124A Unit 4 Wildwood Senior Lending Officer/Office ManagerBrannen Bank, a banking institution in central Florida, is seeking a Senior Lending Officer/ Office Manager for the Citrus county area. Requires a bachelors degree in business or finance, residential and commercial lending experience and at least four years Office Manager Experience. Duties include management of daily branch operations and originating a variety of consumer loans. Offers a competitive salary and benefit package. If interested, please f orward resumeto Brannen Banks of Florida, Inc. Attn: Carol Johnson PO Box 1929 Inverness, FL 34451-1929 EEO/M/F/V/D/DFWP APPT. SETTERS NEEDEDSign on Bonus. Great Commission Pay and weekly bonuses Call Bob 352-628-3500 CAREGIVERS NEEDEDAll Shifts Apply At HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE 4224 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Lecanto NEWSPAPER CARRIER WANTEDNewspaper carrier wanted for early morning delivery of the Citrus County Chronicle and other newspapers for home delivery customers. 3 to 4 hours per day. Must have insured and reliable vehicle preferable a van SUV, or pick up with a cap-Large enough to hold our Sunday product Apply in Person 1624 N Medowcrest Blvd, Crystal River Monday to Friday 8am-5pm Newspaper carriers are independent contractors, not employees of the Citrus County Chronicle SECRETARY/ HOSTESSP/T for Builders Model. Thur, Fri, Sat. $7.79hr. Please Email Resume to: dreamcitrus@ yahoo.com (352) 527-7171 SPRING HILL CLASSES COSMO DA YS February 25, 2013BARBER NIGHTS February 25, 2013SKIN & NAILS Day School Only BENESInternational School of Beauty 1-866-724-2363STATEAPPROVED FOR VATRAINING Your Worldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com SOUS CHEFneeded for upscale private Country Club in Citrus Co. Previous kitchen management required with casual and fine dining culinary experience. Send Resume to: swiley@ citrushills.com Customer Service/Sales Assit.Must have exp., computer skills, good attitude and be a self starter, Call (352) 628-4656 INSIDE SALESREPRESENTATIVECitrus Publishing Citrus County, Fl Job Summary This position is designed to increase our market share of retail and classified display advertising in all of Citrus Publishings products. The position will consist of receiving incoming calls and making outbound service/cold calls. The position will also handle walk-in advertisers from our Meadowcrest office. Essential Functions Answering incoming calls for our Retail and Classified display ads Facilitating the display advertising needs of walk in customers Making outbound service calls to existing accounts Develop new customers through prospecting and cold calling Develop new opportunities for advertisers to do business with Citrus Publishing, Inc, Consistently meet or exceed monthly and annual sales goals Increase Citrus Publishings Market share through the development of on-line advertising revenue Communicate effectively orally and in writing with customers and coworkers Problem solving, analytical abilities and interpersonal skills required Maintain score cards on progress toward established goals Perform daily functions with a minimal amount of direction Minimum Qualifications at least two years of sales experience; advertising experience preferred Demonstrate persuasiveness and/or sales abilities Proper business attire Professional telephone presence Ability to work well in a team environment Administrative This is a 40 hour a week position Send resume to djkamlot@chronicleonline.com Deadline for applications is Feb.12, 2013 Drug Screen Required for Final Applicant. Equal Opportunity Employer Real Estate AgentsBusy real estate office needs Realtors and BuyersAgents Call PLANTATION REALTY 352-634-0129 Automotive Consultant/ AdvisorEagle Buick GMC Inc is in need of experienced Automotive Service Consultants/Advisors Minimum 2 yrs, dealership experience. Aggressive pay plan and strong compensation package that includes health insurance, paid vacation, paid training, certification reimbursement and many other perks. Drug free workplace Application Avail. @ Eagle Buick GMC Inc. Homosassa, Fl. 34448 Send Resume: Fax (352) 417-0944 Email: robbcole@eagle buickgmc.com Older Puppy Found in Crystal River Call to identify (352) 697-1258 FREE REMOVALWants to Thank All of You for making 2012 Possible, See You In 2013 SPRING HILL CLASSES COSMO DA YS February 25, 2013BARBER NIGHTS February 25, 2013SKIN & NAILS Day School Only BENESInternational School of Beauty 1-866-724-2363STATEAPPROVED FOR VATRAINING Not Looking for Someone, just trying to help people.If you are Bored, Lonely, Need Answers. Call someone who cares. 24-7 (352) 426-1821 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP 15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb Delivered 352-795-0077 ARNPor PAWanted Part Time for a busy Pediatric Practice in Crystal River, Send Resume to: lindapracticemgr @t amp abay .rr .com DOCTORS ASSISTNeeded Must Draw Blood EKG & InjectionsSEND RESUME TO: Citrus Co. Chronicle Blind Box 1825M 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd Crystal River Fl. 34429 EXPERIENCED OPERATING ROOM RNWanted for fast-paced outpatient surgery center. Flexible scheduling. Excellent pay and benefits. No nights, weekends, no call or holidays. Apply at : 110 N. Lecanto Hwy. Lecanto or fax resume to: 352-527-1827. EXPERIENCEDRECEPTIONISTFor fast pace medical office. Must be able to work under pressure & handle multiple phone lines. Medical terminology & insurance knowledge required. Send resume to: reply2013@ hotmail.com HHCAGENCY Looking for RN & Psych RN (352) 794-6097 NEEDEDExperienced,Caring & DependableCNAs/HHAsHourly & Live-in,flex schedule offeredLOVING CARE(352) 860-0885 LIC 440CUST. SERVICE REP/or 220AgentNeeded for busy Insurance office. Apply in person 9am-12N SHELDON PALMES INSURANCE 8469 W Grover Cleveland, Homosassa Experienced BartenderAcceptingApplication 10a-11:30 & 2P-4p Apply In Person Only Lollygaggers 744 SE US Hwy 19 Next to Mr. Bs C.R. Drug Free Work Place FREE REMOVAL Washers,Dryers,Riding Mowers, Scrap Metals,Antena towers 270-4087 FREE KITTENS 18 wks old Calico, litter trained (352) 212-4061 Free to Good Home English Mastiff In need of forever home, very sweet and gentle couch potato Must Spay, Call for Interview (352) 637-4322 Free to loving home 2 yr old male Beagle (352) 726-4678 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP 15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb Delivered 352-795-0077 FRESH CITRUS @BELLAMY GROVEStrawberries/Cabbage Gift Shipping, 8:30a-5p Closed Sun. 352-726-6378 Black Labrador Retriever, about 1 yrs old, answers to Buddy, lost in vicinity of W. Dunnellon Rd. Owner is heartbroken. (352) 400-3302 (352) 795-8662 CHIHUAHUA lost Jan 26 His name is Chico, male, long white hair, face, ears are brown, 3 to 4 lbs, last seen Hunter Springs trailer pk, next to the PO. in Crystal River 352-364-1663 LOST MAL TI POO White female 1 yr old named Chloe last seen on W Starjasmine Pl, Beverly Hills. T wo little girls miss her! Please call (352) 249-0846 Wedding Band Gold & White gold lost at Publix forest Ridge, OR Movie Theater shopping plaza Inverness, Sentimental REWARD (352) 637-2458 Todays New Ads INVERNESS2/1, Tri-plex, Great Loc., clean & roomy. no pets $500.mo 1st. & Last $300. Sec. 352-341-1847 INVERNESSA GOTTA GO SALE! Tues. Wed. & Thur. 8a-4p Make Offer Generator, Roto Tiller, Mower, utility trailers, plumbing, eclectrical, fishing & household. Misc. Turn at Applebees Restuarant, 4 miles, S. on 581 Look for Signs INVERNESSA GOTTA GO SALE! Tues. Wed. & Thur. 8a-4p Make Offer Generator, Roto Tiller, Mower, utility trlrs., plumbing, eclectrical, fishing & hshold. Misc. Turn at Applebees Restuarant, 4 miles, S. on 581 look for signs KOHLER CASTIRON dbl SINK REDUCED $50. Standard size, white. Excel condition. 352-513-4027 LL BEAN16 ft, ABS, Canoe, with paddle & jackets, $650 obo (352) 628-3194 MS OFFICE 2010, 1st COURSE BOOK $40. book only. Univ.level. Excellent learning tool. 352-513-4027 SNAPPER RIDER W/BAGGER, good cond. $275 Torro Weed Eater $25 352-726-7789 Toshiba, 50 Big Screen TV You Move (352) 447-1553 $$ TOPDOLLAR $$ For Wrecked, Junk or Unwanted Cars/Trucks $$ (352) 201-1052 $$ $$ CASH PAID $$for junk vehicles. 352-634-5389 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 FREE PICK UP JunkAppliances, Scrap Metal, Mowers, Autos, (352) 220-3138 Todays New Ads BAYLINER 1752007, Bowrider, garage kept, Bimini top, custom cover, depth finder, only 44 hrs on motor,pristine condition! $14,000. 352-560-7377 BEDDING Queen comforter, dust ruffle & pillow shams. Beige, gray, brown. $20 obo 352-513-4536 Body Fit, Gravity Machine, $50. Circle Glide $25. Both Like New (352) 447-1553 CHEVY89 Corvette, White needs trans $3250 352-601-0355 CRYSTALRIVERLarge 2/2 CHA, W/D hk-up $575/mo. 1st Mo. FREE with $600. no dogs 352-726-9570 ESTATE SALE Nature Coast Landings RV Resort. Developed site with gazebo & storage bldg, reduced to $49,500. Separate storage lot available. (RV sold). For info and pictures Click on detailsbyowner.com 352-843-5441 INVERNESS6079 RECTOR, Off South Apopka Fri. 1 & Sat. 2, 9a-2p Complete Contents of House, Including Garage & 2 Sheds Also 3/2/2 Home, Everything Must Go! Way too Much to List Cash Only, Deb, 634-2656 Your Worldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com

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C10TUESDAY,JANUARY29,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE 000D5A Y WINDOW TINTINGW orld Class Window TintingReduce Heat, Fade, GlareAUTO HOME OFFICEMarion & Citrus352-465-6079 Free Estimates CARPET CAREC O M P L E T E C A R P E T C A R E C O M P L E T E C A R P E T C A R E COMPLETE CARPET CARELic & Ins Specializing in: Specializing in: Carpet Stretching Carpet Stretching Carpet Repair Carpet Repair000DD16 Gift Certificates AvailableCARPET & UPHOLSTERYCLEANING LLC 352-282-1480 cell 352-547-1636 officeFree In Home Estimates Lifetime Warranty ELECTRICAL REPAIR 352-621-1248Thomas Electric, LLC Residential/Commercial ServiceGenerac Centurion Guardian Generators Factory Authorized Technicians ER0015377 Stand Alone Generator 000DNDF ALUMINUM 6 Seamless Gutters Screen Rooms Car Ports Hurricane Protectionallextalum13@yahoo.com Citrus Lic. #2396 LICENSED & INSURED352-621-0881FAX 352-621-0812A L L E X T E R I O R A L L E X T E R I O R ALL EXTERIOR A L U M I N U M I N C A L U M I N U M I N C ALUMINUM, INC. 000DNDR CLEAN UPS & CLEAN OUTSNEED SOMEONE TO GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?IF YOU WANT IT TAKEN AWAY...CALLFOR A FREE ESTIMATE TODAY!352-220-9190 WEMAKEITDISAPPEAR FOR LESS Licensed & Insured352-400-3188YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST Often imitated, never duplicated IS IT TIME TO REFINISH YOUR POOL? POOLS AND PA VERSAdd an artistic touch to your existing yard or pool or plan something completely new! QUALITY WORK AT A FAIR PRICE!COPESPOOL AND PAVER LLC000DTAG Copes Pool & Pavers 000DMZO ROOFINGAAA ROOFINGCall the LeakbustersLic./Ins. CCC057537Free Written Estimate Crystal River563-0411Inverness726-8917 www.aaaroofingfl.homestead.com $100 OFFAny Re-RoofMust present coupon at time contract is signed One Day Bath Remodeling In Just One Day,We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub or Shower Right Over Your Old One!!! Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!Visit our Ocala Showroom or call1-352-624-8827For a FREE In-Home Estimate!BATHFITTER.COM BATH REMODELINGBATHFITTER000DNL6 PAINTING 352-465-6631 Ferraros PaintingInterior & Exterior PressureWashing FREE ESTIMATES Repaint Specialist000DMI0 0 0 0 D N C S HANDYMAN Rons Affordable Handyman Services All Home Repairs Small Carpentry Fencing Screening Clean Dryer Vents Affordable & Dependable Experience lifelong 352-344-0905 cell: 400-1722Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761 000DO9L WINDOW CLEANING Window Cleaning Window Tinting Pressure Washing Gutter CleaningFREE ESTIMATES352-503-8465Bonded & Insuredwww.windowgenie.com/springhill ATREE SURGEON Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates Free est. (352)860-1452 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Tractor Work Service specializing in clean up Tree Removal, General prop. maint. 302-6955 DOUBLE J Tree Serv. Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 KINGs LAND CLEARING & TREE SERVICE Complete tree & stump removal hauling, demo & tractor work. 32 yrs. exp. (352) 220-9819 R WRIGHT TREE Service Tree Removal & Trimming. Ins. & Lic.# 0256879 352-341-6827 RON ROBBINS Tree Service Trim, Shape & Remve, Lic/Ins. Free est. 352-628-2825 344-2556, Richard Water Pump Service & Repairs-all makes & models. Call anytime! MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. Attention Consumers! Please make sure you are using a licensed and insured service professional. Many service advertisers are required by state law to include their state license number in all advertisements. If you dont see a license number in the ad, you should inquire about it and be suspicious that you may be contacting an unlicensed business.The Citrus County Chronicle wants to ensure that our ads meet the requirements of the law. Beware of any service advertiser that can not provide proof that they are licensed to do business. For questions about business licensing, please call your city or county government offices. COUNTYWIDE DRYWALL25 ys exp lic2875 all your drywall needs Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal k 352-302-6838 k CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREEEST. (352) 586-2996 Cleaning Svc -Home, office,windows, pressure washing & more. 352-322-1799 HANDYMAN DAVE Pressure Wash homes & drive-ways, Hauling, Odd Jobs 352-726-9570 PIC PICARDS PRESSURE CLEANING& PAINTING 352-341-3300 Robert G. Vigliotti LLC Painting Int/Ext FREE ESTIMATES 35 yrs exp. call 508-314-3279 Winter Clean Up, Leaves, Power Washing & More Call Coastal Lawn Care (352) 601-1447 All phases of T ile Handicap Showers, Safety Bars, Flrs. 422-2019 Lic. #2713 DGS SERVICES LLC Reroofs Metal Roofs REPAIRS Home Inspector 414-8693 ATYOUR HOMEMower and small engine Its Tune Up time.352 220 4244 A-1 Hauling, Cleanups, garage clean outs, trash, lawn maint. furn. & misc. Mark (352) 287-0767 ALLOF CITRUS Clean Ups, Clean Outs Everything from Ato Z 352-628-6790 JEFFS Cleanup/Hauling Clean outs/Dump Runs Lawns/Brush Removal Lic. (352) 584-5374 Chris Satchell PaintingASAP 30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins. 352-464-1397 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 INTERIOR/EXTERIOR & ODD JOBS. 30 yrs J. Hupchick Lic./Ins. (352) 726-9998 Robert G. Vigliotti LLC Painting Int/Ext FREE ESTIMATES 35 yrs exp. call 508-314-3279 Cleaning Svc -Home, office,windows, pressure washing & more. 352-322-1799 All Tractor Work Service specializing in clean up Tree Removal, General prop. maint. 302-6955 AllAROUND TRACTORLandclearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352 -795-5755 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 LAWNCARE N MORE Yard Clean-up, leaves bushes, hauling 352-726-9570 Winter Clean Up, Leaves, Power Washing & More Call Coastal Lawn Care (352) 601-1447 Need a JOB?#1 Employment source is www.chronicleonline.com Classifieds ANDREW JOEHL HANDYMAN. Gen. Maint/Repairs Pressure Cleaning. 0256271 352-465-9201 Affordable Handy man 4 FAST 100% Guar. 4AFFORDABLE 4 RELIABLE Free EstH 352-257-9508 H Affordable Handy man 4 FAST 100% Guar. 4AFFORDABLE 4 RELIABLE Free EstH 352-257-9508 H Affordable Handy man 4 FAST 100% Guar. 4AFFORDABLE 4 RELIABLE Free EstH 352-257-9508 H Affordable Handy man 4 FAST 100% Guar. 4AFFORDABLE 4 RELIABLE Free EstH 352-257-9508 H HANDYMAN DAVE Pressure Wash homes & drive-ways, Hauling Odd Jobs 352-726-9570 THE KLEEN TEAM Residential/Comm. Lic., Bonded, Insured (352) 419-6557 DUN-RITE ELECTRIC Since / Free Est. lic EC 13002699 352-726-2907 **BOB BROWNS**Fence & Landscaping 352-795-0188/220-3194 A 5 ST AR COMP ANY GO OWENS FENC ING All Types. Free Est. Comm/Res. 628-4002 ROCKYS FENC ING Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,H 352 422-7279 H Install, Restretch, Repair Clean, Sales, Vinyl Carpet, Laminent, Lic#4857 Mitch, (352) 201-2245 1 CALL & RELAX! 25yrs Exp in 100% property maint & all repairs, call H&H Services today! lic#37658 352-476-2285 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic.(352) 364-2120 ROBS MASONRY& CONCRETE Driveways tear outs Tractor work, Lic. #1476, 726-6554 AllAROUND TRACTORLand clearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 HELPING HANDS Transport, shopping Dr. appts, errands, etc. Hablo Espanol 813-601-8199 COUNTYWIDE DRYWALL25 ys exp lic2875 all your drywall needs Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal k 352-302-6838 k #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic.#5863 352-746-3777 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also wanted dead or alive washers & dryers. FREE pick up 352-564-8179 CNAAvailable for Private Duty. Prefer afternoons & evenings. References avail. on request. (352) 453-7255 HELPING HANDS Transport, shopping Dr. appts, errands, etc. Hablo Espanol 813-601-8199 JEFFS Cleanup/Hauling Clean outs/Dump Runs Lawns/Brush Removal Lic. (352) 584-5374 THE KLEEN TEAM Residential/Comm. Lic., Bonded, Insured (352) 419-6557 DIESTLER COMPUTER New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 BIANCHI CONCRETE INC.COM ins/lic #2579 Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk. Pool deck repair /stain. 352-257-0078 FA THER & SON Decorative Concrete Textures, Stamp,Spray Crack repair, Staining, driveways, pool decks, Lic/Ins 352-527-1097 Your world first.Every Dayvautomotive Classifieds 000DM1M 2/2 on Lake Rousseau. NOW $17,500 Low Lot Rent $240/mo.2003. Used Seasonally Owner bought a house. 207-546-6115, cell Adult Park 2/1, Mobile, heat and air, nicely furn. large shed, sreen rm. carport, $8,200 Lot Rent $160 mo. (352) 287-3729 DUNNELLON LAKE ROUSSEAU MH Park. Lg. 1/1 w/slider to encl. screened porch, outside shed, CHAfurn. Nice yard, low lot rent. Asking$11,900 (207) 347-0531 HOMOSASSASBest Housing Value Modern homes from $8,400 or Lease to Own from $179/mo. $1000.down + Lot rent at Evanridge Community an exceptional 55+Park 352 628-5977 Your world first.Every Dayvautomotive Classifieds HERNANDO 2/2 DW On lot, with Shed & Deck See for yourself at 2562 N. Treasure Pt. $28,500 obo 352-464-0719 HERNANDO/486 1+acre, 2br SWMH+ den/flp, ManCave/Work Shop w/AC, 28x40, $43,500, J. Desha Cridland Real Estate (352)634-6340 HOMOSASSA**3/2, Fenced Yard,**NEW Flooring, NEW AC $5,000 Down, $435. mo (352) 302-9217 HOMOSASSA2ba 1 ba MH needs complete rehab. Good shed, well & septic. 6524 W.Akazian $12,500 (603) 860-6660 NW Citrus County SWMH on 1 acre, 2/1.5 -paved rd., screened porch, appliances $37,700-possible owner financing 352-795-9908 W. of 19 in Homosassa 1994, 2/2 Doublewide, Move In Condition Corner Lot $44,900. Tradewinds Realty (352) 400-0089 3bdr/2 full baths/ 2 car carport on 1 acre. split layout, steel roof, caged pool, 20x25 ft deck, lg storage building, Furnished Modular $73,900, 5215 Bridget Pt, Castle Lake Park Inverness (352) 597-7353 CASTLE LAKE Floral City 2/2 S/W Fully furnished move in condition. 2 screen rooms, 2 sheds. Landscaped with sprinkler on quiet cul-de-sac. $38,900. 352-212-1883 CRYSTALRIVERLarge 4br 2ba MH READYTO MOVE IN Owner Fin. Avail. CALL(352) 795-1272 FLORALCITY By Owner, 14x 60 2/2 Split Plan w/dbl roof over, w/ porch & carport on fenced 1 acre, Very Nice Quiet, Considering ALL reasonalble Cash offers. 352-586-9498 www.twitter.com/ citruschronicleFollow the HOMOSASSA2 & 3 Br homes w/ storage sheds. Starting at $550/mo + $800/Sec ONL Y $1350 total to move in. We pay trash, lawn, water & sewer. Close to Walmart, Publixs& Suncoast PKY No pets 352-584-1831 HOMOSASSA2BR, $475. mo. Nice Area (352) 422-1932 LECANTOLEISUREACRES 3/2 water & garbage incl. $600mo. (352) 628-5990 14 x 60, 2BR, 1 BA, Carport, Shed, appliances, W/D, clean, move in condition Near new Walmart on 486, $4,800. (352) 387-7824 BANK FORECLOSURELand-n-Home, 3/2 1500 sq. ft. On Acre, paved rd. LOOKS GOOD, Have financing if needed, only $2,500 down, $381.44mo. P&I W.A.C. OR $69,900. Call 352-613-0587 or 352-621-9183 Crystal River 55+ Park. 2BR/1BACarport & Screened Porch. Heat/Air $9,500. 352-746-4648 Ask for Brit HERNANDO$$Private Owner $$ FinancingAvailable New & Used Manufactured Homes Call 1-727-967-4230 HOME-ON-LAND3/2 Great Shape. Acre. Move In Now $59,900. Call 352-401-2979, 352-621-3807 NEW 2013 2br 2baDoublewide w/10 year Warranty $39,900 Delivered & setup, a/c, skirt, steps. Call(352) 795-1272 REPOS-REPOS REPOSWE HA VE REPOS CALL352-621-9181 WE WILL BUYYOURMANUFACTURED Home. from 1976-2013 CALL(352) 795-2377 2BR, 1 BA,on your own 75x 100 lot, no fees! new enclosed sunroom, lg laundry room furn, 2 storage buildings, 5111 Castle LakeAve. S of Inverness on SR 41 $39,500 (352) 597-7353 1 Sweet Little Male Yorkie, CKC reg., $375. Fl. health certs., Call (352) 212-4504 or (352) 212-1258 BIRD SUPPLYSALE Sun, Feb. 3, 9a-3p, Cages, Seed, Toys, Playstands, Milletspray & more! Save! Cage wire, Chicks & ducklings! 8260 Adrian Dr., Brooksville 727-517-5337 MINIATURE POODLES miniature poodle pups born 10/16/12 Health Cert 1 apricot & 1 black female & 1 black male almost potty trained, raised in our home. $500 cash call 352-419-5662 or karaluv3@yahoo.com Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA, Malesstarting@ $400. Lots of colors, Beverly Hills, FL(352)270-8827 www .aceof pup s.net Bermuda Hay 50lbs $6 Never been rained on 795-1906 586-1906 SHAMROCK FARM, CR I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I CRYSTALRIVER6851 W. Vanaman Ct 2/2 $425/$400 dep. DUNNELLON 2/2 5159 W Disney Lane $400/ $400 dep. (727) 480-5512 FLORALCITY2/1$450 mo + sec. (352) 637-6554: 422-1562 HERNANDO2BR/1BA, acre AllAppls $395 mo (No Pet s) (352) 860-0904, (Cell) 352-212-6815 TRAILER 4 x6, has spare tire, garage kept; Good Condition $500 (352) 726-8931 GRACO PACKNPLAY GOOD CONDITION $35 352-613-0529 WHITE WOOD ROUND BASSINETBrand new $60. 352-422-2719 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I WANT TO BUY HOUSE or MOBILE AnyArea Condition orSitua tion. Call Fred, 352-726-9369 Will Buy Block House In Citrus County, Any Condition, Agents welcome (315) 466-2268 BLUEBlue is an approximately 8-y.o. neutered male Cattle Dog mix, Came to the shelter because his family lost their home. Blue is white and tan, weighs about 50 pounds, is a bit chubby for his size, which is medium. He is housebroken, very friendly and affectionate.The most striking thing about him is that he has very beautiful blue eyes, which catch your attention immediately. He loves people and wants to be by your side Is very obedient and walks well on a leash. He is quite laid-back and would make a great companion for an older person. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. Body Fit, Gravity Machine, $50. Circle Glide $25. Both Like New (352) 447-1553 ELLIPTICALMACHINE PRO-FORM 490 LE with users manual. Heavy duty, I-Pod compatible w/fan. Less than 2 yrs old. $300 527-8276 EXERCISE BIKE (DP) UPRIGHTTYPE WORKSTHEARMS TOO $85. 352-464-0316 EXERCISE BIKE PURSUITALL ELECTRONICS $100. 352-464-0316 Proform Crosswalk 480 excel. cond. less than 50 mi. walk on it inclines, preset ifit trainer workout, built in fan, $275. 352-382-5208 ROWING MACHINE BY BODYROW WORKS THEARMSAND LEGS $50. 352-464-0316 $$ REDUCED $$ EZ GO GOLF CART Electric, exc cond. incl. charger. $1,500 (352) 503-2847 .308AMMO 100 Rds-$60-SP& HP 352-503-2792 14 Assorted Golf Clubs, left handed $200 (352) 795-4942 22 Colt Woodsmen early model orgin. $700 OBO. 352-258-1740 30 cal. Carbine 1943 Inland mfg orgin. Korea war bring home. $1000. OBO 352-258-1740 22LR ammo $16per 100. 525 rds $80 (352) 533-2228 BROWNING BUCK MARK 22 L.R. RIMFIRE PISTOLincludes 6000 rounds of 22 ammo, and 3 spare magazines. Will sell as a total package only. $680.00 cash only Call 352-465-4373 Concealed Weapons Permit Course DANS GUN ROOM (352) 726-5238 GOLF CLUBS Two sets, pull carts and accessories. $60.each 726-1495 HOLSTER Uncle Mikes camo belt style size 10 $7 call or text 352-746-0401 REMINGTON 700 BDL 270cal exc cond. $495. will take lever action 30-30 on trade. (906) 285-1696 Winchester Model 70 Super grade, 300 Win. Mag., Nikkon scope, + ++ extras, $,1200 (352) 628-5355 2013 ENCLOSED TRAILERS, 6x12 with ramp, $1895 ** call 352-527-0555 ** SHOWER CHAIR WITH BACK WHITE FIBERGLASS WITH ADJUSTABLE LEGS $30. 352-464-0316 WHEELCHAIR LIFT Easily load a folding manual chair (not scooter)to vehicle hitch $100. Dunnellon 465-8495 BUYING US COINS Top $$$$ Paid. We Also Buy Gold Jewelry Beating ALL Written Offers. (352) 228-7676 NEWACOUSTIC ELECTRIC GUITAR TRANS BLACK,CORD INCLUDED $95 601-6625 NEW ELECTRIC GUITAR FAT STRAT STYLE FINISH CHIPPED PLAYS PERFECT $45 352-601-6625 EPIPHONEACOUSTIC ELECTRIC GUITAR W/AMP,GIGBAG,TUNER,ST RAP,DVD,ETC $100 352-6O1-6625 FULLSIZEACOUSTIC GUITAR PACK NEW W/GIGBAG STRAP,STRINGS,ETC. $65, 352-601-6625 JUSTICE SING & PLAY ELECTRIC GUITAR PINK never used pd$150.sell $75 352-794-3020 586-4987 NEW CUTAWAY ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC GUITARTRANS BLACK/ABALONE $90 352-601-6625 UPRIGHT PLAYER PIANO W/BENCH. Ampico reproducing. Walnut wood, good cond. $600 OBO (352) 382-1885 2 VERTICALBILNDS 6Wx4Lea. w/covers, almond slats.All hdwe. inc. exc. cond. $100. both 352-560-7857 3 MINI MUFFIN TINS $5 NEW WHITE QUICHE DISH $10 LARGE GREEN BOWL $10 352-419-5981 40 PIECE STAINLESS STEELUTENSILSET $20 DECORATIVE HANDLES NEVER USED 352-419-5981 BLINDS 1 PLEATED 64WX63L1 PLASTIC 64WX60LOFF WHITE $40 352-613-0529 COFFEE GRINDER $5 ELECTRIC VEGETABLE STEAMER $5 CANNISTER SET$10 352-419-5981 KOHLER CASTIRON dbl SINK REDUCED $50. Standard size, white. Excel condition. 352-513-4027 LIGHTFIXTURE chandelier, 5 frosted glass shades, bronzed color metal, nice $50.352-422-1309 LIGHTED MAKE UP MIRROR 1x5 times magnification low & high light$25. 352-794-3020 352-586-4987 FishAquarium 50 gallons, cabinet stand, lights & filter $250 (352) 621-0392 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP 15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb Delivered 352-795-0077 GERBILCAGE $20 352-613-0529 Mattress Trade In Sets Clean and Very Nice Fulls $50., Qn. $75. Kings. $125, 621-4500 NEW SKYLIGHTBUBBLETYPE SMOKED POLYCARBONITE 27 BY27 ONLY$60. 352-464-0316 PICK-UPTOOLBOX 56 wide, silver alum, 2 latch, 1 locking, great shape. $65. 352-422-1309 RYOBI 10 COMPOUND SAW#TS1342 15 AMPs, 5500 RPMs, dust bag, EX+, $60, 628-0033 RYOBITABLE SAW Good condition. First $50 can have it. Hurry wont last long at this price. 628-4429 SMALLBLOCK CHEVY STARTER new staggered bolt pattern $25 call or text 352-746-0401 SNAPPER 42 RIDING MOWER/GENERAC 4W GENERATOR Mower $1000. incl mulch attachment GenSet $375.BOTH LIKE NEW 352-489-6465 Stallion Cow Boy Hat, by Stetson, wool, sz 6 & Boots, black 11 D. both New $100. GlassTopTable w/ 4 chairs $100. 352-795-7254 TAILGATE FOR 1986 CHEVYSilverado F10 PickupTruck $50. Ruth 352-382-1000 Target GIFTCARD Bal is $67.79 selling for $55.00 OBO.WILL VERIFY. LINDA 352-341-2271 VERIZON LG ENV TOUCH V X11000 cell phone full key board $25 call or text 352-746-0401 VERIZON SAMSUNG BRIGHTSIDETOUCH cell phone full key board $35.call or text 352-746-0401 WICKERTEACART, Vintage, excellent cond. useful and decorative, $80, (Dunnellon) (352) 465-1813 4 WHEELED WALKER WITH BRAKES & SEAT $75. 352-464-0316 4TOILETSEAT RISER BRAND NEW WITH HANDLES ONLY $25. 352-464-0316 BEDSIDE COMMODE &ALUMINUM WALKER ADJUSTABLE LEGS ON EACH $20.00 EA.352 464 0316 MANUALWHEELCHAIR WITH FOOTRESTS GREATSHAPE $100. 352-464-0316

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TUESDAY,JANUARY29,2013C 11 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS 517-0129 TUCRN Simmons, Robert C. 2012-CP-715 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.2012-CP-715 IN RE: ESTATE of ROBERT C. SIMMONS, DECEASED, NOTICE TO CREDITORS 000DM1Q TOYOTA2002, Tacoma, Crew Cab, $8,770. 352-341-0018 TOYOTA2004, 4 Runner Sport 2WD, 94K mi, Leather $12,800. oboCall Troy 352-621-7113 CADILLAC2007, Escalade, 44k miles, Luxury NAV, $29,500. Call Troy (352) 621-7113 CHEVYTRAILBLAZER LT 05exc. cond. asking $6000 obo, in Hernando (904) 923-2902 FORDF150, 1978, 4 x 4 perfect, father/son, project $1,650 obo (352) 564-4598 JEEP2004, Wrangler X 4WD, Only 57K miles, Hard Top $13,800.Call Troy 352-621-7113 KIA2006 Sedona, Great Family Van, 7 Pass, low mi. Call today for Low Price 352-628-4600 BAD BOYBUGGIE 2011 ready to hunt Only $5998. (352) 621-3678 POLARIS2002 SPORTSMAN 700 CC 4X4 AUTO READYFORTHE MUD ONLY$4288 (352) 621-3678 POLARIS RZR 800 LE TIMETO PLAYHARD ONLY$8388 (352) 621-3678 CF MOTO2008, 250 Trike 772 miles, $2,495. (352) 726-6128 FASHION2007 250 cc; 1,500 miles; $1,200 (352) 726-6128 GOLDWING1985 Blue; 39,155 miles; $2,495 (352) 726-6128 GOLDWING1985 Limited Edition Gold; Fuel injected; 53,012 miles; $3,000 (352) 726-6128 GOLDWING1998, SE with Voyager Trike Kit -Tan; 55,200 miles; $9,000 (352) 726-6128 Harley-DAVIDSON2006 FLHTPI Clean bike, great looks, 88 ci, 5 speed, low miles 19K, accident free, never layed down, garage kept, two tone bk/wt, all service done by HD dealer 352 513-4294 asking $10,500 HARLEY-Davidson Leather Jacket LG as New, $300. OBO Two shorty motorcycle Helmets S/M & L/XL $50ea 352-746-6125 HONDA, Goldwing, 100k + miles, $9,500 (352) 419-4606 HONDA, 750 Shadow Aero. Runs & looks great! $2,995. Firm (352) 344-0084 HONDA1997, GOLDWING ASPENCADE, 24K mi, Lots a Extras! $6000. (352) 212-6450 HONDA2007 Full Size Shadow. Harley,1100CC, Chrome, bags, trade?, 70mpg $2,800. Crystal River (727) 207-1619 HONDABLACK BIRD CBR 1100 LOW LOW MILES ONLY$3488.00 (352) 621-3678 HONDASPIRIT2002, ExcTires, Bags, WS, Sissy Bar, Cobra Pipes. 28k miles. $2,000 (352) 476-3688 HONDAST13002006 MADE TO TOUR ONLY$7786 (352) 621-3678 KAWASKI NINFA650 LIKE NEW ONLY $5488 (352) 621-3678 KYMCO2009,AJILITY SCOOTER GREAT GAS SAVER ONLY $998 (352) 621-3678 SCOOTER 50 CC, like new, 400 miles, runs great $850 OBO (352) 746-0167 (315) 439-6005 SUZUKI1999,1400 Intruder with Lealman Trike Kit 24,283 miles; $10,000 (352) 726-6128 SUZUKI BURGMAN AUTOMATICTWIST AND GO FUN ONLY $4686 (352) 621-3678 SUZUKI GSXR 750195 MILES HOLD ON ONLY$9996 (352) 621-3678 VICTORYCROSS ROADS GREATAmerican MADE CRUSIER ONLY$12888 (352) 621-3678 CHRYSLER, PT Cruiser, loaded, 53k miles, $4,800 (352) 464-4304 FORD2001 COBRAMUSTANG CONV. 5 SPEED, LEATHER MUSTSEE CALL352-628-4600 For More Info FORD2005, Five Hundred LMT, 40K miles, leather, V6 $9,980Call Troy 352-621-7113 FORD2006 Focus ZXW, SE 4DR, WGN. 85k miles $5,800 obo Call Troy (352) 621-7113 FORDMustang Cobra, Indy 500 Pace Car-1994, Convertible, 7100 mi, Gar. kept 252-339-3897 GAS SAVER!1999 Saturn SL$2000 Tan/Gold.Auto. Engine andTrans are solid. 196,000 miles. Clean inside and out. Call Steve: 352-613-0746 Harley Davidson, Super Glide, low miles, $7,500 (352) 613-2333 HONDA2011 CRV LX, 19K miles, likenew, 4 Cyl. $19,950Call Troy 352-621-7113 HYUNDAI2006 Elantra, GLS 90K miles, likenew, 4 DR, auto. $6,800Call Troy 352-621-7113 MAZDA2007, RX8 Looking for A sports Car, Look No Further!!! This is A Must See...Call for an Appt. and Pricing 352-628-4600 MERCURY2004, Grand Marquis, Leather and Loaded To Many Options to List. Call Today Before Its Gone Call 352-628-4600 MITSUBISHI2011 Galant, Low Mi. Great fuel economy, Priced to sell Call 352-628-4600 For Appointment MONEYS TIGHT! PRICES R RIGHT! BUY-SELL-RENTCar-Truck-Boat-RV consignmentusa.or g US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 PONTIAC1999TransAm 5.7Llter V8, 62,700 mi, Show Quality, $7500. (352) 726-8336 Cell 352-302-5569 PONTIAC2008, G6, 4 Door, Cold AC Call 352-628-4600 For Pricing PORSCHE, 911 Carrera, black exterior, black interior 62,600 org. mi $25,900 386-334-2559 CELL TOYOTA2000, Camry LE V6, 183K miles Super Clean $5,800. obo Call Troy (352) 621-7113 TOYOTA2007,Yaris, 59K miles, 2 DR, H/B $7,800. Call Troy 352-621-7113 AUTO SWAP/ Corral CAR Show Sumter County Fairgrounds SUMTER SWAPMEETS SUN. FEB. 3, 2013 1-800-438-8559 CHEVY89 Corvette, White needs trans $3250 352-601-0355 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I CHEVROLET1994,C/K 2500 $2,880 352-341-0018 CHEVROLET2005, Silverado 2500 HD, Diesel crew cab, $13,880 352-341-0018 DODGE1997 Ram 2500 Truck Cummins Diesel, 2WD, AutoTrans,116,000 miles. Garage kept. Well maintained. Has been used as a commute vehicle. $7,800 firm. 352-464-4690 FORD2003 F150 Ex Cab, $8,990 352-341-0018 FORD98, Ranger Splash, very well kept, cold AC, 6 cyl., auto, Tires like new, $3,200 obo (352) 601-0572 MONEYS TIGHT! PRICES R RIGHT! BUY-SELL-RENTCar-Truck-Boat-RV consignmentusa.or g US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 AIRBOAT13ft x 7ft, 500 HP Cadillac, turn key boat $9,500 obo Call Jim for details (813) 361-4929, LL BEAN16 ft, ABS, canoe, with paddle & jackets, $650 obo (352) 628-3194 TRI PONTOON BOAT27 Ft., Fiberglass 250 HP,Ttop, trailer included $17,000. 352-613-8453 WE HAVE BOATSGULF TO LAKE MARINE We Pay CASH For Used Clean Boats Pontoon, Deck & Fishing Boats (352)527-0555 boatsupercenter.com ITASCAMERIDIAN36 Ft, 2005 Motor Home 350HPCat Diesel 55K miles, no smoke/pets 6 Michelin Tires, New 2010 qn w/ sleep No. mattress & overhead fan. W/D combo $71,000 obo (352) 419-7882 MONTEGO BAY35ft 5th wheel 3 slides kept undercover, Exc cond.TruckAvail. LOADED $27,000 (352) 564-2756 NATIONALRV2006Tropical One owner,34ft, 26000 miles,no smoke/pets, 300HPCummins diesel,2 slides, 6 new tires, 3yr warranty,many extras. $87000. Well maintained. 352-341-4506 5TH WHEEL33FT GOOD CONDITION MUST SELL (423) 202-0914 FOREST RIVER2010, Surveyor, Sport 189, 20 ft. Travel Trailer, 1 slide, w/AC, qn. bed, awning, pwr. tonque jack, corner jacks, microwave, equilizing hitch, $10,500, reduced to $9000 (352) 382-1826 HIGH LINE1999, 32ft Deluxe, 12 slide out, new 22awning, 55+ park, can be moved. Was asking $9,000, Sell $6,900 excel. shape 231-408-8344 HI-LO TRAVELTRAILER 2003,tow lite model 22-03t,exc. cond. $6000 obo 352-422-8092 KZ Toyhauler,0732 like new, full slide new tires, Owan Gen., gas tank, Lrg living area separate cargo $18,000. 352-795-2975 MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. SUNNYBROOK 36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides, kg bd,like new, 60amp serv. NADA $29K asking $25K obo 352-382-3298 WE BUYRVS, Travel Trailers, 5th Wheels, Motor Homes Call US 352-201-6945 $$ TOPDOLLAR $$ For Wrecked, Junk or Unwanted Cars/Trucks $$ (352) 201-1052 $$ BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 CASH BUYERS Buying Used Cars Trucks & Vans, For used car lot LARRYS AUTO SALES, Hwy 19... 352 564-8333 MONEYS TIGHT! PRICES R RIGHT! BUY-SELL-RENTCar-Truck-Boat-RV consignmentusa.or g US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 WE BUY ANYVEHICLEInAny Condition, Title, No Title, Bank Lien, No Problem, Dont Trade it in. We Will Pay up to $25K Any Make,Any Model. 813-335-3794 813-237-1892 Call AJ AFFORDABLE AUTOS & VANS Everybody Rides $495 DOWN $49 PER WEEK BUYHERE PAY HERE.Lots of clean-safedependable rides CALLDAN TODAY (352) 5 6 3 -1 9 0 2WE BUYS CARS DEAD OR ALIVE 1675 Suncoast Hwy. Homosassa Fl. BUICK2007, Lucerne, CXL 55K miles, Leather $13,500. obo Call Troy (352)621-7113 CADILLAC1997 De Ville Tan with black imitation rag top fully loaded good runner-norstar engine,only 97000 miles, good tires-$2999.00. jim (941)-705-1795 CHEVROLET Corvette Corvette 6 speed, black on black, $14,500 (352) 613-2333 CHEVROLET2002, Camaro Z28 $9,495.352-341-0018 MICHELE ROSERealtorSimply put I ll work harder 352-212-5097 isellcitruscounty@ yahoo.com Craven Realty, Inc. 352-726-1515 TONY PauelsenRealtor352-303-0619Buy or Sell Call NOW TOP PERFORMANCERealestate Consultant FREE Foreclosure and Short Sale Lists Office Open 7 Days a Week LISAVANDEBOE Broker (R) Owner Plantation Realty 352-634-0129 www.plantation realtylistings.com CRYSTALRIVER2 Story, 5BR/3Bath 2 boat slips near KINGS BAY$425,000. Make Offers 352-563-9857 DUNNELLON Here is that home on Lake Rousseau that you have always wanted! 2br 1 ba on 1.43 acres w/168ft lake frontage. Completely remodeled all new interior & windows. No Flood Insur ance! Priced reduced from $369,000 to $169,000 Call Bernie (352) 563-0116 YOUR High-Tech Water Front RealtorROD KENNER352-436-3531 ERA Suncoast Realty SCAN OR GO TOwww. BestNatur eCoast Pr operties.com To view great waterfront properties NORTH CITRUS 1.4 ac. Cleared, fenced, high & dry. Paved road. Elec., pump/well, septic. Owner finan. No mobiles. $13,900 CALL352-897-4195 HOMOSASSA Wooded Lot on Lee Woods Dr., has Wetlands, with River access, but not on river $6,000. 352-621-1664 BAYLINER 1752007, Bowrider, garage kept, Bimini top, custom cover, depth finder, only 44 hrs on motor,pristine condition! $14,000. 352-560-7377 BAYLINER 1984cuddy cabin, hard top, Volvo motor,AQ125A, needs tune-up. Has 2 props, fish/depth finder, 2001 Rolls float on trailer worth $1000 Comes w/spare motor Has service manual, 2nd owner $2500 call Doug after 4pm352-212-8385 or 352-564-0855 ARBOR LAKES **OPEN HOUSE**2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR & fenced back yard! Gated Comm. 10a-3p 4695 N. Lake Vista Trl (352) 419-7418 ARBOR LAKES Fantastic Dream Home In Active Senior Community $169,900 2,100 sf, 3BR/2BA/2GA Split Floor Plan w/Pool Call (352) 726-6564 3/2 Move In Ready Villa in Windemere. Beautifully Maintained with upgraded features. Premier location close to boat ramp, trail & downtown. MLS#359594 $229,500 Call Myriam Reulen (352) 613-2644 Weston Properties, LLC INVERNESSBlock home 2br, 1ba w/ 2porches, oversized gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres. $130,000 Call Buzz 352-341-0224 or David 607-539-7872 Unique stilt home off 581. Great loc to town, shopping, & hospital. 2br/1ba, w/ rap around porch. Needs some TLC. Sold as is. $33,900 (352) 419-6227 3b/2ba, den MH on land off US 19 newer c/h/a carpet & vinyl, clean RV Hkup. fence ** $39,900** Cridland Real Estate Jackie 352-634-6340 The Meadows Sub. 2/2/1, New roof, NewAC & Appliances Move In, clean cond. 3876 S. Flamingo Terr. Asking $58,000 (352) 382-5558 4/2 BLOCK HOME, mother in law apt, nice home $65,000. (305) 619-0282, Cell 4/2/3 HEATED POOL lot s of extras SELLER MOTIVATED! reduced to 210k 352-688-6500 or 352-212-5023 Buying or Selling REALESTATE, Let Me Work For You!BETTYHUNTREALTORERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc. 352 586-0139hunt4houses68 @yahoo.comwww.bettyhunts homes.com. Sugarmill WoodsHouse for Sale 2/2/2, Call for More Info.334-691-4601 (850) 776-7528 Phyllis StricklandRealtor Best Time To Buy! I have Owner Financing and Foreclosures TROPIC SHORES REALTY. (352) 613-3503 GAIL STEARNSRealtor Tropic Shores Realty (352) 422-4298 Low overhead = Low Commissions Waterfront, Foreclosures Owner financing available I NEEDLISTINGS!I SOLD ALMOST 2HOMES A MONTH IN 2012 Lets BREAK that record together!DEB INFANTINERealtor(352) 302-8046 Real Estate!... its what I do. ERAAmerican RealtyPhone: 352-726-5855 Cell: 352-302-8046 Fax: 352-726-7386 Email:debinfantine@ yahoo.com ESTATE SALE Nature Coast Landings RV Resort. Developed site with gazebo & storage bldg, reduced to $49,500. Separate storage lot available. (RV sold). For info and pictures Click on detailsbyowner.com 352-843-5441 LAND FOR SALE LAND LIQUIDATION 20 acres St. Lucie Waterway, $189,500. 3 miles boat Lake Okeechobee, 45 min boatAtlantic. Private / gated. Deer, turkey, hogs, fishing. (888)716-2259 Gulf Atlantic Land, Broker. MOTIV A TED SELLER W ant s This Gone!!! 6Acres w Big SHOP, Nice 2/2/2 House, Porches Barns, pond, pvd rd, Concrete dr. Reduced! $ 114, 900 MLS 357108. www. crosslandrealty.com 352 726 6644 Specializing in Acreage Farms/Ranches & Commercial Richard (Rick) Couch, Broker Couch Realty & Investments, Inc. (352) 344-8018 RCOUCH.com UNIQUE & HISTORIC Homes, Commercial Waterfront & Land Small Town Country Lifestyle OUR SPECIALTY SINCE 1989LET US FIND YOUAVIEW TO LOVEwww. crosslandrealty.com(352) 726-6644Crossland Realty Inc. HOMOSASSAGNC Commercial 7311 Grover Cleveland Blvd. 3/2 MH $69,900. (603) 860-6660 CITRUS SPRINGS3/2/2, 2 yr old Pool home in imacculate condition, Landscaped backyard. $125,000 Priced to sell! CALL (570) 412-5194 Quiet Country Setting 3/2 on 2 acres mol Approx. 1750 sq ft LA front porch, Lg rear screened porch, Patio, 24x30 Steel Building, Steel Carport -great for boat storage, etc. Fenced and crossfenced, Built in 2003 Nice Oaks, Wooded, Citrus Springs area only 20 Min. to Ocala $129,900 Call 352-302-6784 for appt. PINE RIDGE THIS IS THE PROPERTYYOUVE BEEN LOOKING FOR! Bring your boat, horses, in-laws; there is room for everything! 4/3 w/7 car garage/workshop & in-law suite on 5.83 acres. Mostly wooded w/large backyard. Beautiful & serene. High end finishes; immaculate home in equestrian community. www .centralflest ate.com for pictures/more info. 352-249-9164 2/2/2, REMODELED NEW: Roof, AC, Kit, Baths, Windows, Flrs, 317 S Harrison. Reduced $72,900. Call 352-527-1239 Brentwood Villa 2/2/2 cul-de-sac Completely up dated! 1816 W. Jena Ct OPEN SUN 12-3PM $96,900 PRICED T O SELL! FSBO 610-248-2090 HERNANDOCitrus Hills Pool Home 4/3/2+, circular drive, 1 acre lot, below $200k 352-527-7856 BEVERLYHILLSLg 1/1, Extras, E-Z Terms $425. 697-1457 CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1Water Incl. CHA, $496. 352-220-2447 212-2051 HERNANDOForest Ridge V illage Nice 2/2 home w/garage, screened patio, & pool/clubhouse privileges. $750 mo Call 980-285-8125 HOMOSASSA2/1 Duplexe $450 3/2/2 House $625 River Links Realty 352-628-1616 INVERNESS3/2 Brand New, Granite tops, marble flrs, SS Ap $895 (352) 634-3897 INVERNESS3/2/2 Starting @ $750. www.relaxfl.com 352-601-2615 OR 352-201-9427 INVERNESSHighlands, 2/1/1 $590mo.1st & Sec (352) 344-2560 INVERNESSLarge 1 BR home in 55+ community, Great location just off the water. Bring boat & fishing gear. $585 (352) 344-1380 Sugarmill Woods2/2/2, 2 MBdrms $875. 352-302-4057 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352)726-2225 CRYSTALRIVER3950 sq ft Lt MFG w/office @ $1200/mo 1155 sq ft storage @ 450/mo 600 sq ft office @ 450/mo 352-302-1935 CRYSTALRIVERWarehouse for Rent Free standing, garage area, 1,440sf, $100-$550 352-634-0129 ESTATE SALE in Nature Coast Landings RV Resort. Large developed site and a separate gated storage lot; plus almost new 5th-wheel with slides, screened gazebo, and storage building. All for $79,900. For more info and pictures, click on www.detailsbyowner.com 352-843-5441 PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair HousingAct which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1800-669-9777.The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. CRYSTALRIVERLarge 2/2 CHA, W/D hk-up $575/mo. 1st Mo. FREE with $600. no dogs 352-726-9570 CRYSTALRIVERSpacious 2/1, lawn, water, sewr & garb. W/D hk up $500.mo $250 dep No Pets 352-212-9205 352-212-7922 INVERNESS 2 B/RsAvailable KNOLLWOOD TOWNHOMESRentalAssistance Available For QualifiedApplicants Call 352-344-1010 MWF, 8-12 & 1-5 307 Washington Ave Inverness Florida Equal Housing Opp. INVERNESS2/1, Tri-plex, Great Loc., clean & roomy. no pets $500.mo 1st. & Last $300. Sec. 352-341-1847 CRYSTAL RIVER2/1, 828 5th Ave. NE Furn $650 or Unfurn. $550+sec 727-4558998, 727-343-3965 CITRUS HILLS2/2 Townhouse Condo full appls, carport, Citrus Hills membership inclddPrudential Florida Showcase Properties call 352-476-8136 CITRUS SPRINGS2/2 Duplex nice private area, near shopping & schools. Wtr, sewer incl $600mo 352-558-4477 CRYSTALRIVERLarge 2/2 CHA, W/D hk-up $575/mo. 1st Mo. FREE with $600. no dogs 352-726-9570 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 CRYSTALRIVER**RENT REDUCED** 3/1 Country Home on stilts,w/fenced yard. $565 + Utilities. Call 920-922-6800 Sugarmill Woods3BR, 2BA, Super Clean 3,100 sf, large priv. shaded lot, 2 covered, porches, sm. pet ok. $1,150. mo. yrly lse., sec. dep $700. $3,000 move in (727) 580-1083 BEVERLYHILLS1/1, Fresh paint, appls Flooring $475. mo. 352-302-3987 BEVERLY HILLS2/1 + Florida Room, 106 S. Fillmore $550 mo. 352-422-2798 BEVERLY HILLS2/2/Carport. CHA $550. mo. & 1/1/CP + Fl. Rm $450 (352) 897-4447, 697-1384 BEVERLYHILLS870 Beakrush Ln 2br 1 ba, 1 car gar. enclosed screen porch, $695mo. leased dep. no pets. 352-697-3133 CITRUS COUNTYBeautiful 3-4 Bedrm Homes & Duplexes w/1 car garage. St arting@$433/mo Inverness 352-726-3476 Lecanto 352-746-0373Crystal River 352-563-0890 INVERNESS3/2 MH, Furn. lg screen lanai, shed & lot. All appl incl lg scn TV,55+ PK Asking $12,000. Call (352)364-3747 INVERNESSMove In Ready, Beautiful 1/1 SW, Mobile, Harbor Lights 55+ park, on Big Lake Henderson. Fully furn., very updated, view of lake, Cen. HVAC, W/D, AMust See! Asking $7,000, 352-344-1828 INVERNESS PARK55+ 14X60, 2/2, new roof, all appliances, partly furn. screen room, shed, 352-419-6476 MOBILE HOME, Fully Furnished. Everything stays. Just move in. 2 Sheds, washer/dryer all appliances. Must See! $7,500. (708) 308-3138 PALM TERRACE 55+ Community, 1997 3BR/2BA14 x 66, excel. cond. Shed, Fl. Rm. Carport & Deck $16,000. (352) 400-8231 REDUCED 2/2 $17,500 On Lake Rousseau Lot Rent $240/mo. BETTER THAN NEW! Owner financing. Call LEE (352) 817-1987 Singing Fores t FLORALCITY 14 x 70, Mobile, 2 lrg. bedrooms, furnished & remodeled, heat & air, carport & shed, Wash/ Dryer, Lot rent $176. $14,500 352-344-2420 STONEBROOK, CR 2bd/2ba,gourmet kitch, master suite,encl. porch pond, crprt+ patio $51,900, Cridland RE, Jackie 352-634-6340 Waterfront/Homosassa Westwind Village 55+ Beautifully furnished Move In Ready, 2/2 2 Scrn rms, dbl door, refrig./Ice maker Washer Dryer, Low mnthly pyments, $19000 obo (850) 449-1811 Cell HOMOSASSARENT-to-OWN 3br 2ba MH Immediate Occpancy Owner Financing A vail CALL(352) 795-2377 3/2 Citrus S prings $975 Furn W/FHome $2500 Furn S tilt w/f Hm $1700 3/2 furn w/f condo $1500 More rentals: c21naturecoast.com 835 NE Hwy 19Crystal River, Fl(352) 795-0021 Chassahowitzka 3/2 waterfrnt/DW $500 2/2, fenc. Yd/DW $500 2/2 house w/gar. $600Sugarmill W oods 3/2/2, Furnished, $900. AGENT (352) 382-1000 CRYSTALRIVER1Br 2BACompletely furn., incl utilities, W/D, $700 mo + deposit (352) 422-7717 CRYSTALRIVER2/BR $550. 3BR $750 Near Town 563-9857 CRYSTALRIVERStudio Apartment Completely Furn. Cable TV W/D rm. All util. incld.+ boat dock. $700 mo 352-372-0507 FLORALCITYLAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm. AC, Clean, No Pets (352) 344-1025 HOMOSASSA1/1 Remodeled, Near New Wal-Mart on Cardinal $425. + Sec. (352) 621-5265 Alexander Real Estate (352) 795-6633Crystal River Apts2 BR/1 BA$400-$500 ALSO HOMES & MOBILES AVAILABLE CRYSTALRIVER1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments for Rent 352-465-2985

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C12TUESDAY,JANUARY29,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE 525-0129 TUCRN 02/01 Meeting PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Directors of the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc., a Fla. not for profit corporation will meet in Special Meeting for the purpose of conducting an ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION on Friday, February 1, 2013, at 12:00 P.M., in the Board Room, Administration Annex Building, Citrus Memorial Hospital, 502 W. Highland Boulevard, Inverness, Florida, for the purpose of commencing an attorney/client session pursuant to Section 286.011(8), Florida Statutes. The purpose of the ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION will be to discuss all pending Citrus County Hospital Board litigation cases. Pursuant to said statute, the Board will meet in open session and subsequently commence the attorney/client session which is estimated to be approximately one and half (1.5) hours in duration. At the conclusion of the ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION the meeting shall be reopened per public notice. Those persons to be in attendance at this ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION are as follows: Citrus Memorial Health Foundation Board Members:Joseph Brannen David LangerJames Sanders Carlton Fiarbanks, DMDSandra Chadwick V. Reddy, MD Robert Collins V. Alugubelli, MD Ryan Beaty, Chief Executive Officer Clark A. Stillwell, Esquire, Attorney for Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc. James J. Kennedy, Esquire, Attorney for Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc. Richard Oliver, Esquire, Attorney for Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc. Court Reporter January 29, 2013 520-0205 TCRN Estate of Deforge, Stanley 2012-CP-673, NTC Public Notice 521-0205 WCRN Estate of Fisher, Lasine, 2012-CP-698 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.: 2012-CP-698 IN RE: ESTATE OFLASINE M. FISHER, Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Lasine M. Fisher, deceased, whose date of death was October 14, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is January 29, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/Stephanie M. Murphy 157 McKay Street, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Megan T. Fitzpatrick, Esq. 213 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450-4239 352-726-1821, Florida Bar No. 84987 Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 29 & February 5, 2013 522-0205 FCRN Baker, Donaldson, Joseph, 2012CP745 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION, FILE NO.: 2012-CP-745 IN RE:ESTATE OF JOSEPH DONALDSON BAKER, A/K/A JOSEPH D. BAKER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JOSEPH DONALDSON BAKER A/K/A JOSEPH D. BAKER, deceased, whose date of death was August 9, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Flroida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate must file thier claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is January 29, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/ DEBORAH HUBBARD BAKER DEBORAH ANNE BAKER 8280 North Pine Haven Point, Crystal River, FL 34428 Attorney for Personal Representative: 523-0205 WCRN Young, Malcom Mickey 2012-CP-753 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL COURT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA Probate Division Case No. 2012-CP-753 IN RE: ESTATE OF MICKEY MALCOLM YOUNG a/k/a MICKEY M. YOUNG, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The Administration of the Estate of MICKEY MALCOLM YOUNG a/k/a MICKEY M. YOUNG, deceased, whose date of death was November 14, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives Attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the Decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the Decedents estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is January 29, 2013. Personal Representative: MELODY ANN YOUNG 6712 West Penny Court, Homosassa, FL 34446 Attorney for Personal Representative: James David Green ESQ., FBN 0241430 GREEN & GREEN, P.A., 9030 W. Fort Island Trail #5,Crystal River, FL 34429 Tel:(352) 795-4500 Fax: (352) 795-3300 Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 29 & February 5, 2013 524-0205 WCRN Lapinski, Irene 2012-CP-763 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.2012-CP-763 IN RE: ESTATE of IRENE LAPINSKI DECEASED, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of IRENE LAPINSKI, deceased, whose date of death was NOVEMBER 2, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is January 29, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/ Christina I. Skinner 5829 W. Pine Ridge Blvd, Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Attorney for Personal Representative: BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A., /s/ Michael Mountjoy, Esquire. 209 Courthouse Square, Inverness, FL 34450 Florida Bar Number: 157310 Telephone (352) 726-1211 Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 29 & February 5, 2013 /s/HAROLD B. STEPHENS 825 North Citrus Ave, Crystal River, FL 34428 (352) 795-2088, Florida Bar No. 095562 har oldstephens@tampabay.rr .com Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 29 & February 5, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.: 2012-CP-673 IN RE: THE ESTATE OF: STANLEY M. DEFORGE Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The Administration of the Estate of STANLEY M. DEFORGE, deceased, whose date of death was September 22, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives Attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents Estate on whom a copy of this Notice has been served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents Estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is January 29, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/ Anne Marie Stone 8826 E. Skye Drive, Inverness, FL 34450 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/KAREN O. GAFFNEY, Esquire Karen O. Gaffney, P.A., 205 West Dampier Street, Inverness, FL 34450 Telephone: (352)726-9222, Florida Bar No. 500682 Attorney for the Personal Representative Published two times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 29 & February 5, 2013 519-0129 TUCRN Anderson, Jerry Keith 2012CP716. NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 2012CP716 IN RE: THE ESTATE OF JERRY KEITH ANDERSON DECEASED, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of Jerry Keith Anderson, deceased, whose date of death was February 26,2011 is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is January 22, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/TIFFANY CHRISTY c/o 452 Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness, Florida 34452 Attorney for Personal Representative: HAAG, HAAG & FRIEDRICH, P.A. 452 Pleasant Grove Rd, Inverness, Florida 34452 (352)726-0901, (352)726-3345 (Facsimile), Florida Bar No. 0196529 /s/JEANNETTE M. HAAG, Attorney for the Estate jmhaag1@tampabay.rr .com -Primary Email jmhaag@tampabay.rr .com -Secondary Email Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 22 & 29, 2013 518-0129 TUCRN Haefele, Edward 2012-CP-000723 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE CASE NO. : 2012-CP-000723 IN RE: THE ESTATE OF EDWARD W. HAEFELE, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Edward W. Haefele,, deceased, whose date of death was April 16, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, File Number 2012 CP000723; the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is January 22, 2013. Personal Representative: Diane Mason, 1247 NW 2nd Terrace Crystal River, FL 34428 Thomas M. VanNess, Jr., Esq. Florida Bar No. 0857750 VanNess & VanNess, P.A. 1205 North Meeting Tree Blvd Crystal River, FL 34429, 352-795-1444, tmv@vannesspa.com Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 22 & 29, 2013 The administration of the estate of Robert C. Simmons, deceased, whose date of death was October 30, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is January 22, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/ Hollis Ann Simmons 32R Hurlbutt Circle, Gales Ferry, CT 06335 Attorney for Personal Representative: BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A., /s/ Michael Mountjoy, Esquire. 209 Courthouse Square, Inverness, FL 34450 Florida Bar Number: 157310 Telephone (352) 726-1211 Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 22 & 29, 2013 000DRWU