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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 01-27-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03013

Full Text


Champs: Citrus boys soccer claims district title /B1


TODAY
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5 PAGE A4


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VOL. 118 ISSUE 173


I Just let them die?


Do penalties for smokers, obese make sense?


Rallying
Young and old march for
gun control in nation's
capitol./Page A14


COMMENTARY:


MIKE STOBBE
AP medical writer
NEW YORK Faced with the high
cost of caring for smokers and over-
eaters, experts say society must grapple
with a blunt question: Instead of trying
to penalize them and change their ways,
why not just let these health sinners die?
Annual health care costs are $96 bil-
lion for smokers and $147 billion for the
obese, the government estimates.
These costs accompany sometimes
heroic attempts to prolong lives, includ-


ing surgery, chemotherapy and other
measures.
But despite these rescue attempts,
smokers tend to die 10 years earlier on
average, and the obese die five to 12
years prematurely, according to various
See Page A7
A man smokes Feb. 14, 2007,
in Omaha, Neb. Annual health care
costs are $96 billion for smokers and
$147 billion for the obese, the
government estimates.
Associated Press


Gun control
Debate continues over
assault weapons.
/Page Cl


Financial high-flyers


BUSINESS:

F----


7-1


Credit control
Six tips to get out from
under holiday debt./
Page D1
STATE NEWS:
New
chair
State
Democ-
rats elect
a new
party
chair./
Page A2
OPINION:
New
approaches
will be
necessary to
balance the
county's
income and
expenses.


EXCURSIONS:
Sundance
famous
film
festival
is in Park
City,
Utah, a
lovely
town to
visit, as
travel expert Neil
Sawyer did./Page A15
HOMEFRONT:


New purpose
Find new uses for
vintage china, from
keychains to home
decor./HomeFront

Annie's Mailbox ......A16
Classifieds................ D4
Crossword ............ A16
Editorial .......... ... C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ............. B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies ....................A16
Obituaries ............ A6
Together................. A18


6 1184578 L 211007 o


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Floral City Airboats fabricator Daniel Hughes wires an airboat the company is building. Not only does Floral
City Airboats sell their boats to clients within the United States, they also sell internationally.

Tourism, manufacture: Airboats help power economy


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
They are an outdoor sym-
bol of Citrus County
tied to a rural lifestyle,
accessible natural re-
sources and the need for a ver-
satile, easy-to-operate, multi-
terrain recreation vehicle.
High water, good weather and
accessible wilderness put Citrus
County on the map for airboat-
ing this winter, maintaining the
area's high profile in a sport
hard to quantify for economic
impact.
While ideal conditions attract
outside airboaters and airboat
tours are part of the ecotourism
draw, Citrus County ranks third
in the state with 354 for the
number of registered airboats
and is known worldwide for the
airboats manufactured here.
Earlier this month, two airboats
made in Citrus County were
shipped to Mozambique, on the
southeast coast of Africa.
Conditions change annually,
affecting the prevalence of air-
boats on Citrus County waters,
but the manufacturing side of
the airboat industry has deep


Floral City Airboats is a family-owned business and creates
services airboats.


local roots.
The low water levels of 2012
forced the closing of some boat
ramps and airboat slides. The
slides are manmade ramps en-
abling airboats to ride over
dams or water control struc-
tures. The Brogden Bridge air-
boat slide on Turner Camp
Road provides access between
the Hernando and Inverness
pools of the Tsala Apopka Chain
of Lakes. The slide at Moccasin
Slough east of Inverness con-
nects the Floral City pool to the
Inverness pool.


"Water level definitely plays a
role," Southwest Florida Water
Management District spokes-
woman Terri Behling said. "We
had to close some of the (air-
boat) slides due to low water
levels last year. It was a safety
issue. Once the rain came and
the water came back up, we
were able to reopen them."
She said during the shut-
down, they did maintenance on
the slides and worked with the
Citrus County Airboat Alliance


Page A7


Congressman expands access in area


Small business counselors

also open space in Inverness


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS-Access
to Washington, D.C., just
got easier for Citrus
County residents.
U.S. Rep. Richard Nu-
gent, R-Brooksville, re-
cently opened a district
office in the Inverness
Government Center at


212 W Main St.
The one-person office,
manned by Jeanne McIn-
tosh, is part of a decen-
tralization of the 11th
District, which covers all
of Citrus and Hernando
counties, Ocala and a
good part of Marion
County and The Villages.
Now, instead of one six-
person office, there are


four offices scat-
tered throughout
the district In-
verness/Citrus -
County, Spring
Hill/Hernando .
County, The Vil- '
lages/Sumter
County and Ocala/ Ric
Marion County Nug
"Congressman R-Broc
Nugent decided it
wouldn't serve
this district well if we had
our district office way
down in Brooksville,"
McIntosh said. "So, in-
stead of trying to find


somewhere else,
he decided he
would like to have
--'5 offices throughout
the district so we
can serve con-
stituents better."
McIntosh en-
ard courage con-
ant stituents to call for
sville. an appointment
rather than just
show up, so peo-
ple won't have to wait.
Her telephone number is
352-341-2354.


See Page A4


Analysis


views


CR3 fix


unlikely

PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
An analysis of new debt
issued by Duke Energy
suggests it is unlikely the
company will repair the
Crystal River nuclear
plant.
Fitch Ratings, which
evaluates financial instru-
ments, recently gave
Duke's new $500 million
debenture (unsecured
bonds) issue a stable
rating.
In its news release,
Fitch listed the Crystal
River area plant as one of
the key rating drivers.
It stated, "Fitch be-
lieves it is unlikely man-
agement will elect to
repair Crystal River 3
(CR3) given the rising cost
estimates, construction
risks and low gas-price
environment, and instead
will pursue the retire-
ment option and recovery
of invested capital."
Fitch noted CR3 has
been out of service since
September 2009, and ex-
plained the rate settle-
ment agreement ap-
proved by the Public Serv-
ice Commission.
The release explains
the agreement allows re-
covery of ongoing replace-
ment power costs. In
addition, if Progress En-
ergy Florida decides to re-
tire CR3, the parties to the
settlement agreed not to
challenge the full recov-
ery of all plant investment.
It states that, partly, off-
setting the positive ele-
ments of the agreement
are provisions for rate re-
funds of $388 million of
CR3 replacement power
costs (primarily in 2013
and 2014), a lower-than-
expected rate increase in
2013, a rate freeze through
2016 and the removal of
CR3 from rate base. The
rate refunds include $40
million in 2015 and $60
million in 2016 due to its
inability to start repairs in
2012.
However, the release
cautions, a decision to re-
pair CR3 without assured
regulatory recovery would
strain credit protection
measures and could ad-
versely affect Duke's
ratings.
"In regard to CR3, a de-
cision on whether to re-
pair or retire the plant is
expected no later than
this summer," Progress
Energy Florida spokes-
person Sterling Ivey said
via email. "The company
and board has continued
to gather information nec-
essary to complete the re-
pair/retire analysis for
Crystal River Unit 3 and
See Page A4


ha
ge
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tant elected Florida


Democratic Party chair


BRENDAN
FARRINGTON
AP political writer

LAKE MARY Long-
time fundraiser Allison
Tant was elected chair-
woman of the Florida
Democratic Party on Sat-
urday and immediately set
her sight on defeating Re-
publican Gov. Rick Scott
Tant, of Tallahassee, de-
feated Tampa-area activist
Alan Clendenin, 587 to 448.
In a show of unity, Clen-
denin was then elected
vice chairman and the pair
stood grasping hands over
their heads.
"We are going to beat
Rick Scott," Tant said to
loud cheers. "We're going
to turn this party into a
powerhouse of winning
elections, community by
community"
Tant was backed by Con-
gresswoman Debbie
Wasserman Schultz, who
also serves as the Demo-
cratic National Committee
chairwoman, and Sen. Bill
Nelson, the state's top
Democratic elected offi-
cial. She replaces former
Sen. Rod Smith, who took
over the party after a dis-
astrous 2010 election for
Democrats.
Tant is married to
lawyer Barry Richard,
who was hired by Republi-
can George W Bush to
help secure his 537-vote
Florida victory during the
2000 presidential recount.
Tant's challenge will be
to prove that Democrats'
success last November
wasn't just due to President


GOT







( i 67,),63 2222
R I17IB WetlMin St.


Associated Press
Former Florida Democratic Party Chair Rod Smith of
Alachua hands the gavel to newly elected Chair Allison
Tant at the state party organizational meeting Saturday
in Lake Mary.


Barack Obama's campaign
machine. Besides Obama's
Florida victory, Democrats
elected four new congress-
men and Sen. Bill Nelson
easily won re-election
against Republican Rep.
Connie Mack. Democrats
also made gains in the Leg-
islature, defeating enough
Republican incumbents to
take away the GOP's super-
majority It was the party's
most successful election in
years.
In Smith's final address
to the party, he boasted of
the party's 2012 success,
pointing out in particular
the defeat of Congressman
Allen West, an outspoken
Tea Party favorite, and
state Rep. Chris Dorworth,
who was set to become
House speaker in 2014. He
acknowledged that the
Obama campaign helped
other Democrats on the


ballot, but noted Obama
received fewer votes than
he did four years earlier
"And yet we had enor-
mous pickup," Smith said.
"That is the critical work
of our staff, and your staff,
your people and your
friends and neighbors who
worked very hard to make
this a great year for the
Democratic Party."
In her nomination
speech, Tant said she
wanted to take the energy
from last November and
build on it for the next
election.
"Our journey's not com-
plete. We have in Florida
much to do and we know
all too well how steep our
path is," Tant said. "We're
going to have to work to
outraise, outorganize and
outwork the GOP We've
done it before, we're going
to do it again."


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Man charged in
double hit-and-run
ST. PETERSBURG--A
Pinellas County man has
been charged in a double hit-
and-run that left one person
dead and another with seri-
ous injuries.
A St. Petersburg police
statement said 21-year-old
Timothy Deacon was ar-
rested Friday night on
charges that include DUI
manslaughter, DUI with seri-
ous bodily injury and leaving
the scene of a crash involv-
ing death. Jail records did not
immediately list his bond.
Police said Deacon was
driving carelessly when he
drove over a curb and up on
a sidewalk along the water-
front, hitting 67-year-old Glo-
ria Mastell and 71-year-old
Roger Wurr. Mastell was
knocked over the seawall
and into the water. She was
pronounced dead on the
scene. Wurr was taken to the
hospital with life-threatening
injuries.
Police said Deacon fled
the scene but was later ar-
rested at his home.
10 arrested in
hotel drug ring
MELBOURNE -Authori-
ties in Brevard County are
looking for two suspects in a
hotel drug ring investigation
after arresting 10 other
suspects.
The sheriff's office con-
ducted a monthlong investi-
gation of drug trafficking at a
motel in the Melbourne area.
Florida Today reported the
10 suspects were arrested
Friday after undercover
agents purchased prescrip-


State BRIEFS
tion pills, cocaine and mari-
juana from numerous sus-
pects living at the motel.
The two suspects at large
have active warrants for their
arrest.
Deputy charged
with possession
OAKLAND PARK--A
Broward County sheriff's
deputy has been charged
with possessing a controlled
substance.
The Broward Sheriff's Of-
fice Internal Affairs and the
Public Corruption Task Force
arrested 45-year-old John
Brindle on Friday on one
count of possession of a con-
trolled substance.
A sheriff's office statement
said investigators received a
tip Brindle was purchasing
oxycodone pills without a
prescription in Oakland Park.
Detectives conducted surveil-
lance and later arrested him
after he purchased the pills.
The statement said Brindle
used his position as a detec-
tive and intimidation to obtain
eight oxycodone pills.
Brindle worked as a detec-
tive in Pompano Beach for
seven years. He was previ-
ously employed at Broward
Sheriff's Office for eight
years.
He was suspended with
pay pending prosecution by
the State Attorney's Office.
1 ticket wins
Mega Money prize
TALLAHASSEE One
ticket matched all four num-
bers and the Mega Ball in
the Mega Money game and
will collect $800,000, the
Florida Lottery said Saturday.


The winning ticket was
bought in Cocoa, lottery offi-
cials said.
Six tickets won $1,253
each for picking 4-of-4; 34
tickets won $484.50 each for
picking 3-of-4 plus the Mega
Ball number; 1,173 tickets
won $41.50 each for picking
3-of-4; 1,160 tickets won
$29.50 each for picking 2-of-4
plus the Mega Ball; 10,157
won $3 each for matching one
number plus the Mega Ball;
29,546 tickets won $2 each
for picking 2-of-4; and 24,961
won a free Quick Pick ticket
for matching the Mega Ball.
The numbers drawn Friday
night were 17-23-33-35 and
the Mega Ball was 2.
No one picks
correct Fantasy 5
TALLAHASSEE No
tickets matched all five "Fan-
tasy 5" numbers, meaning
323 tickets with four numbers
correct are worth $555 each.
The Florida Lottery said
Saturday another 8,529 tick-
ets matching three numbers
won $22.50 each and 91,985
tickets won a Quick Pick
ticket for picking two
numbers.
The numbers drawn Friday
-From wire reports






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A2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013


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Page A3 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Crystal River to vote on grant money


Grant to help replace aging water lines


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER The City
Council will consider Monday
accepting a block grant to help
replace aging water lines.
The city was reportedly noti-
fied of a Community Develop-
ment Block Grant (CDBG) worth
$650,000 from the Florida De-
partment of Economic Opportu-


nity. Officials hope to use the
money to replace water lines in
the Copeland Park and high
school areas. According to the
city, some of the water lines
date back to the 1940s and are
constructed of galvanized steel,
which is no longer used in
water line construction because
of its tendency to leak over
time.
The council also will:


Hear from the city attorney
about potential changes to the
noise ordinance.
Consider a resolution re-
adopting the city's Affirmative
Action Program Policy with re-
visions for the city's Community
Development Block Grant
(CDBG) program.
Discuss a first-quarter
revenue report.
Consider the re-
appointment of Mark Littrell to
Seat 3 of the Tree Board to
serve an additional term


through Feb. 14, 2016.
At the Community Redevel-
opment Agency meeting, the
council will:
Consider approval of CRA
Appearance Guideline
revisions.
Discuss revision of the 1988
Adopted CRA plan.
Formed in 1988, the CRA is
responsible for developing and
implementing the community
redevelopment plan that ad-
dresses the unique needs of the
CRA District, according to the


city. The plan includes the over-
all goals for redevelopment in
the area, as well as identifying
the types of projects planned
for the area.
In 2011, the CRA adopted the
Vision Plan and is discussing
proposed projects for the re-
maining five years of the
agency Once the agency board
finalizes the project list, city of-
ficials want the 1988 CRA plan
to be revised and include all
proposed projects for the re-
maining term of the CRA.


Loading up lyngbya


Local volunteers and

college students from

Georgia clean bay

ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Polluted-
murky water in King's Bay is history.
At least that's the mission behind
the One Rake at a Time lyngbya
algae cleanup effort as 100 partici-
pants gathered Saturday at Hunter
Springs Park in Crystal River.
"Lyngbya algae is an invasive
algae that loves dirty water and it
hoards nutrients," Kings Bay Rotary
service leader Art Jones said. "As
lyngbya decays, it releases pollution
back into the water. By removing the
lyngbya, we are taking the pollution
out."
Removal of the invasive lyngbya
won't last forever; however, the long-
term outcome of repeated cleanup is
life-altering.
"If people make better choices, it
is influencing our future," Jones
said. "Our springs are basically a re-
flection of our drinking water."
Since the lyngbya cleanup project
began, new springs have been dis-
covered in canals.
"A lot of the mechanical harvesting
has been happening down in the
canals," King's Bay Rotary Club
member Steve Burch said, noting 18-
inch spring has opened. "All of the
spring vents have been clogged by
this garbage and are now pumping
out fresh water. The fresh water is
pushing this stuff back out. I remem-
ber how dark the water was. Now
you look down here and what do you
see blue water."
Blake Cook, director of Servant
Leadership from Darton State Col-
lege in Albany, Ga., brought 40 stu-
dents to help. However, they decided
to go swimming before working.
"This morning we swam with the
manatees," Cook said. "Then we
came down here and began cleaning
up the lyngbya, which we know de-
pletes the area and vegetation. This
is just something that is very differ-
ent and environmental. This fits per-
fectly within the environmental
component of our program."
Along with the students, dozens of
Rotary Club members and commu-
nity volunteers pitched in.
Since the invasive algae is a major
component of King's Bay, the Kings
Bay Rotary's project continues to set
its sights on removing as much of the
unsightly algae as possible.


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Forty college students from Darton State College in Albany, Ga., loaded tons of lyngbya algae onto flat-top pontoon boats
in efforts to remove the algae that release pollution back into the water of King's Bay.


ABOVE: About 100 volunteers gathered
Saturday at Hunter Springs Park in Crystal
River to remove lyngbya algae from the
water. Volunteers used 16-foot long rakes
to scoop up the algae and place onto
kayaks to be transported to land.
LEFT: Local community volunteers get their
feet wet by removing the invasive lyngbya
algae.


"Tuesday, I swam down to the main
spring here, and compared to two
years ago, it is remarkable what this
project has done," said Andrew Fre-
und, Crystal River's waterfronts ad-
visory board member. "It is so
invigorating to get out in the fresh,
clean water instead of the murk."


The process of removing the algae
is laborious. Volunteers use 16-foot-
long rakes to scoop out the algae. It is
then placed onto sit-atop kayaks or
one of two flat-top pontoon boats to
be transported to land.
Jones said after the algae is re-
moved, it is used as garden fertilizer.


However, he reminds people pre-
vention is the cure.
"An ounce of prevention is worth a
pound of cure," Jones said.
Chronicle reporter Eryn Worthing-
ton can be contacted at352-563-5660,
ext. 1334, or eworthington@
chronicleonline.com.


Locals to raise funds for children's home in run/walk


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

Every child ought to have a safe,
nurturing residence to call home.
That's the steering principle
behind the Covenant Children's
Home (CCH) and the motivation
for the second annual Race for
the Kids 5K run/1 mile walk/
kids fun run Feb. 9 at Spruce
Creek Preserve, Southwest State
Road 200 near Ocala.
CCH is a nonprofit corpora-
tion in partnership with Kids
Central Inc. that supplies long-
term care to children who have
been relocated from their bio-
logical families and need a place
to identify as home.
"Children here are in safe
keeping," executive director
Martin Hoffman said. "Every
penny raised at Race for the
Kids goes to the Covenant Chil-
dren's Home."
Plans are on the table for a
second CCH home to be built en-
abling service to more children.


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Martin Hoffman, left, and Ken Habedank are encouraging the
community to join them Feb. 9 at Spruce Creek Preserve for the
second annual Race for the Kids. Proceeds from the race/walk
benefit children at the Covenant Children's Home in Citrus County.


"There are a lot of children out
there (who) are in need (who) do
not know that Covenant Chil-
dren's Home exists," said Ken
Habedank, chairman of the
board of directors. "They can call


Marty to see if they can get a
child in need into the program
without going through the state
system. A private placement can
be arranged."
Professionally run by DRC


* WHAT: 5K race/1 mile
walk/kids fun run.
WHEN: Feb. 9-7 a.m.
registration begins; 8 a.m.
run; 8:30 a.m. walk.
WHERE: Spruce Creek
Preserve, State Road 200.
COST: Preregistration $20;
day of race $25.
INFO: www.cchfl.org or
www.drcsports.com

Sports, participants will com-
pete rain or shine for first-, sec-
ond- or third-place prizes in
individual age groups. Beginning
at 15 years old, groups consists in
five-year increments. Every
child and man or woman older
than 80 years old will receive a
prize. The family-oriented race
is available for all ages between
6 and 106 as well as four-legged
family members. Last year, the
oldest participant, an 87-year-
old, competed against 300 others.
Habedank expects 600 runners


and walkers this year.
"It is a fun event that will only
take an hour out of your day,"
Habedank said. "It will affect
these children forever, though."
More than 70 sponsors have
committed to participating in
this year's Race for the Kids in-
cluding Citrus County sponsors:
Ted Williams Museum, Suncoast
Dermatology, Burrell Engineer-
ing, Diane Cohen PA., Publix,
Rutabagas, Strive Physical Ther-
apy, Mike Scott Plumbing, Dyna-
body Fitness and Inverness Yoga.
Advance registration is rec-
ommended for $20. Day-of-race
registration is $25. All preregis-
tered participants are guaran-
teed a T-shirt and gift bag.
Registration is at 7 a.m. Visit
and register in advance at
www.drcsports.com or cchfl.org
or call Dee at 352-861-4502.
Chronicle reporter Eryn Wor-
thington can be contacted at352-
563-5660, ext. 1334, or
e worth ington @ chronicle
online. com.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Honor wounded warriors at
Purple Heart ceremony
The combat wounded Patriots of Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 Military Order of the Pur-
ple Heart (MOPH) invites veterans and the
public to attend the eighth annual Purple Heart
Ceremony at 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 9, at the
Florida National Guard Armory.
The patriotic ceremony will commemorate
the proud legacy of the Purple Heart and pay
tribute to Florida's fallen heroes of the Global
War on Terror and America's wounded
warriors.
The ceremony will also feature the MOPH
Department of Florida Afghanistan/
Iraq War Memorial Portrait Mural. The mural
honors more than 300 Floridians who have
fallen during the Afghanistan/Iraq campaigns
and is the first memorial to bear the engraved
names and color portraits of those who fell. Vo-
calists Paul and Jackie Stevio and 8-year-old
singing sensation Marleigh Miller will provide
patriotic music.
For information, visit www.citruspurpleheart.
org or call 352-382-3847.
Thorpe to speak Feb. 8
at Chamber luncheon
CountyAdministrator
Brad Thorpe will be the "
guest speaker at the Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce luncheon meeting
Friday, Feb. 8. He will dis-
cuss the county budget. H '
Networking begins at
11:30 a.m. The meeting will Brad
conclude at 1 p.m. Thorpe
Non-members interested county
in attending should call the administrator.
chamber office at 352-795-
3149 prior to Wednesday, Feb. 6, to make and
pay for reservations.
Information meeting
on water resource Tuesday
The Citrus County Department of Water Re-
sources will host an informational meeting from
7 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 29, at Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park, 4150 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa, in the Florida Room.
Department officials will provide residents
with information regarding a proposed sanitary
sewer system along West Fishbowl Drive and
Spring Cove Road.
Maps of the proposed project will be on dis-
play. County staff will answer questions after


details have been presented.
Anyone with questions is asked to call the
County Water Resources Department at 352-
527-7650.
Science, engineering fair
slated Wednesday
The Citrus County Regional Science and
Engineering Fair is open to the public from 4
to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 30, at the Citrus
County Auditorium on U.S. 41 in Inverness.
Judging for the fair will be earlier in the day.
Awards will be presented Thursday, Jan. 31.
The science fair showcases exhibits from
public and private school students throughout
Citrus County.
MacDill makes changes
with incoming air traffic
TAMPA- MacDill Air Force base is making
changes with incoming air traffic after a cargo
plane landed at the wrong airport.
The plane was headed for the base, but
landed at nearby Peter 0. Knight Airport in
July. Onboard was Gen. James N. Mattis,
commander for the U.S. Central Command in
Tampa.
An investigation found there was confusion
identifying the airports in the area. MacDill rou-
tinely coordinates the local airports and the
Federal Aviation Administration as part of the
MidAir Collision Avoidance Program.
Base officials said an updated landing pro-
cedure was established in "an effort to miti-
gate airport identification issues and further
increase situational awareness in the vicinity."
The changes require crews to contact the
base air traffic control tower when their aircraft
is within five nautical miles of MacDill.
Teen faces charges,
pointing laser at helicopter
ORLANDO -A 13-year-old boy faces
charges after Orange County authorities said
he pointed a laser at a sheriff's office
helicopter.
A sheriffs office statement said the helicopter
was struck twice with the laser Friday evening
in the Orlando area. The pilot was able to see
where the laser was coming from, and deputies
later found the boy with his parents.
Authorities said charges are being filed
against the boy, who was not arrested. His
parents were cooperative with deputies.
The sheriff's office statement said this is the
second time this week a laser was pointed at
one of their helicopters.
-From staff nd wire reports


Local/State BRIEFS


ANALYSIS
Continued from Page Al

we believe the company will be in a po-
sition to make a decision no later than
this summer."
Duke has announced it will host an in-
vestor and analyst meeting Feb. 28.
Jim Rogers, chairman, president and
CEO, and other members of the Duke
Energy management team will provide
updates on the company's operating




ACCESS It's
Continued from Page Al Inver

The office is on the sec- to use
ond floor. t's
SCORE chapter
Also new to the Inver-
ness Government Center
is the Citrus County
SCORE Chapter 646.
SCORE's main office
will remain at the College cation full t
of Central Florida's clients wou
Lecanto campus, said main office
Myron Wambold, SCORE 1236 to ma
chapter administrator ments to
"Inverness is a satellite Inverness.
place for us to take a Inverness
client to talk to them," he Frank DiGio'
said. "It's not an office, is thrilled t
per se, but Inverness has Rep. Nugen
given us space to use as a SCORE in tl
counseling station. It's a Government
way for us to be more "We were
available to clients." Nugent's (sta
Wambold said there about being
won't be a SCORE coun- ness," DiGiov
selor at the Inverness lo- will bring a


lime. Rather,
uld call the
at 352-249-
ike arrange-
meet in

City Manager
vanni said he
to have both
.t's staff and
he Inverness
Center.
excited when
.ff) came to us
here in Inver-
vanni said. "It
lot of people


into the downtown area,
which is always a good
thing."
As for SCORE, DiGio-
vanni said he approached
the nonprofit organiza-
tion to see how they could
make things more conven-
ient for people on the
eastern side of the county
who are interested in
opening a small business.
"We've got a lot of mom-
and-pops in the city, and
that's what we're all
about," he said, referring
to small businesses.


regal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


I Meeting Notices........................D6



Lien Notices.............................D6



K Self Storage Notices....................D6


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
> PR 1HI O PR |HI LO PR
0.00 NA NA NA L,, J71 43 0.00


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
PC


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


H L
79 69
76 53
78 56
70 55
79 57
74 52
78 60
77 59
78 66


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northeast winds around 10 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a light chop. Skies will be partly
cloudy today.


75 46 0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK E lusveY aly
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 77 Low: 54
AM fog, mostly sunny

M i MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 79 Low: 57
Partly cloudy

. TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
5L] High: 80 Low: 62
Partly cloudy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 73/41
Record 83/23
Normal 71/43
Mean temp. 57
Departure from mean +0
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month trace
Total for the year trace
Normal for the year 2.56 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 6
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.21 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 54
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 53%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, maple, oak
Today's count: 10.1/12
Monday's count: 10.8
Tuesday's count: 11.1
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
1/27 SUNDAY 5:18 11:30 5:42 11:53
1/28 MONDAY 6:06 6:29 12:18
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SSUNSET TONIGHT............................6:05 PM .
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:21 A.M.
4O L 25 MOONRISE TODAY...........................6:50 P.M.
FEB. 3 FEB. 10 FEB. 17 FEB. 25 MOONSET TODAY............................ 7:20 A M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers


City
Chassahowitzka*
Crystal River**
Withlacoochee*
Homosassa***


High/Low
5:16 a/1:19 a
3:37 a/11:19 a
1:24 a9:07 a
4:26 a/12:18 a


**At King's Bay
Sunday


High/Low
6:31 p/1:57 p
4:52 p/11:19 p
2:39 p/9:07 p
5:41 p/12:56 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
5:54 a/1:57 a 6:57 p/2:27 p
4:15 a/11:49 a 5:18 p/11:57 p
2:02 a/9:37 a 3:05 p/9:45 p
5:04 a/12:56 a 6:07 p/1:26 p


Gulf water
temperature


66
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.68 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.04 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 39.00 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.32 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION







70s

--4%r


L-"nflerw j' n Honolu
3 f -. "6
/10s "0 70s
30s20


Saturday S
City H L Pcp. Fc
Albany 21 6 s
Albuquerque 57 42 .11 pc
Asheville 47 32 pc
Atlanta 60 38 pc
Atlantic City 28 9 s
Austin 70 51 pc
Baltimore 34 19 s
Billings 54 34 pc
Birmingham 58 39 pc
Boise 39 32 .13 c
Boston 25 13 .01 s
Buffalo 25 8 pc
Burlington, VT 15 2 s
Charleston, SC 61 36 pc
Charleston, WV 31 26 pc
Charlotte 47 22 pc
Chicago 28 13 i
Cincinnati 35 21 pc
Cleveland 25 19 pc
Columbia, SC 59 35 pc
Columbus, OH 29 24 pc
Concord, N.H. 20 2 .01 s
Dallas 54 45 pc
Denver 53 25 pc
Des Moines 37 9 i
Detroit 27 19 i
El Paso 67 47 pc
Evansville, IN 38 21 sh
Harrisburg 28 16 s
Hartford 26 11 s
Houston 78 62 pc
Indianapolis 31 13 pc
Jackson 54 48 pc
Las Vegas 59 51 .37 pc
Little Rock 49 29 pc
Los Angeles 64 55 .12 pc
Louisville 39 22 pc
Memphis 57 33 pc
Milwaukee 27 11 i
Minneapolis 30 2 sr
Mobile 72 53 pc
Montgomery 62 52 pc
Nashville 49 29 pc
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=s
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=
02013 Weather Central, Madiso


*,."of'- x--- -'


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY

Sunday Saturday Sunday
stH L City H LPcp. FcstH L
25 11 New Orleans 74 51 pc 71 58
56 36 New York City 27 15 s 34 27
45 30 Norfolk 35 23 .05 s 38 31
55 42 Oklahoma City 48 28 pc 67 54
35 27 Omaha 47 15 sh 45 32
73 64 Palm Springs 68 57 .36 pc 66 50
34 27 Philadelphia 29 14 s 33 25
42 22 Phoenix 64 57 1.12 sh 68 52
61 49 Pittsburgh 26 18 pc 30 28
36 26 Portland, ME 23 10 s 19 7
26 17 Portland, Ore 47 38 .03 sh 43 36
29 26 Providence, R.I. 26 12 .01 s 31 15
15 2 Raleigh 38 27 s 42 31
59 46 Rapid City 52 20 pc 48 29
43 33 Reno 57 30 sn 39 21
46 32 Rochester, NY 24 2 s 27 24
34 33 Sacramento 60 47 pc 54 34
36 35 St. Louis 38 23 sh 47 45
33 27 St. Ste. Marie 23 4 .02 sn 30 24
50 36 Salt Lake City 34 31 rs 42 25
33 32 San Antonio 73 57 ts 74 64
21 3 San Diego 62 58 .57 pc 59 50
72 60 San Francisco 56 51 pc 53 42
60 32 Savannah 72 52 pc 62 47
38 33 Seattle 47 37 .09 sh 43 39
27 26 Spokane 34 31 .21 c 33 25
70 48 Syracuse 19 -2 s 23 16
43 41 Topeka 60 26 sh 55 45
30 24 Washington 37 25 s 36 29
28 14 YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
76 64 HIGH 88 Laredo, Texas LOW -26 Cook, Minn.
35 33
71 56
60 44 WORLD CITIES


60 54
60 49
42 40
60 56
33 31
31 25
73 53
66 48
53 43
dr=drizzle;
r=rain;
showers;
windy.
n, Wi.


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 90/71/s
Amsterdam 41/40/r
Athens 54/48/c
Beijing 28/17/pc
Berlin 33/33/c
Bermuda 60/55/pc
Cairo 67/48/pc
Calgary 32/14/pc
Havana 82/69/ts
Hong Kong 69/56/pc
Jerusalem 61/47/pc


Lisbon 60/43/sh
London 48/36/sh
Madrid 44/36/sh
Mexico City 71/44/s
Montreal 11/9/pc
Moscow 14/2/s
Paris 41/33/r
Rio 82/70/ts
Rome 46/38/s
Sydney 79/72/ts
Tokyo 42/29/pc
Toronto 29/25/pc
Warsaw 23/17/pc


Z-1C I T R U S


C 0 U N T Y -i--1


businesses, report on regulatory initia-
tives and offer the company's financial
and business outlook for 2013 and
beyond.
On the other local nuclear plant issue,
the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commis-
sion has a February 2013 target date to
complete the mandatory hearing on the
combined license application for Levy
County Units 1 and 2; although, accord-
ing to the NRC website, that schedule is
under review.
Contact Chronicle reporter Pat
Faherty at 352-564-2924.




not an office, per se, but

ness has given us space

e as a counseling station.

a way for us to be more

available to clients.

Myron Wambold
SCORE Chapter 545 administrator.


HRONICLLE
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To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
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*Subscription price includes a separate charge of. 14 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details.
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Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
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residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
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Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com


Where to find us:
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SBri H, 1624 N.
unk.enleld Meadowcrest
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Adove | r Crystal River,
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N I \\ :" '

SInverness
F I Cuurltju~ office
TompkinsSt. gQua 106 W.Marn
106 W. Main
SSt.,
41 Inverness, FL
> ^ 34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 63 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold ......................... ........... ................................... Editor, 5 64 -2 93 0
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy .................................................. Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trista Stokes............................................................... Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes .................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ............................................. Mike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .............................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Com m unity content ................................................ Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .............................................. Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...........................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
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SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


A4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
All meals include juice and milk.
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots.
Tuesday: Breakfast sausage pizza, cereal
variety and toast, grits.
Wednesday: Sausage and egg biscuit, ce-
real variety and toast, tater tots.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon bun, cereal vari-
ety and toast, grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast round, cheese
grits, tater tots, cereal variety and toast.
Lunch
Monday: Cheese pizza, chicken alfredo
with ripstick, Italian super salad with roll, fresh
garden salad, steamed green beans, chilled
pineapple.
Tuesday: Baked chicken nuggets, hot ham-
n-cheese, yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby car-
rots, steamed green beans, chilled
applesauce.
Wednesday: Hamburger sliders, barbecue
roasted chicken with roll, PB dippers, turkey
super salad with roll, fresh baby carrots,
baked beans, dried fruit mix.
Thursday: Nacho rounds with rice, Un-
crustable PBJ, yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby
carrots, sweet peas, chilled applesauce.
Friday: Hot dog, turkey wrap, PB dippers,
fresh baby carrots, steamed broccoli, potato
smiles, chilled pineapple.
Middle school
All meals include juice and milk.
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, MVP
breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots
and grits.
Tuesday: Sausage and egg biscuit, ultra
cinnamon bun, cereal and toast, tater tots.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg and cheese
wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultra
cinnamon bun, cereal and toast, tater tots.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich stuffer, ultimate
breakfast round, cereal and toast, tater tots,
grits.
Lunch
Monday: Pepperoni pizza, chicken and rice
burrito, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots,
steamed broccoli, chilled pineapple.
Tuesday: Chicken nuggets with ripstick, hot
ham and cheese, Italian super salad with roll,
yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby carrots, sweet
green peas, potato smiles, chilled applesauce.
Wednesday: Breaded chicken sandwich,
turkey wrap, PB dippers, fresh garden salad,
baked beans, chilled peaches.
Thursday: Nacho rounds with rice, oven-
baked breaded chicken with ripstick, ham
super salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh
baby carrots, sweet corn, chilled pineapple.
Friday: Chicken alfredo with ripstick, hot
dog, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots, steamed


green beans, chilled flavored applesauce.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, MVP
breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots
and grits, juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and cheese bis-
cuit, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal and toasts,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg and cheese
wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and cheese loco
bread, ultimate breakfast round, cereal and
toast, grits, tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich stuffer, ultra
cinnamon bun, cereal variety, toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken and rice burrito, pizza,
macaroni and cheese with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, fajita chicken super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, baby car-
rots, fresh broccoli, potato roasters, broccoli,
chilled fruit, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Orange chicken plate, maxstix,
turkey and gravy over noodles with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich, Italian super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, cold corn salad, baby carrots, potato tri-
angles, peas, celery, applesauce, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Barbecue roasted chicken
with roll, spaghetti with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, pizza, turkey super salad
with roll, yogurt parfait plate, baby carrots,
baked beans, chilled baked beans, potato
roasters, chilled peaches, juice, milk.
Thursday: Fajita chicken and rice with rip-
stick, macaroni and cheese with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, ham super salad
with roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, green beans, celery, potato triangles,
baby carrots, cucumbers, applesauce, juice,
milk.
Friday: Hot ham and cheese sandwich,
chicken alfredo with ripstick, pizza, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, fajita chicken super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, baby car-
rots, cold corn salad, potato roasters, sweet
corn, chilled fruit, juice, milk.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Sliced turkey with gravy, potatoes
O'Brien, carrot coins, sugar cookie, slice
whole-grain bread, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Beef and mushroom penne
pasta, mixed vegetables, garlic spinach,
pineapple, slice wheat bread, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Baked chicken thigh with
gravy, mashed potatoes, green beans, graham
crackers, slice whole-grain bread, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Hamburger patty with bun, cat-
sup and mustard, baked beans, yellow corn
with diced tomatoes, mixed fruit, low-fat milk.
Friday: Menu not available.
For information about sites, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


Experts look at fish hatcheries


Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS -Marine biologists
are trying to learn whether they can in-
crease populations of two of the Gulf of
Mexico's most popular sport and food
fish and perhaps further relax quotas
on one of them by raising and releas-
ing small fry
Hundreds of thousands of spotted
seatrout, known locally as speckled
trout or specks, and thousands of red
snapper fingerlings have been released
in recent years, all identifiable by tiny
wire tags. The problem is finding them
again.
Of nearly 600,000 or so specks re-
leased since 2006, only about 50 have
been recovered, said Reginald Blaylock,
director of the aquaculture center at the
University of Southern Mississippi's
Gulf Coast Research Lab in Ocean
Springs, Miss.
On Thursday, scientists from USM and
the Mississippi Department of Marine
Resources released close to 2,000 red


snapper to an artificial reef south of
Horn Island, Miss. A flexible hose was
attached to their tank, a diver carried
the other end to the reef, and a valve let
the fish into the hose.
They're too small for electronic tags,
so microwire tags invented in the 1960s
are being used to try to tell whether all
those little fish are having any effect on
overall species numbers.
Although the first U.S. fish hatchery
opened in the 1880s, the science is rela-
tively young, said Ken Leber, associate
vice president for fisheries and aqua-
culture research at Mote Marine Labo-
ratory in Sarasota, Fla., and head of the
Science Consortium for Ocean Replen-
ishment a group of five institutions
including USM.
Overfishing brought annual fishing
quotas on red snapper, though those
have risen from 4 million pounds in 1991
to just more than 8 million pounds last
year, when NOAA said overfishing had
ended and the population is rebounding.
A new stock assessment is under way


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Jan. 28 to Feb. 3 MENUS


SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 A5


N^





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Henry
Blanchard, 55
HERNANDO
Henry W Blanchard, 55,
of Hernando, died Thurs-
day, Jan. 24, 2013, at Citrus
Memorial Health System
in Inverness. Arrange-
ments are by McGan Cre-
mation Service LLC,
Hernando.

Dale
Jennings, 82
INVERNESS
Dale M. Jennings, 82, of
Inverness, died Sunday,
Jan. 20, 2013, under Hos-
pice Care at Citrus Memo-
r i a 1
hospital.
Dale was
born Feb.
24, 1931, in
Olean ,
N.Y, to
Kathleen
and Mau-
rice Jen- Dale
n i n g s Jennings

worked most of his life as
a sales representative with
various jobs, including a
designer for iron gates in
the Nashville area, a
church designer in Florida
and cosmetic representa-
tive. He was a music and
English literature major at
Fredonia State College in
New York and a member
of Mensa. Dale used many
of his focused studies
throughout his life playing
in bands, choirs and quar-
tets. Dale started as young
French horn player in the
St. Bonaventure Band and
was asked to play for the
state symphony Through-
out the years, he was paid
soloist singer, a pianist, or-
ganist, pipe organist and
recorder player, sharing
his musical ability wher-
ever he lived with his
voice and he always could
be heard in the local choir
or on the keyboard. He
also taught piano and
organ.
He used his talents well
with written word in po-
etry and wrote Christian
songs and columns used in
articles for various papers
throughout the country.
His love of nature and
woodworking gave an-
other creative outlet as an
avid photographer all his
life and woodworking in
his retired years. His
greatest gifts were the
ones of volunteering in his
community, a multitude of
services as a deacon. Here
in Inverness he worked for
Ameri-Vista Core of Citrus
County, Rails to Trails and
was also the interim or-
ganist at First Presbyte-
rian Inverness, where he
and his wife worshipped
for many years.
He is survived by his lov-
ing wife of 63 years,
Winifred Jennings; his five
children, Bryan Todd,
Kevin Dale, Jeffrey Worth,
Lisa Anne and Christo-
pher Allison; along with
seven grandchildren and
four great-grandchildren.
A memorial service will
be at 2 p.m. Wednesday,
Jan. 30, 2013, at First Pres-
byterian Church of Inver-
ness, with a small
reception to follow.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.






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Terry
Adams, 57
LECANTO
Terry Lee Adams, 57, of
Lecanto, died Saturday,
Jan. 26, 2013, at Hospice of
Citrus County in Inver-
ness. Arrangements are by
McGan Cremation Service
LLC, Hernando.

'Sugie'
Kovach, 78
INVERNESS
Giovan Arcuri Kovach,
78 of Inverness, FL died
January 23, 2013 in Inver-
ness, FL under the care of
Hospice of Citrus County
and with members of her
family at her bedside.
"Sugie", as she was most
affectionately known by
friends and family alike,
was born May 12, 1934 in
Tampa, FL to the late
Joseph and Edith Arcuri
(Easterling) of Tampa, FL
and came to this area in
1971 from Tampa, FL.
Sugie was a law firm of-
fice administrator in In-
verness, owner and
operator of the "Hoover
House" a bed and break-
fast in the Smokey Moun-
tains of North Carolina
and most recently served
as a door greeter at the In-
verness Wal-Mart. Sugie
was also a past charter
member of the Altrusa
Club of Citrus County.
Sugie was Catholic and
spent 78 years serving and
devoting her life to living
and spreading the word of
the Lord. Sugie loved God
and raised her two sons to
love God. Sugie also en-
joyed reading, watching
Turner Classic Movies and
spending time with her
family and friends. Those
that knew Sugie know that
she loved people and peo-
ple loved their Sugie. She
never met a stranger and
was always quick with a
hug regardless of whether
you wanted one or not.
Left to celebrate her life
are two sons Michael Ko-
vach, Jr. and wife Laura of
Inverness, FL, Gregory Ko-
vach of Tampa, FL, three
sisters Evelyn Bartlett and
husband Barry of St. Pe-
tersburg, FL, Shirley
Moore and husband Rex of
Las Vegas Ny and Mary-
Lou Alcala and husband
Gus of Tampa, FL, three
beautiful grandchildren
that loved "Grandma
Sugie" very much, Ashley
Bruner of Tampa, FL,
Michael Kovach, III "Trey"
of Inverness, FL and Gavin
Kovach of Tampa, FL, and
loving nieces and nephews
Barbara Ann, Barry Jr,
Ted, Alana and Dana as
well as a long list of
friends.
The family will receive
friends in a Celebration of
Sugie's life at the Inverness
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes on Thursday Janu-
ary 31, 2013 from 5 to 7 p.m.
Burial and graveside serv-
ice will follow on Saturday
February 2, 2013 at 2:00 pm
in Myrtle Hill Cemetery in
Tampa, FL. Online condo-
lences may be sent to the
family at www.Hooper
FuneralHome.com.


Clara
Christianson
DUNNELLON
Clara Christianson, of
Dunnellon, Fla., passed
away Tuesday, Jan. 22,
2013. She was born in
Mayaguez, Puerto Rico,
and moved to Dunnellon
more than 30 years ago
from New York.
Clara was a member of
First United Methodist
Church, Dunnellon, and
was the wife of the late
William Christianson. She
is survived by her loving
family and friends.
Memorial contributions
may be made to the Hu-
mane Society of Marion
County, 701 N.W 14th
Road, Ocala, FL 34481.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Bradley
'Scoop'
Driggers Sr.,
51
Bradley "Scoop"
William Driggers Sr, 51,
died Wednesday, Jan. 23,
2013, at Citrus Memorial
Health System, Inverness.
Funeral services will be
at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Jan.
30, 2013, at Fero Funeral
Home. The family will re-
ceive friends from 6 until 8
p.m. Tuesday
Arrangements entrusted
to Fero Funeral Home.

Maria
Marsh, 86
FLORAL CITY
Maria Rosalia Marsh, 86,
Floral City, died Friday,
Jan. 25, 2013, at Avante at
Inverness. Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Cre-
matory is assisting the
family with private
arrangements.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online. com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
the arrangements.


Howard
Whaples, 76
CRYSTAL RIVER
Howard Muir Whaples,
76, of Crystal River, Fla.,
passed away Friday, Jan.
25, 2013, at his home in
Crystal River
He was born Dec. 8,
1936, in Hartford, Conn., to
Clayton Antoine and Mil-
dred Stiles (Muir) Whap-
les. He came to Crystal
River 22 years ago from
Manchester, Conn., where
he retired as assistant
manager of Acme Auto
Parts after 10 years of serv-
ice. He was a former mem-
ber of the New England
Auto Racing Club in Man-
chester and was a
NASCAR fan. His hobbies
were auto-related, any-
thing to do with cars.
He is survived by his lov-
ing wife of 57 years, Bar-
bara, of Crystal River; a
son, Richard Garner, of
Port Richey, Fla.; brother
and sisters-in-law, Walter
Pyka of West Olive, Mich.,
John and Diane Lombardi
of Manchester, Conn., and
Francis and Lorretta
Soule of Springfield, Mass.
A memorial visitation
will be from 1 to 3 p.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013, at
Strickland Funeral Home
Chapel in Crystal River.
Mr. Whaples will be re-
turned to Manchester,
Conn., for services and
burial.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

FREE OBITUARIES
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)
Obituaries will be
posted online at www.
chronicleonline.com.


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Ex-general


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S. Vietnam dies


Associated Press

GARDEN GROVE,
Calif. Khanh Nguyen, a
South Vietnamese general
who briefly gained control
of the government
in a coup and
went on to lead a
"government in
exile" in Califor-
nia, has died.
Nguyen died
Jan. 11 at a San
Jose hospital after
struggling with Kha
diabetes-related NgL
health problems,
said Chanh Nguyen Huu,
who succeeded Nguyen
as head of the Garden
Grove, Calif-based Gov-
ernment of Free Vietnam
in Exile. He was 86.
In November 1960,
Nguyen helped thwart a
coup against the U.S.-
backed president Ngo
Dinh Diem when he mis-


took the rebels for Viet
Cong soldiers and rushed
to the president's defense.
"Because I thought it
was a Viet Cong attack, I
sent orders to the troops
to help us," he
said in a 1981 in-
terview with
WGBH in Boston.
"At that time, I
saw it was a coup
managed by some
of the paratroop-
ers not all of
anh them, but some."
uyen South Viet-
namese generals
overthrew Diem's regime
three years later, starting
a volatile period of politi-
cal unrest.
Several hundred peo-
ple attended a public me-
morial for Nguyen in
Garden Grove on Jan. 19.
Nguyen was buried in
San Jose, where his fam-
ily resides, Huu said.


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A6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PENALTIES
Continued from PageAl

researchers' estimates.
Attempts to curb smoking and
unhealthy eating frequently lead
to backlash: Witness the current
legal tussle over New York City's
first-of-its-kind limits on the size
of sugary beverages and the vi-
cious fight last year in California
over a ballot proposal to add a
$1-per-pack cigarette tax, which
was ultimately defeated.
"This is my life. I should be
able to do what I want," said Se-
bastian Lopez, a college student
from Queens, speaking last Sep-
tember when the New York City
Board of Health approved the
soda size rules.
Critics also contend tobacco-
and calorie-control measures
place a disproportionately
heavy burden on poor people.
That's because they:
Smoke more than the rich,
and have higher obesity rates.
Have less money, so sales
taxes hit them harder One study
last year found poor, nicotine-
dependent smokers in New York
- a state with very high ciga-
rette taxes spent as much as a
quarter of their entire income
on smokes.
Are less likely to have a car
to shop elsewhere if the corner
bodega or convenience store
stops stocking their vices.
Critics call these approaches


AIRBOATS
Continued from Page Al

and other stakeholders to
keep the airboat commu-
nity informed.
Michael Emrich, owner
of Floral City Airboats, has
seen the airboat industry
evolve from marginal to
mainstream.
He agreed high water
levels and slides in good
repair in addition to the
county's natural assets -
make Citrus County a
leading airboat destina-
tion. And visiting air-
boaters spend money here
on food, fuel, lodging and
other activities.
"It's one of the nicer
places in the United States
to ride," he said. "The peo-
ple are the friendliest; and
the airboat people are
friendly here, as well.
"They come from all
over this state and sur-
rounding states to ride the
Withlacoochee River."
Floral City Airboats
started in 1986, and today
the family-owned business
has a global network and
ships airboats all over the
world.
"We're a manufacturer,"
Emrich said. "We build
them from start to finish.
Everything is manufac-
tured here, from the hulls
to the seat cushions."
"I have dealers in Rus-
sia, Turkey, Columbia and
Venezuela," he said. "I
have dealers all over the
world."
Customers fly in from all
over to pick up their boats.
"Fifty percent of what
we build leaves the U.S.,"
he said. "Another 40 per-
cent leaves Florida."
The airboats are built to
fit in a 40-foot shipping
container and trucked to
the appropriate port.
The company can build
anything from mini boats
on up to 40-passenger
airboats.
"We're a custom
builder," he said. They
normally have six to eight
boats under construction.
Despite its global reach,
with wife Terri and 13 em-
ployees, Emrich describes
the company as "a little
mom-and-pop operation."
"It's a different business
today, it has really evolved
in last 20 years," he said.
While some people still
build their own, manufac-
tured airboats have to
meet emission and safety
standards and customers
demand reliability.
There have also been
changes in the airboat
market.
"The majority of people
who are buying boats from
me for pleasure are be-
tween 50 and 75 years old."
Emrich pointed to a
custom-painted eight-
passenger example in the
showroom. "It's the same
people who are interested
in motorcycles and RVs
who are buying boats from
me."
"The boats are actually
built to fit the customer; we
don't have an inventory of
boats," he said. "We'll build
a boat that fits your needs."


unfair, and believe they have
only a marginal effect.
"Ultimately, these things are
weak tea," said Dr. Scott Got-
tlieb, a physician and fellow at
the right-of-center think tank,
the American Enterprise
Institute.
Gottlieb's view is debatable.
There are plenty of public
health researchers who can
show smoking control measures
have brought down smoking
rates and will argue smoking
taxes are not regressive so long
as money is earmarked for pro-
grams that help poor people quit
smoking.
And debate they will. There
always seems to be a fight when-
ever this kind of public health
legislation comes up. And it's a
fight that can go in all sorts of di-
rections.
For example, some studies
even suggest, because smokers
and obese people die sooner,
they may actually cost society
less than healthy people who
live much longer and develop
chronic conditions like
Alzheimer's disease.
Public, not personal
So let's return to the original
question: Why provoke a back-
lash? If 1 in 5 U.S. adults smoke,
and 1 in 3 are obese, why not just
get off their backs and let them
go on with their (probably short-
ened) lives?
Because it's not just about
them, say some health econo-


death, you're pretty much just
harming yourself," he said.
But that viewpoint doesn't fac-
tor in the burden to everyone
else of paying for the diabetes
care, heart surgeries and other
medical expenses incurred by
obese people, noted John Caw-
ley, a health economist at Cor-
nell University.
"If I'm obese, the health care
costs are not totally borne by me.
They're borne by other people in
my health insurance plan and -
when I'm older by Medicare,"
Cawley said.
Pay more for risks
From an economist's perspec-
tive, there would be less reason
to grouse about unhealthy be-
haviors by smokers, obese peo-
ple, motorcycle riders who
eschew helmets and other
health sinners if they agreed to
pay the financial price for their
choices.
That's the rationale for a pro-
vision in the Affordable Care Act
- "Obamacare" to its detractors


more affordable, similar to
buying a WaveRider (per-
sonal watercraft).
"We looked at economy,
how to make an economic
airboat."
He admits mini-
airboats, a philosophical
and technical shift for the
industry, were not immedi-
ately accepted by the air-
boat community. But they
gained ground and at-
tracted new customers to
the sport Now, the nation-
ally distributed Dragonfly
model has definitely been
accepted by the fold.
He said its low operating
cost and easy, quiet opera-
tion have opened airboat-
ing to a new type of
customer.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 A7


mists, bioethicists and public
health researchers.
"Your freedom is likely to be
someone else's harm," said
Daniel Callahan, senior re-
search scholar at a bioethics
think-tank, the Hastings Center.
Smoking has the most obvious
impact. Studies have increas-
ingly shown harm to nonsmokers
who are unlucky enough to work
or live around heavy smokers.
Several studies have shown
heart attacks and asthma attack
rates fell in counties or cities
that adopted big smoking bans.
"When you ban smoking in pub-
lic places, you're protecting
everyone's health, including and
especially the nonsmoker," said S.
Jay Olshansky, a professor at the
University of Illinois-Chicago's
School of Public Health.
It can be harder to make the
same argument about soda-size
restrictions or other legislative
attempts to discourage excessive
calorie consumption, Olshansky
added.
"When you eat yourself to


They also do repairs on
"automotive-powered" air-
boats, as well; another
shift, as many airboats tra-
ditionally have been and
many still are powered by
aircraft engines. Locally,
Emrich estimates 75 per-
cent or more airboats are
powered by aircraft
engines.
The Internet has played
a role in the evolving air-
boat market. He said it
provides information for
the basis of sales as well as
education. And he is a firm
believer in having a good
website as a marketing
tool.
Emrich He said cus-
tomers can spend about
$19,000 for an entry-level
boat, but they build a lot of
$50,000, $60,000 and
$70,000 boats.
"Because we're custom
builders," he said, "my
work stops when your
imagination runs out."
Being immersed in the
airboat business, the com-
pany helps to sponsor a lot
of clubs all across the
country with raffle items
and similar support
"We continue to have
growth since we've been in
Citrus County; we've never
slowed down," he said.
"Last year was the best
year we ever had since
we've been in business."
In 2005, Floral City Air-
boats was voted Small
Business of the Year, by
the Citrus County Eco-
nomic Development Coun-
cil. As for the future, his
expansion plans are sitting
in the corner, and Emrich
would like remain in Cit-
rus County if possible.
"It's still fun for me," he
said. "I still enjoy this."
And he still loves to ride
airboats.
Pemberton
Airboats
Just up Florida Avenue
from Floral City Airboats
is Pemberton Airboats, a
longtime local business
taking airboats in a differ-
ent direction.
Greg Pemberton sees
outside airboaters at-
tracted to Citrus County
for similar reasons with
similar economic benefits.
"It's the character of Cit-
rus County's people," he


www.dragonflyairboats.com
The two-seater Dragonfly mini-airboat from Pemberton
Airboats in Floral City measures 11 feet long and weighs
500 pounds.


said. "Everybody knows
what respect is. Our water-
ways are not full of trash.
It's the people that take
care of it."
He noted hunters and
fishermen here take care
of Mother Nature and do
not leave trash or debris
behind, unlike other areas.
"It's the only real way to
get out there and appreci-


ate that aspect of life," he
said about airboats. "Not
everybody can see the
beauty of that. To that end,
the company is building
airboats that are smaller,
quieter and more fuel-
efficient.
"We're building with
new technology," he said.
"We're not using the mon-
ster motors. And they're


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"I get elderly people
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nearly $5,100 on top of premiums.
The new law doesn't allow in-
surers to charge more for people
who are overweight, however.
It's tricky to play the insur-
ance game with overweight peo-
ple, because science is still
sorting things out. While obesity
is clearly linked with serious
health problems and early
death, the evidence is not as
clear about people who are just
overweight.
That said, public health offi-
cials shouldn't shy away from
tough anti-obesity efforts, said
Callahan, the bioethicist Calla-
han caused a public stir this
week with a paper calling for a
more aggressive public health
campaign that tries to shame
and stigmatize overeaters the
way past public health cam-
paigns have shamed and stigma-
tized smokers.
National obesity rates are es-
sentially static, and public
health campaigns that gently try
to educate people about the ben-
efits of exercise and healthy eat-
ing just aren't working, Callahan
argued. We need to get obese
people to change their behavior.
If they are angry or hurt by it, so
be it, he said.
"Emotions are what really
count in this world," he said.










Spotty snow a mixed bag for businesses


Associated Press

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich.
- Just a week ago, things
looked dire for Sarah and
Tim Long, owners of Tim-
bers Resort in Michigan's
Upper Peninsula. Snow is
their winter lifeblood,
drawing outdoor sports en-
thusiasts from far and wide,
yet the ground was bare.
Then came a desperately
needed arctic blast. Sud-
denly, the drifts were thigh-
deep and snowmobilers
were flocking to the mom-
and-pop operation's cot-
tages on the northern end
of Lake Gogebic.
"Right now, it's going
very good. We're getting
tons of snow," Sarah Long
said Friday.
But after losing nearly
three weeks' worth of
reservations and enduring
a dismal season a year ago,
she's not ready to declare
the crisis over "It's been
pretty scary Hopefully, we
can still recover"
The Longs' experience
illustrates the increasingly
fickle nature of winter in
the Upper Midwest, where
dry, mild weather is mak-
ing life difficult for busi-
nesses that rely on
abundant snow, from ski
hills to plow trucks to tav-
erns near snowmobile
trails. Even as icy tempera-
tures gripped the region
during the past week,
snowfall remained spotty
- a feast in some locales, a
famine elsewhere.
"This year and last year,
there's been what we'd call
a snow drought," said Jake
Crouch, a climate scientist
with NOAA's National Cli-
matic Data Center in
Asheville, N.C.
Even places with snow
are getting less than usual.
The Lake Superior shore-
line city of Marquette,
Mich., is nearly four feet off
its usual pace. Total accu-
mulations are below nor-
mal by 14 inches in
Minnesota's Twin Cities, 4.5
inches in International
Falls, Minn., and La Crosse,
Wis., and 32 inches in
Muskegon, Mich.
Chicago is more than 15
inches below normal and
finally got an inch-deep
layer Friday morning. It
was the city's latest first


Associated Press
Mason Bemiller, 17, from Northridge High School in Middlebury, Ind., snowboards through the terrain park Thursday at Swiss Valley ski area in
Jones, Mich. The lack of snow in some places, and in even places with snow that are getting less than usual, illustrates the increasingly fickle
nature of winter in the Midwest, where dry, mild weather is making life difficult for businesses that rely on abundant snow.


snowfall of at least an inch
since record-keeping
began in 1884.
"This is the first time
we've had a blade down
this year," said Clara Mark,
a dispatcher at Chicago
Snow Removal Services,
which plows parking lots at
condominium complexes,
strip malls and factories.
"It's been rough. Last year
was a bust, too. We only
plowed three times."
Lack of snow has been
fatal for some small busi-
nesses. Others are barely
hanging on, reducing staff
or cutting other expenses.
Some resorts have begun
offering winter activities
that don't require snow,
such as wine tasting and ice
fishing. Diversifying helps,
but there's no substitute for
a powdery white landscape
to draw tourists northward.
"If there's no snow on the
ground, it's hard to get peo-
ple fired up about winter
activities," said Joy Van
Drie, executive director of
the Cadillac Area Visitors


Bureau in Michigan's
Lower Peninsula. "Our
downhill ski resorts can
make snow, but that doesn't
help the businesses out in
the rural areas that rely on
snowmobile traffic the
restaurants, the gas sta-
tions. It's killing them."
But in the eastern Upper
Peninsula village of
Strongs, tavern and motel
owner Rex Hyrns had no
complaints. His area is
among those where condi-
tions are normal.
"Everything's beautiful,
the trails are in good
shape," he said.
Rhinelander, a small
city in northern Wisconsin,
is a popular winter desti-
nation because of its ex-
tensive trail network -
but not this year. Snowmo-
biles generally need at
least 3 inches of packed
snow. But with thinner lay-
ers in some places and
brown spots elsewhere,
trails are unusable.
Snowmobile sales and
rentals have fallen about 30


percent at Shoeder's RV,
Marine and Sport Center,
sales manager Ken Brown
said. Rebates and incen-
tives offered by manufac-
turers are of little help.
"On a normal weekend,
all 30 sleds are rented two
to three weeks in ad-
vance," he said. "Right
now, the inventory is just
sitting there."
Sparse snow has forced
cancellation of the
Langlade County Trail-
blazer Challenge Sled Dog
Race in northeastern Wis-
consin the previous two
years, a blow to the local
tourist industry This
month's scheduled running
has been postponed until
February assuming
there will be enough snow.
In Minneapolis-St. Paul,
snow removal company
owner Kent Gliadon said


his bottom line hasn't suf-
fered too badly, because he
has contracts with apart-
ment complexes and other
clients who pay whether it
snows or not. But subcon-
tractors who mount plows
on their trucks have no
such protection.
"That's the guy that's get-
ting hurt," he said.
Steve Lashinski said
snowmobile sales and
rentals are down 50 per-
cent at his shop in Grand
Marais, Minn.
"It hurts," he said.
But in the Boundary Wa-
ters Canoe Area, Hungry
Jack Lodge owner Forrest
Parson is breathing easier
after getting some good
snow last week. He still
hasn't rented any snowmo-
biles but recently booked
10 cabin reservations.
"Keep the fingers


crossed," he said. "If the
weather comes, the busi-
ness comes with it"
It's not unusual for some
sections of the Upper Mid-
west to get more snow than
others. The region is known
for "snow belts," particu-
larly in Michigan, which
lies in the path of frigid air
masses from Canada that
barrel across the Great
Lakes, suck up moisture
and deposit it as snow on
the other side. But even
some places accustomed to
plentiful "lake effect" snow
are running short
"We used to be in the
middle of the lake effect.
Now we're on the southern
cusp," said Van Drie, 40.
"When I was a kid we'd
have a ton of snow, but it's
getting more and more spo-
radic. We're just not getting
the winter"


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SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 A9




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A A message from'--

SWEETBAY
We recognize that for our valued
associates and customers, the last
week has been challenging. However,
our commitment to the people and
community of Citrus County remains
strong. We look forward to the continued
opportunity to serve you with high
quality meat and locally grown produce.
Come in today and discover your
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A10 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cacophony, with

side order of flu


TTi, I'm Stacy,
-1and I'll be
H your server.
Can I get you something to
drink while you look at the
menu?" she yelled over
the high-decibel music.
Over Stacy's shoulder I
could see seven large-
screen TVs, each showing
a different sports event -
football, basketball, soccer,
skiing, snowboarding,
hockey and
pingpong. Many
more were scat-
tered around
the restaurant.
It's odd, but
when we eat at
home, I can't
tell you how
often we turn
on the televi-
sion and the Ji
radio at the MULL
same time, or
how often we
turn up the music volume
to 11. Oh, wait, I can tell
you. Never.
It was hard to hear
Screamin' Stacy over the
music, but I think she ex-
plained that the Drink o'
the Day was a chocolate
milkshake made with dou-
ble shots of brandy and
tequila. Drink three, and
the fourth one's on the
house. We stuck with diet
sodas.
While Stacy was fetch-
ing our drinks, we scanned
the menus. I suddenly re-
membered reading that
the filthiest things in most
restaurants aren't the
bathrooms, but the menus.
Unlike the bathrooms, the
menus never get cleaned.
Maybe restaurants should
put a bottle of Purell in the
condiment tray along with
the ketchup and hot sauce.
The giant televisions
were starting to annoy me
- not simply because they
were on, but because of
the lack of variety Why
wasn't "The Voice" on any
of the TVs? Or "The
View"? Or "NCIS" or "Dr.
Phil," or "Here Comes


Honey Boo Boo" or a thou-
sand other shows? Why
was it all sports? "Because
you don't need the sound
to watch sports," Sue said.
You can't argue with suc-
cess, but is this how people
decide where to eat now?
By how many televisions
the place has? And if tele-
visions are the deciding
factor, wouldn't people
want to watch something
specific? What
if the customer
said, "I'll give
you a bigger tip
if you put on
LEN American Pick-
ers."' Would that
attract more
customers?
Ain. Everything on actually,
there's a good
M chance that theft
.LEN American pick-
ers owned the
place we were
in. Everything on therwall
looked as if it came out of
one of those old barns full
of junk they find in dirt-
road country. There was
an old Schwinn bike and a
tin sign for Moxie hanging
between two of the TV
sets, and every other
square inch of wall space
was covered in memora-
bilia from the 1950s and
'60s reminding people of a
simpler time, a time be-
fore they put TV sets in
restaurants.
Two guys were sitting at
the bar drinking. They
were intently watching
something on their smart-
phones. I passed them on
my way to try to wash some
of the deadly menu viruses
off my hands.
One was playing "Words
With Friends"; the other
was scoping out his Face-
book wall. Now that almost
everyone has a little TV
with a thousand channels
in their pocket, do we even
still need the big ones?

Contact Jim Mullen at
JimMullenBooks. com.


E& SA09


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CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Focus on gun
control misplaced
Gun control has be-
come the topic of the day;
however, in the media it is
more an emotional issue
than a rational one.
Those who hate guns
want them eliminated en-
tirely Those who are
overwhelming attached to
them want everyone to
have one.
I read Dan Ruth's col-
umn in the Times today
As usual, he twists a mes-
sage from what he sees as
a terrible NRA video. All
the video was pointing
out was "why are the
president's children
more precious than all
other children?" It was in
no way inferring protec-
tion of the president's
children was unfair or
hypocritical. Obviously,
many people require spe-
cial protection that is not
really needed for all of
us.
I believe human life has
been devalued to the ex-
tent we really need to do
some serious reflecting
on the subject. When our
government sponsors
abortion as a way to elimi-
nate an inconvenient life,
it can easily be extended
to other means. Just con-
sider the number of mur-
ders that occur daily,
especially in major met-
ropolitan areas. Most of
them are also the result of
gunfire. Again, the real
reason is not the gun.
Rather it is the lack of
value of human life.
The only real solution
to the killing problem will
come from a return to a
sensible moral code. As a
Christian, I find the code
clearly stated in the Holy


HEALTH


Bible. I know in reading
the Bible, there is a great
deal of horrible violence
recorded. However, it is
not condoned as life hav-
ing no value. With the
birth of Jesus, violent be-
havior and attitudes were
replaced with respect for
life.
Getting back to guns, at
least a background check
on persons purchasing
guns makes sense. That is,
if it is to prevent people
who lack the emotional or
moral stability to own
them. The fear can always
be that the information
can easily be co-opted
and used for ulterior rea-
sons. A decision to confis-
cate firearms could easily
use gun records for that
purpose. Don't laugh at
that possibility Govern-
ment decisions are not al-
ways based on what is
right or legal.
Much of the current dis-
cussion revolves around
assault weapons. How-
ever, there is very little
discussion about why
many people feel they
should have such
weapons. It is always just
those who say there is no
need for such weapons.
Has there ever been a
survey to find out who
wants such weapons and
why? It is entirely possi-
ble the thrill of pulling a
trigger on a real firearm
is equal to the thrill of
pulling the trigger of vir-
tual weapons. In fact, I
have read some of those
video games are used to
train soldiers to use the
real weapons. If the real
desire to have them is just
the thrill, then although I
would feel it is foolish,
that may be a realistic
recreation for some.


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I do not really have a
dog in the fight over
weapons, since I have
never owned one. How-
ever, at times I get the
feeling maybe it could be
time for my situation to
change. If that change
were to occur, it might be
out of fear for my life, not
necessarily from the com-
mon criminal or the in-
sane person. Rather it
would be fear of Gestapo-
like government activities
or the result of despera-
tion in case of a very pos-
sible economic collapse
in our country
Overall, the weapon
issue should be centered
on the cause of the prob-
lem. Any solution arrived
at without relating it to
the cause is wasted effort.
Bob Hagaman
Homosassa

Responsible gun
ownership
I do not advocate the
banning of guns to the ex-
tent they have been in
other countries, such as
Japan and the United


Kingdom where gun vio-
lence is extremely rare.
When there is a gun of
some form or another for
every citizen of this coun-
try, I see no practical way
to eradicate them. But, I
do envy the virtually ab-
solute freedom from gun
violence the citizens of
those countries enjoy I
believe I have the same
right to safety and secu-
rity they have. What it will
take to obtain that is a
change in how our culture
perceives the responsible
use of guns and the re-
sponsibility a person
takes on when they
choose to own a gun.
There are numerous
well-meaning arguments
raging in an effort to iden-
tify the source of our cul-
ture's gun violence.
Violent movies and video
games, mental health is-
sues, the intent of the Sec-
ond Amendment and
street gangs are but a few
of the components of gun
violence being dissected
on network news shows,
in letters to the editor and
in news magazines. The
common thread in all of


these discussions being
the profuse number of
guns already owned. And
the ease of acquiring
them and the accessories
needed to operate them
promises to thicken that
thread.
It is the lack of personal
responsibility of gun own-
ership that enables all of
the components of gun vi-
olence to exist. There
needs to be an elevation
of conscience that defines
these weapons for what
they are killing ma-
chines. And along with
ownership comes a set of
solemn responsibilities.
They are:
Proficiency Not
only in the operation of
the weapon, but a work-
ing knowledge of its capa-
bilities, maintenance
requirements, safe and
prudent handling and
use, storage and knowl-
edge of all applicable gun
laws.
Liability Recogni-
tion as owner of a lethal
weapon they are person-
ally liable for the safe and
lawful use of it and are li-
able for any and all un-
lawful use.
Relinquishment It
is incumbent upon the
owner of the weapon to
surrender it to compe-
tent authority if profi-
ciency and/or liability
standards cannot or will
not be met.
Practices need be put
in place to ensure these
responsibilities are met
by the owner of each gun,
such as:


Licensing of all
firearms. It is in this
process where profi-
ciency standards would
be examined and proof of
financial liability shown.
Ammunition sales
require proof of firearm
license.
Quadrennial firearm
license renewal would be
an ongoing check on the
owners proficiency and
liability
Beyond the personal re-
sponsibility issue, we
need address the issue of
which weapon technolo-
gies need be available to
the citizenry My personal
opinion is the following
technologies need not be
available:
Body armor piercing
bullets;
Fully automatic
firearms;
Magazines in excess
of six bullets;
Accessories enabling
semi-automatic firearms
to be converted to fully
automatic;
"Bump Fire" acces-
sories enabling semi-
automatic firearms to be
operated at a high rate of
fire.
Without common sense
practices assuring the
personal responsibilities
of gun ownership are
being practiced, I feel less
than secure here in
Florida, where every 15th
adult I meet on the street
has a concealed carry
permit.
Richard M. Klotz Jr.
Beverly Hills


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A12 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013


OPINION


EODNOB





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Enact gun
control laws
The following letter was
sent to Sen. Bill Nelson,
Sen. Marco Rubio, and
Rep. Rich Nugent:
I demand you pass the
gun safety proposals out-
lined by President
Obama. The gun lobby has
stood in the way of enact-
ing common sense meas-
ures for too long.
1. Universal background
checks whenever some-
one buys a gun, whether it
is from a licensed dealer
or a private seller;
2. Restoring the ban on
military-style assault
weapons, and a 10-round
limit for magazines;
3. Improving access to
mental health services;
4. Increasing funding for
school security and safety.
When the Second
Amendment became law,
who could foresee one
day future weapons-
manufacturing corpora-
tions would use this
amendment to protect
their "right" to manufac-
ture and sell assault
weapons used to murder
schoolchildren?
The Second Amendment
states: "A well regulated
Militia, being necessary to
the security of a free State,
the right of the people to
keep and bear Arms, shall
not be infringed."
As it stands now, we do
not have a "well regulated
Militia." We have inde-
pendent consumers in a
capitalist society who have
the ability to gun down un-
told innocent people.
In spite of what they
claim, owning a gun does
not protect an individual
from crime. This is pure
Hollywood. Trained sol-
diers and law enforce-
ment do not always hit
what they shoot at, yet in
the minds of these gun
owners, their gun is their
only protection.
Frankly, I would count
on my mind and taking
precautionary measures
before I would even con-


sider brandishing a gun.
I demand you do the
same. Use your mind and
common sense to support
measures that are long
overdue to keep Ameri-
cans safe.
Kathy Dobronyi
Inverness

Discussions about
government
Have you read the Dec-
laration of Independence
lately? Have you ever
read it? It is full of illegal
language.
In fact, about the only
place you can safely read
it is in the privacy of your
own bathroom. Otherwise
you may find yourself in vi-


olation of The Alien Regis-
tration Act of 1940 (Smith
Act, 76th U.S. Congress, 3d
session, ch. 439, 54 Stat
670, 18 U.S.C. 2385, en-
acted June 29, 1940). It is a
United States federal
statute that sets criminal
penalties for advocating
the overthrow of the U.S.
government and required
all non-citizen adult resi-
dents to register with the
government. It is only be-
cause of Supreme Court
decisions limiting its au-
thority in 1957 we can
legally have this discus-
sion, otherwise my quoting
of certain passages in the
Declaration of Independ-
ence violates the letter
and spirit of the law. The
court granted relief by de-


ciding violations had to
show intent and a will to
overthrow the government
Academic discussions
are protected up to a
point. I want to make it
clear I am not advocating
the overthrow of the fed-
eral government nor trying
to recruit a group of indi-
viduals to act toward that
purpose. I want to make an
academic connection be-
tween certain language in
the Declaration of Inde-
pendence and the Second
Amendment to the Consti-
tution. My purpose is to
support the Second
Amendment, not over-
throw the government
The Smith Act states
"Whoever knowingly or
willfully advocates, abets,


advises, or teaches the
duty, necessity, desirabil-
ity, or propriety of over-
throwing or destroying the
government of the United
States or the government
of any State, Territory,
District or Possession
thereof, or the govern-
ment of any political sub-
division therein, by force
or violence, or by the as-
sassination of any officer
of any such government;
or Whoever, with intent to
cause the overthrow or
destruction of any such
government, prints, pub-
lishes, edits, issues, circu-
lates, sells, distributes, or
publicly displays any writ-
ten or printed matter ad-
vocating, advising, or
teaching the duty, neces-
sity, desirability, or propri-
ety of overthrowing or
destroying any govern-
ment in the United States
by force or violence, or at-
tempts to do so" is in deep
trouble. Deep trouble is 20
years, for starters.
The Declaration of In-
dependence, while not
having the force of law,
says when talking about
Life, Liberty and the Pur-
suit of Happiness, "that
whenever any Form of
Government becomes de-
structive of these ends, it
is the Right of the People
to alter or to abolish it,
and to institute new gov-
ernment." The document


goes on to warn of action
over "light and transient
causes" but concludes
"under absolute Despot-
ism, it is their right; it is
their duty to throw off
such Government"
I don't think you can
find many examples of
governments that have
been abolished or thrown
off peaceably, and the
founding fathers knew
that They addressed that
issue with the Second
Amendment to the Consti-
tution, guaranteeing an
armed citizenry That is
the purpose of the Second
Amendment. The govern-
ment cannot take your
guns. You have a right to
those guns to protect
yourself from the tyranny
of government, and in-
fringed means no assault
weapons ban.
If history teaches us
anything, it should teach
us the first step in enslav-
ing a population is to dis-
arm them. Thomas
Jefferson said "When gov-
ernments fear the people,
there is liberty When the
people fear the govern-
ment, there is tyranny"
Ben Franklin said, "They,
who can give up essential
liberty to obtain a little
temporary safety, deserve
neither liberty nor safety"
Harley Lawrence
Homosassa


II


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OPINION


SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 A13











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Fe""" 27 die in Egypt riot after verdict




I^71 Violence spurred by sentencing of21 soccer fans '


Associated Press
Bangladeshi firefighters
and volunteers work to
douse a fire Saturday at a
two-story garment factory
in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Factory fire kills
7 in Bangladesh
DHAKA, Bangladesh -
Afire swept through a two-
story garment factory Satur-
day in Bangladesh's capital,
killing at least seven female
workers and injuring an-
other five, police and fire of-
ficials said.
The fire at the Smart fac-
tory occurred two months
after a blaze killed 112
workers in another factory
near the capital city, raising
questions about safety
standards and treatment of
workers in Bangladesh's
$20-billion garment industry
that exports clothes to lead-
ing Western retailers.
The cause of the latest
fire was not immediately
known, fire official Abdul
Halim said.
Dhaka Metropolitan Po-
lice Deputy Commissioner
Monzurul Kabir told The As-
sociated Press the bodies
of seven women were re-
covered from the top floor
of the factory in Dhaka's
Mohammadpur district. He
said the factory was making
pants and shirts, but could
not provide further details.
Protesters take
on Davos forum
DAVOS, Switzerland -
Three women angry over
sexism and male domina-
tion of the world economy
ripped off their shirts and
tried to force their way into
a gathering of corporate
elites in a Swiss resort.
Predictably, they failed.
The ubiquitous and huge se-
curity force policing the World
Economic Forum in Davos
carried the women away,
kicking and screaming.
The women, from Ukrain-
ian feminist activist group
Femen, scaled a fence and
set off pink flares in the
protest Saturday. Their
chests were painted with
"SOS Davos," as they
sought to call attention to
poverty of women around
the world.
Militant groups
clash in Pakistan
PESHAWAR, Pakistan
- Two Islamic militant
groups clashed Saturday
over control of a prized val-
ley in northwest Pakistan,
killing at least 24 people
and wounding dozens
more, officials said.
Arshad Khan of the Khy-
ber tribal region said the
fighting between the two Is-
lamic militant groups began
Friday in Tirah valley, near
the Afghan border, when
the militant group, Tehrik-e-
Taliban, captured the base
of another militant group,
Ansarul Islam.

Revolution


Associated Press
CAIRO Relatives and
angry young men ram-
paged through the Egypt-
ian city of Port Said on
Saturday in assaults that
killed at least 27 people
following death sentences
for local fans involved in
the country's worst bout of
soccer violence.
Unrest surrounding the
second anniversary of
Egypt's revolution also
broke out in Cairo and
other cities for a third day,
with protesters clashing
for hours with riot police
who fired tear gas that en-


compassed swaths of the
capital's downtown.
The divisive verdict and
bloodshed highlight chal-
lenges being faced by
President Mohammed
Morsi, who took office
seven months ago follow-
ing an Egyptian revolution
that ousted autocratic
leader Hosni Mubarak.
Critics said Morsi has
failed to carry out prom-
ised reforms in the coun-
try's judiciary and police
force, and claim little has
improved in the two years
after the uprising against
Mubarak.
The Islamist leader,


Egypt's first freely elected
and civilian president, met
for the first time with top
generals as part of the
newly formed National
Defense Council to discuss
the deployment of troops
in two cities. The military
was deployed to Port Said
hours after the verdict was
announced, and warned a
curfew could be declared
in areas of unrest The mil-
itary was also deployed to
the canal city of Suez,
where protesters attacked
the main security com-
pound there after eight
people were killed late
Friday


Associated Press
Families and supporters of those accused of soccer
violence from the Port Said soccer club react Saturday
to the announcement of verdicts for 21 fans on trial in
last year's stadium incident, which left 74 people dead,
in Port Said, Egypt.


Rallying against guns


Associated Press
People listens to a speaker during a rally Saturday against gun violence near the Washington Monument
in Washington, D.C.

Thousands march for gun control in Washington, D. C.


Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
Thousands of people,
many holding signs with
names of gun violence
victims and messages
such as "Ban Assault
Weapons Now," joined a
rally for gun control Sat-
urday, marching from
the Capitol to the Wash-
ington Monument.
Leading the crowd
were marchers with "We
Are Sandy Hook" signs,
paying tribute to victims
of the December school
shooting in Newtown,
Conn. Washington Mayor
Vincent Gray and other
city officials marched
alongside them. The
crowd stretched for at
least two blocks along
Constitution Avenue.
Participants held signs
reading "Gun Control
Now," "Stop NRA" and
"What Would Jesus
Pack?" among other
messages. Other signs
were simple and white,
with the names of vic-
tims of gun violence.
About 100 residents
from Newtown, where a
gunman killed 20 first-
graders and six teachers,


traveled to Washington
together, organizers said.
Participant Kara
Baekey from nearby
Norwalk, Conn., said
when she heard about
the Newtown shooting,
she immediately thought
of her two young chil-
dren. She said she de-
cided she must take
action, and that's why
she traveled to Washing-
ton for the march.
"I wanted to make
sure this never happens
at my kids' school or any
other school," Baekey
said. "It just can't hap-
pen again."
Once the crowd ar-
rived at the monument,
speakers called for a ban
on military-style assault
weapons and high-
capacity ammunition and
for universal background
checks on gun sales.
Education Secretary
Arne Duncan told the
crowd it's not about tak-
ing away Second
Amendment gun rights,
but about gun safety and
saving lives. He said he
and President Barack
Obama would do every-
thing they could to enact
gun control policies.


People walk from the U.S. Capitol to the
Washington Monument during a march for gun
control Saturday in Washington, D.C.


Dems may block Obama's way on guns


Associated Press
A Syrian boy chants
slogans as he wears a
sweater with the Syrian
revolution flag during a
demonstration after
Friday prayer in Aleppo,
Syria.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
WASHINGTON -As the Sen-
ate prepares to begin debating
new gun control measures, some
of President Barack Obama's fel-
low Democrats are poised to
frustrate his efforts to enact the
most sweeping limits on weapons
in decades.
These Democrats from largely
rural states with strong gun cul-
tures view Obama's proposals
warily and have not committed to


supporting them. The lawmak-
ers' concerns could stand in the
way of strong legislation before a
single Republican gets a chance
to vote "no."
"There's a core group of Demo-
cratic senators, most but not all
from the West, who represent
states with a higher-than-average
rate of gun ownership but an
equally strong desire to feel their
kids are safe," said Mark Glaze,
director of Mayors Against Illegal
Guns. "They're having hard but


good conversations with people
back home to identify the middle-
ground solutions that respect the
Second Amendment but make it
harder for dangerous people to
get their hands on guns."
All eyes are on these dozen or
so Democrats, some of whom
face re-election in 2014. That in-
cludes Sens. Max Baucus of Mon-
tana, Mark Begich of Alaska and
Mark Pryor of Arkansas.
The Senate Judiciary Commit-
tee begins hearings Wednesday


GUN BUYBACKS
ACROSS THE US
Trenton buyback
nets 1,000 weapons
TRENTON, N.J. More
than 1,000 weapons in-
cluding sawed-off shotguns
were collected during a
two-day gun buyback pro-
gram in New Jersey's capi-
tal city, so many more than
expected authorities ran
out of money and had to
give out vouchers.
People turning in weapons
were allowed to drop them
off at two city churches with
no questions asked until the
event concluded Saturday
night, authorities said. Police
officers were on hand at
each location to ensure no
one entered with a loaded
weapon and to collect and
secure the firearms.
About 1,300 firearms
were collected Friday, au-
thorities said. Participants
received $25 to $250 de-
pending on the type of
firearm, its legality and its
condition. The final tally of
weapons received during
the program and the total
amount of money paid out
will be released Tuesday.
Gun buyback programs
are part of law enforce-
ment's multipronged anti-vi-
olence strategy for dealing
with crime in New Jersey's
major cities. All the weapons
will eventually be destroyed.
San Mateo County
offers cash for guns
SAN MATEO, Calif. -
San Mateo County officials
said so many cars were in
line for a gun buyback pro-
gram Saturday they de-
cided to start a little early.
Authorities offered up to
$100 cash for a handgun,
shotgun or rifle, or $200 for
an assault rifle at the San
Mateo Event Center.
The buyback ran be-
tween 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.,
but more than an hour be-
fore the event began cars
were lined up down a street
approaching the center.
Officials said by 11 a.m.
they had already collected
more than 200 firearms.
Missile launcher at
Seattle gun buyback
SEATTLE A nonfunc-
tional missile launcher was
among the weapons that
showed up Saturday at a
gun buyback in Seattle.
SeattlePl.com reported
the military weapon was a
single-use device that had
been used. Police said a
man who was at the event
bought the surface-to-air
missile launcher for $100. It
was confiscated by police
to determine what it was.
Then the nonfunctioning
device was returned to him.
The gun buyback in a
parking lot in downtown
Seattle was scheduled to
go from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.,
but ended early because of
the large crowd.











EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE





So pretty,





Park City




Scenic, historic old mining ..


town now ski destination :7-......


It's not Grand
Canyon or Niagara
Falls, but it is a
unique and
commanding destination
tucked away in a
picturesque canyon
of the Wasatch
Mountains of Utah, 30
miles from downtown
Salt Lake City.

It is so unique to us, in fact, that a
small piece of it was our first major
purchase when we got married, but
only after we bought a piano a
"condition" of marriage 52 years ago.
Park City traces its beginnings as a
mining town, having drawn many
prospectors to the area in their quest
for silver deposits. One of its silver
mines, called
the Ontario
Mine, was sold
to George
Hearst for
$27,000, but lit-
tle did he ex-
pect that the
mine would
produce $50
million in the
Neil Sawyer years following
1872, forming
SPONTANEpkOUS the basis of the
TRAVELER Hearst family
fortune. Every
prospector/miner in the early days of
discovery anticipated that his mine
would never play out- but some-
times they do. As in playing poker,
the winner is subject to the whim of
the draw Hearst got lucky!
At the peak of the "mining season,"
Park City's estimated population was
about 7,000. When the mines played
out the miners along with most of
the merchants whose game is to fol-
low the money fled for more prom-
ising prospects. Incidentally, there
were more successful merchants
than there were successful prospec-
tors and miners. Every owner,
worker, prospector and family
needed daily provisions, to the mer-
chant's pleasure; whereas, relatively
few miners were successful.
Mining flourished until about 1949.
On a geological time scale, it took
millennia for the silver-rich ore to
develop, yet only minutes to extract
it. While Park City was never classi-
fied as a ghost town, it became only a
shadow of its former self.
Today, however, Park City has
emerged from the past as a thriving
ski destination and resort commu-
nity, due to its numerous and varied
ski slopes, excellent snow conditions
and close proximity to a major air-
port. A skier could spend a month in
Park City and never ski the same
slope twice.


Park City's fame today is largely at-
tributable to the 2002 Winter
Olympics and the Sundance Film
Festival, and it is now home to many
high-profile people: Mitt Romney,
George Hearst (media mogul), nu-
merous Olympians, sportsmen and
Hollywood glitterati.
Park City is now a year-round
recreation destination determined
by the fact summer occupancy is only
slightly less than winter occupancy
There are numerous ski runs that op-
erate year-round for sightseers, hik-
ers and mountain bikers. There truly
is no "off season" at Park City
Practically a one-street city, Main
Street is quite eye-catching, with
most of the retail businesses, the-
aters, bars and restaurants there. In-
terestingly, 64 colorful Victorian
homes, built during boom times, are
listed in the National Register of His-
toric Places and several are located
on Main Street or nearby among
more recently built homes. However,
the hillsides are graced by many new
mansions, attesting to the level of
success of the town in attracting well-
to-do newcomers.
Various other interesting activities
take place in Park City, which is also
home of the U.S. Olympic Ski Team.
Many scenes from 1994's movie
"Dumb and Dumber" were shot in
the city Mrs. Fields Cookies started
here.
Park City is the most liberal city in
Utah, owing to the fact there are
more non-Mormons per capital than
anywhere else in the state. The ambi-
ence and amenities of the city lure
more than 3,000,000 visitors
per year.
Aside from the active sports of ski-
ing and biking, a stroll down Main
Street will make your heart race. In-
teresting family-owned restaurants,
colorful bars and an assortment of
microbreweries, is enough to satisfy
every whim or taste. Reserve a day of
your stay to just browse Main Street
for novelty items, high-fashion cloth-
ing and accessories, and enjoy the
wide variety of gastronomic treats
and libations. Top it off by driving
around the hillside roads overlook-
ing the city, where you can return for
dinner. This one-day, self-guided ex-
cursion will be one of the most mem-
orable of your stay in Park City
As to our purchases of years ago -
we sold our lot in Park City, but I still
have my wife, Karyn, and she has her
piano.
Postscript: Share your travel
wishes: What are the top three
foreign countries you would like to
visit? Email me at the address below.

Neil and Karyn Sawyer have been
residents of Crystal River for 27
years. They travel frequently, having
been to 48 states, 64 countries and
seven continents. Neil welcomes
comments and questions about
travel. Contact him via email to
gobuddy@tampabay.rr com.


i


NEIL SAWYER/Special to the Chronicle
Views along scenic Main Street in Park City, Utah, elevation 6,500 feet.
The purple restaurant was once a home. Barn and farmhouse nearby.


Fall colors in late September 2012 in Park City, Utah.


DREAM
VACATIONS
t'Xpt0 (oi yes


The Chronicle and The Accent Travel Group If it's selected as a winner, it will be pub- Please avoid photos with dates on the print.
are sponsoring a photo contest for readers of lished in the Sunday Chronicle. Photos should be sent to the Chronicle at
the newspaper. At the end of the year, a panel of judges will 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River,
Readers are invited to send a photograph from select the best photo during the year and that FL 34429 or dropped off at the Chronicle of-
their Dream Vacation with a brief description of photograph will win a prize. fice in Inverness, Crystal River or any
the trip. Accent Travel Office.


* Veterans
Notes can
be found on
Page A17 of
today's
Chronicle.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Honor veterans


with Valentines


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( O 302 201 302 2 2 Titans" (2012) B Wiig, Maya Rudolph. (In Stereo) 'R' B *MA' (N)N(N
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E 24 38 3 "Tyler Perry's the "Abducted: The Carlina White Story" (2012, "Steel Magnolias" (2012, Comedy-Drama) "Abducted: The
24 38 24 31 Family That Preys" Docudrama) Aunjanue Ellis. B Queen Latiffah, Phylicia Rashad. B Carlina White Story"
5 ** "Calendar Girls" (2003) Helen Mirren, *** "L ing to Be Perfect" (2010, Drama) *** "Nora Roberts'High Noon" (2009,
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(WGN-AJ 18 18 18 18 20 Videos |Bloopers! Bloopers! |Mother Mother |Mother Mother |Mother News Replay 30 Rock |30Rock


Dear Annie: I am
honored to see cit-
izens and patriots
step forward to honor
and support one of our
nation's greatest assets,
the American veteran.
Our veterans reflect all
that is good in our nation:
honor, courage and com-
mitment. The
volunteers who
serve and sup-
port our veter-
ans bring that
same measure
of greatness to
their mission
each and every
day.
Many of your
readers join us
each February
in the National
Salute to Vet- ANI
eran Patients. MAI
This program
encourages
Americans to visit and
volunteer at the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs
medical centers and to
send letters of thanks or
valentines to those who
have protected our na-
tion. This year's National
Salute is Feb. 10 to 16.
Last year, more than
361,000 valentines were
received at VA medical
centers, and 21,904 peo-
ple visited nearly 82,493
veteran patients. We have
had an increasing num-
ber of Americans partici-
pate in this program each
year, and 2012 was no ex-
ception. I thank you and
your readers for your
work in bringing attention
to this worthy cause.
For more information
regarding the National
Salute and volunteer op-
portunities at a local VA
medical center, please
visit VAs Voluntary Serv-
ice web page at www.
volunteer.va.gov -


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
No movie times were
supplied by Regal Cinemas
for Citrus 6. Please call or
check Fandango.

Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Broken City" (R) ID required.
1:55 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Hansel and Gretel 3D" (R)
ID required. 1:30 p.m.,
7:20 p.m. No passes.
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch
Hunters" (R) ID required.
4 p.m. No passes.
"The Last Stand" (PG-13)


1:20 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Lincoln" (R) ID required.
1:10 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Mama" (R) ID required.
1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:35 p.m.
"Movie 43" (R) ID required.
2 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 8 p.m.
"Parker" (R) ID required.
1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Silver Lings Playbook"
(PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"Zero Dark Thirty" (R) ID
required. 1 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Copper and
zinc alloy
6 Uproar
10 Move a little
15 Puccini opera
20 Tragic lover
21 Track
22 The Pentateuch
23 Bolster
24 Improve
25 Service branch
26 Deliver a speech
27 Bean plant
28 Hankering
29 Sour
31 News
33 Flaubert's Bovary
35 Elderly
36 A gemstone
37 Onetime
39 Ogle
41 Drew a blank
44 Horse's gait
45 Abbr. in citations
48 Spiked
53 Take without right
54 Signaled
55 Felt hat
57 "The Magic -"
58 Fabricated
59 Dwindle
60 Curved path
61 Traveled
63 River in Ireland
64 Before, poetically
65 Donated
66 Baby canine
68 Exchange premium
70 Com spike
71 Road
72 Acrobat's garment
74 Place of exile
76 Gannet
79 "The Sheik of-"
81 Period
83 Most senior
87 Prize
88 Al
89 Lunch in a can
91 Goldbrick
92 Degrade
94 "From Russia
Love"
96 Tropical fruit
97 Windy
98 Slight error
100 Oozing
102 Kind of school,


for short
104 Beanie
107 Ran away
109 Hoist
110 Lump of dirt
111 of averages
114 Told a tale
116 Cleveland's lake
118 Of each hundred (abbr.)
119 Rivers or Crawford
120 Claret
121 Standard
of perfection
123 Reveal
125 Destitute
126 Ship of 1492
127 Cent
128 Astonish
129 Conversation
130 Argue over trifles
131 Holiday time
133 Struck with horror
136 Tome
137 Burden
141 Concern of bettors
144 and rave
145 Long, long time
146 Moray
149 Open, as a flag
151 A Titan
153 Defunct political
acronym
155 Golf score
157 Kettle
158 Damp
159 of passage
160 Efface
161 Went wrong
162 Mawkish
163 Sign over a door
164 Tracking system


DOWN
1 Donkey's cry
2 The Eternal City
3 You said it!
4 D.C. VIP
5 Fizzy drink (2 wds.)
6 Weak
7 Fat
8 Prepare to fire
9 Laminated board
10 Tempest
11 Vast multitude
12 Levin or Gershwin
13 Destiny
14 A pronoun
15 Gift for dad


Russian girl's name
Punch
- as you are
Filled with wonder
Frolic
Popular pet
Table scrap
Motley assortment
Monster
Liberate
Alert color
Folklore creature
Rage
Eskers
Ill-behaved
Melody
Drag
Length times width
Cakes and -
Remedy
Lab burner
Antlered animal
Warning
Fingerboard ridge
Brilliance
Lacking color
Cry at sea
Mahjong piece
"Lord of the Rings" wiz-
ard
Dictionary name
Portend
Indebted
- and Penates
- lazuli
Humming sound
Make sense
(2 wds.)
Low
Be in debt
On the -
Tier
Heavy cup
Golfer Ernie -
Rigid
Endeavor
Tulip tree
River in Africa
Piles
Pole on a ship
Read
Select
Howard or Perlman
Bit from a movie
- de-camp
Hammer part
Force
Kitchen worker
Concatenate


Poker stake
Erosion
Aykroyd
or Fogelberg
Flightless bird
Jar
Candle part
Caustic solution
Literary collection
Lea
Trailblazer


Light brown
Scary yell
Electrical unit
Seize
Too fast
Flat hat
Old instrument
Nonpareil
At a distance
Trick
Stops up


Greek portico
Wine city in Italy
Mild oath
"Born Free"
lioness
Sneering look
Pole
Sass
Playing card
Genus of macaws


Puzzle answer is on Page A18.


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick


Tommy S. Sowers, Ph.D.,
Assistant Secretary for
Public and Intergovern-
mental Affairs, Washing-
ton, D.C.
Dear Dr Sowers: Every
year, our readers make us
proud with their outpour-
ing of appreciation for
our veterans through the
Valentines
for Vets
program.
Teachers,
you have al-
d ways been
wonderfully
supportive in
making this a
class project,
especially
with those
charming
handmade
NIE'S valentines.
ILBOX Encourage
your students
to express
their creativity while
learning the satisfaction
of doing for others.
Every year, the dedi-
cated members of Camp
Fire USA participate in
this VA program, and Sal-
vation Army volunteers
distribute valentines, gifts
and refreshments at vari-
ous VA facilities around
the country
If you do not live close
enough to a VA facility to
drop off your valentines
in person, it's perfectly
OK to put them in the
mail. Simply check your
phone book for the near-
est VA facility, or go to the
VA website at www.va.gov.
We can never repay these
courageous veterans for
the sacrifices they have
made on our behalf, but
we can take the time to let
them know they have not
been forgotten. Remem-
ber our veterans this
Valentine's Day. -Marcy
and Kathy


A16 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT


I
I





Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well
as events to which the public
is invited. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activi-
ties, meals and more for a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.

POST NEWS
VFW Riders Group
meets at 10 a.m. Saturday
(different weeks each month)
at different VFW posts
throughout the year. For infor-
mation, call director Gene
Perrino at 352-302-1037, or
email geneusawo@
tampabay.rr.com.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Satur-
day monthly at 1 p.m. for
lunch and coffee at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). All Coastie veterans
are welcome. For more infor-
mation, call Charlie Jensen at
352-503-6019.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Lounge open at 11 a.m. Mon-
day through Saturday and
noon on Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
For more information about
the post and its other activi-
ties, call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at
352-302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who
served during war time (also
stepchildren); stepchildren;
and female veterans who
served during wartime. Call
Unit President Sandy White at
352-249-7663, or member-
ship chairman Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
activities such as meals,
bingo, golf, darts, karaoke,
pool and more for members
and guests. Review the
monthly newsletter for activi-
ties and updates, and call the
post at 352-746-0440. The
VFW Post 10087 is off County
Road 491, directly behind
Cadence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 746-0440. The
Cake Crab Company Golf
League plays at Twisted Oaks
G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.
Check with Jack Gresham for
tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf
League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted
Oaks Golf Club and Citrus
Springs Country Club. Tee
time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Roast beef dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 1. Cost


is $8; children younger than 6
eat for $4. Karaoke by Mike.
The public is welcome.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, at the intersection of In-
dependence Highway and
U.S. 41. The chapter hall is on


the corner of Independence
Highway and Paul Drive. We
thank veterans for their serv-
ice and welcome any disabled
veteran to join us from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we
accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to as-
sist disabled veterans and
their families when we are
able. Anyone who knows a
disabled veteran or their fam-
ily who requires assistance is
asked to call Commander
Richard Floyd 727-492-0290,
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207,
or 352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClis-
ter is available to assist any
veteran or dependents with
their disability claim by ap-
pointment. Call 352-344-3464
and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the
veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA med-
ical center in Gainesville may
call the Citrus County Transit
office for wheelchair trans-
portation; call 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant
Lynn Armitage at 352-341-
5334.One of the DAVA's proj-
ects is making lap robes and
ditty, wheelchair and monitor
bags for needy veterans in
nursing homes. All who wish
to help in our projects are wel-
come. We need to make the
items certain sizes, so please
call for information. We also
collect toiletry items for the
veterans. Good, clean mate-
rial and yarn are needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries
are at 906 State Road 44
East, Inverness. Call the post
at 352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org for informa-
tion about post activities.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Aux-
iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Post and auxiliary meet
the first Wednesday of the
month at 7 p.m. Dunnellon
Young Marines meet 6 p.m.
Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open
at 4 p.m.
For information about activ-
ities and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets the
second Saturday monthly at
the DAV building at 1039 N.
Paul Drive in Inverness. This
is an advocacy group for cur-
rent and future veterans, as
well as for POWs and MIAs.
Florida Chapter 7 welcomes
new members to help pro-
mote public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help vet-
erans in need of help. Full
membership is open to all in-
dividuals 18 years or older
who wish to dedicate time to
the cause. Visit the website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker
for your next meeting or
event. Call club President Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell), or email him at ultraray
1997@yahoo.com.


Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
or President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
Any female relative age 16 or
older who is a wife, widow,
mother, mother-in-law, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,


granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of an honor-
ably discharged Marine and
FMF Corpsman eligible to join
the Marine Corps League,
and female Marines (former,
active and reserves) and as-
sociate members are eligible
for MCLA membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com. Call or visit
the post for regular and spe-
cial events, as well as meet-
ings. Google VFW 4252,
Hernando.
Everyone is invited to a
special "Speed Bingo" ses-
sion at 10 a.m. Saturday,
Feb. 23. Doors open at 9 a.m.
Food is available. Proceeds
will benefit cancer aid and re-
search. Call 352-726-5206.
The public is welcome at
the Sunday buffet breakfasts
from 10 a.m. to noon;
cost is $5.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-
5012 for information. VFW
membership is open to men
and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including
service in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The Korean
Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above for
information.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For
information about the post
and its activities, call 352-
637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, in-
vites all eligible veterans to
join or transfer to our Post
237 family. There are many
activities (call the post for in-
formation), and monthly din-
ners sell out fast and are a big
hit. Legionnaires, Sons of the
American Legion (SAL), or
American Legion Auxiliary
(ALA) are active helping vet-
erans and the community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org
to view the calendar of
upcoming events. Call the
post at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of
the U.S. is eligible for mem-
bership if said service was
within Korea, including territo-


f' License, BaitandT),, ,I P hil h. t |
S352-422-4640
kingclai r n
-ii Charters Can E.- Arran .-.1


rial waters and airspace, at
any time from Sept. 3, 1945,
to the present or if said serv-
ice was outside of Korea from
June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77 meet the first
Thursday monthly at the for-
mer Inverness Highlands
S&W Civic Association build-
ing at 4375 Little Al Point, off
Arbor Street. Call Post Cmdr.
Norman Brumett at 352-860-
2981 or Auxiliary president
Marie Cain at 352-697-3151
for information about the post
and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food
available.
The post will have an open
house and dedication cere-
mony of its newly acquired
building, formerly Inverness
S&W Highlands Civic Center,
at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 2,
with the open house to follow
until 3 p.m.
Both the dedication and
open house are open to the
public.
The post will do a bus tour
to Miami and Key West Feb.
18 to 24. Profits from the trip
will be used to purchase a
brick for the Fisher House
Walk of Courage and for new
equipment for the Color
Guard of Post 77. The Fisher
House will be a home for the
families of hospitalized veter-
ans at the Malcom Randal
Veterans Hospital in
Gainesville; the Walk of
Courage will be the paved
walkway between the Fisher
House and the hospital. For
more information, call Alice at
352-860-2981.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Dinner is at 6 p.m. and the
meeting follows at 7. All veter-
ans in the Homosassa/Ho-
mosassa Springs area are
invited to be a part of Ameri-
can Legion Post 166. For in-
formation about the post or
the American Legion, call and
leave a message for the post
commander at 352-860-2090.
Your call will be returned
within 24 to 48 hours.
On Feb. 4, American Le-
gion Post 166 will celebrate
the 60th anniversary of the


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end of the Korean War by
honoring Korean War mem-
bers with a Certificate of Ap-
preciation at the regular
meeting at 7 p.m. at the Olive
Tree. Dinner is at 6 p.m.
The meeting is open to all
veterans who served during
times of conflict and who live
in the area from Homosassa
Springs, Homosassa and
Lecanto, to Sugarmill Woods
and Chassahowitzka. Call
Robert Scott, commander,
at 352-860-2090 for
reservations.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose
and Crown restaurant, Citrus
Hills. Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway). For more informa-
tion about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959; or
visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 1 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November at
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. All combat-wounded
veterans, lineal descendants,
next of kin, spouses and sib-
lings of Purple Heart recipi-
ents are invited. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 MOPH, visit the chap-
ter's website at www.citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Pur-
ple Heart has announced two
scholarship opportunities for
college-bound students -
Chapter 776's College of
Central Florida (CF) Endowed
Scholarship and the Military
Order of the Purple Heart
(MOPH) Scholarship for Aca-
demic Year 2013/14.
Chapter 776's CF Endowed
Scholarship for Academic
Year 2013/14 awards $500 to
an applicant accepted or en-
rolled at CF as a full-time stu-
dent (12 or more semester
credit hours). Chapter 776
scholarship information and
an application can be ob-
tained at www.citruspurple-
heart.org, or by calling
352-382-3847. Chapter 776
must receive scholarship ap-


plications no later than 5 p.m.
Feb. 28.
The MOPH Scholarship for
Academic Year 2013/14
awards $3,000 to a member
of the MOPH; a spouse,
widow, direct lineal descen-
dant (child, stepchild, adopted
child, grandchild) of a MOPH
member or of a veteran killed
in action, or who died of
wounds before having the op-
portunity to become a MOPH
member. Great-grandchildren
are not eligible. Applicant
must be a U.S. citizen, a
graduate or pending graduate
of an accredited high school;
be accepted or enrolled as a
full-time student (12 semester
credit hours or 18 quarter
hours) at a U.S. college or
trade school and have at least
a 2.75 cumulative GPA based
on an un-weighted 4.0 grad-
ing system. Scholarship appli-
cations must be received at
MOPH Headquarters in
Springfield, Va., no later than
5 p.m. Feb. 13, 2013. MOPH
scholarship information and
an application can be ob-
tained by visiting the MOPH
website at www.purple
heart.org.
The order invites all veter-
ans and the public, especially
families, to attend the Eighth
Annual Purple Heart Cere-
mony at 11 a.m., Saturday,
Feb. 9, at the Florida National
Guard Armory, Crystal River.
The patriotic ceremony will
commemorate the proud
legacy of the Purple Heart
and pay tribute to Florida's
fallen heroes and America's
wounded warriors.
The ceremony will also fea-
ture the MOPH Department of
Florida Afghanistan/Iraq War
Memorial Portrait Mural. The
mural honors more than 300
Floridians who have fallen
during the Afghanistan/Iraq
campaigns and is the first me-
morial to bear both the en-
graved names and color
portraits of those who fell. Vo-
calists Paul and Jackie Stevio
will provide patriotic music.
For more information, visit
the Chapter 776 website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
See VETERANS/Page A18


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SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 A17





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


101st BIRTHDAY


Sarah Boger was born in
north Georgia in 1912. She
moved into Highland Terrace
in July 2005. She celebrated
her 101st birthday Jan. 18,
2013, at Highland Terrace in
the company of family,
residents and staff. She is
legally blind but enjoys daily
activities, including five days
of morning exercise. She is
an active member of the
First Christian Church in
Inverness, and enjoys gospel
music. Sarah describes her-
self as warm and affection-
ate, and those at Highland
Terrace concur. She enjoys
sewing and getting her hair
done weekly. Her son-in-law,
Bill Nicholson of Inverness,
visits her regularly and
drives her to church.
Pictured celebrating at
Highland Terrace, from left,
are: Eileen Williams, Fridel
Lodispoto, Mrs. Boger,
Shirley Bailey, Joyce Gordon
and Beulah Hollebeck.
Special to the Chronicle


InSERVICE


Candace M. Moore
Air Force Airman 1st
Class Candace M.
Moore graduated from
basic military training at
Lackland Air Force
Base, San Antonio,
Texas.
|'* |The airman com-
Candace pleted an intensive,
M. Moore eight-week program
U.S. Air Force that included training in
military discipline and
studies, Air Force core
values, physical fitness, and basic war-
fare principles and skills.
Airmen who complete basic training


Divorces 1/7/13 to 1/20/13
Amber D. Allen, Spring Hill
vs. Brian T. Nursick, Crystal
River
Nicole Marie Andrews,
Crystal River vs. Jon Leslie
Andrews, Crystal River
Gail M. Billings, West Palm
Beach vs. Allen B. Billings,
Inverness
Kayla N. Cannon, Beverly
Hills vs. Ace Cannon,
Homosassa
Shelley L. Charette,
Hernando vs. Kyle A.
Charette, Hernando
Ashley Hutchinson,
Homosassa vs. Jesse
Hutchinson, Homosassa
Christopher L. Littrell,
Homosassa vs. Jeri D.



VETERANS
Continued from Page A17

Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-
0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at
7 p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post.
Call the post at 352-447-
3495 for information about ac-
tivities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at
3 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,


earn four credits toward an associate in
applied science degree through the
Community College of the Air Force.
Moore is the daughter of Heidi and
Ron Moore of Inverness, and grand-
daughter of Lamonta Moore of
Floral City.
She is a 2012 graduate of Citrus High
School, Inverness.

Ramon C. Luna
Air Force Airman Ramon C. Luna
graduated from basic military training at
Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio,
Texas.
The airman completed an intensive,
eight-week program that included train-


For the RECORD


Littrell, Homosassa
Raymond Namia,
Bushnell vs. Maureen A.
Namia
Christina L. Owens, Floral
City vs. Daniel R. Owens,
Beverly Hills
Brian J. Rivera, Ocala vs.
Ashley M. Rivera,
Crystal River
Leslie Ellen Sells,
Inverness vs. Henry James
Quigley, Inverness
Philip Calderone, Miami vs.
Lisa C. Calderone, Inverness
Steven E. Tallman Jr.
Dunnellon vs. Cindy Noel
Tallman
Marriages 1/7/13 to 1/20/13
Alfonso Bejarano, Correo
De Heredia, Costa Rica/


Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at
the post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call Commander Tom
Gallagher at 860-1629 for in-
formation and directions.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at
Denny's in Crystal River at
2 p.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly. Call Jimmie at 352-
621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Mer-
chant Marine Veterans of
World War II meetings for
2013 will be at 11:30 a.m. at
Kally K's restaurant in Spring
Hill. Dates are: Feb. 9,
March 9, April 13 and
May 11.


Liliana Patricia Franco Tovar,
Correo De Heredia, Costa
Rica
Lynn Asa Dubose,
Lecanto/Jean Vandyke Beck,
Homosassa
Richard Paul Hahn Sr.,
Citrus Springs/Johna Hahn,
Citrus Springs
Justin Ray Hoyt,
Lakeland/Jamie Len Kibler,
Homosassa
Miguel Angel Avila,
Beverly Hills/Ana Maria
Lebron, Beverly Hills
Alfred Joseph Braun,
Homosassa/Carolyn Mary
Griffin, Homosassa
Charles Henry Gerber,
Citrus Springs/Cara Marie
Gunn, Citrus Springs


SERVICES & GROUPS

Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to
veterans in need. The CCVC
is on the DAV property in In-
verness at the corner of Paul
and Independence, off U.S.
41 north. Hours of operation
are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday
and Thursday. Appointments
are encouraged by calling
352-400-8952.
CCVC general meetings
are at 10 a.m. the fourth
Thursday monthly at the DAV
building in Inverness. All ac-
tive duty and honorably dis-
charged veterans, their
spouses, widows and widow-
ers, along with other veterans'
organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. Members can renew
with Gary Williamson at 352-
527-4537, or at the meeting.
Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless


Ramon
C. Luna
U.S. Air Force


Air Force.


ing in military discipline
and studies, Air Force
core values, physical
fitness, and basic war-
fare principles and
skills.
Airmen who com-
plete basic training
earn four credits to-
ward an associate in
applied science degree
through the Community
College of the


Luna is the son of Ramon Luna of
Beverly Hills.
He is a 2012 graduate of Crystal River
High School.


Reginald Devon Martin,
Tallahassee/Shaquita Quontel
Washington, Inverness
Patrick Leroy Ottinger Jr.,
Lecanto/Megan Kay
Conway, Lecanto
Clayton Benjamin
Stetson, Hernando/Barbara
Jean Baker, Hernando

Divorces and marriages
filed in the state of Florida are
a matter of public record,
available from each county's
Clerk of the Courts Office. For
Citrus County, call the clerk at
352-341-6400 or visit www.
clerk.citrus.fl. us. For
proceedings filed in another
county, contact the clerk in
that area.


Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran
in need of food, haircut, voter
ID, food stamps, medical as-
sistance or more blankets is
asked to call Ed Murphy at
the Hunger and Homeless
Coalition at 352-382-0876, or
pass along this phone num-
ber to the veteran.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the De-
partment of Veterans Affairs
(VA), provides tailored care
for veterans and their families.
The program is provided in
private homes, assisted living
facilities and nursing homes,
and staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to ill-
nesses and conditions unique
to each military era or war. It
also provides caregiver edu-
cation. HPH Hospice care
and programs do not affect
veterans' benefits.
Call the Citrus Team Office
at 352-527-4600.


Engagement

Reams/Taylor

Shannon Reams and
Michael Taylor of Bush-
nell have announced
their engagement and ap-
proaching marriage.
The bride is the daugh-
ter Susan Parris and Greg
Reams. The groom is the -
son of Beth Connell and -'-'
James Taylor
The couple will ex- ,
change vows at 4 p.m. ,
Sunday, March 3, 2013, in
Inverness.


Engagement

Hytovick/Tidwell


Rebecca Hytovick of
Dunnellon and Frederick
Wiley Tidwell III of Crys-
tal River have an-
nounced their
engagement
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Sam and
Cherie Hytovick of Dun-
nellon. She will graduate
in the fall from the Uni-
versity of Florida with a
bachelor's degree in fam-
ily, youth and community
services.
The prospective groom
is the son of Fred and
Beverly Tidwell of Crys-
tal River. He will gradu-
ate in spring 2015 from
the U.S. Naval Academy
with bachelor's degrees
in computer engineering


and also electrical
engineering.
The couple plan to ex-
change nuptial vows in
Annapolis, Md. The date
will be announced later


= Engagement

Geary/Dodd


Alyssa Nichole Geary
of Homosassa and John
Michael Dodd of Dyers-
burg, Tenn., have an-
nounced their
engagement and ap-
proaching marriage.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Steve and
Kim Geary Her fiance is
the son of Michael and
Terri Dodd.
The prospective groom
is to graduate from the
University of Tennessee
Martin this winter. He
works for First Citizens
Bank.
Wedding vows will be
exchanged at 5 p.m.
March 9, 2013, at Crystal
River Archaeological
State Park. A reception


will follow at the Citrus
County Builders Associa-
tion.
The couple will reside
in Dyersburg.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A16.


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THEY POURED THEIR HEARTS

OUT IN LOVE LETTERS FOR OUR

VALENTINE'S DAY CONTEST.

www.chronicleonline.com/valentinesday2013

They are counting on you to vote

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BOWL A- TH


A18 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013


TOGETHER











SPORTS


The PGA Tour's
Farmers Insurance
Open was postponed
by fog Saturday./B5



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


1 Recreational sports/B2
_ r0 Tennis, baseball/B2
0 Basketball, hockey/B3
0 High School sports/B4
0 Auto racing/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Football, golf/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Citrus blanks Leesburg for district title


Hurricanes will host Class 3A region

quarterfinal at home Wednesday


DAVID PIEKLIK
Correspondent
BROOKSVILLE They
weren't going to let history re-
peat itself; they were going to
make history
The Citrus High School boys
soccer team did just that Satur-


day with a 3-0 win against Lees-
burg to win the District 3A-6
tournament championship.
With the title, the No. 1 seed
Hurricanes avenged a 3-2 loss to
the No. 2 seed Yellow Jackets in
the district final last season,
when they let a 2-1 lead slip late
in the game. They will now head


Stone'


Lecanto girls

soccer s season

ends in 3-0 loss
C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
LECANTO Perhaps the
way Lecanto girls soccer
coach Roselle Lattin de-
scribed her team's play fol-
lowing its 3-0 ouster by
Fleming Island in the Class 4A
Region 1 semifinals was best.
"We needed to play in the
first half like we did in the
second half," she said. "We
played them evenly in the
second half, and it might
have been completely differ-
ent. We were
down 3-0 to a
team that
has given up
one goal all
For more season.
photos, click "We could
on this story at have just
www.chronicle given up and
online.com. packed it in,
but the girls
didn't. This is a young team,
we have just one senior, and
this is something we can
build on."
Three Panther errors were
quickly converted into three
goals two from Sammie
Saffer by Fleming Island, a
team noted for rising to the
state tournament occasion.
The Golden Eagles reached
the 4A state semifinals the
last two years and seem well
on their way to another trip,
their record now 20-0-2.
Lecanto finishes at 19-6-1.
"In the first half we were
playing well, real well,"
Fleming Island coach Darrell
Ivey said. "The ladies were
ready to play
"We expected a hard team
(in Lecanto), a team that
fights for the ball. And they
played with a lot of passion."
What the Panthers could
not afford to do against a
team of Fleming Island's cal-
iber was commit the kind of
errors they made. They
dodged one mistake when
the Golden Eagles' Janese
Quick got possession deep in-
side Lecanto's zone and
banged a shot off the crossbar
with 31:28 left in the first
half. But the luck didn't last.
A Golden Eagle cross from
the right corner into the box


on to the regional quarterfinals
against Belleview on Wednes-
day at Citrus High School.
With a new-look lineup this
season and new head
coach, the 'Canes (9-
5-4 overall) /
quickly made last
year a distant
memory
"It feels so good to
come back and finish off
Leesburg the second time. I've
been thinking about it since last
year," Citrus senior midfielder


Michael Hetland said.
With many memories from his
last four years, senior midfielder
Austin Killeen remarked, "This
is No. 1 right now."
Playing at the
"Shark Tank" at
Nature Coast
Technical High
School, the 'Canes
defense swarmed all
night to clear balls and
back up its midfield. They kept
play away from their goal most
of the night, protecting goal


'ailed


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Fleming Island goalkeeper Katie Nimitz makes a save in front of Lecanto junior Breanna Martin in
a Class 4A regional semifinal contest on Saturday night at Lecanto High School. Lecanto lost 3-0.


deflected to Saffer, who
quickly deposited it past
Lecanto keeper Megan Houpt
to make it 1-0 with 27:48 re-
maining in the half. Fleming
Island made it 2-0 less than
three minutes later when a


Panther giveaway directly in
front of Houpt was pounced
on by Audrey Johnson. She
scored and the Golden Eagle
lead was doubled.
Lecanto was now on its
heels collectively, unable to


maintain any possession or
mount any offensive threat.
Play through most of the first
half remained in Lecanto's
defensive end.


Page B4


keeper Alan Verone who
earned the clean sheet with
five saves from serious shot
threats.
Citrus took a while to find its
offensive stride, after being
called for three offsides in the
first half and failing to break
striker Joshua Marsden free on
several sends that were too far
in front of him. The teams went
into halftime knotted at 0-0.
With head coach Phil Journey
See PRage B4



End of


the line


for 'Canes

Citrus falls at

Nature Coast in

regional semis
TONY CASTRO
Correspondent
BROOKSVILLE Both Dis-
trict 3A-6 champion Nature
Coast Technical and runner-up
Citrus were seeking to achieve
history during Saturday night's
Region II girls soccer semifinal
at Shark Tank Stadium.
The Hurricanes sought its
first regional final berth in their
ninth attempt since its inaugu-
ral season in 1995-96.
The visiting 'Canes were also
seeking redemption. Since
stuffing NCT on Dec. 9, 2011 at
Shark Tank, 4-0, CHS had
dropped the last four series: 1-
0, 2-1, 3-0 and 3-0.
For its part, the Brooksville
booters were attempting to be-
come the first Hernando County
program in 19 playoff seasons to
reach a regional final.
Unlike the last two matches
when NCT's suffocating de-
fense did not allow a shot on
goal, the 'Canes aimed five
against the rugged back line of
Shark defenders Victoria Wall,
Brianna Baugher, Rose With-
erell and keeper Samantha
Oliveira, but Citrus (12-9-1)
came up empty, losing 3-0.
With Mitchell eliminating
Land O'Lakes, 3-0, and NCT (18-
2-1) garnering its fifth straight
win, the Sharks will travel to
New Port Richey on Tuesday to
face the unbeaten Mustangs for
a berth in the 3A Final Four
On Saturday, NCT set the
tone early as senior defender
Ashley Chevalier gobbled up a
perfect through ball and con-
verted on a diagonal shot from
12 yards out for a 1-0 lead.
Chevalier's fourth goal on
Cummings' eighth assist seemed
to settle the Sharks down.
At 21:30, Citrus missed a
golden opportunity for the
equalizer on sophomore Jesse
Lammer's shot that missed the
near post.
With 6 1/2 minutes remaining
in the first half, NCT junior
Hailey Lalande was credited
with the first of two assists on
the night.
Senior striker Silvana
Paonessa padded the lead be-
hind her 32nd goal of the
season, 2-0.
See Page B4


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Blue team crowned flag football champions


Special to the Chronicle

The adult flag football
fall/winter season came to
an end Thursday night.
Brandon Buckingham and
his blue squad faced off for
the championship against
Darrell Patrick and his
pink squad.
The game started out
looking as if the blue team
would score unanswered,
but the pink team stuck
with it, staying right be-
hind them for the entire
game, until in the second
half, down only two points,
they just didn't have
enough time on the clock
to finish the job.
That left Brandon Buck-
ingham and the blue team
with their third champi-
onship trophy and brag-
ging rights.
This league is for adults
18 and older and is a very
fast-paced, physical game.


If you're up for the chal-
lenge, the new league will
start on or around March
14. We look forward to in-
creasing the number of
teams that we currently
have, to expand competi-
tion.
To register, or for more
information, call recre-
ation program specialist
Jess Sandino at 352-527-
7547.
Men's softball
With only four weeks until
the playoffs, men's softball is
going well. We encourage all
to come out and witness the
talent Citrus County's adult
leagues have to offer!
Games are played Mon-
days at Bicentennial Park in
Crystal River, with games at
6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m.
The tentative start-up date for
the next season of this sport
is March 11.
To register or for more in-


Special to the Chronicle
The blue team celebrates after winning its third
consecutive adult flag football championship Thursday.


formation, call Jess Sandino
at 352-527-7547.
Co-ed softball
The last regular season
game was played Thursday,
leaving Gary Altman ("Plain


White T's") and John Sanders
("Elite Roofing") in the first
and second seeds, both tied
at 6-2. Ricardo Valle and his
team ("Advanced Fitness") fell
just short into third place.
The championship game


will be played at 7 p.m. at Bi-
centennial Park in Crystal
River. The tentative start-up
date for co-ed softball is April
11, we are looking to expand
this league greatly, and if
you're up for a fun time, along
with competitive league play,
then register today.
For more information
call Jess Sandino at
352-527-7547.
Kickball
Have you ever thought of
joining the thrilling world of
kickball? Well, here's your
chance. Kickball is an exciting
game that can be played by
people ages 18 and older. It's
a great way to meet new peo-
ple and get a little exercise
while having fun. Game times
will be at 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
and 8:30 p.m. Games will last
one hour or nine innings,
whichever occurs first. Games
are held at Bicentennial Park


in Crystal River, with a tenta-
tive start-up date of March 13.
For more information please
call Jess Sandino at
352-527-7547.
Beach volleyball
Our first-ever beach volley-
ball season was extremely
successful. There were 10
teams of four, and we are re-
ally looking forward to having
even more next season,
which will start on or around
March 18.
Games are played on
Tuesday, and start at 6:30
p.m. at Bicentennial Park in
Crystal River. The team fees,
days and times will depend on
how many teams we have
sign up. You don't need to be
a star athlete to play: this
league is geared toward fam-
ily fun and exercise.
For more information,
contact Jess Sandino at
352-527-7547.


Title defensed


Azarenka beats Li,

repeats as Australian

Open champion

Associated Press

MELBOURNE, Australia Vic-
toria Azarenka had the bulk of the
crowd against her. The fireworks
were fizzling out, and when she
looked over the net she saw Li Na
crashing to the court and almost
knocking herself out
Considering the cascading criti-
cism she'd encountered after her
previous win, Azarenka didn't need
the focus of the Australian Open final
to be on another medical timeout
So after defending her title with
a 4-6, 6-4, 6-3 victory over the sixth-
seeded Li in one of the most un-
usual finals ever at Melbourne
Park, Azarenka understandably
dropped her racket and cried tears
of relief late Saturday night.
She heaved as she sobbed into a
towel beside the court, before re-
gaining her composure to collect
the trophy
"It isn't easy, that's for sure, but I
knew what I had to do," the 23-year-
old Belarusian said. "I had to stay
calm. I had to stay positive. I just
had to deal with the things that
came onto me."
There were a lot of those things
squeezed into the 2-hour, 40-minute
match. Li, who was playing her sec-
ond Australian Open final in three
years, twisted her ankle and tum-
bled to the court in the second and
third sets.
The second time was on the point
immediately after a 10-minute
delay for the Australia Day fire-
works a familiar fixture in down-
town Melbourne on Jan. 26, but not
usually coinciding with a final.
Li had been sitting in her chair
during the break, while Azarenka
jogged and swung her racket
around before leaving the court to
rub some liniment into her legs to
keep warm.
The 30-year-old Chinese player
had tumbled to the court after twist-
ing her left ankle and had it taped
after falling in the fifth game of the
second set. Immediately after the
fireworks ceased, and with smoke
still in the air, she twisted the ankle
again, fell and hit the back of her
head on the hard court.
The 2011 French Open champion
was treated immediately by a tour-
nament doctor and assessed for a
concussion in another medical
timeout before resuming the match.
"I think I was a little bit worried


Associated Press
Victoria Azarenka hits a backhand return to Li Na on Saturday during the
women's final of the Australian Open in Melbourne, Australia.


when I was falling," Li said, in her
humorous, self-deprecating fashion.
"Because two seconds I couldn't re-
ally see anything. It was totally black
"So when the physio come, she
was like, 'Focus on my finger.' I was
laughing. I was thinking, 'This is
tennis court, not like hospital."'
Li's injury was obvious and at-
tracted even more support for her
from the 15,000-strong crowd.
Azarenka had generated some bad
PR by taking a medical timeout after
wasting five match points on her own
serve in her semifinal win over
American teenager Sloane Stephens
on Thursday She came back after
the break and finished off Stephens
in the next game, later telling an on-
court interviewer she "almost did
the choke of the year."
She was accused of gamesman-
ship and manipulating the rules to
get time to regain her composure
against Stephens, but defended her-
self by saying she actually was hav-
ing difficulty breathing because of a
rib injury that needed to be fixed.
That explanation didn't convince


everybody So when she walked
onto Rod Laver Arena on Saturday,
there were some people who booed,
and others who heckled her or mim-
icked the distinctive hooting sound
she makes when she hits the ball.
"Unfortunately, you have to go
through some rough patches to
achieve great things," she said.
"That's what makes it so special for
me. I went through that, and I'm still
able to kiss that beautiful trophy"
She didn't hold a grudge.
"I was expecting way worse, to be
honest. What can you do? You just
have to go out there and try to play
tennis in the end of the day," she
said. "It's a tennis match, tennis bat-
tle, final of the Australian Open. I
was there to play that.
"The things what happened in
the past, I did the best thing I could
to explain, and it was left behind
me already"
The match contained plenty of
nervy moments and tension, and 16
service breaks nine for Li. But it
also produced plenty of winners
and bravery on big points.


Musical remembered at funeral


Associated Press

ST LOUIS Stan Mu-
sial was remembered dur-
ing a funeral and
memorial outside Busch
Stadium on Saturday as a
Hall of Famer and a
St. Louis icon embraced
by generations of fans who
never had the privilege of
watching him play
Broadcaster Bob
Costas, his voice cracking
with emotion at times,
pointed out during a two-
hour Mass that in 92 years
of life, Stan the Man never
let anyone down.
Costas noted even
though Musial, who died
Jan. 19, was a three-time
NL MVP and seven-time
batting champion, the
pride of Donora, Pa.,
lacked a singular achieve-
ment. Joe DiMaggio had a


Associated Press
New York Archbishop Timothy Dolan greets St. Louis
Cardinals manager Mike Matheny following the funeral
Mass for former Cardinals baseball player Stan Musial at
Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis on Saturday.


56-game hitting streak,
Ted Williams was the last
major leaguer to hit .400,
and Willie Mays and
Mickey Mantle soared to
stardom in the New York
spotlight. Musial didn't


quite reach the 500-
homer club he finished
with 475 and played in
his final World Series in
1946, "wouldn't you know
it, the year before they
started televising the Fall


Classic!"
"What was the hook
with Stan Musial other
than the distinctive stance
and the role of one of
baseball's best hitters?"
Costas said. "It seems that
all Stan had going for him
was more than two
decades of sustained ex-
cellence as a ballplayer
and more than nine
decades as a thoroughly
decent human being.
"Where is the single
person to truthfully say a
bad word about him?"
There was enough room
in the large Roman
Catholic church for a
handful of fans. One of
them wore a vintage, No. 6
Musial jersey Another
clapped softly as pallbear-
ers carried the casket from
the church to the hearse to
the tune of bagpipes.


Plantation to host
golf tourney
Get your foursome to-
gether for the inaugural "Tee
Off for Tourette's Golf Outing"
on Feb. 2.
Mingle with players from
the Bucs and Rays at the
fundraising event at Planta-
tion on Crystal River. The
event is $100 per person or
$400 for a foursome. The
price includes greens fee and
a cart, as well as lunch and
goody bag.
Proceeds benefit the
Florida Tourette Association.
Sponsorships are available.
Kickoff cocktail party Friday,
Feb. 1.
For more information, call
Gary at 352-601-8980.
Team Hope plans
golf tournament
Team Hope will host the
third annual Relay For Life Golf
Tournament to benefit the
American Cancer Society on
Saturday, Feb. 9, at Juliette
Falls Golf Course in Dunnellon.
Four person team scram-
ble is set to begin at 9 a.m.
The registration fee is $75 per
person, which includes lunch,
icy beverages and range
balls. Eagle Buick GMC will
offer a 2013 Buick Vernal for
a designated par three hole-
in-one, along with a chance
to win a Las Vegas vacation
and golf equipment.
There will be plenty of raffle
prizes and surprise guests.
Hole sponsorships are
available for: Silver, $100;
Bronze, $250; Gold, $500;
and Platinum, $1,000.
For more information or to
register, call Michele Snellings
at 352-697-2220, email
Michele.snellings@pgnmail.
com, or call Nick Maltese at
352-464-7511, or email
Nick.Maltese@pgnmail.com.
Blackshear outing
slated for Feb. 23
Dan Kern, chairman of the
Citrus County Builders Asso-
ciation's Jim Blackshear Me-
morial Golf Outing, recently
announced the annual golf
tournament will be Feb. 23 at
the Seven Rivers Golf and
Country Club. It will benefit
the Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County.
Proceeds from the golf
tournament will help fund
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County programs and facili-
ties at the three club sites.
Registration for the event
will begin at 7 a.m. and the
shotgun start is scheduled for
8 a.m. All teams must prereg-
ister. The $60 entry fee in-
cludes greens fee, cart, lunch,
door prizes and one free Mul-
ligan ticket. Signing up a team
for $220 saves $5 per person.
Eagle Buick and Harley-
Davidson, both of Crystal River,
are hole-in-one sponsors. Spon-
sorships for other components
are available by registering on-
line at www.CitrusBuilders.com,
or by calling the Citrus County
Builders Association at
352-746-9028 or the Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County
office at 352-621-9225.
Sugarmill women
plans tourney
The Women of Sugarmill
Woods will stage its 17th
annual School-astic Classic
Golf Tournament on Monday,
Feb. 25, at Sugarmill Woods
Country Club.
Entrance fee is $55. All net
proceeds go to scholarships


for Citrus County students.
Registration starts at
7:30 a.m., with shot gun start
at 9 a.m. Fee includes cart
fees, breakfast, snacks, lunch
and a Chinese auction.
For more information, call
352-586-8021.
Registration for
Basketball League
The Citrus County YMCA
will tip off its 2013 Winter
Youth Basketball League on
Monday, Jan. 28. The league
will play at Key Training Cen-
ter facility's gym.
On Monday, the Y will host
open registration for those
who have not had an opportu-
nity to preregister, along with
a skills assessment, followed
by a team placement. The
open registration event will be
at the Key Training Center fa-
cility outside Crystal River and
begins at 5:30 p.m.
The league will run for 10
weeks (two weeks of practice
and eight weeks of games)
and is open to children ages 3
through 12. The Junior League
will have ages 3 through 5,
and the Youth League will con-
sist of 6- through 12-year-olds
with several age brackets.
Practice will be once a week
on a weekday evening, with
games on Saturday. All prac-
tices and games will be at the
Key Training Center Chet Cole
Life Enrichment Center gym-
nasium.
Cost is $85 for ages 6 to 12,
and $65 for 3 to 5. Scholar-
ships are available through the
YMCA's Financial Assistance
program. To apply, call the of-
fice at 352-637-0132.
To register for the league,
visit the office at 3909 N.
Lecanto Highway or call
352-637-0132 for more details.
Park offers
tennis lessons
Whispering Pines Park of-
fers tennis lessons with Lind-
say Rodriquez. Preregistration
and pre-payment are required
at the park office.
Fee for lessons is $100 for
four hours, or $30 per hour.
Times are arranged with the
instructor.
Call 352-726-3913 for reg-
istration and information.
Whispering Pines also offers
racquetball lessons. Call for
information.
Learn to stretch
with Parks & Rec
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers a low-impact
stretching class. This ongoing
class will be from 10 to 11 a.m.
at Citrus Springs Community
Center. Cost is $5 per class.
The low-impact class is
easy, fun with good benefits.
Stretching helps to make you
more flexible and regular
stretching will help mobility
and balance. This helps to
slow down the onset of com-
mon degenerative conditions,
such as osteoarthritis. Stretch-
ing increases physical and
mental relaxation and reduces
the risk of joint sprain, muscle
strain or back problems. Low-
impact exercises can improve
health and fitness without
harming weight-bearing joints.
Research suggests moderate-
intensity, low-impact activity is
just as effective as high-im-
pact activity in lowering the
risk of heart disease.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com
and click on instructional
classes, or call 352-465-7007.


Recreation BRIEFS


B2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No. 8 Florida runs past Mississippi St.


Associated Press

STARKVILLE, Miss. Kenny
Boynton and Erik Murphy each
scored 18 points, Patric Young
and Scottie Wilbekin added 13
and No. 8 Florida cruised to an
82-47 victory over Mississippi
State on Saturday night.
The Gators (16-2, 6-0 South-
eastern Conference) have now
won eight straight and were
never challenged in this one,
bolting out to a 20-6 lead in less
than eight minutes and a 41-19
advantage by halftime.
Fred Thomas led Mississippi
State (7-11, 2-4) with 19 points.
Colin Borchert and Gavin Ware
both added 10. The Bulldogs
have lost four straight.
No. 1 Duke 84,
Maryland 64
DURHAM, N.C. Freshman
Rasheed Sulaimon scored a sea-
son-high 25 points and Duke
bounced back from one of its worst
losses under Mike Krzyzewski by
routing Maryland 84-64 on Saturday.
Mason Plumlee added 19 points
and Seth Curry had 13 for the Blue
Devils (17-2, 4-2 Atlantic Coast
Conference).
Dez Wells and Charles Mitchell
both had 13 points for the Terrapins
(15-5, 3-4), who have lost four of six.
Villanova 75,
No. 3 Syracuse 71
PHILADELPHIA- Ryan Arcidia-
cono hit the tying 3-pointer with 2.2
seconds left in regulation, and
James Bell hit consecutive 3s in
overtime to send Villanova to its sec-
ond win over a Top 5 team this week.
Darrun Hilliard scored 25 points
and Yarou had 14 points and 16 re-
bounds for the Wildcats.
Triche led the Orange with 23
points and Carter-Williams scored
17 as the Orange had an eight-
game winning streak snapped.
No. 3 Kansas 67,
Oklahoma 54
LAWRENCE, Kan. Ben
McLemore scored 18 points and
Jeff Withey added 13 points and
nine rebounds as Kansas extended
its nation-leading winning streak to
17 games.
Withey had four blocks and three
steals, and Travis Releford added
10 points for the Jayhawks (18-1,
6-0 Big 12).
Romero Osby and Amath M'Baye
scored 12 points each to lead the
Sooners (13-5, 4-2).
Georgetown 53,
No. 5 Louisville 51
WASHINGTON Otto Porter had
17 points and grabbed the game's
decisive rebound with 1.4 seconds to


Associated Press
Florida guard Michael Frazier II and Mississippi State guard Jalen Steele battle for the ball as Mississippi
State guard Fred Thomas, left, and Florida guard Scottie Wilbekin (5) stand by in the second half
Saturday in Starkville, Miss. No. 8 Florida won 8247.


play as Georgetown handed
Louisville its third straight loss.
Porter finished with 12 rebounds
for the Hoyas (14-4, 4-3 Big East).
Russ Smith, taken out of the start-
ing lineup, finished with 12 points,
while Luke Hancock and Gorgui
Dieng also had 12 for the Cardinals
(16-4, 4-3).
No. 6 Arizona 74,
USC 50
TUCSON, Ariz. Nick Johnson
scored 14 points and No. 6 Arizona
used a stifling defense to bounce
back from a home loss to rout USC
74-50.
The Wildcats (17-2, 5-2 Pac-12)
were dominant from the opening tip,
shooting out to leads of 18-4 and
29-7. They were up 39-20 at the half.
The Trojans (8-13, 3-5), who shot
28 percent, trailed by as many as 34
in the second half.
No. 9 Butler 83,
Temple 71
INDIANAPOLIS Rotnei Clarke
scored 24 points in his return from a
severely sprained neck and Khyle
Marshall added 19 points, leading
No. 9 Butler to an 83-71 victory over
Temple on Saturday.
The Bulldogs (17-3, 4-1 Atlantic


10) have won 14 of their last 15.
Temple (13-6, 2-3) was led by
Khalif Wyatt, who scored 16 of his
22 points in the first half.
Iowa State 73,
No. 11 Kansas State 67
AMES, Iowa- Will Clyburn had
24 points and 10 rebounds and Iowa
State handed Kansas State its sec-
ond straight loss.
Freshman Georges Niang added
15 points for the Cyclones (14-5, 4-2
Big 12).
Will Spradlin had 15 points and
Rodney McGruder scored 13 to lead
the Wildcats (15-4, 4-2).
Wisconsin 45,
No. 12 Minnesota 44
MADISON, Wis. Traevon
Jackson just beat the shot clock
and hit a 15-foot jumper from the
right side with 4 seconds left as
Wisconsin handed Minnesota its
fourth straight loss.
After Jackson's shot gave the
Badgers a 45-43 lead, the Golden
Gophers (15-5, 3-4 Big Ten) called a
timeout with 1.8 seconds remaining
and inbounded from halfcourt. The
Badgers' Mike Bruesewitz fouled
Trevor Mbakwe on the play, but the
big man was unable to shoot the en-


suing free throws because of an ap-
parent right hand or wrist injury.
Rodney Williams stepped to the
line and made the first free throw,
but missed the second and Sam
Dekker grabbed the rebound to seal
the win for Wisconsin (14-6, 5-2).
No. 14 Ohio State 65,
Penn State 51
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. Sam
Thompson scored 16 points on 6-of-
7 shooting for Ohio State.
DeShaun Thomas added 11
points, well below his Big Ten-leading
average of 20.5. Thompson picked
up the slack against the Nittany
Lions, who went 11-plus minutes of
the first half without a field goal.
Ohio State (15-4, 5-2 Big Ten)
gradually asserted control in the
second half, though scrappy Penn
State (8-12, 0-8) tried to hang
around with defense and got within
10 points with 2:41 remaining.
No. 16 Oregon 81,
Washington 76
EUGENE, Ore.- E.J. Singler
scored 18 points and No. 16 Oregon
stayed undefeated at home with a
81-76 win against Washington.
Arsalan Kazemi added 11 points
and 11 rebounds, and Carlos Emory


also scored 11 for the Ducks (18-2,
7-0 Pac-12).
Andrew Andrews scored 15, C.J.
Wilcox added 14 points and Abdul
Gaddy and Scott Suggs had 13
each for the Huskies (12-8, 4-3),
whose season-high 21 turnovers
contributed to their third straight loss
after opening conference play 4-0.
No. 18 N.C. State 91,
North Carolina 83
RALEIGH, N.C. Lorenzo
Brown had 20 points and 11 assists
to help No. 18 North Carolina State
beat North Carolina 91-83, ending a
13-game losing streak in the long
rivalry.
Freshman T.J. Warren added 19
points for the Wolfpack (16-4, 5-2
Atlantic Coast Conference), who
beat the Tar Heels for the first time
in nearly six years.
P.J. Hairston scored 19 points to
lead the Tar Heels (13-6, 3-3).
No. 22 Missouri 81,
Vanderbilt 59
COLUMBIA, Mo. Jabari Brown
scored 21 points, Alex Oriakhi tied a
career high with 18 and No. 22 Mis-
souri cruised to an 81-59 victory
over Vanderbilt.
Missouri (15-4, 4-2 Southeastern
Conference) led 49-20 at halftime
thanks to an early 32-2 run spanning
11:47.
Rod Odom matched a career high
with 17 points for Vanderbilt (8-10,
2-4).
No. 24 Notre Dame 73,
South Florida 65
TAMPA- Jerian Grant scored 18
points and Tom Knight had 17 for
Notre Dame.
Eric Atkins added 13 points and
Pat Connaughton contributed 12 for
Notre Dame (16-4, 4-3 Big East),
which had lost three of four. Notre
Dame forward Jack Cooley, who en-
tered averaging 14.8 points, finished
with six points and 14 rebounds.
Zach LeDay had 17 points and
Anthony Collins added 12 for South
Florida (10-9, 1-6).
UCF 74, SMU 65
ORLANDO Isaiah Sykes
posted a double-double and Calvin
Newell scored 17 points to lift Cen-
tral Florida over Southern Methodist
74-65 Saturday in a Conference
USA matchup.
Tristan Spurlock added 14 points,
and Sykes finished with 21 points
and 10 boards. Sykes, who hit 7 of 9
free throws, is shooting 88.4 percent
(23 of 26) from the free-throw line in
conference play after shooting 53.3
percent during nonconference play.
Ryan Manuel had 17 for SMU,
which has lost nine of its last 12 after
starting the season 8-1.


Sixers stop Knicks


Cavs beat Raptors

on late 3-pointer

Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA Jrue Holi-
day scored a career-high 35 points,
Nick Young had 20 and the
Philadelphia 76ers cruised to a 97-
80 victory over the New York
Knicks on Saturday night.
Evan Turner also added 20 points
for the Sixers, who led from the
start and beat the Knicks for the
first time in four tries and second in
eight games.
Carmelo Anthony needed 28
shots to get 25 points. He has 28
straight 20-point games, tied with
Patrick Ewing for second-longest
streak in franchise history Richie
Guerin did it 29 games in a row in
1961-62.
The Atlantic Division-leading
Knicks, who are second in the East-
ern Conference, have lost five of
eight.
Amare Stoudemire had 20 points
for New York. Jason Kidd, Iman
Shumpert and J.R. Smith combined
to go 0 for 17. Kidd had zero assists
in 15 minutes.
Cavaliers 99, Raptors 98
TORONTO Kyrie Irving made a 3-
pointer with 0.7 seconds left to lift
Cleveland to its third consecutive win.
Headed to his first All-Star game, Irv-
ing added to his credentials by calmly
draining a pull-up jumper from the top of
the arc to give him 32 points on the
night. Marreese Speights had 17 for the
Cavaliers, and Tristan Thompson
scored 14.
Toronto had five players score in dou-
ble figures. Amir Johnson had 18 points
and 12 rebounds, Alan Anderson scored
17 and Ed Davis finished with 16.
The Raptors had won seven of their
previous nine meetings with the Cavs.
Wizards 86, Bulls 73
WASHINGTON Emeka Okafor
had 15 points and 16 rebounds, helping


Associated Press
Philadelphia 76ers guard Evan Turner shoots as New York Knicks guard J.R.
Smith (8) and Chris Copeland (14) defend during the second half Saturday
in Philadelphia. The 76ers won 97-80.


the Wizards to another victory.
John Wall and Nene each scored 16
points for Washington, which has won
consecutive games for the second time
this season. The Wizards have won five
straight at home for the first time in five
years, and seven of 10 overall.
It's a marked improvement from the
start of the season, when Washington
(11-31) dropped 28 of its first 32 games.
Chicago had won a season-high
three in a row for the third time. Nate
Robinson scored 19 points for the Bulls,
and Joakim Noah narrowly missed a
triple-double with nine points, 17 re-
bounds and 10 assists, which equaled
his career high.
Rockets 119, Nets 106
HOUSTON James Harden scored
29 points, Chandler Parsons added 16
points and a career-high 11 assists and
the Houston Rockets beat Brooklyn
119-106 for their 12th consecutive win
over the Nets.
Omer Asik had 20 points and 16 re-
bounds for the Rockets, who outre-
bounded the Nets 50-31 and outscored
Brooklyn 60-24 in the paint.
Nets star Deron Williams scored 27
points, but cooled off after a 20-point first
quarter. He was ejected with 1:07 left


after arguing a call with referee David
Jones. Brook Lopez scored 21 points
and Joe Johnson added 13 for Brooklyn.
Jeremy Lin had 14 points, nine as-
sists and six turnovers for the Rockets.
Bobcats 102, T'wolves 101
CHARLOTTE, N.C. Gerald Hen-
derson hit a 3-pointer from 25 feet with
4.6 seconds left to lift the Charlotte Bob-
cats to a 102-101 win over the Min-
nesota Timberwolves, snapping a
16-game home losing streak.
The Bobcats streak was stopped two
short of the NBA record held by the
1993-94 Dallas Mavericks.
Kemba Walker led Charlotte with 25
points and Ramon Sessions finished
with 23 as the Bobcats won at home for
the first time since Nov. 21.
Luke Ridnour had 22 points, seven
rebounds and seven assists to lead
Minnesota, which has lost nine of 10.
Trailing by two, the Bobcats were
struggling to get a shot off before the
24-second shot clock expired. A scram-
ble ensued as the ball was knocked into
the backcourt late in the possession.
Walker retrieved the ball and passed
it ahead to Henderson on the left wing.
He pump-faked to avoid a leaping An-
drei Kirilenko and swished the 3-pointer.


Blackhawks turn


back Blue Jackets


Associated Press


19 over;
Thomr


COLUMBUS, Ohio saves fo
Jonathan Toews scored shutout.
the game-winner early in
the third period and Corey R
Crawford had 24 saves to Ma
help Chicago match the NEW
best start in franchise his- NEW
tory with a 3-2 victory Sat- man Ma
urday night over the tying go
Columbus Blue Jackets, riod and
running the Blackhawks' Gaborik
record to 5-0-0. rally Ne"
The only other time the The F
Blackhawks began a sea- ing drop
son 5-0-0 was 1971-72. four in tt
Patrick Kane had two season,
assists for the Blackhawks, third. BL
who have a 40-23-7 record even at
all-time against the Blue fired the
Jackets. Crawford, who deflecte
won for the fourth time The F
this season, was solid all manding
night but particularly through
when the Blackhawks 42-17 e
were a man down. 2-0 in th
Steve Mason held his
own with 21 saves for the
Blue Jackets, who lost F
their third in a row.
Sharks 4, SUNo
notchedI
Avalanche 0 trick and
SAN JOSE, Calif. second
Patrick Marleau became the the first
second player in NHL history season.
to open a season with four Kimmr
straight multigoal games, McGinn
striking twice on the power Ruslan I
play in the first period for San scored f
Jose. Bryzgal
Marleau has scored exactly Peter
two goals in each game this Panther
season, joining Ottawa's Cy mensen
Denneny in 1917-18 as the relief of
only players to open a cam- was pull
paign with four multigoal three gc
games, according to the Elias the first
Sports Bureau. have los
Joe Thornton added a winning
power-play goal in the second They ha
period, giving San Jose 10 18-2 in t
power-play goals in four The F
games and a franchise record straight


all.
nas Greiss made 24
br his first career

Rangers 6,
aple Leafs 2
YORK Defense-
irc Staal scored the
al early in the third pe-
then set up Marian
's game-winner late to
w York.
Rangers came in hav-
pped three of their first
he lockout-shortened
and trailed 2-1 in the
it Staal got New York
2 at 7:36 and then
e drive that Gaborik
d in with 7:03 left.
Rangers held a com-
g shots advantage
out and finished with a
dge, but they trailed
he first period.
Flyers 7,
Panthers 1
RISE Matt Read
his first career hat
d Philadelphia won its
straight after losing
three games of the

0o Timonen, Tye
, Luke Schenn, and
Fedotenko also
or the Flyers, and Ilya
ov had 30 saves.
Mueller scored for the
s and Scott Clem-
n stopped 13 shots in
Jose Theodore, who
led after allowing
als on nine shots in
period. The Panthers
it four straight after
their season opener.
ve been outscored
hat stretch.
lyers won their fourth
game at Florida.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 B3






B4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 26 15 .634 -
Brooklyn 26 18 .591 11 2
Boston 20 23 .465 7
Philadelphia 18 25 .419 9
Toronto 16 28 .364 11 Y2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 28 12 .700 -
Atlanta 25 18 .581 412
Orlando 14 28 .333 15
Washington 11 31 .262 18
Charlotte 11 32 .256 18Y2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 26 17 .605 -
Chicago 26 17 .605 -
Milwaukee 23 19 .548 2Y2
Detroit 16 27 .372 10
Cleveland 13 32 .289 14
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 36 11 .766 -
Memphis 28 14 .667 512
Houston 24 22 .522 111Y2
Dallas 18 25 .419 16
New Orleans 14 29 .326 20
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 34 10 .773 -
Denver 27 18 .600 712
Utah 23 20 .535 1012
Portland 21 21 .500 12
Minnesota 17 24 .415 15Y2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 32 12 .727 -
Golden State 26 17 .605 5Y2
L.A. Lakers 18 25 .419 13Y2
Sacramento 16 29 .356 16Y2
Phoenix 15 29 .341 17
Saturday's Games
Philadelphia 97, New York 80
Cleveland 99, Toronto 98
Washington 86, Chicago 73
Charlotte 102, Minnesota 101
Houston 119, Brooklyn 106
San Antonio 108, Phoenix 99
Milwaukee 109, Golden State 102
Denver 121, Sacramento 93
Indiana at Utah, late
L.A. Clippers at Portland, late
Today's Games
Miami at Boston, 1 p.m.
Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Memphis, 6 p.m.
Detroit at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Atlanta at New York, 6:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Dallas, 7:30 p.m.
Portland at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Memphis at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Golden State at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Sacramento atWashington, 7 p.m.
Orlando at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Indiana at Denver, 9 p.m.
Houston at Utah, 9 p.m.
Women's
Top 25 fared
Saturday
1. Baylor (18-1) beat No. 20 Oklahoma 82-65.
Next: at Texas Tech, Wednesday
2. Notre Dame (18-1) beat Providence 89-44.
Next: at No. 9 Tennessee, Monday.
3. UConn (18-1) beat Cincinnati 67-31. Next:
vs. Villanova, Tuesday.
4. Duke (17-1) did not play Next: vs. Boston
College, Sunday.
5. Kentucky (18-2) did not play. Next: vs. LSU,
Sunday.
6. Stanford (17-2) did not play. Next: vs. No.
20 Colorado, Sunday.
7. California (16-2) did not play. Next: vs.
Utah, Sunday.
8. Penn State (16-2) did not play. Next: at
Ohio State, Sunday.
9. Tennessee (16-3) did not play. Next: vs. No.
2 Notre Dame, Monday.
10. Maryland (16-3) did not play Next: at
Clemson, Sunday.
11. North Carolina (18-2) did not play. Next: at
Miami, Sunday.
12. Oklahoma State (15-3) beat Kansas 65-
52. Next: vs. West Virginia, Tuesday.
13. Louisville (16-4) did not play. Next: vs. St.
John's, Sunday.
14. Georgia (16-3) did not play. Next: vs.
Florida, Sunday.
15. Purdue (16-3) did not play. Next: at No. 25
Michigan State, Sunday.
16. Texas A&M (15-5) did not play Next: vs.
Missouri, Sunday.
17. Dayton (16-1) did not play. Next: vs.
UMass, Sunday.
18. South Carolina (17-3) did not play Next: at
Arkansas, Sunday.
19. UCLA (14-4) did not play. Next: vs. Ari-
zona State, Sunday.
20. Colorado (15-3) did not play Next: at No.
6 Stanford, Sunday.
20. Oklahoma (15-4) lost to No. 1 Baylor 82-
65. Next: vs. TCU, Wednesday.
22. Florida State (16-3) did not play. Next: vs.
Virginia Tech, Sunday.
23. Michigan (16-3) did not play. Next: vs.
Iowa, Sunday.
24. Iowa State (14-4) beat West Virginia 52-
49. Next: at Kansas, Wednesday.
25. Michigan State (16-3) did not play. Next:
vs. No.15 Purdue, Sunday.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For th, record Pruett off to strong start


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
.. CASH 3 (early)

CASH 3 (late)
0-7-2

-* : PLAY 4 (early)
0-8-3-5
PLAY 4 (late)
8-0-2-2

FANTASY 5
loridaLottery 6-7-9-17-24

POWERBALL LOTTERY
3 22 26 41 49 3-4-5-38-39-41
POWER BALL XTRA
18 5


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (CBS) Michigan State at Indiana
1 p.m. (CW) Virginia Tech at Clemson
3:30 p.m. (SUN) California at Colorado
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Texas Christian at Texas Tech
1 p.m. (SUN) Boston College at Duke
2 p.m. (MNT) Vanderbilt at Alabama
2 p.m. (ESPN2) North Carolina at Miami
3 p.m. (FSNFL) LSU at Kentucky
4 p.m. (ESPN2) Purdue at Michigan State
NBA
1 p.m. (ABC) Miami Heat at Boston Celtics
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Oklahoma City Thunder at Los Angeles
Lakers
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Detroit Pistons at Orlando Magic
6:30 p.m. (ESPN) Atlanta Hawks at New York Knicks
BOWLING
12 p.m. (ESPN) PBATour League Qualifier
FOOTBALL
7 p.m. (NBC) 2013 Pro Bowl
GOLF
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Farmers Insurance Open, Final
Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGATour: Farmers Insurance Open, Final
Round
WOMEN'S COLLEGE GYMNASTICS
9:30 a.m. (SUN) Missouri at Florida (Taped)
6 p.m. (ESPN2) LSU at Alabama (Taped)
HOCKEY
6 p.m. (NBCSPT) Minnesota Wild at St. Louis Blues
6 p.m. (SUN) Philadelphia Flyers at Tampa Bay Lightning
MOTORCYCLE RACING
12 p.m. (CBS) Monster Energy AMA Supercross World
Championship (Taped)
FIGURE SKATING
3 p.m. (NBC) U.S. Championships: Men's Free Skate
WINTER SPORTS
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) FIS Freestyle Skiing World Cup: Aerials
(Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


NHI
EAS


New Jersey
N.Y. Islander
N.Y. Rangers
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh

Boston
Ottawa
Buffalo
Montreal
Toronto

Tampa Bay
Winnipeg
Carolina
Florida
Washington


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
Chicago 5 5 0 0 10 20
St. Louis 5 4 1 0 8 19
Detroit 4 2 2 0 4 10
Nashville 4 1 1 2 4 8
Columbus 5 1 3 1 3 9
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
Vancouver 4 2 1 1 5 13


L standings
TERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
3 3 0 0 6 8
4 2 2 0 4 14
5 2 3 0 4 14


5 2 3 0 4 12
4 2 2 0 4 13
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
4 3 0 1 7 12
4 3 1 0 6 15
4 2 2 0 4 11
3 2 1 0 4 9
5 2 3 0 4 14
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
4 3 1 0 6 19
4 2 1 1 5 10
4 2 2 0 4 11
5 1 4 0 2 8
4 0 3 1 1 8


Colorado 4 2 2 0 4 9 9
Edmonton 3 2 1 0 4 8 9
Minnesota 4 2 2 0 4 9 10
Calgary 3 0 2 1 1 7 12
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 4 4 0 0 8 19 7
Dallas 5 2 2 1 5 11 12
Anaheim 3 2 1 0 4 12 12
LosAngeles 4 1 2 1 3 8 12
Phoenix 5 1 4 0 2 17 20
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Saturday's Games
San Jose 4, Colorado 0
N.Y. Rangers 5, Toronto 2
Chicago 3, Columbus 2
Philadelphia 7, Florida 1
St. Louis 4, Dallas 3
Los Angeles 4, Phoenix 2
Edmonton at Calgary, late
Nashville at Anaheim, late
Today's Games
Buffalo at Washington, 3 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Ottawa, 5 p.m.
New Jersey at Montreal, 6 p.m.
Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 6 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago, 7p.m.
Minnesota at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at San Jose, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Boston at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Colorado at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.


in Rolex 24 at Daytona


Associated Press whose Micd
Racing tea
DAYTONA BEACH event last y
Scott Pruett's chase for behind in th
the Rolex record got off after break
to a strong start Saturday front tie rod
Pruett and his Chip 60 Ford Ril
Ganassi Racing team- affected st
mates were leading or suspension,
near the front of the car seven la
field during the early Allmendir
stages of the Rolex 24 at pended by 1N
Daytona. season for f
Pruett started the gru- dom drug tE
eling endurance race on home hours
the pole and was the July race at
fastest in the 57-car was hoping
field. It was the perfect umphant r
way for Pruett to begin defending hi
his pursuit of Hurley Instead, A
Haywood's record of five and team
Rolex victories. Negri, Jus
"I don't know it we John Pew
have enough for Ambrose co
Ganassi," fellow driver tough time
Jordan Taylor admitted. Then agaii
Pruett, a five-time se- can and often
ries champion, maneu- pen in the tv
vered the No. 01 BMW the-clock te
Riley around the 3.56- off the racin
mile road course without "Luckily,
any problems some- in the 1
thing few drivers could mendinger
say in the early going. happened i
AJ Allmendinger, ing, I'd hav



LINE
Continued from Page B1

That's the way it remained until La-
lande's second assist-her ninth of the
season led to Baugher's fifth goal of
the year to close the scoring, 3-0.
First-year CHS skipper Ian Feldt
didn't hide his praise for the victors.
"They're (NCT) extremely fast They
don't have two to three girls; they have
seven to eight girls," Feldt said. "We've
got some people who can run, but that's
a great team. And great teams find a
way to expose your weaknesses."
According to Feldt, there was no
shame in losing to NCT for a fifth
straight time including all three
meetings this winter
"We had a great run. Four months
ago I don't think anyone would have
thought we'd be in this position
tonight," Feldt said. "This (regional



CITRUS
Continued from Page B1

urging his players to calm down and
do what they've done all season, his
team quickly responded. On a Tyler
Beagan throw-in with 33:33 left in the
game, midfielder Ryan Dolan kicked
in a rebound from an Austin Wilcoxin
rocket from just outside the penalty
box that deflected off the crossbar.
Citrus then withstood three Yellow
Jackets corner kicks within two min-
utes and, after a mandated water
break, scored two goals late to put
Leesburg away. Hetland made the



STONEWALLED
Continued from Page B1

"They're a great team, a great pass-
ing team," Lattin said of Fleming Is-
land. "In the first half, maybe it was a
little nerves, but quite frankly, three
errors did us in.
"We didn't release the ball fast
enough and they jumped on it In the
first half, we weren't really playing like
ourselves. We needed to make quick
passes and release the ball faster"
Another Fleming Island pass into
the box in front of Houpt was sent into
the keeper by Saffer with 7:45 left in
the half, but Houpt couldn't grab it


hael Shank
m won the
ear, fell way
he first hour
king a left-
I on the No.
ey The part
eering and
and left the
ps back.
iger was sus-
TASCAR last
ailing a ran-
est and sent
s before the
Daytona. He
to make a tri-
eturn while
is Rolex title.
llmendinger
mates Ozz
tin Wilson,
and Marcos
)uld have a
catching up.
n, anything
en does hap-
wice-around-
st that kicks
ig season.
it happened
kink," All-
said. "If it'd
n the bank-
e killed my-


semifinal berth) is more than any of us
asked for
"I don't have any regrets," Feldt con-
tinued. "Our district win over Eustis
was one of the best games this program
has ever played. The kids are disap-
pointed now, and they should be be-
cause they're competitors. But when
they settle down they'll realize how
good a season they really put together"
"Our game plan all along was to
score early," noted Sharks fourth-year
coach Lisa Masserio. "We realized that
at this point in the season if you don't
win, you go home.
"We talked (prior to the game) on the
importance of the matches' first 10
minutes, especially on playing well at
midfield and not allowing any mistakes
for them (CHS) to seize the momen-
tum," she said. "What I liked most was
we made sure the tempo favored us. It
was a great win. Credit belongs to the
pressured applied at midfield it was
relentless."


score 2-0 off a through pass with 12:07
remaining.
Killeen added the final goal after
Wilcoxin threw the ball into play and
Killeen wound up from about 30 yards
out, hooking the ball into the upper
left frame past keeper Austin Mc-
Daniel, who finished with nine saves.
As the final whistle blew, Hurricane
players mobbed each other at center
pitch, before gathering for a team
photo at their bench. Journey was all
smiles as he took in the moment, say-
ing he was so happy for the team after
it came so close last season.
"I knew they could do it," he added.
"I'm glad they found the belief in
themselves."


and the ball dribbled through her and
over the goal line to make it 3-0.
Fleming Island's three goals were
more than the number of shots
Lecanto had on goal in the first half.
That scenario was altered a bit in the
second half, with the Panthers playing
with more confidence defensively and
getting several chances offensively.
None, however, found the back of the
net behind Golden Eagles keeper
Katie Nimitz.
"We're extremely proud of our
team," Lattin said of the Panthers.
"They've been great, and great for the
program. We have just one senior and
we've won two straight district titles,
and this year we went further than we
did last year."


self. It was big. So once I
got in the grass, I just
tried to get it whoa'ed
down, but still not dig
the nose in the grass. At
least it's early"
The team can gain a
lap back with every cau-
tion, but those have been
few and far between
through the first five
hours.
"There's no hanging
back there," said Negri,
racing with a broken
right foot. "We need to
be pedal to the metal,
and we need cautions."
Allmendinger wasn't
the only driver who ran
into trouble early, either.
Fellow Daytona Proto-
type drivers Stephane
Sarrazin, Ian James and
Bruno Junqueira fell
laps behind. Sarrazin
had a transmission
problem. James had a
gearbox failure. Jun-
queira spun off the
track. Emmanuel Anas-
sis also had issues.
So, five of the 17 cars
in the DP class were
seemingly out of it.


Pirates wrestlers win The Villages Duals


KEITH CHARTRAND
Correspondent

THE VILLAGES Crystal
River heavyweight wrestler
Brandon Martin hoisted team-
mate Dylan Ayala on his shoul-
ders. Both had smiles a mile
wide.
No, it wasn't some new tag-team
wrestling maneuver coach Craig
Frederick wanted to incorporate
during The Villages Duals Meet
on Saturday It was to celebrate
Crystal River's first-place team
finish as well as the three individ-
ual titles won by Pirate wrestlers
during the eight-team tournament
at The Villages High School.
Ayala held the nearly three-
foot tall first-place trophy high up
in the air as cell phone cameras
clicked to capture the moment
The win for Crystal River was
very up in the air, too, until the Pi-
rates' very last match against the
host school.
The stage was set for Crystal
River and The Villages to battle
for the championship after both


teams lit up the scoreboard dur-
ing their first three wins. The Pi-
rates beat Belleview 43-28,
overwhelmed Lake Weir 66-6 and
defeated Lecanto 55-18.
"We started to get a little more
aggressive and it showed,"
Fredrick said after his squad's
first three wins. "Look at our
scores. I would have never
thought (we'd score like that)
coming in."
Fredrick had a reason to be
concerned though entering the
match against the Buffalo. Jose
Aday, his 138-pounder, broke his
nose against Lecanto and was
questionable. Fredrick was afraid
he'd be losing six critical points.
Meanwhile, the host Buffalo
got past Dunnellon 48-21, took
care of Trinity Catholic 60-24 and
knocked off Clearwater Central
Catholic 45-21.
Crystal River got itself into an
early hole in the title bout. The
Pirates trailed The Villages by 17
points, 23-6, after the first five
matches. Justin Burcroff (145
pounds), Robert Brooker (160


pounds) and Andrew Bilby (182
pounds) were pinned while
Eddie Bennis (170 pounds) lost by
a technical pin. Five points for
the technical pin instead of six for
a regular pin would be crucial
later in the match. Ayala (152
pounds) pinned Colin Wheeler
for Lecanto's six points.
It was the Pirates' big boys that
got Crystal River back in the
match. Three consecutive pins by
Carlos Sanabria (195 pounds), Gio
Valardes (220 pounds) and Martin
(285 pounds), all in the first pe-
riod, turned a Pirates' 17-point
deficit into a 1-point Lecanto
lead, 24-23. The Buffalo had a five
point lead, 35-30, after Crystal
River forfeited the 106 pound
weight class, Tristan Corbett (113
pounds) lost by pin and The Vil-
lages forfeited the 120 pound
weight class.
But in the blink of an eye, the
Pirate duo of Kris Caraballo (126
pound) and Nick Hooper (132
pound) silenced the home crowd
with their lightning quick work.
Caraballo and Nick Hooper


pinned their Buffalo opponents
34 and 37 seconds into their
matches, respectively Now with
a 42-35 lead, Aday forfeited his
match but the Pirates still had
enough to win 42-41.
"We knew it was going close.
We knew we were going to be
with The Villages in the end,"
Ayala said. "Coach motivated us
by saying, 'Last year was second
place; this year it is going to be
first place."
Both Carabello and Hooper
went undefeated in their four
matches with Carabello winning
the 126-pound weight class and
Hooper coming in second in the
132. Their wins against The Vil-
lages were obviously the most im-
portant, though.
"I knew my pin swung the en-
tire match," Carabello said.
"Coach told us to be aggressive. I
went into that match that way I
got my double leg and cradle and
it was over"
Ayala and Michael Allen joined
Carabello as individual winners.
Ayala won the 152 pound weight


class with four wins, two by way
of pin, one by forfeit, one by
points. For Allen it was his first
ever individual title. He won
three of his matches by pin and
one by forfeit Along with Hopper,
Robert Brooker (160 pounds) and
Eddie Bennis (170 pounds) were
also second place finishers for
Crystal River
Lecanto placed seventh in the
team standings. In addition to
their 55-18 loss to Crystal River,
the Panthers lost to Lake Weir 46-
24 and Belleview 58-24. Their
lone win was over Trinity
Catholic, 48-24.
Jonah Nightengale was im-
pressive for Lecanto. The 195-
pounder was undefeated in his
four matches, winning all by pin
to claim his weight class. The
Panthers' Derrick Snyder won
the 113-pound weight class.
Rounding out the team stand-
ings: Belleview finished third,
Clearwater Central Catholic
fourth, Lake Weir fifth, Dunnel-
lon sixth and Trinity Catholic
eighth.


SCOREBOARD


I


rs
3s





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Manuel shines in game

d w -... ..


PGA event



delayed by fog


I.*

**s


Associated Press
South squad quarterback EJ Manuel of Florida State looks for a receiver Saturday as North Squad defensive back TJ
McDonald of USC (7) covers South Squad tight end Mychal Rivera of Tennessee (81) in the first half of the Senior
Bowl at Ladd-Peebles Stadium in Mobile, Ala.


Associated Press
MOBILE, Ala. -Florida
State's EJ Manuel passed
for a touchdown and
rushed for another on the
South's first two drives in
a 21-16 victory over the
North in the Senior Bowl
on Saturday
Manuel and running
backs Stepfan Taylor and
Mike James combined to
put the game for senior
NFL prospects away on
the South's final drive.
Stanford's Taylor carried
five times for 32 yards and
caught a 6-yard pass from
Manuel.
Manuel converted a
fourth-and-1 play on a
sneak to set up a 5-yard
touchdown run for Miami's
James with 2:41 left.
Manuel was named the
game's Most Outstanding
Player Brigham Young de-
fensive end Ezekiel Ansah


received the honors for the
South team while Purdue
defensive lineman
Kawann Short was the
North's top player
Manuel completed 7 of
10 passes for 76 yards with
a 20-yard touchdown pass
to Alabama tight end
Michael Williams. He also
scored on a 2-yard run.
He finished his Florida
State career with his best
season despite his mother
Jackie's battle with breast
cancer. He said she will
undergo surgery on Feb. 1.
Miami, Ohio quarterback
Zac Dysert answered with
a scoring drive that ended
with his 3-yard touchdown
pass to Oregon running
back Kenjon Barner with
23 seconds left. The two-
point conversion and on-
side kick both failed.
Ansah is a native of
Ghana who initially was on
the track team and now is


a potential first-round
pick. He had seven tackles,
3.5 behind the line, 1.5
sacks and a forced fumble.
Short had three tackles,
one for a loss.
Taylor finished with
nine carries for 53 yards
for the South.
Barner led all receivers
with seven catches for 59
yards and gained 13 yards
on three carries.
It was an up and down
day for most of the
quarterbacks.
Arkansas' Tyler Wilson
completed 8 of 11 passes
for 40 yards for the South.
Landry Jones, a four-year
starter for Oklahoma, was
3-of-9 passing for 16 yards
and was sacked twice.
For the North, Dysert
was 10 of 16 for 93 yards
and was intercepted once
and sacked twice. North
Carolina State's Mike
Glennon completed half


his 16 attempts for 82
yards, and Syracuse's
Ryan Nassib was 4 of 10 for
44 yards and threw an
interception.
Southeastern Louisiana
defensive back Robert Al-
ford set up Manuel's 2-
yard run with an 88-yard
return of the opening kick.
Then Manuel lofted an
over-the-shoulder pass to
Williams in the end zone.
Williams converted an-
other third-down play with
a 19-yard catch on the drive.
Glennon and the North
offense finally got things
going to open the second
half.
He completed all three
of his pass attempts for 34
yards and then UCLA's
Johnathan Franklin, a fi-
nalist for the Doak Walker
Award, closed the drive
with a 12-yard run and a
20-yard touchdown on
consecutive plays.


Associated Press

SAN DIEGO Tiger
Woods is going to have to
wait to pursue another
win at Torrey Pines.
A thick fog shrouded
the course along the Pa-
cific bluffs on Saturday
and essentially wiped out
the entire day at the
Farmers Insurance Open.
Woods, a six-time winner
of this tournament, had a
two-shot lead and never
even bothered coming to
the golf course. Three
players completed one
hole and that was after
a three-hour delay
Players were to resume
the third round Sunday
morning and go as long as
daylight allowed, and
then finish Monday
And that's a best-case
scenario.
In a bizarre twist, tour
officials were hopeful of
rain and a little wind
Sunday morning, two ele-
ments that most golfers
dread. That's what is
needed, however, to keep
the fog away from Torrey
Pines and allow the tour-
nament to resume.
"When Mother Nature
doesn't want you to play,
you can't play," said Mark
Russell, the tour vice
president of competition.
They did just about


everything else.
Lucas Glover warmed
up three times, at one
point passed the time with
a little trickery He lined
up two balls in the direc-
tion of the range, and hit
them with a wedge so that
one ball went straight in
the air, and Jerry Kelly
took a baseball swing with
an inverted club and
made contact
Through four tourna-
ments this year, the PGA
Tour already had had its
share of weather prob-
lems. This will be the sec-
ond tournament that
doesn't finish on the
scheduled day The Tour-
nament of Champions at
Kapalua didn't even start
until Monday, the day it
was supposed to end, be-
cause of 40 mph gusts. It
had to be reduced to 54
holes and was completed
Tuesday
Woods was at 11-under
133 and didn't need to
come to the course with
all the delays because he
was in the last group with
Billy Horschel and Casey
Wittenberg. Horschel
spent part of his day get-
ting advice through text
messages on how to play
with Woods.
He'll get to see plenty
of Woods over the next
two days.


Associated Press
Charles Howell III waits out a fog delay at Torrey Pines
golf course Saturday, which prevented the start of the
third round of the Farmers Insurance Open in San Diego.


Pro Bowl players loose _gal


in final walkthrough &I*yJmI N.


AFC takes on

NFC today

in Hawaii

Associated Press
HONOLULU Adrian
Peterson signed and
tossed miniature footballs
into the Aloha Stadium
stands, then chatted up
Hall of Famers Eric Dick-
erson and Marcus Allen.
Arian Foster played Pey-
ton Manning's bodyguard
for stadium cameras and
told fans he recently
walked on hot lava.
The Pro Bowl players
practiced a little, too, on a
sunny Saturday in Hon-
olulu one day before an
all-star game that will
likely be used to deter-
mine its own future.
But the game's main
purpose is fun, said several
players including Min-
nesota tight end Kyle
Rudolph and Kansas City
running back Jamaal
Charles.
"I feel like there's no re-
sponsibility, it's just all
about fun," Charles said.
"You work
hard during Pro
the year- it's
not like a AFC vs
competitive
game." 0 Time: 7 |
Competi- m TV: NBC
tion or at
least the ap-
pearance of it
- is exactly what the NFL
is looking for from its stars
on Sunday as it uses the
game as a measurement of
whether it's worth putting
on in future years. Com-
missioner Roger Goodell
has said the game will stop
if play doesn't improve,
drawing mixed reactions
from top players all over
the league.
Chicago cornerback
Charles Tillman said he
doesn't want this year's
Pro Bowl players to be
known as the group who
led to the game's cancella-


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Associated Press
Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning throws a
pass Friday during AFC team practice at the Ihilani Resort
in Kapolei, Hawaii.


tion, taking away an honor
and privilege for future
players.
"I don't want this to hap-
pen on my watch," he said.
Rudolph said the play-
ers' natural competitive-
ness will help
Bowl make the
game enter-
s. NFC training.
p.m. today. "It's a game
we want to
win, so it'll be
fun," Rudolph
said.
The game should see
plenty of scoring, thanks to
limits on blitzing and de-
fensive schemes. Book-
makers in Las Vegas expect
a combined 81 1/2 points
scored, with the AFC squad
slightly favored. The NFC
and AFC have won five Pro
Bowls each in the last 10
meetings.
Houston tight end Owen
Daniels said fans won't see
many big hits.
"You're not going to see
people play dirty or giving
it up like a playoff game,
but that's just the way it


is," Daniels said. "I think
you've got to accept that
and know that we love
being out here and I think
you've got to know that the
people here love having us
out here."
Daniels said he's been
motivated to return to the
Pro Bowl after making his
first all-star team in 2009.
He said he sees the Pro
Bowl as a good consolation
for players who would
rather be in the Super
Bowl.
Peterson said moments
like his chat with two NFL
greats are what make the
trip worthwhile for him.
"It's the best part," he
said. "It's a bonus, man."
Charles said he's en-
joyed watching the leader-
ship of other Pro Bowl
players as he's been taking
on a bigger leadership role
with the Chiefs.
"I'm just trying to keep
grinding and working
hard," he said. "Trying to
be where I'm at right now
- trying to get back here
next year"


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SPORTS


SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 B5


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ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Newton-John opens
wellness center
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -
Music icon Olivia Newton-
John has helped open a new
Arizona well-
ness center
KSAZ-TV
reported the
"Grease" and
"Xanadu" star
visited Scotts-
dale on Friday
to launch the
Olivia grand opening
Newton-John of the Trivita
Wellness Center
Newton-John, a breast can-
cer survivor, and her hus-
band, John Easterling,
teamed up with Trivita to
open the center aimed at al-
ternative health therapy.
Olivia said she wanted to
help people who are already
healthy find even more health.
The new center will have li-
censed professionals, audio
and visual therapy and inspi-
ration, health coaches and a
fitness studio.
The English-born Aus-
tralian singer's hits include
"Magic," "Suddenly" and
"You're The One That I
Want," a duet with actor John
Travolta from the 1978 movie
"Grease."

Kutcher takes on
tech idol Steve Jobs
PARK CITY, Utah -Ash-
ton Kutcher said playing
Steve Jobs on screen "was
honestly one
of the most
terrifying
things I've
ever tried to
do in my life."
The 34-
year-old actor
was in Park
Ashton City, Utah, to
Kutcher premiere the
biopic "jOBS,"
which was the closing-night
film at the Sundance Film
Festival.
The film tells the story of
the Apple founder, whom
Kutcher considers a personal
hero.
Kutcher played Jobs from
Apple's origins in the 1970s
until the launch of the first
iPod in 2001. The actor said
he admired Jobs for his singu-
lar focus and compassion for
the consumer
The film also shows Jobs'
less appealing side, withhold-
ing stock options from some
of the company's original
employees.

Timberlake to sing at
pre-Super Bowl party
NEW ORLEANS -Justin
Timberlake will appear in his
first concert in more than
four years the
night before
the Super
Bowl.
Timberlake
has signed on
to perform
during
DIRECTV
Justin Super
Timberlake Saturday
Night," on
Feb. 2 in New Orleans.
The singer recently re-
leased a new single, "Suit and
Tie," featuring Jay-Z, and will
release new album "The 20/20
Experience" later this year
The invitation-only concert
also features Ahmir "Quest-
love" Thompson of The Roots
as DJ and will benefit the
Shriners Hospitals for Chil-
dren. It is co-hosted by Mark
Cuban's AXS-TV
The show will be after
DIRECTV's "Celebrity Beach
Bowl," which features a per-
formance by Pitbull.
-From wire reports


Birthday Personal ambitions and several work-re-
lated hopes have excellent chances of being fulfilled
in the year ahead. This will come about due to not
only your ingenuity, but to your boldness in
experimenting with new ideas as well.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) One-on-one relation-
ships could be problematic if they aren't handled skill-
fully. For the sake of harmony, be prepared to make a
compromise or concession.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) When you're able to
use your initiative, things will run quite smoothly. Con-
versely, you might rebel if demands are placed on you.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Should you decide to
get involved with a friend in something that has com-
mercial overtones, it would be smart to keep the
arrangement on a businesslike basis.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Most of your day is likely


'Dallas' draw


Associated Press
The late Actor Larry Hagman poses in front of the Southfork Ranch mansion made famous in the
television show, "Dallas," in Parker, Texas. Tourists have flocked to Southfork Ranch since the
early years of the classic series, which ran from 1978 to 1991. The recent death of the show's
star, Larry Hagman, who legendarily played conniving Texas oilman J.R. Ewing, has also spurred
fans to visit.


Southfork Ranch lures fans old and new to Texas


Associated Press

PARKER, Texas The
white two-story home with
stately pillars overlooking a
green Texas pasture where
longhorns roam is instantly
recognizable: This is the
power seat of television's
famous Ewing family
Tourists from around the
world have been flocking to
Southfork Ranch since the
early years of the classic series
"Dallas," which ran from 1978
to 1991, and the ranch is only
getting more popular. With the
premiere last June of a new
"Dallas" series, the number of
visitors at Southfork has dou-
bled from 150,000 annually to
more than 300,000, according
to Jim Gomes, general man-
ager of the Southfork Ranch &
Hotel and vice president of
Forever Resorts, which owns
the property.
"We are obviously thrilled
the new fans love Southfork
as much as the original fans of
'Dallas,"' said Gomes.
The new show starts its sec-
ond season Monday on the
TNT cable channel. The re-
cent death of Larry Hagman,
who starred as conniving
Texas oilman J.R. Ewing in
both the original series and
the new show, has also
spurred fans to visit.
The 340-acre ranch is about
25 miles northeast of down-
town Dallas in the suburb of
Parker Patrick Duffy, who has
returned to the role of J.R.'s
brother Bobby, said the
biggest changes since he first
filmed on the ranch are new
tourist-related buildings and
event facilities for weddings
and meetings, along with the
buildup of the surrounding
town, including housing addi-
tions and a high school.
But any time he's back at
Southfork, it doesn't take long
for the magic to take over
"You drive down that road
and you look across this pas-
ture and there's the front of
Southfork and it looks like the
opening credits of the show
and I know why people love it
so much," Duffy said.
Duffy remembers a time
when fans watching them film
consisted of small groups of
20 to 30 people. Those crowds
grew to the hundreds as the
"Who Shot J.R.?" mania built
in 1980 when a cliffhanger left
fans in suspense. The answer
came on Nov 21, 1980, when
the shooter was revealed to


This photo shows the backyard pool of the mansion at
Southfork.


be Kristin J.R.'s vengeful
mistress, who was also his
sister-in-law in an episode
that was seen by more people
than any TV program in his-
tory until that time.
When the series first began
filming at Southfork, the fam-
ily that built the house in 1970
still lived there. And while
they hosted tourists as the
show's popularity grew, it did
not become an official tourist
attraction and event location
until 1985 after they sold it.
Forever Resorts bought
Southfork in 1992.
Most of the shooting for the
original series was done in
Los Angeles, though some of it
was filmed in Texas, but the
new show is being filmed in
the Dallas area with loca-
tions ranging from the flag-
ship Neiman Marcus
downtown to the gleaming
Cowboys Stadium.
Cynthia Cidre, executive
producer of the reboot, said
she knew when she started
developing the new series
that Southfork would again be
an integral part of the plot.
The struggle over owner-
ship of the ranch became the
central plot point in the first
season of the new series, with
J.R. telling his son, John Ross:
"Southfork isn't just a piece of
dirt. It's as much a part of me
as my blood and my bones and
I'd pay a hell of a price for it."
Visitors start their tour in a
museum featuring everything
from the gun that "shot" J.R.
to scripts from the original se-
ries to the wedding dress of
Lucy, the niece of J.R. and
Bobby, who was played by
Charlene Tilton. For those
puzzled about the compli-
cated relations of the Ewing
family, there's a family tree to
peruse.
As tour guides take visitors
through the barns and


Today's HOROSCOPE
to be filled with a number of pleasant experiences, but
as nighttime rolls around and people become tired,
tempers will fray.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) There's a chance you
know someone with a very generous nature but a de-
manding attitude. When socializing with this person,
your patience might be tested.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) It behooves you to move
cautiously in matters that pertain to your investments,
especially regarding joint ventures. Take care not to get
involved in something that is all sizzle but no steak.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) If you're smart, you'll go
along with the line of least resistance. You might have
to be mentally alert in order to avoid opposition.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -A failure on your part to
keep pace with your duties could lead to a number of
avoidable complications. Each additional task you


pastures on their way to the
house, they point out where
scenes from both the old and
new series were filmed -
from the cottage where Elena
Ramos, played by Jordana
Brewster, lives, to the spot
from the original series
where the funeral was held
for Bobby, who was later fa-
mously revealed to still be
alive. The story of his death
turned out to be part of a
prolonged dream sequence.
Around the house, the pool
and patio have provided spots
for countless shots. And while
interior scenes for the home
on the series were never shot
inside the 5,900-square-foot,
four-bedroom house, visitors
can still walk through and
take in the rooms decorated
in homage to the Ewings, with
rooms reflecting the tastes of
different characters.
Sally Peavy, tourism sales
manager at Southfork, said
scenes from reunion shows
have been filmed in the house
and that a scene in the second
season of the new show was
also filmed in one room,
though details of the scene
have not been revealed.
There's also a restaurant
and two gift shops on the
grounds. One sells items in-
cluding hats and belts and has
as its centerpiece family pa-
triarch Jock Ewing's silver
Lincoln Continental, which
features "trunk sales."
Josh Henderson, who plays
John Ross, was born in Dallas
and spent much of his child-
hood here. Henderson said
that when he got the part of
J.R.'s son, his mother in-
formed him that he'd already
been to Southfork once, at
age 3.
"I don't remember it but my
mother definitely made sure I
had that information," said
Henderson.


neglect will add to the pressure.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) It's in your best interest to
avoid all political involvements with friends. What tran-
spires at first might be interesting, but conditions could
turn sour quickly.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -An extremely important
objective might not be as equally meaningful to most
of your friends. However, what is interesting to them
could quickly become dominant.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Sources of informa-
tion will be of extreme importance to those with whom
you have dealings. If you're not the author of a vital
tidbit, be sure to credit the person who is.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Unless you manage
your financial arrangements with skill, you are likely to
come out on the short end. Don't hesitate to speak up
if you think you're getting a bum deal.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 25
Mega Money: 17 23 33 35
Mega Ball: 2
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $800,000
4-of-4 6 $1,253
3-of-4 MB 34 $484.50
3-of-4 1,173 $41.50
2-of-4 MB 1,160 $29.50
1-of-4 MB 10,157 $3
2-of-4 29,546 $2
Fantasy 5: 8 9 30 35 36
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 323 $555
3-of-5 8,529 $22.50
THURSDAY, JANUARY 24
Fantasy 5:7 14 18 23 29
5-of-5 3 winners $71,015.93
4-of-5 284 $120.50
3-of-5 9,252 $10

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY


Today is Sunday, Jan. 27, the
27th day of 2013. There are 338
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Jan. 27, 1973, the Vietnam
peace accords were signed in
Paris.
On this date:
In 1756, composer Wolfgang
Amadeus Mozart was born in
Salzburg, Austria.
In 1880, Thomas Edison re-
ceived a patent for his electric
incandescent lamp.
In 1888, the National Geo-
graphic Society was incorporated
in Washington, D.C.
In 1901, opera composer
Giuseppe Verdi died in Milan, Italy,
at age 87.
In 1913, the musical play "The
Isle O' Dreams" opened in New
York; it featured the song "When
Irish Eyes Are Smiling" by Ernest
R. Ball, Chauncey Olcott and
George Graff Jr.
In 1945, Soviet troops liberated
the Nazi concentration camps
Auschwitz and Birkenau in Poland.
In 1951, an era of atomic test-
ing in the Nevada desert began as
an Air Force plane dropped a one-
kiloton bomb on Frenchman Flat.
Ten years ago: The Bush ad-
ministration dismissed Iraq's re-
sponse to U.N. disarmament
demands as inadequate. Mean-
while, chief U.N. inspector Hans
Blix charged that Iraq had never
genuinely accepted U.N. resolu-
tions demanding its disarmament
and warned that "cooperation on
substance" was necessary for a
peaceful solution.
Five years ago: Former In-
donesian president Suharto,
whose regime killed hundreds of
thousands of left-wing political op-
ponents, died in Jakarta at age
86.
One year ago: Addressing
students at the University of
Michigan, President Barack
Obama issued a warning to the
nation's colleges and universities,
threatening to strip their federal
aid if they "jack up tuition" every
year and to give the money in-
stead to schools showing restraint
and value.
Today's Birthdays: Singer
Bobby "Blue" Bland is 83. Actor
James Cromwell is 73. Actor John
Witherspoon is 71. Rock musician
Nick Mason (Pink Floyd) is 68.
Rhythm-and-blues singer Nedra
Talley (The Ronettes) is 67. Ballet
star Mikhail Baryshnikov is 65.
Chief U.S. Justice John Roberts is
58. Country singer Cheryl White is
58. Country singer-musician
Richard Young (The Kentucky
Headhunters) is 58. Actress Mimi
Rogers is 57. Rock musician
Janick Gers (Iron Maiden) is 56.
Commentator Keith Olbermann is
54. Rock singer Margo Timmins
(Cowboy Junkies) is 52. Rock mu-
sician Gillian Gilbert is 52. Actress


Bridget Fonda is 49. Actor Alan
Cumming is 48. Country singer
Tracy Lawrence is 45.
Thought for Today: "Opinion is
that exercise of the human will
which helps us to make a decision
without information." John
Erskine, American author and
educator (1879-1951).


P I











COMM ENTRY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Debating gun control


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Associated Press
Gun rights advocates have voiced opposition to President Barack Obama's proposed ban on new assault weapons and large-capacity
magazines.

Use of weapons embedded in human DNA and history of nation


Spurred by the recent
shootings in Newtown,
Conn., the Obama admin-
istration and Congress have
begun a campaign to impose
restrictions on gun ownership,
military-style assault weapons
and ammunition. While some
surveys reveal the majority of
Americans are in favor of some
reform, the road to change is
rocky as the right to bear arms
is protected by the Second
Amendment.
Through the years, the de-
bate over gun control fades in
and out depending on the po-
litical landscape. Mass killings
such as the one at Sandy Hook
Elementary School tend to


ramp up the emo-
tion and rhetoric, f
equally spurring de-
bate and political
action. Before ex- -i,
ploring both sides of
the debate, it is im- .
portant to under- :
stand the history of
guns in America.
The use of John
weapons is buried GU
deep within our col- COL
lective DNA. From
the first time cave-
men picked up a stick or
hurled a rock to fend off a
saber-tooth tiger or protect
themselves against a maraud-
ing tribe, weapons have given


I



E
L


-. humans the ability to
overpower our
larger competition
in the state of na-
S ture.
The American at-
tachment to guns
originated in Eng-
land when the pos-
session was put into
Read the English Bill of
;ST Rights in 1689 by
IMN Parliament. This
was written to re-
spect the individual
rights of Englishmen and en-
sure the King would not be-
come a tyrant (there was a lot
of that back then).
Naturally, when the first


American colonizers arrived
from Britain near 1607, they
took their guns with them.
Back then, there was no ques-
tion of whether someone
would have a gun. In fact, gun
possession was explicitly de-
manded by the colonies, and
later, the states as a means of
mustering a militia. After all,
one never knew when the
British would come back, as
they did in 1812. Unfortunately,
by then the militias tended to
be rather incompetent as a
military and lost quite a num-
ber of battles to better-trained
British regulars. It was obvious


.Page C4


Point andCOUNTERPOINT


'It's the guns, stupid' Testing amendment


JOHN READ
Guest columnist
Gun control laws are back
in the spotlight because
of mass-murder out-
rages from Newtown, Conn., to
Aurora, Colo., and others.
Because these atrocities
happened so closely together
in time, as to be practically
back-to-back, and each of them
with the use of semi-automatic
assault guns, the focus has


been on these weapons and
their extreme lethality. All
guns are potentially lethal, but
these particular guns are de-
signed to resemble military as-
sault weapons. And the
ammunition, the .223, is espe-
cially lethal because of its ve-
locity and destructiveness.
Even retired U.S. Army Gen.
Stanley McCrystal has indi-
cated these weapons are de-
See Page C3


JOHN MCFADDEN
Guest columnist
t is impossible to get too
emotional over the sense-
less slaughter of children
at Sandy Hook Elementary
School. It is, however, possible
to allow the emotions to seize
control of our ability to reason.
The Obama administration
and anti-gun groups seem to
have fallen into that trap.
There are sufficient hard data


and two failed attempts at gun
control that should have con-
vinced them what they are try-
ing to repress is irrepressible.
Guns vs. Stats
While it appears logical to
say, "if guns, then carnage," so-
ciety simply does not work that
way External factors the
cultural environment, the
state's coercive capacity, the
availability and distribution of
See Page C3


Enjoy


county


like a


tourist

Igrew up in New York
around the city and
can remember
friends telling me they
would never move away
from that great town.
As a happy Florida
transplant more than
40 years ago I have
trouble understanding.
Friends tell me they
could never leave the
great museums, the the-
ater district or sporting
events. My inevitable fol-
low-up question to my
New York friends is:
"When was the last time
you went to the theater?"
The answer is in-
evitably something like:
"1986. But I am going to
go again this year."
Hmmm.
The truth is, we all
tend to take for granted
the place we live. While
we like the comfort of
knowing about the great
things, we get busy (or
lazy) and just don't take
advantage.
That is just as true for
people who live in Citrus
County as anywhere else.
I know people in In-
verness who have never
gone on the Crystal River
to see the manatees. Peo-
ple travel from around
the world to visit, but
we've got folks who won't
visit from Inverness.
I know Crystal River
residents who are regu-
lar bike riders, but they
have never been on the
bike trail on the east
side of the county It is
one of the best bike
trails in the nation, yet
they have failed to navi-
gate the 20 miles to
enjoy the experience.
So, here is a challenge
for the New Year. Take
five things off of the fol-
lowing list and do them.
Make it happen. Enjoy
your backyard and re-
member what is special
about Citrus County.
Go visit Lucifer the
hippo at Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State
Park.
He is the only hippo in
Florida who is an offi-
cial citizen of the state
and he lives here. The
state park is the most
popular in Florida and
it's in your backyard. Go
experience it again and
say hello to Art Yerian,
the facility manager
Ride a bike on the
Withlacoochee State
Trail. You can travel the
entire length of the
county from Istachatta
to Dunnellon. Or you
can ride a much shorter
distance and enjoy the
vistas of the Tsala
Apopka chain of lakes.
Go rent a kayak or
take a tour boat ride on
King's Bay in Crystal
River.
There are hundreds of
manatees in the bay It's
a great time to see them.
Go to the old court-
house in Inverness, look
at the museum and
roam around the his-
toric building.
This courthouse has
been the center of gov-
ernment life for more
than a century and it has
been restored to its orig-
inal condition. This is
where Elvis Presley
made a movie and
See Page C4







Page C2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .........................publisher
Mike Arnold ................. .................. editor
Charlie Brennan .....................editor at large
Curt Ebitz .......................citizen member
00N Mac Harris ..........................citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ............... ..........copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


FUNDING SHORTFALL




County looks



to diversity



revenues


Facing a revenue short-
fall exacerbated by
Progress Energy's re-
fusal to pay all of the prop-
erty taxes assessed on the
Crystal River plant, the
county commission is consid-
ering alternatives
to balance the THE I
county budget.
While negotia- Co'
tions with the commis.
power company at fu
over the assessed alter
value of the plant
continue, it is in- OUR 01
creasingly likely, New ap
regardless of how New ap
the current dis- neede
pute is resolved, rec
the county will re-
ceive less income from the
power company in the future.
And should the nuclear plant
be permanently closed, the
loss of revenue will be even
greater.
In the meantime, public
services such as fire and law
enforcement have to be
funded, roads have to be
maintained, people will still
go to the health department,
residents expect parks and li-
braries to be open, and the
list goes on.
The alternatives faced by
the commission for closing
the revenue gap are limited.
The realistic alternatives are
raising the millage rate on
property taxes, cutting serv-
ices, finding new funding
methods or some combina-
tion of them all.
During the December
meeting, the commission
voted to examine forming
Municipal Service Benefit
Units (MSBUs) and Munici-
pal Service Taxing Units
(MSTUs) as funding alterna-
tives. Both MSBUs and
MSTUs assign costs of serv-
ices to those who benefit
from them. The difference is
MSBUs levy the same fee to
each household that benefits
from a service, while MSTUs
are levied based on the value
of property. Both funding
sources can be applied coun-
tywide or limited to a defined
area.
County Administrator Brad
Thorpe planned to bring pro-
posals for an MSBU for fire
protection and MSTU for


S
u
si
n


P
p


road patrol to the board at its
last meeting, but deferred to
the next meeting when he
was not satisfied by the pro-
posals put together by a
consultant.
He is also bringing to the
commission lists
ISUE: of where the gov-
ernment spends
nty money for discus-
ion looks sion of whether
hiding services should
atives. be cut or in-
cluded in the
'INION: budget. This is a
roaches difficult but nec-
foaches essary task for
itfory.new the commission,
ity. which so far has
shown little stom-
ach for making cuts.
In a time of plentiful tax
revenues, it was easy to make
commitments with continu-
ing costs, and now each serv-
ice or program has a
constituency urging it con-
tinue, and cuts be made to
some other program.
However, in an era of tight
budgets, the commission has
to set priorities and deter-
mine which services are es-
sential and which services
are nice but not necessary.
We recognize this is no easy
task. But for essential serv-
ices to continue, others may
have to be reduced or cut.
This means everybody and
this includes constitutional
officers such as the sheriff-
needs to come to the table
and offer ways to cut their
budgets.
The most likely outcome is
a combination of budget cuts,
new fee structures and per-
haps an increase in millage
will be necessary to fund
services. At this point, the
county is facing new budget
realities, and new ap-
proaches will be necessary to
balance the county's income
and expenses.
There is no magic formula,
and there will be a con-
stituency opposing every cut
and every increase in rev-
enues, but hard decisions
with consequences have to be
made to get the county
through this immediate crisis
and get county government
on a sustainable course for
the future.


== LETTER to the Editor =


Pay me for my gun
investments
I've been watching and read-
ing the news our elected offi-
cials want to do away with
semi-automatic weapons. I
have a few questions for them.
Are they going to reimburse us
the money we have paid for
these weapons? Myself, I have
quite a bit of money I've spent
for my weapons, gun safe and
other accessories. If the govern-
ment wants my weapons, pay
me the amount I have invested
and they can have them.
Now, on a different note. I
have been hearing the mentally
disturbed youth (who) killed
the kids and teachers did not, I


repeat did not, have an assault
rifle with him when he went
into the school and started
killing. He went into the school
with four handguns. There was
an assault weapon law enforce-
ment found in his car after
everything was done.
That's our federal elected of-
ficials. They will smile and take
your wallet while they shake
your hands. They also will bend
the truth, or lie, to get what
they want. Of course, our
weapons are first on the list.
They are putting us right under
their thumbs, so we are unable
to do anything.
Jake Little
Homosassa


"Life is short and so is money."
Bertolt Brecht,
"The Threepenny Opera" 1928


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Plan B best for city, county


ROBERT MERCER
Guest columnist
The combining of private,
public, government and
foundations in the pur-
chase of the Three Sisters prop-
erty was the most significant
coming together of diverse in-
terest and groups in decades for
Crystal River and Citrus
County.
The way Three Sisters is de-
veloped will have the most sig-
nificant impact of any proposal
being discussed and will impact
Crystal River and Citrus County
for years to come. Yet, it is not
included in the current discus-
sion and plans by the city or
county.
It is often mentioned the ex-
pansion of the "tourism sector"
is one of the main pillars of di-
versification necessary to fuel
future growth. In fact, tourism
as it relates to the manatees has
been one of the bright spots and
has brought national and inter-
national media attention to our
area even before the purchase
of Three Sisters. Would it not be
prudent to maximize the bene-
fits of this asset?
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service (FWS) several months
ago produced a development
brochure which presents two
significantly different propos-
als, both of which had virtually
the same development cost es-
timates of the proposed facili-
ties but did not include the
purchase or leasing of offsite
facilities.
Plan A: Envisions all devel-
opment: welcome center, edu-
cational center, eminence
faculty, bus and car parking as
well as all other activities to be
housed within the Three Sis-
ters property.
Plan B: Envisions locating
the welcoming center bus and
car parking at the former Save-
A-Lot portion of the strip mall
on the east side of Cutler Spur
adjacent to the area being pro-
posed as the new entrance to
the Three Sisters property.
Both plans meet the require-
ments set forth in the Florida
Forever Trust agreement the
city of Crystal River, as the
owner of record, must oversee
and FWS, as the manager, must
adhere.
Plan A: While requiring sig-
nificant infrastructure in the
form of roads, parking lots and
utility requirements, it is by far
the easiest for the city of Crys-
tal River to oversee and would
require the least amount of re-
quired involvement in the
parks development.
Plan B: It would require the
addition of the leasing and/or
purchase of the offsite facility.
Although preliminary investi-
gation has been accomplished,
the various options have not
been fully explored or deemed
unfeasible at this time.


Trees blocking view
I have a question. We're always
talking about wanting to invite people
to come into Citrus County and our
beautiful city. And the beautiful lakes
as you come in on (State Road) 44
coming from Wildwood, they're so
nice and inviting to people looking to
see the water and the houses across
there. Why do they keep planting
trees to block the view so you can't
see the lakes? I think it's disgusting.
We can look at trees anywhere. Why


don't they take the trees down and
make it so we can see the lakes?
They're so pretty and it invites people.
We advertise we have seven lakes and
they're all beautiful, wonderful fishing,
and then we put the trees up and hide
it from people who are coming in to
visit our county. I mean that's been
bugging me for years. I don't know
why they do that. Now they're plant-
ing more trees. You go into some
other cities and you can see the beau-
tiful lakes. That's a beautiful come-on
for people to come into our county.


This document is to make the
case for taking the time and ef-
fort to bring Plan B to fruition
as being the best plan for the
long-term future of the Three
Sisters, as well as for the long-
term development for Crystal
River and Citrus County. This
document also will point out
the many instances where Plan
B best fits into Crystal River's
current and future develop-
ment plans as well as several of
the concepts offered in the re-
cent area council/Citrus County
plan.
We only have to look a few
miles to the south of us to find
the perfect model of Plan B.
Most all are aware the Ellie
Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife Park is one of Florida's
most successful parks, with its
welcoming center and parking
on U.S. 19 with the infrastruc-
ture and activities along the
Homosassa River
A partial list of the positive
effects offered by Plan B are as
follows:
Environmental: Minimiz-
ing the infrastructure on the
Three Sisters property, in-
cluded but not limited to the
parking and vehicular traffic,
will unquestionably be the best
for the ecology of the site.
Park development and di-
versification: By removing the
parking and vehicular traffic,
this allows for diversification of
the park's activities to expand
other activities other than man-
atee viewing which at best is a
six-month activity.
Trails could be expanded.
Other Florida wildlife could be
on display Lake Linda could
display fisheries. A springs cen-
ter could be developed. A man-
atee rehab facility could be
developed. Other opportunities
will present themselves as time
goes on. The main point is hav-
ing the opportunity to expand
and diversify the park over
time.
Secondly, with less infra-
structure required, the Three
Sisters Park and manatee view-
ing boardwalk could be open as
soon as bathroom facilities
were provided.
Cutler Spur: Has been
planned to be a "recreational
street" tying the bike jogging
trail from the downtown His-
toric District, King's Bay Park
and Hunter Springs to Three
Sisters and ultimately to Fort
Island Trail and the Gulf.
Plan B would minimize the
vehicular and bus traffic, which
is in direct conflict with the
above contemplated usage.
Secondly, Plan B envisions
transporting attendees to the
park via land transportation
similar to Homosassa Springs
Wildlife Park. As a result, the
carrying capacity of the bridge
as well as the location of the en-


trance off of Cutler Spur may be
less costly and critical.
Mixed Use Development:
What better way to showcase
Crystal River's recent change
and push for mixed-use devel-
opment along the U.S. 19 corri-
dor then to display a
redeveloped and remodeled
shopping center, while show-
casing the area's most signifi-
cant public/private asset, the
Three Sisters.
The Master Plan B as printed
states: "The center will house
an information center, exhibit
space, a large group gathering
and educational spaces and
some retail for the visitor Also
located in the center will be of-
fices and ancillary space for
refuge staff."
Inasmuch as the infrastruc-
ture is already in place once
master planned, the develop-
ment could be staged as fund-
ing from various sources
become available, thus expedit-
ing the opening of the existing
boardwalk, park and manatee
viewing opportunities.
Additional points:
With the welcome center
on U.S. 19, maximum exposure
is accomplished as well as ease
of access, which will result in
impulse stopping by a passing
tourist and the opportunity to
sell the area and a longer stay
Improving the architecture
and appearance of the center
would provide the opportunity
to encourage the revitalization
of the U.S. 19 corridor The traf-
fic should spur new business
opportunities to fill the existing
vacancies.
As leases run out or reloca-
tion of existing business in the
center occur, the center could
offer the best opportunity, as
mentioned a number of times,
to relocate the Chamber of
Commerce, the Economic De-
velopment offices, concentrat-
ing the efforts where the
maximum opportunity presents
itself.
With two major parks in
Citrus County, the opportunity
to increase the length of stay
and make Citrus County a des-
tination is closer to reality.
The fact Plan B was included
in the "Three Sisters Springs
Site Master Plans" indicates
due consideration be given by
the many stakeholders and the
community at large to deter-
mine whether this is broad
enough support to bring the
plan to fruition.

Robert Mercer is a Crystal
River resident who owned and
operated hotels throughout the
United States. He is also an
officer with a local nonprofit
agency and has been involved
in development projects
throughout the country.


T ,


CA63-0579

563-0579


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


What matters most is who you are with


As an elementary school
student, I was enthralled
by geography and stories
concerning the grand cities
around the world the archi-
tectural works of art, the food -
all of it.
At that time, I never dreamed
a day would come when I'd get
to visit
many of
S these
h places.

e only that,
I'd share
such ad-
ventures
with
someone
Fred Brannen like my
A SLICE Cheryl,
OF LIFE someone
w h o
m ak e s
anywhere at all seem grand.
My recollection is Cheryl and I
never left Florida together until
we'd been married for 10 years.
Then, during the summer of
1976, along with our daughters,
9-year-old Beth and 6-year-old



TESTING
Continued from Page C1


capital, ethnic and linguistic so-
cial cleavages and people with
mental short circuits all in-
trude to make the possession of
guns almost immaterial.
An abundance of reliable data
support this.
Last year, the U.N. Office on
Drugs and Crime, reported the
United States had 88.8 firearms
per 100 population and Russia
had only 8.9. Yet Russia had
more than twice as many mur-
ders per 100,000 population
(10.2) than the US (4.8).
In 2012, Uruguay and Norway
had nearly an identical number
of guns per 100 population (31.8
and 31.6 respectively), but
Uruguay had nearly six times
the number of murders per
100,000 (5.9 vs. 1.0).
Weapons ban washout
In 1994, Congress passed an
assault weapons ban that looked
a great deal like the one being
proposed by the Obama Admin-
istration. Title XI, Subtitle A of
the Violent Crime Control and
Law Enforcement Act of 1994
banned the manufacture, trans-
fer and possession of 118 spe-
cific firearms designated as
assault weapons and magazines
holding more than 10 rounds of
ammunition as well. According
to figures provided by the Na-
tional Institute of Justice, the
ban could not possibly succeed.
The number of crimes involv-



GUNS
Continued from Page C1


signed for battle and have no
place in civil society.
If that is the case, then why are
these guns and their semi-auto-
matic handgun relatives so pop-
ular? Well, they are the latest and
greatest, and a lot of gun enthusi-
asts want them. They are sexy
and appeal to our inner Rambo.
They also are easy to handle and
a lot of fun to shoot
But why do so many mass
murderers have access to them
in the first place? After all, most
responsible with their weapons
and not prone to shoot them
wildly in crowded places teem-
ing with people.
In any given year, about 12,000
gun crimes and roughly 19,000
suicides are committed with
guns, plus an assortment of acci-
dental killings and injuries
when guns are dropped or mis-
takenly fired. In a country of 310
million people, roughly 300 mil-
lion guns and slightly more than
32,000 gun-related deaths, that
roughly accounts for 0.0001 per-
cent of the population being
killed by guns every year.
Purpose of guns
So, what's the big deal? After
all, more people are killed in car
crashes every year and yet there
is no call to outlaw cars. Well, the
difference is cars are not in-
tended specifically to kill, while


guns are. In fact, all guns are de-
signed to kill something. Yes, I
know, "guns don't kill people,
people kill people," but guns
make it so much easier and
faster. They enable us to kill
much more efficiently and
quickly than any other means,
short of bombs.
Protection of guns
Another difference between
cars and guns is guns are en-
shrined in the Second Amend-


Becky, we made a road trip to
Boston. We visited Cheryl's
grandmother and great-grand-
mother and did the U.S. Bicen-
tennial celebration up right.
During the past 20-plus years,
we've had the opportunity to see
many more of the world's famous
cities, both within the United
States and in foreign countries.
I've never tried to catalogue
them, but some of the more well-
known places we've been in-
clude: Athens, with it's trove of
ancient treasures including the
Parthenon; London, with Buck-
ingham Palace; and Paris, with
the Eiffel Tower The list contin-
ues with Amsterdam, Bath, Mu-
nich, Hamburg, Venice,
Florence, Dublin, Liverpool, Ed-
inburgh, Cape Town and Sydney
- just a spattering of those in
foreign countries. The stops


ing banned weapons proved to be
quite small between 2 and 8
percent Furthermore, they found
only 3 percent of the incidents
surveyed resulted in more than
10 shots fired and those produced
only 5 percent of gunshot victims.
While crimes involving
banned automatic weapons
dropped, the Justice Institute
found the decline was more than
offset by criminals switching to
non-banned weapons.
Magazine miscarriage
The Institute of Justice also
found attempting to control large
capacity magazines was futile.
At the time the ban was im-
posed, approximately 18 percent
of civilian-owned rifles and 21
percent of civilian-owned hand-
guns were equipped with un-
banned large capacity magazines.
Also, the ban exempted large
capacity magazines manufac-
tured before Sept. 13, 1994. Gun
industry sources estimated in
1995 there were 25 million pre-
ban magazines in the United
States and an additional 4.7 mil-
lion pre-ban magazines were im-
ported during the time the ban
was in force.
Advantage bad guys
Bans have unintended conse-
quences. In 1976, Washington,
D.C., enacted a ban on hand
guns. Those who had weapons
before the ban were allowed to
keep them, if they were disas-
sembled or trigger locked.
Criminals took advantage of
the fact that honest D.C. resi-
dents had no effective means of
self-defense and all forms of


ment to our Constitution.
The Second Amendment
reads "A well regulated Militia
being necessary to the security
of a free State, the right of the
people to keep and bear arms,
shall not be infringed."
Courts have been struggling
with this awkward sentence for
more than 220 years, but it was
not until the Heller v District of
Columbia (2008), and the Mc-
Donald v The City of Chicago
(2010) decisions it was decided
citizens have the right to own
firearms for personal protection.
Many states, such as Florida,
issue concealed carry permits.
As a result millions of us are
walking around with legal
deadly force within easy reach.
Criminal use of guns
Do all these guns in circula-
tion make us safer? And how do
so many guns find their way into
criminal hands? Well, mostly
through background check loop-
holes, gun shows, straw-man
purchases, private sales, rogue
gun dealers, and burglaries.
Large-scale gun manufactur-
ers probably do not start out
making guns for the black mar-
ket, but millions of new guns
manage to find their way into
criminal hands every year.
Surely this should be prevented
in some way
After all, the gun trade is sup-
posed to be regulated; however,
this is done poorly and loosely in
far too many states. At the fed-
eral level, the Bureau of Alcohol,
Tobacco and Firearms (ATF) is
responsible for enforcing na-
tional gun regulations. However,
the ATF has been hamstrung
and hobbled from lack of staffing
and weakened laws pushed
through gun-friendly legisla-
tures during the past couple of
decades. Behind this push has
been the NRA and their allies.


Opposition
to gun control
The National Rifle Associa-
tion (NRA) is adamantly op-


we've made in the good old
U.S.A. include Atlanta, Anchor-
age, Branson, Honolulu, New
Orleans, Nashville, Memphis,
San Francisco, San Diego, Wash-
ington, D.C., and Seattle. And the
list could simply go on and on.
So, of all these marvelous
cities we've visited, which one
have we enjoyed most? Not so
surprisingly, Cheryl and I easily
agreed on the No. 1 city. But, we
didn't agree on our second
choices.
For me, the second most en-
joyable city we've been to is Rio
de Janeiro with Sugar Loaf
Mountain and the statue of
Christ the Redeemer at Corcov-
ado. Then, of course, there's the
beach at Ipanema and genuine
Brazilian barbecue. Whoopee
and yum yum!
For Cheryl, Rome is No. 2. She


criminal violence increased.
The year the ban was imposed,
there were 188 murders in DC.
In 1988, there were 369; in 1994,
there were 454.
Both attempts at gun control
failed. When the time came to
choose between renewing the
1994 Assault Weapons Ban, or al-
lowing it to expire, Congress
chose the latter. In the case of
the D.C. ban, the Supreme Court
mercifully struck it down as un-
constitutional (The District of
Columbia v Heller).
A dose of reality
The president's plan includes
a proposal to keep guns out of
the hands of the mentally unsta-
ble, presumably through some
sort of system of background
checks yet unspecified.
This country averages around
40 murders a day and 99.44 per-
cent of people who commit them
are perfectly sane. Focusing on
the few mad men who commit
mass murder is a poor use of lim-
ited resources.
More to the point, tragedies
such as Sandy Hook are phe-
nomenal, unpredictable, un-
avoidable and unique. The
mental dysfunction of killers
such as these is so rare and hard
to diagnose no politically ac-
ceptable or economically feasi-
ble action will prevent them.
It is, indeed, a sad commentary
on the current state of hu-
mankind's collective develop-
ment, but people like Adam
Lanza emerge naturally through a
socio-genetic process inherent in
every civilization no matter how
advanced. They live in our midst


posed to nearly any sort of gun
regulations. Historically, the
NRA was a group dedicated to
the shooting arts and are still ac-
tive in perfectly legitimate uses
of guns, such as hunting, target
practice and competitions. That
started to change in the 1970s
when the gun industry became
increasingly radical toward the
goal of achieving fewer and
fewer gun regulations and fo-
cusing on the public's right to
nearly any type of weapon
available.
Some groups to the right of the
NRA even think fully automatic
submachine guns should be
legal again. That has not been
the case since 1934 due to the
number of people killed at that
time by those guns. What do you
suppose would happen if today's
batch of suicidal mass murder-
ers had access to submachine
guns? This would certainly re-
lieve them of the bother of hav-
ing to pull the trigger for every
round just pull once and
watch the bodies pile up.
Indeed, the NRA has been ac-
tively lobbying for legislation
making guns more freely avail-
able and with fewer restrictions.
To them the answer is even
more guns, which is like saying
a drowning person needs more
water
Unintended
consequences
One of the presumably unin-
tended consequences of the
NRA's strategy to ensure the free
flow of guns has made it easier
for rogue gun dealers to sell
guns without much in the way of
tracing who buys their products.
How is this done? Well, NRA-
inspired laws ensure records of
gun sales are held for a short
time and not always passed
along to the government In ad-
dition, gun inventories are noto-


riously loose in some states,
further reducing accountability
for their sales. I believe most
dealers are honest and above-
board, but there are lots who are


For me, the second most enjoyable city
we've been to is Rio de Janeiro with
Sugar Loaf Mountain and the statue of
Christ the Redeemer at Corcovado.


matic and militaristic the better.
According to their stated views,
they want to be as well armed as
the military just in case the need
to fight against the U.S. govern-
ment becomes a necessity; thus,
the need for increasingly so-
phisticated and deadly weapons.
Apparently, like James Yeager of
"Tactical Response" (go ahead
and Google it) thousands are
eager and ready to grab their


was taken by the Colosseum and
the artistic beauty within the
Vatican, especially the ceiling of
the Sistine Chapel painted by
Michelangelo.
Now (drum roll) the city se-
lected by both of us as the most
enjoyable: With apologies to my
great-grandpa who was held in
the vicinity as a Confederate
POW and, I suspect to the sur-
prise of some who may have
heard me mutter that we don't
care how it's done up north, the
city my Cheryl and I have found
to be the most enjoyable of them
all is New York City. Our hotel
was fabulous, the Broadway
show we saw was spectacular,
the food and sights were every-
thing we could have hoped for
and we found the folks there to
be friendly and genuinely help-
ful. We enjoyed every bit of it,
even hailing our own taxi cab in
the midst of a snow flurry!
There you have it. New York
City is No. 1 in our book and
when the opportunity presents
itself, we'll go back. Even so,
without question, what we've
found matters most isn't where


unperceived, leading unremark-
able lives, making their presence
known only after they have killed.
We can jail them, commit
them or bury them, but only
after they have slaughtered
innocent people.
Ban the ban
The point is, there is no law
Congress can enact and no de-
cree the president can annunci-
ate to prevent catastrophes such
as the one at Sandy Hook
Elementary
What is bothersome is every-
one in Washington and all the
anti-gun advocates know that.
The data recited above is a mi-
nuscule part of information
available to the Obama adminis-
tration. They are neither foolish
nor irrational, so there must be
another reason for their perse-
verance. Perhaps they mean to
test the Second Amendment. If
that be so, it would be a very un-
wise decision indeed.
The framers of the Bill of
Rights felt so strongly about the
right to bear arms they openly
advocated the use of lethal force
against the agents of any Ameri-
can incumbency attempting to
limit or otherwise alter any of the
rights granted to every individual
under the Constitution.
Speaking at the Virginia Con-
stitutional Convention debates,
George Mason recalled, "Forty
years ago when the resolution of
enslaving America was formed
in Great Britain, the British Par-
liament was advised ... to disarm
the people. That it was the best
and most effectual way to en-
slave them. But they should not


not so scrupulous with their
transactions.
With these backdoor and
straw man sales, a lot of guns
simply vanish without a trace. As
a result, when gun crimes are
committed, it is more difficult
for police to trace where they
came from. In fact, studies show
the two main ways guns find
their way into black markets and
the hands of drug dealers and
other criminal organizations is
through rogue gun dealers and
gun shows. Other studies show
upward of 40 percent of private
gun sales are conducted at gun
shows, making them an easy way
to traffic guns without back-
ground checks. In fact, ATF's in-
vestigations reveal gun shows to
be the largest source of guns
trafficked to criminals (second
only to corrupt dealers).
But if the NRA is pushing for
fewer and/or more lax gun laws,
what is their ultimate objective?
Sadly, their active resistance to
strong gun laws has made guns
easier to fall into criminal
hands, even at the cost of inno-
cent lives. But this does not
seem to bother them very much,
because there is a bigger agenda
at work.
Stockpile of weapons
If we return briefly to the Sec-
ond Amendment, we will see the
words "shall not be infringed" is
central to conservative thinking
about government and tyranny
The paranoid fear of tyrannical
government is a huge motivator
for many thousands of people to
stockpile weapons -all kinds of
weapons and the more auto-


Special to the Chronicle
Cheryl and Fred on board a tour
boat in New York Harbor on a
beautiful, cold and windy January
2011 day.
you are, it's who you're with!
U
Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


do it openly; but to weaken them
and let them sink gradually"
He went on to say, "I consider
and fear the natural propensity
of rulers to oppress the people. I
wish only to prevent them from
doing so (and) divine providence
has given to every individual the
right of self-defense."
When Mason and scores of
others spoke words such as
these, it was only five years after
the end of the Revolutionary
War when their distrust of gov-
ernment was manifest. There is
no such treatise extant in this
country today, but as always, it's
good to remember the well-
known Arab proverb: "If the
camel once gets his nose in the
tent, his body will soon follow."
The prospect of sleeping
alongside a camel appeals to me
not at all and I'll wager I'm not
alone.


John McFadden is a retired
U.S. Army lieutenant colonel.
He is a longtime student ofpo-
litical conflict. For four years,
he taught graduate level classes
on political violence at the
John E Kennedy Center for Un-
conventional Warfare where he
did original research on the
causes and effects of revolu-
tionary change. After retire-
ment, he taught Comparative
Politics and International Rela-
tions at The George Washington
University the University of
Connecticut and Connecticut
College. He holds a master's de-
gree from New York University
and a Ph.D. from George Wash-
ington University


guns and head for the hills. What
they intend to do out there is
anyone's guess, but insurrection
and sedition comes to mind. In
fact, Yeager recently got into
trouble when he threatened to
"start killing people;" not a very
reassuring message to those of
us who are largely sane.
Unfortunate
side effects
Unfortunately, sometimes an
insane person has free access to
many of these armaments slosh-
ing around and uses them to
mow down as many people as
possible before committing sui-
cide. Based on how the NRA and
gun rights extremists react to
these horrific events, not by
looking for sensible regulations
to help prevent them, but by
adding to their stockpiles, leads
me to conclude mass murder is
to them no more than an unfor-
tunate series of events resulting
in "collateral damage," an inter-
esting euphemism for innocent
people killed during battle. Ap-
parently, they see these increas-
ingly frequent atrocities as little
different from natural disasters
such as tornados and hurricanes
- unfortunate but subservient
to the larger scheme of things.
It often seems to the NRA and
other gun extremists that every
Newtown is seen as little more
than yet another public relations
headache to be managed. To the
rest of us who are not fanatical
about guns, Newtown is a
tragedy crying out for sensible
solutions to this flood of guns.
One wonders if this gun mad-
ness will ever end. Maybe not,
given the levels of paranoia from
the likes of the NRA, but like the
post-Columbine bumper sticker
stated it so succinctly: "It's the
guns, stupid."


John Read is president of the
Central Citrus Democratic Club
and public information officer
for the Citrus County Demo-
cratic Executive Committee.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 C3





C4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013


DEBATING
Continued from Page C1

a standing army was a ne-
cessity. But, a large and
competent regular army
was not needed until the
Civil War. Then, things be-
came interesting and the
country was introduced to
large-scale warfare.
The Civil War saw the
increased sophistication
and accuracy of weapons
from repeating rifles to
the Gatling gun; capable
of shooting hundreds of
rounds in a minute, a
huge advance from single-
shot muzzle-loaders and
rifles. As the sophistica-
tion of weapons grew, so
did Americans fascination
with the collection and
use of weapons.
Surprisingly, the Ameri-
can West we now see as so
incredibly violent is actu-
ally a product of Holly-
wood and the movie
industry Yes, there were
lots of guns back then, but
there were also lots of
local gun laws.
For instance, the fa-
mous shootout at the OK
Corral between the Earps
and the Clantons was a
combination grudge fight
and a dispute over the
Clantons' refusal to check
in their guns. The Tomb-
stone, Ariz., laws forbade
guns to be carried in town.
Visitors had to check their
guns with the sheriff or
face arrest and a fine.
Local laws clamping
down on guns in the towns
of the Old West were
rather commonplace, be-
cause town boosters
wanted to attract business
and were concerned they


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


would not have much suc-
cess if everyone was run-
ning around shooting
revolvers every day. Most
gunfights were played out
in taverns, but eventually
the shootouts were out-
lawed. In effect, cowboys
and gunslingers were told
to take their "rooting-toot-
ing" selves out of town if
they insisted on being
crazy with gunplay
The 1870s gave rise to
the National Rifle Associ-
ation, formed in 1871 by
Union veterans Col.
William C. Church and
Gen. George Wingate in
response to the poor
marksmanship they saw
from Union troops. The
marksmanship of South-
ern soldiers was far supe-
rior to the Northerners,
because they were used to
shooting for their food -
"squirrel guns," and all
that. Guns were a strong
part of Southern culture.
Today the National
Rifle Association has mor-
phed into an advocacy or-
ganization and plays a
very large part in the gun
rights debates. Originally
and until the mid-1970s,
the NRA was an organiza-
tion dedicated to gun
safety, hunting and vari-
ous shooting arts. It was
not until the mid-1970s
and the emerging culture
wars shifted the focus of
the organization into a
supporter of gun rights,
and a major player in the
politics of gun control.
The emergence of light-
weight submachine guns
such as the Thompson .45,
or "Tommy Gun," capable
of firing more than 100
rounds in under a minute
began following World
War I. This development


caught the attention of
gun control advocates.
While these guns did not
come into general circula-
tion until after the war,
they literally exploded
onto the public stage in
the 1920s and 1930s when
gangsters such as Al
Capone, Machine Gun
Kelley, Bonnie and Clyde
and their criminal ilk
were running amok. The
National Firearms Act of
1934 pulled Tommy Guns
and sawed-off shotguns
out of circulation and the
dawn of modern gun con-
trol was born.
Two recent court rul-
ings, District of Columbia
v. Heller (2008) and Mc-
Donald v. Chicago (2010),
clarify the intent of the
Second Amendment. Both
rulings complemented
one another, in that, they
effectively separated the
militia portion of the Sec-
ond Amendment from the
right to bear arms portion
- split between the
comma. That famously
awkward sentence was
now seen in favor of the
right to bear arms. Heller
decided guns could be
owned privately and used
for things such as self-de-
fense and Chicago ap-
plied the ruling to the
states.
The two rulings did not,
however, in the words of
Justice Scalia, prohibit
the state or federal gov-
ernments from enacting
regulations for specific
types of weapons, such as
sub-machine guns, sawed-
off shotguns, tanks, mor-
tars, RPG's, land mines
and other strictly military
hardware from the public.
But, more on that in the
subsequent articles.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C

wooed so many young ladies in our
town.
After visiting the courthouse go over
to Stumpknockers and have lunch or
dinner This locally owned and operated
restaurant (Tim and John Channell) fea-
tures all the local fish, shrimp, alligator,
catfish, frog and crab you can imagine.
Take a ride out to Fort Island Gulf
Trail in Crystal River and visit the Gulf
Coast beach.
Yes, we have a beach. OK, it's not
Clearwater, but there are no traffic jams
either. Fort Island Beach is a great little
spot that guarantees a relaxing after-
noon.
If you want to find another gulf
beach, drive up U.S. 19 and take the Fol-
low that Dream road through Inglis and
Yankeetown where it dead-ends at the
Gulf.
There is a nice little beach with a
great view. Very few people even know
about it.
In my mind, the absolute best local
delicacy is the stone crab and there is no
better place to sample it than at Char-
lie's Seafood House on U.S. 19 in Crystal
River
The restaurant has been operated by
Phil Kofmehl and family for decades
and they know how to prepare the crabs
just right. The fact they also operate the
crab docks in Crystal River ensures you
are getting the freshest crabs around.
In the south, the other redneck -
and I say that in a loving way delicacy
involves the consumption of large
amounts of chicken wings.


Citrus County has some good chicken
wings including Lollygaggers in Crystal
River and Coaches in Inverness. But the
absolute best chicken wings you can find
are at the Cove on the east side of Inver-
ness. It is an important local custom you
consume beer while eating the chicken
wings at any of these locations.
One of the best places to be at night
in Citrus County is old Homosassa
where there are a growing number of
restaurants and pubs taking advantage
of the riverfront views.
Riverside Resort has been at it the
longest and they do a good job. The
Freezer is the best place to eat shrimp
in the county and there are a growing
number of local restaurants along the
water that guarantee an enjoyable
evening.
You want to see the wilds of the
Withlacoochee River? One of the most
unique ways is to take an airboat ride
from the vendor at the bridge east of In-
verness or the one going up State Road
200 at Stumpknockers. The boats might
be loud, but it's an experience you won't
forget.
The bike trail at the barge canal
north of Crystal River has a newly ex-
panded bike path that runs to the old In-
glis dam on Lake Rousseau all the way
to the Gulf of Mexico.
Lots of wildlife, good fishing in the
barge canal and an actual hill. Yes, there
is a hill in Citrus County. You walk, ride,
run or just sit.
Get out and enjoy what brings so many
tourists to our area.

Gerry Mulligan is the publisher of the
Chronicle. Email him at
gm ulligan@chronicleonline. com.


SUBMIT LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
* Letters must be no longer than 600 words, and writers will be limited to four
letters per month.
* We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste.
* Send letters to: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429. Or, fax to 352-563-3280, or email to letters@chronicleonline.com.
To read some letters to the editor, See Pages A12 and A13


Suitay Monday fTuesgay Wednesday Thursday .*:


2nd Annual

Pest o ientd Uest
an adoption extravaganza


February 2,2013
9 a.m.to 3 p.m.
Citrus County Auditorium

COME HA^"TVE UN!^^


-Pet Rescues
-Veterinarian
-Face Painting


-Groomers
-Food Cart
-Silent Auction


C -I f ... Citrus County Animal Services
000DNL Humanitarians of FL., Inc.


ONLINE


i AUCTION

Amazing Items
www.rotaryinverness.com







Watch final bidding live
Saturday, February 9th
Noon
WYKE Channel 47 or 16

sponsored in part by:




wwwhroneonlneRotary Club of
Inverness
Charitable Foundation, Inc.
ww^ rtg ynvmesSoBm


.5TH ANNUAL

CITRUS HAS TALENT


to -" S--" "yy -" -7""


6:30 P.M. (Doors open at 6pm)
at the Curtis Peterson Auditorium
Tickets $10 per person Children under 10 are free
Masters of Ceremonies:
Brad Thorpe County Administrator and
Cathy Pearson Assistant County Administrator


For ticket information call
527-5900


Ci-iiKbj~


El.


All through January
Children's POW Camps
For more information call the museum at
352-341-6427 from 10a.m. to 4 p.m.


January 27th 2 p.m.
Friends of Crystal River Annual Meeting
Friends of Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge Complex
At the First United Methodist Church in Homosassa.
Featured Speaker: Paul Boetcher owner of Hydro-Q, Inc.
For more information or directions, please call 352-586-7140
or visit www.friendsofchazz.org Open to the public.

February 2nd 9 a.m.
1 st Annual Tee Off for Tourette
Celebrity Golf Tournament
Entrance Fee: $100 per golfer
at Plantation on Crystal River
Celebrity golf tournament to benefit the Tourette Syndrome
Association of Florida,with a kick off Cocktail party on
Friday, February 1 at 6:30pm for Sponsors and golfers only.
Live auction and meet and greet with celebrities, music by
American Idol contestant Dave Pittman.
For more information call 352-601-8980

February 2nd 9 a.m. 3 p.m.
2nd Annual Best Friends Fest
Citrus County Animal Services
Entrance Fee: $20 per person
At the Citrus County Auditorium. Event will include pet
rescues, groomers, veterinarians, food, face painting an a
silent auction to benefit Animal Services' Special Needs
Fund. Bring in pet food for the needy and you will be
entered into a drawing for a prize. For more information call
352-746-8400

February 8th 6:30 p.m.
Citrus Has Talent
Senior Foundation of Citrus County, INC
at the Curtis Peterson Auditorium
Entrance Fee: $10 per person children under 10 are free.
Doors open at 6 p.m. For tickets or other information
call 352-527-5905

February 9th 11 a.m.
8th Annual Purple Heart Ceremony
Aaron A.Weaver Chapter 776 Military Order Purple Heart
At the National Guard Armory
Eighth Annual Purple Heart Ceremony at the National Guard
Armory in Crystal River, commemorating the proud legacy
of the Purple Heart and Honoring Florida's fallen heros of
the Global War on Terror and America's wounded warriors.
Hosted by The combat wounded Oatriots of Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776. Featuring The Afghanistan/Iraq
Memorial Portrait Mural with Patriotic music by Paul and
Jackie Stevio.Veterans and Public arre cordially invited.


February 9th 12:00 p.m.
Rotary Club of Inverness
2013 Charity Auction
Online and Watch Live on WYKE
www.rotaryinverness.com


Eighth Annual
Purple Heart Ceremony
Florida National Guard Armory, Crystal River
Saturday, February 9,2013,11:00 a.m.
Commemorating the proud legacy of the Purple Heart
& Honoring Florida's fallen heroes of the Global War on
Terror and America's wounded warriors














All Gave Some, Some Gave All
Hosted by The combat wounded Patriots of
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776
Military Order of the Purple Heart
Featuring The Afghanistan/Iraq Memorial
Portrait Mural with Patriotic
music by Paul and Jackie Stevio and Marleigh Miller
VETERANS AND PUBLIC ARE CORDIALLY INVITED


COMMENTARY


ODV3P













CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


4

V

11~~


4A;



I|


CONTROL CREDIT


Six tips to get

out from under

holiday debt

ALEX VEIGA
AP business writer
A wallet-emptying shopping
binge and New Year's debt
hangover are mainstays for
many consumers.
And now that the holiday
bills have arrived, many face
the daunting task of whittling
down the mountain of often
high-interest credit card debt
before it gets out of control.
That task is made more diffi-
cult this year because most pay-
checks have been reduced,
because Congress and the
White House allowed a two-
year reduction in Social Secu-
rity payroll taxes to lapse at the
end of December.
Although many cardholders
have kept their credit card debt
relatively low since 2010, their
average debt is expected to
grow by roughly 8 percent to
$5,446 by the end of this year.
That's the highest level in four
years, according to credit re-
porting firm TransUnion.
That suggests some con-
sumers could end up carrying
at least a portion of their 2012
holiday debt, and paying inter-
est on it, well into 2013.
"The worst thing you can do
is stick your head in the sand
and not begin to change," said
Norma Garcia, manager of the
financial services program for
Consumers Union, publisher of
Consumer Reports.
Here are six tips on how to
detox your finances this year.
1. Tally up
what you owe
First on the debt to-do list is
to take stock of the damage.
That means reviewing credit
card bills, bank statements and
other accounts to determine
how much you owe and how
that translates into monthly
payments.
Experts also recommend get-
ting a copy of your credit report
if you haven't done so in more
than a year.
"That way, you'll know ex-
actly where you are, in terms of
what's being reported to the
credit reporting companies,"
said Rod Griffin, director of
public education for credit re-
porting firm Experian.
Consumers are entitled to get
a credit report from the three
nationwide credit reporting


J
I
7


Photos Special to the Chronicle
Consumers Union financial services manager tells citizens with
credit card debt to follow six simple steps to eliminate money left
on credit cards from holiday spending.


companies free of charge every
12 months. Copies can be ob-
tained at AnnualCreditReport.
com.
A credit report can help you
understand how your debt, and
your payment history, will be
perceived by potential lenders.
It also underscores the need
to bring down card balances, as
high balances are viewed as a
sign of risk.
2. Draw up
a payment plan
Paying down credit card debt
requires discipline.
One oft-advised strategy for
borrowers carrying balances on
two or more credit cards is to
rank the cards by their interest
rates and then make the biggest
monthly payment on the card
with the highest interest rate.
For the rest, only make the min-
imum monthly payment. The
process is repeated once the
card with the highest rate is
paid off.
This approach reduces the
portion of payments going to-
ward interest
Griffin said some borrowers
might be better off funneling
the biggest payments to the
card with the lowest overall
balance. That enables a card-
holder to pay off a card entirely
more quickly This can provide
a psychological boost and reaf-
firm it's possible to conquer
your debt.
Remember this: If you used
credit cards to take advantage
of holiday sales, you may
quickly lose any savings be-
cause you're allowing balances
to linger


3. Consider
a balance transfer
A survey by Consumers
Union found half of the respon-
dents are racking up interest
charges by carrying a balance.
For those who don't have a
pile of cash they can draw upon
to pay down their debt, the next
best option is to lower the in-
terest charges.
You can ask your credit card
issuer to do you the favor, but
don't count on it A more realis-
tic option is to consolidate your
card balances into another card
with a lower interest rate.
Many card issuers extend
balance transfer offers, with
some providing an introductory
period of a year or more to pay
off the transferred balances at
no interest. However, that's not
set in stone.
"Your introductory period is
usually forfeited if you miss a
payment," said Bill Hardekopf,
CEO of LowCards.com.
Banks will typically charge a
fee of 3 percent to 4 percent on
the amount transferred.
The average interest rate on
balance transfer cards is 12.59
percent, according to Credit
Cards.com. That's the rate bor-
rowers can expect to pay after
the introductory period on
their cards ends. On cards of-
fering a variable interest rate,
borrowers can end up having a
lower or higher interest rate.
Worried about taking on
more credit cards? Griffin of
Experian said credit scores put
less emphasis on the number of
accounts borrowers have than
on how those accounts are


used, namely, if your balances
are high relative to the amount
of credit you have available.
Experts differ on the wisdom
of resorting to other options.
"With a credit card, the worst
thing that can happen is you de-
fault, your credit will go down,"
Garcia said. "With a home eq-
uity line of credit, that could
have implications for your
homeownership and your con-
tinued relationship with that
bank."
4. Make a budget,
follow it
Make a budget of your fixed
household expenses, such as
your mortgage or rent, utilities,
car loan, insurance, and so on.
Carve out a realistic amount of
money for more variable costs,
such as gas, groceries and
entertainment.
Once you figure out a
monthly plan that allows you to
pay down your card debt, even
if it means scrimping here and
there, stick with it. The key to
doing that is to remain on top of
expenses.
Computer and mobile phone
apps designed for tracking ex-
penses abound. Your bank
likely already has an app that
can help you to keep up with
charges on your accounts.
Some of the most popular
apps include Mint.com and
Pageonce, which draw data
from bank, credit card and
other accounts to give users a
comprehensive view of their fi-
nances and spending. They also
help organize and track ex-
penses, sending email alerts
when bills are due, among
other features.
Both are available for
iPhones and smartphones run-
ning Google's Android operat-
ing system.
Garcia suggested one way to
remove temptation from ill-
advised impulse spending is to
open a separate bank account
without debit card privileges
and have a portion of your pay-
check directly deposited there.
Then, you use that account to
pay down your cards.
5. Use credit,
don't abuse it
The best way to get back on
the right financial track is to get
in the habit of paying off any
charges on cards right away It
helps to reframe one's under-
standing of what credit is, Gar-
cia said.
"When you use a credit card,
you're tapping into a deficit -
unless you plan to pay for it -
rather than a reservoir of
See Page D2


Employer gifts Santa might have missed


Now the happy holi-
days are fading fast
in the rearview
mirror and we're well into
a new year, it may be a good
time to ask yourself, "Did I
get what I really wanted
this past Christmas,
Hanukkah or Kwanza?"
If what you wanted was a
way to grow and strengthen
your business by enhancing
market competitiveness,
increasing productivity and


attracting and retaining
skilled staff, and Santa did
not deliver, don't worry;
Workforce Connection can.
Unlike so many of the
gifts we enjoy during our
celebrations, Workforce
Connection's offerings
don't come with a hefty
price tag. In fact, not only is
there no charge for our
services, but many of the
services end up keeping
cash in your pocket. Best of


all, you don't have to wait
until next December to
check out these presents.
Let's start with the Em-
ploy Florida Marketplace
at www.EmployFlorida.
com, something that tops
the list of Darlene God-
dard, executive director of
Human Resources for
WINCO Manufacturing and
chairman of our board of
directors.
"The Employ Florida


Marketplace (EFM) is a
great place to post your
openings and staffing needs
- at no charge," Goddard
said. "If you haven't tried
EFM in the past, or if it has
been awhile since you vis-
ited the site, it is time to
take another look at this
wonderful resource."
Goddard noted EFM at-
tracts "highly qualified


Page D2


Insurance

is worth

something
Dear Bruce: My
son-in-law
worked in man-
agement at a textile
company for 27 years be-
fore the company closed
all its factories and
moved overseas. During
that time, my son-in-law
paid into a $400,000 life
insurance policy
Can he get back any
cash value on this pol-
icy? It does not seem
right for him to have lost
all that money when it
was through no fault of
his own. Does he need to
see a lawyer, or is this a
done deal? M.G., via
email
Dear M.G.: At the end
of your note, you say
your son-in-law has "lost
all that money" He did
not lose as much as you
might think.
For 27 years, during
the important part of his
life when his family was
young, your son-in-law
had insurance. Merci-
fully, he is still living.
But if he had died any-
time in that 27 years, his
family would have re-
ceived a $400,000 tax-
free payment not a
bad thing.
Whether the policy
has any cash value is an-
other matter, and
whether he can con-
tinue the policy is still
another matter. It may
be the policy is his or
will become his and he
can continue to make
the payments or take a
lower net paid policy.
He should be talking to
his former employer, as-
suming it is still in busi-
ness overseas or
elsewhere.
I know it seems unfair,
and it may be that he has
lost his rights because
he has neglected to
check into them. The
only way to find out is to
get on it.
Dear Bruce: I read
your column faithfully
every week, and I re-
spect your expertise.
We live next door to a
small mobile home on a
property that has been
trashed and abandoned
for the past two years.
Our son would like to
purchase it, but the
roads we have taken
have led us nowhere.
We started at the title
company, then went to
the courthouse. We
found the property had
a lien on it through the
Department of Human
Services, as the mother
who owned it was on So-
cial Security disability
before she died, and it is
now in the daughter's
name.
We called DHS, which
said it has nothing to do
with it We have con-
tacted the daughter, who
lives in another town,
and she said it belongs to
the county. The county
said the property will be
up for auction in three
years, but we need it now.
So what can we do to pur-
chase this little place?
It has a $1,500 back
sewage bill, and the back
taxes are about $2,000. It
is filled with the last
renter's garbage, trucks,
cars and other stuff.
We don't have a lot of
money to pay lawyers,
etc., but we would love
to clean up this place
next to us and own it.
- C.C., via email


. Page D4


Laura Byrnes
WORKFORCE
CONNECTION


.,t I 1 "





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Price trio to run
CPA firm
Crystal River CPA firm,
Price & Company, P.A., is
pleased to announce Charles
E. Price, E.A., Daniel E. Price,
MACC, CPA, and Phillip W.
Price Jr. will handle the opera-
tion of the firm.
Price & Company, P.A.,
which has been in business
for more than 40 years under
the leadership of its founder,
the late Phillip W. Price Sr.,
will continue providing ac-
counting and payroll services,
individual and corporate tax
preparation, Quickbooks con-
sulting and tax planning serv-
ices.
For questions, call Chuck
Price at 352-795-6118, or visit
www.pwprice.com.
McCallum offers
cruise, land deals
CRYSTAL RIVER -
Melissa McCallum announced
today she has joined Cruise
Planners-American Express
Travel, an award-winning na-
tional cruise and travel fran-
chise company. Affiliation
means Melissa McCallum can
now offer her customers ex-
clusive pricing on a wide
range of cruise and destina-
tion wedding packages, a
choice of thousands of group
departures, private cruise
sales, as well as cabin up-
grades and special amenities
such as shore excursions,
discounted fares, travel gifts
and more. As a Cruise Plan-
ners travel advisor, McCallum
provides specialized land and



BYRNES
Continued from Page D1

candidates" who are regis-
tering with cover letters,
resumes and employment
histories.
"Plus, with some help
from the staff at Workforce
Connection, I am able to
search candidates, see
who is applying, find out
whether or not they are a
veteran and what their
Ready-to-Work credential
level is, and how closely
their experiences match
my requirements."
You'll also find a wealth
of easy-to-navigate tools
and resources. Need labor
market statistics for your
end-of-year review? It's
there.
Want to find out about
available training? Click
on the link. You can even
set up templates for com-
municating with prospec-
tive hires.
"I love great, easy-to-
access resources, and I
love (it's) free," Goddard
said. "I think you will,
too."
Our board chair men-
tioned the Florida Ready-
to-Work credential, a free
employee credentialing
program that tests, and
scores job candidates'
skills and work habits. For
employers, it takes the
guesswork out of hiring,
saving time and money
There are three state-
certified credential levels:
Bronze, silver and gold.
Employers who request
credentialing know job
candidates will have the
skills to get the job done,
thereby reducing em-
ployee training and
turnover costs.
Workforce Connection
has partnered with
providers such as the Col-
lege of Central Florida to
offer employers up to
three complimentary can-
didate assessments, in-
cluding cognitive and
personality tests, aptitude
and integrity tests, voca-
tional interest inventories
and evaluation of work
samples.
"Prove It!" is another
popular assessment we
offer to give you the power
to identify and select the
most talented employees.
It tests hundreds of skills
and behavioral assess-


ments for clerical, soft-
ware, technical, call
center, industrial, finan-
cial, legal and medical
professions, with more
than 1,300 validated
assessments.
Of course, posting your
open positions and match-
ing candidates' skills are
part of the critical recruit-
ment process. Your Work-
force Connection
employment specialist
will work with our busi-
ness development man-


Special to the Chronicle
Charles E. Price, E.A.,
Daniel E. Price, MACC,
CPA, and Phillip W. Price Jr.
will handle the Crystal River
CPA firm Price & Company.

tour packages to the most
sought-after destinations
around the world.
"Cruising has become one
of the fastest growing meth-
ods of travel. More and more
people are taking cruises
every year," McCallum said.
"The cruising trend has
changed and cruisers are
more adventurous and youth-
ful. There's also been the
emergence of multi-genera-
tional cruisers families that
take their cruise vacations to-
gether. Cruises offer the most
satisfying, convenient and
value-oriented way to travel.
Cruise Planners has "Top Pro-
ducer" status with virtually
every cruise line, which en-
ables me to provide my cus-
tomers with the best prices
along with my expertise and
personalized service."
As an American Express
Travel Services Representa-


* For information about
Workforce Connection,
call 352-291-9559

agers to ensure you get the
level of customized serv-
ice to meet your specific
unique needs. This can in-
clude assistance writing
the perfect job descrip-
tion, handling applica-
tions so you aren't
inundated with job seek-
ers at your place of busi-
ness, coordinating hiring
events at your location or
ours and assisting with the
interview process.
We know hiring the right
candidate and upgrading
their skills can be the gift
that keeps on giving for
your company We also
know businesses must
constantly adapt to keep
pace with changing needs
and industry standards.
But if Santa didn't stick a
winning lottery ticket in
your stocking, how can you
afford it?
For prospective new
hires who may not have all
the skills or experience
you need, but would oth-
erwise make an ideal em-
ployee, we continue to
offer our On-the-Job (OJT)
training program. Without
getting too deep into the
weeds, depending on the
size of your company and
the job candidate you
want to hire, Workforce
Connection may reim-
burse up to 90 percent of
your new employee's
wages while you are train-
ing them. OJT may cover
other costs involved in on-
boarding a new employee,
such as background
checks and uniforms.
Last, but certainly not
least, we offer our Custom
Business Training (CBT)
program which may cover
up to 100 percent of your
out-of-pocket costs associ-
ated with training, licens-
ing or certification of your
existing employees. Not
surprisingly, we think it's a
win-win for your business
and your staff.
CBT can offset the cost
of more than 400 licenses
and certifications, includ-
ing A+/Net+ certification
for information technol-
ogy, welder and CNC certi-
fications as well as OSHA
30 certificate for manufac-
turing/construction, ASE
certificate for auto me-
chanics, EMT/Paramedic
certifications and certi-
fied phlebotomist for
health care professionals,
QuickBooks certificate for
administrative positions,
and the 2-15 insurance li-
cense, to name a few.
Let's recap. Workforce
Connection gives you ac-
cess to the state's premier
online job board and pow-
erful employer tools, can-
didate assessments and
personalized professional
HR services plus cost-sav-
ing programs to help you


Special to the Chronicle
Arbor Trail Rehab and Skilled Nursing Center received the
Excellence in Action award from National Research
Corporation. Pictured, from left, are: front row, Bob Bruce,
Andrea Harris, Linda Dixon and Monica Greenlaw; and
back row, Kari Rady and Patti Maltese.


tive agency, Cruise Planners
offers Mariner Club sailings,
which means their customers
receive exclusive benefits
such as a gracious and com-
plimentary host, private cock-
tail party, shore events,
additional shipboard credits,
and more-adding value to the
vacation. New this year is the
exclusive "Cruise for Free"
program that allows cus-
tomers to use their American
Express Reward Points to
cover all or part of their cruise
or land vacation.
Licensed, bonded, and in-
sured, Cruise Planners-Amer-
ican Express Travel is a
member of CLIA (Cruise Line
International Association),
NACOA (National Association
of Cruise Only Agencies), and
the BBB (Better Business Bu-
reau). For more information,
contact Melissa McCallum of

hire the employees you
want and train the em-
ployees you have all at
no cost. To get started or
learn more, call us in In-
verness at 352-237-2223 or
toll-free at 800-746-9950.
Sorry Santa, looks like
Workforce Connection can
help employers jingle all
the way to next Christmas.


Cruise Planners at 352-563-
0307 or visit wwww.cruisewith
melissa.com.
Arbor Trail Rehab
receives award
INVERNESS Today 17
Florida nursing homes have
received the 2011-12 Excel-
lence in Action award from
National Research Corpora-
tion. Arbor Trail Rehab and
Skilled Nursing Center was
the only Citrus County recipi-
ent. This honor recognizes
skilled nursing homes that
achieve the highest levels of
satisfaction excellence, as
demonstrated by overall resi-
dent or employee satisfaction
scores that fall within the top
10 percent of the My In-
nerView product database.
"The most important take-
away regarding the Excel-
lence in Action awards is that

-

Laura Byrnes, APR is a
certified workforce pro-
fessional and communica-
tions manager at
Workforce Connection.
She can be reached at
352-291-9559 or 800-434-
5627, ext 1234 orlbyrnes
@clmworkforce. com.


Crystal River
795-3212


www.wmwccpa.com


Inverness
726-8130


BUSINESS DIGEST
* Submit information via email to newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-3280,
attn: Business Digest.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit notices.
* High-resolution photos will be considered for
publication. Images taken with most cellphone
cameras do not reproduce well.
* Publication on a specific date or in color cannot be
guaranteed.
* Submissions about specific prices of products or
sales events are considered advertising and are not
eligible for Business Digest.


the skilled nursing award re-
cipients were first recognized
by their own residents and
employees through excellent
satisfaction survey scores,"
said Susan L. Henricks, pres-
ident and COO of National
Research Corporation. "This
also underscores the impor-
tance for long-term care
providers to understand the
value of measuring quality
over time. This is not only
true because of increasing
regulatory scrutiny that may
impact reimbursement rates
in the future, plus the favor-
able perceptions that hospi-
tals will look for in post-acute
partnerships, but the differ-
ences that skilled nursing
homes are making in the
lives of their residents and
employees everyday. We
salute our clients for taking
the initiative to measure
quality."
The Excellence in Action
awards are presented exclu-
sively to National Research
clients who use My InnerView
products. Qualifying nursing



CREDIT
Continued from Page Dl

savings," she said. "The
person should ask them-
selves, 'Can I pay off that
balance every month?'
and if I can't, what's that
going to cost me?"


homes must have completed
a customer survey in 2011.
Winners must have also
achieved a minimum of 10 re-
sponses with a minimum 30
percent response rate and
scored in the top 10 percent
of qualifying facilities on the
question "What is your recom-
mendation of this facility to
others" in terms of the per-
centage of the respondents
rating the facility as "excel-
lent."
"We take pride in our facility
and the care we give," said
Andrea D. Harris, nursing
home administrator for Arbor
Trail Rehab. "Our residents
become part of our family
while they are here. We are
humbled that they hold us in
such high regard."
Arbor Trail Rehab has been
a part of Citrus County for
more than 25 years specializ-
ing in Subacute and long-term
care.
For more information on
Arbor Trail Rehab and Skilled
Nursing Center contact Kari
Rady at 352-637-1130.


6. Get help
Feeling overwhelmed by
debt? Counseling agencies
approved by the U.S. De-
partment of Housing and
Urban Development offer
free credit counseling, ad-
vice on budgets and deal-
ing with creditors. They can
be found on www.hud.gov


-iNCMETA


BOB LANE,Accountant
Accounting & Income Tax Returns
Fixed & Equity Indexed Annuities
(352) 344-2888 (352) 344-2599
(352) 344-2480 Fax (352) 637-5500


400 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL. 34450
43 Years in Business 31 Years in Inverness



Christine C. Eck, CPA, PA
910 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 563-2522
Certified Public Accountant Member: Florida Institute of CPAs
Fre V hour io nsult atii'hokn foitilriiini n Iewcints
Tax Preparation:
f "d;,J ll', ll ... i F ;. I,, ;.,1. l l


L iInu ."lri i..,,i irnhllin Iiin


PRICE & COMPANY, P.A.
Certified Public Accountants

795-6118
Serving Citrus County for over 30 years


Charles E. Price, EA

Federal & Out-of-State Tax Preparation
Corporate Tax Preparation
Business Accounting Services
QuickBooks Consulting
Payroll Services

www.pwprice.com


M Accurate and affordable service year round

* Experienced, trained tax professionals

* Convenient evening and weekends hours

* Audit assistance

* Electronic filing


Dunnellon (352) 489-4760
Beverly Hills (352) 527-4117
Crystal River (352)795-4733 / 564-1010
Inverness (352) 726-5349
Homosassa (352) 628-3660


H&R BLOCK'
MITOOOI


AWILLIAMS,
A McCRANIE,
H WARDLOW
& CASH, P.A.
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS


2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS to serve you!
Complete Income Tax Service


I


D2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013


BUSINESS


For Mmoreinforatio

on dvrtsig3al






Scan M. M Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce
this:


numberr onneition -



28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801 JANUARY 27, 2013


NEWS YOU Sunshine Gardens receives New Image honor


CAN USE


Register
Chamber, BWA
lunches planned
for February
You will want to get your
seat reserved for the
Feb. 8 Chamber mem-
bers' lunch at the Plan-
tation on Crystal River.
County Administrator
Brad Thorpe will dis-
cuss the Citrus County
budget. The February
lunch is sponsored by
Premier Vein. Log in to
the Members Only
section at www.
citruscountychamber
.com to receive the pre-
paid discounted mem-
ber price of $18. It
includes lunch, the
presentation and net-
working opportunities.
At the door or invoice
member price is $20;
non-members are wel-
come for $22. Seating
is limited and reserva-
tions are required. Call
the Chamber office at
352-795-3149 to re-
serve your spot. Take a
moment now to make
your reservation for The
Business Women's
Alliance lunch on
Wednesday, Feb. 20, at
Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club. This
meeting of the Cham-
ber's BWA committee is
sponsored by Kumon
Math and Reading Cen-
ter. Reservations are re-
quired. Prepay price for
lunch and networking is
$20; at-the-door price
is $25.
Rental space
available
Looking for high-profile
space? How about
1,000 square feet of
newly renovated retail
rental space? Located
in the Specialty Gems
building. U.S. 19 sig-
nage, wheelchair ramp
and ample parking. Call
Carol Kimbrough at
352-422-0800.



CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce

Upcoming

Chamber

events
Jan. 28 Ribbon-
cutting, 4:30 p.m. at SOQUILI
STABLES, Crystal River.
Feb. 2 Ribbon-cutting,
1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at CIT-
RUS COUNTY FALLEN
HEROS, Bicentennial Park
Feb. 6 Ribbon-cutting,
4:30 p.m. atALIKAT
FASHION/ RIDING DIRTY,
Crystal River.
Feb. 7 Ribbon-cutting,
4:30 p.m. at TAMMY'S
EATERYAND SUB SHOP,
Homosassa.
Feb. 7 Business After
Hours. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
NATURE COAST MIN-
ISTRIES/
FRIENDS OF THE BLUES
Feb. 8 February
Chamber Lunch, 11:30 a.m.
at Plantation
Feb. 20- Business
Women'sAlliance February
Lunch, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at
Citrus Hills Golf and Coun-
try Club.
Feb. 21 Business After
Hours, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
SUNFLOWER SPRINGS
ASSISTED LIVING FACILITY
March 1 Berries Brew
and Barbeque Kick Off
Party, 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. in
downtown Floral City.
Remember, coupons and
discounts also appear on
the mobile and regular
website!
Check out our complete
calendar for community, en-
tertainment and fundraising
events.


T he Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce -
honored newly opened .l
Sunshine Gardens, Crystal
River, with its New Image
Award for January 2013.
Sunshine Gardens, owned
by Robert and Jackie Hilger,
represents a family tradi-
tion of providing a quality
facility that provides qual-
ity care in a colorful, home-
like environment for those needing assisted
living, especially the memory-impaired. In ad-
dition to long-term placement, Sunshine Gardens
provides respite care and adult day care to as-
sist families if they need a break or a vacation.
"We know that taking care of an aging parent
or loved one is a 24/7 job and can be exhaust-


-- ing," said Marcey Mast, ac-
cepting the award for the
organization. "Many give
up their own life and
health to care for that per-
son. We are here to help
you. Our mission statement
is 'Just Do the Right Thing,'
and we do all we can to
help with the transition for
you and your loved one. We
are here for the person
needing the assistance AND for the family"
Sunshine Gardens, located at 311 NE Fourth
Ave., Crystal River, opened in August of 2012.
You may contact them at 352-563-0235 between
the hours of 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more
information, visit their website at www.
sgwseniors.com.


ON THE MOVE


Ambassadors for the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce join with Wells Fargo staff members
to officially join the Chamber. Staff, front row from left: Dusty Smith, Kyle Knapp, Tawnya
Speedling and LeeAnne Rohrer. Ambassadors, back row from left: Sarah Fitts, First
International Title; Nancy Hautop, Cadence Bank; Kim Baxter, Cadence Bank; Dan Pushee,
chairman; George Bendtsen, Insurance by George; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; Bill
Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County; and Tom Corcoran, Life Care Center of Citrus County.


Say hello to new members


First International Title is pleased to
announce the opening of their second
office at 2676 W. Woodview Lane,
Lecanto, FL 34461. With our other office
located in downtown Inverness, First In-
ternational Title now has more than 24 of-
fices throughout the state of Florida. You
can find out more information on our
website at www.firstintitle.com or call us
at 352-513-4856.


W ells Fargo representatives say, "We
are excited to be a new member of
the Chamber. We look forward to em-
bracing our relationship and building it
with both the Chamber and the commu-
nity." Wells Fargo is located at 1100oo S.E.
U.S. 19, Ste. A, Crystal River, 352-601-


Welcome Beverly Lingerfelt as
Practice Manager for Christie
Dental's Meadowcrest, Dunnellon
and Williston practices. Lingerfelt,
originally from Ohio, came to Citrus
County in 2009. She has a Master of
Science degree in management from
Indiana Wesleyan University.


The Nature Coast Chapter of the
Florida Public Relations Association
inducted three new members at its
January luncheon. From left: Katie
Mehl, APR and Nature Coast Chapter
president; Neale Brennan, director of
the Key Training Center Foundation; Sue
Littnan of the Early Learning Coalition;
and Cindi Fein, communications and
public relations coordinator with the
Citrus County Chamber of Commerce.


Meet the new class of Leadership Citrus

J III l I -A 1-WTTEdi--^


Leadership Citrus, a program of the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce, proudly introduces the class of 2013,
comprised of local businesspeople and residents. Front row, from left: Cathy Edmisten, Oak Hill Hospital; Isaac
Baylon, Century 21 JW Morgan; Terri Hartman, Crossland Realty; Meghan Shay, The Centers; Cindi Fein, Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce; Melissa Benefield, Abitare Paris Salon & Spa; Courtney Pollard, Citrus County Chronicle; Katie
Mehl, Citrus Memorial Health System; Sherri Parker, Sherri C. Parker & Assoc. Realtors; Laura Grady, Citrus 95.3 and
The Fox 96.7; Michael Duca, Rockmonster, Inc. and Lindsay Blair, BOCC. Back row: left to right: Melissa Wood, Citrus
County Health Deptartment; Tony Winebrenner, Citrus Pest Management; Ray Thompson, Capital City Bank; Ryan Glaze,
Citrus County Sheriffs Office; and John Steelfox, Citrus County Property Appraiser's Office. Not pictured: Sunshine
Arnold, Jessie's Place. For more information about this program, call the Chamber at 352-795-3149. Good luck class!


Another great event is happening in Citrus County and
on this weeks Chamber Chat we are going to tell you all
about it! Join Melissa Benefield and her co-host Debbie
Reilly as they talk about the "Love Your Library" event
coming up on February 15th. A $20 tickets gets you
great entertainment, hors d'oeuvres, 2 glasses of wine
and so much more! That's not the only great event
we're going to tell you about. The 26th Annual
Strawberry Festival is coming up at the beginning of
March and this years kick off is sure to be a "berry"
good time! Head to downtown Floral City for the
Berries, Brew & BBQ Friday March 1st from 5-9. Then
come on out to the Strawberry Festival in Floral Park
March 2nd and 3rd. Speaking of strawberries, Dudley
Calfee from Ferris Farms is bringing some delicious
berries for us to sample along with some great gift
items from Ferris Groves. Then stay with us to learn
about a "Class Act" fashion show at the Grove
Downtown on Thursday February 7th at 6:30. You will
see great fashions from Karma, Upscale Resale worn by
some Citrus County celebrities!
You have 3 chances to watch Chamber Chat--
Monday 6pm-- Thursday 8am-- Friday 1pm-- every
week! If you would like your business or local event
featured on Chamber Chat-- at no cost to you-- Email
Melissa Benefield at Spotlightmelissa@aol.com.
"LIKE" Chamber Chat on Facebook for clips of past
segments and updates on our weekly show!


YOU CAUGHT MY EYE ...
Iori Parks /
SunTrust Bank, ~
Beverly Hills
...FOR
OUTSTANDING
CUSTOMER
SERVICE!


Sunflower Springs Resort Assisted
Living Community has named Amy
Holaday Director of Community Re-
lations. A longtime Citrus County res-
ident, Amy says: "I have been a fan
of Sunflower Springs since they
opened their doors just over three
years ago, and I could not be happier
to join this team of professionals.
I've learned from experience that
fancy and expensive marketing ef-
forts don't mean a thing unless you
truly understand what your cus-
tomer's individual needs are. We
strive to meet the needs of each one
of our residents and to provide them
with a 'resort' atmosphere that al-
lows them comfort, safety and en-
joyment!" You can easily reach Amy
at 352-621-8017 or aholaday@
sunfloweralf.com.


2013 Chamber officers installed
S Circuit Court
Judge Patricia
Thomas, left,
installed the 2013
P Citrus County
Chamber of
Commerce officers
at the Chamber
lunch Jan. 11. They
are, second from
left, Bill Winkel,
past chairman;
John Murphy,
chairman; Don
Taylor, chairman
elect; and Rob
Wardlow, treasurer.


A











Expiring credits, deductions extended


A few new rules

for filing taxes

CAROLE FELDMAN
Associated Press

WASHINGTON Taxpayers
preparing to file their 2012 re-
turns can breathe a collective
sigh of relief.
The alternative minimum tax
or AMT has been patched per-
manently and several tax cred-
its and deductions that
technically expired at the end of
2011 were extended as part of the
fiscal cliff legislation Congress
passed and President Barack
Obama signed into law in January
"It certainly puts back into
place many of the tax benefits
that had expired for many peo-
ple," said Mark Steber, chief tax
officer with Jackson Hewitt Tax
Services. "The extenders will be
back on people's tax returns,
making their 2012 refunds larger
than they would have been."
But the delay in congressional
action could mean confusion for
some taxpayers over what cred-
its and deductions still exist.
That could make going it
alone on tax day costly Experts
said people should seek some
guidance, whether it's from a
professional tax preparer, up-to-


Associated Press
Mark Steber, right, interviews Justine Watson about the fiscal cliff
Sept. 27, 2012, in Madison Square Park for Jackson Hewitt's "On
the Street" video series, in New York.


date software programs or tax
guides, before filing returns.
More than 90 percent of tax-
payers go to a tax preparer or
use tax software to file their re-
turns, estimated Jim Buttonow, a
20-year IRS veteran who is now
vice president of products for
New River Innovation, a tax
technology company
Filing returns
The Internal Revenue Service
will begin accepting returns Jan.
30, an eight-day delay necessi-
tated by the late congressional


action.
"We have worked hard to open
tax season as soon as possible,"
IRS Acting Commissioner
Steven T Miller said in a state-
ment. "This date ensures we
have the time we need to update
and test our processing systems."
The agency said most taxpay-
ers more than 120 million
households would be able to
begin filing Jan. 30. But filing for
those claiming energy credits, de-
preciation of property or general
business credits will be delayed
until late February or March.


Last year, the agency received
137 million returns.
Electronic filing increased by
6.2 percent to 113 million in
2012, an upward trend tax ex-
perts expect to continue. Al-
though most electronically filed
returns are by tax professionals,
increasing percentages of indi-
viduals are doing their own re-
turns electronically
Nearly 104 million people re-
ceived refunds last year totaling
about $283 billion. The average
refund was $2,707, slightly less
than the year before, according
to the IRS.
Tallying deductions
As people sit down to do their
taxes this year, they'll find the
standard deduction has been ad-
justed higher for inflation, to
$11,900 for married couples fil-
ing jointly, $8,700 for heads of
households and $5,950 for single
taxpayers.
About two-thirds of taxpayers
claim the standard deduction,
according to Barbara Weltman,
an author of J.K. Lasser's Tax
Guide 2013.
Each personal exemption is
worth $3,800 this year, up from
$3,700 in 2011. Look expansively at
dependents beyond your children
under 19, or 24 if in college. For
example, if you're paying more
than half the support for your par-


ents and their taxable income is
less than the $3,800 exemption,
you might be able to claim them as
dependents even if they're not liv-
ing in your own home.
"If a parent's only income is
Social Security, chances are lit-
tle or none of the Social Security
will be taxable. Otherwise, very
few people would get to claim a
parent," said Jackie Perlman,
principal tax research analyst
with H&R Block's Tax Institute.
Single taxpayers with quali-
fied children or relatives as de-
pendents also may be able to use
head of household filing status,
which is more advantageous to
the taxpayer
There also are higher mileage
rate deductions -55.5 cents per
mile if you use your car for busi-
ness, 23 cents per mile for mov-
ing or medical issues and 14
cents a mile for charity
Capital gains rates are un-
changed from 2011 a maxi-
mum of 15 percent for assets
held more than a year.
And don't forget planning for
retirement. You can contribute
up to $5,000 to a traditional indi-
vidual retirement account -
$6,000 for people age 50 and
older and reduce their in-
come by that amount. If you
haven't made a contribution yet,
there's still time. You have until
April 15, the tax filing deadline.


MONEY
Continued from Page D1

Dear C.C.: I understand
your frustration. Part of
the problem is the prop-
erty has a very marginal
value, and no one really
wants to pursue it. If there
were a large DHS lien,
DHS would be happy to
have the matter closed out
I know you don't have a
ton of money for attorneys,
but I really believe an attor-
ney could clear this up for
you in a short time. A letter
from an attorney will get a
lot more attention from any
government agency than
will a letter from you.
You also should com-
plain to the city about the
trash, cars and trucks that
will have to be cleaned up.
Good luck.


Dear Bruce: I read your
column every week in the
Mankato (Minn.) Free Press
and enjoy it immensely I
have a question for you.
Before my mother died,
she signed the family
house, worth $400,000, to
my older sister. I do not
feel my mother was in her
right mind, but I have cho-
sen not to challenge my
sister on this issue, be-
cause she is the only rela-
tive I have left.
My sister and I agreed
she would give me $10,000
a year for 10 years, for a
total of $100,000. So far,
she's given me only
$20,000. Do you think it
would be wise to ask her to
take out a loan and give
me an $80,000 payment in
one lump sum? Then she
would have the tax advan-
tage of being able to
deduct the interest on the


loan and I could pay off my
own mortgage, which is
about $80,000.
My husband and I jointly
make about $50,000 a year
I am 52 years old, and for
retirement I am looking at
Social Security and my
husband's pension. I'm
thinking if our mortgage
were paid off, I could start
saving at least half of my
salary in an IRA for retire-
ment. RJ., Minnesota
Dear R.J.: I think you
are being extraordinarily
generous with your sister.
You're going to settle for
only 25 percent over 10
years. That doesn't seem at
all fair. If you choose not to
challenge your sister, I
think you should receive at
least $150,000.
That being observed, I
would insist the money be
paid in a lump sum. What
happens if your sister de-


cides she wants to leave the
house to some charity and
then passes away? You're
out in the cold. Since the
value of the house is
$400,000, it shouldn't be a
problem for her to get a
$130,000 mortgage if she has
any type of decent income.
You are entitled to the
money now, and you
should be able to invest it
by paying off your mort-
gage. I know this may be a
rough meeting with your
sister, but I believe it's one
that is called for.
Dear Bruce: I have a
question about late fees. I
financed some furniture to
take advantage of zero per-
cent interest. The financ-
ing company and my
personal bank of 20 years
are one and the same. I set
up automatic payments to
manage this account.
The payments are due


on the 14th of each month.
In October 2012, the 14th
was on a Sunday, and the
finance company didn't
process the payment until
Monday, Oct. 15. Conse-
quently, the company ap-
plied a late fee to the
account. I have never ex-
perienced this before.
I called to have the fee
removed and to discuss
what would happen the
next time the due date fell
on a Sunday, but the fi-
nancing company would
not remove the fee. Is this
correct that a late fee is
charged when the due
date falls on a Sunday? -
K.R, via email
Dear KR: I don't know
whether the company was
technically correct in
charging a fee because the
payment was received one
day late as a consequence
of the due date being a


Sunday Examine your
agreement and see how it
addresses this matter.
The way to make sure
this will not happen again
is to have the automatic
payment executed on the
12th of each month instead
of the 14th.
Since you have been a
customer of this institution
for many years, ask again
to have this fee removed.
Usually banks will do this
to accommodate a good
customer


Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.
corn or to Smart Money,
PO. Box 7150, Hudson, FL
34674. Questions of gen-
eral interest will be an-
swered in future columns.
Owing to the volume of
mail, personal replies
cannot be provided.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fax:(35) 53-565 Tol Fee:(88) 82-230 1Emal: lasifids~hroiclonlne~cm Iwebite ww~chonileolin~co


2 Table Lamps,
33" H, white ceramic,
Sq. bamboo design,
excel. $50
Broyhill Dining Rm Set.
Table, Parquet Top,
Rectangular shape, 2
leaves, 6 Caine High-
back chairs, china
hutch, 3 glass panels
3 shelves, med. fruit-
wood color, excel.
$550. (718) 666-6624


A DOCK RENTAL
Crystal Riv. Lited, canal
to river & Gulf. Up to
25ft, no sails 795-1986


CNA
Available for Private
Duty. Prefer afternoons
& evenings. References
available on request.
(352) 453-7255


INVERNESS
RV Spaces. Bring your
own boat and fishing
gear. AGE 55+ commu-
nity. Lot rent only
$360-$375 including
electric. Edge Water
Oaks 352-344-1380





$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$


$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389


BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191


Junk Appliances, Scrap
Metal, Mowers, Autos,
(352) 220-3138
FREE REMOVAL
Washers,Dryers,Riding
Mowers, Scrap
Metals, Antena
towers 270-4087



fertilizer, Horse manure
mixed with pine
shavings for gardens or
mulch. U load and haul
away. 352-628-9624
Free 4 Bronze Jalousie
Windows
36'/2 x 6014
(352) 302-4057
FREE KITTENS
18 wks old
Calico, litter trained
(352) 212-4061
Free to loving home
2 yr old male Beagle
(352) 726-4678



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077
FRESH CITRUS
@BELLAMY GROVE
Strawberries/Cabbage
Gift Shipping,
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378



Black Labrador
Retriever, about 1% yrs
old, answers to "Buddy",
lost in vicinity of W.
Dunnellon Rd. Owner is
heartbroken.
(352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662
Lost Kitten
5 months old, Gray w/
white on chest, 6 toes
on ea foot, Paul Drive
Inverness
Children Devasted
Please call
(352) 637-3339


LOST MALTI-POO
White female 1 yr old
named "Chloe" last
seen on W Starjasmine
PI, Beverly Hills.
Two little girls miss
her! Please call
(352) 249-0846

Lost Women's Gold
Bracelet, Lecanto
Area around 44
REWARD
(352) 527-0211

Wedding Band
Gold & White gold,
lost at Publix forest
Ridge, OR Movie The-
ater shopping plaza
Inverness, Senti-
mental REWARD
(352) 637-2458

Yellow Lab w/brown
collar no tag.Named
ZeusLost downtown
Inverness area
(352) 341-5557









SPRING HILL
CLASSES
COSMO DAYS
February 25, 2013
BARBER NIGHTS
February 25, 2013

SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only
**** ***
BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING


FREE REMOVAL
Wants to Thank
All of You for
making 2012 Possible,
See You In 2013



Not Looking for
Someone, just trying
to help people. If you
are Bored, Lonely,
Need Answers. Call
someone who cares.
24-7 (352) 426-1821



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077



ACCOUNTING
CLERK
Announcement
# 13-04
Responsible for per-
forming accounting
and clerical support
functions at the
Citrus County
Animal Shelter.
Three years financial
accounting experi-
ence. Starting pay
$10.77 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply on line by
Friday, February 1,
2013 EOE/ADA


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




EXPERIENCED
RECEPTIONIST
For fast pace
medical office. Must
be able to work
under pressure &
handle multiple
phone lines. Medical
terminology &
insurance
knowledge required.
Send resume to:
reply2013@
hotmail.com

SEVEN RIVERS

Join Our Team
Seven Rivers
Regional
Medical Center
Please visit our
Career Center at
www.SevenRivers
Regional.comrn
Phone 352-795-8462
Fax 352-795-8464
6201 N. Suncoast
Bvd. Crystal River,
FL, 34428
Stephanie Arduser
Recruiter
EOE Drug /Tobacco
Free Workplace


NURSING
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center of
Citrus County
in Lecanto
RN I LPN
Full-time and PRN
positions available
for Florida-licensed
nurses. Full-time shifts
are 7 a.m.-3 p.m., 3
p.m.-11 p.m. and 11
p.m.-7 a.m. PRN po-
sitions available for
all shifts. Long-term
care experience
preferred.
CNA
Full-time and PRN
positions available
for Florida-certified
nursing assistants.
Full-time shifts are 3
p.m.-11 p.m. and 11
p.m.-7 a.m. PRN po-
sitions available for
all shifts. Long-term
care experience
preferred.
We offer great pay
and benefits for
full-time associates,
including medical
coverage, 401(k)
and paid vacation,
sick days and holi-
days.
Hannah Mand
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln
Lecanto, FL 34461
Hannah Mand@
LCCA com
Visit us online at
LCCA.COM.
EOE/M/F/V/D -
37764


Center --
I : w l

#1 Employment source is



wwwchronicleonline corn


ARNP or PA
Wanted Part Time
for a busy Pediat-
ric
Practice in Crystal
River, Send Re-
sume
to:
lindapracticemar
itampabav.rr.com

HHC AGENCY

Looking for
RN & Psych RN
(352) 794-6097

MEDICAL
OPPORTUNITIES
* Billing Clerk
* Receptionist
* Medical Asst.
* Scanning Asst.
Blind Box 1792P
c/o Citrus
County
Chronicle, 1624
N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal
River, FL 34429

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

SUNSHINE GARDENS
Assisted Living
Facility
Looking for
Experienced
CNA's PRN
for all shifts
No Phone Calls.
Apply in Person at
311 NE 4th Ave.
Crystal River or
online at www.
sawseniors. comr
Click On "About Us"


COLLEGE of
CENTRAL
F FLORIDA
-an equal opportunity
college-
College of
Central Florida
Adjunct Applied
Welding Technology
(Levy Co. Center)
Assistant Director of
Admissions and In-
ternational Students,
(Revised Job
Description)
Faculty Associate
Degree Nursing,
(220 Work days)
Faculty
Criminal Justice
(Citrus Co. Campus)
(168 Work days)
Unofficial transcripts
must be submitted
to be considered
for these positions.
Part-time
Library Technician
(Evenings
Monday-Thursday,
4:00 pm to 9:15 pm
for Fall & Spring
Term. Summer Term
has reduced hours
and varied sched-
ule. Saturday 10:00
am to 5:00 pm.)
How to Apply
Go to www.CF.edu,
click on Quick Links
then Employment
at CF. Submit elec-
tronic application,
pool authorization
card and unofficial
transcripts online.
Email copy of
transcripts to
hr@CF.edu or
fax to 352-873-5885.
3001 SW College
Road,Ocala, FL
34474
CF is an Equal Op-
portunity Employer


Human Resource
Rep
Are you an HR
Professional with a
commitment to ex-
cellence? Do you
want to be part of a
high performance
team? Therapy
Management
Corporation, a
preferred provider in
all the communities
we serve, invites you
to talk with us. Our
home office is in
Homosassa, FL. 3+
years HR experi-
ence, superb com-
munication and
interpersonal skills,
along with strong
technology experi-
ence are what you
will need to be
successful. Please
apply online @
http://www.thera-
pymgmtjobs.com/
Proflle.aspx or fax
resume to
(352) 382-0212

LIC 440 CUST.
SERVICE REP/or
220 Agent
Needed for busy
Insurance office.
Apply in person
9am-12N
SHELDON PALMES
INSURANCE
8469 W Grover
Cleveland,
Homosassa



Your World




C oN......,- e


D4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BREAKFAST
COOK
Must have experience.
Apply in person
between 1pm & 2pm
206 W Tompkins St.
Inverness

Experienced
Bartender

Accepting Application
10a-11:30 & 2P-4p
Apply In Person Only
Lollygaggers
744 SE US Hwy 19
Next to Mr. B's C.R.
Drug Free Work Place

SOUS CHEF

needed for upscale
private Country
Club in Citrus Co.
Previous kitchen
management re-
quired with casual
and fine dining
culinary experience.
Send Resume to:
swiley@
citrushills.com





Customer
Service/Sales
Assit.

Must have exp., com-
puter skills, good atti-
tude and be a self
starter, Call (352)
628-4656

NOW HIRING
Entry-level to Mgmt.
Exp. Not req'd. Train-
ing provided. Benefit
package offered.
$600-$850/wk. Call
Ashley 352-436-4460

Real Estate
Agents

Busy real estate office
needs Realtors and
Buyers Agents Call
PLANTATION REALTY
352-634-0129




Automotive


Local Tower
Service Co.

Hiring person capa-
ble of ascending
broadcast towers to
service lights.
Electrical exp pref,
will train. Travel re-
quired throughout
Southeast. Cpy
vehicle and hotel
provided. Exc pay,
per diem, bonus and
benefits. Back-
ground check and
clean FL Dr. Lic
required. Apply in
person at Hilights
Inc. 4177 N. Citrus
Ave, Crystal River,
FL. 352-564-8830




MECHANIC

Oil, Tire changes,
Brakes and some
cleaning. PT to FT
(352) 563-1600, CR










RESIDENTIAL
ELECTRICIANS
Rough, Trim,
& Service
Full Benefits /EOE
APPLY AT:
Exceptional Electric
4070 CR 124A Unit 4
Wildwood




The City
of Cedar Key

is seeking an
experienced
Building Official.
The building official
is charged with the
administration and
enforcement of
local, state, and
federal codes, ordi-
nances and reaula-


Senior Lending
Officer/Office
Manager

Brannen Bank,
a banking institution in
central Florida,
is seeking a Senior
Lending Officer/ Office
Manager for the Citrus
county area. Re-
quires a bachelors
degree in business or
finance, residential
and commercial
lending experience
and at least four
year's Office Manager
Experience.
Duties include man-
agement of daily
branch operations
and originating a
variety of consumer
loan's. Offer's a com-
petitive salary and
benefit package. If in-
terested, please f
forward resume' to

Brannen Banks of
Florida, Inc.
Attn: Carol Johnson
PO Box 1929
Inverness, FL
34451-1929
EEO/M/F/V/D/DFWP




APPT. SETTERS
NEEDED

Sign on Bonus.
Great Commission Pay
and weekly bonuses
Call Bob 352-628-3500

CAREGIVERS
NEEDED

All Shifts Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

F/T Maintenance
/Grounds

Skills required:
Electrical, Plumbing,
Painting, Mechani-
cal and Grounds
Maintenance HVAC
certification
preferred


Ex erienced
AC Installers

Own Tools & Truck,
TOP PAY, Call Dave
(352) 794-6129



NEWSPA-

PER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and other
newspapers for
home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per
day.

Must have insured
and reliable vehicle
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up
with a cap-Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product

Apply in Person
1624 N
Medowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pm

Newspaper carriers
are independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle



Immmmml


SECRETARY/
HOSTESS

PIT for Builders
Model. Thur, Fri, Sat.
$7.79hr. Please
Email Resume to:
dreamcitrus5i7
yahoo.com
(352) 527-7171


Consultant/ tions for all buildings River Reach
Advisor and structures. Apartments
4to 8 hours per 2151 River Reach Cr
Eagle Buick GMC week as needed Crystal River, FL
Inc is in need of Salary Negotiable 34428
experienced PHONE/FAX
Automotive Service Application 352-795-8024, EOE
Consultants/Advisors Procedure
Minimum 2 yrs, deal- City application SPRING HILL
ership experience, forms are available Front Desk CLASSES
Aggressive pay plan at the reception Receptionists ********
and strong com- desk, City Hall, COSMO DAYS
pensation package 490 2nd Street, Need Front Desk February 25, 2013
that includes health Cedar Key, FL Receptionists who
insurance, paid 32625, Call City Hall are outgoing, BARBER NIGHTS
vacation, paid train- at 352-543-5132. with high energy. February 25, 2013
ing, certification to receive applica- Must be computer
reimbursement and tion by e-mail. literate and able
many other perks. Please include a to multi-task. SKIN & NAILS
Drug free workplace resume with your Part-to-full time, Day School Only
Application Avail. @ application, flexible schedule to ********
Eagle Buick GMC Closing Date include weekends. BENE'S
Inc. Homosassa, Fl. February 15, 2013 Submit resume to International
34448 Send Resume: The City of Cedar nancy@citrushills.
Fax (352) 417-0944 Keyis a Drug Free com, or apply in School of Beauty
Email: Workplace person at 2400 N. 1-866-724-2363
robbcole@eagle Equal Opportunity Terra Vista Blvd., STATEAPPROVED
buickgmc.com Employer Hernando, FL. FOR VA TRAINING




^S^M W1


CLASSIFIED




Real Estate Investor
looking for private
mortgage money.
Pis call Mark
(352) 270-8128




DOLL CLOTHES
build-a-bear clothes,
outfits, tops, bottoms,
31 pc total. $50. all
352-422-1309



BOOK ENDS pr Zebra
black and gold porcilin
by Lipper and Mann
$65. call or text
352-746-0401
CHINA CLOSET DECO
TYPE glass door,good
wood.Picture upon req.
looks good
$100.789-5770


Collectble


1918 JENNY STAMP
Good condition / call for
e-mail picture $100.
OBO LINDA
352-341-2271
DUDLEY'S






"3 AUCTIONS"

Fri 1/25
Estate Coin 6pm
$5-10-20 Gold
pieces, Silver, $500 &
$1,000 bills, Lg 1800's
currency, silver
Sat 1/26
Florida Porch
Antiques
Liquidation 10am
On Site@ 712 W.
Main St in Leesburg,
HUGE Sale of from
Long time Antique
dealer filled the
JC Penny
Tue 1/28 Real Estate
& Restaurant 10am
4135 S. Suncoast
Blvd. (US 19)
Homosassa,
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.corn
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384


SUNDAY,JANUARY 27, 2013 D5


KISSING FACES Sculp-
ture By John Cultrone
with stand $65. call or
text 352-746-0401
N.Y. YANKEES MEMO-
RABILIA signed
hats,Jersey (Jeters)#2
and more $100. or best
offer 789-5770

A4


11111111
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111
Victorian
BATH,PICHER,BOWEL
wood pedestal type.
$100. 789-5770




2 DR WHITE MAYTAG
REFRIG. w/Ice Maker
21.8 cu ft.
Less than 2yrs old.
$350
(352) 726-8021
31/2 Ton $100.
and 21/2 $75.
Used Copeland Scroll
AC COMPRESSORS
R22
John 352-208-7294
DISHWASHER GE
white, works good, looks
good,$100.
352-789-5770
DRYER$100 With 90
day warranty Call/text.
352-364-6504
GE MINI FRIDGE
31Hxl7Wxl9D, Black,
Excellent Condition $45
call 352-503-7143
GE Refrigerator
side by side w/ water
dispenser Bisque $380,
GO CART 5HP, 2s eats
built by Manco $275
(352) 503-6641
GE STOVE, coil top, self
cleaning, bisque $125;
MICROWAVE Over the
Range GE Spacemaker
$75 (352)503-6641
Refrigerator/Freezer,
GE, Side-by-Side,
White, 21.7 cubic feet
$100. Runs good
352-489-7393
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive wash-
ers & dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
WASHERS & DRYERS
(352) 209-5135


WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Exc.
Cond. Free Delivery
352-263-7398
WASHER$100 With 90
day warranty Call/text
352-364-6504
WESTINGHOUSE
STOVE Almond
continuouss clean,works
good looks good. $100.
789-5770
Whirlpool Heavy Duty
Super Capacity,
LP Gas Dryer,
Almond $125.
3V/2 Ton New Replace-
ment Carlyle Scroll AC
Compressor R22 $300
John 352-208-7294




DUDLEY'S






3 AUCTIONS**

Fri 1/25
Estate Coin 6pm
$5-10-20 Gold
pieces, Silver, $500 &
$1,000 bills, Lg 1800's
currency, silver
Sat 1/26
Florida Porch
Antiques
Liquidation 10am
On Site@ 712W.
Main St in Leesburg,
HUGE Sale of from
Long time Antique
dealer filled the
JC Penny
Tue 1/28 Real Estate
& Restaurant 10am
4135S Suncoast
Blvd. (US 19)
Homosassa,
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.corn
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384






Fri. 02/01 Preview @
4pm, Auction@ 6pm
General Merchandise
Sat. 02/02 Preview @
4pm, Auction@ 6pm
Antiques/Gen. Merch
un. 02/03 Preview @
12:30, Auction@ 1pm
Tailgate/Box lots
**WE BUY ESTATES**
6055 N. Carl G. Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
AB3232 (352)613-1389




50 Inch Hitachi HD TV
Projection console
Exc cond. $100
(352) 621-0405
AM/FM, Stereo
Cassette and
Turn Table $65.
TV, Toshiba,
19" color, $35.
(484) 547-9549


SHARP 32" TV WITH
REMOTE $20
352-613-0529



DOOR JAMB"ONLY"
new 3/0 x 6/8 with
weather stripping and
aluminum threshold $20
call text 352-746-0401
DOUBLE & SINGLE
garage doors, both for
$250 352-601-7911



17"FLAT SCREEN
MONITOR with mouse,
keyboard, speakers.
Asking $45
352-650-0180
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP DESKJET F4100
PRINTER computer
printer in good condition
with 1 new ink cartridge
Price $40 628-3418
IPOD MINI 2ND
GENERATION SILVER
4GB.Works great. Ask-
ing $25. 352-650-0180
KODAK 10X ZOOM
CAMERA like new / was
450.00 selling $100.
linda 341-2271




48" Kodiak
Bushhog,
less than 150 hrs.
Asking $450
(352) 382-0731
SIXTY GALLON TANK
ON TRAILER, $70.
352-746-6931




Chipper/Shredder
Troy-Bilt Tomahawk,
Bnggs & Stratton gas
engine. $700 OBO
(352) 601-3174




Oblong glass table
66x40 w/6 reclining
chairs; small side table,
2 footstools, beige w/
tiny flowers. Never
been outside. $400
Call John (352)
422-2317



2 Table Lamps,
33" H, white ceramic,
Sq. bamboo design,
excel. $50
Broyhill Dining Rm Set.
Table, Parquet Top,
Rectangular shape, 2
leaves, 6 Caine High-
back chairs, china
hutch, 3 glass panels
3 shelves, med. fruit-
wood color, excel.
$550. (718) 666-6624
Broyhill Wall Unit
$750.
Bassett Cabinet
with Drawers
$500.
(484) 547-9549


Cherry Desk,
credenza, file cabinet,
$600.
Oak TV Cabinet $300
(352) 212-9507
637-2921, 861-9448
Couch, Clean,
brown, excel, cond.
$200. Entertainment
Center Large, Cherry
Traditional, Like new
$600 (352) 270-9025
Dinning Room Set,
6 captain chairs,
& Hutch maple
$200
(352) 726-1081
FOLDING BED
TWIN $25
352-777-1256
FROSTED LEAF OVAL
MIRRORS 2 mirrors that
measure 36X24.
352-650-0180.
Asking $45. for both
LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET, In Original
Plastic, Never Used,
ORG $3000, Sacrifice
$975. CHERRY, BED-
ROOM SET Solid
Wood, new in factory
boxes- $895
Can Deliver. Bill
(813)298-0221.
LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET, In Original
Plastic, Never Used,
ORG $3000, Sacrifice
$975. CHERRY, BED-
ROOM SET Solid
Wood, new in factory
boxes- $895
Can Deliver. Bill
(813)298-0221.
LIVING ROOM CHAIR
large living room chair
and ottoman in very
good condition. $35.
352-220-4158
Love Seat &
Matching Recliner,
by Flexsteel
$275.
Call between 9a-7p
(352) 382-0603
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500
MATTRESS SETS
Beautiful Factory
Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full
$129.95 Qn. $159.95,
Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
Oak Table 6 chairs,
hutch, Nice $750,.
Cherry Curio Cabinet
Pair $150 ea
(352) 212-9507
637-2921, 861-9448
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg
$75. 352-628-0808
Sectional Sofa
Florida Colors
peach and green
Clean, like new $300
(352) 860-0649
630-816-1171 cell
Sectional Sofa, light
color, like new
$500
Small secretary Desk
$100
(352) 212-3352
TWIN BEDS
Frames, boxspnngs, &
mattresses exc cond.
$125
Cell (734) 355-2325
local 352-503-9452


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive wash-
ers & dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179





HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping
Dr. appts, errands,
etc. Hablo Espanol
813-601-8199





SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352-613-2518





JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump
Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374

THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lie., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557





DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic
#2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck
repair /Stain
352-257-0078

BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078

CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120

FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097

ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Drive-
ways tear outs Trac-
tor work, Lic. #1476,
726-6554




All AROUND TRAC-
TOR
Land clearing, Haul-
ing Site Prep, Drive-
ways Lic/Ins
352-795-5755




HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping
Dr. appts, errands,
etc. Hablo Espanol
813-601-8199


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
k 352-302-6838 k




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777

DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscap-
ing
352-795-0188/220-3194

A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENC-
ING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

ROCKY'S FENC-
ING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
H 352 422-7279 H




Install, Restretch,
Repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent,
Lic#4857 Mitch, (352)
201-2245


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


1 CALL & RELAX!
25vrs Exp in 100%
property maint & all
repairs, call
H&H Services today!
lic#37658
352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handy-
man
4 FAST. 100% Guar.
4 AFFORDABLE
4 RELIABLE-
Free Est
H 352-257-9508 H
Affordable Handy-
man
4 FAST- 100% Guar.
4 AFFORDABLE
4 RELIABLE-
Free Est
H 352-257-9508 H
Affordable Handy-
man
4 FAST- 100% Guar.
4 AFFORDABLE
4 RELIABLE-
Free Est
H 352-257-9508 H
Affordable Handy-
man
4 FAST- 100% Guar.
4 AFFORDABLE
4 RELIABLE-
Free Est
H 352-257-9508 H
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




Cleaning Svc-Home,
office,windows,
pressure washing &
more. 352-322-1799






The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lic/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-1584





All Tractor Work
Service specializing in
clean up Tree Re-
moval, General
prop. maint. 302-6955

All AROUND TRAC-
TOR
Landclearing, Haul-
ing Site Prep, Drive-
ways Lic/Ins
352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


LAWNCARE N
MORE
Yard Clean-up,
leaves
bushes, hauling
352-726-9570
Winter Clean Up,
Leaves, Power Wash-
ing & More Call
Coastal Lawn Care
(352) 601-1447




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up
time. 352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, lawn maint.
furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump
Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998


Robert G. Vigliotti LLC
Painting
Int/Ext FREE
ESTIMATES 35 yrs
exp.
call 508-314-3279




CALL STELLAR
BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins.
FREE EST (352)
586-2996
Cleaning Svc-Home,
office,windows,
pressure washing &
more. 352-322-1799
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300
Robert G. Vighotti LLC
Painting
Int/Ext FREE
ESTIMATES 35 yrs
exp.
call 508-314-3279
Winter Clean Up,
Leaves, Power Wash-
ing & More Call
Coastal Lawn Care
(352) 601-1447




All chases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic.
#2713


ALL EXTERIOR

ALUMINUM4,Nc.


52-621-0881
I FAX 352-621-0812
6" Seamless Gutters
Screen Rooms Car Ports
Hurricane Protection
allextalum13@yahoo.com
Citrus tic. #2396 LICENSED & INSURED


DGS SERVICES LLC
Reroofs Metal Roofs
REPAIRS Home
Inspector 414-8693





MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAIN.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.





Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


CARPET & L
S UPHOLSTERY
S CLEANING


pecla 1Z1N9 INSS Certificates
Carpet Stretchin Available
Carpet Repair
352-282-1480 cell I
352-547-1636 office
Free In Home Estimates
Lic & Ins LfemeWarranty


WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
k 352-302-6838 k



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Tractor Work
Service specializing in
clean up Tree Re-
moval, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding,
bulk mulch, lic/ins
302-8852
KING's LAND
CLEARING & TREE
SERVICE
Complete tree &
stump removal haul-
ing, demo & tractor
work. 32 yrs. exp.
(352) 220-9819
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Li/dlns. Free
est. 352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!











source is...







lwww chronicleonline cor


WINDOW#
GENIE.Y
We (leon Wndo and a Whole Lol More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/spnringhill


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
Repairs
-' Small Carpentry
Fencing
Screening
'Aean Dryer

I lrowdle & Dependable
Eq,,ience lifelong
/ 3 352..3 44-0905
"c4ll 400-1722
u* wed- Lic.#37761


AAA ROOFING
Call the eak6usters"
Free Written Estimate

S$100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof:
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed i
ic./Ins. CCC057537 rc0DMZO


Add an artisik touch to your existing yard

-` or pool or plan

-- mplete new!








POOL AND PAVER LLC
& Insured 352.400-3188


GENERAL A
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators

FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377


World Class

Window Tinting

Reduce Heat, Fade, Glare
AUTO HOME OFFICE
Marion & Citrus FreeEsimates
352-465-6079 -_


C.- -


NEED SOMEONE TO
GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?

WE MAKE IT




DISAPPEAR FOR LESS
IF YOU WANT IT
TAKEN AWAY...CALL FOR A
FREE ESTIMATE TODAY!
352-220-9190









D6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013



BEDSET WITH ERBIL A E
MATTRESS, BOXSPR- $20
ING & FRAME $50 352-613-0529
352-613-0529 GRACO PACKNPLAY
Washed Oak Table 4 GOOD CONDITION
chairs, like new, $750 $40 352-613-0529
White antique iron HEAVY DUTY
Bed, w/ mattress, $500 WHIRPOOL Dryer $125
(352) 212-9507 Exercise Stepper
637-2921, 861-9448 machine $75.
Wood Dresser (352) 795-7254
19/2 x 56/2 HONDA STOCK PIPES
Dark wood fits honda shadow areo
includes, mirror mint $60 352-621-0142
$475 (352) 419-4606 Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Fulls $50., Qn. $75.
S iKings. $125, 621-4500
3 MOWERS MOTORCYCLE SEAT
Craftsman 5000 aftermarket saddlemen
Craftsman 3000 mint paid $325 sell for
White B&S Engine $100 firm fits Honda's
Call (352) 341-1569 352-621-0142
BLACK & DECKER NEW SKYLIGHT BUB-
HEDGE TRIMMER BLE TYPE SMOKED
Includes 100' cord POLYCARBONITE 27
Asking $25. BY 27 ONLY $60.
352-419-4305 352464-0316
Extension ladder PET CARRIER
17 fl Alluminum ladder Petmate. Never used.
$200; Pressure Washer 28 X 20.5 X 21.5. $50.
with wand, 16 ft 352-637-5969
extension $350 PICK-UP TOOL BOX
(352) 726-8931 56" wide, silver alum, 2
LAWN MOVERS latch, 1 locking, great
TORO self propelled, shape. $65.
6.5 HP $150; 0 Turn 352221309
GRAVELY riding ROCKING HORSE
mower. 12 HP $500 Brown/Black-colored,
(352) 726-8931 rocks by rubber, ok con-
TORO POWER edition, I will e-mail plcs,
SWEEP BLOWER $50 (352)465-1616
Includes 100' cord RYOBI 10"
Asking $30. COMPOUND SAW-
352-4194305 #TS1342 15 AMPs,
5500 RPMs, dust bag,
f lg/EX+, $60, 628-0033
Y SMALL BLOCK CHEVY
STARTER new
Citrus Springs staggered bolt pattern
Citrus Springs $25 call or text
Sat & Sun 9a 3p 352-746-0401
8395 N TnanaDr 352D746 040
8395 N Trana Dr SNAPPER 42" RIDING

CITRUS SPRINGS MOWER/GENERAC
Sat& Sun 7a- 2p G OOOW GENERATE OR
7209 N Deborah Terr Mowe $1000 ncl
mulch attachment
GenSet $375.BOTH
CRYSTAL RIVER LIKE NEW
MOVING SALE 352489-6465
Sat 9a-4p Sun 1pp -4p
ALLCondo contents SOLD
must go! Bring help 40ft STEAL
load. The Springs OVERSEAS SHIPPING
on Kings Bay. CONTAINER $500 obo
255 NW Bay Path Dr Stallion Cow Boy Hat,
INVERNESS by Stetson, wool, sz 6 %
Sat & Sun 10:00 am & Boots, black 112 D.
7989 E Turner both New $100.
Camp Rd Glass Top Table w/ 4
chairs $100.
-352-795-7254
Esa Sles TAILGATE FOR 1986
CHEVY Silverado F10
SMW -MOVING Pickup Truck $50.
Marble table w/4 chairs Ruth 352-382-1000
$300. Sofa bed $300. Target GIFT CARD Bal
3 area rugs, wood cof- is $67.79 selling for
fee table. riding mower $55.00 OBO.WILL
$500. Lots More! Call VERIFY. LINDA
9a-7p (352) 503-5275 352-341-2271
C TODDLER HEAD-
BOARD Brand New
Metal Headboard, $10
(352)465-1616
BEAUTIFUL WOOL VERSION LG ENV
WOMEN SUITE tan TOUCH V X11000 cell
Isenhower style, and phOUC e
blouse to match sz.10 pho ull key board
$25 7895770 $25 call or text
$25. 789-5770 352-746-0401
BOYS WINTER VERIZON SAMSUNG
CLOTHING SIZES 5 & BRIGHTSIDE TOUCH
6 SHIRTS, PANTS & cell phone full key board
JACKETS $30 $35.call or text
352-613-0529 352-746-0401
PROM DRESS Long WICKER TEA CART,
blue size 13/14, strap- Vintage, excellent cond.
less $45. call or text useful and decorative,
352-302-2004 $80, (Dunnellon) (352)
PROM DRESS Long, 465-1813


Purple, 1 snouider, size
12 $65. call or text
352-302-2004
PROM DRESS Long,
red / black, halter, size
10/12 $35.call or text
352-302-2004
SILVER FOX COAT fin-
ger tip length beautiful.
sacrafice $100. sz m-I
789-5770
Special Occasion
Men's beautiful all
wool black suit 41 R
Palm Beach from
Falveys Men's Store
Gold Dress Jacket 41R
Tommy Hilfiger from
Dillards both worn
only 2-3 times, excel.
cond. $175 for both
(352) 527-2050
T.J.MAX 50.00 GIFT
CARD WILL VERIFY /
$35. LINDA
352-341-2271
WESTERN BOOTS
Brown marble leather
made in usa by
ACMEsize 8.5EW $40
call text 352-302-8529




MAGELLAN
ROADMATE GPS
5220-LM. Never used.
$99. 352-637-5969
SECURITY CAMERAS
2 wireless B&W
cameras/transmitters to
your TV $50. Dunnellon
465-8495




4 WHEEL WALKER-
hand brakes & wheel
locks, seat, basket,
folds for storage, Ex.,
$50, 352-628-0033
10 FT. WOOD
STEP LADDER
Type 1,250 duty
$90
(352) 422-0294
12 ft. Aluminum John
Boat, no paper work
$165.
Trailer, spare tire and
wheel, fits 10" 15"
$35. (315) 466-2268
BABY STROLLER
brown/green color,
Safety 1st, in ok condi-
tion, $20 (352)465-1616
BSR LARGE HOME
STEREO SPEAKERS
20" WIDE BY 30" HIGH
ONLY $100. NICE
352-464-0316
DIGITAL PHOTO AL-
BUM Brookstone holds
500 pics like new great
brag book $40 call or
text 352-746-0401
FIREWOOD OAK
SEASONED CUT TO
12"-15" LENGTHS $25.
352-527-4319
Fish Aquarium
50 gallons, cabinet
stand, lights & filter
$250
(352) 621-0392
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077
GOLF CLUB CAR
Electric, Looks great &
runs great. $1200Firm
(352) 860-2430
GRANDFATHER CLOCK
Howard Miller Elegant
Shaker Style in Cherry
Top quality mvmt. w/
Wminstr chime re-
cently serviced. Item
is like new and value
priced at $925. Firm.
Serious inquires to
352-560-3474, 4p-8p
pls. leave message


4 WHEEL (SONIC) GO
GO BY PRIDE MOBIL-
ITY TAKE APART(4
PIECES)TO FIT IN
TRUNK OR VAN $585.
352-464-0316
4 WHEEL WALKER
WITH BREAKS AND
SEAT Only
$75.352-464-0316
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES & SEAT
$75. 352-464-0316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER BRAND NEW
WITH HANDLES ONLY
$25. 352-464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
ADJUSTABLE LEGS
ON EACH $20.00
EA.352 464 0316
BEDSIDE COMODE &
ALUMINUM WALKER
ADJUSTABLE LEGS
ON BOTH $25 EA.
352-464-0316
DISPOSABLE UNDER-
WEAR M or W Size L
Pack of 18. $5., 3/$12.,
10/$30. Call
(352)563-6410
DOCTOR'S SCALE for
professional, excellent
condition $95 call
352-382-7585
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT-
RESTS GREAT SHAPE
$100. 352-464-0316
NUTRON R3ZLX
Power Wheel
Chair w/ Harmar
Micro Power Chair
Lift 5yrs old.
$1000 OBO
352-527-2906
SHOWER CHAIR WITH
BACK WHITE FIBER-
GLASS WITH ADJUST-
ABLE LEGS $30.
352-464-0316
WHEEL CHAIR LIFT
Easily load a folding
manual chair (not
scooter)to vehicle hitch
$100. Dunnellon
465-8495




DUDLEY'S






**3 AUCTIONS**

Fri 1/25
Estate Coin 6pm
$5-10-20 Gold
pieces, Silver, $500 &
$1,000 bills, Lg 1800's
currency, silver
Sat 1/26
Florida Porch
Antiques
Liquidation 10am
On Site@ 712W.
Main St in Leesburg,
HUGE Sale of from
Long time Antique
dealer filled the
JC Penny

Tue 1/28 Real Estate
& Restaurant 10am
4135 S. Suncoast
Blvd. (US 19)
Homosassa,
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.comrn
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384


BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676




"MINT" KAY 5 STRING
OPEN BACK, BANJO
50'S-60'S VINTAGE
W/CASE $100
352-601-6625
"NEW" ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR
TRANS BLACK,CORD
INCLUDED $95
601-6625
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
GUITAR "NEW"
W/GIGBAQTUNERSTRAP,
CORD ETC $100
352-601-6625
BLACK LES PAUL
EPIPHONE GUITAR
W/AMP,STRAP,CORD.ETC
NEW!! $100
352-601-6625
DUNLOP CRY BABY
Wah Pedal, Excellent
condition $45., call
352-503-7143
NEW FAT STRAT
STYLE GUITAR,
DROPPED MINOR
DAMAGE $45
352-601-6625
NEW NICE ACOUSTIC
GUITAR PACK
W/GIGBAG,STRAP EX-
TRA STRINGS ETC
$65 352-601-6625
UPRIGHT PLAYER
PIANO W/BENCH.
Ampico reproducing.
Walnut wood, good
cond. $600 OBO
(352) 382-1885




2 VERTICAL BILNDS
6'Wx4'L ea. w/covers,
almond slats. All hdwe.
inc. exc. cond. $100.
both 352-560-7857
BLINDS 1 PLEATED
64WX63L 1 PLASTIC
64WX60L OFF WHITE
$40 352-613-0529
LIGHT FIXTURE
chandelier, 5 frosted
glass shades, bronzed
color metal, nice
$50.352-422-1309
LOVE SEAT Great
condition call for e-mail
picture.$100.Linda
352-341-2271
SINGER SEWING
MACHINE Model 08/28
works book included
352-697-5565 $50.
SUNBEAM FLEECE
ELECT BLANKET KING
SIZE brand new. dual
controllers. sage/green.
$50 352-220-3944
TWIN BED WITH
BOXSPRING & FRAME
$50 352-613-0529




ELLIPTICAL MACHINE
PRO-FORM 490 LE
with users manual.
Heavy duty, I-Pod
compatible w/fan.
Less than 2 yrs old.
$300 527-8276
EXERCISE BIKE (DP)
UPRIGHT TYPE
WORKS THE ARMS
TOO $85.
352-464-0316
EXERCISE BIKE
PURSUIT ALL
ELECTRONICS $100.
352-464-0316
Proform Crosswalk 480
excel. cond. less than
50 mi. walk on it in-
clines, preset ifit
trainer workout,
built in fan, $275.
352-382-5208
ROWING MACHINE BY
BODY ROW WORKS
THE ARMS AND LEGS
$50. 352-464-0316



$$ REDUCED $$
'04 EZ GOGO LF CART
Electric, exc cond.
incl. charger.
$1,500 (352) 503-2847
5 Men's Bicycles
$15. ea
(352) 746-7357
14 Assorted Golf
Clubs,
left handed
$200
(352) 795-4942
22 Colt Woodsmen
early model orgin.
$700 OBO.
352-258-1740
30 cal. Carbine
1943 Inland mfg orgin.
Korea war bring home.
$1000. OBO
352-258-1740
357 Mag. 6 Shot
Rev. German made adj
rear site exc cond. $350
Snnagfield model 53B
single shot 22 rifle $120
(352) 344-5853
22LR ammo $16per
100. 525 rds $80
(352) 533-2228
BROWNING BUCK
MARK 22 L.R. RIMFIRE
PISTOL includes 6000
rounds of 22 ammo,
and 3 spare magazines.
Will sell as a total pack-
age only. $680.00 cash
only Call 352-465-4373
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
FOR SALE
Mini -14 223 scoped
stainless $1000.
10-22 Scoped wood
blue $500.
352-422-2004
For sale
SKS 1956 Sino Soviet
all original $500
352-422-2004
GOLF CLUBS
Two sets, pull carts and
accessories. $60.each
726-1495

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB


Sat. Jan.. 26th 9-5p
Sun. Jan. 27th 9a-4p
HERNANDO
COUNTY FAIR-
GROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605
HOLSTER Uncle Mikes
camo belt style size 10
$7 call or text
352-746-0401
REMINGTON 700 BDL
270cal exc cond. $495.
will take lever action
30-30 on trade.
(906) 285-1696
Winchester Model 70
Super grade, 300 Win.
Mag., Nikkon scope,
+ ++ extras,
$,1200
(352) 628-5355


2013 Enclosed Trail-
ers
6x12 with ramp,
$1895
** call 352-527-0555

Motorcycle utility
trailer 4ft x 8ft. 12 in
wheels $700.
(352) 465-5573
MUSTANG TRAILER
HITCH $100.
352-503-2792
TRAILER 4 x6, has
spare tire, garage kept;
Good Condition $500
(352) 726-8931




GRACO PACKNPLAY
BROWN PLAID GOOD
CONDITION $40
352-613-0529


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




WANT TO BUY
HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situa-
tion. Call Fred,
352-726-9369
Will Buy Block House
In Citrus County,
Any Condition,
Agents welcome
(315) 466-2268




1 Sweet Little Male
Yorkie,
CKC reg., $375. Fl.
health certs.,
Call
(352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258
AMERICAN PITBULL
PUPPIES We have 1
female and 5 males
left they are 3 weeks
old Jan.18th $150each
Mother and Father on
site.
352-302-7975



BIRD SUPPLY SALE
Sun, Feb. 3, 9a-3p,
Cages, Seed, Toys,
Playstands, Milletspray
& more! Save! Cage
wire, Chicks & duck-
lings! 8260 Adrian Dr.,
Brooksville
727-517-5337
DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com


HANK
Hank is an 8 y.o.
male Hound mix
who was a stray. He
is a sweet, affection-
ate, low key gentle-
man, easy to walk,
does not pull on
leash. He has good
energy and is a
good companion. Is
very housebroken,
gets along with
other dogs. Weighs
about 56 pounds.
Not yet neutered
but would be in-
cluded in adoption
fee. Is a very sweet
older dog in need
of a good, safe
home.
Call Mike @
352-726-0165
or Joanne
@352-795-1288.

MINIATURE POO-
DLES miniature poodle
pups born 10/16/12
Health Cert 1 apricot &
1 black female & 1
black male almost
potty trained, raised in
our home. $500 cash
call 352-419-5662 or
karaluv3@yahoo.com


NICKY
Nicky is a 2 y.o.
lab/bulldog mix,
weighing about 78
pounds, and is
Heart-worm
negative. Is very
sweet and loveable,
very intelligent. How-
ever, he is a big,
strong dog who needs
a strong person to
handle him, and a
fenced yard is
strongly recom-
mended. He knows
how to sit for treats
and wants to please
his human friend very
much.
He is available now at
the Citrus County
Animal Shelter.
Call 352-746-8400

RATS FOR SALE
50 cents to $3.00
All Sizes
(352) 419-9080
Leave Message
Shih-Tzu Pups,
ACA, Males
starting@ $400. Lots
of colors, Beverly
Hills, FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net


CLASSIFIED




Bermuda Hay 501bs $6
Never been rained on
795-1906 586-1906
SHAMROCK FARM, CR

^^^^^^-I


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




A DOCK RENTAL
Crystal Riv. Lited, canal
to river & Gulf. Up to
25ft, no sails 795-1986
AIRBOAT
13ft x 7ft, 500 HP Cad-
ilac, turn key boat
$9,500 obo Call Jim for
details (813) 361-4929,
BASS TRACKER
12ft. Jon Boat,
w/ 6HP motor & trailer,
$1,750 obo
(352) 563-0665



MUST SELL


BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motor,AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth
finder, 2001 Rolls
float on trailer worth
$1000. Comes
w/spare motor Has
service manual,
2nd owner $2500
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855

TRI PONTOON
BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
(352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com




ITASCA MERIDIAN
36 Ft, 2005 Motor Home
350HP Cat Diesel 55K
miles, no smoke/pets
6 Michelin Tires, New
2010 qn w/ sleep No.
mattress & overhead
fan. W/D combo
$71,000 obo
(352) 419-7882
MONTEGO BAY 35ft
5th wheel '06, 3 slides
kept undercover, Exc
cond. Truck Avail.
LOADED
$27,000 (352) 564-2756
NATIONAL RV
2006 Tropical One
owner,34ft, 26000
miles,no smoke/pets,
300HP Cummins die-
sel,2 slides, 6 new ti-
res, 3yr
warrantymany extras.
$87000. Well main-
tained. 352-341-4506




5TH WHEEL
33FT
GOOD CONDITION
MUST SELL
(423) 202-0914
FOREST RIVER
2010, Surveyor, Sport
189, 20 ft. Travel
Trailer,
1 slide, w/AC, qn. bed,
awning, pwr. tonque
jack, corner jacks,
microwave, equalizing
hitch, $10,500, reduced
to $9000
(352) 382-1826
HIGH LINE
1999, 32ft, Deluxe, 12'
slide out, new 22' awn-
ing, 55+ park, can be
moved. Was asking
$9,000, Sell $6,900
excel. shape
231-408-8344
HI-LO TRAVEL
TRAILER 2003, tow
lite model 22-03t,exc.
cond.
$6000 obo
352-422-8092
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, kg bd,like new,
60amp serve. NADA
$29K asking $25K
obo 352-382-3298
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot LARRY'S
AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352
564-8333

MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition, Ti-
tle, No Title, Bank
Lien,
No Problem, Don't
Trade it in. We Will
Pay up to $25KAny
Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ




AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE.
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 5 6 3 -1902
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.
BUICK
2007, Lucerne, CXL
55K miles, Leather
$13,500. obo
Call Troy
(352)621-7113

VyVVVVV
CADILLAC
1997 De Ville Tan with
black imitation rag
top, fully loaded ,
good runner-norstar
engineonly 97000
miles, good
tires-$2999.00. Jim
(941)-705-1795
CHEVROLET
'01 Corvette Corvette
6 speed, black on
black, $14,500
(352) 613-2333
CHEVROLET
2002, Camaro Z28
$9,495.
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
'01, PT Cruiser,
loaded, 53k miles,
$4,800
(352) 464-4304
FORD
2001 COBRA MUS-
TANG CONV. 5
SPEED, LEATHER
MUST SEE
CALL 352-628-4600
For More Info
FORD
2005, Five Hundred
LMT, 40K miles,
leather, V6 $9,980
Call Troy
352-621-7113
FORD
2006 Focus ZXW, SE
4DR, WGN. 85k miles
$5,800 obo
Call Troy (352)
621-7113
FORD MUSTANG
2007, 7000 mi, garage
kept, GT clone.
Call (352) 527-1191
FORD
Mustang Cobra, Indy
500 Pace Car-1994,
Convertible, 7100 mi,
Gar. kept 252-339-3897
GAS SAVER!
1999 Saturn SL $2000
Tan/Gold. Auto. Engine
and Trans are solid.
196,000 miles. Clean in-
side and out. Call Steve:
352-613-0746
Harley Davidson
'03, Super Glide,
low miles, $7,500
(352) 613-2333
HONDA
2011 CRV LX, 19K
miles, likenew, 4 Cyl.
$19,950
Call Troy
352-621-7113
HYUNDAI
2006 Elantra, GLS
90K miles, likenew, 4
DR, auto. $6,800
Call Troy
352-621-7113
MAZDA
2007, RX8 Looking for
A sports Car, Look No
Further!!! This is A Must
See...Call for an Appt.
and Pricing
352-628-4600
Mercury
"97 Grand Marquis w/
trailer hitch, 4 good
hancock tires, high
mileage $900 OBO
(352) 249-7541
MERCURY
2004, Grand Marquis,
Leather and Loaded
To Many Options to
List. Call Today
Before It's Gone
Call 352-628-4600
MITSUBISHI
2011 Galant, Low Mi.
Great fuel economy,
Priced to sell
Call 352-628-4600
For Appointment
MONEY'S TIGHT!I
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

PONTIAC
1999 TransAm 5.7Llter
V8, 62,700 mi,
Show Quality, $7500.
(352) 726-8336
Cell 352-302-5569
PONTIAC
2008, G6,
4 Door, Cold AC
Call 352-628-4600
For Pricing
PORSCHE
'99, 911 Carrera, black
exterior, black interior
62,600 org. mi $25,900
386-334-2559 CELL
TOYOTA
2000, Camry LE
V6, 183K miles Super
Clean $5,800. obo
Call Troy (352)
621-7113
TOYOTA
2007, Yaris, 59K mi-
les,
2 DR, H/B $7,800.
Call Troy
352-621-7113


1971 CHEVELLE
CONVERTIBLE
stunning, 40k+ in-
vested, fully re-
stored, 350 auto,
buckets, consistent
show winner, high
end stereo, red w/
white top & interior
$23,900,
352-513-4257

AUTO SWAP
CORRAL SHOW
20TH ANNUAL
Sumter
Swap Meets
SUMTER COUNTY
Fairgrounds, Bush-
nell
Feb. 15, 16, 17th
1-800-438-8559


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




CHEVROLET
1994,C/K 2500
$2,880
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2005, Silverado
2500 HD, Diesel crew
cab, $13,880
352-341-0018
FORD
2003 F150
Ex Cab, $8,990
352-341-0018
FORD
'98, Ranger Splash,
very well kept, cold AC,
6 cyl., auto, Tires like
new, $3,200 obo
(352) 601-0572

MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

TOYOTA
2002, Tacoma,
Crew Cab, $8,770.
352-341-0018
TOYOTA
2004, 4 Runner Sport
2WD, 94K mi,
Leather $12,800.
obo
Call Troy
352-621-7113




CADILLAC
2007, Escalade,
44k miles, Luxury
NAV, $29,500.
Call Troy (352)
621-7113
CHEVY TRAIL-
BLAZER LT 05
exc. cond. asking $6000
obo, in Hernando
(904) 923-2902




307-0127 SUCRN
Personal Mini Storage
02-06 Uen Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF
THE FOLLOWING TENANTS
WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH
TO SATISFY RENTAL LIENS
IN ACCORDANCE WITH
FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF
STORAGE FACILITY ACT,
SECTIONS 83-806 AND
83-807:
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE






308-0127

SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given
that the undersigned in-
tends to sell the vehicles)
below under Florida Stat-
utes 713.78. The under-
signed will sell at public


Meeing^^
Notices^


FORD
F150, 1978, 4x4
perfect, father/son,
project $1,650 obo
(352) 564-4598
JEEP
2004, Wrangler X
4WD, Only 57K mi-
les,
Hard Top $13,800.
Call Troy
352-621-7113




KIA
2006 Sedona,
Great Family Van,
7 Pass, low mi. Call
today for Low Price
352-628-4600




BAD BOY BUGGIE
2011 "ready to hunt"
Only $5998.
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS
2002, SPORTSMAN
700 CC 4X4 AUTO
READY FOR THE MUD
ONLY $4288
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS RZR 800 LE
TIME TO PLAY HARD
ONLY $8388
(352) 621-3678




CF MOTO
2008, 250 Trike
772 miles, $2,495.
(352) 726-6128
DALIN DAY STAR
2006, 700mi saddle
bags, Fully dressed,
Call (352) 527-1191
FASHION
2007 250 cc;
1,500 miles; $1,200
(352) 726-6128
GOLDWING
1985 Blue;
39,155 miles; $2,495
(352) 726-6128








Harley-DAVIDSON
2006 FLHTPI Clean
bike, great looks, 88 ci,
5 speed, low miles 19K,
accident free, never
played down, garage
kept, two tone bk/wt, all
service done by HD
dealer 352 5134294
asking $10,500




- DUNNELLON
UNIT
#0008 MARILYN WALKER
0009 JESSICA KLEMM
0203 LARRY QWAN
0237 LINDA SEIBERT
#0334 DAVID & PATRICIA
VANDEMARK
CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE
KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD
ITEMS, BEDDING,
LUGGAGE, TOYS, GAMES,
PACKED CARTONS,
FURNI-
TURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING,
TRUCKS, CARS, ETC.
THERE'S NO TITLE FOR




sale by competitive bid-
ding on the premises
where said vehicles)
have been stored and
which is located at
Adam's 24 Hr Towing,
6403 W. Homosassa Trail,
Homosassa,Citrus
C o u n t y ,
Florida the following:
DOS: 2/07/13 @ 8 AM


1985 Limited Edition -
Gold; Fuel injected;
53,012 miles; $3,000
(352) 726-6128
GOLDWING
1998, SE with Voyager
Trike Kit Tan;
55,200 miles; $9,000
(352) 726-6128
HARLEY-Davidson
Leather Jacket LG as
New, $300. OBO
Two shorty motorcycle
Helmets S/M & L/XL
$50ea 352-746-6125
HONDA
'01, Goldwing,
100k + miles,
$9,500
(352) 419-4606
HONDA
'04, 750 Shadow Aero.
Runs & looks great!
$2,995. Firm
(352) 344-0084
HONDA
1997, GOLDWING
ASPENCADE, 24K mi,
Lots a Extras! $6000.
(352) 212-6450
HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley, 1100CC,
Chrome, bags, trade?,
70mpg $2,800. Crystal
River
(727) 207-1619
HONDA BLACK BIRD
CBR 1100 LOW LOW
MILES ONLY $3488.00
(352) 621-3678
HONDA ST1300
2006 MADE TO TOUR
ONLY $7786
(352) 621-3678
KAWASKI NINFA
650
LIKE NEW ONLY
$5488 (352) 621-3678
KYMCO
2009, AJILITY
SCOOTER GREAT
GAS SAVER ONLY
$998 (352) 621-3678
SCOOTER
50 CC, like new, 400
miles, runs great
$850 OBO
(352) 746-0167
(315) 439-6005
SUZUKI
1999,1400 Intruder
with Lealman Trike Kit -
24,283 miles; $10,000
(352) 726-6128
SUZUKI BURGMAN
AUTOMATIC TWIST
AND GO FUN ONLY
$4686 (352) 621-3678
SUZUKI GSXR 750
195 MILES "HOLD ON"
ONLY $9996
(352) 621-3678
VICTORY CROSS
ROADS
"GREAT American
MADE CRUSIER"
ONLY $12888
(352) 621-3678




VEHICLES SOLD AT LIEN
SALE.
OWNERS RESERVE THE
RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS.
LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ON
THE PREMISES- FEBRUARY
6TH @ 2:00PM.
VIEWING WILL BE AT THE
TIME OF THE SALE ONLY.
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE
DUNNELLON
11955 N FLORIDA AVE
(HWY 41)
DUNNELLON, FL 34434
352-489-6878
January 20 & 27, 2013





2003 FORD VIN#
1FMYU02113KA32389
Purchase must be paid
for at the time of sale in
cash only. Vehicles) sold
as is and must be re-
moved at the time of
sale. Sale is subject to
cancellation in the event
of settlement, between
owner & obligated party.
January 27, 2013.

Meeting^^
Notices^^


309-0127 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
2/6/13 Meeting of the Citrus County Economic Development Council, Inc.


PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Wednesday, February 6, 2013 at 5:00 pm. at the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce, Inverness, Florida.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.

If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
By: John Siefert, Executive Director
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle January 27, 2013


310-0127 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB No. 015-13
Gulf to Lake Highway (State Road 44) Water Main Improvements

Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to provide all labor and material to complete the following construction project
which includes but is not limited to:

1) The construction of approx. 1400 linear feet of 12" diameter water main piping
along the south side of SR44 in the Meadowcrest area. Piping will be installed pri-
marily via the horizontal directional drill (HDD) method under an existing sidewalk
along SR44
2) Materials to include but not limited to 12" fusible PVC; misc. bends, tapping sad-
dle, locate wire, couplings, joint restraints, service lines, meter boxes, tees, air release
valves, fire hydrants, tapping sleeve
3) Contacting "Sunshine State One Call" prior to any construction
4) Establishing and maintaining all MOT and traffic (motor vehicle & pedestrian)
safety during all phases of construction
5) Establishing and maintaining all aspects of erosion control during all phases of
construction
6) Dewatering as required in accordance with the project specifications
7) Restoration of the final grade to existing grade
8) Restoration of disturbed areas to equal or better
9) Restoration of all disturbed unpaved areas to be sodded per FDOT specifications
10) Pressure testing of all installed piping and fixtures
11) Providing a safe work environment within the construction zone at all times
12) Restoration of all disturbed sections of existing concrete in accordance with the
contract drawings titled "Gulf to Lake Hwy. (SR-44) Water Main Improvements"
13) Maintaining a stormwater pollution plan
14) Connecting new pipe to existing 12" gate valve at the west end of the project
and to the existing water main at the east end of the project via wet tap with a 12" X
12" tapping sleeve
15) Satisfactorily disposing of unsuitable material
16) Provide 'as-built' record drawings upon project completion

Minimum Requirements for Submittina a Bid

Bidder shall meet, at a minimum, the following requirements to be determined a re-
sponsive and responsible Bidder at the time of Bid Submittal:

1. Florida Registered or Certified General Contractor or Building
Contractor
2. Underground Utility Contractor Ucense
3. MOT (Maintenance of Traffic) Certification

Pre-Bid Conference: A non-mandatory Pre-Bid Conference will be held on February
06, 2013 at 10:00 AM at the Lecanto Government Building, Room 166 located at
3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461.

SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before February 27, 2013 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Citrus County Board of County Commissioners, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Suite 266, and Lecanto, FL 34461.

A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for February 27, 2013 @ 2:15 PM at 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.

Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at the Public Opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing
or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.

To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left
hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5413.

CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Joe Meek, Chairman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle January 27, 2013


I --- ---- --- ---- I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The 2013 VILLAGE TOYOTA
TRADE-IN ASSISTANCE PROGRAM


Receive a $1,0


when


you


purchase


00


Trade-In


or lease a


Bon
new


us*
Toyota.


VILLAGE TOYOTA OT
I*1 0 0 0 TB i
-- -- BONUS* I
'Prior sales e eluded rnust present trad-in LoupIoni prior to itne-up
00ODOQL


USING YOUR $1,000 TRADE-IN BONUS*
IS AN EASY THREE STEP PROCESS:


Choose a new Toyota vehicle
from our outstanding selection
of 2012 and 2013 models.
Let our Toyota experts give you
a complimentary appraisal of
your current vehicle


Present your Trade-In
for an ADDITIONAL $1
towards a new Toyota.


Bonus*
,000


Due to the high
demand for pre-
owned vehicles,


Village


Toyota


must replenish its
inventory.


Call NOW! Ask for Sales Manager
Brett Coble or Charlie DeFreese to get your
$1,000 Trade-in Bonus* activated.
0W Or, call 800-852-7248 to
Schedule a complimentary
trade-in appraisal


We're willing to pay


you the highest possible price for your used


vehicle. Use your total trade value and the $1


,000 Trade-In Bonus*


to get your best deal ever on a new 201 2 or 201 3 Toyota.
www.villagetoyota.com


*$1,000 Trade-in Bonus* is valid only at Village Toyota and can be used towards the purchase or lease of any new 2012 or 2013 Toyota in stock
Not for cash value. Non-transferrable. Must present coupon upon arrival. See dealer for details. Offer expires 1/31/13.


1

2

3


SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 D7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DECEMBER'S

5000 WINNER!
BARBARA WILBURN-YORK
YOU COULD BE THIS MONTH'S WINNER!
VISIT ANY CRYSTAL LOCATION FOR DETAILS


80FE:2i ORREODD ESG WITHINF PCA RCN
S -0-485 X.30


i FR 2 D T H &
800-584-8755 EXT. 31271^


FRE2 OU EODD ESG I THIF &SE IAPRCN
80058-875 XT.311


8 5 8 IT EXT. PE;31P09i1


F 2O E DEE:WITH IPEC G
800-5848755 E I 311


80E 24 H S AGEWHI
ur84875EX.3XZ14


:FR 2 R R S W I
800-584_755 Off


80 -54-75 IT EX.P:1P215
ItlJt'^T t!ii'


FRE I4HORREORE MSAG I THI NF PEILPRCN


CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
CRYSTALAUTOSCOMI


1005 South Suncoast


Blvd. Homosassa


14358 Cortez Blvd. Brooksville


2077 Highway 44W Inverness


352-564-1971
Sales: Monday-Friday 8:00am-8:00pm Saturday 9:00am-7:30pm Sunday-Closed
Service: M, W, F 7:30am-5:30pm T, TH 7:30am-7:00pm Saturday 8:00am-4:00pm Sunday-Closed Body Shop: M-F 7:30am-5:30pm
tSEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. +PRICE INCLUDES $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER
FEE $599.50. WITH APPROVED CREDIT. *LEASES ARE FOR 39 MONTHS 39,000 MILES FOR THE LIFE OF THE LEASE. 15 CENTS PER MILE OVER. $3999 DUE AT SIGNING WITH APPROVED CREDIT.
**0%, SPECIAL FINANCE OFFERS AND NO PAYMENTS UNTIL MARCH 2013 ARE AVAILABLE WITH APPROVED CREDIT, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES
ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK. ^25 MPG BASED ON EPA HIGHWAY FUEL ECONOMY ESTIMATES.
000DOUO I


800584875 EX. 1 2~u~1uHullM:u
:11 :' :


m--mm-9


D8 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOR YOUR SHOPPING CONVENIENCE, COME SEE ALL OUR CARS, TRUCKS, VANS
AND SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES WITH ALL PRICES DRASTICALLY SLASHED!


NO


ON
(NO ONE WIL


THERE WILL BE
SALES PEOPLE
EPRS OR EMPLOYE
THE PREMISES.
.L EVEN BE AVAILABLE TO ANSWER THE PHONES)


Because new models are arriving daily, management has been ordered to eliminate excess
inventory. All prices will be slashed and will be clearly posted on each vehicle. Bring a pen and paper.
Write down the stock number and price. Come in as early as possible on Monday, January 28, 2013
FIRST COME FIRST SERVED!
:11k S


Jeep


AUTO


M


0


T I V E


1035 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL


1005 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL


2077 Highway 44W
Inverness, FL


14358 Cortez Blvd.
Brooksville, FL


937 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL


CRYSTALAUTOS.COM


SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 D9


I r ^ _


DOD-Aw"




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DECEMBER'S
$5000 WINNER!
BARBARA WILBURN-YORK Chevy Runs Deep
YOU COULD BE THIS MONTH'S WINNER!
VISIT ANY CRYSTAL LOCATION FOR DETAILS


FRE 24 H RECORD MESGSIT NOANPRCG


FRE 24 RRCODEDMESAG WITH NFOANDPI


I =005~384=8755


^CALLEThE INSTANT APPRAISAL
N--toil


N
)


FRE 4 aR ECRDDM ESAG WTHINOANPRCG
I~~t R:1IeM:A~)r


1=800=*W5 I 8755


FRE 24 HRECODEDMES AGEWIT INF NDPICN
I 8Ms=e.":~ i4


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL UNE:
800-440-905


CRYS TAL
CHEVROLET E I


CrystalAutos.com *


1035 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448 *


352-795-1515


tSEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. *PRICE INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT ALL WILL QUALIFY, PLUS $2999 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG,
TITLE AND DEALER FEE OF $599.50 WITH APPROVED CREDIT PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK


D10 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013


i






M Sikorski's


OME


RONT


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUID


4;


E4


A vintage plate is upcycled with a
modern letter "E." filled in with
a Sharpie. to complete a plate-
decorating project described on
the lifestyle blog "angel in the
north." run by Anna Nicholson.
in West Yorkshire,
England.
/-.:,: ,- .^ d^ ^ ^ ^


PAGE E6


I)







E2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WHAT A BEAUTY! 6145 W. RIO GRANDE DR. PINE RIDGE POOL HOME 15 ACRE HORSE FARM
*3/3/2 + Office Huge Screened Lanai PINE RIDGE ON THE HORSE TRAIL Beautiful 3BR/2BA/2CG Home
Great Room wNaulted Ceilings
* Beautiful Kitchen Male Cabines 3BD/2BA/2CG Under Construction Well-Kept 3BR, 2 Bath 2-Car Garage Kitchen w/Lots of Cabinets & Eat-In Area
*Lg. Fam. Rm. -Very Tasteful Decor Dream Custom Home Builder Feature 1992 Citrus Hills Home Granite Counters Nice Master Suite
*Really Nice Master Bath Lg. Garage 2,464 SF Living Garden Tub & Shower Cathedral Ceilings, Skylight Screened Lanai & Pool
Call Listing Agent for Details 2006 Roof Shingles -r...J1, I.... l :"i L-Shaped Barn & 2-Stall Barn
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 A PETER & MARIA KOROL *- Tack & Feed Room / Hay Barn I
.. .. .I (352) 527-7842 KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
www.FloiidaLislinglnlo.com (352) 422-3875 Email: kellygoddardsellslloiid coin Email: lenpalmer@remax.net








YOUR PRIVATE SANCTUARY!! 3815 W. DOUGLASFIR CIR. R PRIVATE, SECLUDED
Master with Huge Walk-In Cozy FP in GR PINE RIDGE POOL HOME
*2/2/2 + Office Really Nice Bath BD/BA1 Large SolarHeated POOL R EA LTY O N E POOL HOME!
* Gated Entry *2.8 Acres b New Roof2013 Fully Furnished New Country casual living on 1 acre! Over
* Gy Ent/y *V arkin cres Builtin 1973 Over 1,600 Sq. Ft. IuFr I 3,000 sq. ft., huge garage, fireplace,
Fully Fenced/Boat RV Parking! DIR Pine Ridge Blvd to South on Allamandra, to right on Douglasfir and bonus room! Celebrate the New
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 & PETER & MARVIA KOROL 24/7 INU E Year at home.
.UTTj (352) 527-7842 637-2828 KIM DEVANE (352) 637-2828
www.Floidalislinglinlo.com (352) 422-3875 Email kim@kimdevane.com
1 1 1.r4HERE'S HOW: 247 INFO


1 Buye8 c1alls Buyer ls exclusiveE
_637-2828



NEW ROOF SHINGLES!! OPEN HOUSE 1/27/13 2-4PM numberwhen jUST LISTED!
Newly Painted In/Out *1/2 Acre Lot 4286 S. PURSLANE, HOMOSASSA prompted Come live the casual Florida
Great Family Home Kitchen w/Lots of Cab. 3BR/2BA built in 2006, granite, SS appliances, lifestyle. Open floorplan with tons
Large Screened Pool 3/2/2 Split Plan brick pavers, across street from canal. V of natural light. Pool, spa, and
CS Has 2 Golf Courses Close to Rivers Directions: Fish Bowl Dr to right on Purslane 3 Buyer listens to distant sunsets await! Call 24HR
ELLIE SUTTON 352-217-3997 property hotline for more info!
u|71 u JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821 presentation in KIM DEVANE (352) 637-2828
ww.FIloidaLisinginlo.com Emal: romaxga122@yahoo.com English or Spanish Email kim@kimdevane.com

3 1'57-2828 ;37.8






LOCATION... LOCATION... MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE! FISHERMAN'S DELIGHT PRICE REDUCTION! LECANTO
1 Immaculate Brentwood Golf Course Home
LOCATION... 1,800 Sq. Ft. Living 16x1 2 Observation Deck *Built 2000 3/2/2 Car Garage Owner Financng Possible 3/2/2 Split Bedroom Plan
3BR/2BA home with a total of 2,098 .20x24 Detached Workshop Boat House 115 Ft Waterfront Lush Landscaping led Kite Bed reakfast Neiook
under a new roof. Garage, FL room, and a In-Ground Pool *Acre Lot 53x9 Screened Lanai *Picturesque Winding Drive Master Bath Dual Vanity, Walk-In Shower
privacy fenced backyard. Move-in condition. *145 Ft. on the Water No Flood Zone New Air Conditioner 2011 Kevlar Hurricane Shutters Cvered Lanai C Caged Inground Spa
S SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 Email: sherylpotts@aol.com Email: sherylpotts@aol.com Email: mmatlm.salheremax.net
Email: arbarajmills@earthlink.net Website: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com Welsite: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com VIRTUAL TOURS at www.mlha.silhe.remax.com


521637.2828
b II61 A lehou:F^p


*2/2 on 2.63 Acres 1,680 Sq. Ft. of Living
* Remodeled Kitchen & Baths
* New Flooring Throughout Cast Iron Stove
* 1 -Car Detached Garage Greenhouse & Pond
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net








THE PERFECT HOME for "livin' the good life" in Crystal
River Great 3/2/1 lovingly cared for and sitting on 2 pretty
fully fenced lots. Some amenities include RV/boat storage,
12x 13 utility bldg. w/attached carport. Roof, soffits & gutters
in 2005, A/C 2005. Enjoy your swim spa in your 15x25
privacy fenced deck. Guys check out the MANCAVE
garage/workarea...9' ceiling, air & heat, plumbed, insulated
and cabinets GALORE. REDUCED.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


.2 4 2 11 N L e cI H w B e e l i l 2 8 2w w R t A ~ o 1 .F o i a A e ,I v r e s 6 7 6 0






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


S Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtor A Realtor@
302.3179 s UDo Re a
746-6700 287.9022r
The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
3826 N Briarberry P.
'.. 55+ COMMUNITY Beverly Hills
II i.e I, -,

m UN IMyag .. $ $44,900


21

T~I77


2 www.81Woodfield.CanBYours.com
$339,000 MLS#356914
Realty Connect (352) 212-1446
www.thefloridadream.com


Think you've



got a big tree?


Check the register

LEE REICH
Associated Press
A few months ago, I happened
upon an enormous cucumbertree
magnolia.
"Must be the biggest cucumbertree
magnolia anywhere," I thought.
Such speculation doesn't have to
be idle. In a Washington, D.C., office,
the American Forests organization
keeps the National Register of Big
Trees.
The Big Tree program was begun
in 1940 as America faced impending
war and its attendant need for re-
sources, including wood. The first
giant to be earmarked and saved
from the threat of a saw was Mary-
land's Wye Oak, an estimated 450
years old and, up to its death, the
champion white oak.
Since 1940, more than 800 Big
Trees have been named. Almost
every state has at least one, with the
most in Florida and then California.
Those states are home to some
species found only there.
This undated photo shows a giant
sequoia, a big tree but not a "Big
Tree," in Bristol, R.I.
Associated Press


Madison Model
(home in picture is a model)
3/2/3 Pine Ridge. New Home.
Under construction.
Completion, first of February.
All wood cabinets, tile floors,
beautiful lot, many special
features. Why settle for used
when you can have new??
$228,000
DVH4 Call Joe 302-0910


How big is the biggest?
Not all Big Trees are necessarily
big. Each is merely the biggest of its
species. The smallest Big Tree is in
Texas, a Reverchon hawthorn in
Dallas that "soars" to 9 feet tall and
around whose trunk you could wrap
your hands.
You can probably guess which is
the biggest Big Tree: the General
Sherman sequoia in California, its
upper leaves, at 275 feet, tickling
clouds, and its girth, at 998 inches,
wide enough to accommodate a two
lane road.
Somewhat unsettling, given its
weedy nature, is the image of the
largest staghorn sumac, which is 61
See TREES/Page Ell


SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 E3







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A look at Indian


Hawthorns


here are some 15
species in the
Rhaphiolepis genus
originally from subtropical
east and South-
east Asia. All
are slow-grow-
ing, evergreen,
low-mainte-
nance shrubs
suitable for
Florida gar-
dens. The most
widely used is
commonly
called Indian Jane
Hawthorn, JANI
Rhaphi -
olepisindica, al- GAR
though it is from
China. Perhaps it was
prevalent in Indian gar-
dens when European
botanists and plant collec-
tors first noticed it. The
name stuck and is used
globally
Asian hawthorns, hardy
to 5 degrees, require full
sun but little irrigation
after establishment. They
are tolerant of salty air in
coastal gardens. Leaves
are stiff and leathery, with
a shiny top surface. When
they grow wider than their
height they naturally have
a dense, rounded shape, so
need no pruning.
Decide on the size plant
needed for a particular lo-
cation in the garden, then
buy the appropriate plant
that will mature at that
size. Put the right plant in
the right place and let it
grow naturally The plant
will be healthier, as prun-
ing wounds let in infection,
fungus and disease.
Pruned Indian Hawthorns
frequently become in-
fested with fungus, result-
ing in black spots on the
leaves. The infected leaves
turn red and are shed
quickly
Use a strong leaf blower
to clear the ground be-
neath the shrub. Gather


and dispose of the prob-
lem leaves, or the fungus
will reenter the plant.
The most commonly
available In-
dian Hawthorn,
'"Alba," has
small leaves
about 2 inches
long. It will nat-
urally grow to 4
feet diameter
and 3 feet tall.
Give it room. In
March, it flow-
Weber ers prolifically,
IE'S with dense clus-
ters of small
DEN flowers. About
an inch in diam-
eter, flowers are white,
star-shaped, perfumed and
have five petals opening
from five sepals.
Pink varieties are selec-
tively propagated and cost
more. Patented "Eleanor
Tabor," PP 9398, is avail-
able by special order
through local nurseries. It
is more disease-resistant
and cold-hardier than
other pink Indian
Hawthorns. Grandiflora in
Gainsville may stock this
beautiful variety.
Pollinated flowers are
followed by black pomes
that ripen by mid-summer
Florida wildlife generally
do not eat these exotic
berries. If you want to
prune, do so once a year in
April immediately after
flowering ends and before
fruit sets. Then spray with a
fungicide. Be sure to re-
move all clippings and cook
them in your compost pile.
Indian Hawthorn has a
large growing variety.
Four-inch leaves indicate
the plant will reach 8 feet
tall and 12 to 15 feet in di-
ameter. It makes a dense
privacy screen and view
blocker. The white-
flowered variety is usually


See JANE/Page E5


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
Indian Hawthorn is one of 15 plants in the Rhaphiolepis
genus. All are slow-growing, evergreen, low-maintenance
shrubs suitable for Florida gardens.






p, American Realty & Investments
*** 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
E RA- (352) 634-2371 cell
.FA. .ST. jackie@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS:bidavis.com


I4 LAUNDROMAT
*18 Washers
S11 Natural gasdryers
80 Gal. Natural gas water heater
Fold & wash business too
Alterations offered
$50,000 MLS 351014


AN UPSCALE
VILLA COMMUNITY
Sifting on our 46-mile Rails To Trails.
Windermere's maintenance fee offers
exterior painting roof care lawn /shrub
care, irrigation, basic cable, active
clubhouse, heated pool.
Prices of villas and
townhouses run from
$92,000 to $100,000
10110- NEED A WINTER RETREAT
OR WEEKENDER?
2 Bedroom doublewide
,* Hardwood and laminate floors
Fully furnished
Screened porch
Screened carport
Two sheds/workshop
2 Ponds
SCanal across the road
$29,900 MLS 356840


ERNANDO furnished 2 bedroom, 1 bath CRYSTAL RIVER Handyman/woman
-me w/fenced yard on 3 sides and a canal on special, estate sale, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 2 car gar,
Other, which is dry at present but when 1/3 acre needs about $10,000 worfh of work
et has access to Lake Hernando & Tsala to make this home worth $79000, newer
popka chain. I creened porch and dishwasher & range, wood burning fireplace.
io. #357952 "*,.i. #358966 $55,900


0


1


E4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013



\
Il






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Reader asks:


How do I remove


salt from boots?


Dear Sara:
How do I
remove
winter salt
stains from my
boots? Kara,
New York
Dear Kara: I
brush off my
boots to get any
loose particles
off. Then I mix
vinegar with
water and apply


bara
FRU
LIVI


it to the boots with a cloth
to remove any salt stains.
Dear Sara: I do a lot of
package shipping. Do you
have any suggestions for
finding cheaper packing
peanuts? Lisa K, Ohio
Dear Lisa: Whenever I
have packaging material, I
put it up for grabs on
FreeCycle. I'd post that
you're looking for some
and scan the posts to see if
anyone has any You can
check your local recycling
centers, too. Try contact-
ing local businesses that
receive a lot of shipments.
You can reuse sandwich
bags by filling them with
air to use for shipping. You
can also use shredded
paper or save gift wrap
after holidays.
Dear Sara: Any ideas for
reusing frosting contain-
ers? Kelly G., New
Jersey
Dear Kelly: They're nice
containers because they're
stackable. Use them to
hold crayons, loose change
or pens and pencils. Use
them to mix up colored
frosting for cookie deco-
rating or dyes for egg dye-
ing. You can use them as
pantry storage containers.
They're also nice to use for
small toys, such as Lego
kits, game cards (Uno,


Skip-Bo, etc.) or
Barbie acces-
sories. You can
label them to
keep kits organ-
ized. Use some
-- to start seeds,
too.
Dear Sara:
This year we
Noel scaled back on
GAL gift giving,
ING partly because
of general
philosophy (anti-
consumerism), but mostly
because my husband is un-
employed. We did give
gifts to a few people. We
just finished up Christmas
Day and there were a cou-
ple of lopsided exchanges
where people got our kids
gifts and we didn't get any-
thing for them. Has this
happened to you? Did you
do or say anything? I will
make sure we send thank-
you notes, but I'm not sure
if there's anything else I
should do or say Perhaps I
could include a picture of
the kids in the notes as a
mini-present? Sarah,
Massachusetts
Dear Sarah: I have re-
ceived gifts from people
whom I didn't give gifts to.
I immediately have the
urge to give something in
return, but I've learned to
simply say, "thank you for
thinking of us." Keep in
mind that most people
don't give a gift in order to
receive. Your idea to send
a thank-you card is appro-
priate. It's much easier
when it's gifts for the kids
and the gift-giver doesn't
have kids. If you feel horri-
bly uncomfortable, you
could stock a gift closet
See FRUGAL/Page E11


JANE
Continued from Page E4

allowed to grow as a multi-stemmed
shrub. Mockingbirds like to perch
and nest in mature plants.
Popular and readily available
"Majestic Beauty," R. x delacourii,
is a hybrid cross of R. indicaand R.
umbellata. It never sets viable
seeds, so is cloned from cuttings.
Itis sold in standard tree form with
a single trunk. Be sure to prune off
basal suckers immediately and
lower branches as the small tree


grows. It reaches over 10 feet tall if
maintained as a tree, with a spread
of 12 to 15 feet in 10 to15 years.
I planted two beside a paved
patio to provide shade while not
blocking the view of the surround-
ing garden from the house win-
dows. Large masses of pink,
double flowers blossom abun-
dantly from late February to mid-
summer. Spotty flowering persists
until December. Snipping off
spent blossoms promotes more
flowering and keeps the plant
looking tidy
In the branches hangs a wire
cylinder containing sunflower


seeds to attract cardinals, tufted
titmice and Carolina chickadees
for closer bird-watching. Indian
Hawthorns, tree or shrub forms,
offer cover from predators such as
hawks, kestrel and marauding
cats.

Jane Weber is a professional gar-
dener and consultant Semi-
retired, she grows thousands of na-
tive plants. Visitors are welcome to
her Dunnellon, Marion County
garden. For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or email
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


~i746-9000

Amanda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BROKER0ASSOC(. -REALTOR G REALTOR REALTOR-BROKER EALTOR


"-i~ ~ ~ ~II id Ig'- ..&Z' J, .. e

5== = = _. .... ..
3946 N. PONY 4002 W. PINTO 4710 W. MUSTANG 4704 W. RANGER
4/3.5/3 359171 $749,900 4/2/2 358356 $239,900 3/2/3 359604 $249,900 359371 $249,900


W -'r ,

I- Z___ --- I---
2047 W. PARAGON LN. 842 W. COCKATIEL LRP. 8410 N. SAXON WAY
3/2/2 358792 $149,900 3/2/2 357166 $99,900 3/2/2 700484 $110,000




2616 E. VENUS 6260 S. CANNA LILY 19328 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD.
3/2 700201 $24,900 359137 $59,900 L 3/2/1 356581 $69,900


29 S. WASHINGTON ST 16 S.ADAMS 101 S. BARBOUR ST. 8182 N. POCONO 6560 N. DELTONABLVD.
2/1 356448 $39,900 1 356532 $42,900 2/2/2 354334 $59,900 3/2/2 700103 $86,900 3/252 700080 11,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 E5


_leI : 1 ]0 4 I1Ic t


510 W. PLAYER PATH
2/2/1 358921 $96,500






E6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013




HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
.............................. .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information................. 352-563-5966
News information.......................................... 352-563-5660
................................. ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"
CiH f NIWcLE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Variety is key when


adding protein foods


Most Americans have no trouble
getting enough protein in their
diet. The problem is that most
people don't vary their protein
foods and consume too much of
them each day. In America,
where big portion sizes in meat
and poultry are common, it is
easy to eat more than the sug-
gested amount of protein per -
day
According to www.choose
myplate.gov most people, ages
9 and older, should eat 5 to 7
ounces of protein foods each Monica
day In case you think you can CONS
have more protein foods if you
simply cut back on food from SCIE
other food groups, this won't
work, as you will miss out on the nutrients
you need from the other food groups.
The following tips can help reduce your
portion sizes and vary your protein
intake:
Vary your protein choices by experi-
menting with main dishes made with
legumes (dried beans and peas), nuts, soy,
and seafood.


Plan to eat seafood in place of meat
or poultry twice a week. Select a variety
of seafood that is higher in oils and low in
mercury, such as salmon, trout
and herring.
H Eat plant protein foods
more often (such as kidney,
pinto, black or white beans;
split peas, chickpeas, hum-
mus), soy products such as
tofu, veggie burgers, tempeh
and nuts and seeds (in moder-
ation). These foods are natu-
rally low in saturated fat and
Payne high in fiber.
UMER U Use unsalted nuts or seeds
as snacks or in salads, but
:NCE since nuts and seeds contain a
lot of fat and are therefore a
concentrated source of calories, eat them
in small portions.
Use healthier cooking methods, such
as grilling, broiling, roasting or baking
when preparing meat, poultry or seafood.
For a healthy sandwich, use turkey,
roast beef, canned tuna or salmon, or
See PROTEIN/Page E7


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Inside...


New look for old
china
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E4
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E10
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Artwork is an etching; sizing up a grandfather clock


Dear John: A family
member recently
passed away and left
me a piece of art-
work. I have en-
closed a
photograph of the
piece. Although I
know very little
about art, I have
always liked the
picture and am
glad to own it now.
What can you tell
me about it? Is it a John S
drawing or a SIKOF
print? It measures AT
6 1/4 inches by 4
inches and is in
excellent condition. There is
a signature, WA. Eskey, at
the lower right hand side
just below the picture. What
can you tell me about the
artist and what it might be


k


1


worth? -R.R., Internet
Dear RIR.: I am glad your
photograph is good and
clear. Your land-
scape picture is
an etching. WA.
Eskey was born in
North Hollywood,
Calif., in 1891 and
lived until 1937.
He produced
landscape etch-
ings. I think your
etching would sell
ikorski in the $100 range,
SKI'S perhaps more
IC with a little luck.
'lC Dear John: It
has taken a long
time to get the pictures to-
gether of this clock. I looked
at the face of the clock and
there is no name on it, there
is, however, a crown above
the 12 on the face which says


"trademark" underneath it.
It will run for about 15 min-
utes, although I cannot say I
had it perfectly balanced.
The chime hangs up halfway
through. When it was at my
grandfather's home, it
worked and seemed to keep
good time, but in transport,
as careful as I was, it was not
good enough, I guess.
Thanks for your help on
this. I have no idea what kind
it actually is, but would like
to have it repaired. G.,
Internet
Dear G.: I think your
grandfather clock was made
in Germany circa 1920-40. To
get it repaired, contact Chap-
man Clock Repair at 352-
466-4262.
Dear John: Enclosed is a
photograph of glassware that
was given to movie patrons


in the 1930s. Is there any col-
lector interest in this glass-
ware? -B., Inverness
Dear B.: Glassware has
been and is still being used,
e.g., McDonald's Coca-Cola
glasses recently, as giveaway
premiums for movies, gro-
ceries, gasoline and more for
more than a hundred years,
forming a large and afford-
able category of collecting
called "Giveaway Glass." I do
not recognize your glass-
ware. In order to discover
the maker of your glasses,
you might get some help
See ATTIC/Page E7
This etching was done by
W.A. Eskey, who worked in
the early 20th century. This
one would probably sell in
the $100 range.
Special to the Chronicle


il
1






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

from the folks at Replacements Ltd.
in Greensboro, N.C., at www.replace
ments.com. The phone number is
800-737-5223. Another resource is
Sparkle Plenty Glass; their website
is www.spglass.com. Good luck.
Dear John: This watch was given
to my ancestor upon leaving for
America in 1886. It has been handed
down in my family and now finally to
me. I want to know if it has any value
to anyone but me. It does not work. It
has a porcelain face with some hair-
line cracks. It comes apart, as shown
in the photograph. The round infor-
mation papers were inside the
watch. I hope you can give me some
information on the watch. C.JM.,
Citrus Springs
Dear CJ.M.: You have a man's an-
tique key wind, key set, paircase
pocketwatch. Paircase pocket-
watches like the one you have were
made in England during the 19th
century in large quantities. They are
a specific category of collector
interest.
The case is likely made of silver; if
so, it will be marked on the inside.
Unless made by a notable maker, your
watch would sell in the $100 to $200


PROTEIN
Continued from Page E6

peanut butter. Bologna and salami
are examples of deli meats that are
high in fat and sodium. These types
of deli meats should be eaten only
occasionally
Remember: restaurants serve
larger portions of meat than is rec-
ommended. A 12-ounce steak is
more than double the suggested
amount of protein for the day for
someone at the 2,000 calorie level.
Their amount would be 5.5 ounces of
protein for the whole day Order
smaller portions of meat, like petite
cuts or a smaller hamburger, or take
half your meal home for the next
day
Use the Nutrition Facts Label to
limit sodium. Salt is added to many
canned foods, including beans and
meats. Processed foods, such as
ham, sausage and hot dogs are high
in sodium.
Choose lean or low-fat cuts of
meat (round or sirloin) and ground
beef that is at least 90 percent lean.


Special to the Chronicle
This grandfather clock was likely
made in Germany sometime in the
1920 to 1940s.
range. In order to help you further, I
need some good, clear photos, in-
cluding a photograph of the move-
ment and any notations you find on it.


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for
30 years. He hosts a call-in radio
show, Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, PO. Box 2513, Ocala, FL 34478
or asksikorski@aol. com.

Drain fat from meat and remove
skin from poultry
On average, one egg a day doesn't
increase risk for heart disease. You
can make eggs a part of your weekly
protein choices. The egg yolk contains
the cholesterol and saturated fat, not
the egg whites. So you can have as
many egg whites as you would like.
Call Monica Payne at the Exten-
sion office at 352-527-5713.
Citrus County Extension links the
public with the University of
Florida/IFAS' knowledge, research
and resources to address youth, fam-
ily, community and agricultural
needs. All programs and related ac-
tivities sponsored for, or assisted by,
the Institute of Food and Agricul-
tural Sciences are open to all per-
sons with non-discrimination with
respect to race, creed, color, reli-
gion, age, disability, sex, sexual ori-
entation, marital status, national
origin, political opinions or
affiliations.


Monica Payne is the Family and
Consumer Sciences Agent for
Citrus County Extension.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 E7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NEW



LEASE



ON






DIY tips to give
new life to old
dinnerware
HILLARY SPEED
Associated Press
y V vintage dishware doesn't
have to gather dust in the
china cabinet.
Outdated table settings, such as a
stack of your grandmother's old
plates or a bundle of used mugs you
scooped up at Salvation Army, can
find fresh life with a little TLC. All
it takes is a marker or a drill and a
basic plan.
"I always find it a bit sad when
things so loved by previous genera-
tions are thrown on the scrap heap,"
says lifestyle blogger Anna Nichol-
son, based in Yorkshire, England.
"I'm always looking for ways
things can be reused, upcycled and
overhauled to fit in with our 21st
century style."
Here are some ways to spruce up
old china and dollar-store dishes:
Markers and paint
The popular craft-swapping


See Page E9


E8 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A vintage-plate-decorating project up-
cycled with modern letter print de-
scribed on the lifestyle blog "angel in
the north" is shown in its completed
form. The blog is run by Anna Nichol-
son of West Yorkshire. England.


_ _7 w--


-. .. .:-_.. c- --..
4 '--- -":--.- '- ": .


- -- -o~ --


NEW
Continued from Page E8

website Pinterest is full of
plate-decorating projects that
tap into the "magic" of magic
markers.
Nicholson, whose blog is


"angel in the north" (www.
angelinthenorth.com ), uses
Sharpies to personalize vintage
floral plates. In one set, she
adorned each plate with a let-
ter in the word "EAT," to dis-
play in the kitchen. In another,
she used four plates to spell out
the word "HOME."
She prints her own letter


cutouts, using the font Bodoni
MT, onto thick paper or card-
stock. She traces around the
letters onto the old plates with
a pen, then goes over the out-
line with a Sharpie and fills it
in.
"This is an easy project, but
you do need a steady hand,"
she says.


Others take the Sharpie idea
to another level and if the
dishes are ovenproof bake
the marker on to make it per-
manent. Many crafting blogs
call for drawing with a Sharpie
and baking the ovenproof dish
at 350 degrees for 30 minutes.
Christine Dinsmore, based in
Portland, Ore., has used the


Sharpie method for free-hand-
ing original drawings. On her
blog, The Plumed Nest
(www.theplumednest.com), she
shows how she drew original
monster pictures onto plates
for her children.
"I would often see cute little

See Page E10


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SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 E9







E10 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013


NEW
Continued from Page E9

dishes for children, but
they were usually made
out of plastic," Dinsmore
says. She has tried to rid
her kitchen of plastic "and
didn't want to purchase
any more."
That's when she got in-
spired to draw her own
kid-friendly characters.
Dinsmore advises using
non-toxic Sharpie paint
pens, found at most craft
stores and online. Also,
she recommends cleaning
plates gently, never with
an abrasive sponge or
dishwasher.
Other bloggers suggest
ceramic or glass paint if
the dish will have frequent
contact with food.
Danielle Warner of the
blog "The Yarn to Tell"
(http://theyarntotell.word
press.com ) recommends
Delta PermEnamel paint
for a more painted -
rather than drawn look.
It's also available at craft
stores or online.
Chop it up
Sometimes, old china is
no longer in one piece. But
that shouldn't stop you
from turning it into some-
thing special.
Do-it-yourselfer Ashley
Hackshaw, editor of the
blog "Lil Blue Boo"
(www.lilblueboo.com), was
inspired to find a use for
chunks of a broken Tiffany
vase that she had received
as a wedding gift.
"I couldn't bear to throw
away the beautiful pieces,
so I decided to start mak-
ing them into useful
items," says Hackshaw, of
Palm Desert, Calif.
Her answer: key chains.
Once you find a piece
you like, the main job is to
drill a hole and smooth the
edges. You can use a
household drill, using a
carbide drill bit to make
the hole, and sandpaper
and steel wool for the
edges.
Make sure to wear pro-


Sugarmill Woods
Pine Ridge
SCitrus Hills
S Waterfront


Mike
Stokley
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


Associated Press
The final result of a project making a keychain made out of broken china displayed for
the blog Lil Blue Boo, run by Ashley Hackshaw, in Palm Desert, Calif.


tective eyewear and dip
the piece in water to keep
it cool, Hackshaw says.
Or you can use a rotary
tool and attachment set,
she says.
Then, just thread a key
ring through the hole, and
you have a meaningful and
practical new use for an
old chunk of china.
"One of my favorite gifts
I've ever received was a
keychain from my aunt
that was made from one of
my great-grandmother's
old silverware pieces,"
Hackshaw says. "I knew it
was something that I
would keep forever and
hand down to my daughter,
and hopefully one day she
would do the same. That' s
what gave me the idea
about the broken vase."
Build
something new
If you have beautiful old
pieces of china that you
rarely use, why not turn
them into something else?
Marceli Botticelli of
Franklin, Mass., runs an
Etsy store called "Tea
Times Creations" (www
etsy.com/shop/TeaTimes
Creations). It offers tiered
stands, made out of old
china, that can be used as
serving platters or "tidbit"
trays for anything from


jewelry to loose change or
keys. She also sells jewelry
and nightlights made out
of repurposed table set-
tings and teacups.
For the DIYer, Botticelli
sells kits that come with
drill bits, fittings and in-
structions. And if you're
too sheepish to drill your
own holes into your pre-
cious antique plates, she
offers to do it for you.
One of the biggest chal-
lenges in repurposing old
china for any project, she
says, is finding the right
piece.
"I am inspired by many
different things," she says.


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"It can be the color, the
pattern, a theme."
One client brought her a
plate with an extremely
rare pattern; the client
had been collecting china
since she was 8, and had
never found another plate
like this one.
"I said a prayer, took a
deep breath and I drilled
into the plate," Botticelli
says.
"Now it has a new lease
on life and is not stacked
with other plates in a
closet anymore. It is a
beautiful piece that can be
enjoyed for many years to
come."


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Stone
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM HOMES THROUGHOUT THE NATURE COAST






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

FRUGAL
Continued from Page E5

throughout the year, so you are
prepared for any additional gifts
you might need. You can keep
some general gifts in your car if
you're going to someone else's
home, so if you are given any
surprise gifts, you can simply
run out to your car Or you could
ask them out to lunch after the
holidays are over.
I struggle with uneven gift ex-
changes. I get a bit uncomfort-
able and slightly annoyed when
a gift exchange is agreed to be
under a certain dollar amount
and then the other person ex-
ceeds that amount by a lot. (It's
especially perturbing when they
set the price cap.)
But again, I've learned to deal
with it and show genuine sur-


prise coupled with sincere grat-
itude. I'm not going to start
spending more to match what I
think they're giving each year;
that's just silly I prefer to be
thankful for their gift than to
focus on the fact that they spent
more. I shouldn't feel guilty for
following rules that were preset

Cleaning pans can be a tough
job. Oftentimes, you can simply
fill the pot or pan with soapy
water and let it soak, then clean
it later, or remove what you can
with a wooden or plastic spatula.
If scorched marks remain, add a
baking soda paste of baking soda
and vinegar, or baking soda, dish
liquid, a bit of water and a dryer
sheet (such as Bounce), and let
soak overnight. Scrub with a
green Scotch-Brite pad or a Mr
Clean Magic Eraser. If you still
have some stubborn marks, you
can use oven cleaner or prod-


ucts such as Bon Ami, Cameo or
Bar Keepers Friend.
The first reader tip shares an-
other idea:
Cleaning stainless steel pan: If
I think food will be hard to clean
from the pan, I'll heat up some
water in it on the stove (not a full
boil, but a really good heating),
along with a drop or two of dish
soap. Once the water is heated, I
turn the stove off and cover the
pot.
Once I'm ready to clean, it
usually comes off with ease. -
Libby Canada
Put the word out: I answered
an ad for baby clothes on
Craigslist when my granddaugh-
ter was a newborn. Being an ob-
sessed grandmother, I insisted
we get clothes far in advance.
The seller was offering clothes
from places like the Children's
Place, babyGap, Gymboree -
expensive stuff that I wasn't


going to buy new. As it turns out,
her baby girl is exactly one year
older than my grandchild, so the
clothes are all in the right sea-
son. And in an amazing coinci-
dence, both their names are Lily
Grace, so even the nametags are
correct!
I bought the whole lot of
clothes, and the seller and I now
have an arrangement: When she
amasses a bin full of outgrown
clothes, she sends me an email
and I go by to pick them up. My
daughter hasn't had to buy new
clothes for her baby since she
was born! EN, Massachusetts
Shop and plan ahead for the
year: Here's a good example of
buying with the whole year in
mind. Budget $12 plus tax for
January Next, run to the dollar
store while you are already out
running errands. (Don't use
extra gas!) Purchase 12 20-ounce
bottles ofnon-lotion-y body wash


SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 Ell
at $1 each, of various scents and
colors.
Now, fill each of your hand
soap pumps by combining a bit
of water and the soap (leaving
room to put the pump back in),
and shake. For roughly 25 cents
per bottle, you have the entire
year's worth of hand soap, so you
can check it off the stockpile list.
This is a cheap and effective
way of completing one small
thing for an entire year -
Cricket, Texas


Sara Noel is the owner of Fru-
gal Village (wwwfrugalvillage.
corn), a website that offers prac-
tical, money-saving strategies
for everyday living. To send
tips, comments or questions,
write to Sara Noel, c/o Univer-
sal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St.,
Kansas City MO 64106, or email
sara@frugalvillage. com.


TREES
Continued from Page E3

feet high. Or one of the two
poison-sumac co-champs, 23
feet tall with a branch spread
of 21 feet!
Trees with history
It's fun to imagine what was
going on when the sequoia or
western juniper champions
were still in their relative youth
a thousand or so years ago.
A few Big Trees have been
more than mere witnesses;
they have been part of history
The champion osage orange
tree, still standing at the
Patrick Henry homestead,
was grown from a seed sent by
Lewis and Clark to Thomas
Jefferson, then presented to
Henry's daughter.
I will now surely pause for
thought before planting out
my 5-year-old osage orange
seedlings this spring.
Rules of
the competition
The Big Tree program is
friendly competition, but like
any competition, there are
rules. Most obvious is that a
Big Tree must be a tree, that
is, a plant with a definite
crown of foliage topping a
trunk at least 3 inches in di-
ameter It also must be native


or naturalized in the conti-
nental United States.
Big Trees are measured
three ways to give an overall
score, which becomes the
basis for championship. First,
and most straightforward, is
to measure trunk girth in
inches. Rules specify taking
this measurement at 4.5 feet
from the ground. If the ground
slopes, measure from the high
point; if the tree forks at 4.5
feet, measure the smallest cir-
cumference below that
height; if the fork starts lower,
measure the largest stem.
Height is a straightforward
measure only if you're a very
good tree climber Fbr an indi-
rect measure, hold a yardstick
vertically in your outstretched
hand, adjusting its height above
your hand to equal the distance
from your hand to your eyes.
Now walk backwards until the


top of the tree lines up with the
top of the yardstick and you can
just see the base of the tree over
your hand all without moving
your head or your hand. The
height of the tree, if you stayed
on level ground, is equal to your
distance away from the tree.
The third measurement is
the average spread of the
branches. Add the widest
spread and the smallest
spread, then divide by two.
Get your overall score by
adding up the girth in inches,
the height in feet, plus one-
quarter times the average
branch spread in feet.
I'm going to go measure that
cucumbertree magnolia, and if
it scores higher than 389 points
- the score for the current
champ, reigning in Waukon,
Iowa then this local tree is a
champion. And even if it's not,
it is majestic to behold.


000BOSH

Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@myflorida-house .com


ELEGANT MOVE RIGHT IN A BOATER'S DREAM
CUSTOM BUILT HOME BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS! Sailboat water (no bridges); 240
S Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home on a 1 acre
In the equestrian section of Pine comer lot with mature oak tees and lots feet of seawall; stationary &
Ridge next to riding trails. Take of privacy! Very well maintained, new floating dock; spacious modem 3/
a 360 interactive virtual tour at roof 05/09. Just bring your suitcase and 25 home sits high and dry (never
a 360 interactive virtual tour at move right in! Community features flooded) on 2 lots. This meticu-
www.mypineridgehome.com. golf, tennis, clubhouse lously maintained property is a
MLS #355468.$410,000 MLS #358397 $169,000 must see! $499,000


S, NORTHRIDGE ESTATES -
uVillages of Citrus Hills, well known for
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bridges to the Crystal River! Tile floors, Oaks East, a I ,r, ..t nght away.A recent facelift included new
bonus room, fireplace, newer roof and community on the8 paint and flooring, and A/C, range and
windows; great income potential, too! $218,000 the garage door were replaced in 2012.
MLS 359564 $220,000 will buy you this peace of heaven! MLS 700472 $142,500






CLASSIC AND LIVING ON THE WATER! 4590 WORLDWIDE DR., INVERNESS
CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is Completely updated 3/2 home! New. roof
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defines thi distinctive 54 waterfront lifestyle. Open and airy with the 01/11, W/H 2009! Florida room, fenced
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1 425.000 i $489,000 ... .. 62,000
.$425.000 $489,000 1 '. $62,000


A few Big Trees have been more than
mere witnesses; they have been part
of history. The champion osage
orange tree, still standing at the
Patrick Henry homestead, was grown
from a seed sent by Lewis and Clark
to Thomas Jefferson, then presented
to Henry's daughter.










Want to go car-free? A guide to cargo bicycles


FINLEY FAGAN
Mother Earth News

Bike culture is exploding in
cities across the world. Whether
people are riding folding bikes
to the commuter train, slipping
through traffic on streamlined
single-speeds, or carrying chil-
dren and groceries on their
cargo bikes, bicycles are making
urban life more dynamic and en-
joyable. Cargo bikes -specialty-
form or retrofitted are a good
option for cycle commuters who
want to fully replace the car with
green transportation that works
for everyday life. In this excerpt
from "On Bicycles: 50 Ways the
New Bike Culture Can Change


Your Life" (New World Library,
2012), Finley Fagan explains the
different kinds of cargo bikes
and their benefits.
Hauling stuff by pedal power
is nothing new. So what do we
know about cargo cyclists, this
curious breed who set them-
selves up for hauling heavy or
cumbersome loads?
Sales figures indicate that the
buyers of cargo bikes are just as
likely to be male as they are fe-
male, and that the new cargo is
not strictly business. While some
entrepreneurs and couriers are
zipping around laden with mail,
organic fruit and vegetables,
baked goods, coffee and Christ-
mas trees, for others cargo cy-


cling is all about the everyday A
to B getting the kids to school,
the pets to the park, the gro-
ceries into the fridge, the fridge
into the new apartment.
Nicole and Anthony Stout are
parents who have taken cargo
cycling one step further, having
now celebrated three years
without a car. I was interested to
find out how car-free living is
going for them and their two
young children in suburban
Colorado.
"Living car-free in suburban
America requires a pretty signif-
icant mind-set change," Anthony
says. "Your world becomes
smaller and bigger at the same
time. You may not stray as far


and wide as you do with a car,
but because you see so much
more and experience the world
in a different way, your local
world seems bigger ... At first, we
thought we'd have to save up
and buy a Prius or something,
then we discovered (cargo) bikes
do the job nicely Living car-free
is very healthy for our kids. They
see so much more, smell so
much more, notice so much
more than when they go some-
place via car."
Anthony acknowledges that
living car-free in the suburban
United States has not always
been easy
For those wanting to get a
taste of cargo cycling, a cheap


and easy way to start is to make
a regular bike more cargo-
friendly with any combination of
racks, bags, child seats and bas-
kets. Play around and see what
your bike is capable of carrying
and what errands it can conquer.
People in the developing world
have been mastering this skill
for decades.
If you feel the desire to in-
crease your cargo capacity with
a heavy-duty cargo bike or trike,
the good news is that handling
becomes second nature after a
brief adjustment period. The
extra weight makes for slower
starts and slower stops, but


See BIKES/Page E13


' E HI..


UM


BILL DECKER 352-464-0647 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133 VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777


Term 6 Moth or More


E12 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BIKES
Continued from Page E12

riding is not difficult on
flat terrain once you have
built up momentum. For
hillier terrain, consider
stronger brakes and lower
gearing, and choose be-
tween an electric assist
and an extra-buff pair of
legs. On your wheels, fatter
tires, beefier rims and
more spokes will help
cushion loads. Keeping
your load low and balanc-
ing it on both sides will en-
hance stability.
Nowadays there is a
cargo-hauling option for
almost every kind of ter-
rain, use and budget. So,
what's your cargo beast of
choice? Here are some of
the options.
Perhaps the most iconic
image of cargo cycling is a
parent riding a two-
wheeled bakfiets laden
with children (bakfiets is a
generic term for any "box


bike," whereas Bakfiets is
a popular Dutch bike com-
pany). With its plywood
box in front, fitted out with
child seats, harnesses and
canopy, and a low step-
through frame and stable
parking stand, these
heavy-duty, ultrapractical
cargo bikes have become a
huge hit with families
across the pancake flats of
the Netherlands.
European models from
Bakfiets, WorkCycles,
Monark and Bullitt are
available in North Amer-
ica, along with a growing
range of locally designed
bakfiets that address the
demand for lower price
tags, lower bike weight or
lower gearing for hilly ter-
rain. These include a nim-
ble cargo bike from
Bilenky, the Cetma Cargo
bike, Joe Bike's Shuttle-
bug, CAT's Long Haul, the
super-stylish Metrofiets
and Tom's Cargo Bikes,
with their DIY hillbilly
charm.
Longtail bikes (with one


exception, the Madsen)
have no single box for
hauling loads. Instead the
rear part of the frame is
extended so the rear
wheel is about 15 inches
farther behind the seat
than on a conventional
bike, allowing bulky items
to be strapped on either
side of or above the rear
wheel. Smaller items can
be tucked away in large
rear bags. Optional seats
for children and adults
can be fastened to a plat-
form above the rear wheel.
North American interest
spiked with the introduc-


tion of Xtracycle in the
late nineties. Xtracycle's
bolt-on FreeRadical is a
frame extension that can
be retrofitted onto almost
any regular bicycle,
lengthening the wheelbase
and turning it into a long-
tail cargo bike.
Other North American
designers followed, offer-
ing a range of sturdy one-
piece longtail bikes
capable of carrying loads
of more than four hundred
pounds. These include the
versatile Surly Big Dummy
(capable of epic off-road
adventures); the rock-


solid, no-frills Yuba
Mundo; the big-name
Kona Ute; and the stylish
Xtracycle Radish.
Trikes, the often-forgot-
ten siblings of bikes, found
widespread popularity in
Christiania, an eccentric
quarter of Copenhagen, in
the 1980s.
Christiania Bikes devel-
oped a small, front-loading
trike with a large plywood
box capable of carrying up
to 220 pounds of kids and
freight.
Homegrown cargo trikes
include Portland's Terra-
Cycle Cargo Monster (a re-


SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 E13

cumbent trike with an
Xtracycle frame exten-
sion), Montana's Lightfoot
Trike and offerings from
the venerable Worksman
Cycles of New York City,
which has been selling in-
dustrial trikes for more
than a century
Excerpted from Mother
Earth News, the Original
Guide to Living Wisely. To
read more articles from
Mother Earth News,
please visit www.Mother
EarthNews.com or call
800-234-3368 to subscribe.
Copyright 2013 by Ogden
Publications Inc.


- U U U U


PINE RIDGE ndil CITRUS HILLS
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd. P Pr/ ld 20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Frida Sh Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 Florida Showcase (352) 746-0744
(352) 527-1820 Properties (352) 746-0744
P noperties


SUBMISSION DEADLINES
* Follow these guidelines to help ensure timely pub-
lication of submitted material. The earlier Chroni-
cle editors receive submissions, the better chance
of notes running more than once.
* Community notes: At least one week in advance
of the event.
* Veterans Notes: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication
Sunday.
* Together page: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication
Sunday.
* Business Digest: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publica-
tion Sunday.
* Chalk Talk: 4 p.m. Monday for publication
Wednesday.
* Health Notes: 4 p.m. Friday for publication Tuesday.
* Religious events : 4 p.m. Tuesday for publication
Saturday.
* Real Estate Digest: 4 p.m. Thursday for publica-
tion Sunday.
* Photos and stories are published as space is
available. The Chronicle cannot guarantee place-
ment on color pages.
* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness
or Crystal River; by fax at 563-3280; or by e-mail
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.


Ti,- 435 E Keller Ct
+dllMs MLS#700431 S334,900
Incredible 3/2/2, for the ultimate in FL.
Directions: Rte 46to south on Citrus Hills Blvd to left on
Keller Ct to comer home.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774
NEW LISTING


-LillS 60 E Ireland Ct
MLS#700370 $249,700
New 2013 construction on the
Oaks Golf Course.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3




S..atet 4074N Indianriver Dr
Sef MLS#700337 $299,900
Someone built your dream house! Not a
touch forgotten.
Directions: Rte 486 to north onAnnapolis to right on
Indianhead to third right on Tradewind becomes
Indianriverto home on left.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086
NEW LISTING





5575 N Mesa Pt
MLS#700417 $247,900
New 2013 construction, 3/2/3 in scenic
Pine Ridge.
Phil Phillips 352-613-7553


-"'I


OPEN HOUSE


"f 351 W Hillmoor Ln
/,V u r.li ".:'- .: i S147000
2/2/2 + workshop surrounded by
Twisted Oaks Golf Course.
Directions: Forest Ridge Blvd to Laurel Ridge (Hollow Dr)
to left on Crestline to right on Hillmoorto home on left.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926
NEW LISTING





1246 E Cleveland St
15taU'S MLS#700297 $125,000
2/2/2 home is nimbly located on a tree
filled lot.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086
PENDING


L. -- 326W Doerr Palh
Z 5l4Sa MLS#700366 $299,900
Gorgeous 3/3/2 home on the 6th
fairway Skyview Golf Course.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


L'"' 3690 W Treyburn Path
MLS#358373 $129,900
Lovely 3/2/2 home in Breath-taking
neighborhood.
Tami Mayer 352-476-1507
PENDING


-Mjr^i l'^ .*. (Cais .2;
'- 3709 N Buckwheat Pt 4 9 E Hartiord SI29 Ib 165E Ireland Ct V e 645 WSunbird Path
MLS#356804 $89,900 MLS#356657 $59,000 MLS#354308 $199,000 MLS#700047 $84,000
SERIOUSLY? A furnished Pine Ridge Maintenance free lifestyle, Updated 3/2/2 Oaks Golf Outstanding value 2/2
pool home on an acre. PRICED to SELL QUICKLY!!! Course Home "maintenance free" villa.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952 Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 Mike McHale 352-302-3203 Mark Casper 352-476-8136
@ 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Rnancial company. Prudential, the
_0M Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entties, registered in manylurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E14 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013



Chron^icle


CRYSTAL RIVER
6851 W. Vanaman Ct
2/2 $425/$400 dep.
DUNNELLON 2/2
5159 W Disney Lane
$400/ $400 dep.
(727) 480-5512
FLORAL CITY 2/1
$450 mo + sec. (352)
637-6554: 422-1562
HERNANDO
2BRI1BA, 1/2 acre
All Appl's $395 mo
(No Petsl
(352) 860-0904,
(Cell) 352-212-6815
HOMOSASSA
2 & 3 Br homes w/ stor-
age sheds. Starting at
$550/mo + $800/Sec -
ONLY $1350 total to
move in. We pay trash,
lawn, water & sewer.
Close to Walmart,
Publixs& Suncoast PKY
No pets 352-584-1831
HOMOSASSA
2/1, $400/mo.+ util.
1574 S. Iroquois Ave
(352) 503-7562
HOMOSASSA
2/2, $140 Wk. Elec.
Included Adult Park
(352) 621-0601
HOMOSASSA
2BR, $475. mo. Nice
Area (352) 422-1932
HOMOSASSA
2BR/2 BA, No Pets
$500 (352) 628-5696
INGLIS
2/2, Close to Plant
on 1 acre Clean, Quiet
$495. (352) 447-6016
LECANTO
LEISURE ACRES
3/2 water & garbage
incl. $600mo.
(352) 628-5990




14x 60, 2BR, 1/2 BA,
Carport, Shed, appli-
ances, W/D, clean,
move in condition
Near new Walmart on
486, $4,800.
(352) 387-7824
Crystal River 55+
Park. 2BR/1BA Car-
port & Screened
Porch. Heat/Air
$9,500. 352-746-4648
Ask for Brit
HERNANDO
$$ Private Owner $$
Financing Available
New & Used
Manufactured Homes
Call 1-727-967-4230


__ To place an ad, call 563-5966


BANK
FORECLOSURE
Land-n-Home, 3/2
1500 sq. ft. On %
Acre, paved rd.
LOOKS GOOD,
Have financing if
needed, only
$2,500 down,
$381.44mo. P&l
W.A.C. OR $69,900.
Call 352-613-0587
or 352-621-9183

HOME-ON-LAND
3/2 Great Shape.
%Acre. Move In
Now
$59,900.
Call 352-401-2979,
352-621-3807





NEW 2013

2br 2ba
Doublewide w/10 year
Warranty $39,900
Delivered & setup, a/c,
skirt, steps.
Call(352) 795-1272

REPO'S- REPO'S
REPO'S
WE HAVE REPO'S
CALL 352-621-9181



WE WILL

BUY YOUR
MANUFACTURED
Home. from 1976-2013
CALL (352) 795-2377




2BR. 11/2 BA.on your
own 75x 100 lot.
no fees! new enclosed
sunroom, Ig laundry
room furn, 2 storage
buildings, 5111 Castle
Lake Ave. S. of
Inverness on SR 41
$39,500 (352) 597-7353

3bdr/2 full baths/ 2 car
carport on 1 acre.
split layout, steel roof,
caged pool, 20x25 ft
deck, Ig storage build-
ing, Furnished Modu-
lar $73,900, 5215
Bridget Pt, Castle
Lake Park
Inverness
(352) 597-7353


CASTLE LAKE
Floral City
2/2 S/W Fully furnished
move in condition.
2 screen rooms,
2 sheds. Landscaped
with sprinkler on quiet
cul-de-sac. $38,900.
352-212-1883
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 4br 2ba MH
READY TO MOVE IN!
4-wner Fin. Avail.+
CALL (352) 795-1272
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Less Than
$46,500. Cash.
Considering ALL Cash
offers. 352-586-9498
HERNANDO 2/2 DW
On lot, with Shed &
Deck See for your-
self at 2562 N. Treas-
ure Pt. $28,500 obo
352-464-0719
HERNANDO/486
1+acre, 2br SWMH+-
den/flp, ManCave/Work
Shop w/AC, 28x40,
$47,500, J. Desha
Cridland Real Estate
(352)634-6340
HOMOSASSA
-3/2, Fenced Yard,-
NEW Flooring. NEW
AC $5.000 Down.
$435. mo
(352) 302-9217
HOMOSASSA
2ba 1 % ba MH needs
complete rehab. Good
shed, well & septic.
6524 W. Akazian
$12,500 (603) 860-6660
NW Citrus County
SWMH on 1 acre, 2/1.5
- paved rd., screened
porch, appliances -
$37,700 possible
owner financing
352-795-9908
W. of 19 in Homosassa
1994, 2/2 Doublewide,
Move In Condition
Corner Lot $44,900.
Tradewinds Realty
(352) 400-0089




2/2 on Lake Rous-
seau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent
$240/mo. 2003. Used
Seasonally
Owner bought a
house. 207-546-6115,
cell


Adult Park 2/1,
Mobile, heat and air,
nicely furn. large
shed, sreen rm. car-
port, $8,200
Lot Rent $160 mo.
(352) 287-3729

CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
H WINTER SPE-
CIALS H
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
2/2 New Model
$59K
2/2 waterfront.
$31,000.
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

DUNNELLON
LAKE ROUSSEAU MH
Park. Lg. 1/1 w/sliderto
encl. screened porch,
outside shed, CHA furn.
Nice yard, low lot rent.
Asking$11,900
(207) 347-0531
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $179/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS
3/2 MH, Furn. Ig screen
lanai, shed & lot. All appl
incl Ig scn TV,55+ PK
Asking $12,000. Call
(352)364-3747
INVERNESS
Move In Ready,
Beautiful 1/1 SW,
Mobile, Harbor Lights
55+ park, on Big Lake
Henderson. Fully furn.,
very updated, view of
lake, Cen. HVAC, W/D,
A Must See! Asking
$7,000, 352-344-1828
INVERNESS PARK
55+, 14X60, 2/2, new
roof, all appliances,
partly furn. screen
room, shed,
352-419-6476
MOBILE HOME,
Fully
Furnished. Everyth-
ing stays. Just move
in. 2 Sheds,
washer/dryer all ap-
pliances. Must See!
$7,500. (708) 308-3138

PALM TERRACE
55+ Community,
1997 3BR/2BA 14 x 66,
excel. cond. Shed,
Fl. Rm. Carport &
Deck $16,000. (352)
400-8231


REDUCED 2/2 $17,500
On Lake Rousseau
Lot Rent $240/mo.
BETTER THAN NEW!
Owner financing. Call
LEE (352) 817-1987

Singing Fores t
FLORAL CITY
14 x 70, Mobile, 2 lrg.
bedrooms, furnished &
remodeled, heat & air,
carport & shed, Wash/
Dryer, Lot rent $176.
$14,500. 352-344-2420

STONEBROOK, CR
2bd/2ba,gourmet kitch,
master suite,encl. porch
pond, crprt+ patio
$51,900, Cridland RE,
Jackie 352-634-6340

Waterfront/Homosassa
Westwind Village 55+
Beautifully furnished
Move In Ready, 2/2
2 Scrn rms, dbl door,
refrig./Ice maker
Washer Dryer, Low
monthly payments,
$19000 obo
(850) 449-1811 Cell





INVERNESS
RV Spaces. Bring your
own boat and fishing
gear. AGE 55+ commu-
nity. Lot rent only
$360-$375 including
electric. Edge Water
Oaks 352-344-1380





HOMOSASSA
RENT-to-OWN
3br 2ba MH
Immediate Occpancy
Owner Financino Avail.
CALL (352) 795-2377











3/2 Citrus SDrinas $975
Furn W/FHome $2500
Furn Stilt w/f Hm $1700
3/2 furn w/f condo$1500
More rentals:
c21naturecoast.com
835 NE Hwy 19Crystal
River, FI(352) 795-0021


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL


Need a Good Tenant?




2/2/1 New Paint, New Floorin.$650
3/1 Fieple, Scree Room.....$650
4/2 nacnal............$750
3/2/2 ScrnPati.......$800


3/1 ....................$650
2/2/1 .................$675
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010



SRENTAL MAIGEMIE "
REALlY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounlyHorneRenlals.corn
CITRUS SPRINGS
8160 N. Duval Dr. ((CS)....$1,300
3/2/2 Pool home, full furn. w/utiies
water/sewerand elec. cops
CRYSTAL RIVER
11246 Freshwater Pth (R)... ..$1,200
2/2/1] S[ceened inn [ilcefurnishing,utlltssinc.
10350 Deepwods Dr. (R) ...$150
2/2/1 Cose to mall, Ig. utility room
HOMOSASSA
1650W. Hoosssa TI 21 (H) ... $500
2/1 Cozy duplex on Homosossa Tril
40 Hollyhock Cir. (H) .. $950
3/2/2 Oaik VllageSMW, spacious home
HERNANDO/INVERNESS
994 E. Winnetka St. (Her).... S625
2/1.50n 1 acre with carport
6315 N. Shrewool Dr. (Her)... $650
2/1 ute home with FLroom nd greatbckynrd
854 Pritchard Isl. (Inv.)...$800
2/2 Townhouse onwaterdont, comm. pool




Maaj et Inc.


Chassahowitzka
3/2 waterfrnt/DW $500
2/2, fenc. Yd/DW $500
2/2 house w/gar. $600
Suarmil IWoods
312/2, Furnished, $900.
AGENT (352) 382-1000


- I
CRYSTAL RIVER
1Br 2BA Comletely
furn. incl utilities, W/D,
$700 mo 1st, last & dep
(352) 422-7717
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Studio Apartment
Completely Furn. Ca-
ble TV W/D rm. All util.
incl'd.+ boat dock.
$700 mo 352-372-0507
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1
Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real
Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES
& MOBILES
AVAILABLE
CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apart-
ments for Rent
352-465-2985
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, $575. quiet,
Clean. incld's water,
352-563-2114
352-257- 6461
CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 2/1, lawn,
water, sewr & garb. W/D
hk up $500.mo $250
dep No Pets
352-212-9205
352-212-7922

SINVERNESS
2 B/R's Availa-
ble
KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOMES
Rental Assistance
Available For
Qualified Appli-
cants
Call 352-344-1010
MWF, 8-12 & 1-5
307 Washington
Ave
Inverness Florida
Equal Housing
Opp.



EOUAL HOLSINM
OPPORTUNITY
L J
L------ J




CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret Har-
bourApts. Newly re-
modeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incl
Water, garbage, W/D
hook-up.
352-586-4037


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1/ 2, 828 5th Ave. NE
Furn $650 or Unfurn.
$550 + sec 727-
455-8998, 727-776-3120




CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furn w/ member-
ship, Seasonal/Annual
352-476-4242,
352-527-8002
CITRUS HILLS
2/2/2 Townhouse
Condo, full apple's,
carport, Citrus Hills
membership incld'd
Prudential Florida
Showcase Properties
call 352-476-8136




CITRUS SPRINGS
Like New, 2/2, All appl.
$625. 954-557-6211




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
**RENT REDUCED**
3/1 Country Home on
stilts,w/fenced yard.
$565 + Utilities.
Call 920-922-6800
Sugarmill Woods
3BR, 21/2BA, Super
Clean 3,100 sf, large
priv. shaded lot,
2 covered, porches,
sm. pet ok. $1,150.
mo. yrly Ise. se.,sec. dep
$700. $3,000 move in
(727) 580-1083




BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, Fresh paint, appl's
Flooring $475. mo.
352-302-3987
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 + Florida Room,
106 S. Fillmore $550
mo. 352-422-2798
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/Carport. CHA
$550. mo. & 1/1/CP
+ Fl. Rm $450 (352)
897-4447, 697-1384
BEVERLY HILLS
870 Beakrush Ln
2br 1 ba, 1 car gar.
enclosed screen porch,
$695mo. leased dep.
no pets. 352-697-3133
BEVERLY HILLS
Lg 1/1, Extras, E-Z
Terms $425. 697-1457
CITRUS SPRINGS
4 Br, 2 Ba, 2Car gar.
only $795/mo. 7206 N.
Varsity Ave. 382-1373.
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
Water Incl. CHA, $496.
352-220-2447
212-2051
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2+ Carport $725. mo
DUNNELLON
3/1,$625 mo. 1st Ist,
Sec (352) 489-9239


CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Inverness
352-726-3476
Lecanto
352-746-0373
Crystal River

352-563-0890



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

DUNNELLON
2/2/2
RAINBOW SPRINGS
*Avail. Feb. 1st*
$800. mo+ sec.
(352) 465-2022
HERNANDO
Forest Ridge Village
Nice 2/2 home *
w/garage, screened
patio, & pool/clubhouse
privileges. $750 mo
Call 980-285-8125

HOMOSASSA
2/1 Duplexe $450
3/2/2 House $625
River Links Realty
352-628-1616

Homosassa Spring
3/2 $750/mo + sec.
(352) 628-3696
INV. S. HIGH-
LANDS
2/2/2, 1st & Sec.
$850. mo.
352-419-5442
Invern. Highlands
2/2/1, City Water, Great
Loc. Quiet Neighrhood
$650. 352-860-2554
INVERNESS
1/1 Great Location, 55+
community Bring boat &
fishing gear. $585
352-344-1380

INVERNESS
3/2 Brand New,
Granite tops, marble
firs, SS Ap $895
(352) 634-3897

INVERNESS
312/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352- 601-2615 OR
352-201-9427

INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/1/1
$590mo.1 st & Sec
(352) 344-2560
Sugarmill Woods
3/2/2, Pool, remodeled
$1,200. 352-302-4057




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225
Rom


BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV &
W/D WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1
Furn. $950.
352-419-4421





CRYSTAL RIVER
3950 sq ft Lt MFG
w/office @ $1200/mo
1155 sq ft storage @
450/mo
600 sq ft office @
450/mo
352-302-1935

CRYSTAL RIVER
Warehouse for Rent
Free standing, garage
area, 1,440sf,
$100-$550
352-634-0129






AUTOMATED
Home Info 2417
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE







ESTATE SALE in Na
ture Coast Landings
RV Resort. Large de-
veloped site and a
separate gated storage
lot; plus almost new
5th-wheel with slides,
screened gazebo, and
storage building. All for
$79,900. For more info
and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441


From mobiles to
mansions,
From Gulf to Lakes,
give me a call,
I sell 'em all!
352-422-4137
nancv.wilsono
vahoo.com

Nancy J. Wilson
Realtor@
Broker-Associate
SRES@GRI
Waybright Real Es-
tate, Inc.


MOTIVATED SELLER
Wants This Gone!!!
6 Acres w Big SHOP,
Nice 2/2/2 House,
Porches Barns, pond,
pvd rd, Concrete dr.
Reduced! $ 114, 900
MLS 357108. www.
crosslandrealty.com
352 726 6644


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments,
Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
cross land realty.comrn
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.





INVERNESS
Sunday 1/27 1p-4pm
3/2 MH, Furn. Ig screen
lanai, shed & lot. All apple
incl Ig scn TV,55+ PK
Asking $12,000.
911 Hoffmann Lane
Melody MH Park
(352) 364-3747

OPEN HOUSE
S uarmill Woods
Sunday 1-3PM
3 Chinkapin Court
Homosassa Fl
Nancy Little Lewis
Realtor
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 302-6082






DUDLEY'S






"3 AUCTIONS*

Fri 1 /25
Estate Coin 6pm
$5- 10-20 Gold
pieces, Silver, $500 &
$1,000 bills, Lg 1800's
currency, silver
Sat 1/26
Florida Porch
Antiques
Liquidation 10am
On Site@ 712 W.
Main St in Leesburg,
HUGE Sale of from
Long time Antique
dealer filled the
JC Penny
Tue 1/28 Real Estate
& Restaurant 10am
4135 S. Suncoast
Blvd. (US 19)
Homosassa,
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384


HOMOSASSA
GNC Commercial
7311 Grover Cleveland
Blvd. 3/2 MH $69,900.
(603) 860-6660


CITRUS

SPRINGS
3/2/2, 2 yr old Pool
home in imacculate
condition,
Landscaped backyard.
$125.000 Priced to
sell!
CALL (570) 412-5194

Leek

Quiet Country Setting
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area
only 20 Min. to Ocala
$129,900 Call
352-302-6784
for appt.




PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat,
horses, in-laws; there
is room for everyth-
ing! 4/3 % w/7 car
garage/workshop &
in-law suite on 5.83 ac-
res.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164




21212, REMODELED
NEW: Roof, AC, Kit,
Baths, Windows, Firs,
317 S Harrison.
Reduced $72,900.
Call 352-527-1239





aa





Brentwood Villa
2/2/2 cul-de-sac
Completely updated!
1816 W. Jena Ct
OPEN SUN 12-3PM
$96,900
PRICED TO SELL!
FSBO 610-248-2090

HERNANDO
Citrus Hills Pool
Home
41312+, circular
drive,
1 acre lot, below
$200k 352-527-7856


ARBOR LAKES
"OPEN HOUSE"2/2/2
+ Den or 3 BR &
fenced back yard!
Gated Comm. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista TrI
(352) 419-7418

ARBOR LAKES
Fantastic Dream
Home In Active Senior
Community $169,900
2,100 sf, 3BR/2BA/2GA
Split Floor Plan w/Pool
Call (352) 726-6564





3/2 Move In Ready Villa
in Windemere. Beauti-
fully Maintained with up-
graded features. Prem-
ier location close to boat
ramp, trail & downtown.
MLS#359594 $229,500
Call Myriam Reulen
(352) 613-2644
Weston Properties, LLC

INVERNESS
Block home 2br, 1 ba
w/ porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + ac-

Buzz 352-341-0224 or
David 607- 539- 7872

Unique stilt home off
581. Great loc to town,
shopping, & hospital.
2br/lba, wl rap around
porch. Needs some
TLC. Sold as is.
$33,900 (352) 419-6227





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the

house number



REALTY ONE





3b/2ba, den MH
on land off US 19

vinyl, clean RV Hkup.
fence "$39.900*
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie 352-634-6340


AUTOMATED
Home Info 2417
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo
Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558


MUST SELL

4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell










4/2/3 HEATED POOL
lots of extras!
SELLER MOTIVATED!
reduced to 210k
352-688-6500 or
352-212-5023


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.




Sugarmill Woods
House for Sale
2/2/2, Call for More
Info. 334-691-4601
(850) 776-7528




I l 3TF4 a


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!

I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


GAIL
STEARNS
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298

Low overhead =
Low
Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available

I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I '11 work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


C Ditrs[ou


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA VANDEBOE
Broker (R)
Owner
Plantation Re-
alty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near
KINGS BAY $425,000.
Make Offers
352-563-9857

DUNNELLON
Here is that home on
Lake Rousseau that
you have always
wanted! 2br 1 2 ba on
1.43 acres w/168ft
lake frontage. Com-
pletely remodeled all
new interior & windows.
No Flood Insur-
ance! Priced reduced
from $369,000 to
$169,000
Call Bernie
(352) 563-0116


#1 Empnicleonlin source is.co



www.chronicleonline.comr


TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

Buy or Sell
Call NOW

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Realestate
Consultant





"FREE
Foreclosure
and Short Sale
Lists


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFure Cast
Properties.com
0"To view
great waterfront
properties"







1V ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact fee
credit, high and dry,
trees, $11,000 obo
(352) 795-3710


NORTH CITRUS
1.4 ac. Cleared, fenced,
high & dry. Paved road.
Elec., pump/well, septic.
Owner finan. No
mobiles. $13,900
CALL 352-897-4195







HOMOSASSA Wooded
Lot on Lee Woods Dr.,
has Wetlands, with
River access, but not
on river $6,000.
352-621-1664


OPEN HOUSE
Sunday 2p-6p
Come see this
natural wonderland.
3/2 stilt home on over
1 12 acres and an
amazing body of
water. Bring a fishing
pole and enjoy a
BBQ. Located N on
19 just over the Barge
Canal Bridge, R on
Foss Grove Path. Fol-
low the signs to 12307
Edwards Ct. You will
not want to miss this!
If directions needed
pls call Kim or Jo at
352-220-2658



YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013 E15









E16 SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2013


INVeiHNneh nuMIE
S" _,, I........ r, I I .,,I I ,


v I.. .... r. d I
I l f 1.1 ...) I .1: F ..I. ....I


OFFERED AT ONLY $71,900
C.ll Eh.s G KIill.lh .at 352 400 2635
lo1 shown Ing inlp/m.aliopn
I I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE











LOTS OF LAND FOR FAIR MARKET PRICE
I) 1 I I ,1 l,,ll h i" r. ...ilI il I t.. h......I



*' il'il I ... I .|1 hrl' 3 i "...|' ..l', I ... I ..I
.l I 1 1 4. 1 11i I.. .1 L. i] inliLl h.*

Il.* *-.4 iJ $119,900
Pat Da is 352 212 1280
Ilien sting nn c2/1pa.idais corn


19.75 ACRES WITH BOARD FENCING






ll h ...i ASKING S375.000
C./I Jim iloiopn 422 2173
lo wenn this loiel/ .iace.Iqe












HOMOSASSA
...- i.- r. ; i n. I i|,ll ,,l],,.
Pv .-n ...,. P Iar. FI l I H..I...

V.- ., I I in .) I-.-.. .-
Jeanne b IVil/l.id Pickiel 212 3410
In I Ii CitlusCounip Sold corn










2/1 97' MOBILE HOME
I. .I... ... ii I..I I.. ... hi.. i
. I n.p ...h .] ,,, *II I P .n.. .. [,,l' I ....


Nl; = I.1)i $34,900
C.ll TeJil R BI.Ipco 352 4/19 9252
ter Iblnl.io co rn


WATERFRONT!
P .n vhn L -,' I N.-..-.... 0I- I
F il L l..-jl .....l L. ilh [ i, ) 1.. I. 1


I ,,,,,, ,'" ASKING 199K
C.// Ouade Feesei 352 302 1699














PINE RIDGE CUL-DE-SAC


Ci Nild.i 32 20 0202=
C.// Nhi/da 352 2/0 0202


WATERFRONT ON OPEN CANAL
h.. I. Il. H ,.') ...* t. lh I.. h I. 1i. nl. l n lnln ln


I I II& .-. I.I
Reduced $99,000
Cll // l.itha Snipdei to pie tie
352 416 8727


I. nIh. v I"" 1. Q.... I] h ill. 1



I .l I'II Ii I .I 1 .11 U I 'il .I S185,000
C.// C.sei KIearse 4/6 6549









WINDERMERE



l .l 1h I. i. l. ,l l .lh .]...I i
L *nnn d. N- i-.n n jI.. I
,KI I. l'h. I h.. ] .- p ,. I.., I I 1 h fi.-

,.]J., MC) =ll i i ASKING $94,000
Pat D.nis ,3521212 1280
I'en .ll listings c2pad.n is cornm


RIVERFRONT BLUFF




= '$395,000
Jeannppe Piche/ 212 34/0
Cit 1 s CiwiusConti Sold cornm


POOL HOME

I~n.].. ,n,.. ,, e,, Ii. I ,,I .I .U.,,, ,,li [.li i.,,r,
i., .el,... il l ] i I. .... ... ; l r.. i l.....I


' M.., l = ;iil'lI ASKING $89,900
Call Jim lloton 422 2113
for I our person.l tour


HERNANDO
LAKEFRONT "- :
II,.it I Ii ..I I, ... II ...-.l .. ..

h l..lI i. i r, 1..... ... ,- ll ,1 l .-.. h .

Iiii i, ,11. i ,i, $127,500
C.ill Ruth Fiedenck / 352 563 6866


BEAUTIFUL HAMPTON HILLS
F....i H.....I ONLY $199,000 -e.i........
P ni r, I ,. m ., I ) I ,i,.). I I ...
l.. i .I i. nn I.. ) in, I I il.-l. i ....I

. ..i....In .-.n ,,-, 1 ,,,... .. ....... I ...l, H .......
nn,,-,,,-,, m ........ ,-, .. ,.. r. ...... e ln = '

C.// Eh.is G KI/t.ll./h
for more inlorm.tion 352-400-2635


THE GLEN BEVERLY HILLS

. ........ .. I ... ........ i i .f.i .I i....1 .I .]
.j.. I I .. H ....._ I- 1n l I ._
.].m.m...' .. I. I .l .'. l l I 1 L = ph. ..fi'
*. i,.u. N ,.l;3 = -.il ASKING S44.000
P.at D.nis ,3521212 7280
I'ien listing 1n n n c2p.itd.mis cornm


HIGHLANDS I
T .. m'. '. ." 1 r..l ll, .1 ... I .... .



lh i .'-. ) 1h n a h l. .' i. l.. I. 1.1I
Asking $159,900
C.ll Ruth Fiederick / 352 563 6866


REDUCED
AGAIN!

. i I- i,, l ,1-, 1 I,, h ) ,, .] I,. ,, i ,., ,,,
In .ill,, i [ll I p. I .. I,
Only $73,500
352 302 1699 Ouade Feesei


BACK ON THE MARKET AND
PRICE RIGHT!

* P1 I- l I. I -.. I I q .f .'


Nln = '.. ASKING $74,500
Call N.Inc Jenks 352 400 8072
i Ii sellingciiiuscouni 11/homes com


WHERE THE MERRY MEN ROAMED?

L.i.. I I. in ..--. Ir. i i.....r.- ). .. h ....- ,

rh.. lh... 1.1 I ,I .. ..I.Id I. ,, ,I i.. I I. l 1 .,
...I L..... ..... p l.II r .. I .. ..,

ll; = ;)Ii. $51,000
ff1ril/n Booth 637 4904


I ]. ,,,,, irlll. ..1. II. lI....

I= .1'. $90,000
Jeanne b IVill.nid Pickhel 212 3410
n_ n_ in CitlusCounti Sold cornm


^_7,