Citrus County chronicle

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Title:
Citrus County chronicle
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Unknown
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
Creation Date:
January 26, 2013

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aleph - 366622
oclc - 15802799
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201


JANUARY 26, 2013


.3 football districts finalizedM/N31AGER'S


CITRU ....... U SPEOIAIS


See rage ciS

VILLAGE TOYOTA
wwchrie.co CRYSTAL RIVER
www chronicleonline .com


Florida's Best Community -Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


SC-33=3 d





Early morning fog.
Mostly sunny.
PAGE A4

TODAY & next morning


HIGH
75


LOW
47


Work continues
on State Road
200 bridge
Officials from the
Florida Department of
Transportation caution
motorists and cyclists tak-
ing the Withlacoochee
River bridge on State
Road 200 this weekend
to be aware the overpass
will be down to one lane
for both directions as im-
provements are made to
the bridge. The closure
limits extend from just be-
fore the Stumpknockers
on the River restaurant
on the Marion County
side to a little past the Cit-
rus County line.
The single-lane closing
goes through 6 a.m. Mon-
day. Vehicles needing to
cross the bridge will be
directed by flaggers, al-
ternating northbound and
southbound traffic
through the one open
lane.
Weather conditions
and other unforeseen cir-
cumstances could alter
work schedules.


'1 killed my father'


Hatchet-wielding man guilty of murder


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer


INVERNESS The
hatchet-wielding man ac-
cused of sneaking up on his
father and hacking him to
death has been found guilty
It took the jury a hair over
John two hours of deliberation
Campbell Friday to find John William


Campbell, 39, guilty of first-
degree murder in the death
of John Henry Campbell, 68.
He now potentially faces the
death penalty
That phase of the trial is
set to begin at 8:30 a.m. Tues-
day in Circuit Judge Ric
Howard's courtroom.
See T L!Page A5


Penalty phase. Life or death?


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer

INVERNESS -Prose-
cutor Pete Magrino will not
tip his hand as to what his
team's strategy will be
going into next week's
penalty phase in the case


Illuminating work


Gun control
Thousands of rules and
regulations cover gun
ownership./Page AO


World forum
Leaders discuss
economic problems at
world forum./Page A7


Birthday
Lou the hippo marks
his 53rd birthday at
Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park.
/Page A3



Comics .......... C8
Community ....... C6
Crossword ........ C7
Editorial ......... A8
Entertainment .....B6
Horoscope ........B6
Lottery Numbers ...B4
Lottery Payouts .... B6
Movies ........... C8
Obituaries ........ A6
Classifieds ........ C9
TV Listings ....... C7



6 184178200! 211


LINDA DAVID/Special to the Chronicle
During a recent field trip to Three Sisters Springs, Linda David shot a reflection known as "First Light" as
the morning rays of light were hitting the rising mist off the water. Through a relationship with Crystal River
National Wildlife Refuge, the Citrus County Camera Club is working to donate images to the refuge.


Field trips, cameraderie highlight camera club offerings


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

A long time ago in 2004 -
two men purchased new digital
cameras. As they played with
their cameras, they thought: This
is kind of cool. I wonder who else
just got a new camera?
Ed Katterson and Vito DePinto
decided to take that thought fur-
ther and placed an advertise-


ment in the Chronicle to inquire
if anyone had a similar interest.
On June 7, 2004, 25 responders
with cameras confirmed their
suspicions, leading to the estab-
lishment of the Art Center Cam-
era Club of Citrus County
"They thought it was such a
great experience and decided to
get together once a month," said
Jim Houle, vice president of vi-
sual arts and camera club presi-


dent "They chose Monday night.
Every first Monday night of the
month we get together to talk
photography"
Quickly, they began hearing
from people who were not pho-
tographers and were clueless
about photography However,
these individuals wanted to buy
cameras and wanted help

See CLUB/Page A5


Court: Obama appointments violate constitution
o GOP powers to make recess ing some that make it ea
aGappointments. ier for unions to organize
Thp oo~rt'v dp ivi n c LII C J UCpaiip n


Associated Press

WASHINGTON
President Barack Obama
violated the Constitution
when he bypassed the
Senate last year to ap-


point three members of
the National Labor Rela-
tions Board, a federal ap-
peals court ruled Friday
in a far-reaching decision
that could severely limit
a chief executive's


marked a victory for Re-
publicans and business
groups critical of the
agency If it stands, it
could invalidate hun-
dreds of board decisions
over the past year, includ-


ine tnree-juge pani
of the U.S. Court of A
peals for the D.C. Circt
said contrary to the a
ministration's claim, ti
Senate was not in rece

See R- /Pag eP


of the State of Florida v.
John William Campbell.
However, Magrino had
this to offer: He believes
Campbell's case is a death-
penalty case and his team
has, since the inception of
the case, endeavored to
See P- L/Page A5




Hospital


boards


unite


Trustees,

foundation

reconcile


ERYN
WORTH I NGTON
Staff writer

INVERNESS -Three
years of legal squabbling
involving Citrus Memorial
Health System may be in
its closing stages.
No attorneys were pres-
ent Friday at the Citrus
County Hospital Board
(CCHB) and the Citrus Me-
morial Health Foundation
joint workshop to consider
dismissing lawsuits, link-
ing to work together and
transferring money back
to the hospital.
"We have to come to-
gether, put personal is-
sues to the side for what is
important to our pa-
tients," said James
Sanders, member of Cit-
rus Memorial Health
Foundation. "We need to
work together instead of
having two different
unions."
Both the foundation
board and CCHB have
agreed to drop costly legal
disputes, link their boards
by creating a balanced
membership ratio -
which would allow them
to work together on future
hospital endeavors and
transfer money back to
the hospital. These issues
have plagued the boards
since 2009.
"The issues are imma-
terial and this is not about
us," said Robert Priselac,
CCHB member. "It is
about the citizens of this
county Let's do the right
thing."
Because they are un-
able to vote in a workshop,
they decided to meet indi-
vidually with their boards
and return Jan. 30 for a
globalization agreement.
The agreement pro-
poses to dismiss lawsuits
or counterclaims that are
now pending in circuit
court.
"Let's spend three
hours talking about pa-
tient care instead of legal
issues," said Debbie
Ressler, CCHB member
"We need to be here for
healthcare and how we
are going to improve the
hospital."
Hospital Chief Executive
Officer Ryan Beaty said he
was pleased with the
progress that was made.
"We have been adults
[ today," Ressler said. "If
we unify, it will speak vol-
as- umes to the public."
ze. CCHB members are ex-
[el pected to vote to globalize
p- together at their Wednes-
uit day meeting.
d- Chronicle reporter
he Eryn Worthington can be
ss contacted at 352-563-5660,
ext. 1334, or eworthington
A5 @chronicleonline. com.


VOL. 118 ISSUE 172




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Page A3. SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013



TATE&


(


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONIC


CLE


Around the

COUNTY

'Snack Attack' Feb. 2
aids children's group
From 4 to 6 p.m. Satur-
day, Feb. 2, there will be a
"Snack Attack Dinner" hon-
oring Betty Strifler, who re-
cently retired after serving
24 years as Citrus County's
clerk of
the circuit
court. The
event, to
benefit
the Boys
& Girls
Clubs of
Citrus
Betty
County, Strifler
will be at retired clerk of
the Bev- courts.
erly Hills
Lions Club.
Cost of dinner per person
is $9 and ham, turkey or
both will be served along
with scalloped potatoes,
green beans, coleslaw,
brownie with ice cream and
coffee. Only 200 tickets will
be sold.
Mrs. Strifler will be hon-
ored in a presentation fea-
turing Circuit Judge Patricia
Thomas at 5:30 p.m.
Tickets outlets include:
0 Beverly Hills Civic As-
sociation 352-746-2657.
0 Home Again Resale
Store 352-270-8861.
0 Central Ridge Boys
and Girls Clubs 352-270-
8841.
Make checks payable to:
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County. Proceeds will be
used to provide snacks for
children at the Central Ridge
Boys & Girls Clubs site.
Time running out to
drop trees at landfill
Citrus County Central
Landfill is offering free
Christmas tree disposal dur-
ing January. Trees must be
cleaned of all decorations,
tinsel, lights and not have
artificial snow.
For information on landfill
hours, call 352-527-7670
during office hours or go to
the county's website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us. Click
on departments, then Pub-
lic Works, then Solid Waste.
Get retro to benefit
Relay for Life
The College of Central
Florida Citrus Campus Ro-
taract Club is hosting a
Retro Game Night. This
event will be from 4 to 8
p.m. Friday, Feb. 1, in the
Conference Center.
Featured will be an as-
sortment of old and new
video games and systems,
card games such as Magic
the Gathering and tabletop
family games.
A donation of $5 to bene-
fit Crystal River Relay for
Life is requested and will be
accepted at the door. Pro-
ceeds from concessions will
also benefit Relay for Life.
This is open to the public,
and supervised children are
welcome.
Contact Rory at 352-2011-
9057 or wellsr@cf.edu.
Republicans to learn
of city government
Nature Coast Republican
Club and Citrus Republican
Womens Club will host a
presentation on city govern-
ment Saturday, Feb. 9.
Guest speakers will be
Inverness City Manager
Frank DiGiovanni and Crys-
tal River City Manager Andy
Houston. The 9 am. meet-
ing, at American Legion
Post 155, Crystal River, will
follow an 8:30 am. social.
-From staff reports

Correction

Due to reporter error, a
story on Page Al of Thurs-
day's edition, "Prosecution
ends case," warrants cor-
recting. Casey Phillips'


name was misspelled. The
Chronicle regrets the error.
Readers can alert The
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles
by emailing newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or by
calling 352-563-5660.


Elderly woman suffers sexual abuse


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

HOMOSASSA -A man was ar-
rested Wednesday on charges of
sexual battery on a disabled 90-
year-old woman, according to the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office.
Daniel Hall, 39, West Craft
Lane, faces charges of sexual bat-
tery and lewd and lascivious bat-
tery on an elderly or disabled
person. His bond was $15,000.
Investigators responded to the
allegations after a female acquain-
tance noticed the woman's upset


behavior, which initiated the opportunity and her
the investigation, disability.
Reportedly, the At the conclusion of the
woman disclosed that investigation, Hall apolo-
Hall performed inap- gized to the woman for his
propriate sexual activi- actions in a letter He also
ties on her as she sat on stated that if anyone treated
a toilet and waited for his mother in that fashion,
assistance. Daniel Hall he would be upset.
Hall denied any con- admitted to He was transported to the
tact with the woman at sexual abuse. Citrus County Detention
first. Then he told a sim- Facility.
ilar story matching the Chronicle reporter Eryn
woman's version. Worthington can be reached at
He admitted to investigators he eworthington@chronicleonline.
took advantage of her because of corn or 352-563-5660, ext. 1334.


Birthday boy


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Hundreds of hippo fanatics both
young and old gathered Friday at
the Ellie Schiller Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park to
celebrate Lu's 53rd birthday. The
hippo, coming in at hefty 6,000
pounds or so, seemed to know
what was coming before receiving
his birthday cake. The cake,
specially created by Publix for the
animal, is made from bread not
cake batter and is topped with
a special icing not loaded with
sugar, according to park manager
Art Yerian. Pre-kindergarten,
kindergarten and first-grade
classes from Rock Crusher
Elementary School visited the
park and helped sing "Happy
Birthday" to Lu before he
devoured his treat.


Hippo lookin'

good at 53

TOP RIGHT: Park volunteers
Dorothy Hahn, left, and Vicky
lozzia tossed the treat into Lu's
mouth as crowds looked on.
BOTTOM RIGHT: Scores of
visitors snapped photos and shot
video of the giant animal as he
made his way around his
enclosure, slurping up each piece
of cake.


LOCAL MEETING
0 The Citrus Alliance Against
Adult Abuse (C4A) monthly
meeting is at 9:30 am. the
second Wednesday monthly
at HPH Hospice, 3545 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly
Hills, in the Winn-Dixie
shopping plaza. For details,
call Judy Stauffer at 352-
303-2620. Help is needed to
protect vulnerable residents
against abuse, neglect and
exploitation.




Around the

STATE

Miami

Woman convicted of
abuse, kidnapping
A former caretaker was
convicted Friday of child
abuse and kidnapping in a 4-
year-old foster child's disap-
pearance more than a decade
ago, but a mistrial was de-
clared on a murder charge
after jurors were narrowly un-
able to agree.
The 12-person jury said
early on they were split 11-1
on whether 67-year-old Gera-
lyn Graham killed Rilya Wilson
and could not persuade the
holdout over two days of delib-
erations. The murder charge
carried a potential life sen-
tence, while the charges on
which Graham was convicted
carry potential sentences of at
least 30 years behind bars.
Assistant State Attorney
Joshua Weintraub said the
state would not try Graham a
second time for first-degree
murder. Graham has long
maintained her innocence.

Orlando

Court sets aside 2 of 4
Anthony convictions
A Florida appellate court
Friday set aside two of the
four convictions Casey An-
thony faced for lying to detec-
tives during the investigation
into her missing 2-year-old
daughter.
Judges on the 5th District
Court of Appeals agreed with
Anthony's attorneys that two
of the charges constituted
double jeopardy, or being
convicted or punished more
than once for the same crime.
Anthony was acquitted of
killing Caylee in 2011.

Tallahassee

Floridians who lost
homes can file claims
Florida Attorney General
Pam Bondi said Floridians
who lost their homes to fore-
closure still have a chance to
get a share of a large national
settlement.
The initial deadline for peo-
ple to file for a claim payment
was Jan. 18, but state officials
say claims filed afterwards
are likely to be accepted.
Those eligible could receive
at least $840.
The settlement applies to
loans serviced by Bank of
America, Wells Fargo, JP
Morgan Chase, Citi or
GMAC/Ally. Payments will go
to people who lost their home
to foreclosure between 2008
and 2011.
Florida has been one of the
states hit hardest by the fore-
closure crisis.
So far only about half of the
estimated 150,000 people in
Florida eligible for claim pay-
ments have responded to
mail notices or phone calls.
-From wire reports


Learn about League of Women Voters today


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County does not
have a League of Women
Voters and has not had a
chapter for many years.
Nature Coast Unitarian
Universalists have invited
Allie Gore, of the Marion
County League of Women


Voters, to advise how a Cit-
rus County contingent
might join up with it, or
form a local branch.
The event is at 2 p.m.
today at the Unitarian
Universalist Fellowship,
7633 N. Florida Ave., (U.S.
41), Citrus Springs.
Gore is a longtime edu-


cator who was instrumen-
tal in reactivating the Mar-
ion County League and
she is willing to help Cit-
rus County do the same.
She will show a short
video on the history of the
struggle for equal suffrage,
followed by a PowerPoint
presentation and discus-


sion of the League today
As a strictly nonpartisan
organization, the LWV does
not support or oppose can-
didates. It does, however,
take stands on issues after
coming to a consensus and
works to increase public
understanding of policy is-
sues through education.


The League a grass-
roots organization with
chapters in all 50 states -
was founded 92 years ago
and has been open to men
for 40 years.
All interested persons
are invited. Call 352-465-
4225 or email naturecoast
uu.org for information.






CiTRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Landlord arrested after fight


Chronicle tigator King, her landlord
at a boarding house, was
A Homosassa man was arguing with her about the
arrested after a woman ac- amount of housework she
cused him of helped with and
punching her and about her coughing
grabbing her at night, according
throat during an to his arrest affi-
argument davit. She claimed
Teddy King, 36, King punched her
of South Palm Av- once in the chest
enue, faces a and used both of
felony charge of his hands to grab
aggravated battery Teddy her throat and
causing great bod- King squeeze her neck.
ily harm, permanent dis- The woman said she be-
ability or disfigurement lieved she lost conscious-
The woman told an inves- ness during the incident.


The investigator saw a
cut on the side of the
woman's neck, and emer-
gency medical services
transported her to Seven
Rivers Regional Medical
Center for evaluation and
treatment, according to
the affidavit.
King told the investiga-
tor he had been involved
in an argument with the
woman but denied touch-
ing her. King was taken
to the Citrus County De-
tention Facility, where
his bond was set at
$5,000.


Fire damages Homosassa home


Chronicle

HOMOSASSA A sin-
gle-wide manufactured
home was 50 percent de-
stroyed and its contents
completely lost in a fire
Thursday night, according
to a report by Battalion
Chief Craig Stevens of the
Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice Fire Rescue.
Firefighters from the
Kensington Fire Station,
who were training in the


Lecanto area, were the first
to arrive on the scene, 6834
W Sasser St, at 8:08 p.m.
Crews found the 1,000-
square-foot home in flames
and began offensive action
against the blaze, according
to the report
Crews from stations in
Homosassa, Connell
Heights, Pine Ridge, Sug-
armill Woods, Crystal
River and DeRosa also
helped fight the blaze,
which was brought under


control at 8:53 p.m.
Due to lack of hydrants
in the area, a shuttle was
used to ferry water, ac-
cording to the report.
Stevens' report stated
the fire started on the ex-
terior of the structure,
near the air conditioning
unit. A bird and squirrel
perished in the fire due to
the smoke.
No other injuries were
reported. Damage is esti-
mated at $44,000.


State BRIEFS


'Satanists' praise governor
Scott for prayer bill
TALLAHASSEE A group of self-
proclaimed "Satanists" praised Gov. Rick Scott
for signing a bill into law that lets school
boards permit student-initiated prayer and
other "inspirational messages."
The devil, though, was in the details at a
rally Friday in front of Florida's Old Capitol.
A high priest wearing goat horns and four
"minions" dressed in black robes were joined
by a spokesman and camera crew.
The spokesman, Lucian Greaves of Cam-
bridge, Mass., earlier this month was listed as
the casting director on the Actors Access web-
site in an ad seeking unpaid, non-union actors
in Tallahassee for a "mockumentary" titled


"The Satanic Temple."
Greaves, though, insisted it's not all a hoax
as a smile creased his face.
Marion Co. to hire nuisance
alligator trappers
OCALA- Marion County is looking to hire
nuisance alligator trappers.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission is accepting applications for
contracted trappers. Applicants must live in
the county, have an email address, a clean
criminal history and no fish-and-wildlife law
violations.
Applications must be received by Jan. 31.
For an application visit MyFWC.com/Alligator.

-From wire reports


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic
battery arrest
0 Gary Smith, 29, of Her-
nando, at 1:25 p.m. Jan. 16 on
felony charges of domestic
battery by strangulation and
aggravated battery using a
deadly weapon. According to
his arrest affidavit, he is ac-
cused of cutting a woman with
a razor blade. No bond.
DUI arrest
0 Dane Simms, 29, of Polk
Street, Inverness, at 1:08 a.m.
Thursday on misdemeanor
charges of driving under the
influence and possession of
drug paraphernalia. According
to his arrest affidavit, he was
arrested after a clerk at a gas
station/convenience store on
U.S. 19 in Crystal River re-
ported seeing him run over
grass and shrubs and nearly
hit gas pumps in a pickup
truck. A law enforcement offi-
cer found a silver pipe con-
taining marijuana residue in
the truck. A test of his breath
showed his blood alcohol con-
centration was 0.229 percent.
The legal limit is 0.08 percent.
Simms vomited after providing
one breath sample and re-
fused to provide any more.
Bond $1,500.
Other arrests
0 Gina Martin, 46, of S.
Elm Avenue, Homosassa, at
11:18 a.m. Wednesday on a
Citrus County warrant for fail-


ure to appear in court for two
original felony charges of petit
theft. No bond.
0 Lester Sellers, 60, of W.
Baja Court, Crystal River, at
7:04 p.m. Wednesday on a
felony charge of failure of a
sex offender to report
name/address change within
48 hours. Bond $20,000.
0 David Stearns II, 24, at
12:34 a.m. Thursday on a mis-
demeanor charge of posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia.
Bond $500.
Burglaries
0 A commercial burglary
was reported at 8:47 a.m.
Thursday, Jan. 24, in the 3200
block of S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
MA vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 10:11 a.m. Jan. 24 in
the 5900 block of N. Oakmont
Drive, Beverly Hills.
0 A residential burglary was
reported at 7:04 p.m. Jan. 24
in the 8000 block of E. Pen-
brook Lane, Floral City.
MA vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 11:44 p.m. Jan. 24 in
the 3100 block of S. Stone-
brook Drive, Homosassa.
Thefts
0 A grand theft was re-
ported at 8:49 a.m. Thursday,
Jan. 24, in the 50 block of S.
Lincoln Ave., Beverly Hills.
0 A petit theft was reported
at 1:41 p.m. Jan. 24 in the
4500 block of S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa.
0 A petit theft was reported


at 2:18 p.m. Jan. 24 in the
8900 block of S. Filly Point,
Inverness.
0 A grand theft was re-
ported at 8:25 p.m. Jan. 24 in
the 2400 block of E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Inverness.

ON THE NET
For information about
arrests made by the
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcit rus.o rg
and click on the
Public Information
link, then on Arrest
Reports.
Also under Public In-
formation on the
CCSO website, click
on Crime Mapping
for a view of where
each type of crime
occurs in Citrus
County. Click on
Offense Reports to
see lists of burglary,
theft and vandalism.
For the Record
reports are also
archived online at
www.chronicle
online.com.
The Sexual Predator
Unit is responsible
for tracking all
registered sexual
offenders in the
county. Click on the
Sexual Offender
Information link.


oday's Citrus County Chronicle




Fictitious Name Notices.....C18



Meeting Notices..................C18


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
Hi LO PR PR LO
77 45 NA IAANA 72 47NA


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
PC
5
5
PC
s
PC


PC


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


H L F'cast
78 63 s
74 49 pc
76 53 pc
67 51 pc
73 53 s
73 47 pc
74 56 s
74 52 s
76 59 s


MARINE OUTLOOK


West winds around 10 knots. Seas 2
feet. Bay and inland waters will have a
light chop. Partly cloudy skies today.


HI LO PR HI LOPR
48 NA 78 48 NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
forecast by: -a

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 75 Low: 47
Early AM Fog; Mostly Sunny

SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 79 Low: 51
Early AM Fog; Partly Cloudy

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 80 Low: 51
Early AM Fog; Partly Cloudy


Gulf water
temperature


650
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.68 28.68 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.04 38.04 39.25
Tsala Apopka-Inverness 39.00 39.00 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.32 40.32 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 75/45
Record 84/23
Normal 71/43
Mean temp. 60
Departure from mean +3
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00 in.
Total for the month trace
Total for the year trace
Normal for the year 2.46 in.
*As of 7 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 6
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.22 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 4
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 340
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, Maple, Oak
Today's count: 9.6/12
Sunday's count: 10.0
Monday's count: 10.1
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
1/26 SATURDAY 4:32 10:44 4:55 11:07
1/27 SUNDAY 5:18 11:30 5:42 11:53


0
JAN. 2


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
UNSET TONIGHT ..05.......................... M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW ..................... 7:21 A.M.
) MOONRISETODAY ...........................5:55 P.M.
FEB. 3 FEB. 10 FEB. 17 MOONSET TODAY...........6:42A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilfties' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.
TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 4:37 a12:39 a 6:04 p/1:26 p
Crystal River- 2:58 a10:48 a 4:25 p/10:41 p
Withlacoochee* 12:45 a/8:36 a 2:12 p/8:29 p
Homosassa** 3:47 a/12:25 p 5:14 p/ -


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
5:16 a/1:19 a 6:31 p/1:57 p
3:37 a/11:19 a 4:52 p/11:19 p
1:24 a/9:07 a 2:39 p/9:07 p
4:26 a/12:18 a 5:41 p/12:56 p


5'


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Friday Saturday
H L Pcp. FcstH L
17 4 .01 c 22 5
57 39 sh 54 38
34 20 .01 s 44 22
46 32 s 55 34
24 10 .01 pc 30 19
80 61 pc 73 60
22 12 .07 s 32 19
52 25 pc 50 24
65 42 .04 pc 53 33
37 28 sh 41 33
24 10 c 25 12
16 1 .01 sn 26 15
13 -3 c 16 1
52 28 pc 65 38
27 16 .11 c 31 15
27 21 .11 s 47 26
28 18 pc 24 21
27 20 pc 28 19
19 13 .04 sn 28 18
35 28 s 54 28
22 17 .20 pc 26 15
19 3 c 22 3
54 44 pc 61 56
60 28 c 59 31
40 15 pc 27 24
21 15 .07 pc 27 10
63 47 c 71 49
38 25 pc 34 23
20 13 .05 pc 30 15
23 11 c 26 8
79 61 pc 79 61
27 18 .10 pc 24 17
75 53 pc 59 45
62 51 sh 60 48
53 32 pc 53 38
67 60 .14 sh 64 52
29 23 .02 pc 31 23
51 35 .04 pc 52 37
25 17 .05 pc 24 20
21 13 pc 18 12
71 47 pc 68 50
72 48 pc 59 38
38 30 .46 s 42 26


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY

Friday Saturday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 75 52 pc 74 57
NewYorkCity 24 13 .05 pc 29 19
Norfolk 31 23 .05 s 39 23
Oklahoma City 50 28 c 56 46
Omaha 48 13 pc 38 29
Palm Springs 62 57 .28 sh 69 51
Philadelphia 24 17 .04 pc 29 15
Phoenix 77 56 sh 66 53
Pittsburgh 18 11 .13 sn 26 10
Portland, ME 23 1 c 21 7
Portland, Ore 46 39 .24 sh 43 38
Providence, R.I. 24 9 c 25 11
Raleigh 28 20 .32 s 40 22
Rapid City 49 19 pc 50 29
Reno 52 35 .04 c 52 31
Rochester, NY 16 8 .04 sn 24 14
Sacramento 66 50 trace c 59 36
St. Louis 45 27 pc 33 26
St. Ste. Marie 16 1 .10 sf 19 -2
Salt Lake City 36 25 c 37 28
San Antonio 78 61 pc 75 59
San Diego 65 59 .39 sh 62 55
San Francisco 63 51 c 54 43
Savannah 59 33 pc 68 40
Seattle 51 41 .35 sh 45 35
Spokane 39 27 .07 sh 33 27
Syracuse 16 4 .02 sn 22 11
Topeka 49 17 pc 46 34
Washington 25 19 .02 s 33 21
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 87 Alice, Texas LOW -19 Saranac Lake,
N.Y.
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 86/70/s
Amsterdam 30/28/sn
Athens 60/45/sh
Beijing 27/7/pc
Berlin 24/17/s
Bermuda 66/60/pc
Cairo 73/51/s
Calgary 30/14/pc
Havana 80/67/pc
Hong Kong 67/52/pc
Jerusalem 67/50/s


Lisbon 58/52/c
London 36/35/sh
Madrid 59/41/s
Mexico City 69/43/s
Montreal 10/-2/pc
Moscow 10/3/pc
Paris 41/33/pc
Rio 86/73/ts
Rome 45/35/s
Sydney 84/72/ts
Tokyo 32/28/pc
Toronto 25/10/pc
Warsaw 20/8/s


CH pNICIL
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Servng Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $36.65* 6 months: $64.63*
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*Subscription price includes a separate charge of. 14 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
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For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
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Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday
Main switchboard phone numbers:
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residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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s Inverness
office
Tomnp 4 kn s St. c.:1 square
106 W. Main
St,,
W c Inverness, FL
)> 34450

Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ Publisher, 5 6 3-3 222
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Trista Stokes....................Online Manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes..................Classified Manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
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By Citrus Publishing Inc.
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A4 SATURDAY JANUARY 26, 2013


LOCAL/STATE





Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLUB
Continued from Page Al

utilizing them.
That was the steering
principle behind the Art
Center Camera Club of Cit-
rus County
"There are always peo-
ple saying they don't know
how to work their cameras
and asking for advice,"
Houle said. "There are
people with fancy cameras
that don't even know how
to work their cameras."
The members became
organized and formed a
steering committee. Each
steering committee mem-
ber has a different role
such as: Field trip coordi-
nator, program coordina-
tor and competition
coordinator
Currently, there are 140
members, which is the
largest group at the Art
Center
"We have people who
don't own a camera,"
Houle said. "We have peo-
ple who have the point-
and-shoot cameras. We
have college professors
who teach photography
We run the whole gamut of
professional photogra-
phers, down to people who
don't have a camera."
The camera club offers
photographers many
choices. On the fourth
Monday of the month, spe-
cial interest groups meet to
discuss lighting, composi-
tion, exposure and other
facets of photography After
an hour, they break into
groups to discuss camera
brands and what their cam-
era controls do.
"It is for groups of pho-
tographers who want to be
together with their type of
camera," Houle said.
"Nikon people will be to-
gether, the Canon people
together, etc ... Even a
point-and-shoot group."
In addition, Doug Bauer
and Bud Smart plan field
trips around Citrus County
with a photographic
theme. Recently, they re-
ceived permission to visit



RECESS
Continued from Page Al

at the time Obama filled
the vacancies Jan. 4, 2012.
It also held that presi-
dents have the authority to
bypass the Senate in filling
vacancies only when they
occur during a recess,
which it said occurs only
between the end of the
first year of a two-year
Congress and when law-
makers convene for the
second year
White House press sec-
retary Jay Carney said the
administration strongly
disagrees with the deci-
sion and the NLRB would
continue to conduct busi-
ness as usual, despite calls
by some Republicans for


JIM HOULE/Special to the Chronicle
From left to right, Judy Callison, Linda David and Linda
Williams positioned themselves and their equipment as
they prepared to capture images of Three Sisters Springs
during early morning hours.


Three Sisters Springs at
6:30 a.m. They caught
morning rays of light hit-
ting the mist rising off the
water They were aiming to
get the first shots of the
wintering manatees in the
springs.
"We showed up there in
the dark," Houle said in
excitement. "There were
people already lined up to
get in and it was dark out"
Through a relationship
with Crystal River Na-
tional Wildlife Refuge,
they are arranging for pho-
tographers to donate pic-
tures to the refuge in trade
for photographer and cam-
era club recognition. Crys-
tal River National Wildlife
Refuge in return will be
able to use these images
for advertising purposes
through postcards,
notepads and various
other forms.
"In other states that
have this program, they
are able to sell the adver-
tising items for profit,"
Houle said. "However,
here it is a new organiza-
tion. They are still low on


the board members to
resign.
"The decision is novel
and unprecedented," Car-
ney said. "It contradicts
150 years of practice by
Democratic and Republi-
can administrations."
Under the court's deci-
sion, 285 recess appoint-
ments made by presidents
between 1867 and 2004
would be invalid.
The Justice Department


Homosassa 621-7700
Crystal River 795-8600
Inverness 860-1037
TERMITE SPECIALISTS
SINCE 1967
3USH
(PEST CONTROL
Toll Free 1-877-345-BUSH
www.bushhomeservices.com


funds and do not have that
type of money to put out.
We are looking to do things
on consignment. One of
the things that we are
looking at is the photogra-
pher to mount or frame
their work and then sell-
ing it on consignment. So
that way the wildlife and
photographer would make
a profit on it."
In addition, the camera
club has several classes
each year Houle said the
best piece of advice he has
to offer is to learn about
your camera.
"Read the manual,"
Houle said. "I don't think
you can hurt the camera.
Take the camera and take
pictures. They are digital
now days. It's instant grat-
ification. If it doesn't look
right, well, delete it and
take another"
"Also, always use the
flash," Houle added. 'Any-
time you turn that camera
on, turn the flash on. Fill in
the shadows."
For more information,
visit artcentercc or
accc.digiact.org.


hinted the administration
would ask the Supreme
Court to overturn the de-
cision, which was ren-
dered by three
conservative judges ap-
pointed by Republican
presidents.
"We disagree with the
court's ruling and believe
that the president's recess
appointments are constitu-
tionally sound," the state-
ment said.


FREE INSPECTIONS
This Is a This Isa
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dc h41


COPES
i POOL AND PAVER LLC
Ic & 352-400-3188


The Citrus County Fair Association proudly presents
14th Annual

I Truck & Tractor Pull


TRIAL
Continued from Page Al

The Campbell trial pre-
sented jurors with a choice
of whether to convict him
as charged or opt for a
lesser charge and poten-
tially spare him death row
Campbell, via his defense
team of public defenders
Michael Lamberti and
Devon Sharkey, never dis-
puted the fact he killed his
father in August 2010, but
his state of mind was such
he did not scheme to kill
him and then cover it up.
Campbell's attorneys
called it a "pressure-
cooker" situation brought
on mostly by a controlling,
set-in-his-ways and distant
father, and the younger
Campbell simply snapped.
Father and son shared a
doublewide home in
Inverness.
"He knows what he did
was wrong and he still
struggles with what he
did," Sharkey told jurors
during closing arguments
Friday morning.
Sharkey said Campbell
clearly admitted his ac-
tions but said Campbell



PENALTY
Continued from Page Al

present evidence includ-
ing the fact Campbell is a
seven-time felon in order
to make it so.
"We intend to have ad-
ditional testimony as to
the aggravating factors,"
Magrino said.
Campbell, 39, was unan-
imously convicted by a
jury Friday of first-degree
murder in the hacking
death of his father, John
Henry Campbell, 68.
Magrino said the
aggravating-factors testi-
mony will come from two
witnesses.
Meanwhile, Campbell
attorneys Devon Sharkey
and Michael Lamberti are
readying for this life-or-
death legal tussle.
Their charge is to pres-
ent enough mitigating fac-
tors to spare Campbell's


was in a daze, foggy in the
mind, depressed and deal-
ing with a rekindled pas-
sion for crack cocaine
when he grabbed a wood-
handled hammer-like
hatchet and buried it in his
father's skull -three times
- as he sat in a chair The
senior Campbell's last
words were "what was
that?" after the initial blow
Campbell admitted to
Citrus County Sheriff's
Detective Gary Atchison
in a taped confession he
knew the second strike
was the death blow be-
cause he felt resistance
which meant the blade
had penetrated the skull.
"I killed my father,"
Campbell told jurors when
he took the stand Thursday
He, however, said de-
pression and a belief he
was bringing peace to his
father, who he believes
also was emotionally tor-
mented, led him to com-
mit homicide.
Meanwhile, the prosecu-
tion team of Pete Magrino
and Rich Buxman tried to
paint a different picture of
Campbell during the trial.
Prosecutors presented
evidence in Campbell's
own words that he


life.
Sharkey said the de-
fense has five witnesses
lined up.
Judge Ric Howard as a
certified first-degree mur-
der trial judge will have
the final say in Campbell's
sentence, however, the
law requires him to give
"great weight" to the jury
recommendation.
Howard has already
asked the jury to recon-
vene Tuesday morning for
this phase of the trial. He
instructed jurors to steer
clear of any media cover-
age and discussion of the
case.
According to Florida
statute, prosecutors must
prove any of 16 aggravat-
ing factors in their efforts
to attempt to convince the
jury to vote for death.
Florida is one of a few
states that only requires a
plurality of votes among
the panel. If seven out of
the panel of 12 jurors vote


SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013 A5

planned his father's death
for days. They explained
Campbell grabbed the
hatchet, went and sat with
it at a computer desk be-
hind where his father was
sitting, thought about
what he was going to do
and sneaked up behind
his unsuspecting father
and hit him multiple time
over the head.
"Chopped in the head
and murdered him," Ma-
grino said to jurors in his
closing.
Magrino then described
how Campbell tried to
scrub off the blood on the
hatchet to conceal his ac-
tions and rifled through
his father's pants pockets,
stealing his a credit card
then going on a shopping
spree. A string of actions,
Magrino believes, added
up to premeditation and
felonious murder
After the verdict, Ma-
grino said he believed the
jury decision was the "ap-
propriate verdict."
Sharkey said he was
disappointed they lost,
but the defense will pres-
ent mitigating elements in
the penalty phase to help
keep their client off death
row


for death that will be
the recommendation to
the judge, explained
Magrino.
Some aggravating fac-
tors, prosecutors could
argue are that Campbell's
actions were "especially
heinous, atrocious or
cruel."
Prosecutors' arguments
and presentations have
limits on them, however
There are no limits on
the defense's mitigating
evidence.
As per law, the defense
attorneys may present any
evidence that would miti-
gate against imposition of
the death penalty
It will be up to the ju-
rors to see which side's
evidence outweighs the
other's and recommend
accordingly
At the end, after Howard
makes the final sentencing
decision, he must say
which of the aggravating
factors led to his decision.


Alex Villacastin, Catherine Ca
MD Sembrano-Navarro, MD

I : I r





S Citus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Women in combat


American women

have served and

diedfrom the first

Associated Press

WASHINGTON American
women have served and died on the
nation's battlefields from the first.
They were nurses and cooks, spies
and couriers in the Revolutionary
War Some disguised themselves as
men to fight for the Union or the
Confederacy Yet the U.S. military's
official acceptance of women in
combat took more than two
centuries.
New roles for females have been
doled out fitfully, whenever com-
manders have gotten in binds and
realized they needed women's help.
"The main driver is that it's been
militarily necessary," said retired
Capt Lory Manning, a 25-year Navy
veteran who leads military studies
for the Women's Research & Edu-
cation Institute.
She points, for example, to cre-
ation of the Army Nurse Corps in
response to the struggle against dis-
ease in the Spanish-American War
Some milestones on the way to
this week's lifting of the ban on
women in ground combat jobs:
FROM THE FIRST
They didn't wear uniforms, but
the Army hired women as nurses,
cooks and laundresses during the
American Revolution. Women were
also spies and saboteurs. They car-
ried George Washington's messages
across enemy lines to his generals.
A few hundred women secretly
served as Civil War soldiers, histo-
rians estimate. There are records of
some who were discovered only
after they were wounded or killed.
NURSES NEEDED
Despite their record as volun-
teers and contract workers, women
were denied a place within military
service until 1901, when the Army
Nurse Corps was created. Navy
nurses followed in 1908.
What prompted the creation of
the Nurse Corps? The devastating
toll of typhoid, malaria and other
diseases that killed far more sol-
diers than the fighting during the
Spanish-American War
OVER THERE
The world wars brought large-
scale proof that women could han-
dle many of the military's
noncombat jobs. They were re-
cruited to "Free a man to fight!"
For the first time in World War I,
women other than nurses were al-
lowed to enlist in the Navy and


Associated Press
Aviatrix Nancy Harkness Love, director of the Women's Auxiliary Ferry
Squadron (WAFS), and Col. Robert H. Baker, commanding officer, inspect
the first contingent of women pilots in the WAFS on Sept. 22, 1942, at New
Castle Army Air Base, Del.


Marines. They worked as telephone
operators, accountants, draftsmen,
clerks. Some went to Europe. Still,
only about 35,000 women, the ma-
jority of them nurses, served among
nearly 5 million U.S. men. They
were promptly sent home after the
armistice.
They were the advance troops for
the wave of women to come in the
next world war, including the
Navy's WAVES and the Army's
WACS. There were even civilian pi-
lots the WASPS who reposi-
tioned planes and towed gunners'
targets but were denied Air Force
status.
More than 400,000 women served,
at home and overseas, stepping into
nearly all types of noncombat jobs.
World War II was the turning
point that earned women full-
fledged military status. In 1948,
after fierce debate, Congress ap-
proved allowing women to serve in
the regular forces of all branches of
the service all the time, not just in
war
WELCOME BACK
In peacetime, the Pentagon re-
treated back to assigning females to
"women's work." They got few
chances at promotion and couldn't
be admirals or generals. Although
military nurses risked their lives in
Korea and Vietnam, the military in-
sisted women weren't fit for combat
conditions.
The equal rights movement
prompted some changes in 1967,
Congress got rid of a law limiting
women to 2 percent of the military
and opened up promotions to
higher service grades.
In 1973, the draft ended and the
all-volunteer military was born.
Short on male volunteers, the De-
fense Department began seriously
recruiting women and assigning
them a wider range of jobs.
Women grew to more than 10 per-
cent of America's force by the 1980s.


FRONT LINES BLUR
More than 40,000 women de-
ployed for the Persian Gulf War in
1990 and 1991. They worked along-
side men, flying helicopters, driving
trucks, guarding bases and firing
missiles as Americans at home
watched on television news.
Officially, women were banned
from combat. But there were no
clear front lines. Women soldiers
and Marines were at risk wherever
Scud missiles fell.
AFTER 9/11
More than 200,000 women serve
in the military now 15 percent of
a force of 1.4 million. And the wars
in Afghanistan and Iraq have oblit-
erated any remaining notion that
they can be kept out of the fight.
With the military straining to staff
two wars at once, everyone was
needed. But battle lines were
jagged; insurgents could be any-
where. Women in support jobs
found themselves in firefights and
blasted by roadside bombs. And
their gender made them especially
valuable on some patrols: They
could search and interview Muslim
women, whose culture forbid such
contact with men.
In 2012, to reflect the new reali-
ties, the Defense Department
changed its rules to officially allow
women into many jobs they were al-
ready doing, but in units closer to
the fighting. They were still banned
from the most dangerous jobs, such
as being infantry soldiers or Special
Operations commandos.
On Thursday, Defense Secretary
Leon Panetta announced an end to
the ban on women in combat.
Women have become an integral
part of the service, fighting and
dying alongside men, Panetta said.
In fact, 152 women in uniform have
died in Iraq and Afghanistan.
"The time has come," he said,
"for our policies to recognize that
reality."


Round 2 for Sloppy Joe's bar, a Havana original


Associated Press

HAVANA A half-cen-
tury later, Jose Rafa
Malem remembers the
balmy breezes blowing
through the bar's arching
porticos, the grain of the
tall wood stools, the whiff
of Pedro Domecq brandy
on his father's breath.
And how could he forget
the tangy ground-beef-
and-tomato-sauce sand-
wiches synonymous with
what was then one of Ha-
vana's hippest hangouts,
playfully dubbed Sloppy
Joe's?
"I ate so many, I got
tired of them," said Rafa,
a 59-year-old Havana na-
tive who grew up to be-
come a bartender
Soon, Rafa will be able
to relive those boyhood
memories as the original
Sloppy Joe's reopens in
Havana's historic quarter,
giving residents and
tourists from all over the
chance to belly up to the
same bar that served
thirsty celebrities such as
Rock Hudson, Babe Ruth
and Ernest Hemingway
It's part of an ambitious
revitalization project by
the Havana City Histo-
rian's Office, which since
the 1990s has transformed
block after block of crum-
bling ruins into rehabili-
tated buildings along
vibrant cobblestone
streets.
The effort has helped fi-
nance Cuba's socialist
present by drawing
tourists fascinated by its
pre-socialist past, from
colonial palaces of the
18th century to celebrity
hangouts of the 1950s.
"For the people of this
city, I think it's very inter-
esting and very important
to rescue a place that has
so much history and is so
recognized around the
world," said Ernesto Iz-
naga, manager of the
born-again Joe's, which


Associated Press
A classic American car is reflected in the storefront
window Friday of Sloppy Joe's bar in Havana, Cuba.


will be run by state-owned
tourism concern
Habaguanex. "To restore
it to how it was before."
Sloppy Joe's was
founded in 1918 by a Gali-
cian immigrant named
Jose Abeal Otero, who
purchased a grocery store
in Old Havana after years
of tending bar in New Or-
leans and Miami. Legend
has it the sobriquet comes
from the place's grubbi-
ness and Abeal's Ameri-
can nickname, Joe.
Rafa's father was a
close friend of longtime
bartender Fabio Delgado
and took his boy there on
Sunday afternoons begin-
ning in the late '50s. Dur-
ing the day, Rafa said,
Joe's was a mellow family

To Place Your

"In Memory" ad,

Saralynne
Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller@chronicleonline.com


joint where kids slurped
ice cream and Coca-Cola
while mom and dad chat-
ted over more potent
spirits.
Employees made sand-
wiches to order behind
the black mahogany bar,
polished to a high shine
and purportedly once the
longest in Latin America
at about 59 feet.
After dark, the place
filled up with Americans
on vacation.
Abeal's affable person-
ality and familiarity with


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English from his years in
the States helped make
Joe's a favorite among
tipsy Yanks as far back as
the Prohibition era of
1920-1933, along with the
nearby El Floridita bar,
the reputed birthplace of
the daiquiri cocktail, and
La Bodeguita del Medio,
home of the minty, rum-
infused mojito.


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Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L Pace
1901 SE Hwy. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


Obituaries


Geraldine
'Jerry'
VanPoucker,
87
CRYSTAL RIVER
Geraldine 'Jerry"
VanPoucker, 87, of Crystal
River, Fla., passed away
Jan. 22, 2013, at Crystal
River Health & Rehab
under Hospice care. Jerry
was born Nov. 7, 1925, in
Detroit,
Mich., the
daughter
of the late
Roy and
Marie
Gerspach.
In her
earlier
Geraldine y e a r s
Vanpouckerypri s,
prior to
her marriage to Richard
VanPoucker, Jerry was a
wholesale sales represen-
tative for Coty Cosmetics
in Michigan. Jerry and
Richard "Dick" were mar-
ried in 1961 and moved to
Crystal River She was an
astute business woman
and together they built and
managed the Thunderbird
Mobile Home Park and
Sales for 33 years, retiring
in 2000.
Jerry had an active and
loving life with her hus-
band for 51 years. They en-
joyed traveling, playing
pool, cards, visiting
casinos and bowling.
Private arrangements
are under the direction of
Strickland Funeral Home
and Crematory In lieu of
flowers please make
contributions to Hospice.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Timothy
Edwards, 56
DUNNELLON
Timothy David Ed-
wards, 56, Dunnellon,
passed away Jan 24, 2013,
in Hospice of Citrus
County, Lecanto. Timothy
was born April 1, 1956, in
Riverview, Calif., to Lee
Hilton Edwards Sr and
Dorothy Gargaro Edwards.
He is survived by his
mother, Dorothy Edwards
of Crystal River; his two
brothers, Lee Edwards of
Citrus Springs and Keith
Edwards of St Petersburg.
Private arrangements
with Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with
Crematory
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Lewis
Baker Jr., 75
LAKE PANASOFFKEE
Lewis C. Baker Jr., 75,
Lake Panasoffkee, died
Jan. 24, 2013. A celebration
of life memorial service
will be announced at a
later date.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is in
charge of arrangements.




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Edward
Lybolt, 79
SUMTERVILLE
Edward M. Lybolt, 79,
Sumterville, died
Jan. 24, 2013. A graveside
committal service at
Florida National Ceme-
tery will be announced at
a later date.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is in
charge of arrangements.






Lynford
Roya, 94
LECANTO
Lynford I. Roya, 94,
Lecanto, died Jan 24, 2013.
Burial in Burlington, Vt.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory
provided information.

Mindy
Gibson, 56
INVERNESS
Mindy L. Gibson, 56,
Inverness, died Jan. 21,
2013. A celebration of life
memorial service will be
at 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2,
2013, at the VFW Post 4337
in Inverness.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is
assisting the family There
will be no calling hours at
the funeral home.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's poI icy
permits both free and
paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be
submitted by the
funeral home or
society in charge of
arrangements.
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
Email obits@
chronicle online.com
or fax 352-563-3280.



a". .Zal
Funeral Home With Crematoy
TODD SUMLIN
Service: Sat. lpm
TIM EDWARDS
Private Arrangements
MINDY GIBSON
Memorial Pending
PAUL SOWARDS
Service: Mon 2:00 PM
EDWARD LYBOLT
Private Arrangements
LEWIS BAKER
Private Arrangements
726-8323 ..

Th {Memory of


Douy(as Patton
whoyassedawa
January 26, 2 0I

You Left us beautiful memories
Your love is still our guide
And though we cannot see you
We know that you're always by our side
A million times we've needed you
A million times we've cried
Our goodbye came much too soon
And only God knows why
Now we think of you in silence
And often speak your name
But all we have are memories
And your picture in a frame
Your resting place we visit
And put flowers there with care
But no one knows the heartache
As we turn and leave you there
,1ways in our hearts,
LOVe,
Your Tamicy
000DUQI


A6 SATURDAY JANUARY 26, 2013







Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money&Markets

1,520 ................................. S& P 500

1,480. Close: 1,502.96
Change: 8.14 (0.5%)
1,440 .........10 DAYS .........
1,5 2 0 ... ........................................ .............. ............ ..........

1,5 20



1.320 A SN .........
1 ,3 0 '..... ..... ... ." ......... i.... .

1 ,36 0 .......... .... ........ .... ....... ..... ..... ... .. ......... ... ....... "....


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE

3,381
3,608
1874
1144
364
13


NASD

1,871
2,008
1360
1072
206
10


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
13895.98
5877.79
470.05
8904.65
3156.20
1503.26
1096.70
15879.22
905.24


A click of the wrist
gets you moare at www.chronicleonline.com

13,920 ................. "" Dow Jones industrials
13,64 ........Close: 13,895.98
Change: 70.65 (0.5%)
13,3W0'': 10 DAYS ....


Associated Press


14,000

13,600

13,200


12,800.-:7

12,400"..........


LOW
13825.33
5810.22
465.30
8860.76
3135.86
1494.82
1089.32
15785.33
900.10


CLOSE
13895.98
5870.05
470.05
8904.53
3149.71
1502.96
1096.70
15878.72
905.24


CHG. %CHG.
+70.65 +0.51%
+15.11 +0.26%
+2.78 +0.59%
+47.94 +0.54%
+19.33 +0.62%
+8.14 +0.54%
+9.64 +0.89%
+93.39 +0.59%
+5.05 +0.56%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE *CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN

AK Steel Hold AKS 3.42 -0- 10.33 4.44 -.04 -0.9 V A A -3.5 -50.7
AT&TInc T 29.02 0 38.58 34.02 +.27 +0.8 A A A +0.9 +18.0
AmetekInc AME 29.86 0 41.22 41.07 -.03 -0.1 A A A +9.3 +33.8
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 60.52 0 91.21 91.71 +1.45 +1.6 A A A +4.9 +49.0
Bank of America BAC 6.72 -- 12.20 11.62 +.09 +0.8 A A A +0.1 +58.7
Capital City Bank CCBG 6.35 0 12.23 11.77 +.13 +1.1 A A A +3.5 +20.0
CenturyLinkInc CTL 36.50 0 43.43 40.13 +.03 +0.1 A A A +2.6 +16.4
Citigroup C 24.61 0 43.25 42.91 +.11 +0.3 A A A +8.5 +43.3
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 0 21.43 16.84 +.19 +1.1 A A A +6.3 -6.1
Disney DIS 38.38 0 54.87 54.38 +.43 +0.8 A A A +9.2 +39.4
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 0 71.13 67.92 +.12 +0.2 A A A +6.5 +11.7
EPR Properties EPR 40.04 48.92 47.37 -.28 -0.6 A A A +2.7 +15.8
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 77.13 93.67 91.73 +.38 +0.4 A A A +6.0 +7.3
Ford Motor F 8.82 14.30 13.68 -.19 -1.4 V A A +5.6 +9.8
Gen Electric GE 18.02 23.18 22.29 +.24 +1.1 A A A +6.2 +20.8
Home Depot HD 43.98 0 67.69 67.82 +.47 +0.7 A A A +9.7 +52.4
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 --- 29.27 20.96 +.01 ... V A A +1.6 -18.9
IBM IBM 181.85 0 211.79 204.97 +.55 +0.3 A A A +7.0 +8.2
LKQ Corporation LKQ 14.63 0 23.51 23.38 +.38 +1.7 A A A +10.8 +40.5
Lowes Cos LOW 24.76 0 38.53 38.58 +.17 +0.4 A A A +8.6 +45.2
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 0 101.89 93.72 +.41 +0.4 A A A +6.2 -2.6
Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.26 -0 32.95 27.88 +.25 +0.9 A A A +4.4 -3.0
Motorola Solutions MSI 44.18 0 59.48 58.60 -.20 -0.3 V A A +5.2 +24.9
NextEra Energy NEE 58.71 0 72.35 72.50 +.40 +0.6 A A A +4.8 +25.9
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 15.69 -- 43.18 19.35 +.23 +1.2 A A A -1.8 -44.2
Piedmont Office RT PDM 16.10 0 19.36 19.50 +.20 +1.0 A A A +8.0 +10.2
Regions Fncl RF 4.80 0 7.85 7.69 +.02 +0.3 A A A +7.9 +47.4
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 --- 85.90 45.12 -.28 -0.6 V A A +9.1 +6.7
Smucker, JM SJM 70.50 0 90.31 89.26 -.88 -1.0 V A A +3.5 +13.8
Sprint Nextel Corp S 2.10 6.04 5.64 -.03 -0.5 V A 7 -0.5 +161.3
Texas Instru TXN 26.06 34.24 32.80 -.29 -0.9 V A A +6.2 +4.0
Time Warner TWX 33.62 0 51.29 50.40 -.40 -0.8 A A A +5.4 +38.0
UniFirst Corp UNF 55.86 88.35 80.80 +.06 +0.1 V A A +10.2 +32.8
Verizon Comm VZ 36.80 48.77 42.67 +.08 +0.2 A 7 7 -1.4 +18.1
Vodafone Group VOD 24.95 0 30.07 27.07 +.29 +1.1 A A A +7.5 +2.2
WalMart Strs WMT 57.18 0 77.60 69.00 -.79 -1.1 V A A +1.1 +16.3
Walgreen Co WAG 28.53 0 39.74 39.67 +.23 +0.6 A A A +7.2 +18.0
Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included, b Annual rate plus stock, c Liquidating dividend, e Amount declared
12 months, f- Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement, i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no
Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred, k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement, p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend, t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date.
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99. dd- Loss in last 12 months.


Interestrates
M uH
IFATML
--,MIIIIIIII III





The yield on the
10-year Trea-
sury note
jumped to 1.95
percent Friday.
Yields affect in-
terest rates on
consumer loans.


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
The price of
gold fell after
encouraging
earnings reports
and rising stock
markets around
the world meant
less demand
from investors
for the metal as
a safe-haven
investment.




112
E~M


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .07 0.08 -0.01 .05
6-month T-bill .10 0.10 .07
52-wk T-bill .13 0.13 .10
2-year T-note .28 0.24 +0.04 .21
5-year T-note .85 0.76 +0.09 .77
10-year T-note 1.95 1.84 +0.11 1.94
30-year T-bond 3.13 3.04 +0.09 3.09


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 2.72 2.63 +0.09 2.58
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 3.97 3.94 +0.03 4.65
Barclays USAggregate 1.82 1.80 +0.02 2.19
Barclays US High Yield 5.61 5.64 -0.03 7.66
MoodysAAACorpldx 3.76 3.75 +0.01 3.93
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.09 1.03 +0.06 .99
Barclays US Corp 2.74 2.73 +0.01 3.58


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 95.88
Ethanol (gal) 2.38
Heating Oil (gal) 3.06
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.44
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.88
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1656.40
Silver (oz) 31.18
Platinum (oz) 1693.90
Copper (Ib) 3.64
Palladium (oz) 740.25

AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.26
Coffee (Ib) 1.48
Corn (bu) 7.21
Cotton (Ib) 0.81
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 358.80
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.13
Soybeans (bu) 14.41
Wheat (bu) 7.77


PVS.
95.95
2.38
3.09
3.45
2.86
PVS.
1669.50
31.70
1682.30
3.66
725.95

PVS.
1.26
1.47
7.24
0.83
360.70
1.13
14.35
7.69


%CHG
-0.07
-0.04
-0.96
-0.06
+0.44
%CHG
-0.78
-1.62
+0.66
-0.68
+1.97

%CHG
+0.34
+1.19
-0.48
-2.86
-0.53
+0.18
+0.40
+1.04


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 21.27 +.09 +4.3 +14.4 +11.8 +5.7
BondA m 12.88 -.04 -0.4 +4.9 +5.8 +3.7
CaplncBuA m 54.14 +.15 +2.6 +13.4 +9.1 +3.1
CpWldGrIA m 38.84 +.28 +4.4 +18.1 +8.4 +2.0
EurPacGrA m 42.71 +39 +3.6 +15.5 +6.2 +1.2
FnInvA m 43.03 +.26 +5.5 +16.7 +12.0 +4.0
GrthAmA m 36.21 +.24 +5.4 +18.5 +11.5 +3.9
IncAmerA m 18.70 +.09 +3.5 +13.6 +11.4 +5.3
InvCoAmA m 31.70 +.17 +5.1 +15.4 +10.4 +3.5
NewPerspA m 32.89 +33 +5.2 +19.2 +10.8 +4.1
WAMutInvA m 32.73 +.20 +4.9 +14.0 +13.2 +4.4
Dodge & Cox Income 13.87 -.02 +0.1 +6.7 +6.2 +6.8
IntlStk 36.37 +.27 +5.0 +18.6 +7.2 +1.3
Stock 130.11 +.78 +6.7 +21.9 +12.3 +3.1
Fidelity Contra 80.90 +37 +4.3 +15.3 +13.4 +5.3
GrowCo 97.75 +.81 +4.9 +14.2 +15.7 +7.3
LowPriStk d 41.73 +.25 +5.6 +17.6 +14.6 +7.9
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.31 +.01 +3.6 +15.0 +11.0 +6.0
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.43 -.02 +0.7 +11.0 +8.3 +9.6
GlBondAdv 13.39 -.02 +0.7 +11.3 +8.6 +9.9
Harbor Intllnstl d 64.25 +.70 +3.4 +15.0 +8.7 +2.1
PIMCO TotRetA m 11.21 -.03 -0.2 +8.3 +6.7 +7.2
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 27.95 +.14 +5.7 +17.3 +12.7 +4.4
GrowStk 39.57 +30 +4.7 +16.5 +14.3 +6.2
Vanguard 50OAdml 138.57 +.75 +5.5 +15.9 +13.4 +4.8
5001nv 138.56 +.75 +5.5 +15.8 +13.3 +4.7
GNMAAdml 10.84 -.02 -0.5 +1.8 +5.2 +5.6
MulntAdml 14.44 -.03 +0.6 +5.0 +5.9 +5.2
STGradeAd 10.82 -.01 0.0 +3.9 +3.6 +3.8
TotBdAdml 11.01 -.04 -0.6 +3.6 +5.5 +5.4
Totlntl 15.47 +.09 +3.3 +13.7 +5.6 -0.2
TotStlAdm 37.72 +.22 +5.8 +16.1 +13.9 +5.5
TotStldx 37.71 +.23 +5.8 +16.0 +13.8 +5.4
Welltn 35.19 +.08 +4.0 +12.8 +10.7 +6.2
WelltnAdm 60.78 +.14 +4.0 +12.9 +10.8 +6.3
Annualize; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
Strong earnings reports
Standard & Poor's 500 i
its eighth straight gain F
The index closed above
1,500 level for the first ti
since December 2007 a
marked its longest run 0
secutive gains since 200,


Hasbro
Close: $37.31 V-1.14 or -3
Due to weak holiday demal
toy maker's fourth-quarter r
didn't meet expectations. It
cut 10 percent of its workfo
$40
38
36
34
N D
52-week range
$32.00
Vol.: 7.3m (4.1x avg.)
Mkt. Cap:$4.85 b Yiel

Procter & Gamble
Close: $73.25 A2.83 or 4.0
The consumer products ma
that its fiscal second quarto
come more than doubled a
ed its profit outlook.
$75

70

65 N D
52-week range
$59.07

Vol.: 28.7m (3.2x avg.)
Mkt. Cap:$200.28 b Yiel

Halliburton
Close: $39.72A1.91 or 5.1
The energy services compa
that its net income for the fo
quarter fell 26 percent, but
suits beat expectations.
$40
35
30
25
N D
52-week range
$26.28
Vol.: 32.5m (3.Ox avg.)
Mkt. Cap: $36.86 b Yiel

Oshkosh
Close: $41.08A6.50 or 18.
The truck maker reported a
cent rise in fiscal first-quarte
come and boosted its guida
the full year.
$50
40
30
20
N D
52-week range
$18.49

Vol.: 5.2m (4.3x avg.)
Mkt. Cap:$3.74 b

Starbucks
Close: $56.81 A2.24 or 4.1
Thanks to higher global sal
coffee chain said its profit ro
percent in the latest quarter
ing expectations.
$60
55
50
N D
52-week range
$43.04

Vol.: 15.4m (2.Ox avg.)
Mkt. Cap: $42.24 b Yiel


YTD
+6.04%
+10.61%
+3.74%
+5.46%
+4.31%
+5.38%
+7.47%
+5.89%
+6.58%





P/E DIV

dd
28 1.80f
22 0.24
1.57e
45 0.04
dd
36 2.90
13 0.04
30 1.00
17 0.75f
19 3.06
21 3.00
12 2.28
11 0.40f
16 0.76f
24 1.16
10 0.90


NEW YORK- The Standard & Poor's
500 index closed above 1,500 on Friday
for the first time since the start of the
Great Recession in 2007, lifted by strong
earnings from Procter & Gamble and
Starbucks.
The S&P 500 rose 8.14 points to 1,502.96.
It was the eighth straight gain, the longest
winning streak since November 2004.
The Dow Jones industrial average
closed at 13,895.98, up 70.65 points. The
Nasdaq composite gained 19.33 points to
3,149.71.
Procter & Gamble, world's largest con-
sumer products maker, gained $2.83 to
$73.25 after reporting its quarterly in-
come more than doubled. P&G also
raised its profit forecast for its full fiscal
year Starbucks rose $2.24 to $56.81 after
reporting a 13 percent increase in profits.
"Earnings are growing," said Joe Tan-
ious, a global market strategist at JPMor-
gan. "The bottom line is that corporate
America is doing exceptionally well."
Tanious expects corporate earnings to
grow at about 5 percent over the "next
year or two," and stock valuations to rise.


Currently, the S&P 500 is trading at an av-
erage price-to-earnings ratio of 14, below
an average of 15.1 for the last decade, ac-
cording to FactSet data.
Apple continued to decline, allowing
Exxon Mobil to once again surpass the
electronics giant as the world's most
valuable publicly traded company Apple
fell 2.4 percent to $439.88, following a 12
percent drop on Thursday, the biggest
one-day percentage drop for the com-
pany since 2008, after Apple forecast
slower sales. The stock is now 37 percent
below the record high of $702.10 it
reached Sept. 19.
Apple first surpassed Exxon in market
value in the summer of 2011, grabbing a
title Exxon had held since 2005. The two
traded places through that fall, until
Apple surpassed Exxon in early 2012.
Stocks have surged this month, with
the S&P 500 advancing 5.4 percent. It
jumped at the start of the year when law-
makers reached a last-minute deal to
avoid the "fiscal cliff." Stocks built on
those gains on optimism that the housing
market is recovering and the labor mar-
ket is healing. The Dow Jones is up 5.5
percent on the year


AP debate: Training needed



to redesign job market


Associated Press


14 3.40 DAVOS, Switzerland-
28 Training youths for the
23 0.64 challenges of a fast-
17 3.08f changing world has to be
15 0.92 central to any strategy to
20 1.04 rebuild the job market fol-
14 2.40 lowing a financial crisis
dd that's wiped out millions of
17 0.80 middle-class jobs during
11 0.04 the past five years.
dd That was the central
21 2.08 conclusion that emerged
dd from the annual Associ-
21 0.84 ated Press debate at the
18 1.04 World Economic Forum in
16 0.15 the Swiss village of Davos,
cc 2.06 which focused on the need
1.53e to build up skills for a
14 1.59 changing economy
18 1.10 "We need a young labor
orpaidinlast force," IMF Deputy Man-
rgular rate jI
arrears. aging Director Min Zhu
r- Declared or said. "Government doesn't

pay enough attention to
training and retraining."
Amid concerns that the
sent the rich world is faced with a
ndex to
riday. lost generation of young
the people with dismal job
ime prospects, panelists sug-
nd gested other ideas in the
Af con- debate that was moder-
4. ated by the AP's senior

managing editor for U.S.
HAS news, Michael Oreskes.
.0% Proposals included the
nd, the creation of "green" jobs to
Irplans t save the planet from cli-

rce. mate catastrophe and low-
Sering the costs of hiring
first-time workers.
The International Labor
j Organization estimates
that young people are
I $39.98 three times more likely to
PE:14.4 be unemployed than
d: 3.9% adults, and that worldwide
PG around 75 million youths
3% aged between 15 and 24
aker said are looking for work. This
er net in- youth employment crisis,
nd boost- it says, threatens to scar

"the very fabric of our
societies."
Eric Cantor, a Republi-
can Congressman from
J Virginia, said training is

3$73.25 needed to give workers the
PE:23.7 tools they need for the
d: 3.1% "new labor force."
'America is a huge cata-

1% HAL lyst for growth," he said.
any said "Workers need to be
fourth trained to get into those
its re- jobs."

He warned, however,
against piling more gov-
ernment money on schools
without coming up with a
J "better way" to create new

$40.28 skills.
PE:12.7 An Associated Press
d: 0.9% analysis of employment
data from 20 countries
OSK found millions of mid-skill,

20 per mid-pay jobs have already
er net in- disappeared over the past
ance for five years -jobs that form

the backbone of the mid-
dle class in developed
countries.
That experience has left
J a growing number of tech-

1$41.27 nology experts and econo-
mists pondering whether
PE: 16. 4
Yield:... middle-class jobs will re-
turn when the global econ-
SBUX omy recovers, or whether
1 they have been lost
es, the
ose 13 forever
r, meet- Italian Finance Minister
Vittorio Grilli, also at the
debate, argued that tech-
nology doesn't have to be
the enemy, and "will pro-
J vide a second wind to ad-
vanced economies."
I$62.00
PE: 317 7 Young people in the job
d: 1.5% market don't all feel


Associated Press
German Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle gestures as
he speaks Friday at the Open Forum, on the sideline of
the 43rd annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum in
Davos, Switzerland.


they're getting education
that fits today's demand.
"The quality of courses
is not up to standard at
all," said Lucy Nicholls, a
22-year-old fashion gradu-
ate in London.
She was speaking Friday
in a Google hangout video
chat as part of AP's Class
of 2012, an exploration of
Europe's financial crisis
through the eyes of young
graduates facing the worst
downturn the continent
has seen since the end of
World War II.
Emerging markets may
offer some ideas to the de-
veloped world in its new
jobs conundrum.
Turkish Deputy Prime
Minister Ali Babacan,


whose country has gener-
ated 4.6 million jobs over
the past five years, cred-
ited the performance on a
host of innovative policies,
such as paying the wages
of some young people
when they first enter the
workforce.
"The biggest problem is
the cost of entry to the job
market," he said. "If an
employer thinks it is less
expensive to hire, then
employment becomes
easier"
Nobel Prize-winning
economist Joseph Stiglitz
suggested focusing on
"green, renewable jobs" to

help solve the youth un-
employment crisis as well
as the planet.


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Li-TdwgJFvw- I r7
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rvery Kids 10 8v xmder from Kids Me]na
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BUSINESS


SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013 A7







Page A8. SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013




PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan .................................... publisher
M ike A rnold .............................................. edito r
Charlie Brennan .......................... editor at large
Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member


Mac Harris ................................ citizen m em ber
Founded Rebecca Martin.............guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief


"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


SINKING EXPECTATIONS




Relationship with


Progress goes


from bad to worse


It is hard to imagine how
the county's relationship
with its major taxpayer
and private employer could
get much worse.
As has been well covered in
this newspaper, Progress En-
ergy has officially disputed
its tax bill and has only made
partial payment for the cur-
rent fiscal year.
While the finger
pointing over the THE I
breakdown of ne-
gotiations with Progress
the power com-
pany continues, OUR O
the fact is the
county only re- Wach
ceived $19 million iceb
of the $34 million
tax bill that was issued.
County property appraiser
Geoff Greene believes he still
has time to negotiate a reso-
lution to the dispute, but the
argument sounds very much
like the captain of the Titanic
announcing he is not afraid of
icebergs.
While this tax dispute takes
center stage, the backstory
remains what Progress En-
ergy might decide to do with
its offline nuclear plant in
Crystal River. The nuclear
plant has not produced
power for more than two
years, after it was shut down
for repairs that went bad.
Fitch Ratings recently sug-
gested company officials
have already made the deci-
sion to cancel the expensive
repairs.
Some type of announce-
ment is expected within the
next month.
If Progress Energy does de-
cide to not refurbish the nu-
clear plant, the long-term
impact on Citrus County will
be significant. The loss of
hundreds of employees in
our community along with
their economic impact is
hard to imagine.
If the breakdown in tax ne-
gotiations plays any role in
Progress Energy's decision to
exit our community, we will
all live to regret the bureau-



Saving money on road
I read the article in the Chron-
icle the other day about
extending the Suncoast
Parkway north. I totally
agree. I think it would
be a great idea, as it
would facilitate trips to
and from the Tampa
Airport. However, I do
have one recommenda-
tion for the powers-to-
be on how to save some CAL
money on this project.
In my humble opinion, 56V
there is no need to con-
tinue the biking/jogging trail
that parallels the highway. The
other day I saw three people
total on the trail from Spring
Hill going north to (U.S.) 98.
That's not unusual, either. And
it was a beautiful, sunny day.
Why ear camouflage?
Just reading the SHARE Club
newsletter that comes from Cit-
rus Memorial hospital and the
guy's writing an article about he
went out with some guy hunting,
deer hunting from a deer stand
in a tree using a bow and how


cratic barriers we put in
place.
Last week Progress Energy
Florida president Alex Glenn
sent a letter to county offi-
cials with a stern warning.
Company officials only ex-
pect to pay $19 million in
taxes for the next fiscal year
and the payments will go
down after that.


SSUE:
s dispute.

PINION:
out for
)u rgs.


I

(


If Progress de-
cides to close
the nuclear plant,
that warning
could have ex-
treme conse-
quences. Because
the nuke plant is
no longer consid-
ered part of the


Progress rate base, local taxes
on this substantial capital in-
vestment are no longer paid.
Tax bills are not paid based
on letters, but Glenn's letter
could be a message about the
company's future plans in
Citrus County.
What we need today is for
our public officials to stop
gazing at their navels and in-
stead look at the big picture.
County Commission Chair-
man Joe Meek has attempted
to get the property appraiser
and the power company to
the negotiating table in an ef-
fort to avoid the confronta-
tional relationship and
growing legal bill.
What we don't want is an-
other wasteful and expensive
legal battle such as the one
just completed at Citrus Me-
morial hospital.
And what we don't want is
the dispute with county offi-
cials to weigh on the power
company's long-term decision
to possibly exit Citrus County.
The big picture is it is bet-
ter to have an open and hon-
est partnership with Progress
Energy as opposed to a can-
tankerous one that involves
lawsuits and threats.
We are disappointed suc-
cessful negotiations have not
been completed. We hate to
think there is an iceberg in
our future.


the host guy hunter wore cam-
ouflage and this other guy wore
jeans and a dark shirt. And it re-
minds me of hunters I
JIND see in the woods with
all these camouflage
o clothes, but then they
EL wear bright orange
vests and sometimes
bright orange hats be-
cause that's actually a
law that you're sup-
posed to have above
5 your waist for deer
)579 hunting. So what's the
point of wearing cam-
ouflage? Is it stupid or
is there logic there?
Need traffic signal
A traffic light at the new Wal-
mart, but no traffic light for
(State Road) 44 and Meadow-
crest Boulevard where the
county license bureau is? That
exit onto (S.R.) 44 is an acci-
dent waiting to happen. A traffic
light should be put there
immediately.
Editor's note: Plans are in the
works for a traffic light at SR 44
and Meadowcrest.


What water shortage?
On Jan. 10, 2013, (SWFWMD)
Southwest Florida Water Man-
agement District placed a 1/4-
page advertisement
announcing the annual exten-
sion of their water restrictions
for the citizens of Citrus County
They warned of possible addi-
tional water restrictions due to
low water tables and/or lack of
adequate water supplies. Re-
strictions and fines for watering
one's lawn more than once a
week on specified days.
Water levels in our rivers and
lakes would determine if addi-
tional restrictions are necessary,
and any unnecessary watering
or use is prohibited. SWFWMD
is the same agency that recently
accepted an annual payment of
$50 to allow a water bottling
company to pump 28 million gal-
lons of our fresh water a year for
bottled sale use.
I once questioned the gover-
nor's office about the authority
of SWFWMD in making these
types of decisions and I was
told: SWFWMD officials (board
of directors) are not elected
positions, therefore they are
not answerable to the (con-
stituents) citizens of Florida
counties. Each SWFWMD di-
rector is appointed by the gov-
ernor of Florida.
I then asked if the governor
could not put greater restraints
or restrictions on some of the
SWFWMD decisions that
greatly effect and/or cause
harm to the citizens. I was told


"It is better to have a permanent
income than to be fascinating."
Oscar Wilde, 1887


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Campaign finances need work


A


If the system is so corrupt the
white-hatters throw their hands
in the air, imagine how rotten
things have become.
Like the police officer weary
from the never-ending so-called
War on Drugs, Krassner and


n a pivotal story arc on
HBO's seminal series, "The
Wire," veteran police com-
mander Howard "Bunny" Colvin
attempts to effect some real
change in the troubled neigh-
borhoods for which he has long
been responsible.
Without the knowl-
edge of central com-
mand, Colvin sets up
areas where police
would monitor but
not punish drug
trade. The police
crack down severely
on violence in these
areas and also on
drug trafficking else- Peter S
where in the city For FLO
many weeks, Colvin's VOl
experiment works,
and violent crime de-
clines. However, Colvin's supe-
riors, the media and city
politicians eventually find out
about the arrangement, and the
"Hamsterdam" experiment
ends.
The corridors of power in
Tallahassee are very different
from the hard streets of Balti-
more, but watching my friend
Dan Krassner, the earnest exec-
utive director of the self-styled
watchdog group Integrity
Florida, testify before the
House Ethics and Elections
Committee on Wednesday, I
could not help but be reminded
of Bunny Colvin's experiment.
Only Krassner does not want to
decriminalize drug use, he
wants to repair Florida's bro-
ken campaign finance laws.
That it is Integrity Florida
proposing to eliminate the $500
cap on contributions to state po-
litical candidates says every-
thing you need to know about
just how broken are Florida's
campaign finance regulations.
Integrity Florida is the good guy


many, many others
are frustrated over a
system that barely
functions.
But is lifting the
cap on contributions,
while requiring al-
most real-time re-
porting of all
contributions (as op-
posed to quarterly
reporting), the best
solution for solving
what ails campaign
finance laws? Yes, it
is, but for the wrong


reasons.
The real culprit are the Com-
mittees of Continued Existence,
which, as the Florida Division
of Elections Gary Holland ex-
plained during testimony on
Wednesday, were originally de-
signed to be political commit-
tees for dues-gathering
organizations but have become
fundraising machines with the
power to raise unlimited con-
tributions and, "basically, give it
to anybody"
In reality, CCEs are nothing
more than political washing
machines through which big
contributions from well fi-
nanced companies, individuals
and interest can launder
money Because Company X is
limited to giving merely $500
per election cycle to a candi-
date, it gives $50,000 to the Com-
mittee for an Optimistic Florida
to spend on attack ads against
the candidate's opposition.
I know how this works be-
cause I am the tip of the spear
in this equation. I'm one of


those dark agents who designs
the direct-mail and TV ads to
attack the aforementioned can-
didate's opposition. So, for my
sake, please, please lift the
limit on contributions to politi-
cal candidates. Legislation that
does so should be titled the "Po-
litical Consultants Jobs Act of
2013."
As for whether lifting the con-
tribution limit will fix the sys-
tem, that's unclear
What is clear is the corner
legislators are painting them-
selves into during the debate
over this issue.
What they're saying is, yes,
CCEs are bad, but we're ad-
dicted to them to the unlim-
ited money they can raise and
to the ease of accepting contri-
butions in big chunks rather
than $500 at a time. So we need
to be able to accept six-figure
checks into our own accounts to
break us of our addiction.
What legislators are also say-
ing is, yes, real-time reporting of
campaign contributions is a
good and possible requirement.
The long-standing impediment
to real-time reporting has been
the burden it supposedly places
on candidates, but now they're
willing to accept that burden in
return for no contribution
limits.
How about legislators just go
cold turkey and do away with
the CCEs and institute real-
time reporting and then see
what kind of integrity remains
in Florida?


Peter Schorsch, a political
consultant based in St.
Petersburg, publishes and
edits the Florida political blog
SaintPetersBlog com. Readers
can contact Schorsch at
saintpeter4@gmail com.


OPINIONS INVITED
0 The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
0 Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
0 Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
0 All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
0 We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
0 Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
0 SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

by (an) associate at the gover-
nor's office once the governor
appointed a SWFWMD mem-
ber, he (governor) no longer
had any control on policies or
programs made by the
SWFWMD Board of Directors.
In other words, they have a
free hand to do as they please.
Until SWFWMD can justify
giving away 28 million gallons
of my fresh water each year,
which has destroyed my lawn,
foliage and landscapes that


cost me thousands of dollars, I
will continue to use water as I
see necessary, including to
drink, bathe and wash my car
Wake up citizens and smell
SWFWMD's stench!
John Chambers
Inverness

Doing what's right
Re: "Rush to quick settle-
ment not best for the county,"
and "Standing up to Goliath."
Sunday's Chronicle has two
items that are excellent My
compliments to the authors,
Geoff Greene, Citrus County
Tax Assessor, and Theodora C.
Rusnak, President Citrus
County Council.
If I were a teacher in middle
or high school, my students
would have these items as-
signed as required reading.
There is a very valuable com-
mon thread in them. That is
taking responsibility and doing
what is right and lawful re-
gardless of popular opinions.
This is one of the main charac-
teristics that has made the
good ol' U.S.A. the place we
love and cherish. We would
have fewer problems if more
folks today would follow suit
and take action. Too many of
us become apathetic and just
sit back and complain. I en-
courage everyone to make the
effort to read them.
Frank Heath
Floral City


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Schorsch
RIDA
ICES


LETTERS to the Editor


I


I





Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to the EDITOR


Business helps
senior citizen
I am a senior citizen on
Social Security. I am writ-
ing to the Chronicle to let
all citizens in Citrus
County know our local
businesses do care about
us and will help us out
when we least expect it.
I am writing this letter
after Citrus Kia's General
Manager Paul Arduser
helped me out of the
goodness of his heart. It is
nice to know caring peo-
ple are in abundance in
our county. This is why I
am sharing my experi-
ence with all of you.
In December of 2012,
my car was backed into in
a parking lot. The driver's
insurance company fixed
the car by sending me to
an auto body shop in Cit-
rus County. They did a
good job, but the paint job
they provided was not my
color I complained to the
shop and the owner of the
shop said it was a good
match and he could not
do any better
Not knowing what to do,
I took my car to Citrus Kia
because I felt like they
are my family, and I just
wanted their opinion
about whether the color
matched.
Paul Arduser and the
auto mechanic on duty
said I was right; It was a
different color than the
rest of the body of my Kia
Soul.
I called the insurance
adjuster out to check out
what Citrus Kia told me
about my car The ad-
juster said it was an OK
job and he could not do
anything else for me.
I was very upset be-
cause my car in the back
had a green tint to it and
not the sparkling metallic
color the rest of my car
has.
I called Paul and he
said, "Don't worry about
it, we will paint your car,
just bring your car ... no
charge."
They did a fantastic job.
My car is back like it was,
and not only did they not
charge me, they gave me a
car for two days to use.
I am a 77-year-old sen-
ior citizen who has limited
income. I am very grateful
for what Citrus Kia did for
me. I thought everyone
should know about what
wonderful people they are
and how they did treat me
like family
I would like to thank
Paul Arduser for all his
help, in making my Soul
perfect. Paul is a very
nice young man, who is a
true professional and has
a big heart.
Thank you for taking
care of my Kia Soul!


Elizabe


Writer ft
scamm


th Katona
Hernando

!eels
ed


My daughter turned 15,
so as any parent I went
down to our DMV and
picked her up a copy of
the Florida Handbook.
The handbook contains
advertisements on the
back page and on the in-
side cover for this lowest
price traffic school, so I go


and check it ou
$87.50 (which I
can get your dr
cohol test and (
(which the state
and practice te
license permit.
sure you will b
the actual test,
they feel you a
you can take th
permit test onl
So it sounde(
my daughter sr
days on practice
and then finall
ready for the pi
She passed the
alcohol test an(
permit test. No
left was to go t(
office and get h
I called the DIM
later to make s
had gotten the
notice stating i
ter had passed
which they con
informed them
be down that a
get her permit
woman on the
will be an addi
I couldn't belie
was hearing, I j
$87.50. Nope, I
pay the stand
$54, which you
pay to get your
which includes
Well, bottom
advertisement
on the DMV bo
scam. They sav
money, they co
money If I had
was going to ha
again at the DA
why would I ha
daughter take
online? This is
fault for allowi
false advertise
their product.
is a scam and d
it, I thought I w
person. Well, le
you, they just s
how stupid I w
Jaymi


Enforce
muffler
To our count
What happene
muffler law on
Wish they would
it like they wei
Pudgees.


Psychi
help the s
Evelyn O'Bri
"Time for chan
Jan. 9, 2013, Ch
so typical of th(
letters that hav
showing up rec
address all oft]
through her let
starts most par
with "I believe
clude she is wo
opinions and li
ing points, not
clear to me mo
anti-gun lobby
from opinions.
mind me of the
who don't pay
tax but have al
ideas about ho
should be spend
of them own a,
ever shot a gun
shot anyone, bE
or been shot
Let's address
show and flea
loophole first. I


at. For big a problem that we
I paid) you should use scarce re-
rug and al- sources on it? A 1997 U.S.
certificate Justice Department sur-
e requires) vey of 14,285 state prison
sts for your inmates found that among
To make those inmates who car-
e ready for ried a firearm during the
and when offense for which they
re ready, were sent to jail, 0.7 per-
ae driving cent obtained the firearm
line. at a gun show, 1 percent at
d good and a flea market, 3.8 percent
pent two from a pawn shop, 8.3 per-
ce testing cent from a retail store,
ly was 39.2 percent through an il-
ermit test. legal/street source, and
drug and 39.6 percent through fam-
d also the ily or friends. Report:
)w all was "Firearm Use by Offend-
o the DMV ers." By Caroline Wolf
her license. Harlow, U.S. Department
IV two days of Justice, November
rure they 2001, bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/
electronic index. cfm?typbdetail&iid
my daugh- 940. Do you see where the
her exam, problem is?
firmed. I The next issue is she
iwe would believes we should ban
afternoon to assault-type weapons and
and the high-capacity magazines,
line said it which she said are de-
itional $54. signed for one use to
ve what I kill as many people as
just paid possible. Most weapons
still had to since the Stone Age axe
rd fee of were designed to kill as
normally many people as possible.
permit You are confusing style
s the test. with function. An SUV is a
line is this style of vehicle, but it's
which is not the only one used by
'ok, is a drunks to kill people. The
ed me no functionality of today's
st me AR-style weapons is avail-
tknown I able in any number of
ave to pay semi-automatic hunting
MV, then weapons that look noth-
ave let my ing like an AR-styled
everything weapon. AR-style
the state's weapons have two charac-
ing this teristics that are desir-
ment on able in some situations.
Again this They are compact and
Jon't fall for they are light They make
vas a smart excellent hunting
et me tell weapons with legal maga-
howed me zines in the scrub brush
as. forests of Florida where a
100-yard shot is apt to be
e Anderson the exception.
Crystal River People who are not
skilled in the use of semi-
airboat automatic weapons don't
laws seem to realize a fresh
magazine is a matter of
ty fathers: click, slap, bang. It's liter-
d to the ally that fast The size of
airboats? the magazine matters, but
ld enforce a roll of duct tape is all it
nt after takes to double your mag-
azine size. Large maga-
Frank Yohn zines have disadvantages,
they are cumbersome and
Floral City they all have feeding
problems.
atric Most liberals discount
solution psychiatric intervention,
but I know, not think, that
ien's letter it offers our best possible
ges" in the solution to this problem.
ronicle is Adam Lanza was under
e anti-gun the direct daily observa-
ve been tion of hundreds of teach-
cently I can ers during a 12-year
them period. They all knew he
tter. She had serious problems, but
agraphs they didn't report it and
," so I con- the educational system
)rking from was not required to ad-
iberal talk- dress it. All they were in-
facts. It's terested in doing was
st of the mainstreaming him and
is working getting him out the door
They re- The psychiatrist who
people treated James Holmes
any income made contact with a Uni-
1 kinds of versity of Colorado police
w mine officer to express con-
it. Very few cerns about her patient's
gun, have behavior several weeks
, have ever before Holmes' rampage,
een shot at yet no intervention oc-
curred. In the majority of
s the gun mass shootings, someone
market knew something was
Is it that wrong. We have no organ-


ized legal way to address
it. We are going to use the
TSA approach of throw-
ing a net over millions in
the hopes of catching one
or two people. It also fits
the administration's plans
of disarming us.
Harley Lawrence
Homosassa

Time for gov't to
live within means
Florida Power, Progress
Energy and most recently
Duke Power have con-
tributed hundreds of mil-
lions of dollars to the
Citrus Country economy
during the last 50 years,
both directly in tax
monies paid to the county
as well as a markedly
above average wage to its
employees who have
strongly supported our
local economy and busi-
nesses. Hundreds of mil-
lions of dollars is very
likely a conservative fig-
ure. These companies
have also provided afford-
able, reliable power to us
over the years as well,
and we all certainly like
that light switch to work.
My question to Citrus
County government and
the Chronicle is "How can
you rationally consider
raising taxes on Duke
Power to the amount of
1.4 million dollars from
the previous year?" It is a
well-known fact Citrus
County real estate assess-
ments and property val-
ues have decreased on
average 30 percent or
more during the last five
years. Why would Duke
Power's property values
increase while county ad-
ministrators and commis-
sioners property values


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decreased as have their
taxes?
Two of Duke Power's
coal-fired generating
plants at Crystal River
are scheduled to be re-
tired during the next two
years and the nuclear
plant, which is Duke's
main revenue generator,
has not been operational
in more than three years
and likely will be decom-
missioned as well. They
have been forced by the
federal government to
spend millions of dollars
to reduce expelled pollu-
tants at their coal-fired
generators. It is nothing
more than pure avarice
and greed on local offi-
cials' behalf to have not
considered these impor-
tant economic issues fac-
ing Duke Power
What is desperately
needed in Citrus County
is less six-figure adminis-
trative salaries and num-
bers of ineffective and
redundant administrators
who continually fail in
their fiduciary duties to
taxpayers, and also a
local newspaper editorial
staff that can report and
dissect issues in an unbi-
ased manner Our local
government should be
made to operate as any
private business would
and does in a slow econ-
omy which would include
a marked reduction in ex-
penditures and living
within the constraints of
revenue production. Un-
fortunately for all of us,
Citrus County government


has not embraced this
idea.
Matthew Fox
Dunnellon

Thanks for help
with contest
Judging for the state-
wide winners of the Pa-
triot's Pen essay contest
sponsored by the Veterans
of Foreign Wars, Depart-
ment of Florida, was re-
cently conducted at VFW
Post 4337 in Inverness.
The Patriot's Pen essay
contest is for sixth- to
eighth-grade students in
any school or for anyone
who is home schooled.
This year's theme was
"What I Would Tell Amer-
ica's Founding Fathers."
The first place winner
will receive a large mone-
tary award plus trips to
Orlando and Washington,
D.C.
I wish to thank all the
volunteers who so gra-
ciously gave of their time,
experience and knowl-
edge in selecting this
year's winner The judges
were Dianne and Bill
Micklon, Shirley Jones,
Paul Floss, Pauline Morri-
son, Margaret Williams
and Glenda Winslow I
also wish to thank Robert
Sprute and Sam from Post
4337 for their
hospitality.
Peggy Peardon
Florida Patriot's Pen
chairman
Floral City


Our Goal Is A


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v/u':


THEY POURED THEIR HEARTS

OUT IN LOVE LETTERS FOR OUR

VALENTINE'S DAY CONTEST.

www.chronicleonline.com/valentinesday20l3

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for them so they can...


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I


OPINION


SATURDA JANUARY 26, 2013 A9


k4eZXW,












N ATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Wintry


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Gun control


World BRIEFS


Protests


Associated Press
JC Conrad, 44, of
Spokane Valley, Wash.,
pounds a painted plywood
piece back into the
mouth area of his giant
snowman Friday.


s launch
ion push
ON Reviv-
at has lan-
ars, President
a will launch a
t week aimed
the nation's
nation system
gal status for
ipartisan
nears agree-
ving the








Marco
Rubio
R-Florida.


Associated Press
President Barack Obama listens Jan. 16 as Vice President Joe Biden speaks about proposals to reduce gun violence
in the South Court Auditorium at the White House in Washington. There is a legal avenue to get any gun you want some-
where in the U.S., thanks to the maze of gun statutes across the country and the lack of federal laws. An Associated
Press analysis finds there are thousands of laws, rules and regulations at the local, county, state and federal levels.


Maze of laws aboutfirearms in


Associated Press


Senators
immigrate
WASHINGT
ing an issue th
guished for yea
Barack Obama
campaign next
at overhauling
flawed immigra
and creating le
millions, as a b
Senate group r
ment on achieve
same
goals.
The
proposals
from
Obama
and law-
makers
will mark
the start
of what is
expected
to be a content
emotional proc
deep political in
Latino voters o
ingly backed C
2012 election,
publicans grap
way to regain t
with an increase
ful pool of vote
The presided
his case for im
changes during
Vegas Tuesday
ate working gro
aiming to outline
als next week,
a Senate aide.
Senate lawn
ing on the imm
include Democ
Schumer of Ne
Durbin of Illinoi
Menendez of N'
and Republica
Cain of Arizona
Graham of Sou
and Marco Rul
according to Se
Miss. al
clinic w
JACKSON,
the nation mar
anniversary of
decision to legal
tions in the U.S
sippi's lone abo
says it received
the state health
intends to revo
ing license.
However, Ja
Women's Heal
tion is not expe
anytime soon.
Under a stat
tive procedures
clinic can rema
while it awaits
the departmen
be more than a
away.
Birth c
machine
SHIPPENSE
The U.S. Food
Administration
any regulatory
vending machi
Pennsylvania o
dispenses the
pill.
FDA spokes
Jefferson said
officials looked
available inform
the Shippensb
sity vending pr
spoke with uni
campus health
decided no act
necessary.
The pill is av
$25 at a health
ing machine th
ble to students
university emp


forcement of existing laws.
"Which begs the question:
Why are we putting more
laws on the books if we're
not enforcing the laws we al-
ready have on the books?"
said Andrew Arulanandam,
spokesman for the National
Rifle Association.
MEN
New gun laws will face
tough opposition in Con-
gress, particularly from
members who rely on the
NRA during election cam-
paigns. The NRA con-
tributed more than $700,000
to members of Congress dur-
ing the 2012 election cycle,
according to the Center for
Responsive Politics.
Recognizing the opposi-
tion in Congress, states al-
ready are passing their own
new gun laws while officials
from some states are prom-
ising to ignore any new fed-
eral mandates. As the
national debate on gun con-
trol and Second Amendment
rights escalates, the terms
being used won't mean the
same thing everywhere, due
to the thousands of laws,
rules and regulations across
the country
"The patchwork of laws in
many ways means that the
laws are only as effective as
the weakest law there is,"
said Gene Voegtlin of the In-
ternational Association of
Chiefs of Police. "Those that
are trying to acquire
firearms and may not be able
to do that by walking into
their local gun shop will try
to find a way to do that This
patchwork of laws allows
them to seek out the weak
links and acquire weapons."
MEN
Obama wants to address
this, in part, by passing fed-
eral gun-trafficking laws that
carry heavy penalties. It's
difficult to crack down on
trafficking because the
penalties are too low to
serve as a deterrent, and
federal prosecutors decline
many cases because of a lack
of evidence. For instance, in
order to charge someone
with willfully participating
in a business of selling
firearms without a license,
the ATF needs to prove that
the guns were not sold out of
the suspect's private collec-
tion, the Justice Department
inspector general has said.
Obama has also called for
a new federal law banning
magazines that carry more
than 10 rounds of ammuni-
tion a measure that was in
effect during the previous as-
sault weapons ban, between
1994 and 2004. High-capacity
magazines have been used in
recent deadly mass shoot-
ings, including those in New-
town, and in the suburban
Denver movie theater attack
last summer


United States hurts eforts

GLOSSARY OF TERMS
A primer on some key terms in the debate over
President Obama's gun-control proposals:
SEMI-AUTOMATICS
" They can be pistols, rifles or shotguns and
they're popular sellers. They fire a bullet each
time the trigger is pulled, with no need to
manually move the next round into the firing
chamber. That means they can fire again as
fast as a person can release and pull the
trigger, so long as the gun's got more ammuni-
tion at the ready. Semi-automatic weapons are
popular with hunters, sport shooters and gun
enthusiasts.
FULL AUTOMATICS
" While a semi-automatic can fire one bullet per
trigger pull, an automatic keeps firing bullets as
long as the trigger is pulled once. Full
automatics range from the Prohibition-era
machine guns to modern rifles, pistols or
shotguns.
" Sales of full automatics are restricted by
federal law.
ASSAULT WEAPONS
" In 1994, Congress passed and President Bill
Clinton signed into law a ban on some semi-
automatic rifles and handguns deemed
"assault weapons." Defining the term was
tricky then and remains controversial today.
" Under that now-expired law, some new guns
were banned by name, including the Uzi, the
AK-47 and the Colt AR-15, which is similar to
the military's standard issue M16.
" Guns already sold to buyers before the ban
were exempt and could be resold. Meanwhile,
manufacturers skirted the ban by producing
similar guns under new names or making
minor design changes, such as removing a
bayonet mount.
" Obama says he wants Congress to ban what he
calls "military-style assault weapons," but he
hasn't defined the term, so it's unclear which
guns would be covered.
HIGH-CAPACITY MAGAZINE
" Obama wants to reinstate the ban on sales of
new high-capacity magazines, defined as those
that hold more than 10 rounds of ammunition.
" These magazines allow a shooter using a semi-
automatic weapon like the Bushmaster .223 to
fire more bullets before pausing to reload.
GUN OWNERS
" More than a third of Americans 36 percent
say someone in their household owns a gun,
according to an Associated Press-GfK poll
conducted Jan. 10-14.
" Millions use guns for hunting, sport and target
shooting.
" Some people keep guns solely for protection.
Carrying a concealed handgun is legal in every
state but Illinois under certain conditions; for
example, the gun owner might need to pass a
background check first. Some states require
safety classes.
" Federal laws prevent the government from
tracking how many guns are sold every year
and who buys them, so there are no definitive
statistics.
BACKGROUND CHECKS
" Federal law requires anyone who buys a gun
from a licensed dealer to submit to a
background check. Convicted criminals and
people who have been declared by a judge to
be "mentally defective" are among those barred
from buying a gun.
" The Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence
says as many as 40 percent of all gun sales are
completed without a background check. That's
because sales between private gun owners and
sales at gun shows are exempt under federal law.
" Obama has proposed a federal law requiring
universal background checks for every gun sale.


Associated Press
Egyptian protesters take
cover Friday as they
clash with riot police, not
seen, near Tahrir Square,
Cairo, Egypt.

Clashes on Egypt
anniversary
CAIRO Egyptians de-
livered an angry backlash
against President Mo-
hammed Morsi and his
Muslim Brotherhood on Fri-
day, marking the second
anniversary of the start of
the country's revolution with
tens of thousands filling
major squares and streets
around the country to call
for a new regime change.
Two years to the day that
protesters first rose up
against now-toppled auto-
crat Hosni Mubarak, Egypt
is entrenched in the new
phase of its upheaval the
struggle between ruling Is-
lamists and their oppo-
nents, played out on the
backdrop of a worsening
economy.
At least four people, in-
cluding a 14-year-old boy,
were killed in the day's
worst clashes, in the city of
Suez, where protesters set
ablaze a building that once
housed the city's local
government.
Mexican suspects
to get warnings
MEXICO CITY- Read-
ing suspects their rights is
an idea that most Mexicans
had only heard about in
American movies until Fri-
day, when authorities an-
nounced they are starting a
program to require police to
do just that.
Eduardo Sanchez, the
assistant secretary of the
interior, said all federal po-
lice will have to advise de-
tainees of their right to
remain silent and the right
to a lawyer. The warning
will also advise foreigners
they have a right to con-
sular assistance and speak-
ers of Indian languages and
foreigners they can have
translators.
The United States has
required so-called "Miranda
Rights" warnings since the
1960s.
Brazil sidewalks
to get bar codes
RIO DE JANEIRO -
Brazil is mixing tradition
with the newest technology
to connect visitors to tourist
information by embedding
bar codes into the black-
and-white stone mosaic
sidewalks that are a symbol
of Rio de Janeiro.
The first two-dimensional
bar codes were installed
Friday at the end of
Ipanema beach, by a huge
rock called Arpoador.
Anyone who wants to
know more about the area
can download an applica-
tion to their smartphone or
tablet and photograph the
icon. The user is taken to a
website that gives basic
facts about the place, inter-
esting trivia and a map.


tious and WASHINGTON- Military-
tess with style assault weapons, gang-
implications. ster-style Tommy guns, World
verwhelm- War II-era bazookas and even
)bama in the sawed-off shotguns some-
leaving Re- where in the U.S., there is a
pling for a legal avenue to get each of
their standing those firearms and more.
singly power- This is thanks to the maze
rs. of gun statutes around the
nt will press country and the lack of a
migration minimum federal standard
g a trip to Las to raise the bar for gun con-
tri phe toLas trol in states with weak laws.

up is also An Associated Press analy-
sis found there are thousands
ne its propos- of laws, rules and regulations
according to at the local, county, state and
federal levels. The laws and
makers work- rules vary by state, and even
igration effort within states, according to a
rats Charles 2011 compilation of state gun
ewYork, Dick laws by the Bureau of Alco-
is and Robert hol, Tobacco, Firearms and
New Jersey; Explosives.
ns John Mc- These laws and regula-
a, Lindsey tions govern who can carry a
uth Carolina firearm, what kind of firearm
bio of Florida, is legal, the size of ammuni-
enate aides. tion magazines and more. In
some places, a person can
abortion buy as many guns as desired.
earned This maze of laws under-
mines gun-control efforts in
Miss. -As communities with tougher
rks the 40th gun laws and pushes ad-
the historic vocates of tighter controls to
alize abor- seek a federal standard. Gun
S., Missis- rights proponents say en-
ortion clinic forcing all existing laws
d notice that makes more sense than pass-
h department ing new ones.
)ke its operat- "If you regulate something
on the local or state level, you
ckson are still a victim to guns com-
Ith Organiza- ing into other localities or
ected to close states," said Laura Cutilletta,
a senior staff attorney at the
te administra- California-based Law Center
s law, the to Prevent Gun Violence.
ain open In California, most guns
a hearing by come from Nevada, where
it. That could there is almost no regulation
of firearms, Cutilletta said,
month and in Arizona, gun owners
don't need a permit.
ontrol MEN
stands President Barack Obama
earlier this month announced
BURG, Pa. a $500 million plan to tighten
I and Drug federal gun laws. The De-
won't take cember shooting massacre in
action over a Newtown, Conn., that killed
ine at a 20 children and six adults at
college that an elementary school,
morning-after launched the issue of gun
control policy to a national
woman Erica focus not seen in decades.
Friday that Obama is urging Congress
I at publicly to pass new laws, some of
nation about which would set a minimum
urg Univer- standard for the types of
firearms and ammunition
program, that are commercially avail-
ersity and able. Democratic Sens.
officasn Patrick Leahy of Vermont
tion was and Dianne Feinstein of Cal-
ifornia introduced new pro-
vailable for posals this week to increase
i center vend- penalties for firearms traf-
at's accessi- picking and impose a new as-
and sault weapons ban.
loyees. The powerful gun lobby
-From wire reports says the problem lies in en-


-From wire reports


Associated Press
A QR code made of black
and white stones covers
a sidewalk Friday near
the beach in Rio de
Janeiro, Brazil.












.PORTS


0 The Citrus boys
basketball team
scored a big win
over District 6A-6
foe West Port./B4


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 Football, tennis/B2

. ) Basketball, golf/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 High School sports/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Entertainment/B6


Coach Varnadore introduced at CRHS


JON-MICHAEL SORACCHI
Staff writer

More than 50 students, parents
and Crystal River High School staff
members packed into the campus'
media center Thursday evening to
officially meet new Pirates varsity
football coach Nathan Varnadore.
Before introducing Varnadore,
Crystal River activities director
Tony Stukes addressed the foot-
ball players assembled and ac-
knowledged the adversity they
Crystal River football coach Nathan
Varnadore, left, talks to Pirates foot-
ball players in the Crystal River High
School media center Thursday night.
JON-MICHAEL SORACCHI/Chronicle


faced in 2012.
"I commend you on the past sea-
son you've had," Stukes said. "I'm
here to tell you today, we're put-
ting the past in the past. We're
starting a new program."
Stukes was referring to the cir-
cumstances surrounding the dis-
missal of former Pirates head
coach Greg Fowler, who was sus-
pended and ultimately relieved of
his coaching duties when a Citrus
County School Board investigation
found he used profane and abusive
language around and toward some
of his players.
Varnadore, 28, immediately
began setting new standards for
See I /Page B4


Warriors nip Pirates


Free-throw

shooting decides

game for SRCS

C.J. RISAK
Correspondent

CRYSTAL RIVER One
thin line was all that sepa-
rated Seven Rivers Christian
and Crystal River in their
girls basketball matchup
Friday at Crystal River High
School.
That was the free throw
line. While Seven Rivers was
hardly outstanding, the War-
riors were
still much
better than
Crystal River
particu-
larly when it
For more counted most
photos, click S e v e n
on this story at Rivers scored
www.chronicle the game's
online.com. final seven
points, con-
necting on 5 of 6 from the line
in the final 1:06, to hold off
Crystal River on its Senior
Night and gain a 50-43 victory
"You miss (11) free throws
in the second half and lose by
seven, well, that's your game,"
said Pirates coach Jason
Rodgers, whose team con-
verted just 2 of 13 from the
line in the second half and
was just 10 of 26 at the stripe
for the game. "We gave up a
few too many fouls to them,
and they made their free
throws at the end. And that
was the difference."
Crystal River, which tied
with Dunnellon for first in Dis-
trict 5A-7 but has the top seed
going into the tournament,
ends its regular season at 14-9.
Seven Rivers will take a 15-6
mark into its 2A-6 tourney
The Warriors (18 of 31 at the
line) weren't nearly as sharp
this time as they were in beat-
ing Crystal River in their gym
eight days earlier In that one,
they handled the Pirate pres-
sure and got easy baskets
while doing it in taking an
early lead and holding onto it.
Not this time. Crystal River
forced a whopping 32
turnovers in the game, 18
coming in the first half. Prob-
lem was, the Pirates who
had 25 turnovers in the con-
test couldn't turn them STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Crystal River guard Megan Wells drives the lane for a layup Friday night against Seven
See NIP/Page B4 Rivers Christian School at Crystal River High School.


2013 DODGE DART


*UConnect

Touchscreen

9 10 Airbags


FHSAA football districts
for 2013 finalized
JON-MICHAEL SORACCHI
Staff writer

After tentative football realignment by the
Florida High School Athletic Association
(FHSAA) was released in December chang-
ing the complex of Citrus and Lecanto's
District 6A-5, the new finalized version was
announced Friday with more big changes.
The Hurricanes and Panthers will still
have Lake Weir and Ocala Vanguard from
the tentative four-team alignment, but wel-
come back Gainesville (who petitioned out
of Class 7A back into 6A) and adds Ocala
See DISTRETS/Page B4




Citrus,


Lecanto



look for



more


Girls soccer teams

play in regional

semifinals tonight

JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent

The girls soccer postseason
continues and two local squads
remain to play another day.
Lecanto and Citrus aim to ad-
vance to their respective re-
gional finals after meeting its
next opponents in the semifi-
nals today
The District 4A-4 champion
Panthers host Fleming Island
(5-0 winners over Springstead)
at 7 p.m. tonight for a shot at
moving ahead.
Lecanto defeated Ridgeview
in its regional quarterfinal 3-2
on Wednesday
Fleming Island competed last
year in the state semifinals, so
Lecanto has some work to do on
the field if it hopes to defeat the
program.
"(Today) we're playing a qual-
ity program," Lecanto head
coach Roselle Lattin said. 'A
program that continually goes
to the (state) final four
"I don't think that we have
had our best game yet," Lattin
continued. "If we do (bring our

See JPage B4





1,000-point career
mark for Connors
Citrus senior guard Lindsay
Connors netted 18 points to go
over the 1,000-point career
mark during a 55-49 loss at
Leesburg on Friday night.
Shenelle Toxen added 11
points for the Hurricanes and
Kiersten Weaver chipped in
nine points.
Citrus finishes the regular
season at 19-6 overall; the Hur-
ricanes host the District 6A-6
tournament next week as the
No. 2 seed and will play No. 3
Lecanto on Thursday.
-From staff reports


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CiTus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Joe Flacco: A Blue Hen with a golden arm


Associated Press


OWINGS MILLS, Md. Maybe
Delaware is the new Quarterback U.
When Joe Flacco takes the field
with the Baltimore Ravens against
San Francisco, he'll be the second
former Blue Hens quarterback to
start a Super Bowl. Rich Gannon was
the first with Oakland 10 years ago.
That's more than powerhouses
USC, Texas, Oklahoma and Florida
f combined. It's one more than Miami,
Michigan, Tennessee, Penn State,
Florida State, Syracuse, Nebraska
and Pitt.
Stanford, UCLA, BYU, Maryland
and Washington State also have two.
Only Notre Dame, Alabama, Purdue
and California have three.
Quite an impressive feat for a sec-
Associated Press ond-tier football college in the sec-
Baltimore Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco looks to pass ond-smallest state in the U.S.
during the first half of an NFL preseason game against It's a good thing Flacco didn't turn
the Detroit Lions in Baltimore. When Flacco takes the to baseball when he hoped or he
field on Feb. 3, he'll be the second former Delaware Blue may not have even made it to the
Hens quarterback to start a Super Bowl. Rich Gannon NFL.
was the first, starting for the Oakland Raiders in Super The story goes like this. After his
Bowl XXXVII. junior season at Delaware, Flacco


went to then-coach K.C. Keeler and
told him he'd like to pitch for the
Blue Hens' baseball team in the
spring. Keeler and other coaches
persuaded him to concentrate on
football.
Over the years, the context of that
conversation has been reported dif-
ferent ways. Flacco set the record
straight this week, making it clear
he simply wanted to play two sports
and wasn't considering quitting
football.
"K.C. misrepresents that," Flacco
said. "I just wanted to play baseball
because I liked baseball. I never was
giving up on football. I always had a
lot of confidence in my ability there.
I just wanted to have a little bit of
fun."
Flacco had an outstanding senior
year and led Delaware to the FCS
championship game against Ap-
palachian State. He wowed Balti-
more's scouting department in a
long workout before the draft and
ended up being selected by the
Ravens with the No. 18 overall pick
in 2008.


Since then, Flacco has done things
no other quarterback has accom-
plished during the Super Bowl era.
Flacco is the first quarterback to
lead his team to a playoff victory in
each of his first five seasons. His six
postseason wins on the road rank
first and he leads the league with 62
victories since 2008.
"I'm really happy for him and as a
former Blue Hen, I'm really proud,"
said Gannon, who was the NFL MVP
in 2002 when he led the Raiders to
the Super Bowl, a loss to Tampa Bay
"His career is off to a terrific start
and you can only imagine what will
happen next Sunday if he's able to
get the job done and win a world
championship."
Flacco has padded his already re-
markable resume this month. In
three playoff games, he's thrown
eight touchdown passes and not a
single interception. His biggest
achievement though, is beating Pey-
ton Manning and Tom Brady on the
road in consecutive games to help
the Ravens win their second AFC
championship.


Murray reaches





Aussie final


Associated Press

MELBOURNE, Aus-
tralia Andy Murray was
sucking in deep breaths,
trying to recover from his
exhausting win over Roger
Federer Pain was very
much on his mind.
The U.S. Open cham-
pion defeated Federer 6-4,
6-7 (5), 6-3, 6-7 (2), 6-2 in a
four-hour Australian Open
semifinal Friday night. It
was Murray's first victory
against the 17-time major
winner at a Grand Slam
event.
But with the clock about
to strike midnight Murray
was already thinking
about Sunday's final
against two-time defend-
ing champion Novak
Djokovic, who is on a 20-
match winning streak at
Melbourne Park. This will
be a rematch of their U.S.
Open final.
"Every time we play
each other it's normally a
very physical match," Mur-
ray said. "I'll need to be
ready for the pain. I hope
it's a painful match -
that'll mean it's a good
one."
Murray had a 10-9
record against Federer,
but had lost his three pre-
vious Grand Slam matches
to the Swiss star
One of those defeats
came at Wimbledon last
year Murray said the dis-
appointment of that loss
triggered his run to the
gold medal at the London
Olympics, and then his
drought-breaking triumph
at the U.S. Open.
"You know, I've obvi-
ously lost some tough
matches against him in
Slams," Murray said. "So
to win one, especially the
way that it went tonight,
yeah, was obviously nice."
Murray ended a 76-year


Associated Press
Britain's Andy Murray hits a forehand return to Switzerland's Roger Federer during their
men's semifinal Friday at the Australian Open tennis championship in Melbourne, Aus-
tralia. Murray won in five sets.


drought for British men at
the majors when he beat
Djokovic in five sets in the
final at Flushing Meadows.
He's hoping the step-by-
step manner in which he
has crossed career mile-
stones off his to-do list will
continue Sunday
He lost four major fi-
nals, including two in Aus-
tralia, before winning a
Grand Slam title. He lost
three times to Federer in a
major before beating him.


Even then, he wasted a
chance to serve out in the
fourth set Friday night as
Federer rallied.
"Those matches ... have
helped obviously mentally,"
he said. "I think going
through a lot of the losses
that I've had will have
helped me as well. Obvi-
ously having won against
Novak before in a Slam
final will help mentally"
Djokovic will not be the
only defending champion


this weekend playing for
another title.
Victoria Azarenka will
face China's Li Na on Sat-
urday night for the
women's crown.
Azarenka hasn't added a
major title since her
breakthrough in Australia
last year
Li, who is seeded sixth,
lost the 2011 Australian
final before claiming her
first major title months
later at the French Open.


Ravens' Caldwell still longs to be head coach


Associated Press


OWINGS MILLS, Md. -
Jim Caldwell enjoys his
job as offensive coordina-
tor of the Baltimore
Ravens, and he's quite
good at it.
Before taking over in
early December, Caldwell
had never held the posi-
tion at any level yet the
Ravens' attack has flour-
ished under his direction.
Quarterback Joe Flacco
has looked sharp, the play-
calling has been unpre-
dictable and Baltimore
has scored 90 points in
three playoff games to
earn a berth in the Super
Bowl.
Caldwell's success
prompted head coach John
Harbaugh to ask him to re-
tain the post in 2013. Cald-
well appreciates the
opportunity, but has no in-
tention of making "Offen-
sive Coordinator, Baltimore
Ravens" the last line on his
resume.
The 58-year-old Caldwell
wants to be a head coach.
He did it in Indianapolis


Associated Press
Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice, left, stands
with offensive coordinator Jim Caldwell during practice
Friday at the team's training facility in Owings Mills, Md.
The Ravens face the San Francisco 49ers in Super Bowl
XLVII in New Orleans on Feb. 3.


from 2009-11, and is itching
for another crack at the top
job in his profession.
"At some point in time,
if the Lord wills it, I'd
love to be able to do it
again," Caldwell said Fri-
day. "But it may not hap-
pen. Everybody in our
profession is looking for
an opportunity to run
their own program, and


I'm no different than any-
body else in that regard."
Caldwell might have got-
ten the chance to at least
interview for an opening if
he wasn't so busy helping
the Ravens earn a date
with San Francisco in the
Super Bowl next Sunday
"I had a couple of GMs
tell me, 'If it weren't for
your guys' success in the


playoffs and continuing to
play, then he would have
been someone we would
have interviewed,"
Ravens general manager
Ozzie Newsome said.
"Hopefully next year
we're in the same spot,
and it will be tough for
him to get interviews
again. Really, though, I can
see him getting that op-
portunity a year from
now"
Caldwell certainly is a
viable candidate for a
head coaching job. He took
the Colts to the Super
Bowl in 2009 and was in-
strumental in the develop-
ment of quarterback
Peyton Manning. He's also
provided the Baltimore of-
fense with a boost after re-
placing the fired Cam
Cameron on Dec. 10.
Caldwell deserves
plenty of credit for Balti-
more's surprising run to
the Super Bowl. In the six
games since he's taken
over, the Ravens have av-
eraged 26.2 points and
406.2 yards of offense.


From spectator



to contributor


Associated Press

SANTA CLARA, Calif
- LaMichael James has
transformed himself from
a rookie spectator forced
to watch the first three
months of the season to a
key contributor to a
Super Bowl team in a
matter of weeks for the
San Francisco 49ers.
After being inactive the
first 12 games of the sea-
son, James has become
an impact player for the
49ers in their run to the
Super Bowl next week
against Baltimore.
His long kickoff return
set up the go-ahead score
in a late-season win in
New England. His experi-
ence running the zone
read helped Colin
Kaepernick rush for 181
yards in a win to open the
playoffs against Green
Bay Then James got into
the scoring act himself
last week, starting San
Francisco's comeback in a
28-24 win over Atlanta in
the NFC championship.
"I had a lot to learn,"
James said. "I'm still learn-
ing. I'm very blessed to be
in the situation I'm in."
Fresh off scoring his
first professional touch-
down in last week's win
over the Falcons, James
is finally fulfilling the ex-
pectations the Niners had
for him after drafting him
in the second round last


April following a stellar
college career at Oregon.
"From the first time he
stepped on the field, he's
been dynamic," coach
Jim Harbaugh said.
Getting on the field was
the hard part. James was
inactive the first 12 games
as he had to adjust to
playing from a huddle
after being part of Ore-
gon's fast-paced offense
for three years and to
learn a much more exten-
sive playbook than he was
used to with the Ducks.
James dutifully worked
at learning his craft, mak-
ing his contributions as a
scout team running back
and receiver and soaking
in whatever tips he could
get from starter Frank
Gore and running backs
coach Tom Rathman.
"It was very different,"
James said. "I'd never re-
ally been in a huddle
until I was in high school.
Actually, sitting in a hud-
dle and then having to re-
member it- and not just
run it that was a little
bit different for me, but it
all works out."
James got his chance
after Kendall Hunter
went down with a season-
ending Achilles' injury in
New Orleans on Nov. 25.
The Niners needed a
change-of-pace back to
team with Gore and
James proved to be a
perfect fit


Associated Press
San Francisco 49er LaMichael James (23) gets away
from the Atlanta Falcons' Stephen Nicholas (54) for a
15-yard touchdown run during the first half of the NFC
Championship game Sunday in Atlanta.






Tee off for Tourette

Tee Off for Tourette Celebrity Golf Tournament
Saturday, February 2, 2013
Shotgun start at 9:00am Registration 8:00am
Plantation on Crystal River.






Kick off Cocktail party
Friday, February 1
music from American Idol contestant Dave Pittman,
live auction and meet and greet with
sports celebrities and door prizes.

All proceeds from this event will go to help
adults and children who suffer from Tourette Syndrome.

For more information and to register,
go to our website, www.teeoffforts.com,
or email Gary D'Amico at gary78@tampabay.rr.com.

CiikpNICIIE


B2 SATURDAY JANUARY 26, 2013


SPORTS





Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Woods tops leaderboard at Torrey Pines


Associated Press


SAN DIEGO Tiger Woods
made it look easy on a dreary
day at Torrey Pines and wound
up in a place he hasn't been in
five years.
He had the 36-hole lead by
himself at one of his favorite
PGA Tour stops.
Woods didn't miss a shot dur-
ing a four-hole stretch around
the turn on the North Course
that included a 5-iron to 5 feet for
eagle and a wedge that one-
hopped off the pin to set up
birdie. It carried him to a 7-
under 65 on Friday and gave him
a two-shot lead in the Farmers
Insurance Open.
"I feel good right now,"
Woods said. "I'm leading the
tournament."
Woods was at 11-under 133 and
had a two-shot lead over Billy
Horschel, with six other players
two shots behind. Already a fa-
vorite with seven wins as a pro at
Torrey Pines, Woods had even
more in his favor going into the
weekend. He had a 74-0 edge in
PGA Tour wins against the next
seven players behind him.
Horschel, who had to go back
to Q-school to get his card last
year, had a 69 on the South


Associated Press
Tiger Woods picks up his ball after finishing his round on the north
course Friday at Torrey Pines Golf Course during the second round of
the Farmers Insurance Open in San Diego.


Course to get into the final group.
Woods caught a break in the
draw by playing the easier North
- it's about 600 yards shorter -
on a day of light rain, a late breeze
and soft conditions. But he kept
the ball in play off the tee, and he
only got in trouble once. That was
on the par-4 eighth hole when he
drove into a tough lie in the
bunker, and it led to his only bogey
There's a simple formula for
playing the North- make birdie


on the par 5s and pick up a few
more on the short par 4s. And
that's just what he did.
Woods missed birdie putts in-
side 8 feet on the opening two
holes and was taking baby steps
until he took off. It started with a
25-foot birdie putt on the 17th.
He followed with the 5-iron that
landed just left of the pin on the
18th, a two-putt birdie on the
par-5 first hole, and his wedge
that took one hop, struck the flag


and settled 4 feet away
It was similar to Thursday on
the South Course when he played
a five-hole stretch in 5 under, only
this time, Woods finished strong.
His approach to the seventh spun
back and ran over the cup to set
up a short birdie, and he finished
off his routine day with a 5-wood
onto the ninth green for another
two-putt birdie.
"Drive the ball well here and
you're going to probably have four
iron shots into the par 5s," Woods
said. "You sprinkle that in with
probably four or five wedge shots
in there, a round of 6- or 7-under
par is definitely conceivable."
Brad Fritsch, a rookie from
Canada, had a 67 on the South
Course to lead the group of six
players at 8-under 136. The oth-
ers were Casey Wittenberg, Steve
Marino, Jimmy Walker, Josh
Teater and Erik Compton, whom
Woods referred to as "remark-
able" for being a two-time heart
transplant recipient and being
on the PGA Tour
Defending champion Brandt
Snedeker didn't fare so well.
After opening with a 65 on the
North, he made only one birdie
and twice took bogey on the par
5s on his way to a 75 that left him
seven shots behind.


Miami routs Detroit


Wade's 29points

paces Heatpast

Pistons 110-88

Associated Press

MIAMI Dwyane Wade
scored 29 points and sparked a
pivotal run to help the Miami
Heat earn their fourth victory in
a row Friday by beating the De-
troit Pistons 110-88.
The Heat got even for a loss at
Detroit on Dec. 28. They im-
proved to 18-3 at home, while the
Pistons fell to 4-16 on the road.
After falling behind by nine
points, the Heat outscored De-
troit 26-4 during a seven-minute
stretch in the second quarter to
take a 60-47 lead. Wade scored 15
points during the spurt.
LeBron James had 23 points,
seven rebounds and seven as-
sists for the Heat, who shot 56
percent. Over the past two sea-
sons, they're 34-2 when shooting
at least 50 percent.
Greg Monroe scored 31 points
for Detroit.
Hawks 123,
Celtics 111, 2OT
ATLANTA- Kyle Korver scored
27 points and the Atlanta Hawks
overcame a 27-point deficit in the
first half to beat Boston 123-111 in
double-overtime, handing the Celtics
their sixth straight loss.
Jeff Teague had 23 points for At-
lanta before fouling out in the first
overtime. Al Horford had 24 points
and 13 rebounds. Josh Smith, who
opened the second overtime with a
three-point play, had 17 points and
14 rebounds.
Kevin Garnett had 24 points and
10 rebounds but fouled out in the sec-
ond overtime as the Celtics were left
with their longest losing streak in six
years. Rajon Rondo had 16 points, 11
assists and 10 rebounds for his fifth
triple-double of the season.
Korver had five of his career-high
eight 3-pointers in the fourth quarter.
Grizzlies 101,
Nets 77
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Marc Gasol
had 20 points and nine rebounds
and the Memphis Grizzlies built a
30-point lead in the second half en
route to a 101-77 victory over the
Brooklyn Nets.
Gasol was 10 of 15 from the field,
all of his points coming in the first
half, as Memphis, which had seven
players in double figures, won for the
fourth time in the past five games.
Mike Conley made six of seven
shots, including 2 of 3 outside the


Associated Press
Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade hangs from the rim after a dunk, near
Detroit Pistons forward Kyle Singler, center, and forward Tayshaun
Prince, rear, during the first half Friday in Miami.


arc, for 14 points, while Zach Ran-
dolph had 12 points and matched
Gasol's nine rebounds.
Rudy Gay, Jerryd Bayless and
Tony Wroten scored 11 apiece, while
Chris Johnson, on a 10-day contract
with Memphis, had 10 points.
Brook Lopez led the Nets with 18
points, while Deron Williams
scored 12, adding six assists. Joe
Johnson and Reggie Evans scored
11 points each, with Evans
grabbing 10 rebounds.
Bulls 103,
Warriors 87
CHICAGO Kirk Hinrich scored
a season-high 25 points, hitting six of
seven three-pointers in the Chicago
Bulls' 103-87 victory over the Golden
State Warriors.
Nate Robinson added 22 points
off the bench in the Bulls' third
straight victory.
David Lee, the Warriors' All-Star
selection, scored 23 points. Stephen
Curry added 21 for Golden State,
which shot 34.6 percent from the
field to snap a three-game winning


streak.
Jimmy Butler had 16 points and a
career-high 12 rebounds starting in
place of Luol Deng, who missed his
fourth consecutive game due to a
right hamstring injury.
Cavaliers 113,
Bucks 108
CLEVELAND Kyrie Irving
scored 35 points and the Cleveland
Cavaliers rallied from a 20-point
deficit in the third quarter to defeat
the Milwaukee Bucks 113-108.
Irving, voted an Eastern Confer-
ence reserve for next month's All-
Star Game in Houston on Thursday,
scored 16 points in the third quarter
to help Cleveland get back in the
game. He added eight points down
the stretch as the Cavaliers posted
back-to-back wins for only the sec-
ond time this season.
Cleveland, which trailed 79-59
midway through the third quarter,
took a 96-95 lead on a 3-pointer by
newly acquired Wayne Ellington with
6:31 to play. The basket was his first
since joining the Cavaliers from Min-


nesota on Tuesday, and it gave
Cleveland the lead for good.
Ersan Ilyasova scored a season-
high 30 points and Monta Ellis added
21, but the Bucks' collapse ended
their three-game winning streak.
Wizards 114,
Timberwolves 101
WASHINGTON John Wall had
14 points and five assists in his first
start of the season, and the no-
longer-last Washington Wizards fi-
nally hit double digits in wins with a
114-101 victory over the Minnesota
Timberwolves.
Wall, who came off the bench for
the first seven games after his return
from a knee injury, had assists on the
Wizards' first two baskets in a game
in which Washington never trailed.
He wowed the crowd with a nice spin
move for a layup late in the first half
and went 6 for 10 from the field in 21
minutes, his playing time still limited
after missing 33 games with a stress
injury to his left knee cap.
The Wizards are 5-3 since Wall's
return after going 5-28 without him.
Rockets 100,
Hornets 82
NEW ORLEANS First-time All-
Star James Harden had 30 points
and the Houston Rockets broke out
of their worst slump of the season by
beating the New Orleans Hornets.
The Rockets, who had lost eight of
nine and trailed by double digits in
12 straight games, led almost all the
way this time. Harden scored 10
points and Patrick Patterson had six
during a 16-2 run early in the third
quarter as Houston took control,
going ahead 64-46.
The Hornets never got closer than
10 the rest of the way, losing for only
the third time in their last 10 games.
Harden, selected an All-Star re-
serve for the Western Conference on
Thursday, handed out eight assists
and was 12 for 12 on free throws.
Spurs 113,
Mavericks 107
DALLAS Tony Parker returned
from a cut above the same eye he in-
jured in a nightclub incident last sum-
mer and scored 23 points to lead the
San Antonio Spurs to a 113-107 vic-
tory over the Dallas Mavericks.
Parker missed about a quarter in
the first half when he took three
stitches above his left eye after a col-
lision with Elton Brand on a drive. He
nearly lost the eye in June when
shards of glass embedded in his
cornea after he got caught in a bot-
tle-throwing melee in New York.
Tim Duncan stayed home with a
sore right knee, but DeJuan Blair
made up for his absence by scoring
a season-high 22 points.


SPORTS


Charles Howell III
Harris English
K.J. Choi
Bill Haas
Jim Herman
Graham DeLaet
Will Claxton
Jerry Kelly
Martin Flores
Pat Perez
Justin Leonard
Roberto Castro
Justin Bolli
Nicholas Thompson
Bo Van Pelt
Colt Knost
Jeff Overton
Cameron Tringale
Brendon de Jonge
Brendan Steele
J.J. Henry
John Huh
Brandt Snedeker
Bryce Molder
Adam Hadwin
Michael Letzig
John Rollins
Chez Reavie
Boo Weekley
Mike Weir
John Mallinger
Robert Garrigus
Hunter Mahan
Dustin Johnson
Vijay Singh
Gary Woodland
Luke List
Charley Hoffman
Tom Gillis
Michael Thompson
Brian Harman
Sang-Moon Bae
Jonas Blixt
Rickie Fowler
Hank Kuehne
David Lynn
Greg Owen
Patrick Reed
Peter Tomasulo
Lucas Glover
Brian Stuard
D.H. Lee
Jin Park


66n-72s
68s-70n
65s-73n
69s-69n
69n-69s
68n-70s
69n-69s
67n-71s
69s-69n
72s-67n
68n-71s
71s-68n
72s-67n
69n-70s
67n-72s
69n-71 s
71n-69s
68n-72s
74s-66n
67n-73s
69n-71s
69s-71n
65n-75s
68n-72s
66n-74s
68s-73n
70s-71n
71s-70n
74s-67n
66n-75s
67n-74s
72s-69n
69s-72n
69n-72s
68n-73s
72s-69n
66n-75s
70n-72s
69s-73n
71n-71s
74s-68n
70s-72n
70n-72s
77s-65n
68n-74s
67n-75s
74s-68n
73s-69n
67n-75s
69s-73n
68n-74s
68n-74s
72s-70n


Robert Karlsson 69n-74s
Jeff Klauk 71 s-72n
James Driscoll 68n-75s
Neal Lancaster 72n-71s
Daniel Summerhays 72n-71s
Ben Curtis 72s-71 n
Trevor Immelman 72s-71 n
Jason Day 73n-70s
Nicolas Colsaerts 69n-74s
Seung-Yul Noh 71s-72n
Phil Mickelson 72n-71s
Aaron Baddeley 71 n-72s
Martin Laird 72s-71 n
Matt Every 69s-74n
Eric Meierdierks 69n-74s
James Hahn 71s-72n
Scott Gardiner 70n-73s
Steve LeBrun 68n-75s
Doug LaBelle II 72s-71 n
Failed to qualify


Kevin Chappell
Scott Stallings
Stuart Appleby
Cameron Percy
Derek Ernst
Ricky Barnes
Rod Pampling
Tommy Gainey
Jhonattan Vegas
Marc Leishman
Darron Stiles
Jordan Spieth
J.B. Holmes
David Hearn
Charlie Beljan
Billy Mayfair
Michael Bradley
Y.E. Yang
Ben Crane
D.A. Points
Camilo Villegas
Robert Streb
Morgan Hoffmann
Lee Williams
Shawn Stefani
Donald Constable
David Lingmerth
Michael McCabe
Brad Adamonis
Stewart Cink
Richard H. Lee
Bobby Gates
John Daly
Angel Cabrera
Fabian Gomez
Ben Kohles
Steven Bowditch
Stephen Ames
Bud Cauley
John Merrick
Alistair Presnell
Ryo Ishikawa
Greg Chalmers
Keegan Bradley
Scott Piercy
Patrick Cantlay
Henrik Norlander
Aaron Watkins
Brandt Jobe
Matt Jones
Steven Fox
Jon Fiedler
Mark Baker
Jeff Gove
David Mathis
Geoff Ogilvy
Andres Romero
Andrew Svoboda
Paul Haley II
Kyle Stanley
Sean O'Hair
Andres Gonzales
Troy Matteson
Scott Langley
Tim Herron


70n-74s
66n-78s
69n-75s
74n-70s
70s-74n
70s-74n
73s-71n
73n-71s
70n-74s
71s-73n
72n-73s
72n-73s
73n-72s
72s-73n
76s-69n
74n-71s
71n-74s
70s-75n
72s-73n
73s-72n
76s-69n
71n-74s
71n-74s
71s-74n
72s-73n
75n-70s
72s-73n
70s-75n
75s-70n
71n-75s
72n-74s
72s-74n
74s-72n
70s-76n
75n-71s
73s-73n
76s-70n
70n-77s
72n-75s
74n-73s
72s-75n
68n-79s
73n-74s
70n-77s
74s-73n
71n-76s
72n-75s
71n-77s
74n-74s
74s-74n
70n-78s
75n-74s
75n-74s
73s-76n
74n-76s
77s-73n
76s-74n
74s-76n
73s-77n
75s-76n
75s-77n
74n-78s
75s-77n
76n-77s
76s-77n


Bolts get two last-period Malone goals for victory


Associated Press

TAMPA Ryan Malone
scored a pair of third-pe-
riod goals as the Tampa
Bay Lightning beat the Ot-
tawa Senators 6-4 on
Friday night
Malone deflected Sami
Salo's blue-line slap shot
at 3:39 of the third that
pulled the Lightning even
at 4. Tampa Bay took a 5-4
lead when the left wing
scored from the low left-
circle with 7:02 to play
Tom Pyatt extended the


lead to 6-4 with a late
empty-net goal. Tampa
Bay (3-1) has outscored its
opponents 11-1 in the third
this season.
Matt Carle, Steven
Stamkos and Victor Hed-
man also scored for the
Lightning, who started a
five-game homestand.
Bruins 4,
Islanders 2
BOSTON Zdeno Chara
scored the tiebreaking goal
early in the third period and


Tuukka Rask made 24
saves, lifting the Boston Bru-
ins to a 4-2 win over the New
York Islanders.
Patrice Bergeron, Shawn
Thornton and Gregory Camp-
bell also scored for Boston,
which improved to 3-0-1.
Devils 3,
Capitals 2, OT
NEWARK, N.J. Ilya Ko-
valchuk scored 4:39 into over-
time, and the New Jersey
Devils won their third straight
game to start the lockout-short-


ened season, 3-2 over the win-
less Washington Capitals.
Kovalchuk took a pass
from defenseman Marek
Zidlicky low in the left circle
and beat Michal Neuvirth,
who was outstanding in over-
time. Neuvirth made seven
saves, most on a New Jersey
power play.
Stephen Gionta and Patrik
Elias scored for New Jersey,
which is off to its first 3-0 start
since the 2002-03 season, the
last time the Devils won the
Stanley Cup.


Hurricanes 3,
Sabres 1
BUFFALO, N.Y Jay Har-
rison scored the go-ahead
goal with 4:50 left, helping the
Carolina Hurricanes to a 3-1
win over the Buffalo Sabres.
Harrison fired a slap shot
from the right point after Eric
Staal won the faceoff, and the
puck beat Buffalo's Ryan
Miller on the short side.
Alexander Semin tied it for
the Hurricanes early in the
third period, and Jeff Skinner


scored an empty-net goal for
Carolina, which has won two
straight games.
Red Wings 5,
Wild 3
DETROIT- Henrik Zetter-
berg snapped a tie midway
through the second period, and
Todd Bertuzzi scored his sec-
ond goal of the game early in
the third to lift the Red Wings to
a 5-3 win over the Wild.
Pavel Datsyukput Detroit
ahead by two late in the
second period.


SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013 B3

Farmers
Insurance Open
Friday
San Diego
Purse: $6.1 million
Torrey Pines (South Course); 7,698 yards,
par 72, Torrey Pines (North Course); 7,053
yards; par 72
Second Round
TigerWoods 68s-65n 133 -11
Billy Horschel 66n-69s-135 -9
Casey Wittenberg 69s-67n-136 -8
Brad Fritsch 69n-67s 136 -8
Erik Compton 71s-65n- 136 -8
Steve Marino 68s-68n-136 -8
Jimmy Walker 67n-69s-136 -8
JoshTeater 66s-70n-136 -8
NickWatney 69s-68n- 137 -7
Luke Guthrie 68s-69n-137 -7
John Senden 69s-68n-137 -7
Tag Ridings 67s-70n-137 -7
Charlie Wi 71s-66n- 137 -7
Ross Fisher 66n-71s- 137 -7
Justin Hicks 67s-70n-137 -7





B4 SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
New Jersey 3 3 0 0 6 8 3
N.Y Islanders 4 2 2 0 4 14 13
Pittsburgh 4 2 2 0 4 13 13
N.YRangers 4 1 3 0 2 9 14
Philadelphia 4 1 3 0 2 5 12
Northeast Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Boston 4 3 0 1 7 12 8
Ottawa 4 3 1 0 6 15 8
Buffalo 4 2 2 0 4 11 12
Montreal 3 2 1 0 4 9 4
Toronto 4 2 2 0 4 12 12
Southeast Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Tampa Bay 4 3 1 0 6 19 12
Winnipeg 4 2 1 1 5 10 10
Carolina 4 2 2 0 4 11 13
Florida 4 1 3 0 2 7 12
Washington 4 0 3 1 1 8 17
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Chicago 4 4 0 0 8 17 10
St. Louis 4 3 1 0 6 15 6
Detroit 4 2 2 0 4 10 14
Nashville 4 1 1 2 4 8 11
Columbus 4 1 2 1 3 7 15
Northwest Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Colorado 3 2 1 0 4 9 5
Edmonton 3 2 1 0 4 8 9
Minnesota 4 2 2 0 4 9 10
Vancouver 3 1 1 1 3 8 12
Calgary 3 0 2 1 1 7 12
Pacific Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
San Jose 3 3 0 0 6 15 7
Dallas 4 2 1 1 5 8 8
Anaheim 2 2 0 0 4 12 7
Phoenix 4 1 3 0 2 15 16
LosAngeles 3 0 2 1 1 4 10
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Thursday's Games
N.Y Islanders 7, Toronto 4
Philadelphia 2, N.Y. Rangers 1
Montreal 4, Washington 1
Carolina 6, Buffalo 3
Ottawa 3, Florida 1
St. Louis 3, Nashville 0
Chicago 3, Dallas 2, OT
Colorado 4, Columbus 0
Edmonton 2, Los Angeles 1, OT
San Jose 5, Phoenix 3
Friday's Games
Boston 4, N.Y Islanders 2
Carolina 3, Buffalo 1
New Jersey 3, Washington 2, OT
Tampa Bay 6, Ottawa 4
Detroit 5, Minnesota 3
Winnipeg 4, Pittsburgh 2
Vancouver at Anaheim, late
Today's Games
Colorado at San Jose, 4 p.m.
Toronto at N.Y Rangers, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Edmonton at Calgary, 10 p.m.
Nashville at Anaheim, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Buffalo at Washington, 3 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Ottawa, 5 p.m.
New Jersey at Montreal, 6 p.m.
Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 6 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
N.Y Islanders at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at San Jose, 8 p.m.



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 26 14 .650 -
Brooklyn 26 17 .605 1Y2
Boston 20 23 .465 7Y2
Philadelphia 17 25 .405 10
Toronto 16 27 .372 11Y2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 28 12 .700 -
Atlanta 25 18 .581 4Y2
Orlando 14 28 .333 15
Washington 10 31 .244 18Y2
Charlotte 10 32 .238 19
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 26 16 .619 -
Indiana 26 17 .605 Y2
Milwaukee 22 19 .537 3Y2
Detroit 16 27 .372 10Y2
Cleveland 12 32 .273 15
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 35 11 .761 -
Memphis 28 14 .667 5
Houston 23 22 .511 111Y2
Dallas 18 25 .419 1512
New Orleans 14 29 .326 1912
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 33 10 .767 -
Denver 26 18 .591 712
Utah 23 19 .548 912
Portland 21 21 .500 111Y2
Minnesota 17 23 .425 1412
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 32 12 .727 -
Golden State 26 16 .619 5
L.A. Lakers 17 25 .405 14
Sacramento 16 27 .372 1512
Phoenix 15 28 .349 1612
Thursday's Games
Toronto 97, Orlando 95
New York 89, Boston 86
Phoenix 93, L.A. Clippers 88
Friday's Games
Washington 114, Minnesota 101
Atlanta 123, Boston 111 ,2OT
Cleveland 113, Milwaukee 108
Miami 110, Detroit 88
San Antonio 113, Dallas 107
Chicago 10u3, Goldeni State 87
Memphis 101, Brooklyn 77
Houston 100, New Orleans 82
Oklahoma City at Sacramento, late
Utah at L.A. Lakers, late
Today's Games
New York at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Washington, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Charlotte, 7:30 p.m.
Brooklyn at Houston, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Golden State at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Denver, 9 p.m.
Indiana at Utah, 9:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Portland, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games


Miami at Boston, 1 p.m.
Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Memphis, 6 p.m.
Detroit at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Atlanta at New York, 6:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Dallas, 7:30 p.m.
Portland at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.



NFL playoff glance
All Times EST
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 20
San Francisco 28, Atlanta 24
Baltimore 28, New England 13
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 27
At Honolulu
AFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (NBC)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 3
At New Orleans
Baltimore vs. San Francisco, 6 p.m. (CBS)


CiTus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sports BRIEFS


For the record

Floridd LOTTERY

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On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12 p.m. (ABC) Notre Dame at South Florida
12 p.m. (ESPN) Louisville at Georgetown
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Ohio State at Penn State
1 p.m. (CBS) Maryland at Duke
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Boston College at Virginia
1:30 p.m. (MNT) Arkansas at South Carolina
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Alabama at Tennessee
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) Dartmouth at Harvard
2 p.m. (SUN) Marshall at Memphis
3 p.m. (CW) Wake Forest at Georgia Tech
4 p.m. (MNT) LSU at Kentucky
4 p.m. (ESPN) Oklahoma at Kansas
4 p.m. (ESPN2) Western Kentucky at Middle Tennessee St.
4 p.m. (FSNFL) UCLA at Arizona State
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) New Mexico at San Diego State
6 p.m. (ESPN2) Temple at Butler
6 p.m. (SUN) Georgia at Texas A&M
7 p.m. (ESPN) North Carolina at North Carolina State
8 p.m. (ESPN2) Florida at Mississippi State
8 p.m. (SUN) Mississippi atAuburn
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12 p.m. (SUN) Oklahoma at Baylor
NBA
7 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Bulls at Washington Wizards
GOLF
6 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Commercialbank Qatar
Masters, Final Round
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Farmers Insurance Open, Third
Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour: Farmers Insurance Open, Third
Round
COLLEGE GYMNASTICS
5 p.m. (SUN) Arkansas at Kentucky (Taped)
HOCKEY
7:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Philadelphia Flyers at Florida Panthers
FIGURE SKATING
3 p.m. (NBC) U.S. Championships: Pairs Free Skate &
Free Dance
4:30 p.m. (NBC) U.S. Championships: Pairs Free Skate &
Free Dance
8 p.m. (NBC) U.S. Championships: Ladies Short Program
& Free Skate
TENNIS
3 a.m. (ESPN) Australian Open men's final Novak
Djokovic vs. Andy Murray

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network.If you are unable tolocate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BOYS SOCCER
District 3A-6 final at Nature Coast High School
6 p.m. No. 1 Citrus vs. No. 2 Leesburg
GIRLS SOCCER
FHSAA regional semifinals
7 p.m. Fleming Island at Lecanto
8 p.m. Citrus at Nature Coast
WRESTLING
8 a.m. Lecanto, Crystal River at The Villages duals


REGIONAL
Continued from Page B1

best game), we can be com-
petitive. No doubt in my
mind."
The Citrus Hurricanes ex-
ited their District 3A-6 tour-
nament as the runner-up
(losing to Nature Coast 3-0
in the finals) and managed
to defeat Eastside 3-0 in
their regional quarterfinal
on Wednesday
The Lady 'Canes travel to
Nature Coast once again to
face the district champs in
the regional semifinals at 7


NIP
Continued from Page B1

into baskets.
"We had a hard time with
their man-to-man (press),"
said the Warriors' Andrea
Zachar, who scored 16 points
in the game. "If we get (the
ball) into the middle, we can
handle it."
Eleven second-quarter
turnovers by Seven Rivers al-
lowed the Pirates to take
control, turning a 14-9 deficit
after one quarter into a 23-21
halftime lead. Katelyn Han-
nigan scored 11 of Crystal
River's 14 points in the quar-
ter, finishing with 19 in the
game.
But the Warriors recap-
tured command with a nine-
point run in the third
quarter, reversing a four-
point Crystal River lead in
making it a 30-25 Seven
Rivers advantage. The Pi-
rates, behind the floor shoot-


p.m. tonight at The Shark
Tank, giving Citrus a much-
needed chance at retribution
against their district rival.
Nature Coast downed
Palatka 4-0 in its regional
quarterfinal match.
"I'm extremely excited for
our girls and the program
here at Citrus," Citrus head
coach Ian Feldt said. "Our
veterans have been working
hard for years, so to see all
their dedication validated
by a spot in the semifinals is
exciting. We know we are in
for a tough game against Na-
ture Coast. They are a qual-
ity team, the toughest we've
seen all year"

ing of Hannigan and Megan
Wells (eight in the half, 16 for
the game), trimmed the War-
riors' lead to 32-31 after
three quarters.
A three-pointer by Wells
pulled Crystal River to
within 41-40 with four min-
utes left in the fourth, and
after two Seven Rivers free
throws by Tiana Miele, Han-
nigan tied it at 43-all with a
three-point play with 1:39 to
go.
That's when the Warriors
took over at the line. Alexis
Zachar who had 18 points
in the game- hit both ends of
her one-and-one free throws
to put Seven Rivers up 45-43
with 1:06 left Andrea Zachar
hit 1 of 2 at the line with 23.6
seconds to go, and Alexis
grabbed the miss and put that
in to make it 48-43.
"I think Crystal River
played really well," Seven
Rivers coach Gary Dreyer
said. "They were hyped up
with it being Senior Night
and they deserve the credit."


Pirates boys hoops leave
The Villages with 55-53 win
Ty Reynolds scored 17 points to lead
the Crystal River boys basketball team to
a 55-53 triumph at The Villages on Friday.
Crystal River had to survive a last-
second shot by the home team before
celebrating its victory.
Pirates sophomore forward Sam
Franklin chipped in 15 points for the Pi-
rates, who are now 11-10 overall and
completed a 3-0 week with the win.


Crystal River plays 7 p.m. Tuesday at
home against Lecanto.
SRCS boys basketball
squeezed by St. Francis
The Seven Rivers boys basketball team
took a tough 54-53 setback at St. Francis
Catholic in Gainesville on Friday.
Cory Weiand led the Warriors with 16
points and Adam Gage added 14 points.
Seven Rivers (9-10 overall) plays 6:30
p.m. Monday at home against Branford.
-From staff reports


Citrus runs past



West Port at home


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

INVERNESS In the Citrus boys'
basketball home game against West
Port on Friday, the Hurricanes got
their shooting stroke back and won
some confidence for the district tour-
nament in two weeks.
Citrus shook off its previous night's
loss to Crystal River and led by a
combined 51 points from junior point
guard Devin Pryor (28 points, six re-
bounds) and sophomore forward
Desmond Franklin (23 points, nine re-
bounds) finished its regular-season
district schedule by prevailing 80-64
over the Wolf Pack in front of a "red-
out" home crowd that wore t-shirts rep-
resenting the American Heart
Association.
With an overtime win over Central
earlier in the week, Citrus (14-8 over-
all, 6-2 in District 6A-6) moves to 4-0 at
home in league play and has at least
one win over each of its 6A-6 foes.
The loss is just the fourth of the sea-
son for West Port (14-4 overall).
After successfully handling West
Port's press early in the game, Citrus
built up a 35-23 lead by halftime be-
hind Franklin's 11 second-quarter
points.
The 'Canes' largest lead came mid-
way into the third when junior guard
Mitchell Ellis (13 points) knocked
down a 3 after scooping up a long re-
bound from a blocked shot by West
Port.
The Wolf Pack then scored 12
straight to narrow the gap, but unlike
Citrus' loss at West Port where the
Wolf Pack overcame a third-quarter
deficit with a ferocious rally in the sec-
ond half- the 'Canes traded baskets
down the stretch to maintain its dou-


CRHS
Continued from Page B1

his future Pirates during a 25-minute
presentation.
"Obviously the (wins) on the sched-
ule are nice and convenient, but you
should want to be the best in every-
thing you do," Varnadore said. "Never
settle for second best or anything less
than that"
He encouraged his potential grid-
iron athletes to play other sports, es-
pecially track and field or weightlifting
in the spring.
As far as football goes, the new coach
did not outline specific schemes but
stated the Pirates would be an attack-
ing, uptempo offensive team. Exact for-
mations and plays will be based on the
personnel from year to year.
Varnadore, a former defensive coor-



DISTRICTS
Continued from Pg B1

Forest for a six-team division.
Citrus head coach Rayburn Greene
was diplomatic in his assessment of
the re-districting.
"I'm thrilled to have them back in
our district," Greene said in reference
to Gainesville. "The only way to build a
championship program is to play
champions. We look forward to it.
'A couple of the kids were excited
because they said playing Gainesville
lets you know what you're made of,"
Greene added.
Schools in Class 6A are supposed to
have an enrollment of between 1,574 to
1,871 students in the fall of 2012, based
on information at www.fhsaa.org.
Gainesville and Forest were aligned
into a Class 7A district with three Tal-
lahassee schools and likely appealed
based on the extensive travel. A re-
quest to move down can also be made
if a school is within 10 percent of the
enrollment ceiling, which Gainesville
fits into.
Forest (with 2,350 students, accord-
ing to their school website) does not In
fact, if the number on the Wildcats'
website is correct, it would place them
enrollment-wise in Class 8A.
A text message from Lecanto High
School activities director Ron Allan
outlined some of the frustrations of the
process.
"We asked to move down to (Class)
5A once (Gainesville) and Forest were
added but it was denied," Allan said in
the message.
Lecanto head coach McKinley Rolle
said his Panthers won't shy away from
any district opponents.
"We're gonna compete against any
district foes we have," Rolle said.
"We're going to play to the best of our


ble-digit advantage for the remainder
"When we had our 8-game winning
streak, we were scoring in the mid-
and upper-70s every night, but we
hadn't seen that in awhile," Citrus
head coach Tom Densmore said on
his team's offensive output. "We just
kept playing until the very end, with
two minutes to go, when we ran out
the clock.
"I decided the Crystal River game
was a bad sandwich game between
two key district games," Densmore
added. "We didn't move well on de-
fense in that game, but I thought we
really did a good job rebounding and
on defense to hold West Port to 23 in
the first half."
The Wolf Pack share a 6-2 district
record with the 'Canes, but West Port
earns the No. 1 seed due to
tiebreaker rules while Citrus faces
Lecanto (No. 3 seed) as the second
seed in the first round of the 6A-6
tournament at Central.
West Port senior Corey David had 22
points in the second half to match
Pryor's 28 points for the night, and
Wolf Pack senior Alec Jewell added 13.
"Last night we weren't focused as
much because this is the game that
mattered more," Pryor said of the
turnaround after Thursday
Densmore and Pryor each noted
Franklin's rediscovery of his jump
shot.
"Today I made sure I was going to
help my team," Franklin said. "I came
to the gym right after the team dinner
and shot around until the start of the
JV game.
"Devin (Pryor) controlled the ball
real well," he added.
Citrus plays South Sumter 7 p.m.
Wednesday at home.

dinator at Palmetto High School in
Manatee County, expressed his affinity
for stopping opponents' offenses. He
said Crystal River will play aggressive,
sound defense, create turnovers and
be mentally and physically tougher
than any opposing team.
He explained his four keys to vic-
tory: play great defense, score in the
red zone, have an excellent red zone
and win the turnover margin.
Varnadore also said his time as a
junior coach at Division II powerhouse
Carson-Newman College in Johnson
City, Tenn., prepared him for this
moment.
"I saw how a championship program
pushes everyone forward and sets the
standard," he said. "That's when it
clicked: I want to coach."
Chronicle sports editor Jon-Michael
Soracchi can be emailed at jmsorac-
chi@chronicleonline. corn or reached
at 352-564-2928.

abilities."
Crystal River was also affected by
the new final: Live Oak Suwannee won
a petition, making a seven-team Dis-
trict 5A-5 which also includes
holdovers Dunnellon, North Marion,
Gainesville Eastside, Alachua Santa
Fe and Belleview.
Schools in Class 5A have an enroll-
ment of between 1,049 to 1,573 students
in the fall of 2012.
Crystal River activities director Tony
Stukes said a trip to Live Oak (110
miles away or roughly two hours) was
not desirable.
"It really doesn't impact us, other
than the travel to Live Oak," Stukes
said. "I would prefer that it stayed the
same, but we're not complaining about
anything."
Dunnellon coach Frank Beasley did-
n't know what to make of Suwanee's
reason for moving into the district
"The switch (by Suwanee) doesn't
make sense to me," Beasley said, be-
fore adding, "we played them four
years ago, it's a tough place to play and
a tough place to win."
Beasley's confusion has merit:
Suwannee went from being in a three-
team district with Tallahassee
Rickards and Waklla --which is one
long trip per year based on playing one
home and one away --to a six-team
district with a minimum of three long
road trips the next two seasons.
Beasley didn't have an issue with the
size of the district, saying a bigger divi-
sion actually appealed to him.
"Somietimies it's better to have more
district games," he said. "It ratchets up
the intensity from week to week."
Visit wwwfhsaa, org/sports/
football/assignments for the full list of
new football districts.
Chronicle sports editor Jon-Michael
Soracchi can be emailed at
jmsoracchichronicleonline. corn or
reached at 352-564-2928.


SCOREBOARD




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pjs








ENTERAINMN13

--NTERTAINMENT


CIRUS COUNTY CHRONJICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


Michael Buble and
Luisana Lopilato

Michael Buble, wife
expecting first child
NEW YORK- Michael
Buble has something new to
sing about: becoming a father
In an online video posted
Thursday by the YouTube
account of Buble's wife,
Luisana Lopilato, a sonogram
with the words "Mini
Buble!!!" is shown. The 20-
second video ends up with
words: "We're having a baby
Buble!!!!"
The 37-year-old Canadian
singer and his 25-year-old
Argentine actress wife were
married in 2011. The couple
met in 2009 during a South
American concert tour
A representative for Buble
confirmed the couple is
expecting.

'American Pie' singer
fined for speeding
ROCKLAND, Maine -
'American Pie" singer Don
McLean has been fined $400
for driving his Chrysler too
fast through a Maine school
zone and has paid the levy
McLean
contested the
charge in
September,
saying school
zone warning
lights weren't
flashing. Po-
lice said in
Rockland Don
District Court McLean
on Thursday
they were flashing.
A judge found McLean was
speeding in the Rockport
school zone but lowered what
would be a $515 fine if
uncontested to $400.
McLean immediately paid
up.
McLean lives in nearby
Camden, along Maine's coast.
He burst into popularity in
1971 with his hit 'American
Pie," about the deaths of
Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens
and the Big Bopper in a plane
crash Feb. 3, 1959 The Day
the Music Died.

Wood, Bell expecting
first child
NEW YORK Evan
Rachel Wood is going to be a
mom.
Wood's publicist, Amanda
Silverman, said Friday the
25-year-old actress and her
husband, Jamie Bell, are ex-
pecting their first child later
this year She said Wood and
Bell are
"thrilled."
The couple
married last
year They
first dated in
2005 but
broke up the
following year Evan
Wood's Rachel
breakout role Wood
was in 2003's
gritty film "Thirteen." In 2011,
she co-starred with Kate
Winslet in the HBO minis-
eries "Mildred Pierce." Both
roles earned her Golden
Globe nominations.
Bell, 26, is best known for
his starring role in "Billy El-
liott." His film credits also in-
clude "King Kong" and "The
Adventures of Tintin."


-From wire reports


Birthday Even though you are likely to have the
edge over your opposition in the year ahead, you'll
still have to earn every one of your victories.
Chances are, they won't be awarded without a
hard-fought contest.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)- Don't let a co-worker
whose abilities are not up to your standards become
empowered to dictate the collective course of action.
Be firm and remain in control.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) If you are impelled to
work on tasks you find distasteful, there's a chance
your performance won't be up to its usual high stan-
dard. If you can, set it aside until you're in a better
frame of mind.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Even if you're used to
making all the rules, abide by the will of the majority.
If you don't, you could be attacked for defending an
untenable position.


Peter Pan pop


American actor William H. Macy portrays a deadbeat dad on the Showtime television series,
"Shameless."


Macy is proud to be the drunken dad in 'Shameless'


AP television writer

NEW YORK On "Shame-
less," William H. Macy plays
the world's most deadbeat
dad.
He stars as Frank
Gallagher, a boozy, shiftless
grifter whose brood of six
mix-and-match offspring (do
any of them share the same
mother?) care for one another
and, by necessity, him. The
oldest daughter, Fiona
(played by Emmy Rossum), is
the family's de facto mom, a
Wendy to Frank's derelict
Peter Pan.
"Derelict" is putting it
mildly. Frank is abrasive, self-
absorbed, scheming and delu-
sional, a pickled patriarch
whose most dignified mo-
ments find him passed out on
the bathroom floor of the fam-
ily's ragtag South Chicago digs,
or on a random street corner
or maybe public park.
But somehow the family
stays afloat, even with Frank
dragging everybody down.
"For all the craziness they
go through, it is a tight-knit
family, an honest family that
loves each other fiercely,"
Macy said. "That's what the
show is about."
Airing Sunday at 9 p.m. on
Showtime, "Shameless" began
its third season recently with
Frank coming to in Mexico, not
sure how he got there and with
no funds or credentials to get
himself home.
Ever the schemer, he figures
out a way. Just as, this week, he
figures out a way to score some
drinking money: He volun-
teers to take a neighbor's in-
fant to the doctor for a
scheduled vaccination, then
spends the cash meant for the
doctor at his favorite bar He
pricks the baby with a thumb
tack to simulate a shot, and
shares a few drops of his
whisky to calm the baby's
crying.
"I pride myself on taking the
script and saying, 'I can DO
this!"' said Macy, clearly glee-
ful at the depths to which
Frank routinely sinks. "I take
all the stuff the writers can
shovel my way!"
Well, almost.


"Once or twice I've said,
'Too much. Too despicable. It's
over the line,"' Macy admited
with a laugh. "But it's the writ-
ers' job to push that line, to put
every character in really un-
comfortable situations. So we
have a good, healthy tug of
war"
The show barrels along a
path both heartbreaking and
hilarious, while Frank sets the
pace with his appalling level
of substance abuse.
The series doesn't glorify
drinking, however riotously
drinking is depicted. (Frank
would be nobody's choice as a
role model.) And "Shameless"
recognizes that, in a MADD-
enlightened era, inebriation is
no longer automatically a joke.
"But to claim 'being drunk
isn't funny' is not true," Macy
hastens to say "Being drunk
CAN be VERY funny!"
It surely has its funny mo-
ments thanks to Frank and
the guy who plays him.
"I flatter myself that, as an
actor, I do a pretty good
drunk," said Macy, who, while
acknowledging he's on the
wagon right now, can draw
on 'a little firsthand
experience."
He is careful to modulate
Frank's drunken state as the
day wears on.
"For a scene that takes place
at 11 o'clock in the morning,
well, that's a four-beer buzz,"
he explained, "as opposed to
11:30 at night, when Frank's
speech is very slurred."
Playing a drunk, which
Macy deems less a thespian
technique than "a parlor
trick," comes with pitfalls: A
great impersonation of a
drunk can distract an actor
from the primary substance of
the scene.
"But if I'm pretty clear what
the scene is about, then I just
add on the drunkenness -
slurring or stumbling- and it
takes care of itself."
Wardrobe helps too.
"I wear the same clothes al-
most all the time," he said.
'And I pride myself on this, as
does our costumer, Lyn
(Paolo): I've never had a fit-
ting. She has sent me pants
with the top two buttons
missing and the waist too big.


Today's HOROSCOPE
Taurus (April 20-May 20) When it comes to ca-
reer situations, keep your guard up and be ready to
fight or change course. Opposition from several un-
expected sources is extremely probable.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Do not discuss your
ideas with others, especially with someone who is
known to plagiarize. This person will be true to form.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -Be particularly careful
about getting involved in a tricky financial arrange-
ment. It could be a ploy to demand an even larger
cash outlay from all participants in the near future.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -Avoid teaming up with an
individual who is known to be underhanded. You
won't be very comfortable watching this person oper-
ate.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Guard against a strong
inclination to make things much harder on yourself
than they need to be. A tendency to do so would def-


So I put a belt on it, I fix it.
With Frank, close is good
enough."
If Frank is reliably scruffy,
there's one big change coming
up. As Macy displays at this re-
cent interview, his hair, previ-
ously near shoulder-length,
has been shorn.
"I cut it for the show I cut it
ON the show in a future
episode. I won't give away
why," he said. 'And it was a
daunting decision. I did have a
great head of hair I'd lived
with it for three years, and I'd
gotten used to it."
Still, Macy isn't the type to
let vanity get in the way of a
good role or a great
performance.
Although he has achieved
offbeat leading-man status in
such films as "Fargo" (for
which he landed an Oscar
nomination) and the made-for-
TV "Door to Door" (which he
also co-wrote), the 62-year-old
Macy has had a busy career on
screen and on stage as a cele-
brated character actor
But a few years ago, he got
the hankering to headline a
TV series.
By then his wife, Felicity
Huffman, was flourishing on
"Desperate Housewives,"
Macy noted, "and she loved
every part of it. I was jealous. I
said, 'I want to do TV, too!"'
So far, so good.
"I love 'Shameless' so
much!" he said. "You get big
stuff to do in scenes that are
tough to do, with volumes of
dialogue and a character who
talks fast. You have to know
your part inside and out. It re-
ally tests you as an actor, every
single week. And I'm a better
actor for it. I wish I'd done this
earlier in my career"
He mentions the book "The
Outliers," in which author
Malcolm Gladwell advances
the theory if you practice
something -anything -for
10,000 hours, you reach a key
threshold of expertise. Ac-
cording to Gladwell, people
recognized as experts have
logged that length of service.
Count Macy, thanks to
"Shameless."
"It's my 10,000 hours," he
said. And he's hoping for thou-
sands more.


initely impede your progress.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Be extremely selective
regarding any social invitations you might receive.
There's a strong chance you could get caught up in
a group of people that you won't like at all.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) You and your special
someone must be of the same mindset where an im-
portant issue is concerned. Discord could occur if
one decides something without the consent of the
other.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Generally, you love
endeavors of a mental nature, but since your powers
of concentration are not apt to be up to par currently,
you should be careful. Small mistakes are likely.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Don't open your
wallet to someone who never makes good on debts.
If you do, you'll be reinforcing this person's bad
habit.


Floida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
0 Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 24
Fantasy 5:7 14 18 23 29
5-of-5 3 winners $71,015.93
4-of-5 284 $120.50
3-of-5 9,252 $10
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23
Powerbal: 11 12 24 43 45
Powerball: 9
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 1 winner $1 million
No Florida winner
Lotto: 15 21 22 24 39 41
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 13 $12,235
4-of-6 1,273 $84
3-of-6 27,829 $5
Fantasy 5:1 19 20 32 35
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 284 $555
3-of-5 8,581 $26


INSIDE THE NUMBERS
0 To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, Jan. 26, the
26th day of 2013. There are 339
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Jan. 26, 1788, the first
European settlers in Australia, led
by Capt. Arthur Phillip, landed in
present-day Sydney.
On this date:
In 1784, in a letter to his daugh-
ter Sally, Benjamin Franklin ex-
pressed unhappiness over the
choice of the eagle as the symbol
of America, and stated his own
preference: the turkey.
In 1837, Michigan became the
26th state.
In 1870, Virginia rejoined the
Union.
In 1939, during the Spanish
Civil War, rebel forces led by Gen.
Francisco Franco captured
Barcelona.
In 1942, the firstAmerican
Expeditionary Force to go to
Europe during World War II ar-
rived in Belfast, Northern Ireland.
In 1950, India officially pro-
claimed itself a republic as
Rajendra Prasad took the oath of
office as president.
Ten years ago: Secretary of
State Colin Powell, citing Iraq's
lack of cooperation with U.N. in-
spectors, said he'd lost faith in the
inspectors' ability to conduct a
definitive search for banned
weapons programs.
Five years ago: Barack
Obama routed Hillary Rodham
Clinton in the South Carolina
primary.
One year ago: The Pentagon
outlined a plan for slowing the
growth of military spending, in-
cluding cutting the size of the
Army and Marine Corps, retiring
older planes and trimming war
costs.
Today's Birthdays: Actress
Anne Jeffreys is 90. Actress Joan
Leslie is 88. Cartoonist Jules
Feiffer is 84. Sportscaster-actor
Bob Uecker is 78. Actor Scott
Glenn is 74. Singer Jean Knight is
70. Activist Angela Davis is 69.
Rock musician Corky Laing
(Mountain) is 65. Actor David
Strathairn is 64. Alt-country
singer-songwriter Lucinda
Williams is 60. Rock singer-musi-
cian Eddie Van Halen is 58. Reg-
gae musician Norman Hassan
(U B40) is 55. Actress-comedian-
talk show host Ellen DeGeneres
is 55. Hockey Hall-of-Famer
Wayne Gretzky is 52. Musician
Andrew Ridgeley is 50. Rhythm-
and-blues singer Jazzie B. (Soul
II Soul) is 50. Actor Paul Johans-
son is 49. Gospel singer Kirk
Franklin is 43. Actress Jennifer
Crystal is 40. Rock musician
Chris Hesse (Hoobastank) is 39.
Actor Gilles Marini is 37. NBA
player Vince Carter is 36. Actress
Sarah Rue is 35.


Thought for Today: "Thinking
is easy, acting is difficult, and to
put one's thoughts into action is
the most difficult thing in the
world." Johann Wolfgang von
Goethe, German poet, dramatist
and author (1749-1832).












RELIGION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


A spiritual journey


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


For the Chronicle
Mariana Blain, of Inverness, received spiritual support and guidance while battling brain cancer.

Local woman turns tofaithfor help in fight with deadly brain cancer


CHARLES LAWRENCE
Chronicle correspondent


n early July 2011, Inverness
resident, grandmother and former
school teacher Mariana Blain
suddenly began having trouble reading
simple words such as "banana." Even-
tually, she made a doctor's appoint-
ment and an MRI picked up her
physician's worst fears. She was
diagnosed with Stage 4 Glioblastoma
Mulitforme brain cancer


Despite the diagnosis, Blain
said she felt great. But doc-
tors told her without an im-
mediate operation she would
likely die in three weeks to
one month.
"My husband and sons were
devastated," she said.
One of Blain's sons, Jimmy,
was an Army major stationed
in Afghanistan when she first
became ill. When he informed
the Army of his mother's dis-
ease, the Army sent him back
to Florida immediately to be
by her side.
Blain said she also knew the
Lord was by her side, but she
didn't want to talk to Him at
first


"When it all first happened I
was mad," she said. "I just
didn't want to talk to God."
Blain said she did talk to the
angels, though, and felt some-
one was there supporting her
all the time.
"When you have an angel,
you wonder if you are making it
up," she said. "I think the angel
was with me, talking to me. I
wasn't talking to God. I was talk-
ing to an angel. It was a while
before I could talk to God."
On Aug. 2, 2011, a cran-
iotomy was performed at Mof-
fitt Cancer Center in Tampa,
and within three days Blain

See / NC---Page C4


What's


in a


name?
On Nov. 24, the
Jameson family
named their new-
born baby girl Hashtag,
after Twitter's use of the
(#) symbol.
The year before, an
Egyptian man named his
son Facebook, and in
2011 an Israeli couple
named their baby Like.
These babies join
celebrities' babies Spec
Wildhorse Mellencamp,
Moxie Crimefighter Jil-
lette, Pilot Inspecktor
Lee and Audio Science
Clayton, which makes
Apple Blythe Alison
Martin sound almost tra-
ditional as a baby name.
I think people's names
say much more about
the parents than about
the child. Naming your
kid Moxie Crimefighter
is setting him up to be
pushed into lockers in
middle school.
Then there are church
names.
I've always wondered
about churches with
"First" in their names -
First Baptist, First Pres-
byterian. I guess they
want everyone to know
See 'Page C5


Religion NOTES


Food & fellowship
0 The Red Level Baptist
Church Youth group will spon-
sor a chili cook-off at 5 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 2, at Red
Level Baptist Church, 11025
W. Dunnellon Road, Crystal
River. Everyone is invited to
come out and enjoy all you
can eat for $5. Proceeds will
go to send the youth on a
mission trip this summer. Call
352-795-2086.
0 Yankeetown Community
Church will serve its annual
Shrove Tuesday pancake
supper from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Feb. 12 in the church fellow-
ship hall behind the church
on State Road 40 west of the
traffic light on U.S. 19 in In-
glis. The cost of $5 for adults
and $3 for children younger
than 10 includes all-you-can-
eat, made-from-scratch but-
termilk pancakes with
sausage or ham, apple juice,
coffee and tea. Proceeds will
benefit church-supported
missionaries. Enjoy delicious
food, fun and fellowship.
0 Floral City United
Methodist Church will host its
first dinner of the new year
from 3 to 6 p.m. today in
Hilton Hall at 8478 E. Marvin
St. across from the elemen-
tary school. Menu includes
roast pork, candied sweet po-
tatoes, fresh green beans,
salad, assorted desserts and
beverages for a donation of
$7.50. Takeouts available.
Call 352-344-1771.
0 The public is invited to a
baked steak dinner from
4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, Feb.
8, at Parsons Memorial Pres-
byterian Church, 5850 River-
side Drive, Yankeetown. A $7
donation includes dinner,
dessert and drink. There will
be a $50 money tree raffle.


Takeout available by calling
352-447-2506.
0 Everyone is invited to
Saturday night supper from
4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Feb. 9 in the
Dewain Farris Fellowship Hall
at Community Congregational
Christian Church, 9220 N. Cit-
rus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs. Menu includes meat-
loaf, vegetable, coleslaw,
dessert, coffee and tea. Tick-
ets are $10 for adults, $5 for
children and can be pur-
chased at the door. Takeouts
available. Call the church at
352-489-1260.
0 The "22nd annual
Peace Potato Pancake Sup-
per" will take place from 4 to
7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12, at
Peace Lutheran Church, 7201
U.S. 41 S., north of State
Road 40, five miles north of
downtown Dunnellon. Tickets,
available at the door, are $5
for adults, and $2.50 for chil-
dren ages 5 through 12.
There is no charge for chil-
dren younger than age 5.
Tickets are also available
from members and at the
Peace Lutheran booth at the
Dunnellon First Saturday
event Feb. 2.
Menu includes traditional
potato pancakes or buttermilk
pancakes, ham, fruit cup,
dessert and beverage. Call
the church office at 352-489-
5881 or visit PeaceLutheran
Online.com.
0 Come enjoy a Shrove
Tuesday pancake supper
from 5 to 7 p.m. Feb. 12 at
Holy Faith Episcopal Church,
Blue Cove, Dunnellon. The
men's club will serve pan-
cakes, sausage, applesauce,
dessert and a beverage. Tick-
ets are $6 at the door. Call the
church office at 352-
489-2685.
See /Page C2


New ministry


Special to the Chronicle
Father Stephen Dass, right, and his wife, Mary, are starting a new ministry for the Dio-
cese of Central Florida. They explained the ministry recently at St. Anne's Church. The
Sao Paulo Mercy Ministry will minister in the "red light" district of Sao Paulo, Brazil,
primarily to the homeless street children, but also to other homeless individuals, sex
workers and drug addicts. Their goal is to help persons in their daily life and to testify
to the love of God among those who find themselves in despair and hopelessness.


Terry Mattingly
ON
RELIGION


Defining
'evangelical'


in 2013
ist America's
prominent evan-
gelicals and the
Rev. Rick Warren re-
mains near the top, right
up there with the Rev.
Brian McLaren, Bishop
TD. Jakes, Jim Wallis,
the Rev. Tim Keller and
others.
Evangelicals, of
course, have been
known to argue about
who belongs on that list.
In recent years, it has be-
come increasingly obvi-
ous the experts are
struggling to decide who
is and who is not an
evangelical in the first
place.
"I know what the word
'evangelical' is supposed
to mean," said Warren,
58, leader of the 20,000-
member Saddleback
Church in Lake Forest,
Calif., with its many
branches and ministries.
"I mean, I know what the
word 'evangelical' used
to mean."
The problem, he said,
is many Americans no
longer link "evangeli-
cal" with a set of tradi-
tional doctrines, such as
evangelizing the lost, de-
fending biblical author-
ity, helping the needy
and proclaiming salva-
tion is found through
faith in Jesus Christ
alone.
Somewhere during
the George W Bush
SeeF 'Page C5





C2 SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013


NOTES
Continued from Page C1

Sales & such
0 Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church in Beverly
Hills will host its monthly out-
door flea market from 8 a.m.
to 2 p.m. today on the church
property at 6 Roosevelt
Boulevard in Beverly Hills off
North Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491). Shoppers
are welcome. Up to 50 com-
mercial and private vendors
are expected to display their
wares. Commercial vendors
and private individuals are
welcome to bring and sell
goods. Spaces are available
for $10. A mobile kitchen,
"Cooking Good," will serve
breakfast and lunch items.
Flea markets take place the
fourth Saturday monthly ex-
cept in June, July and August.
Next month's flea market is
Feb. 23. For more information
or to reserve a space, call
Rose Mary at 352-527-6459
or e-mail wjeselso@
tampabay.rr.com.
0 There will be a big yard
sale and clothes giveaway
from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Satur-
day, Feb. 2, at Calvary
Chapel in Inverness, 960 S.
U.S. 41. Afree men's break-
fast will also be served at 9
that morning. Call 352-
726-1480.
0 Everyone is invited to the
annual tag sale from 8 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, at
Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church, 439 E. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Hernando. Thrivent
Financial for Lutherans will
provide supplemental funding
for this event through the Cit-
rus County Chapter and its
members at Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church. Many
household items will be
available.
0 Floral City United
Methodist Church will host its
annual "Used Treasure


CiTRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sale" from 8:30 a.m. to noon
Saturday, Feb. 2. Proceeds
from the sale are used to
send youth to summer camp
and various mission projects.
0 The Beverly Hills Com-
munity Church Youth Group
will host an indoor yard sale
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Satur-
day, Feb. 2, in the fellowship
hall at 82 Civic Circle.
0 The Altar and Rosary So-
ciety of St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church will host a
Chinese auction from 11
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb.
2, in Father Stegeman Hall at
the corner of U.S. 41 and
State Road 40 East in Dun-
nellon. Drawings for the items
will begin at 1 p.m. An enve-
lope of 20 tickets is $5 and
can be purchased at the door.
Also included is a free ticket
for coffee and dessert. Food
and drinks will be available at
a nominal charge. Call Pat at
352-489-1984.
0 The Episcopal Church
Women of Shepherd of the
Hills Episcopal Church will
have their "Trash to Treas-
ure Sale" from 9 a.m. to 2
p.m. Friday, Feb. 8, in the
parish hall. There will be lots
of books. The church is on
County Road 486 in Lecanto
on the right-hand side just
east of the County Road 491
traffic light. Call Francine at
352-794-0070.
0 The women of the ELCA
at St. Timothy Lutheran
Church in Crystal River will
host their "Grannie's Attic"
sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fri-
day and Saturday Feb. 8 and
9. The sale will include the
popular Men's Tent, home-
made baked goodies, and the
fellowship hall filled to the
rafters with treasures. Hot dog
lunches will be available for
sale. Call Marcia Treber at
352-794-3217 or the church
at 352-795-5317. The church
is on U.S. 19, across from the
airport.
0 First Lutheran Church in-
vites the public to its annual


MLK Day parade


Special to the Chronicle
Unitarian Universalists marched in the parade recently on Martin Luther King Jr. Day.
From left are: Meredith Paine of Crystal River, Sandy Sondheim of Beverly Hills and
Linda Myers of Pine Ridge.


rummage sale from 8 a.m. to
2 p.m. Friday and Saturday,
Feb. 8 and 9. Bring your
friends and neighbors. There
will be treasures for everyone.
The church is at 1900 W.
State Road 44, Inverness.
0 The Ladies of Faith will
host the "17th Annual Trash
'N' Treasure Sale" from 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and Sat-
urday, Feb. 8 and 9, at Faith
Lutheran Church in Crystal
Glen Subdivision, Lecanto (off
County Road 490 and State
Road 44). Find all kinds of
"stuff' for the kitchen, the
home, the garden and
garage, clothing, shoes,
books and some jewelry and
Christmas items. Also in-
cludes a bake sale. This year,
for the first time, beautiful
handmade quilts will be fea-
tured. Proceeds from this sale
support local, state, national
and international missions.
This is a Thrivent event.


Music & more
0 The Diggles Family, full-
time Southern Gospel record-
ing artists, will perform at 4
p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, at First
Christian Church of Inverness
at 2018 Colonade St. (behind
the RaceTrac gas station on
State Road 44). The Diggles
Family is led by Doug Dig-
gles, who sings lead, tenor,
baritone, bass and plays the
piano. Christina sings, plays
the violin, viola, guitar, classi-
cal guitar, piano, mountain
dulcimer and mandolin. She
helps in arranging songs and
picking out parts for Katie on
her instruments. Katie adds
the third part in their family
harmony. She also plays the
violin, mandolin, piano and
mountain dulcimer, and is be-
ginning to arrange musical
pieces. Diane Diggles brings
an extra beauty to many of
the songs by interpreting


them through sign language.
She also runs the sound-
board. Call the church at 352-
344-1908. All are welcome to
attend this performance and a
freewill offering will be col-
lected.
0 Sheila Raye Charles,
daughter of singer Ray
Charles, will perform during a
"Community Worship Event,"
at 11 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 3, at
Wildwood United Methodist
Church, 300 Mason St., Wild-
wood. Singer/songwriter
Sheila Raye Charles will be
on hand to sign her book,
"Behind the Shades," after the
service. Everyone is invited to
attend. Call the church at 352-
748-1275 or Michael Beck at
352-203-7258.
0 The Burchfield Broth-
ers will perform Wednesday,
Feb. 13, at Hernando Church
of the Nazarene, 2101 N.
Florida Ave., Hernando.
These men are geniuses with


instruments, including classi-
cal guitar, midi-marimba, Irish
whistles and recorders. The
concert will open at 6:45 p.m.
with the Celebrations Sounds
orchestra and choir of the
Hernando Nazarene church.
There is no cost to attend; a
love offering will be collected.
Everyone is invited.
0 Hear Susie McEntire in
concert at 6 p.m. Monday,
Feb. 18, at First Baptist
Church, 20831 Powell Road,
Dunnellon. The event is spon-
sored by Cross at the River
Cowboy Church. Cost is $15
per person, $25 per couple,
$30 at the door. Call Pastor
Ed Anthony at 352-445-5171
or Matthew at 352-489-0099.
Visit www.susiemcentire.com.
Fun & games
0 The St. Scholastica
Council of Catholic Women
will sponsor a "Bunco Bash
Event" at 11:30 a.m. today at
the Fr. James Hoge Parish
Center, 4301 W. Homosassa
Trail, Lecanto. Entrance fee is
$12. Free food and door
prizes. All funds raised will go
to such charities as Daystar
Life Center, Family Life and
Pregnancy Center, Hugs for
the Homeless, migrant work-
ers of Florida, and overseas
missionaries.
0 St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church will host a Military
Card Party on Monday, Feb.
11. Lunch will be served at
12:15 p.m. followed by card
play at 1 p.m. Enjoy fun,
prizes and a raffle. Cost is
$12 per player. Make up your
table of four or come as a sin-
gle and we will pair you. Call
Dottie at 352-382-3656 or
Marilyn at 352-746-6583 for
reservations by Feb. 7. The
church is at 114 N. Osceola
Ave., Inverness.
0 The Ladies Auxiliary
Knights of Columbus Council
6168 will host a "Valentine
Bunco Bonanza" at 10:30

See NOTES/Page C4


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA


~ River

Foursquare

Gospel Church

1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30AM
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager 6



Crystal River

CHURCH OF

CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.- 11:00 A.M. 6:00P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


THE 7]
SALVATIONF'6
ARM Y CIRUSCOUNTY
CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 KM.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 KM.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 K.
Lt. Vanessa Miller
712S. cbol ve
/ It
513496 .... W


0 Crystal iver

Church of God

Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 NW. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nursery
Provided





'The
Church
in the
7 Heart
11 of the
Co mmunity
with a
Heart
for the
Community"







Special

Event or

Weekly
Services

Please Call
Beverly at

564-2912
For

Advertising

Information


- Temple

Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko

Services
Fridays 8PM
Saturdays 10AM
Religious School
Sundays
9AM-Noon



ST. THOMAS

CATHOLIC

CHURCH
vng SouhwestCus Coun y

MASSES:
turday ..... 4:30 P.M.
unday ...... 8:00 A.M.
............... 10:30 A.M.
S. 19 1/4 mile South of West
Cardinal St., Homosassa





ST. ANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River n1 ile west of Plantation Ilo
352-795-2176
wwwstannescr.org


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship with Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive.- Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
TroyAllen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAgeGroups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir/ Special Music/"Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


West
Citrus

Church of Christ

9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352.564.8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr. 0






US Hwy. 19



SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
Bob Dickey


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
AllAges 9:30AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour @ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor





HEKE, YOU'LL FIND
,, C. NJN F.A.MILY
IN CHKIST!

CKYSTL


INITD
NA CTHOD I 5 I
C H U KC H
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
:- A Stephen Ministry Provider.:


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
- MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am

DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am

HOLY DAYS
As Announced

CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm

795-4479


Homosassa
First United
Methodist
Church

Everyone
Becoming
A Disciple
of Christ

Sunday Worship
8:00 am & 9:30 am
& 11:00 am
Sunday School
9:30 am
Reverend
Kip Younger
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org
Office Hours:
8:30 4:30 M-F
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors





Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Religion BRIEFS


Obama, Biden attend
Cathedral service
WASHINGTON Christian, Mus-
lim, Jewish and Sikh clergy prayed
for President Barack Obama's sec-
ond term in an inaugural service at
Washington National Cathedral.
Obama and Vice President Joe
Biden sat in the front pew Tuesday
as prayers were said in English,
Spanish, Arabic and Hebrew.
Kathryn Lohre, president of the
National Council of Churches, asked
God to "grant them wisdom to dis-
cern your will and to consider your
word among the counsel they
receive."
The Rev. Adam Hamilton, senior
pastor of the United Methodist
Church of the Resurrection in Lea-
wood, Kan., praised Obama's
rhetorical skills saying, "You
should have been a preacher" -
and urged the president to bring a
divided nation together.
Earlier this month, the cathedral
said it would begin hosting same-
sex weddings.
Ex-pastor convicted of
killing second wife
STROUDSBURG, Pa.-A former
Pennsylvania pastor has been con-


victed in the 2008 death of his sec-
ond wife, but still awaits trial in the
1999 death of his first wife.
Arthur Schirmer blamed the sec-
ond death on a slow-speed car
crash and said his first wife fell down
the stairs, but authorities ultimately
charged him with bludgeoning both
women.
The verdict Tuesday comes after
Schirmer testified Friday in Monroe
County Court. He told jurors that he
was driving his second wife, Betty, to
the hospital for jaw pain when a deer
crossed their path, causing them to
crash.
The former United Methodist pas-
tor was convicted of first-degree
murder and evidence tampering. He
pleaded not guilty and maintained
his innocence. His attorney pledged
to appeal.
Schirmer is charged separately in
the 1999 death of his first wife,
Jewel, and awaits trial in Lebanon
County, Pa.
Man in mosque arson
case withdraws plea
TOLEDO, Ohio -A former Marine
who said he set fire to an Ohio
mosque because he wanted to
avenge the killings of American troops
has asked to withdraw his guilty plea


to federal hate crime charges.
Randy Linn says he was under
duress and depressed when he en-
tered his plea last month in the fire
at a suburban Toledo mosque.
A deal between prosecutors and
Linn had called for him to be sen-
tenced to 20 years next April after he
pleaded guilty to intentionally dam-
aging and destroying religious prop-
erty and two gun-related charges.
Prosecutors say he broke into
The Islamic Center of Greater
Toledo last fall and went room by
room to make sure no one was in
the building before he poured gaso-
line on a prayer rug and lit it on fire.
Linn described on Dec. 19 how he
had been drinking heavily before he
drove to the mosque in Perrysburg.
DA will review L.A.
church files for crimes
LOS ANGELES Prosecutors
who have been stymied for years in
their attempts to build a criminal con-
spiracy case against retired Los An-
geles Archdiocese Cardinal Roger
Mahony and other church leaders
say they'll review newly released
priest files for additional evidence.
Thousands of pages from the in-
ternal disciplinary files of 14 priests
made public Monday show Mahony


and other top aides maneuvered be-
hind the scenes to shield molester
priests and provide damage control
for the church.
Some of the documents provide
the strongest evidence to date that
Mahony and another key official
worked to protect a priest who re-
vealed in therapy sessions that he
had raped an 11-year-old boy and
abused up to 17 boys.
Egypt Muslim cleric
cancels Saudi visit
CAIRO Cairo airport officials
say Egypt's top Muslim cleric can-
celled a visit to Saudi Arabia at the
invitation of its monarch when he
discovered that senior delegates
traveling with him were assigned
economy class seats by their Saudi
hosts.
The officials said Sheik Ahmed al-
Tayeb, the Grand Imam of AI-Azhar
- Sunni Islam's highest seat of
learning angrily disembarked from
a Saudi-bound airliner shortly before
takeoff on Wednesday and in-
structed his delegation to follow suit.
AI-Tayeb was assigned a first
class seat.
The Egyptians were due to per-
form the minor pilgrimage to Mecca,
or umrah, before flying to the Saudi


capital Riyadh to attend Monday's
award ceremony for the King Faisal
International Prize for scientific and
religious achievement.
The officials spoke on condition of
anonymity because of the matter's
sensitivity.
Bob Jones asks for
outside abuse probe
COLUMBIA, S.C. Bob Jones
University is asking an outside
Christian organization that deals
with child abuse to investigate how
the fundamentalist college responds
to abuse allegations.
Trustees at the Greenville Chris-
tian university agreed earlier this
month to the investigation, which will
include recommendations on how to
better deal with any future abuse al-
legations. The investigation will in-
clude Bob Jones Academy, which
teaches students from preschool to
12th grade.
School officials say the investiga-
tion was prompted by heart-breaking
revelations of sexual abuse in secu-
lar and Christian organizations. The
investigation will review how it re-
sponds to students who say they
were abused before coming to the
school or outside its campus as well.
-From wire reports


Places of wor



offer love, pe



and harmony


n over to "His" house, you


SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF


'ship that



ace


to all.




spirits will belifedf!t


HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


Community Church
"'\ I//~





Sundays 10:00am
New Location
1196 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto
Rev. Brian Baggs Pastor
(352) 527-4253
www.qenesiscommunitychurch.org
- Authentic Love, Relevant Faith
Embracing Community


~ Shepherd

of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon offaith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Sunday School
Adult 9:15
Child 10:00
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
Bishop Jim Adams,Rector
527-0052
540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy,
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
wwwSOTHECor


_U Floral City
nited Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychureh.eom


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
L fting Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
www.fbcfloralcity.org


"Faith
Lutheran

Church
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325

COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com

{ (9a,~ r t the1w


Hernando
Churchof
TheNazarene
Place to Belong

2101 N. Florida Ave,

Hernando FL

726-6144

Nursery Provided


*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School

9:45 A.M.

Praise & Worship

10:40 A.M.

Praise Service

6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer

(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 am
11:30 am

Saturday
Vigil
4:00 pm
6:00 pm
Weekday
Masses
8:30 am
Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm

(352 ) 746-9422


JT.4/,VCA-Yf Ji')

Grace Bible
Church


Sunday
9:30 AM ....................Discovery Time
11:00 AM ...................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM ...................Evening Service
Monday
6:15 PM ..................... Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM..Awana (Sept. Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM ...................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
17 mi. east of US. 19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com



HERNANDO

United

Methodist

Church

OPew
/Hear/h
0



OPM


"A Safe Sanctuary for Children and Families"
2125 E, Norvell Bryant Hwy, (486)
(1 miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl .org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Individual Hearmi Devices


Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.

Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.

Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
....... Floral City, FL.



The New Church
Without Walls
"An Exciting & Growing
Multi-Cultural
Non-Denominational
Congregation Ministering to
the Heart of Citrus County"


Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr.
& Lady "T" Alexander

Sunday School 9:30 am
Sunday Service 11:00 am
Wednesday Bible Study 7pm

3962 N. Roscoe Rd.
Hemando, FL
Ph: 352-344-2425
www.newchurchwithoutwalls.com
Email:cwow@embarqmail.com

"The perfect church for
people who aren't"


Homosassa Springs
X, SEV-DAYADVNTRr'CHURCH







Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www. homosassaadventist.com


0


Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA


Coe






Worship



8:30 am

11:00 am
Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org


352-74-71611


RELIGION


SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013 C3


I


I


I





C4 SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12, at the Kof
C Hall, 2389 W. Norvell Bryant
Highway (County Road 486),
Lecanto. Two levels of play will be
featured, a competitive level for
seasoned players and a social
level for beginners and persons
with disabilities. The $12 ticket in-
cludes a brunch. Door prizes, raf-
fle prizes and cash prizes will be
awarded. Reservations must be
made in advance by calling Char
at 352-746-9490 or Bernita at
352-344-0235. Funds raised will
benefit the Auxiliary Scholarship
Fund and charitable organizations
in the community.
0 Upward Youth Soccer reg-
istration for boys and girls in
kindergarten through sixth grade
will take place from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. Wednesday through Satur-
day, Feb. 13-16 at Joy Evangeli-
cal Lutheran Church, 7045 S.W.
83rd Place at State Road 200,
Ocala. Registration fee of $65 per
child includes a reversible jersey,
water bottle, socks, car magnet
and an end-of-season reward.
Scholarships are available. All
players must attend one soccer
evaluation that promotes equal
and competitive teams, as well as
a substitution system, to complete
the registration process. Practice
begins Tuesday, Feb. 26 and
Thursday, Feb. 28. The first game
is Saturday, March 9. All events
will occur at Hope Field at Joy
Lutheran Church. Volunteers are
needed to help with coaching,
registering the participants and or-
ganizing the players. Call Pastor
Ed Holloway at 352-854-4509,
ext. 223, or Fran Johnson at 352-
854-4509, ext. 221.

Live & learn
0 A new "Coffee Talk for Col-
lege and Young Adults" begins
at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 4, at
Genesis Community Church,


CiTRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


which meets at the Builders Asso-
ciation, 1196 S. Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491). Join other
young adults for an informal dis-
cussion of the book "Blue Like
Jazz" by Donald Miller. "Blue Like
Jazz" portrays Donald Miller's
quest for meaning, a depth of
faith, the realization that humanity
is broken and imperfect, explo-
rations of childhood misconcep-
tions of faith, and the desire to live
into his true identity. So, grab a
cup of coffee and a dessert and
share your thoughts about this in-
triguing book chapter by chapter.
You can purchase your own book
online through Amazon, Barnes
and Noble, etc., and we will have
a few books available for loan.
Genesis Community Church
meets at 10 a.m. Sundays and is
led by the Rev. Brian Baggs. Call
(352) 464-0983 for more informa-
tion or email Kathy Baggs at
kathybaggs@hotmail.com.
0 Two self-improvement and
spiritual development opportu-
nities (IS/ARE) offered Sunday,
Feb. 10, and Monday, Feb. 11, at
Unity of Citrus County, 2628 W.
Woodview Lane, Lecanto. The
first, from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Feb.
10, is a lecture by award-winning
actor and acclaimed author John
Maxwell Taylor, titled "The Power
of I Am." This lecture describes
techniques to give strength and
confidence to your personality,
permitting you to reflect the
beauty and strength of your soul.
The techniques presented will en-
able you to connect easily with
others and to hold your own with
everyone you meet. The second,
from 7to9 p.m. Feb. 11, isa
workshop led by John Maxwell
Taylor and his wife, Emily Taylor,
titled "Healing with the Tao." This
workshop will teach simple, time-
tested Taoist techniques to heal
your internal organs, boost your
immune system, and fill yourself
with vibrant life energy and happi-
ness. Call 352-746-1270 for more
information. A love offering of $20
is suggested.


0 The ladies of Lecanto Church
of Christ meet for Bible study at
10 a.m. the second Tuesday
monthly. Bible study is followed by
a luncheon. Studies have in-
cluded such subjects as prayer,
love and patience. All ladies are
invited to attend and enjoy Chris-
tian fellowship.
Special events
0 Citrus County does not have
a League of Women Voters, and
has not had a chapter for many
years. The league is a nonparti-
san organization encouraging in-
formation and participation in
government. It was founded 92
years ago and has been open to
men for 40 years. The league is a
grassroots organizations with
chapters in all states. The LWV is
strictly nonpartisan; it does not
support nor oppose candidates. It
takes a stand on issues after
coming to a consensus and works
to increase the public's under-
standing of policy issues, through
education. The Nature Coast Uni-
tarian Universalists have invited
Allie Gore, of the Marion County
League of Women Voters, to tell
us how we might join up with it, or
form a local branch. Gore is a
longtime educator. She was cru-
cial in reactivating the Marion
County League and will help us, if
Citrus County wishes to do the
same. Gore will show a short
video of the history of the struggle
for equal suffrage. This will be fol-
lowed by a PowerPoint presenta-
tion and discussion of the LWV
today. The event is open to the
public at 2 p.m. today at the Uni-
tarian Universalists Fellowship,
7633 N. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41),
Citrus Springs. Call 352-465-4225
or visit naturecoastuu.org.
0 Citrus County Clergy Associ-
ation will conduct its "Quarterly
Celebration" at St. Margaret's
Episcopal Church at 6 p.m. tomor-
row. Everyone is invited.
0 All widows in the community
are invited to join the Widows
Ministry Group from 4 to 5:30


p.m. Wednesdays at Cornerstone
Baptist Church, 1100 W. Highland
Blvd., Inverness. "God isn't fin-
ished with us yet!" Call Darla at
352-270-8115.
0 First Christian Church of Ho-
mosassa Springs' Faith Promise
Mission Rally begins at 7 p.m.
Friday. The public is invited to at-
tend all activities. Bob Devoe from
Lifeline Christian Mission is the
main speaker. Individuals can
sample international food fare
while visiting mission booths sup-
ported by the church. Saturday
Men's Missionary breakfast at 8
a.m. is followed by the ladies
salad luncheon at noon. Mark and
Deborah Clark from Lake Aurora
Christian Camp will lead the Sun-
day school service at 9:30 a.m.
The Sunday worship service is at
10:30 a.m. The church is at 7030
W. Grover Cleveland Blvd. Dan
Wagner is the minister. Call the
church office at 352-628-5556.
0 Children and youth in the
area are invited to a "Weekend
Bible Adventure" at 9 a.m. Sat-
urday, Feb. 16, at First United
Methodist Church, Homosassa.
The day will include team-building
games, Bible songs, crafts, stories
and skits. Lunch will be provided,
as well as a T-shirt and other
take-home surprises. Following
the fun for the children from age 5
to 11, the youth, parents, grand-
parents and friends are invited to
join us at 4 p.m. for a concert by
"Light Central," a praise band of
college students from Orlando.
Call the church for more informa-
tion at 352-628-4083.
0 Men and older boys are in-
vited to the "Jack 'Murph the
Surf' Men's and Boys' Event" at
10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, at
North Oak Baptist Church, 9324
N. Elkcam Blvd., Citrus Springs. A
complimentary lunch will be
served following the presentation.
Jack Roland Murphy, aka "Murph
the Surf," author, artist, sports-
man, musician and Christian

See NOTES/Page C5


CANCER
Continued from Page C1

was home from the hospital and said
she felt good throughout and happy
"I was not depressed. People said I
looked good," she says.
But in October 2011, Blain's blood
counts became critically low, and she
had to have a bone marrow biopsy She
said when her son Jimmy came to visit
her, she started feeling better and her
blood counts returned to normal.
She drew strength from other sources
as well. When word got out that Blain
was ill, she received a flood of cards and
letters from well-wishers. Someone
started a page for her on www caring-
bridge.com, which now has over 700 en-
tries from friends and family
Blain said in total she has received
more than 500 cards and a variety of
gifts, including Jewish Stars and prayer
beads and a quilt from the Catholics
and from the ladies at church.
A member of Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in Lecanto, Blain
said her pastor, Bishop Jim Adams, has
come to visit often during her illness.
"The church has been wonderful. I
praise the Lord and thank Him all the
time. I am blessed that I am still here.
I've passed the survival rate for people
with this disease already I know the
Lord is with me," she said.
When her elderly mother became
very ill, Blain said her mother won-
dered why she was hanging on so long.
"It's because I need you here, mom,"
Blain responded. Her mother passed
away shortly after the operation.
When asked what she thinks heaven
might be like, Blain said through tears:
"I think God will look beautiful, with a
big face."
"I think I will be working," she
added. "I think you're going to be doing
something with your life in heaven."
For now, Blain believes there is a
reason she is still here on Earth. "I've
had angels hovering over me my whole
life," she said. "Someone has been with
me this whole time.
"Something is keeping me here now"
In April 2012, Blain's tumor returned
and she is trying new treatment to beat
the disease which has now crossed her
mid-brain.


S46 Years of
FIRST ~ringing Christ
to Inverness

LUTHERAN

CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am

Sunday School
Bible Class
8:45 AM.

726-1637
Missouri Synod
www.1 stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. Larry Powers
Senior Pastor
Sunday Services:
Traditional Service ........... 8:30 A.
Sunday School.......9:30 A
Contemporary Service...10:30 AM
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes........7:00 -
Boys and Girls Brigade....7:00 -
Teens ................................. 7:00 -
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726 4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"


PRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bblicos
LesfEperamos!
David Pihero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave,, Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711


At

Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Sunday Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to belong. A place to become:'


t "Firs For Christ"...John 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr. Ray Kelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study












rad:
St



rh


5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM

Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday

Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca .com



Riding a Hard Trail
Join us at

t C1OS AT THE RIVER,


COWBOY CHtURClt

Greater Dunnellon
Historical Train Depot

12061 S. Williams St.
(Hwy 41)
Dunnellon, FL 34432



Sunday Church Service:
10:00am to 11:00am

Ladies Bible Study
2nd & 4th Wednesday's
7:00pm

Contact
Pastor E. Patrick Anthony

352-465-6223
or
cell 352-445-5171

crossattheriverl@gmaiI.com
website:
www.crossattheriver.org


COMMUNITY
CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH


'fPaiwj9 Wefcnww&

SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260


rIll


VIGIL MM
4:00 P.M. & 6:


SUNDAY MA
8:00 A.M. & 10


SPANISH N
12:30 P.


CONFESS
2:30 P.M. to 3:1
orByAppoln


WEEKDAY M
8:00 Al


6 Roosevelt
Beverly 1-
746-214
(1 Block East of
www.ourladyo
, .catholicweb


Pastor
Tom Walker


INVERNESS
First CHuRcH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study, Gospel
Singing, Pitch-in Dinners, singing
the old hymns? Then you'll enjoy
this Church family.
Home of the
"Saturday Nite GOSPEL
JUBILEE" A great Nite Out!
Last Saturday of the month 6:00
Fun, Food, Fellowship & Free!





of Lake, Aoaxseaa,
SBC
Joseph W. (Joe) Schroeder,
Pastor
SERVICES
Sunday 11:00am
& 6:00pm
Wednesday 6:00pm
Magnifying God's name by
bringing people to Jesus
7854 W. Dunnellon Rd (CR 488)
Ph. 352-795-5651
Cell 352-812-8584
Email: pastorjoelO@gmail.com
Check us out on Facebook


UI







Hwy. 44 E~
*Washington Ave., Inverness 0

SSES: m Sunday Services *
:00 P.M. 0 Traditional *
*8:00 AM & 11:00 AM.
ASSES:: Casual Service
I







:30 A. E 9:30 AM
lASShn11:00 AM Service
AASS: Tapes & CD's Available
A. m Sunday School for all ages
0 9:30 AM
ONS: Nursery Provided
5P.M. Sat. : Fellowship & Youth Group m
)tent 5to 7PM 0
0 Web Site: www.fpcinv.org 0
SS: Podcast: FPC inv.com
.M. m udy col o llae0





ON Church Office 637-0770
S 5Pastor Craig Davies
Blvd. 0
Jils
4
SR 491)
hfrhicefla n
t~com||{ .:atr ri Dve


Places of worship that



offer love, peace and



harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!


SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS


RELIGION





Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

they were there first.
When I lived in Port-
land, Maine, for a few
years, I went to First Bap-
tist Church in Portland. A
sign out front read: "First
Baptist Church Jesus
Never Fails." My friend
Terry, who grew up in
Portland, said she used to
walk by the church on her
way to school and always
thought the sign meant it
was the first Baptist
church Jesus never failed
- as if he had failed all the
other Baptist churches.
Two churches in Texas
are named Divide Baptist
Church and Petty United
Methodist Church. There's
also a Boring United
Methodist Church and a
Half Way Baptist Church.
Canada may have the
longest-named church: St
Francis National Evangeli-
cal Spiritual Baptist Faith
Archdiocese of Canada, or
"St Francis N.E.S.B.F Arch-
diocese of Canada" for short
I don't know about you,
but I'd be embarrassed to
invite someone to come
with me to Hot Rod
Church for Sinners or
Scum of the Earth Church,
although there's no doubt
what they believe about
the state of humanity.
What if you invited
someone to go to Sandals
or Matthew's Party or even
The Salvage Yard -what
would they think?
On the flipside there's
actually a church called
Flipside, "turning the world
upside down for Jesus."
The trend for new
churches today is one- or
two-word ambiguous
names such as Resonate,
Revolution, Radiance, Re-
deemer, Mosaic, Encom-
pass, Journey, Legacy,
Celebration, Elevation,
Mars Hill, Urban Refuge,
The Well, The Pursuit, The
Orchard, The Brook.
When I hear names like
these, I picture loud gui-
tars and a very young, very
hip pastor wearing skinny
jeans and salmon-colored
sneakers, sitting on a high
stool, sipping coffee as he
preaches.
I also picture lots of young
people bringing their kids to
church, and I like that
Maybe it's the names that
draw them; I don't know
This past weekend my
husband and I went out for
a drive and as we took
some back roads we
passed a church called
Faithful Few Ministries.
That's what got me think-
ing about church names.
I was (and still am) curious
about how they came to call
themselves Faithful Few.
The church looked old,
which doesn't mean any-
thing. Old on the outside
doesn't necessarily mean
stale on the inside. Nei-
ther does new and trendy
on the outside mean the
members don't cling to
lifeless theology.
You can't judge a book
by its cover and you can't
judge a church by its
building, but sometimes
you can get an idea of a
church's identity or per-
sonality by its name.
If that's true, then the
people who chose that
name see themselves as
Faithful Few, which, in my
opinion, reeks of arrogance
and self-righteousness (and
yes, I'm fully aware my
pointing that out reeks of
arrogance and self-
righteousness even more).
It sounds biblical and
humble, but calling your-
self Faithful Few is mostly
prideful and presumptu-
ous. It says, "We are the
faithful few --and you're
probably not."
God is the faithful one.
When it comes to church
names, maybe the best one
is this: The Gathering
Place For Sinners Who
Know They Can't Get Any


Better By Their Own Ef-
forts So They Run To Jesus
For Mercy and To Be Cov-
ered With His Righteous-
ness By Grace Alone
Through Faith Alone.
Or maybe just #grace.


Nancy Kennedy is the au-
thor of'Move Over, Victo-
ria -I Know the Real
Secret," "Girl on a
Swing," and her latest
book, "Lipstick Grace."
She can be reached at
352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday, or via
email atnkennedy@
chronicleonline. com.


RELIGION


NOTES
Continued from Page C4

motivational speaker, gained notori-
ety in 1964 for the jewel robbery of
the century when he and a partner
stole the J.P. Morgan Gem collection
and the Star of India, largest star sap-
phire in the world, from the American
Museum of Natural History in New
York City. For 22 years, Jack was a
speaker, trainer and the International
Director for Bill Glass Champions for
Life Prison Ministry and School of
Evangelism, based in Dallas, Texas.
Jack and his wife Kitten live in Crystal
River. Their ministry, Sonshine Ad-
ventures, works with the church to
train and develop prison, jail and
youth ministries. Call the church at
352-489-1688.
0 A fashion show will take place
from 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, in
the Dewain Farris Fellowship Hall at
Community Congregational Christian
Church, 9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.,

quest
DEFINE thinkt
people
Continued from Page C1 rights
nately
years the word "evangeli- mean
cal" a church-history Wan
term "got co-opted into ment,
being a political term," rience
said Warren, in a recent intern
telephone interview news]
Debates about this and te
vague word are not new a blit2
During a 1987 interview of an
with the Rev. Billy Gra- niver:
ham, I asked him point book
blank, "What does the Drive
word 'evangelical' mean?" Earth
The world's most fa- The b
mous evangelist re- than
sponded, 'Actually, that's a arour
question I'd like to ask transit
somebody, too.... You go all langu
the way from the extreme By l
fundamentalists to the ex- storm
treme liberals and, some- bers
where in between, there starti:
are the evangelicals." fore
Ultimately, Graham said
"evangelicals" preach sal-
vation through faith in
Jesus and believe all the
doctrines in the Nicene EX
Creed especially in the
resurrection. D
Warren said he would
certainly agree with Gra-
ham's bottom line, which
is "evangelical" must be
defined in doctrinal A
terms. The problem is
this isn't how the term is
being used in public life,
especially by the news
media.
During the George W
Bush administration, he
said, most journalists
"seemed to think that
'evangelical' meant that
you backed the Iraq war,
for some reason or an-
other ... But right now, I T
don't think there is any -


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746.3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison, III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion.1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School ............. 9:00
Worship .................. 10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School ............. 6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(At The Flashing Light)
For more
information call
352-422-6535
Pastor
Toddon
Langdon 14


Citrus Springs. The event will feature
fashions by Bealls, hair and makeup
by "New Concepts," and delightful
desserts. Cost is $7. Call the church
at 352-489-1260.
Worship
0 Covenant Love Ministry meets
in building 11 at Shamrock Acres In-
dustrial Park, 6843 N. Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River. There is a gospel sing
at 7 p.m. Fridays. Regular church
services are at 10:30 a.m. Sundays.
The ministry website is Covenant-
Love.com. Call Pastor Brian Kinker at
352-601-4868.
0 St. Raphael Orthodox Church
in America invites the public to at-
tend Great Vespers at 5 p.m. today
and Divine Liturgy at 10 a.m. Sunday.
The church is at 1277 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness (off U.S. 41 North, across
from Dollar General). The Holy
Myrrhbearers ask attendees to bring
a box or can of food for distribution at
Family Resource Center in Her-
nando. Call 352-726-4777.
0 "There Is No Place Like Home,"


ion that most people
that evangelicals are
de who oppose gay
s period. Unfortu-
y, that's all the word
Is."
rren based this judg-
in part, on his expe-
es during 22 recent
views with major
papers, magazines
elevision networks -
i marking the release
expanded, 10th an-
sary edition of his
"The Purpose
n Life: What On
i Am I Here For?"
book has sold more
32 million copies
ad the world, with
nations in 50
ages.
the end of that media
n, Warren said mem-
of his team were
ng to place bets be-
each interview on


Come To S -
ST.
MARGARET's"
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH





SUNDAY
Family Worship
9:00 AM
Coffee Fellowship following the Service
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study & Prayer
7:00 PM
We are a nondenominational church
meeting at the Inverness Womans Club
1715 Forest Drive, Inverness
(across from Whispering Pines Park entrance)
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813


SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013 CS


from Luke 4:16-30, is the sermon
given by Pastor Stephen Lane at
6 p.m. today and 9:30 a.m. Sunday at
Faith Lutheran Church in Crystal
Glen Subdivision, off State Road 44
and County Road 490 in Lecanto. Fel-
lowship follows the Sunday service
and Bible study and Sunday school
both begin at 11 a.m. The adult class
will start another theme as the Book
of Revelation is completed. The
church is handicapped accessible, of-
fers hearing assistance, large-print
bulletins and a cry room where the
parents can see and hear the service
in progress. Lenten Wednesday serv-
ices begin Ash Wednesday, Feb. 13,
at 5 p.m. with a covered-dish supper
after the service. Lenten services will
continue Feb. 20 and 27, and March
6, 13 and 20, all at 5 p.m. followed by
a covered-dish supper. Call 352-527-
3325 or visit faithlecanto.com.
0 St. Paul's Lutheran Church,
6150 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly
Hills, will have regular Sunday wor-
ship services at 8 and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday school for ages 3 through 12


whether the perfunctory
gay-marriage question
would be the first, or the
second, question asked.
On CNN, interviewer
Piers Morgan noted the
U.S. Constitution and the
Bible are "well-
intentioned" but "inher-
ently flawed." Morgan
continued: "My point to
you about gay rights for
example it's time for an
amendment to the Bible."
Warren, of course, dis-
agreed: "I do not believe
the Bible is flawed, and I
willingly admit ... that I
base my worldview on the
Bible, which I believe is
true, and truth.... It was
true 1,000 years ago, it'll
be true 1,000 years from
today"
Time after time, said
Warren, interviewers as-
sumed his beliefs on
moral and cultural issues


Our Lady of

Fatima

CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 US, Hwy, 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
Weekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June-August)
9:00 and 11:00A.M. ,

726-1670







All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033


-from salvation to s
ethics were base
mere politics, rather
on convictions about
Bible and centuri(
doctrine.
"I've decided that
people don't have
politics is their relig
he said. "Politics i
only thing that is r
real to many people i
world today.... So if
tics isn't at the cent
your life, then many
ple just can't under
what you're saying."
In the end, Warren
it may be time for va
brands of conserv
Protestants -Bal
charismatics, Wesle
Pentecostals, Calv
and others to stole
ing to crowd under a


is at 9:15 a.m. Adult Bible class at
9:15 a.m. will continue studying the
book of Revelations in depth. Choir
rehearsal is at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday.
Senior fellowship is from 3 to 5 p.m.
Thursday. St. Paul's Lutheran School
will host a basketball tournament
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. today. Boys and
girls basketball teams will participate
in this tournament, including teams
from Orlando area and Northdale in
Tampa. Concession stand available.
Call 352-489-3027.
0 Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church invites the public to worship
at 8:30 and 11 a.m. Sunday. A coffee
hour follows both services. The
church is barrier free and offers a free
CD ministry, large-print service helps
and hearing devices. A nursery atten-
dant is available for preschool-age
children. The church will have a tag
sale from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Sat-
urday, Feb. 2. Ash Wednesday wor-
ship services are at noon and 7 p.m.
Feb. 13.The church is on County
Road 486 opposite Citrus Hills Boule-
vard in Hernando. Call 352-746-7161.

exual mon "evangelical" um-
ed on brella. They need to start
than talking more about the
at the specific traditions that
es of shape their lives.
"Maybe 'evangelical'
when will be like the word 'lib-
faith, eral,"' he said. "When that
gion," word turned into a nega-
s the tive, everybody on the left
really just turned into 'progres-
in our sives' and they moved
r poli- right on.... Maybe it's time
ter of to give the word 'evangeli-
peo- cal' a rest."
,stand

said, Terry Mattingly is the di-
arious rector of the Washington
native Journalism Center at the
ptists, Council for Christian Col-
yans, leges and Universities
nists and leads the GetReli-
p try- gion. orgproject to study
com- religion and the news.


Monday-Thursday
Early Bird 4pm-6pm ................. $13.95
Thursday
R ib Eye ......................................... $19.95
Martini Night 4pm-1Opm
Specialty Martinis ...................... $5.00
Friday
1 / lb. Live Maine Lobster ..... $19.95

Sunday
Award Winning Sunday Brunch
11:30am-2:00pm .......................... $15.95

Call for reservations or more information.


at Plantation on Crystal River
9301 W. Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River
352-795-4211
www.plantationoncrystalriver.com


WFirs t

Assembly


of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452


Pastor,
Dairold
6
Bettye
Rushing


lrst Unite


Methodist


(IChurch
of Inverness

3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 ml. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
SeniorPastor



8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion

9:45 AM
Sunday School

10:00 AM


NContemporary

O2117 Praise & Worship
FICE (35-


pirituality & Eternal Life
explore the Connection, Experience the Freedom

Discover:
How claiming one's identity as God's offspring
brings countless freedoms.
"Eternal Life:
Could it be that God didn't intend you to age?"
Sunday, January 27, 2013 at 2 PM
First Church of Christ, Scientist
224 North Osceola Avenue
Inverness, Florida
Practitioner and teacher of Christian Science
Healing, Mark Swinney, has devoted more than
twenty five years both to praying with people and
empowering people to pray effectively for
themselves. He has traveled much of the world
speaking about his heartfelt love for God and
Christian healing, and is known for his honesty,
humor, and candid style. Swinney is a member
of the Christian Science Board of Lectureship
and travels from his home in Sandia Park, New
Mexico, USA.
his talk is sponsored by First Church of Christ, Scientist
For more information please call: 352-726-4033


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS


We &zL L








C Pae 06 SATRDAY JANARY & 213



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Refuge Friends
to meet Jan. 27
The annual meeting of
the Friends of Crystal River
National Wildlife Refuge
Complex Inc., will take
place at 2 p.m. Sunday,
Jan. 27, in the Fellowship
Hall of the First United
Methodist Church, 8831 W.
Bradshaw St., Homosassa.
Keynote speaker this
year will be Paul Boetcher,
owner of Hydro-Q Inc. Be-
fore retiring, he was the
lead hydrologic technician
with the U.S. Geological
Survey for more than 30
years.
Also at the meeting will
be County Commissioner
Joe Meek, who will give an
update on the actions the
county is taking to support
King's Bay and its water
quality.
Information concerning
the various Friends' activi-
ties and 2013 events will
be on display. The public is
welcome. The event is free,
but a donation of nonper-
ishable food items is appre-
ciated. Light refreshments
will be served.
For more information call
352-586-7140.
Brits' club to
gather Monday
The British American So-
cial Club will meet from 7 to
9 p.m. Monday, Jan. 28, at
Holiday Inn Express, 903
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, In-
verness. After a short busi-
ness meeting will be a
social gathering and re-
freshments will be served.
The club meets the
fourth Monday of every
month and welcomes all
who are interested in
British history and culture.
Visit the website at
www.britamclub.com, or
call Judi Matthews at 352-
527-2581, or Dave Jones
at 352-382-3418.
Library Friends
to gather Feb. 5
The Friends of the Dun-
nellon Public Library will
meet at 10 a.m. Tuesday,
Feb. 5, in the library meet-
ing room, 20351 Robinson
Road, Dunnellon.
For more information,
call 352-438-2520.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA

Lennon


Special to the Chronicle
This fuzzy and curious
guy is Lennon. He is one
of the cutest, medium-
haired orange and white
tabbies you will ever see,
and he will endear him-
self to you with his sweet
and loveable kitty ways.
However, if you are look-
ing for a more mature fe-
line, all our adult cat
adoption fees are half
price at $27.50. Visitors
are welcome from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and
2 to 4 p.m. Monday
through Saturday at the
Humanitarians' Man-
chester House on the
corner of State Road 44
and Conant Avenue, east
of Crystal River. Drop by
and enjoy the felines in
their cage-free, home-
style environment. Call
the Humanitarians at
352-613-1629 for adop-
tions, or view most of the
Hardin Haven's felines
online at www.petfinder.
com/shelters/fl186.html.


Stocking snacks


Fundraiser fete for retired clerk to help Boys 6- Girls Club


Special to the Chronicle

Melissa Miller, club director at
the Central Ridge Boys & Girls
Club, said when 45 active children
come in from school, they all want a
"pick-me-up snack" and the cup-
boards are running bare.
To provide money for snacks and
to honor retired Clerk of the Circuit
Court Betty Strifler, the Beverly
Hills Civic Association will host a
Saturday, Feb. 2, "Snack Attack Din-
ner" at the Beverly Hills Lions Club.
The doors open at 4 p.m. and
Judge Patricia Thomas will make an


Betty
Strifler
fundraiser will
honor years of
service.


award presentation
to Strifler at 5:30.
The menu will
offer ham, turkey or
both, scalloped po-
tatoes, green beans,
coleslaw, brownie
and ice cream for
dessert and coffee.
"If you can't at-
tend, please write a
check in any amount
payable to the Boys
& Girls Clubs with


'Snack Attack' in the memo line and
mail it to: PO. Box 907, Lecanto,


Florida 34460," said Civic Associa-
tion President Harvey Gerber
Incoming Clerk Angela Vick,
along with Thomas, Strifler and sev-
eral county commissioners, will be
at the head table.
A limit of 200 tickets at $9 each are
being sold. Sales outlets are:
0 Beverly Hills Civic Association,
1 Civic Circle, 352-746-2657;
0 Central Ridge Boys & Girls
Club, 901 W Roosevelt Blvd., 352-
270-8841;
0 and Home Again Resale Store,
1980 N. Future Terrace, 352-
270-8861.


Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus County YMCA will tip
off its 2013 Winter Youth Basketball
League on Monday, Jan. 28. The
league will play at Key Training
Center facility's gym.
On Monday, the Y will host open
registration for those who have not
had an opportunity to pre-register,
along with a skills assessment, fol-
lowed by a team placement. The
open registration event will be at the


Key Training Center facility outside
Crystal River and begins at 5:30 p.m.
The league will run for 10 weeks
(two weeks of practice and eight
weeks of games) and is open to chil-
dren ages 3 through 12. The Junior
League will have ages 3 through 5,
and the Youth League will consist of
6- through 12-year-olds with several
age brackets. Practice will be once a
week on a weekday evening, with
games being played on Saturday All
practices and games will be at the


Key Training Center Chet Cole Life
Enrichment Center gymnasium.
The league cost is $85 for ages 6 to
12, and $65 for 3 to 5. Scholarships
are available through the YMCAs
Financial Assistance program. To
apply, call the office at 352-637-0132.
To register for the league, visit
www.ymcasuncoast.org and down-
load the form on the Citrus County
page. Visit the office at 3909 N.
Lecanto Highway or call 352-637-
0132 for more details.


Stoneridge snowbirds' exhibit at library


Special to the Chronicle
During the month of February, the Lakes Region Library will host a new exhibit by the Stoneridge Snowbirds Art
Group of Inverness. The exhibit is set up in the research and computer area of the library and is available for view-
ing during regular library business hours. The diverse group of artists was formed in 2008 and includes members from
the Inverness and Floral City areas. They meet on a weekly basis at the community clubhouse for an afternoon of
painting and sharing of ideas. Members belong to the Citrus Art Center and also the Citrus Watercolor Club, but go
their separate ways during the summer months. Back, from left, are: Joan Mensch, Joan Meredith, Caroline Frary,
Shirley Glueck and Mac Stewart. Front, from left, are: Audrey Bunchkowski, Sylvia Heymans and Jude Caborn. Not
pictured are artists Linda Middleton, Lauren Schumacher and Charlene Nelson.




Time to register for fair pageants


Entries soughtfor children in baby topre-teen competitions


Special to the Chronicle

It's time to register for the chil-
dren's pageants, slated for Sunday,
March 24, at the 2013 Citrus County
Fair
The Pre Teen Pageant for ages 7 to
13 will begin at 1 p.m., starting with
the 13-year-olds. The Little Miss/Mis-
ter, ages 5 and 6, will start immedi-
ately after the Pre Teen contest, with
the 6-year-olds first. The Beautiful
Baby competition for ages 1to 4 will
start at 3 p.m. with the 4-year-olds
and ending with the Decorated Baby


pageant for ages 6 to 11 months.
Contestants must be a resident of
Citrus County. There is a $30 entry
fee and pre-registration is required.
All contestants are awarded prizes.
Applications must be in the Fair Of-
fice by Hriday, Feb. 22. Applications
are available at wwwcitruscounty
fair com under the Pageants tab on
the left, all Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce offices or the Fair Of-
fice at 3600 S. Florida Ave.,
Inverness.
All pageants are held in the Citrus
County Auditorium.


General admission on the day of
the pageants for adults is $5; chil-
dren ages 5 to 10 is $3; ages 4 and
younger are free.
Family memberships are $40 per
family (one household with two par-
ents, children younger than 18). An
individual is $15. Memberships will
cover admission to the baby pag-
eants and the fair from March 25
through 30.
The deadline to purchase mem-
berships is Friday, March 1.
For more information, call 352-
726-2993.


News NOTES

Elks celebrate
Burns' birthday
A Robert Burns Birthday
Dinner Celebration will take
place at 2 p.m. Sunday,
Jan. 27, at the Brooksville
Elks Lodge No. 2582,
14494 Cortez Blvd., west
of the Suncoast Parkway.
On the menu will be pot
roast, potatoes, green
beans, haggis, cake, cof-
fee, tea and soda. The cer-
emony begins with piping
and entrance of the haggis,
followed by the traditional
address to the haggis.
There will be Scottish
Highland dances per-
formed by the students at
the Diane Dubock School
of Scottish Highland
Dance. Salutes will be of-
fered to the lads and
lassies and the history of
Scotland's poet Robert
Burns will be presented. A
Scottish blessing and
poems will be read.
Tickets are $20. Call
Alice at 352-688-4766,
Cathy at 352-686-0975,
Mike at 352-341-1551 or
Joan at 352-527-2439 for
tickets.
'Making Sense
of Suicide Grief'
The Wings Grief Educa-
tion Team at Hospice of
Citrus County will present a
community workshop titled
"Making Sense of Suicide
Grief."
The program will be of-
fered from 1 to 2:30 p.m.
Monday, Jan. 28, at the
Hospice of Citrus County
Wings Education Center,
8471 W. Periwinkle Lane,
Suite A, Homosassa.
It will be moderated by
Hospice of Citrus County
Wings Grief Specialist
Paddy O'Connor, Ph.D.
The workshop is free.
For more information, or to
make a reservation, call
Lynn Miller at 352-
621-1500.
Hospice slates
dementia talk
HPH Hospice, in part-
nership with the
Alzheimer's Association,
Gulf Coast Chapter, will
offer a presentation from 2
to 3 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 29,
at the HPH administrative
offices at 3545 N. Lecanto
Highway (the Winn-Dixie
shopping plaza) in Beverly
Hills.
Jerry Fisher, program
specialist with the
Alzheimer's Association,
will discuss what happens
to driving ability during the
Alzheimer's disease
process.
Seating is limited and
reservations are required.
To reserve a space, call
HPH at 352-527-4600.
F.C. Heritage
meeting planned
It's time for the quarterly
meeting of the Floral City
Heritage Council Tuesday,
Jan. 29, at the Floral City
Community House, 8370
E. Orange Ave.
Potluck dinner starts at
7 p.m., followed by the
quarterly meeting at 7:30
pm. No "Snippet of History"
program is planned, since
this is the general member-
ship meeting for the elec-
tion of the 2013 leadership
officers and steering
committee. Nominations
will be accepted from the
floor or may be added by
calling the nominating chair
at 352-586-9545.
Members are reminded
to bring a food item for the
potluck, their own plate and
table service and a nonper-
ishable food items or a gro-
cery store gift card for the
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition Food Pantry.
Visitors are welcome.
Visit www.floralcityhc.


org, or call Peters at 352-
860-0101, or email
fchc@hotmail.com.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.


Ready for some roundball?



Open registration Jan. 28 for YMCA Youth Basketball League


Awls 'Air





Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY EVENING JANUARY 26, 2013 C: Cocast, Citrus B: Bright .ouse Dh.Co.cast, Dunnellon & Inglis F:Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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North 01-26-13
4 10 3
V 742
+ AK543
4652
West East
*K974 4A82
VK65 V3
+ 98 *+QJ106
I K Q 10 4 J 9873
South
SQ J65
V A Q J 10 9 8
*72
AA

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
4 V Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: K

Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Arthur C. Clarke, an English science-fiction
writer who lived a lot of his life in Sri Lanka,
said, "I don't pretend we have all the answers.
But the questions are certainly worth thinking
about."
I hope you thought the questions in my Christ-
mas Competition were worth thinking about.
And I am going to give you my answers without
pretense. However, they will have to be fur-
nished in two stages, because the East-West
hands will change slightly for the play problem.
This was the initial question: How should
South play in four hearts after West leads the
club king?
Declarer has eight top tricks: five hearts, two
diamonds and one club. The heart finesse is
bound to fail, of course. But a high spade can be
established and perhaps a low spade ruffed in
the dummy
It looks natural to lead a spade to dummy's 10
at trick two. Here, though, if East wins with his
ace and shifts to his trump, the contract cannot
be made. West can kill the spade ruff.
Instead, South should play a diamond to the
dummy, then lead the spade three toward his
hand. If East wins with his ace, declarer loses
only two spades and one heart, being able to es-
tablish two spade winners. If East plays low,
South's queen loses to West's king, but West can-
not shift with effect to hearts. Suppose he leads
a club. Declarer ruffs and plays a spade to the
10. East wins and switches to a trump, but South
can try the finesse, being assured of one spade,
five hearts, two diamonds, one club and one
spade ruff.
The bidding and opening-lead answers will be
in Monday's column.
[0 THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, h t
one letter to each square, I had to get out yf there.
That bird guy was
to form four ordinary words. driving me crazy.
SAIBS E


k I WHN THIlF ARVS AY
AL. CA-AYAZ NFPF A RP T
COSTEK rHF roo0 A
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
A: 1111
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday'sI Jumbles: AROSE HOWDY YELLOW POETIC
Answer: Magellan set out to circumnavigate the globe
and was able to "SEA" THE WORLD


41 Treetop Answer to Previous Puzzle
refuges
43 Novelty
45 Actress ISIS=WET OFT
Sorvino AKRON AMA L E A
48 Dislike NI EICE "DI"HE SS
i n t e n s e l y .
51 Purplish KW IK I S -K
flowers NASALMEAYN
53 Wood hyacinth
56 Parakeet Y A P .IF..... EN S
quarters E P A KARL S L 0 T
57 Captain's NER SAAB CR0
journal
58 Spoken SS TS E UIRO I M P
59 Aroma AHIS GIOU DA-
60 Wool supplier GH
61 Slightly C YJ T ESS
improper EC-ADI0IR T1
62 Talking bird ALE RH S EAD


DOWN HAD _/
1 Fathers 6 Jungle
2 Napoleon's crusher
fate 7 Subzero
3 Unambiguous commen
4 It lets off 8 Via -
steam 9 Liverpoo
5 Matured poky


M0TGE LS]
10 Teen woe
11 Acorn, to an
oak
it 17 Corp.
homebase
01 19 Chilling (var.)
22 Eggy desserts
24 Boxer's three
minutes
25 Stare rudely
27 Dinny's rider
28 Checkbook
amt.
29 Type of diving
30 Eur. airline
31 Slime
32 Cinnamon -
36 "Platoon"
actor
38 They need a
29 PIN
42 Prime-time
series
44 Trellis
46 Eager and
willing
47 Light bulb
filler
48 Efficient
49 Squander
50 Gargantuan
51 Pact member
52 Inoculants
54 Victorian, e.g.
55 Insect resin


1-26 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS

WANT MORE PUZZLES?
0 Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


D earAnnie: I would like
to reply to "Arizona
Grandparents," whose
daughter won't allow them to
see their grandchild. They
asked whether it will ever get
better
My granddaugh-
ter was 6 when my
son and his wife di-
vorced and I was no
longer allowed to
see her I continued
to send her a card
and money on every
birthday and at
Christmas. I never
heard back and had
no idea whether
she received them.
Her other grand-
mother kept me in- ANN
formed from time to MAIL
time and even sent
me her 5th grade
picture. When she was 14, my
granddaughter wrote me a
nice letter I was ecstatic! I
wrote her back, but heard
nothing.
I had no money for a lawyer
and didn't want to do anything
that would put me completely
out of contact. My son lived
halfway across the country
When my granddaughter was
17, my son found her Facebook
page. After her 18th birthday, I
called her, and she was happy
to hear from me. She lived
only two hours away We met at
a central location and had a
wonderful reunion. Since
then, we've been in regular
contact. She is now 23, mar-
ried and expecting her first
child.
So, Arizona Grandma, don't
give up. Just do what you can,
and hopefully your story will
end as happily as mine. -A
Happy Grandma
Dear Grandma: We heard


from many grandparents, most
of whom had happy endings.
Read on:
From Indiana: For two
years, I did not get to see my
grandson. During that time, I
did a lot of praying and crying.
For his birthday
and Christmas, I
would leave his
presents on his
front porch. One
day I got a phone
call, and my son in-
vited me to come
over, saying, "It's
time you got to
know your grand-
son." Our first visit
lasted three hours.
On the way home, I
E'S did a lot of praising
.BOX God and crying. I
now get to see him a
couple of times a
week. He calls me Grandma. I
have him in my life now, and
we will continue to move for-
ward and not dwell on the
past.
Florida: We have not seen
our granddaughter in three
years. My husband and I live
10 minutes away, but aren't al-
lowed to visit. At one point, my
son wished me dead. I send
cards and presents, but I don't
know whether they give these
things to her or tell her they
are from us. My friends say to
wait until she is older But
she's only 10 now, so I may not
be around when she's older
This is all over a stupid dis-
agreement (with his brother)
that we are paying for I have
three other grandchildren
who miss their cousin. I have
apologized and am willing to
see her on their terms if only
they would communicate with
me. Maybe they'll read this.
Illinois: Nine years ago, my


oldest grandson called and
told me not to contact him
again. I could tell he was being
coached by his mother, my
son's ex-wife. One winter day
early last year, my grandson
and his mother stopped by my
house unannounced. I was
surprised and happy It turns
out my grandson had con-
tacted my son (his father).
Now he calls me Grandma,
and we see him every once in
a while. He'll be 22 this week,
and I hope to celebrate with
him. Miracles do happen.
Indiana: Your response to
"Arizona Grandparents" was
right on. My husband and I
have had to deal with the
same type of mean-spirited
behavior from our eldest
daughter Tell them to keep in
touch with their 7-year-old
granddaughter with cards for
her birthday, Christmas gifts
and acknowledgments of the
important times in her life.
Our grandson is now 22 and in
the Navy, and we get to chat
and see him when he comes
home. It does hurt when you
are cut off, but in time, it can
turn out OK. Please tell them
there is always hope. They are
not alone.


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcast net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, clo
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit
www creators. com.


ACROSS
1 Knock flat
5 "Fernando"
band
9 Tank filler
12 Wheel part
13 Trail mix
14 High card
15 Eat less
16 Audio
accessory
18 Scheduled
20 Ran in neutral
21 Whodunit
name
22 Online help
page
23 Swashbuckling
Flynn
26 Holds up
30 Cold War org.
33 Gentle exercise
34 Marinate
35 Noisy
37 Humerus
neighbor
39 Pilot a ferry
40 Actress
Freeman


ENTERTAINMENT


SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013 C7


41






CiTus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CS SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013

Peanuts


DON'T YOU THINK iOME
NICE MVSIC IN THE
MORNING 15 A C00D WA9
TO 5TART THE PAY?


C


I NEVER WORRY
ABOUT HOLO r TART
THE PAq..,


IT 6 HOIT END5 UP
THAT BOTHER ME


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser


4XTU\S VS COL-KIR(OF U ,K
T FLL[ FT7W


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Blondie
I WAS LOOKING AT HE "S X EST
HUNKS O 2012" LIST... AND VOU'R.E
NOT 170


YEAH, WELLI HAVE O CONCEDE o
PlTT, CLOONEY
IT'S 50 RARE AND5ECKMAM
70 ;:IND SOMEONE ONCE IN A
WI H LOOKS AN WILE' HA! HA!
SUCH, A GREAT
SENSE 0O:
HUMOR .


SHES A GZA7 LITLE SALES GAL,
5UTr C'MON ... I OESERVE
SOME Cgisr'f


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


Doonesbury


Big Nate

I CAN'T YYEd-i.
BELIEVE pPOOR
JENNuS ,ARTI.
MOVING' Jani
ARTUR?






Arlo and Janis


YES,
H'og. I FE'S
ARTUR *-tI EP.
HE'S HEK CURRENT
FRIE .. ,IEND'


BUT AS HER. FUTURE
BOYFRIEND OF DESTINY,
I'M SUFFERING A
LOT MORE THAN


DID HE JUST CALL
HIMSELF A FUTURE
BOYFRIENDD OF DESTINY?
f 'VE STORED
LISTENING.




,(A~kK YAIy




S-ITUTMtRwHE.
M -110RK) UP
YOUR 005~6
AWDWALK AWAY!




J


Tody s MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
No movie times were supplied by Regal Cine-
mas for Citrus 6. Please call or check
Fandango.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Parker" (R) ID required. 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Movie 43" (R) ID required. 2 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
8 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters" (R) ID re-
quired. In 3D. 1:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 9:45 p.m. No
passes.
"Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters" (R)
ID required. 4 p.m. No passes.
"Mama" (PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:35 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"Broken City" (R) ID required. 1:55 p.m.,
4:55 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:30 p.m.


"The Last Stand" (R) ID required. 1:20 p.m.,
4:05 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"Zero Dark Thirty" (R) ID required. 1 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Silver Lings Playbook" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Lincoln" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10:35 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie list-
ings and entertainment information.


"WHIY IG IT OU, CAN GO SLEVING FOR. HOURS,
KiT YOU CAN ONLY HELP OUR PA SIOVJ EL.
SNOW FOR THREE M I!NUTeS?"


Betty


Frank & Ernest


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: A slenb_


"K ZNJL RN TZCF C XNNE GNSGLHR ...


KD K TZCF C YCE GNSGLHR, K'P KS C


RLHHKYZL PNNE OSRKZ K TZCF C


XNNE NSL." -ECJL YHOYLGA

Previous Solution: "What is important is life, friends and attempting to make
this unjust world a better place in which to live." Oscar Niemeyer
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-26


LISTEN..


Garfield


Pickles


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


Dilbert


RUT I PON'T TWIN K
T 1I1 PSYC IAT R 16T



CAN HEL


m~~


Comics


.1













To place an ad, call 563"5966


SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013 C9


Classifieds

I


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


BEVERLY HILLS
Sat 9a- 2p
Mattresses, pressure
washer, books, lawn
equip. & more!
39 S Jefferson St
BROWNING BUCK
MARK 22 L.R. RIMFIRE
PISTOL includes 6000
rounds of 22 ammo,
and 3 spare magazines.
Will sell as a total pack-
age only. $680.00 cash
only Call 352-465-4373
Chipper/Shredder
Troy-Bilt Tomahawk,
Briggs & Stratton gas
engine. $700 OBO
(352) 601-3174
CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furn w/ member-
ship, Seasonal/Annual
352-476-4242,
352-527-8002
CRYSTAL RIVER
HUGE 3 FAMILY SALE
Sat.26th, 7:00a-?
Furniture, household,
toys, dvds, Barbies.
And Much More!!
9728 W. Orchard St.
near Turkey Oak & 495
CRYSTAL RIVER
MEGA SALE
Friday & Sat., 8a-2p
Decorating accesso-
ries, framed art, men's
& women's callaway
golf clubs, Hummels,
furn., collectible glass,
tools, Fabric, ladders,
silver Jewl. Antiques &
More Behind Olive
Tree Restrant. US 19,
UNITS 80, 81 & 82

CRYSTAL RIVER
MOVING SALE
Sat 9a- 4p Sun lp-4p
ALLCondo contents
must go! Bring help
load. The Springs
on Kings Bay.
255 NW Bay Path Dr
FORD
Mustang Cobra, Indy
500 Pace Car-1994,
Convertible, 7100 mi,
Gar. kept 252-339-3897
HONDA
'04, 750 Shadow Aero.
Runs & looks great!
$2,995. Firm
(352) 344-0084
INGLIS
2/2, Close to Plant
on 1 acre Clean, Quiet
$495. (352) 447-6016
INVERNESS
RV Spaces. Bring your
own boat and fishing
gear. AGE 55+ commu-
nity. Lot rent only
$360-$375 including
electric. Edge Water
Oaks 352-344-1380
INVERNESS
Sunday 1/27 Ip-4pm
3/2 MH, Furn. Ig screen
lanai, shed & lot. All appl
incl Ig scn TV,55+ PK
Asking $12,000.
911 Hoffmann Lane
Melody MH Park
(352) 364-3747
OPEN HOUSE
Suaarmill Woods
Sunday 1-3PM
3 Chinkapin Court
Homosassa Fl
Nancy Little Lewis
Realtor
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 302-6082


Classifieds


_ wIsBBsH869p1J7!51
I................. 1 m M MM----,, Zt


OPEN HOUSE
Sunday 2p-6p
Come see this
natural wonderland.
3/2 stilt home on over
1% acres and an
amazing body of
water. Bring a fishing
pole and enjoy a
BBQ. Located N on
19 just over the Barge
Canal Bridge, R on
Foss Grove Path. Fol-
low the signs to 12307
Edwards Ct. You will
not want to miss this!
If directions needed
pis call Kim or Jo at
352-220-2658
QUEEN MATTRESS,
BOX SPRING &
FRAME with all linens.
$150 (352) 287-6601
Refrigerator/Freezer,
GE, Side-by-Side,
White, 21.7 cubic feet
$100. Runs good
352-489-7393
REMINGTON 700 BDL
270cal exc cond. $495.
will take lever action
30-30 on trade.
(906) 285-1696




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE PICK UP
JunkAppliances, Scrap
Metal, Mowers, Autos,
(352) 220-3138
FREE REMOVAL
Wshers,Dryers,Rding
Mowers, Scrap
Metals, Antena
towers 270-4087




fertilizer, Horse manure
mixed with pine
shavings for gardens or
mulch. U load and haul
away. 352-628-9624
Free 4 Bronze Jalousie
Windows
361/2 x 601/4
(352) 302-4057
FREE KITTENS
18 wks old
Calico, litter trained
(352) 212-4061
Free to loving home
2 yr old male Beagle
(352) 7264678




FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077
FRESH CITRUS
@BELLAMY GROVE
Strawberries/Cabbage
Gift Shipping,
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378




Black Labrador
Retriever, about 1% yrs
old, answers to "Buddy",
lost in vicinity of W.
Dunnellon Rd. Owner is
heartbroken.
(352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662
Lost Kitten
5 months old, Gray w/
white on chest, 6 toes
on ea foot, Paul Drive
Inverness
Children Devasted
Please call
(352) 637-3339


LOST MALTI-POO
White female 1 yr old
named "Chloe" last
seen on W Starjasmine
PI, Beverly Hills.
Two little girls miss
her! Please call
(352) 249-0846

Lost Women's Gold
Bracelet, Lecanto
Area around 44
REWARD
(352) 527-0211

Wedding Band
Gold & White gold,
lost at Publix forest
Ridge, OR Movie The-
ater shopping plaza
Inverness, Senti-
mental REWARD
(352) 637-2458

Yellow Lab w/brown
collar no tag.Named
ZeusLost downtown
Inverness area
(352) 341-5557





CAROL'S AIRPORT
TRANSPORT
352-746-7595

FREE REMOVAL
Wants to Thank
All of You for
making 2012 Possible,
See You In 2013







SPRING HILL
CLASSES

COSMO DAYS
February 25, 2013

BARBER NIGHTS
February 25, 2013

SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING





FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077





ARNP or PA

Wanted Part Time
for a busy Pediat-
ric
Practice in Crystal
River, Send Re-
sume
to:




EXPERIENCED
RECEPTIONIST
For fast pace
medical office. Must
be able to work
under pressure &
handle multiple
phone lines. Medical
terminology &
insurance
knowledge required.
Send resume to:
reply2013@
hotmail.com


Sudoku ****** 4puz.com


234 ___1 _


9 2


1 53


6 3 _


7 _5 _8 _4


1 9






6 7











Instllaionsb BianCBC1253853





SPermit And

I Engineering Fees
I Up t~o $00value---------- OODT

Siding. Soffit Fascia Skirting. Roofovrs Carports Screen Rooms. Decks. Windows. Doors. Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


HHC AGENCY

Looking for
RN & Psych RN
(352) 794-6097

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885





Human Resource
Rep

Are you an HR
Professional with a
commitment to ex-
cellence? Do you
want to be part of a
high performance
team? Therapy
Management
Corporation, a
preferred provider in
all the communities
we serve, invites you
to talkwith us. Our
home office is in
Homosassa, FL. 3+
years HR experi-
ence, superb com-
munication and
interpersonal skills,
along with strong
technology experi-
ence are what you
will need to be
successful. Please
apply online 4
http://www.thera-
pymgmtjobs.com/
Proflle.aspx or fax
resume to
(352) 382-0212

LIC 440 CUST.
SERVICE REPIor
220 Agent

Needed for busy
Insurance office.
Apply in person
9am-12N
SHELDON PALES
INSURANCE
8469 W Grover
Cleveland,
Homosassa




BREAKFAST
COOK
Must have experience.
Apply in person
between 1pm & 2pm
206 W Tompkins St.
Inverness

Experienced
Bartender

Accepting Application
10a-11:30 & 2P-4p
Applv In Person Only
Lollygaggers
744 SE US Hwy 19
Next to Mr. B's C.R.
Drug Free Work Place

PIT DISH
WASHER

Apply in person
between 1- 4pm
LaCasa Di Norma
Restaurant 1609 S E
Hwy 19, C. R.iver
352-795-4694

SOUS CHEF

needed for upscale
private Country
Club in Citrus Co.
Previous kitchen
management re-
quired with casual
and fine dining
culinary experience.
Send Resume to:
swiley@
citrushills.com


Real Estate
Agents

Busy real estate office
needs Realtors and
Buyers Agents Call
PLANTATION REALTY
352-634-0129




Automotive
Consultant/
Advisor

Eagle Buick GMC
Inc is in need of
experienced
Automotive Service
Consultants/Advisors
Minimum 2 yrs, deal-
ership experience.
Aggressive pay plan
and strong com-
pensation package
that includes health
insurance, paid
vacation, paid train-
ing, certification
reimbursement and
many other perks.
Drug free workplace
Application Avail. @
Eagle Buick GMC
Inc. Homosassa, Fl.
34448 Send Resume:
Fax (352) 417-0944
Email:
robbcole@eagle
buickgmc.com


Local Tower
Service Co.

Hiring person capa-
ble of ascending
broadcast towers to
service lights.
Electrical exp pref,
will train. Travel re-
quired throughout
Southeast. Cpy
vehicle and hotel
provided. Exc pay,
per diem, bonus and
benefits. Back-
ground check and
clean FL Dr. Lic
required. Apply in
person at Hilights
Inc. 4177 N. Citrus
Ave, Crystal River,
FL. 352-564-8830









RESIDENTIAL
ELECTRICIANS
Rough, Trim,
& Service
Full Benefits /EOE
APPLY AT:
Exceptional Electric
4070 CR 124A Unit 4
Wildwood


Senior Lending
Officer/Office
Manager

Brannen Bank,
a banking institution in
central Florida,
is seeking a Senior
Lending Officer/Office
Manager for the Citrus
county area. Re-
quires a bachelors
degree in business or
finance, residential
and commercial
lending experience
and at least four
year's Office Manager
Experience.
Duties include man-
agement of daily
branch operations
and originating a
variety of consumer
loan's. Offer's a om-
petitive salary and
benefit package. If in-
terested, please f
orward resume' to

Brannen Banks of
Florida, Inc.
Attn: Carol Johnson
P0 Box 1929
Inverness, FL
34451-1929
EEO/M/F/VDDFWP


The City
of Cedar Key

is seeking an
experienced
Building Official.
The building official
is charged with the
administration and
enforcement of
local, state, and
federal codes, ordi-
nances, and regula-
tions for all buildings
and structures.
4 to 8 hours per
week as needed
Salary Negotiable

Application
Procedure
City application
forms are available
at the reception
desk, City Hall,
490 2nd Street,
Cedar Key, FL
32625, Call City Hall
at 352-543-5132.
to receive applica-
tion by e-mail.
Please include a
resume with your
application.
Closing Date
February 15, 2013
The City of Cedar
Key is a Drug Free
Workplace
Equal Opportunity
Employer






NEWSPA-
PER
CARRIER
WANTED


Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and otherI
newspapers for
home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per
day.

Must have insured
land reliable vehicle
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up
* with a cap-Large *
Enough to hold ouri
Sunday product

Apply in Person

IMedowcrest Blvd,I
* Crystal River
*Monday to Fridayt
8am- 5pm

INewspaper carriers
*are independent
* contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle


APPT. SETTERS
NEEDED

Sign on Bonus.
Great Commission Pay
and weekly bonuses
Call Bob 352-628-3500

CAREGIVERS
NEEDED

All Shifts Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

Experienced
ACInstallers

Own Tools & Truck,
TOP PAY, Call Dave
(352) 794-6129

SECRETARY/
HOSTESS

P/T for Builders
Model. Thur, Fri, Sat.
$7.79hr. Please
Email Resume to:
dreamcitrusO
yahoo.com
(352) 527-7171











SPRING HILL
CLASSES

COSMO DAYS
February 25, 2013

BARBER NIGHTS
February 25, 2013

SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING





Real Estate Investor
looking for private
mortgage money.
Pis call Mark
(352) 270-8128





DOLL CLOTHES
build-a-bear clothes,
outfits, tops, bottoms,
31 pc total. $50. all
352-422-1309




BOOK ENDS pr Zebra
black and gold porcilin
by Lipper and Mann
$65. call or text
352-746-0401
CHINA CLOSET DECO
TYPE glass doorgood
wood.Picture upon req.
looks good
$100.789-5770





DUDLEY'S
"AU'CTraW





.3 AUCTIONS-

Fr 1 /25
Estate Coin 6pr
$5-10-20 Gold
pieces, Silver, $500 &
$1,000 bills, Lg 1800's
currency, silver
Sat 1/26
Florida Porch
Antiques
Liquidation 10am
On Site@ 712W.
Main St in Leesburg,
HUGE Sale of from
Long time Antique
dealer filled the
JC Penny
Tue 1/28 Real Estate
& Restaurant 10am
4135 S. Suncoast
Blvd. (US 19)
Homosassa,
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384


11111111
Tell that special
person
,Happy Birthday
I with a classi-
fied ad under
HappyNotes.
OniV $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


1918 JENNY STAMP
Good condition / call for
e-mail picture $100.
OBO LINDA
352-341-2271
KISSING FACES Sculp-
ture By John Cultrone
with stand $65. call or
text 352-746-0401
N.Y. YANKEES MEMO-
RABILIA signed
hats,Jersey (Jeters)#2
and more $100. or best
offer 789-5770
Victorian
BATH,PICHER,BOWEL
wood pedestal type.
$100. 789-5770




2 DR WHITE MAYTAG
REFRIG. w/Ice Maker
21.8 cu ft.
Less than 2yrs old.
$350
(352) 726-8021
31/2 Ton $100.
and 21/2 $75.
Used Copeland Scroll
AC COMPRESSORS
R22
John 352-208-7294
DISHWASHER GE
white, works good, looks
good,$100.
352-789-5770
DRYER$100 With 90
day warranty Call/text.
352-364-6504
GE MINI FRIDGE
31 Hxl 7Wxl 9D, Black,
Excellent Condition $45
call 352-503-7143
GE Refrigerator
side by side w/ water
dispenser Bisque $380,
GO CART 5HP, 2s eats
built by Manco $275
(352) 503-6641
GE STOVE, coil top, self
cleaning, bisque $125,
MICROWAVE Over the
Range GE Spacemaker
$75 (352)503-6641
Samsung refrigerator
white SBS 25 cf hidden
hinges LED lighting less
than 1 yr old $575
(352) 419-4513
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive wash-
ers & dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
WASHERS & DRYERS
(352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Exc.
Cond. Free Delivery
352-263-7398
WASHER$100 With 90
day warranty Call/text
352-364-6504
WESTINGHOUSE
STOVE Almond
,continous cleanworks
good looks good. $100.
789-5770
Whirlpool Gold,
Matching Set, Fridge,
Range, Microwave,
Stainless Steel $1,300
firm Call for details
(352) 527-6779
Whirlpool Heavy Duty
Super Capacity,
LP Gas Dryer,
Almond $125.
3/2 Ton New Replace-
ment Carlyle Scroll AC
Compressor R22 $300
John 352-208-7294




DUDLEY'S






.*3 AUCTIONS**

Fri 1/25
Estate Coin 6pm
$5-10-20 Gold
pieces, Silver, $500 &
$1,000 bills, Lg 1800's
currency, silver
Sat 1/26
Florida Porch
Antiques
Liquidation 10am
On Site@ 712W.
Main St in Leesburg,
HUGE Sale of from
Long time Antique
dealer filled the
JC Penny
Tue 1/28 Real Estate
& Restaurant 10am
4135 S. Suncoast
Blvd. (US 19)
Homosassa,
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384






Fri. 02/01 Preview (
4pm, Auction@~ 6pm
General Merchandise
Sa.0/2Preview @
4pm, Auction@~ 6pm
Antiques/Gen. Merch
Su.0/3Preview @
12:30, Auction@ 1 pm
Tailgate/Box lots
**WE BUY ESTATES**
6055 N. Carl G. Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
AB3232 (352)613-1389




Craftsman 10 in Table
saw w/folding stand w/
wheels $350
(352) 465-2459
Ridgid 12in compound
sliding miter saw,
w/ laser & folding stand
w/wheels. $450
(352) 465-2459


50 Inch Hitachi HD TV
Projection console
Exc cond. $100
(352) 621-0405
AM/FM, Stereo
Cassette and
Turn Table $65.
TV, Toshiba,
19" color, $35.
(484) 547-9549
SHARP 32" TV WITH
REMOTE $20
352-613-0529




DOOR JAMB"ONLY"
new 3/0 x 6/8 with
weather stripping and
aluminum threshold $20
call text 352-746-0401
DOUBLE & SINGLE
garage doors, both for
$250 352-601-7911




17"FLAT SCREEN
MONITOR with mouse,
keyboard, speakers.
Asking $45
352-650-0180
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/MCard
352-637-5469
HP DESKJET F4100
PRINTER computer
printer in good condition
with 1 new ink cartridge
Price $40 628-3418
IPOD MINI 2ND
GENERATION SILVER
4GB.Works great. Ask-
ing $25. 352-650-0180
KODAK 1OX ZOOM
CAMERA like new/ was
450.00 selling $100.
linda 341-2271




48" Kodiak
Bushhog,
less than 150 hrs.
Asking $450
(352) 382-0731
Like New 24HP Deisel
Tractor, 4WD,
FE Loader, BB, trailer,
rake, 3 PT Hitch, Never
used commercially.
only 500 hrs. $11,500
obo (352) 795-4259
SIXTY GALLON TANK
ON TRAILER, $70.
352-746-6931




Chipper/Shredder
Troy-Bilt Tomahawk,
Briggs & Stratton gas
engine. $700 OBO
(352) 601-3174




Oblong glass table
66x40 w/6 reclining
chairs, small side table,
2 footstools, beige w/
tiny flowers. Never
been outside. $400
Call John (352)
422-2317




2 Table Lamps,
33" H, white ceramic,
Sq. bamboo design,
excel. $50
Broyhill Dining Rm Set.
Table, Parquet Top,
Rectangular shape, 2
leaves, 6 Caine High-
back chairs, china
hutch, 3 glass panels
3 shelves, med. fruit-
wood color, excel.


Broyhill Wall Unit
$750.
Bassett Cabinet
with Drawers
$500.
(484) 547-9549
Cherry Desk,
credenza, file cabinet,
$600.
Oak TV Cabinet $300
(352) 212-9507
637-2921, 861-9448
COLLEZIONE EUROPA
style king sz poster bed
set triple dresser mirror
5 drawer chest 2 NS
headbd footbd rails, light
oak finish solid wood
HUGE AND HEAVY!
$1350 352419-4513
Couch, Clean,
brown, excel. cond.
$200. Entertainment
Center Large, Cherry
Traditional, Like new
$600 (352) 270-9025
Dinning Room Set,
6 captain chairs,
& Hutch maple
$200
(352) 726-1081
FOLDING BED
TWIN $25
352-777-1256
FROSTED LEAF OVAL
MIRRORS 2 mirrors that
measure 36X24.
352-650-0180.
Asking $45. for both
LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET, In Original
Plastic, Never Used,
ORG $3000, Sacrifice
$975. CHERRY, BED-
ROOM SET Solid
Wood, new in factory
boxes- $895
Can Deliver. Bill
(813)298-0221.
Love Seat &
Matching Recliner,
by Flexsteel
$275.
Call between 9a-7p
(352) 382-0603
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500
MATTRESS SETS
Beautiful Factory
Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full
$129.95 Qn. $159.95,
Kg. $249.95
352-621 -4500
Oak Pedestal Table
Wood Craft Table
Wood 7 Drawer Desk
Wood Desk Chair
Mahogany Upol. Arm
Chair. 352-726-5159
Oak Table 6 chairs,
hutch, Nice $750,.
Cherry Curio Cabinet
Pair $150 ea
(352) 212-9507
637-2921, 861-9448
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30,
Full $40.Qn $50, Kg
$75. 352-628-0808
Sectional Sofa
Florida Colors
peach and green
Clean, like new $300
(352) 860-0649
630-816-1171 cell
Sectional Sofa, light
color, like new
$500
Small secretary Desk
$100
(352) 212-3352
TWIN BEDS
Frames, boxsprings, &
mattresses exc cond.
$125
Cell (734) 355-2325
local 352-503-9452
Washed Oak Table 4
chairs, like new, $750
White antique iron
Bed, w/ mattress, $500
(352) 212-9507


1547923

6384751

7926834
8751269

5478312

3695487

4213596


CIR US CO UNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIEDS







CIO SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013




MATTRESS, BOXSPR Sat& Sun 7a 2p
ING & FRAME $50 7209 N DeborahTr
352-61 3-0529 1___________
Wood Dresser INVERNESS
19/2x 561/2 Sat &SunI10:00am
Dark wood 7989 E Turner
includes, mirror Camp Rd
$475 (352) 419-4606 INVERNESS
Xlarge dresser & 2 Sat Jan 26th 9a-2p
nightstands solid wood MULTI FAMILY
bow front & sides $525. Household, clothing,
Thomasville coffee table electronics. etc.
set mint cond $425. No early birds
352-419-4513 9828 E. Lake Tahoe Dr.
ROYAL OAKS
ANNUAL
piYARD SALE


3 MOWERS
Craftsman 5000
Craftsman 3000
White B&S Engine
Call (352) 341-1569
BLACK & DECKER
HEDGE TRIMMER
Includes 100' cord
Asking $25.
352-419-4305
Extension ladder
17 fl Alluminum ladder
$200, Pressure Washer
with wand, 16 ft
extension $350
(352) 726-8931
LAWN MOVERS
TORO self propelled,
6.5 HP $150, 0 Turn
GRAVELY riding
mower. 12 HP $500
(352) 726-8931
TORO POWER
SWEEP BLOWER
Includes 100' cord
Asking $30.
352-419-4305




BEVERLY HILLS
OUR LADY OF
GRACE CHURCH
FLEA MARKE T
SAT. JAN. 26th
8AM to 2PM.
6 Roosevelt Blvd.

BEVERLY HILLS
Sat 9a- 2p
Mattresses, pressure
washer, books, lawn
equip. & more!
39 S Jefferson St
CITRUS HILLS
Sat & Sun 7:30a -lp
MULTI FAMILY
1196 N. Man-O-War Dr
Citrus Springs
Sat & Sun 9a- 3pI
8395 N Triana Dr

CRYSTAL RIVER
HUGE 3 FAMILY SALE
Sat.26th, 7:00a-?
Furniture, household,
toys, dvds, Barbies.
And Much More!!
9728 W. Orchard St.
near Turkey Oak & 495

CRYSTAL RIVER
MEGA SALE
Friday & Sat., 8a-2p
Decorating accesso-
ries, framed art, men's
& women's callaway
golf clubs, Hummels,
furn., collectible glass,
tools, Fabric, ladders,
silver Jewl. Antiques &
More Behind Olive
Tree Restrant. US 19,
UNITS 80, 81 & 82

CRYSTAL RIVER
MOVING SALE
Sat 9a- 4p Sun lp-4p
ALLCondo contents
must go! Bring help
load. The Springs
on Kings Bay.
255 NW Bay Path Dr

CRYSTAL RIVER
Thurs, Fri, Sat, 8a -5p
50's Old town Canoe,
3 boats, tools, fishing &
households
7915 W Riverbend Rd.
HERNANDO
Annual Apache
Shores yard sales
Sat. 26th 9a-2p
Maps at Club House
on Buffalo & Apache
Trail off 200
HERNANDO
Saturday 26th 9a-2p
3505 Flying Arrow
Path off 200,
Antiques, Guns, 2 Jon
Boats, 1 alum. fishing
boat, longerberger
baskets, Lots of Misc.
Additional Sales
on Same Road
INVERNESS
Fri- Sat 8a-4p
Moving into RV. Tools,
household items,
E. Maxwell Place
INVERNESS
Fri. 25 & Sat. 26 8a-2p
MISC., some furniture,
concrete statues
3229 S FRANKLIN TERR


Saturday, Jan. 2,
8am-lpm BIG
SELECTION! From
Inv.
S. on 41 to Royal
Oaks sign (before
airport) turn right,
follow signs.




SMW -MOVING
Marble table w/4 chairs
$300. Sofa bed $300.
3 area rugs, wood cof-
fee table. riding mower
$500. Lots More! Call
9a-7p (352) 503-5275




BEAUTIFUL WOOL
WOMENS SUITE tan
Isenhower style, and
blouse to match sz.10
$25. 789-5770
BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING SIZES 5 &
6 SHIRTS, PANTS &
JACKETS $30
352-613-0529
PROM DRESS Long
blue size 13/14, strap-
less $45. call or text
352-302-2004
PROM DRESS Long,
Purple, 1 shoulder, size
12 $65. call or text
352-302-2004
PROM DRESS Long,
red/ black, halter, size
10/12 $35.call or text
352-302-2004
SILVER FOX COAT fin-
ger tip length beautiful.
sacrafice $100. sz m-I
789-5770
Special Occasion
Men's beautiful all
wool black suit 41R
Palm Beach from
Falveys Men's Store
Gold Dress Jacket 41 R
Tommy Hilfiger from
Dillards both worn
only 2-3 times, excel.
cond. $175 for both
(352) 527-2050
T.J.MAX 50.00 GIFT
CARD WILL VERIFY /
$35. LINDA
352-341-2271
WESTERN BOOTS
Brown marble leather
made in usa by
ACMEsize 8.5EW $40
call text 352-302-8529




MAGELLAN
ROADMATE GPS
5220-LM. Never used.
$99. 352-637-5969
SECURITY CAMERAS
2 wireless B&W
cameras/transmitters to
your TV $50. Dunnellon
465-8495




4 WHEEL WALKER-
hand brakes & wheel
locks, seat, basket,
folds for storage, Ex.,
$50, 352-628-0033
10 FT. WOOD
STEP LADDER
Type 1,250 duty
$90
(352) 422-0294
12 ft. Aluminum John
Boat, no paper work
$165.
Trailer, spare tire and
wheel, fits 10" 15"
$35. (315) 466-2268
BABY STROLLER
brown/green color,
Safety 1st, in ok condi-
tion, $20 (352)465-1616
BSR LARGE HOME
STEREO SPEAKERS
20" WIDE BY30" HIGH
ONLY $100. NICE
352-464-0316
DIGITAL PHOTO AL-
BUM Brookstone holds
500 pics like new great
brag book $40 call or
text 352-746-0401
FIREWOOD OAK
SEASONED CUT TO
12"-15" LENGTHS $25.
352 -527-4319


- .


Fish Aquarium
50 gallons, cabinet
stand, lights & filter
$250
(352) 621-0392
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.OOlb,
Stone Crabs@ $6.OOlb
Delivered 352-795-0077
GERBIL CAGE
$20
352-613-0529
GOLF CLUB CAR
Electric, Looks great &
runs great. $1200Firm
(352) 860-2430
GRACO PACKNPLAY
GOOD CONDITION
$40 352-613-0529
GRANDFATHER CLOCK
Howard Miller Elegant
Shaker Style in Cherry
Top quality mvmt. w/
Wminstr chime re-
cently serviced. Item
is like new and value
priced at $925. Firm.
Serious inquires to
352-560-3474, 4p-8p
pls. leave message
HEAVY DUTY
WHIRPOOL Dryer $125
Exercise Stepper
machine $75.
(352) 795-7254
HONDA STOCK PIPES
fits honda shadow areo
mint $60 352-621-0142
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Fulls $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
MOTORCYCLE SEAT
aftermarket saddlemen
mint paid $325 sell for
$100 firm fits Honda's
352-621-0142
NEW SKYLIGHT BUB-
BLE TYPE SMOKED
POLYCARBONITE 27
BY 27 ONLY $60.
352-464-0316
PET CARRIER
Petmate. Never used.
28 X 20.5 X 21.5. $50.
352-637-5969
PICK-UP TOOL BOX
56" wide, silver alum, 2
latch, 1 locking, great
shape. $65.
352-422-1309
ROCKING HORSE
Brown/Black-colored,
rocks by rubber, ok con-
dition, I will e-mail pics,
$50 (352)465-1616
RYOBI110"
COMPOUND SAW-
#TS1342 15 AMPs,
5500 RPMs, dust bag,
EX+, $60, 628-0033
SMALL BLOCK CHEVY
STARTER new
staggered bolt pattern
$25 call or text
352-746-0401
SNAPPER 42" RIDING
MOWER/GENERAC
4"000W GENERATOR
Mower $1000. ind
mulch attachment
GenSet $375.BOTH
LIKE NEW
352-489-6465
SNAPPER 42" RIDING
MOWER/GENERAC
4"000W GENERATOR
Mower $1000. ind
mulch attachment
GenSet $375.BOTH
LIKE NEW
352-489-6465

SOLD
40ft STEAL
OVERSEAS SHIPPING
CONTAINER $500 obo
Stallion Cow Boy Hat,
by Stetson, wool, sz 64
& Boots, black 11% D.
both New $100.
Glass Top Table w/ 4
chairs $100.
352-795-7254
TAILGATE FOR 1986
CHEVY Silverado F10
Pickup Truck $50.
Ruth 352-382-1000
TODDLER HEAD-
BOARD Brand New
Metal Headboard, $10
(352)465-1616
VERIZON LG ENV
TOUCH V XI1000 cell
phone full key board
$25 call or text
352-746-0401
VERIZON SAMSUNG
BRIGHTSIDE TOUCH
cell phone full key board
$35.call or text
352-746-0401
WICKER TEA CART,
Vintage, excellent cond.
useful and decorative,
$80, (Dunnellon) (352)
465-1813




4 WHEEL (SONIC) GO
GO BY PRIDE MOBIL-
ITY TAKE APART(4
PIECES)TO FIT IN
TRUNK OR VAN $585.
352-464-0316


11


4 WHEEL WALKER
WITH BREAKS AND
SEAT Only
$75.352-464-0316
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES & SEAT
$75. 352-464-0316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER BRAND NEW
WITH HANDLES ONLY
$25. 352-464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
ADJUSTABLE LEGS
ON EACH $20.00
EA.352 464 0316
BEDSIDE COMODE &
ALUMINUM WALKER
ADJUSTABLE LEGS
ON BOTH $25 EA.
352-464-0316
DISPOSABLE UNDER-
WEAR M or W Size L
Pack of 18. $5., 3/$12.,
10/$30. Call
(352)563-6410
DOCTOR'S SCALE for
professional, excellent
condition $95 call
352-382-7585
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT-
RESTS GREAT SHAPE
$100. 352-464-0316
NUTRON R3ZLX
Power Wheel
Chair w/Harmar
Micro Power Chair
Lift 5yrs old.
$1000 OBO
352-527-2906
SHOWER CHAIR WITH
BACK WHITE FIBER-
GLASS WITH ADJUST-
ABLE LEGS $30.
352-464-0316
WHEEL CHAIR LIFT
Easily load a folding
manual chair (not
scooter)to vehicle hitch
$100. Dunnellon
465-8495


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIEDS




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676


DUDLEY'S







**3 AUCTIONS-
Fr 1 /25
Estate Coin 6pr
$5-10-20 Gold
pieces, Silver, $500 &
$1,000 bills, Lg 1800's
currency, silver
Sat 1/26
Florida Porch
Antiques
Liquidation 10am
On Site@ 712W.
Main St in Leesburg,
HUGE Sale of from
Long time Antique
dealer filled the
JC Penny

Tue 1/28 Real Estate
& Restaurant 10am
4135 S. Suncoasf
Blvd. (US 19)
Homosassa,
*check webslte*
www.dudleys
auctlon.com
637-9588 1O%BP
Au2267 AB 1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384






"MINT" KAY 5 STRING
OPEN BACK, BANJO
50'S-60'S VINTAGE
W/CASE $100
352-601-6625


"NEW" ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR
TRANS BLACKCORD
INCLUDED $95
601-6625
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
GUITAR "NEW"
W/GIGBAQTUNERSTRAP,
CORD ETC $100
352-601-6625
BLACK LES PAUL
EPIPHONE GUITAR
W/AMPSTRACORD.ETC
NEW !! $100
352-601-6625
DUNLOP CRY BABY
Wah Pedal, Excellent
condition $45., call
352-503-7143
NEW FAT STRAT
STYLE GUITAR,
DROPPED MINOR
DAMAGE $45
352-601-6625
NEW NICE ACOUSTIC
GUITAR PACK
W/GIGBAGSTRAP EX-
TRA STRINGS ETC
$65 352-601-6625

Player Piano
Works great, with
spare motor and
service manual $750
Call (352) 795-8085
UPRIGHT PLAYER
PIANO W/BENCH.
Ampico reproducing.
Walnut wood, good
cond. $600 OBO
(352) 382-1885




2 VERTICAL BILNDS
6'Wx4'L ea. w/covers,
almond slats. All hdwe.
inc. exc. cond. $100.
both 352-560-7857
BLINDS I PLEATED
64WX63L I PLASTIC
64WX60L OFF WHITE
$40 352-613-0529


II


a4R


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive wash-
ers & dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179




HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping
Dr. appts, errands,
etc. Hablo Espanol
813-601-8199




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
unholst 352-613-2518


qualified
employee?



This area's

#1

employment

source!


CHRkopNiLE
Classifieds


JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump
Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374

THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557





DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic
#2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck
repair/Stain
352-257-0078

BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repar
/stain. 352-257-0078

CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120

FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097

ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Drive-
ways tear outs Trac-
tor work, Lic. #1476,
726-6554


All AROUND TRAC-
TOR
Land clearing, Haul-
ing Site Prep, Drive-
ways Lic/Ins
352-795-5755




HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping
Dr. appts, errands,
etc. Hablo Espanol
813-601-8199




COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
k 352-302-6838 k




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



**BOB BROWN S**
Fence & Landscap-
ing
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENC-
ING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENC-
ING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
H 352 422-7279 H


Install, Restretch,
Repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent,
Lic#4857 Mitch, (352)
201-2245




1 CALL & RELAX!
25vrs Exp in 100%
property maint & all
repairs, call
H&H Services today!
lic#37658
352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handy-
man
4 FAST 100% Guar.
4 AFFORDABLE
4 RELIABLE
Free Est
H 352-257-9508 H
Affordable Handy-
man
4 FAST 100% Guar.
4 AFFORDABLE
4 RELIABLE-
Free Est
H 352-257-9508 H
Affordable Handy-
man
4 FAST 100% Guar.
4 AFFORDABLE
4 RELIABLE-
Free Est
H 352-257-9508 H
Affordable Handy-
man
4 FAST 100% Guar.
4 AFFORDABLE
4 RELIABLE-
Free Est
H 352-257-9508 H


HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




Cleaning Svc-Home,
office,windows,
pressure washing &
more. 352-322-1799



K* itchen k


The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lie/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-1584




All Tractor Work
Service specializing in
clean up Tree Re-
moval, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRAC-
TOR
Landclearing, Haul-
ing Site Prep, Drive-
ways Lic/Ins
352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


GOT LEAVES
Let our DR VAC
Do the work!
Call 352-502-6588

LAWNCARE N
MORE
Yard Clean-up,
leaves
bushes, hauling
352-726-9570

Winter Clean Up,
Leaves, Power Wash-
ing & More Call
Coastal Lawn Care
(352) 601-1447





AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up
time. 352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, lawn maint.
furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767

ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790

JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump
Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Robert G. Vigliotti LLC
Painting
Int/Ext FREE
ESTIMATES 35 yrs
exp.
call 508-314-3279




CALL STELLAR
BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins.
FREE EST (352)
586-2996
Cleaning Svc-Home,
office,windows,
pressure washing &
more. 352-322-1799
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300
Robert G. Vigliotti LLC
Painting
Int/Ext FREE
ESTIMATES 35 yrs
exp.
call 508-314-3279
Winter Clean Up,
Leaves, Power Wash-
ing & More Call
Coastal Lawn Care
(352) 601-1447




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie.
#2713


DGS SERVICES LLC
Reroofs Metal Roofs
REPAIRS Home
Inspector 414-8693




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


#1 Employment source is



www.chronicleonline.com


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
k 352-302-6838 k




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Tractor Work
Service specializing in
clean up Tree Re-
moval, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding,
bulk mulch, lic/ins
302-8852
KING's LAND
CLEARING & TREE
SERVICE
Complete tree &
stump removal haul-
ing, demo & tractor
work. 32 yrs. exp.
(352) 220-9819
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


Chronicle


Classifieds


In Print /


& Online


HoNIcLE1C-i0iu6N


(352) 563-5966


V


F Al


126 Lagh gck It er I, UnesJC oL


"My old legs are not as fast

as they used to be."







SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013 CLL


[WORDY G R....... RCK KN

1. Weirdly peculiar layer of lawn (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Authentic passion for a cause (1) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Not fancy "The Rock" Johnson (1) syllables in each word.
0 1 D @2013 UFS Dist. by Univ. Ucick for UFS

4. Union-of-two-companies advocate (2)


5. Working under songwriter Berlin (2)


6. Toronto NBA team imprisoners (2)


7. Stomps all over "try these" freebies (2)


SHIdNVS SHfdNVH 'L SUOLdV SIOldVH 9 9DNIAtI )NIAltaS '
HaA H91 I t IIT 'z tNAVAM NIVId 'IVEtIZ I1I 'g OS (1(10 '1
SHRMSNV


LIGHT FIXTURE
chandelier, 5 frosted
glass shades, bronzed
color metal, nice
$50.352-422-1309
LOVE SEAT Great
condition call for e-mail
picture.$100.Linda
352-341-2271
SINGER SEWING
MACHINE Model 08/28
works book included
352-697-5565 $50.
SUNBEAM FLEECE
ELECT BLANKET KING
SIZE brand new. dual
controllers, sage/green.
$50 352-220-3944
TWIN BED WITH
BOXSPRING & FRAME
$50 352-613-0529




ELLIPTICAL MACHINE
PRO-FORM 490 LE
with users manual.
Heavy duty, I-Pod
compatible w/fan.
Less than 2 yrs old.
$300 527-8276
EXERCISE BIKE (DP)
UPRIGHT TYPE
WORKS THE ARMS
TOO $85.
352-464-0316
EXERCISE BIKE
PURSUIT ALL
ELECTRONICS $100.
352-464-0316
Proform Crosswalk 480
excel. cond. less than
50 mi. walk on it in-
clines, preset ifit
trainer workout,
built in fan, $275.
352-382-5208
ROWING MACHINE BY
BODY ROW WORKS
THE ARMS AND LEGS
$50. 352-464-0316

SOLD
TREADMILL- by Health
Rider, space saver, ex-
tra features, exc cond.
floor pad incl. cost
$400+ Asking $150




$$ REDUCED $$
'04 EZ GO GOLF CART
Electric, exc cond.
incl. charger.
$1,500 (352) 503-2847
5 Men's Bicycles
$15. ea
(352) 746-7357
14 Assorted Golf
Clubs,
left handed
$200
(352) 795-4942
22 Colt Woodsmen
early model orgin.
$700 OBO.
352-258-1740
30 cal. Carbine
1943 Inland mfg orgin.
Korea war bring home.
$1000. OBO
352-258-1740
357 Mag. 6 Shot
Rev. German made adj
rear site exc cond. $350
Springfield model 53B
single shot 22 rifle $120
(352) 344-5853
22LR ammo $16per
100. 525 rds $80
(352) 533-2228
Antique Punt Gun
(duck) mfg cir 1831, by
Royal De Charlesville,
app. $5000 in 1998
$3000. (727) 488-6474
BROWNING BUCK
MARK 22 L.R. RIMFIRE
PISTOL includes 6000
rounds of 22 ammo,
and 3 spare magazines.
Will sell as a total pack-
age only. $680.00 cash
only Call 352-465-4373
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
FOR SALE
Mini -14 223 scoped
stainless $1000.
10-22 Scoped wood
blue $500.
352-422-2004
For sale
SKS 1956 Sino Soviet
all orginal $500
352-422-2004
GOLF CLUBS
Two sets, pull carts and
accessories. $60.each
726-1495

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. Jan.. 26th 9-5p
Sun. Jan. 27th 9a-4p
HERNANDO
COUNTY FAIR-
GROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605
HOLSTER Uncle Mikes
camo belt style size 10
$7 call or text
352-746-0401
REMINGTON 700 BDL
270cal exc cond. $495.
will take lever action
30-30 on trade.
(906) 285-1696


Winchester Model 70
Super grade, 300 Win.
Mag., Nikkon scope,
+ ++ extras,
$1200
(352) 628-5355




2013 Enclosed Trail-
ers
6x12 with ramp,
$1895
call 352-527-0555

Motorcycle utility
trailer 4ft x 8ft. 12 in
wheels $700.
(352) 465-5573
MUSTANG TRAILER
HITCH $100.
352-503-2792
TRAILER 4 x6, has
spare tire, garage kept,
Good Condition $500
(352) 726-8931




GRACO PACKNPLAY
BROWN PLAID GOOD
CONDITION $40
352-613-0529


Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday
"wth a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only$28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


WANT TO BUY
HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situa-
tion. Call Fred,
352-726-9369

Will Buy Block House
In Citrus County,
Any Condition,
Agents welcome
(315) 466-2268





1 Sweet Little Male
Yorkie,
CKC reg., $375. Fl.
health certs.,
Call
(352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258

AMERICAN PITBULL
PUPPIES We have 1
female and 5 males
left they are 3 weeks
old Jan.18th $150each
Mother and Father on
site.
352-302-7975


HANK
Hank is an 8 y.o.
male Hound mix
who was a stray. He
is a sweet, affection-
ate, low key gentle-
man, easy to walk,
does not pull on
leash. He has good
energy and is a
good companion. Is
very housebroken,
gets along with
other dogs. Weighs
about 56 pounds.
Not yet neutered
but would be in-
cluded in adoption
fee. Is a very sweet
older dog in need
of a good, safe
home.
Call Mike @
352-726-0165
or Joanne
@352-795-1288.


BIRD SUPPLY SALE
Sun, Feb. 3, 9a-3p,
Cages, Seed, Toys,
Playstands, Milletspray
& more! Save! Cage
wire, Chicks & duck-
lings! 8260 Adrian Dr.,
Brooksville
727-517-5337
MINIATURE POO-
DLES miniature poodle
pups born 10/16/12
Health Cert 1 apricot &
1 black female & 1
black male almost
potty trained, raised in
our home. $500 cash
call 352-419-5662 or
karaluv3@yahoo.com


NICKY
Nicky is a 2 y.o.
lab/bulldog mix,
weighing about 78
pounds, and is
Heart-worm
negative. Is very
sweet and loveable,
very intelligent. How-
ever, he is a big,
strong dog who needs
a strong person to
handle him, and a
fenced yard is
strongly recom-
mended. He knows
how to sit for treats
and wants to please
his human friend very
much.
He is available now at
the Citrus County
Animal Shelter.
Call 352-746-8400

RATS FOR SALE
50 cents to $3.00
All Sizes
(352) 419-9080
Leave Message
Shih-Tzu Pups,
ACA, Males
starting@ $400. Lots
of colors, Beverly
Hills, FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofouos.net




Bermuda Hay 501bs $6
Never been rained on
795-1906 586-1906
SHAMROCK FARM, CR


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
",Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




CRYSTAL RIVER
6851 W. Vanaman Ct
2/2 $425/$400 dep.
DUNNELLON 2/2
5159 W Disney Lane
$400/ $400 dep.
(727) 480-5512
FLORAL CITY 2/1
$450 mo + sec. (352)
637-6554: 422-1562


You've Got It!








Somebody









Wants




It!




































C C T R U SC 0 U N T YE








(352) 563-5966



www.chronicleonline.com


MANAG ER'S







SPECIALS


'11 CADILLAC




OTS


NAV S/R





$33'PI


12119006





!I !m95


I i ll '


'04 TOYOTA AVALON XL '09 KIA RIO


12120161 S;6p 99 M5 1 3010032A*ip 9!m95


'04 TOYOTA CAMRY


12120252 8 995


'05 TOYOTA AVALON


1212036912,995


'08 CADILLAC CTS Loaded '11 TOYOTA CAMRY


1212020214,9 95 12120351315,995


'11 TOYOTA CAMRY


1212029215,995



'10 TOYOTA PRIUS


1212035717,995


'12 NISSAN ALTIMA


12129001 6IO995



'08 TOYOTA SIENNA


1212035817,995


'08 TOYOTA AVALON XLS '06 LEXUS


1212900718 ,995o1301005718,995




'11 TOYOTA CAMRY Hybrid '12 CHEVY EQUINOX


1212017120 ,995 13010041$21,995


'11 TOYOTA TUNDRA


1212900821P995


'10 CADILLAC CTS


13010026$24,995


'12 TOYOTA PRIUS '12 TOYOTA CAMRY XLE


1212038925p995 1212032725,995



'10 CADILLAC SRX '11 CADILLAC DTS NA, Sunroof


12129004$29,995 1211900632p995







@ VILLAGE TOYOTA



CRYSTAL RIVER


www.,,l.,ovcorn352.628.5100
*Payments are with $2,000 cash down or trade equity and with approved credit. See dealer for details.


1-26-13


'12 CHRYSLER





TOWN & COUNTRY



7k Miles 12120106





21,995


CIR US COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIEDS






CiTus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


w/ Engine, 2.OL Turbo, 14, DI, DOHC,
VVT & Preferred Equipment Group
Ultra Low-MWeage Lease For Gualfied Lessees


w/ Luxury Collection Preferred Equipment Group


Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For Qualifled
Lessees


$2,199 due at signing (after al offers), Includes security deposi Tax, tile, license, dealer fees and optional equipment ewo.
Mileage charge of $025/mile over 30,000 miles MRSP $35,795136








w/ Base Preferred Equipment Group
Ultra Low-Miluage
Lease For Gualified
Lessees

L emO. 36 MONTH LEASE


$3,319 due at signing (after all offers). Includes security deposit. Tax, title, liense, dealer fees and optional equpment extra-
Mileage charge of $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $64,165. 16536


/MO. 36 MONTH LEASE


$2,739 due at signing {after oll offers). Includes security deposit. Tax, ile, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra
Mieage charge of$0.25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $43,405.36,


Ulra Low-MEage
Lease For uialified
Lessees


MIaMsIjdlMA





w/ Preferred Equipment Group


MW IM 36 MONTH LEASE
$2839 due at signing (after all offers). Includes security deposit. Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra
Mileage charge of $0 25/mile over 30,000 miles MRSP $44,99536,


CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED


2005 CADILLAC 2007 CADILLAC 2008 GMC
DEVILLE DTS ENVOY SLT
LUXURY COLLECTION
GOLD MIST, 71,000 MILES, LOCAL TRADE IN, GOLD MIST, LUXURY PACKAGE, BURGUNDY, ONLY 18,000 MILES, LEATHER,
EXTRA CLEN 6C2S243A LOCAL ONE OWNER TRADE,#C3XO42A ONE OWNER TRADE, #C2S272A
,IF988 s I5,4BB s17,988


CERTIFIED PR E-OWNED


2008 CADILLAC 2007 CADILLAC 2009 CADILLAC
DTS STS DTS
LUXURY COLLECTION LUXURY COLLECTION
GOLD MIST, LUXURY PACKAGE, GOLD MIST, 31,530 MILES, LUXURY GRAY, LUXURY PACKAGE,
LOCAL ONE OWNER TRADE, #C382160A PERFORMANCE PACKAGE, SUNROOF #C383130 40,175 MILES, #C382230A
-S78,488 $18,gBB 21,9B8


2009 CADILLAC 2007 PORSCHE 2011 BUICK 2011 MERCEDES-BENZ 2011 CADILLAC 2012 CADILLAC
CTS CAYMAN "S" LACROSSE CXS C300 SRX CTS
LUXURY COLLECTION LUXURY COLLECTION LUXURY COLLECTION
BLACK OIAMONO, SUNROOF, PERFORMANCE RED, TIP-TRONIC TRANSMISSION, BLACK, LOW MILES, CHROME WHEELS. BLACK, 18,582 MILES, GOLD MIST ONLY 12,000 MILES, ONE OWNER RADIANT SILVER, LUXURY PACKAGE,
PACKAGE ONE OWNER, #C2S245A LOCAL TRADE, #C3Ml51 B SUNROOF LOADED #C2S269G LOADED WITH LUXURY, #C382220 TRADE WITH SUNROOF #BS678665 SUNROOF LOADED, #C3831 00
s2-1,_98B 925.,f9BB s2,9913 1,27.B 2BSBB 2 29 G4B8


2005 CHEVROLET
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
BLACK, ONLY 22,000 MILES, ONE OWNER
TRADE WITH NAW10TN, #55128528
-529,988


2013 ACURA
RDX
BURGANOY ONLY 700 MILES, LOCAL TRADE,
CLEAN, CARFAX #C2S270A
s32,988


2011 FORD
EXPEDITION
UMIrED
WHIE, 11,000 MILES, ONE OWNER, NA ,ATON,
SUNROOF REAR VIDEO #C2M271 A
s33, 988


2011 CADILLAC
DTS
PREMIUM COLLECTION
VANILLA LATTE, 15,000 MILES SUNROOF,
LOCAL ONE OWNER, #ZV609A
-S35 1 988


2009 FORD
GT 500
BLACK, 27,67 MILES, AWESOME CAR WITH ALL
THE POWERAND LUXURY, #C2S242A
-S381.988


2011 CADILLAC
ESCALADE
LUXURY COLLECTION
LACK, 22 CHROME WHEELS, SUNROOF,
NAVIGATION. #C382870
-s4e 988


4040SW COLLEGE ROAD o OCALA, FL o 352-732-4700


C12 SATURDAY JANUARY 26, 2013





Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


, $ERICA~v,


Where do you find America's
freshest lineup? You'll find
these fuel-efficient vehicles in
a Nick Nicholas Ford Showroom
near you. Exclusive EcoBoost
technology delivers efficient
power. And now, Nick Nickolas
Ford offers 4 models EPA rated
at 40 mpg highway or better.
So you can go further.


Family Owned
& Opperated


21I3 201I3 w .1 -
C-MAX HYBRID FUSION HYBRID 2013 FOCUS 2013 FIESTA
RATED AT UP TO RATED AT UP TO RATED AT UP TO RATED AT UP TO
4 HWYHWY HWY HWY
4 MPG 2 4MPG 2 4MPG 54 MPG 5


2013 FIESTA SE


w N2C27f N U
2012 FUSION SE


w WA W rN2C281 'q
2012 FOCUS SE


M SRP ...................................................... 25,900 M SRP .................................................. 20 ,2 15
MSRPSpecial Added Discount ...............................19450 Special Added Discount...............................-35
Nick Nicholas Ford Discount...........-280 Nick Nicholas Ford Discount...........-1,201 Nick Nicholas Ford Discount.........-1,181
Retail Customer Cash...............-$500 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash ......-1,750 Retail Customer Cash..............-1,000
3 Payments On Us Special 3 Payments on Us Special 3 Payments On Us Special
Retail Customer Cash ............................ $1,000 Retail Bonus Cash ......................................-1,500 Retail Customer Cash .............................-1,000

$17 400$20921$60 16







2013 EDGE SE 2012 F-150 4X4 SUPER CREW 2012 F-250 LARIAT 4X4 CREW CAB


M SRP ......................................................... 29,795
Nick Nicholas Ford Discount..............-...... 796
Retail Customer Cash..................-...... 500
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash .........-1,000
Retail Bonus Customer Cash.............-...... 500
3 Payments On Us Special
Retail Customer Cash...................... $1,500

$25,499

dAMAll Ford
Pre-Owne
Certified Pre-Owned Comi


M SRP ......................................................... 38,335
Nick Nicholas Ford Discount............-1,936
Retail Customer Cash................-1,250
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash .........-1,250
3 Payments On Us Special
Retail Customer Cash................-1,500


$32,399


I Certified
ed Vehicles
e With:


M SRP ......................................................... 54,735
XLT Diesel Discount........................ -1,500
Nick Nicholas Ford Discount............-3,636
Retail Customer Cash...................... -1,500
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash .........-1,000
3 Payments On Us Special
Retail Custom er Cash .............................................-1,500

$45,599


" 172-point inspection by factory-trained technicians
" 7-year/100,000-mile powertrain warranty coverage**
" 12-month/12,000-mile Ford Comprehensive Limited Warranty Coverage**
-Vehicle history report 24/7 Roadside Assistance


2009 FORD FUSION SE
Extra clean, sunroof. NPR632
$18,968


2011 FORD FIESTA SES
Loaded loaded, loaded. N3C057D
$19,668


2010 FORD ESCAPE XLT
The riht size SUV. NP5767A
'19,968


2009 FORD FUSION SEL
The import beater for real. N2T247A
$19,668


2011 FORD ESCAPE XLS
Only 1Ok miles. NN2T313A
$21,668


2008 FORD EDGE LIMITED
One owner limited. N3T099A
$22,668


2011 FORD FLEX SEL
Room for the whole family. N2C292A
$25,668


2010 FORD MUSTANG GT 2009 FORD ESCAPE XLT 2010 FORD EDGE LIMITED 2010FORDF15 OLARIAT SUPER CREW 2010 FORD EDGE LIMITED
Just reduced. NP5748 Just reduced. N2T257B Vista roof and nav. N2T351F Extra sharp lariat crew cab. N2T296A Don't miss thisloaded limited. N2T374A
$25,968 $18,668 $29,968 $31,668 $31,968


Certified Pre-Owned


2006 FORD EXPLORER XL5 I
Nice exlorer for notmh moneyN3C32A I
S a396


2005 FORD MUSTANG
Low mileage pony car. N2T41OA
$13968


2JEEP WRANGLER4X4
Extra clean and ready to tow NP5777D
$ 14,968


UUU SAIUK VU At
Extra clean. N2C249A
$15,668


1965 FORD MUSTANG I 2007 MAZDA MX.S MIATA CONVT I
First lime offered for soIe in 33 years N2C033M Affordable top down fun. N3T056P
$18,000 $18,668


2009 PONTIACToRENT6 20 FOD F5OISARIATSUPERCRW 2010 CHEVY MALIBU LT 2006 GMC SIERRA C500CRW
LoKng for new home & oves Ki, N2T2155M Thisone has the wow factor N2T209P Only 22k miles and loaded. N2C]61A Loaded one owner. N3T206M
$18,968 $19,968 $19,968 $22,668


SATURDAY JANUARY 26, 2013 C13


2005 CHEVROLET MALIBU 1995 JEEP GRMD CHEROKEE ORVIS 4X4 2003 FORD CROWN VICTORIA LX 2007 CHEVY UIPLANDER EXT IT
D (HER R 4 4 F RD !CR ICTORIA LX
5 EPG of op OK 72T38X6 I G e 2 29AB
Great starter car. NP5740B Great SUV w/lo of options. N2T386B Great car. N2C294B Roorn for the whole family. NP5642B
IM7'47 g oniN
7i!, i 6 8 $ 77,9 6 8 $9,868 $12,668




CiTus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SIVI O


,kj~i i


#> ff
New 2012 Honda Civic LX
AUTOMATIC


4 %#


New 2013 Honda Fit 9
MODEL G E&ICLXW E UiPPED NOT STRIPPED
WiaH AUTOMATIC, W CAND CRUISE




New 2012 Honda Accord LX Sedan
DDEL C12FCE'W, ATICMAT1C, OER PKG.
CHifSETRACTION CONTRG w."DSO MUCH MORE




New 2012 Honda Civic HyWid


ti,, r0


New 2012 Honda CR-V LX 2WD
MK1DE. 3H EWY ME sEE rIY THE C S THE RST
S 212PIU HaN REA SA WHILe i E tJ. S



New 2012 Honda Ridgeline Rr
~L~A?~lA D~THE E


New 2912Honda Crossur 2WD.2ALEX
WO2EL'HI, .~O~WI~ IEAC TH :-'LE A I.~~1CE
.). WX t W- tIJT'EE f T NEEY-.....
AOvO


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C14'SATURDAY JANUARY 26, 2013


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Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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ICl,


2012 Chevy Volt
Now's the time to




AND0% APR Ior 72 bos


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: 9
32


All-New 2013 Chew Spark 1LS
Automatic Transmission


2012 Chew Sonic 5 Dr. LS
MSRP: S 15,560
$4') 0 "


2013 Chew Malibu LS
MSRP: .23,44


2013 Chevy Equinox LS
$Ik,. dC13135, ALjIQ,4t.-y, MSRP: $25,03O


2012 Chew Tave LS
Stk #C1232F, Auto, Seats 7!. Was $3,7,5
SAMA A


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SATURDAY JANUARY 26, 2013 C15


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Each vehicle includes: Kia Certified Pre-Owned vehicles
l 150 point quality assurance inspection must be less than five years old
0 CARFAX vehicle history report and have less than 60,000 miles.
10 years/100,000 miles Powertrain Warranty from the original in-service date
0 24-hour roadside assistance for 10 years/unlimited miles from the original in-service date
0 Towing, rental, and travel breakdown benefits for Out of Town Repair/Expense


0t


Veiles to Choo, ...'se'n


II


AT CITRUS KIA, "WE JUST DON'T
CLOSE CAR DEALS, WE OPEN RELATIONSHIPS"


IA




2,


1850 S.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL
352 564 8668
The Power to SurpriseTM
Shop from Home @ www.citruskia.com KNS


*$3,000 down, 75 months at 4% interest rate. Plus tax, tag, title. WAC.


Sportage


Sorento


Rondo


Rio


Forte


Sedona


C16 SATURDAY JANUARY 26, 2013


r







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HERNANDO
2BR/1 BA, %/ acre
All Appl's $395 mo
(No Pets)
(352) 860-0904,
(Cell) 352-212-6815
HOMOSASSA
2 & 3 Br homes w/ stor-
age sheds. Starting at
$550/mo + $800/Sec -
ONLY $1350 total to
move in. We pay trash,
lawn, water & sewer.
Close to Walmart,
Publixs& Suncoast PKY
No pets 352-584-1831
HOMOSASSA
2/1, $400/mo.+ util.
1574 S. Iroquois Ave
(352) 503-7562
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Furn or Non
Furn.
9075 S. Breen Terr.
$500 mo (352)
382-7396
HOMOSASSA
2BR, $475. mo. Nice
Area (352) 422-1932
HOMOSASSA
2BR/2 BA, No Pets
$500 (352) 628-5696
INGLIS
2/2, Close to Plant
on 1 acre Clean, Quiet
$495. (352) 447-6016
LECANTO
LEISURE ACRES
3/2 water & garbage
incl. $600mo.
(352) 628-5990




14 x 60, 2BR, 11/2 BA,
Carport, Shed, appli-
ances, W/D, clean,
move in condition
Near new Walmart on
486, $4,800.
(352) 387-7824

BANK
FORECLOSURE
Land-n-Home, 3/2
1500 sq. ft. On 1/2
Acre, paved rd.
LOOKS GOOD,
Have financing if
needed, only
$2,500 down,
$381.44mo. P&I
W.A.C. OR $69,900.
Call 352-613-0587
or 352-621-9183
Crystal River 55+
Park. 2BR/1BA Car-
port & Screened
Porch. Heat/Air
$9,500. 352-746-4648
Ask for Brit
HERNANDO
$$ Private Owner $$
Financing Available
New & Used
Manufactured Homes
Call 1-727-967-4230

HOME-ON-LAND
3/2 Great Shape.
%Acre. Move In
Now
$59,900.
Call 352-401-2979,
352-621-3807





NEW 2013

2br2ba
Doublewide w/10 year
Warranty $39,900
Delivered & setup, a/c,
skirt, steps.
Call(352) 795-1272
Palm Harbor Homes
New Homes at
$39,900. $5K for your
used
mobile home. 3 New
Models, 1,100-2,400
SF 800-622-2832 ext
210
REPO'S- REPO'S
REPO'S
WE HAVE REPO'S
CALL 352-621-9181



WE WILL

BUY YOUR
MANUFACTURED
Home. from 1976-2013
CALL (352) 795-2377




2BR. 1 /2BA.on your
own 75x 100 lot.
no fees! new enclosed
sunroom, Ig laundry
room furn, 2 storage
buildings, 5111 Castle
Lake Ave. S. of
Inverness on SR41
$39,500 (352) 597-7353
3bdr/2 full baths/ 2 car
caroort on 1 acre.
split layout, steel roof,
caged pool, 20x25 ft
deck, Ig storage build-
ing, Furnished Modu-
lar $73,900, 5215
Bridget Pt, Castle
Lake Park
Inverness
(352) 597-7353
CASTLE LAKE
Floral City
2/2 S/W Fully furnished
move in condition.
2 screen rooms,
2 sheds. Landscaped
with sprinkler on quiet
cul-de-sac. $38,900.
352-212-1883
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 4br 2ba MH
READY TO MOVE IN!
.-Owner Fin. Avail
CALL (352) 795-1272
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Less Than
$46,500. Cash.
Considering ALL Cash
offers. 352-586-9498
HERNANDO 2/2 DW
On lot, with Shed &
Deck See for your-
self at 2562 N. Treas-
ure Pt. $28,500 obo
352-464-0719
HERNANDO/486
1+acre, 2br SWMH+
den/flp, ManCave/Work
Shop w/ AC, 28x40,
$47,500, J. Desha
Cridland Real Estate


(352)634-6340
HOMOSASSA
-3/2, Fenced Yard,-
NEW Floorina. NEW
AC $5.000 Down.
$435. mo
(352) 302-9217
HOMOSASSA
2ba 1 ba MH needs
complete rehab. Good
shed, well & septic.
6524 W. Akazian
$12,500 (603) 860-6660
NW Citrus County
SWMH on 1 acre, 2/1.5
paved rd., screened
porch, appliances -
$37,700 possible
owner financing
352-795-9908
W. of 19 in Homosassa
1994, 2/2 Doublewide,
Move In Condition
Corner Lot $44,900.
Tradewinds Realty
(352) 400-0089


2/2 on Lake Rous-
seau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent
$240/mo. 2003. Used
Seasonally
Owner bought a
house. 207-546-6115,
cell
Adult Park 2/1,
Mobile, heat and air,
nicely furn. large
shed, sreen rm. car-
port, $8,200
Lot Rent $160 mo.
(352) 287-3729

CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
H WINTER SPE-
CIALS H
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
2/2 New Model
$59K
2/2 waterfrnt.
$31,000.
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

DUNNELLON
LAKE ROUSSEAU MH
Park. Lg. 1/1 w/slider to
encl. screened porch,
outside shed, CHAfurn.
Nice yard, low lot rent.
Asking$11,900
(207) 347-0531
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $179/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS
3/2 MH, Furn. Ig screen
lanai, shed & lot. All appl
ind Ig scn TV,55+ PK
Asking $12,000. Call
(352)364-3747
INVERNESS
Move In Ready,
Beautiful 1/1 SW,
Mobile, Harbor Lights
55+ park, on Big Lake
Henderson. Fully furn.,
very updated, view of
lake, Cen. HVAC, W/D,
A Must See! Asking
$7,000, 352-344-1828
INVERNESS PARK
55+, 14X60, 2/2, new
roof, all appliances,
partly furn. screen
room, shed,
352-419-6476
MOBILE HOME,
Fully
Furnished. Everyth-
ing stays. Just move
in. 2 Sheds,
washer/dryer all ap-
pliances. Must See!
$7,500. (708) 308-3138
PALM TERRACE
55+ Community,
1997 3BR/2BA 14 x 66,
excel. cond. Shed,
Fl. Rm. Carport &
Deck $16,000. (352)
400-8231
REDUCED 2/2 $17,500
On Lake Rousseau
Lot Rent $240/mo.
BETTER THAN NEW!
Owner financing. Call
LEE (352) 817-1987
Singing Fores t
FLORAL CITY
14 x 70, Mobile, 2 Irg.
bedrooms, furnished &
remodeled, heat & air,
carport & shed, Wash/
Dryer, Lot rent $176.
$14,500. 352-344-2420
STONEBROOK, CR
2bd/2ba,gourmet kitch,
master suiteencl. porch
pond, crprt+ patio
$51,900, Cridland RE,
Jackie 352-634-6340
Waterfront/Homosassa
Westwind Village 55+
Beautifully furnished
Move In Ready, 2/2
2 Scm rms, dbl door,
refrig./Ice maker
Washer Dryer, Low
mnthly pyments,
$19000 obo
(850) 449-1811 Cell




HOMOSASSA
RENT-to-OWN
3br 2ba MH
Immediate Occpancy
Owner Financing Avail.
CALL (352) 795-2377






ACTION
RENAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
wn.(CirusCounlyHomeRentalscon
CITRUS SPRINGS
8160 N. Duval Dr. (CS).... $1,300
3/2/2 Pool home fuli fun w/utiliies
wuti/sew iineeccps
CRYSTAL RIVER
II1246 Freshwater Path ((R)..SI,200

10350 Deepwoods Dr. (CR) ... S750
2/21 (lose to mull, Ig utily room
HOMOSASSA
1650 W. Homosassa Trail #21 (H) ... $500
2/1 (ozy upe on Homosc~a Tril
40 Hollyhock Cir. (H) .. $950
3/2/2OCkVilage SMW, sm~oos home
NE RNAN DO/IN VERN ESS
994 E. Winnetka St. (Her)... $625
2/1 So Ol ucre witI curport
6315 N. Shoewood Dr. (Her)... $650

854 Pritchard Isi. (Inv.)...S800
















Chassahowitzka
3/'2 waterfrnt/'DW $500


22 fenc. Yd/DW $500
2/2 house w/gar. $600
SuqarmillWoods
3/2/2, Furnished, $900.
AGENT (352) 382-1000




CRYSTAL RIVER
1Br 2BA Conletelv
furn. in l utilities, W/D,
$700 me 1st, last & dep
(352) 422-7717
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Studio Apartment
Completely Furn. Ca-
ble TV W/D rm. All util.
incl'd.+ boat dock.
$700 mo 352-372-0507
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1
Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025


Alexander Real
Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES
& MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apart-
ments for Rent
352-465-2985
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, $575. quiet,
Clean incld's water,
352-563-2114
352-257- 6461

INVERNESS
2 B/R's Availa-
ble
KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOMES
Rental Assistance

Available For
Qualified Appli-
cants
Call 352-344-1010
MWF, 8-12 & 1-5
307 Washington
Ave
Inverness Florida
Equal Housing
Opp.









L d


CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 2/1, lawn,
water, sewr & garb. W/D
hk up $500.mo $250
dep No Pets
352-212-9205
352-21 2-7922




CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret Har-
bourApts. Newly re-
modeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Inc
Water, garbage, W/D
hook-up.
352-586-4037


THIS OUT!

RAINTREE
APARTMENT
ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS
1, 2 & 3 Bedrms.
Starting @ $448.
201 E. Hills St.
Inverness, Fl34452
(352) 726-4330
TDD #711
80:0am -4:00pm
Closed for lunch
12pm-1pm.
Equal

Housing

Opportunity


CLASSIFIEDS





2/1/2, 828 5th Ave. NE
Furn $650 or Unfurn.
$550 + sec 727-
455-8998, 727-776-3120

V' THIS OUT!

RAINTREE
APARTMENTS II
ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS
Elderly or disabled
with or without
children
201 E. Hills St.
Inverness, Fl34452
(352) 726-4330
TDD #711
8:00a -4:00p, M-F
Closed for lunch
12pm-1pm.
Equal Housing
Opportunity








LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza,
Office/Retail, CR 486,
900 sf. @ $700+ util. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801


0#1 EplOFM

wwIxyml


SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013 C17


CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furn w/ member-
ship, Seasonal/Annual
352-476-4242,
352-527-8002

CITRUS HILLS
2/2/2 Townhouse
Condo, full apple's,
carport, Citrus Hills
membership incld'd
Prudential Florida
Showcase Properties
call 352-476-8136




CITRUS SPRINGS
Like New, 2/2, All appl.
$625. 954-557-6211




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
**RENT REDUCED**
3/1 Country Home on
stilts,w/fenced yard.
$565 + Utilities.
Call 920-922-6800



ie source is


Aein.com]


For more information on how to reach
'CitrUs County'readers cai1


352-563-5592.


IOOO8X'D


Sugarmill Woods
3BR, 2/2BA, Super
Clean 3,100 sf, large
priv. shaded lot,
2 covered, porches,
sm. pet ok. $1,150.
mo. yrly Ise., sec. dep
$700. $3,000 move in
(727) 580-1083





BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, Fresh paint, appl's
Flooring $475. mo.
352-302-3987

BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 + Florida Room,
106 S. Fillmore $550
mo. 352-422-2798

BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/Carport. CHA
$550. mo. & 1/1/CP
+ Fl. Rm $450 (352)
897-4447, 697-1384

CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Inverness
352-726-3476
Lecanto
352-746-0373
Crystal River
352-563-0890




EQALUSING
OPPORTUNITY


BEVERLY HILLS
870 Beakrush Ln
2br 1% ba, 1 car gar.
enclosed screen porch,
$695mo. leased dep.
no pets. 352-697-3133
BEVERLY HILLS
Lg 1/1, Extras, E-Z
Terms $425. 697-1457
CITRUS SPRINGS
4 Br, 2 Ba, 2Car gar.
only $795/mo. 7206 N.
Varsity Ave. 382-1373.

CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
Water Incl. CHA, $496.
352-220-2447
212-2051

CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2+ Carport $725. mo
DUNNELLON
3/1,$625 mo. IstIst,
Sec (352) 489-9239

DUNNELLON
2/2/2
RAINBOW SPRINGS
*Avail. Feb. 1st *
$800. mo+ sec.
(352) 465-2022

HERNANDO
Forest Ridge Village
Nice 2/2 home *
w/garage, screened
patio, & pool/clubhouse
privileges. $750 me
Call 980-285-8125
Homosassa Spring
3/2, $750/mo + sec.
(352) 628-3696
INVERNESS
1/1 Great Location, 55+
community Bring boat &
fishing gear. $585
352-344-1380


Invern. Highlands
2/2/1, City Water, Great
Loc. Quiet Neighrhood
$650. 352-860-2554
INVERNESS
3/2 Brand New,
Granite tops, marble
firs, SS Ap $895
(352) 634-3897

INVERNESS
3/2/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352- 601-2615 OR
352-201-9427

INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/1/1
$590mo.1st & Sec
(352) 344-2560
Sugarmill Woods
3/2/2, Pool, remodeled
$1,200. 352-302-4057




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225




BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV &
W/D WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611




FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1
Furn, $950.
352-419-4421


CITRUS COUN TYE

CHRpoNICLE
II www.chronicleonline.com
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservaton Commission;
http/tlnyurl.com/http-myfwc-custhelp-com-app


m







C18 SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013


CRYSTAL RIVER
3950 sq ft Lt MFG
w/office @ $1200/mo
1155 sq ft storage @
450/mo
600 sq ft office @
450/mo
352-302-1935

CRYSTAL RIVER
Warehouse for Rent
Free standing, garage
area, 1,440sf,
$100-$550
352-634-0129



-e l jstt


ESTATE SALE in Na-
ture Coast Landings
RV Resort. Large de-
veloped site and a
separate gated storage
lot, plus almost new
5th-wheel with slides,
screened gazebo, and
storage building. All for
$79,900. For more info
and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441


From mobiles to
mansions,
From Gulf to Lakes,
give me a call,
I sell 'em all!
352-422-4137
nancv.wilson a
vahoo.com

Nancy J. Wilson
Realtor@
Broker-Associate
SRESGRI
Waybright Real Es-
tate, Inc.


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"a ny
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. "Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




EOUAL HOUS NG
OPPORTUNITY


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches
&
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments,
Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WW.
crosslandrealty, com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc


INVERNESS
Sunday 1/27 lp-4pm
3/2 MH, Furn. Ig screen
lanai, shed & lot. All apple
inl Ig scn TV,55+ PK
Asking $12,000.
911 Hoffmann Lane
Melody MH Park
(352) 364-3747

OPEN HOUSE
Suaarmill Woods
Sunday 1-3PM
3 Chinkapin Court
Homosassa Fl
Nancy Little Lewis
Realtor
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 302-6082





DUDLEY'S
-3AUOCTIOS-







Fri 1/25
Estate Coin 6pm
$5-10-20 Gold
pieces, Silver, $500 &
$1,000 bills, Lg 1800's
currency, silver
Sat 1/26
Florida Porch
Antiques
Liquidation 10am
On Site@ 712W.
Main St in Leesburg,
HUGE Sale of from
Long time Antique
dealer filled the
JC Penny
Tue 1/28 Real Estate
& Restaurant loam
4135 S. Suncoast
Blvd. (US 19)
Homosassa,
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB 1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384
HOMOSASSA
GNC Commercial
7311 Grover Cleveland
Blvd. 3/2 MH $69,900.
(603) 860-6660


R MI I


CITRUS

SPRINGS
3/2/2, 2 yr old Pool
home in imacculate
condition,
Landscaped backyard.
$125.000 Priced to
sell!
CALL (570) 412-5194



Quiet Country Setting
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area
only 20 Min. to Ocala
$129,900 Call
352-302-6784
for appt.




PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat,
horses, in-laws, there
is room for everyth-
ing! 4/3 % w/7 car
garage/workshop &
in-law suite on 5.83 ac-
res.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes, immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164




2/2/2, REMODELED
NEW: Roof, AC, Kit,
Baths, Windows, Firs,
317 S Harrison.
Reduced $72,900.
Call 352-527-1239


Brentwood Villa
2/2/2 cul-de-sac
Completely updated!
1816 W. Jena Ct
OPEN SUN 12-3PM
$96,900
PRICED TO SELL!
FSBO 610-248-2090
HERNANDO
Citrus Hills Pool
Home
4/3/2+, circular
drive,
1 acre lot, below
$200k 352-527-7856




ARBOR LAKES
"OPEN HOUSE*2/2/2
+ Den or 3 BR &
fenced back yard!
Gated Comm. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista Trl
(352) 419-7418
ARBOR LAKES
Fantastic Dream
Home In Active Senior
Community $169,900
2,100 sf, 3BR/2BA/2GA
Split Floor Plan w/Pool
Call (352) 726-6564


3/2 Move In Ready Villa
in Windemere. Beauti-
fully Maintained with up-
graded features. Prem-
ier location close to boat
ramp, trail & downtown.
MLS#359594 $229,500
Call Myriam Reulen
(352) 613-2644
Weston Properties, LLC

INVERNESS
Block home 2br, 1ba
w/ 2porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + ac-
res. $130,000 Call
Buzz 352-341-0224 or
David 607-539-7872
Unique stilt home off
581. Great Ioc to town,
shopping, & hospital.
2br/lba, w/ rap around
porch. Needs some
TLC. Sold as is.
$33,900 (352) 419-6227




3b/2ba den MH
on land off US 19
newer c/h/a carpet &
vinyl, clean RV Hkup.
fence **$39.900*
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie 352-634-6340
GRAND 2006
CUSTOM HOME
www.81woodfield.
CanBYours.com
81 Woodfield,
Homosassa
3 Bed/2 Bath/3 Car Gar
Salt Water Pool & More!
$339K, MLS#356914
Realty Connect
(352) 212-1446
The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo
Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558







MUST SELL

4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell







4/2/3 HEATED POOL
lots of extras!
SELLER MOTIVATED!
reduced to 210k
352-688-6500 or
352-212-5023


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY I
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts

homes.com.

Sugarmill Woods
House for Sale
2/2/2, Call for More
Info. 334-691-4601
(850) 776-7528


GAIL
STEARNS
Realtor


Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298

Low overhead =
Low
Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available

I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Emai:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!

I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I '1 work harder

352-212-5097
iselicitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515














TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

Buy or Sell
Call NOW

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Realestate
Consultant





"FREE
Foreclosure
and Short Sale
Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA VANDEBOE
Broker (R)
Owner
Plantation Re-
alty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near
KINGS BAY $425,000.
Make Offers
352-563-9857

OPEN HOUSE
Sunday 2p-6p
Come see this
natural wonderland.
3/2 stilt home on over
1% acres and an
amazing body of
water. Bring a fishing
pole and enjoy a
BBQ. Located N on
19 just over the Barge
Canal Bridge, R on
Foss Grove Path. Fol-
low the signs to 12307
Edwards Ct. You will
not want to miss this!
If directions needed
pis call Kim or Jo at
352-220-2658


YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


ROD KENNER
352-436-3531
ERA
Suncoast Realty


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNa u-reoast
Properies.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties-


Citrus County
Homes I


5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945


CLASS IFI EDS



DUNNELLON
Here is that home on
Lake Rousseau that
you have always
wanted! 2br 1 ba on
1.43 acres w/168ft
lake frontage. Com-
pletely remodeled all
new interior & windows.
No Flood Insur-
ance! Priced reduced
from $369,000 to
$169,000
Call Bernie
(352) 563-0116




% ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact fee
credit, high and dry,
trees, $11,000 obo
(352) 795-3710
NORTH CITRUS
1.4 ac. Cleared, fenced,
high & dry. Paved road.
Elec., pump/well, septic.
Owner finan. No
mobiles. $13,900
CALL 352-897-4195




HOMOSASSA Wooded
Lot on Lee Woods Dr.,
has Wetlands, with
River access, but not
on river $6,000.
352-621-1664




A DOCK RENTAL
Crystal Riv. Lited, canal
to river & Gulf. Up to
25ft, no sails 795-1986
AIRBOAT
13ft x 7ft, 500 HP Cad-
illac, turn key boat
$9,500 obo Call Jim for
details (813) 361-4929,
BASS TRACKER
12ft. Jon Boat,
w/ 6HP motor & trailer,
$1,750 obo
(352) 563-0665



MUST SEL


BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motorAQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth
finder, 2001 Rolls
float on trailer worth
$1000. Comes
w/spare motor Has
service manual,
2nd owner $2500
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855

PONTOON BOAT
18ft. 1991, NEW carpet
seats, etc., Nice,
Boat only. Will deliver
$1,200. (352) 637-3983
TRI PONTOON
BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
(352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com




ITASCA MERIDIAN
36 Ft, 2005 Motor Home
350HP Cat Diesel 55K
miles, no smoke/pets
6 Michelin Tires, New
2010 qn w/ sleep No.
mattress & overhead
fan. W/D combo
$71,000 obo.
(352) 419-7882
MONTEGO BAY 35ft
5th wheel '06, 3 slides
kept undercover, Exc
cond. Truck Avail.
LOADED
$27,000 (352) 564-2756
NATIONAL RV
2006 Tropical One
owner,34ft, 26000
milesno smoke/pets,
300HP Cummins die-
sel,2 slides, 6 new ti-
res, 3yr
warranty,many extras.
$87000. Well main-
tained. 352-341-4506




5TH WHEEL
33FT
GOOD CONDITION
MUST SELL
(423) 202-0914
FOREST RIVER
2010, Surveyor, Sport
189, 20 ft. Travel
Trailer,
1 slide, w/AC, qn. bed,
awning, pwr. tonque
jack, corner jacks,
microwave, equilizing
hitch, $10,500, reduced
to $9000
(352) 382-1826
HIGH LINE
1999, 32ft, Deluxe, 12'
slide out, new 22' awn-
ing, 55+ park, can be
moved. Was asking
$9,000, Sell $6,900
excel. shape
231-408-8344
HI-LO TRAVEL
TRAILER 2003, tow
lite model 22-03t, exc.
cond.
$6000 obo
352-422-8092
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, kg bd,like new,
60amp serv. NADA
$29K asking $25K
obo 352-382-3298
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,


Call Troy
352-621-7113


REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot LARRY'S
AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352
564-8333
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition, Ti-
tle, No Title, Bank
Lien,
No Problem, Don't
Trade it in. We Will
Pay up to $25K Any
Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ




BUICK
2007, Lucerne, CXL
55K miles, Leather
$13,500. obo
Call Troy
(352)621-7113
CHEVROLET
'01 Corvette Corvette
6 speed, black on
black, $14,500
(352) 613-2333
CHEVROLET
2002, Camaro Z28
$9,495.
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
'01, PT Cruiser,
loaded, 53k miles,
$4,800
(352) 464-4304
FORD
2001 COBRA MUS-
TANG CONV. 5
SPEED, LEATHER
MUST SEE
CALL 352-628-4600
For More Info
FORD
2005, Five Hundred
LMT, 40K miles,
leather, V6 $9,980
Call Troy
352-621-7113
FORD
2006 Focus ZXW, SE
4DR, WGN. 85k miles
$5,800 obo
Call Troy (352)
621-7113
FORD MUSTANG
2007, 7000 mi, garage
kept, GT clone.
Call (352) 527-1191
FORD
Mustang Cobra, Indy
500 Pace Car-1994,
Convertible, 7100 mi,
Gar. kept 252-339-3897
GAS SAVER!
1999 Saturn SL $2000
Tan/Gold. Auto. Engine
and Trans are solid.
196,000 miles. Clean in-
side and out. Call Steve:
352-613-0746
Harley Davidson
'03, Super Glide,
low miles, $7,500
(352) 613-2333
HONDA
2011 CRV LX, 19K
miles, likenew, 4 Cyl.
$19,950
Call Troy
352-621-7113
HYUNDAI
2006 Elantra, GLS
90K miles, likenew, 4
DR, auto. $6,800
Call Troy
352-621-7113
MAZDA
2007, RX8 Looking for
A sports Car, Look No
Furtherlll This is A Must
See.Call for an Appt.
and Pricing
352-628-4600
Mercury
"97 Grand Marquis w/
trailer hitch, 4 good
hancock tires, high
mileage $900 OBO
(352) 249-7541
MERCURY
2004, Grand Marquis,
Leather and Loaded
To Many Options to
List. Call Today
Before It's Gone
Call 352-628-4600
MITSUBISHI
2011 Galant, Low Mi.
Great fuel economy,
Priced to sell
Call 352-628-4600
For Appointment
MONEY'S TIGHT
PRICES R RIGHT
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
PONTIAC
1999 TransAm 5.7Liter
V8, 62,700 mi,
Show Quality, $7500.
(352) 726-8336
Cell 352-302-5569
PONTIAC
2008, G6,
4 Door, Cold AC
Call 352-628-4600
For Pricing
PORSCHE
'99, 911 Carrera, black
exterior, black interior
62,600 org. mi $25,900
386-334-2559 CELL
TOYOTA
2000, Camry LE
V6, 183K miles Super
Clean $5,800 obo
Call Troy (352)
621-7113
TOYOTA
2007, Yaris, 59K mi-
les,
2 DR, H/B $7,800


1971 CHEVELLE
CONVERTIBLE
stunning, 40k+ in-
vested, fully re-
stored, 350 auto,
buckets, consistant
show winner, high
end stereo, red w/
white top & interior
$23,900,
352-513-4257


AUTO SWAP
CORRAL SHOW
20TH ANNUAL
Sumter
Swap Meets
SUMTER COUNTY
Fairgrounds, Bush-
nell
Feb. 15, 16, 17th
1-800-438-8559







I I I I I I I I
Tell that special
person
",Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII





CHEVROLET
1994,C/K 2500
$2,880
352-341-0018

CHEVROLET
2005, Silverado
2500 HD, Diesel crew
cab, $13,880
352-341-0018

FORD
2003 F150
Ex Cab, $8,990
352-341-0018

FORD
'98, Ranger Splash,
very well kept, cold AC,
6 cyl., auto, Tires like
new, $3,200 obo
(352) 601-0572

FORD
'98, Ranger XLT, two
tone paint, electric
pkg. auto trans., al-
most new tires 170 k
$2,850 obo, 503-3787

MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

TOYOTA
2002, Tacoma,
Crew Cab, $8,770.
352-341-0018


BAD BOY BUGGIE
2011 "ready to hunt"
Only $5998.
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS
2002, SPORTSMAN
700 CC 4X4 AUTO
READY FOR THE MUD
ONLY $4288
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS RZR 800 LE
TIME TO PLAY HARD
ONLY $8388
(352) 621-3678




CF MOTO
2008, 250 Trike
772 miles, $2495.
(352) 726-6128
DALIN DAY STAR
2006, 700mi saddle
bags, Fully dressed,
Call (352) 527-1191
FASHION
2007 250 cc;
1,500 miles; $1,200
(352) 726-6128
GOLDWING
1985 Blue;
39,155 miles; $2,495
(352) 726-6128
GOLDWING
1985 Limited Edition -
Gold; Fuel injected;
53,012 miles; $3,000
(352) 726-6128


1998, SE with Voyager
Trike Kit Tan;
55,200 miles; $9,000
(352) 726-6128


TOYOTA
2004, 4 Runner Sport
2WD, 94K mi,
Leather $12,800.
obo
Call Troy
352-621-7113




CADILLAC
2007, Escalade,
44k miles, Luxury
NAV, $29,500.
Call Troy (352)
621-7113
CHEVY TRAIL-
BLAZER LT 05
exc. cond. asking $6000
obo, in Hernando
(904) 923-2902




FORD
F150, 1978, 4x4
perfect, father/son,
project $1,650 obo
(352) 564-4598
JEEP
2004, Wrangler X
4WD, Only 57K mi-
les,
Hard Top $13,800.
Call Troy
352-621-7113




KIA
2006 Sedona,
Great Family Van,
7 Pass, low mi. Call
today for Low Price


298-0126 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) announces the follow-
ing public meeting to which all interested persons are invited:

Cooperative Funding Public Meeting: Governing Board members will discuss, evalu-
ate and prioritize fiscal year 2014 requests for project funding in Hillsborough, Pasco
and Pinellas counties of SWFWMD.

DATE/TIME: Tuesday, February 12, 2013; 10 am

PLACE: SWFWMD Tampa Service Office, 7601 US Highway 301 North, Tampa FL
33637

A copy of the agenda may be obtained by contacting: WaterMatters.org Boards,
Meetings & Event Calendar; 1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211.

Pursuant to the provision of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring
reasonable accommodations to participate in this workshop/meeting is asked to ad-
vise the agency at least 5 days before the workshop/meeting by contacting
SWFWMD's Human Resources Bureau Chief, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352) 796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-1476 (FL only), ext. 4702;
TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or email to ADACoordinatorswfwmd.state.fl.us.

If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board/Committee with
respect to any matter considered at this meeting or hearing, he/she will need to en-
sure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the
testimony and evidence from which the appeal is to be issued.

For more information, you may contact: Lori.Manuel &watermatters.org
1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211, x4606 (Ad Order EXE0245)
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle January 26, 2013


299-0126 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) announces the follow-
ing public meeting to which all interested persons are invited:

Cooperative Funding Public Meeting: Governing Board members will discuss, evalu-
ate and prioritize fiscal year 2014 requests for project funding in Polk, Highlands and
Hardee counties of SWFWMD.

DATE/TIME: Wednesday, February 13, 2013; 1 pm

PLACE: SWFWMD Bartow Service Office, 170 Century Boulevard, Bartow, FL 33830

A copy of the agenda may be obtained by contacting: WaterMatters.org Boards,
Meetings & Event Calendar; 1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211.

Pursuant to the provision of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring
reasonable accommodations to participate in this workshop/meeting is asked to ad-
vise the agency at least 5 days before the workshop/meeting by contacting
SWFWMD's Human Resources Bureau Chief, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352) 796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-1476 (FL only), ext. 4702;
TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or email to ADACoordinatorswfwmd.state.fl.us.

If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board/Committee with
respect to any matter considered at this meeting or hearing, he/she will need to en-
sure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the
testimony and evidence from which the appeal is to be issued.

For more information, you may contact:Lori.Manuel Owatermatters.org
1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211, x4606 (Ad Order EXE0246)
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle January 26, 2013


297-0126 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Rctitious
Name Law, pursuant
to Section 865.09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of
WHITE DIAMOND
LIMOUSINE SERVICE
Located at 2424 Hwy 44
West, Inverness, Florida,
34450 in the County of
Citrus, intends to register
the said name with the
Division of Corporations of
the Florida Department of
StateTallahassee, Florida.


Dated at Inverness, Flor-
ida, this 22nd day of
January, 2013.
/s/Frances Williams
President
Published one (1) time
in the Citrus County
Chronicle,
January 26, 2013

296-0126 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notlce under Rctitious
Name Law, pursuant
to Section 865.09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under


the fictitious name of
DECO CAFE
Located at 109 Court-
house Square, Inverness
Florida, 34450 in the
County of Citrus, intends
to register the said name
with the Division of Cor-
porations of the Florida
Department of State,
Tallahassee, Florida.
Dated at Crystal River,
Florida, this 22nd day of
January, 2013.
/s/Jennifer S. Spaulding
President
Published one (1) time
in the Citrus County
Chronicle,
January 26, 2013


Business Name
Address Phone


Harley-DAVIDSON
2006 FLHTPI Clean
bike, great looks, 88 ci,
5 speed, low miles 19K,
accident free, never
layed down, garage
kept, two tone bklwt, all
service done by HD
dealer 352 513-4294
asking $10,500
HARLEY-Davidson
Leather Jacket LG as
New, $300. OBO
Two shorty motorcycle
Helmets S/M & L/XL
$50ea 352-746-6125
HONDA
'01, Goldwing,
100k + miles,
$9,500
(352) 419-4606
HONDA
'04, 750 Shadow Aero.
Runs & looks great!
$2,995. Firm
(352) 344-0084
HONDA
1997, GOLDWING
ASPENCADE, 24K mi,
Lots a Extras! $6000.
(352) 212-6450
HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley,1100CC,
Chrome, bags, trade?,
70mpg $2,800. Crystal
River
(727) 207-1619
HONDA BLACK BIRD
CBR 1100 LOW LOW
MILES ONLY $3488.00
(352) 621-3678
HONDA ST1300
2006 MADE TO TOUR
ONLY $7786
(352) 621-3678
KAWASKI NINFA
650
LIKE NEW ONLY
$5488 (352) 621-3678
KYMCO
2009, AJILITY
SCOOTER GREAT
GAS SAVER ONLY
$998 (352) 621-3678
SCOOTER
50 CC, like new, 400
miles, runs great
$850 OBO
(352) 746-0167
(315) 439-6005
SUZUKI
1999,1400 Intruder
with Lealman Trike Kit -
24,283 miles; $10,000
(352) 726-6128
SUZUKI BURGMAN
AUTOMATIC TWIST
AND GO FUN ONLY
$4686 (352) 621-3678
SUZUKI GSXR 750
195 MILES "HOLD ON"
ONLY $9996
(352) 621-3678
VICTORY CROSS
ROADS
"GREAT American
MADE CRUSIER"
ONLY $12888
(352) 621-3678


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DECEMBER'S 4

15000 WINNER!
BARBARA WILBURN-YORK Chevy Runs Deep
YOU COULD BE THIS MONTH'S WINNER!
VISIT ANY CRYSTAL LOCATION FOR DETAILS


FRE 2 HRREORDD3ESAGEWIH NF ADRIIN
I m 8 Osm 5%go -A- m755


FRE 24HRCRDDMESGET I NFO ANDPICN
1 __ ORA1: ~)r4


1=800=5834m8755


CAL=H-ISTN APRIALLIE


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FRE 24 HRECORDE MS AGEWIHINOANDRIIN


I A FM 00 1 A3


FRE 24 H-RECRDE MSAGEWIHINOANDPICN


CAL rilE INT T APPRIA LINE.:

800-44o9os



CHELSTA
C H EV RO LE TL


CrystalAutos.come9


1035 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448*


352-795-1515


Saes MnayFrda :00a. 100m # atuda 900m-:3mSunda-Clsed


-SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. *PRICE INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT ALL WILL QUALIFY, PLUS $2999 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG,
TITLE AND DEALER FEE OF $599.50 WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK


SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013 C19




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DECEMBER'S $5000 WINNER!'
BARBARA WILBURN-YORK
YOU COULD BE THIS MONTH'S WINNER!
VISIT ANY CRYSTAL LOCATION FOR DETAILS


CRYSTAL
N ISSAN

352-564-1971
4NL ? 937 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL
2CRYSTALAUTOSECOM
Sales: Monday-Friday 8:00am-8:00pmm Saturday 9:00am-7:30pm Sunday-Closed
Service: M, W, F 7:30am-5:30pm T, TH 7:30am-7:00pm Saturday 8:00am-4:00pm Sunday-Closed 'aBody Shop: M-F 7:30am-5:30pm
+PRICE INCLUDES $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX TAG TITLE AND
DEALER FEE $599.50. WAC. *LEASES ARE FOR 39 MONTHS 39,000 MILES FOR THE LIFE OF THE LEASE. 15 CENTS PER MILE OVER. $3999 DUE AT SIGNING
WITH APPROVED CREDIT. **0%, SPECIAL FINANCE OFFERS AND NO PAYMENTS UNTIL MARCH 2013 ARE AVAILABLE WITH APPROVED CREDIT, NOT VERY-
ONE WILL QUALIFY. OFFERS CANNOT BE COMBINED. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


OD UQ


C:20)SATURDAY JANUARY 26, 2013




Full Text

PAGE 1

E RYNW ORTHINGTON Staff writerA long time ago in 2004 two men purchased new digital cameras. As they played with their cameras, they thought: This is kind of cool. I wonder who else just got a new camera? Ed Katterson and Vito DePinto decided to take that thought further and placed an advertisement in the Chronicle to inquire if anyone had a similar interest. On June 7, 2004, 25 responders with cameras confirmed their suspicions, leading to the establishment of the Art Center Camera Club of Citrus County. They thought it was such a great experience and decided to get together once a month, said Jim Houle, vice president of visual arts and camera club president. They chose Monday night. Every first Monday night of the month we get together to talk photography. Quickly, they began hearing from people who were not photographers and were clueless about photography. However, these individuals wanted to buy cameras and wanted help INSIDE JANUARY 26, 2013 Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community VOL. 118 ISSUE 172 50 CITRUS COUNTY 2013 football districts finalized /B1 www.chronicleonline.com INDEX Comics . . . . .C8 Community . . . .C6 Crossword . . . .C7 Editorial . . . . .A8 Entertainment . . .B6 Horoscope . . . .B6 Lottery Numbers . .B4 Lottery Payouts . .B6 Movies . . . . . .C8 Obituaries . . . .A6 Classifieds . . . .C9 TV Listings . . . .C7 NEWS BRIEF HIGH 75 Early morning fog. Mostly sunny. PAGE A4 TODAY & next morning SATURDAY VILLAGE TOYOTA CRYSTAL RIVER 000DOQ9 MANAGERS SPECIALS See Page C11 LOW 47 LOCAL NEWS: BirthdayLou the hippo marks his 53rd birthday at Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park. / Page A3 I killed my father A.B. SIDIBE Staff writerINVERNESS The hatchet-wielding man accused of sneaking up on his father and hacking him to death has been found guilty. It took the jury a hair over two hours of deliberation Friday to find John William Campbell, 39, guilty of firstdegree murder in the death of John Henry Campbell, 68. He now potentially faces the death penalty. That phase of the trial is set to begin at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday in Circuit Judge Ric Howards courtroom. Hatchet-wielding man guilty of murder A.B. SIDIBE Staff writerINVERNESS Prosecutor Pete Magrino will not tip his hand as to what his teams strategy will be going into next weeks penalty phase in the case of the State of Florida v. John William Campbell. However, Magrino had this to offer: He believes Campbells case is a deathpenalty case and his team has, since the inception of the case, endeavored to Penalty phase: Life or death? John Campbell See TRIAL / Page A5 See PENALTY / Page A5 Work continues on State Road 200 bridge Officials from the Florida Department of Transportation caution motorists and cyclists taking the Withlacoochee River bridge on State Road 200 this weekend to be aware the overpass will be down to one lane for both directions as improvements are made to the bridge. The closure limits extend from just before the Stumpknockers on the River restaurant on the Marion County side to a little past the Citrus County line. The single-lane closing goes through 6 a.m. Monday. Vehicles needing to cross the bridge will be directed by flaggers, alternating northbound and southbound traffic through the one open lane. Weather conditions and other unforeseen circumstances could alter work schedules. Hospital boards unite Trustees, foundation reconcile E RYNW ORTHINGTON Staff writerINVERNESS Three years of legal squabbling involving Citrus Memorial Health System may be in its closing stages. No attorneys were present Friday at the Citrus County Hospital Board (CCHB) and the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation joint workshop to consider dismissing lawsuits, linking to work together and transferring money back to the hospital. We have to come together, put personal issues to the side for what is important to our patients, said James Sanders, member of Citrus Memorial Health Foundation. We need to work together instead of having two different unions. Both the foundation board and CCHB have agreed to drop costly legal disputes, link their boards by creating a balanced membership ratio which would allow them to work together on future hospital endeavors and transfer money back to the hospital. These issues have plagued the boards since 2009. The issues are immaterial and this is not about us, said Robert Priselac, CCHB member. It is about the citizens of this county. Lets do the right thing. Because they are unable to vote in a workshop, they decided to meet individually with their boards and return Jan. 30 for a globalization agreement. The agreement proposes to dismiss lawsuits or counterclaims that are now pending in circuit court. Lets spend three hours talking about patient care instead of legal issues, said Debbie Ressler, CCHB member. We need to be here for healthcare and how we are going to improve the hospital. Hospital Chief Executive Officer Ryan Beaty said he was pleased with the progress that was made. We have been adults today, Ressler said. If we unify, it will speak volumes to the public. CCHB members are expected to vote to globalize together at their Wednesday meeting. Chronicle reporter Eryn Worthington can be contacted at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington @chronicleonline.com. Illuminating work Associated PressWASHINGTON President Barack Obama violated the Constitution when he bypassed the Senate last year to appoint three members of the National Labor Relations Board, a federal appeals court ruled Friday in a far-reaching decision that could severely limit a chief executives powers to make recess appointments. The courts decision marked a victory for Republicans and business groups critical of the agency. If it stands, it could invalidate hundreds of board decisions over the past year, including some that make it easier for unions to organize. The three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit said contrary to the administrations claim, the Senate was not in recess Court: Obama appointments violate constitution LINDA DAVID /Special to the Chronicle During a recent field trip to Three Sisters Springs, Linda David shot a reflection known as First Light as the morning rays of light were hitting the rising mist off the water. Through a relationship with Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge, the Citrus County Camera Club is working to donate images to the refuge. Field trips, cameraderie highlight camera club offerings See CLUB / Page A5 Decision a victory for GOP See RECESS / Page A5 NATIONAL NEWS: Gun controlThousands of rules and regulations cover gun ownership./ Page A10 WORLD NEWS: World forumLeaders discuss economic problems at world forum./ Page A7 000DRX0

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Miami Woman convicted of abuse, kidnapping A former caretaker was convicted Friday of child abuse and kidnapping in a 4year-old foster childs disappearance more than a decade ago, but a mistrial was declared on a murder charge after jurors were narrowly unable to agree. The 12-person jury said early on they were split 11-1 on whether 67-year-old Geralyn Graham killed Rilya Wilson and could not persuade the holdout over two days of deliberations. The murder charge carried a potential life sentence, while the charges on which Graham was convicted carry potential sentences of at least 30 years behind bars. Assistant State Attorney Joshua Weintraub said the state would not try Graham a second time for first-degree murder. Graham has long maintained her innocence. Orlando Court sets aside 2 of 4 Anthony convictions A Florida appellate court Friday set aside two of the four convictions Casey Anthony faced for lying to detectives during the investigation into her missing 2-year-old daughter. Judges on the 5th District Court of Appeals agreed with Anthonys attorneys that two of the charges constituted double jeopardy, or being convicted or punished more than once for the same crime. Anthony was acquitted of killing Caylee in 2011.TallahasseeFloridians who lost homes can file claims Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi said Floridians who lost their homes to foreclosure still have a chance to get a share of a large national settlement. The initial deadline for people to file for a claim payment was Jan. 18, but state officials say claims filed afterwards are likely to be accepted. Those eligible could receive at least $840. The settlement applies to loans serviced by Bank of America, Wells Fargo, JP Morgan Chase, Citi or GMAC/Ally. Payments will go to people who lost their home to foreclosure between 2008 and 2011. Florida has been one of the states hit hardest by the foreclosure crisis. So far only about half of the estimated 150,000 people in Florida eligible for claim payments have responded to mail notices or phone calls. Around the COUNTY Snack Attack Feb. 2 aids childrens groupFrom 4 to 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, there will be a Snack Attack Dinner honoring Betty Strifler, who recently retired after serving 24 years as Citrus Countys clerk of the circuit court. The event, to benefit the Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County, will be at the Beverly Hills Lions Club. Cost of dinner per person is $9 and ham, turkey or both will be served along with scalloped potatoes, green beans, coleslaw, brownie with ice cream and coffee. Only 200 tickets will be sold. Mrs. Strifler will be honored in a presentation featuring Circuit Judge Patricia Thomas at 5:30 p.m. Tickets outlets include: Beverly Hills Civic Association 352-746-2657. Home Again Resale Store 352-270-8861. Central Ridge Boys and Girls Clubs 352-2708841. Make checks payable to: Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County. Proceeds will be used to provide snacks for children at the Central Ridge Boys & Girls Clubs site. Time running out to drop trees at landfill Citrus County Central Landfill is offering free Christmas tree disposal during January. Trees must be cleaned of all decorations, tinsel, lights and not have artificial snow. For information on landfill hours, call 352-527-7670 during office hours or go to the countys website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us. Click on departments, then Public Works, then Solid Waste. Get retro to benefit Relay for Life The College of Central Florida Citrus Campus Rotaract Club is hosting a Retro Game Night. This event will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 1, in the Conference Center. Featured will be an assortment of old and new video games and systems, card games such as Magic the Gathering and tabletop family games. A donation of $5 to benefit Crystal River Relay for Life is requested and will be accepted at the door. Proceeds from concessions will also benefit Relay for Life. This is open to the public, and supervised children are welcome. Contact Rory at 352-2019057 or wellsr@cf.edu. Republicans to learn of city government Nature Coast Republican Club and Citrus Republican Womens Club will host a presentation on city government Saturday, Feb. 9. Guest speakers will be Inverness City Manager Frank DiGiovanni and Crystal River City Manager Andy Houston. The 9 a.m. meeting, at American Legion Post 155, Crystal River, will follow an 8:30 a.m. social. From staff reports Around the STATE S TATE & L OCAL Page A3 SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Elderly woman suffers sexual abuse E RYNW ORTHINGTON Staff writerHOMOSASSA A man was arrested Wednesday on charges of sexual battery on a disabled 90year-old woman, according to the Citrus County Sheriffs Office. Daniel Hall, 39, West Craft Lane, faces charges of sexual battery and lewd and lascivious battery on an elderly or disabled person. His bond was $15,000. Investigators responded to the allegations after a female acquaintance noticed the womans upset behavior, which initiated the investigation. Reportedly, the woman disclosed that Hall performed inappropriate sexual activities on her as she sat on a toilet and waited for assistance. Hall denied any contact with the woman at first. Then he told a similar story matching the womans version. He admitted to investigators he took advantage of her because of the opportunity and her disability. At the conclusion of the investigation, Hall apologized to the woman for his actions in a letter. He also stated that if anyone treated his mother in that fashion, he would be upset. He was transported to the Citrus County Detention Facility. Chronicle reporter Eryn Worthington can be reached at eworthington@chronicleonline. com or 352-563-5660, ext. 1334. Birthday boy MATTHEW BECK /Chronicle Hundreds of hippo fanatics both young and old gathered Friday at the Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park to celebrate Lus 53rd birthday. The hippo, coming in at hefty 6,000 pounds or so, seemed to know what was coming before receiving his birthday cake. The cake, specially created by Publix for the animal, is made from bread not cake batter and is topped with a special icing not loaded with sugar, according to park manager Art Yerian. Pre-kindergarten, kindergarten and first-grade classes from Rock Crusher Elementary School visited the park and helped sing Happy Birthday to Lu before he devoured his treat. Hippo lookin good at 53 TOP RIGHT: Park volunteers Dorothy Hahn, left, and Vicky Iozzia tossed the treat into Lus mouth as crowds looked on. BOTTOM RIGHT: Scores of visitors snapped photos and shot video of the giant animal as he made his way around his enclosure, slurping up each piece of cake. From wire reports Learn about League of Women Voters today Special to the ChronicleCitrus County does not have a League of Women Voters and has not had a chapter for many years. Nature Coast Unitarian Universalists have invited Allie Gore, of the Marion County League of Women Voters, to advise how a Citrus County contingent might join up with it, or form a local branch. The event is at 2 p.m. today at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 7633 N. Florida Ave., (U.S. 41), Citrus Springs. Gore is a longtime educator who was instrumental in reactivating the Marion County League and she is willing to help Citrus County do the same. She will show a short video on the history of the struggle for equal suffrage, followed by a PowerPoint presentation and discussion of the League today. As a strictly nonpartisan organization, the LWV does not support or oppose candidates. It does, however, take stands on issues after coming to a consensus and works to increase public understanding of policy issues through education. The League a grassroots organization with chapters in all 50 states was founded 92 years ago and has been open to men for 40 years. All interested persons are invited. Call 352-4654225 or email naturecoast uu.org for information. Daniel Hall admitted to sexual abuse. LOCAL MEETING The Citrus Alliance Against Adult Abuse (C4A) monthly meeting is at 9:30 a.m. the second Wednesday monthly at HPH Hospice, 3545 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills, in the Winn-Dixie shopping plaza. For details, call Judy Stauffer at 352303-2620. Help is needed to protect vulne rable residents against abuse, neglect and exploitation. Betty Strifler retired clerk of courts. Correction Due to reporter error, a story on Page A1 of Thursdays edition, Prosecution ends case, warrants correcting. Casey Phillips name was misspelled. The Chronicle regrets the error. Readers can alert The Citrus County Chronicle to any errors in news articles by emailing newsdesk@ chronicleonline.com or by calling 352-563-5660.

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE L OCAL /S TATE HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR 77 45 NA HI LO PR 75 49 NA HI LO PR 72 45 NA HI LO PR 78 48 NA HI LO PR 72 47 NA YESTERDAYS WEATHER Early AM Fog; Mostly Sunny THREE DAY OUTLOOK Early AM Fog; Partly Cloudy Early AM Fog; Partly Cloudy High: 75 Low: 47 High: 79 Low: 51 High: 80 Low: 51 TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING Exclusive daily forecast by: TEMPERATURE* Friday 75/45 Record 84/23 Normal 71/43 Mean temp. 60 Departure from mean +3 PRECIPITATION* Friday 0.00 in. Total for the month trace Total for the year trace Normal for the year 2.46 in.*As of 7 p.m. at Inverness UV INDEX: 6 0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Friday at 3 p.m. 30.22 in. DEW POINT Friday at 3 p.m. 45 HUMIDITY Friday at 3 p.m. 34% POLLEN COUNT** Trees and weeds were light and grasses were absent. ** Light only extreme allergic will show symptoms, moderate most allergic will experience symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience symptoms. AIR QUALITY Friday was good with pollutants mainly particulates. ALMANAC CELESTIAL OUTLOOK SUNSET TONIGHT ............................6:05 P.M. SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:21 A.M. MOONRISE TODAY ...........................5:55 P.M. MOONSET TODAY ............................6:42 A.M. JAN. 26FEB. 3FEB. 10FEB. 17 WATERING RULES BURN CONDITIONS For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestrys Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdiTodays Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.City H L Fcast Daytona Bch. 74 54 pc Ft. Lauderdale 78 64 s Fort Myers 78 54 s Gainesville 74 46 pc Homestead 80 60 s Jacksonville 72 48 pc Key West 76 65 s Lakeland 76 51 s Melbourne 75 56 pc City H L Fcast Miami 78 63 s Ocala 74 49 pc Orlando 76 53 pc Pensacola 67 51 pc Sarasota 73 53 s Tallahassee 73 47 pc Tampa 74 56 s Vero Beach 74 52 s W. Palm Bch. 76 59 s FLORIDA TEMPERATURESWest winds around 10 knots. Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will have a light chop. Partly cloudy skies today. Gulf water temperature65 LAKE LEVELS Location Thu. Fri. Full Withlacoochee at Holder 28.68 28.68 35.52 Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.04 38.04 39.25 Tsala Apopka-Inverness 39.00 39.00 40.60 Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.32 40.32 42.40Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the meanannual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211. MARINE OUTLOOK Taken at Aripeka THE NATION Albany 17 4 .01 c 22 5 Albuquerque 57 39 sh 54 38 Asheville 34 20 .01 s 44 22 Atlanta 46 32 s 55 34 Atlantic City 24 10 .01 pc 30 19 Austin 80 61 pc 73 60 Baltimore 22 12 .07 s 32 19 Billings 52 25 pc 50 24 Birmingham 65 42 .04 pc 53 33 Boise 37 28 sh 41 33 Boston 24 10 c 25 12 Buffalo 16 1 .01 sn 26 15 Burlington, VT 13 -3 c 16 1 Charleston, SC 52 28 pc 65 38 Charleston, WV 27 16 .11 c 31 15 Charlotte 27 21 .11 s 47 26 Chicago 28 18 pc 24 21 Cincinnati 27 20 pc 28 19 Cleveland 19 13 .04 sn 28 18 Columbia, SC 35 28 s 54 28 Columbus, OH 22 17 .20 pc 26 15 Concord, N.H. 19 3 c 22 3 Dallas 54 44 pc 61 56 Denver 60 28 c 59 31 Des Moines 40 15 pc 27 24 Detroit 21 15 .07 pc 27 10 El Paso 63 47 c 71 49 Evansville, IN 38 25 pc 34 23 Harrisburg 20 13 .05 pc 30 15 Hartford 23 11 c 26 8 Houston 79 61 pc 79 61 Indianapolis 27 18 .10 pc 24 17 Jackson 75 53 pc 59 45 Las Vegas 62 51 sh 60 48 Little Rock 53 32 pc 53 38 Los Angeles 67 60 .14 sh 64 52 Louisville 29 23 .02 pc 31 23 Memphis 51 35 .04 pc 52 37 Milwaukee 25 17 .05 pc 24 20 Minneapolis 21 13 pc 18 12 Mobile 71 47 pc 68 50 Montgomery 72 48 pc 59 38 Nashville 38 30 .46 s 42 26 New Orleans 75 52 pc 74 57 New York City 24 13 .05 pc 29 19 Norfolk 31 23 .05 s 39 23 Oklahoma City 50 28 c 56 46 Omaha 48 13 pc 38 29 Palm Springs 62 57 .28 sh 69 51 Philadelphia 24 17 .04 pc 29 15 Phoenix 77 56 sh 66 53 Pittsburgh 18 11 .13 sn 26 10 Portland, ME 23 1 c 21 7 Portland, Ore 46 39 .24 sh 43 38 Providence, R.I. 24 9 c 25 11 Raleigh 28 20 .32 s 40 22 Rapid City 49 19 pc 50 29 Reno 52 35 .04 c 52 31 Rochester, NY 16 8 .04 sn 24 14 Sacramento 66 50 trace c 59 36 St. Louis 45 27 pc 33 26 St. Ste. Marie 16 1 .10 sf 19 -2 Salt Lake City 36 25 c 37 28 San Antonio 78 61 pc 75 59 San Diego 65 59 .39 sh 62 55 San Francisco 63 51 c 54 43 Savannah 59 33 pc 68 40 Seattle 51 41 .35 sh 45 35 Spokane 39 27 .07 sh 33 27 Syracuse 16 4 .02 sn 22 11 Topeka 49 17 pc 46 34 Washington 25 19 .02 s 33 21YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HIGH & LOW HIGH 87 Alice, Texas LOW -19 Saranac Lake, N.Y. SATURDAY CITY H/L/SKY Acapulco 86/70/s Amsterdam 30/28/sn Athens 60/45/sh Beijing 27/7/pc Berlin 24/17/s Bermuda 66/60/pc Cairo 73/51/s Calgary 30/14/pc Havana 80/67/pc Hong Kong 67/52/pc Jerusalem 67/50/s Lisbon 58/52/c London 36/35/sh Madrid 59/41/s Mexico City 69/43/s Montreal 10/-2/pc Moscow 10/3/pc Paris 41/33/pc Rio 86/73/ts Rome 45/35/s Sydney 84/72/ts Tokyo 32/28/pc Toronto 25/10/pc Warsaw 20/8/s WORLD CITIES Friday Saturday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Friday Saturday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Weather Central, Madison, Wi. Saturday SundayCity High/Low High/Low High/Low High/LowChassahowitzka* 4:37 a/12:39 a 6:04 p/1:26 p 5:16 a/1:19 a 6:31 p/1:57 p Crystal River** 2:58 a/10:48 a 4:25 p/10:41 p 3:37 a/11:19 a 4:52 p/11:19 p Withlacoochee* 12:45 a/8:36 a 2:12 p/8:29 p 1:24 a/9:07 a 2:39 p/9:07 p Homosassa*** 3:47 a/12:25 p 5:14 p/ 4:26 a/12:18 a 5:41 p/12:56 p TIDES *From mouths of rivers **At Kings Bay ***At Masons CreekKEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy. SOLUNAR TABLESDATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR (MORNING) (AFTERNOON) 1/26 SATURDAY 4:32 10:44 4:55 11:07 1/27 SUNDAY 5:18 11:30 5:42 11:53 FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M. SATURDAY HI LO PR 76 48 NA Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday. ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday. Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time. Citrus County Utilities customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional watering allowances. To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352527-7669. Today's active pollen: Juniper, Maple, Oak Todays count: 9.6/12 Sundays count: 10.0 Mondays count: 10.1 For the RECORD A4 S ATURDAY, J ANUARY26, 2013 To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $36.65* 6 months: $64.63* 1 year: $116.07* *Subscription price includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year. For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655 Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers: Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com Meadowcrest office 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 Inverness office Whos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................ Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Mike Arnold..........................................................................................Editor, 564-2930 Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275 John Murphy........................................................Circulation Director, 563-3255 Trista Stokes..................................................................Online Manager, 564-2946 Trista Stokes..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-2946 Report a news tip:Opinion page questions .................................................. Mike Arnold, 564-2930 To have a photo taken .......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660 News and feature stories....................................Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660 Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista,563-5660 Sports event coverage................................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579 The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc. 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community Where to find us:1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. Crystal River, FL 34429 Blvd. Citrus County Sheriffs OfficeDomestic battery arrest Gary Smith 29, of Hernando, at 1:25 p.m. Jan. 16 on felony charges of domestic battery by strangulation and aggravated battery using a deadly weapon. According to his arrest affidavit, he is accused of cutting a woman with a razor blade. No bond. DUI arrest Dane Simms 29, of Polk Street, Inverness, at 1:08 a.m. Thursday on misdemeanor charges of driving under the influence and possession of drug paraphernalia. According to his arrest affidavit, he was arrested after a clerk at a gas station/convenience store on U.S. 19 in Crystal River reported seeing him run over grass and shrubs and nearly hit gas pumps in a pickup truck. A law enforcement officer found a silver pipe containing marijuana residue in the truck. A test of his breath showed his blood alcohol concentration was 0.229 percent. The legal limit is 0.08 percent. Simms vomited after providing one breath sample and refused to provide any more. Bond $1,500. Other arrests Gina Martin 46, of S. Elm Avenue, Homosassa, at 11:18 a.m. Wednesday on a Citrus County warrant for failure to appear in court for two original felony charges of petit theft. No bond. Lester Sellers 60, of W. Baja Court, Crystal River, at 7:04 p.m. Wednesday on a felony charge of failure of a sex offender to report name/address change within 48 hours. Bond $20,000. David StearnsII 24, at 12:34 a.m. Thursday on a misdemeanor charge of possession of drug paraphernalia. Bond $500. Burglaries A commercial burglary was reported at 8:47 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 24, in the 3200 block of S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. A vehicle burglary was reported at 10:11 a.m. Jan. 24 in the 5900 block of N. Oakmont Drive, Beverly Hills. A residential burglary was reported at 7:04 p.m. Jan. 24 in the 8000 block of E. Penbrook Lane, Floral City. A vehicle burglary was reported at 11:44 p.m. Jan. 24 in the 3100 block of S. Stonebrook Drive, Homosassa. Thefts A grand theft was reported at 8:49 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 24, in the 50 block of S. Lincoln Ave., Beverly Hills. A petit theft was reported at 1:41 p.m. Jan. 24 in the 4500 block of S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. A petit theft was reported at 2:18 p.m. Jan. 24 in the 8900 block of S. Filly Point, Inverness. A grand theft was reported at 8:25 p.m. Jan. 24 in the 2400 block of E. Gulf-toLake Highway, Inverness. Landlord arrested after fight ChronicleA Homosassa man was arrested after a woman accused him of punching her and grabbing her throat during an argument. Teddy King, 36, of South Palm Avenue, faces a felony charge of aggravated battery causing great bodily harm, permanent disability or disfigurement. The woman told an investigator King, her landlord at a boarding house, was arguing with her about the amount of housework she helped with and about her coughing at night, according to his arrest affidavit. She claimed King punched her once in the chest and used both of his hands to grab her throat and squeeze her neck. The woman said she believed she lost consciousness during the incident. The investigator saw a cut on the side of the womans neck, and emergency medical services transported her to Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center for evaluation and treatment, according to the affidavit. King told the investigator he had been involved in an argument with the woman but denied touching her. King was taken to the Citrus County Detention Facility, where his bond was set at $5,000. Teddy King ON THE NET For information about arrests made by the Citrus County Sheriffs Office, go to www.sheriffcitrus.org and click on the Public Information link, then on Arrest Reports. Also under Public Information on the CCSO website, click on Crime Mapping for a view of where each type of crime occurs in Citrus County. Click on Offense Reports to see lists of burglary, theft and vandalism. For the Record reports are also archived online at www.chronicle online.com. The Sexual Predator Unit is responsible for tracking all registered sexual offenders in the county. Click on the Sexual Offender Information link. Fire damages Homosassa home ChronicleHOMOSASSA A single-wide manufactured home was 50 percent destroyed and its contents completely lost in a fire Thursday night, according to a report by Battalion Chief Craig Stevens of the Citrus County Sheriffs Office Fire Rescue. Firefighters from the Kensington Fire Station, who were training in the Lecanto area, were the first to arrive on the scene, 6834 W. Sasser St., at 8:08 p.m. Crews found the 1,000square-foot home in flames and began offensive action against the blaze, according to the report. Crews from stations in Homosassa, Connell Heights, Pine Ridge, Sugarmill Woods, Crystal River and DeRosa also helped fight the blaze, which was brought under control at 8:53 p.m. Due to lack of hydrants in the area, a shuttle was used to ferry water, according to the report. Stevens report stated the fire started on the exterior of the structure, near the air conditioning unit. A bird and squirrel perished in the fire due to the smoke. No other injuries were reported. Damage is estimated at $44,000. State BRIEFS Satanists praise governor Scott for prayer bill TALLAHASSEE A group of selfproclaimed Satanists praised Gov. Rick Scott for signing a bill into law that lets school boards permit student-initiated prayer and other inspirational messages. The devil, though, was in the details at a rally Friday in front of Floridas Old Capitol. A high priest wearing goat horns and four minions dressed in black robes were joined by a spokesman and camera crew. The spokesman, Lucian Greaves of Cambridge, Mass., earlier this month was listed as the casting director on the Actors Access website in an ad seeking unpaid, non-union actors in Tallahassee for a mockumentary titled The Satanic Temple. Greaves, though, insisted its not all a hoax as a smile creased his face. Marion Co. to hire nuisance alligator trappers OCALA Marion County is looking to hire nuisance alligator trappers. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is accepting applications for contracted trappers. Applicants must live in the county, have an email address, a clean criminal history and no fish-and-wildlife law violations. Applications must be received by Jan. 31. For an application visit MyFWC.com/Alligator. From wire reports Legal notices in todays Cit rus C ounty Chronicle 000DM1W Fictitious Name Notices . . C18 Meeting Notices . . . . . . . . . C18

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at the time Obama filled the vacancies Jan. 4, 2012. It also held that presidents have the authority to bypass the Senate in filling vacancies only when they occur during a recess, which it said occurs only between the end of the first year of a two-year Congress and when lawmakers convene for the second year. White House press secretary Jay Carney said the administration strongly disagrees with the decision and the NLRB would continue to conduct business as usual, despite calls by some Republicans for the board members to resign. The decision is novel and unprecedented, Carney said. It contradicts 150 years of practice by Democratic and Republican administrations. Under the courts decision, 285 recess appointments made by presidents between 1867 and 2004 would be invalid. The Justice Department hinted the administration would ask the Supreme Court to overturn the decision, which was rendered by three conservative judges appointed by Republican presidents. We disagree with the courts ruling and believe that the presidents recess appointments are constitutionally sound, the statement said. utilizing them. That was the steering principle behind the Art Center Camera Club of Citrus County. There are always people saying they dont know how to work their cameras and asking for advice, Houle said. There are people with fancy cameras that dont even know how to work their cameras. The members became organized and formed a steering committee. Each steering committee member has a different role such as: Field trip coordinator, program coordinator and competition coordinator. Currently, there are 140 members, which is the largest group at the Art Center. We have people who dont own a camera, Houle said. We have people who have the pointand-shoot cameras. We have college professors who teach photography. We run the whole gamut of professional photographers, down to people who dont have a camera. The camera club offers photographers many choices. On the fourth Monday of the month, special interest groups meet to discuss lighting, composition, exposure and other facets of photography. After an hour, they break into groups to discuss camera brands and what their camera controls do. It is for groups of photographers who want to be together with their type of camera, Houle said. Nikon people will be together, the Canon people together, etc Even a point-and-shoot group. In addition, Doug Bauer and Bud Smart plan field trips around Citrus County with a photographic theme. Recently, they received permission to visit Three Sisters Springs at 6:30 a.m. They caught morning rays of light hitting the mist rising off the water. They were aiming to get the first shots of the wintering manatees in the springs. We showed up there in the dark, Houle said in excitement. There were people already lined up to get in and it was dark out. Through a relationship with Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge, they are arranging for photographers to donate pictures to the refuge in trade for photographer and camera club recognition. Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge in return will be able to use these images for advertising purposes through postcards, notepads and various other forms. In other states that have this program, they are able to sell the advertising items for profit, Houle said. However, here it is a new organization. They are still low on funds and do not have that type of money to put out. We are looking to do things on consignment. One of the things that we are looking at is the photographer to mount or frame their work and then selling it on consignment. So that way the wildlife and photographer would make a profit on it. In addition, the camera club has several classes each year. Houle said the best piece of advice he has to offer is to learn about your camera. Read the manual, Houle said. I dont think you can hurt the camera. Take the camera and take pictures. They are digital now days. Its instant gratification. If it doesnt look right, well, delete it and take another. Also, always use the flash, Houle added. Anytime you turn that camera on, turn the flash on. Fill in the shadows. For more information, visit artcenter.cc or accc.digiact.org. C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S ATURDAY, J ANUARY26, 2013 A5 SAME DAY APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE! Inverness 3733 E Gulf to Lake Hwy 341-5520 Homosassa 7991 S Suncoast Blvd 382-8282 Citrus Springs 10489 N Florida Ave. 489-2486 000DVDG Alex Villacastin, MD Catherine Sembrano-Navarro, MD Carlos F. Gonzalez, MD Alistair Co, MD Family Practice Maria Villacastin, ARNP Shiela Villacastin, ARNP Alexander Villacastin, ARNP Lawrence Stawkowski PA Lab EKG X-Ray Pulmonary Function Bone Density Womens Health Minor Procedures Chelation Youre Not Just a Patient Youre a Person 527-0012 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY FAUX WOOD BLINDS, TOP TREATMENTS DRAPERY, SHADES, SHUTTERS VERTICALS The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! BLIND S TREETOPS PLAZA 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO 2012 2012 2012 2012 www.72-hourblinds.com WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE 000DTAE Homosassa 621-7700 Crystal River 795-8600 Inverness 860-1037 000D0QW Toll Free 1-877-345-BUSH www.bushhomeservices.com PEST CONTROL T ERMITE S PECIALISTS S INCE 1967 F REE I NSPECTIONS 000DL3N T h e C i t r u s C o u n t y F a i r A s s o c i a t i o n p r o u d l y p r e s e n t s T r u c k & T r a c t o r P u l l S a v e o n a d v a n c e d t i c k e t s a l e s O n e D a y : A d u l t $ 8 C h i l d r e n 4 1 1 $ 4 T w o D a y : A d u l t $ 1 5 C h i l d r e n 4 1 1 $ 7 J a n u a r y 2 5 t h o p e n 4 p m p u l l 6 p m J a n u a r y 2 6 t h o p e n 1 0 a m p u l l 1 p m F o r m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n c a l l 7 2 6 2 9 9 3 o r g o t o w w w c i t r u s c o u n t y f a i r c o m / t r a c t o r h t m l Sponsored by: Citrus County Chronicle, Eagle Buick GMC, Crystal Motor Car Company Proceeds to benefit Youth Scholarships! 1 4 t h A n n u a l Lic. & Insured 352-400-3188 YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIS T Often imitated, never duplicated IS IT TIME TO REFI NISH YOUR POOL? POOLS AND PAVERS Add an artistic touch to your existing yard or pool or plan something completely new! QUALITY WORK AT A FAIR PRICE! COPES POOL AND PAVER LLC 000DTAF Copes Pool & Pavers JIM HOULE /Special to the Chronicle From left to right, Judy Callison, Linda David and Linda Williams positioned themselves and their equipment as they prepared to capture images of Three Sisters Springs during early morning hours. CLUB Continued from Page A1 The Campbell trial presented jurors with a choice of whether to convict him as charged or opt for a lesser charge and potentially spare him death row. Campbell, via his defense team of public defenders Michael Lamberti and Devon Sharkey, never disputed the fact he killed his father in August 2010, but his state of mind was such he did not scheme to kill him and then cover it up. Campbells attorneys called it a pressurecooker situation brought on mostly by a controlling, set-in-his-ways and distant father, and the younger Campbell simply snapped. Father and son shared a doublewide home in Inverness. He knows what he did was wrong and he still struggles with what he did, Sharkey told jurors during closing arguments Friday morning. Sharkey said Campbell clearly admitted his actions but said Campbell was in a daze, foggy in the mind, depressed and dealing with a rekindled passion for crack cocaine when he grabbed a woodhandled hammer-like hatchet and buried it in his fathers skull three times as he sat in a chair. The senior Campbells last words were what was that? after the initial blow. Campbell admitted to Citrus County Sheriffs Detective Gary Atchison in a taped confession he knew the second strike was the death blow because he felt resistance which meant the blade had penetrated the skull. I killed my father, Campbell told jurors when he took the stand Thursday. He, however, said depression and a belief he was bringing peace to his father, who he believes also was emotionally tormented, led him to commit homicide. Meanwhile, the prosecution team of Pete Magrino and Rich Buxman tried to paint a different picture of Campbell during the trial. Prosecutors presented evidence in Campbells own words that he planned his fathers death for days. They explained Campbell grabbed the hatchet, went and sat with it at a computer desk behind where his father was sitting, thought about what he was going to do and sneaked up behind his unsuspecting father and hit him multiple time over the head. Chopped in the head and murdered him, Magrino said to jurors in his closing. Magrino then described how Campbell tried to scrub off the blood on the hatchet to conceal his actions and rifled through his fathers pants pockets, stealing his a credit card then going on a shopping spree. A string of actions, Magrino believes, added up to premeditation and felonious murder. After the verdict, Magrino said he believed the jury decision was the appropriate verdict. Sharkey said he was disappointed they lost, but the defense will present mitigating elements in the penalty phase to help keep their client off death row. TRIAL Continued from Page A1 present evidence including the fact Campbell is a seven-time felon in order to make it so. We intend to have additional testimony as to the aggravating factors, Magrino said. Campbell, 39, was unanimously convicted by a jury Friday of first-degree murder in the hacking death of his father, John Henry Campbell, 68. Magrino said the aggravating-factors testimony will come from two witnesses. Meanwhile, Campbell attorneys Devon Sharkey and Michael Lamberti are readying for this life-ordeath legal tussle. Their charge is to present enough mitigating factors to spare Campbells life. Sharkey said the defense has five witnesses lined up. Judge Ric Howard as a certified first-degree murder trial judge will have the final say in Campbells sentence, however, the law requires him to give great weight to the jury recommendation. Howard has already asked the jury to reconvene Tuesday morning for this phase of the trial. He instructed jurors to steer clear of any media coverage and discussion of the case. According to Florida statute, prosecutors must prove any of 16 aggravating factors in their efforts to attempt to convince the jury to vote for death. Florida is one of a few states that only requires a plurality of votes among the panel. If seven out of the panel of 12 jurors vote for death that will be the recommendation to the judge, explained Magrino. Some aggravating factors, prosecutors could argue are that Campbells actions were especially heinous, atrocious or cruel. Prosecutors arguments and presentations have limits on them, however. There are no limits on the defenses mitigating evidence. As per law, the defense attorneys may present any evidence that would mitigate against imposition of the death penalty. It will be up to the jurors to see which sides evidence outweighs the others and recommend accordingly. At the end, after Howard makes the final sentencing decision, he must say which of the aggravating factors led to his decision. PENALTYContinued from Page A1 RECESS Continued from Page A1

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Associated PressHAVANA A half-century later, Jose Rafa Malem remembers the balmy breezes blowing through the bars arching porticos, the grain of the tall wood stools, the whiff of Pedro Domecq brandy on his fathers breath. And how could he forget the tangy ground-beefand-tomato-sauce sandwiches synonymous with what was then one of Havanas hippest hangouts, playfully dubbed Sloppy Joes? I ate so many, I got tired of them, said Rafa, a 59-year-old Havana native who grew up to become a bartender. Soon, Rafa will be able to relive those boyhood memories as the original Sloppy Joes reopens in Havanas historic quarter, giving residents and tourists from all over the chance to belly up to the same bar that served thirsty celebrities such as Rock Hudson, Babe Ruth and Ernest Hemingway. Its part of an ambitious revitalization project by the Havana City Historians Office, which since the 1990s has transformed block after block of crumbling ruins into rehabilitated buildings along vibrant cobblestone streets. The effort has helped finance Cubas socialist present by drawing tourists fascinated by its pre-socialist past, from colonial palaces of the 18th century to celebrity hangouts of the 1950s. For the people of this city, I think its very interesting and very important to rescue a place that has so much history and is so recognized around the world, said Ernesto Iznaga, manager of the born-again Joes, which will be run by state-owned tourism concern Habaguanex. To restore it to how it was before. Sloppy Joes was founded in 1918 by a Galician immigrant named Jose Abeal Otero, who purchased a grocery store in Old Havana after years of tending bar in New Orleans and Miami. Legend has it the sobriquet comes from the places grubbiness and Abeals American nickname, Joe. Rafas father was a close friend of longtime bartender Fabio Delgado and took his boy there on Sunday afternoons beginning in the late s. During the day, Rafa said, Joes was a mellow family joint where kids slurped ice cream and Coca-Cola while mom and dad chatted over more potent spirits. Employees made sandwiches to order behind the black mahogany bar, polished to a high shine and purportedly once the longest in Latin America at about 59 feet. After dark, the place filled up with Americans on vacation. Abeals affable personality and familiarity with English from his years in the States helped make Joes a favorite among tipsy Yanks as far back as the Prohibition era of 1920-1933, along with the nearby El Floridita bar, the reputed birthplace of the daiquiri cocktail, and La Bodeguita del Medio, home of the minty, ruminfused mojito. Geraldine Jerry VanPoucker, 87 CRYSTAL RIVERGeraldine Jerry VanPoucker, 87, of Crystal River, Fla., passed away Jan. 22, 2013, at Crystal River Health & Rehab under Hospice care. Jerry was born Nov. 7, 1925, in Detroit, Mich., the daughter of the late Roy and Marie Gerspach. In her earlier years, prior to her marriage to Richard VanPoucker, Jerry was a wholesale sales representative for Coty Cosmetics in Michigan. Jerry and Richard Dick were married in 1961 and moved to Crystal River. She was an astute business woman and together they built and managed the Thunderbird Mobile Home Park and Sales for 33 years, retiring in 2000. Jerry had an active and loving life with her husband for 51 years. They enjoyed traveling, playing pool, cards, visiting casinos and bowling. Private arrangements are under the direction of Strickland Funeral Home and Crematory. In lieu of flowers please make contributions to Hospice. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Timothy Edwards, 56DUNNELLON Timothy David Edwards, 56, Dunnellon, passed away Jan 24, 2013, in Hospice of Citrus County, Lecanto. Timothy was born April 1, 1956, in Riverview, Calif., to Lee Hilton Edwards Sr. and Dorothy Gargaro Edwards. He is survived by his mother, Dorothy Edwards of Crystal River; his two brothers, Lee Edwards of Citrus Springs and Keith Edwards of St Petersburg. Private arrangements with Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Lewis Baker Jr., 75LAKE PANASOFFKEELewis C. Baker Jr., 75, Lake Panasoffkee, died Jan. 24, 2013. A celebration of life memorial service will be announced at a later date. Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory is in charge of arrangements. Edward Lybolt, 79 SUMTERVILLEEdward M. Lybolt, 79, Sumterville, died Jan. 24, 2013. A graveside committal service at Florida National Cemetery will be announced at a later date. Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory is in charge of arrangements. Lynford Roya, 94 LECANTOLynford I. Roya 94, Lecanto, died Jan 24, 2013. Burial in Burlington, Vt. Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory provided information. Mindy Gibson, 56 INVERNESS Mindy L. Gibson, 56, Inverness, died Jan. 21, 2013. A celebration of life memorial service will be at 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, 2013, at the VFW Post 4337 in Inverness. Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory is assisting the family. There will be no calling hours at the funeral home. A6 S ATURDAY, J ANUARY26, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE OBITUARIES The Citrus County Chronicles policy permits both free and paid obituaries. Obituaries must be submitted by the funeral home or society in charge of arrangements. Free obituaries, run one day, can include: full name; age; hometown/state; date of death; place of death; date, time and place of visitation and funeral services. If websites, photos, survivors, memorial contributions or other information are included, this will be designated as a paid obituary and a cost estimate provided to the sender. Email obits@ chronicle online.com or fax 352-563-3280. Geraldine Vanpoucker Obituaries Women in combat American women have served and died from the first Associated PressWASHINGTON American women have served and died on the nations battlefields from the first. They were nurses and cooks, spies and couriers in the Revolutionary War. Some disguised themselves as men to fight for the Union or the Confederacy. Yet the U.S. militarys official acceptance of women in combat took more than two centuries. New roles for females have been doled out fitfully, whenever commanders have gotten in binds and realized they needed womens help. The main driver is that its been militarily necessary, said retired Capt. Lory Manning, a 25-year Navy veteran who leads military studies for the Womens Research & Education Institute. She points, for example, to creation of the Army Nurse Corps in response to the struggle against disease in the Spanish-American War. Some milestones on the way to this weeks lifting of the ban on women in ground combat jobs: FROM THE FIRST They didnt wear uniforms, but the Army hired women as nurses, cooks and laundresses during the American Revolution. Women were also spies and saboteurs. They carried George Washingtons messages across enemy lines to his generals. A few hundred women secretly served as Civil War soldiers, historians estimate. There are records of some who were discovered only after they were wounded or killed. NURSES NEEDED Despite their record as volunteers and contract workers, women were denied a place within military service until 1901, when the Army Nurse Corps was created. Navy nurses followed in 1908. What prompted the creation of the Nurse Corps? The devastating toll of typhoid, malaria and other diseases that killed far more soldiers than the fighting during the Spanish-American War. OVER THERE The world wars brought largescale proof that women could handle many of the militarys noncombat jobs. They were recruited to Free a man to fight! For the first time in World War I, women other than nurses were allowed to enlist in the Navy and Marines. They worked as telephone operators, accountants, draftsmen, clerks. Some went to Europe. Still, only about 35,000 women, the majority of them nurses, served among nearly 5 million U.S. men. They were promptly sent home after the armistice. They were the advance troops for the wave of women to come in the next world war, including the Navys WAVES and the Armys WACS. There were even civilian pilots the WASPS who repositioned planes and towed gunners targets but were denied Air Force status. More than 400,000 women served, at home and overseas, stepping into nearly all types of noncombat jobs. World War II was the turning point that earned women fullfledged military status. In 1948, after fierce debate, Congress approved allowing women to serve in the regular forces of all branches of the service all the time, not just in war. WELCOME BACK In peacetime, the Pentagon retreated back to assigning females to womens work. They got few chances at promotion and couldnt be admirals or generals. Although military nurses risked their lives in Korea and Vietnam, the military insisted women werent fit for combat conditions. The equal rights movement prompted some changes in 1967, Congress got rid of a law limiting women to 2 percent of the military and opened up promotions to higher service grades. In 1973, the draft ended and the all-volunteer military was born. Short on male volunteers, the Defense Department began seriously recruiting women and assigning them a wider range of jobs. Women grew to more than 10 percent of Americas force by the 1980s. FRONT LINES BLUR More than 40,000 women deployed for the Persian Gulf War in 1990 and 1991. They worked alongside men, flying helicopters, driving trucks, guarding bases and firing missiles as Americans at home watched on television news. Officially, women were banned from combat. But there were no clear front lines. Women soldiers and Marines were at risk wherever Scud missiles fell. AFTER 9/11 More than 200,000 women serve in the military now 15 percent of a force of 1.4 million. And the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have obliterated any remaining notion that they can be kept out of the fight. With the military straining to staff two wars at once, everyone was needed. But battle lines were jagged; insurgents could be anywhere. Women in support jobs found themselves in firefights and blasted by roadside bombs. And their gender made them especially valuable on some patrols: They could search and interview Muslim women, whose culture forbid such contact with men. In 2012, to reflect the new realities, the Defense Department changed its rules to officially allow women into many jobs they were already doing, but in units closer to the fighting. They were still banned from the most dangerous jobs, such as being infantry soldiers or Special Operations commandos. On Thursday, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta announced an end to the ban on women in combat. Women have become an integral part of the service, fighting and dying alongside men, Panetta said. In fact, 152 women in uniform have died in Iraq and Afghanistan. The time has come, he said, for our policies to recognize that reality. Round 2 for Sloppy Joes bar, a Havana original Associated Press A classic American car is reflected in the storefront window Friday of Sloppy Joes bar in Havana, Cuba. Associated Press Aviatrix Nancy Harkness Love, director of the Womens Auxiliary Ferry Squadron (WAFS), and Col. Robert H. Baker, commanding officer, inspect the first contingent of women pilots in the WAFS on Sept. 22, 1942, at New Castle Army Air Base, Del. 000DUQI In Memory of Douglas Patton who passed away January 26 2011 You Left us beautiful memories Your love is still our guide And though we cannot see you We know that youre always by our side A million times weve needed you A million times weve cried Our goodbye came much too soon And only God knows why Now we think of you in silence And often speak your name But all we have are memories And your picture in a frame Your resting place we visit And put flowers there with care But no one knows the heartache As we turn and leave you there Always in our hearts Love Your Family 000DOS2 Funeral Home With Crematory C h a s E D a v i s Chas. E. Davis 726-8323 TODD SUMLIN Service: Sat. 1pm TIM EDWARDS Private Arrangements MINDY GIBSON Memorial Pending PAUL SOWARDS Service: Mon 2:00 PM EDWARD LYBOLT Private Arrangements LEWIS BAKER Private Arrangements FERO FERO Memorial Gardens & Memorial Gardens & Funeral Home Funeral Home 000DM73 352 746-4646 352 746-4646 www.dignitymemorial.com S ERVING F AMILIES FOR S ERVING F AMILIES FOR 37 YEARS WITH 37 YEARS WITH D IGNITY & R ESPECT D IGNITY & R ESPECT Beverly Hills Beverly Hills National Cremation Society Considering Cremation? REGISTER TO WIN A FREE CREMATION PLAN Come join the National Cremation Society for a FREE Lunch & Informational Seminar on the benefits of pre-planning your cremation When the time comes wouldnt you prefer your loved ones celebrate your legacy rather than stress about making arrangements? Give them the relief theyll need during a tough time. Well discuss: Affordable options and savings Veterans benefits Worldwide Away-From-Home Protection And much more... RESERVATION REQUIRED Limited seating available. CALL NOW! 1-352-728-0093 APPLEBEES 200 N. Suncoast Blvd. Crystal River Tues., Jan. 29 10:00 AM Lunch CHILIS 140 N. Suncoast Blvd. Crystal River Tues., Feb. 5 10:30 AM Lunch SONNYS 750 W. Main St., Inverness Thurs., Feb. 7 11:00 AM Lunch First time attendees only please. *Free cremation does not include Travel Protection Plan. 000DV9F 1901 SE H WY 19 C RYSTAL R IVER 352-795-2678 Your Trusted Family-Owned Funeral Home for 50 Years trickland S Funeral Home and Crematory www.stricklandfuneralhome.com 000DU38 Funeral Directors C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace 000DN11 ADVANCED FAMILY HEARING AID CENTER A Unique Approach To Hearing Services Jerillyn Clark Board Certified Licensed Hearing Aid Specialist 2027 N. Donovan Ave., Crystal River 795-1775 SERVING CITRUS COUNTY FOR 28 YEARS SEE US BEFORE YOU BUY! FREE 2ND OPINION Closing time for placing ad is 4 business days prior to run date. There are advanced deadlines for holidays. To Place Your In Memory ad, Saralynne Miller at 564-2917 scmiller@chronicleonline.com 0 0 0 D S M Q

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Associated PressDAVOS, Switzerland Training youths for the challenges of a fastchanging world has to be central to any strategy to rebuild the job market following a financial crisis thats wiped out millions of middle-class jobs during the past five years. That was the central conclusion that emerged from the annual Associated Press debate at the World Economic Forum in the Swiss village of Davos, which focused on the need to build up skills for a changing economy. We need a young labor force, IMF Deputy Managing Director Min Zhu said. Government doesnt pay enough attention to training and retraining. Amid concerns that the rich world is faced with a lost generation of young people with dismal job prospects, panelists suggested other ideas in the debate that was moderated by the APs senior managing editor for U.S. news, Michael Oreskes. Proposals included the creation of green jobs to save the planet from climate catastrophe and lowering the costs of hiring first-time workers. The International Labor Organization estimates that young people are three times more likely to be unemployed than adults, and that worldwide around 75 million youths aged between 15 and 24 are looking for work. This youth employment crisis, it says, threatens to scar the very fabric of our societies. Eric Cantor, a Republican Congressman from Virginia, said training is needed to give workers the tools they need for the new labor force. America is a huge catalyst for growth, he said. Workers need to be trained to get into those jobs. He warned, however, against piling more government money on schools without coming up with a better way to create new skills. An Associated Press analysis of employment data from 20 countries found millions of mid-skill, mid-pay jobs have already disappeared over the past five years jobs that form the backbone of the middle class in developed countries. That experience has left a growing number of technology experts and economists pondering whether middle-class jobs will return when the global economy recovers, or whether they have been lost forever. Italian Finance Minister Vittorio Grilli, also at the debate, argued that technology doesnt have to be the enemy, and will provide a second wind to advanced economies. Young people in the job market dont all feel theyre getting education that fits todays demand. The quality of courses is not up to standard at all, said Lucy Nicholls, a 22-year-old fashion graduate in London. She was speaking Friday in a Google hangout video chat as part of APs Class of 2012, an exploration of Europes financial crisis through the eyes of young graduates facing the worst downturn the continent has seen since the end of World War II. Emerging markets may offer some ideas to the developed world in its new jobs conundrum. Turkish Deputy Prime Minister Ali Babacan, whose country has generated 4.6 million jobs over the past five years, credited the performance on a host of innovative policies, such as paying the wages of some young people when they first enter the workforce. The biggest problem is the cost of entry to the job market, he said. If an employer thinks it is less expensive to hire, then employment becomes easier. Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz suggested focusing on green, renewable jobs to help solve the youth unemployment crisis as well as the planet. B USINESS C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S ATURDAY, J ANUARY26, 2013 A7 Money & MarketsAclick of the wrist gets you moare at www.chronicleonline.com 1,320 1,360 1,400 1,440 1,480 1,520 J ASOND 1,440 1,480 1,520 S&P 500 Close: 1,502.96 Change: 8.14 (0.5%) 10 DAYS 12,400 12,800 13,200 13,600 14,000 J ASOND 13,360 13,640 13,920 Dow Jones industrials Close: 13,895.98 Change: 70.65 (0.5%) 10 DAYSAdvanced1874 Declined1144 New Highs364 New Lows13 Vol. (in mil.)3,381 Pvs. Volume3,608 1,871 2,008 1360 1072 206 10 NYSE NASD DOW13895.9813825.3313895.98+70.65+0.51%+6.04% DOW Trans.5877.795810.225870.05+15.11+0.26%+10.61% DOW Util.470.05465.30470.05+2.78+0.59%+3.74% NYSE Comp.8904.658860.768904.53+47.94+0.54%+5.46% NASDAQ3156.203135.863149.71+19.33+0.62%+4.31% S&P5001503.261494.821502.96+8.14+0.54%+5.38% S&P4001096.701089.321096.70+9.64+0.89%+7.47% Wilshire 500015879.2215785.3315878.72+93.39+0.59%+5.89% Russell 2000905.24900.10905.24+5.05+0.56%+6.58% HIGH LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. YTD Stocks Recap AK Steel Hold AKS3.422 10.33 4.44-.04 -0.9 tst-3.5-50.7dd... AT&T Inc T29.026 38.58 34.02+.27 +0.8 sss+0.9+18.0281.80f Ametek Inc AME29.860 41.22 41.07-.03 -0.1 sss+9.3+33.8220.24 Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD60.520 91.21 91.71+1.45 +1.6 sss+4.9+49.01.57e Bank of America BAC6.729 12.20 11.62+.09 +0.8 sss+0.1+58.7450.04 Capital City Bank CCBG6.350 12.23 11.77+.13 +1.1 sss+3.5+20.0dd... CenturyLink Inc CTL36.506 43.43 40.13+.03 +0.1 sss+2.6+16.4362.90 Citigroup C24.610 43.25 42.91+.11 +0.3 sss+8.5+43.3130.04 Commnwlth REIT CWH13.465 21.43 16.84+.19 +1.1 sss+6.3-6.1301.00 Disney DIS38.380 54.87 54.38+.43 +0.8 sss+9.2+39.4170.75f Duke Energy DUK59.638 71.13 67.92+.12 +0.2 sss+6.5+11.7193.06 EPR Properties EPR40.049 48.92 47.37-.28 -0.6 sss+2.7+15.8213.00 Exxon Mobil Corp XOM77.139 93.67 91.73+.38 +0.4 sss+6.0+7.3122.28 Ford Motor F8.829 14.30 13.68-.19 -1.4 tss+5.6+9.8110.40f Gen Electric GE18.029 23.18 22.29+.24 +1.1 sss+6.2+20.8160.76f Home Depot HD43.980 67.69 67.82+.47 +0.7 sss+9.7+52.4241.16 Intel Corp INTC19.232 29.27 20.96+.01 ... tss+1.6-18.9100.90 IBM IBM181.858 211.79 204.97+.55 +0.3 sss+7.0+8.2143.40 LKQ Corporation LKQ14.630 23.51 23.38+.38 +1.7 sss+10.8+40.528... Lowes Cos LOW24.760 38.53 38.58+.17 +0.4 sss+8.6+45.2230.64 McDonalds Corp MCD83.316 101.89 93.72+.41 +0.4 sss+6.2-2.6173.08f Microsoft Corp MSFT26.263 32.95 27.88+.25 +0.9 sss+4.4-3.0150.92 Motorola Solutions MSI44.180 59.48 58.60-.20 -0.3 tss+5.2+24.9201.04 NextEra Energy NEE58.710 72.35 72.50+.40 +0.6 sss+4.8+25.9142.40 Penney JC Co Inc JCP15.692 43.18 19.35+.23 +1.2 sst-1.8-44.2dd... Piedmont Office RT PDM16.100 19.36 19.50+.20 +1.0 sss+8.0+10.2170.80 Regions Fncl RF4.800 7.85 7.69+.02 +0.3 sss+7.9+47.4110.04 Sears Holdings Corp SHLD38.402 85.90 45.12-.28 -0.6 tss+9.1+6.7dd... Smucker, JM SJM70.500 90.31 89.26-.88 -1.0 tss+3.5+13.8212.08 Sprint Nextel Corp S2.109 6.04 5.64-.03 -0.5 tst-0.5+161.3dd... Texas Instru TXN26.069 34.24 32.80-.29 -0.9 tss+6.2+4.0210.84 Time Warner TWX33.620 51.29 50.40-.40 -0.8 sss+5.4+38.0181.04 UniFirst Corp UNF55.868 88.35 80.80+.06 +0.1 tss+10.2+32.8160.15 Verizon Comm VZ36.805 48.77 42.67+.08 +0.2 stt-1.4+18.1cc2.06 Vodafone Group VOD24.955 30.07 27.07+.29 +1.1 sss+7.5+2.21.53e WalMart Strs WMT57.186 77.60 69.00-.79 -1.1 tss+1.1+16.3141.59 Walgreen Co WAG28.530 39.74 39.67+.23 +0.6 sss+7.2+18.0181.10 52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIVStocks of Local Interest Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b Annual rate plus stock. c Liquidating dividend. e Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i Sum of dividends paid after s tock split, no regular rate. j Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative iss ue with dividends in arrears. m Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yie ld not shown. r Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown. cc P/E exceeds 99. dd Loss in last 12 months. Thanks to higher global sales, the coffee chain said its profit rose 13 percent in the latest quarter, meeting expectations. The truck maker reported a 20-percent rise in fiscal first-quarter net income and boosted its guidance for the full year. The energy services company said that its net income for the fourth quarter fell 26 percent, but its results beat expectations. The consumer products maker said that its fiscal second quarter net income more than doubled and boosted its profit outlook. Due to weak holiday demand, the toy makers fourth-quarter revenue didnt meet expectations. It plans to cut 10 percent of its workforce. Strong earnings reports sent the Standard & Poors 500 index to its eighth straight gain Friday. The index closed above the 1,500 level for the first time since December 2007 and marked its longest run of consecutive gains since 2004. 34 36 38 $40 J ND Hasbro HAS Close: $37.31 -1.14 or -3.0% $32.00$39.98 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 7.3m (4.1x avg.) $4.85 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 14.4 3.9% 65 70 $75 J ND Procter & Gamble PG Close: $73.25 2.83 or 4.0% $59.07$73.25 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 28.7m (3.2x avg.) $200.28 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 23.7 3.1% 25 30 35 $40 J ND Halliburton HAL Close: $39.72 1.91 or 5.1% $26.28$40.28 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 32.5m (3.0x avg.) $36.86 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 12.7 0.9% 20 30 40 $50 J ND Oshkosh OSK Close: $41.08 6.50 or 18.8% $18.49$41.27 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 5.2m (4.3x avg.) $3.74 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 16.4 ... 45 50 55 $60 J ND Starbucks SBUX Close: $56.81 2.24 or 4.1% $43.04$62.00 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 15.4m (2.0x avg.) $42.24 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 31.7 1.5% The yield on the 10-year Treasury note jumped to 1.95 percent Friday. Yields affect interest rates on consumer loans. NET 1YR TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO 3.25 3.25 3.25 .13 .13 .13 PRIME RATE FED FUNDS 3-month T-bill.070.08-0.01.05 6-month T-bill.100.10....07 52-wk T-bill.130.13....10 2-year T-note.280.24+0.04.21 5-year T-note.850.76+0.09.77 10-year T-note1.951.84+0.111.94 30-year T-bond3.133.04+0.093.09 NET 1YR BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO Barclays LongT-BdIdx2.722.63+0.092.58 Bond Buyer Muni Idx3.973.94+0.034.65 Barclays USAggregate1.821.80+0.022.19 Barclays US High Yield5.615.64-0.037.66 Moodys AAACorp Idx3.763.75+0.013.93 Barclays CompT-BdIdx1.091.03+0.06.99 Barclays US Corp2.742.73+0.013.58 YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO Commodities The price of gold fell after encouraging earnings reports and rising stock markets around the world meant less demand from investors for the metal as a safe-haven investment. Crude Oil (bbl)95.8895.95-0.07+4.4 Ethanol (gal)2.382.38-0.04+8.5 Heating Oil (gal)3.063.09-0.96+0.4 Natural Gas (mm btu)3.443.45-0.06+2.8 Unleaded Gas (gal)2.882.86+0.44+2.3 FUELS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Gold (oz)1656.401669.50-0.78-1.1 Silver (oz)31.1831.70-1.62+3.3 Platinum (oz)1693.901682.30+0.66+10.1 Copper (lb)3.643.66-0.68-0.0 Palladium (oz)740.25725.95+1.97+5.4 METALS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Cattle (lb)1.261.26+0.34-2.8 Coffee (lb)1.481.47+1.19+3.1 Corn (bu)7.217.24-0.48+3.2 Cotton (lb)0.810.83-2.86+7.2 Lumber (1,000 bd ft)358.80360.70-0.53-4.0 Orange Juice (lb)1.131.13+0.18-2.3 Soybeans (bu)14.4114.35+0.40+1.6 Wheat (bu)7.777.69+1.04-0.2 AGRICULTURE CLOSE PVS. %CHG%YTD American Funds BalAm 21.27+.09 +4.3+14.4+11.8+5.7 BondAm 12.88-.04 -0.4+4.9+5.8+3.7 CapIncBuAm 54.14+.15 +2.6+13.4+9.1+3.1 CpWldGrIAm 38.84+.28 +4.4+18.1+8.4+2.0 EurPacGrAm 42.71+.39 +3.6+15.5+6.2+1.2 FnInvAm 43.03+.26 +5.5+16.7+12.0+4.0 GrthAmAm 36.21+.24 +5.4+18.5+11.5+3.9 IncAmerAm 18.70+.09 +3.5+13.6+11.4+5.3 InvCoAmAm 31.70+.17 +5.1+15.4+10.4+3.5 NewPerspAm 32.89+.33 +5.2+19.2+10.8+4.1 WAMutInvAm 32.73+.20 +4.9+14.0+13.2+4.4 Dodge & Cox Income 13.87-.02 +0.1+6.7+6.2+6.8 IntlStk 36.37+.27 +5.0+18.6+7.2+1.3 Stock 130.11+.78 +6.7+21.9+12.3+3.1 Fidelity Contra 80.90+.37 +4.3+15.3+13.4+5.3 GrowCo 97.75+.81 +4.9+14.2+15.7+7.3 LowPriStk d 41.73+.25 +5.6+17.6+14.6+7.9 FrankTemp-Franklin Income Am 2.31+.01 +3.6+15.0+11.0+6.0 FrankTemp-Templeton GlBond Am 13.43-.02 +0.7+11.0+8.3+9.6 GlBondAdv 13.39-.02 +0.7+11.3+8.6+9.9 Harbor IntlInstl d 64.25+.70 +3.4+15.0+8.7+2.1 PIMCO TotRetAm 11.21-.03 -0.2+8.3+6.7+7.2 T Rowe Price EqtyInc 27.95+.14 +5.7+17.3+12.7+4.4 GrowStk 39.57+.30 +4.7+16.5+14.3+6.2 Vanguard 500Adml 138.57+.75 +5.5+15.9+13.4+4.8 500Inv 138.56+.75 +5.5+15.8+13.3+4.7 GNMAAdml 10.84-.02 -0.5+1.8+5.2+5.6 MuIntAdml 14.44-.03 +0.6+5.0+5.9+5.2 STGradeAd 10.82-.01 0.0+3.9+3.6+3.8 TotBdAdml 11.01-.04 -0.6+3.6+5.5+5.4 TotIntl 15.47+.09 +3.3+13.7+5.6-0.2 TotStIAdm 37.72+.22 +5.8+16.1+13.9+5.5 TotStIdx 37.71+.23 +5.8+16.0+13.8+5.4 Welltn 35.19+.08 +4.0+12.8+10.7+6.2 WelltnAdm 60.78+.14 +4.0+12.9+10.8+6.3 TOTALRETURN FAMILYFUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*Mutual Funds Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week. Interest rates Stocks gain Associated PressNEW YORK The Standard & Poors 500 index closed above 1,500 on Friday for the first time since the start of the Great Recession in 2007, lifted by strong earnings from Procter & Gamble and Starbucks. The S&P 500 rose 8.14 points to 1,502.96. It was the eighth straight gain, the longest winning streak since November 2004. The Dow Jones industrial average closed at 13,895.98, up 70.65 points. The Nasdaq composite gained 19.33 points to 3,149.71. Procter & Gamble, worlds largest consumer products maker, gained $2.83 to $73.25 after reporting its quarterly income more than doubled. P&G also raised its profit forecast for its full fiscal year. Starbucks rose $2.24 to $56.81 after reporting a 13 percent increase in profits. Earnings are growing, said Joe Tanious, a global market strategist at JPMorgan. The bottom line is that corporate America is doing exceptionally well. Tanious expects corporate earnings to grow at about 5 percent over the next year or two, and stock valuations to rise. Currently, the S&P 500 is trading at an average price-to-earnings ratio of 14, below an average of 15.1 for the last decade, according to FactSet data. Apple continued to decline, allowing Exxon Mobil to once again surpass the electronics giant as the worlds most valuable publicly traded company. Apple fell 2.4 percent to $439.88, following a 12 percent drop on Thursday, the biggest one-day percentage drop for the company since 2008, after Apple forecast slower sales. The stock is now 37 percent below the record high of $702.10 it reached Sept. 19. Apple first surpassed Exxon in market value in the summer of 2011, grabbing a title Exxon had held since 2005. The two traded places through that fall, until Apple surpassed Exxon in early 2012. Stocks have surged this month, with the S&P 500 advancing 5.4 percent. It jumped at the start of the year when lawmakers reached a last-minute deal to avoid the fiscal cliff. Stocks built on those gains on optimism that the housing market is recovering and the labor market is healing. The Dow Jones is up 5.5 percent on the year. 000DVFJ Crystal River 305 S.E. US 19 352-795-7223 AP debate: Training needed to redesign job market Associated Press German Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle gestures as he speaks Friday at the Open Forum, on the sideline of the 43rd annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

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O PINION Page A8 SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013 What water shortage? On Jan. 10, 2013, (SWFWMD) Southwest Florida Water Management District placed a 1/4page advertisement announcing the annual extension of their water restrictions for the citizens of Citrus County. They warned of possible additional water restrictions due to low water tables and/or lack of adequate water supplies. Restrictions and fines for watering ones lawn more than once a week on specified days. Water levels in our rivers and lakes would determine if additional restrictions are necessary, and any unnecessary watering or use is prohibited. SWFWMD is the same agency that recently accepted an annual payment of $50 to allow a water bottling company to pump 28 million gallons of our fresh water a year for bottled sale use. I once questioned the governors office about the authority of SWFWMD in making these types of decisions and I was told: SWFWMD officials (board of directors) are not elected positions, therefore they are not answerable to the (constituents) citizens of Florida counties. Each SWFWMD director is appointed by the governor of Florida. I then asked if the governor could not put greater restraints or restrictions on some of the SWFWMD decisions that greatly effect and/or cause harm to the citizens. I was told by (an) associate at the governors office once the governor appointed a SWFWMD member, he (governor) no longer had any control on policies or programs made by the SWFWMD Board of Directors. In other words, they have a free hand to do as they please. Until SWFWMD can justify giving away 28 million gallons of my fresh water each year, which has destroyed my lawn, foliage and landscapes that cost me thousands of dollars, I will continue to use water as I see necessary, including to drink, bathe and wash my car. Wake up citizens and smell SWFWMDs stench!John Chambers Inverness Doing whats rightRe: Rush to quick settlement not best for the county, and Standing up to Goliath. Sundays Chronicle has two items that are excellent. My compliments to the authors, Geoff Greene, Citrus County Tax Assessor, and Theodora C. Rusnak, President Citrus County Council. If I were a teacher in middle or high school, my students would have these items assigned as required reading. There is a very valuable common thread in them. That is taking responsibility and doing what is right and lawful regardless of popular opinions. This is one of the main characteristics that has made the good ol U.S.A. the place we love and cherish. We would have fewer problems if more folks today would follow suit and take action. Too many of us become apathetic and just sit back and complain. I encourage everyone to make the effort to read them. Frank Heath Floral City I n a pivotal story arc on HBOs seminal series, The Wire, veteran police commander Howard Bunny Colvin attempts to effect some real change in the troubled neighborhoods for which he has long been responsible. Without the knowledge of central command, Colvin sets up areas where police would monitor but not punish drug trade. The police crack down severely on violence in these areas and also on drug trafficking elsewhere in the city. For many weeks, Colvins experiment works, and violent crime declines. However, Colvins superiors, the media and city politicians eventually find out about the arrangement, and the Hamsterdam experiment ends. The corridors of power in Tallahassee are very different from the hard streets of Baltimore, but watching my friend Dan Krassner, the earnest executive director of the self-styled watchdog group Integrity Florida, testify before the House Ethics and Elections Committee on Wednesday, I could not help but be reminded of Bunny Colvins experiment. Only Krassner does not want to decriminalize drug use, he wants to repair Floridas broken campaign finance laws. That it is Integrity Florida proposing to eliminate the $500 cap on contributions to state political candidates says everything you need to know about just how broken are Floridas campaign finance regulations. Integrity Florida is the good guy. If the system is so corrupt the white-hatters throw their hands in the air, imagine how rotten things have become. Like the police officer weary from the never-ending so-called War on Drugs, Krassner and many, many others are frustrated over a system that barely functions. But is lifting the cap on contributions, while requiring almost real-time reporting of all contributions (as opposed to quarterly reporting), the best solution for solving what ails campaign finance laws? Yes, it is, but for the wrong reasons. The real culprit are the Committees of Continued Existence, which, as the Florida Division of Elections Gary Holland explained during testimony on Wednesday, were originally designed to be political committees for dues-gathering organizations but have become fundraising machines with the power to raise unlimited contributions and, basically, give it to anybody. In reality, CCEs are nothing more than political washing machines through which big contributions from well financed companies, individuals and interest can launder money. Because Company X is limited to giving merely $500 per election cycle to a candidate, it gives $50,000 to the Committee for an Optimistic Florida to spend on attack ads against the candidates opposition. I know how this works because I am the tip of the spear in this equation. Im one of those dark agents who designs the direct-mail and TV ads to attack the aforementioned candidates opposition. So, for my sake, please, please lift the limit on contributions to political candidates. Legislation that does so should be titled the Political Consultants Jobs Act of 2013. As for whether lifting the contribution limit will fix the system, thats unclear. What is clear is the corner legislators are painting themselves into during the debate over this issue. What theyre saying is, yes, CCEs are bad, but were addicted to them to the unlimited money they can raise and to the ease of accepting contributions in big chunks rather than $500 at a time. So we need to be able to accept six-figure checks into our own accounts to break us of our addiction. What legislators are also saying is, yes, real-time reporting of campaign contributions is a good and possible requirement. The long-standing impediment to real-time reporting has been the burden it supposedly places on candidates, but now theyre willing to accept that burden in return for no contribution limits. How about legislators just go cold turkey and do away with the CCEs and institute realtime reporting and then see what kind of integrity remains in Florida? Peter Schorsch, a political consultant based in St. Petersburg, publishes and edits the Florida political blog SaintPetersBlog.com. Readers can contact Schorsch at saintpeter4@gmail.com. It is better to have a permanent income than to be fascinating. Oscar Wilde, 1887 Campaign finances need work CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARD Gerry Mulligan .................................... publisherMike Arnold .............................................. editor Charlie Brennan .......................... editor at largeCurt Ebitz .................................. citizen member Mac Harris ................................ citizen member Rebecca Martin .......................... guest member Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief SINKING EXPECTATIONS Relationship with Progress goes from bad to worse I t is hard to imagine how the countys relationship with its major taxpayer and private employer could get much worse. As has been well covered in this newspaper, Progress Energy has officially disputed its tax bill and has only made partial payment for the current fiscal year. While the finger pointing over the breakdown of negotiations with the power company continues, the fact is the county only received $19 million of the $34 million tax bill that was issued. County property appraiser Geoff Greene believes he still has time to negotiate a resolution to the dispute, but the argument sounds very much like the captain of the Titanic announcing he is not afraid of icebergs. While this tax dispute takes center stage, the backstory remains what Progress Energy might decide to do with its offline nuclear plant in Crystal River. The nuclear plant has not produced power for more than two years, after it was shut down for repairs that went bad. Fitch Ratings recently suggested company officials have already made the decision to cancel the expensive repairs. Some type of announcement is expected within the next month. If Progress Energy does decide to not refurbish the nuclear plant, the long-term impact on Citrus County will be significant. The loss of hundreds of employees in our community along with their economic impact is hard to imagine. If the breakdown in tax negotiations plays any role in Progress Energys decision to exit our community, we will all live to regret the bureaucratic barriers we put in place. Last week Progress Energy Florida president Alex Glenn sent a letter to county officials with a stern warning. Company officials only expect to pay $19 million in taxes for the next fiscal year and the payments will go down after that. If Progress decides to close the nuclear plant, that warning could have extreme consequences. Because the nuke plant is no longer considered part of the Progress rate base, local taxes on this substantial capital investment are no longer paid. Tax bills are not paid based on letters, but Glenns letter could be a message about the companys future plans in Citrus County. What we need today is for our public officials to stop gazing at their navels and instead look at the big picture. County Commission Chairman Joe Meek has attempted to get the property appraiser and the power company to the negotiating table in an effort to avoid the confrontational relationship and growing legal bill. What we dont want is another wasteful and expensive legal battle such as the one just completed at Citrus Memorial hospital. And what we dont want is the dispute with county officials to weigh on the power companys long-term decision to possibly exit Citrus County. The big picture is it is better to have an open and honest partnership with Progress Energy as opposed to a cantankerous one that involves lawsuits and threats. We are disappointed successful negotiations have not been completed. We hate to think there is an iceberg in our future. THE ISSUE: Progress dispute.OUR OPINION: Watch out for iceburgs. OPINIONS INVITED The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the newspapers editorial board. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Persons wishing to address the editorial board, which meets weekly, should call Charlie Brennan at 352563-5660. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and hometown, including letters sent via email. Names and hometowns will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Letters must be no longer than 600 words, and writers will be limited to four letters per month. SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352563-3280 or email to letters@chronicleonline.com LETTERS to the Editor Saving money on roadI read the article in the Chronicle the other day about extending the Suncoast Parkway north. I totally agree. I think it would be a great idea, as it would facilitate trips to and from the Tampa Airport. However, I do have one recommendation for the powers-tobe on how to save some money on this project. In my humble opinion, there is no need to continue the biking/jogging trail that parallels the highway. The other day I saw three people total on the trail from Spring Hill going north to (U.S.) 98. Thats not unusual, either. And it was a beautiful, sunny day. Why ear camouflage? Just reading the SHARE Club newsletter that comes from Citrus Memorial hospital and the guys writing an article about he went out with some guy hunting, deer hunting from a deer stand in a tree using a bow and how the host guy hunter wore camouflage and this other guy wore jeans and a dark shirt. And it reminds me of hunters I see in the woods with all these camouflage clothes, but then they wear bright orange vests and sometimes bright orange hats because thats actually a law that youre supposed to have above your waist for deer hunting. So whats the point of wearing camouflage? Is it stupid or is there logic there? Need traffic signalA traffic light at the new Walmart, but no traffic light for (State Road) 44 and Meadowcrest Boulevard where the county license bureau is? That exit onto (S.R.) 44 is an accident waiting to happen. A traffic light should be put there immediately. Editors note: Plans are in the works for a traffic light at SR 44 and Meadowcrest. THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and h ave less than a minute to record. COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. S OUND OFF CALL 563-0579 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Peter Schorsch FLORIDA VOICES

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Business helps senior citizen I am a senior citizen on Social Security. I am writing to the Chronicle to let all citizens in Citrus County know our local businesses do care about us and will help us out when we least expect it. I am writing this letter after Citrus Kias General Manager Paul Arduser helped me out of the goodness of his heart. It is nice to know caring people are in abundance in our county. This is why I am sharing my experience with all of you. In December of 2012, my car was backed into in a parking lot. The drivers insurance company fixed the car by sending me to an auto body shop in Citrus County. They did a good job, but the paint job they provided was not my color. I complained to the shop and the owner of the shop said it was a good match and he could not do any better. Not knowing what to do, I took my car to Citrus Kia because I felt like they are my family, and I just wanted their opinion about whether the color matched. Paul Arduser and the auto mechanic on duty said I was right; It was a different color than the rest of the body of my Kia Soul. I called the insurance adjuster out to check out what Citrus Kia told me about my car. The adjuster said it was an OK job and he could not do anything else for me. I was very upset because my car in the back had a green tint to it and not the sparkling metallic color the rest of my car has. I called Paul and he said, Dont worry about it, we will paint your car, just bring your car ... no charge. They did a fantastic job. My car is back like it was, and not only did they not charge me, they gave me a car for two days to use. I am a 77-year-old senior citizen who has limited income. I am very grateful for what Citrus Kia did for me. I thought everyone should know about what wonderful people they are and how they did treat me like family. I would like to thank Paul Arduser for all his help, in making my Soul perfect. Paul is a very nice young man, who is a true professional and has a big heart. Thank you for taking care of my Kia Soul! Elizabeth Katona Hernando Writer feels scammed My daughter turned 15, so as any parent I went down to our DMV and picked her up a copy of the Florida Handbook. The handbook contains advertisements on the back page and on the inside cover for this lowest price traffic school, so I go and check it out. For $87.50 (which I paid) you can get your drug and alcohol test and certificate (which the state requires) and practice tests for your license permit. To make sure you will be ready for the actual test, and when they feel you are ready, you can take the driving permit test online. So it sounded good and my daughter spent two days on practice testing and then finally was ready for the permit test. She passed the drug and alcohol test and also the permit test. Now all was left was to go to the DMV office and get her license. I called the DMV two days later to make sure they had gotten the electronic notice stating my daughter had passed her exam, which they confirmed. I informed them we would be down that afternoon to get her permit and the woman on the line said it will be an additional $54. I couldnt believe what I was hearing, I just paid $87.50. Nope, I still had to pay the standard fee of $54, which you normally pay to get your permit which includes the test. Well, bottom line is this advertisement, which is on the DMV book, is a scam. They saved me no money, they cost me money. If I had known I was going to have to pay again at the DMV, then why would I have let my daughter take everything online? This is the states fault for allowing this false advertisement on their product. Again this is a scam and dont fall for it, I thought I was a smart person. Well, let me tell you, they just showed me how stupid I was. Jaymie Anderson Crystal River Enforce airboat muffler laws To our county fathers: What happened to the muffler law on airboats? Wish they would enforce it like they went after Pudgees. Frank Yohn Floral City Psychiatric help the solution Evelyn OBriens letter Time for changes in the Jan. 9, 2013, Chronicle is so typical of the anti-gun letters that have been showing up recently I can address all of them through her letter. She starts most paragraphs with I believe, so I conclude she is working from opinions and liberal talking points, not facts. Its clear to me most of the anti-gun lobby is working from opinions. They remind me of the people who dont pay any income tax but have all kinds of ideas about how mine should be spent. Very few of them own a gun, have ever shot a gun, have ever shot anyone, been shot at or been shot. Lets address the gun show and flea market loophole first. Is it that big a problem that we should use scarce resources on it? A 1997 U.S. Justice Department survey of 14,285 state prison inmates found that among those inmates who carried a firearm during the offense for which they were sent to jail, 0.7 percent obtained the firearm at a gun show, 1 percent at a flea market, 3.8 percent from a pawn shop, 8.3 percent from a retail store, 39.2 percent through an illegal/street source, and 39.6 percent through family or friends. Report: Firearm Use by Offenders. By Caroline Wolf Harlow, U.S. Department of Justice, November 2001, bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/ index.cfm?typbdetail&iid 940. Do you see where the problem is? The next issue is she believes we should ban assault-type weapons and high-capacity magazines, which she said are designed for one use to kill as many people as possible. Most weapons since the Stone Age axe were designed to kill as many people as possible. You are confusing style with function. An SUV is a style of vehicle, but its not the only one used by drunks to kill people. The functionality of todays AR-style weapons is available in any number of semi-automatic hunting weapons that look nothing like an AR-styled weapon. AR-style weapons have two characteristics that are desirable in some situations. They are compact and they are light. They make excellent hunting weapons with legal magazines in the scrub brush forests of Florida where a 100-yard shot is apt to be the exception. People who are not skilled in the use of semiautomatic weapons dont seem to realize a fresh magazine is a matter of click, slap, bang. Its literally that fast. The size of the magazine matters, but a roll of duct tape is all it takes to double your magazine size. Large magazines have disadvantages, they are cumbersome and they all have feeding problems. Most liberals discount psychiatric intervention, but I know, not think, that it offers our best possible solution to this problem. Adam Lanza was under the direct daily observation of hundreds of teachers during a 12-year period. They all knew he had serious problems, but they didnt report it and the educational system was not required to address it. All they were interested in doing was mainstreaming him and getting him out the door. The psychiatrist who treated James Holmes made contact with a University of Colorado police officer to express concerns about her patients behavior several weeks before Holmes rampage, yet no intervention occurred. In the majority of mass shootings, someone knew something was wrong. We have no organized legal way to address it. We are going to use the TSA approach of throwing a net over millions in the hopes of catching one or two people. It also fits the administrations plans of disarming us. Harley Lawrence Homosassa Time for govt to live within means Florida Power, Progress Energy and most recently Duke Power have contributed hundreds of millions of dollars to the Citrus Country economy during the last 50 years, both directly in tax monies paid to the county as well as a markedly above average wage to its employees who have strongly supported our local economy and businesses. Hundreds of millions of dollars is very likely a conservative figure. These companies have also provided affordable, reliable power to us over the years as well, and we all certainly like that light switch to work. My question to Citrus County government and the Chronicle is How can you rationally consider raising taxes on Duke Power to the amount of 1.4 million dollars from the previous year? It is a well-known fact Citrus County real estate assessments and property values have decreased on average 30 percent or more during the last five years. Why would Duke Powers property values increase while county administrators and commissioners property values decreased as have their taxes? Two of Duke Powers coal-fired generating plants at Crystal River are scheduled to be retired during the next two years and the nuclear plant, which is Dukes main revenue generator, has not been operational in more than three years and likely will be decommissioned as well. They have been forced by the federal government to spend millions of dollars to reduce expelled pollutants at their coal-fired generators. It is nothing more than pure avarice and greed on local officials behalf to have not considered these important economic issues facing Duke Power. What is desperately needed in Citrus County is less six-figure administrative salaries and numbers of ineffective and redundant administrators who continually fail in their fiduciary duties to taxpayers, and also a local newspaper editorial staff that can report and dissect issues in an unbiased manner. Our local government should be made to operate as any private business would and does in a slow economy which would include a marked reduction in expenditures and living within the constraints of revenue production. Unfortunately for all of us, Citrus County government has not embraced this idea. Matthew Fox Dunnellon Thanks for help with contest Judging for the statewide winners of the Patriots Pen essay contest sponsored by the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Department of Florida, was recently conducted at VFW Post 4337 in Inverness. The Patriots Pen essay contest is for sixthto eighth-grade students in any school or for anyone who is home schooled. This years theme was What I Would Tell Americas Founding Fathers. The first place winner will receive a large monetary award plus trips to Orlando and Washington, D. C. I wish to thank all the volunteers who so graciously gave of their time, experience and knowledge in selecting this years winner. The judges were Dianne and Bill Micklon, Shirley Jones, Paul Floss, Pauline Morrison, Margaret Williams and Glenda Winslow. I also wish to thank Robert Sprute and Sam from Post 4337 for their hospitality.Peggy Peardon Florida Patriots Pen chairman Floral City O PINION C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S ATURDAY, J ANUARY26, 2013 A9 www.chronicleonline.com Get Published Win Prizes Receive Awards! They poured Their Hearts Out in love letters for our Valentines Day contest.www.chronicleonline.com/valentinesday2013 They are counting on you to votefor them so they can...VOTE NOW! 000DVGY 000DTC1 Limited Quantities Available! Geriatrics Family & General Medicine Internal Medicine Intensive Care (Hospital) Long-Term Care (Nursing Home) Homosassa 4363 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa Springs (352) 503-2011 Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am B.K. Patel, M.D Internal Medicine H. Khan, M.D. Board Certified Family Pactice Beverly Hills 3775 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills (352) 746-0600 Inverness 308 S. Line Ave. Inverness (352) 344-5511 000DQZI New Patients & Walk-Ins Are Always Welcome Humana, Freedom, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted Our Goal Is A Healthier You Active Staff at both Seven Rivers & Citrus Memorial Hospitals Primary Medical Care Centers Lic: CMC039568 4811 S. Pleasant Grove Rd., Inverness SERVICE all Brands COUPONS (See phone book or website) 000DMZZ HEATING Gary Headley Owner, Engineer www.Alpha-AC.com 352-726-2202 Since 1985 Dealers for: Letters to the EDITOR

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Wintry Associated Press JC Conrad, 44, of Spokane Valley, Wash., pounds a painted plywood piece back into the mouth area of his giant snowman Friday. Senators launch immigration push WASHINGTON Reviving an issue that has languished for years, President Barack Obama will launch a campaign next week aimed at overhauling the nations flawed immigration system and creating legal status for millions, as a bipartisan Senate group nears agreement on achieving the same goals. The proposals from Obama and lawmakers will mark the start of what is expected to be a contentious and emotional process with deep political implications. Latino voters overwhelmingly backed Obama in the 2012 election, leaving Republicans grappling for a way to regain their standing with an increasingly powerful pool of voters. The president will press his case for immigration changes during a trip to Las Vegas Tuesday. The Senate working group is also aiming to outline its proposals next week, according to a Senate aide. Senate lawmakers working on the immigration effort include Democrats Charles Schumer of New York, Dick Durbin of Illinois and Robert Menendez of New Jersey; and Republicans John McCain of Arizona, Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and Marco Rubio of Florida, according to Senate aides. Miss. abortion clinic warnedJACKSON, Miss. As the nation marks the 40th anniversary of the historic decision to legalize abortions in the U.S., Mississippis lone abortion clinic says it received notice that the state health department intends to revoke its operating license. However, Jackson Womens Health Organization is not expected to close anytime soon. Under a state administrative procedures law, the clinic can remain open while it awaits a hearing by the department. That could be more than a month away.Birth control machine stands SHIPPENSBURG, Pa. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration wont take any regulatory action over a vending machine at a Pennsylvania college that dispenses the morning-after pill. FDA spokeswoman Erica Jefferson said Friday that officials looked at publicly available information about the Shippensburg University vending program, spoke with university and campus health officials, and decided no action was necessary. The pill is available for $25 at a health center vending machine thats accessible to students and university employees. From wire reports Nation BRIEFS N ATION & W ORLD Page A10 SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Protests Associated Press Egyptian protesters take cover Friday as they clash with riot police, not seen, near Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt. Clashes on Egypt anniversaryCAIRO Egyptians delivered an angry backlash against President Mohammed Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood on Friday, marking the second anniversary of the start of the countrys revolution with tens of thousands filling major squares and streets around the country to call for a new regime change. Two years to the day that protesters first rose up against now-toppled autocrat Hosni Mubarak, Egypt is entrenched in the new phase of its upheaval the struggle between ruling Islamists and their opponents, played out on the backdrop of a worsening economy. At least four people, including a 14-year-old boy, were killed in the days worst clashes, in the city of Suez, where protesters set ablaze a building that once housed the citys local government. Mexican suspects to get warningsMEXICO CITY Reading suspects their rights is an idea that most Mexicans had only heard about in American movies until Friday, when authorities announced they are starting a program to require police to do just that. Eduardo Sanchez, the assistant secretary of the interior, said all federal police will have to advise detainees of their right to remain silent and the right to a lawyer. The warning will also advise foreigners they have a right to consular assistance and speakers of Indian languages and foreigners they can have translators. The United States has required so-called Miranda Rights warnings since the 1960s. Brazil sidewalks to get bar codes RIO DE JANEIRO Brazil is mixing tradition with the newest technology to connect visitors to tourist information by embedding bar codes into the blackand-white stone mosaic sidewalks that are a symbol of Rio de Janeiro. The first two-dimensional bar codes were installed Friday at the end of Ipanema beach, by a huge rock called Arpoador. Anyone who wants to know more about the area can download an application to their smartphone or tablet and photograph the icon. The user is taken to a website that gives basic facts about the place, interesting trivia and a map. World BRIEFS From wire reports Associated Press President Barack Obama listens Jan. 16 as Vice President Joe Biden speaks about proposals to reduce gun violence in the South Court Auditorium at the White House in Washington. There is a legal avenue to get any gun you want somewhere in the U.S., thanks to the maze of gun statutes across the country and the lack of federal laws. An Associated Press analysis finds there are thousands of laws, rules and regulations at the local, county, state and federal levels. Associated PressWASHINGTON Militarystyle assault weapons, gangster-style Tommy guns, World War II-era bazookas and even sawed-off shotguns somewhere in the U.S., there is a legal avenue to get each of those firearms and more. This is thanks to the maze of gun statutes around the country and the lack of a minimum federal standard to raise the bar for gun control in states with weak laws. An Associated Press analysis found there are thousands of laws, rules and regulations at the local, county, state and federal levels. The laws and rules vary by state, and even within states, according to a 2011 compilation of state gun laws by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. These laws and regulations govern who can carry a firearm, what kind of firearm is legal, the size of ammunition magazines and more. In some places, a person can buy as many guns as desired. This maze of laws undermines gun-control efforts in communities with tougher gun laws and pushes advocates of tighter controls to seek a federal standard. Gun rights proponents say enforcing all existing laws makes more sense than passing new ones. If you regulate something on the local or state level, you are still a victim to guns coming into other localities or states, said Laura Cutilletta, a senior staff attorney at the California-based Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence. In California, most guns come from Nevada, where there is almost no regulation of firearms, Cutilletta said, and in Arizona, gun owners dont need a permit. President Barack Obama earlier this month announced a $500 million plan to tighten federal gun laws. The December shooting massacre in Newtown, Conn., that killed 20 children and six adults at an elementary school, launched the issue of gun control policy to a national focus not seen in decades. Obama is urging Congress to pass new laws, some of which would set a minimum standard for the types of firearms and ammunition that are commercially available. Democratic Sens. Patrick Leahy of Vermont and Dianne Feinstein of California introduced new proposals this week to increase penalties for firearms trafficking and impose a new assault weapons ban. The powerful gun lobby says the problem lies in enforcement of existing laws. Which begs the question: Why are we putting more laws on the books if were not enforcing the laws we already have on the books? said Andrew Arulanandam, spokesman for the National Rifle Association. New gun laws will face tough opposition in Congress, particularly from members who rely on the NRA during election campaigns. The NRA contributed more than $700,000 to members of Congress during the 2012 election cycle, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. Recognizing the opposition in Congress, states already are passing their own new gun laws while officials from some states are promising to ignore any new federal mandates. As the national debate on gun control and Second Amendment rights escalates, the terms being used wont mean the same thing everywhere, due to the thousands of laws, rules and regulations across the country. The patchwork of laws in many ways means that the laws are only as effective as the weakest law there is, said Gene Voegtlin of the International Association of Chiefs of Police. Those that are trying to acquire firearms and may not be able to do that by walking into their local gun shop will try to find a way to do that. This patchwork of laws allows them to seek out the weak links and acquire weapons. Obama wants to address this, in part, by passing federal gun-trafficking laws that carry heavy penalties. Its difficult to crack down on trafficking because the penalties are too low to serve as a deterrent, and federal prosecutors decline many cases because of a lack of evidence. For instance, in order to charge someone with willfully participating in a business of selling firearms without a license, the ATF needs to prove that the guns were not sold out of the suspects private collection, the Justice Department inspector general has said. Obama has also called for a new federal law banning magazines that carry more than 10 rounds of ammunition a measure that was in effect during the previous assault weapons ban, between 1994 and 2004. High-capacity magazines have been used in recent deadly mass shootings, including those in Newtown, and in the suburban Denver movie theater attack last summer. GLOSSARY OF TERMSA primer on some key terms in the debate over President Obamas gun-control proposals: SEMI-AUTOMATICS They can be pistols, rifles or shotguns and theyre popular sellers. They fire a bullet each time the trigger is pulled, with no need to manually move the next round into the firing chamber. That means they can fire again as fast as a person can release and pull the trigger, so long as the guns got more ammunition at the ready. Semi-automatic weapons are popular with hunters, sport shooters and gun enthusiasts. FULL AUTOMATICS While a semi-automatic can fire one bullet per trigger pull, an automatic keeps firing bullets as long as the trigger is pulled once. Full automatics range from the Prohibition-era machine guns to modern rifles, pistols or shotguns. Sales of full automatics are restricted by federal law. ASSAULT WEAPONS In 1994, Congress passed and President Bill Clinton signed into law a ban on some semiautomatic rifles and handguns deemed assault weapons. Defining the term was tricky then and remains controversial today. Under that now-expired law, some new guns were banned by name, including the Uzi, the AK-47 and the Colt AR-15, which is similar to the militarys standard issue M16. Guns already sold to buyers before the ban were exempt and could be resold. Meanwhile, manufacturers skirted the ban by producing similar guns under new names or making minor design changes, such as removing a bayonet mount. Obama says he wants Congress to ban what he calls military-style assault weapons, but he hasnt defined the term, so its unclear which guns would be covered. HIGH-CAPACITY MAGAZINE Obama wants to reinstate the ban on sales of new high-capacity magazines, defined as those that hold more than 10 rounds of ammunition. These magazines allow a shooter using a semiautomatic weapon like the Bushmaster .223 to fire more bullets before pausing to reload. GUN OWNERS More than a third of Americans 36 percent say someone in their household owns a gun, according to an Associated Press-GfK poll conducted Jan. 10-14. Millions use guns for hunting, sport and target shooting. Some people keep guns solely for protection. Carrying a concealed handgun is legal in every state but Illinois under certain conditions; for example, the gun owner might need to pass a background check first. Some states require safety classes. Federal laws prevent the government from tracking how many guns are sold every year and who buys them, so there are no definitive statistics. BACKGROUND CHECKS Federal law requires anyone who buys a gun from a licensed dealer to submit to a background check. Convicted criminals and people who have been declared by a judge to be mentally defective are among those barred from buying a gun. The Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence says as many as 40 percent of all gun sales are completed without a background check. Thats because sales between private gun owners and sales at gun shows are exempt under federal law. Obama has proposed a federal law requiring universal background checks for every gun sale.Gun control Maze of laws about firearms in United States hurts efforts Associated Press A QR code made of black and white stones covers a sidewalk Friday near the beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Marco Rubio R-Florida.

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Football, tennis/ B2 Basketball, golf/ B3 Scoreboard/B4 High School sports/ B4 TV, lottery/ B4 Entertainment/ B6 The Citrus boys basketball team scored a big win over District 6A-6 foe West Port./ B4 S PORTS Section B SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE 000DOUV Coach Varnadore introduced at CRHS J ON -M ICHAEL S ORACCHI Staff writerMore than 50 students, parents and Crystal River High School staff members packed into the campus media center Thursday evening to officially meet new Pirates varsity football coach Nathan Varnadore. Before introducing Varnadore, Crystal River activities director Tony Stukes addressed the football players assembled and acknowledged the adversity they faced in 2012. I commend you on the past season youve had, Stukes said. Im here to tell you today, were putting the past in the past. Were starting a new program. Stukes was referring to the circumstances surrounding the dismissal of former Pirates head coach Greg Fowler, who was suspended and ultimately relieved of his coaching duties when a Citrus County School Board investigation found he used profane and abusive language around and toward some of his players. Varnadore, 28, immediately began setting new standards for Crystal River football coach Nathan Varnadore, left, talks to Pirates football players in the Crystal River High School media center Thursday night. JON-MICHAEL SORACCHI /Chronicle STEPHEN E. LASKO /For the Chronicle Crystal River guard Megan Wells drives the lane for a layup Friday night against Seven Rivers Christian School at Crystal River High School. Free-throw shooting decides game for SRCS C.J. RISAK CorrespondentCRYSTAL RIVER One thin line was all that separated Seven Rivers Christian and Crystal River in their girls basketball matchup Friday at Crystal River High School. That was the free throw line. While Seven Rivers was hardly outstanding, the Warriors were still much better than Crystal River particularly when it counted most. Seven Rivers scored the games final seven points, connecting on 5 of 6 from the line in the final 1:06, to hold off Crystal River on its Senior Night and gain a 50-43 victory. You miss (11) free throws in the second half and lose by seven, well, thats your game, said Pirates coach Jason Rodgers, whose team converted just 2 of 13 from the line in the second half and was just 10 of 26 at the stripe for the game. We gave up a few too many fouls to them, and they made their free throws at the end. And that was the difference. Crystal River, which tied with Dunnellon for first in District 5A-7 but has the top seed going into the tournament, ends its regular season at 14-9. Seven Rivers will take a 15-6 mark into its 2A-6 tourney. The Warriors (18 of 31 at the line) werent nearly as sharp this time as they were in beating Crystal River in their gym eight days earlier. In that one, they handled the Pirate pressure and got easy baskets while doing it in taking an early lead and holding onto it. Not this time. Crystal River forced a whopping 32 turnovers in the game, 18 coming in the first half. Problem was, the Pirates who had 25 turnovers in the contest couldnt turn them Citrus, Lecanto look for more FHSAA football districts for 2013 finalized J ON -M ICHAEL S ORACCHI Staff writerAfter tentative football realignment by the Florida High School Athletic Association (FHSAA) was released in December changing the complex of Citrus and Lecantos District 6A-5, the new finalized version was announced Friday with more big changes. The Hurricanes and Panthers will still have Lake Weir and Ocala Vanguard from the tentative four-team alignment, but welcome back Gainesville (who petitioned out of Class 7A back into 6A) and adds Ocala See DISTRICTS / Page B4 Girls soccer teams play in regional semifinals tonight J AMES B LEVINS CorrespondentThe girls soccer postseason continues and two local squads remain to play another day. Lecanto and Citrus aim to advance to their respective regional finals after meeting its next opponents in the semifinals today. The District 4A-4 champion Panthers host Fleming Island (5-0 winners over Springstead) at 7 p.m. tonight for a shot at moving ahead. Lecanto defeated Ridgeview in its regional quarterfinal 3-2 on Wednesday. Fleming Island competed last year in the state semifinals, so Lecanto has some work to do on the field if it hopes to defeat the program. (Today) were playing a quality program, Lecanto head coach Roselle Lattin said. A program that continually goes to the (state) final four. I dont think that we have had our best game yet, Lattin continued. If we do (bring our SPORTS BRIEFS 1,000-point career mark for Connors Citrus senior guard Lindsay Connors netted 18 points to go over the 1,000-point career mark during a 55-49 loss at Leesburg on Friday night. Shenelle Toxen added 11 points for the Hurricanes and Kiersten Weaver chipped in nine points. Citrus finishes the regular season at 19-6 overall; the Hurricanes host the District 6A-6 tournament next week as the No. 2 seed and will play No. 3 Lecanto on Thursday. From staff reports See REGIONAL / Page B4 See CRHS / Page B4 For more photos, click on this story at www.chronicle online.com. See NIP / Page B4

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Associated Press MELBOURNE, Australia Andy Murray was sucking in deep breaths, trying to recover from his exhausting win over Roger Federer. Pain was very much on his mind. The U.S. Open champion defeated Federer 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-3, 6-7 (2), 6-2 in a four-hour Australian Open semifinal Friday night. It was Murrays first victory against the 17-time major winner at a Grand Slam event. But with the clock about to strike midnight, Murray was already thinking about Sundays final against two-time defending champion Novak Djokovic, who is on a 20match winning streak at Melbourne Park. This will be a rematch of their U.S. Open final. Every time we play each other its normally a very physical match, Murray said. Ill need to be ready for the pain. I hope its a painful match thatll mean its a good one. Murray had a 10-9 record against Federer, but had lost his three previous Grand Slam matches to the Swiss star. One of those defeats came at Wimbledon last year. Murray said the disappointment of that loss triggered his run to the gold medal at the London Olympics, and then his drought-breaking triumph at the U.S. Open. You know, Ive obviously lost some tough matches against him in Slams, Murray said. So to win one, especially the way that it went tonight, yeah, was obviously nice. Murray ended a 76-year drought for British men at the majors when he beat Djokovic in five sets in the final at Flushing Meadows. Hes hoping the step-bystep manner in which he has crossed career milestones off his to-do list will continue Sunday. He lost four major finals, including two in Australia, before winning a Grand Slam title. He lost three times to Federer in a major before beating him. Even then, he wasted a chance to serve out in the fourth set Friday night as Federer rallied. Those matches ... have helped obviously mentally, he said. I think going through a lot of the losses that Ive had will have helped me as well. Obviously having won against Novak before in a Slam final will help mentally. Djokovic will not be the only defending champion this weekend playing for another title. Victoria Azarenka will face Chinas Li Na on Saturday night for the womens crown. Azarenka hasnt added a major title since her breakthrough in Australia last year. Li, who is seeded sixth, lost the 2011 Australian final before claiming her first major title months later at the French Open. Associated PressOWINGS MILLS, Md. Jim Caldwell enjoys his job as offensive coordinator of the Baltimore Ravens, and hes quite good at it. Before taking over in early December, Caldwell had never held the position at any level yet the Ravens attack has flourished under his direction. Quarterback Joe Flacco has looked sharp, the playcalling has been unpredictable and Baltimore has scored 90 points in three playoff games to earn a berth in the Super Bowl. Caldwells success prompted head coach John Harbaugh to ask him to retain the post in 2013. Caldwell appreciates the opportunity, but has no intention of making Offensive Coordinator, Baltimore Ravens the last line on his resume. The 58-year-old Caldwell wants to be a head coach. He did it in Indianapolis from 2009-11, and is itching for another crack at the top job in his profession. At some point in time, if the Lord wills it, Id love to be able to do it again, Caldwell said Friday. But it may not happen. Everybody in our profession is looking for an opportunity to run their own program, and Im no different than anybody else in that regard. Caldwell might have gotten the chance to at least interview for an opening if he wasnt so busy helping the Ravens earn a date with San Francisco in the Super Bowl next Sunday. I had a couple of GMs tell me, If it werent for your guys success in the playoffs and continuing to play, then he would have been someone we would have interviewed, Ravens general manager Ozzie Newsome said. Hopefully next year were in the same spot, and it will be tough for him to get interviews again. Really, though, I can see him getting that opportunity a year from now. Caldwell certainly is a viable candidate for a head coaching job. He took the Colts to the Super Bowl in 2009 and was instrumental in the development of quarterback Peyton Manning. Hes also provided the Baltimore offense with a boost after replacing the fired Cam Cameron on Dec. 10. Caldwell deserves plenty of credit for Baltimores surprising run to the Super Bowl. In the six games since hes taken over, the Ravens have averaged 26.2 points and 406.2 yards of offense. B2 S ATURDAY, J ANUARY26, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S PORTS 000DS6M Associated Press Britains Andy Murray hits a forehand return to Switzerlands Roger Federer during their mens semifinal Friday at the Australian Open tennis championship in Melbourne, Australia. Murray won in five sets. Associated Press Baltimore Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco looks to pass during the first half of an NFL preseason game against the Detroit Lions in Baltimore. When Flacco takes the field on Feb. 3, hell be the second former Delaware Blue Hens quarterback to start a Super Bowl. Rich Gannon was the first, starting for the Oakland Raiders in Super Bowl XXXVII. Associated Press San Francisco 49er LaMichael James (23) gets away from the Atlanta Falcons Stephen Nicholas (54) for a 15-yard touchdown run during the first half of the NFC Championship game Sunday in Atlanta. Associated Press Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice, left, stands with offensive coordinator Jim Caldwell during practice Friday at the team's training facility in Owings Mills, Md. The Ravens face the San Francisco 49ers in Super Bowl XLVII in New Orleans on Feb. 3. Associated PressOWINGS MILLS, Md. Maybe Delaware is the new Quarterback U. When Joe Flacco takes the field with the Baltimore Ravens against San Francisco, hell be the second former Blue Hens quarterback to start a Super Bowl. Rich Gannon was the first with Oakland 10 years ago. Thats more than powerhouses USC, Texas, Oklahoma and Florida combined. Its one more than Miami, Michigan, Tennessee, Penn State, Florida State, Syracuse, Nebraska and Pitt. Stanford, UCLA, BYU, Maryland and Washington State also have two. Only Notre Dame, Alabama, Purdue and California have three. Quite an impressive feat for a second-tier football college in the second-smallest state in the U.S. Its a good thing Flacco didnt turn to baseball when he hoped or he may not have even made it to the NFL. The story goes like this. After his junior season at Delaware, Flacco went to then-coach K.C. Keeler and told him hed like to pitch for the Blue Hens baseball team in the spring. Keeler and other coaches persuaded him to concentrate on football. Over the years, the context of that conversation has been reported different ways. Flacco set the record straight this week, making it clear he simply wanted to play two sports and wasnt considering quitting football. K.C. misrepresents that, Flacco said. I just wanted to play baseball because I liked baseball. I never was giving up on football. I always had a lot of confidence in my ability there. I just wanted to have a little bit of fun. Flacco had an outstanding senior year and led Delaware to the FCS championship game against Appalachian State. He wowed Baltimores scouting department in a long workout before the draft and ended up being selected by the Ravens with the No. 18 overall pick in 2008. Since then, Flacco has done things no other quarterback has accomplished during the Super Bowl era. Flacco is the first quarterback to lead his team to a playoff victory in each of his first five seasons. His six postseason wins on the road rank first and he leads the league with 62 victories since 2008. Im really happy for him and as a former Blue Hen, Im really proud, said Gannon, who was the NFL MVP in 2002 when he led the Raiders to the Super Bowl, a loss to Tampa Bay. His career is off to a terrific start and you can only imagine what will happen next Sunday if hes able to get the job done and win a world championship. Flacco has padded his already remarkable resume this month. In three playoff games, hes thrown eight touchdown passes and not a single interception. His biggest achievement, though, is beating Peyton Manning and Tom Brady on the road in consecutive games to help the Ravens win their second AFC championship. Joe Flacco: A Blue Hen with a golden arm Associated PressSANTA CLARA, Calif. LaMichael James has transformed himself from a rookie spectator forced to watch the first three months of the season to a key contributor to a Super Bowl team in a matter of weeks for the San Francisco 49ers. After being inactive the first 12 games of the season, James has become an impact player for the 49ers in their run to the Super Bowl next week against Baltimore. His long kickoff return set up the go-ahead score in a late-season win in New England. His experience running the zone read helped Colin Kaepernick rush for 181 yards in a win to open the playoffs against Green Bay. Then James got into the scoring act himself last week, starting San Franciscos comeback in a 28-24 win over Atlanta in the NFC championship. I had a lot to learn, James said. Im still learning. Im very blessed to be in the situation Im in. Fresh off scoring his first professional touchdown in last weeks win over the Falcons, James is finally fulfilling the expectations the Niners had for him after drafting him in the second round last April following a stellar college career at Oregon. From the first time he stepped on the field, hes been dynamic, coach Jim Harbaugh said. Getting on the field was the hard part. James was inactive the first 12 games as he had to adjust to playing from a huddle after being part of Oregons fast-paced offense for three years and to learn a much more extensive playbook than he was used to with the Ducks. James dutifully worked at learning his craft, making his contributions as a scout team running back and receiver and soaking in whatever tips he could get from starter Frank Gore and running backs coach Tom Rathman. It was very different, James said. Id never really been in a huddle until I was in high school. Actually, sitting in a huddle and then having to remember it and not just run it that was a little bit different for me, but it all works out. James got his chance after Kendall Hunter went down with a seasonending Achilles injury in New Orleans on Nov. 25. The Niners needed a change-of-pace back to team with Gore and James proved to be a perfect fit. Murray reaches Aussie final Ravens Caldwell still longs to be head coach From spectator to contributor

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S PORTSC ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S ATURDAY, J ANUARY26, 2013 B3 Farmers Insurance Open Friday San Diego Purse: $6.1 million Torrey Pines (South Course); 7,698 yards, par 72, Torrey Pines (North Course); 7,053 yards; par 72 Second Round Tiger Woods68s-65n 133-11 Billy Horschel66n-69s 135-9 Casey Wittenberg69s-67n 136-8 Brad Fritsch69n-67s 136-8 Erik Compton71s-65n 136-8 Steve Marino68s-68n 136-8 Jimmy Walker67n-69s 136-8 Josh Teater66s-70n 136-8 Nick Watney69s-68n 137-7 Luke Guthrie68s-69n 137-7 John Senden69s-68n 137-7 Tag Ridings67s-70n 137-7 Charlie Wi71s-66n 137-7 Ross Fisher66n-71s 137-7 Justin Hicks67s-70n 137-7 Charles Howell III66n-72s 138-6 Harris English68s-70n 138-6 K.J. Choi65s-73n 138-6 Bill Haas69s-69n 138-6 Jim Herman69n-69s 138-6 Graham DeLaet68n-70s 138-6 Will Claxton69n-69s 138-6 Jerry Kelly67n-71s 138-6 Martin Flores69s-69n 138-6 Pat Perez72s-67n 139-5 Justin Leonard68n-71s 139-5 Roberto Castro71s-68n 139-5 Justin Bolli72s-67n 139-5 Nicholas Thompson69n-70s 139-5 Bo Van Pelt67n-72s 139-5 Colt Knost69n-71s 140-4 Jeff Overton71n-69s 140-4 Cameron Tringale68n-72s 140-4 Brendon de Jonge74s-66n 140-4 Brendan Steele67n-73s 140-4 J.J. Henry69n-71s 140-4 John Huh69s-71n 140-4 Brandt Snedeker65n-75s 140-4 Bryce Molder68n-72s 140-4 Adam Hadwin66n-74s 140-4 Michael Letzig68s-73n 141-3 John Rollins70s-71n 141-3 Chez Reavie71s-70n 141-3 Boo Weekley74s-67n 141-3 Mike Weir66n-75s 141-3 John Mallinger67n-74s 141-3 Robert Garrigus72s-69n 141-3 Hunter Mahan69s-72n 141-3 Dustin Johnson69n-72s 141-3 Vijay Singh68n-73s 141-3 Gary Woodland72s-69n 141-3 Luke List66n-75s 141-3 Charley Hoffman70n-72s 142-2 Tom Gillis69s-73n 142-2 Michael Thompson71n-71s 142-2 Brian Harman74s-68n 142-2 Sang-Moon Bae70s-72n 142-2 Jonas Blixt70n-72s 142-2 Rickie Fowler77s-65n 142-2 Hank Kuehne68n-74s 142-2 David Lynn67n-75s 142-2 Greg Owen74s-68n 142-2 Patrick Reed73s-69n 142-2 Peter Tomasulo67n-75s 142-2 Lucas Glover69s-73n 142-2 Brian Stuard68n-74s 142-2 D.H. Lee68n-74s 142-2 Jin Park72s-70n 142-2 Robert Karlsson69n-74s 143-1 Jeff Klauk71s-72n 143-1 James Driscoll68n-75s 143-1 Neal Lancaster72n-71s 143-1 Daniel Summerhays72n-71s 143-1 Ben Curtis72s-71n 143-1 Trevor Immelman72s-71n 143-1 Jason Day73n-70s 143-1 Nicolas Colsaerts69n-74s 143-1 Seung-Yul Noh71s-72n 143-1 Phil Mickelson72n-71s 143-1 Aaron Baddeley71n-72s 143-1 Martin Laird72s-71n 143-1 Matt Every69s-74n 143-1 Eric Meierdierks69n-74s 143-1 James Hahn71s-72n 143-1 Scott Gardiner70n-73s 143-1 Steve LeBrun68n-75s 143-1 Doug LaBelle II72s-71n 143-1 Failed to qualify Kevin Chappell70n-74s 144E Scott Stallings66n-78s 144E Stuart Appleby69n-75s 144E Cameron Percy74n-70s 144E Derek Ernst70s-74n 144E Ricky Barnes70s-74n 144E Rod Pampling73s-71n 144E Tommy Gainey73n-71s 144E Jhonattan Vegas70n-74s 144E Marc Leishman71s-73n 144E Darron Stiles72n-73s 145+1 Jordan Spieth72n-73s 145+1 J.B. Holmes73n-72s 145+1 David Hearn72s-73n 145+1 Charlie Beljan76s-69n 145+1 Billy Mayfair74n-71s 145+1 Michael Bradley71n-74s 145+1 Y.E. Yang70s-75n 145+1 Ben Crane72s-73n 145+1 D.A. Points73s-72n 145+1 Camilo Villegas76s-69n 145+1 Robert Streb71n-74s 145+1 Morgan Hoffmann71n-74s 145+1 Lee Williams71s-74n 145+1 Shawn Stefani72s-73n 145+1 Donald Constable75n-70s 145+1 David Lingmerth72s-73n 145+1 Michael McCabe70s-75n 145+1 Brad Adamonis75s-70n 145+1 Stewart Cink71n-75s 146+2 Richard H. Lee72n-74s 146+2 Bobby Gates72s-74n 146+2 John Daly74s-72n 146+2 Angel Cabrera70s-76n 146+2 Fabian Gomez75n-71s 146+2 Ben Kohles73s-73n 146+2 Steven Bowditch76s-70n 146+2 Stephen Ames70n-77s 147+3 Bud Cauley72n-75s 147+3 John Merrick74n-73s 147+3 Alistair Presnell72s-75n 147+3 Ryo Ishikawa68n-79s 147+3 Greg Chalmers73n-74s 147+3 Keegan Bradley70n-77s 147+3 Scott Piercy74s-73n 147+3 Patrick Cantlay71n-76s 147+3 Henrik Norlander72n-75s 147+3 Aaron Watkins71n-77s 148+4 Brandt Jobe74n-74s 148+4 Matt Jones74s-74n 148+4 Steven Fox70n-78s 148+4 Jon Fiedler75n-74s 149+5 Mark Baker75n-74s 149+5 Jeff Gove73s-76n 149+5 David Mathis74n-76s 150+6 Geoff Ogilvy77s-73n 150+6 Andres Romero76s-74n 150+6 Andrew Svoboda74s-76n 150+6 Paul Haley II73s-77n 150+6 Kyle Stanley75s-76n 151+7 Sean OHair75s-77n 152+8 Andres Gonzales74n-78s 152+8 Troy Matteson75s-77n 152+8 Scott Langley76n-77s 153+9 Tim Herron76s-77n 153+9 Associated PressSAN DIEGO Tiger Woods made it look easy on a dreary day at Torrey Pines and wound up in a place he hasnt been in five years. He had the 36-hole lead by himself at one of his favorite PGA Tour stops. Woods didnt miss a shot during a four-hole stretch around the turn on the North Course that included a 5-iron to 5 feet for eagle and a wedge that onehopped off the pin to set up birdie. It carried him to a 7under 65 on Friday and gave him a two-shot lead in the Farmers Insurance Open. I feel good right now, Woods said. Im leading the tournament. Woods was at 11-under 133 and had a two-shot lead over Billy Horschel, with six other players two shots behind. Already a favorite with seven wins as a pro at Torrey Pines, Woods had even more in his favor going into the weekend. He had a 74-0 edge in PGA Tour wins against the next seven players behind him. Horschel, who had to go back to Q-school to get his card last year, had a 69 on the South Course to get into the final group. Woods caught a break in the draw by playing the easier North its about 600 yards shorter on a day of light rain, a late breeze and soft conditions. But he kept the ball in play off the tee, and he only got in trouble once. That was on the par-4 eighth hole when he drove into a tough lie in the bunker, and it led to his only bogey. Theres a simple formula for playing the North make birdie on the par 5s and pick up a few more on the short par 4s. And thats just what he did. Woods missed birdie putts inside 8 feet on the opening two holes and was taking baby steps until he took off. It started with a 25-foot birdie putt on the 17th. He followed with the 5-iron that landed just left of the pin on the 18th, a two-putt birdie on the par-5 first hole, and his wedge that took one hop, struck the flag and settled 4 feet away. It was similar to Thursday on the South Course when he played a five-hole stretch in 5 under, only this time, Woods finished strong. His approach to the seventh spun back and ran over the cup to set up a short birdie, and he finished off his routine day with a 5-wood onto the ninth green for another two-putt birdie. Drive the ball well here and youre going to probably have four iron shots into the par 5s, Woods said. You sprinkle that in with probably four or five wedge shots in there, a round of 6or 7-under par is definitely conceivable. Brad Fritsch, a rookie from Canada, had a 67 on the South Course to lead the group of six players at 8-under 136. The others were Casey Wittenberg, Steve Marino, Jimmy Walker, Josh Teater and Erik Compton, whom Woods referred to as remarkable for being a two-time heart transplant recipient and being on the PGA Tour. Defending champion Brandt Snedeker didnt fare so well. After opening with a 65 on the North, he made only one birdie and twice took bogey on the par 5s on his way to a 75 that left him seven shots behind. Associated Press Tiger Woods picks up his ball after finishing his round on the north course Friday at Torrey Pines Golf Course during the second round of the Farmers Insurance Open in San Diego. Miami routs Detroit Wades 29 points paces Heat past Pistons 110-88 Associated PressMIAMI Dwyane Wade scored 29 points and sparked a pivotal run to help the Miami Heat earn their fourth victory in a row Friday by beating the Detroit Pistons 110-88. The Heat got even for a loss at Detroit on Dec. 28. They improved to 18-3 at home, while the Pistons fell to 4-16 on the road. After falling behind by nine points, the Heat outscored Detroit 26-4 during a seven-minute stretch in the second quarter to take a 60-47 lead. Wade scored 15 points during the spurt. LeBron James had 23 points, seven rebounds and seven assists for the Heat, who shot 56 percent. Over the past two seasons, theyre 34-2 when shooting at least 50 percent. Greg Monroe scored 31 points for Detroit. Hawks 123, Celtics 111, 2 OT ATLANTA Kyle Korver scored 27 points and the Atlanta Hawks overcame a 27-point deficit in the first half to beat Boston 123-111 in double-overtime, handing the Celtics their sixth straight loss. Jeff Teague had 23 points for Atlanta before fouling out in the first overtime. Al Horford had 24 points and 13 rebounds. Josh Smith, who opened the second overtime with a three-point play, had 17 points and 14 rebounds. Kevin Garnett had 24 points and 10 rebounds but fouled out in the second overtime as the Celtics were left with their longest losing streak in six years. Rajon Rondo had 16 points, 11 assists and 10 rebounds for his fifth triple-double of the season. Korver had five of his career-high eight 3-pointers in the fourth quarter.Grizzlies 101, Nets 77 MEMPHIS, Tenn. Marc Gasol had 20 points and nine rebounds and the Memphis Grizzlies built a 30-point lead in the second half en route to a 101-77 victory over the Brooklyn Nets. Gasol was 10 of 15 from the field, all of his points coming in the first half, as Memphis, which had seven players in double figures, won for the fourth time in the past five games. Mike Conley made six of seven shots, including 2 of 3 outside the arc, for 14 points, while Zach Randolph had 12 points and matched Gasols nine rebounds. Rudy Gay, Jerryd Bayless and Tony Wroten scored 11 apiece, while Chris Johnson, on a 10-day contract with Memphis, had 10 points. Brook Lopez led the Nets with 18 points, while Deron Williams scored 12, adding six assists. Joe Johnson and Reggie Evans scored 11 points each, with Evans grabbing 10 rebounds. Bulls 103, Warriors 87CHICAGO Kirk Hinrich scored a season-high 25 points, hitting six of seven three-pointers in the Chicago Bulls 103-87 victory over the Golden State Warriors. Nate Robinson added 22 points off the bench in the Bulls third straight victory. David Lee, the Warriors All-Star selection, scored 23 points. Stephen Curry added 21 for Golden State, which shot 34.6 percent from the field to snap a three-game winning streak. Jimmy Butler had 16 points and a career-high 12 rebounds starting in place of Luol Deng, who missed his fourth consecutive game due to a right hamstring injury.Cavaliers 113, Bucks 108 CLEVELAND Kyrie Irving scored 35 points and the Cleveland Cavaliers rallied from a 20-point deficit in the third quarter to defeat the Milwaukee Bucks 113-108. Irving, voted an Eastern Conference reserve for next months AllStar Game in Houston on Thursday, scored 16 points in the third quarter to help Cleveland get back in the game. He added eight points down the stretch as the Cavaliers posted back-to-back wins for only the second time this season. Cleveland, which trailed 79-59 midway through the third quarter, took a 96-95 lead on a 3-pointer by newly acquired Wayne Ellington with 6:31 to play. The basket was his first since joining the Cavaliers from Minnesota on Tuesday, and it gave Cleveland the lead for good. Ersan Ilyasova scored a seasonhigh 30 points and Monta Ellis added 21, but the Bucks collapse ended their three-game winning streak. Wizards 114, Timberwolves 101WASHINGTON John Wall had 14 points and five assists in his first start of the season, and the nolonger-last Washington Wizards finally hit double digits in wins with a 114-101 victory over the Minnesota Timberwolves. Wall, who came off the bench for the first seven games after his return from a knee injury, had assists on the Wizards first two baskets in a game in which Washington never trailed. He wowed the crowd with a nice spin move for a layup late in the first half and went 6 for 10 from the field in 21 minutes, his playing time still limited after missing 33 games with a stress injury to his left knee cap. The Wizards are 5-3 since Walls return after going 5-28 without him. Rockets 100, Hornets 82NEW ORLEANS First-time AllStar James Harden had 30 points and the Houston Rockets broke out of their worst slump of the season by beating the New Orleans Hornets. The Rockets, who had lost eight of nine and trailed by double digits in 12 straight games, led almost all the way this time. Harden scored 10 points and Patrick Patterson had six during a 16-2 run early in the third quarter as Houston took control, going ahead 64-46. The Hornets never got closer than 10 the rest of the way, losing for only the third time in their last 10 games. Harden, selected an All-Star reserve for the Western Conference on Thursday, handed out eight assists and was 12 for 12 on free throws. Spurs 113, Mavericks 107 DALLAS Tony Parker returned from a cut above the same eye he injured in a nightclub incident last summer and scored 23 points to lead the San Antonio Spurs to a 113-107 victory over the Dallas Mavericks. Parker missed about a quarter in the first half when he took three stitches above his left eye after a collision with Elton Brand on a drive. He nearly lost the eye in June when shards of glass embedded in his cornea after he got caught in a bottle-throwing melee in New York. Tim Duncan stayed home with a sore right knee, but DeJuan Blair made up for his absence by scoring a season-high 22 points. Associated Press Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade hangs from the rim after a dunk, near Detroit Pistons forward Kyle Singler, center, and forward Tayshaun Prince, rear, during the first half Friday in Miami. Bolts get two last-period Malone goals for victory Associated PressTAMPA Ryan Malone scored a pair of third-period goals as the Tampa Bay Lightning beat the Ottawa Senators 6-4 on Friday night. Malone deflected Sami Salos blue-line slap shot at 3:39 of the third that pulled the Lightning even at 4. Tampa Bay took a 5-4 lead when the left wing scored from the low leftcircle with 7:02 to play. Tom Pyatt extended the lead to 6-4 with a late empty-net goal. Tampa Bay (3-1) has outscored its opponents 11-1 in the third this season. Matt Carle, Steven Stamkos and Victor Hedman also scored for the Lightning, who started a five-game homestand. Bruins 4, Islanders 2 BOSTON Zdeno Chara scored the tiebreaking goal early in the third period and Tuukka Rask made 24 saves, lifting the Boston Bruins to a 4-2 win over the New York Islanders. Patrice Bergeron, Shawn Thornton and Gregory Campbell also scored for Boston, which improved to 3-0-1. Devils 3, Capitals 2, OT NEWARK, N.J. Ilya Kovalchuk scored 4:39 into overtime, and the New Jersey Devils won their third straight game to start the lockout-shortened season, 3-2 over the winless Washington Capitals. Kovalchuk took a pass from defenseman Marek Zidlicky low in the left circle and beat Michal Neuvirth, who was outstanding in overtime. Neuvirth made seven saves, most on a New Jersey power play. Stephen Gionta and Patrik Elias scored for New Jersey, which is off to its first 3-0 start since the 2002-03 season, the last time the Devils won the Stanley Cup. Hurricanes 3, Sabres 1BUFFALO, N.Y. Jay Harrison scored the go-ahead goal with 4:50 left, helping the Carolina Hurricanes to a 3-1 win over the Buffalo Sabres. Harrison fired a slap shot from the right point after Eric Staal won the faceoff, and the puck beat Buffalos Ryan Miller on the short side. Alexander Semin tied it for the Hurricanes early in the third period, and Jeff Skinner scored an empty-net goal for Carolina, which has won two straight games. Red Wings 5, Wild 3DETROIT Henrik Zetterberg snapped a tie midway through the second period, and Todd Bertuzzi scored his second goal of the game early in the third to lift the Red Wings to a 5-3 win over the Wild. Pavel Datsyukput Detroit ahead by two late in the second period.

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S COREBOARD On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 12 p.m. (ABC) Notre Dame at South Florida 12 p.m. (ESPN) Louisville at Georgetown 12 p.m. (ESPN2) Ohio State at Penn State 1 p.m. (CBS) Maryland at Duke 1 p.m. (FSNFL) Boston College at Virginia 1:30 p.m. (MNT) Arkansas at South Carolina 2 p.m. (ESPN2) Alabama at Tennessee 2 p.m. (NBCSPT) Dartmouth at Harvard 2 p.m. (SUN) Marshall at Memphis 3 p.m. (CW) Wake Forest at Georgia Tech 4 p.m. (MNT) LSU at Kentucky 4 p.m. (ESPN) Oklahoma at Kansas 4 p.m. (ESPN2) Western Kentucky at Middle Tennessee St. 4 p.m. (FSNFL) UCLA at Arizona State 4 p.m. (NBCSPT) New Mexico at San Diego State 6 p.m. (ESPN2) Temple at Butler 6 p.m. (SUN) Georgia at Texas A&M 7 p.m. (ESPN) North Carolina at North Carolina State 8 p.m. (ESPN2) Florida at Mississippi State 8 p.m. (SUN) Mississippi at Auburn WOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 12 p.m. (SUN) Oklahoma at Baylor NBA 7 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Bulls at Washington Wizards GOLF 6 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Commercialbank Qatar Masters, Final Round 1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Farmers Insurance Open, Third Round 3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour: Farmers Insurance Open, Third Round COLLEGE GYMNASTICS 5 p.m. (SUN) Arkansas at Kentucky (Taped) HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Philadelphia Flyers at Florida Panthers FIGURE SKATING 3 p.m. (NBC) U.S. Championships: Pairs Free Skate & Free Dance 4:30 p.m. (NBC) U.S. Championships: Pairs Free Skate & Free Dance 8 p.m. (NBC) U.S. Championships: Ladies Short Program & Free Skate TENNIS 3 a.m. (ESPN) Australian Open mens final Novak Djokovic vs. Andy Murray Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. Prep CALENDAR TODAYS PREP SPORTS BOYS SOCCER District 3A-6 final at Nature Coast High School 6 p.m. No. 1 Citrus vs. No. 2 Leesburg GIRLS SOCCER FHSAA regional semifinals 7 p.m. Fleming Island at Lecanto 8 p.m. Citrus at Nature Coast WRESTLING 8 a.m. Lecanto, Crystal River at The Villages duals NHL standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA New Jersey3300683 N.Y. Islanders422041413 Pittsburgh422041313 N.Y. Rangers41302914 Philadelphia41302512 Northeast Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Boston43017128 Ottawa43106158 Buffalo422041112 Montreal3210494 Toronto422041212 Southeast Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Tampa Bay431061912 Winnipeg421151010 Carolina422041113 Florida41302712 Washington40311817 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Chicago440081710 St. Louis43106156 Detroit422041014 Nashville41124811 Columbus41213715 Northwest Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Colorado3210495 Edmonton3210489 Minnesota42204910 Vancouver31113812 Calgary30211712 Pacific Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA San Jose33006157 Dallas4211588 Anaheim22004127 Phoenix413021516 Los Angeles30211410 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Thursdays Games N.Y. Islanders 7, Toronto 4 Philadelphia 2, N.Y. Rangers 1 Montreal 4, Washington 1 Carolina 6, Buffalo 3 Ottawa 3, Florida 1 St. Louis 3, Nashville 0 Chicago 3, Dallas 2, OT Colorado 4, Columbus 0 Edmonton 2, Los Angeles 1, OT San Jose 5, Phoenix 3 Fridays Games Boston 4, N.Y. Islanders 2 Carolina 3, Buffalo 1 New Jersey 3, Washington 2, OT Tampa Bay 6, Ottawa 4 Detroit 5, Minnesota 3 Winnipeg 4, Pittsburgh 2 Vancouver at Anaheim, late Todays Games Colorado at San Jose, 4 p.m. Toronto at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. Chicago at Columbus, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Florida, 7:30 p.m. St. Louis at Dallas, 8 p.m. Los Angeles at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Edmonton at Calgary, 10 p.m. Nashville at Anaheim, 10:30 p.m. Sundays Games Buffalo at Washington, 3 p.m. Pittsburgh at Ottawa, 5 p.m. New Jersey at Montreal, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 6 p.m. Detroit at Chicago, 7 p.m. Minnesota at St. Louis, 8 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Winnipeg, 8 p.m. Vancouver at San Jose, 8 p.m.NBA standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division WLPctGB New York2614.650 Brooklyn2617.6051 Boston2023.4657 Philadelphia1725.40510 Toronto1627.37211 Southeast Division WLPctGB Miami2812.700 Atlanta2518.5814 Orlando1428.33315 Washington1031.24418 Charlotte1032.23819 Central Division WLPctGB Chicago2616.619 Indiana2617.605 Milwaukee2219.5373 Detroit1627.37210 Cleveland1232.27315 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division WLPctGB San Antonio3511.761 Memphis2814.6675 Houston2322.51111 Dallas1825.41915 New Orleans1429.32619 Northwest Division WLPctGB Oklahoma City3310.767 Denver2618.5917 Utah2319.5489 Portland2121.50011 Minnesota1723.42514 Pacific Division WLPctGB L.A. Clippers3212.727 Golden State2616.6195 L.A. Lakers1725.40514 Sacramento1627.37215 Phoenix1528.34916 Thursdays Games Toronto 97, Orlando 95 New York 89, Boston 86 Phoenix 93, L.A. Clippers 88 Fridays Games Washington 114, Minnesota 101 Atlanta 123, Boston 111,2OT Cleveland 113, Milwaukee 108 Miami 110, Detroit 88 San Antonio 113, Dallas 107 Chicago 103, Golden State 87 Memphis 101, Brooklyn 77 Houston 100, New Orleans 82 Oklahoma City at Sacramento, late Utah at L.A. Lakers, late Todays Games New York at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Cleveland at Toronto, 7 p.m. Chicago at Washington, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Charlotte, 7:30 p.m. Brooklyn at Houston, 8 p.m. Phoenix at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. Golden State at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m. Sacramento at Denver, 9 p.m. Indiana at Utah, 9:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Portland, 10 p.m. Sundays Games Miami at Boston, 1 p.m. Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m. New Orleans at Memphis, 6 p.m. Detroit at Orlando, 6 p.m. Atlanta at New York, 6:30 p.m. Phoenix at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Portland at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.NFL playoff glanceAll Times EST Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 20 San Francisco 28, Atlanta 24 Baltimore 28, New England 13 Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 27 At Honolulu AFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (NBC) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 3 At New Orleans Baltimore vs. San Francisco, 6 p.m. (CBS) Florida LOTTERY Here are the winning numbers selected Friday in the Florida Lottery: CASH 3 (early) 7 9 9 CASH 3 (late) 7 2 1 PLAY 4 (early) 9 3 9 8 PLAY 4 (late) 4 0 9 0 FANTASY 5 8 9 30 35 36 MEGA MONEY 17 23 33 35 MEGA BALL 2 B4 S ATURDAY, J ANUARY26, 2013 Pirates boys hoops leave The Villages with 55-53 winTy Reynolds scored 17 points to lead the Crystal River boys basketball team to a 55-53 triumph at The Villages on Friday. Crystal River had to survive a lastsecond shot by the home team before celebrating its victory. Pirates sophomore forward Sam Franklin chipped in 15 points for the Pirates, who are now 11-10 overall and completed a 3-0 week with the win. Crystal River plays 7 p.m. Tuesday at home against Lecanto. SRCS boys basketball squeezed by St. Francis The Seven Rivers boys basketball team took a tough 54-53 setback at St. Francis Catholic in Gainesville on Friday. Cory Weiand led the Warriors with 16 points and Adam Gage added 14 points. Seven Rivers (9-10 overall) plays 6:30 p.m. Monday at home against Branford. From staff reports Sports BRIEFS his future Pirates during a 25-minute presentation. Obviously the (wins) on the schedule are nice and convenient, but you should want to be the best in everything you do, Varnadore said. Never settle for second best or anything less than that. He encouraged his potential gridiron athletes to play other sports, especially track and field or weightlifting in the spring. As far as football goes, the new coach did not outline specific schemes but stated the Pirates would be an attacking, uptempo offensive team. Exact formations and plays will be based on the personnel from year to year. Varnadore, a former defensive coordinator at Palmetto High School in Manatee County, expressed his affinity for stopping opponents offenses. He said Crystal River will play aggressive, sound defense, create turnovers and be mentally and physically tougher than any opposing team. He explained his four keys to victory: play great defense, score in the red zone, have an excellent red zone and win the turnover margin. Varnadore also said his time as a junior coach at Division II powerhouse Carson-Newman College in Johnson City, Tenn., prepared him for this moment. I saw how a championship program pushes everyone forward and sets the standard, he said. Thats when it clicked: I want to coach. Chronicle sports editor Jon-Michael Soracchi can be emailed at jmsoracchi@chronicleonline.com or reached at 352-564-2928. Forest for a six-team division. Citrus head coach Rayburn Greene was diplomatic in his assessment of the re-districting. Im thrilled to have them back in our district, Greene said in reference to Gainesville. The only way to build a championship program is to play champions. We look forward to it. A couple of the kids were excited because they said playing Gainesville lets you know what youre made of, Greene added. Schools in Class 6A are supposed to have an enrollment of between 1,574 to 1,871 students in the fall of 2012, based on information at www.fhsaa.org. Gainesville and Forest were aligned into a Class 7A district with three Tallahassee schools and likely appealed based on the extensive travel. A request to move down can also be made if a school is within 10 percent of the enrollment ceiling, which Gainesville fits into. Forest (with 2,350 students, according to their school website) does not. In fact, if the number on the Wildcats website is correct, it would place them enrollment-wise in Class 8A. A text message from Lecanto High School activities director Ron Allan outlined some of the frustrations of the process. We asked to move down to (Class) 5A once (Gainesville) and Forest were added but it was denied, Allan said in the message. Lecanto head coach McKinley Rolle said his Panthers wont shy away from any district opponents. Were gonna compete against any district foes we have, Rolle said. Were going to play to the best of our abilities. Crystal River was also affected by the new final: Live Oak Suwannee won a petition, making a seven-team District 5A-5 which also includes holdovers Dunnellon, North Marion, Gainesville Eastside, Alachua Santa Fe and Belleview. Schools in Class 5A have an enrollment of between 1,049 to 1,573 students in the fall of 2012. Crystal River activities director Tony Stukes said a trip to Live Oak (110 miles away or roughly two hours) was not desirable. It really doesnt impact us, other than the travel to Live Oak, Stukes said. I would prefer that it stayed the same, but were not complaining about anything. Dunnellon coach Frank Beasley didnt know what to make of Suwanees reason for moving into the district. The switch (by Suwanee) doesnt make sense to me, Beasley said, before adding, we played them four years ago, its a tough place to play and a tough place to win. Beasleys confusion has merit: Suwannee went from being in a threeteam district with Tallahassee Rickards and Wakulla which is one long trip per year based on playing one home and one away to a six-team district with a minimum of three long road trips the next two seasons. Beasley didnt have an issue with the size of the district, saying a bigger division actually appealed to him. Sometimes its better to have more district games, he said. It ratchets up the intensity from week to week. Visit www.fhsaa.org/sports/ football/assignments for the full list of new football districts. Chronicle sports editor Jon-Michael Soracchi can be emailed at jmsoracchi@chronicleonline.com or reached at 352-564-2928. into baskets. We had a hard time with their man-to-man (press), said the Warriors Andrea Zachar, who scored 16 points in the game. If we get (the ball) into the middle, we can handle it. Eleven second-quarter turnovers by Seven Rivers allowed the Pirates to take control, turning a 14-9 deficit after one quarter into a 23-21 halftime lead. Katelyn Hannigan scored 11 of Crystal Rivers 14 points in the quarter, finishing with 19 in the game. But the Warriors recaptured command with a ninepoint run in the third quarter, reversing a fourpoint Crystal River lead in making it a 30-25 Seven Rivers advantage. The Pirates, behind the floor shooting of Hannigan and Megan Wells (eight in the half, 16 for the game), trimmed the Warriors lead to 32-31 after three quarters. A three-pointer by Wells pulled Crystal River to within 41-40 with four minutes left in the fourth, and after two Seven Rivers free throws by Tiana Miele, Hannigan tied it at 43-all with a three-point play with 1:39 to go. Thats when the Warriors took over at the line. Alexis Zachar who had 18 points in the game hit both ends of her one-and-one free throws to put Seven Rivers up 45-43 with 1:06 left. Andrea Zachar hit 1 of 2 at the line with 23.6 seconds to go, and Alexis grabbed the miss and put that in to make it 48-43. I think Crystal River played really well, Seven Rivers coach Gary Dreyer said. They were hyped up with it being Senior Night and they deserve the credit. best game), we can be competitive. No doubt in my mind. The Citrus Hurricanes exited their District 3A-6 tournament as the runner-up (losing to Nature Coast 3-0 in the finals) and managed to defeat Eastside 3-0 in their regional quarterfinal on Wednesday. The Lady Canes travel to Nature Coast once again to face the district champs in the regional semifinals at 7 p.m. tonight at The Shark Tank, giving Citrus a muchneeded chance at retribution against their district rival. Nature Coast downed Palatka 4-0 in its regional quarterfinal match. Im extremely excited for our girls and the program here at Citrus, Citrus head coach Ian Feldt said. Our veterans have been working hard for years, so to see all their dedication validated by a spot in the semifinals is exciting. We know we are in for a tough game against Nature Coast. They are a quality team, the toughest weve seen all year. Citrus runs past West Port at home S EAN A RNOLD CorrespondentINVERNESS In the Citrus boys basketball home game against West Port on Friday, the Hurricanes got their shooting stroke back and won some confidence for the district tournament in two weeks. Citrus shook off its previous nights loss to Crystal River and led by a combined 51 points from junior point guard Devin Pryor (28 points, six rebounds) and sophomore forward Desmond Franklin (23 points, nine rebounds) finished its regular-season district schedule by prevailing 80-64 over the Wolf Pack in front of a redout home crowd that wore t-shirts representing the American Heart Association. With an overtime win over Central earlier in the week, Citrus (14-8 overall, 6-2 in District 6A-6) moves to 4-0 at home in league play and has at least one win over each of its 6A-6 foes. The loss is just the fourth of the season for West Port (14-4 overall). After successfully handling West Ports press early in the game, Citrus built up a 35-23 lead by halftime behind Franklins 11 second-quarter points. The Canes largest lead came midway into the third when junior guard Mitchell Ellis (13 points) knocked down a 3 after scooping up a long rebound from a blocked shot by West Port. The Wolf Pack then scored 12 straight to narrow the gap, but unlike Citrus loss at West Port where the Wolf Pack overcame a third-quarter deficit with a ferocious rally in the second half the Canes traded baskets down the stretch to maintain its double-digit advantage for the remainder. When we had our 8-game winning streak, we were scoring in the midand upper-70s every night, but we hadnt seen that in awhile, Citrus head coach Tom Densmore said on his teams offensive output. We just kept playing until the very end, with two minutes to go, when we ran out the clock. I decided the Crystal River game was a bad sandwich game between two key district games, Densmore added. We didnt move well on defense in that game, but I thought we really did a good job rebounding and on defense to hold West Port to 23 in the first half. The Wolf Pack share a 6-2 district record with the Canes, but West Port earns the No. 1 seed due to tiebreaker rules while Citrus faces Lecanto (No. 3 seed) as the second seed in the first round of the 6A-6 tournament at Central. West Port senior Corey David had 22 points in the second half to match Pryors 28 points for the night, and Wolf Pack senior Alec Jewell added 13. Last night we werent focused as much because this is the game that mattered more, Pryor said of the turnaround after Thursday. Densmore and Pryor each noted Franklins rediscovery of his jump shot. Today I made sure I was going to help my team, Franklin said. I came to the gym right after the team dinner and shot around until the start of the JV game. Devin (Pryor) controlled the ball real well, he added. Citrus plays South Sumter 7 p.m. Wednesday at home. NIP Continued from Page B1 REGIONAL Continued from Page B1 DISTRICTS Continued from Page B1 CRHS Continued from Page B1

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S ATURDAY, J ANUARY26, 2013 B5 Come see Citrus Countys finest new jewelry showroom offering expert jewelry repair, from a simple solder to diamond replacement or even a custom design. Insurance and estate appraisals available. Kenny & Frances Williams (Formerly of Kenneth Charles Jewelers) Always Free appraisals and testing! Nobody Pays More For Your Gold, Silver or Coins GUARANTEED 2416 Hwy. 44 W., Inverness goldiggersandgunslingers.com 352-341-GUNS (4867) Mon.-Fri. 9:00 6:00 Sat. 9:00 4:00 Top Name Brand Check out the SILVER STAMPEDE right next door! Mon.-Fri. 9:00-6:00 Sat. 9:00-4:00 352-637-CASH (2274) 2418 Hwy. 44 W., Inverness Gold Coins Paper Money C ASH FOR ANY AND ALL G OLD I F YOU ARE NOT SURE BRING IT IN AND WE WILL TEST IT FOR FREE LUXURY ITEMS Louis Vuitton Gucci Chanel Cartier Rolex Mont Blanc Diamonds Silver Certificates All Old U.S. Money Confederate $500 & $1,000 Bills Fractional Currency I need diamonds! 1/2 carat and larger. Top Prices Paid Collections Graded Coins Indian Head Pennies Proof Sets All Old U.S. Coins Gold Coins Silver Coins Kennedy Half Dollars 1965 1970 Old U.S. Paper Money Wheat Penny Antiques WHY DO BUSINESS WITH GOLDIGGERS & GUNSLINGERS? GIA Certified Gemologist Diamond and Rare Stone Appraiser Approved Insurance Appraisal Family Owned and Operated Super Reputation Professionally Run Business Friendly Atmosphere Conduct Business Seated at a Desk Any necessary research is done right in front of you Leave kno wing that you have been treated fairly Knowing that we will be here tomorrow and the next day. We live here. The co ffee is always on. Swords Military Items Old Documents Gambling Items Autographs Old Toys Old Post Cards Old Photos Old Golf Items Lunch Boxes Bronze Figures Porcelain Figures Old Banjos, Guitars & String Instruments Music Boxes Oriental Rugs Royal Doultons Wrist Watches & Pocket Watches Older Mechanical, Working Or Broken Flatware Tea Sets Trays Trophies Water Pitchers Candlesticks Sugar & Creamers All Sterling Buying Forks Spoons Knifes Buying Silver Paying Cash For Silver Coins 1964 & Older Wanted Fine Art Oil Paintings Watercolors Listed Artists Old Movie Posters Old Prints or Etchings Signed or Numbered Cash For Jewelry Rings Cameos Necklaces Victorian Bracelets Art Deco Brooches Art Nouveau Earrings Cuff Links Pins Enameled Pendants Antique Charms Masonic Large Diamonds Vintage Wrist Watches We Need Costume Jewelry Antique Items Pins Brooches Boxed Sets Colorful Rhinestone Items Mesh Purses Garnet Jewelry Bring In The Whole Jewelry Box 1,675 1,675 2012 2012 Expert cleaning Polishing Battery replacement Fine watch repair, Rolex, Cartier, etc. SELL YOUR OLD UNUSED, TANGLED OR BROKEN GOLD JEWELRY FOR CASH All Gold 10k-14k-18k, Etc. Dental Gold Broken Gold Jewelry Class Rings Engagement Rings Wedding Rings Bracelets Chains Charms Old Watches Tiffany Cartier Yurman Jensen Bulgari 000DW62

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E NTERTAINMENT Page B6 SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Peter Pan pop Michael Buble, wife expecting first child NEW YORK Michael Buble has something new to sing about: becoming a father. In an online video posted Thursday by the YouTube account of Bubles wife, Luisana Lopilato a sonogram with the words Mini Buble!!! is shown. The 20second video ends up with words: Were having a baby Buble!!!! The 37-year-old Canadian singer and his 25-year-old Argentine actress wife were married in 2011. The couple met in 2009 during a South American concert tour. A representative for Buble confirmed the couple is expecting. American Pie singer fined for speeding ROCKLAND, Maine American Pie singer Don McLean has been fined $400 for driving his Chrysler too fast through a Maine school zone and has paid the levy. McLean contested the charge in September, saying school zone warning lights werent flashing. Police said in Rockland District Court on Thursday they were flashing. A judge found McLean was speeding in the Rockport school zone but lowered what would be a $515 fine if uncontested to $400. McLean immediately paid up. McLean lives in nearby Camden, along Maines coast. He burst into popularity in 1971 with his hit American Pie, about the deaths of Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper in a plane crash Feb. 3, 1959 The Day the Music Died. Wood, Bell expecting first child NEW YORK Evan Rachel Wood is going to be a mom. Woods publicist, Amanda Silverman said Friday the 25-year-old actress and her husband, Jamie Bell are expecting their first child later this year. She said Wood and Bell are thrilled. The couple married last year. They first dated in 2005 but broke up the following year. Woods breakout role was in 2003s gritty film Thirteen. In 2011, she co-starred with Kate Winslet in the HBO miniseries Mildred Pierce. Both roles earned her Golden Globe nominations. Bell, 26, is best known for his starring role in Billy Elliott. His film credits also include King Kong and The Adventures of Tintin. Birthday Even though you are likely to have the edge over your opposition in the year ahead, youll still have to earn every one of your victories. Chances are, they wont be awarded without a hard-fought contest. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Dont let a co-worker whose abilities are not up to your standards become empowered to dictate the collective course of action. Be firm and remain in control. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) If you are impelled to work on tasks you find distasteful, theres a chance your performance wont be up to its usual high standard. If you can, set it aside until youre in a better frame of mind. Aries (March 21-April 19) Even if youre used to making all the rules, abide by the will of the majority. If you dont, you could be attacked for defending an untenable position. Taurus (April 20-May 20) When it comes to career situations, keep your guard up and be ready to fight or change course. Opposition from several unexpected sources is extremely probable. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Do not discuss your ideas with others, especially with someone who is known to plagiarize. This person will be true to form. Cancer (June 21-July 22) Be particularly careful about getting involved in a tricky financial arrangement. It could be a ploy to demand an even larger cash outlay from all participants in the near future. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Avoid teaming up with an individual who is known to be underhanded. You wont be very comfortable watching this person operate. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Guard against a strong inclination to make things much harder on yourself than they need to be. A tendency to do so would definitely impede your progress. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Be extremely selective regarding any social invitations you might receive. Theres a strong chance you could get caught up in a group of people that you wont like at all. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) You and your special someone must be of the same mindset where an important issue is concerned. Discord could occur if one decides something without the consent of the other. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Generally, you love endeavors of a mental nature, but since your powers of concentration are not apt to be up to par currently, you should be careful. Small mistakes are likely. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Dont open your wallet to someone who never makes good on debts. If you do, youll be reinforcing this persons bad habit. From wire reports Don McLean Michael Buble and Luisana Lopilato Today in HISTORY THURSDAY, JANUARY 24 Fantasy 5 : 7 14 18 23 29 5-of-53 winners$71,015.93 4-of-5284$120.50 3-of-59,252$10 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23 Powerball: 11 12 24 43 45 Powerball: 9 5-of-5 PBNo winner No Florida winner 5-of-51 winner$1 million No Florida winner Lotto: 15 21 22 24 39 41 6-of-6No winner 5-of-613$12,235 4-of-61,273$84 3-of-627,829$5 Fantasy 5: 1 19 20 32 35 5-of-5No winner 4-of-5284$555 3-of-58,581$26 Today is Saturday, Jan. 26, the 26th day of 2013. There are 339 days left in the year. Todays Highlight: On Jan. 26, 1788, the first European settlers in Australia, led by Capt. Arthur Phillip, landed in present-day Sydney. On this date: In 1784, in a letter to his daughter Sally, Benjamin Franklin expressed unhappiness over the choice of the eagle as the symbol of America, and stated his own preference: the turkey. In 1837, Michigan became the 26th state. In 1870, Virginia rejoined the Union. In 1939, during the Spanish Civil War, rebel forces led by Gen. Francisco Franco captured Barcelona. In 1942, the first American Expeditionary Force to go to Europe during World War II arrived in Belfast, Northern Ireland. In 1950, India officially proclaimed itself a republic as Rajendra Prasad took the oath of office as president. Ten years ago: Secretary of State Colin Powell, citing Iraqs lack of cooperation with U.N. inspectors, said hed lost faith in the inspectors ability to conduct a definitive search for banned weapons programs. Five years ago: Barack Obama routed Hillary Rodham Clinton in the South Carolina primary. One year ago: The Pentagon outlined a plan for slowing the growth of military spending, including cutting the size of the Army and Marine Corps, retiring older planes and trimming war costs. Todays Birthdays: Actress Anne Jeffreys is 90. Actress Joan Leslie is 88. Cartoonist Jules Feiffer is 84. Sportscaster-actor Bob Uecker is 78. Actor Scott Glenn is 74. Singer Jean Knight is 70. Activist Angela Davis is 69. Rock musician Corky Laing (Mountain) is 65. Actor David Strathairn is 64. Alt-country singer-songwriter Lucinda Williams is 60. Rock singer-musician Eddie Van Halen is 58. Reggae musician Norman Hassan (UB40) is 55. Actress-comediantalk show host Ellen DeGeneres is 55. Hockey Hall-of-Famer Wayne Gretzky is 52. Musician Andrew Ridgeley is 50. Rhythmand-blues singer Jazzie B. (Soul II Soul) is 50. Actor Paul Johansson is 49. Gospel singer Kirk Franklin is 43. Actress Jennifer Crystal is 40. Rock musician Chris Hesse (Hoobastank) is 39. Actor Gilles Marini is 37. NBA player Vince Carter is 36. Actress Sarah Rue is 35. Thought for Today: Thinking is easy, acting is difficult, and to put ones thoughts into action is the most difficult thing in the world. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, German poet, dramatist and author (1749-1832). INSIDE THE NUMBERS To verify the accuracy of winning lottery numbers, players should double-check the numbers printed above with numbers officially posted by the Florida Lottery. Go to www. flalottery.com, or call 850487-7777. Spotlight on PEOPLE Florida LOTTERIES SO YOU KNOW Last nights winning numbers, Page B4 Todays HOROSCOPE AP television writer NEW YORK On Shameless, William H. Macy plays the worlds most deadbeat dad. He stars as Frank Gallagher, a boozy, shiftless grifter whose brood of six mix-and-match offspring (do any of them share the same mother?) care for one another and, by necessity, him. The oldest daughter, Fiona (played by Emmy Rossum), is the familys de facto mom, a Wendy to Franks derelict Peter Pan. Derelict is putting it mildly. Frank is abrasive, selfabsorbed, scheming and delusional, a pickled patriarch whose most dignified moments find him passed out on the bathroom floor of the familys ragtag South Chicago digs, or on a random street corner or maybe public park. But somehow the family stays afloat, even with Frank dragging everybody down. For all the craziness they go through, it is a tight-knit family, an honest family that loves each other fiercely, Macy said. Thats what the show is about. Airing Sunday at 9 p.m. on Showtime, Shameless began its third season recently with Frank coming to in Mexico, not sure how he got there and with no funds or credentials to get himself home. Ever the schemer, he figures out a way. Just as, this week, he figures out a way to score some drinking money: He volunteers to take a neighbors infant to the doctor for a scheduled vaccination, then spends the cash meant for the doctor at his favorite bar. He pricks the baby with a thumb tack to simulate a shot, and shares a few drops of his whisky to calm the babys crying. I pride myself on taking the script and saying, I can DO this! said Macy, clearly gleeful at the depths to which Frank routinely sinks. I take all the stuff the writers can shovel my way! Well, almost. Once or twice Ive said, Too much. Too despicable. Its over the line, Macy admited with a laugh. But its the writers job to push that line, to put every character in really uncomfortable situations. So we have a good, healthy tug of war. The show barrels along a path both heartbreaking and hilarious, while Frank sets the pace with his appalling level of substance abuse. The series doesnt glorify drinking, however riotously drinking is depicted. (Frank would be nobodys choice as a role model.) And Shameless recognizes that, in a MADDenlightened era, inebriation is no longer automatically a joke. But to claim being drunk isnt funny is not true, Macy hastens to say. Being drunk CAN be VERY funny! It surely has its funny moments thanks to Frank and the guy who plays him. I flatter myself that, as an actor, I do a pretty good drunk, said Macy, who, while acknowledging hes on the wagon right now, can draw on a little firsthand experience. He is careful to modulate Franks drunken state as the day wears on. For a scene that takes place at 11 oclock in the morning, well, thats a four-beer buzz, he explained, as opposed to 11:30 at night, when Franks speech is very slurred. Playing a drunk, which Macy deems less a thespian technique than a parlor trick, comes with pitfalls: A great impersonation of a drunk can distract an actor from the primary substance of the scene. But if Im pretty clear what the scene is about, then I just add on the drunkenness slurring or stumbling and it takes care of itself. Wardrobe helps too. I wear the same clothes almost all the time, he said. And I pride myself on this, as does our costumer, Lyn (Paolo): Ive never had a fitting. She has sent me pants with the top two buttons missing and the waist too big. So I put a belt on it, I fix it. With Frank, close is good enough. If Frank is reliably scruffy, theres one big change coming up. As Macy displays at this recent interview, his hair, previously near shoulder-length, has been shorn. I cut it for the show. I cut it ON the show in a future episode. I wont give away why, he said. And it was a daunting decision. I did have a great head of hair. Id lived with it for three years, and Id gotten used to it. Still, Macy isnt the type to let vanity get in the way of a good role or a great performance. Although he has achieved offbeat leading-man status in such films as Fargo (for which he landed an Oscar nomination) and the made-forTV Door to Door (which he also co-wrote), the 62-year-old Macy has had a busy career on screen and on stage as a celebrated character actor. But a few years ago, he got the hankering to headline a TV series. By then his wife, Felicity Huffman, was flourishing on Desperate Housewives, Macy noted, and she loved every part of it. I was jealous. I said, I want to do TV, too! So far, so good. I love Shameless so much! he said. You get big stuff to do in scenes that are tough to do, with volumes of dialogue and a character who talks fast. You have to know your part inside and out. It really tests you as an actor, every single week. And Im a better actor for it. I wish Id done this earlier in my career. He mentions the book The Outliers, in which author Malcolm Gladwell advances the theory if you practice something anything for 10,000 hours, you reach a key threshold of expertise. According to Gladwell, people recognized as experts have logged that length of service. Count Macy, thanks to Shameless. Its my 10,000 hours, he said. And hes hoping for thousands more. Macy is proud to be the drunken dad in Shameless American actor William H. Macy portrays a deadbeat dad on the Showtime television series, Shameless. Evan Rachel Wood

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Whats in a name? O n Nov. 24, the Jameson family named their newborn baby girl Hashtag, after Twitters use of the (#) symbol. The year before, an Egyptian man named his son Facebook, and in 2011 an Israeli couple named their baby Like. These babies join celebrities babies Spec Wildhorse Mellencamp, Moxie Crimefighter Jillette, Pilot Inspecktor Lee and Audio Science Clayton, which makes Apple Blythe Alison Martin sound almost traditional as a baby name. I think peoples names say much more about the parents than about the child. Naming your kid Moxie Crimefighter is setting him up to be pushed into lockers in middle school. Then there are church names. Ive always wondered about churches with First in their names First Baptist, First Presbyterian. I guess they want everyone to know See GRACE / Page C5 Defining evangelical in 2013 L ist Americas prominent evangelicals and the Rev. Rick Warren remains near the top, right up there with the Rev. Brian McLaren, Bishop T.D. Jakes, Jim Wallis, the Rev. Tim Keller and others. Evangelicals, of course, have been known to argue about who belongs on that list. In recent years, it has become increasingly obvious the experts are struggling to decide who is and who is not an evangelical in the first place. I know what the word evangelical is supposed to mean, said Warren, 58, leader of the 20,000member Saddleback Church in Lake Forest, Calif., with its many branches and ministries. I mean, I know what the word evangelical used to mean. The problem, he said, is many Americans no longer link evangelical with a set of traditional doctrines, such as evangelizing the lost, defending biblical authority, helping the needy and proclaiming salvation is found through faith in Jesus Christ alone. Somewhere during the George W. Bush See DEFINE / Page C5 Nancy Kennedy GRACE NOTES Terry Mattingly ON RELIGION R ELIGION Section C SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE 794604 Sundays ClassifiedsAdvertising local job opportunities. APPLY NOW! Despite the diagnosis, Blain said she felt great. But doctors told her without an immediate operation she would likely die in three weeks to one month. My husband and sons were devastated, she said. One of Blains sons, Jimmy, was an Army major stationed in Afghanistan when she first became ill. When he informed the Army of his mothers disease, the Army sent him back to Florida immediately to be by her side. Blain said she also knew the Lord was by her side, but she didnt want to talk to Him at first. When it all first happened I was mad, she said. I just didnt want to talk to God. Blain said she did talk to the angels, though, and felt someone was there supporting her all the time. When you have an angel, you wonder if you are making it up, she said. I think the angel was with me, talking to me. I wasnt talking to God. I was talking to an angel. It was a while before I could talk to God. On Aug. 2, 2011, a craniotomy was performed at Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, and within three days Blain A spiritual journey For the Chronicle Mariana Blain, of Inverness, received spiritual support and guidance while battling brain cancer. Local woman turns to faith for help in fight with deadly brain cancer C HARLES L AWRENCE Chronicle correspondentI n early July 2011, Inverness resident, grandmother and former school teacher Mariana Blain suddenly began having trouble reading simple words such as banana. Eventually, she made a doctors appointment and an MRI picked up her physicians worst fears. She was diagnosed with Stage 4 Glioblastoma Mulitforme brain cancer. See CANCER / Page C4 Religion NOTES Food & fellowship The Red Level Baptist Church Youth group will sponsor a chili cook-off at 5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, at Red Level Baptist Church, 11025 W. Dunnellon Road, Crystal River. Everyone is invited to come out and enjoy all you can eat for $5. Proceeds will go to send the youth on a mission trip this summer. Call 352-795-2086. Yankeetown Community Church will serve its annual Shrove Tuesday pancake supper from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Feb. 12 in the church fellowship hall behind the church on State Road 40 west of the traffic light on U.S. 19 in Inglis. The cost of $5 for adults and $3 for children younger than 10 includes all-you-caneat, made-from-scratch buttermilk pancakes with sausage or ham, apple juice, coffee and tea. Proceeds will benefit church-supported missionaries. Enjoy delicious food, fun and fellowship. Floral City United Methodist Church will host its first dinner of the new year from 3 to 6 p.m. today in Hilton Hall at 8478 E. Marvin St. across from the elementary school. Menu includes roast pork, candied sweet potatoes, fresh green beans, salad, assorted desserts and beverages for a donation of $7.50. Takeouts available. Call 352-344-1771. The public is invited to a baked steak dinner from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 8, at Parsons Memorial Presbyterian Church, 5850 Riverside Drive, Yankeetown. A $7 donation includes dinner, dessert and drink. There will be a $50 money tree raffle. Takeout available by calling 352-447-2506. Everyone is invited to Saturday night supper from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Feb. 9 in the Dewain Farris Fellowship Hall at Community Congregational Christian Church, 9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs. Menu includes meatloaf, vegetable, coleslaw, dessert, coffee and tea. Tickets are $10 for adults, $5 for children and can be purchased at the door. Takeouts available. Call the church at 352-489-1260. The nd annual Peace Potato Pancake Supper will take place from 4 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12, at Peace Lutheran Church, 7201 U.S. 41 S., north of State Road 40, five miles north of downtown Dunnellon. Tickets, available at the door, are $5 for adults, and $2.50 for children ages 5 through 12. There is no charge for children younger than age 5. Tickets are also available from members and at the Peace Lutheran booth at the Dunnellon First Saturday event Feb. 2. Menu includes traditional potato pancakes or buttermilk pancakes, ham, fruit cup, dessert and beverage. Call the church office at 352-4895881 or visit PeaceLutheran Online.com. Come enjoy a Shrove Tuesday pancake supper from 5 to 7 p.m. Feb. 12 at Holy Faith Episcopal Church, Blue Cove, Dunnellon. The mens club will serve pancakes, sausage, applesauce, dessert and a beverage. Tickets are $6 at the door. Call the church office at 352489-2685. New ministry Special to the Chronicle Father Stephen Dass, right, and his wife, Mary, are starting a new ministry for the Diocese of Central Florida. They explained the ministry recently at St. Annes Church. The Sao Paulo Mercy Ministry will minister in the red light district of Sao Paulo, Brazil, primarily to the homeless street children, but also to other homeless individuals, sex workers and drug addicts. Their goal is to help persons in their daily life and to testify to the love of God among those who find themselves in despair and hopelessness. See NOTES / Page C2

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Sales & such Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church in Beverly Hills will host its monthly outdoor flea market from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. today on the church property at 6 Roosevelt Boulevard in Beverly Hills off North Lecanto Highway (County Road 491). Shoppers are welcome. Up to 50 commercial and private vendors are expected to display their wares. Commercial vendors and private individuals are welcome to bring and sell goods. Spaces are available for $10. A mobile kitchen, Cooking Good, will serve breakfast and lunch items. Flea markets take place the fourth Saturday monthly except in June, July and August. Next months flea market is Feb. 23. For more information or to reserve a space, call Rose Mary at 352-527-6459 or e-mail wjeselso@ tampabay.rr.com. There will be a big yard sale and clothes giveaway from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, at Calvary Chapel in Inverness, 960 S. U.S. 41. A free mens breakfast will also be served at 9 that morning. Call 352726-1480. Everyone is invited to the annual tag sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, 439 E. Norvell Bryant Highway, Hernando. Thrivent Financial for Lutherans will provide supplemental funding for this event through the Citrus County Chapter and its members at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church. Many household items will be available. Floral City United Methodist Church will host its annual Used Treasure Sale from 8:30 a.m. to noon Saturday, Feb. 2. Proceeds from the sale are used to send youth to summer camp and various mission projects. The Beverly Hills Community Church Youth Group will host an indoor yard sale from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, in the fellowship hall at 82 Civic Circle. The Altar and Rosary Society of St. John the Baptist Catholic Church will host a Chinese auction from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, in Father Stegeman Hall at the corner of U.S. 41 and State Road 40 East in Dunnellon. Drawings for the items will begin at 1 p.m. An envelope of 20 tickets is $5 and can be purchased at the door. Also included is a free ticket for coffee and dessert. Food and drinks will be available at a nominal charge. Call Pat at 352-489-1984. The Episcopal Church Women of Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church will have their Trash to Treasure Sale from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, Feb. 8, in the parish hall. There will be lots of books. The church is on County Road 486 in Lecanto on the right-hand side just east of the County Road 491 traffic light. Call Francine at 352-794-0070. The women of the ELCA at St. Timothy Lutheran Church in Crystal River will host their Grannies Attic sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and Saturday Feb. 8 and 9. The sale will include the popular Mens Tent, homemade baked goodies, and the fellowship hall filled to the rafters with treasures. Hot dog lunches will be available for sale. Call Marcia Treber at 352-794-3217 or the church at 352-795-5317. The church is on U.S. 19, across from the airport. First Lutheran Church invites the public to its annual rummage sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Feb. 8 and 9. Bring your friends and neighbors. There will be treasures for everyone. The church is at 1900 W. State Road 44, Inverness. The Ladies of Faith will host the th Annual Trash N Treasure Sale from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Feb. 8 and 9, at Faith Lutheran Church in Crystal Glen Subdivision, Lecanto (off County Road 490 and State Road 44). Find all kinds of stuff for the kitchen, the home, the garden and garage, clothing, shoes, books and some jewelry and Christmas items. Also includes a bake sale. This year, for the first time, beautiful handmade quilts will be featured. Proceeds from this sale support local, state, national and international missions. This is a Thrivent event.Music & more The Diggles Family fulltime Southern Gospel recording artists, will perform at 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, at First Christian Church of Inverness at 2018 Colonade St. (behind the RaceTrac gas station on State Road 44). The Diggles Family is led by Doug Diggles, who sings lead, tenor, baritone, bass and plays the piano. Christina sings, plays the violin, viola, guitar, classical guitar, piano, mountain dulcimer and mandolin. She helps in arranging songs and picking out parts for Katie on her instruments. Katie adds the third part in their family harmony. She also plays the violin, mandolin, piano and mountain dulcimer, and is beginning to arrange musical pieces. Diane Diggles brings an extra beauty to many of the songs by interpreting them through sign language. She also runs the soundboard. Call the church at 352344-1908. All are welcome to attend this performance and a freewill offering will be collected. Sheila Raye Charles daughter of singer Ray Charles, will perform during a Community Worship Event, at 11 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 3, at Wildwood United Methodist Church, 300 Mason St., Wildwood. Singer/songwriter Sheila Raye Charles will be on hand to sign her book, Behind the Shades, after the service. Everyone is invited to attend. Call the church at 352748-1275 or Michael Beck at 352-203-7258. The Burchfield Brothers will perform Wednesday, Feb. 13, at Hernando Church of the Nazarene, 2101 N. Florida Ave., Hernando. These men are geniuses with instruments, including classical guitar, midi-marimba, Irish whistles and recorders. The concert will open at 6:45 p.m. with the Celebrations Sounds orchestra and choir of the Hernando Nazarene church. There is no cost to attend; a love offering will be collected. Everyone is invited. Hear Susie McEntire in concert at 6 p.m. Monday, Feb. 18, at First Baptist Church, 20831 Powell Road, Dunnellon. The event is sponsored by Cross at the River Cowboy Church. Cost is $15 per person, $25 per couple, $30 at the door. Call Pastor Ed Anthony at 352-445-5171 or Matthew at 352-489-0099. Visit www.susiemcentire.com.Fun & games The St. Scholastica Council of Catholic Women will sponsor a Bunco Bash Event at 11:30 a.m. today at the Fr. James Hoge Parish Center, 4301 W. Homosassa Trail, Lecanto. Entrance fee is $12. Free food and door prizes. All funds raised will go to such charities as Daystar Life Center, Family Life and Pregnancy Center, Hugs for the Homeless, migrant workers of Florida, and overseas missionaries. St. Margarets Episcopal Church will host a Military Card Party on Monday, Feb. 11. Lunch will be served at 12:15 p.m. followed by card play at 1 p.m. Enjoy fun, prizes and a raffle. Cost is $12 per player. Make up your table of four or come as a single and we will pair you. Call Dottie at 352-382-3656 or Marilyn at 352-746-6583 for reservations by Feb. 7. The church is at 114 N. Osceola Ave., Inverness. The Ladies Auxiliary Knights of Columbus Council 6168 will host a Valentine Bunco Bonanza at 10:30 C2 S ATURDAY, J ANUARY26, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE Special Event or Weekly Services Please Call Beverly at 564-2912 For Advertising Information H o m o s a s s a F i r s t U n i t e d M e t h o d i s t C h u r c h R e v e r e n d K i p Y o u n g e r P a s t o r 8831 W. Bradshaw St. Homosassa, FL 34448 352-628-4083 www.1umc.org Office Hours: 8:30 4:30 M-F Everyone Becoming A Disciple of Christ Sunday Worship 8:00 am & 9:30 am & 11:00 am Sunday School 9:30 am Open Hearts Open Minds Open Doors 000DJ8U 000DJH8 795-4479 St. Benedict Catholic Church U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd. MASSES Vigil: 5:00pm Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am DAILY MASSES Mon. Fri.: 8:00am HOLY DAYS As Announced CONFESSION Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm 000DJIO S E E K I N G ? S E E K I N G ? SEEKING? Here, youll find a caring family in Christ! 4801 N. Citrus Ave. (2 Mi. N Of US 19) 795-3148 www.crumc.com Rev. David Rawls, Pastor Sunday Worship 9:00 am Traditional Service 10:30 am Contemporary Service with Praise Team Bible Study A t 9:00 & 10:30 F or all ages. Wednesday 6:30 Nursery available at all services. Youth Fellowship Sunday 4:00 Wednesday 6:30 Bright Beginnings Preschool 6 Weeks-VPK Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm. 795-1240 A Stephen Ministry Provider C rystal R iver U nited M ethodist C hurch Saturday Informal Worship w/Communion 5:00 PM Sunday Early Service w/Communion 8:00 AM Sunday School All Ages 9:30 AM (Coffee Fellowship hour @ 9:00 AM) Sunday Traditional Service w/Communion 10:30 AM Special services are announced. Nursery provided. St. Timothy Lutheran Church ELCA 1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River For more information call 795-5325 www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor 000DJI2 SERVICES Sunday AM Bible Study 9:30 Worship 10:30 Sunday PM Worship 6:00 Wednesday PM Bible Study 7:00 EVANGELIST Bob Dickey 000DJIV 9592 W. Deep Woods Dr. Crystal River, FL 34465 352-564-8565 www.westcitruscoc.com Church of Christ West Citrus CR 495/Citrus Ave. US Hwy. 19 W. Deep Woods Dr. West Citrus Church of Christ First Baptist Church of Homosassa Come Worship with Us 10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa 628-3858 Rev. J. Alan Ritter Troy Allen, Director of Student Ministries Sunday 9:00 am Sunday School (All Age Groups) 10:30 am Worship Celebration Choir / Special Music / Kidz Worship Sunday Night 6 pm Worship Celebration Wednesday Night 6:30 pm Worship Celebration Childrens Awanas Group Youth Activities www.fbchomosassa.org 000DJ71 000DJH3 S T A NNE S C HURCH A Parish in the Anglican Communion Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m. 10:15 a.m. Morning Prayer & Daily Masses 4th Sunday 6:00p.m. Gospel Sing A long 9870 West Fort Island Trail Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn 352-795-2176 www.stannescr.org To be one in Christ in our service, as His servants, by proclaiming His love. Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple ST. THOMAS CATHOLIC CHURCH Serving Southwest Citrus County MASSES: Saturday . . 4:30 P M Sunday . . . 8:00 A M . . . . . . . . . 10:30 A M 000DJI1 U.S. 19 1 4 mile South of West Cardinal St., Homosassa 628-7000 1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave. 795-6720 A FULL GOSPEL FELLOWSHIP Sunday 10:30 A M Wednesday Christian Ed 7:00 P M Prayer Sat. 4-6pm Pastor John Hager Crystal River Foursquare Gospel Church 000DJ95 The Church in the Heart of the Community with a Heart for the Community MOUNT OLIVE MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 000DJE8 2105 N. Georgia Rd., PO Box 327 Crystal River, FL 34423 Church Phone (352)563-1577 SUNDAY SERVICES Sunday School 9:30 A M Morning Service 11:00 A M Wed. Prayer Mtg. & Bible Study~ 6:30 P M Nursery Provided 2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd. (12th Ave.) C r y s t a l R i v e r C h u r c h o f G o d Church Phone 795-3079 000DIXH Sunday Morning Adult & Childrens Worship 8:30 & 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:45 AM Evening Service 6:00 PM Wednesday Life Application Service Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM THE SALVATION ARMY CITRUS COUNTY CORPS. SUNDAY Sunday School 9:45 A.M. Morning Worship Hour 11:00 A.M. TUESDAY: Home League 11:30 A.M. Lt. Vanessa Miller 712 S. School Ave. Lecanto 513-4960 0 0 0 D J G W Crystal River CHURCH OF CHRIST A Friendly Church With A Bible Message. Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East Sunday Services 10:00 A M 11:00 A M 6:00 P M Wednesday 7:00 P M Come Worship With Us! Bible Questions Please Call Ev. George Hickman 795-8883 746-1239 000DIWM Places of worship that offer love, peace and harmony to all. Come on over to His house, your spirits will be lifted !!! SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA 000DJMK MLK Day parade Special to the Chronicle Unitarian Universalists marched in the parade recently on Martin Luther King Jr. Day. From left are: Meredith Paine of Crystal River, Sandy Sondheim of Beverly Hills and Linda Myers of Pine Ridge. See NOTES / Page C4 NOTES Continued from Page C1 13158 Antelope St. Spring Hill, FL 34609 352-686-7034 Rabbi Lenny Sarko Services Fridays 8PM Saturdays 10AM Religious School Sundays 9AM-Noon Temple Beth David 000DJI8

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Obama, Biden attend Cathedral serviceWASHINGTON Christian, Muslim, Jewish and Sikh clergy prayed for President Barack Obamas second term in an inaugural service at Washington National Cathedral. Obama and Vice President Joe Biden sat in the front pew Tuesday as prayers were said in English, Spanish, Arabic and Hebrew. Kathryn Lohre, president of the National Council of Churches, asked God to grant them wisdom to discern your will and to consider your word among the counsel they receive. The Rev. Adam Hamilton, senior pastor of the United Methodist Church of the Resurrection in Leawood, Kan., praised Obamas rhetorical skills saying, You should have been a preacher and urged the president to bring a divided nation together. Earlier this month, the cathedral said it would begin hosting samesex weddings. Ex-pastor convicted of killing second wife STROUDSBURG, Pa. A former Pennsylvania pastor has been convicted in the 2008 death of his second wife, but still awaits trial in the 1999 death of his first wife. Arthur Schirmer blamed the second death on a slow-speed car crash and said his first wife fell down the stairs, but authorities ultimately charged him with bludgeoning both women. The verdict Tuesday comes after Schirmer testified Friday in Monroe County Court. He told jurors that he was driving his second wife, Betty, to the hospital for jaw pain when a deer crossed their path, causing them to crash. The former United Methodist pastor was convicted of first-degree murder and evidence tampering. He pleaded not guilty and maintained his innocence. His attorney pledged to appeal. Schirmer is charged separately in the 1999 death of his first wife, Jewel, and awaits trial in Lebanon County, Pa.Man in mosque arson case withdraws plea TOLEDO, Ohio A former Marine who said he set fire to an Ohio mosque because he wanted to avenge the killings of American troops has asked to withdraw his guilty plea to federal hate crime charges. Randy Linn says he was under duress and depressed when he entered his plea last month in the fire at a suburban Toledo mosque. A deal between prosecutors and Linn had called for him to be sentenced to 20 years next April after he pleaded guilty to intentionally damaging and destroying religious property and two gun-related charges. Prosecutors say he broke into The Islamic Center of Greater Toledo last fall and went room by room to make sure no one was in the building before he poured gasoline on a prayer rug and lit it on fire. Linn described on Dec. 19 how he had been drinking heavily before he drove to the mosque in Perrysburg. DA will review L.A. church files for crimesLOS ANGELES Prosecutors who have been stymied for years in their attempts to build a criminal conspiracy case against retired Los Angeles Archdiocese Cardinal Roger Mahony and other church leaders say theyll review newly released priest files for additional evidence. Thousands of pages from the internal disciplinary files of 14 priests made public Monday show Mahony and other top aides maneuvered behind the scenes to shield molester priests and provide damage control for the church. Some of the documents provide the strongest evidence to date that Mahony and another key official worked to protect a priest who revealed in therapy sessions that he had raped an 11-year-old boy and abused up to 17 boys. Egypt Muslim cleric cancels Saudi visit CAIRO Cairo airport officials say Egypts top Muslim cleric cancelled a visit to Saudi Arabia at the invitation of its monarch when he discovered that senior delegates traveling with him were assigned economy class seats by their Saudi hosts. The officials said Sheik Ahmed alTayeb, the Grand Imam of Al-Azhar Sunni Islams highest seat of learning angrily disembarked from a Saudi-bound airliner shortly before takeoff on Wednesday and instructed his delegation to follow suit. Al-Tayeb was assigned a first class seat. The Egyptians were due to perform the minor pilgrimage to Mecca, or umrah, before flying to the Saudi capital Riyadh to attend Mondays award ceremony for the King Faisal International Prize for scientific and religious achievement. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because of the matters sensitivity.Bob Jones asks for outside abuse probeCOLUMBIA, S.C. Bob Jones University is asking an outside Christian organization that deals with child abuse to investigate how the fundamentalist college responds to abuse allegations. Trustees at the Greenville Christian university agreed earlier this month to the investigation, which will include recommendations on how to better deal with any future abuse allegations. The investigation will include Bob Jones Academy, which teaches students from preschool to 12th grade. School officials say the investigation was prompted by heart-breaking revelations of sexual abuse in secular and Christian organizations. The investigation will review how it responds to students who say they were abused before coming to the school or outside its campus as well. R ELIGION C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S ATURDAY, J ANUARY26, 2013 C3 Come, Fellowship & Grow With Us In Jesus 5863 W. Cardinal St. Homosassa Springs, FL 34446 Telephone: (352) 628-7950 Pastor Dale Wolfe Tuesday Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm Sabbath-Saturday Services Sabbath School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am www.homosassaadventist.com 000DJHR Homosassa Springs H ERNANDO S EVENTH DAY A DVENTIST C HURCH 1880 N. Trucks Ave. Hernando, FL 34442 (352) 344-2008 Sabbath Saturday Services Sabbath School 9:30 am Worship 11:00 am Wednesday Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm Pastor Dale Wolfe www.hernandoadventist.com 000DJCO Come, Fellowship & Grow With Us In Jesus The New Church Without Walls An Exciting & Growing Multi-Cultural Non-Denominational Congregation Ministering to the Heart of Citrus County Senior Pastors & Founders Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr. & Lady T Alexander Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Service 11:00 am Wednesday Bible Study 7pm 3962 N. Roscoe Rd. Hernando, FL Ph: 352-344-2425 www.newchurchwithoutwalls.com Email:cwow@embarqmail.com The perfect church for people who arent 000DQIC 000DJ8Y COME Worship With The Church of Christ Floral City, Florida Located at Marvin & Church streets. Established in 33 A.D. in Jerusalem by Jesus Christ. A warm welcome always awaits you where we teach the true New Testament Christian Faith. Sunday Bible Study 9:30 a.m. Steve Heneghan, Minister CHURCH OF CHRIST Floral City, FL. Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m. Wed./Eve. Bible Study 6:00 p.m. 000DJD7 HERNANDO Sunday School 8:45 AM 9:30 AM Fellowship 9:30 AM Worship Service 10:00 AM Individual Hearing Devices Ministries and Activities for all Ages. 2125 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486) (1 1 2 miles from Hwy. 41) For information call (352) 726-7245 www.hernandoumcfl.org Reverend Jerome Jerry Carris United Methodist Church A Safe Sanctuary for Children and Families Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors www.gracebiblehomosassa.org email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS, Infant & Toddler Nursery 000DJCL 1 1 2 mi. east of U.S. 19 6382 W. Green Acres St. P.O. Box 1067 Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067 Pastor: Rev. Ray Herriman (352) 628-5631 Sunday 9:30 AM . . . . . . . . . . Discovery Time 11:00 AM . . . . . . . . . Praise & Worship 6:00 PM . . . . . . . . . . Evening Service Monday 6:15 PM . . . . . . . . . . Teens Tuesday 6:15 PM........Awana (Sept. Apr.) Wednesday 7:00 PM . . . . . . . . . . Bible Study & Prayer Meeting Catholic Church St. Scholastica St. Scholastica 4301 W. Homosassa Trail Lecanto, Florida www.stscholastica.org Sunday Masses 9:00 am 11:30 am Saturday Vigil 4:00 pm 6:00 pm Weekday Masses 8:30 am Confessions Saturday 2:45 -3:30 pm (352) 746-9422 000DJHX 2101 N. Florida Ave. Hernando FL 726-6144 Nursery Provided CHILDREN YOUTH SENIORS Sunday School 9:45 A.M. Praise & Worship 10:40 A.M. Praise Service 6:00 P M Praise & Prayer (Wed.) 7:00 P M Randy T. Hodges, Pastor 000DIW5 www.hernandonazarene.org 935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto Crystal Glen Subdivision Hwy. 44 just E. of 490 527-3325 (L.C .M.S.) COME WORSHIP WITH US Sunday Service 9:30 A.M. Sunday Bible Study & Childrens Sunday School 11 A.M. Saturday Service 6:00 P.M. Weekly Communion Fellowship after Sunday Worship Calendar of events Audio of sermons available at www.faithlecanto.com 000DIY5 Rev. Stephen Lane 00070P2 Faith Lutheran Church A Heart From God... A Heart For Others. First Baptist Church 8545 Magnolia 726-4296 Sunday Schedule 8:30 AM Blended Worship Service 9:45 AM Sunday School 11:00 AM Traditional Worship 6:00 PM Worship Wednesday 6:30 PM Music, Youth, Fellowship A warm, friendly Church Nursery Available www.fbcfloralcity.org 000DJ6D of Floral City Rev. John Rothra 000DJID Floral City United Methodist Church 8478 East Marv in St. (across from Floral City School) Sunday School 9:05 A M Sunday Worship Service 10:30 A M Sanctuary 8:00 A M Service in the 1884 Church Bible Study Tuesday 10:00 A M Wednesday 6:00 P M Wheel Chair Access Nursery Available Rev. Mary Gestrich Church 344-1771 WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com We strive to make newcomers feel at home. Shepherd of the Hills E PISCOPAL C HURCH Bishop Jim Adams, Rector 527-0052 Our mission is to be a beacon of faith known for engaging all persons in the love and truth of Jesus Christ. 2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (CR 486) Lecanto, Florida (4/10 mile east of CR 491) www.SOTHEC.org Services: Saturday 5:00 pm Sunday 8:00 & 10:30 am Sunday School Adult 9:15 Child 10:00 Nursery 10:30 am Healing Service Wednesday 10:00 am 000DJGZ 3790 E. Parsons Point Rd. Hernando, FL 34442 352-726-6734 Visit us on the Web at www.fbchernando.com 000DJ6X Reaching and restoring lives through Jesus Christ Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Sunday Service 10:45 a.m.. Wednesday Prayer Meeting/Bible Study 6:30 p.m. Rev. Keith Dendy First Baptist Church Of Hernando First Baptist Church Of Hernando 000DJ98 Sundays 10:00am New Location 1196 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto Rev. Brian Baggs Pastor (352) 527-4253 www.genesiscommunitychurch.org Authentic Love Relevant Faith Embracing Community Places of worship that offer love, peace and harmony to all. Come on over to His house, your spirits will be lifted !!! SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS 000DJMR Religion BRIEFS From wire reports 000DJC6 Reverend Kenneth C. Blyth Pastor 439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. Hernando, Florida Building is Barrier-Free gshernando.org Worship 8:30 am 11:00 am Fellowship After Worship Weekly Communion Sunday School 9:45 am Nursery Provided

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a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12, at the K of C Hall, 2389 W. Norvell Bryant Highway (County Road 486), Lecanto. Two levels of play will be featured, a competitive level for seasoned players and a social level for beginners and persons with disabilities. The $12 ticket includes a brunch. Door prizes, raffle prizes and cash prizes will be awarded. Reservations must be made in advance by calling Char at 352-746-9490 or Bernita at 352-344-0235. Funds raised will benefit the Auxiliary Scholarship Fund and charitable organizations in the community. Upward Youth Soccer registration for boys and girls in kindergarten through sixth grade will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday, Feb. 13-16 at Joy Evangelical Lutheran Church, 7045 S.W. 83rd Place at State Road 200, Ocala. Registration fee of $65 per child includes a reversible jersey, water bottle, socks, car magnet and an end-of-season reward. Scholarships are available. All players must attend one soccer evaluation that promotes equal and competitive teams, as well as a substitution system, to complete the registration process. Practice begins Tuesday, Feb. 26 and Thursday, Feb. 28. The first game is Saturday, March 9. All events will occur at Hope Field at Joy Lutheran Church. Volunteers are needed to help with coaching, registering the participants and organizing the players. Call Pastor Ed Holloway at 352-854-4509, ext. 223, or Fran Johnson at 352854-4509, ext. 221. Live & learn A new Coffee Talk for College and Young Adults begins at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 4, at Genesis Community Church, which meets at the Builders Association, 1196 S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491). Join other young adults for an informal discussion of the book Blue Like Jazz by Donald Miller. Blue Like Jazz portrays Donald Millers quest for meaning, a depth of faith, the realization that humanity is broken and imperfect, explorations of childhood misconceptions of faith, and the desire to live into his true identity. So, grab a cup of coffee and a dessert and share your thoughts about this intriguing book chapter by chapter. You can purchase your own book online through Amazon, Barnes and Noble, etc., and we will have a few books available for loan. Genesis Community Church meets at 10 a.m. Sundays and is led by the Rev. Brian Baggs. Call (352) 464-0983 for more information or email Kathy Baggs at kathybaggs@hotmail.com. Two self-improvement and spiritual development opportunities (IS/ARE) offered Sunday, Feb. 10, and Monday, Feb. 11, at Unity of Citrus County, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. The first, from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Feb. 10, is a lecture by award-winning actor and acclaimed author John Maxwell Taylor, titled The Power of I Am. This lecture describes techniques to give strength and confidence to your personality, permitting you to reflect the beauty and strength of your soul. The techniques presented will enable you to connect easily with others and to hold your own with everyone you meet. The second, from 7 to 9 p.m. Feb. 11, is a workshop led by John Maxwell Taylor and his wife, Emily Taylor, titled Healing with the Tao. This workshop will teach simple, timetested Taoist techniques to heal your internal organs, boost your immune system, and fill yourself with vibrant life energy and happiness. Call 352-746-1270 for more information. A love offering of $20 is suggested. The ladies of Lecanto Church of Christ meet for Bible study at 10 a.m. the second Tuesday monthly. Bible study is followed by a luncheon. Studies have included such subjects as prayer, love and patience. All ladies are invited to attend and enjoy Christian fellowship. Special events Citrus County does not have a League of Women Voters and has not had a chapter for many years. The league is a nonpartisan organization encouraging information and participation in government. It was founded 92 years ago and has been open to men for 40 years. The league is a grassroots organizations with chapters in all states. The LWV is strictly nonpartisan; it does not support nor oppose candidates. It takes a stand on issues after coming to a consensus and works to increase the publics understanding of policy issues, through education. The Nature Coast Unitarian Universalists have invited Allie Gore, of the Marion County League of Women Voters, to tell us how we might join up with it, or form a local branch. Gore is a longtime educator. She was crucial in reactivating the Marion County League and will help us, if Citrus County wishes to do the same. Gore will show a short video of the history of the struggle for equal suffrage. This will be followed by a PowerPoint presentation and discussion of the LWV today. The event is open to the public at 2 p.m. today at the Unitarian Universalists Fellowship, 7633 N. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41), Citrus Springs. Call 352-465-4225 or visit naturecoastuu.org. Citrus County Clergy Association will conduct its Quarterly Celebration at St. Margarets Episcopal Church at 6 p.m. tomorrow. Everyone is invited. All widows in the community are invited to join the Widows Ministry Group from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays at Cornerstone Baptist Church, 1100 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness. God isnt finished with us yet! Call Darla at 352-270-8115. First Christian Church of Homosassa Springs Faith Promise Mission Rally begins at 7 p.m. Friday. The public is invited to attend all activities. Bob Devoe from Lifeline Christian Mission is the main speaker. Individuals can sample international food fare while visiting mission booths supported by the church. Saturday Mens Missionary breakfast at 8 a.m. is followed by the ladies salad luncheon at noon. Mark and Deborah Clark from Lake Aurora Christian Camp will lead the Sunday school service at 9:30 a.m. The Sunday worship service is at 10:30 a.m. The church is at 7030 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd. Dan Wagner is the minister. Call the church office at 352-628-5556. Children and youth in the area are invited to a Weekend Bible Adventure at 9 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, at First United Methodist Church, Homosassa. The day will include team-building games, Bible songs, crafts, stories and skits. Lunch will be provided, as well as a T-shirt and other take-home surprises. Following the fun for the children from age 5 to 11, the youth, parents, grandparents and friends are invited to join us at 4 p.m. for a concert by Light Central, a praise band of college students from Orlando. Call the church for more information at 352-628-4083. Men and older boys are invited to the Jack Murph the Surf Mens and Boys Event at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, at North Oak Baptist Church, 9324 N. Elkcam Blvd., Citrus Springs. A complimentary lunch will be served following the presentation. Jack Roland Murphy, aka Murph the Surf, author, artist, sportsman, musician and Christian was home from the hospital and said she felt good throughout and happy. I was not depressed. People said I looked good, she says. But in October 2011, Blains blood counts became critically low, and she had to have a bone marrow biopsy. She said when her son Jimmy came to visit her, she started feeling better and her blood counts returned to normal. She drew strength from other sources as well. When word got out that Blain was ill, she received a flood of cards and letters from well-wishers. Someone started a page for her on www.caringbridge.com, which now has over 700 entries from friends and family. Blain said in total she has received more than 500 cards and a variety of gifts, including Jewish Stars and prayer beads and a quilt from the Catholics and from the ladies at church. A member of Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church in Lecanto, Blain said her pastor, Bishop Jim Adams, has come to visit often during her illness. The church has been wonderful. I praise the Lord and thank Him all the time. I am blessed that I am still here. Ive passed the survival rate for people with this disease already. I know the Lord is with me, she said. When her elderly mother became very ill, Blain said her mother wondered why she was hanging on so long. Its because I need you here, mom, Blain responded. Her mother passed away shortly after the operation. When asked what she thinks heaven might be like, Blain said through tears: I think God will look beautiful, with a big face. I think I will be working, she added. I think youre going to be doing something with your life in heaven. For now, Blain believes there is a reason she is still here on Earth. Ive had angels hovering over me my whole life, she said. Someone has been with me this whole time. Something is keeping me here now. In April 2012, Blains tumor returned and she is trying new treatment to beat the disease which has now crossed her mid-brain. C4 S ATURDAY, J ANUARY26, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE R ELIGION First Presbyterian Stephen Ministry Congregation 000DJDT Hwy. 44 E @ Washington Ave., Inverness Sunday Services Traditional 8:00 AM & 11:00 AM Casual Service 9:30 AM 11:00 AM Service Tapes & CDs Available Sunday School for all ages 9:30 AM Nursery Provided Fellowship & Youth Group 5 to 7 PM Web Site: www.fpcinv.org Podcast: FPC inv.com Church Office 637-0770 Pastor Craig Davies 000DJ75 Pastor Tom Walker I NVERNESS First C HURCH OF G OD 5510 E. Jasmine Ln. Non-denominational Sunday: 10:30 AM & 6:00 PM Wed: 6:00 Bible Study Do you enjoy Bible Study, Gospel Singing, Pitch-in Dinners, singing the old hymns? Then youll enjoy this Church family. Home of the Saturday Nite GOSPEL JUBILEE A great Nite Out! Last Saturday of the month 6:00 Fun, Food, Fellowship & Free! Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills 746-2144 (1 Block East of S.R. 491) Holy Days To Be Announced VIGIL MASSES: 4:00 P M & 6:00 P M ************ SUNDAY MASSES: 8:00 A M & 10:30 A M ************* SPANISH MASS: 12:30 P M ************* CONFESSIONS: 2:30 P M to 3:15 P M Sat. or By Appointment ************* WEEKDAY MASSES: 8:00 A M www.ourladyofgracefl .catholicweb.com 000DJFB Dr. Jeff Timm 9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd. 352-489-1260 S UNDAY 10:00 AM Faith. Freedom. Fellowship. C O M M U N I T Y C O N G R E G A T I O N A L C H R I S T I A N C H U R C H Warmly Welcomes You To Worship www.citrusspringscongregational.org 000DIW9 000DSZI Riding a Hard Trail Join us at Greater Dunnellon Historical Train Depot 12061 S. Williams St. (Hwy 41) Dunnellon, FL 34432 Sunday Church Service: 10:00am to 11:00am Ladies Bible Study 2nd & 4th Wednesdays 7:00pm Contact Pastor E. Patrick Anthony 352-465-6223 or cell 352-445-5171 crossattheriver1@gmail.com website: www.crossattheriver.org Hope Evangelical Lutheran Church ELCA Pastor Lynn Fonfara 9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd. Citrus Springs Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 8:30 a.m. Communion Every Sunday Information: 489-5511 Go To Our Web Page hopelutheranelca.com 000DJD9 Pastor Terry Roberts Ph: 726-0201 Independent Fundamental Cross road Bap tist Chu rch 000DIWC Youre invited to our Services S u n d a y S c h o o l 1 0 : 0 0 A M S u n d a y 1 0 : 4 5 A M & 6 : 0 0 P M W e d n e s d a y 7 : 0 0 P M 5335 E. J asmine Lane, Inverness 1 2 Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41 North (Formally Calvary Bible Church Location) Dr. Ray Kelley Minister Sunday: 9:00 A M Sunday School 10:15 A M Worship Service Wednesday: 6:00 P M Bible Study First For Christ...John 1:41 F IRST C HRISTIAN C HURCH O F I NVERNESS 000dje1 We welcome you and invite you to worship with our family. 2018 Colonade St., Inverness 344-1908 www.fccinv.com 000DJIS A place to belong. A place to become. Victory Baptist Church At Sunday School 9:45 AM Worship 10:45 AM Sunday Evening 6:00 PM Wednesday 7:00 PM Choir Practice 8:00 PM Highway 41 North, turn at Sportsman Pt. Quality Child Care Pastor Gary Beehler 352-465-8866 5040 N Shady Acres Dr. 726-9719 General Conference 1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451 Telfono: (352) 341-1711 ORDEN DE SERVICIOS: DOMINGOS: 9:30 AM Escuela Biblica Dominical 10:30 AM Adoracin y Prdica MARTES: 7:00 PM Culto de Oraci n JUEVES: 7:00 PM Estudios Bblicos Les Esperamos! PRIMERA IGLESIA HISPANA DE CITRUS COUNTY Inverness, Florida Asambleas de Dios David Pinero, Pastor ~ 000DJ7I Sunday Services: Traditional Service . . . . . 8:30 AM Sunday School . . . . . . . . 9:30 AM Contemporary Service . 10:30 AM Wednesday Night: Adult Classes . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 PM Boys and Girls Brigade . . 7:00 PM Teens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 PM Rev. Larry Powers Senior Pastor I NVERNESS C HURCH OF G OD Welcome Home Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South in Inverness Just Past Burger King Church Office 726-4524 Also on Site Little Friends Daycare and Learning Center 000DJDV 000DIYN Holy Communion Every Sunday at 7:45am & 10:00am The Rev. Thomas Beaverson F IRST L UTHERAN C HURCH 46 Years of Bringing Christ to Inverness Sunday School & Bible Class 8:45 A M 726-1637 Missouri Synod www.1stlutheran.net 1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness 000DJDD Places of worship that offer love, peace and harmony to all. Come on over to His house, your spirits will be lifted !!! SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS 000DJMO 000DUUE First Baptist Church of Lake Rousseau SBC Joseph W. (Joe) Schroeder, Pastor SERVICES Sunday 11:00am & 6:00pm Wednesday 6:00pm Magnifying Gods name by bringing people to Jesus 7854 W. Dunnellon Rd (CR 488) Ph. 352-795-5651 Cell 352-812-8584 Email: pastorjoe10@gmail.com Check us out on Facebook CANCER Continued from Page C1 NOTES Continued from Page C2 See NOTES / Page C5

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years the word evangelical a church-history term got co-opted into being a political term, said Warren, in a recent telephone interview. Debates about this vague word are not new. During a 1987 interview with the Rev. Billy Graham, I asked him point blank, What does the word evangelical mean? The worlds most famous evangelist responded, Actually, thats a question Id like to ask somebody, too. ... You go all the way from the extreme fundamentalists to the extreme liberals and, somewhere in between, there are the evangelicals. Ultimately, Graham said evangelicals preach salvation through faith in Jesus and believe all the doctrines in the Nicene Creed especially in the resurrection. Warren said he would certainly agree with Grahams bottom line, which is evangelical must be defined in doctrinal terms. The problem is this isnt how the term is being used in public life, especially by the news media. During the George W. Bush administration, he said, most journalists seemed to think that evangelical meant that you backed the Iraq war, for some reason or another. ... But right now, I dont think there is any question that most people think that evangelicals are people who oppose gay rights period. Unfortunately, thats all the word means. Warren based this judgment, in part, on his experiences during 22 recent interviews with major newspapers, magazines and television networks a blitz marking the release of an expanded, 10th anniversary edition of his book The Purpose Driven Life: What On Earth Am I Here For? The book has sold more than 32 million copies around the world, with translations in 50 languages. By the end of that media storm, Warren said members of his team were starting to place bets before each interview on whether the perfunctory gay-marriage question would be the first, or the second, question asked. On CNN, interviewer Piers Morgan noted the U.S. Constitution and the Bible are wellintentioned but inherently flawed. Morgan continued: My point to you about gay rights for example its time for an amendment to the Bible. Warren, of course, disagreed: I do not believe the Bible is flawed, and I willingly admit ... that I base my worldview on the Bible, which I believe is true, and truth. ... It was true 1,000 years ago, itll be true 1,000 years from today. Time after time, said Warren, interviewers assumed his beliefs on moral and cultural issues from salvation to sexual ethics were based on mere politics, rather than on convictions about the Bible and centuries of doctrine. Ive decided that when people dont have faith, politics is their religion, he said. Politics is the only thing that is really real to many people in our world today. ... So if politics isnt at the center of your life, then many people just cant understand what youre saying. In the end, Warren said, it may be time for various brands of conservative Protestants Baptists, charismatics, Wesleyans, Pentecostals, Calvinists and others to stop trying to crowd under a common evangelical umbrella. They need to start talking more about the specific traditions that shape their lives. Maybe evangelical will be like the word liberal, he said. When that word turned into a negative, everybody on the left just turned into progressives and they moved right on. ... Maybe its time to give the word evangelical a rest. Terry Mattingly is the director of the Washington Journalism Center at the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities and leads the GetReligion.org project to study religion and the news. they were there first. When I lived in Portland, Maine, for a few years, I went to First Baptist Church in Portland. A sign out front read: First Baptist Church Jesus Never Fails. My friend Terry, who grew up in Portland, said she used to walk by the church on her way to school and always thought the sign meant it was the first Baptist church Jesus never failed as if he had failed all the other Baptist churches. Two churches in Texas are named Divide Baptist Church and Petty United Methodist Church. Theres also a Boring United Methodist Church and a Half Way Baptist Church. Canada may have the longest-named church: St. Francis National Evangelical Spiritual Baptist Faith Archdiocese of Canada, or St. Francis N.E.S.B.F. Archdiocese of Canada for short. I dont know about you, but Id be embarrassed to invite someone to come with me to Hot Rod Church for Sinners or Scum of the Earth Church, although theres no doubt what they believe about the state of humanity. What if you invited someone to go to Sandals or Matthews Party or even The Salvage Yard what would they think? On the flipside theres actually a church called Flipside, turning the world upside down for Jesus. The trend for new churches today is oneor two-word ambiguous names such as Resonate, Revolution, Radiance, Redeemer, Mosaic, Encompass, Journey, Legacy, Celebration, Elevation, Mars Hill, Urban Refuge, The Well, The Pursuit, The Orchard, The Brook. When I hear names like these, I picture loud guitars and a very young, very hip pastor wearing skinny jeans and salmon-colored sneakers, sitting on a high stool, sipping coffee as he preaches. I also picture lots of young people bringing their kids to church, and I like that. Maybe its the names that draw them; I dont know. This past weekend my husband and I went out for a drive and as we took some back roads we passed a church called Faithful Few Ministries. Thats what got me thinking about church names. I was (and still am) curious about how they came to call themselves Faithful Few. The church looked old, which doesnt mean anything. Old on the outside doesnt necessarily mean stale on the inside. Neither does new and trendy on the outside mean the members dont cling to lifeless theology. You cant judge a book by its cover and you cant judge a church by its building, but sometimes you can get an idea of a churchs identity or personality by its name. If thats true, then the people who chose that name see themselves as Faithful Few, which, in my opinion, reeks of arrogance and self-righteousness (and yes, Im fully aware my pointing that out reeks of arrogance and selfrighteousness even more). It sounds biblical and humble, but calling yourself Faithful Few is mostly prideful and presumptuous. It says, We are the faithful few and youre probably not. God is the faithful one. When it comes to church names, maybe the best one is this: The Gathering Place For Sinners Who Know They Cant Get Any Better By Their Own Efforts So They Run To Jesus For Mercy and To Be Covered With His Righteousness By Grace Alone Through Faith Alone. Or maybe just #grace. Nancy Kennedy is the author of Move Over, Victoria I Know the Real Secret, Girl on a Swing, and her latest book, Lipstick Grace. She can be reached at 352-564-2927, Monday through Thursday, or via email at nkennedy@ chronicleonline.com. R ELIGION C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S ATURDAY, J ANUARY26, 2013 C5 000DJE6 3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd. Inverness, FL 34452 (2 mi. so. of Applebees) Come as you are. (352) 726-2522 TONY ROSENBERGER Senior Pastor of Inverness SUNDAY 8:30 AM Traditional Worship with Holy Communion 9:45 AM Sunday School 10:00 AM Contemporary Praise & Worship P a s t o r D a i r o l d & B e t t y e R u s h i n g 4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd. (Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452 OFFICE: (352) 726-1107 Where everyone is special! Jesus Christ-central theme of our worship Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m & 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Worship 7:00 p.m. Ministries for all ages Nursery Available 000DIYG First Assembly of God at Plantation on Crystal River 9301 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River 352-795-4211 www.plantationoncrystalriver.com 000DP3V Weekly Specials Monday-Thursday Early Bird 4pm-6pm . . . . . . . . $13.95 Thursday Rib Eye . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19.95 Martini Night 4pm-10pm Specialty Martinis . . . . . . . . . . . $5.00 Friday 1 1 2 lb. Live Maine Lobster . . $19.95 Sunday Award Winning Sunday Brunch 11:30am-2:00pm . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15.95 Call for reservations or more information. 000DIVY All are invited to our Healing Services 352-726-4033 First Church of Christ, Scientist Inverness 224 N. Osceola Ave. Sunday Services 10:30 AM Sunday School 10:30 AM Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM Our Lady of Fatima C ATHOLIC C HURCH 726-1670 550 U.S. Hwy. 41 South, Inverness, Florida 000DJEX Weekday Mass: 8 A.M. Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M. Saturday Confessions: 2:30 3:30 P.M. Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule 7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M. Sunday Masses: Summer Schedule (June August) 9:00 and 11:00 A.M. SUNDAY Family Worship 9:00 AM Coffee Fellowship following the Service 0 0 0 D J E J N ORTH R IDGE CHURCH We are a nondenominational church meeting at the Inverness Womans Club 1715 Forest Drive, Inverness (across from Whispering Pines Park entrance) Pastor Kennie Berger 352-302-5813 WEDNESDAY Bible Study & Prayer 7:00 PM C o m e T o S T M A R G A R E T S E P I S C O P A L C H U R C H I n H i s t o r i c D o w n t o w n I n v e r n e s s 1 Block N.W. Of City Hall 114 N. Osceola Ave. Inverness, FL 34450 726-3153 S e r v i c e s : S u n W o r s h i p 8 & 1 0 : 3 0 A M W e d n e s d a y 1 2 : 3 0 P M M o r n i n g P r a y e r 9 : 0 0 A M M o n F r i Fr. Gene Reuman, Pastor w h e r e e v e r y o n e i s s t i l l w e l c o m e 000DJHC www.stmaggie.org 000DQSD This talk is sponsored by First Church of Christ, Scientist For more information please call: 352-726-4033 Practitioner and teacher of Christian Science Healing, Mark Swinney, has devoted more than twenty five years both to praying with people and empowering people to pray effectively for themselves. He has traveled much of the world speaking about his heartfelt love for God and Christian healing, and is known for his honesty, humor, and candid style. Swinney is a member of the Christian Science Board of Lectureship and travels from his home in Sandia Park, New Mexico, USA. Eternal Life: Could it be that God didnt intend you to age? Sunday, January 27, 2013 at 2 PM First Church of Christ, Scientist 224 North Osceola Avenue Inverness, Florida Discover: How claiming ones identity as Gods offspring brings countless freedoms. Spirituality & Eternal Life Explore the Connection, Experience the Freedom Redemption Christian Church SUNDAY Bible School . . . . . . 9:00 Worship . . . . . . . . . 10:15 WEDNESDAY Bible School . . . . . . 6:30 Currently meeting at East Citrus Community Center 9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway (At The Flashing Light) Pastor Todd Langdon For more information call 352-422-6535 000DJGV 000DIW3 000DJM8 SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS Places of worship that offer love, peace and harmony to all. Come on over to His house, your spirits will be lifted !!! GRACE Continued from Page C1 DEFINE Continued from Page C1 motivational speaker, gained notoriety in 1964 for the jewel robbery of the century when he and a partner stole the J.P. Morgan Gem collection and the Star of India, largest star sapphire in the world, from the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. For 22 years, Jack was a speaker, trainer and the International Director for Bill Glass Champions for Life Prison Ministry and School of Evangelism, based in Dallas, Texas. Jack and his wife Kitten live in Crystal River. Their ministry, Sonshine Adventures, works with the church to train and develop prison, jail and youth ministries. Call the church at 352-489-1688. A fashion show will take place from 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, in the Dewain Farris Fellowship Hall at Community Congregational Christian Church, 9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs. The event will feature fashions by Bealls, hair and makeup by New Concepts, and delightful desserts. Cost is $7. Call the church at 352-489-1260. Worship Covenant Love Ministry meets in building 11 at Shamrock Acres Industrial Park, 6843 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River. There is a gospel sing at 7 p.m. Fridays. Regular church services are at 10:30 a.m. Sundays. The ministry website is CovenantLove.com. Call Pastor Brian Kinker at 352-601-4868. St. Raphael Orthodox Church in America invites the public to attend Great Vespers at 5 p.m. today and Divine Liturgy at 10 a.m. Sunday. The church is at 1277 N. Paul Drive, Inverness (off U.S. 41 North, across from Dollar General). The Holy Myrrhbearers ask attendees to bring a box or can of food for distribution at Family Resource Center in Hernando. Call 352-726-4777. There Is No Place Like Home, from Luke 4:16-30, is the sermon given by Pastor Stephen Lane at 6 p.m. today and 9:30 a.m. Sunday at Faith Lutheran Church in Crystal Glen Subdivision, off State Road 44 and County Road 490 in Lecanto. Fellowship follows the Sunday service and Bible study and Sunday school both begin at 11 a.m. The adult class will start another theme as the Book of Revelation is completed. The church is handicapped accessible, offers hearing assistance, large-print bulletins and a cry room where the parents can see and hear the service in progress. Lenten Wednesday services begin Ash Wednesday, Feb. 13, at 5 p.m. with a covered-dish supper after the service. Lenten services will continue Feb. 20 and 27, and March 6, 13 and 20, all at 5 p.m. followed by a covered-dish supper. Call 352-5273325 or visit faithlecanto.com. St. Pauls Lutheran Church 6150 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills, will have regular Sunday worship services at 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday school for ages 3 through 12 is at 9:15 a.m. Adult Bible class at 9:15 a.m. will continue studying the book of Revelations in depth. Choir rehearsal is at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. Senior fellowship is from 3 to 5 p.m. Thursday. St. Pauls Lutheran School will host a basketball tournament from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. today. Boys and girls basketball teams will participate in this tournament, including teams from Orlando area and Northdale in Tampa. Concession stand available. Call 352-489-3027. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church invites the public to worship at 8:30 and 11 a.m. Sunday. A coffee hour follows both services. The church is barrier free and offers a free CD ministry, large-print service helps and hearing devices. A nursery attendant is available for preschool-age children. The church will have a tag sale from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2. Ash Wednesday worship services are at noon and 7 p.m. Feb. 13.The church is on County Road 486 opposite Citrus Hills Boulevard in Hernando. Call 352-746-7161. NOTES Continued from Page C4

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Submit information at least two weeks before the event. Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an event. Publication on a special day cant be guaranteed. News NOTES News NOTES Refuge Friends to meet Jan. 27 The annual meeting of the Friends of Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge Complex Inc., will take place at 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 27, in the Fellowship Hall of the First United Methodist Church, 8831 W. Bradshaw St., Homosassa. Keynote speaker this year will be Paul Boetcher, owner of Hydro-Q Inc. Before retiring, he was the lead hydrologic technician with the U.S. Geological Survey for more than 30 years. Also at the meeting will be County Commissioner Joe Meek, who will give an update on the actions the county is taking to support Kings Bay and its water quality. Information concerning the various Friends activities and 2013 events will be on display. The public is welcome. The event is free, but a donation of nonperishable food items is appreciated. Light refreshments will be served. For more information call 352-586-7140. Brits club to gather Monday The British American Social Club will meet from 7 to 9 p.m. Monday, Jan. 28, at Holiday Inn Express, 903 Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness. After a short business meeting will be a social gathering and refreshments will be served. The club meets the fourth Monday of every month and welcomes all who are interested in British history and culture. Visit the website at www.britamclub.com, or call Judi Matthews at 352527-2581, or Dave Jones at 352-382-3418. Library Friends to gather Feb. 5 The Friends of the Dunnellon Public Library will meet at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 5, in the library meeting room, 20351 Robinson Road, Dunnellon. For more information, call 352-438-2520. C OMMUNITY Page C6 SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Humanitarians OF FLORIDA Lennon Special to the Chronicle This fuzzy and curious guy is Lennon. He is one of the cutest, mediumhaired orange and white tabbies you will ever see, and he will endear himself to you with his sweet and loveable kitty ways. However, if you are looking for a more mature feline, all our adult cat adoption fees are half price at $27.50. Visitors are welcome from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m. Monday through Saturday at the Humanitarians Manchester House on the corner of State Road 44 and Conant Avenue, east of Crystal River. Drop by and enjoy the felines in their cage-free, homestyle environment. Call the Humanitarians at 352-613-1629 for adoptions, or view most of the Hardin Havens felines online at www.petfinder. com/shelters/fl186.html. Elks celebrate Burns birthdayA Robert Burns Birthday Dinner Celebration will take place at 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 27, at the Brooksville Elks Lodge No. 2582, 14494 Cortez Blvd., west of the Suncoast Parkway. On the menu will be pot roast, potatoes, green beans, haggis, cake, coffee, tea and soda. The ceremony begins with piping and entrance of the haggis, followed by the traditional address to the haggis. There will be Scottish Highland dances performed by the students at the Diane Dubock School of Scottish Highland Dance. Salutes will be offered to the lads and lassies and the history of Scotlands poet Robert Burns will be presented. A Scottish blessing and poems will be read. Tickets are $20. Call Alice at 352-688-4766, Cathy at 352-686-0975, Mike at 352-341-1551 or Joan at 352-527-2439 for tickets. Making Sense of Suicide Grief The Wings Grief Education Team at Hospice of Citrus County will present a community workshop titled Making Sense of Suicide Grief. The program will be offered from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 28, at the Hospice of Citrus County Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Suite A, Homosassa. It will be moderated by Hospice of Citrus County Wings Grief Specialist Paddy OConnor, Ph.D. The workshop is free. For more information, or to make a reservation, call Lynn Miller at 352621-1500. Hospice slates dementia talk HPH Hospice, in partnership with the Alzheimers Association, Gulf Coast Chapter, will offer a presentation from 2 to 3 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 29, at the HPH administrative offices at 3545 N. Lecanto Highway (the Winn-Dixie shopping plaza) in Beverly Hills. Jerry Fisher, program specialist with the Alzheimers Association, will discuss what happens to driving ability during the Alzheimers disease process. Seating is limited and reservations are required. To reserve a space, call HPH at 352-527-4600. F.C. Heritage meeting planned Its time for the quarterly meeting of the Floral City Heritage Council Tuesday, Jan. 29, at the Floral City Community House, 8370 E. Orange Ave. Potluck dinner starts at 7 p.m., followed by the quarterly meeting at 7:30 pm. No Snippet of History program is planned, since this is the general membership meeting for the election of the 2013 leadership officers and steering committee. Nominations will be accepted from the floor or may be added by calling the nominating chair at 352-586-9545. Members are reminded to bring a food item for the potluck, their own plate and table service and a nonperishable food items or a grocery store gift card for the Citrus County Veterans Coalition Food Pantry. Visitors are welcome. Visit www.floralcityhc. org, or call Peters at 352860-0101, or email fchc@hotmail.com. Special to the ChronicleThe Citrus County YMCA will tip off its 2013 Winter Youth Basketball League on Monday, Jan. 28. The league will play at Key Training Center facilitys gym. On Monday, the Y will host open registration for those who have not had an opportunity to pre-register, along with a skills assessment, followed by a team placement. The open registration event will be at the Key Training Center facility outside Crystal River and begins at 5:30 p.m. The league will run for 10 weeks (two weeks of practice and eight weeks of games) and is open to children ages 3 through 12. The Junior League will have ages 3 through 5, and the Youth League will consist of 6through 12-year-olds with several age brackets. Practice will be once a week on a weekday evening, with games being played on Saturday. All practices and games will be at the Key Training Center Chet Cole Life Enrichment Center gymnasium. The league cost is $85 for ages 6 to 12, and $65 for 3 to 5. Scholarships are available through the YMCAs Financial Assistance program. To apply, call the office at 352-637-0132. To register for the league, visit www.ymcasuncoast.org and download the form on the Citrus County page. Visit the office at 3909 N. Lecanto Highway or call 352-6370132 for more details. Ready for some roundball? Open registration Jan. 28 for YMCA Youth Basketball League Special to the Chronicle Melissa Miller, club director at the Central Ridge Boys & Girls Club, said when 45 active children come in from school, they all want a pick-me-up snack and the cupboards are running bare. To provide money for snacks and to honor retired Clerk of the Circuit Court Betty Strifler, the Beverly Hills Civic Association will host a Saturday, Feb. 2, Snack Attack Dinner at the Beverly Hills Lions Club. The doors open at 4 p.m. and Judge Patricia Thomas will make an award presentation to Strifler at 5:30. The menu will offer ham, turkey or both, scalloped potatoes, green beans, coleslaw, brownie and ice cream for dessert and coffee. If you cant attend, please write a check in any amount payable to the Boys & Girls Clubs with Snack Attack in the memo line and mail it to: P .O. Box 907, Lecanto, Florida 34460, said Civic Association President Harvey Gerber. Incoming Clerk Angela Vick, along with Thomas, Strifler and several county commissioners, will be at the head table. A limit of 200 tickets at $9 each are being sold. Sales outlets are: Beverly Hills Civic Association, 1 Civic Circle, 352-746-2657; Central Ridge Boys & Girls Club, 901 W. Roosevelt Blvd., 352270-8841; and Home Again Resale Store, 1980 N. Future T errace, 352270-8861. Stocking snacks Fundraiser fete for retired clerk to help Boys & Girls Club Betty Strifler fundraiser will honor years of service. Special to the Chronicle During the month of February, the Lakes Region Library will host a new exhibit by the Stoneridge Snowbirds Art Group of Inverness. The exhibit is set up in the research and computer area of the library and is available for viewing during regular library business hours. The diverse group of artists was formed in 2008 and includes members from the Inverness and Floral City areas. They meet on a weekly basis at the community clubhouse for an afternoon of painting and sharing of ideas. Members belong to the Citrus Art Center and also the Citrus Watercolor Club, but go their separate ways during the summer months. Back, from left, are: Joan Mensch, Joan Meredith, Caroline Frary, Shirley Glueck and Mac Stewart. Front, from left, are: Audrey Bunchkowski, Sylvia Heymans and Jude Caborn. Not pictured are artists Linda Middleton, Lauren Schumacher and Charlene Nelson. Stoneridge snowbirds exhibit at library Special to the ChronicleIts time to register for the childrens pageants, slated for Sunday, March 24, at the 2013 Citrus County Fair. The Pre Teen Pageant for ages 7 to 13 will begin at 1 p.m., starting with the 13-year-olds. The Little Miss/Mister, ages 5 and 6, will start immediately after the Pre Teen contest, with the 6-year-olds first. The Beautiful Baby competition for ages 1 to 4 will start at 3 p.m. with the 4-year-olds and ending with the Decorated Baby pageant for ages 6 to 11 months. Contestants must be a resident of Citrus County. There is a $30 entry fee and pre-registration is required. All contestants are awarded prizes. Applications must be in the Fair Office by Friday, Feb. 22. Applications are available at www.citruscounty fair.com under the Pageants tab on the left, all Citrus County Chamber of Commerce offices or the Fair Office at 3600 S. Florida Ave., Inverness. All pageants are held in the Citrus County Auditorium. General admission on the day of the pageants for adults is $5; children ages 5 to 10 is $3; ages 4 and younger are free. Family memberships are $40 per family (one household with two parents, children younger than 18). An individual is $15. Memberships will cover admission to the baby pageants and the fair from March 25 through 30. The deadline to purchase memberships is Friday, March 1. For more information, call 352726-2993. Time to register for fair pageants Entries sought for children in baby to pre-teen competitions

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S ATURDAY, J ANUARY26, 2013 C7 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE E NTERTAINMENT P HILLIP A LDER Newspaper Enterprise Assn. Arthur C. Clarke, an English science-fiction writer who lived a lot of his life in Sri Lanka, said, I dont pretend we have all the answers. But the questions are certainly worth thinking about. I hope you thought the questions in my Christmas Competition were worth thinking about. And I am going to give you my answers without pretense. However, they will have to be furnished in two stages, because the East-West hands will change slightly for the play problem. This was the initial question: How should South play in four hearts after West leads the club king? Declarer has eight top tricks: five hearts, two diamonds and one club. The heart finesse is bound to fail, of course. But a high spade can be established and perhaps a low spade ruffed in the dummy. It looks natural to lead a spade to dummys 10 at trick two. Here, though, if East wins with his ace and shifts to his trump, the contract cannot be made. West can kill the spade ruff. Instead, South should play a diamond to the dummy, then lead the spade three toward his hand. If East wins with his ace, declarer loses only two spades and one heart, being able to establish two spade winners. If East plays low, Souths queen loses to Wests king, but West cannot shift with effect to hearts. Suppose he leads a club. Declarer ruffs and plays a spade to the 10. East wins and switches to a trump, but South can try the finesse, being assured of one spade, five hearts, two diamonds, one club and one spade ruff. The bidding and opening-lead answers will be in Mondays column. (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53 O u tl aw Bik ers H e ll s Angels M u d ca t s: D own an d Dirty M u d ca t s: D own an d Dirty (N) Wi c k e d T una B ac k i n the Hunt Wi c k e d T una G o Fish! Wi c k e d T una B ac k i n the Hunt (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25Sponge.Sponge.iCarly GiCarly GVictoriousVictoriousRockiCarly GNannyNannyFriendsFriends (OWN) 103 62 103 Prison Wives PGStatenStatenStatenStatenStatenStatenMcGheesMcGheesStatenStaten (OXY) 44 123 Definitely, Maybe (2008) PG-13 The Family Stone (2005) Definitely, Maybe (2008) PG-13 (SHOW) 340 241 340 4 The Help The Iron Lady (2011, Biography) Meryl Streep. (In Stereo) PG-13 Maz Jobrani: I Come in Peace (N) Boxing Mike Dallas Jr vs. Lucas Martin Matthysse. (N) (Live) PG, L (SPEED) 732 112 732 Rolex Sports Car Series Racing 24 Hours at Daytona: Part 1. From Daytona International Speedway in Florida. (N) (Live)Auto Raci ng General Tire Mint 400. (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36 The Green Mile (1999, Drama) Tom Hanks, David Morse. (In Stereo) R The Shawshank Redemption (1994, Drama) Tim Robbins. An innocent man goes to a Maine penitentiary for life in 1947. (In Stereo) R The Wolfman (STARZ) 370 271 370 Friday Night Lights (2004) Billy Bob Thornton. Underworld: Awakening (2012) Kate Beckinsale. R Spartacus: War of the Damned MA The Raid: Redemption (2011) Iko Uwais. R Ali R (SUN) 36 31 36 College Basketball Georgia at Texas A&M. (N) (Live) College Basketball Mississippi at Auburn. (N) (Live) Inside the HEAT Future Phenoms College Basketball (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29 Ogre (2008) John Schneider. R Snow Beast (2011, Suspense) John Schneider, Jason London. PG-13 Abominable Snowman (2013, Suspense) Adrian Paul. Premiere. NR Rock Monster (2008) NR (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19KingFam. GuyFam. GuyFam. GuyBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangCougarThe (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35 Guys and Dolls (1955, Musical Comedy) Marlon Brando. NR Captains Courageous (1937, Adventure) Spencer Tracy. G (DVS) Lord of the Flies (1963) James Aubrey. NR Moonfleet (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Moonshiners (In Stereo) Moonshiners (In Stereo) Gold Rush Dozer Wars PG Gold Rush Pink Slip PG Gold Rush (In Stereo) PG Gold Rush Pink Slip PG (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30Dateline: Real Life48 Hours: Hard Evid.48 Hours: Hard Evidence A scorned wife sues a mistress. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. (TMC) 350 261 350 The Woman in the Fifth The Italian Job (2003) Mark Wahlberg. (In Stereo) PG-13 Scream 4 (2011, Horror) Neve Campbell. (In Stereo) R Mask Maker (2010) Nikki Deloach. (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34 Catch Me if You Can (2002) Gran Torino (2008, Drama) Clint Eastwood. A veteran faces his longtime prejudices. R (DVS) Gran Torino (2008, Drama) Clint Eastwood. A veteran faces his longtime prejudices. R (DVS) (TOON) 38 58 38 33 RegularRegular Hoodwinked! (2005) PGVentureFam. GuyFam. GuyClevelandDynamiteBoon (TRAV) 9 54 9 44Tastiest PlacesTastiest PlacesGhost AdventuresGhost AdventuresGhost AdventuresGhost Adventures (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55Most ShockingWipeout PG Wipeout PG Wipeout PG Wipeout Rats! PGWorlds Dumbest... (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24CosbyCosbyCosbyCosbyCosbyCosbyRaymondRaymondRaymondRaymondRaymondKing (USA) 47 32 47 17 18 The Mummy (1999) Brendan Fraser. A mummy seeks revenge for a 3,000-year-old curse. G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra (2009, Action) Channing Tatum, Dennis Quaid. PG-13 Fast & Furious (2009) PG-13 (WE) 117 69 117 To Be AnnouncedCyndi Lauper Cyndi Lauper Cyndi Lauper Cyndi Lauper Cyndi Lauper Cyndi Lauper Cyndi Lauper Cyndi Lauper Cyndi Lauper Cyndi Lauper (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20Law Order: CINBA Basketball Chicago Bulls at Washington Wizards.VideosWGN News at NineBones D ear Annie : I would like to reply to Arizona Grandparents, whose daughter wont allow them to see their grandchild. They asked whether it will ever get better. My granddaughter was 6 when my son and his wife divorced and I was no longer allowed to see her. I continued to send her a card and money on every birthday and at Christmas. I never heard back and had no idea whether she received them. Her other grandmother kept me informed from time to time and even sent me her 5th grade picture. When she was 14, my granddaughter wrote me a nice letter. I was ecstatic! I wrote her back, but heard nothing. I had no money for a lawyer and didnt want to do anything that would put me completely out of contact. My son lived halfway across the country. When my granddaughter was 17, my son found her Facebook page. After her 18th birthday, I called her, and she was happy to hear from me. She lived only two hours away. We met at a central location and had a wonderful reunion. Since then, weve been in regular contact. She is now 23, married and expecting her first child. So, Arizona Grandma, dont give up. Just do what you can, and hopefully your story will end as happily as mine. A Happy Grandma Dear Grandma : We heard from many grandparents, most of whom had happy endings. Read on: From Indiana : For two years, I did not get to see my grandson. During that time, I did a lot of praying and crying. For his birthday and Christmas, I would leave his presents on his front porch. One day I got a phone call, and my son invited me to come over, saying, Its time you got to know your grandson. Our first visit lasted three hours. On the way home, I did a lot of praising God and crying. I now get to see him a couple of times a week. He calls me Grandma. I have him in my life now, and we will continue to move forward and not dwell on the past. Florida : We have not seen our granddaughter in three years. My husband and I live 10 minutes away, but arent allowed to visit. At one point, my son wished me dead. I send cards and presents, but I dont know whether they give these things to her or tell her they are from us. My friends say to wait until she is older. But shes only 10 now, so I may not be around when shes older. This is all over a stupid disagreement (with his brother) that we are paying for. I have three other grandchildren who miss their cousin. I have apologized and am willing to see her on their terms if only they would communicate with me. Maybe theyll read this. Illinois: Nine years ago, my oldest grandson called and told me not to contact him again. I could tell he was being coached by his mother, my sons ex-wife. One winter day early last year, my grandson and his mother stopped by my house unannounced. I was surprised and happy. It turns out my grandson had contacted my son (his father). Now he calls me Grandma, and we see him every once in a while. Hell be 22 this week, and I hope to celebrate with him. Miracles do happen. Indiana: Your response to Arizona Grandparents was right on. My husband and I have had to deal with the same type of mean-spirited behavior from our eldest daughter. Tell them to keep in touch with their 7-year-old granddaughter with cards for her birthday, Christmas gifts and acknowledgments of the important times in her life. Our grandson is now 22 and in the Navy, and we get to chat and see him when he comes home. It does hurt when you are cut off, but in time, it can turn out OK. Please tell them there is always hope. They are not alone. Annies Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please email your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annies Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annies Mailbox and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit www.creators.com. ANNIES MAILBOX Bridge (Answers Monday) AROSE HOWDYYELLOW POETIC Yesterdays Jumbles: Answer: Magellan set out to circumnavigate the globe and was able to SEA THE WORLD Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. SAIBS TRINP RUSBAD COSTEK Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble A: SATURDAY EVENING JANUARY 26, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsEntertainment NightDeception Figure SkatingNewsSNL # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6Life on Fire Phoenix Temple (N) PG The Lawrence Welk Show G Are You Served? Keeping Up As Time Goes By As Time Goes By Waiting for God Yes, Minister New Tricks Wicca Work PG % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41Lawrence WelkGriffithGriffith Platoon (1986) Tom Berenger.Austin City Limits (N)Artists Den ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly News Paid Program Paid Program Deception (In Stereo) Figure Skating U.S. Championships: Ladies Free Skate. From Omaha, Neb. NewsSaturday Night Live ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 NewsWorld News Jeopardy! G Wheel of Fortune The Taste Auditions Part 1 The first round of blind taste tests. 20/20 (In Stereo) PG NewsHot Topics (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 1010 News, 6pm (N) Evening News Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! G NCIS: Los Angeles Betrayal 48 Hours (N) (In Stereo) PG 48 Hours (In Stereo) PG 10 News, 11pm (N) Paid Program ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13FOX13 6:00 News (N) (In Stereo) TMZ (N) (In Stereo) PG UFC: Johnson vs. Dodson (N Subject to Blackout) (In Stereo Live) FOX13 10:00 News (N) (In Stereo) NewsUltimate Fighter 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 NewsABC Entertainment NightThe Taste Auditions Part 1 20/20 PG NewsCrook 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Cornerstone With John Hagee G Jack Van Impe Prophecy News In Touch With Dr. Charles Stanley G Leslie Hale 7th Street Theater All Over the World CTN Special Pure Passion < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11NewsWorld News Paid Program Lets Ask America The Taste Auditions Part 1 The first round of blind taste tests. 20/20 (In Stereo) PG NewsPrivate Practice @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Leverage The First David Job PG Leverage Parker gets jury duty. Movie F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9HousePaidPaidPaidBloopersBloopersFuturamaFuturamaRing of Honor Wrest.Bones H (WACX) TBN 21 21 BeautyGospelJim RaleyLife Center ChurchRabbi MesserPaidPaidB. HinnChosenKingdom L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12King of Queens Two and Half Men Two and Half Men Engagement The First Family The First Family Mr. Box Office Mr. Box Office Criminal Minds (DVS) Criminal Minds (DVS) O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15Ford-Fast Lane School Zone Your Citrus County CourtDa Vincis Inquest (In Stereo) I Spy YEye for an Eye Fam Team S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7FOX 35 News at 6Big BangBig BangUFC: Johnson vs. Dodson FOX 35 News at 10The Ultimate Fighter (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14Comed.NoticieroLa Familia P. LucheSbado Gigante (N) PG (SS)Comed.Noticiero (WXPX) ION 17 House House House House Psych PG Psych PG (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27StorageTexas StorageTexas Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Shipping Wars PG Shipping Wars PG Shipping Wars PG Shipping Wars PG Shipping Wars PG Shipping Wars PG Shipping Wars PG Shipping Wars PG (AMC) 55 64 55 Signs (2002, Suspense) Mel Gibson, Joaquin Phoenix. PG-13 Identity (2003, Suspense) John Cusack, Ray Liotta. Premiere. R Signs (2002, Suspense) Mel Gibson, Joaquin Phoenix. PG-13 (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21To Be AnnouncedToo Cute! Pool Puppies PG Too Cute! Fluffy Puppy Party G Pit Boss Dog Days at Shortywood PG Pit Bulls and Parolees (N) (In Stereo) Pit Boss Dog Days at Shortywood PG (BET) 96 19 96 Lakeview Terrace (2008, Suspense) Samuel L. Jackson. PG-13 Coach Carter (2005, Drama) Samuel L. Jackson. A high-school basketball coach pushes his team to excel. PG-13 Meet the Browns (2008) (BRAVO) 254 51 254 Housewives/Atl.Housewives/Atl. The Family Man (2000) Nicolas Cage. The Family Man (CC) 27 61 27 33 Harold & Kumar Escape From Guantanamo Bay (2008) Kal Penn. R Without a Paddle (2004, Comedy) Seth Green, Matthew Lillard. PG-13 Grandmas Boy (2006, Comedy) Doris Roberts, Allen Covert. R (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37 Princess Bride Joe Dirt (2001, Comedy) David Spade. A mullet-headed janitor relates his personal tale of woe. PG-13 My Big Redneck Vacation (N) Swamp Pawn (Series Premiere) (N) My Big Redneck Vacation (CNBC) 43 42 43 PaidPaidMoney inAmerican GreedDebt/PartSuze Orman ShowPrincessPrincessAmerican Greed (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46The Situation RoomCNN Newsroom (N)CNN Presents PGPiers MorganPiers MorganCNN Presents PG (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5Austin & Ally G Shake It Up! G A.N.T. Farm G A.N.T. Farm G Good Luck Charlie All Fall Down G Dog With a Blog G Austin & Ally G Jessie G Austin & Ally G Austin & Ally G GoodCharlie (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17College GameDayCollege BasketballWinter X Games From Aspen, Colo. (N)SportsCenter (N) (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49College Basketball Temple at Butler. (N)College Basketball2013 Australian Open Tennis (EWTN) 95 70 95 48MassJohnPauKarol: A Man WhoRosaryLiving RightDaughter (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28 The Sorcerers Apprentice (2010, Fantasy) Nicolas Cage. PG Pirates of the Caribbean: At Worlds End (2007, Action) Johnny Depp. Premiere. Jack Sparrows friends join forces to save him. PG-13 The Goonies (FLIX) 118 170 A Low Down Dirty Shame (1994) Keenen Ivory Wayans. (In Stereo) R Ransom (1996, Suspense) Mel Gibson, Rene Russo. (In Stereo) R The Constant Gardener (2005, Drama) Ralph Fiennes. (In Stereo) R (FNC) 44 37 44 32Americas News HQFOX Report (N)Huckabee (N)Justice With JeanineGeraldo at LargeJour.News (FOOD) 26 56 26 Rachael v. GuyTail. ShowdownUnwrappedUnwrappedDinersDinersIron Chef America (FSNFL) 35 39 35 Tennis Champions Series: Denver.College Basketball Marshall at Memphis.College Basketball UCLA at Arizona State. (FX) 30 60 30 51UFC: Johnson vs. Dodson Preliminaries From Chicago. (N) (Live) The A-Team (2010, Action) Liam Neeson, Bradley Cooper. Former Special Forces soldiers form a rogue unit. PG-13 AngerTotally Biased (GOLF) 727 67 727 CentralPGA Tour Golf Farmers Insurance Open, Third Round. CentralPGA Golf (HALL) 59 68 59 45 54 Undercover Bridesmaid (2012) NR Honeymoon for One (2011, Romance) Nicollette Sheridan. NR The Lost Valentine (2011, Drama) Jennifer Love Hewitt. NR The Lost Valentine (2011) (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2 The Day After Tomorrow (2004) Dennis Quaid. (In Stereo) PG-13 Wrath of the Titans (2012) Sam Worthington. PG-13 Safe House (2012, Action) Denzel Washington. (In Stereo) R WrathTitans (HBO2) 303 202 303 Joyful Noise (2012) Queen Latifah, Dolly Parton. (In Stereo) PG-13 Enlightened Girls MA Boardwalk Empire Sunday Best MA Game of Thrones (In Stereo) MA Treme Dont You Leave Me Here MA (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52HuntersHunt IntlHouse Hunters RenoLove It or List It GLove It or List It GHuntersHuntersHuntersHunt Intl (HIST) 51 25 51 32 42Fort Knox: Secrets Revealed PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn StarsPawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG (LIFE) 24 38 24 31 Selena (1997, Biography) Jennifer Lopez, Edward James Olmos. PG Tyler Perrys the Family That Preys (2008, Drama) Kathy Bates, Alfre Woodard. PG-13 Double Divas Double Divas Double Divas (LMN) 50 119 Derailed (2005) Clive Owen. Adulterous lovers face a violent blackmailer. NR Chloe (2009, Drama) Julianne Moore, Liam Neeson. R Trust (2009) Jamie Luner. A woman receives mysterious letters and e-mails. NR (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3 Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows The Hangover Part II (2011) Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms. (In Stereo) R Banshee Meet the New Boss MA Troy (2004) Brad Pitt. Achilles leads Greek forces in the Trojan War. R (MSNBC) 42 41 42 DocumentaryDocumentaryDocumentaryDocumentaryDocumentaryDocumentary WANT MORE PUZZLES? Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.

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C8 S ATURDAY, J ANUARY26, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE C OMICS Pickles Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 No movie times were supplied by Regal Cinemas for Citrus 6. Please call or check Fandango. Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 Parker (R) ID required. 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10 p.m. Movie 43 (R) ID required. 2 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:15 p.m. Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters (R) ID required. In 3D. 1:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 9:45 p.m. No passes. Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters (R) ID required. 4 p.m. No passes. Mama (PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:35 p.m., 10:10 p.m. Broken City (R) ID required. 1:55 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:30 p.m. The Last Stand (R) ID required. 1:20 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:50 p.m. Zero Dark Thirty (R) ID required. 1 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:20 p.m. Silver Lings Playbook (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:25 p.m. Lincoln (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:35 p.m. Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings and entertainment information. Peanuts Garfield For Better or For Worse Sally Forth Beetle Bailey Dilbert The Grizzwells The Born Loser Blondie Doonesbury Kit N Carlyle Rubes Dennis the Menace The Family Circus Betty Big Nate Arlo and Janis Frank & Ernest Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead. Todays MOVIES WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies WFJV-FM 103.3 s to s WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix Local RADIO K ZNJL RN TZCF C XNNE GNSGLHR ... KD K TZCF C YCE GNSGLHR, KP KS C RLHHKYZL PNNE OSRKZ K TZCF C XNNE NSL. ECJL YHOYLGAPrevious Solution: What is important is life, friends and attempting to make this unjust world a better place in which to live. Oscar Niemeyer (c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-26

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S ATURDAY,J ANUARY26,2013C 9 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS Fax: (352) 563-5665 l Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 l Email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com l website: www.chronicleon line.com To place an ad, call563-5966 Chronicle Classifieds Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time699185 000DM1S 000DM1J Tweet Tweet Tweet Follow the Chronicle on www.twitter.com/citruschroniclenews as it happens right at your finger tips Broyhill Wall Unit $750. Bassett Cabinet with Drawers $500. (484) 547-9549 Cherry Desk, credenza, file cabinet, $600. Oak TV Cabinet $300 (352) 212-9507 637-2921, 861-9448 COLLEZIONE EUROPA style king sz poster bed set triple dresser mirror 5 drawer chest 2 NS headbd footbd rails, light oak finish solid wood HUGEAND HEAVY! $1350 352-419-4513 Couch Clean, brown, excel. cond. $200. Entertainment Center Large, Cherry Traditional, Like new $600 (352) 270-9025 Dinning Room Set, 6 captain chairs, & Hutch maple $200 (352) 726-1081 FOLDING BED TWIN $25 352-777-1256 FROSTED LEAF OVAL MIRRORS 2 mirrors that measure 36X24. 352-650-0180. Asking $45. for both LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET, In Original Plastic, Never Used, ORG $3000, Sacrifice $975. CHERRY, BEDROOM SET S olid Wood, new in factory boxes$895 Can Deliver. Bill (813)298-0221. Love Seat & Matching Recliner, by Flexsteel $275. Call between 9a-7p (352) 382-0603 Mattress Sets Beautiful Factory Seconds twin $99.95 full $129.95 qn $159.95, kg $249.95 352-621-4500 MATTRESS SETS Beautiful Factory Seconds Twin $99.95, Full $129.95 Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95 352-621-4500 Oak Pedestal Table Wood Craft Table Wood 7 Drawer Desk Wood Desk Chair Mahogany Upol. Arm Chair. 352-726-5159 Oak Table 6 chairs, hutch, Nice $750,. Cherry Curio Cabinet Pair $150 ea (352) 212-9507 637-2921, 861-9448 Preowned Mattress Sets fromTwin $30; Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75. 352-628-0808 Sectional Sofa Florida Colors peach and green Clean, like new $300 (352) 860-0649 630-816-1171 cell Sectional Sofa, light color, like new $500 Small secretary Desk $100 (352) 212-3352 TWIN BEDS Frames, boxsprings, & mattresses exc cond. $125 Cell (734) 355-2325 local 352-503-9452 Washed Oak Table 4 chairs, like new, $750 White antique iron Bed, w/ mattress, $500 (352) 212-9507 637-2921, 861-9448 50 Inch Hitachi HD TV Projection console Exc cond. $100 (352) 621-0405 AM/FM, Stereo Cassette and Turn Table $65. TV, Toshiba, 19 color, $35. (484) 547-9549 SHARP32 TV WITH REMOTE $20 352-613-0529 DOOR JAMBONLY new 3/0 x 6/8 with weather stripping and aluminum threshold $20 call text 352-746-0401 DOUBLE & SINGLE garage doors, both for $250 352-601-7911 17FLATSCREEN MONITOR with mouse, keyboard, speakers. Asking $45 352-650-0180 DIESTLER COMPUTER New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 HPDESKJETF4100 PRINTER computer printer in good condition with 1 new ink cartridge Price $40 628-3418 IPOD MINI 2ND GENERATION SILVER 4GB.Works great. Asking $25. 352-650-0180 KODAK 10X ZOOM CAMERAlike new / was 450.00 selling $100. linda 341-2271 48 Kodiak Bushhog, less than 150 hrs. Asking $450 (352) 382-0731 Like New 24HP Deisel Tractor, 4WD, FE Loader, BB, trailer, rake, 3 PT Hitch, Never used commercially. only 500 hrs. $11,500 obo (352) 795-4259 SIXTYGALLONTANK ONTRAILER, $70. 352-746-6931 Chipper/Shredder Troy-BiltTomahawk, Briggs & Stratton gas engine. $700 OBO (352) 601-3174 Oblong glass table 66x40 w/6 reclining chairs; small side table, 2 footstools, beige w/ tiny flowers. Never been outside. $400 Call John (352) 422-2317 2 Table Lamps, 33 H, white ceramic, Sq. bamboo design, excel. $50 Broyhill Dining Rm Set. Table, Parquet Top, Rectangular shape, 2 leaves, 6 Caine Highback chairs, china hutch, 3 glass panels 3 shelves, med. fruitwood color, excel. $550. (718) 666-6624 1918 JENNYSTAMP Good condition / call for e-mail picture $100. OBO LINDA 352-341-2271 KISSING FACES Sculpture By John Cultrone with stand $65. call or text 352-746-0401 N.Y.YANKEES MEMORABILIAsigned hats,Jersey (Jeters)#2 and more $100. or best offer 789-5770 Victorian BATH,PICHER,BOWEL wood pedestal type. $100. 789-5770 2 DR WHITE MAYTAG REFRIG. w/Ice Maker 21.8 cu ft. Less than 2yrs old. $350 (352) 726-8021 3 Ton $100. and 2 $75. Used Copeland Scroll AC COMPRESSORS R22 John 352-208-7294 DISHWASHER GE white, works good, looks good,$100. 352-789-5770 DRYER$100 With 90 day warranty Call/text. 352-364-6504 GE MINI FRIDGE 31Hx17Wx19D, Black, Excellent Condition $45 call 352-503-7143 GE Refrigerator side by side w/ water dispenser Bisque $380, GO CART5HP, 2s eats built by Manco $275 (352) 503-6641 GE STOVE, coil top, self cleaning, bisque $125; MICROWAVE Over the Range GE Spacemaker $75 (352)503-6641 Samsung refrigerator white SBS 25 cf hidden hinges LED lighting less than 1 yr old $575 (352) 419-4513 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also wanted dead or alive washers & dryers. FREE pick up 352-564-8179 WANTED DEAD OR ALIVE WASHERS & DRYERS (352) 209-5135 WASHER OR DRYER $135.00 Each. Reliable, Clean, Like New, Exc. Cond. Free Delivery 352-263-7398 WASHER$100 With 90 day warranty Call/text 352-364-6504 WESTINGHOUSE STOVEAlmond ,continous clean,works good looks good. $100. 789-5770 Whirlpool Gold, Matching Set, Fridge, Range, Microwave, Stainless Steel $1,300 firm Call for details (352) 527-6779 Whirlpool Heavy Duty Super Capacity, LP Gas Dryer, Almond $125. 3 Ton New Replacement Carlyle Scroll AC Compressor R22 $300 John 352-208-7294 DUDLEYS AUCTION **3 AUCTIONS ** Fri 1/25 Estate Coin 6pm $5-10-20 Gold pieces, Silver, $500 & $1,000 bills, Lg 1800s currency, silver Sat 1/26 Florida Porch Antiques Liquidation 10am On Site@ 712 W. Main St in Leesburg, HUGE Sale of from Long time Antique dealer filled the JC Penny Tue 1/28 Real Estate & Restaurant 10am 4135 S. Suncoast Blvd. (US 19) Homosassa, *check website* www.dudleys auction.com 637-9588 10%BP Au2267 AB1667 Maine-ly Real Estate #381384 Fri, 02/01 Preview @ 4pm, Auction@ 6pm General Merchandise Sat, 02/02 Preview @ 4pm, Auction@ 6pm Antiques/Gen. Merch Sun, 02/03 Preview @ 12:30, Auction@ 1pm Tailgate/Box lots **WE BUY ESTATES** 6055 N. Carl G. Rose Hwy 200 Hernando AB3232 (352)613-1389 Craftsman 10 in Table saw w/folding stand w/ wheels $350 (352) 465-2459 Ridgid 12in compound sliding miter saw, w/ laser & folding stand w/wheels. $450 (352) 465-2459 APPT. SETTERS NEEDED Sign on Bonus. Great Commission Pay and weekly bonuses Call Bob 352-628-3500 CAREGIVERS NEEDED All Shifts Apply At HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE 4224 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Lecanto Experienced AC Installers Own Tools & Truck, TOP PAY,Call Dave (352) 794-6129 SECRETARY/ HOSTESS P/T for Builders Model. Thur, Fri, Sat. $7.79hr. Please Email Resume to: dreamcitrus@ yahoo.com (352) 527-7171 SPRING HILL CLASSES COSMO DA YS February 25, 2013BARBER NIGHTS February 25, 2013SKIN & NAILS Day School Only BENES International School of Beauty 1-866-724-2363 STATEAPPROVED FOR VATRAINING Real Estate Investor looking for private mortgage money. Pls call Mark (352) 270-8128 DOLLCLOTHES build-a-bear clothes, outfits, tops, bottoms, 31 pc total. $50. all 352-422-1309 BOOK ENDS pr Zebra black and gold porcilin by Lipper and Mann $65. call or text 352-746-0401 CHINACLOSETDECO TYPE glass door,good wood.Picture upon req. looks good $100.789-5770 DUDLEYS AUCTION **3 AUCTIONS** Fri 1/25 Estate Coin 6pm $5-10-20 Gold pieces, Silver, $500 & $1,000 bills, Lg 1800s currency, silver Sat 1/26 Florida Porch Antiques Liquidation 10am On Site@ 712 W. Main St in Leesburg, HUGE Sale of from Long time Antique dealer filled the JC Penny Tue 1/28 Real Estate & Restaurant 10am 4135 S. Suncoast Blvd. (US 19) Homosassa, *check website* www.dudleys auction.com 637-9588 10%BP Au2267 AB1667 Maine-ly Real Estate #381384 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I Local Tower Service Co. Hiring person capable of ascending broadcast towers to service lights. Electrical exp pref, will train. Travel required throughout Southeast. Cpy vehicle and hotel provided. Exc pay, per diem, bonus and benefits. Background check and clean FLDr. Lic required.Apply in person at Hilights Inc. 4177 N. Citrus Ave, Crystal River, FL. 352-564-8830 RESIDENTIAL ELECTRICIANS Rough, Trim, & Service Full Benefits /EOE APPL Y A T : Exceptional Electric 4070 CR 124A Unit 4 Wildwood Senior Lending Officer/Office Manager Brannen Bank a banking institution in central Florida, is seeking a Senior Lending Officer/ Office Manager for the Citrus county area. Requires a bachelors degree in business or finance, residential and commercial lending experience and at least four years Office Manager Experience. Duties include management of daily branch operations and originating a variety of consumer loans. Offers a competitive salary and benefit package. If interested, please f orward resumeto Brannen Banks of Florida, Inc. Attn: Carol Johnson PO Box 1929 Inverness, FL 34451-1929 EEO/M/F/V/D/DFWP The City of Cedar Key is seeking an experienced Building Official. The building official is charged with the administration and enforcement of local, state, and federal codes, ordinances, and regulations for all buildings and structures. 4 to 8 hours per week as needed Salary Negotiable Application Procedure City application forms are available at the reception desk, City Hall, 490 2nd Street, Cedar Key, FL 32625, Call City Hall at 352-543-5132. to receive application by e-mail. Please include a resume with your application. Closing Date February 15, 2013 The City of Cedar Key is a Drug Free Workplace Equal Opportunity Employer NEWSPAPER CARRIER WANTEDNewspaper carrier wanted for early morning delivery of the Citrus County Chronicle and other newspapers for home delivery customers. 3 to 4 hours per day. Must have insured and reliable vehicle preferable a van SUV, or pick up with a cap-Large enough to hold our Sunday product Apply in Person 1624 N Medowcrest Blvd, Crystal River Monday to Friday 8am-5pm Newspaper carriers are independent contractors, not employees of the Citrus County Chronicle HHCAGENCY Looking for RN & Psych RN (352) 794-6097 NEEDED Experienced, Caring & Dependable CNAs/HHAsHourly & Live-in,flex schedule offeredLOVING CARE (352) 860-0885 Human Resource Rep Are you an HR Professional with a commitment to excellence? Do you want to be part of a high performance team? Therapy Management Corporation, a preferred provider in all the communities we serve, invites you to talk with us. Our home office is in Homosassa, FL. 3+ years HR experience, superb communication and interpersonal skills, along with strong technology experience are what you will need to be successful. Please apply online @ http://www.therapymgmtjobs.com/ Profile.aspx or fax resume to (352) 382-0212 LIC 440CUST. SERVICE REP/or 220AgentNeeded for busy Insurance office. Apply in person 9am-12N SHELDON PALMES INSURANCE 8469 W Grover Cleveland, Homosassa BREAKFAST COOK Must have experience. Apply in person between 1pm & 2pm 206 W Tompkins St. Inverness Experienced Bartender AcceptingApplication 10a-11:30 & 2P-4p Apply In Person Only Lollygaggers 744 SE US Hwy 19 Next to Mr. Bs C.R. Drug Free Work Place P/T DISH WASHERApply in person between 1-4pm LaCasa Di Norma Restaurant 1609 S E Hwy 19, C. R.iver 352-795-4694 SOUS CHEF needed for upscale private Country Club in Citrus Co. Previous kitchen management required with casual and fine dining culinary experience. Send Resume to: swiley@ citrushills.com Customer Service/Sales Assit. Must have exp., computer skills, good attitude and be a self starter, Call (352) 628-4656 Real Estate AgentsBusy real estate office needs Realtors and BuyersAgents Call PLANTATION REALTY 352-634-0129 Automotive Consultant/ Advisor Eagle Buick GMC Inc is in need of experienced Automotive Service Consultants/Advisors Minimum 2 yrs, dealership experience. Aggressive pay plan and strong compensation package that includes health insurance, paid vacation, paid training, certification reimbursement and many other perks. Drug free workplace Application Avail. @ Eagle Buick GMC Inc. Homosassa, Fl. 34448 Send Resume: Fax (352) 417-0944 Email: robbcole@eagle buickgmc.com LOST MAL TI POO White female 1 yr old named Chloe last seen on W Starjasmine Pl, Beverly Hills. T wo little girls miss her! Please call (352) 249-0846 Lost Womens Gold Bracelet, Lecanto Area around 44 REWARD (352) 527-0211 Wedding Band Gold & White gold lost at Publix forest Ridge, OR Movie Theater shopping plaza Inverness, Sentimental REWARD (352) 637-2458 Yellow Lab w/brown collar no tag.Named Zeus Lost downtown Inverness area (352) 341-5557 CAROL S AIRPORT TRANSPORT 352 746 7595 FREE REMOVALWants to Thank All of You for making 2012 Possible, See You In 2013 SPRING HILL CLASSES COSMO DA YS February 25, 2013BARBER NIGHTS February 25, 2013SKIN & NAILS Day School Only BENES International School of Beauty 1-866-724-2363 STATEAPPROVED FOR VATRAINING FL. JUMBO SHRIMP 15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb Delivered 352-795-0077 ARNPor PAWanted Part Time for a busy Pediatric Practice in Crystal River, Send Resume to: lindapracticemgr @t amp abay .rr .com EXPERIENCED RECEPTIONIST For fast pace medical office. Must be able to work under pressure & handle multiple phone lines. Medical terminology & insurance knowledge required. Send resume to: reply2013@ hotmail.com Todays New Ads OPEN HOUSE Sunday 2p-6p Come see this natural wonderland. 3/2 stilt home on over 1 acres and an amazing body of water. Bring a fishing pole and enjoy a BBQ. Located N on 19 just over the Barge Canal Bridge, R on Foss Grove Path. Follow the signs to 12307 Edwards Ct.You will not want to miss this! If directions needed pls call Kim or Jo at 352-220-2658 QUEEN MATTRESS, BOX SPRING & FRAME with all linens. $150 (352) 287-6601 Refrigerator/Freezer, GE, Side-by-Side, White, 21.7 cubic feet $100. Runs good 352-489-7393 REMINGTON 700 BDL 270cal exc cond. $495. will take lever action 30-30 on trade. (906) 285-1696 $$ TOPDOLLAR $$ For Wrecked, Junk or Unwanted Cars/Trucks $$ (352) 201-1052 $$ $$ CASH PAID $$for junk vehicles. 352-634-5389 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 FREE PICK UP JunkAppliances, Scrap Metal, Mowers, Autos, (352) 220-3138 FREE REMOVAL Washers,Dryers,Riding Mowers, Scrap Metals,Antena towers 270-4087 fertilizer, Horse manure mixed with pine shavings for gardens or mulch. U load and haul away. 352-628-9624 Free 4 Bronze Jalousie Windows 36 x 60 (352) 302-4057 FREE KITTENS 18 wks old Calico, litter trained (352) 212-4061 Free to loving home 2 yr old male Beagle (352) 726-4678 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP 15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb Delivered 352-795-0077 FRESH CITRUS @BELLAMY GROVE Strawberries/Cabbage Gift Shipping, 8:30a-5p Closed Sun. 352-726-6378 Black Labrador Retriever, about 1 yrs old, answers to Buddy, lost in vicinity of W. Dunnellon Rd. Owner is heartbroken. (352) 400-3302 (352) 795-8662 Lost Kitten 5 months old, Gray w/ white on chest, 6 toes on ea foot, Paul Drive Inverness Children Devasted Please call (352) 637-3339 Todays New Ads BEVERLYHILLSSat 9a-2p Mattresses, pressure washer, books, lawn equip. & more! 39 S Jefferson St BROWNING BUCK MARK 22 L.R. RIMFIRE PISTOLincludes 6000 rounds of 22 ammo, and 3 spare magazines. Will sell as a total package only. $680.00 cash only Call 352-465-4373 Chipper/Shredder Troy-BiltTomahawk, Briggs & Stratton gas engine. $700 OBO (352) 601-3174 CITRUS HILLS2/2Furn w/ membership, Seasonal/Annual 352-476-4242, 352-527-8002 CRYSTALRIVERHUGE 3 FAMILYSALE Sat.26th, 7:00a-? Furniture, household, toys, dvds, Barbies. And Much More!! 9 728 W. Orchard St. near Turkey Oak & 495 CRYSTALRIVER MEGASALEFriday & Sat., 8a-2p Decorating accessories, framed art, mens & womens callaway golf clubs, Hummels, furn., collectible glass, tools, Fabric, ladders, silver Jewl. Antiques & More Behind Olive Tree Restrant. US 19, UNITS 80, 81 & 82 CRYSTALRIVERMOVING SALE Sat 9a-4p Sun 1p -4p ALL Condo contents must go! Bring help load. The Springs on Kings Bay. 255 NW Bay Path Dr FORD Mustang Cobra, Indy 500 Pace Car-1994, Convertible, 7100 mi, Gar. kept 252-339-3897 HONDA 750 Shadow Aero. Runs & looks great! $2,995. Firm (352) 344-0084 INGLIS 2/2, Close to Plant on 1 acre Clean, Quiet $495. (352) 447-6016 INVERNESS RV Spaces. Bring your own boat and fishing gear.AGE 55+ community. Lot rent only $360-$375 including electric. Edge Water Oaks 352-344-1380 INVERNESS Sunday 1/27 1p-4pm 3/2 MH, Furn. lg screen lanai, shed & lot. All appl incl lg scn TV,55+ PK Asking $12,000. 911 Hoffmann Lane Melody MH Park (352) 364-3747 OPEN HOUSESugarmill W oods Sunday 1-3PM3 Chinkapin Court Homosassa Fl Nancy Little Lewis Realtor Exit Realty Leaders (352) 302-6082 Your world first.Every Day v automotive Classifieds

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C10 S ATURDAY,J ANUARY26,2013 C LASSIFIEDS C ITRUS C OUNTY ( FL ) C HRONICLE COUNTYWIDE DRYWALL25 ys exp lic2875 all your drywall needs Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal k 352-302-6838 k ATREE SURGEON Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates Free est. (352)860-1452 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Tractor Work Service specializing in clean up Tree Removal, General prop. maint. 302-6955 DOUBLE J Tree Serv. Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 KINGs LAND CLEARING & TREE SERVICE Complete tree & stump removal hauling, demo & tractor work. 32 yrs. exp. (352) 220-9819 R WRIGHT TREE Service Tree Removal & Trimming. Ins. & Lic.# 0256879 352-341-6827 RON ROBBINS Tree Service Trim, Shape & Remve, Lic/Ins. Free est. 352-628-2825 344-2556, Richard Water Pump Service & Repairs-all makes & models. Call anytime! DGS SERVICES LLC Reroofs Metal Roofs REPAIRS Home Inspector 414-8693 MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. Attention Consumers! Please make sure you are using a licensed and insured service professional. Many service advertisers are required by state law to include their state license number in all advertisements. If you dont see a license number in the ad, you should inquire about it and be suspicious that you may be contacting an unlicensed business.The Citrus County Chronicle wants to ensure that our ads meet the requirements of the law. Beware of any service advertiser that can not provide proof that they are licensed to do business. For questions about business licensing, please call your city or county government offices. Need a JOB? #1 Employment source is www.chronicleonline.com Classifieds INTERIOR/EXTERIOR & ODD JOBS. 30 yrs J. Hupchick Lic./Ins. (352) 726-9998 Robert G. Vigliotti LLC Painting Int/Ext FREE ESTIMATES 35 yrs exp. call 508-314-3279 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREEEST. (352) 586-2996 Cleaning Svc -Home, office,windows, pressure washing & more. 352-322-1799 HANDYMAN DAVE Pressure Wash homes & drive-ways, Hauling, Odd Jobs 352-726-9570 PIC PICARDS PRESSURE CLEANING& PAINTING 352-341-3300 Robert G. Vigliotti LLC Painting Int/Ext FREE ESTIMATES 35 yrs exp. call 508-314-3279 Winter Clean Up, Leaves, Power Washing & More Call Coastal Lawn Care (352) 601-1447 All phases of T ile Handicap Showers, Safety Bars, Flrs. 422-2019 Lic. #2713 GOT LEAVES Let our DR VAC Do the work! Call 352-502-6588 LAWNCARE N MORE Yard Clean-up, leaves bushes, hauling 352-726-9570 Winter Clean Up, Leaves, Power Washing & More Call Coastal Lawn Care (352) 601-1447 ATYOUR HOMEMower and small engine Its Tune Up time.352 220 4244 A-1 Hauling, Cleanups, garage clean outs, trash, lawn maint. furn. & misc. Mark (352) 287-0767 ALLOF CITRUS Clean Ups, Clean Outs Everything from Ato Z 352-628-6790 JEFFS Cleanup/Hauling Clean outs/Dump Runs Lawns/Brush Removal Lic. (352) 584-5374 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 HANDYMAN DAVE Pressure Wash homes & drive-ways, Hauling Odd Jobs 352-726-9570 THE KLEEN TEAM Residential/Comm. Lic., Bonded, Insured (352) 419-6557 Cleaning Svc -Home, office,windows, pressure washing & more. 352-322-1799 The T ile Man Bathroom Remodel Specializing in handicap. Lic/Ins. #2441. 352 634 1584 All Tractor Work Service specializing in clean up Tree Removal, General prop. maint. 302-6955 AllAROUND TRACTORLandclearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352 795-5755 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 Install, Restretch, Repair Clean, Sales, Vinyl Carpet, Laminent, Lic#4857 Mitch, (352) 201-2245 1 CALL & RELAX! 25yrs Exp in 100% property maint & all repairs, call H&H Services today! lic#37658 352-476-2285 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 ANDREW JOEHL HANDYMAN. Gen. Maint/Repairs Pressure Cleaning. 0256271 352-465-9201 Affordable Handy man 4 FAST 100% Guar. 4AFFORDABLE 4 RELIABLE Free Est H 352-257-9508 H Affordable Handy man 4 FAST 100% Guar. 4AFFORDABLE 4 RELIABLE Free Est H 352-257-9508 H Affordable Handy man 4 FAST 100% Guar. 4AFFORDABLE 4 RELIABLE Free Est H 352-257-9508 H Affordable Handy man 4 FAST 100% Guar. 4AFFORDABLE 4 RELIABLE Free Est H 352-257-9508 H AllAROUND TRACTORLand clearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 HELPING HANDS Transport, shopping Dr. appts, errands, etc. Hablo Espanol 813-601-8199 COUNTYWIDE DRYWALL25 ys exp lic2875 all your drywall needs Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal k 352-302-6838 k #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic.#5863 352-746-3777 DUN-RITE ELECTRIC Since / Free Est. lic EC 13002699 352-726-2907 **BOB BROWNS** Fence & Landscaping 352-795-0188/220-3194 A 5 ST AR COMP ANY GO OWENS FENC ING All Types. Free Est. Comm/Res. 628-4002 ROCKYS FENC ING Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,H 352 422-7279 H JEFFS Cleanup/Hauling Clean outs/Dump Runs Lawns/Brush Removal Lic. (352) 584-5374 THE KLEEN TEAM Residential/Comm. Lic., Bonded, Insured (352) 419-6557 DIESTLER COMPUTER New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 BIANCHI CONCRETE INC.COM ins/lic #2579 Driveways-Patios-Side walks. Pool deck repair /Stain 352257-0078 BIANCHI CONCRETE INC.COM ins/lic #2579 Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk. Pool deck repair /stain. 352257-0078 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic.(352) 364-2120 FATHER & SON Decorative Concrete Textures, Stamp,Spray Crack repair, Staining, driveways, pool decks, Lic/Ins 352-527-1097 ROBS MASONRY& CONCRETE Driveways tear outs Tractor work, Lic. #1476, 726-6554 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also wanted dead or alive washers & dryers. FREE pick up 352-564-8179 HELPING HANDS Transport, shopping Dr. appts, errands, etc. Hablo Espanol 813-601-8199 SHADY VIEW CANVAS Awnings *Carports*Boat Tops & Covers upholst 352-613-2518 Your world firstemployment Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com Need a job or a qualified employee? This areas #1 employment source! 000DM1M NEWACOUSTIC ELECTRIC GUITAR TRANS BLACK,CORD INCLUDED $95 601-6625 ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC GUITAR NEW W/GIGBAG,TUNER,STRAP, CORD ETC $100 352-601-6625 BLACK LES PAUL EPIPHONE GUITAR W/AMP,STRAP,CORD.ETC NEW !! $100 352-601-6625 DUNLOPCRYBABY Wah Pedal, Excellent condition $45., call 352-503-7143 NEW FAT STRAT STYLE GUITAR, DROPPED MINOR DAMAGE $45 352-601-6625 NEW NICE ACOUSTIC GUITAR PACK W/GIGBAG,STRAPEXTRASTRINGS ETC $65 352-601-6625 Player Piano Works great, with spare motor and service manual $750 Call (352) 795-8085 UPRIGHT PLAYER PIANO W/BENCH. Ampico reproducing. Walnut wood, good cond. $600 OBO (352) 382-1885 2 VERTICALBILNDS 6Wx4Lea. w/covers, almond slats.All hdwe. inc. exc. cond. $100. both 352-560-7857 BLINDS 1 PLEATED 64WX63L1 PLASTIC 64WX60LOFF WHITE $40 352-613-0529 BUYING US COINS Top $$$$ Paid. We Also Buy Gold Jewelry Beating ALL Written Offers. (352) 228-7676 DUDLEYS AUCTION **3 AUCTIONS ** Fri 1/25 Estate Coin 6pm $5-10-20 Gold pieces, Silver, $500 & $1,000 bills, Lg 1800s currency, silver Sat 1/26 Florida Porch Antiques Liquidation 10am On Site@ 712 W. Main St in Leesburg, HUGE Sale of from Long time Antique dealer filled the JC Penny Tue 1/28 Real Estate & Restaurant 10am 4135 S. Suncoast Blvd. (US 19) Homosassa, *check website* www.dudleys auction.com 637-9588 10%BP Au2267 AB1667 Maine-ly Real Estate #381384 MINT KAY5 STRING OPEN BACK, BANJO 50S-60S VINTAGE W/CASE $100 352-601-6625 4 WHEELWALKER WITH BREAKS AND SEATOnly $75.352-464-0316 4 WHEELED WALKER WITH BRAKES & SEAT $75. 352-464-0316 4TOILETSEAT RISER BRAND NEW WITH HANDLES ONLY $25. 352-464-0316 BEDSIDE COMMODE &ALUMINUM WALKER ADJUSTABLE LEGS ON EACH $20.00 EA.352 464 0316 BEDSIDE COMODE & ALUMINUM WALKER ADJUSTABLE LEGS ON BOTH $25 EA. 352-464-0316 DISPOSABLE UNDERWEAR M or W Size L Pack of 18. $5., 3/$12., 10/$30. Call (352)563-6410 DOCTORS SCALE for professional, excellent condition $95 call 352-382-7585 MANUALWHEELCHAIR WITH FOOTRESTS GREATSHAPE $100. 352-464-0316 NUTRON R3ZLX Power Wheel Chair w/ Harmar Micro Power Chair Lift 5yrs old. $1000 OBO 352-527-2906 SHOWER CHAIR WITH BACK WHITE FIBERGLASS WITH ADJUSTABLE LEGS $30. 352-464-0316 WHEELCHAIR LIFT Easily load a folding manual chair (not scooter)to vehicle hitch $100. Dunnellon 465-8495 FishAquarium 50 gallons, cabinet stand, lights & filter $250 (352) 621-0392 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP 15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb Delivered 352-795-0077 GERBILCAGE $20 352-613-0529 GOLF CLUB CAR Electric, Looks great & runs great. $1200Firm (352) 860-2430 GRACO PACKNPLAY GOOD CONDITION $40 352-613-0529 GRANDFATHER CLOCK Howard Miller Elegant Shaker Style in Cherry Top quality mvmt. w/ Wminstr chime recently serviced. Item is like new and value priced at $925. Firm. Serious inquires to 352-560-3474 4p-8p pls. leave message HEAVYDUTY WHIRPOOLDryer $125 Exercise Stepper machine $75. (352) 795-7254 HONDASTOCK PIPES fits honda shadow areo mint $60 352-621-0142 Mattress Trade In Sets Clean and Very Nice Fulls $50., Qn. $75. Kings. $125, 621-4500 MOTORCYCLE SEAT aftermarket saddlemen mint paid $325 sell for $100 firm fits Hondas 352-621-0142 NEW SKYLIGHTBUBBLETYPE SMOKED POLYCARBONITE 27 BY27 ONLY$60. 352-464-0316 PETCARRIER Petmate. Never used. 28 X 20.5 X 21.5. $50. 352-637-5969 PICK-UPTOOLBOX 56 wide, silver alum, 2 latch, 1 locking, great shape. $65. 352-422-1309 ROCKING HORSE Brown/Black-colored, rocks by rubber, ok condition, I will e-mail pics, $50 (352)465-1616 RYOBI 10 COMPOUND SAW#TS1342 15 AMPs, 5500 RPMs, dust bag, EX+, $60, 628-0033 SMALLBLOCK CHEVY STARTER new staggered bolt pattern $25 call or text 352-746-0401 SNAPPER 42 RIDING MOWER/GENERAC 4W GENERATOR Mower $1000. incl mulch attachment GenSet $375.BOTH LIKE NEW 352-489-6465 SNAPPER 42 RIDING MOWER/GENERAC 4W GENERATOR Mower $1000. incl mulch attachment GenSet $375.BOTH LIKE NEW 352-489-6465 SOLD 40ft STEAL OVERSEAS SHIPPING CONTAINER $500 obo Stallion Cow Boy Hat, by Stetson, wool, sz 6 & Boots, black 11 D. both New $100. GlassTopTable w/ 4 chairs $100. 352-795-7254 TAILGATE FOR 1986 CHEVYSilverado F10 PickupTruck $50. Ruth 352-382-1000 TODDLER HEADBOARD Brand New Metal Headboard, $10 (352)465-1616 VERIZON LG ENV TOUCH V X11000 cell phone full key board $25 call or text 352-746-0401 VERIZON SAMSUNG BRIGHTSIDETOUCH cell phone full key board $35.call or text 352-746-0401 WICKERTEACART, Vintage, excellent cond. useful and decorative, $80, (Dunnellon) (352) 465-1813 4 WHEEL(SONIC) GO GO BYPRIDE MOBILITYTAKEAPART(4 PIECES)TO FITIN TRUNK OR VAN $585. 352-464-0316 CITRUS SPRINGS Sat& Sun 7a -2p 7209 N Deborah Terr INVERNESS Sat & Sun 10:00 am 7989 E Turner Camp Rd INVERNESS Sat Jan 26th 9a-2p MULTI FAMILY Household, clothing, electronics. etc. No early birds 9828 E. Lake Tahoe Dr. ROYALOAKS ANNUAL YARD SALESaturday, Jan. 26, 8am-1pm BIG SELECTION! From Inv. S. on 41 to Royal Oaks sign (before airport) turn right, follow signs. SMW-MOVINGMarble table w/4 chairs $300. Sofa bed $300. 3 area rugs, wood coffee table. riding mower $500. Lots More! Call 9a-7p (352) 503-5275 BEAUTIFULWOOL WOMENS SUITE tan Isenhower style, and blouse to match sz.10 $25. 789-5770 BOYS WINTER CLOTHING SIZES 5 & 6 SHIRTS, PANTS & JACKETS $30 352-613-0529 PROM DRESS Long blue size 13/14, strapless $45. call or text 352-302-2004 PROM DRESS Long, Purple, 1 shoulder, size 12 $65. call or text 352-302-2004 PROM DRESS Long, red / black, halter, size 10/12 $35.call or text 352-302-2004 SILVER FOX COATfinger tip length beautiful sacrafice $100. sz m-l 789-5770 Special Occasion Mens beautiful all wool black suit 41R Palm Beach from Falveys Mens Store Gold Dress Jacket 41R Tommy Hilfiger from Dillards both worn only 2-3 times, excel. cond. $175 for both (352) 527-2050 T.J.MAX 50.00 GIFT CARD WILLVERIFY/ $35. LINDA 352-341-2271 WESTERN BOOTS Brown marble leather made in usa by ACMEsize 8.5EW $40 call text 352-302-8529 MAGELLAN ROADMATE GPS 5220-LM. Never used. $99. 352-637-5969 SECURITYCAMERAS 2 wireless B&W cameras/transmitters to yourTV $50. Dunnellon 465-8495 4 WHEELWALKERhand brakes & wheel locks, seat, basket, folds for storage, Ex., $50, 352-628-0033 10 FT. WOOD STEPLADDER Type 1, 250 duty $90 (352) 422-0294 12 ft. Aluminum John Boat, no paper work $165. Trailer, spare tire and wheel, fits 10 -15 $35. (315) 466-2268 BABYSTROLLER brown/green color, Safety 1st, in ok condition, $20 (352)465-1616 BSR LARGE HOME STEREO SPEAKERS 20 WIDE BY30 HIGH ONLY$100. NICE 352-464-0316 DIGITALPHOTOALBUM Brookstone holds 500 pics like new great brag book $40 call or text 352-746-0401 FIREWOOD OAK SEASONED CUTTO 12-15 LENGTHS $25. 352-527-4319 TWIN BED SET WITH MATTRESS, BOXSPRING & FRAME $50 352-613-0529 Wood Dresser 19 x 56 Dark wood includes, mirror $475 (352) 419-4606 Xlarge dresser & 2 nightstands solid wood bow front & sides $525. Thomasville coffee table set mint cond $425. 352-419-4513 3 MOWERS Craftsman 5000 Craftsman 3000 White B&S Engine Call (352) 341-1569 BLACK & DECKER HEDGETRIMMER Includes 100cord Asking $25. 352-419-4305 Extension ladder 17 fl Alluminum ladder $200; Pressure Washer with wand, 16 ft extension $350 (352) 726-8931 LAWN MOVERS TORO self propelled, 6.5 HP$150; 0 Turn GRAVELYriding mower. 12 HP$500 (352) 726-8931 TORO POWER SWEEPBLOWER Includes 100cord Asking $30. 352-419-4305 BEVERLY HILLSOUR LADY OF GRACE CHURCH FLEA MARKE T SA T JAN. 26th 8AM to 2PM. 6 Roosevelt Blvd. BEVERLYHILLSSat 9a-2p Mattresses, pressure washer, books, lawn equip. & more! 39 S Jefferson St CITRUS HILLSSat & Sun 7:30a -1p MULTI FAMILY 1196 N. Man-O-War Dr Citrus SpringsSat & Sun 9a -3p 8395 N Triana Dr CRYSTALRIVERHUGE 3 FAMILYSALE Sat.26th, 7:00a-? Furniture, household, toys, dvds, Barbies. And Much More!! 9 728 W. Orchard St. near Turkey Oak & 495 CRYSTALRIVER MEGASALEFriday & Sat., 8a-2p Decorating accessories, framed art, mens & womens callaway golf clubs, Hummels, furn., collectible glass, tools, Fabric, ladders, silver Jewl. Antiques & More Behind Olive Tree Restrant. US 19, UNITS 80, 81 & 82 CRYSTALRIVERMOVING SALE Sat 9a-4p Sun 1p -4p ALL Condo contents must go! Bring help load. The Springs on Kings Bay. 255 NW Bay Path Dr CRYSTALRIVERThurs, Fri, Sat, 8a -5p 50s Old town Canoe, 3 boats, tools, fishing & households 7915 W Riverbend Rd. HERNANDO Annual Apache Shores yard sales Sat. 26th 9a-2p Maps at Club House on Buffalo & Apache Trail off 200 HERNANDO Saturday 26th 9a-2p 3505 Flying Arrow Pathoff 200, Antiques, Guns, 2 Jon Boats, 1 alum. fishing boat, longerberger baskets, Lots of Misc. Additional Sales on Same Road INVERNESS Fri-Sat 8a-4p Moving into RV.Tools, household items, E. Maxwell Place INVERNESS Fri. 25 & Sat. 26 8a-2p MISC., some furniture, concrete statues 3229 S FRANKLIN TERR

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S ATURDAY,J ANUARY26,2013C 11 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS 000DOQ2 352-628-5100 www.villagetoyota.com CRYSTAL RIVER VILLAGE TOYOTA MANAGERS SPECIALS *Payments are with $2,000 cash down or trade equity and with approved credit. See dealer for details. TOYOTA AVALON XL12120161 $ 6,995 KIA RIO 13010032A $ 7,995 TOYOTA AVALON12120369 $ 12,995 TOYOTA CAMRY12120351 $ 15,995 NISSAN ALTIMA12129001 $ 16,995 TOYOTA SIENNA12120358 $ 17,995 LEXUS13010057 $ 18,995 CHEVY EQUINOX13010041 $ 21,995 CADILLAC CTS13010026 $ 24,995 TOYOTA CAMRY XLE12120327 $ 25,995 CADILLAC DTS NAV, Sunroof12119006 $ 32,995 TOYOTA CAMRY12120252 $ 8,995 CADILLAC CTS Loaded 12120202 $ 14,995 TOYOTA CAMRY12120292 $ 15,995 TOYOTA PRIUS12120357 $ 17,995 TOYOTA AVALON XLS12129007 $ 18,995 TOYOTA CAMRY Hybrid 12120171 $ 20,995 TOYOTA TUNDRA12129008 $ 21,995 TOYOTA PRIUS12120389 $ 25,995 CADILLAC SRX12129004 $ 29,995 OVER 100 TO CHOOSE FROM! CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY 7k Miles 12120106 $ 21,995 CADILLAC DTSNAV S/R 12119006 $ 33,995 000DM1Q Youve Got It!Somebody Wants It! (352) 563-5966 www.chronicleonline.com640980B BIRD SUPPLYSALE Sun, Feb. 3, 9a-3p, Cages, Seed, Toys, Playstands, Milletspray & more! Save! Cage wire, Chicks & ducklings! 8260 Adrian Dr., Brooksville 727-517-5337 MINIATURE POODLES miniature poodle pups born 10/16/12 Health Cert 1 apricot & 1 black female & 1 black male almost potty trained, raised in our home. $500 cash call 352-419-5662 or karaluv3@yahoo.com NICKY Nicky is a 2 y.o. lab/bulldog mix, weighing about 78 pounds, and is Heart-worm negative. Is very sweet and loveable, very intelligent. However, he is a big, strong dog who needs a strong person to handle him, and a fenced yard is strongly recommended. He knows how to sit for treats and wants to please his human friend very much. He is available now at the Citrus County Animal Shelter. Call 352-746-8400 RATS FOR SALE 50 cents to $3.00 All Sizes (352) 419-9080 Leave Message Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA, Malesstarting@ $400. Lots of colors, Beverly Hills, FL(352)270-8827 www .aceof pup s.net Bermuda Hay 50lbs $6 Never been rained on 795-1906 586-1906 SHAMROCK FARM, CR I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I CRYSTALRIVER6851 W. Vanaman Ct 2/2 $425/$400 dep. DUNNELLON 2/2 5159 W Disney Lane $400/ $400 dep. (727) 480-5512 FLORALCITY2/1$450 mo + sec. (352) 637-6554: 422-1562 WANT TO BUY HOUSE or MOBILE AnyArea Condition orSitua tion. Call Fred, 352-726-9369 Will Buy Block House In Citrus County, Any Condition, Agents welcome (315) 466-2268 1 Sweet Little Male Yorkie, CKC reg., $375. Fl. health certs., Call (352) 212-4504 or (352) 212-1258 AMERICAN PITBULL PUPPIES We have 1 female and 5 males left they are 3 weeks old Jan.18th $150each Mother and Father on site. 352-302-7975 HANK Hank is an 8 y.o. male Hound mix who was a stray. He is a sweet, affectionate, low key gentleman, easy to walk, does not pull on leash. He has good energy and is a good companion. Is very housebroken, gets along with other dogs. Weighs about 56 pounds. Not yet neutered but would be included in adoption fee. Is a very sweet older dog in need of a good, safe home. Call Mike @ 352-726-0165 or Joanne @352-795-1288. Winchester Model 70 Super grade, 300 Win. Mag., Nikkon scope, + ++ extras, $,1200 (352) 628-5355 2013 Enclosed Trailers 6x12 with ramp, $1895 ** call 352-527-0555 ** Motorcycle utility trailer 4ft x 8ft. 12 in wheels $700. (352) 465-5573 MUSTANGTRAILER HITCH $100. 352-503-2792 TRAILER 4 x6, has spare tire, garage kept; Good Condition $500 (352) 726-8931 GRACO PACKNPLAY BROWN PLAID GOOD CONDITION $40 352-613-0529 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I LIGHTFIXTURE chandelier, 5 frosted glass shades, bronzed color metal, nice $50.352-422-1309 LOVE SEATGreat condition call for e-mail picture.$100.Linda 352-341-2271 SINGER SEWING MACHINE Model 08/28 works book included 352-697-5565 $50. SUNBEAM FLEECE ELECTBLANKETKING SIZE brand new. dual controllers. sage/green. $50 352-220-3944 TWIN BED WITH BOXSPRING & FRAME $50 352-613-0529 ELLIPTICALMACHINE PRO-FORM 490 LE with users manual. Heavy duty, I-Pod compatible w/fan. Less than 2 yrs old. $300 527-8276 EXERCISE BIKE (DP) UPRIGHTTYPE WORKSTHEARMS TOO $85. 352-464-0316 EXERCISE BIKE PURSUITALL ELECTRONICS $100. 352-464-0316 Proform Crosswalk 480 excel. cond. less than 50 mi. walk on it inclines, preset ifit trainer workout, built in fan, $275. 352-382-5208 ROWING MACHINE BY BODYROW WORKS THEARMSAND LEGS $50. 352-464-0316 SOLD TREADMILL-by Health Rider, space saver, extra features, exc cond. floor pad incl. cost $400+ Asking $150 $$ REDUCED $$ EZ GO GOLF CART Electric, exc cond. incl. charger. $1,500 (352) 503-2847 5 Mens Bicycles $15. ea (352) 746-7357 14 Assorted Golf Clubs, left handed $200 (352) 795-4942 22 Colt Woodsmen early model orgin. $700 OBO. 352-258-1740 30 cal. Carbine 1943 Inland mfg orgin. Korea war bring home. $1000. OBO 352-258-1740 357 Mag. 6 Shot Rev. German made adj rear site exc cond. $350 S pringfield model 53B single shot 22 rifle $120 (352) 344-5853 22LR ammo $16per 100. 525 rds $80 (352) 533-2228 Antique Punt Gun (duck) mfg cir 1831, by Royal De Charlesville, app. $5000 in 1998 $3000. (727) 488-6474 BROWNING BUCK MARK 22 L.R. RIMFIRE PISTOLincludes 6000 rounds of 22 ammo, and 3 spare magazines. Will sell as a total package only. $680.00 cash only Call 352-465-4373 Concealed Weapons Permit Course DANS GUN ROOM (352) 726-5238 FOR SALE Mini-14 223 scoped stainless $1000. 10-22 Scoped wood blue $500. 352-422-2004 For sale SKS 1956 Sino Soviet all orginal $500 352-422-2004 GOLF CLUBS Two sets, pull carts and accessories. $60.each 726-1495 GUN & KNIFE SHOW BROOKSVILLE HSC CLUB Sat. Jan.. 26th 9-5p Sun. Jan. 27th 9a-4p HERNANDO COUNTYFAIRGROUNDS Admission $6.00 (352) 799-3605 HOLSTER Uncle Mikes camo belt style size 10 $7 call or text 352-746-0401 REMINGTON 700 BDL 270cal exc cond. $495. will take lever action 30-30 on trade. (906) 285-1696

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S ATURDAY, J ANUARY26, 2013 C13 2013 EDGE SE MSRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29,795 Nick Nicholas Ford Discount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -796 Retail Customer Cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -500 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash . . . . -1,000 Retail Bonus Customer Cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -500 3 Payments On Us Special Retail Customer Cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 $25,499 MSRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19,180 Nick Nicholas Ford Discount . . . . . . . . . . -280 Retail Customer Cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -$500 3 Payments On Us Special Retail Customer Cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,000 2013 FIESTA SE $17,400 Dealer retains all incentives. On select vehicles. Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $3 99. W.A.C. See dealer for additional details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pi ctures are for illustrative purposes only. Trade-In Assistance Bonus Customer Cash available to those who currently own or lease a 1998 or newer Ford/LM/Competitieve Car Truck or SUV who trades in or have a lease expiring by Jan. 31, 2012. Model Select Vehicles Tr ade-in Assistance Bonus Customer Cash (PGM#33368) (National). Offers expires Jan. 31, 2013. 1 Based on AutoSource, Inc. data pulled on 9/21/12. 2EPA-e stimated 47 city/47 hwy/47 combined mpg. 3EPA-estimated 29 city/40 hwy/33 combined mpg. Actual milea ge will vary. N3T125 Family Owned & Opperated Where do you find Americas freshest lineup? Youll find these fuel-efficient vehicles in a Nick Nicholas Ford Showroom near you. Exclusive EcoBoost technology delivers efficient power. And now, Nick Nickolas Ford offers 4 models EPA rated at 40 mpg highway or better. So you can go further. 2012 F-150 4X4 SUPER CREW $32,399 MSRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38,335 Nick Nicholas Ford Discount . . . . . . . . . . . . -1,936 Retail Customer Cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -1,250 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash . . . . -1,250 3 Payments On Us Special Retail Customer Cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -1,500 2012 FUSION SE MSRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25,900 Special Added Discount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -450 Nick Nicholas Ford Discount . . . . . . . . . . . -1,201 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash . . -1,750 3 Payments on Us Special Retail Bonus Cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -1,500 $20,999 N2C272 2012 F-250 LARIAT 4X4 CREW CAB MSRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54,735 XLT Diesel Discount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -1,500 Nick Nicholas Ford Discount . . . . . . . . . . . . -3,636 Retail Customer Cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -1,500 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash . . . . -1,000 3 Payments On Us Special Retail Customer Cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -1,500 $45,599 MSRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20,215 Special Added Discount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -35 Nick Nicholas Ford Discount . . . . . . . . . -1,181 Retail Customer Cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -1,000 3 Payments On Us Special Retail Customer Cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -1,000 $16,999 2012 FOCUS SE N2C281 1 N3C024 2013 C-MAX HYBRID RATED AT UP TO 47 HWY MPG 2 2013 FUSION HYBRID RATED AT UP TO 47 HWY MPG 2 2013 FOCUS RATED AT UP TO 40 HWY MPG 5 2013 FIESTA RATED AT UP TO 40 HWY MPG 5 172-point inspection by factory-trained technicians 7-year/100,000-mile powertrain warranty coverage** 12-month/12,000-mile Ford Comprehensive Limited Warranty Coverage** Vehicle history report 24/7 Roadside Assistance All Ford Certified Pre-Owned Vehicles Come With: NICK NICHOLAS USED CAR SUPER CENTER 2005 CHEVROLET MALIBU Great starter car. NP5740B $7,868 1995 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE ORVIS 4X4 Great SUV w/lots of options. N2T386B $7,968 2007 MAZDA MX-5 MIATA CONVT Affordable top down fun. N3T056P $18,668 2011 DODGE RAM 1500 BIG HORN Loaded SLT CREW CAB. NP5786D $25,668 2006 FORD F150 LARIAT SUPER CREW This one has the wow factor. N2T209P $19,968 2009 FORD FUSION SEL The import beater for real. N2T247A $19,668 2010 FORD ESCAPE XLT The right size SUV. NP5767A $19,968 2010 FORD MUSTANG GT Just reduced. NP5748 $25,968 2010 FORD EDGE LIMITED Dont miss this loaded limited. N2T374A $31,968 2006 GMC SIERRA C1500 CREW Loaded one owner. N3T206M $22,668 2003 FORD CROWN VICTORIA LX Great car. N2C294B $9,868 1965 FORD MUSTANG First time offered for sale in 33 years. N2C033M $18,000 2008 FORD MUSTANG BULLITT Limited and collectible Bullitt. N2T153E $23,968 2008 FORD F350 LARIAT DUALLY CREW Loaded 24k mile dually. NP5744A $30,668 2011 FORD FIESTA SES Loaded, loaded, loaded. N3C057D $19,668 2009 FORD FUSION SE Extra clean sunroof. NPR632 $18,968 2010 FORD F150 LARIAT SUPER CREW Extra sharp lariat crew cab. N2T296A $31,668 2010 FORD EDGE LIMITED Vista roof and nav. N2T351F $29,968 2009 FORD ESCAPE XLT Just reduced. N2T257B $18,668 2012 NISSAN FRONTIER SV 4X4 CREW Only 7k miles. N2T302A $27,968 2010 CHEVY MALIBU LT Only 22k miles and loaded. N2C161A $19,968 2009 PONTIAC TORRENT Looking for new home & loves kids. N2T215M $18,968 2011 FORD FLEX SEL Room for the whole family. N2C292A $25,668 2011 FORD ESCAPE XLS Only 10k miles. NN2T313A $21,668 SALE HOURS: Mon-Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5:00 Hwy. 44 W. Inverness 726-1231 www.nicknicholasford.com GENUINE PARTS. GENUINE SERVICE. GENUINE PEACE OF MIND. S EE O UR E NTIRE I NVENTORY AT : nicknicholasford.com Ocala Inverness Brooksville Spring Hill Homosass a Springs Crystal River Inglis Dunnellon 486 Hwy. 44 Hwy. 41 Hwy. 98 Hwy. 50 US 19 Hwy. 490 Hwy 2 00 Nick Nicholas Ford Nick Nicholas Floral City Hwy 491 Beverly Hills 2011 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER One owner and loaded. N3T145A $33,668 2008 FORD F150 SUPER CREW One owner local trade. N2T307B $23,968 2010 FORD F150 STX SUPER CAB Only 16k miles. N3T228A $24,668 2008 SATURN VUE XE Extra clean. N2C249A $15,668 2006 FORD EXPLORER XLS Nice explorer for not much money. N3C032A $13,968 2005 FORD MUSTANG Low mileage pony car. N2T410A $13,968 2007 CHEVY UPLANDER EXT LT Room for the whole family. NP5642B $12,668 2003 JEEP WRANGLER 4X4 Extra clean and ready to tow. NP5777D $14,968 *Not all buyers will qualify for Ford Credit limited-term financing on select vehicles. APR varies by term. See dealer for complete qualifications and program details. **See your dealer for limited-warranty coverage details. Vehicle availability varies by dealership. 2008 FORD EDGE LIMITED One owner limited. N3T099A $22,668 000DVD9 Brad Hill Salesperson of the Month

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C16 S ATURDAY, J ANUARY26, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE Shop from Home @ www.citruskia.com AT CITRUS KIA, WE JUST DONT CLOSE CAR DEALS, WE OPEN RELATIONSHIPS 000DVNS 352-564-8668 1850 S.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL The Power to Surprise TM *$3,000 down, 75 months at 4% interest rate. Plus tax, tag, title. WAC. The Power to Surprise TM Each vehicle includes: 150 point quality assurance inspection CARFAX vehicle history report 10 years/100,000 miles Powertrain Warranty from the original in-service date 24-hour roadside assistance for 10 years/unlimited miles from the original in-service date Towing, rental, and travel breakdown benefits for Out of Town Repair/Expense Kia Certified Pre-Owned vehicles must be less than five years old and have less than 60,000 miles. Sorento Sportage Rondo Forte Rio Sedona $ 249 Your Choice month LARGEST SELECTION LARGEST SELECTION of Certified Vehicles to Choose From! 2 0 1 2 O P T I M A L X 2 0 1 2 S O U L + 2 0 1 2 O P T I M A L X 2 0 1 2 S O U L + 2012 OPTIMA LX 2012 SOUL+

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S ATURDAY,J ANUARY26,2013C 17 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS 0 0 0 8 X H D For more information on how to reach Citrus County readers call 352-563-5592. Invern. Highlands 2/2/1 City Water, Great Loc. Quiet Neighrhood $650. 352-860-2554 INVERNESS 3/2 Brand New, Granite tops, marble flrs, SS Ap $895 (352) 634-3897 INVERNESS 3/2/2 Starting @ $750. www.relaxfl.com 352-601-2615 OR 352-201-9427 INVERNESS Highlands, 2/1/1 $590mo.1st & Sec (352) 344-2560 Sugarmill Woods3/2/2, Pool, remodeled $1,200. 352-302-4057 HERNANDO Affordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352)726-2225 BUSHNELL On 50 acres TV & W/D WIFI UTILITIES $450 (352) 603-0611 FLORALCITYLake House 3/1 Furn. $950. 352-419-4421 BEVERLYHILLS870 Beakrush Ln 2br 1 ba, 1 car gar. enclosed screen porch, $695mo. leased dep. no pets. 352-697-3133 BEVERLYHILLSLg 1/1, Extras, E-Z Terms $425. 697-1457 CITRUS SPRINGS 4 Br, 2 Ba, 2Car gar. only $795/mo. 7206 N. Varsity Ave. 382-1373. CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1Water Incl. CHA, $496. 352-220-2447 212-2051 CRYSTAL RIVER3/2+ Carport $725. mo DUNNELLON 3/1,$625 mo. 1st lst, Sec (352) 489-9239 DUNNELLON 2/2/2 RAINBOW SPRINGS Avail. Feb. 1st $800. mo+ sec. (352) 465-2022 HERNANDO Forest Ridge V illage Nice 2/2 home w/garage, screened patio, & pool/clubhouse privileges. $750 mo Call 980-285-8125 Homosassa Spring3/2 $750/mo + sec. (352) 628-3696 INVERNESS 1/1 Great Location, 55+ community Bring boat & fishing gear. $585 352-344-1380 Sugarmill Woods3BR, 2BA, Super Clean 3,100 sf, large priv. shaded lot, 2 covered, porches, sm. pet ok. $1,150. mo. yrly lse., sec. dep $700. $3,000 move in (727) 580-1083 BEVERLYHILLS1/1, Fresh paint, appls Flooring $475. mo. 352-302-3987 BEVERLY HILLS2/1 + Florida Room 106 S. Fillmore $550 mo. 352-422-2798 BEVERLY HILLS2/2/Carport. CHA $550. mo. & 1/1/CP + Fl. Rm $450 (352) 897-4447, 697-1384 CITRUS COUNTYBeautiful 3-4 Bedrm Homes & Duplexes w/1 car garage. Starting@$433/mo Inverness 352-726-3476 Lecanto 352-746-0373 Crystal River 352-563-0890 CITRUS HILLS2/2Furn w/ membership, Seasonal/Annual 352-476-4242, 352-527-8002 CITRUS HILLS 2/2 Townhouse Condo full appls, carport, Citrus Hills membership incldd Prudential Florida Showcase Properties call 352-476-8136 CITRUS SPRINGSLike New, 2/2 ,All appl. $625.954-557-6211 HERNANDO Affordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 CRYSTALRIVER**RENT REDUCED** 3/1 Country Home on stilts,w/fenced yard. $565 + Utilities. Call 920-922-6800 CRYSTAL RIVER2/1 828 5th Ave. NE Furn $650 or Unfurn. $550 + sec 727455-8998, 727-776-3120 RAINTREE APARTMENTS IIACCEPTING APPLICATIONS Elderly or disabled with or without children 201 E. Hills St. Inverness, Fl 34452(352) 726-4330TDD #711 8:00a-4:00p, M-F Closed for lunch 12pm-1pm. Equal Housing Opportunity LECANTO Oak Tree Plaza, Office/Retail, CR 486, 900 sf. @ $700+ util. & sales tax.1 mo. Free w/12 mo. Lease 352-258-6801 Need a JOB? #1 Employment source is www.chronicleonline.com Classifieds CRYSTALRIVERSpacious 2/1 lawn, water, sewr & garb. W/D hk up $500.mo $250 dep No Pets 352-212-9205 352-212-7922 CRYSTALRIVER** NICE** Secret HarbourApts. Newly remodeled 2/1 starting @ $575 unfurn/furn. Incl Water, garbage, W/D hook-up. 352-586-4037 RAINTREE APARTMENTACCEPTING APPLICATIONS1, 2 & 3 Bedrms. Starting @ $448. 201 E. Hills St. Inverness, Fl 34452(352) 726-4330TDD #711 80:0am-4:00pm Closed for lunch 12pm-1pm. Equal Housing Opportunity Alexander Real Estate (352) 795-6633Crystal River Apts2 BR/1 BA$400-$500 ALSO HOMES & MOBILES AVAILABLE CRYSTALRIVER1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments for Rent 352-465-2985 CRYSTAL RIVERLarge 2/2, $575. quiet, Clean inclds water, 352-563-2114 352-257-6461 INVERNESS 2 B/RsAvailable KNOLLWOOD TOWNHOMESRentalAssistance Available For QualifiedApplicants Call 352-344-1010 MWF, 8-12 & 1-5 307 Washington Ave Inverness Florida Equal Housing Opp. 2/2 on Lake Rousseau. NOW $17,500 Low Lot Rent $240/mo.2003. Used Seasonally Owner bought a house. 207-546-6115, cell Adult Park 2/1, Mobile, heat and air, nicely furn. large shed, sreen rm. carport, $8,200 Lot Rent $160 mo. (352) 287-3729 CRYSTALRIVER VILLAGE H WINTER SPECIALS H 2/2, $15,000. Furn. 2/2 New Model $59K 2/2 waterfrnt. $31,000. 352-795-7161 or 352-586-4882 DUNNELLON LAKE ROUSSEAU MH Park. Lg. 1/1 w/slider to encl. screened porch, outside shed, CHAfurn. Nice yard, low lot rent. Asking$11,900 (207) 347-0531 HOMOSASSASBest Housing Value Modern homes from $8,400 or Lease to Own from $179/mo. $1000.down + Lot rent at Evanridge Community an exceptional 55+Park 352 628-5977 INVERNESS 3/2 MH, Furn. lg screen lanai, shed & lot. All appl incl lg scn TV,55+ PK Asking $12,000. Call (352)364-3747 INVERNESS Move In Ready, Beautiful 1/1 SW, Mobile, Harbor Lights 55+ park, on Big Lake Henderson. Fully furn., very updated, view of lake, Cen. HVAC, W/D, AMust See! Asking $7,000, 352-344-1828 INVERNESS PARK55+ 14X60, 2/2, new roof, all appliances, partly furn. screen room, shed, 352-419-6476 MOBILE HOME, Fully Furnished. Everything stays. Just move in. 2 Sheds, washer/dryer all appliances. Must See! $7,500. (708) 308-3138 PALM TERRACE 55+ Community, 1997 3BR/2BA14 x 66, excel. cond. Shed, Fl. Rm. Carport & Deck $16,000. (352) 400-8231 REDUCED 2/2 $17,500 On Lake Rousseau Lot Rent $240/mo. BETTER THAN NEW! Owner financing. Call LEE (352) 817-1987 Singing Fores t FLORALCITY 14 x 70, Mobile, 2 lrg. bedrooms, furnished & remodeled, heat & air, carport & shed, Wash/ Dryer, Lot rent $176. $14,500 352-344-2420 STONEBROOK, CR 2bd/2ba,gourmet kitch, master suite,encl. porch pond, crprt+ patio $51,900, Cridland RE, Jackie 352-634-6340 Waterfront/Homosassa Westwind Village 55+ Beautifully furnished Move In Ready, 2/2 2 Scrn rms, dbl door, refrig./Ice maker Washer Dryer, Low mnthly pyments, $19000 obo (850) 449-1811 Cell HOMOSASSA RENT-to-OWN 3br 2ba MH Immediate Occpancy Owner Financing A vail CALL(352) 795-2377 RENTAL MANAGEMENT REALTY, INC.352-795-7368 000DUO1 www.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.com CITRUS SPRINGS 8160 N. Duval Dr. (CS). . $1,3003/2/2 Pool home, fully furn. w/utilities water/sewer and elec. caps CRYSTAL RIVER 11246 Freshwater Path (CR) . . $1,2002/2/1 Screened lanai, nice furnishing, utilities incl. 10350 Deepwoods Dr. (CR) . . $7502/2/1 Close to mall, lg. utility room HOMOSASSA 7650 W. Homosassa Trail #27 (H) . $5002/1 Cozy duplex on Homosassa Trail40 Hollyhock Cir. (H) .. $9503/2/2 Oak Village SMW, spacious homeHERNANDO/INVERNESS 994 E. Winnetka St. (Her). . $6252/1.5 on 1 acre with carport6315 N. Shorewood Dr. (Her) . $6502/1 Cute home with FL room and great backyard 854 Pritchard Isl. (Inv.) . $8002/2 Townhouse on waterfront, comm. pool CASTRO Realty and Property Management Inc. 333 N. CroftAvenue Inverness FL34453352-341-4663 CITRUS COUNTY RENTALS1 4 BEDROOMS ALLAREASCall For Details 352-341-4663 Chassahowitzka 3/2 waterfrnt/DW $500 2/2, fenc. Yd/DW $500 2/2 house w/gar. $600Sugarmill W oods 3/2/2, Furnished, $900. AGENT (352) 382-1000 CRYSTALRIVER1Br 2BACompletely furn., incl utilities, W/D, $700 mo 1st, last & dep (352) 422-7717 CRYSTALRIVER2/BR $550. 3BR $750 Near Town 563-9857 CRYSTALRIVERStudio Apartment Completely Furn. Cable TV W/D rm. All util. incld.+ boat dock. $700 mo 352-372-0507 FLORALCITYLAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm. AC, Clean, No Pets (352) 344-1025 HERNANDO 2BR/1BA, acre AllAppls $395 mo (No Pet s) (352) 860-0904, (Cell) 352-212-6815 HOMOSASSA 2 & 3 Br homes w/ storage sheds. Starting at $550/mo + $800/Sec ONL Y $1350 total to move in. We pay trash, lawn, water & sewer. Close to Walmart, Publixs& Suncoast PKY No pets 352-584-1831 HOMOSASSA 2/1, $400/mo.+ util. 1574 S. Iroquois Ave (352) 503-7562 HOMOSASSA 2/1,Furn or Non Furn. 9075 S. Breen Terr. $500 mo (352) 382-7396 HOMOSASSA 2BR, $475. mo. Nice Area (352) 422-1932 HOMOSASSA 2BR/2 BA, No Pets $500(352) 628-5696 INGLIS 2/2, Close to Plant on 1 acre Clean, Quiet $495. (352) 447-6016 LECANTOLEISUREACRES 3/2 water & garbage incl. $600mo. (352) 628-5990 14 x 60, 2BR, 1 BA, Carport, Shed, appliances, W/D, clean, move in condition Near new Walmart on 486, $4,800. (352) 387-7824 BANK FORECLOSURE Land-n-Home, 3/2 1500 sq. ft. On Acre, paved rd. LOOKS GOOD, Have financing if needed, only $2,500 down, $381.44mo. P&I W.A.C. OR $69,900. Call 352-613-0587 or 352-621-9183 Crystal River 55+ Park. 2BR/1BACarport & Screened Porch. Heat/Air $9,500. 352-746-4648 Ask for Brit HERNANDO $$Private Owner $$ FinancingAvailable New & Used Manufactured Homes Call 1-727-967-4230 HOME-ON-LAND 3/2 Great Shape. Acre. Move In Now $59,900. Call 352-401-2979, 352-621-3807 NEW 2013 2br 2ba Doublewide w/10 year Warranty $39,900 Delivered & setup, a/c, skirt, steps. Call(352) 795-1272 Palm Harbor Homes New Homes at $39,900. $5K for your used mobile home. 3 New Models, 1,100-2,400 SF 800-622-2832 ext 210 REPOS-REPOS REPOS WE HA VE REPOS CALL352-621-9181 WE WILL BUYYOURMANUFACTURED Home. from 1976-2013 CALL(352) 795-2377 2BR, 1 BA,on your own 75x 100 lot, no fees! new enclosed sunroom, lg laundry room furn, 2 storage buildings, 5111 Castle LakeAve. S of Inverness on SR 41 $39,500 (352) 597-7353 3bdr/2 full baths/ 2 car carport on 1 acre. split layout, steel roof, caged pool, 20x25 ft deck, lg storage building, Furnished Modular $73,900, 5215 Bridget Pt, Castle Lake Park Inverness (352) 597-7353 CASTLE LAKE Floral City 2/2 S/W Fully furnished move in condition. 2 screen rooms, 2 sheds. Landscaped with sprinkler on quiet cul-de-sac. $38,900. 352-212-1883 CRYSTALRIVERLarge 4br 2ba MH READYTO MOVE IN Owner Fin. Avail. CALL(352) 795-1272 FLORALCITY By Owner, 14x 60 2/2 Split Plan w/dbl roof over, w/ porch & carport on fenced 1 acre, Very N ice Quiet, Less Than $46,500. Cash. Considering ALL Cash offers. 352-586-9498 HERNANDO 2/2 DW On lot, with Shed & Deck See for yourself at 2562 N. Treasure Pt. $28,500 obo 352-464-0719 HERNANDO/486 1+acre, 2br SWMH+ den/flp, ManCave/Work Shop w/AC, 28x40, $47,500, J. Desha Cridland Real Estate (352)634-6340 HOMOSASSA **3/2, Fenced Yard,**NEW Flooring, NEW AC $5,000 Down, $435. mo (352) 302-9217 HOMOSASSA 2ba 1 ba MH needs complete rehab. Good shed, well & septic. 6524 W.Akazian $12,500 (603) 860-6660 NW Citrus County SWMH on 1 acre, 2/1.5 -paved rd., screened porch, appliances $37,700-possible owner financing 352-795-9908 W. of 19 in Homosassa 1994, 2/2 Doublewide, Move In Condition Corner Lot $44,900. Tradewinds Realty (352) 400-0089

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C18 S ATURDAY,J ANUARY26,2013 C LASSIFIEDS C ITRUS C OUNTY ( FL ) C HRONICLE 296-0126 SACRN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice under Ficti tious Name Law, pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under 297-0126 SACRN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice under Ficti tious Name Law, pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of WHITE DIAMOND LIMOUSINE SERVICE Located at 2424 Hwy 44 West, Inverness, Florida, 34450 in the County of Citrus, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State,Tallahassee, Florida. the fictitious name of DECO CAFE Located at 109 Courthouse Square, Inverness Florida, 34450 in the County of Citrus, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Crystal River, Florida, this 22nd day of January, 2013. /s/Jennifer S. Spaulding President Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, January 26, 2013 Dated at Inverness, Florida, this 22nd day of January, 2013. /s/Frances Williams President Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, January 26, 2013 298-0126 SACRN PUBLIC NOTICE The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) announces the following public meeting to which all interested persons are invited: Cooperative Funding Public Meeting: Governing Board members will discuss, evaluate and prioritize fiscal year 2014 requests for project funding in Hillsborough, Pasco and Pinellas counties of SWFWMD. DATE/TIME: Tuesday, February 12, 2013; 10 am PLACE: SWFWMD Tampa Service Office, 7601 US Highway 301 North, Tampa FL 33637 A copy of the agenda may be obtained by contacting: WaterMatters.org-Boards, Meetings & Event Calendar; 1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211. Pursuant to the provision of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring reasonable accommodations to participate in this workshop/meeting is asked to advise the agency at least 5 days before the workshop/meeting by contacting SWFWMDs Human Resources Bureau Chief, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida 34604-6899; telephone (352) 796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or email to ADACoordinator@swfwmd.state.fl.us. If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board/Committee with respect to any matter considered at this meeting or hearing, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence from which the appeal is to be issued. For more information, you may contact: Lori.Manuel@watermatters.org 1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211, x4606 (Ad Order EXE0245) Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle January 26, 2013 299-0126 SACRN PUBLIC NOTICE The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) announces the following public meeting to which all interested persons are invited: Cooperative Funding Public Meeting: Governing Board members will discuss, evaluate and prioritize fiscal year 2014 requests for project funding in Polk, Highlands and Hardee counties of SWFWMD. DATE/TIME: Wednesday, February 13, 2013; 1 pm PLACE: SWFWMD Bartow Service Office, 170 Century Boulevard, Bartow, FL 33830 A copy of the agenda may be obtained by contacting: WaterMatters.org-Boards, Meetings & Event Calendar; 1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211. Pursuant to the provision of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring reasonable accommodations to participate in this workshop/meeting is asked to advise the agency at least 5 days before the workshop/meeting by contacting SWFWMDs Human Resources Bureau Chief, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida 34604-6899; telephone (352) 796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or email to ADACoordinator@swfwmd.state.fl.us. If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board/Committee with respect to any matter considered at this meeting or hearing, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence from which the appeal is to be issued. For more information, you may contact:Lori.Manuel@watermatters.org 1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211, x4606 (Ad Order EXE0246) Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle January 26, 2013 2012 JEEP WRANGLER Luxury, loaded. $ 00,000 BusinessName Address Phone C O M I N G C O M I N G COMING S A T F E B 2 N D S A T F E B 2 N D SA T., FEB. 2ND T H E B E S T P L A C E T O S E L L Y O U R T H E B E S T P L A C E T O S E L L Y O U R THE BEST PLACE TO SELL YOUR B O A T C A R C A N O E M O T O R C Y C L E O R T R U C K B O A T C A R C A N O E M O T O R C Y C L E O R T R U C K BOAT, CAR, CANOE, MOTORCYCLE OR TRUCK C A L L 5 6 3 3 2 0 6 F O R D E T A I L S C A L L 5 6 3 3 2 0 6 F O R D E T A I L S CALL 563-3206 FOR DETAILS GOLDWING 1998, SE with Voyager Trike Kit -Tan; 55,200 miles; $9,000 (352) 726-6128 Harley-DAVIDSON2006 FLHTPI Clean bike, great looks, 88 ci, 5 speed, low miles 19K, accident free, never layed down, garage kept, two tone bk/wt, all service done by HD dealer 352 513-4294 asking $10,500 HARLEY-Davidson Leather Jacket LG as New, $300. OBO Two shorty motorcycle Helmets S/M & L/XL $50ea 352-746-6125 HONDA Goldwing, 100k + miles, $9,500 (352) 419-4606 HONDA 750 Shadow Aero. Runs & looks great! $2,995. Firm (352) 344-0084 HONDA 1997, GOLDWING ASPENCADE, 24K mi, Lots a Extras! $6000. (352) 212-6450 HONDA 2007 Full Size Shadow. Harley,1100CC, Chrome, bags, trade?, 70mpg $2,800. Crystal River (727) 207-1619 HONDABLACK BIRD CBR 1100 LOW LOW MILES ONLY$3488.00 (352) 621-3678 HONDAST13002006 MADE TO TOUR ONLY$7786 (352) 621-3678 KAWASKI NINFA650 LIKE NEW ONLY $5488 (352) 621-3678 KYMCO 2009,AJILITY SCOOTER GREAT GAS SAVER ONLY $998 (352) 621-3678 SCOOTER 50 CC, like new, 400 miles, runs great $850 OBO (352) 746-0167 (315) 439-6005 SUZUKI 1999,1400 Intruder with Lealman Trike Kit 24,283 miles; $10,000 (352) 726-6128 SUZUKI BURGMAN AUTOMATICTWIST AND GO FUN ONLY $4686 (352) 621-3678 SUZUKI GSXR 750195 MILES HOLD ON ONLY$9996 (352) 621-3678 VICTORYCROSS ROADS GREATAmerican MADE CRUSIER ONLY$12888 (352) 621-3678 TOYOTA2004, 4 Runner Sport 2WD, 94K mi, Leather $12,800. obo Call Troy 352-621-7113 CADILLAC 2007, Escalade, 44k miles, Luxury NAV, $29,500. Call Troy (352) 621-7113 CHEVYTRAILBLAZER LT 05exc. cond. asking $6000 obo, in Hernando (904) 923-2902 FORD F150, 1978, 4 x 4 perfect, father/son, project $1,650 obo (352) 564-4598 JEEP 2004, Wrangler X 4WD, Only 57K miles, Hard Top $13,800.Call Troy 352-621-7113 KIA 2006 Sedona Great Family Van, 7 Pass, low mi. Call today for Low Price 352-628-4600 BAD BOYBUGGIE 2011 ready to hunt Only $5998. (352) 621-3678 POLARIS 2002 SPORTSMAN 700 CC 4X4 AUTO READYFORTHE MUD ONLY$4288 (352) 621-3678 POLARIS RZR 800 LE TIMETO PLAYHARD ONLY$8388 (352) 621-3678 CF MOTO 2008, 250 Trike 772 miles, $2,495. (352) 726-6128 DALIN DAYSTAR2006, 700mi saddle bags, Fully dressed, Call (352) 527-1191 FASHION2007 250 cc; 1,500 miles; $1,200 (352) 726-6128 GOLDWING 1985 Blue; 39,155 miles; $2,495 (352) 726-6128 GOLDWING 1985 Limited Edition Gold; Fuel injected; 53,012 miles; $3,000 (352) 726-6128 1971 CHEVELLE CONVERTIBLE stunning, 40k+ invested fully restored, 350 auto, buckets, consistant show winner, high end stereo, red w/ white top & interior $23,900, 352-513-4257 AUTO SWAP CORRAL SHOW 20TH ANNUAL Sumter Swap Meets SUMTER COUNTY Fairgrounds, Bushnell Feb. 15, 16, 17th 1-800-438-8559 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I CHEVROLET 1994,C/K 2500 $2,880 352-341-0018 CHEVROLET 2005, Silverado 2500 HD, Diesel crew cab, $13,880 352-341-0018 FORD 2003 F150 Ex Cab, $8,990 352-341-0018 FORD 98, Ranger Splash, very well kept, cold AC, 6 cyl., auto, Tires like new, $3,200 obo (352) 601-0572 FORD Ranger XLT, two tone paint, electric pkg. auto trans., almost new tires 170 k $2,850 obo, 503-3787 MONEYS TIGHT! PRICES R RIGHT! BUY-SELL-RENTCar-Truck-Boat-RV consignmentusa.or g US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 TOYOTA2002, Tacoma, Crew Cab, $8,770. 352-341-0018 MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. $$ TOPDOLLAR $$ For Wrecked, Junk or Unwanted Cars/Trucks $$ (352) 201-1052 $$ BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 CASH BUYERS Buying Used Cars Trucks & Vans, For used car lot LARRYS AUTO SALES, Hwy 19... 352 564-8333 MONEYS TIGHT! PRICES R RIGHT! BUY-SELL-RENTCar-Truck-Boat-RV consignmentusa.or g US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 WE BUY ANYVEHICLEInAny Condition, Title, No Title, Bank Lien, No Problem, Dont Trade it in. We Will Pay up to $25K Any Make,Any Model. 813-335-3794 813-237-1892 Call AJ BUICK 2007, Lucerne, CXL 55K miles, Leather $13,500. obo Call Troy (352)621-7113 CHEVROLET Corvette Corvette 6 speed, black on black, $14,500 (352) 613-2333 CHEVROLET 2002, Camaro Z28 $9,495. 352-341-0018 CHRYSLER, PT Cruiser, loaded, 53k miles, $4,800 (352) 464-4304 FORD 2001 COBRAMUSTANG CONV. 5 SPEED, LEATHER MUSTSEE CALL352-628-4600 For More Info FORD 2005, Five Hundred LMT, 40K miles, leather, V6 $9,980Call Troy 352-621-7113 FORD 2006 Focus ZXW, SE 4DR, WGN. 85k miles $5,800 obo Call Troy (352) 621-7113 FORD MUSTANG2007, 7000 mi, garage kept, GTclone. Call (352) 527-1191 FORD Mustang Cobra, Indy 500 Pace Car-1994, Convertible, 7100 mi, Gar. kept 252-339-3897 GAS SAVER!1999 Saturn SL$2000 Tan/Gold.Auto. Engine andTrans are solid. 196,000 miles. Clean inside and out. Call Steve: 352-613-0746 Harley Davidson Super Glide, low miles, $7,500 (352) 613-2333 HONDA 2011 CRV LX, 19K miles, likenew, 4 Cyl. $19,950 Call Troy 352-621-7113 HYUNDAI 2006 Elantra, GLS 90K miles, likenew, 4 DR, auto. $6,800Call Troy 352-621-7113 MAZDA 2007, RX8 Looking for A sports Car, Look No Further!!! This is A Must See...Call for an Appt. and Pricing 352-628-4600 Mercury Grand Marquis w/ trailer hitch, 4 good hancock tires, high mileage $900 OBO (352) 249-7541 MERCURY2004, Grand Marquis, Leather and Loaded To Many Options to List. Call Today Before Its Gone Call 352-628-4600 MITSUBISHI 2011 Galant Low Mi. Great fuel economy, Priced to sell Call 352-628-4600 For Appointment MONEYS TIGHT! PRICES R RIGHT! BUY-SELL-RENTCar-Truck-Boat-RV consignmentusa.or g US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 PONTIAC 1999TransAm 5.7Llter V8, 62,700 mi, Show Quality, $7500 (352) 726-8336 Cell 352-302-5569 PONTIAC 2008, G6, 4 Door, Cold AC Call 352-628-4600 For Pricing PORSCHE 911 Carrera, black exterior, black interior 62,600 org. mi $25,900 386-334-2559 CELL TOYOTA2000, Camry LE V6, 183K miles Super Clean $5,800. obo Call Troy (352) 621-7113 TOYOTA2007,Yaris, 59K miles, 2 DR, H/B $7,800. Call Troy 352-621-7113 DUNNELLON Here is that home on Lake Rousseau that you have always wanted! 2br 1 ba on 1.43 acres w/168ft lake frontage. Completely remodeled all new interior & windows. No Flood Insur ance! Priced reduced from $369,000 to $169,000 Call Bernie (352) 563-0116 ACRE LOT with well, septic and power pole, impact fee credit, high and dry, trees, $11,000 obo (352) 795-3710 NORTH CITRUS 1.4 ac. Cleared, fenced, high & dry. Paved road. Elec., pump/well, septic. Owner finan. No mobiles. $13,900 CALL352-897-4195 HOMOSASSA Wooded Lot on Lee Woods Dr., has Wetlands, with River access, but not on river $6,000. 352-621-1664 ADOCK RENTALCrystal Riv. Lited, canal to river & Gulf. Up to 25ft, no sails 795-1986 AIRBOAT13ft x 7ft, 500 HP Cadillac, turn key boat $9,500 obo Call Jim for details (813) 361-4929, BASS TRACKER 12ft. Jon Boat, w/ 6HP motor & trailer, $1,750 obo (352) 563-0665 BAYLINER 1984cuddy cabin, hard top, Volvo motor,AQ125A, needs tune-up. Has 2 props, fish/depth finder, 2001 Rolls float on trailer worth $1000 Comes w/spare motor Has service manual, 2nd owner $2500 call Doug after 4pm352-212-8385 or 352-564-0855 PONTOON BOAT18ft. 1991, NEW carpet seats, etc., Nice, Boat only. Will deliver $1,200. (352) 637-3983 TRI PONTOON BOAT27 Ft., Fiberglass 250 HP,Ttop, trailer included $17,000. 352-613-8453 WE HAVE BOATSGULF TO LAKE MARINE We Pay CASH For Used Clean Boats Pontoon, Deck & Fishing Boats (352)527-0555 boatsupercenter.com ITASCAMERIDIAN36 Ft, 2005 Motor Home 350HPCat Diesel 55K miles, no smoke/pets 6 Michelin Tires, New 2010 qn w/ sleep No. mattress & overhead fan. W/D combo $71,000 obo (352) 419-7882 MONTEGO BAY35ft 5th wheel 3 slides kept undercover, Exc cond.TruckAvail. LOADED $27,000 (352) 564-2756 NATIONALRV2006Tropical One owner,34ft, 26000 miles,no smoke/pets, 300HPCummins diesel,2 slides, 6 new tires, 3yr warranty,many extras. $87000. Well maintained. 352-341-4506 5TH WHEEL 33FT GOOD CONDITION MUST SELL (423) 202-0914 FOREST RIVER2010, Surveyor, Sport 189, 20 ft. Travel Trailer, 1 slide, w/AC, qn. bed, awning, pwr. tonque jack, corner jacks, microwave, equilizing hitch, $10,500, reduced to $9000 (352) 382-1826 HIGH LINE1999, 32ft Deluxe, 12 slide out, new 22awning, 55+ park, can be moved. Was asking $9,000, Sell $6,900 excel. shape 231-408-8344 HI-LO TRAVELTRAILER 2003,tow lite model 22-03t,exc. cond. $6000 obo 352-422-8092 KZ Toyhauler,0732 like new, full slide new tires, Owan Gen., gas tank, Lrg living area separate cargo $18,000. 352-795-2975 SUNNYBROOK 36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides, kg bd,like new, 60amp serv. NADA $29K asking $25K obo 352-382-3298 WE BUYRVS, Travel Trailers, 5th Wheels, Motor Homes Call US 352-201-6945 Phyllis Strickland Realtor Best Time To Buy! I have Owner Financing and Foreclosures TROPIC SHORES REALTY. (352) 613-3503 MICHELE ROSE Realtor Simply put I ll work harder 352-212-5097 isellcitruscounty@ yahoo.com Craven Realty, Inc. 352-726-1515 TONY Pauelsen Realtor 352-303-0619 Buy or Sell Call NOW TOP PERFORMANCE Realestate Consultant FREE Foreclosure and Short Sale Lists Office Open 7 Days a Week LISAVANDEBOE Broker (R) Owner Plantation Realty 352-634-0129 www.plantation realtylistings.com CRYSTALRIVER2 Story, 5BR/3Bath 2 boat slips near KINGS BAY$425,000. Make Offers 352-563-9857 OPEN HOUSE Sunday 2p-6p Come see this natural wonderland. 3/2 stilt home on over 1 acres and an amazing body of water. Bring a fishing pole and enjoy a BBQ. Located N on 19 just over the Barge Canal Bridge, R on Foss Grove Path. Follow the signs to 12307 Edwards Ct.You will not want to miss this! If directions needed pls call Kim or Jo at 352-220-2658 YOUR High-Tech Water Front Realtor ROD KENNER 352-436-3531 ERA Suncoast Realty SCAN OR GO TOwww. BestNatur eCoast Pr operties.com To view great waterfront properties 3/2 Move In Ready Villa in Windemere. Beautifully Maintained with upgraded features. Premier location close to boat ramp, trail & downtown. MLS#359594 $229,500 Call Myriam Reulen (352) 613-2644 Weston Properties, LLC INVERNESS Block home 2br, 1ba w/ 2porches, oversized gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres. $130,000 Call Buzz 352-341-0224 or David 607-539-7872 Unique stilt home off 581. Great loc to town, shopping, & hospital. 2br/1ba, w/ rap around porch. Needs some TLC. Sold as is. $33,900 (352) 419-6227 3b/2ba, den MH on land off US 19 newer c/h/a carpet & vinyl, clean RV Hkup. fence ** $39,900** Cridland Real Estate Jackie 352-634-6340 GRAND 2006 CUSTOM HOME www .81woodfield. CanBY ours.com 81 Woodfield, Homosassa 3 Bed/2 Bath/3 Car Gar Salt Water Pool & More! $339K, MLS#356914 Realty Connect (352) 212-1446 The Meadows Sub. 2/2/1, New roof, NewAC & Appliances Move In, clean cond. 3876 S. Flamingo Terr. Asking $58,000 (352) 382-5558 4/2 BLOCK HOME, mother in law apt, nice home $65,000. (305) 619-0282, Cell 4/2/3 HEATED POOL lot s of extras SELLER MOTIVATED! reduced to 210k 352-688-6500 or 352-212-5023 Buying or Selling REALESTATE, Let Me Work For You!BETTYHUNTREALTORERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc. 352 586-0139 hunt4houses68 @yahoo.com www.bettyhunts homes.com. Sugarmill WoodsHouse for Sale 2/2/2, Call for More Info.334-691-4601 (850) 776-7528 GAIL STEARNS Realtor Tropic Shores Realty (352) 422-4298 Low overhead = Low Commissions Waterfront, Foreclosures Owner financing available I NEED LISTINGS! I SOLD ALMOST 2HOMES A MONTH IN 2012 Lets BREAK that record together!DEB INFANTINERealtor (352) 302-8046 Real Estate!... its what I do. ERAAmerican Realty Phone: 352-726-5855 Cell: 352-302-8046 Fax: 352-726-7386 Email:debinfantine@ yahoo.com INVERNESS Sunday 1/27 1p-4pm 3/2 MH, Furn. lg screen lanai, shed & lot. All appl incl lg scn TV,55+ PK Asking $12,000. 911 Hoffmann Lane Melody MH Park (352) 364-3747 OPEN HOUSESugarmill W oods Sunday 1-3PM3 Chinkapin Court Homosassa Fl Nancy Little Lewis Realtor Exit Realty Leaders (352) 302-6082 DUDLEYS AUCTION **3 AUCTIONS ** Fri 1/25 Estate Coin 6pm $5-10-20 Gold pieces, Silver, $500 & $1,000 bills, Lg 1800s currency, silver Sat 1/26 Florida Porch Antiques Liquidation 10am On Site@ 712 W. Main St in Leesburg, HUGE Sale of from Long time Antique dealer filled the JC Penny Tue 1/28 Real Estate & Restaurant 10am 4135 S. Suncoast Blvd. (US 19) Homosassa, *check website* www.dudleys auction.com 637-9588 10%BP Au2267 AB1667 Maine-ly Real Estate #381384 HOMOSASSA GNC Commercial 7311 Grover Cleveland Blvd. 3/2 MH $69,900. (603) 860-6660 CITRUS SPRINGS 3/2/2, 2 yr old Pool home in imacculate condition, Landscaped backyard. $125,000 Priced to sell! CALL (570) 412-5194 Quiet Country Setting 3/2 on 2 acres mol Approx. 1750 sq ft LA front porch, Lg rear screened porch, Patio, 24x30 Steel Building, Steel Carport -great for boat storage, etc. Fenced and crossfenced, Built in 2003 Nice Oaks, Wooded, Citrus Springs area only 20 Min. to Ocala $129,900 Call 352-302-6784 for appt. PINE RIDGE THIS IS THE PROPERTYYOUVE BEEN LOOKING FOR! Bring your boat, horses, in-laws; there is room for everything! 4/3 w/7 car garage/workshop & in-law suite on 5.83 acres. Mostly wooded w/large backyard. Beautiful & serene. High end finishes; immaculate home in equestrian community. www .centralflest ate.com for pictures/more info. 352-249-9164 2/2/2, REMODELED NEW: Roof, AC, Kit, Baths, Windows, Flrs, 317 S Harrison. Reduced $72,900. Call 352-527-1239 Brentwood Villa 2/2/2 cul-de-sac Completely up dated! 1816 W. Jena Ct OPEN SUN 12-3PM $96,900 PRICED T O SELL! FSBO 610-248-2090 HERNANDO Citrus Hills Pool Home 4/3/2+, circular drive, 1 acre lot, below $200k 352-527-7856 ARBOR LAKES **OPEN HOUSE**2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR & fenced back yard! Gated Comm. 10a-3p 4695 N. Lake Vista Trl (352) 419-7418 ARBOR LAKES Fantastic Dream Home In Active Senior Community $169,900 2,100 sf, 3BR/2BA/2GA Split Floor Plan w/Pool Call (352) 726-6564 CRYSTALRIVER3950 sq ft Lt MFG w/office @ $1200/mo 1155 sq ft storage @ 450/mo 600 sq ft office @ 450/mo 352-302-1935 CRYSTALRIVERWarehouse for Rent Free standing, garage area, 1,440sf, $100-$550 352-634-0129 ESTATE SALE in Nature Coast Landings RV Resort. Large developed site and a separate gated storage lot; plus almost new 5th-wheel with slides, screened gazebo, and storage building. All for $79,900. For more info and pictures, click on www.detailsbyowner.com 352-843-5441 From mobiles to mansions, From Gulf to Lakes, give me a call, I sell em all! 352-422-4137 nancy .wilson@ yahoo.com Nancy J. Wilson Realtor Broker-Associate SRESGRI Waybright Real Estate, Inc. MOTIV A TED SELLER W ant s This Gone!!! 6Acres w Big SHOP, Nice 2/2/2 House, Porches Barns, pond, pvd rd, Concrete dr. Reduced! $ 114, 900 MLS 357108. www. crosslandrealty.com 352 726 6644 PUBLISHERS NOTICE: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair HousingAct which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777.The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Specializing in Acreage Farms/Ranches & Commercial Richard (Rick) Couch, Broker Couch Realty & Investments, Inc. (352) 344-8018 RCOUCH.com UNIQUE & HISTORIC Homes, Commercial Waterfront & Land Small Town Country Lifestyle OUR SPECIALTY SINCE 1989LET US FIND YOU AVIEW TO LOVE www. crosslandrealty.com(352) 726-6644Crossland Realty Inc.

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