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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 01-20-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03006

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VOL. 118 ISSUE 166


MLK holiday
events set
Local events Monday
in honor of Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr. Day:
CRYSTAL RIVER
The Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. Parade, 10 a.m.
Monday, starting at Sev-
enth Avenue and pro-
ceeding to Copeland
Community Park for a
gathering and celebration.
INVERNESS
The MLK Unity Walk
sponsored by The New
Church Without Walls be-
gins at 8:30 a.m. Monday
at the Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office parking lot,
1 Martin Luther King Jr.
Drive, Inverness. Walkers
will proceed to Liberty
Park where, at 9 a.m., a
ceremony will commence.
DUNNELLON
MLK march/parade
begins at 9 a.m. Monday,
beginning at McDonald's.
The event will conclude at
Ernie Mills Park on Bostick
Street. The lineup begins
at 8 a.m. at McDonald's.
Following the march/pa-
rade, there will be a Fam-
ily Unity Day Festival/
Picnic at Ernie Mills Park.
The event is free and
open to the public.
-From staff reports


COMMENTARY:


County chides Progress


Tax letter states utility will

continue with lesser payments


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER -
For the second time since
November, Progress En-
ergy Florida caught Citrus
County officials off guard.


First came the com-
pany's decision to pay a
little more than half of its
property tax bill a deci-
sion that cost the school
board and county millions
of dollars in revenue.
Then last week, the


company's Florida presi-
dent, R. Alexander Glenn,
sent officials a letter stat-
ing the company's 2013
property taxes will be the
same or less than it paid
for 2012.
Citrus officials are pre-
paring a formal response.
County Commission
Chairman Joe Meek said
Glenn was off base to sug-
gest the company's tax


payment for 2013 before
Property Appraiser Geoff
Greene completes an ap-
praisal of the Progress en-
ergy complex north of
Crystal River.


Glenn's letter, sent to
Meek, Greene, Superin-
tendent of Schools Sandra
Himmel and Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy, outlines the com-
pany's plans to pay $19
million or less in 2013
property taxes.
Should Progress and its
parent company, Duke
Energy, decide this year to
permanently shelve the
See Page A4


Out-of-this-world fun


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Terri Vore with the Nature Coast Dragon Boat Club explains some of the intricacies of the dragon boat
Saturday at the 26th annual Florida Manatee Festival in Crystal River.


Marijuana
Resident Anthony
Schembri writes about
marijuana./Page C1
HOMEFRONT:




,/ -


JI,





'

True blue
The color of the season
is blue/HomeFront
SIKORSKI'S ATTIC:



*11 y


Cash cows:

Manatees mean

tourist dollars
PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
Those cute creatures of
habit that return to King's
Bay each winter have an un-
deniable impact on Citrus
County's economy
And they are attracting
more visitors each year, ac-
cording to the latest figures.
For many area businesses,
manatees mean money, as
they attract visitors po-
tential big spenders from
all over, reinforcing the eco-
nomic impact of tourism.
Plus, possibly seeking some
positive cache, local busi-
nesses from auto sales to
tour boat operators have
long used the term "mana-
tee" in their business names.
Citrus County has been
known as Florida's manatee
capital since the early 1980s.
The county's most signifi-
cant tourist draw has been it
is the only place in the
See Page A8


Manatees invade

Crystal River
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Mana-
tees received the memo this
weekend. They lounged in the
spring-fed waters of King's Bay
and Three Sisters Springs as
visitors snapped numerous
photos during the two-day
event featuring crafts, fine arts
and food vendors from all
across the country
Celebrating 26 years of the
beloved marine mammal, thou-
sands of visitors and residents
adventured to the Florida
Manatee Festival at Three Sis-
ters Springs and the historic
business district of Crystal
River to commemorate the
local celebrities.
On the 40th anniversary of
the Endangered Species Act,
shuttle buses escorted visitors
to Three Sisters Springs to
view the manatees in their nat-
ural winter-home environment
from the recently built walk-
way Once arriving, educational
booths, crafts and music wel-
comed visitors to the springs.
"The main reason to have
Three Sisters Springs open to
the public is to enhance the ed-
ucation experience during the
Florida Manatee Festival,"
said visitor services specialist
Ivan Vicente. "At noon, we have
already seen a thousand peo-
ple here. We hope to see an-
other thousand more."
Educating the public is ex-
actly what they did, as a
See Page A8
Tania Burchell
with the National Radio
Astronomy Observatory unveils
the deep-space photo of a
nebula dedicated to the
manatee. Called the Manatee
Nebula, it is 100 quadrillion
miles away and is visible only
to radio telescopes like the
Very Large Array (VLA) that
can detect its very low-energy
signature. The movie
"Contact" with Jodie Foster,
according to Ms. Burchell, did
a fine job showing off the VLA.
r Two-year-old
Taylor Richard from Lakeville,
Mass., sits patiently as Dawn
"Sunshine" Gurtner, or "A
Splash of Sunshine," puts the
finishing touches on a very
fancy face-painting job.


What a find
A thrift-store bargain
could be worth 10 times
what was paid./Page E6

Annie's Mailbox ......A16
Classifieds ............ D5
Crossword ...........A16
Editorial ............. C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ................B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies ................. A16
Obituaries ................A6
Together................... A18


6 i e 0 sLJ o


Walmart opens Wednesday in center of county


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
After months of construction,
the new Walmart at County Roads
486 and 491 in Lecanto is sched-
uled to open Wednesday morning.
Store manager Tom Cooper an-
nounced the grand opening cere-
mony would begin at 7:30 a.m.
and the doors would open to
shoppers at 8 a.m. The store will
be open 24 hours a day, seven
days a week.
Cooper was previously store
manager at the Brooksville Wal-
mart and has been with the com-
pany for 12 years.
He described the new Walmart,
See Page A5


-1 .-
-.. .... .--- -:-- -



MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Construction on County Road 486 continues west of the new Walmart
in Lecanto.


Walmart to add

traffic to C.R 486

construction zone
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
LECANTO The road isn't
ready, but Walmart is.
The new Walmart opens
Wednesday even as workers are
11 months away from completing
the final leg of the widening of
County Road 486.
While county officials expect


See Page A5









Week in state gov't: Let my people vote (early and in more places)


MICHAEL PELTIER
The News Service of
Florida

TALLAHASSEE Gov.
Rick Scott this week broke
with many in his own party
by saying some recent Re-
publican-backed election
changes should be re-
versed to give voters more
time to cast ballots.
Following an election
mired by hours-long lines
in certain precincts, Scott
said local election super-
visors need more flexibil-
ity to expand early voting
hours and venues in an ef-
fort to make every poten-
tial vote count.
Scott's comments came
as lawmakers returned to
Tallahassee and began
looking at several major is-
sues, from what went
wrong on Election Day to
finding ways to enhance
safety for students follow-
ing the fatal shooting of 20
grade-school children and
six adults in a Connecticut
school last month.
Meanwhile this week, a
Florida Supreme Court
decision upheld a Scott-
backed initiative to re-
quire workers in the
Florida Retirement Sys-
tem to pay into to their
pension plans, a ruling
that will affect hundreds of
thousands of teachers,
state and local employees.
And as President Obama
announced plans to push
for gun control measures,
Florida's governor said he
won't push for any legisla-
tion to make it more diffi-
cult to own a gun, and the
Senate president said he
didn't expect that debate
to be held this year in the
Legislature, but left to
Washington.
EARLY VOTING
Two years after signing
an elections bill that crit-
ics said was politically in-
spired to reduce voting by
Democrats, Gov Rick Scott
said this week the change
should be reversed.
Elections supervisors
should have the authority to
give voters up to 14 days be-
fore Election Day, Scott said


this week. The governor
also said shorter ballots
would help alleviate the
long lines that clogged some
precincts in the last general
election, and supervisors
should have more flexibility
in setting up early voting.
All of that would, presum-
ably, make it easier for peo-
ple to vote which was the
argument the losers made
when they tried to persuade
Republicans not to reduce
the opportunities to vote in
the first place.
Scott's announcement
breaks with many in his
own party who backed the
voting restrictions as a way
to fight fraud.
Scott also said the early
voting period should once
again include the Sunday
before Election Day, an op-
tion used by many black
churches to get out the vote
and seen by most as an ad-
vantage for Democrats.
FRS CHANGES OK
In a victory for Republi-
can legislative leaders
(and for Scott), a divided
Florida Supreme Court
this week upheld a 2011
law that requires govern-
ment workers to chip in 3
percent of their salaries to
help fund their own retire-
ment accounts.
In a 4-3 decision, the
high court overturned a
Leon County circuit judge
who ruled the law violated
the constitutional rights of
government workers hired
before July 1, 2011, the day
the law took effect
Legislative leaders had
feared a loss at the
Supreme Court would
blow a $1 billion hole in
the state budget.



I :1




GOT
DEBT?


Weekly ROUNDUP


Backers of the contribu-
tion said the ruling allows
the state to save money
and offer retirement plans
more similar to business
in the private sector
Critics, including a coali-
tion of unions led by the
Florida Education Associ-
ation, characterized the
employee contributions as
a hidden tax on govern-
ment employees, many of
whom have not seen a
raise in several years.
ETHICS PROPOSALS
Sen. Jack Latvala, chair-
man of the Senate Ethics
and Elections Committee,
said this week he expects
an ethics bill to go to the
full Senate during the first
week of the 2013 legisla-
tive session in March.
The bill appears likely
to deal with several issues,
including bolstering
penalties for officials who
do not file financial-
disclosure forms, reining
in lawmakers' use of polit-
ical committees to pay for
meals and other personal
expenses, and cracking
down on voting conflicts of
interest It also may seek to
make it harder for former
legislators to lobby after
their service.
The bill may also give the
Florida Commission on
Ethics the power to under-
take investigations after re-
ceiving referrals from the
governor's office, the
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement, state attor-
neys or federal prosecutors.
SCHOOL SAFETY
In the wake of the De-
cember school shootings


in Newtown, Conn., law-
makers appear serious
about school-safety
changes they're already
talking about how much it
might cost.
Florida now spends
about $70 million on school
security. Putting a cop in
each elementary school
might cost more than $100
million, school district rep-
resentatives estimate.
A Senate panel this
week discussed ways to
standardize cost-sharing of
school resource officers.
In some counties, local
sheriffs are paying the
bulk of providing law en-
forcement officers in
schools. In other counties,
they pay little or nothing.
Scott, though, said he has
no plans to push lawmak-
ers to enact any gun control
legislation this session.
"Gov Scott supports the
second amendment," a
statement from his office
said this week "He will lis-
ten to ideas about improv-
ing school safety during
the legislative session, but
he continues to support
the second amendment
and is not proposing any
gun law changes."
On Friday, Senate Presi-
dent Don Gaetz said he
didn't think state lawmak-
ers were likely to go there
on their own, either. In an
interview with the Tampa
Bay Times editorial board,
Gaetz said while he favors
background checks on all
gun purchases, he doesn't
think any changes to gun
laws will come up in
Tallahassee.


"Congress is going to
take that up," Gaetz, R-
Niceville, said. "Let them
have that debate."
STORY OF THE
WEEK: Two years after
signing a new law reducing
early voting, Gov Rick Scott
does an about face and calls
for extending the number
of days Florida voters can
go to the polls early.
QUOTE OF THE
WEEK: "I just don't quite
understand how someone
can be a make-believe cop,
pursue my son who had
every right to be in that


neighborhood, chase him,
get in a confrontation with
him, shoot and kill him and
not be arrested. Something
has to be done." Sybrina
Fulton in reference to the
state's stand your ground
law, (and a delay before the
arrest of George Zimmer-
man in the shooting death
of her son, Trayvon Mar-
tin.) Zimmerman, a neigh-
borhood watch volunteer
has now been charged with
murder, but is expected to
claim self-defense under
Florida's Stand Your
Ground doctrine.


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A2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013


STATE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Page A3 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013



TATE&


SOUP


Women's club

raises fnds

with liquid

concoctions

ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
With standing room only,
150 attendees strolled into
the aroma of 25 diverse fla-
vors of homemade soups
Saturday at the Yankee-
town-Inglis Woman's Club.
The annual Soup-a-Thon
and Bake Sale presented
eager bellies with the op-
portunity to sample unlim-
ited pots of simmering
soup for $7.
Samples of everything
from vegetable, tomato,
fish chowders, pastas,
green bean, "he-man,"
chicken and rice, chicken
and noodle, and more
were accessible to gratify
every taste bud.
"We had people come
from Beverly Hills and
Pine Ridge (who) brought
out soup today," said Marty
Hilliard, past president of
Yankeetown-Inglis
Woman's Club.
After partakers warmed
their appetites, they satis-
fied their sweet tooth with
baked goods.
"We always run out and
never have enough baked
goods," Hilliard said
laughing.
As they left, attendees
voted for the best pot of
soup. That was no easy task
"Oh wow, I don't know
which one to vote for, be-
cause they were all so
good," said Lisa Willark
from Homosassa. "But that
lobster bisque keeps talk-
ing to me."
The Soup-a-Thon is one
of many fundraisers the
women host along with
running a thrift shop.
"The woman's club has
been in existence since
1965, and has done these
events for the last 30 or 40
years," Hilliard said. "We
maintain the public li-
brary next door to us here.
It's the only library that we
know of that is still run
and maintained by a
woman's club. We main-
tain the building and
grounds of the library The
money also goes back into
the community. We con-
tribute to the two volun-
teer fire departments,
Yankeetown School, Isa-
iah's Place, just so many
different places."
From the women who
greeted customers at the
door to the ones ladling
soups or cleaning up ta-
bles, they were happy to be
there and helping their
community.
"Today is just about get-
ting the community to-


* Second place:
Lobster bisque by
Mitch Simmons.
Third place: Bubba
Gump shrimp and
chicken soup
by Dee Dixon.

gether and tasting all of
the good soups," Hilliard
said. "We have a lot of
service organizations in
the community and we are
trying to get everyone to
work together for a com-
mon cause. Our main focus
is to give back to the com-
munity and help it grow."
Chronicle reporter Eryn
Worthington can be con-
tacted at 352-563-5660, ext.
1334, or eworthington@
chronicleonline. com.


Special to the Chronicle.
The Southwest Florida Water
Management District
(SWFWMD) is reminding resi-
dents who irrigate their lawns to
"Skip a Week" or more of water-
ing during the cooler months of
January and February.
According to research by the
University of Florida, grass
doesn't need to be watered as
often during the cooler months.
One-half to three-quarters of an
inch of water every 10 to 14 days
is sufficient. In fact, if your lawn
has received any significant
rainfall, then you can turn off
your irrigation system and oper-
ate it manually as needed.
"Overwatering can encourage
pests and disease in your lawn,"
said Robin Grantham, Florida
Friendly Landscaping project
manager. "Too much irrigation
can also make lawns less able to
survive droughts."
Skipping a week of watering is
as easy as "off" for residents
with irrigation timers. "Turn the


timer to 'off' for the week that
you want to skip, and 'on' for the
week that you want to water,"
Grantham said.
You can determine when your
grass needs water when:
Grass blades are folded in
half lengthwise on at least one-
third of your yard.
Grass blades appear blue-
gray.
Grass blades do not spring
back, leaving footprints on the
lawn for several minutes after
walking on it.
Watering only every other
week at most during the winter
will help conserve drinking
water supplies the public needs
for critical uses during the dry
season. In fact, if everyone
skipped one week of irrigation
this season, it could save an esti-
mated 1.9 billion gallons of
water.
For information about water
restrictions and water conserva-
tion, contact your local utility or
visit SWFWMD's website at
WaterMatters. org/SkipAWeek/.


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


ISO


ABOVE: Gerry and Sandy Lightsey joined mo
hungry people filling their bellies with samp
soups. BELOW: Lisa King Weber chose a spi
soup at the annual Yankeetown-Inglis Wo
Soup-a-Thon and Bake Sale.


I Postscript



John Luc ready


with helping


hand or laugh


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer


FLORAL CITY If
S.." you ever needed any-
thing, even (or espe-
cially) if you
I whneeded a laugh,
John Luc was
your man.
He loved help-
ing people and
he prided himself
on always being
ready at a mo-
ment's notice Johr
when someone
needed a hand.
"In his obituary guest
book, his former (Coast
Guard) chief wrote that
John was the only person
who ever worked for him
that he didn't have to tell
what to do," said Lynda
Luc, his wife of 41 years.
"That was John. He knew
what needed to be done
and he did it. That's the
one thing he was really
proud of."
John Theodore Luc Jr
died Jan. 3 at his Floral
City home. He was 65.
Born in Tampa, Luc
joined the U.S. Coast
Guard in 1965 right out
of high school. His first
assignment: Boston,
serving on an ice
breaker that traveled to
the arctic. For three
years, this Florida boy
saw only snow and ice.
His 22-year Coast
Guard career included
serving five years as part
of former President
Richard Nixon's security
detail in Miami, serving
in the prestigious honor
guard in Yorktown, Va.,
"' as well as working as a
S construction tender in
St. Petersburg and fi-
nally as senior chief
boatswain's mate in
re than 100 Yankeetown.
'les of many No job was too big or
ced chicken too small for him.
)man's Club He retired from the
Coast Guard in 1987 and
four days later joined the
Citrus County Sheriff's
Office, serving as CCSO's
first marine officer until
retiring in 2008.
"He used to ride a
Vespa to Yankeetown
every day," Mrs. Luc
said. "John would do any-
thing to save money."
That was another thing
about Luc he knew
how to make money and
make it stretch. And he
paid cash for everything.
"This is how ingenious
She was," Mrs. Luc said.
"When he first went into
the Coast Guard, he
found out there were a
lot of guys on the ship
that couldn't sew; they
)UNTY couldn't repair their uni-
forms or put their
patches on. So John
MLK Day bought a mini Singer
sewing machine and he
mental offices did enough sewing and
rvance of the repairs and taking extra
watches that when he
in Crystal left Boston he had
erness will enough money to buy a
ill be avail- brand new Volkswagen."
mn. Monday. The couple met in
South Florida, where
Monday Luc and his wife's sister
Directors will were neighbors.
n. 21, in "It was love at first
ent Building, sight," Mrs. Luc said.
anto. "But he definitely wasn't
tend to re- a Romeo. He was not a
rus 20/20. lady killer he wore
those military-issue
itrus2020.org black-framed glasses
they call 'birth control
Tuesday glasses' but we hit it
e memorial off right away"
de Ever the jokester, Luc
22, at the chose May 1 as their wed-
ding date so he could
County Right shout, "May Day! May
Day!"
nesday "He should've been a
comedian," Mrs. Luc
I Science said. "You could be hav-
pen for public ing the worst day and he
nesday, Jan. could make you laugh."
orium on U.S. You could be having
the worst day on the
From staff reports water, and he could save


your life, too.
In 1993, two fishermen
were out in the gulf,
stranded in shallow
water and Luc walked
two boats a mile and a


Luc


half to the Coast
Guard boat in
deeper water.
One of the men
sent a letter to
then-Sheriff
Charles Dean
commending
Luc's actions.
The man
wrote, "I was


amazed at the strong and
silent strength and stam-
ina he possessed. ... As a
disabled American vet-
eran, I would consider it
an honor to call John Luc
a friend and ally"
Luc's son, Eric Luc,
said it was nothing for
his dad to get a call at
2 a.m. about an overdue
boater and race across
the county to the rescue.
"Whenever there was
flooding of the Withla-
coochee River, my dad
was out there patrolling,
making sure people were
safe," Eric Luc said.
"People used to call him
the 'mayor of Arrow-
head,' and joked that if
Arrowhead ever had an
election, he'd win by a
landslide."
CCSO deputy Sgt. Don
Lestinsky, who worked
with Luc for 10 years,
said Luc "knew every-
thing there was to know
about boats, and he
taught all of us a lot.
John was a persistent
seaman.
"Many years ago when
the Withlacoochee River
flooded, John was out on
the river from dawn till
dusk looking for people
who needed help. He
just wouldn't quit,"
Lestinsky added. "When-
ever you needed to find
John Luc, he was on the
water. We will miss him."
In 1999, Citrus County
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy recog-
nized Luc for his work
above and beyond the
call of duty during that
devastating Arrowhead
flooding the year before.
"John Luc is actually
the sheriff of Arrow-
head," Dawsy said at the
recognition event. "Dur-
ing the floods, John was
their savior. I didn't even
see him for months."
Eric Luc said his dad
was also recognized by
the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Commission for
smoothing over the bitter
disputes between crab-
bers and shrimpers.
"He was proud of that,
plus his work with drug
interdiction, going out on
patrols and catching
drug smugglers," he said.
John Luc was a big guy
- bigger than life. He
loved all-you-can-eat
wings at Sonny's, catfish
at Stumpknockers and
everything at the Golden
Corral. He loved Pepsi
Max and his beloved dog
Sassy, motorcycles and
guns and being out on
the water.
He was kind and gen-
tle and tough as nails. As
a marine deputy, he pre-
ferred giving warnings
rather than tickets, but
he wasn't afraid to arrest
bad guys.
Most of all, he loved
serving people.
"It was hard for him to
retire," Eric Luc said.
"He was dedicated to
helping people."
"He always put me
first for 41 years," Mrs.
Luc said. "He was a great
guy You couldn't ask for
a better one."
Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy can be
reached at nkennedy@
chronicleonline.com or
352-564-2927.


All county and city governm
will be closed Monday in obse
Martin Luther King Jr. holiday.
The Chronicle's main office
River and satellite office in Inv
be closed. Representatives wi
able by phone from 7 to 10 a.r
Citrus 20/20 meet
The Citrus 20/20 Board of [
meet at 5:30 p.m. Monday, Ja
Room 117, Lecanto Governm
3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lec;
All directors are urged to ati
view the future direction of Cit
For information, visit www.c
or call 352-201-0149.
Roe v. Wade service
There will be a Roe vs. Wad
service at noon Tuesday, Jan.
Old Courthouse in Inverness.
For information, call Citrus (
to Life at 352-563-7017.
Science fair Wedi
The Citrus County Regiona
and Engineering Fair will be o
viewing from 4 to 7 p.m. Wedr
30, at the Citrus County Audit(
41 in Inverness.


'Skip A Week'of watering AroundTHE CO

1 n m A ,- Offices closed for R


I


H 8000 MO S






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


7 players share top prize
TALLAHASSEE Seven winners of the
"Fantasy 5" game will collect $33,175.66
each, the Florida Lottery said Saturday.
The winning tickets were bought in Mel-
bourne, Tampa, West Palm Beach, Fort Wal-
ton Beach, Surfside, Hudson and Largo,
lottery officials reported.
The 455 tickets matching four numbers won
$82 each. Another 12,770 tickets matching
three numbers won $8 each, and 112,812 tick-
ets won a Quick Pick ticket for picking two
numbers. The numbers drawn Friday night
were 2-7-11-12-36.

Man, 3 children die in wreck
LAKELAND Florida authorities say a
man and three children have been killed in a
wreck northwest of Orlando.
The Florida Highway Patrol said the accident
occurred Friday night on State Road 33 in Lake
County. Police said in a news release "for an


unknown reason" 41-year-old Wilfredo Malave
lost control of his 2009 Mercedes, which struck
several trees and a pole before hitting another
tree and coming to a rest.
The father and his 9-year-old son Zion were
pronounced dead at the scene; a 7-year-old
boy and a 2-year-old girl died at Southlake
Hospital. The driver and the children were
wearing seatbelts or child restraints.
Authorities are investigating the crash and
whether alcohol was involved.
Mom gives birth in car
OCALA-- A central Florida couple is cele-
brating after their baby girl was unexpectedly
born in the front seat of their car while on the
way to hospital.
Laura Jimenez had already been to the
hospital the night before, but was sent home
because her labor was not progressing.
On Thursday morning, the baby's father,


Leobardo Villasana, started driving Jimenez to
the hospital after her water broke.
But as they battled their way through slug-
gish rush hour traffic, Jimenez said she had to
push. The mother said she was surprised at
the easy birth of the 8-pound baby. This is her
third child.
Villasana continued driving to the hospital,
never stopping the car for the birth.
The Ocala Star Banner reported mother
and baby are in good health.
Home with Doors ties for sale
PENSACOLA- Bidders will soon have the
chance to buy a Victorian-style home in
Florida with a connection to Jim Morrison, the
famed frontman of The Doors.
The Pensacola News Journal reported the
home is owned by Bruce Morrison, a second
cousin of Jim Morrison. He is now selling the
home and many of the relics inside, and is tak-


State BRIEFS


PROGRESS
Continued from Page Al


broken nuclear power
plant, the tax payment
could be reduced by an-
other $6 million to $9 mil-
lion, Glenn wrote.
In his letter, Glenn said
he didn't want Cit-
rus County offi-
cials to be
blindsided if
Progress' tax pay-
ment is less than
they expected. -
That was the case
in November, 1
when Progress Alex
paid $19 million presic
when officials said Proc
the company owes Energy
$35.1 million.
Meek said the recipients
of Glenn's letter decided to
formulate a response that
all of them will sign.
A copy of a draft issued
late Friday, obtained by the
Chronicle from Himmel
through a public records
request, criticizes Glenn
for stating the company's
tax payment ahead of the
formal county appraisal.
"Given that we have not


yet undertaken a
full assessment to
value the property,
we think that is
premature for you
to unilaterally de-
termine what your
taxes should be
given that taxes
are based upon
value and not
opinion,"
the draft
kW letter states.


Glenn
lent of
iress
Florida.


Joe M
chairmr
coum
commit


It adds: "We be-
lieve it is inappro-
priate for your
company to deter-
mine a partial pay-
ment of a tax bill.
Duke/Progress En-
ergy would not ac-
cept a partial
payment of a


monthly electric
bill from their customer,
nor should they."
County seeks 'fair
share' from Duke
Glenn's letter is the lat-
est in a dispute that has
caused great strain on a
decades-long relationship
between county govern-
ment and Progress and,
previously Florida Power,
which pays more than 25


S percent of the
county property
tax base and is the
county's largest
,-1 private employer.
P Progress
0, I shocked officials
in November with
leek its "good faith"
ian of property tax pay-
inty ment. The county

ssion. and school district,
which had already
set their tax rates and
budgets for the fiscal year,
suddenly found them-
selves millions of dollars
in the hole.
The reaction was swift
and angry Dawsy con-
ducted a well-attended
news conference outside
the sheriff's office during
which he said he would
blame Duke Energy if the
loss in tax revenue placed
his deputies in harm's way
County Commissioner
John Kenney called Duke,
"a bunch of thugs."
Greene said his office
plans a full assessment of
the company's assets at the
energy complex. That
process is starting this
month with on-site visits by
Greene's assessment team.
Progress then sued


Greene over his Greene and Glenn,
assessment of pol- at the Orlando of-
lution-control fice of Greene's at-
equipment at the torney, produced
company's coal | no movement on
burning plants. .- either side on the
Progress contends pollution-control
the equipment issue.
should be assessed Geoff Greene, who
as salvage, or 10 Greene said last week he is
percent of its property open to further ne-
value. Greene said appraiser. gotiations, de-
the equipment has lined to comment
income value to the com- on Glenn's letter.
pany and should be taxed The draft letter makes it
as such. The difference is clear officials expect
about $1 billion in taxable Progress to pay taxes de-


value.
Meek arranged for both
sides to meet earlier this
month. The meeting with


termined by assessment
"We are committed to
working through these is-
sues efficiently and amica-


bly, and yet, we are com-
mitted to ensuring that
Duke, like every other tax-
payer, pay their fair share,
not the share they want to
pay," it states.
Meek said he doesn't
know what to make of
Glenn's letter last week re-
garding the 2013 property
taxes. He said it doesn't
help the situation.
"It's very unusual and,
some would say, disturb-
ing," he said. "They're dic-
tating to us what they say
they're going to pay"
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
SPR HI O PR HILO PR
0.00 NA NA NA L,, J72 49 0.00


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
sh
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
sh
sh


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


H L
78 67
73 51
75 58
63 47
76 56
69 41
75 57
78 60
77 66


F'cast
pc
sh
sh
s
sh
pc
sh
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northeast winds around 10 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a light chop. Partly cloudy with a
few afternoon showers today.


74 50 0.00 NA NA NAI

THREE DAY OUTLOOK E lusivedaly
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
T- High: 75 Low: 53 *
Partly sunny

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 72 Low: 46
Mostly cloudy, stray shower later

. TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
J High: 67 Low: 36
[ j Partly cloudy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 75/48
Record 84/21
Normal 71/42
Mean temp. 62
Departure from mean +6
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month trace
Total for the year trace
Normal for the year 1.82 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 5
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.17 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 55
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 50%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, elm, maple
Today's count: 9.9/12
Monday's count: 10.2
Tuesday's count: 9.9
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
1/20 SUNDAY 12:10 6:21 12:33 6:45
1/21 MONDAY 12:53 7:05 1:17 7:28
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SSUNSET TONIGHT............................6:00 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:23A.M.
(1 1 : S MOONRISE TODAY.........................12:59 PM.
JAN. 26 FEB.3 FEB. 10 FEB. 17 MOONSET TODAY............................1:57A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers


City
Chassahowitzka*
Crystal River**
Withlacoochee*
Homosassa***


High/Low
12:53 p/8:18 a
11:14 a/5:40 a
9:01 a/3:28 a
12:03 p/7:17 a


**At King's Bay
Sunday


High/Low
---/7:23 p
10:24 p/4:45 p
8:11 p/2:33 p
11:13 p/6:22 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
12:03 a/9:36 a 2:25 p/8:41 p
12:46 p/6:58 a 11:29 p/6:03 p
10:33 a/4:46 a 9:16 p/3:51 p
1:35 p/8:35a --- 7:40 p


Gulf water
temperature


63
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.79 NA 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.11 NA 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 39.07 NA 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.42 NA 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


r' 64 Hoiuton ..
--Wk~z}l \ 7 60
L. Enc "nor ngtj n Honolu s '
Ho''* ,,_,
FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 42 24 pc 35 13
Albuquerque 53 20 s 54 22
Asheville 55 24 s 50 27
Atlanta 57 33 s 62 38
Atlantic City 51 28 pc 49 29
Austin 69 30 s 68 43
Baltimore 54 28 pc 49 29
Billings 45 31 sn 19 8
Birmingham 57 30 s 54 32
Boise 17 -1 pc 20 7
Boston 49 25 pc 48 21
Buffalo 44 33 sn 26 18
Burlington, VT 39 20 .01 sn 35 -3
Charleston, SC 65 36 s 66 43
Charleston, WV 56 24 pc 39 26
Charlotte 54 23 s 57 34
Chicago 47 37 pc 21 8
Cincinnati 55 36 pc 34 21
Cleveland 51 36 sn 29 19
Columbia, SC 61 27 s 65 37
Columbus, OH 53 33 c 30 20
Concord, N.H. 42 17 pc 40 6
Dallas 67 40 s 64 39
Denver 57 32 pc 46 17
Des Moines 54 37 pc 21 1
Detroit 48 36 c 26 14
El Paso 62 29 s 61 36
Evansville, IN 57 34 pc 40 22
Harrisburg 55 26 pc 43 23
Hartford 45 25 pc 43 21
Houston 68 34 s 66 46
Indianapolis 53 37 pc 27 14
Jackson 61 29 s 61 37
Las Vegas 61 35 s 62 36
Little Rock 62 28 s 56 33
Los Angeles 79 51 s 74 50
Louisville 57 40 pc 39 23
Memphis 58 31 s 54 32
Milwaukee 44 38 pc 16 6
Minneapolis 39 14 sn 5 -10
Mobile 63 35 s 63 45
Montgomery 62 31 s 60 37
Nashville 57 28 s 49 25
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 65 39 s 65 48
New York City 51 30 pc 45 26
Norfolk 56 26 s 57 35
Oklahoma City 64 35 s 58 25
Omaha 54 28 pc 25 2
Palm Springs 77 47 s 75 44
Philadelphia 52 30 pc 46 27
Phoenix 75 44 s 75 45
Pittsburgh 51 33 c 35 18
Portland, ME 42 18 pc 43 9
Portland, Ore 37 25 s 43 29
Providence, R.I. 49 23 pc 46 19
Raleigh 54 26 s 58 32
Rapid City 44 30 pc 19 3
Reno 38 15 s 38 18
Rochester, NY 48 32 sn 26 17
Sacramento 62 27 s 61 33
St. Louis 66 42 pc 35 15
St. Ste. Marie 22 17 .48 sn 9 -6
Salt Lake City 21 4 pc 22 12
San Antonio 68 36 s 68 45
San Diego 76 47 s 73 47
San Francisco 60 39 s 62 44
Savannah 63 37 s 67 42
Seattle 34 31 s 41 32
Spokane 30 10 pc 31 14
Syracuse 47 32 sn 31 15
Topeka 66 40 pc 38 11
Washington 54 33 pc 50 28
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 83 Fullerton, Calif. LOW -18 Gunnison,
Colo.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 86/74/pc
Amsterdam 24/23/sn
Athens 63/54/pc
Beijing 29/17/sn
Berlin 24/20/pc
Bermuda 69/64/sh
Cairo 71/53/s
Calgary 21/19/pc
Havana 81/65/pc
Hong Kong 67/59/pc
Jerusalem 60/49/s


Lisbon 58/48/sh
London 36/28/sn
Madrid 44/36/sh
Mexico City 63/44/c
Montreal 34/0/sf
Moscow 18/8/pc
Paris 34/23/sn
Rio 81/69/ts
Rome 58/52/r
Sydney 82/70/sh
Tokyo 37/34/pc
Toronto 25/10/sf
Warsaw 21/12/c


j- C I T R U S


C O U N T Y -"--1


HRONICLLE
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $36.65* 6 months: $64.63*
1 year: $116.07*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of. 14 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
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Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
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To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
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Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com


Where to find us:
Meadowcrest
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SrjrrlBr,,ir. i H.*, 1624 N.
Drunken leld Meadowcrest
Ie-- Cinnocndale Dr Blvd.
Ave | Cao e Crystal River,
A M eadowcresl FL 34429
N I \ '1:1 '

SInverness
IE Cuurltwjup office
T o in s t .u g1 0 6 W M a i n
St.,
41 Inverness, FL
> ^ 34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 63 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold ......................... ........... ................................... Editor, 5 64 -2 93 0
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy .................................................. Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trista Stokes............................................................... Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes .................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ............................................. Mike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .............................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Com m unity content ................................................ Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .............................................. Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ........................... Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Phone 352-563-6363
Si POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


ing bids at an estate sale Saturday.
Bruce Morrison said the rocker's parents
once lived in the home. He claims, according
to family lore, Jim Morrison was conceived
there. He said he has video of Jim Morrison's
mother in the home's backyard, holding him
while she's pregnant.
Gerbil saved in home fire
TAMPA-Authorities have extinguished a
fire that broke out at a Tampa home while a
teen was cooking.
Several Tampa Fire Rescue crews re-
sponded to the house fire Friday.
They said a teen was cooking when grease
caught fire on the stove, quickly filling the
kitchen with smoke. The teen was home alone
and said he could not extinguish the fire, so he
ran to a neighbor's house to call 911.
A gerbil named Sniffles was rescued from
the home and is doing well. No other injuries
were reported.
-From wire reports


A4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WALMART
Continued from Page Al

the third in Citrus County,
as a medium-size store, not
a Super Walmart like the
store in Inverness.
"It is right in line with
other Walmarts," he said.
It will be a little over
116,000 square feet and
compares more to the
store in Homosassa. That
store opened last April, re-
placing an older location.
The Walmart has a drive-
through pharmacy, grocery
department and a Subway
restaurant Cooper had ex-
pected to hire about 200
new employees.


The Walmart has a drive-through
pharmacy, grocery department and
a Subway restaurant. Manager
Tom Cooper had expected to hire
about 200 new employees.


It anchors a shopping
center called Central
Ridge Plaza on about 40
acres. Gulf to Lakes Asso-
ciates Inc. sold the site to
the big-box retailer and is
co-developer with Wal-
mart for the infrastruc-
ture. Early plans called for
a Walmart store and at
least seven smaller stores.
In November, the first
step was taken for the pos-
sible building of a large,


unnamed retail store on
C.R. 486, across the road
and northwest of the new
Walmart. Citrus County
Planning and Develop-
ment Commission ap-
proved a request for a
comprehensive plan
amendment to allow the
project.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. com.


MATHEW BECK/Chronicle
The new signal on County Road 486 at Walmart is synchronized to avoid traffic
backups at the nearby light at the C.R. 491 intersection.


Memory




Loss


Wears Many Faces


TRAFFIC
Continued from Page Al
traffic to pick up with the
store's opening, they hope
motorists will be patient as
the widening project
continues.
"There's definitely going
to be an impact with addi-
tional traffic, no doubt
about that," assistant
county administrator Ken
Frink said. "We ask for the
public's patience. I think
they'll be really happy
with the end result."
The $11.3 million road
widening project from


State Road 44 to about a
mile west of C.R. 491 is on
schedule for completion at
the end of this year, county
spokeswoman Lindsay
Ubinas said.
Frink said the Walmart
traffic impact on the road
still under construction
may not be that significant
since much of the popula-
tion areas near the new
store are Beverly Hills, Cit-
rus Springs, Pine Ridge
and Citrus Hills all to the
north and east of the store.
The Walmart also re-
quired a traffic signal at its
entrance on C.R. 486. A
traffic study showed the
116,000-square-foot store


would generate about 389
peak-hour trips, which
warranted a signal.
Gulf to Lakes Corp., the
property's developer, paid
for the traffic signal.
Frink said the signal and
the C.R. 491 intersection
signal are synchronized by
fiber-optic cable to make
sure they change signals
nearly simultaneously to
avoid traffic backups be-
tween the two signals.
"We normally wouldn't
let signals that close," he
said, "unless they're syn-
chronized."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228.


FlEE Dine & Learn on Tinnitus & Hearing Loss


WHO: ANYONE WITH TINNITUS OR HEARING Loss
LIMITED SEATING CALL NOW!
WHEN: WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23
3:30 PM 5:00 PM
WHERE: GOLDEN CORRAL
2605 E. GULF TO LAKE, INVERNESS


IMNIININ IO EARST U YOU A NOTALON.

The Better Hearing Institute defines tinnitus as the perception of a sound
that has no external source. It affects everyone differently. If you are
experiencing ringing in your ears, answer the following questions:
Y N


* Would you say that you are aware of the ringing in your ears
on a regular basis?
* Does the ringing in your ears bother or annoy you?
* Does the ringing in your ears interfere with your ability to
concentrate?
* Would you say that because of the ringing in your ears you
have trouble sleeping or falling asleep?
* Do you believe the ringing in your ears interferes with your
ability to hear?
If you answered YES to any of these questions or have tried
other tinnitus relief options without success and you are finally
ready to stop letting the ringing in your ears take over your life,
this seminar is for you!
Call 352-621-8000 to reserve your seat.




AUDIBEL
HOMOSASSA INVERNESS
5699 S. Suncoast Blvd. 2036 Hwy. 44W.
L. aiU s CUL 5s5.fsl'M


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Seatiingis


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at home atone, with
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or living in another
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the experts that will
help you gain peace
of mind and get the
support you need.


* Suspiciousness

* Sleeplessness

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Now Accepting

Reservations
Having a plan is the smart thing to do.


MARK YOUR

CALENDAR
FOR OUR UPCOMING EDUCATIONAL
TALKS & SUPPORT GROUPS


- WEDNESDAY -

January 23 5pm


- THURSDAY -

February 7 2:30pm


- FRIDAY -

February 8, 15, 22 2pm


Call for details and to RSVP
Seating and respite care is available but limited.


SUPERIOR

RESIDENCES

of Lecanto

MEMORY CARE


4865 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy. (SR44) Lecanto, FL 34461
(352) 746-LIVE (5483)

*s pe ac


Assisted Living Facility License # 12256


I


SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 A5


I 000DRLM





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Ingrid Berg, 70
LECANTO
Ingrid Lucia Berg, 70,
Lecanto, died Jan. 17, 2013,
at her residence under the
loving care of her family
and Hospice of Citrus
County.
Ingrid was born Oct. 25,
1942, in Germany She was
a master beautician in her
native country and worked
as a professional hair-
dresser for 20 years. She
was a homemaker and
avid gardener who also en-
joyed oil painting.
Left to cherish her mem-
ory is her son, Andy, his
wife, Jackie Dillersberger,
and their children Lucia
and Andreas, Homosassa;
also daughter Anabel
Dillersberger, Lecanto.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, Leo Berg,
in 1993.
Inurnment will take
place at a later date at Oak
Ridge Cemetery in Inver-
ness. Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with
Crematory is in charge of
arrangements. In lieu of
flowers, please consider
the needs of the family
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.
Julie Mae
Sineus, 47
HOMOSASSA
Julie Mae Sineus, 47, of
Homosassa, Fla., died Jan.
7,2013. Julie Mae was born
May 14, 1965, in Freeport,
Bahamas. She was a cus-
tomer service representa-
tive at the Homosassa
Walmart. Julie Mae moved
to Homosassa in 2006 from
Orlando, Fla.
Survivors include her
six children, Markindey
Sineus of Homosassa, Fla.,
Winsor Sineus of Howard
College, Md., Fabiana
Sineus, Angeline Sineus,
Nickinson Sineus and
Subrina Sineus, all of Ho-
mosassa, Fla.; several
brothers and sisters; and
the father of her children,
Jean Claude Sineus.
Funeral services for Ms.
Sineus will be at noon Sat-
urday, Jan. 26, 2013, at
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church, Lecanto, Fla. The
Rev Adam Smith will offi-
ciate. The family will re-
ceive friends from 11 a.m.
until the hour of service.
Interment services will be
at Magnolia Cemetery,
Lecanto, Fla. Heinz Fu-
neral Home & Cremation,
Inverness, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.
Ellard
Jacklin, 79
HOMOSASSA
Ellard G. Jacklin, 79, of
Homosassa, died Saturday,
Jan. 19,2013, at Hospice of
Citrus County in Lecanto.
Arrangements by McGan
Cremation Service LLC,
Hernando.


To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,'
Saralynne
Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller@chronicleonline.com


Thomas 'Tom'
Fix, 66
LECANTO
Thomas "Tom" M. Fix,
66, of Lecanto, Fla., died
Jan. 16,2013, at HPH Hos-
pice in Lecanto, Fla.
Thomas
was born
June 21,
1946, in
Cleveland,
Ohio, and
raised in
Kawanis
Lake of
Newbury, Thomas
O h i o, Fix
where he
graduated in 1964. He
joined the U.S. Army and
served in Vietnam in 1966-
67 as a flight line supervi-
sor for OV-1 Mohawks. He
loved being in the Army
He returned home, where
he remained single and
enjoyed life. At the age of
39, he met his wife, Cheryl
(Pajcic) of Strongville,
Ohio, and they married in
1985. They lived in down-
town Cleveland, where
Tom took over the family
business, Fix Cleaners,
started by Tom's grandfa-
ther then later operated by
his father. He was proud to
continue the family busi-
ness until he became ill in
1995 and was forced to
close Fix Cleaners after 80
years. Tom started addi-
tional businesses while in
Cleveland; JoPaul Donuts
and Erieside Concession
on Euclid Beach and
Edgewater Beach. He was
an avid fan of the Cleve-
land Browns, Cleveland
Indians, Ohio State Buck-
eyes and Tampa Bay Rays.
Tom was very involved in
Cleveland politics. He
loved boating on Lake
Erie. He and his family
traveled for three months
across the United States by
RV before settling in
Lecanto, Fla. While in
Florida, Tom became very
involved with Central Cit-
rus Little League. He was
a parent, volunteer, con-
cession manager, umpire
and board member. Tom
helped build the CCLL


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baseball/softball complex
in Holder. Tom and his
wife were honored by
Williamsport, Pa., as Vol-
unteers of the Year.
Tom was preceded in
death by his beloved par-
ents, Henry G. Fix and
Anna (Valko) Fix. Sur-
vivors include his wife of
28 years, Cheryl Fix;
daughter, JoAnna; son,
Paul; brothers, Henry
(Rodica) Fix of Geneva,
Ohio, and Matthew Fix of
Twinsburg, Ohio; sisters,
Elizabeth "Pinky" (Ed)
Godwin of Port Charlotte,
Fla., Kristina "Tina" Tucci
of Chardon, Ohio, Sally An-
drews of Ohio, and
Michele (Brian) Peck of
Twinsburg, Ohio; many
nieces and nephews; and
"adoptive children,"
Joshua Teter Jones, Brit-
tani Tribble, Stephanie
Marotta, Jamie Flatley and
so many others he has
touched.
The family will receive
friends from 5 to 8 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013, at
Heinz Funeral Home. A
prayer service will begin
at 5:30 p.m. Hospice Chap-
lin Carl Hemphill will pre-
side. A funeral Mass will
be at 11 a.m. Friday, Jan.
25, 2013, at St. Scholastica
Catholic Church in
Lecanto. Father Michael
Smith will preside. In lieu
of flowers, donations may
be given to HPH Hospice
or the Wounded Warrior
Project. Heinz Funeral
Home & Cremation, Inver-
ness, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Jimmie
Jones, 87
INVERNESS
Jimmie L. Jones, 87, of
Inverness, died Friday,
Jan. 18, 2013, at HPH Hos-
pice Care Center, Lecanto.
Private arrangements
are by Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory, Inverness.


Deaths ELSEWHERE
James
Hood, 70
STUDENT
MONTGOMERY, Ala. -
One of the first black stu-
dents who enrolled at the
University of Alabama a
half century ago in defi-
ance of racial segregation
has died. James Hood of
Gadsden was 70.
Officials at Adams-
Buggs Funeral Home in
Gadsden said they are
handling arrangements for
Hood, who died Thursday
Then-Alabama Gov
George Wallace made his
infamous "stand in the
schoolhouse door" in a
failed effort to prevent
Hood and Vivian Malone
from registering for classes
at the university in 1963.
Hood and Malone were
accompanied by Deputy
U.S. Attorney General
Nicholas Katzenbach
when they were con-
fronted by Wallace as they
attempted to enter the uni-
versity's Foster Audito-
rium to register for classes
and pay fees.
Wallace backed down
later that day and Hood
and Malone registered for
classes.
Hood was the last sur-
vivor among the major fig-
ures in the schoolhouse
door incident. Wallace
died in 1998, Vivian Mal-
one Jones in 2005 and
Katzenbach last year
After enrolling, Hood re-
mained at UA for a few
months and moved to
Michigan, where he re-
ceived a bachelor's degree
from Wayne State Univer-
sity and a master's degree
from Michigan State.
He later moved to Wis-
consin, where he worked
at the Madison Area Tech-
nical College for 26 years.
He retired in 2002 as
chairman of public safety
services in charge of po-
lice and fire training.


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Chew, who played Propo-
sition Joe on the HBO se-
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He was 52.


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A6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013


m]





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


We pause to remember the 56,000,000 lives

lost since Roe vs. Wade January 22, 1973.



Citrus County Right to Life Invites You to Attend Our




Roe -vs- Wade




Memorial Service



Tuesday, Jan. 22, at Noon

on the North Lawn of the Old Citrus County Courthouse

[ Nnifrobert Abbe [ Bob & Tern Abraham [ Beth& Frank Abramowich [IJuanitaAcosta [ Elizabeth Adams [ Dr & Mrs Babb Adams [ William & M . i i . i .
[ Ray & TernAllee [ Keith & Barbara Allen Steve &AnneAmann Davis & Louise Anders ITheresa Anderson Tom&LizAntony NormaArkell i. 1 I.
0 Maria Baez [ Susan Bailey [ Lowell Baker [ Bakes Family [ Charles Ballehr [ Lucy Ballien & Daughter Shen Osborn [ Faye & Louis Barfleld D i i 1 1 i i- I 1 1 i
[ Pat Baumstark Irene Bautista [ Ramona-Marie Bazile [ Vivian Beasley [ Gary Beasley [ Joyce &Wayne Beck [ Gerald & BernitaBecker [ Jane i- i- i. i. i-- I- 1 i- 1- i- I :
0 Stephanie & Jeff Bell [ Barbara Benoya [ Barbara L Benson [ Mary Benson [ Deborah Benson [I Mike Benson [ Diane & RudyBeres [ Maureen- I 1 1I i 1
[ Sal Blanco [ Barbara Blodeau [ Gerard Bilodeau Bert & Linda Biroc [ Pat & Denny Bisson [ Don & Marilyn Blackburn E Muriel Blar[ ClaytonE i i i i i i .
D Grace Bonnette D DanBoone D Rose Mare Boone [ JaneBoone [ GaryBorgeson MarcellaBoss IMarian & Tony Bottichio I Danny Boydstun [ i 1 .i i -
0 Sandra Brasmeester [ Marilyn Breltfeller [ Joseph Breltfeller Charlotte Brennan [ Bill & Joan Brewis [ Jeanne & Mane Brodeur Theresa Bros .
[ Sunniva Brown [ Jan & Tom Brownhll E Fran Bruner [ Klaus Brunmitzer [ Fred & Jimmie Bryant [I Jacquelne Budd E Tracy& DarickBuettner [ J 1 1 i l 1 .
0 Sue &Pete Burrell [ Gail & Joseph Buss [ Jane Buzzelli [ Keith & Jennifer Byers [ Carl Bykowski [ Matthew& Maryanne Byrnes L Andy & Marya
[ George & Minam Cannan [ Susan Cannella [ Dave & Janet Carey [ JudyCarlton [ Len & Cheryl Carmon [ Sunny [ Shade & Soleryah Carter [ JE
[ Joan Castronovo [ Mane Catrello [ Joan Cecil [ Gmny Celano [ Dallas Cerny [ Kim Cerny E Janice Chace [ Ann Chapman [ Eleanor Chatfield
[ Meni Chirgwin Harry & Marilyn Chisholm [ William& Patricla Chmielewski [ John Chnswell [ Bohdan Cleslicki Teresa Cleslicki Paul Cigno "
[ Harold & Elaine Cipollore E Ed Clark [ Wendell Clark [ Paul Clark [ Mildred Clark John Clarke [ Jack & Ruby Clarkson Louise Clemens .
S Ken &MaryAnn Clements[IBarbaraClifton [ JohannaClifton [ Earl&GraceClore [ TheresiaCluts [Irene CmarEDick&GlennaCofran
[ Ron & Cathy Coll ns [ JaniceConforti [ Margie & Dick Connell [ Mary Connolly [ LesConnon Kathie Conquest [ John Conroyo [ Howard Cooke
[ Bruce & Pat Cooney [ Thomas J Corkery [ Joyce Corrado [ Frank & Eizabeth Correla [ D Cortes [ Tom, Martha & Rachel Couric
[ Robert & Babette Coxe [ Robert Cispo [ Irene Cnspo [ John & Susan Cromwell [ Mirtha Crook [ Josephine & Martin Crowe [ Gary & Sheila Cuge
[ Monsignor George Cummings [ Bob & Rommy Cuneo [ Bob Curry [ Sam & Mary Curtis [ Kathy Czechowski [ Jacinta Da Silva [ Mr & Mrs Patrick i
[ Katherine Daniels [ Paul & Jeanette Daugherty [ Bruce & Camille Davies Angel & Jenny Davila [ Ron & Jeannme Davis [ Donna Davis
[ Lou & Kathy Davis [ Gene & Deanna Davis [ Evelyn De Falco [ Stephen De Fiore [ Mike De Fiore [ Concetta De Luca [ Mel & Jackie De Sha
[ Donna De Simone [ Cindy De Vine [ Warren & Sylvia Deets [ Wilfned Dehne [ Joan Del Glorno [ Marie Delalla [ Susan & Jerry Delong
[ Moses &Anne Desabrals [ Michael & Debble Desautel Jackie Devine [ James & Janice Devine [ Tom & Clare Devlin Barbara & William Dexter
E 1 O Di Frisco [ Benjamin & Nancy Di Vona [ Bert & Deanna Diaz r Denny& Bonnie Dingier [ Rosemary Dingman Vona Dixon [ Mary *
0 Dorothy Dobos [ Doug & Laune Dodd T E Donovan[ Ed & Mary Derochea [ Joyce Dorsten [ Dianne Dotson [ Santo & Barbara Dovi Juanitai
[ Edward Doyle [ Jean Doyle [ Eva Drost [ Ella Dubols [ Peggy & Jim Ducey [ Duane & Barbara Dueker [ Mike & Pat Duke
[ Mr & Mrs Sam Dunlap [ Joan Dunne [ Charlotte Dunn D Robert & Joanne Dunton [ Ray & Faye Durrett [ Ruth Duvall
[ Dr & Mrs William Dwielle [ Margaret Dwyer [ Joseph Ear I Francis Ear [ Michele Ecklund I Don & Vera Eddy [ Carolyn Edge [ Carolyn Edge
[ Laverne Edwards [ A J Edwards [Lu Ella Eggenberger iF ., i Mary Jane Eggleston [ Joanne Ehmke [ DianeElmhirst
0 Phyllis & George Ely [ Carol Emmitt [ Kathy & Bill Emond [ Ralph &Janme Enger I Ann Englund A [ Helga Erhart [ Ralph Esoltenbauch
I John & Connie Evans [ Barry & MaryAnne Evans [ Greg & Becky Evans [ Robert Fabne [ MaryAnn Fabnre E i [ Nancy Farese
[ Nina Farewell [ Ins & Matt Farrell E Barbara & Gerald Farrell [ Mark Felton [ Barbara Fennell [ James Fennell [ Tamlko Figley E Julie Files
[ Jeanette Finck [ Jane Fischer [ Joan Fitzgerald E Pat Flaherty [ Patricla Flanagan [ Ron & Joyce Fly [ Michael Foley [ Lorraine & Charlie Footit
0 Judith Ford 0 Marion Ford [ Lynn Forgione 0 Rosemary Fortier [ Jim Betty & Derek Fowler I Ernie & Darla Fowler [ Kathy& Joe Francis I Heli- i
[ Richard Frank [ Richard L Frank [ Suzanne Frank [ Karen Frank [ Joe Frank I Elizabeth Frank [ Richard Frank [ Johnny &Ashley Frank
[ Lester Frankel I Lorraine Fncke [ Ronald Fnesland [ Wilford & Marilyn Fnesland [ Bill Fness [ Betty Fness [ Paul & Johnda Fulton
[ Ronnie & Eva Gable [ Yolanda Ganchorn L Gerald & Marge Gansen [ Daniella Garcla [ Ricardo Garcla [ Maria Garcla [ Connie Garcia
[ Arlene Gargano [ Dawne Gatlng 1'.- [ Ron & Sharon Gentry Rip & Judy Gettman 0 Lance &Ashley Gibson [ Ann Gidosh
D Christine Glese D Ann M Gilbert D Nicole & Leonard Giordano D Constance Giordano D Claire Giordano D Debbi & Ernie Glover D Allan Gobbi
D Bernie & Sue Goddard E Mary Ann & Aj Gogan D Josephine Gonsette D Rose Goodenough [ Rose Goodenough o Gary & Lisa Gormsen
D Charles Gottfred D Claire Gould D Rhea Grabarczyk E Mary K Graf E James & Johnnie Graham D Darvi & Delene Graham
D Bill & Terry Gramlng D Gall & Bob Granger D Anna Grasso D Joan & Larry Gray D Kenneth & Regina Green Ron & Charlotte Greenaway
D Phil Gregoire D Lynn Griffis Darry Gnffis D Rich & Bea Griffith D Joseph Gnmaldo E Charles& Lorraine Grimes
D Maureen & James Grossman Jeffery Grow LShirley & Len Guenette F Len Guenette G Karen & Van Gusha D Charles Guth D Robert Hackett
L -- 1H Dorothy HahnL -1 Nicole & George Hale D Edward Hall E Patricia Hall D Janet Handnck
D Norm & Judy Hanson L Nancy & Bernie Harney D Mr & Mrs Nathan & Barbara Harris Yvonne Harris Donna Harison D Louise Harnson
F Kay & Shirley Harsin 0 Lorraine Hartnett 0 Mike & Carol Hartney 0 Grant &Anita Haskins L H 1 Sandy & Ron Hawk E Diana Hayden
D Frank & Carol Ryan Hayes D Hal & Mary Hayes D Tom Healey D George & Lillian Hellmer D Joan & Bob Henault D Roger & Sue Henley
D1 1 1.- Joan Herberger H Victoria Hertik Linda & Martin Hession Mary HickeyC .1: H 11 Ron &Bev Hill
D Ken & Martha Hmkle D James Hmman D Lula Hitchcock D Ethel Hitson L Gerry & Florence Hodum D Laura Hoesly E Mr & Mrs Tom Hoey
D Chuck & Donna Holden DF Sue Holmes D Linda Holthaus M lan & Meilea Holzer K Barbara Homan a Sean Hopper D Mary Horan D Kathy Horan
D Jim & Tern Horan E Joan Horn L1 H D Jerry & Judy Horton Len& Betty Houle D Tom &Pat Hubbel L i 1 H
D Kim Hulett 0 Tracy Humble D Bob & Nadme Humphries Philip & Claire Hussey L Barbara Hyatt L I I i 11 H Billliames
0 Mr & Mrs William lies E Alicia Indelicato [ Joseph Indelicato [ Kathleen Indelicato [ Lee Inserra [ Bobbie Jack [ Peg & Curtis James
[ George & Judy Jamewicz [ Lionel Janisse Stephen Jarrell Chester Jaworski Mr & Mrs Walter Jeselson E Mary Jo Johnson [ Rufus Johnsoi
Marjone Johnson E Cyndy Jones 0 Bud & Ev Jones [ Jack & Irma Jonza [ Doug Jonf I Douglas Jonf [ Ron & Knsta Joseph
I Joan & Francis Joyal [IJoe & Giny Julavits Don & Jeanie Kajens ki [Catherine Kman [ Roland & Nancy Kappelmann [ Jim & Bobble Kanbo
[ Mike & Barbara Kasica I Don Kaskie [ Casey & Faye Kearse [ Gregg & Darla Kell [ Pastor Ray & Shirley Kelley [ Lou Kelly [ Delores Kelly
[ Scott & Carole Kemper [ Donna Kenady [ Therese & Ed Kendnck I John & Pam Kennedy [ Ann & Nell Ketzlick I Jerry Kidwell
[ Betty Kidwell [ KyranKillianK [ Robert King [ Maria Kirk 1: 1 i [ EJ Knijewski [ Deacon Terry & Hazel Knox
0 Dolores Knox [ Helen & Eugene Koczur [ Glen & Marina Koelber Ron & Irene Kornatowskih [John & Shirley Kornfemd
[ Sally & Mike Krasny [ Ed Krausa [ William Kncher [ Gma Kroll [ Willard & Shirley Krotsch [ Frances Kuebler [ Joyce Kuffel
I John Kuhn [ Karol Kusmaul 0 John Kutchaver Janice Kyle 0 Mary La Piana [ Jean Laird [ Alice Lambert
I Robert Landini [ Jim & Lon Lane [ John Laney [ David Lanzilla I[ Suzanne Lanzilla I[ Eugene Lanzilla [ John Larkin
0 Rosemane & Edwin Larock Howard & Alma Lauben L Roslyn Lauben Jerry & Kathy Lavole [ Margaret Lawrence
0 Antonio Lazaro [ John & Nancy Leaf [ Lois Lee I Mernelee Legath [ Bob & Barbara Lord I Richard & Antoinette Lempner
[ Dennis & Renate Leonard [ John Levesque [ Joan Licoln-Sablone [ Bob & Jane Lidsay
[ Alexander, Mane, Blessilda & ChynnaLiu [ Maria Locasto I Dons Lombardi Margaret Lombardo [ Walter & Carol Long
[ Bradley & Barbara Looper [ Eric Loster Ray & Marilyn Louks James & Debby Lucy [ I i- 1i [ Ann Maccabee
[ Debbie Mails [ Gloria Manalac [ Dick Mann [ Lloyd & Suzanne Manning 0 Elizabeth Marclano [ Charles Marinelli
0 Charles Marinelli Patricia & Donald Marken [ William & Anne Martell [ Charlie Martin I Bob &Bev Martin
0 Nick & Maianita Maselli [ Michael Matkovich I Frances Matkovich I Joe & Rosalie Matt [ Marjone Mattingly
[ Charles E Mattinalv [ Audrev Mattox [ Leo Maver [ John &Patsv Mazzone [Patricla Mc Carty E John & Kathv Mc Cormick


ne Mc Dermott D Raymond Mc I
in Mc Phee E Deborah Mccarthy
ke& Mary Mcdowell 0 Terry Mcf
. Il Karen & Jim
n Michaels 0 Joyce Michaels 01
Mitchell [ Jim& Yvonne Mitche
tncia Monsil 0 Francis Mooney
ttanny Morales 0 John & Marle


Elheny 0 1i-- H 1 1. 1
E Linda & Bob Mcclain 0 Georg
arlin 0 Suzanna Mcfarlin 0 Maur
eister E Julia Melendez E Judith
Tom & Diana Miles 0 Dale Miller
ell 0 Janet& Mike Mitchell E Rob
] Joe & Mane Mooney 0 Catheri
ne Moran E Donna Moreno L Rut


Carol Mc Hugh 0 Dolores & James Mc Laughlin
i & Marion Mcconnell 0 Sheryl Mccullough
een Mcniff E Jeff & Kay Meahl E Cecilia Medeiros
h Menard 0 Richard & Glenda Metheney E Ray & Pat Michae
0 Joe & Lon Miller 0 Jim& Linda Mills J Jim Mitchell
bm Moffatt D John & Patti Mogg 0 Sharon Momono
ne Moore E Sheldon &Judy Moore 0 Thomas Mora
th Morgan 0 Doreen Morgan 0 Jim Morton E Lawrence ML


] Janet & Donald Murphy [ Ed & Arlene Murphy [ Janet Murrey [ Jesse & Lon Mynck [ Rosemary Naber [ Rosemary Naber
] Tom& Pat Napolitano [ Theresa Nash [ Bill & Connie Nebraska [ Sonya R Neidig E Theresa Neill [ Cory Neill [ Sanna Nelson
]Tern Nery [ Roseann Nestor [ Ed & Donna Newbould [ Peter Newton [ Niblock Family [ Nick& Lynda Nichols [ Nancy Nissen
] Leo & Gloria Nolan [ Bob Noris E Robble Noris [ Paul Norville [ William Novak [ James 0' Donnell Frieda 0' Donnell
] Michael O'bnen0 Robert & Sharon O'bnski [ Fred Oberst [ Mary K Obnen [ Helen Occhipnti [ Robert Oconnell [ Jim Ohmstead
]Pastor Frederick& Margaret Ohsiek [ Joseph Ondrejko [ Joan Oropallo [ George R& Micheline Ouellette [ Dick & Cindy Over
] Mitch & Barbara Ozirsky Judy Ozment [ Anna Palmer [ Roberta Palmer [ Mary Pannell [ Dianne Pans [ Kaye Parra-Kelley [ Ann Parry [ Ts i-'
] Richard & Patricla Patterson [ Lucy Pellegrno [ Phyllis & Leonard Pellegrom [ Anna Perko [ Norma Persavich
] Carol Peterman [ Lucille & Milton Peters [ Franklin & Helynn Peters [ Terry & Rose Ellen Peterson [ Lillian Peterson [ Randy & Debbie Pettit
] Stephen & Marcie Phillips Rosemary Pietruski [ Tom Pilkington Eugenio Pmero [ Walter &AIice Pittman [ CamiPlaisted
] Mayor Bob Plaisted Cookie Plasted E Ron & Jacke Plos [ Joan Pomidor [ Larry &Vanta Powers E Ed & Lynda Powers Mary Lee Powers
] Carol Powers [ John Pozzi [ Pina Pozzi [ Dave & Pam Preast [ David Presdon [ Don & Wanda Pndemore [ Bob & Terry Prince
] Ginette Provencher [ Gene & Pattie Pullen [ Frank & Patricla Pullen [ Patricia & Frank Pullen [ Gregory Purtll [ Joseph Quadrni [ Sally Quinn
] Anne Quinn Wayne & Mary Lou Raby [ PJ, Tina, Tarra, Chance, Trent & Logan Raby [ Chris [ Yarelys & Baby CJ Raby [ Phil Ramirez
] John & Gall Rando [ Barbara Rashley Jim & Janet Rashley [ Tom & Sarah Rausch [ Sharon Reed [ Rachael Reed [ Peter & Diane Reguin
] Peter Regum [ John Reilly [ John (Jack)Reilly [ Myrlee Reinhart [ Michael & Enka Rels [ Dr & Mrs Gerald ReIter [ Clint & Millie Reph
SClinton Reph [ Margie & Bob Reusch [ Darrell & Barbara Rew [ Bart & Mary Lu Reyes [ Lucille Reynolds [ Susan Rheault [ Jim & Sharon Rhoads
] Henry Richard [ Dr Louis & Carolyn Rideout [ Elena Riechman [ Carol Riggs [ i f. [ Luke Ritche [ Paulette Ritchie Mary Rivera
] Marjone Robateau [ John Robateau [ Luis Rodnguez [ F .i [ Ryen Rodnguez [ Paul Rodnguez [ Del Rodts [ Levant & Evelyn Roge
] Ron & Mary Romanell [ Fran & Bob Rondeau [ Catherine Rose [ Hyacinth Rose [ Linda Ross [ Vcky Ross [ Jolene & Dana Rossignol [ Carole F.
Lauren Russ [ Tern Ruttman [ Paul & Jane Rux Elizabeth J Ryan [ Steve Sablone [ Salatmo [ Clarence & Lynda Samm [ Win& Rose Samson
] Margaret Sanchez Helen Sanders Bob & Judy Sandstrom Pafut Santiago Santiago Sa Saito Dennis&PattiSargent Billy & Candace Sass
SLelan Saumell [ Karen Savela [ Jose & Lilla Sayson [ Linda Scarano [ Ruth Schar [ Phil Scherer [ Dolores & Louis Schiavo Dale & Brenda Scl -
] Gerald Schlaud [ Marlene Schlaud E Theresa Schleif [ Marvin Schley [ Robert Schneickert E Mabel & Bernie Schneider [ Earl & Anne Schuknecht ,.
]Pastor Donnie Seagle [ Gerald Sequin [ John Sergent [ Nelson & Cynthia Sergent [ Kim Sharpe [ S Shaute [ Nell & Pearl Sheehan [ Lloyd & Vi
] Barbara Shibley [ Betty J Silver [ Dawn Simon [ Mary & John Simonetti [ Christian Sivon [ Christina Sivon [ Joe & Shirley Skender [ Jane Ski
] Karen S Skrapits [ France Slaby [ Donald & Susan Slough [ John R& Daisy M Smith [ Marene Smith I Jeffery & Denise Smith [ Denise Smith [ .
IChnt&DebbleSmith [Mark&LizzySmythe [Jim&MarySondalle [Alex&AnnSosnicki ZennySparks Arlene &JackSpeakmanL SarahSpe .- l .
] Bill & Joan Spiddle [ Lee Split [ Bob & Gail Stafford [ Stan Stankiewicz [ Rosemary Stanley [ Cindy Staten Syria & Robert Stazko Mr & Mrs ... -' .
] Steely Sr & Family D Lynn & Ron Steffel D Judy Stevens D Jim Stevens L Bryan L Stevens a Rod & Barbara Stevens D John Stewart D Richard & Theresa Stimpfl
] Doug & Judi Stinson o Fred & Lore Stock E Gaye Stokes D Mildred Stone D Don Storm E Fr Ryszard Stradomski E Bob &Anne Stratton D Michelle Strong D Rosalie Suda
] Ann Mane Sudmann L Sandra Sullivan D Maureen Sullivan L Kathenne & Joshua Summers L Dawn Sunday D Charles Surowlec D Marge Susman D Dana Sutter
] Cynthia & EzeoTalaroc L Anne Tang DRuby Taylor L Connie TaylorE Jim & Brenda TaylorE Frank Teal 0 Ashlee & John Telschow I Sue Tejchman D The Raynor Family
] Paul Thll D Doug & Janet Thomas E Bob & Irene Thomas D Wllam Thompson E Gayle Thrower D Diane Tibbits Mary Tisza D Michael Tobin Linda Tommelleo
] Gene & Jean Toney Angela Toro L CeciliaTrentmann D Frank Trepamen L Tncca E Robert& Linda Trometer D Carlton "Buck"Troutt D Sophie Troy
] Michele & Gregory Troy E Gloria Tubolino [ Mr & Mrs Tuosto Jim & Jan Turner D Patricla Tush D Dan & Donna Tvenstrup [ Lalame Umandap L Lance & Tncia Uzar
] Christna Uzar E Johnathan Uzar L Enza & Andrew Uzar D Amber & Joseph Uzar D Veronica Uzar E Walton & Mitzi Van Hoose D Elsie Van Winkle D Frank & Linda Varone
] Pete & Martha Velazquez Paul & Maureen Vervoort L I J Mae Villa Va John & Marianne Vincell D Steve & Knsten Vncell L Nicholas Vncelli D Matt V
] Maura Wade D Edyth Wagnon D Rick & Jan Waldemar E Hans & Heather Waldraff 4 11 Bob & JoyceWalker Jon & Jackle Walton
] Jean Ware L I E Richard Waters D Mike Waters D Don & Patti Watkis D Luclle Watkins D Jean Watts D Rita Watts D Jimmy & Merry Waybrght D Laura'
] Michelle Webber D Bill & Janet Weber D Lorraine Wehle Christine Welder L Rich Weigold L Brad o Dot & Sarah Welch E Walter & Barbara Wezwick
] James Whetzel z Donna Whetzel D i .- Cathy & Bill Whynot 0 lone & Harry Wickham D CarolWilcox 0 Stan & Mary Wilhelm 0 John & Bonnie Wllette
] Edwma Wilyoung D John Wiburn D Joan Wirthman E Pat Wisniewski w Mane Wisser Ann Carol Witchey Bill & Carol Witchey D Mrs Wohltjen D Veronica M Wood
] Michael & Victona Wyka Brian Wyka W D Jen Wyka D Bnanna Wyka D Jacob Wyka D Clinton Wynne D Karen Yantis E Harold & Louise Yerxa D Linda Zabmski
SAllan & Anne Mane Zarek 7 Dan &JudvZearlev F7 Jeanne Zeller F Richard Zenng


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A right to hope. A right to tomorrow. A right to life.



Citrus Right to Life

519 Cabot Street Inverness, FL 34452 352-563-7017

www.citruscountyrighttolife.org

email: kathy98mindspring.com.


PLEASE SUPPORT OUR LOCAL CRISIS PREGNANCY CENTERS:
* FAMILY AND PREGNANCY LIFE CENTER 317 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 344-3030
* LIFE CHOICE CARE CENTER
Inverness Office: 305 S. Line Ave., Inverness, FL 34452 341-5176
Crystal River Office: 9030 Ft. Island Gulf Trail, Crystal River, FL 34429 228-4909
POST-ABORTIVE COUNSELING (Project Rachel) hopeafterabortion.org ADO


f Churches 8 Organizations '
E Cornerstone Baptist Church
L Council Of Catholic Women At Our Lady Of Grace Church
L Council Of Catholic Women At St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Church
E Divine Providence Ministries
E First Baptist Church Of Inverness
F First Christian Church Of Inverness
L Knights Of Columbus 6168 Ladies Auxilliary
E Knights Of Columbus Council 6391
E Knights Of Columbus Council 14485
L Knights Of Columbus Council 6168
F Life Choice Care Center
O.L.G. Youth Group Ministry
E Our Lady Of Fatima Respect Life
L Our Lady Of Grace Catholic Church
L Partners In Christ Sunday School Class Of
First Baptist Church Of Inverness
E Pregnancy & Family Life Center
7 St. Benedict Catholic Church
L St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church
E St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Men's Association
El Victory Baptist Church

f Businesses 1
E Anthony Coceman, PA.
E Barry Evans Drafting & Desig
0 FrankTile, Inc
O Honey-Do's
E Jack Fleming Prudential Florida Showcase Properties
7 Jane Boone L.M.T.
L Joseph Indelicato PA.
L Joseph Uzar Lawn Care
E Just Horse'n Around Inc.
7 Nick Nicholas Ford
L Pat Bisson -Avon Products
F Professional Hearing Centers
\ Uzar Enterprises


PTION: THE LOVING OPTION


SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 A7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


* WHAT: Florida Manatee Festival.
* WHEN: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 20.
* ADMISSION: $3; children 12 and younger
admitted free.
* WHERE: Downtown Crystal River (U.S. 19 at Citrus
Avenue).
* PARKING: Bus shuttle service from Crystal River
Mall parking lot round trip $1.
* TOURS: Boat tours: $10; children 12 and younger
admitted free. Three Sisters Springs is not open
today.


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Tom Hunter and his wife, Susan, with Earth & Sea, came
all the way from Washingtonville, N.Y., to show off their
unique jellyfish displays at the Floirda Manatee Festival
on Saturday. The jellyfish shown here in their natural
colors will glow in the dark for several hours at night.


FUN
Continued from Page Al

Manatee Nebula was un-
veiled. Through a radio
telescope that moves on
Earth, a set of telescopes
spans from Hawaii to the
Virgin Islands, creating a
single array 5,000 miles
long. Tania Burchell, a
radio astronomer with the
National Radio Astronomy
Observatory in West Vir-
ginia, described the neb-
ula to the audience before
the unveiling.
"This nebula is com-
pletely invisible," Burchell
said. "We look at the invis-
ible universe. There is a
whole universe out there
broadcasting in radio
waves. The stuff you are
picking up on your radios,
the universe is doing as
well. You have to know ex-
actly how to look for them
and where to look for
them. That is what we did
with this nebula. It took a
year to make this image. It
is huge. It spans 700 light


N q

I, i I h I, ,


years across. If you could
see it with your eyeball it
would be four-full moons
big across the night sky"
The Manatee Nebula
had been viewed by only 20
people in the nation before
Saturday Nebulas are
never named as they are in-
visible to the human eye.
However, due to a direc-
tor's assistant dying wish,
they nicknamed the nebula.
"When the images came
through to our director, the
director's assistant who
was a big manatee fan -
said 'Ah, it's a manatee',"
Burchell said. "She loved
manatees. So I spent the
last year crusading to get
this nicknamed. As radio
astronomers, we have
never nicknamed anything
that we have made. Be-
cause they are invisible and
didn't think anyone would
care. But she really cared."
The Manatee Nebula
will be on display at the
Visitor's Center on King's
Bay drive.
Back at the Florida
Manatee Festival, atten-
dees, children and pets


Exclusive


partook in the festivities
along Citrus Avenue.
Waiting for longer than
an hour in line for the boat
tour, Michael and Louise
Amarietti from Polk
County enjoyed their first
experience at the festival.
"We thought we would
drive up for the day to see
the manatees," Louise
Amarietti said smiling.
"We had never been here
and had always heard
about the festival. We are
waiting to take the boat out
to see what all of this
hoopla is about."
Manning their 100 per-
cent recycled glass booth,
sisters Amy Sharkey and
Fanny Hautau from Dun-
nellon marveled at the size
of the festival.
"This is our third year
here," Fanny said. "The
crowd is great. Usually, we
are on the other side of
festival. But we thought we
would try over here by the
water this year"
They were selling hand-
made-glass yard and gar-
den ornaments.
Throughout the festival,


"itJ'. -'.r-


0


L .


Visit Our New Location Inside Crystal River Mall


NRAO/AUI/NSF, K. Golap, M. Goss; NASA's Wide Field Survey Explorer (WISE).
The W50 supernova remnant in radio (green) against the
infrared background of stars and dust (red) is now called
the Manatee Nebula.


ON THE NET
Find a link to images
of the Manatee
Nebula with this story
at www.chronicle
online.com.

remarks could be heard as
people commented on the
beautiful temperatures for
the weekend. They re-
membered freezing tem-
peratures a few years ago
that hampered the festival.
The Florida Manatee
Festival is hosted and or-
ganized by the Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce, the Rotary Clubs of
Citrus County and the city
of Crystal River, with spon-
sorship from a number of
local companies and
organizations.
The festival, which has
vendors on both sides of
U.S. 19 and Citrus Avenue,
runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
today Cost is $3 for adults,
and children younger than
12 are free.
Call Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at 352-
563-5660, ext. 1334.


Products


TOURIST
Continued from PageAl

United States where one
can legally interact and
swim with manatees.
There are also manatee
education opportunities
and, of course, manatee
souvenirs.
The result has been a
wintertime manatee-
based tourism economy
creating jobs and generat-
ing tax revenue.
"There were 114,203 vis-
itors here for 2012, show-
ing a huge increase in
tourism since last year,"
Ivan Vicente, visitor spe-
cialist at Crystal River
Wildlife Refuge, said.
"There were more tourists
reported by dive boat and
tour boat operators."
The number of manatee-
seeking visitors is up more
than 20,000 for 2012. The
numbers had increased
from about 68,000 in 2010
to more than 93,000 in 2011
Vincente said the differ-
ence is noticeable, and
more and more people in
the private sector are find-
ing out about it. Also, there
are a lot more paddle
boarders going out mana-
tee watching.
"These animals have
brought a lot of tourism
money to this area," Refuge
Manager Michael Lusk
said during a recent tour of
King's Bay by federal offi-
cials. "During the winter,
you can barely get through
here. You have boaters,
people trying to swim, peo-
ple trying to kayak and the
tour operators. And, of
course, you have the mana-
tees who come to the area
because the water temper-
ature at the springs stays at
72 degrees."
Lusk said recently he did
not know of any other place
in the world where there is
an eco-tourism industry
built around getting in the
water with an endangered
species or interacting
closely with a protected
marine mammal.
"It's very unique and
very delicate," he said.
"Overall, the tourist
numbers are growing,"
Capt. Michael Birns, pres-


ident of the Manatee Eco-
Tourism Association
(META), said. "I see 2013
as a huge season for mana-
tee tourism."
He views the activity as
an overall barometer of the
national economy He said
they are seeing a lot more
tourists from the Midwest
right now, with the volume
from Northeast and Eu-
rope a little light.
And some things to raise
awareness of Crystal
River's manatee tourism
are in the offing, including
a spread in National Geo-
graphic and a segment on
"The Daily Show with Jon
Stewart."
"Manatee tourism is the
number one hook that
brings them here," he said.
"The big challenge for us
as a county is to keep them
here.
"We're the manatee cap-
ital of the world. We have
to strive to become a
world-class destination."
Birns said he is proud of
METAs role, as a young or-
ganization being a positive
force in developing mana-
tee tourism.
"About half of the tour
boat owners belong. We're
very committed," he said.
Marla Chancey, execu-
tive director of the Citrus
County Visitors and Con-
vention Bureau, pointed
out the 2011 Manatee Im-
pact Study The study was
based on a survey of peo-
ple who had been manatee
watching within Citrus
County in the past three
years.
Among the findings:
local area visitors spent
less than $100 per person
on manatee viewing and a
little more per party on
their entire manatee
watching experience.
Those from other parts
of Florida, other states and
Canada, spent 2.5 to 6
times more on manatee
watching than those from
the local area. And they av-
eraged spending more
than $1,400 per party, with
a significant number
spending $3,500 or more.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. com.


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A8 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013


ii" 1 -





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


News ANALYSIS


Analysis: Obama's Asian outreach


MATTHEW PENNINGTON
Associated Press
WASHINGTON President Barack
Obama wants Asia to be a growing focus of
his second-term foreign policy, but whether
that happens could depend on his ability to
manage global hot spots and avert a fiscal
crisis at home.
Within two weeks of his Nov 6 re-
election, Obama became the first U.S. pres-
ident to visit Myanmar The visit was a sign
he intended to sustain his administration's
commitment to the region following the
long wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
That's a reflection ofAsia's growing eco-
nomic and strategic importance. In the
past three years, Washington has em-
broiled itself in diplomacy over the dis-
puted South China Sea, sent more military
assets to the Asia-Pacific and pushed for-
ward a regional trade pact The Obama ad-
ministration also has put much effort into
managing ties with emerging rival China.
Asia has welcomed those moves, but gov-
ernments in the region question the U.S.
ability to sustain its policy
While Sen. John Kerry, the nominee to
replace Hillary Rodham Clinton as secre-
tary of state, is expected to continue the
focus, the Middle East seems destined to
demand the lion's share of his attention.
It also will be tough to enhance the U.S.
profile in Asia in an age of austerity In con-
trast to China, the U.S. can little afford
more aid for its allies or to expand its mil-
itary presence.
Perhaps most critical to U.S. stature in
the region will be how it manages its deep
political divisions at home.
Failure to resolve the standoff between
Obama and Republicans over how to man-
age America's $16.4 trillion national debt
weighs on global financial markets.
The Republican-controlled House is set
to vote on a temporary measure this com-
ing week that would permit the govern-
ment to borrow more money to meet its
debt obligations for about three more
months. The proposal wouldn't tackle how
to reduce the debt
Without an extension in the debt ceiling,
the world's largest economy could default
as soon as mid-February That probably
would mean a downgrade in the U.S. credit
rating, leading to higher borrowing costs in
the U.S. and elsewhere. It would alarm
creditor governments, such as China and
Japan, which both hold more than $1 tril-
lion in U.S. Treasury securities. It could
undermine America's position as a safe
haven for investors and trigger economic
turmoil.
For all the divisiveness in Washington,
Asia policy remains an area of broad
agreement


Both parties have supported efforts to
build stronger ties with Asia to position the
U.S. to benefit from the region's rapid eco-
nomic growth: cementing alliances in
South Korea and Japan, building a strate-
gic partnership with India and expanding
ties in Southeast Asia.
Most notably, Republicans and Democ-
rats have shown rare unity in backing the
administration's ambitious outreach to for-
mer pariah state Myanmar
Butthe Asia policy initiatives of Obama's
first term could bring with them messy re-
sponsibilities in the second term.
The U.S. declaration in 2010 of its na-
tional interest in the peaceful resolution of
maritime territorial disputes in the South
China Sea has boosted Washington's stand-
ing among nations intimidated by China's
assertive behavior in the region.
But the Southeast Asian bloc the U.S.
wants to tackle the disputes appears ill-
suited to cope. It is at risk of fracturing be-
tween those nations that want collective
negotiations advocated by the U.S. and
those opposing such diplomacy in defer-
ence to China.
Doubts remain over the commitment of
Myanmar's military to democratic reform.
Despite a shift away from authoritarian
rule that has been rewarded by the relax-
ation of U.S. penalties, the military has
waged an offensive against ethnic rebels in
the country's north.
If confirmed as secretary of state, an im-
mediate concern for Kerry will be the ris-
ing tension in Northeast Asia, where
China, Japan and South Korea all are ush-
ering in new leaders.
China's spat with Japan over contested
islands threatens to embroil the U.S. if it
escalates. While Washington will reaffirm
its alliance with Japan, it also wants deeper
ties with Beijing to dilute the risk of con-
flict breaking out The U.S. will encourage
Japan and South Korea, which both host
American forces, to patch up relations
strained over Tokyo's attitude toward its
colonial past
On North Korea, Kerry's arrival could
herald a new approach.
As chairman of the Senate Foreign Re-
lations Committee, he was critical of the
Obama administration's reluctance to ne-
gotiate with North Korea on its nuclear
program, and held informal talks last year
with visiting North Korean officials in
New York
But he'll also be aware of the pitfalls of
such engagement. Within a week of the
meeting in New York, the North dashed
hopes of rapprochement by announcing a
long-range rocket launch.
MatthewPennington covers U.S.-Asian
affairs for Associated Press in
Washington.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Jan. 22 to 25 MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: Martin Luther King Jr. Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Breakfast sausage pizza, cereal
variety and toast, grits, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and egg biscuit, ce-
real variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon bun, cereal vari-
ety and toast, grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast round, cheese
grits, tater tots, cereal variety and toast, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Martin Luther King Jr. Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Creamy macaroni and cheese,
corn dog minis, yogurt parfait plate, fresh gar-
den salad, steamed green beans, chilled ap-
plesauce, fruit juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Pepperoni pizza, pulled bar-
becue pork on bun, turkey super salad with
roll, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots, sweet
green peas, chilled peaches, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds with rice, oven-
baked breaded chicken, yogurt parfait plate,
fresh baby carrots, sweet corn, chilled flavored
applesauce, fruit juice, milk variety.
Friday: Breaded chicken sandwich,
spaghetti with ripstick, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, steamed broccoli, chilled pineapple,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Martin Luther King Jr. Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Sausage and egg biscuit, ultra
cinnamon bun, cereal and toast, tater tots,
milk and juice variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg and cheese
wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultra
cinnamon bun, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich stuffer, ultimate
breakfast round, cereal and toast, tater tots,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Martin Luther King Jr. Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Cheese pizza, pulled barbecue
pork on bun, PB dipper, fresh baby carrots,
steamed broccoli, chilled pineapple, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Wednesday: Hamburger, barbecued
roasted chicken with ripstick, PB dippers,
fresh baby carrots, baked beans, potato trian-
gles, chilled peaches, fruit juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Fajita chicken and rice with rip-
stick, nacho rounds with rice, Italian super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh gar-
den salad, Mexicali corn, chilled applesauce,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Friday: Spaghetti with ripstick, mozzarella
maxstix, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots, sweet


green peas, chilled applesauce, fruit juice,
milk variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Martin Luther King Jr. Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and cheese bis-
cuit, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal and toasts,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg and cheese
wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and cheese loco
bread, ultimate breakfast round, cereal and
toast, grits, tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich stuffer, ultra
cinnamon bun, cereal variety, toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Martin Luther King Jr. Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Nacho rounds with rice, turkey
with gravy over noodles with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, Italian super salad
with roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait, garden salad,
celery, Mexicali corn, cold corn salad, potato
roasters, baby carrots, applesauce, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Fresh turkey wrap, pizza,
spaghetti with ripstick, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, ham super salad with roll, yogurt
parfait plate, baby carrots, baked beans,
chilled baked beans, potato triangles, dried
fruit mix, juice, milk.
Thursday: Oven-baked breaded chicken
with rice, macaroni and cheese with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich, turkey super
salad with roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait plate,
garden salad, green beans, celery, baby car-
rots, potato roasters, cucumbers, pineapple,
juice, milk.
Friday: Pulled barbecue pork, pizza,
chicken alfredo with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, fajita chicken super salad
with roll, yogurt parfait plate, baby carrots, cold
corn salad, potato triangles, sweet green
peas, applesauce, juice, milk.

SENIOR DINING
Monday: Martin Luther King Jr. Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Grape juice, Salisbury steak,
noodles with brown gravy, garden peas, din-
ner roll with margarine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Chef salad (ham, cheese,
whole boiled egg, tomato) with French dress-
ing, carrot-raisin salad, fresh orange, slice
whole-grain bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Thursday: Chicken parmesan, California
vegetables, Italian flat green beans, peaches
slice whole-grain bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Friday: Meatballs with brown gravy, rice
pilaf, mixed vegetables, pears, slice wheat
bread with margarine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include: Lecanto, East
Citrus, Crystal River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon. For informa-
tion, call Support Services at 352-527-5975.


A10 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'His' and 'hers' movies


Sue is dying to see "Les Miserables";
I can't wait to see "Django Un-
chained." She wants to see
"Django" as much as she wants to eat
giant sea slugs, and I want to sit through
the three hours of "Les Mis" as much as I
want to help her shop for purses.
"Have you seen the commercial for it?
It's all blood and gore and guns and
death," she says.
I say, "That's why it's called 'miserable,'
isn't it?"
"You know I'm talking about
'Django.' 'Les Mis' is a
musical."
"Yeah, a musical about
blood and gore and guns and '
death. The only difference is
they get to sing as they die,
which is just dragging it out, if
you ask me."
Once again, we are at an im-
passe over which movie to see.
The ones she likes to watch MUL
are torture for me; the ones I
like, she thinks are disgusting.
"What about 'Lincoln'?" she asks.
"Everyone says it's really great. Too bad
he dies at the end."
"Now you've wrecked it for me. You're
supposed to say 'spoiler alert' before you
blurt out the end of a movie. I'll never be
able to enjoy it now How would you like
it if I told you what happened to the Ti-
tanic before you saw the film?"
"I knew what was going to happen. If
knowing the ending of a movie spoils it
for you, it must not be a very good movie.
Everyone knows what happens at the end
of 'Romeo and Juliet,' but they still want
to see it," Sue says.
"Well, don't tell me. I haven't seen it
yet."
It's not just movies. We have a "Down-
ton Abbey" gap in our house, too. Sue's
seen all the episodes twice; I haven't
been able to get through a single one. It's
not that I don't like them, it's that you
have to watch them in order or you miss
everything. I never saw the first episode,
so I'm lost. You don't have to watch the
James Bond or Jackie Chan movies in
order You can just dive in any old time

Ginger Huma


II


and they still make sense.
I don't know when our tastes started to
diverge. Maybe we never liked all the
same things and just now many, many
years later we're willing to say so.
When you're dating, you go the extra mile
and do things you may not like to do just
to be with the other person. On the fourth
date you can say things like, "Sure, I'd
love to come with you to shop for fabric
remnants." In the second year of mar-
riage, she might say, "Sure, go
out drinking with your high
school buddies. Go have some
fun." Then, after 30 years, you
find yourself watching differ-
ent television shows in differ-
ent rooms. I'm watching the
Billy Bob Thornton festival on
Spike TV and she's watching
extreme home makeovers on
HGTV
*M Maybe cable TV has done
LEN this to us. Back when there
were only three channels, we
almost had to watch the same shows to-
gether I mean, can you remember what
was on opposite "The Ed Sullivan
Show"? Neither can I.
It's not as if we disagree about every
film. Neither of us wants to go to teenage
slasher movies with names like "The
Chilling," "The Grabbing" or "The Spook-
ing." If there's a gerund in the title, we
pretty much know it's not for The Ageing.
We don't have knock-down drag-outs over
the latest gross-out comedy, because nei-
ther of us has any interest in it. We avoid
anything that might attract small chil-
dren, so there's no need for discussion.
So we end up double-dating with a cou-
ple we know who have the same prob-
lems we do agreeing on a movie. Sue and
Sally will go see "Les Mis" at the multi-
plex, while Bob and I will go down the
hall to "Django," and we'll all meet at a
restaurant for dinner Bob and I just hope
it's not that health-food place they
dragged us to last time.

You can contact Jim Mullen at
JimMullenBooks. com.


ine Society OF CITRUS CO.


This is no way to start the new year for little Ginger. Her
person, the love of her life, adopted her when she was 6
months old. Just as Ginger turned 10, her person died.
Now, she needs a new person and a new loving home.
Ginger is sweet and loves everyone. An approved
adoption application and adoption fee are required. Visit
the website at ww.roomforonemore.net. For more
information, call Karron at 352-560-0051.
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Taking away
freedom
There were quite a few
letters yesterday and
today (Jan. 7 and 8) in the
Chronicle and most were
quite good. A few make
one wonder
The letters from Mr.
Tom Restivo and Tom
Stephan probably made
the most sense. The one
from my friend Jim McIn-
tosh that gun owners
should be taxed come
on Jim, aren't we Ameri-
cans taxed too much al-
ready? The new Obama
taxes are surprising even
the liberals.
The letter that made no
sense at all was by E. G.
Yerian, in which she
states the AR-15 can fire
four rounds per second or
one hundred per minute.
Huh? Four times 60
comes up 240 on my cal-
culator, not 100. She goes
on to state this weapon
shoots like a machine gun
and it was designed for
the armed forces. Her
facts are as faulty as her
math, and it is apparent
she is confusing the AR-15
with the M-16.
They look exactly alike,
but are very different.
The AR-15 does not fire
four rounds per second
and not 100 (or 240) RPM.
It is a semi-automatic


weapon, which means it
fires each time the trigger
is pulled. Who can pull a
trigger 240 times per
minute? I can't, and I
once owned an AR-15
with 30-round magazines.
I never had the urge to
murder anyone, so why
should my rights be tram-
pled because of some
lunatic?
The M-16, on the other
hand, was indeed de-
signed for the military
and has a selector switch
(known as the Rock and
Roll switch) and in one
position, acts like the AR-
15; that is semi-automatic
and the trigger must be
pulled for each shot.
When this switch is in the
full automatic position, it
fires like a machine gun,
because it is a machine
gun ... well, a submachine
gun to be precise.
How do I know this?
Uncle Sam spent a lot of
money sending me
through intense weapons
training, six long months
to learn all the weapons
of the armed forces from
the aluminum .38 caliber
pistol carried by pilots up
to and including our
earth-cracking thermonu-
clear weapons (hydrogen
bombs). SpecWeps was my
career field and I com-
manded a six-man team
loading H-bombs onto B-


47 bombers duri
height of the Col
While all who
time to write an
their name to th
ters are to be co:
for having the ba
to sign their nam
really should spe
factual knowledge
not from knee-je
tion. Taking guns
from honest citiz
ammunition as o
suggested) will n
vent tragedies li
rible school shoo
they will open th
for far more trag
when criminals
follow the law pi
armed citizens.T
they want your g
What they really
your freedom! W
allow this to hap
Har

Greed, dec
threaten


ng the
Id War.
take the
d sign
ese let-


have troops and war ma-
terial disbursed around
the globe and far too
many of these activates
are unfunded.


mmended America needs to
backbone awaken and realize
ne, they what's happening to our
eak from nation. If you haven't fig-
ge and ured out by now why the
*rk reac- nation is bankrupt, then I
s away would suggest you haven't
zens (or been paying attention.
ne letter Wars and rumors of war.
lot pre- The military industrial
ke the ter- complex is cancerous and
voting, but is spreading its plague
ie door throughout the world
jedies starting with the Penta-
who don't gon, lobbyist in Washing-
rey on dis- ton, defense contractors,
They say Wall Street bankers, inter-
,uns. national bankers, multi-
want is national corporations,
Te cannot foreign aid to decant and
)pen. corrupt countries just to
ry Cooper name a few, all of which
Hernando owe no allegiance to our
ernanacountry, but will do what-
ever is necessary to en-
eption hance the bottom line and
S US make a profit. The word


It is my concerned opin-
ion the military industrial
complex is one of the
most lucrative capitalist
ventures known. Today
our nation is involved in
unnecessary wars and we


for this is greed, plain and
simple. It is my opinion
much of this corruption is
carried out under the aus-
pices of the U.S. Congress
who will do whatever is
necessary to be re-elected
and stay in power.
President Dwight D.
Eisenhower was deeply
concerned about what
was happening and gave
us fair warning, and I
quote:
The phrase military-
industrial complex was
first used Jan. 17, 1961, by
President Dwight D.
Eisenhower in his
farewell address to the
nation in what is called
his Military Industrial
Complex Speech. (This
speech maybe found in its
entirety on the Web.) And
the words remain as true
as they were when Eisen-
hower spoke them.
It's also my opinion if
we weren't at war in the
Middle East (10-plus
years), it would be some-


place else. And I might
add if there was no oil in
the Middle East, we
would not be there in the
first place. As I've said be-
fore "Take the profit out
of wars and they will
cease."
In addition to being fi-
nancially bankrupt, it ap-
pears to me we're on the
verge of being morally
bankrupt, and this is seri-
ous. Regrettably, we can-
not legislate morality.
History tells us democ-
racies last for about 200
years and all fail for much
the same reasons: apathy,
greed, moral decency,
racism, class warfare, etc.,
to name a few. God has
blessed this nation like
none other in history and
this is how we show our
appreciation. We might
consider term limits for
the professional politi-
cians. May God help us.
Earl Herring
Pine Ridge


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A12 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013


OPINION


_l, -'


i





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Fiscal cliff
averted
Whew! Our illustrious
legislators got that fiscal
cliff bill done just in the
nick of time.
The truth is, we fell off
that cliff beginning in
2008 with the first so-
called stimulus bill, fol-
lowed by bailouts, the
raising of the debt ceiling,
more bailouts, more stim-
ulus spending, a down-
grade in our national
credit rating and no
budget for four years.
The people we voted for
and sent to Washington
had 507 days (since the
debt ceiling agreement in
2011) to address this loom-
ing fiscal crisis, but it still
came down to the 11th
hour before they were
able to reach a solution.
But, of course, it is not a
solution at all. This bill ad-
dressed only the tax issue
and does nothing about
the insane spending.
The debt is at $16.4 tril-
lion and counting. Accord-
ing to cnsnews, on day one
of fiscal 2013 (Oct. 1, 2012),
the federal government
added more debt than the
total debt accumulated
between our founding on
July 4, 1776, and the attack
on Pearl Harbor!
We have been scammed
once again by the clowns in
Washington who used scare
tactics and class warfare to
gain support for a bill that
does virtually nothing to
solve our fiscal woes.
"It's time that the rich
paid their fair share!"
screamed the Democrats.
According to the CBO, the
richest 20 percent paid
67.9 percent of taxes. The
bottom 20 percent of
American earners paid
three-tenths of a percent.
About 49 percent don't
pay any income tax. In
fact, if the government
taxed the rich at 100 per-
cent, it would fund them
for only about 2-1/2
months. There simply isn't
enough money to be had
to pay all the bills.
Middle-class workers


r7 6")*4t

"I4y, oK, eVR PYO... W AVoiPdP THI F'tAL -iCAFF!"


were shocked to discover
less take-home pay in their
first paycheck for 2013, be-
cause Congress failed to
extend the payroll tax cut
The Tax Policy Center re-
ports 80 percent of house-
holds with incomes
between $50,000 and
$200,000 will face higher
taxes this year an aver-
age increase of $1635.
That's a lot of money in my
book Oh, by the way, that
doesn't include the some
20 new taxes imposed by
Obamacare.
On top the absurdity of
this non-solution to the
fiscal cliff crisis, our es-
teemed leaders had the


audacity to fill a third of
this bill with pork.
According to Utah Sen.
Mike Lee, they only re-
ceived the bill six minutes
before voting on it
"Not one single senator
who voted for this bill had
read it," he observed.
Swell.
Are you ready for this?
Among the long list of
add-ons, are these gems:
$78 million for race
tracks for NASCAR
$222 million for rum
distillers in Puerto Rico
and the Virgin Islands
$430 million for the
movie industry


$15 million for
asparagus growers
$4 million for those
who buy electric scooters,
like Segways
I strongly suggest readers
go online and read about
the unnecessary spending
included in this bill.
Here's an idea. How
about a new bill to cut the
pork out of this legisla-
tion? Or better yet, a Con-
stitutional amendment
that prevents any pork
from going into any bill
and demands that legisla-
tion pertains to one issue.
Patricia Lamery
Inverness


II


Act of domestic
terrorism
How many responsible
gun owners have killed
someone lately?
If the honest gun owners'
property is seized or
banned, what will our gov-
ernment do about the ille-
gal gun owners? Why did
our government allow guns
to bought and sent across
the southern border? Why
is our government arming
the Syrian rebels with "as-
sault rifles," but trying to
take the honest citizens'
away here at home?
Instead of punishing
the honest citizen, why
don't we enforce the laws
already on the books, and
at the same time take a
good look at mental
health and violence in the
entertainment industry?
Gun control works
great! Just ask Chicago,
Mexico or Australia.
For anyone to attack my
right to bear arms and am-


munition is an act of trea-
son and should be consid-
ered domestic terrorism.
My protection and that
of my family and friends
will come way before any
one of you anti-gunners.
John Troy
Crystal River

If I were president
So, President Obama is
going to spend $500 million
more of our money to take
away our Second Amend-
ment right to bear arms.
If I were president I
would force the entertain-
ment industry (specifically
Hollywood and the video
game makers) to eliminate
the extreme violence and
brutality in their products.
This would cost taxpayer
nothing, and might actually
curb the anger and vio-
lence in today's society and
tomorrow's young adults.
Laurene Kowalski
Hernando


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OPINION


SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 A13


\r\ i is t*Ot*\eA+











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


WorBRIEFS Obama to take second oath of office


Takes shape


Associated Press
A snowman is made in a
park Saturday in Moscow,
Russia. Moscow families
took part in a festival of
building snowmen in a
Moscow park.


Syrian FM calls on
rebels to disarm
BEIRUT Syria's for-
eign minister invited the
country's rebels Saturday to
lay down their weapons and
take part in a national dia-
logue, saying everyone who
participates will be included
in a new Cabinet with wide
executive powers.
Walid al-Moallem said in
a live interview on state TV
late Saturday any opposi-
tion parties could join the
Cabinet as long as they re-
ject foreign intervention in
Syria. The Syrian govern-
ment has started contacting
"representatives of the Syr-
ian people," he added.
Explorer's whisky
heads to Antarctic
SCOTTBASE, Antarctica
- Three bottles of rare,
19th century whisky found
beneath the floor boards of
Antarctic explorer Ernest
Shackelton's abandoned
expedition base were re-
turned to the polar continent
Saturday after a distiller flew
them to Scotland to recreate
the long-lost recipe.
New Zealand Prime Min-
ister John Key personally
returned the Scotch to
Antarctic Heritage Trust offi-
cials at a ceremony at New
Zealand's Antarctic base on
Ross Island. The bottles will
be transferred by March
from Ross Island to the des-
olate hut at Cape Royds,
where they had been forgot-
ten for 102 years.

Nation BRIEFS

Gun rallies


Associated Press
A man who refused to be
identified holds an AR-15
semi-automatic riffle at
rally Saturday in support
of gun rights at the
Capitol in Hartford, Conn.
The rally was dubbed,
"Guns Across America."

NC man gets back
Purple Heart
RALEIGH, N.C.--A
North Carolina man is get-
ting his Purple Heart back,
almost 70 years after he
mailed it home and never
saw it again.
Ninety-year-old George
Hemphill will receive his
Purple Heart medal in a
ceremony Sunday in
Rutherfordton. Hemphill got
the award for his fighting in
1944 during World War II in
France.
He mailed it home and
never asked about it again.
A man bought Hemphill's
Purple Heart in October
2000 in an antique store in
Columbia, S.C. He held on
to it until a friend put him in
touch with Purple Hearts
Reunited, which is run by a
Vermont man who found
Hemphill and his daughter
in Union Mills, N.C.
-From wire reports


Capitolprepares

forpresidential

inauguration

Associated Press
WASHINGTON On the brink
of a second term, President
Barack Obama invoked Martin
Luther King Jr's commitment to
service Saturday as inauguration-
goers flocked to the capital city for
a distinctly American celebration
including an oath-taking as old as
the republic, a splashy parade
and partying enough to last four
years.
"I think we're on the cusp of
some really great things," Vice
President Joe Biden predicted for
a country still recovering from a
deep recession.
Freshly built inaugural stands
at the Capitol gleamed white in
the sun, and hundreds of chairs
for special guests were set out on
the lawn that spills down toward
the National Mall as the president
and vice president began their in-
auguration weekend.
Julius Cherry, in town from


Associated Press
CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. -
The U.S. Marine Corps, known for
turning out some of the military's
toughest warriors, is studying how
to make its troops even tougher
through meditative practices,
yoga-type stretching and exer-
cises based on mindfulness.
Marine Corps officials said they
will build a curriculum that would
integrate mindfulness-based tech-
niques into their training if they
see positive results from a pilot
project. Mindfulness is a Bud-
dhist-inspired concept emphasiz-
ing active attention on the moment
to keep the mind in the present.
Facing a record suicide rate
and thousands of veterans seek-
ing treatment for post-traumatic
stress, the military has been
searching for ways to reduce
strains on service members bur-
dened with more than a decade of
fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan.
Marine Corps officials are test-
ing a series of brain calming exer-
cises called "Mindfulness-Based
Mind Fitness Training" they be-
lieve could enhance the perform-
ance of troops, who are under
mounting pressures from long de-


Associated Press
The West Front of the Capitol in Washington is dressed in red, white
and blue with two days to go before the 57th Presidential Inauguration
and President Obama's second inauguration on Saturday.


Sacramento, Calif., brought his
family to the foot of the Capitol to
see the area where their official
tickets will let them watch the
public ceremonies Monday
"There were people who said
they'd never vote for an African-
American president," the 58-year-
old lawyer said. "Now they've
voted for him twice, and he won


the popular vote and the electoral
vote. That says something about
his policies and his team."
"And the country," added
Cherry's wife, Donna.
Said Erika Goergen, from the
Midwest and attending college lo-
cally: "It's amazing to be here
right now."
Officials estimated as many as


w


Associated Press
Dr. Elizabeth Stanley instructs a class of U.S. Marines at Camp Pendleton, Calif. The class was part of an
experiment in 2011 in which 160 Camp Pendleton Marines learned to sit and stand during periods of silence
and focus their attention on their bodies, breathing and the present moment so their minds could turn down
the ongoing chatter about the past and future.

US Marines studying mindfulness-based training


( -Ps."



A


U.S. Marine Lance Corporal Carlos
Lazano talks about a special
training he underwent in which
Marines were taught methods to
"quiet the mind" and reach an inner
calm as a means to battle stress.
ployments and looming budget
cuts expected to slim down forces.
"Some people might say these
are Eastern-based religious prac-
tices, but this goes way beyond
that," said Jeffery Bearor, the ex-
ecutive deputy of the Marine
Corps training and education


command at its headquarters ii
Quantico, Va. "This is not tied to
any religious practice. This i
about mental preparation to bel
ter handle stress."
The School Infantry-West a
Camp Pendleton will offer the
eight-week course starting Tues
day to 80 Marines.
The experiment builds on a
2011 study involving 160 Marine
who were taught to focus their at
tention by concentrating on thei
body's sensations, including
breathing, in a period of silence
The Marines practiced the calm
ing methods after being immersed
in a mock Afghan village wit]
screaming actors and controlled
blasts to expose them to comba
stress. Naval Health Researc]
Center scientist Douglas C. John
son, who is leading the research,
monitored their reactions by look
ing at blood and saliva samples
images of their brains and prob
lem-solving tests they took.
Another 160 other Marine
went through the mock village
with no mindfulness-based train
ing, acting as the control group
Results from the 2011 study are
expected to be published thi
spring.


Algeria: 32 militants, 23 hostages killed


Associated Press


ALGIERS, Algeria In
a bloody finale, Algerian
special forces stormed a
natural gas complex in the
Sahara desert Saturday to
end a standoff with Is-
lamist extremists that left
at least 23 hostages dead
and killed all 32 militants
involved, the Algerian gov-
ernment said.
With few details emerg-


ing from the remote site in
eastern Algeria, it was un-
clear whether anyone was
rescued in the final opera-
tion, but the number of
hostages killed Saturday
- seven was how many
the militants had said that
morning they still had. The
government described the
toll as provisional and
some foreigners remain
unaccounted for
The siege atAin Amenas


transfixed the world after
radical Islamists linked to
al-Qaida stormed the com-
plex, which contained
hundreds of plant workers
from all over the world,
then held them hostage
surrounded by the Alger-
ian military and its attack
helicopters for four tense
days that were punctuated
with gun battles and dra-
matic tales of escape.
Algeria's response to the


crisis was typical of its his-
tory in confronting terror-
ists, favoring military
action over negotiation,
which caused an interna-
tional outcry from coun-
tries worried about their
citizens. Algerian military
forces twice assaulted the
two areas where the
hostages were being held
with minimal apparent
mediation first on
Thursday, then Saturday


)0 people will attend Mon-
public ceremonies. That's
than live in the city, if far
than the 1.8 million who
at Obama's first inaugura-
n 2009.
e president made only a
ing reference to race as he
at an elementary school not
)m the White House after he
first lady Michelle Obama
Ad a bookcase as part of a na-
I service event organized by
augural committee.
6 think about not so much
inauguration, but we think
t this is Dr King's birthday
going to be celebrating this
end," the president said.
e said everybody wants to be
everybody wants to be a
major But if you're going to
rum major, be a drum major
rvice, be a drum major for
e, be a drum major for look-
it for other people," Obama
of the civil rights leader
e birthday is celebrated as a
nal holiday on Monday
'ause the date for inaugura-
et in the Constitution, Jan.
lls on a Sunday this year,
la and Biden were to be
1 in for second terms in sep-
private ceremonies Sunday



N.Y. gun

law limits

access to

permits

Associated Press
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y.
New York's new gun
control law may be the
nation's toughest, but it
also includes broad new
privacy provisions al-
lowing would-be gun
owners to shield their
identities from reporters
and the public.
It is part of the swift
reaction to a suburban
New York City newspa-
per's publication last
month of an interactive
map with the names and
addresses of thousands
of permit holders. The
Journal News defended
its publication of public
records, but it was inun-
dated with complaints
and even threats, and on
Friday the newspaper
pulled the information
from its website.
"I am personally grate-
ful that the Journal News
will never be able to do
something as dangerous
and idiotic as this again,"
said Republican state Sen.
Greg Ball, who helped
draft the provision.
The provision allows
handgun permit appli-
cants to ask their per-
sonal information be
kept secret for several
reasons: if they are po-
lice officers, witnessed a
crime, served on a jury
in a criminal case or are
victims of domestic vio-
lence. More vaguely, they
can claim they fear for
their safety or might be
subjected to harassment.
Permit holders can also
ask their personal infor-
mation from previous ap-
plications be withdrawn
from the public record,
for the same reasons.
Claiming the possibil-
ity of harassment is "a
little bit of a stretch,"
said Diane Kennedy,
president of the New
York News Publishers
Association. "It just
makes it really easy for
anyone to opt out with-
out really giving a partic-
ularly strong reason."
Journal News Media
Group publisher Janet
Hasson said she, too, was
disappointed with the
broad nature of the pro-
vision. In a statement
after the newspaper took
the gun permit names
and addresses down, she
said the new law didn't
require the removal, but
"we believe that doing so
complies with its spirit."


The interactive map had
been viewed more than
1.2 million times.


Meditation masters


I]
I'

(

- 41


. -











EXCURSIONS
-- .1mCITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


U


* Veterans Notes
can be found on
Page A17 of today's
Chronicle.


r


New Orleans gets ready


for big game, big party


and even bigger crowds


STACEY PLAISANCE
Associated Press


NEW ORLEANS

for record crowds as
the biggest sporting
event of the year, the
NFL Super Bowl, collides with
Mardi Gras season in what many
locals are calling "Super Gras."
Mardi Gras floats are getting finishing touches,
including one float being touted as the biggest the
city's Carnival has ever seen. Bakeries are hiring
extra hands to decorate the thousands of king
cakes, a traditional Mardi Gras treat, being pre-
ordered for the Super Bowl on Feb. 3. Mardi Gras
falls nine days later on Feb. 12.
The city's hotels are more than 90 percent occu-
pied for the weeks before and after the big game,
according to Stephen Perry, president of the New
Orleans Metropolitan Convention and Visitors
Bureau.
"We are ready to give the world a show," said
Perry
Carnival season, with parades, parties and
masked revelry in the weeks before Mardi Gras, is
always one of the most expensive times of year to
visit New Orleans. But Super Bowl weekend has
driven prices higher than usual. Smaller boutique-
style hotels that usually go for $300 to $500 a night
during Carnival are as high as $800 during Super
Bowl. Rooms at some major hotels are up to $2,000
a night, according to online listings.
Carnival parades will not be held downtown
during Super Bowl weekend, but dozens will roll
in the city on the weekends before and after the
game. Some sports fans are extending their stays
to take in the masked riders tossing beads, cos-
tumed marching groups and make-believe royalty.
Parades normally held in the suburbs will take
place as scheduled on game weekend.
"There will be so much energy in the street,"
Perry said. "It's a very unique situation to have
Super Bowl, which is truly an experience of a life-
time, coinciding with a unique cultural event like
Mardi Gras."
This will be New Orleans' 10th
Super Bowl, tying Miami for the
city that's hosted the most
Super Bowls. It's also the
seventh Super Bowl tak- '
ing place in the Super-
dome, now named for its
sponsor Mercedes-Benz.
But more importantly, it
will be the Super-
dome's first Super .
Bowl since Hurricane
Katrina ripped off its ij
roof and flooded sur-
rounding streets when "
levees gave way in 2005.
Thousands of evacuees were
housed in filthy conditions in the
damaged arena for days after the storm
with no air conditioning or working bathrooms.
The dome has since undergone more than $336
million in renovations, including new suites, con-
cession stands, and bathrooms, and new electrical,
video and audio systems. All seats were cleaned or
replaced, and club lounges got new windows with
views of downtown.
The dome's outer shell faded a dull gray by
more than three decades of Louisiana sun and
dented by flying storm debris has also been re-
placed. The new siding restores the stadium to the
champagne color it had in 1978 when it hosted its
first Super Bowl.
Though there are no public tours of the dome,
anyone can attend the Jan. 29 Super Bowl media
day For $25, fans can sit in the stands, listen to
NFL Network coverage and player interviews
with portable head-sets, and get a look at the
newly renovated space.


Associated Press
Artist Stephan Wanger poses Monday, Jan. 14, in front of his bead mosaic "Paragons of New Orleans" at
Mardi Gras World in New Orleans. The bead mosaic will be 42 feet wide by 8 feet high and contain approx-
imately 1.5 million recycled beads.


Also open to the public is the NFL Experience,
a theme park for football lovers set up at the
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center Jan. 30-Feb. 3.
It's $25 to enter and includes interactive games
and a regulation-size goal post where fans can
kick field goals. Fans can also visit the NFL Expe-
rience's media area, where player and celebrity
interviews are held.
"We opened the area to fans for the first time
last year, and the feedback was incredible," said
Mary Pat Augenthaler, the NFEs director of spe-
cial events. She said the media area includes
"Radio Row"
and


the
NFL Network.
"Last year some fans spent hours just in that one
section. Not everybody can go to the game, but in
here you feel like you're a part of the central nerv-
ous system of the Super Bowl."
As Super Bowl fans leave town, a new wave of
revelers will arrive for Mardi Gras weekend.
That's when some of the city's largest parade or-
ganizations, known as superkrewes, hold their
glitzy balls and parades.
Parade groups have been working for months to
make this year bigger and better than ever The
Krewe of Endymion is boasting it will have the
largest float in city history for its Feb. 9 parade,
led by pop singer Kelly Clarkson.
The Bacchus parade and its yet-to-be-named
celebrity rider rolls on Feb. 10, and the Orpheus
parade rolls on Feb. 11 -the eve of Fat Tuesday
known as Lundi Gras with actor Gary Sinise,
Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning actress Mariska


Hargitay and New Orleans musicians Troy "Trom-
bone Shorty" Andrews and Harry Connick Jr.
Visitors who can't catch the parades in person
may opt for a visit to Mardi Gras World, the enor-
mous studio and warehouse where floats are
made and stored. Tours include a stop in the prop
shop, where artists create and paint float decora-
tions and sculptures.
This year, Mardi Gras World is also the site of a
Guinness World Record attempt by New Orleans
artist Stephan Wanger to create the world's largest
Mardi Gras bead mosaic. Visitors can help cut and
place beads one by one onto a 42-foot-long, 8-foot-
tall board etched with the New Orleans skyline.
"It's something we want hands from all over the
world to be a part of," Wanger said. The
,. First bead was placed in November,
and the last will be placed on Feb.
jr 13, the day after Mardi Gras
.h 4 known as Ash Wednesday
One thing the city won't be short
y on is music. Super Bowl weekend
d*% kicks off with a gospel concert on Feb. 1
at the UNO Lakefront Arena with per-
rormances by Fantasia, Donnie McClurkin, Marvin
Winans and Bishop Paul S. Morton of New Or-
leans. Dozens of local acts will be performing
throughout the weekend on stages along the Mis-
sissippi River and in the French Quarter. On game
day. Beyonce will be the half-time performer.
Other local attractions include steamboat
cruises many with live jazz on the Missis-
sippi, the recently-expanded World War II Mu-
seum, Audubon Zoo, Aquarium of the Americas
and New Orleans Museum of Art by City Park. Just
outside the city, options include airboat tours of
Louisiana swamps and bayous and plantation
home tours.
Foodies can indulge in charbroiled oysters,
seafood gumbo, fried softshell crab po-boys and
shrimp and grits. The city has 52 more restaurants
than it did in 2002 the last time New Orleans
hosted a Super Bowl. Newer restaurants include
Susan Spicer's Mondo and Donald Link's Cochon.
Chef John Besh, who owned two restaurants be-
fore Hurricane Katrina in 2005, now owns eight -
including Luke, Domenica and Borgne.
But with the two major events bringing thou-
sands of people in, reservations are going fast at
old favorites like Commander's Palace, Galatoire's
and Brennan's.


DREAM
VACATIONS
r/i0^ C e t


The Chronicle and The Accent Travel Group If it's selected as a winner, it will be pub- Please avoid photos with dates on the print.
are sponsoring a photo contest for readers of lished in the Sunday Chronicle. Photos should be sent to the Chronicle at
the newspaper. At the end of the year, a panel of judges will 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River,
Readers are invited to send a photograph from select the best photo during the year and that FL 34429 or dropped off at the Chronicle of-
their Dream Vacation with a brief description of photograph will win a prize. fice in Inverness, Crystal River or any
the trip. Accent Travel Office.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY EVENING JANUARY 20, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House DI: Comcast Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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Mother wants


to reconnect


Dear Annie: My
problem is my re-
lationship with my
daughter, "Carolyn." It
started 10 years ago when
she went to visit her
grandparents in another
state. My parents and I
haven't had a close rela-
tionship since I was in my
20s. I am now 57.
I raised Carolyn as a
single parent without a
dime of child
support from
her father. I
worked 12-
hour days six
days a week
to provide for
her. When
Carolyn was 6
years old, I
was pro-
moted. It re-
quired d A
extensive ANN
travel, and I MAI
needed help MAIL
from my par-
ents. My daughter lived
with them for two years,
during which time they
told her awful things, say-
ing I was a terrible mom
and didn't care about her
When I began seeing a
man (whom I eventually
married), my parents la-
beled him "a monster."
He was actually wonder-
ful. He loved Carolyn and
adopted her and was the
only father she ever
knew.
When Carolyn went to
visit my parents in her
20s, however, they con-
vinced her that this man
had mistreated her when


I
.1


she was little and she
simply didn't remember.
But, Annie, he never did
any such thing. They
made it up.
Carolyn is now in her
30s and has been es-
tranged from me for more
than 10 years due to my
parents' brainwashing.
Since then, my life has
changed dramatically.
I've been quite ill, in and
out of the hospi-
tal, and Carolyn
has never in-
quired about
my health. How
can I reconnect
with my daugh-
ter? Help Me
in Tennessee
Dear Ten-
nessee: Your
parents sound
mentally unbal-
E'S anced. How-
BOX ever, if Carolyn
truly believes
that her stepfa-
ther abused her, you need
to acknowledge this -
true or not in order to
deal with it Please don't
argue with her recollec-
tions. She will think you
are simply protecting
your husband. Instead,
suggest to Carolyn that
the two of you get family
counseling together be-
cause you love her and
want to find a way to keep
her in your life. We hope
she is willing.


Email questions to
anniesmailbox@
comcastnet.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Mama" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
10:25 p.m.
"Broken City" (R) ID required.
12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"The Last Stand" (R) ID re-
quired. 12:40 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Gangster Squad" (R) ID re-
quired. 12:20 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Les Miserables" (PG-13)
12 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"Zero Dark Thirty" (R) ID re-
quired. 12:10 p.m., 3:40 p.m.,
7:05 p.m., 10 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Mama" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Broken City" (R) ID required.


12:50 p.m., 3:55 p.m., 7:40
p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"The Last Stand" (R) ID re-
quired. 12:35 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10 p.m.
"A Haunted House" (R) ID re-
quired. 12:45 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Gangster Squad" (R) ID re-
quired. 1 p.m., 4:25 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Les Miserables" (PG-13)
12:10 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Django Unchained" (R) ID
required. 12 p.m., 3:30 p.m.,
6:55 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Zero Dark Thirty" (R) ID re-
quired. 12:20 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
7:05 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Lincoln" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:25 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Pie choice
6 Level
10 Seemingly
(2 wds.)
14 Fast car
19 Texas landmark
20 Allude
22 In a frenzy
24 Get away from
25 Revolving part
26 Where Greeks once
gathered
27 Picture
28 Analyze
grammatically
29 Fencer's sword
30 Types
32 Fries-to-be
34 On your -
35 Track events
39 Starchy tuber
41 Easily controlled
43 Violin maker
45 Cousin
to a pessimist
47 Blunder
48 Not quite right
51 Dance about
53 Gadget
55 Enthusiast
56 Impair
59 Very bad
61 Island in Venice
62 Membership charges
64 Word of warning
66 Glorify
68 Circular object
70 -on the Mount
72 Blend
73 Comment
75 Coral island
77 White sale item
79 Run before
the wind
80 Upperclassman
82 Charged particle
84 Ancient drug
of forgetfulness
86 Cut
88 Stared
90 Kind
of processing
91 Police
surveillance
95 Contender


97 Sheen
101 Difficulty
102 Tea-growing state
104 "A Boy Sue"
106 Cleric
108 Cockpit occupant
110 Crowd
112 Section
114 Rope
for a cowboy
115 Beautiful man
117 Antiquity
118 avis
120 Household
servant
121 Playing card
122 Calendar abbr.
124 Water bird
126 Mean
128 Indeed!
129 Word in arithmetic
131 Brown ermine
133 Devoured
135 Sluice valve
139 Mood
141 Ancestry
145 Not at all fat
146 Trap
148 Thin candle
150 Dressed
151 Caper
153 Humidor item
155 Building locations
157 One at--
158 Direct
159 Notched,
as a leaf edge
160 Jessica Parker
161 Poe's bird
162 Equine
163 Let it stand!
164 Stem joint
165 Long lock

DOWN
1 Reduced
2 Marry in secret
3 Supply food
4 One-celled
organism
5 Likewise not
6 Monk's title
7 Lower limbs
8 Under way
9 Patio
10 "What Kind of Fool -


-?"
11 Peckinpah and Water-
ston
12 Unsuitable
13 Compute
14 Certain voter (abbr.)
15 Deity's incarnation
16 Chocolate
substitute
17 A Ford
18 Pee Wee or Della
21 Moth-eaten
23 Of a wood
31 Mailed
33 Scour
36 Mischievous child
37 Nobleman
38 Steady and sober
40 Janeiro
42 Tribal emblem
44 Kind of ink
46 Woo
48 Finished
49 Repairs
50 Gas jet
52 --del Sol
54 Dud of a car
56 Walk in unison
57 Quibble
58 Marsh plant
60 vital
63 Did a farm job
65 Bridge position
67 Hoodwink
69 "King-"
70 On an incline
71 China neighbor
74 Asian country
76 Fibber
78 A slackening
81 Rule the -
83 River in Russia
85 Twangy
87 Aggressive
89 Not quite dry
91 Contemptuous
92 Claw
93 Old Greek contest
94 Mystical card
96 Memorize
98 Streetcar
99 Work by Elia
100 "Sweet O'Grady"
101 Quarrel
103 Customs
105 Male duck


107 Gives silent
assent
109 Like a wallflower
111 Under, poetically
113 Ordeal
116 Ditties
119 Opposing one
123 Subtlety
125 Oafish fellow
126 Visionary


Place of refuge
Funds
Steps
Gather together
Sweet liquid
Instant
Slow, in music
Western
Rye fungus
Stylishly


Puzzle answer is on Page A18.


old-fashioned
Sakes -!
Sports
Perfect places
Facilitate
Peruse
Exclaim
Soak, as flax
That girl
Skill


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclicl


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


A16 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well
as events to which the public
is invited. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activi-
ties, meals and more for a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.

Post News
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Satur-
day monthly at 1 p.m. for
lunch and coffee at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). All Coastie veterans
are welcome. For more infor-
mation, call Charlie Jensen at
352-503-6019.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Lounge open at 11 a.m. Mon-
day through Saturday and
noon on Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The post is currently taking
consideration for new bands,
deejays and karaoke enter-
tainers for the upcoming year.
If interested in being consid-
ered as an entertainer or mu-
sician at the post, call Elfi
Baker or Patti Foster at 352-
795-6526.
For more information about
the post and its other activi-
ties, call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at
352-302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who
served during war time (also
stepchildren); stepchildren;
and female veterans who
served during wartime. Call
Unit President Sandy White at
352-249-7663, or member-
ship chairman Barbara Logan
at 352-795-4233.
The Auxiliary will have its
annual Chili/Cornbread Cook-
off and Chinese Auction on
Saturday, Jan. 26, at the post
home, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
After the judging by local
dignitaries and the award of
prizes, the chili and cornbread
will be available for purchase.
To enter chili or cornbread,
have it at the post by 11:30
a.m. Saturday, Jan. 26.
While judges make their
decisions, the Chinese auc-
tion will feature many items.
Doors will open about 11 a.m.
and the winning tickets will be
picked about 2 p.m. Everyone
is welcome.
For more information, call
Unit President Sandy White at
352-249-7663, or Chairper-
son Barbara Logan at 352-
795-4233.
U H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
activities such as meals,
bingo, golf, darts, karaoke,
pool and more for members
and guests. Review the
monthly newsletter for activi-
ties and updates, and call the
post at 352-746-0440. The
VFW Post 10087 is off County
Road 491, directly behind Ca-
dence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 746-0440. The
Cake Crab Company Golf
League plays at Twisted Oaks
G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.


Check with Jack Gresham for
tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf
League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted
Oaks Golf Club and Citrus
Springs Country Club. Tee
time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW


Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Fried chicken dinner from 5
to 6:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 25.
Cost is $8; children younger
than 6 eat for $4. All are wel-
come.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, at the intersection of In-
dependence Highway and
U.S. 41. The chapter hall is on
the corner of Independence
Highway and Paul Drive. We
thank veterans for their serv-
ice and welcome any disabled
veteran to join us from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we
accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to as-
sist disabled veterans and
their families when we are
able. Anyone who knows a
disabled veteran or their fam-
ily who requires assistance is
asked to call Commander
Richard Floyd 727-492-0290,
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207,
or 352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClis-
ter is available to assist any
veteran or dependents with
their disability claim by ap-
pointment. Call 352-344-3464
and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the
veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA med-
ical center in Gainesville may
call the Citrus County Transit
office for wheelchair trans-
portation; call 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant
Lynn Armitage at 352-341-
5334. One of the DAVA's proj-
ects is making lap robes and
ditty, wheelchair and monitor
bags for needy veterans in
nursing homes. All who wish
to help in our projects are wel-
come. We need to make the
items certain sizes, so please
call for information. We also
collect toiletry items for the
veterans. Good, clean mate-
rial and yarn are needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries
are at 906 State Road 44
East, Inverness. Call the post
at 352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org for informa-
tion about all weekly post
activities.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Aux-
iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
lon. Post and auxiliary meet
the first Wednesday of the
month at 7 p.m. Dunnellon
Young Marines meet 6 p.m.
Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4p.m.
For information about activ-
ities and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544, or
e-mail boosc29@gmail.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets the
second Saturday monthly at


the DAV building at 1039 N.
Paul Drive in Inverness. This
is an advocacy group for cur-
rent and future veterans, as
well as for POWs and MIAs.
Florida Chapter 7 welcomes
new members to help pro-
mote public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help vet-
erans in need of help. Full
membership is open to all in-
dividuals 18 years or older
who wish to dedicate time to
the cause. Visit the website at


www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker
for your next meeting or
event. Call club President Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell), or email him at ultraray
1997@yahoo.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
or President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
Any female relative age 16 or
older who is a wife, widow,
mother, mother-in-law, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of an honor-
ably discharged Marine and
FMF Corpsman eligible to join
the Marine Corps League,
and female Marines (former,
active and reserves) and as-
sociate members are eligible
for MCLA membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to fw4252@
tampabay.rr.com. Call or visit
the post for regular and spe-
cial events, as well as meet-
ings. Google us at VFW 4252,
Hernando.
Everyone is invited to a
special "Speed Bingo" ses-
sion at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb.
23. Doors open at 9 a.m.
Food is available. Proceeds
will benefit cancer aid and re-
search. Call 352-726-5206 for
information.
The public is welcome at
the Sunday buffet breakfasts
from 10 a.m. to noon; cost is
$5.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-
5012 for information. VFW
membership is open to men
and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including
service in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The Korean
Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above for
information.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For
information about the post
and its activities, call 352-637-
0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, in-


If you want
to advertise

here in the

Great
Getaways

call 563-5592


vites all eligible veterans to
join or transfer to our Post
237 family. There are many
activities (call the post for in-
formation), and monthly din-
ners sell out fast and are a big
hit. Legionnaires, Sons of the
American Legion (SAL), or
American Legion Auxiliary
(ALA) are active helping vet-
erans and the community.
Stop by the post or visit the


website at www.Post237.org
to view the calendar of up-
coming events. Call the post
at 352-746-5018.
The post will host a benefit
poker run Saturday, Jan. 26,
with proceeds going to sup-
port American Cancer Society
Moffitt Cancer Center Ovarian
Cancer Research and pa-
tients and families served by
Hospice of Citrus County. A


$10 entry fee per rider will in-
clude a poker hand and a
meal at the end of the run.
Registration begins at 10 a.m.
at American Legion Post 237
in Beverly Hills. Last bike in
will be 4:30 p.m., when food
will be served. All vehicles are
welcome to participate. Music
will be provided and donated

See VETERANS/Page A18


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SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 A17





A18 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013


VETERANS
Continued from Page A17

by George Marshall. There
will be door prizes, a 50/50
drawing and fun. For more in-
formation, call 352-
746-5018 or John Roby at
352-341-5856.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of
the U.S. is eligible for mem-
bership if said service was
within Korea, including territo-
rial waters and airspace, at
any time from Sept. 3, 1945,
to the present or if said serv-
ice was outside of Korea from
June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77 meet the first
Thursday monthly at the for-
mer Inverness Highlands S &
W Civic Association building
at 4375 Little Al Point, off
Arbor Street. Call Post Cmdr.
Norman Brumett at 352-860-
2981 or Auxiliary president
Marie Cain at 352-697-3151
for information about the post
and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food is
available.
The post will do a bus tour
to Miami and Key West from
Feb. 18 to 24. Profits from the
trip will be used to purchase a
brick for the Fisher House
Walk of Courage and for new
equipment for the Color
Guard of Post 77. The Fisher
House will be a home for the
families of hospitalized veter-
ans at the Malcom Randal
Veterans Hospital in
Gainesville; the Walk of
Courage will be the paved
walkway between the Fisher
House and the hospital. Call
Alice at 352-860-2981.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Dinner is at 6 p.m. and the
meeting follows at 7. All veter-
ans in the Homosassa/Ho-
mosassa Springs area are
invited to be a part of Ameri-
can Legion Post 166. For in-
formation about the post or
the American Legion, call and
leave a message for the post
commander at 352-860-2090.
Your call will be returned
within 24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose
and Crown restaurant. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway). For more informa-
tion about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959; or
visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 1 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November at
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. All combat-wounded
veterans, lineal descendants,
next of kin, spouses and sib-
lings of Purple Heart recipi-
ents are invited. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 MOPH, visit the web-
site at www.citruspurpleheart.
org or call 352-382-3847.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Pur-
ple Heart has announced two
scholarship opportunities for
college-bound students -
Chapter 776's College of
Central Florida (CF) Endowed
Scholarship and the Military
Order of the Purple Heart
(MOPH) Scholarship for
Academic Year 2013/14.
Chapter 776's CF Endowed
Scholarship for Academic
Year 2013/14 awards $500 to


an applicant accepted or en-
rolled at CF as a full-time stu-
dent (12 or more semester
credit hours). Chapter 776
scholarship information and
an application can be ob-
tained at www.citrus
purpleheart.org, or by calling
352-382-3847. Chapter 776
must receive scholarship ap-
plications no later than 5 p.m.
Feb. 28.
The MOPH Scholarship for
Academic Year 2013/14
awards $3,000 to a member
of the MOPH; a spouse,
widow, direct lineal descen-
dant (child, stepchild, adopted
child, grandchild) of a MOPH
member or of a veteran killed
in action, or who died of
wounds before having the op-
portunity to become a MOPH
member. Great-grandchildren
are not eligible. Applicant
must be a U.S. citizen, a
graduate or pending graduate
of an accredited high school;
be accepted or enrolled as a
full-time student (12 semester
credit hours or 18 quarter
hours) at a U.S. college or
trade school and have at least
a 2.75 cumulative GPA based
on an un-weighted 4.0 grad-
ing system. Scholarship appli-
cations must be received at
MOPH Headquarters in
Springfield, Va., no later than
5 p.m. Feb. 13. MOPH schol-
arship information and an ap-
plication can be obtained by
visiting the MOPH At
www.purpleheart.org.
The order invites all veter-
ans and the public, especially
families, to attend the Eighth
Annual Purple Heart Cere-
mony at 11 a.m., Saturday,
Feb. 9, at the Florida National
Guard Armory, Crystal River.
The patriotic ceremony will
commemorate the proud
legacy of the Purple Heart
and pay tribute to Florida's
fallen heroes and America's
wounded warriors.
The ceremony will also fea-
ture the MOPH Department of
Florida Afghanistan/Iraq War
Memorial Portrait Mural.
The mural honors more
than 300 Floridians who have
fallen during the
Afghanistan/Iraq campaigns
and is the first memorial to
bear both the engraved
names and color portraits of
those who fell. Vocalists Paul
and Jackie Stevio will provide
patriotic music.
For more information, visit
the Chapter 776 website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or


call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-
0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post. Call the post
at 352-447-3495 for informa-
tion about the post and its
activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call Commander Tom
Gallagher at 860-1629 for in-
formation and directions.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2013 will
be at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill.
Dates are: Feb. 9, March 9,
April 13 and May 11.


New ARRIVALS

Noah & Shiloh Sphon


Emma and Gregg
Sphon of Dunnellon have
announced the birth of
twins, Noah Evans Sphon
and Shiloh Elizabeth
Sphon, at 6:05 a.m. Dec.
14, 2012, at Shands
hospital.
Noah weighed 6
pounds, 5 ounces and
Shiloh weighed 6 pounds


and 10 ounces.
Both were 18 3/4 inches
long.
Maternal grandparents
are Tim and Virginia
Boeh of Crystal River
Paternal grandparents
are Kevin and Yvonne
Sphon of Crystal River.
Vivian Lott is the ba-
bies' great-grandmother.


FOR THE RECORD
* Divorces and marriages filed in the state of
Florida are a matter of public record, available
from each county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For
Citrus County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or
visit the website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.



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SPORTS


The
Tampa Bay
Lightning
drop the
puck on the
2013 NHL
season./B3

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 NFL/B2
0 Recreation sports/B2
0 Hockey, golf/B3
r Tennis/B3, B4
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
- Basketball/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Pirates take fourth at Kilpatrick IBT


Crystal River highest-scoring local


team at Citrus's
JOE KORNECKI III
Correspondent
INVERNESS -Three Citrus
County wrestling teams fin-
ished in the top 10 out of 16
teams. Saturday night in the
2013 Ed Kilpatrick Classic.
Crystal River finished fourth
with 119.5 points, and Citrus
placed in fifth with a 102.5


wrestling tourney
score. Lecanto finished with a
49 to close out in ninth place.
Lake Gibson of Lakeland (No.
3 in the state) earned champi-
onship honors with a score of
237.5. Palm Bay finished in sec-
ond with a 169 and Haines City
(128.5) finished in third.
"We had four make the finals
and one in the consolation
round," Citrus coach Jeff Wood


said. "We had a good time, and
there were good matches."
"Chris Mosher went 2-1 with
the (No. 2) wrestler in the state.
Austin Renaud is a first-year
wrestler.... and made the cham-
pionship round ... and Nick Fer-
nandez lost to one of the best
195-pounders in the state. We
wrestled well, but we have to
get more in the championship
rounds to increase our chances
... at least eight."
The first of four Citrus cham-
pionship matches was between
Mosher and Caleb Smith of Lake


Gibson. The match was very
competitive and decided by the
smallest of margins (2-1) in the
106-pound class, in which Smith
took the victory Renaud (160-
pound class) fell to former Citrus
grappler Colton Jackson of The
Villages in a first-period fall.
Dorian Spradling of Lake
Gibson defeated the 'Canes'
Casey Bearden 9-2 in the 170-
pound class, and Dylan Meeks
of Central Florida Christian
Academy defeated Citrus' Nick
Fernandez in the 195-pound
class by a 13-4 score.


Senior Jacob Nolen who
competed in his last match at
home won third place in the
consolation round by way of fall
against Hunter Solem of Ridge-
wood (Orange Park).
The Crystal River Pirates had
three championship con-
tenders: Fernando Quiles of
Palm Bay defeated the Pirates'
Nick Hooper in the 132-pound
class. Dylan Ayala (152-pound
class) competed hard for three-
full periods, but fell to Lake
See Page B4


usia


St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Famer Stan Musial (seen here in 1952) died Saturday, the Cardinals announced. He was 92.

Cards Hall ofFamer 'Stan the Man'one ofMLB's all-time greats


Associated Press
ST LOUIS Stan Mu-
sial, one of baseball's great-
est hitters and a Hall of
Famer with the St. Louis
Cardinals for more than
two decades, died Satur-
day He was 92.
Stan the Man won seven
National League batting ti-
tles, was a three-time MVP


and helped the Cardinals
capture three World Series
championships in the 1940s.
The Cardinals announced
Musial's death in a news re-
lease. They said he died Sat-
urday evening at his home
in Ladue surrounded by
family The team said Mu-
sial's son-in-law, Dave Ed-
monds, informed the club of
Musial's death.


Musial was so revered in
St Louis, two statues of him
stand outside Busch Sta-
dium. He spent his entire
22-year career with the
Cardinals and made the
All-Star team 24 times -
baseball held two All-Star
games each summer for a
few seasons.
A pitcher in the low mi-
nors until he injured his


arm, Musial turned to play-
ing the outfield and first
base. It was a stroke of luck
for him, as he went on to hit
.331 with 475 home runs
before retiring in 1963.
Widely considered the
greatest Cardinals player
ever, the outfielder and
first baseman was the first
See Page B4


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1111-9


Weaver


passes


away at 82

Former Orioles

manager was on

cruise at the time

Associated Press
BALTIMORE Earl Weaver al-
ways was up for an argument, es-
pecially with an umpire.
At the slightest provocation, the
Earl of Baltimore would spin his
hat back, point his finger squarely
at an ump's chest and then fire
away. The Hall of Fame manager
would even tangle with his own
players, if necessary
All this from a 5-foot-6 pepper-
pot who hated to be doubted.
Although reviled by some,
Weaver was
beloved in Balti-
more and re- .
mained an Oriole
to the end.
The notoriously
feisty Hall of Fame
manager died at
age 82 on a
Caribbean cruise Earl Weaver
associated with led Orioles to
the Orioles, his 1970 World
marketing agent Series title.
said Saturday
"Earl was a black and white
manager," former O's ace and Hall
of Fame member Jim Palmer said
Saturday "He kind of told you
what your job description was
going to be and kind of basically
told you if you wanted to play on
the Orioles, this was what you
needed to do. And if you couldn't
do it, I'll get someone else. I know
that's kind of tough love, but I don't
think anyone other than Marianna,
his wife, would describe Earl as a
warm and fuzzy guy."
Weaver took the Orioles to the
World Series four times over 17
seasons but won only one title, in
1970. His .583 winning percentage
ranks fifth among managers who
served 10 or more seasons in the
20th century
Dick Gordon said Weaver's wife
told himWeaver went back to his
cabin after dinner and began
choking between 10:30 and 11 Fri-
day night. Gordon said a cause of
death has not been determined.
"It's a sad day Earl was a terrific
manager," Orioles vice president
of baseball operations Dan Du-
quette said. "The simplicity and
clarity of his leadership and his
passion for baseball was un-
matched. He's a treasure for the
Orioles. He leaves a terrific legacy
of winning baseball with the
See Page B4










Kids Fishing Clinic tabbed for Feb. 23


Special to the Chronicle

The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission and
Citrus County Parks and Recre-
ation have teamed up again to
host the ninth annual Kids Fish-
ing Clinic on Saturday, Feb. 23.
The clinic will be available to
pre-registered children from
ages 5 to 15. Clinic times will be
9 a.m., 10 a.m., 11 a.m., noon and
1 p.m. at Fort Island Trail Park
in Crystal River. The free clinic
enables young people to learn
the basics of environmental
stewardship, fishing ethics, an-
gling skills and safety
In addition, environmental
displays will provide each par-
ticipant with a unique chance to
experience Florida's marine life
firsthand. Kids Fishing Clinics
strive toward several goals, but


the main objective is to create
responsible marine resource
stewards by teaching children
about the vulnerability of
Florida's marine ecosystems.
The clinics also aspire to teach
fundamental saltwater fishing
skills and provide participants
with a positive fishing experi-
ence. In addition to a free Kid's
Fishing Clinic T-shirt, rods and
reels will be supplied for the
children to use during the clinic
and to take home with them.
Space is limited, so call today
to register your child at 352-527-
7540. To become a sponsor, call
Andy Smith at 352-400-0960.
The ninth annual Kids Fishing
Clinic is set for Saturday, Feb.
23, at Fort Island Trail Park in
Crystal River.
Special to the Chronicle


49ers vs. Falcons:




the key matchups


Associated Press

Matchups for the NFC champi-
onship game Sunday between the
San Francisco 49ers and Atlanta
Falcons at the Georgia Dome:
When the 49ers (12-4-1) have the
ball:
A year ago, the idea was to stop RB
Frank Gore (21) and force the 49ers
to throw. While Atlanta still will key
on Gore in the running game with
OLBs Sean Weatherspoon (56) and
Stephen Nicholas (54), the Falcons
are extremely aware of San Fran-
cisco's other running threat: QB
Colin Kaepernick (7).
The second-year pro comes off a
record-setting postseason debut in
which he ran for 181 yards and
two touchdowns. By the way, he
also threw for 263 yards and two
more TDs.
The Niners will be varied and ag-
gressive with the ball, although they
want Gore to get 20 or so carries be-
hind a line led on the left side by All-
Pro guard Mike lupati (77) and tackle
Joe Staley (74). If the blockers can
control the trenches against DTs
Jonathan Babineaux (95), Peria Jerry
(94) and Corey Peters (91), it will free
up Gore, rookie LaMichael James
(23) and Kaepernick to take off.
Atlanta wants to keep Kaepernick
in a box so he can't break anything
like the sensational 56-yard sprint to
the end zone he made against Green
Bay DE John Abraham (55) is the
main sacks threat, but he's nursing a
sprained left ankle. If he isn't effec-
tive, the Falcons could be in trouble;
they'll need DE Kroy Biermann (71),
Babineaux and DT Vance Walker
(99) to be sharp and disciplined in
their rushes.
Where the Falcons believe they
match up well is with their aggres-
sive secondary against WRs Michael
Crabtree (15) and Randy Moss (84)
and tight ends Vernon Davis (85) and
Delanie Walker (46). Crabtree has
blossomed into a star, but Atlanta's
cornerbacks, Asante Samuel (22),
Dunta Robinson (23) and Robert Mc-
Clain (27), practice against the likes
of Roddy White and Julio Jones, so


Associated Press
Atlanta Falcons wide receiver Julio Jones, left, stands on the field with
teammate Harry Douglas practice at the team's training facility Friday in
Flowery Branch, Ga. The Falcons host the San Francisco 49ers in the NFC
championship today.
they won't be awestruck. And ball: All-Pros Patrick Willis (52)
safeties Thomas DeCoud (28), and NaVorro Bowman (53),
William Moore (25) and Chris Hope Ahmad Brooks (55) and some solid
(24) face Tony Gonzalez, only a Hall backups.
of Fame quality tight end. Ryan will try to go deep to Jones
When the Falcons (14-3) have the and White, and have Gonzalez pa-
ball: trol the middle along with WR
White (84) and Jones (11) are as dy- Harry Douglas (83), who made a
namic a pair of receivers as any in huge late catch against Seattle.
the NFL. Throw in the wily Gonzalez That might be the best matchup of
in likely the final season of a record- the entire NFC title game: Atlanta's
setting run and the Falcons can make pass catchers versus San Fran-
all the plays in the passing game. cisco's secondary and LBs.
That is, if QB Matt Ryan (2) gets As strong as the Falcons' second-
enough time to find them against ary might be, the Niners probably
the NFL's third-ranked defense. are better with CBs Carlos Rogers
DE-LB Aldon Smith (99) had 19 1/2 (22), Terell Brown (25) and Chris
sacks and must get extra attention Culliver (29), and safeties Dashon
in protection. Goldson (38), an All-Pro, and Donte
Ryan released the demons of past Whitner (31).
playoff failures against Seattle, par- For Ryan and the Falcons to win
ticularly with that scintillating last- that encounter, the line must be
minute drive to victory He's stout. Center Todd McClure (62)
precise, leading the league in com- leads a generally experienced unit
pletion percentage, and gutsy on which RT Tyson Clabo (77) is the
He can't allow himself to get rat- top blocker Of special interest will
tled something Ryan should be be how RG Peter Konz (66), a
beyond now by Aldon Smith, rookie, matches up with SF's inte-
Justin Smith (94), who is playing rior defensive line of Ray McDon-
with an injured triceps, and the ald (91), Ike Sopoaga (90) and Ricky
best group of linebackers in foot- Jean Francois (95).


Ravens must slow down Pats


Associated Press

Matchups for the AFC
championship game Sun-
day between the Baltimore
Ravens and New England
Patriots at Gillette Stadium:
When the Ravens (12-6)
have the ball:
For most of his five pro
seasons, RB Ray Rice (27)
has been the main man on
offense for Baltimore. He
still is a key player, leading
the team in rushing and
scoring 10 TDs. But he's not
the only option, making the
Ravens far more threaten-
ing with the ball than in
previous years.
Indeed, when Rice strug-
gled holding onto the ball in
the wild-card win over In-
dianapolis, rookie Bernard
Pierce (30) rushed for
103 yards.
Rice is a breakaway
threat whether running or
receiving, and the rapid
development ofWR Torrey
Smith (82) has added a di-
mension to the passing at-
tack of QB Joe Flacco (5).
WR Jacoby Jones (12)
caught the 70-yard pass to
tie last week's game at
Denver at the end of regu-
lation and provides an-
other deep threat
Flacco also has rekin-
dled his connection with
WR Anquan Boldin (81),
who has been sensational


in the playoffs with 11 re-
ceptions for a 19.6-yard av-
erage and a TD.
Baltimore will try to mix
the quick-striking runs of
Rice and Pierce with
shorter passes to Rice,
Boldin and TEs Dennis
Pitta (88) and Ed Dickson
(84). It's the most effective,
balanced offense the
Ravens have had under
John Harbaugh.
Flacco, the only quarter-
back to win playoff games
in each of his first five pro
seasons, has gotten exem-
plary protection from his
line of late, led by left guard
Marshal Yanda (73). If he
gets it again, he'll surely
take shots against New
England's mediocre sec-
ondary Boldin and Smith
could give fits to CBs Aqib
Talib (31) and Alfonzo Den-
nard (37), and safeties
Devin McCourty (32) and
Steve Gregory (28).
A DB probably will have
to deal with Rice in pass-
ing situations because LBs
Jerod Mayo (51), Brandon
Spikes (55), and Dont'a
Hightower (54) are not par-
ticularly quick. But they
are smart and sound
fundamentally
New England's best de-
fenders are DT Vince Wil-
fork (75), who requires two
blockers, and DE Rob
Ninkovich (50), who seem-


ingly always winds up by
the ball.
When the Patriots (13-4)
have the ball:
Watch out!
New England led the
NFL with 557 points, often
using a no-huddle attack
that tires out defenses,
while also confusing them.
In two games against Hous-
ton, which supposedly has
one of the league's top
units, the Patriots ran sev-
eral plays in which re-
ceivers were uncovered.
You think Tom Brady (12)
took advantage?
Baltimore and anyone
else has no chance
against New England if it
doesn't get pressure on
Brady The way the Giants
handled the Patriots in
their two Super Bowl meet-
ings is the blueprint That
means Ravens pass rushers
Terrell Suggs (55), under-
rated Paul Kruger (99) and
Pernell McPhee (90), and
even blitzing backs such as
star safety Ed Reed (20) and
CBs Cary Williams (29) and
Corey Graham (24) must get
to the two-time league MVP
Or at least force him to get
rid of the ball when he
doesn't want to.
The onus for protecting
Brady falls on a line that
has solidified as the season
wore on, led by guard
Logan Mankins (70). The


other big chore is neutraliz-
ing Baltimore's man-moun-
tain NT, Haloti Ngata (92),
in both the running and
passing games.
Given time, Brady will
pick apart anyone. WR
Wes Welker (83) is almost
guaranteed to gain 100
yards, as is TE Aaron Her-
nandez (81). The Patriots
will miss outstanding tight
end Rob Gronkowski, gone
with a broken left arm, so
Brady will get others in-
volved, particularly WR
Brandon Lloyd (85) deep,
and RBs Stevan Ridley
(22), Danny Woodhead (39)
and Shane Vereen (34) on
shorter patterns.
Ridley is a 1,000-yard
rusher, something very
rare for the Patriots, and
third-stringer Vereen
scored three times against
the Texans.
Charged with slowing
down the run will be Ngata
and, of course Ray Lewis
(57). The brilliant line-
backer's 17-year career will
end when the Ravens' sea-
son concludes, and don't
think Baltimore won't be
stoked to get him to one
more Super Bowl.
And don't think the Patri-
ots won't attack Lewis, who
missed 10 games with a torn
right triceps, but has 30
tackles in the two playoff
games since returning.


Hitting hardwood
for heart health
Citrus High School's Red
Out Basketball Game benefit-
ting the American Heart Asso-
ciation is slated for 7 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 25, at Citrus High
School Gymnasium.
Citrus High School and
West Port High School varsity
boys' basketball teams will
match up in red to bring aware-
ness to heart disease, the No.
1 killer of Americans. During
the game, loved ones will be
honored and remembered.
Teams, students and com-
munity members are asked to
purchase and wear an Ameri-
can Heart Association "Rock
the Beat" shirt to school and
to the game in honor of loved
ones. The T-shirts are being
sold at CHS for $10. All pro-
ceeds go to the American
Heart Association and will
help to fund research and
education.
For more information, email
Greg Naruta at narutag@
citrus.k12.fl.us, or call
352-726-2241.
Volunteers needed
for youth league
Citrus County YMCA is cur-
rently seeking to connect vol-
unteers through its Y
Community Champions pro-
gram. Volunteers are needed
for the Winter Youth Basket-
ball League to begin Jan. 28
in Crystal River at the Key
Training Center.
The Youth Basketball
League will run for 10 weeks
(two weeks of practice and
eight weeks of games) and is a
friendly noncompetitive league
centered on teamwork and
good sportsmanship. Volunteer
coaches would be needed one
weekday evening for practice,
and on Saturday for games.
Referees and score keepers
are also needed for Saturday
games. Basketball experience
and/or a youth sports back-
ground is preferred. All volun-
teers must undergo a
background screening.
For more information or to
volunteer, call 352-637-0132,
or stop by the office at 3909
N. Lecanto Highway in Bev-
erly Hills.
Plantation to
host golf tourney
Get your foursome to-
gether for the inaugural "Tee
Off for Tourette Golf Outing"
on Feb. 2.
Mingle with players from
the Bucs and the Rays at the
fundraising event at Planta-
tion on Crystal River. The
event is $100 per per-
son/$400 for a foursome and
the price includes greens fee
and a cart, as well as lunch
and goody bag.
All proceeds benefit the
Florida Tourette Association.
Sponsorships are still avail-
able. Kickoff cocktail party on
Friday, Feb. 1.
Contact Gary at 352-601-
8980.
Team hope plans
golf tournament
Team Hope will host the
third annual Relay For Life
Golf Tournament to benefit the
American Cancer Society Sat-
urday, Feb. 9, at Juliette Falls
Golf Course in Dunnellon.
Four person team scramble
is set to begin at 9 a.m. The
registration fee is $75 per per-
son, which includes lunch, icy
beverages and range balls.
Eagle Buick GMC will offer a
2013 Buick Vernal for a desig-
nated par three hole-in-one,
along with a chance to win a
Las Vegas vacation and golf
equipment.


There plenty of raffle
prizes and surprise guests.
Hole sponsorships are
available for: Silver, $100;
Bronze, $250; Gold, $500;
and Platinum, $1,000.
For more information or to
register, call Michele Snellings
at 352-697-2220, email
Michele.snellings@pgnmail.
com, or call Nick Maltese at
352-464-7511, or email
Nick. Maltese@pgnmail.com.
Blackshear outing
slated for Feb. 23
Dan Kern, chairman of the
Citrus County Builders Asso-
ciation's Jim Blackshear Me-
morial Golf Outing, recently
announced the annual golf
tournament, to be Feb. 23 at
the Seven Rivers Golf and
Country Club, will benefit the
Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County.
Proceeds from the golf
tournament will help fund
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County programs and facili-
ties at the three club sites.
"This is money that will stay
in Citrus County to help our
own children," said Kern.
Registration for the event
will begin at 7 a.m. and the
shotgun start is scheduled for
8 a.m. All teams must pre-
register. The $60 entry fee in-
cludes greens fee, cart, lunch,
door prizes and one free Mul-
ligan ticket. Signing up a team
for $220 saves $5 per person.
Eagle Buick and Harley-
Davidson, both of Crystal
River, are hole-in-one spon-
sors. Sponsorships for other
components of the event at
all levels are available by reg-
istering online at www.
CitrusBuilders.com, or by
contacting the Citrus County
Builders Association at
352-746-9028 or the Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County
office at 352-621-9225.
Sugarmill plan
School-astic tourney
The Women of Sugarmill
Woods will stage its 17th an-
nual School-astic Classic Golf
Tournament Monday, Feb. 25,
at Sugarmill Woods Country
Club.
Entrance fee is $55. All net
proceeds go to scholarships
for Citrus County students.
Registration starts at
7:30 a.m., with shot gun start
at 9 a.m. Fee includes cart
fees, breakfast, snacks, lunch
and a Chinese auction.
For more information, call
352-586-8021.
Youth Basketball
registration open
Citrus County YMCA is tak-
ing registrations for its 2013
Winter Youth Basketball
League, which begins
Monday, Jan. 28.
The league will run for 10
weeks (two weeks of practice
and eight weeks of games)
and is open to children ages 3
through 12. The Junior League
will have ages 3 through 5,
and the Youth League will con-
sist of 6- through 12-year-olds
with several age brackets.
Practice will be once a week
on a weekday evening, with
games being played on Satur-
day. All practices and games
will be at the Key Training
Center Chet Cole Life Enrich-
ment Center gymnasium.
Open tryouts and a skill
assessment will be given
Monday, Jan. 28, to deter-
mine team placement. The
league cost is $85 for ages 6
to 12, and $65 for 3 to 5.
Scholarships are available
through the YMCA's Finan-
cial Assistance program. To
apply, call the office at
352-637-0132.


Recreation BRIEFS


B2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lightning strike


TB downs

Washington

6-3 at home

Associated Press

TAMPA Martin St.
Louis and Eric Brewer
each scored two goals as
the Tampa Bay Lightning
beat the Washington Cap-
itals 6-3 in the season
opener for both teams
Saturday night
St. Louis added an as-
sist, while Vincent Lecav-
alier and Cory Conacher
also scored goals for the
Lightning.
Joel Ward scored twice
and Wojtek Wolski also
had a goal for the Capitals,
who lost in Adam Oates'
NHL coaching debut.
St. Louis' drive from
above the left circle dur-
ing a 5-on-3 power play
gave Tampa Bay a 4-3 ad-
vantage at 4:47 of the
third. Conacher, who had
an assist in first NHL
game, scored his first goal
to extend the lead to 5-3
with 6:36 to go. Brewer
scored his second goal
late in the third.
Panthers 5,
Hurricanes 1
SUNRISE Jonathan
Huberdeau had a goal and
two assists in his NHL debut,
Brian Campbell scored twice
in a first-period frenzy and
the Florida Panthers opened
defense of their Southeast
Division title with a 5-1 win
over the Carolina Panthers.
Alex Kovalev also had a
goal and two assists in his
first game with Florida.
Jose Theodore made 41
saves for the Panthers, who
led 4-0 after the first 20 min-
utes for their highest-scoring
period since Dec. 17, 2010.
Penguins 3,
Flyers 1
PHILADELPHIA- Tyler
Kennedy and James Neal
both scored goals to lead the
Pittsburgh Penguins past the
Philadelphia Flyers 3-1.
Claude Giroux scored for
the Flyers in the first game
for both teams since the end
of the 113-day NHL lockout.
Chris Kunitz added an
empty-netter in the final sec-


R E I 1 6 -



Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning right wing Martin St. Louis celebrates with teammates following
his goal during the third period Saturday against the Washington Capitals in Tampa.


onds for the Penguins.
Blackhawks 5,
Kings 2
LOS ANGELES Marian
Hossa had two goals and an
assist, Corey Crawford made
19 saves, and the Chicago
Blackhawks crashed the
Kings' Stanley Cup champi-
onship celebration with a 5-2
victory over Los Angeles.
Captain Jonathan Toews
and Patrick Kane each had a
goal and an assist for the
Blackhawks, who jumped to a
3-0 lead on Michael Frolik's
goal less than 15 minutes in.
Rob Scuderi and Jordan
Nolan scored and Jonathan
Quick stopped 17 shots for
the Kings.
Bruins 3,
Rangers 1
Tuukka Rask stopped 20
shots for Boston in his first
game after taking over for
two-time Vezina Trophy win-
ner Tim Thomas, and the
Bruins beat the New York
Rangers 3-1 in the lockout-
delayed season opener.
Milan Lucic and Daniel
Paille scored for Boston,
which won the Northeast Di-
vision last year before losing
in the first round of the play-
offs. Rask backed up
Thomas during the Bruins'
2011 Stanley Cup run and in-
herited the job when the
enigmatic goalie decided to
take a year off to rest.
Brad Richards scored for
the Rangers on an assist from
Rick Nash, the former Colum-
bus star who was New York's
biggest acquisition over the
summer. Henrik Lundqvist


made 31 saves for the
Rangers, who finished with
the best record in the Eastern
Conference last season but
lost in the conference finals to
the New Jersey Devils.
Devils 2,
Islanders 1
UNIONDALE, N.Y -
David Clarkson's goal at 8:17
of the third period sent the
New Jersey Devils to a 2-1
season-opening win over the
New York Islanders.
Travis Zajac also scored for
New Jersey. Martin Brodeur
stopped 18 shots to increase
his NHL wins record to 657.
Travis Hamonic had New
York's goal, a power-play
score at 7:12 of the third.
Evgeni Nabokov made 26
saves for the Islanders.
Maple Leafs 2,
Canadiens 1
MONTREAL- Nazem
Kadri and Tyler Bozek scored
power-play goals as the
Toronto Maple Leafs opened
the lockout-shortened NHL
season with a 2-1 victory over
the Montreal Canadiens.
The Maple Leafs went 2
for 5 with the man-advantage
and held Montreal to 1 for 5
on Brian Gionta's goal.
Michael Kostka, playing
his first NHL game at 27
years old, earned an assist
on Kadri's goal.
Senators 4,
Jets 1
WINNIPEG, Manitoba -
Erik Karlsson had a goal and
two assists and the Ottawa
Senators spoiled the Win-
nipeg Jets' home opener with


a 4-1 victory.
Milan Michalek, Kyle Turris
and Chris Neil, with the game-
winner in the second period,
scored Ottawa's other goals.
Dustin Byfuglien scored for
the Jets.
Craig Anderson stopped
27 of the 28 shots he faced
for the Senators.
Blues 6,
Red Wings 0
ST. LOUIS Rookie
Vladimir Tarasenko scored
twice in his NHL debut and
Chris Stewart also had a pair
of goals to help the St. Louis
Blues manhandle the Detroit
Red Wings 6-0 in their
season opener.
Coach Ken Hitchcock, gen-
eral manager Doug Arm-
strong and goalies Jaroslav
Halak and Brian Elliott posed
at center ice with postseason
trophies earned from last sea-
son's Central Division cham-
pionship team shortly before
the opening faceoff. A stand-
ing room crowd of 20,035
roared throughout the opener.
Stars 4,
Coyotes 3
DALLAS Jaromir Jagr
scored two goals and as-
sisted on the game-winner in
his Dallas debut, and the
Stars opened the shortened
season with a 4-3 victory
against the Phoenix Coyotes.
Jagr, the NHL's active
leader in goals, assists and
points, had a hand in all four
goals for Dallas. Ray Whit-
ney, Phoenix's leading scorer
last season, scored a goal in
the first game against his
former team.


Coasting into fourth round


Federer's game too

much for Tomic in

Australian Open

Associated Press

MELBOURNE, Australia -
Fifth-seeded Angelique Kerber has
been ousted in the fourth round of
the Australian Open by the woman
who defeated Serena Williams at
the same stage last year.
No. 19-seeded Ekaterina
Makarova had a 7-5, 6-4 win in the
opening match Sunday on Rod
Laver Arena, taking out the highest
seed to tumble so far at the season's
first major
Makarova beat Williams in the
fourth round in 2012 at Melbourne
Park and went on to reach the quar-
terfinals, which remains her best
result at a Grand Slam.
Kerber and Makarova were two of
only four women in 2012 to beat
Williams, who finished off unbeaten
post-August with titles at Wimble-
don, the London Olympics, the U.S.
Open and the WTA Championships.
Wimbledon semifinalist Kerber
had beaten Makarova three times
last year, including in the second
round at Wimbledon.
"Seems like it was the same this
year and last year Unbelievable feel-
ing," Makarova said. "I really like to
play here. The crowd is so perfect"
The 24-year-old Makarova could
meet fellow Russian, No. 2-ranked
Maria Sharapova, in the quarterfi-
nals, at the same stage they met
last year. Sharapova can advance
by beating playing Belgium's
Kirsten Flipkens later Sunday in
the fourth round.
"Actually I really want to play
against Maria because I lost here
last year in the quarters and I play
a lot of times against her last year,"
Makarova said. "Now I'm pretty
confident and I like my game."
"Last year I was so surprised ...
and I had so many thoughts in my
mind. This year I'm a little bit used
to it, so I think I'll be ready to play a
good game."


Another pair who met here last
year played out a similar result on
Saturday night, with No. 2-ranked
Roger Federer knocking Bernard
Tomic out of the tournament in
straight sets to end Australia's par-
ticipation in either the men's or
women's singles draws.
Federer gave the 20-year-old
Aussie an instant reality check by
breaking him in the very first game
to set up a 6-4, 7-6 (5), 6-1 win.
"I elected to serve, considering I
was serving really well the last few
weeks," said Tomic, who won his
first ATP World Tour title at Sydney
last week and had a win over No. 1-
ranked Novak Djokovic at an exhi-
bition tournament in Perth at the
start of the month. "Yeah... that first
service game was important. I lost
it. Then I was like, 'Oh, no!"'
Federer, who has won four of his
17 Grand Slam titles at Melbourne
Park, also beat Tomic in the fourth
round here last year.
"It's not my favorite part of the
job beating up on the hometown he-
roes," Federer told the crowd at
Rod Laver Arena, where he has
won four of his 17 Grand Slam ti-
tles. "But it's nice that you guys sort
of invite me back every year"
Federer earned his 250th win at
a Grand Slam event, the milestone
sprinkled with some of his classic
crisp volleys and trademark one-
handed backhands.


Federer won the first point of the
match with a forehand winner, the
first of three in that game, and
Tomic only won two points before
the Swiss star converted a service
break in the first game.
Federer will face Canadian Milos
Raonic, who had 7-6 (4), 6-3, 6-4 win
over Germany's Philipp
Kohlschreiber in a matchup of two
big servers.
The third round ended in the
early hours of Sunday morning,
when No. 14-seeded Gilles Simon
outlasted fellow Frenchman Gael
Monfils 6-4, 6-4, 4-6, 1-6, 8-6 in a
match that finished at 12:32 a.m.
local time.
Both men needed treatment from
the trainer during the 4 hour, 43-
minute match on Hisense Arena,
with Simon struggling to shake off
soreness in his elbow and Monfils
fighting fatigue.
Simon and Jeremy Chardy, who
ousted 2009 U.S. Open champion
Juan Martin del Potro, were among
the four Frenchman who advanced
on Saturday
Their compatriots, No. 7-seeded
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga who beat
Slovenian Blaz Kavcic 6-2, 6-1, 6-4 -
No. 9 Richard Gasquet-who ousted
Croatia's Ivan Dodig4-6,6-3,7-6 (2), 6-
0 will meet in the next round.
Del Potro's 6-3, 6-3, 6-7 (3), 3-6, 6-3
loss to Chardy left only three major
winners in the men's draw.


Stallings leads


Humana Challenge


Associated Press

LA QUINTA, Calif. -
Scott Stallings opened a
five-stroke lead in the Hu-
mana Challenge on Satur-
day, holing a 20-foot
downhill putt on the par-5
eighth hole for his second
eagle of the round.
Stallings shot a 9-under
63 to reach 22-under 194
after three days in perfect
conditions in the
Coachella Valley
The two-time PGA Tour
winner played PGA
West's Jack Nicklaus Pri-

Humana Challenge
Saturday
La Quinta, Calif.
Purse: $5.6 million
p-PGAWest, Arnold Palmer Private
Course (6,950 yards, par 72), n-PGA
West, Jack Nicklaus Private Course
(6,951 yards, par 72), q-La Quinta Coun-
try Club (7,060 yards, par 72)
Third Round
Scott Stallings 66p-65q-63n -194 -22
Roberto Castro 63n-67p-69q 199 -17
Stewart Cink 66q-67n-66p 199 -17
Charles Howell III 67q-65n-67p- 199 -17
John Rollins 70p-65q-64n-199 -17
Charley Hoffman 65n-67p-67q 199 -17
Sang-MoonBae 67p-69q-64n-200 -16
Kevin Streelman 69n-65p-66q -200 -16
Brian Stuard 71p-67q-62n -200 -16
Kevin Stadler 66q-66n-68p-200 -16
Brian Gay 67q-66n-67p 200 -16
Ryan Palmer 65p-69q-66n-200 -16
Billy Horschel 67n-68p-65q 200 -16
Lee Williams 67q-65n-68p 200 -16
Jason Kokrak 63q-69n-69p-201 -15
David Lingmerth 68q-64n-69p-201-15
N.Thompson 69q-66n-66p -201 -15
Richard H. Lee 66n-65p-70q -201 -15
D. Summerhays 65n-68p-69q 202 -14
ZachJohnson 66p-66q-70n -202 -14
James Hahn 63p-67q-72n -202 -14
Ricky Barnes 65q-68n-69p-202 -14
Robert Garrigus 66p-67q-69n-202 -14
Jimmy Walker 66p-70q-66n -202 -14
BoVan Pelt 66n-68p-68q 202 -14
Brandt Snedeker 67q-68n-67p 202 -14
Bryce Molder 66p-68q-68n -202 -14
Aaron Baddeley 64p-68q-70n-202 -14
Ben Kohles 68p-68q-66n -202 -14
Justin Leonard 67p-69q-67n 203 -13
Darron Stiles 66p-65q-72n -203 -13
Greg Chalmers 64n-68p-71q- 203 -13
Cameron Tringale 65n-72p-66q 203 -13
Harris English 67n-69p-67q 203 -13
Stephen Ames 67p-68q-68n-203 -13
Fabian Gomez 69q-67n-67p 203 -13
Justin Hicks 69p-69q-65n -203 -13
MattKuchar 70q-64n-69p 203 -13
Johnson Wagner 66n-70p-67q 203 -13
Carl Pettersson 68n-66p-69q-203 -13
Alistair Presnell 68p-70q-65n -203 -13
Steven Bowditch 71n-65p-67q 203 -13
Robert Streb 67n-69p-68q 204 -12
Russell Henley 64n-69p-71q-204 -12
Kevin Chappell 68q-69n-67p 204 -12
Brendon de Jonge69q-69n-66p 204 -12
Doug LaBelle II 64n-70p-70q --204 -12
Tom Gillis 69p-66q-69n -204 -12
William McGirt 68p-66q-70n-204 -12
Jeff Maggert 65n-72p-67q 204 -12
Martin Laird 69n-69p-66q 204 -12
Luke Guthrie 73q-67n-64p 204 -12
Greg Owen 72q-65n-68p 205 -11
Geoff Ogilvy 70q-65n-70p 205 -11
D.A. Points 67q-69n-69p -205 -11
Brad Fritsch 69q-65n-71 p -205 -11
Matt Jones 68n-68p-69q -205 -11
D.J.Trahan 69p-68q-68n -205 -11
Bud Cauley 70n-63p-72q 205 -11
Jerry Kelly 65n-71p-69q -205 -11
CamiloVillegas 71q-67n-67p-- 205 -11
Bob Estes 69q-69n-67p 205 -11
Phil Mickelson 72q-67n-66p 205 -11
Stuart Appleby 67q-70n-68p 205 -11
Lucas Glover 71p-69q-65n 205 -11
Luke List 70n-66p-69q 205 -11
Boo Weekley 68q-67n-71 p 206 -10
Colt Knost 68q-67n-71 p 206 -10
Jeff Overton 69p-71q-66n-206 -10
John Senden 72p-66q-68n-206 -10
Michael Bradley 65n-69p-72q 206 -10
Jason Bohn 70n-69p-67q 206 -10
Charlie Wi 72q-64n-70p 206 -10
Graham DeLaet 71p-70q-65n-206 -10
David Toms 75p-67q-64n 206 -10
David Mathis 70q-66n-70p 206 -10
Brendan Steele 72p-70q-64n -206 -10
ShawnStefani 68q-69n-69p-206 -10
Tag Ridings 67n-71p-68q-206 -10
Ross Fisher 74q-65n-67p 206 -10
D.H. Lee 70q-66n-70p 206 -10
Failed to qualify
John Merrick 69p-71q-67n -207 -9
Brian Davis 68n-68p-71q- 207 -9
Trevor Immelman 73q-64n-70p 207 -9
Steve Marino 69n-70p-68q 207 -9
Jeff Klauk 68q-69n-70p -207 -9
Derek Ernst 69n-70p-68q 207 -9
Joey Snyderlll 69n-70p-68q 207 -9
Scott Langley 70q-67n-70p -207 -9
Pat Perez 68q-69n-70p -207 -9
Tim Clark 71q-66n-70p -207 -9
Henrik Norlander 70p-71q-66n--207 -9


vate Course after open-
ing with a 66 on the
Arnold Palmer Private
Course the site of the
final round Sunday -
and shooting a 65 on
Saturday at La Quinta
Country Club.
John Rollins, Stallings'
playing partner, was tied
for second with Stewart
Cink, Roberto Castro,
Charles Howell III and
Charley Hoffman.
Phil Mickelson scram-
bled to make the cut by
two strokes in his season
debut.

Davis Lovel l 71p-70q-67n-208 -8
Gary Woodland 71n-66p-71q -208 -8
Webb Simpson 73p-70q-65n 208 -8
Robert Allenby 68n-72p-68q 208 -8
JoshTeater 73q-65n-70p 208 -8
Troy Matteson 70p-70q-68n -208 -8
Erik Compton 67q-67n-74p 208 -8
Patrick Cantlay 65n-72p-71q -208 -8
Robert Karlsson 71n-69p-69q -209 -7
Joe Ogilvie 71n-69p-69q -209 -7
Chris Stroud 69p-66q-74n 209 -7
Eric Meierdierks 70p-70q-69n 209 -7
David Hearn 71 n-66p-72q 209 -7
MarkWilson 77q-66n-66p 209 -7
Mike Weir 67q-75n-67p 209 -7
Bill Haas 70n-68p-71q-209 -7
Matt Every 69p-69q-71 n 209 -7
Jesper Parnevik 67n-73p-69q -209 -7
Kevin Na 69p-70q-70n 209 -7
Cameron Percy 72p-68q-69n 209 -7
Steve Jones 74p-67q-69n--210 -6
Dicky Pride 69n-70p-71q -210 -6
JhonattanVegas 68n-69p-73q-210 -6
Jeff Gove 73p-69q-68n-210 -6
Ben Crane 71n-68p-71q -210 -6
Patrick Reed 74q-68n-68p- 210 -6
Casey Wittenberg 69q-69n-72p 210 -6
Justin Bolli 71p-70q-69n -210 -6
Wes Short,Jr. 70n-71p-69q -210 -6
Ken Duke 72q-65n-73p -210 -6
Chris Kirk 68p-71q-71n-210 -6
Andrew Svoboda 67n-74p-69q -210 -6
Seung-Yul Noh 72q-68n-71p-211 -5
Bobby Gates 66n-73p-72q-211 -5
Scott Gardiner 70q-67n-75p- 212 -4
Aaron Watkins 72q-70n-70p -212 -4
Morgan Hoffmann72p-67q-73n- 212 -4
Scott Verplank 69q-72n-71p -212 -4
Kyle Stanley 67n-75p-70q -212 -4
Brian Harman 77p-66q-69n -212 -4
Martin Flores 74n-72p-66q-212 -4
Paul Haley II 67n-72p-73q- 212 -4
BartBryant 72p-71q-70n -213 -3
Will Claxton 69q-70n-74p -213 -3
Blake Adams 70p-75q-68n -213 -3
James Driscoll 70p-73q-70n-213 -3
LeeJanzen 73n-72p-68q- 213 -3
Ryo Ishikawa 70p-72q-71n -213 -3
Rory Sabbatini 69n-75p-69q -213 -3
Steve LeBrun 72n-72p-70q-214 -2
Brett Quigley 72n-68p-74q- 214 -2
Chad Campbell 74p-67q-73n-214 -2
Sean O'Hair 70q-71n-74p -215 -1
John Mallinger 76q-71n-68p-215 -1
Jin Park 73p-74q-68n-215 -1
Andres Gonzales 73p-72q-70n-215 -1
David Lynn 69n-71p-76q-216 E
Troy Kelly 73p-73q-70n -216 E
Tommy Gainey 74q-71n-72p-217 +1
Scott McCarron 68q-72n-78p -218 +2
Chris Starkjohann 68p-81q-70n 219 +3
Charlie Beljan 78q-73n-69p 220 +4
Michael Letzig 74p-77q-73n 224 +8
Mark Brooks 79n-74p-74q 227 +11
Abu Dhabi HSBC
Championship
Saturday
At Abu Dhabi Golf Club, Abu Dhabi,
United Arab Emirates
Purse: $2.7 million
Yardage: 7,605, Par: 72
Third Round
Justin Rose 67-69-68 -204
Jamie Donaldson 67-70-69 206
Thorbjorn, Olesen 68-69-69 206
Thongchai Jaidee 70-71-66 207
Richie Ramsay 73-68-67 208
David Howell 69-71-68 208
G. Fernandez-Castano 70-67-71 -208
Andrew Dod 74-70-65 209
Ricardo Santos 71-72-66-209
M. Campbell 69-71-69-209
Jbe Kruter 72-69-69 210
Martin Kaymer 71-69-70 210
S.S.P Chowrasia 73-73-65 211
Bernd Wiesberger 74-71-66-211
Peter Hanson 73-72-66 -211
Anders Hansen 71-71-69-211
Jorge Campill 74-68-69-211
G. Coetzee 69-71-71 -211
JohanEdfors 71-73-68 -212
Lorenzo Gagli 74-68-70 -212
Danny Willett 70-71-71 -212
Jason Dufner 71-69-72-212
Joost Luiten 70-69-73 212


Branden Grace
Matteo Manassero
Padraig Harrington
Todd Hamilton
Paul Lawrie
Ernie Els
Thomas Bjorn


71-69-73-
72-68-73-
72-72-70-
75-69-71 -
74-71-71 -
71-73-72-
72-74-71 -


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R F IT W 'z i,


Associated Press
Roger Federer waves following his third-round win Saturday over Bernard
Tomic at the Australian Open in Melbourne, Australia.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 B3






B4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013



Australian Open
results
Sunday
At Melbourne Park, Melbourne, Australia
Purse: $31.608 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
Men
Fourth Round
David Ferrer (4), Spain, def. Kei Nishikori
(16), Japan, 6-2, 6-1,6-4.
Women
Fourth Round
Ekaterina Makarova (19), Russia, def. An-
gelique Kerber (5), Germany, 7-5, 6-4.
Doubles
Men
Third Round
Marcel Granollers and Marc Lopez (3),
Spain, def. Eric Butorac, United States, and
Paul Hanley, Australia, 6-2, 7-5.
Mike and Bob Bryan (1), United States, def.
Jeremy Chardy, France, and Lukasz Kubot,
Poland, 6-7 (4), 6-4, 6-3.
Women
Third Round
Silvia Soler-Espinosa and Carla Suarez
Navarro, Spain, def. Liezel Huber, United
States, and Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez (6),
Spain, 7-6 (5), 2-6, 6-4.
Sara Errani and Roberta Vinci (1), Italy def.
Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan, and Peng Shuai (15),
China, 6-4, 0-6, 7-5.
Mixed
First Round
Lucie Hradecka and Frantisek Cermak,
Czech Republic, def. Bethanie Mattek-Sands,
United States, and Horia Tecau, Romania, 4-6,
7-6 (5), 10-8.
Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, and Fabio
Fognini, Italy, def. Natalie Grandin, South Africa,
and Rajeev Ram, United States, 6-2, 6-3.
Legends Doubles
Round Robin
Men
Jacco Eltingh and Paul Haarhuis, Nether-
lands, def. Mansour Bahrami, Iran, and Wayne
Ferreira, South Africa, 6-3, 6-4.
Wayne Arthurs and Pat Cash, Australia, def.
Thomas Enqvist, Sweden, and Fabrice Santoro,
France, 7-6 (5), 6-7 (3), 10-7.



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 25 13 .658 -
Brooklyn 24 16 .600 2
Boston 20 19 .513 51/2
Philadelphia 17 23 .425 9
Toronto 14 26 .350 12
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 26 12 .684 -
Atlanta 22 18 .550 5
Orlando 14 25 .359 12Y2
Charlotte 10 30 .250 17
Washington 8 29 .216 17Y2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 25 16 .610 -
Chicago 23 16 .590 1
Milwaukee 20 18 .526 312
Detroit 14 25 .359 10
Cleveland 10 32 .238 1512
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 32 11 .744 -
Memphis 26 13 .667 4
Houston 21 21 .500 10Y2
Dallas 17 24 .415 14
New Orleans 13 27 .325 1712
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 32 8 .800 -
Denver 24 18 .571 9
Utah 22 19 .537 1012
Portland 20 19 .513 111Y2
Minnesota 17 20 .459 1312
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 31 9 .775 -
Golden State 24 15 .615 612
L.A. Lakers 17 22 .436 1312
Sacramento 16 25 .390 15/2
Phoenix 13 28 .317 1812
Friday's Games
Chicago 100, Boston 99, OT
Philadelphia 108, Toronto 101, OT
Indiana 105, Houston 95
Charlotte 106, Orlando 100
Brooklyn 94, Atlanta 89
Memphis 85, Sacramento 69
San Antonio 95, Golden State 88
Washington 112, Denver 108
Oklahoma City 117, Dallas 114, OT
Saturday's Games
San Antonio 98, Atlanta 93
Sacramento 97, Charlotte 93
Memphis 85, Chicago 82, OT
Minnesota 92, Houston 79
Golden State 116, New Orleans 112
Utah 109, Cleveland 98
Milwaukee at Portland, late
Washington at L.A. Clippers, late
Today's Games
L.A. Lakers at Toronto, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Boston at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Denver, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Indiana at Memphis, 1 p.m.
Sacramento at New Orleans, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Atlanta, 2 p.m.
Houston at Charlotte, 2 p.m.
Brooklyn at New York, 3:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 4 p.m.
San Antonio at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Chicago, 9:30 p.m.
Washington at Portland, 10 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
New Jersey 1 1 0 0 2 2 1
Pittsburgh 1 1 0 0 2 3 1
N.Y Islanders 1 0 1 0 0 1 2
N.YRangers 1 0 1 0 0 1 3
Philadelphia 1 0 1 0 0 1 3
Northeast Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Boston 1 1 0 0 2 3 1
Ottawa 1 1 0 0 2 4 1
Toronto 1 1 0 0 2 2 1


Buffalo 0 0 00 0 0 0 0
Montreal 1 0 1 0 0 1 2
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Florida 1 1 0 0 2 5 1
Tampa Bay 1 1 0 0 2 6 3
Carolina 1 0 1 0 0 1 5
Washington 1 0 1 0 0 3 6
Winnipeg 1 0 1 0 0 1 4
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 1 1 0 0 2 5 2
Columbus 1 1 0 0 2 3 2
St. Louis 1 1 0 0 2 6 0
Nashville 1 0 0 1 1 2 3
Detroit 1 0 1 0 0 0 6
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Calgary 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Colorado 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Edmonton 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Minnesota 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Vancouver 0 0 0 0 0 0 0


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the record A lot of helping hands

Flori LOTTERY at Crystal River Open


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) South Carolina at Florida
1 p.m. (SUN) Wake Forest at Boston College
2 p.m. (MNT) Auburn at Kentucky
3 p.m. (ESPN2) Maryland at Georgia Tech
3 p.m. (FSNFL) Alabama-Birmingham at Texas-El Paso
3 p.m. (SUN) Florida State at North Carolina State
5 p.m. (ESPN2) Texas A&M at Georgia
10:30 p.m. (SUN) Iowa State at Oklahoma State
(Same-day Tape)
NBA
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Dallas Mavericks at Orlando Magic
BOYS HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL
5 p.m. (ESPN) Huntington Prep (W.Va.) vs. New Hampton
(N.H.)
BOWLING
3 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Round One Japan Cup (Taped)
NFL
3 p.m. (FOX) NFC Championship San Francisco 49ers
at Atlanta Falcons
6:30 p.m. (CBS) AFC Championship Baltimore Ravens
at New England Patriots
GOLF
6 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Abu Dhabi HSBC
Championship Final Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Humana Challenge Final
Round
7:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Mitsubishi Electric
Championship Final Round
HOCKEY
12:30 p.m. (NBC) Philadelphia Flyers at Buffalo Sabres
10 p.m. (NBCSPT) Chicago Blackhawks at Phoenix Coyotes
MOTORCYCLE RACING
1 p.m. (CBS) Monster Energy AMA Supercross World
Championship (Taped)
RODEO
2 p.m. (CBS) Bull Riding Winston-Salem Invitational
(Taped)
SOCCER
1 p.m. (UNI) Mexican Premier Division: Pumas vs. Tijuana
TENNIS
11 a.m. (ESPN2) Australian Open: Round of 16 (Taped)
9 p.m. (ESPN2) Australian Open: Round of 16
2 a.m. (ESPN2) Chris Evert/Raymond James Pro-Celebrity
Classic (Taped)
3:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Australian Open: Round of 16
SKIING
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) Skiing (Taped)
3 p.m. (NBC) U.S. Freestyle Cup (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Dallas 1 1 0 0 2 4 3
Anaheim 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Los Angeles 1 0 1 0 0 2 5
Phoenix 1 0 1 0 0 3 4
San Jose 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Friday's Games
No games scheduled
Saturday's Games
Columbus 3, Nashville 2, SO
Pittsburgh 3, Philadelphia 1
Ottawa 4, Winnipeg 1
Chicago 5, Los Angeles 2
Boston 3, N.Y Rangers 1
Toronto 2, Montreal 1
New Jersey 2, N.Y. Islanders 1
Tampa Bay 6, Washington 3
Florida 5, Carolina 1
St. Louis 6, Detroit 0
Dallas 4, Phoenix 3
Colorado at Minnesota, late
Anaheim at Vancouver, late
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Buffalo, 12:30 p.m.
San Jose at Calgary, 6 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y Rangers, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Edmonton at Vancouver, 9 p.m.
Chicago at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Winnipeg at Boston, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Islanders, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Nashville, 6 p.m.
Buffalo at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Florida at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Columbus, 7:30 p.m.
Anaheim at Calgary, 9 p.m.



NFL playoff glance
All Times EST
Wild-card Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 5
Houston 19, Cincinnati 13
Green Bay 24, Minnesota 10
Sunday, Jan. 6
Baltimore 24, Indianapolis 9
Seattle 24, Washington 14
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 12
Baltimore 38, Denver 35, 20T
San Francisco 45, Green Bay 31
Sunday, Jan. 13
Atlanta 30, Seattle 28
New England 41, Houston 28
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 20
San Francisco at Atlanta, 3 p.m. (FOX)
Baltimore at New England, 6:30 p.m. (CBS)
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan.27
At Honolulu
AFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (NBC)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 3
At New Orleans
AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6 p.m.
(CBS)


NFL injury report
NEW YORK -The updated National Foot-
ball League injury report, as provided by the
league:
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS at ATLANTA FAL-
CONS 49ERS: PROBABLE: G Alex Boone
(knee), LB NaVorro Bowman (shoulder), CB
Tarell Brown (shoulder), TE Garrett Celek (foot),
CB Chris Culliver (knee), S Dashon Goldson
(shin), LB Tavares Gooden (knee), RB Frank
Gore (knee), LB Clark Haggans (shoulder), G
Mike lupati (shoulder), RB Bruce Miller (shoul-
der), LB Aldon Smith (shoulder), DT Justin
Smith (elbow, triceps), LB PatrickWillis (shoul-
der). FALCONS: QUESTIONABLE: DE John
Abraham (ankle), DT Jonathan Babineaux
(shoulder). PROBABLE: S William Moore
(hand), LB Stephen Nicholas (foot), CB Christo-
pher Owens (hamstring).
BALTIMORE RAVENS at NEW ENGLAND
PATRIOTS RAVENS: OUT: CB Asa Jackson
(thigh). QUESTIONABLE: LB Dannell Ellerbe
(ankle, back), RB Vonta Leach (knee, ankle),
RB Bernard Pierce (knee), WR David Reed
(thigh). PROBABLE: RB Anthony Allen (head),
WR Anquan Boldin (shoulder), CB Chykie
Brown (shoulder), NTTerrence Cody (ankle), G
Gino Gradkowski (head), DE Arthur Jones
(thigh, knee), LB Ray Lewis (triceps), LB Albert
McClellan (shoulder), DE Pernell McPhee
(thigh), DT Haloti Ngata (knee), S Bernard Pol-
lard (chest), S Ed Reed (shoulder), CB Jimmy
Smith (abdomen), WR Torrey Smith (back), LB
Terrell Suggs (Achilles, biceps), G Marshal
Yanda (shoulder). PATRIOTS: PROBABLE: CB
Marquice Cole (finger), DE Chandler Jones
(ankle), G Nick McDonald (shoulder), DE Trevor
Scott (knee), RB Danny Woodhead (thumb).


BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBA-Fined Dallas Mavericks F Shawn Mar-
ion $25,000 for public criticism of officiating.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BUFFALO BILLS Named Pat Morris of-
fensive line coach.
CHICAGO BEARS Retained defensive
backs coach Jon Hoke and defensive line coach
Mike Phair. Announced the retirement of Rusty
Jones director of Physical development.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS Named Jedd
Fisch offensive coordinator and Bob Babich de-
fensive coordinator.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS Signed DL
Marcus Forston from the practice squad.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
BUFFALO SABRES Signed general man-
ager Darcy Regier to a contract extension.
NEW JERSEY DEVILS Assigned RW
Bobby Butler to Albany (AHL). Recalled LW
Mattias Tedenby from Albany.
ST. LOUIS BLUES Assigned F Chris
Porter to Peoria (AHL).
ECHL
ECHL Suspended F lan Schultz two
games and fined him an undisclosed amount.


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)

CASH 3 (late)


PLAY 4 (early)
9-3-7-6
PLAY 4 (late)
4-1-8-8

FANTASY 5
oridaLottery 9-24- 25- 27- 33

POWERBALL LOTTERY
8-28-29-34-38 12-13-21-26-46-48
POWER BALL XTRA
35 5


ERIC VAN DEN HOOGEN
Correspondent

The Youth Group at the First
United Methodist Church in Inver-
ness and The Family Recourse Center
in Hernando got help from 144 hands,
during the ninth annual Crystal River
Open, in their effort to collect either
food or gently used clothing.
In other words, 72 participants or 36
teams showed up to play in this event
at the Crystal River High School ten-
nis courts. Throw in nature's helping
hand cooler temperatures and rain-
cleaned courts and it made for one
nice day of tennis.
If you have something you wish to
donate, please feel free to drop it off
at the tennis courts today between 9
a.m. and 2 p.m.
The results for the first day of com-
petition was as follows:
Women's A Doubles:
Shu Sha Mu/Lisa Steed def. Carrie
Ingersoll/Terrie Marshall, 6-2, 6-2;
Anna Mirra/Cory Jensen def. Judy
Long/Linda Martin, 6-1, 6-3.
Women's B Doubles:
Maddie Lewis/Veronica Williams
def. Tana Hubbard/Maureen Caruso,
6-4, 0-6, 6-4.
Men's A Doubles:
Rick Scholl/Kevin Scholl def. Mar-
cial Irrizary/Robert Lee, 6-0, 6-0;
David deMontfort/Jim Lavoie def. Vin-
nie Tremante/Wayne Steed, 6-3, 6-1;
Don Kirby/Tom Spessard def. Shea


Chronicle

Thirteen Citrus High School girls
weightlifters placed Saturday after-
noon as the Hurricanes scored 56
points to claim first place in the Key-
stone Heights Invitational over run-
ner-up Gainesville (53).
Lecanto came in seventh with 14
points.
According to Citrus coach Tia Nel-
son, this is her first time winning the
event in her time with the Hurricane
program.
Placers for Citrus are as follows:
101 pounds: Riana Smith, sixth



WEAVER
Continued from Page B1

Orioles and we're so grateful for his
contribution. He has a legacy that
will live on."
Weaver will forever remain a part
of Camden Yards. A statue of him
was dedicated last summer in the
stadium's flag court, along with the
rest of the team's Hall of Fame



MUSICAL
Continued from Page B1

person in team history to have his
number retired. 01' 6 probably was
the most popular, too, especially after
Albert Pujols skipped town.
At the suggestion of a pal, actor
John Wayne, he carried around auto-
graphed cards of himself to give away
He enjoyed doing magic tricks for kids
and was fond of pulling out a harmon-
ica to entertain crowds with a favorite,
"The Wabash Cannonball."
Humble, scandal-free, and eager to
play every day, Musial struck a chord
with fans throughout the Midwest and
beyond. For much of his career, St.
Louis was the most western outpost in
the majors, and the Cardinals' vast
radio network spread word about him
in all directions.
Farmers in the field and families on
the porch would tune in, as did a fu-
ture president- Bill Clinton recalled
doing his homework listening to Mu-
sial's exploits.
Musial's public appearances dwin-
dled in recent years, though he took
part in the pregame festivities at



KILPATRICK
Continued from Page B1

Gibson's Alex Destra by a 12-11 score.
But the Pirates' Brandon Martin
(heavyweight) was crowned cham-
pion, as he defeated Freddy Benoit of
Lake Gibson by way of fall.
"I thought we performed well... and
I performed well," Martin said. "It was
a great tournament ... and I look for-
ward to next week."
Also, Crystal River had three grap-
plers compete in the consolation
round for third place. Kris Carballo
(126-pound class) defeated Lecanto's
Jonathan Fillinger by way of fall at the
1:06 mark. Jose Aday (138-pound class)
fell to Kevin Jean Jacques via pin in
the second period of Lake Gibson
High. Geo Valardes (220-pound class)
defeated Palm Bay's Josh Ewar (fall)
"We've been working ... and we
looked a little better than last week,"
Pirates head coach Craig Frederick


110 pounds: Monica Coates, third
110 pounds: Kristina Trujillo,
fourth
119 pounds: Ashley Nichols, first
119 pounds: Sarah Carsley, fourth
129 pounds: Aaron McIntrye, sec-
ond
139 pounds: Mackenzie Hotaling,
second
139 pounds: Kendra Kirby, third
154 pounds: Hannah Evans, second
183 pounds: Anna Venero, first
183 pounds: Leslie Nina, second
199 pounds: Samantha Kanawall,
second
199 pounds: Kara Hooks, fifth

members.
"Earl Weaver stands alone as the
greatest manager in the history of
the Orioles organization and one of
the greatest in the history of base-
ball," Orioles owner Peter Angelos
said. "This is a sad day for everyone
who knew him and for all Orioles
fans. Earl made his passion for the
Orioles known both on and off the
field. On behalf of the Orioles, I ex-
tend my condolences to his wife,
Marianna, and to his family."

Busch during the 2011 postseason as
the Cardinals won the World Series.
And he was at the White House in
February 2011 when President
Barack Obama presented him with
the Presidential Medal of Freedom,
America's highest civilian honor for
contributions to society
He certainly delivered at the plate.
Musial never struck out 50 times in
a season. He led the NL in most every
hitting category for at least one year,
except homers. He hit a career-high
39 home runs in 1948, falling one short
of winning the Triple Crown.
In all, Musial held 55 records when
he retired in 1963. Fittingly, the acco-
lades on his his bronze Hall plaque
start off with this fact, rather than
flowery prose: "Holds many National
League records..."
He played nearly until 43rd birth-
day, adding to his totals. He got a hit
with his final swing, sending an RBI
single past Cincinnati's rookie second
baseman that was Pete Rose, who
would break Musial's league hit
record of 3,630 some 18 years later.
Of those hits, Musial got exactly
1,815 at home and exactly 1,815 on the
road. He also finished with 1,951 RBIs
and scored 1,949 runs.

said. "It was promising .... but we're
still making the same mistakes. We
had six guys place .... and Martin was
the champion."
Lecanto had two wrestlers finish
fourth: Fillinger fell to Carballo, and
Chris Ewing (160-pound class) was de-
feated via pin in the first period by
Derek Dibernardo of the Central
Florida Christian Academy
"We're getting ready for districts at
Springstead," Lecanto head coach
Scot Roberts said. "We're going to have
a couple hard weeks of practice."
Lake Gibson had the most champi-
onship grapplers with seven, and
Sedarian Perry (Lake Gibson) and
Colton Jackson (The Villages) had the
most victories by pin with four apiece.
Outstanding Wrestlers
Lightweight (106-138) Gary Evans
(Haines City).
Middleweight (145-170) Chase
Krutzky (Lake Gibson).
Heavyweight (182-285) Taylor Jack-
son (The Villages).


SIIJL


Monroe/Chris Hancock, 6-4, 6-0; Don-
nie Simmons/Mike Brown def. Mike
Walker/Mike Tringali, 6-0, 6-4.
Semifinal: Jim Lavoi/David de-
Montfort def. Rick Scholl/Kevin
Scholl, 4-6, 6-3, 6-0; Mike Brown/Don-
nie Simmons def. Don Kirby/Tom
Spessard, 6-1, 6-0.
Consolation: Shea Monroe/Chris
Hancock def. Marcial Irrizary/Robert
Lee, 6-3, 6-2.
Men's B Doubles:
AJ Glenn/Michael Hetland def.
Samuel DeAngelis/Ben Epstein, 6-4,6-2.
Mixed Doubles A:
Anna Mirra/Mike Walker def. Lisa
Steed/Wayne Steed, 6-2, 6-1; Linda
Martin/Steve Barnes def. Judy
Long/Gary Zolnierz, 6-1, 7-5.
Final: Anna Mirra/Mike Walker def.
Linda Martin/Steve Barnes, 6-2, 6-1.
Consolation Final: Lisa
Steed/Wayne Steed def. Judy
Long/Gary Zolnierz, 6-1, 6-4.
Mixed Doubles B & 60+:
Ruth Branson/Len Calodney def.
Emily Speaker/Doug Speaker, 6-3, 6-4;
Veronica Williams/Ben Epstein def.
Terrie Marshall/Butch Marshall, 6-4,
3-6, 6-3; Roxanne DeAngelis/Samuel
DeAngelis def. Shu Sha Mu/Paige Ob-
stfeld, 6-2, 7-5; Mahima Tatam-
bothla/Mike Tringali def. Carrie
Ingersoll/Paul Ingersoll, 6-1, 6-4.
A special thanks to Brown Funeral
Home for their generosity and Crystal
River High School for the use of their
beautiful tennis facility.


Hurricanes lifters



take first at Keystone


SCOREBOARD


I I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Gators chomp down on defense


Associated Press

GAINESVILLE Scottie
Wilbekin had 13 points and 10 as-
sists, his first career double-dou-
ble, for No. 10 Florida during a
83-52 victory over No. 17 Missouri.
The victory was coach Billy
Donovan's 400th with the Gators,
making him the third coach in
Southeastern Conference his-
tory to accomplish that feat with
the same school. He joined Ken-
tucky's Adolph Rupp and LSU's
Dale Brown in the 400-win club.
Erik Murphy scored 15 points
despite playing with a broken fin-
ger for the Gators (14-2, 4-0 SEC),
who won their sixth straight, and
Kenny Boynton added 14.
Jabari Brown led the Tigers
(13-4, 2-2) with 16 points.
No. 6 Syracuse 70,
No. 1 Louisville 68
LOUISVILLE, Ky. Brandon
Triche scored 23 points and Michael
Carter-Williams scored the final four
points as No. 6 Syracuse rallied to
upset No. 1 Louisville 70-68 on Sat-
urday in a showdown of unbeaten
Big East Conference teams.
Carter-Williams had 16 points,
Jerami Grant and C.J. Fair both had
10 for the Orange (17-1, 5-0) who
won their seventh straight.
Russ Smith's 25 points led
Louisville (16-2, 4-1), which had its
11-game winning streak stopped.
No. 4 Kansas 64,
Texas 59
AUSTIN, Texas Ben McLemore
scored 16 points and Kansas
stormed back from a late double-digit
deficit for its 15th straight win.
Jeff Withey added 14 points and
nine rebounds for the Jayhawks
(16-1,4-0 Big 12).
Travis Releford added 12 points
for Kansas.
Sheldon McClennan led the Long-
horns with 18 points.
No. 7 Arizona 71,
Arizona State 54
TEMPE, Ariz. Mark Lyons
scored 24 points and Nick Johnson
added 19 as Arizona pulled away in
the second half.
Arizona (16-1, 4-1 Pac-12) went
on the decisive run after Arizona
State point guard Jahii Carson picked
up his fourth foul midway through the
second half. Solomon Hill added 13
points for the Wildcats, who scored
18 points off turnovers and outscored
the Sun Devils by 14 inside.
Carson had 22 points and four as-
sists, and Evan Gordon added 14
points for the Sun Devils.
No. 18 Michigan St. 59,
No. 11 Ohio St. 56
EAST LANSING, Mich. Keith
Appling made two free throws with
7.9 seconds left and finished with 15
points to help No. 18 Michigan State
beat Ohio State 59-56.
The Buckeyes had a chance to
potentially tie the game in the clos-
ing seconds, but Shannon Scott
didn't come close on a running


Associated Press
Florida forward Will Yeguete grimaces as he tries to hold on the ball against Missouri guards Earnest Ross
and (33) and Keion Bell (5) during the second half Saturday in Gainesville. Florida won 83-52.


3-point attempt.
Deshaun Thomas, who scored a
career Big Ten-high 28 points, was
upset Scott didn't pass him the ball.
Thomas wanted a shot to send the
game into overtime after he had
made six 3-pointers in regulation.
The Spartans (16-3, 5-1 Big Ten)
have won five straight conference
games.
Ohio State (13-4, 3-2) was playing
for the first time since handing Michi-
gan its only loss last Sunday.
Wichita State 67,
No. 12 Creighton 64
WICHITA, Kan. Carl Hall had
17 points and 13 rebounds and
Malcolm Armstead hit two key free
throws in the closing seconds for
Wichita State.
Cleanthony Early added 13 points
and Demetric Williams had 10 for the
Shockers (17-2, 6-1 Missouri Valley
Conference), who pushed their home-
court winning streak to 17 games.
Doug McDermott finished with 25
points for the Bluejays (17-2, 6-1).
Wyoming 58,
No. 15 San Diego St. 45
LARAMIE, Wyo. Leonard
Washington had 14 points and 14
rebounds to help Wyoming beat a
cold shooting No. 15 San Diego
State 58-45.
Larry Nance Jr. added 11 points
and 12 rebounds, and Derrious
Gilmore had 13 points for the Cow-
boys (15-2, 2-2 Mountain West).
Wyoming's win snapped a five-
game losing streak to the Aztecs.
SDSU (14-4, 2-2) lost its second
game in a row, the first time this sea-
son the Aztecs have lost back-to-
back games. SDSU fell to UNLV on


Wednesday.
No. 16 Kansas St. 69,
Oklahoma 60
MANHATTAN, Kan. Rodney
McGruder scored 20 points and Will
Spradling added 15 for Kansas State.
Romero Osby and Amath M'Baye
both scored 12 points for Oklahoma.
The Sooners (12-4, 3-1) kept pace
with the Wildcats most of the way
thanks to snagging 36 rebounds to
Kansas State's 24.
Angel Rodriguez helped seal the
deal in the closing minutes with a
slashing layup in the paint and a 3
that put Kansas State (15-2, 4-0) up
61-52 with 2:25 left. Rodriguez fin-
ished with 12 points and nine assists.
No. 20 Notre Dame 69,
Rutgers 66
SOUTH BEND, Ind. Jack Coo-
ley had 19 points, 10 rebounds and
blocked a shot with 2 seconds left to
help No. 20 Notre Dame hang on
for a 69-66 win over Rutgers, end-
ing a two-game losing streak for the
Fighting Irish.
Rutgers used a 6-1 run late to
close to 67-66 when Eli Carter
scored on a layup with 7 seconds
left then forced a held ball on Eric
Atkins two seconds later. Carter
drove inside for the layup, but Coo-
ley blocked the shot. Atkins then
made a pair of free throws for the
Irish (15-3, 3-2 Big East).
Myles Mack 3-point attempt at the
buzzer missed as the Scarlet
Knights (14-4, 3-3) lost for the ninth
straight time at Notre Dame.
No. 21 Oregon 76,
No. 24 UCLA 67
LOS ANGELES Tony Woods


scored 18 points and Oregon pulled
away over the final 6 1-2 minutes to
improve to 5-0 in Pac-12 play for the
first time in 39 years.
Dominic Artis added 14 points, and
Arsaian Kezemi had 12 points and 11
rebounds for the Ducks (16-2, 5-0
Pac-12), who snapped the Bruins'
10-game winning streak, including
eight straight victories at home.
UCLA (15-4, 5-1) led by three
points at halftime after shooting 55
percent.
Travis Wear scored 17 points to
lead the Bruins.
No. 22 VCU 90,
Duquesne 63
PITTSBURGH Rob Branden-
berg scored 22 points and No. 22
VCU dominated in winning its 13th
consecutive game, 90-63 over
Duquesne at Consol Energy Center.
The Rams' Treveon Graham had
17 of his 20 points in the first half,
when VCU (16-3, 4-0 Atlantic 10)
used a 26-2 run to seize control. It
would cruise to extend what is the
nation's second-longest active win-
ning streak.
VCU coach Shaka Smart became
the second-youngest coach to reach
100 career victories.
Cincinnati 71,
No. 25 Marquette 69
CINCINNATI Sean Kilpatrick
scored seven of his career-high 36
points in overtime, and Cincinnati
blew a 16-point lead before rallying
to a 71-69 victory over No. 25 Mar-
quette, ending the Bearcats' streak
of three straight home losses.
Cincinnati (16-3, 4-2 Big East)
pulled it out without point guard


Cashmere Wright, who sprained his
right knee during a 75-70 win at De-
Paul on Tuesday night. Without him,
the Bearcats depended almost
solely on Kilpatrick for points.
Marquette (13-4, 4-1) managed
only 13 points in the first half and
never led until overtime. The Golden
Eagles' loss leaves No. 6 Syracuse
as the only team still unbeaten in Big
East play at 5-0.
Virginia 56,
Florida State 36
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. Joe
Harris scored 17 points and Virginia
used a 22-4 run late in the first half
and stifling defense throughout to
beat Florida State for the first time in
eight tries, 56-36.
Akil Mitchell added 13 points for
the Cavaliers (12-5, 2-2 Atlantic
Coast Conference), who led 33-15
at halftime the fifth time this sea-
son they have held an opponent
under 20 first-half points. It was the
first time they have done it in an
ACC game since they led Clemson
28-14 on Feb. 10, 1996.
Michael Snaer scored nine points
to lead the Seminoles (10-7, 2-2),
who shot 37 percent, missed 14 of
15 3-point attempts and committed
18 turnovers that Virginia turned into
20 points.
South Florida 61,
Georgetown 58
TAMPA-Anthony Collins scored
all 14 of his points in the second
half, including a couple of free
throws with 3 seconds remaining, to
lead South Florida to its first Big
East victory of the season, a 61-58
decision over Georgetown.
Otto Porter scored 21 points for
Georgetown, but lost control of the
ball in the final seconds while the
Hoyas (12-4, 2-3) were working for a
game-winning shot.
Jawanza Poland led USF (10-7,
1-4) with 15 points, including two
free throws with 3:40 left that stood
as the Bulls' final points until Collins'
foul shots.
Central Florida 79,
Houston 75, OT
HOUSTON Isaiah Sykes
scored 22 points, grabbed nine re-
bounds and dished out four assists
to lead UCF past Houston in over-
time 79-75.
Houston sprinted out of the gates,
taking a 9-0 lead to begin the game
sparked by Leon Gibson who scored
the Cougars' first seven points. The
Cougars were up 14-3 before UCF
(12-5, 2-1 C-USA) answered back
with a 20-7 run to tie it at 23 with
7:41 remaining in the half.
Sykes hit a pair of free throws for
UCF with 1:27 to go in the game to
tie it at 72. Neither team would score
the rest of the half.
In overtime, a Calvin Newell lay-
up gave the Knights a 74-72 lead
with 2:54 to go and never trailed
again. Keith Clanton had 19 points
and pulled eight rebounds for UCF.


Spurs clip Hawks

Associated Press ij Y1


ATLANTA Tony Parker had 23
points and 12 assists, and the San
Antonio Spurs held off the short-
handed Atlanta Hawks 98-93 on
Saturday night for their fourth
straight victory
Matt Bonner added 17 points, and
Kawhi Leonard and Tiago Splitter
each had 14 for the Spurs.
Josh Smith led the Hawks with 21
points. Kyle Korver, who started at
shooting guard, had 19 points.
Spurs forward Tim Duncan was
not in uniform as he was given the
night off by coach Gregg Popovich.
Kings 97, Bobcats 93
CHARLOTTE, N.C. Marcus Thorn-
ton scored 18 points off the bench,
Tyreke Evans came up big down the
stretch, and the Sacramento Kings held
on to beat the Charlotte Bobcats 97-93
for their third win in four games.
After scoring just 69 points in a 16-
point loss to Memphis a night earlier, the
Kings made sure there would be not be
another offensive letdown.
They led most of the way but needed
a late burst from Evans, who scored six
of the team's last nine points in the final
four minutes.
Evans finished with 16 points. DeMar-
cus Cousins added 17 points and 10 re-
bounds, and James Johnson chipped in
with nine points and nine rebounds for
the Kings (16-25).
Warriors 116,
Hornets 112
NEW ORLEANS Klay Thompson
had a season-high 29 points, Jarrett
Jack scored seven of his 25 in the final
minute and the Golden State Warriors
beat the New Orleans Hornets 116-112.


Associated Press
San Antonio Spurs small forward Kawhi Leonard pulls down a rebound in front
of Atlanta Hawks small forward Josh Smith in the first half Saturday in Atlanta.


The Warriors trailed 110-108 in a
topsy-turvy game when Jack hit two
free throws with 52 seconds left to tie
the score. He converted a tough floater
to give Golden State a 112-110 lead,
and he finished off the Hornets with
three free throws.
Thompson scored 24 in the first half
as the Warriors led by as much as 16.
Jack, who played for the Hornets last
season, added 12 assists. Stephen
Curry, returning after missing two
games with a right ankle sprain, had 17
of his 20 points in the second half.
Grizzlies 85, Bulls 82, OT
CHICAGO Marc Gasol scored 19
points, Zach Randolph had 13 points
and 19 rebounds, and the Memphis


Grizzlies beat the Chicago Bulls 85-82
in overtime.
Memphis scored the first six points of
the extra period, Gasol's putback mak-
ing it 82-76. The Bulls cut it to 83-80 on
Jimmy Butler's layup and had a chance
to tie, but Nate Robinson missed a 3-
pointer with 25 seconds left.
Robinson made a layup with 6.6
seconds left, but Jerryd Bayless scored
with 4.8 seconds remaining to make it
85-82. Carlos Boozer missed a 3 as
time expired.
Chicago, playing its third consecutive
overtime game in four days, didn't have
enough in overtime. The Bulls played
without forward Luol Deng and had to
fight back from a 17-point, third-quarter
deficit.


Rose takes control


in Abu Dhabi


Associated Press
ABU DHABI, United
Arab Emirates Justin
Rose extended his lead at
the Abu Dhabi Champi-
onship on Saturday, shoot-
ing a 4-under 68 to take a
two-shot lead over Jamie
Donaldson and Thorbjorn
Olesen.
A day after top-ranked
Rory McIlroy and second-
ranked Tiger Woods
missed the cut, the fifth-
ranked Englishman made
his third round look easy
with seven birdies. After
three-putting on the first
for a bogey, Rose had a
stretch of six birdies over
nine holes including
sinking a 20-footer on No. 5
that gave him back the lead
and an approach shot on
No. 9 that rolled to 4 feet
from the hole for birdie.
"Delighted about the
day," said Rose, who has
been at the top of the
leaderboard all week. "I
strengthened my lead, if
you like, one to two shots. I
guess that's always good."
Olesen (69) and Donald-
son (69) struggled to make
putts early but finished
with birdies to close the
gap. Thailand's Thongchai
Jaidee (66) finished with
two birdies to move into
fourth, three shots behind
Rose.
Rose cooled down on
the back nine, hitting er-
rant drives on Nos. 13 and
17 that led to bogeys and


reduced a four-shot lead
to two. After Olesen and
Donaldson birdied No. 18,
Rose responded by nearly
chipping in on the same
hole and finished with his
seventh birdie that gave
him a three-round total of
204.
"I was a little bit mad
about the bogey at No. 17
because I didn't feel I did
an awful lot wrong there,"
Rose said. "I've been very
resilient and bounced
back well."
Olesen and Donaldson
struggled to make putts
early but finished satisfied
to be in the mix coming
into Sunday Olesen hit an
approach shot from a
sandy rough on 18 that
landed a few feet from the
pin for a birdie. Donaldson
matched him with a clutch
putt on 18 for his second
birdie in four holes.
"Very happy with the
score, 3-under was great,"
Donaldson said. "A little
bit scrappy at the start but
(I) recovered really well in
places."
Playing alongside Rose,
the 52nd-ranked Olesen
said he would have to start
strong if he was going to
overtake the Englishman.
"It looks like he's play-
ing really well but, if I can
get some birdies in quickly,
I think it can be exciting,"
said the 52nd-ranked Dane
who is paired with Rose
for the final round.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


'Ace of


Cakes'


bakes for


Obama


Baker to adorn

dessert with

stars, stripes

Associated Press

WASHINGTON Balti-
more celebrity baker Duff
Goldman said the cake he's
baking for President Barack
Obama's inaugural ball is
going to be
more elegant
than crazy, full
of stars and
stripes and a
whole lot of
glitter
Goldman
said the staff
J at his Charm
Duff City Cakes
Goldman bakery, which
had its ex-
treme cakes featured in the
Food Network show "Ace of
Cakes," began Friday to deco-
rate the details to put on the
cake. They'll start baking the
cake itself Sunday, the day be-
fore the inauguration and the
Commander in Chief's Ball
where the cake will be served.
The finished product will
stand 3 to 4 feet tall, drip with
patriotic fondant bunting and
sparkle with clusters of stars
shooting out like fireworks.
"Glitter is going to be all
over the place," Goldman said
in a telephone interview.
On Saturday, four bakers
were in the process of repli-
cating in fondant and royal
icing the presidential seal
and the seals of the four mili-
tary branches honored at the
Commander in Chief's Ball.
Goldman said they are fo-
cused on the details, such as
making sure the eagle in the
presidential seal faces the
correct way and the bird
holds exactly six arrows in its
talons. They also want to
make sure they spell the Latin
motto on the seal correctly: E
pluribus unum.
"This is one you really want
to spellcheck, big time," said
Goldman, whose television
show ran for 10 seasons be-
fore going off the air in 2011.
Goldman said the whole
cake will take about 100 hours
to complete. When finished, it
is expected to weigh 50
pounds and serve several
hundred people. Inside,
guests will find Swiss butter-
cream frosting and layers of
red velvet, lemon poppy seed,
pineapple coconut, and
pumpkin chocolate chip cake.
This isn't the only inaugura-
tion cake the bakery is mak-
ing. Goldman said he is
baking five other cakes for
various inauguration events,
including a 4-foot replica of
the White House. Still, the
Commander in Chief's Ball
cake is special because the
event at the Washington Con-
vention Center is one of only
two official parties the presi-
dent will attend.
Goldman said he played it
cool when the Presidential In-
augural Committee called
about two weeks ago to ask
him to make a cake.
"When you get off the phone
you get to scream, 'We're mak-
ing the inaugural cake,'" he
said.


Birthday Your chart indicates that in the year
ahead, you are likely to be far more fortunate with joint
endeavors than independent ventures. Keep this in
mind if you find something good you'd like to get off
the ground.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Even if you feel time is
running out for getting done what needs doing, keep a
cool head, especially regarding complex endeavors or
situations that must move at a measured pace.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Should you find your-
self in an uncomfortable position of your own making,
don't make matters worse by succumbing to the
temptation to blame others.
Aries (March 21-April 19) It behooves you to be
watchful over your prized possessions lock your
car even when it's parked in your driveway. The un-
usual could happen, and you should take precautions.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Keep your impulsive
tendencies in check, especially when it comes to


Capitol celebrations


Associated Press
Kelly Clarkson performs a medley of her songs Nov. 18 at the 40th annual American Music
Awards in Los Angeles. Clarkson and fun. are just two of the acts who will perform during the
upcoming inaugural festivities.

Beyonce, Wonder star at packed inauguration events


MESFIN FEKADU
AP Music Writer

NEW YORK Kelly Clark-
son is a multiple nominee at
next month's Grammy
Awards, but what she's really
excited about is another event
where she'll be joined by Be-
yonce, Katy Perry, Stevie
Wonder, Alicia Keys, Mana,
Usher and Brad Paisley
Oh, and the president.
President Barack Obama's
inauguration is shaping up to
be an event as star-studded as
any red carpet, with dozens of
heavy hitters lining up to per-
form and the promise of a
few key surprises to liven up
the weekend.
"I think it's going to be the
coolest thing ever to look back
with my grandkids and go: 'I
was a part of that and I'm
proud of that. I'm not
ashamed of that,"' Clarkson
said in a recent interview.
Clarkson once said she was
a fan of Republican presiden-
tial candidate Ron Paul, but
she said she voted for Obama
twice. She'll perform "My
Country 'Tis of Thee" at
Obama and Vice President
Joe Biden's swearing in cere-
mony Monday after Obama
takes the oath of office.
"We came up with a really
cool arrangement for it and I
really love the lyrics," she
said.
Beyonce will sing the na-
tional anthem and James Tay-
lor will sing "America the
Beautiful" on the West Front
of the Capitol on Monday
Both performers are regular
Obama supporters, and
celebrities have been a big
part of Obama's strategy to at-
tract voters. Bruce Spring-
steen is a regular supporter,
as is Lena Dunham, Scarlett
Johansson, Jay-Z and dozens
of others.
Pop-rock trio fun., which
had a wild year with two No.
1 hits, a near-platinum album
and six Grammy nominations,
performed for first lady
Michelle Obama, Sasha and
Malia and Jill Biden on Satur-


day at the Kids' Inaugural
Ball.
"It's been amazing year, and
2013 is kicking off with us
doing the inauguration ... it's
just an incredible thing," lead
singer Nate Ruess said. "I
think the three of us care so
much about Obama and so to
be invited, I can't even deal."
Fun. will be joined at the
concert by Perry, Wonder,
Keys, Usher, Smokey Robin-
son, Paisley, Marc Anthony,
Mindless Behavior, Nick Can-
non and the cast of "Glee."
"I think they're all very tal-
ented people. Stevie's my
brother and so is Usher,"
Robinson said in an inter-
view. "I know Katy ... I'm very
happy to be performing
among them."
While there will be no
shortage of star power, it's not
quite a repeat of the 2009 in-
auguration when everyone
who's anyone flocked to
Washington for a televised
concert on the Mall.
The first time around, Bey-
once was a surprise guest,
singing the Etta James classic
"At Last" for the first dance.
Her husband, Jay-Z, was an-
other surprise at the private


staff ball, singing "99 Prob-
lems but George Bush Ain't
One." The Jonas Brothers -
then favorites of the Obama
girls performed at the kids'
concert and U2, Springsteen
and so many others per-
formed on the Mall.
There may still be surprises
in store, but plenty of per-
formances are assured. Keys,
Paisley, Chris Cornell, Jamie
Foxx, Jennifer Hudson and
Anthony will perform at the
Commander-in-Chief's Ball
on Monday
Will.i.am, who debuted the
song "New Day" at 2009's in-
auguration, will be at a num-
ber of events, including
OurTime.org's "General Now
Party" on Saturday, which
also includes John Legend
and Common. Eva Longoria
will host the "In Performance
at the Kennedy Center" event,
which celebrates Latino arts
and culture, and will feature
Antonio Banderas and
Rosario Dawson. And 25-year-
old pop party girl Ke$ha will
perform a charity concert
Monday
The Creative Coalition will
host parties Sunday and Mon-
day that are expected to in-
clude Eric Stonestreet,
Connie Britton, Taraji P Hen-
son, Melissa Leo and David
Arquette, among others.
Like will.i.am, soul crooner
Legend will attend multiple
events, including Russell Sim-
mons' Hip-Hop Inaugural
Ball II with 2 Chainz, Brandy
and Pharrell. BET also has a
ball that comedian-actor
Wayne Brady will host; per-
formers include Bell Biv
Devoe, Doug E. Fresh, MC
Lyte and Jermaine Dupri.
And Pharrell will host an
event late Monday that sup-
ports education.
Clarkson said she continues
to gush when she thinks about
all that's going on to celebrate
Obama's second term in
office.
"I'm excited to be a part of it
honestly I'm more stoked
about (it more) than maybe a
lot in my career," she said.


James Taylor, above left, Beyonce and Stevie Wonder will perform during the inaugural festivities
Monday after President Barack Obama is sworn in for his second term in Washington, D.C.


Today's HOROSCOPE
sensitive career matters. There's a strong chance you
could create an otherwise avoidable complication.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Instead of doing the
smart thing and bringing a problem out in the open,
you might make matters harder by suffering in silence.
You can't resolve what you won't face.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Friends will appreciate
you more if you make some kind of effort to hew to
the will of the majority. Regardless of how much better
your way is, go with the flow.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) It's important to keep a
sense of fair play in all your one-on-one relationships,
especially when involved with people who are being
unreasonable. Set an example that they will want to
follow.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Getting along with co-
workers might be a bit tougher than usual, so be care-
ful. By being too bossy or arrogant, you would only


shatter whatever structure has been holding things
together.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) If you find yourself in-
volved with someone who, in your opinion, is behav-
ing too wildly, protect your position at all times. Don't
go down with him or her.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) There is a good chance
that some petty annoyances could easily get blown
out of proportion by your mate or other family mem-
bers if things are not handled well. Keep a cool head.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) First and foremost,
be safety-conscious at all times when handling unfa-
miliar tools. If you find matters too much to handle,
don't hesitate to turn the entire project over to another.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) --You need to place
more importance on something of an aesthetic nature
than you do on anything material. If you do the oppo-
site, the price you'll pay will be severe.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 18
Mega Money: 11 14 26 39
Mega Ball: 7
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 5 $1,389
3-of-4 MB 45 $338
3-of-4 843 $53.50
2-of-4 MB 1,326 $23.50
1-of-4 MB 11,924 $2.50
2-of-4 26,715 $2
Fantasy 5: 2- 7 11 12-36
5-of-5 7 winners $33,175.66
4-of-5 455 $82
3-of-5 12,770 $8
THURSDAY, JANUARY 17
Fantasy 5:1 25 26 30 35
5-of-5 2 winner $105,829.97
4-of-5 207 $164.50
3-of-5 7,738 $12

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Jan. 20, the
20th day of 2013. There are 345
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Jan. 20, 1953, Dwight D.
Eisenhower took the oath of office
as president of the United States;
Richard M. Nixon was sworn in as
vice president.
On this date:
In 1265, England's first repre-
sentative Parliament, which in-
cluded officials from districts, cities
and boroughs, met for the first
time.
In 1649, King Charles I of
England went on trial, accused of
high treason (he was found guilty
and executed by month's end).
In 1887, the U.S. Senate ap-
proved an agreement to lease
Pearl Harbor in Hawaii as a naval
base.
In 1936, Britain's King George
V died; he was succeeded by
Edward VIII.
In 1942, Nazi officials held the
notorious Wannsee conference,
during which they arrived at their
"final solution" that called for
exterminating Jews.
In 1957, President Dwight D.
Eisenhower and Vice President
Richard Nixon were sworn in for
their second terms of office in a
private Sunday ceremony (a pub-
lic ceremony was held the next
day).
In 1961, John F. Kennedy was
inaugurated as the 35th President
of the United States.
In 1986, the United States ob-
served the first federal holiday in
honor of slain civil rights leader
Martin Luther King Jr.
Ten years ago: Secretary of
State Colin Powell, faced with stiff
resistance and calls for caution,
bluntly told the Security Council
that the U.N. "must not shrink"
from its responsibility to disarm
Saddam Hussein's Iraq.
Five years ago: The Los
Angeles Times announced its top
editor, James O'Shea, had been
fired after he rejected a manage-
ment order to cut $4 million from
the newsroom budget, 14 months
after his predecessor was also
ousted in a budget dispute.
One year ago: Six U.S.
Marines were killed in a helicopter
crash in Afghanistan's southern
province of Helmand. A rogue
Afghan soldier killed four French
troops.
Today's Birthdays: Country
singer Slim Whitman is 89. Come-
dian Arte Johnson is 84. Former
astronaut Buzz Aldrin is 83.
Olympic gold medal figure skater
Carol Heiss is 73. Singer Eric
Stewart is 68. Movie director David
Lynch is 67. Country-rock musi-
cian George Grantham (Poco) is
66. Actor Daniel Benzali is 63.
Rock musician Paul Stanley
(KISS) is 61. Rock musician lan
Hill (Judas Priest) is 61. Comedian
Bill Maher (MAR) is 57. Actor
Lorenzo Lamas is 55. Actor James


Denton is 50. Country singer John
Michael Montgomery is 48.
Thought for Today: "America
is great because she is good. If
America ceases to be good,
America will cease to be great." -
Alexis de Tocqueville, French au-
thor (1805-1859).












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Special to the Chronicle
The war on pot is failing, but criminologist Anthony Schembri said we should not give up the fight, as suggested by columnist Carl Hiaasen.





MARIJUANA

U.S. drug policy should be shaped by facts, not uninformed opinions


Editor's note: This column is
a rebuttal to Carl Hiasenii
column "War on pot -0o'es up m
smoke."

ANTHONY SCHEMBRI
Special to the Chnt id c
he "Don't" are d.\ im -
Yesterday's felonies
are today's niide-
meanors-today's nisde- .9
meanors are tomorrow, '-
offenses. We're not red i:- -#._
ing crime, we're legalizin-' "
it.
Carl Hiaasen wrote .nu
article called "War on pot
goes up in smoke." An irti: le
about marijuana that left out so,
much, I am compelled to fill in
the gaps in
his article.
I am a
criminologist. I
study crime as the
Radzinowicz profes-
sor of criminology)
criminal law and poli ce
science. I served j. lthe
deputy chief of the n.nrcotits
bureau in Brooklyn and repre-
sented the Internation.l N.r-
cotic Enforcement As,:, i.tion
at the United Nation, I \vent
through Serpico and the
French Connection.
In the world of criminology,
we demand evidence for our
opinions.
The problem with being a
criminologist is our studies
and research are sentenced to
filing cabinets and book-
shelves when they should af-
fect public policy
They don't. For example, a
Rand study called "Controlling
Cocaine: Supply Versus De-
mand Programs" and one by
the Institute for Defense
Analysis (IDA) called '"An Em-
pirical Examination of Coun-
terdrug Interdiction Program
Effectiveness" looked at the


They identified the cost
to reduce cocaine use by
1 percent as $750 million in-
ternationally, $550 mil-
lion nationally, $350
million locally and $34 mil-
lion on demand reduction. Yet
our strategies fund the first
three and little on demand re-
duction. Saddled by a Con-
gress so concerned with
appearing tough on crime it is
unwilling to analyze alterna-
tive approaches, the War on
Drugs will be 100 years old
since it began with the passage
of the Harrison Act in 1914.
We are doing the wrong
things with greater conviction.


especially professionals
with drug experience, recog-
nize the system is failing too
many, costing too much and
helping too few.
Mr Hiaasen's opinion is be-
cause a lot of people are smok-
ing it, we should legalize it.
Most apparent is what he left
out of his article, the uncon-
troverted medical effects of
marijuana. Let me fill in the
gaps.
When marijuana is smoked,
it influences pleasure, mem-
ory, thinking, concentration,
sensory and time perception
and coordinated movement.
Marijuana overwhelms the en-


docannabinoid system, caus-
ng tie high and other effects
iiees experience.
Medit :1 I research shows the
follmiiin. distorted percep-
tion,. Impaired coordination,
difttitiilt.\ with thinking and
problem solving, disrupted
le.rninn. and memory. Users
report lower life
satisfaction, poor
mental and physi-
,:al health, relation-
Oil ,hip problems and
less academic and ca-
reer success compared
to their peers who came
from i similar back-
) grounds.
Marijuana use is associ-
ated with a higher likelihood
of dropping out of school, in-
creased ab-
sences,
tardiness, acci-
dents, workers'
compensation claims
La nd job turnover. Mari-
iiana's adverse impact on
lea nin>11 and memory persists
after the acute effects of the
drii.. \e.jrs off. When mari-
.111ana ,ie begins in adoles-
cenc e. thlie effects may persist
for iu n.\ years. Regular mari-
juana use by young people can
have long-lasting negative im-
pact on the structure and func-
tion of their brains.
A recent study of marijuana
users who began using in ado-
lescence revealed a profound
deficiency in connections be-
tween brain areas responsible
for learning and memory Peo-
ple who began smoking mari-
juana heavily in their teens
lost as much as 8 points in IQ
between age 13 and 38. More
importantly, the lost cognitive
abilities were not restored in
those who quit smoking mari-
juana as adults.
See Page C3


Rush to quick settlement not best for county


Editor's note: This column is
in response to the Jan. 13
editorial "Utility tax issue needs
a settlement."
I promised the citizens of Cit-
rus County I would keep
them updated on the status of
the Duke litigation. Now, I find it
necessary to clear up misinfor-
mation presented in the Sunday,
Jan. 13, editorial titled "Utility
tax issue needs a settlement."
Four major points to consider:
Progress Energy/Duke sued
us, not the other way around.
I wonder whether the Editorial
Board is suggesting I don't de-
fend our taxpaying citizens?
My track record as property
appraiser during the past four
years has been to successfully set-
tle almost 50 multi-year lawsuits
with major corporations such as
Bright House, Winn-Dixie and Si-


mons Properties. In .
order to do that, there
must be two willing
parties. Without that,
the process will be
more difficult.
I stand committed to
negotiate in good faith
on behalf of Citrus
County so long as the
settlement is just and
fair to all taxpayers. Geoff
This case sets a PROI
precedent that must be APPR
carefully considered
given the millions of
dollars at stake and how chal-
lenges from other corporations
might follow its example.
Our citizens and taxpayers de-
serve public officials who will
fight to keep big corporate inter-
ests from pushing their way to un-
fair tax breaks, resulting in
pressure on the taxing authorities


Greene
PERTY
RAISER


like the county and the
school board to raise
property tax rates.
Progress
Energy/Duke receives a
return on investment
through their rate
based on pollution
equipment just like any
other equipment.
Legally, I believe, this
makes Progress/Duke
ineligible to receive the
tax break on its pollu-
tion-control equipment
Any course moving


forward must be in the best inter-
est of our citizens. I will establish
the values of all property owned
by Duke for the next four years,
and it is my hope there will be pos-
itive developments in this case, so
we can return to a normal working
relationship as soon as possible.
I do not intend, however, to


open up the pocketbooks of every
taxpayer in Citrus County to
higher taxes or subject them to
lower levels of county and school
board services, just to satisfy the
cries for a quick settlement. Sav-
ing a million dollars on a quick
settlement, while costing the
county and school board $16 mil-
lion in 2012 alone and, during the
next 30 years, $350 million is not
a good business decision.
Unlike the Citrus Memorial lit-
igation, which was a battle for
control and power, those finan-
cial consequences pale by com-
parison to what could happen to
our county if we don't defend
ourselves. This case is very dif-
ferent, involving the challenge
and defense of a value opinion as
dictated by Florida statutes. Cool
heads must prevail.


Page C4


Citizen


of Year


stands


test of


time
ast week, we
named Art Jones
of Crystal River as
our 2012 Citizen of the
Year.
Jones has led the vol-
unteer project to rake
the weeds out of King's
Bay and his efforts have
generated lots of volun-
teers, financial support
and public awareness.
And the really cool
thing is Jones and his
band of volunteers are
getting things done.
For the past 32 years,
the Chronicle has been
recognizing citizens who
have done outstanding
things in our community.
I believe our list has
stood the test of time.
Back in 1980, the Rev
Roger Shively of the
First United Methodist
Church in Homosassa
was our first recipient
for his leadership in the
creation of Citrus
United Basket. CUB,
based in Inverness, is
still one of the top non-
profit agencies in our
county all these years
later.
Dr Ed Dodge was our
Citizen of the Year in
1987. Dr. Dodge has
since retired and now
volunteers his time in
Africa, where he teaches
at a university to train
doctors who will stay
and work in their impov-
erished countries.
Dr Dodge still returns
to Citrus County and
teaches health courses
at College of Central
Florida in Lecanto. He
was the very first health
columnist for the Chron-
icle way back in the
early 1980s.
Steve Lamb and the
late Wilson Burns were
recognized in 1986 for
leading the effort to
start United Way That
organization is still
doing a great job in our
community.
Sam Tamposi won the
honor in 1983 for start-
ing Citrus Hills.
Curt Ebitz won in 1996
for starting Veteran's Ap-
preciation Week and for
all his work to protect
water in our community.
If you haven't noticed,
Curt is still a member of
the Chronicle's editorial
board today
Chet Cole of the Key
Training Center won the
honor in 1997. His or-
ganization continues to
grow and prosper under
his leadership.
The late Gary Maidhof
was honored in 1998 and
was still working hard to
benefit our community
just last year when he
died of a heart attack.
Stan Olsen built Black
Diamond and many
other first-class commu-
nities in Citrus County
He was honored in 1999.
One of my favorite
honorees was Judge
William E Edwards, the
local circuit court judge.
He ruled Citrus County
with an iron hand. He
one time grew tired of
all the burglaries in Cit-
rus County, so he an-
nounced from his
courtroom bench that


Page C3


p







Page C2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .......................publisher
H Mike Arnold ................ ................. editor
SCharlie Brennan ....................editor at large
Curt Ebitz ................... ........ citizen m ember
J Mac Harris ......................... citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ...... .................. guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ..................... ........ copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


GIVING BACK





Art Jones




empowers




community


Art Jones was selected
as the Citrus County
Chronicle's 2012 Citi-
zen of the Year for a whole lot
of good reasons.
Jones is the
founder and chief THE I
bottle washer THE I
with the One Citizen
Rake at a Time Ye
program and has
coordinated the OUR OP
volunteer effort to
rake lyngbya out Art Jones
of King's Bay in job c
Crystal River.
The effort began 15 months
ago behind Jones' home and
it has now spread throughout
the Crystal River area. More
than 350 volunteers have do-
nated their time to work with
Jones in the cleanup effort.
The Kings Bay Rotary Club
has used its muscle to sup-
port Jones and in the past six
months he has gained consid-
erable momentum. The Crys-
tal River City Council has
pumped money into the effort
and the county recently allo-
cated $225,000 to purchase a
mechanical harvester specif-
ically designed to assist in the
effort. Sen. Charles Dean (R-
Inverness) has backed Jones
and is trying to win financial
support from the Florida
Legislature.
For the past 10 years, all
sorts of scientific, govern-
ment and university groups
have studied the lyngbya in-
filtration into Crystal River.
Yet none have come up with
an action plan to fight it.
Many thousands of dollars
have been spent on studies
and they all sit on the book-
cases of those who completed
them.
Jones had a simple idea.
Clean the ugly weed from the
bottom of the bay and maybe
something good will happen.
Well, the fight has been long
and hard, but something good
is happening.
We can see sandy spots on
the bottom of the bay. Hun-
dreds of tons of lyngbya have
been removed from the water


Those who protect
You may not like guns and
choose not to own one.
That's your right. You (
may not believe in God.
That is your choice. How-
ever, if someone breaks
into your house with a
gun, the first two things f
you will do are call some-
one with a gun and pray
they get there in time. CAL
Deserving praise 563
I am calling about a
nice young (man) named
Robert from Kmart. He was the
only young man I want to give
credit for today, because I called
seven different stores looking for
the item and he's the only nice
young man (who) went and
looked for me to see if they had
it. And I think anybody (who)
takes time out of their busy


Ez
S


d


and suddenly fresh water
springs are flowing.
Seniors climb into the bay
with their rakes and stand
next to high school students.
YMCA volunteers
come out and pull
SSUE: heavy rakes of
of the lyngbya while
ar. working with
housewives they
'INION: might never have
met before-- soc-
gets the cer moms and
one. NRA dads. Some
volunteers come
in their expensive cars and
others on their well-used
bicycles.
They all have one thing in
common. They want to volun-
teer their time and
resources to help clean up
our environment.
Art Jones has done more
than just start a volunteer
clean-up effort. Art Jones has
empowered a community. He
has let individuals know they
can make a difference. He
has let the community know
we don't have to sit around
and wait until the bureau-
crats tell us the most expen-
sive solution for the problem.
He has put people to work.
And as stakeholders of the
clean-up, they are now em-
powered as agents of change
and agents of good. Art Jones
has helped people remember
what people in this country
have always known hard
work pays off. He has infused
us with optimism. In these
depressed economic times,
Art Jones and the One Rake
at a Time project have re-
minded us that we Americans
can still do great things.
The Chronicle is proud to
name Art Jones as our Citizen
of the Year for 2012. But all of
us send him thanks for put-
ting the can-do attitude back
into our community.
If we can come together to
clean up the lyngbya in
King's Bay and Crystal River,
we can do anything. Some-
times, we need to be re-
minded of that.


workday to look for something
for a customer deserves praise
and thank you.


-0579


Illegal signs
County commis-
sioners, more and
more illegal signs are
popping up all over
the county. Why does-
n't county code en-
forcement do their job
and stop this by hir-
ing the county em-
ployees (to) pick up
the signs and call the
phone numbers and


advise the people they are not
permitted and will be fined?
Where's our Keep Citrus County
Beautiful committee? Let's get
out there and work and help
keep Citrus County beautiful. No
more illegal signs. Someone
please help keep Citrus County
beautiful.


Standing up
to Goliath
Our government functions by
law. We elect our representa-
tives to create law. Laws are
there to keep us safe, protect
our environment, regulate
trade, etc. We expect our law-
makers to abide by the laws
they create.
Unfortunately, there are
times when those entrusted to
create and enforce the laws be-
lieve they can apply them as
they choose, rather than as in-
tended or required. When this
happens, sometimes a citizen is
willing to challenge govern-
ment through our court system
to force the just application of
the law. Often this appears like
a David-and-Goliath encounter.
Government has the lawyers,
staff and our tax dollars, while
the citizen only has his/her own
resources and tenacity to push
forward. This is the situation
one Citrus County resident has
found herself in.
Joanne Bartell has chal-
lenged the county and a devel-
oper, Halls River Development
The developer has proposed
and the county has approved an
approximate 11-acre site on the
Halls River It includes a
restaurant, 31 rental units, a
1,500-square foot caretaker res-
idence, boardwalks, boat
launch ramp and all the ameni-
ties commensurate with this
type of development The issue
is whether or not our county
land codes allow this type of de-
velopment, in this kind of loca-


"Morality is the custom of one's country
and the current feeling of one's peers."
Samuel Butler, 'Note-books' 1912


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Is torture morally right?


D oes torture
work? It is a
Bush-era de-
bate that has found -
Obama-era relevance
because of a new
movie, "Zero Dark
Thirty," in which tor-
ture seems to work
quite well.
The film, an Oscar Leona
nominee for Best Pic- OTI
ture, is being sold as VoI
a fact-based account-
ing of the 10-year
manhunt that led to the killing
of Osama bin Laden. In it, tor-
ture the waterboarding,
sleep deprivation, stress posi-
tions, hitting and humiliation
the U.S. government once anti-
septically dubbed "enhanced
interrogation" is depicted as
integral to the information
gathering that allowed the CIA
to find him.
That depiction has alarmed
some observers. Acting CIA Di-
rector Michael Morell recently
issued a statement to agency
employees in which he said the
film gives the impression these
brutal methods "were the key to
finding bin Laden. That im-
pression is false."
Actors Martin Sheen and Ed
Asner are so upset at that im-
pression they have reportedly
asked members of the motion
picture academy not to support
the film in Academy Awards
voting.
But torture still has its de-
fenders. Bush-era Attorney
General Michael Mukasey
penned an op-ed in the Wall
Street Journal in 2011 defend-
ing the harsh techniques be-
cause, he said, they produced
results. In a recent column,


rd Pitts
HER
ICES


George E Will went
so far as to quote
Jack Nicholson's fa-
mous "You can't han-
dle the truth!"
speech from "A Few
Good Men" about the
moral choices the
nation's defenders
are required to
make. Will, who
dubbed torture
"hard, but morally
defensible," failed to
mention Nicholson's


character ends up arrested and
disgraced.
Does torture work?
Beg pardon, but we have been
asking the wrong question.
What matters is not whether tor-
ture works. What matters is
whether torture is right
Consider: Mothers Against
Drunk Driving reports drunken
drivers kill almost 10,000 peo-
ple a year. That's three
Sept. 11s and then some. But if
you wanted to stop the carnage,
it would be simple. Just make
drunken driving a capital crime
with instant punishment. The
evidence -blood alcohol levels
- allows for scientific certainty
of guilt, so there'd be no need of
a long trial. We could execute
the miscreants within a day
Drunken driving would disap-
pear The new policy would solve
the problem. It would work
And if that were truly the ul-
timate rubric by which we de-
cided a question, there could be
no argument against it. But we
won't make drunken driving a
capital crime for one simple
reason. It would be wrong. In
fact, it would be repellent to our
values, inconsonant with the
kind of people we consider our-


selves to be.
That is the same reason tor-
ture unsettles the American
conscience and why addressing
that unease by debating its effi-
cacy misses the point. We are a
nation where human rights are
enshrined in law, a nation that
proudly, routinely lectures
other nations on the need to
close their gulags, free their
dissidents and treat human be-
ings as human beings.
We cannot be that nation and
yet this other nation that tor-
tures and then defends torture
because it works. Indeed, if that
were the only important metric,
what other things might we do,
condone or defend?
But it isn't the only important
metric.
In America, drunken drivers,
child rapists and even murder-
ers have rights. And though
those rights are sometimes in-
convenient, even incompatible
with justice, we honor them
anyway, because we realize the
nation's moral authority derives
precisely from the willingness
of the state to curb its own
power even when it has rea-
son to do otherwise, even when
doing otherwise might "work."
This is an obeisance power
makes to human freedom. On
the day it no longer does, it is
not just terrorists who will be in
trouble.
Power not constrained by hu-
manity is not constrained by
anything at all.

Leonard Pitts is a columnist
for the Miami Herald, 1 Herald
Plaza, Miami, FL 33132.
Readers may email him at
lpitts@miamiherald. com.


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


tion and the adverse environ-
mental impact it would have.
The county heard all of the
arguments and chose to ignore
their own regulations to ap-
prove it. Ms. Bartell, it ap-
pears, had no choice but take
the issue to court.
While this case was pending,
the developer filed a new site
plan, which appears to some to
be an obvious diversionary tac-


tic to sidestep Bartell's court
challenge.
On Jan. 4, 2013, the county
and the attorney for the devel-
oper moved to have the origi-
nal lawsuit voided, claiming it
was a moot issue because they
applied for a new permit Ms.
Bartell, who is not an attorney,
represented herself in court
and challenged the actions of
the developer's attorney and
the county The judge's ruling
is expected soon.
Some might believe our
elected officials are above re-
proach. Others believe people
(who) challenge government
are radicals and naysayers.
The truth is our laws can and
are bypassed at times for the
benefit of a few preselected
winners. Too much power in
the hands of a few is danger-
ous to our way of life.
People who are willing to
stand up to what they feel is
government run amuck is what
this country is all about Our
elected officials are not royalty
They are our elected represen-
tatives. It is their responsibility
to respect the citizenry and en-
sure the laws of the land are
equally applied to all, regard-
less of wealth or social standing.
We respect and commend
Joanne Bartell for reminding
us what this country is all
about. She has taken a stand
against Goliath for the benefit
of us all.
Theodora C. Rusnak
president
Citrus County Council


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Ju3r FSJ?A o0Ne VY w hdoMTHjiNc$ 6R4 V WVAT MAIAs YoO
fTHiNK M1 oK To 61AN Ti R RULS FRidRboNd?"


LETTER 1 to the Editor


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Grandkids would rather go to Uncle Gizmo's


we're no longer
kids, my
brother and I.
He's 71 and I'm 67.
I wouldn't say ours is *
a typical relationship
for brothers, but then,
how would I know?
I only have one
brother and what we
have is what we've Fred B
got. Camaraderie, A SL
closeness, love and
admiration. OF L
While we were
growing up, I never perceived
sibling rivalry or any sort of com-
petitive spirit other than when
we were playing ball with a
stuffed sock and a stick in the
backyard. I did, however, feel se-
cure when walking across a
street or a railroad track hand-
in-hand with my big brother


3r
&I
L
L


Some might think it
strange that as the
'HI second born, I was
named after our fa-
ther and as the oldest,
he wasn't. The gist of
this is when my
brother was born, our
mother was a few
days shy of her 18th
rannen birthday and Daddy
ICE was a few years older
Apparently, based on
-IFE modesty and even
though our mother
wanted to name her first son
Fred Jr, Daddy prevailed in his
insistence not to do so. They
agreed to name my brother after
my mother's brother, William.
When I was born four years
later, our mother had become
more than a girl; she had grown
into a rather strong-willed young


woman. This time, she won the
name game and I became our fa-
ther's namesake in spite of his
protests.
William and I see each other as
often as possible. Sometimes it's
difficult, because we've now be-
come medical piggy banks, which
means there are disrupting doc-
tor's appointments by the score.
Even so, we have vowed to
visit when we can so as not to
allow our only time together to
be when one of our relatives has
died and we're at a funeral. This
past year has been tough and
we've missed our monthly third
Thursday dinner date much too
often, but we were able to pull
off our annual holiday family get
together during the first week-
end after Christmas. We've done
this consistently for the past 20
years and the venue is alter-


nated one year they host, the
next year we do.
Their home is different than
ours not better, not worse, but
different They have a five-acre
yard with golf carts, tractors, a
dog and two sheds out back
filled with all sorts of mechani-
cal gadgets. My brother works
diligently to entertain our grand-
kids with his stuff and as a re-
sult, years ago one our
granddaughters aptly nick-
named him "Uncle Gizmo."
We have a house in town with
a considerably smaller yard, but
it isn't tiny There's a concrete
driveway which stretches for
some 300 feet in a circular con-
figuration and we have a garage
full of bicycles, scooters and
pedal cars for 'em to play with
on said driveway We also have a
full-bore Wi-Fi system and we


even have a Wii. It isn't as exotic,
but I think our place is equally
as entertaining as my brother's
gadget haven.
This year, when some of our
grandchildren heard the discus-
sion regarding the family gath-
ering and realized it was to be at
our house, without giving a mo-
ment's thought to their grand-
daddy's feelings, a very loud
protest went out, "We'd rather go
to Uncle Gizmo's!"
I suppose that's what happens
when you think there is no com-
petition your brother comes
along and whether intentionally
or accidentally, alienates your
grandchildren's affection!


Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


Banning weapons
bad idea
Leonard Pitts' gun ownership
views (Dec. 24) are far from factual.
"To take reasonable steps to en-
sure emotionally disturbed indi-
viduals and violent felons have no
access to guns" sounds like a
cure-all.
I would be interested in such
"steps" since it's already illegal
for a felon to own a gun and not
within firearms dealers' responsi-
bilities to determine who is emo-
tionally disturbed.
True, there are many who
should never own a gun. However,
criminals and those not-of-sound
mind who lose control and com-
mit horrific crimes, planned or at
random, will continue doing so.
Laws may disallow purchase of
the AK-47, AR-15 and automatic
weapons with larger round clips,
but no law will stop those deter-
mined to take lives, be it with bul-
lets, bombs, knives, razors, pipes,
hammers and even fists.
Cokie and Steven Roberts (Dec.
22) absurdly compare gun control
laws to "speed limit or drunken
driving laws." Gun ownership and
usage laws are in place and the ma-
jority of citizens obey them. I don't
know why some want fully auto-
matic firearms. I don't know why we
have cars able to travel 150 mph,
why marijuana is illegal and alco-
hol is not; or why it's OK to murder
an unborn child but not legal to
prostitute. Laws are not to punish


but to protect We are certainly enti-
tled to our personal views.
As Americans, we have the right
to bear arms, to be gun owners,
hunters and competitors. We who
enjoy, collect and use firearms, will
never give up our privileges and
rights. We will legally bear arms
and help in the fight to disarm and
punish those who abuse them. We
will stay strong and ban together
for the good of all Americans and
we will always let freedom ring.
Joanie Welch
Inverness

Neighborhood patrols
working
Citrus County Sheriff's Office: I
think the sheriff's office is doing a
fine job around our neighborhood,
besides the Crime Watch Patrol
that is supposed to be organized to
keep a watch out for any involved
activities. I don't think it takes one
person to take credit for every-
thing through the years. It is the
community that tries to keep the
neighborhood safe from any type
of crime, drug activities, theft,
trespassing on properties, etc.
Let's give the sheriff's office
and Crime Watch Patrol credit
and keep them driving around in
whatever vehicles to keep our
neighborhoods safe. We need
more watching. Keep up the good
work!
Dorraine Baltzell
Lecanto


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

anyone convicted of burglary
in our county would automat-
ically spend a year in the
county jail.
The burglary rate suddenly
went way down. Funny how
that works.
Judge Edwards also grew
sick and tired of our county
commission (imagine that) be-
cause the jail was so small in-
mates were being let out
before their sentences were
completed. There were not
enough cells at the jail.
The judge called the sheriff
and all the county commis-
sioners to his courtroom and
ordered them to immediately
turn the county auditorium at
the fairgrounds into a tempo-
rary jail. If they failed to act,
the judge told them he would
find room for them in a jail.
They quickly got the job
done.
Judge Edwards is retired
and lives in Rainbow Springs,
where he can still be seen
playing golf a couple of times
a week.
The late Pete DeRosa was
honored in 2003. He led the
community effort to build
Seven Rivers hospital in Crys-
tal River. And yes, the com-
munity of DeRosa is named
after him.
Father James Hoge was
honored in 1991. He only
started every Catholic Church
in Citrus County and the
Catholic elementary school in
Lecanto. Father Hoge still vis-
its Citrus County regularly
from his retirement base at St.
Leo University
William Bunch, who still
runs Oyster's Restaurant in
Crystal River, was honored in
1993 for a single act of
courage. William's brother
had been shot and killed dur-
ing a confrontation with a
Crystal River police officer
and our community was ready
to erupt into violence. William
came forward and faced down
those who were ready to ex-
plode. His intervention pre-
served the peace.
Ginger West was recognized
in 1990 and she continues to


2011- Jewel Lamb
2010- Paul Mellini
2009- Brown Dumas Jr.
2008- Lace Blue-McLean
and Andy Houston
2007- Barbara Mills
2006-Jean Grant
2005 Mike and Kautia
Hampton
2004 Aaron Weaver
2003 Pete DeRosa
2002 Don Sutton
2001 Leroy Bellamy
2000 Ron and Beverly
Drinkhouse
1999- Stan Olsen
1998 Gary Maidhof
1997 Chet Cole
1996 Curt Ebitz
1995 Laura Lou
Fitzpatrick and
John Lettow
1994 Peggy and Dave
Pattillo
1993 Ray Darling and
William Bunch

lead the Family Resource
Center in Hernando today.
She is still as cantankerous as
she was back in 1990, and I say
that with much respect.
Aaron Weaver of Inverness
gave his life when his plane
was shot down in Iraq. He sur-
vived the Black Hawk Down
incident and had to beg mili-
tary officials to let him serve
again after fighting off cancer.
Thousands of people lined
the streets of Citrus County
when his body was returned
to Citrus High School for a
memorial service. He won the
Citizen of the Year honors in
2004.
Ruth Levins, Avis Craig,
Annie Johnson, Ray Darling,
Laura Lou Fitzpatrick, John
Lettow are all still familiar
names to us.
There were couples who
won the honor. Hank and
Miriam Cohen won in 1981 for
starting up the first environ-
mental group in the county;
Bob and Mary England won
for their leadership of United
Way; Peggy and Dave Pattillo


1992 Avis Craig
1991 Annie W. Johnson
and Father James
C. Hoge
1990 Ginger West
1989 David Langer and
Phil Zellner
1988 Bob and Mary
England
1987 Dr. Ed Dodge
1986 Wilson Burns and
Steve Lamb
1985 Comprehensive
Plan Advisory
Board: Charles
Miko, David Walker,
Dixie Hollins, Tom
Franklin, Rick
Rollason, Robert
Henigar and Clark
Stillwell
1984 Ruth Levins
1983 -Sam Tamposi
1982 -Judge William F
Edwards
1981 Hank and Miriam
Cohen
1980 The Rev. Roger Shively

won in 1994 for starting the ef-
fort to revitalize down town
Inverness; Ron and Beverly
Drinkhouse in 2000 for their
leadership efforts to restore
the county courthouse. (And
yes, Ron is our famous wine
columnist).
The more recent winners
are names still very familiar.
Jewel Lamb, Paul Melini,
Brown Dumas, Lace Blue
McLean and Andy Houston.
We don't award the recogni-
tion lightly and we are fortu-
nate each year there are
numerous nominees who are
deserving.
The list of winners is a
"Who's Who" of Citrus County
who made good things
happen.
We believe Art Jones and
his efforts will also stand that
test of time.


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him at
gmulligan@chronicle
online.com.


DRUG
Continued from Page C1

Marijuana use has a va-
riety of adverse, short-
and long-term effects, es-
pecially on cardiopul-
monary and mental
health. It raises heart rate
by 20 percent to 100 per-
cent shortly after smok-
ing; users have a 4.8-fold
increase in the risk of
heart attack in the first
hour after smoking. In-
creased heart rate of
smokers causes palpita-
tions and arrhythmias.
A recent analysis of
data from several studies
found marijuana use
more than doubles a dri-
ver's risk of being in an
accident. Marijuana
smoke is an irritant to the
lungs, and smokers can
have the same respiratory
problems experienced by
tobacco smokers, such as
daily cough and phlegm
production, more fre-
quent acute chest illness,
and a heightened risk of
lung infections. A number
of studies have shown an
association between
chronic marijuana use
and mental illness.
High doses of mari-
juana can produce a tem-
porary psychotic reaction
(involving hallucinations
and paranoia) in some
users, and using mari-
juana can worsen the


course of illness in pa-
tients with schizophrenia.
A series of large prospec-
tive studies also showed a
link between marijuana
use and later develop-
ment of psychosis.
Associations have also
been found between mar-
ijuana use and other men-
tal health problems such
as depression, anxiety,
suicidal thoughts among
adolescents and personal-
ity disturbances, includ-
ing a lack of motivation to
engage in typically re-
warding activities.
Marijuana use during
pregnancy is associated
with increased risk of
neurobehavioral prob-
lems in babies. Because
THC and other com-
pounds in marijuana
mimic the body's own
cannabinoid like chemi-
cals, marijuana use by
pregnant mothers may
alter the developing en-
docannabinoid system in
the brain of the fetus.
Consequences for the
child may include prob-
lems with attention, mem-
ory and problem solving.
Finally, marijuana use
has been linked in a few
recent studies to an in-
creased risk of an aggres-
sive type of testicular
cancer in young men.
Although many have
called for the legalization
of marijuana to treat con-
ditions including pain
and nausea caused by


HIV/AIDS, cancer and
other conditions, the sci-
entific evidence to date is
not sufficient for the mar-
ijuana plant to gain FDA
approval, for two main
reasons.
First, there have not
been enough clinical tri-
als showing marijuana's
benefits outweigh its
health risks in patients
with the symptoms it is
meant to treat. The FDA
requires carefully con-
ducted studies in large
numbers of patients (hun-
dreds to thousands) to ac-
curately assess the
benefits and risks of a po-
tential medication.
Second, to be consid-
ered a legitimate medi-
cine, a substance must
have well-defined and
measureable ingredients
consistent from one unit
(such as a pill or injec-
tion) to the next. This con-
sistency allows doctors to
determine the dose and
frequency. As the mari-
juana plant contains hun-
dreds of chemical
compounds that may have
different effects and vary
from plant to plant, its use
as a medicine is difficult
to evaluate. However,
THC-based drugs to treat
pain and nausea are al-
ready FDA approved and
prescribed, and scientists
continue to investigate
the medicinal properties
of cannabinoids.
Contrary to common be-


lief, marijuana is addic-
tive. Estimates from re-
search suggest about 9
percent of users become
addicted to marijuana;
this number increases
among those who start
young (to 17 percent, or 1
in 6) and among daily
users (to 25 percent to 50
percent). Thus, many of
the nearly 7 percent of
high school seniors who
(according to annual sur-
vey data) report smoking
marijuana daily or almost
daily are well on their
way to addiction, if not al-
ready addicted (besides
functioning at a sub-opti-
mal level all of the time).
Long-term marijuana
users trying to quit report
withdrawal symptoms in-
cluding irritability, sleep-
lessness, decreased
appetite, anxiety and
drug craving, all of which
can make it difficult to re-
main abstinent.
Now, let me inform you
and others about some-
thing that has not gained
a lot of media attention.
The potency of marijuana
is increasing. The amount
of THC in marijuana sam-
ples confiscated by police
has been increasing
steadily throughout the
past few decades. In 2009,
THC concentrations in
marijuana averaged close
to 10 percent, compared
to 4 percent in the 1980s.
For a new user, this may
mean exposure to higher


concentrations of THC,
with a greater chance of
an adverse or unpre-
dictable reaction. In-
creases in potency may
account for the rise in
emergency department
visits involving marijuana
use. For experienced
users, it may mean a
greater risk for addiction
if they are exposing them-
selves to high doses on a
regular basis.
However, the full range
of consequences associ-
ated with marijuana's
higher potency is not well
understood. What is un-
derstood is every penny
spent on buying mari-
juana puts a bullet in a
Mexican gun or corrupts a
police officer.
Mr. Hiaasen may be
happy to learn Mexico's
president, commenting on
legalizing marijuana and
in response to Washington
and Colorado legislation,
said "this could bring us
to rethink our strategy
on legalization about
legalization."
He forgot 60,000 of his
citizens were murdered
over the past five years
because of his drug traf-
fic. So 79 percent of Mexi-
cans oppose legalization
compared to 50 percent of
Americans who oppose
legalization.
Uruguay's parliament
passed a sweeping pot le-
galization measure, but
President Mujia asked


them to wait because the
public is against it. The
2009 Criminal Justice
Transition Coalition,
which includes The Sen-
tencing Project and 20
other prominent national
organizations, released a
collaborative report iden-
tifying critical needs for
federal policy reform.
Smart on Crime: Recom-
mendations for the Next
Administration and Con-
gress contains compre-
hensive policy
recommendations at
every stage of the justice
system for the new
administration and
Congress.
They have failed to act
on it.
Mr. Hiaasen the wealth
of this country is not in its
banks, it's in its justice,
ethics, integrity and peo-
ple. Why would we sub-
ject our people to the
medical effects of this
drug?
I am just as disappointed
as you are about our fed-
eral strategy's failure to
fix this problem. Use your
paper's power to shape
our culture and convene
people together on this
issue. Don't proselytize.


Dr Anthony J. Schembri
is a Radzinowicz
professor of criminology,
criminal law and police
science, with the
University of Florida.


Past Chronicle Citizens of the Year


Letters to THE EDITOR


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C CUND Cash, check only please


CAL

563-0579


I"% %Fqwm NNW


have the voting process for that.
Our founding fathers did not mean
we were to take muskets or assault
weapons to institute a new govern-
ment. It's called the voting process.
Thank the Lord for it.
Play it loud
I think it's funny the person (who)
called in complaining about the
commercials (being) too loud. The
louder the commercials are, the
quicker I hit my mute button and
I'm sure I'm not the only one. So
they can play it as loud as they want.


Churches stepping up
I'd like to reply to "Help for the
homeless" in today's paper (Jan.
12). I'd like to say the churches are
actually stepping up to the plate as
far as the homeless. I don't know if
you've noticed in the food banks,
most of the food banks are started
in the churches and the money is
being gathered by either people
working for it or people donating it
to the homeless banks. They also
provide clothing and they provide
other services like driving people


places. So the churches (are) really
stepping up to the plate. The plate
needs to be stepped up to by our
government.
Feed the hungry
Instead of bickering over
nonessential issues like the port
and redevelopment of downtown
Crystal River during these tough
economic times, I really wish our
local politicians would focus their
energy, time, money on feeding the
hungry, housing the homeless and
educating our children.


COUNTY
Continued from Page C1

No one stumbled into
this lawsuit. We are defen-
dants by Duke's choice.
Our financial crises is by
Duke's design, and any
failure of this community
to maintain unity in de-
fending this case will set a
precedent for other corpo-
rations in the future.
While profiting one tax-
payer, it will be costly to all
of the citizens of Citrus
County for many years. The
message will be: If you are
large enough and influen-
tial enough, you can file a
lawsuit and get an immedi-
ate discount on your prop-
erty taxes, without any
opportunity for the normal
due diligence on the part of
the property appraiser in
reviewing your claim.
As property appraiser, it
is my responsibility to
place a just value on all
property in Citrus County.
In doing so, the need to be
equitable among taxpayers
is of the greatest impor-
tance and that means treat-
ing large and small alike.
The information is false


indicating the property ap-
praiser representatives
who attended the recent
Orlando meeting with
Duke did not go prepared
to negotiate. School board
representatives attended
the meeting and can verify
we made a good-faith effort
to try to arrive at a settle-
ment. This was our first
meeting, not our last, I
would certainly hope. I
came prepared to listen,
and we did negotiate and
we did not close the door to
future negotiations or
meetings. As the lead per-
son for the county's inter-
ests, I can assure you no
one on my team created an
obstacle to settlement dur-
ing this meeting.
To clarify, the county
representatives who trav-
eled to St. Petersburg in
May did not go there to ne-
gotiate a tax bill. It was to
begin advance financial
planning for the next three
to five years by the county
based on the utility com-
pany's plans. The meeting
in St. Petersburg on May
16, 2012, was specifically
held to discuss the future
of CR-3 and how the as-
sessments could be af-
fected in future tax year


values not taxes. This
meeting was held prior to
the property appraiser's
scheduled May 25 meeting
with the Progress Energy
tax department concerning
the 2012 assessment. No
top Progress Energy corpo-
rate leadership, appraisers
or tax department staff
with knowledge of the val-
uation facts were present
May 16. The Progress En-
ergy public relations staff
present had never been di-
rectly involved in the nego-
tiations in the past. This
meeting was scheduled to
avoid exactly what we are
now facing.
There has been no break-
down in communication
between my office and tax
officials at Duke. In fact, we
are working cooperatively
to arrange for a field in-
spection of the very assets
of which they are now ques-
tioning values. I had sev-
eral conversations with the
vice president of tax last
week. Results of data col-
lection, voluntary exchange
of information while per-
forming the 2013 appraisal
work may also be helpful in
arriving at a settlement for
2012.
Additional discussions


will continue to take place
as areas of compromise
can be identified, explored
and calculations are re-
viewed and validated. It
will be extremely difficult
to develop the needed
trust between Citrus
County and Progress En-
ergy/Duke, if false or mis-
leading information
concerning these negotia-
tions continues to be com-
municated as fact.
Your statement "Always
in contention in Citrus
County has been a local de-
cision to tax pollution-con-
trol equipment at the
power plant site; this is not
done in the other 67 coun-
ties" was not accurate. Pol-
lution control has not
always been in contention.
A mutually agreed upon
settlement for 14 years
does not equal "always in
contention."
The facts are:
Citrus County has 80
percent of the pollution-
control equipment of the
entire Progress Energy 37-
county system.
100 percent of the pol-
lution stays in Citrus
County.
Citrus generated 31.5
percent of the entire sys-


them's energy, but Citrus
County only receives 15
percent of the systemwide
property tax value.
That's why the issue is so
important here. The
judge's ruling in 1998 did
not affect just Citrus
County, but technically all
five counties that make up
Circuit Court District 5
(Citrus, Marion, Lake,
Sumter and Hernando
counties). If the power
company intended to chal-
lenge that ruling, they
could have done so then. In
order to take away the
force of decision, they
could have appealed to a
higher court. But they did
not. Therefore, the treat-
ment of pollution control
remains a key factor here
with which I am obliged to
work.
The property appraiser
and interveners have filed
counterclaims that may re-
sult in Duke being ordered
by the court to pay the en-
tire 2012 tax bill. These
claims have not yet been
heard by a judge. It is very
early in the litigation.
An official announce-
ment as to the judge as-
signed is expected shortly
Even if there is a settle-


ment by the parties, it will
still require the approval
of the court, including the
validity of their good faith
payment of $19 million.
Sunday's published
opinion suggests we should
rush to settlement, negoti-
ate from a weak position
and get a deal, to put this
"problem" behind us. I
also am not for dragging
this out any longer than is
necessary This opinion
shows little regard for the
rest of the taxpayers in Cit-
rus County who will pick
up the tab (and not just for
the litigation).
To reach a successful ne-
gotiation and settlement
for 2012 and future years
requires the experts com-
pleting their analysis and
appraisal so the citizens of
Citrus County can be ade-
quately represented in this
matter. Only then, can I as-
sure the long-term inter-
ests of our citizens have
been protected. I am not
willing to sacrifice the citi-
zen's interest by acting in
haste.


Geoff Greene is the Citrus
County Property
Appraiser


y Monday es~tu y Wednesday Thursday .:


2nd Annual

T est ocit ^ifest
an adoption extravaganza


February 2,2013
9 a.m.to 3 p.m.
Citrus County Auditorium



-Pet Rescues -Groomers
-Veterinarian -Food Cart


C RWp 1 E Citrus County Animal Services
000DNNJ Humanitarians of FL., Inc.





HATS OFF T .,'

SPRING FASHION.?.

You are invited to the
15TAnnual Key Training Center
Fashion Show and Tea

Sunday, February 10
2-4 p.m.
S Chet Cole Life Enrichment Center
Key Training Center, Lecanto

Tickets are $30
-$25 if you wear a hat!
Prizes for
MOST BEAUTIFUL HAT
MOST CREATIVE HAT
TABLE WITH THE BEST
COLLECTION OF HATS

Fashions provided by Belk
8 Key Center Thrift Stores.

r Please call 795-5541 Ext 311 for
--1 IJ- L tickets or for more information.


Friday, January 25th Doors
open at 11:00 AM
I Fashions by Bealls. For tickets call
382-3151 or 382-1848


All through January
Children's POW Camps
For more information call the museum at
352-341-6427 from 10 a.m.to 4 p.m.

January 20th
Art Center Theater "Nunsense"
Call the box office for tickets or more information at
352-746-7606 or visit www.citruscountyartcenter.com.

January 20th
Saturday 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Sunday 9 a.m.- 4 p.m.
Florida Manatee Festival
For more information call 352-795-1921
or visit www.citruscountychamber.com

January 20th 1 p.m. 3p.m.
Zumbathon for Precious Paws Rescue
For more Information call: 352-419-4124.

January 25th
10 a.m.- 12:30 p.m.
Lu the Hippo's Birthday
For more information call 352-628-5343.

January 25th 9am
Early Childhood Expo
Free Admission
For more information call 352-746-2020.

January 25th 9am
Friends, Fashion & Fun Fashion Show
For more information call 352-382-1848.

January 25th 26th
Truckand
Tractor Pull
For more information visit
www.citruscountyfair.com/tractor.html
or call 352-726-2993.

January 26th
Books and Beyond Book Festival
Call 352-634-4216 for more information
or for ticket reservations.

January 26th 9 a.m.
Rotary Club of Sugarmill Woods
Golf Tournament
Call 352-382-7706 for more information.

January 26th 11:30 a.m.
Bunco Bash Event
Call 563-5994 for more information

January 26th 7 p.m.
Night with an Author
3rd Annual Festival of Books


C4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013


COMMENTARY


ODT1C


I recently went to two doctors ...
who refused my debit or credit
cards cash or check only, they
said. I hope this is not going to be
a trend. I use my credit and debit
cards because of the ease of keep-
ing my bank accounts.
Use vote to make changes
Just one comment to the letter to
the editor, "Opposes assault
weapon ban:" To alter, abolish or
institute new government, sir, we












BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY


CHRONICLE


Surviving side effects


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Associated Press
Joe Brasco and his wife, Ann Marie Brasco, of New Jersey Limo Bus & Limousine, had to scramble as two of the company's seven full-
time employees called in sick with the flu at the same time. But the Brascos have managed to find substitutes for their small business.


Outbreak offlu epidemic particularly bad for small businesses


JOYCE M. ROSENBERG
AP business writer

NEW YORK The flu sea-
son has created a scramble for
New Jersey Limo Bus &
Limousine.
Two of the company's seven
full-time employees called in
sick at the same time. They
were in charge of maintaining
and cleaning the limos and
buses. Two part-time drivers
also called in sick.
"It's very difficult to get
things done," said Ann Marie
Brasco, owner of the Fairfield,
N.J., firm.
The epidemic is giving small
businesses across the country
their own case of the flu. Pro-
ductivity is suffering, meetings
and conference calls are being
canceled as employees call in
sick and owners are getting
nervous as project deadlines
approach. Workers who are
still healthy are stepping in to
cover for absent colleagues,
and owners are looking out-
side their companies for
backup help. Larger compa-
nies also are strained, but the
situation is tougher on small
businesses because they're
thinly staffed after holding off
on hiring since the recession.
Brasco and her husband,
Joe, have managed to find sub-
stitutes when workers have
called in sick. But with the flu
rampant in New Jersey, they're
recruiting more backup driv-
ers. It's not a simple process -
drivers have to be licensed to
drive a limo, and they have to
pass drug and background
tests.
If all else fails, the Brascos
have to sub for their workers.
When a driver called in sick dur-
ing the flu season last year, Joe
Brasco put on a tux and drove a
Rolls-Royce for a wedding.
The Brascos are taking other
precautions -limos and buses
are being scrubbed down each
time they are used.
"It's an enclosed cabin with
everyone breathing in the same


The Brascos, of New Jersey Limo Bus & Limousine, prepare a Rolls Royce in Fairfield, N.J.


air," Ann Marie Brasco said.
The company has already
lost some business because of
the flu. One family that hired a
bus for their daughter's 16-
year-old birthday party had to
cancel. The Brascos didn't
charge the family, but instead
gave them a credit for a future
rental.
At Preapps.com, three of the
company's 10 workers were
out sick with the flu at the
same time. It was particularly
bad timing-the Boston-based
mobile applications company
is preparing for a product
launch Jan. 24.
Owner Sean Casto said the
flu has wreaked havoc in other
ways, as well.
"It's not just our team. It's
other companies that we're
trying to have potential meet-
ings with we've had to delay
meetings," Casto said.
Staffers worked from home
as much as they could one of
the big silver linings in a com-
pany whose work revolves
around computers. But pro-


ductivity is still suffering,
Casto said.
Researchers at Pepperdine
University said small busi-
nesses are taking a bigger hit
from the flu than larger com-
panies. Preliminary results of
a survey under way now show
smaller companies are experi-
encing a greater loss of pro-
ductivity and higher costs from
the epidemic, said Craig
Everett, associate director of
Pepperdine's Private Capital
Markets Project, which is con-
ducting the survey
"One possible explanation is
that small firms were already
stretched thin by the recession
and are now essentially play-
ing the game without a bench,"
Everett said. "Small busi-
nesses may be less capable of
covering for their sick employ-
ees, resulting in a more nega-
tive impact on output."
At many companies, when
someone is out sick, it leaves a
heavier workload for the
healthy workers still on the
job.


Five of the eight workers in
Katherine Roepke's
Minneapolis-based public re-
lations firm, Roepke Public
Relations, were out sick last
Friday. The company was al-
ready short-staffed because
Roepke had been holding off
on making two new hires while
she tried to get a sense of how
business would be this year.
The three people who were
at work took on the projects
sick co-workers had been han-
dling. Roepke, who doesn't
usually write press releases,
wrote them in her staffers'
absence.
Coping with the absences
hasn't been as bad as it could
be. Roepke has long had a pol-
icy of training staffers so they
can easily substitute for one
another.
"We're dealing with so many
deadlines. It's important that
anyone can step in and do any-
thing. That has helped us dur-
ing this time," she said.

See Page D4


Nonprofits deserve same business treatment


Nonprofit organiza- principles of nonprofit or-
tions are busi- ganization management.
nesses, Periodic review
too! The reality of basic docu-
is they should ments, opera-
be operated tional and
with the same management
business-like practices is cru-
discipline as cial to contin-
their for-profit ued success.
brethren. Their Periodic review
success de- by nonprofit
pends on it. Dr. Frederick professionals
The manag- Dr. Fredenck can reveal and
ing of, or volun- Herzog help prevent
steering for, a NONPROFIT mission creep
nonprofit or- BRIEFS and the least ex-
ganization is pected and un-
challenging. It requires a wanted scrutiny from state
focused dedication to the or federal agencies. Loss


of grant funding can easily
occur when the nonprofit
begins to operate outside
its original confines. Gov-
ernmental agencies do
monitor nonprofits and
have enforcement powers
over nonprofits.
Review Services
The Nonprofit Re-
source Center is offering a
review of all organiza-
tional documents, both
state and federal. This
evaluation process can re-
veal informational items
government agencies may
question. An audit can
crop up at any time in the


life of a nonprofit organi-
zation. The agencies con-
cerned can pull audit
even years after approval
and permission to operate
as a nonprofit. Best prac-
tices indicate a review is
important to guard
against a negative out-
come resulting from
agency reviews.
Documentation
Federal and state ap-
proval of origination docu-
ments give life to and
permission for nonprofits
to operate in their realm of
service. These bureaus
can permit a nonprofit's


state and federal tax ex-
empt status. They can also
take it away when a
breach on the part of the
nonprofit is discovered.
The IRS is on the watch
for infractions of the tax
exemption. They can initi-
ate an audit when they
sense a nonprofit is gener-
ating income earned out-
side of their exemption.
That revenue is called un-
related-business income.
It represents income in-
consistent with the pur-
pose of the tax exemption
that was granted.


Page D4


Betting


on gold,


silver
Dear Bruce: I have
about $650,000 in
various cash in-
vestments (mutual
funds, bonds, etc.). I am
56 years old. I am think-
ing of adding gold or sil-
ver to my portfolio. What
do you think about gold
and silver as an invest-
ment? I know they have
performed well, but
what is your opinion of
their growth moving
forward?
Thanks for being
there! I never miss a
show. B.P, via email
Dear B.P: You are cor-
rect gold has performed
well about a 7 percent
return over the last
year That's not a spec-
tacular gain, but if all of
your investments were
earning 7 percent, I
think you would be
pleased.
I still consider gold a
speculation rather than
an investment It has sev-
eral things going for it,
including the idea it has
intrinsic value and it will
always be worth some-
thing. However, it pays
no interest. Gold must be
stored in a secure place,
and its price can rise and
fall as a result of world
events that may not even
catch your attention
until it is too late.
Despite that, I have no
quarrel with investing a
small percentage of your
portfolio in gold, pro-
vided you take posses-
sion of the gold coins or
bars.
The problem with sil-
ver is its relatively low
price. Gold may be worth
40 to 50 times as much
per ounce as silver, so
the storage space re-
quired for silver would
be considerably greater,
whether it's junk silver,
silver dollars or some-
thing similar.
My maximum expo-
sure for precious metals
would be 5 percent to 10
percent of your portfolio.
This is more of a hedge
than it is a straight
investment.
Dear Bruce: I am writ-
ing to disagree with your
stance about parents
treating their children
differently in their es-
tate. This is a great way
to create resentment
and guarantee disagree-
ments that might last the
lifetime of your children.
In many cases (and I
can name numerous ex-
amples in my small cir-
cle), one child has
worked hard, sacrificed
good times to get a de-
gree and a good job and
is successful. The other
has goofed off, worked
low-paying jobs, has not
saved and is not success-
ful. So now let's reward
the irresponsible behav-
ior and give the slackers
more to even it out?
Certainly if one of the
children had an illness
or other circumstance
beyond his or her con-
trol, and if the other chil-
dren were aware and in
agreement, there maybe
some exception to this
rule. But generally, it's
best to keep it equal.
Keeping track of money
"loaned" to be recon-
ciled from the estate is a
great way to further re-
duce the family tension
during that difficult
time. Unfortunately, de-
spite our best intentions,
See .Page D5






i[* Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


Scan this:



numberr connectionnD2
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Seagrass Waterfront embraces past, looks to future


Like many of us, Basil
Green worked most of his
life. Then he retired.
He continued to enjoy
time spent at Seagrass Pub
and Grill. He loved the
natural, peaceful beauty of
Buzzard Bay, the gorgeous
sunsets and watching the
manatee, otters, ospreys
and bald eagles. Retire-
ment would be good. Basil
and Beverly Plein would
go with friends to Sea-
grass, pull tables together
for the group and enjoy the
entertainment. Then Sea-
grass fell into disrepair
and closed.
Then Basil and Beverly
had a dream, one that
comes to fruition in Janu-
ary 2013. Their dream was
to give rebirth to the Sea-
grass, maintaining the his-
tory of the original 1960s
facility but in a new image.
Primary was to retain the
tiki bar "attitude" and ex-
pand the dining capabili-
ties, as well as provide for
the boaters who are con-
sistently pulling up for
refreshments.
But where to start? The
buildings were in disre-
pair, the land was over-
grown and there were
issues with sanitation and
drainage. To others, the
hurdles might have
seemed insurmountable,
but not to Basil and Bev-
erly They got right down to
business.
They knocked down both
buildings of the original
Seagrass. They hooked
into the sewer system,
complied with all county
and state codes, raised the
ground 3.5 feet above flood
stage, and built a new boat
launch for their customers.
Basil and Beverly put in
hours of time and attention
to detail, not to mention
millions of dollars. The tiki
bar remained open during
construction, and Rudy's
BBQ assisted with some
basic food service.
"This is exactly the type
of investment Citrus
County needs," says Josh
Wooten, President and
CEO of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce.
"Not only does it provide
our residents and visitors
with another fantastic op-
tion for waterfront enter-
tainment and enjoyment,
its creation contributed to
cleaning up an outstand-
ing waterway while im-
proving the economy with
the employment of more
than 60 people."
It would be a disservice
to call this investment a
renovation or a rebuild. It
is truly a re-creation.
The private boat launch
for customers and guests


a^'?~ B;'
tea~i -


. A


The parota table for large groups is the piece de resistance of the dining room at
Seagrass Waterfront, conveniently located by the dance floor.


has been moved to one
side of the facility, allow-
ing for a continuous dock
and seating/dining across
the front of the building.
The new boat docks offer
slips for 30 boats. There
are about two dozen fully
furnished rental units,
ranging from one to four
bedrooms, all with full
kitchens and three of
them directly on the river
Assistant Karen Shaffer
manages the guest units
and will be happy to
schedule your stay You
may call Karen regarding
rental units at 352-503-
6808.
From just over 1,000
square feet to now 6,500
square feet, there is seat-
ing for 300 and you may
choose from outside,
screened in or indoors.
The popular tiki bar, boast-
ing a fresh thatch roof, an-
chors one corner of the
building and is easily ac-
cessible to those sitting on
the docks. Although calling
it a tiki bar is a bit mis-
leading, as that only refers
to its appearance. The full
bar inside that supplies
the tiki bar comes stocked


with 20 different draft
beers from around the
world. The line of taps
takes up most of the back
of the bar and is un-
matched anywhere in Cit-
rus County. The eclectic
wine list, including all
components of reds and
whites, compliments the
food menu.
Speaking of the menu,
long time patrons of Sea-
grass will be glad to know
the Seagrass Salad and the
Captain's Platter remain
on the menu. The modern
kitchen is fully equipped
with state of the art equip-
ment and a Chef that
knows how to handle it.
Chef Ken Tufo comes to
Homosassa after 13 years
of chef work in the Long Is-
land/Manhattan area.
"My specialty is
Mediterranean," Ken says,
"and it will be reflected on
the menu, but not the sole
component."
Beverly chose the color
scheme with an eye to
maintaining an 'on the
water' theme. When you
first enter from the
screened in porch you im-
mediately feel at home


with the soft blue/green
walls, and wood high back
chairs around the bar and
high top tables. The con-
crete floor, with room for
dancing, was painted with
various shades of blue to
continue the feeling of the
peaceful Homosassa
River. The decorations are
tasteful and "homey," com-
plimenting the friendly
feeling. You won't find
neon signs blaring at you
from every wall, that's for
sure.
And for those of you fa-
miliar with the old Pub
and Grill you will be happy
to know that attention was
paid to the restrooms.
Women will especially
enjoy the four stalls plus a
handicap stall and two
sinks positioned under a
phenomenal mirror that
you might wish you could
take home with you.
The indoor restaurant
has four different compo-
nents, all sporting wall-
mounted TVs. The one
side has cozy, comfortable
booths around the sides
and high top tables in the
center. Behind that sec-
tion, on the street side, is a


semi-private room perfect
for small group get-togeth-
ers. There is the beautiful
bar area with its 20 beer
taps and then the piece de
resistance the group
table.
Remember we men-
tioned how Basil and Bev-
erly use to pull tables
together so a large group
of friends could enjoy an
evening? Enter Parota,
courtesy of South America.
Parota is a hardwood tree
with typically a massive
girth, making it possible to
mill the trunks for use as
structural elements in a
deck, terrace or pergola.
Basil had a 16-foot, one-
piece table created for the
Seagrass so that large
groups of friends could sit
together. Cut vertically
from the tree, the beautiful
grain on the table is ex-
posed. At about 3 inches
thick, you won't be moving
this table easily as it
weighs approximately
1,200 pounds.
Betty & Jerry Ruczynski


have been in the area for
24 years. "We've seen a
number of owners come
and go at the Seagrass,"
says Betty "but this one is
quite special. This is the
best thing for the river; a
nice restaurant, good food,
and great people."
The new Seagrass Wa-
terfront celebrated an in-
vitation only "soft
opening" on Friday, Jan.
18, and it is certain to re-
main home to many and
become home to new
friends. Whether you are
interested in a draft beer
from somewhere around
the world or cuisine that is
sure to please your palate
you will find yourself com-
ing back, even if just to
find yourself "sitting on
the dock of the bay, watch-
ing the tide roll away".
Seagrass is at 10386 W
Halls River Road, Ho-
mosassa, FL 34448. The
phone number is 352-503-
2007. Watch for notice of
Seagrass' official grand
opening, coming soon.


Last day of 26th annual

Florida Manatee Festival


It's not too late to cele-
brate the Manatee down-
town Crystal River. Grab
the family and come on
down to Citrus Avenue and
U.S. 19.
Enjoy one of Florida's
largest festivals, where
unique crafts, fine art,
mouthwatering food, chil-
dren's games, manatee
viewing, live entertain-
ment and dragon boats all
come together at one in-
tersection. More than 150
craft vendors from near
and far will set up shop on
Citrus Ave.
This year's Florida Man-
atee Festival is bigger, bet-
ter and more Manatee
than ever! Local boat cap-
tains are available today to
take you on a 20- to 30-
minute tour around the
area to view the manatee
and other wildlife that
may include osprey and
bald eagles. Tickets are
$10 (children 12 and
younger free) and are
available at the boat dock
area.
Entertainment at the
waterside for today in-
cludes Bob & Sheila Ever-
hart from 10a.m. to noon
and the Susanne Smith
Band from 1 to 4 p.m. The


Family Stage entertain-
ment today performances
by Shazahdi and Jewels of
the Desert dance troupe
from 11 to 11:30 a.m. and
concludes with local fa-
vorite Phantastic Sounds/
Paul and Jackie Stevio
from 2 to 4 p.m.
We recommend that you
park at the Crystal River
Mall and take advantage of
the shuttle bus back to the
festival site.
The shuttle is $1
roundtrip per person and
is well worth avoiding the
limited parking in the
downtown area. Admis-
sion to the festival is $3 per
person and children 12
and younger are no
charge.
For more information,
visit www.floridamanatee
festival.com.
The Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce,
the Rotary Club of Crystal
River, the City of Crystal
River, Supporting Partner
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle join with 2013 Present-
ing Sponsor Crystal
Automotive and 2013 Plat-
inum sponsor Tampa Bay
Times to bring you this an-
nual event, one of
Florida's largest festivals.


GOLF ANYONE?
Fundraisers scheduled for spring 2013
* Register yourself or your foursome today for the
first annual Tee Off for Tourette Celebrity Golf
Outing taking place Feb. 2 at Plantation on Crystal
River. Imagine golfing with Daryl Talley, two-time
Pro-Bowl and two-time All-Pro former linebacker
for the Buffalo Bills; or John Prince, famous sports
artist; or maybe Nick DelGuidice, with the Kansas
City Royals. These are among the celebrities that
will be auctioned off for play in the tournament.
The event kicks off with a party at the Plantation
on Friday, Feb. 1, where Dave Pittman, American
Idol Contestant, will perform. Costs for an individ-
ual player is $100 and $400 for a foursome.
Greens fee, cart, lunch and goody bags included.
Shotgun start 9 a.m. Contact Gary D'Amico
gary78@tampabay.rr.com to register and for more
details. And if you can't play but want to be
involved, there a few sponsorships still available
* Citrus County Builders Association's annual Jim
Blackshear Memorial Golf Outing to be Feb. 23 at
Seven Rivers Golf & Country Club with 50 percent
of proceeds to benefit the Boys & Girls Club of
Citrus County. Entry includes greens fee, cart,
lunch, door prizes and one Mulligan ticket! Other
activities include putting contest and reverse draw
card game. Call 352-746-9028.
* March 4! Save the Date and reserve your foursome
today! Proceeds benefit projects of Citrus Memorial
Health System. This is an 18 hole event/scramble
format. Registration and Continental breakfast at
8:30 a.m. Shotgun start at 10 a.m. Cost per player
$325. Team prizes for first, second and third place.
$25,000 hole in one cash prize; longest drive, closest
to pin, putting contest, drawings and door prizes.
Sponsorship packages available at cmhfoundation.
com under "upcoming events," or call 352-344-6442
Lance LeDoux or Chris Pool at 352-344-6560.
Presenting sponsor is Wells Fargo Insurance.
* SCORE, Counselors to Small Business, is making
plans for its 15th annual Golf Classic in April.
Watch the Community Calendar at www.citrus
countychamber.com for details.


YOU CAUGHT MY EYE ...

Lisa Nash \ \
ED.S. Disposal,
Lecanto /
...FOR
OUTSTANDING
CUSTOMER
SERVICE!



NEWS YOU CAN USE
DONATE/VOLUNTEER
Sheriff's Ranch-Caruth Camp
This youth camp, located just north of Inglis, is
in need of a volunteer registered nurse. Please
call Ms. Pat Nelson at 352-447-2259 for details
and to complete an application.


Strawberry Festival


We are always looking
for volunteers to help CIT
with our Festivals. ca
Strawberry Festival is
Saturday, March 2, and Sun-
day, March 3. Consider donat-
ing your time and see the
Festival from the "inside." Call
Matthew at 352-726-2801.


RUS COUNTY
amber of Coe



aoniin. Jsv


Cinderella's Closet
Clean out your closet and make some girl beau-
tiful for her prom! This is the sixth year for our
Citrus Cinderella's Closet. All services are com-
pletely free! We still need donations (especially
plus-size dresses) as well as volunteers! Drop
off your donations from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday at Cornerstone Baptist
Church, 1100 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness.
352-726-7335 or bcwcw@ yahoo.com. Drop
off any items prior to Jan. 25.


Enjoy drinks under the thatched tiki bar while enjoying
the view of Buzzard Bay in Homosassa.


A semi-private room lets small groups enjoy time together.






Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Builders Association






Builder's connection


D3

SUNDAY
JANUARY 20, 2013


CCBA membership furthers your industry


"Every man owes a part of his
time and money to business or
industry in which he is engaged.
No man has the moral right to
withhold support from an organ-
ization that is striving to improve
conditions within his sphere"-
Theodore Roosevelt
Are you a member of the
CCBA? When asked this ques-
tion, often the answer is "Why
should I be?" when, in fact, the
better question is: Why
shouldn't you be?
Membership with your local
Home Builders Association is
support of your industry through
and through. Standing alone, a
small business is "a voice in the


dark," but by joining other mem-
bers of the team, what can be ac-
complished is nothing short of
amazing.
When you join your local asso-
ciation, you automatically be-
come a full member at the state
and national level. That's three
memberships for the price of
one. Your National (NAHB),
State (FHBA) and Local (CCBA)
Home Builders Associations
offer plenty of resources to help
each member make the most of
their investment and connect
with the benefits they value most
For more than 60 years,
NAHB has been the nation's
leading source for housing in-


dustry information. HBA mem-
bers use a variety of ways to stay
connected to industry informa-
tion, including publications, e-
newsletters, exclusive website
content, bulletins, special re-
ports, email alerts and financial
data, and many other means.
Up-to-date information, when


you want it, how you want it!
Membership in your local
Home Builders Association is
more than just networking or
having a special seal on your
business door or stationary, it's
about contacts. You may not feel
that you need more business, but
every contact a businessperson
makes is a potential asset to
them and their business.
That doesn't just mean more
business; it means better infor-
mation flow, more exposure to
more innovative and/or more
cost effective materials and
services, as well as more oppor-
tunities to put your advertising
dollars to their most effective


Citrus Builders Care Building a Better Christmas


The Citrus Builders Care Building a Better Christ-
mas party was Friday, Dec. 14, 2012, at the Citrus
County Builders Association. Toys collected from
Marine Corps Reserve Toys for Tots were distrib-
uted, as well as extra items made possible by the
individual generosity of countless Citrus County
residents. This year's program helped more than
200 children and was hosted at and organized by
Citrus County Builders Association members Gold
Crest Homes and the CCBA Community Affairs
Committee. Citrus Builders Care and Gold Crest
Homes would like to take the time to say thank you
to all the people who made this year's event pos-
sible through donations of funds and time: Art by
Annie Adams, Bay Area Air Conditioning, Connolly's
Sod & Nursery, Deem Cabinets, Dream Custom
Homes, Inverness Sertoma, Ken Lindquist Corpora-
tion, Lloyd and Charlotte Myer, Marie Brotnitsky,
Melissa Keesling, Nature Coast Lodge, Porter's
Locksmithing, Quality Crafted Builders, Will Con-
struction Corp. and the many, many employees and
family members of Gold Crest Homes & Realty.
Special thanks to Paul Pilny and the Marine Corps
Reserve Toys for Tots and, of course, to Santa and
Mrs. Claus!


UPCOMING CCBA EVENTS
* The CCBA Membership Committee will host a Future
Member Luncheon at CCBA Headquarters from
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 31. A complimen-
tary lunch will be provided for one representative of
each nonmember company that attends, courtesy of
Larder & Sons Construction. This is an excellent op-
portunity to learn about association membership and
what it can do for your business. Reservations are re-
quired. For information and to RSVR call Executive
Officer Donna Bidlack at 352-746-9028 any time from
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Thursday.
* The CCBA January General Membership Luncheon
featuring guest speaker TBARTA with a hot lunch
from Joe's Deli will be from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 24, at the CCBA. Cost is $10 per per-
son; nonmember reservations must be prepaid. Reg-
istration is open online at www.CitrusBuilders.com or
by phone to 352-746-9028.
* The annual CCBA Bull & BBQ has been set for Feb.
28. This year's event, open to all members of all busi-
ness organizations, will be a "Master Chef" Competi-
tion with categories being Chili, Wings, BBQ and Best
Side Dish instead of a barbecue-only competition.
Save the date and watch for details to come soon.
* 2013 CCBA annual Family Fishing Tournament, spon-
sored by Exclusive Platinum Sponsor ED.S. Disposal
will be April 27 and 28 at the Homosassa Riverside
Resort, with a portion of the proceeds to benefit the
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart again this year. Online registration for
entries and sponsorships is now open and includes
the return of the very popular Super Angler Pass,
which will be offered again in conjunction with the
m-m-Mel Tillis and Friends Tournament. For more in-
formation, visit www.CitrusBuilders.com.


use through local HBA sponsor-
ships and publications. Put quite
simply, it means that your busi-
ness is better because you made
an investment in your industry!
So what are you waiting for? If
you already know that you've
waited too long to support your
industry, then go to www.Citrus
Builders.com, and click on the
"how to join" link for a printable
membership application. If
you're still not convinced that
you need to make this invest-
ment, then call the CCBA at 352-
746-9028.
The Citrus County Builders
Association Shouldn't you be
a member?



2013


Spring


Parade


of


Homes

The 2013 Spring Parade
of Homes for Citrus and
Hernando counties, pre-
sented by the Citrus
County and Hernando
Builders Associations, will
begin March 16 and end
March 24.
The 2013 Parade of
Homes features 15 homes at
scattered sites throughout
Citrus and Hernando Coun-
ties. Models will be open
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon-
day through Saturday and
from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday
Builders featured in this
year's parade are:
Alexander Custom
Homes
Artistic Homes
Dream Custom Homes
Gold Crest Homes
Hartland Homes
GreenPointe Homes
Pastore Custom
Builders
Royal Coachman
Homes
Van Orden Homes
This parade made possi-
ble by Gold Sponsor
Florida Public Utilities
and Bronze Sponsors All
Performance Title and
Senica Air Conditioning.
Stay tuned to the
Builder Connection for re-
lease dates of Official Pa-
rade of Homes Guides or
visit www.CitrusParadeof
Homes.com for updates
and information. For in-
formation on how to spon-
sor this bi-county event,
call the Citrus County
Builders Association at
352-746-9028 any time from
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday
through Thursday


Annual golf outing to aid children


Dan Kern, chairman of the
Citrus County Builders Associ-
ation's Jim Blackshear Memo-
rial Golf Outing, recently
announced the annual golf tour-
nament, to be Feb. 23 at the
Seven Rivers Golf and Country
Club, will benefit the Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County.
"We are pleased to select the
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County as a worthwhile charity
that does so much good for Cit-
rus County kids," said Kern.
The Golf Outing, in its 24th
year, is open to all amateur
golfers and is a favorite CCBA
event due to regularly changing
golf courses each year that aid
in keeping the outing interest-
ing and challenging for return-
ing golfers. It was renamed in
honor of Jim Blackshear, a
founder of the CCBA, after his
passing in 2004
Proceeds from the golf tour-
nament will help fund Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County pro-
grams and facilities at the 3 club
sites. "This is money that will
stay in Citrus County to help our
own children," said Kern.
Registration for the event will
begin at 7 a.m. and the shotgun
start is scheduled for 8am. All


Jim Blackshear


teams must pre-register. The
$60 entry fee includes greens
fee, cart, lunch, door prizes and
one free Mulligan ticket. Sign-
ing up a team for $220 saves $5
per person.
Eagle Buick and Harley-
Davidson, both of Crystal River,
are hole-in-one sponsors, and
Citrus Pest Management and
Senica Air Conditioning have
joined the event as Beverage
Cart Sponsors.
Player registrations and spon-
sorships are available by regis-
tering online at www.Citrus
Builders.com or by contacting
the Citrus County Builders' As-
sociation at 352-746-9028 or the
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County office at 352-621-9225.


A note from
David Blackshear
Pops was the epitome of the
everyman golfer.
Always a bogey player at best, he
loved the game.
As a younger man in Miami, he
was the typical 1960's weekend war-
rior, wearing a straw Sam Snead
hat, chewing on the plastic tip of a
Tiparrilo, enjoying a game of walk-
ing in the sun with his regular four-
some and telling lies, having a cold
beer, and trying to conquer the
course and a $2 Nassau.
He taught me a game that would
replace baseball after I wrecked
my knee, never realizing the wis-
dom of life that I would use the rest
of my days.
In his never-ending pursuit of ad-
vancing the legacy of the CCBA, Dad
thought a golf tournament would
bring the members together for
some fun, camaraderie, and raise
funds for his favorite organization.
I want to thank all the partici-
pants over the years for letting his
legacy live on.
Sincerely, Dave Blackshear





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NONPROFIT
Continued from Page Dl

Management and best
practices
Management of the day-to-day
operations is an area in which
the Nonprofit Resource Center
can guide and assist officers, di-
rectors, staff and volunteers with
respect to best practices. Im-
proving operations is important
to ensure continued service on
the part of the volunteers, grant
funding and the impact the non-
profit has on clients or commu-
nity services. More and more
funding organizations are re-
quiring positive results for the
services rendered by the non-
profits they support
How to ask for help
Asking for help is only an email
away It could be the best invest-
ment for a struggling nonprofit Dr
Frederick J. Herzog, Ph.D. LLC
can be reached via email at
fherzog@tampabayrr com.
Dr. Herzog is highly experi-
enced in nonprofit organization
management. He has served
more than 125 different nonprof-
its during his professional career.
He is a longstanding professional
member of the American Society
of Association Executives and
earned the Certified Association
Executive designation. He is also
a member of the Association
Forum and the Society of Non
Profit Organizations.
Dr. Herzog is not a licensed at-
torney, CPA or tax consultant He
provides management counsel
and guidance to nonprofits.

Dr FrederickJ Herzog can be
reached via email at
therzog@tampabay.rrcom.


Business DIGEST

Funeral professional Seven Rivers awarded $1,000 in equipment
recertified- [_- ___I


INVERNESS Matt Watley,
CFSP, CPC, vice president and
general manager of Hooper Fu-
neral Homes & Crematory has re-
cently qualified for recertification of
the designation of Certified Fu-
neral Service Practitioner (CFSP),
by the Academy of Professional
Funeral Service Practice. Watley
is also a lifetime member of the
Academy. In addition to his
Florida license, Watley is also a fu-
neral service licensee in the states
of Virginia and North Carolina.
A number of professions grant
special recognition to members
upon completion of specified aca-
demic and professional programs
and "CFSP" is funeral service's
national individual recognition.
A select few have distinguished
themselves among their peers
within the funeral service profes-
sion as they continue their educa-
tion to exceed the highest
standards of care. This achieve-
ment is especially notable be-
cause Watley has voluntarily
elected to participate in quality ed-
ucational and service opportunities
that far surpass what the funeral
service licensing board in Florida
requires. Watley has committed to
a program of lifelong learning to
serve you and families in your
community with the level of excel-
lence expected of a CFSP.
The Academy of Professional
Funeral Service Practice, since its
founding in 1976, had as its goals
to recognize those practitioners
who have voluntarily entered into
a program of personal and profes-
sional growth, to raise and im-
prove the standards of funeral
service and encourage practition-


Special to the Chronicle
The Florida Department of Health has recognized the Women's & Family Center at Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center for outstanding performance as a participant in the Newborn Hearing
Screening Program. The reward for 100 percent compliance with the program, which includes
performing and reporting hearing screenings on all babies born at the hospital, was a certificate of
achievement and $1,000 in hearing screening equipment. Accepting the certificate and equipment on
behalf of the Women's & Family Center staff are Kristen Williams, R.N.; Greg Bare, R.N.,
administrative supervisor; and Kerry Bishir, R.N.


ers to make continuing education
a lifelong process in their own self-
interest, the interest of the families
they service and the community in
which they live and serve.
To initially receive the designa-
tion of "CFSP", the practitioner


must complete a 180-hour pro-
gram of continuing education ac-
tivities and events. In addition, the
practitioner is required to accumu-
late 20 hours of continuing educa-
tion per year to be recertified.
Hooper Funeral Homes & Cre-


matory serves the families of Cit-
rus County with locations in Inver-
ness, Beverly Hills and
Homosassa. Should you have any
questions regarding Hooper Fu-
neral Homes & Crematory, call
352-726-2271.


FLU
Continued from Page D1

Even with such a small
staff, Roepke said she'd
rather have staffers stay
home when they're not
feeling well. An employee
who was taking part in a
meeting with clients from
the Netherlands came
down with the flu and
Roepke knew the staffer
would drag herself in de-
spite being so ill. So
Roepke emailed the


staffer's husband.
"I said, 'please help me
convince her to stay
home,"' Roepke said.
The employee agreed,
and a co-worker filled in.
Companies that provide
care for elderly and chron-
ically ill people have to
find substitutes when one
of their caregivers comes
down with the flu. Some-
times, a sub needs to be
found immediately
Four caregivers who
work for the Caring Senior
Service in Amarillo, Texas,
called in sick last week.


Owner Bill Archinal has a
pool of workers he can call
on because the staffing
needs in the caregiving
business tend to fluctuate.
One caregiver who got
the flu began to get symp-
toms while she was with a
client That meant finding
someone right away to re-
lieve her- no one wanted
to risk having her infect
her client. So a supervisor
went to the client's home.
"When this caregiver
called and said, 'I think
I'm getting the flu,' they
said, 'I'll be right there,"'


Archinal said. "We want to
get that sick person out of
there."
Finding a replacement
can become complicated.
Sometimes a client will re-
sist having someone they
don't know come to care
for them.
"They get upset and say,
just don't send anybody,"
Archinal said.
If the client is someone
who is frail and really
needs the help, then super-
visors will intervene and
try to persuade the client to
accept a substitute.


As hard as it is for small
businesses with employ-
ees to weather the flu, it's
even tougher for the more
than 21 million companies
that have no employees.
When the owner is sick
and can't work, there's no
one to delegate to.
Last week, Ed Zitron was
sick and lost his voice. He
was able to get much of his
work done by email for his
one-man public relations
business, but phone calls
were out of the question.
"I had to cancel calls
left, right and center. Peo-


ple who I promised to call
had to just not talk to me,"
said Zitron, whose com-
pany is based in New York.
But Zitron's clients were
understanding. He attrib-
utes that to having devel-
oped strong relationships
and a sense of trust with
them. And he's up-front
about not being able to
work.
"I tell them the truth ... I
just got really sick," he
says. "They know I'm a
solid person. They know
I'm not going to disappear
with their money."


I I 'I I I


AWILLIAMS, =
A McCRANIE,
H WARDLOW
& CASH, P.A.
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2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS to serve you!
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Crystal River
795-3212


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PRICE & COMPANY, P.A.
Certified Public Accountants

795-6118
Serving Citrus County for over 30 years


Charles E. Price, EA

Federal & Out-of-State Tax Preparation
,' Corporate Tax Preparation
Business Accounting Services
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Accounting & Income Tax Returns
Fixed & Equity Indexed Annuities
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43 Years in Business 31 Years in Inverness


Inverness
726-8130


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For more information

on advertising call

Saralynne Miller at
352-564-2917 or

Yvonne Shepard at

1 352-563-3273 1


D4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013


BUSINESS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MONEY
Continued from Page D1


most folks equate money
with love, and the hurt that
comes from being slighted
goes to the grave. J.D.,
Lehigh Valley, Pa.
Dear J.D.: I don't dis-
agree with many of the
points you make; however,
it is difficult to be precisely
equal. I have five children,
and their needs have var-
ied over the years. I have
helped when I thought
help was necessary To
even it out at this point in
my life and theirs, I think,
would be a mistake.
My will is clear. Any old
debts, advancements, etc.,
are completely forgiven,
and their details are not to
be shared with the other
siblings. I have discussed
this with my children, and
they think it is perfectly
OK.
It's true that such a strat-


egy could cause a problem
among siblings, but I still
believe there are many cir-
cumstances where one
child requires more, or
where one has been more
fortunate because of hard
work and doesn't have the
same needs as another
One may remain single,
while another has chil-
dren. These are choices the
children make freely, but
nonetheless, I believe ad-
justments must be made.
Dear Bruce: I read your
column recently about the
grandmother who wanted
to save money for her
granddaughter by putting
money in an account at
Christmas and birthdays.
You recommended doing
something else instead.
When my husband's
nephew was born many
years ago, we opened a
bank account and put $100
in it. At each birthday and
Christmas, we added
money to the account in-
stead of buying a gift, and


by the time the boy fin-
ished high school, there
was enough money to pay
for one year at the local
community college. Be-
cause the boy's family was
never able to save any-
thing on their own, this
source of funds was very
valuable to them. KB.,
Lexington, Ky.
Dear KB.: It worked for
you, and there is no reason
I would ever condemn it.
Consistency such as yours
is certainly a sign of your
affection for your nephew.
It should be noted there
may be ways to avoid taxes
on the investment if the
money is to be used for
"qualified education ex-
penses." Much depends on
the size of the gift.
Dear Bruce: In a few
weeks, we are going to get
about $200,000 from a rel-
ative from their life insur-
ance. My wife and I are in
our 70s and owe about
$40,000 on our home. We
have two credit cards with


zero interest if we pay
them off on time, which is
no problem for us. Our
cars are in good shape,
and we do not intend to
trade anytime soon. The
only tax deductions we
have are the house and
our tithe and gifts to our
church.
I would like to pay off
the house and not have to
worry about that bill. The
interest rate is 4.75 per-
cent. What are your
thoughts on this?
We also want to gift an-
other person. I understand
we can gift up to $13,000 a
year without either of us
paying taxes. Is this cor-
rect? Also, will we have to
pay taxes on the insurance
money when we receive
it? B.H., via email
Dear B.H.: Part of your
question is a no-brainer.
You owe $40,000 on your
home, and you're paying
4.75 percent in interest.
Where in the world are
you going to put this


money and earn 4.75
percent?
You can give money to
anyone you wish. You
mention $13,000, but
here's some good news:
The IRS has raised the an-
nual gift tax exclusion to
$14,000 for 2013. And the
real number is $28,000 -
$14,000 from you and the
same amount from your
wife, with no taxes to be
paid by anyone.
As to the other question,
life insurance payouts that
are paid to a beneficiary in
a lump sum generally are
not considered income
and are not taxable.

--
Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.
corn or to Smart Money,
PO. Box 7150, Hudson, FL
34674. Questions of gen-
eral interest will be an-
swered in future columns.
Owing to the volume of
mail, personal replies
cannot be provided.


BUSINESS


To place an ad, call 563-5966




SClassifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


ANDY
Would love to see you
again, at Walgreen's
Sunday At 2pm (with
Your "Less" Gray Hair)
JEANNE (Halls R. R.)
Elderly Gentleman,
Looking for lady,
for
vacation time
(352) 382-5661
I'm a frustrated active
widower looking for an
attractive, personable
Christian lady with
good chemistry, me-
dium to small build be-
tween 70-80 for good
companionship maybe
something more down
the line. If you are in
good health, good spir-
its & ready for a new
relationship I am ready
to meet with you. Give
me a welcome call at
352-527-9632 I will
glady give you a call
back.



Extension ladder
17 fl Alluminum ladder
$200; Pressure Washer
with wand, 16 ft
extension $350
(352) 726-8931
FORD
'98, Ranger XLT, two
tone paint, electric
pkg. auto trans., al-
most new tires 170 k
$2,850 obo, 503-3787
Free
Pond Plants
(352) 270-1524
HERRY'S
MARKET DAY
FREE VENDOR
SPACE!
Produce, Seafood,
Floral Neededl
Outdoor Flea Market
held on the grounds
8471 W Periwinkle Ln
HOMOSASSA
(behind Wendy's)
Last Saturday Every
Month 8am -Noon
Saturday, Jan. 26th
Call Caroline at
352-527-2020

HOMOSASSA
PRO-LINE BOATS
LARGE INDOOR
RELOCATION SALE
Mon. 21 thru Fri. 25th
8am-5pm
Office Furniture,
Equip. & Supplies
1520 S. Suncoast Bid
INV. S. HIGH-
LANDS
2/2/2, 1st & Sec. $850.
mo. 352-419-5442
LAWN MOVERS
TORO self propelled,
6.5 HP $150; 0 Turn
GRAVELY riding
mower. 12 HP $500
(352) 726-8931
PORSCHE
'99, 911 Carrera, black
exterior, black interior
62,600 org. mi $25,900
386-334-2559 CELL
TRAILER 4 x6, has
spare tire, garage kept;
Good Condition $500
(352) 726-8931



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk
or Unwanted
Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$



Your World
I--- &
4 puw "e


CHRipiaE
i ,


1, 11 1mm BB I


for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $200 &
UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Washers,Dryers,Riding
Mowers, Scrap
Metals, Antena
towers 270-4087



Free Firewood
Cut and Haul
(352) 249-7212
Free HP 8500
printer/scanner/fax
(352) 503-3154



FRESH CITRUS
@BELLAMY GROVE
Strawberries/Cabbage
Gift Shipping,
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378



Black Labrador
Retriever, about 1% yrs
old, answers to "Buddy",
lost in vicinity of W.
Dunnellon Rd.
(352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662
Lost
2 Rescued Persian
Cats
1 has health issues
Leisure Acres in
Lecanto
(352) 628-1347
LOST Female 11 yr
Calico, declawed &
spade. Named Minnie;
lost in Pine Ridge area.
Please (352) 697-1685
LOST -female mix red
nose pitt bull, lyr old
w/greens eyes. Pink
camo collar, named,
Paisley tan & white.
Last seen on Pineridge
blvd (352) 601-1899
Lost Shar-Pei mix, male
w/chip, tan approx 451bs
named Bubba. Last
seen in Arrowhead Area
please call
(352) 344-8916



Found Black & White
Large Fat Cat
on Hemlock St.
in the Highlands
(352) 419-5146
Found female Dog call
to Id. Floral City Area.
(352) 419-9495
Found four keys on
multicolor lanyard car
key(Mitsubishi) and
looks like three house
keys. Found at the car
wash on Hwy. 44 and
Eden drive, Inverness.
Call 726-6754
FOUND Men's
prescription eyes
glasses in blue case in
Sugarmill Woods.
(352) 628-4360
FOUND POODLE
MALE -HWY 200
Hernando. Call to
identify. (352)726-1006
Found young dog,
in the area of Raindow
Acres, Dunnellon
(239) 405-0045
LOST MALTI-POO
White female 1 yr old
named "Chloe" last
seen on W Starjasmine
PI, Beverly Hills. Two
little airls miss her!
Please call
(352) 249-0846
Orange w/ white chest
male cat in Plantation
Estates. No collar.
Leave message
(352) 563-0790



FREE REMOVAL
Wants to Thank
All of You for
making 2012 Possible,
See You In 2013


SMARTER FASTER, T
I SATELLITE INTERNET I
888-801-8853
Mention this ad at
Manatee Festival
Sfor $50 rebate at
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SPRING HILL
CLASSES
*********
COSMO DAYS
February 25, 2013
BARBER NIGHTS
February 25, 2013

SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING




NOW HIRING
Preschool
Teachers
Ft or Pt, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
Kiz 'R" RUSS
Preschool
Apply Within
(352) 344-4106




ADMIN/
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
Office Position
available in Lecanto
PT, 9am-4pm, M-F.
Computer experience
required.
SEND RESUME TO:
flhearinacenter@a
amail.com










Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthdays
fied ad under

includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966





ARNP or PA
Wanted Part Time
for a busy Pediat-
ric
Practice in Crystal
River, Send Re-
sume
to:
lindapracticemar
@tampabav.rr.com

C.N.A.s
Full Time & Part time
If you are ready to
brighten up your
career, join our
caring, dedicated
team. Now hiring on
3-11 & 11-7 shifts
with excellent
benefits
Apply in person at:
Arbor Trail
Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd
Invernes s
An EEO/AA
Employer, M/F/V/D


Certified
Surgical Tech-
Experienced
Needed for outpa-
tient surgery center
Days only, no nights,
wkends., no call or
holidays. Excellent
pay and benefits.
Fax resume to:
352-527-1827
Attention: Marjorie


EXPERIENCE

F/T Medical Assistant
Medical Receptionist
Temp.Transcriptionist
Needed for busy
Medical Practice.
Experience only
need apply.
Medical Assistant
must be willing to
travel between Citrus
& Hernando Counties,
Fax resume to:
352-341-4477


Experienced
Operating Room
Registered Nurse
Needed for outpa-
tient surgery center.
Days only, no nights,
wkends., no call or
holidays. Excellent
pay and benefits.
Fax resume to:
352-527-1827
Attention: Marjorie


IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS
RN's & LPN's
Hospital Experi-
ence
ICU, ER, CCU,
Med. Surge, Tele,
Labor
& Delivery, Daily
Pay,
Apply onine at
WWW.
nurse-temps.com
352-344-9828


Job Fair
REGISTERED
NURSES!
Join us on
Jan 23, 2013
From 10am -6pm
Refreshments
& Prizes!

Hospital Staffing
SContracts, PRN
And Block Book-
ing
Call to RSVP
Arbor
Medical Staff-
ing
14926 Casey Road
Tampa, FL 33624
(800) 919-8964
www.arborstaff.com


SEVEN RIVERS

Join Our
leam
Seven Rivers
Regional Medical
Center
Please visit our
Career Center at
www.SevenRivers
Reaional.com
Phone 352-795-8462
Fax 352-795-8464
6201 N. Suncoast
Bvd. Crystal River,
FL, 34428
Stephanie Arduser
Recruiter
EOE Drug /Tobacco
Free Workplace


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


HHC AGENCY

Looking for
Psych RN
(352) 794-6097

PT Certified
Dental Assistant
Call 352-746-0330,
ask for Vicki.

RN or RN OCN
MED. ASST. w/
PHLEBOTOMY
DETAILS AT

Specialists

SUNSHINE GARDENS
Assisted Living
Facility
Looking for
Experienced
CNA's PRN
for all shifts
No phone calls.
Apply in person at
311 NE 4th Ave.
Crystal River or
online at www.
sgwseniors. corn
(click on About "Us")




Executive
Director Tourism
Announcement
#13-02
Works with the
Tourist Development
Council to attract
visitors to Citrus
County and to
review plans and
marketing strate-
gies. Represents
Citrus County in
tourist related
matter at the local,
state and national
levels. Responsible
for budget prepara-
tion and control.
Makes public
presentations and
lectures regarding
the economic im-
pact of the tourism
and sports industry
in Citrus County.
Beginning pay rate
is negotiable.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Citrus County
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online.
EOE/ADA

Human Resource
Rep
Are you an HR
Professional with a
commitment to ex-
cellence? Do you
want to be part of a
high performance
team? Therapy
Management
Corporation, a
preferred provider in
all the communities
we serve, invites you
to talk with us. Our
home office is in
Homosassa, FL. 3+
years HR experi-
ence, superb com-
munication and
interpersonal skills,
along with strong
technology experi-
ence are what you
will need to be
successful. Please
apply online @
http://www.thera-
pymgmtjobs.com/
Profile.aspx or fax
resume to
(352) 382-0212


Marketing Director

Nature Coast
Financial Advisors, Inc.
Email info to:
aarvdynaturecoast
financial.com
352-794-6044




BREAKFAST
COOK
Must have experience.
Apply in person
between 1pm & 2pm
206 W Tompkins St.
Inverness

Food Service
Opportunity
Seeking the right
person with
appropriate exp. to
lease and operate a
cafe' w/proven track
record affiliated w/ the
Florida Artists Gallery
in Floral City. Kitchen
fully equipped with
much new equipment.
Call Ann Covington @
352-344-9300





AC SALES
Will train right person,
easy six figure income
Must have val. fl. DL,
Paul (352) 216-3290


Customer
Service/Sales
Assit.
Must have exp., com-
puter skills, good atti-
tude and be a self
starter, Call (352)
628-4656

Real Estate
Agents
Busy real estate office
needs Realtors and
Buyers Agents Call
PLANTATION REALTY
352-634-0129

SALES PERSON
WANTED
For sales of manu-
factured & modular
homes. Must be
very motivated &
have a proven sales
background. Knowl-
edge of housing &
real estate helpful.
Prior experience
helpful. E-mail re-
sume to group-
erman@
aol.com or fax to
352-621-9171





Automotive
Consultant/
Advisor
Eagle Buick GMC
Inc is in need of
experienced
Automotive Service
Consultants/Advisors
Minimum 2 yrs, deal-
ership experience.
Aggressive pay plan
and strong com-
pensation package
that includes health
insurance, paid
vacation, paid train-
ing, certification
reimbursement and
many other perks.
Drug free workplace
Application Avail. @
Eagle Buick GMC
Inc. Homosassa, Fl.
34448 Send Resume:
Fax (352) 417-0944
Email:
robbcole@eagle
buickgmc.com


FIRE PLANS
EXAMINER
Announcement
#12-65
Reviews develop-
ment and fire
protection plans
for new and existing
buildings for
compliance with
applicable codes
and ordinances.
Four years work
experience in fire
protection, con-
struction, architec-
ture or a related
field or any combi-
nation of training
and experience
that demonstrates
ability to perform
duties of position.
Beginning pay
$17.85 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us You
can also visit one of
the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL. 34461
to apply online.
This job is open
until filled. PREVIOUS
APPLICANTS NEED
NOT REAPPLY,
APPLICATIONS
ARE STILL PENDING
EOE/ADA


Exp. Power
Equip. & Small
Engine Mechanic

Must have at least
2 yrs. exp. in a small
engine shop, and
have own tools
Apply in Person
M-Fri 6659 W
NORVELL BRYANT
HWY, CR
NO CALLS


Key Training
Center
has positions availa-
ble in group home
home setting. Assist
adults with disabili-
ties in daily living
skills. HS Diploma/
GED required.
F/T Maintenance
Worker- mainte-
nance, renovation
& repair of build-
ings/ grounds, to
include plumbing,
carpentrymasonry,
etc. HS Diploma/
GED required.
Apply in person at
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto FL
34461*E.O.E.*


#1 Employment source is







www.chronicleonline.com


EXP. FORM
SETTER/FINISHER
Piece Work or State
Hourly. Own Tools
No Attitude/Stories
352-726-5039


EXP. ROOFERS
NEEDED
Must have License
Tools & Transportion.
Call 352-697-3113

LIMOUSINE
DRIVER
Super stretch & Sedan.
Experienced need only
to reply.
Send resume to:
fllanier@yahoo.com

Senior Lending
Officer/Office
Manager
Brannen Bank,
a banking institution in
central Florida,
is seeking a Senior
Lending Officer/ Office
Manager for the Citrus
county area. Re-
quires a bachelors
degree in business or
finance, residential
and commercial
lending experience
and at least four
year's Office Manager
Experience.
Duties include man-
agement of daily
branch operations
and originating a
variety of consumer
loan's. Offer's a com-
petitive salary and
benefit package. If in-
terested, please f
forward resume' to
Brannen Banks of
Florida, Inc.
Attn: Carol Johnson
PO Box 1929
Inverness, FL
34451-1929
EEO/M/F/V/D/DFWP


EOE/DFWP


Couppoktt.
fiuppo/it.


Find out what these values can
mean for your career.

HPH Hospice is now hiring RN's! HPH Hospice
is a not-for-profit community-based healthcare
organization providing innovative, skilled medical
care to patients with life-limiting illness and
compassionate support to their family members.
We are currently searching for qualified candidates
with 1 plus years of acute care experience to fill
the following positions:

Hospice RN Opportunities
* Weekend RAs, Full-time & Part-time
* Evening RNs, Part-time

To learn more about becoming a part
of our team, please visit our website at
www.hph-hospice.org (under Careers)
or contact our recruiter:
787-868-7971
12107 Majestic Blvd.
Hudson, FL 34667


a not-or-prfit oganzaton inidayll kesad


SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 D5


BUSINESS DIGEST

* Submit information
via email to newsdesk
@chronicleonline.com
or fax to 352-563-
3280, attn: Business
Digest.

* The Chronicle
reserves the right to
edit notices.

* High-resolution
photos will be
considered for
publication. Images
taken with most
cellphone cameras do
not reproduce well.

* Publication on a
specific date or in
color cannot be
guaranteed.

* Submissions about
specific prices of
products or sales
events are considered
advertising and are
not eligible for
Business Digest.







D6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013


PRODUCTION
CNC OPERATOR

ENTRY LEVEL SMALL
SHOP. ZERO DEFECT
ENVIRONMENT
Crystal River Area
352-422-6086





*CALL NOW*
Looking to fill
immediate positions
in the CUSTOMER
RELATIONS DEPT
Training, 401(k),
Medical. No Exp.
Necessary. Call
Michelle
352-436-4460

APPT. SETTERS
NEEDED

Sign on Bonus.
Great Commission Pay
and weekly bonuses
Apply in Person
6421 W. Homosassa Tr




Now hiring 18-25
guys and gals. Travel
entire USA w/ unique
business group.
$500 sign-on bonus.
Call 877-853-7654
or 866-298-0163
www.sunshine
subscrintion.com

CAREGIVERS
NEEDED

All Shifts Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto


NEWSPA-
PER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and other
newspapers for
home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per
day.

Must have insured
and reliable vehicle
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up
with a cap-Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product

Apply in Person
1624 N
Medowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pm

Newspaper carriers
are independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle


C lONICLE
i____m lJ


$AVON$ Earn up to
50%
only $10 for startup kit
850-570-1499 for Appt

Exp. appt. setters

Top Pay, Hrly. Clean
work enviontment
Dave (352) 794-6129

Recreation
Program
Specialist
Announcement
#13-03

Responsible recrea-
tion work serving as
the Parks and
Recreation repre-
sentative during
recreational activi-
ties (public and
private) at county
events/facilities.
Must be available to
work a flexible
schedule to include
nights and week-
ends. Must have
some experience
in recreation and/
or programming.
Starting pay
$9.99 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, January 25,
2013. EOE/ADA

MUST LOVE CATS

Mature P/T caretaker
w/own transportation,
for local cat rescue.
Kennel & general
cleaning, clerical &
customer svc.
Send resume to:
Blind Box 1824p c/do
Citrus County Chronicle,
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429









SPRING HILL
CLASSES

COSMO DAYS
February 25, 2013

BARBER NIGHTS
February 25, 2013

SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING


Real Estate Investor
looking for private
mortgage money.
Pis call Mark
(352) 270-8128




BAVARIAN CHINA
SERVICE FOR 12+
DINNERWARE
w/gold trim. $300
OBO
(352) 746-3327
DISNEYS 75 YEARS
-music & memories 3
disc.cd limited edition
pd.$50.00 sell
$20.352-527-9982
FRAMED DISNEY
PRINT "FLATTERY"
cert.#838 of 2000-18"by
24" $100.more info. call
352-527-9982
ROCKWELL SCOUT-
ING "1979" 50 first day
covers-matching gov.
stamps-$100.
352-527-9982
SEVERAL BARBIE
DOLLS IN ORG
BOXES $400 OR obo.
(352) 746-3327


de


11111111
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111

TOP DESIGNER PER-
FUME BOTTLE
COLLECTION 30
Bottles $30 Please call
352-726-0040




FRONT LOAD WASH-
ING MACHINE Ken-
more44092 needs $250
repair 3.5 cubic ft 16
cycles $50 341-0450
GE Washer & Dryer
Front Load, white,
Like New,
only used 1 yr.
Asking $800 for pair
(352) 422-5462
KENMORE ULTRA
WASH DISHWASHER
White, four years old
excellent condition
$150 Inverness
(352) 344-4404
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive wash-
ers & dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179


GAS DRYER in good
condition.Propane
capable.
$100. 352-513-4519
SOLD
Samsung refrigerator
white SBS 25 cf hidden
hinges LED lighting less
than 1 yr old $575
Amana washer dryer set
3 yrs old $350
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
WASHERS & DRYERS
(352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Relia-
ble, Clean, Like New,
Excellent Condition.
Free Delivery 352
263-7398
Westinghouse
Air Handler,
3 ton unit, 6 yrs. old
$250. obo
(352) 465-6973
Whirlpool Gold,
Matching Set, Fridge,
Range, Microwave,
Stainless Steel $1,300
firm Call for details
(352) 527-6779




AUCTION
Public Auction
Onsite & Online
Tues, Jan 22 @
11am
Preview: Day of
Sale 9-11am
Lake Mary Logistics,
Inc.
9313 Bachman Rd,
Orlando, Fl 32824
Huge lot of vehicles
and trailers including:
'05 GMC C7500
24ft box truck
Details & photos at
www.moecker
auctions.com
(800)840-BIDS
15% -18%BP, $100
ref. cash dep.
Assignment for the
Benefit of Creditors
Case No.:
2012-CA-016597-O0
Subj to confirm.
AB-1098
AU-3219, Eric Rubin

AUCTIONS
Moecker Auctions,
Inc.
has been commis-
sioned to liquidate
the assets of
Discount Packaging
Supply, Inc.
Bankruptcy Auction
Thurs, Jan 24 @
10am
Preview: Day of
Sale 9-10am
6508 NW 82 Ave,
Miami, Fl 33166
Box Manufacturing
Assembly Equip-
ment,
Vehicles,Forklift,
Tons of Packaging &
Supplies, Pre-Cut &
Raw Cardboard,
Racking, Warehouse
Items and more!
Details & photos at
www.moecker
auctions.com
(800) 840-BIDS
10%-13%BP, $100
ref. cash dep.
Bankruptcy Case
No.: 12-27424-LMI
Subj to confirm.
AB-1098
AU-3219, Eric Rubin


CLASSIFIED




DUDLEY'S






**4 AUCTIONS*

Thur 1/24
Estate Adventure
3pm Quality
furniture-leather
shaker-Florida,
electronic, mower,
hundreds of items,
Fri 1/25
Estate Coin 6pmr
$5-10-20 Gold
pieces, Silver, $500 &
$1,000 bills, Lg 1800's
currency, silver
Sat 1/26
Florida Porch
Antiques
Liquidation 10am
On Site 712W.
Main St in Leesburg,
HUGE Sale of from
Long time Antique
dealer filled the
JC Penny
Tue 1/28 Real Estate
& Restaurant 10am
4135 S. Suncoast
Blvd. (US 19)
Homosassa,
*check webslte*
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384






Fri 01/18 Preview @
4pm, Auction@ 6pm
General Merchandise
Sat 01/19 Preview @
4pm, Auction@ 6pm
General Merchandise
Sun 01/20 Preview @
12:30, Auction@ 1pm
Tailgate/Box lot Auc-
tion
"WE BUY ESTATES**
6055 N. Carl G. Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
AB3232 (352)
613-1389



Craftsman 10 in Table
saw w/folding stand w/
wheels $350
(352) 465-2459
Drill Press laser trac on
6ft floor stand,
Brand new $200
(352) 465-2459
EXTENSION LADDER
20 FT. Aluminum $65
Please call
352-726-0040
Ridgid 12in compound
sliding miter saw,
w/ laser & folding stand
w/wheels. $450
(352) 465-2459


tll it. \ t'



Lii) Da)



C 1i ,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


47" Hitachi
HD Projection TV,
with glass stand
$200
352-628-5340
SHARP 32" TV WITH
REMOTE $25
352-613-0529



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP COLOR LASERJET
ALL-IN-ONE
Printer-Scanner-Fax,
$99 Please call
352-726-0040
LINKSYS ROUTER
Wi-Fi wireless home
networking $15 Please
call 352-726-0040
WEB TV SYSTEM
2 keyboards, epson
C88 Printer $50
(352) 382-2545



2008 Dump Trailer
6 x 10 (352) 586-1736
48" Kodiak
Bushhog,
less than 150 hrs.
Asking $450
(352) 382-0731



Ashley tan microfiber
recliner very good
condition, arm push
style, does not rock $85
352-4194513
COLLEZIONE EUROPA
style king sz poster bed
set triple dresser mirror
5 drawer chest 2 NS
headbd footbd rails, light
oak finish solid wood
HUGE AND HEAVY!
$1350 3524194513
CURIO CABINET,
Vintage, wood and
curved glass, 3 glass
shelves, lighted, $100,
(352)465-1813
DINETTE SET
4 ft Glass top w/4
chairs on casters,
$200
(352) 8974739
DINETTE SET
Johnson Casual, 30
in, glass-stainless
dinette w/ 2 chr $250.
Naguchi glass top
coffee table $150
(352) 503-9494
Glass top Wicker
dinning table
seats 6 w/6 chairs
& bar chairs. All
wicker, all padded
$500 OBO
(352) 425-0667
LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET, NEW, never
used-$975. CHERRY,
BEDROOM SET solid
wood, new in factory
boxes- $895 Original
price $6500, Can
Deliver. Bill
(813)298-0221.
Love Seat &
Matching Recliner,
by Flexsteel
$275.
Call between 9a-7p
(352) 382-0603


-m-
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500
OAK ENTERTAIN-
MENT CENTER. VERY
GOOD COND. 2
DRAWERS & 4
DOORS. $150
(765) 336-9590
ORIENTAL DINING
ROOM CHEST
48" black lacquer w/
gold flowers $200.
6 Panel Oriental
Black & Gold Screen
$325.
(352) 503-9494
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg
$75. 352-628-0808
QUEEN PASTEL
SOFA BED w/ 3
cushions seat $150.
Matching LOVE SEAT
$100. (352) 422-0296
SECTIONAL COUCH
12' x 10'7 piece
couch. Black w/ tur-
quoise, navy blue.
Very good Cond. $350
(352) 503-9494
Sectional Sofa
Florida Colors
peach and green
Clean, like new $300
(352) 860-0649
630-816-1171 cell
SEWING MACHINE
Old Singer Fashion
Mate, in wood cabinet.
Works $40.00 or best
offer 726-1495
SHOWER CHAIR
Adjustable Legs $30.
Periwinkle OVAL
WOOL RUG 96 X 136.
$100. (352) 422-0296
TEEN BUNK BED
$175- Double Bed on
top, large desk below.
Silver/metal frame.
Bought from Kids'
Room to Go. Email for
pix. Excellent
shape/like new. email:
kmtopspin@hotmail.com
or (352) 212-2901
TWIN BED W/ BOX
SPRING, MATTRESS &
HEAD BOARD. $100
(352) 344-2690
Two Bar Stools
Country style, solid oak,
2ft high w/windsor back
& swivel seat. $100
(352) 341-1941
Wood Dresser
19/2 x56/2
Dark wood
includes, mirror
$475 (352) 419-4606
Xlarge dresser & 2
nightstands solid wood
bow front & sides $525.
Thomasville coffee table
set mint cond $425.
352-419-4513




Extension ladder
17 fl Alluminum ladder
$200; Pressure Washer
with wand, 16 ft
extension $350
(352) 726-8931
John Deere Rider
Model #111/42"
3 blades Recent
Service, Runs
Good, Looks Good
$500. (352) 527-8618


9 HP Lawn Vac
and Trailer
Pull Behind $800.
(352) 586-1736
LAWN MOVERS
TORO self propelled,
6.5 HP $150; O0Turn
GRAVELY riding
mower. 12 HP $500
(352) 726-8931
POULAN ELECTRIC
POLE SAW
Model PLN1510
Excellent condition
Asking $75.00
352419-4305
Weed Wacker
32CC, craftsman, gas
Weed Waker
Bandit, gas,
Craftsman Blower 32CC
gas,
Homelite Blower
model 170 gas,
Echo Chainsaw #500
VL, 18" Gas $150 for All
Riding Lawn Mower
John Deere 1991, #212
36" cut, ran in 2010,
cast iron rear end $225.
(352) 628-1126
YARDMAN BY MTD
RIDING LAWN
MOWER includes tilt
cart; spreader & bagger.
runs strong 42" cut
$500. (352) 527-0832




CRYSTAL RIVER
Thurs. 17 thru Sun.
20th
Estate Sale
9am-Until,
Everything Must go!
Riding mower, genera-
tor, furniture TV's,
etc.
4410 N. Wellview
Point

HERRY'S
MARKET DAY
FREE VENDOR
SPACE!
Produce, Seafood,
Floral Needed!
Outdoor Flea Market
held on the grounds
8471 W Periwinkle Ln
HOMOSASSA
(behind Wendy's)
Last Saturday Every
Month 8am -Noon
Saturday, Jan. 26th
Call Caroline at
352-527-2020

HOMOSASSA
PRO-LINE BOATS
LARGE INDOOR
RELOCATION SALE
Mon. 21 thru Fri. 25th
8am-5pm
Office Furniture,
Equip. & Supplies
1520 S. Suncoast Bid




BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING SIZES 5 &
6 SHIRTS, PANTS &
JACKETS $30
352-613-0529
Special Occasion
Men's beautiful all
wool black suit 41 R
Palm Beach from
Falveys Men's Store
Gold Dress Jacket 41R
Tommy Hilfiger from
Dillards both worn
only 2-3 times, excel.
cond. $175 for both
(352) 527-2050


PHONE/FAX MACHINE
Panasonic plain paper
Fax/Copier
excellent condition. $50.
352-628-2150
SECURITY CAMERAS
Two wireless B&W
cameras/transmitters to
your tv. $50.Dunnellon
352465-8495




55 Gallon Fish Tank
with Cabinet Stand,
with all accessories
$375.
(352) 613-7429
ACER 77E 17"
MONITOR tube type
monitor incl. manual &
cables-like new-FREE
352-527-9982
B&D 14.4 CORDLESS
DRILL, CIR SAW REC
SAW LIGHT CHARGER
WITH CASE $85.
352-464-0316
BABY STROLLER Nice
stroller, safety 1st, fea-
tures basket and cup
holder, brown/green
color, $20
(352)465-1616
BAL RV Stablizer Jack
for Motorhome, Trailer
or 5th Wheel $25.
COOLER $5
2 Wheel cart $5
(352) 860-0183
BLINDS HORIZONTAL
1 PLEATED SIZE
64WX63L 1 PLASTIC
64WX60L OFF WHITE
$60 352-613-0529
Casio Electronic Cash
Register PCR-T465 $20
Kenmore Upright
Freezer #253
34 Tall x 27 wide $60
352-503-6971
COCA-COLA
REFRIGERATOR glass
sided 13x36inches by
San den. $100.
352-341-0934
COMPUTER'S MOUSE
hp co., universal, grey
colored, newly packed,
$10 (352)465-1616
DARKROOM
EQUIPMENT including
Enlarger. FREE. Phone
352-503-5172
Dell V305 Printer
$40.
Lexmark X, 4270
Copier/Fax $40.
352-503-6971
Epson LQ570E, Printer,
$20
HP Office Jet
Series 600 $25.
352-503-6971
GERBIL CAGE GOOD
CONDITION $20
352-613-0529
GLASS-BLUE COBALT
7pc assorted
$100.352-628-4210
GRANDFATHER CLOCK
Howard Miller Elegant
Shaker Style in Cherry
Top quality mvmt. w/
Wminstr chime re-
cently serviced. Item
is like new and value
priced at $925. Firm.
Serious inquires to
352-560-3474,4p-8p
pls. leave message


97es7


ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Drive-
ways tear outs Trac-
tor work, Lic. #1476,
726-6554




All AROUND TRAC-
TOR
Land clearing, Haul-
ing Site Prep, Drive-
ways Lic/Ins
352-795-5755




HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping
Dr. appts, errands,
etc. Hablo Espanol
813-601-8199




COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
k 352-302-6838 k




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive wash-
ers & dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179



HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping
Dr. appts, errands,
etc. Hablo Espanol
813-601-8199




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352-613-2518




JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump
Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374



AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551,
584-3730
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic
#2579
Driveways-Paios-Side
walks. Pool deck
repair /Stain
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097


AAA ROOFING
Call the "eak6ustee"
Free Written Estimate

: $100 FF
SAny Re-Roof:,
S Must present coupon at time contract is signed 1
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 00DMZO

S .T'T.TM


**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscap-
ing
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENC-
ING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENC-
ING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
H 352 422-7279 H




Install, Restretch,
Repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent,
Lic#4857 Mitch, (352)
201-2245


m ^^^^


1 CALL & REL
25vrs Exp in 1
property maint
repairs, cal
H&H Services t
lic#37658
352-476-228
ANDREW JOE
HANDYMAN
Gen. Maint/Rep
Pressure Clear
0256271 352-465
Affordable Har
man
4 FAST* 100% G
4 AFFORDABLE
4 RELIABLE-
Free Est
H 352-257-95


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


LAX!
00%
& all
II
today!

15
EHL
N.
pairs
ning.
5-9201


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
Affordable Handy-
man
4 FAST 100% Guar.
4 AFFORDABLE
4 RELIABLE-
Free Est
H 352-257-9508 H
Affordable Handy-
man
4 FAST* 100% Guar.
4 AFFORDABLE
4 RELIABLE-
Free Est
H 352-257-9508 H
Affordable Handy-
man
4 FAST *100% Guar.
4 AFFORDABLE
4 RELIABLE-
Free Est
H 352-257-9508 H
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570



Cleaning Svc-Home,
office,windows,
pressure washing &
more. 352-322-1799

Kitchen
Bath


All Tractor Work
Service specializing in
clean up Tree Re-
moval, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRAC-
TOR
Landclearing, Haul-
ing Site Prep, Drive-
ways Lic/Ins
352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120



GOT LEAVES
Let our DR VAC
Do the work!
Call 352-502-6588
LAWNCARE N
MORE
Yard Clean-up,
leaves
bushes, hauling
352-726-9570
Winter Clean Up,
Leaves, Power Wash-
ing & More Call
Coastal Lawn Care
(352) 601-1447


Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
''1S; or pool or plan
I P somelhina1
B -i : ompleel new!
S"Often imitated,



YWU INKTER OCING RIICK M VIR S!CIAIST


POOL AND PAVER LLC
Licensed U1 G AA403188
& Insured 352-4w00-31 |


AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up
time. 352-220-4244



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, lawn maint.
furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
HAULING
FREE ESTIMATES
scrap metals haul
for FREE (352)
344-9273
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump
Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374



Chris Satchell Paint-
ing ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref.
Ins. 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR
BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins.
FREE EST (352)
586-2996
Robert G. Vigliotti LLC
Painting
Int/Ext FREE
ESTIMATES 35 yrs
exp.
call 508-314-3279


INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



CALL STELLAR
BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins.
FREE EST (352)
586-2996
Cleaning Svc-Home,
office,windows,
pressure washing &
more. 352-322-1799
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300
Robert G. Vigliotti LLC
Painting
Int/Ext FREE
ESTIMATES 35 yrs
exp.
call 508-314-3279
Winter Clean Up,
Leaves, Power Wash-
ing & More Call
Coastal Lawn Care
(352) 601-1447




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie.
#2713


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.
COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
k 352-302-6838 k


ALL EXTERIOR




352-621-0881
FAX 352-621-0812
6" Seamless Gutters
Screen Rooms Car Ports
Hurricane Protection
allextalum13@yahoo.com
Citrus Lic. #2396 LICENSED & INSURED






Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
SAll Home
-V Repairs
\ Small Carpentry
F* fencing
SScreening
lean Dryer
,, Vents
4 1oda e & Dependable
Eq,,,ence lifelong
12.344-0905
S cell- 400-1722
o wured -Lic#37761


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Tractor Work
Service specializing in
clean up Tree Re-
moval, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding,
bulk mulch, lic/ins
302-8852
KING's LAND
CLEARING & TREE
SERVICE
Complete tree &
stump removal haul-
ing, demo & tractor
work. 32 yrs. exp.
(352) 220-9819
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


#1 Employment source is

www.chronicleonline.com


NEED SOMEONE TO
GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?

WE MAKE IT




DISAPPEAR FOR LESS
IF YOU WANT IT
TAKEN AWAY...CALL FOR A
FREE ESTIMATE TODAY! '
352-220-9190 -








We Cleon Windo and 0 Whole Lot More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


World Class

Window Tinting

Reduce Heat, Fade, Glare
AUTO HOME OFFICE
Marion & Citrus Free Eshates
352,465,6079 S


ndy- *
uar. The Tile Man
E Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lie/Ins.
508 H #2441.352-634-1584






CARPET & LL'
UPHOLSTERY
CLEANING


Specia 1 In: Certificates
Carpet Stretchin Available
Carpet Repair
g 352-282-1480 cell r
352-547-1636 office
Free In Home Estimates
Lic & Ins Lifetime Warranty


GENER AC j
Stand Alone .
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generic Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

35262 14*







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, JANUARY 20,2013 D7


HEAVY DUTY
WHIRPOOL Dryer $125
Exercise Stepper
machine $75.
(352) 795-7254
Hi-tec Magnum Swat
Boots Like new
size 11.5 -$40
352-860-2475
Janome Memory Craft
6500 sewing machine &
Gracey Quilting Table.
$1200. (352) 465-2692
L'EFFLEUR .75 EAU
DE PARFUM SPRAY &
SATCHET $25 Vintage
Coty unopened
352-419-5981
LEXMARK SCANNER,
PRINTER, FAX, COPY
MACHINE New, White
colored, needs ink, $15
(352)465-1616
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Fulls $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
MINI-BLINDS FOR
FRENCH DOORS
Neutral color-like
new-$15 Please call
352-726-0040
MOVING/STORAGE
BOXES- 20 new/4 sizes
26x20x5, 22x15x27,
27x16x27,24x24x24
$3 ea. 352-422-0294
NEW BLACK LEATHER
PURSE BY ROLF $25
NEVER USED E-MAIL
PHOTO INVERNESS
352-419-5981
PHOTOGRAPHY books
and lights. FREE
Phone 352-503-5172
RCA Video Camera
with accessories
$125.
Men's Golf clubs $60
Garmin GPS $60.
(352) 527-7223
REAR WINDOW GMC
P/U 1500 dark tinted,
good cond. $50.
352-628-4210
SECURITY SCREEN
DOORS (2) 36" x 80"
Black w/ locks, $85 for
both, can email pic
352-382-3650
Self Propelled
Golf Cart
$125.
(352) 601-7380
SKYLIGHT BUBBLE
TYPE 27 BY 27 SUN
RESISTANT, SMOKED
BRAND NEW ONLY
$50. 352464-0316
UNIVERSAL REMOTE
CONTROL newly
packed, never used,
$10 (352)465-1616
WHITE BIRD CAGE For
medium size bird. Good
condition. Complete
with stand. $50.
352 726 5753
X BOX
50$
352-419-5102




COPIER HP 150 color
copier, works great,
$75. 352-628-2150
PRINTER Epson Stylus
Photo R200 color
printer, excellent
condition. $50.
352-628-2150




2 POWER LIFT
CHAIRS RECLINERS
BY PRIDE MED SZ
$285.
LG SZ $350.
BOTH EXC. COND.
(352) 270-8475
4 WHEEL (SONIC) GO
GO BY PRIDE MOBIL-
ITY TAKE APART(4
PIECES)TO FIT IN
TRUNK OR VAN $585.
352-464-0316
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH SEAT AND
BRAKES ONLY 75.00
352-464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM
WALKER ADJUSTA-
BLE LEGS ON BOTH
25. EA 352464-0316
Electric Lift Chair,
great cond. Must See.
Asking $400
Call (352) 726-2695
Leave Message
MANUAL WHEEL Chair
Lift Easily load Folding
Chair not scooter to
vehicle hitch $100.
Dunnellon352465-8495
Manual WHEELCHAIR
WITH FOOTRESTS
GOOD SHAPE ONLY
$100.
352-464-0316
NUTRON R3ZLX
Power Wheel
Chair w/ Harmar
Micro Power Chair
Lift 5yrs old.
$1000 OBO
352-527-2906
SHOWER CHAIR WITH
BACK FIBERGLASS
WITH ADJUSTABLE
LEGS ONLY $30.
352-464-0315
TOILET SEAT 4"
RISER BRAND NEW
NEVER USED ONLY
$25. 352-464-0316
WALKER 3 WHEELED
WITH BRAKES SUPER
SHAPE ONLY $65.
352-464-0316




DUDLEY'S







"4 AUCTIONS"

Thur 1/24
Estate Adventure
3pm Quality
furniture-leather
shaker-Florida,
electronic, mower,
hundreds of items,

Estate Coln 6pm


$5-10-20 Gold
pieces, Silver, $500 &
$1,000 bills, Lg 1800's
currency, silver
Sat 1/26
Florida Porch
Antiques
Liquidation 10am
On Site@ 712W.
Main St in Leesburg,
HUGE Sale of from
Long time Antique
dealer filled the
JC Penny

Tue 1/28 Real Estate
& Restaurant 10am
4135 S. Suncoast
Blvd. (US 19)
Homosassa,
*check webslte*
www.dudleys
auctlon.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384


BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676




Player Piano
Works great, with
spare motor and
service manual $750
Call (352) 795-8085




2 VINTAGE WHITE
GLASS MIXING
BOWLS $10. 8.5 IN
AND 6.5 IN WITH
SPOUT 352-419-5981
3 MINI 12 COUNT
MUFFIN TINS $5
ELECTRIC VEGIE
steamer $7 Inverness
352-419-5981
4 DECORATIVE
KITCHEN
CANNISTERS WITH
LIDS $10 CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 352-419-5981
BLINDS HORIZONTAL
1 PLEATED 64WX63L
1 PLASTIC 64WX60L
OFF WHITE $60
352-613-0529
QUICHE DISH WHITE
IRIDESCENT $10
GREEN 10 IN
MIXING/FRUIT BOWL
$10 352-419-5981




BODY BY JAKE
EXERCISE MACHINE
IT REALLY WORKS
YOU OUT ONLY $50.
352-464-0316
BODY ROW ROWING
MACHINE IT WORKS
THE ARMS AND LEGS
ONLY $60.
352464-0316
EXERCISE BIKE (DP)
FAN TYPE UPRIGHT IT
WORKS THE ARMS
TOO ONLY $85.
352-464-0316
RECUMBANT
Stationary bike $100
OBO
Tricycle $100 OBO
(352) 621-4611




.308 AMMO 100
Rds,SP&HP $100.
352-503-2792
3 COMPLETE MENS
GOLF CLUBS SETS
W/ BAGS $125 EA
(352) 382-1971
5 Men's Bicycles
$15. ea
(352) 746-7357
357 Mag JHPAmmo
1 box New $50
Inverness
864-283-5797
357 Mag. 6 Shot
Rev. German made adj
rear site exc cond. $350
Springfield model 53B
single shot 22 rifle $120
(352) 344-5853
AMMO .223/5.56 Ammo
New in Box $75 per
Hundred. Get it while
you can! 352-427-0051
Antique Put gun (duck)
mfg cir 1831, by Royal
De Charlesville, app.
$5000 in 1998 asking
$3000. (727) 488-6474
BROWNING 308
MODEL 81 BLR (lever
action), Genuine wal-
nut stock,
exc cond. $700 OBO
(352) 382-3803
CALLAWAY RAZR
DRIVER
9.5 Stiff $95.00
352-503-7740
COBRA DRIVER 2011
Model
never Hit $95.00
352.220.3492
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
FOR SALE
Mini -14 223 scoped
stainless $1000.
10-22 Scoped wood
blue $500.
352-422-2004
For sale
SKS 1956 Sino Soviet
all original $500
352-422-2004
FULL SIZE PING
PONG TABLE good
condition includes new
net,paddles, and balls
$50 call/text 464-4280

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. Jan.. 26th 9-5p
Sun. Jan. 27th 9a-4p
HERNANDO
COUNTY FAIR-
GROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605

Ping 1-15 Driver
9.5 Stiff great condition
352.503.7740
Pistol .22 SEMI-AUTO
Phoenix Arms NIB 3
clips,$295 cash
352-860-1039
REMINGTON Model 11
12 gauge semi-auto,
peep site, poly choke
$230. Smith & Wesson
model 15, 22 revolver,
adj. rear site, $250
(352) 344-5853
Sig-SWAT P522
NIB, 25 Round Meg
quad rail, green laser
flash suppressor,
$830.
(352) 422-0266
SINGLE BIKE RACK in


good condition. I can
e-mail
photo. $25.
352-513-4519
Smith Corona,
1903-A3, .30-06,
$535.
Trap Door, Spring-
field, Rifle .45-70
$495.
(352) 270-6142
WILSON GOLF
X-31 Tour MRH Set
3wds/8irons grap/stl sw
& putt Dunnellon $100
352-465-8495




2013 Enclosed Trail-
ers
6x12 with ramp,
$1895
call 352-527-0555


Motorcycle utility
trailer 4ft x 8ft. 12 in
wheels $700.
(352) 465-5573
TRAILER 4 x6, has
spare tire, garage kept;
Good Condition $500
(352) 726-8931




ROUND WOODEN
FABRIC CANOPY
BASSINET Beautiful
$75. 352-422-2719

Sel oS ap


Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




WANT TO BUY
HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situa-
tion. Call Fred,
352-726-9369




COLEMAN TENT
/CAMPER. '95, A/C,
stove, sink, sleeps 6+,
good canvas and
upholstery $1200
(352) 628-0173




1 Sweet Little Male
Yorkie,
CKC reg., $375. Fl.
health certs.,
Call
(352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258
13 Chickens $5. ea.
2 Roosters $7 ea.
2 Ducks $10. ea.
(352) 503-6796
(352) 364-1819
AMERICAN PITBULL
PUPPIES We have 1
female and 5 males
left they are 3 weeks
old Jan.18th $150each
Mother and Father on
site.
352-302-7975


BELLA
Bella is a beautiful
silvery brindle Cattle
Dog/Shepherd mix,
came to the shelter
because her family
lost their home. She is
4 years old, spayed,
housebroken, micro-
chipped, and
Heartworm-negative,
weighs 45 pounds.
Walks well on a leash,
gets along with other
dogs and is very, very
playful. Fenced yard is
preferred, but can
jump a low fence.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


m. -_
BLUE
Blue is an approxi-
mately 8-y.o. neu-
tered male Cattle
Dog mix, Came to
the shelter because
his family lost their
home. Blue is white
and tan, weighs
about 50 pounds, is
a bit chubby for his
size, which is me-
dium. He is house-
broken, very
friendly and affec-
tionate. The most
striking thing about
him is that he has
very beautiful blue
eyes, which catch
your attention imme-
diately. He loves
people and wants to
be by your side Is
very obedient and
walks well on a
leash. He is quite
laid-back and would
make a great com-
panion for an older
person.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.

DOG Training & Ken-
nel
crittersandcanines.com







H (352) 634-5039 H









HANK
Hank is an 8 y.o.
male Hound mix
who was a stray. He
is a sweet, affection-
ate, low key gentle-
man, easy to walk,
does not pull on
leash. He has good
energy and is a
good companion. Is
very housebroken,
gets along with
other dogs. Weighs
about 56 pounds.
Not yet neutered
but would be in-
cluded in adoption
fee. Is a very sweet
older dog in need
of a good, safe
home.
Call Mike @
352-726-0165
or Joanne
@352-795-1288.


Dachshunds Puppies
Mini, Long hair,
females,black & cream.
Champion blood lines.
$250
(352) 220-4792
MINIATURE POO-
DLES miniature poodle
pups born 10/16/12
Health Cert 1 apricot &
1 black female & 1
black male almost
potty trained, raised in
our home. $500 cash
call 352-419-5662 or
karaluv3@yahoo.com


NICKY
Nicky is a 2 y.o.
lab/bulldog mix,
weighing about 78
pounds, and is
Heart-worm
negative. Is very
sweet and loveable,
very intelligent. How-
ever, he is a big,
strong dog who needs
a strong person to
handle him, and a
fenced yard is
strongly recom-
mended. He knows
how to sit for treats
and wants to please
his human friend very
much.
He is available now at
the Citrus County
Animal Shelter.
Call 352-746-8400

RATS FOR SALE
50 cents to $3.00
All Sizes
(352) 419-9080
Leave Message
Shih-Tzu Pups,
ACA
starting@ $350. Lots
of colors, Beverly
Hills, FL
(352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net









SKIPPY
Skippy is a Redbone
Coonhound, 8 y.o.,
who came to the
shelter because his
owner "couldn't af-
ford him." Originally
very thin and mal-
nourished, he's now
happy and healthy,
having been in a
foster home for
months. He is sweet,
trusting and loving,
with beautiful bright
eyes. He is the classi-
cal "Good Dog".
Completely house-
broken. Loves walk-
ing, being petted,
and car rides.
Would be best in a
1-dog family. For a
grateful, loving ca-
nine companion,
Call Judy @
352-503-3363.


^^^^^-11


w





Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




BOAT TRANSIT
TRAILER Very Ig., dbl.
axles up to 33 ft. Any
boat type! $1800 or
OBO (813) 244-3945




5HP OUTBOARD
MOTOR LIKE NEW
$385 (352) 341-2661 or
352-586-7437
BASS TRACKER
12ft. Jon Boat,
w/ 6HP motor & trailer,
$1,750 obo
(352) 563-0665



MUST SELL


BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motor,AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth
finder, 2001 Rolls
float on trailer worth
$1000. Comes
w/spare motor Has
service manual,
2nd owner -$2500
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855

LOWE
1982 aluminum 18' boat
w/trailer, motor needs
work. $700.00
352-628-2150
PONTOON BOAT
18ft. 1991, NEW carpet
seats, etc., Nice,
Boat only. Will deliver
$1,200. (352) 637-3983
TRI PONTOON
BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
TWIN VEE 2006
26ft 210hrs, Twin 140hp
Suzukis, 4 Stroke,
Extras, Trailer $28,500
(352) 564-8882
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
(352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com


FOREST RIVER
INC.
2006 Cardinal like new.
Rare in-place senior
use. Smoke/pet free.
352-843-5441.
detailsbyowner.com.
Wholesale, $17,830.00
ITASCA MERIDIAN
36 Ft, 2005 Motor
Home
350HP Cat Diesel 55K
miles, no smoke/pets
6 Michelan Tires,
New 2010 qn w/
sleep No. mattress &
overhead fan. W/D
combo $71,000 obo .
(352) 419-7882
NATIONAL RV
2006 Tropical One
owner,34ft, 26000
miles,no smoke/pets,
300HP Cummins die-
sel,2 slides, 6 new ti-
res, 3yr
warranty,many extras.
$87000. Well main-
tained. 352-341-4506




5TH WHEEL
33FT
GOOD CONDITION
MUST SELL
(423) 202-0914
FOREST RIVER
2010, Surveyor,
Sport 189, 20 ft.
Travel Trailer,
1 slide, w/AC, qn. bed,
awning, pwr. tonque
jack, corner jacks, mi-
crowave, equilizing
hitch, $10,500, re-
duced to $9800
(352) 382-1826
HIGH LINE
1999, 32ft, Deluxe,
12' slide out, new 22'
awning, 55+ park, can
be moved. Was ask-
ing $9,000, Sell $6,900
excel. shape
231-408-8344
HI-LO TRAVEL
TRAILER 2003, tow
lite model 22-03t,exc.
cond.
$6000 obo
352-422-8092
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, kg bd,like new,
60amp serve. NADA
$29K asking $25K
obo 352-382-3298
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945




4 Tires
215- 65/17
10,000 miles left
$60 for Set
(352) 628-1126
FIERO
Assorted body parts
$25 each
(352) 586-0084
SILVERADO 5TH
WHEEL TAILGATE
$100
&
VINYL RANGER BED
COVER $75
(352) 637-2982




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk
or Unwanted
Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 &
UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot LARRY'S
AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352
564-8333
MONEY'S TIGHT!I
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition, Ti-
tle, No Title, Bank
Lien,
No Problem, Don't
Trade it in. We Will
Pay up to $25K Any
Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ




2005 TOYOTA
Camry XLE 77K mi
loaded RED 4 cyl 1
owner clean carfax
$10,850 way under KBB
352-419-4513
BUICK
2007, Lucerne, CXL
55K miles, Leather
$13,500. obo
Call Troy
(352)621-7113
CADILLAC
2003 CTS, Must see.
Luxury car at an
affordable price.
Call 352-628-4600
for an appointment.
CHEVROLET
2002, Camaro Z28
$9,495.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2005, Venture
$3,995
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2007, Impala
$9,995
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
'01, PT Cruiser,
loaded, 53k miles,
$4,800
(352) 464-4304
CHRYSLER
'97, Town and Country


Van 7 pass. good
cond. Call for Details
$1750. 352-637-2588
FORD
2001 COBRA MUS-
TANG CONV. 5
SPEED, LEATHER
MUST SEE
CALL 352-628-4600
For More Info
FORD
2005, Five Hundred
LMT, 40K miles,
leather, V6 $9,980
Call Troy
352-621-7113


CLASSIFIED


warranty, $12400,
dema@netscape.com
FORD
'98, Ranger XLT, two
tone paint, electric
pkg. auto trans., al-
most new tires 170 k
$2,850 obo, 503-3787
LARIAT
'00 DullyV10, Goose
Neck towing pkg.
125k mi, clean $8,600.,
352-637-4864, 220-3277
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

NISSAN
2008 Titan King Cab,
w/bedliner & tow pkg,
New engine w/2 yr
warranty, 36K, $12, 000
OBO(352) 464-1164


FORD
2006 Focus ZXW, SE
4DR, WGN. 85k miles
$5,800 obo
Call Troy (352)
621-7113
FORD MUSTANG
2007, 7000 mi, garage
kept, GT clone.
Call (352) 527-1191
GAS SAVER!
1999 Saturn SL $2000
Tan/Gold. Auto. Engine
and Trans are solid.
196,000 miles. Clean in-
side and out. Call Steve:
352-613-0746
HONDA
2011 CRV LX, 19K
miles, likenew, 4 Cyl.
$19,950
Call Troy
352-621-7113
HYUNDAI
2006 Elantra, GLS
90K miles, likenew, 4
DR, auto. $6,800
Call Troy
352-621-7113
JEEP
Grand Cherokee ltd.
White, 70k mi. Mint
cond. Auto.$11,000
(305) 619-0282
KIA
'99, Sportage, Conv.
Top, low miles,
Runs great.
CALL 352-628-4600
For pricing.
LINCOLN
1998, MARK VIII
Automatic, COLD A/C
CALL 352-628-4600
For an appointment
to see!
MERCEDES
2006 SLK 350 Convy.
$26,000 OBO &
2005 S430 $22, 000
OBO (352) 621-4611
MITSUBISHI
'01, Eclipse GT,
sunroof, black w/ tan
leather int. runs
great
$2,500. 352-464-0719
MITSUBISHI
Mirage 2000 2dr.
coupe 5spd, 107k,
36mpg, cd & air. Just
serviced. $1850 (352)
422-1026
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

OLDSMOBILE '99
Cutlass, custom, 4 DR,
loaded, good mi., V6,
cruise, tilt, gar. clean
$3,250. (352) 212-9383
PONTIAC
1999 TransAm 5.7Llter
V8, 62,700 mi,
Show Quality, $7500.
(352) 726-8336
Cell 352-302-5569
PORSCHE
'99, 911 Carrera, black
exterior, black interior
62,600 org. mi $25,900
386-334-2559 CELL
SUBARU
1992 Legacy, 1 owner,
good cond. manual
trans. $1500 OBO
(352) 628-3194
TOYOTA
2000, Camry LE
V6, 183K miles Super
Clean $5,800. obo
Call Troy (352)
621-7113
TOYOTA
2000, Camry, Good
fuel economy, 4 door
transportation.
CALL 352-628-4600
for pricing & details.
TOYOTA
2007, Yaris, 59K mi-
les,
2 DR, H/B $7,800.
Call Troy
352-621-7113




1971 CHEVELLE
CONVERTIBLE
stunning, 40k+ in-
vested, fully re-
stored, 350 auto,
buckets, consistent
show winner, high
end stereo, red w/
white top & interior
$23,900,
352-513-4257

CHEVROLET
2004 Corvette convert.
Millennium yellow, 22K,
in excellent condition.
Corsa exhaust system
customized stainless
steel accessories inside
& out. Incl. grills, lights,
& tag frame.Performa-
nce exhaust headers, &
cold air intake filter.
$26,000. 352-382-2324







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966





FORD
2003 F250
crew cab, $6,495.
352-341-0018
FORD
2010 F150 Platinum
Supercrew, 4x4, 31700
miles, black, leather,
navigation, rear view
camera, tow package,
excellent condition,


TOYOTA
2004, 4 Runner Sport
2WD, 94K mi,
Leather $12,800.
obo
Call Troy
352-621-7113




CADILLAC
2007, Escalade,
44k miles, Luxury
NAV, $29,500.
Call Troy (352)
621-7113
JEEP
2011 Patriot 2.0L, 5
speed, FWD, alc,
power
windows/doors,
white, 12k, like new,
$12,750 352 513-4100



SOLD
CHEVROLET
'96, Suburban LT,
excel. cond. Leather,
garaged. Must See
$4,400 obo




FORD
F150, 1978, 4x4
perfect, father/son,
project $1,650 obo
(352) 564-4598
JEEP
1995, Wrangler,
$5,495.
352-341-0018
JEEP
2004, Wrangler X
4WD, Only 57K mi-
les,
Hard Top $13,800.
Call Troy
352-621-7113




BAD BOY BUGGIE
2011 "ready to hunt"
Only $5998.
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS
2002, SPORTSMAN
700 CC 4X4 AUTO
READY FOR THE MUD
ONLY $4288
(352) 621-3678


POLARIS RZR 800 LE
TIME TO PLAY HARD
ONLY $8388
(352) 621-3678




DALIN DAY STAR
2006, 700mi saddle
bags, Fully dressed,
Call (352) 527-1191
Harley Davidson
2002, 883 Sportser,
new tires & saddlebags
17k mi., $4,500. obo
(607) 968-4269








Harley-DAVIDSON
2006 FLHTPI Clean
bike, great looks, 88 ci,
5 speed, low miles 19K,
accident free, never
played down, garage
kept, two tone bk/wt, all
service done by HD
dealer 352 513-4294
asking $10,500
HONDA
'01, Goldwing,
100k + miles,
$9,500
(352) 419-4606
HONDA
'06, Shadow 600 VLX,
deluxe. Can not tell
from brand new.
EXTRAS $3,600 obo
(352) 527-2294
HONDA
1997, GOLDWING
ASPENCADE, 24K mi,
Lots a Extras! $6000.
(352) 212-6450
HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley,1100CC,
Chrome, bags, trade?,
70mpg $2,800. Crystal
River
(727) 207-1619
HONDA BLACK BIRD
CBR 1100 LOW LOW
MILES ONLY $3488.00
(352) 621-3678
HONDA ST1300
2006 MADE TO TOUR
ONLY $7786
(352) 621-3678
KAWASKI NINFA
650
LIKE NEW ONLY
Meeting


302-0120 THCRN

PUBLIC NOTICE
The following is the schedule for the Regular Board Meetings of the Homosassa Spe-
cial Water District Board of Commissioners. All meetings are held on the 3rd Monday
of each month. Meetings begin at 3:00 PM and are held at the Water District office,
7922 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa, FL.
January 21, 2013
February 18, 2013
March 18, 2013
April 15,2013
May 20, 2013
June 17, 2013
July 15, 2013
August 19, 2013
September 16, 2013
October 21,2013
November 18, 2013
December 16, 2013
Published one time in the Citrus County Chronicle January 20, 2013


304-0120 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus
County, Florida, will hold a public hearing on the 12th day of February, 2013, at 5:01
pm in the Commission Chambers, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Ave-
nue, Inverness, Florida 34450, to consider adopting a Resolution approving PV-12-03
for Timothy C. Pitts on behalf of Crystal Glen Properties, LLC to determine the advisa-
bility of vacating, abandoning, discontinuing and removing Note 12 of the plat of
Crystal Glen, as recorded in Plat Book 14, Pages 21 through 27, public records of Cit-
rus County, Florida, as described in the attached Exhibit "A", renouncing and dis-
claiming any right of Citrus County and the public in and to any land described in
the attached Exhibit "A".
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Com-
missioners with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at leasttwo days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 341-6580.
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
Board of County Commissioners, Citrus County, Florida
Exhibit A
Remove the following from Plat Book 14, Page 21 of the Plat of Crystal Glen:
12. TRACT "A" SHALL BE USED FOR RECREATIONAL FACILITIES.
Published one time in the Citrus County Chronicle January 20, 2013


305-0120 SUCRN

PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION: ORDER TO DEMOLISH
CASE NUMBER: 129214
Description of property: AK: 1116767 and legally described as BELLO GARDENS PB 4
PG 118 LOT 1

LEROY & HEATHER RINGLE
1196S. CANDLENUT AVE.
HOMOSASSA, FL

On September 6, 2012, an order was issued by the Citrus County Certified Building
Official to demolish the structures) on the property located at: 1196 S. Candlenut
Ave.; Homosassa, FL. If the property owners) fail to comply with this order, the Code
Compliance Division will issue a work order to abate the nuisance condition.

Any persons) having a legal interest in this property may contact the Code Compli-
ance Office within 30 days of this publication. Board of County Commissioners, Dept.
of Planning and Development, Code Compliance Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, FL. 352-527-5350. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD
telephone (352) 341-6580.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle January 20, 2013


306-0120 SUCRN

PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION: ORDER TO DEMOLISH
CASE NUMBER: 117180
Description of property: AK: 1631408 and legally described as HIGHLANDS TRAILER
PARK PB2 PG 132 LOT43 BLKA

STEPHEN H WEBB
1571 N PAUL DR
INVERNESS, FL

On October 2, 2012, an order was issued by the Citrus County Certified Building Offi-
cial to demolish the structures) on the property located at: 1571 N. Paul Dr.; Inver-
ness, FL. If the property owners) fail to comply with this order, the Code Compliance
Division will issue a work order to abate the nuisance condition.

Any persons) having a legal interest in this property may contact the Code Compli-
ance Office within 30 days of this publication. Board of County Commissioners, Dept.
of Planning and Development, Code Compliance Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, FL. 352-527-5350. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD
telephone (352) 341-6580.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle January 20, 2013


303-0120 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

INVITATION TO BID
ITB No. 016-13
Public Access Internet and Telecommunication Services
Citrus County Library System
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to furnish public access Internet and telecommunications services for its five
branch libraries located throughout Citrus County.

The selected contractor will provide for and meet the requirements of a reliable,
constant high-speed Internet connection to support public access to Internet ser-
vices as well as the connectivity necessary to ensure the operational needs are met
for each branch, the headquarters library, and other services and connections re-
quired for essential day-to-day operations at each facility.

These services are vital to the operations of all five libraries providing public Internet
access to over 130 public access workstations as well as 24/7 access to a variety of
Web services, premium databases, online library catalog and patron account ac-
cess. It will also provide the needed connectivity infrastructure to support the Inte-
grated Library System (ILS), staff network access, and the public workstation man-
agement systems vital to library operations.

SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before February 20, 2013 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Purchasing Manager, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sover-
eign Path, Suite 266, Lecanto, FL 34461.

A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for February 20, 2013 @ 2:15 PM at 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.

Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at the Public Opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or
speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.

To obtain a copy of the Bid Documents for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "BIDS" on the left hand side of
the Home Page. Or, call the Office of Management & Budget/Purchasing at (352)
527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Joe Meek, Chairman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle January 20, 2013


KYMCO
2009, AJILITY
SCOOTER GREAT
GAS SAVER ONLY
$998 (352) 621-3678

SUZUKI BURGMAN
AUTOMATIC TWIST
AND GO FUN ONLY
$4686 (352) 621-3678

SUZUKI GSXR 750
195 MILES "HOLD ON"
ONLY $9996
(352) 621-3678

VICTORY CROSS
ROADS
"GREAT American
MADE CRUSIER"
ONLY $12888





307-0127 SUCRN
Personal Mini Storage
02-06 Lien Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF
THE FOLLOWING TENANTS
WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH
TO SATISFY RENTAL LIENS
IN ACCORDANCE WITH
FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF
STORAGE FACILITY ACT,
SECTIONS 83-806 AND
83-807:
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE
DUNNELLON
UNIT
#0008 MARILYN WALKER
#0009 JESSICA KLEMM
#0203 LARRY QWAN
#0237 LINDA SEIBERT
#0334 DAVID & PATRICIA
VANDEMARK
CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE
KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD
ITEMS, BEDDING,
LUGGAGE, TOYS, GAMES,
PACKED CARTONS, FURNI-
TURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING,
TRUCKS, CARS, ETC.
THERE'S NO TITLE FOR
VEHICLES SOLD AT LIEN
SALE.
OWNERS RESERVE THE
RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS.
LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ON
THE PREMISES- FEBRUARY
6TH @ 2:00PM.
VIEWING WILL BE AT THE
TIME OF THE SALE ONLY.
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE
DUNNELLON
11955 N FLORIDA AVE
(HWY 41)
DUNNELLON, FL 34434
352-489-6878
January 20 & 27, 2013


Meeting^^
Notices.^


I Mot




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IERICK4




1 K


Where do you find America's
freshest lineup? You'll find
these fuel-efficient vehicles in
a Nick Nicholas Ford Showroom
near you. Exclusive EcoBoost
technology delivers efficient
power. And now, Nick Nickolas
Ford offers 4 models EPA rated
at 40 mpg highway or better.
So you can go further.


2013
C-MAX HYBRID
RATED AT UP TO

47MPG2


2013 FIESTA SE


2013
FUSION HYBRID
RATED AT UP TO
4 HWY
47MPG2


2013 FOCUS 2013 FIESTA
RATED AT UP TO RATED AT UP TO
40 4HWY HWY
40MPG5 40MPG5


w 'W N2C281 1
2012 FOCUS SE


M SRP........................................... 25,900 M SRP........................................ 20,215
M SRP....................Special Added Discount.................................-450 Special Added Discount ..............................-35
Nick Nicholas Ford Discount................-.....280 Nick Nicholas Ford Discount.... .............-.....1,201 Nick Nicholas Ford Discount...............-....1,181
Retail Customer Cash.............................$500 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash.....-1,750 Retail Customer Cash..... .............-1,000
3 Payments On Us Special 3 Payments on Us Special 3 Payments On Us Special
Retail Customer Cash............................$1,000 Retail Bonus Cash............................-1,500 Retail Customer Cash............................-1,000

$17o400 $20.999 $16 999






2013 EDGE SE 2012 F-150 4X4 SUPER CREW 2012 F-250 LARIAT 4X4 CREW CAB


M SRP... ........................ ............. 29,795
Nick Nicholas Ford Discount......... ...........-796
Retail Customer Cash..... .........................-500
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash........-1,000
Retail Bonus Customer Cash....... .............-500
3 Payments On Us Special
Retail Customer Cash..................................$1,500

$25,499


tified Pre-Ow


M SRP.................................................... 38,335
Nick Nicholas Ford Discount......................... 1,936
Retail Customer Cash.......... ................-1,250
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash........-1,250
3 Payments On Us Special
Retail Customer Cash.......... ................. -1,500

$32,399


M SRP............ ..................................... 54,735
XLT Diesel Discount............ ......... .........-1,500
Nick Nicholas Ford Discount........ .........-3,636
Retail Customer Cash............ .............-........ 1,500
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash........-1,000
3 Payments On Us Special
Retail Custom er Cash ............................................-1,500

$45,599


* 172-point inspection by factory-trained technicians
*7-year/100,000-mile powertrain warranty coverage**
* 12-month/12,000-mile Ford Comprehensive Limited Warranty Coverage**
*Vehicle history report *24/7 Roadside Assistance
-_Jlnu tmmine a W M


2011 FORD FIESTA SES
Loaded loaded, loaded. N3C057D
$ 19,668


2010 FORD MUSTANG GT 2011 FORD EDGE LIMITED
Just reduced. NP5748 Don't miss this limited. N3T080A
$25,968 $29,968
A 14MA 14


2010 FORD ESCAPE XLT
The right size SUV. NP5767A
S19,968


2010 FORD EDGE LIMITED
Vista roof and nav. N2T351 F
$29,968


2009 FORD FUSION SEL
The import beater for real. N2T247A
$19,668


2010 FORD F150 LARIAT SUPER CREW
Extra sharp lariat crew cab. N2T296A
$31,668
r-1 aI* Noyl


2011 FORD ESCAPE XLS
Only 10k miles. NN2T313A
$21,668


2010 FORD EDGE LIMITED
Don't miss this loaded limited. N2T374A
$31,968


2008 FORD EDGE LIMITED
One owner limited. N3T099A
$22,668


2011 FORD FLEX SEL
Room for the whole family. N2C292A
$25,668


Certified Pre-Owned


2008 SUZUKI 514 2003 FORD CROWN VICTORIA LI 2007 CHEVY UPLANDER EXT IT I2006 FORD EXPLORER XLS
Super economy. N2T351Q Great car. N2C294B Room for the whole family. NP5642B Nice explorer for not much money N3C032A
$9,968 $9,868 $12,668 $13,968
awl SAL.


2005 FORD MUSTANG |
Low mileage pony car. N2T410A
$13,968


2003 JEEP WRANGLER 4X4
Extra clean and ready to tow. NP5777D
$14,968


2008 SATURN VUE XE
Extra clean. N2C249A
$15,668

W ,.;- T-.


2009 PONTIAC TORRENT 2012 JEEP COMPASS SPORT 2006 FORD F1SO LARIAT SUPER CREW 2010 CHEVY MALIBU LT
ooking for new home & loves ids N2T215M Only 6k miles. N3T164B This one has the wow factor. N2T209P Only 22k miles and loaded. N2C161A
$18,968 $19,968 $19,968 $19,968
^---jUW~i ^^SSSbin


Family Owned
& Opperated


2 1 NZUZfZ
2012 FUSION SE


All Ford Certified
Pre-Owned Vehicles
Come With:


2009 FORD FUSION SE
Extra clean sunroof. NPR632
$18,968


D8 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The 2013 VILLAGE TOYOTA
TRADE-IN ASSISTANCE PROGRAM


Receive a $1,0


when


you


purchase


00


Trade-In


or lease a


Bon
new


us*
Toyota.


VILLAGE TOYOTA OT
I*1 0 0 0 TB i
-- -- BONUS* I
'Prior sales e eluded rnust present trad-in coupIoni prior to itne-up
00doqk


USING YOUR $1,000 TRADE-IN BONUS*
IS AN EASY THREE STEP PROCESS:


Choose a new Toyota vehicle
from our outstanding selection
of 2012 and 2013 models.
Let our Toyota experts give you
a complimentary appraisal of
your current vehicle


Present your Trade-In
for an ADDITIONAL $1
towards a new Toyota.


Bonus*
,000


Due to the high
demand for pre-
owned vehicles,


Village


Toyota


must replenish its
inventory.


Call NOW! Ask for Sales Manager
Brett Coble or Charlie DeFreese to get your
$1,000 Trade-in Bonus* activated.
0W Or, call 800-852-7248 to
Schedule a complimentary
trade-in appraisal


We're willing to pay


you the highest possible price for your used


vehicle. Use your total trade value and the $1


,000 Trade-In Bonus*


to get your best deal ever on a new 201 2 or 201 3 Toyota.
www.villagetoyota.com


*$1,000 Trade-in Bonus* is valid only at Village Toyota and can be used towards the purchase or lease of any new 2012 or 2013 Toyota in stock
Not for cash value. Non-transferrable. Must present coupon upon arrival. See dealer for details. Offer expires 1/31/13.


1

2

3


SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 D9




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


0


a


fe


2012 Chevy Volt
Now's the time to GO GREEN!!!




AND 0% APR fr 72 m.o&


Al-New 2013 Chevy Spak 1LS
AutoaticTranrnission


2012 ChevySonic 5 Dr.LS
MSRP: $15.560


. i..


2013 heavy Malibu LS
MSRP: $23440


2013 Chevy Equhiox LS
StkC. C13135, Auto,4cyL MSRP: S25,030


2012 Chevy Waverse LS
Stk #C12326, Auto, Seats 7!Was $30,750


*1


I'll,"'


4.


D10 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DECEMBER'S $5000 WINNER!
BARBARA WILBURN-YORK
YOU COULD BE THIS MONTH'S WINNER!
VISIT ANY CRYSTAL LOCATION FOR DETAILS





CRYSTAL.
N I S S A N/
352-564-1971
937 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL A
CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
Sales: Monday-Friday 8:00am-8:00pm Saturday 9:00am-7:30pm Sunday-Closed


Service: M, W, F 7:30am-5:30pm T, TH 7:30am-7:00pm Saturday 8:00am-4:00pm Sunday-Closed Body Shop: M-F 7:30am-5:30pm
+PRICE INCLUDES $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX TAG TITLE AND
DEALER FEE $599.50. WAC. *LEASES ARE FOR 39 MONTHS 39,000 MILES FOR THE LIFE OF THE LEASE. 15 CENTS PER MILE OVER. $3999 DUE AT SIGNING
WITH APPROVED CREDIT. **0%, SPECIAL FINANCE OFFERS AND NO PAYMENTS UNTIL MARCH 2013 ARE AVAILABLE WITH APPROVED CREDIT, NOT VERY-
ONE WILL QUALIFY. OFFERS CANNOT BE COMBINED. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 D11




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DECEMBER'S

*5000 WINNER!

BARBARA WILBURN-YORK

YOU COULD BE THIS
MONTH'S WINNER!
VISIT ANY CRYSTAL LOCATION FOR DETAILS


O '12 XB


I 24 HRWV
B:I800-584-875 Exti .13040


r '12 SENTRA


:u. :^ *


r '12 IMPALA '-

#1s


OR $10,999 $12,999 u$14,999 Buy$ 14,999*
oR $172 O. $203, O. $235m O. $235!


'12 CRUZE



FRI 4 ... u
1-80-5 "75 Ex.1 83


r '12 SONATA
ON
".%ww~r-e


'12 MALIBU


FEE 24H :EUUDM SHWI NIW EW N


FO$14,999 $15,999 u$15,999 u$15,999
OR PER3 ORP $250EROR PER LOR ER
oR $235 O. $250 ,m. $250,^ J $250r.
MO. yvy


'12200
VAyth,
... .. ..
FRH .*j^ elr HNRURDD ESARWSHIN F MWE aF ,
1-800-584-8755 ''Ext.18182^^s


'12 JOURNEY -


FM. q FM N ~ DMi PEIM P UI


r '12 EQUINOX -


f "'I f W M


'12 CHALLENGER)


B 9BB91Ea6
1-800.-584-8755 iExl42


L; $16,999 j i$17,9991 'ou.$19,999 B u$20,999I
OR 2 PER OR $282 R PER3JR PER


' '12 CAMARO '



:.F R:V4H: UU MD i


' '12 PRIUS


:uF A M E W UN


F'12 RAM QUAD CAB
S-,


:is :. W NRMrfM PO


r '12 WRANGLER )


F:R 61 :IH :CRF F= %THIR WSMM


FR20,999 .,$22,999 ,ORS22,999 FR9s22,9999
OR $328 OR $360. OR $360 o." $360





Y,' AUTOMOTIVE

352-564-1971 WWW.CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd. 1005 S. Suncoast Blvd. 2077 Highway 44W 14358 Cortez Blvd. 937 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL Inverness, FL Brooksville, FL Homosassa, FL

*PRICE AND PAYMENTS INCLUDE $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. PAYMENTS ARE FOR72 MONTHS AT 3.99% APR WITH APPROVED CREDIT PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PUR-
POSES ONLY. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.
L 000DOUI


" '12 500


IAEL.4 HR KMRDLD MUM WIIH INFO AM 9UK MON6
1-800-584-8755 Ext.52534


D12 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013


Ni 4HMPUB MMW Y1i WAD7C O
1-80-584875 Ext225







Sikorski's
-- Attic PAGE E6


HOMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GULID


iii {mL tiJiJJih



rj li/
bJ2jjIJ^J

J^Uffrfi
rJL 9'


1. r 0 4 4 V


2 /
[~~]


This photo provided by Home-
Goods shows a set of storage
boxes in a deep blue print
that add blue accents to a
room in a practical way.
Blues ranging from sky to
teal to indigo are popping up
in home d6cor retailers from
now throughout the season.
Associated Press


ii


/]


I .







E2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013


24'7TNFO TINE
5./637-2828a
5 4!1Q


YOUR SEARCH IS OVER!!
*3 or 4 Bedrooms Updated Classy Kitchen
* Gorgeous Pool/Lanai On 3rd Green
* Huge Formal Dining *3-CAR GARAGE
* Extraordinary Landscape Extended Fam. Suite
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.FloridaLislinglinlo.com u









NEW PRICE ON POOL HOME!!
* Island Kt./Lots of Cabs Beautiful Scrn. Pool!!
* Great Master with Bath Kitchen wlLots of Cab.
* Loads of Upgrades Water Softener/Rev. Osmosis
* Irrigation Well Fantastic Equestrian Comm.
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.Flo idaLislinginlo.comi


5989 N. ORCHIS TER.
PINE RIDGE
*4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF Living
*2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath
* Office or Den Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875









11985 N. GOLDENDALE AVE.
DUNNELLON, FL
Furnished Doublewide 1 Acre Lot Near Boat Ramp
2BD/2BAw/3-Car Detached Garage/Workshop
Utility Shed w/Elect Plus 30'x50' Steel Carport
PETER & MARVIA KOROL i
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875

1J I







4286 S. PURSLANE
HOMOSASSA
3BR/2BA built in 2006, granite, SS appliances,
brick pavers, across street from canal.
Directions: Fish Bowl Dr. to right on Purslane

JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email: team@dtrusrealty.com L


JET SKI OFF YOUR BACKYARD!
Excellent location to wide open Inverness chain of lakes. Jet
ski off your backyard with minutes to Big Lake Henderson.
Furnishings are negotiable. 2 bedroom 2 1/2 bath
waterfront maintenance-free unit. Two screened porches.
Community pool and short distance to Withlacoochee State
Bike Trail. Motivated seller looking for offers.
JENNIFER STOLTI (352) 637-6200
Email: jenniferStollz@remax.ne
www.CitrusCountyHomes.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


II 1 11 Ii i
ROOM FOR TOYS OVER 1/2 ACRE!!
* Well-Kept 3BR, 2 Bath *2-Car Garage
* Enclosed Heat/AC FL Rm. *2-Car Carport
* Granite Counters Updated Baths
*2 Comer Lots Large Patio & Shed/Workshop

KELLIE GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorid.com











REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
S 637-2828


2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


'* i.o wn uversizea iuarage Loaas o0 oiorage
* Open Floor Plan Convenient Location
* Backs Up To Conservation Area Large Master w/Sitting Area
S.7 Acre Lot Room for Boa/RV
* Price Slashed, Don't Miss This One!
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpotts@aol.com
Website: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


24"7INdFO LINE -l
Enter touse __428

II IIIwS''


544Z N. Ufl
CITRUS SI
* Beautiful 3BR/2BA/2CG Home
* Granite Countertops
*Great Room/Dining Room
*Tile in Living Area

LEN PALMER (352)
Email: lenpalmer@rer


*Nice Kitchen w/Eat-In Area
* Stainless Steeel Appliances
SMaster Suite w/Garden Tub
* Lots of Nice Upgrades

212-2611
max.netl


14 ACRE RANCH!
* 2,700 Sq. Ft. Stable *3/2/2 Spacious Home
* Fenced and Cross-Fenced *Vaulted Beamed Ceilings
* Two Wells Long Private Drive
*New Deck New Roof in 2005
*Priced to Sell!! Don't Miss This One!
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 11
Email: sherylpotls@aol.comin 1
Weisile: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com i .


OPEN LAKEFRONT POOL HOME
This brand new listing includes a family room with
fireplace, split bedrooms Granite counters, stainless
steel appliances, self-cleaning, caged pool, laminate
flooring and more Huge lot on open lakefront with a
dock Has everything Needs nothing
THE REAL ESTATE DOCTOR AT (352) 212-6002
JOHN HOLLOWAY, SR.
ORS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO
Email: johnHolloway@tampabay.rr.com o i
www.TheHollowayTeam.com









WATERFRONT
Deep water, dock, screened
porch plus a nice 3/2/2 and just
a few lots off the RIVER.

LUCY BARNES (352) 634-2103
Email: lucybarnes@remax.net
Visual Tours: www.cryslalriverl.com


MEADOWCREST
* Open Floor Plan Large Living Room
* Formal Dining Room Eat-In Kitchen
* Florida Room Pinehurst Village

KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(Em 352) 637-6200i r
Email: kcunmngham@remax.net


THE PERFECT HOME for living the good life" in Crystal
River Great 3/2/1 lovingly cared for and sitting on 2 pretty
fully fenced lots. Some amenities include RV/boat storage,
12xl 3 utility bldg. w/attached carport. Roof, soffits & gutters
in 2005, A/C 2005. Enjoy your swim spa in your 15x25
privacy fenced deck. Guys check out the MANCAVE
garage/workarea...9' ceiling, air & heat, plumbed, insulated
and cabinets GALORE. REDUCED.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


.2 4 2 N L e c ni H w B e e l i l 2 8 2w w R t A ~ o 1 .F o i a A e ,I v r e s 6 7 6 0


[ ~~ c 52yi637.2782a
B~fc-^^~terhose1^?8


oC^^ --







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Be careful when giving gifts


Dear Sara: I'm looking for gifts
ideas for a new daughter-in-
law. I'm considering family
recipes, photos of her husband
when he was a child and maybe an
address book containing all the ad-
dresses, phone numbers and impor-
tant dates for his side of the family
Is this intrusive? C.L., Mississippi
Dear C.L.: I wouldn't find it intru-
sive, but this is something that very
much depends on the recipient.
Some people would find it quite in-
trusive and would prefer these
items be given to the husband in-
stead, if he wanted them. She might
view it as if you're pawning off
things she doesn't value as keep-
sakes and forcing her to store and be
responsible for them when she isn't


interested in them at all. wrong? -Lilly Illinois
It can make her feel as if Dear Lilly: When guava
she's solely responsible is ripe, you can eat the en-
for all her husband's ex- tire fruit, including the
tended family's important peel/rind and the seeds.
dates, too. You might con- You can bite into it like an
sider that she probably apple, but you can eat it
doesn't care about her all. Some people cut off
husband's third cousin the ends, cut the fruit in
that she's never met quite half or quarters, remove
as much as direct family Sara Noel the seeds and only eat
members do. At least not FRUGAL what is remaining. Some
yet, anyway LIVING people cut them in half,
Dear Sara: I bought scoop out the fruit center
these little yellow guavas at the store and throw away the skin.
the other day When I eat them, Dear Sara: Have you ever tried
they're soft and creamy, but the just writing the prices on the things
seeds are really hard. I thought the you buy? I have heard that you
seeds were edible, but it's hard to
chew them. Am I eating them See FRUGAL/Page E4


TSpa}~ecialiigi eErit

REALT GROUPwo Rsae


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about
breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-563-
5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone
number, and the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-
563-5660 and ask for Nancy Kennedy. Again, be
prepared to leave a detailed message.




LARealto RealtoE
3023179O O so 287 19022
746-6700 WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl W K AT VYILV
.;.LAUREL RIDGE I llJ
2,900y~u fA 244 W. Romany Lp.. Beverly Hills


Office in the
Terra Vista
Welcome Center


Ril I FCKFR 3K2.4f64-& 47 SIIAN Mill I FN M.4-99.91. VICTORIA FRANKI IN 31-497-3777


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
This home is immaculate All and brightly Open kitchen/
Living area, room plan home-ready for immediate
occupancy just like a model All this situated on beautifully landscaped
golf course lot in gated community
MLS 700267 $119,900






DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, PLUS DEN, HILLSIDE VILLAS
This maintenance fre
community of Terra V
villa Home features large family room, open formal dining Open kitchen with
breakfast bar and eat- in with golf course view Master has window with view of
$229,000


SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 3-CAR, HUNT CLUB
Lakefront Terra Vista Richmond Modell 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 3-car garage with
beautiful lake view and a view of the fountain Home has many upgrades
ertaining A
$379,000


DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOOD
Exceptionally well maintained home situated on a preserve hon


colors


sta
S all

$214,900


e site that shows DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 3.5 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 2 BEDROOM, 2 B
Come and see this really nice custom Windward on the 5th hole of Skyview Golf Beautiful maintenance free home, 2
i lanai has a open floor plan h a greE
D take a look The garage shutters, superior lots of
is enlarged for extra room room Ready to move into on a corner
$249,000 MLS 356463 $199,000 MLS 355853


Term .fas -6Mots or More
T^^erra Visa & Brentwood Rentals! SociaMmesi icue ih l etl


7 CAR DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
aths King in Fully furnished 2/2/2 detached villa in Terra Vista Beautifully decorated Immaculate unfurnished home in the Community of Brentwood Open floor
Enjoy ............ i ........ I ....... r .11. I I I ..... I .....' .... h '11' I" I .... ... .1, I
$ 1 ,0 0 0 a sun ny ,. , I 1 .5 0 0 (i 1. ,,.. ii..i $ 1 ,1 0 0


U


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703


SKYVIEW VILLAS
2 5/2 w/den Private brick


$364,900


OD VILLAS
I new carpet
, car garage
$1,100


garage, plus cen,
n with plantation
very
$199,000


'I I


SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 E3







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

should make a price book for the
things you buy most often, but I'm
never really sure what to include and
what to leave out. Using an actual
notebook was too cumbersome and
time-consuming. I figure if I write on
the most obvious ones with a sharpie,
I'll probably just memorize the price,
since I'll be using the item so often. I
guess it wouldn't work if you tried to
keep track of the price of everything,
but it should work at least with the
most common things you buy, right?
-Nishu, California


Dear Nishu: Your idea will work,
and most importantly you'll have
created a system that works for you,
specifically Many of the products
you buy will already have a price
sticker on them, so it won't be too
time-consuming for you. I prefer
using a handy little notepad; some
people prefer a dry-erase board or
a spreadsheet, and others simply
use their receipts as a reference.
After a while, you do tend to memo-
rize the best price on many prod-
ucts. I like to have information
recorded, too, such as unit sizes and
prices, dates, store name, etc. You
might be interested in comparison
shopping/price book apps, too, such
as Pricebook, RedLaser and Com-


pareMe Shopping Utility.

Free product samples let you try
before you buy While some samples
are full-sized, many are trial-sized
or single-use. They're the perfect
size for travel, and they make nice
add-on gifts or donation items, too.
They work well to supplement the
products you normally buy. A few
product samples can help in a
pinch if you run out of something
such as soap or shampoo; they can
save you a trip to the store.
The first reader tip shares how
samples help her budget:
Sign up for samples: Get all the

See FRUGAL/Page E5


Real Estate DIGEST


John
Maisel
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


pA&




Steve Alison
McClory Markham
EXIT Realty EXIT Realty
Leaders. Leaders.


- U U U U


PINE RIDGE CITRUS HILLS
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd. i',/, J Pruude il 20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Frid Sh Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 Florida Showcase (352) 746-0744
(352) 527-1820 Properties (352) 746-0744
Properties


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3


C/ In 384z W Niorthcrest Lt
MLS#352588 $159,900
3/2/2 home on a cul-de-sac offer
spacious indoor.
Directions: East on Rte44torightinto Crystal Glen
(Crystal Glen Dr) to rihton Northcrest Cto home on left.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


"--L. ,L rage ,ve
-Aa MLS#358012 $499,000
Custom Cracker home 3/3/plusw/tin-
roof on 5 acres.
Sandra 01ear352-212-4058


NEW LISTING





821 W Cockatiel Lp
7IWQ MLS#700170 S89,900
2/2/2 envy of the neighborhood, has
the curb appeal.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086






S 1673Westgate Ln
MLS#356655 $218,000
Perfect home spacious rooms &
generous outdoor spaces.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523
PENDING


NEW LISTING


11111 _A -
l 2284 N Hardee Pt
/ MLS#700246 S84,900
A Must See!! Lovely 2/2/1 patio villa,
nicely furnished.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


NEW LISTING





9426 N Elliot Way
MLS#700151 $74,000
3/2 with lots of character.
Lori Nickerson 352-220-8434


^'"<^^s>.<- A~




73 Meneooo' I3Atst^a
1770 W Shanelle Path 1075 S Softwind Lp
MLS#354810 $164,900 u MLS#352259 $128,000


Charming 2/2/2 on the Brentwood Farms
Golf Course
John Lombard 352-422-6887


Spacious 3/2/3 home, corner lot, friendly
neighborhood.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523
PENDING


2392 N Loma Pt 14 S Polestar Pt 4214 N Stanwyck Trt 847W Sunbird Path
Bjs15aS MLS#358186 $59,000 4-tills MLS#352140 $348,000 ldid MLS#700107 $114,000 2 w MLS#357800 $99,900
MAKE MEAN OFFER, updated TWO masters, full guest suite, office, 3.5 Start living outyour Florida dream on BE SURPRISED! When you see this 2/2/2
Mobile on owner owned land. baths day One! plus den villa.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523 Mark Casper352-476-8136 Mark Casper352-476-8136 Barry Cook 352-302-1717
0 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Rnancial company. Prudential, the
Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Rnancial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


Charlene
Angelo
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


Pamela
Shemet
EXIT Realty
Leaders.

EXIT Realty
agents
on top
EXIT Realty
Leaders is proud to
honor the following
agents with the
multi-million dollar
producer status:
Charlene Angelo
and Peggy Price;
Nancy Little Lewis;
John Maisel; Steve
McClory and Ali-
son Markham;
Pamela Shemet;
Mary Gulling; The
Real Team; Nancy


Peggy Nancy Little
Price Lewis
EXIT Realty EXIT Realty
Leaders. Leaders.


Mary
Gulling
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


Nancy
Ayres
EXIT Realty
Leaders.
Ayres; and Lili
Garcia.
The year of 2012
proved to be a busy
year. EXIT Realty
closed $35 million
in sales, and won


The Real
Team
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


Lili
Garcia
EXIT Realty
Leaders.
Citrus County's
"Best of the Best"
real estate office for
the second year in
a row.
See DIGEST
/Page E5


* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding
and engagement announcements, anniversaries,
birth announcements and first birthdays.







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E4

free samples you can find
online, then actually use
them! I am always using
shampoo and conditioner
samples, toothpaste sam-
ples, etc. They add up over
time, so maybe you're buy-
ing one or two fewer tubes
of toothpaste a year, one
less bottle of shampoo a
year, etc. Every little bit
counts! Also, I play the on-
line instant-win games.
I've gotten quite a few
things this way, including a
full-size jar of anti-wrinkle
cream that arrived via
FedEx just this morning!
- EE, Illinois
Re-purpose clothing:
This week, I cut up some
clothing for rag strips, cut
up some old handker-
chiefs and placemats with
ragged lace edgings to
make cloth dust masks,
and found some excellent


leather and fur clothing
materials at the thrift
shop, which I'm going to
make into mitts, gloves,
slippers and moccasins. I
have other clothes in my
closet that I'm going to
make into aprons and bak-
ing hats; last year I made
some into dishcloths, dish-
towels and pot holders.
There's no need to look
further than my dressers,
shelves and closets when I
want something; it's usu-
ally there in another form.
- TP, Canada
Pineapple ripeness:
Someone who grew
pineapple told us to try to
pull out an inner "leaf" -
if it came out easily, the
pineapple is fully ripe.
We've used that method
for many years, and it has
proven to be true every
time. Judy S., North
Carolina
Remove jar labels: I use
Goo Gone. A few drops on
a paper towel, with some
rubbing, removes all glue


Cindy Patty
Lewis Sargent
Trotter Trotter
Realty. Realty.


DIGEST
Continued from Page E4

Trotter sales. They ac-
agents complished this
with the hard work
deliver and dedication of
results their agents.


Trotter Realty
would like to con-
gratulate their
agents for making
2012 an outstand-
ing year.
Trotter Realty
had over $20 mil-
lion last year in


The top selling
agent last year was
Cindy Lewis.
Cindy and Patty
Sargent sold more
than $3 million
each. Bonita
Amonte had more
than $2 million in


Bonita
Amonte
Trotter
Realty.


Ben
Plockelman
Trotter
Realty.
sales and Ben
Plockelman had
$2 million. Trotter
Realty is looking
forward to an even
stronger year
ahead in 2013.


residue. Stickier residue
requires more liquid and
more rubbing. It leaves an
oily leftover that must be
washed off with soap and
water. I have been using
Goo Gone for years. Since
you use so little at a time,
a single bottle will last a
long time. Kathy G.,
Oklahoma
Homemade Worcester-
shire sauce: This home-


made version keeps well
in the fridge. I think it
tastes much better than
the store-bought brands!
2 tablespoons olive oil.
2 large onions, roughly
chopped.
1/2 cup tamarind
paste.
2 tablespoons minced
garlic.
2 tablespoons minced
ginger


2 jalapenos, seeds re-
moved and minced.
3 tablespoons
chopped anchovies.
3 tablespoons tomato
paste.
2 whole cloves.
2 tablespoons freshly
cracked black pepper
1/2 cup dark corn
syrup.
1 cup molasses.
3 cups white vinegar.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 E5

1 cup dark beer.
1/2 cup orange juice.
2 cups water.
1 lemon, thinly sliced.
1 lime, thinly sliced.
In a large saucepan,
heat the olive oil over
medium heat. Add the
onion and saute until soft,
about 6 to 7 minutes. Stir
in the tamarind paste,

See FRUGAL/Page E10


Amanda & Kik Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BROKEI/ASSC. REALTOR CR REALTCR REALTOR-BROKER REALTOR


3946 N. PONY 4002 W. PINTO
4/3.5/3 359171 $749,900 4/2/2 358356 $239,900






4710 W. MUSTANG 10953 N. TARTAN 3750 N. HO
3/2/3 359604 $249,900 4/2/2 355293 $109,900 3/2/2 35888


2047 W. PARAGON LN.
3/2/2 358792 $149,900


842 W. COCKATIEL LP. 2450 N. BRENTWOOD CIR.
3/2/2 357166 $99,900 2/2/2 354530 $118,000


I s c~r Ho r= i-r~s


I 13290 S. OAKVIEW
4/25 358122 $109,900


6260 S. CANNA LILY 9328 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD.
3/2 359137 $59,900 3/2/1 356581 $69,900


-- -I


101 BARBER 16 S. ADAMS 2616 E. VENUS 8182 N. POCONO 6560 N. DELTONA BLVD.
2/2/2 354334 $59,900 2/1 356532 $42,900 3/2 700201 $24,900 3/2/2 700103 $86,900 3/2.5/2 700080 $119,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


-- __m


m


JIM I=.-Li ? SA


W,111 ll 14 ll I ITCJ


INVERNESS


EI CTUSSRIG


I


I






E6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
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Ci hONiCLE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
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News notes submitted without photos will not be
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The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Soldier's letter to 4-H
4 -H is a community of young instead of exchanging gifts, the 4-H'ers
people across America, brought items to pack care packages to
J- .-L learning leadership, citi- send to soldiers in Afghanistan.
zenship and life skills. One of The soldiers were identified
the essential elements 4-H using the wwwanysoldier.com
provides the youth member- website. This website allows
ship is generosity. Generosity B troops to register the needs for
allows youth to give of their en- their group, and provides the
ergy and talents to benefit oth- donors with their shipping ad-
ers in the world around them. dress. Three soldiers were se-
It extends from the range of elected and each received two
community service projects to blankets and a box of hygiene
civic engagement and embod- supplies, snacks and entertain-
ies the spirit of providing self- ment materials to share.
less service to organizations or The 4-H Council was very
individuals in need of help. Amy Duncan pleased to get a thank-you note
Practicing generosity YOUNG from one of the soldiers, de-
through service can be as sim- IDEAS spite his very busy schedule.
ple as raking the leaves in an With permission from his com-
elderly neighbor's yard or col- manding officer, the soldier's
lecting canned vegetables for a food letter is shared here for all to enjoy:
drive. As young people mature, they de- "Citrus County 4-H group,
velop a need for more significant engage- I would like to thank you from the bot-
ment in their community, which could tom of my heart for the generous dona-
include lobbying for social issues. tions of blankets we received in the last
Recently, the Citrus 4-H County Coun- couple days!! They are very nice!! At-
cil, made up of members from 4-H clubs tached is a couple photos of soldiers
across the county, completed a multi- snuggled up in them. One in his room and
stage community service project First, at the other outside so hopefully you can see
the November meeting, the council mem- some of our wonderful mountains and
bers made no-sew knot blankets to do- scenery I think you have a wonderful
nate. Then, at the December meeting, See 4-H/Page E7


Inside...


Blue is beautiful
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E10
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E4
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Wall pocket a bargain; organs a tough sell these days


D ear John: I have been hang your attractive wall
reading your articles in pocket. Wall pockets are a pop-
the Chronicle for years. ular category of collecting. They
This is the first time I need have been made since the 19th
your help. I pur- century and on into
chased this cute lit- the 20th century
tle vase at a thrift The Isle of Lewis
store for $1.50. The I is a popular tourist
colors caught my destination just off
eye and the price the coast of Scot-
seemed very rea- land. The Scotia Ce-
sonable, so I bought ramic Company
it. The condition is seems to still be in
perfect. There is a business on the is-
hole on the backside land. I am not sure
of the vase, perhaps John Sikorski how old your piece
to hang on a wall. On SIKORSKI'S is. The shape is a
the back, it says Sco- ATTIC thistle, Scotland's
tia Ceramics, Isle of ATTIC floral emblem. I
Lewis. I hope this is think it would sell
enough information for you to for 10 times what you paid.
tell me what it is worth. -E.S., Dear John: I have this organ,
Internet which was given to me by my
Dear E.S.: Wow, what a bar- aunt. I have no idea how old it
gain. The hole in the back is to is, but it is a beautiful piece of


furniture. On the front of it, it
has "Peerless Organ, Chicago,
U.S.A, Foley & Williams Mfg.
Co., Pal Pipe Cone Action
Mfgd. by Foley & Williams." Do
you have any idea what the age
of it is and the value? S.,
Internet
Dear S.: Pump organs were
found in a large percentage of
American homes during the
19th century and early 20th
century They were manufac-
tured in large quantities. The
cases were generally very dec-
orative, making them an im-
portant highlight in the home.
Currently there is very little in-
terest in the antiques market.
The only way to sell them,
short of good luck, is at a rec-
ognizably affordable price -
but even then, it is a difficult
task. In fact, it is likely the
piano stool sitting in front of


your organ would sell for a
hundred dollars before the
organ would sell at the same
price. For information about
the company and age, check at
the library in either the
Michele Piano Atlas or the
Pierce Piano Atlas.
Dear John: Perhaps you can
help me out of my situation.
Recently at an auction, I
bought a marble-top table. It
was just what I had been look-
ing for, so I bought it. There
were two other bidders and I
was determined to win the bid.
It ended up costing me $750,
See ATTIC/Page E10
This wall pocket was manufac-
tured on the Isle of Lewis in
Scotland. Wall pockets have
long been a popular category
of collecting.
Special to the Chronicle






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


4-H
Continued from Page E6

program going and think it's great
that you extended your efforts to
Afghanistan. Thank you!!!
"The number one thing my sol-
diers asked for when they got here
was blankets. I think most of them
are happy at this point. I think as the
winter progresses and the nights get
colder, they will greatly, GREATLY
appreciate the blessings you all
have sent. I kept the little scarf-
looking piece that was sent. It's so
soft! The blankets are incredible!!
"I hope you all had a Merry Christ-
mas and are planning a great New
Year's! Christmas just wasn't Christ-
mas yesterday, but it was ok. We all
knew there was sacrifice involved
when we signed the dotted line.
However, tokens of appreciation like
the blankets you sent ALWAYS make
hard days easier!! Thank you again!!
"Well, I can't think of much more to
say ... I kinda feel like I'm rambling. I
hope this email finds you and your
group in good spirits and you can ex-
perience a sense of accomplishment
as you HAVE made a difference in at
least two soldiers' lives, as they will
use these blankets to comfort them-
selves and stay warm through the cold
winter here in Bagram, Afghanistan.
Your efforts, sacrifice, generosity, and
hard work will not go unnoticed.
"Thank you again!!"
SSG Strader, Jeremy
345th Combat Support Hospital
Bagram, Afghanistan
Whether the goal is to help others
through a simple community service










PINE RIDGE
4/3/3 POOL HOME
Best Priced Home on Market.
Hurry! Beautiful lot, large lanai.
Convenient location, 2630 sq. ft
cooled. MUST SEE!
$205,000
Call Joe 302-0910
000DTEC


The essential
element of giving of
one's time in the
service to others is LAND
the essence of
generosity.


project or to engage youth civically
in political and societal issues, ei-
ther approach can have lasting ben-
efits for youth. The essential element
of giving of one's time in the service
to others is the essence of generosity.
That service can build competen-
cies and confidence that can last a
lifetime, ranging from public speaking
and conflict resolution, to community
change.Young people can gain skills
and connections from volunteer serv-
ice that help them feel valued and im-
portant Through their work, they can
influence policies, speak out about is-
sues, and begin to make decisions
about what they feel is important
For information about how to start
or join a club in your area, please con-
tact your Citrus County Extension's 4-
H Office by calling 352-527-5712 or
mailing 4-H Agent Amy Duncan at
amyduncan@bocc.citrus.fl.us.
Citrus County Extension connects
the public with the University of
Florida/IFAS's knowledge, research
and resources to address youth, fam-
ily, community and agricultural
needs. Programs and activities of-
fered by the Extension Service are
available to all persons without re-
gard to race, color, handicap, sex, re-
ligion or national origin.


www.81Woodfield.CanBYours.com
$339,000 MLS#356914
Realty Connect (352) 212-1446
www.thefloridadream.com


SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 E7






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


This photo shows an upholstered
chair in a blue and white print from
HomeGoods (www.homegoods.com).
Associated Press


II


Cool hue can bring a splash
offspring to any decor


As the new year begins,
bringing new colors into
our homes can help re-
fresh and recalibrate our
spirits. This spring, blues
may be just the tonic we
need.
Many color marketing
and manufacturing groups
have named some version
of blue among their 2013
colors of the year. Azko-
Nobel likes indigo; Pan-
tone's top palette includes
Monaco Blue, a mix of
royal and navy; Color Mar-
keting Group chose mid-


range blues. That means
that lots of home retailers
will be singing the blues
this spring, in a good way
Blues range from ener-
getic to restful. They can
call to mind the graduated
blues of the sky or those of
the oceans, rivers and
lagoons.
Blues play well with
most colors, textures and
room styles.
Rustic woven elements
bring indigo home with a
See BLUE/Page E9


This photo shows a lamp from Target's
Threshold spring d6cor line, in one of
the season's statement colors -
a rich blue (www.target.com).
Associated Press


kim cook
associated press


E8 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BLUE
Continued from Page E8

traditional, often global sensibility.
Canadian designer Windsor Shaw
pairs indigo silk drapes with a jute
rug, for example. Sleek lacquer-
ware and silver accessories take
blue into smart city-modern
territory
Blue and white is a combination
with lots of possibilities. Sara Pe-
terson, HGTV Magazine's editor in
chief, says, "We love soft blue-grays
in master bedrooms, with white
linens and dark wood furniture.
Light blue is really pretty on
painted kitchen cabinets with
white countertops. In a kid's room,
cobalt blue is fun when paired with
painted white furniture and bursts
of bright accent colors, like fuchsia
or lime green."
RH Baby and Child has a re-
versible navy and natural braided
wool rug, while Restoration Hard-
ware offers Ben Soleimani's
heathered navy pinstripe rug; both
would be great bases for other navy
touches in a room.
(www.rhbabyandchild.com;
www.rh.com)
Crate & Barrel and CB2 have
some peppy peacock-blue pieces in
the spring collections. The latter's
got the low-slung Avec sofa, skinny
John floor lamp, and the Yolo flat-
weave rug in a fresh, fun peacock
and white circle print. (www.crate-
andbarrel.com)
At C&B there's the little Willa
wooden chair in perky peacock,
and the Kruger patio side table and
stool come in a deep ultramarine


SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 E9


This photo shows towels
in various shades of blue
as a simple and inexpen-
sive way to introduce blue
into spring d6cor
(www.homegoods.com).
Associated Press


called Harbor Blue. (www.cb2.com)
This spring, Target's Threshold
collection features an array of
landscape blues, focusing on one in
particular
'"As we traveled through Europe
and Asia on our trend trips, teal
See BLUE/Page E10


CONGRATULATIONS

KARIS GEISTFELD

2012 Sales Associate
of the Year!
We're so pleased to recognize Karis. As successful as she is as a Sales Associate,
she's an even better person. By putting the needs and desires of her clients first
she consistently exceeds their expectations, and that in turn has led to a
loyal following of satisfied customers.
Thank you Karis for all you do here at the Villages of Citrus Hills.
Congratulations from us all.

citrus -l s l "'JSc anCHIPRe IN
irUS S Ucensed Brokerage Agency


ODOP


w v






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BLUE
Continued from Page E9

started to become more promi-
nent," says Julie Guggemos, vice
president of product development
Target's spring collection in-
cludes an ikat print shower curtain,
a floral door mat and a ceramic
lamp in teal. (www.target.com)
Indigo, an inky shade often
found in dyed textiles, works with
a variety of interior styles. It an-
chors neutrals less harshly than
black, and it's a sophisticated
counterpoint to bright colors or
pastels.
Homegoods has well-priced, in-
digo printed upholstered chairs,
fabric-covered storage boxes and
ikat patterned towels. (wwwhome
goods.com)


Deep water or blueberries come
to mind with Monaco Blue. It pops
against many of the season's more
playful shades, such as nectarine,
pea green, violet, poppy red and
lemony yellow.
Turquoise, which held sway over
much of 2012's color story, stays
strong into spring. The color's
pretty, yet carries an edge. Modern
d6cor looks great in turquoise:
Ikea's Klippan sofa comes in a ver-
sion that will have you thinking of
the tropics. Go with that vibe by
pairing it with textural white and
cream accessories evoking sandy
beaches, nubby shells and palm
bark. (www.ikea.com)
Safavieh offers the Paris ceramic
table lamp in a gentle light blue or
the more emphatic navy. An uphol-
stered ottoman in powder or ink
would be a chic addition.
(www.safaviehhome.com)


Citrus plants



and winter


C itrus
tre es s
originally
evolved in
Southeast Asia.
Exact locations
have been lost,
as the plants
have been culti-
vated for thou-
sands of years Jane V
for their valu-
able food crop. JANI
Most citrus vari- GARI
eties are frost-
tender. If grown in
northern Florida, they will


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REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466 FRUGAL
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garlic, ginger and
jalapenos and cook for 5
more minutes. Add the an-
chovies, tomato paste,
cloves, pepper, corn syrup,
molasses, white vinegar,
dark beer, orange juice,
water, lemon and lime.
Bring to a boil, reduce
heat to medium low and
simmer, stirring occasion-
ally, for 2 to 3 hours, or
until it naps the back of a


Veber
E'S
DEN


need protection
from icy winds
and freezing
temperatures.
Nearby lakes
and rivers can
provide warmer
microclimate
protection for
citrus groves.
Most desir-
able citrus are
on sour orange
rootstock, Pon-
- cirus trifoliate.

See JANE/Page E11


spoon. Strain the mixture
and refrigerate. Yields 6
cups. Susie, Minnesota

Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (www.
frugalvillage.com), a
website that offers
practical strategies for
everyday living. To send
tips, comments or
questions, write to Sara
Noel, c/o Universal
Uclick, 1130 Walnut St,
Kansas City MO 64106, or
email sara@frugal
village. com.


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352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

including the auction buyer's fee.
I was glad to get it. My husband
thinks I let my emotions get the
best of me and paid way too
much.
In your articles over the years,
there have been several white
marble-top tables you have been
asked about similar to the one I
bought, and valued in the $400 to
$500 range. So what do you think,
did I overpay? A.M.S.,
Internet
Dear A.M.S.: Auctions are fun
and exciting. It is easy to get emo-
tionally involved in the bidding
competition. At least you are not
experiencing buyer's remorse and
are happy with your purchase. In
order for me to say if this situation
got the best of you or not, I need a
couple of good, clear photographs
of your marble-top table.
Dear John: A while back, you
mentioned letter openers in one of
the articles. I paid a quarter for
one at a garage sale a couple of
weeks ago. I have enclosed a pho-
tograph. It is solid brass. On the
back on the handle, it says "Auto-
matic Gas-Steam Radiator Co.";
under these words is a radiator,
then "Pittsburgh Steam Heat with-
out a Boiler." What can you tell me
about it and how much it is worth?
-A.NA., Internet
DearA.NA: Letter openers are
a large category of collecting. They
have been produced worldwide
for centuries. All the famous mak-
ers produced them in a variety of
material, i.e., wood, plastic,
bronze, brass, porcelain, ivory,
gold, silver and more. They sell
from pennies into the thousands of
dollars. I wish your photo was
clear enough to see the detail. I
think it was produced between
World War I and II. Potential dol-
lar value is likely to be more than
10 times what you paid.


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business
for 30 years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's Attic, on
WJUF (90.1 FM) Saturdays from
noon to 1 p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box 2513,
Ocala, FL 34478 or ask
sikorski@aol. com.


COLD-OLL
HANIeRO


E10 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013


E5 E


m mmm m l m ill m






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E10

A few citrus fruit varieties are
grafted on hardier rootstock of C. au-
rantium, Seville Orange. Grafted
trees may survive very light frosts.
Wrap young trunks with insulating
foam to help protect the graft. Re-
move insolation by mid-March. If the
plant freezes, sprouts below the
graft will be the sour orange of the
root stock with large thorns and un-
palatable fruit suitable only for mar-
malade. Grafted citrus trees are
prone to collar rot, so the graft is
generally 6 or more inches above
ground.
Planting close to the south side of
a building provides protection from
chilly north and northwest winds.
The citrus benefit from heat stored
during the day and radiated from
the building at night. Wrap young
trees to the ground with commercial
frost blanket during their first few
years after planting to trap in earth
warmth. Plant far enough from
buildings for growth, or the tree will
have to be espaliered, or pruned off
on one side. Prune trees for easy
picking and to stay lower than the
eaves. Their evergreen canopy will
shade the building from hot summer
sun. All citrus have fragrant white
flowers.
Lemon, Citrus limon, is naturally
more tolerant of cold than the or-
anges. "Meyer" lemon is a cross of
C. limon and C. reticulata and is
often grown from rooted cuttings.
Lime, C. aurantifolia, is the most
frost-tender and should only be
grown in extreme south Florida
and the Keys. A crossbreed called
"Eustis" or "Tavares" limequat, C
aurantifoliaix Fortunella japonica,
is hardier, so more suitable in
northern central Florida and the
south parts of north Florida. Lime-
quats look, smell and taste like
"Key Lime," but are much hardier.
Satsuma, specifically "Owari," is
one of the hardier citrus plants.
The extension service of the Uni-
versity of Florida has a list of cold-
hardy citrus for our area.
Kumquat is a small fruit closely
related to citrus oranges. Formerly
thought to be in the Citrus genus,
modern genetics identify it as For-
tunella japonica. There are five
species of Fortunella. All originated
in China. Robert Fortune (1812-80)
was the Scottish plant collector who


introduced kumquats to British con-
servatories.
This compact, small tree may
grow 10 feet tall in garden situations
and is pruned low to increase fruit-
ing and ease of picking. In the wild
it can grow to 25 feet. It can be
grown for years in a container,
where it will become root-bound
and remain a small specimen.
"Meiwa" has a sweet, round fruit
eaten raw, including its thin peel.
Elongated "Nagami" kumquat is
tarter.
More tolerant of cold than citrus,
kumquat grows well outdoors in
Marion, Levy and Citrus counties.
Plant kumquats in a full sun location
protected from wind and freezes.
Soil should be acidic, very well-
drained, sandy, enriched with de-
cayed humus and moisture-
retaining.
Florida-grown citrus trees will be
available at local nurseries by early
March after the danger of frost is
passed. Check the UF list for hardi-
ness before shopping. All citrus
must be sprayed for insects on the
day it leaves the tent at the south-
ern growers. Attractive, fragrant
and edible citrus plants are well
worth the effort in the home garden
provided cold-hardy varieties are
selected and given winter
protection.

Jane Weber is a professional
gardener and consultant Semi-
retired, she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors are welcome
to her Dunnellon, Marion County,
garden. For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or email
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
2BR/1 BA w/enclosed porch and
fenced back yard.
S44,900 MLS#700212


A water-wise guide


LETITIA L. STAR
Natural Home & Garden

Although for most of us the
tap water runs out of the
faucet clear, tasteless and
odorless, our municipalities
must work hard to filter an
ever-increasing array of both
natural and manmade pollu-
tants from our groundwater.
And even if it meets legal
standards, your tap water
may still contain pollutants.
Getting informed about
drinking water quality is a
good idea for everyone, but
particularly those of us who
live with children, are sensi-
tive to chemicals or have
weakened immune systems.
The Safe Drinking Water
Act of 1974 is the main fed-
eral law establishing stan-
dards for drinking water
quality. Under this law, all


BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Commercial location several blocks from Old
Courthouse. Former flower shop.
$86,900 MLS#356806


TO SETTLE ESTATE-FLORAL CITY, FL BANK OWNED-HERNANDO, FL
Gorgeous oaks and backdrop on Lake Magnolia. 3BR/2BA doublewide on 1.27 acres.
3BR/2BA DW on large lot. Central water. By Citrus Hills.
$32,500 MLS#359133 $40,000 MLS#700217
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471 ...
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours (s2 302-6714


U.S. municipal tap water is
treated to remove pollutants
in accordance with federally
mandated maximum con-
taminant levels (MCLs) set by
the EPA. State and local gov-
ernments may also set water
safety laws.
But despite federal, state
and local water regulations,
contaminants can still make
their way into our water sup-
ply The Environmental
Working Group (EWG) re-
cently analyzed nearly 20
million records from state
water officials and discov-
ered that "testing by water
utilities has found 315 pollu-
tants in the tap water Ameri-
cans drink." More than half
of these detected chemicals
aren't subject to health or
safety regulations and can
legally be present in any
amount. And although fed-


eral guidelines do govern the
others, 49 of these contami-
nants were found to exceed
set levels in different parts of
the country, thus polluting
the tap water of 53.6 million
Americans.
Because of these kinds of
reports, consumer concern
about tap water safety has in-
creased in recent years. In a
2011 survey commissioned by
the Water Quality Associa-
tion (WQA), 54 percent of
consumers polled were con-
cerned about contaminants
in tap water, and 49 percent
were concerned or very con-
cerned about their house-
hold water supply
"We are seeing people be-
come more educated about
water issues and finding
ways to ensure water quality

See WATER/Page E12


DISTRESSED HOMEOWNERS SEMINAR
SIs your home UNDERWATER/UPSIDE DOWN?I N
YOU HAVE OPTIONS!
Come learn what others don't know... FOR FREE!

Seminar Highlights Include: i
Short Sales Is my house a good candidate?
Bankruptcy Can it save my home?
Loan Modifications Is anybody getting one?
Deficiencies What is this? And how can it harm me for years to come?
Misperceptions What are they?
Time Frames How long do I have?

Guest Speaker Michael T Kovach, Jr. Attorney at Law


Crystal Oaks
Civic Assn.
4958 W. Crystal Oaks D
(/ mi. off SR 44 on left


"I guarantee that homeowners who attend this seminar
will receive all the information they need to make the best
possible decisions given thier particular circumstances."
Attorney Mike Kovach, Jr.

Jan. 22, 2013 LIMITED SEATING

5:30 PM all or email today for
reservations
r.- Trish Antonetti 352-400-3323
I) Lecanto, FL trishantonetti@yahoo.com


, _,11Wk


SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 Ell







E12 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013


WATER
Continued from Page Ell

for their families," says
Peter J. Censky, WQA exec-
utive director. Although
safety regulations do en-
sure at least a minimal
level of cleanliness and
safety in municipal water
supplies, taking responsi-
bility for the health of our
own drinking water is
smart. Indeed, even the
President's Cancer Panel
recommends the use of
home filtering devices to
decrease exposure to can-
cer-causing agents. To en-
sure you have safe
drinking water in your
home, take these steps:
Step 1: Learn What's In
Your Tap Water
Every year by July 1,
your water supplier will
mail you an annual Con-
sumer Confidence Report
(also called the Drinking
Water Quality Report). You


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


may also be able to find
your report on the EPA's
website. The EPA offers
online tools to help you
learn how to read the re-
port at its Local Drinking
Water Information page.
You also may find your
local and state reports in
the EWG's National Drink-
ing Water Database.
While these reports
offer an analysis of your
local water at its source,
it's also wise to directly
test your tap water at
home. Some contami-
nants, such as lead, could
leach through pipes and
household plumbing, and
therefore not be detected
before water enters your
home. Relatively inexpen-
sive home water-testing
kits are available at hard-
ware stores. You could also
obtain professional tests
on your water; the EPA
recommends contacting
your state certification
program for a list of certi-
fied laboratories.


Jackie Davis
,, American Realty & Investments
*** 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
ERA (352) 634-2371 cell
REAL ESTATE jackie@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS: bidavis.com



....... .. n .... ed

1 u eat-in kitdien, a huge family room with

S- "- '.. Country Club's course. Doesn t get better n this.
._ .. -';..- .$295,000 MLS700259


Step 2: Understand
Water Contaminants
Drinking water contam-
inants come from many
sources: Radon, radium
and arsenic are naturally
occurring, while microor-
ganisms, pesticides and ni-
trates come from people,
animals and industry.
Here are a few contami-
nants to specifically watch
out for:
U Chromium-6 (Hexava-
lent chromium): You may
be familiar with this highly
toxic chemical from the
movie Erin Brockovich.
Chromium-6 occurs natu-
rally from the erosion of
chromium deposits, but it
can also be produced by
industrial processes and
released into the environ-
ment by poor storage or in-
adequate industrial waste
disposal practices. In a
2010 tap water survey, the
EWG found this known
carcinogen in 31 of the 35
American cities tested-
that's 89 percent. While
chromium-3 is an impor-
tant dietary element,
chromium-6 is believed to


f l CAT FARRELL
(352) 400-321
rS / KELLER WILLIAMS
Cat'3CatSells


cause many serious health
problems, including can-
cer. The EPAs maximum
level of chromium was set
in 1991, but in 2008, the
agency began a rigorous
and comprehensive re-
view of chromium-6 health
effects based on new sci-
ence. According to the
EPA's website, "when this
human health assessment
is finalized, the EPA will
carefully review the con-
clusions and consider all
relevant information to de-
termine if the current
chromium standards
should be revised." Read
more at the EPAs website
U Atrazine. This com-
mon herbicide is thought
to potentially cause en-
docrine disruption, cancer
and reproductive disor-
ders. Studies have linked
high levels of atrazine in
the water supply to birth
defects in children, and in
one study male frogs ex-
posed to atrazine trans-
formed into fully
functioning female frogs.
Use of the herbicide is
particularly high in the


REALTY '
CitrusFi.com


I..................,', -Bl "' I IIqgr gI


r


715 E Hartford, Bldg 32-3B 900 E Hartford St, Hernando




MILS 358139 $67,500 MLS 359131 $184,000
Dir: 486 to S on Annapolis to R on |Dir: 486 to S on Annapolisto opposite
Hartford to Bldg 32#3B # left corner of Hartford.


OPEN HOUSE SUN., 1-3 PM
5 Crossandra, Sugarmill Woods
Directions: Hwy 19
io Hwy 98 to Right
on Green Park to
Lef6l on Grass to Left
on Crossandra.
Call for more info
352-464-4179
MLS# 359306
Charlene Angelo 352-464-4179

EXIT Realty Leaders
352-794-0888


Midwest, where it's used
on crops in spring. Six
states Illinois, Indiana,
Iowa, Kansas, Mississippi
and Ohio recently set-
tled a lawsuit against Syn-
genta, the manufacturer of
atrazine, for millions to
subsidize the chemical's
removal from the public
water supply Atrazine is
among the pollutants dis-
cussed in the 2012 water
quality documentary Last
Call at the Oasis, which
features Erin Brockovich
and other environmental
experts.
U Chlorine and chlo-
ramines. Chlorine is com-
monly used by
municipalities to help pu-
rify the local water supply
However, chlorine can
combine with organic mat-
ter in water to create chlo-
rination by-products,
which could potentially
cause cancer, according to
NSF International, an in-
dependent nonprofit or-
ganization that provides
standards development,
product certification and
risk management to help
protect the world's food,
water and health. Some
municipalities have
switched from chlorine to
chloramine (a combina-
tion of chlorine and ar-
senic) to treat water
Although the EPA classi-
fies both as safe at levels
used in drinking water,
both chlorine and chlo-


ramine are toxic at high
levels and have been asso-
ciated with health risks. If
your local water utility
uses chloramines as a dis-
infectant, make sure the
water filtration system you
use is certified specifically
for chloramines, and not
only chlorine, the NSF
recommends.
U Lead. Lead is a highly
toxic metal. If your home
was built before 1986, it's
more likely to have lead
pipes, fixtures and solder,
according to the EPA.
Even legally "lead-free"
plumbing in newer homes
may contain up to 8 per-
cent lead. No amount of
lead exposure is consid-
ered safe drinking lead-
contaminated water could
result in physical and
mental development de-
lays in babies and chil-
dren. Adults aren't
immune: Watch out for
blood pressure increases
and kidney problems. Be-
cause lead is more likely to
enter drinking water
through the corrosion of
plumbing materials where
water has high acidity or
low mineral content, the
EPA issued the Lead and
Copper rule, which re-
quires treatment systems
to make drinking water
less corrosive to the mate-
rials it comes into contact
with on its way to

See WATER/Page E13


w "Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods"

9 NANCY Direct:

Multi-Million $$$ Producer KEYI REALTYINC.
8015SSuncoastBlvd, Homosassa, FL 382-1700 Nancy@Nancyknows.com
ASPECT SA *E *O *!


SOLAR HEATED, SELF-CLEANING POOL PAVER LANAI SURROUNDS HEATED POOL,
w/ SPA/FOUNTAIN ON LARGE LOT! WATERFALL & SPA PRIVATE 1.25 ACRES!
* 3 Bedroom + Office w/ Larger Side Entry Garage 3 Bed + Den/ 3 Full Baths / 3 CAR Garage
* Jetted Tub + Separate Glass Shower & 2 Closets Bonus "Media Room" or Family Room to Pool
* Granite Island Kitchen Opens to Family Room Double Walk-Thru Shower + Jetted Tub in Master
$199,900 MLSOO#700314 $382,500 MLS#357179
1fy^01W1t0A il 1 1 1 +f


13 .. 1=2







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WATER
Continued from Page E12

consumers' taps. You can
read more about lead ex-
posure at the EPA's
website.
Step 3: Select the Best
Water Filter
When shopping for a fil-
ter, you will find many
"technologies," ranging
from carbon to ozone to
UV Don't worry; the
choices are surprisingly
easy to navigate. A few
overall tips to keep in
mind: Some filters use a
combination of technolo-
gies, while others use just
one; any filter you use
should be certified by a
reputable, independent
agency; and check what a
filter is certified to do by
reading the fine print.
Some filters are certified
to improve water's taste,
for example, but not to
guarantee the removal of
specific contaminants. To
find the filter most capable
of removing specific con-
taminants, lookup the pol-
lutant on the EWG website
and find a list of filters cer-
tified to effectively remove
it.
While many filter tech-
nologies exist, those most
adept at removing contam-
inants include carbon or
charcoal filtration and re-
verse osmosis. Carbon fil-


ters vary in effectiveness;
some remove chlorine
only while others remove a
range of contaminants, in-
cluding lead and mercury
You will find carbon filters
in carbon block and gran-
ulated activated carbon
varieties. In general, car-
bon block filters are more
effective. Carbon filters
cannot effectively remove
many inorganic pollutants
such as arsenic, fluoride or
nitrate, according to the
EWG.
Reverse osmosis filters
are adept at removing in-
organic contaminants not
removed by carbon filters.
You can sometimes find
combination carbon/re-
verse osmosis filters,


which remove a wide
range of organic and inor-
ganic pollutants. However,
reverse osmosis filters use
three to 20 times the water
they produce, so limit
their use to drinking and
cooking water
Other filter types you
may encounter include
ozone and UV (ultraviolet).
These are effective at re-
moving or killing bacteria
and microorganisms but
not chemical contami-
nants. Ion exchange filters


Reverse osmosis filters are adept
at removing inorganic contami-
nants not removed by carbon
filters. You can sometimes find
combination carbon/reverse
osmosis filters, which remove
a wide range of organic and
inorganic pollutants. However,
reverse osmosis filters use three
to 20 times the water they
produce, so limit their use to
drinking and cooking water.


and water softeners lower
levels of calcium and mag-
nesium but do not remove
contaminants.
You will also find a num-
ber of filter styles, which
range in price and complex-
ity of installation. Options
include pitcher/dispenser,
faucet-mounted, faucet-
integrated, on-counter,
under-sink or whole-house.
The best type for your home
depends on your budget and
the contaminants in your
home's water Also keep in
mind that a growing body of
research shows that plastic
can leach chemicals into
liquids stored in it, so avoid-
ing plastic water storage
containers may be best for
those with chemical
sensitivities.
Excerpted from Natural
Home & Garden, a na-
tional magazine that pro-
vides practical ideas,
inspiring examples and
expert opinions about
healthy, ecologically
sound, beautiful homes. To
read more articles from
Natural Home & Garden,
please visit wwwNatural
HomeMagazine.com or
call 800-340-5846 to sub-
scribe. Copyright 2012 by
Ogden Publications Inc.


30Du33^ ^

REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
MfS CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
O.CE: (352) 795-6633
WWWAEIXRYECOM AIT SL(S@AI TYT RECOM


I E Em IO DYENIA W


Reat o AMERICAN
LP. o I Rele t ERA REALTY INVESTMENTS
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU 4511 N. Lemno Hwy.
Cell: (352) 697-1685 ofiN3524- o 6


GOLF COURSE COTTAGE! 2007 POOL HOME!
* 1900+ sq ft of living 3/2/2 3/2/2 pool home on corner lot
* Modern flair in Southern Woods Sweeping circular driveway
* 18" tile in all main areas Family room has fireplace
* Gas fireplace in the family room Corian kitchen w/SS appliances
* 3 sets of 8' pocketing doors Well for outside irrigation
* Large lanai with open views Sink & cabinetry in laundry room
#359297 $194,900 #354014 $219,000
See.JVirItu .IIIou ,.i..UJJIJr II.I.I..Ie IIB.I..m


CRYSTAL RIVER-NORTH 2.5 acres, 3
CRYSTAL RIVER 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car bedroom, 2 bath,"" ITT ..1.
1. chain .1 1, i .L i i i ,
... .... Large country kitchen, large
master bath w/garden tub & separate shower
i .. s#354504 $99,500





HO-tM-tO 0 RIVERHVTT wi T acre tracts) surrounded by 5,000 acre
HOMOSASSA RIVERHAVEN waterfront homosassa wildlfe management area. Raise
home w/2 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car garage, & cattle/horses or just enjoy the wildlife.
den clean bnght and ready to move in to. electrically independent home is powered by
Ih ,, :" I 1 }lll ;'' I ;ll ll


SUBMISSION DEADLINES
* Follow these guidelines to help ensure timely pub-
lication of submitted material. The earlier Chroni-
cle editors receive submissions, the better chance
of notes running more than once.
* Together page: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication
Sunday.
* Business Digest: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publica-
tion Sunday.
* Chalk Talk: 4 p.m. Monday for publication
Wednesday.
* Health Notes: 4 p.m. Friday for publication Tuesday.
* Religious events : 4 p.m. Tuesday for publication
Saturday.
* Real Estate Digest: 4 p.m. Thursday for publica-
tion Sunday.
* Photos and stories are published as space is
available. The Chronicle cannot guarantee place-
ment on color pages.


bE'4I

Eealtor


SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 E13









E14 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563"5966


CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1 near river, incl elec.
$375mo (352) 220-0480
CRYSTAL RIVER
6851 W Vanaman Ct
$450/$400 dp 2/2
DUNNELLON
5159 W Disney Lane
$425/ $400 dp 2/2
(727) 480-5512
Hernando/Cit. Hills
3/2 dw, 1/2 acre
fenced, paved road
$625/mo
(352)795-7813
HOMOSASSA
2/2, 2 Ig porches &
1 carport. $675
(908) 884-3790
HOMOSASSA
2BR/2 BA, No Pets
$500 (352) 628-5696
LECANTO
2BR DW $550. mo.
(352) 628-2312




14 x 60, 2BR, 1 V2 BA,
Carport Shed appli
ances, W/D, clean,
move in condition
Near new Walmart on
486, $4,800.
(352) 387-7824
2BR. 11/2% BA.on your
own 75x 100 lot.
no fees! new en-
closed
sunroom, Ig laundry
room, furn, 2 stor-
age buildings, 5111
Castle Lake Ave. S.
of
Inverness on SR 41
$39,500 (740)
255-0125
3bdr/2 full baths/ 2 car
carport on 1 acre.
split layout, steel roof,
caged pool, 20x25 ft
deck, Ig storage build-
ing, Furnished Modu-
lar $73,900, 5215
Bridget Pt, Castle
Lake Park
Inverness
352-597-7353
Crystal River 55+
Park. 2BR/1BA Car-
port & Screened
Porch. Heat/Air
$9,500. 352-746-4648
Ask for Brit


BANK
FORECLOSURE
Land-n-Home, 3/2
1500 sq. ft. On %
Acre, paved rd.
LOOKS GOOD,
Have financing if
needed, only
$2,500 down,
$381.44mo. P&I
W.A.C. OR $69,900.
Call 352-613-0587
or 352-621-9183

HERNANDO
3BR 2BA MH
Ready to move in !
FHA & Owner Financ-
ing avail, call
352-795-1272

HOME-ON-LAND
3/2 Great Shape.
%Acre. Move In
Now
$59,900.
Call 352-401-2979,
352-621-3807
Palm Harbor Homes
New Homes at
$39,900. $5K for your
used
mobile home. 3 New
Models, 1,100-2,400
SF 800-622-2832 ext
210

REPO'S- REPO'S
REPO'S
WE HAVE REPO'S
CALL 352-621-9181




DUNNELLON
LAKE ROUSSEAU 55+
comm. Lg. 1/1 w/slider
to encl. screened porch,
outside shed, CHAfurn.
Nice yard, low lot rent.
Asking$11,900
(207) 347-0531




CASTLE LAKE
Floral City
2/2 S/W Fully furnished
move in condition.
2 screen rooms,
2 sheds. Landscaped
with sprinkler on quiet
cul-de-sac. $38,900.
352-212-1883


CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice Large 4br 2ba MH
READY TO MOVE IN!
4Owner Fin. Avail.4
CALL (352) 795-1272
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Less Than
$46,500. Cash.
Considering ALL Cash
offers. 352-586-9498
HERNANDO 2/2 DW
On lot, with Shed &
Deck Seeforyour-
self at 2562 N. Treas-
ure Pt. $28,500 obo
352-464-0719
HOMOSASSA
**3/2, Fenced Yard,**
NEW Flooring. NEW
AC $5.000 Down.
$435. mo
(352) 302-9217
HOMOSASSA
2ba 1 2 ba MH needs
complete rehab. Good
shed, well & septic.
6524 W. Akazian
$12,500 (603) 860-6660
NW Citrus County
SWMH on 1 acre, 2/1.5
- paved rd., screened
porch, appliances -
$37,700 possible
owner financing
352-795-9908
W. of 19 in Homosassa
1994, 2/2 Doublewide,
Move In Condition
Corner Lot $44,900.
Tradewinds Realty
(352) 400-0089




2/2 on Lake Rous-
seau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent
$240/mo. 2003. Used
Seasonally
Owner bought a
house. 207-546-6115,
cell

Adult Park 2/1,
Mobile, heat and air,
nicely furn. large
shed, sreen rm. car-
port, $8,200
Lot Rent $160 mo.
(352) 287-3729


CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
H WINTER SPE-
CIALS H
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
2/2 New Model
$59K
2/2 waterfront.
$31,000.
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

INGLIS
3/2 Furn., screened
porch. Lot rent $295
Includes amenities.
$15,000 (352)
212-8873

INVERNESS
3/2 Furn.,Appl., Ig
screen porch & shed,
Great cond. $16,000.
Call for appt.
(352)364-3747

INVERNESS
Move In Ready,
Beautiful 1/1 SW,
Mobile, Harbor Lights
55+ park, on Big Lake
Henderson. Fully furn.,
very updated, view of
lake, Cen. HVAC, W/D,
A Must See! Asking
$7,000, 352-344-1828

INVERNESS PARK
55+, 14X60, 2/2, new
roof, all appliances,
partly furn. screen
room, shed,
352-419-6476

MOBILE HOME,
Fully
Furnished. Everyth-
ing stays. Just move
in. 2 Sheds,
washer/dryer all ap-
pliances. Must See!
$7,500. (708) 308-3138

PALM TERRACE
55+ Community,
1997 3BR/2BA 14 x 66,
excel. cond. Shed,
Fl. Rm. Carport &
Deck $16,000. (352)
400-8231

REDUCED 2/2 $17,500
On Lake Rousseau
Lot Rent $240/mo.
BETTER THAN NEW!
Owner financing. Call
LEE (352) 817-1987


Singing Fores t
FLORAL CITY
14 x 70, Mobile, 2 Irg.
bedrooms, furnished &
remodeled, heat & air,
carport & shed, Wash/
Dryer, Lot rent $176.
$14,500. 352-344-2420

Waterfront/Homosassa
Westwind Village 55+
Beautifully furnished
Move In Ready, 2/2
2 Scrn rms, dbl door,
refrig./Ice maker
Washer Dryer, Low
monthly payments,
$19000 obo
(850) 449-1811 Cell






HOMOSASSA
Large 3br 2ba MH
Rent to Own
*Ready to Move In *
Owner Financina Avail.
CALL (352) 795-1272







J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL


Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!


2/2/1 NwPaintNewFlooring.$650
3/1 Fireplce,Scmen Room.....$650
4/2 ona anal............$750
3/2/2 screenatio.......$800


3/1 ....................$650
2/2/1 ...............$675
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010


RENTAL MANAGEMENT 1
S REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCountyHorneRentals.corn
BEVERLY HILLS/LECANTO
1071 N. Commerce Ter. (L)....$525
2/1 Apt, screened lanai
8160 N. Duval Dr. ((S).... $1,300
3/2 Pool hme, utdilesl ncaw/cps, full urm hed
CRYSTAL RIVER
11255W.BayshoreDr.(CR) $850
2/2Waterfront condo
10350 Deepwoods Dr. (CR) ... $150
2/2/1 Close to mall, g. utility room
HOMOSASSA
2278S. Sandburg Pt. (H) .. $500
2/1 Duplex locate between H) & (R)
8019 W. Grove St..... $575
2/2 SW mobile on 1.25 acres
HERNANDO/INVERNESS
994 E. Winnetka St. (Her).... $625
2/1.5 on 1 acre wth crpnort
854 Pritchard Isl. (Inv.)...$800
2/2 Townhouse on waterfront, comm. pool














Chassahowitzka
3/2 Waterfront DW,
$500
2/2, Fenced Yd DW,
$500
2/2, House w/ Gar.,
$600
Sugarmill Woods
3/2/2, Furnished,
$900.
AGENT (352) 382-1000

-I

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1
Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025


CRYSTAL RIVER
Studio Apt. Com-
pletely Furn. on
Hunter's Sprgs, sun
deck, W/D rm. All util.
incl'd.+ boat dock.
$700/mo.
352-372-0507





Alexander Real Es-
tate (352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts
2 BRII BA
$400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILA-
BLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
I & 2 Bd Rm Apart-
ments for Rent
352-465-2985

CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, $575. quiet,
Clean incld's water,
352-563-2114
352-257- 6461

INVERNESS
2 B/R's Availa-
ble
KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOMES
Rental Assistance
Available For
Qualified Applih-
cants
Call 352-344-1010
MWF, 8-12&1 -5
307 Washington
Ave
Inverness Florida
Equal Housing
Opp.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY '






INVERNESS
1 BR., Partially Furn.
Quiet resident. neigh.
(352) 637-1805


CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret Har-
bourApts. Newly re-
modeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incd
Water, garbage, W/D
hook-up.
352-586-4037




LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza, Of-
fice/
Retail, CR 486, 900
sf. @ $700+ until. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801




INVERNESS
2/2/1 Lg Condo
Waterfront Community
with heated pool.
Non-smoker, pet
restrict. $650. mo
317-442-1063




Citrus Springs
2/2/1 $650/mo
352-746-7990
HOMOSASSA
2/2 $550 mo. incl.
garb. Pets? No
smoking. 1st & sec.
352-212-4981
INVERNESS
2/1, Clean, W/D Hk
-up, No pets,$550 mo.
+ Sec (352) 220-4818




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




BLACK DIAMOND
EXCLUSIVE 3/2/2
3389 N Bent Tree Pt
1650 SF, Pool, $1,150
/mo (740) 398-9585


CRYSTAL RIVER
*RENT REDUCED*
3/1 Country Home on
stilts,w/fenced yard.
$565 + Utilities.
Call 920-922-6800




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 + Florida Room,
106 S. Fillmore $550
mo. 352-422-2798
BLACK DIAMOND
Newer 3/2/2 $1,150
Bob @ Coldwell
Banker 352-6344286
Cit.Hills/Brentwood
2/2/2 on golf course.
Club included
$900/mo 516-991-5747

CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Inverness
352-726-3476
Lecanto
352-746-0373
Crystal River

352-563-0890



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

CONNELL
HEIGHTS
2/2/gar, washer, dryer
$500dep. $675 pr mo.
No pets. 352-601-1257
CRYSTAL RIVER
1BR Great location
$600, 3BR Newly
remolded $895,
1br New, $395
(352) 598-2232
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
Water Incl. CHA, $496.
352-220-2447
212-2051
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/2, $750. mo + sec.
850-371-1568
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1.5, fncd yrd, 1 blk to
King's Bay. Boat tie-up;
$650/mo, 1st/L/$300
sec (352)794-0811








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HERNANDO
Forest Ridae Village
Nice 2/2 home *
w/garage, screened
patio, & pool/clubhouse
privileges. $750 mo
Call 980-285-8125
INV. S. HIGH-
LANDS
2/2/2, 1st &Sec.
$850. mo.
352-419-5442
Invern. Highlands
2/2/1, City Water, Great
Loc. Quiet Neighrhood
$675. 352-860-2554
INVERNESS
2/1 Great Location,
55+ community, Bring
boat & fishing gear.
$695
(352) 344-1380
INVERNESS
3/2 Brand New,
Granite tops, marble
firs, SS Ap $895
(352) 634-3897
INVERNESS
3/2/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352- 601-2615 OR
352-201-9427
INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/1/1
$590mo.1st & Sec
(352) 344-2560
Rainbow Lake Est.
Nice 3/2, Home,
Private, $400. mo.
1 (256) 352-8519
Sugarmill Woods
3/2/2, Pool, remodeled
$1,200. 352-302-4057



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225

V THIS OUT!
HOMOSASSA,
FLORIDA
3 bedroom. 2 bath.
Completely remodeled 3
bdrm 2 baths, fully fur-
nished, carport, & cov-
ered dock. House is in
a no wake zone with
beautiful view down the
river. No pets, no
smoking. $1,450. per
month 386-527-0126



BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV &
W/D WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611



FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1
Furn. $950.
352-419-4421




CRYSTAL RIVER
3950 sq ft Lt MFG
w/office @ $1200/mo
1155 sq ft storage @
450/mo
600 sq ft office @
450/mo
352-302-1935


CRYSTAL RIVER
Warehouse for Rent
Free standing, garage
area, 1,440sf,
$100-$550
352-634-0129




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE





ESTATE SALE in Na-
ture Coast Landings
RV Resort. Large de-
veloped site and a
separate gated storage
lot; plus almost new
5th-wheel with slides,
screened gazebo, and
storage building. All for
$79,900. For more info
and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441


From mobiles to
mansions,
From Gulf to Lakes,
give me a call,
I sell 'em all!
352-422-4137
nancv.wilsonad
vahoo.com
Nancy J. Wilson
Realtor@
Broker-Associate
SRESGRI
Waybright Real Es-
tate, Inc.



Quiet Country Sett-
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area
only 20 Min. to Ocala
$129,900 Call
352-302-6784 for
appt.


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



QUAL HO s NG
OPPORTUNITY

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches
&
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments,
Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com




BEVERLY HILLS
*Sun 12- 3p*
317 S Harrison St
Remodeled 2/2/2. New:
Roof. A/C. Kit. Baths.
Windows. & Floorinq.




HOMOSASSA
GNC Commercial
7311 Grover Cleveland
Blvd. 3/2 MH $69,900.
(603) 860-6660


Ew
DUDLEY'S





.4 AUCTIONS**

Thur 1/24
Estate Adventure
3pm Quality
furniture-leather
shaker-Florida,
electronic, mower,
hundreds of items,
Fri 1/25
Estate Coin 6pm
$5-10-20 Gold
pieces, Silver, $500 &
$1,000 bills, Lg 1800's
currency, silver
Sat 1/26
Florida Porch
Antiques
Liquidation 10am
On Site@ 712 W.
Main St in Leesburg,
HUGE Sale of from
Long time Antique
dealer filled the
JC Penny
Tue 1/28 Real Estate
& Restaurant 10am
4135 S. Suncoast
Blvd. (US 19)
Homosassa,
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.corn
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384













CITRUS

SPRINGS
3/2/2, 2 yr old Pool
home in imacculate
condition,
Landscaped back-
yard. $125.000 Priced
to sell!
CALL (570) 412-5194








PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat,
horses, in-laws; there
is room for everyth-
ing! 4/3 % w/7 car
garage/workshop &
in-law suite on 5.83 ac-
res.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164


REMODELED 2/2/2
NEW: Roof, AC, Kit,
Baths, Windows, Firs,
317 S Harrison. $76,900
Call 352-527-1239




.- -I





CITRUS

HILLS
GOLF COURSE HOME
3/2/2+ $173K.
BY APPT ONLY
(216) 849-3447
HERNANDO
Citrus Hills Pool
Home
4/3/2+, circular
drive,
1 acre lot, below
$200k 352-527-7856



ARBOR LAKES
OPEN HOUSE-
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR
&
fenced back yard!
Gated Comm. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista
TrI
(352) 419-7418



3/2 Move In Ready Villa
in Windemere. Beauti-
fully Maintained with up-
graded features. Prem-
ier location close to boat
ramp, trail & downtown.
MLS#359594 $229,500
Call Myriam Reulen
(352)613-2644
Weston Properties, LLC
INVERNESS
Block home 2br, 1ba
w/ 2porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + ac-
res. $130,000 Call
Buzz 352-341-0224 or
David 607-539-7872
Unique stilt home off
581. Great loc to town,
shopping, & hospital.
2br/lba, w/ rap around
porch. Needs some
TLC. Sold as is.
$33,900 (352) 419-6227




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RrMX
REALTY ONE


Get
Results in
the
homefront
declassified!


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

GRAND 2006
CUSTOM HOME
www.81woodfield.
CanBYours.com
81 Woodfield,
Homosassa
3 Bed/2 Bath/3 Car Gar
Salt Water Pool & More!
$339K, MLS#356914
Realty Connect
(352) 212-1446

The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo
Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558





A1.-r -AA
MUST SELL

4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell







4/2/3 HEATED POOL
lots of extras!
SELLER MOTIVATED!
reduced to 210k
352-688-6500 or
352-212-5023


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Sugarmill Woods
House for Sale
2/2/2, Call for More
Info. 334-691-4601
(850) 776-7528


Phyllis Strick-
land
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503









GAIL
STEARNS Re-
altor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298
Low overhead =
Low Commis-
sions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financ-
ing available

I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!








DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com



Get

Results in

the

homefront

classified!


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
Buy or Sell
Call NOW

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Realestate
Consultant





"FREE
Foreclosure
and Short Sale
Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA VANDEBOE
Broker (R)
Owner
Plantation Re-
alty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near
KINGS BAY $425,000.
Make Offers
352-563-9857


Hme


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaure-Coast
Properlies.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"




% ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact fee
credit, high and dry,
trees, $11,000 obo
(352) 795-3710
NORTH CITRUS
1.4 ac. Cleared, fenced,
high & dry. Paved road.
Elec., pump/well, septic.
Owner finan. No
mobiles. $13,900
CALL 352-897-4195
Owner Financing
5 ACRES FLORAL
CITY
Pasture Land
9858 S. Istachatta Rd
2012 Taxes $115 w/
Agricultural Greenbelt,
Water/Elec/Barn/fence
$89K. MLS#354831
Realty Connect
(352) 212-1446









66


DUNNELLON
Here is that home on
Lake Rousseau that
you have always
wanted! 2br 1 % ba on
1.43 acres w/168ft
lake frontage. Com-
pletely remodeled all
new interior & windows.
No Flood Insur-
ance! Priced reduced
from $369,000 to
$169,000
Call Bernie
(352) 563-0116
YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 E15








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


$229.000 WOW!

ii.. l s..:. .. i i .:.' 6i ...... i ..1 i3 -]
...... I..L. 11 i L.63 I2 -..3 .


AIlall Parsons 634 1273


I ,] ,,, 11111,, ,, i n, i ....h I hin i
d .. .... ..: ... ...I.. r. .... 11. l = "
Call Elias G Kuallah fat mote
infolnation 352 1002635
I


* A n...i i Nu IILI II
* "i' -. .,ili i,"), i l *l
* I- I II.-. 1, .1 1, :,.

Mil. = ?6.1 $80,000
Jeanne o WVi/,aid Pichiel 3522123410
i it i CiltusCounii Sold com


I. p,:1 lI.ii .. .... ,Al- -.
l .d I.1:l .. 1l.. h .
PRICED TO SELL 6 $249,000
Call Ouade Feese/ 352 302 7699


iuw DEunuilW. & DM In,
1 CG IN DESIRABLE ROYAL OAKS

I_ u .I. h l..) |. .. ..h I,. l ill.... ill H ll I
I, I b,.I I I hll,,, -,i'i i' 1,-I
Mi_ = j ASKING $63,900
Pat Das ,352212 7280


WITHLACOOCHEE DEEP WATER



r : OFFERED AT S399,900
C Aic nI .iJe, 352400i80172


li 1. ..I Ih ..... I l- -"1 ... .... i. Ii

f l.h .il1.)F. l..ild i.j I
Mli = im/hhi 4 $1,300,000
Call Jim Motion 422 2173
t--1


87,.500
a ,rj ,s Min,- i. a i -. i i I26Iu6.
VV.. ..l m u lll I .... il.I Ih. I L. ). ..... ... l ilh

i li 1 .... fi a ll o m. pl 3S21 .72 S SS
I J i I.. .I I 11 .1 u l Ihl ..I ..I u. II I
Call Donts Miner/ ht appi 352 726.6668


r I 0 VVLI r 0 107

lottainme 0 Regan 586 0075


1. j ;t .:.j h .:j, .. pf(., I Iun. :.,il ... I I .iol.1 I (,io0 il ...



Jeanne Pickie1212 3410 Mil = 3 $73,900
itv iI:. CiltusCounltSold. com Stelan Stua I 352 212 0211


LOTS OF VALUE HERE
. )1 .:. Ii I ).: ..:. ,d, h : -... I ,.. i,. d A -,
il ii .:.i h.:.I .,I r / ii, :. ,-
.- ii i -. ASKING $228.000
Pat Dat,s 352 212 7280
I'ei, lstang at c21paidaits corn


PRISTINE RANCH

h II I, I I I I h I.
" "" 1 1- .
,"i I h I I
i,,,,, .I I1 I 1 I
'l = 3.h1 $375,000
Call Jim Motion at 422 2173
to see this cattleman s di earn


H..i TIl I _, = ~ ..11
Call Elmas G. Kirallah or more
information at 352 400 2635


CLOSE TO TOWN AND UNIQUE!!!



I u, I.l hi ll hP1 I 1
Ch lI .dI I, ,IId I I 6' 2I....



C.,II odp fAlIl,, P.tsons 352 63-4 1273


INVERNESS HOME WITH 4 BEDROOMS!!!



* I..,',. IhI .1...l I, h.(.. i' ,,, "I
MIl- = .'i,;11 ONLY $59,000
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


I ,. I ,, .,h,,,- i" "'..- ..'I. 1 -,,,,, 1,1,1,,,,,I

,I '. ....... ,, -, q r ..I. ,, 1, 1, .

ASKING $63.800
P rO 0 2212,'2SOq


Cheap, Cheap, Cheap!!
BANK OWNED OFFICE BUILDING

INCREDIBLE BUY
AT ONLY $64.900!!
Call Quade Feese, 352 302 7699



START A


REWARDING


REAL ESTATE


CAREER

Call Isaac Baylon
For Info 352-697-2493


. h ,' ,, .. .. i .. ...........i. ...

$236.000
Terii R Blanco 3S2 419 9252
lenp ,Iblanco corn


E16 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013