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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 01-19-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03005

Full Text



On the line: Soccer teams vie for district titles /B1 MAUGER'


TODAY Ca T CITRU-S COUNT Y
& next "
morning
HIGH SP IAS
75 SeePageC11
Periods of clouds Sil Tag uIC
LOW and sunshine. VILLAGE TOYOTA
52 Breezyandrmild. CRYSTAL RIVER


JANUARY 19, 2013 Florida's Best Communit


www.chronicleonline.com
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 500


Ex-teacher faces child porn charges


Bridge lane
closure slated
Officials from the
Florida Department
of Transportation
caution motorists and
cyclists taking the
Withlacoochee River
bridge on State Road
200 this weekend to
be aware the over-
pass will be down to
one lane in both di-
rections as improve-
ments are made to
the bridge. The clo-
sure limits extend
from just before the
Stumpknockers on
the River restaurant
on the Marion
County side to a little
past the Citrus
County line.
The single-lane
closing goes through
6 a.m. Monday. Vehi-
cles needing to cross
the bridge will be di-
rected by flaggers,
alternating north-
bound and south-
bound traffic through
the one open lane.
Jobless rate
drops
The regional un-
employment rate for
the last month of
2012 was 8.9 per-
cent, down 0.3 per-
cent over the month
and down 2.5 per-
cent compared to
December 2011, ac-
cording to Workforce
Connection, which
serves Citrus, Levy
and Marion counties.
Out of a labor force
of 206,848, there
were 18,476 jobless,
a drop of 508 over
the month and 4,963
fewer than the same
time last year.
The December
2012 unemployment
rates, released Fri-
day by the Florida
Department of Eco-
nomic Opportunity
(DEO), were 9.1 per-
cent in Citrus County,
down 0.1 percent
from November; 8.9
percent in Marion
County, down 0.3
percent over the
month; and 8.6 per-
cent in Levy County,
down 0.2 percent
over the month.
Florida's not season-
ally adjusted unem-
ployment rate was
7.9 percent in De-
cember, down 0.1
percent, and the na-
tional unemployment
rate was 7.6 percent,
up 0.2 percent.
Indicators varied
across each county.
Citrus County experi-
enced declines in the
size of its labor force
and number of those
working as well as a
drop in the number of
unemployed; Levy
County remained vir-
tually unchanged
over the month, with
very slight shrinkage
of its labor force, em-
ployed and
unemployed.
-From staff reports



Comics ......... C9
Community ...... .C7
Crossword ........C8
Editorial ........A10
Entertainment B6
Horoscope ....... B6
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies .......... .C9
Obituaries . . ... .Ax
Classifieds ... .. .C10
TV Listings .......C8


llll84578 l2002! 5I


Educator worked 23 years at

Crystal River Middle School
MIKE WRIGHT teacher resigned abruptly
Staff writer in mid-November, after


CRYSTAL RIVER -
Joseph Michael Balint
was marking his 35th year
in public education this
school year, including the
past 23 at Crystal River
Middle School.
The social studies


authorities said they were
removing him from the
classroom because he was
the target of a criminal
investigation.
Thursday night, Balint,
62, of Sugarmill Woods,
turned himself in to the
Citrus County Detention


Facility. He was u trict human re-
charged with 11 sources director
felony counts of 14- Jonny Bishop said
possessionofchild ik -j Friday
pornography and "We have no rea-
jailed on $55,000 son to believe any-
bond. thing inappro-
Authorities said private happened to
Balint had down- Joseh our students or on
loaded child Balint our school cam-
pornography on faces 11 puses," Bishop
his computer at felony counts. said.
home. None of the Bishop said the
alleged activity is thought sheriff's office contacted
to have occurred in school him Nov. 16 and said it was
or on school campus, dis- investigating Balint for


possessing child pornogra-
phy Bishop said he called
CRMS to let administra-
tors know he would be
coming to school to remove
Balint from the classroom
for reassignment.
Balint was out sick that
day, so Bishop said he
went to Balint's home, but
he wasn't there. Bishop
left a message on Balint's
phone to call him.
Balint returned the call

See Page A5


Manatees move home


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Scores of manatees crowd around a series of springs outside of the Three Sisters Springs area during a frigid morning last winter. The
26th annual Florida Manatee Festival kicks off today in Crystal River with activities throughout the city.


When cold weather hits, sea cows flock to the warm


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER- They've come each win-
ter to lounge, soak up the warmth and eat to
their hearts' content
Tourists? Not exactly
When the cold weather hits, more manatees
flock to the springs of King's Bay than any nat-
ural ecosystem in the world, said Michael Lusk,
manager of the Crystal River National Wildlife
Refuge.
They mosey in from the Gulf of Mexico be-
cause the springs are familiar, deep and pro-
tected with sanctuaries, offering manatees
unfettered access to areas of rest and food.
Numbers are down so far this year, thanks to
several weeks of spring-like weather. That may
change as temperatures drop to a more com-
mon Florida winter.
"Some more came in last night and I'd expect
a few more tonight," Lusk said Friday "It's def-
initely down. It's half what we've seen the last
See Page A5


MANATEE FESTIVAL
* The Florida Manatee Festival runs from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. Sunday in downtown Crystal River.
* Admission is $3; children age 12 and
younger are admitted free. For $4,
attendees can park at the Crystal River
Mall and take a shuttle to the festival
($4 covers the shuttle and entry).
* In conjunction with the Manatee
Festival, an array of activities are
planned at the Three Sisters Springs
property today, ranging from
educational presentations to
entertainment to the unveiling of a
Manatee Nebula at 12:30 p.m. Free
shuttles leave from the corner of
Northeast Fifth Street and Northeast
First Avenue starting at 9 a.m. The last
shuttle leaves Three Sisters at
4:30 p.m. Three Sisters activities are
on Saturday only.


water ofKing's Bay


Protections to stay

put even if manatee

down-listed
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
A month after a watchdog organi-
zation filed a petition on behalf of
Save Crystal River to down-list the
manatee from endangered is still
under review by officials.
According to U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service spokesman, Chuck Under-
wood, even if the West Indian mana-
tee is tabbed for down-listing to
threatened status, the protections en-
joyed by the sea cows under the En-
dangered Species Act will remain
See Page A5


Steering group targets Medicaid outreach


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer

INVERNESS Not all county
residents who are eligible for
Medicaid, a federal health care
program, are getting its benefits,
a group of care providers said
Thursday
"For Medicaid, the county has
a lower rate than the state rate,"
said Lindsey Redding, associate
planner with the WellFlorida
Council, a private, nonprofit or-


ganization that is state-
designated to offer health consul-
tancy for clients and projects.
"Overall, 15.6 percent of the
county's residents are eligible to
receive Medicaid, which is lower
than the state rate of 16.9 per-
cent," Redding said. "When they
say eligible to receive Medicaid,
that means are receiving Medi-
caid. It's a strange way of phras-
ing it, but that's how they do it."
Along with Shane Bailey, com-
munity initiatives director with


WellFlorida Council, Redding
presented a report called "2013
Citrus County Needs Assessment
Technical Report" during the first
steering committee meeting of the
Citrus County Hospital Board and
19 of the county's groups that have
an interest in health care. Their
report was based on 2011 statisti-
cal information.
The committee will put to-
gether a needs assessment plan.
Under a 2011 state law, the board
is required to conduct a health


needs assessment. WellFlorida
Council, hired as the board's con-
sultant, presented data regarding
health care delivery. Based on
community feedback, Well-
Florida will write the plan.
The Medicaid data hit a nerve
with the committee, especially
when designating eligibility.
"The way that the data reports
is that if they are eligible (for
Medicaid), they are signed up,"


Page A5


VOL. 118 ISSUE 165


r





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Expert to talk about


water data collection


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer

Paul Boetcher, a former
hydrologic data collector
for the U.S. Geological
Survey, will share his ex-
pertise at the annual meet-
ing of The Friends of
Crystal River National
Wildlife Refuge Complex.
Boetcher, owner of
Hydro-Q Inc. a consult-
ing firm will be the
keynote speaker at the
Sunday, Jan. 27, event in
Homosassa.
Among the things
Boetcher will talk about is
how flow measurements
are done in various bodies
of water.
"I will talk about how to
use that flow measurement
to calculate the discharge
rate," Boetcher said.
The event is at 2 p.m. in
the fellowship hall of First


* WHAT: Annual meeting of The Friends of Crystal
River National Wildlife Refuge Complex.
* WHEN: Sunday Jan. 27.
* WHERE: First United Methodist Church, 8831 W.
Bradshaw St., Homosassa.
* INFO: 352-586-7140.
* ON THE NET: friendsofchazz.org.


United Methodist Church,
8831 W Bradshaw St.,
Homosassa
Boetcher was a lead hy-
drologic technician with
the U.S. Geological Survey
for more than 30 years.
While at USGS,
Boetcher said he has
worked with Southwest
Florida Water Manage-
ment District on data used
to help determine Mini-
mum Flows and Levels for
area waterways.
Boetcher, who retired
from USGS in 2006, said he
will also talk about how to


monitor flow measure-
ments and all the other
variables such as weather
and tides involved in accu-
rately calibrating flows.
Citrus County Commis-
sioner Joe Meek will up-
date the audience on the
county's efforts regarding
cleanup at King's Bay and
its water quality issues.
The event, open to the
public, is free but a dona-
tion of non-perishable
food is encouraged.
For more information,
call 352-586-7140 or visit
friendsofchazz.org.


Dunnellon community plans


Martin Luther King Jr. parade


Special to the Chronicle

The Dunnellon commu-
nity will pay homage Mon-
day to Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr, the charismatic
civil rights leader of the
1960s.
"It is a time for the na-
tion to remember the injus-
tices that Dr. King fought
for," said Dr. Abraham
Robinson, senior pastor at
New Second Bethel Mis-
sionary Baptist Church.
"It's a time to remember
his fight for the freedom,
equality, and dignity of all
races and peoples. It's a
time to remember the mes-
sage of change through
nonviolence."
This year's theme for
Martin Luther King Day in
Dunnellon is: "Remember,
Celebrate, and Act! A Day
On, Not A Day Off."


"Although many people
see this and other holidays
as 'a day without home-
work,' or 'a day to hang out
with friends,' it is much
more than that; it is the
celebration of equality, the
celebration of freedom
and the celebration of a
wonderful, wonderful
man," Dr. Robinson said.
Civic and community
leaders will participate in
the city's annual MLK
march/parade at 9 a.m.
Monday, beginning at Mc-
Donald's. The event will
conclude at Ernie Mills
Park on Bostick Street.
The lineup begins at 8 a.m.
at McDonald's.
Following the event,
there will be a Family
Unity Day Festival/Picnic
at Ernie Mills Park. The
event is free and open to
the public. There will be


food, drinks, entertain-
ment and sports activities
from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Following the Family
Unity Day Festival/Picnic,
there will be a softball
tournament at the Eugene
Martin Park in South Dun-
nellon. Teams will include
players from the various
Dunnellon churches.
There Choir Federation
will perform its tribute to
Dr. King at 3 p.m. Sunday,
at Mt. Olive African
Methodist Episcopal
Church, 11799 Summit
Ave.
For more information,
call Dr. Robinson at 386-
590-6846; Frances Taylor
at 352-489-3618; Anita
Williams at 352-489-3465;
Mary Terrell at 352-489-
3435; Vanessa Watts at 352-
390-5592 or Maxine
Thomas at 352-489-1363.


Nuke tax repeal bill alive


Could be

headed to

House

PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer

A bill repealing the
Florida statute enabling
utilities to recover certain
costs for nuclear power
plants in advance could
be headed for a hearing
by the state House of
Representatives.
As a result of Section
366.93, Florida Statutes -
The Renewable Technol-
ogy and Energy Efficiency
Act Progress Energy
Florida will be able to
charge customers approxi-
mately $143 million in 2013
to cover costs associated
with Crystal River nuclear
plant and the proposed nu-
clear plant in Levy County
The statute was passed
in 2006 to encourage the
construction of nuclear
power plants and the di-
versification of the state's
energy sources.
State Rep. Michelle
Rehwinkel Vasilinda, D-
Tallahassee, filed the re-
peal bill HB 4003 -
with an effective date of
July 1, 2013.
But the nuclear recov-
ery measure has survived
past attempts to repeal it,
including a 2009 effort by
state Rep. Mike Fasano,
R-New Port Richey, a
state senator at the time.
Vasilinda has been a
passionate critic of ad-
vanced nuclear cost re-
covery, and state Sen.
Charlie Dean, R-
Inverness, questioned its
benefits to ratepayers at
a Florida Public Service
Commission hearing.
"I have heard that it is
going to get a hearing this
session," Vasilinda said
Friday. "I don't know
when, I heard that the
Speaker (Rep. Will
Weatherford, R-Wesley
Chapel) said, 'we need a
discussion about that"'
"It needs to be re-


pealed," she said. "It's a
scheme whose time has
come. We need to end it
now.
"We do not need those
powerplants," she said, cit-
ing the Crystal River nu-
clear plant. "We've go so
many other options on the
table renewables and
other sources we just
don't need these things."
Vasilinda said we need
to get away from central-
ized power plants for se-
curity and other factors
such as the weather disas-
ters seen in the Northeast
"We need to look to the
future," she said. "We are
sending a letter out to all
House members to ask
them to co-sponsor the
bill."
Vasilinda also wants to
be sure if bill goes
through, it is an "out and
out" repeal with no bench-
marks that utilities could
use to their advantage.
She wants transparency
by utilities, so consumers
know who much they are
paying for the nuclear
charge each month, what
the total plant cost is and
when it will be online.
In response to the bill,
Progress Energy Florida
spokeswoman Suzanne
Grant said the act encour-
ages the development of
nuclear energy by ensur-
ing two key outcomes: It
lowers the overall costs of
a nuclear power plant to
customers by several bil-
lion dollars. It ensures
that state regulators will
closely oversee every step
of the plant's construction.
"Under the legislation,
a utility can recover pru-


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dent preconstruction and
interest costs during the
construction period,"
Grant said. "Paying these
costs in advance signifi-
cantly lowers the long-
term financing costs. The
overall cost of the plant
decreases, minimizing the
price customers pay over
its operating lifetime."
Grant said the law also
protects customers from
potential cost overruns.
Utilities like Progress En-
ergy Florida are required
to come before the PSC
every year in public
hearings and show that
the costs of new plants are
prudent and reasonable.
"If the utilities don't do
that, they cannot recover
the costs from their cus-
tomers" Grant said.
"Given the significant ex-
pense of building a nu-
clear power plant, this
requirement makes sense
for customers. The law
not only saves customers
money but also provides
annual oversight of all ex-
penses associated with
nuclear construction."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. com.






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A2 SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013


LOCAL







Page A3 SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013



TATE &


(


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONIC


CLE


Around the
COUNTY

Join Valentine's Day
letter writing contest
The Chronicle invites
readers to participate in a
"letters from the heart" con-
test. Pour your soul into a
letter to your wife or hus-
band, girlfriend or boyfriend,
partner or friend, child or
parent, pet or
television.
Go to www.chronicle
online.com/valentinesday
2013. Entries will be ac-
cepted online through Jan.
25. First round of judging is
up to you! Pick your favorite
letter and vote once per
hour from Jan. 26 through
Jan. 31.
Three winners will be
chosen from your top selec-
tions by a panel of award
winning authors from the
Sunshine State Romance
Authors, part of the Ro-
mance Writers of America,
Florida Chapter 10,
presided over by Loretta
Rogers.
First, second and third
place will receive awards,
prizes and their letters will
be published in the Chroni-
cle on Valentine's Day.
Smartphone users, use
the QR code below to link
to the entry form.


Offices close
to observe holiday
All county and city gov-
ernmental offices will be
closed Monday in obser-
vance of the Martin Luther
King Jr. holiday.
The Chronicle's main of-
fice in Crystal River and
satellite office in Inverness
will be closed.
Customer service repre-
sentatives will be available
by phone from 7 to 10 a.m.
Monday.
Take Christmas trees
to county landfill
Citrus County Central
Landfill is offering free
Christmas tree disposal
during January. Trees must
be cleaned of all decora-
tions, tinsel, lights and not
have artificial snow.
For more information, call
352-527-7670 during office
hours or go to the county's
website at www.bocc.
citrus.fl.us. Click on depart-
ments, then Public Works,
then Solid Waste.
Learn about Florida
history at library
The Friends of the A.F.
Knotts Public Library invites
the public to an afternoon of
exploration in honor of the
500 years of European in-
volvement in "La Florida" on
Monday, Jan. 21.
As one of the first women
to arrive in La Florida in
1528, Maria Velasquez
Conquistradora accompa-
nied her husband on the
Panfilo de Narvaez
Expedition.
Narvaez brought with him
about 600 people to start
his colony. Ten of those
people were women.
The 2 p.m. program will
be preceded by the Friends
annual meeting at 1:30 p.m.
All are welcome.


Golf tourney aids charity


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Elijah
Lindall is a 12-year-old boy who
loves to play baseball with his
friends.
At the age of 7, doctors diag-
nosed Elijah with Tourette syn-
drome (TS), a genetic
neurological disorder that be-
comes evident between the ages
of 3 and 9. Symptoms of TS are
motor and vocal tics and sudden
repetitive movement involving
discrete muscles.
Contrary to popular belief, TS
does not result in shouting
obscenities.
"That is only in 10 percent of
those diagnosed with Tourette,"
said Elijah's mother, Maria Robi-
nett. "It is very rare that you have
that kind of a tic. But as soon as
you say that, that is automatically
what people assume."


In honor of her son, Maria is
raising awareness about TS and
feels it is misunderstood.
"There is not a lot of awareness
for Tourette," Maria said. "There
is awareness for cancer,
Alzheimer's and other conditions,
which is fantastic, but there is not
enough awareness or knowledge
for Tourette."
She is organizing the inaugural
Tee Off for Tourette Celebrity Golf
Tournament on Feb. 2, at the
Plantation on Crystal River, 9301
W Fort Island Trail.
The kick-off party starts the
tournament at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 1,
with live music, and auction and
a meet-and-greet with celebrities.
Rise and shine the next morn-
ing with a shot-gun start at 9 a.m.
Green fees, cart, lunch and
goody bag are included in the
$100 registration fee.
Proceeds from the 18-hole tour-
nament remain in Florida


through the Tourette Syndrome
Association of Florida Inc., a non-
profit organization helping those
living with TS.
"They don't even know what
part of the brain it comes from,"
Maria said. "They just know that
there is a part of the brain that
causes it, but they don't know
where. They don't have a cure.
There is so much testing needed
to be done."
Elijah does not golf; however,
he is looking forward to being a
part of the tournament.
"I just want everyone to know
that I am no different than they
are," Elijah said.
Celebrities such as American
Idol contestant Dave Pittman,
former Buffalo Bills linebacker
Darryl Talley, Kansas City Royal
infielder Nick DelGuidice, sports
artist John Prince, former Tampa
Rays catcher Toby Hall and for-
mer Tampa Bay Buccaneer tight


snip in time

snip in time


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Dr. Danilo Liwanag prepares to make an incision on a female cat Thursday morning as he starts the process
of spaying the animal at the Humanitarians facility in Crystal River. A new program, SnippetCitrus -
Spay/Neuter Innocent Pets, offers assistance to pet owners who may not otherwise be able to afford to
sterilize a pet.

Charity helps low-income pet owners spay, neuter animals


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
One way to reduce the
incidence of putting
unwanted pets to sleep
is to make sure they
aren't born in the first place by
sterilizing more animals.
That's the objective of a new
group: SnippetCitrus -
Spay/Neuter Innocent Pets.
"We've already done 50 pets,"
said one of the organizers, Mary
Lee Johnson.
The nine-member committee
recently organized to raise
funds to offer low-cost spaying
and neutering operations for
pets whose owners couldn't oth-
erwise afford it.
"Our goal is to stop pet home-
lessness before it starts," John-
son said.
SnippetCitrus is going
through the process of applying
for charity status, but already
has started its mission with the
help of the Humanitarians of
Florida, a long-established sep-
arate charity that offers a low-
cost spay/neuter service.
Through an agreement with Hu-
manitarians, SnippetCitrus
reaches out to pet owners who
find they can't afford existing
services.
With SnippetCitrus, the pet
owner would pay $10 for the
pet's operation, matched by $10
from SnippetCitrus. The sur-


Head technician Jill Rhoads, CVT,
works on the female cat before it
is taken into surgery.

gery is performed at the Hu-
manitarian's Manchester House
clinic at 1149 Conant Ave., Crys-
tal River.
"So far, we've had two
fundraisers," Johnson said. "We
want to keep raising money to
help people who have financial
difficulties."
The group has raised funds
through a jewelry party and
through charging for pets' pho-
tographs with Santa Claus. It
also has raised funds through 12
members paying $100 each for


VIP membership.
Members will be at this week-
end's Florida Manatee Festival
in Crystal River and the
Wednesday opening of Lecanto
Walmart to raise awareness in
the community about the need
to spay and neuter pets.
According to SnippetCitrus:
"Spay/neuter is a simple solu-
tion to the complex problem of
the euthanasia epidemic, which
destroys 4 million to 6 million
animals each year and is a di-
rect result of animals left unal-
tered in communities. Reducing
the strain on shelter systems
also allows them to devote more
resources to each animal,
thereby increasing each ani-
mal's chance for a positive
outcome."
With every $100 it raises,
Johnson said, the group can
spay or neuter 10 cats or five
dogs.
Another goal for members is
to ask veterinarians to donate
their services or offer cheaper
fees to SnippetCitrus clients.
In addition to Johnson, mem-
bers include: Pattie Amon,
Kathy Frisbie, Maggie Hypes,
Helen Lefave, Deb Manos, Bob
Pace, Lois Thomas and Chris
Vanerka.
The group has a website,
SnippetCitrus.com, and a Face-
book page. To volunteer or ask
for more information, call 352-
503-3237.


-From staff reports


TEE-OFF FOR TOURETTE
6:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 1,
Kick-Off Party for sponsors
and golfers at Plantation
lounge including: live auction,
celebrity meet and greet and
music by American Idol
contestant Dave Pittman.
Registration begins at 8 a.m.
Saturday, Feb. 2.
Shotgun start at 9 a.m.
Saturday.

end Anthony Becht will assist
with entertainment or golfing
alongside tournament players.
For more information on regis-
tering for the tournament, visit
www.teeoffforts.com or call Gary
D'Amico at 352-527-2938.
Chronicle reporter Eryn Wor-
thington can be contacted at
eworthington@chronicleonline.
cor or 352-563-5660, ext. 1334.



Voting


league


open to


men,


women

Learn about

League of

Women Voters

Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County does not
have a League of Women
Voters and has not had a
chapter for many years.
Nature Coast Unitarian
Universalists have invited
Allie Gore, of the Marion
County League of Women
Voters, to advise how a Cit-
rus County contingent
might join with it, or form
a local branch.
The event is at 2 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 26, at the
Unitarian Universalist
Fellowship, 7633 N.
Florida Ave, (U.S. 41), Cit-
rus Springs.
Gore is a longtime edu-
cator who was instrumen-
tal in reactivating the
Marion County League and
is willing to help Citrus
County to do the same.
She will show a short
video on the history of the
struggle for equal suffrage,
which will be followed by
a PowerPoint presentation
and discussion of the
League today
As a strictly nonpartisan
organization, the LWV does
not support or oppose can-
didates. It does, however,
take stands on issues after
coming to a consensus and
works to increase public
understanding of policy is-
sues through education.
The League a grass-
roots organization with
chapters in all 50 states -
was founded 92 years ago
and has been open to men
for 40 years.
All interested persons
are invited. For informa-
tion, call 352-465-4225 or
visit naturecoastuu.org.

INFORMATION
To learn more about
the presentation, call
352-465-4225 or visit
naturecoastuu.org.


Clarification

A story on Page Al of
Wednesday's edition, "Time
to toast manatees," war-
rants clarification.
Live entertainment will
not include a Jimmy Buffett
sound-alike contest this
year.
Readers can alert The
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles
by mailing newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or by
calling 352-563-5660.


Two dead in shooting at
assisted-living home
WEST PALM BEACH Two peo-
ple are dead after a shooting at a
Palm Beach County assisted-living
home.
Tequesta police Lt. Jason Turner
said the incident happened Friday af-
ternoon at the Clare Bridge facility,
which specializes in care of those with
Alzheimer's disease and other forms
of dementia.
Turner said the relationship be-
tween the two victims was not known.


Police said the facility was secured.
No other details were immediately
released.
New Port Richey officer
arrested on drug charges
NEW PORT RICHEY Officials
said a 13-year veteran of the New
Port Richey police department has
been arrested on drug charges.
John Nohejl was arrested Thursday
in a vehicle in Hernando County. He
was charged with trafficking in hy-
drocodone, possession of cocaine,
fleeing to elude, tampering with evi-


dence, possession of drug parapher-
nalia and possession of two driver's li-
censes. He is being held at the
Hernando County Jail on $110,500
bond.
He has been on paid administrative
leave since April 2012, when his po-
lice chief ordered two internal investi-
gations on Nohejl.
Juvenile justice process
to tighten in Florida
TALLAHASSEE Florida is tight-
ening monitoring and improving the
quality of juvenile justice residential


and detention facilities.
Department of Juvenile Justice
Secretary Wansley Walters an-
nounced the new efforts Friday.
They come nearly a month after a
privately owned facility for girls in the
Florida Panhandle agreed to end its
contract following the arrest of a staff
member who was accused of batter-
ing a 15-year-old inmate.
Ninety-five percent of the residential
facilities are privately operated and
the state is planning this year to out-
source the remaining five.
-From wire reports


State BRIEFS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic
battery arrest
Matthew Wilson, 24, of
Floral City, at 3:26 p.m.
Wednesday on a misde-
meanor charge of domestic
battery. No bond.
Other arrests
Cynthia Smith, 48, of
South Mary Ellen Terrace, Ho-
mosassa, at 5:53 p.m.
Wednesday on a felony charge
of driving while license sus-
pended (habitual traffic of-
fender). Bond $2,000.
Vanessa Brown-Ulloa,
25, of South Austin Point, Bev-
erly Hills, at 6:41 p.m. Wednes-
day on a felony charge of grand
theft. According to her arrest af-
fidavit, she is accused of steal-
ing jewelry. Bond $2,000.
Casey Waldron, 20, of
Dunnellon, at 8:50 a.m. Thurs-
day on a felony charge of ag-
gravated assault with a deadly
weapon without intent to kill. No
bond.
Rachel Rieder, 41, of
Beverly Hills, at 10:37 a.m.
Thursday on a felony charge of
possession of a controlled sub-
stance. Bond $2,000.
Bonnie Margaral, 49, of
East Quail Court, Inverness, at
5:31 p.m. Thursday on a Citrus
County warrant for violation of
probation on an original felony
charge of possession of a con-
trolled substance. No bond.
Hediye Ortalan, 30, of
West Silver Meadow Loop,
Hemando, at 6:32 p.m. Thurs-
day on a felony charge of pos-
session of a controlled
substance (Xanax) and misde-
meanor charge of retail petit
theft. Bond $5,250.
Victor Bibi Hamann, 28,
of West Toucan Loop, Her-
nando, at 7:31 p.m. Thursday
on a felony charge of obtaining
a controlled substance by fraud
or deception. Bond $2,000.
Kevin Pape, 51, of South
OakviewAvenue, Floral City, at
1:50 p.m. Friday on a Citrus
County warrant for violation of


probation on an original felony
charge of resisting a law en-
forcement officer with violence.
No bond.
Burglary
SA vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 7:31 p.m. Thursday,
Jan. 17, in the 10 block of N.
Barbour St., Beverly Hills.
Thefts
A petit theft was reported
at 10:19 a.m. Thursday, Jan.
17, in the 5800 block of S.
Choctaw Way, Homosassa.
A petit theft was reported
at 12:26 p.m. Jan. 17 in the
1600 block of N. Rock Cress
Path, Crystal River.
A petit theft was reported
at 6:04 p.m. Jan. 17 in the 2400
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Invemess.
A petit theft was reported
at 7:50 p.m. Jan. 17 in the 2400
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Invemess.
Vandalisms
*A vandalism was reported at
12:47 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 17, in
the area of E. Slate Street and S.
Atwood Terrace, Inverness.
A vandalism was reported
at 7:08 a.m. Jan. 17 in the 2600
block of W. Woodland Ridge
Drive, Lecanto.
A vandalism was reported
at 5:27 p.m. Jan. 17 in the 600
block of La SalleAve., Inverness.

ON THE NET

For information about
arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's
Office, go to www.
sheriffitrus. org and
click on the Public In-
formation link, then on
Arrest Reports.
Also under Public
Information on the
CCSO website, click
on Crime Mapping for
a view of where each
type of crime occurs
in Citrus County. Click
on Offense Reports to
see lists of burglary,
theft and vandalism.


Gov.'s staff ordered to




testify in recording case


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Sev-
eral current and former
employees in the adminis-
tration of Gov Rick Scott
are being ordered by a
judge to testify in a sensa-
tional criminal case that
centers on allegations of
illegal taping.
It is still unclear after
Friday's hearing whether
Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll
will be forced to answer
questions in the criminal
case against her former
aide that has also in-
cluded allegations of im-
proper relationships in
Carroll's office.
Carletha Cole, who was
fired last year, was ar-
rested in 2011 and accused
of giving a reporter a secret
recording containing a
conversation between Cole
and Carroll's chief of staff.
Cole has not been charged
with making the recording
- nor have prosecutors
said exactly when the


recording was made.
Circuit Judge Frank
Sheffield initially ruled
that Carroll must answer
questions from lawyers
representing Cole. But
then he changed his mind
at the urging of Scott's top
lawyer Sheffield said Car-
roll would be questioned
last and only if Cole's
lawyers could show her
testimony was needed.
Sheffield, however,
made it clear that ques-
tions of Scott administra-
tion employees will be
limited to illegal taping
and whether or not top of-
ficials working for the gov-
ernor had ordered
widespread taping as al-
leged by Cole.
The judge said lawyers
could not ask Carroll or
anyone else about the
lieutenant governor's sex-
ual preference or whether
or not her office was the
"absolute worst place in
the world to work."
"We are not going to try


the lieutenant governor's
office," Sheffield said.
Cole's attorneys have
asserted that their client
was being set up because
she witnessed unprofes-
sional behavior by Carroll
and other employees, in-
cluding walking in on Car-
roll and a female aide in a
"compromising position."
Carroll, who is a former
Navy officer and married,
has called the allegations
"false and absurd."
Attorney Stephen Web-
ster suggested other em-
ployees in Carroll's office
placed recordings on
Cole's computer and she
assumed they were public
records. A spokesman for
the governor's office has
previously denied that
there was a widespread
policy of taping people.
It is against Florida law
to record someone without
consent, but there have
been legal questions about
recordings made in public
buildings. Cole is charged


with a third-degree felony
and could face up to five
years in prison.
The current and former
employees who were or-
dered to answer questions
include Carroll's travel
aide Beatriz Ramos, for-
mer chief of staff Steve
MacNamara, and former
chief of staff Mike
Prendergast.
The Scott administra-
tion last year had tried to
get the judge to shield
both Ramos and Carroll
from answering any ques-
tions but Sheffield denied
the request.
Pete Antonacci, a for-
mer prosecutor and now
general counsel for Scott,
repeated the request on
Friday and said that as an
elected official that Car-
roll was "special" and she
should not be subjected to
questioning.
"It's very clear from
what the prosecutors said
that she had no role," An-
tonacci told the judge.


notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle





Meeting Notices,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,C14



Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices.....C14




SF Self Storage Notices.........................C14


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES
City H L F'cast City H
Daytona Bch. 70 55 pc Miami 78
Ft. Lauderdale 78 66 sh Ocala 72
Fort Myers 79 60 sh Orlando 74
Gainesville 69 46 pc Pensacola 63
Homestead 79 61 sh Sarasota 78
Jacksonville 68 43 pc Tallahassee 66
Key West 75 66 pc Tampa 76
Lakeland 76 55 pc Vero Beach 74
Melbourne 74 63 pc W. Palm Bch. 77


F'cast
sh
pc
pc
s
pc
s
pc
sh
sh


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northeast winds around 20 knots.
Seas 2 to 4 feet. Bay and inland
waters will be choppy. Partly cloudy
skies today.


64 40 NA 64 41 NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK E "xclusve daly
forecast by:
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
) High: 75 Low: 52
Periods of clouds and sunshine.
*- Breezy and milder.
SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 74 Low: 48
Partly sunny to mostly cloudy. A little cooler by
^ night.
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
."' High: 73 Low: 44
Partly sunny with another cold front by night.


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 64/38
Record 87/23
Normal 70/42
Mean temp. 51
Departure from mean -5
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00 in.
Total for the month trace
Total for the year trace
Normal for the year 1.72 in.
*As of 7 pm at Inverness
UV INDEX: 3
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.26 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 50
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 60%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, Elm, Maple
Today's count: 10.3/12
Sunday's count: 10.8
Monday's count: 10.2
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
1/19 SATURDAY 11:49 5:37 -6:00
1/20 SUNDAY 12:10 6:21 12:33 6:45
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT ............................5:59 PM .
SUNRISE TOMORROW ..................... 7:24A.M.
( 1 MOONRISE TODAY.........................12:19 PM.
JAN. 26 FEB. 3 FEB. 10 FEB. 17 MOONSET TODAY............................1:04A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
informationon drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 11:25 a/7:05 a 11:04 p/6:25 p
Crystal River* 9:46 a/4:27 a 9:25 p/3:47 p
Withlacoochee* 7:33 a/2:15 a 7:12 p/1:35 p
Homosassa*** 10:35 a/6:04 a 10:14 p/5:24 p


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
12:53 p/8:18 a -- :23 p
11:14 a/5:40 a 10:24 p/4:45 p
9:01 a/3:28 a 8:11 p/2:33 p
12:03 p/7:17 a 11:13 p/6:22 p


Gulf water
temperature


63
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.79 28.79 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.13 38.11 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.10 39.07 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.44 40.42 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Friday Saturday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L
22 10 c 41 30
51 24 s 50 24
49 30 s 48 28
56 31 s 57 40
36 26 s 50 37
65 26 s 66 40
37 28 s 46 32
56 33 pc 31 9
52 28 s 56 35
17 1 s 21 10
29 19 c 45 35
26 14 .01 c 44 22
20 -1 sn 37 30
56 39 s 60 42
39 23 s 53 35
49 30 s 51 33
43 19 pc 46 15
40 19 s 52 31
34 21 pc 44 26
55 32 s 56 36
35 19 s 49 27
20 8 c 38 28
62 31 s 65 42
59 29 s 54 20
56 25 pc 48 9
34 18 pc 41 20
59 30 pc 61 33
45 20 s 53 33
36 26 s 48 32
29 21 pc 44 31
62 36 s 65 43
40 19 s 48 23
57 28 s 60 38
59 34 s 61 37
54 26 s 62 35
79 52 s 74 48
45 25 s 52 33
54 28 s 56 36
42 14trace pc 43 11
41 17 .01 pc 34 -4
59 36 s 64 40
58 33 s 59 38
51 26 s 55 34


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY

Friday Saturday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 55 40 s 65 45
New York City 34 25 s 47 35
Norfolk 43 35 .10 s 51 36
Oklahoma City 60 26 s 63 30
Omaha 52 27 s 48 13
Palm Springs 77 47 s 74 45
Philadelphia 39 30 s 47 33
Phoenix 74 44 s 75 46
Pittsburgh 30 16 c 45 28
Portland, ME 20 9 sn 36 31
Portland, Ore 46 26 pc 45 30
Providence, R.I. 32 20 pc 46 35
Raleigh 46 30 .06 s 51 33
Rapid City 59 25 pc 34 7
Reno 36 17 s 38 16
Rochester, NY 25 11 .02 c 47 24
Sacramento 61 27 s 62 32
St. Louis 56 24 s 58 28
St. Ste. Marie 19 2 .51 sn 33 2
Salt Lake City 22 2 pc 26 10
San Antonio 64 35 s 66 41
San Diego 73 48 s 75 48
San Francisco 62 39 s 62 44
Savannah 59 40 s 62 42
Seattle 38 30 pc 40 31
Spokane 27 16 c 31 18
Syracuse 25 14 .06 c 42 27
Topeka 62 33 s 56 21
Washington 40 34 s 46 33
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 81 Hawthorne, Calif. LOW-24 Presque
Isle, Maine
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 88/75/pc
Amsterdam 25/19/pc
Athens 58/49/pc
Beijing 39/21/c
Berlin 25/12/pc
Bermuda 63/62/c
Cairo 70/54/s
Calgary 28/0/pc
Havana 81/65/pc
Hong Kong 64/59/pc
Jerusalem 62/47/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


54/48/sh
36/25/c
52/36/r
68/45/pc
34/33/sf
14/2/c
30/27/c
81/72/ts
45/35/sh
73/66/ts
34/26/pc
39/21/c
17/17/sn


For the RECORD


SC I T R U S.


COUNTY -


(ARONICLL
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To k t u S 106 W. Main
St.,
41 44 b L Inverness, FL
34450
FD N

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KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


A4 SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013


LOCAL/STATE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MEDICAID
Continued from Page Al

Redding answered a committee
member.
While people may be eligible,
they would not be counted as el-
igible until they were in the
Medicaid system, under statisti-
cal evidence.
"One of the issues I first got in-
volved with on this board was
the issue of people who are eli-
gible, not enrolled, eligible,"
said Robert Priselac, hospital
board vice chairman. "The prob-
lem is we can't get them signed
up because they don't have a


SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013 A5


real ID and other factors. There
are people out there that maybe
we can help and get them en-
rolled and get them the services.
I'd like to know what that figure
is: How many people out there
do we need to get into the
system?"
Debbie Ressler, hospital
board chairwoman, said the
board and Citrus Memorial
Health Foundation held a
signup session for Medicaid
about two years ago.
"We probably signed up at
least 100, didn't we?" Ressler
asked.
Ryan Beaty, Citrus Memorial
hospital CEO, concurred.
"There are a lot of folks out


there that need help," Beaty
said.
Anne Black, community rela-
tions coordinator for HPH Hos-
pice in Citrus County, spoke of
her experience as a health de-
partment employee in enrolling
Medicaid recipients at the
signup session.
"The problem at that signup
was many of them were guys be-
tween 18 and 64 because unless
you're raising a child, you don't
qualify for Medicaid," Black
said. "They fall between the
cracks. They were sent to my
table and we charge them on a
sliding scale."
A pocket of people in the
county need Medicaid but can't


qualify, Black said.
Priselac asked Bailey and
Redding to find data about peo-
ple who could qualify for the
services of Medicaid but are not
enrolled.
Those people who qualify for
Medicaid but are not enrolled
are accounted for among the
numbers for the uninsured in
Citrus County, which was 16.6
percent. Beaty presented recent
data from Citrus Memorial's
billing regarding an increase in
uninsured patients.
"Over the past couple of years,
the self-pay component (unin-
sured) of our revenues has fluc-
tuated between six-and-a-half
and seven percent," Beaty said.


"In December, it moved up to 8.5
percent Self-pay is about 98 per-
cent no-pay It started about six
months ago bumping up and
coming down. I don't know if it's a
trend, if it will continue, it's going
to be flat or what. But I would say
that that type of data probably
means that the data you've got
here from 2011 may not be really
germane at this moment."
The next meeting on Feb. 15
will review community input re-
sults from focus groups and sur-
veys and begin strategic
planning.
Chronicle reporter Chris Van
Ormer can be reached at
cvanormer@chronicleonline.
cor or 352-564-2916.


REVIEW
Continued from Page Al

unchanged.
"They (manatees) are
also protected under the
Marine Mammal Protec-
tion Act. And, should any-
thing happen or we get
data that leads us to be-
lieve they are in danger,
we can relist it without
delay," Underwood said.
Attorneys for the Pacific
Legal Foundation, a non-
profit watchdog organiza-
tion, filed a petition with
USFWS in December



MANATEE
Continued from Page Al

two years because it's so
warm."
The U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service conducts
aerial surveys of manatees
on coastal waters. Reports
show 229 manatees so far
this month in King's Bay,
with another count set for
Tuesday



ARREST
Continued from Page Al

and met that day in the dis-
trict administrative offices
with Bishop and Teresa
Royal, the district's com-
pliance and policy officer
When Bishop told Balint
he was being removed
from the classroom, Balint
resigned on the spot,
Bishop said.


seeking to down-list the
manatee from endangered
to threatened. The group
said the effort is based on
the government's own sci-
entific study conducted in
2007.
"Their own 2007 study
concluded the manatee
has made a fantastic re-
covery and all we are ask-
ing is for them to follow
conclusions of their scien-
tific review," said Alan De-
Serio, managing attorney
with Pacific Legal Founda-
tion's office in Stuart.
According to the founda-
tion and USFWS officials,
the agency conducted a


Compare that to the
frigid 2010 winter, when the
high January count showed
566 manatees in King's Bay.
So what's the draw?
Manatee expert Robert
Bonde, research biologist
for the U.S. Geological
Service who has studied
manatees for more than 33
years, said the King's Bay
springs offer manatees
deep, warm water.
Manatees are creatures
of habit that builds up over


"He wasn't very comfort-
able in our conversation
and that was evident early
on," Bishop said.
After Balint resigned,
district officials retrieved
his classroom computer
and reviewed its
contents.
"Nothing there raised a
red flag," Bishop said.
The investigation began
in August after the Na-
tional Center for Missing
and Exploited Children in


status review of the West
Indian manatee the
species found in Florida
- as required every five
years by the Endangered
Species Act The review is
to make sure a species still
requires endangered
species protection and, if
so, to what degree.
The foundation says the
2007 review recommended
manatee should be down-
listed from its current en-
dangered status to the
status of threatened.
"We are just taking the
first step in what we hope
will eventually lead to re-
moving the manatee from


generations. Older mana-
tees shy away from shallow
water because their gener-
ations have been attacked
by harpoon or had their
backs chopped with boat
propellers. These mana-
tees tend to stick to the
sanctuaries, Bonde said.
Younger manatees with
no such experience are
more likely to move where
they want because they
have no experience with
boats.


Washington, D.C., con-
tacted the sheriff's office
in reference to potential
downloads of child
pornography somewhere
in Citrus County, sheriff's
spokeswoman Heather
Yates said.
Investigators were able
to pinpoint the images
being downloaded from
Balint's home in Sugarmill
Woods. Detectives went to
the home and Balint con-
sented to a search to allow


the list," DeSerio said.
He said his office has yet
to hear from USFWS
about the status of their
petition and would give
them about 60 days before
deciding on taking the
next step a lawsuit in
federal court
"I think we are taking
the right steps and in the
right direction," DeSerio
added.
Underwood said even if
the manatee had recov-
ered enough to be
delisted, there are always
other laws on the books to
protect the species and
they will continue to be


"Life as they know it,
they're not worried about
people," Bonde said.
King's Bay is a strategic
location, halfway between
the Panhandle and the
southern Gulf of Mexico.
Sanctuaries in the Crystal
River National Wildlife
Refuge provide protection,
and manatees flock to the
area in cold weather.
The odd thing about this
winter is it started cold,
then warmed up for sev-


detectives to take posses-
sion of his laptop com-
puter, Yates said.
The sheriff's office is-
sued an arrest warrant
Wednesday and Balint
turned himself in the next
day The charges are pos-
session of material includ-
ing sexual performance of
a child.
Superintendent of
Schools Sandra "Sam"
Himmel said she decided
not to have letters sent


monitored for re-listing if
necessary
He points to the bald
eagle which has recovered
enough and was delisted,
but has criminal sanctions
attached to harming them.
He said the Wood Stork's
status from endangered to
threatened is currently
under review, but the
species also is dually pro-
tected under the Migratory
Birds Act.
Underwood said the sta-
tus of the manatee had been
under review since last year
as part of the five-year re-
view process. The last re-
view was in 2007.


eral weeks. Bonde and
Lusk both said manatees
left the area when the
weather warmed up and
now may return if temper-
atures continue to drop.
"It's all based on temper-
atures," Bonde said. "If the
gulf's temperature drops
below 20 degrees Celsius,
that'll be the signal that they
need to find warmer water
somewhere."
Bonde said he doesn't
think manatees ventured


home to parents of Crystal
River Middle School stu-
dents regarding Balint's
arrest because the allega-
tions are not connected to
the school or his teaching.
School Principal Gloria
Bishop had a meeting Fri-
day afternoon with her
staff to inform them of
Balint's arrest.
Balint spent seven years
in Palm Beach County be-
fore being hired in 1985 as
a Lecanto High School so-


He believes the agency
should have an answer for
the foundation's petition
within 90 days.
Save Crystal River Inc., a
local citizens group, has
been embroiled in a tussle
with USFWS mostly over
new human activity rules
adopted by the government
The group has called the
government's recent ac-
tions including designat-
ing the bay as a manatee
protection refuge as
overreach.
Chronicle reporter AB.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe
@chronicleonline. com.


too far during the recent
warm spell to make it back
to the King's Bay springs.
"Some as far as 100
miles away may be headed
to Crystal River right now,"
he said. "They're on that
treadmill, using their body
temperature and heat to
keep their body warm by
exercising. The sanctuar-
ies are a blessing. The
manatees can rely on
them. They know they're
there."


cial studies teacher. He
was dean of students at
Lecanto High for three
years before moving to
CRMS in 1990, where he
had taught since.
District officials in No-
vember also contacted the
Florida Professional Prac-
tices Commission, which
oversees teacher certifica-
tion. He said the state was
awaiting possible criminal
charges before proceeding
with discipline.


HAVE A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about
breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-563-
5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone
number, and the address of the news event.
* Approval for story ideas must be granted by the
Chronicle's editors before a reporter is assigned.
Call Editor Mike Arnold or managing editor Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Nicholas
Barcia, 92
CRYSTAL RIVER
Nicholas Barcia, 92, of
Crystal River, Fla., passed
away Saturday, Jan. 12,
2013, at his home.
Nick Barcia, born in
1920, traveled to the



Sic ily i ,
Italy, with
his very
large and
loving
Nicholas family. He
Barcia grew up in
New York City and worked
with his father, then his
brother Charlie, on Sec-
ond Avenue, at the DeLuxe
Sandwich Shop. He made
a mean meatball hero! He
married the love of his life,
Grace Oliveri, in 1946. The
family grew to include a
son, Richard, and daugh-
ters, Lynn and Suzanne.
Robin Quinn was another
happy addition to his chil-
dren. He loved her like his
own. He loved and felt im-
mense pride in his grand-
daughters, Dr Sara Barcia,
Gina Barcia and U.S. Army
Sgt. Becky Barcia.
Throughout the years he
loved watching thorough-
breds and spent many
happy Saturdays at Aque-
duct, Belmont and
Saratoga with Grace, his
brother Charlie and his
wife Gloria. Even after
moving to Florida,
Kentucky Derby day was
celebrated like a national
holiday at his daughter,
Lynn, and son-in-law, Joe
Turck's home in Lecanto.
A lover of life, his motto
was to "re-lax," yet he
never seemed to relax. He
loved Florida, its mana-
tees (he almost fell out of a
boat he was so excited
to see his first one), air-
boats, kayaking, swimming
and going to the beach
with Robin. He loved going
to parties and hanging out
with his large circle of
friends.
He loved to tell stories
and was sometimes timed
(some would take a while
to tell). He loved to laugh
and would laugh at the
most ridiculous things.
And, most of all he loved to
sing, although, micro-
phones were either taken
away or turned off! Some
of his favorites being,
"Strangers in the Night"
and "New York,
New York."
His wife of more than 50
years, (Grace, 1924-2000) is
probably dragging him all
over heaven. And those he
left behind on earth know
that the party is on. We can
hear him say "love ya,
Baby!"
Strickland Funeral
Home with Crematory is
assisting the family with
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Joyce
Lambo, 75
HOMOSASSA
Joyce Carolyn Lambo,
75, of Homosassa, Fla.,
passed away Wednesday,
Jan. 16, 2013, at her home
in Homosassa under the
care of her family and
HPH Hospice. She was
born Jan. 24, 1937, in
Rockland, Maine, to Frank
and Alice (Anderson)
Fuller. She came here 32
years ago from St. Peters-
burg. She was a retired
Flexowriter operator, a
member of Crystal River
Women of the Moose and
the American Legion Post
155 Aux.
She was preceded in
death by her husband,
Robert Lambo, Nov. 27,
2005. Surviving is her son,
Stephen Hakes of
Homosassa, and a sister,
Alice Austin of Crocket,
Texas.
Private cremation
arrangements are under
the care of Strickland
Funeral Home with
Crematory Crystal River


CLA. E. bavu
Funeral Home

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SCremation


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For Information and costs,
call 726-8323


Kenneth
Swearingen,
90
HOMOSASA
Kenneth Hartly
Swearingen, 90, died Jan.
17, 2013, at daughter's
home in Brookline, N.H.
He was born July 30, 1922,
in Claremont, S.D., son of
Joseph Swearingen and
Myrtle (Freeland) Jones.
He was the husband of
the late Ruth M.
(Heimburger) Swearingen.
Prior to her death Nov 3,
1991, they had shared al-
most 49 years of marriage.
Kenneth served his coun-
try proudly during World
War II in the U.S. Navy.
Following his service, he
worked as a carpenter and
then went to work as a
sorter for the U.S. Post Of-
fice. He enjoyed cutting
trees, and made a point to
visit Granny's Restaurant
whenever he was in
Homosassa, Fla.
He is survived by a
son, Kenneth Hartly
Swearingen II of Plano,
Texas; a daughter,
Marlene Morgan of
Brookline, N.H.; four
grandsons, Keith
Swearingen, Matthew
Swearingen, Trevor
Morgan, and Evan Morgan;
and two great-
granddaughters, Jade
Swearingen and Abigail
Swearingen.
A graveside service will
be 1 p.m. Monday,
Jan. 21,2013, at Pine Grove
Cemetery in Brookline,
N.H. Family and friends
are invited to attend.
Those who wish may make
memorial contributions to
Meals on Wheels- Milford,
NH, PO. Box 910,
Merrimack, NH 03054, or
Home Health & Hospice
Care, 7 Executive Park
Drive, Merrimack, NH
03054, or WWII Veteran's
Memorial. The Davis
Funeral Home, 1 Lock St.,
Nashua, has been placed
in charge of arrangements.
An online guest book is
available at wwwdavis
funeralhomenh.com,
603-883-3401. "One Mem-
ory Lights Another."

Roy
Hatt, 68
INVERNESS
Roy David Hatt, 68,
Inverness, Fla., passed
away Jan. 13, 2013, at
Citrus Memorial Health
System. Born July 28, 1944,
to the late Alexander and
Henrietta Hatt, he moved
to Citrus County in 1992.
He was a
t truck

produce
stand
owner.
Sur -
vivors in-
clude wife,
Roy M wil ie
Hatt H a t t ,
daughters, Stacy (Hurb)
Hollis, Teri (Mike) Jones,
brother, George (Carol)
Hatt; seven grandchildren,
nieces and nephews; best
friends, Jean and Wally
Steeves. He was preceded
in death by his parents,
brother, Charles, sisters,
Jean, Barbara; mother-in-
law, Flo, son-in-law,
Dwayne Jones.
A memorial service will
be 11 a.m, Saturday,
Jan. 19, 2013, at Mt. Zion
AME Church, Her-
nando. Private cremation
services entrusted to New
Serenity Memorial Fu-
neral Home &
Cremation Svcs. Inc.,
352-563-1394.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. cornm.

To Place Your

r"In Memory" ad,

Saralynne


Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller@chronicleonline.com


Richard
Monnich, 84
INGLIS
Richard Monnich, 84, of
Inglis, died Jan. 17, 2013.
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home & Crematory in
Lecanto.

Anselm 'Ann'
de Lande, 78
CITRUS HILLS
Anselm "Ann" de Lande,
78, died January 17, 2013,
with her family by her
side, in Citrus Hills,
Florida. She battled with
prolonged illnesses. She
leaves behind her beloved
husband
of 57 years,
Alvin. Ann
will for-
ever be re-
membered
by her five
children,
Gaston &
Anselm his wife
de Lande Yudy, Lita
& her partner Eric, Marcia
& her husband Benjamin,
Merle & her husband
George, &
Sherwin. She also leaves
behind 17 grandkids, &
four great-grandkids,
along with countless
friends, and family who
were blessed to have
known her
Ann was born on
April 21, 1934, in Trinidad
& Tobago, to her late par-
ents John, & Lucy de Gale;
she was 1 of 13 children.
She was married in May
1955, at Santa Rosa church
in Arima, Trinidad.
Ann loved cooking,
sewing, singing, doing
crossword puzzles & was
devoted to her lord & sav-
ior Ann was known mostly
for her generosity and for
being a loving mother. On-
line condolences may be
sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com. Arrangements
are under the direction of
the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory, 501 W Main St,
Inverness, Florida 34450.


John L.
Matyi, 63
CRYSTAL RIVER
John L. Matyi, 63, of
Crystal River, died Jan. 14,
2013. Private cremation
will take place under the
direction of Brown Fu-
neral Home & Crematory
in Lecanto.

Ingrid
Berg, 70
LECANTO
Ingrid L. Berg, 70,
Lecanto, died Jan. 17,2013,
at her residence. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory is in charge of
private arrangements.


OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be
submitted by the
funeral home or
society in charge of
arrangements.
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.


Corporate Office
14651 21st St.
Dade City, FL
33523
352-567-5133


Studio 54 auction


Items from

famed

nightclub

up for bid

Associated Press

WEST PALM BEACH
- A trove of memorabilia
from Studio 54 is going up
for bid in an auction that
is resurrecting those long-
ago nights at the iconic
1970s clubhouse with a
legacy greater than its
lifespan.
Mementos kept by the
late Studio 54 co-owner
Steve Rubell, including
paparazzi photographs,
letters and artwork once
belonging to the New
York club's A-list guests,
are being auctioned off
Saturday in West Palm
Beach.
The items give a fasci-
nating glimpse of life at
54: author Fran Lebowitz
shoulder-to-shoulder with
pop artist Andy Warhol. A
stone-faced Frank Sinatra
staring off in the distance.
Diana Ross, arms flailing
on the dance floor Robin
Williams, Dustin Hoff-
man, Michael Jackson,
Elton John, Cher and
on and on and on.
Rubell's partner, Bill
Hamilton, finally decided
to part with the treasures,
more than 23 years after
Rubell's death at the age
of 45. The boxes of news-
paper clippings, photo-
graphs and everything
else had spent decades in
their apartment on West
55th Street in Manhattan,
where Hamilton still lives.
Giving up the items was
hard, said Hamilton, who
was too young to ever
enjoy Studio 54 himself.
He decided to auction
them, in part, because he
got married last year and
wanted to shed some of
his possessions. But as he
took a final look at the
photos, he was reminded
of Rubell's generosity and
how much fun he helped
create.
"He really just wanted
you to have a good time.
And he might have just
met you and he invited
you into the club, but he
was going to make sure
you remember it," he
said. "These people from
1978, 1979 are still living
those nights."
Rubell and Ian
Shrager opened Studio
54 in 1977 and sold it in
1981, after they "got out
of camp," as they called
prison, where they
served time on charges
of federal income tax
evasion. It continued op-
erating under different
management for years
afterward.
"They just pushed the
envelope every single
night," Hamilton said.
The club's memories
are captured in hand-
scrawled notes from its
guests, such as one from


A Studio 54 poster is on
display in West Palm
Beach.
Farrah Fawcett to Rubell
that says "Dearest Steve,
Thank you for a fabulous
weekend. You made it
work!" Or the telegram
from Yves St. Laurent to
Rubell, inviting him to a
black-tie celebration of
his perfume Opium.
Most of the dozens and
dozens of photographs
were taken by news out-
lets or paparazzi and it's
not known how many
copies exist But there's a
handful of one-of-a-kind
Polaroids shot by Warhol,
making them the most
valuable of the bunch.
Altogether, the collec-
tion broadens the public
portrait of Rubell, known
to many younger people
only through Mike Myers'
portrayal of him in the
movie "54."
"I'm left with the belief
that there was an energy


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with the way Rubell
would put together these
groups of people every
night," said auctioneer
Rico Baca of Palm Beach
Modern Auctions, which
is handling the sale. "And
this energy comes out in
these photographs."
Among the pricier ob-
jects on the auction block
is a metal sculpture by
Warhol of dollar signs,
which was given to Rubell,
and is estimated to fetch
up to $50,000. There's also
a Warhol drawing of Stu-
dio 54 drink tickets, esti-
mated to go for up to
$150,000, and a painted
portrait of Rubell by
Michael Vollbracht given
to the club impresario on
his 35th birthday, with an
estimated value of up to
$20,000.
Also being sold are
drink tickets, posters, in-
vitations and even
Rubell's personal address
book. And, perhaps most
interestingly, the key to
the fortress itself, Rubell's
tattered front-door reser-
vation book, which held
his jotted notes on each
night's guest list.
The book is filled with
gads of famous names, no-
tations on whether the
guest's bill would be
footed by the club, and the
faint sound of disco-
fueled memories frozen
in time.


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Associated Press
A photograph of the late Frank Sinatra, owned by
Studio 54 club co-founder Steve Rubell, is displayed
Wednesday in West Palm Beach. Memorabilia from the
famed 1970s club is hitting the auction block in Florida.
The private collection of co-founder Steve Rubell is
being sold Saturday in West Palm Beach.


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A6 SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
In this combination of file photos, the Rev. Martin Luther
King Jr., left, speaks April 15, 1967, at a peace rally in New
York; and President Barack Obama, right, speaks Nov. 7 at
an election-night party in Chicago after winning a second
term in office. Inauguration Day coincides with the King hol-
iday, marking what some say is an inextricable tie between
the nation's first black president and the civil rights
movement. Obama plans to incorporate the legacy of that
movement into his inauguration.

Inauguration Day

intersects with King


Associated Press

ATLANTA President
Barack Obama plans to
use a Bible that belonged
to the Rev. Martin Luther
King Jr as he takes his
oath of office on the holi-
day honoring the slain
icon, marking what some
say is an inextricable tie
between the nation's first
black president and the
civil rights movement.
It's only the second time
Inauguration Day has co-
incided with the King hol-
iday Some say it's only
fitting the celebrations are
intertwined.
"It's almost like fate and
history coming together,"
said U.S. Rep. John Lewis,
who worked alongside
King in the fight for civil
rights during the 1950s and
'60s and plans to attend the
inauguration. "If it hadn't
been for Martin Luther
King Jr, there would be no
Barack Obama as
president."
Some King commemora-
tions have been shuffled
around to accommodate the
inauguration, though others
are going on as planned.
King's youngest daugh-
ter, Bernice King, plans to
attend the observance of
her father's memory at
Ebenezer Baptist Church
in Atlanta, where he
preached, and said she
doesn't fear the inaugura-
tion will overshadow the
celebration.
"I think it enhances the
observance, actually, be-
cause it heightens people's
awareness about the King
holiday," she said. "I also
think it gives some sort of
validation to the signifi-
cant work that my father
made to this country, to
this world, in fact."
The only other time a
presidential inauguration
has fallen on the King hol-
iday was in 1997 at the
start of President Bill Clin-
ton's second term. Clinton
invoked King's memory in
his inaugural address, and
events were planned
throughout the inaugura-
tion weekend to commem-
orate King.
"Thirty-four years ago,
the man whose life we cel-


ebrate today spoke to us
down there at the other
end of this Mall in words
that moved the conscience
of a nation. Like a prophet
of old, he told of his dream
that one day America
would rise up and treat all
its citizens as equals be-
fore the law and in the
heart," Clinton said in his
address. "Martin Luther
King's dream was the
American dream."
Obama plans to incorpo-
rate the legacy of the civil
rights movement into his
inauguration. Myrlie
Evers-Williams, the widow
of slain civil rights activist
Medgar Evers, is slated to
deliver the invocation.
The president also plans
to take the oath of office
for his second term with
his hand on two Bibles,
one owned by King and
one by Abraham Lincoln.
As he takes the oath,
Obama will face the Lin-
coln Memorial, where
King delivered his "I Have
a Dream" speech 50 years
ago this August.
Having the president
call for her father's Bible
was a special moment,
Bernice King said.
"What a significant
honor," she said. "To me,
it's like another elevation
for my father."
Obama also plans to
honor King throughout his
inaugural weekend, begin-
ning by asking Americans
to volunteer in their com-
munities Saturday to honor
the civil right leader's
legacy of service. Inaugural
planners also say there will
be a float honoring King in
the parade to the White
House after the swearing-
in ceremony
In Washington and Balti-
more, however, annual
Martin Luther King Jr Day
parades have been moved
to avoid conflicting with the
inauguration. The Balti-
more parade, typically a
major event in the majority-
black city, will be Saturday
The parade along Mar-
tin Luther King Jr Avenue
in southeast Washington
has been moved to April
20, the 50-year anniversary
of King's release from a
Birmingham, Ala., jail.


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l A I. *









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Thursday
R ib Eye .........................................$ 19 .9 5
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Specialty Martinis ....................$5.00
Friday
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Sunday
Award Winning Sunday Brunch
ll:30am-2:00pm........ ........... 15.95

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We t82
BAR & GRILL


at Plantation on Crystal River
9301 W. Fort Island Trail,
SCrystal River
352-795-4211
www.plantationoncrystalriver.com


Gov't: Food allergies may be disability


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Allergic to
gluten? What about peanuts? Fed-
eral disabilities law may be able to
help.
The Justice Department said in a
recent settlement with a Massachu-
setts college that severe food aller-
gies can be considered a disability
under the law. That gives those who
suffer from such allergies a new av-
enue in seeking menus that fit their
diet. But some say it goes too far
The decision leaves schools,
restaurants and other places that
serve food more exposed to legal
challenges if they fail to honor re-
quests for accommodations by peo-
ple with food allergies.
Colleges and universities are es-
pecially vulnerable because they
know their students and often re-
quire them to eat on campus, Eve
Hill of the Justice Department's
civil rights division said. But a
restaurant also could be liable if it
blatantly ignored a customer's re-
quest for certain foods and that per-
son became ill, though that case
might be harder to argue if the cus-
tomer had just walked in off the
street and was unknown to the
restaurant, Hill said.
The settlement with Lesley Uni-
versity, reached last month but
drawing little attention, will re-
quire the Cambridge institution to
serve gluten-free foods and make
other accommodations for students
who have celiac disease. At least
one student had complained to the
federal government after the school
would not exempt the student from
a meal plan even though the stu-
dent couldn't eat the food.
"All colleges should heed this set-
tlement and take steps to make ac-
commodations," said Alice Bast,
president and founder of the Na-
tional Foundation for Celiac Aware-
ness. "To our community, this is
definitely a precedent."
Under the agreement, Lesley
University will not only provide
gluten-free options in its dining
hall, but also allow students to pre-
order, provide a dedicated space for
storage and preparation to avoid
contamination, train staff about
food allergies and pay a $50,000
cash settlement to affected
students.
"We are not saying what the gen-
eral meal plan has to serve or not,"
Hill said. "We are saying that when
a college has a mandatory meal
plan, they have to be prepared to
make reasonable modifications to
that meal plan to accommodate stu-
dents with disabilities."


Associated Press
This Nov. 11, 2008, file photo shows gluten-free frozen pizza, just one of
hundreds of items at Gluten Free Trading Co. in Milwaukee. Schools, restau-
rants and anyone else serving food are more vulnerable to legal threats over
food sensitivities after the Justice Department determined severe food al-
lergies can be classified as disabilities under federal law.


The agreement said food aller-
gies may constitute a disability
under the Americans With Disabil-
ities Act, if they are severe enough.
The definition was made possible
under 2009 amendments to the dis-
ability law that concerned episodic
impairments that substantially
limit activity.
"By preventing people from eat-
ing, they are really preventing them
from accessing their educational
program," Hill said of the school
and its students.
Not everyone agrees.
Hans von Spakovsky, a fellow at
the conservative Heritage Founda-
tion who worked in the civil rights
division of the Justice Department
under President George W Bush,
said the inclusion of food allergies
is a major expansion of the disabil-
ity law.
Von Spakovsky disagreed food al-
lergies are severe enough to pre-
vent students from accessing
education and said the costs could
be substantial for colleges that al-
ready are battling backlash from
high tuition costs.
"I certainly encourage colleges
and universities to work with stu-
dents on this issue, but the fact that
this is a federal case and the Justice
Department is going to be deciding
what kind of meals could be served
in a dining hall is just absurd," he
said.
People who suffer from celiac
disease don't absorb nutrients well
and can get sick from the gluten
found in wheat, rye and barley The
illness, which affects around 2 mil-


lion Americans, causes abdominal
pain, bloating and diarrhea, and
people who have it can suffer
weight loss, fatigue, rashes and
other problems. Celiac is a diag-
nosed illness that is more severe
than gluten sensitivity, which some
people self-diagnose.
Ten years ago, most people had
never heard of celiac disease. But
awareness has exploded in recent
years, for reasons that aren't en-
tirely clear. Some researchers say it
was under-diagnosed; others say it's
because people eat more processed
wheat products like pastas and
baked goods than in past decades,
and those items use types of wheat
that have a higher gluten content.
Gluten-free diets have expanded
beyond people with celiac disease.
Millions of people are buying
gluten-free foods because they say
they make them feel better, even if
they don't have a wheat allergy.
Americans were expected to spend
$7 billion on gluten-free foods last
year.
With so many people suddenly
concerned with gluten content, col-
leges and universities have had to
make accommodations. Some will
allow students to be exempted from
meal plans, while others will work
with students individually They
may need to do even more now as
the federal government is watching.
"These kids don't want to be iso-
lated," Bast said. "Part of the col-
lege experience is being social. If
you can't even eat in the school
cafeteria, then you are missing out
on a big part of college life."


A Al,


s the saying goes, if you need something done, ask a busy
woman. Without all her hard work and dedication, our
idea for the Citrus County project "Christmas Stockings", would
not have been possible without Barbara Mills.
When we first approached her with the idea, and were looking for
guidance, she jumped right in and kept us on track. It was her boundless
energy, resources, contacts and dedication, that made everything "happen". We
were able to send over 90 stockings to local soldiers. Each box had between 5
and 10 stockings, so there were some to share.
We had so many people help with this project, starting with the "Sewing
Divas" from Alida Langley's Sewing and Quilting shop in Floral City. We
provided the "Divas" the material and fur which they spent several evenings
sewing, cutting, and trimming, and made over 100 camouflage stockings. In
the toe of each stocking they enclosed a remembrance from home.
The Jazzin Bean Coffee shop in Crystal River donated bags of flavored
coffee for each stocking. Each bag was hand decorated, and needless to say, the


aroma was wonderful.
William & Margaret McLaughlin donated bottles of homemade hot sauce, and
they too enclosed a holiday message on each bottle.
The Inverness Verizon store and it's regional manager, Jeff DeLigio, hosted a
wonderful pizza party, where so many people came and brought additional
donations for the stockings. Among them was Alice Green who made camouflage
caps. Fred Daniels and the Citrus County Veteran's Coalition planned the party
and brought raffles and prizes to raise funds.
And we are all so thankful to the following:


Ray & Lucie Allard
Dorraine Baltzell
Joette Bowsky
Jack & JoAnn Brown
Cheryl Bryant
Nancy Castro
Lucy Coco
Wayne & Betty Cooper
Crystal River Lions Club
Ray & Jane Darling
Debbi Eorgan
Tim & Barbara French
Walter & Judith Foss
STom Gallagher
Rhonda Garden
Rose & Frederick
Golsner


Roy & Evelyn Greenawalt
Donald & Vera Henderson
Tim & Lori Hess
B. & E. Hufnagel
James & Judith Humphrey
Elaine Hunt
Clayton & Janet Jeck
Gus & Donna Kahwati
Elsie T. Keane
Richard & Jeanne Kofsuske
LAMOPH 776
Carlton McLeod
William & Evelyn McCaw
Robert & Lace McLean
Sandy & Richard Mass
David Matthews
Reginald & Judy Morgan
Jim & Alice Neal
NEREIDS of the Crystal River
Sail & Power Squadron
Elroy & Maria Nunez
Connie O'Brien


Ruth & Manuel Pataca
Larry & Sandra Philllips
Vicki Phillips
Ann Poland
Quality Production Services
Barbara Rezac
Manidell Rodts
Dan & Betty Rudy
Robert & Marsha Shappell
Becky Smith
Stanley & Sylvia Steeves
Eugene & Nancy Suydam
Jerry Thompson
R.L. Viens
Barbara Ward
Nancy Weaver
James & Martha Wehrenberg
K. & Bonnie Williams
Pedro Williams
Rosalie White
Wanderers Car Club
Forrest & Gloria Young
Betty Wolff
Stephen & Ellen Zane


Ciu e HomZavt
Funeral Home and Staff


__


A8 SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013


NATION






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money&Markets
1,520................................. S& P 500
1, ,, Close: 1,485.98
Change: 5.04 (0.3%)
1,440 ........10 DAYS ........


A click of the wrist k
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com
Son..... Dow Jones industrials
S ,, i Close: 13,649.70
1Change: 53.68 (0.4%)
- I' 1 DAYS


Stocks gain


1,480 ::::j::::: 13,600 '''
1,40 12
1, 400 13.200 f .
1360 12,800

1 ,3 2 0 ....... .................. ...................... ... 12 0 0 ...........
320 A 0. O N 1 A .... .. ... .. ... .. ... ... ..


StocksRecap


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE
3,708
3,603
1962
1040
359
5


NASD
1,814
1,707
1299
1124
153
8


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
13649.85
5696.52
462.88
8792.63
3134.73
1485.98
1073.93
15674.57
892.80


LOW
13573.78
5640.27
458.46
8738.69
3119.20
1475.81
1067.98
15576.03
888.26


CLOSE
13649.70
5695.27
462.88
8792.63
3134.71
1485.98
1073.93
15674.57
892.80


CHG.
+53.68
+13.99
+4.28
+26.08
-1.29
+5.04
+2.86
+48.08
+2.44


%CHG.
+0.39%
+0.25%
+0.93%
+0.30%
-0.04%
+0.34%
+0.27%
+0.31%
+0.27%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR%CHG %RTN P/E
AK Steel Hold AKS 3.42 -- 10.33 4.62 -.02 -0.4 V A A +0.4 -47.7 dd
AT&T Inc T 29.02 -- 38.58 33.44 +.24 +0.7 V V -0.8 +15.6 43
Ametek Inc AME 29.86 39.19 39.36 +.21 +0.5 A A A +4.8 +29.8 22
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 60.52 91.21 89.72 +.81 +0.9 A A A +2.6 +48.5
Bank of America BAG 6.44 12.20 11.14 -.14 -1.2 V V -4.0 +74.7 43
Capital City Bank CCBG 6.35 12.23 11.49 -.24 -2.0 V A A +1.1 +22.8 dd
CenturyLink Inc CTL 36.50 43.43 40.02 +.32 +0.8 V A A +2.3 +15.3 36
Citigroup C 24.61 43.25 41.66 +.42 +1.0 V A A +5.3 +46.3 13
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 --- 21.43 16.27 +.27 +1.7 A A A +2.7 -5.6 29
Disney DIS 38.38 53.40 52.34 -.07 -0.1 A A A +5.1 +38.1 17
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 -- 71.13 66.81 +.79 +1.2 A A A +4.7 +8.0 18
EPR Properties EPR 40.04 48.92 47.27 +.53 +1.1 A A A +2.5 +14.7 21
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 77.13 93.67 90.80 +.60 +0.7 A A A +4.9 +7.8 12
Ford Motor F 8.82 14.30 14.11 -.11 -0.8 A A A +9.0 +20.0 12
Gen Electric GE 18.02 23.18 22.04 +.74 +3.5 A A A +5.0 +17.4 16
Home Depot HD 43.52 0 65.92 65.47 +.42 +0.6 A A A +5.9 +51.4 23
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 -- 29.27 21.25 -1.43 -6.3 A A +3.1 -6.0 10
IBM IBM 179.32 -- 211.79 194.47 +.82 +0.4 A A +1.5 +9.4 13
Lowes Cos LOW 24.76 0 37.08 36.99 +.15 +0.4 A A A +4.1 +40.3 22
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 -- 102.22 92.26 +.50 +0.5 A A A +4.6 -5.9 17
Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.26 --- 32.95 27.25 ... A +2.0 -0.6 15
Motorola Solutions MSI 44.18 0 58.16 59.01 +.97 +1.7 A A A +6.0 +25.7 25
NextEra Energy NEE 58.71 0 72.22 71.55 +.47 +0.7 V A A +3.4 +24.2 14
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 15.69 -- 43.18 18.87 +.73 +4.0 A V -4.3 -44.9 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 16.10 0 18.91 19.03 +.15 +0.8 A A A +5.4 +12.4 17
Regions Fncl RF 4.75 --- 7.73 7.43 -.02 -0.3 A A A +4.2 +56.0 cc
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 34.00 - 85.90 46.66 +1.05 +2.3 A A A +12.8 +33.6 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 70.50 0 90.24 89.56 -.03 ... A A A +3.8+14.1 21
Sprint Nextel Corp S 2.10 0 6.04 5.65 +.02 +0.4 V A V -0.4 +154.8 dd
Texas Instru TXN 26.06 34.24 33.52 +.37 +1.1 A A A +8.5 +9.0 21
Time Warner TWX 33.62 50.28 49.93 +.53 +1.1 A A A +4.4 +35.2 18
UniFirst Corp UNF 55.86 88.35 81.71 +.47 +0.6 V A A +11.4 +33.9 16
Verizon Comm VZ 36.80 -- 48.77 42.54 +.41 +1.0 V V -1.7 +13.2 39
Vodafone Group VOD 24.95 30.07 25.86 +.15 +0.6 V A A +2.7 +1.0
WalMart Strs WMT 57.18 77.60 69.20 +.35 +0.5 A A A +1.4 +17.7 14
Walgreen Co WAG 28.53 0 39.60 39.21 -.15 -0.4 A A A +5.9 +21.6 18
YRC Worldwide Inc YRCW 4.56 14.80 6.63 +.07 +1.0 V V -1.8 -36.7 dd
Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid but are not included b -Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e -Amount declared or pa
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement I Sum of dividends paid after stock split no regular
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arre
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Dec
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distnbution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates


UFOr


The yield on the
10-year
Treasury note
fell Friday.
Yields affect
interest rates on
consumer loans.



PRIME FED
RATE FUNDS
YEST 3.25 .13
6MOAGO 3.25 .13
1YR AGO 3.25 .13


Commodities
Crude oil rose
on hopes that
stronger econo-
mies in the U.S.
and China will
drive more de-
mand. The In-
ternational En-
ergy Agency
raised its fore-
cast for global
demand this
year.




IHi


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .07 0.07 ... .04
6-month T-bill .09 0.10 -0.01 .06
52-wk T-bill .13 0.14 -0.01 .09
2-year T-note .25 0.26 -0.01 .24
5-year T-note .76 0.79 -0.03 .86
10-year T-note 1.84 1.83 +0.01 1.98
30-year T-bond 3.03 3.07 -0.04 3.04


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 2.62 2.66 -0.04 2.56
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 3.95 3.96 -0.01 4.63
Barclays USAggregate 1.82 1.78 +0.04 2.18
Barclays US High Yield 5.72 5.76 -0.04 7.93
MoodysAAA CorpIdx 3.79 3.74 +0.05 3.78
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.05 1.05 ... 1.04
Barclays US Corp 2.76 2.73 +0.03 3.62


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 95.56
Ethanol (gal) 2.37
Heating Oil (gal) 3.05
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.57
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.80
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1686.60
Silver (oz) 31.90
Platinum (oz) 1672.10
Copper (Ib) 3.66
Palladium (oz) 722.00
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.25
Coffee (Ib) 1.56
Corn (bu) 7.28
Cotton (Ib) 0.79
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 362.30
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.15
Soybeans (bu) 14.29
Wheat (bu) 7.91


PVS.
95.49
2.34
3.02
3.49
2.77
PVS.
1690.40
31.79
1696.90
3.65
725.40
PVS.
1.27
1.56
7.25
0.78
369.40
1.12
14.30
7.81


%CHG
+0.07
-0.04
+1.04
+2.06
+1.03
%CHG
-0.22
+0.36
-1.51
+0.45
-0.47
%CHG
-1.30
+0.51
+0.41
+0.99
-1.92
+1.96
-0.07
+1.28


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 21.06 +.06 +3.2 +14.1 +10.7 +5.6
BondA m 12.92 +.01 -0.1 +5.3 +6.0 +3.9
CaplncBuA m 53.76 +.02 +1.9 +13.3 +8.0 +2.7
CpWIdGrlA m 38.31 -.02 +3.0 +18.4 +6.4 +1.4
EurPacGrA m 42.23 -.08 +2.5 +17.3 +4.3 +0.7
FnlnvA m 42.48 +.11 +4.2 +16.4 +10.2 +3.9
GrthAmA m 35.70 +.09 +3.9 +18.9 +9.6 +3.7
IncAmerA m 18.52 +.04 +2.5 +13.1 +10.3 +5.1
InvCoAmA m 31.37 +.09 +4.0 +15.7 +8.7 +3.3
NewPerspA m 32.30 -.05 +3.3 +19.2 +8.6 +3.7
WAMutlnvA m 32.32 +.11 +3.6 +12.9 +11.6 +4.3
Dodge & Cox Income 13.88 +.01 +0.1 +6.9 +6.3 +6.9
IntlStk 35.96 +.06 +3.8 +20.5 +5.3 +0.7
Stock 128.02 -.04 +5.0 +21.3 +10.6 +2.7
Fidelity Contra 80.16 -.04 +3.3 +15.6 +11.8 +5.0
GrowCo 96.37 +.02 +3.4 +15.1 +13.8 +6.6
LowPriStk d 41.00 -.02 +3.8 +17.5 +13.0 +8.0
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.29 +.01 +2.8 +15.1 +9.9 +5.9
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.48 -.02 +1.0 +13.7 +7.9 +9.8
GIBondAdv 13.44 -.01 +1.1 +14.0 +8.2 +10.1
Harbor Intllnstl d 63.23 -.21 +1.8 +16.2 +6.3 +1.6
PIMCO TotRetA m 11.24 +.01 +0.1 +8.8 +6.8 +7.3
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 27.61 +.10 +4.4 +17.0 +10.9 +4.3
GrowStk 39.15 +.05 +3.6 +16.9 +12.4 +5.7
Vanguard 500Adml 136.99 +.47 +4.3 +16.2 +11.7 +4.6
5001nv 136.98 +.46 +4.3 +16.0 +11.6 +4.5
GNMAAdml 10.87 ... -0.3 +2.0 +5.3 +5.6
MulntAdml 14.47 ... +0.8 +4.7 +6.0 +5.2
STGradeAd 10.83 ... +0.1 +4.2 +3.7 +3.9
TotBdAdml 11.05 +.01 -0.3 +3.7 +5.6 +5.5
Totlntl 15.38 -.01 +2.7 +16.0 +3.8 -0.7
TotStlAdm 37.25 +.12 +4.5 +16.5 +12.2 +5.4
TotStldx 37.24 +.12 +4.5 +16.3 +12.1 +5.3
Welltn 34.91 +.08 +3.2 +12.8 +9.5 +6.0
WelltnAdm 60.29 +.13 +3.1 +12.9 +9.6 +6.1
-Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
The Standard & Poor's 500
dex rose modestly Friday, I
ing it to a new five-year hig
the fourth day in a row. Ind
al stocks led the way after
eral Electric reported strong
earnings and revenue than
nancial analysts expected.


General Electric
Close: $22.04A0.74 or 3.5%
The conglomerate said that its r
income rose 8 percent in the fou
quarter as earnings at all its ind
al segments improved.
$2"
2-
21
20 N D
52-week range
$18.02pr 1jiD $2
Vol.: 112.8m (2.6x avg.) PE
Mkt. Cap:$231.12 b Yield:
State Street
Close: $53.36A2.98 or 5.9%
The financial company said that
plans to lower expenses by cutt
630 jobs, or about 2 percent of
worldwide workforce.
$-I



Ii U
52-week range
$38.21 $5
Vol.: 10.4m (2.5x avg.) PE
Mkt. Cap:$24.8 b Yield:
Morgan Stanley
Close: $22.38A1.63 or 7.9%
The New York-based investment
bank reported a profit in the fou
quarter, reversing a loss in the s
period a year ago.





52-week range
$12.26 $2
Vol.: 65.4m (3.2x avg.) F
Mkt. Cap:$44.19 b Yield:

Johnson Controls
Close: $31.01 V-0.95 or -3.0%
The heating and ventilation sysi
maker reported a 17 percent de
in its first-quarter net income an
posted a weak outlook.



1
0 IO N D
52-week range
$23.37 -- $3
Vol.: 14.3m (3.1x avg.) PE
Mkt. Cap:$21.21 b Yield:

Capital One Financial
Close: $56.99V-4.60 or -7.5%
The lender said that its fourth-q
ter net income grew more than
fold, as revenue rose by 38 pero
from a year earlier.
"^_


Ii_

52-week range
$44.30 $6
Vol.:27.1m (6.6x avg.) PI
Mkt. Cap:$33.15 b Yield:


YTD
+4.16%
+7.32%
+2.16%
+4.13%
+3.82%
+4.19%
+5.24%
+4.53%
+5.12%


DIV


1.80f
0.24
1.57e
0.04

2.90
0.04
1.00
0.75f
3.06
3.00
2.28
0.40f
0.76f
1.16
0.90
3.40
0.64
3.08f
0.92
1.04
2.40

0.80
0.04

2.08

OA,


IRS loses lawsuit in fight
1.04
015 against tax preparers
2.06 WASHINGTON -A federal judge has ruled
1.54e the IRS lacks authority to impose new regula-
1.59 tions, including a competency exam, on hun-
1.10 dreds of thousands of tax preparers.
S The ruling Friday from Judge James Boas-
idn last berg bars the IRS from implementing a host of
r rate I -from
arsem regulations requiring tax preparers to pass a
qualifying exam, pay an annual application fee
and take 15 hours of continuing-education
courses.
Sin- Attorneys and certified public accountants
push- would have been exempt from the regulations.
)h for An Arlington, Va.-based libertarian legal
ustri- firm, the Institute for Justice, filed the suit on
Gen-
ger behalf of three tax preparers who said the new
ifi- regulations would put them out of business or
force them to raise prices.
The IRS said the new regulations were
GE needed to address a growing problem of
poorly prepared returns.
et Transcripts show Fed
ustri- underestimated crisis

WASHINGTON Federal Reserve officials
Sin 2007 badly underestimated the scope of the
approaching financial crisis and how it would
j tip the U.S. economy into the deepest eco-
nomic downturn since the Great Depression,
3.18 transcripts of the Fed's policy meetings show.
:17.0 The meetings occurred as the country was
on the brink of its worst financial crisis since
TTr the 1930s. As the year went on, Fed officials
shifted their focus away from the risk of infla-
it tion as they slowly began to recognize the
its severity of the problem.
Beginning in September 2007, the Fed cut
Interest rates and took extraordinary steps to
try to ease credit and shore up confidence in
the banking system. Throughout the year, the
J housing crisis deepened, home prices weak-
4.17 ened and subprime mortgages soured.
:13.5 China's growth rebounds,
1.8% but still vulnerable
MS
BEIJING China's economy is finally re-
nt bounding from its deepest slump since the
rth 2008 global crisis but the shaky recovery
ame could be vulnerable to a new downturn in
global trade.
S Growth rose to 7.9 percent in the three
months ending in December, up from the pre-
vious quarter's 7.4 percent, data showed Fri-
day. For the year, the economy grew by 7.8
2.46 percent, which was China's weakest annual
PE:... performance since the 1990s.
0.9% Retail spending and factory output rose, but
Jci analysts say China could suffer a setback if
exports weaken or the government fails to
teams maintain investment spending that is propping
,cline
d up the recovery.
Morgan Stanley's profit
surges, stock soars
NEW YORK Profits roared back at in-
J vestment bank Morgan Stanley in the fourth
5.50 quarter, reversing a loss in the same period a
:17.4 year ago, when results were weighed down by
2.5% a costly legal settlement.
Earnings increased sharply across the
COF bank's business lines, and its stock jumped
about 8 percent. Morgan Stanley's investment
uar-
two- bank underwrote more stock and bond offer-
cent ings and brought in more fees from advising
companies on mergers and other deals. Fi-
" nancial advisers in the wealth management
unit, who work with individual investors, gener-
ated more revenue per worker.
The bank is transforming itself to adapt to a
2.92 post-financial crisis world. Like other invest-
E:9.3 ment banks, Morgan Stanley has traditionally
0.4% focused on doing business with companies,


GE rises,

Intelfalls

Associated Press

NEW YORK Better
earnings from General
Electric and Morgan Stan-
ley helped the stock market
inch higher Friday, as major
indexes closed out their
third straight week of gains.
GE led the 30 stocks in
the Dow Jones industrial
average after the conglom-
erate reported stronger
quarterly earnings, thanks
to orders from Brazil, An-
gola and other developing
countries. Profits in-
creased at all seven of its
industrial segments, in-
cluding oil and gas, energy
management, aviation and
transportation. GE
climbed 74 cents to $22.04.
The Dow gained 53.68
points to end at 13,649.70.
The Standard & Poor's
500 index rose 5.04 points
to 1,485.98, while the Nas-
daq composite fell 1.30
points to 3,134.70.
Even though investors
had plenty of news to di-
gest, trading was largely
quiet. "Earnings always
matter," said Rex Macey,
the chief investment offi-
cer of Wilmington Trust In-
vestment Advisors in
Atlanta. "But just because
we're in the middle of
earnings season doesn't
mean we're going to get
huge market moves."


gained 8 percent, rising
Market watch $1.63 to $22.38.
Jan. 18,2013 Intel, the world's biggest
Dow Jones +53.68 chipmaker, said late
industrials 13,4970 Thursday fourth-quarter
net income fell 27 percent.
Nasdaq -1.30 A growing preference for
composite 3,134.71 smartphones and tablets,
instead of personal com-
Standard & +5.04 puters and laptops pow-
Poor's 500 1,485.98 ered by Intel chips, have
made investors wary of the
Russell +2.44 company's stock. It lost
2000 892.80 $1.43 to $21.25.

NYSE diary Norwegian Cruise Line
Advanced: 1,962 soared 30 percent in its
first day of trading, the top
Declined: 1,040 performance of the three
Unchanged: 133 companies making their
Volume: 3.7 b public debut Friday Five
companies raised a total of
Nasdaq diary $1.8 billion through initial
Advanced: 1,299 public offerings this week,
Declined: 1,124 making it the best week for
IPOs since early October,
Unchanged: 127 according to the data
Volume: 1.8 b provider Ipreo.
AP American Express fell
96 cents to $59.78. Hefty
This earnings season is charges tied to the credit
off to a good start so far. Of card issuer's plan to cut
the 67 companies in the jobs and reorganize some
S&P 500 that have re- business lines hurt results,
ported, 43 have trumped and revenue fell short of
analysts' estimates. estimates.
Solid results this week Analysts forecast com-
from JPMorgan Chase and panies in the S&P 500 will
others, along with encour- report a 4 percent increase
aging news on housing and in fourth-quarter earnings
employment, pushed the over the same period the
S&P 500 index to its latest year before, according to a
five-year high. report out Friday from
Morgan Stanley's earn- S&P Capital IQ. They say
ings surged across its banks and other financial
many business lines, as firms should have the
more companies hired the strongest profit growth of
investment bank to help it any industry Technology
raise money and line up companies like Intel are
mergers. Morgan Stanley expected to struggle.


governments and other big organizations. But
the bank is adapting its strategy ahead of new
regulations, which are eliminating some of the
practices the bank used to rely on for revenue,
such as trading for its own profit.

Toyota settlement may
signal future legal strategy
LOS ANGELES Legal observers say re-
cent settlements by Toyota Motor Corp. may
signal the Japanese automaker would rather
fight its battles behind closed doors instead of
in a courtroom.
The company has been chipping away at
settling lawsuits over sudden-acceleration is-
sues. It has agreed to pay more than $1 billion
to resolve economic loss and some wrongful-
death claims.
But the question remains whether attorneys
who sued Toyota could prove to a jury there
was a design flaw responsible for the danger-
ous problem.
Venture investments
declined in 2012
NEW YORK -A new study shows funding
for business startups declined in 2012, for the
first time in three years, as venture capitalists
spent less money on fewer deals.
Capital-intense sectors such as clean tech-
nology and life sciences were among the
hardest hit, according to a MoneyTree study
released Friday. It was conducted by PriceWa-
terHouseCoopers and the National Venture
Capital Association, based on data from
Thomson Reuters.
In all of 2012 startup investments fell 10
percent to $26.52 billion from $29.46 billion.
There were 3,698 deals completed, down 6
percent from 3,937 in 2011.
Venture investments also declined 13 per-
cent in the final quarter of the year, to $6.4 bil-
lion from $7.38 billion a year earlier, though
the number of deals was the same in both
quarters at 968.
Overcharging batteries eyed
in Boeing 787 fires
WASHINGTON It's likely fires on two
Boeing 787 Dreamliners were caused by over-
charging lithium ion batteries, aviation safety
and battery experts said Friday, pointing to de-
velopments in the investigation of the Boeing
incidents as well as a battery fire in a business
jet more than a year ago.
An investigator in Japan, where a 787 made
an emergency landing earlier this week, said
the charred insides of the plane's lithium ion
battery show the battery received voltage in
excess of its design limits.
The similarity of the burned battery from the
All Nippon Airways flight to the burned battery
in a Japan Airlines 787 that caught fire Jan. 7
while the jet was parked at Boston's Logan In-
ternational Airport suggests a common cause,
Japan's transport ministry said.
Jobless rates fall in less than
half of US states
WASHINGTON Unemployment rates fell
in less than half of U.S. states last month, as
steady but slow hiring is making gradual im-
provement in the job market.
The Labor Department said Friday rates fell
in 22 states in December and rose in 16. They
were unchanged in 12.
The department's monthly report also
shows steady hiring nationwide in the past two
years has lowered the unemployment rate in
many parts of the country. The rate is now
below 7 percent in 25 states. And some of the
states hardest hit in the recession have seen
solid gains.
-From wire reports


Business HIGHLIGHTS


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013 A9







Page A10 SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ................................ publisher
M ike Arnold .............................................editor
S Charlie Brennan ..........................editor at large
Curt Ebitz ................ ................. citizen member
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
'You may difer with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


BIG HIT




Sports tourism


plan deserves


full consideration


While the Tourism De-
velopment Council's
concept of promoting
sports tourism in the county
is not new, we are encour-
aged that a quasi-government
agency is now carrying the
baton for the idea.
Eight years ago, local son
Mike Hampton, then a Major
League Baseball
star for the At-
lanta Braves, pro- THE I
posed the idea of
a building a state- TDC ey
of-the-art sports bas
complex. The Vet- tourna
erans Community for to
and Family Com-
plex, as the proj- OUR 01
ect was named, Build o
would have in- tourism
eluded a swim-
ming pool,
boarding facilities, walking
trails, sports facilities includ-
ing a replica of Fenway Park,
all on a 160-acre landscaped
park in the center of the
county. Hampton offered to
buy the property if the county
would agree to build the fa-
cilities. The county commis-
sion balked and a developer
purchased the property.
The difference between then
and now is huge. This commis-
sion board has touted itself as
business friendly and has, for
the most part, lived up to that
billing. The scope of the con-
cept floated by the TDC is
scaled down from Hampton's
grand plan, but still builds on
the same concepts of using
youth sporting events, includ-
ing baseball tournaments, to
draw families to the commu-
nity and rely on the area's nat-
ural beauty and resources to
keep them coming back
Ironically, this concept is


One of the small people
I know what Commissioner
(Scott) Adams is talking about.
I'm one of those small people
whom he is referring to. As a
long-term county employee, we
have been denied raises in any
form, cost of living adjustments,
for six years now even when
Progress Energy was
paying their whole I
amount of taxes owed. I 0
cannot afford family in-
surance and I qualify for
food stamps. Mean-
while these $100,000
bureaucrats keep creat-
ing different positions
so they get raises. We
are hardworking county CAL
employees who should 563-
not be part of this
budget crisis. Us under-
ranked have been absorbing the
budget for six years now. Mean-
while special interests and other
spending prevails.


Looking for more fans
Hey, Mr. Mulligan, can you tell
us how we can join the Scott
Adams fan club?
Support the park
The BOCC and Whispering
Pines Park funding; shame on
the BOCC. Whispering Pines Park
is a huge and the only available
recreational area for people in
the entire area. People use it to
swim, to bike, to ride, to watch
their kids play ball or just to go


I

r


1
.(


similar to the second plan
Hampton pitched to commis-
sioners in 2008, which sug-
gested building a youth
academy at Bicentennial Park
in Crystal River that would in-
clude summer camps, tourna-
ments and a sports training
facility. Hampton offered to
operate it if the county
granted
a long-term $1
SSUE: lease.
The TDC plan is
es youth viable because it
ball suggests partner-
ments ing with a national
urism. youth baseball or-
ganization -
PINION: Super Series
n sports baseball that
n idea. would bring 10
tournaments a
year to Bicenten-
nial Park, which would host
the weekend events. Organiz-
ers for Super Series Baseball
said about 2,000 people are
usually associated with each
tournament. Those families
would stay at local hotels and
eat at local restaurants.
Also while here, they could
ride the county's trails, visit
its other parks or take a man-
atee tour. The organizers es-
timated a yearly economic
impact of $1.8 million.
This concept is a good start-
ing point and could expand to
other sports, like youth bas-
ketball. Citrus County al-
ready has a great parks
system and can capitalize on
that existing asset. Who
knows, we might one day con-
vince Mike Hampton to part-
ner with the county on one of
his state-of-the-art sports
complex concepts.
This is an idea that needs
to be pursued to its fullest.


for a walk. Shame on the BOCC
for finding money for all kinds of
other projects but not the
agreed-upon $300,000 for Whis-
pering Pines. I admit we are not
a special interest group that con-
trols any money. We are just a
special interest group that does
vote. And I can assure you, Scott
Adams is going to get a lot of our
votes and you know
MND what the rest of you will
get. Shame on you for
not supporting the park.
Honest people
I've often read Sound
Offs from callers who
have been blessed by
honest people who re-
turn lost property, etc.
0579 Well, it happened to me
on Jan. 10. I dropped
my wallet at the Dollar
General Store on (U.S.) 41 in In-
verness. Luckily, two honest
gentleman found it and returned
it to my house intact. I was so
flabbergasted that I didn't even
think to ask their names, but I
won't forget. So I say again,
thank you, kind sirs. God has a
special smile for honest people
such as yourselves. God bless.
Medical corridor needed
I read in today's paper the
hospital likes the idea of Com-
missioner (Dennis) Damato's
medical corridor. Please hurry it
up. We need more medical facili-
ties in Citrus County. I'm tired
of driving to Gainesville.


"Some folks want their luck buttered."
Thomas Hardy, 1886


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Sotomayor model of heroism


Heroes come in all colors, snobbishness is dead wrong.
sizes and genders. They Stories conveying "homespun
speak different lan- wisdom" are exactly how we
guages and overcome different teach our children essential
obstacles, but they values. That pot of
have one thing in water is a symbol of
common: They teach responsibility, and
the old-fashioned Sotomayor's empha-
virtues of courage, sis of such ordinary
determination and examples is what
self-reliance. makes her book so
At age 8, Sonia So- "'' useful. Many heroes
tomayor was diag- > are "fantasized" in
nosed with diabetes, popular culture, she
a life-threatening ill- says, outsized and
ness 50 years ago. Cokie and unapproachable.
She quickly realized Steven Roberts Her aim is "to tell
that her dysfunc- OTHER the truth," to show
tional parents an VOICES "how an ordinary
alcoholic father, a de- person, with
tached mother strengths and weak-
could not be relied on. So she nesses like anyone else, has
learned to boil a pot of water, managed an extraordinary
sterilize a needle and give her- journey"
self the insulin shots she A critical part of that journey
needed to stay alive, was her admission to Prince-
A year later, her father drank ton, and then Yale Law School,
himself to death and her through the "special door" of
mother sank into a deep de- affirmative action. At college,
pression, locking herself in her she felt like "an alien landing in
room at night and sobbing un- a different universe." She
controllably After months of writes: "I came to accept during
this behavior, Sotomayor told my freshman year that many of
Nina Totenberg of NPR, the girl the gaps in my knowledge and
banged on her mother's door understanding were simply
and demanded that she pull limits of class and cultural
herself together. The next day background, not lack of apti-
her mother emerged, in a nice tude as I'd feared. I honestly
dress and with styled hair, and felt no envy or resentment, only
life resumed for the little astonishment at how much of a
family world there was out there and
These are two of the stories how much of it others already
Sotomayor tells in her new knew."
memoir, "My Beloved World," Steve has taught at George
and in a round of media inter- Washington University for 21
views. They certainly help ex- years, and Sotomayor's descrip-
plain how a Puerto Rican who tion is both familiar and in-
grew up speaking Spanish in sightful. Students like her don't
the housing projects of the lack aptitude; they lack experi-
South Bronx became the first ence. They have not enjoyed
Hispanic Supreme Court jus- the advantages that more privi-
tice. One reviewer sneered that leged families take for granted.
Sotomayor "can sometimes irri- Their minds are like empty
tate" by handing out "facile rooms, without the intellectual
homespun wisdom, such as, furniture others construct from
'From a task as simple as boil- travels and lessons, books and
ing water, you can learn a plays.
worthwhile lesson."' Sotomayor quickly figured
But that sort of intellectual this out, and the same girl who


sterilized her own needles at
age 8 built her own furniture.
She bought grammar and vo-
cabulary texts and drilled her-
self during lunch hour at her
summer job. But not every stu-
dent who feels like an "alien" at
an elite campus has that forti-
tude, and the "special door" of
affirmative action has to be the
beginning of the story, not the
end. When schools accept
"Sonia from the Bronx," they
have to help her overcome "the
limits of class and cultural
background."
Many reviewers have com-
pared Sotomayor's story to that
of Justice Clarence Thomas,
who also entered Yale Law
School through a "special door"
but emerged with a deeply hos-
tile view of affirmative action.
As he wrote in his memoir "My
Grandfather's Son," "I'd gradu-
ated from one of America's top
law schools but racial prefer-
ence had robbed my achieve-
ment of its true value."
Sotomayor takes a very dif-
ferent view, defending affirma-
tive action that creates "the
conditions whereby students
from disadvantaged back-
grounds could be brought to the
starting line of a race many
were unaware was even being
run." She confessed to The
Washington Post that she occa-
sionally feels "a touch (of) im-
postor syndrome," but insists:
"If affirmative action opened
doors for me at Princeton, once
I got in, I did the work. I proved
myself worthy"
So she has. Her book is being
published in Spanish and Eng-
lish, but it should be translated
into many other languages as
well. A young adult version
would be a good idea, too. We
need more heroes who look and
sound like Everywoman, not
Superman.

Steve and Cokie Roberts can
be contacted by email at
stevecokie@gmail. com.


LETTER to the Editor


Big Brothers reunion
As the nation celebrates Na-
tional Mentoring Month, it is
important to let all mentoring-
minded people know how
much they matter. Across the
nation, Big Brothers Big Sis-
ters is reconnecting with
alumni Bigs, Littles, donors
and family, staff and board
members.
The reunion effort is an ex-
tension of Start Something, a
national initiative Big Brothers
Big Sisters unveiled two years
ago in partnership with the Ad
Council. The effort invites all
adults not just volunteers -
to support quality mentoring to
change the odds for children
facing adversity.
The 2012 nationwide search
and reunite effort extends
Start Something to hundreds of
thousands of people who have
an affinity with Big Brothers
Big Sisters, but have not been
asked to stay or become re-en-
gaged with the organization.
Our hope is that by bringing
our alumni together and show-
ing them how much we appre-


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


ciate them, we will open av-
enues for people who are al-
ready invested in our work to
"Start Something (Again)" to
help kids succeed in school
and life.
Each year, Big Brothers Big
Sisters serves nearly 4,000
youth right here in the Tampa
Bay area. Most of them are
children of single, low-income


or incarcerated parents or
sons and daughters of military
personnel. Longstanding inde-
pendent research and Big Sis-
ters Youth Outcomes Survey
results find children enrolled
in Big Brothers Big Sisters im-
prove in areas such as school,
behavior and self-esteem.
Today, as Big Brothers Big
Sisters embarks on a nation-
wide search to reunite with
former Bigs, Littles, donors
and family, staff and board
members, I encourage you to
ask friends and family once in-
volved to visit our websites and
reconnect with us. And if you
are the person with whom we
have lost contact, we believe
National Mentoring Month is a
perfect time to start something
(again).
Susan Rolston
chief executive officer
Big Brothers Big Sisters of
Pinellas County
Stephen Koch
president, CEO and Big Brother
Big Brothers Big Sisters of
Tampa Bay


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


IF AN ATTACKER HAS A
30- ROUND MAGAZINE HOW

MA NYDOPOUVS WITH PUMP-
ACTION SHOTGUNS WILL IT
TAKE TO STOP HII ?


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to the EDITOR


Project
I'm responding
article in the Jai
Chronicle. Here
again with this i:
development tha
change the lands
pristine Ozello fo
I'm a longtime la
and resident of (
certainly have se
of changes here,
good, quite a few
This will be the
far if it moves fo
The Ozello Co
Park should not
as overflow park
the condo projee
ter what they do
prove" it. The pa
not belong to Cit
County, it belong
people and taxp
Citrus County N
how the resident
Ozello feel abou
four-story project
the project will
proved to move
Why? With the s!
cash for the coui
rate they will w
the project with
arms for tax moi
who knows what


Column ins
I don't know w
didn't think of it,
went over my he
George Will's col
"Our decadent d
racy" in the Jan.
cle to give me th.
little insight I wa
It's the last little
the puzzle that tie
gether the recent
America to welfa
status. It explains
second term as p
I had no delus
about Barack Ot
plans for Ameri
made them abur
clear before he e
foot in the White
He rejects and d
America's excep
and greatness, h
the people and i
tions that made
and he intends t
tribute the incor
wealth of the coi
people who have
mate claim to it.
scope is shallow
doesn't begin to
the trillion-dolla
he is racking up.
focuses on incre
taxes on the wea
was a known and
piece of the puzz
I touched on a
piece of the puzz
cent letter when
something like "
macare will actu
solve part of the
problem with its
panels. A society
murder 50 milli
unborn children
no problem pull:
plug on its helpl
sick, non-produc
zens." If you don
that, wait until y
your first "proce
nied" response i
local ethics pan
It's coming.
In another letter
"It's clear to me t
Obama, Reed an
are disciples of C
Piven. If you don
ber them, they we
two socialist prof
who came up wit


bad of bankrupting the country
by overloading the welfare
g to your system and establishing a
n. 3 new socialist society from
we go the ashes."
intrusive That explains the moti-
at will vation ofObama and the
scape of leadership of the Demo-
orever. critic Party, but it can't pos-
andowner sibly explain the rank and
Ozello and file Democratic politician
een a lot and the population in gen-
some eral. Most of them have
v ba. never heard of Cloward-
worst by Piven, and while they can't
reward. articulate the difference
immunity between a billion and a
be used trillion, they sense that the
ting for country is on an unsustain-
ct no mat- able course.
to "im- George Will takes this to
ark does the final conclusion that I
trus had only seen dimly
os to the through the fog of political
ayers of war. The Democrats know
*o matter their welfare state is un-
ts of sustainable. They under-
t this stand like I do that tax
ct I feel increases on the rich can-
be ap- not begin to finance their
forward. government expansion.
shortfall of They understand that even
nty to op- huge tax increases on the
welcome middle class will not get
open them the revenue they
ey and need. That only leaves
Else. them massive taxes on en-
Tom Mott ergy and consumption like
Ozello Europe to fund their enti-
tlement empire. That is not
,ightful acceptable here because
that will impact their enti-
7hy I tlement clients as well as
but it just the rich and middle class.
ad. It took That leaves them one solu-
lumn tion, "the immoral con-
emoc- scripting of the wealth of
3 Chroni- future generations."
at last George does have a way
as missing. with words, butthat's truly
.e piece of what is happening. Demo-
es to- cratic politicians have
t shift of made the decision that in
re state order to keep giving out
s Obama's the freebies that are keep-
resident ing them in office, they
ions have to conscript the
bama's wealth of future genera-
ca. He tions. They will leave fu-
idantly ture generations to pay off
ever set the debts they ran up buy-
House. ing their lifestyles and
denies privileges. The tragedy is
)tionalism 51 percent of the popula-
e hates tion has bought in on the
nstitu- idea of stealing from their
us great, children, but isn't that what
o redis- we should have expected
ne and from a country who mur-
untry to ders their unborn children
e no legiti- and will soon be pulling
His the plug on their unpro-


and
address
ar deficits
He only
asing the
ilthy He
d given
zle.
another
zle in a re-
I said
Oba-
tally help
Medicare
death
y that can
on of its
1 will have
ing the
ess, old,
active citi-
't believe
ou get
*dure de-
from your
el.

er Isaid
hat
d Pelosi
'loward-
't remem-
ere the
'essors
h the idea


ductive elderly citizens?
Harley Lawrence
Homosassa

Good Samaritans
We have found there
are still good people in
this world, some may call
them angels. We have had
a couple of breakdowns in
the last week.
On New Years Eve we
were on our way to dinner
in Inglis with friends and
our car broke down in
front of Nick Nicholas
Ford of Crystal River
Dave, from the service de-
partment, came to our aid
and we were able to get a
new fan belt and be on our
way, again, in no time! A
few days later, we took
some of our friends from
Michigan to see the mana-
tee at Three Sisters and
our pontoon boat motor
would not start, a man gave
us a tow with his boat back
to the boat ramp. We did
not get his name, but thank
you, and thank you again to
both of you! We aren't sure
what we would have done
without your help.
Arch and Mary Hancock
Floral City

Use our reserves
To whom it may concern
in the U.S. government:
We have millions of gal-
lons of oil in the United
States a supposed guar-
antee. Why does the gov-
ernment keep it all in the
ground none allowed to
be removed from the
earth?
And we import oil from
countries all over the
world who hate us or have
no feeling concerning the
USA. They change what-
ever they want to and we
have nothing to say to
them.
Who in the government
has the idea that this is
normal behavior and why
is it in effect for years?
Does anyone in the gov-
ernment know why this is
the case? And can't some-
one find out and get a le-
gitimate reason?
Leroy Loveland Sr.
Homosassa


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(352) 503-2011


Sound OFF
Damato's misguided plan be willing to learn something for free.


I see where (Dennis) Damato has a
new vision for the city of Crystal River.
He needs to have a new vision for the
city of Crystal River. He's the one that
was behind moving the county office to
Meadowcrest and taking business peo-
ple who would come into the city, local
people who would come in to get their
taxes or pay their taxes or get their
tags or whatever, from spending money
in the city and going to other busi-
nesses, because he decided it needed
to be out of the city. So now he wants
to backtrack and bring business to the
city. He should have left the county of-
fice in the city where it belongs.
Sign me on
I would like to make a comment about
a letter to the editor on Friday from Har-
riet Heywood. She was exactly right. I
agree 100 percent. I don't have a com-
puter. If there's a letter somewhere I can
sign, I would be glad to. Publish it in the
Sound Off. And she knows what she's talk-
ing about. It's very refreshing to get news
from someone who knows what they're
talking about.
Learning for free
This is one more Sound Off on the
Citrus port debacle. I understand that
Mr. Brad Thorpe wants to be paid to go
to New Orleans and learn how to do his
job if he's working at the port. And
also, I understand that if the deal falls
through, he said he'd pay for it out of
his pocket, but if the deal goes
through, he wants to be reimbursed for
being paid to learn something that he
needs to know about his job. I would


Sinking support
I would venture to guess that most of
the public does not know that for every
mile you go into the Gulf of Mexico, it gets
1 foot deeper on average. So if your boat
goes buoy out there at 1 mile, you can ac-
tually walk home. Doesn't sound like a re-
ally good place for a port, now does it?
Collecting bottle caps
I'd like to answer "Bottle caps," they
want to know where to put the bottle
tops from cans. You can tell them they
can drop them off at any Lions Club
because Lions clubs collect them and
turn them in to wherever.
Keep them leashed
There are a number of call-ins in
today's Chronicle about leash laws and
letting dogs run loose, damage to
property, scaring people, etc. There's
one thing no one has mentioned: The
heartache of seeing a dog run into the
street hit by a car and having to go and
pick up the body of your beloved dog
and take it home for burial. If you love
your animals, keep them on a leash.
Thanks to Kiwanis
Thank you to the Kiwanis of Beverly
Hills for the lovely dinner and the enter-
tainment that was provided, as well as
the young boys and girls that served us
during that holiday season.
Deserving of raise
I'm calling about the (Sound Off),
"Lazy Americans." I worked the same
job for six years, $5 an hour. I think I
deserve a raise. Don't call me lazy.


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OPINION


SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013 All












NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Komodo


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


American dead in Algeria


Associated Press
After 234-240 days incu-
bated at 84 degrees, the
Komodo Dragon baby
emerges from its shell
Thursday at The Memphis
Zoo in Tennessee. A
clutch of 16 viable eggs
are starting to hatch at
the zoo.


Air Force finds
pornography
WASHINGTON Hop-
ing to fight sexual assault in
its own ranks, the Air Force
said Friday a sweep of air
base offices worldwide
found thousands of suspect
materials ranging from
pornographic films to a beer
bong.
It's not clear what the in-
spection, and the odd as-
sortment of items it turned
up, tells Air Force leaders
about the link between the
workplace environment and
the growing problem of sex-
ual violence. But it was
meant to impress on Air
Force commanders that
they need to attack the un-
derlying problem of
unprofessionalism.
The Air Force said the
no-notice or short-notice in-
spections found 631 items
judged to be pornographic,
including magazines, calen-
dars, photos and videos.
They also turned up
3,987 items deemed unpro-
fessional. Examples: a
pubic hair in an office log-
book, a beer bong and
World War II-era airplane
nose art depicting a fully
clothed but "promiscuous"
woman, according to an Air
Force document listing all
the items.


Associated Press

ALGIERS, Algeria The militants had
filled five jeeps with hostages and begun
to move when Algerian government at-
tack helicopters opened up on them,
leaving four in smoking ruins. The fifth
vehicle crashed, allowing an Irish
hostage inside to clamber out to safety
with an explosive belt still strapped
around his neck.
Three days into the crisis at a natural
gas plant deep in the Sahara, it remained
unclear how many had perished in the
faceoff between Africa's most uncompro-
mising militant group and the region's
most ruthless military
By Friday, around 100 of the 135 foreign
workers on the site had been freed and 18
of an estimated 30 kidnappers had been
slain, according to the Algerian govern-
ment, still leaving a major hostage situa-
tion centered on the plant's main refinery
The government said 12 workers, both
foreign and Algerian, were confirmed
dead. But the extremists have put the
number at 35. And the government attack
Thursday on the convoy as pieced to-
gether from official, witness and news


media accounts suggested the death
toll could go higher
In Washington, U.S. officials said one
American a Texan was known to
have died.
Meanwhile, the al-Qaida-linked
Masked Brigade behind the operation of-
fered to trade two American hostages for
two terrorists behind bars in the U.S., in-
cluding the mastermind of the 1993 World
Trade Center bombing. The U.S. rejected
the deal out of hand.
"The United States does not negotiate
with terrorists," declared State Depart-
ment spokeswoman Victoria Nuland.
The Algerian government released few
details about the continuing siege at the
Ain Amenas plant, which is jointly run by
BP, Norway's Statoil and Algeria's state-
owned oil company By Friday, however,
the outlines of the takeover by Islamic
militants were coming into focus.
The attack had been in the works for
two months, a member of the Masked
Brigade told an online Mauritanian news
outlet that often carries al-Qaida-related
announcements. The band of attackers in-
cluded militants from Algeria, Mali, Egypt,
Niger, Mauritania and Canada, he said.


Light rail proposal for Motor City


i -' `- --


Associated Press
This artist's rendering provided by the M-1 Rail streetcar project shows the proposed 3.3-mile streetcar line
along Woodward Avenue in Detroit. The federal government on Friday committed $25 million to build the
streetcar line through the heart of Detroit, putting in place the last piece of a plan bringing light rail to one
of the few urban centers still without it.


Ex-New Orleans GOP leader: House to vote on debt limit increase
mayor charged


NEW ORLEANS On
Friday, former New Orleans
mayor Ray Nagin was in-
dicted on charges he lined
his pock-
ets with
bribe
money, a .
payoffs
and gra-
tuities
while the
chroni-
cally poor Ray Nagin
city strug- former mayor
gled to re- of New
cover Orleans.
from Hur-
ricane Katrina's punishing
blow.
The federal indictment al-
leges city contractors paid


Nagin more tha
in bribes and s
trips to Hawaii,
and other place
change for his
ing millions of d
work for the cit
The charges
Nagin are the |
City Hall corrul
gation that alre
suited in guilty
former city office
businessmen
sentence for a
vendor.
DC cabs
to take
WASHINGT
taxicabs in the
Columbia will
accept credit c
March 30.
The D.C. Ta
mission annou
will use its regi
thority to mand
grades to the r
cash-only cabs
the city.


Associated Press


WASHINGTON House Republi-
can leaders Friday offered President
Barack Obama a three-month re-
prieve to a looming, market-rattling
debt crisis, backing off demands that
any immediate extension of the gov-
ernment's borrowing authority be
accompanied by stiff spending cuts.
The retreat came with a caveat
aimed at prodding Senate Democ-
rats to pass a budget after almost
four years of failing to do so: a threat
to cut off the pay of lawmakers in ei-
ther House or Senate if their cham-


ber fails to pass a budget this year
House Republicans have passed
budgets for two consecutive years.
The idea got a frosty reception
from House Democrats, but a more
measured response from the White
House and Democratic Senate Ma-
jority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada.
Republicans hadn't settled on full
details, but the measure would give
the government about three more
months of borrowing authority be-
yond a deadline expected to hit as
early as mid-February, No. 2 House
Republican Eric Cantor of Virginia
said Friday


The legislation wouldn't require
immediate spending cuts, as earlier
promised by GOP leaders such as
Speaker John Boehner of Ohio. In-
stead, it's aimed at forcing the Dem-
ocratic-controlled Senate to join the
House in debating the federal
budget.
"We are going to pursue strategies
that will obligate the Senate to fi-
nally join the House in confronting
the government's spending prob-
lem," Boehner told GOP lawmakers
at a retreat in Williamsburg, Va.
"The principle is simple: 'no budget,
no pay"'


Obama backers aim to outflank NRA on gun control


Associated Press


an $200,000 WASHINGTON Sup-
subsidized his porters of President
Jamaica Barack Obama's gun-
es in ex- control proposals are plan-
help secur- ning a methodical, state-
dollars in by-state campaign to try to
ty. persuade key lawmakers
Against that it's in their political in-
product of a terest to back his sweeping
option investi- effort to crack down on
ady has r firearms and ammunition
iady has re-
deas b tw sales and expand criminal
eas anbd two background checks.
alsn and two To succeed will require
and a prison overturning two decades of
former city conventional wisdom that
gun control is bad politics.
ordered The National Rifle Asso-
credit citation is confident that ar-
gument won't sell. But with
ON -All polls showing majorities
District of supporting new gun laws a
be required to month after the Connecti-
ards by cut shooting deaths of 20
schoolchildren and six
xicab Com- adults, gun-control ac-
nced Friday it tivists say the political cal-
ulatory au- culus has changed. Their
late up- goal in coming weeks is to
convince lawmakers of
that serve that, too, and to counter
that see the NRA's proven ability to
mobilize voters against
-From wire reports any proposals limiting ac-


Associated Press
Rob Gotham talks to a customer Wednesday in the
firearms department at Great Lakes Outdoor Supply in
Middlefield, Ohio.


cess to guns.
The gun-control advo-
cates are focused first on
the Senate, which is ex-
pected to act before the
House on Obama's gun
proposals. How Senate
Majority Leader Harry
Reid, D-Nev, proceeds will
depend in part on what he
hears from a handful of
Democrats in more conser-
vative states where voters
favor gun rights. These in-
clude some who are eyeing
re-election fights in 2014,
such as Mark Pryor of


Arkansas, Mark Begich of
Alaska and Max Baucus of
Montana.
"We need to tell our
members of Congress that
they've got to stand up for
sensible gun laws, and if
they do that, we will stand
up for them, and if they
don't we will stand up for
whoever runs against
them," New York Mayor
Michael Bloomberg told
the U.S. Conference of
Mayors on Friday. "Be-
cause that's exactly what
the NRA is trying to do."


Bloomberg's group,
Mayors Against Illegal
Guns, is among a coalition
of some 50 labor unions,
advocacy groups and oth-
ers that have been meeting
since before Christmas to
plot strategy, in loose coor-
dination with the White
House, according to peo-
ple involved.
Just hours after Obama
rolled out his gun propos-
als on Wednesday, the
group gathered at the
headquarters of the Na-
tional Education Associa-
tion to game out their
plans. As of Friday, voters'
calls to Reid's office were
running two-to-one
against Obama's propos-
als, a Reid aide said.
But the NRA, which
claims some 4 million
members, has already acti-
vated its base, issuing a
fiery appeal this week in
which Executive Vice
President Wayne LaPierre
warned backers: "It's
about banning your guns,
PERIOD! ... I warned you
this day was coming and
now it's here. This is the
fight of the century"


World BRIEFS

Epiphany


Associated Press
In this photo taken with a
fisheye lens, a Russian Or-
thodox believer swims in
the icy water early Satur-
day on Epiphany at a pond
in Tyarlevo village outside
St. Petersburg, Russia.
The temperature in St. Pe-
tersburg is -14.8 F. Thou-
sands of Russian
Orthodox Church follow-
ers plunged into icy rivers
and ponds across the
country to mark Epiphany.


Venezuelan VP
active for Chavez
CARACAS, Venezuela
- Venezuela's vice presi-
dent stepped into the shoes
of ailing

Hugo
Chavez in
a flurry of
public
events
Friday,
working
to main- Nicolas
tain an Maduro
image of vice president
govern- of Venezuela.
ment con-
tinuity after more than five
weeks of unprecedented si-
lence from the normally
garrulous president.
Vice President Nicolas
Maduro and other Cabinet
ministers have striven to as-
sure a nervous public that
Chavez's administration is
firmly in charge even as the
opposition challenges its le-
gitimacy. Chavez has been
out of sight in Cuba since
undergoing cancer surgery
on Dec. 11.
Poland museum
expands art wing
WARSAW, Poland -
Poland's National Museum
in Warsaw has opened an
expanded gallery devoted
to 20th and 21st century
Polish art, with officials hail-
ing it as the most compre-
hensive permanent
collection of modern and
contemporary art in the na-
tion's capital.
More than 220 objects
went on view at an inaugu-
ration Friday night. The bulk
of the exhibition is made up
of paintings but there are
also a number of sculptures
and video installations, with
all of the works dating from
World War I to the present
day.
-From wire reports










SPORTS


The Orlando Magic
couldn't confound the
Charlotte Bobcats./B3



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Football, golf/B2
0 Basketball, cycling/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 Sports briefs/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 High school sports/B5
0 Hockey/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Back-to-back district titles for Panthers


Hamilton's winner in 68th minute

puts Lecanto past Springstead 1-0
JAMES BLEVINS defeated No. 3 Springstead Ea-
Correspondent gles 1-0 in the District 4A-4
championship at Springstead's
SPRING HILL A jubilant Booster Stadium.
Roselle Lattin struggled to "I think from the minute that
maintain her composure as she whistle blew," Lattin said, "we
watched her cheering players wanted it. I could tell. We won
hoist the district trophy for the everything and kept the ball in
second time in her fourth year their half. We attacked the net"
as the Lecanto girls soccer team Lecanto won its semifinal
head coach and for the sec- match Wednesday against No. 4
ond year in a row. Gainesville to make the finals
The feat was achieved Friday while Springstead knocked No.
night as the No. 1 seed Panthers 2 Forest out in its semifinal


game 3-2 in overtime to meet ing 40 minutes, the half didn't
the Panthers on Friday night. lack for some heartbreaking
The match was a nail-biter; near-misses.
both behe- A key mo-
moths in the ment for the
district I think from the Eagles came
Lecanto and minute that whistle blew, late in the
Springstead b first half as
split their ef- we wanted it. fr e s h m an
forts down Samantha
the middle in Roselle Lattin Betters snuck
the scoreless Lecanto girls coach said of the Panthers' t h r o u g h
first half, performance against Springstead. Lecanto de-
much like the fenders on a
two teams breakaway.


had split their two matches dur-
ing the regular season.
Despite the two teams failing
to score any goals in the open-


but Panthers freshman goal-
keeper Meagan Houpt (four
saves) made her best save of the
season as she shut Betters


down in the box.
"With Meagan making that
stop with her feet," Lattin said
of Houpt's key save, "it was bril-
liant. It was almost like the
changing of arms really"
The second half started with
a perceptibly more aggressive
Lecanto team. Junior Taylor
Christian (11 shots) had another
stellar night up front creating
many of Lecanto's offensive
opportunities.
After pressuring Springstead
in their territory for several
minutes, Lecanto freshman
Laura Hamilton answered her


Page B4


rag ed


Late outburst

by West Port
sinks Lecanto

SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
LECANTO After
leading since midway
through the second pe-
riod, Lecanto was over-
whelmed by a 25-5 West
Port rally in the fourth
quarter that lifted the
Wolf Pack to a 63-59 boys
hoops victory in the Pan-
thers gym Friday
The loss secures
Lecanto's District 6A-6
league record at 5-3 for the
season, putting the team
in position to likely hold
the second or third seed
for the district tournament
with the Wolf Pack and
Citrus still contending for
the top seeds.
The Panthers (13-6
overall) came out with a
new look for West Port (13-
3 overall, 5-1 in district)
that successfully con-
founded the visitors dur-
ing stretches and helped
hold them to 35 points
through three quarters
with a deliberate pace.
But similar to its 23-2
run against Citrus last Fri-
day, West Port made up for
its previously lackluster
offense in one momentous
push, generating 28 points
in the fourth quarter on
the back of eight team
steals off a press defense.
"They did a good job of
speeding us up," Lecanto
coach Frank Vilardi said
of the final period. "We
turned the ball over and
the shots started falling
for them. If you let them
play their pace, those
things happen."
West Port guard John
Benton rolled up all 10 of
his points during a
3 1/2-minute stretch that
transformed a 49-43 Pan-
ther lead with five min-
utes to play into a 60-52
West Port advantage with
1:35 left.


- . ... ... ..
.
. ... .- ....:..
STFPDH E I ASKOl/for the hrhmnlcle


Lecanto senior Robert Vega works his way in to score two points as West Port's John Benton
See Page B3 defends against him Friday night at Lecanto.


2013 DODGE DART


*41 mpg
*2.4L 4Cyl
*Turbo


Sharks

swim past

Hurricanes

Citrus girls soccer

falls 3-0 in district
title contest
JOE KORNECKI III
Correspondent
LEESBURG The Citrus Hurri-
canes girls soccer team fell to the Na-
ture Coast Sharks of Brooksville in a
3-0 shutout on a cold, blustery night
in the District 3A-6 championship
game Friday at Leesburg High
School's H.O. Dabney Stadium.
The loss means that the 'Canes
will travel to Palatka on Wednesday
in the regional playoffs.
Citrus (11-8-1) was overwhelmed
right from the start, as the Sharks
put tremendous pressure in the
'Canes' zone. Despite solid Citrus
goalkeeping, the Sharks scored two
first-half goals for control of the
game.
"The goalkeeping has been a
nice aspect of our game this year,"
Citrus coach Ian Feldt said.
See Page B4


Celtics blank

Pirates 8-0

in district

championship
BYRON SAUCER
Correspondent
OCALA Crystal River did
what no other District 2A-6 team
could do survive the first half
against Trinity Catholic.
The No. 2 seed Pirates forced a
second half against the top-seeded
Celtics, who came in having
outscored district competition 76-0
over the course of the season, all by
way of the eight-goal mercy rule.
Granted, it only took Trinity
Catholic three minutes of the sec-
ond half to complete another 8-0
tally as the Celtics collected their
ninth straight league crown. But
Crystal River head coach Bill
Reyes, who has now guided the
girls soccer team to the only three
regional berths in school history,
knew what his club was up against
in Friday's championship match.
Trinity Catholic (15-2 overall) got
See Page B3


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Two best out


Woods, Mcllroy

shoot 75s, miss cut

atAbu Dhabi

Associated Press

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emi-
rates Tiger Woods and Rory McIl-
roy missed the cut at the Abu Dhabi
Championship on Friday, a woeful
start to the season for the world's top
two golfers.
Woods missed it after he was pe-
nalized two shots for wrongly taking a
free drop, while top-ranked McIlroy
was frustrated trying to adjust to his
new Nike clubs, even though he used
his old Titleist putter in the second
round. Both finished with 3-over 75s.
"When you don't hit fairways on
this golf course, you can't score,"
McIlroy said.
Justin Rose played solid, mistake-
free golf. Away from the large gal-
leries, the Englishman shot a 69 for
a 136 total and a one-shot lead at the
halfway point over Jamie Donaldson
(70) of Wales, Gonzalo Fernandez-
Castano (67) of Spain and Thorbjorn
Olesen (69) of Denmark.
Woods and McIlroy were expected
to contend for the lead but often looked
like weekend golfers. Their struggles
captivated the crowds and their de-
parture means it is the first time the
world's top two players missed a cut in
the same tournament since McIlroy
and Luke Donald at the 2012 U.S.
Open. The last time in a regular tour-
nament came in 2005 by Woods and
Vijay Singh at Disney World.
"I didn't hit it particularly well. I
putted great but just didn't hit it very
good. I was struggling with that,"
Woods said. "I have some work to do,
and next week I'm playing at Torrey
(in San Diego), and obviously it will
be different weather there, so going
to go back and get ready"
Woods thought he was safe in fin-
ishing his second round at 73. But he
was advised by the European Tour
chief referee Andy McFee of the
penalty, giving him a 75 and 3-over
total of 147. The cut for the top 60
plus ties was 2 over
McFee said he warned Woods on
the 11th tee of the penalty, which
was a result of his taking a free drop
when his ball was embedded in
sand. It's not allowed.
"I called Martin (Kaymer) over to
verify the ball was embedded. We
both agreed it was embedded and
evidently it was in sand," Woods said
of the infraction that happened


Associated Press
Tiger Woods follows his ball Thursday on the 10th hole during the first round
of the Abu Dhabi Golf Championship in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. After
taking a two-stroke penalty, Woods mounted a furious rally but missed the cut.


when his drive on 5 landed in a bed
of vines. "Andy ruled I broke an in-
fraction, consequently got a two-shot
penalty. Andy feels the way he feels
about it and I broke the rules."
Kaymer said he thought the ball
was embedded and was surprised to
hear of the ruling.
"I didn't know about it and he ob-
viously didn't know about it, other-
wise he wouldn't have done it. It's an
unfortunate thing," Kaymer said.
"Obviously he was fighting back a
lot, and he was 3 or 4 over par, and
trying to make the cut. He was play-
ing very well coming in. He was
making nice putts in the end."
McFee said Woods didn't chal-
lenge him on the ruling. It came to
light when a spectator alerted the
European Tour to the infraction, he
said. After the drop, a reporter
heard some spectators questioning


whether the drop was appropriate.
"An embedded ball relief is
through the green but in ground
other than sand," McFee said. "I
talked to him when he came off the
11th tee because I couldn't be sure
about a two-stroke penalty until we
got into the recording area."
Woods said it was frustrating to
bow out of a tournament in this way,
especially after he recovered from
four bogeys on his first five holes -
the fifth subsequently becoming a
triple. He birdied five of the last 11
holes including three in a row in the
back nine.
"It's tough because I didn't get off
to a very good start. I fought and got
it back," Woods said. "I was right
there and felt if I could post even par
I had the chance to go into the week-
end only eight back. Evidently it
wasn't enough."


Te'o encouraged


to speak on hoax


Irish AD

wants LB to

address public

Associated Press

SOUTH BEND, Ind. -
Notre Dame athletic di-
rector Jack Swarbrick
said the school has en-
couraged linebacker
Manti Te'o to speak pub-
licly and soon about
being the victim of a hoax
involving a dead girl-
friend who never existed.
Swarbrick said during
the taping of his weekly
radio show, which airs
regionally Saturday but
was posted online as a
podcast Friday, Te'o has
to explain exactly how
he was duped into an
online relationship with
a woman whose "death"
was then faked by the
perpetrators of the
hoax.
"I don't have any spe-
cific knowledge as to how
and when, but I can't
fathom a circumstance
where it doesn't (hap-
pen). I sort of share
everybody's view that it
has to happen. We are
certainly encouraging it
to happen. We think it's
important and we'd like
to see it happen sooner
rather than later,"


Swarbrick said.
Swarbrick added be-
fore Deadspin.com broke
the news with a lengthy
report Wednesday, Te'o
and his family had
planned to go public with
the story Monday
"Sometimes the best
laid plans don't quite
work, and this was an ex-
ample of that. Because
the family lost the oppor-
tunity in some ways to
control the story," he said.
He said the university
doesn't have anything
more to add.
"It is in the Te'o family's
court," he said. "We are
very much encouraging
them. I hope by the time
people are listening to
this they have made
themselves available to
explain and to take ques-
tions, because we think
that's in everybody's in-
terest. It's certainly our
expectation at Notre
Dame that they would do
that."
Swarbrick said again
he is confident Te'o is the
victim and did not back
away from the strong sup-
port he gave the All-
American during a news
conference Wednesday
night, when the AD said
an investigation done by a
firm hired by the school
turned up evidence sup-
porting Te'o's claim he
was not involved.


Associated Press
The wrenching story of Notre Dame linebacker Manti
Te'o's girlfriend dying of leukemia a loss he said
inspired him to play his best all the way to the BCS
championship was dismissed by the school
Wednesday as a hoax perpetrated against the player.


NFL Conference Championship GAMES


AFC: Ravens at Patriots


Pats'Brady in

way on Lewis'

last ride

Associated Press

FOXBOROUGH, Mass.
- You again!
Ray versus Tom.
Tom versus Ray
Oh yeah, the Ravens
and Patriots, along for the
ride. Ray Lewis' last ride,
one Tom Brady hopes to
cut short Sunday in the
AFC championship game.
A year after a brutal
last-minute loss in Foxbor-
ough, Baltimore is back,
looking for a reversal of
fortune and a spot in the
Super Bowl for the first
time since winning it in
2001. If the Ravens fall
again, Lewis' superb 17-
year career as the NFEs
best linebacker of his era
will end as he retires.
Brady, the most success-
ful quarterback of his
time, has no thoughts of
retirement or of failing
to make his sixth Super
Bowl in the last dozen
seasons.
That Lewis and Brady
will bring a mutual admi-
ration society to Gillette
Stadium adds some flat-
tery to what has become
an intense rivalry
"Both sides understand
the game of football,"
Lewis said. "There have
been some great, great ri-
valries and we have one of
those going on with New
England now."
Adds Brady: "It's really
a pleasure to play against
him. He's really been so
consistent over the years
and durable and tough.
He's so instinctive."
At the forefront in this
rematch, naturally, is
Brady who has won three
NFL titles and would be


Associated Press
Baltimore Ravens inside linebacker Ray Lewis will retire
after this season, making the AFC championship game
at New England on Sunday his last chance at a second
Super Bowl title.


only the second player to
reach six Super Bowls by
leading New England (13-
4) past Baltimore (12-6).
And there's Lewis, the
most dominant inside
linebacker the league has
seen since the heyday of
Mike Singletary
Brady is all
about compo- Al
sure, accu-
racy and even champ
sophistica- ga
tion. Lewis
brings aggres- Balti
sion, ferocity Raveni
and mayhem at New
to the field. Patriot
An odd cou-
ple, indeed, U Time: 6
but one that Sunday.
appreciates 0 TV: CBS
the attributes
of the other.
"He doesn't give up
hardly any plays, makes a
ton of tackles," Brady said
of the 37-year-old Lewis,
who missed 10 games with
a right triceps injury, but
has been a tackling ma-
chine in the postseason.
"He's great in the pass
game, great in the run
game. He blitzes well, like
he did a few years ago.
He's really a playmaker
for them, so they give him
an opportunity to make


those plays. You see when
he makes a play, their
whole sideline gets really
amped-up."
No one can be more
amped-up for this oppor-
tunity than Lewis. No one,
of course, raises his team-
mates to a more fevered
pitch than
C Lewis.
F But what
ionship the Ravens
me need Sunday
is discipline
more to go with the
s(12-6) fervor. Other-
England wise, Brady
S (13-4) willpickthem
apart.
30 p.m. For all the
energy and
clutch plays
Baltimore's
defense has


made since Lewis re-
turned, it remains vulner-
able because it's three
biggest stars Lewis,
safety Ed Reed, outside
LB Terrell Suggs are
aging and not nearly 100
percent healthy
There's also the exhaus-
tion factor: The Ravens
have played one more
postseason game than the
Patriots, and went into the
sixth period last week at
Denver


IF

I





:


NFC: 49ers at Falcons


Two teams,

different

perspectives

Associated Press

ATLANTA The Fal-
cons are well aware of just
how desperate this city is
for its first Super Bowl
championship.
Mike Peterson sees and
hears it everywhere he
goes.
"The city is hungry," the
Atlanta linebacker said.
"You can feel it when
you're in the grocery store.
Everybody is saying, 'Go
Falcons.' Everyone is
wearing red and black.
The city is painted red
and black."
The Falcons will be
playing in the NFC cham-
pionship game for only the
third time when they host
the San Francisco 49ers
on Sunday, a matchup of
teams that come into this
game from very different
historical perspectives.
For the 49ers, this is a
chance to rekindle the
franchise's glorious
legacy, to follow in the
footsteps of those magnifi-
cent teams that captured
five Super Bowls titles in
the 1980s and '90s, led by
giants of the game such as
Joe Montana, Jerry Rice
and Steve Young.
The Falcons? They've
never won even a single
Super Bowl. Heck, they've
only gotten that far one
time, during the 1998 sea-
son when a charismatic
bunch known as the "Dirty
Birds" shockingly made a
run to the big game and
was promptly blown out by
the Denver Broncos in
John Elway's finale.
"They're trying to recap-
ture greatness," Falcons
safety Thomas DeCoud
said. "We're trying to


Associated Press
San Francisco wide receiver Randy Moss and the rest of
the 49ers will try to earn the franchise's first Super Bowl
berth since 1995 in the NFC championship game at
Atlanta on Sunday.


break the ceiling on it"
While the Falcons (14-3)
are the NFC's top seed
and playing at home, they
opened as a three-point
underdog against the
49ers (12-4-1), who looked
unstoppable in last week's
rout of the
Green Bay NI
Packers in
the divisional champ
round. gal
The most Sa
dynamic San F
player on that 49ers (
field was a at At
quarterback Falcon.
who began the
season as a Time: 3
backup. Colin Sunday.
Kaepernick 0 TV: FOX
took over the
starting job
when Alex Smith was in-
jured, and coach Jim Har-
baugh made the bold
decision to keep it that way
even when Smith healed.
Never mind the former
starter had led San Fran-
cisco to the NFC title game
a year ago and was one of
the top-rated passers in the
league this season.
Harbaugh looked like a
genius when Kaepernick
ran all over the Packers in
a 45-31 victory, turning in


F
i

Im
ar


s
p


one of the great perform-
ances in playoff history
It wasn't so much that he
passed for 263 yards and
two touchdowns. What re-
ally stood out was what he
did when he kept the ball
himself. Kaepernick
scored two
C touchdowns -
onship including a 56-
yarder in
ne which he
ncies4o looked more
nIcs O like Michael
L2-4-1) Johnson than
anta a football
(14-3) player and
finished with
.M. 181 yards
rushing, a
postseason
record for a
quarterback.
He also showed plenty of
flare, celebrating his scores
by flexing his right arm and
kissing his biceps a
move that quickly became
a social media sensation
known as Kaepernicking.
"He's super fast, athletic
and he can throw the
ball," 49ers running back
LaMichael James said.
"But once he takes off,
he's faster than a lot of
running backs and
linebackers."


B2 SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013


SPORTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Magic not working


Charlotte beats

Orlando 106-100
Associated Press

ORLANDO Kemba Walker had
25 points and eight rebounds, and
Gerald Henderson added 17 points
as the Charlotte Bobcats snapped a
five-game losing streak with a 106-
100 win over the Orlando Magic on
Friday night
The Bobcats evened the season
series with the Magic and now re-
turn home for four consecutive
games, beginning with Sacramento
on Saturday.
Charlotte started fast and shot the
ball well throughout, with its field
goal percentage hovering above 50
percent for most of the night. The
Bobcats also shot 17 more free
throws than Orlando, including
some crucial ones in the final
minute to secure the victory
Arron Afflalo led Orlando with 23
points, followed by Jameer Nelson
with 22.
Orlando has lost its last six games
against teams with records below
.500.
Nets 94, Hawks 89
NEW YORK Deron Williams scored
24 points, making four free throws in the
final 43.4 seconds, and the Brooklyn
Nets beat the Atlanta Hawks 94-89 to
earn a split of a home-and-home series.
Brook Lopez added 20 points for the
Nets, who bounced back from a 109-95
loss in Atlanta on Wednesday that
snapped their seven-game winning
streak. Former Hawks guard Joe John-
son finished with 18 points and Reggie
Evans grabbed 20 rebounds as the Nets
beat the Hawks for the first time in seven
meetings.
Jeff Teague had 21 points and 10 as-
sists for the Hawks, who played without
starting center Al Horford and lost key re-
serve Lou Williams to a serious-looking
right knee injury. Former Nets guard
Devin Harris scored 17 and Josh Smith
had 12 points and nine rebounds in his
return from a one-game suspension, but
shot just 5 of 15.
George leads Pacers past Rockets
105-95
Pacers 105, Rockets 95
INDIANAPOLIS Paul George
scored 31 points and David West had 20,
leading Indiana past Houston 105-95.
The Pacers (25-16) have won 11 straight
home games their longest streak since
winning 14 in a row in 2002-03.
Houston (21-20) has lost six in a row.
The Rockets were led by Omer Asik with
22 points and James Harden with 17.
But it was a big night for George, who
made 8 of 11 shots and five 3-pointers
during a 23-point first half that gave Indi-
ana control.
Houston got as close as three early in
the third, but Indiana went on a 10-3 run,
closed the quarter on a 12-4 spurt to
make it 83-69 and didn't let Houston get


BLANK
Continued from Page B1

a hat trick from senior forward
Tabby Tindell (three goals, assist)
and two more goals from Alyssa
Eashoo as the Celtics fired 20 shots
to three by the Pirates. Crystal
River keeper Minnah Barajas
recorded eight saves, including a
pair of highlight-reel stops against a
veteran, skilled Celtic team that
made it to last year's state
semifinals.
Despite the setback, the seventh-
year coach knows none of it would
be possible without the services of
eight seniors who turned around
the once-dormant program.
"Crystal River High School had
never gone to regionals before this
group, so not only did they break


Associated Press
Maria Sharapova celebrates Friday after defeating
Venus Williams in third round of the Australian Open in
Melbourne, Australia.



Sharapova beats


Venus in two sets


Associated Press
The Orlando Magic's Arron Afflalo, left, passes the ball around the Charlotte
Bobcats' Brendan Haywood on Friday during second half play in Orlando.
Charlotte won 106-100.


closer than seven the rest of the game.
76ers 108, Raptors 101, OT
PHILADELPHIA- Jrue Holiday had a
career-high tying 33 points and 14 as-
sists, including all 12 of Philadelphia's
points in overtime, and the 76ers over-
came a 19-point second-half deficit to
defeat the Toronto Raptors 108-101.
Thaddeus Young added 27 points and
14 rebounds while Spencer Hawes and
Lavoy Allen had 12 apiece for the Sixers.
Ed Davis had 18 points and 10 re-
bounds for the Raptors. Terrence Ross
and Alan Anderson each scored 18.
Jose Calderon chipped in 13 points
and Kyle Lowry had 11 points and 11 as-
sists before fouling out for Toronto, which
fell to 4-17 on the road. The Raptors lost
their fourth in a row.
Grizzlies 85, Kings 69
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Mike Conley
scored 19 points, Marc Gasol added 18
points and 10 rebounds and the Mem-
phis Grizzlies snapped a three-game los-
ing streak with an 85-69 victory over the
Sacramento Kings on Friday night.
All five Memphis starters were in dou-
ble figures. Tony Allen had 14 points and
nine rebounds, plus six assists. Rudy
Gay scored 15 points and Marreese

through a first time, but they did it a
second and third time now," Reyes
said of his seniors. "It's a great
group of girls, and it's a fitting way
for these seniors to go out."
Of course, Reyes and the Pirates
(now 11-10-2 overall) aren't done yet.
Crystal River will travel to face 2A-
5 champ Keystone Heights, a 5-4
winner over Santa Fe, in Wednes-
day's regional quarterfinal.
The Pirates' plan is simple: sur-
vive Wednesday and take another
swipe at Trinity in the regional
semifinals.
But first, Reyes wants his team to
enjoy achieving another milestone
at Crystal River.
"I'm really proud of them," Reyes
said of his team. "No district team
has gone past the first half against
Trinity Granted, it was barely, but
we made it into the second half. We
had some lapses and made some


Speights finished with 10 points in nine
rebounds.
DeMarcus Cousins was the only
Sacramento player in double figures with
22 points and 12 rebounds as the Kings,
limited to 34 percent shooting, had their
two-game winning streak end. Isaiah
Thomas had nine points and five assists
as the Kings recorded a season-low nine
assists in the game.
Bulls 100, Celtics 99, OT
BOSTON Marco Belinelli made a
game-winning jumper with 3.1 seconds
left, Jimmy Butler scored six points in
overtime and the Chicago Bulls ex-
tended their road show by beating the
Boston Celtics 100-99.
Carlos Boozer had 19 points and 20
rebounds, and Joakim Noah added 14
points and 13 boards as the Bulls won
their 14th straight road game. They
haven't lost since April 2011.
Rajon Rondo scored a season-high 30
points for Boston before fouling out with
1:16 to play in overtime.
Kevin Garnett had 16 points and Paul
Pierce passed former Celtics star Robert
Parish for 22nd on the NBA's career
scoring list by chipping in 13 points.
Pierce has 23,342 points and Parish
23,334.

mistakes against a state champi-
onship-caliber team, and you can't
do that.
"Wednesday, we're not going to be
playing a state championship-cal-
iber team, I don't think so. So if we
bring our fight we have a chance to,
unfortunately, meet Trinity in the
regional semifinals."
Sophomore Christina Bresson got
off two shots against the Celtics
after beating the defense downfield,
but was denied first by keeper Tay-
lor Mosely, then by a hustling back
line as she tried to convert the
rebound.
Senior Brooke Levins got off the
only other shot for the Pirates when
she tried Mosely from 30 yards out.
It was the first three shots the
Celtics had faced since the quarter-
final round after fourth-seeded
Mount Dora failed to attempt a sin-
gle shot on goal against the Celtics.


Associated Press

MELBOURNE, Aus-
tralia- Maria Sharapova
leaned back and pumped
her arms. She ripped her
elbows back and forth,
screaming after her vic-
tory Four pumps, five -
she rocked forward six
pumps. More.
Sharapova had just de-
feated Venus Williams 6-
1, 6-3 Friday, her first
victory over the seven-
time major winner in a
Grand Slam. This was a
match clearly worth cele-
brating, but it was if
Sharapova had won the
Australian Open title
eight days early
"I was just really
pumped," she said. "Why
shouldn't I be?"
Sharapova knows she
must stay on top of her
game. Another Williams
could be waiting. Since
Sharapova won the
French Open, to complete
a career Grand Slam of
all four major titles, Ser-
ena Williams has won just
about everything.
Asked if she was think-
ing about a showdown


LATE GAME

Azarenka moves
to fourth round
MELBOURNE, Aus-
tralia Defending cham-
pion Victoria Azarenka
beat injured American
Jamie Hampton 6-4, 4-6,
6-2 to reach the fourth
round of the Australian
Open.
Azarenka maintained
her streak of advancing to
the fourth round of every
Grand Slam since the
2011 U.S. Open
The top-ranked
Azarenka broke Hampton
in the sixth game of the
final set, with the Ameri-
can wincing in pain on al-
most every shot.
-Associated Press

with the younger of the
Williams sisters, Shara-
pova said: "She's on the
other side of the draw,
and other players are on
the other side of the draw
as well."
That means they can
meet only in the final.


Associated Press

CHICAGO Lance
Armstrong finally cracked.
Not the way anti-
doping authorities
hoped or as disillusioned
fans wanted, while ex-
pressing deep remorse
or regrets, though there
was plenty of that in Fri-
day night's second part of
Armstrong's interview
with Oprah Winfrey
It wasn't over the $75
million in lost sponsor-
ship deals, nor when
Armstrong was forced to
walk away from the Live-
strong cancer charity he
founded and called his
"sixth child." It wasn't
even about his lifetime
ban from competition.
It was another bit of
collateral damage that
Armstrong said he wasn't
prepared to deal with.
"I saw my son defend-
ing me and saying,
'That's not true. What
you're saying about my
dad is not true,"' Arm-
strong recalled.
"That's when I knew I
had to tell him."


Armstrong was near
tears at that point, referring
to 13-year-old Luke, the old-
est of his five children. It
came just past the midpoint
of an hourlong broadcast, a
day after the disgraced cy-
cling champion admitted
using performance-
enhancing drugs when he
won seven straight Tour de
France titles.
Critics said he hadn't
been contrite enough in
the first half of the inter-
view, taped Monday, but
Armstrong seemed to lose
his composure when Win-
frey zeroed in on the emo-
tional drama involving his
personal life.


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RAGGED
Continued from Page 1

Wolf Pack leading scorer
Drhyromi Maxwell's play
was also critical during the
run as he made a couple of
steals and added five of his
game-high 17 points.
"Other than those three
minutes, I thought we
played 29 really good min-
utes," Vilardi said. "Unfor-
tunately, the game's
32 minutes long."
Lecanto's best stretches
came in the second and
early third period behind
strong low-post play by sen-
ior center Geoffrey Ruiz (12
points, eight rebounds) and
sophomore forward Bran-
don Burich (13 points,
seven rebounds). Ruiz had
eight points and five
boards in a second quarter
that saw Lecanto erase an
8-point deficit to head into


the half with a 30-24 lead.
Senior guard Mikey
Makros paced the Panthers
with 15 points and led off
Lecanto's scoring in the
second period with a pair
of3s.
West Port guard Corey
David figured in his team's
second-half comeback with
12 of his 16 points in the
half.
"I felt like Lecanto had a
pretty good plan for us,"
West Port coach Lyle
Livengood said of his
team's early struggles. "It
kind of caught us off guard
and we didn't handle it
very well. We just weren't
shooting the ball with any
confidence.
"We were trying to gen-
erate energy any way we
can with the press at the
end," he added, "and for
whatever reason our guys
reacted pretty well."
The Panthers will play at
Seven Rivers on Tuesday.


Check us out on the internet
* Go to www.chronicleonline.com for more news.


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Armstrong emotional

in Oprah interview


Tee off for Tourette
Tee Off for Tourette Celebrity Golf Tournament
Saturday, February 2, 2013
Shotgun start at 9:00am Registration 8:00am
Plantation on Crystal River.






Kick off Cocktail party
Friday, February 1
music from American Idol contestant Dave Pittman,
live auction and meet and greet with
sports celebrities and door prizes.

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For more information and to register,
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i lOOODS6M


SPORTS


SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013 B3






B4 SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013



Australian Open
results
Saturday at Melbourne Park, Melbourne,
Australia, Purse: $31.608 million (Grand
Slam), Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
WomenThird Round
Maria Kirilenko (14), Russia, def. Yanina
Wickmayer (20), Belgium, 7-6 (4), 6-3.
Victoria Azarenka (1), Belarus, def. Jamie
Hampton, United States, 6-4, 4-6, 6-2.
Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia, def. Carla
Suarez Navarro, Spain, 6-2, 4-6, 6-3.
Doubles
Men Second Round
Simone Bolelli and Fabio Fognini, Italy, def.
Rohan Bopanna, India, and Rajeev Ram (12),
United States, 6-2, 7-6 (3).
Thomaz Bellucci, Brazil, and Benoit Paire,
France, def. Alexander Peya, Austria, and Bruno
Soares (9), Brazil, 3-6, 6-4, 6-3.
Robin Haase and Igor Sijsling, Netherlands,
def. Jonathan Marray, Britain, and Andre Sa
(16), Brazil, 6-4, 7-6 (5).
Mixed First Round
Jarmila Gajdosova and Matthew Ebden, Aus-
tralia, def. Sabine Lisicki, Germany and Fred-
erik Nielsen, Denmark, 7-6 (6), 6-3.
Friday, At Melbourne Park, Melbourne, Aus-
tralia, Purse: $31.608 million (Grand Slam),
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
Men Third Round
JankoTipsarevic (8), Serbia, def.Julien Ben-
neteau (32), France, 3-6, 6-4, 2-6, 6-4, 6-3.
Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Radek
Stepanek (31), Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-3, 7-5.
Nicolas Almagro (10), Spain, def. Jerzy
Janowicz (24), Poland, 7-6 (3), 7-6 (4), 6-1.
Kei Nishikori (16), Japan, def. Evgeny Don-
skoy, Russia, 7-6 (3), 6-2, 6-3.
Kevin Anderson, South Africa, def. Fernando
Verdasco (22), Spain, 4-6, 6-3, 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-
2.
Stanislas Wawrinka (15), Switzerland, def.
Sam Querrey (20), United States, 7-6 (6), 7-5,
6-4.
Tomas Berdych (5), Czech Republic, def. Ju-
rgen Melzer (26), Austria,6-3, 6- -2, 6-2.
David Ferrer (4), Spain, def. Marcos Bagh-
datis (28), Cyprus, 6-4, 6-2, 6-3.
Women Third Round
Angelique Kerber (5), Germany def. Madison
Keys, United States, 6-2, 7-5.
Agnieszka Radwanska (4), Poland, def.
Heather Watson, Britain, 6-3, 6-1.
Julia Goerges (18), Germany def. Zheng Jie,
China, 6-3, 1-6, 7-5.
Ekaterina Makarova (19), Russia, def. Mar-
ion Bartoli (11), France, 6-7 (4), 6-3, 6-4.
Ana Ivanovic (13), Serbia, def. Jelena
Jankovic (22), Serbia, 7-5, 6-3.
Li Na (6), China, def. Sorana Cirstea (27), Ro-
mania, 6-4, 6-1.
Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, def. Valeria
Savinykh, Russia, 6-2, 4-6, 6-3.
Maria Sharapova (2), Russia, def. Venus
Williams (25), United States, 6-1, 6-3.
Doubles
Men Second Round
Marcel Granollers and Marc Lopez (3),
Spain, def. Paolo Lorenzi and Potito Starace,
Italy 7-5, 6-4.
Aisam-ul-Haq Qureshi, Pakistan, and Jean-
Julien Rojer (6), Netherlands, def. Xavier
Malisse and Dick Norman, Belgium, 7-6 (5), 6-
4.
Eric Butorac, United States, and Paul Han-
ley Australia, def. Michael Kohlmann, Germany,
and Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, 6-1, 6-4.
Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United States, def.
Flavio Cipolla and Andreas Seppi, Italy, 6-3, 6-
4.
Jeremy Chardy, France, and Lukasz Kubot,
Poland, def. Sam Groth and Matt Reid, Aus-
tralia, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3.
Juan Sebastian Cabal and Robert Farah,
Colombia, def. Yen-hsun Lu, Taiwan, and Go
Soeda, Japan, 6-4, 6-4.
Sergiy Stakhovsky Ukraine, and Mikhail
Youzhny, Russia, def. John Peers and John-
Patrick Smith, Australia, 6-3, 6-3.
Daniele Bracciali, Italy, and Lukas Dlouhy,
Czech Republic, def. Alex Bolt and Greg Jones,
Australia, 6-2, 7-6 (4).
Women Second Round
Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan, and Peng Shuai (15),
China, def. Mathilde Johansson and Pauline
Parmentier, France, 6-2, 6-4.
Kimiko Date-Krumm, Japan, and Arantxa
Parra Santonja, Spain, def. Andrea Hlavackova
and Lucie Hradecka (2), Czech Republic, 7-5,
6-3, 6-3.
Silvia Soler-Espinosa and Carla Suarez
Navarro, Spain, def. Dominika Cibulkova, Slo-
vakia, and Ksenia Pervak, Kazakhstan, 3-2, re-
tired.
Sara Errani and Roberta Vinci (1), Italy def.
Jill Craybas, United States, and Chanelle
Scheepers, South Africa, 6-2, 6-0.
Ashleigh Barty and Casey Dellacqua, Aus-
tralia, def. Maria Kirilenko, Russia, and Lisa
Raymond (3), United States, 6-4, 6-4.
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, and
Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, def. Raquel
Kops-Jones and Abigail Spears (8), United
States, 6-4, 6-2.
Liezel Huber, United States, and Maria Jose
Martinez Sanchez (6), Spain, def. Han Xinyun
and ZhouYi-Miao, China, 1-6, 7-6 (3), 6-3.
Natalie Grandin, South Africa, and Vladimira
Uhlirova (14), Czech Republic, def. Melinda
Czink, Hungary, and Bojana Jovanovski, Ser-
bia, 6-3, 6-3.
Ekaterina Makarova and Elena Vesnina (4),
Russia, def. Mandy Minella, Luxembourg, and
Megan Moulton-Levy, United States, 6-4, 6-4.
Nuria Llagostera Vives, Spain, and Zheng Jie
(7), China, def. Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia,
and Yanina Wickmayer, Belgium, 6-3, 6-3.
Mixed First Round
Katarina Srebotnik, Slovenia, and Nenad Zi-
monjic, Serbia, def. Olivia Rogowska and
Marinko Matosevic, Australia, 6-3, 6-3.
Anabel Medina Garrigues, Spain, and Bruno
Soares, Brazil, def. Bojana Bobusic and Chris
Guccione, Australia, 6-4, 6-7 (7), 10-3.
Yan Zi, China, and Santiago Gonzalez, Mex-
ico, def. Tamira Paszek and Alexander Peya,
Austria, 6-2, 6-2.
Sania Mirza, India, and Bob Bryan (3), United
States, def. Sam Stosur and Luke Saville, Aus-
tralia, 6-2, 6-2.



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pet GB
NewYork 25 13 .658 -
Brooklyn 24 16 .600 2


Boston 20 19 .513 5/2
Philadelphia 17 23 .425 9
Toronto 14 26 .350 12
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 26 12 .684 -
Atlanta 22 17 .564 4/2
Orlando 14 25 .359 12/2
Charlotte 10 29 .256 16/2
Washington 7 29 .194 18
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 25 16 .610 -
Chicago 23 15 .605 '2
Milwaukee 20 18 .526 3/2
Detroit 14 25 .359 10
Cleveland 10 31 .244 15
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 31 11 .738 -
Memphis 25 13 .658 4
Houston 21 20 .512 9/2
Dallas 17 23 .425 13
New Orleans 13 26 .333 16/2


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FO r Kthe' ra-ecord[


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:
.-.- CASH 3 (early)
8-4-9
CASH 3 (late)
3-1-7
PLAY 4 (early)
1-0-8-6
PLAY 4 (late)
6-8-1-6
FANTASY 5
2-7-11-12-36
MEGA MONEY
11 -14 -26 -39
Fori Lottery MEGA BALL
7


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12 p.m. (ESPN) Maryland at North Carolina
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Connecticut at Pittsburgh
12:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Harvard at Memphis
1:30 p.m. (MNT) Arkansas at Mississippi
2 p.m. (CBS) Kansas at Texas
2 p.m. (ABC, CW) Wake Forest at Virginia Tech
2 p.m. (ESPN) Missouri at Florida
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Texas Tech at Oklahoma State
2:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Arizona at Arizona State
3 p.m. (NBCSPT) Columbia at Cornell
4 p.m. (CBS) Oregon at UCLA
4 p.m. (ABC) Florida State at Virginia
4 p.m. (MNT) Mississippi State at Tennessee
4 p.m. (ESPN) Syracuse at Louisville
4 p.m. (ESPN2) Creighton at Wichita State
4:30 p.m. (CW) Florida State at Virginia
4:30 p.m. (FSNFL) California at Stanford
5 p.m. (NBCSPT) Hofstra at George Mason
6 p.m. (ESPN) Ohio State at Michigan State
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) UNLV at Colorado State
9 p.m. (ESPN) Gonzaga at Butler
NBA
8 p.m. (WGN-A) Memphis Grizzlies at Chicago Bulls
BOXING
9 p.m. (NBCSPT) Gabriel Campillo vs. Sergey Kovalev
9:45 p.m. (HBO) Mikey Garcia vs. Orlando Salido
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
6 p.m. (ESPN2) NFLPA Bowl: American vs. National
GOLF
6 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Abu Dhabi HSBC
Championship Third Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Humana Challenge Third
Round
7:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Mitsubishi Electric
Championship Second Round
4 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Abu Dhabi HSBC
Championship Final Round
COLLEGE GYMNASTICS
5 p.m. (SUN) Florida at LSU (Taped)
HOCKEY
3 p.m. (NBC) Pittsburgh Penguins at Philadelphia Flyers
7 p.m. (SUN) Washington Capitals at Tampa Bay Lightning
7:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Carolina Hurricanes at Florida Panthers
SOCCER
9:55 a.m. (ESPN2) English Premier League: Manchester
City vs. Fulham
6 p.m. (UNI) Mexican Premier Division: America vs. Atlante
TENNIS
7 a.m. (ESPN2) Australian Open Third Round (Taped)
9 p.m. (ESPN2) Australian Open Round of 16
3 a.m. (ESPN2) Australian Open Round of 16
SNOWBOARDING
1 p.m. (NBCSPT) Copper Slopestyle (Taped)
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) Copper Freestyle Slopestyle (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
GIRLS WEIGHTLIFTING
9 a.m. Citrus, Lecanto at Keystone Heights Invitational
WRESTLING
10 a.m. Citrus, Lecanto in Ed Kilpatrick IBT at Citrus High
School


Northwest Division
W L Pct
Oklahoma City 31 8 .795


Denver
Utah
Portland
Minnesota


L.A. Clippers
Golden State
L.A. Lakers
Sacramento
Phoenix


24 17 .585
21 19 .525
20 19 .513
16 20 .444
Pacific Division
W L Pct
31 9 .775
23 15 .605
17 22 .436
15 25 .375
13 28 .317


Thursday's Games
New York 102, Detroit 87
L.A. Clippers 90, Minnesota 77
Milwaukee 98, Phoenix 94
Miami 99, L.A. Lakers 90
Friday's Games
Chicago 100, Boston 99, OT
Philadelphia 108, Toronto 101, OT
Indiana 105, Houston 95
Charlotte 106, Orlando 100
Brooklyn 94, Atlanta 89
Memphis 85, Sacramento 69
San Antonio 95, Golden State 88
Washington at Denver, late
Oklahoma City at Dallas, late
Today's Games
San Antonio at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Memphis at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Houston at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Golden State at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Utah, 9 p.m.
Milwaukee at Portland, 10 p.m.
Washington at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
L.A. Lakers at Toronto, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Boston at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Denver, 8 p.m.



NFL playoff glance
All Times EST
Wild-card Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 5
Houston 19, Cincinnati 13
Green Bay 24, Minnesota 10
Sunday, Jan. 6
Baltimore 24, Indianapolis 9


Seattle 24, Washington 14
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 12
Baltimore 38, Denver 35, 20T
San Francisco 45, Green Bay 31
Sunday, Jan. 13
Atlanta 30, Seattle 28
New England 41, Houston 28
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 20
San Francisco at Atlanta, 3 p.m. (FOX)
Baltimore at New England, 6:30 p.m. (CBS)
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 27
At Honolulu
AFC vs. NFC,7p.m. (NBC)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 3
At New Orleans
AFC champions. NFC champion, 6 p.m. (CBS)



Abu Dhabi
Championship
Friday
At Abu Dhabi Golf Club, Abu Dhabi,
United Arab Emirates
Purse: $2.7 million
Yardage: 7,605, Par: 72
Second Round
Justin Rose, England 67-69 -136
Jamie Donaldson, Wales 67-70-137
G. Fernandez-Castano, Spain 70-67-137
Thorbjorn, Olesen, Denmark 68-69-137
Garth Mulroy South Africa 71-68 -139
Joost Luiten, Netherlands 70-69-139
Matteo Manassero, Italy 72-68 -140
Jason Dufner, United States 71-69 -140
Branden Grace, South Africa 71-69 -140
Martin Kaymer, Germany 71-69-140
George Coetzee, South Africa 69-71 -140
Henrik Stenson, Sweden 69-71 140
Michael Campbell, New Zealand 69-71 -140
David Howell, England 69-71 -140
Keith Home, South Africa 72-69 -141
Soren Kjeldsen, Denmark 70-71 -141
Joel Sjoholm, Sweden 71-70-141
Wen-Chong Liang, China 69-72-141
Richie Ramsay, Scotland 73-68 -141
Thongchai Jaidee, Thailand 70-71 -141
Danny Willett, England 70-71 141
Raphael Jacquelin, France 72-69-141
Jbe Kruter, South Africa 72-69 -141


Senior Night goes



right for Panthers


DAVID PIEKLIK
Correspondent

LECANTO They weren't thinking
about the playoffs just yet; the Pan-
thers wanted to earn one last win for
their seniors at home, and the
Lecanto boys soccer team got it Friday
night.
The team ended the regular sea-
son with a 2-1 win on Senior Night
over Central High School of
Brooksville, finishing with a record
of 9-7-2. The Panthers play
Gainesville at Forest High School
Ocala on Tuesday in the first round
of the District 4A-4 playoffs.
Zeke Rice scored the game-winning
goal off a Scott Stears throw in with
3:25 remaining in the game.
"I threw it right over the keeper's
head and right into Zeke's chest,"
Stears said of the play "He did his


job and put it into the back of the net."
Lecanto controlled possession most
of the night against the Bears (4-10-3)
and outshot them 18-8. Central went
up midway through the first half when
forward Odulaja Nione's corner kick
from the left flag hooked past Lecanto
goalkeeper Ryan Stevens.
Lecanto continued to pressure Cen-
tral's defenders, and found the back of
the net with 18:34 left in the game
when Jacob Rice headed in a Jimmy
Carr corner kick.
Zeke Rice's goal followed a free
kick from 18 yards out that a Panthers
midfielder bounced off the left goal
post. The close call is something head
coach Doug Warren has seen often
this season, and one he hopes changes
in the playoffs.
Warren was happy with the timing
of the win, adding, "Obviously, you
want to win your Senior Night."


JUSTIN PLANTE
Correspondent

CRYSTAL RIVER -
It was a heartbreaker in
Crystal River on Friday
night.
After shooting out to a
10-point lead late in the
third quarter, the Crystal
River boys basketball
team found itself out of
gas, giving visiting Her-
nando High School its
best shot at a victory
And unfortunately for
the Pirates, Hernando
would not squander it.
Fueled by guard Jeff Ve-
lazquez and his game-
high 35 points, the
Leopards rallied to a 70-
65 overtime victory, seal-
ing theirs and Crystal
River's fate in the dis-
trict race.
The first three quar-
ters, however, went ex-
actly how the Pirates
wanted it to. Crystal
River opened the game
with a 9-2 lead behind
solid shooting and a
physical paint presence.
The Pirates held the ad-
vantage on the boards
throughout the first half,
outrebounded the Leop-
ards 22-14.
But, even with the Pi-
rates' aggressiveness,
Hernando was still find-
ing its way into the paint
Leopard guard Ve-
lazquez proved to be too
much to handle in the


paint, as he consistently
found ways to get inside.
But even with Ve-
lazquez having his way
with the Pirates' defense,
Crystal River still went
into the half up by nine.
"There were a lot of
things that we came out
and did well tonight,"
Crystal River coach
Steve Feldman said.
"But, as has been the
case all season long, we
seem to just hit this wall
that we just can't get
over. We come out with a
lot of intensity, and then
we just flatline."
Feldman's words rang
true.
The Pirates, after a
playing a well-executed
first half, simply could
not find their rhythm of-
fensively in the second
half. Sam Franklin, how-
ever, was the ray of light
the Pirates needed to
keep themselves in the
game. After scoring just
six points in the first
half, Franklin dominated
the paint en route to all
14 of the Pirates' points
in the third quarter
It was an impressive
performance, and one
that put a spark in the
Pirates that hopefully
would carry them to a
big district win.
Hernando had a dif-
ferent plan, however
Coming out hot in the
fourth quarter, the Leop-

Sports BRIEFS


CR girls basketball team
clinches top seed in district
The Crystal River girls basketball team's
43-17 victory at Hernando High School in
Brooksville on Friday night sewed up the
No. 1 seed for the Pirates in the upcoming
District 5A-7 tournament.
Megan Wells led Crystal River with 14
points and three assists, while Pirates
teammate Jasmyne Eason added nine
points and 14 rebounds.
Crystal River (14-8 overall, 7-2 district)
also received seven points and three
steals from Katelyn Hannigan.
The Pirates play Friday at home for
Senior Night against Seven Rivers.



PANTHERS
Continued from Page B1

team's call with the game-winner in the
68th minute.
Hamilton muscled her way past two
Eagle defenders for the cross box shot
to the lower 90 and out of the reach of
Springstead goalkeeper Emma Betters
(nine saves).
Hamilton has had a breakout role for
the Panthers in the district finals, scor-
ing all of the goals on her team in both
games played during the tournament
The freshman had nothing but glow-
ing words for her goalkeeper who made
what many on the team felt was the play
of the game.



SWIM
Continued from Page B1

"We didn't seem to have the effort we
did the other night ... and we had our
sweeper Meghan Flaherty out ... but
hat's off to Nature Coast though ... they
have a fantastic team with a lot of
greatplayers ... and they're very deep."
After relentless pressure by Nature
Coast (16-2-1) and a number of quality
saves by Citrus junior goalkeeper Liz
Rinaldi, the Sharks broke the ice off a
rare kind of a goal by Silvana Paonessa,
as her perfectly placed corner kick
went into the goal untouched for a 1-0


ards press defense forced
a plethora of turnovers
that turned into quick
buckets, as Crystal River
found it's 10-point lead
dwindled to just three
with less than 15 seconds
remaining.
And after the inbound
pass, Hernando's Gio-
vanni Perez set up at the
top of the key and
drained the game tying
three that sucked all of
the energy out of the
crowd and the team.
From that point on, it
was as if the Pirates
were just going through
the motions. Junior
guard Ty Reynolds put
on another offensive
performance scoring a
team-high 26 points, but
it just wasn't enough.
With the loss, Crystal
River cemented its spot
as the last seed of the
district, where, more
than likely they will face
this same Hernando
squad to start the tour-
nament.
"We know where we
stand now, and we know
who we're facing," coach
Feldman said. "We knew
what to expect. Our dis-
trict is tough and we did-
n't take these guys
lightly They're 13-4 for a
reason. But, when you go
6 of 15 at the stripe, this
is what happens. Those
six or seven free throws
made the difference."


Hurricanes boys hoops
pulls away late from Eagles
Behind Desmond Franklin's nine fourth-
quarter points, including a big dunk, the
Citrus High School boys basketball team
scored a 51-46 triumph at Springstead
High School in Spring Hill.
Citrus junior point guard Devin Pryor
led the Hurricanes with 18 points, while
Franklin and Mitchell Ellis each had
13 points.
Citrus (12-7 overall, 4-2 district) hosts
Central on Tuesday.
The Hurricanes are still a game behind
West Port in the district standings.
From wire reports

"(Houpt) has improved a lot," Hamil-
ton said of her teammate in net "She
really helped us a lot Samantha Betters
is an amazing player and when she goes
in, she's going to score, that's just her
mentality. For (Houpt) to stop that...
that's a setback (for Springstead). That's
like saying 'Wow, look what our keeper
can do."'
After composing herself, Lattin
looked toward the future as Lecanto
will play at home in its regional soccer
quarterfinal Wednesday against Orange
Park Ridgeview.
Overall, the win came from a Lecanto
team working together and playing top-
notch soccer across the boards.
"(I'm) extremely proud of them," Lat-
tin said. "Everyone really (did well). It's
a round of applause for everyone."

Nature Coast lead in the 22nd minute.
Paonessa struck for a second time,
as she fired a tracer by Rinaldi that
found the back of the goal for a 2-0 ad-
vantage in the 29th minute. Rinaldi's
13 saves kept the score from being
much worse, but Citrus still trailed
going into the intermission.
In the second half, the trend contin-
ued, as the Sharks continued to have
their way Lisa Soehngen fired a re-
bound into the goal to give the Sharks a
3-0 cushion in the 59th minute to cap
the scoring for the night Rinaldi who
had 17 total saves in a good effort was
pulled for junior Lauren Heise, who
played well and made seven saves to
prevent more Nature Coast goals.


Pirates boys hoops loses



heartbreaker in overtime


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



'Canes


slam


Leopards

JUSTIN PLANTE
Correspondent

INVERNESS As it's
done all season, the Citrus
High School girls basket-
ball team powered
through another visiting
squad at home.
Their latest victim: re-
building Hernando High
School and it didn't take
long for the outcome to be
in hand.
Powered by a quick of-
fensive burst in the first
quarter, Citrus rode a 32-
10 halftime lead to an
overwhelming 64-28 win
to improve its home
record to 9-1.
It was Citrus' defense
that fueled its offensive
output, as the press once
again found ways to force
Hernando into plenty of
tough situations.
That, of course, is the
name of the game for the
Lady 'Canes: using pres-
sure to force turnovers and
turnovers
\ leading
to easy
q0 buckets
in transi-
tion, which was how Citrus
built a quick 16-0 lead
midway through the first
quarter.
This is a fact well known
by Citrus senior Lindsay
Connors. Connors, who
benefitted from the easy
looks en route to a game-
high 19 points, said the
team's pressure has the po-
tential to cause mind games
for opposing offenses.
"I feel like our defensive
pressure gets into a lot of
teams' heads," she said.
"Like if we play it well
enough, we get in their
heads and they just men-
tally shut down. It can be
overwhelming."
And she has a point.
Throughout the first
quarter, when Citrus really
kicked up the pressure,
Hernando had 13 total team
turnovers, and 19 through-
out the first half. To put that
into perspective, Citrus had
just eight turnovers for the
entire game.
That statistic comes
down to just playing smart
The assist-to-turnover
ratio for the Lady 'Canes
was a sterling 18-8. The
biggest facilitator for that
was senior Elizabeth
Lynch, who finished with a
game-high six assists.
Other big scorers for Cit-
rus were junior Shenelle
Toxen, who finished with
13 points, and junior Haley
Martone, who finished
with eight points, all com-
ing in the fourth quarter.
For Citrus (17-5 overall,
7-1 District 6A-6), the win
punctuates the 'Canes are
playing some of their best
basketball at the best time
of the year.
"These past couple of
games, we've really come
out with a lot of energy,"
Connors said. "We really
feed off of one another, and
it helps us play better"
Citrus head coach Brian
Lattin was definitely
happy by the effort he saw,
not only from his starting
five, but from his bench,
which saw plenty of play-
ing time in the win.
"It was a great team ef-
fort tonight," he said.
"Everybody got in there,
and everybody played
hard. Our defense played
great and we got offensive
looks. This is how you
want to be playing around
this time of year, just solid
team play"


SPORTS


NHL has work to do for fans


Associated Press

Three generations of
the Ribble family hurried
through a parking lot in
suburban Detroit, eager
to see the Red Wings
practice when the lockout
finally ended.
"I was getting nervous
we weren't going to have
hockey this year," said
Reid Ribble, whose dad
joined him, his wife and
their two young sons to
watch the Red Wings skate
last Sunday "I'm glad they
got it figured out"
It took a while and it
might end up being a
costly blow to the sport.
The NHL, its teams and
players have work to do
to win people back after
the third work stoppage
in less than two decades.
"We all know there's a
debt there to the fans,"
said Chicago Blackhawks
star Jonathan Toews, who
took part in negotiations
with the NHL.
Commissioner Gary
Bettman, owners and
players have said they're


---- '
- -, ------- -












Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning right winger Martin St. Louis
carries the puck during practice Friday in Tampa. The
Lightning being their 48-game season today against
the Washington Capitals.


sorry in various ways.
Teams have tried to apol-
ogize with free food, beer
and tickets, along with
discounted gear and ac-
cess to the players. The
harder work begins Sat-
urday, when 13 games
kick off a lockout-short-
ened season where each
team has a 48-game sprint
before the playoffs.
"The lockout hurt the
game, so we definitely


want to do everything we
can do to give them a
good show," Red Wings
captain Henrik Zetter-
berg said.
Marc Ganis, president
of Chicago-based sports
business consulting firm
Sportscorp Ltd., said the
league is skating against a
steep incline in many
parts of the United States.
"It's a great sport, but it
has geographic con-


straints," Ganis said. "In
the stronger markets, such
as Detroit, there is a
strong, passionate fan
base for the NHL. The real
challenge for the league is
growing its fan base, and
that has been its challenge
for at least three decades.
The league should use this
restart of the season as an
opportunity to be more
fan-friendly"
The league, teams and
players seem to be trying
to do that. Practices and
scrimmages were open to
the public for free and fans
flocked to arenas in some
cities such as Philadel-
phia, where 15,000 fans
watched the Flyers skate.
In other markets,
though, there seems to be
a cautious approach at
play
Columbus has sold a lit-
tle more than 7,000 season
tickets this year, down
about 1,000 from last sea-
son, perhaps in part be-
cause star Rick Nash was
traded to the New York
Rangers in addition to a
backlash from the lockout.


Shocking rally


Re op' ints3 But a floater through heavy traf-
eyno 35 p ltS, fic by sophomore power forward
1 ,/ r, e Sam Franklin (11 points, 11 re-
S reOUndpusheSbounds) and a three by junior
1 Hunter Roessler (4-for-4 foul shoot-
CR /past 7 fves ing) -his first field goal of the game
S- nudged the Pirates to within
SEAN ARNOLD three 30 seconds remaining before
Correspondent Reynolds (game-high 35 points, 10
boards) made a pair of steals on
LECANTO After scoring 31 Warrior inbound plays and con-
points in the first 31 minutes of reg- verted each into baskets in the wan-
ulation, Crystal River junior point ing seconds to put Crystal River
guard Ty Reynolds had two more over the top for a 60-59 triumph in
plays in his pocket for the final 20 the Seven Rivers gym Thursday
seconds that would help his Pi- The Warriors (9-7 overall), cele-
rates boys basketball squad rating senior night,
deliver an unlikely come- jumped out to a 14-0 lead
back victory against county and didn't surrender a
opponent Seven Rivers bucket until Reynolds
Christian School. knocked down a 3 with 3:35
The Warriors led the en- left in the opening quarter
tire game until a layup by as the Pirates (8-9 overall)
Reynolds three minutes went 4-for-17 from the field
into the fourth period put in the period.
the Pirates up 44-43. Seven Ty Reynolds Seven Rivers, ahead by
Rivers Christian junior CRjunior PG eight points at the close of
Adam Gage (team-high 31 rallied team for each of the first two quar-
points, 10 rebounds) then unlikely win. ters, headed into the half
scored nine points in the leading 30-22.
last four minutes, however, to aid "We talked about only having
his club to a 58-51 advantage fol- one offensive rebound at halftime,
lowing a pair of converted free and we knew if we stood around,
throws by Warriors freshman Zac Seven Rivers would try to spread
Saxer (12 points) with 57 seconds us and get the shots they like and
left in the contest. work us right into the free throw




Lady Warriors fend (

C.J. RISK
Correspondent We've been
*. __ II I L


LECANTO Crystal River's
girls basketball team limited
Seven Rivers Christian to two bas-
kets and just five points in the final
quarter of its game at Seven Rivers
on Thursday, and three of those
came on a game-ending three-
pointer by Kaitlen Fenton.
Know what? It didn't make a bit
of difference.
That's how big the Warriors
cushion was, a 20-point lead over
Crystal River going into the fourth
quarter that left the Pirates' 12-5
closing surge woefully short as
Seven Rivers posted a 58-45 win.
"We've been playing well our last
few games," said Seven Rivers
coach Gary Dreyer, his team im-
proving to 12-6 overall. "We've
worked hard on our defense and
on offense, we just want to run
plays.
"If we run our offense, we won't
turn it over, and if we don't turn it
over, we'll score more points."
A simple approach that was
made even simpler by the inside
play of Alexis and Andrea Zachar,
who dominated in the paint. They


playing well our last
few games.
Gary Dreyer
Seven Rivers Christian girls basketball
coach said after win over Crystal River.

combined to score 17 first-half
points, Alexis getting nine and An-
drea eight. Alexis finished the
game with 13, Andrea had 12.
If forcing turnovers were a route
to victory for the Pirates, they ex-
ploited it early but could not sus-
tain it. Crystal River (13-8 overall)
led 7-4 midway through the open-
ing quarter after Seven Rivers
committed five turnovers; only the
Pirates' errant shooting from the
field (they were 4-of-15 in the pe-
riod) kept them from taking a sub-
stantial lead.
That and the Warriors ability to
adjust offensively and trim their
turnover count. After having five
in the first three minutes of the
game, they had just two more in
the half allowing them to take
control, leading 14-11 after one
quarter and 33-24 at the half.


and make it that kind of contest,"
Crystal River coach Steve Feldman
said.
While Gage poured in 13 points
in the third, Reynolds and Franklin
combined for 14 to keep pace and
pull the Pirates within five entering
the fourth. Crystal River also began
making significant gains on the
boards, particularly on the offen-
sive glass, as it outrebounded the
Warriors 22-8 in the second half.
"That's a lot of the difference in
the game," Seven Rivers coach Jim
Ervin said of the rebounding dispar-
ity "And then at the end of the game,
we just mentally were fatigued and
didn't make good decisions."
A pull-up jumper by Reynolds
with 2:25 left gave Crystal River a
5149 edge before the Warriors wres-
tled back the lead and appeared
poised for the win after Gage con-
nected on a wide-open 3 from the
corner to send the home crowd into
a frenzy with 1:10 remaining.
"We fouled multiple guys out, but
we kept reaching a little deeper,"
Feldman said. "I can't say enough
about (senior guard) Nick Ricca's
defense against Gage, with a
tremendous size disadvantage.
"The kids kept their heads and
there was no quit or panic in
them. Their perseverance was
unbelievable."




)ff Pirates

"We've played a lot against
(pressure) lately," Dreyer said.
"Against Citrus, Lady of the Lakes,
St. John. Each time we did, we pro-
gressed."
A three-pointer by Kiersten
Croyle she would have four of
them in the game helped draw
Crystal River to within 18-17 three
minutes into the second quarter,
but the Warriors regained control
with a 10-point run for a 28-17 lead.
The Pirates again went to their
pressure defense in the third
quarter, and again it helped create
seven Seven Rivers turnovers, but
they could not take advantage. The
Warriors outpointed Crystal River
12-1 in the last five minutes of the
third, limiting the Pirates to three
field goals in the quarter.
Croyle finished with a game-
high 19 points for Crystal River, 10
coming in the fourth quarter. Next
best for the Pirates was Megan
Wells with nine.
Fenton, who also had nine first-
half points for the Warriors, fin-
ished with a team-best 14 for the
game. Tiana Miele scored 11, giv-
ing Seven Rivers four players -
including the Zachar sisters -
scoring in double figures.


SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013 B5






Tampa Bay Rays
agree to terms
with four players
ST. PETERSBURG -
The Tampa Bay Rays have
agreed to one-year con-
tracts with right-handed
pitcher Jeff Niemann and
infielder Ryan Roberts,
along with outfielders Matt
Joyce and Sam Fuld to
avoid arbitration.
Niemann, who turns 30
next month, will earn $3
million the team announced
Friday. The 32-year-old
Roberts received $2.95 mil-
lion plus incentives. Joyce
gets $2.45 million and Fuld
will earn $725,000.
The 31-year-old Fuld bat-
ted .255 with seven stolen
bases and 14 runs scored
after missing the first 96
games of last season while
recovering from surgery to
repair ligaments in his right
wrist. The 28-year-old Joyce
had 17 home runs, 59 RBIs
and a career-high 55 walks.
CR rallies to
down Hernando
on Thursday
The Crystal River boys
soccer team finished its
regular season Thursday
with a 5-3 come-from-be-
hind win against Hernando.
Trailing 3-1 at halftime,
the Pirates rallied to victory
and finish with an 8-8-6
record. Senior midfielder
John McAteer had two goals
and an assist; Eric Hartwell,
Cliff Guyett and Adam Burns
also scored goals.
Hartwell, Guyett and
Burns recorded assists as
well, and midfielder Omam
Valdivia added two assists.
Crystal River travels to
Crescent City on Monday
to play Mount Dora in the
District 2A-6 tournament
quarterfinals.
The team will be without
leading scorer Travis Swan-
son, who was injured for the
remainder of the season
Monday against Leesburg.
Muschamp
suspends OL,
dismisses others
GAINESVILLE Jes-
samen Dunker probably will
get another chance to play
at Florida.
For three of his team-
mates, their time with the
team is over.
Coach Will Muschamp
suspended Dunker on Fri-
day following his arrest for
allegedly stealing a scooter.
Muschamp made the an-
nouncement two days after
Dunker was charged with a
third-degree felony.
Muschamp suspended
Dunker, a redshirt freshman
expected to compete for a
starting job this spring, from
all team activities until "we
get more information."
Dunker's attorney said
Thursday that his client
paid $600 for the scooter
and had no idea it had
been reported stolen. The
State Attorney's Office is in-
vestigating the case and
will decide whether to pro-
ceed with the charges.
Dunker likely will end up
getting reinstated. That won't
happen for defensive end
Kendric Johnson, receiver
Stephen Alli and offensive
lineman Tommy Jordan.
Muschamp is parting ways
with all three of them.
Johnson and Alli, both
fourth-year juniors, are
scheduled to graduate this
spring and will no longer be
on scholarship. Jordan,
meanwhile, is applying for
medical exemption be-
cause of a shoulder injury.
From staff and wire reports


Richards leads Lecanto girls hoops to 79-62 win


LARRY BUGG
Correspondent

LECANTO If nothing else,
the Lecanto High School girls bas-
ketball team provided interesting
entertainment to the faithful
Thursday night at the Panthers
gym.
Lecanto (9-10 overall, 3-5 in
district) took a 52-29 halftime
lead while playing like a female
version of the Harlem Globetrot-
ters. Visiting opponent Spring-
stead played like the Washington
Generals.
In the second half, the Panthers
started off playing like retired


players and let the Eagles back
into the game. Finally, Lecanto
showed some of their initial spark
in the fourth quarter and held on
to win 79-62.
Lecanto's Paige Richards led
the offensive attack with 28 points
overall, 17 in the first half. She
also grabbed four rebounds, had
two steals and a blocked shot
Megan Straight added 18 points
including five three-pointers.
Marie Buckley had 11 points and
Taylor Mitchell had 10 points and
seven rebounds, six of which
came in the final quarter
The Panthers used a tight full-
court press in the first quarter and


Springstead had six turnovers as
the Panthers took a 23-12 lead.
Richards scored eight
The Panthers revved up the en-
gine in the second quarter and
outscored the visitors 29-17.
Straight had 10 points in the
quarter
Springstead showed life in the
third quarter, outscoring the Pan-
thers 22-8. The Eagles' Kenyatta
Watters hit nine of her 16 points.
Richards and Marie Buckley had
four points each for the Panthers.
The Panthers played the fourth
quarter like it was the first,
outscoring their foes 19-7.
Richards had seven points.


Both teams were very sloppy
with the ball. Springstead had 21
turnovers and Lecanto had 19.
Richards had an explanation
for the uneven game.
"We were exhausted," Richards
said. "We were very up and down.
We had a tough week. We played
West Port and Central. We were
pretty tired. We stuck with it. It
has happened a lot
"(We need) to rebound for days,
hard work, hustle back on plays
and (have) team work"
The Panthers coach acknowl-
edged her team needs to keep its
effort up.
"It's something we are working


to overcome," Lecanto coach Brit-
tany Szunko said. "It's not letting
our momentum down. A goal of
ours is to come out and score or
get a stop to start every single
quarter We had a game plan and
it fell apart We are working on the
focus and sticking with the game
plan.
"We were very fortunate on the
shooting end. To me, it still comes
down to the defensive effort We
gave them 62 points. I am thinking
about the rebounds and the little
things."
Lecanto plays 6:30 p.m. Tues-
day at Seven Rivers Christian
School.












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Shakira
baby shower
NEW YORK What does
the baby of the world's most
famous Latin American
singer need? Nothing,
apparently
Expectant parents Shakira
and soccer
star Gerard
Pique of FC
Barcelona are
inviting
friends and
family to join
an online
baby shower
to benefit un- Shakira
derprivileged
children. Their own child is
expected to be born early this
year
A UNICEF-hosted website
invites those attending the
virtual baby shower to buy
gifts costing as little as $5,
which can buy a mosquito net
to ensure a sleeping baby
stays safe from malaria a
leading cause of child deaths
worldwide. Guests can spend
$10 for polio vaccines to pro-
tect 17 children, or $37 for a
baby scale.

Bailey as Bacchus'
'god of wine'
NEW ORLEANS-Actor
G.W Bailey will reign as Bac-
chus 2013 when the Mardi
Gras krewe rolls next month.
Bailey is known for his
roles in the "Police Academy"
movies and the cable TV
crime drama, "The Closer"
Clark Brennan, who
chaired the krewe's selection
committee, tells The Times-
Picayune Bailey was a natu-
ral choice to reign in their
Feb. 10 parade.
He said Bailey is a regular
visitor of New Orleans and
"his charitable work made
him a perfect fit for
Bacchus."
Bailey is executive director
of The Sunshine Kids Foun-
dation, a nonprofit for young
cancer patients. Brennan said
several of the children and
their families will participate
in this year's parade.

Pregnant Kim wants
to be more private
NEW YORK -As the
tabloids speculated about
whether Jessica Simpson is
expecting again (she is) and
the media zeroed in on Kate
Middleton's acute morning
sickness, Kim Kardashian
said it was
nice to be out
of the media
spotlight dur-
ing the early
stages of her
pregnancy.
"I'm obvi-
ously so
happy for Kim
them, but if Kardashian
anything I
loved the privacy," the 32-
year-old reality TV star said
in an interview Wednesday.
That bit of privacy went
out the window when
Kardashian's boyfriend,
Kanye West, revealed during
a Dec. 30 concert in Atlantic
City, N.J., they are expecting
their first child together.
Now that the word is out,
Kardashian said her motherly
instincts have made her pull
back from being so open
about her personal life.
The couple went public
with their relationship in
March.
Kardashian is due in July.
Her reality show, "Kourt-
ney and Kim Take Miami,"
premieres at 9 p.m. Sunday
on E!
-From wire reports


Birthday Favors you do for others in the year
ahead are likely to be paid back quite promptly and in
great measure. If you try your best to be one of the
good guys, you'll end up being a huge winner in life.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Your associates
might be inclined to hold back some good ideas if they
sense you aren't likely to appreciate them. Don't be a
know-it-all.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -A matter you've been
anxious to finalize can be concluded, but not neces-
sarily to the satisfaction of everyone involved. Some
might feel there is still a leak in the bucket.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) In order for you to ne-
gotiate an important matter, some kind of compromise
might have to be reached. If you take action, it won't
happen.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Two strong factors
could affect your chances of success: One is a strong


Leaving a legacy


Associated Press
Pauline Friedman Phillips, right, the nationally-syndicated advice columnist best known as "Dear
Abby," and her daughter Jeanne Phillips, pose Feb. 14, 2001, after the dedication of a Dear Abby
star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in Los Angeles.

Dear Abby offered wit, warmth and snappy advice


JOCELYN NOVECK
AP national writer

NEW YORK Two men
had recently bought a house
together in San Francisco, and
the neighbors were annoyed.
The men were entertaining "a
very suspicious mixture of
people," the neighbors wrote,
asking: "How can we improve
the neighborhood?"
"You could move," Dear
Abby replied.
That zinger, contained in
the 1981 collection "The Best
of Dear Abby," was such clas-
sic Abby-real name, Pauline
Friedman Phillips it moved
her daughter to burst into
laughter Thursday when re-
minded of it, even though she
had just returned from the fu-
neral of her mother The elder
Phillips had died a day earlier
at age 94 after a long battle
with Alzheimer's disease.
"People weren't really talk-
ing about homosexuality back
then," said Jeanne Phillips,
who now writes the famous
syndicated column. "But you
know, there wasn't a subject
my mother wouldn't take on."
As the world said goodbye
to Dear Abby on Thursday, the
Web was full of her snappiest
one-liners, responses to thou-
sands of letters over the
decades she wrote in her
daily column. But her admir-
ers noted behind the humor
and wit was a huge heart, and
a genuine desire to improve
people's lives.
"She really wanted to help
people," said Judith Martin, the
etiquette columnist known as
Miss Manners. "Yes, she wrote
with humor, but with great sym-
pathy She had an enormous
amount of influence, and for
the good. Her place in the cul-
ture was really extraordinary"


ONLINE
www.dearabby.com

The long-running "Dear
Abby" column first appeared
in the San Francisco Chroni-
cle in 1956. Phillips was
hardly experienced, but she
had managed to snag an in-
terview for the job. A skepti-
cal editor allowed her to write
a few sample columns, and
Phillips was hired.
She wrote under the name
Abigail Van Buren, plucking
the name Abigail from the
Bible and Van Buren from
American history Her col-
umn competed for decades
with that of Ann Landers, who
was none other than her twin
sister, Esther Friedman Led-
erer (she died in 2002.) Their
relationship was stormy in
their early adult years, but
they later regained the close-
ness they'd had growing up in
Sioux City, Iowa.
Carolyn Hax, who writes
her own syndicated advice
column, feels one can't speak
of one sister without the other,
so influential were they both,
and at the same time.
"Any of us who do this owe
them such a debt," she said.
"The advice column was a
backwater of the newspaper,
and now it is so woven into
our cultural fabric. These
columns are loved and widely
read, by people you wouldn't
expect. That couldn't have
happened without them."
In a time before confes-
sional talk shows and the
nothing-is-too-private culture
of the Web, the sisters'
columns offered a rare win-
dow into Americans' private
lives and a forum for dis-
cussing marriage, sex and the


Today's HOROSCOPE

motivation for victory, and the other is a sense of
adventure.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -At times, it seems like
nothing ever changes. Those who are usually sup-
portive of you will remain so, while those who tend to
oppose you will be antagonistic once again.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Your chances for suc-
cess look pretty good, provided that what needs to be
done is finished quickly and with a nominal amount of
effort. If more is required, you might not hold up.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) If you handle business
matters well, chance will play a very small role in how
your affairs play out. Be methodical and avoid taking
foolish risks.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Provided you operate along
traditional lines, the probabilities of generating favor-
able returns are pretty good. Should you be inclined to


swiftly changing mores of the
1950s, '60s and '70s.
The two columns differed
in style, though. While Ann
Landers responded to ques-
tioners with homey, detailed
advice, Abby's replies were
more flippant and occasion-
ally risqu6, like some col-
lected for her 1981 book.
Dear Abby: My boyfriend is
going to be 20 years old next
month. I'd like to give him
something nice for his birth-
day What do you think he'd
like? Carol
Dear Carol: Nevermind
what he'd like, give him a tie.
Dear Abby: I've been going
with this girl for a year How
can I get her to say yes? Don
Dear Don: What's the
question?
Jeanne Phillips, who took
over the column in 2002 after
a few years of sharing the by-
line, recalled in a telephone
interview Thursday her
mother's response to a
woman who wrote in detail of
how many drinks she'd
shared with her date one
night. "Did I do wrong?" the
woman wrote, in the daugh-
ter's retelling.
"Probably," her mom
responded.
But with all the wonderful
humor, the younger Phillips
said she was most impressed
with two things: her mother's
compassion and her bravery
The compassion, she said,
shone through especially when
her mother met her readers.
She remembers a young girl
coming up at a speaking en-
gagement and saying some-
thing quietly, at which point
her mother embraced the girl,
who wept on her shoulder
"That is my favorite visual
memory of my mom," she
said.


test out something new, everything becomes iffy.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) In order to maintain good
relationships with others today, you must be willing to
give them the same freedom to operate independently
as you want for yourself.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Unexpected changes will
work out to your ultimate advantage, provided you are
flexible enough to accept them. Resist any urge to
adjust events and control things.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Because you'll auto-
matically instill harmony and a spirit of cooperation,
you'll be a welcome addition to any group. Good
things happen when everyone gets along.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -You'll have a great
opportunity to accomplish much more than you origi-
nally anticipated, mostly because your industrious-
ness will be challenged, and will rise to the occasion.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 17
Fantasy 5:1 25 26 30 35
5-of-5 2 winners $105,829.97
4-of-5 207 $164.50
3-of-5 7,738 $12
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16
Powerball: 9 -21 -28 -32 -51
Powerball: 35
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 No winner
No Florida winner
Lotto: 12 -20 -41 -43 -49- 53
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 18 $7,392
4-of-6 1,200 $85
3-of-6 25,547 $6
Fantasy 5: 6- 9 10- 12 31
5-of-5 1 winner $238,716.74
4-of-5 420 $91.50
3-of-5 12,814 $8


INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, Jan. 19, the
19th day of 2013. There are 346
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Jan. 19, 1953, CBS-TV
aired the widely watched episode
of "I Love Lucy" in which Lucy
Ricardo, played by Lucille Ball,
gave birth to Little Ricky. (By coin-
cidence, Ball gave birth the same
day to her son, Desi Arnaz Jr.)
On this date:
In 1807, Confederate general
Robert E. Lee was born in
Westmoreland County, Va.
In 1853, Giuseppe Verdi's
opera II Trovatore" premiered in
Rome.
In 1861, Georgia became the
fifth state to secede from the
Union.
In 1937, millionaire Howard
Hughes set a transcontinental air
record by flying his monoplane
from Los Angeles to Newark, N.J.,
in 7 hours, 28 minutes and 25
seconds.
In 1942, during World War II,
Japan invaded Burma (Myanmar).
In 1955, a presidential news
conference was filmed for televi-
sion for the first time, with the per-
mission of President Dwight D.
Eisenhower.
Ten years ago: President Fidel
Castro and millions of other
Cubans voted in parliamentary
elections where all 609 candidates
ran uncontested.
Five years ago: Republican
John McCain won a hard-fought
South Carolina primary; Democ-
rats Hillary Rodham Clinton and
Barack Obama split the spoils in
the Nevada caucuses.
One year ago: Six U.S.
Marines were killed in a helicopter
crash in southern Afghanistan.
Today's Birthdays: Former
U.N. Secretary-General Javier
Perez de Cuellar is 93. Actress
Jean Stapleton is 90. Actor Fritz
Weaver is 87. Actress Tippi
Hedren is 83. Former PBS news-
man Robert MacNeil is 82. Movie
director Richard Lester is 81.
Singer Phil Everly is 74. Actor-
singer Michael Crawford is 71. Ac-
tress Shelley Fabares is 69.
Country singer Dolly Parton is 67.
ABC newswoman Ann Compton
is 66. TV chef Paula Deen is 66.
Rock singer Martha Davis is 62.
Singer Dewey Bunnell (America)
is 61. Actor Desi Arnaz Jr. is 60.
Actress Katey Sagal is 59. Come-
dian Paul Rodriguez is 58. Con-
ductor Sir Simon Rattle is 58.
Reggae musician Mickey Virtue
(UB40) is 56. Rock musician Jeff
Pilson (Foreigner) is 55. Actor
Paul McCrane is 52. Actor William
Ragsdale is 52. International Ten-
nis Hall of Famer Stefan Edberg is
47. Rock singer Whitfield Crane
(Ugly Kid Joe) is 45. Singer Trey
Lorenz is 44. Actor Shawn


Wayans is 42. Rock singer-musi-
cian John Wozniak (Marcy Play-
ground) is 42.
Thought for Today: "Words
have no power to impress the
mind without the exquisite horror
of their reality." Edgar Allan Poe
(1809-1849).










RELIGION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


I;;


Coffee and counseling


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


JOSHUA MARSHALL/Dally Journal
Coffeehouse Fve serves up coffee and smoothies to visitors at Greenwood Christian Church in Greenwood, Ind.

Church-based coffeehouse supports community counseling work


RYAN TRARES
DailyJournal


GREENWOOD, Ind.
he evening

rush had hit

Coffeehouse

Five, bringing a

line of people to

wait for their

smoothies and

coffee.
In tables and overstuffed
chairs throughout the small
space, they sipped on cap-
puccinos and lattes. Soft
brown tones and low light
create a welcoming atmos-
phere. Music by contempo-
rary artists played.

The scene could have come out of any
Starbucks. But for every cup of coffee or
chai tea they took, patrons were helping
the mission work of a Johnson County
church.
While Coffeehouse Five has the look
and feel of a neighborhood cafe, it's actu-
ally the engine that helps support local
counseling efforts.
The model is an example of churches
diversifying their fundraising efforts. By
starting coffee shops, cafes and restau-
rants in their buildings, they can make
See Page C6


Religion NOTES

New officers


Special to the Chronicle
The Episcopal Church Women of St. Anne's Church recently elected officers for 2013.
They are, from left: Doris Fynn, president; Liz Winner, secretary; Evelyn Mayer, vice
president; and Edwina Reisig, treasurer. The ECW works on various service projects
through the year for organizations such as Jesse's Place, Seven Rivers Regional Med-
ical Center, HPH Hospice, Citrus County Sheriff's Office and many others.


JOSHUA MARSHALL/Dally Journal


Food & fellowship
The third Saturday sup-
per is from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
today in the Dewain Farris
Fellowship Hall at Community
Congregational Christian
Church, 9220 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs.
Menu includes beef stew,
salad, homemade bread,
granny cake, coffee and tea.
Cost is $10 for adults and $5
for children.
Tickets can be purchased
at the door. Takeouts avail-
able. Call the church at 352-
489-1260.
The annual spaghetti
dinner put on by the United
Methodist Women of the First
United Methodist Church of
Dunnellon is today at the
Friendship Hall of the church,
21501 W. State Road 40.
Seatings are at 4:30 and 5:30
p.m. Adult tickets at the door


are $7 and $3 for children.
There is a limited number of
tickets for each seating.
Dinner includes "all-you-
can-eat" spaghetti with meat
sauce, tossed salad, garlic
bread, dessert and coffee or
tea.
Call the church office at
352-489-4026. Proceeds will
be used for UMW mission
projects.
Floral City United
Methodist Church will host its
first dinner of the new year
from 3 to 6 p.m. Saturday,
Jan. 26, in Hilton Hall at 8478
E. Marvin St. across from the
elementary school.
Menu includes roast pork,
candied sweet potatoes, fresh
green beans, salad, assorted
desserts and beverages for a
donation of $7.50. Takeouts
available. Call 352-344-1771.
See Page C2


Power


of a


soggy

stamp

wenty years ago
this year, we had a
devastating storm
blow through our area
that we call the No-
Name Storm.
I hadn't thought about
it in a while, but the
other day a woman came
into the newspaper of-
fice and mentioned it.
She still lives in one of
the hardest hit areas.
When she left, I
started thinking about
that storm and its after-
math. For many people
around here, it was our
area's Hurricane Sandy
or a mini Hurricane Ka-
trina, blowing in and
surprising everyone,
wreaking havoc.
Afterward, people
sprang into action to
help those whose homes
were damaged. I wanted
to help, too.
I had learned a dear
man from my church,
Joe Koch, needed help
at his house, so I set out
with visions of being
See Page C6


Judi Siegal
JUDI'S
JOURNAL


The

value of

tzedakah
This is the second arti-
cle in a series on Jewish
values.
One of the most en-
during values of
Judaism is the
concept of tzedakah, giv-
ing charity. Actually the
word "tzedakah" means
righteousness, so when
we help our neighbor in
need, we are doing the
right thing an act
which, as Jews, we are
commanded to do.
In Judaism, giving
charity is an entitlement.
A person in need is enti-
tled to be able to live and
the recipients of help
are supposed to help
those in even direr
straights. Since Biblical
times, Jews were to give
(tithe) 10 percent of their
income to charity, and
today many indeed con-
tinue to do so.
During the time of the
Temple, animal sacrifice
was often used as a form
of charity, because the
donor was giving some-
thing of value to God in
gratefulness, in suppli-
cation for a favor or for
forgiveness of sin. Giving
tzedakah is also one of
those obligations that
can alleviate a severe
judgment decree made
by God during the High
Holiday season, and for
See Page C6


L_ n





C2 SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013


NOTES
Continued from Page C1

The "22nd annual
Peace Potato Pancake Sup-
per" will take place from 4 to
7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12, at
Peace Lutheran Church, 7201
U.S. 41 S., north of State
Road 40, five miles north of
downtown Dunnellon. Tickets,
available at the door, are $5
for adults, and $2.50 for chil-
dren ages 5 through 12.
There is no charge for chil-
dren younger than age 5.
Tickets are also available
from members, and at the
Peace Lutheran booth at the
Dunnellon First Saturday
event on Feb. 2. Menu in-
cludes traditional potato pan-
cakes or buttermilk pancakes,
ham, fruit cup, dessert and
beverage. Call the church of-
fice at 352-489-5881 or visit
PeaceLutheranOnline.com.
The Legacy League of
St. John the Baptist Catholic
Church will host a Soup-a-
thon at 1 p.m. Ash Wednes-
day, Feb. 13. The church is
south of the State Road 40
and U.S. 41 intersection. The
Soup-a-thon will feature more
than 30 kinds of meatless
soups, served with crackers
or homemade bread. Fill your
soup bowl as often as you
like. Coffee, tea, lemonade
and brownies are all included
in the $5 cost. Diners will get
to vote on their favorite soup.
Prizes will be awarded to the
cooks of the top three favorite
soups. Tickets may be pur-
chased from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
at the church office or at the
door. Tickets purchased prior
to the event will use the "ex-
press lane" when entering the
church hall. Bring your
friends, family and an
appetite.
Beverly Hills Community
Church spaghetti suppers
have resumed from 4 to
6 p.m. the third Friday


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Kwanzaa


Special to the Chronicle
The Nature Coast Unitarian-Universalists learn about Kwanzaa from "Dee" D'Adjoa, of Citrus Hills. Here, Dee stands
before the altar representing the seven symbols and seven principles of this African-American celebration.


monthly in the Jack Steele
Hall at 86 Civic Circle, Beverly
Hills. A donation of $8 per per-
son or two tickets for $15 in-
cludes all-you-can-eat salad,
spaghetti with meat sauce,
Italian bread, dessert and cof-
fee or tea. Come and enjoy a
delicious meal. Tickets are
available at the door.
Sales & such
The Council of Catholic
Women of Our Lady of Grace
Church will host its annual
"Tricky Tray Fundraiser"
today in the Parish Life Cen-
ter, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly
Hills. Doors open at 10 a.m.
and drawings begin at 11:30
a.m. The event features bas-


kets with contents valued at
$25 or more, raffles and
money trees. Items include a
mah jongg set, gift certificates
for golf, restaurants and su-
permarkets. Purchase a sheet
of 25 numbered tickets for $5
for deposit in a bag adjacent
to your choice of baskets. The
Life South Blood Mobile is on
site. Ticket tenders are avail-
able for blood donors and for
those who cannot stay. Pro-
ceeds go to needed items for
the church and charitable
contributions. Call Bernita
Becker at 352-344-0235. For
membership information, call
Rosalie Madigan at 352-
746-2987.
Our Lady of Grace


Catholic Church in Beverly
Hills will host its monthly out-
door flea market from 8 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Saturday Jan. 26, on
the church property at 6 Roo-
sevelt Boulevard in Beverly
Hills off North Lecanto High-
way (County Road 491).
Shoppers are welcome. Up to
50 commercial and private
vendors are expected to dis-
play their wares. Commercial
vendors and private individu-
als are welcome to bring and
sell goods. Spaces are avail-
able for $10. A mobile kitchen,
"Cooking Good," will serve
breakfast and lunch items.
Flea markets take place the
fourth Saturday monthly ex-
cept in June, July and August.


Next month's flea market is
Feb. 23. For more information
or to reserve a space, call
Rose Mary at 352-527-6459
or e-mail wjeselso@
tampabay.rr.com.
There will be a big yard
sale and clothes giveaway
from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Satur-
day, Feb. 2, at Calvary
Chapel in Inverness, 960 S.
U.S. 41. Afree men's break-
fast will also be served at 9
that morning. Call 352-
726-1480.
Everyone is invited to the
annual tag sale from 8 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, at
Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church, 439 E. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Hernando. Thrivent


Financial for Lutherans will
provide supplemental funding
for this event through the Cit-
rus County Chapter and its
members at Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church. Many
household items will be
available.
Floral City United
Methodist Church will host its
annual "Used Treasure
Sale" from 8:30 a.m. to noon
Saturday, Feb. 2. Proceeds
from the sale are used to
send youth to summer camp
and various mission projects.
The Beverly Hills Com-
munity Church Youth Group
will host an indoor yard sale
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Satur-
day, Feb. 2, in the fellowship
hall at 82 Civic Circle.
The Altar and Rosary So-
ciety of St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church will host a
Chinese auction from
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 2, in Father Stegeman
Hall at the corner of U.S. 41
and State Road 40 East in
Dunnellon. Drawings for the
items will begin at 1 p.m. An
envelope of 20 tickets is $5
and can be purchased at the
door. Also included is a free
ticket for coffee and dessert.
Food and drinks will be avail-
able at a nominal charge. Call
Pat at 352-489-1984.
The Episcopal Church
Women of Shepherd of the
Hills Episcopal Church will
have their "Trash to Treas-
ure Sale from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. Friday, Feb. 8, in the
parish hall. There will be lots
of books. The church is on
County Road 486 in Lecanto
on the right-hand side just
east of the County Road 491
traffic light. Call Francine at
352-794-0070.
The women of the ELCA
at St. Timothy Lutheran
Church in Crystal River will
host their "Grannie's Attic"
sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fri-
day and Saturday, Feb. 8
See NOTES/Page C3


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! !

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship i iih Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Troy Allen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AlIAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org



( Crystal iver
Church of Cod
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
| (12th Ave.) Nu,,ery
| Provided

THE
SALVATION
ARMY CITRUSCOUNTY
CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 AM.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 AM.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 .M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller
712S. cbol ve
/ It
513496 .... W


Crystal River
CHURCH OF

CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M. 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239



M N0 T





















CHURCH
"The
Church
in the
Heart
of the
Community
with a
Heart
for the
Community"







TTHOMAS
CATHOLIC

CHURCH



MASSES:
caturday.....4:30 P.M.
;unday......8:00 A.M.

...............10:30 A.M.
I'. I] ll t RI I 'e , I ,

-MiS
Chumb. Phone (352)563-15771

ST. THOMAS


' Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon


SST. ANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
wwwstannescr.org


Special
Event or
Weekly
Services
Please Call
Beverly at
564-2912

For
Advertising
Information


t St. Timothy f
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour @ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor



Homosassa
First United
Methodist
church
Everyone
Becoming
A Disciple
of Christ

Sunday Worship
8:00 am & 9:30 am
& 11:00 am
Sunday School
9:30 am
Reverend
Kip Younger
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org
Office Hours:
8:30 4:30 M-F
Open Hearts
Open Minds


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
- MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 -4:30pm
795-4479


.. .


HERE, YOU'LL FIND
A CAkPJNC FAMILY
IN CHKIST!

CKYTAL
RIVE
VN ITED
M THODIST I
CH UKCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
:, A Stephen Ministry Provider .:


Eo Crystal
O River
Foursquare
Gospel Church

1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager



West
Citrus
Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352.564.8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.






US Hwy. 19



SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
L Bob Dickey


RELIGION


". f-.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

and 9. The sale will include the popu-
lar Men's Tent, homemade baked
goodies, and the fellowship hall filled
to the rafters with treasures. Hotdog
lunches will be available for sale.
Call Marcia Treber at 352-794-3217
or the church at 352-795-5317. The
church is on U.S. 19, across from the
airport.
The Ladies of Faith will host the
"17th Annual Trash 'N' Treasure
Sale" from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday
and Saturday, Feb. 8 and 9, at Faith
Lutheran Church in Crystal Glen
Subdivision, Lecanto (off County
Road 490 and State Road 44). Find
all kinds of "stuff" for the kitchen, the
home, the garden and garage, cloth-
ing, shoes, books and some jewelry
and Christmas items. Also includes a
bake sale. This year, for the first
time, beautiful handmade quilts will
be featured. Proceeds from this sale
support local, state, national and in-
ternational missions. This is a
Thrivent event.
St. Thomas the Apostle Council
of Catholic Women will have its an-
nual rummage sale from 9:30 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m. Friday, March 15, on the
grounds of St. Thomas the Apostle
Catholic Church, 7040 S. Suncoast


RELIGION


Blvd., Homosassa. Rain date is Fri-
day March, 22. Space rental are
available for $15. Call 352-503-7172.
Music & more
Dunnellon Presbyterian Church
had to accept Leslie Hammes' with-
drawal from performing Sunday due
to a recent illness. However, the
church's own musician, Renee Deu-
vall has prepared a program for
3 p.m. Sunday. Renee will sing, and
perform classical to contemporary
arrangements, Chopin to Gershwin,
Rachmaninov to Scott Joplin. Her
vocals will include an operatic aria,
and she is planning on performing a
local, first-time young composer's
arrangement. Deuvall has requested
all proceeds are to benefit the
church's building project.
In dark times, like world-ending
prophecies, economic failure, war-
torn areas throughout the world, and
family and life problems, it is hard to
find peace. We sometimes lose di-
rection and neglect the blessings,
gifts and talents God has given us.
We need to be refreshed! Acts 2:44:
"All the believers were together and
had everything in common." We in-
vite people of all ages to come and
be refreshed or refresh others with
your musical talents, poetry, creativ-
ity or personal testimony of how God

See NOTES/Page C5


SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013 C3


N.Y. teacher sues over


classroom religious displays


Associated Press
BUFFALO, N.Y. -A school-
teacher is suing her district
after being told to remove reli-
gious displays from her class-
room or risk being fired.
Joelle Silver, a science
teacher at Cheektowaga Cen-
tral High School in a Buffalo
suburb, describes herself as a
devout Christian.
A federal lawsuit filed Jan. 10
says the district was overtly
hostile toward her religion and
violated her constitutional
rights when it directed Silver
last year to remove from her
classroom several posters and
other displays quoting Bible
verses.
Superintendent Dennis Kane
said by phone that a student
had complained about the ma-
terial to the Freedom from Re-
ligion Foundation, a Madison,
Wis.-based watchdog group,
which prompted the district to
seek legal guidance.
"When you get advice that
you're violating the separation


of church and state, you have
an obligation to resolve that,"
Kane said.
His June letter instructed Sil-
ver to remove several posters
and sticky notes with religious
references, including a poster
with images of an American
flag and text books with a su-
perimposed quote: "Be on
guard. Stand true to what you
believe. Be courageous. Be
strong. And everything you do
must be done in love. 1
Corinthians 16:13-14."
Kane also cited the presence
of a prayer request box belong-
ing to the school's Bible study
club and advised Silver to keep
religious references out of her
classroom lectures.
"If you need to be able to oc-
casionally glance at inspira-
tional Bible verses between
classes during the course of the
day, I suggest that you keep
such material in a discreet
folder that only you will have
access to," the letter said. "You
may keep such a folder in a
drawer of your desk, so long as


you take precautions not to
share it or disclose its contents
to your students or their par-
ents or guardians."
Silver's lawsuit, filed by the
American Freedom Law Center
of Ann Arbor, Mich., said the
district's actions "send a clear
message to (Silver) that she is an
outsider, not a full member of
the political and school commu-
nity because she is a Christian."
Robert Muise, co-founder of
the center, called the case "one
of the most egregious examples
of religious hostility I have wit-
nessed in a public school."
"Ms. Silver does not cease
being a Christian, nor does she
shed her constitutional rights at
the schoolhouse gate," he said.
An attorney for the Freedom
from Religion Foundation said
teachers have to act neutrally
when it comes to religion.
"It's required by law," Re-
becca Markert said. "Public
school employees, including
teachers, are prohibited from
professing religious beliefs and
imposing them on students."


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
LJjicI'l Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
wwwfbcfloralcity.org


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.


ICome on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! !

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO,


FLO


)RAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


Community Church




Sunday 10:00am
New Location
1196 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto
Rev. Brian Baggs Pastor
(352) 527-4253
www.aenesiscommunitvchurch.ora
SAuthentic Love Relevant Faith
Embracing Community


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
000Y Floral City, FL.


SFloral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com




Grace Bible
Church


Sunday
9:30 AM....................Discovery Time
11:00 AM...................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM.....................Evening Service
Monday
6:15 PM.....................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept.- Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM....................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
IV mi. east of US.19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O.Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 am
11:30 am
Saturday
Vigil
4:00 pm
6:00 pm
Weekday
Masses
8:30 am
Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm

(352) 746-9422



The New Church
Without Walls
"An Exciting & Growing
Multi-Cultural
Non-Denominational
Congregation Ministering to
the Heart of Citrus County"
Senior Pastors & Founders


AIN.
Ab v


Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr.
& Lady "T" Alexander

Sunday School 9:30 am
Sunday Service 11:00 am
Wednesday Bible Study 7pm

3962 N. Roscoe Rd.
Hemando, FL
Ph: 352-344-2425
www.newchurchwithoutwalls.com
Email:cwow@embarqmail.com

"The perfect church for
people who aren't"


HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church

Ope
Heart,
Ope

Ope
Doorw

S ... ..... r Children and Families"
2125 E,Norvell Bryant Hwy, (486)
(12 miles from Hwy.41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl .org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
1,,, ",,, ..',;J ,"T ,,' T ',


Hernando
( Churchor
TheNazarene
A Place to Belong

2101 N, Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon offaith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
ofJesus Christ.
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Sunday School
Adult 9:15
Child 10:00
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy,
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
un ( ;)THE(' r,' ,.

1^ '-:..-


R Faith
Lutheran

Church ,(LMS
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325
COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com
f,,,t r",om to t..
.y^.%ov ,%^ (W/^fw


, Homosassa Springs
L SEVENmIDAYADVENTISTCHURCH






Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services a
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


O


Good

Shepherd
Lutheran

Church
ELCA

e






Worship
e s





Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
SFellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

35-4-761









Effort makes Bible accessible to minority cultures


RYAN TRARES
DailyJournal
FRANKLIN, Ind. Most of
the students had never seen the
words of the Bible translated in
their language.
All of them spoke Lisu, an ob-
scure Asian language. The Lisu
people number about 1 million
throughout the world, and their
culture has very little printed
material. Even the Bible has
only been translated a few times.
But with the help of Franklin
resident VL. Vawter, the college-
age students watched in wonder
as verses, chapters and familiar
biblical passages appeared on a
screen in front of them, all in
their native Lisu.
Now Vawter's work may open
the floodgates of understanding
for minority languages through-
out the world.
"It's been told to me, 'This will
change Asia.' It will raise the ed-
ucational level. It will change
their lives," Vawter told the
Daily Journal.
During a five-month period
last year, Vawter taught a series
of courses at the Lisu Bible In-
stitute in Thailand. He simulta-
neously finished a computer
program called RegionsReader
that allows minority cultures
such as the Lisu to study the
Bible and other literature in
their own language.
By the time it's finished,
RegionsReader will allow teach-
ers to take existing writings, im-
ported into the program, and
view the works in Lisu. Together
with a translating program, it
will allow for the comparison
and deeper study of a wide array
of literature.
Vawter is also in the process of
organizing drives for used com-
puters and mobile devices,
which would be given to leaders
in these communities for free.
His work has drawn excited in-
terest from linguists, biblical
scholars and other academics as
a way to open small pockets of
people throughout the world to


literature and the written word in
ways they never had been before.
"This could really, really affect
thousands and thousands of peo-
ple, and raise them up educa-
tionally, raise up their thinking,
free them economically," he
said.
Vawter never anticipated his
teaching stint in Thailand would
result in a potentially culture-
shifting development. The
Franklin resident was recruited
by friend and missionary Jesse
Yangmi to teach for a semester
at Lisu Bible Institute.
Yangmi, a Burmese native,
founded the school in 1999 in the
northern region of Thailand.
Though he had been educated in
the U.S., he returned to South-
east Asia to work as a mission-
ary His specialty was language
- he spoke nearly 10 different
languages, and had translated
the Bible into Lisu.
Franklin Memorial Christian
Church had supported Yangmi's
mission work in the past. Vawter,
being a member of the church
and active in its ministry, had in-
vited Yangmi to use translation
software in his home.
"I've always been impressed
with that kind of work, translat-
ing Scripture. He and I clicked,"
Vawter said.
Their friendship grew from
that point, and Vawter had been
asked on multiple occasions to
come teach for a semester in the
mountainous district of Chiang
Dao.
Though he had turned it down
in the past, Vawter felt the time
was right in early 2012.
Vawter was charged with
teaching a series of biblical
courses at the college on sub-
jects such as the revelation of
the Holy Spirit and how to study
the Bible.
While he stood in front of the
class, an interpreter translated
his words.
"My number one concern was
to be able to teach them, and to
be able to connect with them
emotionally," he said. "With


many of these languages, you
can't use any social illustrations
or metaphors, because they
won't understand them."
When describing his lessons,
Vawter instead had to use illus-
trations and examples they'd un-
derstand family interaction
and nature. To bridge the lan-
guage gap, Vawter used physical
comedy to connect with his stu-
dents. He would use slapstick,
faking falls or injuries to make
them laugh.
But while his main job was
teaching, Vawter also had been
creating a digital concordance for
the Lisu Bible that students and
professors could call up on their
computers. A concordance allows
people to look up any word and
search for the individual in-
stances within a body of text
Vawter's program would be
like a search engine for the
Bible.
For example, if he wanted to
look up "truth," he could type it
into his search function and find
all of the ways it was used
throughout the Bible. Scholars
could compare the idea of truth
in the Old and New Testaments,
or how different books of the
Bible interpreted it
Concordance software is al-
ready available for free online.
But RegionsReader is specifi-
cally built for individual minor-
ity language.
"They don't have anything to
read and refer to. They don't
have the means to do it," Vawter
said. "This is one of those things
where you think you did one


thing, but as it opens up, you re-
alize it's a lot bigger than you
thought."
Vawter had been a program-
mer with the U.S. Navy, working
in the intelligence field in the
early 1980s. Working in Berlin,
Germany, he was in the middle
of the Cold War conflict with the
Soviets.
Afterward, he continued com-
puter programming, something
that extended after he entered
the ministry Mostly, he worked
in databases, as opposed to
games or graphics.
"I want to be able to give peo-
ple the information they need,"
he said.
That meshed well with the
needs of the Lisu people. They
were not only poor economi-
cally, but they also lacked any
kind of literature in their own
language. They have no newspa-
pers and very few books.
The books that do exist in Lisu
are so expensive the average
person can't afford them, Vawter
said.
"They have nothing. The stuff
that is translated is often unin-
telligible, because a translation
is only as good as the person who
translated it," Vawter said.
His first step was developing a
program that would let him
search through the digital ver-
sion of the Bible, and display it
on the projection screen in the
classroom.
In order to better understand
the Lisu language, Vawter found
an English-to-Lisu dictionary on-
line written by a linguistics pro-


By the time it's finished, RegionsReader
will allow teachers to take existing
writings, imported into the program,
and view the works in Lisu. Together
with a translating program, it will allow
for the comparison and deeper study of
a wide array of literature.


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School.............9:00
Worship................. 10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School.............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(At The Flashing fiuht -


352-422-,535g

lodd
Langdon


S Hwy.44E@ U
SWashington Ave., Inverness U

Sunday Services
Traditional *
8:00 AM & 11:00 AM
Casual Service
9:30 AM
11:00 AM Service
Tapes & CD's Available
" Sunday School for all ages
0 9:30 AM
" Nursery Provided
U Fellowship & Youth Group m
S 5 to 7 PM
Web Site: www.fpcinv.org
Podcast: FPC inv.com

SChurch Office637-0770
SPastor Craig Davies U
*


COMMUNITY
CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH

XV

I %Wnw


//rmn '1/ '"/
SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260
illyl tI SSf1 Sd.[[ Ii|S[.l. liI lEIR.|i


Riding a Hard Trail
Join us at

SCROSSATTHEReR


COWBOY ('Il H('II
Greater Dunnellon
Historical Train Depot

12061 S. Williams St.
(Hwy 41)
Dunnellon, FL 34432


Sunday Church Service:
10:00am to 11:00am

Ladies Bible Study
2nd & 4th Wednesday's
7:00pm


Contact
Pastor E. Patrick Anthony
352-465-6223
or
cell 352-445-5171

crossattheriverl@gmail.com
website:
www.crossattheriver.org


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Bevery Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison, III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday CoffeelConversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion Ist Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!



r :







VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M.L &6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM. & 10:30 AM.


SPANISH MASS:
12:30 P.M.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P. to 3:15 P. Sat.
orByAppointment

WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
. .catholicweb.com .:


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca .com



W First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452


Dairold

Bettye
Rushing

















OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


road
t1st



ch

5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
% Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. Larry Powers
Senior Pastor
Sunday Services:
Traditional Service...........8:30 A
Sunday School.................9:30 A
Contemporary Service...10:30 A
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes ............... 7:00 EM
Boys and Girls Brigade....7:00 EM
Teens................7:00 EM
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726 4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"



Special

Event or

Weekly

Services

Please Call

Beverly at

564-2912




For

Information

On Your

Religious

Advertising

,,


fessor from Australia. Vawter
contacted the professor, David
Bradley, to get a digital version of
it.
The two men continued a
back-and-forth conversation by
email to discuss Lisu and other
languages. Bradley said he
would be in Thailand in Sep-
tember, and wondered if they
could meet.
Showing him the usable con-
cordance, Bradley grew more
and more excited about its po-
tential. Vawter described it as
someone figuratively knocking
the sunglasses off of your eyes,
allowing him to see the light
"This will be very useful for
Lisu speakers and for anyone in-
terested in Lisu language, as the
software makes it easier to find
strings of Lisu text," Bradley
said. "This is a valuable new way
to organize Lisu materials
electronically"
The more he heard from spe-
cialists in Southeast Asia, the
more Vawter began to under-
stand the far-reaching results of
such a program. Working with
longtime Lisu missionary
David Morse, he saw this could
introduce a written Bible to
cultures who lack any kind of
literature.
The software is aimed at
teachers, preachers or anyone
else who would be teaching the
Bible.
"These teachers have heard
the verses read to them, but they
don't have copies. You have no
books to discuss them. All you
have is your memory and any
notes you took," he said. "Now,
do your lectures. It will be very
hard."
But it also has the potential to
work with ballads, folklore and
other written works. Since the
program doesn't read the lan-
guage, but looks for patterns in
it, it can work with any minority
language, Vawter said.
"You'll have history you can
read. You'll have poetry you can
read. You'll have exposition to
read. You can learn by it," he said.


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS


C4 SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013


RELIGION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

has enhanced your life begin-
ning at 7 p.m. Friday at First
United Methodist Church in
Inverness, 3896 S. Pleasant
Grove Road. Refreshments
will be provided. For informa-
tion and talent participation,
call Joe Hupchick at 352-726-
9998 or the church office at
352-726-2522.
Sheila Raye Charles,
daughter of singer Ray
Charles, will perform during a
"Community Worship Event,"
at 11 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 3, at
Wildwood United Methodist
Church, 300 Mason St., Wild-
wood. Singer/songwriter
Sheila Raye Charles will be
on hand to sign her book,
"Behind the Shades," after the
service. Everyone is invited to
attend. Call the church at 352-
748-1275 or Michael Beck at
352-203-7258.
Fun & games
The St. Elizabeth Ann
Seton Parish Men's Associa-
tion is sponsoring its annual
"A Day at the Races" trip to
Tampa Bay Downs for an ex-
citing day of thoroughbred
horse racing on Wednesday.
Cost of $45 per person in-
cludes round-trip bus trans-
portation from the church
parking lot, entry fee and re-
served seating in the club-
house, racing form and a hot
buffet luncheon.
The St. Scholastica
Council of Catholic Women
will sponsor a "Bunco Bash
Event" at 11:30 a.m. Satur-
day, Jan. 26, at the Fr. James
Hoge Parish Center, 4301 W.
Homosassa Trail, Lecanto.
Entrance fee is $12. Free
food and door prizes. All
funds raised will go to such
charities as Daystar Life Cen-
ter, Family Life and Preg-
nancy Center, Hugs for the
Homeless, migrant workers of
Florida, and overseas
missionaries.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church will host a Military
Card Party on Monday,
Feb. 11. Lunch will be served
at 12:15 p.m. followed by card
play at 1 p.m. Enjoy fun,
prizes and a raffle. Cost is
$12 per player. Make up your
table of four or come as a sin-
gle and we will pair you. Call
Dottie at 352-382-3656 or
Marilyn at 352-746-6583 for
reservations by Feb. 7. The
church is at 114 N. Osceola
Ave., Inverness.
The Ladies Auxiliary
Knights of Columbus Council
6168 will host a "Valentine
Bunco Bonanza" at


First United


Methodist


of Inverness

3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor



8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion

9:45 AM
Sunday School

10:00 AM
Contemporary
SPraise & Worship


10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12,
at the K of C Hall, 2389 W.
Norvell Bryant Highway
(County Road 486), Lecanto.
Two levels of play will be fea-
tured, a competitive level for
seasoned players and a so-
cial level for beginners and
persons with disabilities. The
$12 ticket includes a brunch.
Door prizes, raffle prizes and
cash prizes will be awarded.
Reservations must be made
in advance by calling Char at
352-746-9490 or Bernita at
352-344-0235. Funds raised
will benefit the Auxiliary Schol-
arship Fund and charitable or-
ganizations in the community.
Upward Youth Soccer
registration for boys and girls
in kindergarten through sixth
grade will take place from
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday
through Saturday, Feb. 13-16
at Joy Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 7045 S.W. 83rd
Place at State Road 200,
Ocala. Registration fee of $65
per child includes a reversible
jersey, water bottle, socks, car
magnet and an end-of-season
reward. Scholarships are
available. All players must at-
tend one soccer evaluation
that promotes equal and com-
petitive teams, as well as a
substitution system, to com-
plete the registration process.
Practice begins Tuesday,
Feb. 26 and Thursday, Feb.
28. The first game is Satur-
day, March 9. All events will
occur at Hope Field at Joy
Lutheran Church. Volunteers
are needed to help with
coaching, registering the par-
ticipants and organizing the
players. Call Pastor Ed Hol-
loway at 352-854-4509, ext.
223, or Fran Johnson at 352-
854-4509, ext. 221.
Special events
The ladies of Lecanto
Church of Christ meet for
Bible study at 10 a.m. the
second Tuesday monthly.
Bible study is followed by a
luncheon. Studies have in-
cluded such subjects as
prayer, love and patience. All
ladies are invited to attend
and enjoy Christian
fellowship.
All widows in the com-
munity are invited to join the
Widows Ministry Group
from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Wednes-
days at Cornerstone Baptist
Church, 1100 W. Highland
Blvd., Inverness. "God isn't
finished with us yet!" Call
Darla at 352-270-8115.
Citrus County does not
have a League of Women
Voters, and has not had a
chapter for many years. The
league is a nonpartisan or-
ganization encouraging infor-
mation and participation in


Vic ory

in


Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
SndA.i, Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place too, tI 1, , .' .,


government. It was founded
92 years ago and has been
open to men for 40 years. The
league is a grassroots organi-
zations with chapters in all
states. The LWV is strictly
nonpartisan; it does not sup-
port nor oppose candidates. It
takes a stand on issues after
coming to a consensus and
works to increase the public's
understanding of policy is-
sues, through education. The
Nature Coast Unitarian Uni-
versalists have invited Allie
Gore, of the Marion County
League of Women Voters, to
tell us how we might join up
with it, or form a local branch.
Gore is a longtime educator.
She was crucial in reactivat-
ing the Marion County
League and will help us, if Cit-
rus County wishes to do the
same. Gore will show a short
video of the history of the
struggle for equal suffrage.
This will be followed by a
PowerPoint presentation and
discussion of the LWV today.
The event is open to the pub-
lic at 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 26,
at the Unitarian Universalists
Fellowship, 7633 N. Florida
Ave. (U.S. 41), Citrus Springs.
Call 352-465-4225 or visit
naturecoastuu.org.
A new "Coffee Talk for
College and Young Adults"
begins at 6:30 p.m. Monday,
Feb. 4, at Genesis Commu-
nity Church, which meets at
the Builders Association, 1196
S. Lecanto Highway (County
Road 491). Join other young
adults for an informal discus-
sion of the book "Blue Like
Jazz" by Donald Miller. "Blue
Like Jazz" portrays Donald
Miller's quest for meaning, a
depth of faith, the realization
that humanity is broken and
imperfect, explorations of
childhood misconceptions of
faith, and the desire to live
into his true identity. So, grab
a cup of coffee and a dessert
and share your thoughts
about this intriguing book
chapter by chapter. You can
purchase your own book on-
line through Amazon, Barnes
and Noble, etc., and we will
have a few books available
for loan. Genesis Community
Church meets at 10 a.m. Sun-
days and is led by the Rev.
Brian Baggs. Call 352-464-
0983 for more information or
email Kathy Baggs at kathy
baggs@hotmail.com.
Two self-improvement
and spiritual development
opportunities are offered
Sunday, Feb. 10, and Mon-
day, Feb. 11, at Unity of Citrus
County, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto. The first, from
12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Feb. 10, is
a lecture by award-winning
actor and acclaimed author


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033


I PRIMERAIGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM- Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM- Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Telefono: (352) 341-1711


John Maxwell Taylor, titled
"The Power of I Am." This lec-
ture describes techniques to
give strength and confidence
to your personality, permitting
you to reflect the beauty and
strength of your soul. The
techniques presented will en-
able you to connect easily
with others and to hold your
own with everyone you meet.
The second, from 7 to 9 p.m.
Feb. 11, is a workshop led by
John Maxwell Taylor and his
wife, Emily Taylor, titled "Heal-
ing with the Tao." This work-
shop will teach simple,
time-tested Taoist techniques
to heal your internal organs,
boost your immune system,
and fill yourself with vibrant
life energy and happiness.
Call 352-746-1270 for more
information. A love offering of
$20 is suggested.
Fashion show will take
place from 1 to 3 p.m. Satur-
day, Feb. 16, in the Dewain
Farris Fellowship Hall at Com-
munity Congregational Chris-
tian Church, 9220 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs.
The event will feature fash-
ions by Bealls, hair and
makeup by "New Concepts,"
and delightful desserts. Cost
is $7. Call the church at 352-
489-1260.
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady
of Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
604 U.S. 41 S. Proceeds fund
the food pantry. The store ac-
cepts donations of household
items, clothing and small ap-
pliances. Call 352-726-1707.
Worship
First Presbyterian
Church of Crystal River
meets for worship at 10:30
a.m. Sunday. Two adult
Christian education classes
and one children's class begin
at 9 a.m. Tomorrow, the Rev.
Alwood's sermon is "First
Glimpse of Glory." FPC food
pantry is open from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. the second and the
fourth Tuesday monthly. For
new clients: Social Security
cards must be shown to staff.
The church will celebrate its
130th year of serving God in
Citrus County/Crystal River
on Sunday, Feb. 10. The Ash
Wednesday service will be at
6 p.m. Feb. 13 in the sanctu-
ary. For the other Wednes-
days of Lent, come share a
simple meal and studies. Call
the church office at 352-795-
2259. The church is at 1501
S.W. U.S. 19 (Suncoast
Boulevard).
Starting this Sunday at
Gravity Church is the "Live
Like You Were Dying Series"
at 11 a.m. Cafe opens at


Come To MV
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor




"First For Christ"...ohn 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN J
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS
We welcome you and inviteyou
to worship with our family.
Dr. Ray Kelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study
W010la . 11-A03G
344-190


10:30 a.m. The church is at
801 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal
River.
Covenant Love Min-
istry meets in building 11 at
Shamrock Acres Industrial
Park, 6843 N. Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River. There is a
gospel sing at 7 p.m. Friday.
Regular church services are
at 10:30 a.m. Sunday. The
ministry website is Covenant-
Love.com. Call Pastor Brian
Kinker at 352-601-4868.
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church in America invites
the public to attend Great
Vespers at 5 p.m. today and
Divine Liturgy at 10 a.m. Sun-
day. The church is at 1277 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness (off U.S.
41 North, across from Dollar
General). The Holy
Myrrhbearers ask attendees
to bring a box or can of food
for distribution at Family Re-
source Center in Hernando.
The public is also invited to at-
tend Great Vespers at
6:30 p.m. Tuesday in The Vil-
lages at St. George Episcopal
Church, 1250 Paige Place,
Lady Lake. Call 352-
726-4777.
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in
Lecanto will celebrate the
second Sunday after the
Epiphany with Holy Eucharist
services at 5 p.m. today and
8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday. A
nursery is provided during the
10:30 a.m. service. Christian
Formation is at 9:15 a.m.
Godly Play Sunday school is
at 10 a.m. There is a healing
service at 10 a.m. Wednes-
day followed by Bible study.
SOS is from 9 a.m. to noon
Thursday at Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church. Evening
Bible study is at 7 p.m.
Thursday.
"A Wedding Miracle,"
from John 2:1-11, is theme of
Pastor Lane's message at
6 p.m. today and 9:30 a.m.
Sunday at Faith Lutheran
Church in Crystal Glen Sub-
division, off State Road 44
and County Road 490 in
Lecanto (follow the sign in to
the church). The church is
handicapped accessible, with
hearing assistance provided
and a children's cry room
where the parents/grandpar-
ents can see and hear the
service in progress. Following
the Sunday service is a time
of fellowship and at 11 a.m.,
both children's Sunday school
and adult Bible study are
available. The adults are
studying the Book of Revela-
tion, the 21st Chapter. Call
352-527-3325 or visit faith
lecanto.com.
North Oak Baptist
Church in Citrus Springs of-
fers a Saturday night worship


First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study, Gospel
2 -h '.... I in Din ners, singing
the old hymns? Then you'll enjoy
this Church family.
fJ Home of the
"Saturday Nite GOSPEL
JUBILEE" A great Nite Out!
Last Saturday of the month 6:00
Fun,Food,Fellowship & Free!


Our Lady of

Fatima

CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy. 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
SWeekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June -August)
9:00 and 11:00 A.M.
726-1670


RELIGION


F1 46 Years of
SRST Bringinging Christ
FIRS to Inverness

LUTHERAN

CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am

Sunday School
& Bible Class
8:45 A.M.
726-1637
E MMissouri Synod
www. 1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH





SUNDAY
Family Worship
9:00 AM
Coffee Fellowship .: 11 .... ,. . .
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study & Prayer
7:00 PM
We are a nondenominational church
meeting at the Inverness Womans Club
1715 Forest Drive, Inverness
(across rom Whispering Pines Park entrance
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! !

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS


SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013 C5

service at 7 p.m. A "come-as-
you-are" atmosphere com-
bined with timely messages
and contemporary praise and
worship makes this a positive
experience for people of all
ages. Childcare is provided
for birth through 4 years of
age and a children's group for
kids through third grade meet
at the same time. All are in-
vited to attend. The church is
at the intersection of North
Elkcam Boulevard and North
Citrus Springs Boulevard. Call
352-489-1688 or 352-746-
1500 for more information.
First Baptist Church of
Inverness, 550 Pleasant
Grove Road, offers the follow-
ing Sunday activities: SON-
rise Sunday school class at
7:45 a.m., blended worship
service at 9 a.m., "Kid's
Church" for ages 4 through
fourth grade during the 9 a.m.
service, Sunday school
classes for all ages at
10:30 a.m. A nursery is avail-
able for all services except
the 7:45 a.m. class. On Sun-
day evening, Connection
classes are offered and
AWANA begins at 5:15. Mid-
week worship service for
adults is at 6 p.m. Wednes-
days. For the youths, there is
"Ignite," and for children,
"Wednesday Worship Kids."
Call the office at 352-726-
1252 or visit www.fbc
inverness.com.
St. Paul's Lutheran
Church, 6150 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills, con-
ducts regular worship services
at 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday's
services will include music by
Chris Driesbach from New Or-
leans, who will also share his
story when the Spirit brought
him to faith through the Word.
He has written much of his
own music, all on CD. Follow-
ing this service will be a
potluck luncheon followed by
a congregational meeting.
Sunday school for children is
at 9:15 a.m. Bible class begins
at 9:15 a.m. as we study the
book of Revelations. Choir re-
hearsal resumes at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday. Senior fellowship
time from 3 to 5 p.m. Thurs-
day. Bring an appetizer to
share. Call 352-489-3027.
First Presbyterian
Church is at 206 Washington
Ave., Inverness. The Sunday
worship schedule includes
traditional services at 8 and
11 a.m., casual service at
9:30 a.m., Sunday school
hour at 9:30 a.m., and coffee
hour from 9 to 11 a.m. Sun-
day is "Time and Talent Sun-
day." The Rev. Craig S.
Davies will preach on "Driven
to Serve" with readings from
9:30-37. Call the church at
352-637-0770.





C6 SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013


COFFEE
Continued from Page C1

money to help pay for ad-
diction therapy to disaster
relief to clean-water proj-
ects in Africa.
"We don't look like a
church or sound like a
church. But we are," Brian
Peters, pastor and director
of Coffeehouse Five, told
the Daily Journal. "Our
goal is to serve the com-
munity, and our goal is to
build disciples of Christ
through stronger mar-
riages. This is the way
we're doing it."
The church lobby coffee-
house has become a tool to
help further the causes
congregations find impor-
tant. A sense of community
is one of the primary
draws to street-corner
cafes, and churches offer
that already built in.
By building on that at-
mosphere, congregations
can appeal to a new demo-
graphic and bring new
people into the church, all
while aiding their mission
work.
"It's welcoming and
inviting. They can sit down
and talk with their friends,
then have a cup of coffee
and take it into the serv-
ice," said Kathy Stahlhut,
who oversees the cafe. "It
promotes relationships
and getting to know each
other better."
When the leaders at
Greenwood Christian
Church were remodeling
their facility, one of the
priorities was providing a
place where the congrega-
tion could meet before and
after services.
They designed a wide-
open commons area to
solve that issue. Inside,
they created a coffee bar
complete with high-
standing tables, a counter
where people can take ad-
vantage of free wireless In-
ternet and a lounge where
people can meet.
With a fancy new space,
church leaders thought
the cafe could be more
than just a place to serve
coffee and doughnuts after
worship. They envisioned
opening it to the public,
said David Strange, execu-
tive minister at Green-
wood Christian Church.
"Every weekend, there's
a line, and there's always
good traffic during the
week as well," Strange
said. "When we first
started, we wondered how
it would work, but it didn't
take long to catch on."
The cafe is open in the
mornings for three hours,
and before and after wor-
ship services. People can
order anything from hot



JUDI
Continued from Page C1

this reason, many Jews
contribute to their favorite
charities at that time of the
year.
There are many ways
Jews fulfill the mitzvah
(commandment) of
tzedakah. In almost every
Jewish home is a pushke, a
tzedakah box where coins
are tossed traditionally be-
fore the Sabbath, when
carrying money is forbid-
den. I like to keep one in
my laundry room so I can
toss those extra coins that
end up in my washer from
my husband's pants!
People can make outright
donations to synagogues,
Jewish organizations such
as Hadassah, or to Jewish
social service groups. While
Jews do take care of their
own, we also contribute
heavily to the communities
we live in with donations to
Goodwill, food banks, the


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


chocolate to cinnamon
rolls to specialty mochas.
Profits from the cafe go
to the church's evangelism
ministry throughout the
year Greenwood Christian
Church supports church
training in Mexico, med-
ical services in Ghana and
school construction in
Papua New Guinea.
The church has many
fundraising drives to help
pay for those missions.
Much of the profit gener-
ated by the World Harvest
Cafe goes to emergency
services and special
projects.
"If something happens,
like a disaster, or if a proj-
ect comes up that they
didn't expect, that's what
they can use that money
for," Strange said.
Coffeehouse Five has
taken that concept a step
further. Instead of the cafe
being within a church
building, the coffee shop is
the church itself.
Working with the leader-
ship at Community Church
of Greenwood, Peters
started his own ministry,
One Hope Church. Coffee-
house Five is the home
base of One Hope Church.
The sole reason for its ex-
istence is to strengthen the
community through
counseling.
Coffeehouse Five helps
fund the church's work,
which is to provide free
and accessible marriage
counseling. Peters and
others in the church meet
with couples before they
get married, mentor cou-
ples struggling in their
marriage and provide help
for people addicted to
drugs or alcohol.
Peters had been on the
staff as a pastor at Commu-
nity Church of Greenwood
for 10 years before he came
up with the idea to start
Coffeehouse Five. While at
the church, he found him-
self doing an increasing
amount of marriage coun-
seling. He also helped with
more and more people
struggling with drug and al-
cohol addiction.
Part of his struggle was
with the role of the church
in a community
"The local church, in-
stead of existing to meet its
own needs, it should exist
to meet the needs of a
community and to serve,"
Peters said.
The overwhelming chal-
lenge he saw in the John-
son County community
was how to assist children
and help them succeed.
Problems such as abuse,
neglect, poverty and poor
education threatened the
next generation.
Many agencies address
those issues, so Peters
looked for a more unique

Salvation Army, Red Cross
and the like. We also give
our time and volunteer for
the United Way and other
organizations that help in
the community. Be doing
these acts of tzedakah, we
are practicing tikun olam,
repairing the world and
making it a better place to
live.
There are also specific
times when giving charity
is advisable. Instead of
sending flowers, a charita-
ble contribution in mem-
ory of the deceased is
performed. And on the
yarzheit, or anniversary of
the death of the loved one,
a contribution is made.
When one recovers from a
serious illness, a contribu-
tion in gratefulness to God
is made to a worthy cause.
For weddings, bar/bat
mitzvahs, baby namings
and the like, gifts of
tzedakah are always ac-
ceptable.
According to the great
sage Maimonides, there
are eight levels of charity


solution. He focused on
the increasing number of
divorces as a root cause of
all of the issues facing
kids. Research has shown
children with divorced
parents are more likely to
live in poverty and to suf-
fer abuse. At the same
time, they are less likely to
go to college.
"With the work I was al-
ready doing with marriage
counseling, we said that
we wanted to strengthen
the community We thought
we could do that by ad-
dressing needs of children
by targeting divorce," Pe-
ters said.
They also wanted to cre-
ate an environment that
was welcoming for coun-
seling. Too often, the
places where marriage
therapy or drug and alco-
hol counseling is done is
either too sterile or undig-
nified. That turns people
off, Peters said.
"We want people to feel
good, to relax, to be com-
fortable. Then we want to
provide them with help,"
Peters said.
Peters and his family
are deeply rooted in the
culture of the coffee shop
- the earthy smells of the
beans, the warmth of com-
munity that meets in the
same place daily, the
friendliness of the barista
who knows your name and
order.
His daughter had
worked in the coffee busi-
ness, so she helped put to-
gether equipment
purchasing and training.
The coffeehouse is in
the Gathering Place, Com-
munity Church of Green-
wood's recreation center.
Worship services for those
being counseled are con-
ducted Sundays in the cof-
fee shop. The coffee shop
conducted a music series
during the summer and is
open to more events in the
future.
So far, the response has
been positive since Coffee-
house Five opened almost
two years ago. But people
have been slow to grasp
the idea of a coffee shop
church.
"It's such a different
concept. People wrestle
with the fact that we don't
look like a church," Peters
said. "And it's hard when
people can go through
drive-thru at Starbucks."
The goal in the near fu-
ture is to move to a more
accessible location, possi-
bly in a storefront or shop-
ping center in Greenwood.
"Our goal is to be a free-
service, free-standing cof-
fee shop," Peters said.
"People get the idea. They
think it's a good concept,
but it's taken a while for
them to grasp it."

Starting with the lowest
level, they are:
Giving begrudgingly
Giving less that you
should, but giving it cheer-
fully
Giving after being
asked.
Giving before being
asked.
Giving when you do
not know the recipient's
identity, but the recipient
knows your identity
Giving when you the
know the recipient's iden-
tity, but the recipient does-
n't know your identity.
Giving when neither
party knows the other's
identity
Enabling the recipient
to become self-reliant.
Keeping these princi-
ples in mind, many Jews
have organized their
wealth into foundations in
order to better serve their
communities. One local
Lecanto couple, Bob and


Anglican Spiritual Tradition


Special to the Chronicle
Father Kevin Holsapple, at St. Anne's Church on Fort Island Trail, prepares for his up-
coming series on "Anglican Spiritual Tradition," which begins at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Jan.
22, in the parish library, and continues for eight weeks on Tuesday evenings. Atten-
dees need not be present for every session, but it would be more beneficial to attend
all the sessions. Call the church office at 352-795-2176.


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

Greatly Used by God. I
imagined myself ripping
out drywall and putting
up sheetrock and comfort-
ing Joe with "psalms and
spiritual songs," as the
Bible says.
However, by the time I
got to his house that day, a
crew had already been
there and finished all the
stuff I had wanted to do.
Desperate to help, I
looked around Joe's
house, but all I could find
was a pile of wet postage
stamps on the desk and
Joe sitting nearby not say-
ing much of anything.
So, I stood next to Joe
making feeble chit-chat,
peeling sheets of wet
stamps apart. As I set
them out to dry, I babbled
on and on about how he
could reuse them with a
bit of glue, blah, blah,
blah.
Joe continued not say-
ing much, and mostly just
nodded. When I finished
my stamp peeling, I left
feeling like a failure.
I was also a little ticked
at God, because I had
wanted to be helpful and
useful, which, if you know
me, isn't my usual M.O.
Since wanting to help
comes so infrequently to
me, I had hoped it would
be something big and
showy, but all I ended up
doing was playing around
with wet postage stamps.
How ordinary How
average.
Except it turned out


Carol Spector, have
formed the Bob and Carol
Spector Foundation for
Animal Welfare and Ju-
daic Studies. This philan-
thropic couple has
combined their two pas-
sions, humane treatment
of dogs and their rescue
from harm and their love
of Judaism and pursuit of
Jewish knowledge into
their foundation's pur-
pose. Through their ef-
forts, dog shelters and
Jewish groups in the area
have benefited from their
generosity
Another foundation is
the Florence and
Lawrence Spungen Foun-
dation, which focuses on
the northern suburbs of
their local communities of
Chicago, Ill., and Santa
Barbara, Calif. This foun-
dation is concerned with
cancer research and Jew-
ish educational causes. A
hallmark of this organiza-


not to be ordinary to Joe.
Weeks later I found out he
had told EVERYBODY
how much I had helped
him that day That he had
been almost in despair,
but his turning point
came when I stopped to
talk to him and peel his
wet stamps.
I still think about that a
lot, about how what I tend
to think is useful and
helpful is usually not what
God thinks is useful. I
think usefulness is being
grand and inspiring,
preferably with an
audience.
But that's not how God
works.
In the Sermon on the
Mount, Jesus told his fol-
lowers, "When you give to
the needy, do not an-
nounce it with trumpets,
as the hypocrites do in the
synagogues and on the
streets, to be honored by
others. Truly I tell you,
they have received their
reward in full. But when
you give to the needy, do
not let your left hand
know what your right
hand is doing, so that your
giving may be in secret.
Then your Father, who
sees what is done in se-
cret, will reward you"
(Matthew 6:2-4).
God uses ordinary and
common and deeds done
unaware to do the ex-
traordinary A little boy's
lunch of bread and a cou-
ple fishes, in the hands of
Jesus once fed
thousands.
A smile, a kind word or
gesture, if God chooses to
use it, a simple, ordinary
gesture has the power to


tion is it provides grand-
children with the opportu-
nity to give tzedakah to a
charity of their choice.
This is a wonderful way to
promote the Jewish value
of tzedakah to ensuing
generations.
As part of its aim to pro-
mote Jewish educational
causes, the Florence and
Lawrence Spungen Foun-
dation is sponsoring a spe-
cial exhibit on the
Holocaust, which will be
coming to On Top of the
World Cultural Center in
Ocala from 11 a.m. to 4:30
p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12. The
exhibit will feature letters,
postcards and memora-
bilia not ordinarily seen in
museums due to their rar-


change the course of a
person's life.
People's lives are
rocked by storms all the
time, and people want to
help. But as I've observed,
when it comes to how God
works, often the greatest
help isn't always from the
biggest, grandest gestures.
That's because some-
times people want to help
in order to help their own
image. If I'm honest, I
wanted to help Joe by rip-
ping out soggy drywall and
speaking awesome words
of wisdom because it would
feel good and I would look
awesome doing it
I'm exactly who Jesus
had in mind when he
talked about people trum-
peting their good deeds in
public.
Instead, God seems to
prefer using people most
when they're least aware
of it. When they're just
doing ordinary stuff like
peeling wet stamps, offer-
ing a listening ear, sharing
a lunch.
These small gestures,
these simple, seemingly
inconsequential acts of
mercy and kindness, if
God is in them, if he has
ordained them, they are
great and glorious.


Nancy Kennedy is the au-
thor of "Move Over, Victo-
ria I Know the Real
Secret," "Girl on a
Swing," and her latest
book, "Lipstick Grace."
She can be reached at
352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday or via
emailatnkennedy
@chronicleonline. com.


ity The exhibit is free and
open to the public, so all
can come and learn about
the Holocaust before many
of its survivors have faded
into history. This is a not-
to-be-missed event and an
outstanding example of
tzedakah.
In these difficult
ecomonic times, may we
all take note of the Jewish
expression of tzedakah
and may we all do our part
in helping those in need.


Judi Siegal is a retired
teacher and Jewish edu-
cator She lives in Ocala
with her husband, Phil.
She can be reached at
niejudis@yahoo. com.


Sustaining Partner: Brought to you by the Cityof Crystal River
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Spirituality & Eternal Life
Explore the Connection, Experience the Freedom

Discover:
SHow claiming one's identity as God's offspring
brings countless freedoms.
"Eternal Life:
Could it be that God didn't intend you to age?"
A Sunday,January 27, 2013 at 2 PM
First Church of Christ, Scientist
224 North Osceola Avenue
Inverness, Florida
Practitioner and teacher of Christian Science
Healing, Mark Swinney, has devoted more than
twenty five years both to praying with people and
empowering people to pray effectively for
themselves. He has traveled much of the world
speaking about his heartfelt love for God and
Christian healing, and is known for his honesty,
humor, and candid style. Swinney is a member
of the Christian Science Board of Lectureship
and travels from his home in Sandia Park, New
Mexico, USA.
This talk is sponsored by First Church of Christ, Scientist
For more information please call: 352-726-4033


ST. TIMOTHY LUTHERAN HUT' : H
TP-'' 1.TN-TS...









The Larry Stephensn Blueass Band

Friday, January 25, 2113
Doors Open 6:00 p.m.
-I-7.v.. 7 p.m. 9:00 p.m.

Timothy Lutheran I !..! I.
1070 North ...... I Blvd., Crystal River

Tickets and general info. i : -' 795-5325
Admission $10 donation at the door.

For more info visit www.arrystephensonband.com
soDQO & www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com


RELIGION








Page C7 SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nes NOTES Trail-blazing sneaker News NOTES


Rose enthusiasts -- -- -- -


gather Sunday
The Marion County Rose
Society will meet at 2:30
p.m. Sunday, Jan. 20, at
the Marion County Ag Cen-
ter Auditorium, 2232 N.E.
Jacksonville Road (County
Road 200A), Ocala.
Meetings are open to all
who want to have fun
learning about and sharing
their love of roses.
Visit www.marioncounty
roses.org or call 352-341-
0564.
Lions plan
'Tribute to Elvis'
The Beverly Hills Lions
Club will sponsor the return
of Marcus Held, appearing
in a "Tribute to Elvis," who
will offer a nostalgic musi-
cal trip by singing the
songs of Elvis.
The tribute will be from
2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Jan.
20, at the Beverly Hills
Lions Club, 72 Civic Circle.
Tickets are $6 and may be
purchased from any Lion
member or at the door. As-
sorted desserts with coffee
and tea will be served. For
more information, call
Donna at 352-527-1960 or
Shirley at 352-527-1943.
Retired nurses
to meet Jan. 28
The Citrus Marion Chap-
ter of the Florida Regis-
tered Nurses Retired
(RNR) will meet Monday,
Jan. 28, at the Inverness
Golf & Country Club.
Sign-in for the meeting
starts at 11 am. The
speaker will be from the
Citrus Memorial Heart &
Vascular Center who will
speak on vascular disease.
the charity will be Guardian
Ad Litem.
Retired nurses wishing
to attend should call Mary
Jane at 352-726-6882 or
Gladys at 352-854-2677 by
Wednesday, Jan. 23.
Eagles welcome
all to jam session
The Citrus Eagles 3992
welcomes the public to
come to jam sessions from
6 to 9 p.m. Sunday with
B.J. Bear and Co.
The Eagles lodge is at
8733 Gulf-to-Lake Highway
in Inverness (State Road
44 east).

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA

Kenya


Famous female aviator to


Special to the Chronicle

The upcoming third annual
awards banquet of the Civil Air Pa-
trol West Citrus Squadron will be at
7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 7, at the Crystal
River Church of God, to honor the
cadets and senior members of the
West Citrus Squadron of the CAP as
well as its Citrus County special
guests.
A lifetime member of CAP Mary
Feik, will be keynote speaker. Her
history as a pioneer aviator began at
age 7 in her hometown in upstate
New York during the Great Depres-
sion, with a ride in a Curtiss JN-4 bi-
plane. At age 11, she began helping
her father rebuild car engines, which
led to aircraft maintenance in later
teen years.
After graduating from high school,
she was told that she would not be al-
lowed to enroll in a college-level en-
gineering program because she was
a woman. Undeterred, at age 18, she
was already teaching Army Air Force
aircraft maintenance personnel,
crew chiefs and mechanics. Feik
went on to author numerous pilot
training manuals and technical engi-
neering reports that have been used
throughout the U.S. Armed Forces.
Logging more than 6,000 hours in a
wide variety of civilian and military
aircraft including the P-51 Mustang,


speak at


Special to
Mary Feik, pioneer aviator, w
to the Civil Air Patrol Wes
Squadron at its annual
banquet.
the A-26 Invader, the B-24 L
the C-121 Constellation, and
Shooting Star, Feik has bee:
by Women in Aviation Inter
as one of the "100 most in
women in the aviation ai
space industries over the
years."


CivilAir Patrol banquet

In 1994, she was inducted into the
Women in Aviation Pioneer Hall of
Fame. In 1996, she was the first
woman presented the Charles Taylor
SMaster Mechanic Award by the FAA
Sin appreciation of her technical abil-
ity and dedication to the cause of air
safety She is retired from the Na-
tional Air and Space Museum's Paul
E. Garber Restoration Facility,
where she has restored and taught
the restoration of antique and classic
aircraft
In 2003, CAP named an achieve-
ment award in her honor; the Feik
ribbon denotes promotion to the
rank of cadet senior airman and re-
quires cadets to pass leadership and
aerospace exams, participate in a
character development forum, meet
physical fitness requirements, dis-
play positive attitude, demonstrate
the Chronicle good communication skills and have
Nill speak a sense of responsibility and aware-
st Citrus ness of the CAP core values of in-
awards tegrity, excellence, volunteer service
and respect
The CivilAir Patrol (CAP) is a com-
iberator, munity-based organization and the
ltheP-80 official auxiliary of the U.S. Air
n named Force. Nationwide, CAP performs
national search and rescue missions, home-
fluential land security and disaster relief serv-
nd aero- ices, and provides aerospace
past 100 education and mentorship forAmer-
ica's youths ages 12 to 18.


Audubon outing to St. Marks


Special to the Chronicle
Birders on the Dixie Mainline Trail are, from left: Bob Collier, Franklin Grebenc, Jean Freidner, Mavis Grebenc, Mike
Smith, Effie Smith, Fred Hileman, Thomas Gulley and Lily Collier.


Citrus County birders tally 125 species on trip


Special to the Chronicle
Kenya is a sweet, gentle
and playful long-haired
gray and white kitty girl
who is looking for her
own home. Who could
say "no" to this face? If
you are looking for a
more mature feline, all
our adult cat adoption
fees are half price at
$27.50. We also have
many more cats and kit-
tens that need homes.
Visitors are welcome
from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
and 2 to 4 p.m. Monday
through Saturday at the
Humanitarians' Man-
chester House on the
corner of State Road 44
and Conant Avenue, east
of Crystal River. Drop by
and enjoy our felines in
their cage-free, home-
style environment. Call
the Humanitarians at
352-613-1629 for adop-
tions, or view most of the
Hardin Haven's felines
online at www.petfinder.
com/shelters/fl186.html.

* Submit information at
event.


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County Audubon
took a birding outing to St.
Marks in the upper Pan-
handle for a two-night stay
recently
The first day became a
half day into the St. Marks
Preserve. Day two before
dawn found bird enthusi-
asts on Bottoms Road
watching the sun rise. It is
always a beautiful sight to
see that orange orb come


up over the horizon.
The morning then
turned into an eerily mist-
iness that did not lend it-
self to great photography,
but did not deter the birds
from flying about. They
have to eat whether it is a
sunny day or a dull one.
The mist had lifted by the
afternoon and birds be-
came more evident just
from the nature of the
light. That afternoon
found the group back into


St. Marks Preserve and
gave them some great
photo opportunities.
All left the next morning
for Cedar Key, taking a de-
tour through Lower
Suwannee National
Wildlife Refuge Dixie
Mainline Trail. The trail is
a narrow limerock road,
but is a great place to view
some of the most pristine
land in Florida. The trail
is about 9 miles and is
worth the trek for just the


to Panhandle

beauty of it.
After its arrival in Cedar
Key, the group was re-
warded with the group
seeing the red-breasted
nuthatch. The bird is a
rare visitor to Florida, but
a great number has per-
meated the state since fall.
Final tally for the trip was
a whopping 125 species.
All events are open to
the public. Visit citrus
countyaudubon.com for
more information.


Legion post to host benefit poker run


Special to the Chronicle

American Legion Post 237,4077 N.
Lecanto Highway, will host a benefit
poker run Saturday, Jan. 26, with
proceeds going to support American
Cancer Society Moffitt Cancer Cen-
ter Ovarian Cancer Research and
patients and families served by Hos-
pice of Citrus County
A $10 entry fee per rider will in-


least two weeks before the


* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


clude a poker hand and a meal at
the end of the run. Registration be-
gins at 10 a.m. at American Legion
Post 237 in Beverly Hills. Last bike
in will be 4:30 p.m., when food will
be served.
The poker run will encompass six
stops to include the Inglis Amvests
Post 447, IRRU Social Club, VFW
Post 10087 Beverly Hills, Fraternal
Order of Eagles No. 4272, Stixx Bil-


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


liards, The Oar House and Ameri-
can Legion Post 237.
The best hand will win the poker
run and all vehicles are welcome to
participate. Music will be provided
and donated by George Marshall.
There will be door prizes, a 50/50
drawing and fun.
For more information, call 352-
746-5018 or John Roby at 352-
341-5856.


I


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.


New council sets
social meeting
The new Knights of
Columbus Council No.
15624 Pope John Paul II
will have a social meeting
at 5:30 p.m. Monday, Jan.
28, at St. Elizabeth Ann
Seton Catholic Church in
Citrus Springs.
This will be the group's
first covered-dish social.
Everyone is welcome. Bring
a covered dish large
enough to feed six people,
according to your last
name: Initials A-E bring sal-
ads, F-K bring a vegetable
dish, L-Q bring a main dish
and R-Z brings dessert.
For more information,
email capdreese2
@yahoo.com, or call 352-
533-3049.
Come fete poet
Robert Burns
Robert Burns Birthday
Dinner Celebration will take
place at 2 p.m. Sunday,
Jan. 27, at the Brooksville
Elks Lodge No. 2582,
14494 Cortez Blvd., west of
the Suncoast Parkway.
On the menu will be pot
roast, potatoes, green
beans, haggis, cake, cof-
fee, tea and soda. The cer-
emony begins with piping
by Cathy Garlock and the
entrance of the haggis, fol-
lowed by the traditional ad-
dress to the haggis
delivered by Mike Frazer.
There will be Scottish
Highland dances performed
by the students at the
Diane Dubock School of
Scottish Highland Dance. A
Salute to the Lassies byAl
Emery, a Salute to the Lad-
dies by Alice Craig will be
offered. The history of Scot-
land's Beloved Poet Robert
Burns will be presented by
Al Emery. A Scottish bless-
ing and poems read.
Tickets are $20. Call
Alice at 352-688-4766,
Cathy at 352-686-0975,
Mike at 352-341-1551 or
Joan at 352-527-2439 for
your tickets. Kilts and plaid
will be worn.
Vietnam vets
to gather Jan. 22
The Vietnam Veterans
Gathering Inc. will meet at
10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Jan.
22, at the Village Inn in
Beverly Hills.
The group will discuss
current fundraising projects.
All veterans who would like
to participate with the or-
ganization are welcome.
The mission of WG is to
assist veterans and to keep
alive the memory of fallen
comrades, both in South-
east Asia and other the-
aters of operation.
For more information,
call Tom Neaman at 352-
586-7126.

Hitting hardwood
for heart health
Citrus High School's Red
Out Basketball Game bene-
fitting the American Heart
Association is slated for 7
p.m. Friday, Jan. 25, at the
Citrus High School
Gymnasium.
Citrus High School and
West Port High School var-
sity boys' basketball teams
will match up in red to bring
awareness to heart dis-
ease, the No. 1 killer of
Americans. During the
game loved ones will be
honored and remembered.
Teams, students and
community members are
asked to purchase and
wear an American Heart
Association "Rock the Beat"
shirt to school and to the
game in honor of loved
ones. The T-shirts are
being sold at CHS for $10.
All proceeds will benefit
the American Heart
Association.
For more information,
email Greg Naruta at
narutag@citrus.kl2.fl.us, or
call 352-726-2241.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATUR DAY EVENING JANUARY 19, 2013 C: Conmast, Citrus B: Bright House DO: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 I9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
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24 38 24 31 Suspense) Moira Kelly David Cubitt.'NR' D Docudrama) Hob Lowe. Premiere. NR' c Prosecuting Movie'14'
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West
SJ 9 8 4
S 63
* J 10 9 8
SK J 6


South
1 V
4 NT
5 NT
6


North
SK 5 3 2
SA J 7 4
+ A4
* 5 3 2


01-19-13


East
& Q 10 7
V2
SQ 6 5 3 2
10 9 8 7
South
4 A6
V K Q 10 9 8 5
+ K7
* AQ4


Dealer: South
Vulnerable: North-
West North
Pass 2 NT
Pass 5 V
Pass 6*
Pass Pass


South
East
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass


Opening lead: + J

Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Carl Jung said, "Your vision will become clear
only when you can look into your own heart.
Who looks outside, dreams; who looks inside,
awakes."
At the bridge table, though, the opposite ap-
plies. If you worry only about your 13 cards, your
partner will be dreaming of getting a new "third
opponent"
This deal requires vision. How should South
play in six hearts after West leads the diamond
jack?
North's Jacoby two-no-trump response
showed four-plus hearts and game-forcing val-
ues.
South starts with 11 top tricks: two spades, six
hearts, two diamonds and one club. Probably his
immediate reaction is to hope that the club fi-
nesse is working. Then he might think about
eliminating diamonds and spades before trying
to duck a club to West for an endplay
However, declarer can do better. He should
win the first trick with his diamond king, draw
two rounds of trumps, play three rounds of
spades (ruffing the last in his hand), return to
dummy with a diamond, and call for the last
spade.
Here, when East discards, South throws a
club. West takes the trick but is endplayed. If he
leads a club, it is into declarer's ace-queen. Or if
he does something else, South ruffs in the
dummy and sluffs his club queen.
If, though, East follows to the fourth spade, de-
clarer ruffs, crosses to dummy with a trump, and
ducks a club, hoping West will win the trick. But
if East takes it and leads another club, South is
forced to take the finesse.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
LITUG

.1-T..I ri- I Services, Incg

CREMY



HINELA



FANNIT


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
You are telling All of them!
me that you plan It will be the
to include every greatest


i:I '
I7
-l
wc r. in. V-i







TO NOAH WEBSTER,
CREATING A DICTIONARY
WAS ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A: m 1 -
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: STASH RODEO INDICT ITALIC
Answer: Choosing to take the shortcut through the
poison ivy was A RASH DECISION


ACROSS
1 Knock -
loop
5 Wielded an ax
10 Black belt
sport
12 Goofball
13 Funds for
research
14 Pine products
15 Sing loudly
16 Kiddie's ammo
18 kwon do
19 Crushed
grapes
23 BTU kin
26 Rough shelter
27 Horrid tasting
30 Cover stories
32 Quartet
members
34 Mountains
and trees
35 Muse of
astronomy
36 Jiffies
37 Social insect
38 Travel
stopover


1-19


Mustiest
Sparkle
Ziegfeld
nickname
Woodwind
Mark of shame
Like junk
mail, usually
Nanny from
abroad
(2 wds.)
BLT need
Connection
(hyph.)
Webbing

DOWN
Cab tab
By mouth
Declaims
violently
LL.D. holder
Half a bray
Ice, to Fritz
Court order
Ms. Ferber
Prescribed
amount


Answer to Previous Puzzle


YODEL WO VEN
UNUSED SONATA
LOOTER AMULET
ARI LAS
OED INCAN DCC|
MME E KED HULA
EMBASSY PECAN
LEANT LEOPARD
EE T ROAD T EL
TSE HI ENR I STE
MUD WAG
ABSUU RD ITAL IC
TOASTY GREASE
MASKS Y AH OO


Frequent
007 foe
Adopt
Enfold
Rescue squad
mem.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Parched
feeling
Turns inside
out
Ms. Merrill
Paint
container
Sorrowful cry
Diet
Burt's ex
Poet's Ireland
Tampa Bay
gridders
Ignore
(2 wds.)
- Andreas
Fault
More than
most
Remote
Smooth
singer Mel -
Exam for jrs.
Needle case
Plumbing unit
Arthur and
Lillie
Solemn
promise
Old name for
Tokyo
Moo goo
- pan
Opposite of
max
- de plume


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


Dear Annie: I am 19
years old and afraid
that my brother is gay
'James" recently made a
new friend at work who is gay
He has been going
to the library with
this new friend and
spending the en-
tire day there
doing homework.
James doesn't own
a phone, so it is
hard for my mother
to get ahold of him.
Sometimes he
leaves for work at 6
p.m. and doesn't
come home until 9
the following ANN
morning, making MAIL
excuses that he
was at work. My
mother knows he's lying, be-
cause she calls his job and
they often say he isn't there.
His friend has left messages
on our home answering ma-
chine that make us all ques-
tion their relationship.
A few days ago, my mom
called me crying hysterically
because James hadn't re-
turned all night after an argu-
ment in which she asked if he
was gay He screamed at her to
never ask that question again
and said that he is not gay
I try to be open-minded to-
ward everyone and don't ob-
ject if James is gay But my
mother was not brought up
this way In her culture, being
gay is absolutely unaccept-
able. If James "came out" my
mother would throw him out
of the house and disown him.
It would ruin our family name.
She even once said she would
have to move away from our
hometown.
My brother has always had
trouble making friends, and I


II
.I


feel this latest friend is some-
one who just happens to ac-
cept him for who he is. I don't
believe James is interested in
men. But I am worried for his
sake. What do I do?
Unsure
SDear Unsure:
Please don't pres-
sure your brother
Having a gay friend
will not change his
sexual orientation,
and finding some-
one who "accepts
him for who he is" is
not to be brushed
aside lightly James
needs to navigate
IE'S this in his own way
BOX You can mention
that he seems
stressed and let him
know that if he needs to talk,
you are available. You also can
give him the website for
PFLAG (pflag.org) just in case
he should find it useful.
Dear Annie: You recently
printed a letter from a socia-
ble man in his mid-50s who is
having difficulty making new
friends. My husband and I are
in a similar predicament now
that the kids are out of the
house.
Your suggestion to find ac-
tivities is a good start, but the
reality is that people form true
friendships over shared com-
mon experiences. Volunteer
activity, work, team sports (like
bowling or a walking group)
and religious groups provide
the most opportunity for form-
ing friendships over an ex-
tended period of time.
But I wish you would have
specifically addressed our age
group. Perhaps the "sandwich
generation" burdens are part
of the problem, but we don't
see significant numbers of


people our age anywhere ex-
cept restaurants and church.
Please provide more guidance
regarding friendships for peo-
ple over 40. Prime of Life
Dear Prime: You have al-
ready noted that activities
where you see the same peo-
ple repeatedly provide the
best opportunities to create
friendships, and once you are
out of school, your age doesn't
really matter. Besides bowling
leagues and volunteer work,
we also recommend book
clubs, gourmet clubs, choirs,
community theater and civic
organizations. Determine
what your interests are, and
then look for local groups or
check meetup.com.
Dear Annie: May I weigh in
on baby showers for second
and third babies?
When she was pregnant
with her second child, my
lovely daughter-in-law was
given a "sprinkle." Her friends
brought frozen dinners,
cooked and labeled. All she
had to do was defrost and
heat.
What a blessing for a new
mom, especially one with
other small children. The
meals lasted for weeks. -
MultiGrandma


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcastnet, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 7373rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox visit the
Creators Syndicate Web page
at www creators.com.


C8 SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts

C MY POOR OL'
PITCHER'S MOUND
IS COVERED
LUITH SNOW..
(^ --


Pickles


STANDING HERE, A FLOOD
OF MEMORIES COMES
POURING OVER ME...SCENE
AFTER SCENEE FLASHES
THRO16H Mq MIND... ALL
THE 6AME5 WE'VE PLAYED...








\ UWAE RL~SE SALL
OVER, AA 91 CAN'T
EVEiK REMEMBER
WHAT I 5UMFQ INTO,


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I CAN REMEMBER EVER'
6AME... EVERY INNING...
EVERY PITCH... EVERY
STOLEN BA5E.,.EVER'
CATCH ...EVERY HIT.....


I CAN EVEN REMEMBER
THE DAY N WE SCORED
OUR RUN...



'^?%~


Sally Forth


Beetle Bailey


Dilbert


The Grizzwells


JolF-r i A SS HE SO! IT tMUS B5FTUO I &U-5 5o, I 1 tOW I U;LKE
RL tWWR&E.S M-MZNCE A R -I YOUR M) ROTAE7 OAK.E A
K IE.ALL( ?OE5?AAKEdT^\& W-^ IVH E!'5 NOT AfR.OUNt?
REAR& GROwt ONtCz.! ____


Blondie
WELCOME TO SHOPTALK! OUR NEXT

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Doonesbury

50 YOU PO STILL-
FANTASIZ ABOUT
BREAKING A BIC
STORY? SOM-
TIMES.








Big Nate

JENNY,
M'LADY WHAT
WHAT' / DO
r'Ew YOU
CARE '







Arlo and Janis -


JUST WONDERING
HOW EVERYTHING
GOING BETWEEN YOU
AND ARTUR,THATS
ALL --


SSNIIFF'


WAANH!

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Betty


Frank & Ernest


Today's MOVIES

limes provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Mama" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
10:25 p.m.
"Broken City" (R) ID required. 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"The Last Stand" (R) ID required. 12:40 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Gangster Squad" (R) ID required. 12:20 p.m.,
3:50 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Les Miserables" (PG-13) 12 p.m., 3:30 p.m.,
7 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Zero Dark Thirty" (R) ID required. 12:10 p.m.,
3:40 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 10 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Mama" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 8 p.m.,
10:30 p.m.
"Broken City" (R) ID required. 12:50 p.m.,
3:55 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:30 p.m.


"The Last Stand" (R) ID required. 12:35 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10 p.m.
"A Haunted House" (R) ID required. 12:45 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Gangster Squad" (R) ID required. 1 p.m.,
4:25 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Les Miserables" (PG-13) 12:10 p.m., 3:40 p.m.,
7 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Django Unchained" (R) ID required. 12 p.m.,
3:30 p.m., 6:55 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Zero Dark Thirty" (R) ID required. 12:20 p.m.,
3:45 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Lincoln" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
10:25 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie list-
ings and entertainment information.


WJUF-FM90.1 National Public LocalRADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: s slenbe r


"O'G BKE ENR AOBS KU YVEKT ENYE


FKPHS ABKF FNYE


GX VNYTYVERT NYS


UKT JTRYAUYIE HYIE EPRISYX." -


HOYG BRRIKB

Previous Solution: "Every great work of art has two faces, one toward its own
time and one toward the future, toward eternity." Lester Bangs
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-19


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


IT's i0ST yooR
MoTHIER TFP-
DRNCING ON-TRE
1 ,,LCOFF-EE



gT~cj


The Born Loser


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


COMICS


SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013 C9









ClO SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013


CLASSIFIED


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds

In Print

and

Online

All

The Time


ANDY
Would love to see you
again, at Walgreen's
Sunday At 2pm (with
Your "Less" Gray Hair)
JEANNE (Halls R. R.)
Elderly Gentleman,
Looking for lady,
for
vacation time
(352) 382-5661
I'm a frustrated active
widower looking for an
attractive, personable
Christian lady with
good chemistry, me-
dium to small build be-
tween 70-80 for good
companionship maybe
something more down
the line. If you are in
good health, good spir-
its & ready for a new
relationship I am ready
to meet with you. Give
me a welcome call at
352-527-9632 I will
glady give you a call
back.



5 Men's Bicycles
$15. ea.
(352) 746-7357
357 Mag. 6 Shot
Rev. German made adj
rear site exc cond. $350
Springfield model 53B
single shot 22 rifle $120
(352) 344-5853
BEVERLY HILLS
Fri. 25th & Sat. 26th
89 S. Tyler Street
BEVERLY HILLS
SAT 8a ?
Jewelry, tools, power
washer, computer desk,
Weber grills.
821 & 822 Colbert Ct.

MO VIt4
SALE

CITRUS HILLS
Sat. 1/19, 8a-2p
Furniture, stereo eq,
tools, hshold items,
1940 W Pearson ST

CITRUS
SPRINGS
Saturday Only,
8am-?
MANY $1 ITEMS
2288 W. Nautilus Dr





m


11111111
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111













source is...








www chronicleonline corn


COLEMAN TENT
/CAMPER. '95, A/C,
stove, sink, sleeps 6+,
good canvas and
upholstery $1200
(352) 628-0173
FOR SALE
Mini -14 223 scoped
stainless $1000.
10-22 Scoped wood
blue $500.
352-422-2004
For sale
SKS 1956 Sino Soviet
all original $500
352-422-2004
FORD
2010 F150 Platinum
Supercrew, 4x4, 31700
miles, black, leather,
navigation, rear view
camera, tow package,
excellent condition,
warranty, $12400,
dema@netscape.com
Free
Pond Plants
(352) 270-1524
GAS SAVER!
1999 Saturn SL $2000
Tan/Gold. Auto. Engine
and Trans are solid.
196,000 miles. Clean in-
side and out. Call Steve:
352-613-0746
HERNANDO
Forest Ridge Village
Nice 2/2 home *
w/garage, screened
patio, & pool/clubhouse
privileges. $750 mo
Call 980-285-8125
HOMOSASSA
Sat 8a -2pm
Multi Family
5012 S. Austin Pt.
INVERNESS
Saturday 19, 8a-lp
244 Satellite Ave.
JEEP
Grand Cherokee ltd.
White, 70k mi. Mint
cond. Auto.$11,000
(305) 619-0282
NORTH CITRUS
1.4 ac. Cleared, fenced,
high & dry. Paved road.
Elec., pump/well, septic.
Owner finan. No
mobiles. $13,900
CALL 352-897-4195
PT Certified
Dental Assistant

Call 352-746-0330,
ask for Vicki.
RATS FOR SALE
50 cents to $3.00
All Sizes
(352) 419-9080
Leave Message
REMINGTON Model 11
12 gauge semi-auto,
peep site, poly choke
$230. Smith & Wesson
model 15, 22 revolver,
adj. rear site, $250
(352) 344-5853
Sugarmill Woods
House for Sale
2/2/2, Call for More
Info. 334-691-4601
(850) 776-7528



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk
or Unwanted
Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
C Running or Not -
CASH PAID $200 &
UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Washers,Dryers,Riding
Mowers, Scrap
Metals, Antena
towers 270-4087



Free Firewood
Cut and Haul
(352) 249-7212
FREE SYCAMORE
CUT AND ON
GROUND. LOADING
AND HAULING MAY
BE AVAILABLE. CALL
FOR DETAILS.
(352) 613-8111


Sudoku ******


Fx(rn5-5-1-ll F l:( 2 ia s JIJIJJJIIJJbsit w^hrncenln^o


Chronicl Toas Free ffers Annuncmen Medica Trades
Connecton Now ds--]!. 11^^^^^^^^ _S11^^^^^^^ 11^^^^^^^^ S^^^kills I


Free HP 8500
printer/scanner/fax
(352) 503-3154
Free to Good Home
2 Males Basset
Hound/Lab Mix,
1 six yrs. old.
2yrs old
Both good with Kids
(352) 419-6200


Black Labrador
Retriever, about 1% yrs
old, answers to "Buddy",
lost in vicinity of W.
Dunnellon Rd.
(352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662
Lost
2 Rescued Persian
Cats
I has health issues
Leisure Acres in
Lecanto
(352) 628-1347
LOST CAT BLACK
6mo old, has chip
named Ebby. Crystal
River, Van Norwick
Area(352) 795-0363
LOST DOG 8LB BLIND
DOG, 718 S Marlene Pt
Inverness, needs
meds. Call
(352) 637-2645
LOST Female 1V yr
Calico, declawed &
spade. Named Minnie;
lost in Pine Ridge area.
Please (352) 697-1685
LOST -female mix red
nose pitt bull, lyr old
w/greens eyes. Pink
camo collar, named,
Paisley tan & white.
Last seen on Pineridge
blvd (352) 601-1899
LOST Grey Long Hair
Maine coon cat 20lbs
very friendly.
Homosassa area
Oldfield & Meadow.
Reward (727) 4224433
LOST Male
Wedding Gold Band in
Sweetbay Supermarket
Inverness. Please call
(352) 637-2273
REWARD
Lost Shar-Pei mix, male
w/chip, tan approx 45lbs
named Bubba. Last
seen in Arrowhead Area
please call
(352) 344-8916



Found Black & White
Large Fat Cat
on Hemlock St.
in the Highlands
(352) 419-5146
Found female Dog call
to Id. Floral City Area.
(352) 419-9495
Found four keys on
multicolor lanyard car
key(Mitsubishi) and
looks like three house
keys. Found at the car
wash on Hwy. 44 and
Eden drive, Inverness.
Call 726-6754
FOUND Men's
prescription eyes
glasses in blue case in
Sugarmill Woods.
(352) 628-4360
FOUND POODLE
MALE -HWY 200
Hernando. Call to
identify. (352)726-1006
Found young dog,
in the area of Raindow
Acres, Dunnellon
(239) 405-0045
LOST MALTI-POO
White female 1 yr old
named "Chloe" last
seen on W Starjasmine
PI, Beverly Hills. Two
little girls miss her!
Please call
(352) 249-0846
Orange w/ white chest
male cat in Plantation
Estates. No collar.
Leave message
(352) 563-0790



4puz.comrn


6 81


85 2


14 8


7 9 3


8 9



F-t1 4 2


4 31


3 59


26 _1_1 5

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9


FREEST 1ET 1
Permit And il
I Engineering Fees I R7 l_ I
SUp to $200 value I "
..... :. .
*Siding -Soffit *Fascia *Skirting *Roofovers *Carports* Screen Rooms *Decks Windows *Doors *Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


FREE REMOVAL
Wants to Thank
All of You for
making 2012 Possible,
See You In 2013

SMARTER FASTER
I SATELLITE INTERNET I
| 888-801-8853
Mention this ad at
Manatee Festival
for $50 rebate at
HughesNet Booth

--- -


SPRING HILL
CLASSES

COSMO DAYS
February 25, 2013

BARBER NIGHTS
February 25, 2013

SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING





NOW HIRING
Preschool
Teachers
Ft or Pt, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
Kiz 'R" RUSS
Preschool
Apply Within
(352) 344-4106





ADMIN/
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
Office Position
available in Lecanto
PT, 9am-4pm, M-F.
Computer experience
required.
SEND RESUME TO:
flhearinacenter(@
amail.com









I I I I I I I I

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII





ARNP or PA

Wanted Part Time
for a busy Pediat-
ric
Practice in Crystal
River, Send Re-
sume
to:
lindapracticemar
iatampabav.rr.com

Certified
Surgical Tech-
Experienced

Needed for outpa-
tient surgery center
Days only, no nights,
wkends., no call or
holidays. Excellent
pay and benefits.
Fax resume to:
352-527-1827
Attention: Marjorie

EXPERIENCE

F/T Medical Assistant
Medical ReceDtionist
Temp.Transcritionist
Needed for busy
Medical Practice.
Experience only
need apply.
Medical Assistant
must be willing to
travel between Citrus
& Hernando Counties,
Fax resume to:
352-341-4477

Experienced
Operating Room
Registered Nurse
Needed for outpa-
tient surgery center
Days only, no nights,
wkends., no call or
holidays. Excellent
pay and benefits.
Fax resume to:
352-527-1827
Attention: Marjorie

HHC AGENCY

Looking for
Psych RN
(352) 794-6097

IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS
RN's & LPN's

Hospital Experi-
ence
ICU, ER, CCU,
Med. Surge, Tele,
Labor
& Delivery, Daily
Pay,
Apply onine at
www.
352-344-9828


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

PT Certified
Dental Assistant

Call 352-746-0330,
ask for Vicki.




Human Resource
Rep

Are you an HR
Professional with a
commitment to ex-
cellence? Do you
want to be part of a
high performance
team? Therapy
Management
Corporation, a
preferred provider in
all the communities
we serve, invites you
to talk with us. Our
home office is in
Homosassa, FL. 3+
years HR experi-
ence, superb com-
munication and
interpersonal skills,
along with strong
technology experi-
ence are what you
will need to be
successful. Please
apply online @
http://www.thera-
pymgmtjobs.com/
Profile.aspx or fax
resume to
(352) 382-0212

Marketing Director

Nature Coast
Financial Advisors, Inc.
Email info to:
aarvy(inaturecoast
financial.com
352-794-6044




BREAKFAST
COOK
Must have experience.
Apply in person
between 1pm & 2pm
206 W Tompkins St.
Inverness

Food Service
Opportunity
Seeking the right
person with
appropriate exp. to
lease and operate a
cafe' w/proven track
record affiliated w/ the
Florida Artists Gallery
in Floral City. Kitchen
fully equipped with
much new equipment.
Call Ann Covington @
352-344-9300




AC SALES

Will train right person,
easy six figure income
Must have val. fl. DL,
Paul (352) 216-3290

Customer
Service/Sales
Assit.

Must have exp., com-
puter skills, good atti-
tude and be a self
starter, Call (352)
628-4656

Real Estate
Agents

Busy real estate office
needs Realtors and
Buyers Agents Call
PLANTATION REALTY
352-634-0129

SALES PERSON
WANTED

For sales of manu-
factured & modular
homes. Must be
very motivated &
have a proven sales
background. Knowl-
edge of housing &
real estate helpful.
Prior experience
helpful. E-mail re-
sume to group-
erman@
aol.com or fax to
352-621-9171




AUTO
COLLISION
TECH

352-726-2139 or
637-2258 Aft. 5 pm

Automotive
Consultant/
Advisor

Eagle Buick GMC
Inc is in need of
experienced
Automotive Service
Consultants/Advisors
Minimum 2 yrs, deal-
ership experience.
Aggressive pay plan
and strong com-
pensation package
that includes health
insurance, paid
vacation paid trdin-
ing, certification
reimbursement and
many other perks.
Drug free workplace
Application Avail. @
Eagle Buick GMC
Inc. Homosassa, Fl.
34448 Send Resume:
Fax (352) 417-0944
Email:
robbcole@eagle
buickgmc.com

EXP. FORM
SETTER/FINISHER

Piece Work or State
Hourly. Own Tools
No Attitude/Stories
352-726-5039


Exp. Power
Equip. & Small
Engine Mechanic

Must have at least
2 yrs. exp. in a small
engine shop, and
have own tools
Apply in Person
M-Fri 6659 W
NORVELL BRYANT
HWY, CR
NO CALLS


EXP. ROOFERS
NEEDED

Must have License
Tools & Transportion.
Call 352-697-3113

Key Training
Center

has positions availa-
ble in group home
home setting. Assist
adults with disabili-
ties in daily living
skills. HS Diploma/
GED required.
F/T Maintenance
Worker- mainte-
nance, renovation
& repair of build-
ings/ grounds, to
include plumbing,
carpentrymasonry,
etc. HS Diploma/
GED required.

Apply in person at
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto FL
34461 *E.O.E.*

LIMOUSINE
DRIVER
Super stretch & Sedan.
Experienced need only
to reply.
Send resume to:
fllanier@yahoo.com

PRODUCTION
CNC OPERATOR

ENTRY LEVEL SMALL
SHOP. ZERO DEFECT
ENVIRONMENT.
Crystal River Area
352-422-6086

Senior Lending
Officer/Office
Manager

Brannen Bank,
a banking institution in
central Florida,
is seeking a Senior
Lending Officer/ Office
Manager for the Citrus
county area. Re-
quires a bachelors
degree in business or
finance, residential
and commercial
lending experience
and at least four
year's Office Manager
Experience.
Duties include man-
agement of daily
branch operations
and originating a
variety of consumer
loan's. Offer's a com-
petitive salary and
benefit package. If in-
terested, please f
forward resume' to

Brannen Banks of
Florida, Inc.
Attn: Carol Johnson
PO Box 1929
Inverness, FL
34451-1929
EEO/M/F/V/D/DFWP





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NEEDED

Sign on Bonus.
Great Commission Pay
and weekly bonuses
Apply in Person
6421 W. Homosassa Tr

CAREGIVERS
NEEDED

All Shifts Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto


NEWSPA-j
PER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
Morning delivery of
the Citrus County
mChronicleand other
newspapers for
customers.
3 to 4 hours per
day.

Must have insured
and reliable vehicle
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up
with a cap-Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product

Apply in Person
1624 N
Medowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River
I Monday to Friday
8am-5pm

I Newspaper carriers
are independent
contractors, not
Employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle


--- --- J

MUST LOVE CATS

Mature P/T caretaker
w/own transportation,
for local cat rescue.
Kennel & general
cleaning, clerical &
customer svc.
Send resume to:
Bhlind Box 1824p c/o
Citrus County Chronicle,
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429


Exp. appt. setters

Top Pay, Hrly. Clean
work enviontment
Dave (352) 794-6129









SPRING HILL
CLASSES

COSMO DAYS
February 25, 2013

BARBER NIGHTS
February 25, 2013

SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING












BAVARIAN CHINA
Real Estate Investor








SERVICE FOR 12+
DINNERWARE
w/gold trim. $300
mortgage money.
(352) 746-3327

BOOKENDS, ZEBRA
Antique, lpper&Mann,
pair, black and gold $65.
352-746-0401
DISNEYS 75 YEARS
-music & memories 3
disc.cd limited edition
pd.$50.00 sell
$20.352-527-9982
FRAMED DISNEY
PRINT "FLATTERY"
cert.#838 of 2000-18"by
24" $100.more info. call
352-527-9982
KISSING FACES
SCULPTURE By John
Cultrone $70. can text
pic. call or text
352-746-0401
ROCKWELL SCOUT-
ING "1979" 50 first day
covers-matching gov.
stamps-$100.
352-527-9982
SEVERAL BARBIE
DOLLS IN ORG.
BOXES $400 OR obo.
(352) 746-3327
TOP DESIGNER PER-
FUME BOTTLE
COLLECTION 30
Bottles $30 Please call
352-726-0040




Chest Freezer
7 cu. ft. Runs Great,
Ice Cold
$60.
352-697-9646
DRYER $100 Works
great. 90 day full
warranty. Call/text
352-364-6504
DRYER $65 Old R.C.A.
works great but ugly. No
rust. 30 day warranty.
Call/text 352-364-6504
FRONT LOAD WASH-
ING MACHINE Ken-
more44092 needs $250
repair 3.5 cubic ft 16
cycles $50 341-0450
GAS DRYER in good
condition.Propane
capable.
$100. 352-513-4519
GE Washer & Dryer
Front Load, white,
Like New,
only used 1 yr
Asking $800 for pair
(352) 422-5462
KENMORE ULTRA
WASH DISHWASHER
White, four years old
excellent condition
$150 Inverness
(352) 344-4404
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive wash-
ers & dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179

SOLD
Samsung refrigerator
white SBS 25 cf hidden
hinges LED lighting less
than 1 yr old $575
Amana washer dryer set
3 yrs old $350
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
WASHERS & DRYERS
(352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Relia-
ble, Clean, Like New,
Excellent Condition.
Free Delivery 352
263-7398
WASHER$100 Works
great. 90 day full
warranty. Call/text
352-364-6504
Westinghouse
Air Handler,
3 ton unit 6 yrs. old
$250. obo
(352) 465-6973
Whirlpool Gold,
Matching Set, Fridge,
Range, Microwave,
Stainless Steel $1,300
firm Call for details
(352) 527-6779




AUCTIONS
Moecker Auctions,
Inc.
has been commis-
sioned to liquidate
the assets of
Discount Packaging
Supply, Inc.
Bankruptcy Auction
Thurs, Jan 24 @
10am
Preview: Day of
Sale 9-10am
6508 NW 82 Ave,
Miami, Fl 33166


Box Manufacturing
Assembly Equip-
ment,
Vehicles,Forklift,
Tons of Packaging &
Supplies, Pre-Cut &
Raw Cardboard,
Racking, Warehouse
Items and more!
Details & photos at
www.moecker
auctions.com
(800) 840-BIDS
10% -13%BP, $100
ref. cash dep.
Bankruptcy Case
No.: 12-27424-LMI
Subj to confirm.
AB-1098
AU-3219, Eric Rubin


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

\[ 2. 5|4| e^^ ^ J


AUCTION
Public Auction
Onsite & Online
Tues, Jan 22 @
11am
Preview: Day of
Sale 9-11am
Lake Mary Logistics,
Inc.
9313 Bachman Rd,
Orlando, Fl 32824
Huge lot of vehicles
and trailers including:
'05 GMC C7500
24ft box truck
Details & photos at
www.moecker
auctions.com
(800)840-BIDS
15% -18%BP, $100
ref. cash dep.
Assignment for the
Benefit of Creditors
Case No.:
2012-CA-016597-O0
Subj to confirm.
AB-1098
AU-3219, Enc Rubin

DUDLEY'S






1-19
AUTOGRAPH
AUCTION
11am Celebrity &
Sports, Live & On
Line everything from
golf to Rock& Roll.
Bats, balls, Albums,
photos, books,
cards & more from
Hendrix to Tiger.
www.dudleys
auction.corn
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384






Fri. 01/18 Preview @
4pm, Auction@ 6pm
General Merchandise
Sat, 01/19 Preview@

Sun 01/20 Preview @
12:30, Auction@ 1pm
Tailgate/Box lot Auc-
tion
**WE BUY ESTATES"
6055 N. Carl G Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
AB3232 (352)
613-1389



Craftsman 10 in Table
saw w/folding stand w/
wheels $350
(352) 465-2459
Drill Press laser trac on
6ft floor stand,
Brand new $200
(352) 465-2459
DUDLEY'S






1-19
AUTOGRAPH
AUCTION
11am Celebrity &
Sports, Live & On
Line everything from
golf to Rock& Roll.
Bats, balls, Albums,
photos, books,
cards & more from
Hendrix to Tiger.
www.dudleys
auction.corn
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384
EXTENSION LADDER
20 FT. Aluminum $65
Please call
352-726-0040
Ridgid 12in compound
sliding miter saw,
w/ laser & folding stand
w/wheels. $450
(352) 465-2459



47" Hitachi
HD Projection TV,
with glass stand
$200
352-628-5340
SHARP 32" TV WITH
REMOTE $25
352-613-0529



3-0 X 6-8 EXTERIOR
DOOR JAMB "ONLY"
new $25.call text
352-746-0401



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP COLOR LASERJET
ALL-IN-ONE
Pnrinter-Scanner-Fax,
$99 Please call
352-726-0040
LINKSYS ROUTER
WI-FI wireless home
networking $15 Please
call 352-726-0040
WEB TV SYSTEM
2 keyboards, epson
C88 Printer $50
(352) 382-2545



2008 Dump Trailer
6 x 10(352)586-1736
48" Kodiak
Bushhog,
less than 150 hrs.
Asking $450
(352) 382-0731



Ashley tan microfiber
recliner very good
condition, arm push
style, does not rock $85
352419-4513
COLLEZIONE EUROPA
style king sz poster bed
set triple dresser mirror
5 drawer chest 2 NS


headbd footbd rails, light
oak finish solid wood
HUGE AND HEAVY!
$1350 352-419-4513


BLACK AND GLASS TV
stand 55'w x22"d x20"h
like new call or text
$70.352-746-0401
CURIO CABINET,
Vintage, wood and
curved glass, 3 glass
shelves, lighted, $100,
(352)465-1813
DINETTE SET
4 ft Glass top w/4
chairs on casters,
$200
(352) 897-4739
DINETTE SET
Johnson Casual, 30
in, glass-stainless
dinette w/ 2 chr $250.
Naguchi glass top
coffee table $150
(352) 503-9494
DINING TABLE
High quality table
w/4 chairs, leaf, and
hutch. Asking $400
but worth much
more.
(352) 860-0183
Glass top Wicker
dinning table
seats 6 w/6 chairs
& bar chairs. All
wicker, all padded
$500 OBO
(352) 425-0667
LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET, NEW, never
used-$975. CHERRY,
BEDROOM SET solid
wood, new in factory
boxes- $895 Original
price $6500, Can
Deliver. Bill
(813)298-0221.
Love Seat &
Matching Recliner,
by Flexsteel
$275.
Call between 9a-7p
(352) 382-0603
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500
OAK ENTERTAIN-
MENT CENTER. VERY
GOOD COND. 2
DRAWERS & 4
DOORS. $150
(765) 336-9590
ORIENTAL DINING
ROOM CHEST
48" black lacquer w/
gold flowers $200.
6 Panel Oriental
Black & Gold Screen
$325.
(352) 503-9494
POTTERY BARN
ENTERTAINMENT
CABINET Great Cond.
$60 352-201-2665
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg
$75. 352-628-0808
QUEEN PASTEL
SOFA BED w/ 3
cushions seat $150.
Matching LOVE SEAT
$100. (352) 422-0296
SECTIONAL COUCH
12' x 10' 7 piece
couch. Black w/ tur-
quoise, navy blue.
Very good Cond. $350
(352) 503-9494
Sectional Sofa
Florida Colors
peach and green
Clean, like new $300
(352) 860-0649
630-816-1171 cell
SEWING MACHINE
Old Singer Fashion
Mate, in wood cabinet.
Works $40.00 or best
offer 726-1495
SHOWER CHAIR
Adjustable Legs $30.
Periwinkle OVAL
WOOL RUG 96 X 136.
$100. (352) 422-0296
TEEN BUNK BED
$175- Double Bed on
top, large desk below.
Silver/metal frame.
Bought from Kids'
Room to Go. Email for
pix. Excellent
shape/like new. email:
kmtopspin@hotmail.com
or (352) 212-2901
TWIN BED W/ BOX
SPRING, MATRESS &
HEAD BOARD. $100
(352) 344-2690
Two Bar Stools
Country style, solid oak,
2ft high w/windsor back
& swivel seat. $100
(352) 341-1941
Wood Dresser
19/2 x56/2
Dark wood
includes, mirror
$475 (352) 419-4606
Xlarge dresser & 2
mnightstands solid wood
bow front & sides $525.
Thomasville coffee table
set mint cond $425.
352-419-4513



9 HP Lawn Vac
and Trailer
Pull Behind $800.
(352) 586-1736
ANTIQUE JOHN
DEERE 110 LAWN
TRACTOR 1962 or
1964.8 HP Kohler
cast iron eng, 2 speed
tranny. Runs good,
needs starting switch.
Can demo, $400.
352-422-6811
John Deere Rider
Model #111/42"
3 blades Recent
Service, Runs
Good, Looks Good
$500. (352) 527-8618
POULAN ELECTRIC
POLE SAW
Model PLN1510
Excellent condition
Asking $75.00
352-419-4305
RYOBI 200MPH
BLOWER Model
RY09550 26cc, 8-20-09.
Great condition, Must
SEE. Paid $129, asking
$50. Mike
646-509-6654
Weed Wacker
32CC, craftsman, gas
Weed Waker
Bandit, gas,
Craftsman Blower 32CC
gas,
Homelite Blower
model 170 gas,
Echo Chainsaw #500
VL, 18" Gas $150 for All


Riding Lawn Mower
John Deere 1991, #212
36" cut, ran in 2010,
cast iron rear end $225.
(352) 628-1126


GeBer
BHelpI


3 178 561 249
91-4327 56 8
7-4 92 368 5 1
2 81754 6 93
536S8 19472
4.5782316
86317 759 24
192643785








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



RY-OBIHedgeTRIM- BE D14.4 RDLELE
MER Model RY 39500A DRILL, CIR SAW REC
26cc 6-26-09 Good con- SAW LIGHT CHARGER
edition. Paid $179, asking WITH CASE $85.
$75. Mike 646-509-6654 352-464-0316
YARDMAN BY MTD BAL RV Stablizer Jack
RIDING LAWN for Motorhome, Trailer
MOWER includes tilt or 5th Wheel $25.
cart; spreader & bagger. COOLER $5
runs strong 42" cut 2 Wheel cart $5
$500. (352) 527-0832 (352) 860-0183
C- BLINDS HORIZONTAL
1 PLEATED SIZE
Y s64WX63L 1 PLASTIC
64WX60L OFF WHITE
BEVERLY HILLS $60 352-613-0529
Casio Electronic Cash
ESTATE SALE Register PCR-T465 $20
Frl & Sat 8a to 3pm Kenmore Upright
Vintage Heywood- Freezer #253
Wakefield coffee, 34 Tall x 27 wide $60
corner, & end tables. 352-503-6971
Dealers welcome. COCA-COLA
Whirlpool front loading REFRIGERATOR glass
washer w/base. sided 13x36inches by
Window AC ults, table San den. $100.
saw, Dale Earnheardt 352-341-0934
memorabilia, other COMPUTER'S MOUSE
misc. items. All hp co., universal, grey
reasonable offers colored, newly packed,
considered. $10 (352)465-1616
788 W Buttonbush Dr $10 (352)4-
CORTLAND GRAPH-
BEVERLY HILLS ITE FLY ROD- Precision
SAT 8a ? II Model #9089, 9ft., 2
Jewelry, tools, power pc., 8/9 wt., in bag, Ex+,
washer, computer desk, $50. 352-628-0033
Weber gnlls. DARKROOM
821 & 822 Colbert Ct. EQUIPMENT including
Enlarger. FREE. Phone
1Mo14 14G 352-503-5172
Dell V305 Printer
S A-IE $40.
SAL. LexmarkX, 4270
CITRUS HILLS Copier/Fax $40.
Sat. 1/19, 8a-2p 352-503-6971
Furniture, stereo eq, DIGITAL PICTURE
tools, hshold items, BOOK Brookstone
1940 W Pearson ST holds 500 pics like new,
complete in box $40.call
CITRUS text 352-746-0401
SPRINGS Epson LQ570E, Printer,
$20
Saturday Only, HP Office Jet
8am-?
MANY $1 ITEMS Series 600 $25.
352-503-6971
2288 W. Nautilus Dr 352-503-6971
2u Generator Industrial
CRYSTAL RIVER 8.5 KW Remote Start
Like New
MEGA SALE LkeNew
Fri 8-2 & Sat, 8-12p 352-697-9646
Furniture. collectibles,
Thomasville wall unit GERBIL CAGE GOOD
fenton, fostoria, sterl- CONDITION $20
ing silver jewl. an- 352-613-0529
tiques Tools & MORE, GLASS-BLUE COBALT
Behind Olive Tree 7pc assorted
Rest. US 19, $100.352-628-4210
UNITS 80 & 81 GRANDFATHER CLOCK
Howard Miller Elegant
CRYSTAL RIVER Shaker Style in Cherry
SAT 9 ? Top quality mvmt. w/
1149 N TRUDEL PT Wminstr chime re-
cently serviced. Item
CRYSTAL RIVER is like new and value
Thurs. 17 thru Sun. priced at $925. Firm.
20th Serious inquires to
Estate Sale 352-560-3474, 4p-8p
9am-Until, pls. leave message
Everything Must ao! HEAVY DUTY
Riding mower, genera- WHIRPOOL Dryer $125
tor, furniture TV's, Exercise Stepper
etc. machine $75.
4410 N. Wellview (352) 795-7254
Point
O IT Hi-tec Magnum Swat
FLORAL CITY Boots Like new
2 Great Pickin' Yard size 11.5 $40
Sales, Fri. & Sat. 8-2p 352-860-2475
12474 E. Trails End Rd. Janome Memory Craft
NEIGHBORHIOOD 6500 sewing machine &
IH BO Gracey Quilting Table.
SA LE $1200. (352) 465-2692
L'EFFLEUR .75 EAU
FLORAL CITY DE PARFUM SPRAY &
Sat 1/19 9am-3pm SATCHET $25 Vintage
Lots of great items. Coty unopened
Singing Forest Park 352-419-5981
Residents. Off LEXMARK SCANNER,
Old Floral City Rd @ PRINTER, FAX, COPY
Keating, Baker & Ogden MACHINE New, White
HOMOSASSA colored, needs ink, $15
Sat 8a -2pm (352)465-1616
Multi Family LG TOUCH VERIZON
5012 S. Austin Pt. X 11000 cell phone
INVERNESS good condition $25.call
Frl & Sat 9a -2pm or text 352-746-0401
614 Pilneaire St. Mattress Trade In Sets
INVERNESS Clean and Very Nice
Friday & Saturday Fulls $50., Qn. $75.
OAK HAVEN Kings. $125, 621-4500
5 mil. out Turner Camp MINI-BLINDS FOR
INVERNESS- FRENCH DOORS
INVEr N ES, Neutral color-like
Saturday 19, 8a-lp new-$15 Please call
244 Satellite Ave. 352-726-0040
LECANTO MOTORCYCLE PIPES
Saturday 9AM stock 05 honda shadow
ESTATE SALE, areo pipes mint $60
Furniture Must Go 352-621-0142
No Early Arrivals! MOTORCYCLE SEAT
1600 N. Ottawa Ave cruiser saddlemen his
and hers mint 100 firm.
PINE RIDGE 352-621-0142
HUGE SALE 2 Houses MOVING/STORAGE
W & 3Circle BOXES20 new/4 sizes
W. Douglas Fur. Circle 26x20x5,22x15x27,
Saturday Only 8a-2p 27x16x27,24xlx2
PINE RIDGE $3 ea. 352-422-0294
WOMAN'S CLUB SALE NEW BLACK LEATHER
Fri 18 & Sat. 19 PURSE BY ROLF $25
PRB to Bronco to NEVER USED E-MAIL
5253W. Wichita Dr., PHOTO INVERNESS
352-419-5981
PHOTOGRAPHY books
and lights. FREE
HERNANDO Phone 352-503-5172
JAN 14th -20th, RCA Video Camera
9a-5pm EVERYTHING with accessories
MUST GO CALL OR $125.
COME BY 3180 E. Men's Golf clubs $60
Buffalo Lane Garmin GPS $60.
(352) 212-1733 (352) 527-7223
l REAR WINDOW GMC
P/U 1500 dark tinted,
good cond. $50.
352-628-4210
BOYS WINTER SARYOBI 10" COM-
CLOTHING SIZES 5 & POUND MITER SAW-
6 SHIRTS, PANTS & #TS1342, 15Amps,
JACKETS $30 5500 RPMs, dust bag,
352-613-0529 EX+, $60. 628-0033
Special Occasion SALMON NATURAL
Men's beautiful all SKIN FISH MOUNT- 31
wool black suit 41R Inches, Ex. condition,
Palm Beach from $35. 352-628-0033
Falveys Men's Store SAMSUNG BRIGHT-
Gold Dress Jacket 41R SIDE touch Venzon cell
Tommy Hilfiger from phone good condlon
Dillards both worn phn oo-dco-no0401
only 2-3 times, excel.
cond. $175 for both SECURITY SCREEN
(352) 527-2050 DOORS (2) 36" x 80"
Black wi locks, $85 for
WEDDING GOWN Oleg both, can email pic
Cassini. White. Size 8. 352-382-3650
$100 (352) 201-2665
Self Propelled
IGolf Cart
$125.
(352) 601-7380
PHONE/FAX MACHINE SKYLIGHT BUBBLE
Panasonic plain paper TYPE 27 BY 27 SUN
Fax/Copier RESISTANT,SMOKED
excellent condition. $50. BRAND NEW ONLY
352-628-2150 $50.352-464-0316
SECURITY CAMERAS SMALL BLOCK CHEVY
Two wireless B&W STARTER new stag-
cameras/transmitters to gered bolt pattern $25.
your tv. $50.Dunnellon call or text
352-465-8495 352-746-0401
f UNIVERSAL REMOTE
CONTROL newly
packed, never used,
.... .. $10 (352)465-1616


4 WHEEL WALKER- WESTERN B T
hand brakes& wheel Acme brown marble
locks, seat, basket, size 8.5EW great shape
folds for storage, Ex., $40. call or text
$50 352-628-0033 352-746-0401
55 Gallon Fish Tank WHITE BIRD CAGE For
with Cabinet Stand, medium size bird. Good
with all accessories condition. Complete
$375. with stand. $50.
(352) 613-7429 352 726 5753
2004 FORD V10 X BOX
STOCK INTAKE $35. 50$
call or text 352-419-5102
352-746-0401
ACER 77E 17" B sn
MONITOR tube type E um en
monitor incl. manual &
cables-like new-FREE COPIER HP 150 color
352-527-9982 copier, works great,
BABY STROLLER Nice $75. 352-628-2150
stroller, safety 1st, fea- PRINTER Epson Stylus
tures basket and cup Photo R200 color
holder, brown/green printer, excellent
color, $20 condition. $50.
(352)465-1616 352-628-2150


CLASSIFIED


2 POWER LIFT
CHAIRS RECLINERS
BY PRIDE MED SZ
$285.
LG SZ $350.
BOTH EXC. COND.
(352) 270-8475
4 WHEEL (SONIC) GO
GO BY PRIDE MOBIL-
ITY TAKE APART(4
PIECES)TO FIT IN
TRUNK OR VAN $585.
352-464-0316
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH SEAT AND
BRAKES ONLY 75.00
352-464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM
WALKER ADJUSTA-
BLE LEGS ON BOTH
25. EA 352-464-0316
Electric Lift Chair,
great cond. Must See.
Asking $400
Call (352) 726-2695
Leave Message
MANUAL WHEEL Chair
Lift Easily load Folding
Chair not scooter to
vehicle hitch $100.
Dunnellon352-465-8495
Manual WHEELCHAIR
WITH FOOTRESTS
GOOD SHAPE ONLY
$100.
352-464-0316
NUTRON R3ZLX
Power Wheel
Chair w/ Harmar
Micro Power Chair
Lift 5yrs old.
$1000 OBO
352-527-2906
SHOWER CHAIR WITH
BACK FIBERGLASS
WITH ADJUSTABLE
LEGS ONLY $30.
352-464-0315
TOILET SEAT 4"
RISER BRAND NEW
NEVER USED ONLY
$25. 352-464-0316
WALKER 3 WHEELED
WITH BRAKES SUPER
SHAPE ONLY $65.
352-464-0316



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jew-
elry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676



"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR
W/CASE,STRAP,XTRA
STRINGS,PICKS
ETC.$75 352-601-6625
"NEW" ELECTRIC
GUITAR "FAT STRAT"
STYLE BLEMISHED
SOUNDS GREAT! $45
352-601-6625
Player Piano
Works great, with
spare motor and
service manual $750
Call (352) 795-8085



2 VINTAGE WHITE
GLASS MIXING
BOWLS $10. 8.5 IN
AND 6.5 IN WITH
SPOUT 352-419-5981
3 MINI 12 COUNT
MUFFIN TINS $5
ELECTRIC VEGIE
steamer $7 Inverness
352-419-5981
4 DECORATIVE
KITCHEN
CANNISTERS WITH
LIDS $10 CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 352419-5981
BLINDS HORIZONTAL
1 PLEATED 64WX63L
1 PLASTIC 64WX60L
OFF WHITE $60
352-613-0529
OAK ROUND TOILET
SEAT LIKE NEW Never
used, moved inlaid $40
352-419-5549
QUICHE DISH WHITE
IRIDESCENT $10
GREEN 10 IN
MIXING/FRUIT BOWL
$10 352-419-5981



BODY BY JAKE
EXERCISE MACHINE
IT REALLY WORKS
YOU OUT ONLY $50.
352-464-0316
BODY ROW ROWING
MACHINE IT WORKS
THE ARMS AND LEGS
ONLY $60.
352-464-0316
EXERCISE BIKE (DP)
FAN TYPE UPRIGHT IT
WORKS THE ARMS
TOO ONLY $85.
352-464-0316
RECUMBANT
Stationary bike $100
OBO
Tncycle $100 OBO
(352)621-4611
WAVE MASTER Free
Standing Punching Bag.
Great Condition. $40
352-201-2665

-I
.308 AMMO 100
Rds,SP&HP$100.
352-503-2792
3 COMPLETE MENS
GOLF CLUBS SETS
W/ BAGS $125 EA
(352) 382-1971
5 Men's Bicycles
$15. ea
(352) 746-7357
357 Mag JHPAmmo
1 box New $50
Inverness
864-283-5797
357 Mag. 6 Shot
Rev. German made adj
rear site exc cond. $350
SDrinafield model 53B
single shot 22 rifle $120
(352) 344-5853
AMMO .223/5.56 Ammo
New in Box $75 per
Hundred. Get it while
you can! 352-427-0051
Antique Put gun (duck)
mfg cir 1831, by Royal
De Charlesville, app.
$5000 in 1998 asking
$3000. (727) 488-6474
BROWNING 308
MODEL 81 BLR (lever


action), Genuine wal-
nut stock,
exc cond. $700 OBO
(352) 382-3803
CALLAWAY RAZR
DRIVER
9.5 Stiff $95.00
352-503-7740
CAMO HOLSTER,
SMALL Uncle Mikes
size 10 for belt $10.call
or text 352-746-0401
COBRA DRIVER 2011
Model
never Hit $95.00
352.220.3492
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238


I I


Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
On y $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
II11111111I



WANT TO BUY
HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situa-
tion. Call Fred,
352-726-9369



COLEMAN TENT
/CAMPER. '95, A/C,
stove, sink, sleeps 6+,
good canvas and
upholstery $1200
(352) 628-0173



1 Sweet Little Male
Yorkie,
CKC reg., $375. Fl.
health certs.,
Call
(352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258


BELLA
Bella is a beautiful
silvery brindle Cattle
Dog/Shepherd mix,
came to the shelter
because her family
lost their home. She is
4 years old, spayed,
housebroken, micro-
chipped, and
Heartworm-negative,
weighs 45 pounds.
Walks well on a leash,
gets along with other
dogs and is very, very
playful. Fenced yard is
preferred, but can
jump a low fence.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


BLUE
Blue is an approxi-
mately 8-y.o. neu-
tered male Cattle
Dog mix, Came to
the shelter because
his family lost their
home. Blue is white
and tan, weighs
about 50 pounds, is
a bit chubby for his
size, which is me-
dium. He is house-
broken, very
friendly and affec-
tionate. The most
stinking thing about
him is that he has
very beautiful blue
eyes, which catch
your attention imme-
diately. He loves
people and wants to
be by your side Is
very obedient and
walks well on a
leash. He is quite
laid-back and would
make a great com-
panion for an older
person.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


SATURDAY,JANUARY 19, 2013 C11


__ _


Mid


'11 CADILLAC



DTS


NAV S/R




$33P.I


12119006




!I m 1


I I I I I II '1I


'04 TOYOTA AVALON XL

12120161 6 9 95


'04 TOYOTA CAMRY

12120252 8.995


'09 KIA RIO

13010032A 7,995


'05 TOYOTA AVALON

12120369 12,995


'08 CADILLAC CTS Loaded '11 TOYOTA CAMRY

12120202 14,99 12120351 15.995


'11 TOYOTA CAMRY '12 NISSAN ALTIMA

12120292,995 , 12129001 1 ,995


'10 TOYOTA PRIUS

12120357 S1995


'08 TOYOTA SIENNA

12120358 1P995


'08 TOYOTA AVALON XLS '06 LEXUS

12129007 18995 13010057 18,p995



'11 TOYOTA CAMRY bride '12 CHEVY EQUINOX

12120171,20995 13010041 21995


'11 TOYOTA TUNDRA

12129008 21,995


'10 CADILLAC CTS

13010026 2 ,995


'12 TOYOTA PRIUS '12 TOYOTA CAMRY XLE

12120389 ,2599 12120327 2 5995


'10 CADILLAC SRK '11 CADILLAC DTS NAV, Sunroof

12129004 29995 12119006 32p995


VILLAGE TOYOTA


CRYSTAL RIVER

www.villagetoyota.com 352 628 5 100

*Payments are with $2,000 cash down or trade equity and with approved credit. See dealer for details.


FOR SALE
Mini -14 223 scoped
stainless $1000.
10-22 Scoped wood
blue $500.
352-422-2004
For sale
SKS 1956 Sino Soviet
all original $500
352-422-2004
FULL SIZE PING
PONG TABLE good
condition includes new
net,paddles, and balls
$50 call/text 464-4280
Ping 1-15 Dnver
9.5 Stiff great condition
352.503.7740
Pistol .22 SEMI-AUTO
Phoenix Arms NIB 3
clips,$295 cash
352-860-1039
REMINGTON Model 11
12 gauge semi-auto,
peep site, poly choke
$230. Smith & Wesson
model 15, 22 revolver,
adj. rear site, $250
(352) 344-5853
Sig-SWAT P522
NIB. 25 Round Meg
quad rail, green laser
flash suppressor,
$830.
(352) 422-0266
SINGLE BIKE RACK in
good condition. I can
e-mail
photo. $25.
352-513-4519
Smith Corona,
1903-A3, .30-06,
$535.
Trap Door, Spring-
field, Rifle .45-70
$495.
(352) 270-6142
WILSON GOLF
X-31Tour MRH Set
3wds/8irons grap/stl sw
& putt Dunnellon $100
352-465-8495



2013 Enclosed Trail-
ers
6x12 with ramp,
$1895
call 352-527-0555

Motorcycle utility
trailer 4ft x 8ft. 12 in
wheels $700.
(352) 465-5573



ROUND WOODEN
FABRIC CANOPY
BASSINET Beautiful
$75. 352-422-2719

Sell r Swa


MANAGER'S






SPECIALS


I -- I. I I


-


12 CHRYSLER




TOWN & COUNTRY


7k Miles 12120106



S21,995


r




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Each vehicle includes: Kia Certified Pre-Owned vehicles
150 point quality assurance inspection must be less than five years old
0 CARFAX vehicle history report and have less than 60,000 miles.
10 years/100,000 miles Powertrain Warranty from the original in-service date
24-hour roadside assistance for 10 years/unlimited miles from the original in-service date
Towing, rental, and travel breakdown benefits for Out of Town Repair/Expense
I IS\\I I \7 i / II


Af Certd SECTION
of Certified Vehicles to Choose From!


-W


AT CITRUS KIA, "WE JUST DON'T
CLOSE CAR DEALS, WE OPEN RELATIONSHIPS"


IAI


2:


1850 S.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL
352-564-8668 2


The Power to Surprise'
Shop from Home @ www.citruskia.com


*$3,000 down, 75 months at 4% interest rate. Plus tax, tag, title. WAC.


Sportage


Sorento
^^wig.
^ j


Rondo


Rio


Forte


Sedona


C12 SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013


-"









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


13 Chickens $5. ea.
2 Roosters $7 ea.
2 Ducks $10. ea.
(352) 503-6796
(352) 364-1819
AMERICAN PITBULL
PUPPIES We have 1
female and 5 males
left they are 3 weeks
old Jan.18th $150each
Mother and Father on
site.
352-302-7975
Dachshunds Puppies
Mini, Long hair,
females,black & cream.
Champion blood lines.
$250
(352) 220-4792









HANK
Hank is an 8 y.o.
male Hound mix
who was a stray. He
is a sweet, affection-
ate, low key gentle-
man, easy to walk,
does not pull on
leash. He has good
energy and is a
good companion. Is
very housebroken,
gets along with
other dogs. Weighs
about 56 pounds.
Not yet neutered
but would be in-
cluded in adoption
fee. Is a very sweet
older dog in need
of a good, safe
home.
Call Mike @
352-726-0165
or Joanne
@352-795-1288.

MINIATURE POO-
DLES miniature poodle
pups born 10/16/12
Health Cert 1 apricot &
1 black female & 1
black male almost
potty trained, raised in
our home. $500 cash
call 352-419-5662 or
karaluv3@yahoo.com


NICKY
Nicky is a 2 yo.
lab/bulldog mix,
weighing about 78
pounds, and is
Heart-worm
negative. Is very
sweet and loveable,
very intelligent. How-
ever, he is a big,
strong dog who needs
a strong person to
handle him, and a
fenced yard is
strongly recom-
mended. He knows
how to sit for treats
and wants to please
his human friend very
much.
He is available now at
the Citrus County
Animal Shelter.
Call 352-746-8400

RATS FOR SALE
50 cents to $3.00
All Sizes
(352) 419-9080
Leave Message









SKIPPY
Skippy is a Redbone
Coonhound, 8 y.o.,
who came to the
shelter because his
owner "couldn't af-
ford him." Originally
very thin and mal-
nourished, he's now
happy and healthy,
having been in a
foster home for
months. He is sweet,
trusting and loving,
with beautiful bright
eyes. He is the classi-
cal "Good Dog".
Completely house-
broken. Loves walk-
ing, being petted,
and car rides.
Would be best in a
1-dog family. For a
grateful, loving ca-
nine companion,
Call Judy @
352-503-3363.


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive wash-
ers & dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179






HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping
Dr. appts, errands,
etc. Hablo Espanol
813-601-8199






SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352-613-2518






JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump
Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lc. (352) 584-5374






AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551,
584-3730


Shih-Tzu Pups,
ACA
starting@ $350. Lots
of colors, Beverly
Hills, FL
(352)270-8827
www.aceofoups.net

^^^^


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1 near river, mcl elec.
$375mo (352) 220-0480
CRYSTAL RIVER
6851 W Vanaman Ct
$450/$400 dp 2/2
DUNNELLON
5159 W Disney Lane
$425/ $400 dp 2/2
(727) 480-5512
Hernando/Cit. Hills
3/2 dw, 1/2 acre
fenced, paved road
$625/mo
(352)795-7813
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Furn or Non
Furn.
9075 S. Breen Terr.
$500 mo (352)
382-7396
HOMOSASSA
2/2, 2 Ig porches &
1 carport. $675
(908) 884-3790
LECANTO
2BR DW $550. mo.
(352) 628-2312




14 x 60, 2BR, 1/2 BA,
Carport, Shed, appli-
ances, W/D, clean,
move in condition
Near new Walmart on
486, $4,800.
(352) 387-7824
2BR. 1, BA.on your
own 75x 100 lot.
no fees! new en-
closed
sunroom, Ig laundry
room furn, 2 stor-
age buildings, 5111
Castle Lake Ave. S.
of
Inverness on SR 41
$39,500 (740)
255-0125
3bdr/2 full baths/ 2 car
caroort on 1 acre.
split layout, steel roof,
caged pool, 20x25 ft
deck, Ig storage build-
ing, Furnished Modu-
lar $73,900, 5215
Bridget Pt, Castle
Lake Park
Inverness
352-597-7353

BANK
FORECLOSURE
Land-n-Home, 3/2
1500 sq. ft.On 1/2
Acre, paved rd.
LOOKS GOOD,
Have financing if
needed, only
$2,500 down,
$381.44mo. P&I
W.A.C. OR $69,900.
Call 352-613-0587
or 352-621-9183

Crystal River 55+
Park. 2BR/1BA Car-
port & Screened
Porch. Heat/Air
$9,500. 352-746-4648
Ask for Brit
HERNANDO
3BR 2BA MH
Ready to move in !
FHA & Owner Financ-
ing avail, call
352-795-1272

HOME-ON-LAND
3/2 Great Shape.
Acre. Move In
Now
$59,900.
Call 352-401-2979,
352-621-3807


DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic
#2579
DrivewaysPatios-Side
walks. Pool deck
repair /Stain
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Drive-
ways tear outs Trac-
tor work, Lic. #1476,
726-6554




All AROUND TRAC-
TOR
Land clearing, Haul-
ing Site Prep, Drive-
ways Lic/Ins
352-795-5755




HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping
Dr. appts, errands,
etc. Hablo Espanol
813-601-8199


Palm Harbor Homes
New 2013...30x76
4bd/3ba.
$0 Down. $399/Month
800-622-2832 ext 210

REPO'S- REPO'S
REPO'S
WE HAVE REPO'S
CALL 352-621-9181




DUNNELLON
LAKE ROUSSEAU 55+
comm. Lg. 1/1 w/slider
to encl. screened porch,
outside shed, CHA furn.
Nice yard, low lot rent.
Asking$11,900
(207) 347-0531




CASTLE LAKE
Floral City
2/2 S/W Fully furnished
move in condition.
2 screen rooms,
2 sheds. Landscaped
with sprinkler on quiet
cul-de-sac. $38,900.
352-212-1883
CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice Large 4br 2ba MH
READY TO MOVE IN!
4O0wner Fin. Avail.+-
CALL (352) 795-1272
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Less Than
$46,500. Cash.
Considering ALL Cash
offers. 352-586-9498
HERNANDO 2/2 DW
On lot, with Shed &
Deck See for your-
self at 2562 N. Treas-
ure Pt. $28,500 obo
352464-0719
HOMOSASSA
**3/2, Fenced Yard,**
NEW Flooring. NEW
AC $5.000 Down.
$435. mo
(352) 302-9217
HOMOSASSA
2ba 1 '/2 ba MH needs
complete rehab. Good
shed, well & septic.
6524 W. Akazian
$12,500 (603) 860-6660
NW Citrus County
SWMH on 1 acre, 2/1.5
paved rd., screened
porch, appliances -
$37,700 possible
owner financing
352-795-9908
W. of 19 in Homosassa
1994, 2/2 Doublewide,
Move In Condition
Corner Lot $44,900.
Tradewinds Realty
(352) 400-0089




2/2 on Lake Rous-
seau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent
$240/mo. 2003. Used
Seasonally
Owner bought a
house. 207-546-6115,
cell
Adult Park 2/1,
Mobile, heat and air,
nicely furn. large
shed, sreen rm. car-
port, $8,200
Lot Rent $160 mo.
(352) 287-3729

CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
H WINTER SPE-
CIALS H
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
2/2 New Model
$59K
2/2 waterfront.
$31,000.
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

INGLIS
3/2 Furn., screened
porch. Lot rent $295
Includes amenities.
$15,000 (352)
212-8873
INVERNESS
3/2 Furn.,Appl., Ig
screen porch & shed,
Great cond. $16,000.
Call for appt.
(352)364-3747
INVERNESS
Move In Ready,
Beautiful 1/1 SW,
Mobile, Harbor Lights
55+ park, on Big Lake
Henderson. Fully furn.,
very updated, view of
lake, Cen. HVAC, W/D,
A Must See! Asking
$7,000, 352-344-1828
INVERNESS PARK
55+, 14X60, 2/2, new
roof, all appliances,
partly furn. screen
room, shed,
352-419-6476


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
k 352-302-6838 k




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777

DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907





**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscap-
ing
352-795-0188/220-3194

A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENC-
ING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

ROCKY'S FENC-
ING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
H 352 422-7279 H




Install, Restretch,
Repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent,
Lic#4857 Mitch, (352)
201-2245


Fully
Furnished. Everyth-
ing stays. Just move
in. 2 Sheds,
washer/dryer all ap-
pliances. Must See!
$7,500. (708) 308-3138
PALM TERRACE
55+ Community,
1997 3BR/2BA 14x 66,
excel, cond. Shed,
Fl. Rm. Carport &
Deck $16,000. (352)
400-8231
REDUCED 2/2 $17,500
On Lake Rousseau
Lot Rent $240/mo.
BETTER THAN NEW!
Owner financing. Call
LEE (352) 817-1987
Singing Fores t
FLORAL CITY
14 x 70, Mobile, 2 Irg.
bedrooms, furnished &
remodeled, heat & air,
carport & shed, Wash/
Dryer, Lot rent $176.
$14,500. 352-344-2420
Waterfront/Homosassa
Westwind Village 55+
Beautifully furnished
Move In Ready, 2/2
2 Scrn rms, dbl door,
refrig./Ice maker
Washer Dryer, Low
monthly payments,
$19000 obo
(850)449-1811 Cell




HOMOSASSA
Large 3br 2ba MH
Rent to Own
*Ready to Move In 4
Owner Financing Avail.
CALL (352) 795-1272





ACTION-

RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.Citrus(ounlyHomeRentals.com
BEVERLY HILLS/LECANTO
1011 N.(ommerce Ter.(L)....$525
2/1 Apt, screened lanai
8160 N. DuvalDr.((S).... $1,300
3/2 Poolhons, uiili i w/i ps,fullyfurnished
CRYSTAL RIVER
11255W.BayshoreDr.((R) $850
2/2Waterfront condo
10350 Deepwoods Dr. ((R).... $750
2/2/1 Close to mall, Ig. utility room
HOMOSASSA
2278 S. Sandburg Pt. (H).. $500
2/1 Duplex located between () & (CR)
8019 W. Grove St. ....$575
2/2 SW mobile on 1.25 acres
HERNANDO/INVERNESS
994 E.Winnetka St. (Her)....$625
2/1.5 on 1 acre with carpoit
854 Pritchard Isl. (Inv.)...S800
2/2 Townhous on waerfront, comm. pool














Chassahowitzka
3/2 Waterfront DW,
$500
2/2, Fenced Yd DW,
$500
2/2, House w/ Gar.,
$600
Suaarmill Woods
3/2/2, Furnished,
$900.
AGENT (352) 382-1000




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Studio Apt. Com-
pletely Furn. on
Hunters Sprgs, sun
deck, W/D rm. All until.
mncl'd.+ boat dock.
$700/mo.
352-372-0507
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1
Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Es-
tate (352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts
2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILA-
BLE


1 CALL & RELAX!
25vrs Exp in 100%
property maint & all
repairs, call
H&H Services today!
lic#37658
352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352465-9201
Affordable Handy-
man
4 FAST. 100% Guar.
4 AFFORDABLE
4 RELIABLE-
Free Est
H 352-257-9508 H
Affordable Handy-
man
4 FAST- 100% Guar.
4 AFFORDABLE
4 RELIABLE-
Free Est
H 352-257-9508 H
Affordable Handy-
man
4 FAST- 100% Guar.
4 AFFORDABLE
4 RELIABLE-
Free Est
H 352-257-9508 H
Affordable Handy-
man
4 FAST- 100% Guar.
4 AFFORDABLE
4 RELIABLE-
Free Est
H 352-257-9508 H
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570


CLASSIFIED




CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apart-
ments for Rent
352-465-2985
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, $575. quiet,
Clean. incld's water,
352-563-2114
352-257- 6461

INVERNESS
2 B/R's Availa-
ble
KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOMES
Rental Assistance
Available For
Qualified Appli-
cants
Call 352-344-1010
MWF,8-12&1-5
307 Washington
Ave
Inverness Florida
Equal Housing




EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY




L------J




CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret Har-
bourApts. Newly re-
modeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incl
Water, garbage, W/D
hook-up.
352-586-4037
INVERNESS
1 BR., Partially Furn.
Quiet resident. neigh.
(352) 637-1805




LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza, Of-
fice/
Retail, CR 486, 900
sf. @ $700+ util. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801




INVERNESS
2/2/1 Lg Condo
Waterfront Community
with heated pool.
Non-smoker, pet
restrict. $650. mo
317-442-1063




Citrus Springs
2/2/1 $650/mo
352-746-7990
HOMOSASSA
2/2 $550 mo. incl.
garb. Pets? No
smoking. 1st & sec.
352-2124981
INVERNESS
2/1, Clean, W/D Hk
-up, No pets,$550 mo.
+ Sec (352) 220-4818




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




BLACK DIAMOND
EXCLUSIVE 3/2/2
3389 N Bent Tree Pt
1650 SF, Pool, $1,150
/mo (740) 398-9585
CRYSTAL RIVER
*RENT REDUCED**
3/1 Country Home on
stilts,w/fenced yard.
$565 + Utilities.
Call 920-922-6800




CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 34 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Inverness
352-726-3476
Lecanto
352-746-0373
Crystal River

352-563-0890



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Cleaning Svc-Home,
office,windows,
pressure washing &
more. 352-322-1799






The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lic/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-1584





All Tractor Work
Service specializing in
clean up Tree Re-
moval, General
prop. maint. 302-6955

All AROUND TRAC-
TOR
Landclearing, Haul-
ing Site Prep, Drive-
ways Lic/Ins
352-795-5755





CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120





GOT LEAVES
Let our DR VAC
Do the work!
Call 352-502-6588


SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013 C13


2/1 + Florida Room,
106 S. Fillmore $550
mo. 352-422-2798
BLACK DIAMOND
Newer 3/2/2 $1,150
Bob @ Coldwell
Banker 352-634-4286
Cit.Hills/Brentwood
2/2/2 on golf course.
Club included
$900/mo 516-991-5747
CONNELL
HEIGHTS
2/2/gar, washer, dryer
$500dep. $675 pr mo.
No pets. 352- 601-1257
CRYSTAL RIVER
1BR Great location
$600, 3BR Newly
remolded $895,
1br New, $395
(352) 598-2232

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1
Water Incl. CHA,
$496. 352-220-2447
212-2051
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/2, $750. mo + sec.
850-371-1568
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1.5, fncd yrd, 1 blkto
King's Bay. Boat tie-up;
$650/mo, 1st/L/$300
sec (352)794-0811
HERNANDO
Forest Ridge Village
Nice 2/2 home *
w/garage, screened
patio, & pool/clubhouse
privileges. $750 mo
Call 980-285-8125
Invern. Highlands
2/2/1, City Water, Great
Loc. Quiet Neighrhood
$675. 352-860-2554
INVERNESS
2/1 Great Location,
55+ community, Bring
boat & fishing gear.
$695
(352) 344-1380
INVERNESS
3/2 Brand New,
Granite tops, marble
firs, SS Ap $895
(352) 634-3897
INVERNESS
3/2/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352- 601-2615 OR
352-201-9427

INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/1/1
$590mo.1st & Sec
(352) 344-2560
INVERNESS
Lakefront Patio
Home maint.free 2BD,
2BAw/ Den, Move In
Ready, $900 mo. Ka-
ren Morton
JW Morton Real Es-
tate Century 21
352) 212-7595
Rainbow Lake Est.
Nice 3/2, Home,
Private, $400. mo.
1 (256)352-8519




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225

THIS OUT!

HOMOSASSA,
FLORIDA
3 bedroom. 2 bath.
Completely remodeled 3
bdrm 2 baths, fully fur-
nished, carport, & cov-
ered dock. House is in
a no wake zone with
beautiful view down the
river. No pets, no
smoking. $1,450. per
month 386-527-0126




BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV &
W/D WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611




FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1
Furn. $950.
352-419-4421




CRYSTAL RIVER
3950 sq ft Lt MFG
w/office @ $1200/mo
1155 sq ft storage @
450/mo
600 sq ft office @
450/mo
352-302-1935
CRYSTAL RIVER
Warehouse for Rent
Free standing, garage
area, 1,440sf,
$100-$550
352-634-0129


LAWNCARE N
MORE
Yard Clean-up,
leaves
bushes, hauling
352-726-9570
Winter Clean Up,
Leaves, Power Wash-
ing & More Call
Coastal Lawn Care
(352) 601-1447




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up
time. 352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, lawn maint.
furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from Ato Z
352-628-6790
HAULING
FREE ESTIMATES
scrap metals haul
for FREE (352)
344-9273
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump
Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lc. (352) 584-5374




Chris Satchell Paint-
ing ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref.
Ins. 352-464-1397


9 LaughngStock Interational nc, Dst by Unversal u cklor S, 2013


"... with this ring, I thee wed."






Thank You For 15 Years, of Votes!P

I a riFUL E ,


W WILLTAIEX
C ONS TRUCTION CORP

I E--62 9Q-2 1988


ture Coast Landings
RV Resort. Large de-
veloped site and a
separate gated storage
lot; plus almost new
5th-wheel with slides,
screened gazebo, and
storage building. All for
$79,900. For more info
and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


CALL STELLAR
BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins.
FREE EST (352)
586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Robert G. Vighotti LLC
Painting
Int/Ext FREE
ESTIMATES 35 yrs
exp.
call 508-314-3279




CALL STELLAR
BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins.
FREE EST (352)
586-2996
Cleaning Svc-Home,
office,windows,
pressure washing &
more. 352-322-1799
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300
Robert G. Vighotti LLC
Painting
Int/Ext FREE
ESTIMATES 35 yrs
exp.
call 508-314-3279
Winter Clean Up,
Leaves, Power Wash-
ing & More Call
Coastal Lawn Care
(352) 601-1447


From mobiles to
mansions,
From Gulf to Lakes,
give me a call,
I sell 'em all!
352-4224137
nancv.wilson(d
yahoo.com

Nancy J. Wilson
Realtor
Broker-Associate
SRESGRI
Waybright Real Es-
tate, Inc.







Quiet Country Sett-
ina
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area
only 20 Mm. to Ocala
$129,900 Call
352-302-6784 for
appt.





Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches
&
Commercial









Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments,
Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic.
#2713





MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAIN.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


HOMOSASSA
GNC Commercial
7311 Grover Cleveland
Blvd. 3/2 MH $69,900.
(603) 860-6660












CITRUS

SPRINGS
3/2/2, 2 yr old Pool
home in imacculate
condition,
Landscaped back-
yard. $125.000 Priced
to sell!
CALL (570) 412-5194




PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat,
horses, in-laws; there
is room for everyth-
ing! 4/3 '/2 w/7 car
garage/workshop &
in-law suite on 5.83 ac-
res.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164




REMODELED 2/2/2
NEW: Roof, AC, Kit,
Baths, Windows, Firs,
317 S Harnson. $76,900
Call 352-527-1239


Cts EHl
Homes^J^


CITRUS

HILLS
GOLF COURSE HOME
3/2/2+ $173K.
BY APPT ONLY
(216) 849-3447


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
k 352-302-6838 k




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Tractor Work
Service specializing in
clean up Tree Re-
moval, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding,
bulk mulch, lic/ins
302-8852
KING's LAND
CLEARING & TREE
SERVICE
Complete tree &
stump removal haul-
ing, demo & tractor
work. 32 yrs. exp.
(352) 220-9819
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Tnrim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


I I- I


RelEstt


roll\ lo p 7 w ",* 0 W17









C14 SATURDAY,JANUARY 19, 2013


HERNANDO
Citrus Hills Pool
Home
413/2+, circular
drive,
1 acre lot, below
$200k 352-527-7856





ARBOR LAKES
**OPEN HOUSE**
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR
&
fenced back yard!
Gated Comm. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista
Trl
(352) 419-7418





3/2 Move In Ready Villa
in Windemere. Beauti-
fully Maintained with up-
graded features. Prem-
ier location close to boat
ramp, trail & downtown.
MLS#359594 $229,500
Call Mynam Reulen
(352) 613-2644
Weston Properties, LLC

INVERNESS
Block home 2br, 1ba
w/ 2porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + ac-
res. $130,000 Call
Buzz 352-341-0224 or
David 607-539-7872

Unique stilt home off
581. Great loc to town,
shopping, & hospital.
2br/lba, w/ rap around
porch. Needs some
TLC. Sold as is.
$33,900 (352) 419-6227





GRAND 2006
CUSTOM HOME
www.81woodfield.
CanBYours.com
81 Woodfield,
Homosassa
3 Bed/2 Bath/3 Car Gar
Salt Water Pool & More!
$339K, MLS#356914
Realty Connect
(352) 212-1446

The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo
Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558







MUST SELL

4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell







4/2/3 HEATED POOL
lots of extras!
SELLER MOTIVATED!
reduced to 210k
352-688-6500 or
352-212-5023


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Sugarmill Woods
House for Sale
2/2/2, Call for More
Info. 334-691-4601
(850) 776-7528


GAIL
STEARNS Re-
altor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298

Low overhead =
Low Commis-
sions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financ-
ing available


I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!









DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515













TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

Buy or Sell
Call NOW

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Realestate
Consultant


Werf ron
Homes^^^


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near
KINGS BAY $425,000.
Make Offers
352-563-9857

DUNNELLON
Here is that home on
Lake Rousseau that
you have always
wanted! 2br 1 % ba on
1.43 acres w/168ft
lake frontage. Com-
pletely remodeled all
new interior & windows.
No Flood Insur-
ance! Prced reduced
from $369,000 to
$169,000
Call Bernie
(352) 563-0116

YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


1=J 'c k'L"

SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaflreCoast
Properties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"





% ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact fee
credit, high and dry,
trees, $11,000 obo
(352) 795-3710

NORTH CITRUS
1.4 ac. Cleared, fenced,
high & dry. Paved road.
Elec., pump/well, septic.
Owner finan. No
mobiles. $13,900
CALL 352-897-4195

Owner Financing
5 ACRES FLORAL
CITY
Pasture Land
9858 S. Istachatta Rd
2012 Taxes $115 w/
Agricultural Greenbelt,
Water/Elec/Barn/fence
$89K. MLS#354831
Realty Connect
(352) 212-1446


Citrus County
Homes 9


FOREST RIVER
INC.
2006 Cardinal like new.
Rare in-place senior
use. Smoke/pet free.
352-843-5441.
detailsbyowner.com.
Wholesale, $17,830.00
ITASCA MERIDIAN
36 Ft, 2005 Motor
Home
350HP Cat Diesel 55K
miles, no smoke/pets
6 Michelan Tires,
New 2010 qn w/
sleep No. mattress &
overhead fan. W/D
combo $71,000 obo.
(352) 419-7882
NATIONAL RV
2006 Tropical One
owner,34ft, 26000
miles,no smoke/pets,
300HP Cummins die-
sel,2 slides, 6 new ti-
res, 3yr
warranty,many extras.
$87000. Well main-
tained. 352-341-4506




5TH WHEEL
33FT
GOOD CONDITION
MUST SELL
(423) 202-0914
FOREST RIVER
2010, Surveyor,
Sport 189, 20 ft.
Travel Trailer,
1 slide, w/AC, qn. bed,
awning, pwr. tonque
jack, corner jacks, mi-
crowave, equalizing
hitch, $10,500, re-
duced to $9800
(352) 382-1826
HIGH LINE
1999, 32ft, Deluxe,
12' slide out, new 22'
awning, 55+ park, can
be moved. Was ask-
ing $9,000, Sell $6,900
excel. shape
231-408-8344
HI-LO TRAVEL
TRAILER 2003, tow
lite model 22-03t,exc.
cond.
$6000 obo
352-422-8092
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, kg bd,like new,
60amp serv. NADA
$29K asking $25K
obo 352-382-3298
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945




4 Tires
215- 65/17
10,000 miles left
$60 for Set
(352) 628-1126
FIERO
Assorted body parts
$25 each
(352) 586-0084
SILVERADO 5TH
WHEEL TAILGATE
$100
&
VINYL RANGER BED
COVER $75
(352) 637-2982



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk
or Unwanted
Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot LARRY'S
AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352
564-8333


BOAT TRANSIT
TRAILER Very Ig., dbl.
axles up to 33 ft. Any
boat type! $1800 or
OBO (813) 244-3945




Hobie Kayak,
$1,600 "Outback" for
Fishing hunting or tak-
ing pictures 12ft 1
inch, 33" wide mirage
drive, capacity 400
Ibs. used 1 time, $500
in extras included
(352) 212-1258



5HP OUTBOARD
MOTOR LIKE NEW
$385 (352) 341-2661 or
352-586-7437
BASS TRACKER
12ft. Jon Boat,
w/ 6HP motor & trailer,
$1,750 obo
(352) 563-0665



MOST SELL


BAYLINER1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motor,AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth
finder, 2001 Rolls
float on trailer worth
$1000. Comes
w/spare motor Has
service manual,
2nd owner $2500
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855

LOWE
1982 aluminum 18' boat
w/trailer, motor needs
work. $700.00
352-628-2150
PONTOON BOAT
18ft. 1991, NEW carpet
seats, etc., Nice,
Boat only. Will deliver
$1,200. (352) 637-3983
TRI PONTOON
BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
Included $17,000.
352-613-8453
TWIN VEE 2006
26ft 210hrs, Twin 140hp
Suzukis, 4 Stroke,
Extras, Trailer $28,500
(352) 564-8882
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
(352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com


Rerato


7. Slackers' sofas (2)


SHHi03 lSHnO'IS 'L HIaNftVI HINaOVO '9 iNVAJ INIIt 3'9
NOOVA NOOVIA 'P SIHNflf SNO'1 OT301 )OH'Z SR3JVd XVI '
1-19-13 SaIlhMS


BUYINJUN AR
Running or Not *
CASH PAID- $300 &
UP
(352) 771-6191
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition, Ti-
tle, No Title, Bank
Lien,
No Problem, Don't
Trade it in. We Will
Pay up to $25K Any
Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ




2005 TOYOTA
Camry XLE 77K mi
loaded RED 4 cyl 1
owner clean carfax
$10,850 way under KBB
352-419-4513
BUICK
2007, Lucerne, CXL
55K miles, Leather
$13,500. obo
Call Troy
(352)621-7113
CADILLAC
2003 CTS, Must see.
Luxury car at an
affordable pnce.
Call 352-628-4600
for an appointment.
CHEVROLET
2002, Camaro Z28
$9,495.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2005, Venture
$3,995
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2007, Impala
$9,995
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
'01, PT Cruiser,
loaded, 53k miles,
$4,800
(352) 464-4304
CHRYSLER
'97, Town and Country
Van 7 pass. good
cond. Call for Details
$1750. 352-637-2588

DUDLEY'S
AUCTIOI-






1-19
AUTOGRAPH
AUCTION
11am Celebrity &
Sports, Live & On
Line everything from
golf to Rock& Roll.
Bats, balls, Albums,
photos, books,
cards & more from
Hendrix to Tiger.
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384
FORD
2001 COBRA MUS-
TANG CONV. 5
SPEED, LEATHER
MUST SEE
CALL 352-628-4600
For More Info
FORD
2005, Five Hundred
LMT, 40K miles,
leather, V6 $9,980
Call Troy
352-621-7113
FORD
2006 Focus ZXW, SE
4DR, WGN. 85k miles
$5,800 obo
Call Troy (352)
621-7113
GAS SAVER!
1999 Saturn SL $2000
Tan/Gold. Auto. Engine
and Trans are solid.
196,000 miles. Clean in-
side and out. Call Steve:
352-613-0746
HONDA
2011 CRV LX, 19K
miles, likenew, 4 Cyl.
$19,950
Call Troy
352-621-7113
HYUNDAI
2006 Elantra, GLS
90K miles, likenew, 4
DR, auto. $6,800
Call Troy
352-621-7113
JEEP
Grand Cherokee ltd.
White, 70k mi. Mint
cond. Auto.$11,000
(305) 619-0282
KIA
'99, Sportage, Conv.
Top, low miles,
Runs great.
CALL 352-628-4600
For pricing.
LINCOLN
1998, MARK VIII
Automatic, COLD A/C
CALL 352-628-4600
For an appointment
to see!


FORD MUSTANG
2007, 7000 mi, garage
kept, GT clone.
Call (352) 527-1191
MERCEDES
2006 SLK 350 Cony.
$26,000 OBO &
2005 S430 $22, 000
OBO (352) 621-4611
MITSUBISHI
'01, Eclipse GT,
sunroof, black w/ tan
leather int. runs
great
$2,500. 352-464-0719
MITSUBISHI
Mirage 2000 2dr.
coupe 5spd, 107k,
36mpg, cd & ar. Just
serviced. $1850 (352)
422-1026
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

OLDSMOBILE '99
Cutlass, custom, 4 DR,
loaded, good mi., V6,
cruise, tilt, gar. clean
$3,250. (352) 212-9383
SUBARU
1992 Legacy, 1 owner,
good cond. manual
trans. $1500 OBO
(352) 628-3194
TOYOTA
2000, Camry LE
V6, 183K miles Super
Clean $5,800. obo
Call Troy (352)
621-7113
TOYOTA
2000, Camry, Good
fuel economy, 4 door
transportation.
CALL 352-628-4600
for pricing & details.
TOYOTA
2007, Yaris, 59K mi-
les,
2 DR, H/B $7,800.
Call Troy
352-621-7113




1971 CHEVELLE
CONVERTIBLE
stunning, 40k+ in-
vested, fully re-
stored, 350 auto,
buckets, consistent
show winner, high
end stereo, red w/
white top & interior
$23,900,
352-513-4257

CHEVROLET
2004 Corvette convert.
Millennium yellow, 22K,
in excellent condition.
Corsa exhaust system
customized stainless
steel accessories inside
& out. Incl. gnlls, lights,
& tag frame.Performa-
nce exhaust headers, &
cold air intake filter.
$26,000. 352-382-2324







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Onhy $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
I I I I I I I I




FORD
2003 F250
crew cab, $6,495.
352-341-0018
FORD
2010 F150 Platinum
Supercrew, 4x4, 31700
miles, black, leather,
navigation, rear view
camera, tow package,
excellent condition,
warranty, $12400,
dema@netscape.com
LARIAT
'00 Dully, V10, Goose
Neck towing pkg.
125k mi, clean $8,600.,
352-637-4864, 220-3277
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.or
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

NISSAN
2008 Titan King Cab,
w/bedliner & tow pkg,
New engine w/2 yr
warranty, 36K, $12, 000
OBO(352) 464-1164
TOYOTA
2004, 4 Runner Sport
2WD, 94K mi,
Leather $12,800.
obo
Call Troy
352-621-7113


CADILLAC
2007, Escalade,
44k miles, Luxury
NAV, $29,500.
Call Troy (352)
621-7113
JEEP
2011 Patriot 2.0L, 5
speed, FWD, a/c,
power
windows/doors,
white, 12k, like new,
$12,750 352 513-4100



SOLD
CHEVROLET
'96, Suburban LT,
excel. cond. Leather,
garaged. Must See
$4,400 obo




FORD
F150, 1978, 4x4
perfect, father/son.
project $1,650 obo
(352) 564-4598
JEEP
1995, Wrangler,
$5,495.
352-341-0018
JEEP
2004, Wrangler X
4WD, Only 57K mi-
les,
Hard Top $13,800.
Call Troy
352-621-7113




BAD BOY BUGGIE
2011 "ready to hunt"
Only $5998.
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS
2002, SPORTSMAN
700 CC 4X4 AUTO
READY FOR THE MUD
ONLY $4288
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS RZR 800 LE
TIME TO PLAY HARD
ONLY $8388
(352) 621-3678




DALIN DAY STAR
2006, 700mi saddle
bags, Fully dressed,
Call (352) 527-1191
Harley Davidson
2002, 883 Sportser,
new tires & saddlebags
17k mi.. $4.500. obo


Harley-DAVIDSON
2006 FLHTPI Clean
bike, great looks, 88 ci,
5 speed, low miles 19K,
accident free, never
played down, garage
kept, two tone bk/wt, all
service done by HD
dealer 352 513-4294
asking $10,500
HONDA
'01, Goldwing,
100k + miles,
$9,500
(352) 419-4606
HONDA
'06. Shadow 600 VLX,
deluxe. Can not tell
from brand new.
EXTRAS $3,600 obo
(352) 527-2294
HONDA
1997, GOLDWING
ASPENCADE, 24K mi,
Lots a Extras! $6000.
(352) 212-6450
HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley,1100CC,
Chrome, bags, trade?,
70mpg $2,800. Crystal
River
(727) 207-1619
HONDA BLACK BIRD
CBR 1100 LOW LOW
MILES ONLY $3488.00
(352) 621-3678
HONDA ST1300
2006 MADE TO TOUR
ONLY $7786
(352) 621-3678
KAWASKI NINFA
650
LIKE NEW ONLY
$5488 (352) 621-3678
KYMCO
2009, AJILITY
SCOOTER GREAT
GAS SAVER ONLY
$998 (352) 621-3678
SUZUKI BURGMAN
AUTOMATIC TWIST
AND GO FUN ONLY
$4686 (352) 621-3678
SUZUKI GSXR 750
195 MILES "HOLD ON"
ONLY $9996
(352) 621-3678
VICTORY CROSS
ROADS
"GREAT American
MADE CRUSIER"
ONLY $12888
(352) 621-3678


293-0119 SACRN
UnitC-21
PUBLIC NOTICE

HEATH MINI STORAGE
5164 S. Floria Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
SALE OF CONTENTS


Februav2.2013
Pursuant to Florida Stat-
ute 83.805, the entire
contents of the following
storage unit(s) will be sold
in order to pay for past
due rental, advertising
and other charges owed


by these tenants. The sale
will take place 2 weeks
from the first publication.
UNIT C-21
Kathy English
7450 S. Roy Terrace
Floral City.FL 34436
January 19, 2013


WORDBY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Lumberjack tool wrapped sets (1) Every answers a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Pawn a Lego unit (1) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
Definition tells you how many
3. Cloister residents' tiered beds (1) syllables in each word.

I I 20131UFS Dist by Univ Ulck for UFS
4. Lidded wine vessel cart (2)


5. Lawyer customer Kobe of the NBA (2)


6. More bonily thin cruel teaser (2)


290-0119 SACRN
1/30 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
SALE:
S.M. Duggan Towing
L.L.C. gives Notice of Fore-


closure of Lien and intent
to
sell these vehicles) on
1/30/2013, 10:00 a.m. at
1635 NE 32nd Ave, Ocala,
FL 34470 pursuant to Flor-
ida Statutes S.M. Duggan


Towing L.L.C. reserves the
right to accept or reject any
and/or all bids.
2001 FORD EXPEDITION
VIN#
1FMRU15W61LA36723
January 19,2013


291-0119 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) announces the follow-
ing public meeting to which all interested persons are invited:
Cooperative Funding Public Meeting: Governing Board members will discuss, evalu-
ate and prioritize fiscal year 2014 requests for project funding in the northern counties
of SWFWMD. All or part of this meeting may be conducted by means of communica-
tions media technology in order to permit maximum participation of Governing
Board members.

DATE/TIME: Tuesday, February 5, 2013; 1 p.m.

PLACE: SWFWMD Brooksville Service Office, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, FL
34604-6899

A copy of the agenda may be obtained by contacting: WaterMatters.org Boards,
Meetings & Event Calendar; 1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211.

Pursuant to the provision of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring
reasonable accommodations to participate in this workshop/meeting is asked to ad-
vise the agency at least 5 days before the workshop/meeting by contacting
SWFWMD's Human Resources Bureau Chief, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352) 796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-1476 (FL only), ext. 4702;
TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or email to ADACoordinator@swfwmd.state.fl.us.

If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board/Committee with
respect to any matter considered at this meeting or hearing, he/she will need to en-
sure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the
testimony and evidence from which the appeal is to be issued.

For more information, you may contact: Lori.Manuel@watermatters.org
1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211 x4606 (Ad Order EXE0243)
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle January 19, 2013



292-0119 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) announces the follow-
ing public meeting to which all interested persons are invited:

Cooperative Funding Public Meeting: Governing Board members will discuss, evalu-
ate and prioritize fiscal year 2014 requests for project funding in the southern counties
of SWFWMD. All or part of this meeting may be conducted by means of communica-
tions media technology in order to permit maximum participation of Governing
Board members.

DATE/TIME: Wednesday, February 6, 2013; 10 a.m.

PLACE: SWFWMD Sarasota Service Office, 6750 Fruitville Road, Sarasota FL 34240

A copy of the agenda may be obtained by contacting: WaterMatters.org Boards,
Meetings & Event Calendar; 1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211.

Pursuant to the provision of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring
reasonable accommodations to participate in this workshop/meeting is asked to ad-
vise the agency at least 5 days before the workshop/meeting by contacting
SWFWMD's Human Resources Bureau Chief, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352) 796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-1476 (FL only), ext. 4702;
TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or email to ADACoordinator@swfwmd.state.fl.us.

If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board/Committee with
respect to any matter considered at this meeting or hearing, he/she will need to en-
sure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the
testimony and evidence from which the appeal is to be issued.

For more information, you may contact: Lori.Manuel@watermatters.org
1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211, x4606 (Ad Order EXE0244)
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle January 19, 2013


294-0124 FCRN
vs, Thomas, Ronnie 09-2010-CA-000471 NOFS
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO: 09-2010-CA-000471
CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RONNIE THOMAS STODGHILL, II A/K/A RONNIE T STODGHILL A/K/A RONNIE
STODGHILL; REGIONS BANK; AUDREY M. MARSHALL; BRANDY M. STODGHILL; RONNIE
THOMAS STODGHILL; THOMAS E. MARSHALL UNKNOWN TENANTSS; IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the
12th day of December, 2012, and entered in Case No. 09-2010-CA-000471, of the
Circuit Court of the 5TH Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein
CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC is the Plaintiff and RONNIE THOMAS STODGHILL, II A/K/A
RONNIE T. STODGHILL A/K/A RONNIE STODGHILL; REGIONS BANK; AUDREY M. MAR-
SHALL; BRANDY M. STODGHILL; RONNIE THOMAS STODGHILL; THOMAS E. MARSHALL
UNKNOWN TENANTS) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The
Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash electronically at
www.citrus.realforeclose.com, the Clerk's website for on-line auctions at, 10:00 AM
on the 31st day of January, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said
Final Judgment, to wit:
SEE EXHIBIT A
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN OR-
DER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO
THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINATOR,
TELEPHONE (352) 341-6700, 110 N APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS FL, 34450, AT LEAST 7
DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIV-
ING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN
7 DAYS. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711.
Dated this 16th day of January, 2013.
By: /s/ Marco Dattini, Florida Bar No. 412228
Submitted by:
Choice Legal Group, PA.,1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309,Telephone: (954) 453-0365
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052, Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANTTO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516
eservice@clegalgroup.com
EXHIBIT A

A PARCEL OF LAND IN THE NE 1/4 OF SE 1/4 OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 17 SOUTH,
RANGE 19 EAST.BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:

FROM A POINT OF BEGINNING, COMMENCE AT THE NE CORNER OF THE W 1/2 OF E 1/2
OF NE1/4 OF SE 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 17 SOUTH, RANGE 19 EAST, THENCE
S. 0 DEGREES 7'13"W. 1310.92 FEET TO THE SE CORNER OF SAID W 1/2 OF E 1/2 OF NE
1/4 OF SE 1/4, THENCE S. 89 DEGREES 53' 35" W. 317.09 FEET TO THE SW CORNER OF
SAID W 1/2 OF E 1/2 OF NE 1/4 OF SE 1/4, THENCE N. 0 DEGREES 8' 19" E. 1081.30 FEET,
THENCE N.16 DEGREES 19'13" W. 131 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE MEAN LOW WATER
LINE 140 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF SAID W 1/2 OF E 1/2
OF NE 1/4 OF SE 1/4 OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 17 SOUTH, RANGE 19 EAST, THENCE N.
89 DEGREES 41'55" E., ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, 256 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING.SUBJECT TO AN EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTH 20 FEET
THEREOF FOR ROAD RIGHT-OF-WAY
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 19 & 24 2013


295-0124 FCRN
vs, Brundage, Cynthia 2010CA-0004175 NOFS
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 09-2010-CA-004175
NEWEST BANK, FSB,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CYNTHIA BRUNDAGE; ERNEST BRUNDAGE A/K/A ERNEST B. BRUNDAGE; UNKNOWN
TENANTSS; IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 12th
day of December, 2012, and entered in Case No. 09-2010-CA-004175, of the Circuit
Court of the 5TH Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein ONEWEST
BANK, FSB is the Plaintiff and CYNTHIA BRUNDAGE, ERNEST BRUNDAGE A/K/A ERNEST
B. BRUNDAGE and UNKNOWN TENANTS) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY
are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash electronically at www.citrus.realforeclose.com, the Clerk's website for on-line
auctions at, 10:00 AM on the 31st day of January, 2013, the following described
property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:

LOT 21, HOMOSASSA RETREATS, UNIT NO. 3, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION LOCATED
IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 5 AND SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 20 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, AND
BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS; COMMENCE AT THE SW CORNER
OF E 1/2 OF GOVERNMENT LOT 3 OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 20 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST,
THENCE N. 1 DEGREE 35 MINUTES 22 SECONDS W. 470.14 FEET, THENCE S. 85 DEGREES
31 MINUTES 44 SECONDS E. 50.28 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE N. 1
DEGREE 35 MINUTES 22 SECONDS W. 220 FEET, THENCE N. 86 DEGREES 30 MINUTES E.
270 FEET, MORE OR
LESS, TO THE WATERS OF THE CANAL, THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY AND NORTHEASTERLY
ALONG SAID WATERS TO A POINT THAT IS S. 85 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 44 SECONDS E.
210 FEET AND N. 27 DEGREES 20 MINUTES E. 260 FEET, MORE OR LESS, FROM THE POINT
OF BEGINNING, THENCE S. 27 DEGREES 20 MINUTES W. 260 FEET, MORE OR LESS,
THENCE N. 85 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 44 SECONDS W. 210 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINN-
ING.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN OR-
DER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU,
TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINA-
TOR, TELEPHONE (352) 341-6700, 110 N APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS FL, 34450, AT
LEAST 7 DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY
UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEAR-
ANCE IS LESS THAN 7 DAYS. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711.
Dated this 16th day of January, 2013.
By: /s/ Marco Dattini, Florida Bar No. 412228
Submitted by:
Choice Legal Group, PA.1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309Telephone:(954) 453-0365
Facsimile:(954) 771-6052, Toll Free:1-800-441-2438
DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANTTO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516
eservice@clegalgroup.com
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronical January 19 & 24, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


$2,199 due at signing [after all offers. Includes security deposit. Tax, lille, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Mileage charge of $0 25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $35,795 36.







w/ Base Preferred Equipment Group
Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For QuAallfed
Lessees


/MO. 36 MONTH LEASE
$3,319 due at signing (after all offers. Includes security deposit Tax, tille, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Mileage charge of $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $64,165.165.36.


w/ Luxury Collection Preferred Equipment Group


Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For Qualified
Lessees


$2,739 .. ,. 1' 1, :II :h j .- .I r :Pie 1deposil, Taox, ils, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Mileage ,hasy .:I '-. 1 m6lA.'.:, r,, "i,:.:" m l., IA SP $43,405.36,







w/ Preferred Equipment Group
Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For Qualifed
Lessees


-W W'/MO. 36 MONTH LEASE
$2,839 due at signing alter all offers] Includes security deposit Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra
Mileage charge of $0.25/mile over 30.000 miles. MRSP $44,995 36,


) CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED


2005 CADILLAC
DEVILLE
GOLD MIST, 71000 MILES, LOCAL TRADE IN,
EXTRA CLEAN, #C2S243A
s,sasB8


2004 CADILLAC
CTS
LUXURY COLLECTION
CRYSTAL RED, 73,000 MILES, ONE OWNER,
SUNROOF, #40136382
'10,41B


2007 CADILLAC
DTS
LUXURY COLLECTION
GOLD MIST, LUXURY PACKAGE,
LOCAL ONE OWNER TRADE,#C3X042A
ISs 001a


2012 CADILLAC
CTS
LUXURY COLLECTION
RADIANT SILVER, LUXURY PACKAGE,
SUNROOF, LOADED, #0383100
s89,9488


2005 CHEVROLET
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
BLACK, ONLY 22,000 MILES, ONE OWNER
TRADE WITH NAVIGATION, #55126528
*29,BBQ


2013 ACURA
RDX
BURGANDY, ONLY 700 MILES, LOCAL TRADE,
CLEAN, CARFAX, C2S270A
'32,S988


') CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED
k,.


2008 GMC
ENVOY SLT
BUR6ANOY, ONLY 18,000 MILES, LEATHER,
ONE OWNER TRADE, #C2S272A
s-17,98~


2008 CADILLAC
DTS
LUXURY COLLECTION
GOLD MIST, LUXURY PACKAGE,
LOCAL ONE OWNER TRADE, OC382160A
sB,4sBB


2007 CADILLAC
STS
GOLD MIST, 31,530 MILES, LUXURY
PERFORMANCE PACKAGE, SUNROOF, C383130
*-ra ses


2011 CADILLAC
DTS
PREMIUM COLLECTION
SILKY GREEN SUNROOF, NAVIGATION, PREMIUM
PACKAGE, LOCAL TRADE, #C3X09AA
35, 9892


2009 FORD
GT 500
BLACK, 27,67 MILES.AWESOME CAR WITH ALL
THE POWER AND LUXURY #C25242A
*38, 988


2011 CADILLAC
ESCALADE
LUXURY COLLECTION
BLACK, 22' CHROME WHEELS, SUNROOF,
NAVIGATION, #382870
49, 9BB8


4040 SW COLLEGE ROAD OCALA, FL 352-732-4700
000DP21


2009 CADILLAC 2009 CADILLAC 2007 PORSCHE 2011 BUICK 2011 MERCEDES-BENZ 2011 CADILLAC
DTS CTS CAYMAN "S" LACROSSE CXS C300 SRX
LUXURY COLLECTION LUXURY COLLECTION LUXURY COLLECTION
GRAY, LUXURY PACKAGE, BLACK DIAMOND, SUNROOF, PERFORMANCE RED, TIP-TRONIC TRANSMISSION, SLACK, LOW MILES, CHROME WHEELS, BLACK, 18,582 MILES, GOLD MIST, ONLY 12,000 MILES, ONE OWNER
40,175 MILES, #C382230A PACKAGE. ONE OWNER, #C2S245A LOCAL TRADE, C3M151B SUNROOF, LOADED. #C22696 LOADED WITH LUXURY, IC382220 TRADE WITH SUNROOF, #BS678665
R rs,9geBB a 1,GQBB 5,9gB *2SBg98B s27,gg88 s,88


SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013 C15


/MO. 36 MONTH LEASE


~U~ ii~;;;;;;;;;;~ji~




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DECEMBER'S $5000 WINNER!
BARBARA WILBURN-YORK
YOU COULD BE THIS MONTH'S WINNER!
VISIT ANY CRYSTAL LOCATION FOR DETAILS


SNISSAN
352-564-1971
NNi 937 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL
-2- CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
Sales: Monday-Friday 8:00am-8:00pm Saturday 9:00am-7:30pm Sunday-Closed
Service: M, W, F 7:30am-5:30pm T, TH 7:30am-7:00pm Saturday 8:00am-4:00pm Sunday-Closed Body Shop: M-F 7:30am-5:30pm
+PRICE INCLUDES $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX TAG TITLE AND
DEALER FEE $599.50. WAC. *LEASES ARE FOR 39 MONTHS 39,000 MILES FOR THE LIFE OF THE LEASE. 15 CENTS PER MILE OVER. $3999 DUE AT SIGNING
WITH APPROVED CREDIT. **0%, SPECIAL FINANCE OFFERS AND NO PAYMENTS UNTIL MARCH 2013 ARE AVAILABLE WITH APPROVED CREDIT, NOT VERY-
ONE WILL QUALIFY. OFFERS CANNOT BE COMBINED. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


C16 SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Loaded with innovation. Fueled by efficiency.

Now get our best offers on America's favorite Brand.


. '" :


2013
$26,670
-700
-1,000

*2


W G3T062
ESCAPE SE
MSRP
Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
Bonus Cash


Anniversary
Same Owner!
Same Location!


,970


w W W G3T048w
2013 EDGE SE
$28,890 MSRP
-400 Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
-1,500 Bonus Cash

'27,990


Go Further


ford.com


2013 EXPLORER XLT
$36,005 MSRP
-1,010 Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
-2,000 Bonus Cash

'32,995


2013 F-150 SUPER CAB XL
$29,265 MSRP
-800 Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
-3,500 Customer Cash

*24,965


=kIlA Bi P l I II ;


SIV Y rUKU r- I U ALl UUI UUUUI LAKAVAN St
$5,950 $6,950


SVM. V....W .... ......
Eddie Bouer 4x4
$10,950


2003 GMC YUKON SLT
$10,950



08 CHEVY MALIBU LT
$13,950
v -~BL


2008 NISSAN XTERRA
$13,950


2010 FORD E250CARGO VAN 2006 FORD RANGER XLT 4X4
32,000 miles Super Cab, 34,000 miles
$15,950 17,950



2008 JEEP WRANGLER X 2011 GMC TERRAIN SLT
12,000 Miles
$19,950 $23,950


2009 GRAND MARQUIS LS
$13,950


2008 CHRYSLERSEBRING TOURING 2010 FORD FOCUS SEL
20,000 Miles Loaded
$12,950 $12,950
Cl~i-- 'ii


2UI I NISAN VVKSA SL
15,000 Miles
$13,950
[ ., .r


2006 TOYOTA AVALON XLS
$14,950


Nick Nicholas

CaIll Toll Free River


Hwy. 19 N. 795-7371
1 Based on 1 CY sales 2 Based on analysis of data published by EPA, 11/10. *Prices
and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory rebates with approved credit. Plus
tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. Ford Credit Financing required. Not all buyers
will qualify. See dealer for details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors.
Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prices and payments good through 2/4/13.


08 FORD TAURUS SEL
$12,950



2005 FORD F350 LARIAT
Dually Super Cab
$15,950


2010 FORD EDGE SE 2010 LINCOLN MKZ
$19,950 $19,950


2010 LINCOLN MKS
One Owner
$25,950


LINCOLN


Of O -O I 7-O lO I
or Visit Us Online
www.nicknicholasfordLINCOLN.com


Csa vi


SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013 C17


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"I r


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


% % I I


FAR 'V I
m.ff


* I I Ia-


ida


New 2012 Honda CMc LX
AUTOMATIC


*w
Inkm


SLi


New 2013 Honda Fit d
MODEL GEMH3CEXW. EQUIPPED NOT STRIPPED
WITH AUTOMATIC. AC AND CRUISE


New 2012 Honda Accon LX Sedan
MODEL CP2F3CEW, AllTOMATIC,POWER PKG,
CFIUSE.TJACTION CONTfOL AND 50 MUCH MORE


New 2012 Honda CMc Hyrild
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New 2012 Honda CR-V LX 2WD
MODEL 3:CEW COME SEE WHYTHE CRY IS THE BEST
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2012 Chevy Volt
Now's the time to GO GREEN!!!




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Al-New 2013 Chevy Spak 1LS
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MSFRP: $15,560


2013 CheY Malibu LS
MSRP: $23M440


2013 Chevy Equiox LS
Stk. C131 35, Au0o,4cyL MSRP S25,030


2012 Chevy Wese LS
Stk #C12326, Auto, Seat 7LWs $30750
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DECEMBER'S
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