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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 01-16-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03002

Full Text


On the pitch: Lecanto, Citrus boys battle /B1


03 I


Partly cloudy.
PAGE A4


CITRU-S CO U N T Y





[Bs RONICL.
www.chronicleonline.com
Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


VOL. 118 ISSUE 162


Two injured
in airboat
accident
Two men were in-
jured Tuesday morn-
ing in an airboat
accident in Potts
Preserve.
The single boat
accident happened
shortly after 10 a.m.
in a swampy area
near Parsons Point
Road.
Citrus County
sheriff's officials re-
sponded with a ma-
rine unit and
emergency medical
services were called.
Karen Parker with
Florida Fish and
Wildlife said one of
the two male pas-
sengers on the air-
boat was taken to an
area hospital with in-
juries and the other
passenger refused
medical treatment.
No additional details
were available Tues-
day evening.
New look
for stocks
page
The Chronicle has
updated the design
of its stocks page.
The new design
includes 10-day
trends for the S&P
500 and the NAS-
DAQ; daily recaps of
the major markets;
the top 42 stocks of
local interest; daily
recaps of interest
rates; daily recaps of
commodities and the
top 25 mutual funds.
Additionally, readers
will be informed of
news events about
the major companies
being traded.
The information is
contained in a con-
densed format and
is designed for ease
of use.
Readers with In-
ternet access can
obtain any stock list-
ing using the Chroni-
cle's "Stock Lookup"
feature at chronicle
online.com. Click on
the News header
and then Stock
Lookup. Search by
ticker or stock name.
From staff reports


NATIONAL NEWS:


Time to toast manatees


Annual Crystal River festival

tofeaturefin, food, entertainment


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
Mark your calendars to com-
memorate the county's beloved
marine mammal the mana-
tee at the 26th annual
Florida Manatee Festival in the
historic business district of
Crystal River.
Festival hours are from 9 a.m.


to 5 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 19, and
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday,
Jan. 20. Admission is $3 per per-
son; children 12 and younger
are free.
The event will feature mana-
tee education, a juried art and
craft show, food vendors, chil-
dren's activities, dragon boats,
two beer and wine gardens, en-
tertainment, boat tours and big-


screen televisions to watch the
NFL playoff games.
"There is going to be so much
to do and see this weekend,"
said Jeff Inglehart, special
events coordinator with the Cit-
rus County Chamber of Com-
merce. "The weather is going to
be great for the family fun
weekend."
Last year the "gentle giants"
and related hoopla brought in
more than 15,000 visitors during
the two-day weekend. More than
50 exhibitors and 150 vendors will


* WHAT: Florida Manatee Festival.
* WHEN: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Sunday.
* WHERE: Downtown Crystal
River.
* COST: $3 admission; $4 in-
cludes festival admission and
shuttle service from Crystal
River Mall festival parking area
to and from the festival grounds.
* INFO: 795-3149 or www.
citruscountychamber.com.


Page A5


County bartender keeps

drinks, conversationflowing

NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer

M ost anyone

can tend bar,

but not everyone who pours
beer or mixes a drink is a

bartender


Citrus County WORKS

* Editor's note: In this economic climate where jobs are at a premium, the
Chronicle is beginning an occasional series, "Citrus County Works," profil-
ing Citrus County people and the jobs they perform. First up career
bartender Elliot Rothstein.


Number one: A bar-
tender must genuinely
like people. He or she
needs to be able to start
conversations with
strangers and keep
them going or know
when to stay quiet.
Good bartenders are
friendly, but not obnox-
iously so, and always
diplomatic. They keep


up with current events,
but keep their politics
to themselves.
They know not to say,
"How 'bout those Yan-
kees?" to someone with
a Boston accent, unless
they know the person
from Boston would ap-
preciate a friendly
poke along with a pint.
A good bartender has


command over the bar
and control over what
goes on there.
It's so much more
than pouring drinks.
"You have to know
how to make people
feel comfortable," said
Elliot Rothstein, a ca-
reer bartender.


Page A5


Car bling School
Fancy grilles, headlights school board m oves on
and more are featured
at annual auto
show./Page A8 -V f1 "~ ^ W1 "


BUSINESS NEWS:
Walmart jobs
Walmart plans to hire
all eligible veterans in
coming weeks./Page A9

Comics ..........C7
Community .......C5
Crossword ....... .C6
Editorial ........A10
Entertainment .... B6
Horoscope ....... .B6
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies .......... .C7
Obituaries ........ A6
Classifieds ........ C8
TV Listings .......C6


6114178 112002I II


- m111111Li uiill iiitlulet/

Gov. Scott will appoint replacement for Hale


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Citrus County
School Board members are preparing
for life as a group of four following
Susan Hale's resignation Monday
Board members will await Gov Rick
Scott's appointment of Hale's replace-
ment, but they do not know how long
that will take.
In the meantime, board members
said they don't see issues arising by tak-
ing one person out of the mix, even
though it opens the possibility of 2-2
votes that would defeat motions.
"All of us have worked together for a
long time," board member Linda Pow-


ON THE WEB
www.flgov.com/appointments.

ers said. "It doesn't cause me concern.
There won't be any problem working
together."
Hale, elected to the school board in
August and taking office in November,
resigned Monday after attending just
three meetings. Hale, a former tech-
nology teacher at Lecanto High School,
said she wanted to spend more time
with family members in ill health, in-
cluding her mother and husband.
See Page A2


City OKs $6M


in contracts

Funds go to sewerproject,

Cutler Spur improvements


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER-
The City Council awarded
more than $6 million in
contracts for the construc-
tion of two of the city's big-
ticket items work on
Cutler Spur Boulevard
and a vacuum sewer col-
lection system for Area
114 of the regional sewer
project.
One project seeks to
seamlessly move mo-


tourists, parallel to U.S. 19,
from the midtown area to
downtown and the other
is the last phase of a con-
troversial project that
aims to connect some
county residents to the
city sewer system.
Monday night, council
members voted over-
whelmingly to award a
$2,578,659.57 contract to
Commercial Industrial
Corp. for the imminent


Page A2


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
78
LOW
58


More than just pouring drinks


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
Career bartender Elliot Rothstein works at Stumpknockers on the Square in Inverness. A New York native, in 2011 Rothstein was rec-
ognized as Eastern Long Island New York's Best Bartender. He has lived full-time in Citrus County for a year.





A2 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013


CONTRACTS
Continued from Page Al

improvement project on Cutler
Spur. Council members
awarded a $3,577,466.70 con-
tract to Royal American Con-
struction to build the vacuum
sewer collection system in Area
114 in the Fort Island Trail
area. Officials also OK'd a
change of order to GPI South-
east Inc. in the amount of
$335,896.
"This a project of enormous
proportion and I just want to
congratulate (City Manager)
Andy Houston and his staff for
doing a great job. And I am glad
we waited for FDOT (Florida
Department of Transportation)


funding," Councilwoman Paula
Wheeler said of the Cutler Spur
project.
Mayor Jim Farley and the rest
of the council also extended
kudos to Houston and city staff
for the work they did in pulling
everything together.
Houston said he, too, was
proud of the project and hopes
"the neighbors will be patient
with us," as construction gets
under way
Houston said the Cutler Spur
Boulevard project extends ap-
proximately 1.23 miles from Fort
Island Trail to the south right-of-
way line at U.S. 19 and North-
east Third Avenue.
According to officials, the
project was started as part of the
city's Comprehensive Plan in
2006 and involves the following:


Lane widening of two 12-
foot traffic lanes will be imple-
mented from Fort Island Trail to
U.S. 19.
SA multi-use path is included
running from Fort Island Trail to
the southern terminus of the
Cross-Town Trail at Southeast
Second Court.
A sidewalk will be con-
structed on Northeast Third Av-
enue from U.S. 19 to Northeast
Third Street
SA major culvert that is start-
ing to show signs of failure will
be replaced, as will crossing
drains as required.
Stormwater treatment
swales have been added and ap-
proved by the water manage-
ment district.
Shoulder improvements
have been made to the maxi-


mum extent possible.
A 12-inch water main will be
installed from King's Bay Drive
to Southeast Paradise Point
Road. Installation of an 8-inch
force main from King's Bay
Drive to Northeast Third Street
will be included.
According to officials, the
city and county entered into
an interlocal agreement on
Aug. 8, 2009, to provide for the
expansion of city wastewater
service into specific unincor-
porated areas to remove septic
tanks from the vicinity of
King's Bay, an Outstanding
Florida Water.
Area 114 is the final phase of a
grant program to help with fund-
ing the project The original bid
package for this phase of the
project included all of Area 114,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

but according to the city, the
properties on all private roads
were subsequently removed
from the project. This reduced
the number of potential assess-
ment units from 253 to 224, and
adversely affected the funding
status of the project by providing
fewer units over which to allo-
cate fixed costs, according to the
city
The City Council also picked
6 p.m. Feb. 18 for a workshop
comparing a controversial plan
to revitalize the city unveiled by
Commissioner Dennis Damato
and the city's own vision plan.
The workshop is open to the
public.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


BOARD
Continued from Page Al

State Rep. Jimmie T
Smith, R-Inverness, said
he wouldn't expect Scott to
decide quickly
"There's no dire con-
flict. It's a relative uniform
board with no internal
chaos," he said. "We in Cit-
rus County are well re-
spected for working
policies out."
Former two-term board
member Bill Murray,
whom Hale defeated in
the August primary, said
Tuesday he was consider-
ing seeking the
appointment.
"I'm noncommittal," he
said. "There are things I
need to mull over for two
or three days."
Scott must first formally
accept Hale's resignation,
and then seek applications
for the vacancy The new
appointed member would
serve for two years and
then the position will be
on 2014 ballot to fill the re-
maining two years of the
term.
Superintendent of
Schools Sandra "Sam" Him-
mel said district officials are
waiting for clarification
from the governor's office
whether the appointee must
live in the same district as
Hale. District 4 covers
southwest Citrus County, in-
cluding Homosassa and
Sugarmill Woods.


151n"


Himmel said indica-
tions suggest the ap-
pointee could live
anywhere in the county,
but the residency require-
ment would kick in if the
person ran for election to
the office in 2014.
The school board hasn't
had a vacancy since the
mid-1990s, when it hap-
pened two straight years.
In 1993, Gov Lawton
Chiles created a vacancy
when he appointed board
member Patricia Thomas
to the circuit court bench.
He then appointed Willie
White to the school
board.
The next year, board
member June Black re-
signed when her family
moved out of the county
Chiles appointed Kevin
Cunningham to the
vacancy
White and Cunningham
campaigned for their re-
spective offices in 1994
and both lost
Cunningham, an Inver-


ness Realtor, said he sub-
mitted his name for con-
sideration at the time after
several people associated
with the school district
asked him.
He said he sent Chiles a
resume that included in-
formation about commu-
nity involvement.
"The governor called me
one day and asked if I'd
take the seat," Cunning-
ham said. "He made me
promise I would run for it
at the end of the term."
Cunningham said the
current vacancy may at-
tract attention from busi-
ness interests himself
included.
"I would do it because I
feel very strongly the
school board has lost busi-
ness representation on the
board," he said. "That's
something really missing."
Board member Pat
Deutschman said she won-
ders whether Scott will
use the vacancy to advance
his support of public fund-


ing for charter schools.
"The governor is known
to appoint like-minded
people," she said.
However, she said, the
issue is not prevalent in
Citrus County
"This is not a county
struggling with the public
schools versus charter
schools trying to come in,"


she said. "We're small
enough and a high-
performing district, I don't
think the governor would
go out and seek somebody
contentious."
Smith, who said he plays
no role in Scott's decision,
unless the governor seeks
his opinions on applicants,
agreed.


"In all his appointments,
he's never played party
politics," Smith said. "I
truly feel the most quali-
fied person who applies
for the position will be the
one the governor picks."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright
@chronicleonline. com.







Page A3 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Advocates take another stab at MFL rules


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer

BROOKSVILLE Officials
with the Southwest Florida
Water Management District
(SWFWMD) remained largely
mum Tuesday as a group of ad-
vocates pressed their case for a
reversal of recently passed
water withdrawal rules for two
of the area's river systems.
In the past couple of years,
SWFWMD officials and environ-
mental activists have been in-
volved in a tussle over how to set
state-mandated minimum flow
and levels (MFLs) for the Ho-
mosassa and Chassahowitzka
river systems. Minimum flows


and levels are the percentage
levels at which water can be
withdrawn from a body of water
Last October, the water dis-
trict's board voted to set the
MFLs for each river at 3 percent
The SWFWMD staff recommen-
dation was initially for 3 percent
and 9 percent respectively for
the Homosassa and Chassahow-
itzka rivers.
The board also instructed
SWFWMD staff to develop the
framework for a "water use cau-
tionary area" for Hernando and
Citrus counties and present it to
the board in June 2013. Caution-
ary areas require more stringent
water withdrawal permit rules.
The rule also requires MFLs


be reviewed every six years
rather than the usual 10 years.
However, Martyn Johnson of
Homosassa and many advocates
were not satisfied with the new
MFLs, insisting significant harm
has already been done to the
rivers and that SWFWMD
should be fashioning a restora-
tion plan rather than one of
withdrawal.
Johnson recently requested a
hearing in which advocates will
get to query all manner of data
used by officials to help adopt
the rules.
Johnson told officials the
rules language was vague,
lacked clarity and should have
been decided on "real empirical


data and not based on models."
He said the rules do not de-
fine the minimum flows from the
springs into the rivers, which is
more important than flows into
the rivers.
He also questioned why
SWFWMD staff relied on data
mostly derived from the 1990s
forward rather than bringing in
the entire historical gamut of
data.
A series of advocates includ-
ing Ron Miller of the Homosassa
River Alliance, Katie Tripp of
Save the Manatee Club and
Boyd Blihovde of the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service added their
voices to the debate.
Other speakers came forward


to defend the rules and urged of-
ficials not to succumb to emo-
tion, but to stick with what the
science says.
"I think it is important that sci-
ence drive the discussion," Kel-
ley Rice said. He also went on to
declare his support for the rules.
Rice was joined by Jimmy
Brooks, a cattle producer, and
Curt Williams, advocate for the
Florida Farm Bureaus Federa-
tion in urging district staff to not
react to emotion.
"Why would we change a tire
when we ran out of gas,"
Williams said to buttress his ar-
gument about SWFWMD staff
sticking with the scientific data
and not get overprotective.


Around

THE STATE

Ocala

Nuisance alligator
trappers needed
Wildlife officials say nui-
sance alligator trappers are
needed in Marion County.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission is accepting appli-
cations for contracted
nuisance alligator trappers
in the Ocala area. Those
who apply must live in the
county, have a working
email address, a clean
criminal history and no
wildlife law violations.
The deadline to apply is
Jan. 31. For information,
visit MyFWC.com/Alligator.

The Villages

First lady kicks off
literacy campaign
Florida first lady Ann
Scott launched the state's
fifth annual literacy cam-
paign at a charter school in
The Villages.
Gov. Rick Scott's wife
joined author Susan Snyder
at The Villages Intermediate
Center on Monday to begin
"Celebrate Literacy Week
Florida!"
Students across the state
this year again are being
challenged to participate in
the Million Minute Marathon
by reading an additional 20
minutes a day in school.
They can choose to read
Snyder's "Grandma's Crazy
Chickens," the official 2013
marathon book, or make a
selection on their own.
The goal this year is to
read 30 million minutes.
That's up from 20 million
minutes last year.

Tampa

Shock-jock trial
begins in courtroom
Jury selection is under
way in the defamation trial
between two Tampa Bay-
area radio disc jockeys.
Todd Schnitt better
known as MJ, the host of
the now-defunct "MJ Morn-
ing Show" -filed suit
against Bubba "The Love
Sponge" Clem. Clem is ac-
cused of making defama-
tory remarks about Schnitt
and his wife, who is a for-
mer assistant state attor-
ney. Jury selection in
Hillsborough County court
began Monday.
The Tampa Tribune re-
ported the trial is expected
to last three weeks.


Corre

A "Correctio
A3 of Tuesday
contained an ir
phone number
and Main folk r
Thursday, Jan.
Old Courthous
Museum in Inv
correct number
341-6427.
The Chronic
error.
Readers car
Citrus County
any errors in n
by mailing ne
chronicleonline
calling 352-563


Foggy morning


The east
side of
Citrus
County
was
socked in
with
dense fog
Tuesday
morning,
creating a
serene
back-
ground as
this
angler
heads out
across
Lake Hen-
derson in
Inverness.
Changes
in the
weather
are
coming,
and tem-
peratures
are
forecast
to return
to a more
normal,
winter
range
beginning
this
weekend
as a cold
front will
pass
through
the area.
MATTHEW
BECK
/Chronicle


Ethics bill


takes shape


in Senate

Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Each year, as many
as 800 elected officials ignore a law that
requires they submit a form detailing
their financial interests, according to the
state Ethics Commission, but there's not
much the panel can do about it.
An automatic fine of as much as $1,500
is issued, but the commission has written
off $1 million in fines over the past
decade because, it says, they're essen-
tially uncollectable.
That would change under a wide-
ranging bill the Senate Ethics and Elec-
tions Committee began crafting Tuesday
as a top priority for Senate President Don
Gaetz. The measure also would seek to
keep politicians from routinely having
meals and drinks paid for through politi-
cal committees and would add tighter re-
strictions on government jobs that
politicians can take while in office and lob-
bying jobs they can take once they leave.
The committee agreed with the com-
mission's top priority of allowing liens on
real property when officials violate the
law and refuse to pay fines. The commit-
tee also will seek to expand the statute of
limitations on the law to 20 years from
four and create the ability to garnish
wages if officials fail to pay fines.
About 37,000 state, county and munici-
pal officials are required to disclose their
finances, and every year about 1 percent
to 2 percent ignore the law, according to
Ethics Commissioner Matthew Carlucci.


Eagles to seek RV campsite in Homosassa


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer

A fraternal organization based
in Homosassa will ask a citizens'
panel Thursday for permission to
develop a recreational vehicle
park near its clubhouse.
The Crystal River Eagles Aerie
4272 would like to add RV camping
to its facility at 5340 W Grover
Cleveland Blvd. According to the
Aerie's application to the Citrus
County Planning and Develop-
ment Commission (PDC), many
fraternal organizations, such as
the Eagles, Moose and Elks, offer
low-cost RV camping for members.
In 2003, the Aerie was granted a
conditional use permit to develop
the property with a 4,900-square-
foot clubhouse building, a utility
building, a parking lot, landscap-
ing and other improvements. Its
proposed RV park would be of-


fered for use by fraternal organi-
zation members and their guests,
and not open to public commerce.
According to a submitted master
plan, the RV park would include
up to 16 spaces resulting in a gross
density of 0.61 spaces per acre
that is well below the maximum
density of 10 spaces per acre.
The 9.8-acre site would need a
land-use change from medium
density residential district to
recreational vehicle park district
for the plan to proceed. In addi-
tion, the applicant is requesting a
waiver from three code standards:
The requested total square
footage for existing and proposed
clubhouse buildings is 7,700
square feet, exceeding the maxi-
mum of 5,000 square feet. Al-
though two club houses for two
other organizations have been ap-
proved previously at more than
maximum sizes, county staff con-


WHAT: Citrus County
Planning and Development
Commission meeting.
WHEN: 9 a.m. Thursday.
WHERE: Room 166, Lecanto
Government Building, 3600
W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto.

tends this requested waiver could
not be supported without
justification.
Staff, however, have no objec-
tion to the request to have less
than the minimum number of
acres 10 for an RV park, as
the applicant has 9.8.
Staff would support with an
added condition a request to
waive a requirement to install a
bathroom within 300 feet of the
park, as it could create unsanitary
conditions and the Florida De-
partment of Environmental
Health Department has com-


mented about the requirement. It
would approve the application
with the condition a state RV park
permit would be obtained. Re-
quirements for a dump station,
water fill station and a
shower/bath house would be de-
termined at permit submittal. An
onsite sewage disposal system
permit would be required.
According to county planning
staff, one letter of objection has
been received.
The applicant states the request
is consistent with the county's
comprehensive plan and compat-
ible with adjacent land uses.
If approved by the PDC, the re-
quest would go before the Citrus
County Board of County Commis-
sion for approval.
Chronicle reporter Chris Van
Ormer can be reached at
cvanormer@chronicleonline. cor
or 352-564-2916.


County BRIEFS


Sessions to teach
energy savings
Citrus County Housing Services will


offer an energy conservation aware-
-From wire reports ness program in conjunction with its
Low Income Home Energy Assistance
action Program (LIHEAP).
Find out where and how to get the
n" on Page most cost-effective energy results in a
's edition house. Learn where most energy is
correct tele- typically wasted, and how energy flow
Sfor the Celtic works. Build an energy-saving priority
music event list with the most cost-effective
. 17, at the choices to cut electric costs.
e Heritage Two hour-and-a-half sessions will be
'erness. The offered in the evening and the daytime
r is 352- for participants' convenience. The first
is at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 22, and
le regrets the again at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 13.
Both sessions will take place at the Cit-
n alert The rus County Resource Center at 2804
Chronicle to W. Marc Knighton Court in Lecanto.
ews articles LIHEAP consumers and the public
wsdesk@ are invited to participate in this free
e.com or by program to learn helpful tips for lower-
3-5660. ing home energy bills, conservation


and weatherization assistance. As
seating is limited, reservations should
be made by calling 352-527-7530.
Any person who requires special ac-
commodations (ADA) must provide at
least a 72-hour notice.
Gorgeous girl's dresses
needed for prom
Cinderella's Closet is looking for
"gorgeous girl's dresses" sizes 20
and up. There are approximately 100
dresses in each size from 3 and up;
however, compared to recent years,
there is a great need for the sizes 20
and up dresses.
Cinderella's Closet a prom dress
giveaway is a ministry of the Work-
ing Christian Women group, under the
umbrella of Cornerstone Baptist
Church, 1100 W. Highland Blvd.,
Inverness.
From 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 2, at Cornerstone Baptist
Church, girls who have limited funds
and a current high school identifica-
tion can come and select a gown.


To donate a dress, jewelry or acces-
sories, visit 1100 W. Highland Blvd. in
Inverness or call 352-726-7335.
Watch, bid on Rotary
auction on television
From noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, Feb.
9, WYKE-TV will feature a live broad-
cast of the Rotary Club of Inverness'
auction to provide scholarships to Cit-
rus High School and Withlacoochee
Technical Institute students. WYKE
airs on cable channel 16.
This auction is a major fundraiser
for the scholarships, raising $7,000
last year.
Those wishing to lend support by
bidding on items needn't wait until
Feb. 9, however. The Rotary Club of
Inverness has a dedicated website
that's continually being updated. It
shows items and allows password-
protected bidding. It is www.rotary
inverness.com.
Winning bidders will be announced
live Saturday, Feb. 9. Participants can
watch live or check back online to see


if they are the final bidder.
Ninth annual Kids
Fishing Clinic Feb. 23
Citrus County Parks and Recre-
ation in association with the U.S. Fish
& Wildlife Conservation Commission
presents a free kids' fishing clinic on
Saturday, Feb. 23, for pre-registered
children between the ages of 5 and
15. Clinic times will start at 9 a.m., 10
a.m., 11 a.m., noon and 1 p.m.
Kids will learn the basics of environ-
mental stewardship, fishing ethics, an-
gling skills and safety. This is a
catch-and-release event. Participants
must be accompanied by an adult.
Each child will receive a free fishing
rod and reel. Food and drinks will be
available for purchase from the Nature
Coast Volunteer Center.
The clinic will be at Fort Island Trail
Park at 12073 W. Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River.
Registration is now open. Call 527-
7540 for more information.
-From staff reports


I


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
Joshua Wilkinson, 25,
at 12:37 p.m. Monday on a
felony charge of failure to
comply with sex offender reg-
istration law. According to his
arrest affidavit, he registered
with an address in Hernando
but was not living there. Bond
$20,000.
Chad Haager, 24, at 2:25
p.m. Monday on a Citrus
County warrant for violation of
probation on an original felony
charge of arson to a dwelling
with people present. No bond.
Lonnie Williams, 18, of
North Jackson Street, Dunnel-
Ion, at 6:29 p.m. Monday on
felony charges of grand theft
and burglary of an unoccupied
residence. According to his ar-
rest affidavit, he is accused of
burglarizing a home in Beverly
Hills and taking an MP3 player,
camera, television and laptop
computer. Bond $7,000.
Peggy Fielder, 46, of
Southeast 49th Court, Inglis, at
9:08 p.m. Monday on a misde-
meanor charge of retail petit
theft. Bond $250.
Gary Johns, 25, of Stark
Lane, Steinhatchee, on Tues-
day on a felony charge of crim-
inal mischief. According to his
arrest affidavit, he is accused of
breaking a large plate-glass
window at Bella Oasis in Ho-
mosassa. Bond $2,000.
Peggy Abney, 47, of
West Ramm Road 13, Clare-
more, Okla., at 3:13 a.m. Tues-
day on a felony charge of
possession of a controlled sub-
stance (morphine) and a mis-
demeanor charge of
possession of drug parapher-
nalia. Bond $5,500.
Matthew Slatton, 28, of
South Monroe Street, Beverly
Hills, at 2:47 p.m. Tuesday on
a Citrus County warrant for fail-
ure to appear in court for origi-
nal felony charges of grand
theft and giving false verifica-
tion of ownership. No bond.
Kenneth Renew, 34, of
Blountville Bypass, Blountville,


Tenn., at 8:18 p.m. Sunday on
a Citrus County warrant for vio-
lation of probation on an origi-
nal felony charge of obtaining a
substance by fraud. No bond.
Burglaries
A commercial burglary
was reported at 7:58 a.m. Mon-
day, Jan. 14, in the 6500 block
of W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River.
A commercial burglary
was reported at 11:08 a.m. Jan.
14 in the 5500 block of S.
Boulevard Drive, Homosassa.
SA vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 8:16 a.m. Friday, Jan.
11, in the 10300 block of W.
Halls River Road, Homosassa.
SA residential burglary was
reported at 6:40 p.m. Jan. 11 in
the 10 block of S. Lincoln Ave.,
Beverly Hills.
SA residential burglary was
reported at 9:56 a.m. Saturday,
Jan. 12, in the 2900 block of W.
Cypress Drive, Dunnellon.
A residential burglary was
reported at 10:05 a.m. Jan. 12
in the 50 block of S. Columbus
St., Beverly Hills.
SA residential burglary was
reported at 11:51 p.m. Jan. 12
in the 9700 block of W. Arms
Drive, Crystal River.
SA residential burglary was
reported at 3:45 a.m. Sunday,
Jan. 13, in the 10 block of N.
Jackson St., Beverly Hills.
SA residential burglary was
reported at 5:59 a.m. Jan. 13 in
the 8200 block of W. Trotter
Lane, Homosassa.
SA residential burglary was
reported at 8:07 a.m. Jan. 13 in
the 8200 block ofW. Woodbury
Court, Crystal River.
Thefts
An auto theft was reported
at 6:03 a.m. Monday, Jan. 14,
in the 400 block of N. Robin
Hood Road, Inverness.
SA grand theft was reported
at 7:23 a.m. Jan. 14 in the 9100
block of N. Santos Drive,
Dunnellon.
A petit theft was reported
at 8:09 a.m. Jan. 14 in the 2200
block of N. Skeeter Terrace,
Hemando.


ON THE NET

For more information
about arrests made
by the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the
Public Information
link, then on Arrest
Reports.
Also under Public
Information on the
CCSO website, click
on Crime Mapping for
a view of where each
type of crime occurs
in Citrus County.
Click on Offense
Reports to see lists
of burglary, theft and
vandalism.


A petit theft was reported
at 9:23 a.m. Jan. 14 in the 6300
block of N. Tamarind Ave.,
Hemando.
An auto theft was reported
at 12:51 p.m. Jan. 14 in the
2600 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
A petit theft was reported
at 12:56 p.m. Jan. 14 in the
2300 block of State Road 44
West, Inverness.
A larceny petit theft was
reported at 3:36 p.m. Jan. 14 in
the 100 block of N. Florida
Ave., Inverness.
SA grand theft was reported
at 5:26 p.m. Jan. 14 in the 8700
block of E. Marvin St., Floral
City.
A petit theft was reported
at 5:54 p.m. Jan. 14 in the 3200
block of N. Carolwood Point,
Hemando.
A petit theft was reported
at 8:55 p.m. Jan. 14 in the 6800
block of S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
A grand theft was reported
at 12:27 a.m. Friday, Jan. 11, in
the 1400 block of N. U.S. 41,
Inverness.
A petit theft was reported
at 1:11 a.m. Jan. 11 in the 4900
block of W. Meadow St.,
Homosassa.
SA grand theft was reported


at 8:13 a.m. Jan. 11 in the 6300
block of W. Green Acres St.,
Homosassa.
A grand theft was reported
at 9:01 a.m. Jan. 11 in the 100
block of W. Citrus Springs
Blvd., Dunnellon.
SA grand theft was reported
at 9:25 a.m. Jan. 11 in the 2500
block of S. Panther Pride Drive,
Lecanto.
A petit theft was reported
at 11:39 a.m. Jan. 11 in the
3300 block of S. Winding Path,
Invemess.
SA grand theft was reported
at 11:55 a.m. Jan. 11 at Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.,
Invemess.
A larceny petit theft was
reported at 12:20 p.m. Jan. 11
in the 3700 block of N. Hi-
awatha Terrace, Crystal River.
SA grand theft was reported
at 5:16 p.m. Jan. 11 in the 8700
block of S. Lakeshore Drive,
Floral City.
A petit theft was reported
at 11:43 p.m. Jan. 11 in the 700
block of S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal
River.
A petit theft was reported
at 9:27 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 12,
in the 6900 block of N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills.
A petit theft was reported
at 9:28 a.m. Jan. 12 in the 800
block of CedarAve., Invemess.
A grand theft was reported
at 11:10 a.m. Jan. 12 in the 100
block of N.E. Bayshore Drive,
Crystal River.
A grand theft was reported
at 11:44 a.m. Jan. 12 in the
5000 block of E. Backner Lane,
Invemess.
SA grand theft was reported


at 2:44 p.m. Jan. 12 in the 6000
block of S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
A grand theft was reported
at 4:58 p.m. Jan. 12 in the 6800
block of S. Sorrell Ave.,
Homosassa.
A larceny petit theft was
reported at 5:36 p.m. Jan. 12 in
the 2400 block of E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Invemess.
A petit theft was reported
at 3:37 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 13, in
the 2400 block of E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Invemess.
SA grand theft was reported
at 6:03 a.m. Monday, Jan. 14,
in the 400 block of N. Robin
Hood Road, Invemess.

Vandalisms
A felony vandalism was
reported at 9:52 a.m. Monday,
Jan. 14, in the 300 block of S.
FitzpatrickAve., Inverness.
SA vandalism was reported
at 11:37 a.m. Jan. 14 in the
11000 block of W. Yellow Oak
Lane, Crystal River.
SA vandalism was reported
at 10:08 p.m. Jan. 14 in the
5400 block of W. Mannis Court,
Homosassa.
A vandalism was reported
at 11:07 p.m. Jan. 14 in the
4000 block of S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa.
SA vandalism was reported
at 8:38 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 12,
in the 9800 block of E. Lake
Tahoe Drive, Inverness.
SA vandalism was reported
at 11:18a.m. Jan. 12 in the600
block of N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal
River.
SA vandalism was reported
at 1:27 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 13,
at Zinnias Court, Homosassa.


legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


S. Meeting Notices..............................C12

Miscellaneous Notices...................C12

Notice to
Creditors/Administration ...........C12


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
) PR HI LO PR HI LO PR
0.00 NA NA NA L, J78 57 0.00


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
PC


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
sh
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


South winds around 10 knots. Seas 2
feet. Bay and inland waters will have a
light chop. Skies will be partly cloudy
today.


NA NA NA 8-- 3 59 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exlus vedally
forecast by:
r ^i TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
S High: 78 Low: 58
Partly cloudy.

rl THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
High: 76 Low: 56
Partly sunny with a slight chance of showers.

... FRIDAY & SATURDAY MORNING
SHigh: 70 Low: 46
.10 6 IPartly to mostly cloudy with a slight chance of
showers.
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Tuesday 83/56
Record 84/23
Normal 70/42
Mean temp. 70
Departure from mean +14
PRECIPITATION*
Tuesday 0.00 in.
Total for the month trace
Total for the year trace
Normal for the year 1.43 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 6
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Tuesday at 3 p.m. 30.07 in.


DEW POINT
Tuesday at 3 p.m. 57
HUMIDITY
Tuesday at 3 p.m. 430
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, maple, elm
Today's count: 8.6/12
Thursday's count: 10.7
Friday's count: 9.8
AIR QUALITY
Tuesday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
1/16 WEDNESDAY 9:25 3:13 9:48 3:36
1/17 THURSDAY 10:15 4:04 10:38 4:26


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SSUNSET TONIGHT............................5:56 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:24A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY......................... 10:30 A.M.
JAN. 26 FEB. 3 FEB. 10 MOONSET TODAY .......................... 11:14 PM.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
informationon drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Wednesday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 8:24 a/4:23 a 9:01 p/4:34 p
Crystal River* 6:45 a/1:45 a 7:22 p/1:56 p
Withlacoochee* 4:32 a/11:44 a 5:09 p/--
Homosassa*** 7:34 a/3:22 a 8:11 p/3:33 p


***At Mason's Creek
Thursday
High/Low High/Low
9:15 a/5:10 a 9:36 p/5:06 p
7:36 a/2:32 a 7:57 p/2:28 p
5:23 a/12:20 a 5:44 p/12:16 p
8:25 a/4:09 a 8:46 p/4:05 p


Gulf water
temperature


70
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Mon. Tues. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder n/a 28.81 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando n/a 38.15 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness n/a 39.12 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City n/a 40.46 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY


Tuesday Wednesday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 37 27 sn 35 26
Albuquerque 25 9 s 39 19
Asheville 54 46 .97 sh 55 34
Atlanta 67 48 .34 sh 60 41
Atlantic City 40 37 .38 sh 46 36
Austin 42 35 .05 s 52 24
Baltimore 40 38 .29 sh 46 38
Billings 26 16 c 43 18
Birmingham 52 39 .66 r 48 38
Boise 22 14 s 25 8
Boston 42 37 rs 36 32
Buffalo 31 26 pc 38 26
Burlington, VT 35 26 sn 35 19
Charleston, SC 79 57 pc 75 57
Charleston, WV 36 32 .32 sh 45 29
Charlotte 64 45 .05 sh 61 44
Chicago 31 12 pc 38 22
Cincinnati 33 24 pc 39 27
Cleveland 32 27 pc 38 27
Columbia, SC 78 60 c 74 53
Columbus, OH 34 25 pc 38 27
Concord, N.H. 39 22 sn 32 20
Dallas 39 30 .05 s 51 34
Denver 30 -8 s 49 21
Des Moines 34 15 pc 43 23
Detroit 31 16 pc 34 24
El Paso 39 24 s 44 25
Evansville, IN 33 22 s 41 27
Harrisburg 38 37 .08 sh 39 29
Hartford 40 34 .01 sn 35 29
Houston 42 37 .07 pc 51 35
Indianapolis 30 19 s 37 26
Jackson 39 35 .52 r 45 34
Las Vegas 45 23 s 52 35
Little Rock 32 24 .07 pc 46 29
Los Angeles 57 39 s 64 49
Louisville 34 24 .09 s 41 29
Memphis 31 27 .20 pc 45 30
Milwaukee 30 15 pc 35 17
Minneapolis 30 10 sn 33 7
Mobile 67 44 r 58 39
Montgomery 63 49 .09 r 55 43
Nashville 34 30 .34 pc 45 29
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Tuesday Wednesday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 52 47 .03 r 50 39
New York City 38 35 .09 rs 42 35
Norfolk 48 44 .36 sh 56 42
Oklahoma City 35 21 pc 48 30
Omaha 36 14 pc 45 22
Palm Springs 61 35 s 67 45
Philadelphia 43 39 .18 sh 44 32
Phoenix 51 29 s 62 40
Pittsburgh 32 23 rs 41 27
Portland, ME 38 29 rs 34 26
Portland, Ore 38 34 .01 s 43 29
Providence, R.I. 43 36 .13 rs 36 30
Raleigh 53 44 sh 60 44
Rapid City 31 -4 .02 pc 45 21
Reno 38 15 s 37 16
Rochester, NY 34 25 pc 38 24
Sacramento 50 28 s 55 31
St. Louis 31 17 s 43 30
St. Ste. Marie 27 9 sn 30 7
Salt Lake City 54 11 pc 19 5
San Antonio 42 37 .01 s 55 29
San Diego 59 40 s 64 47
San Francisco 53 34 s 56 43
Savannah 80 59 pc 76 57
Seattle 44 33 s 41 30
Spokane 29 12 pc 28 19
Syracuse 35 30 rs 38 26
Topeka 36 14 pc 47 26
Washington 43 39 .43 sh 45 37
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 84 Plant City, Fla.
LOW-33 Kremmling, Colo.
WORLD CITIES


WEDNESDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 86/71/s
Amsterdam 28/20/s
Athens 62/55/sh
Beijing 34/10/s
Berlin 26/25/c
Bermuda 68/65/pc
Cairo 72/59/c
Calgary 43/36/pc
Havana 82/68/pc
Hong Kong 70/55/s
Jerusalem 58/53/c


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


57/57/sh
34/24/s
48/38/sh
71/44/s
34/28/pc
16/16/sn
30/20/pc
87/74/sh
48/41/sh
81/66/pc
39/28/pc
38/25/pc
32/24/c


SC I T R U S


C 0 U N T Y -*


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N \ 1:1 :'

SInverness
FI Cur ntju~ office
TompkinsSt. g | :iujr
T o n 106 W M ain
/ ~ St.,
41 4 Inverness, FL
> 34450


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Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold ................................................ .......................... .... Editor, 564 -2 93 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
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Trlsta Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
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SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


AN.18
JAN. 18


Man


faces sex


crime


charges

Chronicle

A Beverly Hills man
was arrested Tuesday
and charged with lewd
and las-
civious
molesta-
tion of
an 11-
year-old
boy, ac-
cording
to the
to e Jacques
Citrus Jacques
County
Sheriff's Office.
Jacques P Jamner, 54,
reportedly told investi-
gators he knew the boy
and that the juvenile
often came over his
house to play video
games and sometimes
slept over in his bed. He,
however, denied allega-
tions of improper sexual
contact with the child.
The child told investi-
gators a different story,
accusing Jamner of im-
proper sexual contact.
Jamner was arrested
and transported to the
Citrus County Detention
Center. No bond was
allowed.


A4 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FAMU delays hiring


new band leader


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE
Florida A&M University
unexpectedly delayed the
announcement on Tues-
day of a new director for
the university's famed
marching band, citing con-
tract negotiations with the
finalist for the job.
Before an auditorium
full of faculty and students,
university officials
abruptly said that the ap-
pointment of a new direc-
tor for The Marching 100
was on hold for now. The
band which has ap-
peared at Super Bowls
and inauguration parades
- has been in limbo for
more than a year following


the hazing death of drum
major Robert Champion.
Champion died in No-
vember 2011 after being
beaten aboard a band bus.
More than a dozen band
members were charged in
connection with the
incident.
One of the main sticking
points was over the struc-
ture of the job, which was
changed after Champion's
death. The next band di-
rector will not also serve
as chairman of the school's
music department.
"We felt we had a firm
commitment on Monday,
but there were concerns
expressed by the candi-
date regarding the new ac-
ademic structure in the


Department of Music,"
said Rodner Wright, the
interim FAMU provost
who led the search com-
mittee for a new director.
"We are continuing our
discussion with the candi-
date. In lieu of the new
discussion, we want to
make sure that we are
doing what is in the best
interest of university."
The delay comes just
one day before FAMU offi-
cials are scheduled to go
before the university sys-
tem's Board of Governors
to discuss a blistering re-
port that concluded that
the school lacked internal
controls to prevent or de-
tect hazing prior to Cham-
pion's death.


Officials talk school security


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Local education of-
ficials told a Florida Senate panel Tues-
day that communication is key to making
schools safe from shootings like the one
in Connecticut that killed 20 first-graders
and six adults.
Three county school superintendents
cited technology that allows schools to
communicate directly with police and
parents, as well as surveillance systems
for buildings and satellite tracking sys-
tems for school buses.
Another system allows schools to run sex-
ual predator checks on visitors using their
driver's licenses in a matter of seconds.
Police in schools, known as resource
officers, also help by establishing rapport
with students and parents, said Leon
County Superintendent Jackie Pons of
Tallahassee. He said students typically


ative Playgr
FESTIVAL hosted by Cl
velopment SI
Continued from Page Al Treats for
clude seafoc
be on hand this year. festival favor
"People come from all "There is
over the world to see our much food a
manatees," Inglehart said. glehart said
"I have been receiving looking for
phone calls all week from eat, I'm sure
different parts of the it here this w
world." Do not forge
To evade the hassle of local celebr
finding a parking space, manatees. B
drive one mile north of deploy Satur
downtown to the grounds day from the
on the north side of Crystal the end of Ki:
River Mall. Shuttle buses For $10, for
will be running to and older, a 20-
from the festival for an ad- boat ride wil
ditional $1 fee. an opportuni
Once arriving look for a atees in the s
"You Are Here" guide that ters of Kin
will be posted throughout Three SistE
to view activities and loca- Tours are 10
tions. The area includes Saturday an
Heritage Village on Citrus 3 p.m. Sunday
Avenue (County Road 495), Shuttle bu
the Creative Playground escort visit
behind City Hall and Sisters Sprin
across U.S. 19 near North- manatees in
west Seventh Street in winter-home
Crystal River. from the r
For children, games and walkway Th
activities will be provided pickup local
on the grounds of the Cre- Three Sister


BARTENDER
Continued from Page Al

Currently he tends bar at Stumpknock-
ers on the Square in Inverness, ever
since he moved to Citrus County from
New York, where he spent more than 30
years in the hospitality industry, first as
a bartender then as a restaurant man-
ager, then owner of his own restaurant.
Now semi-retired, he's back behind the
bar where he feels at home. For Roth-
stein, bartending is like having people
over to your house. He's the host and it's
his role to make sure each guest who
comes in the front door has the best ex-
perience possible.
"For example, it's important to re-
member people's names and what they
like," he said. "People like to be recog-
nized, and when you know their names
and what they drink it makes them feel
that you care about them which I do."
In 2011, Rothstein was recognized as
Eastern Long Island New York's Best
Bartender.
"I love what I do," he said. "If I could
go back and start over, I would've started
this a lot earlier because I've enjoyed it
so much."
He didn't get into bartending until he
was in his late 30s. Prior to that he owned
a retail clothing store with his brother
until a newly built mall put them out of
business. That's when a friend of a friend
opened a wine and cheese cafe in Port
Jefferson, N.Y, and hired him to serve
beer and wine.
Eventually, they began serving liquor
and Rothstein learned to mix drinks.
"That was during the disco craze, and I
fell in love with the whole scene," he
said.
Rothstein said much of what he does
comes naturally being gregarious and
engaging, learning when to leave people


tip resource officers off about such secu-
rity threats as classmates who bring guns
or knives to school.
"It's not having an armed presence on
your campus but having that communi-
cation person who they can trust," Pons
told the Senate Education Committee.
St. Johns County Superintendent
Joseph Joyner said being able to reach
out to parents using automated tele-
phone calls was crucial following the
shootings in Newtown, Conn. He said the
calls advised parents that additional law
enforcement officers would be in the
schools and counselors available for chil-
dren who were traumatized. The call as
well as the school system's website of-
fered parents advice on how to talk to
children about such tragedies.
"People want to know their children
are safe in school and they expect us to
guarantee it," Joyner said.


found and are
childhood De-
ervices.
sale will in-
)d, barbecue,
ites and more.
going to be so
available In-
. "If you are
something to
you will find
weekend."
get to visit the
'ities the
oat tours will
day and Sun-
Sboat dock at
ng's Bay Park.
ages 12 and
to 30-minute
1 give visitors
ty to see man-
;pring-fed wa-
g's Bay and
ers Springs.
a.m. to 4 p.m.
.d 10 a.m. to
y.
ises will also
ors to Three
.gs to view the
their natural
environment
recently built
e shuttle bus
tion to go to
s is at the cor-


ner of Northeast Fifth
Street and Northeast First
Avenue.
Live entertainment will
include the annual Jimmy
Buffett sound-alike contest
on Saturday along with
Cajun Dave and the band
Mighty Mongo. Sunday,
couple Bob and Sheila
Everhart will entertain the
crowd followed by the Su-
sanne Smith Band.
The Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce do-
nated a space for a local
student to ask members of
the public to sign sympa-
thy cards to be sent to fam-
ilies of victims from Sandy
Hook Elementary School
in Newtown, Conn.
The Florida Manatee
Festival is hosted and or-
ganized by the Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce, the Rotary Clubs of
Citrus County and the city
of Crystal River.
Visit wwwcitruscounty
chamber.com or call 352-
795-3149.
Chronicle reporter Eryn
Worthington can be con-
tacted at 352-563-5660, ext
1334, or eworthington
@chronicleonline. com.


alone, when to listen, when to introduce
strangers at his bar to each other.
"It's more than just pouring drinks,
serving them and then doing something
else," he said.
He said he stays alert to potential trou-
ble and has no problem cutting people off
who have had too much to drink or stop-
ping arguments from escalating. Over the
years, he's had to tell customers to leave.
"Even if people hate you, the next day
they'll thank you," he said. "You're liable
for what happens. You have to be able to
control your environment. You can't let
your guard down or people will walk on
you. At the same time, you have to make
people feel special and important so
they'll want to come back."
He said on days off if he's out with his
wife and they stop for a drink some-
where, he looks at how the bars are set
up and watches the bartender, always
looking for ways to improve his own
game.
It helps to be a night person, he said.
And potential bartenders need to be OK
with working weekends and holidays.
He said the basics of bartending
haven't changed, although trends in
drinks always change, and a good bar-
tender keeps up with the trends, such as
flavored vodkas.
"That gives more variety and more
choices, and that helps bar sales," he
said.
He said what he likes to do best is mix
drinks that require careful blending of
various liquors and flavors. When it
comes to making a good drink, precision
is key, he said, and not being heavy
handed with the liquor. It's both science
and craft.
"To me, this is not a job," Rothstein
said. "I've been fortunate to do what I
love. To me, this is not work."
Chronicle reporter Nancy Kennedy
can be reached at nkennedy@chroni-
cleonline. com or 352-564-2927.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Toni
Wells, 51
INVERNESS
Toni Lea Wells, 51, died
Jan. 8, 2013, in Inverness,
Fla., after a sudden illness.
She was born June 15,
1961, in Fairmont, WVa.
Her wishes were to be cre-
mated. McGan cremation
service is handling
arrangements.





Joseph
Body, 82
HERNANDO
Joseph Michael Body, 82,
Hernando, died Jan. 11,
2013, in Citrus Memorial
hospital. Mr. Body was
born in Manville, N.J., on
Oct. 31,
1930, to the
late Daniel
and Helen
Body. He
moved to
Citrus
County in
1988 from
Joseph E a s t
Body Meadow,
N.Y, where he retired
after 35 years from Pan
American Airways as an
aircraft maintenance su-
pervisor. Mr. Body served
in the USAF and is a vet-
eran of the Korean
Conflict. His love and
growing knowledge of avi-
ation ignited his long ca-
reer with Pan Am, where
his influence expanded to
key management roles be-
fore his retirement. A
skilled swimmer and a
man with a passion for self-
learning in many areas, Mr
Body lived a full, active life
in his new community.
Since his earliest years, he
was dedicated to learning
new skills and engaging
them. He was an
accomplished woodcrafts-
man and the consumate
fix-it man. He built a wood-
working shop for himself
and spent countless hours
in it doing what he loved -
creating. He was also a
self-taught financial plan-
ner, building a deep under-
standing of economics over
the years. Staying busy and
involved were important
values to Mr. Body He
worked at Whispering
Pines Park as a park aide
and also worked as a pool
maintenance specialist.
He and his wife traveled
extensively, including a
trip around the world. The
birth of his granddaughter
Tasha, in 1987, brought
great joy to his life and he
is remembered fondly for
his care and dedication to
her.
Left to mourn his pass-
ing is his wife of 60 years,
Anne (Osyczka) Body,
Hernando; two daughters,
Joanne Osenenko and hus-
band Derek, of Woodstock,
N.Y, Susan Madden and
husband Kevin, of East
Meadow, N.Y; his brother,
William, of St. Louis, Mo.;
and one grandchild, Tasha.
Funeral services will be
at 1 p.m. Friday, Jan. 18,
2013, at Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home. Burial
with military honors will
follow at Florida National
Cemetery. Visitation will
be 12 to 1 p.m., at the
funeral home.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
U The Citrus County Chroni-
cle's policy permits both
free and paid obituaries


Anna
Pearsall, 95
LECANTO
Anna L. Pearsall, 95, of
Lecanto, Fla., died Jan. 13,
2013, while under the care
of Hospice of Citrus
County.

Mary
Boilard, 96
LECANTO
Mary E. Boilard, 96,
Lecanto died Jan. 14,2013.
Mrs. Boilard was born in
Dunnel-
lon, N.J.,
on Sept.
r4-_. 22, 1916, to
? the late
-1 Joseph
and Anna
(Udvari)
Nagy and
Mary came to
Boilard this area
in 1978 from Martinsville,
N.J. She was employed as
a secretary for Randsom
Machinary Company in
Plainfield, N.J., and was of
the Catholic faith.
Survivors include her
daughter, Barbara Stahl
and husband Jack, of
Lecanto, Fla.; three grand-
children and seven great-
grandchildren. She was
preceded in death by her
husband of 63 years,
Armand Boilard.
Mary's family will lay
her urn to rest beside Ar-
mand in Florida National
Cemetery. Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with
Crematory is assisting the
family
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Florieta
Suarez
INVERNESS
Florieta Ritch Suarez of
Inverness, Fla., formerly of
Freeport, died Jan. 12,
2013.
She was the devoted
wife of the late Mario who
died Dec 12, 2012; loving
mother of Karl Hosey,
Maria E Devon, Patricia A.
Hodge, and Angela M.
Winser; beloved grand-
mother of seven and great-
grandmother of three.
Services were in
Freeport, N.Y.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. corn

Harriet
Brown, 81
CRYSTAL RIVER
Harriet E. Brown, 81,
of Crystal River, Fla.,
died Jan. 12, 2013. Pri-
vate Cremation will take
place under the direc-
tion of Brown Funeral
Home & Crematory in
Lecanto.






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Patricia
Romaine, 71
BEVERLY HILLS
Patricia J. Romaine, 71,
of Beverly Hills, Fla., died
Jan. 13, 2013, at Hospice of
Citrus County Care Unit in
Inverness.
Patricia was born Dec. 7,
1941, in Queens, N.Y.,
daughter of Kenyon and
Elizabeth Romaine. She
was a caregiver. Patricia
moved to Beverly Hills in
1983 from Richmond Hills,
N.Y She was Catholic.
Ms. Romaine is survived
by one sister, Carol
McHugh; nieces, Michelle
McHugh, Inverness,
Deborah Poliseno and
Colleen McHugh, Lecanto;
nephews, William McHugh,
St. Simons, Ga., Matthew
McHugh, Inverness, and
James McHugh, Atlanta,
Ga.; 13 great-nieces and
nephews.
Funeral services for Ms.
Romaine will be at 11:30
a.m. Thursday, Jan. 17,
2013, at Oak Ridge Ceme-
tery in Inverness. Heinz
Funeral Home & Crema-
tion, Inverness, FL.

Margaret
Freund, 71
BEVERLY HILLS
Margaret Frances
Freund, 71, of Beverly
Hills, Fla., died Jan. 12,
2013. Private cremation
will take place under the
direction of Brown Fu-
neral Home & Crematory
in Lecanto.

Irene
Anzalone, 80
OCALA
Irene T Anzalone, 80, of
Ocala, Fla., died Jan. 11,
2013. Local arrangements
are under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home &
Crematory in Lecanto,
with services taking place
at a later date in Saugus,
Mass.

SO YOU KNOW
U Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted
by funeral homes.

*r.^ ^ tt 4 *Efelltill


Vernon
Metts Sr., 92
INVERNESS
Vernon Earl Metts Sr.,
92, Inverness, died Jan. 13,
2013, at Nature Coast
Lodge. Vernon was born
May 12, 1920, in Lisbon,
Ohio, to
the late
- Marion
a n d
Bertha
(Parsons)
I Metts. He
served our
country in
Vernon the United
Metts Sr. States
Army during World War II
in Okinawa and the Asiatic
Pacific Theatre. Vernon
was the owner/operator of
Auto Truck Service, Inc. in
Lake Milton, Ohio, for
many years. He was a
member of Argus Masonic
Lodge No. 545 of Canfield,
Ohio, and was a member of
the Ohio Highway Patrol
Auxiliary, serving for more
than 19 years. Upon relo-
cation to this area in 1981
from Canfield, he became
a member of VFW No.
4337 of Inverness, and was
a member of St. Anne's
Episcopal Church in Crys-
tal River.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are his sons, Vernon E.
Metts Jr, Lake Milton,
Ohio, Harold J. (Ruth)
Metts, Hernando, and
Gary P (Brenda) Metts,
Canfield, Ohio; his daugh-
ters, Marie E. (Ian) Ebert,
Kansas City, Mo., Sandy
(Don) Amicone, Lakeland

CGIas. 8. !bacs
Funeral Home With Crematory
JOSEPH BODY
Service: Fri. 1:00 PM Chapel
GORDON RYDER
Private-Florida National Cemetery
VERNON E.METTS,SR.
Service: Thurs. 12:30 PM
HELEN LORELLO
Services at Joseph Weber FR.
Lake Ronkonkoma, NY
FRANCIS POWERS
Arrangements Pending
726-8323 0DOS


and Dorothy Gergens,
Calif.; 16 grandchildren
and 15 great-grandchildren.
He was preceded in death
by his wife, Annamarie
Metts on Nov 29, 2009, his
two sisters, Vangel and
Irma and his brother,
Oliver.
A funeral tribute for Ver-
non will be at 12:30 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 17, 2013, at
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home. Burial will follow
at Florida National
Cemetery with military
honors. The family will re-
ceive friends in visitation
from 11:30 a.m., until the
hour of service. Donations
to Hospice of Citrus
County, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464 in
Vernon's memory are re-
quested in lieu of flowers.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Michael
Ingle, 59
SUMMERTFIELD
Michael Kay Ingle, 59, of
Summerfield, Fla., died
Jan. 12, 2013. Local
arrangements are under
the direction of Brown
Funeral Home & Crema-
tory in Lecanto.

SO YOU KNOW
U Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted
by funeral homes.




To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,

Saralynne
Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller@chronicleonline.com


off I


....... ... --tii:yh ; L .... .... ....... . ... ...
-~".. _.Z .I..I.I..A!.
a-". Fo LoOoRo I oD
**ss* ^- ^^ H ^ ^ ^^BH


I I I I 1 rH J L ,K1J I A
WAg: .


Vicki
LaBelle, 53
OCALA
Vicki D. LaBelle, 53, of
Ocala, died Jan. 8, 2013.
Private Cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home & Crematory in
Lecanto.

Dorothy
Kristian, 92
INVERNESS
Dorothy Mary Kristian,
92, of Inverness, FL passed
away January 11, 2013.
Born in Hamilton, OH, she
lived, worked and raised
her family in Franklin, NJ
for over 40 years until mov-
ing to Inverness, FL in
1985. She was a retired
clerk for the Plastoid Corp.
and a Catholic by faith.
She is survived by her
daughter, Rosemarie
Csuka of Floral City, FL;
grandson, Michael J.
Csuka, his wife Dottie and
their son, Jacob of Ocala,
FL. She was preceded in
death by her husband,
John G. Kristian and her
two sisters.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com. Arrangements
are by the Inverness
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes.

See Page A7


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A6 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from Page A6

Nancy
Czupka, 78
INVERNESS
Nancy J. Czupka, 78, of
Inverness, Fla., died Jan.
12, 2013, at her home
under the loving care of
her family and Hospice of
Citrus County Nancy was
born Nov 23, 1934, in
Galesburg, Ill., the daugh-
ter of Howard Karl and
Marie Bowman. Nancy
worked for 20 years at Walt
Disney World as a supervi-
sor in merchandising and
then as an account man-
ager in the Disney Travel
Company She moved to
Inverness in 1999 from
Orlando. She enjoyed
taking care of her family
Nancy was preceded in
death by her parents; son,
Thomas; and brother,
Howard. Survivors in-
clude her husband of 58
years, Ernest R. Czupka of
Inverness; eight children,
Steven Czupka of
Inverness, Ronald Czupka
and his wife Martha of
Hickory, N.C., Theodore
Czupka and his wife
Patricia of Orlando, Jean
Marie Oshima of
Temecula, Calif, Kathlene
Hohns and her husband
William of Windermere,
Martin Czupka of Orlando,
Christine Green of San
Clemente, Calif., and
Michele Scott and her
husband Frank of Orlando;
10 grandchildren; and two
great-grandchildren.
Private interment for
Mrs. Czupka will be
at Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell, Fla.
Donations may be given to
Hospice of Citrus County.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness, FL.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.


Ruth
Kircher, 87
HOMOSASSA
Ruth M. Kircher passed
away Sunday, Jan. 13,2013.
A native of Cleveland,
Ohio, she was born Oct. 21,
1925. Ruth
married
her life-
f M I o n gF
long
sweet-
heart, War-
ren John
Kircher
Jan. 11,
Ruth 1947. She
Kircher taught
school at Our Lady Queen
of Martyrs in Fort
Lauderdale while raising
her family of three
daughters.
Ruth was a very success-
ful real estate agent in
South Florida for many
years until her retirement,
when she and John moved
to Homosassa. They en-
joyed many years of golf
and friendship in their
beloved Sugarmill Woods
community, where they
were active parishoners
and Eucharistic Ministers
at St. Thomas the Apostle
Catholic Church.
Ruth returned to
Lauderhill after John
passed away in 2009 and
resided at Lenox on the
Lake Assisted Living.
She entered her eternal
home surrounded by her
family Ruth is survived by
three daughters, Laura L.
Overmyer, Plantation,
Patricia A. Mielo, Castle
Rock, Colo., and Debra J.
Hinton, Locust Grove, Ga.;
and five grandchildren.
A funeral service of re-
membrance will be at
Wilder Funeral Home,
Homosassa, 11 a.m. Friday,
Jan. 18, 2013, with inter-
ment to follow at
Fountains Memorial Park.
Friends will be received
Friday from 10 a.m. until
time of service. In lieu of
flowers, donations may be
made to the Alzheimer's
Association Ruth Kircher
Memorial Fund at
http:act. alz. org/goto/ruth.
kircher.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.


Alan
Landrum, 66
PAEONIAN
SPRINGS, VA.
Alan Lawrence Lan-
drum, 66, of Paeonian
Springs, Va., slipped away
Sunday, Dec. 6,2012, in the
care of Hospice and with
family at
his side.
The mid-
dle son of
J T .
Landrum
a n d
Martha
Dean
Alan Lowrey
Landrum Landrum,
Al was preceded in death
by his parents and younger
brother, Dean Stuart Lan-
drum. Survived by his wife
Camille Landrum; brother,
Michael L. Landrum
(Brenda); and nieces and
nephews.
Alan was employed as a
chief inspector for Par-
sons/Brinckerhoff, an in-
ternational construction
management firm. A Viet-
nam veteran, he proudly
served his country in the
United States Army
There will be a memo-
rial service for Alan at Ar-
lington National Cemetery
in the spring. In lieu of
flowers, memorial contri-
butions may be made to
Evercare Hospice, 12018
Sunrise Valley Drive, Re-
ston, VA 20191 or a charity
of your choosing. Please
send condolences to
www. colonial lfun eral
home.com.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be
submitted by the
funeral home or
society in charge of
arrangements.
Phone 352-563-5660.


Albert
Scrivano, 89
CRYSTAL RIVER
Albert John Scrivano, 89,
of Crystal River, Fla.,
passed away Monday, Jan.
14, 2013, at Cypress Cove
Care Center in Crystal
River He was born April 27,
1923, in Wilmington, Del., to
John and Josephine (Can-
telora) Scrivano. He came
here seven years ago from
Port Richey, Fla. He was a
retired carpenter with
Union Local 7 Suburban
Carpenters of New York He
was a U.S. Army 101st Air-
borne World War II veteran,
and a member of St Bene-
dict's Catholic Church in
Crystal River. He enjoyed
golfing and stamp
collecting.
In addition to his par-
ents, he was preceded in
death by three brothers.
Surviving are three sons,
John Scrivano (Charlene)
of Port St. Lucie, Thomas
Scrivano (Nancy) of St.
Cloud, and Dannie
Scrivano (Jerri) of Ho-
mosassa; daughter, JoAnn
Blondin (Mike) of Flagler
Beach; sister, Dora
Ciardullo of Virginia;
and three grandchildren,
Matthew, Kristin and
Butchie.
A visitation will be 2 to 4
p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. Thurs-
day, Jan. 17, 2013, at the
Strickland Funeral Home
Chapel in Crystal River. A
funeral mass will be cele-
brated at 9:30 a.m. Friday,
Jan. 18, 2013, at St. Bene-
dict's Catholic Church in
Crystal River, with Father
Ryszard Stradomski as cel-
ebrant. Burial with mili-
tary honors will follow at
the Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
Additionally, all
obituaries will be
posted online at
www.chronicleonline
.com.


Claire
Weber, 91
HOMOSASSA
Claire S. Weber, 91, of
Homosassa, passed away
Jan. 13, 2013. She was pre-
ceded in death by her
daughter, Donna, brother,
Lee Stew-
art, and
parents,
Chester
and Mar-
garet
Stewart.
She is sur-
vived by
Claire her hus-
Weber b a n d
band ,
Henry Weber; grand-
daughter, Leah Young, and
great-granddaughter,
Ashley Young.
Claire was employed in
her younger years as a
school teacher in New
York and also as an execu-
tive secretary at Avon
Products for 30 years. She
was residing at Sunflower
Springs Assisted Living
Facility with her husband
Henry Weber
A memorial service will
be at Sunflower Springs
for residents and family to
pay their respects. The fa-
cility is at 8733 W Yulee
Drive, Homosassa. The
service will be open to
friends and family and will
be conducted at 1:15 p.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013,
on the third floor. Any do-
nations may be made to
Hospice of Citrus County
of the Nature coast, PO.
Box 641270, Beverly Hills,
FL 34464.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this when submitting
a free obituary.)


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013 A7





Francis
Powers Jr., 63
HERNANDO
Francis "Frank" Harold
Powers Jr., 63, Hernando,
died Jan. 14, 2013, at his
residence. Frank was born
June 6, 1949, in Holyoke,
Mass., to the late Francis
Harold Powers Sr. and
Ingeborg (Bauermann)
Powers. A man of
incredible integrity and
honesty, he proudly served
our country in the United
States Marine Corp in
Vietnam, achieving the
rank of sergeant; was
awarded a Bronze Star
medal with Combat V and
two purple hearts. Frank
was a loving family man.
He was a member of the
DAV and American Legion
in Clearwater. Frank
coached Little League
baseball in Citrus County
for more than 15 years.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory is his wife of 44 years,
Mary Powers; his sons,
Jeromy Powers (Lori), and
Francis H. Powers III
(Nicole), all of Hernando;
sisters, Maryanne LaRoche,
Julie Langlois, Gretchen
Powers, Kathy Cessarini,
all of Massachusetts; and
grandchildren, Lauren,
Chelbie, Schyler, Zendrick,
Seth, Nicolette, Memphis
and Hunter. He was pre-
ceded in death by his
brother, George Pisty.
Inurnment will be at
2:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 22,
2013, at Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is
assisting the family with
arrangements. There will
be no calling hours at the
funeral home.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
The national database
Legacy.com maintains
the Chronicle's
obituaries and guest
books.


fxperiere heDilereAcer!


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His staff were very courteous & friendly.
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bling the thing at Detroit auto show


Associated Press
DETROIT Headlights,
grilles and other doodads are
stepping up and popping out on
cars.
Car bling is proliferating, from
daytime running lights that go
up the hood of the new Cadillac
ATS, to a wide, bold grille on the
Ford Fusion, to engraving within
the lamps of the new Corvette
and Ford Transit.
It is inexpensive but distinc-
tive, providing automotive eye
candy that can even boost gas
mileage or improve safety. Bling
isn't new, but advancements in
technology and design are al-
lowing automakers to do more of
it and move it from luxury cars
into the mainstream.
"You've got form and function
with the beauty," said IHS Auto-
motive analyst Rebecca
Lindland.
The adornments are on dis-
play at the North American In-
ternational Auto Show in
Detroit, which opens to the pub-
lic Jan. 19:
FETCHING ETCHING
Mom never advised looking
into lights, but peering into the
lamps of certain vehicles offers
some aesthetic rewards: Tiny
engravings are appearing in-
side, like figures inside a snow
globe.
Headlights in the splashy new
Corvette feature the brand's
crossed-flag logo, and the utili-
tarian Ford Transit offers Ford's
Blue Oval logo contained in a
seven-sided shape.
Likewise, the new Jeep Grand
Cherokee features a vintage
miniature Jeep silhouette and
the phrase, "Since 1941," refer-
ring to the year Jeeps began
rolling out.
IHS Automotive's Lindland
said it's intriguing that designers
are "laying this kind of jewelry
in just that small spot" in the
process attracting buyers and
providing recognition on the
road.
LINE OF SIGHT
Distinctive lights abound, but
a prime example graces the
front of the new Cadillac ATS, a
sport sedan.
The car's daytime running
lights go up the top of the fender
along the hood line. They help
contribute to an overall design


Associated Press
A 2014 Chevrolet Silverado with a step in the rear bumper is displayed Tuesday at media previews for
the North American International Auto Show in Detroit.


that is angular and edgy.
Those lights are helping
Cadillac set itself apart from
competitors, said Consumer Re-
ports lead car tester Jake Fisher
Osram Automotive supplies
lighting components for the ATS
and other Cadillacs. David
Hulick, the company's global
marketing director of solid state
lighting, said the ATS benefits
from hidden LEDs, or light-emit-
ting diodes, which offer an "in-
tense, white appearance" that
can't be duplicated with tradi-
tional bulbs.
Hulick said getting more out
of illumination was the impetus
behind the first automotive use
of LEDs in exterior lighting: a
mid-1990s Ford Thunderbird.
He said that model used "super-
red LEDs with a neon look" -
something that also "couldn't be
achieved with traditional
technology."
HOT OFF THE GRILLE
Ford is heating up its grilles,
particularly its Fusion model.
The Fusion jettisoned the old,
bulky shutters that go back years
and embraced a wide, bold grille
with numerous thin blades.
Consumer Reports' Fisher
said the grille helps the midsize
family sedan "evoke the looks of


A headlight on the 2014 Acura RLX is shown Tuesday.


an Aston-Martin" adding to
the mystique and brand identity
without adding to the bottom
line.
Ford hopes to finally surpass
Toyota Camry's sales with the
new Fusion, helped by a more
aggressive-looking trapezoidal
grille.
There are other grilles provid-
ing artistic thrills: When the
light hits it just right, the angu-
lar brushed-metal grille of
Hyundai's new luxury concept
car shows off at least a dozen
small inverted triangles that ap-


pear behind horizontal bars.
The wide-mouth grille has a
bunch of tiny holes, and the an-
gles reflect light.
It's just one of many new
styling cues on the HCD-14 Gen-
esis, which Hyundai said is the
direction it will take the next
generation of its luxury cars, the
Genesis and Equus.
THE EYES HAVE IT
The tail lamps on the high-
performance version of the 2014
Jeep Grand Cherokee are tinted
black, giving it an ominous look.
Ralph Gilles, a Chrysler design


leader, noted the lamps are
"kind of like death."
"They look like they're really
staring at you. If you look at
them they're all dark inside. You
can't even see the lens," Gilles
said.
He said it's the first time
Chrysler has done such head-
lamps. The vehicle, he added,
"can pretty much be sinister if
you want it to."
He said designers wanted to
create something unique that
"owners will love."
The headlights on Land
Rover's small SUV the Range
Rover Evoque also give that
vehicle "a bit more of the sinis-
ter look," according to IHS Auto-
motive analyst Rebecca
Lindland. The slim lamp also
represents an advance in
functionality.
"The great thing with lighting
technology is that you can actu-
ally have a very narrow light and
still have a tremendous amount
of road illumination," she said.
CRYSTAL CLEAR
When it comes to headlights,
there's bling, and then there's
the king of bling.
The Acura RLX's headlights
look like a crystal chandelier,
courtesy of a horizontal collec-
tion of lenses and LED light that
has been split and directed in a
beam pattern, according to
Hulick of Osram Automotive.
He said Acura's lights are a
great example of a vehicle being
simultaneously eye-catching
and illuminating with the help of
LEDs.
"Lighting, in my opinion, has
replaced chrome as the jewelry
on the car"
STEPPING UP
The 2014 Chevrolet Silverado
pickup truck has a practical fea-
ture that breaks up the boring
horizontal view of the bumper
There are two steps that make
it easy to climb into the bed to
fetch tools or tie down a load.
The steps are inset into the cor-
ner of the bumpers, and even
have treads to stop work shoes
from slipping.
The always-ready steps could
give GM an advantage over other
automakers in an increasingly
competitive pickup market, es-
pecially with buyers who con-
stantly are going in and out of
the truck bed.


CARDIOLOGY
Consultants, PA.
www.citruscardiology.org



Are you new to Citrus County?

You chose the best place to move. Now choose the best physicians to
help protect your new life!

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of our highly regarded specialists in our full

service Inverness facility.


A limited number of appointments
are available lpm-4pm on Fridays
for new residents, or those with
high risk factors, including family
history of heart disease and/or
aneurysm, and/or current or
former smokers who have no
current cardiologist.


Please call 352-726-8353

to schedule your screening today!

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Five Locations To Serve You


I


Prices Oood Wednesday Jan. 16 through Monday, Jan. 21, 2013


A8 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013


NATION






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money&Markets

S&P 500
1, Close: 1,472.34
Change: 1.66 (0.1%)
1,400 ........10 DAYS ........


A click of the wrist k
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com
i nn............. ....... Dow Jones industrials
, Close: 13,534.89
Change: 27.57 (0.2%)
13,080 10 DAYS .......


1,480 13,800

1,440 l 13,20 13,500 ..
13,200 |
1 ,4 8 0 ..................................................... .................. ...... 13 ,8 0 0 ............. .... ................... ............ ... ...........


1381,4000 .


....0 .. ...................... ... ....... ........... ... ...... ... .... .. ... ....... . ...... ...........
12,900 ..............

1,360 12,3000
1,320 J A S N D J J A S N D J


StocksRecap


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE
3,081
2,951
1738
1288
188
5


NASD
1,812
1,848
1306
1134
118
14


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
13543.76
5645.75
459.41
8736.98
3112.29
1473.31
1064.80
15552.62
884.84


LOW
13447.49
5573.55
456.26
8671.06
3093.32
1463.76
1054.22
15444.13
875.42


CLOSE
13534.89
5639.64
459.37
8733.10
3110.78
1472.34
1064.65
15543.80
884.60


CHG.
+27.57
+39.15
+1.18
+15.65
-6.72
+1.66
+5.50
+30.43
+4.50


%CHG.
+0.20%
+0.70%
+0.26%
+0.18%
-0.22%
+0.11%
+0.52%
+0.20%
+0.51%


YTD
+3.29%
+6.27%
+1.39%
+3.43%
+3.02%
+3.24%
+4.33%
+3.66%
+4.15%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR%CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 3.42 -- 10.33 4.58 +.12 +2.7 V V -0.4 -49.9 dd
AT&T Inc T 29.02 -- 38.58 33.76 -.26 -0.8 V A +0.1 +19.0 44 1.80f
Ametek Inc AME 29.86 38.98 38.53 -.07 -0.2 V A A +2.6 +26.5 21 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 60.52 91.21 88.69 +1.39 +1.6 A A A +1.5 +48.6 1.57e
Bank of America BAG 6.44 12.20 11.55 +.08 +0.7 V A V -0.5 +74.1 30 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 6.35 12.23 11.86 -.02 -0.2 V A A +4.3 +22.2 dd
CenturyLink Inc CTL 36.50 -- 43.43 39.79 -.28 -0.7 V V A +1.7 +17.4 36 2.90
Citigroup C 24.61 43.25 42.57 +.35 +0.8 A A A +7.6 +37.5 13 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 --- 21.43 15.98 +.12 +0.8 A A A +0.9 -6.3 29 1.00
Disney DIS 38.38 --- 53.40 51.09 +.50 +1.0 A A A +2.6 +33.7 16 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 71.13 66.05 +.66 +1.0 A A A +3.5 +7.0 18 3.06
EPR Properties EPR 40.04 -- 48.92 46.05 -.09 -0.2 A A V -0.1 +13.6 20 3.00
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 77.13 93.67 89.53 -.05 -0.1 V A +3.4 +8.1 11 2.28
Ford Motor F 8.82 14.08 14.30 +.31 +2.2 A A A +10.4 +17.9 12 0.40f
Gen Electric GE 18.02 23.18 21.20 +.08 +0.4 A V A +1.0 +15.8 16 0.76f
Home Depot HD 43.52 65.92 63.95 +.47 +0.7 A A A +3.4 +48.6 23 1.16
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 29.27 21.88 -.12 -0.5 A A +6.1 -9.0 10 0.90
IBM IBM 179.32 -- 211.79 192.50 -.12 -0.1 V A +0.5 +9.4 13 3.40
Lowes Cos LOW 24.76 0 36.47 35.93 +.55 +1.6 A A A +1.2 +36.7 21 0.64
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 -0- 102.22 91.51 -.02 ... A A +3.7 -5.9 17 3.08f
Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.26 --- 32.95 27.21 +.32 +1.2 A V A +1.9 -1.9 15 0.92
Motorola Solutions MSI 44.18 0 57.75 57.53 -.14 -0.2 A A A +3.3 +26.1 24 1.04
NextEra Energy NEE 58.71 0 72.22 71.88 +.19 +0.3 A A A +3.9 +25.3 14 2.40
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 15.69 -- 43.18 18.71 +.62 +3.4 A V -5.1 -45.8 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 16.10 18.91 18.70 +.20 +1.1 A A A +3.6 +9.8 16 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 4.75 7.73 7.29 +.10 +1.4 A A A +2.2 +50.9 cc 0.04
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 34.00 -- 85.90 44.22 -.38 -0.9 A V A +6.9 +43.0 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 70.50 90.24 88.36 +.06 +0.1 A A A +2.5 +14.6 20 2.08
Sprint Nextel Corp S 2.10 --- 6.04 5.62 -.07 -1.2 V A V -0.9 +146.3 dd
Texas Instru TXN 26.06 34.24 32.28 -.06 -0.2 V A A +4.5 +6.8 20 0.84f
Time Warner TWX 33.62 0 50.28 49.13 -.17 -0.3 V A A +2.7 +35.1 18 1.04
UniFirst Corp UNF 55.86 88.35 81.59 +.15 +0.2 V A A +11.3 +31.9 16 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 36.80 - 48.77 41.97 -.62 -1.5 V V -3.0 +14.6 39 2.06
Vodafone Group VOD 24.95 -e- 30.07 26.17 -.10 -0.4 V A A +3.9 +3.3 1.54e
WalMart Strs WMT 57.18 77.60 68.98 +.68 +1.0 A V A +1.1 +17.4 14 1.59
Walgreen Co WAG 28.53 0 39.21 39.30 +.26 +0.7 A A A +6.2 +22.7 18 1.10
YRC Worldwide Inc YRCW 4.56 -- 14.80 6.69 +.06 +0.9 V V -0.9 -39.2 dd
Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid but are not included b -Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e -Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement I Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distnbution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Retailers rally


Associated Press

NEW YORK Stocks
edged higher on Wall
Street after a rally in retail
stocks offset concerns
about flaring tensions in
Washington over increas-
ing the country's borrow-
ing limit.
The Dow Jones indus-
trial average ended the
day up 27.57 points at
13,534.89. The Dow moved
higher in the late after-
noon after being down as
much as 62 points in the
early going.
The Standard and
Poor's 500 rose 1.66 points
to 1,472.34, a five-year
high. The Nasdaq compos-
ite index, dragged down by
a fall in Apple, fell 6.72
points to 3,110.78.
Retail stocks moved
higher throughout the day,
boosted by a report that
showed retail sales in-
creased in December,
helping the major indexes
reverse early losses.
Consumers bought more
autos, furniture and cloth-
ing, despite worries about
potential tax increases,
the Commerce Depart-
ment said Tuesday. Sales
rose 0.5 percent in Decem-
ber from November,
slightly better than No-
vember's 0.4 percent in-
crease and the best


Market
Jan. 15,
Dow Jones
industrials

Nasdaq
composite

Standard &
Poor's 500

Russell
2000

NYSE(
Advanced:
Declined:
Unchanged
Volume:

Nasdaq
Advanced:
Declined:
Unchanged
Volume:


showing since
J.C. Penne
cents, or 3.4
$18.71. Dolla
gained $1.62,
cent, to $44.64
vanced 31 ce
percent, to $14
Treasury Sec
othy Geithnei
gressional le;
letter late Mon
government w
borrowing lim:


mid-February, earlier than
watch expected. Federal Re-
2013 serve Chairman Ben
+27.57 Bernanke also commented
13,534.8 on the issue Monday, say-
3,534.89 ing it was one of the "criti-
-6.72 cal fiscal watersheds" for
3,110.78 the government in coming
weeks.
+1.66 President Barack
1,472.34 Obama has criticized con-
gressional Republicans for
+4.50 linking talks over raising
884.60 the debt ceiling to ongoing
dia budget negotiations.
ry Obama said the conse-
1,738 quences of the U.S. govern-
1,288 ment defaulting on its debt
: 121 would be disastrous and
shouldn't be used as a bar-
3.1 b gaining chip to extract con-

diary cessions on spending cuts.
1,306 "We are very concerned
1, how the market is going to
4 respond to all the news
: 136 events that will be coming
1.8 b out of Washington over the
AP next few months," said
Eric Wiegand, a senior
September portfolio manager at U.S.
y rose 62 Bank Wealth Management.
percent, to "It really comes down to
ar General the uncertainty and the
or 3.8 per- risk of a further down-
4. Ford ad- grade of our debt."
nts, or 2.2 Markets were roiled in
:.30. the summer of 2011 as law-
cretaryTim- makers haggled over an in-
r told con- crease to the debt limit.
aders in a The dispute cost the U.S.
day the U.S. its AAA ranking from the
ill reach its credit-rating firm Stan-
it as soon as dard and Poor's.


Interestrates
MA' H
UU


The yield on the
10-year Trea-
sury note fell to
1.84 percent
Tuesday. Yields
affect interest
rates on con-
sumer loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
The price of
platinum rose
on worries
about supply
after Anglo
American Plati-
num, the world's
largest producer
of the metal,
said that it will
stop production
at four mines.





IHi


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .07 0.06 +0.01 .03
6-month T-bill .11 0.10 +0.01 .05
52-wk T-bill .13 0.13 ... .09
2-year T-note .25 0.25 ... .22
5-year T-note .75 0.76 -0.01 .79
10-year T-note 1.84 1.85 -0.01 1.87
30-year T-bond 3.03 3.03 2.91


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 2.61 2.64 -0.03 2.43
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 3.99 4.02 -0.03 4.63
Barclays USAggregate 1.79 1.80 -0.01 2.19
Barclays US High Yield 5.72 5.75 -0.03 7.95
MoodysAAA CorpIdx 3.76 3.77 -0.01 3.90
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.03 1.05 -0.02 .99
Barclays US Corp 2.72 2.73 -0.01 3.68


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 93.28
Ethanol (gal) 2.34
Heating Oil (gal) 3.01
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.46
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.71
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1683.40
Silver (oz) 31.50
Platinum (oz) 1688.00
Copper (Ib) 3.62
Palladium (oz) 712.60
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.30
Coffee (Ib) 1.53
Corn (bu) 7.31
Cotton (Ib) 0.76
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 367.60
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.10
Soybeans (bu) 14.14
Wheat (bu) 7.83


PVS.
94.14
2.33
3.06
3.37
2.75
PVS.
1668.90
31.08
1656.30
3.62
702.55
PVS.
1.30
1.53
7.24
0.76
376.20
1.12
14.60
7.67


%CHG
-0.91
-0.04
-1.67
+2.43
-1.72
%CHG
+0.87
+1.34
+1.91
+0.10
+1.43
%CHG
+0.05
-0.52
+0.90
+0.91
-2.29
-1.08
-0.31
+2.05


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 20.94 +.04 +2.6 +14.8 +10.5 +5.0
BondA m 12.93 ... -0.1 +5.4 +6.0 +3.8
CaplncBuA m 53.54 -.04 +1.5 +13.8 +7.9 +2.0
CpWIdGrlA m 38.12 -.04 +2.5 +20.3 +6.3 +0.7
EurPacGrA m 42.01 -.05 +1.9 +19.9 +4.1 0.0
FnlnvA m 42.14 +.05 +3.3 +17.6 +9.9 +2.8
GrthAmA m 35.49 +.01 +3.3 +20.3 +9.4 +2.8
IncAmerA m 18.40 ... +1.9 +13.3 +10.1 +4.4
InvCoAmA m 31.15 -.02 +3.3 +16.3 +8.5 +2.5
NewPerspA m 32.16 +.01 +2.9 +21.6 +8.4 +2.9
WAMutlnvA m 32.11 +.04 +2.9 +13.8 +11.3 +3.3
Dodge & Cox Income 13.88 ... +0.1 +7.1 +6.3 +6.8
IntlStk 35.70 -.06 +3.1 +23.8 +5.1 -0.1
Stock 127.07 +.20 +4.2 +22.7 +10.3 +1.7
Fidelity Contra 79.78 -.07 +2.8 +17.3 +11.7 +4.0
GrowCo 96.11 -.12 +3.1 +17.1 +13.7 +5.6
LowPriStk d 40.80 +.15 +3.3 +19.2 +12.8 +7.1
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.28 ... +2.3 +15.1 +9.8 +5.2
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA x 13.46 -.07 +0.9 +15.2 +7.9 +9.6
GIBondAdv x 13.42 -.06 +0.9 +15.4 +8.2 +9.9
Harbor Intllnstl d 62.98 -.27 +1.4 +19.6 +6.2 +0.8
PIMCO TotRetA m 11.25 +.01 +0.2 +8.8 +6.8 +7.4
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 27.40 +.08 +3.6 +17.8 +10.6 +3.5
GrowStk 38.91 -.03 +3.0 +18.6 +12.1 +4.7
Vanguard 500Adml 135.71 +.15 +3.3 +16.8 +11.3 +3.6
5001nv 135.71 +.15 +3.3 +16.6 +11.2 +3.5
GNMAAdml 10.88 ... -0.2 +1.9 +5.4 +5.6
MulntAdml 14.45 +.01 +0.6 +4.8 +6.0 +5.3
STGradeAd 10.84 ... +0.2 +4.4 +3.7 +3.9
TotBdAdml 11.06 ... -0.2 +3.6 +5.7 +5.5
Totlntl 15.32 -.03 +2.3 +18.9 +3.7 -1.4
TotStlAdm 36.91 +.07 +3.5 +17.2 +11.9 +4.4
TotStldx 36.90 +.07 +3.5 +17.1 +11.7 +4.3
Welltn 34.74 +.06 +2.7 +13.4 +9.4 +5.2
WelltnAdm 60.00 +.10 +2.7 +13.5 +9.4 +5.3
-Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
Stock indexes were mixed
Tuesday after gains for con-
sumer stocks offset a slump for
the telecom and technology in-
dustries. The Standard &
Poor's 500 index spent much
of the day down, but an after-
noon rally sent it to its first gain
in three days.

Express EXPR
Close: $17.40A3.34 or 23.8%
Thanks to successful promotions
during the holiday season, the cloth-
ing chain lifted its fourth-quarter and
full-year forecasts.


I'

I0 l J
52-week range
$10.47- $26.27
Vol.:11.8m (6.2x avg.) PE: 11.4
Mkt. Cap:$1.49 b Yield:...
Lululemon LULU
Close: $69.47V-2.83 or -3.9%
The yoga-inspired clothing company
raised its fiscal fourth-quarter earn-
ings guidance, but it was below an-
alysts' expectations.
$8 --



S O N D J
52-week range
$52.201 i $81.09
Vol.:11.9m (5.4x avg.) PE:43.2
Mkt. Cap:$7.77 b Yield:...

Body Central BODY
Close: $8.30V-1.41 or -14.5%
Due to worsening holiday sales
trends, the women's clothing store
chain cut its profit forecast for the
year to below expectations.
$11
1 :'


00 N D J
52-week range
$7.71 $30.93
Vol.:1.1m (6.1x avg.) PE:8.7
Mkt. Cap:$135.35 m Yield:...

QLogic QLGC
Close: $10.74A0.56 or 5.5%
The maker of computer networking
gear raised its guidance for its fiscal
third quarter on stronger revenue
from two of its units.
$11



0O N D J
52-week range
$8.63 $19.00
Vol.:2.9m (2.4x avg.) PE: 11.9
Mkt. Cap:$995.83 m Yield:...
Given Imaging GIVN
Close:$16.10V-2.10 or -11.5%
The medical equipment company is
no longer considering a sale of the
company, and one of its biggest
shareholders plans to sell its stake.

I-


52-week range
$12.14 $19.95
Vol.:1.1m (9.6x avg.) PE: 322.0
Mkt. Cap:$497.92 m Yield:...


Associated Press
Walmart employees Jon Christians and Lori Harris take job applications and answers
questions Sept. 1, 2011, during a job fair at the University of Illinois Springfield
campus in Springfield, III. Wal-Mart Stores Inc., the world's largest retailer and nation's
largest private employer, said Tuesday it is making a pledge to boost its sourcing from
domestic suppliers and hire more than 100,000 veterans.



Walmart to hire vets, buy American


Associated Press


NEW YORK Why wait on Washing-
ton when there's Walmart?
Wal-Mart Stores Inc., the world's
largest retailer and the biggest private
employer in the U.S. with 1.4 million
workers here, said Tuesday that it is
rolling out a three-part plan to help
jumpstart the sluggish U.S. economy
The plan includes hiring more than
100,000 veterans in the next five years,
spending $50 billion to buy more Ameri-
can-made merchandise in the next 10
years and helping its part-time workers
move into full-time positions.
The move comes as Walmart tries to
bolster its image amid widespread criti-
cism. The company, which often is criti-
cized for its low-paying jobs and buying
habits in the U.S., recently has faced alle-
gations that it made bribes in Mexico and
calls for better safety oversight after a
deadly fire at a Bangladesh factory that
supplies its clothes. But Walmart said its
initiatives are unrelated to those events,
but rather are meant to highlight what
companies can contribute to the economy
"We've developed a national paralysis
that's driven by all of us waiting for some-
one else to do something," Bill Simon,
president and CEO of Walmart's U.S.
business, said Tuesday at an annual re-


tail industry convention in New York.
"The beauty of the private sector is that
we don't have to win an election, con-
vince Congress or pass a bill to do what
we think is right We can simply move for-
ward, doing what we know is right."
Any changes Walmart makes to its hir-
ing and buying practices garners lots of
attention because of the company's mas-
sive size. Indeed, with $444 billion in an-
nual revenue, if Walmart were a country,
it would rank among the largest
economies in the world. But critics say
the changes amount to a drop in the
bucket for the behemoth, and they ques-
tion whether Walmart's initiatives will
have a major impact on the U.S. economy
"They sound impressive when you first
hear the numbers, but when you begin to
look at them, it's a very tiny scale that
doesn't add up to much," said Stacy
Mitchell, senior researcher at the Insti-
tute for Local Self Reliance, a nonprofit
national research organization.
The centerpiece of Walmart's plan is a
pledge to hire veterans, many of who
have had a particularly difficult time
finding work after coming home from
Afghanistan and Iraq. The unemploy-
ment rate for veterans who served in Iraq
or Afghanistan stood at 10.8 percent in
December, compared with the overall un-
employment rate of 7.8 percent.


Ireland: Horsemeat found in
supermarket burgers
LONDON The Irish food safety watchdog
said Tuesday that it had discovered traces of
horse and pig DNA in burger products sold by
some of the country's biggest supermarkets,
including a burger sold by global retailer Tesco
that authorities said was made of roughly 30
percent horse.
Ireland's Agriculture Minister Simon
Coveney blamed a lone meat processor in
County Monaghan, on the border with North-
ern Ireland, for the horsemeat find, which he
called "totally unacceptable." Coveney told
state broadcaster RTE that an imported addi-
tive used to make the burger appears to have
been packed with horsemeat.
The Food Safety Authority of Ireland also
said Tuesday it had found traces of pig DNA in
85 percent of the burger products it tested in
Irish supermarkets, including those operated
by British frozen food specialist Iceland, Ger-
man discounters Lidl and Aldi, and supermar-
ket giant Spar. Local Irish chains also carried
beef with horse or pig DNA. Many, like the


Oakhurst Beef Burgers carried by Aldi, carried
both pig and horse DNA.
But most of the traces were miniscule. For
example, the authority said it found 0.1 per-
cent horse DNA content in Iceland's own-
brand quarter-pounder patties.

Rare-earth elements found
in Jamaica's red mud
KINGSTON, Jamaica Jamaica's top en-
ergy official said the Caribbean island may
benefit from deposits of rare-earth elements
that are key ingredients for cellphones, wind
turbines and gas-saving cars.
Science, Technology, Energy & Mining
Minister Philip Paulwell said Japanese re-
searchers believe they have found "high con-
centrations of rare earth elements" in the
country's red mud, or bauxite residues.
Paulwell said researchers from Japan's Nip-
pon Light Metal Co. Ltd. believe it can be effi-
ciently extracted.
He said a pilot program will establish the
scope of a project and its environmental
impact.
-From wire reports


Business BRIEFS


I \ - % I I I I I I I I ; ; I


BUSINESS


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013 A9







Page A10 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ................................ publisher
M ike Arnold ..............................................editor
S Charlie Brennan ..........................editor at large
Curt Ebitz ............................... citizen member
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may difer with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


WORK TOGETHER




Park funding a



good place for



cooperation


M ore money woes. This work
time it's about fund- without
ing for Whispering Now
Pines Park, the 290-acre the ur
parkland jewel owned by the Duke
state of Florida, located in freeze
and operated by the city of least d
Inverness, and
used by 500,000
visitors every THE ISSUE:
year- 90 percent
of whom are not The City of
city residents. It Inverness and th
has been jointly county at a
funded by the city funding standoff
and the county,
but now there's OUR OPINION
trouble. Just get together
A recent Chron- and make it
icle story likened happen.
the funding tug-
of-war between
the city of Inverness and the That's
Board of County Commis- The
sioners to parents squabbling control
over child support. That was eratio:
laughable, but not far off the it's rea
mark. to ask
For years, the county used.
equally split park funding accour
with the city. Since 2008, dlingc
though, the two bodies have On
had issues. The county county
wanted to take over opera- quickly:
tion of Whispering Pines to eva
Park, which the city rejected. Whisp
Then the county reduced its This
contribution from $370,000 to rough
$300,000 for the fiscal years county
2008 through 2011. County
For the year 2012-13, which Meeks
began in October, the county is not
has not sent its payment to list foi
the city. County representa- to world
tives have said they want a this is
memorandum of understand- start.
ing with the city, specifying Both
the purposes to which county nicer,
money is being put. The city little.
balked, saying that things that?


Playing blame game A
Sam Nail really nailed it in his I just
letter to the editor Wednesday, wrote ir
Jan. 9. Question: What
is the oldest and most OUND
played game in the
world? Answer: "The
blame game." It all
started in the Garden
of Eden and it's still
going strong. Sam, you
did really nail it. We just
gotta keep on doing it, C
don't we? Thanks for
your letter. 563-0579
Don't spend it
If we have all the extra money Editc
for revitalization in the city of Rani
Crystal River using county
funds, why don't we hold back This
on that and use that money to side fir
pay the deficit of the Progress County.
Energy? in Citru
I don't get it. Why are we for the
spending, spending, spending time yo
when we don't even have a clue days, it
what we're going to wind up going o
with with this Progress Energy scared
stuff? Don't spend money. Put it know w
towards the deficit, to somM
here tw
Looking for MOU say wh
As I read that Inverness never definite
gave the county a memorandum U
of understanding on how Inver-
ness spent the county tax dol- I thou
lars, I must say that the people nals wh
of the county would certainly law, anc
like a memorandum of under- their di
standing from the county on it also a
how they spend my money. They ne


d just fine for years
it that.
Sthe county has cited
expected shortfall in
Energy tax payments to
the park funding, or at
lelay it even if the city
does sign a mem-
orandum.
Whispering
Pines Park is a
local treasure and
ie possibly the best-
run park in all of
f. Central Florida.
The city does not
1: want to have to
r charge entry fees,
as has been done
in other budget-
stressed public
recreation spots.
admirable.
city needs the county's
bution, so a little coop-
n is in order. We think
isonable for the county
how its money is being
We're always in favor of
stability in the han-
)f public funds.
the other hand, the
y seized a little too
y on the Duke tax issue
de its responsibility to
ering Pines Park.
is another example of
edges between the
y and the cities. As
y Commission chair Joe
said, all this squabbling
useful. It's on his goal
r the county and cities
k together better and
an excellent place to

I sides need to play
give a little and get a
What's so hard about



against the law
want to tell the man who
i about the NRA being
popular as ever, in
Florida if that AR is a
.223 caliber that is
against the law to hunt
with.
Looking for Pitts
I was wondering, I
haven't seen Leonard
Pitts' column in the
paper since the begin-
ning of the New Year. Is
he still a columnist for
the newspaper?
air's note: Yes he is.
ge spoils solitude
is in regard to the out-
ing range that is in Citrus
I'm a full-time resident
s Hills and to move here
solitude of nature, any-
ou're outside on certain
sounds like a war that is
n. Even the dogs are
at the park. So I don't
'hy that was a good idea
ebody. And I've only been
'o years, so I can't even
ose idea that was, but it
ely spoils the solitude.
se turn signals
ought using directional sig-
en changing lanes is a
d most people don't use
rectionals. And I thought
applied to police officers.
ever use their turn signals.


"Those who are at war with others are
not at peace with themselves."
William Hazlitt, 1778-1830


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Appropriate job for NRA backer


NRA's biggest
tool in Florida is
a funeral director
He is Rep. Dennis I
Baxley, an Ocala Re- ,
publican who does *
whatever the gun
lobby wants.
Three days after C
the slaughter of first- Carl H
graders in Newtown, OTI
Conn., Baxley made VOI
national headlines by
suggesting weapons should be
carried by employees at public
schools.
Said he: "In our zealousness
to protect people from harm,
we've created all these gun-free
zones, and what we've inadver-
tently done is we've made them
a target. A helpless target is ex-
actly what a deranged person is
looking for where they cannot
be stopped."
So that's the problem. It's not
crackpots with Bushmasters,
it's those darn gun-free zones.
And since a brain-free zone
usually encircles Florida's Leg-
islature, count on some eager-
beaver lawmaker to follow up
on Baxley's idea of arming
teachers, coaches, maybe even
cafeteria workers.
You might be wondering what
kind of a person would advo-
cate saturating our schools with
loaded firearms. How about a
grandfather of eight who lists
his hobbies as fishing, reading
and "listening to Gospel
music"?
Rock on, Dennis. Nearer my
Glock to thee!
Although Baxley has been on
the boards of child-protection
groups in Marion County, the
massacre of those innocent
children in Connecticut failed
to shake his faith in a guns-for-
all philosophy
He's been a longtime darling
of the NRA. In 2004 the group
gave him an A-plus rating and a
"Defender of Freedom" award,
and four years later it pumped
$35,000 into his election cam-
paign, according to Mother


i


I



I
H
I1


Jones magazine.
In return, Baxley
has been obedient
and loyal as a puppy
He's responsible for
Florida's half-baked
"Stand Your
Ground" law, now a
go-to legal defense
for any dope dealer
iaasen or gang banger who
IER shoots down a rival
CES on the street.
The law has been
so problematic for prosecutors
that Gov Rick Scott last year
formed a task force to review it.
Baxley, of course, was given a
prime seat.
As head of the House Judici-
ary committee, he's in position
to snuff proposed changes to
the "Stand Your Ground"
statute. Similarly, any sane leg-
islation that might limit access
to weapons and mass ammo
clips of the sort used at Sandy
Hook Elementary would have
to get Baxley's approval, which
will never happen.
He's way too tight with Mar-
ion Hammer, Florida's top gun
lobbyist and a cloud-mate of
that gibbering NRA wingnut,
Wayne LaPierre. Both Hammer
and LaPierre trade on the myth
that they speak for America's
gun owners, when they don't
even speak for the group's
membership.
A conservative pollster re-
ported that more than 70 per-
cent of NRA members surveyed
support certain reforms that
are rabidly opposed by the
leadership requiring crimi-
nal background checks on all
gun buyers, for example, and
banning firearm ownership by
anyone on the FBI's terrorist
watch list.
Another fact that the NRA
doesn't brag about: Its funding
increasingly depends on gun
manufacturers, not gun owners.
According to the Violence Pol-
icy Center, 22 firearms manu-
facturers, including Beretta
USA and Smith and Wesson,
gave almost $39 million to the


NRA between 2005 and 2011.
So it's basically a corporate
shill promoting itself as a grass-
roots defender of the
Constitution.
In many states, the NRA has
used campaign contributions
and threats of retribution to se-
cure political puppets such as
Baxley The successful tactic
has given the lobby a clout that
far outweighs the true size of its
constituency
The NRA claims 4.3 million
members. If you charitably as-
sume it's not padding the num-
bers, the total still represents
just a tiny fraction of American
gun owners, of whom there are
at least 146 million.
In other words, more than 97
percent of legal gun owners in
this country hunters, target
shooters, people who keep or
carry a firearm for protection
- don't belong to the NRA.
Many gun owners have multi-
ple weapons (I own two, a shot-
gun and a rifle), but the vast
majority don't keep assault ri-
fles or military-style semi-auto-
matics of the type used on the
moviegoers in Aurora, Colo., the
children in Newtown or, more
recently, four firefighters and
an off-duty policeman in Web-
ster, N.Y
The latest wave of attacks has
shaken up a few pro-NRA stal-
warts like Sen. Joe Manchin, a
West Virginia Democrat, who
said: "I don't know anybody in
the sporting or hunting arena
that goes out with an assault
rifle. I don't know anybody who
needs 30 rounds in a clip to go
hunting."
Tragically, nothing so sensi-
ble is being heard from law-
makers such as Baxley, though
he undoubtedly has embalmed
enough young gunshot victims
to realize that something needs
to change.

Carl Hiaasen is a columnist for
the Miami Herald. Readers
may write to him at: 1 Herald
Plaza, Miami, Fla., 33132.


I 30ST OA'T
BELiEVE IN IT
FOR ME.
PEROl4ALLY/


MRC.ow/cm ,
7 D/1 ist.by KingFeaiturcs




PEt"Ui4 ,
/| I ioBEEVE
S11i
AB06MOO.


LETTERS to the Editor


ER rocks
My first medical problem for
the New Year was handled in a
wonderful, caring manner that
I would like to comment on.
There are so many negative
comments regarding the treat-
ment at our Citrus Memorial
emergency room that I would
like to share my personal ex-
perience.
My husband, 81 years young,
was in trouble with what I be-
lieved might be congestive
heart failure. This was a huge
problem in 2012, which in-
volved three months ofhospi-
talization and rehab facilities
- Citrus Memorial, Ocala
Heart Center and Citrus
Health and Rehab. All of these
facilities took excellent care of
him.
On Jan. 3, 2013, after contact-
ing Dr Walker our cardiologist,
it was recommended we go di-
rectly to the emergency room.
The arrival treatment was
first rate. I related my fears to
the attendant Matt and before I
had even filled in the first line
of the paperwork, they had my


husband in a wheelchair and
into the examination room.
When they were comfortable
with the fact that it was not my
worst fear, he was brought
back to the waiting room, and
shortly taken for testing, which
happened quickly We were
lucky it was pneumonia and
not what I was afraid of. The
care and concern for not only
Glenn, but also his family, was
awesome and appreciated.
They informed us of every-
thing going on and assured us
he would be well taken care of.
I sat in the waiting room
watching the well-working
team handle the arrivals on a
who needs help fast basis, and
was so impressed. We are for-
tunate to live in an area with
this type of concerned, dedi-
cated professionals. I know
everyone does not have what
they believe are good experi-
ences, but in my opinion Citrus
Memorial does a great job.
Thank you all for being so
caring.
Roslie Greenwell-Kilgus
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
* Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


I





WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013 All


LETTERS to the Editor


Open letter to
port director
While I have never writ-
ten a letter to this paper
concerning any matter, I
felt a particular need to
do so in light of County
Administrator and Port
Director Brad Thorpe's
recent offer to reimburse
the county for his port di-
rector certification ex-
penses. I believe this offer
ultimately culminated
from my public records
request for his travel
records and a Citrus
County Council meeting
last month where I chal-
lenged Mr. Thorpe on var-
ious statements he had
made and continues to
make. This is an open let-
ter to Brad Thorpe for
your consideration in
publishing.
Dear Mr Thorpe;
Hopefully, Mr. Thorpe,
your soiree (port director
certification) to New Or-
leans will offer a plenary
or break-out session on
leadership. I would sug-
gest you enhance these
skills prior to ever worry-
ing about directing port
traffic or products at Port
Citrus, because you lack
all manner of understand-
ing for this important
quality.
Leadership is demon-
strated through one's
courage, knowledge and
judgment to make the
"right" decision to begin
with. Not, Mr Thorpe, by
reacting after the au-
thor of this letter brought
the matter to citizens'
attentions.
Between this planned
trip and last month's New
Orleans trip you are well
past $5,000 in taxpayer-
funded expenses. Yet none
of these costs were refer-
enced when you sought
approval from port board
members in October.
Why not extend your
offer to its obvious exten-
sion and front the initial
$20,000 being paid to
TranSystems? My ques-


tion to you is: What can
we expect from you if the
feasibility study says it
could be a port? Does that
entitle the citizens to a
full, partial or no refund?
Or does your offer require
an absolute yes or no con-
clusion?
Leadership in govern-
ment should not be spec-
ulating on the outcome of
any study, feasibility or
otherwise. It clouds the
process. My purpose in
requesting the public
records concerning this
expenditure was to bring
truth to your rhetoric.
This port project has cost
significantly more than
the $8,000 you like to toss
around. I know it and say
it you know it and
won't admit it. If you
claim I'm wrong with that
statement, challenge me
on it.
On a related leadership
matter, it amazes me that
you and this board felt no
moral/ethical obligation
to continue with funding
for the city of Inverness
and Whispering Pines
Park (please note: mostly
kids use parks). Why have
you chosen this option?
Simply put, because you
can there's no "signed"
agreement. Your ap-
proach to this revenue
crisis is significantly
worse than Duke Energy's
tax payment tactics. At
least they made a good
faith payment and are
seeking an independent
judicial ruling. The tac-
tics you have employed
are more along the lines
of"I can, therefore I will."
As for reimbursing the
citizens for your port cer-
tification, keep your
money, you have com-
pletely missed the entire
point. A leader would ab-
solutely recognize in
these delicate financial
times we need to dis-
pense with any unneces-
sary expenditure and
practice fiscal austerity;
not enhance their per-
sonal resumes off the


backs of taxpayers and
county employees, who,
by the way, haven't re-
ceived pay raises, in what
- three to four years?
Andrew Carnegie once
said, "The older I get the
less I listen to what peo-
ple say and the more I
look at what they do."
Bob Schweickert Jr.
Inverness

Thank you,
supporters
"Thank You!" is the
only way to put it.
Christmas at Crystal
River Health & Rehab
was full of smiles as well
as tears of joy Our sup-
porters in the community
really came through again
for our long-term care
elders The residents
would like to shout out
Thank You to: Lyn Coker
of "Just a Cupcake" and
the Giving Tree partici-
pants, Lesley O'Dell and
friends of"Lesley's Re-
source's," Crystal River
Lions Club for the Li-


oness' Tree Trimmers and
bakers, West Citrus Elk's
Club Veterans Committee,
Blackshears' Aluminum
mailbox, Crystal River
Women's Club, Santa 4
Seniors, Becca, Catherine
and Joni the Job Coaches
of Crest School, Citrus
School to Work Zone stu-
dents and job coach, Leo,
Kevin Colucci, Danny,
George & Jiel of"Da
Band." Ray Weber, Hos-
pice of Citrus County,
Christian Center Church,
1st Assembly of God, New
Hope Baptist, St. Bene-
dict's. Plus all our friends
and neighbors who
stopped by CRHR for the
1st Annual Holly Jolly
community gathering.
Thanks to all those who
stopped by to sing, visit,
and bring goodies
throughout the season.
Citrus County residents
rock!
Anita Marshall,
activity director
Crystal River Health &
Rehabilitation Center,
Crystal River


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OPINION


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WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Obama weighs action on guns


Associated Press
Jesus Lozano takes pre-
cautions from the cold,
windy rain Tuesday while
riding his bike on North
Main in downtown
Memphis, Tenn.



Facebook unveils
social search
MENLO PARK, Calif. -
Facebook CEO Mark
Zuckerberg unveiled a new
search feature on Tuesday
in the company's first
staged
event at
its Menlo
Park,
Calif.,
head-
quarters
since its
May initial Mark
public Zuckerburg
offering. CEO of
Called Facebook.
"graph
search," the new service
lets users search their so-
cial connections for infor-
mation about people,
interests, photos and
places. It'll help users who,
for instance, want to scroll
through all the photos their
friends have taken in Paris
or search for the favorite TV
shows of all their friends
who happen to be doctors.
Until now Facebook
users were unable to
search for friends who live
in a certain town or like a
particular movie. With the
new feature, people can
search for friends who, say,
live in Boston who also like
the film "Zero Dark Thirty."
Obama agrees


to use D(
WASHINGT
dent Barack O
ousine will soo
District of Colu
tion Without Ri
tion" license pl
The White H
Obama has liv
four years and
how patently u
families to wor
children and p;
without having
Congress. The
House said Tu
Obama's official
will begin using
bolic license pl
the inauguratic
weekend.
Ore. to ho
energy t
CORVALLIS
Newport, Ore.,
selected as the
its backers call
scale wave en
The city on
central coast b
Reedsport to tl
what's called ti
Marine Energy
A statement
State Universit
cility at a site y
elected about fil
shore will test d
generating pot
vironmental im
pletion is expe
several years.
Plans call fo
berths" ope
water dedicate
individual devi
arrays of devic
are to transmit
electric grid an
entists and enn
onshore.
The center i
a partnership,
stantially by fed
between Orego
the University o
Washington.


C plates BERLIN Call it "Eu-
ON -Presi- rope's Got Talent" for
ON -Presi- geeks.
bama's lim- geeks.
Teams of scientists from
n carry the across the continent are
mbias axa- vying for a funding bo-
epresenta- nanza that could see two of
ate. them receive up to 1 bil-
louse said lion ($1.33 billion) over 10
ed in D.C. for years to keep Europe at
has seen the cutting edge of
nfair it is for technology.
k hard, raise The contest began with
ay taxes, 26 proposals that were
a vote in whittled down to six last
! White year Just four have made
esday that it to the final round.
al vehicles They include a plan to
g the sym- develop digital guardian
ates during angels that would keep
)n this people safe from harm; a
massive data-crunching
machine to simulate so-
ost wave cial, economic and techno-
est site logical change on our
Oreplanet; an effort to craft
h, Ore.e the most accurate com-
Shas been puter model of the human
e site for what brain to date; and a team
a utility- working to find better
ergy test site. ways to produce and em-
Oregon's ploy graphene an ultra-
)eat out thin material that could
he south for revolutionize manufactur-
he Pacific ing of everything from air-
Center. planes to computer chips.
from Oregon The two winners will be
y said the fa- announced Jan. 28 by the
et to be se- European Union's execu-
ve miles from tive branch in Brussels
devices for Initially, each project
ential and en- will receive 54 million
pacts. Com- from the European
cted to take Union's research budget,
an amount that will be
r four "test matched by national gov-
n spaces of ernments and other
d to testing sources. Further funding
ces or small will depend on whether
es. Cables they reach certain mile-
pwer to the stones within the first 30
d datatosci- it could total 1 billion
gineers each.
Securing such vast sums
s a project of will be made harder by the
funded sub- austerity measures im-
deral dollars, posed by many financially
on State and drained European govern-
of ments.
Still, the senior EU offi-
-From wire reports cial overseeing the so-


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Facing pow-
erful opposition to sweeping gun
regulations, President Barack
Obama is weighing 19 steps he
could take through executive ac-
tion alone, congressional officials
said. But the scope of such meas-
ures is limited.
The steps could include order-
ing stricter action against people
who lie on gun sale background
checks, seeking to ensure more
complete records in the federal
background check database, strik-


ing limits on federal research into
gun use, ordering tougher penal-
ties against gun trafficking, and
giving schools flexibility to use
grant money to improve safety
Obama will unveil his proposals
Wednesday, barely over a month
since the massacre of 20 children
and six adults at Sandy Hook Ele-
mentary School in Newtown,
Conn., thrust the gun issue into the
national spotlight after years of in-
action by Obama and lawmakers.
The White House said Obama
and Vice President Joe Biden will
be joined at Wednesday's an-


called Future and Emerg-
ing Technologies Flag-
ships program is confident
the money will be made
available and insists the
investment is necessary if
Europe wants to match the
success of the CERN labs
on the Swiss-French bor-
der that have become the
world's premier center for
particle research, thanks
to their $10 billion atom
smasher
"Supporting research
and development is not a
nice-to-have, it is essential
because no investment
means no chance for a bet-
ter future," Neelie Kroes
told The Associated Press
in an email. "And espe-
cially during a crisis we all
need something positive to
look ahead to. Just cutting
public expenditure and
austerity don't bring new
growth and jobs."
Kroes, whose title is Eu-
ropean Commissioner for
Digital Agenda, believes it
will pay off.
"By pooling resources
across the EU and focus-
ing on the two best proj-


nouncement by children who
wrote the president letters after
the Newtown shooting. Supportive
lawmakers and advocacy groups
are also expected to attend.
Obama is vowing not to back off
his support for sweeping gun leg-
islation that would require con-
gressional backing including
banning assault weapons, limiting
the capacity of ammunition maga-
zines and instituting universal
background checks despite op-
position from the influential gun
lobby
"Will all of them get through this


ects we get a good shot at a
manifold return on the in-
vestment," she said.
Switzerland, Norway, Is-
rael and Turkey, which are
not part of the 27-nation
EU, are also partnering in
the program.
One explicit aim of the
program is to encourage
scientists to address not
just contemporary prob-
lems but also those that
could arise in future.
Climate change, aging
societies and a shortage of
natural resources all loom
large in predictions for
Europe's future. So far, so-
lutions to these problems
have been limited, partly
because of their sheer
scope.
"The world of today has
become so complex that
it's beyond our control,"
said Dirk Helbing, a pro-
fessor at the Swiss Federal
Institute of Technology
ETH in Zurich. Helbing is
the coordinator of the
FuturICT team that aims
to monitor the state of the
planet in real time using
growing mountains of data


now at our fingertips.
Anybody will be able to
tap into the system to ex-
plore possible future sce-
narios in much the same
way as the meteorologists
can now forecast the
weather with a certain de-
gree of accuracy
"Think of it as the tele-
scope of the 21st century to
help get better insight into
problems," Helbing said.
A rival project led by sci-
entists at ETH's sister
school EPFL in Lausanne,
focuses less on the plane-
tary and more on the
personal.
Adrian Ionescu, a pro-
fessor of nanoneletronics
at EPFL, said the boom in
mobile devices has con-
centrated mainly on com-
munication and gaming.
His team's Guardian An-
gels project aims to de-
velop wearable, self-
powered gadgets than can
warn their users of danger,
encourage them to exer-
cise, and collect environ-
mental and health
information that could be
of use to doctors.


Congress? I don't know," Obama
said Monday at a news conference.
"My starting point is not to
worry about the politics," he said.
"My starting point is to focus on
what makes sense, what works."
The president said he would
unveil a comprehensive roadmap
for curbing gun violence within
days. His plan will be based on
recommendations from Biden's
gun task force and is expected to
include both legislative proposals
and steps Obama can implement
by himself, using his presidential
powers.



House


votes


$50B


storm


aid

Associated Press

WASHINGTON
More than 10 weeks after
Superstorm Sandy bru-
talized parts of the heav-
ily populated Northeast,
the House approved
$50.7 billion in emer-
gency relief for the vic-
tims Tuesday night as
Republican leaders
struggled to close out an
episode that exposed
painful party divisions
inside Congress and out
The vote was 241-180,
and officials said the
Senate was likely to ac-
cept the measure early
next week and send it to
President Barack Obama
for his signature. Democ-
rats supported the aid in
large numbers, but there
was substantial Republi-
can backing, too, in the
GOP-controlled House.
"We are not crying wolf
here," said Rep. Chris
Smith, R-N.J., one of a
group of Northeastern
lawmakers from both
parties who sought
House passage of legisla-
tion roughly in line with
what the Obama admin-
istration and governors
of the affected states
have sought
Democrats were more
politically pointed as
they brushed back South-
ern conservatives who
sought either to reduce
the measure or offset
part of its cost through
spending cuts elsewhere
in the budget.
"I just plead with my
colleagues not to have a
double standard," said
Rep. Carolyn Maloney of
New York. "Not to vote
tornado relief to Ala-
bama, to Louisiana, to
Mississippi, Missouri, to
- with Ike, Gustav, Kat-
rina, Rita but when it
comes to the Northeast,
with the second worst
storm in the history of
our country, to delay,
delay, delay"
One key vote came on
an attempt by Rep. Rod-
ney Freylinghuysen to
add $33.7 billion to an
original allotment of $17
billion in aid. That vote
was 228-192 and included
heavy Democratic
support
Earlier, conservatives
failed in an attempt to
offset a part of the bill's
cost with across-the-
board federal budget
cuts.
The vote was 258-162.
Critics said the pro-
posed cuts would crimp
Pentagon spending as
well as domestic ac-
counts and said the aid
should be approved with-
out reductions
elsewhere.
Sandy roared through
several states in late Oc-
tober and has been
blamed for 140 deaths
and billions of dollars in
property damage.


Colder in California


Associated Press
Icicles are formed Tuesday on an orange tree in a grove in Redlands, Calif. A cold snap that has California
farmers struggling to protect a $1.5 billion citrus crop has slowly started to ease, though frigid temperatures
were still the norm Tuesday morning throughout the state and across other parts of the West.




Race is on for EU's $1.3B science projects

Associated Press IF-


Associated Press
People use an infrared-DIC microscope to do multi-neuron patch-clamp recording May
9, 2011, in the Blue Brain team and the Human Brain Project laboratory of the Ecole
Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, in Lausanne, Switzerland. The Blue Brain team
has come together with 12 other European and international partners to propose the
Human Brain Project, a candidate for funding under the EU's FET Flagship program.












SPORTS


Where
will Tim
Tebow
play next
year?/B3

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 Golf/B2
0 NFL, Cycling/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 Sports briefs/B4
0 Basketball/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Lady Pirates tame Tavares' Bulldogs


CrystalRiver

claims 53-41 win

STEVE MCGUNNIGLE
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER Follow-
ing a shaky opening half, the
Crystal River Lady Pirates
came out from the break a
much improved team, pulling
away from visiting District 5A-7
foe Tavares for a 53-41 win
Tuesday night.
Crystal River (13-7, 7-2 dis-
trict) committed 14 of their 21
turnovers in the first half before
settling down to seize control,
turning a 23-19 halftime edge to



SPORTS^
BRIEFS^


swell the lead to as high as 13 in
the third quarter. Tavares (8-8,
5-4) never got closer than nine
the rest of the way, as the Lady
Pirates hit enough of their free
throws down the stretch to keep
the Lady Bulldogs at bay
Jasmyne Eason scored 11 of
her 14 points in the first half,
while Megan Wells had an all-
around game, coming alive in
the second half to score all of
her 11 points along with seven
rebounds and five assists.
Wells and company made a
concerted effort down the
stretch to drive and either draw
fouls or kick out for easy scores.
It worked. Tavares' Savannah
Guenther (game-high 17 points)
fouled out down the stretch.


"We came together as a team
and ran our plays, and we were
able to settle down," Wells said
of Crystal River's second half.
"We were ready to get the game
over with."
To start the third, Wells found
Lamechia Richburgh (seven
points, 17 rebounds) down low.
After an Eason free throw, Wells
received a downcourt inbounds
pass from Richburgh to break
free for a layup, making it 28-19.
The Pirates outscored
Tavares 15-7 in the period to go
up 38-26 entering the fourth.
Crystal River went up by as
much as 43-28 with less than
five minutes remaining.
See Page B4


West Port whips district rival Lecanto 53-38
C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
LECANTO The surge Lecanto High School's girls basketball team
has put together since the Christmas break hit a major stumbling block
Tuesday, and it was put there by perennial District 6A-6 power West Port.
The Wolf Pack scored the game's first nine points, then netted the first
eight of the second half, which was more than enough to power them
past their host Lecanto, 53-38.
West Port's win ended the Panthers' six-game winning streak.
Lecanto is now 8-10 overall, 2-5 in 6A-6; West Port remains in a position
to tie Citrus for first in 6A-6 district, improving to 13-7 overall and 5-1 in
district play.
"The start of the first half and the start of the second half were impor-
tant for us," Wolf Pack coach Corey Rollerson said. "Once we got that
lead, we were able to maintain it and keep the momentum going.
See Page B4


AP: Soriano agrees
to $28M deal
WASHINGTON Reliever
Rafael Soriano and the Wash-
ington Nationals reached
agreement pending a physical
on a $28
S i million, two-
year con-
tract that
includes
4ot $14 million
in deferred
money, a
Rafael person fa-
Soriano miliar with
the negotia-
tions told The Associated
Press on Tuesday.
Speaking to the AP on con-
dition of anonymity because
the deal was not yet official, the
person said Soriano's contract
contains a $14 million option
for 2015 that would become
guaranteed if he reaches 120
games finished over 2013 and
2014 combined.
The Soriano-Nationals ne-
gotiations were first reported
by Yahoo Sports.
Manning, Peterson
on 101 Award list
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -
Broncos quarterback Peyton
Manning was chosen AFC of-
fensive
player of the
year and
Vikings run-
Sning back
Adrian Pe-
terson the
NFC's top
offensive
Peyton
canning player in
voting for
the 101
Awards.
A nation-
wide panel
of 101
sportswrit-
ers and
broadcast-
Adrian ers who reg-
Peterson ularly cover
the NFL vote on the awards,
which will be handed out for
the 43rd time on March 2 in
Kansas City.
San Francisco linebacker
Aldon Smith was the NFC's
top defensive player, and
Seattle's Pete Carroll the con-
ference coach of the year.
Houston's J.J. Watt was the
AFC's best defensive player
and Chuck Pagano and Bruce
Arians of Indianapolis shared
the AFC coaching honor.
Cardinals lose out
on McCoy
PHOENIX The Arizona
Cardinals' list of potential
coaches lost a name when the
San Diego Chargers hired
Mike McCoy.
Now the Cardinals are
going to take a look at Seattle
offensive coordinator Darrell
Bevell, reportedly setting up
an interview with the man who
provided the game plan that
led to the Seahawks' 58-0 vic-
tory over Arizona.
The other known candidates
to replace the fired Ken
Whisenhunt are Cardinals de-
fensive coordinator Ray Horton,
Pittsburgh Steelers offensive
coordinator Todd Haley and
Cincinnati Bengals offensive co-
ordinator Jay Gruden.
From wire reports


Close contest


Citrus, Lecanto

play to 1-1 draw

in county rivalry

DAVID PIEKLIK
Correspondent
INVERNESS It was a
district playoffs tune-up be-
tween two evenly matched
engines; the Citrus and
Lecanto boys soccer teams
now have some tinkering to
do for higher performance
after a 1-1 draw Tuesday
The Hurricanes (6-5-4) and
Panthers (9-7-2) added to an-
other chapter of close con-
tests this season, with the
latest match on Senior Night
at Hurricane Stadium. Pos-
session was even throughout
the match as were shots on
goal; 16 for Lecanto and 12
for Citrus.
The teams which play in
different districts paced
each other in the non-district
match of county rivals, with a
few games left in the regular
season before playoffs begin.
Hurricanes senior Michael
Hetland acknowledged play-
ers start to get a little tired at
this point of the season, but
the game was a good warm-
up for playoffs and the team
is mentally prepared.
"Even if we are ahead, we
need to act like we're losing
and always give it 100 per-
cent," he said.
Lecanto controlled posses-
sion and the tempo the first
half, keeping passes to the
outside and working the ball
around for good shots. Jacob
Rice put his team on the
scoreboard with 8:40 remain-
ing, heading the ball in off a
Scott Stears pass.
The Panthers took the 1-0
lead into the half, after which
Citrus came out more aggres-
sive and maintained ball con-
trol. At the 37:40 mark of the
second half, 'Canes defender
Noah Macginnis with his
back to the goal spun to


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Lecanto High School striker Evan Chapman catches some serious air for the header as the
Panthers battle the Citrus Hurricanes in a non-district county rival match Tuesday in Inverness.


find striker Joshua Marsden,
who beat one-on-one cover-
age and fired a shot past
Lecanto goal keeper Ryan
Stevens to tie the score.


Though Citrus controlled
the tempo for much of the
second half, the team could-
n't find a hole in the Lecanto
defense. The teams traded a


few free kicks and corner
kicks but didn't generate one
goal.


Page B4


Serena Williams secures victory on bad ankle


Womenplay

first round of

Australian Open

Associated Press
MELBOURNE, Australia -
Flat on her back, her sore right
ankle raised and her hands cov-
ering her face, Serena Williams
tried to block out thoughts her
bid for a third straight Grand
Slam title might be ruined.
After a dominating run the
past six months, Williams was a
big favorite to win the Aus-
tralian Open. Suddenly, though,
there seemed a way for her to
be gone in the first round.
"I almost panicked, and I
thought, 'I can't do that,"' she
said. "I just have to really re-
main calm and think things
through."
The stats showed this was
nothing more than a stroll a


Associated Press
Chair umpire Kerrilyn Cramer, centre, and opponent Edina Gallovits-
Hall come to the aid of Serena Williams after she fell during her first-
round match Tuesday at the Australian Open in Melbourne, Australia.


6-0, 6-0 wipeout in 54 minutes of
No. 110-ranked Edina Gallovits-
Hall at Melbourne Park on
Tuesday Williams conceded
only six points in the second set.


But this match took signifi-
cantly longer to complete given
the medical timeouts. And
while the score may have been
painful to her opponent, there


was plenty of pain to go around.
The first set was 4-0 after 19
minutes at Hisense Arena when
her tumble near the baseline
diverted attention on Day Two
from center court, where a day
session featuring Roger Fed-
erer, Andy Murray and women's
champion Victoria Azarenka
was under way
After some deep breaths, the
31-year-old Willlams pulled
herself together, got to her
hands and knees for a few min-
utes and gradually to her feet
Her already heavily taped
ankle was assessed and re-
taped. She went back on court
and won the next four points to
get herself to another
changeover, and more attention
from the doctor. She went back
and held another service game
to clinch the set, giving her time
for more treatment.
"A very similar thing hap-
pened to me last year, almost on
the same side, the same shot,"


Page B4






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


All eyes on Rory Mcllroy


No. 1 golfer begins

year with Nike

deal equipment

DOUG FERGUSON
APgolf writer

HONOLULU This much
could always be said about Tiger
Woods. The richest man in golf
played like he didn't have two
nickels to rub together.
Rory McIlroy appears to be cut
from the same cloth.
Even a cloth that now has a
swoosh.
McIlroy's big year got under
way Monday in Abu Dhabi with
the kind of glitzy production that
would make even Ryder Cup or-
ganizers envious, with music blar-
ing and lasers lighting up the
room. There were video messages
from Phil Knight, Wayne Rooney
and Woods, for so long the most
prominent face of Nike Golf.
Adding to the buildup was a
commercial that debuts Wednes-
day and shows McIlroy and Woods
trying to one-up each other on the
range with shots that find the
"cup" in faraway places. It's rem-
iniscent of that McDonald's com-
mercial from a generation ago,
Michael Jordan and Larry Bird
matching shots (nothing but net)
that go through windows and
bounce off scoreboards.
There was a time when Woods
never shared the stage with any
Nike athlete in a commercial.
What must follow now for McIl-
roy is the most important part of
any marketing campaign -
performance.
Nike endorsement contracts
are among the best-guarded se-
crets in golf. Two industry leaders
independently estimated the
value at $20 million a year, in-
cluding one who was aware of a
bidding war for McIlroy that did-
n't last very long.
At some point, this becomes
like Monopoly money, anyway
Will it change McIlroy? Don't
bet on it
"I don't play golf for the money
I'm well past that," McIlroy said.
"I'm a major champion, which
I've always dreamed of being. I'm
world No. 1, which I've always
dreamed of being. I think this is a
company that can help me sustain
that and win ever more majors."
McIlroy's talent is such he prob-
ably could win with anything,
much like Woods and Phil Mick-


F


i/'
Ir


r .
Associated Press
Rory Mcllroy celebrates his victory on the 18th green in the final round
of the PGA Championship on Aug. 12, 2012, on the Ocean Course of the
Kiawah Island Golf Resort in Kiawah Island, S.C. Nike said it has signed
a sponsorship deal with No. 1-ranked golfer for a reported $200 million.


elson winning majors with two
brands of clubs, and Ernie Els
winning majors under three
equipment contracts.
From Nike's standpoint, the up-
side might not be easy to measure.
McIlroy already has shown to
be less predictable than Woods.
Even during such a remarkable
season when he won five times, a
major and money titles on both
sides of the Atlantic, the 23-year-
old from Northern Ireland missed
five cuts. It took Woods 13 years
before he missed his fifth cut
If the kid goes through another
bad patch this year, the cynics will
be quick to blame the equipment.
If he wins early and often, and
maybe even slips on a green
jacket the second weekend in
April, then all credit to the im-
mense talent that is Rory McIlroy
Nike is all about the athlete,
however, and it has Nos. 1 and 2
in the world at the moment, the
two biggest names in golf regard-


less of their ranking.
Predictions are a dangerous
business in any sport, particularly
when the cup on the golf
course, not the new Nike com-
mercial is only 4 1/4 inches
around, the game is played out-
doors and the talent pool is get-
ting so deep it looks like it's about
to drop off a shelf in the ocean.
For years, the standard was
Woods, and that hasn't changed.
McIlroy, however, might have a
tough time living up to his own
standard. More than five wins
around the world was the quality of
competition McIlroy beat last year
- a major, two FedEx Cup playoff
events, Europe's version of the
Tour Championship. The weakest
field McIlroy beat all year was the
Honda Classic, where the top five
included Woods, Lee Westwood,
Justin Rose and Charl Schwartzel.
"I want to win golf tournaments.
I made that clear from the get go,"
McIlroy said.


Find proper fit



for your golf clubs


r ;t'l

11r ~1


I would like to start out by
wishing all golfers of Cit-
rus County a safe and
healthy New Year.
This month, I want to focus
on the importance of having
proper-fitting golf clubs. Golf
is one of the few
sports we all play
differently. The
end result is the
same in terms of
trying to get the
ball into the hole
in as few shots as
possible. The dif-
ference is, we all
swing the club dif- Herb
ferently and have
different body HEF
sizes and HIN
strengths.
Most amateur golfers think
having fitted clubs is only for
the better players. That
could not be farther from the
truth. Because the skill level
of the average player is not
as high, it is even more im-
portant for him or her to
have clubs matching his or
her body type and swing.
The three main categories
I look at when doing a club
fitting are length, lie and
shaft flex and type. When I
perform a fitting, I do not try
to change the swing a golfer
has. I want to fit the clubs to
your swing, not fit your swing
to the clubs.
The first part of the fitting
is measuring for length. I
want to make sure the club is
proper length for a golfer to
make contact in the middle
of the clubface. To do this, I
apply hitting tape to the face
of the club and look at where
the impact is. If it is on the
toe, I will try to lengthen the
club. If it is near the heel, I
will shorten the club.
Once I have the correct
length, I measure for lie
angle next. I feel this may be
the most important part of a
fitting. To check for lie, I
apply impact tape to the bot-
tom of the club head to see
which part of the club is im-
pacting the ground first. In a
perfect world, the impact
would be in the middle of the
sole of the club. If the impact
is on the heel, then the club
is to upright and it could
cause the ball to go left. If it


Local LEADERS


BRENTWOOD
MEN
Jan. 9,Wednesday Point Quota Group
results.
First +12
Angelo Deyeso and Don Henderson
Second +9
John Fish and Brian Ingraham
Most over quota +9
Louis DeGennaro
Closest to the Pin:
No. 2 Clair Lockwood
No. 4 Dick Hunt
50/50 winner Paul Roy
Jan. 12, Saturday Morning Scramble
results.
First
Robert Haden, Morris Frank,
Art Miller and Jesse Lewis
Second
Gene Kutina, Gene Moff,
Neil Swanton and Frank Hughes
Third
Rick Urban, Gene Pokaluk,
Larry Lietzke and Pete Krol
Closest to the Pin:
No.2 Vaughn Thornton
No. 4 Gene Pokaluk
Jan. 13, Sunday Morning Scramble
results.
First 7 under
Vaughn Thornton, John Fish
and Ann Fish
Second 6 under
(MOC) Eagle on No. 3
Joe Goyette, Ann McLaughlin,
Dave McLaughlin and Jennie Diaz
Third 6 under
Steve Leonard, Jim Pearson,
Bob Staker and Mona Evans
Closest to the Pin:
No.2 Vaughn Thornton
No. 4 Chuck Curtis
50/50 winner Floyd Linco
Jan. 14, Monday Morning Mens Group
results.
First Bob Flegle +4
Second Jim Kieffer +2
Most over quota +1 Steve Leonard
Closest to the Pin:
No.2 Andy McKenney
No. 4 John Fish
WOMEN
Jan. 15, Brentwood Tuesday Ladies
League standings.
Teams:
First 28 points
Cathy Foody and Clarita Parado
Second 26
Penny Magliano and Jane Vandenbergh
Third 22.5
Glenora Hilton and Dorothy Gratien
Individuals:
First Cathy Foody 14 points
Second Penny Magliano 12.5
(Tie) Glenora Hilton 12.5
Low gross Kay Fitzsimmons 46
Low net Cathy Foody 33
(Tie) Kay Fitzsimmons 33
(Tie) Barbara Ouellette 33
Chip-ins:
No. 2 Kay Fitzsimmons
No.1 Barbara Ouellette
No.2 Rozanne Young
Birdies:
No. 2 Kay Fitzsimmons


Nos. 4 and 8 Claire Lindley
No.2 Rozanne Young
Game of the Day Most 6's:
Kay Fitzsimmons, Claire Lindley Jane Van-
denbergh, Glenora Hilton and Gigi Haltom
tie at four each.
Closest to the Pin:
No. 4 Mary Ann Barch

BRENTWOOD
FARMS
Jan.15, Beverly Hills Men's Nine Hole
Golf League results.
Frank DeLucia 35
Seamus Graham 35
Jesse Lewis 36:
Birdies:
No. 4 Bill Collier
Closest to the Cup: Chuch Boho.
Golfers of any age or ability, snowbirds and
those new to the area are welcome to join a
friendly round of nine holes of handicap
golf. The group plays every Tuesday morn-
ing at Brentwood Farms golf course with a
tee time at 7:45 a.m. For information, call
Frank Hughes at 352-746-4800 or email
new216@tampabay.rr.com.

CITRUS HILLS
MEN
Jan. 9, The Citrus Hills Men's Golf Asso-
ciation On The Oaks Golf Course played
"Individual Point Quota."


First
Second
Third
Fourth
Fifth

First
Second
Third
Fourth
Fifth

First
Second
Third
Fourth
Fifth

First
Second
Third
Fourth
Fifth


A Flight
Dennis Bruggerl
John Nagle
Jerry Czack
Tony Barone
Mike Shipman
B Flight
Rod Pavilionis
Vic Jamnik
Jim Remler
Dick Morelli
Charlie Haire
C Flight


+8
+5
+3
+2 (MOC)
+2 (MOC)

+13
+8
+7
+6
+3


John Keller +9
Joe Konie +6
John Bechler +5 (MOC)
Randy Robertson +5 (MOC)
Mike Rizzio +4
D Flight
George Lowell +7
Tim Quinn +6
Dave O'Brien +5 (MOC)
Len Ciriello +5 (MOC)
Gene Stillman +5 (MOC)
WOMEN


Jan. 8, The Citrus Hills Ladies Golf Asso-
ciation participated in a game of "Team
of Four Point Quota." The number of
points each team needed to make is
based on individual handicaps. Points
earned on gross score are as follows:
Bogey/1 point, Par/2 points, Birdie/4
points, Eagle/8 points and Hole in one/16
points.
First +27
Kay Close, Sung Ja Kim,
Virginia Romiti and Karin Radtke
Second +17
Kathy Stefani, Susan Kim
Barbara Shipman and Fe Alino
Third +14
Judy Stone, Lily Kim,
Cathi Smith and Barbara Hirnyk


Birdies:
No. 5
No. 8
No. 12
No. 11
No. 13
Nos. 6, 13 and 17


Sherry Robertson
Kathy Stefani
Becky Holland
Jackie Dziekan
Nelia Rodriguez
Kay Close


CITRUS SPRINGS
MEN
Jan. 15,The Citrus Springs Men's Asso-
ciation played 2 bb on 4's and 5's and 1
on 3's.
First 107
Pete Clutter, Glen Robertson,
Rocky Marziani and Bob Geci
Second 112
Mike Feltner, Doug Sirmons,
Russ Woodworth and Bill Mannix
Third 114
Walt Norton, Harvey Jenkins,
Bob Hunt and Jack Williamson
Closest to the Pin:
No. 4 Rick Hancock
No. 8 Mike Feltner
No. 11 Harvey Jenkins
No. 14 Rick Hancock
No. 16 Doug Sirmons
Jan. 10, The Citrus Springs Men's Asso-
ciation played 2 bb on front and 3 bb on
back.
First 148
Pete Clutter, Emil Colletti,
Rocky Marziani and Dave Balas (blind)
Second 151
Rick Hancock, Jerry Feher,
Bob Malloy and Rocky Marziani (blind)
Third 153
Don Gonczi, Leon Smith,
Bob Manecky and Bob Hunt
Closest to the Pin:
No. 4 Rick Hancock
No. 8 Rick Hancock
No. 11 Bob Hunt
No. 14 Bill Curry
No. 16 Doug Sirmons
Jan. 8, The Citrus Springs Men's Associ-
ation played team skins.
Two skins
Rick Hancock, Bob Hunt,
Walt Norton and Rocky Marziani
One skin
Harvey Jenkins, Woody Miner,
Russ Woodworth and Bob Manecky
(Tie) Mike Feltner, Don Gonczi,
Bill Mannix and Glen Robertson
Closest to the Pin:
No. 4 Rick Hancock
No. 8 Harvey Jenkins
No. 11 Pete Clutter
No.14 Bob Hunt
No.16 Bob Geci
WOMEN
Jan. 11, Points Quota "Chicks with
Sticks" results.
Linda Miller +13
Sandy Brown +7
Carol Lanzillo +5
Carole Seifert +5
Vickie Colebank +4
Marcie Marcus +4
Amy Thomas +4
Roberta Gendron +2
May Forsythe +2
Marj Sibley +2
Closest to the Pin:
No. 4 Leanne Feher


No. 8 Kathleen Littlefield
No. 11 Marcie Marcus
No. 16 Marcie Marcus
"Chicks with Sticks," a ladies points quota
league, meets every Friday morning at Cit-
rus Springs. Interested players with GHIN
handicaps should call Carole at (352) 746-
2082.

EL DIABLO
Jan. 13, Group played Pinehurst pairs.
First 82/61
Jon and Gaby Thompson
Second 74/62
Tony Borgia and Mark Matthews
Third 100/63
Maryanne Conroy and Pat Lampasona
Fourth 78/65
Ric Dias and Jon Thompson
Closest to the Pin:
No. 13 Jon Thompson
No. 15 Ric Dias
Jan. 15, the group played a nine-hole
scramble.
First 32/23.25
Jon Townsend, Juanita Emrich,
Bob Montgomery and Jeff Sprague
Second 32/24
Curtis Karr, Stan Webber,
Ghost 1 and Ghost 2
Third 33/24.38
Bob and Debbie Marino,
Pete Palmer and Ghost
Fourth 33/24/75
Doc Freer, Jack Durden,
David and Kaye Cansler
Fifth 34/25/25
Mike and Donna Dougherty,
Dave Whitacre and Clint Fisher
Sixth 38/28.75
Rory Natzke, Hattie Townsend


Ed Stup and Ghost
Closest to the Pin:
No. 3
No. 4
Juanita, Bob, Jeff
No. 6
No. 9


Stan Webber
Team of Jon,

Mike Dougherty
Team of Bob,
Debbie, Pete, Ghost


Birdies: Team of Jon, Juanita, Bob,
Jeff with 10

INVERNESS
WOMEN
Jan. 15, the Women's Golf Association of
the Inverness Golf and Country Club
played Low gross/low net.
First Low gross Mollie Chamberlain 92
Second Low gross Pat Whipple 94
First low net Nancy Bennett 69
Second low net Betsy Jordan 72
Third low net Fran Hayes 73
Third low net Di Arnell 73
Fourth low net Sue Sasso 74
Chip-ins:
No. 6 Nancy Purcell
Nos. 7 and 16 Nancy Bennett
Birdie:
No. 14 Sally Staton
Jan. 8, the Women's Golf Association of
the Inverness Golf and Country Club
played points.
First Flight
Mollie Chamberlain +2
Nancy Bennett -1
Second Flight


Diane Rozzi +7
Nancy Purcell +6
(Tie) Jean Neil +4
(Tie) Bonnie Williams +4
(Tie) Tere Wood +4
Chip-ins:
No. 2 Jean Neil
No. 5 Sue Sasso
Birdie:
No. 8 Bonnie Williams

LAKESIDE
Jan. 10, LakeSide Ladies Points Quota
League results.
Linda Miller +6
Closest to the Pin:
No. 2 Kathleen Littlefield
No. 8 Amy Thomas
No. 15 Joyce Smith
LakeSide Ladies Points Quota League
meets at 9 a.m. every Thursday morning
and is now open to all women. No member-
ship dues are required. Occasional play
welcomed. Interested players with GHIN
handicaps should call Jan at 352-344-9550.

SOUTHERN WOODS
MEN
Jan. 9, Southern Woods Men's Golf As-
sociation played the 2013 MGA Series
(Individual Quota Points)
Flight 1(White Tee)
First Rod Fortune +6 5
Second JimWickliffe +2 4
Third Steve Ley +1 3
Fourth Carl Pedersen E 2
Fifth Ray Schnell -2 0.5
(Tie) Bill Ervasti -2 0.5
Flight 2 (Orange Tee)
First Mike Taylor +5 4.5
(Tie) John Doyle +5 4.5
Third StuyvieWainwright +3 3
Fourth Doug Martin +2 2
Fifth Tom Venable +1 0.33
(Tie) Tony Schmid +1 0.33
(Tie) Russell Fortune +1 0.33
Flight 3 (Orange Tee)
First Soc Hiatokis +6 4.5
(Tie) Brian Hadler +6 4.5
Third Rich Perry +3 2.5
(Tie) Tom Hendrickson +3 2.5
Fifth Bob Chadderton +2 0.5
(Tie) O.J. Klim +2 0.5
Flight 4 (Gold Tee)
First Jim Lunsford +4 5
Second Erv Koch +3 4
Third Dan Pera E 2.5
(Tie) DaleVaughn E 2.5
Fifth Bill Moreau -2 1
Closest to the Pin:
No. 4 Erv Koch
No. 8 Erv Koch
No.13 Tony Schmid
No. 17 DickJohnson

SUGARMILL
WOODS
Jan. 10, Sugarmill Woods Country Club
Men's Golf Association played Best 2 of
4.
First -27
Dennis Borras, Frank Siemietkowski,
Bob Eart and John Lawrey
Second -25
Stuyvie Wainwright, John Holden,
Bill Engelbrecht and Sid Kaplowitz


Third -24
Jay Yarger, Scott Litzenberg,
Tom Jones and Bill Moreau
Fourth -23
Dillard Jarrell, Dick Johnson,
Tony Valente and Bob Carriveau
(Tie) Jeff Stier, Tom Venable,
JackWinner and Phil Runfola
(Tie) Joe Silvestri, Bob Verkennes,
Reese Kilgore and Paul Domino
Golfers of the week:
Low gross Art Anderson 77
Low net Dennis Borras 65
Low net sr. John Lawrey 61
Closest to the Pin:
Pine No. 4 Howard Watson
Pine No. 7 Chuck Reeb
Oak No.3 John Rada
Oak No.6 Chuck Reeb
Jan. 8, Sandblasters Men's Group played
team point quota.
First +15
John Rada, Zane Megos,
Jack Keene and FrankVanzin
(Tie) Jeff Stier, Bill Pierson,
Jim Rettick and Tony Valente
Third +14
Jim Duller, Dave Hornbeck,
Jack Koskela and JackWinner
Notable Rounds:
John Doyle 82
Mike Schwabek 83
John Rada +9
Jim Rettick +8

SEVEN RIVERS
MEN
Jan.10, the 7Rivers Men's Golf Associa-
tion played "Two Better Balls of Four"
tournament.
First 115
Don Eddy, Clayton Jeck
and Bill Stallings
Second 117
Paul Collins, Gene Kelly
Al Silliman and Alex Stevens
Closest to the Pin:
No. 7 Bill Stallings
No. 11 DickVan Poucker
WOMEN
Jan. 9, 7Rivers W.G.A results.
First Flight
Low gross Linda Travis 82
Low net Carol Biedscheid 65
Second Flight
Low gross Joan Poore 90
Low net Diane Keck 63
Low net Dena Neal Tie 68
Low net Kay Koebcke 68
Third Flight
Low gross Sheila McLaughlin 105
Low net Lee Simon 68


Birdies:
No. 6
No. 6
No. 5
No. 11
Chip-ins:
No. 1
No. 5
Nos. 6 and 11


Kathryn Carver
Linda Travis
Joan Poore
Lee Simon

Norma Tutty
Joan Poore
Lee Simon


Niners points game
First Flight
Cathy DiFani 24
Second Flight
Gemma Hertzog 20


B2 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013


GOLF


is on the toe, the club is to
flat and the ball could go to
the right.
Now that I have the length
and lie established, it is time
to discuss the shaft. There
are many options to choose
from, but the most
important deci-
sions to be made
are shaft type and
flex. You must
choose from steel
or graphite. Most
of my students
should be swing-
ing graphite
le shafts, unless they
urley are very strong. A
B'S steel shaft will
ITS slow down the
swing speed and
result in a loss of distance.
The next decision is which
flex it should they be. The av-
erage golfer is probably
swinging a club stiff for them.
This happens for many rea-
sons, but mostly out of pure
ego. It is important to swing
the proper flex so you can get
the most distance and accu-
racy as possible. There is no
reason to be macho and say
you should swing a regular
when your swing speed says
it should be lite flex.
The last couple of notes
are the importance of being
fitted by a certified club fit-
ter, demo days and liking
what you are looking at.
Please do not walk into a
store and purchase a set of
clubs before speaking with
someone who is certified in
club fitting.
The other two items go
hand-in-hand: In order to
swing the golf club confi-
dently, you must like what
you are looking down at. The
best way to do this is by at-
tending demo days. Once
there, you can look at multi-
ple vendors and decide what
looks best to you before
being fitted and purchasing
your new set of golf clubs.
See you on the links.


Herb Hurley is PGA general
manager at Sugarmill Woods
Country Club & Southern
Woods Golf Club. He can be
reached at hhurley@
sugarmillwoodscc. com.


F
R





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WADA: Armstrong needs to confess


Europe picks
Ryder captain
ABU DHABI, United
Arab Emirates Paul
McGinley was chosen as
Eu-
rope's
SRyder
Cup
captain
for
2014,
ending
Paul a
McGinley chaotic
cam-
paign marked by a late
challenge from former cap-
tain Colin Montgomerie.
McGinley, a 46-year-
old Irishman, replaces
Jose Maria Olazabal,
whose team rallied to vic-
tory over the United
States in October at Med-
inah, outside Chicago.
Europe will defend the
trophy at Gleneagles,
Scotland.
LPGA adds


Doping agency seeks admission ofguilt

under oath before reducing lifetime ban


Associated Press

LONDON Lance Armstrong
must make a full confession under
oath not just an admission in a
television interview with Oprah
Winfrey if he wants authorities
to consider lifting his lifetime ban
from sports, the director of the
World Anti-Doping Agency said
Tuesday
WADA director general David
Howman told The Associated
Press that Armstrong's interview
with Winfrey is "hardly the same
as giving evidence to a relevant
authority" that deals with doping
rules and sanctions.
"He's got to follow a certain
course," Howman said. "That is
not talking to a talk show host."
Armstrong was stripped of his
seven Tour de France titles and
banned for life from Olympic
sports last year following a U.S.


Anti-Doping Agency report that
portrayed him as a longtime
performance-enhancing drug
user. After years of denials, he
confessed to doping in an inter-
view with Winfrey taped Monday
Armstrong has been in conver-
sations with USADA about a pos-
sible confession to authorities and
a path to restoring his eligibility
Howman said a reduced ban is
possible depending on the level of
cooperation.
"Is he trying to do something for
himself to have the sanctions
changed?" Howman said. "Does
he want to do something for the
benefit of the sport itself? In both
instances, he will need to make a
full statement on oath."
International Olympic Commit-
tee vice president Thomas Bach
said Armstrong should provide a
complete confession to USADA or
WADA.


Associated Press
In this photo provided by Harpo
Studios Inc., cyclist Lance
Armstrong listens to a question
from Oprah Winfrey during taping
Monday for the show "Oprah and
Lance Armstrong: The Worldwide
Exclusive" in Austin, Texas.

"The TV interview is not the
right platform," he told the AP
The International Cycling
Union, meanwhile, urged Arm-
strong to testify before its inde-
pendent commission on doping to


shed light on allegations that in-
clude whether the UCI helped
cover up his use of performance-
enhancing drugs.
Cycling's governing body said it
was aware of reports Armstrong
had confessed during the Winfrey
interview, which will be broadcast
over two nights on Thursday and
Friday
"If these reports are true, we
would strongly urge Lance Arm-
strong to testify to the Independ-
ent Commission established to
investigate the allegations made
against the UCI in the recent
USADA reasoned decision on
Lance Armstrong and the United
States Postal Service (USPS)
team," the UCI said in a
statement.
The UCI set up an independent
panel in November to investigate
the Armstrong case and what role
the governing body had in the
scandal. The UCI has been ac-
cused of covering up suspicious
samples from Armstrong, accept-
ing financial donations from him
and helping him avoid detection
in doping tests.


3 more events

tournament sede ebow in holding pattern
R season begins, the LPGA
28-tournament schedule


Quarterback's

NFL future

uncertain
DENNIS WASZAK JR.
AP Sports Writer


in NrtNEW YORK From
in North nearly unstoppable to
nearly invisible.
swing late in Tim Tebow was two wins
udes a new from the Super Bowl a
in China. The year ago. Now, he's pretty
s in Novem- much a player without a
LPGATitle- team likely to be re-
$700,000 to leased by the New York
he biggest Jets after one frustrating
men's golf. season and his hometown
o announced team in Jacksonville al-
e sponsor of ready pulling in the wel-
ending Title- come mat.
extended its Even Tebow doesn't how
2016. this will unfold. A backup
a full sched- role on another NFL
'A Tour will team? A position change?
rs of televi- The Canadian Football
ge, the most League?
"I don't know what my
future holds, but I know
Mcllroy who holds my future," the
kb Dhabi devout Christian said in a
recent interview with Fox
\BI, United Business Network, his only
es The public comments since his
golfers meet strange Jets season ended.
more "And, in that," he added,
often on "there is a lot of peace and
the a lot of comfort."
course, Tebow barely played for
but nei- the Jets last season.
their No. "An absolute mess," is
1- the way recently retired
ranked special teams coordinator
Rory Mike Westhoffdescribed it
Mcllroy Tebow has two years left
no on his contract, but New
are ready to York is expected to trade
are ready to or release him in the next
y. few weeks. So far, destina-
aired together tion unknown.
wo rounds of "I can't imagine a sce-
olf Champi- nario in which he'll be a
ng Thursday. Jacksonville Jaguar," new
iblished a general manager David
ionship since Caldwell said last week.
other for the "Even if he's released."
funds of last While there's an outside
ament. chance Tebow could re-
e heated ri- main a New Yorker, de-
rge, they pending on the whims of
need to face the still-to-be-hired GM, it
in Sunday appears highly unlikely
ament at So, that's two NFL
yet to hap- teams down the only
h Woods did ones, at that, who showed
at Mcllroy in any interest last offseason
onda Classic when Denver shopped
-eagle finish, him and the 25-year-old
Tebow's options appear to
From wire reports be dwindling.
"Tim Tebow is an ex-


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Tuesday del
anced schec
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next month i
More than ha
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America.
The Asian
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Woods,
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ABU DHA
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world's top g








Tiger
Woods
Tiger Woods
call it a rivalry
They're pa
for the first tw
Abu Dhabi G
onship start
They've esta
friendly relat
playing toge
first three roi
year's tourna
For a mor
valry to eme
agreed they
each other o
with a tourna
stake. It has
pen, although
make a run;
last year's H
with a birdie-


I don't know what my future
holds, but I know who holds my
future.

Tim Tebow
said in a recent interview with Fox Business Network.


tremely popular individ-
ual or, he was," said for-
mer Cowboys executive
Gil Brandt, now an analyst
for NFL.com. "I think his
popularity has waned sig-
nificantly the last three or


four months."
The buzz these days be-
longs to young quarter-
backs like Washington's
Robert Griffin III, Seattle's
Russell Wilson, Indianapo-
lis' Andrew Luck and San


Francisco's Colin Kaeper-
nick. It seems so long ago
now Tebowing his sig-
nature dropping to a knee
for a prayerful pose was
all the rage.
But even Tebow never
Tebowed during the regu-
lar season for the Jets. Not
once. Quite a fall for a
Heisman Trophy winner
and two-time national
champion with the Univer-
sity of Florida, and whose
No. 15 Broncos jersey
ranked second in national
sales to Green Bay's Aaron


Rodgers in 2011.
"I think it's fair to say
that I'm a little disap-
pointed," Tebow acknowl-
edged last month.
The Jets had every in-
tention of trying to make
things work with Tebow
when general manager
Mike Tannenbaum sur-
prisingly acquired him
from Denver last March -
after Peyton Manning ar-
rived for a fourth-round
draft pick. But once Tebow
got on the field, something
went woefully wrong.
Tebow went from being
considered a key part of
Rex Ryan's offense to al-
most non-existent. Offen-
sive coordinator Tony
Sparano didn't know how
to use him effectively, and
Tebow wasn't particularly
productive when he got his
few snaps in the wildcat-
style formation. He made
his biggest mark on special
teams as the personal punt
protector, and did all he
could to hide his frustra-
tion at not playing. But the
numbers said it all: a mere
102 yards rushing and 6-of-
8 passing for 39 yards. And,
the most damning stat of
all: zero touchdowns.
"I would've liked to see
him get a chance," defen-
sive end Mike DeVito said.
It didn't even come when
Mark Sanchez struggled so
badly he was benched for
the first time in his career.
Instead of going with
Tebow, the No. 2 quarter-
back on the depth chart,
Ryan went with third-
stringer Greg McElroy
Tebow now had a bruised
ego to go along with the two
broken ribs that limited
him earlier in the season.
"Every opportunity you
get, you want to make the
most of," Tebow said a few
weeks before the season
ended, "and I'd have
loved to have more of an
opportunity to just play
quarterback."
Acquiring Tebow ulti-
mately led to Tannenbaum
and Sparano losing their
jobs. And, it clouded
Tebow's prospects in the
NFL.


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Five majors,
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n Australia.
alf th tnou r-_


Associated Press
New York Jets quarterback Tim Tebow warms up before of a game Sunday, Dec. 30,
against the Buffalo Bills in Orchard Park, N.Y. Tebow's future is uncertain as it is
speculated the Jets will release him this year.


Tee off for Tourette
Tee Off for Tourette Celebrity Golf Tournament
Saturday, February 2, 2013
Shotgun start at 9:00am Registration 8:00am
Plantation on Crystal River.






Kick off Cocktail party
Friday, February 1
music from American Idol contestant Dave Pittman,
live auction and meet and greet with
sports celebrities and door prizes.

All proceeds from this event will go to help
adults and children who suffer from Tourette Syndrome.

For more information and to register,
go to our website, www.teeoffforts.com,
or email Gary D'Amico at gary78@tampabay.rr.com.

i lOOODS6M


SPORTS


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013 B3






B4 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013



Australian Open
results
Wednesday, At Melbourne Park, Mel-
bourne, Australia, Purse: $31.608 million
(Grand Slam), Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
Men
Second Round
Nicolas Almagro (10), Spain, def. Daniel Gi-
meno-Traver, Spain, 6-4, 6-1, 6-2.
Sam Querrey (20), United States, def. Brian
Baker, United States, 6-7 (2), 1-1, retired.
Kei Nishikori (16), Japan, def. Carlos Berlocq,
Argentina, 7-6 (4), 6-4, 6-1.
Tomas Berdych (5), Czech Republic, def.
Guillaume Rufin, France, 6-2, 6-2, 6-4.
Women
Second Round
Agnieszka Radwanska (4), Poland, def. Irina-
Camelia Begu, Romania, 6-3, 6-3.
Angelique Kerber (5), Germany, def. Lucie
Hradecka, Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-1.
Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, def. Klara Za-
kopalova (23), Czech Republic, 6-1,6-0.
Valeria Savinykh, Russia, def. Dominika
Cibulkova (15), Slovakia, 7-6 (6), 6-4.
Julia Goerges (18), Germany, def. Romina
Oprandi, Switzerland, 6-3, 6-2.
Li Na (6), China, def. Olga Govortsova, Be-
larus, 6-2, 7-5.
Madison Keys, United States, def. Tamira
Paszek (30), Austria, 6-2, 6-1.
Singles
Men
First Round
Andy Murray (3), Britain, def. Robin Haase,
Netherlands, 6-3, 6-1, 6-3.
Blaz Kavcic, Slovenia, def. Thomaz Bellucci
(29), Brazil, 6-3, 6-1, 6-3.
Joao Sousa, Portugal, def. John-Patrick
Smith, Australia, 6-4, 6-1, 6-4.
Ricardas Berankis, Lithuania, def. Sergiy
Stakhovsky, Ukraine, 6-2, 7-6 (4), 7-5.
Andreas Seppi (21), Italy, def. Horacio Ze-
ballos, Argentina, 6-2, 6-4, 6-2.
Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, def. Igor Sijsling,
Netherlands, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-2.
Florian Mayer (25), Germany, def. Rhyne
Williams, United States, 2-6, 3-6, 6-2, 7-6 (12),
6-1.
Milos Raonic (13), Canada, def. Jan Hajek,
Czech Republic, 3-6, 6-1,6-2, 7-6 (0).
Go Soeda, Japan, def. Luke Saville, Australia,
6-7 (4), 6-3, 6-2, 6-3.
Alejandro Falla, Colombia, def. Josselin
Ouanna, France, 6-4, 7-5, 6-4.
Amir Weintraub, Israel, def. Guido Pella, Ar-
gentina, 7-6 (2), 7-5, 6-2.
Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. Benoit
Paire, France, 6-2, 6-4, 6-1.
Philipp Kohlschreiber (17), Germany, def.
Steve Darcis, Belgium, 6-2, 6-3, 6-4.
James Duckworth, Australia, def. Benjamin
Mitchell, Australia, 6-4, 7-6 (8), 4-6, 5-7, 8-6.
Jeremy Chardy, France, def. Adrian Menen-
dez-Maceiras, Spain, 7-6 (5), 6-7 (3), 6-2, 6-1.
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (7), France, def. Michael
Llodra, France, 6-4, 7-5, 6-2.
Juan Martin del Potro (6), Argentina, def.
Adrian Mannarino, France, 6-1, 6-2, 6-2.
Richard Gasquet (9), France, def. Albert
Montanes, Spain, 7-5, 6-2, 6-1.
Marcel Granollers (30), Spain, def. Grega
Zemlja, Slovenia, 7-6 (6), 7-6 (5), 1-0 retired.
Jesse Levine, Canada, def.Tommy Robredo,
Spain, 7-6 (5), 6-7 (2), 6-4, 6-4.
Lukas Rosol, Czech Republic, def. Jamie
Baker, Britain, 7-6 (5), 7-5, 6-2.
Marin Cilic (12), Croatia, def. Marinko Mato-
sevic, Australia, 6-4, 7-5, 6-2.
Gilles Simon (14), France, def. FilippoVolan-
dri, Italy, 2-6, 6-3, 6-2, 6-2.
Ivan Dodig, Croatia, def.Wu Di, China, 7-5, 4-
6, 6-3, 6-3.
Benjamin Becker, Germany, def. Aljaz Be-
dene, Slovenia, 4-6, 6-3, 7-5, 7-6 (1).
Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, def. Tommy Haas
(19), Germany, 7-6 (3), 4-6, 6-3, 4-6, 8-6.
Daniel Brands, Germany, def. Martin Klizan
(27), Slovakia, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4.
Nikolay Davydenko, Russia, def. Dudi Sela,
Israel, 3-6, 6-1, 7-5, 6-3.
Yen-hsun Lu, Taiwan, def. Ruben Ramirez Hi-
dalgo, Spain, 6-2, 6-1, 4-6, 6-1.
Rajeev Ram, United States, def. Guillermo
Garcia-Lopez, Spain, 6-4, 6-4, 3-6, 6-2.
Bernard Tomic, Australia, def. Leonardo
Mayer, Argentina, 6-3, 6-2, 6-3.
Gael Monfils, France, def. Alexander Dolgo-
polov (18), Ukraine, 6-7 (7), 7-6 (4), 6-3, 6-3.
Women First Round
Caroline Wozniacki (10), Denmark, def.
Sabine Lisicki, Germany, 2-6, 6-3, 6-3.
Carla Suarez Navarro, Spain, def. Sara Er-
rani (7), Italy, 6-4, 6-4.
Maria Kirilenko (14), Russia, def.Vania King,
United States, 6-4, 6-2.
Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia, def. Lourdes
Dominguez Lino, Spain, 6-2, 6-1.
Kimiko Date-Krumm, Japan, def. Nadia
Petrova (12), Russia, 6-2, 6-0.
Peng Shuai, China, def. Rebecca Marino,
Canada, 6-3, 6-0.
Elena Vesnina, Russia, def. Caroline Garcia,
France, 3-6, 6-3, 6-1.
Shahar Peer, Israel, def. Alexandra Panova,
Russia, 6-4, 1-6, 6-3.
Hsieh Su-wei (26), Taiwan, def. Lara Arru-
abarrena-Vecino, Spain, 7-6 (5), 6-2.
Varvara Lepchenko (21), United States, def.
Polona Hercog, Slovenia, 6-4, 6-1.
Serena Williams (3), United States, def. Edina
Gallovits-Hall, Romania, 6-0, 6-0.
Victoria Azarenka (1), Belarus, def. Monica
Niculescu, Romania, 6-1, 6-4.
Roberta Vinci (16), Italy, def. Silvia Soler-Es-
pinosa, Spain, 6-3, 7-5.
Petra Kvitova (8), Czech Republic, def.
Francesca Schiavone, Italy, 6-4, 2-6, 6-2.
Yulia Putintseva, Kazakhstan, def. Christina
McHale, United States, 6-1, 6-7 (0), 6-2.
Bojana Jovanovski, Serbia, def. Maria-Teresa
Torro-Flor, Spain, 2-6, 6-4, 6-3.
Annika Beck, Germany, def.Yaroslava Shve-
dova (28), Kazakhstan, 6-2, 6-7 (7), 6-3.
Donna Vekic, Croatia, def. Andrea Hlavack-
ova, Czech Republic, 6-1,6-2.
Lucie Safarova (17), Czech Republic, def.
Mirjana Lucic-Baroni, Croatia, 7-6 (4), 6-4.
Sloane Stephens (29), United States, def. Si-
mona Halep, Romania, 6-1,6-1.
Laura Robson, Britain, def. Melanie Oudin,
United States, 6-2, 6-3.
Ayumi Morita, Japan, def. Anna Tatishvili,
Georgia, 6-3, 6-3.
Garbine Muguruza, Spain, def. Magdalena
Rybarikova, Slovakia, 4-6, 6-1, 14-12.
Akgul Amanmuradova, Uzbekistan, def.
Mathilde Johansson, France, 6-4, 6-2.
Daria Gavrilova, Russia, def. Lauren Davis,
United States, 6-3, 6-7 (2), 6-4.
Eleni Daniilidou, Greece, def. Karolina
Pliskova, Czech Republic, 7-5, 5-7, 6-4.


CONTEST
Continued from Page B1

"Way to hold your compo-
sure at the end of the game,"
Panthers coach Doug War-
ren told his team afterward.
Citrus coach Phil Journey
said he doesn't like ties, but
Lecanto is a good team and
it's good to get a draw
against a team like that.
"It's a tune-up ... see what
corrections to make and
what to do to score goals,"
he added.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the record Teen tennis athletes


Florida LOTTERY

Here are the winning numbers selected
Tuesday in the Florida Lottery:
S.- CASH 3 (early)
:: 99-6-3
CASH 3 (late)

S PLAY 4 (early)
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For Lotty MEGA BALL
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On the AIRWAVES=

TODAY'S SPORTS
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m. (ESPN2) North Carolina State at Maryland
7 p.m. (SUN) Miami at Boston College
8 p.m. (38 MNT) Auburn at Arkansas
9 p.m. (ESPN2) West Virginia at Iowa State
GOLF
10:30 p.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Abu Dhabi HSBC
Championship, First Round
NBA
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Indiana Pacers at Orlando Magic
8 p.m. (ESPN) Houston Rockets at Dallas Mavericks
10:30 p.m. (ESPN) (SUN) Miami Heat at Golden State
Warriors
TENNIS
2 p.m. (ESPN2) 2013 Australian Open: Second Round
(Taped)
11 p.m. (ESPN2) 2013 Australian Open: Second Round
3 a.m. (ESPN2) 2013 Australian Open: Second Round

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BOYS BASKETBALL
7:30 p.m. River Ridge at Citrus
GIRLS SOCCER
District 2A-6 tournament at Trinity Catholic High School
5 p.m. No. 2 Crystal River vs. No. 3 South Sumter
District 3A-6 tournament at Leesburg High School
7:30 p.m. No. 3 Citrus vs. No. 2 Eustis
District 4A-4 tournament at Springstead High School
8 p.m. No. 1 Lecanto vs. No. 4 Gainesville or No. 5 Vanguard
GIRLS WEIGHTLIFTING
4 p.m. County Championship at Lecanto High School
WRESTLING
5:30 p.m. Crystal River at Lecanto


Sports BRIEFS

Panthers wrestle down Marauders
The Lecanto High School wrestling team beat Clearwater Cen-
tral Catholic 45-33.
Leading the Panthers were Derrick Steele, Jonah Nightengale,
David McNall, Dalton Collins and Brian Scorria.
The Panthers will have its senior night match Wednesday
against Crystal River.
Citrus girls beat Springstead on hardcourt
Citrus High School girls basketball team beat Springstead 76-
42 on Tuesday on the road.
Leading the Lady Hurricanes were Lindsay Connors with 25
points, Shenelle Toxen with 12 points, Elizabeth Lynch with 10
points and Marissa DuBois with seven points.
Citrus (16-5 overall, 7-1 district) will host Hernando at 7:30 p.m.
Thursday.
Seven Rivers girls defeat OCA on the road
Seven Rivers Christian School girls basketball team bounded
by Ocala Christian Academy, 57-28, on Tuesday night in Ocala.
Leading the Lady Warriors was Alexis Zachar with 15 points
and six blocked shots. Following close behind her were Alyssa
Gage with 14 points and seven steals and Katie Fenton with 10
points. Andrea Zachar nabbed the most rebounds for her team,
along with eight points, four assists and three steals.
Seven Rivers (11-6 overall) will host Crystal River on Thursday
night.
Warriors spear Crusader in basketball
Seven Rivers Christian School boys basketball team sank
Ocala Christian Academy 59-36.
Adam Gage earned a double-double Tuesday night with 29
points and 13 rebounds. Other top scorers included Cory Weiand
with 11 points and Zach Saxer with 10 points.
Crystal River (9-6 overall) will host Crystal River at 7 p.m.
Thursday.
Crystal River boys fall against Tavares
Crystal River High School boys suffered its ninth defeat on the
road Tuesday night against Tavares, lost 60-46.
Matt Taylor lead the Pirates with 17 points. Ty Reynolds fol-
lowed with 15 points.
Crystal River (7-9 overall, 1-7 district) will play Seven Rivers on
Thursday.


WILLIAMS
Continued from Page B1

Williams said, referring to a
fall that forced her to pull
out of the Brisbane Interna-
tional last year and con-
tributed to her fourth-round
exit at the Australian Open.
Her subsequent trip to the
French Open ended in her
only first-round exit at a
Grand Slam tournament,
more painful mentally than
physically Stunned by the
defeat in Paris, she hired a
new coaching consultant,
amended her training
regime and won Wimbledon,
the London Olympics, the


U.S. Open, the se
championship ar
2013 Brisbane I:
title to her colle(
Now she has
her last 37 matcl
decided that sl
ankles, wait for
and bruising
about medical t
"I would really
know," she said.
won this tour
had two bone br
knees. I had no
knew I was in I
sometimes wha
know cannot hu
She expects
start her se
match Thursd
Spain's Garbine


play in JCT tourney


Summerlike temperatures pre-
vailed for the fourth JCT Tour-
nament at Southern Hills
Country Club in Brooksville.
Tennis professionals Lou Giglio,


Rick Scholls and


Eric
van den Hoogen
ON COURT


Judy Jeanette
agreed it was a
perfect day and
a great tourna-
ment. Partici-
pants and
parents con-
curred.
The boys'
high school win-
ner was Jesse
DeWitt. who de-
feated Carl Zee,
6-4, 1-6, 6-3.
To reach the
finals, Jesse de-
feated Nick


Pais, 6-3, 6-0, and Ben Epstein, 1-6, 6-1,
7-5. Carl defeated Sammy DeAngelis,
6-1, 6-0, and Mark Mulleavey, 6-3, 6-2.
Consolation results: Coty Willey def.
Charles Buckner, 6-0, 6-4.
The girls high school winner was
Madison Gamble, who defeated Bryn
Buckner, 6-2, 6-0.
To reach the finals, Madison de-
feated Robyn Cotney, 6-0, 6-3, and
Maddie Lewis, 6-2, 6-0. Bryn had a bye
in the first round and defeated Sarina
Singh, 6-2, 6-2, in the next round.
Consolation results: Robyn Cotney
def. Nicole Carrier, 6-1, 6-0.
The Tournament of Champions, the
last tournament of the season, is
scheduled for Feb. 9 at Sugarmill
Woods/Oak Village Sports Complex.
To sign up, email jjeanette3saj@
aol.com.
Do not forget to signup for the ninth
annual Crystal River Open on Jan. 19
and 20at Crystal River High School.
Proceeds will go to the Youth Group at
the First United Methodist Church in
Inverness and The Family Recourse
Center in Hernando.
Entry fee is a donation of cash, toi-
letries, non-perishable foods, and/or
gently used clothing. Suggested mon-
etary donation is $20 per person and
$10 for a second event.
Divisions offered will be women's,
men's, junior doubles and mixed dou-
bles divided in A, B and C. Two
matches are guaranteed with a conso-
lation round.
Deadline for entries is Wednesday,
Jan. 16. Check in at least 15 minutes
prior to the match. Call Jan. 18 for
your starting times if you have not
been notified.
If you are not able to play, but want
to help, volunteers will accept dona-
tions from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday
and Sunday at the tennis courts.
Organizers would like to stress they
will adjust the schedule to allow you
to participate if you have other com-
mitments, tennis or otherwise.
For more information, call tourna-
ment directors Cindy Reynolds or AJ
Glenn at 352-697-3089 or aj-
glenn03@gmail.com; Sally deMontfort
at 352-795-9693 or deMont@embarq-
mail.com; or Eric van den Hoogen at
352-382-3138 or hoera@juno.com.
Citrus County Tuesday
Womens Team Tennis
Results for rain make-up matches:
Crystal River Chip and Charge def.
Bicentennial Breakers, 3-2;
Sugarmill Woods Matchmakers def.
Crystal River Yo-yo's, 4-1.
Standings: Sugarmill Woods Matchmak-



PIRATES
Continued from Page B1

"The girls played great in the second
half," Crystal River head coach Jason
Rodgers said. "I told them in the locker
room, play what we want to play, not
what they want to play Once we settled
and started running our offense, the
rest of the game is history after that"
Early on, the Pirates settled to play
with Tavares' outside shooting game
before taking command. The Bulldogs



LECANTO
Continued from Page B1

XAv1- nJniay] t-u tfi-r


oLatiensiveiy, we pjiaye Deer
From staff reports tonight (than in Friday's loss at Cit-
rus). We were able to get the ball up
the floor and get some easy baskets."
ason-ending This game was a bit of a detour for
nd added the Lecanto, but not a major step back.
international While the poor start and the second
action. half proved decisive, the Panthers kept
36 wins from battling and held their own against the
hes. And she Wolf Pack's potent pressure defense.
he'd ice her That was not readily evident in two
the swelling runs, however Lecanto committed five
and think turnovers in the game's first two min-
ests later, utes and had three more in the first
ly rather not two minutes of the second half -both
"One year I without a Lecanto point being scored.
lament and West Port was up 17-7 after one quar-
uises in both ter, then took its 25-15 halftime advan-
idea. I just tage to 33-15 with its third-period run.
pain. I think "We just got outhustled and outre-
at you don't bounded," said Lecanto's Marie Buck-
rt you." ley, who finished with 10 points. "The
to at least rebounding meant a lot, and missed
*cond-round free throws hurt us too."
lay against The Panthers could have made up
Muguruza. some ground at the line, particularly in


ers, 20; Riverhaven Reds, 18; Crystal
River Chip and Charge, 13; Bicentennial
Breakers, 13; Crystal River Yo-yo's, 5.
The women-only league is geared to-
ward players rated 3.0 to 3.5. If interested in
playing or to captain a team, contact chair-
woman Candace Charles at 352-563-5859
or Candacecharles@tampabay.rr.com.
Citrus Area Senior Ladies
3.0/3.5 Tuesday League
To play in this league, a player must be
at least 50 years of age or older, with a
3.0/3.5 rating. The league is always look-
ing for players to sub for teams.
For information, email chairwoman Lucy
Murphy at wjlrmurphy@embarqmail.com
or 352-527-4239.
Thursday Morning Citrus
Area Doubles League
Results for Jan. 10:
Pine Ridge Fillies def. Sugarmill
Woods Oakies, 8-1;
Skyview Advantage def. Skyview
Aces, 6-3;
Bicentennial Babes def. the Bratz, 7-3;
Pine Ridge Mavericks vs. Skyview, 5-5.
For information, contact chairwoman
Diane Halloran at 352-527-7763 or td-
hfla@tampabay.rr.com
Ladies on the Court
Results for Jan. 10: Barb and Dot, Marta
and Maria.
Ladies on The Court play at 8:30 a.m.
Thursday at Le Grone Park courts in
Crystal River. Bring a new can of balls and
50 cents. Two out of three tiebreak sets
are played.
For information, contact Barbara Shook
at dshook@tampabay.rr.com or 352-795-
0872.
The Friday Senior Ladies
Doubles 3.0-3.5 League
Results for Jan. 11:
Bicentennial Flyers vs. Citrus Hills Hot
Shots, 2-2;
Pine Ridge Mustangs def. Meadow-
crest Aces, 4-1;
Riverhaven Eagles def. Sugarmill
Woods, 4-0.
All players must be at least 50 years of
age or older with a 3.0-3.5 rating. Players
cannot be a member of a team and sub.
For information, email chairwoman Sue
Doherty at suedoherty@prodigy.net.
USTA Leagues
3.5 Adult 55+ Women:
Skyview def. Fort King, 2-1. Record 1-0.
April Manley/Jacqueline Bennett won,
6-2, 2-6, 1-0;
Nelva Polich/Marti Little won, 6-2, 6-2;
Margie McLellan/Ann Sulinski lost, 6-
2, 6-3.
7.0 Adult 65+ Women started Tues-
day, Jan. 15.
For information in District 4 (south), call
or e-mail Leigh Chak at 352-572-7157 or
vacocala@gmail.com or ustaflorida.com.
Tournaments
Jan.19 and 20: ninth annual Crystal
River Open at Crystal River High School.
Feb. 9 and 10: JCT Tournament of
Champions at SMW.
March 2 and 3: second annual Spring
Classic at Crystal River High School.


Eric van den Hoogen, Chronicle
tennis columnist, can be reached at
hoera@juno.com.


finished 17-for-65 from the field (26
percent) and 3-for-21 from the three-
point line. The Pirates shot 42 percent
from the floor (16-for-38).
Crystal River's only deficiency
came at the free-throw line, but the
team was there with such frequency
the game was never within reach for
the Lady Bulldogs. The Pirates fin-
ished 19-for-47 from the stripe.
Crystal River head to Seven Rivers
for 7 p.m. start Thursday before its final
district game Friday at Hernando,
where the team hopes to lock up the
No. 1 seed for the district tournament


the first half, but they converted just 3-
of-14 tries. The third quarter wasn't
much better- only 2-of-6 as Lecanto
fell behind 43-23 going into the fourth.
The final quarter was the Panthers'
best. They outscored West Port 9-2 to
start the period, trimming the deficit
to 45-32. Megan Straight had five
points in Lecanto's rally.
That, however, was as close as the
Panthers got.
West Port was led by Navondra
Dubois with 12 points. Aaliyah High
contributed 11 and Kori Hanks scored
nine.
Joining Buckley in double figures for
Lecanto were Deanna Moehring and
Paige Richards with 11 points apiece.
"We know how aggressive they are,"
Panthers' coach Brittany Szunko said.
"We know their style of play. We've


talked about how important it is to es-
tablish momentum each quarter.
"We did have some great spots in
the game where we took the play over.
The highlight for me tonight was the
fourth quarter, when we took it down
to 13 after trailing by 20."
Lecanto has one 6A-6 game remain-
ing, at home against Spring Hill-
Springstead Thursday


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


St. John's upsets Notre Dame, 67-63


Wisconsin

takes down

No. 2 Indiana
Associated Press
NEW YORK JaKarr
Sampson scored 14 of his
17 points in the first half
and St. John's handed No.
20 Notre Dame its second
straight loss, 67-63 at Madi-
son Square Garden on
Tuesday night.
The Red Storm (10-7, 2-3
Big East), who had lost two
straight and four of five,
had a 12-point lead mid-
way through the second
half and despite giving it
all up, they managed to


score the game's final six
points for the win, their
third straight over the
Fighting Irish.
Eric Atkins had a sea-
son-high 21 points for
Notre Dame (14-3, 2-2),
which used an 18-4 run to
wipe out the double-digit
deficit and take a 61-59
lead with 4:27 to play
Notre Dame's last lead
came at 63-61 on a drive by
Jerian Grant with 2:50 left.
D'Angelo Harrison, the
second-leading scorer in
the Big East with a 20.6 av-
erage, hit a 3-pointer 18
seconds later to give the
Red Storm the lead for
good at 64-63. Harrison
took just three shots in the
first half. His only field
goals of the game were 3-


pointers and he finished
with eight points.
Wisconsin 64,
No. 2 Indiana 59
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -
Ryan Evans had with 13
points and seven rebounds,
and Traevon Jackson added
11 points as Wisconsin upset
No. 2 Indiana 64-59 to take
sole possession of the Big
Ten lead.
The Badgers (13-4, 4-0)
have won seven straight and
beaten two Top 15 opponents
in four days. They now have
11 straight wins over the
Hoosiers and five straight in
Bloomington.
Cody Zeller scored 18 of
his 21 points in the first half to
lead Indiana (15-2, 3-1),


which had a six-game winning
streak and an 18-game home
winning streak both end.
No.12 Creighton 79,
N. Iowa 68
OMAHA, Neb. Doug
McDermott scored 21 of his
31 points in the second half
and No. 12 Creighton pulled
away for a 79-68 win over
Northern Iowa.
The Bluejays (17-1, 6-0
Missouri Valley Conference)
won their 11th straight game
and are off to their best start
in program history.
Anthony James scored a
season-high 25 points and
Jake Koch added 19 to lead
Northern Iowa (9-9, 2-4).
McDermott had his second
straight 30-point game.


Associated Press
St. John's Chris Obekpa, right, fights for a rebound
against Notre Dame's Cameron Biedscheid and Tom
Knight during the second half of Tuesday's game at
Madison Square Garden in New York. St. John's won 67-63.


Pacers dominate


Indiana downs

Charlotte
Associated Press
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
Roy Hibbert had 18 points
and seven rebounds, and
the Indiana Pacers
handed the Charlotte Bob-
cats their 13th straight
home loss with a 103-76
victory Tuesday night.
The Pacers bounced
back from Sunday's 11-
point defeat to the Brook-
lyn Nets and won for the
fifth time in six games.
With team owner
Michael Jordan looking on
from the bench, the Bob-
cats lost their fifth in a row.
They've dropped 24 of 26
since Thanksgiving.
Indiana won this one
going away behind some
dominant inside play, out-
rebounding the Bobcats
60-31 and outscoring them
52-22 in the paint, once
again exposing Charlotte's
problems down low.
Paul George had 16
points and 10 rebounds,
while David West added 15
points and eight rebounds
for the Pacers. George Hill
chipped in with 16 points
and seven rebounds.
Nets 113,
Raptors 106
NEW YORK Brook
Lopez had 22 points and nine
rebounds, Joe Johnson and
Deron Williams each scored
21 points, and the Brooklyn
Nets extended their season-
high winning streak to seven
games with a 113-106 victory
over the Toronto Raptors.
Andray Blatche added 14
points for the Nets, in the
midst of their longest winning
streak since running off 14 in a
row late in the 2005-06 sea-
son. A .500 team when they
fired Avery Johnson late last
month, Brooklyn is 9-1 under
interim coach P.J. Carlesimo
and has pulled within 1 1/2
games of the New York Knicks


Associated Press
The Indiana Pacers' Roy Hibbert shoots over the Charlotte Bobcats' Kemba Walker
and Bismack Biyombo during the first half of Tuesday night's game in Charlotte, N.C.


for the Atlantic Division lead.
Hornets 111,
76ers 99
PHILADELPHIA- Greivis
Vasquez scored 23 points,
Eric Gordon added 19 and the
New Orleans Hornets beat the
Philadelphia 76ers 111-99.
Ryan Anderson had 14
points, Xavier Henry scored
11 and Anthony Davis 10 for
the Hornets, who are still last
in the Western Conference at
12-26 including matching


6-13 records at home and on
the road.
Jrue Holiday led the Sixers
with 29 points and 11 assists.
Nick Young and Evan Turner
added 14 points each while
Thaddeus Young scored 12.
Clippers 117,
Rockets 109
HOUSTON Jamal Craw-
ford scored a season-high 30
points, including 12 straight to
start the fourth quarter, and
the Los Angeles Clippers


looked just fine without Chris
Paul in a 117-109 win over
the struggling Houston
Rockets.
The Clippers won their sec-
ond game in a row despite
missing their star point guard,
who is day to day with a
bruised right kneecap.
Los Angeles used a big
third quarter to take the lead,
and Crawford extended the
advantage to 20 by outscoring
Houston 12-7 in the opening
minutes of the fourth quarter.


NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 24 13 .649 -
Brooklyn 23 15 .605 112
Boston 20 17 .541 4
Philadelphia 16 23 .410 9
Toronto 14 24 .368 1012
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 24 12 .667 -
Atlanta 21 16 .568 312
Orlando 13 24 .351 1112
Charlotte 9 29 .237 16
Washington 7 28 .200 1612
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 24 15 .615 -
Chicago 21 15 .583 112
Milwaukee 19 17 .528 312
Detroit 14 24 .368 912
Cleveland 9 31 .225 1512
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 29 11 .725 -
Memphis 24 12 .667 3
Houston 21 18 .538 712
Dallas 16 23 .410 1212
New Orleans 12 26 .316 16
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 30 8 .789 -
Denver 23 16 .590 712
Portland 20 17 .541 912
Utah 21 19 .525 10
Minnesota 16 19 .457 1212
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 30 9 .769 -
Golden State 23 13 .639 512
L.A. Lakers 16 21 .432 13
Sacramento 14 24 .368 1512
Phoenix 13 27 .325 1712
Monday's Games
Washington 120, Orlando 91
Boston 100, Charlotte 89
Chicago 97, Atlanta 58
L.A. Clippers 99, Memphis 73
Dallas 113, Minnesota 98
Oklahoma City 102, Phoenix 90
Utah 104, Miami 97
Sacramento 124, Cleveland 118
Tuesday's Games
Indiana 103, Charlotte 76
New Orleans 111, Philadelphia 99
Brooklyn 113, Toronto 106
L.A. Clippers 117, Houston 109
Portland at Denver, late
Milwaukee at L.A. Lakers, late
Wednesday's Games
Chicago at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Brooklyn at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Houston at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Denver at Oklahoma City, 8p.m.
New Orleans at Boston, 8 p.m.
Memphis at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Portland, 10 p.m.
Washington at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Miami at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
New York vs. Detroit at London, England,
3p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Milwaukee at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Miami at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.


Notre


Dame


women


win
Associated Press
SOUTH BEND, Ind. -
Kayla McBride scored 17
points, and Skylar Dig-
gins had 15 points and
nine assists as second-
ranked Notre Dame
cruised to its 10th
straight victory, a 79-64
victory over Georgetown
on Tuesday
Notre Dame (15-1, 4-0
Big East), the nation's
leading free-throw team
at 81.1 percent, was 33 of
36 from the line, includ-
ing 22 of 25 in the first
half.
Georgetown (10-7, 1-3),
which lost its third
straight, fell to 3-26 all-
time vs Notre Dame.
No. 3 UConn 72,
No. 15
Louisville 58
HARTFORD, Conn. -
Stefanie Dolson and Bria
Hartley each scored 16
points to lead No. 3 Con-
necticut to a 72-58 win over
15th-ranked Louisville.
Kelly Faris added 13
points and seven assists
while Kaleena Mosqueda-
Lewis had 12 for the Huskies
(15-1, 3-1 Big East).
No. 24 Iowa St. 82,
No. 16
Oklahoma 61
AMES, Iowa Hallie
Christofferson scored 24
points and Nikki Moody had
20 points and 13 assists to
help No. 24 Iowa State beat
No. 16 Oklahoma 82-61.
The Cyclones (13-2, 4-1)
snapped Oklahoma's six-
game winning streak and
pulled even with the Soon-
ers for second place in the
Big 12, a half-game behind
No. 1 Baylor.


LeBron about to


sink 20,000 points


Associated Press
LeBron James was the
youngest player in NBA his-
tory to win rookie of
the year, to record a
triple-double, to
score 1,000 points, to
score 10,000 points,
to win MVP honors
at an All-Star Game
... You get the idea.
His latest
youngest-to-do-it LeB
milestone could Jar
come as early as
Wednesday He needs 18
points to become the 38th
NBA player to score 20,000
in his career If it happens
Wednesday when the Miami
Heat visit the Golden State
Warriors, James will be
more than a year younger
than anyone else to reach
the mark
"You look at how many
players have come through
this league, the history of
the game," James said.
"That 20K mark is very lim-
ited. How many guys have
done that? It's very, very


limited.
"It'll be big-time. I'm not
going to shy away from that
I'm not a big stats guy as far
as individual, but
that'll be pretty
cool."
James' team-
mates say he could
have reached
20,000 even faster
"If LeBron was a
different kind of
Iron player, he'd have a
ies lot more points by
now," Heat guard
Dwyane Wade said. "He's so
unselfish. We give him the
ball enough to score more.
He just won't do it We've
had the discussion. We've
sat down at dinner and we
both said, 'Sometimes, I
wish I had it in me.' We talk
about it, we joke about it, but
when the game comes he's
unselfish."
Considering James has
scored at least 18 points in
74 of his last 75 games, in-
cluding playoffs, the mile-
stone would seem likely to
be met against the Warriors.


t<] % Sg Denu aes Fea Fw4 mda tias


7th Annual


Golf Tournament


Sunday, January 20th

Shot Gun Start noon

El Diablo Golf & Country Club

Scramble Tournament
Entrance Fee of $70 per player, four player teams
Raffle, door prizes, closest to the pin, longest drive,
straightest drive, tournament favors
Chicken Dinner following tournament.
CHtKN


7th Annual


SportA & Celebrity


Memor iliaa Auction

Satur ay, Jan. 19th
IN
6 p.m. -
Hosted y Chester V. Cole
Life Enrichment Center
Sports and celebrities ..
Shirts,_bal's, bats ad photos
Music provided 6y) A Vee's Events to Remember
$25 per person includes dinner, debsert,.V
dancing and entertainment -
lcLE Discounts for group. 1 .i


FILLING UP FAST CALL ASAP


BASKETBALL


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013 B5


I
3
B












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Megan Fox running
from fame
NEW YORK Instead of
chasing fame, Megan Fox is
running from it.
The "Transformers" actress
tells Esquire
magazine she
wanted to be
like Marilyn
Monroe and
even has a tat-
too of the late
actress on her
arm, but has
now begun
the process of Megan
having it a Fox
removed.
Fox now admires Ava
Gardner who "was a broad"
who spoke her mind and
"had power"
Esquire's February issue
goes on sale Jan. 22.

French actor living
American dream
NEW YORK- Gilles
Marini has made a name for
himself in Hollywood, thanks
to roles on ABC Family's
"Switched at Birth" and
"Brothers & Sisters," and
competing on "Dancing With
the Stars."
The 36-year-old was born in
France, but didn't make his
acting debut until he was 29
and living in the U.S.
"I'm an American product,"
Marini said in a recent inter-
view. "I never worked a day in
my life in France in this busi-
ness. It's funny because my
wife said not long ago, 'Oh,
you are French but you are an
American actor,' and now an
American citizen.... It's funny
Everything has been done in
America."
While Marini would like to
make a film in France and
cites French filmmaker Luc
Besson as someone he would
like to work with, he says it's
not necessary to his career
On "Switched at Birth,"
Marini plays Angelo Sorrento,
the father of a teenage daugh-
ter who was switched in the
hospital as a newborn with
another baby The two teens
grew up in very different
environments.
There's more to the show
than its soap opera sounding-
title. Some of the other char-
acters are deaf, and their
scenes are performed using
American Sign Language
with open-captioning.
The series, which also stars
D.W Moffett and Lea
Thompson, will air an all-ASL
episode in March, told from
the perspective of its deaf
characters.
"Switched at Birth" airs
Monday at 8 p.m. EST.

Kidnapping
saved girl
OLD WESTBURY, N.Y -
Twenty years after a New
York girl was held for 17 days
inside a Long Island dun-
geon, that now-30-year-old
woman is writing about the
ordeal.
Katie Beers said that in an
odd way, getting kidnapped
was the best thing that hap-
pened to her
"Buried Memories: Katie
Beers' Story" (Title Town
Publishing), has a happy end-
ing. Beers is now the married
mother of two who works in
insurance sales near her
Pennsylvania home.
She is hoping the book re-
leased this week to coincide
with the 20th anniversary of
her freedom helps other vic-
tims of sexual abuse and
neglect.
From wire reports


Birthday There are excellent chances for you to be
luckier than usual in the year ahead in terms of
achieving long-held dreams. This is possible even if
the effort you put forth is only nominal.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) It would do wonders
for you to try to alter your weekday routine a bit. Plan
to do something fun with the family that you would
usually reserve for weekends.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Make a concerted ef-
fort to stay in contact with family and/or friends who
are extremely important to your immediate plans.
They'll be more inclined to help if you're in close
proximity.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Don't hesitate to think
bigger-than-life when putting together a financial en-
deavor. Conditions are exceptionally good for you to
pull off something on a grand scale.
Aries (March 21-April 19) What works out well for


Associated Press
Disney Infinity: Monsters University Play Set combines a video game and a toy line.




Disney Infinity



Company unveils its own 'Sky e'-ke fanchie


DERRIK J. LANG
AP Entertainment writer

LOS ANGELES Captain
Jack Sparrow driving
Cinderella's carriage? Mr.
Incredible swinging the Queen
of Hearts' flamingo mallet?
Sulley from "Monsters, Inc."
galloping around on Bullseye
from "Toy Story"? Those are
just a few of the silly scenarios
that could become a virtual re-
ality with "Disney Infinity," a
new endeavor from Disney
combining a video game with a
toy line.
The Walt Disney Co. re-
vealed plans Tuesday to
launch what it's billing as a
new gaming platform that's
strikingly similar to
Activision's successful
"Skylanders" franchise.
"Infinity" will blend real-life
toy figures depicting various
Disney personalities with a
sprawling virtual world where
those same characters can do
stuff like race cars, play games
and construct buildings to-
gether, as well as go on adven-
tures in their own realms.
"Infinity" will be available
for the Xbox 360, PlayStation 3,
Wii, Wii U, Nintendo 3DC, PC,
online and on tablets and
smartphones. It's being crafted
by Disney-owned developer
Avalanche Software, which
created the 2010 game based
on "Toy Story 3." That game's
"toy box" mode served as in-
spiration for what
eventually became "Infinity."
Akin to "Skylanders," the
plastic figures have the ability
to store data and transmit
characters' histories through
a reader. Also like
"Skylanders," the toys can
work between consoles, mean-
ing a Mr. Incredible figure can
seamlessly go from a PS3 in
your living room to the Wii in
your friend's basement.
The game is essentially di-
vided into two modes: "play
sets," featuring structured ad-
ventures where gamers can
collect vehicles, scenery, gadg-
ets and more; and the "toy
box," an unstructured open
world where users' imagina-
tions can run wild, much like
the games "Minecraft" and
"LittleBigPlanet." Both modes
allow for gamers to play coop-
eratively or online together.
"What's staggering about
this is not what's happening
right now but the potential of
what's gonna happen when it
gets out there in the hands of
kids, adults and creative peo-
ple just getting lost in there
creating stuff," said Lasseter.


Associated Press
Disney plans to release new figures, play sets and power discs
during the next several years.


"We can't even imagine it right
now."
"Infinity" serves as some-
thing of a homecoming for Dis-
ney's very different heroes.
While disparate Disney char-
acters can sometimes be spot-
ted together in theme parks, on
ice or the merchandising
world, they're rarely united
within any of Disney's fictional
domains.
Fictionally, the characters
depicted in "Infinity" are not
the actual characters them-
selves but the real-world toys
come to life on screen. To that
end, the figures all maintain
the same toy-inspired style,
more apparent in the scally-
wags from "Pirates of the
Caribbean" than say the play-
things from "Toy Story," and
the game's graphics are
equally toy-like.
"Infinity" is set to debut in
June, along with "Monsters
University," the 3-D prequel to
the 2001 Disney-Pixar film
"Monsters, Inc."
Despite the continued suc-
cess of the Disney Co. as a
whole, Disney's interactive di-
vision, responsible for games
like the console adventure
"Epic Mickey" and the online
virtual world "Club Penguin,"
operated at a loss last year. If
"Infinity" becomes as finan-
cially successful as "Skylan-
ders," it could provide a much
needed boost to Disney
Interactive.
A starter pack for "Infinity"
will include the game, reader,
play set piece and three fig-
ures: Sulley of "Monsters Uni-
versity," Captain Jack Sparrow
of "Pirates of the Caribbean"
and Mr. Incredible of "The In-
credibles." Pleasants said the
starter pack will cost $74.99,
the same price as the "Skylan-
ders: Giants" starter pack re-
leased last year.
"Infinity" will initially
launch with 17 figures ($12.99 a
piece, or $29.99 for a


Today's HOROSCOPE
you is likely to do so for those with whom you're di-
rectly involved. This is because everyone is apt to be
looking out for one another's interests.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Think positive and keep
the faith, because at the very times when things look
like they're going against you, your associates are
likely to come through. They'll not let you down.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Even though it might
look like you're behaving extravagantly, what you're
really doing is trying your best to make a solid invest-
ment of good will in your relationships with others.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -This might be one of
your better days to talk to influential people about
helping you advance a big personal ambition. If you
want to succeed, you must be as forthright as
possible.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) If you've been restless
lately and have the means to do something about it,


three-pack) and 20 power discs
($4.99 a pack).
The power discs can be
placed on the reader to pro-
vide new items and power-ups.
For example, slipping the disc
for Fix-It Felix Jr.'s hammer
from "Wreck-It Ralph" under-
neath Davy Jones from "Pi-
rates of the Caribbean" will
raise the captain's ability to
deal damage.
Disney sees "Infinity" as a
long-term platform with a plan
to release new figures, play
sets and power discs during
the next several years.
"Within 'Infinity,' we will
leverage Disney characters
from the past, present and fu-
ture and we will continue to
do so in the future," said
Pleasants.
Disney is clearly taking a cue
from Activision with "Infinity,"
injecting the toys-meets-games
genre with its own characters
and locales and perhaps
smartly so. Activision Blizzard
Inc. revealed last week that
its "Skylanders" franchise
crossed the $500 million mark
in U.S. retail sales, outselling
top action figure lines from
franchises such as the WWE
and "Star Wars."
Pleasants noted that "Infin-
ity" is driving past the innova-
tions that Activision originally
made when it launched the
genre with "Skylanders" in
2011. He said that unlike "Sky-
landers," "Infinity" will boast
several different styles of
gameplay The play set for
"The Incredibles," for exam-
ple, is more focused on action
than the one for "Monsters
University," where stealthiness
is the name of the game.
"We have some pretty inter-
esting things up our sleeve on-
line and on mobile that we'll
be doing," said Pleasants, "We
think they will be really differ-
ent than what 'Skylanders' has
done."


this might be a good time to make some travel plans.
Target a place that you've always wanted to visit.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) This could be a profitable
day in more ways than one. Although you might gain
financially, you'll also learn something extremely
valuable in the process.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Persons with whom you'll
have one-on-one dealings, either socially and com-
mercially, are likely to treat you in a more bountiful
fashion than usual. Be just as generous in return.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Your motives for help-
ing others will be honest and sincere, yet owing to
conditions of which you're unaware, you'll be the one
who stands to benefit the most from your actions.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -Although your rab-
bit's foot might not be working in high-risk situations,
you still could be very lucky when dealing with some-
one with whom you share strong emotional bonds.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

MONDAY, JANUARY 14
Fantasy 5:8 14 17 27 34
5-of-5 1 winner $205,821.09
4-of-5 356 $93
3-of-5 9,556 $9.50
SUNDAY, JANUARY 13
Fantasy 5:4 5 7 19 24
5-of-5 4 winners $45,896.12
4-of-5 410 $72
3-of-5 11,083 $7


INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Wednesday, Jan. 16,
the 16th day of 2013. There are
349 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Jan. 16, 2003, the space
shuttle Columbia blasted off under
extremely tight security for what
turned out to be its last flight; on
board was Israel's first astronaut,
Ilan Ramon. (The mission ended
in tragedy on Feb. 1, when the
shuttle broke up during its return
descent, killing all seven crew
members.)
On this date:
In 1547, Ivan IV of Russia (pop-
ularly known as "Ivan the Terrible")
was crowned Czar.
In 1883, the U.S. Civil Service
Commission was established.
In 1912, a day before reaching
the South Pole, British explorer
Robert Scott and his expedition
found evidence that Roald
Amundsen of Norway and his
team had gotten there ahead of
them.
In 1920, Prohibition began in
the United States as the 18th
Amendment to the U.S.
Constitution took effect, one year
to the day after its ratification. (It
was later repealed by the 21st
Amendment.)
In 1935, fugitive gangster Fred
Barker and his mother, Kate "Ma"
Barker, were killed in a shootout
with the FBI at Lake Weir, Fla.
In 1942, actress Carole
Lombard, 33, her mother
Elizabeth and 20 other people
were killed when their plane
crashed near Las Vegas, Nev.,
while en route to California from a
war-bond promotion tour.
In 1944, Gen. Dwight D.
Eisenhower took command of the
Allied Expeditionary Forces in
London.
Ten years ago: AOL Time
Warner chief executive Dick Par-
sons was tapped to be the media
conglomerate's new chairman,
succeeding Steve Case.
Five years ago: President
George W. Bush closed out his
Mideast trip with a brief visit to
Egypt, where he was welcomed
by President Hosni Mubarak.
One year ago: Republican
presidential front-runner Mitt
Romney fended off attacks from
rivals during a debate in Myrtle
Beach, S.C.; hours before the de-
bate, former Utah Gov. Jon
Huntsman withdrew from the race
and announced his support for
Romney despite their differences.
Today's Birthdays: Author
William Kennedy is 85. Author-
editor Norman Podhoretz is 83.
Opera singer Marilyn Horne is 79.
Hall of Fame auto racer A.J. Foyt
is 78. Singer Barbara Lynn is 71.
Country singer Ronnie Milsap is
70. Country singer Jim Stafford is
69. Talk show host Dr. Laura
Schlessinger is 66. Movie director
John Carpenter is 65. Actress-
dancer-choreographer Debbie
Allen is 63. Singer Sade is 54.
Rock musician Paul Webb (Talk
Talk) is 51. Rhythm-and-blues
singer Maxine Jones (En Vogue)
is 47. Actor David Chokachi is 45.
Actor Richard T. Jones is 41. Ac-
tress Josie Davis is 40. Model


Kate Moss is 39. Rock musician
Nick Valensi (The Strokes) is 32.
Actress Yvonne Zima is 24.
Thought for Today: "There are
three ingredients to the good life:
learning, earning, and yearning."
- Christopher Morley, American
journalist (1890-1957).











EDUCATIONAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE







Making a difference


One of the most celebrated events of the school year is the annual Galaxy of Stars banquet, where
the teacher of the year and school-related employee of the year are named. The banquet, sponsored
by the Citrus County Education Foundation, is Thursday, Jan. 24, at the College of Central Florida.
Twenty-two teachers and 28 school-related employees have already been awarded in their home schools
or work areas. Last year's winners were Hernando Elementary School teacher Michael Porcelli and
Citrus Springs Elementary School custodian Dennis Bidlack.
Here are this year's nominees for teacher of the year:


Al Balk Susan Barmon
Crystal River High School Floral City Elementary,
social studies teacher. gifted and ESE teacher.


Megan Blackstock Jeane DeFelice
Lecanto Middle, eighth- Withlacoochee Technical
grade reading teacher. Institute, instructional
media specialist.


Melanie Foy Sherry Fray
Inverness Primary, Rock Crusher
fourth-grade teacher. Elementary, special/
language pathologist.


Lynne Howard Melanie Howard
Hemando Elementary, CREST, teacher on
second-grade teacher. special assignment.


Connie Kane Deb Kenney
Pleasant Grove Homosassa Elementary,
Elementary, third-grade pre-K teacher.
teacher.


Trisha Knox
Citrus Springs
Elementary School, third-
grade teacher.


Shauna Parrish
Citrus Springs
Elementary, speech/
language pathologist.


Stephanie Purinton
Citrus Springs Middle,
ESE staffing specialist.


Nancy Smith
Citrus High, 12th-grade
English language/arts.


Donna Stewart
Lecanto Primary, Title I
math teacher.


Ben Stofcheck
Academy of
Environmental Sciences,
administrator/10th-grade
science.


Robert Thompson
Lecanto High School,
ninth- and 10th-grade
social studies teacher.


Janet Tuggle
Renaissance Center,
teacher on special
assignment for
curriculum.


Jackie Tyler Casandra Weldon
Forest Ridge Elementary, Crystal River Primary,
first-grade teacher. third-grade teacher.


Mike Williams
Crystal River Middle,
music and band teacher.


Jason Worsham
Inverness Middle, eighth-
grade social studies
teacher.


Hard work


equals success


In a few months, we will
see excellent athletes
in Citrus County get col-
lege scholarships. What we
don't always see,
however, are the
many students
in Citrus County
who get scholar-
ships for their
dedication and ,
commitment to
academics.
Most parents
and students ac-
cept without Darrick
question the GU
need to practice COL
a sport for two
hours a day
After all, practice makes
perfect, and to be success-
ful in sports takes time.
The same is true for aca-
demics. Students who
want to achieve in the ac-
ademic world need to
practice their academics
(homework).
At Lecanto's Interna-
tional Baccalaureate (IB)
and Pre-IB programs, our
goal is to give students the
best academic education
possible, and this means
giving around two hours


B

E
E
I


of homework a night. Yes,
IB can be a challenging
road, but a road that can
lead to serious scholar-
ship money -
as evidenced by
several of our
current IB
seniors.
Having at-
tended Pope
John Paul
Catholic School
for six years,
Gwendolyn
3uettner "Ina" Lim origi-
"ST nally had plans
J M N to attend Trinity
Catholic, but
made the switch
to Lecanto specifically to
attend IB. Ina applied to
USF in August and was
immediately accepted.
In fact, USF was so im-
pressed with her aca-
demic record that they
offered her a spot in the
Honors College and gave
her $18,000 in scholarship
money Combining this
money with her Florida
Bright Futures means Ina
will have all four years of


Page C3


Will longer school year



help or hurt US students?


Associated Press
Did your kids moan that winter
break was way too short as you got
them ready for the first day back
in school? They might get their
wish of more holiday time off
under proposals catching on
around the country to lengthen
the school year.
But there's a catch: a much
shorter summer vacation.
Education Secretary Arne Dun-
can, a chief proponent of the
longer school year, says American
students have fallen behind the
world academically
"Whether educators have more
time to enrich instruction or stu-
dents have more time to learn how
to play an instrument and write
computer code, adding meaning-
ful in-school hours is a critical in-
vestment that better prepares
children to be successful in the
21st century," he said in December
when five states announced they
would add at least 300 hours to the
academic calendar in some
schools beginning this year.
The three-year pilot project will
affect about 20,000 students in 40
schools in Colorado, Connecticut,
Massachusetts, New York and


Associated Press
U.S. Department of Education Secretary Arne Duncan is questioned by
student Trebor Goodall, right, as he's videotaped by fellow student Faith
Brown during a tour of the Charles A. Tindley Accelerated School in
Indianapolis. Duncan is a chief proponent of extended hours and a longer
school year.


Tennessee.
Proponents argue that too much
knowledge is lost while American
kids wile away the summer
months apart from their lessons.


The National Summer Learning
Association cites decades of re-
search that shows students' test
scores are higher in the same
See Page C2


AIM





C2 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013

HONORS
Sara Furgeson, of Crys-
tal River, was named to the
Dean's List for the fall se-
mester at Florida Institute of
Technology in Melbourne.
Furgeson is majoring in ma-
rine biology.
To be included on the
Dean's List, a student must
complete 12 or more graded
credits in a semester with a
semester grade point average
of at least 3.4.
Citrus High School fresh-
man Savanna Boudreau was
selected as student of the
month for November 2012 by
the Inverness Elks Lodge No.
2522. She is the daughter of
CHS teacher Nancy
Boudreau.
Savanna has a 4.2
weighted grade point aver-
age, is treasurer of the Key
Club, a member of the Drama
Club and the manager of the
CHS softball team. She volun-
teers at Inverness Primary
School and helps the Inver-
ness Kiwanis Club with serv-
ice projects.
FUNDRAISERS
The Rotary Club of Sug-
armill Woods and the Rotary
Interact Club of Lecanto High
School have joined together
to support the Box Tops for
Education fundraiser for
Lecanto Primary School. Box
Tops for Education labels can



SCHOOL
Continued from Page C1

subjects at the beginning
of the summer than at the
end.
"The research is very
clear about that," said
Charles Ballinger, execu-
tive director emeritus of
the National Association
for Year-Round School in
San Diego. "The only ones
who don't lose are the
upper 10 to 15 percent of
the student body Those
tend to be gifted, college-
bound, they're natural
learners who will learn
wherever they are."
Supporters also say a
longer school year would
give poor children more
access to school-provided
healthy meals.
Yet the movement has
plenty of detractors so
many that Ballinger some-
times feels like the Grinch
trying to steal Christmas.
"I had a parent at one
meeting say, 'I want my
child to lie on his back in
the grass watching the
clouds in the sky during
the day and the moon and
stars at night,"' Ballinger
recalled. "I thought, 'Oh,
my Most kids do that for
two, three, maybe four
days, then say, 'What's
next?"'
But opponents aren't
simply dreamy romantics.
Besides the outdoor op-
portunities for pent up
youngsters, they say fami-
lies already are beholden
to the school calendar for
three seasons out of four
Summer breaks, they say,
are needed to provide an
academic respite for stu-
dents' overwrought minds,
and to provide time with
family and the flexibility to
travel and study favorite
subjects in more depth.
They note that advocates
of year-round school can-
not point to any evidence
that it brings appreciable
academic benefits.
"I do believe that if chil-
dren have not mastered a
subject that, within a
week, personally, I see a
slide in my own child,"
said Tina Bruno, executive
director of the Coalition
for a Traditional School
Calendar "That's where
the idea of parental in-
volvement and parental
responsibility in education
comes in, because our
children cannot and
should not be in school
seven days a week, 365


days a year"
Bruno is part of a "Save
Our Summers" alliance of
parents, grandparents, ed-
ucational professionals and
some summer-time recre-
ation providers fighting
year-round school. Local
chapters carry names such
as Georgians Need Sum-
mers, Texans for a Tradi-
tional School Year and
Save Alabama Summers.
Camps, hotel operators
and other summer-specific
industries raise red flags
about the potential eco-
nomic effect.
The debate has divided
parents and educators.


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EDUCATION


be found on more than 300
products that families pur-
chase and use on a daily
basis.
There are two drop boxes
- one in the lobby of the
Sugarmill Woods Country
Club and the other in the Mili-
tary Outlet Store on West Cit-
rus Avenue in Crystal River.
For a complete listing of the
products, go to www.Rotary
SMW.com.
The labels can also be
mailed to the Sugarmill
Woods Rotary Club. P.O. Box
8, Homosassa Springs, FL
34447.
SCHOLARSHIPS
AND CONTESTS
The SECO Board of
Trustees has voted to con-
tinue SECO's scholarship
program for 2013. The board
has authorized an increase in
the scholarship amount from
$2,500 to $3,000 per student
in recognition of the ever in-
creasing cost of higher educa-
tion. Up to twelve high school
seniors from the cooperative's
service territory will receive
assistance to go on to a col-
lege or technical school after
graduation.
To qualify, graduates must
reside in a home being served
by SECO and be enrolled in
an accredited college, univer-
sity or vocational/technical
school by the end of 2013.
Applications are now avail-

School days shorter than
work days and summer
breaks that extend to as
many as 12 weeks in some
areas run up against in-
creasing political pressure
from working households
- 30 percent of which are
headed by women. These
families must fill the gaps
with afterschool programs,
day care, babysitters and
camps.
"Particularly where
there are single parents or
where both parents are
working, they prefer to
provide care for three
weeks at a time rather
than three months at a
time," Ballinger said.
The National Center on
Time & Learning has esti-
mated that about 1,000 dis-
tricts have adopted longer
school days or years.
Some places that have
tried the year-round calen-
dar, including Salt Lake
City, Las Vegas and parts of
California, have returned
to the traditional ap-
proach. Strapped budgets
and parental dissatisfac-


able at area high school guid-
ance offices and at any of
SECO's customer service
centers in Marion, Lake, Cit-
rus and Sumter counties.
They must be returned to
SECO no later than March
29.
0 The Homosassa Civic
Club is offering the Beri
Hagerty-Phelps Scholar-
ships to graduating high
school students and adults
who live within the boundaries
of the Homosassa Elemen-
tary School District and/or the
Homosassa Special Water
District.
Information and applica-
tions are available through
guidance counselors at Crys-
tal River High School,
Lecanto High School, Withla-
coochee Technical School, or
College of Central Florida.
They are also available at
www.homosassaseafood
festival.org
Applications must be re-
ceived by March 31. For more
information, call 352-628-
9333
0 Take Stock in Children is
offering college scholarships.
To be considered for a
scholarship, a child must be in

tion were among reasons.
School years are ex-
tended based on three
basic models:
-stretching the tradi-
tional 180 days of school
across the whole calendar
year by lengthening spring
and winter breaks and
shortening the one in the
summer
-adding 20 to 30 actual
days of instruction to the
180-day calendar
-dividing students and
staff into groups, typically
four, and rotating three
through at a time, with one
on vacation, throughout
the calendar year
At the heart of the de-
bate is nothing less than
the ability of America's
workforce to compete
globally
The U.S. remains in the
top dozen or so countries
in all tested subjects. But
even where U.S. student
scores have improved,
many other nations have
improved much faster,
leaving American students
far behind peers in Asia


public school in the sixth, sev-
enth or eighth grade, meet the
financial eligibility require-
ments, agree to remain drug,
alcohol and crime free and
get good grades.
Take Stock in Children
scholarships are provided
through the Florida Prepaid
Foundation.
Applications are now avail-
able in the guidance offices of
Citrus County School District's
middle schools.
Take Stock in Children is a
program that prepares eco-
nomically disadvantaged chil-
dren for college.
For more information, call
Take Stock in Children
Citrus/Levy at 352-344-0855.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart is offering two
scholarships for college-
bound students Chapter
776's College of Central
Florida (CF) Endowed Schol-
arship and the Military Order
of the Purple Heart (MOPH)
Scholarship for the academic
year 2013/14.
Chapter 776's CF Endowed
Scholarship awards $500 to
an applicant accepted or en-
rolled at CF as a full-time stu-

and Europe.
Still, data are far from
clear that more hours be-
hind a desk can help.
A Center for Public Edu-
cation review found that
students in India and
China countries Duncan
has pointed to as giving
children more classroom
time than the U.S. don't
actually spend more time
in school than American
kids, when disparate data
are converted to apples-to-
apples comparisons.
The center, an initiative
of the National School
Boards Association, found
42 U.S. states require more
than 800 instructional
hours a year for their
youngest students, and
that's more than India
does.
Opponents of extended
school point out that states
such as Minnesota and
Massachusetts steadily
shine on standardized
achievement tests while
preserving their summer
break with a post-Labor
Day school start.


dent (12 or more semester
credit hours). Chapter 776
scholarship information and
an application can be ob-
tained at www.citruspurple-
heart.org, or by calling
352-382-3847. Chapter 776
must receive scholarship ap-
plications no later than 5 p.m.
Feb. 28, 2013.
The MOPH Scholarship
awards $3,000 to a member
of the MOPH; a spouse,
widow, direct lineal descen-
dant (child, stepchild, adopted
child, grandchild) of a MOPH
member or of a veteran killed
in action, or who died of
wounds before having the op-
portunity to become a MOPH
member. Great-grandchildren
are not eligible. Applicant
must be a U.S. citizen, a
graduate or pending graduate
of an accredited high school;
be accepted or enrolled as a
full-time student (12 semester
credit hours or 18 quarter
hours) at a U.S. college or
trade school and have at least
a 2.75 cumulative GPA based
on an unweighted 4.0 grading
system. Scholarship applica-
tions must be received at
MOPH headquarters in
Springfield, Va., no later than
5 p.m. Feb. 13, 2013. MOPH
scholarship information and
an application can be ob-
tained by visiting the MOPH
website at www.purple
heart.org.
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

has received funding from
Kids Central Inc. and the De-
partment of Children and
Families to offer scholar-
ships to local students for the
2012-13 After School Enrich-
ment Program. The program
is from 2:45 to 6 p.m. Monday
through Friday and serves
students in kindergarten
through seventh grade. The
Spot has 20 scholarships
remaining.
The scholarships are avail-
able to local families who qual-
ify. Applications can be picked
up at 405 S.E. Seventh Ave.,
Crystal River. Scholarships will
be given to students on a first-
come, first-served basis. Any
family receiving free or re-
duced-price lunches automati-
cally qualifies.
The scholarships will offer
students free academic tutor-
ing, nutritional education and
homework assistance, out-
door recreational activities,
arts and crafts, computer tech
labs, reading teams, mentor-
ship and leadership skills.
The program runs the entire
school year. On scheduled early
dismissal days, the hours will be
12:30 to 6 p.m. Bus transporta-
tion from Crystal River Primary
and Middle schools is available
to The Spot.
The Citrus Community
Concert Choir, Inc. is now ac-
cepting applications for its

See P, age C3


Saturday ,O.ARY CL,

January 26th
Southern Woods
Golf Club, Homosassa sGARMIL v"'
9am Shotgun Start

GOLF TOURNAMENT
$65 Individual $200 Foursome
Includes green fees, cart and lunch.

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There will be Hole-in-One Prizes, on all par threes.
Including a car on Hole #8.

Hole Sponsor $150
Includes one golfer, call Jesse

All proceeds will be used for
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CHALK
Continued from Page C2

2013 scholarship award of
$1,500. Application is open to
graduating high school sen-
iors or enrolled college stu-
dents and residents of Citrus
County or children of Citrus
County residents. Past and
present choir members and
relatives of choir members
are also eligible. Appli-
cants may obtain scholarship
qualifications and application
forms from their school guid-
ance counselors or online at
www.citruschoir.com. Com-
pleted applications must be
received no later than April
30, 2013.
The College of Central
Florida is awarding dozens of
scholarships to qualifying
students interested in taking
honors classes at the Citrus
campus this fall semester. A
major component of CF's
Honors Institute, the Commu-
nity of Scholars Honors Pro-
gram offers incoming high
school graduates two-year tu-
ition scholarships, currently
valued at $3,000 per aca-
demic year, while offering par-
tial scholarships to those who
are currently attending CF.
Students in the honors pro-
gram are free to pursue the
degree option of their choos-
ing at CF, with the scholarship
requirement being successful
participation in a limited num-
ber of honors-level classes
that also serve to fulfill degree
requirements. Students may
also take classes at any of the
CF locations each term, and
are not bound to enroll only in
classes offered at the Citrus
campus. Besides financial
benefits, the Community of
Scholars offers members pri-
ority registration each term.
Typically, a cumulative high
school GPA of 3.75 is needed
to qualify for the Community
of Scholars, although applica-
tions for those with a slightly
lower GPA may be consid-
ered in some cases. Students
wishing to be considered for
scholarships should call Dr.
June Hall at 352-746-6721.
CLASSES AND COURSES
For information about out-
doors and recreational
classes in Citrus County, see
the Sunday Sports section of
the Chronicle.
Sherrie Geick is offering
scrapbooking classes at
Whispering Pines Park recre-
ation building. The all-day
class fee is $25; the 1/2-day
class fee is $12.50. Bring your
own supplies.
The classes are from 9
a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.
Class dates are: Feb. 16, April
20, May 18, Aug. 17, Sept.
21, Nov. 16 and Dec. 21.
For information, call the




BUETTNER
Continued from Page C1

college paid for a full
ride!
"I plan on majoring in
biomedical sciences so
that in eight years I will be
a doctor," said Ina.
Looking at Big Ten
schools, Rita West decided
to apply to the University of
Iowa. When Rita got her ac-
ceptance letter in the mail,
she had two scholarship of-
fers, totaling almost $28,000.
Approximately half of that
amount was given to her
because of her placement
in the IB program.
As for homework?
"I average about 2 1/2
hours of homework a
night, but I still have time
to manage the cross-coun-
try and soccer teams and
participate in track. IB is
really paying off as I get
these scholarships," re-
marked Rita.
Chloe Benoist is as
gifted in academics as she
is in sports. Last summer,
Chloe attended a weeklong
AIM program of the U.S.


Coast Guard Academy In-
trigued by the opportunity
of actually attending
school at the Coast Guard,
Chloe applied and was re-
cently offered an appoint-
ment to the Coast Guard
class of 2017.
Only 10 percent of all ap-
plicants get into the Coast
Guard. How did Chloe be-
come one of the select few?
"I think I got selected
because I am well-
rounded; I work equally
hard in both sports and ac-
ademics. IB really helped
me manage my time and


park office at 352-726-3913 or
go to www.inverness-fl.gov.
Beginning Genealogy,
a four-week class to get par-
ticipants started on collecting
family histories, is slated for
10 a.m. to noon Wednesdays.
The fee is $20. The class
meets at Whispering Pines
Park Recreation Building.
One week will be spent at the
library using its resources.
Jackie Reiss is the instructor.
For more information, call
352-726-3913 between 8 a.m.
and 5 p.m.
The Crystal River (com-
puter) Users Group will offer a
class in Adobe Elements
from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Jan.
21, 28, Feb. 4 and 11. Cost is
$25 for members and $35 for
nonmembers. Elements is a
superior image editing pro-
gram that can fix most com-
mon problems that occur
when using a digital camera
or scanning a photograph.
Students should have basic
computer skills for this class.
Photoshop Elements 10 will
be used during this class.
Go to www.crug.com to
sign up.
Withlacoochee Technical
Institute is offering GED prep
classes. Classes are $30 per
term and are offered during
the day and evening in many
locations in Citrus County.
In addition to GED prepara-
tion classes, adult education
students are also offered free
career counseling, and finan-
cial aid and post-secondary
application assistance, as well
as free child care for eligible
adult education parents.
ESOL classes are available
for those wanting to learn to
speak, read and write English.
Tuition scholarships are
available to qualified candi-
dates. For information, con-
tact Student Services at
352-726-2430 ext. 4326 or
ext. 4363, or online at
www.wtionline.cc/programs.
htm#adult.
Withlacoochee Techni-
cal Institute would like input
from community members re-
garding what classes they
would like to see offered at
the school. To offer sugges-
tions, log on to www.wti
online.cc, then click on "Com-
munity Education" and fill out
a suggestion form.
Join the excitement as
the Homosassa Public Library
begins a new Celebrate
Reading program from 4:30
to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday.
Celebrate Reading is a
session consisting of two pro-
grams geared toward helping
preschool and elementary
school-age children develop
literacy skills, improve their
reading and gain a love of
books.
The first program, PAWS to
Read, gives children the oppor-
tunity to build confidence in their


made me more efficient in
all of my efforts."
In today's world, schol-
arships are much-needed
gifts that allow students to
continue their education
after high school. Wonder-
ful opportunities await
those students who are
willing to put in the extra
time and practice the
hard work that accom-
panies success.


DarrickBuettner is
coordinator of the IB
program atLecanto
High School.


reading ability by reading aloud
to a certified therapist.
The second program,
Reading Pals, pairs teens and
younger children together.
Teens read storybooks aloud
to one or two younger chil-
dren at a time. Children may
wish to draw or write about a
story they like.
Listening to stories, talking
about stories and reading
aloud are great ways to im-
prove literacy skills while hav-
ing a good time. For
information, call the youth li-
brarian at 352-628-5626.
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation is offering baton
classes at the Citrus Springs
Community Center.
Classes are open to all girls
and boys ages 4 to college
age. No experience is neces-
sary. For information, call
Diane Sorvillo at 352-527-
6540. All classes are taught
by Sorvillo, a former Majorette
Queen of America and two-
time national champion.
Classes and times are:
4:45 to 5:30 p.m. New
Beginners (ages 4 to 7).
0 5:30 to 6:15 Competi-
tive team class.
6:15 to 7 p.m. Solo
competitive class.
7 to 7:45 p.m. New
Beginners (ages 8 and older).
Class fees are $32 per
month, or two different
classes for $45.
Free tutoring is avail-
able from state-approved
providers to students who
scored a Level 1 or Level 2 on
the Reading or Math FCAT
last spring at all Citrus County
Elementary Schools and the
Renaissance Center (Title I
schools).
Enrollment forms will be
mailed to all qualifying fami-
lies. Tutoring is available after
school, at day care sites or
community centers, in home
or online. Spaces are limited,
so if requests for free tutoring
exceed the amount of funding
available, the school district
will prioritize services.
Neither the Florida Depart-
ment of Education nor the
school district promotes or en-
dorses any particular Supple-
mental Educational Services
provider. For information, call
Maribeth Smith at 352-726-
1931, ext. 2321.
MISCELLANEOUS
The Citrus County YMCA


is currently seeking to con-
nect community volunteers
through their Y Community
Champions program. The Y
Community Champions pro-
gram embraces volunteers to
help in a variety of areas with
the YMCA organization.
The benefits of volunteering
include personal develop-
ment, health and wellness,
building relationships and
having a community connec-
tion. Volunteers are currently
needed in the areas of coach-
ing, program assistants, spe-
cial events and office
administration. All volunteers
must undergo a background
screening.
To volunteer at the YMCA,
call 352-637-0132, or stop by
the office at 3909 N. Lecanto
Highway in Beverly Hills.
The Boys & Girls Clubs
of Citrus County are now reg-
istering children for the be-
fore- and afterschool
programs at each club.
Clubs open as early as 6
a.m. for before-school pro-
gramming, with children re-
maining until the school bus
transports them to their re-
spective schools. Buses also
transport children in the after-
noon when school is out to
the clubs for the afterschool
program, with parents picking
up children by 6 p.m.
To register a child or to
learn more about the Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County
programs, call the Central
Ridge Boys & Girls Club at
352-270-8841, the Robert
Halleen Boys & Girls Club at
352-795-8624, or the Evelyn
Waters Boys & Girls Clubs at
352-341-2507, or the admin-
istrative office at 352-621-
9225.
Hernando Elementary
School is looking for dona-
tions of working Kindles,
Nooks, iPod Touches, iPads,
Internet tablets, digital cam-
eras and digital recording de-
vices to be used by students
in the classroom. If you have
any used but working elec-
tronic devices from the list
above or would like to donate
a new electronic device, con-
tact Heather Bone or Laura
Manos at 352-726-1833 Mon-
day through Friday, between
the hours of 8:15 a.m. to 4:15
p.m. To contact someone out-
side of these hours, call
Heather Bone at 352-462-
4768.


Friday, January 25th Doors
open at 11:00 AM
SFashions by Bealls. For tickets call
382-3151 or 382-1848

The Citrus County Fair Association proudly presents
14th Annual

L Truck & Tractor Pull


Associated Press
Alissa Harrison, a graduate of the Lancaster County
Truancy Diversion Program at Park Middle School in
Lincoln, Neb, said the program changed her life.


Truancy program


meets success


MARGARET REIST
Lincoln Journal Star

LINCOLN, Neb. -
Every two weeks, the Park
Middle School multipur-
pose room becomes a
courtroom complete with
judicial bench and judge,
attorneys and defendants
- and their parents.
Alissa Harrison, an
eighth-grader who loves
photography but until re-
cently did not love school,
showed up like clockwork
twice a month last semes-
ter a defendant work-
ing to change her ways.
She thinks she has,
with the help of the mock
courtroom and all those
who took the time to
make it happen: the
judge and the attorneys,
the counselor and thera-
pist and principal.
"It changed me a lot,"
she said. "The people
there are so nice and
they're encouraging."
And they all are con-
vinced that the word tru-
ancy is a harbinger of
trouble; that school ab-
sences gather speed,
compound upon them-
selves like proverbial
snowballs until they
morph into words such as
flunking and dropout.
It's why the judge, attor-
neys and school officials
decided to try something
different: giving students
who habitually skip class
an alternative to juvenile
court.


A $300,000 grant from
the Nebraska Crime Com-
mission funded the pilot
program at Park Middle
School. The philosophy is
similar to drug courts in
that it uses the threat of
going to court to motivate
participants to get at the
root of the problem and
change their behavior
It works like this: A ju-
venile court petition al-
leging habitual truancy is
filed against participating
students but is dismissed
- and the record sealed
- when students com-
plete the program. Those
who don't, go to court.
A therapist works with
students and their fami-
lies, and a school social
worker helps with school-
related problems and
keeps tabs on grades and
homework. Every other
week, the students and
their parents go to "court"
in the multipurpose
room, with Juvenile Court
Judge Reggie Ryder pre-
siding or Principal Ryan
Zabawa on the bench.
The judge reviews how
students have done in the
interim, asks questions,
seeking feedback from
the students and their
parents, the therapist, so-
cial worker, prosecutor
and defense attorney in
the room.
Instead of sentences,
he doles out incentives
for perfect attendance
and consequences for stu-
dents not toeing the line.


FEShIVAL


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EDUCATION


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The Mini 'Paage

SBetty Debnam, Founding Editor and Editor at Large
@2013Un-Iersal Uclick
from The Mini Page 2013 Universal Ucck
Welcoming President Obama


Celebrating Democracy


Were you following the campaign
last year? The election process shows
just how lucky we are. In America, we
get to choose our leaders.
In November, voters re-elected
President Barack Obama. On Monday,
Jan. 21, the nation celebrates our
democracy with the 57th presidential
inauguration (in-AHG-yur-AY-shun)
ceremony. An inauguration is the
official swearing-in ceremony for a
nation's president.
A special day
The U.S. Constitution sets
Inauguration Day as Jan. 20. But in
2013, that date falls on a Sunday. So
Congress moved the 2013 ceremonies
to Monday.
Jan. 21 is also
Martin Luther King
Jr. Day, honoring
the great civil rights
leader. He fought for
rights at a time when
African-Americans Martin Luther
were often prevented King Jr.
from voting. In honor of Martin Luther
King's work for peace, the first family
is urging everyone to participate in a
National Day of Service on Saturday,
Jan. 19. To find out more about events
in your community, go to 2013pic.org.


Barack Obama is sworn
in as the 44th president of
the United States on Jan.
20, 2009. Michelle Obama
witnesses the ceremony.
On Jan. 21, 2013, President
Obama will publicly take the
oath of office for the second
time. He plans to take the
oath of office privately on
Sunday, Jan. 20, the usual
Inauguration Day.
Vice President Joe Biden
will also take his second
oath of office during these
ceremonies.


Having faith in freedom
The theme of this year's
inauguration is "Faith in America's
Future." It honors America's unity and
strength even in times of trial.
The theme also
pays tribute to the
150th anniversary
of the Statue of
Freedom. This
symbol of liberty was
placed on top of the
new Capitol dome in
1863. At that time, it
looked as if the Civil
War would prevent
the completion of the
Capitol dome. Statue of Freedom


Working with hope
Work on the Capitol dome was often
dangerous and very hard. But workers
didn't give up, even working without
pay. African-Americans who began
working on the dome as slaves stayed
as free men to help finish the Capitol.


President Lincoln saw the completion of
the Capitol dome as a sign that America
would survive as one nation.


Meet Erica Linz
Erica Linz stars as Mia in the 3-D movie
"Cirque du Soleil: Worlds Away." This movie
uses live circus acts from Cirque du Soleil
performances to tell a story about two young
people journeying to find each other. "Cirque
du Soleil" means Circus of the Sunin French.
Erica is an aerial, or flying, acrobat with
Cirque du Soleil. She grew up in Colorado
and began acting when she was 8. She has
also been a competitive gymnast. She joined the circus when she
was 19, soon after graduating from high school.
She has acted as a circus performer in TV shows and as a
stunt double in commercials. She lives in Los Angeles. She runs a
charity called Circus Couture, which uses circus arts and fashion
to raise money for children's cancer care and research.
from The Mini Page 2013 UnirlUclck
'i TlM",a, 1111.f aa am L
OlS GOOOdsortls Repor
Supersport: James Harden
U Height: 6-5 Birthdate: 8-26-89
Weight: 220 Hometown: Los Angeles
Since last season, James Harden has changed NBA
teams and changed roles. What hasn't changed is his
great game.
For the Oklahoma ( .I. I I.1..I. last year, he
captured the Sixth Man Award, given to the league's top reserve. This
season he's soaring as a starting guard for the Houston Rockets.
A former Arizona State standout who was chosen third overall in
the 2009 draft, Harden was averaging 24.7 points, 4.4 rebounds and
5.6 assists in early December. He also helped the United States win an
Olympic gold medal last summer as a reserve. That proved again that he's
a team player, be it subbing or starting.
Now Harden, a savvy player with a thick black beard, is simply starring.
And it appears that's a role that isn't 1l1. 1... 1 .. iI,I 1i1... -.....


from Th Mini Pag- 2013 Un.ieal Udclck


Having a Ball


Presidents on parade
After the swearing-in ceremony
and speeches, and after lunch, the
president and the first lady lead the
inaugural parade from the Capitol to
the White House.
The first parades began as military
escorts for the president. By 1841,
floats and bands were traditional. In
1865, at Abraham Lincoln's second
inauguration, African-American men
were allowed to march for the first
time. Women were first allowed to
parade in 1917 at Woodrow Wilson's
second inauguration.


President Barack Obama and first lady
Michelle Obama wave to crowds in the
2009 inaugural parade.


President George w. Busn and Laura
Bush join the festivities at an inaugural
ball in 2001. People love to check out the
first ladies' inaugural gowns, and many
are on display at the American History
Museum, Smithsonian Institution, in
Washington, D.C.


Dancing the night away
After the parade and other inaugural
festivities, the president and first lady
go dancing. There are usually about 10
official inaugural balls.
There might also be about 100
unofficial balls going on throughout
Washington, D.C., that night.
Americans threw the first ball
about a week after President George
Washington became president in
1789. However, it did not become
a traditional part of the festivities
until 1809, when first lady Dolley
Madison hosted a ball after James
Madison's inauguration.
First lady
Mamie
Eisenhower
poses in her
Inaugural
.: gown in 1953.


People around the world find
inspiration in the inaugural
ceremonies of the U.S. president.
Usually, U.S. presidents have
taken their oath of office in public.
But sometimes, as when a president
has died in office, the vice president
takes the oath in private.
This is the promise, or oath, that
the president makes:
"I do solemnly swear (or affirm)
that I will faithfully execute the
Office of President of the United
States, and will to the best of my
Ability, preserve, protect and
defend the Constitution of the
United States."


John F. Kennedy is sworn into office in
1961.

The Mini Page thanks Matt House, Joint
Congressional Committee on Inaugural
Ceremonies, for help with this issue.
Next week, The Mini Page is about the U.S.
Supreme Court.
Look through your newspaper for stories
about the presidential inauguration.


iring the W


~ *" ;i :.
:'.,F...


Abraham Lincoln takes the oath of office
at his second inauguration in 1865.

Words that live through time
After taking the oath of office,
the president usually gives a speech,
or inaugural address.
Most historians regard the
inaugural addresses of Presidents
Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Delano
Roosevelt and John F. Kennedy as
some of the most inspirational in
history.

Abraham Lincoln 1861
During his inaugurations,
Abraham Lincoln faced a country
torn apart by the Civil War. He used
the power of his words to try to heal
the nation. In 1861, he made a final
effort to keep the country together.
"We are not enemies, but
friends. We must not be
enemies." He appealed to "the
better angels of our nature."


forld

President Lincoln 1865
Near the end of the Civil War,
white people and newly freed black
people gathered together to hear
President Lincoln's words of healing.
Historians believe that John Wilkes
Booth, who would soon assassinate
Lincoln, may have been in the audience.
President Lincoln urged people to
get along together:
"With malice toward none, with
charity for all, with firmness in
the right as God gives us to see
the right, let us strive on to finish
the work we are in, to bind up
the nation's wounds, to care for
him who shall have borne the
battle and for his widow and
his orphan, to do all which may
achieve and cherish a just and
lasting peace among ourselves
and with all nations."

Franklin D. Roosevelt 1933
America was in the Great
Depression, when many Americans
were poor. President Roosevelt
encouraged people, saying, "The
only thing we have to fear is fear
itself."

John F. Kennedy 1961
President Kennedy spoke at a time
when America and the former Soviet
Union came near the brink of nuclear
war.
"And so, my fellow Americans:
Ask not what your country can
do for you ask what you can do
for your country."


The Mini Page Staff
Betty Debnam Founding Editor and Editor at Large Lisa Tarry Managing Editor Lucy Lien Associate Editor Wendy Daley Artist


The Mini Page' I ft'e4

Guide to the Constitution hP
The popular nine-part series on the Constitution, written in
collaboration with the National Archives, is now packaged as a
colorful 32-page softcover book. The series covers:
* the preamble, the seven articles and 27 amendments
* the "big ideas" of the document
* the history of its making and the signers


from Th Mi Pag 2013 U-nl.rl Udik
.^TM MIGHTY IAT^ ^ T
d! FUNNY'S ivIInMi J11Qv(
All the following jokes have something in common.
Can you guess the common theme or category?
Paul: What do we call a fender bender when
it happens to the president's vehicle?
Patty: A presi-dent!


Priscilla: What sounds like sports equipment
but is really a large dance?


Peter: The inaugural ball!
Piper: Why is the inauguration such .
a clean event? iin_
Percy: Because it's in Washington! -,. . I,-, -

^/-\ from TneMlnlPage O2013Um ersal Ucllk
12. Base t Bro TRY'N
& -m "els Inauguration FIND
Words that remind us of Inauguration Day are hidden in the block below.
Some words are hidden backward or diagonally. See if you can find:
ADDRESS, BALL, BANDS, BUSH, CAPITOL, CEREMONY, DAY, DOME,
FAITH, FREEDOM, FUTURE, GOWN, INAUGURATION, KING, LINCOLN,
NEW, OATH, OBAMA, PRESIDENT, ROOSEVELT, WAR, WASHINGTON.
ROOMOD E E R F HT I AF
WOLDYOLIKE O B B A BA N D S E R U T U F
TO ATTEND A
BALL? O G A A T V B W L O T I P AC
S D O L MH U AS S E R D D A
E D AW L A S R N LOCN I L
St. V K O Y N L H Y N O M E R E C
E I N M KNO T G N I H SAW
L N E M E L T N E D I S E R P
T GWN O I T A R U G U AN I

fro TU Min, Page 2013 Un 1eral U-l,&

Ready Resources
The Mini Page provides ideas for websites,
books or other resources that will help you learn
more about this week's topics.
On the Web:
facebook.com/JCCIC
havefunwithhistory.com/HistorySubjects/
AmericanPresidents.html
youtube.com/watch?v=as5J-RUTW3w&feature=youtu.be
At the library:
"Kids Meet the Presidents 2nd Edition" by Paul Rodhe and
Paul Beatrice
"Our Country's Presidents: All You Need to Know About the
Presidents, From George Washington to Barack Obama" by Ann
Bausum


----------------------------------------
To order, send $9.95 plus $3.50 postage and handling for each copy. Send check or money
order (U.S. funds only) payable to: Andrews McMeel Universal, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood,
KS 66206 or call toll-free 1-800-591-2097.
Please send copies of The Mini Page Guide to the Constitution (Item #0-7407-6511-6) at
$13.45 each, total cost. (Bulk discount information available upon request.) www.smartwarehousing.com


Name:
Address:
City:
-i.-. -


A-'-


Mini Spy... t
Mini Spy and her friends are witnessing the inauguration
of the president. See if you can find: exclamation mark
* muffin donkey chicken pencil
* cat ant number 3 matchbook word MINI
* lima bean key swan number 8 flyswatter
* letter C golf club ice skate paintbrush


from Th Min Pag. 2013 Uneal UcIk


iTM Rookie Cookie's Recipe
Sticky Cinnamon Popcorn Balls
You'll need:
* 8 cups popped popcorn (1 microwave package)
* 2 tablespoons butter
3 cups small marshmallows
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
* 8 sheets wax paper (10 by 12 inches)
What to do:
1. Pop microwave popcorn according to package directions.
2. Remove unpopped kernels and place popcorn in large glass bowl.
3. In another glass bowl, add butter and marshmallows. Microwave for
2 minutes at 50 percent power.
4. Stir to combine butter and marshmallows; add cinnamon and blend well.
5. Pour marshmallow mixture on top of popcorn. Stir to coat evenly
(mixture will be sticky).
6. Place one cup of coated popcorn in middle of wax paper sheet. Roll up
edges of paper to form a popcorn ball. Store in airtight container.
You will need an adult's help with this recipe. fr, u-..Mn 13 ,lur.,-Iu,


Insp


The promise


from The Mini Page @ 2013 Un.ersal Uclck


C4 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013


EDUCATION


I
I


.-------------------------------------







Page C5 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Audubon Society
to meet today
Citrus CountyAudubon
Society will meet at 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 16, at
Unity Church of Citrus
County, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
Guest speaker will be
Matthew Beck, chief pho-
tographer and photo editor
at the Chronicle. His pres-
entation, "Photography
Styles and Techniques," will
focus on his many pub-
lished and unpublished bird
and wildlife photos, includ-
ing some of his methods
for capturing an award-win-
ning photo.
All CCAS events are
open to the public. For
more information, visit
CitrusCountyAudubon.com.
Quilters to meet
in Inverness
The Citrus Friendship
Quilters Guild will meet at
1 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 17,
at the Lakes Region
Library, 1551 Druid Road,
Inverness. The club meets
the first and third
Thursday of the month.
The first meeting of the
month is a business meet-
ing followed with show-
and-tell, when members
may show handiwork and
either keep it or donate it to
one of many different com-
munity organizations the
club supports. This is fol-
lowed by a workshops) on
new or different techniques.
The second meeting is a
very short business meet-
ing, followed by show-and-
tell and workshops.
For more information,
call Denise Helt at 352-
344-1675, or Shirley
Gorsuch at 352-637-6838.
CHWC to sponsor
Bunco Bash
The CHWC's annual
Bunco Bash will be Thurs-
day, Jan. 17, at the Beverly
Hill's Lion's Club, 72 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills. The
doors will open at 7 p.m.
and play will start at
7:30 p.m.
Admission is $15; call
Ginny at 352-527-7077 or
Ann at 357-344-8708. Tick-
ets can also be purchased
at the door.
Proceeds go to the
CHWC's scholarship fund
and to local charities the
club supports. There will be
great cash prizes, gifts,
treats and beverages
for all.

AdoptA
RESCUED PET


Max


Special to the Chronicle
This is Max. He has been
with our group for awhile
now and it is amazing to
us because he is a great
little dog. He is young
and very playful, so will
required a fenced yard.
He loves to play with
other dogs and people.
When he is not playing,
he is a lovable and cuddly
little guy. Max is a Chi-
huahua mix and about 2
years old. Adopt A Res-
cued Pet Inc. does home
visits prior to adoptions,
so can only adopt to the
Citrus County area. Call
352-795-9550 and leave
your name, number and
pet's name and for a re-
turn call. Visit www.
adoptarescuedpet.com
for our other pets and the
adoption calendar.

* Submit information at
event.


Special to the Chronicle

Are you determined to improve
your health in 2013? Get a jump start
by joining this year's Fitness in Cit-
rus: Community-wide Fitness Chal-
lenge. It begins Monday, Feb. 4, and
runs through Sunday, March 17.
Hundreds of Citrus County resi-
dents look forward to participating
in the Fitness in Citrus challenge
every year. Most said they got into it
for their health or to lose weight, but
ended up saying they enjoyed it


Special to the Chronicle

The public is invited for
an evening of fun, food, art
and antiques hosted by the
Community Outreach Pro-
gram of Congregation Beth
Sholom at an Art & An-
tiques Auction Saturday,
Jan. 19, at Kellner Audito-
rum behind the Beverly
Hills Jewish Center, 102
Civic Circle.


most for the fun and camaraderie,
though they also said they felt a lot
better about themselves, many lost
weight, and some even quit smoking.
How to get involved? Email
fitnesschallenge@tampabayrr.com
and ask for details and registration
form.
Form a team that means you
and at least one other person. Small
teams typically do best. Your team
needs to choose either the "steps"
challenge or the "minutes of activ-
ity" challenge. Also, choose your


The preview party be-
gins at 6:30 p.m.; appetiz-
ers will be served. The
auction begins at 7:30 p.m.
with desserts and coffee.
Wine and beer will be
available; door prizes will
be awarded.
Selection will include:
original paintings, litho-
graphs, etchings,
silkscreens, French
posters, serigraphs, sports


team's fitness level by choosing a
category: "just getting started," "get-
ting there" or "jocks."
In the "steps" challenge you earn
points for each 500 steps you take
(you need to wear a pedometer). In
the "minutes" challenge you earn
points for each 10 minutes of exer-
cise (from a specified list of
activities.)
Registration closes Jan. 25. Email
fitnesschallenge@tampabayrr.com
to get details and registration forms
(in pdf file format).


collectibles, rare antiques,
decorative accessories, an-
imation art, choice col-
lectibles and more.
Featured will be Erte,
Leroy Neiman, Tarkay,
Chagall, Peter Max, Nor-
man Rockwell, Toulouse-
Lautrec, Wissotsky, Lena
Liu, Rembrandt,
Delacroix and many other
renowned artists.
The auction will be pro-


fessionally conducted by
Atlantic Art, 1686 S.W 16th
St., Boca Raton; phone
877-810-2161. Cash, checks
and major credit cards will
be accepted.
Admission tickets are
available for $10 per per-
son, payable by check to
Congregation Beth
Sholom. Reservations can
be made by calling Ed
Altchek at 352-746-6258.


News NOTES


Fitness in Citrus Satrday concert
to help education


Sign up teams now to join in community-wide challenge


Recognition for Sheriff's Office


Special to the Chronicle
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy and the Citrus County Sheriff's Office were presented a plaque from members of The Mission In
Citrus Homeless Shelters on Friday, Jan. 4. The plaque, which was paid for entirely by the working homeless, is the
first of its kind to be presented to law enforcement. The purpose of the plaque was to recognize and promote the
partnership between the two entities. Sheriff Dawsy promised to protect and help those homeless who are working
to better their lives, and The Mission in Citrus Homeless Shelters promised to partner with the Sheriff's Office to pro-
vide intelligence information whenever possible. Wilma and Jane, two of the working homeless, shared their stories
of how helpful and nice the sheriff's deputies were to them in their time of need. Deputy Butch Slusser was recog-
nized for his kindness and humane treatment of the homeless when he serves civil papers. The shelter also wanted
to recognize Deputy Jonathan Payne, who was unable to attend the presentation. From left are: Jane, Wilma,
Marilyn, Jim Sleichter, D.J., Sheriff Jeff Dawsy, Dep. Butch Slusser and Casey.




Learn about advance directives


Special to the Chronicle

If you would like help understand-
ing what and why it is important for
to have advance health care direc-
tives to ensure personal medical
care and wishes are honored, HPH
Hospice invites everyone to a free
community presentation addressing
these topics.
The presentation will be Wednes-


day, Jan. 23, at HPH Hospice admin-
istrative offices, 3545 N. Lecanto
Highway (Winn Dixie Shopping
Plaza), Beverly Hills. Registration
begins at 9:30 a.m., the seminar will
be from 10 a.m. until noon.
The presentation will be given by
George Germann, PA, and David Mc-
Grew, MD. Germann is an attorney
specializing in probate, estate plan-
ning, guardianships and elder law


and a HPH Hospice Board of Direc-
tors member. McGrew is medical di-
rector for HPH Hospice. They will
discuss advance directives, choosing
the right health care surrogate, who
should have copies of an advance di-
rective, pros and cons of CPR and
more useful information; all ex-
plained in easy-to-understand terms.
Pre-registration is required. HPH
Hospice at 352-527-4600.


News NOTES


Spanish club plans
monthly meeting
The Spanish American
Club of Citrus County will
meet at 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan.
17, at the Knights of Colum-
bus Hall, 2389 W. Norvell
Bryant Highway, Lecanto.
The club is a multi-national
social organization promoting
unity among the Latino popu-
lation in Citrus County. It is
open to all and creates an av-
enue to experience the Latino
culture. Membership is $15
per person. Renewals will
begin in June for all.
The next dance is the an-
nual Valentine's Sweetheart
Dance Saturday, Feb. 9, at
the Knights of Columbus Hall.

least two weeks before the


* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


month the show is "Hoot." Call
the Park visitor center for in-
formation at 352-563-0450.
The Friends of Crystal
River State Parks will host a
Sunset Cruise Friday, Jan. 25.
Call the visitor center for in-
formation at 352-563-0450.
The winter sunsets can be
spectacular, but it can get a
little chilly out on the river, so
bring some warm clothes.
Moon Over the Mounds is
being presented at the Crystal
River Archeological Park Jan.
25. A guided, torch-lit tour of
the Native American mound
complex by a knowledgeable
archeologist is offered.
Refreshments and snacks
are served. For information,
call 352-563-0450.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.


The Havana Boys will perform
many of the Cuban dance fa-
vorites. Guest solo vocalist
Luis Rosas will bring us back
to the Musica Del Trio era.
"Havana Pete" will be a spe-
cial host emcee.
For information email
benpris312@aol.com.
Salad luncheon
set for March
The Yankeetown-lnglis
Woman's Club will have its
annual Education Salad
Luncheon at noon Wednes-
day, March 20, at the club-
house on 56th Street,
Yankeetown.
Due to limited space, mem-
bers are selling advance tick-
ets now. There are only 100


tickets available. Cost is $7 in
advance, $10 at the door if
any tickets remain.
To purchase a ticket, see
any club member, stop by the
Second To None Thrift
Shoppe from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Tuesday through Satur-
day, or call 352-447-2057.
Events planned
at state parks
The following events are
planned at the Crystal River
State Parks:
The Redfish Review is a
free movie night at the Visitors
Center at Crystal River State
Park Saturday, Jan. 19. Free
popcorn and refreshments will
be served. The movies were
all filmed in Florida and this


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


Art & Antiques Auction


Beth Sholom Community Outreach to host event Saturday


The Citrus County Edu-
cation Foundation will pres-
ent "Allegro," a concert
featuring the award-
winning Tampa Bay Her-
alds of Harmony Barber-
shop Chorus, with Main
Street and Live Out Loud,
acclaimed quartets.
All are welcome to the
concert, set to begin at 2
p.m., Saturday, Jan. 19, at
Curtis Peterson Auditorium.
Cost is $20.
Proceeds from the con-
cert will benefit Citrus
County Schools' music, art
and PE programs. For
more information, email
eduk8r@tampabay.rr.com.
Concert series
resumes Thursday
Maine-based duo Castle
Bay will present a blend of
Celtic and Maine folk tunes
when the Concert at the
Old Historic Courthouse
Museum resumes Jan. 17.
Doors open at 6:15 p.m.
with the music beginning at
7 p.m. in the second floor
courtroom. Tickets are $10
per person and include
desserts, coffee, soda,
water and other goodies.
All proceeds benefit the
the Old Courthouse Her-
itage Museum.
For tickets or information
call 352-341-6427.
Eagles Ladies to
convene Jan. 22
Crystal River Eagles
Ladies Auxiliary 4272 will
have nominations for vice
president at the Jan. 22
meeting.
Any member of the auxil-
iary wishing to hold that po-
sition must be present to
be nominated. The election
will be Feb. 5.
Cause for Paws
Sunday at mall
Precious Paws Rescue
of Florida will stage a Zum-
bathon from 1 to 3 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 20, at the
Crystal River Mall Food
Court. Entrance fee is $10.
Precious Paws Rescue
will use all proceeds to
fund various programs
such as the low-cost
spay/neuter program and
for general care of foster
animals. It is an all-
volunteer, nonprofit group.
Zumba instructors from
across Citrus County will
donate their time. There will
be door prizes and raffles.
For more information,
call Martha Bowman at
352-419-4124, or email
bowmania48@yahoo.com.
Friends, fashion,
fun at show
For a glimpse of new
spring fashions come to the
Ladies of the West Citrus
Elks annual fashion show,
slated for Friday, Jan. 25,
with the doors opening at
11 a.m. at the West Citrus
Elks Lodge, 7890 Grover
Cleveland Blvd. in
Homosassa.
This year's fashions are
provided by Bealls of
Crystal River. The event in-
cludes lunch, gift baskets
and door prizes.
Tickets are $20. Call
Anne at 352-382-1848 or
Pat 352-382-315.
Class to teach
family history
Beginning Genealogy, a
four-week class to get par-
ticipants started on collect-
ing family histories, is
slated for 10 a.m. to noon
Wednesday.
The fee is $20. The class
meets at Whispering Pines
Park Recreation Building.
One week will be spent at
the library using its re-
sources. Jackie Reiss is
the instructor.
For more information,
call 352-726-3913 between
8 a.m. and 5 p.m.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WEDNESDAY EVENING JANUARY 16, 2013 C: Conmast, Citrus B: Bright House D1: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 I 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
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West
4542
SJ 10 9 8
* K 10 9 6 5 3
0 -
South
4 KQ
IV -


East
4 6
V Q 7 4
8 7
VQ74
*87
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J 10 9 8 7


+ AQ2
K8 3
Dealer: East
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
3--
4 Pass 5 Pass
6 I Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: J


Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Voltaire, whose real name was Francois-
Marie Arouet, said, "Chance is a word void of
sense; nothing can exist without a cause."
You have chances in bridge that are not void
of sense if you have analyzed the available data.
In this deal, though, it is knowledge of a void that
gives you a chance to make a tough contract.
South is in six spades. West leads the heart
jack. How should declarer proceed?
East opened three clubs to show a respectable
seven-card suit and limited high-card values.
True, because there is no weak two-bid in clubs,
sometimes a player will open three clubs with a
strong six-card suit But in this instance, if West
had had a club, he would have led it
North's raise to five spades was aggressive,
but without it, South would not have had a story
with which to bore dinner companions for
weeks.
Declarer will initially think that if the dia-
mond finesse works, he will take seven spades,
two hearts, two diamonds and a diamond ruff in
the dummy But what chance has that finesse?
It is surely zero. Assuming West's lead is hon-
est, East is marked with nine points in hearts
and clubs. With the diamond king as well, he
would have opened one club, not three.
There is one winning line. South ruffs the first
trick, draws two rounds of trumps ending on the
board, and cashes the top hearts, discarding his
diamond ace and queen! Then he ruffs a heart,
removes West's last trump, and leads his re-
maining diamond. West must let declarer into
the dummy South takes seven spades, four
hearts and one diamond.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
KEAWA

T.1-, r.i- I, Servces, Inc

ROWNS



SRLIHL '



TESLET


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
We know
Good you can Thanks, guys.
luck, d it. We'll I appreciate the
ob. beat this encouragement.
drought. \


I I- - -
S.- i I --




II '
II


,- ,





WHEN HE STARTED TO
PRLL FOR WATER, THESE
TURNED UP.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A:L-1-1 1
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: CUFFS THUMP TICKET AFFORD
I Answer: The limo driver had been working for years but
he didn't have much to "CHAUFFEUR" IT


ACROSS
1 Fiberglass
bundle
5 Vaccine meas.
8 Rub
2 Grades 1-12
3 "Si," to
Maurice
4 Pharaoh's god
5 Sandals' lack
6 Lantern fuel
8 Came next
20 Units of
resistance
!1 FedEx rival
22 Amigo of
Fidel
!3 Montezuma's
empire
!6 Himalayan
guide
!9 Misfortunes
10 Timber
31 That fellow
13 Geological
period
14 Rough it
15 Bingo kin
16 Go hungry


Witches' brew
ingredients
Coral islet
Color Easter
eggs
Extend over
Type of
sausage
Fake pills
Limerick locale
Import vehicle
List shortener
Warehouse
pallet
Butte
Want ad letters
Herbal
soothers

DOWN
Gamble
- vera lotion
After that
Disposable
hankies
Burger
go-withs
Signaled


Answer to Previous Puzzle


Exclaimed
over
Merchandise
ID
Mince
Dazzle
Where tigers
pace
Backpacker's
load
A few
Sigh of relief
"- No
Sunshine"
Undulating
Jan. and Feb.
Wading bird
Most
enthusiastic
Thorn tree
PBS "Science
Guy"
Nightclub
Swing around
Tablets
Go to the
polls
Running shoe
name
Opera
highlight
Pan spray
Busy one?
Publishing
execs


1-16 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS

WANT MORE PUZZLES?
Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


Dear Annie: I have been
married for six months
and am crazy for my
hubby He has back problems
and some sexual issues that
keep us from being intimate.
At least, those are the excuses
he uses for the fact
that we don't touch
like we used to.
I recently came
across some love
notes to an ex-girl-
friend, saying how
they are going to be
happy growing old
together and how
much he loves her I
pay his child sup-
port and love his
kids like my own.
He says he loves ANN
me, but I have MAII
doubts that he is
being honest. He is
constantly texting and email-
ing and never puts his phone
down. He acts as if he is afraid
I will look at it.
I've been hurt before by lies
and don't want to go through it
again. What do I do? -Scared
and Lonely in Kentucky
Dear Scared: Were these re-
cent love notes or old ones that
you happened to find? If they
are old, try to ignore them. He
married you, not his ex-girl-
friend. If they are recent, how-
ever, it could be serious,
especially when combined
with constant and secretive
texting, calling and mailing.
Married partners owe it to
each other to be open and
honest. Talk to your husband.
If his answers don't reassure
you, the next step is
counseling.
Dear Annie: I am a small
woman with large breasts. I
did not buy these. For years,
I've tolerated leering men and


L
L


boys, suggestive comments,
questions about breast en-
hancement and assumptions
that I am of easy virtue. Some
people are unable to make eye
contact because they are star-
ing at my bosom not to men-
tion the idiots who
cannot possibly
take me seriously in
the business world
because of my cup
size. I was once re-
fused a job because
the supervisor was
worried what his
wife would think.
I have learned
to deal with all
that. But I have is-
sues with the way
IE'S other women treat
.BOX me. Most take an
immediate dislike
to me. Men stare
no matter how modestly I
dress, and their wives and
girlfriends glare at me, call
me names they think I don't
hear and generally treat me
like dirt. Even walking in
public past a group of
women seems to bring on the
negativity.
We talk about bullying be-
cause of body type, but doesn't
this qualify? Women don't
seem to see the hurt they
cause, the chance at friend-
ship they miss or the chiro-
practic bills I have from
hauling these things around.
Breast reduction surgery is
not an option for me right now.
Please bring this to the atten-
tion of your readers. Some
might recognize their behav-
ior and make an effort to
change. Too Well Endowed
in Kansas
Dear Kansas: Women can
sometimes ascribe negative
traits to an object of jealousy


If your chest attracts their hus-
bands and boyfriends, they
need to find a reason to dislike
you. We hope your letter
serves as a plea for greater tol-
erance, but we also recom-
mend you check to see
whether your insurance cov-
ers breast reduction surgery
since you have chronic back
pain. You shouldn't suffer
needlessly
Dear Annie: "Connecticut"
complained that her ex-hus-
band pressured their kids not
to invite her current boyfriend
to their family events. You said
that unless the kids stood up to
Dad, nothing would change.
We have dealt with a control-
ling ex-spouse for 30 years.
She has never changed. And
the kids don't want to hurt her
feelings, because she is still
their mother.
A long time ago, we made
the decision to celebrate
birthdays and holidays before
or after the actual day It lets
us have a great time with the
kids without the stress of deal-
ing with the controlling par-
ent. And we don't miss out on
any celebration. Lucky
Grandparents


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate, 737
3rd Street, Hermosa Beach,
CA 90254. To find out more
aboutAnnie's Mailbox and
read features by other
Creators Syndicate writers
and cartoonists, visit the
Creators Syndicate Web page
at www creators.com.


North 01-16-13
SA3
AK 6 5 3 2
SJ 4
* 9 7 4


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


FIT NEMO0 RAZ ZE
ISU OVER AHOY
LE FT BA K DANE
MET L G IBEDD
FNYI I JIA
PI AFMAUD L A X
INDY PIN ORE
LCD ALE BRANN
EHS LISA RE B A

EARLS E HEIR
VE NSHADE
VE I L UN I HA DI
ER GOYKY T LAD
NOSY Y IS EMS


C6 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


ARE 'OU TRqIN6 TO
TAKE APVANTA6E OF OUR
MISFORTUNE? OUR 5DEWALK
15 COVERED WITH SNOW
THROlt6H NO FAULTOF OOR5,
AND qOU WANT TO
PROFIT BY THIS
TERRIBLE MISFORTUNE?


FROM NOLO ON,EVERY
TIME IT !5NOW
I'LL FEEL OUILTY!





5.-zg-^


Q JET FUEL? THAT. BUT POUR IT INTO
SONE OF OUR BIG ICED
TEA PITCHERS AS
A TRAVEL MUG.


ACTUALLY, STUDIES
SHOW THAT ANY BIG
CHANGES IN A PERSON'S
LIFE VASTLY INCREASE
THE ODDS OF SICKNESS
AND DEATH.




-.. ^ .


The Born Loser

NF1Ew. C & WLL UST 5AY,I IHRPRSSE BY&L
TODENRYOUR. TRNKYMOUFOR T RE T UR~EAMNNERWIAWRmCA
REQUE-5T FOR YOUR Y OU ARE tIUGTwS, m BO!


ARE YOU
TRYING I CANT
TO KILL FEEL MY
U5? ARM!

) v











fc,' ^
___ ^ __


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


"My goodness, you're several shades
whiter than usual. Why, you look as if
you've seen a... Oh, right.... You looked in
the mirror again."


Blondie

JULIUS DITHERS HAS TO BE H MONEY, WHAT HAPPENED? OU I'M JUST
THE MOST COLD-HEARTED HAVEN'T EVEN LEFT FOR WORK YET! D OING MY
0 BOSS IN THE HISTORY WARMUP EXERCISE
OF CAPITALISM!! BEFORE THE '-
EAH, I KNOW GAMES BEGIN AT
S 'S 0KA ..WORK TOAVY





St M

Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"Mommy, my favorite jeans
keep shrinking."


[HI,PAP. WE'RE CONNA. LET IT FREEZE
S6 WE CAN ICE SKATE."


Doonesbury

wpAS5THE OPcon-

.-*u ."" ; . ..


Bi RE5Nate ,A,






Big Nate


"i7' 6UESSI6AI BOEHNER
1S ABOUT TO FINW OUT
JUST HOXW HARRPIT WXI
BE TO RESTORE UNTTY..."











WHAT? YES, THlIS
BUT ALSO IS
YOU WH-AT r
GUYS THINK. BUT
ARE A SHE MAYBE
GREAT DOES NOT
COUPLE THINK IT.


SO r AM ASK NATE
FOR HELP, BECAUSE
HE 15 EXPERT AT
TALKING TO GIRLS'
Y '5 -- T '


HEHI UH...YOU KNOW
hEH 'WHAT "EXPERT'
MnEANS, RIGHT'
DON'T LISTEN
To THEM.
ARTURp.


Arlo and Janis


Today MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Gangster Squad" (R) ID required. 12:45 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Texas Chainsaw" (R) ID required. In 3D. 1 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m. No passes.
"Zero Dark Thirty" (R) ID required. 12:15 p.m.,
3:45 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Les Miserables" (PG-13) Noon, 3:30 p.m.,
7p.m.
"Jack Reacher" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" (PG-13)
4p.m.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" (PG-13)
In 3D. Noon, 6:50 p.m. No passes.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"A Haunted House" (R) ID required. 2 p.m., 5
p.m., 8:10 p.m.
"Gangster Squad" (R) ID required. 1:30 p.m.,


4:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Texas Chainsaw" (R) ID required. In 3D. 1:40
p.m., 4 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Zero Dark Thirty" (R) ID required. 1 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Les Miserables" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:15 p.m.
"Django Unchained" (R) ID required. 1:10 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Parental Guidance" (PG) 1:45 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
8:05 p.m.
"Jack Reacher" (PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"The Guilt Trip" (PG-13) 4:50 p.m.
"Lincoln" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:45 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie list-
ings and entertainment information.


Betty


Frank & Ernest


WJUF-FM90.1 National Public LocalRADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.701dies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: S slenbe S


"YGI YE LVI ZIODILZ YE KFEI FZ LVTL


TKK LVTL FZ DITKKN JYDLV LVI


CYFGS


FZ JVTL JI CY EYD YLVIDZ."


KIJFZ OTDDYKK

Previous Solution: "Excellence is the unlimited ability to improve the quality of
what you have to offer." Rick Pitino
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-16


Pickles


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


Beetle Bailey


Dilbert


DO NOT FEAR
CHANGE BECAUSE
CHANGE IS GOOD.


The Grizzwells


COMICS


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013 C7











Come enjoy Night with an Author


Popular Florida writer here Jan. 26for annual festival


Special to the Chronicle

Jeff Klinkenberg, columnist
for the Tampa Bay Times for
more than 30 years,and author
of four books, will meet and min-
gle with guests, sign books, and
entertain with some Florida sto-
ries as he comes to Inverness as
the featured author at the third
annual Festival of Books spon-
sored by the GFWC Woman's


Club of Inverness.
His newest book, a collection
of favorite columns, is "Pilgrim
in the Land of Alligators," pub-
lished by University Press of
Florida.
The Night with an Author will
be at the Old Courthouse Her-
itage Museum, Inverness, from 7
to 9 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 26.
In addition to hearing from
Klinkenberg, the night will fea-


ture light appetizers, wine and
desserts, entertainment by local
duo Mariah Dixon playing violin
and Jim Davis on cello, and op-
portunity drawings.
The Night with an Author is
the third annual event spon-
sored by the Inverness Woman's
Club that has featured Florida
authors. The two previous
events gave more than 40 local
authors a chance to meet and


greet the public and sell their
books. Local authors Piers An-
thony and Nancy Kennedy were
the featured writers in 2011 and
2012, respectively
The Festival of Books is an
outgrowth of the commitment to
education through books that
the Inverness Woman's Club has
had since its founding 95 years
ago, according to Sandra
Koonce, chairman of the festival.
"Our club is known for having
begun the first library in Citrus
County, but we wanted to bring


new visions to that long-ago ac-
complishment," Koonce said.
In addition to the festival, the
club has expanded its efforts
this year to volunteer in the local
schools, established the distri-
bution of gently used books in
public places in the community,
and pledged more scholarship
funding for local students, she
said.
Tickets, at $20 each, may be
ordered and reserved for pickup
the night of the event by calling
352-634-4216.


Bavarian band brothers


Special to the Chronicle
The Diepolder Brothers, Heinz and Sepp, will entertain on zither and accordion at the
German American Social Club of West Central Florida Inc.'s "Celebrate Spring" dance
at 1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, at the Knights of Columbus Hall, 2389 W. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Lecanto. Entrance fee is $10. Call Sonja Burghardt at 352-746-7058, or
Michael Reis at 352-637-2042.


Habitat for Humanity of Citrus County
seeks families to apply for 2013 Habitat
home ownership. Interested applicants must
attend a Habitat orientation.
The next orientation will be from 10 a.m.
to noon Saturday, Jan. 26, at the Realtors
Association of Citrus County building, 714
S. Scarboro Ave., Lecanto.


Potential applicants will receive a full ex-
planation of the program, timeline, income
and service requirements. Children cannot
be accommodated at this meeting.
To date, Habitat for Humanity of Citrus
County has completed 85 homes through-
out the area. Call 352-563-2744 for more in-
formation, or visit www.habitatcc.org.


Coffee, cocoa, healthy living


Special to the Chronicle

Free coffee and cocoa
will greet those attending
the Jan. Beverly Hills
Farmers Market, along
with a 1987 restored BMW
owned by Bernie Rorke.
Although the market
opens at 9 a.m., there will
be a "healthy living tour"
that starts at 10 a.m. with a
talk by Karen Esty of Es-
sential Oils. At 10:15 a.m.,
Randy Hobson will speak
on Herbs & Edible Land-


scaping. At 10:30 a.m.,
Snow's Produce will speak
on Amish County Products.
Gipetto's Bakery will dis-
cuss all-natural baking in-
gredients at 10:45 a.m. At 11
a.m., Sarah Meyer will talk
about Soap Nuts and at
11:15 a.m., Ron Hipner will
explain the healthful bene-
fits of alkaline water
A recent feature at the
market is the ability to use
EBT cards at the primary
produce vendor's tables.
The market will offer:


oven-fresh baked items in-
cluding pies, bread, rolls
and cookies, handmade
jewelry, essential natural
oils and fragrances, special
floral arrangements and
many craft items.
The market is a conven-
ience for area residents,
and the Beverly Hills Civic
Association and the Cen-
tral Ridge Community Cen-
ter asks everyone's support
of these local businesses.
The market is at 77 Civic
Circle.


Annual scholarship dinner/auction


Special to the Chronicle

The Sgt. Dennis J.
Flanagan Foundation will
have the seventh annual
scholarship dinner/
celebrity auction at 6 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 19, at the
Chester V Cole Center in
Lecanto.
Sgt. Flanagan was a
graduate of Lecanto High
School who was killed in
the defense of this country
while serving in the
United States Army. He
was a member of the 101st


Airborne Division serving
his second combat tour
when he was killed by an
improvised explosive de-
vise while on patrol in
Iraq.
The cost of dinner/
auction will be $25 per
person. Throughout the
evening, those in atten-
dance will be able to bid on
sports memorabilia of fa-
vorite teams and players at
a silent auction, with all
proceeds benefiting the
Sgt. Dennis J. Flanagan
Scholarship program.


The proceeds will sup-
port the foundation with
awarding of three annual
(renewable) scholarships.
These scholarships -
$1,500 each- will be avail-
able to Citrus County High
School seniors and re-
cently discharged Citrus
County military members
wanting to further their ed-
ucation.
To date, the foundation
has awarded more than
$80,000 dollars in scholar-
ships and grants to stu-
dents and veterans.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fx(32563-665 TllFre .(88.82-30 E ai: lssf 6dsc* oice0lie.0 Iwes0e


I'm a frustrated active
widower looking for an
attractive, personable
Christian lady with
good chemistry, me-
dium to small build be-
tween 70-80 for good
companionship maybe
something more down
the line. If you are in
good health, good spir-
its & ready for a new
relationship I am ready
to meet with you. Give
me a welcome call at
352-527-9632 I will
glady give you a call
back.


I I I I I I I I
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
I I I I I I I I


ANDY
Would love to see you
again, at Walgreen's
Sunday At 2pm (with
Your "Less" Gray Hair)
JEANNE (Halls R. R.)
Elderly Gentleman,
Looking for lady,
for
vacation time
(352) 382-5661



3 COMPLETE MENS
GOLF CLUBS SETS
W/ BAGS $125 EA
(352) 382-1971
3 Sweet Little Male
Yorkies, CKC reg.,
$375. & up
Fl. health certs.,Call
and come pick one out
(352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258
9.8 Mercury Boat
Motor, excel. cond
$225.
Self propelled
Golf Cart $125.
(352) 601-7380
14 x 60 MH, 2BR, 1'V2
BA, Carport, Shed.
appliances, W/D.
clean, move in cond.
Near new Walmart
on 486, $4,800.
(352) 387-7824


MUS SELL

412 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell
Bush Master, XM15
A3, 223 Assault Riffle
with 30 round mag,
new in box, $1,650.
AR Style, 30 round
mags, lightly used
$40.(352) 533-2228


CHRYSLER
'01, PT Cruiser,
loaded, 53k miles,
$4,800.
(352) 464-4304
CRAFTSMAN LAWN
EDGER WORKS
GREAT, $35
(352) 344-5796
Electric Lift Chair,
great cond. Must See.
Asking $400
Call (352) 726-2695
Leave Message
FIERO
Assorted body parts
$25 each
(352) 586-0084
FORD MUSTANG
2007, 7000 mi, garage
kept, GT clone.
Call (352) 527-1191
Free
Pond Plants
(352) 270-1524
GE Washer & Dryer
Front Load, white,
Like New,
only used 1 yr.
Asking $800 for pair
(352) 422-5462
Hobie Kayak,
$1,600 "Outback" for
Fishing hunting or tak-
ing pictures 12ft 1
inch, 33" wide mirage
drive, capacity 400
Ibs. used 1 time, $500
in extras included
(352) 212-1258
HONDAGOLDWING
ASENDADE, 1997
124K mi, Lots a Extras!
$6000. (352) 212-6450
INVERNESS
Move In Ready,
Beautiful 1/1 SW,
Mobile, Harbor Lights
55+ park, on Big Lake
Henderson. Fully furn.,
very updated, view of
lake, Cen. HVAC, W/D,
A Must See! Asking
$7,000, 352-344-1828


John Deer Rider
Model #111/42"
3 blades Recent
Service, Runs
Good, Looks Good
$500. (352) 527-8618
JOHN DEERE Riding
Mower Model LA115,
series 100, two seasons
old. First $550 takes!
(352) 344-5796
KENMORE ULTRA
WASH DISHWASHER
White, four years old
excellent condition
$150- Inverness
(352) 344-4404
Marketing Director
Nature Coast
Financial Advisors, Inc.
Email info to:
aarvnnaturecoast
financial.com
352-794-6044
MOVING/STORAGE
BOXES- 20 new/4 sizes
26x20x5, 22x15x27,
27x16x27,24x24x24
$3 ea. 352-422-0294
Pistol .22 SEMI-AUTO
PhoenixArms NIB 3
clips,$295 cash
352-860-1039
PRESSURE WASHER
Troy Bilt 3000 psi 2.7
GPM, 8.75 torque
190cc, Briggs and Strat-
ton. Purchased
2-1-2010 (still under
Lowe's 4 year
warranty)with 5 tips and
extra long wand. Paid
$319 plus warranty.
Used twice, asking $175
traveler316@gmail.com,
646-509-6654
PRODUCTION
CNC OPERATOR
ENTRY LEVEL SMALL
SHOP. ZERO DEFECT
ENVIRONMENT.
Crystal River Area
352-422-6086


68 379112 5 4
927435816
514268973
2 7 53 8 41 6 9
3 689 174 2 5
4915 26 7 3 8
8 3 2 1519 6 4 7
146873592
7 5 9 6 4 23 8 1


POWER WASHER
MODEL EXCEL
2400PSI HONDA
ENGINE $100
(352) 344-5796
QUEEN PASTEL
SOFA BED w/ 3
cushions seat $150.
Matching LOVE SEAT
$100. (352) 422-0296
REDUCED 212 $17,500
On Lake Rousseau
Lot Rent $240/mo.
BETTER THAN NEW!
Owner financing. Call
LEE (352) 817-1987
SHOWER CHAIR
Adjustable Legs $30.
Periwinkle OVAL
WOOL RUG 96 X 136.
$100. (352) 422-0296
Sig-SWAT P522
NIB, 25 Round Meg
quad railgreen laser
flash suppressor.
$830.
(352) 422-0266
TWIN BED W/ BOX
SPRING, MATRESS &
HEAD BOARD. $100
(352) 344-2690
YARDMAN BY MTD
RIDING LAWN
MOWER includes tilt
cart; spreader & bagger.
runs strong 42" cut
$500. (352) 527-0832


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk
or Unwanted
Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 &
UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Washers,Dryers,Riding
Mowers, Scrap Met-
als, Antena towers
270-4087



FREE KITTENS
16 wks old, litter
trained
352-212-4061
Free to Good Home
2 Males Basset
Hound/Lab Mix,
1 six yrs. old.
2yrs old
Both good with Kids
(352) 419-6200


Habitat orientation set for Jan. 26


C8 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013


COMMUNITY


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FREE
OAK FIREWOOD
1/2 cord well seasoned.
Bring your pickup.
352-419-4305




FRESH CITRUS
@ BELLAMY
GROVE
Greens, Strawber-
ries, Broccoli, Gift
Shipping, 8:30a-5p
Closed Sun.
352-726-6378




Black Labrador
Retriever, about 1% yrs
old, answers to "Buddy",
lost in vicinity of W.
Dunnellon Rd.
(352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662
Free to good home
2 Chihuahuas, 1 tan,
1 blk. & Tan, 61/2 mos,
well tempered
(352) 419-9527
Lost
2 Rescued Persian
Cats
1 has health issues
Leisure Acres in
Lecanto
(352) 628-1347
LOST CAT BLACK
6mo old, has chip
named Ebby. Crystal
River, Van Norwick
Area(352) 795-0363
LOST DOG
7LB BICHON near
Truman/Barbour St
Beverly Hills. Dog was
wearing a pink harness
w/wrong phone number
(352) 270-5066
LOST DOG 8LB BLIND
DOG, 718S Marlene Pt
Inverness, needs
meds. Call
(352) 637-2645
LOST Grey Long Hair
Maine coon cat 2Olbs
very friendly.
Homosassa area
Oldfield & Meadow.
Reward (727) 422-4433
LOST Male
Wedding Gold Band in
Sweetbay Supermarket
Inverness. Please call
(352) 637-2273
REWARD
Missing 1 young black
Angus steer
1 young black Angus
heifer Hoskins Street
Hernando
REWARD 352-563-0411
352-634-2462




Found four keys on
multicolor lanyard car
key(Mitsubishi) and
looks like three house
keys. Found at the car
wash on Hwy. 44 and
Eden drive, Inverness.
Call 726-6754
FOUND Men's
prescription eyes
glasses in blue case in
Sugarmill Woods.
(352) 628-4360
Found young dog,
in the area of Raindow
Acres, Dunnellon
(239) 405-0045










SPRING HILL
January Clas-
ses
HHHHHHHHH
COSMO DAYS
January 14, 2013
COSMO NIGHTS
January 14, 2013
BARBER NIGHTS
February 25, 2013
MASSAGE DAY
January 14, 2013,
MASSAGE NIGHTS
January 14, 2013,
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only
HHHHHHHHH
BENE'S
International
School of
Beauty
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com


FREE REMOVAL
Wants to Thank
All of You for
making 2012 Possible,
See You In 2013




LOOKING FOR RE-
TIRED
PART TIME VOLUN-
TEER
For General
Office Work,
Blind American
(352) 637-1739




Fulltime
Clerical Posi-
tion

Data Entry, Acct.
Receivable, Pho-
nes, Word & Excel
Exp.
Cust. Service. Must
be detail oriented
and Able to multi
task.

NO PHONE CALLS
PLEASE

Please fax Resume'
to 352-799-2932

Receptionist/
Office Assistant

T, TH, F
9:30a-3:30pm
Strong phone &
computer skills.
Excel required
APPLY IN PERSON
w/resume 10a-2p
131 Hwy. 19N
Inglis





HOUSEKEEPERS

Apply within NO
Calls
BEST WESTERN
614 NW Hwy 19
Crystal River







IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fie d under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII





ARNP or PA

Wanted Part Time
for a busy Pediat-
ric
Practice in Crystal
River, Send Re-
sume
to:
lindapracticemar
itampabav.rr.com

Dental Front
Desk

Are you a team
player with great
attitude and
phone skills?
Dental Knowledge
a Must PT/FT
Send Resume to
office@sierradental
group.com

GI Endoscopy
Technician

Full time, with
Benefits
Fax Resume to:
352-563-2961

HHC AGENCY

Looking for
Psych RN
(352) 794-6097


IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS
RN's & LPN's

Hospital Experi-
ence
ICU, ER, CCU,
Med. Surge, Tele,
Labor
& Delivery, Daily
Pay,
Apply onine at
www.
nurse-temis.com
352-344-9828



SJob Fair
REGISTERED
NURSES!
Join us on
Jan 23, 2013
From 10am 6pm
Refreshments
& Prizes!

Hospital Staffing
Contracts, PRN
And Block Book-
ing

Call to RSVP
Arbor
Medical Staff-
ing
14926 Casey Road
Tampa, FL 336241
I (800) 919-8964
www.arborstaff.com


LPN/MEDICAL
ASST
LPN/Medical
Assistant position
at a busy medical
office. Experience
a must. Please
e-mail resume to
cgi@tampabay.rr.com

MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED

Train to become a
Medical Office Assis-
tant. NO EXPERI-
ENCE NEEDED!
Online training gets
you Job ready ASAP.
HS Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependa-
ble
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule of-
fered LOVING
CARE
(352) 860-0885


OUTPATIENT
SURGERY CEN-
TER

RN
OPERATING ROOM-
EXPERIENCED
ONLY!

CST
Graduate of
approved Surgical
Tech program and
Certified- ONLY !

Excellent working
environment, com-
prehensive benefit
package, competi-
tive pay and no call,
nights, or weekends.
Fax Resume to:
352-527-1827


PHLEBOTOMIST

F/T exp. Phleboto-
mist
Salary negotiable.
Fax Resume to:
352-746-3838 or
Send Resume to
P.O.B 640573
BEVERLY HILLS FL
34464


PT Certified
Dental Assis-
tant

Call 352-746-0330,
ask for Vicki.


RN's, PT & OT'S

Citrus & Her-
nando
(352) 794-6097


AIRLINES ARE
HIRING -

Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid
if qualified Housing
available CALL Avia-
tion
Institute of Mainte-
nance (866)314-3769

Director of
Clinical Ser-
vices

Responsible for
directing the pro-
gram's psychological
and treatment
services to include
technical and
administrative du-
ties, testing, individ-
ual, group, and fam-
ily therapeutic activi-
ties, research, and
participation in
overall institutional
programming and ad-
ministration.
Education: Master's
degree from an
accredited college or
university in the
field of counseling,
social work, psychol-
ogy, rehabilitation,
special education or
in a related human
services field is
preferred. 5 years
related experience in
the field of treat-
ment program devel-
opment, implementa-
tion, & evaluation in
a juvenile institution
preferred. Super-
viory skills neces-
sary. The right per-
son must
possess a license:
(MFT, LCSW,
LMHC) from the
state of
Florida, provide

Applv In Person at:
2855 W. Woodland
Ridge Dr. Lecanto,
Florida, 34461
or Email to
sharon.facto@us.a4s.
comr or apply
online at www.
usaiobs.a4s.com
Drug Free Workplace
/IEEO


Licensed
Insurance
Agents

Needed
Life/Health/Annuity
Nature Coast
Financial Advisors,
Inc. Email information
aarviDinaturecoast
financial.com
352-794-6044

Marketing Director

Nature Coast
Financial Advisors, Inc.
Email info to:
aarva(naturecoast
financial.com
352-794-6044

Nursing Ca-
reers

BEGIN HERE -GET
TRAINED IN
MONTHS, NOT
YEARS. FINANCIAL
AID IF QUALIFIED.
HOUSING AVAILA-
BLE. JOB PLACE-
MENT
ASSISTANCE.
CALL CENTURY IN-
STITUTE (877)
206-6559


Sales/Marketing/
Advertising
Manufactured
Homes Serious in-
quires only! (352)
795-1272





HIRING
SERVERS

Must be 18 or
older. Apply
Fisherman's
Restaurant
12311 E Gulf to
Lake
(352) 637-5888


CLASSIFIED





AC SALES

Will train right person,
easy six figure income
Must have val. fl. DL,
Paul (352) 216-3290


Real Estate
Agents

Busy real estate of-
fice needs Realtors
and Buyers Agents
Call
PLANTATION REALTY
352-634-0129

SALES PERSON
WANTED

For sales of manu-
factured & modular
homes. Must be
very motivated &
have a proven sales
background. Knowl-
edge of housing &
real estate helpful.
Prior experience
helpful. E-mail re-
sume to group-
erman@
aol.com or fax to
352-621-9171






AUTO
COLLISION
TECH

352-726-2139 or
637-2258 Aft. 5 pm


CABLE INSTALL-
ERS
$$$
SIGN-ON BONUS

We are seeking ca-
ble installation con-
tractors for our cit-
rus County
location. Contractors
should possess a
technical aptitude,
strong work ethic,
communication skills
& a professional
appearance. Jones
NCTIS certification
or equivalent experi-
ence is a plus. Must
be able to lift 70 Ibs
& have a truck or
van that can carry a
28-foot
fiberglass extension
ladder. Must have a
Fl Driver's license,
good driving record,
submit to & pass a
criminal background
& drug test & must
be
available to work
weekends. We are
offering sign-on
bonuses! We are
busy & growing &
need you to make
this growth success-
ful. Please e-mail
your resume to:
fljobs@kablelink.com
or apply at
Kablelink.com
(Job#26)

ELECTRICIAN

Recently retired, to
supervise electrical
upgrade two BDR
home Citrus Springs
Area.
Advise your experi-
ence, Frank Boitz
Box 248, Indian
Rocks Beach FL.
33785-0248


EXP. FORM
SETTER/FINISHER

Piece Work or State
Hourly. Own Tools
No Attitude/Stories
352-726-5039


Exp. Power
Equip. & Small
Engine
Mechanic

Must have at least 2
yrs. exp. in a small
engine shop, and
have own tools
Apply in Person
M-Fri 6659 W
NORVELL
BRYANT HWY, CR
H NO CALLS


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013 C9


EXP. ROOFERS
NEEDED

Must have License
Tools & Transportion.
Call 352-697-3113

LIMOUSINE
DRIVER
Super stretch & Sedan.
Experienced need only
to reply.
Send resume to:
fllanier@yahoo.com
PRODUCTION
CNC OPERATOR

ENTRY LEVEL SMALL
SHOP. ZERO DEFECT
ENVIRONMENT.
Crystal River Area
352-422-6086
WORKERS
*Accepting applica-
tions*
For workers who are
versatile in operating
site prep equipment,
paving equipment,and
general labor. CDLs a
plus.
Call (352)628-9571 for
an appointment.





AW6SOME


Now hiring 18-25
guys and gals. Travel
entire USAw/ unique
business group.
$500 sign-on bonus.
Call 877-853-7654
or 866-298-0163
www.sunshine
subscriotion.com

CAREGIVERS
NEEDED

All Shifts Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

Experienced
TELEMARKETERS

NEEDED. Good
Commission Pay. write
your own check
Apply in Person
6421 W. Homosassa Tr

NEWSPA-
PER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
Sthe Citrus County
Chronicle and other
newspapers for
home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per
day.

Must have insured
and reliable vehicle
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up
with a cap-Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product

Apply in Person
1624 N
Medowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am-5pm

Newspaper carriers
are independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle



L------ J




ATTEND COLLEGE
ONLINE from
Home. *Medical
*Business
*Criminal Justice
*Hospitality
Job placement
assistance.Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified.
SCHEV
authorized. Call
800-203-3179
www.Centura
Online.com


1-16 ,aughSngStock InternatonalIn,, 3y Jn rsal UC k for UFS, 2013

"We ask for a $5 deposit
on the sausages."


rAdd iuons -[Graes- Kl!I~E I : t-J enenS S- InS


Thank You for 15 Years,


M m t tEAur FUL RE SL- T s'




Eo e o d.


SPRING HILL
CLASSES

COSMO DAYS
February 25, 2013

BARBER NIGHTS
February 25, 2013

SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com




BAVARIAN CHINA
SERVICE FOR 12+
DINNERWARE
w/gold trim. $300
OBO
(352) 746-3327
BOOKENDS, ZEBRA
Antique, Lipper&Mann,
pair, black and gold $65.
352-746-0401
KISSING FACES
SCULPTURE By John
Cultrone $70. can text
pic. call or text
352-746-0401
SEVERAL BARBIE
DOLLS IN ORG.
BOXES $400 OR obo.
(352) 746-3327



VINTAGE AMERICAN
BOSCH CONSOLE
RADIO good condition
$75.00 Richard -
352-341-3887




DRYER $100 Works
great. 90 day full
warranty. Call/text
352-364-6504
Dryer & New Washer
Whirlpool
Lg capacity, Heavy
duty, White,
$300.
(352) 270-8968


works great but ugly. No
rust. 30 day warranty.
Call/text 352-364-6504
EMPIRE SR-30
NATURAL GAS
UNVENTED ROOM
HEATER 30k BTU Used
for 3 years. Excellent
condition works very
well. $70 352-726-5742
GE Washer & Dryer
Front Load, white,
Like New,
only used 1 yr.
Asking $800 for pair
(352) 422-5462
Kenmore Freezer
upright, 15 cu ft.
$100. obo
(607) 968-4269
KENMORE
REFRIGERATOR 24cf
stainless side by side
w/water & ice dis-
penser indoor. Excel-
lent condition. $500.
352-726-9964
KENMORE ULTRA
WASH DISHWASHER
White, four years old
excellent condition
$150 Inverness
(352) 344-4404
Refrigerator/Freezer
Whirlpool, 2 doors,
water & ice, 68 x 35"
Pick up only
$160.
(352) 726-2986
SEARS KENMORE
WASHER, GE
DRYER Both good
condition. Large loads.
Dryer used only 6
months. $350.
352-419-7017
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive wash-
ers & dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
WASHERS & DRYERS
(352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Relia-
ble, Clean, Like New,
Excellent Condition.
Free Delivery 352
263-7398
WASHER$100 Works
great. 90 day full
warranty. Call/text
352-364-6504
Westinghouse
Air Handler,
3 ton unit, 6 yrs. old
$250. obo
(352) 465-6973


DUDLEY'S
AUCTO'W






*THREE AUCTIONS*
1-15
STORAGE AUCTION
10am ON SITE @1925
W Main St, Inverness
14 units lock cut 5
min before each unit
is sold. CASH Be like
the tv shows with the
gamble of what
maybe.
1-17
ESTATE AUCTION
3pm outside House
hold, Entire wood &
Mechanics work
shop, Wood Lathes,
power washers rows
of boxed merch-
andise.
5pm FIVE ESTATE
VEHICLES
2004 Honda S2000
garage kept toy
w/on 750miles Col-
lector sports car,
2006 VW GTI hatch-
back 60+K,
2002 VW Eurovan
Camper 18k,(these 3
cars from 1 estate)
2007 Buick Lucerne
CXL loaded 64K,
2012 Kia Forte ONLY
1,850 miles. All Es-
tate Vehicles GREAT
OPPORTUNITY to buy.
6pm Inside Quality
furniture, Knives,
Jewelry, Large
Power tools
1-19
AUTOGRAPH
AUCTION
11 am Celebrity &
Sports, Live & On
Line everything from
golf to Rock& Roll.
Bats, balls, Albums,
photos, books,
cards & more from
Hendrix to Tiger.
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384


brvhta. D. .. ..n


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive wash-
ers & dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179



HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping
Dr. appts, errands,
etc. Hablo Espanol
813-601-8199
NEED A GIRL FRI-
DAY?
Elder care, House
cleaning, Earrands
HReasonable RatesH
(352) 794-6543




JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump
Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374



AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551,
584-3730
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic
#2579
Driveways-Pabos-Side
walks. Pool deck
repair/Stain
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120


FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures,
Stamp,Spray Crack
repair, Staining,
driveways, pool
decks, Lic/Ins
352-527-1097

ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Drive-
ways tear outs Trac-
tor work, Lic. #1476,
726-6554




All AROUND TRAC-
TOR
Land clearing, Haul-
ing Site Prep, Drive-
ways Lic/Ins
352-795-5755




HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping
Dr. appts, errands,
etc. Hablo Espanol
813-601-8199




COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
k 352-302-6838 k




#1 TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777

DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907


**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscap-
ing
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENC-
ING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 6284002

ROCKY'S FENC-
ING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
H 352 422-7279 H




DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK
$80 Delivered &
Stacked.
352-344-2696




Install, Restretch,
Repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent,
Lic#4857 Mitch, (352)
201-2245




1 CALL & RELAX!
25vrs Exp in 100%
property maint & all
repairs, call
H&H Services today!
lic#37658
352-476-2285

#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
Affordable Handy-
man
4 FAST- 100% Guar.
4 AFFORDABLE
4 RELIABLE-
Free Est
H 352-257-9508 H


ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handy-
man
4 FAST. 100% Guar.
4 AFFORDABLE
4 RELIABLE.
Free Est
H 352-257-9508 H
Affordable Handy-
man
4 FAST- 100% Guar.
4 AFFORDABLE
4 RELIABLE-
Free Est
H 352-257-9508 H
Affordable Handy-
man
4 FAST- 100% Guar.
4 AFFORDABLE
4 RELIABLE-
Free Est
H 352-257-9508 H
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570




Cleaning Svc-Home,
office,windows,
pressure washing &
more. 352-322-1799





The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lie/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-158




All AROUND TRAC-
TOR
Landclearing, Haul-
ing Site Prep, Drive-
ways Lic/Ins
352-795-5755


Service specializing in
clean up Tree Re-
moval, General
prop. maint. 302-6955



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120



GOT LEAVES
Let our DR VAC
Do the work!
Call 352-502-6588
LAWNCARE N
MORE
Yard Clean-up,
leaves
bushes, hauling
352-726-9570
Winter Clean Up,
Leaves, Power Wash-
ing & More Call
Coastal Lawn Care
(352) 601-1447



AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up
time. 352-220-4244



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, lawn maint.
furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS CLEAN
UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump
Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374


HAULING
FREE ESTIMATES
scrap metals haul
for FREE (352)
344-9273



Chris Satchell Paint-
ing ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref.
Ins. 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR
BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins.
FREE EST (352)
586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Robert G. Vigliotti LLC
Painting
Int/Ext FREE
ESTIMATES 35 yrs
exp.
call 508-314-3279




CALL STELLAR
BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins.
FREE EST (352)
586-2996
Cleaning Svc-Home,
office,windows,
pressure washing &
more. 352-322-1799
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE CLEAN-
ING
& PAINTING
352-341-3300
Robert G. Vigliotti LLC
Painting
Int/Ext FREE
ESTIMATES 35 yrs
exp.
call 508-314-3279


Winter Clean Up,
Leaves, Power Wash-
ing & More Call
Coastal Lawn Care
(352) 601-1447




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic.
#2713




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


Attention onsum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.





Your World


















hr, . I I 1 r'lhn . r.m


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
k 352-302-6838 k





A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452

All Tractor Work
Service specializing in
clean up Tree Re-
moval, General
prop. maint. 302-6955

DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding,
bulk mulch, lic/ins
302-8852

KING's LAND
CLEARING & TREE
SERVICE
Complete tree &
stump removal haul-
ing, demo & tractor
work. 32 yrs. exp.
(352) 220-9819

R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827

RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825





344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERV-
ICE
& Repairs- all makes
& models. Call any-
time!


iesi


I ActinsB









C10 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013


Fri. 01/18 Preview@
4pm, Auction@ 6pm
General Merchandise
Sat, 01/19 Preview @
4pm, Auction@ 6pm
General Merchandise
Sun. 01/20 Preview @
12:30, Auction@ 1pm
Tailgate/Box lot Auc-
tion
**WE BUY ESTATES**
6055 N. Carl G. Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
AB3232 (352)
613-1389




DUDLEY'S






*THREE AUCTIONS*
1-15
STORAGE AUCTION
10am ON SITE @1925
W Main St, Inverness
14 units lock cut 5
min before each unit
is sold. CASH Be like
the tv shows with the
gamble of what
maybe.
1-17
ESTATE AUCTION
3pm outside House
hold, Entire wood &
Mechanics work
shop, Wood Lathes,
power washers rows
of boxed merch-
andise.
5pm FIVE ESTATE
VEHICLES
2004 Honda S2000
garage kept toy
w/on 750miles Col-
lector sports car,
2006 VW GTI hatch-
back 60+K,
2002 VW Eurovan
Camper 18k,(these 3
cars from 1 estate)
2007 Buick Lucerne
CXL loaded 64K,
2012 Kia Forte ONLY
1,850 miles. All Es-
tate Vehicles GREAT
OPPORTUNITY to buy.
6pm Inside Quality
furniture, Knives,
Jewelry, Large
Power tools
1-19
AUTOGRAPH
AUCTION
11am Celebrity &
Sports, Live & On
Line everything from
golf to Rock& Roll.
Bats, balls, Albums,
photos, books,
cards & more from
Hendrix to Tiger.
www.dudleys

637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384




47" Hitachi
HD Projection TV,
with glass stand
$200
352-628-5340
55" HITACHI
PROJECTION TV
Superbowl Ready!
Works GREAT!
352-563-1519 or
727-504-4488 $200
FIRM
70' TV HITACHI
model 70Vx915 $400.
(352) 503-3087
SHARP 32" TV WITH
REMOTE $25
352-613-0529




3-0 X 6-8 EXTERIOR
DOOR JAMB "ONLY"
new $25.call text
352-746-0401




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP COLOR LASERJET
ALL-IN-ONE
Printer-Scanner-Fax,
$99 Please call
352-726-0040
WEB TV SYSTEM
2 keyboards, epson
C88 Printer $50
(352) 382-2545




MF 1125 Tractor
with Loader
2008 Dump Trailer
6 x 10 (352) 586-1736




WELL PUMP
MIRES 1 HP pump
with 80 ft of 2 inch
pipe. $95
(727) 421-5371




Ashley tan microfiber
recliner very good
condition, arm push
style, does not rock $85
352-419-4513
BLACK AND GLASS TV
stand 55'w x22"d x20"h
like new call or text
$70.352-746-0401
CURIO CABINET,
Vintage, wood and
curved glass, 3 glass
shelves, lighted, $100,
(352)465-1813
DINETTE SET
4 ft Glass top w/4
chairs on casters,
$200
(352) 897-4739




I


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII


DINETTE SET
Johnson Casual, 30
in, glass-stainless
dinette w/ 2 chr $250.
Naguchi glass top
coffee table $150
(352) 503-9494
DINING TABLE
High quality table
w/4 chairs, leaf, and
hutch. Asking $400
but worth much
more.
(352) 860-0183
Glass top Wicker
dinning table
seats 6 w/6 chairs
& bar chairs. All
wicker, all padded
$500 OBO
(352) 425-0667
Leather Living room
set& King size Wood
bedroom set custom
made &
priceless (352)
586-3231
LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET, NEW,
never used-$975.
CHERRY, BEDROOM
SET solid wood, new in
factory boxes- $895
Original price $6500,
Can Deliver. Bill
(813)298-0221.
MATTRESS SETS
Beautiful Factory
Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full
$129.95 Qn. $159.95,
Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
OAK ENTERTAIN-
MENT CENTER. VERY
GOOD COND. 2
DRAWERS & 4
DOORS. $150
(765) 336-9590
ORIENTAL DINING
ROOM CHEST
48" black lacquer w/
gold flowers $200.
6 Panel Oriental
Black & Gold Screen
$325.
(352) 503-9494
Pair of 4 drawer chest 4'
tall x 20" wide, dark oak
pressed wood mint cond
good space saver
$35 ea 3524194513
POTTERY BARN
ENTERTAINMENT
CABINET Great Cond.
$60 352-201-2665
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg
$75. 352-628-0808
QUEEN PASTEL
SOFA BED w/ 3
cushions seat $150.
Matching LOVE SEAT
$100. (352) 422-0296
QUEEN SZWATER-
BED Soft sides, pillow
top, boxspring, frame
&
headboard. $300 OBO
(352) 637-5525
SECTIONAL COUCH
12'x 10'7 piece
couch. Black w/ tur-
quoise, navy blue.
Very good Cond. $350
(352) 503-9494
SHOWER CHAIR
Adjustable Legs $30.
Periwinkle OVAL
WOOL RUG 96 X 136.
$100. (352) 422-0296
Sleep by Number Air
Bed, King Size,
complete, exec. cond.,
like new $,2,500 new
asking $1,250.
(352) 726-1040

SOLD
3 Pc. Bedroom Set
Dresser with Mirrors,
Chest of drawers, 1 end
table, dark pecan
Burlington House $100.
TEEN BUNK BED
$175- Double Bed on
top, large desk below.
Silver/metal frame.
Bought from Kids'
Room to Go. Email for
pix. Excellent
shape/like new. email:
kmtopspin@hotmail.com
or (352) 212-2901
TWIN BED W/ BOX
SPRING, MATRESS &
HEAD BOARD. $100
(352) 344-2690
Two Bar Stools
Country style, solid oak,
2ft high w/windsor back
& swivel seat. $100
(352) 341-1941




9 HP Lawn Vac
and Trailer
Pull Behind $800.
(352) 586-1736
ANTIQUE JOHN
DEERE 110 LAWN
TRACTOR 1962 or
1964.8 HP Kohler
cast iron eng, 2 speed
tranny. Runs good,
needs starting switch.
Can demo, $400.
352-422-6811
CRAFTSMAN LAWN
EDGER WORKS
GREAT, $35
(352) 344-5796
John Deer Rider
Model #111/42"
3 blades Recent
Service, Runs
Good, Looks Good
$500. (352) 527-8618
JOHN DEERE Riding
Mower Model LA115,
series 100, two seasons
old. First $550 takes!
(352) 344-5796
PRESSURE WASHER
Troy Bilt 3000 psi 2.7
GPM, 8.75 torque
190cc, Bnrggs and Strat-
ton. Purchased
2-1-2010 (still under
Lowe's 4 year
warranty)with 5 tips and
extra long wand. Paid
$319 plus warranty.
Used twice, asking $175
traveler316@gmall.com,
646-509-6654
RYOBI 200MPH
BLOWER Model
RYO9550 26cc, 8-20-09.
Great condition, Must
SEE. Paid $129, asking
$50. Mike
646-509-6654
RYOBI Hedge TRIM-
MER Model RY 39500A
26cc 6-26-09 Good con-
dition. Paid $179, asking


$75. Mike 646-509-6654
Weed Wacker
32CC, craftsman, gas
Weed Waker
Bandit, gas,
Craftsman Blower
32CC gas,
Homelite Blower
model 170 gas,
Echo Chainsaw #500
VL, 18" Gas $150 for
All
Riding Lawn Mower
John Deer 1991, #212
36" cut, ran in 2010,
cast iron rear end
$225. (352) 628-1126
YARDMAN BY MTD
RIDING LAWN
MOWER includes tilt
cart; spreader & bagger.
runs strong 42" cut
$500. (352) 527-0832


CRYSTAL RIVER
Thurs. 17 thru Sun.
20th
Estate Sale
9am-Until,
Everything Must ao!
Riding mower, genera-
tor, furniture TV's,
etc.
4410 N. Wellview
Point
DUNNELLON
Multi- Family
Thurs. Fri. & Sat 9-until
costume jewelry, col-
lectibles, THIS & THAT
20249 SW 54th Street
HERNANDO
Wed & Thurs 8a -2p
*Multi Family *
4415 E Harvard Dr




BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING SIZES 5 &
6 SHIRTS, PANTS &
JACKETS $30
352-613-0529
WEDDING GOWN Oleg
Cassini. White. Size 8.
$100 (352) 201-2665




4 WHEEL WALKER-
hand brakes & wheel
locks, seat, basket,
folds for storage, Ex.,
$50 352-628-0033
9.8 Mercury Boat
Motor, excel. cond
$225.
Self propelled
Golf Cart $125.
(352) 601-7380
55 Gallon Fish Tank
with Cabinet Stand,
with all accessories
$375.
(352) 613-7429
2004 FORD V10
STOCK INTAKE $35.
call or text
352-746-0401
Casio Electronic Cash
Register PCR-T465 $20
Kenmore Upright
Freezer #253
34 Tall x 27 wide $60
352-503-6971
ENTRY FIRE
PROOF SAFE. 17 X
20 X 18. 135LBS,
NEW $425 ASKING
$225.
(352) 212-4079
COCA-COLA
REFRIGERATOR glass
sided 13x36inches by
San den. $100.
352-341-0934
COMPUTER'S MOUSE
hp co., universal, grey
colored, newly packed,
$10 (352)465-1616


CORTLAND GRAPH-
ITE FLY ROD- Precision
II Model #9089, 9ft., 2
pc., 8/9 wt., in bag, Ex+,
$50. 352-628-0033
Dell V305 Printer
$40.
Lexmark X, 4270
Copier/Fax $40.
352-503-6971
DIGITAL PICTURE
BOOK Brookstone
holds 500 pics like new,
complete in box $40.call
text 352-746-0401
DINING TABLE
W/4 PADDED CHAIRS
$50. obo
(217) 821-6524
DOG CAGE
3L X 22W X 25H $25
COOLER $5
2 Wheel cart $5
(352) 860-0183
Epson LQ570E, Printer,
$20
HP Office Jet
Series 600 $25.
352-503-6971
General Field Fence
Total 471n H x 200 ft
L.
24 Posts 3in X 6% ft.
Utility gate 50in h x
12ft L. All for $320
(352) 228-7143
GERBIL CAGE GOOD
CONDITION $20
352-613-0529
Hi-tec Magnum Swat
Boots Like new
size 11.5 $40
352-860-2475
Janome Memory Craft
6500 sewing machine &
Gracey Quilting Table.
$1200. (352) 465-2692
LARGE BEAUTIFUL
BIRD CAGE $100.
Great cond.
352-302-5468
L'EFFLEUR .75 EAU
DE PARFUM SPRAY &
SATCHET $25 Vintage
Coty unopened
352-419-5981
LEXMARK SCANNER,
PRINTER, FAX, COPY
MACHINE New, White
colored, needs ink, $15
(352)465-1616
LG TOUCH VERIZON
X 11000 cell phone
good condition $25.call
or text 352-746-0401
MOTORCYCLE PIPES
stock 05 honda shadow
areo pipes mint $60
352-621-0142
MOTORCYCLE SEAT
cruiser saddlemen his
and hers mint 100 firm.
352-621-0142
MOVING/STORAGE
BOXES- 20 new/4 sizes
26x20x5, 22x15x27,
27x16x27,24x24x24
$3 ea. 352-422-0294


CLASSIFIED



NEW BLACK LEATHER
PURSE BY ROLF $25
NEVER USED E-MAIL
PHOTO INVERNESS
352-419-5981
Over 60 Jig Saw Puz-
zles $50. for all
(352) 746-3799
PET CARRIER ME-
DIUM SIZE FIBER-
GLASS ONLY $15.
352-464-0316
PIN FISH TRAPS FOR
BAIT FISH- 9" X 14" X
24", bait box inside, 2
available, $15 each.
352-628-0033
POWER WASHER
MODEL EXCEL
2400PSI HONDA
ENGINE $100
(352) 344-5796
RCA Video Camera
with accessories
$125.
Men's Golf clubs $60
Garmin GPS $60.
(352) 527-7223
REAR WINDOW GMC
P/U 1500 dark tinted,
good cond. $50.
352-628-4210
RYOBI 10" COM-
POUND MITER SAW-
#TS1342, 15 Amps,
5500 RPMs, dust bag,
EX+, $60. 628-0033
SALMON NATURAL
SKIN FISH MOUNT- 31
inches, Ex. condition,
$35. 352-628-0033
SAMSUNG BRIGHT-
SIDE touch Verizon cell
phone good condition
$35. 352-746-0401
SCHWIN RANGER
2.6FS MOUNTAIN
BIKE- 21 spd, 26"x
1.95" tires/alloy wheels,
$65. 628-0033
SKYLIGHT 27+ 27
BUBBLE TYPE UV
FIBERGLASS ONLY
$50. 352-464-0316
SMALL BLOCK CHEVY
STARTER new stag-
gered bolt pattern $25.
call or text
352-746-0401

SOLD
2 LAZY BOY/ CLUB
RECLINERS, BUR-
GUNDY $400.
B & S PRESSURE
WASHER 2000 PSI,
$120.
SOLD
Two 12 FT. W over-
head garage doors,
with
all hardware, great shape
$100. ea. or $200. both
STUDENT VIOLIN IN
CASE- includes shoul-
der rest, EX+, $50.
352-628-0033
UNIVERSAL REMOTE
CONTROL newly
packed, never used,
$10 (352)465-1616


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WESTERN BOOTS
Acme brown marble
size 8.5EW great shape
$40. call or text
352-746-0401

Medical
Equipment


2 POWER LIFT
CHAIRS RECLINERS
BY PRIDE MED SZ
$285.
LG SZ $350.
BOTH EXC. COND.
(352) 270-8475
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH SEAT AND
BRAKES GREAT
SHAPE ONLY $85.
352-464-0 316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER BRAND NEW
WITH HANDLES FOR
SUPPORT ONLY $25.
352-464-0316
BATHTUB SAFETY
RAIL
Medline Deluxe in box
$35.352-628-4210
BEDSIDE COMMODE
&ALUMINUM
WALKER ADJUSTA-
BLE LEGS ON EACH
20.00 EACH
352-464-0316
Electric Lift Chair,
great cond. Must See.
Asking $400
Call (352) 726-2695
Leave Message
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT-
RESTS GOOD SHAPE
ONLY $100.
352-464-0316
SHOWER CHAIR
WITH BACKREST FI-
BERGLASS
W/ADJUSTABLE
LEGS ONLY $35.
352-464-0316
WALKER
4 wheels/hand brake
seat&basket good
cond.
$55.352-628-4210




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jew-
elry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676




"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR
W/CASE,STRAP,XTRA
STRINGS,PICKS
ETC.$75 352-601-6625
"NEW" ELECTRIC
GUITAR "FAT STRAT"
STYLE BLEMISHED
SOUNDS GREAT! $45
352-601-6625


BALDWIN PIANO
Hamilton Studio upright
Bench Seat, Oak wood
mint cond. $500.
352-746-1654

BUYING
Guitars, Banjos &
Mandolins,Fender,
Gibson & Martin
any condition
(443) 463-3421




2 VINTAGE WHITE
GLASS MIXING
BOWLS $10. 8.5 IN
AND 6.5 IN WITH
SPOUT 352-419-5981
3 MINI 12 COUNT
MUFFIN TINS $5
ELECTRIC VEGIE
steamer $7 Inverness
352-419-5981


a000


O CITRUS COUNTY

For more information on how to reach i NI T
1^ I Citrus County readers call
352-563-5592. www.chronicleonline.com
000H2 Scarborough 2010


4 DECORATIVE
KITCHEN
CANNISTERS WITH
LIDS $10 CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 352-419-5981
OAK ROUND TOILET
SEAT LIKE NEW Never
used, moved inlaid $40
352-419-5549
QUICHE DISH WHITE
IRIDESCENT $10
GREEN 10 IN
MIXING/FRUIT BOWL
$10 352-419-5981
TWIN BEDDING
Mem fm tppr-rmv
cvr/Mttr cvr/dk aq
shts
Grt cnd-drm-1 smstr
$70 352-527-8287
VACUUM CLEANER
Rainbow
complete good cond.
$100.00
352-628-4210




AB LOUNGER WORK
ON THOSE ABS
ONLY $40.
352-464-0316
EXERCISE BIKE FAN
TYPE WORKS THE
ARMS TOO GREAT
SHAPE ONLY $85.
352-464-0316
GAZELLE LIKE
EXERCISER OK
SHAPE ONLY $40.
352-464-0316
PURSUIT EXERCISE
BIKE ALL
ELECTRONICS SU-
PER
CONDITION $100.
352-464-0316
RECUMBANT
Stationary bike $100
OBO
Tricycle $100 OBO
(352) 621-4611
ROWING MACHINE
BY BODY ROW GET
IN SHAPE $85.
352-464-0316
TREADMILL
$80 obo
AB COASTER
$40. obo
(352) 613-2333
TREADMILL
Pro Form Crosswalk
/Incline 380, like new,
$275 OBO
(352) 382-7399
WAVE MASTER Free
Standing Punching Bag.
Great Condition. $40
352-201-2665




3 COMPLETE MENS
GOLF CLUBS SETS
W/ BAGS $125 EA
(352) 382-1971
357 Mag JHP Ammo
1 box New $50
Inverness
864-283-5797
BROWNING 308
MODEL 81 BLR (lever
action), Genuine wal-
nut stock,
exc cond. $700 OBO
(352) 382-3803
Bush Master, XM15
A3, 223 Assault Riffle
with 30 round mag,
new in box, $1,650.
AR Style, 30 round
mags, lightly used
$40.(352) 533-2228
CAMO HOLSTER,
SMALL Uncle Mikes
size 10 for belt $10.call
or text 352-746-0401
CLUB CAR
Golf Cart
Excellent Condition
$1,500.
352-527-3125


Leok
Concealed Weapons
Class at the Inver-
ness VFW, $55.00
10:00 Sat. Jan. 19,
Don't Wait
Til It's Too Late!
Walk-ln's Welcome.
Call: 352-220-4386
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
FULL SIZE PING
PONG TABLE good
condition includes new
net,paddles, and balls
$50 call/text 464-4280
Pistol .22 SEMI-AUTO
Phoenix Arms NIB 3
clips,$295 cash
352-860-1039
SIG SAUER
REVALUATION -C3,
45ACP Night sights, 2
mags. w/case. Like
New. $800.(352)
441-0645
Sig-SWAT P522
NIB, 25 Round Meg
quad rail, green laser
flash suppressor,
$830.
(352) 422-0266
Smith Corona,
1903-A3, .30-06,
$535.
Trap Door, Spring-
field, Rifle .45-70
$495.
(352) 270-6142


WINCHESTER mod.
70 Black Shadow
243WSM. New in box,
Includes
factory scope. $695.
Will take 30-30 lever
on trade. (906)
285-1696




2013 Enclosed Trail-
ers
6x12 with ramp,
$1895
** call 352-527-0555

NEW
HAULMARK 6X12
ENCLOSED TRAIL-
ERS
ONLY $1999.
(352) 621-3678




GIRLS BABY 6-12
mos. shorts, shirts,
summer outfits, 12-18
mos.dresses 31
pieces, $20.
352-400-5650


Sell r Svi


-





Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fled ad under
Happy Notes.
OnIy $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




WANT TO BUY
HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area
Condition or Situa-
tion. Call Fred,
352-726-9369


BELLA
Bella is a beautiful
silvery brindle Cattle
Dog/Shepherd mix,
came to the shelter
because her family
lost their home. She is
4 years old, spayed,
housebroken, micro-
chipped, and
Heartworm-negative,
weighs 45 pounds.
Walks well on a leash,
gets along with other
dogs and is very, very
playful. Fenced yard is
preferred, but can
jump a low fence.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


BLUE
Blue is an approxi-
mately 8-yo. neu-
tered male Cattle
Dog mix, Came to
the shelter because
his family lost their
home. Blue is white
and tan, weighs
about 50 pounds, is
a bit chubby for his
size, which is me-
dium. He is house-
broken, very
friendly and affec-
tionate. The most
striking thing about
him is that he has
very beautiful blue
eyes, which catch
your attention imme-
diately. He loves
people and wants to
be by your side Is
very obedient and
walks well on a
leash. He is quite
laid-back and would
make a great com-
panion for an older
person.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


WORDY GURD Y TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Ladle the bisque or minestrone (1) Evey answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Alan Alda sitcom garbage (1) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Media mogul Seacrest's jungle beasts (2) syllables in each word.

@2013 UFS. Dist.byUniv UclickforUFS

4. What particular muscle spasm? (1)


5. Port-au-Prince land's sub-90 numbers (2)


6. More candid Chase loan officer (2)


7. Poe's raven's spoken word repeated eternally (3)


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HOIIAU HIH M' SNOI SNVAH HSVHI HSV 'g dflOS dOOJS *1
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


3 Sweet Little Male
Yorkies, CKC reg.,
$375. & up
Fl. health certs.,Call
and come pick one out
(352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258
13 Chickens $5. ea.
2 Roosters $7 ea.
2 Ducks $10. ea.
(352) 503-6796
(352) 364-1819
Dachshunds Pup-
pies
Mini, Long hair, fe-
males,
black & cream.
Champion blood lines.
$250
(352) 220-4792
MINIATURE POO-
DLES miniature poodle
pups born 10/16/12
Health Cert 1 apricot &
1 black female & 1
black male almost
potty trained, raised in
our home. $500 cash
call 352-419-5662 or
karaluv3@yahoo.com







RED MINIATURE
POODLE PUPS
7 WEEKS;2 MALES
AND 1 FEMALE; $850.
REGISTRATION AND
HEALTH CERTIFI-
CATES; AVAILABLE
12-22-12. CALL
352-419-8233 OR
jeaceannross@msn.com

Shih-Tzu Pups,
ACA
starting@ $350. Lots
of colors, Beverly
Hills, FL
(352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net









SKIPPY
Skippy is a Redbone
Coonhound, 8 y.o.,
who came to the
shelter because his
owner "couldn't af-
ford him." Originally
very thin and mal-
nourished, he's now
happy and healthy,
having been in a
foster home for
months. He is sweet,
trusting and loving,
with beautiful bright
eyes. He is the classi-
cal "Good Dog".
Completely house-
broken. Loves walk-
ing, being petted,
and car rides.
Would be best in a
1-dog family. For a
grateful, loving ca-
nine companion,
Call Judy @
352-503-3363.



Livestock


1111111II
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII





CRYSTAL RIVER
6851 W Vanaman Ct
$450/$400 dp 2/2
DUNNELLON
5159W Disney Lane
$425/ $400 dp 2/2
(727) 480-5512

HOMOSASSA
$350-$550 2 bed-
room. 1 bath. also 1
bed 1 bath lovely
setting, quiet park
with pool, commu-
nity center,l/2 mile
from boat
dock,several availa-
ble call (352)628-4441

HOMOSASSA
2/1, Screen Porch
$375mo 1st, Last &
Sec (352) 382-5661

HOMOSASSA
2/2, 2 Ig porches &
1 carport. $675
(908) 884-3790
HOMOSASSA
3/2, CHA, $650mo,dep
$650 352-503-6747
(352) 628-1928

LECANTO
3/2 on 5 acres, 1st,
last & sec. $500. off
Cardinal
(352) 628-4482




14 x 60, 2BR, 1I/2 BA,
Carport, Shed, appli-
ances, W/D, clean,
move in condition
Near new Walmart on
486, $4,800.
(352) 387-7824

BANK
FORECLOSURE
Land-n-Home, 3/2
1500 sq. ft. On /2
Acre, paved rd.
LOOKS GOOD,
Have financing if
needed, only
$2,500 down,
$381.44mo. P&I
W.A.C. OR $69,900.
Call 352-613-0587
or 352-621-9183

Crystal River 55+
Park. 2BR/1BA Car-
port & Screened
Porch. Heat/Air
$9,500. 352-746-4648
Ask for Brit

HOME-ON-LAND
3/2 Great Shape.
Acre. Move In
Now
$59,900.
Call 352-401-2979,
352-621-3807


HERNANDO
3BR 2BA MH
Ready to move in !
FHA& Owner Financ-
ing avail, call
352-795-1272
Palm Harbor Homes
New 2013...30x76
4bd/3ba.
$0 Down. $399/Month
800-622-2832 ext 210
REPO'S- REPO'S
REPO'S
WE HAVE REPO'S
CALL 352-621-9181




**CRYSTALRIVER**
3b/2ba den newer
c/h/a cpt & vinyl, very
clean + bonus RV
Hkup. $34.900
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie 352-634-6340
CASTLE LAKE 2 bed-
room. 2 bath. 2/2 S/W
Fully furnished move in
condition.
2 screen rooms, 2
sheds
Landscaped with sprink-
ler on quiet cul-de-sac
352-212-1883
CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice Large 4br 2ba MH
READY TO MOVE IN!
4Owner Fin.
Avail.+- CALL (352)
795-1272
HERNANDO 2/2 DW
On lot, with Shed &
Deck See for your-
self at 2562 N. Treas-
ure Pt. $28,500 obo
352-464-0719
HOMOSASSA
*t3/2, Fenced Yard,**
NEW Flooring. NEW
AC $5.000 Down.
$435. mo
(352) 302-9217
HOMOSASSA
2ba 1 '/2 ba MH needs
complete rehab. Good
shed, well & septic.
6524 W. Akazian
$12,500 (603) 860-6660



2/2 on Lake Rous-
seau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent
$240/mo. 2003. Used
Seasonally
Owner bought a
house. 207-546-6115,
cell
Adult Park 2/1,
Mobile, heat and air,
nicely furn. large
shed, sreen rm. car-
port, $8,200
Lot Rent $160 mo.
(352) 287-3729
INGLIS
3/2 Furn., screened
porch. Lot rent $295
Includes amenities.
$15,000 (352)
212-8873
INVERNESS
3/2 Furn.,Appl., Ig
screen porch & shed,
Great cond. $16,000.
Call for appt.
(352)364-3747
INVERNESS
Move In Ready,
Beautiful 1/1 SW,
Mobile, Harbor Lights
55+ park, on Big Lake
Henderson. Fully furn.,
very updated, view of
lake, Cen. HVAC, W/D,
A Must See! Asking
$7,000, 352-344-1828
INVERNESS PARK
55+, 14X60, 2/2, new
roof, all appliances,
partly furn. screen
room, shed,
352-419-6476
MOBILE HOME,
Fully
Furnished. Everyth-
ing stays. Just move
in. 2 Sheds,
washer/dryer all ap-
pliances. Must See!
$7,500. (708) 308-3138
PALM TERRACE
55+ Community,
1997 3BR/2BA 14 x
66,
excel. cond. Shed,
Fl. Rm. Carport &
Deck $16,000. (352)
400-8231
REDUCED 2/2 $17,500
On Lake Rousseau
Lot Rent $240/mo.
BETTER THAN NEW!
Owner financing. Call
LEE (352) 817-1987
Singing Fores t
FLORAL CITY
14 x 70, Mobile, 2 Irg.
bedrooms, furnished &
remodeled, heat & air,
carport & shed, Wash/
Dryer, Lot rent $176.
$14,500. 352-344-2420
Waterfront/Homosassa
Westwind Village 55+
Beautifully furnished
Move In Ready, 2/2
2 Scrn rms, dbl door,
refng./Ice maker
Washer Dryer, Low
mntnly payments,
$19000 obo
(850) 449-1811 Cell




HOMOSASSA
Large 3br 2ba MH
Rent to Own
*Ready to Move In *
Owner Financina Avail.
CALL (352) 795-1272




Chassahowitzka
3/2 Waterfront DW,
$500
2/2, Fenced Yd DW,
$500
2/2, House w/ Gar.,
$600
Suqarmill Woods
3/2/2, Furnished,
$900.
AGENT (352) 382-1000




CRYSTAL RIVER
Studio Apt. Com-
pletely Furn. on
Hunter's Sprgs, sun
deck, W/D rm. All until.
incl'd.+ boat dock.
$700/mo.
352-372-0507
FLORAL CITY


LAKEFRONT 1
Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Es-
tate (352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts
2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILA-
BLE
CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apart-
ments for Rent
352-465-2985


INVERNESS
2 BIR's Availa-
ble
KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOMES
Rental Assistance
Available For
Qualified Appli-
cants
Call 352-344-1010
MWF,8-12&1-5
307 Washington
Ave
Inverness Florida
Equal Housing
Opp.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY








LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza, Of-
fice/
Retail, CR 486, 900
sf. @ $700+ until. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801




CITRUS HILLS
2/2'/2 Townhouse
condo, full appli-
ances, carport, Cit-
rus Hills membership
included
Prudential Florida
Showcase Proper-
ties
call 352-476-8136

INVERNESS
2/2/1 Lg Condo
Waterfront Community
with heated pool.
Non-smoker, pet
restrict. $650. mo
317-442-1063




Citrus Springs
2/2/1 $650/mo
352-746-7990
HOMOSASSA
2/2 $550 mo. incl.
garb. Pets? No
smoking. 1st & sec.
352-2124981




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1 Country Home on
stilts,w/fenced yard.
$600 + Utilities.
Call 920-922-6800




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
HOMOSASSA
2 BR, Seasonal,
Avail. Now.
641-660-3312




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 + Florida Room,
106 S. Fillmore $550
mo. 352-422-2798
BLACK DIAMOND
Newer 3/2/2 $1,150
Bob @ Coldwell
Banker 352-634-4286
Cit.Hills/Brentwood
2/2/2 on golf course.
Club included
$900/mo 516-991-5747
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1
Water Incl. CHA,
$496. 352-220-2447
212-2051
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/2, $750. mo + sec.
850-371-1568
INVERNESS
2/1 Great Location,
55+ community, Bring
boat & fishing gear.
$695
(352) 344-1380
INVERNESS
2/2/1, In quiet city limit
location, built 2006,
$625. mo. No Pets
(352) 347-0858

INVERNESS
3/2/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352- 601-2615 OR
352-201-9427

INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/1/1
$590mo.1st & Sec
(352) 344-2560
INVERNESS
Lakefront Patio
Home maint.free 2BD,
2BAw/Den, Move In
Ready, $900 mo. Ka-
ren Morton
JW Morton Real Es-
tate Century 21
352) 212-7595




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish
Camp
(352)726-2225




INVERNESS
Rm w/Priv. ba, $85.
wk no smoke
352-502-6302




CRYSTAL RIVER
Warehouse for Rent
Free standing, garage
area, 1,440sf,
$100-$550


352-634-0129

Real stat
For Sal


EA I1 ALE OLe III Inad-
ture Coast Landings
RV Resort. Large de-
veloped site and a
separate gated storage
lot; plus almost new
5th-wheel with slides,
screened gazebo, and
storage building. All for
$79,900. For more info
and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441


From mobiles to
mansions,
From Gulf to Lakes,
give me a call,
I sell 'em all!
352422-4137
nancv.wilsoni)
vahoo.com

Nancy J. Wilson
Realtor@
Broker-Associate
SRESGRI
Waybright Real Es-
tate, Inc.



MOTIVATED
SELLER wants this
gone!!!
6 Acres w Big
SHOP, Nice 2/2/2
House, porches
Barns, pond, pvd rd,
Concrete drive. Re-
duced!
$114,900 MLS
357108.
www.crosslandrealty.
com 352 726 6644




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY





Lee k

Quiet Country Sett-

3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area
only 20 Mm. to Ocala
$129,900 Call
352-302-6784 for
appt.




Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches
&
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments,
Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


.s


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"

www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty
Inc.




HOMOSASSA
GNC Commercial
7311 Grover Cleveland
Blvd. 3/2 MH $69,900.
(603) 860-6660











CITRUS

SPRINGS
3/2/2, 2 yr old Pool
home in imacculate
condition,
Landscaped back-
yard. $125.000 Priced
to sell!
CALL (570) 412-5194




PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat,
horses, in-laws; there
is room for everyth-
ing! 4/3 w/7 car
garage/workshop &
in-law suite on 5.83 ac-
res.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164




CITRUS HILLS
GOLF COURSE HOME
3/2/2+ $173K.
BY APPT ONLY
(216) 849-3447
HERNANDO
Citrus Hills Pool
Home
4/3/2+, circular
drive,
1 acre lot, below
$200k 352-527-7856




ARBOR LAKES
**OPEN HOUSE-
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR
&
fenced back yard!
Gated Comm. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista
TrI
(352) 419-7418




INVERNESS
Block home 2br, 1ba
w/ porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + ac-
res. $130,000 Call
Buzz 352-341-0224 or
David 607-539-7872




GRAND 2006
CUSTOM HOME
www.81woodfield.
CanBYours.com
81 Woodfield,
Homosassa
3 Bed/2 Bath/3 Car Gar
Salt Water Pool & More!
$339K, MLS#356914
Realty Connect
(352) 212-1446
The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
NewAC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo
Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558






MUST SELL

4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell






4/2/3 HEATED POOL
lots of extras!
SELLER MOTIVATED!
reduced to 210k
352-688-6500 or
352-212-5023



| '4i


Buying or Sell-
ing
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For
You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty,
Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013 Cll


CLASSIFIED



20 ACRES FREE!
Own 60 acres for 40 acre
price/payment. $0 Down,
$168/mo. Money Back
Guarantee, NO CREDIT
CHECKS. Beautiful
Views, West Texas.
(800)843-7537
www.sunsetranches.comr

UNIQUE & HIS-
TORIC
Homes, Commer-
cial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


GAIL
STEARNS Re-
altor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298

Low overhead =
Low Commis-
sions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financ-
ing available


I have been
selling an
average of
2 Properties
a month
I NEED
LISTINGS!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352)
726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscoun-
ty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515














Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

*Buy or Sell*

I'll Represent
YOU

ERA
American Re-
alty






Crystal River Waterfront
Condo 2 bedroom.
1-1/2 bath. Beautiful
condo for sale by owner.
Located in the "Islands"
which is minutes from
the beach, fishing and
golfing. Enjoy catching
fish and blue crabs from
your private dock. Year
round heated pool and
tennis courts. Very
private and quiet.
$78,000352-586-1266


Waterfron
Homes^^^


Hme


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNafureCoast
Properties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"





**Heatherwood 581"
access to game re-
serve & Tillus Hill,
2.42 Acres well, sep-
tic, no impact fees,
$30,000 by
owner, sold as is
(352) 422-0435

% ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact fee
credit, high and dry,
trees, $11,000 obo
(352) 795-3710

Owner Financing
5 ACRES FLORAL
CITY
Pasture Land
9858 S. Istachatta Rd
2012 Taxes $115 w/
Agricultural Greenbelt,
Water/Elec/Barn/fence
$89K. MLS#354831
Realty Connect
(352) 212-1446





BOAT TRANSIT
TRAILER Very Ig., dbl.
axles up to 33 ft. Any
boat type! $1800 or
OBO (813) 244-3945





Hobie Kayak,
$1,600 "Outback" for
Fishing hunting or tak-
ing pictures 12ft 1
inch, 33" wide mirage
drive, capacity 400
Ibs. used 1 time, $500
in extras included
(352) 212-1258





1988 27 ft Sportscraft
Coastal Fisherman,
cabin cruiser, $10k
OBO (813)-244-3945

5HP OUTBOARD
MOTOR LIKE NEW
$385 (352) 341-2661 or
352-586-7437

BASS TRACKER
12ft. Jon Boat,
w/ 6HP motor & trailer,
$1,750 obo
(352) 563-0665




MUST SELL


BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard
top, Volvo motor,
AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has
2 props, fish/depth
finder, 2001 Rolls
float on trailer worth
$1000. Comes
w/spare motor Has
service manual,
2nd owner $2500
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855

MINI-X KAYAK
Fully loaded for fishing
or fun. Electnc motor
$500.(352) 341-1297

TRI PONTOON
BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453

TWIN VEE 2006
26ft 21 Ohrs, Twin 140hp
Suzukis, 4 Stroke,
Extras, Trailer $28,500
(352) 564-8882

WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
(352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com


Vehicle


FOREST RIVER
INC.
2006 Cardinal like new.
Rare in-place senior
use. Smoke/pet free.
352-843-5441.
detailsbyowner.com.
Wholesale, $17,830.00


Phyllis Strick-
land
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!

I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot LARRY'S
AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352
564-8333
SALE LAYAWAY
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT,
CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near
KINGS BAY $425,000.
Make Offers
352-563-9857

DUNNELLON
Here is that home on
Lake Rousseau that
you have always
wanted! 2br 1 ba on
1.43 acres w/168ft
lake frontage. Com-
pletely remodeled all
new interior & windows.
No Flood Insur-
ance! Prced reduced
from $369,000 to
$169,000
Call Bernie
(352) 563-0116

YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


FOREST RIVER
INC.
2006 Cardinal like new.
Rare in-place senior
use. Smoke/pet free.
352-843-5441.
detailsbyowner.com.
Wholesale, $17,830.00
ITASCA MERIDIAN
36 Ft, 2005 Motor
Home
350HP Cat Diesel 55K
miles, no smoke/pets
6 Michelan Tires,
New 2010 qn w/
sleep No. mattress &
overhead fan. W/D
combo $71,000 obo .
(352) 419-7882
NATIONAL RV
2006 Tropical One
owner,34ft, 26000
miles,no smoke/pets,
300HP Cummins die-
sel,2 slides, 6 new ti-
res, 3yr
warranty,many extras.
$87000. Well main-
tained. 352-341-4506




5TH WHEEL
33FT
GOOD CONDITION
MUST SELL
(423) 202-0914








*THREE AUCTIONS*
1-15
STORAGE AUCTION
10am ON SITE @1925
W Main St, Inverness
14 units lock cut 5
min before each unit
is sold. CASH Be like
the tv shows with the
gamble of what
maybe.
1-17
ESTATE AUCTION
3pm outside House
hold, Entire wood &
Mechanics work
shop, Wood Lathes,
power washers rows
of boxed merch-
andise.
5pm FIVE ESTATE
VEHICLES
2004 Honda S2000
garage kept toy
w/on 750miles Col-
lector sports car,
2006 VW GTI hatch-
back 60+K,
2002 VW Eurovan
Camper 18k,(these 3
cars from 1 estate)
2007 Buick Lucerne
CXL loaded 64K,
2012 Kia Forte ONLY
1,850 miles. All Es-
tate Vehicles GREAT
OPPORTUNITY to buy.
6pm Inside Quality
furniture, Knives,
Jewelry, Large
Power tools
1-19
AUTOGRAPH
AUCTION
11am Celebrity &
Sports, Live & On
Line everything from
golf to Rock& Roll.
Bats, balls, Albums,
photos, books,
cards & more from
Hendrix to Tiger.
www.dudleys
auction.comrn
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384

FOREST RIVER
2010, Surveyor,
Sport 189, 20 ft.
Travel Trailer,
1 slide, w/AC, qn. bed,
awning, pwr. tonque
jack, corner jacks, mi-
crowave, equalizing
hitch, $10,500, re-
duced to $9800
(352) 382-1826
HIGH LINE
1999, 32ft, Deluxe,
12' slide out, new 22'
awning, 55+ park, can
be moved. Was ask-
ing $9,000, Sell $6,900
excel. shape
231-408-8344
HI-LO TRAVEL
TRAILER 2003, tow
lite model 22-03t,exc.
cond.
$6000 obo
352-422-8092
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, kg bd,like new,
60amp serv. NADA
$29K asking $25K
obo 352-382-3298
WE BUY RVS,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945




4 Tires
215- 65/17
10,000 miles left
$60 for Set
(352) 628-1126
FIERO
Assorted body parts
$25 each
(352) 586-0084
New Headlight
assembly for 1994
Honda Accord
(352) 726-0437
SILVERADO 5TH
WHEEL TAILGATE
$100
&
VINYL RANGER BED
COVER $75
(352) 637-2982




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk
or Unwanted
Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not -
CASH PAID $300 &
UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars


Rerato


Mirage 2000 2dr.
coupe 5spd, 107k,
36mpg, cd & air. Just
serviced. $1850 (352)
422-1026
OLDS MOBILE
'95 SEDAN, auto-
matic, good cond.
$1,450
352-637-2588
OLDSMOBILE '99
Cutlass, custom, 4 DR,
loaded, good mi., V6,
cruise, tilt, gar. clean
$3,450. (352) 212-9383
SALE LAYAWAY
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT,
CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition, Ti-
tle, No Title, Bank
Lien,
No Problem, Don't
Trade it in. We Will
Pay up to $25K Any
Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ




2005 TOYOTA
Camry XLE 77K mi
loaded RED 4 cyl 1
owner clean carfax
$10,850 way under KBB
352-419-4513
BUICK
2007, Lucerne, CXL
55K miles, Leather
$13,500. obo
Call Troy
(352)621-7113
CADILLAC
'02, Best STS, Black
on Black, sunroof
78K mi., new tires
$7,500. (352) 628-1126
CADILLAC
2003 CTS, Must see.
Luxury car at an
affordable price.
Call 352-628-4600
for an appointment.
CHEVROLET
2002, Camaro Z28
$9,750.
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
'01, PT Cruiser,
loaded, 53k miles,
$4,800
(352) 464-4304

DUDLEY'S






*THREE AUCTIONS*
1-15
STORAGE AUCTION
10am ON SITE @1925
W Main St, Inverness
14 units lock cut 5
min before each unit
is sold. CASH Be like
the tv shows with the
gamble of what
maybe.
1-17
ESTATE AUCTION
3pm outside House
hold, Entire wood &
Mechanics work
shop, Wood Lathes,
power washers rows
of boxed merch-
andise.
5pm FIVE ESTATE
VEHICLES
2004 Honda S2000
garage kept toy
w/on 750miles Col-
lector sports car,
2006 VW GTI hatch-
back 60+K,
2002 VW Eurovan
Camper 18k,(these 3
cars from 1 estate)
2007 Buick Lucerne
CXL loaded 64K,
2012 Kia Forte ONLY
1,850 miles. All Es-
tate Vehicles GREAT
OPPORTUNITY to buy.
6pm Inside Quality
furniture, Knives,
Jewelry, Large
Power tools
1-19
AUTOGRAPH
AUCTION
11 am Celebrity &
Sports, Live & On
Line everything from
golf to Rock& Roll.
Bats, balls, Albums,
photos, books,
cards & more from
Hendrix to Tiger.
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384

FORD
'05, Thunderbird,
37k miles,
$24,000.
(352) 465-4015
FORD
2001 COBRA MUS-
TANG CONV. 5
SPEED, LEATHER
MUST SEE
CALL 352-6284600
For More Info
FORD
2005, Five Hundred
LMT, 40K miles,
leather, V6 $9,980
Call Troy
352-621-7113
FORD
2006 Focus ZXW, SE
4DR, WGN. 85k miles
$5,800 obo
Call Troy (352)
621-7113
FORD MUSTANG
2007, 7000 mi, garage
kept, GT clone.
Call (352) 527-1191
HONDA
2011 CRV LX, 19K
miles, likenew, 4 Cyl.
$19,950
Call Troy
352-621-7113
HYUNDAI
2006 Elantra, GLS
90K miles, likenew, 4
DR, auto. $6,800
Call Troy
352-621-7113
KIA
'99, Sportage, Conv.
Top, low miles,
Runs great.
CALL 352-628-4600
For pricing.
LINCOLN
1998, MARK VIII
Automatic, COLD A/C
CALL 352-6284600
For an appointment
to see!
LINCOLN
'95, Town Car
140k miles $2,250
(352) 628-1126
MERCEDES
2006 SLK 350 Conv.
$26,000 OBO &
2005 S430 $22, 000
OBO (352) 621-4611
MITSUBISHI
'01, Eclipse GT,
sunroof, black w/ tan
leather int. runs
great
$2,500. 352464-0719
MITSUBISHI









C12 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013


TOYOTA
2000, Camry LE
V6, 183K miles Super
Clean $5,800. obo
Call Troy (352)
621-7113
TOYOTA
2000, Camry, Good
fuel economy, 4 door
transportation.
CALL 352-628-4600
for pricing & details.
TOYOTA
2007, Yaris, 59K mi-
les,
2 DR, H/B $7,800.
Call Troy
352-621-7113




** CHEVY**
95 Impala SS
Rare Collector Car
LT-lengine, Superb
Condition $8,500
(352) 249-7678

1971 CHEVELLE
CONVERTIBLE
stunning, 40k+ in-
vested, fully re-
stored, 350 auto,
buckets, consistent
show winner, high
end stereo, red w/
white top & interior
$23,900,
352-513-4257

CHEVROLET
1964% TON PICKUP
35kmi. 283 V8, 3 sp
Column shift, $8995
OBO
(352) 464-3106
FORD
1967 MUSTANG, 99%
org. No body work,
rust free, great cond.
71k mi
$13500
352-447-1823
MGB 1973
Red convertible,
show room cond.
Everything works.
$6200
(765) 336-9590







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




CHEVROLET
2003, Avalanche
$6,300
352-341-0018
FORD
2003 F250
$6,495.
352-341-0018
LARIAT
'00, Dully, V10, Goose
Neck towing pkg.
125k mi, clean $8,600.,
352-637-4864, 220-3277
SALE LAYAWAY
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT,
CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
TOYOTA
2004, 4 Runner Sport
2WD, 94K mi,
Leather $12,800.
obo
Call Troy
352-621-7113




CADILLAC
2007, Escalade,
44k miles, Luxury
NAV, $29,500.
Call Troy (352)
621-7113
CHEVROLET
2002, Silverado
$3,990
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
'96, Suburban LT,
excel. cond. Leather,
garaged. Must See
$4,400 obo 270-3795
CHEVY TRAIL-
BLAZER LT 05
exc. cond. asking
$7000
obo, in Hernando
(904) 923-2902
JEEP
2011 Patriot 2.0L, 5
speed, FWD, a/c,
power
windows/doors,
white, 12k, like new,
$12,750 352 513-4100





1978 MIDAS RV
90k miles, 26ft, sleeps
4
**$1500 obo**
352-212-7032




JEEP
2004, Wrangler X
4WD, Only 57K mi-
les,
Hard Top $13,800.
Call Troy
352-621-7113




FORD
1995, E-150
Conversion Van,
$2,850.
352-341-0018




NEW POLARIS
RANGERS


AS LOW AS 7888.
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS
2002, SPORTSMAN
ATV. 4X4, SERVICED
AND READY FOR
HUNTING SEASON.
$2995
(352) 621-3678




DALIN DAY STAR
2006, 700mi saddle
bags, Fully dressed,
Call (352) 527-1191
Harley Davidson
2002, 883 Sportser,
new tires & saddlebags
17k mi., $4,500. obo
(607) 968-4269


DALIN DAY STAR
2006, 700mi saddle
bags, Fully dressed,
Call (352) 527-1191
HONDA
'06, Shadow 600 VLX,
deluxe. Can not tell
from brand new.
EXTRAS $3,600 obo
(352) 527-2294
HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley, 1100CC,
Chrome, bags, trade?,
70mpg $2,800. Crystal
River
(727) 207-1619


HONDA
2005, VTX 1300CC
3 TO CHOOSE FROM
YOU PICK $4,888.
(352) 621-3678
KYMCO
2009, 125 cc. Looks
and drives great Only
$995
(352) 621-3678
VICTORY
2005, KINGPIN
2 TONE, STAGE ONE,
LOADED WITH
OPTIONS
ONLY $7888.
(352) 621-3678


HONDA GOLDWING
ASENDADE, 1997
124K mi, Lots a Extras!
$6000. (352) 212-6450
YAMAHA
2005, ROYAL STAR
TOUR DELUXE,
READY FOR A ROAD
TRIP ONLY $6688.
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
2007 STRATOLINER
1800CC LOADED
WITH OPTIONS A
REAL TOUR BIKE
ONLY $5889.
(352) 621-3678


772-0123 WCRN
Estate of Jean K. Ramin File No: 2012 CP 685 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2012 CP 685 Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF JEAN K. RAMIN
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of JEAN K. RAMIN, deceased, whose date of
death was September 4, 2012, file number 2012 CP 685, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division; the address of which is 110 N
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450. The names and addresses of the personal rep-
resentative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
Al creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
Al other creditors of the decedent and other persons having daims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is January 16, 2013.
Personal Representative:
Scott Ramin
18446 Valentine Road, Mount Vernon, WA 98273
John S. Clardy III, Florida Bar No. 123129
Clardy Law Firm PA, PO Box 2410, Crystal River, FL 34423-2410
Telephone (352)795-2946
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 16 & 23 2013

773-0116 WCRN
Daniel Raleigh Case No: 2012CP734 Notice to Cred,
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.2012CP734
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
DANIEL RALEIGH, Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been en-
tered in the Estate of Daniel Raleigh, deceased, File Number 2012CP734, by the Cir-
cuit Court for Citrus County, FL, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N.
Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450; that the total cash value of the estate is $63,156.12
and that the name and address of those to whom it has been assigned by such or-
der is: ROSARIO HAMILTON, 191W. thistle PI., Beverly Hills, FL 34465.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this Notice is served within three
months after the date of the first publication of this Notice must file their claims with
this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is January 9, 2013..
Attorney for Person(s) Giving Notice: Person(s) Giving Notice:
JEROME ROTENBERG, ESQUIRE ROSARIO HAMILTON
CArney & Associates, P.A. 191 W. Thistle PI.
7655 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Ste. 2, Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Crystal River, FL 34429, 352/795-8888
January 9 & 16, 2013.


774-0116 WCRN
Gerald C. Abbott File No: 2012CP736 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2012CP736 Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
GERALD C. ABBOTT
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of GERALD C. ABBOTT, deceased, whose date of
death was NOVEMBER 7,2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the
personal representatives' attorney are set forth below.
Al creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
Al other creditors of the decedent and other persons having daims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is January 3, 2013.
Attorney for Personal Representatives: Personal Representatives:
/s/Thomas E. Slaymaker, Esquire RAYMOND JAMES TRUST, N.A.
Florida Bar Number: 398535 /s/ Christine R. Parker, First Vice President
Slaymaker and Nelson, P.A., and Trust Office
2218 Highway 44 West, 200 Colonial Parkway, Suite 170
Inverness, Florida 34453 Lake Mary, Florida 32746
Telephone: (352) 726 6129, Fax: (352) 726 0223
E-Mail:j tom@slaymakerlaw.com
Secondary E-Mail: marilyn@slaymakerlaw.com
January 9 & 16, 2013..

780-0123 WCRN
LaGrow, Ruth E 2072CP774, Notice to Cred SA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2012CP774 Division Probate

IN RE: ESTATE OF RUTH E. LAGROW
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered
in the estate of RUTH E. LAGROW, deceased, File Number 2012-CP-774, by the Circuit
Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450; that the date of death of RUTH E.
LAGROW (the Decedent) was November 20, 2012; that the total value of the estate
is $55,179.00and that the names and addresses of the person to whom it has been
assigned by such order are:
Name Address
Gayle Ellen Lane 720 East Gilchrest Court Unit 3-B
Hernando, Florida 34442
Robert W. LaGrow 3363 St. George Rd.
Williston, Vermont 05495
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for
full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITH-
STANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of the Notice is January 16, 2013.
Person Giving Notice:
/s/Gayle Ellen Lane
720 E. Gilchrest Court, Unit 3-B
Hernando, Florida 34442
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
/s/John A. Nelson, Esquire, Florida Bar Number: 0727032
Slaymaker and Nelson, P.A., 2218 HWY 44 West, Inverness, FL 34453
Telephone: (352)726-6129, Fax: (352)726-0223
E-Mail: tom@slaymakerlaw.com, Secondary E-Mail:
legalasst4@slaymaker.comPublished two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle
January 16 & 23, 2013


E YEAH, IT'LL TOW











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775-0116 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Pursuant to FSS 705, the following items will be disposed as provided by state statute
unless claimed by the owner:
1. Back soft shell case with Galveston electric guitar & Washburn guitar amplifier
with power cord
2. Men's Bulova watch
3. Ladies silver colored ring
4. Red Troybilt 21 inch push mower with Honda motor
To make claim for the items, contact Betty Rideout, Evidence Custodian, Citrus
County Sheriff's Office at 352-341-7425.
Sheriff Jeffrey J. Dawsy
By: Patricia E. Bergerson, Staff Services Director
January 9 & 16, 2013


781-0116 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will
meet in Regular Session on January 22, 2013, at 1:00 P.M., in the Citrus County Court-
house, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, for the purpose of conducting
the regular business of Citrus County.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 341-6580.
Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Governing Body with re-
spect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a record of the proceed-
ings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0101, Florida Statutes).
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle January 16, 2013


VILLAGE TOYOTA


www.villagetovota.com CRYSTAL RIVER



352-628-5100

*All Offers While Supplies Last. 6 ;^


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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