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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 01-13-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02999

Full Text



Broncos, Ravens meet for spot in AFC title game /B1 NEW2013TOY

Tn^vA 9 CITRU-S COUNTY Y


Morning fog; partly
cloudy to mostly sunny.
PAGE A4


JANUARY 13, 2013 Florida's Best Communit


HRONICLt


www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOLUME 118 ISSUE 159


LOCAL NEWS:


Tax Aide
Volunteers train to help
residents with their tax
preparations./Page A3


It's exhilarating. You get this big wad of
lyngbya muck out of the way and underneath is ve"
beautiful pure, white sand.
Art Jones
2012 Citrus County Chronicle Citizen of the Year.



Raking in accolades


COMMENTARY:
wL -.


Women/men
Comparing contrasts
between senators./
Page Cl
BUSINESS:


.:. '



.r


Tackle taxes
U.S. tax code is longer
than the Bible and lacks
the good news./Page D1
HOMEFRONT:
I MMA


De-clutter
Designers give tips on
how to use extra space
to create a home
organizational hub.
/HomeFront


New look for
stocks coming
Tuesday
The Chronicle is up-
dating the design of its
stocks page beginning
with Tuesday's edition.
The new design will in-
clude 10-day trends for
the S&P 500 and the
NASDAQ; daily recaps of
the major markets; the
top 42 stocks of local in-
terest; daily recaps of in-
terest rates; daily recaps
of commodities and the
top 25 mutual funds.
Additionally, readers
will be informed of news
events about the major
companies being traded.
The information is con-
tained in a condensed
format and is designed
for ease of use.


Annie's Mailbox ......A16
Classifieds ..............D5
Crossword ..............A16
Editorial.................. ...C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ...............B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies .................. A16
Obituaries ................A6
Together................ A18


6 11|||1784 12157 8 0078 oI


MATTHEW BECK/Chroncle file
Art Jones, right, points out lyngbya raking activity in Hunters Spring to Herschel T. Vinyard, secretary of the
Department of Environmental Protection, during Vinyard's visit in November.


ArtJones is

Chronicle Citizen

of the Year
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER
Quixote jousts not at
windmills but at a black
gooey mess that sleeps
along the bottom of King's Bay.
His weapon of choice: a rake.
When Art Jones first told people
15 months ago of his plan to rid
lyngbya from the bay "one rake at
a time," they may have doubted
his sanity.
After all: The bay is 600 acres,
the muck is thick, and Jones is but
one man. What good could he
possibly do?
Government agencies from
Washington, D.C., to the city itself
had studied the problem for years.
Yet, their experts could not agree
on a solution.
Meanwhile, Jones went about
his raking. He started with a patch
of canal behind his house. Before
long, Jones could see soft white
sand that had been suffocated by
lyngbya.
Jones enlisted help from his
Kings Bay Rotary Club. He let
people know about cleanup days.
Volunteers began to trickle in,
wading into the water at Hunters
Spring Park with their own rakes
and kayaks.
In 2012, a movement was born.
And it's because of those efforts
that Jones is the 2012 Citrus
County Chronicle Citizen of the
Year.
"I was involved from the very
See Page A5


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle file
Jones' "One Rake at a Time" project has enlisted more than 300 people to
remove nearly 600 tons of muck from the bottom of King's Bay canals, la-
goons and spring areas. These volunteers helped at Hunters Spring.

Yerian, others receive nominations


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
Every year, Citrus County citi-
zens show their support for
friends, co-workers and commu-
nity leaders by offering nomina-
tions for Citrus County Chronicle
Citizen of the Year.
This year, several people nomi-
nated Art Yerian, manager of the
Homosassa Springs Wildlife State


Park. Here is some of what they
wrote in nominating Yerian:
Liz Yerian (Art's wife): "Art do-
nates the park for free to the
YMCA for their summer camps
and gives them any and everything
they need. He also spearheaded
community events for our citizens
like the haunted tram rides,
Easter, and the celebration of
See Page A7


Mentors make difference in lives of students


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
Ever since time began, those with
wisdom and experience shared it
with the younger generation.
Today, mentors still play a valuable
role in the lives of young people.
Here in Citrus County, close to 300
adults volunteer their time to mentor
local students, developing one-on-
one relationships that last a school
year or an entire school career
Karen Setlowe is just one mentor
who makes a difference in a stu-
dent's life.
"I've been a mentor for seven
years in Citrus County, but I've men-


tored many young people over the
years," said the 69-year-old play-
wright and actress. "What's exciting
for me as a mentor I can pass on
all of the gifts I've received from
people who have mentored me."
Not simply a tutor, who helps stu-
dents with specific skills, such as im-
proving math grades, a mentor
develops a personal relationship
with a student with the purpose and
goal of helping the student blossom
and bloom and reach his or her full
potential.
Setlowe has been with her student
- identities, even gender, are kept
confidential for seven years, from


the time the student was in kinder-
garten. The student is now in middle
school.
In Citrus County, school mentors
go through three hours of training -
one hour for being a school volun-
teer and an extra two for mentoring.
All mentoring is done on school
property during school hours, under


PageA4


School mentor volunteer Karen
Setlowe has been with her student
for seven years, from the time the
student was in kindergarten. Janu-
ary is National Mentoring Month.
Special to the Chronicle


Health


care:


Shot


or out

Hospitals

mandateflu

vaccinations

for workers
LINDSEY TANNER
AP Medical Writer
CHICAGO- Patients can
refuse a flu shot. Should
doctors and nurses have
that right, too? That is the
thorny question surfacing
as U.S. hospitals increas-
ingly crack down on em-
ployees who won't get flu
shots, with
some work- STATE BY
ers losing STATE
their jobs
over their 0 What's up
refusal. with the
"Where flu in each
does it say state?/
that I am Page A10O
no longer a
patient if I'm a nurse," won-
dered Carrie Calhoun, a
longtime critical care nurse
in suburban Chicago who
was fired last month after
she refused a flu shot
Hospitals' get-tougher
measures coincide with an
earlier-than-usual flu sea-
son hitting harder than in
recent mild seasons. Flu is
widespread in most states,
and at least 20 children
have died.
Most doctors and nurses
do get flu shots. But in the
past two months, at least 15
nurses and other hospital
staffers in four states have
been fired for refusing, and
several others have re-
signed, according to af-
fected workers, hospital
authorities and published
reports.
In Rhode Island, one of
three states with tough
penalties behind a manda-
tory vaccine policy for
health care workers, more
than 1,000 workers recently
signed a petition opposing
the policy, according to a
labor union that has filed
suit to end the regulation.
Why would people whose
job is to protect sick pa-
tients refuse a flu shot? The
reasons vary: allergies to flu
vaccine, which are rare; re-
ligious objections; and
skepticism about whether
vaccinating health workers
will prevent flu in patients.
Dr Carolyn Bridges, asso-
ciate director for adult im-
munization at the federal
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention, said the
strongest evidence is from
studies in nursing homes,
linking flu vaccination
among health care workers
with fewer patient deaths
from all causes.
"We would all like to see
stronger data," she said. But
See Page A8



1


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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50s, 60s, 70s, old-time country & gospel, and some
STAR tributes including a shorter version Elvis tribute.
Evening shows 2 hours or longer Feature a few of the same
song selections as same day's afternoon show, but with longer
Elvis tribute and includes Elvis Teddy Bear/Scarf toss.
Both same day shows will be significantly different.
Meet & Greet with performers at end of evening show ONLY.

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Page A3 SUNDAY, JANUARY 13,2013



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




City council to compare visionary plans


Crystal River officials to review city's

plan with Damatos proposed ideas


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
The tale of the competing plans
will be one of the topics of discus-
sion at Monday's Crystal River City
Council meeting.
Council members will look at a
2008 vision plan the city is imple-
menting and stack it against a part-
nership plan offered by Citrus
County Commissioner Dennis


Damato last month. Damato has
been heavily criticized by city offi-
cials for failing to seek input from
them about the plan and borrowing
liberally from the city's plan.
The city council will also sched-
ule a workshop on the issue for
6 p.m. Feb. 18.
The council also:
Will be updated on the issue of
short-term rentals (resort housing)
and report on other Florida cities'


* WHAT: Crystal River City
Council meeting.
WHEN: 7 p.m. Monday, Jan.
14; 6 p.m. CRA meeting.
WHERE: City Hall on U.S. 19.
CONTACT: www.crystalriverfl.
org.

willingness to pursue either an
amendment of the current state
statute that preempts certain local
control over resort housing or a
challenge to the constitutionality of
the statute.
Consider on first reading the
Holland annexation, providing for


the annexation of 14.04 acres
owned by East Bald Eagle Proper-
ties off Fort Island Trail.
Consider awarding the con-
tract for the Cutler Spur Boulevard
Improvement Project to Commer-
cial Industrial Corp. in the amount
of $2,458,659.57, with an additional
$120,000 allowance for change
order revisions during construction
for a total cost of $2,578,659.57.
Consider awarding a contract
to Royal American Construction
Group for the construction of avac-
uum sewer collection system in
Area 114 of the Disadvantaged
Small Communities (DSC) Grant
program in the amount of


$3,577,466.70.
Consider change order No. 1 to
GPI Southeast Inc. in the amount of
$335,896 for technical services as-
sociated with the extension of
sewer service into ProjectArea 114.
Receiver a quarterly report
about the Three Sisters Springs
Management Plan meeting.
At the Community Redevelop-
ment Agency (CRA) meeting, coun-
cil members will consider
implementing the buy-a-brick pro-
gram and be updated on Riverwalk
project
Chronicle reporter AB. Sidibe
can be reached at 352-564-2925 or
asidibe@chronicleonline.com.


taxing workload


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Pat Phillips addresses a group of men and women who will help residents across Citrus County file their taxes this year through the AARP Tax-Aide program.


AARP Tax Aide program prepares for new season


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER It is income tax re-
turn season and AARP Tax Aide can make
your life easier
Each year, an all-volunteer service offers
free income tax return preparation and
electronic filing services at six locations in
Citrus County. The service has changed
throughout the years with technology, in-
cluding the ability to make appointments by
phone.
"It has changed," said instructor Pat
Phillips, in her ninth year with program.
"We don't have to do paper returns any
more, it gets better every year"
Volunteers undergo 40 hours of training in
five days. They work on sample returns and
get IRS-certified at three levels.
"We train all people to do all the returns
in our program," Phillips said. "They do
basic, intermediate and advanced."
The tax return preparation process has
become a labor of love for Phillips, who has
a background in computers.
"I'm from working with software, but have
an overriding passion for numbers," she
said. "I thought this would be interesting to
do."
Phillips said program volunteers come
from all walks of life, including retired
nurses, teachers, salesmen and a few ac-
countants.
"A lot of retirees are looking for something


to do," she said. "They want to give back."
Additional volunteers are always needed.
Clients, in turn, show their appreciation
and many come back each year Phillips said
even people who do not have to file often
want to make sure they have not been the
victim of fraud.
The AARP Tax Aide program is designed
to help low- and middle-income seniors.
"We will take anyone who walks in the
door," district coordinator John Clarke said.
No one is turned away if their tax return
is within the program's scope. They do not,
however, do returns for self-employed peo-
ple with depreciable assets, farms, rental
property and bankruptcy cases. But they can
help people who have been in foreclosure.
Clarke, whose career background is in-
formation technology, has been with the pro-
gram five years. He cited a little-known
aspect of the Tax Aide service its positive
economic impact on Citrus County. For tax
year 2011, it served 6,266 county residents,
with a $3.03 million net refund return.
"Money that will be spent here," he said.
For the first time, residents can make ap-
pointments by phone to have their taxes
done. Potential clients should call 2-1-1 and
will be told what documents to bring. They
will get a follow-up reminder call.
Walk-in returns will still be handled at the
Crystal River Moose Lodge.
Contact Chronicle reporterPatFahertyat
352-564-2924 or pfaherty@chronicle
online com.


APPOINTMENTS NEEDED
These sites require an appointment, unless otherwise noted. Call 2-1-1 to
make an appointment, announce to the answering operator you wish to make an
AARP Tax Aide appointment; do not call the library.
If possible, once an appointment is made via 2-1-1, visit www.citrusunitedway.
org/why-pay-when-you-can-get-your-taxes-done-free-0. Print out the intake and
interview form to take to the appointment. This will alleviate the necessity of oth-
erwise obtaining the form prior to the appointment.
Appointments are being made now.
Central Ridge Library: 425 W. Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills, from 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. every Friday through April 12 (library closed Feb. 15 and March 29). Sat-
urdays on Feb. 23, March 23 and April 6 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. No appointments
after 3 p.m.
Coastal Region Library: 8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River, from 10 a.m. to
7 p.m. every Monday Feb. 4 through April 15. Every Thursday from 10 a.m. to
7 p.m. Jan. 31 through April 11. Appointments not available until noon Feb. 14,
March 14 and April 11; Saturday, Feb. 9, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. No appointments
after 4 p.m.
Floral City Public Library: 8360 E. Orange Ave., Floral City, every Tuesday
from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Feb. 5 through April 9. Saturday Feb. 23 and April 6 from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. No appointments after 3 p.m. Feb. 12 and March 12; no ap-
pointments after 2 p.m. Feb. 23 and April 6. No appointments after 5 p.m.
Homosassa Public Library: 4100 Grandmarch Ave., Homosassa, from
10 a.m. to 7 p.m. every Wednesday Feb. 6 through April 10. Saturday Feb. 16,
March 16 and April 13 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. No appointments after 5 p.m.
Lakes Region Library: 1511 Druid Road, Inverness, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.
every Wednesday Feb. 6 through April 10. Saturday Feb. 16, March 23 and
April 13 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. No appointments after 5 p.m.
WALK-IN OPTION
Crystal River Moose Lodge: 1855 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday Feb. 4 through April 15. No longer open on Tuesdays.
No appointments taken for this site. Walk-ins are assisted on a first-come, first-
served basis. Doors close at 4 p.m.


Seven Rivers New Year's baby

Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center
announced the arrival of
the hospital's first baby
born in the New Year.
At 8:20 p.m. Jan. 6, 2013,
Yarelys Lowery gave birth
to a baby boy weighing
6 pounds, 9.5 ounces and \
measuring 19 inches long.
Mom is pictured with
father, Christopher Raby, r
and baby, "C.J." The '
family received
New Year's gift baskets
from Rose Mary Sobel, "
M.D., and the Women's I '' -
& Family Center. i . -
Special to Chronicle | J -y3"


AroundTHE COUNTY


NARFE meeting is Dog adoption fees
scheduled Jan. 14 reduced through Jan. 15


Chapter 776 of the National Active
and Retired Federal Employees As-
sociation (NARFE) invites all active
and retired employees and surviving
annuitants to attend its next meeting
Monday, Jan. 14.
This will be the club's first meeting
at the Kracker Shack Cafe, 1314
U.S. 41 N., Inverness, near the In-
verness Post Office. Guest speaker
is Laurie A. Diestler, volunteer coor-
dinator on the Citrus County staff.
The meeting will start with a short
luncheon at noon, followed by the
regular business meeting.
For information call 352-270-0185.


Friends of Citrus County Animal
Services (FOCCAS) will offer reduced
dog adoption fees at Citrus County
Animal Services. Fees are dropping
from $60 to $20.13 through Jan. 15.
The fee includes vaccinations,
heartworm test, spaying or neutering
and microchip. Free obedience
classes are available, too.
Cat adoptions are free, and new
owners pay only for the $5 license.
All adoptable shelter animals can be
seen at www.citruscritters.com.
The shelter can be reached at
352-746-8400. The facility is at 4030
S. Airport Road in Inverness.


Habitat orientation
set for Jan. 26
Habitat for Humanity of Citrus
County seeks families to apply for
2013 Habitat home ownership. Inter-
ested applicants must attend a Habitat
orientation to be considered eligible.
The next orientation will take place
from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Jan.
26, at the Realtors Association of Cit-
rus County building, 714 S. Scarboro
Ave., off State Road 44 in Lecanto.
Potential applicants will receive a
full explanation of the program, time-
line, income and service require-
ments. Children cannot be
accommodated at this meeting.
From staff reports






A4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013



MENTORS
Continued from Page Al

school supervision.
Mentors and students are
matched by such things as
interests, academic or per-
sonal needs, strengths and
age.
Setlowe said when she
was first paired with her
student it was just to help
with reading skills. How-
ever, over the years she has
realized how perfectly the
two have been matched.
"As fate would have it, my
student has developed into
a writer, and recently ... is
one of the few young writers
in the country (who) has
been asked to submit a
(writing) sample to a major
book publisher," Setlowe
said.
She said her student did
not know anything about
her career or background
for several years, never hav-
ing asked about it. But as it
turned out, as the student
progressed and showed an
aptitude for writing, Set-
lowe has been able to share
her insight and knowledge
of publishing, even finding
which, if any, publishers ac-
cept submissions from kids.
The program, which
started in the early 1980s,
"provides selected students
the opportunity to work one-
on-one with a caring adult
who has agreed to develop a
caring relationship with an
at-risk student, help the stu-
dent make wise choices,
give advice, act as a role
model, share information,
and share career experi-
ences, etc.," said Terry
Cates, mentor program fa-
cilitator. "Mentors have had
a tremendous, positive im-
pact on the lives of many of
our students over the
years."


Mentors

have had a

tremendous,

positive impact

on the lives of

many of our

students over

the years.

Terry Cates
mentor program facilitator.


He added some mentors
have worked with the same
student for several consecu-
tive years, such as Setlowe
and her student
Setlowe said she and her
student have an agreement
when or if the student feels
it's time to discontinue the
relationship, that's when
she will say good bye.
She said in her case, it's
what's best for the student
and what the student needs.
"As a mentor, it's not about
pushing my values onto the
student It's about encourag-
ing the student to develop,"
Setlowe said. "I think of the
definition of'education' and
the Latin word 'educare' -
to bring out that which is al-
ready there; to nurture the
seeds that are already
there."
January is National Men-
toring Month.
For information about
mentoring a student in Cit-
rus County, call Helen Pan-
nelli, director of the
volunteer/mentor program
for the Citrus County School
Board, at 352-726-1931, ext.
2233.
Chronicle reporterNancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@chronicle
online.com or 352-564-2927.


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Meals include juice and milk.
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast,
cereal variety and toast, tater
tots.
Tuesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, cereal variety
and toast, grits.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, tater tots,
cereal variety and toast.
Lunch
Monday: Cheese pizza,
chicken alfredo with ripstick,
Italian super salad with roll,
fresh garden salad, steamed
green beans, chilled pineapple.
Tuesday: Baked chicken
nuggets, mozzarella maxstix,
yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby
carrots, potato smiles, chilled
applesauce.
Wednesday: Hamburger
sliders, hot ham-n-cheese, PB
dippers, turkey super salad
with roll, fresh baby carrots,
baked beans, dried fruit mix.
Thursday: Nacho rounds
with rice, barbecued roasted
chicken with roll, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh baby carrots, sweet
green peas, chilled applesauce.
Friday: Hot dog, turkey
wrap, PB dippers, fresh garden
salad, steamed broccoli,
chilled pineapple.
Middle school
Meals include juice and milk.
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal
and toast, tater tots, grits.
Tuesday: Sausage and egg
biscuit, ultra cinnamon bun, ce-
real and toast, tater tots.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater
tots.


Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater
tots.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, tater
tots, grits.
Lunch
Monday: Pepperoni pizza,
chicken and rice burrito, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
steamed broccoli, chilled
pineapple.
Tuesday: Chicken nuggets
with ripstick, hot ham and
cheese, Italian supper salad
with roll, yogurt parfait plate,
fresh baby carrots, sweet
green peas, potato deli roast-
ers, chilled applesauce.
Wednesday: Breaded
chicken sandwich, turkey wrap,
PB dippers, fresh garden
salad, baked beans, chilled
peaches.
Thursday: Nacho rounds
with rice, oven-baked breaded
chicken with ripstick, ham
super salad with roll, yogurt
parfait plate, fresh baby car-
rots, sweet corn, chilled
pineapple.
Friday: Chicken alfredo with
ripstick, hot dog, PB dippers,
fresh baby carrots, steamed
green beans, called flavored
applesauce.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal
and toast, tater tots, grits, juice
and milk variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toasts, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco bread, ultimate


breakfast round, cereal and
toast, grits, tater tots, juice and
milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun, ce-
real variety, toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken and rice
burrito, pizza, macaroni and
cheese with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, fa-
jita chicken super salad with
roll, yogurt parfait plate, baby
carrots, fresh broccoli, potato
roasters, broccoli, chilled fruit,
juice, milk.
Tuesday: Orange chicken
plate, maxstix, turkey and
gravy over noodles and rip-
stick, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, Italian super salad
with roll, yogurt parfait plate,
garden salad, cold corn salad,
baby carrots, potato triangles,
peas, celery, applesauce, juice,
milk.
Wednesday: Barbecued
roasted chicken with roll,
spaghetti with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich,
pizza, turkey super salad with
roll, yogurt parfait plate, baby
carrots, baked beans, chilled
baked beans, potato roasters,
chilled peaches, juice, milk.
Thursday: Fajita chicken
and rice with ripstick, macaroni
and cheese with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, ham
super salad with roll, maxstix,
yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, green beans, celery, po-
tato triangles, baby carrots, cu-


SJanuary 14 to 18 MENUS


wegal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


l Meeting Notices.....................D7


O iA Miscellaneous Notices..........D6


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


F'cast
s
s
s
s
s
s
pc
s
s
5







5


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southeast winds from 10 to 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a moderate chop.
Skies will be mostly sunny today after
some patchy morning fog.


85 59 0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exlusteaily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 83 Low: 55
AM fog; partly cloudy to mostly
sunny 8 :
ir MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 83 Low: 53
AM fog; partly cloudy to mostly sunny

i TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
SHigh: 82 Low: 52
SAM fog; partly cloudy to mostly sunny

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 83/58
Record 84/20
Normal 70/42
Mean temp. 71
Departure from mean +15
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month trace
Total for the year trace
Normal for the year 1.13 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 5
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.11 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 59
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 44%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, maple, elm
Today's count: 8.7/12
Monday's count: 11.1
Tuesday's count: 10.7
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
1/13 SUNDAY 6:38 12:25 7:05 12:52
1/14 MONDAY 7:36 1:24 8:01 1:49
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


FEB. 3


SUNSET TONIGHT ............................ 5:54 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW....................7:25 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY ...........................8:36 A.M.
MOONSET TODAY ........................... 8:16 P.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 6:02 a/2:06 a 7:26 p/2:49 p
Crystal River** 4:23 a/12:11 p 5:47 p/-
Withlacoochee* 2:10 a/9:59 a 3:34 p/10:02 p
Homosassa*** 5:12 a/1:05 a 6:36 p/1:48 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
6:50 a/2:52 a 7:58 p/3:26 p
5:11 a/12:14 a 6:19 p/12:48 p
2:58 a/10:36 a 4:06 p/10:47 p
6:00 a/1:51 a 7:08 p/2:25 p


F'cast
s
s
s
c
s
pc
s
s
s


Gulf water
temperature


74
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder NA NA 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando NA NA 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness NA NA 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City NA NA 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


n.1sJoneau


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Saturday Sunday
H L Pcp. FcstH L
43 36 c 52 41
32 13 pc 33 6
70 53 c 71 47
69 61 trace c 72 53
50 45 c 55 51
75 66 .02 pc 47 30
57 42 r 61 51
13 4 .02 c 18 3
73 66 .03 ts 68 43
23 5 c 22 4
44 37 .01 c 53 47
59 45 sh 57 31
45 39 sh 50 37
81 57 pc 77 58
72 46 r 68 41
73 48 c 73 58
53 34 pc 28 20
66 39 r 59 27
61 50 r 55 29
81 57 c 77 59
64 49 r 59 28
39 32 .03 c 49 38
66 42 .09 s 44 27
10 -12 c 19 2
53 21 pc 22 10
59 40 rs 44 25
53 28 pc 41 28
67 52 1.04 i 40 21
49 39 c 60 47
43 35 .05 c 50 43
75 64 .01 sh 53 41
64 46 .14 rs 38 21
78 68 .02 ts 63 38
42 28 pc 41 27
74 57 1.34 ts 46 26
57 44 s 61 40
68 59 r 56 29
73 64 .26 ts 46 27
52 32 .01 pc 24 15
40 9 pc 11 7
76 66 pc 75 56
80 64 ts 74 53
70 64 .93 r 59 34


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY

Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 78 68 ts 75 53
New York City 47 42 c 54 48
Norfolk 58 46 pc 73 55
Oklahoma City 56 30 s 35 19
Omaha 30 19 pc 23 7
Palm Springs 55 37 s 50 33
Philadelphia 53 43 c 59 50
Phoenix 53 31 pc 48 30
Pittsburgh 61 48 r 62 35
Portland, ME 42 33 .02 c 50 40
Portland, Ore 34 26 pc 37 28
Providence, R.I. 45 39 .05 c 52 44
Raleigh 71 49 c 76 57
Rapid City 11 6 .02 c 16 2
Reno 27 6 pc 28 10
Rochester, NY 58 43 sh 57 35
Sacramento 48 30 s 51 29
St. Louis 58 41 .03 pc 30 16
St. Ste. Marie 47 35 sn 28 17
Salt Lake City 20 11 .06 sn 16 3
San Antonio 74 67 pc 51 32
San Diego 56 42 s 56 34
San Francisco 48 38 s 51 36
Savannah 79 59 pc 79 59
Seattle 37 25 c 39 30
Spokane 44 18 c 23 13
Syracuse 50 36 sh 56 37
Topeka 49 24 pc 31 12
Washington 51 43 r 67 53
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 86 Kingsville, Texas LOW -32 Alamosa,
Colo.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 87/70/pc Madrid
Amsterdam 29/22/pc Mexico City
Athens 54/46/pc Montreal
Beijing 37/18/pc Moscow
Berlin 27/22/pc Paris
Bermuda 66/62/pc Rio
Cairo 66/50/s Rome
Calgary 16/8/pc Sydney
Havana 83/66/pc Tokyo
Hong Kong 67/52/s Toronto
Jerusalem 48/43/s Warsaw


58/48/sh
37/31/c
45/33/sh
74/45/pc
47/45/r
14/9/pc
38/26/c
85/71/ts
56/53/r
84/63/ts
50/36/sh
48/32/r
24/14/c


C I T R U S


C U N TY


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

cumbers, applesauce, juice,
milk.
Friday: Hot ham and
cheese sandwich, chicken al-
fredo with ripstick, pizza, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich,
fajita chicken super salad with
roll, yogurt parfait plate, baby
carrots, cold corn salad, potato
roasters, sweet corn, chilled
fruit, juice, milk.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Sliced meatloaf
with mushroom gravy, scal-
loped potatoes, green peas,
applesauce, slice whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Tuesday: Meatballs with
tomato gravy, rotini noodles,
mixed vegetables, mixed fruit,
slice whole-grain bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Chicken chop
suey over steamed rice, green
beans, gingered carrots,
peaches, slice whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Thursday: Tuna pasta
salad, marinated broccoli
salad, fresh orange, graham
crackers, slice whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Friday: Oven-fried chicken
thigh, black-eyed peas, country
vegetable medley, pineapple,
slice wheat bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For additional information,
call Support Services at 352-
527-5975.


HRKONICLE
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To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
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1 year: $116.07*
*Subscription price Includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
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Online display ad: 352-563-5592
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MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
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Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com


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Ave M d Crystal River,
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N 11

SInverness
Courthouse office
TompkinsSt. square
,0 8 106 W. Main
S 41 44 Inverness, FL
34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M u lliga n ............................................................................ P ub lish er, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .................................................................................... E ditor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trista Stokes.................................................................. Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ..................................................M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories ............................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Com m unity content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff .............................................................................................................. 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
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JAN.18


0
JAN. 28


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


I-


L





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PAST WINNERS RAKING


Past Citrus County
Chronicle Citizens of
the Year are:
m 2011- Jewel Lamb
m 2010 Paul Mellini
* 2009 Brown
Dumas Jr.
m 2008 Lace Blue-
McLean and Andy
Houston
* 2007 Barbara Mills
m 2006- Jean Grant
* 2005 Mike and
Kautia Hampton
* 2004 Aaron Weaver
* 2003 Pete DeRosa
* 2002 Don Sutton
m 2001 Leroy Bellamy
* 2000 Ron and
Beverly Drinkhouse
* 1999 Stan Olsen
* 1998 Gary Maidhof
m 1997 Chet Cole
* 1996- Curt Ebitz
* 1995 Laura Lou
Fitzpatrick and John
Lettow
m 1994 Peggy and
Dave Pattillo
m 1993 Ray Darling
and William Bunch
m 1992 Avis Craig
* 1991- Annie W.
Johnson and Father
James C. Hoge
m 1990 Ginger West
m 1989 David Langer
and Phil Zellner
m 1988 Bob and Mary
England
* 1987 Dr. Ed Dodge
* 1986 -Wilson Burns
and Steve Lamb
* 1985 Comprehensive
Plan Advisory Board:
Charles Miko, David
Walker, Dixie Hollins,
Tom Franklin, Rick Rol-
lason, Robert Henigar
and Clark Stillwell
* 1984- Ruth Levins
* 1983 Sam Tamposi
* 1982 Judge William
F Edwards
* 1981- Hank and
Miriam Cohen
m 1980 The Rev. Roger
Shively


Continued from Page Al

first rake up," Council-
woman Paula Wheeler said.
"I've watched him attack
Hunters Springs with vigor
and look at the result there.
It's a true grassroots effort.
People are showing up and
doing it one rake at a time.
Art's enthusiasm and dedi-
cation play a major role."
More than 350 have peo-
ple have joined the cause.
Count Ed and Nancy Turner
among them.
"I like the way he's gone
about it," Ed Turner said.
"He started basically on his
own. Over the year, he had a
natural buildup of support.
Being able to involve the
Rotary Club was a very big
step in that process. He's a
very competent person in
terms of communication
and is very committed."
Those same government
agencies that couldn't agree
on a solution are now
marching lock and step be-
hind Jones. The city of Crys-
tal River has donated nearly
$40,000; the county ear-
marked $250,000 for a me-
chanical harvester.
Last November, Jones and
city leaders hosted Her-
schel Vinyard, secretary of
the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection.
The DEP is considering
funding the project, and it
may provide property for
the lyngbya spoil.
State Sen. Charlie Dean,
R-Inverness, was so im-
pressed with Jones he ob-
tained $100,000 in funding
that, unfortunately for
Jones, Gov Rick Scott
vetoed.
That didn't dampen
Dean's enthusiasm.
"Art has distinguished
himself," Dean said. "He's
able to put it together with
support of an organization
such as the Rotary And the
sheer numbers of people he
has attracted who are not
Rotarians speaks highly of
his ability. I'm impressed
with the fella. He's very
down to earth. Very
genuine."
The work is paying off.
Small patches of sandy bot-
tom are now spreading to


Art Jones places a sample of lyngbya algae into a bag.


beaches and entire canals.
Volunteers have reported
springs previously choked
by lyngbya are now bubbling
fresh water.
ForJones, that's the prize.
"It's exhilarating," Jones
said. "You get this big wad of
lyngbya muck out of the way
and underneath is beautiful
pure, white sand."
Jones: Bay no
longer 'bleeding'
Jones received several
nominations for Chronicle
Citizen of the Year as resi-
dents applauded his efforts
in King's Bay
"His dedication and com-
mitment to enriching the
waters of King's Bay is un-
matched," Tracie Surran, a
tourist, wrote. "His ability to
rally support and encourage
the community from
young and impressionable
to seasoned and experi-
enced is promising for
the environmental and aes-
thetic future of King's Bay"
Linda Krall wrote: "He
has contributed so much to-
ward cleaning of King's Bay,
not only the physical labor,
but his ability to enlist the
enthusiasm of other county
groups and individual to
also get involved."
Jones said when he
started with his one rake he
envisioned a day when oth-
ers would join in.
"I truly believe most peo-
ple are good, decent people
and most people do care,"
he said. "I've not been dis-
appointed at all."
Jones, 57, is a retired fi-


nancial planner. He moved
from St. Petersburg to Crys-
tal River in 2003 to escape
red tide, finding his solitude
among the fresh water of
Hunters Spring.


ART JONES/Special to the Chronicle
This beach at Stoney Point on the south end of King's Bay was
once covered in 2 feet of lyngbya muck. Efforts by Jones and
volunteers have helped restore the area to its sandy bottom.


He soon noticed the black
muck in the canal behind
his house. Research led him
to understand the noxious
algae and his desire to rid it
from King's Bay


He started with one rake
and a five-year vision to rid
the bay's canals, springs and
tributaries of the muck. His

See Page A7


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SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Margaret
Bangs, 95
Margaret (Gavin) Bangs,
95, went to be with her Lord
on Jan. 10, 2013, under the
loving care
of her fam-
ily and Hos-
pice of
Citrus .
County.
Margaret
was born
Sept. 29,
1917, in Margaret
Newark, Bangs
N.J., to the
late Thomas and Sarah
(Dimmack) Gavin. She was a
homemaker who also
served as a library clerk for
the Pearl River, New York
School System for more
than 15 years. Upon her re-
location to Florida in 1978,
she was a charter member
of the Trinity Presbyterian
Church and served as
church librarian. She was a
lifelong avid reader who
also enjoyed quilting. As a
young mother, Margaret was
involved with the Girl
Scouts and Cub Scouts
while her children were ac-
tive with those
organizations.
Left to cherish her mem-
ory are her son and daugh-
ter-in-law, Robert and Linda
Bangs, Bangor, Maine; her
daughter and son-in-law, Ju-
dith and Jerry Waite, Her-
nando; four grandchildren;
and six great-grandchil-
dren. She was preceded in
death by her brother, Hugh
Gavin; and sister, Mary C.
Gavin.
Inurnment will be at a
later date at the Trinity
Presbyterian Church Me-
morial Garden. The family
requests memorial dona-
tions to Guiding Eyes for the
Blind, 611 Granite Springs
Road, Yorktown Heights,
NY 10598 in lieu of flowers.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is in
charge of arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.
Leland
Canfield, 95
INVERNESS
Leland B. Canfield, 95, In-
verness, died Tuesday, Jan.
8,2013. Services will be at 2
p.m. Monday, Jan. 14, 2013,
at First Church of God in In-
verness. Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home With
Crematory


CIw. ,
Funeral Home
With Crematory
SBurial Shipping
SCremation

Cremation Veter a
S Memorial Care-

For Information and costs,
call 726-8323

To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Saralynne
Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller@chronicleonline.com
I'. ~8


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CALLI


Alan Olsen, 83
INVERNESS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr. Alan Vincent
Olsen, age 83, of Inverness,
Florida, will be held 2:00
PM, Tuesday, January 15,
2013 at the Inverness
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes. He died on Wednes-
day, January 9, 2013 in In-
verness, Florida. Interment
will be held at Anderson-
ville National Cemetery, An-
dersonville, Georgia on a
later date. The family will
receive friends from 1:00
PM 2:00 PM, Tuesday at the
Inverness Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Homes. Friends
who wish may send memo-
rial donations to the charity
of their choice.
Mr. Olsen was born Octo-
ber 12, 1929 in South Coven-
try, CT, son of the late Arthur
and Elsie (Unterventer)
Olsen. He was an Army vet-
eran and worked as an En-
gineer for IBM. Mr. Olsen
was a member of Life Pa-
tron member of the NRA,
life member of the NRA
Heritage Society, the DAV
and the DAV Guardian Soci-
ety He loved his family and
America.
Survivors include his wife
of 60 years, Maria Olsen of
Inverness, FL, 2 sons, Alan
A. Olsen of Cypress, TX, and
James T Olsen of Middle-
town, CT, 3 daughters, Bev-
erly Olsen of Williamsburg,
VA, Janice T Reddick of
Palm Harbor, FL, and Caro-
line L. Dille of Bluffton, SC,
brother, Arthur A. Olsen of
Manchester, CT, and 5
grandchildren. Online con-
dolences may be sent to the
family at www.Hooper
FuneralHome. com.


SO YOU KNOW


* The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicleonline.
com or phone 352-563-
5660 for details and
pricing options.
* Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge.



"Your Trusted Family-Owned
Funeral Home for 50 Years"


Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


Marjorie
'Lucile' Free, 85
TA M PA
Marjorie Lucile Free, 85,
a native of Tampa, passed
away Jan. 10, 2013. Marjorie
also spent time living in
Lutz.
She was preceded in
death by her parents,
William J. Free Jr and L.
Pearl Stevenson Free; her
brother, WL. Free; and two
sisters, Oneta F Hickman
and Darrus F Brand. Mar-
jorie is survived by nieces
Marlene H. Smith, Mary
Jean H. Becker, Carol H.
Varn and Debby Danner;
one nephew, David Danner;
and many great-nieces and
-nephews.
A graveside service will
take place at 2 p.m. Monday,
Jan. 14, 2013, at Lutz Ceme-
tery. Arrangements by
Blount & Curry Carrollwood
Chapel.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

FREE OBITUARIES
m Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services. A flag
will be included for free
for those who served in
the U.S. military.


Richard
Ziarnik, 81
BEVERLY HILLS
Richard N. Ziarnik, 81, of
Beverly Hills, Fla., passed
away Jan. 10 at the Hospice
House in Lecanto, Fla. Born
March 29, 1931, to George
and Catherine (Fitrzyk)
Ziarnik, Richard moved to
Citrus County eight years
ago from Kentucky
He was a retired me-
chanic and a Catholic.
He is survived by his sis-
ter, Irene Jakubiak; sister-
in-law, Norma Ziarnik; and
many nieces, nephews and
grandnieces and grand-
nephews; and Godfather to
Stephanie (Murfin) Winter
Private cremation will
take place under the direc-
tion of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto, Fla.
Mass of the Resurrection
will be offered at 9 a.m. Jan.
15 at Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church in Beverly
Hills, Fla.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions can be made to Hos-
pice of Citrus County or to
the charity of your choice.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

DEADLINE
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the next day's edition.


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S 0'C I E T Y 1


Death ELSEWHERE

John
Wilkinson, 67
GUITARIST
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -
Rhythm guitar player John
Wilkinson, who performed
with Elvis Presley more
than a thousand times, has
died at his home in south-
west Missouri. He was 67.
Wilkinson passed away
Friday at his home in
Springfield after a fight with
cancer, according to a fam-
ily spokesman and the
Gorman-Scharpf Funeral
Home. Priscilla and Lisa
Marie Presley offered their
"deepest sympathy" to his
family, saying in a statement


that "John and the beautiful
music he made with Elvis
will live forever in our
hearts."
Wilkinson first met Elvis
Presley when he was 10
years old after sneaking into
his dressing room before a
show at the Shrine Mosque
in Springfield. He amused
Presley when he told him,
"You can't play guitar worth
a damn."
After the chance meeting,
Wilkinson developed a
name for himself as a singer
and guitarist, performing
with such groups as The
New Christy Minstrels.
He is survived by his wife,
Terry A private graveside
service is planned.
-From wire reports

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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


You can look at King's Bay in
two different ways. If you do
nothing, every day it's a little bit
dirtier. Or you can get in the water,
start raking it out and it's
a little bit cleaner.
Art Jones
organizer of One Rake at a Time project.


RAKING
Continued from Page A5

plan is moving into a second
phase: Discouraging the use
of lawn fertilizers that,
when swept by rain into the
water, help create the muck
Jones and his volunteers
are removing.
"If we can prevent pollu-
tion from coming in, that's
the long-term cure," he said.
Jones doesn't get involved
in the political debate of
whether to ban the sale and
use of fast-release fertiliz-
ers. Instead, he knows wa-
terfront property owners
are beginning to see for
themselves how healthy the
ecosystem can be without
lyngbya.
"Until you start to clean
up your mess, you don't
have the motivation to mod-
ify your behavior that's cre-
ating the mess," he said.
"You look at King's Bay, it's
a real fixer-upper"
The "One Rake at a Time"
project has already re-
moved 567 tons of lyngbya
muck since September 2011,
Jones said. He knows this
because a volunteer who
donates use of a small weed
harvester loads muck onto a
trailer that holds 175 cubic
feet. Each cubic foot weighs






f a fe


about 40 pounds.
Volunteers are paid $1 for
every cubic yard of lyngbya
muck they haul away
Jones is now preparing a
prototype to show other Ro-
tary organizations in
Florida. Jones said "One
Rake at a Time" is proof
that big things can be ac-
complished with individu-
als and groups working
together
"You can look at King's
Bay in two different ways,"
Jones said. "If you do noth-
ing, every day it's a little bit
dirtier Or you can get in the
water, start raking it out and
it's a little bit cleaner.
"People realize we've
turned the corner. Now the
bay is healing. It's no longer
bleeding."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


OTHERS
Continued from Page Al

lights. He made sure that those who
can't afford the fees of those events
don't have to pay so that no child will
ever miss out!"
Eileen Seissler: "(He) was re-
sponsible for getting funds for the
Manatee Recovery Tank, in the park.
He was responsible for acquiring the
funds for the Shorebird Aviary He
was responsible for acquiring funds
for the Friends of the Manatee Board-
walk. He has improved the Celebra-
tion of Lights, held yearly Every year
he hosts a dinner for the volunteers
and staff. As he is concerned for
wildlife, he finds ways to move new
animals to the park."
Barbara Cairns, animal lover and
park volunteer: "Relentless with his
own ideas and activities, he still takes
time to recognize his staff and volun-
teers for their contributions. Inspir-
ing others, he gets people in the
community involved in park issues."
Charlotte Gable, park adminis-
trative assistant: "The last 7-8 years,
he has brought in funds from out-of-
Florida, to enrich so many animal
lives. He constantly fights for keeping
our manatee program and has
brought us other endangered animals
to the park for visitor enjoyment and
education. Not only has he visually
enhanced exhibits, the care and med-
ical treatment behind the scenes has
improved greatly"
Gail Mitchell: "His dedication to
making the park a beautiful place for


visitors from our area as well as from
all over the world. His efforts have
created a wonderful place for mana-
tee rehabilitation, an exciting Shore-
bird Aviary where visitors can
actually want into the area and have
birds around them, a manatee board-
walk for visitors to use to view our
manatees and hear the presentations,
and so much more."
Other nominations
Fran Burgess nominated Diane
Toto for "her dedication, energy and
all-around hard work making the
Food Pantry of Citrus County a saving
grace for hundreds of families in our
community."
Morgan Patterson, commandant
of the Citrus Detachment of the Ma-
rine Corps League, nominated Bar-
bara Mills. "Her tireless work with all
veterans and especially homecoming
wounded vets is outstanding and in
need of recognition."
Retired Marine Col. Robert
Crawford also nominated Barbara
Mills. "Her many contributions to a
wide variety of county organizations
including 'Welcome Home.' Freedom
Flights for WWII Vets, The Fallen He-
roes Monument, Toys for Tots, and the
hands-on making of gifts sent to our
deployed service members, attest to
her unselfish and enduring dedica-
tion to serve our troops who stand in
harms way All this while she sup-
ports her son and his shipmates de-
ployed to Afghanistan."
Vickie LaMarche nominated Deb-
bie Ressler for her dedication to the
community beyond her role as chair-
woman of the Citrus County Hospital


Board: "Debbie Ressler is one of the
most active advocates for this com-
munity that I know. Being a critical
care nurse with a bachelor's degree
she could easily get a well paying po-
sition. Instead, she works every day
for zero pay to help someone else. She
has always been very active in her
church, belongs to Altrusa and the
Women's Club of Beverly Hills serving
as recording secretary"
Tracy S. Reynolds nominated
DougAlexander: "His contribution to
the people of Citrus County is im-
measurable. He is a man of honor and
dignity and is a true man of God."
Eunice Duma nominated Ginger
West, executive director of the Family
Resource Center: "Ginger works tire-
lessly to help the poor & homeless. In
addition to providing food & clothing
to the poor, she has started a clinic for
them to see medical professionals
once a week, completely free of
charge...She has a strong faith in God
& demonstrates that in all she does.
She has been doing this for years."
William J. Thacher nominated
his father, William Thacher, for his 50
years of extraordinary service
through Kiwanis.
R. Daly nominated Bernice
Brown for her work in organizing the
Martin Luther King Jr. parade in
Crystal River
Margaret Stevens nominated
Andy Freund for his litany of public
service to youth groups, church, Cit-
rus County Fair Association, Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, Homosassa
Scout Hut, the Mission of Citrus
homeless shelter and HPH Hospice
as Santa Claus.


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A8 SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013


HEALTH
Continued from Page Al

other evidence shows flu
vaccination "significantly
decreases" flu cases, she
said. "It should work the
same in a health care
worker versus somebody
out in the community."
Cancer nurse Joyce Gin-
gerich is among the skeptics
and said her decision to
avoid the shot is mostly "a
personal thing." She's
among seven employees at
IU Health Goshen Hospital
in northern Indiana who
were recently fired for re-
fusing flu shots.
Gingerich said she gets
other vaccinations, but
thinks it should be a choice.
She opposes "the injustice
of being forced to put some-
thing in my body"
Medical ethicist Art Ca-
plan said health care work-
ers' ethical obligation to
protect patients trumps
their individual rights.
"If you don't want to do it,
you shouldn't work in that
environment," said Caplan,
medical ethics chief at New
York University's Langone
Medical Center. "Patients
should demand that their
health care provider gets flu
shots and they should ask
them."
For some people, flu
causes only mild symptoms.
But it can also lead to pneu-
monia, and there are thou-
sands of hospitalizations
and deaths each year. The
number of deaths has var-
ied in recent decades from
about 3,000 to 49,000.
A survey by CDC re-
searchers found in 2011,
more than 400 U.S. hospitals
required flu vaccinations
for their employees and 29
hospitals fired unvacci-
nated employees.
At Calhoun's hospital,
Alexian Brothers Medical
Center in Elk Grove Village,
Ill., unvaccinated workers
granted exemptions must
wear masks and tell pa-
tients, "I'm wearing the
mask for your safety," Cal-
houn said. She said that's
discriminatory and may
make patients want to avoid
"the dirty nurse" with the
mask.


Associated Press
Bill Staples, a Mississippi Department of Health employee, is given an intradermal shot of flu vaccine Oct. 17 by regis-
tered nurse Rosemary Jones, also with the health department, in Jackson, Miss. A survey by Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention researchers found in 2011, more than 400 U.S. hospitals required flu vaccinations for their employees and
29 hospitals fired employees that were not vaccinated against the virus.


The hospital justified its
vaccination policy in an
email, citing the CDC's
warning that this year's flu
outbreak was "expected to
be among the worst in a
decade" and noted Illinois
has already been hit espe-
cially hard.
The mandatory vaccine
policy "is consistent with
our health system's mission
to provide the safest envi-
ronment possible," the
email stated.
The government recom-
mends flu shots for nearly
everyone, starting at age 6
months.
Vaccination rates among
the general public are gen-
erally lower than among
health care workers.
According to the most re-
cent federal data, about 63
percent of U.S. health care
workers had flu shots as of
November.
That's up from previous
years, but the government
wants 90 percent coverage
of health care workers by
2020.
The highest rate, about 88


ON THE NET
a R.I. union lawsuit against mandatory vaccines:
www.seiul 199ne.org/files/2013/01/FluLawsuitRl.pdf
* CDC: www.cdc.gov


percent, was among phar-
macists, followed by doctors
at 84 percent, and nurses, 82
percent Fewer than half of
nursing assistants and aides
are vaccinated, Bridges
said.
Some hospitals have
achieved 90 percent but
many fall short. A govern-
ment health advisory panel
has urged those below 90
percent to consider a
mandatory program.
Also, the accreditation
body over hospitals requires
them to offer flu vaccines to
workers, and those failing to
do that and improve vacci-
nation rates could lose ac-
creditation.
Starting this year, the gov-
ernment's Centers for
Medicare & Medicaid Serv-
ices is requiring hospitals to
report employees' flu vacci-
nation rates as a means to


boost the rates, the CDC's
Bridges said. Eventually the
data will be posted on the
agency's "Hospital Com-
pare" website.
Several leading doctor
groups support mandatory
flu shots for workers. And
the American Medical Asso-
ciation in November en-
dorsed mandatory shots for
those with direct patient
contact in nursing homes;
elderly patients are particu-
larly vulnerable to flu-
related complications.
The American Nurses As-
sociation supports man-
dates if they're adopted at
the state level and affect all
hospitals, but also says ex-
ceptions should be allowed
for medical or religious
reasons.
Mandates for vaccinating
health care workers against
other diseases, including


measles, mumps and hepa-
titis, are widely accepted.
But some workers have less
faith that flu shots work -
partly because there are
several types of flu virus
that often differ each season
and manufacturers must re-
formulate vaccines to try
and match the circulating
strains.
While not 100 percent ef-
fective, this year's vaccine is
a good match, the CDC's
Bridges said.
Several states have laws
or regulations requiring flu
vaccination for health care
workers, but only three -
Arkansas, Maine and Rhode
Island spell out penalties
for those who refuse, ac-
cording to Alexandra Stew-
art, a George Washington
University expert in immu-
nization policies and co-
author of a study appearing
this month in the journal
Vaccine.
Rhode Island's regula-
tion, enacted in December,
may be the toughest and is
being challenged in court by
a health workers union.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

The rule allows exemp-
tions for religious or med-
ical reasons, but requires
unvaccinated workers in
contact with patients to
wear face masks during flu
season.
Employees who refuse
the masks can be fined $100
and may face a complaint or
reprimand for unprofes-
sional conduct that could
result in losing their profes-
sional license.
Some Rhode Island hos-
pitals post signs announcing
that workers wearing masks
have not received flu shots.
Opponents say the masks vi-
olate their health privacy
"We really strongly sup-
port the goal of increasing
vaccination rates among
health care workers and
among the population as a
whole," but it should be vol-
untary, said SEIU Health-
care Employees Union
spokesman Chas Walker.
Supporters of health care
worker mandates note that to
protect public health, courts
have endorsed forced vacci-
nation laws affecting the gen-
eral population during
disease outbreaks, and have
upheld vaccination require-
ments for schoolchildren.
Cases involving flu vac-
cine mandates for health
workers have had less
success.
A 2009 New York state
regulation mandating
health care worker vaccina-
tions for swine flu and sea-
sonal flu was challenged in
court but was later re-
scinded because of a vac-
cine shortage.
And labor unions have
challenged individual hos-
pital mandates enacted
without collective bargain-
ing; an appeals court up-
held that argument in 2007
in a widely cited case in-
volving Virginia Mason Hos-
pital in Seattle.
Calhoun, the Illinois
nurse, said she is unsure of
her options.
"Most of the hospitals in
my area are all implement-
ing these policies," she said.
"This conflict could end the
career I have dedicated my-
self to."
AP Medical Writer Lind-
sey Tanner can be reached
at www twittercom/Lindsey
Tanner


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Savor the culture ,

and recipes of

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as together they

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Chefs ofNapoli IH


(:hefs of Naipoli II is iwned
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dJily 'soups tsserles
chicken ,indJ \vtl cs-.al ippini
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SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 A9


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, ..,r ;











Flu strikes all 50 states in some form


Associated Press

Here is a snapshot of flu ac-
tivity in all 50 states:
* Alabama: The state Department of
Public Health doesn't tally statewide flu
cases but emergency departments have
been busy treating patients with flu
symptoms. Hospitals have been able to
handle the load without using tents or
other unusual measures.
* Alaska: Flu is widespread, though not
at the high levels being reported in some
other states. There is no vaccine short-
age and no deaths have been reported
in children.
* Arizona: Flu cases are increasing but
authorities aren't calling it a worse-than-
usual season so far. Plenty of vaccine
remains.
* Arkansas: The Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention said Friday that
Arkansas is among a few states in the
southeast in which flu cases spread less
rapidly in the past week, but a state Health
Department spokesman said it's too early
to say cases have peaked there. Nine
people have died, including one child.
* California: Flu activity is on the rise,
but the increase is not unexpected, state
health officials said Friday. Four flu-
related deaths have been reported this
year. Officials said there is no vaccine
shortage.
* Colorado: At least two children have
died from flu-related complications. Sev-
eral providers have reported temporary
vaccine shortages, and one large health
group, Kaiser Permanente, stopped of-
fering flu shots this week but expected to
resume vaccinations with new shipments
expected by this weekend.
* Connecticut: There were 1,680 con-
firmed cases of flu as of Jan. 5, an in-
crease over the past two years. Three flu
deaths have occurred, all in people older
than 65. Vaccine supplies are adequate.
* Delaware: Flu activity is widespread,
and the number of cases is higher than
at this time in recent years. No flu deaths
have been reported and vaccine supplies
are adequate.
* District of Columbia: A big spike in
flu cases have been reported this year -
310 since the season began Sept. 30, an
increase of more than 300 percent over
the entire 2011-12 flu season. No re-
ported deaths. Health officials are still
urging residents to get vaccinated, and
there have been no reports of shortages.
* Florida: Most counties are reporting
mild or moderate flu activity. There has
been an increase in flu-like illness treated
in emergency rooms and doctors'offices,
and two children have died. Vaccine de-
mand is up but flu shots are available.
* Georgia: Flu has reached epidemic
levels. Although activity has declined a
bit, it's uncertain if cases have peaked.
Two adult, flu-related deaths, have been
reported.
* Hawaii: Flu is at a low, steady level
normal for the state, and there is plenty
of vaccine available. No pediatric deaths
or uptick in adult deaths.
* Idaho: Eight older adults have died
from flu-related illness and doctors are
seeing an increase in patients with flu-
like symptoms. There have been no runs
on flu vaccine and the state's supply is in
good shape.
* Illinois: Intensive care unit hospitaliza-
tions and flu-related deaths surpass previ-
ous years and continue to climb, with 27
adult deaths so far. Eight Chicago-area hos-
pitals turned away ambulances earlier this
week because of a surge of patients with
flu-like symptoms, but that situation eased.
* Indiana: Flu is widespread and
deaths have climbed to 15 during what
health officials call a "moderately severe"
flu season. Two of this season's deaths
were in children younger than 18.
* Iowa: Flu problems are increasing
and are worse than in recent years.
Some locations have run out of vaccine,
partly because clinics ordered fewer
doses because of recent mild flu sea-
sons. Iowa doesn't track flu deaths.
* Kansas: The Kansas Department of
Health and Environment has reported one
child flu death. Flu is widespread, but vac-
cine supplies have mostly been adequate.
* Kentucky: Flu has been widespread for
the past five weeks, which is earlier than
usual. State authorities are not aware of


DALE GERHARD/The Press ofAtla


any shortages and no flu deaths in children.
* Louisiana: High levels of flu-like ill-
ness are reported but no child deaths. So
far emergency rooms have not had to
turn away patients to accommodate
those with suspected flu.
* Maine: Authorities say flu cases are
increasing and reaching "epidemic pro-
portions" with widespread illness
throughout the state. Most hospitals are
near capacity, and there have been some
spot shortages of vaccine. Maine doesn't
tally flu deaths, but one school-aged child
has died Maine's first flu-related death
in a healthy child in years.
* Maryland: Flu cases are widespread
and more numerous than expected, but
there are signs things may be stabilizing.
Most patients are older than 65; no chil-
dren's deaths have been reported.
* Massachusetts: A high level of flu ac-
tivity, with 18 deaths, none in children.
The city of Boston declared a public
health emergency on Wednesday and is
working with health care centers to offer
free flu vaccines.
* Michigan: Health officials say the flu
season is worse than previous ones, isn't
slowing down, but has not reached an
emergency level yet. Four children have
died from flu-related illness.
* Minnesota: Some clinics have run out of
vaccine and had to wait a day or two to get
new supplies, but there have no serious short-
ages. There have been 27 deaths, most in
elderly patients.
* Mississippi: High levels of flu-like ill-
ness have been reported, but no child
deaths.
* Missouri: Flu cases began in No-
vember and authorities can't tell if the
season has peaked yet. Illness is wide-
spread. There have been no reported flu
deaths in children.
* Montana: This flu season is shaping
up as the worst since 2009. There are no
reported vaccine shortages. One elderly
person has died from the flu.
* Nebraska: One child and two adults
have died from the flu, where cases are
up this year compared with last year.
There are some spot shortages of vac-
cines, but supplies are adequate in most
places.
* Nevada: Confirmed flu cases are up
57 percent from two weeks ago and the
increase is continuing.
* New Jersey: Hospital emergency
room visits by patients with flu-like symp-
toms are double the number seen at this
time last year. Two children have died,
both with underlying medical conditions
that made them more vulnerable.
* NewYork: The governor has declared
a flu emergency. The order allows phar-
macists give vaccines to anyone 6
months or older, suspending a state law
that limits pharmacists to administering
immunizing agents to those 18 or older.
Two children and at least 10 New York
City adults have died from flu-related ill-


Ed Sessions, of
Erma, N.J., left, receives a flu
shot from registered nurse
Natalie Sendler at a flu shot
clinic Friday in Cape May
Court House, N.J.
Seventeen-month-old Sophia
Stricker momentarily loses
her composure as she
endures a flu shot from Nurse
Katy Whitman on Jan. 11, at
Eugene Urgent Care in
Eugene, Ore. Sophia visited
the clinic with her mom,
Catherine Schmidt. The
clinic reported a steady
stream of vaccination
patients through the day.
ness. Statewide adult deaths aren't
tracked.
* North Dakota: Flu activity is earlier
than usual but not abnormal; one death,
in an elderly resident, has been reported.
* Ohio: There have been nearly 2,000
flu-related hospitalizations since October,
compared to 86 in last year's unusually
mild flu season, and 175 the previous
season. One child has died from flu com-
plications. Sufficient supplies of vaccine
available around the state.
* Oregon: Flu is widespread and in-
creasing, but authorities say it's not out-
side the normal range. No deaths in
children have been reported.
* New Hampshire: The flu season is
more severe than in recent years, but the
state public health director says it's not
yet alarming. So far, 14 flu-related deaths
in adults have occurred, an unusually


high number this early in the season, but
no child deaths.
* New Mexico: There have been no
deaths but 88 New Mexicans have been
hospitalized with flu-like illness compared
with two cases at this time last year. Vac-
cine supply is ample.
* North Carolina: Flu is prevalent in
every county but declined slightly this past
week; authorities say it's too soon to know
if that's a trend. As of Jan. 10, there were
17 reported flu deaths, including 14 peo-
ple older than 65. Local public health de-
partments had adequate vaccine supply.
* North Dakota: Flu activity is earlier
than usual but not abnormal; one death,
in an elderly resident, has been reported.
* Ohio: There have been nearly 2,000
flu-related hospitalizations since October,
compared to 86 in last year's unusually
mild flu season. One child has died from


flu complications; their
deaths last season. The
apartment says there are
of vaccine available aro
* Pennsylvania: Flu i
23 flu-related deaths, o
Hospitals throughout Pe


South Carolina: Flu is widespread
but hospitalizations have slightly de-
creased. Of 22 flu deaths, one was an in-
fant, the rest adults older than 50. The
State's Division of Health and Environ-
mental Control has ample vaccine;
whether there were any shortages else-
where was unclear.
South Dakota: Flu activity is earlier
L and occurring at higher levels than usual.
Nine people have died from flu-related ill-
ness, all older than 75.
Tennessee: Dr. Kelly Moore, the med-
ical director of the Tennessee Immuniza-
tion Program, said the flu season seems
worse than in recent years but that clinic
reporting is often disrupted over the hol-
idays, so whether cases are increasing
or not is uncertain. One child has died
from flu-related illness.
Texas: Flu cases have been reported
in more than half of Texas, and several
county health departments say this sea-
son is worse than in past years. In the last
week of December, nearly 12 percent of
doctor visits were for flu-like symptoms,
almost double the amount for that week
in 2011. The number of cases dropped
last week. At least six Texas children have
died from flu-related illness since last fall.
Utah: Utah officials say flu cases
spiked last week but dipped this week,
and call it an early and active season. No
deaths have been reported. Utah's vac-
ntic City, AP photo cine supply is holding steady with no re-
ports of shortages.
Vermont: Flu cases appear to be on
the rise. Three adults have died, all in De-
cember. Vermont Health Department of-
ficials say flu rates are higher than other
years but the number of deaths does not
appear out of the ordinary.
Virginia: The state hit widespread in-
fluenza activity in December, a month or
two early, which hasn't happened since
the 2003-04 season. Outbreaks have
been reported in schools and nursing
homes in all regions of the state but no
children have died.
Washington: Flu has spread to more
than half the communities in the state;
that's not unusual but it appears to be in-
creasing and authorities say is could be
Associated Press worse than recent mild seasons. There
e were no child have been five lab-confirmed flu deaths
State Health De- in adults and one in a 12-year-old boy.
sufficient supplies Wisconsin: Flu-related hospitaliza-
und the state. tions total more than 1,300, versus 389
s widespread. Of for all of last year. One child has died.
ne was an infant. State officials believe they have an ample
ennsvlvania have supply of vaccine and no shortages. In


reported an influx of cases; at least one
hospital, to free up ER capacity and min-
imize flu transmission, has erected an
outdoors MASH-like "surge tent." Other
hospitals have mobile flu units.
* Rhode Island: Health Director
Michael Fine said flu is "particularly se-
vere" and it could be the worst season in
years. The state has seen 5,568 emer-
gency room visits for flu-like symptoms
since Dec. 10, an average of about 180 a
day. Many people are seeking vaccina-
tion and supplies are plentiful. No chil-
dren have died from the flu.


Milwaukee, hospital emergency depart-
ment visits have tripled over the past few
weeks due to patients with flu-like symp-
toms and ambulances were being di-
verted elsewhere, a city Health
Department spokeswoman said Friday.
* Wyoming: Flu activity is high. One
county ran out of vaccine last week and
the distributor won't have any more flu
vaccine this season. Supplies are avail-
able from many doctors' offices and other
providers, and thousands of people have
already been vaccinated. There have
been no reported deaths.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Auto show arrives in motor city this week


Many visitors

want to touch,

smell new cars
Associated Press

DETROIT Why go to a
crowded auto show when
you can glimpse dozens of
new models on the Internet?
Because you can't catch a
whiff of that new-car smell
through your iPhone. Pho-
tos can't re-create the smell
of leather seats or the
smooth feel of a hood.
At this year's North Amer-
ican International Auto Show
in Detroit, which opens to the
public Jan. 19, visitors can
see 500 cars and trucks
spread over 18 carpeted
acres. At least 800,000 people
are expected to take in the
shiny models, amid the bright
lights and thumping music.
The biggest draw will be
the first new Corvette in
nine years. Technology
lovers can see an experi-
mental concept from electric
carmaker Tesla and a diesel
version of the Jeep Grand
Cherokee. Young buyers can
check out a small SUV con-
cept from Honda. Big
spenders and big dream-
ers can take a gander at
the new Bentley convertible.
But for all the gleaming
metal, most models won't be
new to fans. Corvette lovers
have been salivating over
drawings posted on the Web.
Spy cameras snapped an
Acura MDX last fall, months
before its official debut in De-
troit Mercedes has already
released photos of its E-Class
coupe and convertible.
But even with all those
spoilers, visitors keep flock-
ing to Detroit and other auto
shows. They want to touch
the cars, check out the trunk
space or just hop in.
"You can't do enough on a
screen. You can't crawl in-
side and get a feel for it,"
said Rod Alberts, a 23-year
veteran of the Detroit show
who is its executive director
Detroit is one of 65 shows
held in the U.S. this year,
from a tiny one in Toledo to
New York and Chicago gath-
erings that attract more than
1 million visitors each year
Detroit has been holding an
auto show almost continu-
ously since the early 1900s,
when local dealers lined up
a handful of cars alongside
fishing and hunting gear.
More than half of visitors
at the Detroit show are
shopping for a new car, ac-
cording to informal polls.
And with car sales stronger
than they've been in five
years, attendance at NAIAS
and other shows could be
higher in 2013, after slipping
during the recession. Car
sales rose 13 percent to 14.5
million last year and could
reach 15 million in 2013.
The auto show is the ideal
venue for shoppers because
they can browse without
being pestered by salespeo-
ple, said Michelle Krebs, a
senior analyst with car buy-
ing site Edmunds.com.
"It's like the circus. It's
the only place you can see it
under one roof," she said.
It's also a circus for car
companies. Literally Infiniti
will use performers from
Cirque du Soleil to introduce
its new small car in Detroit.
"Auto shows are one of the
rare moments that the
brand can meet the cus-
tomer, shake their hand,
look them in the eye and say,
'This is who we are,'"' said
Jim Farley, Ford's global
marketing director.
Car companies had to cut
back on their displays dur-
ing the downturn. Most are
no longer doing the kinds of
expensive stunts they did at
the Detroit show before the
sobering recession, which
forced them to close plants
and lay off thousands of
workers. In 1992, then-
Chrysler chief Bob Lutz
drove the new Jeep Grand
Cherokee through a plate
glass window. This year, Lutz
will talk to a holographic


EaS m


ABOVE: Crowds visit the 59th Detroit Auto Show on Jan. 15,
1975, in the Cobo Arena in Detroit. Thousands of buyers and
car fans are expected to crowd Detroit's North American
International Auto Show from Jan. 14 to 27. RIGHT: Chrysler
Group President and CEO Dieter Zetsche is surrounded by
media as he sits on a Dodge Tomahawk concept motorcycle
unveiled Jan. 6, 2003. BELOW: Members of the international
media examine the 1991 Toyota Sera concept car during a
three-day press preview for Auto Show.



-e -.


DETROIT AUTO SHOW: A USER'S GUIDE
* WHEN: Public days are Jan. 19-27. The show is open
from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. every day except Jan. 27, when
it closes at 7 p.m.
* WHERE: Cobo Center in downtown Detroit.
* COST: $12 each. Children under 6 are free.
* WHAT YOU'LL SEE: New cars debuting include:
* Acura MDX concept
* Audi SQ5, R8 and RS5 convertible
* Bentley GT Speed convertible
* BMW 4-Series concept, Z4
* Cadillac ELR
* Chevrolet Corvette
* Honda urban SUV concept
* Hyundai HCD-14 concept
* Infiniti Q50
* Kia luxury sedan
* Lexus IS
* Lincoln MKC concept
* Mercedes-Benz E-Class
* Mini John Cooper Works Paceman
* Nissan Versa hatchback
* Tesla concept
* Toyota Furia concept
* Volkswagen Passat performance concept
Source: The Associated Press


image of Thomas Edison at
the display of electric-truck
maker Via Motors.
And the element of sur-
prise is gone. Icons like the
Ford Mustang and Dodge
Viper were seen for the first
time when sheets were
pulled off of them in Detroit
As recently as 2000, there
were audible gasps when
General Motors revealed
the ungainly Pontiac Aztek.
"There isn't going to be
that sort of shock and awe
that you had at earlier
shows," said Justin Hyde,
senior editor of the Yahoo
Autos' Motoramic blog.
Bloggers are already
abuzz about whether a new


Ferrari supercar will ap-
pear next year in Detroit.
Still, Hyde said, the show
is the best place to get a lot
of information about cars in
a global market that's be-
come huge and fractured.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press

A new year was just be-
ginning an extraordinary
year, in which so much
would change.
Half a century ago, on
Jan. 14, 1963, George Wal-
lace took the podium to give
his inaugural address as
governor of Alabama. His
words framed a fiery rejoin-
der to a civil rights move-
ment gathering strength.
"I draw the line in the
dust and toss the gauntlet
before the feet of tyranny,"
he thundered, "and I say,
segregation now, segrega-
tion tomorrow, segregation
forever!"
Fifty years later, the
words still have the power
to shock. In college classes
like "The Sixties in History
and Memory," today's stu-
dents recoil.
But turn the pages of their
text to a day seven months
later, and there's another riv-
eting oration. At the
thronged Lincoln Memorial,
the Rev Martin Luther King
Jr offered a vision of a "day
when all of God's children,
black men and white men,
Jews and Gentiles, Protes-
tants and Catholics, will be
able to join hands and sing in
the words of the old Negro
spiritual: 'Free at last! Free
at last! Thank God almighty,
we are free at last!"'
Students shiver at the


words and cadence of this
speech and at the contra-
dictions and convulsions of
1963.
"We constantly make the
point," said Donald Spivey,
who teaches "The Sixties"
at the University of Miami,
"that you're hit with all of
these things at once."
What things?
Under the shadow of the
Cold War's threat of "mutu-
ally assured destruction,"
1963 was the year of dawning
arms control between the
U.S. and the Soviet Union;
they signed a Nuclear Test
Ban Treaty. In June, the ad-
versaries agreed to set up a
"hotline" communications
link between the Kremlin
and the White House to en-
sure against a catastrophic
mistake.
For many women, it was a
year of liberation. The 1963
best-seller "The Feminine
Mystique" catalyzed the
modern women's move-
ment. One author said the
book literally saved lives.
Around 1963, the critical
mass of the baby boom gen-
eration was reaching a criti-
cal moment Its leading edge,
teenagers by then, were
starting to recognize what
they wanted to do, to believe
and, significantly, to buy The
music they listened to was
beginning to challenge
givens of the conformist
1950s. Bob Dylan, who sang


Associated Press
TOP: A 17-year-old civil rights demonstrator, defying an anti-
parade ordinance of Birmingham, Ala., is attacked by a po-
lice dog May 3, 1963. That was a year of revolution in race
relations in the United States. BOTTOM: The Rev. Martin
Luther King Jr. waves to the crowd Aug. 28, 1963, at the
Lincoln Memorial for his "I Have a Dream" speech.


of"blowin' in the wind." Mo-
town. And soon the shaggy-
haired, parent-unsettling
Beatles, whose first album
came out in Britain that year,
leading a new wave of Pied
Piper bands who'd produce
much of the generation's
soundtrack
At the center of it all was
the Kennedy administra-
tion, glamorous and youth-
ful, often likened to
"Camelot" the mythical
world lasting, as a Broad-
LEFT: Astronaut
John Glenn sits
with models of the
Mercury space-
craft atop its
launch rocket and
a lunar module
Feb. 8, 1963. He
talks about the
first anniversary of
his historic flight.
RIGHT: The top of
the Washington
Monument and
part of a U.S. flag
are reflected in
the sunglasses of
Austin Clinton
Brown, 9, of
Gainesville, Ga.,
on Aug. 28, 1963,
at the Capitol.


way lyric lamented, just
"one brief, shining
moment."
Then suddenly, in Novem-
ber, the greatest jolt of all in
a year of tumult, one felt still
today: Rifle shots in Dallas
that brought that moment to
a close.
While today's students
have grown up during the
shadowy war on terrorism,
many show no sense of
"what it's like to live in a
culture of optimism."
-Y. i


U"~fi~


Associated Press

DALLAS Robert E
Kennedy Jr is convinced a
lone gunman wasn't solely
responsible for the assassi-
nation of his uncle, Presi-
dent John E Kennedy, and
said his father believed the
Warren Commission report
was a "shoddy piece of
craftsmanship."
Kennedy and his sister,
Rory, spoke about their
family Friday night while
being interviewed in front
of an audience by Charlie
Rose at the Winspear
Opera House in Dallas.
The event comes as a year
of observances begins for
the 50th anniversary of the
president's death.
Their uncle was killed
Nov 22, 1963, while riding
in a motorcade through
Dallas. Five years later,
their father was assassi-
nated in a Los Angeles hotel
while celebrating his win in
the California Democratic
presidential primary
Robert F Kennedy Jr
said his father spent a year
trying to come to grips with
his brother's death, read-
ing the work of Greek
philosophers, Catholic
scholars, Henry David
Thoreau, poets and others
"trying to figure out kind of
the existential implica-
tions of why a just God
would allow injustice to
happen of the magnitude
he was seeing."
He said his father
thought the Warren Com-
mission, which concluded
Lee Harvey Oswald acted
alone in killing the presi-
dent, was a "shoddy piece
of craftsmanship." He said
that he, too, questioned the
report.
"The evidence at this
point I think is very, very
convincing that it was not a
lone gunman," he said, but
he didn't say what he be-
lieved may have happened.


Rose asked if he believed
his father, the U.S. attorney
general at the time of his
brother's death, felt "some
sense of guilt because he
thought there might have
been a link between his
very aggressive efforts
against organized crime."
Kennedy replied: "I
think that's true. He talked
about that. He publicly
supported the Warren
Commission report but pri-
vately he was dismissive of
it."
He said his father had in-
vestigators do research into
the assassination and found
phone records of Oswald
and nightclub owner Jack
Ruby, who killed Oswald
two days after the presi-
dent's assassination, "were
like an inventory" of mafia
leaders the government
had been investigating.
He said his father, later
elected U.S. senator in
New York, was "fairly con-
vinced" that others were
involved.
The attorney and well-
known environmentalist
also told the audience
light-hearted stories Friday
about memories of his
uncle. As a young child
with an interest in the en-
vironment, he said, he
made an appointment with
his uncle to speak with him
in the Oval Office about
pollution.
He'd even caught a sala-
mander to present to the
president, which unfortu-
nately died before the
meeting.
"He kept saying to me, 'It
doesn't look well,"' he
recalled.
Rory Kennedy, a docu-
mentary filmmaker whose
recent film "Ethel" looks at
the life of her mother, also
focused on the happier
memories. She said she
and her siblings grew up in
a culture where it was im-
portant to give back.


Associated Press
Journalist Charlie Rose, right, makes opening comments
as Rory Kennedy, center, and Robert F. Kennedy Jr. look
on before Rose conducted an interview Jan. 11 in front of
an audience at the AT&T Performing Arts Center in Dallas.
The Kennedys are in Dallas as a year of observances
begins for the 50th anniversary of President John F.
Kennedy's assassination.




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A12 SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013


NATION


RFK children



speak about


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Villagers watch Indian Border Security Force soldiers patrol
Jan. 12 at Suchet Garh village, near the India-Pakistan
international border, about 17 miles south of Jammu, India.

Pakistan, India

seek to ease tension


Associated Press
ISLAMABAD Despite
the worst bout of violence
in years along the disputed
Kashmir border, Pakistani
and Indian officials have
kept tension from spiraling
out of control. It's an exam-
ple of how far the archene-
mies have come since
relations were shattered by
the 2008 Mumbai terror
attack.
Risk of escalation re-
mains, but senior officials
from both nations have
sought to limit the poten-
tial damage to relations be-
tween the nuclear-armed
neighbors, which have
slowly warmed since Pak-
istani militants killed 166
people in the Indian
coastal city of Mumbai.
"The violence may have
a negative impact and slow
down the reconciliation
process, but it will not end
the process because, de-
spite the incidents, the two
governments at the official
level are not in favor of es-
calation," Pakistani politi-
cal analyst Hasan Askari
Rizvi said.
Private Indian media
has hyped the Kashmir vio-
lence, which killed two sol-
diers on each side, but the
response in Pakistan has
been more muted, even


among Islamic hard-liners
who are opposed to better
relations with India and
have suspected ties to the
Pakistani military, Rizvi
said.
"That indicates the army
generally wants to improve
relations with India," he
said. "These groups make
noise, but the noise stays
within limits."
India and Pakistan have
been rivals for decades.
The two have fought three
wars since they were
carved out of British India
in 1947 two of them over
the Himalayan region of
Kashmir. The region is di-
vided between the two
countries, but each claims
it in its entirety
They suspended peace
talks after the Mumbai at-
tack, but both countries
have reasons for wanting
better ties.
Pakistan desperately
wants increased trade with
India to help turn around
its stuttering economy The
country's powerful gener-
als cannot afford conflict
with India at a time when
the army is bogged down in
a battle against Pakistan
Taliban militants a fight
that could get even more
complicated with the draw-
down of foreign forces in
Afghanistan.


Women battle a different war

Domestic abuse

rampant in
Sierra Leone


Associated Press
FREETOWN, Sierra
Leone Tears streammed
down Fatmata's face as she
shuffled into the police sta-
tion courtyard, alone and
doubled over in pain after
being held down and beaten
with a stick.
The 26-year-old said it's not
her first battering. This time,
though, she was pressing
criminal charges against her
husband and his girlfriend.
Sitting on a bench and
waiting for an officer to take
her statement, she wiped
her nose and clutches her
side.
"I am in terrible pain,"
she said.
Domestic violence is a
problem all over West
Africa, not least in Sierra
Leone, a nation of 6 million
that became synonymous
with "blood diamonds," sex-
ual violence and hacked-off
limbs in the civil war that
ended in 2002.
Today Sierra Leone can
take pride in having an
elected government and a
five-year-old law criminaliz-
ing domestic violence. It has
more than 40 police units
dedicated to resolving fam-
ily cases including domestic
violence.
"If you won't help her,
who will?" said a billboard
showing a man about to club
a terrified woman while an-
other man tries to restrain
him.
But what the country
lacks, despite its wealth in
diamonds, gold, titanium
and bauxite, is the money to
enforce the law. Nearly two
thirds of its people live on
less than $1.25 a day, and
fewer than a quarter of
Sierra Leone women can
read and write.
Leaving a violent rela-
tionship can be hard for
women in any country, but
in Sierra Leone it's almost


impossible.
A woman who refuses to
have sex with her husband
can be summoned to appear
before traditional leaders
for a reprimand. Even in
death, a husband still has
control. His widow can be
forced to marry his brother
or lose her home, land and
children.
A man can take up with an-
other woman and the mother
of his children will be left
with no legal recourse.
Violence toward women
was rampant in the lawless
1990s.


"Even before the war
things were difficult, but the
war made things worse,"
said Juliana Konteh, the
evangelist missionary who
founded the Women in Cri-
sis Movement to care for
those raped and displaced
in the civil war.
Konteh's is one of the few
organizations that operate
safe houses for battered
women in Sierra Leone.
"Whether you are an ex-
combatant or not," she said,
"everyone is going through
trauma."
In 2012 police investi-


Associated Press
An officer consoles
Fatmata, who came to the
police station Nov. 19, 2012,
to report she was beaten by
her partner and his new
girlfriend, in Freetown, Sierra
Leone. Fatmata decided to
press charges against the
two for the beating, which
left her needing expensive
doctor's visits and X-rays.
Ibrahim, right, 33,
argues with relatives of his
longtime partner, Fatmata,
after allegedly helping his
new girlfriend beat Fatmata,
in Freetown, Sierra Leone.
gated more than 4,000 cases
of suspected domestic vio-
lence, and close to 800 peo-
ple were charged.
But the figures don't tell
the whole story Authorities
acknowledge convictions
are rare. The International
Rescue Committee, a U.S.-
based nonprofit that works
to prevent violence against
women, said in a report: "A
shortage of personnel at all
levels leads to delays and
case withdrawals, in part
from the strong family
pressure to settle out of
court."


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Nation BRIEFS French drive back rebels ""WBRIE

,,, :! mE m_.


1hlily


Associated Press
Fiona Chiang shields her
face from blowing sand
Thursday as she walks on
Carlsbad Boulevard in
Carlsbad, Calif.

Californians deal
with freeze
SAN DIEGO Californi-
ans are bundling up with
sweaters and gloves and
stocking up on firewood as
they endure the latest winter
storm that has brought very
unseasonable freezing
temperatures.
The National Weather
Service said records could
fall as the cold snap stretches
into the weekend.
"It's only going to get
colder," NWS weather spe-
cialist Bonnie Bartling said.
"Early Sunday, you're looking
at possibly mid-30s in down-
town Los Angeles." Long
Beach could see temps dip
into the low 30s, she said.
Family quarrels in
lotto winner death
CHICAGO In the week
since news surfaced that a
Chicago man was poisoned
to death before he was to col-
lect a lottery payout, surpris-
ing details about his
convoluted family saga have
trickled out daily.
Urooj Khan's widow and
siblings fought for months
over the businessman's es-
tate, including the lottery
check.
His father-in-law owed tens
of thousands of dollars in
taxes. His 17-year-old daugh-
ter from a previous marriage
had moved out of her step-
mom's home and into his sis-
ter's after Khan's death. Then
his ex-wife came forward, an-
nouncing she hadn't seen her
daughter in more than a
decade.
In coming weeks, authori-
ties plan to exhume the 46-
year-old Indian immigrant's
body for more tests.
CEO's payday
at HP: $15M
Meg Whitman could get
more than $15 million for her
first year as CEO of Hewlett-
Packard, according to com-
pany filings.
It's a big payday even by
the lofty
standards
of big-time
CEOs. The
chief exec-
utives of
major pub-
lic compa-
nies made M
a median of Whitman
$9.6 million CEO of HP.
in 2011, the
most recent year available,
according to executive pay
research firm Equilar.
But Whitman's $15.4 mil-
lion pay package takes an
unusual formula, one she
hopes will inspire confidence
she is serious about turning
around the ailing computer
company. For the second
year in a row, she will receive
just $1 in salary. She will also
receive a $1.7 million bonus
and about $220,000 worth of
perks, almost all of that re-
lated to use of company
airplanes.
The bulk of her pay,
though, is tied to the com-
pany's performance. She is to
receive $7 million in stock
awards and $6.4 million in
option awards. Options are
the right to buy shares in the
future at the price they're
trading at when the options
are granted, so they're worth
something only if the shares
go up.
-From wire reports


Associated Press

BAMAKO, Mali The
battle to retake Mali's north
from the al-Qaida-linked
groups controlling it began
in earnest Saturday, after
hundreds of French forces
deployed to the country and
began aerial bombardments
to drive back the Islamic
extremists.
At the same time, nations
in West Africa authorized
the immediate deployment
of troops to Mali, fast-
forwarding a military inter-
vention that was not due to
start until September
The decision to begin the
military operation was
taken after the fighters, who
seized the northern half of
Mali nine months ago, de-
cided earlier this week to
push even further south to
the town of Konna, coming
within 30 miles of Mopti, the


Associated Press
This picture released by the French Army Communications
Audiovisual office shows French Mirage 2000 D aircraft fly-
ing to N'Djamena overnight Friday to Saturday, after taking
off from the French military base of Nancy. The battle to re-
take Mali's north from the al-Qaida-linked groups controlling
it began in earnest Saturday, after hundreds of French forces
deployed to the country and began aerial bombardments to
drive back the Islamic extremists.


first town held by the gov-
ernment and a major base
for the Malian military


Many believe that if Mopti
were to fall, the Islamists
could potentially seize the


rest of the country, dramati-
cally raising the stakes. The
potential outcome was "a
terrorist state at the
doorstep of France and Eu-
rope," French Defense Min-
ister Jean-Yves Le Drian
said Saturday
France scrambled Mirage
fighter jets from a base in
neighboring Chad, as well
as combat helicopters be-
ginning the aerial assault
Friday They have also sent
in hundreds of troops to the
front line, as well as to se-
cure the capital.
In just 24 hours, French
forces succeeded in dis-
persing the Islamists from
Konna, the town the fighters
had seized in a bold ad-
vance earlier in the week,
Le Drian said.
Malian military officials
said they were now con-
ducting sweeps, looking for
snipers.


Sports therapy for Sandy Hook


Associated Press
Retired soccer player Alexi Lalas, rear center, watches children play Jan. 7 during a visit by MLS and United States
national team players to the Newtown Youth Academy in Newtown, Conn. The event, which was set up by Hous-
ton Dynamo general manager and Connecticut native Chris Canetti, featured about 40 current and former soccer
players interacting with and signing autographs for 1,000 children in a community devastated by the deadly shoot-
ing at Sandy Hook Elementary School.

Athletes from college topro offer help in Newtown, Conn.


Associated Press

NEWTOWN, Conn. Newtown
first-grader Katelyn Sullivan has
been sleeping in her parents' bed
since last month's massacre at
Sandy Hook Elementary school.
Katelyn, who attends another
school in town, knew seven of the
victims. They were in her Sunday
school or dance class, or just
friends. But on this day, the 6-year-
old wasn't thinking about bad men
or death. She was meeting soccer
stars such as Mia Hamm and Lan-
don Donovan, and kicking a ball
around the field at the Newtown
Youth Academy, a nonprofit sports
center
"The best part was probably play-
ing soccer," she said. "I was playing
with professional players, but I
don't know who they were."
She just shrugged when her par-
ents mentioned that one was Alexi
Lalas, the retired star of the U.S.
national team.
Since the tragedy, Katelyn and
her two older brothers also have


Retired soccer player Mia Hamm,
center, signs an autograph during
the event.

met members of the Harlem Globe-
trotters and the UConn men's bas-
ketball team. Brooklyn Nets
forward Kris Humphries picked
Katelyn up at one event to help her
dunk a basketball.
But what mattered to her parents
was their children were having fun.
"It's just been huge," said Joe Sul-
livan, Katelyn's father "It's a pick-
me-up for the community and the
kids to get back to a little bit of a
sense of normalcy and to kind of


take their minds off of everything
that has happened."
The sports world began respond-
ing shortly after the 20 children and
six adults were killed inside the
school Dec. 14.
New York Giants receiver Victor
Cruz came to play tag football and
video games with the family and
friends of victim Jack Pinto, after
learning the 6-year-old shooting vic-
tim was to be buried in a replica of
Cruz's jersey The Giants later hosted
families from Sandy Hook at a game.
"I didn't want to go in there and
make a speech," Cruz said. "I just
wanted to go and spend some time
with them and be someone they
could talk to, and be someone they
can vent to, talk about how much of a
fan they are of the team, or different
times they watched the Super Bowl."
Later in the month, NBA and
NHL stars helped lead a series of
clinics and games for Newtown
children at the Chelsea Piers sports
center in nearby Stamford. Pro
Lacrosse players did the same in
Newtown.


Commando killed in raid to free hostage in Somalia


Associated Press


MOGADISHU, Somalia -
A French commando raid in
Somalia to free a captive in-
telligence agent ended in
the deaths of 17 Islamists
and a French soldier
France said the hostage also
died in the failed rescue,
but the man's captors de-
nied he had been killed and
claimed Saturday to have
seized a second soldier
Confusion surrounded
early reports of the botched
rescue of the French agent,
known by his code-name
Denis Allex. He was cap-
tured July 14, 2009, in the


east African country and
last seen in a video released
in October pleading for the
French president to help
him.
But it was clear that a
dangerous raid the French
defense minister said was
planned with the utmost of
care had gone horribly
wrong.
French Defense Minister
Jean-Yves Le Drian said
Allex was killed by his cap-
tors and that one French
soldier was missing and one
dead, along with 17 Is-
lamists. The Defense Min-
istry earlier said two
commandos were killed in


the fighting in the Somali
town of Bulomarer
"It was an extremely dan-
gerous mission," Le Drian
said. "Everything indicates
Denis Allex was killed."
The militant Islamist
group al-Shabab, which
held Allex for more than
three years, said Saturday
he remained alive and in its
custody, as was a new cap-
tive a French commando
wounded in fighting.
Le Drian said the opera-
tion in Somalia was unre-
lated to the French
offensive overnight in Mali
to drive back Islamist mili-
tants in the west African


country. There are seven
French hostages in Mali.
Residents of Bulomarer
described hearing explo-
sions and gunfire from what
they called an al-Shabab
base. An al-Shabab official
said fighting began after
helicopters dropped off
French soldiers.
"Five helicopters at-
tacked a house in the town.
They dropped soldiers off
on the ground so that they
could reach their destina-
tion ... but fighting has bro-
ken out," he said on
condition of anonymity be-
cause he was not authorized
to speak to the media.


Years


4--
Associated Press
A Haitian national flag flies
at half-staff Saturday on the
front lawn of the former Na-
tional Palace, marking the
third anniversary of the dev-
astating 7.0 magnitude
earthquake in Port-au-
Prince, Haiti.

Haiti marks quake
anniversary
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti
- President Michel Martelly
urged Haitians to recall the
tens of thousands of people
who lost their lives in a devas-
tating earthquake three years
ago, marking the disaster's
anniversary Saturday with a
simple ceremony.
Martelly also thanked other
countries and international or-
ganizations for their help after
the Jan. 12, 2010 disaster.
"Haitian people, hand in
hand, we remember what has
gone," Martelly said as a gi-
gantic Haitian flag flew at half-
staff before him on the front
lawn of the former National
Palace, a pile of tangled steel
reinforcement bars nearby.
"Hand in hand, we're remem-
bering, we're remembering
Jan. 12."
Passenger has
baby aboard flight
YEREVAN, Armenia -A
passenger has given birth to
her first child aboard an Ar-
menian airline and named her
daughter after one of the flight
attendants who helped with
the delivery.
The birth of the healthy
baby occurred Saturday, two
hours before the long Ar-
mavia airline flight from
Siberia was scheduled to land
in Yerevan, Armenia's capital.
Flight attendant Asmik
Gevondyan noticed 31-year-
old passenger Armina
Babayan appeared to be in
labor and organized the deliv-
ery conducted by several
crew members.
Volcano erupting
in Russia province
MOSCOW A volcano
erupting in Russia's Far East
is sending plumes of gas and
ash high into the sky and cre-
ating a lava lake.
The Plosky Tolbachik vol-
cano is in Kamchatka penin-
sula, hundreds of miles from
the nearest residential areas.
Gennady Karpov, a vol-
cano expert at Russia's Acad-
emy of Sciences in the Far
East, said Friday: "There
were no lava lakes at Kam-
chatka volcanos before now.
We have never seen this
before."
Plosky Tolbachik has emit-
ted jets of hot lava up to 650
feet high.
Vatican criticizes
court ruling
VATICAN CITY The Vat-
ican is pressing its opposition
to gay marriage, insisting Sat-
urday that children should
grow up with a father and a
mother after Italy's high court
upheld a lower court ruling
and granted custody of a
child to his gay mother.
In its decision Friday, the
Court of Cassation said there
was no "scientific certainty or
experience-based data" to
support the father's claims
that the child's development
was being damaged by living
with his mother and her fe-
male partner. Such an argu-
ment was "mere prejudice,"
the court said.
On Sunday, a major
demonstration against gay
marriage is planned for Paris.
-From wire reports


*











EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE








Grand Central c


* Veterans Notes can be
found on
PageA Al7 -
of toda,'s 1
Ch: onicle.


nnial


Associated Press
The mythological figures Hercules, Mercury and Minerva adorn the main facade of Grand Central Terminal, part of a sculptural group created by Jules Alexis, atop
the terminal in New York. Constructed in 1913 by the Vanderbilt family, railroad barons and wealthy industrialists, the terminal is the country's most famous train station
and one of the finest examples of Beaux Arts architecture in America. The building turns 100 on Feb. 1. Departures are announced 10 minutes early, so travelers
will be on the platform on time.



NYC's terminal marking 100 years come Feb. 1


The building's survival is also a testa-
ment to historic preservation: The
landmark was saved from demolition
in the 1970s thanks to a battle spear-
headed by Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis
that went all the way to the U.S.
Supreme Court. In 1978, the court
ruled that cities have the right to pro-
tect historic buildings, even if that lim-
its the owner's ability to develop or sell
the property. The decision legitimized
preservation efforts around the coun-
try
Grand Central was an engineering
wonder when it opened in 1913, with
trains flowing seamlessly over 67 sub-
terranean tracks and thousands of peo-
ple departing and arriving daily from
around the country Purists note that
it's actually not a station, but a termi-
nal, where trains stop and start their
routes rather than passing through.
But it's always been much more than a
place to get on or off a train: It's a spec-
tacular public space with marble
floors, tiled arches, ornate staircases
and even sculpture inspired by Greek
and Roman mythology
"The whole point was that regular
people would feel like they were in a
cathedral," said Jessica Halem, spokes-
woman for the Municipal Art Society.
The terminal also symbolized "the
great era of transportation," said
Mickey Jacob, president of the Ameri-
can Institute of Architects. "The
grandeur and elegance coming into
this space suggested the great adven-
ture beyond."
But the era of luxurious long-dis-
tance train travel began to fade after
World War II. By the time Grand Cen-
tral's restoration began in the late
1990s, the roof leaked, bathrooms were
unusable, pigeons roosted in corners,
and the windows and ceiling were dark
from cigarette smoke. On Christmas


Day, 1985, a homeless woman died in
the waiting room. So many homeless
people lived in the hallways and tun-
nels that the U.S. Census sent in a spe-
cial team in 1990 to count them.
Today the only trains in Grand Cen-
tral are run by Metro-North Railroad
to the city's northern suburbs. But the
railroad's 275,000 passengers are not
the only ones using Grand Central. It
remains the largest train station in the
world, and it is also one of the most-vis-
ited buildings in the world, with
750,000 people passing through daily,
including
tourists and
commuters
using the on-
site New York
City subway M TR
station.
Some of 9:7
those passing
through are :4 Z
shoppers.
Grand Central :I [I ;
has become an
attractive loca- I II Z
tion for dozens
of high-end retailers, from a jeweler to
an Apple store. And while the iconic
Oyster Bar continues to dish up raw
oysters, as it has since 1913, the termi-
nal's restaurants and bars now include
Michael Jordan's The Steak House
N.YC. and the elegant Campbell Apart-
ment, which was once the private
apartment and salon of a 1920s tycoon,
John W Campbell.
If you're visiting Grand Central for
the first time, make a point of contem-
plating its famous features: the tall
windows, grand staircases, chande-
liers, and four-faced clock at the cen-
tral information booth. The clock has
been a meeting point for New Yorkers
for generations and now serves as a


symbol of the centennial.
Just outside the Oyster Bar lies the
whispering gallery Press your face into
a corner and your whisper can be
heard by someone in a corner across
the way
A plaque honoring Onassis' work in
saving the terminal can be found in
Vanderbilt Hall. Onassis was the
widow of President John E Kennedy,
and their daughter, Carolyn Kennedy
Schlossberg, is expected to attend a
centennial launch event in Grand
Central Feb. 1.


the renovation.
Other fun facts for Grand Central
cognoscenti: The times listed on a
board for MetroNorth trains are a
minute earlier than actual departures,
to give passengers precious seconds to
board in time. The information booth's
brass kiosk hides a spiral staircase
connecting to a booth a floor below.
And there's a secret train platform a
few blocks away beneath the Waldorf-
Astoria Hotel, where U.S. presidents
visiting New York usually stay (The
hotel is north of Grand Central but the


-EW H E


One of the terminal's best-known fea-
tures is the ceiling painting of the zo-
diac, with gold-leaf constellations and
twinkling light bulb stars. But a com-
muter in 1913 noticed that the zodiac
was backwards it's a mirror image of
how the sky actually looks. Among the
explanations given: It was painted
from God's point of view, above the
heavens.
While you're staring up, look for a
hole in the ceiling near the Pisces con-
stellation that marks the spot where ca-
bles secured a rocket ship displayed
here in 1957. And in the ceiling's north-
west corner, near the stationmaster's
office, there's a black smudge. That's
the color of the ceiling before


terminal's subterranean footprint ex-
tends from 42nd to 97th streets.) Presi-
dent Franklin Delano Roosevelt, whose
legs were paralyzed from polio, used
the platform to exit a train unobserved.
A car took him into the Waldorf garage
through an underground passage.
On a recent evening, those admiring
the terminal included a group of do-
cents from the Municipal Art Society
who were training to give public tours.
Their varied reasons for becoming vol-
unteer guides show how passionate
many New Yorkers remain about
Grand Central, 100 years after it
opened.
See Page A17


DREAM
VACATIONS
ffpp Eot t


The Chronicle and The Accent Travel Group are If it's selected as a winner, it will be published Please avoid photos with dates on the print.
sponsoring a photo contest for readers of the in the Sunday Chronicle. Photos should be sent to the Chronicle at
newspaper. At the end of the year, a panel of judges will 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River,
Readers are invited to send a photograph from select the best photo during the year and that FL 34429 or dropped off at the Chronicle office
their Dream Vacation with a brief description of the photograph will win a prize, in Inverness, Crystal River or any
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Woman weary of


'Jekyll and Hyde'


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0 WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Doc Martin'PG' MasterpieceClassic PG DVS Masterpiece Classic Abolitionists Doc Martin'PG'
News Nightly Golden Globes Arrivals The 70th Annual Golden Globe Awards Achievement in film and televi- News Supersmile
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N FTS ABC 11 1 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time Revenge "Sabotage" Happy Apartment News Castle 'PG'
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(AE) 54 48 54 25 27 NY NY WarsPG WarsPG WarsPG Wars WarsP PGWars PG Wars PG WarsPG' Wars PG'
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(X 118 170 Nicholson. (In Stereo)'R' Rene Russo. (In Stereo)'R'B Douglas. (In Stereo)'R'
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(FSNFL) 35 39 35 Action Sports World PokerTour World PokerTour The Best of Pride (N) World PokerTour World PokerTour
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59 68 59 45 54 (2004) N Comedy) Brooke Burns. 'NR' B Danielle Panabaker. B 'G'B
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0 303 202 303 N N c c Krasinski. (In Stereo)'PG' 'PG-13' c
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24 38 24 31 Daughter" (2012) Luner, A[Sapienza.'NR' N Annabeth Gish, Jessica Lowndes.'NR' c (2012) Jamie Luner.
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(N 50 119 Alexandra Paul, Cynthia Preston.'NR' N Pardue, Tara Reid. R' Nelson, Michael Riley a
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Dear Annie: I have
been married to
"Bart" for 21 years. I
knew he had issues with al-
cohol. He has a pattern of
getting sober for a few years
and then relapsing over and
over. He is truly a wonderful
guy, but when he drinks, he's
like a different
man. I feel as if I
am living with
Jekyll and Hyde.
I've talked to
him, cried,
begged and 4
threatened sepa-
ration, to no
avail. We recently
had what I
thought was a
good weekend.
After a produc-
tive Sunday AN N
morning, I spent MAIL
the afternoon
cleaning, and he
went to his local hangout.
He came home with a friend
in tow and barely spoke to
me.
After dinner, Bart went
back to the bar "for a few." I
wasn't surprised, but I
couldn't kiss him goodbye,
so I just waved him off and
kept my feelings to myself.
When he returned a couple
of hours later, he was very
upset. He called me names
and claimed I wasn't cordial
to our dinner guest. I nor-
mally don't argue with him
when he's inebriated, but I
finally snapped and told
him to get out of my room.
He said he was going to
leave, and the next day, he
did, although I didn't find
out until his brother called
me at work. So, Bart's left
me, and I don't know
whether our marriage is


Today MOVIES
Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"Gangster Squad" (R) ID
required. 12:45 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"Texas Chainsaw" (R) ID
required. In 3D. 1 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:40 p.m. No passes.
"Zero Dark Thirty" (R) ID
required. 12:15 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
7:05 p.m.
"Les Miserables" (PG-13)
12 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Jack Reacher" (PG-13)
12:30 a.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected
Journey" (PG-13) 4 p.m.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected
Journey" (PG-13) In 3D. 12 p.m.,
6:50 p.m. No passes.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"A Haunted House" (R) ID
required. 1:40 p.m., 4 p.m., 8 p.m.
"Gangster Squad" (R) ID


required. 1:30 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"Texas Chainsaw" (R) ID
required. In 3D. 2 p.m., 5 p.m.,
7:55 p.m. No passes.
"Zero Dark Thirty" (R) ID
required. 1 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:15 p.m.
"Les Miserables" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Django Unchained" (R) ID
required. 12:50 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:05 p.m.
"Parental Guidance" (PG)
1:45 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Jack Reacher" (PG-13)
1:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"The Guilt Trip" (PG-13)
4:50 p.m.
"Lincoln" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:35 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Confidence
6 No -, no gain
10 Jack in a rhyme
15 Sports item
18 "Little Orphan-"
19 Ottoman ruler
21 Armistice
22 Check
24 Fruity beverage
25 Allocation based on
need
26 Jockey
27 Regarding
(2 wds.)
28 Native of (suffix)
29 Interment
31 Island
33 Vituperate
35 Cellphone
communication
37 Promontory
38 Sidestep
39 Numbers
40 Bracelet location
42 Like a lot
43 Shelter
in a garden
44 Swindles
46 Scoundrel
47 Affaire d'honneur
48 French cleric
52 Very pale
53 Retreads
54 Tightened
56 Cold and damp
57 Divide in two
58 Floating platform
59 Wasteland
60 Conscious
62 Poker stake
63 Nab
65 Spike of corn
66 Plane of a kind
67 Frost
68 Skywalker
69 Long story
71 Gaza or Sunset
73 Change the decor
75 Western Indian
76 Quadriceps
location
77 Recline
78 Breakfast fare
82 Made more
manageable
84 Swearword
85 Insensible state


86 Regret
87 and save
90 Nerve or natural
91 Zero in on
93 Attachment
94 Unrestrained
95 Wetland
97 Approach
98 Hum
99 City in Oklahoma
100 Candy paste
102 Refuge
104 Motorist
105 Cereal grain part
107 Secondhand
108 Unbroken
109 Less refined
110 Played a part
112 Ultimate
113 Estimate
114 Precious stone
117 Punctuation mark
118 Broth
119 Pack
123 Breakfast cereal
124 Passion
125 A drink
after the first
127 Consumed
128 Easier said
done
129 Dwindled
131 Liken
133 Sharp
135 Fill to the gills
136 Run off to wed
137 Dampened
138 Made sound
recordings
139 -Angeles
140 Greasy spoon
141 Toward shelter
142 Mimicry


DOWN
1 Aspect
2 Licorice flavoring
3 Kind of fund
or finger
4 Fasten
5 Marjoram is one
6 Stickler
7 Assumed name
8 Type style (abbr.)
9 Old horse
10 Walked
with confidence


"- and Prejudice"
Impolite
High card
Ivan the -
Great skill
Race
of Norse gods
Appellation
Emphasize
On edge
Denials
Oneness
Long-eared
animal
The "I"
Time of day
Brink
Not canned,
not frozen
Dissolute one
Blood vessel
Family member
Opportunity
Ceased
Soldier's weapon
Expensive
Pitt or Garrett
Cook
Pitcher
Preside over,
as a meeting
Gossiped
Tutor
Surreal artist
Itinerary
Elevation
Dry
Clustered mass
Go over again
"- Expectations"
Fruit stone


71 Motto
72 Stopwatch or hourglass,
e.g.
74 Elevator name
76 Melba -
79 Furrow
80 Artilleryman
81 Passover feast
83 Word
of agreement
85 Belief
87 Dross
88 ZIP or area
89 Laugh loudly
90 Degree holder,
for short


92 Blacksmith's block
93 "Seven -
for Seven
Brothers"
95 Thought
96 The elderly
98 Narcotize
101 Banned
102 Treated
with respect
103 Chester- Arthur


Peach or plum, e.g.
Service branch
Farm structure
Brought about
Tin
Food for farm denizens
Beard
Newts
Taj -
Sister of Clio
Thin pancake


Puzzle answer is on Page A18.


Layered rock
Brownish gray
Mink relative
Like untended lawns
Soon
Select
Pro -
- Pasha
Sine non
Beanie


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


over. He didn't take all of his
belongings, so I'm sure I will
hear from him.
I don't know if this is the
alcohol or if he has someone
else on the side. Either way,
he's a mess, and so am I. I'm
worried about him and
about what would happen if
he gets drunk on
the job or drives
while impaired. I
admit that the
thought of cutting
H4 our ties makes
me feel a little re-
lieved, but after
21 years, I'm also
sad. What do I
do? Heartbro-
ken in New York
Dear New
York: It's also
IE'S possible that Bart
BOX is allowing his
drinking to sabo-
tage his marriage
because he thinks you de-
serve better And you do, as
would anyone in your
situation.
Please contact Al-Anon
(al-anon-alateen.org) and
get some counseling with
or without Bart. There are
low-cost options through
your church, local hospitals,
university psychology de-
partments, United Way and
the YMCA.


Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar longtime
editors of the Ann Landers
column. Email questions to
anniesmailbox
@comcast.net, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St., Hermosa
Beach, CA 90254.


A16 SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT


1
Ll





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well as
events to which the public is in-
vited. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.

POST NEWS
Crystal River Ladies
Auxiliary of VFW Post 4272
will have nominations for vice
president at the Jan. 22 meet-
ing. Any member of the auxil-
iary wishing to have that
position must be present to be
nominated. The election will be
at the Feb. 5 meeting.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Saturday
monthly at 1 p.m. for lunch and
coffee at the Country Kitchen
restaurant in Brooksville, 20133
Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50,
east of U.S. 41). All Coastie vet-
erans are welcome. For more
information, call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
Red Tail Memorial Chap-
ter 136 of the Air Force Associ-
ation meets at 7 p.m. Thursday,
Jan. 17, at Ocala Regional Air-
port Administration Building,
750 S.W. 60thAve., Ocala. All
are welcome. Members who
wish to donate items for the
Workforce Connection Home-
less Veterans Stand Down
should bring them to this meet-
ing. Call Mike Emig at 352-854-
8328 for more information.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
All are welcome at the post
yard sale beginning at 9 a.m.
Sunday, Jan. 13. Seafood boil
from 2 to 7 p.m.; cost is $7.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155 is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Lounge
open at 11 a.m. Monday
through Saturday and noon on
Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the American
Legion, American Legion Rid-
ers and 40/8 families have din-
ners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The post is currently taking
consideration for new bands,
deejays and karaoke entertain-
ers for the upcoming year. If in-
terested in being considered as
an entertainer or musician at
the post, call Elfi Baker or Patti
Foster at 352-795-6526.
For more information about
the post and its other activities,
call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at 352-
302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30


p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters, daugh-
ters, granddaughters, great-
granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
wartime. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663,
or membership chairman
Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.
The Auxiliary will have its an-
nual Chili/Cornbread Cook-off
and Chinese Auction on Satur-
day, Jan. 26, at the post home,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River.
After the judging by local dig-
nitaries and the award of
prizes, the chili and cornbread
will be available for purchase.
To enter chili or cornbread,
have it at the post by 11:30 a.m.
Saturday, Jan. 26.
While judges make their de-
cisions, the Chinese auction will
feature many items. Doors will
open about 11 a.m. and the
winning tickets will be picked
about 2 p.m. Everyone is
welcome.
For more information, call
Unit President Sandy White at
352-249-7663, or Chairperson
Barbara Logan at 352-
795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers ac-
tivities such as meals, bingo,
golf, darts, karaoke, pool and
more for members and guests.
Review the monthly newsletter
for activities and updates, and
call the post at 352-746-0440.
The VFW Post 10087 is off
County Road 491, directly
behind Cadence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 746-0440. The
Cake Crab Company Golf
League plays at Twisted Oaks
G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.
Check with Jack Gresham
for tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf League
plays Thursdays alternating be-
tween Twisted Oaks Golf Club
and Citrus Springs Country
Club. Tee time is 8 a.m. New
players, both men and women,
are welcome. You do not have
to be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking is
allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Baked pork chop dinner from
5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 18.
Cost is $8; children younger
than 6 eat for $4. All are
welcome.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call 352-
465-4864.


Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive. We thank veterans
for their service and welcome
any disabled veteran to join us
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tues-
day or Thursday at the chapter
hall. This is also the time that
we accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart at
352-419-0207, or 352-
344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone Com-
mander Linda Brice at 352-560-
3867 or Adjutant Lynn Armitage
at 352-341-5334.One of the
DAVA's projects is making lap
robes and ditty, wheelchair and
monitor bags for needy veter-
ans in nursing homes. All who
wish to help in our projects are
welcome. We need to make the
items certain sizes, so please
call for information. We also
collect toiletry items for the vet-
erans. Good, clean material
and yarn are needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries are at
906 Highway 44 East, Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495, or visit www.vfw4337.org
for information about all weekly
post activities.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.


Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month at 7
p.m. Dunnellon Young Marines
meet 6 p.m. Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4 p.m.
All are welcome at the out-
door flea market and pancake
breakfast on Jan. 19. All-you-
can-eat breakfast is served
from 7:30 to 10:30 a.m. for $5.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive
in Inverness. This is an advo-
cacy group for current and fu-
ture veterans, as well as for
POWs and MIAs. Florida Chap-
ter 7 welcomes new members
to help promote public aware-
ness of the POW/MIA issue
and help veterans in need of
help. Full membership is open
to all individuals 18 years or
older who wish to dedicate time
to the cause. Visit the website
at www.rollingthunderfl7.com
for more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call
club President Ray Thompson
at 813-230-9750 (cell), or email
him at ultraray1997@
yahoo.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at the VFW in
Beverly Hills. Call JV Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Presi-
dent Elaine Spikes at 352-860-
2400 for information. New
members are welcome. Mem-
bership fee is $30 a year. Any
female relative age 16 or older
who is a wife, widow, mother,
mother-in-law, stepmother, sis-
ter, daughter, stepdaughter,
grandmother, granddaughter,
aunt or daughter-in-law of an
honorably discharged Marine
and FMF Corpsman eligible to
join the Marine Corps League,
and female Marines (former,
active and reserves) and asso-
ciate members are eligible for
MCLA membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200, Her-
nando; 352-726-3339. Send
emails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
Call or visit the post for regular
and special events, as well as
meetings. Google us at VFW
4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at the
Sunday buffet breakfasts from
10 a.m. to noon; cost is $5.
Proceeds will benefit cancer
aid and research. Call 352-
726-5206 for information.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.


Call 352-795-5012 for informa-
tion. VFW membership is open
to men and women veterans
who have participated in an
overseas campaign, including
service in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The Korean Campaign medal
remains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans to join or transfer
to our Post 237 family. There
are many activities (call the
post for information), and
monthly dinners sell out fast
and are a big hit. Legionnaires,
Sons of the American Legion
(SAL), or American Legion Aux-
iliary (ALA) are active helping
veterans and the community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org to
view the calendar of upcoming
events. Call the post at 352-
746-5018.
The post will host a benefit
poker run Saturday, Jan. 26,
with proceeds going to support
American Cancer Society Mof-
fitt Cancer Center Ovarian Can-
cer Research and patients and
families served by Hospice of
Citrus County. A $10 entry fee
per rider will include a poker
hand and a meal at the end of
the run. Registration begins at
10 a.m. at American Legion
Post 237 in Beverly Hills. Last
bike in will be 4:30 p.m., when
food will be served. All vehicles
are welcome to participate.
Music will be provided and do-
nated by George Marshall.
There will be door prizes, a
50/50 drawing and fun. For
more information, call 352-
746-5018 or John Roby at 352-
341-5856.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Any veteran who has seen hon-
orable service in any of the
Armed Forces of the U.S. is eli-
gible for membership if said
service was within Korea, in-
cluding territorial waters and
airspace, at any time from Sept.
3, 1945, to the present or if said
service was outside of Korea
from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob Herman-
son at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the former Inverness
Highlands S & W Civic Associa-
tion building at 4375 Little Al
Point, off Arbor Street.. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 or Auxiliary pres-
ident Marie Cain at 352-697-
3151 for information about the
post and auxiliary.


All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food will be
available.
The post will do a bus tour to
Miami and Key West Feb. 18 to
24. Profits from the trip will be
used to purchase a brick for the
Fisher House Walk of Courage
and for new equipment for the
Color Guard of Post 77. The
Fisher House will be a home for
the families of hospitalized vet-
erans at the Malcom Randal
Veterans Hospital in
Gainesville; the Walk of
Courage will be the paved
walkway between the Fisher
House and the hospital. For
more information, call Alice at
352-860-2981.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 352-
726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Dinner is at 6 p.m. and the
meeting follows at 7. All veter-
ans in the Homosassa/Ho-
mosassa Springs area are
invited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166. For informa-
tion about the post or the Amer-
ican Legion, call and leave a
message for the post com-
mander at 352-860-2090. Your
call will be returned within 24 to
48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for
the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at
1 p.m. the third Tuesday of Jan-
uary, March, May, July, Sep-
tember and November at the
Citrus County Builders Associa-
tion, 1196 S. Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491), Lecanto.
All combat-wounded veterans,
lineal descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are invited. To
learn more about Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 MOPH,
visit the chapter's website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.

See VETERANS/Page A18


GRAND
Continued from Page A15

Robert Depczenski said his in-
terest in telling Grand Central's
story to visitors was inspired in


part by the destruction in the
1960s of another beautiful train
station the original Pennsylva-
nia Station, which was torn down
to make way for Madison Square
Garden and the current Penn
Station.
Another volunteer tour guide,


Liza Whiting, says she enjoys let-
ting visitors in on Grand Central's
fun secrets, like the whispering
gallery, the hidden staircase and
the black spot on the ceiling.
And Diane Pagen decided to be-
come a tour guide because of a
personal experience: During a


time when she struggled with de-
pression, visiting Grand Central
always lifted her mood.
Those who've felt Grand Cen-
tral's magic say it's no surprise
that it still inspires strong
emotion.
The building is not only "grand


and elevating with the Beaux Arts
architecture representing the
height of high culture," said
Roberta Lane, senior New York
field officer for the National Trust
for Historic Preservation. "It also
just really appeals to people on a
personal level."


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SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 A17


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I


I










When needed most: Papers, VA and HPH Hospice


As you're reading this, I'm
sorting through papers,
statements, bills, sticky
notes, scribbles in spiral note-
books, and crumpled receipts. I
just lost a veteran family member
who conscientiously kept every-
thing, but never organized it for
"when the time came."
Papers, bills, and so on
are stuffed into box
after box, in no partic-
ular order. He'd fig-
ured that since he'd
end up with no "es-
tate," of any value, then
there'd be no need for
sorting through any-
thing.
Unless the instruc- Barbara
tions are spelled out VETE
exactly, be prepared to
feel lost, bewildered
and confused
I'd confidently gone to his infa-
mous spiral notebook, certain that
everything I'd need to know
would be right there.
Instead, I could barely make
sense of his handwriting that I'd
never had a problem reading in
the decades we'd known each
other. Everything seemed garbled.


C
I


His final wishes were simple on
the surface, but many entities only
give "executors" 10 days to get in-
formation to them. I'm worried it
may take me 10 months just to sort
through all his papers!
The illness came on quickly We
chose to be as brave and upbeat as
possible, even though
survival past a few
months was typically
S less than 6 percent -
but survival was possi-
ble. I asked him if he
still had all his informa-
Stion in the same place
as he'd always had.
"Oh, sure, right there
on my desk in the little
>orcoran spiral book." The reply
ANSM was filled with his cer-
tainty that the issue was
S purely academic.
He'd beat a serious
heart attack in 2007, and had said
then, "This isn't going to get me. I
have no intention of dying."
He said it again with the same
dedication.
He'd collapsed at home and we
wasted no time getting him admit-
ted to the nearest hospital's In-
tensive Care Unit. He went into


cardiac arrest twice within the
first hour.
It quickly became obvious that
he would not survive this, no mat-
ter how determined we were to
get him to his 63rd birthday, less
than a week away
Transferring him anywhere
would be risky, at best We worried
about the distance to the nearest
VA facility, and discovered that
veterans are welcome at the HPH
Hospice House, just the same as
anyone else.
Upon his transfer to the HPH
Hospice House in Lecanto, the
staff met us and gave us a tour of
the facility that offered an imme-
diate feeling of friendship and re-
laxation. Our loved one was
finally comfortable. There were
no more needles in his arms and
the room had the appearance of a
fine hotel suite.
We were invited to spend the
night with him, in his room, on a
sofa bed. It was so very special to
spend that last night with him.
Our loved one had a restful
night. He was quietly checked on
every 20 minutes. We learned spe-
cial ceremonies are held for vet-
erans who come to this facility for


treatment. At 11 a.m. on Dec. 7,
our loved one was honored with a
special certificate and pinning
ceremony led by the Hospice
chaplain.
Honors were given; heartfelt
gratitude was expressed for sacri-
fice he'd made for the preserva-
tion of this country's freedom.
Chaplain and staff members alike
saluted, and a prayer was offered.
I couldn't help but feel how fitting
it was that this was Pearl Harbor
Day
That afternoon, our loved one
took his last breath. He had
served two tours in Vietnam, and
I was one of the few he ever spoke
to of his experiences during his
service as a door gunner and
"tunnel rat." He was offered, and
turned down, a Purple Heart for
some shrapnel he got in his leg.
His response was, "give it to
someone who really deserves it."
Now you know a little about this
veteran we had the honor of hav-
ing as a part of our family
I know there are more of you
out there, and veteran or not,
please make sure to put together
a file with step-by-step instruc-
tions with account numbers,


phone numbers, PIN numbers,
passwords, and anything your ex-
ecutor may need to know.
Get a full set of your military
records. Copy your DD-214s. If
you applied for and/or were ap-
proved for Agent Orange benefits,
or payment of veterans' final serv-
ices, make sure to list exactly who
to contact and what to do about
this.
You can keep everything locked
or otherwise secured in a box,
vault or envelope, to be opened
upon your death.
Update your will, power of at-
torney, medical surrogate/living
will paperwork regularly
Copy every ID card, your Social
Security card, membership and
credit cards you have, and keep
this folder up to date.
Leave clear instructions about
where to locate the originals, be-
cause they will be needed.
0]
Barbara L. Corcoran is the public
information officer of the Citrus
County Veterans Coalition Inc.
She maybe contacted via
Barbiel@ccvcfl.org. Visit the
website at wwwccvcfl.org.


VETERANS
Continued from Page A17

Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Purple
Heart has announced two
scholarship opportunities for
college-bound students -
Chapter 776's College of Cen-
tral Florida (CF) Endowed
Scholarship and the Military
Order of the Purple Heart
(MOPH) Scholarship for Aca-
demic Year 2013/14.
Chapter 776's CF Endowed
Scholarship for Academic Year
2013/14 awards $500 to an ap-
plicant accepted or enrolled at
CF as a full-time student (12 or
more semester credit hours).
Chapter 776 scholarship infor-
mation and an application can
be obtained at www.citruspur-
pleheart.org, or by calling 352-
382-3847. Chapter 776 must
receive scholarship applications
no later than 5 p.m. Feb. 28,
2013.
The MOPH Scholarship for
Academic Year 2013/14 awards
$3,000 to a member of the
MOPH; a spouse, widow, direct
lineal descendant (child,
stepchild, adopted child, grand-
child) of a MOPH member or of
a veteran killed in action, or
who died of wounds before
having the opportunity to be-
come a MOPH member. Great-
grandchildren are not eligible.


Applicant must be a U.S. citi-
zen, a graduate or pending
graduate of an accredited high
school; be accepted or enrolled
as a full-time student (12 se-
mester credit hours or 18 quar-
ter hours) at a U.S. college or
trade school and have at least
a 2.75 cumulative GPA based
on an un-weighted 4.0 grading
system. Scholarship applica-
tions must be received at
MOPH Headquarters in Spring-
field, Va., no later than 5 p.m.
Feb. 13, 2013. MOPH scholar-
ship information and an appli-
cation can be obtained by
visiting the MOPH website at
www.purpleheart.org.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social hour
follows. All Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are welcome. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-746-
1135, Ted Archambault at 352-
382-0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.


Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men's Auxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Monday. LAVFW meets at 5
p.m. and the membership
meeting is at 6:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday at the post. Call
the post at 352-447-3495 for in-
formation about the post and its
activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher at 352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets at 7
p.m. third Thursday at the post
home, 6535 S. Withlapopka
Drive, Floral City. All eligible
veterans welcome. Call Com-
mander Tom Gallagher at 860-
1629 for information and
directions.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors meet at Denny's in Crys-
tal River at 2 p.m. the fourth
Thursday monthly. Call Jimmie
at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2013 will be
at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill. Dates
are: Feb. 9, March 9, April 13
and May 11.


SERVICES & GROUPS
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to vet-
erans in need. Food donations
and volunteers are always wel-
comed and needed. The CCVC
is on the DAV property in Inver-
ness at the corner of Paul and
Independence, off U.S. 41
north. Hours of operation are
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Appointments are
encouraged by calling 352-400-
8952. CCVC general meetings
are at 10 a.m. the fourth Thurs-
day monthly at the DAV build-
ing in Inverness. All active duty
and honorably discharged vet-
erans, their spouses, widows
and widowers, along with other
veterans' organizations and
current coalition members are
welcome. The CCVC is a non-
profit corporation; donations are
tax deductible. Members can
renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Gerald A. Shonk Chapter
70 of Inverness announces the
design and availability of this
year's Citrus County Veterans
Appreciation Commemora-
tive Pin. In keeping with this
year's theme, "Honoring our


Military Retirees," the national
symbol of the bald eagle will
represent the men and women
who made military service a ca-
reer. The image is set in the
outline of Citrus County. The
pins are available for $3 each
by calling the chapter at 352-
344-3464, or John Seaman at
352-860-0123. They are also
available at the Citrus County
Veterans Service Office. All pro-
ceeds benefit Chapter 70's
scholarship fund and veterans'
assistance programs.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call Ed Murphy at the Hunger
and Homeless Coalition at 352-
382-0876, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
Open spots still remain for
those couples and individuals
interested in taking a trip to
Hawaii with a group of veter-
ans, their families and friends.
The annual trek, coordinated
and led by Don McLean, a U.S.
Navy veteran, is scheduled this
year for Sept. 17 to Oct. 4. Par-
ticipants will visit the islands of
Oahu (Hale Koa Hotel), Kauai


(Marriott), Hawaii (stay in the
KMC inside the volcano) and
Maui (Royal Lahina Resort).
Reservations should be made
as soon as possible. Call
McLean at 352-637-5131, or
email dmclean8@tampa
bay.rr.com.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency Ser-
viceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-527-
3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Purple Heart recipients are
sought to be honored with cen-
terpieces with their names on
them at The Old Homosassa
Veterans' Memorial. Call
Shona Cook at 352422-8092.
* Ex-military and retired mili-
tary personnel are needed to
assist the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and
non-law enforcement pro-
grams.Criminal background
check and membership are re-
quired. Email Vince Maida at
vsm440@aol.com, or call
917-597 6961.


Divorces 12/31/12 to 1/6/13
Elizabeth Ann Yant,
Rutherfordton, N.C., vs. Jerry
D. Yant, Crystal River

Marriages 12/31/12 to 1/6/13
Jerry Leon Bland,
The Villages/Diana Kay Bland,
The Villages
John David Blunk,
Inverness/Christine Yvonne
Smith, Inverness
Richard Sylvester Cabral,
Inverness/Laurelei Ellen
Haines, Eustis



Animal Services
ADOPTABLES


Nicky


Special to the Chronicle
Big, sweet and lovable is
how we think of Nicky. Nicky
is a 2-year-old male lab/bull-
dog mix and has the wonder-
ful traits of both breeds. He
is extremely intelligent and
with just a few obedience
lessons so far, he is on his
way to becoming a star stu-
dent. He loves to get atten-
tion and to sit for treats.
Nicky is doing great with his
leash training sessions, too.
At 78 pounds, this big hunk
of love is very family friendly
and seems to like everyone
he meets. Come meet Nicky
at Citrus County Animal Serv-
ices, 4030 S. Airport Road,
Inverness, behind the fair-
grounds. View all adoptable
pets at www.citruscritters.
com. Call 352-746-8400.


For the RECORD

Ronald Steven Dean Jr.,
Inverness/Wendy Jo Ann
Kennedy, Inverness
Regis Francis Hampton,
Istachatta/Cynthia Louise
Messer, Floral City
Nicholas Robert Jahnke,
Inverness/Jasmine Jo Pluger,
Inverness
Damian Anthony Lewis,
Beverly Hills/Patricia Ann
Collins, Beverly Hills
Jacob Emmett McMinn,
Hernando/Crystal Brooke
Elliott, Hernando


Matthew Vincent Zarek,
Petersburg, Va./Kristina
Alejandra Valdes Pages, Miami

Divorces and marriages filed
in the state of Florida are a
matter of public record,
available from each county's
Clerk of the Courts Office. For
Citrus County, call the clerk at
352-341-6400 or visit
www.clerk.citrus.fl.us. For
proceedings filed in another
county, contact the clerk in that
area.


FOR THE RECORD
U Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida are
a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus County,
call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the website at
www.clerk.citrus.fl.us. For proceedings filed in another
county, contact the clerk in that area.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A16.

F1A I H PSA N SPIRIAT B A T
A N N EIS U LTAN T R UC EIR E IN
CI D EIRIT R I AGER D E R AS TO
EIB U R IA RHODE RE V IL E
TEXT NESS E VADE FIGURES
WR IST ADOREAR BOR
CH EATS ROGUED U EL AB B E
CHA L K YIT IES ENiS EIDIRAW
HA L VIEIRA FT A THE HIAIWIAK E
A NTE COLLAR EA RG LI DER
ICE L U K E EP IC S TR P
RIE D OUTE T HIG H L IE EG GS
L OO EIMA R E A0 H RIO0N E

A NU G AT HAV E N DRI V ER
G ERMIUS ED SIOL ID C RIU DE R

EMERALD CO L ON SOUPI STOW
FA R IN/AIARR HCHASEIRIAT E
T H A N WN ED EQ UATEIAIC ACU T E
SATEE L OPE DEU L L E D T A P E D
L OS D N ER AL E E A PIE RY
1-13 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


A18 SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013


VETERANS & TOGETHER


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE











SPORTS


Shorthanded
No. 11 UF
pounds SEC
foe LSU on
boards./B5


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE i


0 Recreation briefs/B2
0 NFL/B2, B4
0 Tennis, cycling/B3
0 Sports briefs/B3, B4
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Basketball/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Peterson, Watt unanimous All-Pro picks


Associated Press
Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson's 2,097-yard season
helped him become a unanimous selection to the NFL All-Pro team.


Associated Press
NEW YORK It's unanimous,
on both sides of the ball.
Vikings 2,000-yard man Adrian
Peterson and Texans pass-swat-
ting end J.J. Watt were unanimous
choices for The Associated Press
All-Pro team announced Saturday
Peterson, who came within 9
yards of breaking Eric Dicker-
son's single-season rushing
record, and Watt, who led the
NFL with 20 1-2 sacks, were se-
lected by all 50 members of a na-
tionwide panel of media
members who cover the league.
Peterson is a three-time All-
Pro, while Watt represents lots of
new blood. He's among 17 players
making their All-Pro debuts.
"Obviously it's a huge honor, es-
pecially for being such a young


in


guy," said Watt, a second-year pro.
"It's crazy to even think about. It's
very humbling and very motivat-
ing. It makes me want to do it
again and again."
Peyton Manning made his sixth
team, the previous five while
quarterbacking Indianapolis. He
led Denver to the AFC's best
record, 13-3.
Also chosen for the sixth time
was Atlanta tight end Tony Gonza-
lez, who this season moved into
second place on the career recep-
tions list San Francisco linebacker
Patrick Willis made it for the fifth
time in his six pro seasons.
The 49ers had the most All-
Pros, six: Willis, fellow LBs Na-
Vorro Bowman and Aldon Smith,
guard Mike lupati, safety Dashon
Goldson and punter Andy Lee.
"As an organization, we take


e door


.,y.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ .1*-J'' ::: ; : i.;.~~~?*~irrr r


Associated Press
Baltimore Ravens wide receiver Jacoby Jones celebrates as he crosses the goal line for the game-tying touchdown against the Denver
Broncos with 31 seconds left in the fourth quarter of an AFC divisional playoff game Saturday in Denver. The Ravens won 38-35 in the
second overtime on Justin Tucker's field goal following an interception thrown by Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning.

Baltimore upends top seed Denver 38-35 in OTto reach AFC title game


Associated Press
DENVER Welcome to
NFL immortality, Joe Flacco.
Somewhere up there in the
all-time playoff archives near
the "Hail Mary" by Staubach
and the "Immaculate Recep-
tion" by Franco now lives the
"Flacco Fling" by the Balti-
more Ravens quarterback.
One big throw down the side-
line, 70 make-or-break yards on
a wing and a prayer a high,
arcing touchdown pass that


soared through the icy air, flew
over two defenders, landed in
the hands ofJacobyJones, saved
the game for Baltimore and kept
Ray Lewis' 17-year career going
at least one more week.
The record will show Justin
Tucker kicked a 47-yard field
goal 1:42 into the second over-
time Saturday to give the
Ravens a 38-35 victory over
Peyton Manning and the Den-
ver Broncos. The highlight?
That would be Flacco's game-
tying touchdown to Jones on


third-and-3 from the 30 with 31
seconds left in regulation and
no timeouts.
"At that point," Flacco said,
"you have to start taking shots.
You have to get a little lucky."
And while Flacco gets to cel-
ebrate that throw, Manning will
have a long offseason to think
about a really bad one.
On Denver's second posses-
sion of overtime, he stopped
and threw across his body to
the middle of the field and into
the arms of Ravens cornerback


Corey Graham at Denver's 45.
Baltimore (12-6) ran five plays
and gained 16 yards before
Tucker sailed his winning kick
down the middle.
The Manning throw, in-
tended for Brandon Stokley,
was one quarterbacks from jun-
ior high to the pros are advised
not to make. It's a throw that
unraveled all the good Manning
has accomplished during this,
his comeback season from neck
See .Page B4


great pride in the success and
recognition of our players," 49ers
general manager Trent Baalke
said. "This type of acknowledge-
ment only comes from hard work
and a team-first mentality, which
all six of these men exhibit on a
daily basis. They play the game
the way it was meant to be
played, and are very deserving of
this honor."
Seattle was next with RB Mar-
shawn Lynch, center Max Unger,
cornerback Richard Sherman
and safety Earl Thomas. All were
selected for the first time.
Sherman was incensed when
he didn't make the Pro Bowl. He
was thrilled with the news he
made the All-Pro team "because
that's comparing the whole
league."
See P Page B4



NHL on


way back

League, players

finally come

to agreement

Associated Press
NEW YORK NHL
hockey is finally back, and this
time it's official.
Nearly one week after a
tentative labor deal was
agreed to by the league and its
players, the sides agreed to a
required memorandum of un-
derstanding (MOU) on Satur-
day night that truly makes the
lockout a thing of the past.
Training camps will open
on Sunday, and a 48-game reg-
ular season will begin next
Saturday. The signing of the
MOU also paved the way for
the NHL to release the long-
awaited revised schedule.
Twenty-six of the 30 teams
will play next Saturday All
games will be intraconference
this season.
It took another lengthy ne-
gotiation to finally end the
four-month lockout. The sides
worked on the MOU all week,
after a tentative deal was
reached last Sunday morning
the 113th day of the lockout
and needed all day Satur-
day to finish it.
The announcement that the
deal was signed came several
hours after the union easily
ratified the tentative agree-
ment that was reached after
an all-night, 16-hour bargain-
ing session last weekend.
The more than 700 union
members had a 36-hour win-
dow from Thursday night until
Saturday morning to vote elec-
tronically The NHL board of
governors unanimously ap-
proved the deal on Wednesday.
The NHL hoped to open
camps on Sunday, and that
prospect seemed in jeopardy
Saturday until the document
was signed at 10 p.m. EST
The new deal is for 10 years,
but either side can opt out of
it after eight. The previous
agreement was in effect for
seven seasons.
While this negotiation was
long, the sides were able to
rescue at least part of the


See Page B4


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Double trouble


Associated Press
New England Patriots tight ends Rob Gronkowski, left, and Aaron Hernandez are part of a new breed of tight end that is
a matchup problem for both linebackers and defensive backs due to their combination of size, strength and speed.


Pair ofPatriots TEs

could given Texans

fits inplayoffgame

Associated Press

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. The New
England Patriots didn't need Rob
Gronkowski when they dominated
the Houston Texans last month.
Now he's back.
And that gives the Texans, 42-14 los-
ers on Dec. 10, a tougher challenge in
Sunday's rematch in a di-
visional playoff game. AFC div
"Obviously, he's a great playoff
player," Patriots wide re-
ceiver Wes Welker said Hous
Thursday "So any time Texans
you can throw him in a
there, it's a good thing." a w
It's even better when Patrots
Gronkowski is out there U Time: 4:
with their other star tight today.
end, Aaron Hernandez.
But they played to- 0 TV: CBS
gether in just five games
this season. Hernandez missed six of
the first 10 with a sprained right
ankle. Then Gronkowski sat out the
next five with a broken left forearm
before returning for limited action in
the regular-season finale, a 28-0 win
over the Miami Dolphins in which he
caught just two passes, one for a
23-yard touchdown.
In their previous two NFL regular
seasons, Gronkowski played in all 32
games, Hernandez in 28. They com-
bined for 87 catches in 2010 and 169
in 2011. They were productive when
healthy this season with Gronkowski
catching 55 passes with 11 touch-


downs and Hernandez grabbing 51
with five scores.
"Two's always better than one,"
special teams captain and wide re-
ceiver Matthew Slater said.
But to Tom Brady, just having them
on the field doesn't mean anything.
They need to produce.
"It's a matter of execution more
than anything," the Patriots quarter-
back said. "Just because (Gronkowski)
may have the opportunity to be out
there on a particular play doesn't
matter if we don't execute it well."
Gronkowski was protecting his left
arm when he faced Miami, trying to
keep it away from contact. The im-
portance of his health
isional was evident last year
Same when his playing status
was listed as question-
iton able for the Super Bowl
(134) just 48 hours before the
England game.
He had suffered a high-
(12-4) ankle sprain two weeks
30 p.m. earlier in the Patriots'
23-20 win over the Balti-
more Ravens in the AFC
championship game.
That hampered him in
the Super Bowl
He had just two catches for 26 yards
after a season in which he had 105 re-
ceptions, 15 of them in the other two
postseason games.
On the last play of the 21-17 loss to
the New York Giants, Brady made
one desperation heave for the cham-
pionship, a long pass to the right side
of the end zone on the last play Her-
nandez and three Giants went up for
the ball, Gronkowski lunged for it as it
was heading for the ground, and it fell
incomplete.
After the season, Gronkowski had
arthroscopic surgery on the ankle.


Then he broke his forearm while
blocking on an extra point in a 59-24
win over the Colts. He still may not be
completely healthy, but Gronkowski is
ready for whatever he's asked to do.
"I'll give the coaches a great look of
what I can do (in practice) so they're
prepared for the game and what to
call," he said. "So whatever the
coaches have in mind, I've just got to
perform the best I can."
The better he and Hernandez do
that, the more coverage they're likely
to draw. And that would give wide re-
ceivers Welker, Brandon Lloyd and
Deion Branch more room to operate.
"The more weapons you have, the
more guys have to pay attention to
those guys," Welker said. "Obviously,
Aaron and Gronk are definitely guys
you have to pay attention to."
The double threat they pose,
though, is no guarantee of success. In
their five games together, the Patriots
are just 3-2.
Gronkowski caught five touchdown
passes in dominating wins over the
St. Louis Rams, Buffalo Bills and In-
dianapolis Colts in which Hernandez
was sidelined. Hernandez caught two
scoring passes in the last month's rout
of the Texans.
Today, as a 9 1/2-point underdog,
Houston will face Gronkowski for the
first time in his pro career
"He's exceptional," Texans coach
Gary Kubiak said. "If the ball is close
to him, he's going to catch it The thing
about him, people play him with cor-
ners on him. They play him with
linebackerss on him. They play him
with safeties. His size is just such that
it's just hard. You get in there and bang
with him, you're going to lose that bat-
tle. Obviously, we didn't see him the
first time around so it'll be different
for us, but a big, big challenge for us."


Falcons WRs will


challenge Seahawks


Associated Press

RENTON, Wash. -
Taken individually, Roddy
White and Julio Jones rank
among the NFL's elite at
wide receiver
As a tandem, Seattle cor-
nerback Richard Sherman
doesn't know if there is a
better duo.
"As a tandem, they're
probably the top tandem out
there," Sherman said. "It's
going to be a
tough matchup
for us but it's NC
fun to play playoff
against good Sea
players."
Today's NFC Seahawl
divisional play- at At
off game be- Falcons
tween Seattle
and Atlanta 0 Time: 1
will feature a m TV: FOX
fascinating
matchup be-
tween Sherman and fellow
Seahawks cornerback Bran-
don Browner and the Fal-
cons' receiving duo of White
and Jones.
It's the big, physical cor-
nerbacks of the Seahawks,
who because of their skills
allow Seattle's defense to be
unique, against the big,
physical and fast star re-
ceivers of the Falcons who
make the offense go.
"I expect our guys to try to
play like they always play.
They don't need to change
anything because we're not
doing anything different,
we're going to try and hang
with them, and we'll find out
what happens," Seattle
coach Pete Carroll said.
"This is probably the best


("
I-l


L


Associated Press
Seattle Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman expects to
be challenged by Atlanta Falcons wide receiver duo Roddy
White and Julio Jones today.


Recreation BRIEFS


County 11-under AAU
team holding tryouts
The Raiders 11-under travel base-
ball team is setting appointments for
tryouts for 10-and 11-year-olds.
To call and schedule a tryout, call
352-302-5644.
Legends track event
scheduled for Feb. 16
The inaugural Nature Coast's
Legends of the Spring Track and Field
Meet is scheduled for Feb. 16 at
Lecanto High School.
The deadline is Feb. 11 to pre-
register, which you can do at www.
active.com.
There are four races:
The All Comer's Portion is for
grades K-6.
The Future Legends is for grades
7-12.
The Legends Meet is for alumni
of schools in the following counties:
Citrus, Sumter, Hernando, Marion,
Dixie, Levy, Lake, Pasco and Alachua.
There will be a trophy given out to the
winning school.
The Open is for anyone over 18
who wishes to participate unattached
to a school. This category is not a
team-scoring event.
There is also a pre-event pick up
and social from 5:30 to 8: 30 p.m. on
Feb. 15 at Beef 'O' Brady's in Crystal
River.
Volunteers needed for
Youth Basketball League
Citrus County YMCA is currently


seeking to connect volunteers
through its Y Community Champions
program. Volunteers are needed for
the Winter Youth Basketball League
to begin Jan. 28 in Crystal River at
the Key Training Center.
The Youth Basketball League will
run for 10 weeks (two weeks of prac-
tice and eight weeks of games) and is
a friendly noncompetitive league cen-
tered on teamwork and good sports-
manship. Volunteer coaches would be
needed one weekday evening for
practice, and on Saturday for games.
Referees and score keepers are also
needed for Saturday games. Basket-
ball experience and/or a youth sports
background is preferred. All volun-
teers must undergo a background
screening.
For more information or to volun-
teer, call 352-637-0132, or stop by the
office at 3909 N. Lecanto Highway in
Beverly Hills.
Afterschool clubs
resume Monday
The Citrus County YMCA's After-
school Enrichment Clubs will resume
their normal schedule for the second
half of the school year by offering a
third session beginning Jan. 14.
The Afterschool Clubs will be of-
fered at: Central Ridge Elementary,
Citrus Springs Elementary, Crystal
River Primary, Floral City Elementary,
Forest Ridge Elementary, Homosassa
Elementary, Inverness Primary,
Lecanto Primary, Pleasant Grove Ele-
mentary and Rock Crusher Elemen-
tary. The clubs are open to all children


in kindergarten through fifth grade.
The upcoming session will offer kids
the opportunity to participate in soccer,
basketball cheerleading and two new
art programs, introduction to water-
color and introduction to drawing.
The Citrus County YMCA has re-
ceived a grant for the Afterschool Pro-
grams from Suncoast Federal Schools
Credit Union. This grant has enabled the
Y to provide many full scholarships this
year to children across the county to
participate in the Enrichment Clubs. To
apply for the grant scholarship and fi-
nancial assistance for other YMCA pro-
grams, call the Y office at 352-637-0132.
Youth Basketball
registration open
Citrus County YMCA is now taking
registrations for its 2013 Winter Youth
Basketball League, which begins Mon-
day, Jan. 28.
The league will run for 10 weeks
(two weeks of practice and eight
weeks of games) and is open to chil-
dren ages 3 through 12. The Junior
League will have ages 3 through 5,
and the Youth League will consist of
6- through 12-year-olds with several
age brackets. Practice will be once a
week on a weekday evening, with
games being played Saturday. All
practices and games will be at the
Key Training Center Chet Cole Life
Enrichment Center gymnasium.
Open tryouts and a skill assess-
ment will be given Monday, Jan. 28,
to determine team placement. The
league cost is $85 for ages 6 to 12,
and $65 for 3 to 5. Scholarships are
available through the YMCA's Finan-


cial Assistance program. To apply,
call the office at 352-637-0132.
To register for the league, visit
www.ymcasuncoast.org and download
the form on the Citrus County page.
Visit the office at 3909 N. Lecanto
Highway or call 352-637-0132 for
more details.
Stargazing at
the preserve
Back by popular demand, the
Chiefland Star Party Group will pres-
ent a telescopic view of the stars and
planets beginning at 6 p.m. Friday,
Jan. 18, at the Withlacoochee Gulf
Preserve.
It will begin with a laser show of the
constellations. Several large telescopes
will be available for viewing. Multiple
objects will be observed, including the
bands on Jupiter and its moons.
The late-rising moon gives little
night light interference for better
stargazing conditions. The preserve
has very low artificial lighting, which
adds to the experience.
For safety, it is recommended par-
ticipants arrive before sunset to sign
in. Bring a flashlight and bug spray. If
possible, bring a piece of red tissue
paper along to dim the flashlight for
better star viewing for everyone.
Visit www.withlacoocheegulfpreserve
.com.
Come learn
'About Boating Safely'
The United States Coast Guard
Auxiliary, Homosassa Flotilla 15-4, will
conduct a four-session "About Boating


Safely" program from 7 to 9 p.m. Mon-
days, Jan. 14 and 21, and Thursdays,
Jan. 17 and 24, at the West Citrus
Community Center, 8940 Veterans
Drive, Homosassa.
Subjects covered will include
knowledge of your boat, boating
preparation, how to navigate on the
waterways, safe vessel operation,
the legal requirements, both federal
and state. Also included will be infor-
mation on boating emergencies/what
to do, carbon monoxide dangers and
hypothermia warnings.
At the completion of the program,
students will receive a certificate of
completion, safe boating card and the
knowledge and information for safe
boating to truly enjoy the beautiful
Florida waters. Total cost is $30.
For more information or to sign up
for this class call Ned Barry at
352-249-1042 or email nedbarry@
tampabay.rr.com.
Zumba offered
at Dunnellon church
Zumba, the Latin-inspired dance-
fitness class, is offered at 4:30 p.m.
Monday and Thursday afternoons at
Dunnellon Presbyterian Church,
20641 Chestnut St.
Call 352-489-3021.
Club offers
Zumba lessons
Yankeetown/Inglis Woman's Club is
offering Zumba classes in air-
conditioned comfort from 5:30 to
6:30 p.m. Monday and Wednesdays.
Everyone is welcome. For informa-
tion, call 352-447-2057.


B2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013


SPORTS


pair and pair that you could
match up, and because of
the size, and because of
their physical nature in the
way that they play, it's going
to be really exciting to see."
While neither was the Fal-
cons' leading receiver that
honor went to tight end Tony
Gonzalez White and Jones
are coming off excellent reg-
ular seasons. White had
more catches with 92 versus
Jones' 79. Jones caught more
touchdowns
with 10, com-
isional pared to
f game White's seven.
ttle They combined
for more than
kS (12-5) 2,500 yards
lanta receiving.
(13-3) But Browner
and Sherman
).m. today, were stars of
the defensive
side. They
combined for
11 interceptions despite
Browner missing four games
due to suspension and 30
passes defensed, with 24 of
those by Sherman.
Whoever wins those
matchups likely won't be the
most important element in
Sunday's game. But it could
be the most entertaining.
"Everybody is talking
about it," Atlanta center
Todd McClure said.
"They've got good corners.
We've got good receivers. I
think when you look back on
this game Sunday after-
noon, whoever wins that
matchup will probably be
successful on the field.
There's a lot more to it but I
think that will be one
deciding factor."


v
I

k


p


vi





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Murray's new angle


Player atAussie

Open as Grand

Slam champ

Associated Press

MELBOURNE, Australia The
novelty of being the first British
man to win a Grand Slam title in
76 years is about to give way to the
reality of being a reigning major
winner.
It's just another reason Andy
Murray has found to keep Ivan
Lendl in his corer.
Murray's career-changing win at
the U.S. Open in September came
shortly after his breakthrough win
at the London Olympics, where he
avenged a painful defeat on the
same court to Roger Federer at
Wimbledon.
The 25-year-old Scot said it was
the most intense three months of
his life. He's had time to celebrate
the win and dwell on its signifi-
cance, and now he is days away
from his first Grand Slam event
since, and at a venue where he has
twice lost in the final.
"Obviously, the last few years I
got close but never managed to get
over the final hurdle," he said of his
four previous failures in Grand
Slam finals. "So whether it was a
mental thing, whether it was things
in my game I needed to improve,
physical things, who knows exactly
"But now that I've managed to do
it, I hope that when I'm in those sit-
uations again I'll deal with them
better and put less pressure on my-
self, which obviously will help me
play better"
Murray's biggest obstacles to a
second Grand Slam remain top-
ranked Novak Djokovic, who is aim-
ing for a third consecutive
Australian Open title, and No. 2-
ranked Federer, who has won four
Australian titles among his 17 ma-
jors. Murray landed in the same half
of the draw as Federer, meaning
they could potentially meet in the
semifinals.
Djokovic is in the other half and
has the more favorable run to the
final. In the absence of the injured
Rafael Nadal, another Spaniard -
David Ferrer- moves up to the No.
4 seeding. Ferrer has never
reached a major final and would
likely have to beat Djokovic, if re-
sults go according to the seedings,
in the semifinals to reach that ca-
reer milestone.
Serena Williams has won five Aus-
tralian Open titles, more than any
woman in the Open era, and with a
run of 35 victories in her last 36
matches, is among the top con-
tenders again in Melbourne. Her run
includes the titles at Wimbledon, the
London Olympics, the U.S. Open, the
WTA Championship and the Bris-
bane International last week.
Top-ranked Victoria Azarenka
hasn't added to her Grand Slam col-
lection since winning at Melbourne
Park last year, when she beat Maria
Sharapova in the final. And she'll
likely have to beat Williams to
reach the final after both were
drawn in the same half.
In recent seasons, Murray has ar-


Associated Press
Andy Murray comes into Monday's Australian Open after winning his first Grand Slam title at the 2012 U.S. Open.


rived in Australia at the start of the
season to answer questions about
that long British drought that dated
to Fred Perry's last major win in
1936.
Not anymore. Since Lendl first
joined him as coach this time last
year, the pair have worked together
to hone his game. Lendl lost his
first four Grand Slam finals, as well,
before going on to win eight majors.
So Murray is confident that
Lendl's guidance will continue to
serve him well.
"Having someone like Ivan around
me as well he went through a sim-
ilar sort of thing- so that's obviously
helped as well," Murray said. "He's
given me some advice on how to deal
with certain things that come with
winning big events."
Murray said it was hard to de-
scribe in a few words the difference
that Lendl has made to his game.
"We've worked on some minor
technical things, some mental
things, and we've obviously worked


on tactical things as well," he said.
"But he tries to keep things fairly
simple and not overcomplicate
things. That's something that I think
especially at the beginning of my
career I struggled with."
Federer thinks Djokovic is the fa-
vorite at Melbourne Park, where he
has won the last two titles.
"He's probably been the best hard-
court player over the last couple of
years, even though Murray won the
U.S. Open," he said. "Andy Murray is
playing great and only going to get
stronger in the next couple of years."
Djokovic lost to Australia's
Bernard Tomic at the Hopman Cup
mixed-team competition last week,
but will be taking the Australian
Open a lot more seriously
"It's a huge challenge," he said. "I
love the Australian Open. That
court brings back the best memo-
ries of my career.
"I like the hard court, I like the
conditions and I'm going to go for
the trophy, of course. I have high


ambitions for myself, but I'm ab-
solutely aware that it's going to be
very difficult because today's
Grand Slam is very competitive.
"Andy Murray winning his first
Grand Slam title last year also got
him to this group of players who are
serious candidates to win the Aus-
tralian Open title."
Federer has changed his ap-
proach for this Australian Open,
avoiding playing in a warm-up tour-
nament in 2013.
"I'm confident if mentally I'm
fresh, which I feel I am, and physi-
cally I am fine, which I am, too, that
I will play a good Australian Open,"
he said. "I think it's an exciting one.
We had four different Grand Slam
champions this last year and every-
body seems in great shape. There's
not one you could say he's not play-
ing so well except Rafa, who's obvi-
ously not playing.
"I've never played a poor Aus-
tralian Open, so of course I'm hop-
ing for a similar result"


NCAA probe on

Miami could be closing


Associated Press

CORAL GABLES The
nearly 2-year-old NCAA
investigation into Miami's
compliance practices may
be nearing an end.
Two people with knowl-
edge of the situation told
The Associated Press on
Saturday that the NCAA is
scheduling meetings to
discuss specific allega-
tions with individuals who
are believed to have com-
mitted violations found
during the inquiry Some
meetings will take place
Monday, said the people,
who spoke on condition of
anonymity because nei-
ther the NCAA nor Miami
authorized them to reveal
the developments publicly
The reviewing of spe-
cific findings is a sign that
the investigation phase is
ending, meaning Miami
may finally receive its no-
tice of allegations letter in
the coming days. Typically,
schools review at least one
draft of the notice before it
formally arrives.
The NCAA does not
comment on ongoing in-
vestigations. Miami's state-
ment throughout the
investigation has been that
it is cooperating and not
commenting further.
Earlier this month,
Miami coach Al Golden
told the AP that he did not
expect the university to be


surprised by the NCAA's
findings.
"We just want to receive
the notice," Golden said.
"The day we do that is the
day we take a big step for-
ward. I don't think there's
any question that will be a
release. And the good thing
there is we don't anticipate
any shock or any surprise."
Miami's receipt of the
notice of allegations is
simply the end of one
phase of the process.
Up next would be the
sanctions phase, when the
actual penalties against
the Hurricanes would be
handed down. Typically,
schools and individuals
named in the notice of al-
legations have 90 days to
file a response to the
NCAA's findings, all of
which would be reviewed
by the committee on in-
fractions which oper-
ates separately from the
NCAA's investigative arm.
If the notice of allega-
tions is, in fact, looming,
that means Miami may
find out its punishment by
perhaps May or June.
Some of the sanctions
have already gone into ef-
fect, since they were self-
imposed. Miami's football
team has missed three
postseason games two
bowl games and what
would have been an ap-
pearance in this season's
ACC championship game.


Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas Lance
Armstrong said he will an-
swer questions "directly, hon-
estly and candidly" during an
interview with Oprah Win-
frey next week. He will also
apologize and make a limited
confession to using perform-
ance-enhancing drugs, ac-
cording to a person with
knowledge of the situation.
Armstrong has spent more
than a decade denying that
he doped to win the Tour de
France seven times. Without
saying whether he would
confess or apologize during
the taping, Armstrong told
The Associated Press in a
text message early Saturday,
"I told her (Winfrey) to go
wherever she wants and I'll
answer the questions di-
rectly, honestly and candidly
That's all I can say"
A confession would be a
stunning reversal for Arm-
strong after years of public
statements, interviews and
court battles from Austin to
Europe in which he denied
doping and zealously pro-
tected his reputation.
Armstrong was stripped
of his titles and banned
from the sport for life last
year after the U.S. Anti-Dop-
ing agency issued a detailed
report accusing him of lead-
ing a sophisticated and


GAl M IIA
Associated Press
Lance Armstrong said he will
answer questions "directly,
honestly and candidly" dur-
ing an interview with Oprah
Winfrey next week.
brazen drug program on his
U.S. Postal Service teams
that included steroids,
blood boosters and a range
of performance-enhancing
drugs.
Armstrong's interview
with Winfrey is not expected
to go into great detail about
specific allegations levied in
the more than 1,000-page
USADA report. But Arm-
strong will make a general
confession and apologize,


according to the person, who
requested anonymity be-
cause there was no authori-
zation to speak publicly
Several outlets had also re-
ported that Armstrong was
considering a confession.
Armstrong hasn't re-
sponded to the USADA re-
port or being stripped of his
Tour de France titles. But
shortly afterward, he
tweeted a picture of himself
on a couch at home with all
seven of the yellow leader's
jerseys on display in a room
at his home in Austin. He
also agreed to be inter-
viewed there, in what the
Oprah Winfrey Network an-
nounced would be a "no-
holds barred" session.
That's scheduled to be
taped Monday and broad-
cast Thursday night
"His reputation is in cri-
sis," said crisis management
expert Mike Paul, president
of New York-based, MGP &
Associates PR. "Most people
don't trust what comes out of
his mouth. He has to be truly
repentant and humble."
He also has to be careful.
Armstrong is facing legal
challenges on several fronts,
including a federal whistle-
blower lawsuit brought by
former teammate Floyd
Landis, who himself was
stripped of the 2006 Tour de
France title.


SPORTS


Dorsey, who played line-
backer for the Packers in
the 1980s, was instrumen-
tal in building Green Bay
into a perennial contender.
He was the director of col-
lege scouting from 2000-
12, and spent last year as
the director of football
operations.
Dorsey also worked with
new Chiefs coach Andy
Reid from 1992-98, when
Reid was an assistant
coach for the Packers.
Reid was hired to replace
Romeo Crennel on Jan. 4.
From wire reports


Armstrong will answer


'honestly' to Oprah


SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 B3






Cowher says
coaching again in
NFL not in plans
NEW YORK Bill
Cowher insists he's staying
in the studio and not re-
turning to the sideline.
Cowher said Saturday
on CBS' "The NFL Today"
that he has no plans to
coach in the NFL, a few
days after telling Newsday
that he probably would
come back at some point.
The 55-year-old Cowher is
an analyst for CBS who
coached the Pittsburgh
Steelers from 1992-2006.
He won a Super Bowl after
the 2005 season.
Cowher says he plans
"on being with one team,
and that is this team here
at CBS. I know we are
going to the Super Bowl."
He told Newsday on
Tuesday that returning to
coaching after a long layoff
is motivation for him to
come back, but hadn't
been contacted by any
teams looking for a new
coach.
Kelly set to
return to
Notre Dame
SOUTH BEND, Ind. -
Notre Dame coach Brian
Kelly will be back for a
fourth season after leading
the Fighting Irish to the na-
tional title game this past
season.
Kelly issued a statement
Saturday that after inter-
viewing with the Philadel-
phia Eagles, he will remain
as coach of the Irish.
Kelly said he has had
thoughts about coaching in
the NFL, but after much re-
flection and conversations
with those closest to him
he has decided to stay with
the Irish.
Kelly led the Irish to a
12-1 record this past sea-
son and has an overall
record of 28-11 in three
seasons with Notre Dame.
AP sources:
Eagles interview
Gus Bradley
PHILADELPHIA- The
Philadelphia Eagles are in-
terviewing Seahawks de-
fensive coordinator Gus
Bradley in Atlanta, two peo-
ple familiar with the meet-
ing told The Associated
Press on Saturday.
Bradley is the eighth
candidate interviewed
since the Eagles fired Andy
Reid on Dec. 31 following a
4-12 finish. The people
spoke on condition of
anonymity because the
teams aren't commenting
on the interview.
Seattle plays the Fal-
cons in a NFC divisional
playoff game today. If
Bradley is their guy, the
Eagles can't officially hire
him until the Seahawks are
eliminated.
Bradley is in his fourth
season in Seattle. His de-
fense finished first in the
NFL in points allowed
(15.3) and fourth in yards
(306.2).
Chiefs hire
Packers'
Dorsey as GM
KANSAS CITY, Mo.-
The Kansas City Chiefs
have hired longtime Pack-
ers personnel man John
Dorsey to replace the fired
Scott Pioli as their general
manager.
The Chiefs announced
the hiring while the Pack-
ers were playing the San
Francisco 49ers in the
NFC playoffs on Saturday
night. Dorsey will be intro-
duced at a news confer-
ence Monday.






B4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013



2012 All-Pro team
NEW YORK The Associated Press 2012
NFL All-Pro team selected by a national panel
of 50 media members:
OFFENSE
Quarterback-Peyton Manning, Denver.
Running Backs-Adrian Peterson, Min-
nesota; Marshawn Lynch, Seattle.
Fullback-Vonta Leach, Baltimore.
Tight End-Tony Gonzalez, Atlanta.
Wide Receivers-Calvin Johnson, Detroit;
Brandon Marshall, Chicago.
Tackles-Duane Brown, Houston; Ryan
Clady, Denver.
Guards-Mike lupati, San Francisco; Jahri
Evans, New Orleans.
Center-Max Unger, Seattle.
Placekicker-BlairWalsh, Minnesota.
Kick Returner-Jacoby Jones, Baltimore.
DEFENSE
Ends-J.J. Watt, Houston; Cameron Wake,
Miami.
Tackles-Geno Atkins, Cincinnati; Vince Wil-
fork, New England.
Outside Linebackers-Von Miller, Denver;
Aldon Smith, San Francisco.
Inside Linebacker-Patrick Willis, San Fran-
cisco; NaVorro Bowman, San Francisco.
Cornerbacks-Richard Sherman, Seattle;
Charles Tillman, Chicago.
Safeties-Earl Thomas, Seattle; Dashon
Goldson, San Francisco.
Punter-Andy Lee, San Francisco.
SECOND TEAM
OFFENSE
Quarterback-Aaron Rodgers, Green Bay
Running Backs-Alfred Morris Washington;
Jamaal Charles, Kansas City
Fullback-erome Felton, Minnesota.
Tight End-Jason Witten, Dallas.
Wide Receivers-A.J. Green, Cincinnati;
Andre Johnson, Houston.
Tackles-Joe Thomas, Cleveland; Joe Sta-
ley, San Francisco.
Guards-Marshal Yanda, Baltimore; Logan
Mankins, New England.
Center-Maurkice Pouncey, Pittsburgh.
Placekicker-Phil Dawson, Cleveland.
Kick Returner-David Wilson, New York Gi-
ants.
DEFENSE
Ends-Justin Smith, San Francisco; Julius
Peppers, Chicago.
Tackles-Justin Smith, San Francisco;
Ndamukong Suh, Detroit, and Haloti Ngata, Bal-
timore.
Outside Linebackers-Chad Greenway, Min-
nesota; Ahmad Brooks, San Francisco, Clay
Matthews, Green Bay, and DeMarcus Ware,
Dallas.
Inside Linebackers-Daryl Washington, Ari-
zona; London Fletcher, Washington.
Cornerbacks-Champ Bailey, Denver; Tim
Jennings, Chicago.
Safeties-Eric Weddle, San Diego; Jairus
Byrd, Buffalo.
Punter-Thomas Morstead, New Orleans.
Ravens 38,
Broncos 35, OT
Baltimore 14 7 7 7 3- 38
Denver 14 7 7 7 0- 35
First Quarter
Den-Holliday 90 punt return (Prater kick),
12:14.
Bal-TSmith 59 pass from Flacco (Tucker kick),
10:31.
Bal-Graham 39 interception return (Tucker
kick), 9:49.
Den-Stokley 15 pass from Manning (Prater
kick), 4:02.
Second Quarter
Den-Moreno 14 pass from Manning (Prater
kick), 7:26.
Bal-TSmith 32 pass from Flacco (Tucker kick),
:36.
Third Quarter
Den-Holliday 104 kickoff return (Prater kick),
14:47.
Bal-Rice 1 run (Tucker kick), :20.
Fourth Quarter
Den-D.Thomas 17 pass from Manning (Prater
kick), 7:11.
Bal-J.Jones 70 pass from Flacco (Tucker kick),
:31.
Overtime
Bal-FG Tucker 47, 13:18.
A-76,732.
Bal Den
First downs 21 30
Total Net Yards 479 398
Rushes-yards 39-155 41-125
Passing 324 273
Punt Returns 3-22 3-90
Kickoff Returns 4-64 4-171
Interceptions Ret. 2-39 0-0
Comp-Att-Int 18-34-0 28-43-2
Sacked-Yards Lost 1-7 3-17
Punts 8-48.3 5-48.8
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 2-1
Penalties-Yards 8-58 10-87
Time of Possession 36:36 40:06
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Baltimore, Rice 30-131, Pierce 5-
14, Flacco 2-7, Leach 1-3, TSmith 1-0. Denver,
Hillman 22-83, Moreno 10-32, Hester 8-11,
Manning 1-(minus 1).
PASSING-Baltimore, Flacco 18-34-0-331.
Denver, Manning 28-43-2-290.
RECEIVING-Baltimore, Boldin 6-71, TSmith 3-
98, Pitta 3-55, Dickson 3-29, J.Jones 2-77, Leach
1-1. Denver, Decker 6-84, Dreessen 6-46,
Tamme 3-44, D.Thomas 3-37, Stokley 3-27, Hill-
man 3-20, Moreno 2-21, Hester 1-7, Willis 1-4.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-Denver, Prater 52
(SH).
NFL playoff glance
All Times EST
Wild-card Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 5
Houston 19, Cincinnati 13
Green Bay 24, Minnesota 10
Sunday, Jan. 6
Baltimore 24, Indianapolis 9
Seattle 24, Washington 14
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 12
Baltimore 38, Denver 35, 20T
San Francisco 45, Green Bay 31
Sunday, Jan.13
Seattle at Atlanta, 1 p.m. (FOX)
Houston at New England, 4:30 p.m. (CBS)
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan.20
San Francisco vs. Seattle-Atlanta winner,
3 p.m. (FOX)
Baltimore vs. Houston-New England winner,
6:30 p.m. (CBS)
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan.27
At Honolulu


AFC vs. NFC, 7p.m. (NBC)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 3
At New Orleans
AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6 p.m.
(CBS)



PGA Tour
Sony Open
Saturday
At Waialae Country Club, Honolulu
Purse: $5.6 million
Yardage: 7,044, Par: 70
Third Round
Russell Henley 63-63-67-193 -17
Scott Langley 62-66-65 -193 -17
Tim Clark 64-66-66 -196 -14
Scott Gardiner 68-64-65--197 -13
Charles Howell III 66-64-67-197 -13
Matt Jones 66-68-64 -198 -12
Danny Lee 66-66-66 -198 -12


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr thLe record


= lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
1-8-8
CASH 3 (late)
-.7. 2-7-2-9

S PLAY 4 (early)
S4-1-3-6
PLAY 4 (late)
9-8-6-9

FANTASY 5
d Ltty 1-4-13-18-30

POWERBALL LOTTERY
10-14-21-23-47 2-9-12-24-31-46
POWER BALL XTRA
7 4


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1:30 p.m. (CBS) Michigan at Ohio State
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12:30 p.m. (SUN) Oklahoma at Texas (Taped)
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Boston College at Clemson
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Nebraska at Penn State
2:30 p.m. (SUN) Alabama at Mississippi
3 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami at Florida State
4 p.m. (ESPN2) California at Stanford
4:30 p.m. (SUN) Southern Mississippi at Memphis
BOWLING
1 p.m. (ESPN) PBA World Series final (Taped)
FOOTBALL
1 p.m. (FOX) NFC Divisional Playoff Seattle Seahawks
at Atlanta Falcons
4:30 p.m. (CBS) AFC Divisional Playoff Houston Texans
at New England Patriots
GOLF
7 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Volvo Golf Champions
Final Round
7 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Sony Open Final Round
SOCCER
12:55 p.m. (UNI) Mexican Premier Division: Toluca vs. Puebla
TENNIS
6:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Australian Open: First Round
2:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Australian Open: First Round
3 a.m. (ESPN2) Australian Open: First Round
SNOWBOARDING
2:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) FIS Freestyle Copper Halfpipe (Taped)
4 p.m. (NBC) Sprint U.S. Grand Prix (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Pat Perez 68-63-67-198
Chris Kirk 68-62-68 -198
Marc Leishman 67-68-64 -199
Dicky Pride 68-67-64 -199
Brian Stuard 66-68-65 -199
Matt Kuchar 66-63-70 -199
Tommy Gainey 66-69-65 200
Jeff Overton 65-68-67 200
Tim Herron 66-66-68 -200
Harris English 69-69-62 -200
Scott Piercy 64-64-72 -200
Shane Bertsch 69-67-65 -201
John Senden 69-66-66 -201
Ricky Barnes 70-65-66 201
David Mathis 69-66-66 -201
Justin Hicks 69-68-64 -201
Russ Cochran 68-68-66 202
Erik Compton 67-68-67--202
John Huh 71-63-68 -202
Alistair Presnell 68-66-68 -202
Vijay Singh 67-67-68 202
Stephen Ames 65-67-70 -202
PeterTomasulo 68-68-67-203
Morgan Hoffmann 66-70-67 203
Doug LaBelle II 71-66-66-203
David Hearn 67-70-66 203
Keegan Bradley 68-69-66 -203
David Lingmerth 69-68-66 203
Webb Simpson 66-69-68 -203
Josh Teater 70-68-65 -203
Nicholas Thompson 69-68-67 -204
Hideto Tanihara 70-65-69 -204
Brad Fritsch 67-70-67 -204
Rory Sabbatini 69-65-70 204
Brian Gay 70-68-66 204
John Rollins 68-66-70 -204
Kevin Streelman 71-67-66 -204
Charlie Wi 67-69-69 -205
Chad Campbell 69-68-68 -205
Ben Kohles 67-70-68 -205
Henrik Norlander 70-64-71 205
Justin Leonard 70-68-67 205
Jeff Maggert 71-67-67 -205
Billy Horschel 66-70-70 -206
Steve Marino 69-67-70 -206
Lee Williams 69-66-71 -206
Dean Wilson 69-68-69 -206
Brendon de Jonge 69-68-69 -206
Bart Bryant 68-67-71 206
Jimmy Walker 69-69-68 206
Sang-Moon Bae 72-66-68 206
Kyle Stanley 73-65-68 206
Y.E. Yang 70-68-68 -206
Cameron Percy 71-67-68 206
D.H. Lee 68-68-71 -207
Shawn Stefani 68-67-72 207
Carl Pettersson 68-69-70 207
Mark Anderson 73-64-70 207
George McNeill 70-68-69 207
Steven Bowditch 67-69-72 208
Ryan Palmer 67-68-73 208
Derek Ernst 71-67-70 -208
Fabian Gomez 69-69-71 -209
Jason Kokrak 69-69-73 -211
James Hahn 70-67-75 212
Robert Streb 67-71-77 215
John Daly 70-68-79 -217



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE


New York
Brooklyn
Boston
Philadelphia
Toronto

Miami
Atlanta
Orlando
Charlotte
Washington

Indiana
Chicago
Milwaukee
Detroit
Cleveland


Atlar





South





Cent


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
San Antonio 28 11 .718
Memphis 24 10 .706
Houston 21 17 .553
Dallas 14 23 .378
New Orleans 11 25 .306
Northwest Division
W L Pct
Oklahoma City 28 8 .778
Denver 22 16 .579
Portland 20 16 .556
Utah 20 19 .513
Minnesota 16 17 .485
Pacific Division
W L Pct
L.A. Clippers 28 9 .757
Golden State 23 12 .657
L.A. Lakers 15 21 .417
Sacramento 13 23 .361
Phoenix 13 26 .333
Friday's Games
Toronto 99, Charlotte 78
Boston 103, Houston 91
Atlanta 103, Utah 95
Brooklyn 99, Phoenix 79
Memphis 101, San Antonio 98, OT
New Orleans 104, Minnesota 92
Chicago 108, NewYork 101
Detroit 103, Milwaukee 87
Denver 98, Cleveland 91
Golden State 103, Portland 97
Oklahoma City 116, L.A. Lakers 101
Saturday's Games
Orlando 104, L.A. Clippers 101
Indiana 96, Charlotte 88
Washington 93, Atlanta 83
Utah 90, Detroit 87
Philadelphia 107, Houston 100
Phoenix 97, Chicago 81
Memphis at Dallas, late
Miami at Sacramento, late
Today's Games
New Orleans at NewYork, 12 p.m.
Milwaukee at Toronto, 1 p.m.
Indiana at Brooklyn, 6 p.m.
Minnesota at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Golden State at Denver, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Portland, 9 p.m.
Cleveland at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Orlando at Washington, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Chicago, 8 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Miami at Utah, 9 p.m.
Cleveland at Sacramento, 10 p.m.


S-2 BASEBALL
S-2 American League
-1 CLEVELAND INDIANS-Released OF
+1 Thomas Neal.
2 +2 FOOTBALL
5 +5 National Football League
S+7 INDIANAPOLIS COLTS-Announced special
teams coordinator Marwan Maalouf will not re-
turn next season.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
The National Hockey League and the Na-
tional Hockey League Players' Association


ntic Division today signed a Memorandum of Understanding
W L Pct GB reflecting the terms of a new, 10-year Collective
23 13 .639 Bargaining Agreement.
21 15 .583 2 ECHL
19 17 .528 4 ECHL-Suspended Alaska's Chris Clackson
16 22 .421 8 indefinitely and fined him an undisclosed
14 22 .389 9 amount for his actions in a Jan. 11 game
least Division against Ontario.
W L Pct GB FLORIDA EVERBLADES-Announced F
23 11 .676 Leigh Salters, F Matthew Pistilli, D Beau
21 15 .583 3 Schmitz, and G John Muse were called up by
13 23 .361 11 Charlotte (AHL) and F Alex Hutchings and D
9 27 .250 15 Charles Landry were recalled by Syracuse
tl D2 .176 17 (AHL). Agreed to terms with F Ernie Hartlieb, F
tral Division
W L Pct GB Bill Kinkel, FTodd Pococke, F Matt Syroczynski
23 14 .622 and D Ryan Brindley.
20 15 .571 2 READING ROYALS-Announced F Barry
18 17 .514 4 Almeida, F Alex Berry and F Matt Pope were
14 24 .368 9'2 recalled by Hershey (AHL). Activated F David
9 29 .237 14Y2 Civitarese from the reserve list.


49ers roll past Packers


Associated Press
The San Francisco 49ers' Colin Kaepernick had an NFL quarterback record 183 yards
rushing during a 45-31 win by his team over the Green Bay Packers. The 49ers are now in
the NFC championship game.





Henley, Langley tied




for Sony Open lead


Associated Press

HONOLULU PGA Tour
rookies Russell Henley and
Scott Langley get to play
one more round together at
the Sony Open, this time
with a lot more on the line.
Henley two-putted from
30 feet for birdie on the last
hole Saturday for a 3-under
67, allowing him to catch up
to Langley, who had to settle
for a par and a 65. They
broke the tournament scor-
ing record through 54 holes
at 17-under 193.
Better yet, they had a
three-shot lead over Tim
Clark.
At stake on Sunday is a
trophy, the customary lei
draped around the neck
and an invitation to the
Masters.
If the third round was any
indication, Clark and every-
one will have to chase them
down. The 23-year-old rook-



NHL
Continued from Page B1

season.
The NHL also played a 48-



ALL-PRO
Continued from Page B1

"That is taking individu-
als and saying they are the
best in the NFL at that posi-
tion and that's what I
wanted to be," Sherman
said. "The Pro Bowl is tak-
ing three from each side, it's
more of a popularity con-
test. The All-Pro, you're the
best at your position. It
doesn't matter if you're a



DOOR
Continued from Page B1

surgery during which he
threw for 37 touchdowns and
led the Broncos (13-4) to top
seeding in the AFC.
"Yeah, bad throw," Man-
ning said. "Probably the deci-
sion wasn't great either I
thought I had an opening,
and I didn't get enough on it,
and I was trying to make a
play and certainly a throw I'd
like to have back."
Lewis, who led the Ravens
with 17 tackles over this
nearly 77-minute game in 13-
degree weather, kneeled
down to the ground and put
his helmet on the rock-solid
turf when it was over
"I've never been a part of a
game so crazy in my life," he
said.
After he thaws out, the
Ravens (12-6), 912-point un-
derdogs for this one, will get
ready for a game at either
New England or Houston,
who meet Sunday for the
other spot in the AFC title
game.
This game, the longest
since the Browns beat the
New York Jets 23-20 in 1987,
was an all-timer up there
with San Diego's 41-38 dou-
ble-overtime victory over
Miami for drama. But
Flacco's throw might best be
bookended next to one made


ies never flinched on a
warm afternoon with only a
mild breeze on a Waialae
Country Club that was ripe
for low scores.
Langley made seven
birdies to offset a pair of bo-
geys. Henley has been more
steady, and he carries a
streak of 43 holes without a
bogey into the final round.
They each have a chance
to become the first rookies
to win in their PGA Tour
debut since Garrett Willis in
the 2001 Tucson Open.
The rookies have ruled
along the shores of Oahu,
and if not for Clark, it would
have been even more pro-
nounced. Clark made a
birdie on the last hole that
put him into the final group.
Otherwise, that spot
would have been occupied
by Scott Gardiner of Aus-
tralia, who had a 64 and was
four shots behind.
Charles Howell III, twice

game campaign following a
lockout in the 1994-95
season.
The 2004-05 was com-
pletely canceled because of
a lockout. This one forced
the cancellation of 510 regu-

fifth-rounder or fourth-
rounder or undrafted. If you
play the best, you're All-
Pro."
Denver had three All-
Pros: LB Von Miller, tackle
Ryan Clady and Manning.
No other team had more
than two.
The NFC had 17 players
and only 10 made it from the
AFC.
One rookie, Minnesota
kicker Blair Walsh, was cho-
sen.
Also on offense were Bal-


by Roger Staubach, who fa-
mously coined the term "Hail
Mary" after his game-win-
ning toss to Drew Pearson
beat Minnesota in the 1975
playoffs.
Staubach was near mid-
field when he threw his.
Flacco was standing
around the 20 for his throw,
buying time in the pocket
when he saw Jones sprinting
down the right sideline into
double coverage.
Defensive back Tony
Carter slowed up and let
Jones streak by him. Instead
of staying step for step with
Jones, safety Rahim Moore
tried to leap and knock down
the ball. Flacco, who throws
the high, deep ball as well as
anyone, got it over Moore's
head and into Jones' hands.
"I started to step up in the
pocket and I kept my eye on
the safety's depth at that
point," Flacco said. 'Just felt I
had a shot of maybe getting
over him. At that point in the
game, you don't have any
timeouts, when you've got to
go a pretty decent length
you've got to start taking shots
at some point It happened to
work out"
Jones caught it and
pranced into the end zone,
blowing kisses toward the
crowd.
"I was kissing to God. I was
thanking the lord," Jones
said. "I don't disbelieve in
myself. I've been believing in


a runner-up at the Sony
Open, had a 67 and also was
four behind.
Seven players were
within five shots of the lead,
which included Monday
qualifier Danny Lee and
Pat Perez, whose goal to
have a more positive atti-
tude was severely tested on
the final hole when he
missed a 40-inch birdie
putt Perez still had a 67 and
was at 12-under 198.
Henley and Langley
shared low amateur honors
at Pebble Beach in the 2010
U.S. Open, and then be-
came fast friends by flying
together to Northern Ire-
land for the Palmer Cup.
They were thrilled to be
playing together for their
rookie debut in the opening
two rounds.
Neither had any idea they
would still be together going
into the final round. Nobody
has been able to catch them.


lar-season games, the Winter
Classic and the All-Star
game.
No preseason games will
be played in the seven days
before the regular season
gets under way

timore fullback Vonta
Leach, making it for the
third straight year; Detroit
WR Calvin Johnson and
Chicago WR Brandon Mar-
shall; Houston tackle Duane
Brown; New Orleans guard
Jahri Evans, making his
fourth consecutive appear-
ance; Baltimore kick re-
turner Jacoby Jones; Miami
DE Cameron Wake; Cincin-
nati DT Geno Atkins and
New England DT Vince Wil-
fork; and Chicago CB
Charles Tillman.


myself since I was born.
Never no disbelief.
Moore was on the verge of
tears after the game.
"The loss, it was my fault,"
Moore said. "I got a little too
happy It was pathetic. My
fault Next time I'll make that
play"
The teams were tied at 14
after the first quarter, 21 at
halftime, 28 after three quar-
ters and at 35-35 after regula-
tion.
They punted three times to
start overtime, the last of
them setting up Denver on its
7-yard line.
Manning was moving the
Broncos along slowly and
steadily But on second-and-6
from the 38, he rolled to his
right, stopped, planted and
threw across the field. Gra-
ham stepped in front of the
receiver for the interception,
which he returned 39 yards
for a touchdown and a 14-7
lead. He also had a first-quar-
ter interception.
The temperature at kickoff
was 13 degrees, and Man-
ning, wearing an orange-and-
gray glove to get more feel in
the icy weather, fell to 0-4 life-
time in playoff games when
the temperature is 40 or less.
He finished 28 for 43 for 290
yards and accounted for all
three Denver turnovers -
the two picks and a lost fum-
ble that setup the touchdown
that tied the game at 28 late
in the third quarter


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No. 11 Gators dismantle LSU 74-52


No. 20 N.C

St. knocks off

No. 1 Duke

Associated Press

BATON ROUGE, La. -
Kenny Boynton scored 20
points and Florida used a
31-6 run across the halves to
rout LSU 74-52.
Patric Young had 14
points for the Gators (12-2, 2-
0 SEC). Boynton's perimeter
shooting and Young's inte-
rior play were instrumental
in Florida controlling the
offensive end.
The Tigers (9-4, 0-2) stuck
around well into the first
half before Florida broke a
19-all tie with a 10-1 run to
end the half, punctuated by
Scottie Wilbekin's jumper at
the buzzer.
North Carolina 77,
Florida State 72
TALLAHASSEE P.J. Hair-
ston scored a career-high 23
points and North Carolina de-
feated defending Atlantic Coast
Conference champion Florida
State 77-72, almost a year to
day after suffering a 33-point
loss against the Seminoles.
Hairston made 9 of 14
shots, including four of nine
from beyond the arc for North
Carolina, which shot 48.3 per-
cent overall and 40 percent
from 3-point range.
The Tar Heels (11-5, 1-2) led
33-31 at halftime and took the
lead for good at 73-72 with
3:09 left on Jackson Simmons'
basket.
James McAdoo added 14
points and eight rebounds, and
Reggie Bullock had 12 points
and eight rebounds.
Okaro White led the Semi-
noles (10-6, 2-1) with 15 points
- all in the second half. Terry
Whisnant added 14 points and
Terrance Shannon 12 for
Florida State.
No. 20 N.C. St. 84,
No. 1 Duke 76
RALEIGH, N.C. C.J.
Leslie scored 25 points in-
cluding six straight during a key
second-half run to help No.
20 North Carolina State beat
No. 1 Duke 84-76 on Saturday.
Richard Howell added 16
points and 18 rebounds in a re-
lentless performance for the
Wolfpack (14-2, 3-0 Atlantic
Coast Conference) in a
matchup of the teams predicted


Associated Press
Florida guard Kenny Boynton dives for a loose ball in front of LSU guard Malik Morgan during the second half Saturday at
the Pete Maravich Assembly Center in Baton Rouge, La. No. 11 Florida won 74-52.


to finish 1-2 in the league.
N.C. State was picked for the
first time in nearly four decades
to win the league, though two
early losses drained some buzz.
Seth Curry scored 22 for
Duke (15-1, 2-1)
, I I,,-c..: lh:1 fMA


Hall.
Minnesota (15-2, 3-1) was
led by Andre Hollins with 25
points but had its 11-game win-
ning streak snapped despite
rallying from 23 points down at
halftime to within 3 with 19.5
seconds left.


NI. 3 Louisvllle o4,
USF 38 No. 6 Kansas 60,
Tavc Tn, k A


LOUISVILLE, Ky. Peyton
Siva scored 17 points and
Louisville held South Florida to
a season-low 27 percent shoot-
ing for an easy victory.
Center Gorgui Dieng added
12 points and 16 rebounds
while forward Chane Behanan
had 12 rebounds and seven
points for the Cardinals (15-1,
3-0 Big East), who won their
10th in a row. Behanan played
just five days after injuring his
left ankle in practice and miss-
ing Wednesday's victory
against Seton Hall.
Victor Rudd came off the
bench to score 10 points for
South Florida (9-6, 0-3).
No. 5 Indiana 88,
No. 8 Minnesota 81
INDIANAPOLIS Victor
Oladipo had 20 points and six
rebounds and Jordan Hulls
knocked down four 3-pointers,
helping Indiana hold off Min-
nesota's late charge.
The Hoosiers (15-1, 3-0 Big
Ten) have won six straight over-
all and 18 in a row at Assembly


Iexas IeclI aU
LUBBOCK, Texas Kevin
Young scored 14 points and
Kansas beat Texas Tech for the
Jayhawks' 13th straight win.
Jeff Withey and Travis Rele-
ford added 12 points each and
Withey pulled down seven re-
bounds in the first Big 12 road
game for Kansas.
The Jayhawks (14-1, 2-0 Big
12) trailed briefly early on. They
started the second half with a
12-0 run and stretched their
lead as the game wore on.
Jamal Williams scored 11
points to lead Texas Tech (8-6,
1-2) and Dejan Kravic added
nine points and got eight
rebounds.
No. 7 Syracuse 72,
Villanova 61
SYRACUSE, N.Y. C.J.
Fair had 22 points, Trevor
Cooney hit a pair of 3-pointers
to punctuate a late surge and
Syracuse beat Villanova.
Syracuse (16-1,4-0 Big
East) has won 34 straight home
games, the longest active


streak in the nation in Division I.
Villanova (11-5, 2-1) had its
seven-game winning streak
snapped.
Mississippi 64,
No. 10 Missouri 49
OXFORD, Miss. Murphy
Holloway scored 22 points,
Jarvis Summers added 12 and
Mississippi cruised to a 64-49
victory over No. 10 Missouri.
Ole Miss (13-2, 2-0 South-
eastern Conference) led the en-
tire game, jumping out to an
early 9-0 lead thanks to timely
shooting and superior defense.
Holloway was nearly unstop-
pable in the paint, making 8 of
12 shots from the field and 6 of
10 free throws.
Missouri (12-3, 1-1)was
without leading scorer Lau-
rence Bowers, who is out with a
sprained MCL in his right knee.
Wisconsin 74,
No. 12 Illinois 51
MADISON, Wis. Jared
Berggren scored 15 points and
grabbed a season-high 12 re-
bounds, and Traevon Jackson
added a career-best 14 points
to lead Wisconsin over Illinois.
The Badgers (12-4, 3-0 Big
Ten) scored the game's first 14
points and led by 20 at halftime
on the way to their sixth
straight win.
Whether they were making
3-pointers, driving for layups,


putting back misses or throw-
ing down dunks, the Badgers
had their way in this one. They
outshot Illinois 49.1 percent to
35.3 percent, making 10 of 23
3-pointers, and outrebounded
the Illini 43-24.
No. 14 Butler 79,
Dayton 73
DAYTON, Ohio Roosevelt
Jones scored 16 points and
Butler extended its best start in
four years beating Dayton for
its 11th straight victory despite
losing its top scorer to injury.
The Bulldogs (14-2, 2-0 At-
lantic 10) lost guard Rotnei
Clarke, who hit the padded
backboard support hard after an
intentional foul at 8:13 at the first
half and was taken off the court
on a stretcher. He was moving
his legs and gave a thumbs-up
sign as he left the court.
UConn 65,
No. 17 N. Dame 58
SOUTH BEND, Ind. -
Shabazz Napier scored 19
points, Tyler Olander scored 12
of his career-high 16 points in
the second half and Connecti-
cut ended the game with a 7-0
run to beat Notre Dame, ending
a 12-game winning streak by
the Fighting Irish.
After EricAtkins scored six
straight points for the Irish to tie
the score at 58 with a basket in-
side, Ryan Boatright made four


straight free throws for Connecti-
cut and DeAndre Daniels added
a basket and a free throw to put
the game away. The Huskies (12-
3, 2-1) are the only team to beat
the Irish (14-2, 2-1) at home in
the past 48 games dating back to
the end of the 2009-10 season.
No. 18 Kansas St. 65,
West Virginia 64
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. -
Shane Southwell made two
free throws with 21 seconds
left, then blocked Gary
Browne's layup attempt with a
second left to preserve Kansas
State's win over West Virginia.
Southwell and Rodney Mc-
Gruder both had 17 points for the
Wildcats (13-2, 2-0 Big 12), who
won for the sixth straight time.
Jabarie Hinds had a career-
high 15 points for West Virginia,
(8-7, 1-2).
No. 19 G'town 67,
St. John's 51
NEW YORK Otto Porter
had 19 points and a season-
high 14 rebounds and No. 19
Georgetown broke out of its
scoring funk with a victory over
St. John's.
Martel Starks had 17 points
for the Hoyas (11-3, 1-2 Big
East), who had lost two straight
games and scored 48 points in
both. There was plenty of of-
fense from them in this game
as they continued their great
defense in taking a 36-19 half-
time lead after being up by as
many as 33-10.
Georgetown reached 48
points with 13:36 to play and it
had a 21-point lead. The Hoyas'
biggest lead of the game was
26 points.
No. 25 N. Mexico 72,
Fresno State 45
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.-
Alex Kirk had 19 points and a
career-high 14 rebounds and
No. 25 New Mexico played
without leading scorer Kendall
Williams for disciplinary reasons
in a rout over Fresno State.
Cameron Bairstow matched
his career high with 16 points,
including 15 in the first half. Kirk
and Bairstow, who made his
first six shots, combined for nine
points in a 16-2 run that gave
the Lobos their largest halftime
lead of the season at 39-22.
Fresno State (6-9, 0-2,
Mountain West) had cut the
lead to 23-20 with six straight
points before the Lobos (15-2,
2-0) went on the game-chang-
ing run in which six different
players contributed points.


No illusion here


Magic snap 10-game

skid during win

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES J.J. Redick gave
Orlando its first lead on a 3-pointer
with 42 seconds left, Arron Afflalo
tied his season high with 30 points,
and the Magic beat the Los Angeles
Clippers 104-101 on Saturday to snap
a 10-game skid.
The loss ended the Clippers' fran-
chise-record 13-game, home-winning
streak and provided them with a scare
when All-Star guard Chris Paul went
down holding his right knee with 54
seconds to go. Paul returned after a
timeout and hit a 15-footer to draw his
team within one with 33 seconds left.
Redick added 21 points, and Vuce-
vic had 18 points and 15 rebounds for
the injury-riddled Magic, who ended
the franchise's longest skid since 2003-
04 while also stopping a four-game
road losing streak.
Blake Griffin tied his season-high
with 30 points, Crawford added 13
points, and Paul had 10 points and 16
assists for the Clippers.
Wizards 93,
Hawks 83
WASHINGTON John Wall gave his
teammates a lift with 14 points and four as-
sists in his first game of the season, and
the worst-in-NBA Washington Wizards
have their first winning streak after a 93-83
victory over the Atlanta Hawks.
Wall's playing time will be limited as he
returns from a knee injury, but he appeared
to have his old speed and explosiveness
back while playing seven minutes in the
first half and 15 in the second half.
No. 3 overall pick Bradley Beal, getting
to play with Wall for the first time, scored
16 points for the Wizards, who are 6-28 but
have strung together two wins in a row fol-
lowing their upset of Oklahoma City on
Monday.
Jeff Teague scored 19 points for the
Hawks.


Associated Press
Los Angeles Clippers forward Blake Griffin tries to block the inbound pass of Orlando
Magic forward Josh McRoberts during the second half Saturday in Los Angeles.


76ers 107,
Rockets 100
PHILADELPHIA- Jrue Holiday scored
30 points, Thaddeus Young had 18 points
and 12 rebounds and the Philadelphia 76ers
snapped a five-game losing streak with a
107-100 win over the Houston Rockets.
Jason Richardson scored 16 points for
the Sixers, who finally return home for a
lengthy stint as they try to play their way
back into the Eastern Conference playoff
race. The Sixers opened a stretch of 12
homes in the next 13 and hope they can
start to offset a miserable 2-6 road trip that
stretched over the new year.
James Harden led the Rockets with 29
points and Chandler Parsons had 23.
Jazz 90, Pistons 87
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -Al Jefferson
scored 10 of his 20 points in the third quar-
ter, and the Utah Jazz rallied to beat the
Detroit Pistons 90-87.
Detroit's Brandon Knight missed a 3-
pointer in the final seconds that would have
tied the game after the Pistons trailed by 13
points with 3:26 left.


The Jazz (20-19) avoided falling under
.500 and into a last-place tie with Min-
nesota in the Northwest Division.
Pacers 96,
Bobcats 88
INDIANAPOLIS George Hill scored
19 points, D.J. Augustin added a season-
high 18 and the Indiana Pacers beat the
Charlotte Bobcats 96-88 for their fourth
straight win.
Lance Stephenson had 17 points and
David West scored 14 points to help the
Central Division-leading Pacers, playing
without leading scorer Paul George (ill-
ness), get their sixth win in seven games.
Recently signed Dominic McGuire started
in place of George.
Suns 97, Bulls 81
CHICAGO Luis Scola scored 22
points to help the Phoenix Suns beat the
Chicago Bulls 97-81, snapping a five-game
losing streak.
Michael Beasley added 20 points for
Phoenix, which had lost 12 straight on the
road and got their first win away from home
since beating Cleveland on Nov. 27.


No. 3 Huskies


slam Marquette


Associated Press

MILWAUKEE
Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis
scored 24 points and Ste-
fanie Dolson added 20 to
help third-ranked UConn
cruise to an 85-51 win over
Marquette on Saturday
Mosqueda-Lewis scored
nine points and Dotson six
during a 21-3 run to open
the game for the Huskies
(14-1, 2-1 Big East) who im-
proved to (8-0) all-time
against Marquette. Coming
into the game, all the victo-
ries, save one, were by an
average of 29.7 points.
Sarina Simmons scored
19 points to lead the
Golden Eagles (8-7, 0-2).
Her teammates were 2 for
16 in the first half as the
Huskies handed Mar-
quette its worst loss overall
this season.
No. 15 L'ville 70,
Providence 62
PROVIDENCE, R.I. -
Shoni Schimmel and Bria
Smith scored 17 points each
to pace Louisville to a Big
East victory over Providence.
Antonita Slaughter added
12 points and Monique Reid
11 for the Cardinals (14-3, 2-
1), who shot 64 percent (16 of
25) in the first half.
Tori Rule scored 20 points
and Symone Roberts had 13
points and seven assists for
the Friars (5-10, 0-2), who
were facing a ranked opponent
for the first time this season.
Louisville led 58-43 with
6:07 remaining after a layup
by Reid, but a steal and layup
by Evi liskola started a 15-5
run that brought the Friars to
within 63-58 at the 1:26 mark.


No. 22 Dayton 82,
Butler 39
INDIANAPOLIS -Amber
Deane had 18 points and 11
rebounds Saturday and Day-
ton routed Butler in the Atlantic
10 Conference opener for
both schools.
Andrea Hoover and
Samantha Mackay had 13
points apiece for the Flyers
(13-1), who were playing for
the first time since their only
loss Dec. 30 against Bowling
Green.
Daress McClung and Liz
Stratman led Butler (9-7) with
11 points each. Stratman
scored 10 in the second half.
The Bulldogs stayed close
until midway through the first
half, when the Flyers went on
a 10-0 run and eventually led
44-22 at halftime.
Butler was playing its first
game in the Atlantic 10 after
leaving the Horizon League.
No. 25 Iowa St. 68,
TCU 52
AMES, Iowa Chelsea
Poppens scored 24 points and
made 15 rebounds to lead No.
25 Iowa State over TCU 68-52.
Poppens was 8 of 13 from
the field.
Hallie Christofferson scored
14 points, including four 3-
pointers, for the Cyclones (12-
2, 3-1 Big 12). Anna Prins had
eight points and 10 rebounds.
Nikki Moody had nine assists.
Iowa State led 29-24 at half-
time and never trailed in the
second half, leading by as
much as 25 points. Iowa State
shot 39.6 percent from the
field for the game, while TCU
shot 38.6 percent. Iowa State
outrebounded TCU 44-25.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


Associated Press
Britney Spears has said
she and Jason Trawick
have ended their yearlong
engagement.

Spears and fiance
end engagement
LOS ANGELES Brit-
ney Spears announced
Friday she has ended her
yearlong engagement,
capping a week of
changes that included
her leaving "The X Fac-
tor" and promising fans
she was returning her
focus to music.
Within hours of con-
firming her departure
from the Fox reality se-
ries, Spears also an-
nounced her relationship
with talent agent Jason
Trawick had ended.
"Jason and I have de-
cided to call off our en-
gagement," Spears said in
the statement. "I'll always
adore him and we will re-
main great friends."
Spears' publicist Jeff
Raymond said the
breakup was a difficult
decision made by "two
mature adults."
"I love and cherish her
and her boys, and we will
be close forever," Trawick
said in a joint statement
that was first reported by
People magazine.
Trawick also resigned
his role Friday as a
Spears' co-conservator,
with Superior Court
Judge Reva Goetz ap-
proving his departure
from the case.
Spears and Trawick got
engaged in December
2011 and was added as her
co-conservator in April.
Spears, 31, has been
under a court-supervised
conservatorship since
February 2008, with her
father and another co-
conservator, Andrew Wal-
let, having control over
numerous aspects of her
personal life.

CBS welcomes
back Angus Jones
PASADENA, Calif. -
The teenage actor Angus
T. Jones is expected back
at "Two and a Half Men"
next week, with CBS ac-
cepting his apology for
calling the popular com-
edy "filth" and "very
inappropriate."
"We move on," CBS En-
tertainment President
Nina Tassler said Satur-
day After a break for the
holidays, actors on "Two
and a Half Men" are
about to begin rehearsals
for new episodes.
Jones, 19, plays the
"half" in the popular
comedy, portraying actor
Jon Cryer's son.
Jones, who reportedly
makes $350,000 an
episode, later said he
was sorry if his remarks
in an interview with a re-
ligious organization
showed an indifference
to his colleagues or a lack
of appreciation for his
opportunity.
-From wire reports


Comical kids


Children get

grown-up

laughs at

NYC club

Associated Press

NEW YORK Baby-
faced 16-year-old Eric
Kurn climbed onto the
comedy club stage, gave
the packed room a look of
wide-eyed cluelessness
and launched into his
deadpan bit: "I think it's
time I had a girlfriend. ..
There's just one little
problem. None of the girls
I know think it's time I
had a girlfriend."
"Even some of the girls
I don't know yet agree
with that," the redhead
went on like a teenage
Rodney Dangerfield, to
cascades of laughter
With the afternoon
crowd of 300 won over,
Kurn coasted through his
act, touching on the art of
adolescent lying and
lamenting his parents can
use technology to check
homework and grades
online.
That's the way it goes
with "Kids 'N Comedy," a
nearly 17-year-old laugh
train that gives some bud-
ding class clowns, ages 9
to 18, a chance to learn the
nuances of comedy with-
out facing a trip to the
principal's office.
Nine-week classes and
two-week summer camps
give children some basic
training in comedy club
work before a final exam
of sorts a performance
before a paying audience
of strangers.
Classes originated with
Jo Ann Grossman, a Man-
hattan woman with no
training in comedy, and
her husband, Stu, who
teaches some of the
classes. In staging the com-
edy acts, starting out in
1996, they quickly realized
they had to impose limits
on children and their un-
filtered funny thoughts.
"We wanted it to be
clean," Grossman said.
That ground rule wasn't
the hard part for 14-year-
old Zach Rosenfeld, who
recalled his first class
when he was 9 and the
sheer terror of trying, and
perhaps failing, to be
funny
"I was very nervous," he
said. "But after sitting
through a couple of those
classes, I started to open
up more and more.... The
class teaches you to calm
down and not be so
scared."
Class participants were
told to write down funny
things in their lives, and
refine some of those
thoughts into an act.
Rosenfeld said he sat
nervously before he went
on stage the first time, tap-
ping his foot and trying to
remember his lines, only
to get before the crowd
and forget most of them.
"I could get away with it
because I was cute. I was
9," he said. "I was blacking
out with part of the routine.
I just started talking to the
audience, 'I like this table.'
They were laughing."
When he walked off
stage, he said, he knew he
would perform again. And
he has.
"When you hear laugh-


Birthday In the year ahead, you are likely to participate in
something where you have a minor but critical role. However,
what you gain from this arrangement will be far more signifi-
cant than any title or position.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) If you first lay a sturdy foun-
dation, something in which you're presently involved will have
excellent chances for success. Begin building now for your
tomorrows.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Outward appearances tend
to be more significant than you might like, currently. If you
hope to inspire someone or get his or her support, you must
first look like a leader.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -Your intuitive perceptions
could provide you with a great deal of valuable information.
This is because your hunches are likely to reveal many things
your logic ignores.


Associated Press
Teenage comedian Eric Kurn performs his stand-up act during the "Kids 'N Comedy"
show at Gotham Comedy Club in New York.


Comedian Zach
Rosenfeld, 14, does his
stand-up routine at "Kids 'N
Comedy." Teenage
comedian Val Bodurtha
plays banjo and sings a
song chastising classmates
who tout views on social
issues and politics.

ter on the stage, it's one of
the greatest things on the
face of the earth," Rosen-
feld said. "You're shining
in the stage's light and
people like you."
Most recently, Rosen-
feld did his act at the Kids
'N Comedy holiday show
at the Gotham Comedy
Club, dubbed the "Christ-
makwanzukah" show. He
wasn't alone.
Val Bodurtha, 16, pulled
out a banjo, singing a song
chastising classmates who
tout views on social issues
and politics.
She sang: "You should
really learn your facts be-
fore you begin to speak"
and "stop posting pictures
of your meals and gratu-
itous shots of you."
At one point, she said
"fricking," the show's clos-
est brush with profanity.
During his act, Graham
Janovic, 11, said while
other families bought bat-
teries and soup before Su-
perstorm Sandy, his family
stocked up on candy and
toilet paper, making him
worry every knock at the


door was a cameraman
from the "Hoarders" tele-
vision show.
As comics do, Janovic
and others highlighted
personal flaws, turning
the stage into therapy
"I'm a recovering
dyslexic," he said.
"Don't judge me. I have
a disease, a disease of the
mind: ADHD," 17-year-old
Leo Frampton said, re-
minding spectators that
trouble focusing is com-
mon for teens. "People
used to say, 'I love text-
books.' Now they say: 'I
love exciting and interest-
ing experiences.' ADHD is
the new rock 'n' roll."
He said he gets annoyed
during holiday breaks
when adults repeatedly ask
him if he's looking forward
to returning to school. He
said he'd like to counter:
"Hey it's almost tax season.
... Looking forward to going
back to the office?"


Today's HOROSCOPE
Aries (March 21-April 19) -Although you're naturally as-
sertive, be more laid back when dealing with friends. You
can gain more from letting others take the reins.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Certain meaningful objectives
can be reached if you focus only on them and nothing else.
You're likely to fall short if you lack the necessary concen-
tration and fortitude.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Make an effort to try to
broaden your perspective and widen your horizons. The
larger your scope of observation, the more opportunities
you're likely to find.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -You're not going to find a bet-
ter day to investigate situations that have aroused your cu-
riosity. By applying yourself, you should be able to ferret out
useful information.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Take plenty of time to weigh both


The sold-out show -
the first at Gotham in the
history of Kids 'N Comedy
- was a milestone for
Grossman and a credit to
the classes, which cost
$595, and comedy summer
camps, which cost $1,045.
Grossman said profes-
sionalism results from
hard work.
"We try to motivate
them to write all the
time," she said. "If you
want to keep it fresh, you
have to keep on writing."
Some youngsters have
graduated to bigger
things, including 26-year-
old actor Josh Peck, who
recently appeared in the
movie "Red Dawn" after
playing Josh Nichols in
the Nickelodeon sitcom,
"Drake & Josh."
"To see these kids,
they're funny, they're re-
ally funny," Grossman
said. "Nobody's doing
knock-knock jokes."


sides of an important issue. By doing so, you'll be more
able to structurally apply what you learn.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Make sure you have plenty of
backup if you're taking on something that could require as-
sistance. Better to be safe instead of sorry.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Under no circumstances
should you go along with something you instinctively feel
does not serve your best interests. Show commitment to
your decision, and your independence will be respected.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Being able to tie up any
loose ends will clear the air and put you at peace, not to
mention make this a very productive day for you.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -Although you are likely to
be more mentally than physically restless, you can gratify
your impulses by sharing your time with some stimulating
companions who make you think.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 11
Mega Money: 15 23 28 33
Mega Ball: 20
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 8 $1,071
3-of-4 MB 44 $426.50
3-of-4 1,208 $46
2-of-4 MB 1,430 $27
1-of-4 MB 12,210 $3
2-of-4 34,458 $2
Fantasy 5: 7 25 27 35 36
5-of-5 1 winner $233,907.09
4-of-5 280 $134.50
3-of-5 9,333 $11
THURSDAY, JANUARY 10
Fantasy 5: 6 7 8 27 30
5-of-5 1 winner $213,192.27
4-of-5 297 $115.50
3-of-5 9,608 $10

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Jan. 13,
the 13th day of 2013. There
are 352 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Jan. 13, 2012, the Ital-
ian luxury liner Costa Con-
cordia ran aground off the
Tuscan island of Giglio and
flipped onto its side; 32 peo-
ple were killed. (Ship's cap-
tain Francesco Schettino
faces possible trial on
charges of manslaughter and
abandoning ship before
evacuation was complete.)
On this date:
In 1794, President George
Washington approved a
measure adding two stars
and two stripes to the Ameri-
can flag, following the admis-
sion of Vermont and
Kentucky to the Union. (The
number of stripes was later
reduced to the original 13.)
In 1864, composer
Stephen Foster died in a
New York hospital at age 37.
(In his pocket: a note which
read, "Dear friends and gen-
tle hearts.")
In 1962, comedian Ernie
Kovacs died in a car crash in
west Los Angeles 10 days
before his 43rd birthday.
In 1966, Robert C. Weaver
was named Secretary of
Housing and Urban Develop-
ment by President Lyndon B.
Johnson; Weaver became the
first black Cabinet member.
In 1990, L. Douglas Wilder
of Virginia became the na-
tion's first elected black gov-
ernor as he took the oath of
office in Richmond.
In 1992, Japan apologized
for forcing tens of thousands
of Korean women to serve as
sex slaves for its soldiers dur-
ing World War II, citing newly
uncovered documents that
showed the Japanese army
had a role in abducting the
so-called "comfort women."
Ten years ago: Connecti-
cut Sen. Joseph Lieberman
jumped into the 2004 race for
president.
Five years ago: The
Golden Globes were an-
nounced in a dry, news con-
ference-style ceremony,
devoid of stars because of
the Hollywood writers' strike;
"Atonement" won best motion
picture drama, while "Mad
Men" was named best dra-
matic TV series.
One year ago: Myanmar
freed some of its most fa-
mous political prisoners,
sparking jubilation among
their supporters.
Today's Birthdays:
Comedian Rip Taylor is 79.
Actor Richard Moll is 70.
Rhythm-and-blues musician
Fred White is 58. Actress


Julia Louis-Dreyfus is 52.
Thought for Today: "Life
is a dream for the wise, a
game for the fool, a comedy
for the rich, a tragedy for the
poor." Sholom Aleichem,
Russian author-humorist
(1859-1916).











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


WOMEN


VS.


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Associated Press
Vice President Joe Biden administers the Senate oath to Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., accompanied by her husband Joseph Shepard, during a
mock swearing-in ceremony Jan. 3, on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., as the 113th Congress officially began. McCaskill is one of a record
number of 20 female senators. In an interview with Diane Sawyer, McCaskill said by nature, women are less confrontational than men.


Examining the contrasts between U.S. Congressmen and Congresswomen


As the son of a woman, the
husband of a woman and
the father of daughters
and granddaughters, I celebrate
the record number of females
who are now U.S. senators. How-
ever, I do see some differences
in the way these and other
women are treated, depending
on their party, policies and
beliefs.
Diane Sawyer broadcast a cel-
ebratory report last week on
ABC's "World News Tonight" on
which she
gushed
about the
"record
number"
of 20 fe-
male sena-
tors. Sen.
Barbara
Mikulski,
D -Md.,
Cal Thomas a 1 s o
OTHER praised
VOICES the Senate
female
popula-
tion. Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-
Calif., said she won't be satisfied
until there are 50 female
senators.
In the Senate, the ratio of fe-
male Democrats to Republicans
is 16 to 4. Would media approval
for these women be different if
the ratio were reversed? Con-
sider how conservative females
are treated, most notably Rep.
Michele Bachmann, R-Minn.
During her presidential run,
Bachmann was labeled a reli-
gious fanatic and anti-woman for
being pro-life. Her husband,
Marcus, was criticized because


We're less on testosterone.
We don't have that need to
always be confrontational. And
I think we're problem solvers,
and I think that's what
this country needs.
Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif.
who was elected to the Senate in 1992.


of his Christian counseling clinic
that some allege focuses on con-
verting gays to heterosexuality, a
charge he vehemently denies.
The media mostly ignore other
Republican women, like Gov Su-
sana Martinez of New Mexico -
at least for now.
"We're less on testosterone,"
Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif.,
told Sawyer "We don't have that
need to always be confronta-
tional. And I think we're prob-
lem solvers, and I think that's
what this country needs."
Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska,
agreed.
So testosterone is to blame for
the fact male senators are so
combative and Congress contin-
ues to founder? Imagine a male
suggesting estrogen hampers
women from performing well at
their jobs. You don't have to
imagine. Some men have said
that and worse, to their shame,
and society and ultimately his-
tory itself was right to denounce
them.
But after all the talk about fe-
male bonding and how women
and men have different ap-


proaches to solving problems,
what does that mean? Does it
mean a Democratic female sen-
ator who is pro-choice on abor-
tion and favors same-sex
marriage, bigger roles for gov-
ernment, more spending and
higher taxes will be able to find
common ground with a Republi-
can female senator who takes
the opposite positions? I
doubt it.
This double standard seems
not only to apply to gender, but to
race. Consider the disparaging
things said about Tim Scott, the
new senator from South Car-
olina, a replacement for the re-
tired Jim DeMint. Scott is black,
but his race does not endear him
to liberals. He probably won't be
embraced by the NAACP whose
president accused him of not be-
lieving in civil rights, having re-
ceived an "F" on the NAACP's
civil rights scorecard, which
judges legislators on their votes
on "civil rights" issues. In fact,
Scott is just as much an example
of the advancement of civil
rights for blacks as those female
senators are examples of


progress for women.
In the end, it isn't about gen-
der or race, but ideology When
they speak of "women's issues,"
for example, the left seems to
think all women think alike, or
should. The same goes for blacks
and civil rights. I think the right
correctly sees content of charac-
ter and ideas as superior to gen-
der and skin color.
In the interview with Diane
Sawyer, Sen. Claire McCaskill,
D-Mo., said by nature women are
"less confrontational." Really?
McCaskill must never have met
the leaders of the women's
movement whose disciples are
among her colleagues. The chair
of the Democratic National
Committee, Rep. Debbie Wasser-
man Schultz, D-Fla., is no
shrinking violet.
I'm not betting on estrogen
besting testosterone to "get
things done," forge compromise
and diffuse confrontation, espe-
cially given the history of some
very uncompromising female
leaders like Cleopatra, Cather-
ine the Great, underground rail-
road "conductor" Harriet
Tubman, the late Bella Abzug, D-
N.Y, or British Prime Minister
Margaret Thatcher. In fact, these
women exhibited more testicu-
lar fortitude than some men,
which, in the case of the conser-
vative Thatcher, likely had a lot
to do with why her male col-
leagues dumped her as party
leader.

Readers may email
Cal Thomas at tmseditors@
tribune, com.


Thomas Jefferson: Flawed man, effective leader


MICHAEL FRANCIS
Guest columnist
Jon Meacham,
"Thomas Jefferson:
The Art ofPower"
(New York: Random
House, 2012) 759 pages, $35.
Jon Meacham is a con-
tributing editor of TIME
magazine and the au-
thor of numerous historical
studies including his biogra-
phy of Andrew Jackson,
which won a Pulitzer Prize
in 2008. Now, he has turned
his focus to our third Ameri-


Book RE VIEW


can president who strength-
ened the political process
during a period when the
continued existence of the
Union seemed doubtful due
to clashing northern and
southern interests.
The book begins by de-
scribing the historical pe-
riod Jefferson grew up in -
first the war of independ-
ence and then the attempts
to create a governing struc-
ture that would unify the
states. As a young man, Jef-
ferson read extensively in


history, political theory, nat-
ural science, mathematics
and the law. He rose to
prominence as a spokesman
for Virginia's interests and
then was called upon to
write the first draft of the
Declaration of Independ-
ence a key document
defining the individual
rights of citizens. He also be-
came a prominent voice for
the South on the slavery
issue. The preservation of
slavery in the southern
states, he argued, was neces-


sary to preserve the union.
Meacham argues Jeffer-
son recognized the conflict
between the existence of
slavery and the call for
equality of citizens. Jeffer-
son understood the evils of
keeping blacks in bondage,
but he accepted the contin-
uation of the institution. In
his eyes, freedom for illit-
erate slaves was seen as
hopelessly utopian.
And so we come to the
issue of Sally Hemings. His-
torians now agree, after the
death of his wife, he had a
long relationship with Hem-


ings, one of his slaves. Over
the years, Sally gave birth to
a number of sons and
daughters fathered by Jef-
ferson. Thus, we face the
troubling issue of how he
could believe in the rights of
mankind, but he had this
long relationship? To Jeffer-
son's credit, he treated his
slaves well and promised
Hemings to free her and her
children after he died.
Meacham observes, "Jef-
ferson was never able to
move public opinion on


Page C3


Two


words


to live



by
Some years back,
there was a Long Is-
land transplant
named Ron Noon who
moved to Citrus County.
By the time I got to know
him, Ron was the execu-
tive in charge of the Crys-
tal River Rotary Club.
In a former life, he was
the manager of the ceme-
tery in Beverly Hills and I
believe he sold pools on
Long Island. Most of what
he did in his professional
life had to do with digging
holes.
He was a good sales guy,
but he had a short temper.
I worked with him on a
number of different com-
munity projects and con-
sistently found myself
giving him a three-word
order: "Ron, be nice."
Some volunteer at the
Manatee Festival would
run a golf cart into a ditch
and Ron would read him
the riot act. I would hear
the commotion and go to
him with the quick order:
"Ron, be nice."
After a while I didn't
even have to say the
words. Ron would see me
coming and he would just
say: "I know, be nice."
Ron really was a nice
guy and did a lot of good
things in Citrus County.
He was nice to kids and
mean to old grouchy peo-
ple until he became one.
Then, he was mean to kids
and nice to old people.
I visited Ron in the hos-
pital a few days before he
died. He didn't have much
of a voice left and had
trouble breathing. He mo-
tioned for me to get real
close so I could hear him
whisper. His final words
to me were: "Be nice."
Citrus County is going
through some difficult
times right now and our
public officials are not
getting along. Sen. Charlie
Dean and Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy spent much of 2012
arguing over the sheriff's
child protection program.
Newly elected county
commissioner Scott
Adams is already fighting
fast and furious with his
fellow commissioners.
Tempers are showing.
Crystal River Mayor Jim
Farley and County Com-
missioner Dennis Damato
have been quick to anger
over making improvement
plans for the river city.
Their disagreement isn't
about the facts as much as
it is personal.
Certainly our election
season was a bit of a dis-
aster. The Rep. Jimmie T
Smith-Nancy Argenziano
race was depressingly
personal in the fighting.
The sheriff's race be-
tween Dawsy and county
commissioner Winn Webb
became very emotional,
personal and insulting.
The conflicts have put
the community on edge.
Add that to the current
problems Property Ap-
praiser Geoff Greene is
having with Progress En-
ergy, it's enough to turn
the lights out.
Disputes and disagree-
ments are part of the way
we govern ourselves. It
would be nice to believe
out of public arguments
See Page C3


EN


I







Page C2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013



PINION


"Let us never negotiate out offer.
But let us never fear to negotiate."
John F. Kennedy, Jan. 20 1961


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan................. ................... publisher
M ike A rnold .................................................editor
S Charlie Brennan ................................editor at large
Curt Ebitz................ ................. citizen member
Mac Harris ..................... .......... citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ................ ..... ....... ...... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


ENERGY COSTS





Utility tax




issue needs




a settlement


Citrus County is stumbling
into a legal dispute with
Progress Energy/Duke
about property taxes and the
dispute promises to be disrup-
tive and expen-
sive for the
taxpayers of this HE I
community. Breakdo
In our view, a Progres
great deal of the negoti
responsibility for
the breakdown OUR 01
rests at the feet of
officials in the Get bac
county property table al
appraiser's office. de
Progress Energy
is the largest taxpayer and pri-
vate employer in Citrus County.
The company, which was pur-
chased in a well-publicized
merger with Duke Energy in
2012, has complained its $36
million property tax bill is too
high. The power company has
been complaining for years its
official appraisal by the prop-
erty appraiser's office was too
high and needed to be lowered.
Progress officials were under
the impression our property
appraiser's office had heard
their complaints and was going
to lower the assessment for
2012. Instead, Property Ap-
praiser Geoff Greene raised
the assessment on its five
power plants in Crystal River.
Leaders at the energy com-
pany grew frustrated and re-
fused to pay their full tax bill.
Instead, they delivered a par-
tial payment of $19 million and
prepared to challenge the re-
maining charges in court.
Since Progress pays 26 per-
cent of our local property tax,
their position on the partial
payment immediately put the
county and school system into
budgetary turmoil. Further-
more, the county and school
board had to jointly fund the
property appraiser with
$350,000 to fight the Progress
legal battle.
Heated words were hurled at
Progress Energy for their posi-
tion, and the emotions of our
politicians ended up on the
front page of this newspaper
and television news shows
around the state.
The controversy over the tax
bill is not as simple as some
would like you to believe.
Progress Energy has negoti-
ated its property tax bill for the
past 14 years. Finding the right
assessment for the huge energy
complex north of Crystal River
has never been as simple as as-
sessing the value of a home or
a normal-sized business. Each
year officials with the county
property appraiser's office and
Progress have sat down at a
conference table and argued
about the assessment. And
each year both sides have
agreed on the tax bill. That did
not happen this year, and there
has been a lot of finger-
pointing as to who was respon-
sible for the breakdown. The
merger with Duke Energy and
the turnover of the top utility
leaders probably had some-
thing to do with the fact that a


sit-down did not happen.
Citrus officials once traveled
to Progress offices in St.
Petersburg to negotiate the tax
bill, but our local officials did-


SSUE:
wn in the
s Energy
nations.

PINION:
:k to the
nd get a
eal.


n't believe the
Progress officials
assigned to them
were high enough
in the organiza-
tion. Our delega-
tion left St.
Petersburg with-
out even dis-
cussing an
agreement.
Always in con-
tention in Citrus


County has been a local deci-
sion to tax pollution-control
equipment at the power plant
site. This is not done in any of
Florida's 67 counties except
Citrus, and it's based on a
15-year-old local circuit court
decision.
It's true; Progress did not file
an appeal via the county's tax
adjustment board. But they
have never filed an appeal.
They have always sat down
with our county officials to ne-
gotiate the details.
Citrus County Commission
Chairman Joe Meek tried to in-
tervene last week and con-
vinced Property Appraiser
Greene to negotiate again with
Progress officials. While
Greene and his contingent
traveled to Orlando to make a
deal with the company's
Florida president, he did not
come prepared to negotiate.
This lawsuit is not in the best
interest of Citrus County. The
three years of legal battles at
Citrus Memorial hospital
should have taught us these big
courtroom battles only make
the lawyers rich.
Citrus County needs to nego-
tiate a deal with Progress for
the current year's tax bills. For
next year, the county and the
company need to agree on a
specific process for determin-
ing value and then bring in out-
side experts to do the job.
County and school officials
need to explain to the property
appraiser no further funds will
be set aside to pay for his legal
bills.
Florida Power, Progress En-
ergy and now Duke have been
the county's largest employer
and taxpayer for more than 40
years. The power company has
been a strong partner and its
employees outstanding citizens.
Citrus County needs to re-
main a strong partner with the
utility and that is done through
honest and open communica-
tion. If Progress Energy
reaches the conclusion that
Citrus County is acting in bad
faith, then that would serve as
a barrier to future expansion
in this community.
The breakdown in negotia-
tions is bad for all concerned.
This is not the time to listen to
high-priced attorneys who
want an extended legal battle
and million dollar fees. It is
time to sit down at the negoti-
ating table and show some
leadership.


2013-

I have been asked to
share what is com-
ing up for the city
of Crystal River during
2013, and I thank the :.
Chronicle for the op-
portunity to do so.
We are looking for-
ward to this year, be-
cause 2013 promises to
be a year when several
projects that have been
in the discussion and Andy I
planning stage for a GU
considerable period of COLU
time, start to move to-
ward completion.
Those projects include:
Riverwalk
There is a map in my office
dated 1989 that shows a concep-
tual design for a Riverwalk proj-
ect from the current site of the
Best Western Motel to King's Bay
Park. The intent is to enhance
public access to the waterfront
and encourage redevelopment of
properties along the commercial
waterfront, with the idea of cre-
ating a destination point for visi-
tors and residents alike. Since
that time, while a small portion of
the project has been built, the
project has for the most part been
mired in inaction.
With significant involvement
and assistance from the Crystal
River Area Council of the Cham-
ber of Commerce, we have
reached a point where the af-
fected property owners have in-
dicated a tentative buy-in to the
project, with some caveats. We
are evaluating the cost and other
implications of those caveats,
which deal with issues such as
parking and stormwater treat-
ment, with a goal of the Council
having all of the necessary infor-
mation required to make a go or
no-go decision on this project in
the next few months. If the proj-
ect moves forward as proposed,
we should be in final design this
summer and hopefully be ready
to start construction thereafter
Cutler Spur Boulevard
improvements
This project has been in the
works since 2006, and the con-
tract to start construction should
be approved in January
The project will include widen-
ing the lanes to meet new safety
standards; installing a multi-use
extension of the Cross-Town Trail
from its current terminus just
south of Third Street all the way
to Fort Island Trail; replacing a
large culvert starting to show
signs of failure; installing side-
walks along Third Avenue to U.S.
19; addressing subsurface issues
that have caused pavement fail-
ure; and providing enhanced
stormwater treatment.
Through coordination with
FDOT and the county, we have
secured grant funding and trans-
portation impact fee funding to
cover a significant portion of the
cost. Construction is expected to
take nearly a year, so we ask for


The year ahead


Houston
EST
MNIST


everyone's patience.
Extension of
sewer service to elimi-
nate septic tanks
The city secured
state grant funding in
1999 to significantly re-
duce the cost of remov-
ing septic tanks from
areas adjacent to
King's Bay, an out-
standing Florida
water, through the ex-
tension of centralized
sewer service.
The city first ex-


tended service to sev-
eral small areas within the city
limits not already served by cen-
tralized sewer service, then
began extending sewer service
into the unincorporated area
along Fort Island Trail in the gen-
eral vicinity of the Plantation Re-
sort. The last phase of that
project will start in early 2013
and be completed in early 2014.
Upon completion, more than 500
active septic tanks will have been
removed through this project.
This project has been a coopera-
tive effort between the city and
county, with the city installing the
infrastructure and the county
handling the related assessment
process.
Extension of reclaimed water
to Progress Energy complex
The city is working with
SWFWMD and Progress Energy
to install a pipeline that will take
treated wastewater effluent from
the sprayfield currently in oper-
ation on County Road 495 to the
Progress Energy Power Genera-
tion Complex. The treated waste-
water will be used in lieu of
groundwater within the gas flue
desulphurization apparatus
("scrubbers") installed on the two
newer coal plants.
SWFWMD has projected this
will reduce nitrate loading within
King's Bay by 16 percent while re-
ducing groundwater withdrawal
by roughly 1 million gallons a day
This new disposal process will
allow the city to discontinue reg-
ular use of the sprayfield while
substantially increasing the dis-
posal capacity of its wastewater
treatment system.
Design work should be com-
pleted in 2013 and construction
should start in late 2013 or early
2014.
Improvements within the
Community Redevelopment
District
The city adopted a visioning
plan for downtown in 2008 to
guide redevelopment within the
Community Redevelopment Dis-
trict (CRD). Since that time, the
plan has led to such improve-
ments as the new streetscaping
for South Citrus Avenue, the ac-
quisition of additional public
parking, the implementation of
"mixed-use" land use within the
CRD and along the U.S. 19 com-
mercial corridor, the installation
of wayfaring signage, and the im-


proved walkability of the CRD
through the installation of addi-
tional sidewalks.
In 2013, the streetscaping along
North Citrus will be enhanced to
complement the work done on
South Citrus, and decorative
crosswalks should be installed at
the intersection of U.S. 19 and
Citrus Avenue to provide better
pedestrian connection between
the north and south sides. We will
continue to explore the feasibil-
ity of a transient marina at King's
Bay Park to encourage coastal
cruisers to visit Crystal River
Improvements to city parks
The city developed a master
plan for Hunter Springs Park in
2012. In 2013, the early stages of
the improvements to that park
identified within the master plan
will be initiated through shore-
line "hardening" to address the
current erosion problems and the
start of the design process to cre-
ate a safer and more enjoyable
swimming area.
Future improvements will in-
clude expanded parking and the
construction of a new restroom
facility set back from the water-
line so as not to block the water-
front view. We will also be
proceeding with installing a per-
formance gazebo in King's Bay
Park to enhance the park's use
for special events, since it is al-
ready utilized as part of the
venue for events such as the Man-
atee Festival and the Stone Crab
Jam.
In addition to these projects,
the city will work with the Tourist
Development Council (TDC) to
get more specific data on why
people come to Crystal River,
what they like and don't like
about their visits here and what
the actual economic impact of
tourism within Crystal River is.
The city has agreed to partially
fund a study being conducted by
the TDC on tourism overall
within Citrus County so that in-
formation specific to Crystal
River will be available. That re-
port should be available in June,
and the information it provides
hopefully will allow us to work
with the TDC to develop strate-
gies for making tourism an even
stronger element within the local
economy
The city also intends to look at
ways to encourage revitalization
of the U.S. 19 commercial corri-
dor during the upcoming year
The county, the Chamber of Com-
merce and the Economic Devel-
opment Council (EDC) have
expressed an interest in working
with us on this effort, and we look
forward to a collaborative effort
to address the various issues that
adversely impact this older com-
mercial corridor
2013 promises to be a busy and
productive year for Crystal River
--*--A
Andy Houston is city manager
for the city of Crystal River


TAH(ER.
6(oMJC OA 203


Lazy Americans
I'm calling the Chronicle in reference to
your Sound Off, "Low pay, not prosperity."
It just shows you how lazy Americans are
because he or she's complaining (that)
$10 an hour under that is not enough.
Just shows you how lazy they are. A job is
a job, rather it's $7.50, $8.50 an hour,
and you work your way up through hard
work. That's why there's so much unem-
ployment, because Americans are lazy


and they don't want to work for less than
minimum wage or above minimum wage.
They need to get a life and realize. If you
don't like it, move to another country. See
how much money you make.
Remove garage sale signs
This call's regarding garage sale signs. I
feel all the signs should be removed after
your sale is over. If not, you should be fined
for littering, which is a $500 fine. Also, re-
member your address is on the signs.


CA-
563-0579


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Look of love is still in our eyes


"The look oflove is in
your eyes ... the look
your heart can't dis-
guise. The look of love
is saying so much more
than words could ever
say ... and what my
heart has heard, it
takes my breath away
.."The Look of Love,
Burt Bacharach and
Hal David, 1967.


Fred Brannen
A SLICE
fr IMC


In September 2006, r
Cheryl and I were
on the last leg of a magnificent
trip to Greece. It had been a
guided adventure by land and sea.
We'd done a tour of the main-
land as well as an Aegean cruise
to various islands such as
Mykonos, Rhodes, Patmos and
Santorini. We began in Athens


LIElr


and were now closing
out with a final night
back in the city before
flying home the follow-
ing day It was a pack-
aged tour, and this last
night included a good-
bye gathering with the
members of our tour
group. We had dinner
in a very nice restau-
rant positioned on a
hill with a most im-
pressive view of the
Acropolis and its


crowning glory, the Parthenon.
The after-dinner entertain-
ment was a pianist/singer who
also had a karaoke set-up. After
playing and singing for us, he
asked for someone from the audi-
ence to come up and do a song
with him. Not really knowing


what to expect, my Cheryl volun-
teered. To her surprise, she was
advised they were going to do the
ditty about a yellow polka dot
bikini. She agreed to do it, but
only if she could sing a song of
her own choosing at the conclu-
sion. The deal was made.
Then, after singing about an
itsy bitsy bathing suit, Cheryl
sang "The Look of Love." She
dedicated it to me in honor of our
40th wedding anniversary, which
we'd celebrated on the trip.
While she sang, our eyes met and
as is almost always the case, we
simply melted into each other It
was as though there was no one
else there.
We didn't let it bother us when
a few of our tour mates teased by
calling out, "You two should get a
room!"


A few days ago, a young appli-
ance repairman was in our home
working on a sick dishwasher. As
he was about to leave, he com-
mented on how he'd made mental
notes concerning the gentle, ten-
der way Cheryl and I spoke to each
other and especially about the way
we looked lovingly into each
other's eyes with a lingering gaze.
He allowed as to how these things
might help his own marriage.
When did it start? When did we
begin to express our feelings with
such looks?
It was at the very beginning of
our whirlwind courtship in De-
cember 1965 during the eight
days we had between our first
date and me leaving for active
duty as an army reservist. The
first occasion was when Cheryl
insisted I stay close by her side


while she spoke on the phone
with another young man who'd
called to ask her out. On that
evening, she locked her eyes with
mine as she turned the other fel-
low down and we realized some-
thing special was going on
between us.
I've heard it said the eyes are
the windows to the soul. When
looking into Cheryl's eyes, I truly
believe I see her soul. I see the
essence of her innermost being as
well as a reflection of my own.
Not only that, but I see all of the
things in life we have shared and
continue to share, including our
ever present love.
--In--
Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


Notre Dame stunk
Why did they let a Divi-
sion 2 team like Notre
Dame play in the BCS? It
was ridiculous.
Editor's Note:
Notre Dame is a Di-
vision I school in
football.


Go Dragon
Boat team
I loved the arti-
cle on the Nature CAL
Coast Dragon Boat 563 057
Team. It is wonder- O5 ) f0
ful to read of older
people who are physically
active and mentally vibrant Does
whether paddling with the I'm able
dragon boat team, cycling recover
on the Withlacoochee trail 249-73


or something else. Thanks
for the great coverage.
Nuts to you
Yesterday on TV,


an announcer
commented a gov-
ernment official
resigned his post
to retire to work in
California on his
walnut orchard.
He said this time
he's going to work
with a different
kind of nuts.
Cornice
recovering
anyone know where
e to get a cornice
ed? Please call 352-
29.


Hot Corer: ARMING SCHOOLS


RICAL CU FFOR T GA RALLY, WALLY RBD R @ &




S LETTERS to the Editor


Defending gun ownership
In defense of the NRA, I have been
reading this fine organization is too
powerful. In my opinion it's complete
and utter nonsense. What may I ask
is the problem with a firearms-re-
lated company making monetary con-
tributions to an organization that
lobbies the politicians in Washington
to protect their interests? It's the
same thing that is being done by the
Brady Camp, and Handgun Control
Inc. They accept monetary contribu-
tions and hire Washington lobbyists
to advance their anti-gun agendas.
I think we have to think with some
clarity here. Any business, whether it
is the drug manufacturers down to
the Future Farmers of America, posi-
tion themselves in such a way for
using Washington lobbyists to ad-
vance their goals. The NRA is no dif-
ferent. The anti-gun media use a
different measurement of judgment
when it comes to the NRA, because
they downright hate them. I do not
think they should. The NRA is a pow-
erful lobby, no doubt That's good.
That's what gun owners, and all
firearm-related businesses need.
They are lobbying to protect their in-
terests and their businesses, not to
promote the killing or shooting of in-
nocent people.
The NRA does a wonderful job
teaching people to be safe and re-
sponsible gun owners, through their
firearms safety courses. I should
know, because I teach them. But I
have to ask? Where is that being writ-
ten in the newspapers? They paint
the NRA as a bunch of non-feeling,
gun nuts bent on the destruction law
and order That could not be farther
from the truth.
We should have a serious problem
accepting the view that any new lim-


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chronicle
editorials are the opinions of the news-
paper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do not
necessarily represent the opinion of
the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited to ex-
press their opinions in a letter to the
editor.
Persons wishing to address the edito-
rial board, which meets weekly, should
call Mike Arnold at 352-564-2930.
All letters must be signed and include
a phone number and hometown, in-
cluding letters sent via email. Names
and hometowns will be printed; phone
numbers will not be published or given
out.
We reserve the right to edit letters for
length, libel, fairness and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than 600
words, and writers will be limited to
four letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429. Or, fax to 352-563-3280, or
e-mail to letters@chronicleonline.com.


its on the types or number of
firearms that we should be able to
buy be dictated by a bunch of social-
ists looking to control the ways we
can defend ourselves. It's our free-
dom of choice. Yours, mine, and no-
body else. That's what the NRA is
protecting. That our rights guaran-
teed under the Constitution, which
we swear to protect and defend, are
not undermined in any way That
means no more anti-gun legislation.
We should be sick of it.
There are thousands of laws on the
books, just enforce them on the bad
guys. I find it odd, that everywhere
you look, the mainstream media is
trying to shift the blame of the killing
of those poor children to the NRA,


and 130 million or so law-abiding gun
owners simply because they happen
to own guns? It's true. Every time
something like this happens, it's
more gun control. The mainstream
media and the anti-gun lobby use
these types of tragedies to advance
their cause for more gun control,
which is, and has been an utterly dis-
mal failure. It's time to accept the
truth for what it is. It's time to stop
the blame game and think with our
heads. It's time to stop getting angry
at the wrong people. We should be
angry at a system that allows men-
tally unstable people to slip through
the cracks and hurt others. It's time
to stop punishing law-abiding and re-
sponsible gun owners who hurt no
one, and just want to live in peace
and to be left alone to pursue their
interests.
Wayne C. Sessa
Beverly Hills

Happy clinic open
Regrettably, I failed to add my
voice in opposition to the proposed
closing of the Sugarmill Woods Walk-
in Clinic but happily other voices as-
sured its continuation.
I do want to thank the Citrus Me-
morial Health System for the effort
involved in keeping it open, because
it is a much-needed clinic for the in-
creasing residents of Sugarmill
Woods and surrounding communi-
ties. Also, my thanks to Dr. Wright
Hernandez, who will oversee the
clinic and provide his private-prac-
tice medical support.
I'm hopeful, in time the clinic will
also be open on Saturdays, even half
days.


France


s M. Harbin
Homosassa


Arm our teachers
If the editor doesn't
want to arm teachers,
what is his suggestion? He
doesn't have a suggestion.
He's just against it. I be-
lieve it's a good thing. I
think they should increase
the presence of the school
resource officers and give
them guns and bullets in-
stead of letting them be
like, you know, Barney Fife.
They're not able to fire. An-
other way is if teachers
want to be trained to shoot
a gun or have a Taser I
think a gun would be bet-
ter if they need to stop
the killer before he kills my
children. I think if they
want to be armed, they
should. I find it hypocriti-
cal the editor always is
against things but doesn't
have a solution.

Need stricter laws
I'm calling the Chronicle
in reference to the armed
security officers patrolling
at schools. This is a waste
of taxpayer money and
time, because if someone
wanted to do something,
they're going to do it. All
they have to do is go to
school and take that per-
son out first and, boom,
they could do whatever
they want. If someone's
going to do something,
they're going to do it re-



WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

come better solutions for
our problems. It is when
things get personal -
when the ego takes prece-
dent over the facts we
begin to lose our focus. We
lose our edge.
Ron Noon knew we


gardless. Whatever control
you try to have over it, it's
not going to happen. If you
use a sword, a knife, chem-
icals; if someone wants to
do something, they're
going to do it. The best
way to control it is to have
stricter laws, gun control
on ammunition. But more
important, change the
laws, penalties. And don't,
do not glorify these people
(who) commit these crimes
and put their pictures on
the front page, because
that's what they're looking
for. That's what you need
to do. Putting armed
guards in schools is not
the answer. It's not going
to help.
More guns in school
The comment about the
teacher being taught how
to use a 9mm in her class-
room; I guess this person
would rather see no guns
in the school and let con-
tinuous killings and the
mass shootings that have
been going on. I think there
ought to be some teaching
people how to use guns.
It's a good idea. Everybody
should be able to know
how to safely use a gun,
because if an idiot comes
in the classroom with an
AK-47 again, he needs to
be taken down right away
rather than to have more
children murdered.


could argue about issues
and still like each other We
can argue positions but still
show respect. The dying
words of Ron Noon ring
with truth: "Be nice."


Gerry Mulligan is the pub-
lisher of the
Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicle
online.com.


JEFFERSON
Continued from Page Cl

slavery His powers failed him -
and they failed America" (page 124).
Of course, one can argue if slav-
ery had been outlawed, the
colonies could never have
achieved unity.
With the former colonies push-
ing the British for recognition of
their independence, Jefferson was
elected to the Congress in 1783 and
then was sent to be the American
ambassador in France, a country
whose culture he admired. As am-
bassador, he was helpful in con-
vincing the French to support
American independence. Of
course, France's willingness in this
regard was linked to its competi-
tion with London. Jefferson ob-
served the beginnings of the
French Revolution, which he was
initially sympathetic toward, al-
though the increasingly violent na-
ture of the movement caused him


to be critical of events there after
he returned to America in 1787.
With George Washington now
president, Jefferson was pleased
to have a strong leader for the
states, although there were con-
tained political divisions over is-
sues such as trade and slavery It
was during this period the compe-
tition emerged with Alexander
Hamilton, who was building a
vital monetary and trade system.
Hamilton was seen as the cham-
pion of tightening the union while
Jefferson's Party based prima-
rily in the south worried if the
northerners were in power, slav-
ery would be abolished.
When John Adams won the
presidency in 1797, Jefferson be-
came vice president and close
confidant. Meanwhile, Hamilton
continued to develop the Ameri-
can banking system and took other
steps to strengthen the power of
the central government. But be-
cause he had been born in the
West Indies, he could not become
president under the terms of the


U.S. Constitution.
In 1801, Jefferson was chosen as
president primarily on the
basis of his support in the South,
although he had northern political
leaders who admired him. Con-
trary to the idea many had that
Jefferson would weaken the cen-
tral government, when he became
president, he moved toward a
more robust union even while
protecting southern interests.
Jefferson had surprisingly weak
oratorical skills. His voice did not
carry well and he was uncomfort-
able with public speaking. But in
conversation, his brilliance and
wide set of scientific and histori-
cal interests made him a popular
host He turned out to be a master
at finding middle ground between
politicians with widely diverging
points of view. He had a dazzling
knowledge, wit and imperturba-
bility. His sincerity helped the two
parties to find common ground.
Much of the divisiveness that had
characterized Washington politics
evaporated when confronted by


Jefferson's charm and intellect.
The eight years of Jefferson's
tenure included such significant
triumphs as the Lewis and Clark
expedition, the Louisiana Pur-
chase and the opening of tribal
land holdings to settlement (often
done with no regard to the rights
of the Indians). Most important,
his performance in office reduced
the level of conflict between the
political parties something that
made James Madison's presi-
dency beginning in 1809 easier.
One thought that runs through a
contemporary reading of Jeffer-
son's successes in building con-
sensus is today's politicians are
too closely tied to their parties
and constituents. Politicians
under Jefferson were far from the
preying eyes of their supporters
and local newspapers. This made
it easier to find a middle ground.
Lamentably, today's communica-
tion systems allow the public to
scrutinize the actions of our rep-
resentatives. Compounding this is
today's growing power of special


interest groups and their lobbyists
and the need for candidates to
raise enormous amounts of money
for their campaigns.
Bottom line: a great book that
shows us how lucky we were to
have good leadership during our
perilous founding period.
Meacham also reminds us, as a
people, we have much in common
and probably our political differ-
ences are less important than we
think.


Michael Francis is a Sugarmill
Woods resident who taught inter-
national politics and US. foreign
policy at the University ofNotre
Dame for 39 years prior to retir-
ing He served as a chairman of
the Department of Government
and International Studies for six
years, was director ofNotre
Dame's 20 different foreign stud-
ies programs for five years, and
held various other teaching and
administration positions at the
university


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Do not infringe
I love it when liberals
call for a discussion but
then add a warning to peo-
ple who disagree with them
to stay out of the discus-
sion. That's how liberals
think. Let's set them
straight on several points.
A recent letter writer
rambles on about the sec-
ond amendment and only
ends up demonstrating he
doesn't meet his own re-
quirement of a sane person
able to read and write as
an adult. To understand the
Second Amendment, you
have to understand the
purpose of the first 10
amendments to the Consti-
tution. They are individual
rights reserved to the citi-
zens and the government is
prohibited from violating
them. The Second Amend-
ment has nothing to do
with defending the country
against foreign invasion. It
has everything to do with
protecting the individual
citizen, as the other nine
do, against tyranny by the
government such as the
abuse that had just caused
a revolution. The word
"free" means as opposed to
"tyrannical." Another word
the letter writer ignores is
"infringed." It means to
transgress or encroach.
That means no assault
weapons bans.
That is the one true and
correct meaning of the Sec-
ond Amendment.
The writer wants to keep
people out of the discus-
sion, but you can't do that.
People kill people, not
guns. We have 300 million


guns and 20 million seri-
ously disturbed citizens.
About 20 out of that 20 mil-
lion people are a threat at
any one time. Someone has
to know them and have
some knowledge of their
problems. We had an as-
sault weapons ban in place
for 10 years and fair and
impartial statistical re-
search has failed to turn up
evidence the federal ban
that expired in 2004 did
any good.
The liberal outrage over
armed guards in schools
would be laughable if it
wasn't so tragic. Why is it
OK for Obama and the
members of Congress to
send their children to a
school protected by 11
armed guards and you
don't even rate a single
rent-a-cop? Arm half the
schools and let the parents
choose which ones they


prefer. Every recent mass
shooting save one has oc-
curred in a marked and
posted guns-free zone. The
theater in Colorado was the
only one of five theatres in
the area that was posted.
The only people even read-
ing and heeding the sign
are the law-abiding citizens
with concealed carry per-
mits. If you think for a
minute that gun-free zones
deter criminals and cra-
zies, you're sadly mistaken.
Harley Lawrence
Homosassa

Explain your side
My friend Larry Jo-
hansen's Dec. 27 letter
demonstrates the far and
wide, left vs. right differ-
ences. Larry is a well-
meaning gentleman (who)
volunteers countless after-
noons next to Hardees,


TAHLFER























commitment to his beliefs.
I agree it's time to quit
fighting a war we aren't try-
ing to win and let them be
their own police.
Here's where I respect-
fully disagree. Mr. Jo-
hansen takes issue with a
frequent conservative let-
ter writer, Mr. Lawrence,
whose letters are well ar-
ticulated, thorough and fact
based. Mr. Johansen would
have been afforded 600
words to refute his points
but instead used 75 words
to say quit writing "hog-
wash" he disagrees with.
Intolerant, arrogant re-
sponse of no substance is
the norm from the left, no
doubt learned from our
president who, when
stranded in a debate and
caught in a blatant lie, re-
sponded to a point blank


question with "please pro-
ceed governor" In other
words, shut up and move on.
Conservatives are eager for
dialogue and logical strate-
gies while Democrats are
full speed in their agenda of
redistribution and not inter-
ested otherwise.
Our country is drowning
in debt and the Democrats'
only plan is to tax (plunder)
the wealthy raising a
micro-fraction of the
deficit, while further hin-
dering job creators. This is
not a solution. It is another
lie from the great deceiver
who knows it's not enough
money It is so illogical any
rational thinking person
can't help but be suspicious
of the motivation, leading
to the conspiracy theories
ridiculed by the left as fan-
tasy even though strong na-
tions have fallen victim to
the same countless times
throughout history
Mr Johansen and the rest
of middle-class America is
about to see the greatest be-
trayal of their lifetime as
they are taxed to the bone,
because their vote is no
longer needed but their
money is. The rest of our
money will be spent on
higher-priced goods and
services, which will neces-
sarily cost more to offset the
attacks the left think are so
fair and due. What I can't un-
derstand is why the left ei-
ther doesn't see this or why
they think they will be ex-
empted from this inflation.
Mr. Johansen once over-
heard a conversation I had
about the state of our econ-
omy and my beliefs as to
why it was. He suggested I


look around at my full
restaurant and appreciate
contributions our current
leadership played. Remem-
ber, I didn't build it, govern-
ment-built roads brought
those customers. Somehow,
he forgot to factor in that
those roads were there for
the 10 years previous when
a half dozen others failed in
the same building during
far better economic times.
He didn't bother to recog-
nize a unique concept, or
the 15-hour days we
washed dishes to save pay-
roll, or the risk of our life
savings and even our own
home, with no financial as-
sistance. Then, we did it
again, doubling the job op-
portunities we created.
True to the democratic, so-
cialist philosophy they wish
to take credit for our exis-
tence and take our money
for their existence. I choose
to thank a higher power
Please Mr. Johansen, or
anyone like-minded, use
the 600 words allowed and
explain why we should be
forbidden from expecting
transparency, honesty, in-
tegrity and a viable course
of action from the man
(who) promised this. Please
explain why our president
has violated federal law by
not passing a budget his en-
tire time in office even
though he had majority
control of the House and
Senate. Please explain how
our country is not on the
way to bankruptcy Please
explain why we should
shut up.
Mitch Simmons
Crystal River


Sustaining Partner: Brought to you by the City ot Crystal River

CHipONiCE CITRIS oNT CRYSTAL

S rb H,,|rh L.. T EL
t H.-r,,r- r 1,,- ,,.1".. r ,',r : :. M l
+, .. ... .... ... ...,






ourthouse
C Proudly Present


S r,, i r

Tickets $10,,,,..
Including Refreshments
at the 1912 Citrus County
Courthouse, Inverness
Doors open at 6:15
Music starts promptly at 7 p.m.


CI :~- Ip l E
Edward Jones
Financial Services


Limited seating.
Reservations Necessary.
Call: 352-341-6427
To BENEFIT THE CITRUS
CoUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY


Smith Optical Services, David Rom
State Farm Insurance, Dave and
Thelma Noble, Rebecca Pujals-
Jones, Highlander Caf6 of Crystal
River, Charles Davis Funeral Home
and Crematory, Joyce's Courtside
Pub, Deco Caf6, Elegant Catering,
3Js Pizza, Ice Cream Doctor, Winn
Dixie Supermarkets, Sweetbay
Supermarkets, Suncoast
Chiropractic and Anonymous,


January 11th 20th
Art Center Theater "Nunsense"
Call the box office for tickets or more information at
352-746-7606 or visit www.citruscountyartcenter.com.


January 19th 20th
Saturday 9 a.m.- 5 p.m. Sunday 9 a.m.- 4 p.m.
Florida Manatee Festival
For more information call 352-795-1921
or visit www.citruscountychamber.com

January 20th 1 p.m.- 3p.m.
Zumbathon for Precious Paws Rescue
For more Information call: 352-419-4124.

January 25th
10 a.m.- 12:30 p.m.
Lu the Hippo's Birthday
For more information call 352-628-5343.

January 25th 26th
Truck and
Tractor Pull
For more information visit
www.citruscountyfair.com/tractor.html or call 352-726-2993.

January 26th
Books and Beyond Book Festival
Call 352-634-4216 for more information
or for ticket reservations.

January 26th 9 a.m.
Rotary Club of Sugarmill Woods
Golf Tournament
Call 352-382-7706 for more information.


January 26th 11:30 a.m.
Bunco Bash Event


Saturday ,,

January 26th -
Southern Woods
Golf Club, Homosassa S'GonRMLlo'
9am Shotgun Start

GOLF TOURNAMENT
$65 Individual $200 Foursome
Includes green fees, cart and lunch.

Ladies, Men's and Team winners will receive prizes.
There will be Hole-in-One Prizes, on all par threes.
Including a car on Hole #8.

Hole Sponsor $150
Includes one golfer, call Jesse

All proceeds will be used for
Rotary Club of Sugarmill
Woods Charitable Projects.

For more information call ..
Jesse Mackey at 382-7706



C IINICLE CitrusC o(j


C4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013


COMMENTARY


iooDQF












BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


GOVERNMENT S COMPLICATED TAX SYSTEM


SCHEDULE i .
,,Vimr. n, I 'CaDltal Ra .


SCHEDULE
(Forn




U [
(8


SCHEDULES A
(Form 1040)


"-.'-.."_. ed
amie .d-
4- .A--.


Tax code longer than Bible, but no good news


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Too intimidated
to fill out your tax return without help?
Join the club.
At nearly 4 million words, the U.S.
tax law is so thick and complicated
that businesses and individuals spend
more than 6 billion hours a year com-
plying with filing requirements, ac-
cording to a report Wednesday by an
independent government watchdog.
That's the equivalent of 3 million
people working full-time, year-round.
"If tax compliance were an industry, it
would be one of the largest in the United
States," said the report by Nina E. Olson,
the National Taxpayer Advocate.


The days of most taxpayers sitting
down with a pencil and a calculator to
figure out their taxes are long gone,
Olson said. Since 2001, Congress has
made almost 5,000 changes to U.S. tax
law. That's an average of more than
one a day
As a result, almost 60 percent of fil-
ers will pay someone to prepare their
tax returns this spring. An additional
30 percent will use commercial soft-
ware. Without the help, Olson said,
most taxpayers would be lost.
"On the one hand, taxpayers who
honestly seek to comply with the law
often make inadvertent errors, causing

See Page D4


Largest taxpayer savings
Taxpayers will be able to reduce their tax bills by about $1.1
trillion this year. Some of the biggest tax breaks:
Employer contributions for medical insurance $181
premiums and medical care billion
Retirement plan contributions and earnings 165
Mortgage interest deduction 101
Long-term capital gains and some dividends 84
State and local taxes 69
Deduction for charitable contributions H 46
Most Social Security and veterans' benefits 45
Interest on tax-exempt state and local
government bonds
Capital gains on inherited investments 24
Income from some life insurance products 23
SOURCES: National Taxpayer Advocate; Joint Committee on Taxation AP


Stand Down helps vets face homelessness challenges


I saw my nephew Jeremy
recently in Louisiana at a
family wedding. He was
out of uniform and sporting
mufti in a big way as proud
best man for his brother,
Joseph.
His leave from the U.S. Air
Force was short, barely book-
ending the weekend right
after Christmas. It is comfort-
ing to know after nearly six
years and two tours in
Afghanistan, defusing impro-


vised explosive devices -
soon he will look at the short
end of his service. Home,
then, won't be just a place he
is able to visit briefly In the
warm embrace of friends and
family, home will be a safe
haven, a place of comfort
where he can decompress and
refuel for life's next challenge.
Jeremy is one of the lucky
ones.
Combat or hazardous duty
should be the most difficult


experience of a veteran's life.
But for too many veterans,
home is merely a fond and
fading memory In Workforce
Connection's three-county
region, an estimated 500 vet-
erans are homeless.
We know veterans account
for 14 percent to 17 percent
of the homeless population
nationally They are home-
less more often and for
longer stretches on aver-
age nine times the standard


deployment for those home-
less more than two years.
About 59 percent of our
homeless vets live in tempo-
rary housing such as VA shel-
ters, while the rest live on the
streets, in abandoned build-
ings, in wooded areas or in
their cars.
We're talking about our
neighbors 68 percent have
lived in the county where

See Page D4


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


*


Page D4


Laura Byrnes
WORKFORCE
CONNECTION


Roth IRA

no-brainer

for young

investors
Dear Bruce: I am
married and 32
years old. My hus-
band and I would like to
open an IRA, but we are
unsure which kind. I may
be going back to school to
obtain my pharmacy de-
gree. We have heard of the
Roth IRA, but we don't
know if it's the best for us
to contribute to. Please
explain the benefits of the
Roth and traditional IRAs.
- Reader, via email
Dear Reader: The
major difference between
a Roth IRA and a tradi-
tional IRA is with a Roth,
your contributions are not
tax-deductible, but they
have the potential to grow
tax-free. With a traditional
IRA, your contributions
may be tax-deductible and
can grow tax-deferred.
If you have a relatively
modest income, you're far
better off with the Roth,
since you pay no taxes on
any money earned on the
investment Given you are
very young and your
money can sit in the Roth
and work for 50 years and
you won't pay one penny in
tax on the money earned
during this period, the
Roth is a wonderful deal
that is not to be missed.
Dear Bruce: My cousin
and I own a house through
a trust. I have my own
house that my family and I
live in, but my cousin and
his family live in this
house. To say they are pigs
would be an understate-
ment The house needs so
much work, but my
cousin's not putting forth
the effort or cash to get it
in decent condition, and I
have no extra money to get
it in acceptable condition.
The attorneys have
talked about renting out
the house, but in its pres-
ent condition, it is not
rentable. We have talked
about selling it, but just
like everywhere else, the
housing market is soft and
no one would want to buy
it anyway with the amount
of work that needs to be
done. What should we do?
- S.O., Missouri
Dear S.O.: There's a
time and a place to be a
nice guy, and this is not
one of them. It seems to
me unless your cousin is
willing to move out and
absorb half the cost of fix-
ing up this place, your
next move should be to try
to get this matter resolved
through the courts. I sug-
gest you speak with an at-
torney
This is another perfect
example of why property
should not be given to
beneficiaries in undi-
vided interest, other than
in the case of a husband
and wife.
Dear Bruce: My
boyfriend and I recently
bought a home together. I
was married previously
and itemized my taxes for
years with the previous
home I owned.
But now with this
house, which is in both of
our names, who gets to
itemize? Can we file taxes
as a married couple, even
though we are not legally
married? Reader, via
email
Dear Reader: To an-
swer your last question
first, no, you cannot file as
a married couple if you're
not married.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST
Leadership Citrus Introduces the Class of 2013


Special to the Chronicle
These local business people and residents have begun their journey into the Leadership Citrus Class of 2013. Front row, from left, are: Cathy Edmisten, Oak Hill Hospital; Isaac
Baylon, Century 21- JW Morgan; Terri Hartman, Crossland Realty; Meghan Shay, The Centers; Cindi Fein, Citrus County Chamber of Commerce; Melissa Benefield, Abitare Paris Salon
& Spa; Courtney Pollard, Citrus County Chronicle; Katie Mehl, Citrus Memorial Health System; Sherri Parker, Sherri C. Parker & Assoc. Realtors; Laura Grady, Citrus 95.3 and The Fox
96.7; Michael Duca, Rockmonster, Inc. and Lindsay Blair, BOCC. Back row, from left: Melissa Wood, Citrus County Health Dept.; Tony Winebrenner, Citrus Pest Management; Ray
Thompson, Capital City Bank; Ryan Glaze, Citrus County Sheriff's Office and John Steelfox, Citrus County Property Appraiser's Office. Not pictured: Sunshine Arnold, Jessie's Place.


Realtors donate toys and money
to local Family Resource Center


DEX Imaging supports
2012 Tree of Remembrance


Special to the Chronicle
Sarah Spencer, 2012 president of Realtors Association of Citrus County, presents a truck
full of toys and an $800 check to Ginger West, of the Family Resource Center. From left,
are: Spencer; West; Becky Norman, Realtor; and Bonnie Rosenberger, executive director
of Realtors Association of Citrus County.


special o L e nCironicle
Tom Allnutt, right, Sales Manager, DEX Imaging, provides a 2012 Tree of Remembrance
sponsorship to Hospice of Citrus County Public Relations Manager Joe Foster. The Tree
of Remembrance is a tribute to the lives and spirit of loved ones who are missed and sup-
ports children who are served by Herry's Kids Pediatric Services. Visit Hospice of Citrus
County on Facebook or at www.hospiceofcitrus.org.


I* E. VM E)I TA 3RE.C To


BOB LANE,Accountant
Accounting & Income Tax Returns
Fixed & Equity Indexed Annuities
(352) 344-2888 (352) 344-2599
(352) 344-2480 Fax (352) 637-5500


A- L


hE


400 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL. 34450
43 Years in Business 31 Years in Inverness


Christine C. Eck, CPA, PA
910 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 563-2522
Certified Public Accountant Member: Florida Institute of CPAs

STax Preparation:
S,,.l3; ;. .,1 .h.;,, .... F k.1 i,. ,n \11 ,,,:
ua, l.,., ,:,J e-lile .,.
l, la.. . V M I ,,, ,illlhl* l'n ,t ll il,. li'i,, ll h l.lin ii,



PRICE & COMPANY, P.A.
Certified Public Accountants
795-6118
Serving Citrus County for over 30 years

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795-3212


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726-8130


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IT'S TAX TIME!

There's Still Time Left
To Place Your Ad Call
563-5592


For more~ (' iil~~i information
on dvrtsig al

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I


D2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013


BUSINESS










D3

SUNDAY
JANUARY 13, 2013


Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


Scan RE i
this:
r-Lr'


numberr connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Celebrity golf
tournament
helps Tourette
patients
Register yourself or your
foursome today for the
First Annual Tee Off for
Tourette Celebrity Golf
Outing taking place Feb. 2
at Plantation on Crystal
River. Imagine golfing with
Daryl Talley, two-time Pro-
Bowler and two-time All-
Pro linebacker for the
Buffalo Bills; or John
Prince, famous sports
artist; or maybe Nick Del-
Guidice of the Kansas City
Royals. These are among
the celebrities who will be
auctioned off for play in
the tournament. The event
kicks off with a party at
the Plantation on Friday,
Feb. 1, where Dave
Pittman, "American Idol"
contestant, will perform.
Cost for an individual
player is $100; $400 for a
foursome. Greens fee, cart,
lunch and goody bags in-
cluded. Shotgun start 9
a.m. Contact Gary D'Am-
ico at gary78@tampabay.
rr.com to register and for
more details. If you can't
play but want to be in-
volved, there a few spon-
sorships still available.



NEWS YOU

CAN USE

Register
Take steps toward
strong bones
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center invites you
too join physical therapist
Bruno Silva to find out
which lifestyle choices you
can modify to prevent bone
loss. Attend on Wednesday,
Jan. 23 at 1 p.m. in the
Medical Offices Building
Community Room. Pro-
gram is free; registration
requested. Call 352-795-
1234.

Prostate cancer screen-
ing
During January, men over
age 40 who have not had a
prostate cancer screening
in the past 12 months are
welcome to register for a
free prostate-specific anti-
gen (PSA) and physical
exam on Wednesday, Jan.
30. Appointments are lim-
ited and will be scheduled
between 4 p.m. and 7 p.m.
Call Seven Rivers Regional
at 800-436-8436 to sched-
ule your appointment.

Volunteer
Sheriff's Ranch
Caruth Camp
This youth camp, located
just north of Inglis, is in
need of a volunteer regis-
tered nurse. Please call
Ms. Pat Nelson at 352-
447-2259 for details and
to complete an application.

Manatee/Strawberry
festivals
We are always looking for
volunteers to help with our
festivals. The Florida Mana-
tee Festival is Saturday,
Jan. 19, and Sunday, Jan.
20. The Floral City Straw-
berry Festival is Saturday,
March 2, and Sunday,
March 3. Consider donat-
ing your time and see the
festival from the "inside."
Call Matthew at 352-726-
2801.

Cinderella's Closet
Clean out your closet and
make some girl beautiful
for prom! This is the sixth
year for our Citrus Cin-
derella's Closet. Every girl
deserves the chance to at-
tend her prom. We provide
dresses, shoes and acces-
sories for underprivileged
girls in our community. All
services are completely
free! We still need dona-
tions as well as volunteers!
Drop off your donations
Monday through Friday be-
tween 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. at
the Cornerstone Baptist
Church, 1100 W. Highland
Blvd., Inverness. 352-726-


7335 or bcwcw@
yahoo.com. Please drop
off any items prior to Jan.
25, as the closet is open
on Feb. 2.


Florida Manatee Festival arrives Jan. 19 and 20


The 2013 Florida Man-
atee Festival arrives
this coming week-
end, so gather up the family
and spend a day together.
Enjoy the sights and sounds
of one of Florida's largest
festivals, where unique
crafts, fine art, mouthwa-
tering food, children's
games, manatee viewing,
live entertainment and
dragon boats all come to-
gether at one intersection.


This year's is the 26th an-
nual Florida Manatee Fes-
tival, and it is bigger, better
and more manatee than
ever! Local boat captains
will be available Saturday
and Sunday to take you on a
20- to 30-minute tour
around the area to view
manatees and other
wildlife such as osprey and
bald eagles. Tickets are $10
(children 12 and under free)
and are available at the


Healthy Living


Magazine exudes


community spirit

"Stay Healthy My Friends!"
Healthy Living Magazine disappears off
shelves in the blink of an eye. If you
haven't been able to find it at your doc-
tor's office, local restaurant or other business,
you are always welcome to stop by the Chamber
office for a copy. This free monthly magazine
features many local writers with a vested inter-
est in the county and area.
Wendell Husebo, publisher,
takes great pride in bringing
meaningful information to
h help make the world a more
efficient, healthy and individ-
ually independent place. The
Magazine's slogan, "Stay
SHealthy My Friends," could
Wendell just as well be Wendell's
usebo mantra. He brings to the plate
a diverse background of home education and
world travel as well as a deep connection to
health and basic values. This is reflected in the
four pillars supporting healthy living: financial,
mental, physical and spiritual health.
In every issue, the magazine's overall theme
addresses each of the pillars; bringing to the
forefront not just facts, but energy and ideas to
cultivate a change for the better in the reader.
When asked what makes Healthy Living unique
in the publishing business, Wendell replied,
"Our local magazine has the best graphics, pho-
tography and cleanliness in the country. In ad-
dition, our feature stories cannot be bought and
are not censored by special-interest groups."
This up-front attitude is conveyed in every issue as
the team delivers clean, concise messages that are
necessaryto hear, notjustwhat people wantto hear.
We welcome Healthy Living Magazine and
Wendell Husebo as a Chamber member and
strong Chamber supporter and hope you will
each take a moment and read the January issue
of Healthy Living, focused on "A Strong Foundation."


A little bit of magic


John Seifert, left, executive director of the Citrus County
EDC, and Josh Wooten, president/CEO of the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce, participate in "snow"
shoveling at the Jan. 9 groundbreaking for HPH Hospice
Citrus Hospice Care Center in Lecanto.


boat dock area and are good
only on the day of purchase.
On Saturday, Jan. 19 only,
you have the opportunity to
tour Three Sisters Springs
at no charge with a free
shuttle made available in a
joint effort of the Florida
Manatee Festival, Friends
of the Crystal River Na-
tional Wildlife Refuge Com-
plex and U.S. Fish and
Wildlife.
We recommend that you


park at the Crystal River
Mall and take advantage of
the shuttle to the festival
site. The shuttle is $1
roundtrip per person and is
well worth avoiding the lim-
ited parking in the down-
town area. Admission to the
festival is $3 per person,
with children 12 and under
admitted free. For more in-
formation, visit www
floridamanateefestival.com
or call the Chamber at 352-


726-2801.
The Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce, the Ro-
tary Club of Crystal River,
the City of Crystal River
and supporting partner the
Citrus County Chronicle
join with 2013 presenting
sponsor Crystal Automotive
and 2013 platinum sponsor
the Tampa Bay Times to
bring you this annual event,
one of Florida's largest fes-
tivals.


Counts economic engine


fueled by new enterprise zone


New enterprise zone
The Citrus County Economic Devel-
opment Council announces a new en-
terprise zone has been created for
Citrus County The application was ap-
proved by J. Thomas
Beck, AICP, director, Di-
vision of Community De-
velopment with the state
of Florida's Department i~1 P
of Economic Opportu- J
nity The Florida Enter- CITRUS COUN
prise Zone Program Economic Developn
provides various state council, Inc.
tax incentives to busi- ,
nesses within designated
enterprise zones. The state sets the cri-
teria to qualify for enterprise-zone des-
ignation.
Upon receiving confirmation of the
zone's approval, John Siefert, execu-
tive director of the Citrus County EDC,
said, "We appreciate the joint efforts of
Rep. Jimmie T Smith, the Citrus
County staff of the BOCC, the state of
Florida, Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce and the EDC to complete
all of the necessary evaluations and
studies that resulted in the application
that the Florida Department of Eco-
nomic Opportunity has approved. We
will be working to implement the En-
terprise Zone Authority and advise ex-
isting businesses of the advantages and
opportunities within the new enter-
prise zones, as well as solicit new busi-
nesses to establish in the zones."

Working to close
the skills gap
There are about 6,000 unemployed
and 600 open jobs in Citrus County So
why are companies not hiring? A re-
cent skills gap symposium determined
there is distinct difference between
the skills that employers need and the
skills the job seekers possess.


YOU CAUGHT MY EYE

Wealthi McQuinn
Publix, Crystal River.

... FOR OUTSTANDING
CUSTOMER SERVICE


2013 is off to a great start! How are you doing with your
resolutions? This weeks Chamber Chat focuses on ways to
make this a better year and a better you! Dr. Sharma from
Premier Vein Center in Homosassa co-hosts Chamber Chat
this week. Did you know that nearly 1/2 of the US populations
suffers from vein disease? Dr. Sharma discusses some of the
risk factors and treatments and shares what we can do to
prevent vein disease. Susan Connor-- Health Coach and
Certified Health and Fitness Specialist-- invites you to the
Pure Elements Yoga & Wellness Studio Open House on
January 29th. You can find out about their many workshops
and their new 10 week weightless program that is custom
designed for you!
As long as we are doing something good for our bodies we
can do something good for our community. Dorene Bettis and
Nancy Wheeler tell us how your unwanted household items
can be donated to help send care packages to our military
overseas through a great local organization called Yard Sale
for the Troops. Donating is even easier now that StoreRight
Self Storage is a drop off location for your donations! Dan
Kern joins us to talk about the upcoming 2013 CCBA Jim
Blackshear Memorial Golf Tournament that will be held on
February 23rd at Seven Rivers Golf & Country Club. A "Hole in
One" could win you a brand new motorcycle or a brand new
car from Harley Davidson Crystal River or Eagle Buick!
You have 3 chances to watch Chamber Chat-- Monday
6pm-- Thursday 8am-- Friday 1pm-- every week!
If you would like your business or local event featured on
Chamber Chat-- at no cost to you-- Email Melissa Benefield at
Spotlightmelissa@aol.com. "LIKE" Chamber Chat on Facebook
for clips of past segments and updates on our weekly show!


To help close that gap, the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce and the
Citrus County Economic Development
Council will form a taskforce and part-
ner with State Rep. Jimmie T Smith's
taskforce. If you are interested in par-
ticipating in this joint ef-
fort, please leave your
name and phone num-
ber with the Chamber of-
S \ fice by calling Matthew
\ at 352-726-2801.
Ty Additionally, United
ent Way of Citrus County and
Workforce Connection,
S in cooperation with the
Chamber and EDC, will
host a workshop titled "Land That Job"
on March 8. Watch for further details.

Business incubator
reaches capacity
The last available office at the Citrus
Enterprise Center is now leased. The
business incubator is a joint project be-
tween the Citrus County Economic De-
velopment Council and the Chamber of
Commerce. Businesses occupy a "turn-
key" office at a low rental rate to assist
them in their growth. Business coun-
seling and mentoring are also available.
Cassidy Transport celebrates one
year in the incubator and has grown in
staff and space, now occupying two of
the three offices in the center. This
month we welcome Coy Merrick and
his American Plumbing Services of
Florida.
A special thank-you to Chamber
members Karen and Kevin Cunning-
ham, Re/Max One, who generously do-
nated office furniture to complete the
office for American Plumbing Services
of Florida.
For information or to tour the facili-
ties, please contact Ardath Prender-
gast at 352-795-2000 or visit the EDC
website at http://www.citrusedc.com.


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce

Upcoming

Chamber

events
Jan. 16 Ribbon-cutting,
4:30 p.m. at REMAX ONE in
Inverness
Jan. 19 and 20 Florida
Manatee Festival in Crystal
River, www.floridamanatee
festival .com.
Jan. 23 Ribbon-cutting,
7:30 a.m. at Walmart in
Lecanto
Jan. 24 Business After
Hours, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
GRUMPY GATORS
Feb. 7 Business After
Hours, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
NATURE COAST MIN-
ISTRIES
Feb. 8 February Cham-
ber Lunch, 11:30 a.m. at
Plantation
SAVE THE DATES -
March 20 & 21 2013 Leg-
islative Days in Tallahassee;
details to follow.
Remember, coupons and
discounts also appear on the
mobile and regular website!
Check out our complete
calendar for community, en-
tertainment and fundraising
events.


m


JT
ne
v .





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST

HPH Hospice recognizes

employees' years of service


w
-u


Sp


Special to the Chronicle
Two HPH Hospice Citrus employees were recently recognized by the not-for-profit agency
for their many years of dedicated service. Chief Executive Officer Tom Barb, left,
recognizes Kate Brusik, RN, regional director for her 15 years of service. Chief
Executive Officer Tom Barb recognizes Kathy Kidd, a social worker, for her 20 years of
service. Gwendolyn Burk, manager of Social Work Services, adds her congratulations. HPH
Hospice, Healing People's Hearts provides dignity, comfort and care for patients affected
by a life-limiting illness regardless of their ability to pay. Services also include support, both
emotionally and spiritually for patients' loved ones. For more information, call 527-4600 or
visit www.hph-hospice.org.


Workforce warns about scams
OCALA- Workforce Connection of Citrus,
Levy and Marion counties cautions jobseekers to
be alert for scammers usurping the names of le-
gitimate businesses and organizations to take
advantage of those looking for work.
Workforce Connection CEO Rusty Skinner
said the regional workforce board decided to
issue the warning after hearing about the prob-
lem from other workforce boards.
"Scammers are unscrupulous, clever and are
often very good at what they do," Skinner said.
The Employ Florida Marketplace, or EFM, is
the state's premier online job bank and used by all
24 regional workforce boards. Even though EFM
posts scamming warnings on nearly every page,
Skinner said when someone is searching for work
and finds what appears to be a promising job, "it's
easy to get excited and let your guard down."
Skinner noted there have been no reports of
similar employment scams in Citrus, Levy and
Marion counties, and he hopes to keep it that


TAX
Continued from Page D1

them to either overpay their
tax or become subject to IRS
enforcement action for mis-
taken underpayments,"
Olson said.
"On the
other hand,
sophisti-
S cated tax-
payers often
find loop-
holes that
enable them
Nina Olson to reduce or
who prepared eliminate
the National their tax lia-
Taxpayer abilities "
Advocate O 1 s o n
report. ranks com-
plexity as
the most serious tax prob-
lem facing taxpayers and
the Internal Revenue Serv-
ice in her annual report to
Congress. She urges law-
makers to overhaul the na-
tion's tax laws, making them
simpler, clearer and easier
to comply with.
Momentum is building in
Congress to overhaul the tax
code for the first time since
1986. But Washington's di-
vided government has yet to
show it can successfully
tackle such a task.
President Barack Obama
and Republican leaders in
Congress said they are on-
board, though they have
rarely seen eye to eye on tax
policy. They struggled
mightily just to avoid the
year-end fiscal cliff, passing
a bill that makes relatively
small changes in the na-
tion's tax laws.
Undaunted, the top tax
writer in the House said he
is determined to pass re-


ONL
National Ta
Advocate: t
advocate, ir
AnnualRep(

form legislative
"This report
the code is 10
of the Bible wi
good news," sa
Camp, chair:
House and Wa
Committee. "O
code has bec
mare of looph
cial interest p:
create added
and costs for
taxpayers ane
nesses.
"Comprehel
form will mak
one is playing
rules and hel
create more jo
in their wor
added.
The genera
tax reform is
braced on
Eliminate or
tax credits, ex
deductions an
ditional reven
lower income
everyone. Th
ever, no consei
tax breaks to s
That's becau
like their cr
tions and exen
provisions tha
law so comply
first place. W
want to pay 1
ployer-provide
efits or on coi
their retired
How would
feel about los
gage interest d
Those are


way by alerting jobseekers to warning signs.
Jobseekers are asked to follow these tips:
Research the company to make sure it is
the real deal (to ensure a business is authentic,
contact the Better Business Bureau at
www.bbb.org).
Keep your email address private and do not
provide your Social Security number or any sen-
sitive information to an employer unless you are
confident they are legitimate.
Be wary of any employer offering a job with-
out an interview.
Be alert for any employer charging fees to
either employ, find placement or provide training.
Investigate thoroughly any employer re-
questing you transfer funds or receive packages
for reshipment, especially if they are located
overseas.
Avoid vague offers, exaggerated claims of
possible earnings or product effectiveness, or any
job posting claiming "no experience necessary."
From staff reports


biggest tax breaks in the tax
INE code, according to congres-
ixpayer sional estimates. Together,
taxpayer they are projected to save
s.gov/2012 taxpayers nearly $450 bil-
ort lion this year
In all, taxpayers will save
about $1.1 trillion this year
)n this year. by taking advantage of tax
Sconfirmsthat breaks, according to the
times the size Joint Committee on Taxa-
th none of the tion, the official score-
aid Rep. Dave keeper for Congress. That's
man of the almost as much as individu-
ys and Means als will pay in income taxes.
)ur broken tax To avoid angering millions
ome a night- of constituents who rely on
oles and spe- popular tax breaks, politi-
rovisions that cians prefer to endorse tax
complexities reform without getting into
hardworking specifics. Instead, they say
d small busi- they want to reform the tax
code by eliminating special
nsive tax re- interest "loopholes" that help
:e sure every- only small butwell-connected
by the same groups of taxpayers.
lp businesses Obama has repeatedly
)bs and invest said he wants to eliminate
-kers," Camp tax breaks for hedge fund
managers and companies
1 formula for that buy corporate jets.
Widely em- Throughout the recent fiscal
Capitol Hill: cliff debate, House Speaker
reduce some John Boehner said he fa-
emptions and vored raising additional tax
id use the ad- revenue by reducing unspec-
iue to pay for ified tax loopholes rather
tax rates for than raising income tax
ere is, how- rates.
nsus on which Olson defines "loopholes"
scale back. as tax breaks that benefit
se Americans someone else. She warns
edits, deduc- targeting onlynarrow provi-
nptions-the sions won't raise enough
t make the tax revenue to significantly
icated in the lower rates or make the law
would workers much simpler.
taxes on em- "That's what we've been
ed health ben- trying to say to taxpayers,
ntributions to that the special interests are
nent plans? us. It's not just oil and gas or
homeowners whatever you want to point
ing the mort- your finger at," Olson said.
reduction? "That's not where the
the three money is."


hosp
action initially licensed l 1.






4

.-
^tg


MONEY
Continued from Page D1

I have stated many times I am not in
favor of unmarried people buying a home
together. As you know since you're di-
vorced, it's difficult enough to settle these
matters when you are married. The law is
so deficient on matters regarding unmar-
ried couples as to militate against buying a
home together as you did.
Depending on your income, it may or
may not pay you to itemize. If you do, you
can claim half of the interest paid on the
mortgage. It may be that one or the other
of you is better off with the standard de-
ductions. If there's any question in your
mind, see a tax professional.
Dear Bruce: My husband and I are in
our 70s. It's a second marriage for both of
us, as our previous spouses are deceased.
When we married, we agreed in a prenup-
tial that what each of us brought to the
marriage we would keep in case of a di-
vorce.
Since then, my husband sold a piece of
property and bought the house we now
live in. His will states if he should die, the
home we now live in goes to me for as long
as I live and then to his children. We had it
notarized and signed by two witnesses. My
question is, since it was not done by a
lawyer, can there ever be a problem with
the will? SJ., via email
Dear SJ.: I have no problem with giving
you life rights on the home. It is appropri-
ate and proper. That having been ob-
served, making these changes to his will
without the help of a professional is fool-
ish. The fact that you had it notarized and
witnessed can mean little, if anything.
This could affect you for many, many
years. Why not do it the smart way and
have an attorney draw a proper will con-
veying life rights, etc.? You will both sleep
better, and this way there will be no bur-
den on his children to make concessions
to you that otherwise they might prefer not
to make.



BYRNES
Continued from Page D1

they reside for more than a year who
volunteered for military service to defend
democracy and protect our country
Whether they worked on the front lines or
behind an office desk, every deployment
has its risks.
On Saturday, Jan. 19, Workforce Con-
nection's Veterans Services Team will host
a Homeless Veteran Stand Down in col-
laboration with area veterans groups and
community organizations. Stand Down
takes place at the Florida Army National
Guard Armory, 900 S.W 20th St., in Ocala.
Stand Down assists homeless veterans
and their families by providing health
screenings, Veterans Administration and
Social Security benefits, counseling and
referrals to a variety of services such as
employment, housing and substance
abuse treatment. Nonperishable foods,
blankets and clothing will be distributed.
Funding is provided by a grant from the
National Veterans Homeless Support
(NVHS) and Florida Department of Chil-
dren and Families. Workforce Connection
was one of 20 organizations in Florida to
receive the funding. The goal is to assist
4,000 homeless veterans throughout the
state.
Workforce Connection's Lead Local Vet-
erans Employment Representative
(LLVER) Kim Smith is the Stand Down co-
ordinator She said the event is shaping up
to be one that "really benefits our veteran
communities."
"Our Veteran Services Team is working
hard to ensure that we are able to provide
as many resources and services as possible
to our veterans in greatest need," said
Smith, a U.S. Navy veteran and former


BUSINESS DIGEST
* Submit information via email to newsdesk@ chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attn: Business Digest.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit notices.
* High-resolution photos will be considered for publication. Images taken with most
cellphone cameras do not reproduce well.
* Publication on a specific date or in color cannot be guaranteed.
* Submissions about specific prices of products or sales events are considered ad-
vertising and are not eligible for Business Digest.


Dear Bruce: I am a 75-year-old widower.
I own my house, and my daughter, who is
53, lives with me. I was thinking of adding
my daughter's name to the deed and am
not sure if this would be a good idea. What
are the pros and cons? Reader, via
email
Dear Reader: I have said many times if
you put your child's name on the deed to
your house and then he or she gets into fi-
nancial difficulty perhaps a severe au-
tomobile accident where the insurance
is a little thin your house could be in
jeopardy
I would keep the house in your name
and have an attorney draw up a will that
leaves your property to your daughter
upon your demise.
Dear Bruce: I am 82 years old, and my
husband recently passed away In my will,
I am leaving the house to my nephew and
niece. I wonder if leaving it in just my
name, or my name and my deceased hus-
band's name, will cause them any prob-
lems when I pass away? If I remove my
husband's name from the deed, will the
bank require me to refinance my mort-
gage? Reader, via email
Dear Reader: In my opinion, it would be
wise to have your husband's name re-
moved from the deed, bank accounts, stock
ownership, etc. Having his name on these
assets can only confuse things upon your
demise. Removing his name should be
routine upon presentation of a death cer-
tificate, and it should not present any dif-
ficulties.
Be certain your will is very specific
about your nephew and niece. With regard
to the house, you should be specific as to
how it's disposed of- very likely sold and
the residual amounts divided among your
heirs.
[-
Send questions to bruce@bruce
williams.com or to Smart Money PO. Box
7150, Hudson, FL 34674. Questions of
general interest will be answered in
future columns. Owing to the volume of
mail, personal replies cannot be
provided.


Florida National Guard member "This net-
work of resources is meant as a hand up,
not a handout"
To date, organizations planning to par-
ticipate and/or support Stand Down in-
clude the Florida Army National Guard,
the Air Force Association, Veterans of For-
eign Wars (VFW), Disabled American Vet-
erans (DAV), the Marine Corps League,
Marion County Veterans Council, Military
order of the Purple Heart, VFW Orange
Lake, Volunteers of America, the Ameri-
can Red Cross, Community Legal Services
of Mid Florida, Ocala VA Community Out
Patient Clinic, Florida Vocational Reha-
bilitation, Marion County Homeless Coun-
cil, Rolling Thunder, Florida Department
of Veteran Affairs Homeless, Salvation
Army and Good Will Industries Sun Coast
Inc.
If you are reading this and know of a
homeless veteran who can benefit from
Stand Down, please give them the infor-
mation.
Homeless veterans who need assistance
with transportation to Stand Down may
call Workforce Connection's Citrus County
veterans staff in Inverness at 352-637-2223.
Better yet, offer the vets a ride; after all, a
short drive to Ocala on a lazy Saturday is
the least we can do for those who have
served our country Who knows? Maybe
that road trip will help them find a place
to call home.
To learn more about the Homeless Vet-
eran Stand Down or Workforce Connec-
tion's priority veterans services, call Kim
Smith, LLVER, at 800-434-JOBS, ext. 2225.


Laura Byrnes is a certified workforce
professional and communications man-
ager at Workforce Connection. Contact
her at 352-291-9559 or 800-434-5627, ext.
1234 orlbyrnes@clmworkforce.com.


It's coming



k ^^a^ fna a


Community-Wide Fitness Challenge

February 4 through March 17, 2013

No excuses this year Join the 9th Annual Fitness Challenge
* You get points for a variety of types of exercise
* Teams select the fitness level category to compete in:
"Jocks", "Getting There", or "Just Getting Started"
* Report points weekly and get helpful tips along the way

* Team registration deadline is January 25, 2013 5 p.m.


Act NOW-
email fitnesschallenge @ tampabay.rr corn
and ask for details.


D4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013


BUSINESS


www.chronicleonline.com









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Classifieds


Elderly Gentleman,
Looking for lady,
for
vacation time
(352) 382-5661
I'm a frustrated active
widower looking for an
attractive, personable
Christian lady with good
chemistry, medium to
small build between
70-80 for good
companionship maybe
something more down
the line. If you are in good
health, good spirits &
ready for a new
relationship I am ready to
meet with you. Give me a
welcome call at
352-527-9632 I will glady
give you a call back.




13 Chickens $5. ea.
2 Roosters $7 ea.
2 Ducks $10. ea.
(352) 503-6796
(352) 364-1819
BROWNING 308 MODEL
81 BLR (lever action),
Genuine walnut stock,
exc cond. $700 OBO
(352) 382-3803
DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com






(352) 634-5039 *

OPEN HOUSE
Sunday 13, 2-4PM
5322 Riverside Drive
Yankeetown
Nancy Little Lewis
Realtor
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 302-6082





$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not -
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE JUNK PICK UP
Appliances, Scrap
Metal, Mowers, Autos,
(352) 220-3138




12 Gallon Salt Water
Nano Reef tank w/ live
coral. Supplies included.
Free to good home.
(352) 795-3170 after 6pm
American Pot Belly Pig,
3 yr old male, Excellent
Pet, Free Good Home.
352-287-0767
FREE 2 Cats, Male 3
mo., & Female 13 mo.
To Good Home.
(352) 794-7496
Free Firewood
Cut and Haul
(352) 249-7212
FREE HANDYMAN
SPECIAL FOR HUNTING
CAMP 5TH WHEEL
CAMPER.(352) 795-0150
FREE KITTENS
16 wks old, litter trained
352-212-4061





FRESH CITRUS @
BELLAMY GROVE
Greens, Strawberries,
Broccoli, Gift Shipping,
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378





Black Labrador Retriever,
about 1% yrs old, an-
swers to "Buddy", lost in
vicinity of W. Dunnellon
Rd. (352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662
LARGE LOST DOG
Rottweiler mix, black &
tan. Off of Cardinal
Reward (727)470-5374
LOST Female 1/2 yr
Calico, declawed &
spade. Named Minnie;
lost in Pine Ridge area.
Please (352) 697-1685
Lost Male Cat British
blue, named Morpheis in
Sugarmill Woods,
chipped. (352) 476-7930
LOST-Prescription
eyeglasses!!! Gobbler
Drive REWARD!!!





Set of Keys
4 keys on chain on
Drive Inverness














COSMO DAYS




MASSAGE DAY

January 14 2013
SKIN & NAILS


Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com


LOOKING FOR RETIRED
PART TIME VOLUNTEER
For General
Office Work,
Blind American
(352) 637-1739





Fulltime
Clerical Position

Data Entry, Acct.
Receivable, Phones,
Word & Excel Exp.
Cust. Service. Must be
detail oriented and
Able to multi task.

NO PHONE CALLS
PLEASE

Please fax Resume' to
352-799-2932

OFFICE POSITION

3 Days a weeks phone
& computers skills a
must. Inverness Fl.
20yrs. in Business.
Resume required.
Blind Box 1821p c/o
Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429

Receptionist/
Office Assistant

T, TH, F 9:30a-3:30pm
Strong phone &
computer skills.
Excel re quired
APPLY IN PERSON
w/resume 10a-2p
131 Hwy. 19N Inglis





HAIR STYLIST
NEEDED
For Busy Salon
Experience preferred,
bonus incentive of-
fered. Great Location
(352) 794-6016





HOUSEKEEPERS

Apply within NO Calls
BEST WESTERN
614 NW Hwy 19
Crystal River







me, ,iew
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966






ARNP or PA

Wanted Part Time for
a busy Pediatric
Practice in Crystal
River, Send Resume
to: lindapracticemar
iPtampabav.rr.com

Bnet CARE
Manager

The Centers is seeking
a Bachelor's level
Care Manager to
coordinate mental
health svcs for
children enrolled in
Behavioral Health
Network. Extensive
travel required in
Citrus & Hernando
Counties. Use of
personal vehicle
reqd., State mileage
rate pd. Work hours
dictated by case-
load. Please submit
salary. Full benefits
pkg DFWP/EOE/We
E-Verify. Fax or
e-mail resume to HR,
the Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
jobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us









of Citrus County

CNA'S
3pm-11
Full time and PRN
Apl in person

124 Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando


Dental2F4ont0Desk

Are you a team
player with great
attitude and
phone skills?
Dental Knowledge
a Must PT/FT
Send Resume to
office@sierradental
group.com

FIT or PIT
Dental Assistant

Experience required.
Fax Resume To:
352-795-1637 or Email
case rswanson
dental~comn


IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS
RN's & LPN's

Hospital Experience
ICU, ER, CCU, Med.
Surge, Tele, Labor
& Delivery, Daily Pay,
Apply onine at www.
nurse-temps.com
352-344-9828


Job Fair
REGISTERED
NURSES!
Join us on
Jan 23, 2013
From 10am -6pm
Refreshments
& Prizes!

Hospital Staffing
Contracts, PRN
And Block Booking

Call to RSVP
Arbor
Medical Staffing
14926 Casey Road
Tampa, FL 33624
(800) 919-8964
www.arborstaff.com


.
Join Our Team

Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center
Please visit our
Career Center at
www.SevenRivers
Regional.com
Phone 352-795-8462
Fax-352-795-8464
6201 N. Suncoast Bvd.
Crystal River, FL 34428
Stephanie Arduser
Recruiter
EOE Drug/Tobacco
Free Workplace

LPNIMEDICAL
ASST
LPN/Medical
Assistant position at
a busy medical office.
Experience a must.
Please e-mail resume
to
cgi@tampabay.rr.com

MED TECHS

Immediate Openings
For All Shifts
Assistant living
Must have current,
up to date Med Tech
Certification.
Apply in person at
Highland Terrace
700 Medical Court E.
Inverness, FL 34452

MEDICAL
OPPORTUNITIES

* Billing Clerk
* Receptionist
* Medical Asst.
* Scanning Asst.

Blind Box 1792P
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624
N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal
River, FL 34429

NEEDEDd
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

OUTPATIENT
SURGERY CENTER

RN
OPERATING ROOM-
EXPERIENCED ONLY!

CST
Graduate of
approved Surgical
Tech program and
Certified- ONLY !

Excellent working
environment, com-
prehensive benefit
package, competi-
tive pay and no call,
nights, or weekends.
Fax Resume to:
352-527-1827

PIT
Dental Hygienist

Experience required.
Fax Resume To:
352-795-1637 or Email
casie@rswanson
dental.com

PHLEBOTOMIST

F/T exp. Phlebotomist
Salary negotiable.
Fax Resume to:
352-746-3838 or
Send Resume to
P.O.B 640573
BEVERLY HILLS FL
34464

Residential SA
Educator

The Centers is seeking
an Educator to pro-
vide educational ser-
vices to adolescents
in our 24/7 residential
substance abuse
treatment facility in
Lecanto. Teach
lesson plans accord-
ing to each county's
requirements, i.e.,
math, social studies,
science, English, etc.
Assist individuals with
special and specific
needs, interactions
and goals. Bachelors
in field of Edu or
Human Services &
exp reqd. Middle
School or HS level
State of FL teaching
certification pre-
ferred. Full benefits
pkg DFWP/EOE/We
E-Verify Fax or e-mail
resume to HR,
The Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
jobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us

TBOSS Therapist
The Centers is seeking
Masters Level Thera-
pist for TBOSS position
in Citrus County.
Must have min 2 yrs
exp working with
adults, children & ad-
olescents providing
individual, group &
family therapy.
Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE/We
E-Verify. Fax or
e-mail resume to HR,
the Centers, Inc.,


(352) 291-5580,
jobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us


LOOKING FOR RETIRED
PART TIME VOLUNTEER
For General
Office Work,
Blind American
(352) 637-1739


related experience in
the field of treatment
program develop-
ment, implementa-
tion, & evaluation in
a juvenile institution
preferred. Superviory
skills necessary. The
right person must
possess a license:
(MFT, LCSW, LMHC)
from the state of
Florida, provide

Apply In Person at:
2855 W. Woodland
Ridge Dr. Lecanto,
Florida, 34461
or Email to
sharon.facto@us.a4s.
com or apply
online at www.
usaiobs.a4s.com
Drug Free Workplace
/EEO


=Medica


GI Endoscopy
Technician

Full time, with Benefits
Fax Resume to:
352-563-2961

PT Certified
Dental Assistant

Call 352-746-0330,
ask for Vicki.

RN's, PT & NOT'S

Citrus & Hernando
(352) 794-6097





COLLEGE f
CENTRAL
F FLORIDA
-an equal opportunity
college-

College of
Central Florida

Faculty-
Criminal Justice
Citrus County
Campus
(Re-posted, Previous
Applicants Need Not
Re-apply)
(Start date is 08/2013)
Provide instruction for
a diverse student
population. Master's
degree in Criminal
Justice or a Master's
degree with a
concentration in the
teaching discipline
required. (18 gradu-
ate semester hours
required in Criminal
Justice required.)
Education must be
from a regionally ac-
credited institution.
Three years of related
work experience or a
combination of work
and teaching experi-
ence preferred.
Travel is required.
Courses will be
taught primarily at
the Citrus Campus
(Lecanto, FL) and
include classes at
the Ocala Criminal
Justice Institute. A
copy of transcripts
must be submitted
with the application
to be considered for
this position.
Close date is
02/28/2013

Faculty
-Associate
Degree Nursing
(Start date of 8/2013
with the opportunity
to begin employ-
ment in May/June
2013 and extended
contract to include
summers available.)
Nursing faculty teach
at both Ocala and
Citrus campuses.
Master's degree in
Nursing or Master's
degree with a
concentration in the
Nursing discipline (a
minimum of 18 grad-
uate semester hours
in Nursing) required.
Education must be
from a regionally
accredited institution.
Florida registered
nurse licensure
required (or be
eligible). Requires a
minimum of two
years of Nursing prac-
tice. Prefer two years
of recent bedside
clinical experience or
teaching (medical,
surgical/adult health
preferred) or a com-
bination of work and
teaching experience.
A copy of transcripts
and license must be
submitted with the
application to be
considered for this
position.
Position is open
until filled.

Part-time Library
Technician
(Work Monday
through Thursday
and daytime shift
every Saturday.)
High school diploma
required. One years
of experience in a
library or similar cus-
tomer service orien-
ted environment re-
quired. Open until
filled.

How to Apply
Go to www.CF.edu,
click on Quick Links
then Employment at
CF. Submit electronic
application, pool au-
thorization card and
unofficial transcripts
online. Email copy of
transcripts to
hr@CF.edu or fax to
352-873-5885.

3001 SW College Rd.
Ocala, FL 34474
CF is an Equal
Opportunity Employer

Director of
Clinical Services

Responsible for
directing the pro-
gram's psychological
and treatment
services to include
technical and
administrative duties,
testing, individual,
group, and family
therapeutic activities,
research, and
participation in
overall institutional
programming and
administration.
Education: Master's
degree from an
accredited college
or university in the
field of counseling,
social work, psychol-
ogy, rehabilitation,
special education or
in a related human
services field is
preferred. 5 years


NOW HIRING FULL-TIME POSITIONS














BETNEiTS PACKiAGE

EOE / DRUG FREE WORKPLACE

APPLYIN PE SO


SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 D5


CLASSIFIED




Executive
Assistant

Therapy Manage-
ment Corporation
(TMC), a multi-state
preferred provider of
Physical, Occupa-
tional and Speech
therapy and a com-
pany committed to
service excellence is
seeking an Executive
Assistant to the Pres-
ident &CEO. TMCs
Home Office is lo-
cated in Homosassa,
FL. The ideal candi-
date must have a
minimum of 3 years'
experience as an Ex-
ecutive Assistant.
Must have excep-
tional skills in Micro-
soft Office with an
emphasis on Word
and Excel. Please
apply online @
www.therapymgmt.
corn or fax resume to
352.381.0212

Licensed
Insurance Agents

Needed
Life/Health/Annuity
Nature Coast
Financial Advisors,
Inc. Email information
aarv@naturecoast
financial.com
352-794-6044

Sales/Marketing/
Advertising
Manufactured Homes
Serious inquires only!
(352) 795-1272




HIRING SERVERS

Must be 18 or older.
Apply Fisherman's
Restaurant
12311 E Gulf to Lake
(352) 637-5888




AC SALES

Will train right person,
easy six figure income
Must have val. fl. DL,
Mike (352) 726-1002
Real Estate Agents

Busy real estate office
needs Realtors and
Buyers Agents Call
PLANTATION REALTY
352-634-0129
SALES PERSON
WANTED

For sales of manufac-
tured & modular
homes. Must be very
motivated & have a
proven sales back-
ground. Knowledge
of housing & real es-
tate helpful. Prior ex-
perience helpful.
E-mail resume to
grouperman@
aol.com or fax to
352-621-9171

Telemarketing
manager needed

Must be experienced
Salary + bonues
Call (352) 628-5700
or email Resume
mdp@newair.biz




Appliance Tech

Must be experienced
on LG & Samsung.
and other makes,
laundry & refrigera-
tion, 30% commission
Full time, 5 days wk
(352) 445-0072

CABLE INSTALLERS

SIGN-ON BONUS

We are seeking cable
installation contractors
for our citrus County
location. Contractors
should possess a
technical aptitude,
strong work ethic,
communication skills &
a professional
appearance. Jones
NCTIS certification or
equivalent experience
is a plus. Must be able
to lift 70 Ibs & have a
truck or van that can
carry a 28-foot
fiberglass extension
ladder. Must have a FI
Driver's license, good
driving record,
submit to & pass a
criminal background &
drug test & must be
available to work
weekends. We are
offering sign-on
bonuses! We are busy
& growing & need you
to make this growth
successful. Please
e-mail your resume to:
fljobs@kablelink.com
or apply at
Kablelink.com (Job#26)








Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


Whirlpool
Lg capacity, Heavy
duty, White,
$300.
(352) 270-8968
KENMORE
REFRIGERATOR 24cf
stainless side by side
w/water & ice dispenser
indoor. Excellent condi-
tion. $500. 352-726-9964
SEARS KENMORE
WASHER, GE DRYER
Both good condition.
Large loads. Dryer used
only 6 months. $350.
352-419-7017
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers &
dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179


AUTO
COLLISION TECH

352-726-2139 or
637-2258 Aft. 5 pm

Big Truck/Equip.
Mechanic

Must have tools & exp.
***apply at:***
6730 N. Citrus Ave.
Crystal River, FL
no phone calls please

ELECTRICIAN

Recently retired, to
supervise electrical up-
grade two BDR home
Citrus Springs Area.
Advise your experi-
ence, Frank Boitz
Box 248, Indian Rocks
Beach FL. 33785-0248

Exp. Marine
Fork Lift Driver

7 day shift
**Apply in Person**
Twin Rivers Marina
2880 N. Seabreeze Pt
Crystal River Fl 34429
no phone calls pls

Exp. Power Equip.
& Small Engine
Mechanic

Must have at least 2
yrs. exp. in a small
engine shop, and
have own tools
Apply in Person M-Fri
6659 W NORVELL
BRYANT HWY, CR
NO CALLS*

Framers Needed

352-212-9092

WORKERS
*Accepting applications*
For workers who are
versatile in operating site
prep equipment, paving
equipment,and general
labor. CDL's a plus.
Call (352)628-9571 for an
appointment.





BUS DRIVER

Must have valid CDL
w/Passenger
endorsement &
automobile insurance.
Must be able to operate
a 19 passenger bus to
transport residents of a
Senior Independent
Living facility to various
locations within the
local community. Must
be able to bend, stoop,
squat & lift up to 50lbs.
Previous exp. w/seniors
a plus. Must have
strong customer
service skills, positive
attitude & able to work
as a member team.
Fax resume to
352-344-0885
or email to
amy.rock@dewar
properties.com
EOE/DFWP

COMMUNITY
HOSTESS

Seeking high-energy
hostesses for seasonal
part-time position
shuttling potential
homeowners around
countryclub comm-
unity's amenities. Must
be articulate, upbeat
and service oriented.
Apply at Terra Vista
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd., Hernando, FL

CUSTOMER
RELATIONS
*Call Now!* Looking
to fill immediate
positions. Training,
401(k), medical.
No exp. necessary.
$550-$800 a
week.Call Karen
352-436-4460

Experienced
TELEMARKETERS

NEEDED. Good
Commission Pay.
Write your own check
Apply in Person
6421 W. Homosassa Tr


NEWSPAPER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
Sthe Citrus County
Chronicle and other
newspapers for
home delivery
S customers.
3 to 4 hours per day.

Must have insured
and reliable vehicle
preferable a van
SSUV, or pick up with
I a cap-Large
Enough to hold our
Sunday product
Apply in Person
I 1624 N Medowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River
Monday to Friday
* 8am-5pm

I Newspaper carriers
are independent
contractors, not
Employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle



l .. .. al


CENTER. VERY GOOD
COND. 2 DRAWERS & 4
DOORS. $150
(765) 336-9590
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
QUEEN SZ WATERBED
Soft sides, pillow top,
boxspring, frame &
headboard. $300 OBO
(352) 637-5525
Sleep by Number Air
Bed, King Size,
complete, exec. cond.,
like new $,2500 new
asking $1,250.
(352) 726-1040


mal codentable


$AVON$ Earn up to 50%
only $10 for startup kit
850-570-1499 for Appt

LEASING AGENT

Full time Leasing agent
needed for Senior
Independent Living
Facility. Provides
Administrative support,
shows/ markets/leases
apartments to
prospective residents,
and works as a team
member to ensure
community needs are
met. Must have valid
drivers license &
automobile insurance.
Previous experience w/
property management
a plus. Must have
strong customer
service skills, positive
attitude & ability to
utilize office equipment
& computer software.
Fax resume to
352-344-0885
or email to
amy.rock@dewar
properties.com
EOE/DFWP

PT, Kitchen, Bar
Back & General
Help Needed

PLEASE CALL
(352) 628-2602





Timely, accurate & exp.

w/ref. 352-302-6418
HOUSE CLEANER

Timely, accurate & exp.
w/ref. 352-302-6418









SPRING HILL
January Classes

COSMO DAYS
January 14,2013
COSMO NIGHTS
January 14, 2013
BARBER NIGHTS
February 25 2013
MASSAGE DAY
January 14.2013,
MASSAGE NIGHTS
January 14.2013,
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com




ANTIQUE CANDY DISH,
Keystone china.
Made/USA. Hand-painted
22 k. gold accents, $100.
Make offer. 637-2635.
ANTIQUE CHINA
CABINET
Vintage deco, drawers,
glass door off white $100.
352-513-4473




50 Wizard Comics One
Half edition
$1 ea obo
20 Holiday Barbie Dolls
$1 ea. obo
(352) 860-1110
550
Matchbox Cars
$1 ea.
(352) 860-1110
BAVARIAN CHINA
SERVICE FOR 12+
DINNERWARE w/gold
trim. $300 OBO
(352) 746-3327
BRADEX "Little Jack
Horner" Mother Goose
Series by John McClel-
land. Exclusive, limited,
permanently closed
1982. $100. 419-7017
BRADEX "Mary, Mary"
1st issue Mother Goose
series by John McClel-
land, excl.for this ed.
Perm. closed 1979. $100.
Ong.mail box. 419-7017
DISNEYS 75 YEARS
music & memories 3 disc
cd limited edition pd.$50
sell $20. 352-527-9982
FRAMED DISNEY PRINT
"FLATTERY" cert.#838 of
2000-18"by
24"-$100.more info call
352-527 9982
LIGHTED CHRISTMAS
VILLAGE by Margaret
Hockingberry. 500
ceramic pieces. $1000
OBO. Can be seen at
20451 Powell Rd Lot 115
Dunnellon(352) 489-0713
LITHO COLLECTOR
YELLOW STEEL SIGN
Do not drink water Fish
crap in it
$25. call 603-493-2193
OCCUPIED JAPAN
AICHI BREAD PLATES
Two gold trimmed, pink
roses, 7.5", very good.
$5. 352-601-0067
ROCKWELL SCOUTING
"1979" -50first day
covers-matching gov.
stamps $100.-more
info.call 352-527-9982
SEVERAL BARBIE
DOLLS IN ORG. BOXES
$400 OR obo.
(352) 746-3327
THREE DOLLS FROM
THE 1950 ERAgood
condition $50. for all.
352-527-1399
VINTAGE AMERICAN
BOSCH CONSOLE
RADIO good condition
$75.00 Richard -
352-341-3887




Dryer &New Washer


WASHER white works
good. GE. $75.
352-513-4473
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Free De-
livery 352 263-7398




CORNER DESK WITH
HUTCH TOP computer
desk in fantastic shape
$100 call 352 257-3870










4pm, Auction@ 6pmr
General Merchandise
Sat 01/19 Preview @
4pm, Auction@ 6pm
General Merchandise
Sun 01/20 Preview @
12:30, Auction@ 1pm
Tailgate/Box lot Auction
**WE BUY ESTATES**
6055 N. Carl G. Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
AB3232 (352) 613-1389




BLUE OX 6" DROP
DOWN HIGH-LOW
Hitch10,000 lb. capacity.
$85. 352-601-0067
Industrial
Metal Brake,
Used to shape
aluminum. 8 ft,
$250 or best offer.
352-302-6840
SKILL SAW
8'/4 inch blade $10.
(352) 860-0183




55" HITACHI
PROJECTION TV
Superbowl Ready! Works
GREAT! 352-563-1519 or
727-504-4488 $200
FIRM
70' TV HITACHI
model 70Vx915 $400.
(352) 503-3087
RCA RECEIVER 5 DISK
DVD/CD CHANGER
includes subwoofer in
great shape $100. call
352-257-3870
SHARP 32" TV WITH
REMOTE $25
352-613-0529
SONY TV 36 inch color,
works ,good,looks good.
$100. or best offer
352-513-4473
SUBWOOFERS -sound
dynamics rts series
1000-100 watts rms/400
watts peak-like new $50.
352-527-9982
TV STAND 53 1/2" Long
X 20" High X 19" Wide
$10. Homosassa call
603-493-2193




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
WEB TV SYSTEM
2 keyboards, epson C88
Printer $50
(352) 382-2545




LEXMARK SCANNER,
PRINTER, FAX, COPY
MACHINE New, White
colored, needs ink, $15
(352)465-1616
WELL PUMP
MIRES 1 HP pump with
80 ft of 2 inch pipe. $95
(727) 421-5371




Two patio chairs and
table white plastic
$40 352-860-2475




3 Pc. Bedroom Set
Dresser with Mirrors,
Chest of drawers, 1
end table, dark pecan
Burlington House
$100. (352) 287-0767
4 GREAT DINETTE
CHAIRS Wood Frame
w/ uphlostered seat &
backs on wheels $140.
352-527-9332
ATTRACTIVE, CLEAN,
COMFORTABLE
SECTIONAL Tan cotton
with batik floral design
$200. 352-897-4154
Bassett couch & loveseat
New condition, no stains
& NO WEAR! Light
blue/gray/mahogany $99
firm 637-3636
DINETTE SET
4 ft Glass top w/4 chairs
on casters,
$200
(352) 897-4739
DINING TABLE
High quality table w/4
chairs, leaf, and hutch.
Asking $400 but worth
much more.
(352) 860-0183


DISPLAY CASES,
CASH REGISTER Two
glass/metal display
cabinets,$300 and
$275; a cash register
$40 and a stand $25, 1
open glass shelving
cabinet $225.
352-804-0216
FLORAL SECTIONAL
SOFA3 piece in good
shape. $100 call
352-257-3870
Leather Living room set&
King size Wood bedroom
set custom made &
priceless (352) 586-3231
LOVE SEAT AND CHAIR
matching in good condi-
tion $60. call
352-257-3870
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
OAK ENTERTAINMENT


white $12
352-860-2475
STEREO CABINET
Wood tone with turntable.
19"x34 1/2"x16 1/2" $45.
Please call 352-726-1495
TEEN BUNK BED $175-
Double Bed on top, large
desk below. Silver/metal
frame. Bought from Kids'
Room to Go. Email for
pix. Excellent shape/like
new. email:
kmtopspin@hotmail.com
or (352) 212-2901
TILED KITCHEN
TABLE and 4 matching
chairs $100 obo
(352) 860-0183
WHITE WICKER
COMPUTER DESK &
CHAIR Attractive,
Like New $175.
352-897-4154
WICKER Henry Link,
chair & large couch ,
new cushions, end table
coffee table
$350
(352) 597-7353




ANTIQUE JOHN DEERE
110 LAWN TRACTOR
1962 or 1964. 8 HP
Kohler cast iron eng, 2
speed tranny. Runs
good, needs starting
switch. Can demo, $400.
352-422-6811
Leaf Blower$ 10
Easy Hand Spreader for
Seed or Fertilizer $5.
(352) 860-0183
Weed Wacker
32CC, craftsman, gas
Weed Waker
Bandit, gas,
Craftsman Blower
32CC gas,
Homelite Blower
model 170 gas,
Echo Chainsaw #500
VL, 18" Gas $150 for All
Riding Lawn Mower
John Deer 1991, #212
36" cut, ran in 2010,
cast iron rear end $225.
(352) 628-1126




HERNANDO
Sat. & Sun. 9a-4p
Large 3 Family Sale
Old wicker Dinnette.
Set, golf clubs, jewrly,
clothes, telescope,
water troft neon bar
lights, comic, gitar
MUCH MUCH MORE!
Signs form Croft to
Harley to 1578 E. Ray St
INVERNESS
Veterans Yard Sale
Our Lady of Fatima
Church
Saturday 7:30a-1:30p
550 US HWY 41 S.
Call 352-400-8952
for vendor space, $10
Please Bring
A Can Good to help feed
veterans




2 LAZY BOY/ CLUB
RECLINERS, BUR-
GUNDY $400.
B & S PRESSURE
WASHER 2000 PSI,
$120. (352)746-3372
2 WHEELED WALKER,
Folding $15 OBO
Aliminum(352) 527-2085
3 PAIRS OF CROC
SHOES.$15 ALL
M/8,W/9,BLACK,BROWN,
BLUE. (352)527-2085
6 ft. Step Ladder
$20.
(352) 860-0183
20 FT ELECTRICAL
POWER POLE W/meter
can & 100amp panel
W/12 breakers. You pull
$300 OBO(352)628-2980
55 Gallon Fish Tank
with Cabinet Stand,
with all accessories
$375.
(352) 613-7429
28" Grab Bar
for Shower
$10.
(352) 860-0183
ACER 77E 17"MONITOR
tube type monitor
incl.manual &cable-like
new."free" 352-527-9982
BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING SIZES 5 & 6
SHIRTS, PANTS &
JACKETS $35
352-613-0529
BRACE-BACK
WINDSOR WOODEN
CHAIR. $30 OBO
Vintage (352) 527-2085
BRADFORD
EXCHANGE PLATES.
$10EA, $70ALL. CIRCA
1980s. (352) 527-2085
CENTURY FIRE PROOF
SAFE. 17X20X 18.
135LBS, NEW $425
ASKING $225.
(352) 212-4079
CHILD'S BLUE
WOODEN ROCKER. $15
OBO VINTAGE.
(352)527-2085
CHRISTMAS TREE
Artificial 7.5 ft storage
boxes inc. $40.
352-249-9164
General Field Fence
Total 471n H x 200 ft L.
24 Posts 3in X 6 ft.
Utility gate 50in h x 12ft L.
All for $320
(352) 228-7143
GERBIL CAGE GOOD
CONDITION $25
352-613-0529
GIBSON ELECTRIC
RANGE $100.
DINING TABLE W/4
PADDED CHAIRS $50
(217) 821-6524
HOSPITAL BED
W/REMOTE. $90 OBO
CLEAN MATTRESS
W/COVER, RAILS.
(3520 527-2085
KENZIE, JENNAAVON
DOLLS $15EA. IN BOX,
1990. (352)527-2085
LARGE BEAUTIFUL
BIRD CAGE $100. Great
cond. 352-302-5468
LOVESEAT AND CHAIR
matching in good shape
$60. call 352-257-3870
ORIGINAL XBOX
Ex. cond. console,
controllers, DVD cony.,
DVD remote, & games.
$100 CALL AFTER 5PM


MAppl Hce


(352) 212-4888
Over 60 Jig Saw Puzzles
$50. for all
(352) 746-3799
PET CARRIER MEDIUM
SIZE FIBERGLASS
ONLY $15. 352-464-0316
RCA Video Camera
with accessories $125.
Men's Golf clubs $60
Garmin GPS $60.
(352) 527-7223
RED WOODEN CHAIR.
$20 OBO VINTAGE.
(352) 527-2085
ROCKING HORSE
Black-colored, rocks by
rubber, batteries are op-
tional for sound, ok condi-
tion, $30 (352)465-1616









D6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013


hromecontinental it
tire cover $40 860-2475
SAMSUNG 4CH
High res. color security
cameras w/recorder
smart phone ready. Night
vision, etc. New paid
$600 asking $300.
(352) 212-4079
SKYLIGHT 27+ 27
BUBBLE TYPE UV
FIBERGLASS ONLY
$50. 352-464-0316
TRAVEL KIT FOR GPS
Day Tripper, new in box,
charger, case, fits 5"
screen. $10
352-601-0067
TROY BILT
GENERATOR 5500
watts, 8550 starting
watts. Only run to
circulate oil. Like new
$350. Call 352-527-0832
Two 12 FT. W overhead
garage doors, with
all hardware, great
shape $100. ea. or
$200. both
(352) 287-0767



2 POWER LIFT CHAIRS
RECLINERS BY PRIDE
MED SZ $285.
LG SZ $350.
BOTH EXC. COND.
(352) 270-8475
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH SEAT AND
BRAKES GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $85.
352-464-0 316
4" TOILET SEAT RISER
BRAND NEW WITH
HANDLES FOR
SUPPORT ONLY $25.
352-464-0316
AUTO MEDICATION
DISPENSER Battery
Backup Dispense Meds
2x Day For 2 Wks $75.
352-527-0324
BATHTUB SAFETY RAIL
Medline Deluxe in box
$35.352-628-4210
BEDSIDE COMMODE &
ALUMINUM WALKER
ADJUSTABLE LEGS ON
EACH 20.00 EACH
352-464-0316
MANUAL WHEELCHAIR
Footrests included.
$50,OBO. Very Good
condition. 352-726-5116.
MANUAL WHEELCHAIR
WITH FOOTRESTS
GOOD SHAPE ONLY
$100. 352-464-0316
REHABILICARE NERVE
STIMULATION SYSTEM
Rehabilicare Promax
Portable Electrical Nerve
Stimulation System
{TENS} unit for chronic
back and nerve pain,
Paid $375,sell for $200
call 352-419-4767
SHOWER CHAIR WITH
BACKREST FIBER-
GLASS W/ADJUSTABLE
LEGS ONLY $35.
352-464-0316
WALKER
4 wheels/hand brake
seat&basket good cond.
$55.352-628-4210



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676


BUYING
Guitars, Banjos &
Mandolins,Fender,
Gibson & Martin
any condition
(443) 463-3421




TWIN BEDDING
Mem fm tppr-rmv cvr/Mttr
cvr/dk aq shts
Grt cnd-drm-1 smstr
$70 352-527-8287
VACUUM CLEANER
Rainbow
complete good cond.
$100.00
352-628-4210
WALL MIRROR
68" X 42" Homosassa
$10. Call 603-493-2193




AB LOUNGER WORK
ON THOSE ABS ONLY
$40. 352-464-0316
EXERCISE BIKE FAN
TYPE WORKS THE
ARMS TOO GREAT
SHAPE ONLY $85.
352-464-0316
GAZELLE LIKE
EXERCISER OK SHAPE
ONLY $40. 352-464-0316
PURSUIT EXERCISE
BIKE ALL
ELECTRONICS SUPER
CONDITION $100.
352-464-0316
ROWING MACHINE BY
BODY ROW GET IN
SHAPE $85.
352-464-0316
TREADMILL
$80 obo
AB COASTER
$40. obo
(352) 613-2333
TREADMILL
Pro Form Crosswalk
/Incline 380, like new,
$275 OBO
(352) 382-7399




8FT POOL TABLE
3 pc slate, Oak cabinet
$250. (352) 382-1751
A TAURUS 45 PT 1911,
Semi auto pistol. gray &
black never fired, flawless
cond. All extras Included
$850.(352) 344-0355
AMMUNITION .223/5.56
AMMO Wolf Military
Classic. $75 for 100
rounds. 352427-0051
BLUE BURTON CART
BAG W/SUGARMILL CC
LOGO LIKE NEW $75
(352) 382-1971
BROWNING 308 MODEL
81 BLR (lever action),
Genuine walnut stock,
exc cond. $700 OBO
(352) 382-3803
CLUB CAR
Golf Cart
Excellent Condition
$1,500.
352-527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
CUSTOMS MADE
CROSS BOWS, 150LB
PULL W/SCOPE $350
(352) 628-7633


GOLF CART CLUB CAR
EZ-GO 36volt new
charger, new tires &
brakes. $1200. Golf Cart
parts- top & seats $100
cell (315) 466-2268
SHOT GUN 20 Gauge
JC Higgins pump, adj.
chock, Like new $275
OBO. (352) 476-1113
or (352)-513-5125
SIG SAUER
REVALUATION -C3,
45ACP Night sights, 2
mags. w/case. Like New.
$800.(352) 441-0645
Smith Corona,
1903-A3, .30-06,
$535.
Trap Door, Springfield,
Rifle .45-70 $495.
(352) 270-6142

SOLD
Golf Cart Club Car
with utility bed on
back, runs good,
comes w/ charger and
spare tire. Asking $875
TREADMILL
Golds Gym 450.
Electric, used 3 hours.
Retail $900,
asking $225.
(352) 746-0506
WINCHESTER mod. 70
Black Shadow 243WSM.
New in box, Includes
factory scope. $695. Will
take 30-30 lever on trade.
(906) 285-1696




2013 Enclosed Trailers
6x12 with ramp, $1895
** call 352-527-0555 **
NEW
HAULMARK 6X12
ENCLOSED TRAILERS
ONLY $1999.
(352) 621-3678




BABY STROLLER Safety
1st, good condition, $20
(352)465-1616
GIRLS BABY 6-12 mos.
shorts, shirts, summer
outfits, 12-18
mos.dresses 31 pieces,
$20. 352-400-5650
TODDLER HEADBOARD
Brand New Metal
Headboard, $10
(352)465-1616




LQQKING for TV
Console cabinets, wood,
floor model style. Free or
cheap. 352-513-4301
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369




RV BAGGAGE DOOR
CATCH Package of 2,
white, rounded. $5.
352-601-0067
WINEGARD SATELLITE
ALIGNMENT COMPASS
Model SC2000, water-
proof, aim to satellite. $8.
352-601-0067


13 Chickens $5. ea.
2 Roosters $7 ea.
2 Ducks $10. ea.
(352) 503-6796
(352) 364-1819
AKC BOXER PUPPIES
Boxer Puppies
$450-$600 4-females,
3-males
8 WKS 1/08/2013
352-302-0918








BLUE
Blue is an approxi-
mately 8-y.o. neu-
tered male Cattle
Dog mix, Came to
the shelter because
his family lost their
home. Blue is white
and tan, weighs
about 50 pounds, is a
bit chubby for his size,
which is medium. He
is housebroken, very
friendly and affec-
tionate. The most
striking thing about
him is that he has
very beautiful blue
eyes, which catch
your attention imme-
diately. He loves peo-
ple and wants to be
by your side. Is very
obedient and walks
well on a leash. He is
quite laid-back and
would make a great
companion for an
older person.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.
Dachshunds Puppies
Mini, Long hair, females,
black & cream.
Champion blood lines.
$250
(352) 2204792
DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com






(352) 634-5039
MINIATURE POODLES
miniature poodle pups
born 10/16/12 Health
Cert 1 apricot & 1 black
female & 1 black male al-
most potty trained, raised
in our home. $500 cash
cal 32-19-5662 or --


POODLE PUPS
7 WEEKS;2 MALES AND
1 FEMALE; $850.
REGISTRATION AND
HEALTH CERTIFI-
CATES; AVAILABLE
12-22-12. CALL
352419-8233 OR
janiceannross@msn.com
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $350. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net


CLASSIFIED














WHISPER
Whisper is a beautiful
chestnut brown
female Staffordshire
Terrier, 3 years old,
weighs 55 pounds,
housebroken. She
loves to love her peo-
ple and would make
a great companion.
Greets all with mirth
and enthusiasm.
Obedient, affection-
ate, and a sense of
humor. You can see
amusement on her
face when she smiles.
Has an easy-going
personality, enjoys life
and humankind. Very
intelligent, easy to
train. Spay, micro-
chip, updated
vaccines included in
adoption fee.
Call Anne @
352-201-8664."





BOAT TRANSIT
TRAILER Very Ig., dbl.
axles up to 33 ft. Any
boat type! $1800 or
OBO (813) 244-3945





1988 27 ft Sportscraft
Coastal Fisherman,
cabin cruiser, $10k
OBO (813)-244-3945

5HP OUTBOARD
MOTOR LIKE NEW $385
(352) 341-2661 or
352-586-7437




MUST SELL


BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motor, AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth finder,
2001 Rolls float on
trailer worth $1000.
Comes w/spare motor
Has service manual,
2nd owner $2500
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855

TRI PONTOON BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453

WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For Sale %
BRIDGEVIEW
381 KWT
2011 Bridgeview 381
KWT 38' destination
trailer asking $28,900
OBO 4
slides,ac,42tv,fireplace,island
kidchen/conan
countertops,residential 4
burner
stove/oven,residential
fng,mw,queen bed
/storage, queen sleeper
sofa,recliner maxair
covers,awnings front &
side. like new
610-597-9936
chnsda47@gmail.com

ITASCA MERIDIAN
36 Ft, 2005 Motor Home
350HP Cat Diesel 55K
miles, no smoke/pets
6 Michelan Tires, New
2010 qn w/sleep No.
mattress & overhead
fan. W/D combo $71,000
obo. (352) 419-7882

NATIONAL RV
2006 Tropical One
owner,34ft, 26000
miles,no smoke/pets,
300HP Cummins diesel,2
slides, 6 new tires, 3yr
warranty,many extras.
$87000. Well maintained.
352-341-4506




5TH WHEEL
33FT
GOOD CONDITION
MUST SELL
(423) 202-0914
FOREST RIVER
2010, Surveyor, Sport
189, 20 ft. Travel Trailer,
1 slide, w/AC, qn. bed,
awning, pwr. tonque jack,
corner jacks, microwave,
equilizing hitch, $10,500,
reduced to $9800
(352) 382-1826

HIGH LINE
1999, 32ft, Deluxe, 12'
slide out, new 22' awn-
ing, 55+ park, can be
moved. Was asking
$9,000, Sell $6,900 ex-
cel. shape 231-408-8344
HI-LO TRAVEL
TRAILER 2003, tow lite
model 22-03t,exc. cond.
$6000 obo 352-422-8092
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides,
kg bd,like new, 60amp
serve. NADA $29K asking
$25K obo 352-382-3298




4 Tires
215- 65/17
10,000 miles left
$60 for Set
(352) 628-1126
SILVERADO 5TH
WHEEL TAILGATE $100
&
VINYL RANGER BED
COVER $75
(352) 637-2982


New Headlight
assembly for 1994
Honda Accord
(352) 726-0437



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
SALE LAYAWAY
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition, Title,
No Title, Bank Lien,
No Problem, Don't Trade
it in. We Will Pay up to
$25K Any Make, Any
Model. 813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ




BUICK
2007, Lucerne, CXL
55K miles, Leather
$13,500. obo
Call Troy (352)621-7113
CADILLAC
'02, Best STS, Black
on Black, sunroof
78K mi., new tires
$7,500. (352) 628-1126
CADILLAC
2003 CTS, Must see.
Luxury car at an
affordable price.
Call 352-628-4600
for an appointment.

Misc. otice


CHEVROLET
2002, Camaro Z28
$9,750.
352-341-0018
FORD
'05, Thunderbird,
37k miles,
$24,000.
(352) 465-4015
FORD
2001 COBRA MUSTANG
CONV. 5 SPEED,
LEATHER MUST SEE
CALL 352-6284600
For More Info

FORD
2005, Five Hundred LMT,
40K miles, leather, V6
$9,980
Call Troy 352-621-7113
FORD
2006 Focus ZXW, SE
4DR, WGN. 85k miles
$5,800 obo
Call Troy (352) 621-7113

HONDA
2011 CRV LX, 19K miles,
likenew, 4 Cyl. $19,950
Call Troy 352-621-7113

HYUNDAI
2006 Elantra, GLS 90K
miles, likenew, 4 DR,
auto. $6,800
Call Troy 352-621-7113
KIA
'99, Sportage, Conv.
Top, low miles,
Runs great.
CALL 352-628-4600
For pricing.

LINCOLN
1998, MARK VIII
Automatic, COLD A/C
CALL 352-628-4600
For an appointment
to see!
LINCOLN
'95, Town Car
140k miles $2,250
(352) 628-1126

Misc. otice


MITSUBISHI
'01, Eclipse GT,
sunroof, black w/ tan
leather int. runs great
$2,500. 352-464-0719
MITSUBISHI
Mirage 2000 2dr. coupe
5spd, 107k, 36mpg, cd &
air. Just serviced. $1850
(352) 422-1026
OLDS MOBILE
'95 SEDAN, automatic,
good cond. $1,450
352-637-2588
OLDSMOBILE '99
Cutlass, custom, 4 DR,
loaded, good mi., V6,
cruise, tilt, gar. clean
$3,650. (352) 212-9383
SALE LAYAWAY
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
TOYOTA
2000, Camry LE
V6, 183K miles Super
Clean $5,800. obo
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
TOYOTA
2000, Camry, Good fuel
economy, 4 door
transportation.
CALL 352-628-4600
for pricing & details.
TOYOTA
2007, Yaris, 59K miles,
2 DR, H/B $7,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113




1971 CHEVELLE
CONVERTIBLE
stunning, 40k+ in-
vested, fully restored,
350 auto, buckets, con-
sistant show winner,
high end stereo, red w/
white top & interior
$23,900, 352-513-4257

^^^^^^-I


398-0113 SUNCRN
INVITATION TO BID
City of Crystal River
DESIGN-BUILD SERVICES FOR POLE BARN STRUCTURE
Bid #13-B-02
The City of Crystal River will receive sealed bids for DESIGN-BUILD SERVICES FOR POLE
BARN STRUCTURE. You are hereby invited to submit a bid on the above referenced
project. The Owner is the City of Crystal River.
Bids will be received until 10:00 AM, on February 12, 2013, opened and read aloud at
10:05 AM in the Council Chambers at Crystal River City Hall.
DESCRIPTION OF WORK: The work consists of design and construction of a pole barn
structure to store City equipment meeting the following requirements: 50'x40' in size,
16' high, with six (6) 10'x14' roll up doors, one (1) 36" side door, a 6" reinforced con-
crete slab, including grading and site preparation. Final location of the structure to
be determined by the City. Successful bidder to supply sealed plans in compliance
with all State and Local Building Codes sufficient for obtaining a building permit from
the City (fees to be waived).
ALL BIDDERS must be properly qualified for the type of work for which the BID is sub-
mitted. BIDS must be enclosed in an opaque envelope and marked:
"DESIGN-BUILD SERVICES FOR POLE BARN STRUCTURE, BID #13-B-02", AND THE NAME
OF THE BIDDER AND THEIR ADDRESS
BIDS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO: CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
CAROL HARRINGTON, CITY CLERK
123 NW HIGHWAY 19, CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34428
All contract documents may be examined at City Hall at no charge, downloaded
for free on the City website (www.crystalriverfl.org), or picked up at City hall for no
charge. Bidders who utilize the City website for the bid documents are advised
check the website regularly for updates and addendums. Bid packages may be
picked up at the Public Works Department at City Hall, at the address above, be-
tween the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00 pm Monday through Friday. The contact per-
son is Theresa Krim, 352-795-4216, extension 314 or Lou Kneip at extension 305.
No BIDS may be withdrawn for a period of SIXTY (60) days after closing time sched-
uled for receipt of BIDS. Work shall be completed within forty five (45) days from re-
ceipt of the notice to proceed by the owner.
The OWNER reserves the right to reject any and all BIDS for any reason whatsoever
and waive all informalities. THE OWNER ALSO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO SELECT THE BID
RESPONSE THAT IN ITS SOLE DETERMINATION BEST MEETS ITS BUSINESS NEEDS.
Published one time in the Citrus County Chronicle January 13, 2013


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers &
dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179



Care for the Elderly
& Sick in your home, 15
yrs exp. Errands, Appts.
Cleaning 352-637-6729
HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping Dr.
appts, errands, etc. Hablo
Espanol 813-601-8199
NEED A GIRL FRIDAY?
Elder care, House
cleaning, Earrands
*Reasonable Rates*
(352) 794-6543


SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518





JEFF'S Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551, 584-3730

DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078

CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120

FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097


Add an artistic louch to your existing yard
I S or pool or plan1
I something
Completely new!
"Often imitated
never plictiel"


OUR INTERLOCKINGBRICKPAVIRSPEIALIST


i POOL AND PAVER LLC
insured 352400-3188


ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping Dr.
appts, errands, etc. Hablo
Espanol 813-601-8199




COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
S352-302-6838 *




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




*BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194


AAA ROOFING
Call Ae "/ eakuste.rs"
Free Written Estimate

$iOO OFF:
Any Re-Roof
i Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCCO57537 OOODMZN


*BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
S352 422-7279 *k




DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696




Install, Restretch, Repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl Car-
pet, Laminent, Lic#4857
Mitch, (352) 201-2245




1 CALL & RELAX! 25vrs
Exp in 100% property
maint & all repairs, call
H&H Services today!
lic#37658 352476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


Affordable Handyman
VFAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
S352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
/ AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
SFAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
S352-257-9508 *
HANDYMAN DAVE
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways,, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352- 726-9570
HANDYMAN DAVE
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways,, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352- 726-9570




Tutoring available T F
after 3:30, S & S after
12. You set rate.
(352) 212-9371





The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955


All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120




GOT LEAVES
Let our DR VAC
Do the work!
Call 352-502-6588
LAWNCARE N MORE
Yard Clean-up, leaves
bushes, hauling
352-726-9570
Winter Clean Up, Leaves,
Power Washing & More
Call Coastal Lawn Care
(352) 601-1447




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small engine
It's Tune Up time.
352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS CLEAN
UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790


HAULING
FREE ESTIMATES
scrap metals haul for
FREE (352) 344-9273
JEFF'S Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Robert G. Vigliotti LLC
Painting
Int/Ext FREE
ESTIMATES 35 yrs exp.
call 508-314-3279




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE CLEANING
& PAINTING
352-341-3300
Robert G. Vigliotti LLC
Painting
Int/Ext FREE
ESTIMATES 35 yrs exp.
call 508-314-3279
Winter Clean Up, Leaves,
Power Washing & More
Call Coastal Lawn Care
(352) 601-1447


ALL EXTERIOR

ALUMINUM, INC.


352-621-0881
FA 352621081
6" Seamless Gutters
Screen Rooms Car Ports
Hurricane Protection
allextalum13@yahoo.com
Citrus Lic. #2396% LICENSED & INSURED


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713






MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.






Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


World Class

Window Tinting

Reduce Heat, Fade, Glare
AUTO HOME OFFICE
Marion & Citrus Free Estimates
35Z.465.6079 4. -


Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.
COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
S352-302-6838




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. (352)302-5641
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's LAND CLEARING
& TREE SERVICE
Complete tree & stump
removal hauling, demo
& tractor work. 32 yrs.
exp. (352) 220-9819
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free est.
352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
S Repairs
\ \ "* Small Carpentry
Fencing
SScreening
dean Dryer
Vents
Affordable & Dependable
S Experience lifelong
352-344-0905
o cell 400-1722
,.o tsred -Lic#3 7761


WINDOWS
GENIE.",7
We Clean Windows and Whole Lot More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
wvw.windowgenie.com/springhill


S"Repainti
l, i Speciali.t"

lnlrinor .& E -rijror
[I, n.. it.,,/.. .. '

j FREE ESTIMATES -

E352465-6631


GENERAL I
Stand Alone ,.-
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352-621-124


NEED SOMEONE TO
GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?

WE MAKE IT




DISAPPEAR FOR LESS
IF YOU WANT IT
TAKEN AWAY...CALL FOR A
FREE ESTIMATE TODAY!
352-220-9190


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala |
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


CARPET & L
UPHOLSTERY
CLEANING



Carpet Stretching-Available
Carpet Repair
352-282-1480 cell
352-547-1636 office -
Free In Home Estimates 1f
Lic & Ins Lifetime Warranty .









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY,JANUARY 13, 2013 D7


** CHEVY**
95 Impala SS
Rare Collector Car
LT-lengine, Superb
Condition $8,500
(352) 249-7678
CHEVROLET
1964 % TON PICKUP
35kml. 283 V8, 3 sp
Column shift, $8995 OBO
(352) 464-3106
FORD
1967 MUSTANG, 99%
org. No body work, rust
free, great cond. 71k mi
$13500 352-447-1823
MGB 1973
Red convertible, show
room cond. Everything
works. $6200
(765) 336-9590







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





CHEVROLET
2003, Avalanche
$6,300
352-341-0018
CHEVY C20
1984, LB, solid body &
bed, good glass, interior
needs tic, dual exhaust,
350v8, Turbo 400, Holly 4
barrel, needs ps pump
$1400 obo 352-628-7243
pls leave message
Dodge Ram
2008 Big Horn 5.7 Hemi
30k Great cond. $19,000
Call Fred
(352) 628-6470
FORD
2003 F250
$6,495.
352-341-0018
FORD RANGER '03
EDGE, 81k V6 auto.,
Very good cond. $8500.
(352) 419-7703
SALE LAYAWAY
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
TOYOTA
2004,4 Runner Sport
2WD, 94K mi, Leather
$12,800. obo
Call Troy 352-621-7113




CADILLAC
2007, Escalade,
44k miles, Luxury NAV,
$29,500.
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
CHEVROLET
2002, Silverado
$3,990
352-341-0018
CHEVY TRAIL-
BLAZER LT 05
exc. cond. asking $7000
obo, in Hernando
(904) 923-2902
JEEP
2011 Patriot 2.0L, 5
speed, FWD, a/c, power
windows/doors, white,
12k, like new, $12,750
352 513-4100






1978 MIDAS RV
90k miles, 26ft, sleeps 4
**$1500 obo**
2-9212.97n02


2004, Wrangler X 4WD,
Only 57K miles,
Hard Top $13,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113
JEEP WRANGLER
1990,New motor, no rust,
Arizona jeep. $4000.
(352) 586-8396




FORD
1995, E-150
Conversion Van,
t$ 2cn


new rVuLARmo
RANGERS
AS LOW AS 7888.
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS
2002, SPORTSMAN
ATV. 4X4, SERVICED
AND READY FOR
HUNTING SEASON.
$2995
(352) 621-3678




BMW
1980 RI00T, 1000 CC
excellent condition
$2,800
(352)346-5960
Harley Davidson
2002, 883 Sportser,
new tires & saddlebags
17k mi., $4,500. obo
(607) 968-4269
HONDA
2005, VTX 1300CC
3 TO CHOOSE FROM
YOU PICK $4,888.
(352) 621-3678
HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley,1100CC, Chrome,
bags, trade?, 70mpg
$2,800. Crystal River
(727) 207-1619
KYMCO
2009, 125 cc. Looks and
drives great Only $995
(352) 621-3678
VICTORY
2005, KINGPIN
2 TONE, STAGE ONE,
LOADED WITH
OPTIONS
ONLY $7888.
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
2005, ROYAL STAR
TOUR DELUXE, READY
FOR A ROAD TRIP
ONLY $6688.
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
2007 STRATOLINER
1800CC LOADED WITH
OPTIONS A REAL TOUR
BIKE ONLY $5889.
(352) 621-3678


399-0113 SUCRN
Eig, To Vote- Johnnie Manning, Patrick Danahy
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Johnnie Manning Patrick Danahy
1585 WJ Williams Ln 90 Byrsonima Cir
Dunnellon, FL 34434 Homosassa, FL 34446
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan
Gilll
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave, Inverness, FL 34451
Published one (1)time in the Citrus County Chronicle January 13, 2013


300-0113 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
CITRUS COUNTY CONSTRUCTION
LICENSING AND APPEALS BOARD AGENDA
WEDNESDAY January 23, 2013 2:00 P.M.
Lecanto Government Complex
3600 W. Sovereign Path
Lecanto. Florida 34461
................................L..a. nt'. Fr.id..36 .......................
DAVID HUTCHINS, CHAIRMAN JAMES WHITE WILLIAM L. WINKEL
GERRY GAUDETTE ROBERT CABLE
******************************************************************************
(1) CALL TO ORDER
(2) PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE
(3) PROOF OF PUBLICATION
(4) APPROVAL OF MINUTES

(5) CITATIONS:

a) Shaun Stehlik Citation #0058 Engage in the business or act in the ca-
pacity of a contractor without being duly registered or certified in Citrus
County.
b) Theron Aungst Citation #0067 Engage in the business or act in the ca-
pacity of a contractor without being duly registered or certified in Citrus
County.
c) David Getchell Citation #0086 Engage in the business or act in the ca-
pacity of a contractor without being duly registered or certified in Citrus
County.

(6) OTHER DISCUSSION:

Review/Discussion of Chapter 18, Buildings & Building Regulations

ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL A DECISION MADE BY THE CONSTRUC-
TION LICENSING & APPEALS BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSID-
ERED AT THIS PUBLIC HEARING WILL NEED TO INSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD
OF THE PROCEEDING IS MADE, WHICH RECORD SHALL INCLUDE THE TESTI-
MONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. (SECTION
286.0101. FL. STATUTES.)
ANY PERSON REQUIRING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION AT THIS MEETING
BECAUSE OF A DISABILITY OR PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENT SHOULD CONTACT THE
COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR'S OFFICE, 110 NORTH APOPKA, INVERNESS, FL 34450,
(352) 341-6560 AT LEAST TWO DAYS BEFORE THE MEETING. IF YOU ARE HEAR-
ING OR SPEECH IMPAIRED, USE THE TTY TELEPHONE (352-341-6580) OR
LECANTO GOVERNMENT BUILDING (352-527-5350).
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle January 13, 2013


301-0113 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The public is hereby notified that Citrus County Code Compliance will conduct its
monthly Special Master Hearing on Wednesday, January 16, 2013 @ 9:00AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, Multi purpose Room 166, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any and all persons interested are
invited to attend. The following cases) will be heard by the Code Compliance Spe-
cial Master; however cases may abate prior to hearing date. If you have questions,
contact Code Compliance at (352) 527 5350.
Bruszewski, Thomas
205 S Fillmore St, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: A pile of garbage and other miscellaneous
materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Eggert, Kathryn M. & Siegrist, George W.
6459 S Hancock Rd, Homosassa, FI 34448
Construction of a structure (Gazebo, Shed, etc.) without a valid permit, a violation of
Citrus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part:
No person shall erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or
demolish any building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residen-
tial unit, or set or place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit
within the territory covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit
therefore. To Wit: Put fill on the property prior to obtaining Building Permit.
Evans, Thomas L. & Donna J.
255 S Scarboro Ave, Lecanto, FI 34461
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3730(B)(2); The following animals
are specifically prohibited from being considered personal pets under this section
and are allowable only under the provisions of this Land Development Code within
residential districts: Roosters, gamecocks, and turkeys. To Wit: Roosters
Evans, Thomas L. & Donna J.
255 S Scarboro Ave, Lecanto, FI 34461
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3730(B)(5); Any coop, pen, or
other similarly utilized structure shall be located not less than 10 feet from any prop-
erty line. This provision shall not be construed to apply to a perimeter fence or a
portable cage. To Wit: Coop or pen for hens.
Fuller, A R
1131 S Otto Pt, Inverness, FI 34450
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recyding such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Car tires, metal and plastic debris, large
amounts of tree debris, and other miscellaneous trash and debris.
Hart, Randy L. & Tamara P.
5701 N Velvet Ter, Dunnellon, FI 34433
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapterl 8 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improveconvert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: No permit for
single wide trailer.
Menster, Andrea D.
10667 W Halls River Rd, Homosassa, FI 34448
Construction of a structure (Gazebo, Shed, etc.) without a valid permit, a violation of
Citrus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part:
No person shall erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or
demolish any building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residen-
tial unit, or set or place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit
within the territory covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit
therefore. To Wit: Enclosed carport and converted to living space,
installed new windows, and a shed.
Miedema, Rod & Tracy
696 S Otis Ave, Lecanto, FI 34461
Construction of a structure (signs) without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County
Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall
erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any
building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or
place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory
covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: Two
portable signs located on the front of the property. One sign holds letters and the
other sign is electronic/flashing.
Owens, Marilyn A.
2100 N Picnic Pt, Hernando, FI 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Tarps, buckets, wood, garbage, metal, plastic,
and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Owens, Marilyn A.
2100 N Picnic Pt, Hernando, FI 34442
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: The one travel trailer and one trailer made of wood parked on the prop-
erty.
Owens, Marilyn A.
2100 N Picnic Pt, Hernando, FI 34442
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Ramistella Enterprises Inc.
9392 N Citrus Springs Blvd, Citrus Springs, FI 34434
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Sharp Trust
107 W Harvard St, Inverness, FI 34452
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Large amounts of household garbage, house-
hold items, and miscellaneous junk. The garage also needs to be secured.
Vega, Alejandro
508 S Adams St, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Code Compliance
Special Master with respect to any matterconsidered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Court House, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, phone:
(352) 341 6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352)341 6580.
MICHELE LIEBERMAN, SPECIAL MASTER
CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle January 13, 2013


ImicN


I Misc. N


CLASSIFIED


ImicN


Metn


Metn


Metn




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DECEMBER'S

15000 WINNER!
BARBARA WILBURN-YORK
YOU COULD BE THIS MONTH'S WINNER!
VISIT ANY CRYSTAL LOCATION FOR DETAILS


c RiMEE:N & E
80-54875EX.312


:iii ; IM
FRE24HURRCODD ESAEWIHINO& PCILPRCN


L :FREi24HOU R D E E INF'&SPCL PRICING
800-584-8755EXT.3109


E 2 EAG EF SPA
80-8-75ET 17


i~i
fsasmaas* (
El LZ, lL


IFEE C MSAG S S A
80I-8-75EXT.


FUM IT1 CIA
80-8-85 XI 19


CRYSTALS

CRYSTALAUTOS.COMi


1005 South Suncoast


Blvd. Homosassa


14358 Cortez Blvd. Brooksville


2077 Highway 44W Inverness


352-564-1971
Sales: Monday-Friday 8:00am-8:00pm Saturday 9:00am-7:30pm Sunday-Closed
Service: M, W, F 7:30am-5:30pm T, TH 7:30am-7:00pm Saturday 8:00am-4:00pm Sunday-Closed Body Shop: M-F 7:30am-5:30pm
tSEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. +PRICE INCLUDES S1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $59950. WITH APPROVED CREDIT 'LEASES ARE FOR 39 MONTHS
39,000 MILES FOR THE LIFE OF THE LEASE.15 CENTS PER MILE OVER $3999 DUE AT SIGNING WITH APPROVED CREDIT. *0%, SPECIAL FINANCE OFFERS AND NO PAYMENTS UNTIL MARCH 2013 ARE AVAILABLE WITH APPROVED CREDIT, NOT EVERYONE WILL
00DOU QUALIFY. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK. 25 MPG BASED ON EPA HIGHWAY FUEL ECONOMY ESTIMATES.


F 2 4 ^ ^ H R C D M E E
54- I


LREEE MESA ISA
8 5485 I


LR2R1C1OE SPA
80-8-75ET 15


/ 1*
o C


D8 SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AT CITRUS KIA, "WE JUST DON'T
CLOSE CAR DEALS, WE OPEN RELATIONSHIPS"


1 I 1850 S.. Hwy. 19, CINstal River, Fl

A) 352.564.8668 4Z
The Power to SurpriseTM' ,
Shop from Home @ www.citruskia.com


*$3,000 down, 75 months at 4% interest rate. Plus tax, tag, title. WAC.


Each vehicle includes: Kia Certified Pre-Owned vehicles
150 point quality assurance inspection must be less than five years old
CARFAX vehicle history report and have less than 60,000 miles.
10 years/100,000 miles Powertrain Warranty from the original in-service date
24-hour roadside assistance for 10 years/unlimited miles from the original in-service date
Towing, rental, and travel breakdown benefits for Out of Town Repair/Expense


SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 D9




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DECEMBER'S
15000 WINNER!
BARBARA WILBURN-YORK Chevy Runs Deep
YOU COULD BE THIS MONTH'S WINNER!
VISIT ANY CRYSTAL LOCATION FOR DETAILS


2013 CHEVROLET MALIBU


@ II

BUY 1899
FOR$18,991


2013 CHEVROLET SPARK


....... .
Alkr


BUY
FOR


$9,868


2012 CHEVROLET CRUZE


BUY 5,800
FOR


N


2013 CHEVROLET EQUINOX



9,880

uO $19,880
FOR


2013 CHEVROLET CAMARO
.MW 4


BUY19,991
2012 CHEVROLET SILVERADO EXT
2012 CHEVROLET SILVERADO EXT


OBU 18,749
FOR


CrystalAutos.com *


1035 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448 352-795-1515


tSEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. *PRICE INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT ALL WILL QUALIFY, PLUS $2999 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEAL-
ER FEE OF $599.50 WITH APPROVED CREDIT PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


C T NA AL
Il ~1 ~~ I ~ ~~~~ 3 ~ ~ I ~~lr ~ ~~ ~IIV


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:
800-440-905


CHEVROLET
CH EVROLET ,0LH,


D10 SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013


ODOUN






SSection E -SUNDAY, JANUARY 13,2012



ITRUS O M COUNTY HRONILE REAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL


INSIDE
SSikorski's
SAttic
PAGE E6


ESTATE GUIDE


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E2_ SUNA_ JANAR 13 03CmsCuwY( HOIL


REAL SHOW STOPPER!!
* On 3rd Green Extraordinary Landscape
* Gorgeous Pool/Lanai 3 or 4 Bedrooms
* Huge Formal Dining 3-CAR GARAGE
* Updated Classy Kitchen Extended Fam. Suite
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
www.Floiidalislinglinlo.com


' Oversized Corner Lot Home Never Lived In
*3/2 Split BR Plan 2 1/2 Ton Updated AC
*Bay Window in GR New HW Heater
Near S. Deltona 2-Car Garage
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 I
www.Floiidalislinglinlo.coni


WOWII Describes this beautiful Pine Ridge home No expenses
spared Large 3/2/2 split plan home with separate office space
Interior features boast light & bright spaces, gourmet upgraded
kitchen, travertine tile throughout, formal dining, bar/sitting area,
window treatments and much more Exterior offers fresh paint,
solar heated pool, fenced rear yard, large patio area, workshop,
fenced garden to name a few
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460 I
Email: davidsivory@hotmail.com


BUUU N. UKNUHI ItK.
PINE RIDGE
*4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF Living
* 2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath
* Office or Den Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


11i 4 N. INU. Un.
CITRUS SPRINGS
*3BD/2BA/2CG Split Floor Plan
*4 Lots, 1.3 Acres Nice Trees, Great Yard
* Newer Roof Covered Lanai, Caged Pool
* Nice Surroundings Convenient Location
GEILA gulaa' ENGLISH 352-249-6961
Email: g.english@remax.net
www.sellingcitruscountyhomes.com


*2004 Goldcrest Home *3-Car Garage
* Mother-In-Law Suite 15x30 Heated, Salt, Pool
* Kitchen w/Corian Counters 2 HVAC Units
* Over 4,500 Sq. Ft. Living Horses Welcome

KELLIE GODDARD 352-476-8536
www.Kellyg.remaxagent.com












REALTY ONE


24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:

1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


S 2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


GREAT BUY IN MEADOWCREST
This 3 bedroom, 2 bath home has a spacious 2-car
garage, split bedrooms, enclosed patio & private backyard,
central vac, wood cabinets, pantry, and wonderful location.
Just close to 2 community pools, tennis courts, and the
fitness walk around the lake.
WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575
Email: Wayne@WayneHemmerich.cm


CRYSTAL RIVER
* Beautiful 3BR/2BA/2CG Home Living Room & Famil Room
* Lg. Office Kitchen w/Island & Lots of Cabinets
* Lg. Master Suite Heated PoolLanai
*NewAC 2010 *Lots of Upgrades
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenplmer@remax.net










MINI FARMS!!10 ACRES!!
3 bedroom, 2 bath doublewide, fenced and
cross-fenced, large open kitchen with lots of
cabinets, above ground pool, 20x24 metal
building with roll-up doors, irrigation system.

DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682
Emaihl dijml@yamhoo.com


LOCATION... LOCATION...
LOCATION...
3BR/2BA home with a total of 2,098 under
a new roof. Garage, FL room, and a privacy
fenced backyard. Move-in condition.

BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200
Email: brbarojmils@earlthlink.net


24/7 INFO LINE
(352)372828




- .


8 MICHIGAN STREET
BEVERLY HILLS UNIT 6
Completely remodeled Move-in conditions This 2 bedroom
has everything newly New roof, A/C, water heater, kitchen
cabinets, counters, appliances, oak hardwood and tile floors,
paint inside and out, dual pane windows, decorator light fixtures
and ceiling fans, bathroom high-top vanity and mirror, glass
tales, large fenced backyard A MUST SEE HOMEI
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929
Email: mortho.sather@remax.net
VIRTUAL TOURS at www.martha.sather.remax.com


ILUKAL UC IT
S2 Bedrooms, 1 Bath, Concrete Block Home
* Large Living Room w/Fireplace
SInside Laundry
* Corner Lot- 1 06 Acres
Carport & Large Detached Garage
* 2 Sheds
* BBQ Pit & Concrete Slab for Entertaining
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net



o bs-.
1 -


Back on the market and ready to sell! Neat, clean and
ready to move into. This charming country 5/2.5/2
boasts formal living and dining, large roomy kitchen and
oversized family room w/woodburning fireplace, plus tons
and tons of storage space throughout. All this and more is
situated on a lovely 2.39 acre lot and comes with a NEW
Roof. Priced to sell.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


242 N H B H I10NFl


11985 N. GOLDENDALE AVE.
DUNNELLON, FL
* Furnished Doublewide 1 Acre Lot Near Boat Ramp
S2BD/2BA w/3-Car Detached Garage/Workshop
* Utility Shed w/Elect Plus 30'x50' Steel Carport
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


E2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus Garden Club


tackles 'shady' topic


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus Garden Club's
February meeting is sure to
pique everyone's interest
because the agenda is brim-
ming with topics. The meet-
ing is on Thursday, Feb.7, at
the recreational building at
Whispering Pines Park in
Inverness.
The social begins at 9 a.m.
when the hostess of the
month, Mary Jo Miller, and
her cupid helpers will greet
the group with freshly made
coffee and a table set with
refreshments. The business
meeting will be called to
order by President Dee
Nielsen at 9:30 a.m. The
program begins approxi-
mately at 10:45 a.m.
Dr. Joan Bradshaw will be
the speaker, and her topic
will be "Planting in the
Shade." Joan is the Citrus
County Extension Director
and the natural resource
conservation faculty for spe-
cialized programs. If you
have a problem in your yard
with a bare, shady spot, you
will not want to miss the
timely advice Joan will
offer.
Also on the agenda is the
feature of the month by
Janet MacGregor She will
present a mysterious topic
called "In the Night Gar-
den." Then Carol Hillard
will share one of "Nature's
Nuggets."
For the horticultural sec-
tion, Jerry Lubowiecki,
master gardener, will be on
hand to answer questions
about Florida's habitat.


Vicky Ross will critique two
floral designs made by
Carol Hillard and Janet
MacGregor Vicky offers
many hints on how to
arrange flowers for a home
or flower show.
Judy Thomason, chair-
man of the butterfly garden
in Whispering Pines Park,
has a maintenance day
scheduled for 9 a.m. Feb. 11.
Everyone is invited to come
and help please the butter-
flies by donning gloves and
doing some cleanup, as well
as helping replace some
timbers for a new outline of
the four separate gardens.
The Hospice garden,
chaired by Bob Morris, will
need some winter TLC. So
come on out at 9 a.m. Feb. 18
to do some trimming and
general spruce-up. Keeping
this meditation garden
inviting to the employees
and patients is the primary
goal.
A workshop is planned for
9:30 a.m. Feb. 21 at the
recreational building in
Whispering Pines. This
workshop will be led by
Louise Allen, president of
the Brooksville Garden
Club. Louise is a talented
lady and will show how to
make a sweet, romantic
Tussy Mussy
Do not forget to bring your
nonperishable food items
for the food banks of Citrus
County Also greatly appre-
ciated are the items the an-
imals at the shelter could
use. For questions, call
President Dee Nielsen at
352-249-9145.


Ft' Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney |
S Realtor'. A HOUSE Realtor I I
1 302.3179 SOLD Na'e 287-9022
WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746.6700 oDR90

OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, JAN. 13 1-3 PM
4316 N. Bacall, Beverly Hills
Dir.: 491 N. to Forest Ridge (R) Lincoln
(R) Gleason (L) Bacall. Home on left.


Reuse plastic zippered bags


N ew bedding is fre-
quently sold in
plastic zippered
bags. These can be reused
to organize items such as
toys and games, craft proj-
ects and supplies, seasonal
clothing or Christmas
wrapping supplies, just to
name a few. How have you Sar
reused them?
The first reader tip FRU
shares an idea: LIV
Reuse plastic zippered
bags: I keep them in my suitcase.
Each one can hold an outfit or shoes.
Use one for underwear. I love how I
can quickly organize my suitcase with
them. -Diana, Iowa
Homemade gift idea: Of all the gifts
I gave my granddaughter, her favorite
was a "handmade" notebook she will
use as a journal. I purchased compo-
sition books during back-to-school
sales and made covers for them using
samples from a wallpaper sample
book. For my granddaughter, I folded
a Victorian floral print sample and
covered the composition book as you
would a school textbook. It makes a


PN I IRD


PINE RIDGE
41313 POOL HOME
Best Priced Home on Market.
Hurry! Beautiful lot, large lanai.
Convenient location, 2630 sq. ft
cooled. MUST SEE!
$205,000
Call Joe 302-0910
000DR6W


I


lovely gift for a teen or
friend. Karen B., email
Shopping tips: Like
many, I jot down my gro-
S cery list as needed items
occur to me at home. But
S before heading to the
store, I'll circle all of the
produce items and under-
l line all of the dairy Simple
l and quick differentiation
GAL marks like these help sort
NG the items visually
Relatedly, I don't bring
cloth grocery bags along, as I reuse the
plastic grocery bags. I also use those
old plastic grocery bags in our kitchen
trash bin (they fit perfectly), as well as
in the bathrooms. By reusing, I'm also
creating even less trash, since I'm not
buying boxes of trash liner bags. -
Connie, Rhode Island
Uses for produce bags: I have found
many uses for those produce bags
easily found in supermarket produce
sections.
Breading items before frying or
baking. Put food items inside bag with
flour or breadcrumbs and shake to
coat.


Covering shoes before packing
them in a suitcase.
Storage of small items (i.e. gloves,
socks, etc.)
Defrosting items in fridge while
containing the mess.
Holding medicines when traveling.
As an RV owner, I deposit used
toilet paper in these bags instead of
throwing it in the holding tank, so as
not to clog the plumbing or block the
sensors.
When traveling back home from
vacation, I use these bags to store wet
bathing suits and washcloths. -Hank
G., Florida
Use for pool noodles: I cut pool
noodles to fit over hangers to prevent
points on the shoulders of my cloth-
ing as it dries.
For clothing that remains on the
hanger after it dries, I use pipe insu-
lators, because they are thinner and
don't take up as much room in the
closet. Pool noodles can also be used
as temporary baby bumpers on the
corners of sharp furniture. Mona
G., email
See FRUGAL/Page E5


DISTRESSED HOMEOWNERS SEMINAR
Is your home UNDERWATER/UPSIDE DOWN?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS!
Come learn what others don't know... FOR FREE!

Seminar Highlights Include:
* Short Sales Is my house a good candidate?
* Bankruptcy Can it save my home?
* Loan Modifications Is anybody getting one?
* Deficiencies What is this? And how can it harm me for years to come?
* Misperceptions What are they?
* Time Frames How long do I have?

Guest Speaker Michael T. Kovach, Jr. Attorney at Law


Crystal Oaks
Civic Assn.
4958 W. Crystal Oaks D
( mi. off SR 44 on left


"I guarantee that homeowners who attend this seminar
will receive all the information they need to make the best
possible decisions given thier particular circumstances."
Attorney Mike Kovach, Jr.

Jan. 22, 2013 LIMITED SEATING
5:30 PM Call or email today for
reservations
r. Trish Antonetti 352-400-3323
)Lecanto, FL trishantonetti@yahoo.com


SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 E3







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Using deer to


prune your trees


and shrubs


It's possible in some situations


LEE REICH
Associated Press

Deer are ready to start
pruning our trees and
shrubs.
Although unconcerned
with promoting plant health
or aesthetics, in at least one
situation deer can actually
help us prune well.
Picture an overgrown
shrub, especially one
planted too close to a home.
With age and a little neglect,
said shrub begins to swal-
low up the home, or at least
block the view from a win-
dow.
There are many ap-
proaches to dealing with an
overgrown shrub. Briefly,
you could, over the course of
a few years, renovate the
plant by each year cutting
some of the oldest stems to
the ground to make way for
younger, shorter ones. Or
you could take the dramatic
approach: Lop the whole
plant to the ground and start


anew with all young shoots,
which will enthusiastically
sprout forth from the estab-
lished roots. Also worth con-
sidering is just grubbing out
the shrub and replacing it
with something, or even
nothing.
Deer aren't much help
with any of these ap-
proaches. But they can help
out with another, which cap-
italizes on the venerability
of such a plant: You and
your hoofed friends can
transform a selected portion
of the plant into a pictur-
esque, small tree.
An ideal candidate for
this operation is yew, a fast-
growing evergreen fre-
quently snuggled against
home foundations.
The first step in trans-
forming an old yew or any
other old shrub is to se-
lect two or three of the old-
est stems to become the
trunks of your tree-to-be.
See DEER/Page E5


PINE RIDGE
HORSE PROPERTY
SPECIALIST
Horse trails and nature are just
a small part of the pleasure in
Pine Ridge Estates. If you are looking for a place
with peace and quite and lots of privacy, this may be
your next home. Need a home with an in-law apt?
We have that! Need a beautiful barn for your horses?
We have that! Need privacy in the woods on 5.5
acres? Need a winter home with a heated pool? We
have that! We have it all and more! Call today and
describe what YOU are looking for. We will find it
for you. Sherri C. Parker, CRB, CRS, SRES
Broker/Owner. 352-527-8090.


Associated Press
This Dec. 31 photo shows a deer-pruned yew next to the
foundation of a house in New Paltz, N.Y. Deer are ready to
start pruning our trees and shrubs. Although not discrimi-
nating as to when or what they munch in terms of promot-
ing plant health or aesthetics, in at least one situation deer
can actually lend us a "hand" in pruning.

Jackie Davis
American Realty & Investments
S1it 117 s. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
m A? (352) 634-2371 Cell
ERA" jackie@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of our listings and all MLS:bidavs.co

TOTALLY
ENERGY EFFICIENT
3 Bedrooms
3 Baths
.... 3-Car garage
Stunning kitchen
Plumbed for full apartment
2.65 Fenced acres
$399,000 MLS 358805
LOTS OF GOODIES
-., 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
Convection oven
S3-Car garage
Heated pool
Living room
Summer kitchen
,; Family room
$205,000 MLS 356376
ON TWO PARCELS
,3 Bed, 2 bath, 2-cargarage

Fireplace in living room
Re-screened pool cage
Parking for RV, boat
$165,000 MLS 358267


l i l =l 1


-a


E4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

Kitchen cleaning tips: To
clean your burners, place
them in a large pot, cover
them with water and add
some dishwashing deter-
gent. Boil for a couple of
minutes, then let sit. Come
back later and wash the
grunge off. To clean your
blender, add some dish-
washing liquid and water,
turn it on for a couple of sec-
onds, then rinse. Chele,
Tennessee
MEN
Toaster ovens are a great
alternative to regular ovens.
They cost less to operate and
won't heat up your kitchen
as much. You can cook or
bake most anything in it that
you would in a regular oven,
but in smaller portions.
Using a toaster is still your
cheapest option for toast
and bagels, but you can
bake, broil, roast or reheat
foods such as sandwiches,
appetizers, mini pizzas, fish,
beef, poultry, desserts, etc.,
in a toaster oven, too. They
work well during holidays if
your regular oven is full.
Visit your local library and
look for toaster oven cook-
books, or search online to
find hundreds of recipes. If
you find a used toaster oven
without a manual, make a
call to the manufacturer.
Checking online for your
toaster oven's make and
model might bring up a copy
of the manual, too.
The first reader shares
how she uses her toaster
oven:


SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 E5


Use a toaster oven: I use a
toaster oven for 90 percent
of my cooking. I have a
Black and Decker model
with convection. Tonight I'm
cooking homemade lasagna
in it. Another hidden bene-
fit of cooking with the
toaster oven: If you are
cooking anything smelly
(like fish), you can take it
outside! Wendy Canada
Cast iron for frying: I
know people love stainless
steel, but I've never had
good luck with it when using
it for frying. Maybe it's be-
cause I'm used to cast iron,
which in my opinion is the
best bang for the cooking
buck. It can be used for bak-
ing, as well as frying, and its
low-stick coating is com-
pletely renewable and gets
better with age. I love stain-
less steel for other cook-
ware, but not for frying. -
S.D., Minnesota
Cutting down on holiday
waste: I've been using
reusable gift boxes for going
on 20 years now. I discov-
ered that men would rather
give a gift unwrapped than
deal with paper and tape.
Gift boxes and bags were my
solution. Christmas morning
cleanup is so easy-just put
the boxes back in the tub of
giftwrapping stuff. C.D.,
Wisconsin
Chocolate-dipped fortune
cookies: My kids have lists
as long as their arms of peo-
ple they would like to give
gifts to, so I needed to come
up with something cheap
and cute for them to give
out. I contacted one of our
local Chinese restaurants to

See FRUGAUPage E7


OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 11-3PM PINE RIDGE
Large Pine Ridge 4/4/3 Pool
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E. i .-i,,n Riding Trails. Interior
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7 .II, :.l..- 1 & bright spaces. Two
I i l':1 I. Ledrooms offer room for
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'. ~ILst Price $369,000
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S 1I ,. nt on N. Bravo to 3503
Z 'I6. bldvu Dr.
Alison Markham & Steven McClory
EXIT Realty Leaders
352-697-0761 cell 352-422-3998 3s2.794i0888


DEER
Continued from Page E4

These stems should have pleasant
forms and extend from ground level
to as high as the future crown of
branches.
Once selections are made, cut away
all other stems growing from the base
of the plant.
The next step cutting away any
branches growing off those new
trunks between the ground and a few


feet above the ground is where
deer help out. They'll enjoy munch-
ing on all those smaller branches. You
and your deer helpers will want to re-
move branches high enough along the
trunk so the plant looks like a tree, or,
in the case of the deer, as high as they
can reach.
The final step in pruning will be to
shorten and remove enough branches
in the crown of your new tree to give
it good shape. Do this step yourself.
Yew is a particularly good candi-
date for this treatment because its
reddish brown, peeling trunk is well


worth exposing and highlighting, and
age deepens its beauty. Yew also
bounces back enthusiastically from
virtually any type of pruning, so you
can do the job fearlessly
In subsequent years, new sprouts
will arise from ground level and off
the trunks; after all, the plant was
once, and really aspires to be, a
bush. Deer will be eager to nip off all
those young sprouts, but check on
their work to cut away any that they
miss.
Lee Reich is author of "The Prun-
ingBook" (Taunton Press, 2010).


r Rh IRk 1I1m


Amanda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BROKER/ASSOC. REACTOR, il REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR

r~rl~rrc~Eil~S


746-9000o

estbu S


s,-- Uo~l l= si "i


-'ITLLRIE


I ++ OWNER FINANCIN +


CITRUS SPRINGS

_U


.HRNND


CIRUSSPvRING


BEERYHIL







E6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013


HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
......... .....................................advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................... 352-563-5966
News information.......................... ................. 352-563-5660
...... ......................... .............newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing...............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CiiqoNikiE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
* Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
* News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
* Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
* Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
* For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Come to AGRItunity


Eighth annual conference addresses agriculture


Interested in learning
more about getting
started in agriculture
or learning more about
what's new in the field of
agriculture? Plan to attend
the Eighth Annual AGRItu-
nity Conference and Trade
Show on Jan. 26. This year's
event will be at the Sumter
County Agricultural Educa-
tion Center (Sumter County
Fairgrounds) at 7620 State
Road 471, Bushnell. Don't
miss this exciting annual
event which includes 12
workshops, a large trade
show, livestock exhibits, an-
tique farm equipment and
more.
To kick off the two-day
event, a farm tour is sched-
uled to visit five agriculture
operations in Sumter and
Lake Counties. Tour stops
include Bethel turf farms,
Knight's Farm Fresh Feed,
Grand Oaks Equestrian
Farm, Seaquest Dairy Goat


Farm and Heather Oaks with a stimulating keynote
blueberry farm. The cost to speaker, Sheri Salatin of
participate in the day-long Polyface Farm. Sheri is the
farm tour is $35. marketing direc-
For those in- tor at Polyface
terested in Farm in rural
learning more Virginia and has
about aquapon- been influential
ics, a workshop in launching
will be on Fri- agricultural buy-
day, Jan. 25. The -' ing clubs. Salatin
aquaponics now oversees 25
workshop will drop locations
include fish pro- Joan Bradshaw throughout Vir-
duction, plant FLORIDA- ginia and Mary-
production and land with over
methods of FRIENDLY 3,000 families.
aquaponics to LIVING In addition to
link the plant the general ses-
and fish systems together. A sions, breakout sessions
field trip is planned to will focus on livestock,
Green Acres Aquaponics- crops and methods of agri-
Farm. Preregistration is re- culture business:
quired and there is a fee of U Crop sessions will in-
$30, which includes bus clude alternative soil man-
transportation to the farm. agement, pomengranate
The 2013 AGRItunity production, farmscaping
Conference and trade show
begins on Saturday, Jan. 26 See SHOW/Page E9


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Iaside...


I1


Kick the clutter
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E7
For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the website for the Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office,
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Sizing up an FDR novelty clock; silver asparagus server


Dear John: We follow
you in the Citrus
County Chronicle
every week and enjoy
it. We have a statue
clock of FDR. The
clock does not work,
but we feel the trou-
ble might be in the
wiring because of its
age. We remember
this clock when I was
a child and I am now
83 years old. It meas- Joh
ures 15 1/4 inches tall, S
10 inches wide and 4 S
1/4 inches at the base. A
It has a patent num-
ber on the back, which reads
Pat 91.140. It says "For the
Man of the Hour" on the base.
The clock's face says United
Clock. Does it have any value?
-B.H., Beverly Hills
Dear B.H.: Your clock is
collectible in two categories,
clock collecting and Presi-
dential memorabilia. The


i
n
0
O


case is made of white metal
with a copper-flashed finish.
The maker of your clock,
United Clock
Co., produced a
wide variety of
S novelty clocks.
i The FDR
clock like the
one you have
was produced
in large quanti-
ties and is low
Sikorski on both totem
RS I'S poles of collec-
RSKIS tor interest. I
ITIC think it would
sell in the $50 to
$100 range, short of a lucky
day
Dear John: I recently pur-
chased the chair pictured in
these photos at an estate sale.
This chair is very well-built
and quite heavy, weighing ap-
proximately 29 pounds, and is
in good condition. I believe
the fabric is original and has


no tears. I tried to determine
whether it is an old Shaker
side chair, a mid-century Dan-
ish or Mission Oak. Perhaps it
is none of these, but it does not
seem to my untrained eye to
be a reproduction.
I read your Sunday column
regularly and wonder if you
can please help me out and
let me know your opinion
about the style, condition, and
value of this chair. -PP, Cit-
rus Springs
Dear PE: The chair does
appear to be well made. It
was likely manufactured after
World War II. The style has a
generic hotel-furniture look
but does not fall into a cate-
gory of interest relative to vin-
tage 20th century furniture.
Potential dollar value is
catch-as-catch-can.
DearJohn: I have read your
articles for some time now.
My aunt passed away a few
years ago and left me a ster-


ling silver asparagus server
that was made during the Vic-
torian era. She also said that
there are marks on it that will
date it. I have found them but
do not know what to do next. I
have shown them to several
dealers but no one has been
able to help. I thought I would
ask if you can suggest a place
where I can get some infor-
mation. Thank you for any
help you might provide. -
TD., Internet
Dear T.D.: I would be glad
to help you. Asparagus
servers are eagerly sought
after by collectors of English
silver, one of my favorite top-
ics. In order to help you, I
See ATTIC/Page E9
This novelty clock showing
President Franklin D. Roo-
sevelt falls into two collecting
categories clocks and
Presidential memorabilia.
Special to the Chronicle







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Teresa
Boozer
Prudential
Florida Showcase
Properties.


U r



Florence
Cleary
Prudential
Florida Showcase
Properties.


Matt
Robinson
Prudential
Florida Showcase
Properties.

Prudential
agents set
records in
2012
Prudential
Florida Showcase
Properties recog-
nizes the following
team members for
surpassing $1 million
in sales for 2012:


Brian
Murray
Prudential
Florida Showcase
Properties.


JoAnn
Condit
Prudential
Florida Showcase
Properties.


Dick
Hildebrandt
Prudential
Florida Showcase
Properties.

A



.i



Mark
Casper
Prudential
Florida Showcase
Properties.


Tami
Mayer
Prudential
Florida Showcase
Properties.


Jane
O'Gwynn
Prudential
Florida Showcase
Properties.









Phil
Phillips
Prudential
Florida Showcase
Properties.
Florence Cleary,
JoAnn Condit,
Jane O'Gwynn,
Matt Robinson,
Dick Hildebrandt
and Phil Phillips
from our Citrus Hills
office. Special recog-
nition to Mark
Casper, Citrus Hills,
for reaching nearly
$3 million in sales.
Contact the Pine


Teresa Boozer, Ridge office at 352-
Brian Murray and Tami Mayer 527-1820 or the Citrus Hills of-
from our Pine Ridge office; and fice at 352-746-0744.

DIGEST DEADLINES
Submit information for the Real Estate Digest by 4
p.m. Thursday for publication Sunday.
News notes are published as space is available.
Submit material, attn: HomeFront, at Chronicle offices
in Inverness or Crystal River; fax to 563-3280; or e-
mail to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.


Real Estate DIGEST


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E5

purchase a box of fortune cookies and
discovered I could get 175 cookies for
$11! With various sprinkles purchased
at the Dollar Tree and dipping choco-
late and wrapping bags (100 for $1.99)
from a local discount party store, I'm
looking at 100 great gifts for around 40
cents each. I am currently printing out
tags that say "I am Fortune-ate to have
you in my life." And for anybody who
did the math, I actually have 75 indi-
vidually wrapped cookies to set out
for my mom's 60th birthday party, too.
Thought I would share this in case
anyone is still looking for cheap ideas.
- S.S., West Virginia
Buy with a friend or family mem-
ber: When I was single, I did not need


five pounds of ground chuck or 10 of
any one item, and buy-one-get-one-
free items would go to waste. So my
friend and I decided we would split
sales. Besides taking advantage of
special offers, we would also split 10-
pound bags of potatoes, oranges,
onions, etc. Sue, Texas
Note from Sara: This works well
when shopping at wholesale clubs
such as Sam's orB.J's, too.
Pressure-cooking: I like cooking in
mass amounts. I save time by using a
pressure cooker, which saves on en-
ergy because it cooks so quickly I
then can my meats, instead of using a
freezer.
I don't have to pay for additional
electricity, the food is cooked and
ready to serve, it stores for years
rather than months, and I only have
to stay by the stove once for a limited
number of meals.


-SEjI [ ALL OF CITRUS C


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


Prudential

Florida Showcase

Properties


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


Fo a Virt l To*Lur or Mu Sli le Photos

Swww.FloridaShowcaseropertiesc


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3
NEW LISTING




is"T a 338 W Red Sox Path
MLS#700094 $479,000
Stunning custom detailed home on a cul-de-sac.
Directions: Rte86 to Terra Vista entrance, though guard
house, straighttoleft atFenwayand lefton RedSoxto#338.
Sandra Clear 352-212-4058
NEW LISTING
777 AF, 1


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-3


7 iJ\ga 1064WDiamond Shore Lp
MLS#358227 $219,900
No Remodeling needed in this newly renovated villa.
Directions: Rte 86 to Terra Vista entrance to right on
Skyview Crssingto left onDiamondShoretohome on left.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926
NEW LISTING


NEW LISTING


<^ni a 33378 W Naegelia PI
MLS#359406 $94,900
Lovely 3/2/2 home in quiet area priced to sell.
Directions: Rte 491to Hampshire to right on Elkcamto left
on Naegelia to homeon left
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478
NEW LISTING


4214 N Stanwyck Terr 645 W Sunbird Path
UiUge MLS#700107 $114,000 MLS#700047 $84,000
Start living out your Florida dream on Outstanding value 2/2/2
day One! "maintenance free" villa.
Mark Casper 352-476-8136 Mark Casper352-476-8136


U riy iW-.;- - .- .
1048 W Lake Shore Ct
ZilS MLS#700045 $365,000
Beautiful 3/2/2 home on a cul-de-sac
in Terra Vista.
Sandra Olear 352-212-4058
NEW LISTING
A I i ,'


4182 N Lincoln Ave
"UZUde MLS#700099 $62,900
Pride of ownership shows-2/1/1
home priced to sell.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213


- -I c- NI vllf~em oilH mo sonsomror
7 z 6152 N Silver Palm Way 6i 847 W Sunbird Path 314 S Fllmore St l 0 2619NBrentwoodCir
S MLS#358583 $118,900 I' MLS#357800 $99,900 +1il S MLS#358326 $99,500 MLS#358183 $129,000
MUST SEE, charming,well maintained BE SURPRISED! When you see this A beautifully renovated 3/2/2 Beautiful 3/2/2 ready for its
3/2/2 pool home. 2/2/2 plus den villa, pool home. new owners!
Tami Mayer 352-476-1507 Barry Cook 352-302-1717 Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213 JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774
P 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential,the M
SPrudential logo and the Rocksymbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


If you like this idea, I began by
checking out YouTube videos by
michigansnowpony
I can cook pinto beans in six min-
utes of cooking time (plus a bit more
time to let the pressure release and
whatnot). A four-pound bag from
Save-A-Lot was $4.19 and made eight
quarts. The equivalent in canned
pinto beans from Wal-Mart would
have cost $1.48 per can, for a total of
$23.44! I use the beans for chili, soups,
refried beans, tostadas, etc. --M.H.,
Michigan
EN.
Dear Sara: I have a small carton of
35 percent whipping cream in the
fridge. I believe I bought it for a
recipe that didn't come to fruition. I
don't want to waste it, but it's not get-
ting used and the expiration date is

See FRUGA/Page E13


SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 E7






E8 SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013




Kick


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


out the clutter!


Associated Press
Designer Brian Patrick Flynn turned a disorganized catch-all room into a clean and colorful creative space as shown here, decorated solely with random leftover pieces pulled from stor-
age. Flynn uses bold color as a backdrop, then unites the disparate pieces with touches of the same accent color.

Designers give tips on how to use extra space to create a home organizational hub


MELISSA RAYWORTH
Associated Press
getting a family organized requires
more than a few well-chosen New
Year's resolutions. Increasingly,
homeowners are carving out a physical


space anything from a single kitchen
cabinet to an entire spare room that
can function as a family information cen-
ter and workstation.
In an effort to battle clutter and keep
track of schedules, designer Brian Patrick
Flynn helps clients kick the habit of


spreading out items around their homes.
"These days, it's pretty much a given
that families use their kitchen islands,
dining tables and/or coffee tables as prime
real estate for laptops, school papers,
iPhones and mail," says Flynn, founder
and editor of decordemon.com.


"When I'm designing entire homes, es-
pecially ones for young families, the first
thing I focus on is locating a seldom-used
corner, section or nook somewhere easily
accessible to create a creative and
See .Page E9







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLUTTER
Continued from Page E8

organizational hub. This
usually follows my tirade
of, 'No more using the din-
ing table or breakfast nook
as a clutter station!"'
Here, Flynn and two
other interior designers
offer tips on creating the
perfect family headquar-
ters to wrangle homework
assignments, invitations,
permission slips, calen-
dars and more.
What do you need?
The key pieces are:
SA calendar (paper, dig-
ital or both) that the whole
family can access.
Accessible storage
space for incoming mail,
invitations and permission
slips where things won't
get forgotten.
SA message board (dry-
erase white boards and/or
corkboards are popular)
where family members can
post and share information.
A labeled bin or sec-
tion of corkboard space as-
signed to each family
member.
A power strip for
charging electronic de-
vices, with shelf or desk
space to keep those items
while charging.
See Page E10
The Givan family office Mal-
lory Mathison designed in
Gulf Breeze, Fla.
MALLORY MATHISON/
Flip Flop Photography


SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 E9


SHOW
Continued from Page E6

native pollinators, and mush-
room-bag culture.
Livestock sessions will in-
clude Florida hay myths and
fiction, egg production in
Florida, small ruminant health,
and grass-fed beef
Business agriculture ses-
sions will include preserving
what you produce, developing
buyers clubs, Facebook for farm-
ers, and permaculture plan-
ning for sustainable agriculture.
To participate in the AGRItu-
nity Conference and Trade
Show, there is a preregistration
fee of $15, or you can pay $20 at
the door. To learn more or to



ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

need a couple of good, clear
photographs. The marks on the
asparagus server will give the
maker, date, and town where it
was made. If you cannot get a
photograph of the marks, make
sure you draw a copy of each
one. Then I will finish the story
DearJohn: I have a customer
in Orlando with a hidden treas-
ure who is trying to raise some
money to pay current bills.
The item is a White treadle
sewing machine in working con-
dition with all the accessories.
The wood is in good shape and
all the hinges, etc. are fine.
There is a slight drink stain on
the top cover. I believe the man-
ufacturer's date for the model is


preregister, visit http://sumter.
ifas.ufl.edu. Additional infor-
mation can be obtained by call-
ing 352-793-2728 or by
contacting Citrus County Ex-
tension at 352-527-5700.
Citrus County Extension
links the public with the Uni-
versity of Florida/IFAS's knowl-
edge, research, and resources
to address youth, family, com-
munity, and agricultural needs.
Programs and activities offered
by the extension service are
available to all persons without
regard to race, color, handicap,
sex, religion, or national origin.


Dr Joan Bradshawis
director of Citrus University
ofFlorida/IFAS Citrus County
Extension.


1910. It could be really brought
back to outstanding condition to
display all the unique wood ap-
plications on this machine. I can
send pics if it is of interest? -
AJS.S., Internet
Dear A.J.S.S.: White treadle
sewing machines were pro-
duced in large quantities.
There is no specific collector
interest and very little interest
in the general antiques market-
place. Potential dollar value is
catch-as-catch-can.


John Sikorski has been a pro-
fessional in the antiques busi-
ness for 30 years. He hosts a
call-in radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM) Sat-
urdays from noon to 1 p.m.
Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, PO. Box2513, Ocala
34478 or asksikorski@aol. com.


TO SETTLE ESTATE-FLORAL CITY, FL
Gorgeous oaks and backdrop on Lake Magnolia.
3BR/2BA DW on large lot. Central water.
$37,000 MLS#359133


BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Waterfront 6BR/3BA home on gorgeous 2.63
acres. Fireplace.
$180,000 MLS#700012


LOVE TO ENTERTAIN?
S3 bedrooms with office and sitting area
*2 full baths and 2 half baths
S3857 sqft living for gracious entertaining
' Gorgeous hardwood flooring
*3-car garage + 15'x17'5 craft/workshop
* Pool overlooks the #2 green on Oak golf course
S2 AC/heat units roof new in 2009
* Home warranty for the buyers
#359115 $397,000


Is. _.1...., '.m Ti
DOUBLE SIDED STONE FIREPLACE!
* Unique 3/2/2 custom home
* Open floorplan with tile/laminate flooring
SNew roof 2011 new AC/heat 2011
* Garage floor recently repainted
* Pella dual pane windows for efficiency
* SS french door refrigerator
* Nicely landscaped private lot
* Home warranty for the buyers
#700102 $118,000


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352) 726-2471
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.llcitrusrealty.com After Hours 31302-6714


'- AMERICAN REALTY & INVESTMENTS Fran Perez
-ERA 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 I. '-
R N Office: 352-746-3600 Cell (352) 586-88 A
PODIDIR Ca cell (352) 586-8885 _

GENTLEMAN'S
HORSE FARM
IN DESIRABLE
PINE RIDGE ESTATES
MLS353470
$399,900
4515 W. BONANZA DR., BEVERLY HILLS, FL
For the delight of the horse person, this beautiful 5.7 acre GATED
horse farm comes equipped with a true, mother/daughter pool home
featuring 5/1 bdrms, 3/2 baths, 2/1 garages. Must see to appreciate.
The farm also has a very efficient horse barn w/4 large stalls, plus
separate feed & tack rooms, wash area, 4-board fencing throughout,
4 pastures, 1 acre underground electronic dog containment. Property
also borders on approximately 28 plus miles of horse trails. Home
Warranty provided. Come make this your own.
.11= M ELs^.w' -w~ n


C eAI il TIIrl, @ .A. J.resalehoIIJ.II..IiI







E10 SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013


CLUTTER
Continued from Page E9

Ideally, the space will
also include a work surface
where kids can do home-
work and parents can han-
dle tasks like filling out
permission slips. Many fam-
ilies also include a laptop
or desktop computer for
homework or checking e-
mail. If you have a com-
puter handy, you're more
likely to enter information
digitally and eliminate
paper clutter
Where to put it?
Homes built in the past
few years often come with
what Flynn calls a "bonus
room" with no designated
purpose. These small, spare
rooms work well as a family
organization center, as do
mudrooms.
Atlanta-based designer
Mallory Mathison has
helped clients convert a
pantry or small closet into
an organizational hub. She
suggests removing the doors
to open up the space, then
adding a deep shelf that can
be used as a desktop. Tack
fabric to the underside of
the shelf and hem it just
above the floor, creating


hidden storage space and a
place to tuck a bench or
stool.
Shelves can be added to
the wall above the desktop,
along with a message board
and calendar
If you lack a spare room
or closet, designer Cortney
Novogratz suggests choos-
ing one corner of your
kitchen, since it's a room
the entire family uses daily
Novogratz, co-star of
HGTV's "Home by Novo-
gratz" series, lives in Man-
hattan with her husband
and seven children. She
often works with clients
who have limited space, so
she advises them to use a
single kitchen cabinet as
their organizational hub.
Novogratz suggests lining
the cabinet door with the
calendar and corkboard or
dry-erase board. Then add
small bins on the cabinet
shelves for each family
member's items. A small
laptop can be kept inside
the cabinet and taken out
for use at the kitchen
table.
For additional storage,
she suggests buying a
rolling cart with labeled
drawers where each child
in the family can keep
things like pending work
or art supplies. This can be


wheeled around the kitchen custom
or other rooms as needed. a few i
Novogratz says it helps kids To
stay organized and feel a suggest
sense of ownership over of you
their work when they have a old fu
permanent space for it, even took
if it's just a labeled drawer, bonus
What furniture used
work
do you need? keep
The costliest option is hir- files s
ing a carpenter to install a into a
built-in, custom workstation iber
with a desktop, shelving and using
closed storage. pieces
Flynn suggests a cheaper he say
alternative: Buy two kitchen He
cabinets from a big-box dresse
home improvement store, using
and two pre-fab bookcases. place
Assemble the cabinets, then pendir
the bookcases and stack fitted
them directly on top of the with a
base cabinets. Mount them then b
to the wall and add some and cl
basic molding to the front playro
edges, creating "the look of "Yot


U The Chronicle welcomes tips from
readers about breaking news. Call
the newsroom at 352-563-5660,
and be prepared to give your name,
phone number, and the address of
the news event. To submit story
ideas for feature sections, call 352-
563-5660 and ask for Nancy
Kennedy.


Sbuilt-ins, but for only
hundred bucks."
save even more, he
ts plundering the rest
r home in search of
rniture. "I recently
one hot mess of a
room, which was
for checking e-mail,
ig on art projects and
ig kids' artwork and
tored, then turned it
colorful, designer-cal-
multipurpose space
100 percent leftover
from other rooms,"
s.
placed two old
rs next to each other,
their surfaces as a
to collect mail and
ig paperwork. He out-
the dresser drawers
hanging file system,
brought in an old table
hairs from a child's
om.
Scan make just about


000BOSH


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com


anything work together, as
long as disparate pieces are
united with the proper color
story In my case, I gathered
white, brown, gray and blue
pieces, then set them all
against a fire-engine-red
backdrop."
Another option: If space
is limited, Mathison sug-
gests searching estate sales
(or your own attic) for one
large piece of furniture like
a wooden secretary, which
has a desktop and a mix of
open and closed storage.
Refinish it with several
coats of glossy paint and if
necessary, drill holes in the
back for power cords.
How do you
make it work?
Even the best system
won't work unless you use it.
Flynn says beautiful, bright
colors can help draw you to
your organizational space,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

and successful homework
projects and tests can be
posted alongside your kids'
artwork for added
inspiration.
Plan the space carefully
based on your needs do
older kids need extra space
for doing homework? Are
you juggling lots of appoint-
ments and need to make
your calendar the
centerpiece?
Novogratz suggests hang-
ing up a family calendar and
business calendar together
so you can mark things on
both, and kids can see when
you'll be busy with work
commitments.
If scheduling is key, post
pending items like permis-
sion slips and invitations in
a prominent spot or keep
them in an in-box that you'll
check regularly


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@?myflorida-house .com


A BOATER'S DREAM


ELEGANT MOVE RIGH I iN ME TR E
CUSTOM BUILT HOME BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS!! Sailboat water (no bridges); 240
Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home on a I acre
In the equestrian section of Pine cover lt with mature oak trees and lots feet of seawall; stationary & float
Ridge next to riding trails. Take a of privacy! Very well maintained,new ing dock; spacious modem 3/2.5
Sin iv i to at roof 05/09. Just bring your suitcase and home sits high and dry (never
360' interactive virtual tour at move right in! Community features golf, flooded) on 2 lots. This meticu
www.mypineridgehome.com. tennis,clubhouse, lously maintained property is a
MLS #355468.$410,000 MLS #358397 $169,000 must see! $499,000






IAN ECLECTIC PIECE OF
QUICK TRIP OUT INTO ART THAT HAPPENS TO
THE GULF OF MEXICO! NATURE'S AR A AE
3/3/1 Spanish style home, seawall and BEST KEPT SECRET BE REAL ESTATE!
boat slip on 1 .. .... 1 3/2 5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River This amazing property sits right
to the Crysli i t ....* Oaks East, a gated waterfront community on the water at Lake Tsala
room, fireplace, newer roof and windows; on the Withlacoochee River Apopka! $899,000
great income potential,too! $218,000 For more information please visit
MLS 359564 $220,000 will buy you this peace of heaven! www.eclectic-house .com



It .


CLASSIC AND LIVING ON THE WATER! 4590 WORLDWIDE DR., INVERNESS
CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is Completely updated 3/2 home! New: roof
the right setting for living the Florida 10/12, A/C & e-panel 01/12, windows
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront lifestyle. Open and airy with the 01/11, W/H 2009! Florida room, fenced
estate w/pool and separate apartment. A plantation shutters diffusing the sunlight, backyard, 2 sheds, comer lot, quet
true masterpi ... ,i i.i 190 ft. of seawall gives you plenty of 1 .: :;i. 1 r. .
Lake Tsala ,, I I .-,. i ... room to dock all the water toys ,... i. n . 1 ,
family to move right in! imaginable! . ... ...
000DQX MLS #357471 $425,000 MLS#354435 $489,000 1i $. $68,900





Elt














S To place an ad, call 563-5966



Real Estate Classifieds


Classifieds In Print



and


Online


All


The Time


Fax (352 56-56 1. Tol Free (88 85-24 1 Emil clsiid4hoilo~n~o I 0est:w wcroilol


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 Income Tax Special
$400 + dep.
(352)446-6273
HOMOSASSA
$350-$550 2 bedroom. 1
bath. also 1 bed 1 bath
lovely setting, quiet
park with pool, com-
munity center,1/2 mile
from boat dock,several
available call
(352)628-4441
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Screen Porch
$375mo 1st, Last &
Sec (352) 382-5661
HOMOSASSA
2 Bd, 2 Ba. fully furn.
352-746-0524
HOMOSASSA
2/1, $400/mo.+ util.
1574 S. Iroquois Ave
(352) 503-7562
HOMOSASSA
2/2, 2 Ig porches &
1 carport. $675
(908) 884-3790
HOMOSASSA
3/2, CHA, $650mo,dep
$650 352-503-6747
(352) 628-1928
INVERNESS
Close In, 1 & 2 BR MH
Clean, Quiet & Com-
fortable 352-212-6182
LECANTO
3/2 on 5 acres, 1st, last &
sec. $500. off Cardinal
(352) 628-4482
LECANTO
LEISURE ACRES
3/2 water & garbage incl.
$600mo. (352) 628-5990




BANK
FORECLOSURE
Land-n-Home, 3/2
1500 sq. ft. On 2 Acre,
paved rd. LOOKS
GOOD, Have financing
if needed, only $2,500
down, $381.44mo. P&l
W.A.C. OR $69,900.
Call 352-613-0587
or 352-621-9183

HERNANDO
3BR 2BA MH
Ready to move in !
FHA& Owner Financing
avail. call 352-795-1272


Crystal River 55+ Park.
2BR/1BA Carport &
Screened Porch.
Heat/Air $9,500.
352-746-4648
Ask for Brit
HOME-ON-LAND
3/2 Great Shape.
% Acre. Move In Now
$59,900.
Call 352-401-2979,
352-621-3807
Palm Harbor Homes
New 2013...30x76
4bd/3ba.
$0 Down. $399/Month
800-622-2832 ext 210

REPO'S- REPO'S
REPO'S
WE HAVE REPO'S
CALL 352-621-9181




"CRYSTALRIVER**
3b/2ba den,newer c/h/a
cpt & vinyl, very clean +
bonus RV Hkup. $34.900
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie 352-634-6340
CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice Large 4br 2ba MH
READY TO MOVE IN!
*Owner Fin. Avail.(-
CALL (352) 795-1272
HERNANDO 2/2 DW
On lot, with Shed & Deck
See for yourself at
2562 N. Treasure Pt.
$28,500 obo
352-464-0719
HOMOSASSA
*3/2, Fenced Yard,"
NEW Flooring. NEW AC
$5.000 Down. $435. mo
(352) 476-7077
HOMOSASSA
2ba 1 % ba MH needs
complete rehab. Good
shed, well & septic.
6524 W. Akazian
$12,500 (603) 860-6660




2/2 on Lake Rousseau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent $240/mo.
2003. Used Seasonally
Owner bought a house.
207-546-6115, cell


Adult Park 2/1,
Mobile, heat and air,
nicely furn. large shed,
sreen rm. carport, $8,200
Lot Rent $160 mo.
(352) 287-3729

CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
WINTER SPECIALS *
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
2/2 New Model $59K
2/2 waterfront. $31,000.
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

INGLIS
3/2 Furn., screened porch.
Lot rent $295
Includes amenities.
$15,000(352) 212-8873

INVERNESS
3/2 Furn.,Appl., Ig screen
porch & shed, Great
cond. $16,000. Call for
appt. (352)364-3747

INVERNESS PARK
55+, 14X60, 2/2, new
roof, all appliances, partly
furn. screen room, shed,
352-419-6476

MOBILE HOME, Fully
Furnished. Everything
stays. Just move in. 2
Sheds, washer/dryer all
appliances. Must See!
$7,500. (708) 308-3138

PALM TERRACE
55+ Community,
1997 3BR/2BA 14 x 66,
excel. cond. Shed,
Fl. Rm. Carport & Deck
$16,000. (352) 400-8231

Singing Fores t
FLORAL CITY
14 x 70, Mobile, 2 Irg.
bedrooms, furnished &
remodeled, heat & air,
carport & shed, Wash/
Dryer, Lot rent $176.
$14,500. 352-344-2420

Waterfront/Homosassa
Westwind Village 55+
Beautifully furnished
Move In Ready, 2/2
2 Scrn rms, dbl door,
refrig./Ice maker
Washer Dryer, Low
mntnly payments,
$19000 obo
(850) 449-1811 Cell


HOMOSASSA
Large 3br 2ba MH
Rent to Own
*Ready to Move In *
Owner Financing Avail.
CALL (352) 795-1272







fAcTIONm
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.ilrusCounlyHomeRenlals.con
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
59 S. Tyler (BH).............$550
2/1 large rooms and FL room
8160 N. Duval Dr. (S)... $1,300
3/2/2 pool home, fully furnished
CRYSTAL RIVER
11255W.Bayshore Dr. ((R)..$850
2/2 waterfront condo, unfurnished
9454 W. Wisconsin Ct.. $775
3/2 quiet dead end street
HOMOSASSA
8019 W. Grove St........ $575
2/2 SW mobile on 1.25 Acres
40 Hollyhock Ct. (H)..... $950
3/2/2 Oak Village SMW, spacious home
HERNANDO/INVERNESS
545 Alaska Ln. ((H).....$725
2/2/1 new roof, FL room
854 Prithard Isl. (lnv.)......$800
2/2 Townhouse on waterfrontwith comm pool

















Chassahowitzka
3/2 Waterfront DW, $500
2/2, Fenced Yd DW, $500
2/2, House w/ Gar., $600
Suaarmill Woods
3/2/2, Furnished, $900.
AGENT (352) 382-1000


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL


Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us your vacanthome
and watch us work for you!


3/1 Screen room, fpl...$650
2/1/1 Screen room...$600
3/2/2 Sceeed porch..$800
4/2 On A Canal.......$750


3/2 ..................$650
2/1 ...................$450
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
4 Cheryl Scruggs,
SRealtor-Associate
F 352-726-9010




CRYSTAL RIVER
Studio Apt. Completely
Furn. on Hunter's Sprgs,
sun deck, W/D rm. All util.
incl'd.+ boat dock.
$700/mo. 352-372-0507
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA$400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE
CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments
for Rent 352-465-2985
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, Quiet, Clean .
incld's water, $575 mo.
Homosassa 1/1, incld's
water $375 mo.
Lecanto 2/1, quiet,clean,
scm porch, $525mo.
352-257- 6461, 563-2114


INVERNESS
2 B/R's Available
IKNOLLWOOD I
TOWNHOMES I
Rental Assistance
Available For
Qualified Applicants
Call 352-344-1010 I
S MWF, 8-12 & 1-5 1
307 Washington Ave
Inverness Florida
Equal Housing Opp.


I EOUAL HOUSING I
OPPORTUNITY
L-- ---
INVERNESS
2/1, large rms, W/D h-up.
Tenant pays elec & H20.
$570. Cl John 726-3849




CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE"* Secret Harbour
Apts. Newly remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incl Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037




LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza, Office/
Retail, CR 486, 900 sf. @
$700+ util. & sales tax. 1
mo. Free w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801




CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Condo Furnished,
ground floor, single-story,
carport, heated pool,
no pets. $650.
(352) 746-9880


CITRUS HILLS
2/21 Townhouse
condo, full appliances,
carport, Citrus Hills
membership included
Prudential Florida
Showcase Properties
call 352-476-8136


INVERNESS
2/2/1 Lg Condo
Waterfront Community
with heated pool.
Non-smoker, pet restrict.
$665. mo 317-442-1063
INVERNESS
Nice Waterfront story
Condo 2/2'%.Great loc.
First, last, Sec $700 mo.
Avail 3/13(352) 302-4546




Citrus Springs
2/2/1 $650/mo
352-746-7990
HOMOSASSA
2/2 $500 MO NO
SMOKING & NO PETS
814-566-8708
HOMOSASSA
2/2 $550 mo. incl. garb.
Pets? No smoking. 1st
& sec. 352-212-4981
INVERNESS
2/1, Clean, W/D Hk-up,
No pets, $550mo. + Sec
(352) 220-4818




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1 Country Home on
stilts,w/fenced yard.
$600 + Utilities.
Call 920-922-6800




HOMOSASSA
2 BR, Seasonal, Avail.
Now. 641-660-3312
SUGARMILL WDS
furn, 2/2/1 $675 mnth
River Links Realty
352-628-1616




CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
Water Incl. CHA, $496.
352-220-2447 212-2051


A NICE HOME IN
THE HAMMOCKS
SMW 3/2/2
Heat. S Pool, FP
maint free. $1,000
(352) 422-1933
BLACK DIAMOND
Newer 3/2/2 $1,150 Bob
@ Coldwell Banker
352-634-4286
Cit.Hills/Brentwood
2/2/2 on golf course.
Club included $900/mo
516-991-5747
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/2 $750. mo + sec.
850-371-1568
HERNANDO
2 bedroom. 2 bath single
family home with garage,
screened patio, & com-
munity pool/clubhouse
privileges. $875/month,
980-285-8125
HOMOSASSA
2/1 Duplex, $475;
3/2/2 House $635.
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 house, $700.
River Links Realty
352-628-1616
Invern. Highlands
2/2/1, City Water Excel.
Loc. $675. 352-860-2554
INVERNESS
2/1 Great Location, 55+
community, Bring boat &
fishing gear. $695
(352) 344-1380
INVERNESS
3/2/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352- 601-2615 OR
352-201-9427
INVERNESS
Lakefront Patio Home
maint.free 2BD. 2BA w/
Den. Move In Ready.
$900 mo. Karen Morton
JW Morton Real Estate
Century 21
352) 212-7595


RIVER HAVEN
Unfurn. Villa 2/2/2 +
Den & Dock on Grand
Canal $1,000 mo 1st,
last, sec. 1 yr. Ise min.
good credit Req. Lawn
serve. Incld Call Bill
(727) 381-1975




BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV & W/D
WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611

INVERNESS
Rm w/ Priv. ba, $85. wk
no smoke 352-502-6302




FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1 Furn.
$950. 352-419-4421




CRYSTAL RIVER
Warehouse for Rent
Free standing garage
area 1.440sf $100-$550
352-634-0129





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RFL4 X"
REALTY ONE


MOTIVATED SELLER


wants this aone!
6 Acres w Big SHOP,
n Nice 2/2/2 House,
porches Barns, pond,
pvd rd, Concrete
HERNANDO drive. Reduced!
Affordable Rentals $ 114, 900 MLS 357108.
Watson's Fish Camp www.crosslandrealty.
(352)726-2225 com 352 726 6644


SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 Ell


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ESTATE SALE in Nature
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site and a separate gated
storage lot; plus almost
new 5th-wheel with
slides, screened gazebo,
and storage building. All
for $79,900. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441


From mobiles to
mansions,
From Gulf to Lakes,
give me a call,
I sell 'em all!
352-422-4137
nancv.wilsonia
yahoo.com
Nancy J. Wilson
Realtor
Broker-Associate
SRESOGRI
Waybright Real Estate,
Inc.


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EOUA HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Look

Quiet Country Setting
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area
only 20 Min. to Ocala
$129,900 Call
352-302-6784 for appt.


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial






A
Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


OPEN HOUSE
Sunday 13, 2-4PM
5322 Riverside Drive
Yankeetown
Nancy Little Lewis
Realtor
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 302-6082











CITRUS

SPRINGS
3/2/2, 2 yr old Pool home
in imacculate condition,
Landscaped backyard.
$125.000 Priced to sell!
CALL (570) 412-5194



PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room for
everything! 4/3 % w/7 car
garage/workshop & in-law
suite on 5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164



Beverly Hills 3 bedroom.
1 bath. OWNER FIN.
W/$5000 DN $822mo
NO CREDIT CK Just
remodeled,new roof, tile,
block, w/sep. 2car garage
(352) 793-7223




CITRUS HILLS
GOLF COURSE HOME
3/3/2+ $173K.
BYAPPT ONLY
(216) 849-3447


Real Estate
For Sale


HERNANDO
Citrus Hills Pool Home
4/3/2+, circular drive,
1 acre lot, below $200k
352-527-7856





ARBOR LAKES
**OPEN HOUSE**
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR &
fenced backyard!
Gated Comm. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista Trl
(352) 419-7418




INVERNESS
Block home 2br, 1ba
w/ 2porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres.
$130,000 Call Buzz
352-341-0224 or
David 607-539-7872





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

W Ord
REALTY ONE

PERFECT for Ass. Liv.
Fac. 4BR/4BA, on 2.2
Tranquil Acres, blocks
from Lake Rosseau
Plantation Realty
Charlene Pilgrim,
Realtor 352-464-2215





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

GRAND 2006
CUSTOM HOME
www.81woodfield.
CanBYours.com
81 Woodfield,
Homosassa
OPEN HOUSE Sat & Sun
11AM to 3PM
3 Bed/2 Bath/3 Car Gar
Salt Water Pool & More!
$339K, MLS#356914
Realty Connect
(352) 212-1446
OWNER SACRIFICE
$100,000. 4 yrs. Ago,
*Selling for $29.900*
CALL 352-564-0207
Forest View/Gated 55+

The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty,
Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


.- -





#4 Employment
u I source is...


HOMOSASSA SPRINGS






2/2/2 Great Country
home on 2 % acre
landscaped lot, in great
neighborhood. Move in
Ready! Call for appt.
126K 352-503-6511





412/3 HEATED POOL
lots of extras!
SELLER MOTIVATED!
reduced to 210k
352-688-6500 or
352-212-5023


rn6~


HAPPY 2013!
I'm Selling
2 PROPERTIES
A WEEK
I NEED LISTINGS!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515


GAIL STEARNS
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298
Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available


"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com




"Heatherwood 581"
access to game reserve
& Tillus Hill, 2.42 Acres
well, septic, no impact
fees, $30,000 by
owner, sold as is
(352) 422-0435
% ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact fee
credit, high and dry,
trees, $11,000 obo
(352) 795-3710


Citrus Coun '
Homes ty


Home o Finder

www.chroniclehomefinder.com


Fikd Your Drvrw* Home

Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.ch roniclehomefinder.com


DUNNELLON
Here is that home on
Lake Rousseau that you
have always wanted! 2br
1 % ba on 1.43 acres
w/168ft lake frontage.
Completely remodeled all
new interior & windows.
No Flood Insurance!
Priced reduced from
$369,000 to $169,000
Call Bernie
(352) 563-0116


E12 SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013


Citrus Counw
Homes


Owner Financing
5 ACRES FLORAL CITY
Pasture Land
9858 S. Istachatta Rd
2012 Taxes $115 w/
Agricultural Greenbelt,
Water/Elec/Barn/fence
$89K. MLS#354831
Realty Connect
(352) 212-1446










Twe







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E7

looming. Any suggestions?
FYI: I don't need to make
whipped cream, so the obvi-
ous suggestion is out. -
Libby Canada
Dear Libby: You can make
butter (shake it in a glass jar),
add it to cream soups, or
make salad dressing, Alfredo
sauce, mashed potatoes,
scrambled eggs and more.
You can freeze it, too. Use a
pastry bag with a large tip
and place dollops or spoon-
drop mounds of it onto a wax-
paper-lined or parchment-
paper-lined cookie sheet and
place in the freezer Once it's
frozen, transfer it to an air-
tight storage container and
place back in the freezer Use
it within two months. You


can't whip it after freezing,
but you can use it in other
recipes. It also works well for
hot cocoa.
Here's a recipe for five-
ingredient ice cream, too:
1/2 cup cold milk.
1 tablespoon vanilla
extract.
1 14-ounce can sweet-
ened condensed milk.
1/8 teaspoon salt.
E 1 pint heavy cream.
In a medium bowl, stir to-
gether cold milk, vanilla,
condensed milk and salt.
Set aside. In a large bowl,
beat heavy cream with an
electric mixer until stiff
peaks form. Fold milk mix-
ture into whipped cream.
Pour into shallow 2-quart
dish, cover and freeze for 4
hours, stirring once after 2
hours or when edges start to
harden. Serve or store in an
airtight container up to 10


days. Q.M., Massachusetts
Dear Sara: I've heard cof-
fee grounds can be reused
to make additional pots of
coffee. Any tips? I heard it
was best to refrigerate the
old grounds as soon as the
pot is done brewing, to pre-
vent mold. What ratio of
new grinds to old grinds
(plus water) do you use?


I do reuse coffee. I imme-
diately remove the carafe
from the burner when the
coffee is fresh. Whatever is
not immediately consumed
is allowed to cool to room
temperature before refrig-
erating. This coffee is either
reheated in the microwave
until piping hot to be drunk,
or it is used to make iced


Yes, you can reuse coffee grounds
if you want to. This probably isn't
an appealing idea to some people,
but if you don't mind the taste, go
ahead. Some people don't like
the taste; it can be bitter because
the good flavor has already been
extracted.


coffee drinks. Stacey,
Pennsylvania
Dear Stacey: Yes, you can
reuse coffee grounds if you
want to. This probably isn't
an appealing idea to some
people, but if you don't mind
the taste, go ahead. Some
people don't like the taste; it
can be bitter because the
good flavor has already been
extracted. Regarding the
ratio, you'll have to experi-
ment. You might find top-
ping it off with one extra
scoop of fresh coffee
grounds is enough, but
someone else might want to
add more scoops to get the
flavor where they want it. If
the flavor is weak, you can
combine it with hot cocoa
and make a thrifty mocha.
Reusing the grounds in a
French press might work
best, and I would reuse them
as quickly as possible (back-


REALTY GROUP
REALTY GROUP


SHpea Te
& Brnwo Resle


Terra vista Realty Group, LLG
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703
BILL DFCKFR 352-464-0647 SUSAN MULL FN 352-422-2133 V


Office in the
Terra Vista
Welcome Center
'ITORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777


"Jl.



TH 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 3.5 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
e Maintenance free 3/2/2vlla Open floor Come and see this really nice custom Windward on the 5th hole of Skyview
Third bedroom can Golf Course P tl...., t I. rooms boast their own full baths The expanded
on cul-de-sac Only lanai ha: .. i I .I .i I . ... ... . ..... ...... r
MLS 359725 $114,900 kitchen i .. ,. i i .,,i,,. ,I . i I$ 225.000
0-2 I Igf 11M11 *l 1i|Hh Sf*Ng l V Wii


SINGLE FAMILY


VILLA 3 BED, 2
exceptional Eleqant r


SIDE VILLAS
Terra Vista This

$339.000


'HOME 3 BED, 3 BATH, 5 CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH


SIDEE SOUTH SINGLE FAMILY HOME 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2 CAR HILLSIDE SOUTH
Elegant, immaculate with a fabulous panoramic view Don't miss this 3/3/2 DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
home on the Skyview Golf Course of . i I ,,I, ,hI I I i I ,i i I I 11 i I l i 1 1 1 I
spa w/spllway custom glass double . I .. 1 ,I . ,, ,, 1 1 I 11 I .. ... .. . ,
-- ri.; .,i.t.r- ,p.-ir-,.d d .. hi. t- tith pull outs, decorative painting Ighting I I .. 1 11 I .
5199,000 i. .i. i $376,500 ... i 1 I 189,900


Term .- 6 oth r .M.re


DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS THIS LOVELY 2 BEDROOM + DEN HOME features an extended lanai S
ully Furnished 2/2/2 Detached Villa in Terra Vista Beautifully decorated Enjoy Immaculate unfurnished home in the Community of Brentwood Open floor plan with an inground spa Open floor plan with tile and carpet Located on a cul de
maintenance free living so you can relax Open Great room, makes for a sunny 11. 1 1 1 .... I ..... 1 1.1.. .. 1. . I .. .1 ii.b sac in the desirable community of Terra Vista Social Membership Included Furn
itmnsnhepr Neltral cnlnrs thrnlinhniit #293R $1.500 I l..I. i..i... .... .1 11 % 1.100 41 1.300 mas


tENTWOOD TOWNHOME, 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR
Townhome in Brentwood for rent Nice 2/Bd with 2 1/2 baths Kin
nomeswith the Citrus Hlls Snial Club Membershn #1190 $1.00


SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 E13

to-back brewing). I'm a bit of
a coffee snob, so I recom-
mend reusing the grounds in
other ways, such as sprin-
kling them in your garden.
You can freeze your brewed
coffee in an ice-cube tray to
use later, too. If you find that
you are refrigerating a lot of
leftover coffee, you could
cold-brew it in a French
press instead (let it set for 24
hours in the press).


Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (www
frugalvillage.com), a
website that offers practi-
cal, money-savingstrate-
gies for everyday living To
send tips, comments or
questions, write to Sara
Noel, c/o Universal Uclick,
1130 Walnut St., Kansas
City MO 64106, or email
sara@frugalvillage. com.


"--N







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A look at weeping



yaupon hollies


here are 17 species of holly na-
tive to the eastern United States
from New England south to
Florida, west to Texas and north to
Minnesota. None occur naturally in
the western U.S. There are three gen-
era in the Aquifoliaceae
family, with about 400
species. Florida hollies are
members of the Ilex genus,
which contains about 350
species globally Rarely, a
holly might have a few bi-
sexual flowers mixed
among male staminate or
female pistillate flowers on
separate dioecious plants.
Both have tiny, whitish Jane
flowers around May in cen- JAN
tral Florida. Female flow-
ers must be pollinated by GAR
male pollen to set fruit
Many hollies are evergreen, others
deciduous. Some are shrubs under 4
feet tall, a few are large shrubs up to
15 feet, others small trees up to 30 feet
American Holly, I. opaca, which grows
in Florida, and Mountain Holly, I.
Montana, growing from West Virginia
to as far south as the mountains of
Georgia, are the only two large trees
over 30 feet tall.
The most popular hollies used in
Florida gardens are varieties of
shrubby native Yaupon Holly, Ilex
vomitoria, Zones 7-10, 12-7. Yaupon
grows naturally on Florida's coastal
plain north to Virginia and along the
Gulf coast to Texas. Small, evergreen
leaves are medium green, bluntly
toothed on the edges, less than 1.5
inches long and half as wide. Yaupons
in wetter locations have larger leaves.
Xeric, dry, sunny sites induce tinier
leaves. Yaupon is salt-tolerant, tough,
wind resistant, drought-tolerant, has
several attractive shapes and requires

OPEN HOUSE SAT & SUN 11AM-3PM




81 Woodfield. Homosassa
US19 to US98 (W. Ponce De Leon Blvd.) (L) Oak Park Blvd.
(L) Corckwood Blvd. (R) Woodfield Cir.
www.81woodfield.CanBYours.com
2006 CUSTOM BUILT/HOME
3 Bedrm/2 bath/3 car gar /salt water pool.
Many custom options! MLS#356914
Realty Connect (352) 212-1446
www.thefloridadream.com


I


little maintenance once established.
The natural sparse, rangy shrub is
abundant in its habitat but has little
place in a cultivated garden. Weeping
yaupon, sold as I. v pendulaa," is an
upright tree form reaching 20 to 25
feet tall, useful to accent
corners of buildings, line
and shade driveways, ac-
cent a lawn and be a back-
drop to a hedge. Weeping
yaupons are cloned from fe-
male plants originating
from one selected variety of
a naturally occurring sport
found almost a century ago.
If fertilized, weeping
Veber yaupon will bear thousands
E'S of small, round fleshy fruits
or drupes enclosing several
DEN seeds contained in hard
stony shells (pyrenes).
Ripening bright red in time for the
winter holidays, the fruit is important
bird food, a favorite of migratory
robins and mockingbirds.
I planted one weeping yaupon
among existing forest plants in a
wildlife corridor along the east prop-
erty line of my lot. A second is planted
to shade the air conditioner and house
walls on the west side of the house. A
semicircle of dwarf male "Schillings"
Holly, I v "Schillings," form an arc of
hedge plants around the eastern
weeper That tree is full of ripe fruit
and birds the west plant has no
berries, although both are identical
clones planted 2.5 years ago.
The fruitless tree is in a raised foun-
dation bed of well-amended sandy soil


Versatile uses for vinegar


SUSAN MELGREN
Mother Earth Living

A staple in any pantry, vine-
gar is a multitasking wonder
with a rich history of use for
everything from making pick-
les to treating war wounds.
The ancient Babylonians used
it to preserve food; medics
during World War I treated
wounds with it; and Roman
armies diluted it with water to
create an everyday antibacter-
ial drink. Today, versatile vine-
gar is still widely used in food
preservation, but its household
uses extend well beyond pick-
ling. Thanks to its acidity and
neutralizing properties, vine-
gar can clean, disinfect, soften,
shine and more. Use it from
the kitchen to the bathroom, in
everything from homemade
cleaners to hair rinses, to take
full advantage of this humble
household wonder
1. Grease Cutter: Vinegar's
acidity lets it cut through
grease with ease. Dip a sponge
in vinegar and wipe to de-
grease stovetops, microwaves,
dirty dishes and more.
2. Disinfectant: A natural an-
tibacterial, vinegar makes a
great base for any nontoxic
cleaning solution. For an all-
purpose disinfecting solution,
dilute 1 part vinegar in 4 parts
water and use anywhere germs
are found, such as countertops,
keyboards, shared phones,
doorknobs and remote
controls.


See JANE/Page E15


Move-In Condition
Exceptionally maintained 3/2/2 home located in Quail Run.
Recently renovated kitchen and bathrooms. Newer AC and roof.
Tile flooring in living areas. Beautifully landscaped and fenced
yard. Near clubhouse, pool and tennis courts. See it today!
MLS #358872 $84,900
Directions: North Lecanto Hwy. to Quail Run
entrance, home is on left.
Alan DeMichael 352-613-5752
Jeanne Gaskill 352-476-5582
a "AMERICAN O .0.004
ERA REALTY & INVESTMENTS 352-746-3600


0 CitrusCounty






WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
For a FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
S $8.6 million already closed by Dec. 31, 2012
Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
S( To Learm More r
.... (352) 746-9924


3. Toilet Bowl Cleaner:
Clean, disinfect and deodorize
your toilet by pouring 1 cup of
vinegar around the inside of
the bowl. Let sit for an hour,
use a brush to remove rings,
then flush.
4. Drain Cleaner: To keep
drains clog-free, pour 1/2 cup
of baking soda down the drain,
then follow with 1/2 cup of
vinegar. Wait for foaming to
subside, then follow with a gal-
lon of boiling water If neces-
sary, remove hair and other
debris with a wire. Repeat if
drain is still slow.
5. Glass Cleaner: For a
streak-free shine, combine 2
cups water, 1/4 cup vinegar and
1/2 teaspoon liquid dish soap
in a spray bottle. Spritz onto
mirrors, then wipe down with
old newspapers.
6. Residue Remover: Clean
the glue residue that labels
and stickers leave behind by
wiping the sticky surface with
a rag dipped in a vinegar-water
solution.
7. Hair Rinse: Shampoos
and other hair products can
leave behind residue, making
hair lackluster Remove
buildup by diluting 2 table-
spoons vinegar and 2 table-
spoons lemon juice in 3 cups
water and mixing well. After
shampooing, pour rinse over
hair before rinsing with water
The vinegar will close the cuti-
cle and leave hair soft and
shiny
8. Furniture Polish: Combine


1/4 cup olive oil, 4 tablespoons
vinegar and 2 teaspoons lemon
juice in a spray bottle. Shake
well before use, and refriger-
ate any leftover solution to
keep it from going rancid.
9. Stain Remover: Purge
grass stains and blood spots by
whipping up your own natural
stain remover Mix 1/2 cup
white vinegar, 1/4 cup baking
soda and 3 cups water in a
spray bottle. Just spray on the
stain and toss clothing into the
laundry!
10. Laundry Softener: Con-
ventional fabric softener stays
in clothing, where a buildup
can cause irritation, but vine-
gar breaks down and dissolves
detergents. For softer clothes,
towels and sheets, just add 1/2
cup of vinegar to the rinse
cycle.
11. Dandruff Preventive:
Vinegar's acidity can help kill
some of the bacteria responsi-
ble for causing dandruff. Rins-
ing with vinegar can also
deep-clean the scalp and help
remove flakes of dead skin
cells. For a no-dandruff rinse,
mix 1/2 cup vinegar, 1/2 cup
fresh mint leaves (or 1 table-
spoon dried leaves) and 1 cup
boiling water Let the mixture
cool to room temperature,
strain, then pour over scalp
after shampooing. Rinse treat-
ment from hair with water
12. Wart Killer: To remove
unsightly warts, dip a cotton

See VINEGAR/Page E15


BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM HOMES THROUGHOUT THE NATURE COAST


Sugarmill Woods
Pine Ridge
Citrus Hills
Waterfront


COME SEE OUR MODELS!



B-EST
wst Of Citrus
I Inc. rainr
HOMEBUILDER CBC049056 Fac
Hwy. 19, 42 miles south of Homosassa Springs. 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd.
352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


r~i2
ci- -3-


E14 SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VINEGAR
Continued from Page E14

ball in vinegar, place over wart and se-
cure with a bandage. Change the cot-
ton ball daily The acid in vinegar will
eat away at the wart over time. (Be
sure to keep the skin around the wart
moisturized.)
13. Breath Freshener: Eliminate
bad breath by rinsing with 2 table-
spoons vinegar and 1 tablespoon salt
diluted in 1 cup water This rinse is es-
pecially effective at removing onion
and garlic odors.
14. Paintbrush Softener: Make stiff
paintbrushes useful again by dipping
hardened bristles in a bowl of vinegar
for an hour or less. Rinse the bristles
with warm water and soap, then let
dry before using.
15. Greens Reviver: Leafy greens


JANE
Continued from Page E14

separated from the house by a 2-inch
wide barrier of pure local limerock.
The limerock leaches alkalinity
straight down into the underlying
sand. Subterranean termites and bur-
rowing insects avoid this natural bar-
rier. No insects lure predators like
frogs, toads, lizards, skinks or snakes.
They stay out in the circling garden
beds.
The weeping yaupon has no pollen
in the female flowers. It is 6 feet from
the limerock but is naturally adaptable
to both acid and adjacent alkali soil in
its natural ecosystem. The difference
is the distance from the 'Schillings'
male pollen. The lack of pollen, no
flowering plants in this bed and thou-
sands of flowers elsewhere in the gar-


looking wilted? Soak them in a bath of
2 cups cold water and 1/2 teaspoon
vinegar to bring them back to life.
16. EggAid: When hard-boiling eggs,
add 1 tablespoon of vinegar to the
water to prevent egg white from seep-
ing out of cracks in the shell.
17. Rust Remover: Revive rusted
nuts, bolts, nails or tools by soaking
them in a bath of pure vinegar for
several hours. If the solution be-
comes cloudy, change the vinegar.
After soaking, wipe away rust with a
cloth.
Excerpted from Mother Earth Liv-
ing, a national magazine thatprovides
practical ideas, inspiring examples
and expert opinions about healthy
beautiful homes and lifestyles. To
read more articles from Mother Earth
Living, please visit wwwMother
EarthLiving.com or call 800-340-5846
to subscribe. Copyright2012 by Ogden
Publications Inc.

den attract pollinators elsewhere.
(The 16-foot retaining wall is not
built. A 4-foot wide stone path and
steps are roughed in below the future
wall. Outward irrigation covers the
fire break lawn surrounding the block
home.The weeping yaupon needs a
"Shillings" mate for fertilization. Gar-
dens are works in progress.)

Jane Weber is a professional
gardener and consultant. Semi-
retired, she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors are welcome to
her Dunnellon, Marion County
garden. For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or email JWe-
ber12385@gmail.com.

Chronicle photographers will con-
sider requests to take photos of
community events. Call 352-563-
5660 for details.


MEET AND GREET
* Clubs are invited to submit information about regular meetings for publication on the Com-
munity page each weekday. Include the name of the organization, the time, day and place of
the meeting, whether it meets weekly, biweekly or monthly, and whom to call for details.
* E-mail to community@chronicleonline.com. Include "Club Meetings" in the subject line.


... '1 -
IDS JEALOUS W/ENVY! Bank Owned GOLF COURSE 3/2.5/2 Pool home w/2929 living in Sugar
174,900! New Roof/Paint/Flooring....#358335.30 Pine St. Kim Fuller 352-212-5752.


CONGRATULATIONS

I KARIS GEISTFELD

2012 Sales Associate
of the Year!
We're so pleased to recognize Karis. As successful as she is as a Sales Associate,
she's an even better person. By putting the needs and desires of her clients first
she consistently exceeds their expectations, and that in turn has led to a
loyal following of satisfied customers.
Thank you Karis for all you do here at the Villages of Citrus Hills.
Congratulations from us all.
i5t- VrLGS Sll CHIP Realty INC.
00DOPIitrus Is Ucensed Brokerage Agency


q ",w1 --Jtvv v> _--' '
Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 SAD SAD HOME seeking TLC and buyer with imagination!
m Fullr 3 2125752 3/1 with 1064 living for $29,900! 7916 Miss Maggie Dr
im Fuller, 352-212-5752 #359413. Km Fuller 352-212-5752. 1


SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013 E15









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A QUIET COUNTRY ROAD

hII jl'. l nlrrl r. a,:JnIl ,:IJ I 1, .a .... a l l.J,:Jrlolln .



l.iI,' H ,II| .,11 I ii,,,,.I, 1. 111 I -It
rill =:....I NEWLY PRICED AT 545,000
and Itadv loi immEdialt occupancy
Call Tim Donovan 220 0328


FA FIVhF.IFl.j)Nl I LI-F
I i :l ,I,'" I Il1-rl,,,,i
l al.l a.l, j l,,loll


MI 5 i / $395,000
1I'1I'1., cilIuscount sold. con
Jeanne Wllaid Pickiel 212 3410


* .Fa. I,.il,. vll.,a
* P .IVATI h.ail. I.... I

* N WVV A I. ,l il.i.A ia. : .h 1'1.:.l
=/11:1111i. $115,000
Jeanne Pickiel 212 3410
Irir'r. CiliusCountrSold. com


24+ ACRE HORSE FARM IN CITRA

l, .. : l : ..h i li .:.>1 d / p .i ll.. ,l i
.l I I I M i l h Ih ld :.i l .i i l I o i H i ll ." 'I
Mi = 3'i,,.1 ASKING $295,000
Call NVancy Jenks 352 4008072


DEMII-b.LUUEU Z. AI;IUNb WIl nt I UW



.jl .l lly I: .' 11 .I P1 ii lly I n) I l : .

Mi = ilii:i.Ix PRICED TO SELL S53,900
Pat Davs 352.212 7280.
Vieir hlstmng. irrsi''. c21paidaias. corn


OPEN WATERFRONT n ii- Ti.ii


Mi__, = ,. ASKING $119,900
Call Jim Motion at 3524222173
to iiew the potential ol this beautiful
iateliont propel Iy'


GREAT LOCATION
Iil:.1 ] I .. I1 'l jll 1 ll I.,.1 l ll. l h

H umlll ,.,i l,,:d ,. ,,,J,',d II,,: I l,,iv.',l .,,, J, I,, .' I,
H ,,H,,: l ,,,,l ; l,,, h, ,,,g .,,' ; ,,:Jl h ,ll. ',:l lJi'i,

Ml = 'i-' ASKING $79,000
Call Maitha Snyder at 4768727


FLORAL CITY $24,900

i.].ili: Hi ll .C ,an I/26 66.65 i, ,i
ni il:i N ,: : |.1i A ll i ,,II I T i I MN = = '- 'l: l llll h ,
dilda Cano 726 6668


HOT LOT... COOL PRICE!
YOU MUST DRIVE BY THIS LOT
TO APPRECIATE IT!
i- cii iHI o, il .i u bI..:Jii il 'i fi : h i. ,,I
P .ll i ,ir i l li iI* \. .,.i,, |1.. Ih : .li l l'll:l l,,Il
'.J fi: in. ... t .I il .l I i i *,ull ijl Ild

lI'M = 3":.'3. $20,000
Maull n Booth 637 4904


ROOM TO S-P-R-E-A-D OUT
5 4WRES HOIESI/ I ESTATE SALE!
1hI I1,,, h hl i ,,,, lh,,, I '6. 1 . 'II h i ill l,: h l

IrI .- ASKING 239.900l 'ild I, I 'I II
Pit DV -s ,3252'212 7280 1...ll i.. $78,500 i I .11,i
Ir.i .sin,, ,1,1d1 lpgdLL,.. m Call Doris Mine ,' 352 422 4627


WATERFRONT MOBILES
1VW V .. a l..il ,:, ,IV_, $44,000
S rIVV i: l..l ic i Aih i $48,000
Ask lot Willaid Pickiel Cell 201 9871


.i ,il 1 ..ll l i . Jlllri. i l..l .. a i..Il ll '.. I iI 1

111 11w .j a' .i al J.jl.. .: .j ri l. i. .I 1.o .Jll
:Jla j. a 1, aJl l ,J .. f ...i laJ h I..
MIn5 = /ii11/ ASKING $89,900
C.aI J1m MAfhMen 4?? ?17 /r e.ur prf r~sIn.i turf


" a, Ij~il'l 'i.1a
All aiLL.' al.-.

Mi'. = 3~i.I $90,000
Jeanne or Irll/aid Pickiel 212 3410
wiri'ir. CrtrusCountrSold, corn


HAS IT ALL!




$274,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


BRENTWOOD POOL HOME

l.l i, ll. :l l s ,: l , ,i .l l ll
.i :,:Jhllu l ,l!! I 0 M ,:I N .il 1: .llh ll
Ml = 3I_"3')' $123,900
loaiame 0 Regan 586 0075


hI ; I.. ' l.h 1 l ..l :.. i. .I-" ,..d h ,J..
l ll, I ] ,lnj iii: i Allli l h 66111 Ill pplhjl.,J i J ;
; II lol l j I. v 1. ..,:J llo. l i l h l l l. 10 11 min ; I nd

.pC',i,.l:.il, %li, .ill]h $77,600
Call Ruth Fiederick 1352 5636866








A FINE HOME IN PERFECT CONDITION
: I : ir 1- II I.ll.T j Ti.i T ml r I -ll I I. (I :
.r ...), ,, II I.- ,,,,II,,,,,,,,,,, I
. ......... ......
..I,,, ,, I ..... .. .j .I j. j .I..I

r"i.: ='-,. ASKING $398.900
Pt Dli,s ,352'212 7280
I..-i hli s ng .1.1.1 i ;paI d?,i icom


THREE BEDROOM, TWO BATH
CITRUS SPRINGS BEAUTY
Fl'fll.lIv ll,[ 1ni 1,,[ llI: .li.lll. i q ij l
Mt 5 = 3i':: $109,900
Call Isaac Baylon lot your personal
tout 352 697 2493


r I


E16 SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2013


- FN