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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 01-12-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02998

Full Text



Rivalry: Pirates pummel Panthers on hardwood /B 10 CAR


TODAY C IT R U-S NT Y UNDER

morning 199mo.
G82 EI SeerageCmO
82 Morning fog. Partly,, J l,, ,I0
LOW cloudy and warm. VILLAGE TOYOTA
57 PAGE A4 CRYSTAL RIVER
www.chronicleonline.com


JANUARY 12, 2013


Florida's Best Community l Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


VOLUME 118 ISSUE 158


New look for
stocks page
coming Tuesday
The Chronicle is updat-
ing the design of its stocks
page beginning with Tues-
day's publication.
The new design will in-
clude 10-day trends for
the S&P 500 and the
NASDAQ; daily recaps of
the major markets; the
top 42 stocks of local in-
terest; daily recaps of in-
terest rates; daily recaps
of commodities and the
top 25 mutual funds. Ad-
ditionally, readers will be
informed of news events
about the major compa-
nies being traded. The in-
formation is contained in
a condensed format and
is designed for ease of
use.


Revitalizing CR


County commissioner and city at odds over plan for downtown redevelopment


1. Pavilion
2. Trailhead
3. Restrooms
4. Wetlands
5. Existing parking area
6. Performance stage


7. Shade structures
8. Event lawn
9. Proposed parking area
10. Wall mural
11. Landmark sign


NATION & WORLD:


Afghanistan
President Hamid Karzai
meets with President
Barack Obama on
Friday to discuss Afghan
policy./Page A10
WALL STREET:
Improved
Stocks gain for
a second
straight week
as company
earnings reports
started to come
in./Page A7


Going digital
Hollywood is helping
small theaters switch to
digital./Page A5
INSIDE:
Armed school
A school district in Ohio
is arming four
employees./Page A5

STATE & LOCAL:
Chamber talk
The CEO
of
Tampa
Interna-
tional
Airport
talks to
local
business
leaders during the
Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce's
installation of
officers./Page A3



Com ics .......... C8
Community .......C6
Crossword ........ C7
Editorial ......... A8
Entertainment . . .B6
Horoscope ........ B6
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies .......... .C8
Obituaries ....... .A5
Classifieds ....... .C9
TV Listings ....... C7


6 84178 2002! 5U I


Special to the Chronicle
This rendering depicts what the lot on the corner of Citrus Avenue and U.S. 19 will look like after it is developed, according to a proposal by County
Commissioner Dennis Damato.


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
The author of a Crystal River
revitalization plan intended to
forge better ties between county
and city leaders, feels misunder-
stood and befuddled by some of
the negative reaction to his offer
to help enhance a community he
loves.
County Commissioner Dennis
Damato said his "Partnership for a
New Beginning" plan for the city is
the only "comprehensive" docu-
ment out there meant to help
transform what he calls a blighted
community into an inviting locale
for business and residents.
"I should be praised for my ini-
tiative. I should not be pummeled
for wanting to take the lead to im-
prove Crystal River and create a
situation where the city and
county leaders are working to-
gether in partnership for the best
interest of the people of the
county," Damato said.


* The Crystal River City
Council will discuss County
Commissioner Dennis
Damato's revitalization plan
for the city at its next
meeting, 7 p.m. Monday,
Jan. 14, and schedule a
workshop about the issue for
Feb. 18.
To view Damato's plan in its
entirety, go to www.bocc.
citrus.fl.us/events/cr redev_
concept.pdf.
Copies of the city's vision
plan are available at Crystal
River City Hall.

"Don't shoot the messenger.
Someone has to take the lead and
do what is right. I am willing to do
that. I know I can be a little dif-
ferent, a little aggressive in the
way I do things, but that is just
me. I like to see things get done
and all I am trying to do is help."
Damato's plan, which was un-
veiled last month, has drawn


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
This privately owned lot at the corner of U.S. 19 and Citrus Avenue is
vacant but has been identified as an area of interest in County
Commissioner Dennis Damato's vision for downtown Crystal River.


heavy criticism from city leaders
who variously accuse him of "bor-
rowing" concepts from their plan
and for failure to consult them
before springing it on them.
"The way to do it would have


been for him to come to us and
say 'I have these ideas and I think
they could help the city,' "Mayor
Jim Farley said.
See PLAN/Page A2


Flu season puts businesses in a bind


their employers
fore, the Centers for Disease Con-
trol and Prevention said Friday.
The only states without widespread
flu were California, Mississippi and
Hawaii. And the main strain of the
virus circulating tends to make
See FLU/PageA2


early and hard across the U.S. is
putting businesses and employees
alike in a bind. In this shaky econ-
omy, manyAmericans are reluctant
to call in sick, something that can
backfire for their employers.
Flu was widespread in 47 states
last week, up from 41 the week be-


TPO starts Hernando


MPO merger


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer


Bob Clifford, director of the Tampa
Bay Area Regional Transportation
Authority (TBARTA).
Clifford reported to the board
that research determined the TPO
should seek to merge with the Her-
nando County Metropolitan Plan-
ning Organization (MPO) for
regional representation to the
Florida Department of Transporta-
tion (FDOT). Clifford had consid-
ered the MPOs in other adjacent
counties, but presented Hernando
County as the best option.
See TPO/Page A2


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Nearly half
the 70 employees at a Ford dealer-
ship in Clarksville, Ind., have been
out sick at some point in the past
month. It didn't have to be that way,
the boss said.


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Either par-
ents and students don't care they
may be transferring from Lecanto
High to Crystal River High School
next year, or they don't know about
it.
District officials are banking on
the latter.
The first of two community open-
house format meetings Thursday
night to provide information about
the rezoning attracted only a
few parents, leading officials to


"If people had stayed home in the
first place, a lot of times that spread
wouldn't have happened," said
Marty Book, a vice president at Car-
riage Ford. "But people really want
to get out and do their jobs, and
sometimes that's a detriment."
The flu season that has struck


* The next community rezoning
open house is from 6 to
Q .. .- Tk ...... ,.4 _l_ -.7 n.


p.m. nThurE
Citrus Sprin
To view map
mation about
online to ww
look under d
"planning ar
development
that depart

conclude they r
out more direct


saay, i-eb. at With some expression of misgiv-
gs Middle School. ings, the county's group that over-
Ds and more infor- sees road plans agreed Thursday
ut the rezoning, go to reach out for a merger deal with
vw.citrus.kl2.fl.us, its larger neighbor to the south.
departments for "I don't want to see us get short-
nd growth changed," said Inverness City
t" and then go to Council member Marti Consuegra
ment's website. at a regular meeting of the Citrus
County Transportation Planning
ieed to get the word Organization (TPO) board. Her
tly comments were in reaction to a
See SCH PageA2 presentation by TPO's consultant


Some workers' reluctance to call in sick could backfire for


School district reaching


out to rezoning parents





A2 SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013


PLAN
Continued from Page Al

"But now we have a plan
from him that has a lot of
the things in our 2008 vision
plan that we are already
doing or are planning to do,"
Farley added.
In a letter to the Chroni-
cle earlier this month, City
Manager Andy Houston
noted projects undertaken
by the city as a result of the
2008 plan included the
South Citrus streetscape,
the development of a master
plan for Hunters Spring
Park, the acquisition of ad-
ditional public parking to
support the South
Citrus/Riverwalk area, the
installation of wayfaring sig-
nage in the downtown area,
the continued improvement
of King's Bay Park, the im-
plementation of "mixed-
use" land use within the
Community Redevelopment
Agency (CRA) District and
along the U.S. 19 business
corridor, the ongoing explo-
ration of the feasibility of a
marina in the downtown
area, and improved "walka-
bility" within the downtown



FLU
Continued from Page Al

people sicker than usual.
Blake Fleetwood, presi-
dent of Cook Travel in New
York, says his agency is op-
erating with less than 40
percent of its full-time staff
because of the flu and other
ailments.
"The people here are
working longer hours and it
puts a lot of strain on every-
one," Fleetwood says. "You
don't know whether to ask
people with the flu to come
in or not." He says the flu is
also taking its toll on busi-
ness as customers cancel
their travel plans: "People
are getting the flu and



TPO
Continued from Page Al

As a result of 2010 U.S.
Census data, Citrus
County's TPO must take on
the higher MPO status for
future transportation
planning. However, FDOT
advised it would urge Cit-
rus to join an existing
MPO rather than seek its
own standalone MPO as
the state already has so
many of them that it
makes regional planning
cumbersome.
Following his presentation
about merging with Her-
nando MPO, Clifford sought
approval from the TPO board
to send two letters to further
engage negotiations. One let-
ter to FDOT Secretary
Ananth Prasad expressed in-
tent to merge with Hernando
MPO, while the second to
Hernando MPO offered to



SCHOOL
Continued from Page Al

Thursday's open house oc-
curred just two days after
school board members gave
their tentative approval to
the rezoning, which will
move about 160 students in
the Citrus Springs-Pine
Ridge area from Lecanto
High to Crystal River High
next year
Chuck Dixon, director of
planning and growth man-
agement for the school dis-
trict, recommended the
rezoning because the
CRHS entrance has moved
to Turkey Oak Drive, mak-
ing it closer to students in
the affected area than
LHS.
There is also a significant
student population differ-
ence between the two
schools. Lecanto High, the


district's largest school, has
1,745 students. Crystal River
High has 1,250 students.
Incoming LHS seniors
and those in the Art Acad-
emy or International Bac-
calaureate program would
be exempt from the rezon-
ing. It would include stu-
dents who are now
eighth-graders at Citrus
Springs Middle School.
Most of the rezoned area
is north of North Citrus
Springs Boulevard and west
of Elkcam Boulevard.
Dixon said he will provide
letters next week regarding
the rezoning to the three
schools affected to send


area through the installa-
tion of additional sidewalks.
Damato is a member of
the Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners
(BOCC) and his district in-
cludes Crystal River
His plan involves devel-
opment in three districts:
downtown/historical, town
center and resort.
Damato said he created
the plan with the aid of
County Administrator Brad
Thorpe and county staff. He
spent about $1,200 of his
own money to have a land-
scape architect draw ren-
derings of his concepts and
turned it into a booklet.
Damato, who owns busi-
nesses in the city, said he
developed the plan because
the city did not have one.
While Damato admits to
studying the city's vision
statement, he doesn't think
that document is a plan.
"It is a vision. What I pro-
duced was a comprehensive
plan with real conceptual
drawings of what can be
done to make the city an at-
tractive place for businesses.
My plan has a vision and
master plan together and in-
volves all sectors of the city,
including a town center


they're reduced to a snivel-
ing little mess and don't feel
like going anywhere."
Many workers go to the of-
fice even when they're sick
because they are worried
about losing their jobs, says
John Challenger, CEO of
Challenger, Gray & Christ-
mas, an employer consult-
ing firm. Other employees
report for work out of finan-
cial necessity, since roughly
40 percent of U.S. workers
don't get paid if they are out
sick. Some simply have a
strong work ethic and feel
obligated to show up.
Flu season typically costs
employers $10.4 billion for
hospitalization and doctor's
office visits, according to the
CDC. That does not include
the costs of lost productivity


start discussions.
"Both counties are geo-
graphically within FDOT
District 7, members of
TBARTA, part of the Tampa
Bay economic and media
organizations/markets, part
of the Nature Coast, growing
in population and employ-
ment, share major
north/south transportation
routes and are reasonably
close in demographic
makeup," Clifford wrote to
Hernando MPO. "Addition-
ally, we believe the eco-
nomic opportunities and
benefits of merging, such as
combining of local re-
sources and speaking as one
larger voice for state, fed-
eral and private resources
and funding, could be an en-
hanced opportunity."
Clifford wrote to Prasad:
"Citrus TPO, Hernando
MPO and FDOT District 7
staffs have begun the coor-
dination process toward
creation of a joint MPO. The


home with students. He said
letters will include black-
and-white copies of the
maps, along with website
addresses to find more
information.
He said the letters are
going to more than 3,000 stu-
dents, even those not in the
affected area. Dixon said
he's doing that to make sure
no one is accidentally
missed.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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along U.S. 19," Damato said.
He would like to see the town
center create multi-level
spaces for both residential
living and businesses. He
proposes an elevated board-
walk for Cutler Spur Boule-
vard from the proposed town
center to downtown.
"I also identified ways to
pay for these projects. I
came up with something
that has an end to it," he
said.
By Damato's estimation,
nearly $20 million in water-
related projects are either
under way or in the works in
the city and $2.2 million in
CRA funds will be available.
"While I think the city's
proposed Riverwalk project
(estimated to cost $1 million)
should be built, the rest of
that money plus impact fee
money ($350,000) can be used
to purchase and build a park
at the corner of Citrus Av-
enue and U.S. 19," he said.
The park Damato pro-
poses will include an "event
center" which could be used
for musical performances.
Houston said while it is
true about the water projects
and the CRA funds, all those
moneys are project specific
and can't be used otherwise.


"The remainder of the
CRA money is earmarked
for other projects, yes, we
could have a discussion
about that, but other than
that he is not talking about
any new money The only
new money I am aware of is
the $350,000 in impact fees,"
Houston said.
Farley dismissed the no-
tion of having a perform-
ance venue at the proposed
Citrus Avenue-U.S. 19 park,
saying it will be too noisy
and that the city is building
a bandshell at King's Bay
Park for musical events.
He also doesn't relish the
notion of having big build-
ings near residential
neighborhoods.
"We do not want to look
like New Port Richey on
U.S. 19," Farley said.
Houston said the city
went through a meticulous
process of workshops, sur-
veys and citizen input to
generate its plan in 2008.
"He (Damato) never
asked for our input when he
came up with his plan,"
Houston said.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


Flu season typically costs employers
$10.4 billion for hospitalization and
doctor's office visits.


from absences.
At Carriage Ford, Book
says the company plans to
make flu shots mandatory
for all employees.
Linda Doyle, CEO of the
Northcrest Community re-
tirement home in Ames,
Iowa, says the company took
that step this year for its 120
employees, providing the
shots at no cost. It is also
supplying face masks for all
staff.
And no one is expected to
come into work if sick, she
said.


Hernando County MPO will
consider this option at the
organization's regular meet-
ing of Jan. 22.
Consuegra sought assur-
ances during the board's
discussion about the pro-
posed merger
"Being closer to Tampa,
the development, the
funding and the spending
of money would better suit
them (Hernando MPO)
right now than would suit
us," Consuegra said.
"We're not to that point of
development with our
population."
Consuegra said Hernando
County had long been devel-
oping its own interests such
as its airport and industrial
area that had no connection
with the interests of Citrus
County, which is working on
its own projects.
"We're in baby steps right
now," Consuegra said. "I
don't want to see us get
shortchanged in any way."


So far, the company hasn't
seen an outbreak of flu
cases.
"You keep your fingers
crossed and hope it contin-
ues this way," Doyle says.
"You see the news and it's
frightening. We just want to
make sure that we're doing
everything possible to keep
everyone healthy Cleanli-
ness is really the key to it.
Washing your hands. Wash,
wash, wash."
Among other steps em-
ployers can take to reduce
the spread of the flu on the


Clifford said these issues
would be addressed during
future negotiations.
"What you are telling me
then is let's take a step and
see what happens," Consue-
gra replied.
Clifford responded that
FDOT was "strongly" en-
couraging that no new
MPOs be created, but that
TPOs join with existing
MPOs. Of the three adjoin-
ing MPOs Ocala-Marion,
Lake-Sumter and Hernando
County, the latter "makes
the most sense."
Consuegra still was con-
cerned that Citrus County's
needs could be "shelved"
because Hernando County
would have greater traffic
movement necessities.
"I don't want to see our
projects put aside because
you've got to do Hernando
County first because of
the population," Consuegra
said.
Clifford said project fund-


AE
WO ,T M



DRP.YSHDSSHTTR
ala..- S.


Special to the Chronicle
This map shows the boundaries of the three areas of
development in Crystal River being targeted by a plan put
forth by Commissioner Dennis Damato.


job: holding meetings via
conference calls, staggering
shifts so that fewer people
are on the job at the same
time, and avoiding hand-
shaking.
Newspaper editor Rob
Blackwell said he had taken
only two sick days in the last
two years before coming
down with the flu and then
pneumonia in the past two
weeks. He missed several
days the first week of Janu-
ary and has been working
from home the past week.
"I kept trying to push my-
self to get back to work be-
cause, generally speaking,
when I'm sick I just push
through it," says Blackwell,
the Washington bureau
chief for the daily trade
paper American Banker.


ing would not work that way
because the combined MPO
would have to develop pri-
orities for FDOT funding
requests. He said the
process worked well for
other combined MPOs, most
of which are joint county
MPOs.
"I want to be clear so you
understand. There are
going to be times when the
No. 1 priority is going to be
in Hernando County," Clif-
ford said. "And when that
project's done, the No. 1 pri-
ority may be in Citrus
County."
With prioritized projects,
Clifford explained, many as-
signments would be ongoing
simultaneously at different
stages of completion, rather


Connecticut is the only
state that requires some
businesses to pay employ-
ees when they are out sick.
Cities such as San Francisco
and Washington have simi-
lar laws.
Challenger and others
said attitudes are changing,
and many companies are re-
thinking their sick policies
to avoid officewide out-
breaks of the flu and other
infectious diseases.
"I think companies are
waking up to the fact right
now that you might get a lit-
tle bit of gain from a person
coming into work sick, but
especially when you have
an epidemic, if 10 or 20 peo-
ple then get sick, in fact
you've lost productivity,"
Challenger said.


than a top project being
completed before the next
could start.
"The other thing FDOT is
required to do is they have a
fair share analysis," Clifford
said. "There is a formula
that they have to ensure that
counties are receiving their
fair share so that it's not all
in one county as opposed to
another county."
By a motion proposed by
County Commission Chair-
man Joe Meek and sec-
onded by Commissioner
Dennis Damato, the TPO
unanimously agreed to send
the letters.
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online. com or 352-564-2916


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Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am


Beverly Hills
3775 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills
(352) 746-0600


Inverness
308 S. Line Ave.
Inverness
(352) 344-5511


Homosassa
4363 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa Springs
(352) 503-2011


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Page A3 -SATURDAY, JANUARY 12,2013



TATE&


County BRIEFS

Americans United
to meet Tuesday
Americans United for Sep-
aration of Church and State
(Nature Coast Chapter)
will meet at 4 p.m. Tuesday,
Jan. 15, at the Lakes Region
Library, 1511 Druid Road,
Inverness.
Sidney Rose, president of
the chapter, will give a talk on
"Piety & Politics" written by
the Rev. Barry Lynn, execu-
tive director of Americans
United for Separation of
Church and State.
The public is welcome to
attend. For information, call
Sidney Rose at 352-344-
9211 or email naturecoastau
@hotmail.com.
Free Christmas
tree disposal
Citrus County Central
Landfill is offering free Christ-
mas tree disposal during
January.
Trees must be cleaned of
all decorations, tinsel, lights
and must not have artificial
snow.
For more information on
landfill hours, call 352-527-
7670 during office hours or
go to the county's website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us. Click
on departments, then Public
Works, then Solid Waste.
Library to honor
Florida history
The Friends of the A.F.
Knotts Public Library invites
the public to an afternoon of
exploration in honor of the
500 years of European in-
volvement in "La Florida" on
Monday, Jan. 21.
As one of the first women
to arrive in La Florida in 1528,
Maria Velasquez Con-
quistradora accompanied her
husband on the Panfilo de
Narvaez Expedition.
Narvaez brought with him
about 600 people to start his
colony. Ten of those people
were women.
Dressed in era clothing,
Maria portrayed by Eliza-
beth Neily of the First Florida
Frontiers will describe her
voyage and her arrival in the
New World.
The 2 p.m. program will be
preceded by the Friends an-
nual meeting at 1:30 p.m.
All are welcome with no
admission charge.
Veterans offered
services in Ocala


Workforce Connection Vet-
erans Services is hosting the
first area-wide Homeless Vet-
eran Stand Down in Ocala in
collaboration with other vet-
eran and organizational
groups to provide services
and resources to area home-
less veterans and their
families.
The event is set from 10
a.m. until 2 p.m. Saturday,
Jan. 19, at the Florida Army
National Guard Armory at
900 S.W. 20th St., Ocala.
Call 352-732-1700 and ask
for a veterans representative
for information.
-From staff reports


Clarification

A statement made by In-
verness Mayor Bob Plaisted
in a story on Page Al of
Thursday's edition, "Inver-
ness council vents about park
funds," needs clarification.
The $1.8 million the city con-
tributes to the county general
fund comes from the taxes
collected from city residents
and businesses.
Plaisted added in a tele-
phone interview Friday that
on top of that amount, Inver-
ness residents contribute in
taxes to help fund transporta-
tion, library, fire, crossing
guard and health department
services, plus more than
$700,000 to the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office.
"We're not getting our bang
for our buck from the county,"
he said.
MEN
Readers can alert The
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles by
mailing newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or by
calling 352-563-5660.


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Some
of Florida's share of a na-
tional $25 billion settlement
with five of the nation's
largest mortgage lenders is
finally going to start being
spent.
But it's unclear how im-
mediate and how wide of an
effect the money will have
in one of the states hardest
hit by the foreclosure crisis
and the recession.
A legislative panel next
week is expected to sign off
on spending $60 million -
or the first portion of $334
million Florida received di-
rectly under the settlement.
This is money going directly
to state government and is


Annual event to

awardprizes for hats

Special to the Chronicle
The 15th annual Key Training Center
Fashion Show and Tea will be from 2 to 4
p.m. Sunday, Feb. 10.
Spring fashions will be presented by
Belk Department Store, in addition to the
parade of fashions from the Key Thrift
Stores modeled by Key Center clients.
The setting will be an afternoon tea at the
Chet Cole Life Enrichment Center, 5521
W Buster Whitton Way, Lecanto campus.
All guests are asked to wear their own fa-
vorite hat, in competition for one of the spe-
cial prizes to be presented: most beautiful,


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Mortgage money put to use


nearly double what is now
provided for the program.
David Westcott, director
of homeownership pro-
grams for the organization,
said the program is "market
driven" and there isn't a
backlog of people seeking
help. He said it is likely it
would take more than a year
to spend the money
"We are not turning peo-
ple away now," Westcott
said.
He stressed, however, that
the money could wind up
helping people purchase
previously foreclosed
homes or homes in a short
sale, which is where a bank
agrees to a sale that wipes
out any remaining
mortgage.
Another $10 million will
go to the Florida Housing
Finance Corporation to pay
for a foreclosure counseling
program modeled after a


federally funded program
that was launched in 2007. A
spokeswoman for the corpo-
ration said the program
links counselors with home-
owners in areas already ex-
periencing high foreclosure
rates.
The national settlement
was announced in February
2011, but the state's share
remained in escrow for
months because Bondi and
state legislators disagreed
over who had authority to
spend it. The money could
not be released without
Bondi's approval since her
office helped negotiate it.
But legislators pointed out
the attorney general cannot
spend money without leg-
islative approval.
Both sides reached a deal
that results in $74 million of
the total $334 million going
straight into the state's main
budget account where law-


makers can use it any way
they want.
After next week, $200 mil-
lion will be left. The full
Legislature is expected to
approve spending that por-
tion during the upcoming
2013 session. Bondi and leg-
islative leaders have said
possible uses of these funds
include foreclosure preven-
tion, neighborhood revital-
ization, affordable housing,
homebuyer or renter assis-
tance, legal assistance,
counseling and other hous-
ing-related programs.
Other states have already
been spending settlement
money on everything from
demolishing vacant fore-
closed homes to paying for
mediation programs to help
borrowers stay in their
homes.
Some states, however,
have used some of the
money to plug budget gaps.


separate from an estimated
$8 billion also expected to
go to help homeowners and
borrowers in the state.
Under a deal worked out
between Attorney General
Pam Bondi and legislative
leaders, the $60 million will
be used to help first-time
homebuyers, provide coun-
seling to homeowners deal-
ing with foreclosure and
default, and help the state's
court system deal with fore-
closure cases.
More than half of the
money $35 million will
go to a program run by the
Florida Housing Financing
Corporation to assist first-
time homebuyers, including
providing them with down
payment assistance. That's


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Circuit Court Judge Patricia Thomas, left, installed Friday the 2013 Citrus County Chamber of Commerce officers at a chamber luncheon in
Citrus Hills. They are, second from left, Bill Winkel, past chairman; John Murphy, chairman; Don Taylor, chairman elect; and Rob Wardlow,
treasurer.



Chamber installs new officers


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
CITRUS HILLS The Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce kicked off the new
year with the installation of officers and an
inside look at Tampa International Airport
At its monthly luncheon Friday, Circuit
Court Judge Patricia Thomas swore in the
2013 officers. John Murphy is the new chair-
man of the board of directors, Don Taylor is
chairman-elect and Rob Wardlow is
treasurer
Murphy is director of circulation for Citrus
County Chronicle. He took the reins from out-
going chairman Bill Winkel of Winkel Con-
struction, who handed over the gavel.
Prior to the ceremony, guest speaker Joe
Lopano, CEO of Tampa International Airport,
brought the audience up to date on airport
revenues, the master plan, passenger loads
and efforts to increase international travel.
He said passenger volume has been down
since 2007 (19 million) and was at 16.6 million
for 2012.


"Our object is to stabilize growth and grow to add flights to Sao Paulo, Brazil; Frankfurt,
revenue," Lopano said. "We want to Germany; Panama City, Panama; Bo-
grow revenue with fewer gota, Colombia; and island destina-
passengers." tions. They want to fill in gaps in
He explained they want to keep domestic service with nonstop flights
costs low for airlines, making Tampa to the West Coast.
more attractive. It currently costs He said the terminal has been un-
$4.99 per enplanement (cost per pas- dergoing improvements and it can be
senger) at Tampa, compared to $18 in expanded without building a new
Miami. one.
"We keep ourselves focused on "We can take the airport from 57 to
costs," he said. As a result, he said, Joe Lopano 75 gates without replacing the termi-
Tampa has been able to attract two CEO of Tampa nal," he said.
new flights to Puerto Rico and in- International He outlined future plans for re-
state service to Gainesville, Jack- Aitrporte m mote parking, service facilities and
sonville and West Palm Beach by related jobs, improved processing for
Silver Airlines. international passengers, and


But Lopano was most excited about the
new nonstop service from Tampa to Zurich.
"Our population, including Citrus County, is
greater than Orlando," Lopano said. "We saw
the market interest and now have a flight to
Zurich."
Tampa also has new service to Cuba, which
he is said is doing very well. They now hope


thanked Citrus County for its support
Chamber members were also informed by
store manager Tom Cooper the new Walmart,
at county roads 491 and 486 in Lecanto, will
open Jan. 23.
Contact Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty at
352-564-2924 or pfaherty@chronicle
online. com.


State BRIEFS


Flights from Tampa
to Cuba scaled back
TAMPA- There will be fewer
flights to Cuba departing from
Tampa International Airport.
ABC Charters is ending its
flights from Tampa to Holguin in
eastern Cuba as of Feb. 28.
In addition, XAEL Charters
Inc. will discontinue its Tampa to
Havana flight and relocate to
Fort Lauderdale.
Weekly flights to Cuba's capi-
tal will still be available each
Wednesday, Saturday and Sun-
day. Prices for those flights may
increase as a result of the other
flight closures.
Flights between Tampa and
Cuba began for the first time in
nearly 50 years in 2011.
Tampa International spokes-
woman Janet Zink said it is natu-
ral to see some adjustments as


the market evolves and more
cities begin offering Cuba flights.
Gator found in cage
in Clearwater
CLEARWATER Police and
code enforcement officers re-
sponding to a complaint discov-
ered dozens of animals -
including an alligator in a cage
and tortoises in the swimming
pool at a home in Clearwater.
Officials found the critters
Thursday.
Besides the gator and tor-
toises, animals found at the
home included chickens, roost-
ers and a pig.
Clearwater public safety
spokeswoman Elizabeth Watts
said the owners of the home
could face city ordinance viola-
tions and a misdemeanor charge
for possessing the alligator.
-From wire reports


most creative and best table presentation.
Refreshments will be provided by
dessert table sponsors local organiza-
tions that will prepare cookies, cakes,
pies and candies, along with a coffee and
tea bar offering a wide variety of flavored
beverages.
Musical entertainment will be pro-
vided by Sally Adams, playing favorites
from all eras on her keyboard.
There will also be a silent auction of-
fering unique items for bid, including
bed-and-breakfast getaways, jewelry, art-
work and collectibles.
Tickets are $30, or $25 for those wear-
ing a hat. There will be a "buffet" of hats
that can be rented, as well.
All proceeds go directly to support of
the Key Training Center
For more information or purchase tick-
ets, call 352-795-5541, ext. 311.


Florida to spend $60 million

from banks settlement


Put on thinking caps

for Key fashion show Feb. 10






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
DUI arrest
Andrea Bolden, 55, of
South Fillmore Street, Beverly
Hills, at 8:23 p.m. Thursday on
misdemeanor charges of driv-
ing under the influence and op-
erating a vehicle without a valid
driver's license. According to
her arrest affidavit, she was ar-
rested following a crash involv-
ing a Citrus County Sheriff's
Office patrol vehicle at Beverly
Hills Boulevard and North Tyler
Street. She told a law enforce-
ment officer she had stopped
at the stop sign at the intersec-
tion and did not see any other
vehicles when she looked for
oncoming traffic. Then she at-
tempted to make a left turn and
struck the patrol vehicle. She
admitted to consuming at least
two beers. She refused to sub-
mit to a test of her breath.
Bond $650.
Wynn Smith, 45, of Otis
Allen Road, Zephyrhills, at 2:27
p.m. Thursday on a Citrus
County warrant for driving
under the influence. Bond
$5,000.
Other arrests
Michelle Cochran, 40, of
South Lima Avenue, Ho-
mosassa, at 7:29 a.m. Thurs-
day on a misdemeanor charge
of disorderly intoxication. Bond
$150.
Ashley Philpott, 32, of
Harbinger Road, Spring Hill, at
11:11 a.m. Thursday on a Cit-
rus County warrant for violation
of probation on an original
felony charge of grand theft.
No bond.
Brandon Harder, 27, of
North Chameleon Point, Crys-
tal River, at 12:20 p.m. Thurs-
day on a Citrus County warrant
for violation of probation on two
original felony charges of
grand theft and original felony


charges of dealing in stolen
property and providing false in-
formation to a pawnbroker. No
bond.
Devin Denoncourt, 20, of
County Road 439, Lake Pana-
soffkee, at 2:38 p.m. Thursday
on a Citrus County warrant for
failure to appear in court for
two original felony charges of
burglary to an unoccupied
structure and an original felony
charge of grand theft. No bond.
Larry Miles Jr., 36, of
North Brynner Pass Terrace,
Beverly Hills, at 4:50 p.m.
Thursday on Citrus County
warrants for violation of proba-
tion on an original felony
charge of possession of co-
caine and original misde-
meanor charges of operating a
motor vehicle without a valid li-
cense, attached tag not as-
signed and petit theft. No bond.
Jeremy Mills, 29, of
Southwest 210 Avenue, Dun-
nellon, at 6:48 p.m. Thursday
on a felony charge of selling,
manufacturing or delivering a
controlled substance or pos-
session of a controlled sub-
stance with intent to sell,
manufacture or deliver. He was
released on his own
recognizance.
Bobby Metz II, 44, of
Northeast 2nd Street, Crystal
River, at 8:41 p.m. Thursday
on a misdemeanor of trespass-
ing in a structure or con-
veyance after warning. Bond
$250.
Kharess Harrison, 34, of
Herald Drive, Leesburg, at 10
p.m. Thursday on a Citrus County
warrant for original felony charge
of possession of cocaine and
possession of a weapon by a
convicted felon and original mis-
demeanor charges of possession
of less than 20 grams of cannabis
and driving while license sus-
pended or revoked. No bond.


Burglaries
A residential burglary was
reported at 2:50 p.m. Thurs-
day, Jan. 10, in the 10300
block of W. War Horse Point,
Crystal River.
SA vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 3:01 p.m. Jan. 10 in
the 5100 block of S. Isabel Ter-
race, Homosassa.
M A residential burglary was
reported at 7:03 p.m. Jan. 10 in
the 400 block of S. Washington
St., Beverly Hills.
Thefts
A petit theft was reported
at 11:37 a.m. Thursday, Jan.
10, in the 6700 block of W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River.
A grand theft was reported
at 1:10 p.m. Jan. 10 in the 400
block of N.E. 11th St., Crystal
River.
A petit theft was reported
at 6:18 p.m. Jan. 10 in the
2800 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
A grand theft was reported
at 8:22 p.m. Jan. 10 in the
6500 block of W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
A grand theft was reported


at 12:27 a.m. Friday, Jan. 11, in
the 1400 block of N. U.S. 41,
Inverness.
M A petit theft was reported
at 1:11 a.m. Jan. 11 in the
4900 block of W. Meadow St.,
Homosassa.
Vandalism
SA vandalism was reported
at 2:02 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 10,
in the 1900 block of N. Lecanto
Highway.


ON THE NET
For more information
about arrests made by
the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the Public
Information link, then
on Arrest Reports.
Also under Public In-
formation on the CCSO
website, click on Crime
Mapping for a view of
where each type of
crime occurs in Citrus
County. Click on
Offense Reports to see
lists of burglary, theft
and vandalism.


Man accused of



raping two girls


AMANDA MIMS
Correspondent

An Inverness man was ar-
rested Wednesday after two
women accused him of rap-
ing them when they were
children.
Joshua Allender,
now 35, is facing
charges of sexual
battery on a person cg,
under 12, sexual '
battery on a person
under 18 and sexual :
battery on a person
12 or older using jos
force. Alle
His accusers, now
20 and 22 years old, told in-
vestigators Allender force-
fully had sex with them. One
of the women said Allender
attempted to have sex with
her when she was 9 years
old, and Allender gave her
Xanax on a regular basis,
she reported. She alleged
he started giving her alcohol
when she was 11 and he


began molesting and raping
her "too many times to
count." She said she was too
afraid to report the abuse.
Allender denied raping
her but told an investigator
he took drugs and drank al-
cohol around that time.
The other ac-
cuser told authori-
ties she was 15
0* years old when Al-
lender, then 28,
raped her. She said
she had been at his
house and woke up
3hua to Allender raping
under her. The victim said
she, Allender and a
witness had been drinking
and taking Xanax. She
claimed Allender choked
her when she attempted to
stop him. Allender said he
had sex with the alleged
victim one time, according
to a report.
Allender was taken to the
Citrus County Detention Fa-
cility and held without bond.


Legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle





SFictitious Name Notices......................C16


Lien Notices..........................................C16





iib Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices........C16


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


F'cast
s
s
s
s
s

pc
s
s
5
PC


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
s
s
s
pc
s
s
s
s
s


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southeast winds around 10 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a light chop. Mostly sunny skies
today.


5 62 000 86 62 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exusive daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 82 Low: 57
AM fog; partly cloudy and warm

SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 81 Low: 55
AM fog; partly cloudy and warm

I MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
.'..... High: 81 Low: 53
AM fog; partly cloudy and warm

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 85R/60
Record 84/19
Normal 70/42
Mean temp. 73
Departure from mean +17
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00 in.
Total for the month trace
Total for the year trace
Normal for the year 1.03 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 5
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.17 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 49
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, Maple, Elm
Today's count: 8.9/12
Sunday's count: 11
Monday's count: 10.5
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
1/12 SATURDAY 5:39 11:21 6:08 -
1/13 SUNDAY 6:38 12:25 7:05 12:52
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


0
JAN. 26


FEB. 3


SUNSET TONIGHT ............................5:53 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:25 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY 7:51A.M.
MOONSET TODAY............................ 7:11 P.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 5:13 a/1:19 a 6:52 p/2:09 p
Crystal River** 3:34 a/11:31 a 5:13 p/11:28 p
Withlacoochee* 1:21 a/9:19 a 3:00 p/9:16 p
Homosassa*** 4:23 a/12:18 a 6:02 p/1:08 p


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
6:02 a/2:06 a 7:26 p/2:49 p
4:23 a/12:11 p 5:47 p/--
2:10 a/9:59 a 3:34 p/10:02 p
5:12 a/1:05 a 6:36 p/1:48 p


Gulf water
temperature


71O
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder NA NA 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando NA NA 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness NA NA 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City NA NA 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydroloaical Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


21 .09
31
46 .52
61 .08
27 .08
36
32 .06
9 .29
63 .32
24 .03
31
34 .08
19 .01
55
54 .22
48 .03
42 .34
41 .31
43 .56
57
43 .39
17
46
17 .07
36 .02
36 .72
40
54 .86
30 .35
22 .03
44
45 1.07
61 .05
31
43
45
55 .69
53
38 .29
34 .02
63
58 .04
61 .06


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 75 64 .03 pc 76 64
New York City 43 37 .05 pc 55 43
Norfolk 59 36 .03 pc 70 52
Oklahoma City 70 45 s 45 24
Omaha 53 36 pc 24 10
Palm Springs 56 38 s 54 32
Philadelphia 50 34 .21 pc 60 45
Phoenix 54 41 s 48 30
Pittsburgh 54 39 .30 c 62 52
Portland, ME 36 19 sh 43 38
Portland, Ore 40 30 pc 40 29
Providence, R.I. 39 26 sh 48 38
Raleigh 51 41 .22 fg 73 56
Rapid City 34 12 .12 pc 14 -4
Reno 32 25 .01 pc 30 14
Rochester, NY 46 34 .12 pc 57 47
Sacramento 50 26 s 51 31
St. Louis 64 50 pc 56 29
St. Ste. Marie 37 34 .29 pc 45 24
Salt Lake City 24 22 .07 sn 17 1
San Antonio 70 41 ts 72 41
San Diego 54 44 s 57 39
San Francisco 51 44 s 50 37
Savannah 75 55 trace pc 77 58
Seattle 37 27 pc 38 27
Spokane 31 20 .01 pc 23 11
Syracuse 42 27 .19 pc 52 43
Topeka 60 46 pc 35 19
Washington 46 38 .01 pc 58 50
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 86 Punta Gorda, Fla. LOW -9 Bryce
Canyon, Utah
WORLD CITIES
SATURDAY Lisbon 58/50/sh
CITY H/L/SKY London 43/32/sh
Acapulco 89/72/pc Madrid 50/36/sh
Amsterdam 32/24/pc Mexico City 72/45/pc
Athens 60/41/pc Montreal 39/36/c
Beijing 39/16/pc Moscow 21/14/pc
Berlin 29/21/sf Paris 41/38/sh
Bermuda 64/61/c Rio 86/72/ts
Cairo 61/51/c Rome 51/47/pc
Calgary 14/6/pc Sydney 102/70/pc
Havana 83/68/pc Tokyo 46/36/s
Hong Kong 57/54/pc Toronto 49/32/pc
Jerusalem 48/37/c Warsaw 24/15/sf


C I T R U S.


C U N TY -


For the RECORD


CHRONICLE
Florida's Best Communlty Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
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residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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Where to find us:
I- IMeadowcrest
44s office
Sa.. ill Bru nt H. v 1624 N.
Dunkerlield Meadowcrest
Dunker e fl-Cannondale Dr Blvd.
IA M dCrystal River,
A "1 \ ,Madowrei FL 34429
N 1:1 :

I Inverness
Courthouse office
Tom pkins St. q a 1 .square
0 106 W. Main
S 41 44 Inverness, FL
34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ... .............. ................................................. P publisher, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ....................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rno ld .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trista Stokes....................................... ............. Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ....................... Mike Arnold, 564-2930
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JAN.18


I-


A4 SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013


LOCAL


A





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries

Jon
Freling, 58
HERNANDO
Jon B. Freling, 58, of
Hernando, Fla., died
Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013, at
Citrus Memorial Hospital,
Inverness. Private arrange-
ments by Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with
Crematory, Inverness.

Richard
Meehan, 68
INVERNESS
Richard K Meehan, 68, of
Inverness, Fla., passed away
Dec. 24, 2012. Mass of the
Resurrection will take place
at 11 a.m., Saturday,
Jan. 12, 2013, at Our Lady of
Grace Catholic Church in
Beverly Hills. Brown
Funeral Home & Crematory
in charge of arrangements.

Jeanne
Weihs, 79
BEVERLY HILLS
The Service of
Remembrance for Jeanne
E. Weihs, age 79, of Beverly
Hills, Florida, will be held
4:30 PM, Sunday, January
13, 2013 at the
Beverly Hills Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes
with Father Avelino Garcia
officiating. Cremation will
be under the direction of
Hooper Crematory,
Inverness, Florida. The
family will receive friends
from 2:30 PM until the time
of service Sunday at the
chapel. The family requests
expressions of sympathy
take the form of memorial
donations to Hospice of
Citrus County, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464. Online condolences
may be sent to the family at
www. H o o p e r Funeral
Home.com.
Jeanne was born June 20,
1933 in Manhattan, NY,
daughter of the late George
and Mary (Fiala) Weihs. She
died January 10, 2013 in
Lecanto, FL. She worked as
an office manager for a
medical supply company
and moved to Beverly Hills
from Brewster, NY 23 years
ago. She was a very strong
woman who overcame a lot
of adversity in life. She
loved her home, playing
Bingo and enjoyed being a
volunteer Ms. Weihs was a
member of the Lions Club
and Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church, Beverly
Hills.
Survivors include her
son, Michael Pietropaolo of
Livingston Manor, NY,
daughter, Deborah Oliveri
and son-in-law, Peter of
Brewster, NY, 3 grand-
children, and 2 great grand-
children.





Leslie
Snapp, 61
INVERNESS
Leslie A. Snapp, 61,
Inverness, died Jan. 10,
2013, under Hospice of
Citrus County care. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory is in charge of
private arrangements.


OBITUARIES
The Citrus County Chron-
icle's policy permits
both free and paid obit-
uaries.
Obituaries must be
submitted by the fu-
neral home or society
in charge of arrange-
ments.
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.


* If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are in-
cluded, this will be des-
ignated as a paid
obituary and a cost es-
timate provided to the
sender.
* A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S. mili-
tary. (Please note this
service when submit-
ting a free obituary.)
* Additionally, all obituar-
ies will be posted online
at www.chronicleonline
.com.


SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013 A5


Microsoft misses chance


Software company scales back presence at consumer electronics show in Vegas


Associated Press

LAS VEGAS Microsoft may
have relinquished its starring role
in America's gaudiest gadget show
a year too early
After 13 straight years in the
spotlight, Microsoft's decision to
scale back its presence at this
week's International CES deprived
the software maker of a prime op-
portunity to explain and promote a
new generation of redesigned com-
puters running its radically re-
made Windows operating system.
The missed chance comes at a
time when Microsoft Corp. could
use a bully pulpit to counter per-
ceptions that Windows 8 isn't com-
pelling enough to turn the
technological tide away from
smartphones and tablets running
software made by Apple Inc. and
Google Inc.
"They needed to be at this show
in a very big way to show the
progress they have made and what
is it about 2013 that is going to make
consumers really gravitate toward
a Windows 8 machine," said tech-
nology industry analyst Patrick
Moorhead.
Since Windows 8 went on sale in
late October, there has been little
evidence to suggest the operating
system will lift the personal com-
puter industry out of a deepening


I .. -VWO " "
Associated Press
Many people who have tried Microsoft's new Windows 8 operating system
without a touch screen have hated it because of the inability to use touch
and swipe commands. E Fun's Apen Touch8 pen allows people to use
Windows 8 on their old monitors for less than the cost of buying a new
touch-enabled computer.


downturn. Worldwide PC ship-
ments during the final three
months of last year dropped 6 per-
cent from the same period in 2011,
according to the research firm In-
ternational Data Corp. The dip oc-
curred despite the bevy of Windows
8 laptops and desktop machines
that were on sale during the holi-
day shopping season.
Microsoft, though, insists things


Associated Press
Projectionist T.J. Biggs oils a Christie Electric Company
film projector last week while preparing for the evening's
movie at Worm Creek Opera House in Preston, Idaho. The
Worm Creek Opera House is under pressure from a rapidly
changing motion picture industry that is forcing movie
theaters around the country to phase out aging film
projectors.


Hollywood mobsters help

mom-and-pop theaters


Associated Press

MIAMI BEACH Some
of Hollywood's big-name
mobsters joined forces
with a Florida-based non-
profit Friday to help save
small-town theaters.
Owners of small cinemas
across the country must
switch from 35 mm film to
digital or go silent. The
conversion requires new
projection equipment,
computers and a sound
system that can average
around $70,000 per screen.
"We tried very hard to
raise the money that we
need to convert, but we
could only come up with a
fraction of the cost," said
Rachel Daddezio with Cin-
ema Saver in Endicott, NY.
"We received so many sto-
ries of what our theater
means to the community,
how families wouldn't be
able to go out if we weren't
there."
Daddezio was presented
Friday with a new screen,
projector and processor for
the theater with the help of
Save America's Cinemas, a
non-profit started less than
a year ago by Walter T.
Shaw.
"They don't have a roller
rink or bowling alley in
some of these communi-
ties," said the filmmaker
and former jewel thief for
the mafia. "All they have is
these theaters. Now we
want to take that away
from them? I'm not going to
let that happen."
Shaw turned to his
"Goodfellas" friends to do
good: Tony (Paulie Wal-
nuts) Sirico and Vincent
(Big Pussy) Pastore of "The



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Sopranos" and Mike Starr
and Debi Mazar from
"Goodfellas."
"Going to the movies for
me was a family experi-
ence," Mazar told the audi-
ence. "It made me become
an actor. It's really a shame
that we are losing these
beautiful theaters. We can't
stop time from marching
forward, it's a modern
world," but "these cinemas
need our help."
About 67 percent of the
nation's 5,750 theaters have
switched to all-digital
equipment, said Patrick
Corcoran, a spokesman for
the National Association of
Theater Owners. But while
the big chains can afford
the digital transition,
smaller theaters are forced
to open a bank loan or turn
to the community for help
with paying for the equip-
ment. Others hand over the
keys to not-for-profits in
the hopes of saving the
town's main attraction.
Shaw said about 60 cine-
mas have reached out to
him for help and he has
committed to saving at
least 400 theaters. It is not
known how many small-
town theaters have closed
down since the switch to
digital began with the 1999
release of "Star Wars
Episode I: The Phantom
Menace." But for Cinema
Saver, which needs
$200,000 to convert the five
auditoriums in its one lo-
cation, the new equipment
with the help from Save
America's Cinemas is a
good start
"It's a small town, but it
means a lot to the commu-
nity," Daddezio said.


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worked out at just fine during CES,
even though it didn't have a booth
and only had a smattering of exec-
utives at the sprawling trade show,
which drew some 156,000 people to
Las Vegas.
The company, which is based in
Redmond, Wash., decided it no
longer makes sense to invest as
much time and money in CES as it
once did. The company said the


show's early January slot doesn't
mesh with the timing of its major
product releases. Windows 8, for in-
stance, was still more than nine
months away from hitting the mar-
ket when Microsoft CEO Steve
Ballmer kicked off last year's CES
with a keynote address that was
billed as the company's swan song
at the show.
"We are very comfortable with
our decision," Microsoft spokesman
Frank Shaw said. "It has been a
productive show for us this year."
Microsoft's retreat from CES
puzzled some attendees curious
about Windows 8. For instance,
when Michael Sullivan showed up
at computer maker Asus' booth,
which was stocked with Windows 8
computers, there was no one
around to discuss the machines or
the software.
"This is unusual," said Sullivan,
CEO of computer sales firm Spec 4
International Inc. "I don't under-
stand why a successful company
isn't bringing executives here."
Asus invited some CES attendees
to learn more about Windows 8 at a
nearby hotel, away from the show's
main trade show. Asus has left its
booth unmanned in previous years
at CES, but the void wasn't as no-
ticeable when Microsoft's own rep-
resentatives were canvassing the
floor


School to begin



arming employees


Could janitors be the first line of defense?


Associated Press

TOLEDO, Ohio -A rural
school district in Ohio is
drawing attention with its
plans to arm a handful of its
non-teaching employees
with handguns this year -
perhaps even janitors.
Four employees in the
Montpelier schools have
agreed to take a weapons
training course and carry
their own guns inside the
district's one building,
which houses 1,000 stu-
dents from kindergarten
through 12th grade, school
officials said.
"It's kind of a sign of the
times," Superintendent
Jamie Grime said Friday
The Toledo Blade re-
ported the employees were
janitors, but school officials
would not confirm that to
The Associated Press, say-
ing only that they are em-
ployees who don't have
direct supervision over the
students in the northwest
Ohio district.
The four employees who
will carry guns all volun-
teered to take part, Grime
said. The school plans to
pay for them to attend a
two-day training course.
"Putting a firearm in a
school is a huge step,"
Grime said. "We're going to
do it properly. These people
need the proper training."
The move comes as dis-
tricts and lawmakers
across the nation weigh
how to protect students fol-
lowing the school massacre
in Newtown, Conn., and
after the National Rifle As-
sociation called for an
armed officer in every U.S.
school. The gunman in
Newtown used a rifle to kill
20 students and six
educators.
Lawmakers in South Car-
olina, Oklahoma, Missouri
and South Dakota are look-
ing into legislation that
would allow teachers and
other school employees to
have guns.
Texas Lt. Gov David
Dewhurst called Friday for
state-funded, specialized
firearms training for teach-
ers and administrators.
School districts would de-
cide who would carry
weapons but not be re-
quired to participate, and


I 'giFI




* I
37.EA S WIT


Associated Press
Montpelier School District superintendent Dr. Jamison
Grime said it's a sign of the times that his Ohio district is
arming four employees with guns.


training would include how
to react during a shooting.
In Arizona's Maricopa
County, Sheriff Joe Arpaio
has said he plans to post
armed volunteers on school
perimeters.
Residents in a Dayton,
Ohio, suburb crowded into
a school meeting this week
to talk about whether staff
members and teachers
should be armed. Reaction
was mixed, according to
The Dayton Daily News.
"We need more good guys
with guns. That's the sad
reality of the situation,"
said Jim Rigano, a Spring-
boro school board member.
Other states are trying to
clamp down on gun sales
and bans on assault rifles.
In Montpelier, school of-
ficials began reviewing se-
curity plans after Newtown
and decided teachers
should not be armed be-
cause their first priority in
an emergency should be
locking doors and protect-
ing students, Grime said.
The school already has se-
curity cameras and locked
doors, and requires visitors
to be buzzed into the front
entrance.
The proposal was not an-
nounced until just before
the board voted unani-



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mously Wednesday to arm a
select group of employees
after consulting with the
local police chief and attor-
neys who reviewed Ohio's
concealed carry law. The
law prohibits guns in
schools except in a few
cases, and allows education
boards to authorize some-
one to carry a gun inside
schools.
No members of the pub-
lic spoke out on the meas-
ure at the meeting, board
President Larry Martin
told the Blade. Grime said
three people attended.
A letter was sent out to
parents after the vote. Only
three complained, while
close to 150 called or sent
emails supporting the idea
in Montpelier, a remote city
of about 4,000 residents
along Interstate 80 near the
convergence of Ohio,
Michigan and Indiana.
"It's a place where peo-
ple hold the Second
Amendment close to their
hearts," the superinten-
dent said.


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A6~TH SAMDYAJNAY1,R03SOKSEiusCUTY IN)ECHRONICL


IIHwTo RsE "THEMRTINREI


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 1375844 11.63 -.15 CheniereEn 45720 20.24 -.30 SiriusXM 1420576 3.16 +.03 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
NokiaCp 1266064 4.70 +.25 NAPallg 25358 1.64 -.03 RschMotn 1102495 13.56 +1.64 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
S&P500ETF870912 147.07 -.01 NwGold g 24078 10.95 +.35 Facebook n 876574 31.72 +.42 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
FordM 664515 14.00 +.17 Rentech 19892 2.99 -.01 Microsoft 534071 26.83 +.37 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
SprintNex 592763 5.92 -.02 Vringo 19202 3.44 +.10 Intel 437952 22.00 +.20 Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by...

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempbon by company. d- New 52-week
low. dd Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Emerging Company Marketplace. h temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
SantFn pfF750.00+250.00 +50.0 Medgenics 7.58 +.51 +7.2 Telikrs 2.98 +1.53 +105.5 ing qualification. n-Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low fig-
Infosys 52.22 +8.27 +18.8 GoldResrc 14.81 +.88 +6.3 Dndreon 6.17 +1.07 +21.0 ures date only fromthe beginning of trading. pf- Preferred stockissue.pr- Preferences.pp-
BestBuy 14.21 +2.00 +16.4 Acquity n 7.83 +.31 +4.1 TxCapBwt 33.34 +5.48 +19.7 Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt- Right to buy security at a specified price. s-
CSVLgNGs 20.64 +2.21 +12.0 MGTCaprs 3.64 +.14 +4.0 TrovaGnwt 3.30 +.50 +17.9 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi Trades will be settled when the
CSVS2xPlat49.52 +4.36 +9.7 USAntimny 2.33 +.09 +4.0 Rdiff.cm 3.50 +.53 +17.8 stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock., u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
CSVlnvNG 20.62 -2.90 -12.3 MeetMe 3.40 -.22 -6.1 ReproswtB 17.00 -6.00 -26.1
BiP GCrb 6.98 -.77 -9.9 Daxor 7.64 -.43 -5.3 ParametSd 7.57 -1.09 -12.6
CabcoJCP9721.55 -2.04 -8.6 PacBkrM g 5.54 -.26 -4.4 ProDex 2.08 -.29 -12.4


CpBTJCP 18.30 -1.68 -8.4 DocuSec 2.75 -.12 -4.2 CascdeBcp 5.61 -.74 -11.7
PrUShNGs25.53 -2.27 -8.2 Bellatrkg 4.16 -.18 -4.1 ArQule 2.58 -.34 -11.6


1,579 Advanced
1,438 Declined
125 Unchanged
3,142 Total issues
265 New Highs
3 New Lows
3,241,760,636 Volume


DIARY


208 Advanced
216 Declined
41 Unchanged
465 Total issues
14 New Highs
2 New Lows
72,396,613 Volume


1,218
1,219
135
2,572
138
12
1,780,908,155


52-Week
High Low Name
13,661.72 12,035.09Dow Jones Industrials
5,576.60 4,795.28Dow Jones Transportation
499.82 435.57Dow Jones Utilities
8,717.05 7,222.88NYSE Composite
2,509.57 2,164.87Amex Index
3,196.93 2,662.96Nasdaq Composite
1,474.51 1,266.74S&P 500
15,521.68 13,248.92Wilshire 5000
883.19 729.75Russell 2000


Last
13,488.43
5,572.62
458.96
8,712.40
2,401.72
3,125.63
1,472.05
15,522.88
880.77


I NYSE


Net % YTD % 52-wk
Chg Chg Chg %Chg
+17.21 +.13 +2.93 +8.58
-1.42 -.03 +5.01 +7.66
+.27 +.06 +1.30 +1.79
-1.36 -.02 +3.18+14.16
-9.48 -.39 +1.96 +6.04
+3.87 +.12 +3.51 +15.31
-.07 ... +3.22+14.19
+2.71 +.02 +3.52+14.59
-.47 -.05 +3.70+15.25


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BooBradpf 18.34 -.09
BoSantSA 8.58 +.17
BoSBrasil 7.66 -.15
BkofAm 11.63 -.15
ABBLtd 21.54 BkAmwtA 5.33 -.20
ACE Ltd 82.76 +.72 BkMontg 63.18
ADTCpn 46.84 +.34 BkNYMel 26.78 -.05
AESCorp 11.11 +.02 Barday 19.29 +.21
AFLAC 52.93 -.44 BariPVixrs 26.46 -.11
AGL Res 40.34 -.33 BarnesNob 12.76 -.28
AK Steel 4.68 -.11 BarrickG 34.25 -.25
ASAGold 21.86 -.13 Baxter 68.95 +.52
AT&T Inc 34.27 -.10 Beam Inc 59.70 -.55
AUOptron 4.22 -.10 BeazerHrs 18.21 -.40
AbtLab s 33.37 -.34 BectDck 81.76 +.08
AbbVien 33.85 +.25 BerkHaA141525.00-243.00
AberFitc 48.08 -.40 BerkH B 94.39 -.26
Accenture 69.88 +.71 BestBuy 14.21 +2.00
AccoBrds 8.30 +.50 BBarrett 18.66 -.30
AdamsEx 11.09 +.06 BioMedR 19.62 -.15
AMD 2.67 +.05 BIkHillsCp 38.29 +.20
Aeropostf 12.38 -.86 BlkDebtStr 4.47 +.08
Aetna 45.53 -.23 BlkEnhC&l 12.89 -.03
Agilent 43.43 -.24 BIkGlbOp 13.89 -.01
Agniong 50.87 +.18 Blackstone 16.86 -.02
AlcatelLuc 1.61 -.02 BlockHR 19.98 +.18
Alcoa 8.94 -.03 Blyths 17.30 +.59
AllegTch 30.58 -.44 Boeing 75.16 -1.93
Allergan 103.19 -.19 BostBeer 137.57 +.57
Allete 43.13 +.23 BostProp 107.00 -.40
AlliBGIbHi 16.27 +.24 BostonSci 6.36 +.06
AlliBlnco 8.20 -.01 BoydGm 6.88 +.14
AlliBern 19.98 +.42 Brandyw 12.47 -.08
Allstate 42.96 +.38 BrigStrat 21.77 +.23
AlphaNRs 9.55 -.22 Brinker 32.80 -.12
AlpTotDiv 4.20 -.01 BrMySq 34.13 +.04
AIpAlerMLP 16.73 +.03 Brookdale 26.05 +.55
Altria 32.93 +.23 BrkfldOfPr 16.77 -.03
AmBev 42.50 -.47 Brunswick 31.04 -.15
Ameren 31.46 -.02 Buckeye 52.55 +.59
AMovilL 24.53 -.07 BurgerKn 17.86 -.15
AmAxle 11.28 -.37 CBL Asc 21.00 -.39
AEagleOut 19.14 -.80 CBREGrp 20.51 -.04
AEP 43.24 -.31 CBS B 38.57 +.03
AmExp 61.24 +.45 CFInds 218.17 +.70
AmlntGrp 35.23 -.57 CH Engy 64.92 +.08
AmSIP3 7.49 C... MS Eng 24.89 -.06
AmTower 78.78 +.11 CSS Inds 21.80 -.18
Amerigas 38.99 +.60 CSX 20.54
Ameriprise 65.07 +.07 CVS Care 51.30 +.07
AmeriBrgn 43.84 -.05 CYS Invest 12.78 +.08
Ameteks 38.77 -.02 CblvsnNY 15.39 -.02
Anadarko 77.84 +.18 CabotOGs 48.10 +.34
AnglogldA 29.16 +.39 Calgon 15.45 +.19
ABInBev 87.60 +.99 CallGolf 6.62 +.09
Ann Inc 32.20 -.79 Calpine 18.64 +.03
Annaly 14.79 +.06 Camecog 20.45 -.33
Apache 80.57 -.14 Cameron 57.55 -.69
Aptlnv 27.25 -.20 CampSp 35.22 -.09
AquaAm 26.68 +.37 CdnNRsgs 30.27 +.13
ArcelorMit 17.29 -.23 CapOne 61.99 -.88
ArchCol 6.95 -.28 CapifiSrce 7.72 -.05
ArdichDan 28.34 ... CapM pfB 14.84 -.07
ArmourRsd 6.93 +.03 CardnlHIth 43.06 +.07
Ashland 84.67 -1.70 Carnival 37.03 -.11
AsdEstat 16.00 -.19 Caterpillar 95.19 +.11
AssuredG 14.88 -.03 Celanese 46.64 -.69
ATMOS 35.53 -.17 Cemex 10.49 -.04
AuRicog 8.08 -.25 Cemigpfs 10.86 -.02
Autliv 65.31 -.47 CenterPnt 20.04 +.25
Avon 15.22 -.29 CenEIBras 3.21 +.01
BB&TCp 30.31 -.23 CntryLink 40.32 +.14
BCEg 42.60 -.10 Checkpnt 11.47 +.07
BHPBilILt 76.66 -2.03 ChesEng 16.87 +.23
BP PLC 44.48 -.53 ChesUfi 46.52 +.26
BRFBrasil 22.14 +.05 Chevron 111.73 +1.26
BRT 6.40 +.10 ChicB&l 47.22 -.53
BakrHu 43.01 -.02 Chioes 17.38
BallCorp 45.40 -.21 Chimera 2.80 +.04


ChinaMble 58.19 -.56 E
ChinaUni 16.99 -.41 E
Cigna 55.60 -.02 E
CindBell 5.30 +.14 E
Cifgroup 42.34 -.49 B
CleanHarb 56.08 +.60 B
CliffsNRs 36.21 -1.53 E
Clorox 75.68 +.20 E
CloudPeak 18.50 -.25 E
Coach 58.89 +1.40 E
CobaltlEn 26.79 +.23 E
CCFemsa 155.61 +1.96 E
CocaColas 36.91 -.05
CocaCE 33.49 +.33
CohStlnfra 19.32 -.16
ColonyFnd 20.85 -.10
Comerica 31.83 -.27
CmwREIT 15.71
CmtyHIt 33.85 +.83
ComstkRs 14.84 +.30
Con-Way 30.46 -.30
ConAgra 30.80 +.18
ConocPhil s 58.27 -.23
ConsolEngy 30.19 -.71
ConEd 55.91 -.18
ConstellA 35.63 -.05
ContlRes 81.76 -.14
Cnvrgys 16.96 +.01
Corning 12.45 -.19
CottCp 8.60 +.07
CovantaH 19.26 +.18
Covdien 60.16
Crane 47.80 +.52
CSVellIVSt 19.58 +.05
CSVS2xVxrs 6.55 -.09
CredSuiss 27.49 -.10
CrwnCsfe 72.78 -.40
CubeSmart 14.40 +.12
Cummins 110.59 -1.85

DCT Indl 6.70 +.05
DDR Corp 15.65 +.03
DNP Selct 9.98 +.08
DR Horton 20.95 +.09
DSW Inc 65.38 -.30
DTE 61.46 +.05
DanaHIdg 15.61 -.14 E
Danaher 59.78 -.21 E
Darden 44.92 -.32 E
DeanFds 17.80 +.16 E
Deere 89.62 -.29 E
Delek 29.54 +2.56 E
DelphiAuto 38.09 -.72 E
DeltaAir 13.35 +.05 E
DenburyR 16.62 -.18 B
DeutschBk 49.62 +.11 F
DevonE 54.26 +.38 F
DiamRk 9.19 -.11 F
DigitalRIt 69.84 +.62 F
DrxFnBull 136.01 -.94 F
DirSCBear 12.04 +.04 F
DirFnBear 13.18 +.06 F
DirDGIdBII 10.17 -.06 R
DirxSCBull 70.92 -.33 H
Discover 40.39 -.09 F
Disney 50.58 -.21 F
DollarGen 43.34 -.04 F
DomRescs 52.43 +.21 F
DowChm 33.86 +.02 r
DrPepSnap 45.08 -.68 R
DuPont 46.15 -.05 F
DukeEn rs 65.69 +.32 R
DukeRlty 14.66 -.09 R
E-CDarg 4.55 -.05 R
EMCCp 24.15 +.30 F
EOG Res 125.63 -.47
EQT Corp 58.42 +.72
EastChem 70.52 -.65


aton 55.75
V EnEq 11.17
VTxMGIo 9.29
disonlnt 45.80
Ban 10.34
BdorGldg 13.05
mersonEl 55.04
mpDist 20.87
nbrdgEPt 29.89
nCanag 19.78
ngyTsfr 45.76
nergySol 3.88


GATX 46.18 +.51
GNC 36.25 +1.71
GabelliET 5.90 +.05
GabHIthW 9.04 +.20
GabUlI 6.74 +.10
GameSbtp 23.25 +.46
Gannett 18.94 -.05
Gap 31.71 +.36
GencoShip 3.88 -.19
GenDynam 70.74 -.91


HartfdFn 23.90 -.17
HawaiiEl 25.76 +.14
HItCrREIT 61.93 -.06
HItMgmt 9.12 -.11
HlthcrRlty 24.96 +.07
HlthcrTrn 10.25 +.13
Heckmann 4.00 +.03
HeclaM 5.87
Heinz 58.46 -.12
HelixEn 20.85 -.15
HedmPayne 58.54 -.33
Herbalife 40.02 +.78


iSCorSP500147.87 +.07
iShCorTBd 110.85 +.11
iShEMkts 44.47 -.36
iShEMBd 121.44 -.61
iShB20T 119.85 +1.06
iS Eafe 58.04 +.12
iSRusMCG 64.88 -.06
iShiBxHYB 94.52 +.17
iSR1KV 75.32 -.02
iSR1KG 67.60 +.10
iSR2KV 78.01 -.13
iShR2K 87.34 -.13


CI TKRU & C 0 U T J |


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nPro 42.32
NSCO 60.88
ntergy 63.07
ntPrPt 54.02
steeLdrs 64.13
-xoRes 6.52
xdeon 29.29
express 13.89
xxonMbl 89.61
airchldS 14.85
amilyDIr 56.44
edExCp 97.40
edSignl 7.82
edlnvst 22.00
errellgs 18.08
erro 4.39
dINRn 25.20
dNatlnfo 37.00
fth&Pac 12.84
stHorizon 9.97
TActDiv 7.98
tTrEnEq 12.36
rstEngy 39.89
uor 62.17
FotLockr 33.57
ordM 14.00
orestLab 38.11
orestOil 6.96
MVCG 35.00
jusion-io 19.93


GenElec 21.13 -.04
GenGrPrp 19.13 +.01
GenMills 40.62 -.98
GenMotors 30.36 -.08
Genpact 16.57 +.32
Genworth 8.11 -.12
GaGulf 49.98 +2.17
Gerdau 9.01 -.20
GlaxoSKIn 44.54 +.05
GolLinhas 6.85 +.17
GoldFLtd 12.17 +.09
Goldcrpg 36.88 -.40
GoldmanS 137.13 -.24
Graffech 9.47 +.07
GtPlainEn 20.73 -.10
Griffon 11.85 +.03
GpFSnMxn 17.04 +.23
GuangRy 20.67 +.06
Guess 26.56 +.58
HCA HIdg 33.20 +.03
HCP Inc 46.00 +.05
HSBC 54.61 +.15
HSBCCap 25.51 +.03
HalconRrs 7.81 +.09
Hallibrtn 36.62 -.28
HanJS 16.69 -.19
HanPrmDv 13.90 -.02
Hanesbrds 36.35 +.19
Hanoverlns 39.57 -.27
HarleyD 50.14 -.22
Harman 49.90 +.03
HarmonyG 7.73 -.05


Hertz 17.54 -.05
Hess 56.25 -.36
HewlettP 16.16 -.12
HighwdPrp 34.50 -.20
Hillshiren 29.58 +.30
HollyFront 44.67 +.23
HomeDp 63.70 +.08
HonwIllnti 66.31 -.11
Hospira 34.13 +.08
HospPT 23.94 -.09
HostHofis 16.67 -.23
HovnanE 6.40 -.09
Humana 69.56 +.32
Huntsmn 17.73 -.24
IAMGIdg 11.05 +.17
ICICI Bk 44.43 -.21
ING 10.31 +.03
iShGold 16.17 -.10
iSAsfia 25.46 -.22
iShBraz 56.41 -.57
iSCan 29.05 +.02
iSFrnce 23.81 +.15
iShGer 25.08 +.18
iShHK 19.93 -.11
iShJapn 9.88 +.03
iSh Kor 63.06 -.36
iShMex 73.35 -.10
iShSing 13.71 -.12
iSTaiwn 13.61 -.10
iShSilver 29.48 -.30
iShS&P100 66.87 +.02
iShChina25 41.09 -.43


iShUSPfd 40.21 +.05
iShREst 66.49 -.01
iShDJHm 22.21 +.03
iSMsdV 50.24 +.10
iStar 8.66 +.13
Idacorp 43.55 +.15
ITW 62.56 -.20
Imafon 3.88 +.04
Imax Corp 23.99 -.53
Infosys 52.22 +8.27
IntegrysE 53.92 +.17
IntcnfEx 129.36 +1.36
Intermec 9.88 +.03
IBM 194.45 +1.57
InfGame 14.98 +.01
IntPap 40.11 +.10
Interpublic 11.68 -.06
Invesco 27.74 +.18
IronMtn 32.84 -.26
ItauUnibH 17.24 +.02

JPMorgCh 46.14 -.01
JPMAIerian 41.28 +.02
Jabil 19.92 +.29
JanusCap 9.58 +.42
Jefferies 18.80 +.04
JohnJn 72.35 +.16
JohnsnCi 31.67 +.18
JoyGIbl 68.13 -.57
JnprNtwk 20.66 +.36
KB Home 16.36 -.09


KBR Inc 29.48 -2.52 Merck 43.23 +.45
KKR 15.98 +.06 MetLife 36.34 -.25
KCSouthn 85.54 +.14 MetroPCS 9.54 -.19
Kaydons 24.12 -.12 MKors 52.94 +.93
KAEngTR 26.63 +.19 MidAApt 65.14 +.11
Kellogg 57.02 -.29 MitsuUFJ 5.42 -.01
KeyEngy 7.60 -.15 Molyoorp 8.48 +.14
Keycorp 8.84 -.10 MoneyGrm 13.89 -.17
KimbClk 85.10 +.17 Monsanto 100.08 +.61
Kimco 19.80 -.01 Moodys 53.28 +.20
KindME 87.25 -.05 MorgStan 20.17 -.17
KindMorg 37.06 -.04 MSEmMkt 15.94 -.15
Kinross g 9.44 -.04 Mosaic 59.74 +.01
KodiakOg 9.20 -.12 MotrlaSolu 57.50 +.72
Kohls 42.02 -.48 MurphO 61.18 +.49
KoreaElc 15.81 +.41 NCR Corp 26.51 +.02
KrispKrm 11.36 +.13 NRG Egy 23.56 +.42
Kroger 25.70 +.15 NVEnergy 18.50 +.05
LDKSolar 2.15 -.03 NYSEEur 32.73 +.28
LTCPrp 36.44 +.07 Nabors 14.65 +.06
LaZBoy 15.11 +.08 NBGreece 1.75 -.08
LabCp 86.41 -1.00 NatFuGas 49.10 +.41
Ladede 38.20 +.31 NatGrid 55.59 -.10
LVSands 52.52 +.08 NOilVarco 70.89 +.48
LeapFrog 9.42 +.04 Naftonstrn 37.78 -1.05
LearCorp 48.01 +.01 Navistar 24.05 +.60
LeggMason 26.52 -.32 NewAmHi 10.62 +.05
LennarA 40.95 -.07 NJ Rscs 39.53 +.03
Level3 23.50 -.05 NYCmtyB 13.51 +.10
LexRItyTr 10.58 -.06 Newcastle 9.76 -.12
LbtyASG 4.24 -.01 NewellRub 21.80 -.15
LillyEli 53.11 -.14 NewfidExp 28.00 -.19
Limited 44.38 +.08 NewmtM 45.76 -.19
LincNat 27.84 ... NewpkRes 8.00 -.05
Lindsay 90.39 -.28 Nexeng 27.01 +.06
Linkedln 118.00 -.04 NextEraEn 71.78 +.29
LloydBkg 3.50 +.04 NiSource 25.76 +.26
LockhdM 93.71 -.40 NikeBs 53.10 +.55
Lorillard 117.02 +.93 NobleCorp 36.42 +.02
LaPac 20.75 +.04 NokiaCp 4.70 +.25
Lowes 35.83 +.28 Nordstrm 53.84 -1.04
SNorfikSo 64.04 -.63
ki NoestUt 39.19 -.12
NorthropG 67.07 -.33
M&TBk 103.24 -.30 NStarRIt 7.41
MBIA 8.26 -.32 Novaris 65.39 +.20
MDU Res 22.00 +.06 NuSIn 42.08 +.71
MEMC 3.93 -.12 Nucor 45.43 -.04
MFAFnd 8.67 ... NustarEn 48.34 -.04
MCR 10.53 +.18 NuvMuOpp 15.86 +.02
MGIC 2.91 -.01 NvPfdlnco 9.98 +.04
MGMRsts 12.80 +.13 NuvQPf2 9.48 -.01
MSCInd 76.00 +2.35 OGEEngy 57.26 +.12
Macquarie 47.58 +.17 OasisPet 34.43 +.18
Macys 36.89 -.36 OcciPet 83.08 +.07
MageiMPts 47.55 -.55 Och-Ziff 9.37
Magnalntg 51.51 -.34 OcwenFn 38.22 -.45
MagHRes 4.08 -.02 OfficeDpt 3.76 +.11
Manitowoc 16.45 +.10 OiSAs 4.29 -.02
Manulifeg 14.40 +.07 Olin 22.46 +17
MarathnO 32.15 -.13 OmegaHIt 24.75 +.04
MarathPet 61.99 -.80 Omncre 38.35 +.08
MktVGold 45.40 -.01 Omnicom 52.28 +.23
MVOilSvs 40.69 -.02 OnAssign 23.62 +.07
MVSemi 33.89 +.16 ONEOKs 44.91 +.06
MktVRus 29.76 -.29 OneokPtrs 58.50 +.04
MktVJrGId 20.20 -.26 OpkoHlth 5.38 +.07
MktVViet 19.80 -1.06 OshkoshCp 32.93 +.12
MarshM 35.26 +.13 OwensCorn 39.45 +.35
MStewrt 2.71 -.01
Masoo 17.69 +.22
McDrmlnt 11.83 ... PG&ECp 40.95 +.08
McDnlds 91.73 +.33 PNC 60.05 -.69
McGrwH 53.87 -.43 PNM Res 20.30
MdcMoRn 16.04 +.05 PPG 142.10 +.33
McEwenM 3.84 -.06 PPLCorp 28.95 -.05
MeadJohn 69.16 +.97 PVR Ptrs 26.32 -.11
Mechel 6.91 -.19 PallCorp 64.29 +.03
Medtrnic 44.07 +.22 PaloANetn 52.81 +2.21


Pandora 11.02
PeabdyE 25.17
Pearson 19.43
Pengrthg 5.01
PennWstg 10.36
Penney 18.26
PepBoy 10.30
PepcoHold 19.08
PepsiCo 70.88
PerkElm 34.45
Prmian 13.17
PetrbrsA 19.51
Petrobras 19.87
Pfizer 26.52
PhilipMor 89.23
Phillips66 n 50.58
PiedNG 31.50
Pier 1 20.79
PimoStrat 11.49
PinWst 51.91
PioNtrl 111.85
PitnyBw 11.91
PlainsAAs 49.89
PlainsEx 47.54
PlumCrk 46.39
Polaris 88.90
PostPrp 50.07
Potash 42.79
PwshDB 27.59
PS USDBull 21.74
PSKBWBk 27.26
PSSrLoan 25.20
PSIndia 18.57
Praxair 114.00
PrecDrill 8.46
PrinFnd 29.20
ProLogis 38.28
ProShtS&P 32.89
PrUltQQQs 58.50
PrUShQQQ 27.67
ProUltSP 64.18
PrUltSP500 96.81
PrUVxSTrs 14.16
ProUltSilv 44.24
ProUShEuro 18.59
ProctGam 69.22
ProgsvCp 22.34
PrUShSP rs 50.71
PrUShL20 rs 64.68
PUSSP500 rs34.14
Prudent 57.60
PSEG 30.12
PubStrg 147.05
PulteGrp 19.34
PPrIT 5.51
QEP Res 29.44
Qihoo360 33.00
QuanexBld 20.96
QuantaSvc 29.02
Questar 21.31
QksilvRes 2.93
Quiksilvr 5.58
RAIT RFin 6.20
RPM 30.92
RadianGrp 6.18
RadioShk 2.22
Ralcorp 89.87
RLauren 165.93


+.16 RangeRs 64.39 +.56
-1.43 RJamesFn 41.62 +.29
+.12 Rayonier 54.00 -.36
+.02 Raytheon 57.99 -.59
-.15 Rltylnco 42.90 +.10
-.89 RedHat 54.45 +.18
RegalEnt 14.27 +.07
-.34 RegionsFn 7.24 -.11
+.07 Renren 3.82 -.03
-.25 Revlon 15.07 -.09
+.02 ReynAmer 42.62 +.36
-.15 Rioinbo 55.65 -1.64
-.14 RiteAid 1.44 +.05
-.24 RockwAut 85.88 -.52
+1.94 RockColl 59.20 -.33
-.93 RockwdH 51.04 -.28
+.05 RylCarb 35.49 -.22
+.03 RoyDShllB 71.66 +.56
+.01 RoyDShllA 69.61 +.43
-.27 Roce 1410 06
-.71
+.01
+.36 SAIC 11.96 +.05
-.18 SAPAG 81.78 -.62
-.21 SCANA 46.49 -.03
+1.09 SKTIcm 16.32 +.21
+.03 SpdrDJIA 134.72 +.18
+.01 SpdrGold 161.06 -.92
-.12 SPMid 192.28 -.30
-.06 S&P500ETF147.07 -.01
-.24 Spdr Div 59.98 +.04
SpdrHome 27.77 +.04
-.13 SpdrS&PBk 24.76 -.21
-.18 SpdrLehHY 41.21 +.01
-.05 SpdrS&P RB 28.93 -.29
-.47 SpdrRefi 63.04 -.01
+.24 SpdrOGEx 56.12 +.17
-.03 SpdrMetM 45.30 -.76
+.19 Safeway 17.41 -.15
-.09 StJoe 23.51 -.21
+.05 Seude 38.29 +.13
+.21 Saks 10.47 -.06
-.11 Salesbrce 173.35 +.23
-.87 SallyBty 24.28 +.01
-.24 SJuanB 14.76 +.31
-.05 SandRdge 6.86 -.01
-.04 Sanofi 48.87 +.42
+.01 Schlmbrg 73.75 +.50
-1.19 Schwab 15.39 +.06
-.05 SeadrillLtd 38.10 -.09
-.30 SealAir 18.22 -.07
-.02 SempraEn 71.83 -.03
+.77 SenHous 24.37 +.16
-.07 Sensient 36.96 -.08
ServNowm n 27.46 +1.00
-.01 SiderurNac 6.13 -.09
+.10 SilvWhtng 36.26 -.06
+.18 SimonProp 159.98 +.08
-.17 Skedchers 18.62 +.60
+.33 SmithAO 64.58 -.32
SmithfF 22.65 -.17
+.07 Smucker 88.22 -1.62
-.05 SonyCp 11.09 +.04
+.06 SoJerInd 52.00 +.24
+.05 SouthnCo 43.16 -.06
+.12 SthnCopper 39.45 +.08
+.25 SwstAirl 11.05 -.02
-1.55 SwstnEngy 32.51 +.42


The remainder of the

NYSE listings can be

found on the next page.


IA EIA N SOC5 CANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.94 +.01
AbdnEMTel 21.80 -.04
Abdnlndo 11.99 -.12
AdmRsc 35.94 +.41
Adventrx .60 +.01
AlexcoRg 3.83
AlldNevG 28.27 -.27
AlphaPro 1.88 +.32
AmApparel 1.16 +.03
AfiatsaRg .16 -.01
Aurizong 3.46 -.03
AvalnRare 1.45


Banrog 3.03 -.07 ClaudeRg .54 -.01
BarcUBS36 41.16 +.11 ClghGlbOp 12.36 -.01
BarcGSOil 22.28 -.08 ComstkMn 2.06 +.01
Bellatrbg 4.16 -.18 CornstProg 5.51 +.04
BioTime 4.52 +.15 CornerstSr 6.73 +.06
BrigusGg .97 -.01 CrSuiHiY 3.26 +.01
BritATob 101.91 -1.01
CAMACEn .74 +.01
CardiumTh .20 DejourEg .21 -.01
CelSd 28 -.01 DetaAprl 13.65 -.03
CFCdag 21.38 -.28 DenisnMg 1.41 -.01
CheniereEn 20.24 -.30 EVLtdDur 17.11 +.11
CheniereE 23.82 -.09 EVMuniBd 14.39 -.11
ChiArmMt .60 +.06 EVMuni2 14.09 +.03
ChinaShen .36 ... ElephTalk 1.00 +.02


EllswthFd 7.42 -.04
EmrldOrs 6.00 -.02
ExeterRgs 1.36 +.08
FrkStPrp 12.86

GamGldNR 13.67 +.05
GascoEngy .09 +.01
Gastargrs 1.26
GenMoly 4.01
GeoGlobIR .06 -.01
GigOpics 1.64 -.02
GoldResrc 14.81 +.88
GoldStdVg 1.20 -.02
GoldenMin 4.67 +.01
GoldStrg 1.76 -.01


GldFId 2.12 +.05
GranTrrag 5.46 -.05
GtPanSilvg 1.62 -.02
Hemisphrx .28 -.01
HstnAEn .31 +.04
iShlndiabt 26.24 -.17
iBb .79 +.18
ImmunoCII 2.05 -.02
ImpOilgs 44.50 +.34
IndiaGC .16 +.02
novioPhm .60 -.02
IntellgSys 1.46 +.02
LntTowerI 236 +.04

LkShrGldg .87 +.04


I _ __ _ NMuHiOp 14.32 -01 ,.I


MeetMe 3.40 -.22
MdwGoldg 1.43 -.02
NavideaBio 2.94 -.10
NeoStem .62 -.01
NBRESec 4.80 +.05
Neuralstem 1.24 +.05
Nevsung 4.46 -.15
NwGoldg 10.95 +.35
NA Pall g 1.64 -.03
NDynMng 3.95 -.15
NthnO&G 17.07 -.18
NovaBayP 1.13
NovaGldg 4.90 -.04


SamsO&G .78
PalainTch .67 +.03 Sandstgrs 12.45
ParaG&S 2.32 -.03 SprottRLg 1.58
PhrmAth 1.33 +.20 SynergyRs 5.70
PlatGpMet .95 +.12 TanzRyg 4.00
PolyMetg .93 -.00 Taseko 3.45
PyramidOil 4.12 +.02 Timminsg 2.96
RareEleg 3.40 +.02 TrnsafPet .95
Rentech 2.99 -.01 TriangPet 6.16
Tucowsg 1.60
RexahnPh .34 -.01 US Geth .35
Richmntg 3.22 -.13 Ur-Energy .91
Rubiong 2.46 -.01 Uranerz 1.41


UraniumEn 2.48 -.01


VangTotW 50.73 -.03
VantageDrl 1.83 -.02
VirnetX 34.40 +1.10
VistaGold 2.58 +.01
Vringo 3.44 +.10
Walterlnv 47.43 +.83
WFAdvlnco 10.30 +.04
WFAdMSec 16.37 +.10
WstC&Ggs 1.69 +.12
YMBiog 2.90
ZBB Engy .34 +.01


I ASDQ AION AL AKT1


Name Last Chg


AMCNet 53.20 +.17
ASML HId 65.42 +.75
Abiomed 12.25 -.55
Abraxas 2.22 -.02
AcadaTc 26.34 +.49
AcadiaHIt 24.85 +.02
AcadiaPh 5.01 +.03
Accuray 5.01 -.07
Achdillion 9.40 +.38
AcmePkt 22.95 +.03
AoordaTh 27.33 -.65
AcfvsBliz 11.52 +.59
AcuraPhm 2.34 +.07
Acxiom 18.49 +.01
AdobeSy 38.09 -.53
Adtran 20.80 -.19
Aegerion 27.65 +1.01
AEterngrs 2.74 +.17
Affymax 20.91 -.27
Affymetrix 3.71 +.24
AirMethd s 41.41 +.01
AkamaiT 39.59 +.09
Akorn 14.09 -.04
Alexion 100.39 -2.18
Alexzars 4.85 -.08
AlignTech 25.87 -1.02
Alkermes 21.90 +.13
AllotComm 13.77 +.02
AllscriptH 10.10 +.17
AlteraCp If 35.27 +.34
AlterraCap 29.49 -.08
Amarin 8.62 +.25
Amazon 267.94 +2.60
Amedisys 11.06 -.21
ACapAgy 31.03 +.07
AmCapLd 13.30 +.16
ACapMtg 25.13
ARItyCTn 12.59 +.03
AmSupr 2.72 -.04
AmCasino 26.83 +.05
Amgen 86.96 -.85
AmicusTh 3.86 -.36
AmkorTch 4.69 +.03
Amsurg 29.79 +.03
Amyris 4.02 +.31
AnaoorPh 4.73 -.27
Anadigc 2.34 -.01
AnalogDev 42.26 -.35
Anlogic 76.07 +.18
Analystlnt 3.71 -.03
AngiesList 11.98 +.19
AntaresP 4.25 -.04
AntheraP h .73 -.04
ApolloGrp 19.21 -.02
Apollolnv 8.92 -.04
Apple Inc 520.30 -3.21
ApldMatf 11.71 +.07
AMCC 9.07 -.08
Approach 25.61 -.08
ArQule 2.58 -.34
ArchCap 44.78 +.27
ArenaPhm 9.66 -.04
AresCap 17.95 +.09
AriadP 19.29 -.38
ArmHId 42.28 +.27
ArrayBio 4.17 -.11
Arris 15.35 -.05
ArubaNet 22.57 +.79
AscenaRts 16.50 -.36
AscentSol h .60 -.03
AspenTech 28.32 +.33
AssodBanc 13.48 -.16
AstexPhm 3.29 -.01
athenahlth 83.35 -.16
Athersys 1.16 +.03
Atmel 7.08 +.01
Autodesk 36.80 +.28
AutoData 59.42 +.10
Auxilium 19.04 -.24
AvagoTch 34.34 +.82
AvanirPhm 3.14 +.06
AvisBudg 20.91 -.23
Aware s 6.00
BBCNBcp 12.27 -.34


BCD Semi 7.67 -.01 CognizTech 78.47 +3.42
B/EAero 50.08 -.33 Cogo Grp 2.44 +.02
BG Med 2.33 -.08 Coinstar 47.94 -.05
BGCPtrs 3.47 -.03 ColdwCr rs 4.90 +.04
BJsRest 34.09 +.14 ColBnkg 18.78 -.29
BMC Sft 42.68 +.45 ColSprtw 52.99 -.23
Baidu 112.97 +2.41 Comcast 38.46 -.04
BallardPh .74 -.01 Comcspd 36.96
BannerCp 30.56 -.24 CmcBMO 36.49 -.31
Bazaarvcn 6.65 -.84 CommSys 10.81
BeacnRfg 34.54 -.26 CommVlt 69.18 -.32
BeasleyB 4.93 -.07 CmplGnom 3.14 -.01
BebeStrs 3.82 ... Compuwre 10.97 +.15
BedBath 56.27 -.43 Comtech 26.55 +.08
BioRelLab 29.73 +.48 Comverse 4.05 +.08
Biocryst 1.84 +.20 Conmed 28.26 +.03
Biogenldc 143.79 -.12 Conns 28.76 +.71
Biolase 2.45 +.10 ConsolCom 16.85 -.11
BioMarin 51.56 -.23 CopanoEn 33.32 +.15
BioSanters 1.42 +.05 Coparts 31.67 +.63
BioScrip 11.60 +.08 Corcept 1.97 +.07
BIkRKelso 10.50 ... CorinthC 2.62 +.13
BloominBn 17.00 -.20 CorOnDem 31.08 -.45
Bluoora 16.06 -.05 CoronadoB 5.70 -.28
BobEvans 43.35 -.01 Costoo 100.28 -.46
BostPrv 9.20 -.21 CreeInc 32.06 +.20
BttmlnT 27.17 +.31 Crocs 15.53 +.17
BoulderBr 12.32 -.37 CrosstxLP 15.50 -.05
BreitBurn 20.17 -.13 Ctrip.oom 24.28 +.34
Brightcvn 9.88 +.75 CubistPh 44.74 -.01
Broadcom 34.82 -.01 Cyberonics 53.60 +.07
BroadSoft 35.45 +.08 Cybexlnfi 2.53
BrcdeCm 5.56 +.09 Cynosure 25.50 -.50
BrukerCp 16.55 -.01 CypSemi 10.04 +.10
BuffabWW 74.69 -1.06 CytRxrs 2.16 +.03
CA Inc 23.34 +.23 Cytodneth 1.12 +.09
CBOE 31.87 +13 Cvtori 3.06 +.06
CH Robins 64.54 +.16
CMEGrps 54.02 +.70
CTC Media 8.11 +.01 DARABioh .78 -.00
CVBFnd 11.00 -.10 DayStarhlf 1.58 -.03
Cadence 13.94 +.10 DeckrsOut 36.64 -.38
Caesars n 7.09 +.01 Dell Inc 10.88 -.16
CalaCvHi 12.70 -.01 Dndreon 6.17 +1.07
CalaGDyln 8.76 +.05 Dennys 5.27 +.05
CalaStrTR 10.29 -.07 Dentsply 39.93 -.40
CalumetSp 31.78 -.01 Depomed 6.52 +.12
CdnSolar 4.42 -.08 DexCom 14.82 -.11
CapCtyBk 11.99 -.13 DianaCont 6.64 -.11
CapProd 7.69 +.16 DigifiGnh 10.48 -.08
CapFedFn 11.88 +.02 DigRiver 14.35 +.07
CpstnTrb h .88 -.01 DirecTV 52.40 -.04
Cardiomgh .44 +.02 DiscComA 68.16 +.77
Cardtronic 25.89 +1.48 DiscComC 62.09 +.43
CareerEd 3.47 +.10 DiscovLab 2.24 -.01
CaribouC 15.98 -.02 DishNetwk 36.21 -.74
Carrizo 20.09 -.14 DollarTrs 38.12 -.02
CarverBcp 4.25 ... DonlleyRR 8.87 +.09
Caseys 52.92 -.36 DragonWg 2.49
CatalystPh .55 -.01 DrmWksA 16.34 -.02
Catamarns 51.40 -1.22 DryShips 2.12 -.07
CathayGen 19.24 -.57 Dunkin 34.36 -.42
Cavium 30.96 -.03 Dynavax 3.30 -.03
Celgene 96.30 +.82 DynaVoxh .32 -.01
CellTherrs 1.52 +.06 E-Trade 9.58 +.03
CelldexTh 7.62 +.03 eBay 53.70 +.70
Celsion 8.46 -.11 EDAP TMS 2.77 +.08
CentEuro h 2.01 +.03 eHealth 24.00 +.46
CentAI 8.62 -.90 EPIQSys 12.88 +.06
Cepheid 35.20 +.01 EV Engy 60.90 -1.87
Cerner 81.62 -.59 EagleBurs 2.26 -.02
Changyou 30.44 +.06 EaglRkEn 9.16 +.06
Chartlnds 65.74 -.49 ErthLink 6.51 -.02
CharterCm 78.39 -.61 EstWstBcp 22.50 -.40
ChkPoint 48.46 -.83 Ebixlnc 16.66 +.15
Cheesecake 33.67 -.12 EchoThera 1.30 +.16
ChelseaTh .89 -.05 EducDevel 3.99 +.01
ChildPlace 46.42 +.02 8x8 Inc 7.59 +.11
ChinaLodg 17.92 +.89 ElectSd 10.07 +.02
ChrchllD 67.82 -1.10 ElectArts 14.24 +.24
CienaCorp 14.65 -.49 EmmisCm 1.93 +.04
CinnFin 41.26 +.06 EndoPhrm 26.26 +.01
Cintas 42.58 -.11 EnerNOC 12.78 +.98
Cirrus 31.58 +.04 ErngyXXI 33.04 -.11
Cisco 20.48 +.04 Entegris 9.20 +.22
CitrixSys 71.47 +.99 EnteroMed 2.36 +.06
CleanEngy 13.80 +.04 EntropCom 5.60 -.03
Clearwire 3.15 ... Epocrates 11.68 -.01


Equinix 217.72 -.06 HuntBncsh 6.59 -.08
Ericsson 10.30 +.02 IAC Inter 43.39 +.22
Euronet 24.76 +.21 iGateCorp 16.53 +.45
Euroseas 1.05 ... iPass 2.00
ExactSdh 11.59 -.14 iShAsiaexJ 60.81 -.42
Exelixis 4.82 -.04 iShACWI 49.27 -.02
ExideTc 3.64 +.02 iShNsdqBio 145.48 -1.16
Expedia 62.61 -.16 Ion PLC 28.29 -.36
Expdlnfi 42.70 +.16 loonixBr 23.00 +.01
ExpScripts 55.60 -.24 IdenixPh 4.60 +.03
ExtrmNet 3.75 +.02 Illumina 52.68 -.96
EZchip 34.92 +.61 ImunoGn 14.56 +.15
Ezoorp 20.51 -.25 Imunmd 3.02 -.07
F5Netwks 97.89 +2.18 ImpaxLabs 21.40 -.20
FEICo 58.50 +.65 Incyte 18.20 -.76
FLIRSys 23.12 -.18 Infinera 6.49 -.17
FXEner 4.40 +.17 InfinityPh 33.49 -1.21
Facebookn 31.72 +.42 Informat 33.32 +1.49
FaroTech 31.77 -3.99 Insmed 6.70 -.23
Fastenal 46.50 ... IntgDv 7.53 +.01
FifthStRn 10.76 +.04 Intel 22.00 +.20
FiflthT ird 15.47 -.23 Inteliquent 2.95 -.01
Fndlnst 18.80 -.19 InteraciB 14.20 -.02
Finisar 14.97 -.53 InterDig 44.11 +.92
FinLine 17.29 -.17 InterMune 10.22 -.01
FstCashFn 49.88 ... InfBcsh 18.91 -.18
FstNiagara 8.29 +.06 InftSpdw 28.60 -.14
FstSolar 32.01 +.04 Intersil 8.63 +.08
FstMerit 15.02 -.19 Intuit 62.62 +.21
Fiserv 82.98 -.22 IntSurg 506.00 -2.87
FlamelT 4.58 +.66 IridiumCm 6.95 -.18
Flextrn 6.46 +.09 IronwdPh 14.71 +.67
FocusMda 25.94 +.07 Isis 13.28 +.06
FormFac 5.00 +.17 IvanhoeEh .74 +.01
Fortnet 19.34 -.24 Ixa 17.66 -.01
FossillInc 100.79 -.20
FosterWhl 24.81 -.42
Francesca 28.23 +.66 JA Solar rs 5.59 +.14
FredsInc 12.44 -.14 JDS Uniph 13.22 -.25
FreeSeash .34 -.02 JackHenry 41.05 -.10
FreshMkt 46.04 -.22 JacklnBox 28.79 +.05
FronterCm 4.35 +.01 Jamba 2.49 -.03
FuelCell h 1.25 +.04 JamesRiv 3.15 -.07
FultonFncl 10.24 -.08 JazzPhrm 55.34 -1.16
JetBlue 5.87 +.06
JiveSoftw 15.38 -.01
GSVCap 8.91 -.02 JoesJeanh 1.14 +.05
GTAdvTc 3.33 -.08 JosABank 42.79 +.09
GalenaBio 1.83 +.03 KLATnc 49.19 +.60
Garmin 39.60 +.21 KeryxBio 2.97 +.05
GenMark 10.83 +.72 KirngldJwl 1.54 +.24
Gentex 18.44 -.05 KongZhg 6.19 +.31
Genfivah 9.85 -.55 KraftFGpn 46.37 +.36
GeronCp 1.66 -.01 KratosDef 4.71 -.08
Gevo 2.03 -.04 Kulicke 12.34 -.01
GileadSd 78.08 +.14 LKQCps 22.66 -.24
GIbSpcMet 14.79 -.11 LPL Find 30.04 -.19
GluMobile 2.42 +.03 LSI Corp 7.15 +.04
GolLNGLtd 37.92 -.12 LSI Indlf 7.66 +.09
Goodyear 13.78 -.35 LTX-Cred 6.40 +.06
Google 739.99 -1.49 LamResrch 38.44 +.59
GrCanyEd 22.88 +.64 LamarAdv 40.07 -.09
GreenMtC 41.23 +1.60 Lattice 4.14 +.05
Groupon 5.35 +.16 LeapWirlss 7.05 +.17
GulfportE 39.78 +.47 LegacyRes 25.56 +.49
HMN Fn 3.30 +.10 LedPhrm 2.29 -.06
HMS Hdgs 27.88 -.60 LibGlobA 67.50 +.92
HainCel 53.32 -.58 LibMedAwi 109.83
Halozyme 7.21 -.05 LibCapA 124.03 +1.41
HanmiRn 15.41 -.26 LibtylntA 21.05 +.12
HansenMed 2.24 -.01 LifeTech 54.02 -.08
HanwhaSol 1.36 -.04 LifePtH 40.80 +.15
Harmonic 5.09 +.03 LinearTch 35.73 -.44
Hasbro 36.89 -.18 LinnEngy 37.11 -.23
HawHold 6.56 +.08 LinnCo n 38.70 +.56
HrfindEx 13.19 -.07 Liquidity 42.70 -1.17
HSchein 83.07 -.29 LivePrsn 13.84 +.19
HercOffsh 6.39 -.23 LodgeNeth .02 -.01
Hibbett 54.28 +.43 LookSmth .81 -.05
HimaxTch 2.91 ... Lulkin 58.17 +.32
Hollysys 12.52 -.30 lululemn gs 70.84 +.26
Hologic 22.35 -.33 Luminex 18.39 +.39
HmLnSvcn 19.90 +.05
HomeAway 22.16 -.13
HorizPhm 2.45 -.04 MAP Phm 15.93 -.02
HotTopic 10.63 -.08 MBFncl 20.87 -.08
HudsCity 8.58 -.03 MELA Sci 1.89 +.05
HuntJB 60.88 -.52 MGE 51.93 +.31


MIPS Tech 7.90 +.01 Paccar 46.03 +.02
MTS 53.36 +.42 PacBbsd 2.49 -.03
MagicJack 14.79 +.20 PacEthan h .35
Majesco 1.06 -.02 PacSunwr 1.90 +.04
MAKOSrg 11.15 -.17 PaciraPhm 19.12 +.47
MannKd 2.59 ... Pactera 7.99 +.01
MktAxess 34.79 -.56 PanASlv 18.83 +.18
MarvelT 8.62 +.14 PaneraBrd 162.96 -3.57
Masimo 20.21 +.02 ParamTch 23.64 +.40
Mattel 37.13 +.13 Parexel 32.74 +.02
MattressF 26.12 +.69 ParkerVsn 2.35 +.27
Mattsonh 1.23 -.06 Patterson 35.49 -.11
Maximlnig 29.61 -.03 PattUTI 19.09 -.28
MaxwlT 8.46 +.10 Paychex 31.78 -.07
MedAssets 18.60 +.10 PnnNGm 50.31 +.14
MedicAcIn 4.77 +.12 PennantPk 11.14 +.02
MediCo 29.26 +.20 PeopUtdF 12.59 -.02
Medivatns 53.12 +.07 Percptr 7.57 +.10
MelooCrwn 18.69 -.37 PeregrinP 2.10 -.04
Mellanox 50.99 +.91 PerionNwk 12.14 -.17
MentorGr 16.35 +.05 Perrigo 103.85 -6.38
MercadoL 86.56 +.27 PetSmart 68.18 -1.25
MergeHIth 2.65 +.04 Pharmacyc 67.42 -.17
Methanx 32.87 -.45 PilgrimsP 8.07
Microchp 33.59 +.04 Plexus 24.81 +.72
MicronT 7.54 +.12 PlugPowrh .65 -.03
MicrosSys 42.49 +.39 Polyoom 11.31 +.44
MicroSemi 21.08 -.41 Popular rs 21.77 -.07
Microsoft 26.83 +.37 Power-One 4.53 +.15
MillerHer 22.54 +.23 PwShs QQQ 67.26 +.09
Mindspeed 4.68 +.17 PriceTR 69.54 +1.33
Misonix 6.89 +.12 priceline 655.49 +1.87
MobileMini 22.36 -.06 Primoris 16.26 +.37
Molex 28.64 +.14 PrivateB 16.19 -.29
Mondelez 27.42 +.11 PrUPQQQs 56.72 +.21
MonroMuf 34.80 -.16 PrognicsPh 3.41 +.07
MonstrBvs 50.92 +2.16 ProgrsSoft 23.08 +.07
Motricityh .46 -.01 PUShQQQrs36.58 -.15
Move Inc 8.38 +.08 ProspctCap 11.24 -.01
Mylan 27.84 -.41 Prothenan 6.43 +.33
MyriadG 26.98 +.23 PureBio rsh .91 +.15
NIl HIdg 6.34 -.11 PureCycle 3.05 +.17
NPS Phm 8.84 -.37 QIAGEN 19.11 +.22
NXP Semi 28.00 -.31 QlikTechh 21.43 +.78
NasdOMX 26.58 -.05 Qlogic 10.09 +.09
NatPenn 9.46 -.10 Qualoom 64.90 +.12
NektarTh 8.27 -.04 QualitySys 17.90 -.07
NeptuneTg 2.35 +.11 Questoor 25.93 +.01
NetApp 33.06 +.64 Quidel 21.39 -.36
NetEase 44.59 +1.35 RFMicD 4.92 +.02
Netfiix 101.29 +3.29 Rambus 5.10 +.02
Neurcrine 8.66 +.01 Randgold 95.18 -1.39
NYMtgTr 6.68 +.04 RaptorPhm 5.70 -.09
NewLeadh 1.10 -.77 Rdiff.cm 3.50 +.53
NewsCpA 26.93 -.04 Regenrn 179.46 -4.31
NewsCpB 27.43 -.07 RentACt 33.72 +.28
NorTrst 52.57 +.16 ReprosTh 17.35 -.14
NwstBcsh 12.40 -.02 RepubAir 8.07 +.34
NovfWrls 1.35 ... RschMotn 13.56 +1.64
Novavax 2.15 +.12 Responsys 6.81 +.09
NuVasive 17.34 +.03 RetailOpp 13.12
NuanceCm 23.02 -.16 RexEnergy 12.80 -.04
NuPathe 2.93 -.13 RigelPh 6.94 +.02
NutriSyst 8.96 +.38 RiverbedT 19.93 +.22
Nvidia 12.21 -.02 RosttaGrs 4.98 -.03
OCZTech 1.94 -.08 RosettaR 46.64 +.37
OReillyAu 88.01 +.27 RossStrs 56.57 -.73
Oclaro 1.80 +.05 RoviCorp 16.65 -.04
Oculus .82 +.05 RoyGId 81.61 +.47
OdysMar 3.18 +.01 Rudolph 13.82 +.26
OldDomFs 35.70 +.01 rue21 27.28 -1.38
OmniVisn 14.84 +.01 RuthsHosp 8.02 +.26
OnSmcnd 7.71 +.08 Ranair 3870 +46
Onoothyr 2.35 +.13
OnyxPh 84.27 -1.91
OpbmerPh 10.25 -.45 S&WSeed 7.50 -.67
Oracle 34.86 -.05 SBACom 70.81 +.19
Orexigen 6.03 +.14 SEI Inv 24.85 +.03
Orthfx 37.44 +.20 SLM Cp 17.37 -.27
OtterTail 25.84 -.03 STEC 5.10 +.15
Overstk 14.69 -.01 SalixPhm 45.79 +.20
SanderFm 48.72 -.29
SanDisk 46.53 +.93
PDCEngy 36.56 +.76 SangBio 6.98 +.08
PDL Bio 7.48 -.04 Sanmina 11.15 +.26
PLXTch 4.28 +.19 Santarus 11.48 +.04
PMCSra 5.34 -.03 Sapient 11.58 +.16
PSSWrld 28.91 +.02 Sareptars 26.18 -.01


SavientPh 1.15
Schnitzer 29.44
SchoolSp .74
SciClone 4.96
SeagateT 33.29
SearsHIdgs 40.95
SeattGen 26.87
SelCmfrt 27.33
Selectvlns 20.16
SemiLedsh .77
Semtech 29.19
Sequenom 4.23
SvcSource 6.51
Shire 98.55
Shutterfly 32.61
SityTech 2.28
SigmaAld 76.40
SignatBk 73.05
SilicGrln 10.60
Silicnlmg 4.71
SilicnMotn 15.47
Slcnware 5.27
SilvStdg 13.55
Sina 54.97
Sindair 12.95
Sinovach 3.67
SiriusXM 3.16
Skullcandy 6.97
SkywksSol 21.37
SmithWes 8.33
SodaStrm 48.10
Sohu.cm 48.22
SolarCap 24.65
SolarCityn 15.50
Solazyme 7.93
SonicCorp 11.05
Sonus 2.21
SouMoBc 22.94
Sourcefire 42.78
SpectPh 12.72
SpiritAir 18.27
Splunkn 32.27
Spreadtrm 17.17
Staples 11.98
StarSdent 2.60
Starbucks 55.01
StfDynam 14.87
StemCells 1.76
Stereotxrs 2.67
SMadden 43.78
Stratasys 84.32
SunesisPh 4.09
SunPwrh 8.19
SuperMicro 9.98
SusqBnc 10.94
SwishrH hlf 1.59
SycamNets 2.34
Symantec 19.94
Symetricm 5.79
Synapfcs 30.52
Synchron 22.96
SynrgyPh 6.42
Synopsys 31.81
SyntaPhm 10.46
TFS Fncl 10.03
tw teleoom 26.40
TakeTwo 12.31
TASER 9.36
TechData 47.23
Telikrs 2.98
Tellabs 2.23
TeslaMot 32.91
TxCapBsh 45.74
Texlnst 32.42
TexRdhse 17.78
Theravnce 23.27
Thoratec 37.31
ThrshdPhm 4.60
TibcoSft 22.95
TitanMach 28.20
TiVo Inc 12.21
TractSupp 91.49
TransGIb 8.98
TrnSwtch h .95
Tranzyme h .60
TrimbleN 62.08
TripAdvis 43.98
TriQuint 5.15


+.03 Trovagnes 8.45 +.87
-.23 TrueRelig 24.71 -.13
-.01 TrstNY 5.18 -.17
+.11 Trustmk 23.38 -.25
-.39 USATechh 2.18 -.02
-.35
-.31 UTWrldwd 14.21 +.16
UltaSalon 93.39 -.93
+.10 Umpqua 12.38 -.18
-.01 UniPixel 17.19 +1.83
-.46 UBWV 25.26 -.08
+.04 UtdNtrlF 52.11 -.47
+.19 UtdOnln 6.21 +.06
+.94 USEnr 1.61
+.2305 UtdTherap 52.17 -.36
-.33 UnivDisp 25.20 -.06
-1.31 UnivFor 39.95 -.15
+.22 UnwiredP 1.87 +.56
+.05 UranmRs h .50 -.07
+.88 UrbanOut 42.75 +.11
-.10
-.45
+.75 VCAAnt 21.98 -.02
-.14 VOXX Ind 9.13 -.13
+.17 ValueClick 19.89 -.01
-.13 VanSTCpB 80.34
+.05 VanlntCpB 87.68 +.06
+.07 Velb 5.37 +.48
+1.10 VBradley 23.40 -.10
+.28 VerintSys 31.50 +.44
+.15 Verisign 38.00 -.87
-.26 Verisk 53.90 +.03
+.05 VertxPh 47.31 +.51
+.2307 ViaSat 37.62 -.04
.46 ViacomB 57.78 -.72
-1.44 Vical 3.31 -.01
-.29 ViewPtFn 21.47 -.23
+.06 VirgnMdah 37.53 -.19
+2.50 VACmce 10.55 +1.06
-.04 ViroPhrm 24.74 -.19
+.24 Virtusa 16.07 +.07
-.07 Vivus 13.89 -.17
+.47
-.08 Vodafobne 26.59 -.06
-.01 Volcano 25.60 +.09
-.12 WarnerCh 13.06 -.13
+.56 WarrenRs 2.91 -.01
+.74 WashFed 17.09 -.06
-.11 Web.com 15.87 +.12
+.01 WebMD 16.08 +.64
-.07 Wendys Co 4.82 +.02
-.02
-.03 WernerEnt 22.70 -.04
-.04 WDigital 43.98 -.18
Westmrld 10.12 -.03
-.01 Wstptlnng 28.01 +.08
+.17 WetSeal 2.81 +.01
-.06 WholeFd 88.66 +.22
+.07 WilshBcp 6.15 -.08
+.34 Windstrm 9.96 +.04
+06 WisdomTr 7.79 +.19
-.06
-.10 WrightM 21.37 -.05
+.33 Wynn 122.99 +.09
+.02 XOMA 2.83 -.02
+.58 X)linx 35.80 -.20
+1.53 Xyratexs 8.37 +.20
YRCWwde 6.70 -.02
.62 YadMnVFn 3.00
-.52 Yahoo 19.29 +.30
+.14 Yandex 23.12 -.32
-.24 Yongye 5.86 -.08
+.09 YouOnDrs 1.18 -.17
-.11 ZaZaEngy 2.14 +.01
+.75 Zagg 7.68 -.02
+.41 Zalicus .78 +.01
-.35 ZonBcp 21.75 -.20
-1.55 Zopharm 4.49 -.03
-.6204 Zpcar 12.19 +.01
-.06 Zogenix 1.46 +.04
+.04 Zoltek 8.48 +.42
+.49 Zumiez 20.22 -.02
-.02 Zynga 2.59 +.11


DIARY


DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.9410 4.9400
Australia .9492 .9438
Bahrain .3771 .3771
Brazil 2.0345 2.0306
Britain 1.6121 1.6153
Canada .9841 .9842
Chile 472.28 471.35
China 6.2168 6.2256
Colombia 1763.50 1764.50
Czech Rep 19.20 19.33
Denmark 5.5944 5.6297
Dominican Rep 40.40 40.40
Egypt 6.5460 6.5458
Euro .7497 .7545
Hong Kong 7.7519 7.7512
Hungary 221.95 221.54
India 54.825 54.575
Indnsia 9723.00 9660.00
Israel 3.7395 3.7510
Japan 89.20 88.19
Jordan .7105 .7087
Lebanon 1505.50 1505.50
Malaysia 3.0205 3.0290
Mexico 12.6485 12.6325
N. Zealand 1.1955 1.1841
Norway 5.5311 5.5287
Peru 2.550 2.551
Poland 3.08 3.08
Russia 30.3335 30.3416
Singapore 1.2250 1.2228
So. Africa 8.7341 8.6578
So. Korea 1056.71 1058.60
Sweden 6.4721 6.4962
Switzerlnd .9130 .9145
Taiwan 28.96 28.98
Thailand 30.29 30.26
Turkey 1.7699 1.7675
U.A.E. 3.6733 3.6731
Uruguay 19.3799 19.3399
Venzuel 4.2952 4.2927


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.07 0.07
6-month 0.10 0.12
5-year 0.78 0.81
10-year 1.87 1.90
30-year 3.05 3.10



S FUTURES

Exch Contract Settle Chg

Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Feb 13 93.56 -.26
Corn CBOT Mar 13 7083/4 +10
Wheat CBOT Mar13 7543/4+1014
Soybeans CBOT Mar13 137314 -6/2
Cattle CME Feb 13 130.60 -.95
Sugar (world) ICE Mar 13 19.17 +.21
OrangeJuice ICE May13 113.80 +.40



SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $1660.00 $1648.10
Silver (troy oz., spot) $30.36/ $29.896
Copper (pound) $3.639b $3.6/90
Platinum (troy oz., spot)$16b29.30 $1bbb.2U

NMER= NewYork Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


I AMEX


I NASDA


Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD
AKSteel ... ... ... 4.68 -.11 +1.7 McDnlds 3.08 3.4 17 91.73 +.33 +4.0
AT&Tlnc 1.80 5.3 45 34.27 -.10 +1.7 Microsoft .92 3.4 15 26.83 +.37 +.4
Ametek s .24 .6 21 38.77 -.02 +3.2 MotrlaSolu 1.04 1.8 24 57.50 +.72 +3.3
ABInBev 1.57 1.8 ... 87.60 +.99 +.2 NextEraEn 2.40 3.3 14 71.78 +.29 +3.7
BkofAm .04 .3 31 11.63 -.15 +.2 Penney ... ... 18.26 -.89 -7.4
CapCtyBk ...... 11.99 -.13 +5.5 PiedmOfc .80 4.3 16 18.40 +.10 +1.9
CntryLink 2.90 7.2 36 40.32 +.14 +3.1 RegionsFn .04 .6 ... 7.24 -.11 +1.5
Citigroup .04 .1 13 42.34 -.49 +7.0 SearsHIdgs .. ...... 40.95 -.35 -1.0
CmwREIT 1.00 6.4 28 15.71 ... -.8 Smucker 2.08 2.4 20 88.22 -1.62 +2.3
Disney .75 1.5 16 50.58 -.21 +1.6 SprintNex ... ....... 5.92 -.02 +4.4
DukeEn rs 3.06 4.7 18 65.69 +.32 +3.0 Texlnst .84 2.6 21 32.42 -.01 +5.0
EPR Prop 3.00 6.5 20 46.01 +.04 -.2 TimeWarn 1.04 2.1 18 49.61 -.20 +3.7
ExxonMbI 2.28 2.5 11 89.61 +.51 +3.5 UniFirst .15 .2 16 81.83 +.47 +11.6
FordM .40 2.9 11 14.00 +.17 +8.1 VerizonCm 2.06 4.8 40 43.30 -.29 +.1
GenElec .76 3.6 16 21.13 -.04 +.7 Vodafone 1.54 5.8 ... 26.59 -.06 +5.6
HomeDp 1.16 1.8 23 63.70 +.08 +3.0 WalMart 1.59 2.3 14 68.63 +.27 +.6
Intel .90 4.1 10 22.00 +.20 +6.7 Walgrn 1.10 2.8 18 39.10 +.53 +5.6
IBM 3.40 1.7 13194.45 +1.57 +1.5 YRCWwde ... ... ... 6.70 -.02 -.7
Lowes .64 1.8 21 35.83 +.28 +.9


AG SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I A







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013 A7


I MUTUiijAL DS I


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital I: LgCpVal 20.08 -.03
Balancp 17.42 ... NatlMunlnc 10.40 +.01
RetInc 8.97 +.02 SpEqtA 17.00
Alger Funds B: TradGvA 7.30
SmCapGr 7.02 ... Eaton Vance B:
AllianceBern A: HIthSBt 9.48 -.02
GblRiskp 16.40 -.02 NatlMulnc 10.39
GIbThGrAp 67.74 -.08 Eaton Vance C:
HighlncoAp 9.63 ... GovtCp 7.29 +.01
SmCpGrA 38.82 -.03 NatMunlnc 10.39
AllianceBern Adv: Eaton Vance I:
LgCpGrAd 31.63 +.13 FltgRt 9.16
AllianceBern B: GblMacAbR 9.89
GIbThGrBt 57.92 -.07 LgCapVal 20.14 -.02
GrowlthBt 28.42 +.05 ParStEMkt 15.28 -.04
SCpGrBt 30.58 -.03 FMI Funds:
AllianceBern C: LgCappn 17.65 +.03
SCpGrCt 30.76 -.03 FPA Funds:
Allianz Fds Insti: Newlnco 10.59
NFJDvVI 13.06 ... FPACres 28.74 -.01
SmCpVi 31.14 -.01 Fairholme 31.38 -.33
Allianz Funds C: Federated A:
AGICGrthC 25.60 +.07 MidGrStA 37.20
Amer Beacon Insti: MuSecA 10.84 +.01
LgCaplnst 22.43 -.04 Federated Instl:
Amer Beacon Inv: KaufmnR 5.20 -.01
LgCaplnv 21.29 -.03 TotRetBd 11.41 +.01
Amer Century Adv: StrValDvlS 5.12 +.01
EqGroAp 25.23 -.01 Fidelity Adv FocT:
Amer Century Inv: EnergyT 37.07
AIICapGr 29.47 ... HItCarT 23.49 -.11
Balanced 17.34 +.01 Fidelity Advisor A:
DivBnd 11.12 +.01 Nwlnsghp 23.50 +.01
Eqlnc 8.04 +.01 StrInA 12.71
Growthl 27.69 +.05 Fidelity Advisor C:
Heritagel 22.98 .07 Nwlnsghtn 22.20
IncGro 28.16 +.04 Fidelity Advisor I:
InfAdjBd 13.13 +.02 EqGrln 67.54 +.09
IntDisc 10.36 -.02 Eqlnin 27.21
InfitlGrol 11.72 -.01 FItRatel n 9.96
NewOpp 8.71 ... IntBdln 11.72 +.01
OneChAg 13.54 ... NwlnsgtIn 23.78
OneChMd 12.94 ... Strlnin 12.87 +.01
RealEstl 24.11 -.03 Fidelity AdvisorT:
Ultra 26.96 +.01 BalancT 16.99
Valuelnv 6.60 ... DivGrTp 13.83
American Funds A: EqGrTp 63.11 +.07
AmcpAp 22.35 +.02 EqInT 26.79
AMutAp 29.06 -.01 GrOppT 42.99 +.01
BalAp 20.88 +.01 HilnAdTp 10.50 +.01
BondAp 12.93 +.02 IntBdT 11.69 +.01
CaplBAp 53.62 +.07 MulncTp 13.83 +.01
CapWGAp 38.12 +.07 OvrseaT 18.34 +.02
CapWAp 21.15 ... STFiT 9.36
EupacA p 42.00 +.06 Fidelity Freedom:
FdlnvAp 42.11 +.03 FF2010n 14.31
GIblBalA 27.16 +.04 FF2010K 13.06 +.01
GovtAp 14.17 +.01 FF2015n 11.98 +.01
GwthAp 35.51 +01 FF2015K 13.14 +.01
HITrAp 11.48 ... FF2020n 14.53
IncoAp 18.38 +.01 FF2020K 13.60 +.01
IntBdAp 13.74 +.01 FF2025n 12.17
IntlGrIncAp 32.23 +.07 FF2025K 13.83
ICAAp 31.19 +.04 FF2030n 14.51 +.01
LtTEBAp 16.39 ... FF2030K 13.99
NEcoAp 29.39 ... FF2035n 12.09
NPerAp 32.16 +.08 FF2035K 14.18
NwWrldA 55.22 -.18 FF2040n 8.44
STBFAp 10.07 FF2040K 14.23 +.01
SmCpAp 40.96 -.08 FF2045K 14.42
TxExAp 13.21 Fidelity Invest:
WshAp 32.04 -.01 AIISectEq 12.40
Ariel Investments: AMgr50n 16.70
Apprec 43.09 ... AMgr70rn 17.71
Ariel 53.45 +.03 AMgr20rn 13.21
Artisan Funds: Balancn 20.61
Intl 25.17 +.10 BalancedK 20.60 -.01
IntlnstI 25.31 +.10 BlueChGrn 50.59 +.04
InftValr 31.17 +.11 BluChpGrK 50.63 +.04
MidCap 38.98 -.06 CAMunn 13.01
MidCapVal 21.54 +.04 Canadan 54.68
BBH Funds: CapAp n 30.37 -.02
CorSeIN 17.89 +.01 CapDevOn 12.15
Baron Funds: Cplncrn 9.62 +.01
Asset 50.80 -.02 ChinaRg r 31.39 -.21
Growth 55.51 +.14 CngS 465.09
SmallCap 27.18 +.09 CTMunren 12.03
Bernstein Fds: Contran 80.15 +.02
IntDur 14.05 +.01 ContraK 80.09 +.02
DivMu 14.86 ... CnvScn 26.81 +.09
TxMgdln 14.29 ... DisEqn 25.12 -.03
Berwyn Funds: DiscEqF 25.06 -.03
Fund 33.34 +.16 DivlntIn 30.53 +.01
BlackRockA: DivrslntKr 30.47 +.01
EqtyDiv 20.40 ... DivStkOn 17.95 +.01
GIAIAr 20.10 DivGthn 30.92 +.01
HiYInvA 8.18 EmergAsrn30.23 -.15
InflOpAp 33.43 -.02 EmrMkn 23.35 -.14
BlackRock B&C: Eq lncn 48.52
GIAICt 18.71 EQIIn 20.09 +.01
BlackRock InstI: ECapAp 19.60 +.11
EquityDv 20.44 Europe 32.06 +.17
GlbAllocr 20.19 Exch 323.88
HiYldBd 8.18 ... Exportn 22.55 -.02
BruceFund401.39 +.77 Fideln 37.04 -.04
Buffalo Funds: Fifty r n 21.01 -.03
SmCapn 29.03 +.02 FItRateHi r n 9.97 +.01
CGM Funds: FrlnOnen 29.97 +.01
Focusn 31.36 -.04 GNMAn 11.74 +.01
MutIn 29.75 +.01 Govtnc 10.55 +.01
Realtyn 30.25 -.05 GroCoen 96.39 -.15
Calamos Funds: Grolncn 21.92 -.02
GrwthAp 48.78 +.10 GrowCoFe 96.27 .14
Calvert Invest: GrSfratrn 21.32 -.02
Incop 16.61 +.01 rht rn 2 .02
InflEqAp 14.49 +.02 Highncr n 9.43 +01
SocialAp 31.16 +01 Indepnn 26.95 -.02
SocBdp 16.29 +.02 IntPmBdn 131 +01
L IntBd n 11.13 +.01
SocEqAp 39.74 +.04 IntGovn 10.84 +.01
TxFLgp 16.66 +.01 lntrnv n 10.84 +01
Cohen & Stee InMun 10.68
Cohen &Steers: -.02 IntDiscn 3372 +.05
RltyShrs 65.78 -.02 InflSCprn 20.81 +.01
ColumbiaClassA: nvGrdn 1157 +02
Acornt 30.29 -.03 InvGBn 7.99 +.01
CaAlloMod p 11.51 Japan r 9.96 .02
DivOpptyA 8.97 .. nr 9. 9 -.02
DivOpptyA 8.97 JpnSm n 9.23
LgCapGrAt28.00 +.01 LgCapVal 11.55 -.01
LgCorQAp 6.66 LatA 47.23 .24
MdCpGrOp 10.46 -.01 LevCoStkn 33.38 +.07
MidCVIOpp 8.77 -.02 LowPrn 40.62 +.08
TxEAp 14.36 +.01 LowPriKr 4058 +08
FrontierA 11.25 -.02 Magelln n 7577 -.03
GlobTech 21.45 +.08 MDMurn 11.67
Columbia Cl ,T&G: MAMunn 1274
EmMktOpln 9.01 -.02 MegaCpStknl2.28 -.01
Columbia Class Z: MIMunn 12.58 +.01
AcornZ 31.42 -.02 MidCapn 30.30 -.03
AcornlntZ 41.65 -.18 MNMunn 12.04
DivlncoZ 15.20 +.02 MtgSecn 11.34
IntTEBd 11.03 ... Munilncn 13.62 +.01
SelLgCapG 14.65 +.07 NJ Munrn 12.30 +.01
Credit Suisse Comm: NwMktrn 17.78 -.04
ComRett 8.00 ... NwMillen 31.29 -.05
DFA Funds: NYMunn 13.74 +.01
InflCorEqn 10.98 OTCn 62.23 +.21
USCorEql n12.78 -.01 OhMun n 12.44 +.01
USCorEq2nl2.61 -.01 1001ndex 9.74 +.01
DWS Invest A: Ovrsea n 32.94 +.07
CommAp 19.51 -.01 PcBasn 25.55 -.10
DWS Invest S: PAMunrn 11.51 +.01
CoreEqtyS 18.96 +.05 Puritnn 19.83
CorPlslnc 11.27 +.01 PuritanK 19.83 +.01
EmMkGrr 16.70 -.11 RealElncr 11.56 +.01
EnhEmMk 11.38 -.03 RealEn 32.76 -.03
EnhGIbBdr 10.39 +.01 SAIISecEqF 12.39
GIbSmCGr 39.08 +.06 SCmdtyStrtn8.77 +.01
GIblThem 24.10 SCmdtyStrFn8.80 +.01
Gold&Prc 13.53 -.05 SrEmrgMkt 17.39 -.06
HiYldTx 13.17 +.02 SEmgMktF 17.42 -.06
IntTxAMT 12.22 ... SrslntGrw 12.14 +.02
Intl FdS 43.73 +.08 SerlntlGrF 12.16 +.02
LgCpFoGr 33.53 +.01 SrslntVal 9.60 +.01
LatAmrEq 33.55 -.07 SerlntlValF 9.62 +.01
MgdMuniS 9.59 +.01 SrInvGrdF 11.57 +.01
MATFS 15.33 +.01 StlntMun 10.87 +.01
SP500S 19.55 STBFn 8.60
WorldDiv 24.30 +.02 SmCapDiscn24.92 +02
Davis Funds A: SmIlCpS r n 18.64 -.02
NYVenA 36.25 +.02 SCpValur 16.78 +.03
Davis Funds B: StkSelLCVrnl2.13 -.02
NYVenB 34.62 +.02 StkSlcACap n29.21 -.02
Davis Funds C: S+0 SelSmCp 20.82
NYVenC 34.94 +.02 Sfratlncn 11.39
Davis FundsY: StrReRtr 9.67
NYVenY 36.64 +.02 TaxFrBrn 11.76
Delaware Invest A: TotalBdn 10.94 +.01
Diver Inc p 9.34 -.01 Trend n 75.64 -.06
SMIDCapG 23.59 +02 USBI n 11.86 +01
TxUSAp 12.34 +.01 Utilityn 19.03 +.01
Delaware Invest B: ValStratn 32.69 +.05
SelGrBt 36.38 +.07 Valuen 79.06 -.02
Dimensional Fds: Wrldwn 20.95
EmMCrEqn20.73 -.11 Fidelity Selects:
EmMktV 30.51 -.19 Aim 42.70 -.01
IntSmVan 16.66 -.01 Bankingn 20.07 -.14
LargeCo 11.59 Biotchn 118.08 -.32
TAUSCorE2n10.32-.01 Brokrn 53.10 +17
USLgVan 23.73 -.05 Chemn 124.38 -.08
USMicron 15.09 ComrnEquipn24.10 +20
USTgdVal 17.60 -.01 Compn 63.14 +.20
US Smalln 23.45 -.01 ConDisn 26.21 -.03
USSmVa 27.11 -.03 ConsuFnn 15.36 -.06
IntlSmCon 16.45 .02 ConStapn 81.81 +.13
EmMktSCn21.70 .09 CstHon 50.30 -.06
EmgMktn 27.86 -.15 DfAern 89.50 -.42
Fixdn 10.33 ... Electrn 47.86 +.30
IntGFxlnn 12.97 +.02 Enrgyn 52.45
IntVan 17.18 ... EngSvn 69.56 -.20
InfProSec 12.75 +.02 EnvAltEnrnl7.68 -.01
Glb5Fxlncn11.13 ... FinSvn 64.17 -.10
2YGIFxdn 10.04 ... Goldrn 36.46 -.04
DFARIEn 26.87 -.01 Healthn 140.40 -.64
Dodge&Cox: Insur n 53.69 -.06
Balanced 80.56 +.04 Leisrn 105.37 +.16
GblStock 9.33 ... Material n 74.03 -.09
Income 13.87 ... MedDI n 58.64 -.23


IntlS 35.74 +.01 MdEqSysn 29.34 -.01
Stock 127.07 +03 Mulndn 59.38 -.05
DoubleUne Funds: NtGasn 31.96 -.02
TRBd I 11.39 Pharm n 15.77 -.04
TRBdNp 11.38 ... Retailn 63.51 +.17
Dreyfus: Softwr n 85.50 +.59
Aprec 45.27 +.16 Techn 103.98 +.19
CTA 12.41 Telcm n 51.92 -.15
CorVA Transn 54.32 -.03
Dreyf 10.15 UtilGr sn 57.93 +.11
DryMid r 29.99 Wireless n 8.57 +.03
GNMA 15.63 +.01 Fidelity Spartan:
GrChinaAr 37.06 -.46 5001dxlnvn 52.14
HiYldAp 6.74 5001dx I 52.15 +.01
StratValA 32.10 -.09 IntlnxInvn 35.09 +.04
TechGroA 35.62 +.18 TotMldxFr 42.65 +.01
DreihsAclnc 10.75 +.01 TotMktlnv n 42.64
Driehaus Funds: USBond I 11.86 +.01
EMktGr 31.06 -.11 Fidelity Spart Adv:
EVPTxMEml49.65 -.11 ExMktAdrn41.55 +.02
Eaton Vance A: 5001dxAdvn52.15 +.01
ChinaAp 18.65 -.15 IntAdrn 35.09 +.04
AMTFMulnc 10.59 +.01 TotMktAd r n42.64
MultiCGrA 8.79 ...USBond 11.86 +.01
InBosA 6.06


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAYV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
First Eagle:
GIbIA 49.36 -.06
OverseasA 22.28 -.04
First Investors A
BIChpAp
Eqtylnco p 7.88 +.02
GloblA p 7.11 +.01
GovtAp 11.35
GrolnAp 17.19 +.04
IncoAp 2.66 +.01
MATFAp 12.50 +.01
MITFAp 12.91 +.01
NJTFAp 13.72
NYTFAp 15.28 +.01
OppAp 30.66 +.03
PATFAp 13.85 +.01
SpSitAp 24.17 -.05
TxExlncop 10.33 +.01
TotRtAp 16.91 +.03
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 11.08
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUS p 8.84 +.01
ALTFAp 11.93 +.01
AZTFAp 11.54 +.01
CallnsAp 13.07 +.01
CAIntAp 12.23
CalTFAp 7.56 +.01
COTFAp 12.48 +.01
CTTFAp 11.46 +.01
CvtScAp 15.53
Dbl TFA 12.08 +.03
DynTchA 34.55 -.01
EqlncAp 18.67 -.01
Fedlntp 12.63 +.01
FedTFAp 12.80 +.01
FLTFAp 11.97 +.02
FoundAlp 11.48 +.02
GATFAp 12.85 +.01
GoldPrMA 30.94 -.05
GrwthAp 52.05 +.01
HYTFA p 10.99 +.02
HilncA 2.10
IncomAp 2.28
InsTFAp 12.67 +.01
NYITFp 11.98
LATFAp 12.09 +.01
LMGvScA 10.23
MDTFAp 12.01 +.01
MATFAp 12.23 +.01
MITFAp 12.39
MNInsA 13.05
MOTFAp 12.80 +.01
NJTFAp 12.64 +.01
NYTFAp 12.16 +.01
NCTFAp 12.98 +.01
OhiolAp 13.17
ORTFAp 12.62 +.01
PATFAp 10.98 +.02
ReEScAp 17.26 -.01
RisDvAp 38.94 +.04
SMCpGrA 34.92 -.06
Stratlnc p 10.76
TtlRtnAp 10.34 +.02
USGovAp 6.78
UbIsAp 13.81 +.01
VATFAp 12.30 +.01
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdvn 13.46 -.01
IncmeAd 2.26
TGIbTRAdv 13.78
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.30
USGvCt 6.74
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 23.04 +.01
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktAp 24.12 -.10
ForgnA p 7.17 +.03
GIBdAp 13.50 -.01
GrwthAp 20.25 +.11
WorldAp 16.40 +.05
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 23.55 -.10
ForgnC p 7.03 +.03
GIBdCp 13.53 -.01
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 16.89 +.01
GE Elfun S&S:
S&Slnc 11.73 +.01
US Eqty 46.22 +.03
GMOTrust:
USTreasx 25.00
GMOTrust IIl:
Quality 23.05 +.04
GMOTrust IV:
IntlntrVI 21.62 +.05
GMOTrust VI:
EmgMktsr 11.85 -.05
IntlCorEq 29.29 +.06
Quality 23.05 +.04
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 53.55
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 40.25 -.02
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 25.49 +.01
HiYield 7.39
HYMuni n 9.48 +.02
MidCapV 40.52 -.02
ShtDrTF n 10.66
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.48 +.01
CapAplnst 44.04 +.05
Intllnv t 62.55 -.05
Intlr 63.14 -.05
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 35.58 -.03
DivGthAp 21.35 +.01
IntOpA p 15.38 -.02
Hartford FdsY:
CapAppl n 35.56 -.04
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 44.81 -.02
Div&Gr 22.25 +.01
Balanced 21.51 +.01
MidCap 29.35
TotRetBd 12.01 +.01
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
StrGrowth 10.56 -.01
ICON Fds:
Energy S 19.38 -.02
HIthcareS 18.15 -.06
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.94
IVA Funds:
WldwideIr 16.26 +.04
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 13.82 -.03
Invesco Funds:
Energy 38.77 -.03
Utlites 17.33 -.01
Invesco Funds A:
BalRiskA 12.46 -.03
Chartp 18.48 +.01
CmstkA 18.45 -.02
Constp 24.83 -.01
DivrsDivp 13.83 -.02
EqlncA 9.43 -.01
GrlncAp 21.69 -.02
HilncMu p
HiYldp 4.49
HYMuA 10.16 +.01
InfitlGrow 29.42 +.06
MunilnA 14.00 +.01
PATFA 17.13 +.01
US MortgA 13.01
Invesco Funds B:
MunilnB 13.97 +.01
US Mortg 12.94
Invesco Funds Y:
BalRiskY 12.54 -.03
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCt 25.94 -.02
AssetStA p 26.60 -.02
AssetSb r 26.80 -.01
HilncA p 8.63 +.01
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 12.05 +.01
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 12.10 +.01
JP Morgan Insth:
MdCpVal n 28.68 -.01
JPMorgan R C:
CoreBondn 12.05 +01
ShtDurBd 11.00 ..
JPMorgan Select:
USEquity n 11.62 ..
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 12.04 +.01
HighYld n 8.25 +.01
lntnTFBd n 11.37
LgCpGr 24.80 +.01
ShtDurBd n 11.00
USLCCrPIs n22.99 +.02
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 26.77 +.04
ContrarnT 15.75 -.05
EnterprT 68.42 -.06
FIxBndT 10.79 +.01
GlUfeSciTr 31.57 -.10
GIbSel T 10.39 -.01
GITechTr 19.48 +.07
Grw&lncT 35.20 +.05
Janus T 32.79 +.01
OvrseasTr 35.50 -.53
PrkMCVal T21.99 -.04
ResearchT 33.67 +.08
ShTmBdT 3.09
TwentyT 64.16
VentureT 56.05 +.02
WrldWTr 49.21 -.02
John Hancock A:
BondAp 16.49 +.03


IncomeA p 6.80
RgBkA 14.68 -.10
John Hancock B:
IncomeB 6.81 +.01
John Hancock Cl 1:
LSAggr 13.28 -.01
LSBalanc 13.83 +.01
LSConsrv 13.54 +.02
LSGrwth 13.84
LSModer 13.52 +.01
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 19.72 -.12


Name NAV Chg
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 20.21 -.12
Legg Mason A:
CBInrlAIIC 9.57 +.03
CBAAgGr 130.81 +.23
CBAAppr 16.21
CBALgCGr 23.71 +.06
WAHilncAt 6.36
WAMgMup 17.31 +.01
Legg Mason B:
CBALgCGr 21.32 +.06
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 31.69
CMValTrp 44.57 +.08
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 27.40 -.05
SmCap 30.09 +.10
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 15.37 +.02
StrlncC 15.88 +.02
LSBondR 15.31 +.02
StrIncA 15.79 +.02
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.72 +.01
InvGrBdY 12.72
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 12.50 -.01
BdDebAp 8.24 +.01
ShDurlncAp 4.66
MidCpAp 18.52 -.04
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncC t 4.69
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.65
MFS Funds A:
MITA 22.23 +.02
MIGA 18.47 +.02
EmGA 50.61 +.01
HilnA 3.62
MFLA
TotRA 15.58 +.01
UtilA 19.00 -.01
ValueA 26.40 +.01
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 16.62 +.02
GvScBn 10.42
HilnBn 3.63
MulnBn 9.06 +.01
TotRBn 15.59 +.01
MFS Funds I:
Valuel 26.52 +.01
MFS Funds InstI:
IntlEq n 19.59 +.06
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 6.18 +.01
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 14.91
GovtBt 8.91 +.01
HYIdBBt 6.15 +.01
IncmBldr 18.07 +.03
InitEqB 11.07 +.02
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 40.10 -.10
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 87.12 -.19
Managers Funds:
Yacknannp nl9.74 +.02
YacktFocn 21.14 +.01
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 7.93 +.01
Matthews Asian:
AsiaDvlnvr 14.72 -.08
AsianGllnv 18.73 -.08
Indialnvr 17.52 -.13
PacTgrlnv 24.64 -.17
MergerFdn 15.87 -.02
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.91 +.02
TotRtBdl 10.91 +.02
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 2.59
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 15.51 -.01
MorganStanley Inst:
IntDEql 14.67
MCapGrl 35.97 +.10
Muhlenkn 54.74 -.01
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 29.18
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrY 33.83 +.03
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 13.86 +.04
GblDiscA 29.19
GIbDiscZ 29.58 +.01
QuestZ 17.03
SharesZ 23.21 +.01
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 23.29 +.06
Geneslnst 50.23 +.04
Intl r 17.83 -.05
LgCapV Inv 29.21 -.02
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 52.25 +.05
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc In 9.96 +.01
Nicholasn 50.43 +.06
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 10.93 +.01
HiYFxlnc 7.63 +.01
SmCpldx 9.61
Stkldx 18.26
Technly 16.81 +.12
Nuveen Cl A:
HYMuBdp 17.29 +.02
LtMBAp 11.25
Nuveen Cl R:
IntDMBd 9.40 +.01
HYMunBd 17.29 +.03
Nuveen Cl Y:
RealEstn 21.66 -.01
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 45.64 +.12
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 29.19 -.01
Globall 24.39 +.12
Intll r 21.76 +.12
Oakmark 50.17 -.10
Select 32.26 -.02
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.70
GlbSMdCap 15.05 -.01
LgCapStrat 10.29
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 7.33 +.01
AMTFrNY 12.39 +.01
CAMuniAp 8.87
CapApAp 50.06 +.05
CaplncAp 9.23 +.01
DvMktAp 36.00 +.01
Discp 60.99 -.02
EquityA 9.88 +.01
EqlncAp 26.49 -.03
GlobAp 66.58 +.25
GIbOppA 30.51 +.09
GblStrlncA 4.38 -.01
Goldp 31.26 -.03
IntBdAp 6.61
IntGrw p 31.36 +.04
LtdTmMu 15.14 +.01
MnStFdA 38.30 -.01
PAMuniAp 11.56 +.01
SenFltRtA 8.33 +.01
USGv p 9.54 +.01
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 7.29 +.01
AMTFrNY 12.40 +.01
CplncB t 9.04 +.01
EquityB 9.14 +.01
GblStfrlncB 4.40
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.39
RoMuAp 17.14 +.01
RcNtMuA 7.67 +.01
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 35.57 +.01
IntlBdY 6.60 -.01
IntGrowY 31.19 +.04
Osterweis Funds:
Sklncon 11.73 +.01
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.88 ...
TotRtAd 11.24 +.01
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AlAsetAutr 11.16 +.01
AIIAsset 12.71
ComodRR 6.62 +.01
Divlnc 12.30
EmgMkCur 10.61 -.02
EmMkBd 12.49 -.02
Fltlnc r 9.04 -.01
ForBdUnr 10.81 .03
FrgnBd 10.79 -.01
HiYId 9.74 +.01
InvGrCp 11.17 +.02
LowDu 10.50 +.01
ModDur 10.90 +01
RealRtnIl 12.23 +.01
ShortT 9.88
TotRt 11.24 +.01
TRII 10.66 +.02
TRIll 9.89 +.01
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIlAstAutt 11.13 +.01
LwDurA 10.50 +.01
RealRtAp 12.23 +.01
TotRtA 11.24 +.01
PIMCO Funds C:
AIIAstAutt 11.09 +.01
RealRtCp 12.23 +.01
TotRtCt 11.24 +.01
PIMCO Funds D:
RealRtnp 12.23 +01
TRIp 11.24 +.01
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIAuthP 11.16 +.02


TotRtnP 11.24 +.01
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 30.24 +.01
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 49.06 -.16
Pioneer Funds A:
BondAp 9.94 +.01
IntiValA 19.81 +.02
PionFdAp 33.50 -.04
ValueAp 12.31
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 10.63 +.01


Name NAV Chg
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 10.74 +.02
Pioneer FdsY:
StratlncYp 11.36 +.01
Price Funds:
Balancen 21.08 +.01
BIChipn 47.51 +.06
CABondn 11.60 +.01
CapAppn 22.76
DivGron 27.18 -.01
EmMktBn 14.18 -.04
EmEurop 19.78 -.07
EmMktS n 34.37 -.22
Eqlncn 27.27 -.02
Eqlndexn 39.66
Europen 16.40 +.06
GNMAn 9.98
Growthn 39.10 +.03
Gr&ln n 23.33 -.01
HIthSci n 43.66 -.21
HiYield n 7.07 +.01
InsflCpG 19.62 +.03
InstHiYId n 9.87 +.01
MCEqGrn 31.52 -.03
IntlBondn 10.05 -.01
IntDis n 47.35 +.07
Intl G&I 13.26
IntlStkn 14.67 -.03
Japann 8.13 -.01
LatAm n 38.78 -.21
MDShrtn 5.23
MDBondn 11.13
MidCapn 58.15 -.05
MCapVal n 24.79 +.03
NAmer n 36.96 -.02
N Asian 16.99 -.06
New Era n 43.03 -.09
N Horiz n 34.50 -.02
NIncn 9.84 +.01
NYBondn 11.98 +.01
OverS SF n 8.69
PSIncn 17.50
RealAssetrinll.28 -.04
RealEstn 21.42 -.01
R2010n 16.73
R2015n 13.12
R2020n 18.25 -.01
R2025n 13.42 -.01
R2030n 19.39 -.02
R2035n 13.73 -.01
R2040n 19.61 -.01
R2045n 13.05 -.01
SciTecn 28.14 +.13
ShtBd n 4.85
SmCpStkn 35.18 -.07
SmCapVal n40.53 -.01
SpecGrn 19.97 -.02
Speclnn 13.06 +.01
TFIncn 10.63 +.01
TxFrHn 11.99 +.01
TxFrSIn 5.70
USTIntn 6.19
USTLgn 13.32 +.10
VABondn 12.37 +.01
Value n 27.33 -.05
Principal Inv:
Divlntllnst 10.45 -.01
LgCGI In 10.26 +.03
LT20201n 12.87
LT20301n 12.79
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 19.09
HiYIdAp 5.77
MidCpGrA 32.07 -.08
MuHilncA 10.41 +.01
STCrpBdA 11.57
UtilityA 12.22
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 18.92 +.02
HiYldBt 5.76
Prudential Fds Z&l:
MadCapGrZ 33.30 -.08
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.13 +.02
AZ TE 9.55 +.01
ConvSec 21.01 +.03
DvrlnAp 7.87 +.01
EqlnAp 17.65 -.01
EuEq 21.11 +.14
GeoBalA 13.61
GIbEqtyp 9.98 +.01
GrInAp 15.39 -.01
GIblHIthA 46.64 +.01
HiYdAp 8.05
HiYld In 6.23
IncmAp 7.28 +.01
IntGrln p 9.97 +.02
InvAp 15.08 +.01
NJTxAp 9.88
MuItCpGr 57.86 +.02
PATE 9.58 +.01
TxExAp 9.11
TFInAp 15.80 +.01
TFHYA 12.80 +.01
USGvAp 13.48 +.02
GIblUtilA 10.44 +.01
VoyAp 22.89
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.82 +.01
DvrlnBt 7.80 +.01
Eqlnct 17.49 -.02
EuEq 20.28 +.13
GeoBalB 13.47
GIbEqt 9.02
GINtRst 18.22 +.01
GrlnBt 15.12 -.01
GIblHIthB 36.42 +.01
HiYIdB t 8.04 +.01
HYAdBt 6.10
IncmBt 7.22 +.02
IntGrlnt 9.91 +.01
InftlGrtht 15.01 -.01
InvBt 13.59 +.01
NJTxB t 9.87 +.01
MultCpGr 49.49 +.02
TxExBt 9.12 +.01
TFHYBt 12.82 +.01
USGvBt 13.41 +.02
GlblUtilB 10.41 +.01
VoyBt 19.27 +.01
RS Funds:
IntGrA 18.70
LgCAIphaA 45.78 +.09
Value 26.82 +.07
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 8.88 +.01
Royce Funds:
MicroCapl 15.09 -.01
PennMulr 11.89
Premierlr 19.80 -.01
TotRetlr 14.11 -.01
ValSvc t 11.58 -.02
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 11.29 +.01
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 16.63 +.02
SEI Portfolios:
S&P500En 40.51 +.01
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 20.95 -.10
Schwab Funds:
HIthCare 19.33 +.02
10001nvr 39.76
S&P Sel 22.92
SmCpSI 21.89 -.01
TSM Ser 26.64
Scout Funds:
Intl 33.83 +.01
Selected Funds:
AmShD 43.39 +.02
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 35.28 +.01
Sequoia 172.89 -.29
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 45.04 +.07
SoSunSCInvtn23.28-.04
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 57.17 -.04
Stratton Funds:
Mul-Cap 38.63 -.13
RealEstate 30.52 .04
SmCap 57.17 -.02
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 9.96 +.01
TCW Funds:
EmMktln 9.43 -.01
TotRetBdl 10.34 +.02
TCW Funds N:
ToRtBdNp 10.68 +.02
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 10.96 +.01
Eqldxlnst 11.17
IntEqllnst 16.61 -.01
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 20.19 +.08
Third Avenue Fds:
IntlValnstr 17.45 +08
REVallnstr 26.04 -.05
Valuelnst 51.37 -.05
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 28.20 +.08
IncBuildAt 19.37 +.02
IncBuildCp 19.36 +.01
IntValue I 28.86 +.08
LtTMul 14.70
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 5.11
Income 9.36 +.01
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp 9.84 +.01
Flexlncp 9.46 +.02
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 34.76 -.03
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 23.82 +.10
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 26.10 -.05


ChinaReg 7.92 -.06
GIbRs 10.01 -.01
Gld&Mtls 11.76 -.02
WdPrcMn 11.74 -.02
USAA Group:
AgvGt 33.85 +.04
CABd 11.20 +.01
CrnstStr 23.45 +.02
GovSec 10.29 +.01
GrTxStr 14.86 +.01
Grwth 17.59 +.04
Gr&lnc 16.72
IncStk 14.03 +.01


Name NAV Chg
Inco 13.50 +.01
Int 26.48 +.13
NYBd 12.57
PrecMM 26.58 -.02
SciTech 15.36 +.06
ShtTBnd 9.29
SmCpStk 15.47 -.02
TxElt 13.78
TxELT 14.01 +.01
TxESh 10.83
VABd 11.68 +.01
WIdGr 22.29 +.08
VALIC:
MdCpldx 21.73
Stkldx 26.95
Value Line Fd:
LrgCo n 20.53 +.01
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdml n 24.23 +.01
CAITAdmn 11.79 +.01
CALTAdmnl12.06 +.01
CpOpAdl n 80.42 +.27
EMAdmr r n 37.22 -.22
Energyn 114.02 +.08
EqlnAdm n n52.16 +.07
EuroAdmln 62.41 +.16
ExplAdml n 76.71 -.08
ExtdAdm n 47.67 +.01
50OAdml n 135.69 +.01
GNMAAdn 10.88
GrwAdm n 37.85 +.05
HlthCrn 62.76 +.15
HiYldCpn 6.15
InfProAdn 28.44 +.04
ITBdAdml n 11.92 +.03
ITsryAdml n 11.66 +.02
IntGrAdm n 62.94 -.06
ITAdmlIn 14.43
ITGrAdmrn 10.31 +.01
LtdTrAdn 11.16
LTGrAdmln 10.84 +.06
LTAdmln 11.86 +.01
MCpAdml nl05.53 -.06
MorgAdm n 63.71 +.06
MuHYAdrnm nl1.33
NYLTAdn 11.85 +.01
PrmCaprn 74.76 +.11
PALTAdrnm nll.78 +.01
ReitAd r n 95.21 -.04
STsyAdml n 10.73
STBdAdml nlO.62
ShtTrAdn 15.92
STFdAdn 10.79
STIGrAdn 10.84 +.01
SmCAdm n 40.15
SmCapGrth n32.46 +.03
SmCapVal n32.28 -.02
TxMCap r n 73.59 +.02
TlBAdml n 11.06 +.02
TStkAdm n 36.87
ValAdml n 23.73 -.02
WellslAdm n59.05 +.12
WelltnAdmrn n59.89 +.08
Windsor n 52.92 -.02
WdsrllAdn 53.74 -.08
Vanguard Fds:
CALTn 12.06 +.01
CapOppn 34.83 +.12
Convrtn 13.01
DivApplnn 24.59 +.03
DivdGronn 17.16 +.02
Energy n 60.74 +.04
Eqlnc n 24.89 +.04
Explr n 82.48 -.08
FLLTn 12.27
GNMAn 10.88
GlobEqn 19.23 -.01
Grolncn 31.29
GrthEqn 12.69 +.01
HYCorpn 6.15
HlthCren 148.76 +.34
InflaPron 14.48 +.02
IntlExplrn 15.15 +.02
IntlGrn 19.79 -.02
InitVal n 32.02 -.01
ITIGraden 10.31 +.01
ITTsryn 11.66 +.02
LifeConn 17.16 +.01
LifeGro n 23.87
Lifelncn 14.28 +.02
LifeMod n 20.93 +.02
LTIGraden 10.84 +.06
LTTsryn 12.88 +.09
Morg n 20.56 +.02
MuHYn 11.33
Mulntn 14.43
MuLtdn 11.16
MuLongn 11.86 +.01
MuShrtn 15.92
NJLTn 12.39
NYLTn 11.85 +.01
OHLTTEn 12.77 +.01
PALTn 11.78 +.01
PrecMtlsrn 15.92 -.12
PrmcpCorn 15.44 +.02
Prmcprn 72.08 +.11
SelValu r n 21.68 -.02
STARn 21.23 +.02
STIGraden 10.84 +.01
STFedn 10.79
STTsryn 10.73
StratEqn 22.18 -.01
TgtRetlncn 12.29 +.01
TgRe2010n24.43 +.02
TgtRe2015nl3.60 +.01
TgRe202O0n24.28 +.01
TgtRe2025 nl3.88
TgRe2030 n23.94
TgtRe2035nl4.46
TgtRe2040 n23.82 -.01
TgtRe2050n23.72 -.01
TgtRe2045 nl4.95 -.01
USGron 22.13 +.06
USValuen 12.27
Wellsly n 24.37 +.05
Well n 34.68 +.05
Wndsrn 15.69
Wndsll n 30.28 -.05
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPI r n103.27 -.05
ExtMkt In 117.64 +.05
MidCplstPl nl 14.96 -.06
TotlntAdm r r25.63 -.04
Totlntllnst r n102.47 -.17
TotlntllPr n1 02.49 -.17
TotlntSig r n 30.74 -.05
500 n 135.68
Balancedn 24.23 +.01
EMktn 28.34 -.17
Europe n 26.80 +.07
Extend n 47.67 +.02
Growth n 37.85 +.04
LgCaplxn 27.21 +.01
LTBndn 14.16 +.08
MidCap n 23.26 -.01
Pacific n 10.29 -.06
REITr n 22.31 -.01
SmCapn 40.13
SmlCpGth n25.95 +.02
STBndhn 10.62
TotBndn 11.06 +.02
TotllntlIn 15.32 -.03
TotStkn 36.86 +.01
Value n 23.74 -.01
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 24.24 +.02
DevMklnstn 9.91 -.01
EmrnMklnstn 28.31 -.16
Extln n 47.67 +.02
FTAIIWIdl r n91.39 -.15
Grwthlstn 37.85 +.05
InfProlnstn 11.58 +.01
Instldxn 134.81 +.01
InsPIn 134.82 +.01
InstTStldxn 33.38 +.01
lnsTStPlus n33.38
MidCplstn 23.31 -.01
REITInstrn 14.74
STBondldxnlO.62
STIGrlnstn 10.84 +.01
SCInstn 40.15
TBIstn 11.06 +.02
TSlnstn 36.88 +.01
Valuelstn 23.73 -.02
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgl n 112.08 +.01
GroSig n 35.05 +04
ITBdSign 11.92 +.03
MidCpldxn 33.30 -.02
STBdldxn 10.62
SmCpSign 36.17
TotBdSgl n 11.06 +02
TotStkSgl n 35.59 +.01
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.98
Virtus Funds I:
EmMktl 10.36 -.06
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetSp 10.13
CorelnvA 6.55
DivOppAp 15.91
DivOppCt 15.75
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 42.39 -.02
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 12.60
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmSlllnv 21.64
Opptylnv 40.94 +.02
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UlStMulnc 4.82
Wells Fargo Admin:
Growth 43.24 +.08
Western Asset:
CrPIsBdF1 p11.67 +.01
CorePlusl 11.67 +01
William Blair N:


GrowthN 12.49 +.04


Stocks gain


Associated Press


NEW YORK Stocks
gained for a second straight
week as company earnings
reports started to come in,
keeping the Standard and
Poor's 500 index within a
fraction of its highest level
in five years.
The S&P 500 was little
changed Friday, and gained
5 points in the week to close
at 1,472.05. The index is a
fraction below its close of
1,472.12 Thursday, its high-
est level since December
2007.
The Dow Jones industrial
average rose 17.21 points to
13,488.43. The Nasdaq com-
posite index rose 3.88 to
3,125.63. For the week, the
Dow rose 53 and the Nasdaq
rose 24.
Companies have started
to report earnings for the
fourth quarter of 2012, but
no clear pattern has
emerged as yet.
Aluminum company
Alcoa gave stocks a lift after
it reported earnings late
Tuesday that matched ana-
lysts' expectations and said
that demand was increas-
ing. Investors were unim-
pressed by Wells Fargo's
record profits Friday, choos-
ing instead to focus on the
sustainability of those
earnings.
"You've been hearing
comments that earnings
season is going to show a
continued contraction in
the rate of growth," said
Robert Pavlik of Banyan
Partners. "People are con-
flicted, they are worried, but
at the same time they don't
want to be missing out on
the action in the overall
market."
Currently, analysts expect


Market watch
Jan. 11,2013

Dow Jones +17.21
industrials 13,488.43

Nasdaq +3.88
composite 3,125.63


Standard &
Poor's 500

Russell
2000


-0.07

1,472.05

-0.47

880.77


NYSE diary
Advanced: 1,579

Declined: 1,438

Unchanged: 125

Volume: 3.2 b

Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 1,218

Declined: 1,219

Unchanged: 135

Volume: 1.8 b
AP

fourth quarter earnings for
S&P 500 companies to grow
at a rate of 3.3 percent, ac-
cording to the latest data
from S&P Capital IQ. That's
a better growth rate than the
previous quarter, but it's
considerably weaker than
the 8.4 percent growth rate
recorded in the same period
last year.
Wells Fargo, the first
major bank to report earn-
ings, dropped even after the
bank reported a 25 percent
increase in fourth-quarter
earnings. The bank's stock
fell 30 cents, or 0.8 percent,
to $35.10.
JPMorgan Chase, Gold-
man Sachs, U.S. Bancorp,
Citigroup and Bank of
America are among banks
and financial companies re-
porting earnings next week.
Financial stocks were the


NEW LOOK COMING
TUESDAY

The Chronicle is
updating the design
of its stocks page
beginning with
Tuesday's publication,
Jan. 15.

The new design will
include:

10-day trends for the
S&P 500 and the
NASDAQ.

daily recaps of the
major markets.

the top 42 stocks of
local interest.

daily recaps of interest
rates.

daily recaps of
commodities.

the top 25 mutual
funds.

Additionally, readers
will be informed of
news events about the
major companies being
traded. The information
is contained in a
condensed format and
is designed for ease of
use.


best performing industry
group in the S&P 500 last
year, gaining 26 percent.
Other companies reporting
earnings next week include
eBay and Intel.
Boeing fell $1.93, or 2.5
percent, to $75.16 after the
U.S. Federal Aviation Ad-
ministration said it is
launching a comprehensive
review of the critical sys-
tems of Boeing's 787, the air-
craft maker's newest and
most technologically ad-
vanced plane, after a fire
and a fuel leak earlier this
week.


Feds: Travel agent stole airline miles


Associated Press $109,000 but that's not all.
She's also accused of using
SEATTLE A former the credit cards of some
agent at a Washington travel clients to buy $180,000 worth
company was charged Fri- of plane tickets, then provid-
day with stealing nearly 3.7 ing those tickets to other cus-
million airline miles from tomers at steep discounts.
high-end clients, then using "Yeakel frequently denied
them to buy plane tickets for her clients access to their
herself and her family airline miles or misled
Karen Yeakel was fired clients into believing that
from her job at Stellar the airlines had restricted
Travel in Bellevue in June the use of airline miles
2011, after discrepancies in when, in fact, no airline
the frequent-flier account of miles were available as de-
one of her top clients turned fendant Yeakel had misap-
out to be just the tip of the propriated them for her own
iceberg, said company part- benefit," prosecutors wrote.
ner Susan Bluhm. Yeakel's lawyer did not
According to a wire fraud immediately return an
charge unsealed Friday in email seeking comment.
federal court, Yeakel used The charge was filed in a
the airline miles to buy 135 federal court document
flights for herself and her called an "information,"
family, worth more than which typically means a


plea deal is in the works.
Yeakel's clients were not
named in the court papers,
but were described as "high
net worth individuals."
Bluhm declined to identify
them.
"A handful of her top
clients were affected, and
those clients are still our
clients," Bluhm said. "They
realized that this was the ac-
tion of a rogue employee.
This was almost two years
ago, and we dealt with it."
The company said in a
statement it was sorry for
those cheated in the scheme.
"Upon discovering these
personal activities Karen
executed on her own, we
fully cooperated with law
enforcement officials to en-
sure justice is served," the
statement said.


Business BRIE FS


Taco Bell set to test

'$1 Cravings' value menu

NEW YORK Taco Bell is testing a new
value menu that could put it in more direct com-
petition with the Dollar Menu at McDonald's.
The Mexican-fast-food chain is testing a "$1
Cravings Menu" in two markets that lists nine
items, including three new offerings. If successful
it would replace the chain's current value menu,
called "Why Pay More," with items priced at 89
cents and 99 cents. The $2 "meal deals" on the
"Why Pay More" menu are not offered on the
new menu.
Chris Brandt, vice president of marketing for
Taco Bell, said the tests began in October and
will continue for at least another couple of
months before a decision is made on whether to
roll out the menu more widely.

Fiscal cliff deal fuels surge

into stock funds

BOSTON The so-called "fiscal cliff" agree-
ment that averted steep tax increases apparently
helped boost investor confidence: The flow of
cash into stock mutual funds during the first
week of 2013 was the largest in more than 11
years.


Mutual funds investing in U.S. stocks attracted
$4 billion in net deposits during the weeklong pe-
riod that ended Wednesday, and funds investing
primarily in foreign stocks took in about $3.5 bil-
lion, according to preliminary data from Lipper, a
unit of Thomson Reuters.
The $7.5 billion total into stock funds was the
largest since the week ending May 2, 2001. It
marked a shift in sentiment from last year, when
investors consistently withdrew more cash from
stock mutual funds than they added to them.
A mildly positive monthly jobs report released
Jan. 4 also may have encouraged investment in
stocks during the latest week, Roseen said. That
day, the Standard & Poor's 500 stock index
closed at its highest level in five years.
Investors deposited a net $34.2 billion into
U.S. funds of all types during the week, including
mutual funds and ETFs investing in bonds, as
well as money-market funds.
The fund flow data released Thursday night
are preliminary, based on flows for about 75 per-
cent of mutual funds and ETFs, according to Lip-
per. The Investment Company Institute, an
industry trade organization, is scheduled to re-
lease more complete data on Wednesday that
will cover flows through the week ended Jan. 9.
-From wire reports


I NEWYORK SPTOCK EXCHANGEI


Name Last Chg
SpectraEn 27.60 -.28
SprintNex 5.92 -.02
SP Mats 39.01 -.06
SP HIthC 41.77 -.01
SPCnSt 35.92 +.16
SP Consum 48.87 +.04
SP Engy 73.61 +.09
SPDRFncI 17.11 -.04
SP Inds 39.09 -.14
SPTech 29.59 +.04
SP UpI 35.40 +.04
StdPac 7.74 +.04
Standex 54.96 +.55
StanBlkDk 75.21 -.62
StateStr 50.58 +.33
Steris 35.77 -.74
SDIIwrM 13.52 -.01
Sbyker 58.84
SturmRug 47.51 -.14
SubPpne 41.54 -.04
SunCmts 41.00 -.58
Suncorgs 34.02 -.12
Sunteih 1.85 +.07
SunTrst 28.31 -.29
SupEnrgy 22.58 -.06
Supvalu 3.53 +.06
SwiftTrans 9.63 -.20
Synovus 2.44 -.03
Sysco 30.91 -.04
TCFFncI 12.61 -.13
TDAmeritr 18.28 +.08


TE Connect 37.90
TECO 17.14
TJXs 43.96
ThawSemi 18.15
TalismEg 12.28
Target 60.07
TeckRes g 37.54
TeleBrasil 25.02
TelefEsp 14.59
TempurP 35.30
Tenaris 41.74
TenetHltrs 34.30
Teradata 65.34
Teradyn 17.10
Terex 29.44
Ternium 23.33
TerraNitro 254.00
Tesoro 42.17
TetraTech 8.12
TevaPhrm 38.06
Textron 26.41
Theragen 1.61
ThermoFis 67.55
ThomCrkg 4.20
3DSys 60.35
3MCo 96.28
Tiffany 60.28
TimeWarn 49.61
Timken 49.80
TollBros 34.41
TorchEngy .62
Torchmark 53.45
TorDBkg 83.11


Total SA 52.88
TotalSys 23.66
Transom 54.09
Travelers 74.85
Tredgar 21.58
TriContf 16.73
TrinaSolar 5.62
Tronox s 19.57
TurqHillRs 9.38
TwoHrblnv 12.13
Tycolnti s 30.25
Tyson 20.32
UBSAG 17.29
UDR 24.39
UIL Hold 36.36
UNS Engy 43.84
USAirwy 14.78
USG 29.30
UltraPtg 18.24
UndArmrs 48.09
UniFirst 81.83
UnilevNV 38.33
Unilever 38.61
UnionPac 130.97
UtdContl 25.99
UtdMicro 2.07
UPSB 77.92
UtdRentals 47.57
US Bancrp 33.50
USNGsrs 18.72
US OilFd 34.06
USSteel 24.88
UtdTech 85.18


UtdhlthGp 52.82 -.29 Walgrn 39.10
UnivHIthS 50.91 +.36 WalterEn 37.28
22.21 +.09 WsteMInc 34.81
I T WatsnPh 83.71
Weathflni 11.53
ValeSA 20.32 -.39 WeinRIt 27.73
ValeSApf 19.40 -.54 WellPoint 61.75
ValeantPh 63.63 -.28 WellsFargo 35.10
ValeroE 34.70 -.20 Wesconf H 67.93
viyNBcp 9.62 -.13 WestarEn 29.23
VangTotBd 83.83 +.06 WAstEMkt 15.42
VangTSM 75.77 +.01 WstAMgHi 6.35
VangValu 60.86 -.05 W 5
VanS&P500 67.36 +.03 WAstlnfopp 13.28
VangREIT 67.16 -.04 WsnRefUnion 29.21
VangDivAp 61.49 +.08 WsUnion 13.80
VangAIIW 46.56 -.02 Weyerhsr 30.80
VangEmg 44.84 -.34 Whrlpl 105.05
VangEAFE 36.00 +.06 WmsCos 33.49
VarianMed 74.58 -.30 WmsPtrs 49.67
Vectren 30.02 +.16 Winnbgo 19.53
Ventas 65.19 +.03 Wipro 9.78
VeoliaEnv 11.60 +.10 WiscEngy 38.03
VeriFone 31.60 +.51 WTJpTot 38.53
VerizonCm 43.30 -.29 WT India 19.65
Visa 161.16 +.65 Worthgtn 27.79
Visteon 54.77 +.60 XL Grp 26.60
Vonage 2.42 -.08 XcelEngy 27.17
Vornado 81.08 +.03 Xerox 7.26
WGLHold 38.70 +.01 Yamanag 17.41
WPXEngy 14.86 +.18 YingliGrn 2.98
Wabash 9.52 -.20 YoukuTud 21.97
WalMart 68.63 +.27 YumBrnds 66.87







Page A8 SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
Mike Arnold ..................... .................. editor
Charlie Brennan ........................... editor at large
Curt Ebitz............... .............citizen member
ZJS Mac Harris ....... .................. citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin .......... ....... guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ............. .................. copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


TO REPAIR OR NOT




Still waiting



for nuke plant



decision


In its most recent update to
the Florida Public Service
Commission, Progress En-
ergy said its review of the Crys-
tal River Nuclear Plant is
ongoing and no decision is
likely to be made until this
summer.
As expected, the
company also re- THE I
peated its earlier No decis
statements that repairing
how much the nuclear
plant's insurance
company pays will OUR O0
be a major factor in
whether the plant Repair
is repaired or re- benefit
tired. The com- ands
pany said in its
meeting with the commission
that there had been two medi-
ated sessions with the insurer
and discussions are continuing.
As of November, Progress
has received $136 million in re-
pair costs and $162 million in
power replacement costs. The
plant has coverage for up to
$2.25 billion for property dam-
ages and $490 million for
power replacement costs.
However, the insurance com-
pany has not paid any claims
since spring of 2011, when it
began its own investigation
into the outage.
The fact no decision on the
plant has been reached is on
one level disappointing, be-
cause it leaves employees and
the community hanging. On the
other hand, it is encouraging
that the company is still con-


Go to warrants office
About the felons registry: It's
not at the jail but at (the) war-
rants department, the sheriff's of-
fice right next to the jail. Please
do not send them to the jail. It's
actually to the warrants depart-
ment next to the jail.
$51 for dinner, movie
I'm always hearing
about young adults get- 0
ting into trouble, young ,
adults getting into this
problem. I just found out
this weekend, one of the
reasons they get into so
much trouble. I went to
the theater with my wife,
and counting the movie CAI
and the Coke and the CAL
popcorn, it cost $51 to 563-
go see a movie. What
young kid can bring his
girlfriend out or what young girl
can bring their friend to go see a
movie these days and spend $51?
Are you kidding me? And I'm 60
years old and I'm looking at this
going, "Are you kidding?" I didn't
even want to spend $51. Come
on, people. Let's wake up.
Service for seniors
I was happy to see in today's
Chronicle that Seven Rivers Re-
gional Medical Center may have a
chance to buy the Citrus Memo-
rial hospital. Then myself and


S
i

r

P


s


I

(


sidering repairs to the unit.
We recognize that in the final
analysis, the decision to repair
or retire the unit will be made
based on economics. We also
recognize that in addition to di-
rect repair costs, an economic
analysis contains a
number of as-
;SUE: sumptions that are
on yet on atbest estimates of
Dr closing future events, such
plant. as the long-term
cost and availabil-
DINION: ity of gas or other
fuels that would be
would used to provide
county power that the unit
tate. will not produce if
retired.
In making their final deci-
sion, we hope that as part of
their analysis, the company will
weigh heavily the benefits of
the plant as part of the state's
power supply These include
stable long-term fuel costs and
the fact that events such as hur-
ricanes in the Gulf of Mexico
will not interrupt fuel supplies
to the plant like they could in-
terrupt natural gas supplies.
We also hope that as a good
corporate citizen, the company
will recognize the value of the
plant to the residents of Citrus
County. We recognize this is an
intangible for a large corpora-
tion, but it is very tangible and
very real to this community.
Repairing and restarting the
plant would be a benefit to the
county and the state, and we
encourage this decision.


many other seniors with Blue
Cross Blue Shield Advantage 65
Health Care Plan could be treated
there. Now we have to go to Seven
Rivers or go to Hernando or Mar-
ion County for treatment. It does-
n't make sense to live in Inverness
and have to go 25 miles or more
to Seven Rivers hospital. It makes
it hard for loved ones to drive that
distance. After repeated
kND correspondence from
JND Blue Cross Blue Shield,
E they have said they would
love to do business with
Citrus Memorial but that
they were not interested.
I would think Citrus Me-
morial would like to ac-
commodate all our
county residents. In
r579 today's mail came a card
)579 from (Citrus) Memorial
saying that they would be
honored to provide the very best
care. Something must be wrong.
Please help.
Thanks for the display
I would just like to thank the
Floral City Water Department for
the wonderful display they had on
Orange Avenue in Floral City for
the Christmas festival. It's so
great a spot to take pictures of
the grandchildren. That's going to
be our next-year Christmas card.
Thank you very much again, Floral
City Water Department.


CLARIFICATION
An editor's note for a letter to the editor titled "Waste of money" on Page
A13 of Friday's edition needs clarification. County Administrator Brad Thorpe
will pay the costs of his port director training; however, if the feasibility study
is favorable, the county's port authority will reimburse the costs.


"Half the agony of living is waiting."
Alexander Rose, 1968


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Graduation rates explained


Editor's note: This is the first
part of a two-part guest column
by school board member Thomas
Kennedy in response to an edito-
rial written by the Chronicle's ed-
itorial board. Part II appears in
Monday's paper on the Opinion
page.
Rarely do I publicly need to
take exception to the Cit-
rus County Chronicle Edi-
torial Board. That said, after
reading the Jan. 4, 2013, Chroni-
cle editorial "If students are fail-
ing, so are we" and reading the
remarks, "OUR OPINION: A
black eye for schools, but a gut
punch for the community" I feel I
must express my frustration
about missing information and
the true roots of the problems.
I thank the Chronicle Editorial
Board for bringing this important
issue to the public's attention and
while I appreciate the writer
shared that "(Citrus) county's
high schools are still beating the
state average of 71 percent in
overall graduation rates, with 82
percent, 76 percent and 86 per-
cent of students graduating from
Citrus, Crystal River and Lecanto
high schools, respectively," I have
a concern when the writer writes,
"There's a glare to the silver lin-
ing, though: Those figures repre-
sent declines for two of the
schools. In 2011, those respective
rates were 83 percent, 83 percent
and 80 percent." What the writer
did not mention or perhaps does
not understand is the reason for
the decline in high school gradu-
ation rates and thus the state's
grades for our high schools.
What is missing is how the
Florida Department of Educa-
tion and the U.S. Department of
Education changed how they de-
termine graduation and dropout
rates in Florida. What concerns
me is parents will read the edito-
rial and assume our high schools
- high schools that ranked 12th
in the state of Florida for having
the highest graduation rates -


are not performing well, and be-
lieve our high school graduation
rates are dropping as a result of
poor instruction or curriculum,
when in fact that is not the case.
In 2012, the state of Florida es-
tablished the graduation meas-
ure by combining the four-year
federal uniform rate and the
modified five-year rate. In the
four-year federal uniform rate, a
high school student who does not
graduate in four years (but per-
haps in four and a half or five
years) is classified as a dropout;
GED graduates, students who
transfer to a vocational program,
and high school "special
diploma" graduates (i.e. CREST
and Key Center students) are also
classified as being non-graduates
in the uniform rate.
These graduation rates do not
take into account the individual
growth of a student. It has been
our school board's position that
we prefer late graduates to no
graduates. These new gradua-
tion/dropout rates are completely
misleading, tell the wrong story
and are of little value to school
leaders and teachers. As if this
were not enough, new high
school graduation requirements
that are now in Florida law, man-
date by 2015 all high school stu-
dents must demonstrate, through
standardized testing, they are col-
lege-ready in order to receive a
basic accredited high school
diploma from the Florida De-
partment of Education. These
new graduation requirements,
combined with the four-year gen-
eral and modified five-year rates
are a recipe for disaster
In addition to tinkering with
graduation rates, the state of
Florida changed in 2012 the way
school grades are calculated.
While all grades were affected,
the changes were greatest and
most complex at the high school
level. As an example, when de-
termining Florida schools'
grades for 2012 in math, only Al-


gebra I scores are used to deter-
mine the schools' total grade for
mathematics. No other math
classes' scores were included.
Furthermore, the state did not
use actual science grades to de-
termine a high school's science
grade. Instead, a phantom sci-
ence score was created by aver-
aging all the test scores of all
non-science categories and giving
that as the science score for the
school. Our high school grades
were also negatively affected be-
cause the new school grading sys-
tem included student scores from
students attending alternative
schools, such as the Renaissance
Center and CREST These alter-
native schools serve many of our
most severely behaviorally-, emo-
tionally- and physically-chal-
lenged students.
As a school board we are com-
mitted to continually improving
teaching and learning at all
school levels. We use multiple in-
dicators to verify best practices.
Modern, proven teaching tech-
niques are benefiting our stu-
dents to be successful. Using the
2012 flawed school grading sys-
tem and misleading graduation
rates to imply to the public our
Citrus County schools are not
being successful is unfair to all in-
volved parents, teachers, stu-
dents and the community in the
education of our young people.
In Part II, I will share how the
new and unreasonably high grad-
uation requirements for high
schools will result in a further de-
cline in our high school gradua-
tion rates.

Citrus County School Board
Member Thomas Kennedy
maintains a weekly blog,
www. ThomasTalksOn
CitrusCountySchool.com where
he shares about his experiences
a board member and the
happenings in the Citrus County
School District.


LETTERS to the Editor


In perspective
U.S. Tax revenue:
$2,170,000,000,000.
Fed budget:
$3,820,000,000,000.
New debt:
$1,650,000,000,000.
National debt:
$14,271,000,000,000.
Recent budget cuts:
$38,500,000,000.
If we remove eight zeros and
pretend it's a household budget
using the same numbers:
Annual family income:
$21,700.
Money the family spent:
$38,200.
New debt on the credit card:
$16,500.
Outstanding balance on the
credit card: $142,710.
Total spending cuts: $38.50.
Does this make it easier to un-
derstand why the fiscal cliff
(raising taxes and mandatory
spending cuts) is necessary?
Another way to look at the Na-
tional Debt and doing as Nancy
Pelosi suggests: 'Just allow the


President to raise the debt
ceiling."
You come home from work
and find there has been a sewer
backup in your neighborhood
and your home has sewage all
the way up to the ceilings. What
should you do? Raise the ceiling
or remove the sewage?
To have addressed this prob-
lem, we should've fired the pres-
ident and all those up for
re-election in Congress this past
November
Gerard Del Vecchio
Hernando

Thanks for kindness
My husband and I would like to
thank the person who found our
cell phone in the parking area of
Home Depot in Crystal River and
brought it in to the store. The
folks at Home Depot called us
and thankfully we picked up the
phone the next morning.
Thank you for your kindness.
Margaret Burns
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
* Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Mike Arnold
at 352-564-2930.
* All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to the EDITOR


Guns on campuses
As a concerned citizen
for the welfare of children
in general I commend
Florida State Rep. Dennis
Baxley for his stand for the
protection of children in
the schools by ending the
ban on guns on school
property so that proper se-
curity can be provided for
our most vulnerable citi-
zens the children.
It also is commended that
all cities in Marion County,
after my requests: Belle-
view, Dunnellon and Ocala
have given Proclamations
Against Child Pornography
to protect children from
abuse but of course to
protect their very lives is of
utmost importance.
Considering the ability of
potential assaulters with
available arsenal- we
must use all due diligence
for the children's protection.
It does appear from the
tragedy at Newtown, Conn.
with the murder of 20
schoolchildren, that the
time has come.
Renee Christopher-
McPheeters
Crystal River

Thanks for help
The Kiwanis members of
Central Ridge-Crystal
River made lemonade out
of lemons thanks to the
support of Ken Melton who
published several articles
appealing to the Beverly
Hills community to save
the Kiwanis Christmas
"Not Home Alone" project.
As we read in the Chroni-
cle the county saved the fi-
nancially struggling
Beverly Hills Community
Center in 2012 and an-
nounced they cannot afford
rent free events even to
charitable organizations.
This announcement al-
most ended our 15-year
"Not Home Alone" project
as we could not afford a
$700 rental fee plus food
and supplies.
Through several articles
published in the Chronicle
and the Visitor we were
able to appeal to the com-
munity and receive dona-
tions from several sources
in Beverly Hills.
We publicly want to
thank Rosella Hale who
raised funds for us through
the Skillbank, and the Bev-
erly Hills Women's Club.
Additional donations were
received from Linda Cook
and the Gronert family,
plus local resident Paul
Sullivan and donations
from our "Not Home
Alone" guests as a token of
their appreciation.
The marquee donation
was from the Lions Club
and the leadership of Tom
Mize who provided their
well equipped clubhouse.
This, coupled with the cash
donations, covered our ex-
penses for 102 local resi-
dents who would have been
alone on Christmas.
Additional Kiwanis
kudos includes Charlie
Small playing the key-
board, Jean Beck with her
viola and flutist Lynn De-
Bose who filled the room
with Christmas music.
Last but not least thanks
goes to the 22 volunteers
who are members of Kiwa-
nis and the Crystal River
High School Key Club who
donated their valuable
time on Christmas Eve and
Christmas Day serving
their community I know
that they too contributed to
and received the Blessing
of Christmas.
Thank you.
Pete D'Elia
Crystal River publicity
chairman
Kiwanis Club
of Central Ridge
Hernando

Opposes ban
I oppose an assault
weapons ban. A letter to
the editor says "Do you re-


ally believe that Thomas
Jefferson had assault and
high-powered weapons in
mind when penning our
Constitution?" I think he
had the same type of
weapons in mind that the
government had at that
time. I do too.
It is the second amend-
ment that guarantees the
other rights that we have.
Our enumerated rights ac-
tually start with the Decla-
ration of Independence


with the often misattrib-
uted phrase "life, liberty,
and the pursuit of happi-
ness." What's often over-
looked is another
important right that follows
those by a couple of sen-
tences. It says "That when-
ever any form of
government becomes de-
structive of these ends, it is
the right of the people to
alter or to abolish it, and to
institute new government."
If it should ever become
necessary to alter or abol-
ish our government, I don't
intend to face the task with
a single-shot musket as
Obama would prefer If his-
tory teaches us anything, it
should teach us that the
first step in enslaving a
population is to disarm
them. Conservatives don't
worry about that kind of
thing because they will
never abuse the people
enough to cause a revolu-
tion, but it keeps liberals
awake at night.
They fear us and I want
to keep it that way I'm
going to remind you that
Thomas Jefferson said
"When governments fear
the people, there is liberty
When the people fear the
government, there is
tyranny"
I'm also going to quote
Ben Franklin who said
"They, who can give up es-
sential liberty to obtain a
little temporary safety, de-
serve neither liberty nor
safety" I intended that the
liberals look up the mean-
ing of the word "infringed"
and abide by it.
I have predicted in previ-
ous letters that the Obama
administration is going to
make disarming the citi-
zens of this country a prior-
ity next term, and the
killings in Newtown play
right into their hands. It
was Obama's hatchet man
Rahm Emanuel who said
"You never let a serious
crisis go to waste."
I also oppose an assault
weapons ban because sta-
tistical research has failed
to turn up evidence that
the federal ban that ex-
pired in 2004 did any good.
I would remind you that
doing the same thing over
and over and expecting a
different result is one defi-
nition of insanity
If you want to reduce gun
violence, and mass killings,
we have two proven meth-
ods, concealed carry and
armed security Since con-
cealed carry was intro-
duced in Florida, gun
homicides are down 36 per-
cent. The liberal media
never covers it but there
are literally dozens of inci-
dents where a mass killing
in progress was stopped in
its tracks by the interven-
tion of an armed citizen. In
several cases, just the pres-
entation of a weapon was
sufficient to cause the
shooter to take his life.
These show up in the news
as "Two killed in mall
shooting" with very little
detail about the true cir-
cumstances. Armed secu-
rity has one big drawback.
The shooter can usually
identify the guard and tar-
get him with his first shot.
You can't beat surprise in
these situations.
It is a big mistake to
think that an insane killer
is stupid. If you wanted to
mark a place for him to
hunt why not put up a big
red sign that says "Gun
Free Zone." Free fire zone
or killing zone would be
more descriptive. Check
out how many of the recent
mass killings have oc-
curred in a gun-free zone.
It's where the crazies go to
kill because they know they
will be unopposed.
Harley Lawrence
Homosassa

Poor rating
I for one am sickened by
our politicians. It amazes
me that they participate in


the political theatrics that
they do while thinking they
are fooling us. They have
such a low approval rate
that I am amazed they even
go out in public.
Now we are "over the fis-
cal cliff" and they think we
do not notice what a terri-
ble job they are doing?
They are allowed to have
lavish vacations, parties,
staff etc. and think we don't
notice how much they are
wasting our money? I have


worked for large companies
for all my life and not one of
them would have allowed
this to happen, especially
while not performing a good
job. Politicians, we see you
and your job is in jeopardy
Shape up or get out.
Connie McNeilly
Crystal River

Shocked by Scott
I was shocked today
when I read Paula Dock-
ery's article on Gov Scott's
almost irreversible damage
to our environment As a
result I write the following
message to Gov Scott, the
Lt. Governor, and heads of
the Senate and House ask-
ing for corrective action.
I'm hopeful that others who
read her article and this,
will use the following
means of quickly asking the
governor to act: www.
congress.org/congressorg/is
sues/alert/?aler-
tid61115481&typeML.
Email of Dec. 28, 2012, to
Gov Scott, the Lt. Governor,
and heads of Senate and
House:
"Paula Dockery, former
Florida state Senator for 16
years shocked me with her
Dec. 28, 2012 article, advis-
ing your actions are result-
ing in serious losses to
Florida's environment and
natural resources.
"After years of having
reasonable environmental
protection under both Re-
publican and Democratic
governors, you and the un-
qualified Department of
Environmental Protection
secretary you appointed
have managed to dismantle
it in only two years. We are
asking support from our
elected representatives as
well as our Board of County
Commissioners and friends
to also request you take im-
mediate corrective steps by
reemploying those highly
qualified and dedicated
employees you fired; re-
verse decisions and actions
taken which those fired
employees believe essen-
tial; fund water resource
development; restore pol-
luted water bodies and pre-
vent further water
degradation; and resist ex-
pediting development of
those politically connected
at the expense of Floridi-
ans' quality of life."
George and Frances
Harbin
Homosassa

Destruction of US
"... Section 1021(b)(2) of the
National Defense Authoriza-
tion Act (NDAA) ... permits
the government to use the
military to detain U.S. citi-
zens, strip them of due
process and hold them in-
definitely in military deten-
tion centers..." (Chris
Hedges, "The Final Battle").
Now, would someone
please advise me: What is
the difference between a
dictatorship and a govern-
ment that empowers its
military to arrest a person
and to imprison that per-
son indefinitely without re-
course to a judicial process
and a jury trial?
Question 2: What is the
difference between an
"elected" Commander-in-
Chief who would sign such
a bill and a dictator?
Question 3: Assuming the
Republicans support this
abrogation of our Constitu-
tion and the establishment
of a military dictatorship,
what will the Democrats,
"liberals" and "lesser-evil"
advocates expect of their
presidential choice, and
how will they respond to
his actually signing this
authority?
Question 4: How does
one explain to the actual
democracies of the world,
to one's own children, and
to future history that we
have allowed the cause of
justice to be trashed back
to before our Constitution
and indeed the Magna


Carta of 800 years ago?
Question 5: Why would,
how could, any American
with any intelligence, a
sense of justice higher than
Heinrich Himmler's, or
even a respect for his own
survival beyond that of a
lemming ever tolerate
and refuse to rise against
this political treachery for
a nanosecond?
Rafe Pilgrim
Crystal River


Sound

Commercials too loud
I would swear Sound Off had an article
saying that the FCC or some commission
was going to mandate that the commer-
cials be lower volume as of mid-
December and I'm sitting here listening
and the television is louder than it's ever
been on ads. Who do we call?
Editor's note: The FCC said it is relying on
customers' complaints to help them monitor
the situation. You may register complaints by
filling out a form online at www.fcc.gov/
complaints; or fax to 866-418-0232; or by
letter mailed to the Federal Communications
Commission, Consumer and Governmental
Affairs Bureau, Consumer Inquiries and Com-
plaints Division, 445 12th St., S.W., Wash-
ington, DC 20554. If you need assistance in
filing your complaint, you may contact the
Commission's Consumer Call Center by call-
ing 888-CALL-FCC (888-225-5322) (voice)
or 888- TELL-FCC (888-835-5322) (TTY). In-
clude state, date, time, advertiser name, TV
program and station.
Free-for-all on the water
Going by Three Sisters Springs a little
while ago, this is (Dec. 27), it was so
crowded with dive boats. I counted 15
dive boats, over 40 kayakers, 15 long
boats and seven or eight other regular
boats, all at Three Sisters in one area. It
was ridiculous. No wonder the manatees
are suffering. Some regulation needs to be
done on the amount of dive boats allowed
at one time. The same thing they do like in
whitewater rafting. If you go to Ocoee to
any of the major rivers up in Georgia and
North Carolina area, only so many's al-
lowed at a time. That's what needs to be
done here instead of just a free-for-all.
Restaurant hygiene
I am so glad someone brought up the
restaurant help wiping tables and then the
seats with the same cloth. Not only that,
the waitresses with the long hair flying
around. In a very popular local eatery, the
waitress was bending over the table, wip-
ing it, and her hair was hanging down,
brushing across the table. Managers need
to set some rules about these things.
Help for homeless
Mr. Mulligan says that Citrus County
needs a better plan for the homeless and
the churches are one of the organizations
not stepping up to the plate. I think if the
churches would get together and pool the
monies that they don't pay in taxes, they
could do wonders for the homeless cause
as well as our current county economy.
Bus charge too high
I don't understand why they raised that


Hope you are happy
I'd just like to make a comment about
Pudgee's (All American) Hot Dogs stand in
Floral City closing. All I've got to say is, I hope
the Citrus County commissioners and fire de-
partment and sheriff's department, especially,
is happy. Now they've closed another busi-
ness down. Typical Citrus County bull. I sure
hope you got the nerve to put this in your
paper... I'm thinking that maybe the sheriff's
department could take that over ... I think
Sheriff Dawsy would do good running a hot-
dog stand. I think it should be a public vote
on that.
Grandfathered in?
Concerning Pudgee's Hot Dogs stand: So
they changed the law years after he was in
business and they're going to put a guy out of
business that makes his living for 12 years
and it was within the law all the time, past in-


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bus up $3 to $6 round trip. I mean it was
OK when it was $2. And if you're going to
raise it up, I can see maybe 25 cents on
each trip, but that's ridiculous. I mean
people who have a low income or we have
no job, how are we going to ride the bus
when we go get food stamps and to go for
doctor appointments, the seniors and all
the other people? What are we paying for?
That new building they didn't need up
there? That's just ridiculous.
Convenient IDs
I was just reading the paper and I no-
ticed that there on the food programs in
the county, they require a photo ID and
other proof of residency. I think that's
amazing that folks can come up with ID to
get free food but really complain when
they have to have an ID in order to vote.
Something doesn't make sense.
Thanks for wallet return
I'd just like to thank the person who re-
turned my wallet that was lost at the Cit-
rus County landfill. God bless you.
Beware deliveries
I'm calling the Sound Off to advise cus-
tomers (to) beware of deliveries. Check
your package before signing for it. I re-
ceived a package from (a delivery service).
I ordered a screen for my TV and I put it
on the side of the wall because the guy
spoke to me. I put it in the house, put it
on the side of the wall, waited for the TV
guy to come. He noticed the box was
dented. He said, "Did you check this?" I
said, "No, I waited for you," so I have a
witness. I opened it up, the corner of the
screen is broken. And guess what? (The
delivery service) has nothing to do with it
because I already signed for the package.
I think the driver should have been aware
to tell me, "Hey, look at this corner," or
whatever. He just spoke to me and boom.
So you have to beware of your packages.
Have who's delivering your package ...have
them open the merchandise for you and
inspect it before you even sign for it. I got
burnt. They won't take it back.
Thanks to blood donors
Life South's blood collection bus and
employees: There isn't space enough here
to list all the positive, descriptive adjec-
tives for these people and their mission
they execute so well. Their competence
and wonderful personalities make it a real
pleasure to donate, consistently, each and
every time. I encourage all those qualified
donors to come forward to partake in this
experience, as Life South workers are the
real heroes with their contribution, profes-
sionalism, and dedication with this diffi-
cult assignment.


spections and everything. Now because they
changed the law and he can't afford to up-
grade, they're going to put him out of busi-
ness. Why isn't he grandfathered in since he
was all set up and in business and passed all
the inspections before they changed the law?
No sense of heritage
The fact that Pudgee's Hot Dogs is being
closed down is disgraceful. It shows no her-
itage, no culture and that's what we pride our-
selves on here in Floral City.
It's not right and I think the sheriff's office
taking over the fire department had a lot to do
with it because at this point, now these peo-
ple think they're untouchable and they think
that they can go into an establishment that
has created itself to be an institution. And to
go and to put them out of business is un-
godly, unheard of, sick, pathetic, and it
doesn't make me proud to be a Citrus County
resident.


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Hot Corner: PUDGEES


OPINION


SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013 A9











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS WorldBRIEFS


-Ni. Sroe Emergency in Mali
S .., .,H rI


Associated Press
A bicycle stands along Salt
Lake City's snow-covered
Main Street on Friday.
Close to a foot of snow has
fallen around Salt Lake City
and surrounding areas early
Friday.


California preps
for cold snap
SAN DIEGO Zookeep-
ers turned up the heat for
chimpanzees and strawberry
growers covered their crops
as Californians braced Friday
for three days of freezing
temperatures.
The cold snap is expected
to last through the weekend.
Morning temperatures fell
into the 20s and 30s in many
areas, and much lower in the
mountains. A low of 12 de-
grees was recorded in the Big
Bear mountain resort east of
Los Angeles.
Boehner invites
Obama to speak
WASHINGTON House
Speaker John Boehner in-
vited President Barack
Obama to
deliver the
State of the
Union
speech on
Tuesday,
Feb. 12.
In a letter
sent Friday,
Boehner John
said the Boehner
country speaker of the
faces im- House invited
president to
mense give State of
challenges the Union
and Ameri- address.
cans ex-
pect the Congress and White
House to work together on
solutions. Boehner says co-
operation will require a "will-
ingness to seek common
ground as well as presidential
leadership."
The White House says it
has accepted the invitation.
Last year, Obama deliv-
ered the State of the Union
speech Jan. 24.
USDA: Drought
cut corn crop
DES MOINES, Iowa--A
U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture report released Friday
showed farmers harvested
10.78 billion bushels of corn,
less than three-fourths of
what the agency predicted
last spring.
While the report covers
many other crops, much of
the attention has been on
corn. which is widely used as


an ingredient in
provides feed fo
and is mixed wit
ethanol. The cro
the hardest hit b
that settled in juE
plants were mat
Delay in
shooting
CENTENNIAL
stunned silence
courtroom Frida
their of a woman
Colorado theater
loudly cursed de
James Holmes,
sympathetic but
from a judge.
Steve Hernan
32-year-old dau(
becca Wingo wa
dead, shouted,'
Holmes!" mome
Judge William S
Holmes two moi
a plea.
Holmes, 25, w
late Thursday to
charges of murd
tempted murder
days of testimony


many foods, WASHINGTON The
r livestock video game industry,
rh gasoline as blamed by some for foster-
th gasoline as ing a culture of violence, de-
1p also was fended its practices Friday
y the drought at a White House meeting
st as the exploring how to prevent
during. horrific shootings like the
plea by recent Connecticut elemen-
suspect tary school massacre.
suspect Vice President Joe Biden,
L, Colo. -A wrapping up three days of
settled over a wide-ranging talks on gun
y after the fa- violence prevention, said
killed in the the meeting was an effort to
r shootings understand whether the
fendant U.S. was undergoing a
prompting a "coarsening of our culture."
firm warning "I come to this meeting
with no judgment. You all
idez, whose know the judgments other
ghter Re- people have made," Biden
as among the said at the opening of a two-
Rot in hell, hour discussion. "We're
nts after looking for help."
ylvester gave The gaming industry con-
nths to enter tends violent crime, partic-
ularly among the young, has
/vas ordered fallen since the early 1990s
as ordered while video games have in-
stand trial on creased in popularity.
Jer and at- There are conflicting stud-
,after 2 1/2 ies on the impact of video
ly. games and other screen vio-
-From wire reports lence. Some conclude video


French forces take action against Islamists


Associated Press
BAMAKO, Mali France launched
airstrikes Friday to help the govern-
ment of Mali defeat al-Qaida-linked
militants who captured more ground
this week, dramatically raising the
stakes in the battle for this vast desert
nation.
French President Francois Hol-
lande said the "terrorist groups, drug
traffickers and extremists" in north-
ern Mali "show a brutality that threat-
ens us all." He vowed that the


operation would last "as long as nec-
essary"
France said it was taking the action
in Mali at the request of President
Dioncounda Traore, who declared a
state of emergency because of the mil-
itants' advance.
The arrival of the French troops in
their former colony came a day after
the Islamists moved the closest yet to-
ward territory still under government
control and fought the Malian military
for the first time in months, seizing the
strategic city of Konna.


Sanda Abou Moahmed, a
spokesman for the Ansar Dine group,
condemned Mali's president for seek-
ing military help from its former
colonizer
"While Dioncounda Traore asked
for help from France, we ask for guid-
ance from Allah and from other Mus-
lims in our sub-region because this
war has become a war against the cru-
saders," he said by telephone from
Timbuktu.
For the past nine months, the Is-
lamic militants have controlled a large
swath of northern Mali, a lawless
desert region where kidnapping has
flourished.


Time to wind down war


Associated Press
President Barack Obama and President Hamid Karzai of Afghanistan speak Friday at a news conference in the East
Room at the White House in Washington.

Presidents Obama, Karzai agree on Afghanistan policy


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Uneasy allies,
President Barack Obama and
Afghan President Hamid Karzai
demonstrated Friday they could
agree on one big idea: After 11
years of war, the time is right for
U.S. forces to let Afghans do their
own fighting. U.S. and coalition
forces will take a battlefield back
seat by spring and, by implication,
go home in larger numbers soon
thereafter
"It will be a historic moment,"
Obama declared.
In a White House meeting billed
as a chance to take stock of a war
that now ranks as America's
longest, Obama and Karzai agreed
to accelerate their timetable for
putting the Afghanistan army in the
lead combat role nationwide. It will


happen this spring instead of sum-
mer a shift that looks small but
looms larger in the debate over how
quickly to bring U.S. troops home
and whether some should stay after
combat ends in 2014.
The two leaders also agreed the
Afghan government would be given
full control of detention centers and
detainees. They did not reach
agreement on an equally sticky
issue: whether any U.S. troops re-
maining after 2014 would be
granted immunity from prosecution
under Afghan law. Immunity is a
U.S. demand that the Afghans have
resisted, saying they want assur-
ances on other things like au-
thority over detainees first.
At a joint news conference with
Karzai in the White House East
Room, Obama said he was not yet
ready to decide the pace of U.S.


troop withdrawals between now
and December 2014. That is the tar-
get date set by NATO and the
Afghan government for the interna-
tional combat mission to end. There
are now 66,000 U.S. troops there.
Obama's message was clear: The
Afghans must now show they are
capable of standing on their own.
"By the end of next year, 2014, the
transition will be complete -
Afghans will have full responsibil-
ity for their security, and this war
will come to a responsible end," he
said, noting that more than 2,000
Americans have died since the war
began in October 2001.
The Afghan army and police now
have 352,000 in training or on duty,
although that number is viewed by
many as unsustainable because the
government is almost entirely reliant
on international aid to pay the bills.


Associated Press
Vice President Joe Biden, second from left, with Attorney General Eric Holder, second from
right, speaks during a meeting Friday with representatives from the video game industry in
the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington. En-
tertainment Software Association President Mike Gallagher sits between Biden and Holder.


games can desensitize peo-
ple to real-world violence or
temporarily quiet part of the
brain that governs impulse
control. Other studies have
concluded there is no lasting
effect.
Biden is expected to sug-
gest ways to address violence
in video games, movies and
on television when he sends
President Barack Obama a
package of recommendations
for curbing gun violence
Tuesday. The proposals are


expected to include calls for
universal background checks
and bans on assault weapons
and high-capacity ammuni-
tion magazines.
Obama appointed Biden
to lead a gun violence task
force after last month's
shooting at a Newtown,
Conn., elementary school
that left 20 children and six
educators dead.
Gun-safety activists were
coalescing around ex-
panded background checks


as a key goal for the vice
president's task force. Some
advocates said it may be
more politically realistic -
and even more effective as
policy than reinstating a
ban on assault weapons.
The Brady Campaign to
Prevent Gun Violence said
some 40 percent of gun sales
happen with no background
checks, such as at gun shows
and by private sellers over
the Internet or through clas-
sified ads.


Associated Press
This photo provided by the
International Mozarteum
Foundation shows Austrian
composer Wolfgang
Amadeus Mozart. Re-
searchers at Salzburg's
Mozarteum museum an-
nounced Friday they have
definitely identified the per-
son in the picture as the
musical genius.


Aboriginal chiefs
meet in Canada
TORONTO Hundreds of
Aboriginal rights activists
protested Friday in front of
Canada's Parliament as
Prime Minister Stephen
Harper and Aboriginal chiefs
attended a summit to discuss
disagreements over treaty
rights and other grievances.
The meeting has divided
the Aboriginal community,
with some chiefs boycotting
the summit because Gover-
nor General David Johnston,
a representative of Queen
Elizabeth II, is not attending.
They argue his presence is
imperative because he's a
representative of the British
monarchy and the talks cen-
ter on treaty rights first estab-
lished by the Royal
Proclamation of 1793.
Johnston is scheduled to
meet separately with chiefs
following the summit, but
some chiefs say that isn't
enough.
French employers,
unions reach deal
PARIS French unions
and business leaders have
agreed to loosen up some
labor protections after months
of negotiations seen as key to
reviving the country's economy.
President Francois Hollande
hailed the agreement Friday
night and ordered his govern-
ment to turn it into a draft law.
But it's unclear whether the
measures agreed upon will be
enough to bring down 10 per-
cent unemployment.
Police break up
pedophile network
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina
-Argentina's police have bro-
ken up a pedophile network
with international ties that
used social media websites to
swap pornographic images
and videos of children.
Security Ministry officials
said Friday that federal police
carried out 61 raids last week
to dismantle the ring as part
of "Operation Oliver."
The covert operation
began in February 2011 after
local police and Interpol in
Britain detected sites in Lon-
don publishing and swapping
pornographic videos with
servers in Argentina.
Officials said there are 64
people charged, but no ar-
rests have been made.
Greece approves
key tax legislation
ATHENS, Greece -
Greece's Parliament has ap-
proved new tax legislation
aiming to boost state rev-
enues by C2.3 billion ($3 bil-
lion) this year, under the
bailout-dependent country's
commitments to its interna-
tional creditors.
The law approved early
Saturday with the support of
all partners in the country's
three-party ruling coalition
shuffles and simplifies tax
scales, reforms family bene-
fits and expands the tax base
to include groups such as
low-earning farmers.
It brings in a new top tax
rate of 42 percent for Greeks
earning more than 42,000
($56,000).
-From wire reports


In gun debate, video game industry defends itself

Associated Press











SPORTS


Bulls
knock off
Knicks in
New York.
/B3


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


H Football/B2
H Basketball/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 Golf/B5
i : Tennis/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Browns introduce


Chudzinski as coach
CLEVELAND Rob
Chudzinski is back for his
third tour with the Cleve-
land Browns, and this time
he's calling the shots.
Chudzinski, who spent
the past two seasons as
Carolina's offensive coordi-
nator, was introduced as
the club's sixth fulltime
coach on Friday. He'll in-
herit a young roster he'll try
to develop into a contender
with the Browns, who have
lost at least 11 games in each
of the past five seasons.
The 44-year-old previ-
ously worked as an assis-
tant with the Browns, most
recently as offensive coor-
dinator in 2008. Chudzinski
has no previous head
coaching experience, but
he's familiar with the Browns
and their history. He rooted
for the Browns while grow-
ing up in Toledo, Ohio.
"I would not miss the
chance for the world."
Chudzinski said. "We're
going to win here."
'Bama's Milliner,
Lacy, Fluker leaving
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. -
Alabama tailback Eddie Lacy,
cornerback Dee Milliner
and right tackle D.J. Fluker
are entering the NFL draft.
Lacy and Milliner an-
nounced their plans to skip
their senior seasons Friday
at a news conference.
Coach Nick Saban says
Fluker couldn't be there but
made the same decision.
Milliner is considered a
potentially early first-round
pick. He had two interceptions
and 22 pass deflections.
Lacy was MVP of the
national championship
game after rushing for 140
yards and scoring two
touchdowns.
The 6-foot-6, 335-pound
Fluker started 35 games
for the Tide and was a sec-
ond-team Associated
Press All-American.
Fluker and Lacy are re-
garded as likely early
round selections.
Cristobal speaks
on return to 'Canes
CORAL GABLES, Fla.
- Mario Cristobal always
considered himself part of
the Miami football family,
even when he wasn't with
the Hurricanes.
The way he sees it, his
family is back together now.
Cristobal spoke for the
first time Friday since be-
coming the Hurricanes' as-
sociate head coach under
Al Golden. The move came
about a month after Cristo-
bal was fired after six sea-
sons as the head coach at
Florida International, al-
though he led the program
to a pair of bowl games.
Cristobal says, "It always


has been an honor to be
part of this family, and cer-
tainly a tremendous honor
to be back."
Cristobal won two na-
tional championships at
Miami as a player, then
was a graduate assistant
at the school and eventu-
ally an assistant coach.


-From wire reports


Pirates prevail


Rivalry renewed as

SCrystalRiver outlasts

Lecanto in overtime

"STEVE MCGUNNIGLE
Correspondent
. LECANTO
In a back-and-forth, closely and some-
times hotly contested battle with 12 lead
changes and six ties, the visiting Crystal
........ ..... River High School boys basketball team
S ,, shocked host Lecanto to prevail 71-64 in
.- :. overtime Friday night.
va n.:.. ..:- Crystal River (7-8) had a chance to deter-
.-Imine the game's fate at the end of the fourth.
With no time left on the clock, the Pirates' Ty
Reynolds stood at the free-throw line, down
59-58 after drawing a foul at the buzzer's
sound. Reynolds, who finished with a game-
high 28 points, sank the first, turning away
from the line afterward to show a nervous
smile. The second attempt came off the front
of the rim, and the Panthers breathed a col-
lective sigh of relief.
'At the free-throw line with no time left,
.win, lose or tie, it was pretty mind-boggling,"
Reynolds said.
See Page B4

'Canes can't come

back from 19-0

West Port blitz
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
OCALA After holding leads in the first
three periods, the Citrus High School boys'
basketball squad succumbed to a 19-0 run by
West Port that began with less than two min-
utes remaining in the third as the Hurri-
canes suffered a 70-58 district loss in the Wolf
Pack gym Friday
A jumper by sophomore Desmond
Franklin (eight points, four steals) put his
'Canes ahead 44-35 with 2:05 left in the third
quarter before West Port's field-goal shoot-
ing thawed out. The Wolf Pack shooters
Drhyromi Maxell, Kordell Taylor, Corey
David and Brandon Falconer each chipped
in multiple buckets during a decisive stretch
in which West Port outscored Citrus 23-2.
By the time'Canes junior Mitchell Ellis (11
points) hit his third 3-pointer to halt the 19-
point West Port rally, Citrus (10-6 overall, 3-2
in District 6A-6) trailed 58-49 with 3:15 to
STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle play The 'Canes also were significantly ham-
Crystal River's A.J. Bostic blocks a shot attempt by Lecanto's Matt Michelet in Friday night's pered by foul trouble in addition to losing
game at Lecanto High School. See Page B4




Weather blustery, but focused Broncos aren't


Associated Press


ENGLEWOOD, Colo. -
Try as they might, the Bal-
timore Ravens just could-
n't get under the skin or
into the heads of the Den-
ver Broncos, who were
more concerned about
talking up their opponents
than trash-talking them.
Most of the Ravens were
exceedingly complimen-
tary of the Broncos this
week, but some spent time
excusing their 34-17 home
loss to Denver last month
with dismissals ranging
from the soon-to-retire
Ray Lewis and several oth-
ers being out of the lineup
to the Broncos' receivers
pushing off too much.


Ravens receiver Anquan
Boldin said after Baltimore's
emotional wild-card win
the Ravens were glad to
get another shot at Denver
Asked how it will be any
different than last time, he
declared, "We'll make it
different."
"I wanted Denver, because
they beat us," said Boldin,
who was shut out in the
first meeting, a game in
which the Broncos
breezed to a 31-3 lead and
cruised to the finish.
The Broncos, not big on
bravado all season,
shrugged it all off.
"We beat them, so of
course they want to play us
again," cornerback Chris
Harris said. "We're up for


the challenge."
Those were about the
brashest statements that
came out of the Broncos
locker room all week.
Not exactly a Pacquiao-
Marquez pre-fight smack
down.
"It's going to be a tough
game," running back
Knowshon Moreno said.
"It's not going to be easy"
Fans aren't buying it, and
oddsmakers have installed
the top-seeded Broncos (13-3)
as more than a touchdown
favorite. They haven't lost
in three months, are com-
ing off a bye and playing at
altitude against a team Associated Press
playing on a short week. Denver Broncos wide receiver Trindon Holliday pulls in a pass
Wednesday during practice at the team's training facility in
See Page B2 Englewood, Colo.


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B2 SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013





Eagles to interview
Jay Gruden Monday
PHILADELPHIA- The
Philadelphia Eagles will in-
terview Bengals offensive
coordinator Jay Gruden on
Monday.
The team already has in-
terviewed seven candi-
dates since firing Andy
Reid on Dec. 31, and has
permission to speak to two
other coordinators.
Gruden, the younger
brother of Jon Gruden, just
finished his second season
in Cincinnati. He previously
served as an offensive as-
sistant on his brother's staff
in Tampa Bay from 2002-08.
Gruden interviewed with
Arizona on Thursday.
The Eagles are expected
to interview Indianapolis of-
fensive coordinator Bruce
Arians and Seattle defensive
coordinator Gus Bradley.
Sources: Titans drop
special teams coach
People familiar with the
decision said Titans coach
Mike Munchak is parting
ways with special teams
coach Alan Lowry, the de-
signer of the Music City
Miracle play that spurred
Tennessee's lone Super
Bowl run in 2000.
The people said Mun-
chak has told Lowry his
contract would not be re-
newed. The people spoke
to The Associated Press
Friday on the condition of
anonymity because the
team is not announcing any
moves until all coaching
changes are completed.
Lowry just finished his
17th season with the fran-
chise, the last 14 coaching
special teams. He de-
signed Home Run Throw-
back that the Titans used
to beat Buffalo in an AFC
wild-card game in January
2000. The Titans returned
a kickoff and three punts
for touchdowns in 2012.
The Tennessean first re-
ported the move.
Lawyer to look out
for Belcher's child
INDEPENDENCE, Mo.
-A Missouri court will ap-
point a lawyer to protect the
interests of the 4-month-old
daughter of the late Kansas
City Chiefs linebacker Jovan
Belcher as her grandpar-
ents argue over custody.
Belcher fatally shot the
child's mother, Kasandra
Perkins, on Dec. 1 in their
Kansas City home, then
drove to Arrowhead Stadium
and killed himself in front of
coaches and the team's
general manager. Belcher's
mother, Cheryl Shepherd,
had been living with the
couple for about two weeks
and was in the home when
her son killed Perkins.
Shepherd received tem-
porary custody of Belcher's
daughter, Zoey, soon after
the shootings and filed a
petition in mid-December
asking to be appointed as
Zoey's guardian and con-
servator of her estate.
Shepherd, of West
Babylon, N.Y., also filed a
second petition seeking to
be named administrator of
her son's estate.
Friday morning, she sat
silently between her two at-
torneys in a Jackson County
courtroom as probate com-
missioner Daniel Wheeler
addressed the petitions.
Wheeler changed the
status of the custody peti-
tion to "contested" because
Zoey's maternal grandpar-
ents and other family mem-
bers in Texas have filed a
petition in that state to be
Zoey's legal guardians.
He also ordered the ap-
pointment of a guardian ad
litem and set a Dec. 25


hearing on Shepherd's
petition.
The Fort Worth Star-
Telegram reported Friday
that Zoey is staying with
relatives in Austin, Texas.
Zoey's estate or guardian
will receive more than $1
million under terms of the
NFL's collective bargaining
agreement, including
$108,000 annually over the
next four years, $48,000 in
the fifth year and $52,000
each year until she turns
18. She can keep receiving
that amount until she is 23
if she attends college.
-From wire reports


FOOTBALL


Monte Kiffin


Associated Press

IRVING, Texas The
Dallas Cowboys hired for-
mer Tampa Bay defensive
coordinator Monte Kiffin as
the replacement for Rob
Ryan on Friday
The team announced the
move on its website a day
after the 72-year-old Kiffin
was at team headquarters to
interview with coach Jason
Garrettand ownerJerryJones.
The hiring of Kiffin
means the Cowboys will
switch back to the 4-3 de-
fense after going to the 3-4
under Bill Parcells in 2005.


The most nota
will be Pro Bowl
DeMarcus Ware
a defensive end
thony Spencer c
the same move
boys re-sign him
Kiffin hasn't c
the NFL since e
year run in Tam
He spent the pas
coaching in colle
son, Lane Kiffin, a
and Southern Ca
At Tampa, K
fenses frequent
among the lea:
and the Bucca
the Super Bow


to replace R
ble switch after the 2002 season. That
linebacker unit was the first in the
becoming league since the champion
d, and An- Chicago Bears in 1985 to
could make lead the NFL in total de-
if the Cow- fense, points allowed and
l. interceptions.
coached in Ryan was fired Tuesday
ending a 13- after two seasons. His de-
[pa in 2008. fenses were inconsistent
st few years pressuring the quarterback
ege with his and didn't force many
itTennessee turnovers. In 2011, the Cow-
alifornia. boys allowed the second-
iffin's de- most passing yards in
ntly were franchise history
gue's best, Jones also said in a taped
neers won interview being aired this
1 with him weekend that he wasn't


<


Associated Press
Jacksonville Jaguars quarterback Chad Henne throws a pass under pressure Dec. 30 in Nashville, Tenn.




Henne, Gabbert


aren't

Associated Press
David Caldwell's tenure as Jack-
sonville's general manager
opened with him slamming the
door on quarterback Tim Tebow.
He might do the same to Blaine
Gabbert and Chad Henne.
Caldwell spent the majority of
his NFL career in Indianapolis
and Atlanta, learning firsthand the
importance of having a franchise
quarterback. Finding one for the
Jaguars likely will determine the
team's long-term success.
"It's hard," Caldwell said Thurs-
day at his introductory news con-
ference. "It makes it a lot more
difficult. (If you don't have one),
everything else has to be perfect. I
don't necessarily know that you
have to have a franchise quarter-


BRONCOS
Continued from Page B1

Although quarterback Joe
Flacco has four road playoff
wins on his resume, the
Ravens were a mediocre 4-4
this season on the road,
where he threw just seven
of his 24 touchdown passes.
Then, there's Peyton Man-
ning. Although he's 0-3 life-
time in cold weather in the
playoffs Saturday's high
will hover around 20 de-
grees with some snow ex-
pected he's beaten the
Ravens (11-6) nine straight
times, including twice in the
playoffs.
He's been stellar with that
glove on his right hand the
last two weeks in prepara-
tion for the wintry weather
and as a concession to the
altered feel of his grip fol-
lowing four neck surgeries.
With the glove, his comple-
tion percentage has been al-
most 6 points better and his


safe,

back, but you have to have one that
can win games for you."
The Jaguars have won just
seven games the past two seasons
with Gabbert, Henne and Luke
McCown under center.
Former general manager Gene
Smith traded up to draft Gabbert
with the 10th overall pick in 2010,
but the former Missouri standout
has made little progress during 24
starts. His pocket presence has
been routinely criticized, though
not nearly to the degree of Tebow's
throwing motion.
Gabbert completed 58 percent
of his passes for 1,662 yards this
season, with nine touchdowns and
six interceptions. He also was
sacked 22 times in 10 games. For-
mer coach Mike Mularkey
benched Gabbert in mid-November


passer rating almost 20 points
higher than without it.
The Broncos aren't taking
anything for granted,
though. They pointed out all
week that the last time they
played, the Ravens were
without Lewis, safety
Bernard Pollard, guard
Marshal Yanda, linebacker
Dannell Ellerbe and tight
end Ed Dickson, all of whom
will be available Saturday
"So, this will be a com-
pletely different game, a
completely different test,"
Broncos coach John Fox said.
Manning said he didn't
have any reaction to the
Ravens saying they were
eager for a chance to atone
for that lopsided loss.
"I know they have some
guys back that did not play
in the first game," Manning
said, noting this is certainly
the time of year you want to
be healthy. "... Those guys
make a difference for their
team. They made a differ-
ence for their team on Sun-
day holding their opponent


either

Henne started the final six games,
finishing with 2,084 yards passing,
11 touchdowns and 11 intercep-
tions. He was sacked 28 times.
Both quarterbacks played be-
hind a shaky offensive line and
didn't have the benefit of having
Maurice Jones-Drew (foot) for the
entire season.
Nonetheless, it has become
clear that neither is the answer.
"I have others in mind," Cald-
well said, adding that he also is
"comfortable with what's here."
Before Caldwell addresses the
quarterback situation, he has to
hire a head coach.
Potential candidates include
San Francisco 49ers offensive co-
ordinator Greg Roman and St.
Louis Rams offensive coordinator
Brian Schottenheimer.


to zero touchdowns. It's an
excellent defense, really no
matter who's in there, in my
opinion, but certainly when
they have all their other
guys back, they're extremely
tough."
Joining the praise parade,
Broncos safety Rahim
Moore gushed this week
about swapping jerseys with
his hero, Baltimore Pro
Bowler Ed Reed, after last
month's game, and Champ
Bailey pumped up Lewis,
saying, "I know he's going to
miss the game, but I think
the game will miss him
more because there's no-
body like him."
Following a 12-week lay-
off with a torn right biceps,
Lewis led the Ravens with
13 tackles to spark an emo-
tional win over Indianapolis
in the final home game of his
spectacular 17-year career
last week. The 37-year-old
middle linebacker intends
to retire after Baltimore
completes its playoff run.
A marquee at a Denver


hotel not far from Sports Au-
thority Field reads: "Join us
for Ray Lewis' retirement
party at 2 p.m. Saturday"
The Broncos would
cringe at such braggadocio.
The weather may be blus-
tery but they certainly aren't,
pointing out repeatedly that
the Ravens are the only NFL
team to reach the playoffs in
each of the past five seasons,
and they've won at least one
game in each of those trips.
They've also had a month to
get used to Jim Caldwell
calling offensive plays after
his discombobulated debut
against Denver on Dec. 16.
Of course, not all the
Ravens were boastful or
bombastic this week; sev-
eral had high praise for the
Broncos and the Broncos
brushed off those compli-
ments, too, lest they lose
their focus.
"I don't really buy into all
that mental warfare and all
that stuff," linebacker Von
Miller said. "I just like to get
between the lines and just


ob Ryan
pleased with some of the
early-season performances
before key defenders started
getting hurt. Garrett said in
a statement announcing the
firing of Ryan that the team
was going in a different
philosophical direction.
The Buccaneers finished
in the top 10 in total defense
11 times in 13 years under
Kiffin and had streaks of 69
straight games with a sack
and 54 with at least one
turnover during that stretch.
Tampa had 31 interceptions
the year it won the Super
Bowl.
Kiffin turns 73 next month.


eral ligament in his right
knee. ... RG Zane Beadles
said a big reason for his
breakout season was his
work with a sports psycholo-
gist last spring.




Membership
is open for 2013
Golf Season
North Central Florida
Senior Amateur Golf Tour.
JOIN TODAY!
352-446-3446
"Where Amateurs Are Treated Like Pro's"


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Chiefs

announce

coordinators,

assistant

coaches
Associated Press

KANSAS CITY, Mo. -
Andy Reid is wasting about
as much time putting to-
gether his first coaching
staff in Kansas City as he
did in finding his new job.
The Chiefs coach an-
nounced Friday that former
Eagles coach Doug Pederson
would be his offensive coor-
dinator and longtime Jets
assistant Bob Sutton the de-
fensive coordinator, along
with the majority of the staff
Reid hopes will turn around
a 2-14 franchise.
The moves come one
week after Reid was hired
by the Chiefs to replace the
fired Romeo Crennel, and
less than two weeks after he
was dismissed following 14
seasons with the Eagles.
Reid announced that Matt
Nagy will coach the Chiefs'
quarterbacks after two sea-
sons as the Eagles' offensive
quality control coach. Eric
Bieniemy will work with
running backs, Tom Melvin
the tight ends, and David
Culley will be an assistant
head coach and work with
wide receivers.
Reid has not announced
an offensive line coach.
Tommy Brasher will work
with the defensive line, but
Reid has not announced
coaches for linebackers, de-
fensive backs or special teams.
"I'm pleased we were able
to get all of these coaches on
board," Reid said. "I have
relationships with each of
them, and I know their past
experiences, work ethics
and coaching styles. These
are high-character coaches,
and each one brings some-
thing different to the table."
Pederson spent 12 sea-
sons playing quarterback in
the NFL, most of them with
Green Bay But he started
the first part of the 1999 sea-
son for Philadelphia, when
Reid has just been hired.
He then helped tutor Dono-
van McNabb, the Eagles'
second overall pick in the
draft
Pederson retired in 2004
and began his coaching ca-
reer, spending two years as
Reid's quality control coach
and the past two seasons
working with the Eagles'
quarterbacks.
"Doug has been around
the game a long time, and he
has great vision," Reid said.
'As a former player in this
league, he sees the game
from a different perspec-
tive, and that will be a great
benefit for our players. He
has a knack for developing
talent."
Pederson will inherit an
offense that was among the
NFEs worst last season with
quarterbacks Matt Cassel
and Brady Quinn. Pederson
and Reid both said they'll
examine the QB options al-
ready on the roster, but they'll
also consider free agency,
the trade market and using
their No. 1 pick in the draft
on upgrading the position.
"It's something I've stud-
ied the last few days, ever
since Coach Reid and I
talked about coming in,"
Pederson said on a confer-
ence call with reporters.

play football. I think that's
where you can settle the
score, on the football field."
Notes: Fox said RB Willis
McGahee didn't have any
setbacks this week. If the
Broncos beat Baltimore and
he continues to progress
next week, he'll be eligible
to return for the AFC cham-
pionship, two months after
tearing the medial collat-





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





Warriors walk away
with 5449 win
The Seven Rivers boys'
basketball team edged out
top-seeded rival First Acad-
emy on Friday night, hold-
ing the Royals (12-3) under
50 points in a 54-49 win.
"We played pretty good
man-to-man defense,"
head coach Jim Ervin said.
Adam Gage led the
scoring for the Warriors (7-
6, 2-2), accounting for 25
points. Jared Bogart and
Corey Winn each con-
tributed 10.
Seven Rivers will host
Oak Hall at 8 p.m. Monday
night.
'Canes drop hard-fought
game to state's best
The Citrus High Hurri-
canes boys soccer team
gave the top-ranked Sun-
lake Seahawks a battle Fri-
day night, but came home
with a 4-2 loss. But the
score, said coach Phil
Journey, wasn't reflective
of the team's effort.
"The entire team played
extremely well, with a lot of
control and enthusiasm,"
he said. "It was a great
game and a great team ef-
fort."
The Hurricanes (6-5-2,
5-1-1) got goals from Killian
McLean and Alan Braun.
They'll host Lecanto High
School at 7:30 Monday for
Senior Night.
Rainey's girlfriend
denies assault
GAINESVILLE For-
mer Pittsburgh Steeler
Christopher Rainey's girl-
friend says she was not as-
saulted, and that the state
of Florida should drop the
battery charge against him.
That's according to
Rainey's lawyer, Huntley
Johnson, who read an email
from the woman during a
bond hearing Friday. The
Gainesville Sun posted video
of the hearing on its website.
Gainesville police
charged Rainey with simple
battery Thursday after an
alleged altercation with his
girlfriend. Police say the two
were arguing over Rainey's
cellphone, and that when
his girlfriend got into a vehi-
cle, the ex-Florida Gator
tried to pull her out. Wit-
nesses told detectives that
Rainey slapped his girl-
friend across the face and
then chased her when she
ran away with his phone in
her purse.
The girlfriend's email
said the witnesses were
mistaken, and Johnson
pointed out that officers
found no marks on the
woman's face.
Trestman denies
Bears rumor
CHICAGO Longtime
NFL assistant and current
CFL coach Marc Trestman
is denying a rumor that the
Chicago Bears are set to
hire him.
In an e-mail to the Montreal
Gazette on Friday, Trestman
said he had not heard from
the Bears, who fired coach
Lovie Smith after the season.
Earlier, Fox analyst and
former Cowboys coach Jimmy
Johnson tweeted that it "looks
like 2 of my guys getting
NFL jobs ... Chud Cleve-
land and my QB coach at
U Trestman to Chicago."
Nine hours later, John-
son tweeted: "It LOOKS
like 2 of my guys were get-
ting NFL jobs not that
Trestman got it!"
Trestman, who coaches
the CFL's Montreal Alou-
ettes, interviewed with the
Bears this week. He was
on Johnson's staff at Miami.
UCLA's Mora gets
one-year extension
LOS ANGELES -


UCLA coach Jim Mora has
agreed to a one-year con-
tract extension through
2017 after revitalizing the
Bruins in his debut season.
UCLA announced the
deal late Friday.
Mora led UCLA to nine
victories, the Pac-12 South
title and a Holiday Bowl
berth after replacing Rick
Neuheisel. The former At-
lanta Falcons and Seattle
Seahawks head coach ad-
justed splendidly to the col-
lege game, climbing as high
as No. 15 in the rankings.
-From wire reports


SPORTS


SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013 B3


Second-half surge nets Lady Pirates a win

Crystal River outshoots Nature Coast 17-0 in third quarter


JUSTIN PLANTE
Correspondent

CRYSTAL RIVER The
game didn't start out the
way the Crystal River High
School girls basketball team
wanted it to, but it sure
ended that way
After narrowly fending off
a late first-half surge from
visiting Nature Coast Tech,
the Lady Pirates went on a
28-8 run that spanned the
entirety of the second half,
led by Megan Wells' game-
high 16 points. Then Crystal
River coasted to a 53-31 vic-
tory over its district foe.
But it didn't start off so
simple for the Lady Pirates.
After shooting out to a
quick seven-point lead,
Crystal River's offense
started to fizzle. Early dom-


nation on the boards
helped stave off a Nature
Coast surge, but the Crystal
River couldn't pull away
Crystal River head coach
Jason Rodgers attributes
the offensive struggles to
lost confidence.
"The girls get down on
themselves sometimes," he
said. "They miss a couple of
shots and they get down. I
said to them at halftime,
'Keep going in.' You keep
going in and keep going in,
eventually shots will fall.
And they did."
Nature Coast's defense
didn't put up much of a
fight. Throughout the first
half, Crystal River found
plenty of open shots most
from the perimeter but
the shots just wouldn't fall.
A credit to the Lady


Sharks, however, was their
physical play late in the sec-
ond quarter. It was clear at
the start of the second quar-
ter that the momentum was
changing. Most of that was
due to Nature Coast's play
in the paint. Lady Sharks
center Rita Jarques was a
force coming off the bench,
as she nabbed a game-high
16 rebounds and a scored a
team-high 11 points, all from
the paint.
But any momentum the
Lady Sharks found in the first
half was stifled in the second.
The Pirates defense was
nothing short of brilliant in
the second half. Rodgers
beamed after realizing his
team gave up eight second-
half points. He credited the
win to the his girls' defen-
sive surge.


"Clearly, if you give up 23
first-half points and only
give up eight in the second,
something changed," he
said. "And it wasn't their
team. It's a huge credit to
our defense."
The Lady Pirates' offen-
sive woes disappeared in
the second half, as they shot
out to a 17-0 advantage in
the third quarter.
Crystal River's Megan
Wells was the catalyst. After
the team struggled in the
first, Wells said it was perse-
verance that helped the Pi-
rates pull away
"After the first, we just
came together and started
running our plays," she said.
"We stuck it out and just
kept shooting. We couldn't
think about the last shot; we
had to keep focused."


Associated Press
The New York Knicks' J.R. Smith, right, is guarded by the Chicago Bulls' Luol Deng on Friday during the first
quarter at Madison Square Garden in New York.


nicks ni


Bulls 108,

Knicks 101
Associated Press

NEW YORK Luol Deng
scored a season-high 33 points in
the Chicago Bulls' third victory over
New York this season, a 108-101
win that sent the Knicks to their
season-high third straight loss.
Topping the 29 points he scored
here last month, Deng shot 13 of 18
from the field and also led the de-
fensive effort that contained
Carmelo Anthony in the decisive
first half of his return from a one-
game suspension.
Carlos Boozer added 17 points
for the Bulls.
Anthony ended up with 39
points for the Knicks.
Hawks 103, Jazz 95
ATLANTA- Devin Harris scored a
season-high 24 points and the Atlanta
Hawks rallied from a second-half deficit
of 15 points to beat the Utah Jazz.
Randy Foye had 25 points to lead Utah.
The Hawks, who trailed 75-60 in the
third quarter, played from behind be-
fore taking their first lead of the second
half on consecutive baskets byAI Hor-


ford. The second basket by Horford,
set up by Josh Smith's pass, gave At-
lanta a 94-92 lead with 2:44 remaining.
Jefferson answered with a tying bas-
ket before Ivan Johnson scored on a fast
break to give the lead back to Atlanta.
Utah's Jamaal Tinsley made one of
two free throws to leave the Hawks'
lead at 96-95. Josh Smith's short
jumper and Lou Williams' 3-pointer
padded the lead.
Celtics 103, Rockets 91
BOSTON Paul Pierce scored 16
of his 23 points in the second half and
Kevin Garnett added 17 points and four
blocks as the Boston Celtics nearly
blew a 17-point lead before pulling
away late in a 103-91 victory over the
Houston Rockets on Friday night.
The Celtics extended their season-
high winning streak to five games, but
only after surviving a 12-0 run that
pulled the Rockets within two points
midway through the fourth quarter.
Rajon Rondo finished with 12 points
and eight assists for the Celtics. Court-
ney Lee and Jared Sullinger scored 14
apiece and Sullinger also had 11 rebounds
for his second straight double-double.
James Harden scored 24 and Chan-
dler Parsons added 18 for Houston, which
fell to 0-2 during a three-game road trip
that concludes Saturday in Philadelphia.


ed


Hornets 104,
Timberwolves 92
NEW ORLEANS Greivis Vasquez
had 18 points and 13 assists to lead
the New Orleans Hornets to a 104-92
victory over the Minnesota Timber-
wolves for their fourth straight win.
Eric Gordon added 16 points, Ryan
Anderson had 15, Jason Smith 14, Al-
FarouzAminu 12 and Roger Mason 10
for the Hornets, who have won five out
of six with Gordon in the starting
lineup.
New Orleans trailed 29-14 after the
first quarter but outscored Minnesota
56-32 over the next two periods to
take a 70-61 lead.
Nets 99, Suns 79
NEW YORK Joe Johnson scored
19 points and MarShon Brooks added
17 points off the bench Friday night,
leading the Brooklyn Nets to its fifth
straight victory, 99-79 over the strug-
gling Phoenix Suns.
The Nets have won three straight
games by 20 or more points for the
first time in the team's NBA history.
Deron Williams added 14 points and
Andray Blatche chipped in 15 points
and eight rebounds as the Nets ended
a five game home losing streak
against Phoenix.


Other top players for the
Pirates were Katelyn Han-
nigan, who finished with 11
points, Lamechia Richburg,
who finished with 10 points
and Jasmyne Eason, who
finished with a team-high 11
rebounds.
With the win, Crystal River
(12-7 overall, 6-2 district)
avenges one of its district
losses, and finds itself near
the top of the standings.
"This puts us at second
behind Dunnellon," Rodgers
said. "So it's looking good
for us right now. But Nature
Coast is a really good team
and could make another run
this year. They were missing
their point guard this time,
so that could play a factor
later. But we're happy with
this win, especially after
losing by 11 at their gym."



Lady


'Canes get


crucialwin

C.J. RISAK
Correspondent

INVERNESS Two
teams, both dependent
upon a belief in pressure
defense creating offensive
chances. Last time the Cit-
rus and West Port girls bas-
ketball teams clashed, the
outcome favored West Port
56-46 on the Wolf Pack's
home court
This time, it was Citrus
that emerged with the 10-
point victory
Thanks to a strong start
from Shenelle Toxen and a
great finish by Lindsay Con-
nors, the Hurricanes took
command early and hung on
throughout for a 55-45 tri-
umph.
It was an important win
for Citrus, moving them to 6-
1 in District 6A-6 a half-
game ahead of West Port,
which slipped to 5-1 in dis-
trict play The Canes are 15-
4 overall, the Wolf Pack are
12-7.
"We didn't play defense as
well as I thought we
should," said West Port
coach Corey Rollerson. "Our
extra effort wasn't there; we
got outhustled to the ball.
"Our offense was about
the same as it has been all
season. We don't have the
scorers like we have had.
But we didn't play defense
as well as we should."
Citrus used its defense to
do what it wanted it to do -
create offense. The 'Canes
led 18-11 after one quarter,
thanks to eight first-quarter
points from Toxen, and in-
creased that to 31-22 at the
half after forcing 11 second-
quarter turnovers by the
Wolf Pack. Toxen had 14
points by the intermission
and would finish with 16.
"We've been preparing for
this game all week, and al-
though it's just as important
as any other district game,
with West Port it's always a
little special," Toxen said. "Our
intensity was up tonight."
That was evident in the
second half, when the Wolf
Pack tried to increase their
pressure. It worked some-
what, forcing nine Hurri-
cane turnovers in the third
quarter. But West Port could
not take advantage offen-
sively, converting just 4 of 17
field-goal attempts in the
quarter
The Wolf Pack's best
chance at catching Citrus
came midway through the
fourth, when Destiny Law-
son converted a pair of 3-
pointers on back-to-back
possessions to ignite a 10-3
run that trimmed the Hurri-
cane lead to 48-43 with 5:03
remaining.
That's when Connors took
over offensively, scoring Cit-
rus' final seven points in a
four-minute span. Connors
collected 12 second-half
points and had 18 for the
game.
"I thought we had to do a
better job handling their
pressure defense than we


did the first time," said Cit-
rus coach Brian Lattin. "I
thought our press was good,
I thought we played good
team defense. Coach Roller-
son is a great coach and
West Port is as good a pro-
gram as there is."
In those last five minutes,
See CRUCIAL/Page B4






B4 SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013



Glantz-Culver Line
For Jan. 12
NFL Playoffs
Today
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY 0/U UNDERDOG
at Denver 9Y2 9Y2 (46) Baltimore
at San Fran. 3 3 (45) Green Bay
Tomorrow
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at N. England 9 9Y2 (47Y2) Houston
NCAA Basketball


FAVORITE LINE
Georgetown 1
at Syracuse 17
at Indiana 8
at Georgia St. Pk
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atTowson 1
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at South Carolina 2/2
at Georgia 10
at West Virginia 1 Y2
at Notre Dame 8V2
at Iowa St. 7Y2
Charlotte 3
at Dayton Pk
George Mason 4Y2
at Florida St. 2
Kent St. 4Y2
at La Salle 8
at Colorado 1 Y2
at N. Iowa 6
Ohio 7Y2
Valparaiso 10
at Wisconsin 6
at Georgia Tech 9Y2
at Southern Miss. 11 2
at Oklahoma 2
at SMU 1
Texas-Arlington 2
at New Mexico 15
Akron 12Y2
Harvard 11 Y2
at California 5Y2
Florida 9Y2
at Louisville 20
William & Mary 2Y2
at James Madison 212
VCU 7Y2
at Wake Forest 3Y2
at Kentucky 15
Kansas 16
at Xavier 7
Detroit 7Y2
at UALR 4Y2
Middle Tenn. 15
at East Carolina 1
at Temple 4
at Baylor 20
Wyoming 2
at Princeton 16
at Bowling Green 8
at Utah 4
at Arkansas 11
Denver 6
at Tulsa 14
at Long Beach St. 7
Louisiana Tech 8
at Saint Mary's (Cal) 14
at Toledo 8
at Buffalo 7
at UC Irvine 6
Saint Joseph's 7
at San Diego St. 7
at W. Kentucky 8
at Mississippi 5
Cincinnati 4
at Green Bay 5
at S. Illinois 1
at Illinois St. 12
at North Texas 2Y2
at La.-Lafayette Pk
Memphis 6Y2
at Cal St.-Fullerton 15
at UTEP 10
Arizona 8
at Santa Clara Pk
at Loyola Marymount 8
atUNLV 16
at Idaho 2
at Pepperdine 1 Y2
at Pacific 7
at UC Davis 3
at Stanford 8
W. Illinois 12
at W. Carolina 8Y2
at North Dakota 312
at Coll. of Charleston11 Y2
Elon 2Y2
Davidson 14
at S. Dakota St. 12
at N. Dakota St. 12
at Belmont 25
Montana 4
at E. Kentucky 7
at Wofford 7
Samford 2
Jacksonville St. 4Y2
at Tennessee St. 812
at SIU-Edwardsville 1
at South Dakota 512
Murray St. 1012
at E. Washington 312
at S. Utah 6Y2
at Portland St. 8
NBA
FAVORITE LINE
at L.A. Clippers 13
at Indiana 11
Atlanta 4Y2
at Detroit 2Y2
at Philadelphia Pk
at Chicago 7
Memphis 3
Miami 7Y2


UNDERDOG
at St. John's
Villanova
Minnesota
Delaware
Marquette
Northeastern
at Clemson
at NC State
Tennessee
Auburn
Mississippi St.
Kansas St.
UConn
Texas
at Rhode Island
Butler
at UNC Wilmington
North Carolina
at Ball St.
Richmond
UCLA
Bradley
atW. Michigan
at Milwaukee
Illinois
Virginia Tech
Houston
Oklahoma St.
Tulane
at Texas St.
Fresno St.
at N. Illinois
at Dartmouth
Washington St.
atLSU
South Florida
at Hofstra
Drexel
at St. Bonaventure
Boston College
Texas A&M
at Texas Tech
George Washington
at Cleveland St.
FlU
at La.-Monroe
UCF
Saint Louis
TCU
at Nevada
Penn
E. Michigan
Southern Cal
Vanderbilt
at Seattle
Rice
Hawaii
at UTSA
San Francisco
Cent. Michigan
Miami (Ohio)
CS Northridge
at Duquesne
Colorado St.
FAU
Missouri
at Rutgers
Ill.-Chicago
Indiana St.
Drake
South Alabama
Arkansas St.
at UAB
UC Riverside
Marshall
at Oregon St.
BYU
Portland
Air Force
New Mexico St.
San Diego
Cal Poly
UC Santa Barbara
Washington
at Nebraska-Omaha
UNC Greensboro
Montana St.
Chattanooga
at Appalachian St.
at Furman
IPFW
Oakland
UT-Martin
at N. Colorado
Morehead St.
Georgia Southern
at The Citadel
at E. Illinois
SE Missouri
Tennessee Tech
Mo.-Kansas City
at Austin Peay
Sacramento St.
Idaho St.
N. Arizona

UNDERDOG
Orlando
Charlotte
atWashington
Utah
Houston
Phoenix
at Dallas
at Sacramento


Friday's
men's scores
EAST
Amherst 79, Hamilton 77
Edinboro 78, Kutztown 77, 20T
Loyola (Md.) 63, Fairfield 58, OT
NYU 75, Case Reserve 58
Niagara 77, St. Peter's 58
Rochester 64, Chicago 47
Siena 57, Canisius 54
St. John Fisher 82, Hartwick 54
Utica 85, Houghton 66
SOUTH
Berea 96, Point Park 90
N. Kentucky 67, Lipscomb 53
MIDWEST
Creighton 74, Missouri St. 52
Mansfield 77, Clarion 73
Northwestern (Minn.) 82, Martin Luther 70
St. Scholastic 82, Minn.-Morris 77
Friday's women's
scores
EAST
Amherst 50, Hamilton 43
Case Reserve 57, NYU 42
Marist 67, Loyola (Md.) 38
SOUTH
Midway 67, Carlow 57
Point Park 62, Berea 41
MIDWEST
Augustana (SD) 92, Bemidji St. 44
Bethany Lutheran 68, North Central (Minn.) 61
Concordia (St.P) 76, Minn. St. (Moorhead) 70
Creighton 64, Illinois St. 45
Indiana St. 67, Drake 49
Mary 74, Winona St. 62
Minn.-Morris 64, St. Scholastica 51
Minot St. 78, Upper Iowa 63
Northland 52, Crown (Minn.) 38
Sioux Falls 83, Minn. Duluth 78
St. Cloud St. 77, SW Minnesota St. 70
Wayne (Neb.) 59, Minn.-Crookston 57


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr the record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
6-2-6
S... -. CASH 3 (late)
f 1 *1-6-4
S. PLAY 4 (early)
S 6-4-0-4
PLAY 4 (late)
3-6-3-4
FANTASY 5
7-25-27-35-36
MEGA MONEY
15 23 28 33
loida Lottey MEGA BALL
20


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL
4 p.m. (ESPN) Huntington Prep (W.Va.) at Cape Henry (Va.)
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
11 a.m. (ESPN2) Georgetown at St. John's
12 p.m. (ABC) (CW) Virginia at Clemson
12 p.m. (ABC) Villanova at Syracuse
12 p.m. (ESPN) Duke at North Carolina State
1 p.m. (ESPN2) Tennessee at Alabama
1:30 p.m. (MNT) (FOX) Mississippi State at Georgia
2 p.m. (ESPN) North Carolina at Florida State
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) Butler at Dayton
2:30 p.m. (ABC) (CW) Virginia Tech at Georgia Tech
3 p.m. (ESPN2) Oklahoma State at Oklahoma
4 p.m. (MNT) (FOX) Texas A&M at Kentucky
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) Drexel at James Madison
4 p.m. (SUN) Boston College at Wake Forest
6 p.m. (NBCSPT) Pennsylvania at Princeton
6 p.m. (SUN) Vanderbilt at Arkansas
8 p.m. (FSNFL) Missouri at Mississippi
8 p.m. (NBCSPT) Colorado State at San Diego State
11 p.m. (FSNFL) Washington at Stanford
NBA BASKETBALL
3:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Orlando Magic at Los Angeles Clippers
8 p.m. (WGN-A) Phoenix Suns at Chicago Bulls
10 p.m. (SUN) Miami Heat at Sacramento Kings
FOOTBALL
4:30 p.m. (CBS) AFC divisional playoff: Baltimore Ravens at
Denver Broncos
8 p.m. (FOX) NFC divisional playoff: Green Bay Packers at
San Francisco 49ers
GOLF
7 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Volvo Golf Champions,
third round
7 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Sony Open in Hawaii, third round
PREMIER LEAGUE SOCCER
7:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Queens Park Rangers FC vs Tottenham
Hotspur FC. From Loftus Road Stadium in London
WINTER SPORTS
1 p.m. (NBCSPT) Freestyle skiing: Copper Freestyle Pipe,
Run 1. From Copper Mountain, Colo. (taped)
4 p.m. (NBC) Visa U.S. Freeskiing Grand Prix. From Copper
Mountain, Colo. (taped)

ON THE RADIO
2 p.m. (WYKE 104.3) North Carolina at Florida State

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
WRESTLING
TBA Citrus at Dunedin
9 a.m. Crystal River at Fivay Invitational


Friday's sports transactions
BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX-Extensioned their
Player Development Contract (PDC) with Port-
land of the Eastern League through 2018.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS-Agreed to terms
with C Henry Blanco on a one-year contract.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ARIZONA CARDINALS-Signed LB Tim
Fugger, DT Ricky Lumpkin, LB Colin Parker, DE
Everrette Thompson, G Jeremiah Warren and
RB Fozzy Whittaker to future contracts.
DALLAS COWBOYS-Named Monte Kiffin
defensive coordinator.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS-Named Doug Ped-
erson offensive coordinator, Bob Sutton defen-
sive coordinator, David Culley assistant head
coach and wide receivers coach, Matt Nagy
quarterbacks coach, Eric Bieniemy running
backs coach, Tommy Brasher defensive line
coach, Barry Rubin strength coach, Travis Crit-
tenden assistant strength coach, Britt Reid and
Corey Matthaei quality control coaches and
Mike Frazier statistical analysis coordinator.
Canadian Football League
WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS-Re-signed
DB Jonathan Hefney.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
ANAHEIM DUCKS-Named Scott Nieder-
mayer assistant coach.
American Hockey League
BRIDGEPORT SOUNDTIGERS-Signed D
T.J. Fast to a professional tryout contract.
PORTLAND PIRATES-Signed D Russ
Sinkewich to a player tryout agreement.
ECHL
ECHL-Suspended San Francisco's Scott
Langdon two games and fined him an undis-
closed for his actions in a Jan. 11 game against
Idaho.
BAKERSFIELD CONDORS-Signed C
Nicolas Tremblay
GWINNETT GLADIATORS-Announced F
Scott Arnold and F Evan Bloodoff were called
up to Portland (AHL).
STOCKTON THUNDER-Signed RW Matt
Ambroz.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
LOS ANGELES GALAXY-Announced the
retirement of F Pat Noonan, who will join the
coaching staff.
SEATTLE SOUNDERS FC-Signed D De-
Andre Yedlin.
COLLEGE
ALABAMA-Announced TB Eddie Lacy CB
Dee Milliner and OT D.J. Fluker are entering the
NFL draft.
ARIZONA STATE-Named Chris Thomsen
running backs coach.
IOWA STATE-Announced sophomore QB
Jared Barnett and sophomore LB C.J. Morgan
will transfer.
SYRACUSE-Named Chuck Bullough de-
fensive coordinator.


NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
New York 23 13 .639
Brooklyn 21 15 .583
Boston 19 17 .528
Philadelphia 15 22 .405


Toronto


Miami
Atlanta
Orlando
Charlotte
Washington

Indiana
Chicago
Milwaukee
Detroit
Cleveland


14 22 .389
Southeast Division
W L Pct
23 11 .676
21 14 .600
12 23 .343
9 26 .257
5 28 .152
Central Division
W L Pct
22 14 .611
20 14 .588
18 17 .514
14 23 .378
9 28 .243


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
San Antonio 28 11 .718
Memphis 24 10 .706
Houston 21 16 .568
Dallas 14 23 .378
New Orleans 11 25 .306
Northwest Division
W L Pct
Oklahoma City 27 8 .771


Portland
Denver
Utah
Minnesota


L.A. Clippers
Golden State
L.A. Lakers
Sacramento
Phoenix


20 15 .571
21 16 .568
19 19 .500
16 17 .485
Pacific Division
W L Pct
28 8 .778
22 12 .647
15 20 .429
13 23 .361
12 26 .316


Thursday's Games
Indiana 81, New York 76
Dallas 117, Sacramento 112, OT
Portland 92, Miami 90
Friday's Games
Toronto 99, Charlotte 78
Boston 103, Houston 91
Atlanta 103, Utah 95
Brooklyn 99, Phoenix 79
Memphis 101, San Antonio 98, OT
New Orleans 104, Minnesota 92
Chicago 108, New York 101
Detroit 103, Milwaukee 87
Cleveland at Denver, late
Portland at Golden State, late
Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, late
Saturday's Games
Orlando at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Washington, 7 p.m.
Utah at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Houston at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Memphis at Dallas, 9p.m.
Miami at Sacramento, 10p.m.


Lady Warriors win on the road

Staff close behind her were was good one-on-one defen-


Seven Rivers Christian
School's girls basketball
team demolished its First
Academy opponents with a
55-4 win Friday night while
on the road.
Leading the team was An-
drea Zachar with a double-
double for her 16 points and
11 rebounds. Following


Alyssa Gage with 13 points,
five rebounds and five steals
and Tessa Kacer with 12
points, six steals and 1
blocked shot. Rounding out
the Lady Warriors offense
was Taylor Desmond with
six points, nine rebounds
and three steals.
Coach Gary Dwyer ac-
credited the teams' 14 steals


sive play
"What we have been
doing in working on de-
fense," he said. "And when
we play strong one-on-one
defense, the other team will
turn it over."
Seven Rivers' (10-5
record) will play against
Oak Hall Academy on Mon-
day night at home.


Nichols honored prior to game


STEVE MCGUNNIGLE
Correspondent
Prior to the Lecanto-Crystal
River boys basketball
game Friday night, the
crowd containing noth sides
of the rivalry was treated to
a heartwarming spectacle,
as the host Panthers hon-
ored former head coach
Chris Nichols, who two
years ago was forced to re-
tire after suffering a pair of
strokes, on the heels of a
heart condition.
His presence is always
felt near or within the walls
of the Panthers Den, be it
echoes of his past success or
the fact that in spite of his
current condition, he remains
a fixture at the gym, for most
games and practices.
Every person in the gym
stool in lengthy applause,
particularly when his retired
number 21 was revealed high
on the wall, decorated on a
banner Said current Lecanto



PIRATES
Continued from Page B1

But in the extra period,
Reynolds was key He and
teammate Sam Franklin
drove to the basket or got to
the line repeatedly, forcing
Lecanto (12-5) to fight uphill
the entire extra four minutes.
"My teammates and
coaches got us ready for
that," Reynolds said of his
team's ability to persevere
following his missed free
throw. "I feel like we came
out with more intensity than
Lecanto, and more will to
win."
The Panthers grabbed the
early lead in overtime on a
pair of free throws from
Brandon Burrich (21 points)
to make it 61-59. But Franklin
found Damien Westfall for a
layup on the break after a
Lecanto turnover to tie it.
Then Franklin hit one of two
free throws and converted
on a score down-court off a
feed from Nick Ricca.
Following a Lecanto miss,
a pair from the line by
Reynolds made it 66-61 with



'CANES
Continued from Page B1

senior power forward
Randy Lynn to injury mo-
ments later
Citrus head coach Tom
Densmore was disappointed
in his team's offensive
against the Wolf Pack's zone
during the West Port run.
"We wanted to get West
Port out of its zone by hold-
ing the ball at the top, but
we took a couple of shots
that weren't following that
plan," Densmore said. "We
had a chance to try to either
run that third quarter out
with a seven-point lead or
force West Port into a better
matchup for us. Then, we
had some foul trouble, so
those were both issues that
hurt us during that run.
"For two quarters and six
minutes, I thought we
played pretty well."
As the only 6A-6 squad
with one district loss, West
Port (10-3 overall, 3-1 in dis-
trict) moves atop the stand-
ings with the victory The
tournament seeds are far
from settled however, with



CRUCIAL
Continued from Page B3

with the outcome still in
doubt, it was the Hurricane
defense that won out. West
Port a team with just one
senior on its roster pres-
sured Citrus into six
turnovers in that span, but
the Wolf Pack had five of
their own.
Citrus' experience play-
ing against pressure was ev-
ident, particularly down the
stretch, but getting out to an


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Coach Chris Nichols is honored
at Friday night's game between
Crystal River and Lecanto.
head coach Frank Vilardi, "I
thought with the applause
and the ovation he got, you
could see that he means
alot, not only to Lecanto but
to the entire community.
He's a class act and this was
a great way to honor him."
Lecanto athletic director
Ron Allan, who came to the
school at the same time as


1:19 remaining.
Two from the stripe by
Burrich brought the Pan-
thers to within three, but
that was the closest they
would get in the waning mo-
ment. The Pirates hit
enough free throws down
the stretch to prevent any
Lecanto comeback.
"We really just regrouped,
and these teammates have
done what they've done all
year," Crystal River head
coach Steve Feldman said.
"We hope we can put the
word rivalry back into this
series."
After the first quarter be-
longed to Crystal River 13-6,
Lecanto took the second 20-
12 for 26-25 halftime advan-
tage on a pair of Mikey
Makros free throws with two
seconds remaining. Makros
finished with 26 points to
lead the Panthers.
The intensity of a rivalry
set in during the second
half. Both sides played to a
46-46 tie entering the fourth.
In the third quarter, Burrich
and Makros kept it close for
Lecanto, scoring nine and
eight points, respectively, in
the period. Reynolds coun-


the Wolf Pack still to play at
Citrus and Lecanto.
West Port made three 3s
in the opening three min-
utes and missed less than
half as many shots from the
field as Citrus in the open-
ing period, but they soon
cooled for most of the mid-
dle two periods.
Meanwhile, the 'Canes
converted four steals into
layups in a four-minute
span that overlapped the
first and second quarters,
helping them grab a 21-19
lead off a buzzer-beating
steal and layup by junior
point guard Devin Pryor in
the first quarter before se-
curing a 34-26 advantage for
the half.
Pryor had a team-high 19
points and four steals.
West Port's Maxell led all
scorers with 26 points
thanks to a 14-point effort in
the fourth. David rode 12
second-half points to a 14-
point outing, and Wolf Pack
guard Alec Jewell was a per-
fect 6-for-6 at the foul line to
add 10 points.
Citrus' Lynn, who had five
points in the first quarter,
and junior center Ben Jan-
icki each grabbed seven re-


early lead was pivotal. And
that early lead came from a
disciplined approach offen-
sively when playing in the
half court, with Toxen's cuts
to the basket ending in good
opportunities in close.
"We were patient on our
offense," said Toxen. "More
patient than the last time we
played them. We just worked
really well as a team."
That patience proved to
be a game-changer. "Any
time you go against a man-
to-man defense in general,
if you're patient and you set
good screens, you're going


Nichols in 1984, agreed, say-
ing, "It's just a little token of
our appreciation from our
school community back to
him and his family"
Nichols and Allan formed
summer camps and winter
leagues early in their
tenures with the school, and
the influence remains.
"With these kinds of
things, he kind of helped
basketball to blossom in this
community," said Allan.
"Alot of these boys that you
see out here went through
the camps when they were
little guys, even up until a
couple years ago. One of the
biggest things that he means
to this school and to the whole
community is that he loves
this game with a passion."
Even still, while he fights
his battle with a heart con-
dition and stroke recovery.
And now, with number 21
high on the wall, his signifi-
cance to this area will be
forever evident.


tered with 10 of his own.
"I think in the third quar-
ter, both those guys got it
going a little bit," Lecanto
head coach Frank Vilardi
said. "We executed in the
third quarter. But in the
fourth and in overtime, we
didn't execute how we
wanted to."
After the Panthers started
the fourth strong to take an
early lead, the Pirates re-
claimed it on a Reynolds
dish and kick out assist to
Ricca for a short jumper,
making it 52-51. From there,
the lead exchanged hands
the rest of the quarter until
Reynolds' 1-out-of-2 from
the line sent it to overtime.
"They stepped to the line,
made some plays late, and
we didn't," Vilardi said.
"You've got to tip your hat to
them, they played a great
game."
Franklin finished with 21
points and seven rebounds
for Crystal River, while
Reynolds led the Pirates
with 10 rebounds as well as
his 28 points.
Lecanto's Geoffrey Ruiz
had seven points and eight
rebounds.


bounds while Janicki added
10 points before fouling out
in the fourth.
"We talked about our
shooting at halftime, and
that the ball is going to go
in," West Port head coach
Lyle Livengood said of his
team's shooting swings. "A
lot of that had to do with Cit-
rus. They had a pretty good
plan for us.
"Going on the road and
winning in your league is
about the toughest thing to
do, and to allow someone to
win from your league on your
home floor is not good,"
added Livengood on the im-
portance of holding serve at
home within the district.
Densmore discussed his
club's opportunities ahead,
which include a couple of
home district games along
with a meeting at Spring-
stead.
"We still play West Port at
home, and our three re-
maining district games will
tell the tale," he said. "We
could still, crazy enough,
finish anywhere between
first and fourth."
Citrus next plays at Weeki
Wachee on Monday for a 7
p.m. start.


to get good shots," Lattin said.
Indeed. Citrus converted
22 of 51 shots (43 percent)
from the floor; West Port
made 15 of 53 (28 percent).
After Connors and Toxen,
Liz Lynch was the 'Canes
best scorer with seven
points, five of those in the
fourth quarter. West Port
was paced by Aaliyah High
with 14 points, with Lawson
scoring 13 and Kori Hanks
eight.
Citrus travels to Ocala
Trinity Catholic Monday
and to 6A-6 foe Spring Hill
Springstead Tuesday


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Sign up now to
play Little League
Inverness Little League
signups are ongoing. Par-
ents may register their chil-
dren at the following
locations and times:
1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Jan. 12
at the concession stand at
Whispering Pines Park; 6
p.m. to 8 p.m. Jan. 15 in
the Community Room at
Whispering Pines Park;
and 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Jan.
16 in the Community Room
at Whispering Pines Park.
Tryouts and registrations
will be held Jan. 19 at
Whispering Pines Park. For
times and more informa-
tion, contact Inverness Lit-
tle League President
Michelle Treas at 352-422-
2517 or shelltreas@
gmail.com.
Clarke may drop
captain's race
DURBAN, South Africa
Darren Clarke said he
may pull out of the race to
become Europe's Ryder
Cup captain for 2014 be-
cause of the impact it
would have on his career in
the next two years.
Clarke and Ireland's
Paul McGinley are the two
main candidates to replace
Spain's Jose Maria Olaza-
bal, with the European
Tour's tournament commit-
tee expected to vote in Abu
Dhabi on Tuesday.
The 2011 British Open
champion said after his
second round at the Volvo
Champions that "I am ex-
empt for another three years
(for major events) and if I
was given the opportunity
to do the captaincy, I'd ef-
fectively be throwing two of
those years away."
French motorcyclist
killed at Dakar
SANTIAGO, Chile -
French motorcyclist
Thomas Bourgin has been
killed in the Dakar Rally
when he collided with a
Chilean police car.
Race officials say the in-
cident occurred as Bourgin
was travelling from Calama
on the Chilean side of the
Andes to the start of the
seventh stage in Argentina
on Friday. They say the po-
lice car was going in the
opposite direction.
He was 25.
Earnhardt Jr. starts
big wreck at test
DAYTONA BEACH -
New cars, same results
at Daytona International
Speedway.
Dale Earnhardt Jr.
started a 12-car accident at
Daytona on Friday that es-
sentially shut down a three-
day test session designed
to hone NASCAR's re-
designed cars.
Stock-car racing's most
popular driver was trying to
bump draft with Marcus
Ambrose on the back
straightaway when he lifted
Ambrose "like a forklift"
and turned him into the
wall. Ambrose's Ford
bounced back across the
track and triggered a
pileup that collected a host
of others.
Two of Earnhardt's Hen-
drick Motorsports team-
mates, Jeff Gordon and
Kasey Kahne, also were in-
volved. So were defending
Sprint Cup champion Brad
Keselowski, new teammate
Joey Logano, Carl Ed-
wards, Kyle Busch, Jamie
McMurray, Martin Truex Jr.,
AricAlmirola and Regan
Smith.
There were no injuries,
but the wreck caused sev-
eral teams to leave Day-
tona. At least 10 teams,


including Michael Waltrip
Racing, Penske Racing
and Richard Petty Motor-
sports, packed up their
haulers and headed back
to North Carolina.
"It is unfortunate, but
sometimes you have to
wreck them to learn," Ke-
selowski said. "The sport is
rewinding. That is the im-
portant thing to say. The
sport advanced to the two-
car tandem three or four
years ago, and there were
certain things you could do
then that you couldn't do in
the past without wrecking."


SPORTS


Ishikawa gets another Masters invite


Associated Press

AUGUSTA, Ga. Ryo
Ishikawa of Japan is headed
back to the Masters with an-
other special invitation.
Augusta National Golf Club
said Friday that Ishikawa
and Thaworn Wiratchant of
Thailand have accepted the
invitations, which are re-
served for international


players. It will be the fifth
straight year the 21-year-
old Ishikawa is playing the
Masters. This is his third
special exemption.
Thaworn is No. 68 in the
world and won the Asian Tour
money title last year He also
holds the Asian Tour record
for most career victories,
winning the Hero India Open
last year for his 15th title.


Ishikawa dropped as low
as No. 91 in the world late
last year before his game
picked up. He won the Tai-
heiyo Masters for his 10th
career title on the Japan
Golf Tour, part of seven top-
10 finishes in his last 10
tournaments of the year. He
is No. 75 in the world.
Ishikawa is sure to get at-
tention because no other


player has received more
exemptions over the last 10
years. Ishikawa is a rock
star in Japan, however, hav-
ing won his first tourna-
ment as a 15-year-old
amateur But his game went
into a deep slump last year,
when he missed the cut in
the first three majors be-
fore a tie for 59th in the
PGA Championship.


Associated Press
Russell Henley drives off the first tee during the second round of the Sony Open on Friday in Honolulu.







Rookies rule


Russell Henley, Scott Langley own top two spots in Honolulu


Associated Press

HONOLULU Two days into
his PGA Tour career, Russell Hen-
ley was on his way to breaking a
record.
Henley had another 7-under 63
on Friday in the Sony Open and
wound up with a two-shot lead
over fellow rookie Scott Langley
among early starters in the second
round. He was at 14-under 126,
which breaks by two shots the 36-
hole record at this tournament.
In the first full-field event of the
season, the two rookies are lead-
ing the way
Langley finished with three
straight birdies for a 66, a solid ef-
fort after opening with a 62. De-
pending on afternoon play, they
would play together a third
straight day, this time as the final
group. They first were linked as
low amateurs in the 2010 U.S.
Open at Pebble Beach.


Oosthuizen takes 1-shot
lead, excavator in Durban
DURBAN, South Africa Louis
Oosthuizen made a long birdie putt at
the final green to take a one-shot lead
after the second round of the Volvo
Champions and swapped a car for
an excavator to use on his South
African farm.
Oosthuizen had an 8-under 64 Fri-
day on a rain-softened Durban Coun-
try Club course for a 12-under 132
total, one shot ahead of Scotland's
Scott Jamieson (64) and Thailand's
Thongchai Jaidee (68).
By sinking the last putt, Oost-
huizen's team won a pro-am event that
awarded a car to the winners. How-
ever, the farming enthusiast talked to
organizers and swapped the car for an
excavator, which happened to be the
prize for anyone who made a hole-in-
one at the 15th.
Six others trail Thongchai and


Jamieson by six shots.
Oosthuizen added to his collection
of agricultural equipment after rais-
ing a few eyebrows when he won the
2010 British Open and spent a large
chunk of his prize money on a cus-
tomized tractor for his farm. On Friday,
the South African, Thongchai and an
amateur player won the pro-am event.
"I've been nagging my wife for a few
years that I want something on the
farm as there are a few stumps and
things I need to get rid of," Oosthuizen
said. "And that's why I stood over that
putt on 18 for a bit longer than normal.
So I'm going to play around with it and
might dig out a few bunkers."
Meanwhile, Jamieson said he's fo-
cused on winning in Durban for a sec-
ond time in a month. He recently won
Nelson Mandela Championship at the
nearby Royal Durban course
"I'm definitely comfortable playing here
in Durban and the confidence is high as
well, which is all-important," he said.


Radwanska wins second WTA crown


Associated Press

SYDNEY Agnieszka
Radwanska claimed back-
to-back WTA titles by dis-
patching Dominika
Cibulkova of Slovakia 6-0,6-
0 in the Sydney Interna-
tional final Friday
A week after winning in
Auckland, the Pole rein-
forced her billing as the
top-seeded player in Syd-
ney when she claimed her
12th career WTA title and
her ninth straight match to
start the 2013 season.
Radwanska faces Aus-
tralian qualifier Bojana
Bobusic in the opening
round of the Australian
Open next week.
Meanwhile, Kevin Ander-
son of South Africa beat
Julien Benneteau of France
3-6, 6-4, 7-6 (8) in a match be-
tween players separated by
a single ranking point to
reach the men's final.

Del Potro in final after
beating Baghdatis
MELBOURNE, Australia -
Former U.S. Open champion
Juan Martin del Potro beat
Marcos Baghdatis 6-4, 6-1 on
Friday to set up a final against
Lleyton Hewitt at the Kooyong
Classic, an exhibition tourna-
ment ahead of the Australian
Open.
The seventh-ranked del


-From wire reports Potro has beaten Hewitt, a for-


Associated Press
Poland's Agnieszka Radwanska plays a shot Friday in the
women's final match at the Sydney International Tennis
tournament. Radwanska won 6-0, 6-0.


mer No. 1 and the 2011 Kooy-
ong champion, in two of their
three previous matches. The
31-year-old Hewitt, preparing
for his 17th Australian Open,
beat No. 6-ranked Tomas
Berdych on Thursday to se-
cure his spot in the final.
In Friday's other match at
the promotion-relegation tour-
nament, Fabio Fognini of Italy
beat big-serving Canadian
Milos Raonic 6-4, 6-4.
Ferrer, Kohlschreiber
to meet in Auckland
AUCKLAND, New Zealand
- Top-seeded David Ferrer
beat Gael Monfils 6-1, 6-2 on
Friday to reach the final of the
Heineken Open.
Ferrer will meet Germany's
Philipp Kohlschreiber in the final.


Ferrer has the chance to
match the record of Australian
great Roy Emerson by winning
the Auckland title four times, in-
cluding three straight champi-
onships.
Second-seeded
Kohlschreiber had a tougher
task to reach the final, having
to handle the powerful serve of
fourth-seeded American Sam
Querrey before winning 6-4,
7-6 (2).
Kohlschreiber will be at-
tempting to win in Auckland for
the second time after taking
the 2008 singles title.
Ferrer's path to the final was
eased by the fact Monfils had
to battle another of the injuries
that have recently affected his
career.
Monfils' ranking dropped to


99 during 2012 as he had a se-
ries of injury setbacks and he
needed a wild card to make
the Auckland main draw.
The injury does not appear
likely to threaten Monfils'Aus-
tralian Open run.

Vesnina reaches
final in Hobart
HOBART, Australia Un-
seeded Russian Elena Vesnina
defeated American teenager
Sloane Stephens 6-2, 6-2 to
reach the Hobart International
final against titleholder Mona
Barthel on Friday.
Vesnina needed only 69
minutes to beat the 19-year-old
Stephens and reach her sev-
enth WTA final.
Barthel, of Germany, beat
Kirsten Flipkens of Belgium 6-
4, 6-4 in the other semifinal.
Vesnina controlled the
match from the outset, break-
ing Stephens in the opening
game and racing to 5-0 in less
than 20 minutes.
Stephens saved three set
points in a brief rally, but could-
n't break Vesnina's dominance.
"I can say this is my time,"
Vesnina said. "I've played so many
finals before and I've been a lit-
tle bit unlucky in the past. I'm
feeling like I'm at home here."
Vesnina's last final was in
Budapest last year when she
upset three seeded players on
the way to a close loss against
Italian Sara Errani.


SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013 B5

Sony Open par scores
Friday at Waialae Country Club, Honolulu
Purse: $5.6 million,Yardage: 7,044, Par: 70
(35-35), (a-amateur)
First round
Scott Langley 30-32- 62 -8
Russell Henley 32-31 -63 -7
Scott Piercy 32-32-64 -6
Tim Clark 32-32-64 -6
Jeff Overton 34-31 -65 -5
Stephen Ames 34-31 65 -5
Matt Jones 33-33-66 -4
Charles Howell III 34-32- 66 -4
Matt Kuchar 33-33-66 -4
Tim Herron 36-30-66 -4
Brian Stuard 33-33- 66 -4
Morgan Hoffmann 31-35-66 -4
Billy Horschel 36-30-66 -4
Webb Simpson 33-33-66 -4
Tommy Gainey 34-32-66 -4
Danny Lee 35-31 66 -4
David Hearn 36-31 -67 -3
Ryan Palmer 33-34-67 -3
Marc Leishman 35-32-67 -3
Brad Fritsch 33-34 67 -3
Robert Streb 34-33-67 -3
Steven Bowditch 34-33-67 -3
Ben Kohles 34-33-67 -3
CharlieWi 33-34-67 -3
Vijay Singh 33-34-67 -3
Erik Compton 36-31 67 -3
Ken Duke 33-35-68 -2
Tag Ridings 34-34-68 -2
Darron Stiles 36-32 68 -2
Carl Pettersson 35-33- 68 -2
Keegan Bradley 35-33-68 -2
Brian Davis 34-34 68 -2
Shawn Stefani 36-32-68 -2
Justin Bolli 35-33-68 -2
Bart Bryant 33-35-68 -2
John Rollins 33-35-68 -2
Chris Kirk 35-33-68 -2
Russ Cochran 31-37- 68 -2
Pat Perez 34-34 68 -2
Dicky Pride 33-35-68 -2
Alistair Presnell 34-34-68 -2
D.H. Lee 34-34-68 -2
Peter Tomasulo 34-34-68 -2
a-Scott Gardiner 34-34-68 -2
Shane Bertsch 34-35-69 -1
DeanWilson 34-35-69 -1
Roberto Castro 36-33-69 -1
John Senden 33-36-69 -1
Brendon de Jonge 35-34- 69 -1
Harris English 37-32-69 -1
Rory Sabbatini 34-35-69 -1
Jerry Kelly 34-35-69 -1
Daniel Summerhays 34-35-69 -1
David Lingmerth 35-34-69 -1
Yuta Ikeda 36-33-69 -1
Justin Hicks 35-34-69 -1
Nicholas Thompson 35-34- 69 -1
Chad Campbell 36-33-69 -1
Graham DeLaet 35-34-69 -1
Jason Kokrak 37-32-69 -1
Colt Knost 34-35- 69 -1
Steve Marino 34-35-69 -1
Jimmy Walker 36-33-69 -1
Jonas Blixt 33-36-69 -1
Chez Reavie 35-34-69 -1
Casey Wittenberg 34-35-69 -1
David Mathis 35-34-69 -1
Fabian Gomez 35-34-69 -1
Jin Park 35-34-69 -1
Lee Williams 36-33-69 -1
Ricky Barnes 36-34-70 E
John Mallinger 36-34-70 E
Y.E.Yang 35-35-70 E
Justin Leonard 36-34-70 E
Dustin Johnson 36-34-70 E
Fred Funk 34-36 -70 E
Jeff Gove 36-34 -70 E
Andrew Svoboda 36-34 -70 E
Josh Teater 35-35-70 E
Brian Gay 35-35 -70 E
Michael Thompson 34-36-70 E
George McNeill 35-35-70 E
Ryan Moore 36-34 -70 E
Kevin Stadler 34-36-70 E
John Daly 34-36-70 E
HidetoTanihara 37-33-70 E
Henrik Norlander 33-37-70 E
a-James Hahn 35-35-70 E
Brian Harman 35-36-71 +1
Kevin Streelman 35-36-71 +1
Mike Weir 34-37-71 +1
Zach Johnson 34-37-71 +1
Johnson Wagner 35-36-71 +1
Kevin Na 39-32-71 +1
Greg Owen 37-34-71 +1
Chris Stroud 35-36-71 +1
Jason Bohn 37-34-71 +1
Jeff Maggert 35-36-71 +1
Cameron Percy 37-34-71 +1
Derek Ernst 37-34-71 +1
Josh Persons 38-33-71 +1
Paul Haley II 36-35-71 +1
Matt Every 37-34-71 +1
Ted Potter, Jr. 35-36-71 +1
John Huh 37-34-71 +1
LukeGuthrie 37-34-71 +1
Russell Knox 37-34-71 +1
Doug LaBelle II 36-35-71 +1
a-Richard Hattori 37-34-71 +1
Scott Stallings 34-38-72 +2
J.J. Henry 37-35-72 +2
Patrick Reed 38-34- 72 +2
Steven Alker 36-36 72 +2
BooWeekley 35-37-72 +2
Sang-Moon Bae 36-36-72 +2
Michael Letzig 35-37-72 +2
Robert Allenby 37-35-72 +2
K.J. Choi 37-35-72 +2
Michael Bradley 38-34-72 +2
Ryuji Imada 36-36- 72 +2
Jim Herman 35-37-72 +2
Donald Constable 34-38-72 +2
Aaron Watkins 36-36-72 +2
Cameron Tringale 38-35-73 +3
MarkAnderson 38-35-73 +3
Steve LeBrun 38-35-73 +3
Kyle Stanley 39-34-73 +3
Martin Flores 36-37-73 +3
Richard H. Lee 37-36-73 +3
MarkWilson 35-39-74 +4
Will Claxton 37-37-74 +4
Luke List 39-35- 74 +4
Hideki Matsuyama 39-35-74 +4
Stewart Cink 38-36-74 +4
Wes Short,Jr. 37-37-74 +4
Ben Curtis 40-34-74 +4
Andres Gonzales 38-36-74 +4
Davis Love III 37-38-75 +5
Tom Gillis 39-36-75 +5
Bud Cauley 40-35-75 +5
Bobby Gates 40-35-75 +5
Joe Ogilvie 39-37-76 +6
Kevin Carll 39-37- 76 +6
Eric Meierdierks 41-36-77 +7
Qualifiers for the
2013 Masters
AUGUSTA, Ga.-The 85 players who have
qualified and are expected to compete in the
77th Masters, to be played April 1114 at Au-
gusta National Golf Club. Players listed in only
first category for which they are eligible.
MASTERS CHAMPIONS: Bubba Watson,
Charl Schwartzel, Phil Mickelson, Angel Cabr-
era, Trevor Immelman, Zach Johnson, Tiger
Woods, Mike Weir, Vijay Singh, Jose Maria
Olazabal, MarkO'Meara, Ben Crenshaw, Bern-
hard Langer, Fred Couples, lan Woosnam, Sandy
Lyle, Larry Mize, Craig Stadler, Tom Watson.
U.S. OPEN CHAMPIONS (five years): Webb
Simpson, Rory Mcllroy, Graeme McDowell,
Lucas Glover.
BRITISH OPEN CHAMPIONS (five years):
Ernie Els, Darren Clarke, Louis Oosthuizen,
Stewart Cink, Padraig Harrington.
PGA CHAMPIONS (five years): Keegan
Bradley, Martin Kaymer, YE.Yang.
PLAYERS CHAMPIONSHIPS CHAMPIONS
(three years): Matt Kuchar, K.J. Choi, Tim Clark.
U.S.AMATEUR CHAMPION AND RUNNER-
UP: a-Steven Fox, a-Michael Weaver.
BRITISH AMATEUR CHAMPION: a-Alan Dunbar.
U.S.AMATEUR PUBLIC LINKS CHAMPION:
a-TJ. Vogel.
U.S. MID-AMATEUR CHAMPION: a-Nathan
Smith.
ASIAN AMATEUR CHAMPION: a-Guan
Tianlang.
TOP 16 AND TIES-2012 MASTERS: Peter


Hanson, Lee Westwood, lan Poulter, Justin
Rose, Adam Scott, Jim Furyk, Sergio Garcia,
Hunter Mahan, Kevin Na.
TOP EIGHT AND TIES-2012 U.S. OPEN:
Michael Thompson, David Toms, John Peter-
son, Jason Dufner.
TOP FOUR AND TIES-2012 BRITISH
OPEN: Brandt Snedeker.
TOP FOUR AND TIES-2012 PGA CHAMPI-
ONSHIP: David Lynn, Carl Pettersson.
TOP 30-2012 PGA TOUR MONEY LIST:
Luke Donald, Steve Stricker, Dustin Johnson,
Rickie Fowler, Nick Watney, Bo Van Pelt, Ryan
Moore, Robert Garrigus, Scott Piercy, John
Huh, Ben Curtis.
PGATOUR EVENTWINNERS SINCE 2012
MASTERS (FULL FEDEX CUP POINTS
AWARDED): Marc Leishman, Ted PotterJr.
FIELD FROM THE 2012 TOUR CHAMPI-
ONSHIP: John Senden.
TOP 50 FROM FINALWORLD RANKING IN
2012: Paul Lawrie, Francesco Molinari, Gonzalo
Fernandez-Castano, Branden Grace, Bill Haas,
Nicolas Colsaerts, Jason Day, Hiroyuki Fujita,
Matteo Manassero, Thomas Bjorn, Jamie Don-
aldson, George Coetzee, Thorbjorn Olesen.
TOP 50 FROM WORLD RANKING ON
MARCH 31:TBD.
SPECIAL FOREIGN INVITATIONS: Ryo
Ishikawa, Thaworn Wiratchant.












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Bieber sued for
assault, wages
LOS ANGELES -A
former bodyguard for
Justin Bieber is suing the
pop superstar claiming
he is owed more than
$420,000 in unpaid over-
time and that he was
fired after Bieber repeat-
edly hit him in the chest
Moshe
Benabou
filed the
lawsuit
Thursday
in Los
Angeles
claiming
that
Justin Bieber
Bieber failed to
properly pay him over-
time. He is also suing for
assault and battery for an
October incident in which
he claims the singer be-
rated him and then
punched him in the
chest.
Benabou claims he
simply walked away but
was promptly fired. The
former bodyguard
worked for the Grammy-
nominated singer be-
tween March 2011 and
October 2012.

Timberlake hints
at return to music
NEW YORK- Is
Justin Timberlake bring-
ing his music career
back?
The su-
perstar
has con-
S centrated
S almost
S exclu-
sively on
his acting
Justin career
Timberlake over the
last few years. But on
Thursday, he posted a
video on his website that
showed him walking into
a studio, putting on head-
phones and saying: "I'm
ready"
Timberlake hasn't
made an album since
2006's Grammy-winning
"FutureSex/LoveSounds."
In the video, Timberlake
is also heard saying that
he obsesses over his
music and doesn't want
to put music out that he
doesn't love and that
you have to wait for
music you love.

Chemistry lesson


Things are getting a little
steamy among the stars of
Fox's new thriller, "The
Following."
The series, which de-
buts Jan. 21, features
SKevin
Bacon as
an inves-
tigator
pursuing
a serial
killer
por-
ltrayed by
Kevin James
Bacon Purefoy.
At a news conference
Tuesday, a reporter noted
that the actors had good
chemistry together She said
her reaction to watching
them perform was, quote,
"I just want them to kiss."
The two actors barely
paused. Bacon reached
over and planted a kiss
on Purefoy's cheek.
Purefoy said, "Rule
nothing in, rule nothing
out."
-From wire reports


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 10
Fantasy 5: 6 7 8 27 30
5-of-5 1 winner $213,192.27
4-of-5 297 $115.50
3-of-5 9,608 $10
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9
Powerball: 11 13 20 27 59
Powerball: 26
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 No winner
No Florida winner
Lotto: 19 20 24 27 42 51
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 11 $10,711
4-of-6 1,129 $88.50
3-of-6 26,287 $5.50
Fantasy 5:12 14 16 24 29
5-of-5 1 winner $239,747.80
4-of-5 344 $112
3-of-5 10,627 $10

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY-

Today is Saturday, Jan. 12,
the 12th day of 2013. There
are 353 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Jan. 12, 1948, the U.S.
Supreme Court, in Sipuel v.
Board of Regents of
University of Oklahoma,
ruled that state law schools
could not discriminate
against applicants on the
basis of race.
On this date:
In 1519, Holy Roman
Emperor Maximilian I died.
In 1773, the first public mu-
seum in America was organ-
ized in Charleston, S.C.
In 1828, the United States
and Mexico signed a Treaty
of Limits defining the bound-
ary between the two coun-
tries to be the same as the
one established by an 1819
treaty between the U.S. and
Spain.
In 1912, textile workers at
the Everett Mill in Lawrence,
Mass., (most of them immi-
grant women) walked off the
job to protest wage cuts.
In 1915, the House of
Representatives rejected,
204-174, a constitutional
amendment giving women
the right to vote.
In 1932, Hattie W.
Caraway became the first
woman elected to the U.S.
Senate after initially being ap-
pointed to serve out the re-
mainder of the term of her
late husband, Thaddeus.
Ten years ago: Blamed by
shareholders for AOL Time
Warner's sharp fall in
fortunes, Steve Case
announced he was stepping
down as chairman of the
conglomerate he'd helped
to create.
Five years ago: President
George W. Bush, visiting
Bahrain, said he was
cheered by news that Iraq's
parliament had approved leg-
islation reinstating thousands
of former supporters of
Saddam Hussein's dissolved
Baath party to government
jobs.
One year ago: Pentagon
leaders scrambled to contain
damage from an Internet
video purporting to show four
Marines urinating on Taliban
corpses.
Today's birthdays: Ac-
tress Luise Rainer is 103.
Country singer Ray Price is
87. Singer Glenn Yarbrough
is 83. The Amazing Kreskin is
78. Country singer William
Lee Golden (The Oak Ridge
Boys) is 74. Rock musician
Cynthia Robinson (Sly and
the Family Stone) is 69.


Associated Press
From left: Tony Dovolani, Melissa Rycroft and Henry Byalikov perform on "Dancing with the Stars: All Stars."






No second act


ABC learns

Associated Press

PASADENA, Calif.
There's no second act for
celebrities on "Dancing
With the Stars."
ABC Entertainment President
Paul Lee said Thursday that was
the lesson from the past few
months, when the network
brought back some favorite con-
testants from its long-running
competition series and the show
fell flat
"It turns out people like to see
bad dancing as much as they like
to see good dancing," Lee said.
Melissa Rycroft, a former con-
testant on "The Bachelor," beat
two former winners Olympian
Shawn Johnson and actress Kelly
Monaco to win the show's first
all-star edition. Nielsen said its
viewership of 14.8 million on Mon-
days last fall was down 21 percent
from the year before. Even worse
for ABC, viewership among the
younger 18- to 49-year-old demo-
graphic was off 31 percent.


once is enough for all-star dancers


It turns out people like to see bad dancing
as much as they like to see good dancing.

Paul Lee
president, ABC Entertainment.


Lee said it is clear the show's
fans enjoy the journey of celebri-
ties learning how to dance. This
spring's edition features first-time
competitors.
The average "Dancing With the
Stars" viewer this fall was 61,
making it ABC's oldest-skewing
show. But it has had an important
side benefit for ABC the past few
years in boosting "Good Morning
America" ratings when dancing
contestants appear on the morn-
ing news show.
This fall's failure notwithstand-
ing, ABC said it will continue to
air separate new editions of
"Dancing" in the spring and fall.
"There is a lot of life left in it,"
Lee said.


The show's slippage had much
to do with ABC's problems in the
fall. Viewership is down 7 percent
from last fall for the third-place
network behind CBS and NBC, al-
though both CBS and Fox had
steeper declines, Nielsen said.
Lee said he was disappointed
no new ABC shows, and no shows
on broadcast TV in general, were
hits this fall. Lee said "Nashville"
has done well with a younger au-
dience, but the country connection
has been a barrier for older viewers.
ABC needs shows that are
"smart with heart" and lead with
emotion to succeed, he said.
"If we ever have a 'Do not enter'
sign for women, that's not going to
work for us," Lee said.


Publishers weekly best-sellers


The Associated Press


For the week ending Jan.
6, 2013.
Hardcover Fiction
1. "Gone Girl" by Gillian
Flynn (Crown)
2. "Empire and Honor"
by WE.B. Griffin and
William Butterworth IV
(Putnam Adult)
3. "The Racketeer" by
John Grisham (Doubleday)
4. "Threat Vector" by
Tom Clancy (Putnam)
5. "Cross Roads" by Wm.
Paul Young (Faith/Words)
6. "The Forgotten" by
David Baldacci (Grand
Central Publishing)
7. "Shadow Woman: A
Novel" by Linda Howard
(Ballantine)
8. "Notorious Nineteen:
A Stephanie Plum Novel"
by Janet Evanovich (Ban-
tam)
9. "The Twelve Tribes of


Birthday Your greatest benefits in the year ahead are
likely to come from things that are of a nonmaterial nature,
such as friendships or love. In the final analysis, they will be
of greater value than silver or gold.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -An important matter that
has been governed by outside forces could begin shifting in
ways that will give you much greater control over its
destiny.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -A number of interesting de-
velopments are stirring behind the scenes that could turn
out to be extremely advantageous for you career-wise. You
could stand to gain financially as well.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Don't get discouraged if you
have fallen a bit behind on the fulfillment of some of your
hopes and expectations. Happy changes are in the offing,
helping you make up for lost time.
Aries (March 21-April 19) It would be smart to establish


Hattie" by Ayana Mathis
(Knopf)
10. "The Casual Vacancy"
by J.K. Rowling (Little,
Brown)
11. "Merry Christmas,
Alex Cross" by James
Patterson (Little, Brown)
12. "The Black Box" by
Michael Connelly (Little,
Brown)
13. "The Last Man: A
Novel" by Vince Flynn
(Atria/Emily Bestler Books)
14. "The Hobbit, or
There and Back Again" by
J.R.R. Tolkien (Houghton
Mifflin Harcourt)
15. "Two Graves" by
Douglas Preston and
Lincoln Child (Grand
Central Publishing)
Hardcover Nonfiction
1. "Shred: The Revolu-
tionary Diet: 6 Weeks 4
Inches 2 Sizes" by Ian K.
Smith (St. Martin's Press)
2. "Killing Kennedy" by


Today's HOROSCOPE
some specific objectives. Anything you can envision in ad-
vance is likely to be far more profitable than just blindly
moving forward.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Certain special knowledge
you've acquired through personal experience can be of
great value to others as well as yourself. Everyone will find
many profitable, mutual uses for it.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Do not discount any advice
or tips being offered by persons who have good track
records. If the sources are reliable, what they say warrants
serious consideration.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -Agreements that you enter
into with proven partners have chances for success,
especially if everyone benefits in fair proportion.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) There's a good chance that
things will come more into focus where your work or career
is concerned. Events will enable you to clarify your


Bill O'Reilly (Henry Holt
and Co.)
3. "Barefoot Contessa
Foolproof: Recipes You
Can Trust" by Ina Garten
(Clarkson Potter)
4. "I Declare: 31 Prom-
ises to Speak" by Joel
Osteen (Faith/Words)
5. "Thomas Jefferson:
The Art of Power" by Jon
Meachum (Random House)
6. "The World Until
Yesterday: What Can We
Learn from Traditional
Societies" by Jared
Diamond (Viking)
7. "No Easy Day" by
Mark Owen (Dutton)
8. "To Sell is Human: The
Surprising Truth About
Moving Others" by Daniel
H. Pink (Riverhead)
9. "The 8-Hour Diet:
Watch the Pounds
Disappear Without
Watching What You Eat" by
David Zinczenko (Rodale)
10. "7 Years Younger:


The Revolutionary 7-Week
Anti-Aging Plan" by
Editors of Good
Housekeeping (Filipacchi)
11. "Wheat Belly
Cookbook: 150 Recipes to
Help You Lose the Wheat,
Lose the Weight, and Find
Your Path Back to Health"
by William Davis (Rodale)
12. "Guinness World
Records 2013" by Guinness
World Records (Guinness
World Records)
13. "The Virgin Diet:
Drop 7 Foods, Lose 7
Pounds, Just 7 Days" by J.J.
Virgin (Harlequin)
14. "May Cause Miracles:
A 40-Day Guidebook of
Subtle Shifts for Radical
Change and Unlimited
Happiness" by Gabrielle
Bernstein (Harmony)
15. "Help, Thanks, Wow:
The Three Essential
Prayers" by Anne Lamott
(Riverhead)


objectives and do your job more effectively.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Something on which you're
working quite hard will have greater chances for success if
you reorganize it along more productive lines. Change what
is not going well.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) You're finally in a cycle where
old projects can be concluded advantageously once and
for all. There's a saying: "If it isn't broke, don't fix it." If it's
busted, change it.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -A new idea that you're toying
with has potential, provided you promote it right away. If
you procrastinate, you're not likely to develop it effectively.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Conditions in general still
look quite encouraging where your material interests are
concerned. In fact, the cycle could get even better for those
who pursue their objectives with vigor.


Singer-musician George
Duke is 67.
Thought for Today:
"Everyone is entitled to his
own opinion, but not his own
facts." Daniel Patrick
Moynihan, U.S. politician and
diplomat (1927-2003).












RELIGION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Tweeting the psalms


Retired minister

gives scripture a .

modern twist _L

YADIRA BETANCES
The Eagle-Tribune

HAVERHILL, Mass. --
E ven after retiring from min- *'
istry, the Rev Jim
Gustafson is looking for
ways to make the word of God -0
accessible to people.
Gustafson, 78, recently pub-
lished "psalms/tweets: Psalms in
Contemporary Style," a 175-page
spiral-bound book in which he
rewrote all 150 psalms as tweets
using slang and modernlm,
expressions.
Gustafson condensed the
psalms to 50, 20, or in some
cases 10 percent of the original
text, although many do not ad-
here strictly to the 140 charac-
ters used in Twitter He said it
did not take him long to rewrite
the psalms, usually 10 to 20
minutes.
"I looked at the various trans-
lations of the psalm and reduced
it I wanted to keep the main
point and emotional impact," he
said.
He began posting the tweets
on his Facebook page and re-
ceived positive feedback from
friends.
"The psalms are a journal of
Old Testament people. The
psalms are a longer statement of
how a person is feeling about
God and circumstances. It shows
the good, the bad and the ugly of
human life," Gustafson said.
One sample tweet is Psalm 70
which reads "Quick, Lord! Res-
cue me! Enemies are out to de-
stroy and humiliate me, saying,
'Aha! We've pinned him down!'
Let them know humiliation and
shame. But, hurry Lord, I am
weak and need You to save me!"
Gustafson said he uses the ..
psalms as a devotion. "
"It's a way to think about the
Lord, to be in the Lord and get
closer to Him," he said. -
If King David could see his
psalms turned into tweets,
Gustafson said he would be
pleased.
"I think so. He was a down-to-
earth guy, who didn't mince his The Eagle-Tribune
words. They show the real slice The Rev. Jim Gustafson from Haverhill, Mass., holds his book, "psalms/tweets: Psalms in Contemporary
Style," where he has condensed the 150 psalms into tweets. The retired minister is an adjunct faculty
See Page C5 member at Northern Essex Community College and travels regularly on missionary trips.


Religion NOTES


Music & more
The Melton Trio will per-
form at 6:30 p.m. today at First
Christian Church of Inverness,
2018 Colonade St. (behind the
RaceTrac on State Road 44).
The Meltons are a full-time
Gospel-singing group based in
Joplin, Mo. Nedra Melton
began singing in Whittier, Calif.,
and at age 16 won the South-
ern California Soprano Solo
Contest and cut an album at
Capital Records. Rhonda
Melton McNerney is the wife of
Tom McNerney, minister of the
Vestaburg Church of Christ, in
Michigan. She is a singer, inspi-
rational speaker and in charge
of worship service at
Vestaburg. Kenny Melton is an
ordained music minister. As one
of five children of the Melton
family, he grew up singing.
Everyone is invited to attend.
There is no charge for tickets.
Call 352-344-1908.
Hernando Church of the
Nazarene, 2101 N. Florida
Ave., will host the Triumphant
Quartet in concert on Wednes-
day. This nationally acclaimed
group has numerous top 10
radio singles, yet keep God first
in everything they do. Join us
for this gospel concert. The
church's own orchestra and
choir, Celebration Sounds, will
open the concert at 6:45 p.m.
Doors will open at 6 p.m. There
is no charge for this event; a
love offering will be collected.
Dunnellon Presbyterian
Church had to accept Leslie
Hammes' withdrawal from per-
forming Jan. 20 due to a recent
illness. However, the church's
own musician, Renee Deuvall
has prepared a program for 3
p.m. that day. Renee will sing,
and perform classical to con-


New Associate Pastor


Special to the Chronicle
Inverness Church of God welcomes new Associate Pastor
David Lucas. Lucas has pastored three churches. He is a
graduate of Lee University and has done work on his Mas-
ter's Degree. He and his wife, Sherrie, have two 9-year-old
children, Caleb and Caitlyn. The Inverness Church of God
family looks forward to his ministry. The church is at 416
U.S. 41 S., Inverness. For more information, call the church
office at 352-726-4524.


temporary arrangements,
Chopin to Gershwin, Rach-
maninov to Scott Joplin. Her
vocals will include an operatic
aria, and she is planning on
performing a local, first-time
young composer's arrange-
ment. Deuvall has requested all
proceeds are to benefit the
church's building project.
In dark times, like world-
ending prophecies, economic
failure, war-torn areas through-
out the world, and family and
life problems, it is hard to find
peace. We sometimes lose di-
rection and neglect the bless-
ings, gifts and talents God has
given us. We need to be re-
freshed! Acts 2:44: "All the be-
lievers were together and had
everything in common." We in-
vite people of all ages to come
and be refreshed or refresh oth-


ers with your musical talents,
poetry, creativity or personal
testimony of how God has en-
hanced your life beginning at 7
p.m. Friday, Jan. 25, at First
United Methodist Church in In-
verness, 3896 S. Pleasant
Grove Road. Refreshments will
be provided. For information
and talent participation, call Joe
Hupchick at 352-726-9998 or
the church office at 352-
726-2522.
Food & fellowship
The third Saturday sup-
per is from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 19, in the De-
wain Farris Fellowship Hall at
Community Congregational
Christian Church, 9220 N. Cit-
rus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs. Menu includes beef
stew, salad, homemade bread,


granny cake, coffee and tea.
Cost is $10 for adults and $5
for children. Tickets can be pur-
chased at the door. Takeouts
available. Call the church at
352-489-1260.
The annual spaghetti
dinner put on by the United
Methodist Women of the First
United Methodist Church of
Dunnellon is Saturday, Jan. 19,
at the Friendship Hall of the
church, 21501 W. State Road
40. Seatings are at 4:30 and at
5:30 p.m. Tickets are available
in advance for a donation of $6
for adults and $3 for children 10
and younger. Adult tickets at
the door are $7. There is a lim-
ited number of tickets for each
seating. Dinner includes "all-
you-can-eat" spaghetti with
meat sauce, tossed salad, gar-
lic bread, dessert and coffee or
tea. For information or advance
tickets, call the church office at
352-489-4026. Proceeds will be
used for UMW mission projects.
Floral City United
Methodist Church will host its
first dinner of the new year
from 3 to 6 p.m. Saturday, Jan.
26, in Hilton Hall at 8478 E.
Marvin St. across from the ele-
mentary school. Menu includes
roast pork, candied sweet pota-
toes, fresh green beans, salad,
assorted desserts, and bever-
ages for a donation of $7.50.
Takeouts available. Call 352-
344-1771.
The "22nd Annual Peace
Potato Pancake Supper" will
take place from 4 to 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 12, at Peace
Lutheran Church, 7201 U.S. 41
S., north of State Road 40, five
miles north of downtown Dun-
nellon. Tickets, available at the
door, are $5 for adults, and
$2.50 for children ages 5


through 12. There is no charge
for children younger than age 5.
Tickets are also available from
members, and at the Peace
Lutheran booth at the Dunnel-
Ion First Saturday event on
Feb. 2. Menu includes tradi-
tional potato pancakes or but-
termilk pancakes, ham, fruit
cup, dessert and beverage. Call
the church office at 352-489-
5881 or visit PeaceLutheran
Online.com.
The Legacy League of St.
John the Baptist Catholic
Church will host a Soup-a-thon
at 1 p.m. Ash Wednesday, Feb.
13. The church is south of the
State Road 40 and U.S. 41 in-
tersection. The Soup-a-thon will
feature more than 30 kinds of
meatless soups, served with
crackers or homemade bread.
Fill your soup bowl as often as
you like. Coffee, tea, lemonade
and brownies are all included in
the $5 cost. Diners will get to
vote on their favorite soup.
Prizes will be awarded to the
cooks of the top three favorite
soups. Tickets may be pur-
chased from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at
the church office or at the door.
Tickets purchased prior to the
event will use the "express
lane" when entering the church
hall. Bring your friends, family
and an appetite.
Sales & such
The Nature Coast Unitar-
ian Universalists will have an
indoor yard sale beginning at
8 a.m. today at the church,
7633 N. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41),
Citrus Springs.
The Council of Catholic
Women of Our Lady of Grace
Church will host its annual
"Tricky Tray Fundraiser" on
See Page C2


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


Why


the law


is a


curse
When my youngest
daughter first
moved away from
home and I realized I
could not control her
every action (not that I
ever could, but I deluded
myself into thinking I
could when she lived with
me), I had a brilliant idea.
She was home for a visit
and when I brought her to
the airport I said, "Let me
give you a list of every-
thing I think you should
and shouldn't do and then
you can just do everything
on the list and we'll both
live happily ever after, es-
pecially me."
Without even a pause to
consider my great idea,
she said no not even
"no thanks."
She rolled her eyes and
said no, hugged me good
bye and got on the plane
back to Charlotte.
It's not as if my list
would be burdensome.
Just things like: Make
your bed every day and
keep your room clean.
Don't stash dirty dishes
under your bed or couch.
Don't do anything to make
your mama cry Hold onto
your cell phone so you
don't keep dropping it in
water
Learn to make rice and
beans so you'll never go
hungry. Don't lie, cheat,
steal or kill. Don't let your
emotions lead you to
make foolish decisions.
Learn to say "I'm sorry"
quickly Be known for your
forgiveness and mercy to-
ward others.
Don't let stubbornness
keep you from doing
things you know you
should.
Don't put metal in the
microwave or plastic in
the oven. Be on time. Pay
your bills and stay out of
debt. Don't text while
you're driving!
Love Jesus. Love the
church. Call your mom so
she knows you're alive.
Learn from other people's
mistakes and spare your-
self some grief.
I could go on, but you
get the picture.
The bottom line is,
while I do have control-
freakish tendencies, the
rules I want to give my
daughter are only to keep
her safe. I want her to
thrive, stay out of trouble
and avoid heartache.
However, there's a
problem. Giving someone
a list of rules and hoping
he or she will (a.) appreci-
ate it and (b.) actually fol-
low them and be happy
about doing so is unrealis-
tic and an exercise in fu-
tility.
People tend to bristle at
rules and being told what
to do.
Last week as I walked
into McDonald's for coffee
I noticed a "Wet Paint. Do
Not Touch" sign taped to a
freshly painted wall of
golden yellow bricks.
Truly, I never would
have even considered
touching the bricks. I
probably would never
have noticed them at all if
it weren't for the sign. But
just reading "Do Not
Touch" made me want to
touch, and I would have,
just to see if, indeed, the
paint was wet, but there
See Page C5


MAI-----f -A





C2 SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013


NOTES
Continued from Page C1

Saturday, Jan. 19, in the Parish
Life Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills. Doors open at 10
a.m. and drawings begin at
11:30 a.m. The event features
baskets with contents valued at
$25 or more, raffles and money
trees. Items include a mah
jongg set, gift certificates for
golf, restaurants and supermar-
kets. Purchase a sheet of 25
numbered tickets for $5 for de-
posit in a bag adjacent to your
choice of baskets. The Life
South Blood Mobile will be on
site. Ticket tenders will be avail-
able for blood donors and for
those who cannot stay. Pro-
ceeds go to needed items for
the church and charitable con-
tributions. Call Bernita Becker
at 352-344-0235. For member-
ship information, call Rosalie
Madigan at 352-746-2987.
The Altar and Rosary Soci-
ety of St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church will host a Chi-
nese auction from 11 a.m. to 2
p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, in Father
Stegeman Hall at the corner of
U.S. 41 and State Road 40
East in Dunnellon. Drawings for
the items will begin at 1 p.m. An
envelope of 20 tickets is $5 and
can be purchased at the door.
Also included is a free ticket for
coffee and dessert. Food and
drinks will be available at a
nominal charge. Call Pat at
352-489-1984.
The Ladies of Faith will
host the "17th Annual Trash
'N' Treasure Sale" from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Friday and Saturday,
Feb. 8 and 9, at Faith Lutheran
Church in Crystal Glen Subdivi-
sion, Lecanto (off County Road
490 and State Road 44). Find
all kinds of "stuff" for the
kitchen, the home, the garden
and garage, clothing, shoes,
books and some jewelry and
Christmas items. Also includes
a bake sale. This year, for the
first time, beautiful handmade


RELIGION


quilts will be featured. Proceeds
from this sale support local,
state, national and international
missions. This is a Thrivent
event.
Fun & games
The St. Elizabeth Ann
Seton Parish Men's Association
is sponsoring its annual "A Day
at the Races" trip to Tampa
Bay Downs for an exciting day
of thoroughbred horse racing
on Wednesday, Jan. 23. Cost
of $45 per person includes
round-trip bus transportation
from the church parking lot,
entry fee and reserved seating
in the clubhouse, racing form
and a hot buffet luncheon.
The St. Scholastica Coun-
cil of Catholic Women will spon-
sor a "Bunco Bash Event" at
11:30 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 26, at
the Fr. James Hoge Parish
Center, 4301 W. Homosassa
Trail, Lecanto. Entrance fee is
$12. Free food and door prizes.
All funds raised will go to such
charities as Daystar Life Cen-
ter, Family Life and Pregnancy
Center, Hugs for the Homeless,
migrant workers of Florida, and
overseas missionaries.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church will host a Military
Card Party on Monday, Feb.
11. Lunch will be served at
12:15 p.m., followed by card
play at 1 p.m. Enjoy fun, prizes
and a raffle. Cost is $12 per
player. Make up your table of
four or come as a single and
we will pair you. Call Dottie at
352-382-3656 or Marilyn at
352-746-6583 for reservations
by Feb. 7. The church is at 114
N. Osceola Ave., Inverness.
Upward Youth Soccer
registration for boys and girls in
kindergarten through sixth
grade will take place from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday
through Saturday, Feb. 13-16 at
Joy Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 7045 S.W. 83rd Place
at State Road 200, Ocala. Reg-
istration fee of $65 per child in-
cludes a reversible jersey,
water bottle, socks, car magnet


Donation


Special to the Chronicle
The Partners in Christ Sunday School class of First Baptist
Church of Inverness recently made a $200 donation to the
Special Operations Warrior Foundation. The Foundation sup-
ports the families of fallen and wounded special operations
forces. Executive Director Steve McLeary receives the $200
check from Jim Mitchell, PIC Sunday School member. For
donation information, call Steve McLeary at 813-805-9400,
or visit the website at www.specialops.org.


and an end-of-season reward.
Scholarships are available. All
players must attend one soccer
evaluation that promotes equal
and competitive teams, as well
as a substitution system, to
complete the registration
process. Practice begins Tues-
day, Feb. 26 and Thursday,
Feb. 28. The first game is Sat-
urday, March 9. All events will
occur at Hope Field at Joy
Lutheran Church. Volunteers
are needed to help with coach-
ing, registering the participants
and organizing the players. Call
Pastor Ed Holloway at 352-
854-4509, Ext. 223, or Fran
Johnson at 352-854-4509,
ext. 221.
Special events
Did you think Kwanzaa
was an alternative to Christ-
mas? Not so. Its message is
universal, nondenominational
and celebrated in various ways.


The Nature Coast Unitarian
Universalists will honor Kwan-
zaa at its 10:30 a.m. service
Sunday. This will include a his-
tory and music of the holiday, a
discussion of the principles and
symbols that are its foundation,
and its importance as a cele-
bration of African American her-
itage. A special guest, d'Adjoa
Nutefewola Avadada, of Citrus
Hills, will participate. "Dee" has
made eight trips to Africa and
has organized Kwanzaa pro-
grams for the Unity Church. All
are invited. Refreshments will
follow. The fellowship meets at
7633 N. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41),
Citrus Springs. Call 352-465-
4225 or visit naturecoastuu.org.
Everyone is welcome at
the "2013 Homecoming/Fam-
ily and Friends Day" at 11
a.m. Sunday at The Independ-
ent House of God Church of the
Living God Pillar and Ground of
the Truth Inc. Join the church for


r,,''As


the service and home-style buf-
fet afterwards. All are also wel-
come to join in the annual
Communitywide Mass Choir,
which will begin rehearsals at
5 p.m. today. Participants are
asked to wear black for the
Sunday service. The church is
at 557 N.E. Second Ave, Crystal
River. Call 352-257-4348.
The ladies of Lecanto
Church of Christ meet for Bible
study at 10 a.m. the second
Tuesday monthly. Bible study is
followed by a luncheon. Studies
have included such subjects as
prayer, love and patience. All
ladies are invited to attend and
enjoy Christian fellowship.
Americans United for
Separation of Church and
State (Nature Coast Chapter)
will meet at 4 p.m. Tuesday at
Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness. Mr.
Rose, president of this chapter,
will give a talk on "Piety & Poli-
tics," written by the Rev. Barry
Lynn, executive director of
Americans United for Separa-
tion of Church and State. The
public is welcome to attend.
Call Maralyn at 352-726-9112
or email naturecoastau@
hotmail.com.
All widows in the commu-
nity are invited to join the Wid-
ows Ministry Group from 4 to
5:30 p.m. Wednesday at Cor-
nerstone Baptist Church, 1100
W. Highland Blvd., Inverness.
"God isn't finished with us yet!"
Call Darla at 352-270-8115.
Citrus County does not
have a League of Women Vot-
ers, and has not had a chapter
for many years. The league is a
nonpartisan organization en-
couraging information and par-
ticipation in government. It was
founded 92 years ago and has
been open to men for 40 years.
The league is a grassroots or-
ganizations with chapters in all
states. The LWV is strictly non-
partisan; it does not support nor
oppose candidates. It takes a
stand on issues after coming to
a consensus and works to in-
crease the public's understand-


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!! I


SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA


B Crystal
SRiver
Foursquare
Gospel Church

1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager



i Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon


THE
SALVATION ''
ARMY CITRUS COUNTY
CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A.M.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller
712 .WSboo Av.


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship, i li Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Troy Allen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAgeGroups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children'sAwanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
AllHAges- 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour @ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


Crystal River
CHURCH OF
CHRISF
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M. 11:00 A.M. 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday i
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883* 746-1239


0 ^ 0




Community










B Crystal Diver


Church of Cod
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old TallahasseeRd.
P (12th Ave.) Nurse, r
C PProvided


Special
Event or
Weekly

Services

Please Call
Beverly at

564-2912
For

Advertising

Information


ST. THOMAS
CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
;aturday.....4:30 P.M.
;unday......8:00 A.M.
................10:30 A.M.
I I r, nl- . .il .r I t
i. ] hl ] 1 .[ H I ] ]
-IB



Homosassa
First United
Methodist
church
Everyone
Becoming
A Disciple
of Christ

Sunday Worship
8:00 am & 9:30 am
& 11:00 am
Sunday School
9:30 am
Reverend
Kip Younger
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org
Office Hours:
8:30 4:30 M-F
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
- MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
795-4479




HEKE, YOU'LL FIND
A CkPJNC FAMILY
IN CHKIST!

C KYTNL
RIVC y -
VNITCD
NM ETHODI
CHU KCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
:. A Stephen Ministry Provider,


ST. ANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1milewest of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
wwwstannescr.org


SWest
Citrus
Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352-564-8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.


p W


US Hwy. 19



SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
L Bob Dickey


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

ing of policy issues, through ed-
ucation. The Nature Coast Uni-
tarian Universalists have invited
Allie Gore, of the Marion
County League of Women Vot-
ers, to tell us how we might join
up with it, or form a local
branch. Gore is a longtime edu-
cator. She was crucial in reacti-
vating the Marion County
League and will help us, if Cit-
rus County wishes to do the
same. Gore will show a short
video of the history of the strug-
gle for equal suffrage. This will
be followed by a PowerPoint
presentation and discussion of
the LWV today. The event is
open to the public at 2 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 26, at the Unitar-
ian Universalists Fellowship,
7633 N. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41),
Citrus Springs. Call 352-465-
4225 or visit naturecoastuu.org.
M A fashion show will take
place from 1 to 3 p.m. Satur-
day, Feb. 16, in the Dewain
Farris Fellowship Hall at Com-
munity Congregational Chris-
tian Church, 9220 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs.
The event will feature fashions
by Bealls, hair and makeup by
"New Concepts," and delightful
desserts. Cost is $7. Call the
church at 352-489-1260.
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
604 U.S. 41 S. Proceeds fund
the food pantry. The store ac-
cepts donations of household
items, clothing and small appli-
ances. Call 352-726-1707.
Worship
Covenant Love Ministry
meets in building 11 at Sham-
rockAcres Industrial Park, 6843
N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River.
There is a gospel sing at 7 p.m.
Friday. Regular church serv-
ices are at 10:30 a.m. Sunday.
The ministry website is
Covenant-Love.com. Call Pastor
Brian Kinker at 352-601-4868.

See NOTES/Page C3


*** -





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

St. Raphael Orthodox
Church in America invites the
public to attend Great Vespers
at 5 p.m. today and Divine
Liturgy at 10 a.m. Sunday. The
church is at 1277 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness (off U.S. 41 North,
across from Dollar General).
The Holy Myrrhbearers ask at-
tendees to bring a box or can of
food for distribution at Family
Resource Center in Hernando.
Call 352-726-4777.
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in Lecanto
will celebrate the first Sunday
after the Epiphany with Holy
Eucharist services at 5 p.m.
today and 8 and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. A nursery is provided
during the 10:30 a.m. service.
Christian Formation is at 9:15
a.m. Godly Play Sunday school
is at 10 a.m. There is a healing
service at 10 a.m. Wednesday
followed by Bible study. SOS is
from 9 a.m. to noon Thursday
at Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church. Evening Bible study is
at 7 p.m. Thursday.
Faith Lutheran Church
will celebrate a special "Friend-


RELIGION


ship Saturday and Sunday"
where we bring our friends to
worship with us and Pastor
Lane's sermon for 6 p.m. today
and 9:30 a.m. Sunday is "It's All
About Connections," with
theme taken from Luke 3:15-
22. Follow the new sign on
State Road 44 to Faith
Lutheran Church in Crystal
Glen Subdivision, off S.R. 44
and County Road 490 in
Lecanto. The church is handi-
capped accessible, offers hear-
ing assistance and has a cry
room so adults can see and
hear the service in progress.
Following the Sunday service is
a time of fellowship and at 11
a.m. adult Bible Study continu-
ing with Revelations 20. This is
also time for children's Sunday
school. Call 352-527-3325 or
visit faithlecanto.com.
North Oak Baptist
Church in Citrus Springs has
offered a Saturday night wor-
ship for more than a year and is
continuing to make changes in
order to meet the needs of
today's families. The Saturday
night service time has changed
to 7. A"come-as-you-are" at-
mosphere combined with timely
messages and contemporary
praise and worship makes this
a positive experience for people


of all ages. Childcare is pro-
vided for birth through 4 years
of age and a children's group
for kids through third grade
meet at the same time. Pastor
Stan Stewart's message tonight
is, "Finding Inspiration in the
Foot Draggers." All are invited to
attend. The church is at the in-
tersection of N. Elkcam Blvd.
and N. Citrus Springs Blvd. Call
352-489-1688 or 352-746-1500.
First Baptist Church of
Inverness, 550 Pleasant Grove
Road, offers the following Sun-
day activities: SONrise Sunday
school class at 7:45 a.m.,
blended worship service at 9
a.m., "Kid's Church" for ages 4
through fourth grade during the
9 a.m. service, Sunday school
classes for all ages at 10:30
a.m. A nursery is available for
all services except the 7:45
a.m. class. On Sunday
evening, Connection classes
are offered and AWANA begins
at 5:15. Midweek worship serv-
ice for adults is at 6 p.m.
Wednesday. For the youths,
there is "Ignite," and for chil-
dren, "Wednesday Worship
Kids." Call the office at 352-
726-1252 or visit www.fbc
inverness.com.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church will celebrate Holy Eu-


charist Rite 1 at 8 a.m. Sunday
and Holy Eucharist Rite 2 at
10:30 a.m. which includes chil-
dren's church. Adult Sunday
school is at 9:30 a.m. Lunch is
at noon followed by youth Sun-
day school. Girl Scouts meet at
6 p.m. Monday and Bible study
at the Radcliffe's is at 7:30 p.m.
Feed My Sheep, a feeding pro-
gram for people in need, is at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday fol-
lowed by a Holy Eucharist and
healing service at 12:30 p.m.
celebrating the Confession of
St. Peter the Apostle. Food
pantry hours are 9:30 to 11:45
a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday.
First Presbyterian
Church is at 206 Washington
Ave., Inverness. The Sunday
worship schedule includes tra-
ditional services at 8 and 11
a.m., casual service at 9:30
a.m., Sunday school hour at
9:30 a.m., and coffee hour from
9 to 11 a.m. This Sunday, the
Baptism of the Lord will be cel-
ebrated with a renewal of Bap-
tismal Vows. The Rev. Craig S.
Davies will preach on "All That
From a Little Bit of Water?" with
readings from Mark 1:7-11. Call
the church at 352-637-0770.
St. Anne's Episcopal
Church (a parish in the Angli-
can Communion) is on Fort Is-


land Trail West in Crystal River.
St. Anne's will celebrate the first
Sunday after the Epiphany with
services at 8 and 10:15 a.m.
Sunday. St. Anne's hosts Our
Father's Table from 11:30 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. today. Overeaters
Anonymous meets at 10:30
a.m. Wednesday in the parish
library. "Recovering From Food
Addiction" meets at 1 p.m.
Thursday in the parish library.
Alcoholics Anonymous meets
at 8 p.m. Friday and Mondays
in the parish library. All are in-
vited to join St. Anne's for a
Bluegrass Gospel sing-along at
6 p.m. the third Sunday
monthly. Annie and Tim's
United Bluegrass Gospel Band
will lead the singing.
Floral City United
Methodist Church will conduct
a Wesley Covenant service at 8
and 10:30 a.m. Sunday. The
service offers an opportunity to
return thanks and gain new un-
derstanding of God's pardon,
grace and healing power. The
church is at 8478 E. Marvin St.
across from the elementary
school. Call 352-344-1771.
Inverness Church of God
Sunday worship services are at
8:30 and 10:30 a.m. Children's
church is during the 10:30 a.m.
service following praise and


SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013 C3

worship on the second, third
and fourth Sundays monthly.
Children remain in the sanctu-
ary for family worship the first
Sunday monthly. Sunday
school begins at 9:30 a.m. with
classes for everyone. Adult
Bible class is at 7 p.m.
Wednesday in rooms 105 and
106. The youth group meets at
7 p.m. Wednesday in the
Youth Ministries Building. K.I.D.
Zone (for children pre-K
through eighth grade) meets
from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday.
This includes K.I.D.'s choir
practice from 6 to 6:30; K.I.D.'s
dinner from 6:30 to 7; and chil-
dren's Bible study classes from
7 to 8 p.m. The church is at 416
U.S. 41 S., Inverness. Call 352-
726-4524.
First Baptist Church of
Floral City, 8545 E. Magnolia
St., invites everyone to share in
Sunday's worship services at
the 8:30 a.m. blended service
and the 11 a.m. traditional serv-
ice. Coffee and doughnuts are
served in the fellowship hall
from 9 to 9:45 a.m. Sunday
school classes for all ages
begin at 9:45 a.m. For more in-
formation, www.fbcfloralcity.org
or call 352-726-4296.

See NOTES/Page C5


Y Homosassa Springs
sL, S. Er.Th. ,,Ai Ai fLT.IFCHURCH


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


En=1Ess
Community Church




Sunday 10:00am
New Location
1196 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto
Rev. Brian Baggs Pastor
(352) 527-4253
www.qenesiscommunitvchurch.org
Authentic Love Relevant Faith
Embracing Community


HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church


opew


Dow



-. -, -, r Children and Families"
2125 E, Norvell Bryant Hwy,.(486)
(1 miles from Hwy.41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl .org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM


First Baptist
Church
Lof Floral City
Lifting Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
www.fbcfloralcity.org


)cove7tt JOI,
Grace Bible
Church


Sunday
9:30 AM.....................Discovery Time
11:00 AM.................. Praise & Worship
6:00 PM.....................Evening Service
Monday
6:15PM.................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept. Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM.....................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
1 mi. east of US. 19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


Rev. Stephen Lane

Faith
Lutheran

Church(LCMS
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy.44 just E. of 490
527-3325

COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com
Y a,&rt 9o, *Od..
{at Forw O)fte~w.


Iof the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon of faith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Sunday School
Adult 9:15
Child 10:00
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
nw .!50.THE('C r. 1

^^^^^fcfcftM^^~- --.'*


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.

Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
000DJ8Y Floral City, FL.



Hernando
Church of
16 TheNazarene
.4 Place to Belong

2101 N. Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 am
11:30 am
Saturday
Vigil
4:00 pm
6:00 pm
Weekday
Masses
8:30 am
Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm
(352) 746-9422


The New Church
Without Walls
"An Exciting & Growing
Multi-Cultural
Non-Denominational
Congregation Ministering to
the Heart of Citrus County"
Senior Pastors & Founders


.S1


Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr.
& Lady "T" Alexander

Sunday School 9:30 am
Sunday Service 11:00 am
Wednesday Bible Study 7pm

3962 N. Roscoe Rd.
Hemando, FL
Ph: 352-344-2425
www.newchurchwithoutwalls.com
Email:cwow@embarqmail.com

"The perfect church for
people who aren't"


e_ Floral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St. |
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


0


Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA

e







Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

352-74-71611


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS





C4 SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013


For S.C. Episcopalians, a


break from lifelong homes


State's diocese split from national church


Associated Press
CONWAY, S.C. Beyond
the headlines, the story of
the Diocese of South Car-
olina's split from the na-
tional Episcopal church is
the story of people like
Rebecca Lovelace.
For most of her 64 years,
she worshipped at St.
Paul's Episcopal Church in
this quiet farming town and
bedroom community about
a dozen miles from the
high-rise condominiums of
Myrtle Beach.
That was until about
three months ago, when
Lovelace and a small group
of other parishioners de-
cided they could not go
along when their church
followed the Diocese of
South Carolina in breaking
ties with the national
church over ordination of
gays and other issues.
Lovelace told her priests
she couldn't stay: "I really
truly felt like there was a
death in the family"
Now, her fledgling con-
gregation of about 35 peo-
ple known as the Conway
Worship Group gathers
each Sunday at the chapel
at Coastal Carolina Univer-
sity. Usually with a retired
priest or one on loan from
another church, they pray,
sing, celebrate communion
and make plans for the
future.
The schism has been
years in the making, dating
to the national church's
consecration of its first
openly gay bishop in 2003,
which upset conservative
Episcopalians.
"I think everybody
reached a point where they
couldn't go any further,"
said Dan Ennis, one of the
organizers of the new con-
gregation and who is dean
of the university's College
of Humanities and Fine
Arts. "A lot of us saw this
coming and a lot of us
dreaded it, but now at least
we know what to do."
The diocese in eastern
South Carolina had 70 con-
gregations with about
29,000 parishioners. It
dates to the 1700s and is
one of the originals that
joined others to form the
Episcopal Church.
The dispute isn't over yet,
now that the breakaway


7 'I, ,,,,, 7
SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260



Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca cornn


diocese has sued the na-
tional church. It is asking a
judge to declare that the
national church has no
right to either the identity
of the Episcopal Diocese of
South Carolina or its
property.
"We seek to protect more
than $500 million in real
property, including
churches, rectories and
other buildings that South
Carolinians built, paid for,
maintained and expanded
- and in some cases died
to protect without any
support from The Episco-
pal Church," said the Rev.
Jim Lewis, an assistant to
Bishop Mark Lawrence.
One expert likened the
fight to the final days of the
Civil War: a lingering skir-
mish after years of contro-
versy among Episcopalians
that will have little effect
on the national church.
"At Appomattox, Grant
and Lee signed the final
surrender but there were
places where the fighting
went on for months. The
news didn't reach Arkansas
and Texas the war was over
I think in South Carolina
you are seeing something
like that," said Frank Kirk-
patrick, a professor of reli-
gion at Trinity College in
Hartford, Conn., and author
of "The Episcopal Church
in Crisis: How Sex, the
Bible and Authority are Di-
viding the Faithful."
He estimates perhaps 5
percent of Episcopalians
nationally may have left the
church in recent years be-
cause of the theological dis-
putes. He says that figure is
likely less than 8 percent if
one includes those who
simply stopped attending
services, but didn't formally
leave.
Though their numbers
are few nationally, South
Carolina believers on ei-
ther side of the split have
been forced to find new
identities apart from the
churches they grew up in.
The Conway group has
used donations from other
national churches to get
started on their own. Each
Sunday uses a simple
stoneware chalice, not the
silver one most congregants
were used to, for the com-
munion wine.
One church in Virginia


Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


sent a bottle of wine to use
for communion, "lots of
Hershey kisses and some
Kleenex for the tears they
know we probably shed.
But there is a light on the
other side," Lovelace said.
She has no animosity to-
ward her friends in her for-
mer congregation.
"They are doing what
they have to do. I respect
the depth of their convic-
tions. I don't agree with it
but hopefully, they know
I'm doing what I feel called
to do," she added. "I never
heard a reason good
enough to make me leave
the national church."
Ennis noted that Bishop
Mark Lawrence has said
the national church is
spreading a "false Gospel of
indiscriminate inclusivity."
"I thought we are all
going to be held to account
so if I'm going to bet my
soul, I'd rather be more in-
clusive than not inclusive,"
Ennis said.
To the south, in Edisto
Beach, about 40 people
have left the local Episco-
pal church to start a wor-
ship group and form their
own congregation affiliated
with the national church.
Lovelace's sister,
Gretchen Smith, who grew
up in the Conway church,
has worshipped in Edisto
for the past eight years.
"We've seen this coming
for years. We maintained a
presence there and wor-
shipped there until it was
clear we could no longer
do it," she said. Right now
the worship group is meet-
ing in homes but, after the
first of the year, it hopes to
find space at a local civic
club.
Back in Conway at a
service earlier this month,
the Rev Dan Lynch, a re-
tired priest from Ocean
Isle Beach, N.C., told the
congregation of 45 people
that God is ultimately in
control.
"President Obama is not
in control. The Republican
Congress is not in control.
God is in control of your fu-
ture and your present," he
said.
"Too many doors have
opened for us for God not to
be in control here,"
Lovelace agreed later.
Coastal Carolina's non-


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School.............9:00
Worship..............1.... 0:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School.............6:30


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness |
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033


RELIGION


Evers' widow to
offer invocation
WASHINGTON The
widow of slain civil rights ac-
tivist Medgar Evers is expected
to deliver the invocation at
President Barack Obama's sec-
ond inauguration on Jan. 21.
The Presidential Inaugural
Committee announced Tues-
day that Myrlie Evers-Williams
would deliver the prayer. It
comes 50 years after her hus-
band was gunned down in the
driveway of his Mississippi
home. The inauguration falls on
Martin Luther King Jr. Day
Evers-Williams is a distin-
guished scholar at Alcorn State
University in Lorman, Miss. She
was chairwoman of the NAACP
from 1995 to 1998.
Inaugural organizers said the
Rev. Louie Giglio of Atlanta's
Passion City Church will deliver
the benediction for Obama's
swearing-in.
In a statement, Obama says
Evers-Williams and Giglio rep-
resent ideals of justice, equality
and opportunity that he
pursues.
In 2009, the Rev. Rick War-
ren delivered the invocation.
Group lists world's
worst persecutors
LONDON, Ont. North
Korea continues to be the worst
country in the world in which to
be a Christian, according to the
new World Watch List released
by Open Doors USA.
The list ranks North Korea as
the world's worst persecutor of
Christians for the 11th year in a
row, followed by eight nations
where Open Doors says "ex-
treme Islam poses the largest
threat for Christians," led by
Saudi Arabia, Afghanistan and
Iraq.
Open Doors International
spokesman Paul Estabrooks
noted that persecution of Chris-
tians has increased in 11th-
ranked Syria, where civil war
has driven thousands into exile,
and in African countries where
Islamist extremism is on the
rise.
In North Korea, Estabrooks
said severe persecution of
Christians has not eased under
new leader Kim Jong Un.
The Open Doors report says
Christians are persecuted in at
least 60 countries, and says
persecution worldwide grew
worse last year.
Iranian pastor free
after Xmas arrest
WASHINGTON -An Iranian
pastor whose re-arrest on
Christmas Day was con-
demned by two U.S. congress-


first United

Methodist


( of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor



8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion

9:45 AM
Sunday School

10:00 AM
Contemporary
Praise & WorshipE


Religion BRIEFS
men is free again, according to
the American Center for Law
and Justice.
ACLJ Executive Director Jor-
dan Sekulow said his group's
Christian contacts in Iran re-
ported that Pastor Youcef
Nadarkhani was released Mon-
day and was at home once
again with his family.
Nadarkhani, who was raised
in a Muslim family, spent almost
three years in prison before his
release in September. The
ACLJ says he had faced a pos-
sible death sentence for refus-
ing to renounce his Christian
faith.
On Friday, Pennsylvania
Congressman Joseph Pitts,
who is Christian, and Min-
nesota Congressman Keith Elli-
son, a Muslim, issued a joint
statement denouncing Nadark-
hani's re-arrest and calling for
his immediate release. They
said that given Iran's "persecu-
tion of Pastor Youcef because
of his Christian faith, it was par-
ticularly cruel to imprison him
on Christmas Day."
Gallaudet
reinstates official
WASHINGTON The na-
tion's leading university for the
deaf and hard of hearing has
reinstated its chief diversity offi-
cer, who was suspended for
three months after signing a pe-
tition circulated by opponents of
gay marriage in Maryland.
Gallaudet University presi-
dent T. Alan Hurwitz announced
the reinstatement of Angela Mc-
Caskill in an email Monday to
students, faculty and staff. The
brief statement didn't elaborate
on the reasons for McCaskill's
reinstatement, and university
officials declined further


Hwy.44E@ U
Washington Ave., Inverness U

* Sunday Services
* Traditional *
* 8:00 AM & 11:00 AM
* Casual Service
* 9:30 AM
11:00 AM Service
Tapes & CD's Available
" Sunday School for all ages
0 9:30 AM
" Nursery Provided
SFellowship & Youth Groupm
5 5 to 7 PM
* Web Site: www.fpcinv.org
Podcast: FPC inv.com

* Church Office 637-0770
Pastor Craig Davies


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



comment.
McCaskill has said she is not
anti-gay. She said she signed
the petition at her church after
listening to a sermon about
marriage, adding that she felt it
was important for Maryland vot-
ers to decide the issue.
Many on campus said they
felt McCaskill was the wrong
person to lead an office that
promotes diversity. But people
on both sides of the gay mar-
riage debate in Maryland,
where McCaskill lives, said she
shouldn't be punished for exer-
cising her First Amendment
rights.
High court won't
hear gun lawsuit
WASHINGTON -The
Supreme Court won't overturn
a Georgia law banning firearms
in churches and other places of
worship.
The high court on Monday
refused to hear an appeal from
GeorgiaCarry.org, which
wanted the justices to overturn
a lower court decision uphold-
ing Georgia's ban on guns in
churches and other places of
worship.
GeorgiaCarry.org argued that
the law burdens "religiously mo-
tivated conduct by regulating
how or what a worshipper can
do with a weapon while he is
worshipping."
But the 11th U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals upheld the
lower court's dismissal of the
lawsuit brought by Geor-
giaCarry and the Rev. Jonathan
Wilkins of the Baptist Taberna-
cle of Thomaston, Ga.
The Supreme Court, without
comment, refused to reconsider
that ruling.
From wire reports


VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.


SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. & 10:30 A.M.


SPANISH MASS:
12:30 PM.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.x to 3:15 P.x Sat.
orByAppointment

WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills l
746-2144 r
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgraceflI
-. .catholicweb.com .-


ST. TIMOTHY LUTHERAN CHURCH
PRF-FNTS...



A -4




TI- Larry Stepliensn Bluegrass

Friday, January 25, 2013
Doors Open 6:00 p.m.
-Ir... 7 p.m. 9:00 p.m.

St. Timothy Lutheran, !, I' 11
1070 North -1 ....i. Blvd., Crystal River

Tickets and general info. I "?') 795-5325
Admission $10 donation at the door.
For more info visit www.larrystephensonband.com
00DQRO I.,. i. ,,i..r r ,.l.er.com


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and .


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TWEETS
Continued from Page C1

of life. I find that refreshing
and right where the rubber
meets the road and I like
that," he said.
Gustafson said he de-
cided to publish the book in
a spiral-bound format so
readers can lay the book flat
and write their own
thoughts on the lines be-
neath the tweeted psalm.
He has a bachelor's de-
gree in philosophy from
Wheaton College, a master's
degree from Fuller Semi-
nary and a doctorate in phi-
losophy from Boston
University.
Gustafson moved to
Haverhill in 1959 and started
ministering part-time at
West Congregational
Church. He served as minis-
ter at the church from 1959
to 1970 and as associate from
1978 to 2000. He continues to
preach at the church when
needed and remains the
church organist.
In addition to West Con-


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

was a man with a paint
brush nearby
I told him I wanted to
touch the bricks just be-
cause the sign said not to.
He said I wouldn't be the
first to do so and that he'd
already seen quite a few do
it blatantly disregard the
sign.
"What if you don't put any
sign up? Then maybe no one
would touch," I suggested.
He replied, "That won't
work, because what if you
lean up against the wet
paint and get it all over you?
I have to warn you."
I agreed with him and
did not touch the wet paint.
But I really wanted to.
Recently, I read a sermon
by Guy Caley, an Assemblies
of God pastor in Missouri, in
which he talked about the
purpose for the law of God.
Paraphrasing the apostle
Paul, he said that "the law


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church invites the
public to worship at 8:30 and 11
a.m. Sunday. A coffee hour fol-
lows both services. The church
is barrier free and offers a free
CD ministry, large-print service
helps and hearing devices. A
nursery attendant is available
for preschool-age children. The
church is on County Road 486
opposite Citrus Hills Boulevard
in Hernando. Call 352-
746-7161.
NorthRidge Church wel-
comes the community to wor-
ship services at 9 a.m.
Sunday. The church is non-
denominational. Experience a
friendly, loving and casual at-
mosphere. Bible study is at 7
p.m. Wednesday. The first
Wednesday monthly is the
Faith Journey video lessons
that give insight and under-
standing to the Scriptures as
related to the culture and land
of biblical times. Subsequent
Wednesday Bible studies are
a time of study and prayer.
The church meets at the Inver-
ness Woman's Club, 1715
Forest Ridge Drive, across
from the Whispering Pines
Park entrance. Call Pastor
Kennie Berger at 352-
302-5813.
The Nature Coast Unitar-
ian Universalist Fellowship of
Citrus County welcomes
member Kathy Fleissner to the
pulpit at 10:30 a.m. Sunday.
Fleissner will honor the African-
American celebration of Kwan-
zaa. The presentation will
include a history of the Kwan-
zaa holiday, a discussion of the
seven principles and symbols
that are the foundations of


Kwanzaa, and a look at some
of the various ways Kwanzaa is
celebrated. The fellowship
meets at 7633 N. Florida Ave.,
Citrus Springs. Call 352-
465-4225.
First Christian Church of
Homosassa Springs' carry-in
dinner will follow the 10:30 a.m.
Sunday worship service. The
public is invited to a marriage
enrichment service Wednesday
evenings beginning with dinner
at 6 p.m. Saturday contempo-
rary service is at 5:30 p.m. The
church is at 7030 W. Grover
Cleveland Blvd. Dan Wagner is
the minister. Call the church of-
fice at 352-628-5556.


RELIGION


gregational, he has been
conducting short-term mis-
sions to the Rus-Rus tribe in
Honduras. He has also trav-
eled to India and Kenya to
teach philosophy for the
past 20 years.
He has blogged about his
travels to Kenya and India
and published them in the
book "Outta My Mind." The
statue of "The Thinker" is
on the cover
Gustafson used his vast
research, knowledge of the
church and reminiscences
from longtime members to
write "Wheat & Weeds in a
Country Parish: The History
of West Congregational
Church." The 244-page book
recounts the church's 275
years. He also wrote the
textbook, "The Quest for
Truth an Introduction to
Philosophy," currently in its
fifth edition
Gustafson said he re-
ceived two calls from God to
join the ministry The first
came while his mother was
driving from Raymond, N.H.
back to Boston and he
looked up at the steeple of
the Congregational Church.

required more than we
could do, and incurs a curse
if not rigidly followed for-
ever And the law itself has
the ability to make us want
to disobey"
As Paul had said, he did-
n't know he coveted until
the law told him not to do so.
That's part of the curse of
the law.
"The law is not able to
work salvation, nor to
change human hearts,"
Caley said. 'All that it is able
to do is show the need for
salvation." That, however,
may be one of the law's
great blessings.
It's a paradox of the Chris-
tian faith God gave us
laws to follow, knowing that
we can't and wouldn't even
want to. But in his gracious
and merciful wisdom he
also gave us Jesus who did
follow them and did so will-


PRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bfblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711


Our Lady of

Fatima
CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy. 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
S Weekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June -August)
\ 9:00 and 11:00A.M.
726-1670

S46 Years of
SRST Bringing Christ
to Inverness

LUTHERAN

CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am

Sunday School
& Bible Class
8:45 A.M.
726-1637
SMissouri Synod
i www. stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


He was sitting in philosophy
class at Wheaton College
when he felt God calling
him to serve as a teacher in
secular colleges.
He taught at the former
White Pines College, which
later became Chester Col-
lege, Chester, N.H. He has
been teaching at Northern
Essex Community College
for the past 31 years, where
he is now an adjunct profes-
sor of philosophy and reli-
gion. For the past 10 years,
he has been teaching an on-
line introduction to philoso-
phy of world religion at the
Haverhill school.
Gustafson and his wife
Eleanor have three chil-
dren: Eric, Rachel and
Aaron Lee. His wife
Eleanor is also an author
having just completed her
sixth novel.
To get a copy of
"psalms/tweets: Psalms in
Contemporary Style,"
through Gustafson, contact
him at jgustafson
@necc.mass.edu for a dona-
tion to the Benevolent Fund
of the West Congregational
Church in Haverhill.

ingly Not only that, he then
allowed us, the law break-
ers, to get credit for Christ's
law keeping. That's what
"saved by grace" means.
As for the law, everything
God says to do or not do is
not because he's a control
freak or that he wants to
keep us from enjoying life,
but for our own good. Like a
painter putting up a "Wet
Paint" sign. Like a mom
wanting to keep her daugh-
ter safe.

Nancy Kennedy is the au-
thor of "Move Over, Victoria
--I Know the Real Secret,"
"Girl on a Swing," and her
latest book, "Lipstick
Grace." She can be reached
at 352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday, or via
email atnkennedy@
chronicleonline. com.


SORTHRIDGE
CHURCH


SUNDAY
Family Worship
9:00 AM
Coffee Fellowship *.11 ;-. ,. 1., ; .
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study & Prayer
7:00 PM
We are a nondenominational church
meeting at the Inverness Womans Club
1715 Forest Drive, Inverness
(across from Whispering Pines Park entrance)
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813




"First For Christ"...John 1:41
FnsT CHRISTIA
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS I
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr.RayKelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study





Special

Event or

Weekly

Services

Please Call

Beverly at

564-2912

For

Advertising

Information


Associated Press
LOUISVILLE, Ky. If
Kentucky's lone Jewish in-
mate on death row wants to
mark the Sabbath, he'll
have to do it from a cell in a
secure unit for now.
The Kentucky Court of
Appeals on Friday ruled
that prison officials are not
violating the religious free-
dom rights of 40-year-old
William Harry Meece, who
is awaiting execution for
the slaying of three people
in Adair County in 1993, by
having him pray in his cell.
Judge Laurence Van-
Meter, writing for a three-
judge panel, concluded that
prison policy correctly pre-
vents Meece from being al-
lowed into the Institutional
Religious Center at the Ken-
tucky State Penitentiary in


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S,
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer 2
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor



W First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452


Eddyville because of secu-
rity concerns. As a death
row inmate, Meece lives in
the Special Security Unit
near the other condemned
inmates and apart from the
other 800-plus inmates.
Meece sued the Ken-
tucky Department of Cor-
rections in 2007, accusing
the agency of violating the
Religious Land Use and In-
stitutionalized Persons Act,
which prohibits burdens on
the ability of prisoners to
worship as they please.
Meece had claimed that
it was a burden to pray in
his small cell and that
prison policies kept him
from covering up the toilet
or praying near it. The
judge disagreed, saying
Meece can pray near a toi-
let and cover it with a sheet.
The inmate also claimed


INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. Larry Powers
Senior Pastor
Sunday Services:
Traditional Service...............8:30 A
Sunday School......................9:30 AM
Contemporary Service........10:30 AM
Evening Service...................6:00 |
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes...............7:00 |
Boys and Girls Brigade..7:00
Teens........................... 7:15 |
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726 4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Dayeare
and Learning Center"


At
Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM


Worship


10:45 AM


S,,i., Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to ,i s i., i,, ,,,,, ,


SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013 C5


Speaker to talk about


spirituality, eternal life


Special to the Chronicle


Aging, and all the things associ-
ated with it, is certainly a leading
topic today International speaker
Mark Swinney asks, "could it be
that God didn't intend us to age?"
Swinney will present a talk ti-
tled, "Eternal life," at 2 p.m. Sun- M;
day, Jan. 27, at the First Church of Swin
Christ, Scientist, 224 N. Osceola
Ave., Inverness.
"Claiming one's identity as God's off-
spring brings countless freedoms," said
Swinney "'As God's spiritual creations, we
don't necessarily need to be slaves to time.
We don't need to wait to become fully who
we are. Time doesn't have the power to
erode who we are, dilute our intelligence,


ark
nney


or sap our strength."
Swinney's ideas are based on
the teachings of Jesus as recorded
in the Bible, and as discussed in
"Science and Health with Key to
the Scriptures" by Mary Baker
Eddy
Practitioner and teacher of
Christian Science healing, Mark
Swinney has devoted more than 25
years both to praying with people


and empowering people to pray effectively
for themselves. He is a prolific author,
with more than 250 published articles ad-
dressing numerous facets of prayer and
healing.
Swinney is a member of the Christian
Science Board of Lectureship. He travels
from his home in Sandia Park, N.M.


he should be allowed to go to
the prison's chapel on his
own or with other Jewish in-
mates on the Sabbath, which
lasts from sundown Friday
to sundown Saturday. He is
currently allowed to join
Roman Catholics on death
row for Thursday services
and Protestants on Sunday
"These restrictions can
best be described as an in-
convenience to Meece's de-
sired approach to practice
his religion, but in no way
inhibit his expression of re-
ligious beliefs," VanMeter
wrote.
Meece, in letters to The
Associated Press before the
ruling came down, railed
against the Corrections De-
partment policy saying "I'll
die or get killed" rather
than follow the state's
rules.


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study, Gospel
S... .. i.. h I-in Dinners, singing
the old hymns? Then you'll enjoy
this Church family.
Home of the
"Saturday Nite GOSPEL
JUBILEE" A great Nite Out!
Last Saturday of the month 6:00
Fun, Food, Fellowship & Free!


g~r0
S



Ea tis


5 Jmirn
[]5335 E. Jasmine


Inverness
A Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201
- --- r- - -


Death row inmate loses


suit over religious practices


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! !!

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS


ad
t I




Laneh
Lane,


I UFFICE: (32) 2-110U7












COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Garden Club
to meet Jan. 14
The Garden Club of Crys-
tal River will meet at 1 p.m.
Monday, Jan. 14, at the Crys-
tal River Preserve on State
Park Road in Crystal River.
Speaker will be Bob Lewis,
president of the Bonsai Soci-
ety, and his topic will be
"Bonsai Essentials."
All meetings are open to
the public. Business meeting
will take place after the pro-
gram. For more information,
call club President Libby
Wentzell at 352-897-1557.
Lions to serve
pancakes Sunday
Beverly Hills Lions Club,
72 Civic Circle Drive, will
have a pancake breakfast
from 8 to 11 a.m. Sunday,
Jan. 13.
Cost is $4 for adults and
$2 for children younger than
12. You will get all the pan-
cakes you can eat, choice of
bacon or sausage or combo,
orange juice and coffee or
tea.
For information call 352-
527-1943.
NARFE meeting
scheduled Monday
Chapter 776 of the Na-
tional Active and Retired Fed-
eral Employees Association
(NARFE) invites all active
and retired employees and
surviving annuitants to attend
its next meeting Monday,
Jan. 14.
This will be the club's first
meeting at the Kracker Shack
Cafe, 1314 U.S. 41 North, In-
verness, near the Inverness
Post Office. Guest speaker is
Laurie A. Diestler, volunteer
coordinator on the Citrus
County staff. The meeting will
start with a short luncheon at
noon, followed by the regular
business meeting.
For information, call 352-
270-0185.
Friends, fashion,
fun at show
For a glimpse of new
spring fashions come to the
Ladies of the West Citrus
Elks annual fashion show,
slated for Friday, Jan. 25,
with the doors opening at 11
a.m. at the West Citrus Elks
Lodge, 7890 Grover Cleve-
land Blvd. in Homosassa.
Along with the fashions,
there will be a luncheon pro-
vided by Chef Ken with gift
baskets and door prizes.
Tickets are $20. Call Anne
at 352-382-1848 or Pat 352-
382-3151 for information or
to purchase tickets.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA

Caviar


Special to the Chronicle
Caviar is a special guy.
This big black kitty with
gorgeous orange eyes is
very loving, gentle and self-
confident for his 1-1/2
years. Currently, all adult
cat adoption fees are half
price at $27.50. Visitors
are welcome from 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m.
Monday through Saturday
at the Humanitarians' Man-
chester House on the cor-
ner of State Road 44 and
Conant Avenue, east of
Crystal River. Please drop
by and enjoy our felines in
their cage-free, homestyle
environment. Call the Hu-
manitarians at 352-613-
1629 for adoptions, or
view most of the Hardin
Haven's felines online at
www.petfinder.com/
shelters/fl186.html.


Celtic-Maine event


Concert at Old Historic Courthouse Museum offers Castle Bay


Special to the Chronicle

Maine-based duo Castle Bay will
present a blend of Celtic and Maine
folk tunes when the Concert at the
Old Historic Courthouse Museum re-
sumes Jan. 17.
Doors open at 6:15 p.m. with the
music beginning at 7 p.m. in the sec-


ond floor courtroom. Tickets are $10
per person and include desserts, cof-
fee, soda, water and other goodies.
Julia Lane's harp provides
melodies and accompaniment to her
partner, Fred Gosbee, who plays gui-
tar, violin, penny whistle, recorder
and the mysterious "chin-cello."
All proceeds benefit the exhibi-


tion, programs, and operations at
the Old Courthouse Heritage
Museum.
Concert sponsorship opportuni-
ties are available beginning at $50.
Sponsors receive special advertising
recognition and season tickets.
For tickets or information, call
352-341-6445,


Special to the Chronicle

Friends of the Dunnellon
Public Library will present
a free public program with
Shari Blissett-Clark, who
sits on the board of Bat Bel-
frys Inc., a nonprofit organi-


zation dedicated to conserv-
ing Florida's bats through
public education and habi-
tat restoration.
Blissett-Clark will speak
at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Jan.
19, in the library meeting
room, 20351 Robinson Road,


Dunnellon,
She serves on the boards
of the Florida Native Plant
Society and Brevard Botan-
ical Garden. A child of a
globe-trotting military fam-
ily, she moved to Florida in
1984.


The program will cover
bat facts, species diversity,
environmental and eco-
nomic benefits of bats and
the overstated disease risks.
It will be a one-hour pro-
gram including a question-
and-answer time.


Free landscape clinics continue


Special to the Chronicle January Master Gardener
Plant Clinics to find out
Plants in the house are about such "Container Gar-
good for you, according to dening." Learn how to pot
research, and potted plants and care for containerized
outdoors can add beauty plants, which plants to use
and drama to a landscape. and potential insect prob-
Come to one of the free lems. The remaining sched-


ule for the free clinics is:
Wednesday, Jan. 16, 1
p.m. at Citrus Springs
Library
Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2 p.m.
at Homosassa Library
Master gardener volun-
teers will be available to re-


spond to any gardening
questions. Bring questions,
samples, etc., to any of the
clinics for free, University of
Florida-based information.
Call the Extension Serv-
ice at 352-527-5700 for more
information.


Thanks for your 'bias' toward charities


very day for many years now, I
get up, make some coffee, wash
my face and walk out to the
driveway to get my Citrus
County Chronicle.
I don't read it carefully I
do search each article's
headline and carefully read
those articles I am inter-
ested in. I have tried reading
other papers but my eyes get '
sleepy and I feel guilty I am
not able to absorb a lot of
useless information that
does not pertain to me. What DuWay
I need to know and want to THE
know is what is going on in H(
my community that makes
me, my mission or my
friends better for having the informa-
tion.
Over the years, I can't list all the
things and events I have found that
mattered to us. Vehicles, furniture,
sales, events and on and on. Countless.
In the beginning of The Path, I listed


I
*
in

3


a small classified ad that 99 percent of
the people in Citrus missed. But one
Realtor did not. It said "The Path of
Citrus County is now ac-
cepting land donations."
That's all! If that was not
enough, we put it into the
real estate listings. A Real-
tor who read it pulled a
miracle and -to make a
long story short he
turned it into a $150,000
donation and this is how
The Path really got some
ne Sipper steam to offer homeless
PATH services.
OME Two years later, the
Chronicle donated the
service fee of stuffing our
meal ticket envelopes and continued
to donate the insertion fee for several
years. This gave us some sustainabil-
ity by developing our mailing list that
still helps us today
Behind all this is a man who does
not take much credit: Gerry Mulligan.


We will never be able to count the im-
pact on ALL of the charities in Citrus
County that his newspaper has
helped.
Some words in the English language
get a bad name and they are not bad
words at all. One of them is "bias." I
think it falls in the same category as
"intolerant" There is not one human
being on earth who is not blessed with
both. This is what makes us who we
are.
Thank you, good Lord above, that
Gerry Mulligan is extremely biased to-
ward charities of all kinds and has
been so for all of the years I have
known him. Your reward in Heaven
must be great! Thank you, Gerry
Mulligan.

DuWayne Sipper is the executive
director of The Path of Citrus County,
a faith-based homeless shelter
Contact him at 527-6500 or
sipperd@bellsouth.net.


Citrus County Sams donations


Ned Barry at 352-249-1042
or email nedbarry@
tampabay.rr.com.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


News NOTES

Orchid Lovers
meet in Spring Hill
Orchid Lovers of Spring Hill
meets at 1 p.m. Saturday,
Jan. 19, at the Partner's Club
(behind Oakhill Hospital,
11375 Cortez Blvd., Spring
Hill).
All are welcome to enjoy a
talk on orchid culture. Orchids
will be raffled and offered for
sale. There will be a mem-
ber's orchid show table and
free refreshments.
For more information, call
Linda Roderick at 352-597-
3736.
Make some super
soup for contest
The Yankeetown-Inglis
Woman's Club's annual
Soup-A-Thon and Bake Sale
will be from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 19. Everyone
is invited to enter their favorite
soup to vie for the title of
"Souper Chef."
Call now to reserve a spot
to win a cash prize of $50 for
first place, $25 for second
place and $10 for third place.
Space is limited to the first 30
soups registered.
The clubhouse on 56th
Street becomes an old-fash-
ioned county fair, where
everyone can join friends and
neighbors to sample the deli-
cious soups and vote for a
favorite.
The Soup-A-Thon will be a
last chance to purchase tick-
ets for the Sweet Magnolia
Gift Basket Raffle. The bas-
ket, valued at more than
$100, is full of beauty prod-
ucts and sweet treats just in
time for Valentine's Day. Tick-
ets at $2 each or three for $5,
are on sale at The Second To
None Thrift Shoppe, Thurs-
day bingo or at the Soup-A-
Thon on Jan. 19. The
drawing will be at 1 p.m. after
the "Souper Chef" is
crowned.
Call the club at 352-
447-2057.
YMCA clubs to
resume Jan. 14
The Citrus County YMCA's
Afterschool Enrichment Clubs
will resume their normal
schedule for the second half
of the school year by offering
a third session beginning
Jan. 14.
The Afterschool Clubs will
be offered at: Central Ridge
Elementary, Citrus Springs
Elementary, Crystal River Pri-
mary, Floral City Elementary,
Forest Ridge Elementary, Ho-
mosassa Elementary, Inver-
ness Primary, Lecanto
Primary, Pleasant Grove Ele-
mentary and Rock Crusher
Elementary. The clubs are
open to all children in kinder-
garten through fifth grade.
The upcoming session will
offer kids the opportunity to
participate in soccer, basket-
ball cheerleading and two
new art programs, introduc-
tion to watercolor and intro-
duction to drawing.
To apply for a grant schol-
arship and financial assis-
tance for other YMCA
programs, call 352-637-0132.
Flotilla 15-4 plans
safety sessions
The United States Coast
Guard Auxiliary, Homosassa
Flotilla 15-4, will conduct a
four-session "About Boating
Safely" program from 7 to 9
p.m. Monday, Jan. 14 and
21, and Thursdays, Jan. 17
and 24, at the West Citrus
Community Center, 8940 Vet-
erans Drive, Homosassa.
Subjects covered will in-
clude boating preparation,
how to navigate on the water-
ways, safe vessel operation,
the legal requirements and
more.
At the completion of the
program, students will receive
a certificate of completion and
safe boating card. Cost is
$30.
For more information, call


Special to the Chronicle
Officers of Citrus County Sams recently presented a donation check to DuWayne Sipper, executive director, and Kathryn
Sipper, development director, of The Path. Pictured, from left, are: Wagon Master Nelson Sutherland, DuWayne Sipper,
Secretary Adele Jacobson, Kathryn Sipper, Treasurer Doris Kelley, Vice President Jerry Miller and Citrus County Sams
President Al Romagnolo. The Sippers gave a tour of The Path housing complex in Beverly Hills, where housing and emo-
tional and physical support is offered to people who need The Path's assistance and direction in transforming their lives,
providing safe shelter, food, hope, dignity and rest. The Good Sams Chapter also presented a donation to Deborah
Rossfeld, executive director of Citrus United Basket in Inverness, the oldest food pantry in Citrus County. CUB provides
food, clothing, household items, personal hygiene items and school supplies to those in need. Citrus County Sams also
sent donations to six other local charities: Camp E-Nini-Hassee, Nature Coast Ministries, Daystar, CREST School, The Sal-
vation Army and Citrus County Blessings. Annual donations are also made to Dogs for the Deaf of Central Point, Ore. (a
national charity for Good Sams), and Camp Boggy Creek of Eustis.



Library will host bat speaker





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bridge


SATURDAY EVENING JANUARY 12, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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West
A 852
VAQ


01-12-13


SA QJ 10 9
East
4 4
V K 7 4 2


* Q J 10 6 5
*6 4 3
South


+ A 9 8 3 2
8 5 2


S A Q J 7 6 3
V 9 8 3
*K4
6 K 7

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both


South West North
14 Pass 2 -
2 4 Pass 4 6


East
Pass
All pass


Opening lead: + Q

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

John Wayne said, "Tomorrow is the most impor-
tant thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very
clean. It's perfect when it arrives and it puts itself
in our hands. It hopes we've learned something
from yesterday"
The next trick is the most important play in
bridge ... for a fleeting moment. And, of course,
some tricks are more important than others.
Which is the key trick in this deal?
South is in four spades. West leads the diamond
queen. How should the defenders continue from
there?
When South opens one spade, North's hand is
worth game in spades, that singleton hopefully
being valuable. But with only three trumps, he
must adopt a two-step routine, bidding his own
nice club suit first, then supporting spades with a
jump.
When this deal was originally played, East won
the first trick with his diamond ace and shifted to
the heart two. West took that trick with his queen
and cashed the ace, but South won the remainder.
West had forgotten the most important defensive
"rule": When leading a low card from length, you
promise at least one honor in that suit.
Here, when East led the heart two, West should
have realized that East had the heart king, since
the jack and 10 were on the board. West should
have won trick two with his heart ace and returned
the heart queen. Then East could have overtaken
with his king and given West a heart ruff to defeat
the contract
That is tough but not impossible, especially if
you discuss the principle with your partners.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
PUREP E
I I E I IE
@2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Righs Reserved
KNURT U /






~~'^T~~


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
...and the
baby zombie
S wore a I'm not
die-per." drawing that.
/i- That stinks!



-- -T .




THE JUMBL-E ARTIST
REFUSE TO PRAW THE
2-ARTOON BE1 AU5F HE
THOUGHT THE WOR-PL-AY
WA5 ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print yourV -'"
answer here:
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: SHYLY THANK PREFER CANCEL
I Answer: The fish market's new slogan was a -
CATCH PHRASE


ACROSS
1 Wool-eater
5 Gear tooth
8 007
12 Melville title
13 Capitalize on
14 Water, in Baja
15 Equine fodder
16 Embrocation
18 Ms. Garbo
20 "Uh" cousins
21 NASA
counterpart
22 Leanest
25 Wave maker
28 Teakettle
sound
29 Norse Zeus
33 Hothouse
flower
35 Hesitate
36 Trojan War
epic
37 Penguin's gait
38 Crayola
choices
39 Skiing mecca
41 Crestfallen


42 Surfer's term Answer to Previous Puzzle
(2 wds.)
45 Yon maiden C PA L S
48 Van Waals A A Y L A EE
force TO GS BAAS OW L
49 Evades A C H Y B R O C A D E S
53 Patios P________O__ HIA__ IA
56 Zen riddle P 0 A CHEDOHARA
57 Pavarotti piece HE YEA T E


58 Barrel
59 Ms. Ferber
60 Baroque
composer
61 Former JFK
arrival
62 Over one's
head

DOWN
1 Synthesizer
inventor
2 Sharif or Epps
3 Lug
4 Multitudes
5 -de-sac
6 Willow shoots
7 Mystery and
sci-fi


UNDER DISMAY
GAl BAUM SMOG
A I m I

A P E sls AE
H DLEMANS UNHIP
WHIRL DESTINE
HISTORIC TRAY
EVA MY NA LOBE
EEK BEEF E NS


8 Loud thud
9 Type of arch
10 Wimple
wearers
11 Statistics
17 Mir's
successor


19 Plant parasite
23 Lend a hand
24 Warty critter
25 Yves' evening
26 Dashiell's peer
27 Battery fluid
30 Big flops
31 "La Bonita"
32 Financial aid
criterion
34 Diner fare
35 Grew ashen
37 Gift for
repartee
39 Some
sweaters
(hyph.)
40 Goes along
with
43 Orthodontist's
grp.
44 Microwaved
45 Iffy attempt
46 Jealous
goddess
47 Guitarist
Clapton
50 Dits and dahs
51 Welles'
"Citizen -"
52 Parka closer
54 Fan noise
55 Noncom


Dear Annie: Our daughter
is going down a bad road,
and our 13-year-old
granddaughter,
"Lana," is in the dri-
ver's seat.
Lana has been diag-
nosed with ADHD, but
since we live in an-
other state, we have no
way of knowing
whether she's staying
on her meds. I've
heard from my wife
that Lana has been de-
stroying furniture and
is physically and ver- ANIN
bally abusing her MAIl
mother. At one point,
she snatched her
mom's cellphone out of her hand
while she was calling for help.
Here's another layer of trou-
ble: We know our daughter has
had drug abuse issues in the past,
and we suspect she's on some
harder stuff now. She is losing
weight at an alarming rate, her
teeth are going bad, and she's just
been kicked out of her apartment
-for the fourth time in less than
two years.
This is stressing the entire fam-
ily, even though we're hundreds
of miles away. What can we do?
How do we cope with this? -
Worried and Wondering
Dear Worried: Is Lana's father
in the picture? Is he reliable?
Would he be willing to ask for
custody? Would you be willing to
take the girl in if her mother is on
drugs? We know Lana is a hand-
ful, but part of the reason is be-
cause her mother may not be a
competent parent We urge you to
make a trip to see your daughter
and assess the situation. You also


might want to alert Lana's school
to the home issues. There is sup-
port for friends and relatives of
addicted children.
Contact Nar-Anon
(nar-anon.org) at 800-
477-6291.
Dear Annie: For the
past 30 years, my
brother-in-law, "Bob,"
has spent the holidays
with us, staying for a
week or more. He has
never offered to take
us out to lunch, dinner
or anything else. In
IE'S fact, the last time we
BOX went out together, he
somehow left his
credit card at home
when the bill arrived, so we paid,
as usual. (How does anyone
travel 1,000 miles without a credit
card?)
Everyone else I know makes it
a regular practice to offer to take
the hosts out for a meal or at the
very least pitch in for groceries.
When we are guests, we do this.
It is courteous, polite and proper.
Are we just old-fashioned?
How do we handle Bob's in-
ability to find his pockets?
Should we mention ahead of time
that diners will be paying for
their own meals? My husband
has never brought this up with
his brother, but I think it's time
Bob became a good guest. He is
single, well-educated and lives
comfortably Should we just come
out and tell him? It would be dif-
ficult to do without ruffling a few
feathers. New Hampshire
Dear New Hampshire: How
does your husband feel about
this? Bob is being a freeloader,
but if your husband prefers not to


confront him (and can afford it),
we think you should let him de-
cide the issue. Otherwise, since
he's family, and you will continue
to host him, it's OK to approach
Bob with a lighthearted touch
and say that it's his turn to pick
up the tab on the next outing.
Dear Annie: This is in re-
sponse to "Frustrated," whose
new husband, "Kevin," won't let
her buy her own stuff. If he is a
control freak, they need counsel-
ing, or if necessary, she can get
the marriage annulled. Life is too
short to live like that.
If it were up to my husband,
we'd never have anything decent
around here. I've replaced some
of his and my old stuff and
learned to stand up to him. It's
not healthy to be married and
feel like you are living out a
prison sentence.
Assuming she's not trying to
buy high-end expensive stuff, she
needs to ask herself: Would she
let a friend treat her that way?
No. Happily Married 20 Years
to a Pack Rat


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann Lan-
ders column. Please email your
questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read fea-
tures by other Creators Syndi-
cate writers and cartoonists,
visit the Creators Syndicate Web
page at www creators. com.


North
A K 10 9
V J 10 6 5
+ 7


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


1-12


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


ENTERTAINMENT


SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013 C7


y





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


KITTENS ARE
WARM. TOO,
YOU KNOW!
-----L


Pickles


Sally Forth

HOW ABOUT WE JUST GIVE NONA HOW ABOUT WE GIVE HOW ABOUT WE RK
SOME SPACE TO WORK NONA A CHANCE TO DON'T DISCUSS
THINGS OLr T BUT WHAT MISS US THIS IN THE REY A QUIZ
ABOUT OF SEGRE / BUT H AHATQZ ALREADY A QUIZ?
SOUT IF SIGHTWE'RE BUT WHAT MILE OF THIS WHOLE
/ WE'RE OUT OF s FACT WE O SYST






Dilbert


For Better or For Worse


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


I HAD TO LAY OFF
SEVEN ENGINEERS AND
... I NEED YOU TO PICK
UP THOSE FUNCTIONS.







The Born Loser


LWOW! I FEEL A WEIGHT
HAS BEEN LIFTED FROMr
MAY CHEST. NOW THAT
AMY FAILURE IS GUAR-
ANTEED, I NO LONGER
FEEL THE STRESS OF
TRYING TO SUCCEED!


I DON'T
KNOW HOW DIDNT
DIDN'T
TO THANK GO THE
YOU FOR WAY I
THIS.
STHIS HOPED.








t D W'T SAY I'> 5PELL IT R\T
SYOUOC TRT BUCK
i~~~~T Ac^^-__ T/E!


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


at rubescartoons.com
"...And while the nature of my client's role
has traditionally been one of one-sided,
unconditional love, in the future it will be
subject to certain stipulations..."


Doonesbury


Big Nate
MAN! W YEAH,.
THOSE THANKS TO
GUYS DEVON
CRUSHED KENDALL.







Arlo and Janis


THANKS HO PROB. ANA
FOR THE POINT WORRY, I
AWE5SOME GOT YOUR BACK
F'5PBACK, WITH YOUR MOM.
BRO. \


Blondie


WE'RE READY, PERFECT!' HERE'S
MR. 8."! THE A NICE BIG BOWL
CHAIRS AR2E ) O H0OT 7UTERED
SE UP !! POPCORN"I






i i_- -


Dennis the Menace


"I POINT KNOW WHICH 15 MORE FUN...GOIN7
AROUND THE MOUNTAIN CU RVESOR
WATCH IN' AMONe FACE."
Betty


,--- >J ,^-
....




The2 /Fmy i-(u
The Family Circus


ayFamy rl o nus4con
"Mommy, Kittycat's doin' that thing
you told her not to."


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Gangster Squad" (R) ID required. 12:45 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Texas Chainsaw" (R) ID required. In 3D. 1 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Zero Dark Thirty" (R) ID required. 12:15 p.m.,
3:45 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Les Miserables" (PG-13) 12 p.m., 3:30 p.m.,
7 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Jack Reacher" (PG-13) 12:30 a.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" (PG-13)
4p.m.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" (PG-13) In
3D. 12 p.m., 7:45 p.m. No passes.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"A Haunted House" (R) ID required. 1:40 p.m.,


4 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Gangster Squad" (R) ID required. 1:30 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Texas Chainsaw" (R) ID required. In 3D. 2 p.m.,
5 p.m., 7:55 p.m., 10:10 p.m. No passes.
"Zero Dark Thirty" (R) ID required. 1 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:40 p.m.
"Les Miserables" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:35 p.m.,
7 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Django Unchained" (R) ID required. 12:50 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
"Parental Guidance" (PG) 1:45 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Jack Reacher" (PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"The Guilt Trip" (PG-13) 4:50 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Lincoln" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:35 p.m.,
10:45 p.m.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 Classic Rock
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: A slenba 7


"FS'IS WCC


CMJS ASGSEGMZSH MO


CMTS. GNSIS'H HDVSGNMOU WG GNS


SOA DT GNS GIWMC GNWG FS'IS WCC


CDDJMOU TDI." AWZMA CLOEN

Previous Solution: "Every actor is somewhat mad, or else he'd be a plumber or a
bookkeeper or a salesman." Bela Lugosi
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-12


IT'S NOT EVER Y
TESTS OUT A B5
SSNOWBLOV





',TOJE^S


r4AOO A000K


Ii. 'I


E X



Al'"


HE'5 (NOPE. HE
PRETTY HAD qZ.
AMAZING.
WHMAT'D
HE HAVE,
50 POINT5? '


,r- 7^


Frank & Ernest


Today's MOVIES


Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


C8 SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013


COMICS


DAY MR. B.
RAND-NEW )
"T Q - -'






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013 C9


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Elderly Gentleman,
Looking for lady,
for
vacation time
(352) 382-5661



2 POWER LIFT CHAIRS
RECLINERS BY PRIDE
MED SZ $285.
LG SZ $350.
BOTH EXC. COND.
(352) 270-8475
4 Tires
215- 65/17
10,000 miles left
$60 for Set
(352) 628-1126
55 Gallon Fish Tank
with Cabinet Stand,
with all accessories
$375.
(352) 613-7429
5TH WHEEL
33FT
GOOD CONDITION
MUST SELL
(423) 202-0914
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lie. & Ins.
Free Est. (352)302-5641
BAVARIAN CHINA
SERVICE FOR 12+
DINNERWARE w/gold
trim. $300 OBO
(352) 746-3327
BUYING
Guitars, Banjos &
Mandolins,Fender,
Gibson & Martin
any condition
(443) 463-3421
CADILLAC
'02, Best STS, Black
on Black, sunroof
78K mi., new tires
$7,500. (352) 628-1126
CITRUS SPRINGS
1/2 PRICE
YARD SALE
SAT. 12th8a-1p
BOOKS, SNACKS, TOO
UNITARIAN CHURCH
7633 N. Florida Ave.
Hwy. 41, 1 mi. N. 491
DINETTE SET
4 ft Glass top w/4 chairs
on casters,
$200
(352) 897-4739
INVERNESS
Rm w/ Priv. ba, $85. wk
no smoke 352-502-6302
ITASCA MERIDIAN
36 Ft, 2005 Motor Home
350HP Cat Diesel 55K
miles, no smoke/pets
6 Michelan Tires, New
2010 qn w/sleep No.
mattress & overhead
fan. W/D combo $71,000
obo. (352) 419-7882
LECANTO
3/2 on 5 acres, 1st, last &
sec. $500. off Cardinal
(352) 6284482
LINCOLN
'95, Town Car
140k miles $2,250
(352) 628-1126




Your World










CHRONICLE




V.1.1. hi-.-n r --nin .-k r


LPN/MEDICAL
ASST
LPN/Medical
Assistant position at
a busy medical office.
Experience a must.
Please e-mail resume
to
cgi@tampabay.rr.com
LQQKING for TV
Console cabinets, wood,
floor model style. Free or
cheap. 352-513-4301
MGB 1973
Red convertible, show
room cond. Everything
works. $6200
(765) 336-9590
OAK ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER. VERY GOOD
COND. 2 DRAWERS & 4
DOORS. $150
(765) 336-9590
PERFECT for Ass. Liv.
Fac. 4BR/4BA, on 2.2
Tranquil Acres, blocks
from Lake Rosseau
Plantation Realty
Charlene Pilgrim,
Realtor 352-464-2215
RCA Video Camera
with accessories $125.
Men's Golf clubs $60
Garmin GPS $60.
(352) 527-7223
SEVERAL BARBIE
DOLLS IN ORG BOXES
$400 OR obo.
(352) 746-3327
SILVERADO 5TH
WHEEL TAILGATE $100
&
VINYL RANGER BED
COVER $75
(352) 637-2982
Smith Corona,
1903-A3, .30-06,
$535.
Trap Door, Springfield,
Rifle .45-70 $495.
(352) 270-6142
Sugarmill Woods
4 Fig Court West
SATURDAY 12th, 8AM.
House full, all priced to
sell, some vintage.
Fiesta Ware
TEEN BUNK BED $175-
Double Bed on top, large
desk below. Silver/metal
frame. Bought from Kids'
Room to Go. Email for
pix. Excellent shape/like
new. email:
kmtopspin@hotmail.com
or (352) 212-2901
Tutoring available T F
after 3:30, S & S after
12. You set rate.
(352) 212-9371
VINTAGE AMERICAN
BOSCH CONSOLE
RADIO good condition
$75.00 Richard -
352-341-3887
WEB TV SYSTEM
2 keyboards, epson C88
Printer $50
(352) 382-2545



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not.
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE JUNK PICK UP
Appliances, Scrap
Metal, Mowers, Autos,
(352) 220-3138



12 Gallon Salt Water
Nano Reef tank w/ live
coral. Supplies included.
Free to good home.
(352) 795-3170 after 6pm


American Pot Belly Pig,
3 yr old male, Excellent
Pet, Free Good Home.
352-287-0767
FREE 2 Cats, Male 3
mo., & Female 13 mo.
To Good Home.
(352) 794-7496
Free Firewood
Cut and Haul
(352) 249-7212
FREE HANDYMAN
SPECIAL FOR HUNTING
CAMP 5TH WHEEL
CAMPER.(352) 795-0150
FREE KITTENS
16 wks old, litter trained
352-212-4061




FRESH CITRUS@
BELLAMY GROVE
Greens, Strawberries,
Broccoli, Gift Shipping,
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378




Black Labrador Retriever,
about 1% yrs old, an-
swers to "Buddy", lost in
vicinity of W. Dunnellon
Rd. (352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662
LARGE LOST DOG
Rottweiler mix, black &
tan. Off of Cardinal
Reward (727)470-5374
LOST Female 1% yr
Calico, declawed &
spade. Named Minnie;
lost in Pine Ridge area.
Please (352) 697-1685
Lost Male Cat British
blue, named Morpheis in
Sugarmill Woods,
chipped. (352) 476-7930




Set of Keys
4 keys on chain on
Southerly off Eden
Drive, Inverness
(352) 726-8978
TOYOTA KEY w/leather
key chain found on the
Withlacoochee Trail
Call (352) 6374429









SPRING HILL
January Classes
** * *
COSMO DAYS
January 14, 2013
COSMO NIGHTS
January 14, 2013
BARBER NIGHTS
February 25, 2013
MASSAGE DAY
January 14, 2013,
MASSAGE NIGHTS
January 14, 2013,
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com




LOOKING FOR RETIRED
PART TIME VOLUNTEER
For General
Office Work,
Blind American
(352) 637-1739


Sudcoku ****** 4puzcom








45 3


32 1 6


1 8 6 3


4 9 12


6 19


2 7


8 ___

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


SA 1-w( of Our f
120m h
Installations by Brian caC ss253853 A '-, winm *sh




F REIE -EST
Permit And I t |ST
I Engineering Fees* a t
SUp to $200 value .*

* Siding Soffit Fascia* Skirting Roofovers* Carports Screen Rooms* Decks Windows Doors* Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


Fulltime
Clerical Position
Data Entry, Acct.
Receivable, Phones,
Word & Excel Exp.
Cust. Service. Must be
detail oriented and
Able to multi task.
NO PHONE CALLS
PLEASE
Please fax Resume' to
352-799-2932

OFFICE POSITION
3 Days a weeks phone
& computers skills a
must. Inverness Fl.
20yrs. in Business.
Resume required.
Blind Box 1821p c/o
Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd
Crystal River, FL 34429

Receptionist/
Office Assistant

T, TH, F 9:30a-3:30pm
Strong phone &
computer skills.
Excel required
APPLY IN PERSON
w/resume 10a-2p
131 Hwy. 19N Inglis





HAIR STYLIST
NEEDED
For Busy Salon
Experience preferred,
bonus incentive of-
fered. Great Location
(352) 794-6016





HOUSEKEEPERS

Apply within NO Calls
BEST WESTERN
614 NW Hwy 19
Crystal River







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966






ARNP or PA
Wanted Part Time for
a busy Pediatric
Practice in Crystal
River, Send Resume
to: lindapracticemar
(atampabav.rr.com

Dental Front Desk
Are you a team
player with great atti-
tude and
phone skills?
Dental Knowledge
a Must PT/FT
Send Resume to
office@sierradental
group.com

F/T or P/T
Dental Assistant
Experience required.
Fax Resume To:
352-795-1637 or Email
casie@rswanson
dental.com

GI Endoscopy
Technician
Full time, with Benefits
Fax Resume to:
352-563-2961

LPNIMEDICAL
ASST
LPN/Medical
Assistant position at
a busy medical office.
Experience a must.
Please e-mail resume
to
cgi@tampabay.rr.com


MED TECHS

Immediate Openings
For All Shifts
Assistant living
Must have current,
up to date Med Tech
Certification.
Apply in person at
Highland Terrace
700 Medical Court E.
Inverness, FL 34452


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

OUTPATIENT
SURGERY CENTER
RN
OPERATING ROOM-
EXPERIENCED ONLY!
CST
Graduate of
approved Surgical
Tech program and
Certified- ONLY I
Excellent working
environment, com-
prehensive benefit
package, competi-
tive pay and no call,
nights, or weekends.
Fax Resume to:
352-527-1827


PIT
Dental Hygienist
Experience required.
Fax Resume To:
352-795-1637 or Email
casie@rswanson
dental.com


PHLEBOTOMIST
F/T exp. Phlebotomist
Salary negotiable.
Fax Resume to:
352-746-3838 or
Send Resume to
P.O.B 640573
BEVERLY HILLS FL
34464


PT Certified
Dental Assistant
Call 352-746-0330,
ask for Vicki.


RN's, PT & OUT'S

Citrus & Hernando
(352) 794-6097





Director of
Clinical Services
Responsible for
directing the pro-
gram's psychological
and treatment
services to include
technical and
administrative duties,
testing, individual,
group, and family
therapeutic activities,
research, and
participation in
overall institutional
programming and
administration.
Education: Master's
degree from an
accredited college
or university in the
field of counseling,
social work, psychol-
ogy, rehabilitation,
special education or
in a related human
services field is
preferred. 5 years
related experience in
the field of treatment
program develop-
ment, implementa-
tion, & evaluation in
a juvenile institution
preferred. Superviory
skills necessary. The
right person must
possess a license:
(MFT, LCSW, LMHC)
from the state of
Florida, provide
Apply In Person at:
2855 W. Woodland
Ridge Dr. Lecanto,
Florida, 34461
or Email to
sharon.facto@us.a4s.
corn or apply
online at www.
usaiobs.a4s.com
Drug Free Workplace
/ EEOC


NOW HIRING FULL-TIME POSITIONS


BENEFITS PACKAGE
SEOE / DRUG FREE WORKPLACE

221 S SncoastBlvd. Hom]as
See dMike Marvelfi^HC

352-628-4600 M..L


Executive
Assistant

Therapy Manage-
ment Corporation
(TMC), a multi-state
preferred provider of
Physical, Occupa-
tional and Speech
therapy and a com-
pany committed to
service excellence is
seeking an Executive
Assistant to the Pres-
ident &CEO. TMC's
Home Office is lo-
cated in Homosassa,
FL. The ideal candi-
date must have a
minimum of 3 years'
experience as an Ex-
ecutive Assistant.
Must have excep-
tional skills in Micro-
soft Office with an
emphasis on Word
and Excel. Please
apply online @
www.therapymgmt.
com or fax resume to
352.381.0212

Licensed
Insurance Agents

Needed
Life/Health/Annuity
Nature Coast
Financial Advisors,
Inc. Email information
aarv@naturecoast
financial.com
352-794-6044

Sales/Marketing/
Advertising
Manufactured Homes
Serious inquires only!
(352) 795-1272





HIRING SERVERS
Must be 18 or older.
Apply Fisherman's
Restaurant
12311 E Gulf to Lake
(352) 637-5888





AC SALES
Will train right person,
easy six figure income
Must have val. fl. DL,
Mike (352) 726-1002

Real Estate Agents
Busy real estate office
needs Realtors and
Buyers Agents Call
PLANTATION REALTY
352-634-0129

SALES PERSON
WANTED

For sales of manufac-
tured & modular
homes. Must be very
motivated & have a
proven sales back-
ground. Knowledge
of housing & real es-
tate helpful. Prior ex-
perience helpful.
E-mail resume to
grouperman@
aol.com or fax to
352-621-9171





Appliance Tech
Must be experienced
on LG & Samsung.
and other makes,
laundry & refrigera-
tion, 30% commission
Full time, 5 days wk
(352) 445-0072

Big Truck/Equip.
Mechanic
Must have tools & exp.
***apply at:***
6730 N. Citrus Ave.
Crystal River, FL
no phone calls please


AUTO
COLLISION TECH
352-726-2139 or
637-2258 Aft. 5 pm

CABLE INSTALLERS
SIGN-ON BONUS
We are seeking cable
installation contractors
for our citrus County
location. Contractors
should possess a
technical aptitude,
strong work ethic,
communication skills &
a professional
appearance. Jones
NCTIS certification or
equivalent experience
is a plus. Must be able
to lift 70 lbs & have a
truck or van that can
carry a 28-foot
fiberglass extension
ladder. Must have a Fl
Driver's license, good
driving record,
submit to & pass a
criminal background &
drug test & must be
available to work
weekends. We are
offering sign-on
bonuses! Wae busy
& growing & need you
to make this growth
successful. Please
e-mail your resume to:
fljobs@kablelink.com
or apply at
Kablelink.com (Job#26)

ELECTRICIAN
Recently retired, to
supervise electrical up-
grade two BDR home
Citrus Springs Area.
Advise your experi-
ence, Frank Boitz
Box 248, Indian Rocks
Beach FL. 33785-0248

Exp. Marine
Fork Lift Driver

7 day shift
**Apply in Person**
Twin Rivers Marina
2880 N. Seabreeze Pt
Crystal River Fl 34429
no phone calls pis

Exp. Power Equip.
& Small Engine
Mechanic

Must have at least 2
yrs. exp. in a small
engine shop, and
have own tools
Apply in Person M-Fri
6659 W NORVELL
BRYANT HWY, CR
NO CALLS*

Framers Needed

352-212-9092

WORKERS
*Accepting applications*
For workers who are
versatile in operating site
prep equipment, paving
equipment,and general
labor. CDL's a plus.
Call (352)628-9571 for an
appointment.




BUS DRIVER
Must have valid CDL
w/Passenger
endorsement &
automobile insurance.
Must be able to operate
a 19 passenger bus to
transport residents of a
Senior Independent
Living facility to various
locations within the
local community. Must
be able to bend, stoop,
squat & lift up to 50lbs.
Previous exp. w/seniors
a plus. Must have
strong customer
service skills, positive
attitude & able to work
as a member team.
Fax resume to
352-344-0885
or email to
amy.rock@dewar
properties.com
EOE/DFWP


571693824
9 8 4512637
3 2 9 1 5 4 7 6 8
1 5 7 8 2 614 9 3
6 4 87 39512
763 241985
4 1 2985 376
8 9 536 7 241


COMMUNITY
HOSTESS

Seeking high-energy
hostesses for seasonal
part-time position
shuttling potential
homeowners around
countryclub comm-
unity's amenities. Must
be articulate, upbeat
and service oriented.
Apply at Terra Vista
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd., Hernando, FL



LEASING AGENT
Full time Leasing agent
needed for Senior
Independent Living
Facility. Provides
Administrative support,
shows/ markets/leases
apartments to
prospective residents,
and works as a team
member to ensure
community needs are
met. Must have valid
drivers license &
automobile insurance.
Previous experience w/
property management
a plus. Must have
strong customer
service skills, positive
attitude & ability to
utilize office equipment
& computer software.
Fax resume to
352-344-0885
or email to
amy.rock@dewar
properties.com
EOE/DFWP



NEWSPAPER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and other
newspapers for
home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per day.
Must have insured
and reliable vehicle
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up with
a cap-Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product

Apply in Person
1624 N Medowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pm
Newspaper carriers
are independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle


CH, oNidE
L_____Jl


Experienced
TELEMARKETERS
NEEDED. Good
Commission Pay.
Write your own check
Aplyv In Person
6421 W. Homosassa Tr

PT, Kitchen, Bar
Back & General
Help Needed
PLEASE CALL
(352) 628-2602










SPRING HILL
January Classes
COSMO DAYS
January 14, 2013
COSMO NIGHTS
January 14, 2013
BARBER NIGHTS
February 25, 2013
MASSAGE DAY
January 14, 2013,
MASSAGE NIGHTS
January 14, 2013,
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com




ANTIQUE CANDY DISH,
Keystone china.
Made/USA. Hand-painted
22 k. gold accents, $100.
Make offer. 637-2635.
ANTIQUE CHINA
CABINET
Vintage deco, drawers,
glass door off white $100.
352-513-4473




50 Wizard Comics One
Half edition
$1 ea obo
20 Holiday Barbie Dolls
$1 ea. obo
(352) 860-1110
550
Matchbox Cars
$1 ea.
(352) 860-1110
BAVARIAN CHINA
SERVICE FOR 12+
DINNERWARE w/gold
trim. $300 OBO
(352) 746-3327
BRADEX "Little Jack
Horner" Mother Goose
Series by John McClel-
land. Exclusive, limited,
permanently closed
1982. $100.419-7017


Fa: 32)53-66 Tl Fee 88)85-24 1E ai: lssf eds 0 .0onieco ebie


How To

Make Your

Dining Room Set

Disappear...

Simply advertise in the
Classifieds and get results
quickly!





(352) 563-5966




iw1whni IC-e I ETn

www.chronicleonline.com


CLASSIFIED






C10 SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013


BRADEX "Mary, Mary"
1st issue Mother Goose
series by John McClel-
land, excl.for this ed.
Perm. closed 1979. $100.
Orig.mail box. 419-7017
DISNEYS 75 YEARS
music & memories 3 disc
cd limited edition pd.$50
sell $20. 352-527-9982
FRAMED DISNEY PRINT
"FLATTERY" cert.#838 of
2000-18"by
24"-$100.more info call
352-527 9982
KISSING FACES
Sculpture by John
Cutrone, Austin produc-
tions with stand $90. call
or text 352-746-0401
LIGHTED CHRISTMAS
VILLAGE by Margaret
Hockingberry. 500
ceramic pieces. $1000
OBO. Can be seen at
20451 Powell Rd Lot 115
Dunnellon(352) 489-0713
LITHO COLLECTOR
YELLOW STEEL SIGN
Do not drink water Fish
crap in it
$25. call 603-493-2193
OCCUPIED JAPAN
AICHI BREAD PLATES
Two gold trimmed, pink
roses, 7.5", very good.
$5. 352-601-0067
ROCKWELL SCOUTING
"1979" -50first day
covers-matching gov.
stamps $100.-more
info.call 352-527-9982
SEVERAL BARBIE
DOLLS IN ORG BOXES
$400 OR obo.
(352) 746-3327











Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966

THREE DOLLS FROM
THE 1950 ERA good
condition $50. for all.
352-527-1399
VINTAGE AMERICAN
BOSCH CONSOLE
RADIO good condition
$75.00 Richard -
352-341-3887
ZEBRA BOOKENDS
Lipper & Mann black and
gold good condition $75.
call or text 352-746-0401



AUTOMATIC DISH
WASHER white works
good. GE. $75.
352-513-4473
DRYER $100 Works
great. 90 day full
warranty. Call/text
352-364-6504
Dryer & New Washer
Whirlpool
Lg capacity, Heavy
duty, White,
$300.
(352) 270-8968
Gas Stove/electric
oven, stainless steel
w/ black top,
$250.
Call Evenings
(352) 527-2300
KENMORE
REFRIGERATOR 24cf
stainless side by side
w/water & ice dispenser
indoor. Excellent condi-
tion. $500. 352-726-9964
R.C.A DRYER $65
Works great. 30 day
warranty. Call/text
352-364-6504
SEARS KENMORE
WASHER, GE DRYER
Both good condition.
Large loads. Dryer used
only 6 months. $350.
352419-7017
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers &
dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179
WASHER $100 Works
great. 90 day full war-
ranty. Call/text
352-364-6504
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Free De-
livery 352 263-7398



CORNER DESK WITH
HUTCH TOP computer
desk in fantastic shape
$100 call 352-257-3870








Fri 01/18 Preview@
4pm, Auction@ 6pm
General Merchandise
Sat 01/19 Preview @
4pm, Auction@ 6pm
General Merchandise
Sun 01/20 Preview @
12:30, Auction@ 1pm
Tailgate/Box lot Auction
"WE BUY ESTATES**
6055 N. Carl G. Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
AB3232 (352) 613-1389



AIR COMPRESSOR
Porta Cable 4 gal, 3 hp,
needs minor repair $60.
call or text 352-746-0401


BLUE OX 6" DROP
DOWN HIGH-LOW
Hitch10,000 lb. capacity.
$85. 352-601-0067
Industrial
Metal Brake,
Used to shape
aluminum. 8 ft,
$250 or best offer.
352-302-6840
SKILL SAW
8% inch blade $10.
(352) 860-0183



55" HITACHI
PROJECTION TV
Superbowl Ready! Works
GREAT! 352-563-1519 or
727-504-4488 $200
FIRM
70' TV HITACHI
model 70Vx915 $400.
(352) 503-3087


BLACK & GLASSTV
center 55"Wx22"Dx20"H
will fit small-large flat
screen $95. call text
352-746-0401
RCA RECEIVER 5 DISK
DVD/CD CHANGER
includes subwoofer in
great shape $100. call
352-257-3870
SHARP 32" TV WITH
REMOTE $25
352-613-0529
SONY TV 36 inch color,
works ,good,looks good.
$100. or best offer
352-513-4473
SUBWOOFERS -sound
dynamics rts series
1000-100 watts rms/400
watts peak-like new $50.
352-527-9982
TV STAND 53 1/2" Long
X 20" High X 19" Wide
$10. Homosassa call
603493-2193



DOOR JAMB exterior
new 3/0x6/8 jamb only
weather strip alum.
threshold rt hand in set
up $30 call 352-746-0401



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
WEB TV SYSTEM
2 keyboards, epson C88
Printer $50
(352) 382-2545



LEXMARK SCANNER,
PRINTER, FAX, COPY
MACHINE New, White
colored, needs ink, $15
(352)465-1616
WELL PUMP
MIRES 1 HP pump with
80 ft of 2 inch pipe. $95
(727) 421-5371



Two patio chairs and
table white plastic
$40 352-860-2475



3 Pc. Bedroom Set
Dresser with Mirrors,
Chest of drawers, 1
end table, dark pecan
Burlington House
$100. (352) 287-0767
4 GREAT DINETTE
CHAIRS Wood Frame
w/Buphlostered seat &
backs on wheels $140.
352-527-9332
ATTRACTIVE, CLEAN,
COMFORTABLE
SECTIONAL Tan cotton
with batik floral design
$200. 352-8974154
Bassett couch & loveseat
New condition, no stains
& NO WEAR! Light
blue/gray/mahogany $99
firm 637-3636
DAYBED 2 twin
mattresses,
bedding,white & brass
sides, clean $50,
352-228-7620
DINETTE SET
4 ft Glass top w/4 chairs
on casters,
$200
(352) 897-4739
DINING TABLE
High quality table w/4
chairs, leaf, and hutch.
Asking $400 but worth
much more.
(352) 860-0183


DISPLAY CASES,
CASH REGISTER Two
glass/metal display
cabinets,$300 and
$275; a cash register
$40 and a stand $25, 1
open glass shelving
cabinet $225.
352-804-0216
FLORAL SECTIONAL
SOFA 3 piece in good
shape. $100 call
352-257-3870
Leather Living room set&
King size Wood bedroom
set custom made &
priceless (352) 586-3231
LOVE SEAT AND CHAIR
matching in good condi-
tion $60. call
352-257-3870
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
OAK ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER. VERY GOOD
COND. 2 DRAWERS & 4
DOORS. $150
(765) 336-9590
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
QUEEN SZ WATERBED
Soft sides, pillow top,
boxspring, frame &
headboard. $300 OBO
(352) 637-5525
Sleep by Number Air
Bed, King Size,
complete, exec. cond.,
like new $,2,500 new
asking $1,250.
(352) 726-1040
Small wooden table
white $12
352-860-2475
STEREO CABINET
Wood tone with turntable.
19"x34 1/2"x16 1/2" $45.
Please call 352-726-1495
TEEN BUNK BED $175-
Double Bed on top, large
desk below. Silver/metal
frame. Bought from Kids'
Room to Go. Email for
pix. Excellent shape/like
new. email:
kmtopspin@hotmail.com
or (352) 212-2901
TILED KITCHEN
TABLE and 4 matching
chairs $100 obo
(352) 860-0183
WHITE WICKER
COMPUTER DESK &
CHAIR Attractive,


Like New $175.
352-897-4154
WICKER Henry Link,
chair & large couch,
new cushions, end table
coffee table
$350
(352) 597-7353



Weed Wacker
32CC, craftsman, gas
Weed Waker
Bandit, gas,
Craftsman Blower
32CC gas,
Homelite Blower
model 170 gas,
Echo Chainsaw #500
VL, 18" Gas $150 for All
Riding Lawn Mower
John Deer 1991, #212
36" cut, ran in 2010,
cast iron rear end $225.
(352) 628-1126


110 LAWN TRACTOR
1962 or 1964. 8 HP
Kohler cast iron eng, 2
speed tranny. Runs
good, needs starting
switch. Can demo, $400.
352422-6811
Leaf Blower$10
Easy Hand Spreader for
Seed or Fertilizer $5.
(352) 860-0183



CITRUS SPRINGS
1/2 PRICE
YARD SALE
SAT. 12th 8a-lp
BOOKS, SNACKS, TOO
UNITARIAN CHURCH
7633 N. Florida Ave.
Hwy. 41, 1 mi. N. 491
CITRUS SPRINGS
Fri & Sat 9a to 2pm
*BIG ESTATE SALE *
2228 W Dophlin Dr.
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri. & Sat. 8AM.-Until
BIG YARD SALE*
Lots of Stuff!
9335 W. Milwaukee Ct.
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. & Sun. 9am-3pm
Boat/Motor/Trailer
Household, antiques,
sports memorabilia
8628 Bass Lake Rd.
HERNANDO
Sat 12th 9a 2pm
MOVING SALE
4070 E LAKE PARK Dr
HERNANDO
Sat. & Sun. 9a-4p
Large 3 Family Sale
Old wicker Dinnette.
Set, golf clubs, jewrly,
clothes, telescope,
water troft neon bar
lights, comic, gitar
MUCH MUCH MORE!
Signs form Croft to
Harley to 1578 E. Ray St
INVERNESS
5080 E Hopp Ln
Fri-Sat, 1/11-12, 8a -4p.
Angels, collectibles,
household/kit. items, craft
items, purses, tables.
INVERNESS
Saturday 1/12, 8a-2p
Refrigerator & Stove,
crafts, china & more!
We downsize & you win
8888 E Sweetwater Dr
INVERNESS
Veterans Yard Sale
Our Lady of Fatima
Church
Saturday 7:30a-1:30p
550 US HWY 41 S.
Call 352-400-8952
for vendor space, $10
Please Bring
A Can Good to help feed
veterans
Sugarmill Woods
4 Fig Court West
SATURDAY 12th, 8AM.
House full, all priced to
sell, some vintage.
Fiesta Ware
YANKEETOWN
Fri. & Sat. 9a-4p
Downsizing, higher end
Fl. home decor, cloth-
ing, jewelry ETC No. Junk
6209 RIVERSIDE DRIVE



2 LAZY BOY/ CLUB
RECLINERS, BUR-
GUNDY $400.
B & S PRESSURE
WASHER 2000 PSI,
$120. (352)746-3372
2 MINI BIKES
$100 firm
352419-5102
2 WHEELED WALKER,
Folding $15 OBO
Aliminum(352) 527-2085
3 PAIRS OF CROC
SHOES.$15 ALL
M/8,W/9,BLACK,BROWN,
BLUE. (352)527-2085
20 FT ELECTRICAL
POWER POLE W/meter
can& 100amp panel
W/12 breakers. You pull
$300 OBO(352)628-2980
20 ft. Ext. Ladder $20.
6 ft. Step Ladder $20.
(352) 860-0183
55 Gallon Fish Tank
with Cabinet Stand,
with all accessories
$375.
(352) 613-7429
2-LG Touch V X11000
Phones good condition
with batteries call or text
$15. each 352-746-0401
28" Grab Bar
for Shower
$10.
(352) 860-0183
ACER 77E 17"MONITOR
tube type monitor
incl.manual &cable-like
new."free" 352-527-9982
BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING SIZES 5 & 6
SHIRTS, PANTS &
JACKETS $35
352-613-0529
BRACE-BACK
WINDSOR WOODEN
CHAIR. $30 OBO
Vintage (352) 527-2085
BRADFORD
EXCHANGE PLATES.
$10EA, $70ALL. CIRCA
1980s. (352) 527-2085
CAMO HOLSTER Uncle
mikes size 10 belt holster
like new $15. call or text
352-746-0401
CENTURY FIRE PROOF
SAFE. 17X20X18.
135LBS, NEW $425
ASKING $225.
(352) 212-4079
CHILD'S BLUE
WOODEN ROCKER. $15
OBO VINTAGE.
(352)527-2085
CHRISTMAS TREE
Artificial 7.5 ft storage
boxes inc. $40.
352-249-9164
Chrome continental Kit
tire cover $40 860-2475
DIGITAL PHOTO ALBUM
Brookstone 500 pic like
new in box call text $50.
352-746-0401
FORD AIR INTAKE fits
stock 2004-? F250 v-10
like new in storage from
2005 $45. call or text


352-746-0401
General Field Fence
Total 47in H x 200 ft L.
24 Posts 3in X 6% ft.
Utility gate 50in h x 12ft L.
All for $320
(352) 228-7143
GERBIL CAGE GOOD
CONDITION $25
352-613-0529
GIBSON ELECTRIC
RANGE $100.
DINING TABLE W/4
PADDED CHAIRS $50
(217) 821-6524
HOOVER STEAM
CLEANER 65$
352419-5102
HOSPITAL BED
W/REMOTE. $90 OBO
CLEAN MATTRESS
W/COVER, RAILS.
(3520 527-2085
KENZIE, JENNAAVON
DOLLS $15 EA. IN BOX,
1990. (352)527-2085


BIRD CAGE $100. Great
cond. 352-302-5468
LOVESEAT AND CHAIR
matching in good shape
$60. call 352-257-3870
MOVING BOXES, USED
in good cond 3 XLg, 4
Lg,11Med12Sm.Bubble
Wrap, $60 248-224-3860
ORIGINAL XBOX
Ex. cond. console,
controllers, DVD conv.,
DVD remote, & games.
$100 CALL AFTER 5PM
(352) 2124888
Over 60 Jig Saw Puzzles
$50. for all
(352) 746-3799
PET CARRIER MEDIUM
SIZE FIBERGLASS
ONLY $15. 352464-0316
RCA Video Camera
with accessories $125.
Men's Golf clubs $60
Garmin GPS $60.
(352) 527-7223
RED WOODEN CHAIR.
$20 OBO VINTAGE.
(352) 527-2085
ROCKING HORSE
Black-colored, rocks by
rubber, batteries are op-
tional for sound, ok condi-
tion, $30 (352)465-1616
SAMSUNG 4CH
High res. color security
cameras w/recorder
smart phone ready. Night
vision, etc. New paid
$600 asking $300.
(352) 2124079
SAMSUNG brightside
touch verizon phone case
extra screen protectors
call text for details $35.
352-746-0401
SKYLIGHT 27+ 27
BUBBLE TYPE UV
FIBERGLASS ONLY
$50. 352464-0316
STARTER CHEWVY
SMALL BLOCK New
staggered pattern
$35.call or text
352-746-0401
TRAVEL KIT FOR GPS
Day Tripper, new in box,
charger, case, fits 5"
screen. $10
352-601-0067
TROY BILT
GENERATOR 5500
watts, 8550 starting
watts. Only run to
circulate oil. Like new
$350. Call 352-527-0832
Two 12 FT. W overhead
garage doors, with
all hardware, great
shape $100. ea. or
$200. both
(352) 287-0767
WESTERN BOOTS
Acme size 8.5EW brown
marble good cond. $45.
call or text 352-746-0401
WINDOW AIR
CONDITIONER $40
352419-5102



2 POWER LIFT CHAIRS
RECLINERS BY PRIDE
MED SZ $285.
LG SZ $350.
BOTH EXC. COND.
(352) 270-8475
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH SEAT AND
BRAKES GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $85.
352464-0 316
4" TOILET SEAT RISER
BRAND NEW WITH
HANDLES FOR
SUPPORT ONLY $25.
352464-0316
AUTO MEDICATION
DISPENSER Battery
Backup Dispense Meds
2x Day For 2 Wks $75.
352-527-0324
BEDSIDE COMMODE &
ALUMINUM WALKER
ADJUSTABLE LEGS ON
EACH 20.00 EACH
352464-0316
Blood Pressure Monitor
Omron, on arm, New
Never used, Pd $100.
$50. (352) 527-2852
MANUAL WHEELCHAIR
Footrests included.
$50,OBO. Very Good
condition. 352-726-5116.
MANUAL WHEELCHAIR
WITH FOOTRESTS
GOOD SHAPE ONLY
$100. 352-464-0316
REHABILICARE NERVE
STIMULATION SYSTEM
Rehabilicare Promax
Portable Electrical Nerve
Stimulation System
{TENS} unit for chronic
back and nerve pain,
Paid $375,sell for $200
call 352-4194767
SHOWER CHAIR WITH
BACKREST FIBER-
GLASS W/ADJUSTABLE
LEGS ONLY $35.
352464-0316



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676



BUYING
Guitars, Banjos &
Mandolins,Fender,
Gibson & Martin
any condition
(443) 463-3421



CHANDELIER
Bronzed metal, 5 frosted
glass shades. Like new
$75. 352-422-1309
CONVECTION OVEN
Crofton; 3 gallon capac-
ity, 1300watts..temp
control:defrost. 250-500F
Asking $40.
tele: (352)419-7825
WALL MIRROR
68" X 42" Homosassa
$10. Call 603-493-2193



AB LOUNGER WORK
ON THOSE ABS ONLY
$40. 352-464-0316
EXERCISE BIKE FAN


TYPE WORKS THE
ARMS TOO GREAT
SHAPE ONLY $85.
352464-0316
GAZELLE LIKE
EXERCISER OK SHAPE
ONLY $40. 352464-0316
PURSUIT EXERCISE
BIKE ALL
ELECTRONICS SUPER
CONDITION $100.
352464-0316
ROWING MACHINE BY
BODY ROW GET IN
SHAPE $85.
352464-0316
TREADMILL
$80 obo
AB COASTER
$40. obo
(352) 613-2333
TREADMILL
Pro Form Crosswalk
/Incline 380, like new,
$275 OBO
(352) 382-7399


$


THE BEST QUALITY




PREOWNED VEHICLES




'06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
GLS, Automatic 12110405


$5,995 or 14/mo.






'05 MERCURY MONTEGO

Only 49k Miles, Premier 1211026 -L


$1,995 or s1O/mo.





S'06 KIA SPECTRA

One Owner, Low Miles 12120189


E7,995 or1 167/mo.







Sport, Must See 12110362


'7,995or16/0meo.





|Ba 08 CH EVY HHR

-LT, Low Miles 12120247


9,90 or 179/mo.




10 KIA OPTIMA

LX, Xtra Clean 12110240


'9,995 or s179 no.





S'03 DODGE RAM 1500

--9 SLT, Quad Cab 12120297


9,995 or $189/mo.


'01 TOYOTA COROLLA

LE, 4 Cyl., Power 12100428


$9,995 or 189 mo.


'04TOYOTACAMRY
LE, Xtra Clean 12120252



$9,995 or 18O/mo




'05 FORD F150 i

Automatic, Low Miles 12120258


9,995 or 1O I/O.






@ VILLAGE TOYOTA


CRYSTAL RIVER


www.villageovoeta.com 35262851 00

*Payments are with $2,000 cash down or trade equity and with approved credit. See dealer for details.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


qm I


$2,199 due at signing (after all offers). Includes security deposit, Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra,
Mileage charge of $0,25/mile over 30,000 miles, MRSP $35,795.36.





w/ Base Preferred Equipment Group
Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For Qualified
Lessees -


.AW /WIMO. 36 MONTH LEASE
$3,319 due at signing (offer all offers), Includes security deposit Tax, title, license, dealer Fees and optional equipment extra,
Mileage charge of $O,25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $64,165,165,36,





w/ Luxury Collection Preferred Equipment Group


Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For Qualified
Lessees


$2,739 due at signing aferall offers). Includes security deposit. Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra,
Mileage charge o$0 25/mile over 30,000 miles, MRSP $43,405.36.





wI Preferred Equipment Group
Ultra Low-eage
Lease For Oualified
Lessees


IW W /MO. 36 MONTH LEASE
$2,839 due at signing (after all offers). Includes security deposit. Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra,
Mileage charge of $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $44,995,36,


V CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED


2007 CADILLAC
DTS
LUXURY COLLECTION
GOLD MIST. LUXURY PACKAGE,
LOCAL ONE OWNER TRADE.
5C3XO42A
$15,488


2009 CADILLAC
CTS
LUXURY COLLECTION
BLACK DIAMOND, SUNROOF,
PERFORMANCE PACKAGE, ONE OWNER,
#C2S245A
s21,988


2008 CADILLAC
DTS
LUXURY COLLECTION
GOLD MIST, LUXURY PACKAGE,
LOCAL ONE OWNER TRADE,
#C382160A
V18,488


2007 PORSCHE
CAYMAN "S",
RED, TIP-TRONIC TRANSMISSION,
LOCAL TRADE,
#C3M1518
s25,988


2007 CADILLAC
STS
GOLD MIST, 31,530 MILES,
LUXURY PERFORMANCE PACKAGE, SUNROOF.
#C383130


2011 MERCEDES-BENZ
C300
BLACK, 18,582 MILES,
LOADED WITH LUXURY,
#C382220
s27,989


S CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED


2010 MINI
COOPER
CONVERTIBLE
MOCHA, 13,309 MILES, LEATHER.
ONE OWNER TRADE.
#C3A094A
S19,588


2008 CADILLAC
CTS
LUXURY COLLECTION
WHITE. 33,815 MILES.
LUXURY PACKAGE. LOADED,
#C382770
s19,988


i i i i i


2012 CADILLAC
CTS
LUXURY COLLECTION
RADIANT SILVER. LUXURY PACKAGE.
SUNROOF, LOADED,
#6383100
s29,488B


2011 CADILLAC
DTS
PREMIUM COLLECTION
SILKY GREEN, SUNROOF, NAVIGATION.
PREMIUM PACKAGE, LOCAL TRADE,
#C3X090A
s35,988


2009 CADILLAC
DTS
LUXURY COLLECTION
GRAY. LUXURY PACKAGE,
40,175 MILES,
#C382230A
,91,188


2009 FORD
GT 500
BLACK. 27,67 MILES.
AWESOME CAR WITH ALL THE POWER
AND LUXURY. #C2S242A
$39,98899


I ,

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ID4040 SW COLLEGE ROAD OCALA, FL 352-732-4700


I


SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013 Cll


r/MO. 36 MONTH LEASE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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New 2012 Honda CMc LX
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New 2013 Honda Fit N
MODEL GEMH3CEXW, EOQUPPED NOT STRIPPED
WITH AUTOMATIC, AC AND CRUISE



New 2012 Honda Accoad LX Sedan
MODEL CP2F3CEW, AUTDMA1IC,POWER PKG.
CRUISE,TRACTION CONTROL AND SO MUCH MORE



New 2012 Honda CMc Hybrid
I0ll. FBEiW M10 TftASSAIaTED4P- b. Ai9OaEC
ASST SRSIEL ESlUflOA IMiLP BUl rMDTHIWC FIEI itI



New 2012 Honda CR-V LX 2WD
MCEL RM3H3CEW COME SEE WIYTHE CR-V IS THE BEST
SULLN COMPACT SUV IN AMERA! SAVE WHILETHEY LAST


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New 2012 Honda Ridgellne RT
VUOILYKl FCEW DW THTIETrW4K INTHESMW. POWER P G,
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New 2012 Honda Crossqour 2WD 24 L EX
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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2012 Chevy Volt
Now's the time to GO GREEN!!!




AND 0% APR for 72 Mo&


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All-New 2013 Chevy Spark 1 LS
Automatic Transmission


2012 Chevy Sonic 5 Dr. LS
MSRP: 315,560


2013 Chevy Mallbu LS
MSRP: $23,440


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2013 Chevy Equinox LS
Stk. #C13135, Auto, 4cyI. MSfP: $25,030


2012 Chevy averse LS
Stk #C12326. Auto, Sets 7 Was S30750


SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013 C13


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DECEMBER'S

15000 WINNER!
BARBARA WILBURN-YORK
YOU COULD BE THIS MONTH'S WINNER!
VISIT ANY CRYSTAL LOCATION FOR DETAILS


F Ri 2M: iES


:iiii;im~ :m


L FREE 2UCE'SSASA
Lij80-84875 XT. 109


E 2O E SSA G EO SPA
800-84-855 XT. 127


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fsassmaasss*


L REE 2R SSAG SPIA
i~i80-54875EXT.3114


FRE 2 HURREOREDMESAE ITHIF; PCA RCN


CRYSTALTOS.COM
CRYSTALAUTOS.COMi


1005 South Suncoast


Blvd. Homosassa


14358 Cortez Blvd. Brooksville


2077 Highway 44W Inverness


352-564-1971
Sales: Monday-Friday 8:00am-8:00pm Saturday 9:00am-7:30pm Sunday-Closed
Service: M, W, F 7:30am-5:30pm T, TH 7:30am-7:00pm Saturday 8:00am-4:00pm Sunday-Closed Body Shop: M-F 7:30am-5:30pm
tSEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. +PRICE INCLUDES S1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. WITH APPROVED CREDIT 'LEASES ARE FOR 39 MONTHS
39,000 MILES FOR THE LIFE OF THE LEASE. 15 CENTS PER MILE OVER $3999 DUE AT SIGNING WITH APPROVED CREDIT. "0%, SPECIAL FINANCE OFFERS AND NO PAYMENTS UNTIL MARCH 2013 ARE AVAILABLE WITH APPROVED CREDIT, NOT EVERYONE WILL
300DOUO QUALIFY. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK. 25 MPG BASED ON EPA HIGHWAY FUEL ECONOMY ESTIMATES.


FE2HO REOE A WIH I
80-54-85 XTI11


L REEs2a4* HA SPA
80058-855 XT 322


L F RS SAG ISPECALI
Li(80-84875 XT 325


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C14 SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


8FT POOL TABLE
3 pc slate, Oak cabinet
$250. (352) 382-1751
A TAURUS 45 PT 1911,
Semi auto pistol. gray &
black never fired, flawless
cond. All extras Included
$850.(352) 344-0355
AMMUNITION .223/5.56
AMMO Wolf Military
Classic. $75 for 100
rounds. 352427-0051
BLUE BURTON CART
BAG W/SUGARMILL CC
LOGO LIKE NEW $75
(352) 382-1971
CLUB CAR
Golf Cart
Excellent Condition
$1,500.
352-527-3125
COLT Single Action
Army, nickel finish
4.75 barrel, 45colt
unfired 3rd generation
mint cond. $1700 obo
352-441-0645
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
CUSTOMS MADE
CROSS BOWS, 150LB
PULL W/SCOPE $350
(352) 628-7633
GOLF CART CLUB CAR
EZ-GO 36volt new
charger, new tires &
brakes. $1200. Golf Cart
parts- top & seats $100
cell (315) 466-2268
SHOT GUN 20 Gauge
JC Higgins pump, adj.
chock, Like new $275
OBO. (352) 476-1113
or (352)-513-5125
SIG SAUER
REVALUATION -C3,
45ACP Night sights, 2
mags. w/case. Like New.
$800.(352) 441-0645

SOLD
Golf Cart Club Car
with utility bed on
back, runs good,
comes w/ charger and
spare tire. Asking $875
TREADMILL
Golds Gym 450.
Electric, used 3 hours.
Retail $900,
asking $225.
(352) 746-0506
WINCHESTER mod. 70
Black Shadow 243WSM.
New in box, Includes
factory scope. $695. Will
take 30-30 lever on trade.
(906) 285-1696




2013 Enclosed Trailers
6x12 with ramp, $1895
call 352-527-0555 **
NEW
HAULMARK 6X12
ENCLOSED TRAILERS
ONLY $1999.
(352) 621-3678




BABY STROLLER Safety
1st, good condition, $20
(352)465-1616
GIRLS BABY 6-12 mos.
shorts, shirts, summer
outfits, 12-18
mos.dresses 31 pieces,
$20. 352400-5650
TODDLER HEADBOARD
Brand New Metal
Headboard, $10
(352)465-1616


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
pp i ifi i


LQQKING for TV
Console cabinets, wood,
floor model style. Free or
cheap. 352-513-4301
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369



RV BAGGAGE DOOR
CATCH Package of 2,
white, rounded. $5.
352-601-0067
WINEGARD SATELLITE
ALIGNMENT COMPASS
Model SC2000, water-
proof, aim to satellite. $8.


AK; UBOXERK pUPPI-S
Boxer Puppies
$450-$600 4-females,
3-males
8 WKS 1/08/2013
352-302-0918


BLUE
Blue is an approxi-
mately 8-y.o. neu-
tered male Cattle
Dog mix, Came to
the shelter because
his family lost their
home. Blue is white
and tan, weighs
about 50 pounds, is a
bit chubby for his size,
which is medium. He
is housebroken, very
friendly and affec-
tionate. The most
striking thing about
him is that he has
very beautiful blue
eyes, which catch
your attention imme-
diately. He loves peo-
ple and wants to be
by your side Is very
obedient and walks
well on a leash. He is
quite laid-back and
would make a great
companion for an
older person.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.
Dachshunds Puppies
Mini, Long hair, females,
black & cream.
Champion blood lines.
$250
(352) 220-4792










WHISPER
Whisper is a beautiful
chestnut brown
female Staffordshire
Terrier, 3 years old,
weighs 55 pounds,
housebroken. She
loves to love her peo-
ple and would make
a great companion.
Greets all with mirth
and enthusiasm.
Obedient, affection-
ate, and a sense of
humor. You can see
amusement on her
face when she smiles.
Has an easy-going
personality, enjoys life
and humankind. Very
intelligent, easy to
train. Spay, micro-
chip, updated
vaccines included in
adoption fee.
Call Anne @
352-201-8664. "



Your World


CHRONIcLE


miniature poodle pups
born 10/16/12 Health
Cert 1 apricot & 1 black
female & 1 black male al-
most potty trained, raised
in our home. $500 cash
call 352419-5662 or
karaluv3@yahoo.com


RED MINIATURE
POODLE PUPS
7 WEEKS MALESS AND
1 FEMALE; $850.
REGISTRATION AND
HEALTH CERTIFI-
CATES; AVAILABLE
12-22-12. CALL
352-419-8233 OR
janiceannross@msn.com
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $350. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net

Livestock


*\.





Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 Income Tax Special
$400 + dep.
(352)446-6273
HOMOSASSA
$350-$550 2 bedroom. 1
bath. also 1 bed 1 bath
lovely setting, quiet
park with pool, com-
munity center,1/2 mile
from boat dock,several
available call
(352)628-4441
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Screen Porch
$375mo 1st, Last &
Sec (352) 382-5661
HOMOSASSA
2 Bd, 2 Ba. fully furn.
352-746-0524
HOMOSASSA
2/1, $400/mo.+ until.
1574 S. Iroquois Ave
(352) 503-7562
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Furn or Non Furn.
9075 S. Breen Terr.
$500 mo (352) 382-7396
HOMOSASSA
2/2, 2 Ig porches &
1 carport. $675
(908) 884-3790
HOMOSASSA
3/2, CHA, $650mo,dep
$650 352-503-6747
(352) 628-1928
INVERNESS
Close In, 1 & 2 BR MH
Clean, Quiet & Com-
fortable 352-212-6182
LECANTO
3/2 on 5 acres, 1st, last &
sec. $500. off Cardinal
(352) 6284482
LECANTO
LEISURE ACRES
3/2 water & garbage incl.
$600mo. (352) 628-5990




BANK
FORECLOSURE
Land-n-Home, 3/2
1500 sq. ft. On 1/ Acre,
paved rd. LOOKS
GOOD, Have financing
if needed, only $2,500
down, $381.44mo. P&I
W.A.C. OR $69,900.
Call 352-613-0587
or 352-621-9183


Crystal River 55+ Park.
2BR/1 BA Carport &
Screened Porch.
Heat/Air $9,500.
352-746-4648
Ask for Brit
HERNANDO
3BR 2BA MH
Ready to move in !
FHA& Owner Financing
avail, call 352-795-1272

HOME-ON-LAND
3/2 Great Shape.
%Acre. Move In Now
$59,900.
Call 352-401-2979,
352-621-3807

Palm Harbor Homes
14 x 50 Mobile Condo
2/2 $29,900
Park Special
800-622-2832 ext 210

REPO'S- REPO'S
REPO'S
WE HAVE REPO'S
CALL 352-621-9181









Jackie 352-634-6340
CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice Large 4br 2ba MH
READY TO MOVE IN!
+Owner Fin. Avail.+
CALL (352) 795-1272
HERNANDO 2/2 DW
On lot, with Shed & Deck
See for yourself at
2562 N. Treasure Pt.
$28,500 obo
352-464-0719
HOMOSASSA
*3/2, Fenced Yard,"
NEW Flooring. NEW AC
$5.000 Down. $435. mo
(352) 476-7077
HOMOSASSA
2ba 1 % ba MH needs
complete rehab. Good
shed, well & septic.
6524 W. Akazian
$12,500 (603) 860-6660




2/2 on Lake Rousseau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent $240/mo.
2003. Used Seasonally
Owner bought a house.
207-546-6115, cell
Adult Park 2/1,
Mobile, heat and air,
nicely furn. large shed,
sreen rm. carport, $8,200
Lot Rent $160 mo.
(352) 287-3729

CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
WINTER SPECIALS *
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
2/2 New Model $59K
2/2 waterfront. $31,000.
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

INGLIS
3/2 Furn., screened porch.
Lot rent $295
Includes amenities.
$15,000 (352) 212-8873
INVERNESS
3/2 Furn.,Appl., Ig screen
porch & shed, Great
cond. $16,000. Call for
appt. (352)364-3747
INVERNESS PARK
55+, 14X60, 2/2, new
roof, all appliances, partly
furn. screen room, shed,
352-419-6476
MOBILE HOME, Fully
Furnished. Everything
stays. Just move in. 2
Sheds, washer/dryer all
appliances. Must Seel
$7,500. (708) 308-3138
Singing Forest
FLORAL CITY
14 x 70, Mobile, 2 Irg.
bedrooms, furnished &
remodeled, heat & air,
carport & shed, Wash/
Dryer, Lot rent $176.
$14,500. 352-344-2420
Waterfront/Homosassa
Westwind Village 55+
Beautifully furnished
Move In Ready, 2/2
2 Scrn rms, dbl door,
refrig./Ice maker
Washer Dryer, Low
mntnly payments,
$19000 obo
(850) 449-1811 Cell


CLASSIFIED



PALM TERRACE
55+ Community,
1997 3BR/2BA 14 x 66,
excel. cond. Shed,
Fl. Rm. Carport & Deck
$16,000. (352) 400-8231




HOMOSASSA
Large 3br 2ba MH
Rent to Own
*Ready to Move In *
Owner Financing Avail.
CALL (352) 795-1272






RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounlyHomeRentals.com
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
59 S. Tyler (BH)............$550
2/1 large rooms and FL room
8160 N. Duval Dr. (CS)... $1,300
3/2/2 pool home, fully furnished
CRYSTAL RIVER
11255 W. Bayslre Dr. ((R).. $850
2/2 waterfront condo, unfurnished
9454 W. Wisconsin C(.. $775
3/2 quiet dead end street
HOMOSASSA
8019 W. Grove St........ $575
2/2 SW mobile on 1.25 Acres
40 Hollyhock Ct. (H)..... $950
3/2/2 Oak Village SMW, spacious home
HERNANDO/INVERNESS
545 E. Alaska Ln.(CH). ....$725
2/2/1 new roof, FL room
854 Pritchard Isl. (Inv.)......$800
2/2 Townhouse on wateront wit comm. pool













Chassahowitzka
3/2 Waterfront DW, $500
2/2, Fenced Yd DW, $500
2/2, House w/ Gar., $600
Sugarmill Woods
3/2/2, Furnished, $900.
AGENT (352) 382-1000




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Hse. Near Twn 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Studio Apt. Completely
Furn. on Hunter's Sprgs,
sun deck, W/D rm. All util.
incl'd.+ boat dock.
$700/mo. 352-372-0507
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE

RAINBOW
GARDEN
APARTMENTS
11850 Rainbow
Garden Circle.
Dunnellon, Fla

(352) 465-3309
TDD #711
OPEN
Mon. & Tues. 9a-4p
Wed. & Thurs. 9a-3p
Friday 9am-Noon
Lunch Noon-lpm

Affordable living for
seniors 62 and older
with or without
children. Rental
Assistance Available
to those who qualify.
1 & 2 Bedrooms
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer."


,
2 B .1BA,$40 -$50


SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013 C15


-IM
CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments
for Rent 352-465-2985
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, Quiet, Clean
incld's water, $575 mo.
Homosassa,1/1, incld's
water $375 mo.
Lecanto 2/1, quiet,clean,
scrn porch, $525mo.
352-257- 6461, 563-2114
INVERNESS
2/1, large rms, W/D h-up.
Tenant pays elec & H20.
$570. Cl John 726-3849



CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret Harbour
Apts. Newly remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. IncI Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037



LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza, Office/
Retail, CR 486, 900 sf. @
$700+ util. & sales tax. 1_
mo. Free w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801



CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Condo Furnished,
ground floor, single-story,
carport, heated pool,
no pets. $650.
(352) 746-9880
CITRUS HILLS
2/22 Townhouse
condo, full appliances,
carport, Citrus Hills
membership included
Prudential Florida
Showcase Properties
call 352-476-8136
INVERNESS
2/2/1 Lg Condo
Waterfront Community
with heated pool.
Non-smoker, pet restrict.
$665. mo 317-442-1063
INVERNESS
Nice Waterfront story
Condo 2/2%.Great loc.
First, last, Sec $700 mo.
Avail 3/13(352) 302-4546




Citrus Springs
2/2/1 $650/mo
352-746-7990
HOMOSASSA
2/2 $500 MO NO
SMOKING & NO PETS
814-566-8708
HOMOSASSA
2/2 $550 mo. incl. garb.
Pets? No smoking. 1st
& sec. 352-212-4981
INVERNESS
2/1, Clean, W/D Hk-up,
No pets, $550mo. + Sec
(352) 220-4818




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1 Country Home on
stilts,w/fenced yard.
$600 + Utilities.
Call 920-922-6800



HOMOSASSA
2 BR, Seasonal, Avail.
Now. 641-660-3312
SUGARMILL WDS
furn, 2/2/1 $675 mnth
River Links Realty
352-628-1616




A NICE HOME IN
THE HAMMOCKS/
SMW 3/2/2
Heat. S Pool, FP
maint. free. $1,000
(352) 422-1933
BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, Fresh paint, appl's
Flooring $475. mo.
352-302-3987
BLACK DIAMOND
Newer 3/2/2 $1,150 Bob
@ Coldwell Banker
352-634-4286


rh-Dw-7'


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers &
dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179




Maximum Auto Repair
& Performance
Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts,
Classic car restoration, tires
new & used, Performance
engines. (352) 419-6549




Maximum Auto Repair
& Performance
Repairs, 4x4 lifts,
Exhausts, Classic car
restoration, tires new &
used, Performance
engines.(352) 419-6549




Care for the Elderly
& Sick in your home, 15
yrs exp. Errands, Appts.
Cleaning 352-637-6729
HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping Dr.
appts, errands, etc. Hablo
Espanol 813-601-8199
NEED A GIRL FRIDAY?
Elder care, House
cleaning, Earrands
*Reasonable Rates*
(352) 794-6543




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518


JEFF'S Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374



AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551, 584-3730
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping Dr.
appts, errands, etc. Hablo
Espanol 813-601-8199



COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
S352-302-6838 *



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



*BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
*k 352 422-7279 *



DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696



Install, Restretch, Repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl Car-
pet, Laminent, Lic#4857
Mitch, (352) 201-2245


1 CALL & RELAX! 25vrs
Exp in 100% property
maint & all repairs, call
H&H Services today!
lic#37658 352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
sFAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
eFAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *

HANDYMAN DAVE
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways,, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352- 726-9570
HANDYMAN DAVE
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways,, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352- 726-9570




Tutoring available T F
after 3:30, S & S after
12. You set rate.
(352) 212-9371


SBat



The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




LARRY'S TRACTOR *
SERVICE FINISH GRAD-
ING & BUSHHOGGING
*352-302-3523***
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120



GOT LEAVES
Let our DR VAC
Do the work!
Call 352-502-6588
LAWNCARE N MORE
Yard Clean-up, leaves
bushes, hauling
352-726-9570
Winter Clean Up, Leaves,
Power Washing & More
Call Coastal Lawn Care
(352) 601-1447



AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small engine
It's Tune Up time.
352-220-4244


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS CLEAN
UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
HAULING
FREE ESTIMATES
scrap metals haul for
FREE (352) 344-9273
JEFF'S Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374



Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Robert G. Vigliotti LLC
Painting
Int/Ext FREE
ESTIMATES 35 yrs exp.
call 508-314-3279



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE CLEANING
& PAINTING
352-341-3300
Robert G. Vigliotti LLC
Painting
Int/Ext FREE
ESTIMATES 35 yrs exp.
call 508-314-3279


Winter Clean Up, Leaves,
Power Washing & More
Call Coastal Lawn Care
(352) 601-1447


-I

All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713





MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lie/Ins.




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.





Youir\\orltd i IrI

Need a .job
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


Classifieds


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838 *



A TREE SURGEON
Lie. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. (352)302-5641
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's LAND CLEARING
& TREE SERVICE
Complete tree & stump
removal hauling, demo
& tractor work. 32 yrs.
exp. (352) 220-9819
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free est.
352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


'1 Dh, 1 o111L
Y% uI V. \'1 ll lilrst.




Classifieds


1-122 LaughingStock Internationa Inc, Dst by Un Iversal UCI ,-k tor Ubs, 2013

"I can't find my baseball anywhere."






Thank You For 15 Years, of:Votesl


You've Got It!






Somebody







Wants






It!


~N ~


C R U S c U N T Y


CHKONICILE



(352) 563-5966


www.chronicleonline.com


640980B







C16 SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013


@000DM1Q


WORDY GURDY BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Atlas page remnant (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Add a hue to a broken-arm holder (1) they will fit in the letter
-- squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Tiger skin marking complaint (1) syllables in each word.
S2013UFS Dist byUniv Uclickfor UFS
4. Geek made the view out of focus (1)


5. "X Factor" mogul Simon's bath cloths (2)


6. Automobile wheel guard seller (2)


7. Actor Crowe's marinara mollusks (2)


S3aSSSfl STI1SSl L HO(INA A HGNH3 9 ST MA1O ST'IlMOo *
1- aIT21 3IN 3El 3adI JI 3dII'S "e NdS IN II dVHiS dV "'I
1-12-13 S[AASNV


S :1,,Jil:71-T


I Mu s
W


Cit.Hills/Brentwood
2/2/2 on golf course.
Club included $900/mo
516-991-5747
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
Water Incl. CHA, $496.
352-220-2447 212-2051
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/2, $750. mo + sec.
850-371-1568
HERNANDO
2 bedroom. 2 bath single
family home with garage,
screened patio, & com-
munity pool/clubhouse
privileges. $875/month,
980-285-8125
HOMOSASSA
2/1 Duplex, $475;
3/2/2 House $635.
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 house, $700.
River Links Realty
352-628-1616
Invern. Highlands
2/2/1, City Water Excel.
Loc. $675. 352-860-2554
INVERNESS
2/1 Great Location, 55+
community, Bring boat &
fishing gear. $695
(352) 344-1380
INVERNESS
3/2/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352- 601-2615 OR
352-201-9427




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225
RIVER HAVEN
Unfurn. Villa 2/2/2 +
Den & Dock on Grand
Canal $1,000 mo 1st,
last, sec. 1 yr. Ise min.
good credit Req. Lawn
serve. Incl'd Call Bill
(727) 381-1975




BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV & W/D
WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611
INVERNESS
Rm w/ Priv. ba, $85. wk
no smoke 352-502-6302




FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1 Furn.
$950. 352-419-4421




CRYSTAL RIVER
Warehouse for Rent
Free standing, garage
area, 1,440sf, $100-$550
352-634-0129

-elUstt


ESTATE SALE in Nature
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site and a separate gated
storage lot; plus almost
new 5th-wheel with
slides, screened gazebo,
and storage building. All
for $79,900. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441


From mobiles to
mansions,
From Gulf to Lakes,
give me a call,
I sell 'em all!
352-422-4137
nancv.wilson(a
vahoo.com

Nancy J. Wilson
Realtor@
Broker-Associate
SRES@GRI
Waybright Real Estate,
Inc.


MOTIVATED SELLER
wants this aone!!!
6 Acres w Big SHOP,
Nice 2/2/2 House,
porches Barns, pond,
pvd rd, Concrete
drive. Reduced!
$114, 900 MLS 357108.
www.crosslandrealty.
corn 352 726 6644



PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY



PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY



Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial







A
Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


Quiet Country Settina
3/ 2on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area
only 20 Min. to Ocala
$129,900 Call
352-302-6784 for appt.
UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND YOU
A VIEW TO LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.corn
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

^J^^^^-I


CITRUS

SPRINGS
3/2/2, 2 yr old Pool home
in imacculate condition,
Landscaped backyard.
$125.000 Priced to sell!
CALL (570) 412-5194




PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room for
everything! 4/3 %2 w/7 car
garage/workshop & in-law
suite on 5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164




Beverly Hills 3 bedroom.
1 bath. OWNER FIN.
W/$5000 DN $822mo
NO CREDIT CK Just
remodeled,new roof, tile,
block, w/sep. 2car garage
(352) 793-7223
OPEN HOUSE
3 S. Jackson St
1/11 & 1/12, 11am-3pm
(352) 422-2084




CITRUS HILLS
GOLF COURSE HOME
3/3/2+ $173K.
BY APPT ONLY
(216) 849-3447
HERNANDO
Citrus Hills Pool Home
4/3/2+, circular drive,
1 acre lot, below $200k
352-527-7856




ARBOR LAKES
**OPEN HOUSE"*
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR &
fenced back yard!
Gated Comm. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista TrI
(352) 419-7418




INVERNESS
Block home 2br, Iba
w/ porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres.
$130,000 Call Buzz
352-341-0224 or
David 607-539-7872


PERFECT for Ass. Liv.
Fac. 4BR/4BA, on 2.2
Tranquil Acres, blocks
from Lake Rosseau
Plantation Realty
Charlene Pilgrim,
Realtor 352-464-2215




GRAND 2006
CUSTOM HOME
www.81woodfield.
CanBYours.com
81 Woodfield,
Homosassa
OPEN HOUSE Sat & Sun
11AM to 3PM
3 Bed/2 Bath/3 Car Gar
Salt Water Pool & Morel
$339K, MLS#356914
Realty Connect
(352) 212-1446
OWNER SACRIFICE
$100,000.4 yrs. Ago,
*Selling for $29.900*
CALL 352-564-0207
Forest View/Gated 55+
The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558




HOMOSASSA SPRINGS






2/2/2 Great Country
home on 2 % acre
landscaped lot, in great
neighborhood. Move in
Ready! Call for appt.
126K 352-503-6511






4/2/3 HEATED POOL
lots of extras!
SELLER MOTIVATED!
reduced to 210k
352-688-6500 or
352-212-5023


B^


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty,
Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


GAIL STEARNS
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298

Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available

HAPPY 2013!
I'm Selling
2 PROPERTIES
A WEEK
I NEED LISTINGS!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515


CLASSIFIED
















Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

*Buy or Sell*

I'll Represent
YOU

ERA
American Realty


WaeEBHEnt
Homes^^^


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near KINGS
BAY $425,000. Make
Offers 352-563-9857
DUNNELLON
Here is that home on
Lake Rousseau that you
have always wanted! 2br
1 % ba on 1.43 acres
w/168ft lake frontage.
Completely remodeled all
new interior & windows.
No Flood Insurance!
Priced reduced from
$369,000 to $169,000
Call Bernie
(352) 563-0116

YOUR "High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SCAN OR GO TO
WWW.
BestN'Tu-reCoast
Properties.com
"To view my
great waterfront
properties"





"Heatherwood 581"
access to game reserve
& Tillus Hill, 2.42 Acres
well, septic, no impact
fees, $30,000 by
owner, sold as is
(352) 422-0435
% ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact fee
credit, high and dry,
trees, $11,000 obo
(352) 795-3710
Owner Financing
5 ACRES FLORAL CITY
Pasture Land
9858 S. Istachatta Rd
2012 Taxes $115 w/
Agricultural Greenbelt,
Water/Elec/Barn/fence
$89K. MLS#354831
Realty Connect
(352) 212-1446




14 Gallon
Marine portable, Gas
Tank, 10ft hose w/ pump
syphon handle, $75.
(352) 564-2746
BOAT TRANSIT
TRAILER Very Ig., dbl.
axles up to 33 ft. Any
boat type! $1800 or
OBO (813) 244-3945




1988 27 ft Sportscraft
Coastal Fisherman,
cabin cruiser, $10k
OBO (813)-244-3945
5HP OUTBOARD
MOTOR LIKE NEW $385
(352) 341-2661 or
352-586-7437



MUST SELL


BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motor, AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth finder,
2001 Rolls float on
trailer worth $1000.
Comes w/spare motor
Has service manual,
2nd owner $2500
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855

WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com


27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453




For Sale ,,,
BRIDGEVIEW
381 KWT
2011 Bridgeview 381
KWT 38' destination
trailer asking $28,900
OBO 4
slides,ac,42'tv,freplace,isand
kitchen /corian
countertops,residential 4
burner
stove/oven,residential
frig,mw,queen bed
/storage, queen sleeper
sofa,recliner maxair
covers,awnings front &
side. like new
610-597-9936
chrisda47@gmail.com
ITASCA MERIDIAN
36 Ft, 2005 Motor Home
350HP Cat Diesel 55K
miles, no smoke/pets
6 Michelan Tires, New
2010 qn w/sleep No.
mattress & overhead
fan. W/D combo $71,000
obo. (352) 419-7882
NATIONAL RV
2006 Tropical One
owner,34ft, 26000
miles,no smoke/pets,
300HP Cummins diesel,2
slides, 6 new tires, 3yr
warranty,many extras.
$87000. Well maintained.
352-341-4506




5TH WHEEL
33FT
GOOD CONDITION
MUST SELL
(423) 202-0914
FOREST RIVER
2010, Surveyor, Sport
189, 20 ft. Travel Trailer,
1 slide, w/AC, qn. bed,
awning, pwr. tonque jack,
corner jacks, microwave,
equilizing hitch, $10,500,
reduced to $9800
(352) 382-1826
HIGH LINE
1999, 32ft, Deluxe, 12'
slide out. new 22' awn-
ing, 55+ park, can be
moved. Was asking
$9,000, Sell $6,900 ex-
cel. shape 231-408-8344
HI-LO TRAVEL
TRAILER 2003, tow lite
model 22-03t,exc. cond.
$6000 obo 352-422-8092
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides,
kg bdlike new, 60amp
serv. NADA $29K asking
$25K obo 352-382-3298
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945




4 Tires
215- 65/17
10,000 miles left
$60 for Set
(352) 628-1126
New Headlight
assembly for 1994
Honda Accord
(352) 726-0437
SILVERADO 5TH
WHEEL TAILGATE $100
&
VINYL RANGER BED
COVER $75
(352) 637-2982



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
SALE LAYAWAY
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition, Title,
No Title, Bank Lien,
No Problem, Don't Trade
it in. We Will Pay up to
$25K Any Make, Any
Model. 813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ



BUICK
2007, Lucerne, CXL
55K miles, Leather
$13,500. obo
Call Troy (352)621-7113
CADILLAC
'02, Best STS, Black
on Black, sunroof
78K mi., new tires
$7,500. (352) 628-1126
CADILLAC
2003 CTS, Must see.
Luxury car at an
affordable price.
Call 352-628-4600
for an appointment.
CHEVROLET
2002, Camaro Z28
$9,750.
352-341-0018
FORD
'05, Thunderbird,
37k miles,
$24,000.
(352) 465-4015
FORD
2001 COBRA MUSTANG
CONV. 5 SPEED,
LEATHER MUST SEE
CALL 352-628-4600
For More Info
FORD
2005, Five Hundred LMT,
40K miles, leather, V6
$9,980
Call Troy 352-621-7113
FORD


2006 Focus ZXW, SE
4DR, WGN. 85k miles
$5,800 obo
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
HYUNDAI
2006 Elantra, GLS 90K
miles, Ilkenew, 4 DR,
auto. $6,800
Call Troy 352-621-7113
KIA
'99, Sportage, Conv.
Top, low miles,
Runs great.
CALL 352-628-4600
For pricing.
LINCOLN
1998, MARK VIII
Automatic, COLD A/C
CALL 352-628-4600
For an appointment
to see!


2011 CRV LX, 19K miles,
Ilkenew, 4 Cyl. $19,950
Call Troy 352-621-7113
LINCOLN
'95, Town Car
140k miles $2,250
(352) 628-1126
MITSUBISHI
'01, Eclipse GT,
sunroof, black w/ tan
leather int. runs great
$2,500. 352-464-0719
MITSUBISHI
Mirage 2000 2dr. coupe
5spd, 107k, 36mpg, cd &
air. Just serviced. $1850
(352) 422-1026
OLDS MOBILE
'95 SEDAN, automatic,
good cond. $1,450
352-637-2588
OLDSMOBILE '99
Cutlass, custom, 4 DR,
loaded, good mi., V6,
cruise, tilt, gar. clean
$3,650. (352) 212-9383
SALE LAYAWAY
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
SATURN ION
2007, 4 cyl, 4dr. gold,
auto, AC,CD, 27k miles
exc. cond. many extras
$8300 obo 352-382-0428
TOYOTA
2000, Camry LE
V6, 183K miles Super
Clean $5,800. obo
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
TOYOTA
2000, Camry, Good fuel
economy, 4 door
transportation.
CALL 352-628-4600
for pricing & details.
TOYOTA
2007, Yarls, 59K miles,
2 DR, H/B $7,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113




** CHEVY-
95 Impala SS
Rare Collector Car
LT-lengine, Superb
Condition $8,500
(352) 249-7678
1971 CHEVELLE
CONVERTIBLE
stunning, 40k+ in-
vested, fully restored,
350 auto, buckets, con-
sistant show winner,
high end stereo, red w/
white top & interior











with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
4 4


CHEVROLET
1964 TON PICKUP
35kmi. 283 V8, 3 sp
Column shift, $8995 OBO
(352) 464-3106
FORD
1967 MUSTANG 99%
org. No body work, rust
free, great cond. 71k mi
$13500 352-447-1823
MGB 1973
Red convertible, show
room cond. Everything
works. $6200
(765) 336-9590




CHEVROLET
2003, Avalanche
$6,300
352-341-0018
CHEVY C20
1984, LB, solid body &
bed, good glass, interior
needs tic, dual exhaust,
350v8, Turbo 400, Holly 4
barrel, needs ps pump
$1400 obo 352-628-7243
pls leave message
Dodge Ram
2008 Big Horn 5.7 Hemi
30k Great cond. $19,000
Call Fred
(352) 628-6470
FORD
2003 F250
$6,495.
352-341-0018
FORD RANGER '03
EDGE, 81k V6 auto.,
Very good cond. $8500.
(352) 419-7703
SALE LAYAWAY
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
TOYOTA
2004, 4 Runner Sport
2WD, 94K ml, Leather
$12,800. obo
Call Troy 352-621-7113




CADILLAC
2007, Escalade,
44k miles, Luxury NAV,
$29,500.
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
CHEVROLET
2002, Silverado
$3,990
352-341-0018
CHEVY TRAIL-
BLAZER LT 05
exc. cond. asking $7000
obo, in Hernando
(904) 923-2902
JEEP
2011 Patriot 2.0L, 5
speed, FWD, a/c, power
windows/doors, white,
12k, like new, $12,750
352 513-4100






1978 MIDAS RV
90k miles, 26ft, sleeps 4
**$1500 obo
352-212-7032


JEEP
2004, Wrangler X 4WD,
Only 57K miles,
Hard Top $13,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113
JEEP WRANGLER
1990,New motor, no rust,
Arizona jeep. $4000.
(352) 586-8396



FORD
1995, E-150
Conversion Van,
$2,850.
352-341-0018




NEW POLARIS
RANGERS
AS LOW AS 7888.
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS
2002, SPORTSMAN
ATV. 4X4, SERVICED
AND READY FOR
HUNTING SEASON.
$2995
(352) 621-3678



BMW
1980 R100T, 1000 CC
excellent condition
$2,800
(352)346-5960
Harley Davidson
2002, 883 Sportser,
new tires & saddlebags
17k mi., $4,500. obo
(607) 968-4269


HARLEY-DAVIDSON
2006 FLHTPI, low miles,
all service recorded,
GREAT looking, good
title, runs strong. Asking
$10,500. (352)513-4294
HONDA
2005, VTX 1300CC
3 TO CHOOSE FROM
YOU PICK $4,888.
(352) 621-3678
HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley,1100CC, Chrome,
bags, trade?, 70mpg
$2,800. Crystal River
(727) 207-1619
KYMCO
2009, 125 cc. Looks and
drives great Only $995
(352) 621-3678
VICTORY
2005, KINGPIN
2 TONE, STAGE ONE,
LOADED WITH
OPTIONS
ONLY $7888.
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
2005, ROYAL STAR
TOUR DELUXE, READY
FOR A ROAD TRIP
ONLY $6688.
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
2007 STRATOLINER
1800CC LOADED WITH
OPTIONS A REAL TOUR
BIKE ONLY $5889.
(352) 621-3678


919-0117 SA/TH CRN
Brehm, Timothy 2012CA 1584 NOFS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION:
CASE NO.: 2012CA1584
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff
vs.
TIMOTHY J. BREHM A/K/A TIMOTHY BREHM; DEBRAK. BREHM A/K/A DEBRA BREHM
A/K/A DEBRA K. KILLIP-BREHM A/K/A DEBRA KAY KILLIP-BREHM F/K/A DEBRA KAY
KILLIP A/K/A DEBRA K. KILLIP A/K/A DEBRA KILLIP; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DEBRA BREHM
A/K/A DEBRA BREHM A/K/A DEBRA K. KILLIP-BREHM A/K/A DEBRA KAY KILLIP-BREHM
F/K/A DEBRA KAY KILLIP A/K/A DEBRA K. KILLIP A/K/A DEBRA KILLIP; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 21st
day of December, 2012, and entered in Case No. 2012CA1584, of the Circuit Court
of the 5TH Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMER-
ICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and TIMOTHY J. BREHM A/K/A TIMOTHY BREHM; DEBRA K.
BREHM A/K/A DEBRA BREHM A/K/A DEBRA K. KILLIP-BREHM A/K/A DEBRA KAY
KILLIP-BREHM F/K/A DEBRA KAY KILLIP A/K/A DEBRA K. KILLIP A/K/A DEBRA KILLIP; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF DEBRA BREHM A/K/A DEBRA BREHM A/K/A DEBRA K.
KILLIP-BREHM A/K/A DEBRA KAY KILLIP-BREHM F/K/A DEBRA KAY KILLIP A/K/A DEBRA K.
KILLIP A/K/A DEBRA KILLIP; UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROP-
ERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash electronically at www.citrus.realforeclose.com, the Clerk's website for
on-line auctions at, 10:00 AM on the 24th day of January, 2013, the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:
LOTS 172, 173 AND 174, RIVER GARDENS UNIT NO. 3, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 170, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA. EXCEPT; A PORTION OF LOT 172, RIVER GARDENS UNIT NO. 3, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 170, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CIT-
RUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS; COMMENCE AT
THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 172; THENCE N. 6800'00" E. 25.00 FEET; THENCE
S. 3127'44" E. 152.07 FEET; THENCE S. 6800'00" W. 50.00 FEET; THENCE N. 2200'00" W.
150.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN OR-
DER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU,
TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINA-
TOR, TELEPHONE (352) 341-6700, 110 N APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS FL, 34450, AT
LEAST 7 DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY
UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEAR-
ANCE IS LESS THAN 7 DAYS. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711.
Dated this 8th day of January, 2013.
By: /s/Bruce K. Fay, Florida Bar No. 97308
Submitted by:
Choice Legal Group, P.A.
1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120,Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309
Telephone: (954) 453-0365, Facsimile:(954) 771-6052
Toll Free:1-800-441-2438
DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE
PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516
eservice@clegalgroup.com
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle January 12 & 17, 2013
10-62822


285-0112 SACRN
Sale Date01/31
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Superior Towing/C&M
Towing gives Notice of
Foreclosure of Lien and in-
tent to sell these vehicles)
on 1/31/2013. 09-00 am at
36 NE 8th St., Ocala, FL
34470, pursuant to subsec-
tion 713.78 of the Florida
Statutes. Superior Towing





287-0112 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law, pursuant to
Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of:
GJF MEDIATIONS
located at 6510 N.
Lakeside Drive, Her-
nando, Florida 34442 in
the County of Citrus, in-
tends to register the said
name with the Division of
Corporations of the
Florida Department of
StateTallahassee, FL.
Dated at Hernando, FL,
this 7th day of January,
2013.
/s/Gasper J. Ficarrotta,
owner
Published one (1) time
in the Citrus County
Chronicle Jan. 12, 2013


/C&M Towing reserves the
right to accept or reject any
and/or all bids.
1937 CHEVY TRUCK
21GC122971
January 12, 2013

286-0112 SACRN
2/5 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given





288-0112 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law, pursuant to
Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of:
Laura Sweet Photography
located at 5531 S Peace-
ful Pt. Homosassa, Florida
34446, in the County of
Citrus, intends to register
the said name with the
Division of Corporations of
the Florida Department of
StateTallahassee, FL.
Dated at Hernando, FL,
this 7th day of January,
2013.
/s/ Laura Sweet, owner
Published one (1) time
in the Citrus County
Chronicle Jan. 12, 2013


that on 2/05/13 at 10:30
am, the following vehicle
will be sold for towing &
storage charges pursuant
to F.S. 715.109:
2000 SUZI
#2S3TE52V6Y6112634
Sale will be held at
Glen's Towing, 6291
Georgian Rd. Homosassa
Springs, FL 34447. Lienor
reserves the right to bid.
January 12, 2013





289-0112 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law, pursuant to
Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of:
Executive Beader
located at 11 Morning
Glory Ct, Homosassa,
Florida 3444 6, in the
County of Citrus, intends
to register the said name
with the Division of
Corporations of the
Florida Department of
StateTallahassee, FL.
Dated at Homosassa, FL,
this 7th day of January,
2013.
/s/Rachel L. Holmes
owner
Published one (1) time
in the Citrus County
Chronicle Jan. 12, 2013


OPEN HOUSE SAT & SUN 11AM-3PM


US19 to US98 (W. Ponce De Leon Blvd.) (L) Oak Park Blvd.
(L) Corckwood Blvd.(R) Woodfield Cir.
www.81 woodfield.CanBYours.com
2006 CUSTOM BUILT/HOME
3 Bedrm/2 bath/3 car gar /salt water pool.
S Many custom options! MLS#356914
Realty Connect (352) 212-1446
www.thefloridadream.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CImus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Where do you find America's freshest
lineup? You'll find these fuel-efficient
vehicles in a Nick Nicholas Ford
Showroom near you. Exclusive
EcoBoost technology delivers efficient
power. And now, Nick Nickolas Ford
offers 4 models EPA rated at 40 mpg
highway or better. So you can go further.


i S...


2013
C-MAX HYBRID
RATED AT UP TO
47 HWY
47MPG2


2013
FUSION HYBRID
RATED AT UP TO
4 HWY
47MPG2


wv


2013 FOCUS
RATED AT UP TO
O HWY
40y MPG5


2013 FIESTA
RATED AT UP TO

40MP
M-PG


2013 FIESTA SE
M SRP .................................................. 19,180
Nick Nicholas Ford Discount......................280
Retail Customer Cash.........................-....$500
3 Payments On Us Special
Retail Customer Cash........ .............$1,000

$1 7,400






2013 EDGE SE
M SRP........... ...................................... 29,795
Nick Nicholas Ford Discount........ ...........-796
Retail Customer Cash.... ..........................-500
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash........-1,000
Retail Bonus Customer Cash....... .............-500
3 Payments On Us Special
Retail Customer Cash..................................$1,500

$25,499
All For
Pre-Owr
... . a--


2009 FORD FUSION SE
Extra clean sunroof. NPR632
$18,968


-Owned


2011 FORD FIESTA SES 2010 FORD ESCAPE XLT
Loaded loaded, loaded. N3C057D The right size SUV. NP5767A
$19,668 $19,968


W N2C272 W
2012 FUSION SE
M SRP...................................................... 25,900
S ecial Added Discount...............................-450
Nick Nicholas Ford Discount..........-1,201
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash.....-1,750
3 Payments on Us Special
Retail Bonus Cash.....................................-1,500

$20,999






2012 F-150 4X4 SUPER CREW
M SRP.........................................................38,335
Nick Nicholas Ford Discount..........................-1,936
Retail Customer Cash.......... ................. -1,250
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash........-1,250
3 Payments On Us Special
Retail Customer Cash ........................... -1,500

$32,399


d Certified
ned Vehicles
-- kAl;L.I-


2012 FOCUS SE
M SRP............................. .. ............ 20,215
Special Added Discount..........................-....35
ck Nicholas Ford Discount..................-1,181
Retail Customer Cash...... ...............-1,000
3 Payments On Us Special
Retail Customer Cash....... ..............-1,000

$16 999






2012 F-250 LARIAT 4X4 CREW CAB
M SRP.......... ...................................... 54,735
XLT Diesel Discount......................................-1,500
Nick Nicholas Ford Discount......... .......-3,636
Retail Customer Cash.......... ................-1,500
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash........-1,000
3 Payments On Us Special
Retail Custom er Cash............................................-1,500

$45,599


* 172-point inspection by factory-trained technicians
* 7-year/100,000-mile powertrain warranty coverage**
*12-month/12,000-mile Ford Comprehensive Limited Warranty Coverage**
*Vehicle history report *24/7 Roadside Assistance

**as. S^S7M


2009 FORD FUSION SEL
The import beater for real. N2T247A
$19,668


2011 FORD FLEX SEL
Room for the whole family. N2C292A
$25,668


2010 FORD MUSTANG GT
Just reduced. NP5748
$25,968


2011 FORD EDGE LIMITED
Don't miss this limited. N3TO80A
$29,968


2010 FORD EDGE LIMITED
Vista roof and nav. N2T351 F
$29,968


2010 FORD F150 LARIAT 5UPER CREW 2010 FORD EDGE LIMITED
Extra sharp lariat crew cab. N2T296A Don't miss this loaded limited. N2T374A
$31,668 $31,968


Certified Pre-Owned
*Notall buyers will quali for Ford Credit limited-term financing on select vehicles APR


2008 SUZUKI SX4 2003 FORD CROWN VICTORIA LX 2007 CHEVY UPLANDER EXT IT 2006 FORD EXPLORER XLS 2005 FORD MUSTANG 2003 JEEP WRANGLER 4X4 2008 SATURN VUE XE
Super economy. N2T351Q Great car. N2C294B Room for the whole family. NP5642B Nice explorer for not much money. N3C032A Low mileage pony car. N2T410A Extra clean and ready to tow. NP5777D Extra clean. N2C249A
$9,968 $9,868 $12,668 $13,968 $13,968 $14,968 $15,668




2006 JEEP COMMANDER 4X4 LIMITED 2008 MITSUBISHI ENDEAVOR SE 2007 MAZDA MX-5MIATA CONVT 2009 PONTIAC TORRENT 2012 JEEP COMPASS SPORT 2006 FORD FI150 ARIAT SUPER CREW 2010 CHEVY MALIBU LT
This is a must see. N3T074B Only 34k miles. N2C296A Affordable top down fun. N3T056P Looking for new home & loves kids. N2T215M Only 6k miles. N3T164B This one has the wow factor. N2T209P Only 22k miles and loaded. N2C161A
$17,968 $18,968 $18,668 $18,968 $19,968 $19,968 $19,968




2008 FORD MUSTANG BULLITT 2008 FORD F150 SUPER CREW 2005 FORD F250 XLT 4X4 CREW 2011 DODGE RAM 1500 BIG HORN 2008 FORD F350 LARIAT DUAllY CREW 2012 CADILLAC SRX 2011 FORD SHEIBYGT500 CONVERT
Limited and collectible Bullitt. N2T153E One owner local trade. N2T307B Loaded diesel in yellow. NP5572D Loaded SLT, CREW CAB. NP5786D Loaded 24k mile dually. NP5744A Spoil yourself. N2T41 2D Only 700 yes 700 miles. N3T206D
$23,968 $23,968 $23,968 $25,668 $30,668 $39,968 $46,668
Inglis Dunnellon
.Beverly Hills00
Crystal
River 4"4 nverness
Floral City
Homosass Nick Nicholas
a Springs Hwy. 98
Michelle Russo Spring Hwy. 50
Salesperson Hill Brooksville
of the Month


I1


K


come vvWith:
-Iou,
POMf


2011 FORD ESCAPE XLS 2008 FORD EDGE LIMITED
Only 10k miles. NN2T313A One owner limited. N3TO99A
$21,668 $22,668


SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013 C17


I


I


Family Owned
& Opperated


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DECEMBER'S $5000 WINNER!
BARBARA WILBURN-YORK
YOU COULD BE THIS MONTH'S WINNER!
VISIT ANY CRYSTAL LOCATION FOR DETAILS


2013 NISSAN
ALTIMA


'$19999+

$109 OR 11901
Model# 13013, Vin# 136690 1 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE, $3,99 DUE AT SIGNING.


2013 NISSAN
SENTRA


$16,999

$179 2 APR
Model# 12113, Vin# 631012 1 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE, $3,999 DUE AT SIGNING.


2012 NISSAN
VERSA


$12,9999

Model# 11462, Vin# 287990
1 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE, $3,99S DUEAT SIGNI,


2012 NISSAN
FRONTIER


$15,999
$149R QA
Model# 31112, Vin# 461839
1 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE S3999 DUE AT SIGNING.


2012 NISSAN
ROGUE


$17,999
$139 OKW
Model# 22112, Vin# 613231
1 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT T1111S CE, $3999DUE ATSIGNING.


2012 NISSAN
MURANO


FRE24HU RCRDDMSSG ITHIFO&PRCN
800-54-875 EXT 610


$2190 Q
Model# 23112, Vi*n 120649
1 OR MORE AVAIRABLE AT THIS PRICE S3999 DUEATSIGNINO .


I U


D~uI
mu.:


\ CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:
L 800-440-90S4


CRYSTAL
r a NISSAN
352-564-1971
937 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL
CRYSTALAUTOS.COM


Sales: Monday-Friday 8:00am-8:00pm Saturday 9:00am-7:30pm Sunday-Closed
Service: M, W, F 7:30am-5:30pm T, TH 7:30am-7:00pm Saturday 8:00am-4:00pm Sunday-Closed Body Shop: M-F


7:30am-5:30pm


+PRICE INCLUDES $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX TAG TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50.
WAC. *LEASES ARE FOR 39 MONTHS 39,000 MILES FOR THE LIFE OF THE LEASE. 15 CENTS PER MILE OVER. $3999 DUE AT SIGNING WITH APPROVED CREDIT. **0%, SPECIAL FI-
NANCE OFFERS AND NO PAYMENTS UNTIL MARCH 2013 ARE AVAILABLE WITH APPROVED CREDIT, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. OFFERS CANNOT BE COMBINED. PICTURES ARE
FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


C18 SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 2013


3DOUJ


I,1 1
:41M