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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 01-06-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02992

Full Text



Getting started: NFL playoffs begin Saturday /B1


CITRU-S CO U N T Y






O N www.chronicleonline.com


Mostly cloudy; showers
move into the area.
PAGE A4


JANUARY 6, 2013 Florida's Best Communit


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VOLUME 118 ISSUE 152


NATIONAL NEWS:


Women face combat


Infantry now shut to women, but do they want war?


Divided GOP
The Republican Party
seems as divided and
angry as ever./Page A9

COMMENTARY:


Charters
Guest writer Greg
Biance discusses
the privatization of
public schools./Page Cl

OPINION:
More letters
Read additional letters
to the editor./Pages
AlO and All


State history
Who is this man, and
why does he have a
statue in St. Augustine?
Find out./Page A13
SIKORSKI'S ATTIC:


Bronzed
Expert John Sikorski
shows the wisdom of
this find./Page E4
HOMEFRONT:


Bed down
Twist up your own
mattress or buy a new
bed./HomeFront

Annie's Mailbox ......A14
Classifieds ................ D4
Crossword ...........A14
Editorial ............ C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ................B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies ................. A14
O bituaries ................A6
Together............... A16


S I ILLl 5 2007!I o


Associated Press
WASHINGTON If or
when the Pentagon lets
women become infantry


troops the country's
front-line warfighters -
how many women will want
to?
The answer is probably


not many
Interviews with a dozen
female soldiers and
Marines showed little inter-
est in the toughest fighting


jobs. They believe they'd be
unable to do them, even as
the Defense Department
inches toward changing its
rules to allow women in di-
rect ground-combat jobs.
In fact, the Marines asked
women last year to go


s in a bucket


Citypark

open to all

faces deluge

ofaccounting,

funding issues

NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS In the
saga of Whispering Pines
Park and the ongoing ten-
sions between county and
city governments over the
county's $300,000 annual
payment, think of a set of
estranged parents driving
their kids to Little League
practice, Mom and Dad in
the front seat squabbling
over money
Parent 1: "If you expect
me to pay 90 percent of
your budget, I want to
know what you're doing
with the money"
Parent: "You've never
asked me before, and I
don't think I have to tell
you what I do with it.
They're your kids, you
know."
Parent 1: "I know
they're my kids. That's
why I deserve to know
what my money's going
for"
Parent 2: "You should
trust me."
Silence.
Parent 1: "I'm not going
to pay you any more
money until we have a
written agreement."
Silence.
Parent 1: "Oh, by the
way: I've come into some
financial difficulty and I
might not be able to pay
you anyway"
Parent 2: "You're
springing this on me
now? Well, with or with-
out your money, these
kids will be cared for But
that money's not a gift,
you know. It's for your
kids. You're responsible
to pay for their care."
Meanwhile, as the car
pulls into the park, the
kids climb out and run off
to ball practice, oblivious
to what's been going on
with their parents for
now. In the end, it's al-
ways the kids who get
hurt.

As 2013 begins, at issue
is the funding of Whisper-
ing Pines Park in Inver-
ness. The current
operating budget for fis-
cal year 2012-13 is
$754,282. Approximately
$64,000 is anticipated to


.
i .e ?':.

*s'- w
ife ^. *. '


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle file
The Splash Pad at Whispering Pines Park in Inverness has been a popular addition to
the park. County government, which has historically split the cost of the regional park
with the city of Inverness, has yet to give the city a $300,000 check to help fund the
park, wanting the city to sign off on a memorandum of understanding.


* WHAT: Whispering Pines budget item.
* WHEN: 1 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 8.
* WHERE: Citrus County Board of County
Commissioners meeting, courthouse, Inverness.
MEN
* WHAT: Whispering Pines discussion.
* WHEN: 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 8.
* WHERE: Inverness City Council meeting, city hall.


be generated through
fees from the swimming
pool, pavilion rental and
other sources.
Since 1993, the county
and the city of Inverness
have shared equally in
the park's funding.
It's only fair, said Inver-
ness City Manager Frank
DiGiovanni, since 90 per-
cent of the half-million


annual park users are not
city residents.
However, since 2008,
the 50-50 split has been
contentious.
As of Jan. 1, the city has
not received the expected
$300,000, which is less
than half of the park's an-
nual budget
"We are not troubled
with such a large amount


of users from outside the
city, but not receiving off-
setting funds to serve
these people is problem-
atic," DiGiovanni said.
County Administrator
Brad Thorpe said there's
a good reason why the
city has not received the
payment, and it's been
sitting on DiGiovanni's
desk since March 2012 -
a "memorandum of un-
derstanding" (MOU), a
document that basically
states the county wants to
know how its $300,000 is
being spent.
"What the county is ask-
ing for are the particu-
lars," said Lindsay Ubinas,
county government public
information officer.
See .Page A5


through its tough infantry
officer training to see how
they would fare. Only two
volunteered, and both failed
to complete the fall course.
None has volunteered for
the next course this month.
See .Page A3



Some


power


rates


to drop


Progress lowers

2013fees
PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
Progress Energy Florida
customers will see lower
electricity bills this year, de-
spite an increase in the nu-
clear cost recovery clause.
The monthly savings over
2012 will be about 6 percent
on a 1,000 kilowatt-hour
(kwh) residential bill from
$123.19 to about $116.06,
compared to $119.95 for
customers of Sumter Elec-
tric Cooperative Inc.
"Multiple cost compo-
nents make up the bill,"
Progress Energy Florida
spokesperson Suzanne
Grant said. "They come be-
fore the PSC (Public Serv-
ice Commission) each year
for a hearing on what each
component will cost."
Elements of a household
power bill include the cus-
tomer charge, energy
charge, fuel charge and
gross receipts tax.
The customer charge is a
fixed amount to cover the
cost of providing service to
the customer's location,
whether or not electricity is
used.
The energy charge covers
all the costs for producing
electricity other than fuel; it
includes a base rate that
covers the costs associated
with producing and deliver-
ing power. These costs in-
clude producing and
distributing electricity,
building and maintaining
power plants, power lines
and poles, substations,
equipment, salaries and re-
lated costs.
Also under the energy
charge are the costs of pur-
chased power, energy con-
servation, energy
conservation cost recovery
and the nuclear cost recov-
ery clause. The nuclear
charge, the subject of con-
siderable publicity last year,
increased by $1.87 ($2.86 to
$4.73) a month, according to
Grant. The charge covers
costs associated with the
proposed Levy County nu-
clear plant and the Crystal
River nuclear plant (CR3)
project
Recovery costs associ-
ated with CR3 are not con-
nected with the plant's
See Page A2


2012 Year in REVIEW


Citrus County generates true crime stories in 2012


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
In the past 12 months,
crime in Citrus County ran
the gamut everything
from the tragic to the shock-
ingly bizarre.
And, like in the other
spheres of life, the unusual
and tragic crime stories gar-
ner the most attention.


The following were some
of the more notable cases the
Chronicle covered in 2012:
In March 2012, an Ohio
man was charged with pos-
ing as a woman in an online
relationship with a Citrus
County school teacher, and
then blackmailing the
teacher with bogus accusa-
tions when she broke it off,
authorities said.


James Barker, 39, of the
Toledo suburb of Swanton,
was arrested March 8 by
Fulton County, Ohio,
deputies on extortion
charges. He was extradited
to Citrus County and was
later released from jail on
$10,000 bond.
The teacher reportedly
corresponded via Face-
book, email and phone with


Barker thinking he was a
woman. Barker allegedly
disguised his voice on the
phone. The teacher ap-
proached the sheriff's of-
fice in February saying she
was in an online relation-
ship with a Colorado
woman and that the woman
was threatening her if the
relationship ended. The
teacher did not know until


later that the correspon-
dence was actually with a
man posing as a woman.
Barker later pleaded no
contest in October and re-
ceived three years proba-
tion with adjudication
withheld. He was also or-
dered not to have any con-
tact with the teacher
See Page A4


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
75
LOW
55


SEEA ED6 TI


I --tS UI NI D :





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast, ce-
real variety and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, tater tots,
cereal variety and toast, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Hamburger sliders,
mozzarella maxstix, Italian
super salad with roll, fresh baby
carrots, baked beans, chilled
applesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Tuesday: Creamy macaroni
and cheese, Uncrustables PBJ,
yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, steamed green beans,
chilled pineapple, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Wednesday: Pepperoni
pizza, pulled barbecued pork
on bun, turkey super salad with
roll, PB dippers, fresh baby car-
rots, sweet green peas, chilled
peaches, fruit juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds
with rice, oven-baked breaded
chicken, yogurt parfait plate,
fresh baby carrots, sweet corn,
chilled applesauce cups, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Friday: Breaded chicken
sandwich, spaghetti with rip-
stick, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, steamed broccoli,
chilled pineapple, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal
and toast, tater tots, grits, milk
and juice variety.
Tuesday: Sausage and egg
biscuit, ultra cinnamon bun, ce-
real and toast, tater tots, milk
and juice variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, tater
tots, grits, juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Cheese pizza,
pulled barbecued pork on bun,
PB dippers, fresh baby carrots,
steamed broccoli, chilled pine-
apple, fruit juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Fajita chicken and
rice with ripstick, nacho rounds
with rice, Italian super salad
with roll, yogurt parfait plate,
fresh garden salad, Mexicali
corn, chilled applesauce, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Hamburger,
barbecued roast chicken with
ripstick, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, baked beans, potato tri-
angles, chilled peaches, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Oriental orange
chicken plate, macaroni and
cheese with ripstick, turkey
super salad with roll, yogurt par-
fait plate, fresh garden salad,
green beans, chilled pineapple,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Friday: Spaghetti with rip-
stick, mozzarella maxstix, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
sweet green peas, chilled ap-
plesauce, fruit juice, milk variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal
and toast, tater tots, grits, juice
and milk variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toasts, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco bread, ultimate
breakfast round, cereal and
toast, grits, tater tots, juice and
milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich


WATERING FINES
* Citrus County is issuing
citations that carry with
them a fine of $100 for
first offenders of local
watering rules.
* Second violations cost
$250, third or more
cost $500.
* Find watering rules in
the weather map on
Page A4 daily.


stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun, ce-
real variety, toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken tenders
with rice, pizza, macaroni and
cheese with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken super salad with roll,
yogurt parfait plate, baby car-
rots, fresh broccoli, potato trian-
gles, broccoli, chilled pineapple,
juice, milk.
Tuesday: Nacho rounds with
rice, turkey and gravy over noo-
dles with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, Italian super
salad with roll, maxstix, yogurt
parfait plate, garden salad, cel-
ery Mexicali corn, cold corn
salad, potato roasters, baby
carrots, applesauce, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Fresh turkey
wrap, pizza, spaghetti with rip-
stick, hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, ham super salad with roll,
yogurt parfait plate, baby car-
rots, baked beans, chilled
baked beans, potato triangles,
dried fruit mix, juice, milk.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken with rice, mac-
aroni and cheese with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich,
turkey super salad with roll,
maxstix, yogurt parfait plate,
garden salad, green beans, cel-
ery, baby carrots, potato roast-
ers, cucumbers, pineapple,
juice, milk.
Friday: Pulled barbecued
pork, pizza, chicken alfredo
with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken super salad with roll,
yogurt parfait plate, baby car-
rots, cold corn salad, potato tri-
angles, sweet green peas,
applesauce, chilled fruit, juice,
milk.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Cream of tomato
soup, apple juice, meatloaf
sandwich on bun, ketchup,
raisins, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Frankfurter on
bun, mustard, baked beans
with tomato, carrot coins,
coleslaw, graham crackers.
Wednesday: Birthday cele-
bration: Beef and macaroni
with cheese, green beans, corn
with red pepper, yellow cake,
slice Italian bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Chicken thigh
with coq au vin sauce, herb
mashed potatoes, spinach,
peaches, slice whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Friday: Barbecued pork ri-
blet, green peas, mashed pota-
toes, chunky cinnamon apples,
slice whole-grain bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


Notes of love for Sandy Hook


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
After hearing of the tragedy on Dec. 14 at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., that claimed the lives of
teachers and students, 14-year-old Caroline Specht wanted to reach out to families of the victims. On Saturday, Howard's
Flea Market in Homosassa donated a space for Specht to ask members of the public to sign the sympathy cards so she
could send them to families. Anna White from Illinois was among those who wrote a message on the sympathy cards.


POWER
Continued from PageAl

repairs, instead they relate
to costs incurred planning
for increased capacity
through major plant modi-
fications. And a settlement
reached last year limits
cost recovery for the Levy
plant through 2017, which
Grant said will provide
some rate stability.
Regardless, the nuclear
charge remains a lightning
rod for some legislators
and groups such as the
Southern Alliance for
Clean Energy, which la-
bels it "a nuclear tax."
The monthly fuel
charge, affected by the re-
placement power costs,
went down about 50 cents.
Grant said the estab-
lished costs usually re-
main in effect for the
entire year, though if an
increase of more than 10
percent is expected it has
to go to the PSC.
Factored into the 2013
rates is the first half of a
$258 million retail cus-
tomer refund of replace-
ment power costs
associated with the Crystal
River nuclear plant
The second half of the
refund is expected to hit in
2014.


We Welcome You To


Value Dental Care

6824 Gulf To Lake Hwy.

Crystal River

352-794-6139


ON THE NET
* Read it? Locally written stories are archived online at www.chronicleonline.com.


ur. Michael vvelcn, UMU & Associates


ur. PHilip anerman, UMU Ur. Jay Kipper, UMU


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=January 7to 11 MENUS:


A2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013


LOCAL







Page A3 SUNDAY, JANUARY 2013



TATE6&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Little League division caters to kids with disabilities


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
Bottom of the ninth. Runners on
first and second. The batter steps
into the box, elbow up and feet
planted.
He steps out. Something's not
right. Another cut, then back in.
The crowd roars, but he can't
hear He breathes and concen-
trates.
The pitch comes. He swings and
misses. Strike one.
He shakes it off, steps out,
breathes and steps back in.
Focus.
The pitcher sets and delivers.
Wait. Swing. Contact
The ball goes over the pitcher's
head, through the infield and to
the fence.
For children with mental and/or
physical disabilities who have
never had the opportunity to play
in a baseball league, moments like
this are more than an individual
triumph.
The noncompetitive Challenger
Division was established as a sep-
arate division of Little League for
boys and girls with physical and
mental challenges so they can
enjoy the game of baseball along-
side the millions of other children
who participate in Little League.
Central Citrus Little League is
inviting children between the ages


* WHO: Mentally and/or physically disabled children between the
ages of 4 and 18, or 19 and 22 if enrolled in a school. Children
need to attend registration to be fitted for uniforms.
* WHAT: Non-competitive Little League baseball.
* WHERE: Central Citrus Little League Pavilion, 6095 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills.
* REGISTRATION: Jan. 12 and Jan. 19 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Jan.
15, 17, 22 and 24 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
* BRING: Three proofs of residency and parent or guardian identifi-
cation. Players out of zone are welcome to participate if their zone
does not have a challengers division.


of 4 to 18 to join the Challenger's
Division baseball team. Children
19 to 22 who are enrolled in a de-
velopmentally-sponsored school
are also encouraged to join.
"I know children who watch
their brother or sister get ready
for a baseball game three times a
week, and they are just sitting in
their house with nothing to do,"
said Tony Cairone, vice president
of operations for the Challenger's
Division. "So we felt it would be
beneficial to these children and
young adults to get out there and
play some baseball just like their
siblings can. We felt it would be a
great opportunity for the children
to get out of their homes and have
some free time to themselves and
have something to do mentally
and physically"
Once children are registered
and teams are formed, the league


will begin practicing and fielding
teams, possibly playing teams
from other leagues that have a
Challenger's Division. Games are
scheduled in alongside other Lit-
tle League games to create sup-
port for players.
"We made sure everything was
in place so that all a parent or
guardian would have to do is come
to the field during the sign-up dates,"
Cairone said. "They will fill out
the same application as Little
League. Instead of checking off
their child's age division or base-
ball or softball, they will check off
the Challenger's Division box. All
that paperwork is forwarded to
me through the league and then
we start putting together teams."
Assisting each player will be a
"buddy" who aids them on the
field with running, catching and
hitting. Managers and coaches are


trained on how to interact re-
spectfully with the children.
'All of these children and young
adults are special in their own
way and need to be treated as in-
dividuals both on and off the ball
field," Cairone said. "These indi-
viduals should always be treated
with pride and dignity, just the
way they come to the ball field and
play their hearts out every game."
Handicapped accessibility, in-
surance, special equipment and a
good time will be available to play-
ers who want to join a team they
can call their own, Cairone said.
"Later on in life, these children
are going to say, 'Wow, I remember
when I was young playing Little
League,"' he said. "'I never
thought I could do that because I
couldn't get out of my wheelchair'
This will prepare these children
to open doors in their adult life.
I'm a true believer that every
child's life is a result of what they
learned when they are young."
There is a Challenger's Division
Little League World Series played
alongside the Little League World
Series in Williamsport, Pa. Selected
Challenger's Division leagues
worldwide play for the title.
"With everything going on with
the power plant and teacher lay-
offs, this is what Citrus County
needs right now," Cairone said. "It
gives hope to this area and this is


RYN WORTHIINUGTN/Chronicle
Brandon Cain is looking forward to
being a part of the Challenger's Di-
vision. His dad, Russell Cain,
helped Brandon stand as he was
overwhelmed with excitement to
be able to play baseball.
a good place to live. Let's make it
a little bit better for our kids."
For more information, sponsor-
ship or to make a donation, call
Cairone at 352-601-7706, email
him at ccllchallenger@aol.com,
visit littleleague.org and click on
"Challenger Division" or go to http://
www.eteamz.com/centralcitrus
littleleague.
Chronicle reporterEryn Worthing-
ton can be contacted at 352-563-
5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington
@chronicleonline. com.


Around
THE STATE

Citrus County
Charity event brings
music to vets
High Octane Saloon is
hosting "Heart Strings for He-
roes: Ride & Rockfest 2013"
Sunday, Jan. 13, at 1590 S.
Suncoast Blvd. in Homosassa.
Four live concerts and a
poker run begin at 11 a.m.
The concerts and poker
run are for the nonprofit cor-
poration Heart Strings for He-
roes (HSFH), which provides
free instruments to injured
men and women. The instru-
ments are donated by
celebrities, businesses or
bought with money raised
from concerts. HSFH is
founded by International
Recording Artists and family
members of Purple Heart
honorees of the U.S. armed
forces.
Live concerts include: Rion
Paige, Jamie Davis, Bottoms
Up and Black Star Whiskey.
The event is part of a world-
record attempt to honor he-
roes by bringing together as
many people in as many
cities as possible to provide
musical instruments and ther-
apy for wounded heroes of
the military, firefighter and
public service divisions.
High Octane and HSFH
will honor local heroes, in-
cluding Marine Lance Cpl.
Joshua Langston White, who
was patrolling in the Kajaki
District in the Helmand
province of Afghanistan when
he was severely injured by an
improvised explosive device.
For more information, call
High Octane Saloon at 352-
794-6037.

Palm Coast

Plane crash victims
identified
Authorities on Saturday
identified the three victims killed
when their small plane crashed
into a house and burst into
flames after trying to land at a
central Florida airport.
The 1957 Beechcraft H35
Bonanza was heading from
Fort Pierce to Knoxville, Tenn.,
when it experienced mechanical
problems and crashed Friday.
Florida Highway Patrol offi-
cials said the victims were
57-year-old pilot Michael An-
ders of Albany, Ky.; 59-year-
old Duane Shaw of Albany,
Ky.; and 42-year-old Charis-
see Peoples of Indianapolis.
Anders told air-traffic controllers
the plane was smoking, vibrat-
ing and had oil pressure prob-
lems minutes before crashing.
Homeowner Susan Crock-
ett was already outside when
rescuers arrived, screaming
that a plane had crashed into
her house.
-From staff and wire reports


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
With the fate of the Crystal River nuclear plant still undecided, replacement fuel costs have remained a leading issue along with insurance
coverage and future licensing.





How many billions?


Public Service Commission to continue review of Crystal River nuclear plant


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
Progress Energy Florida's
pending decision to re-
pair or retire the Crystal
River nuclear plant will be dis-
cussed by the Florida Public
Service Commission on Monday
However, no new information
is expected on whether the util-
ity's insurance will cover more
of the costs.
The status conference relates
to the PSC case examining the
outage and replacement fuel
and power costs associated with
the October 2009 steam genera-
tor replacement project, which
damaged the plant's contain-
ment structure. Additional dam-
age occurred in 2011 as the unit


was being returned to service
and it remains shut down.
Progress Energy initially esti-
mated the plant would be returned
by the first quarter of 2011. The
case has been before the PSC
since November 2010. Status
conferences are held twice a year
to keep the PSC up to date on the
project, unless the presiding
commissioner requests otherwise.
Progress has described the
needed repairs as "a first-of-a-
kind engineering, construction and
licensing project." Once started,
repairs could take 33 to 96 months,
with total cost estimates between
$1.27 billion and $3.43 billion.
Last year an additional re-
quested status conference was
held Oct. 30 when the PSC re-
ceived a summary of the report


from Zapata Inc. regarding its in-
dependent review of the poten-
tial repair plan for the Crystal
River nuclear plant (CR3).
The report estimated the re-
pair cost at approximately $1.49
billion, with a worst-case sce-
nario of $3.43 billion with a 96-
month schedule.
Florida Public Service Com-
missioner Eduardo Balbis, who
presided over the session, was
informed that Progress had four
teams working on the project, in-
cluding a technical review team
and a retirement decommission-
ing team.
The October conference also
discussed the status of the power
company's negotiations with Nu-
clear Electric Insurance Limited
(NEIL), which insures CR3. The


plant is covered by separate
policies, up to $2.25 billion for
property damages and up to $490
million for accidental power out-
ages. As of November, Progress
has received $136 million in re-
pair costs and $162 million for
the accidental outage (power re-
placement) costs.
Last week, Progress Energy
Florida spokeswoman Suzanne
Grant said there was no new in-
formation on the insurance issue
and discussions are continuing
with NEIL.
The conference is scheduled
for 10 a.m. in Tallahassee. It can
be viewed online at
www.psc.state.fl.us.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Pat Faherty at 352-564-2924 or
pfaherty@chronicleonline. com.


Dunnellon woman, 25, charged with armed robbery


Chronicle
CRYSTAL RIVER A
Dunnellon woman was ar-
rested Saturday after rob-
bing a Crystal River man,
according to the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office.
Krystal Smith, 25 of W
Pinion Lane, faces charges
of one count of robbery with
a firearm or other danger-
ous weapon and burglary
Smith's bond was set at
$75,000.


The alleged vic- him. Upon reaching
tim reportedly told the bottom of the
investigators the in- stairs, two other
cident began after subjects reportedly
he left some friends attacked him from
behind at a bar in behind and knocked
Ocala. him to the ground.
After getting home They repeatedly
around 3:30 a.m., he Krystal punched and kicked
received a call from Smith him while he was
Smith, who said she wanted on the ground, he said.
to see him downstairs. As he They then reached into his
exited his residence and pockets and removed approx-
began walking downstairs, imately $1,000, a cellphone,
he saw Smith waiting for keys to the residence and


his personal identification.
They then allegedly asked
him, "Where is it at? I know
you've got more," before en-
tering his home to search
for money When they re-
turned, one had the victim's
shotgun, whereupon he re-
portedly aimed it at the vic-
tim's head and said, "You're
lucky I don't kill you."
They then grabbed his
PlayStation 3 and fled upon
seeing approaching head-
lights.


A short time later, the vic-
tim's friend arrived and ob-
served the victim had a
swollen eye and other
bruising.
Smith told officers she
stayed at home all night and
did not know anything about
the robbery She said she
was walking her dog outside
of her residence at the time
of the incident
Smith was arrested and
transported to the Citrus
County Detention Facility.






A4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013


CRIME
Continued from Page Al

In April, a 69-year-old
Inverness man who was sen-
tenced in November 2011 in
Citrus County to 25 years in
prison for killing his long-
time girlfriend was sen-
tenced again in Palm Beach
County to 25 years in prison
for the murder of another
girlfriend more than 30
years ago.
According to the Palm
Beach County Clerk of
Court website, Jon Good,
also known as Jon Charles
Black and Bob Jay Parsons,
accepted a plea agreement
with the state April 5, and
pleaded guilty in the mur-
der of Charlene Nelson, a
29-year-old Lake Park
woman who was found bru-
tally beaten and stabbed to
death in her home in 1979.
During the initial investi-
gation, detectives issued a
warrant for Good's arrest,
but after a few sightings
around the Orlando area,
Good disappeared until au-
thorities arrested him in
April 2011in a wooded area
off Van Buren Street in
Inverness.
Now going by the name
Bob Jay Parsons, he was
taken into custody after Cit-
rus County deputies discov-
ered the dead body of
Parsons' longtime domestic
partner, 51-year-old Arlene
Preg.
With no documentation
proving Parsons' identity,
Citrus County investigators
quickly uncovered his iden-


* To register for the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office's CodeRED weather
program, visit www.sheriffcitrus.
org/EM/ and click on "CodeRED
Registration" near the center top.


* Enter the location to be monitored
and your contact details if using
a cellphone, you may choose to
receive text alerts, but standard
text messaging rates may apply.


* Choose which types of warnings
to receive: general notifications
and/or severe weather warning
about tornadoes, severe
thunderstorms or flash floods.


tity using fingerprints and
linked him back to the Palm
Beach County killing of
Nelson.
According to court docu-
ments, Parsons will serve
his Palm Beach County sen-
tence concurrent with his
Citrus County sentence.
In June, two masked
men with guns kicked in the
front door of a home on West
Cedar Lake Drive, north of
Crystal River, and as they
pushed a woman to the
floor, her son retaliated with
gunfire.
After a barrage of bullets,
a car sped off from the
home, and Shawn Michael
Wright, 42, of Citrus Springs,
identified by deputies as a
suspect, remained on the
front lawn. Wright died of
the wounds he received
during the exchange of
gunfire.
Deputies found Wright's
black Ford pickup truck sev-
eral miles away; however,
authorities do not know if it
was involved in the
incident.
Detectives are still look-
ing for any tips that may
lead them to the identity of
the second suspect, who is
also believed to have been
wounded. He remains at
large.
In July, a woman later
revealed to have been a con-
fidential informant for the
sheriff's office was discov-
ered gunned down in her
car during the middle of the
night.
Jamie Seeger, 27, was dis-
covered in her Chrysler
Crossfire about 3 a.m.
Wednesday near the inter-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


section of North Reynolds
Avenue and West Cyrus
Street, about a mile and a
half east of Crystal River.
Authorities said she died
from multiple gunshot
wounds.
According to Seeger's
mother's attorney Bill
Grant, the mother of two
young children had worked
several months as a confi-
dential informant for the
sheriff's office and had
been paid to give sheriff's
detectives information on
drug dealers and was in fear
for her safety
He accused the sheriff's
office of failing to ade-
quately protect their in-
formant and has filed a suit
to get the sheriff's office to
turn over documents per-
taining to her work with the
agency
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy denies
Grant's charges and has
said Seeger was an inform-
ant for the agency for a lim-
ited time, but not at the time
of her death.
In early December, CCSO
arrested three people and
charged them in Seeger's
death. The three were Mar-
rio Williams, 27, of Dunnel-
lon, Lawrence Vickers, 45,
of Crystal River and Curtis
Wilson, 30, of St. Petersburg.
The case of a domestic
disturbance July 29 left one
man dead from stab wounds
and another hospitalized for
stab wounds.
Citrus County Sheriff's
Office deputies were sum-
moned to a domestic distur-
bance in progress at home
on West Summer Place in
Citrus Springs.


At the scene, investigators
found Harold Gene Brown,
69, dead from stab wounds.
His stepson, Michael Sta-
ton, 56, also had stab
wounds.
No charges have been
filed in the case.
The case remains under
investigation. The sheriff's
office turned the case over
to the state attorney's office
for review.
In September, Citrus
County Sheriff's Deputy
Gregory Entrekin shot and
killed Derrick Vaccianna,
28, of Hernando.
According to the sheriff's
office, it appeared that Vac-
cianna confronted Entrekin
- who was off duty and
his girlfriend in a residence
on Eden Drive. All three
people involved reportedly
knew each other.
Following a brief verbal
confrontation and tussle,
Entrekin fired a shot, strik-
ing Vaccianna in the chest,
the sheriff's office reported.
The sheriff's office said
investigators were treating
the incident as a burglary of
an occupied dwelling lead-
ing up to the shooting.
Vaccianna's family, how-
ever, is alleging a setup, in-
sisting he was invited to the
residence by Entrekin's girl-
friend, who reportedly also
was romantically linked to
Vaccianna.
Entrekin, 24, who has
been with the CCSO since
Aug. 6, was placed on paid
administrative leave.
The Florida Department
of Law Enforcement and
the State Attorney's Office
are investigating.


ON THE NET
* For information about
arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's
Office, go to www.
sheriffcitrus.org and
click on the Public
Information link, then
on Arrest Reports.
* Also under Public
Information on the
CCSO website, click
on Crime Mapping for
a view of where each
type of crime occurs
in Citrus County. Click
on Offense Reports to
see lists of burglary,
theft and vandalism.
* The Citrus County
Sheriff's Office Volun-
teer Unit is comprised
of nearly 900 citizens
serving Citrus County.
Members come from
all walks of life and
bring with them many
years of life experi-
ence. To volunteer, call
Sgt. Chris Evan at
352-527-3701 or
email cevan@sheriff
citrus.org.
* For information about
volunteering with
Citrus County Sheriff
Fire Rescue call John
Beebe, volunteer
coordinator, at 352-
527-5406.
* For the Record reports
are archived online at
www.chronicleonline.
com.


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
Tyler MacDonald, 19, of
East Dave Lane, Inverness, at
9:40 a.m. Wednesday on
felony charges of trafficking or
endeavoring to traffic in stolen
property, grand theft and bur-
glary to an unoccupied resi-
dence. According to his arrest
affidavit, he is accused of
stealing two game systems
and about 50 video games
from a home on North Fitz-
patrick Avenue in Inverness.
Bond $12,000.
Jessica Simon, 21, of
Lehigh Terrace, Inverness, at
3:50 p.m. Wednesday on a
Citrus County warrant for vio-
lation of conditions of pre-trial
release.
Matthew Bulkeley, 30, of
Feyeteville Drive, Spring Hill,
at midnight Thursday on a
warrant for violation of proba-
tion on an original felony
charge of possession of a con-
trolled substance. No bond.
Jason Lemke, 42, of
East Louie Place, Hernando,
at 11:47 a.m. Thursday on
felony charges of trafficking or
endeavoring to traffic in stolen
property, grand theft giving
false verification of ownership
to a pawnbroker. According to
his arrest affidavit, he is ac-
cused of taking an iPad and
jewelry and pawning the jew-
elry. Lemke denied being in-
volved in the crimes. Bond
$52,000.


egal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle




SMeeting Notices........... D6


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
sh
pc
pc
sh
pc
sh
c
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
sh
ts
pc
ts
sh
ts
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


East winds from 5 to 10 knots. Seas 1
foot or less. Bay and inland waters will
have a light chop. Expect showers and
a few thunderstorms today.


172 47 0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exusive daily
pu 1 TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 75 Low: 55
Mostly cloudy; showers move into
the area.
m -",-MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 69 Low: 58
AM showers exit; partly sunny.

- TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 74 Low: 60
Partly sunny.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 71/45
Record 84/16
Normal 70/42
Mean temp. 58
Departure from mean +2
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month trace
Total for the year trace
Normal for the year 0.44 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 4
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.22 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 56
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 59%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper and Elm
Today's count: 3.7/12
Monday's count: 8.0
Tuesday's count: 10.6
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
1/6 SUNDAY 12:05 6:19 12:33 6:47
1/7 MONDAY 12:56 7:11 1:25 7:40
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


0
JAN. 26


FEB. 3


SUNSET TONIGHT 5:48 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW ........ 7:25 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY ...........................1:48 A.M.
MOONSET TODAY............................ 1:05 P.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 12:59 p/8:18 a /7:59 p
Crystal River* 11:20 a/5:40 a 10:40 p/5:21 p
Withlacoochee* 9:07 a/3:28 a 8:27 p/3:09 p
Homosassa*** 12:09 p/7:17 a 11:29 p/6:58 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
12:19 a/9:37 a 2:32 p/9:17 p
12:53 p/6:59 a 11:45 p/6:39 p
10:40 a/4:47 a 9:32 p/4:27 p
1:42 p/8:36a -- /8:16 p


Gulf water
temperature


64
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.97 NA 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.23 NA 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 39.22 NA 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.57 NA 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


~~ --- I. *-';: "' "'
Dnver, Kasas -mc~r -. ; 3os "-- ,,,_
-- r- -- Hf -- ---- .'

Aania .


\ 60s ,' M,
"1 ', tiI ,


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 53 46 s 61 41
New York City 42 32 pc 44 32
Norfolk 46 32 sh 52 33
Oklahoma City 50 36 s 47 28
Omaha 32 14 s 29 17
Palm Springs 63 36 pc 59 41
Philadelphia 42 28 pc 46 31
Phoenix 63 37 pc 67 43
Pittsburgh 35 24 sn 33 22
Portland, ME 36 23 sn 34 22
Portland, Ore 38 36 sh 43 36
Providence, R.I. 42 26 sn 40 27
Raleigh 49 25 c 51 31
Rapid City 41 22 s 44 26
Reno 32 14 sn 36 21
Rochester, NY 35 30 sn 36 20
Sacramento 51 32 sh 51 37
St. Louis 46 30 pc 33 22
St. Ste. Marie 31 19 sn 24 10
Salt Lake City 20 6 pc 27 12
San Antonio 59 41 s 61 33
San Diego 62 41 c 58 44
San Francisco 53 42 .01 sh 55 45
Savannah 60 34 sh 59 41
Seattle 44 40 trace sh 45 41
Spokane 33 25 c 32 27
Syracuse 34 29 sn 36 21
Topeka 47 30 s 37 20
Washington 46 31 pc 45 34
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 83 Kendall, Fla. LOW -32 Alamosa, Colo.

WORLD CITIES


... ,,, -" .- 8 ,
SOS


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 36 23 sn 36 23
Albuquerque 40 13 s 44 24
Asheville 48 24 pc 50 25
Atlanta 50 30 pc 54 35
Atlantic City 42 26 pc 47 31
Austin 54 41 .01 s 58 31
Baltimore 43 31 pc 45 32
Billings 38 21 pc 42 22
Birmingham 50 31 .07 s 53 28
Boise 22 6 c 33 16
Boston 42 30 sn 40 29
Buffalo 34 29 sn 35 19
Burlington, VT 35 14 sn 33 10
Charleston, SC 57 31 sh 59 41
Charleston, WV 42 22 rs 43 26
Charlotte 50 22 pc 55 30
Chicago 39 18 .03 pc 32 21
Cincinnati 42 19 sn 35 23
Cleveland 34 22 sn 35 26
Columbia, SC 54 26 pc 57 34
Columbus, OH 37 17 sn 35 21
Concord, N.H. 35 21 sn 35 21
Dallas 54 35 s 54 32
Denver 37 18 pc 46 24
Des Moines 39 20 s 27 14
Detroit 32 14 sn 35 20
El Paso 38 22 s 47 33
Evansville, IN 39 18 pc 34 21
Harrisburg 39 28 c 38 26
Hartford 41 28 pc 40 25
Houston 47 42 .84 pc 60 41
Indianapolis 38 18 .01 sn 32 18
Jackson 48 34 .13 s 58 30
Las Vegas 51 30 pc 50 34
Little Rock 50 31 s 49 26
Los Angeles 62 42 sh 59 45
Louisville 46 24 pc 37 23
Memphis 46 30 s 47 28
Milwaukee 36 18 .01 pc 32 20
Minneapolis 26 10 pc 20 14
Mobile 51 40 s 61 39
Montgomery 51 33 s 59 34
Nashville 47 22 pc 46 22
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 88/73/pc Madrid
Amsterdam 47/42/c Mexico City
Athens 47/37/sh Montreal
Beijing 30/10/pc Moscow
Berlin 45/44/sh Paris
Bermuda 68/65/pc Rio
Cairo 64/50/pc Rome
Calgary 37/19/pc Sydney
Havana 82/68/pc Tokyo
Hong Kong 65/58/pc Toronto
Jerusalem 52/42/c Warsaw


54/47/pc
50/45/sh
53/32/s
69/47/pc
29/-4/sn
27/18/c
48/41/c
87/74/ts
55/42/s
82/65/pc
46/36/pc
33/16/sn
32/25/c


C I T R U S.


C O U N TY


For the RECORD


CODERED WEATHER ALERT SIGNUP FOR CITRUS COUNTY


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


CHRONICLE
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N 1:1 :

I IInverness
Courthouse office
Tompkins St. square
0 106 W. Main
S 41 44 Inverness, FL
34450


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Trista Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
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JAN.11 JAN.18


I


I-


.


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DROPS
Continued from Page Al

"Every time we've written
a check, we don't know what
the money is being used for,"
Ubinas said. "We don't know
if it's going for cleaning up
the ballfields or keeping the
bathrooms clean or what-
ever What Brad (Thorpe) is
asking for is accountability
for expenses, specifically re-
lated to the park. Brad has
never heard a word back
from Frank (DiGiovanni)."
DiGiovanni said, "They've
made payments in the past
without an MOU, why all of
a sudden now? Nothing's
changed except now they're
changing the rules
midstream."
HEH
Since 1979, the 290-acre
Whispering Pines Park has
been owned by the state of
Florida and leased to the
city of Inverness, which
manages it.
In the early 1980s, the
park was dedicated as a re-
gional park, to be used by
the entire county
population.
In 1986, the county and
the city of Inverness entered
into an interlocal agree-
ment. At that time, Inver-
ness paid 70 percent of the
park's operating budget and
the county paid 30 percent.
Over the years, the county's
share incrementally in-
creased and the city's share
decreased until 1993, when
it reached 50-50, where it
was expected to stay
And it did for many years
without any problems.
Then came 2008, and the
status quo shifted.
The county proposed that
it take over the management
of Whispering Pines com-
pletely, which the city firmly
rejected.
Then the county reduced
its payment from $370,000 to
$300,000, paying the
$300,000 in 2008, 2009, 2010
and 2011.
Since fiscal year 2012-
2013, which began Oct. 1, the
city has not received a pay-
ment, although it is allo-
cated in the county's budget
The county allocates a
total of $2.6 million for
parks 29 throughout the
county, including Whisper-
ing Pines. Whispering Pines


SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 A5


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
The city park at 1700 Forest Drive, north of the light at the intersection of Pleasant Grove Road with State Road 44 in Inverness, is open to all. Two
meetings city and county Tuesday, Jan. 8, will discuss the future of Whispering Pines Park.


accounts for a little more
than 13 percent of the $2.6
million.
Enter Progress Energy
Florida and its surprise re-
duced tax payment to the
county this past November
to further complicate
matters.
Even if the city of Inver-
ness returns the MOU and
agrees to its terms, the
$300,000 may be delayed for
one year, along with about
eight other county budget
adjustments, according to a
county emergency action
plan dated Dec. 3.
However, the underlying
problem between county
and city governments over
park funding was there long
before the Progress Energy
monkey wrench. Currently,
the governments are at a
standstill and meanwhile
there are kids who want to
play baseball and people
who want to use the tennis
courts and the recreation
building. There's a park that
needs to be run.
MEN
What would happen if?


that the city is looking into
the possibility of corporate
sponsorship, although he
added that that may not
materialize.
"We will engage open dia-
log with leagues and park
users," he said. "We will
work to earn support of the
community that's served."
At the Jan. 8 city council
meeting, the topic of Whis-
pering Pines will be dis-
cussed. The meeting begins
at 5:30 p.m. at the Inverness
Government Center, 212 W
Main St., Inverness.
Also, Whispering Pines as
a budget item will be a mat-
ter for discussion at the
county commission meeting
at 1 p.m. Jan. 8, at the county
courthouse.
County Commission
Chairman Joe Meek said
one of his goals for 2013 is to
work better with both cities,
Inverness and Crystal River
"One of the ways we can
do that is to get an agree-
ment with the city about
Whispering Pines," he said.


ON THE NET
Whispering Pines
Park: www.inverness-fl.
gov/index.aspx?NID=
165

Meek added that the
squabbling between the
county and the city of Inver-
ness is not helpful.
"It's become a hindrance,
and until it gets resolved it's
going to fester," he said. "It's
time to put egos aside."
Meek went on to say that
from the county's stand-
point, it's an issue of finan-
cial accountability
"We're spending all this
money without any involve-
ment," he said. "But I be-
lieve all this can be
resolved. I'm talking with
Frank (DiGiovanni) and
we're going to see if we can
find common ground and
reach an agreement."
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@ chronicle
online, corn or 352-564-2927.


What would the city of In-
verness do if it never re-
ceived any more money
from the county?
"There are options that
we can talk about," said
Cabot McBride, Inverness
City Council president.
"There are things we can
do. I'm not saying I support
these by any means, but we
could start to have people
pay for more of the services,
raise revenue that way Or
we could decrease overall
usage of the park, thereby
decreasing expenses.
"In the final analysis,
what we're all going to be
looking for is an option to


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keep the park operating ...
but the thought of regular
citizens who use the park
having to come up with
$300,000 in no way pleases
me," McBride said.
DiGiovanni said emphati-
cally that the park or its reg-
ular users will not harmed.
"The preference should
not be to cut park funding to
an extent that penalizes
people like Little League
parents or youth program-
ming," he said. "Clearly, the
loss of $300,000 is huge ...
and not an amount that may
just be absorbed."
DiGiovanni went on to say
S -. ."- . .: .
" v." -. .: .
. K -.---.
'',:.4-.;: -;_,, ." .' -. m ;-


Even if the city of Inverness returns
the MOU and agrees to its terms,
the $300,000 may be delayed for
one year, along with about eight
other county budget adjustments,
according to a county emergency
action plan dated Dec. 3.


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


lona Casto, 86
INVERNESS
Iona Casto, 86, Inverness,
died Jan. 4, 2013, at Arbor
Trail Rehabilitation Center.
Iona was born Jan. 1, 1927,
in Detroit, Mich., to the late
Harry and Dorothy (Clay-
ton) LaRivere. She was a
certified public accountant.
Iona was a member of Her-
nando Church of the
Nazarene and enjoyed her
church family as well as
singing in the choir She also
enjoyed traveling.
Left to cherish her mem-
ory are her husband of 29
years, Erwin B. Casto, In-
verness; sons Scott (Kathy)
Baker, South Lyon, Mich.,
and John (Libby) Baker, Co-
rona, Calif.; her daughter
Pamela (Bill) Zell, Ab-
erdeen, N.C.; her sister
Shirley (Kenneth) Holloway,
West Chester, Pa.; step-
daughters Helene (Bill)
Heaton, Lavonia, Mich., and
Mary (Charles) Seabolt, In-
verness; 14 grandchildren;
and five great-grandchil-
dren. She was preceded in
death by a great-grandchild.
A celebration of life me-
morial service will be at 11
a.m. Monday, Jan. 7, 2013, at
Hernando Church of the
Nazarene with Pastor
Randy Hodges officiating.
The family will receive
friends in visitation from 10
a.m. until the hour of serv-
ice. Inurnment will be at a
later date at Michigan Me-
morial Park in Flat Rock,
Mich. The family requests
memorial donations in
Iona's name to the church
building fund in lieu of flow-
ers. Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is in
charge of arrangements.
There are no calling hours
at the funeral home.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. corn.

Beverly
Cole, 64
INVERNESS
Beverly C. Cole, 64, of In-
verness, Fla., died Jan. 1,
2013, at the Hospice of Cit-
rus County Care Unit at
CMHS in Inverness. Beverly
was born Feb. 19, 1948, in
Homestead, Fla., the daugh-
ter of Leonard and Leona
Cash. She was a nurse for
more than 40 years and
most recently, a hospice
nurse for Hospice of Citrus
County. Beverly moved to
Inverness in 2001 from
Hayesville, N.C. She was
Methodist.
Survivors include her
husband, Randy Cole of
Crystal River, Fla.; daugh-
ter, Shannon Cole of Inver-
ness, Fla.; brother, Richard
Cash of Okeechobee, Fla.;
grandchildren, Christina
Cole and Kylie Mills, both of
Inverness, Fla.; and great-
grandson, Vance DiCamillo
of Inverness, Fla.
A memorial service for
Mrs. Cole will be from 1 to 3
p.m. Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013,
at Journey Church, 210A
Tompkins St. in Inverness.
Larry Strickland will pre-
side. In lieu of flowers, do-
nations may be made to the
Ronald McDonald House in
Gainesville, Fla. Heinz Fu-
neral Home & Cremation,
Inverness, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Jere
Coppedge, 63
HERNANDO
Jere M. Coppedge, 63, of
Hernando, died Friday, Jan.
4, 2013, at his residence.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is in
charge of private
arrangements.




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Ernest
Zercie, 86
INVERNESS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr. Ernest Zer-
cie, age 86, of Inverness,
Florida, will be held 1:00
PM, Wednesday, January 9,
2013 at the Inverness
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes. The family will re-
ceive friends from 12:00
Noon until 1:00 PM, at the
chapel. The family requests
expressions of sympathy
take the form of memorial
donations to American Lung
Association 61 Broadway
New York, NY 10006. Online
condolences may be sent to
the family at www.Hooper
FuneralHome.com.
Mr. Zercie was born April
25, 1926 in Connecticut son
of Eudore and Annie (D'Am-
ico) Zercie. He was married
on September 23, 1949 to
Natalie Colwell who sur-
vives him. He died peace-
fully at his home December
26, 2012 in Inverness, FL.
Mr Zercie was employed for
many years in hardware
sales and distribution, retir-
ing in 1989. He was a US
Army veteran serving dur-
ing WWII, having attained
the rank of staff sergeant
and earning a Purple Heart
for his service in the Euro-
pean Theatre. An avid
golfer, he also enjoyed early
morning breakfasts at local
coffee shops where he
would meet daily with his
cronies to "solve the prob-
lems of the world."
Mr. Zercie was preceded
in death by his parents and
is survived by his wife of 63
years Natalie Ann Zercie of
Inverness, FL, 2 Sons: Mark
(Louise) Zercie of Jim
Thorpe, PA; Robert "Bob"
(Margaret) Zercie of
Rochester, NY; 4 Grandchil-
dren: Bryana (Michael)
Trupo of Burke, VA: Marissa
(Kevin) Burns of Middle-
town, NY; Timothy Zercie of
London, England and
Joseph Zercie of Jim
Thorpe, PA, one Great
granddaughter, sister,
Rachel Casinghino of East
Windsor, CT, one nephew.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Hooper
Funeral Homes &
Crematory

Jean
Lawson, 76
DUNNELLON
Jean A. Lawson, 76, of
Dunnellon, died Wednes-
day, Jan. 2, 2013. Services
will be at 1 p.m. Wednesday,
Jan. 9,2013, from the Chapel
of Manasota Memorial Fu-
neral Home.

Doris Sand, 80
BEVERLY HILLS
Doris Irene Sand, 80, of
Beverly Hills, died Thurs-
day, Jan. 3, 2013, under Hos-
pice of Citrus County care.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is in
charge of private
arrangements.




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Norma 'Nonie'
Cox, 59
MARATHON
Norma (Nonie) Harvey
Cox, 59, passed away Dec.
29. 2012. in Marathon, Fla.
She was born July 8, 1953,
in Brooksville, Fla., to the
late Norman Judge and
Muriel Ellis.
Survivors include son
Randell Harvey; daughter
Ashley Cox; two sisters, Dar-
leen Spence (Dale) and
Sharon Newton (Craig); two
stepsisters, Linda Samples
(Frank) and Marylyn
Franklin (Leon); fiance Alan
(Blitz) Blake; three grand-
children, Ciara, Colton and
David; and many nieces and
nephews.
She loved to fish, cook and
bake and life in general, but
most of all being a mother
and grandmother. She will
be greatly missed by all her
family and friends. A memo-
rial service will be at 11 a.m.
Jan. 12 at First Baptist
Church of Inglis, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.




Donald
Doskey, 89
BEVERLY HILLS
Mr. Donald Benjamin
Doskey, age 89 of Beverly
Hills, Florida, died Sunday,
December 30, 2012 in Bev-
erly Hills. He was born Sep-
tember 24, 1923 in
Cleveland, OH, son of Ben-
jamin and Malanche
(Marks) Doskey. He was a
US Marine veteran serving
during World War II. He was
the owner and operator of a
service station and towing
company
Mr. Doskey was preceded
in death by his parents and
brother, Jerome Doskey
Survivors include his wife
of 67 years, Rena Doskey of
Beverly Hills and son, Don-
ald Doskey of Shaker
Heights, OH.
Memorial donations may
be made to Hospice of Citrus
County PO. Box 641270 Bev-
erly Hills, FL 3446. The fam-
ily would like to express
their gratitude to Hospice of
Citrus County and their care-
givers Brian and Howard.
Online condolences may be
sent to the family at
www. Hooper Funeral
Home.com. Arrangements by
the Beverly Hills Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory

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John Luc Jr., 65
FLORAL CITY
John Theodore Luc Jr, 65,
Floral City, passed awayJan.
3, 2013, at his residence. A
native Floridian, John was
born Feb.
18, 1947, in
Tampa to
the late
John T Luc
Sr and Car-
olina T
Sommer He
served our
country in John
the U.S. Luc Jr.
Coast
Guard, retiring as a senior
chief boatswain's mate. He
then was employed as a
deputy for the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, working as
a marine officer. John en-
joyed his motorcycles, guns,
traveling and his farm. He
was a lifetime member of
the Senior Chief's Coast
Guard Association.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory is his wife of 41 years,
Lynda A. Luc, Floral City;
his son John Eric Luc,
Gainesville; and brothers
Fred A. (Theresa) Luc, Bal-
timore, Md., and David
(Patti) Luc, Centereach, N.Y
A celebration tribute to
John's life will be at 6 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013, at
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home. The family will re-
ceive friends in visitation
from 5 p.m. until the hour of
service. A graveside com-
mittal service with military
honors will be at 11:30 a.m.
Friday, Jan. 11, 2013, at
Florida National Cemetery
in Bushnell. The procession
will depart from the funeral
home at 11 a.m. The family
requests donations in John's
memory to Citrus County
Animal Services in lieu of
flowers.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.


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Edward
Silvia, 90
HERNANDO
Edward Andrew Silvia,
90, of Hernando, died
Thursday, Jan. 3, 2013,
under the care of HPH Hos-
pice in Lecanto.
At Ed's request, there will
be no services. Arrange-
ments by McGan Cremation
Service LLC, Hernando.

Donald
White, 55
CRYSTAL RIVER
Donald Edward White, 55,
of Crystal River, died Thurs-
day, Jan. 3,2013, at his home
in Crystal River. Private cre-
mation arrangements are
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tory Crystal River.
See DEATHS/Page A8

FREE OBITUARIES
Free obituaries can
include: full name of
deceased; age; home-
town/state; date of
death; place of death;
date, time and place of
visitation and services.


OBITUARIES
* The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries.
* Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of the
arrangements.
* A flag will be included
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


COMBAT
Continued from Page Al

The failure rate for men is
roughly 25 percent
For the record, plenty of
men don't want to be in the
infantry either, though tech-
nically could be assigned
there involuntarily, if
needed. That's rarely known
to happen.
"The job I want to do in the
military does not include
combat arms," Army Sgt
Cherry Sweat said of infantry,
armor and artillery occupa-
tions. She installed commu-
nications equipment in 2008
in Iraq but doesn't feel men-
tally or physically prepared
for fighting missions.
"I enjoy supporting the sol-
diers," said Sweat, stationed
in South Carolina. "The
choice to join combat arms
should be a personal deci-
sion, not a required one."
Added Marine Gunnery
Sgt Shanese L. Campbell,
who had administrative du-
ties during her service in
Iraq: "I actually love my job.
... I've been doing it for 15
years, so I don't plan on
changing my job skills."
She's an administrative of-
ficer at Twentynine Palms in
California, serving in a once
all-male tank battalion as
part of a Marine Corps ex-
periment to study how open-
ing more jobs to women
might work
A West Point graduate
working in the Pentagon esti-
mates she's known thousands
of women over her 20-year
army career and said there's
no groundswell of interest in
combat jobs among female
colleagues she knows.
She asked to remain
anonymous because in the
military's warrior culture, it's
a sensitive issue to be seen as
not wanting to fight, she said.
But her observations echoed
research of the 1990s, an-
other time of big change in
the military, when interviews
with more than 900 Army
women found that most did-
n't want fighting jobs and
many felt the issue was being
pushed by "feminists" not
representing the majority,
said RAND Corporation soci-
ologist Laura Miller
Much has happened for


Associated Press
Deputy Defense Undersecretary for Military Personnel Policy Vee Penrod, left, and Principal Director for Military Person-
nel Policy Maj. Gen. Gary Patton, speak Feb. 9 at the Pentagon on the results of the department's Women in Service Re-
view. If or when the Pentagon lets women become infantry troops, the country's front-line warfighters, how many women
will want to? The answer is probably not many.


women since then in Ameri-
can society and the military
Foremost in the military is
perhaps that the Iraq and
Afghanistan wars changed
the face of combat and high-
lighted the need for women
to play new roles.
Women already can be as-
signed to some combat arms
jobs, such as operating the
Patriot missile system or field
artillery radar, but offensive
front-line fighting jobs will be
the hardest nut to crack
Many believe women eventu-
ally could be in the infantry,
but the Pentagon for years
has been moving slowly on
that front
InApril 1993, the Pentagon
directed the opening of com-
bat aviation occupations and
warship assignments to fe-
males; the Navy and Air
Force responded by opening
thousands of jobs. Neither of
those steps put women in the
most lethal occupations such
as infantry or tank units. Pol-
icy barred them not only from
specific jobs but also from
doing traditional jobs in
smaller units closest to the
front
That arrangement came
apart in Iraq and
Afghanistan, where battle


Jobs women do in the military
Positions held by enlisted women in the U.S. armed forces as
of November 2012:

Support/administration
HealrIc-are 15


Service and suppi,
Power/mechanical repair
C,:,pmun.-ali.:,nsh nlellgen.:-
Electronic equipment irpaar
Sltuiienllirainee,.:,ler


14
12
10


NOTE: Chart does not include Coast Guard personnel.
SOURCE: Defense Department AP


lines were jagged and insur-
gents could be anywhere.
Some women in support jobs,
including logistics officers
bringing supply convoys to
troops, found themselves in
firefights or targeted by road-
side bombs. Women were
sent on patrol with men to
search and get information
from local women whose cul-
ture didn't allow male sol-
diers to do so.
Developments over the
past decade have been a


main argument from those
wanting more openings for
women. So has the issue of
equal opportunity and the
fact that combat service gives
troops an advantage for pro-
motions, the lack of it leaving
women disadvantaged in try-
ing to move to the higher
ranks.
"If there are women able
to meet the required stan-
dard, then why not let them
fight if they so desire?" said
Maj. Elizabeth L. Alexander.


Since 2002, she has served
in Pakistan once and Iraq
three times in supply and
maintenance jobs and is
now with the 3rd Army in
South Carolina.
More than 200,000 U.S.
women have served in the
wars, 12 percent of the Amer-
icans sent. Of some 6,600
Americans killed, 152 were
women; 84 of them were
killed by enemy action and
68 in nonhostile circum-
stances such as accidents, ill-
ness and suicide.
In February, the depart-
ment altered rules to reflect
realities of the decade, open-
ing some new jobs and offi-
cially allowing women into
many jobs they were already
doing, but in units closer to
the fighting. The new policy
still bans women from being
infantry soldiers, Special Op-
erations commandos, and
others in direct combat, but
opened some 14,000 previ-
ously male-only positions,
mostly in the Army, such as
artillery mechanic and
rocket launcher crew mem-
ber More than 230,000 posi-
tions remain closed to
women, who are 15 percent
of the 1.4 million in all
branches.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 A7

Hundreds of female sol-
diers began moving into once
all-male battalions, taking
jobs they already had trained
for, such as in personnel, in-
telligence, signal corps, med-
icine and chaplaincy
Forty-five women Marines
similarly went to battalions
as part of a large research ef-
fort to gauge how women
might do.
Defense Secretary Leon
Panetta has been studying re-
ports from the services to up-
date him on progress with the
newly opened positions,
what's being done to pursue
gender-neutral physical stan-
dards and what barriers re-
main and whether more
positions can be opened.
Panetta could announce
the next step in the coming
weeks, which might mean
anything from further open-
ings to simply further study
"Yes, there may be a small
number of women who are
interested," said Katy Otto,
spokeswoman for the Serv-
ice Women's Action Network,
an equal opportunity advo-
cacy group. "But does that
mean they should be barred
from entry?"
Lory Manning of Women's
Research and Education In-
stitute said female interest
could be greater than
expected.
"I think they'll be surprised
by the number that will come
forward," said the 25-year
Navy veteran who retired in
the 1990s. She said the Navy
faced a similar question then:
Did women want to go to sea?
"If you asked someone in
1985 about going to sea, she
would have been thinking:
'Girls don't do that and so I
don't want to do that,"' Man-
ning said. "But when push
came to shove, they did it,
they loved it"
Changing the rules for a
potential future draft would
be a difficult proposition.
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A8 SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013


Group aims to save smokestacks


Associated Press

EL PASO, Texas People in this
West Texas city spent decades try-
ing to close a massive copper plant
they said spewed fumes that made
their eyes teary, their lungs burn.
Workers got sick and blamed the
company A hill near a college cam-
pus gradually turned black as the
towering smokestacks churned out
heavy emissions year after year.
The people claimed victory
when the ASARCO copper smelter
finally shut down in 1999. Now,
more than a decade later, some
who opposed the plant are banding
together in a long-shot effort to pre-
vent the demolition of the plant's
iconic smokestacks that have dom-
inated the local skyline for nearly
half a century The chimneys, they
say, are a mark of the city's indus-
trial heritage and should be pre-
served as a monument to workers
who fell ill due to toxic materials
incinerated at the sprawling site.
"I want them to stay as a re-
minder that people in a democracy
can stand up like David to Goliath
and win," said Daniel Arellano, a
former acid plant operator who
suffers from myelodysplastic syn-
drome, a blood and bone marrow
disease, after working at the plant
from 1975-1999.
Arellano is among a group of for-
mer workers and residents who are
supporting the cause of Save the
Stacks, a group dedicated to raising
money to purchase the site before
the towers are demolished in early
2013. But the trustee in charge of
cleaning and selling the 153-acre
property said he has given the
group enough time to raise the
funds and has already made up his
mind to tear down the last remain-
ing pieces.
Still, the group believes there is a
chance to save the hulking towers
and turn them into the nation's
tallest monument Standing at more
than 820 feet, the tallest chimney
took 29 days of round-the-clock con-
crete pouring to build and rises
higher than the Washington Monu-
ment or the St Louis Gateway Arch.
"They want to wipe away our his-
tory," said Robert Ardovino, a
member of Save the Stacks. "As a
city, we deserve something good to
come from it and a giant slab of as-
phalt and a box store is not it."
The towers' red and white stripes
and ASARCO sign can be seen from
miles away amid the mountains
near the Mexican border. They
were a significant addition in 1966
to a copper smelter that opened in


Associated Press
The ASARCO copper smelter smokestacks are pictured Nov. 28 near the Rio Grande in El Paso, Texas. Some peo-
ple are banding together in a long-shot effort to prevent the demolition of the plant's smokestacks, which have
dominated the local skyline for nearly half a century.


1887 at the banks of the Rio
Grande.
It operated for more than a cen-
tury until it was shut down amid
complaints of polluting the area
while incinerating materials from
a military facility that produced
chemical weapons from World War
II. ASARCO filed for bankruptcy in
2005 and four years later placed
$52 million in a trust to clean up
the area.
The towers were to be demol-
ished last spring, but the trustee
granted a one-year moratorium so
Save the Stacks could have time to
raise money and show the struc-
tures were stable. They still have a
long way to go to raise enough
funds. They have collected less than
$40,000 and estimate it would cost
about $3.9 million to keep the
smokestacks standing. The group
also failed to get any financial back-
ing from the city, which instead
passed a resolution supporting the
group's mission as long as it does
not mean spending public money
The trustee, Roberto Puga, said
he now has no choice but to tear
down the towers because potential
buyers don't want them there. He
said it would cost about $14 million
to insure, update and maintain the
stacks over 50 years and doubts the


group will ever find the money
"If there was a guardian angel
that said, 'I'll write you a big check,'
he would have done it by now,"
Puga said.
Still, Save the Stacks isn't ready
to give up. The group has recruited
public officials to help convince
Puga to save the smokestacks.
"We will talk with him and con-
tinue to talk with him until he
pushes the button," Ardovino said.
The towers are surrounded by the
University of Texas at El Paso and
an empty stretch of desert being de-
veloped with upscale apartments.
The plant's construction more than
a century ago ushered in an era of
industry in El Paso that eventually
expanded into businesses such as
apparel factories and other types of
assembly plants. The plant also
helped grow many other businesses
such as utility companies and rail-
roads and brought good-paying jobs
to the area.
"People came for a better way of
life," said local historian Jackson
Polk. "There was a good middle
class, now kids from a smelter town
could go to college. But it also
brought dangers."
The memory of those dangers
has some in this community di-
vided on whether the towers


should stay or go.
Alice Delgadillo, who works at a
supermarket, wants Puga to push
ahead with the demolition.
"If they don't serve a purpose,
why have them?" she said.
Others, such as Juan Cameros,
are more sentimental.
"It will be very sad for the people
of El Paso if they bring them down.
For the families of the men that
worked there," he said while at a
local Laundromat. "I had a teacher,
her father worked for many years
to provide for his family It would
be sad for everyone."
Mariana Chew, an activist work-
ing with the former ASARCO work-
ers, wants the site turned into a
museum and a center for environ-
mental studies. She also wants to
create a fund to address the health
issues and medical expenses of the
former workers.
But for most workers, pursuing
more money in the courts is not
worth their while since the com-
pany has filed for bankruptcy and
is likely to offer a minimal payout.
They say that's why preserving
the towers is so vital for them.
"That's the gun right there," Arel-
lano said, looking up at the towers.
"They want to throw away the
smoking gun."


SC woman, oldest living US citizen, dies at 114


Associated Press

A 114-year-old South Car-
olina woman who was the
oldest living U.S. citizen has
died, two of her daughters
said Saturday
Mamie Rearden of Edge-
field, who held the title as the
country's oldest person for
about two weeks, died
Wednesday at a hospital in
Augusta, Ga., said Sara Rear-
den of Burtonsville, Md., and
Janie Ruth Osborne of Edge-
field. They said their mother
broke her hip after a fall
about three weeks ago.
Gerontology Research
Group, which verifies age
information for Guinness
World Records, listed
Mamie Rearden as the old-
est living American after
last month's passing of 115-
year-old Dina Manfredini of
Iowa. Rearden's Sept. 7,
1898, birth was recorded in
the 1900 U.S. Census, the
group's Robert Young said.
Rearden was more than a


In the mid-1960s at age 65, when
some settled into retirement, she
learned to drive a car for the first
time and started volunteering for
an Edgefield County program that
had her driving to the end of remote
rural roads to find children whose
parents were keeping them home
from school.


year younger than the
world's oldest person, 115-
year-old Jiroemon Kimura
of Japan.
"My mom was not presi-
dent of the bank or any-
thing, but she was very
instrumental in raising a
family and being a commu-
nity person," said Sara
Rearden, her youngest
child.
"Everybody can't go be
president of a bank or pres-


ident of a college, but we
feel just as proud of her in
her role as housewife and
particularly as mother and
homemaker."
Mamie Rearden, who was
married to her husband


Oacy for 59 years until his
death in 1979, raised 11
children, 10 of whom sur-
vive, Sara Rearden said.
She lived in the family
homestead with a son and a
daughter on land that had
been in the family since her
father's accumulation of
acreage made him one of
the area's largest black
landowners.
Her father sent her off to
earn a teaching certificate
at Bettis Academy on the
far side of the county,
spending an entire day on a
loaded wagon to reach the
school along dirt roads, her
daughter said. She taught
for several years until be-
coming pregnant with her
third child.
In the mid-1960s at age


65, when some settled into
retirement, she learned to
drive a car for the first time
and started volunteering for
an Edgefield County pro-
gram that had her driving to
the end of remote rural
roads to find children
whose parents were keep-
ing them home from school,
Sara Rearden said.
Mamie Rearden always
counseled that her children
should treat others as they
wanted to be treated and
that included never gossip-
ing or speaking ill of others.
When asked about a
preacher's uninspiring ser-
mon, her daughter recalled
her mother saying: '"Well, it
came from the Bible.' She
never would bad-mouth
them."


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from PageA6

Herman 'Bum'
Roesch, 88
FLORAL CITY
Herman G. "Bum"
Roesch, 88, of Floral City,
Fla., passed away Saturday,
Dec. 22,
2012, at
Hospice of
Citrus
County in
Lecanto,
Fla. He was
born Jan.
13, 1924, in
Sarasota, Herman
Fla., to the Roesch
late Otto E.
and Marjorie May (Trues-
dale) Roesch Sr. Herman
was a firefighter for the St.
Petersburg Fire Depart-
ment and a U.S. Coast
Guard Merchant Marine. He
arrived in this area in 1975,
coming from St Petersburg,
and was a member of the
Masonic Lodge F&AM No.
133, Floral City. Herman en-
joyed riding motorcycles,
hunting, fishing and the
outdoors.
He was preceded in death
by his wife of 59 years,
Dorothy Survivors include
one son, Lyman (Patty)
Roesch of St. Petersburg;
three daughters, Beverly
Swetland of Clearwater,
Fla., Adele (Layne) Layle of
Chipley, Fla., and Marsha
Roesch of Hernando, Fla.;
one brother, Joe Roesch;
seven grandchildren; 10
great-grandchildren; and
one great-great-grandchild.
A gathering of family and
friends is scheduled from 10
to 11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 12,
2012, at Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory, Inverness, Fla. In lieu
of flowers, the family re-
quests donations to Hospice
of Citrus County, PO. Box
641270, Lecanto, FL 34464.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.


OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicleonline.
com or phone 352-563-
5660 for details and
pricing options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)
Additionally, obituaries
will be posted online at
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.com.
Additional days of
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due to errors in
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charged at the same
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The U.S. military
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respective guard and
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GOP's internal struggles intensified by cliff vote


STEVE PEOPLES
Associated Press
BOSTON The Republican
Party seems as divided and angry
as ever
Infighting has penetrated the
highest levels of the House GOP
leadership. Long-standing geo-
graphic tensions have increased,
pitting endangered Northeastern
Republicans against their col-
leagues from other parts of the
country Enraged tea party leaders
are threatening to knock off
dozens of Republicans who sup-
ported a measure that raised
taxes on the nation's highest
earners.
"People are mad as hell. I'm
right there with them," Amy Kre-
mer, chairman of the Tea Party
Express, said late last week, de-
claring that she has "no confi-
dence" in the party her members
typically support. Her remarks
came after GOP lawmakers
agreed to higher taxes but no
broad spending cuts as part of a
deal to avert the "fiscal cliff."
"Anybody that voted 'yes' in the
House should be concerned"
about primary challenges in 2014,
she said.
At the same time, one of the
GOP's most popular voices, New
Jersey Gov Chris Christie, blasted
his party's "toxic internal politics"
after House Republicans initially
declined to approve disaster relief
for victims of superstorm Sandy
He said it was "disgusting to
watch" their actions and he
faulted the GOP's most powerful
elected official, House Speaker
John Boehner, R-Ohio.
The GOP's internal struggles to
figure out what it wants to be were
painfully exposed after Mitt Rom-
ney's loss to President Barack
Obama on Nov 6, but they have ex-
ploded in recent days. The fallout
could extend well beyond the
party's ability to win policy battles
on Capitol Hill. It could hamper
Republicans as they examine how
to regroup and attract new voters
after a disheartening election
season.
To a greater degree than the De-
mocrats, the Republican Party has
struggled with internal divisions
for the past few years. But these
latest clashes have seemed espe-
cially public and vicious.
"It's disappointing to see in-
fighting in the party," said Ryan
Williams, a Republican operative


Associated Press
House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio leaves Thursday after a three-hour photo session with members of the
113th Congress, which convened earlier in the day. The Republican Party seems as divided and angry as ever.
Enraged tea party leaders are threatening to knock off dozens of Republicans who supported a measure that
raised taxes on the nation's highest earners.


and former Romney aide. "It does-
n't make us look like we're in a po-
sition to challenge the president
and hold him accountable to the
promises he made."
What's largely causing the dis-
sension? A lack of a clear GOP
leader with a single vision for the
party.
Republicans haven't had a con-
sistent standard-bearer since
President George W Bush left of-
fice in 2008 with the nation on the
edge of a financial collapse. His
departure, along with widespread
economic concerns, gave rise to a
tea party movement that infused
the GOP's conservative base with
energy. The tea party is credited
with broad Republican gains in
the 2010 congressional elections,
but it's also blamed for the rising
tension between the pragmatic
and ideological wings of the party
- discord that festers still.
It was much the same for De-
mocrats in the late 1980s before
Bill Clinton emerged to win the


White House and shift his party to
the political center.
Presidential nominee Romney
never fully captured the hearts of
his party's most passionate voters.
But his tenure atop the party was
short-lived; since Election Day,
he's disappeared from the politi-
cal world.
Those Republican leaders who
remain engaged Christie,
Boehner, Senate Minority Leader
Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and
Republican National Committee
Chairman Reince Priebus are
showing little sign of coming
together.
Those on the GOP's deep bench
of potential 2016 presidential con-
tenders, including Florida Sen.
Marco Rubio, Wisconsin Rep. Paul
Ryan, and Louisiana Gov Bobby
Jindal, have begun staking out
their own, sometimes conflicting
ideas for the party.
Over the short term at least, the
party's divisions probably will
continue to be exposed.


Obama has outlined a second-
term agenda focused on immigra-
tion and gun control; those are
issues that would test Republican
solidarity even in good times.
Deep splits already exist between
Republican pragmatists and the
conservative base, who oppose
any restrictions on guns or al-
lowances for illegal immigrants.
It's unclear whether Obama can
exploit the GOP fissures or
whether the Republican dysfunc-
tion will hamper him. With
Boehner unable to control his
fractured caucus, the White House
is left wondering how to deal with
the House on any divisive issue.
Fiscal issues aren't going away,
with lawmakers were agree on a
broad deficit-reduction package.
The federal government reached
its borrowing limit last week, so
Congress has about two months or
three months to raise the debt
ceiling or risk a default on federal
debt. Massive defense and domes-
tic spending cuts are set to take ef-


fect in late February By late
March, the current spending plan
will end, raising the possibility of
a government shutdown.
Frustrated conservative ac-
tivists and GOP insiders hope that
the continued focus on fiscal mat-
ters will help unite the factions as
the party pushes for deep spend-
ing cuts. That fight also may high-
light Democratic divisions
because the party's liberal wing
vehemently opposes any changes
to Social Security or Medicare
"Whenever you lose the White
House, the party's going to have
ups and downs," said Republican
strategist Ron Kaufman. "My
guess is when the spending issues
come up again, the Democrats'
warts will start to show as well."
The GOP's fissures go beyond
positions on issues. They also are
geographical.
Once a strong voice in the party,
moderate Republicans across the
Northeast are nearly extinct.
Many of those who remain were
frustrated in recent days when
Boehner temporarily blocked a
vote on a disaster relief bill.
Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., said
campaign donors in the Northeast
who give the GOP after the slight
"should have their head
examined."
Boehner, who just won a second
term as speaker, quickly sched-
uled a vote on a narrower meas-
ure for Friday after the new
Congress convened, and it rushed
out a $9.7 billion measure to help
pay flood insurance claims.
Weary Republican strategists
are trying to be hopeful about the
GOP's path ahead, and liken the
current situation to party's strug-
gles after Obama's 2008 election.
At the time, some pundits ques-
tioned the viability of the Repub-
lican Party. But it came roaring
back two years later, thanks
largely to the tea party.
"If we have learned anything
from the fiscal cliff fiasco, conser-
vatives discovered we need to
stand firm, and stand together, on
our principles from beginning to
end," said Republican strategist
Alice Stewart. "It's frustrating to
see the GOP drop the ball and turn
a position of true compromise into
total surrender. The Democrats
succeeded in their strategy of di-
vide and conquer."
Associated Press writers Ken
Thomas and Ben Feller in Wash-
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Assault weapons
not needed
After the unbelievable
tragedy in Connecticut
there will be people who
demand banning all guns,
while others will talk about
their "right to bear arms."
Surely there is a middle
path we can all agree on.
I read that some of the
bodies recovered were shot
multiple times. Imagine
what multiple shots from
an assault rifle must have
done to a little 6- or 7-year-
old body How can anyone
in their right mind not
want to put an end to this
carnage that has now be-
come almost a monthly oc-
currence in this country?
As a gun owner, I am not
an advocate of banning all
guns, but there is only one
reason to have an assault
weapon, and that is to kill.
If you feel you cannot pos-
sibly live without such a
weapon, join the military
Visiting a firing range to
shoot under the supervision
of a qualified range master
is something that can pro-
vide enjoyment and relax-
ation. My husband and I
spent many hours sharing
this sport, but once we got
home, the guns were emp-
tied, cleaned and locked up.
After completing an
NRA-sponsored gun safety
program, I applied for and
received a concealed
weapon license. I never
carried a weapon, and let
the license lapse because I
realized that there is no ra-
tional reason to have one.
The only people who "need"
to carry a concealed weapon
are members of law en-
forcement Others may want
one, but I would ask them
to take a long, hard look at
their reason for wanting it.
If you purchase a gun
from a reputable dealer,
you have to go through a
background check. But you
can go to any gun show (or
in some states, a flea market)
and buy or sell any weapon
you want No questions
asked, no background check
done. That is just insane.
You can't just get in a car
and drive away You need
training and must pass a
test for a license. Once you
are qualified to drive, there
are certain laws that you
must obey Children in car
seats, seat belts, traffic
rules, etc. You can't use a
tank as your family car, or
fire a rocket at a plane, or
use a flamethrower to start
a barbecue.


No one wants to take away
our guns. But assault weapons
do not fit the category of
recreational use and should
be banned. If you don't agree,
talk to the parents of the
babies killed in Connecticut
and tell them their precious
children were nothing more
than collateral damage in
the gun-control debate.
Evlyn Skurow
Crystal River

Stockholders
should share burden
This country was
founded on the belief of
"free enterprise." Any part
of the population may pur-
chase shares in the various
corporate enterprises. We
do this in the hope of mak-
ing money, but at the risk of
losing our principal.
Duke Energy is a company
that chose to risk the pur-
chase of Progress Energy
Inc., which turned out to be
costly in maintenance and
keeping to regulatory codes.
It is inherent that the
burden of expense should
be shouldered by the stock-
holders of that company
A perfect example of how
this system works:
In the early '60s, Con-
sumer Power Company of
Michigan (serving two-
thirds of the state) built a
$2 billion establishment in
the hopes of building a nu-
clear plant This was refused
by the nuclear commission,
causing a tremendous loss
to the company The company
then decided to withhold
stock dividends for five
years to recoup the loss. It
worked, and that company
is now solvent and still
serving two-thirds of that
state. That is how our free
enterprise system works.
You commissioners should
tell Duke to pay its rightful
taxes and show it how (if
necessary) by withholding
dividends.
Otherwise, the county
could confiscate (for back
taxes) the aforementioned
property and make it into a
waste-disposal incinerator
- and, thereby, stop subsi-
dizing a landfill every year
with taxpayers' $25.
You are well paid for a
part-time job with the ben-
efit of full retirement after
only serving two terms.
Your pay comes from those
of us who served our em-
ployer for 25 to 40 years for
a partial retirement. This is
our reason for demanding
fiscal responsibility and


not dreams of a port that we
would subsidize continually
Richard Johnson
Inverness

Expanding on Baxley
After reading Rep. Dennis
Baxley's comments on guns
in schools, I am forced to
admit he may be on to
something. But there is a
problem with giving guns to
elementary teachers and
school administrators. The
Sandy Hook school and
other elementary schools
employ mostly women as
teachers and increasingly
as school administrators.
Teaching these people to
use a gun doesn't mean they
could actually bring them-
selves to shoot someone, and
anyone who knows any-
thing about having guns for
protection knows that you
don't give a gun to a person
who isn't willing to use it.
Teachers are teachers
because they are nurturing,
caring, nonviolent people.
Expecting them to shoot an
armed kid is expecting a lot.
So, here's the creative part.
Hire retired military people
to teach, especially in ele-
mentary schools. This opens
up a new career track for
retired military folks, takes
untrained teachers off the
hook and makes hiring an
armed guard who does
nothing 99.99 percent of the
time unnecessary, thus sav-
ing the school district money
I can see the employment
ad now: "Wanted, third-
grade teacher. Must love
kids. Must be able to func-
tion in a collaborative envi-
ronment. Must be able to
shoot straight and be will-
ing to kill if necessary Spe-
cial consideration will be
given to Army snipers and
Navy SEALs." Sounds like
a win-win to me.
Karen Schuler
Hernando

Social Security debt
This letter is a reply to the
letter "Math not adding up"
by Harley Lawrence. He
starts out by showing his
displeasure about some
email a lady sent him about
ending the Bush tax cuts
for the rich. Mr Lawrence
says that would only save
$80 billion and it's not
worth playing around with.
He also goes on to say
that the Democrats raided
the Social Security trust fund.
This fund was raided every
year for 46 years by Repub-
licans and Democrats alike


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www.chronicleonline.com


until there was nothing to
raid. The Social Security
trust fund has $2.7 trillion
dollars in IOUs.
This year the general fund
will pay $190 billion to So-
cial Security, which leaves
$2.51 trillion owed to Social
Security This is not the
general fund contributing
to Social Security, this is a
debt being paid.
The letter-writer also says
we have been $1.5 trillion
short ever year, which is
close but not true. Here are
the figures:
2009: $1.4 trillion;
2010: $1.29 trillion;
2011: $1.29 trillion;
2012: $1.1 trillion.
At least the lady came up
with $80 billion.
This year we will spend
$711 billion on military
spending, China will spend
$143 billion, Russia will spend
$71 billion, and Canada
will spend $24.7 billion.
Maybe we could cut $250
billion from that toward
our $1.1 trillion problem.
So far the Bush tax cuts
have cost $3.5 trillion, and
hopefully we can cut spend-
ing in other areas and con-
tinue to enjoy the Bush tax
cuts. The two wars in Iraq
and Afghanistan so far
have cost us $1.4 trillion.
Mr Lawrence we are
going to have to do a lot of
playing around with money,
including the lady's $80 bil-
lion, to get rid of this $1.1
trillion. And its not going to
be Social Security that is a
legal debt.
Chuck Weiler
Crystal River

Port or green?
In reply to Ms. Brasmeis-







(352) 63-2 2


ter's letter regarding the
Port or going green, I am
not sure which one was the
real subject. I also do not
think the port is a viable
undertaking. However, I
feel the rest of her letter is
like so many when they talk
of going green and green
energy. Everyone wants to
talk about the benefits of
green energy, yet they
never address the financial
issues of this approach. So
far the present administra-
tion has spent hundreds of
millions of taxpayer dollars
in this direction, yet 95 per-
cent of these ventures have
failed in bankruptcy at our
expense. The present ad-
ministration has also re-
fused to expand any of our
present energy sources i.e.
the Keystone pipeline, coal
energy, and our own in-
country oil explorations.
What was to have solved
our problems has only made
us more dependent on oth-
ers and put thousands of
workers out of jobs!
Florida will not sustain any
wind-powered electrical
generation that could ever be
considered even "slightly"
viable. Maybe cool and
neat to look at, but nothing
but a taxpayer's money pit!
Having spent time near
Palm Springs, Calif., and
seen these vast fields of
wind generators with only
maybe 60 percent operat-
ing prompted me to seek
some answers. It seems to


be a well-known fact there
that the government will
subsidize the cost of the
initial installation. How-
ever, the general upkeep
and maintenance of these
machines often far exceeds
their actual operational
cost-benefit ratio. There-
fore, the owners operate
them, pocket the profits,
and then allow them to
crash, again at the tax-
payer's expense. The winds
in this area are consistently
very strong, something that
does not exist anywhere in
Florida. High maintenance
and the very unreliable na-
ture of sun and winds when
no power is generated are
always left out of the mix.
Power storage facilities for
these "off generation" win-
dows is an even bigger no-
payback story
Therefore it is foolish
and to advance such op-
tions in our present energy
situation. We need to ex-
pand our in-country oil ex-
plorations and refining,
and make the construction
of nuclear power plants
something that is realisti-
cally possible. The use of
green energy is a great en-
deavor and should not be
ignored; however, we must
be realistic in its viability
and actual return for cost.
To do otherwise is just a
foolish waste of money
John Cassell
Homosassa


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OPINION


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^^- 0019
^^^Hrl A OFF^^^^^





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



The price we pay
I am among the multi-
tude who signed a
MoveOn.org petition
Harley Lawrence de-
scribed in a recent letter.
I appreciate Mr.
Lawrence repeating some
of that petition for readers
who didn't get it.
The comment that Social
Security has nothing to do
with the deficit is true ex-
cept that our deficit in-
cludes the nation's debt to
Social Security because
the fund was indeed
raided for the general
fund.
Lawrence's statement
that ending the Bush tax
cuts for the wealthy can't
completely make up the
shortfall is true because
the worst financial assault
was caused by the unnec-
essary and futile wars
waged by the Bush admin-
istration. Ending them is a
plus, but it doesn't recover
the loss.
Social Security is fine
and should be left alone,
other than raising the cap.
But Medicare needs tweak-
ing; there is plenty of fraud
by vendors. Means testing
in the form of copayments
for the affluent would be
acceptable, but raising the
eligibility age is unthink-
able. People are living
longer, but this demo-
graphic doesn't apply to
hard working people
whose bodies are worn out
by age 65.
Mr Lawrence refers
today to his earlier letter
about "voters who didn't
share his values, didn't
have a clue about issues
and didn't know there are
three branches of govern-
ment or much about any-
thing else." I was disgusted
with his suggestion that
voters should be tested be-
fore being allowed to vote.
However, he made me
think that a test for candi-
dates, both IQ and mental
competence, might be a
good idea. At the time
Lawrence wrote, there was
a Florida sore loser whose
comments indicated he
might be certifiable.
Since I signed the peti-
tion that upset Mr.
Lawrence, I am aware of
the sender and I am proud
to say she is my friend and


OPINION


Letters to THE EDITOR


I wish there were more
like her. She doesn't mind
paying taxes because she
knows that taxes are the
price we pay for
civilization.
Mary B. Gregory
Homosassa

Dawsy's 'toys'
Have any of those complain-
ing of Sheriff Jeff Dawsy
and his "toys" ever needed
his assistance? Let me tell
you what happened to us:
My mother, suffering
from dementia, took off
from our home on a cold
December night around 10
p.m. We took off searching
for her to no avail. I called
her doctor because I was
under the impression that
an adult had to be missing
for 24 hours before law en-
forcement would get in-
volved, and I didn't know
what else to do. She told
me to call the sheriff's of-
fice immediately, that law
enforcement does not wait
the 24 hours for elderly
residents, they come right
away and that they did.
After initially searching
our property, riding the
streets in a patrol car and
not finding her, they
brought out the helicopter,
then they brought in dogs
from Gainesville and Or-
lando, and additional pa-
trol cars, still to no avail.
You must note that at the
time my mother was less
than 5 feet tall and
weighed 86 pounds, and so
would be difficult to find,
particularly if she was in
the woods surrounding
our neighborhood.
When daylight hit, Sher-
iff Dawsy brought out the
volunteer posse, replaced
patrol cars with deputies
on bikes riding slowly
through the area, and then
he brought out the ATVs so
that they could actually go
into the wooded areas to
look for her. It was an ATV
that found her lying on the
ground in the woods in a
fetal position, under a
tree. It appeared she had
been in that same position
all night.
I am glad the sheriff has
all of his toys, because
when you are in that situa-
tion, they are not toys, they
are his tools. They didn't


find my mother u
most 5 p.m. the n(
evening, but they
quit, they were p
professional and
and brought out
needed to find he
never be able to 1
sheriff and his de
enough for what
Just think if a c
missing on the ot
of the county. Ho
think the parents
feel if they were
the helicopter wa
on assignment an
they would have
one before they c
bring the helicop
to find their child


Bad bill by
On Dec. 12, state
Jimmie Smith, R
ness, introduced
would force Brig]
tures recipients t
remain in Florid
months for each
they received the
ship or else "rep;
money. Regardle:
whether the bill 1
a law, Mr. Smith d
scorn for his shoi
actions.
The Bright Fut
gram encompass(
ber of scholarship
awarded to top a(
in high school wh
attend one of Flo


until al- public universities. This is
ext my first issue with the
didn't plan: Bright Futures is a
ersistent, scholarship; it is not a
patient, loan. To ask students who
what was have studied hard to earn
er, I will the award to "repay" it is
thank the absurd and insulting.
deputies The proposed bill also
they did. essentially punishes re-
2hild was cent college graduates for
her side Florida's abysmal job mar-
w do you ket. Instead of being able
s would to go to greener economic
told that pastures, the affected stu-
as already dents would be forced to
id that work in Florida, where
to finish generally the only jobs
wouldd available for new gradu-
)ter over ates are part-time and
d? close to minimum wage.
This problem would only
Lyn Floyd be exacerbated if there
Inverness was an even larger pool of
college graduates.
Smith As it stands, this move
te Rep. would likely hurt Florida's
-Inver- economy rather than help.
a bill that As the cost advantage of
ht Fu- staying in state for college
to either potentially disappears,
a for six more talented college stu-
semester dents will choose to go
scholar- elsewhere for their educa-
ay" the tion and eliminate any ties
ss of to Florida.
becomes Instead of finding a way
deserves to create good jobs and
rtsighted stop the "brain drain" that
threatens Florida's future
ures pro- ability to be economically


es a num-
ps
chievers
4o plan to
rida's


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competitive, this bill pro-
poses that the state should
trap graduates. Mr. Smith
clearly hopes that the ad-
dition of even more
overqualified graduates
will cause the state's eco-
nomic problems to just
work themselves out magi-
cally, causing Florida to
become a center for jobs
that pay more than $8 an
hour rather than a center
for college graduates who
wait tables. No wonder tal-
ented youngsters are leav-
ing the state in droves if
this is the kind of leader-
ship shown by officials.
Jeff Guertin
Beverly Hills


PSC keeps
Progress in line
Duke (Progress) Energy:
What is it? It's a utility
that's in the business of
generating electricity and
distributing it to con-
sumers. It is also a monop-
oly and as such is
regulated by the state Pub-
lic Service Commission
(PSC).
What does this electric
utility pay taxes on? It
pays taxes on the electric
generating plants, the
poles that hold its wires,


SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 All


the wires that bring the
electricity to you and all
the property that it owns,
including rights of way. It
also pays taxes on all the
personal property that it
owns.
Who pays these taxes?
You guessed it, we do, you
and me and all the con-
sumers who use electricity
It is in the bill that we re-
ceive every month.
The PSC does a very
good job for us. It watches
Progress very carefully
and must approve every-
thing that Progress does or
wants to do. Progress must
be allowed to make a
profit and pay its investors
a fair and competitive re-
turn on their investment.
The PSC watches this very
carefully They both must
plan for the future in a
very time-consuming
manner.
When the state Legisla-
ture encouraged the utili-
ties to move their
coal-fired plants to have
cleaner emissions, it gave
the electric-generating
companies an incentive to
buy scrubbers. The incen-
tive wash t he scrubbers
would be taxed at a much
lower rate. This was a
good deal for them and us.
But then along came Cit-
rus County, which went to
court to get the deal
changed so that it could
tax the scrubbers at full
price to be determined by
the tax appraiser. Up went
the cost of electricity. Now
the people in Citrus
County are complaining
about how much electric-
ity costs. Hooray for Citrus
- we stand alone.
The PSC just ruled that
Progress must refund over
$100 million to its con-
sumers. Just where is it
going to get this money?
You got it right again -
from the consumers by
charging us less or, you
could say, giving us a dis-
count. We get the same
amount of electric, but pay
less for it.
Alfred E. Mason
Crystal River


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NATION


&
CITRUS COUNT


W WORLD
Y CHRONICLE


N BRIEFS EmbattldAsd akS daBRIEFS
Kgs rings e sa to spe unCompromised cat
AssocIated Press -o asanot lear what kind
ofrinitiativer if any, Assad
PTI'IPITT __ ~mwn Pitc, _. nsor f'', n h e cnoonh


Associated Press
Juanita Alvarado, who has
worked at Las Palamas
Bakery for nine years, places
roscas in boxes Jan. 3 in
Brownsville, Texas. The
breads are part of the Dia
de los Reyes, celebrated
Jan 6. The celebration is
the Latin American equiva-
lent of Epiphany, and trans-
lates as "The Day of the
Kings."

Winter will challenge
Shell ship salvage
ANCHORAGE, Alaska -
Responders were preparing to
hook a main tow line to an oil-
drilling ship grounded on rocks
near a remote Alaskan island.
Officials overseeing the re-
sponse to the grounding of
Royal Dutch Shell's Kulluk
barge said they could use the
line to "test capabilities" as they
prepare to recover the ship.
But the plans Saturday were
subject to tides and weather.
They can be fierce in the
North Pacific during winter.
Officials also hope to deploy
oil-soaking booms around
nearby Kodiak Island, espedally
near any salmon streams.
They say there's no sign
the hull has been breached or
that oil has spilled from the
vessel. It ran aground during
a year-end storm.
iPhone owner tricks
thief using dating app
NEW YORK -A New York
City musician used a combi-
nation of technology, seduc-
tion, a hammer and a bribe to
reclaim his missing iPhone
from a confused crook.
Jazz trombonist Nadav
Nirenberg said he left the
phone in a livery cab on New
Year's Eve. The next morning,
the 27-year-old learned via
email someone was sending
messages to women using a
dating app on the phone.
Nirenberg logged on to the
service and offered the man a
date posing as a woman.
He even posted a picture of a
pretty girl.
When the culprit arrived at
Nirenberg's Brooklyn apart-
ment building with wine, the
musician greeted him with a
$20 bill while holding a ham-
mer -just in case.
The thief handed him the
iPhone and left without a word.
WSJ: Buyers emerge
for Hostess brands
NEW YORK The makers
of Thomas' English muffins
and Tastykake snacks are
emerging as the two of the
bidders for Wonder Bread
and other Hostess bread
brands as the company tries
to sell off its assets under
bankruptcy-court oversight, a
newspaper reported Saturday.
The Wall Street Journal
said Hostess Brands Inc.
could reveal as early as next
week that Flowers Foods Inc.
and Grupo Bimbo SAB are in
discussions to acquire the
bread brands, which also in-
clude Nature's Pride. The re-
port said the brands could
command $350 million.
Grupo Bimbo's brands indude
Arnold breads, Thomas' Eng-
lish muffins and Entenmann's
cakes. Flowers Foods Inc.'s
brands include Nature's Own
breads and Tastykake snacks.
Hostess sells Twinkles, Ding
Dongs and Ho Hos, along with
Dolly Madison cakes, which
includes Coffee Cakes and
Zingers.
Hostess, which is based in
Irving, Texas, announced in
November that it was shutting
down its business and selling
its bread, snacks and cakes
brands.
-From wire reports


dent Bashar Assad will de-
liver a speech on Sunday in
a rare address to the nation,
state media said, as rebels
fighting to topple his embat-
tled regime pressed ahead
with an offensive on the
capital.
The official SANA news
agency said in a brief state-
ment Saturday that Assad
will speak about the latest
developments in Syria. The
speech would be the first by
the leader since June, and
comes amid intense fighting
between government troops
and rebels on the outskirts
of Damascus.
Assad has rarely spoken
in public since the uprising
against him began in March
2011. In each of his previous
speeches and interviews,
the president has dug in his
heels even as Western pow-
ers have moved to boost the
opposition in Syria's civil
war


," : : .
~-
Associated Press
A family crosses a street piled with rubbish Jan. 5 in Aleppo,
Syria. The revolt against President Bashar Assad started in
March 2011 began with peaceful protests but morphed into
a civil war that has killed more than 60,000 people,
according to a recent United Nations recent estimate.


Assad vowed in an inter-
view with Russia Today on
Nov 8 that he would "live
and die in Syria."
Fighting has raged for
weeks in the neighborhoods
and towns around Damascus
that have been opposition
strongholds.


The rebels are trying to
push through the govern-
ment's heavy defenses in
Damascus, prompting the
regime to unleash a wither-
ing assault on the suburbs
that has included intense
barrages by artillery and
warplanes.


ylla.x llUl I11 b blu i, l.
Meanwhile, the violence
continued unabated Saturday
Rebels and government
troops clashed in suburbs
south of Damascus, includ-
ing Harasta and Daraya, the
Britain-based Syrian Obser-
vatory for Human Rights
said. Fighting in Daraya
alone left 10 dead, including
six rebels, according to the
Observatory, which relies
on reports by activists on the
ground.
The army dispatched fresh
reinforcements to Daraya,
part of an offensive aimed at
dislodging rebels from the
district, the Observatory said.
Government troops also
arrested several residents in
raids in the suburb of Qatana,
the Observatory said. Fight-
ing was also heavy in the
central province of Hama,
Idlib. Besides the deaths in
Daraya, 35 people were
killed around the country,
the group said.


Lonely rider


i, -- .-

......
S-t.~-.?.-. :-



.- = ..-_ .
-- -' -,-.-.v ,-.... .
. ... --. -- --


* ~ ..


Associated Press
Argentina's Claudio Clavigliasso rides his quad Saturday in Stage 1 of the 2013 Dakar Rally near Pisco, Peru.
It's the second year that the long-distance race involving hundreds of cars and motorbikes has included Peru.
The race began Saturday and will cross into Chile and Argentina before ending Jan. 20.





Four killed in standoff at townhome


AURORA, Colo. A gun-
man barricaded inside his
Colorado home fired shots
at police from a second-
story window before he was
killed as SWAT officers
stormed the home Saturday
Once inside, they found the
bodies of three other adults,
authorities said.
The suspect, whose name
was withheld by police, held
officers at bay for nearly six
hours after neighbors re-
ported gunfire at 3 a.m. in-
side the modest townhome
in the Denver suburb of Au-
rora, said police Sgt. Cas-
sidee Carlson. It wasn't
known if officers shot the
suspect or if he shot himself.
Investigators said two
men and a woman appeared
to have been killed before
officers arrived.
The suspect shot at police
who approached the front of
the home with an armored
vehicle and who fired tear
gas around 8:15 a.m. He was


Associated Press
Police respond to the scene of a barricaded man Saturday in
Aurora, Colo. Four people, including an armed suspect, died
during an hours-long police standoff Saturday at a Colorado
townhome, authorities said.


killed when he fired at offi-
cers from the second-story
window about 45 minutes
later, Carlson said.
"After we arrived on
scene, there were no more
shots fired up until he fired
at us," Carlson said. "During
this time he was all over the
house. He moved furniture.


He was throwing things.
He was agitated. He was
irrational."
A large front window was
missing in the two-story town-
home, the window's mini-
blinds in disarray Bullet
holes marked two upstairs
windows, and neighbors
milled about outside.


A fifth person escaped
unharmed and called police
to report that she saw three
people inside the home who
"appeared lifeless," said
Carlson, who declined to
elaborate about the
woman's escape.
A motive for the killings
was unknown, and police
had yet to say what weapon
or weapons were used. In-
vestigators wearing gloves
and carrying evidence bags
were going over the crime
scene.
Police declined to release
the victims' names.
"We have an idea of who
they are, but we obviously
want to confirm their iden-
tities with the coroner," said
Carlson, who declined to re-
lease the relationship be-
tween the victims and the
shooter.
Officers evacuated neigh-
bors' homes during the
standoff and used a bull-
horn to communicate with
the gunman, urging him to
surrender.


Associated Press
Guards hold a cat that has
items taped to its body at
a medium-security prison in
Arapiraca, in Alagoas state,
Brazil. A prison official says
they caught the cat slip-
ping through a prison gate
with a cell phone, drills,
small saws and other con-
traband taped to its body.
Cat used in Brazil
prison smuggling try
SAO PAULO Guards
thought there was something
suspicious about a little white
cat slipping through a prison
gate in northeastern Brazil. A
prison official said that when
they caught the animal, they
found a cellphone, drills,
small saws and other contra-
band taped to its body.
Alagoas state prisons
spokeswoman Cinthya
Moreno said the cat was
caught New Year's Eve at the
medium-security prison in the
city of Arapiraca.
The 0 Estado de S. Paulo
newspaper reported Saturday
that all of the prison's 263 in-
mates are suspects in the
smuggling attempt, though it
said a prison spokesman said
"It will be hard to discover
who is responsible since the
cat does not speak."
Spanish police seize
ancient vase
MADRID The owner of
an antique shop in Spain was
arrested after police investi-
gators found a vase there
dating back to the late second
century B.C., officials said
Saturday.
The antiquity had been ille-
gally plundered from an Iberian-
era archeological site in the
province of Alicante, an Inte-
rior Ministry statement said.
Inspectors found it in a
cardboard box during a rou-
tine search of the shop in the
eastern town of El Campello.
"We are not yet aware of
the full importance of this dis-
covery, but in 20 years' time
we will still be talking about
this vase," said Jose Luis
Simon, an expert from the
cultural heritage service of the
Ministry of Culture.
Simon said the piece
showed decorative paintwork
from the Iberian era that tells
the story of a hunter who had
managed to kill a wild boar,
one of the rituals of the time
that proved a youth had at-
tained the status of
manhood.
He said that while frag-
ments of vases from this an-
tiquity exist in Spain, this was
the first to be found whole,
making it "of exceptional
value."
Simon said the hunting se-
quences showed similarities
to some found on an ancient
Greek vase, known as a
crater, in the Vatican museum
in Rome.
He said it has been moved
to the Alicante Archeological
Museum for safekeeping.
Chavez allies re-elect
legislative chief
CARACAS, Venezuela -
Allies of President Hugo
Chavez on Saturday chose to
keep the same National As-
sembly president a man
who could be in line to step in
as a caretaker leader in some
circumstances.
Diosdado Cabello was re-
tained as legislative leader in
a vote by a show of hands.
Chavez's allies hold a major-
ity of the 165 congressional
seats.
Just five days remain until
Chavez's scheduled inaugu-
ration on Thursday, and gov-
ernment officials are
suggesting the swearing-in
could be delayed as the pres-
ident fights a severe respira-
tory infection after cancer
surgery in Cuba.
-From wire reports


Associated Press











EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


* Veterans Notes can be found on Page A15 of .
today's Chronicle.


Associated Press
Visitors explore the Castillo de San Marcos in St. Augustine. The nation's oldest fort was built by Spanish settlers between 1672 and 1695 and used to fight off pirates,
hostile natives, French, British and South Carolinian forces. This year, Florida is marking the 500th anniversary since the explorer Ponce de Leon landed in Florida in April
1513, with a series of events related to the state's Spanish heritage and other aspects of its history.


Sunshine State celebrates five centuries of Spanish heritage


SUZETTE LABOY
Associated Press
-MIAMI
W hen Juan
Ponce de
Leon
searched for
riches in Florida, he
unknowingly helped turn
the Sunshine State into
the first travel destination
in the United States.

In April 1513, the Spanish monarchy
contracted the explorer to find another
island off Cuba that was rumored to
have great riches. Instead he landed in
Florida and named it "La Florida,"
after the "feast of the flowers" during
Spain's Easter celebrations.
Five centuries later, the state is cele-
brating its Spanish heritage with a se-
ries of events throughout 2013.
"It was always seen as an exotic
place," historian Dr J. Michael Francis
said of Florida. "That's something that
Florida tourism continues to market on
some level."
Although Florida's history dates back
more than 12,000 years with Native
Americans, the statewide campaign
"Viva Florida 500" will highlight the
start of a new era with de Leon's adven-
turous voyage to the New World.
"He was the first visitor to the United
States," said Will Seccombe, president
and CEO of Visit Florida, the state's of-
ficial tourism marketing corporation.
"That's 500 years of explorers and they
kept coming back."
Tourism is Florida's No. 1 industry,
responsible for welcoming 87.3 million
visitors in 2011, according to state offi-
cial estimates.
Many visitors may know Florida
mostly for its 825 miles (about 1,330
kilometers) of beaches or as the theme
park capital of the world, but the "Viva
Florida" campaign is designed to
broaden their outlook, Seccombe said.
The state will host 150 celebrations that
"highlight cultural diversity and the art
culture history that makes up the fabric
of our communities."


A statue of Spanish explorer Ponce de Leon stands at the foot of the Bridge of Lions
in St. Augustine's Plaza de La Constitucion. On April 2, 2013, St. Augustine will un-
veil another statue of de Leon at the exact latitude logged by his ship the day before
he claimed "La Florida" as a Spanish territory in April 1513.


After de Leon's visit, European set-
tlers colonized present-day St. Augus-


tine, the nation's oldest city. Visitors to
the city can find many references to the


Spanish colonial era, from the massive
Castillo de San Marcos fort that pro-
tected the city from attack, to the color-
ful Spanish architecture and narrow
streets. (Full-scale replicas of Ponce de
Leon's flagship will visit the city in
April).
De Leon probably wasn't the first Eu-
ropean to set foot in Florida, and there
is even debate on where he landed ex-
actly: Melbourne Beach, St Augustine
or South Ponte Vedra Beach. But all of
these suggested spots are based on
fairly tenuous documentation.
"It's unlikely we will ever know the
precise landing spot," said Francis,
Hough Family Chair of Florida Studies
at the University of South Florida in St.
Petersburg, Fla. "There is no archaeo-
logical footprint. No logbook. And even
if found, there's no guarantee we would
even know from that."
The commemoration, he said, is not
about pinpointing the Spanish legacy
but about rediscovering "and maybe
even discover for the first time
Florida's colonial history"
Francis also wants to set the record
straight about the search for eternal
youth: There is no mention of the Foun-
tain of Youth in de Leon's contracts
with Spanish crowns or in his own writ-
ings, Francis said.
"Over time that story became more
embellished," Francis said. "What
started as a myth ended up in the writ-
ings of later historians and chroniclers
as history."
But the legend lives on in Florida's
700 natural springs and with spas,
health resorts and yoga retreats.
Kicking off the 2013 celebration of
European discovery was "La Gran
Naranja" or the "Big Orange" drop a
35-foot LED neon orange LCD descend-
ing from the side of a downtown Miami
hotel on New Year's Eve. The word
naranja comes from the sweet Valencia
orange the Spanish introduced to
America, later becoming Florida's offi-
cial state fruit.
Throughout the year, 150 events
across the state will mark the anniver-
sary: Drive the Spanish Heritage Trail.
Dive on historic shipwrecks. Tour a
Spanish basilica and mission village.
Visit orange groves and cattle ranches.
Taste the flavors of Florida. Other
events will include plenty of festivals
with re-enactments and more.


DREAM
VACATIONS
ffpp Eat t


The Chronicle and The Accent Travel Group are If it's selected as a winner, it will be published Please avoid photos with dates on the print.
sponsoring a photo contest for readers of the in the Sunday Chronicle. Photos should be sent to the Chronicle at
newspaper. At the end of the year, a panel of judges will 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River,
Readers are invited to send a photograph from select the best photo during the year and that FL 34429 or dropped off at the Chronicle office
their Dream Vacation with a brief description of the photograph will win a prize, in Inverness, Crystal River or any
trin Accent Travel Office.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Keep pets, like


kids, under control


SUNDAY EVENING JANUARY 6, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House DA: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 17:30 I 8:00 I 8:30 9:00 19:30 110:00110:30 11:00 11:30
0 WESH NBC 19 19 News News Dateline NBC (N) (In Stereo) N The Biggest Loser (In Stereo) 'PG' News Access
Masterpiece Classic (In To Be Announced Masterpiece Classic "Downton Abbey Season 3" To Be Announced
S WEDUiN PBS 3 3 14 6 Stereo) 'PG' Wedding guests arrive. (N) 'PG'
0 WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Doc Martin'PG' NOVA'PG' |Secrets of Highclere Masterpiece Classic 'PG' (DVS) Doc Martin 'PG'
L. NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly Dateline NBC A couple receives shocking medi- The Biggest Loser (Season Premiere) Adults News Get Sub D
S NB 8 8 8 8 8 News cal news. (N) (In Stereo) N and teens try to lose weight. (N) 'PG'
W FTV ABC 20 20 20 News World Once Upon a Time (In Once Upon a Time (N) Revenge "Power' (N) Happy Apartment News Sports
ABC 20 20 20 News Stereo)'PG' 'PG' *'PG' N Endings 2 Night
] S P CBS 10 10 10 10 10 Basketball 10 News 60 Minutes (N) (In Person of Interest The Good Wife (N) (In The Mentalist (N) (In 10 News, Paid
CBS 10 10 10 10 10(N) Stereo) sN"Identity Crisis"'14' Stereo)'14'" Stereo)'14'" 11pm (N) Program
NFL Football NFC Wild-Card Game: Teams The Bob's Family Guy American FOX13 10:00 News (N) News Burn
0 TTFOX 13 13 13 13 TBA. (Time Tentative). (In Stereo Live) N Simpsons Burgers 14' Dad 14' (In Stereo) N Notice'14'
E DWCJ ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Once Upon aTime Once Upon aTime Revenge (N) PG' Happy Apt. 23 News Inside Ed.
LF IND 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stakel/ Truth Great Awakening Love a Place for A. Womm Daniel Jesse Bridging Great
S W IND 2 2 2 22 22 Terror Transfms Child G' Miracles Wommack Kolinda Duplantis the Gap Awaken
T ABC 11 11 11 News World Once Upon a Time (In Once Upon a Time (N) Revenge "Power (N) Happy Apartment News Castle'PG'
S FTSABC 11 11 11 News Stereo)'PG' 'PG' *'PG' N Endings 23
OR-^ IN 12 12 16 Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & OrderFamily Law & Order How I Met How I Met The Office The Office
LW IND 12 12 16 '14' 'PG' Theory Theory Business"'PG "F l '*PG' 'PG'
@ WTTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 ** "The Open Road"(2009) 'PG-13' Seinfeld Seinfeld Chris Chris Tampa Whacked Born-Ride Honor
D [WACX TBN 21 21 Dr. C.Stanley Rejoice in the Lord Paid Paid Journey World Connec Jim Raley Dayna Brody
King of Two and Two and Engagement CSI: Miami "Count Me CSI: Miami"Delko for Cold Case (In Stereo) Movie'PG'
IM CW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens Half Men Half Men Out"'14 the Defense"'14' '14 '
___ Casita Big Rotary Sunflower Inverness Your Citrus County Court ISpy'Y' Eye for an Famn Team
M N ME FAM 16 16 16 15 Dog Club Spotlight Eye
S) CWOX FOX 13 7 7 NFL Football Simpsons |Burgers |Fam. Guy American FOX 35 News at 10 TMZ(N) PG'K
' WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Comned. |Noticiero AqufyAhora (SS) PremiosOye! 2012 (N) (SS) Saly Pimienta'14 Comed. |Noticiero
I w ION 17 Monk'PG' Monk'PG' MonkPG LawLaw Order: Cl Law Order: ClLaw Order: Cl
Shipping Shipping Srage Storage Storage Storage Storage ral Sge Storage Storage Bethe Boss "Signal 88
(A&E) 54 48 54 25 27 Wars'PG' WarsPG arsPG'WaarsPG War sPG Wars'PG' WarsPG' WarsPG WarsPG' Wars Security" (N) PG
*** "Signs" (2002, Suspense) Mel Gibson, **2 "Bring It On" 2000, Comedy) Kirsten **2 "Bring It On" (2000, Comedy) Kirsten
i 55 64 55 Joaquin phoenix. 'PG-13' Dunst. Premiere. 'PG-13' Dunst, Eliza Dushku. 'PG-13'm
Gator Boys "Warrior Gator Boys: Xtra Bites Gator Boys: Xtra Bites Gator Boys "Mississippi Finding Bigfoot (N) (In Gator Boys "Mississippi
52 35 52 19 21 Gator"'PG'B (N)'PG' (N)'PG' or Bust"'PG' Stereo PG or Bust"'PG'
"The Last Fall" (2012) Lance Gross. An NFL player ** "Four Brothers" (2005) MarkWahlberg. Siblings seek Family Family
96 19 96 struggles with life after his career is over. 'NR' revenge for their adoptive mother's murder R' First First
RAV01 254 51 254 Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. |Housewives/Atl. Shahs of Sunset'14' Housewives/Atl. Happens Atlanta
"Dinner- *** "Hot Tub Time Machine" (2010, Comedy) John ** "1 Love You, Man" (2009, Comedy) Paul Tosh.O0 Tosh.0
27 61 27 33 Schm" Cusack, Rob Corddry, Craig Robinson. R' Rudd, Jason Segel. Premiere. 'R '14'B '14'
Nashville Teddy tells Nashville "Where He Reba 'PG' Reba 'PG' RebaPG Reba PG' Reba PG' Reba 'PG' Redneck Island (In
98 45 98 28 37 Raynathetruth.'PG' Leads Me"'PG' M B M M M M Stereo)'PG'
(CNBC 43 42 43 Paid Paid Princess On Car Crash BMW: A Driving Obs. American Greed 60 Minutes on CNBC
IM ) 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) The Coming Storms Piers Morgan CNN Newsroom (N) The Coming Storms
5 Austin & Shake It Jessie Jessie Dog With a Dog With a Dog With a Dog With a Jessie Good- Austin & Austin &
S 46 40 46 6 5 Ally'G' Up! 'G' 'G' G' Blog G Blog G Blog 'G' Blog G 'G' Charlie Ally 'G' Ally 'G'
(ESPNl 33 27 33 21 17 Strong Strong Strongest Man NFL PrimeTime (N) College Football: GoDaddycom Bowl
N 34 28 34 43 49 World Series of Poker- Europe Final Table. From Cannes, France. SportsCenter Special (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N)
(EWYN) 95 70 95 48 Devotions |Crossing jWorld Over Live |Sunday Night Prime G.K. |Rosary |Fran. God |Bookmark
** "The Notebook" (2004, Romance) Ryan Gosling, Rachel ** "Letters to Juliet" (2010, Drama) Amanda Bunheads (In Stereo)
29 52 29 20 28 McAdams. A man tells a story to a woman about two lovers. NR' Seyfried. Premiere. PG '14'm
S* "Happy Accidents" (2000) MarisaTomei. *** "Always" (1989, Fantasy) Richard *** "Once Around" (1991) Richard Dreyfuss,
UX) 118 170 Premiere. (In Stereo)'R' Dreyfuss, Holly Hunter, Brad Johnson. 'PG' Holly Hunter. (In Stereo)'R'B
FNC 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
OOi) 26 56 26 Rachael v. Guy Rachael v. Guy Chopped (N) Rachael v. Guy Iron Chef America Restaurant Stakeout
(FN$L 35 39 35 Women's College Basketball |Game 365 College Basketball College Basketball Oregon at Oregon State.
S 30 60 *** "Foretting Sarah Marshall" (2008, *n "Grown Ups" (2010, Comedy) Adam "Grown Ups" (2010, Comedy) Adam
30 60 30 1 Romance-Comedy) Jason Segel.'R' Sandier, Kevin James, Chris Rock PG-13' SandIer, Kevin James, Chris Rock. PG-13'
GOLF 727 67 727 PGA Tour Golf Hyundai Tournament of Champions, Third Round. (N) (Live) Central |PGA Tour Golf
**"The Nanny *** "The Wish List" (2010, Romance) "The Seven Year Hitch" (2012, Romance- Frasier Frasier 'PG'
fiLL 59 68 59 45 54 Express" (2009) B Jennifer Esposito, David Sutcliffe. B" Comedy) Natalie Hall, Darin Brooks. B 'G'
( o 302 201 302 2 2"The New ** "The Three Stooges" (2012) *** "Rise of the Planet of the Apes" (2011) Girls'MA' Girls'MA' Enlightened Enlightened
E 302201 302 2 2 World" Sean Hayes. PG James Franco.'PG-13'B
** "Trust the Man" (2005) David Duchovny, ** "Joyful Noise" (2012) Queen Latifah, *2 "Something Borrowed" (2011) Ginnifer
303 202 303 Julianne Moore. (In Stereo) 'R' B Dolly Parton. (In Stereo)'PG-13' Goodwin. (In Stereo)'PG-13' m
HGTV 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters |Hunt Intl Hunters |Hunt Intl Extreme Homes'G' Property Brothers'G' House Hunters Reno Hunters Hunt Intl
(fic) 51 25 51 32 42 American Pickers American Pickers Ax Men DJ Jeremiah is Ax Men "Cage Match" Bamazon "Divided We Pawn Stars Pawn Stars
*IM 51 25 51 32 42 'PG' 'PG' pushed to far. '14' (N)'14'" Fall" (N)'14' 'PG' 'PG'
31 "Fugitive at 17" "Stalked at 17" (2012, Suspense) Taylor "An Amish Murder" 2013, Mystery) Neve "Stalked at 17" (2012)
24 38 24 31 (2012) NR' Spreitler, Chuck Hittinger. 'NR' Campbell. Premiere. 'MR' 'NR'
"Stranger With My Face" (2009, Suspense) "The Initiation of Sarah" (2006, Suspense) "The Haunting of Sorority Row" (2007,
HN 50 119o Alexz Johnson, Catherine Hicks. B JenniferTilly Mika Boorem. NR' Drama) Leighton Meester. NR'
S** "The Hangover Part II" (2011) *** "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban" (2004, *2 "The Sitter" (2011) Jonah Hill. "Sexual
(W X) 320 221 320 3 3 Bradley Cooper. 'R' Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe. (In Stereo) PG' (In Stereo) 'R' Quest"
(MSNB C 42 41 42 -1 Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera |To Catch a Predator Predator Raw |Lockup Tampa
Taboo "Freaky Taboo "Strange Taboo "Strange Drugs, Inc. (N)'14' Alaska State Troopers Drugs, Inc. '14'
(W 109 65 109 44 53 Remedies" Behavior" '14 Syndromes" 14' (N) 14'
(NJ 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. |Sponge. Sponge. |Sponge. See Dad "Rugrats in Paris: The Movie" Nanny |Nanny Friends |Friends
f 103 62 103 Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next My Life Is a Joke Oprah's Next
IIXY) 44 123 Snapped ISnapped PG' N Snapped PG' ISnapped Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Law Order: Cl
SShameless lan ignores Shameless Shameless Monica :hi,,.-i.- Great Shameless (In Stereo) Shameless "Fiona
(SH 340 241 340 4 Lip. 'MA' "Parenthood" 'MA' returns. 'MA' ..- i- 'MA' Interrupted" 'MA'
FIA GT1 World Champ. SPEED Superbike Barrett-Jackson Special Barrett-Jackson Special My Classic Car Crazy British Touring Car
[SPEED] 732 112 732 Highlights Center (N) Family Edition 'PG, L Edition 'PG, L Car 'G Championships
S***2 "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade" **2 "Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull" (2008, ** "Poseidon" (2006)
SPI 37 43 37 27 36 (1989) Harrison Ford.'PG-13' Adventure) Harrison Ford. Premiere. (In Stereo) 'PG-13'Josh Lucas.
** "Just Go With It" ** "Think Like a Man" (2012) Michael Ealy. *** "Under the Tuscan Sun" (2003 "The Girl With the
370 271 370 (2011)'PG-13' (In Stereo)'PG-13' B Romance) Diane Lane. (In Stereo) PG-13' Dragon Tattoo"'R'
NBA Basketball Washington Wizards at Miami Heat. From Heat Live! Inside the Ship Sprtsman Reel Time Fishing the Sport
36 31 36 the AmericanAirlines Arena in Miami. (Live) (N) (Live) HEAT Shape TV Adv Flats Fishing
"Stake Land" (2010) *2 "Resident Evil: Afterlife" (2010, Horror) **2 "The Dead" (2010, Horror) Rob Freeman, Prince David ***
SEYY 31 59 31 26 29 Nick Damici. 'R' Milla Jovovich, Ali Larter. 'R' Osei, David Dontoh. 'R' "Primal"
(JBS) 49 23 49 16 19 ** "Ghosts of Girlfriends Past" (2009) ** "The Wedding Date" |** "The Wedding Date" |Wedding Band 'MA'
S* "She Ware a Yellow Ribbon" (1949) **2 "Mr. Hobbs Takes a Vacation" (1962) **+ "Take Her, She's Mine" (1963, Comedy)
169 53 169 30 35 A,,,,, ,,, IH (DVS) James Stewart. Premiere.'NR' James Stewart. Premiere. NR
Moonshiners "Troubled Amish Mafia (In Stereo) Amish Mafia "Fire From Moonshiners (N) (In Moonshiners (N) (In Amish Mafia "Fire From
53 34 53 24 26 Waters" 14' '14' the Lord" 14' Stereo)BN Stereo)BN the Lord" 14'
(TLE 50 46 50 29 30 Honey |Honey Honey |Honey Here Comes Honey Here Comes Honey Best Funeral Ever Here Comes Honey
*** "Fright Night" (2011, Horror) Anton *2 "I Don't Know How She Does ** "Dummy" (2003) Adrien *** "The Italian Job"
S 350 261 350 Yelchin, Colin Farrell. (In Stereo) 'R' It"(2011) 'PG-13' Brody (In Stereo) 'R' (2003) 'PG-13'
*1 "Rush Hour 3" (2007, Action) Jackie Chan, **2 "Shooter" (2007) Mark Wahlberg. A wounded sniper ** "Shooter" (2007) Mark
48 33 48 31 34 Chris Tucker.PG-13 B plots revenge against those who betrayed him. Wahlberg. 'R' DVS)
N 38 58 38 33 "Percy Jackson & the Olympians" Looney |Dragons Oblongs |King/Hill King/Hill Cleveland Fam. Guy |Fam. Guy
TRAV 9 54 9 44 RV Crazy! G' Killer RV Upgrades Mega RV Countdown Extreme RVs 'G' Extreme RVs 'G' Extreme RVs 'G'
jiiTV) 25 55 25 98 55Storage StorStor atorage StorStoratorage StorStor atorage StorStoratorage Storage World's Dumbest...
(1TV 32 49 32 34 24 Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond |King
47 1 NCIS "Legend"'14'm NCIS"Legend"'14'm NCIS The death of an NCIS -, i. T...- NCIS "Jet Lag" (In "Over/Under" (2013)
47 32 47 17 18 ICE agent. 14' reunio,. I Stereo) '14' Steven Pasquale.
Braxton Family Values Braxton Family Values Braxton Family Values Braxton Family Values Braxton Family Values Mary Mary
117 69 117 14'20Videos |Bloo PG' Bloopers! Mother Mother |MotPG' her Mother Mother Ne14'ws Replay 30 Rock 30 PG'Rock
18 18 18 18 20 Videos Bloopers! Bloopers! TMother Mother Mother IMother IMother News IReplay 30Rock 30Rock


Dear Annie: No one
could love animals
more than I do. I
have had pets all my life and
have served on humane so-
ciety boards. Having said
this, let me ask all of you pet
lovers this question: How
would you feel if I walked
into your house
and relieved my-
self on your car-
peting or
hardwood floor?
This is an advi-
sory to all those
pet owners who
take undisci-
plined animals
into other peo-
ple's homes:
Please don't. It is
neither right nor
fair. Yes, Fluffy ANN
may be just too MAIL
cute, but not
when she is uri-
nating on my rugs.
A home is frequently the
largest investment most of
us make, and having it dam-
aged by undisciplined ani-
mals is just plain wrong. If
you must travel with a pet
that is not housebroken, use
a portable cage or kennel to
confine the animal. -Ani-
mal Lover
Dear Animal Lover: Many
people consider their pets
to be their children, but they
would be appalled if a child
were permitted to soil their
carpet We hope your letter
will inspire them to be
equally considerate when it
comes to their animal com-
panions.


SToday's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"Parental Guidance" (PG)
11 a.m., 1:40 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Les Miserables" (PG-13)
11:30 a.m., 3:15 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Django Unchained" (R)
ID required. 11:15 a.m.. 3:05 p.m.,
7:05 p.m., 9:50 p.m. No passes.
"Jack Reacher" (PG-13)
11:45 a.m., 3:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Monsters Inc" (G) In 3D.
11:05 a.m., 1:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Monsters Inc" (G) 3:50 p.m.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected
Journey" (PG-13) In 3D. 12 p.m.,
8 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected
Journey" (PG-13) 4 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Les Miserables" (PG-13)
11:30 a.m., 3:15 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Django Unchained" (R)
ID required. 12 p.m., 3:40 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.


"Parental Guidance" (PG)
11:35 a.m., 2:15 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10:50 p.m.
"Jack Reacher" (PG-13)
11:25 a.m., 2:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:40 p.m. No passes.
"This is 40" (R) ID required.
11:50 a.m., 2:50 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:45 p.m.
"Monsters Inc." (G) 2:10 p.m.
"Monsters Inc" (G) In 3D.
11:45 a.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
9:45 p.m. No passes.
"The Guilt Trip" (PG-13)
11:10 a.m., 2:05 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 9:40 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected
Journey" (PG-13) In 3D. 11 a.m.,
6:45 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected
Journey" (PG-13) 3 p.m.
"Playing for Keeps" (PG-13)
11:40 a.m., 2:25 p.m., 5:50 p.m.
"Lincoln" (PG-13) 11:15 a.m.,
2:30 p.m., 6:30 p.m., 9:50 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information. Movie
times provided by Regal Cinemas,
subject to change.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Playing card
6 Make a mess of
11 Casino offering
16 Mend
21 Immigrants' island
22 City in Nebraska
23 Use watercolors
24 Where Greeks once as-
sembled
25 Lariat
26 Ventilated
27 Out of practice
28 Giver
29 Form of "John"
30 Fragrant oil
31 Travel in
32 Youngster
34 Sheep
35 Swirled
38 Last letter
40 Tumbled
41 Paved ways (abbr.)
42 Stupefy
44 Uncontrolled movement
45 Sailor
47 Four-poster
49 Fully developed
52 Thin porridge
54 Relating to cows
56 One of the states
60 Turnstile
61 Vestige
62 Make out
63 Flavoring plant
65 Small colonist
66 Not rotten
67 Express
68 Catcher's glove
69 Tiny -
70 Cover with frosting
71 --Hashana
72 Plumlike fruit
73 That man's
74 Bungalow
76 Skittish
78 Jacket
79 Wee
80 "- Gantry"
81 Med. specialty
82 Laugh out loud
83 Speak
humorously
84 Have being
85 Redolence
88 Crowlike bird
89 Center
90 Proposition
in math
94 LaBelle or LuPone


95 And -!
96 Adore
97 Length times width
98 Time
99 Cigar residue
100 Black
102 Small rodent
103 Take unlawfully
104 Cudgel
105 Had top billing
107 Denomination
108 Golf great Sam-
109 Ponder
110 Bill of fare
111 South American cowboy
113 Hush!
114 Irrigate
115 Sister of Jo, Beth and
Amy
117 Cravat
118 Family member
119 Twelvemonth
121 Knock
124 One of a pair
126 Golden-touch king
128 Edible mollusk
132 "- Town"
133 Quid quo
134 Dispatch
135 Lends a hand
139 Holiday night
140 African antelope
142 Tease
144 Kitchen appliance
145 Table bird
147 More tractable
148 Juvenile heroine
149 Cat- -'- -tails
150 Equally
151 Blackboard
152 Delayer's motto
153 Insignificant
154 Moisten


DOWN
1 Otherworldly
2 Epic by Homer
3 Pituitary, e.g.
4 Wallop
5 Safe-travel org.
6 Miss the-
7 Leave
unmentioned
8 Scarlett's home
9 American Indian
10 Owned
11 Small branch
12 Giving praise
13 River in France


Explosive stuff
Fashion
Swim
a certain way
In the past
Skin cleanser
Push together
Rabbits
Cutting tool
Alert color
Brooks or Einstein
Doing nothing
Devour
Wire measure
Cal. abbr.
Way out
No luck
Old salutation
Excavated
Once more
Word with square or war
Sheer
Too hasty
Poison
Full of racket
Actress O'Neal
Cordial flavoring
Mr. Simpson
Food fish
Lowest part
Of the heavens
Undeveloped
region
Drama
Explosive device
Steep
Long walk
Substitute
for butter
Release
Brag
Went very fast
Something of use
Roman
counterpart
of Zeus
In front
Muscular
contraction
Class
"- Frome"
Valerie Harper role
Young equine
Compact
Refute
Rub out
Alma -
Batty
Done to -
Panhandler


Intensity
Agitated state
Liquor
Chem. or biol., e.g.
Daylight
God of war
Western Indian
Sine non
Manner
Holy Roman -
Do sums


120 The dawn
personified
121 Plant parts
122 Of hearing
123 donna
125 Complete
127 Bury
129 Not too warm,
not too cold
130 Bring out
131 Extend


134 Word with long
or birthday
136 Sign on a door
137 Time of fasting
138 Victim
141 Wager
143 Winglike part
144 Swab
145 Car for hire
146 Pub drink


Puzzle answer is on Page A16.


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Dear Annie: Instead of
telling "Plus-Sized Good
Catch" that people tend to
judge one's outward ap-
pearance, you should have
told her that there are on-
line groups made for men
who love large women.
And when you printed a
bunch of letters
in response, only
one was from a
man who likes
large women, but
I know my hus-
band wrote you,
too. Why didn't
you print his? -
La Crescenta,
Calif.
Dear La Cres-
centa: We are
glad your hus-
HIE'S band wrote, but
-BOX unfortunately, we
can only print a
fraction of the
thousands of letters we re-
ceive. We try to keep our re-
sponses representative of
the mail that comes in.
U
Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar, longtime
editors of the Ann Landers
column. Email questions to
anniesmailbox@
comcast.net, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate, 737
Third St., Hermosa Beach,
CA 90254. To find out more
aboutAnnie's Mailbox and
read features by other
Creators Syndicate writers,
visit www. creators.com.


A14 SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT


L





CImus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOT E


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well as
events to which the public is in-
vited. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.

POST NEWS
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Saturday
monthly at 1 p.m. for lunch and
coffee at the Country Kitchen
restaurant in Brooksville, 20133
Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50,
east of U.S. 41). All Coastie vet-
erans are welcome. For more
information, call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
All are welcome at the post
yard sale beginning at 9 a.m.
Saturday, Jan. 12, and Sunday,
Jan. 13. Seafood boil from 2 to
7 p.m.; cost is $7.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155 is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Lounge
open at 11 a.m. Monday
through Saturday and noon on
Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the American
Legion, American Legion Rid-
ers and 40/8 families have din-
ners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The post is currently taking
consideration for new bands,
deejays and karaoke entertain-
ers for the upcoming year. If in-
terested in being considered as
an entertainer or musician at
the post, call Elfi Baker or Patti
Foster at 352-795-6526.
For more information about
the post and its other activities,
call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at 352-
302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters, daugh-
ters, granddaughters, great-
granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
wartime. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663,
or membership chairman Bar-
bara Logan, 352-795-4233.
The Auxiliary will have its an-
nual Chili/Cornbread Cook-off
and Chinese Auction on Satur-
day, Jan. 26, at the post home,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River.
After the judging by local dig-
nitaries and the award of
prizes, the chili and cornbread
will be available for purchase.
To enter chili or cornbread,
have it at the post by 11:30 a.m.
Saturday, Jan. 26.
While judges make their de-
cisions, the Chinese auction will
feature many items. Doors will
open about 11 a.m. and the
winning tickets will be picked
about 2 p.m. Everyone is
welcome.
For more information, call
Unit President Sandy White at
352-249-7663, or Chairperson
Barbara Logan at 352-
795-4233.
U H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers ac-
tivities such as meals, bingo,
golf, darts, karaoke, pool and
more for members and guests.
Review the monthly newsletter
for activities and updates, and
call the post at 352-746-0440.
The VFW Post 10087 is off
County Road 491, directly be-
hind Cadence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 746-0440. The
Cake Crab Company Golf
League plays at Twisted Oaks


G.C. Monday at 8 a.m. Check
with Jack Gresham for tee
times.
The VFW Mixed Golf League
plays Thursdays alternating be-
tween Twisted Oaks Golf Club
and Citrus Springs Country
Club. Tee time is 8 a.m. New
players, both men and women,
are welcome. You do not have
to be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW


Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking is
allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Chicken parmesan dinner
from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, Jan.
11. Cost is $8; children younger
than 6 eat for $4. All are
welcome.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call 352-
465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive. We thank veterans
for their service and welcome
any disabled veteran to join us
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tues-
day or Thursday at the chapter
hall. This is also the time that
we accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart at
352-419-0207, or 352-
344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone Com-
mander Linda Brice at 352-560-
3867 or Adjutant Lynn Armitage
at 352-341-5334.One of the
DAVA's projects is making lap
robes and ditty, wheelchair and
monitor bags for needy veter-
ans in nursing homes. All who
wish to help in our projects are
welcome. We need to make the
items certain sizes, so please
call for information. We also
collect toiletry items for the vet-
erans. Good, clean material
and yarn are needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or Ar-
mitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries are at
906 Highway 44 East, Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495, or visit www.vfw4337.org
for information about all weekly
post activities.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month at 7
p.m. Dunnellon Young Marines
meet 6 p.m. Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4p.m.
All are welcome at the out-
door flea market and pancake
breakfast on Jan. 19. All-you-
can-eat breakfast is served
from 7:30 to 10:30 a.m. for $5.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second


Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive
in Inverness. This is an advo-
cacy group for current and fu-
ture veterans, as well as for
POWs and MIAs. Florida Chap-
ter 7 welcomes new members
to help promote public aware-
ness of the POW/MIA issue
and help veterans in need of
help. Full membership is open
to all individuals 18 years or
older who wish to dedicate time
to the cause. Visit the website


at www.rollingthunderfl7.com
for more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call
club President Ray Thompson
at 813-230-9750 (cell), or email
him at ultraray1997
@yahoo.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at the VFW in
Beverly Hills. Call JV Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Presi-
dent Elaine Spikes at 352-860-
2400 for information. New
members are welcome. Mem-
bership fee is $30 a year. Any
female relative age 16 or older
who is a wife, widow, mother,
mother-in-law, stepmother, sis-
ter, daughter, stepdaughter,
grandmother, granddaughter,
aunt or daughter-in-law of an
honorably discharged Marine
and FMF Corpsman eligible to
join the Marine Corps League,
and female Marines (former,
active and reserves) and asso-
ciate members are eligible for
MCLA membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200, Her-
nando; 352-726-3339. Send
emails to vfw4252@tampabay.
rr.com. Call or visit the post for
regular and special events, as
well as meetings. Google us at
VFW 4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at the
Sunday buffet breakfasts from
10 a.m. to noon; cost is $5.
The post welcomes everyone
to "Speed Bingo" at 10 a.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 9. Refresh-
ments will be available. Pro-
ceeds will benefit cancer aid
and research. Call 352-726-
5206 for information.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for informa-
tion. VFW membership is open
to men and women veterans
who have participated in an
overseas campaign, including
service in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The Korean Campaign medal
remains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans to join or transfer
to our Post 237 family. There
are many activities (call the
post for information), and
monthly dinners sell out fast
and are a big hit. Legionnaires,
Sons of the American Legion
(SAL), or American Legion Aux-
iliary (ALA) are active helping
veterans and the community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org to


view the calendar of upcoming
events. Call the post at 352-
746-5018.
The post will host a benefit
poker run Saturday, Jan. 26,
with proceeds going to support
American Cancer Society Mof-
fitt Cancer Center Ovarian Can-
cer Research and patients and
families served by Hospice of
Citrus County. A $10 entry fee
per rider will include a poker
hand and a meal at the end of
the run. Registration begins at
10 a.m. at American Legion
Post 237 in Beverly Hills. Last
bike in will be 4:30 p.m., when
food will be served. All vehicles
are welcome to participate.
Music will be provided and do-
nated by George Marshall.
There will be door prizes, a
50/50 drawing and fun. For
more information, call 352-
746-5018 or John Roby at 352-
341-5856.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Any veteran who has seen hon-
orable service in any of the
Armed Forces of the U.S. is eli-
gible for membership if said
service was within Korea, in-
cluding territorial waters and
airspace, at any time from Sept.
3, 1945, to the present or if said
service was outside of Korea
from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob Herman-
son at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the former Inverness
Highlands S & W Civic Associa-
tion building at 4375 Little Al
Point, off Arbor Street.. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 or Auxiliary pres-
ident Marie Cain at 352-697-
3151 for information about the
post and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food
available.
The post will do a bus tour to
Miami and Key West Feb. 18 to
24. Profits from the trip will be
used to purchase a brick for the
Fisher House Walk of Courage
and for new equipment for the
Color Guard of Post 77. The
Fisher House will be a home for
the families of hospitalized vet-
erans at the Malcom Randal
Veterans Hospital in
Gainesville; the Walk of
Courage will be the paved
walkway between the Fisher
House and the hospital. For
more information, call Alice at
352-860-2981.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 352-
726-5926.
American Legion Post


3557 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Located Next to Winn Dixie (352) 527-8855
wwwB ]q.-beckystrave:]service~.com P[0-[ Il


PLANTATION Reservation Suggested

S352-795-5797
Everything Outdoors www.c Plantation on Crystal River, 9301 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River
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SPECIALS


166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Dinner is at 6 p.m. and the
meeting follows at 7. All veter-
ans in the Homosassa/Ho-
mosassa Springs area are
invited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166. For informa-
tion about the post or the Amer-
ican Legion, call and leave a
message for the post com-
mander at 352-860-2090. Your
call will be returned within 24 to
48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for
the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959; or visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at
1 p.m. the third Tuesday of Jan-
uary, March, May, July, Sep-
tember and November at the
Citrus County Builders Associa-
tion, 1196 S. Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491), Lecanto.
All combat-wounded veterans,
lineal descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are invited. To
learn more about Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 MOPH,
visit the chapter's website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Purple
Heart has announced two
scholarship opportunities for
college-bound students -
Chapter 776's College of Cen-
tral Florida (CF) Endowed
Scholarship and the Military
Order of the Purple Heart
(MOPH) Scholarship for Aca-
demic Year 2013/14.
Chapter 776's CF Endowed
Scholarship for Academic Year
2013/14 awards $500 to an ap-
plicant accepted or enrolled at
CF as a full-time student (12 or
more semester credit hours).
Chapter 776 scholarship infor-
mation and an application can
be obtained at www.citruspur-
pleheart.org, or by calling 352-
382-3847. Chapter 776 must
receive scholarship applications
no later than 5 p.m. Feb. 28,
2013.
The MOPH Scholarship for
Academic Year 2013/14 awards
$3,000 to a member of the
MOPH; a spouse, widow, direct
lineal descendant (child,
stepchild, adopted child, grand-
child) of a MOPH member or of
a veteran killed in action, or


who died of wounds before
having the opportunity to be-
come a MOPH member. Great-
grandchildren are not eligible.
Applicant must be a U.S. citi-
zen, a graduate or pending
graduate of an accredited high
school; be accepted or enrolled
as a full-time student (12 se-
mester credit hours or 18 quar-
ter hours) at a U.S. college or
trade school and have at least
a 2.75 cumulative GPA based
on an un-weighted 4.0 grading
system. Scholarship applica-
tions must be received at
MOPH Headquarters in Spring-
field, Va., no later than 5 p.m.
Feb. 13, 2013. MOPH scholar-
ship information and an appli-
cation can be obtained by
visiting the MOPH website at
www.purpleheart.org.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social hour
follows. All Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are welcome. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-746-
1135, Ted Archambault at 352-
382-0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men's Auxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Monday. LAVFW meets at 5
p.m. and the membership
meeting is at 6:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday at the post. Call
the post at 352-447-3495 for in-
formation about the post and its
activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets at 7
p.m. third Thursday at the post
home, 6535 S. Withlapopka
Drive, Floral City. All eligible
veterans welcome. Call Com-
mander Tom Gallagher at 860-
1629 for information and
directions.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors meet at Denny's in Crys-
tal River at 2 p.m. the fourth
Thursday monthly. Call Jimmie
at 352-621-0617.

SERVICES & GROUPS
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to vet-
erans in need. Food donations
and volunteers are always wel-

See VETERANS/Page A16


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Discount .............................. $250.00
Total ......................$2,199.00


Feb.27,2013
Tampa Bay Downs..................$64 5
March 20, 2013
Lunch & Sightseeing
Gulf Coast Cruise...................$71
April 3, 2013
Epicurean Delight Day Trip....$67


I


I


I


SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 A15


m





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Honored at 15th annual Father Christmas Ball


100th BIRTHDAY


Jose Rivera


The Chet Cole Life
Enrichment Center of the
Key Center was the venue
this past Christmas for the
15th annual Father
Christmas Ball. Organizers
report the ball's events
were well received and it
was the most successful
year to date. All proceeds
go to Serving Our Savior
Food Ministry. The Rev.
Deacon Joan Bonnell Clark
was revealed as 2012
Father Christmas honoree.
Clark started the SOS food
ministry in 1996 with her
own money. By late 1996,
SOS was up and running
one half-day per week.
Now, Clark continues to
work hard for SOS and
other ministries at
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church. She
writes poetry and novels,
and attends poetry
gatherings throughout the
state.

Special to the Chronicle


Senior Friends to get together


Special to the Chronicle

Senior Friends for Life
will have lunch at 11 a.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 9, at
Yanni's Restaurant, 3297 S.
Suncoast Blvd., U.S. 19, Ho-
mosassa.
Order from the menu.
After lunch, the group will
go to Homosassa Butterfly
6991 W Cardinal St. The


tour will start at 1 p.m.; cost
is $7.42.
The club will have its
monthly meeting Monday,
Jan. 14, at the Inverness
Golf& Country Club, 3150 S.
Country Club Blvd. Regis-
tration will begin at 11 a.m.
Lunch will follow at
11:45 a.m.
The menu is: clam chow-
der with chicken Caesar


salad, or a half crab salad
wrap, bowl of fresh fruit
and dessert
A program will follow
with Betty Heintzelman,
who will display her han-
kies from around the world.
After the meeting, anyone
who wants to stay to play
cards may contact Larry
King or Ellen Jones.
The Friends will have


lunch at 11:30 a.m. Thurs-
day, Jan. 31, at the Ocean
Buffet Restaurant, 3425 S.W
College Road, State Road
200, Ocala. Buffet is $7.25,
with a 10 percent discount
for all seniors older than 65.
For reservations for
these activities, call Myrna
Hocking at 352-860-0819, or
Teddie Holler at 352-
746-6518.


Special to the Chronicle
Jose Rivera celebrated his centennial birthday among family
and friends at the Beverly Hills Lions Club on Thursday, Dec.
27, 2012. Sitting with him is his wife, Luz Rivera.


For the RECORD


Marriages 12/23/12 to
12/29/12
Corey Hansen Bullion, Floral
City/Amy Elizabeth Smith,
Floral City
Farhaad Cyrus Golkar,
Hernando/Michele Marie
Carroll, Hernando
William James Hackett Jr.,
Beverly Hills/Michelle Nelson,
Beverly Hills
Christopher Warren
Henderson, Dunnellon/Jasmine
Ara Mitchell, Dunnellon
Bryan William Latham,
Inverness/Karen Lynn Madison,
Inverness
Kane Alexander Mack,
Homosassa/Shannon Marie
Farabaugh, Crystal River
Steven Michael Noles,
Inverness/Ninozka Kristell


Escudero Atencio, Inverness
Christopher Lee Pursell,
Inverness/April Lynn
Prudhomme, Inverness
Joshua Simon,
Hernando/Minerva Casanas
Simon, Hernando
Jeremy Louis Wall,
Inverness/anessa Lee Ingles,
Inverness

Divorces and marriages filed
in the state of Florida are a
matter of public record,
available from each county's
Clerk of the Courts Office. For
Citrus County, call the clerk at
352-341-6400 or visit
www.clerk.citrus.fl.us. For
proceedings filed in another
county, contact the clerk in that
area.


Looking at the Starbucks gap


Starbucks has just broken the
sound barrier. With its latest
paper cup of premium coffee
selling for $7, I can hear my long-de-
ceased father screaming from the
grave, "Seven dollars for a cup of cof-
fee? My first car didn't cost seven dol-
lars! My first house didn't cost seven
dollars! Your grandfather had to work
on the back of a horse for a week to
make seven dollars!"
No doubt you've heard
similar harangues from
your parents or grandpar-
ents. "What on earth could
make a cup of coffee worth
seven dollars?" they ask.
"Do they put gold in it, or
is it like a lottery? Do you
win something?" Telling
them that the coffee's
made from Costa Rican JI
Finca Palmilera beans
means nothing to them. MUL
They are perfectly
happy to drink the store-brand coffee
they buy in 3-pound cans at the Shop
and Go Away, which they make in a
contraption called a "percolator" that
slowly boils away any coffee goodness
that might accidentally have survived.
They fail to understand why $7 coffee
in a paper cup is so wonderful, even
after you tell them the cup has had
your name written on it by a real
barista.
It's obvious there is a coffee gap be-
tween those who are content to swill
anything dark first thing in the morn-
ing and those who spend hundreds, if
not thousands, of dollars on coffee


VETERANS
Continued from Page A15

comed and needed. The
CCVC is on the DAV property
in Inverness at the corner of
Paul and Independence, off
U.S. 41 north. Hours of opera-
tion are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tues-
day and Thursday.
Appointments are encouraged
by calling 352-400-8952.
CCVC general meetings are at
10 a.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the DAV building in
Inverness. All active duty and
honorably discharged veterans,
their spouses, widows and wid-
owers, along with other veter-
ans' organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. The CCVC is a nonprofit
corporation; donations are tax
deductible. Members can
renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537, or at the meet-
ing. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Gerald A. Shonk Chapter
70 of Inverness announces the
design and availability of this
year's Citrus County Veter-


machines, roasters and premium
beans to make that perfect cup. It's
not the money; many people who
have never stepped into a coffee shop
have expensive tastes boats,
homes, horses, art but to them,
spending money on coffee may seem
an extravagant waste, as all obses-
sions are to the people who don't
share them.
Coffee doesn't just wake
S you up now, it says some-
thing about you, like one of

used to give us in grade
school. (For some reason, I
never became the forest
fire lookout the test pre-
dicted was my destiny) In
the coffee aptitude test, if
you still percolate pre-
M ground, no flavors added,
traditional coffee in a can
LEN for breakfast, chances are
extremely good that you
don't know the words to "Call Me
Maybe" and have never watched the
"Gangnam Style" video on your
iPhone. You have never been in a
Starbucks.
If you have a standard 12-cup drip
coffeemaker and buy a pre-ground
specialty brand, you wonder why peo-
ple make such a big deal over coffee.
The stuff you make at home tastes
fine, much better than that stuff they
give you on airplanes. You saw "Gang-
nam Style" on some talk show and
thought it was stupid/silly Is that all it
takes to make a hit record now?
If you have one of those machines


ans Appreciation Commemo-
rative Pin. In keeping with this
year's theme, "Honoring our
Military Retirees," the national
symbol of the bald eagle will
represent the men and women
who made military service a
career. The image is set in the
outline of Citrus County. The
pins are available for $3 each
by calling the chapter at 352-
344-3464, or John Seaman at
352-860-0123. They are also
available at the Citrus County
Veterans Service Office. All
proceeds benefit Chapter 70's
scholarship fund and veterans'
assistance programs.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran
in need of food, haircut, voter
ID, food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is
asked to call Ed Murphy at the
Hunger and Homeless Coali-
tion at 352-382-0876, or pass
along this phone number to the
veteran.
Open spots still remain for
those couples and individuals
interested in taking a trip to
Hawaii with a group of veter-
ans, their families and friends.


that makes one cup of coffee at a time
with a little vacuum-packed pod in
flavors like French Vanilla and
Mucho Mocha, you have a job where
your boss wants you to waste a week
making a "Gangnam Style" spoof
video using everyone in the office. He
thinks it would boost morale. You
think it would boost morale if he got
fired and you took his job. You have
an exercise mix on your iPod with
"Call Me Maybe" on it
If you slam on the brakes every
time you see a Starbucks, and all the
baristas in your neck of the woods
know your complicated order by
heart, you were over "Gangnam
Style" back when it had only 68,000
views on YouTube, and the only peo-
ple you know who like "Call Me
Maybe" are your parents.
You roast your own fair trade or-
ganic coffee that you buy direct from
the importer. You grind it yourself
after deciding how you will prepare it
- in your glass coffee press or your
$900 espresso machine. You have un-
friended people on Facebook who
post mashups of "Call Me Maybe" and
"Gangnam Style." You wouldn't be
caught dead drinking a cheap $7 cup
of coffee. Old friends are avoiding you
because sometimes they like to talk
about things besides coffee. You won-
der what's the matter with them.
---
Jim Mullen's newest book is called
"Kill Me, Elmo: The Holiday Depres-
sion Fbn Book Visit him a t
JimMullenBooks. com.


The annual trek, coordinated
and led by Don McLean, a U.S.
Navy veteran, is scheduled this
year for Sept. 17 to Oct. 4. Par-
ticipants will visit the islands of
Oahu (Hale Koa Hotel), Kauai
(Marriott), Hawaii (stay in the
KMC inside the volcano) and
Maui (Royal Lahina Resort).
Reservations should be made
as soon as possible. Call
McLean at 352-637-5131, or
email dmclean8@tampa
bay.rr.com.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency Ser-
viceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-527-
3722, ext. 102, ot email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored with
centerpieces with their names
on them at The Old Homosassa
Veterans' Memorial. Call
Shona Cook at 352-422-8092.
Ex-military and retired mili-
tary personnel are needed to
assist the U.S. Coast Guard


Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and
non-law enforcement pro-
grams.Criminal background
check and membership are re-
quired. Email Vince Maida at
vsm440@aol.com, or call 917-
597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA),
provides tailored care for veter-
ans and their families. The pro-
gram is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and staff is
trained to provide Hospice care
specific to illnesses and condi-
tions unique to each military
era or war. It also provides
caregiver education and a
recognition program to honor
veterans' services and sacri-
fices. HPH Hospice care and
programs do not affect veter-
ans' benefits. Call the Citrus
Team Office at 352-527-4600.
Yoga teacher Ann Sand-
strom is associated with the
national service organization,
Yoga For Vets. Free classes to
combat veterans are offered by
her at several locations and
times. Call 352-382-7397.


Special to the Chronicle
Chronicle photojournalist Matthew Beck, right, with Art Cen-
ter Camera Club President James Houle.


Photographer to


speak to camera club


Special to the Chronicle

The next Art Center Cam-
era Club meeting will be
Monday, Jan. 7, at 6:30 p.m.
for refreshments, with the
meeting following at 7 p.m.,
at the Art Center, 2644 N.
Annapolis Ave., Hernando
(intersection of County
Road 486 and Annapolis Av-
enue).
Featured speaker will be
Matt Beck, a photojournalist
with the Chronicle. Back by
popular demand, this will
be the second time he will
speak to the club. Beck will
talk about the stories be-
hind his photos published
in the newspaper, and his
experiences while working
as a reporter. Beck was
hired as a staff photogra-


pher at the Chronicle in
1987. He became chief pho-
tographer in 1990 and re-
tained that position until
becoming a staff writer/pho-
tographer in July 2011.
The second speaker will
be Bud Smart, who will give
a presentation on SIGs (spe-
cial interest groups). SIGs
are groups of club members
who have similar interests
(i.e., Canon cameras), who
will meet the last Monday
each month.
The SIGs are new for the
club and will function to en-
hance and expand mem-
bers' photographic
knowledge.
First-time visitors are
welcome. To become a
member, call the Art Center
at 352-400-4466.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A14.


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1-6 D2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


A16 SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013


.I










SPORTS


Washington Redskins
quarterback Robert
Griffin III will be one of
two rookie signal-callers
today when the Seattle
Seahawks visit the
nation's capital./B5
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Recreational sports/B2
0 College football/B2, B4
0 Basketball/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 NFL playoffs/B5
0 Golf, cycling/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Football realignment benefits local teams


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
The tentative biennial FHSAA
district realignments were re-
cently released and they bring
one welcome change for two
county football programs.
Under the new assignments,
which are subject to appeals until
Jan. 18, Citrus and Lecanto will
join fellow 6A-6 members Lake
Weir and Vanguard of Ocala to
constitute District 5 of Class 6A,
which includes football schools
with enrollments of between


1,574 and1,871 students in the fall
of 2012.
As things stand, Gainesville,
which won the District 6A-6 title
in 2012 while ranked No. 1 in
Class 6A until losing to Miami
Central in the state champi-
onship game, will move up to
Class 7A and join Ocala Forest,
Gainesville's Bucholz and three
Tallahassee schools to form 7A-2.
Without the Hurricanes of
Gainesville, third-place Citrus
would have made the playoffs the
last two seasons, as Gainesville
and Vanguard each captured the


two 6A-6 playoffs spots the past
couple of seasons, with the
Knights taking the title in 2011.
Gainesville is reportedly peti-
tioning to remain in 6A, so Citrus
and Lecanto are remaining cau-
tiously optimistic.
"There's really no telling what
they'll do," Citrus head coach
Rayburn Greene said of the re-
districting process." A few years
ago, I thought we had a pretty


Page B4


The Lecanto High School football
team, along with Citrus, expects
its path to the playoffs in 2013 to
be a little easier with 2012
Class 6A runner-up Gainesville
realigned into Class 7A.
Chronicle file photo


Salting it away


Associated Press
Houston Texans wide receiver Andre Johnson is tackled by Cincinnati Bengals cornerback Adam Jones during the third quarter of an AFC
wild-card playoff game Saturday in Houston.

Houston outplays Cincinnati in surviving for 19-13 NFL playoff victory


Associated Press
HOUSTON J.J. Watt swat-
ted away passes, Arian Foster
ran away from tacklers and the
Houston Texans did just
enough to knock Cincinnati out
of the playoffs for the second
straight year
Matt Schaub made his first
postseason start a successful
one when Foster's 1-yard
touchdown in the third quarter
helped the Texans to a 19-13


AFC wild-card win over the
Bengals on Saturday
"The whole stadium knew
we had to line up and run the
ball and boy, he was at his best
there at the end," coach Gary
Kubiak said. "He's become a
fine, fine player, and it just
seems like the bigger it gets,
the better Arian gets."
Now comes the big test. The
Texans (13-4) move on to the
second round on Jan. 13, when
they visit the New England Pa-


triots, who beat them 42-14 in
Week 14. This time they're 9 /2-
point underdogs.
"It's one step," Watt said of
the win. "We know what it
means, and we have bigger
goals than that."
He's glad the team got back
on track this week, but knows
Houston will have to play bet-
ter to beat the Patriots.
"They know what they're
doing in the playoffs," Watt
said. "They've been here many


times before. They know what
it takes, so it's going to take
everything we have and we're
really excited about the
challenge."
Foster said he isn't planning
to watch too much film of
Houston's loss to the Patriots.
"They're a new team, we're a
new team," Foster said. "Any-
time you play a team twice in a
season ... you have to attack it
See Page B4


Packers


handle


Vikings

Green Bay on to

San Francisco

after 24-10 win
Associated Press
GREEN BAY, Wis. Aaron
Rodgers and the Green Bay
Packers showed how dangerous
they can be when they're at full
strength Saturday night, over-
whelming the Minnesota Vikings
24-10 in an NFC wild-card game
that was never really close.
John Kuhn scored two touch-
downs, DuJuan Harris added
another and Rodgers connected
with an NFL playoff-record 10
receivers as he threw for 274
yards. Defensively, the Packers
(12-5) finally managed to contain
Adrian Peterson and were all
over Vikings backup Joe Webb,
pressed into service because of
Christian Ponder's elbow injury
Peterson was held to 99 yards
- an improvement after gain-
ing 199 and 210 in the first two
games. Webb, who hadn't
thrown a pass all season, was
sacked three times and off tar-
get all night His only highlight
was a 50-yard scoring pass to
Michael Jenkins late in the
fourth quarter
N IF '--I Y


Associated Press
Green Bay Packers running back
DuJuan Harris, who graduated
from Brooksville Central High
School, had 100 total yards and
a touchdown in the Packers'
victory over the Minnesota
Vikings on Saturday night.


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Gainesville out of Citrus, Lecanto's

district while CR's remains same


. r w 7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'Bama's young stars


-. .

Associated Press
Alabama freshman T.J. Yeldon has rushed for 1,000 yards as a complement to junior Eddie Lacy to give the Crimson Tide
a potent ground attack. No. 2 Alabama plays No. 1 Notre Dame in the BCS national championship game Monday in Miami.


Yeldon,

Cooperprep

for huge game

Associated Press

MIAMI TJ. Yeldon
opened his Alabama career
by rolling through Michi-
gan's defense for 111 yards,
and fellow freshman Amari
Cooper took note.
Performing in the face of
huge crowds and big, fast
college defenders wasn't so
hard after all, he figured.
It's still football.
"He was like, 'Oh, this is
easy,"' Cooper said. "I did-
n't have a big game that day,
but I could see it was easy"
Cooper didn't break out as
a freshman star until later for
the Crimson Tide. But both
have shined this season and
get their biggest opportunity


on Monday against the ter-
rific defense of top-ranked
Notre Dame with a BCS
championship on the line.
The tailback Yeldon and
receiver Cooper have al-
ready put up nice numbers
and plays that helped put
the Tide into this position.
Alabama beat LSU on
Yeldon's 28-yard screen
pass in the last minute.
Cooper's late 45-yard
touchdown catch was the
final score of a 32-28 win
over Georgia in the South-
eastern Conference cham-
pionship, when Yeldon ran
for a season-high 153 yards.
Kids today
It's nothing unusual for
Nick Saban to call on the
youngsters to play pivotal
roles. Yeldon follows 2009
Heisman Trophy winner
Mark Ingram and 2011 fi-
nalist Trent Richardson in
a string of quick-learning
tailbacks.
And Cooper is challenging


Julio Jones' freshman re-
ceiving records for Alabama.
"Coach Saban always
says, 'If you're good enough,
you're old enough,"' Cooper
said. "If you're good enough
to play and you show the
maturity, then they'll allow
you to do that"
Their freshman finale
will be the biggest test to
their maturity
Yeldon has run for 1,000
yards as Eddie Lacy's
backfield-mate even
though he hasn't started a
game. Together, they lead a
running game that has pro-
duced 35 touchdowns and
225 yards a game.
They'll face a sturdy front
seven on a defense that has
yielded just two rushing
touchdowns in 12 games.
Both freshmen spoke to
reporters for the first time
this season at Saturday's
BCS media day because
Saban doesn't allow fresh-
men to do interviews -


title game rules force them
to be available. Their abili-
ties have been on display
all season, though.
Lacy, a junior, has worked
through nagging early sea-
son injuries to rush for 1,182
yards and 16 touchdowns.
Alongside him, Yeldon's 6.5-
yard average per carry is
tops among the SEC's 15
leading rushers.
Both Yeldon and Cooper
enrolled a year ago and
went through spring prac-
tice. The 6-foot-2, 216-
pound Yeldon capped it
with an MVP performance
in the spring game that did-
n't just impress fans but
teammates.
"I didn't really know
much about him because
he hadn't really been run-
ning much with the
(starters) in the spring," Al-
abama center Barrett Jones
said. "I was just kind of like,
'Who is this guy?' TJ. is just
such a freak specimen."


For sports,


protect those eyes


A s we begin the new
year, our resolutions
eem to go by the way-
side on an express train.
This hit me over the head
when on New Year's Day,
my daughter's new puppy
destroyed my
sunglasses that I
had resolved to
keep for an en-
tire year They
barely made it for *
three weeks.
My wife recalls .
running in the
'70s in the clear
skies and ham-
mering sun of Dr. Ron
Arizona making DOCT
fun of the kids ORD
who were train-
ing wearing sun-
glasses. She notes they are
the ones who probably have
retained their night vision,
unlike my wife, who can't
see to drive at night. Just
kidding, dear
There is no question eye
protection, including sun-
glasses, are a vital part of
protective equipment for
many sports but also allow
us to participate in a com-
fortable, competitive and
stylish manner
There are hundreds of
sports sunglasses on the
market, popularized by ath-
letes from swimmers to the
dude doing a free fall from
space a few weeks ago.
After all, beach volleyball
Olympian Misty May is a lot
sexier with her sunglasses.
Watching the London
Olympic track runners last
summer, many competitors
wore sunglasses during the
night competitions. This
was as much for style and
gamesmanship, as well as
reducing glare from the sta-
dium lighting.
There is a misconception
sunglasses are the same as
eye protection. While sun-
glasses protect us from
harmful UV rays of the sun,
wind and rain, they do little
to prevent eye injuries due to
blunt trauma force of flying
particles such as soccer, ten-
nis, squash or baseballs. Sun-
glasses can often aggravate
an impact injury to the eye.
In basketball and other
supposed non-contact
sports, it is the flailing
limbs, fingers, elbows and
the head that impact eyes,


causing corneal scratches,
ruptured eye balls and reti-
nal tears. These injuries re-
sulting in vision impairment
can impact careers and -
most importantly lives.
Good vision is critical in
every sport. Ath-
letes of every ilk
protect and main-
tain their vision
during training
and performance
with protective
eyewear The im-
portance of hav-
ing two eyes with
proper acuity,
Joseph function and
OR'S focus provides
ERS the depth per-
ception needed
to cast into that
favorite fishing hole to snag
a sheepshead, hit the game-
winning home run or catch
the winning pass. Imagine
how hard it would be with-
out depth perception to hit
a golf ball, tennis ball or
hammer a nail.
One can't imagine watch-
ing a ski racer navigate a
slalom or downhill course
without goggles, worn for
both protection as well as
the need to have clear vi-
sion in order to see the
course while going 60 mph
in snowy and windy condi-
tions and in flat light.
Eyes are some of the most
sensitive organs in our bod-
ies, noting the need for pro-
tection. Radiation injuries
are by far the most common.
When fishing, wearing sun-
glasses protects your eyes -
not only from radiation in-
juries but also from pene-
trating injuries due to flying
fish hooks, wind-driven
sand and other particles.
Polarized sunglasses and
eye protection allow a new
dimension in glare reduc-
tion and make it possible to
view the fish about to snag
the bait It also helps watch-
ing manatees try to tip you
over in your kayak or
paddleboard.
It's a new year, have a
great one and hope to see
you out there enjoying a
great workout or just being
a sport wearing sunglasses.
Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand
and shoulder orthopedic
surgeon at SeaSpine Ortho-
pedic Institute, may be
reached atrbjhand@cox.net


Michigan State DE
Gholston turning pro
EAST LANSING, Mich. -
Michigan State defensive end
William Gholston is skipping
his senior season to enter the
NFL draft.
Gholston says in an open
letter released by the school
that he is excited about the fu-
ture and promises to represent


the school with "class, dignity,
and professionalism."
Gholston is one of three
Michigan State underclassman
to announce his intentions to
turn pro, joining running back
Le'Veon Bell and tight end Dion
Sims.
The 6-foot-7, 278-pound
Gholston had 4 1/2 sacks this
season and 13 tackles for loss.
From staff reports


Recreation BRIEFS


Shuffleboard
club to meet
The Beverly Hills Shuffle-
board Club board meeting will
be at 3 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 8, at
the Central Ridge Library; the
members' meeting will be at 3
p.m. Thursday, Jan. 10, at the
community center.
The club is still shuffling at 1
p.m. when weather permits,
and welcomes all. For informa-
tion, call Sharon Pineda at
352-527-8488.
Volunteers needed
for Youth Basketball
League
Citrus County YMCA is cur-
rently seeking to connect volun-
teers through its Y Community
Champions program. Volun-
teers are needed for the Winter
Youth Basketball League to
begin Jan. 28 in Crystal River
at the Key Training Center.
The Youth Basketball League
will run for 10 weeks (two
weeks of practice and eight
weeks of games) and is a
friendly noncompetitive league
centered on teamwork and
good sportsmanship. Volunteer
coaches would be needed one
weekday evening for practice,
and on Saturday for games.
Referees and score keepers
are also needed for Saturday
games. All volunteers must un-
dergo a background screening.
For more information or to vol-
unteer, call 352-637-0132, or
stop by the office at 3909 N.
Lecanto Highway in Beverly Hills.


Little League
registration ongoing
The 2013 Crystal River Little
League Baseball registration
will take place at the baseball
side concession at Bicentennial
Park in Crystal River according
to the following schedule:
10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 12;
6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday
through Friday, through Jan. 11.
Registration fee is $55 per
child for all ages and divisions,
including T-ball, baseball and
softball. All parents/guardians
must bring a birth certificate
and three documents proving
residency.
Afterschool clubs
resume Jan. 14
The Citrus County YMCA's
Afterschool Enrichment Clubs
will resume their normal sched-
ule for the second half of the
school year by offering a third
session beginning Jan. 14.
The Afterschool Clubs will be
offered at: Central Ridge Ele-
mentary, Citrus Springs Ele-
mentary, Crystal River Primary,
Floral City Elementary, Forest
Ridge Elementary, Homosassa
Elementary, Inverness Primary,
Lecanto Primary, Pleasant
Grove Elementary and Rock
Crusher Elementary. The clubs
are open to all children in
kindergarten through fifth grade.
The upcoming session will
offer kids the opportunity to par-
ticipate in soccer, basketball
cheerleading and two new art


programs, introduction to water-
color and introduction to drawing.
The Citrus County YMCA has
received a grant for the After-
school Programs from Suncoast
Federal Schools Credit Union.
This grant has enabled the Y to
provide many full scholarships
this year to children across the
county to participate in the En-
richment Clubs. To apply for the
grant scholarship and financial
assistance for other YMCA pro-
grams, call the Y office at
352-637-0132.
Youth Basketball
registration open
Citrus County YMCA is now
taking registrations for its 2013
Winter Youth Basketball League,
which begins Monday, Jan. 28.
The league will run for 10
weeks (two weeks of practice
and eight weeks of games) and
is open to children ages 3
through 12. The Junior League
will have ages 3 through 5, and
the Youth League will consist of
6- through 12-year-olds with
several age brackets. Practice
will be once a week on a week-
day evening, with games being
played on Saturday. All practices
and games will be at the Key
Training Center Chet Cole Life
Enrichment Center gymnasium.
Open tryouts and a skill as-
sessment will be given on Mon-
day, Jan. 28, to determine team
placement. The league cost is
$85 for ages 6 to 12, and $65
for 3 to 5.
Call 352-637-0132 for more
details.


Finishing 2012 in style


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,. ^ :. *: "/. : ^ < .. . ... '*.,.:., ,,, ,.:?, .
.








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-'' " ..' ":^ :- .,, J =.' 13"" ^ *^ '."";. -" -.- -" -""
.-' .-:. ,0.; . .'.. .-- .-. -.


Special to the Chronicle
Local runner Kerri Kitchen competed in the 2012 Dog Dash for D.A.R.T. half marathon in
New Port Richey on Dec. 29. Kitchen took first place as the first woman to finish as well
as being the third person overall to finish the race. Kitchen is sponsored by River Ventures
in Crystal River and competed in 18 races in 2012, winning her division or the women's
masters in each event.


Football BRIEF


B2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013


SPORTS


1





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No. 1 Duke routs Wake Forest


Associated Press

DURHAM, N.C. Ryan Kelly
scored a season-high 22 points in
No. 1 Duke's 80-62 rout of Wake
Forest on Saturday
Seth Curry also had 22 points
and Quinn Cook had a career-high
14 assists for the Blue Devils (14-0,
1-0), who shot 46 percent in their
Atlantic Coast Conference opener
and hit 11 3-pointers including
six during the 25-7 first-half run
that put them up big.
They pushed their lead well
into the 20s with a Curry-led 18-6
run out of the break in which they
scored on nine of their first 10 pos-
sessions.
Travis McKie had 22 points and
11 rebounds for Wake Forest (7-6,
0-1).
No. 3 Arizona 60, Utah 57
TUCSON, Ariz. Solomon Hill had
19 points and Mark Lyons hit two free
throws with 7.2 seconds left as Ari-
zona dodged another last-second shot
to remain undefeated.
Arizona (14-0, 2-0 Pac-12) needed
some help from a disputed call by the
officials to win its conference opener.
The Wildcats faced another big shot in
the closing seconds, when Utah's
Jarred DuBois shot a 3-pointer that
bounced off the rim, hit the top of the
backboard and hit the rim again before
missing.
Utah (8-6, 0-2) kept Arizona within
reach by hitting 14 of 27 shots in the
second half.
No. 11 Illinois 74,
No. 8 Ohio State 55
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Brandon Paul
scored 19 points as Illinois bounced
back from a tough loss in its Big Ten
opener.
The Illini (14-2, 1-1 Big Ten) led 37-25
at halftime and used a 13-2 run early in
the second half to build a 50-27 lead.
Illinois used stingy defense to shut
down the Buckeyes (11-3, 1-1), who
shot just 33 percent from the field and
turned the ball over 16 times.
Deshaun Thomas led Ohio State
with 24 points.
Sophomore center Nnanna Egwu
had 16 points and a game-high eight
rebounds for the Illini.
No. 12 Missouri 66,
Bucknell 64
COLUMBIA, Mo. Phil Pressey
scored a career-high 26 points and Lau-
rence Bowers added 16 for Missouri.
Pressey missed the front end of a 1 -
and-1 with 10.3 seconds remaining,
setting off a frenzied final few seconds.
Bucknell's Mike Muscala stepped on
the baseline with 4.1 seconds left after
catching a pass from Ryan Hill.
Earnest Ross made two free throws
for the Tigers (11-2), but a foul by
Jabari Brown put Muscala on the line
for a final attempt to tie the game. After
making the first free throw, Missouri's
Stefan Jankovic grabbed the rebound
of the second to end the game.
St. John's 53,
No. 14 Cincinnati 52
CINCINNATI JaKarr Sampson


Associated Press
Duke players, from left, Rasheed Sulaimon, Mason Plumlee, Quinn Cook and Josh Hairston huddle up during
the second half Saturday against Wake Forest in Durham, N.C. Duke won 80-62.


scored 16 points and D'Angelo Harri-
son added 15 and St. John's beat
Cincinnati in yet another close game
between the teams.
Cashmere Wright, who finished with
23 points, hit two 3-pointers in an 8-0
run that pulled Cincinnati within one
with 2:32 left in the game. Wright's
layup with 53 seconds to play gave
the Bearcats a 52-51 lead.
Harrison, coming off a career-high
36 points in a loss to Villanova this
week, hit a jumper with 29 seconds left
to regain the lead for St. John's, which
snapped a two-game losing streak.
Cincinnati's Titus Rubles, who fin-
ished with 14 points, squared up with 6
seconds left but missed the jumper. St.
John's (9-5, 1-1 Big East) pulled down
the rebound which forced Cincinnati
(13-2, 1-1) to foul with 3 seconds left.
Marquette 49,
No. 15 Georgetown 48
MILWAUKEE Davante Gardner
made two free throws with 8.3 sec-
onds left and Marquette had to hang
on while Georgetown missed a decid-
ing free throw.
With Marquette leading 49-46,
Greg Whittington of the Hoyas was
fouled by Trent Lockett on a baseline
3-point shot with 2.3 seconds left. He
made the first two free throws and
after Marquette coach Buzz Williams
called a timeout, hit the front of the
rim on the final attempt.
Lockett grabbed the rebound, but
missed two free throws and the game
ended without the Hoyas attempting a
final shot.
Lockett and Vander Blue had 12
points each for the Golden Eagles.
Marquette (11-3, 2-0 Big East) has
won four consecutive games. George-
town (10-2, 0-1) had its seven-game
winning streak snapped in its first road
game of the season.
No. 16 Creighton 79,
Indiana State 66
OMAHA, Neb. Doug McDermott


had 25 points and nine rebounds, and
Creighton used a 19-4 run to break
open a close game in the second half.
The Bluejays (14-1, 3-0) have won
eight straight and are off to their best
start in Missouri Valley Conference
play since 2003-04.
The Sycamores (9-5, 2-1) lost for
the 14th straight time in Omaha since
1999.
No. 17 Butler 57,
New Orleans 44
INDIANAPOLIS Kellen Dunham
scored 15 points and Khyle Marshall
added 13 to lead Butler.
The Bulldogs (12-2) are 7-0 at
home this season and will take a nine-
game winning streak into their Atlantic
10 debut Wednesday night at Saint
Joseph's.
The Privateers (3-10) were led by
Lovell Cook with 11 points and Trad-
darius McPhearson with 10.
No. 18 Michigan St. 84,
Purdue 61
EAST LANSING, Mich. Freshman
Gary Harris scored a season-high 22
points and Michigan State used a 28-7
run in the second half to pull away.
The Spartans (12-3, 1-1 Big Ten)
missed their first 10 shots from the
field after halftime, but it didn't much
matter in what quickly became a free
throw contest. Michigan State finished
18 of 22 from the line, and the Boiler-
makers were 9 of 20 including 6 of
16 in the second half.
Branden Dawson had 14 points and
11 rebounds for the Spartans.
No. 21 Notre Dame 93,
Seton Hall 74
SOUTH BEND, Ind. Scott Martin
had a season-high 22 points on a ca-
reer-high six 3-pointers and Jack Coo-
ley added 19 points and 13 rebounds to
lead Notre Dame to its 11th straight win.
The winning streak is the second-
longest for the Irish (13-1, 1-0 Big East)


in 13 seasons under coach Mike Brey.
The loss ended a seven-game winning
streak for Seton Hall (12-3, 1-1).
Seton Hall, playing with only eight
scholarship players available because
of injuries, kept the game close until
the Irish finished the first half on a 7-2
spurt, then opened the second half
with a 16-4 run to move ahead 60-41.
No. 25 Kansas State 73,
No. 22 Oklahoma St. 67
MANHATTAN, Kan. Rodney Mc-
Gruder scored all but two of his 28
points in the second half and Kansas
State turned away a game effort from
freshman Marcus Smart and Okla-
homa State.
McGruder was 10 of 13 from the field
and hit all five of his 3-pointers after the
break, including two in the dosing min-
utes. The first answered seven straight
points by the Cowboys, and the second
gave the Wildcats (12-2, 1-0 Big 12) a
70-65 lead with 1:37 left in coach Bruce
Weber's Big 12 debut.
Nino Williams added a career-best
17 points for Kansas State, which beat
the Cowboys for the third straight time.
No. 23 N.C. State 78,
Boston College 73
BOSTON Scott Wood atoned for a
scoreless first half with 12 points in the
second, hitting two 3-pointers and six
free throws down the stretch for North
Carolina State in the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference opener for both teams.
The Wolfpack (12-2, 1-0) won their
ninth straight, their longest streak
since 1983-84, but only after giving the
Eagles several opportunities to pull off
an upset.
Rodney Purvis scored 19 points,
Richard Howell finished with 12 points
and 11 rebounds and Lorenzo Brown
had 14 points and eight assists for the
Wolfpack.
Boston College (8-6, 0-1) missed a
chance to tie when Purvis fouled
Patrick Heckman on a 3-point attempt


with 18.9 seconds left. Heckman, a 93
percent shooter from the line coming
in, made 2 of 3 and the Eagles were
forced to foul Wood two more times.
Rutgers 67,
No. 24 Pittsburgh 62
PISCATAWAY, N.J. Eli Carter
scored 23 points and Rutgers held off
a second-half rally to hand Pittsburgh
its second straight loss.
The victory was the first for Rutgers
coach Mike Rice since returning from
a three-game school-imposed suspen-
sion for inappropriate behavior earlier
this week.
The Scarlet Knights (10-3, 1-1 Big
East) led by 14 points at halftime only
to see the Panthers (12-3, 0-2) twice
close the gap to two points in the final
5 minutes, the last time at 55-53 with
3:24 to play.
Florida State 71,
Clemson 66
CLEMSON, S.C. Okaro White
had 15 points and stole an inbounds
pass with 17 seconds left to preserve
Florida State's 71-66 victory over
Clemson to start Atlantic Coast Con-
ference play.
The defending ACC champion
Seminoles (9-5, 1-0) led by 16 points
on Michael Snaer's 3-pointer to start
the second half, yet were ahead just
66-63 in the final minute with the ball
in the Tigers' hands. But White
stepped in front of Rod Hall's pass,
was fouled and made both free throws
to extend the lead.
Clemson (8-5, 0-1) got within 69-66
on Milton Jennings' 3-pointer with 4.5
seconds to go before Terrance Shan-
non iced the game for Florida State
with two foul shots.
Miami 62, Ga. Tech 49
ATLANTA- Rion Brown came off
the bench to score a career-high 22
points, and Miami's overall size gave
Georgia Tech fits as the Hurricanes
whipped the Yellow Jackets 62-49 in
the Atlantic Coast Conference opener
for both teams.
Georgia Tech (10-3) had won six
straight against a soft schedule in which
the Yellow Jackets never faced height
like the Hurricanes (10-3) offered.
The Jackets were outscored 28-16
in the paint while losing for the first
time in nine games in their new arena,
McCamish Pavilion.
Miami outrebounded Georgia Tech
40-29, with Hurricanes forward Kenny
Kadji grabbing a season-high 14 to go
with 11 points.
UCF 99, Florida A&M 69
ORLANDO Isaiah Sykes scored
22 points and Central Florida, shooting
72.4 percent in the first half, coasted to
a 99-69 victory over Florida A&M in a
nonconference game Saturday.
The Knights (10-4) made 21 of 29
first-half shots, including 9 of 14 (64.3
percent) from 3-point range, to take a
55-28 halftime lead against the Rat-
tlers (4-11), who have lost five in a row.
Florida A&M shot 58.6 percent (17
of 29) in the second half but never cut
UCF's lead below 25 points.


Knicks outlast Magic


Associated Press

ORLANDO Carmelo Anthony
scored 16 of his season-high 40 points
in the fourth quarter, helping the New
York Knicks outlast the Orlando
Magic 114-106 on Saturday night.
J.R. Smith added 18 points off the
bench and Tyson Chandler had 14
points and 12 rebounds.
The Knicks have won two straight
overall and four in a row over the
Magic, dating back to last season.
Arron Afflalo and Jameer Nelson
each had 29 points to lead the Magic,
and Nik Vucevic contributed 11
points and 18 rebounds.
Orlando outrebounded New York
45-40, but had 14 turnovers as it ex-
tended its longest losing streak of the
season to eight games.
All of the losses have come since
the injury of starting forward Glen
Davis, who continues to rehab his
sprained left shoulder.
Celtics 89, Hawks 81
ATLANTA- Rajon Rondo had 14
points, 11 rebounds and 10 assists, and
the Boston Celtics rallied to beat the At-
lanta Hawks 89-81.
Paul Pierce scored 17 of his 26 points in
the third quarter as the Celtics erased a
19-point deficit and went on to consecutive
wins for the first time since late November
against Oklahoma City and Orlando.
Lou Williams scored 21 of his 28 points
in the first half for Atlanta, which has lost
two straight.
Nets 113, Kings 93
NEW YORK- Brook Lopez scored 18
points in 17 minutes to lead six players in
double figures, and the Brooklyn Nets got
a nice effort from their reserves in beating
the Sacramento Kings 113-93 for their
third straight victory.
One night after needing two overtimes


Associated Press
Orlando Magic center Nikola Vucevic
takes a shot in front of New York
Knicks center Tyson Chandler during
the second half Saturday in Orlando.
The Knicks won 114-106.
to escape with a 115-113 victory in Wash-
ington, the Nets made sure the starters
weren't too taxed. Deron Williams and Joe
Johnson both scored 15 points, but nei-
ther had to play even 30 minutes.
DeMarcus Cousins had 28 points and
11 rebounds for the Kings, who had won
four of five overall and two straight on the
road but were defenseless in the finale of
their four-game trip.
Pacers 95, Bucks 80
INDIANAPOLIS Roy Hibbert had 20
points, 15 rebounds and five blocked
shots to lead the Indiana Pacers to a 95-
80 victory over the Milwaukee Bucks.


Hibbert grabbed a career-high 11 offen-
sive rebounds as the Pacers (20-14) won
their seventh straight home game. George
Hill added 14 points after missing Indi-
ana's previous three games with a right
thigh contusion.
The Bucks scored the first six points of
the third to grab a 53-52 lead. But the Pac-
ers responded with an 8-0 run and cruised
from there.
Monta Ellis led the Bucks with 21
points.
Rockets 112, Cavaliers 104
CLEVELAND James Harden scored
29 points, including 16 in the fourth quar-
ter, and the Houston Rockets defeated the
Cleveland Cavaliers 112-104.
Jeremy Lin added 20 points for Hous-
ton, which has won 11 of its last 14.
Kyrie Irving led Cleveland with 30
points, including 11 in the final period, but
the Cavaliers fell short of winning two in a
row for the second time this season.
Trail Blazers 102,
Timberwolves 97
MINNEAPOLIS Nicolas Batum and
Wesley Matthews each made five 3s and
scored 26 points to lead the Portland Trail
Blazers over the injury-depleted Min-
nesota Timberwolves 102-97.
The Blazers made a season-high 16 3-
pointers and withstood a fourth-quarter
rally by the Timberwolves to win for the
10th time in 13 games and finish their
four-game road trip with a 3-1 record.
Nikola Pekovic led the Timberwolves
with 21 points but left the game in the third
quarter because of a left hip strain. Only
hours earlier, Minnesota learned it lost star
forward Kevin Love to a broken right hand
for the second time this season when an
MRI confirmed the injury.
Damian Lillard had 20 points for the
Blazers.


No. 5 Irish women


shock No. 1 UConn


Associated Press

STORRS, Conn. Kayla
McBride scored 21 points
and Skylar Diggins added 19
to help No. 5 Notre Dame
upset top-ranked Connecti-
cut 73-72 on Saturday in the
Big East conference opener
for both teams.
Trailing 73-72 with 6 sec-
onds left, Kaleena
Mosqueda-Lewis missed a
3-pointer from the corner
and the Irish (12-1, 1-0) got
the ensuing rebound and
ran out the clock as Diggins
threw the ball into the air at
the final buzzer.
The Irish have had the
Huskies' number the past
few years, winning five of
the past six meetings, in-
cluding two in the Final
Four the past two seasons.
Mosqueda-Lewis and
Stefanie Dolson each
scored 17 points to lead
UConn (12-1, 0-1).
The rivalry, which UConn
leads 29-9, has grown into
one of the biggest in
women's college basketball.
DePaul 86,
No. 11 Louisville 80
CHICAGO -Anna Martin
scored 22 points and DePaul
held on to beat Louisville.
Brittany Hrynko had 21
points and seven assists for the
Blue Demons (12-3), who have
won six in a row.
Louisville (12-3), which had
won its previous three games,
trailed 80-70 before Shoni


Schimmel hit two 3-pointers.
Monique Reid's layup drew the
Cardinals within 80-78, but they
came no closer. Martin made a
layup and Hrynko hit four free
throws for DePaul.
Jasmine Penny had 15
points on 6-of-6 shooting and
Katherine Harry grabbed 13 re-
bounds for the Blue Demons.
Reid led the Cardinals with
25 points. Schimmel scored 19,
Antonita Slaughter scored 14
points and Bria Smith had 11
points and nine rebounds for
Louisville.
No. 14 Purdue 69,
No. 25 Nebraska 66
LINCOLN, Neb. Sam
Ostarello had 17 points and a
career-high 19 rebounds to
help Purdue hold off Nebraska
in overtime.
The Boilermakers never
trailed in the extra period, but
Ostarello's basket with 43
seconds left gave them a
68-66 lead.
Courtney Moses and Drey
Mingo also scored 17 points
for Purdue (13-2, 2-0 Big Ten)
in another close one between
the schools. All three games
between them have gone to
overtime.
Purdue beat Illinois 67-66 in
overtime Wednesday in its Big
10 opener.
Lindsey Moore led all scorers
with 22 points for the Huskers
(11-4, 1-1). Moore also had
eight assists and Jordan
Hooper had 15 points and 14
rebounds for Nebraska.


BASKETBALL


SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 B3






B4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013



NFL playoff glance
All Times EST
Wild-card Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 5
Houston 19, Cincinnati 13
Green Bay 24, Minnesota 10
Today, Jan. 6
Indianapolis at Baltimore, 1 p.m. (CBS)
Seattle at Washington, 4:30 p.m. (FOX)
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 12
Baltimore or Indianapolis at Denver, 4:30 p.m.
(CBS)
Green Bay at San Francisco, 8 p.m. (FOX)
Sunday, Jan.13
Washington or Seattle at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
(FOX)
Houston at New England, 4:30 p.m. (CBS)
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan.20
AFC, TBA (CBS)
NFC, TBA (FOX)
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan.27
At Honolulu
AFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (NBC)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 3
At New Orleans
AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6 p.m.
(CBS)


Packers 24,
Vikings 10
Minnesota 3 0 0 7- 10
Green Bay 7 10 7 0-- 24
First Quarter
Min-FG Walsh 33, 9:26.
GB-Harris 9 run (Crosby kick), :00.
Second Quarter
GB-FG Crosby 20, 3:25.
GB-Kuhn 3 run (Crosby kick), :38.
Third Quarter
GB-Kuhn 9 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick),
9:25.
Fourth Quarter
Min-Jenkins 50 pass from Webb (Walsh kick),


3:39.
A-71,548.
First downs
Total Net Yards
Rushes-yards
Passing
Punt Returns
Kickoff Returns
Interceptions Ret.
Comp-Att-Int
Sacked-Yards Lost
Punts
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


Min
17
324
29-167
157
3-25
3-73
0-0
11-30-1
3-23
5-49.6
2-2
4-30
27:02


GB
20
326
31-76
250
4-17
2-28
1-0
23-33-0
3-24
8-37.8
0-0
2-10
32:58


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Minnesota, Peterson 22-99, Webb
7-68. Green Bay Harris 17-47, Rodgers 2-12,
Grant 7-7, Cobb 2-6, Kuhn 3-4.
PASSING-Minnesota, Webb 11-30-1-180.
Green Bay Rodgers 23-33-0-274.
RECEIVING-Minnesota, Jenkins 3-96, Rudolph
3-42, Simpson 2-21, Wright 2-13, Peterson 1-8.
Green Bay, Harris 5-53, G.Jennings 4-61, J.Jones
4-51, Nelson 3-51, Kuhn 2-15, Grant 1-16, Crab-
tree 1-10, Finley 1-10, Cobb 1-7, Taylor 1-0.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
AFC wild card

Texans 19,
Bengals 13
Cincinnati 0 7 3 3 13
Houston 3 6 7 3- 19
First Quarter
Hou-FG S.Graham 48, 7:49.
Second Quarter
Hou-FG S.Graham 27, 13:07.
Cin-Hall 21 interception return (Brown kick),
9:30.
Hou-FG S.Graham 22, 2:19.
Third Quarter
Hou-Foster 1 run (S.Graham kick), 10:31.
Cin-FG Brown 34, 7:48.
Fourth Quarter
Hou-FG S.Graham 24, 14:17.
Cin-FG Brown 47, 9:03.
A-71,738.
Cin Hou
First downs 12 24
Total Net Yards 198 420
Rushes-yards 16-80 39-158
Passing 118 262
Punt Returns 3-12 2-14
Kickoff Returns 6-156 2-47
Interceptions Ret. 1-21 1-14
Comp-Att-Int 14-30-1 29-38-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 2-9 0-0
Punts 5-46.6 3-42.0
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 0-0
Penalties-Yards 5-51 7-55
Time of Possession 21:11 38:49
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Cincinnati, Green-Ellis 11-63, Dal-
ton 4-15, Leonard 1-2. Houston, Foster 32-140,
Martin 1-16, Schaub 4-1, Tate 2-1.
PASSING-Cincinnati, Dalton 14-30-1-127.
Houston, Schaub 29-38-1-262.
RECEIVING-Cincinnati, Green 5-80, M.Jones
3-34, Hawkins 2-15, Gresham 2-7, Green-Ellis
2-(minus 9). Houston, Daniels 9-91, Foster 8-
34, Johnson 4-62, Walter 4-26, G.Graham 3-29,
Casey 1-20.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 23 10 .697 -
Brooklyn 19 15 .559 4Y2
Boston 16 17 .485 7
Philadelphia 15 20 .429 9
Toronto 12 21 .364 11
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 22 9 .710 -
Atlanta 20 12 .625 2Y2
Orlando 12 21 .364 11
Charlotte 8 24 .250 14Y2
Washington 4 27 .129 18
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 20 14 .588 -
Chicago 18 13 .581 12
Milwaukee 16 16 .500 3
Detroit 13 22 .371 7Y2
Cleveland 8 27 .229 12Y2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 27 9 .750 -
Memphis 20 10 .667 4
Houston 20 14 .588 6
Dallas 13 21 .382 13
New Orleans 8 25 .242 1712
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 25 7 .781 -
Portland 18 15 .545 7Y2
Denver 18 16 .529 8
Utah 17 17 .500 9
Minnesota 15 15 .500 9
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 26 8 .765 -
Golden State 22 10 .688 3
L.A. Lakers 15 17 .469 10
Sacramento 13 21 .382 13
Phoenix 12 22 .353 14
Friday's Games
Cleveland 106, Charlotte 104
Sacramento 105, Toronto 96


Brooklyn 115, Washington 113,20T
Detroit 85, Atlanta 84
Portland 86, Memphis 84
Oklahoma City 109, Philadelphia 85
Boston 94, Indiana 75
Chicago 96, Miami 89
Houston 115, Milwaukee 101
Utah 87, Phoenix 80
L.A. Clippers 107, L.A. Lakers 102
Saturday's Games
Boston 89, Atlanta 81
Indiana 95, Milwaukee 80
NewYork 114, Orlando 106
Houston 112, Cleveland 104
Brooklyn 113, Sacramento 93
Portland 102, Minnesota 97
New Orleans 99, Dallas 96, OT
San Antonio 109, Philadelphia 86
Utah at Denver, late
Golden State at L.A. Clippers, late
Today's Games
Oklahoma City at Toronto, 1 p.m.
Washington at Miami, 6 p.m.
Charlotte at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Memphis at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Denver at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Oklahoma City at Washington, 7 p.m.
Boston at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Utah, 9 p.m.
Orlando at Portland, 10 p.m.
Memphis at Sacramento, 10 p.m.





Bowl Glance
All Times EST
Saturday, Dec. 15
New Mexico Bowl
At Albuquerque
Arizona 49, Nevada 48
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
Utah State 41, Toledo 15
Thursday, Dec.20
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
BYU 23, San Diego State 6
Friday, Dec. 21
Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
UCF 38, Ball State 17
Saturday, Dec. 22
New Orleans Bowl
Louisiana-Lafayette 43, East Carolina 34
MAACO Bowl
Las Vegas
Boise State 28, Washington 26
Monday, Dec. 24
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
SMU 43, Fresno State 10
Wednesday, Dec. 26
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
Central Michigan 24, Western Kentucky 21
Thursday, Dec.27
Military Bowl
At Washington
San Jose State 29, Bowling Green 20
Belk Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
Cincinnati 48, Duke 34
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Baylor 49, UCLA 26
Friday, Dec. 28
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Ohio 45, Louisiana-Monroe 14
Russell Athletic Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Virginia Tech 13, Rutgers 10, OT


Meineke Car Care Bowl
At Houston
Texas Tech 34, Minnesota 31
Saturday, Dec. 29
Armed Forces Bowl
At Fort Worth, Texas
Rice 33, Air Force 14
Pinstripe Bowl
At New York
Syracuse 38, West Virginia 14
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
Arizona State 62, Navy 28
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Texas 31, Oregon State 27
Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl
At Tempe, Ariz.
Michigan State 17, TCU 16
Monday, Dec. 31
Music City Bowl
At Nashville, Tenn.
Vanderbilt 38, N.C. State 24
Sun Bowl
At El Paso, Texas
Georgia Tech 21, Southern Cal 7
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis, Tenn.
Tulsa 31, Iowa State 17
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
Clemson 25, LSU 24
Tuesday, Jan. 1
Heart of Dallas Bowl
At Dallas
Oklahoma State 58, Purdue 14
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville, Fla.
Northwestern 34, Mississippi State 20
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Georgia 45, Nebraska 31
Outback Bowl
At Tampa, Fla.
South Carolina 33, Michigan 28
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Stanford 20, Wisconsin 14
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Florida State 31, Northern Illinois 10
Wednesday, Jan. 2
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Louisville 33, Florida 23
Thursday, Jan. 3
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
Oregon 35, Kansas State 17
Friday, Jan. 4
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington, Texas
Texas A&M 41, Oklahoma 13
Saturday, Jan. 5
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
Mississippi 38, Pittsburgh 17
Sunday, Jan. 6
GoDaddycom Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
Kent State (11-2) vs. Arkansas State (9-3), 9
p.m. (ESPN)
Monday, Jan. 7
BCS National Championship
At Miami
Notre Dame (12-0) vs. Alabama (12-1), 8:30
p.m. (ESPN)
Saturday, Jan. 19
RAYCOM College Football All-Star Classic
At Montgomery, Ala.
Stars vs. Stripes, 3 p.m. (CBSSN)
East-West Shrine Classic
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
East vs. West, 4 p.m. (NFLN)
Saturday, Jan.26
Senior Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
North vs. South, 4 p.m. (NFLN)


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr the record


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
S.... CASH 3 (early)
;.;.;- 1-4-6
.-g CASH 3 (late)
-2 2-2-9

PLAY 4 (early)
2-4-6-3
PLAY 4 (late)
8-2-3-0

FANTASY 5
Forda L 1-4-13-15-19

POWERBALL LOTTERY
26 30 49 51 54 8-19-21-23-36-40
POWER BALL XTRA
25 4


Ole Miss crushes Pitt


Associated Press

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. -
Hugh Freeze needed only
one year to make a winner
out of a Mississippi team that
was woeful in 2011.
The coach noted with sat-
isfaction that most experts
didn't predict such dramatic
improvement in his first
season.
Bo Wallace threw three
touchdown passes and Ole
Miss beat Pittsburgh 38-17 in
the BBVA Compass Bowl on
Saturday to complete an im-
pressive turnaround. Ole
Miss (7-6) took a five-win im-
provement over its 2-10 finish
in 2011.
"I've tried to learn not to
make too much out of a single
game either way, but no ques-
tion this advances our jour-
ney a bit," Freeze said. "To be
where we're sitting here year
one far surpasses certainly
the prognosticators and
whatever they had for us. Our
guys really chose to buy in
and determine we could be
who we want to be. We don't
have to have someone else
determine that"


The bowl win was espe-
cially satisfying for veteran
players who had no postsea-
son last year
"The best thing is our pro-
gram is moving in the right
direction," said junior line-
backer Mike Marry, who had
four of the Rebels' 11 tackles
for losses. "We're not where
we want to be right now but
we're moving there."
Freeze's no-huddle, up-
tempo offense produced 38
first downs and 387 yards. Pitt
was held to 266 yards, its sec-
ond-lowest total of the
season.
"Obviously, it was a tough
one for us," said Pitt coach
Paul Chryst, also completing
his first season. "Give Ole
Miss credit They beat us in
almost every phase. They
were clearly the better team."
Wallace, chosen the game's
MVP completed 22 of 32
passes for 151 yards with
three touchdowns and two
interceptions. He judged his
performance as only average.
"I played OK Nothing just
crazy," Wallace said. "I felt re-
ally good at the start of the


game and then had the two
interceptions and just had to
bounce back from it"
Pitt (6-7) struggled on of-
fense as leading rusher Ray
Graham was held out with a
hamstring injury he suffered
in bowl practice.
"We just couldn't get in a
rhythm, probably because of
their pressure," said Pitt
wide receiver Mike Shana-
han, who had a 16-yard
touchdown catch in the
fourth quarter
"We just couldn't seem to
get in good field position."
The Panthers fell behind
in the opening minutes after
quarterback Tino Sunseri
threw his first interception
since Sept 15 and trailed the
remainder of the game.
Wallace's 13-yard touch-
down pass to Ja-Mess Logan
gave the Rebels the 7-0 lead.
Wallace added first-half
touchdown passes to Randall
Mackey, for 27 yards, and
Vince Sanders, for 18 yards.
Pitt was making its third
straight appearance in the
bowl. The Panthers lost to
SMU in last year's game.


TAMU QB Manziel sets



records in Cotton Bowl win


TODAY'S SPORTS
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12 p.m. (ABC) Syracuse at South Florida
4:30 p.m. (CBS) Temple at Kansas
5:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Florida at Yale
8 p.m. (FSNFL) Tulsa at Southern Methodist
10 p.m. (FSNFL) Oregon at Oregon State
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Georgia at Tennessee
1 p.m. (SUN) Virginia at Miami
2 p.m. (MNT) LSU at Florida
3 p.m. (SUN) Texas A&M at Arkansas
5:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Oklahoma State at Baylor
NBA
6 p.m. (SUN) Washington Wizards at Miami Heat
BILLIARDS
1 p.m. (ESPN2) World Cup of Trick Shots (Taped)
BOWLING
1 p.m. (ESPN) PBA World Series: Bowlers Journal
Scorpion Championship (Taped)
NFL
1 p.m. (CBS) AFC Wild-Card Game Indianapolis Colts
at Baltimore Ravens
4:30 p.m. (FOX) NFC Wild-Card Game Seattle
Seahawks at Washington Redskins
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
9 p.m. (ESPN) GoDaddy.com Bowl -Arkansas State vs.
Kent State
GOLF
3 p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour: Hyundai Tournament of
Champions First Round (Same-day Tape) (CC)
6 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Hyundai Tournament of
Champions First Round
SOCCER
12:55 p.m. (UNI) Pumas vs. Atlas
TENNIS
1 a.m. (FSNFL) Champions Series: Boston. Agassi,
Courier, Lendl and Chang (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


sideline for a 23-yard TD on
the game's opening drive
and went on to an FBS bowl
record for quarterbacks with
229 yards rushing on 17 car-
ries. He also set a Cotton
Bowl record with 516 total
yards as the 10th-ranked Ag-
gies beat No. 12 Oklahoma
41-13 on Friday night to wrap
up their first SEC season.
With first-year coach
Kevin Sumlin and their
young star quarterback
after leaving the Big 12 for
the SEC, the Aggies (11-2)
overwhelming won the only
bowl game matching teams
from those two power con-
ferences. They won 11
games for the first time
since 1998, their only Big 12
title season.
The Aggies never trailed
while winning their last six
games and became the first


scrimmage, and any time we
do that it's going to be hard to
beat us," Foster said.
The Texans had trouble
finishing drives and man-
aged three field goals in the
first half against the Bengals
(10-7). Houston struck first
after the break, with Foster
scoring the game's only of-
fensive touchdown to make it
16-7.
Schaub, who missed last
year's playoffs with a foot in-
jury, had an interception re-
turned for a touchdown by
Leon Hall before halftime.
"It was never easy,"
Schaub said. "Cincinnati is a
great team. I made a
turnover and gave them
points. We just had to rally
around each other and we
did that"
Johnathan Joseph, a for-
mer Bengal, came up with an
interception for the Texans,
who kept Cincinnati without
a playoff win since the 1990
season, the league's longest
current streak
Houston had struggled on
third downs lately This time,
the Texans didn't let the Ben-
gals convert a third down on
nine tries.
The Texans rebounded
from a terrible month where
they lost three of four games
and the No. 1 seed in the

ley Rolle said recently of
non-district scheduling.
"When I first got hired, I
could schedule anybody But
I think Coach Greene is
probably running into the
same problem, where you're
getting put on hold by teams.
I take that as a compliment,
actually, that we're moving in
the right direction."
Greene agrees.
"It was a lot easier to
schedule people when we
were 2-8, because we're not
in the category of cupcake
anymore," Greene said. "I
think most coaches are look-
ing for teams they have a
good shot at beating, and a
lot of these schools are in
bigger districts and have to
be really picky about non-
district games."
The coaches said they ex-
pect the realignments to be
finalized within a week or
two after the appeal dead-
line, which will then be fol-
lowed by a scheduling


SEC team with more than
7,000 total yards 7,261
after gaining 633 in the Cot-
ton Bowl.
"It's huge for this pro-
gram, and for me especially,
with the kind of woes A&M
has had over the past
decade or however long it's
been since they had 11
wins," Manziel said. "For us
to get up tonight and watch
them battle back, it's good
when we strike first. That's
what we like to do. It was
good to do that and not re-
ally look back."
Texas A&M led by only a
point at halftime, but scored
on its first three drives of
the second half-- on drives
of 91 and 89 yards before
Manziel threw a short pass
to Ryan Swope on fourth-
and-5 that turned into a
33-yard TD and a 34-13 lead.


AFC playoffs. The win came
in front of a record crowd of
71,738, including former Oil-
ers great Earl Campbell.
The Bengals couldn't do
anything offensively before
the break, and were out-
gained 250-53 in the first half.
Dalton was 4 of 10 for 3 yards
in the first half.
Schaub shook off his first-
half miscue to finish 29 of 38
for 262 yards, and Dalton fin-
ished 14 of 30 for 127 yards.
The Bengals had a chance
for a touchdown late in the
fourth quarter, but Dalton's
pass sailed just out of reach
of a diving A.J. Green in the
end zone.
"The offense didn't play as
well as it could have," Dalton
said. "You can always look
back and say, 'What if?"'
Dalton's 45-yard pass to
Green got Cincinnati moving
in the third quarter and set
up Josh Brown's 34-yard field
goal. When Dalton tried to go
to Green again, Joseph inter-
cepted and got the Texans in
scoring range again as the
quarter ended.
In last year's playoffs, the
Texans routed the Bengals
31-10, with Dalton throwing
three interceptions.
The main difference in
this one: Schaub was back in
charge for Houston.

frenzy
Crystal River and Dunnel-
lon's Class 5A, District 5
lineup, which also includes
Belleview, North Marion,
Santa Fe and Gainesville's
Eastside, remains the same
with the preliminary
arrangements.
The Colts have made the
playoffs 13 consecutive sea-
sons and had their streak of
nine straight district titles
snapped by the Rams this
past season.
Dunnellon won back-to-
back championships in 2009
and 2010 in District 3A-6,
which included both Citrus
and Crystal River.
Class 5A football schools
are to have an enrollment of
between 1,049 and 1,573 stu-
dents.
Seven Rivers Christian, a
member of the Sunshine
State Athletic Conference,
doesn't compete in a FHSAA
district in football, and is
considered independent.


NFC wild card On the AIRWAVES


Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Texas -At
one point early in the Cotton
Bowl, with "Johnny B.
Goode" blaring through the
stadium speakers, Heisman
Trophy winner Johnny
Manziel peeked up at the
accompanying highlights on
the huge video board hang-
ing over the field.
Texas A&M's exciting
dual-threat quarterback
known as Johnny Football
sure puts on a show worth
watching.
"Best player I've ever
played. He does so many
good things. He's got magic,"
Oklahoma defensive coordi-
nator Mike Stoops said.
"He'll have a chance to win
four (Heismans) if he stays
healthy"
Manziel tiptoed down the



SALTING
Continued from Page B1

differently It's a different
mentality Different things
are at stake."
Shayne Graham kicked
four field goals for the Tex-
ans, while Foster finished
with 140 yards and became
the first NFL player to have
100-yard games in each of his
first three playoff games.
Watt finished with a sack
and swatted away two of
Andy Dalton's pass attempts,
once wagging his finger at
the Bengals quarterback
after the play
"I think it was a full defen-
sive effort, everybody was fly-
ing around and we were
getting off the field on third
downs," Watt said.
The Texans defense
smothered Dalton and the
Bengals early Their second
drive ended when Connor
Barwin tackled BenJarvus
Green-Ellis for a 6-yard loss
and Watt followed with a
sack of Dalton.
Houston's offense had the
ball for almost 39 minutes as
it ate up the clock with a sea-
son-high 32 carries from
Foster
"We controlled the line of



FOOTBALL
Continued from Page B1

good case to stay in a 5A dis-
trict, and we got turned
down. So evidently, it's not
the easiest thing in the
world to successfully appeal.
"Gainesville could proba-
bly use some better compe-
tition than we and the other
teams have been able to give
them," Greene added. "They
were so much faster than us
they could almost score at
will."
While not having
Gainesville would be an un-
deniable benefit to the rest
of the district, the other
schools would have to face
the task of scheduling an-
other non-district game if
the lineup holds.
"We're looking for teams
that are competitive with us,
but it's not an easy process,"
Panthers head coach McKin-


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PGA Tour's season opener delayed again


Associated Press

KAPALUA, Hawaii For
those who think the PGA
Tour season never ends,
here's a new twist: This one
can't get started.
The season-opening Tour-
nament of Champions was
postponed for the second
straight day because of gusts
that topped 40 mph and
made it impossible to play
golf. Unlike the previous
day when 24 players man-
aged to tee off, no one hit a
shot Saturday on the Planta-
tion Course at Kapalua.
"We tried as best we
could," said Slugger White,
the tour's vice president of
rules and competition. Play
was delayed three times be-
fore it was called for the day


The season now starts
Sunday that's when most
tournaments end with
hopes of playing 36 holes,
followed by an 18-hole fin-
ish Monday
It will be the first time the
Tournament of Champions
is reduced to 54 holes since
1997, when Tiger Woods hit
a 7-iron to a foot to beat Tom
Lehman in a playoff when a
par 3 at La Costa was the
only hole that could be used
because of so much rain.
Players arrived in dark-
ness and never got farther
than the practice range. The
wind has been relentless for
two days, and it was clear
early on there would be
trouble. The back nine of
the Plantation Course is
higher up the mountain and


Associated Press
Mark Wilson stretches before using the driving range at the
Tournament of Champions PGA golf tournament Saturday in
Kapalua, Hawaii. Because of wind, play was canceled for the
day after being stopped a day earlier. It has been rescheduled
to begin today.


more exposed. White and
the rules officials found that
golf balls kept moving on the
10th, 11th and 13th holes.
"On the 10th hole, we


dropped a ball on the back
of the green and it rolled
20 yards off the front,"
White said.
He said the wind caused


another ball to roll uphill.
The forecast is slightly
better for Sunday and Mon-
day, with strong wind in the
morning gradually abating
through the day Even so,
the Plantation Course is a
long walk with severe
changes in elevation, which
figures to be brutal on the
caddies. White said they
were considering offering
more shuttle rides on por-
tions of the course to help.
"It's just a little too windy
out there for us to play,"
Brandt Snedeker said. "If
the course wasn't so ex-
posed, it wouldn't be a prob-
lem. But you have a lot of
greens exposed to 40 mph
wind gusts. It's tough to
make that call. They did the
right thing. We had to try to


play today if we wanted to
try to get 72 holes in."
The PGA Tour has weather
guidelines with an emphasis
to play 72 holes, even going a
fifth day provided the fore-
cast allows for it
But this is different
The tour opted last year
for a Monday finish to try to
stay away from NFL play-
offs, and finish before the
BCS championship game.
The Sony Open in Honolulu
starts on Thursday, and it's
no small task to get the tele-
vision and other tournament
equipment to another island.
If the tournament doesn't
end by mid-afternoon on
Monday, the Sony Open
would have a limited TV op-
eration for its opening
round on Thursday


Rookie vs. rookie


First-year QBs lead

Redskins, Seahawks

Associated Press

WASHINGTON How convenient.
Those who can't decide between
Robert Griffin III and Russell Wilson
are literally getting a playoff.
RG3 or RW3? They've only had two
of the best two rookie seasons for
quarterbacks in NFL history, accord-
ing to the numbers. Time to compare
and contrast as much as possible Sun-
day as Griffin's Washington Redskins
host Wilson's Seattle Seahawks in the
NFC's wild-card round.
"I don't play against quarterbacks.
It's not my job to compare us," Griffin
told reporters this week. "You guys will
do that ... I hope you guys have fun."
OK, Robert, we'll take you up on
that. Hey, Redskins Pro Bowl left
tackle Trent Williams, why is your guy
better than theirs?
"I definitely would take his hair
over Russell Wilson's hair," Williams
said. "He's taller. He has a couple of
more endorsements than Russell
does. That gives you grounds enough
to take RG3 over Wilson. Way cooler
TV commercials."
Funny, but there might be some
truth to that, at least when it comes to
getting one's due. Griffin has the
dreadlocks. Wilson has the regular,
clean-cut hairdo. Griffin is in your face
with his Gatorade commercials and
the ubiquitous Subway spots. Wilson
did a more subtle bit for Levi's.
Griffin won a Heisman Trophy, was
the No. 2 overall pick in the draft, was
anointed as starter from Day 1 of train-
ing camp and was selected as a team
captain at midseason. Wilson was a
third-round pick who had to wrest the
starting job from big-contract free
agent Matt Flynn. Griffin's jersey is the
No. 1 seller across the NFL this sea-
son, while Wilson's is a mere No. 19.
Griffin's slogan is "No pressure, no


Associated Press
Washington Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III will meet fellow rookie
Russell Wilson as the Seattle Seahawks travel to Washington D.C. for an NFC
wild-card game.


diamonds." Wilson's is "Separation
is in the preparation." Unlike Grif-
fin, Wilson hasn't bothered to trade-
mark it.
RG3's nickname stands alone. Wil-
son might have been "HW4" had he
been born earlier, but it's his older
brother who got the
name Harrison Wilson NFC wiid-i
IV Wilson also has
"DangeRuss"-which Seattle S
he includes in his (11-5) at V
Twitter handle d ki
while "RW3" is an up- Redskir
start attempt to play 0 Time: 4:30
around with Wilson's
jersey number.
Griffin is charisma
personified, always ready with a hu-
morous quip and the ready-made
sound bite. Wilson can be engaging but
often speaks in cliches. Or, as he put
it: "I'm not about flash."
Griffin crashed coach Mike Shana-
han's news conference Wednesday,
asking the coach how he spent his
New Year's. It's hard to imagine Pete


c


Ie


Carroll getting the same shtick from
Wilson.
"He's always serious, even when
we're not supposed to be serious,"
Seattle fullback Michael Robinson
said. "He's always serious. That's a
good thing. But I don't know, man, he's
always working. It's
ard game hard to pinpoint his
personality."
eahawks Then there is geog-
fashington raphy. Griffin plays in
s (10) the nation's capital for
S1-6 a franchise that was
p.m. today. winning titles back in
the 1930s. Wilson is up
there somewhere in
the far corner of the
map, toiling for a team born in the
1970s and without a Super Bowl tro-
phy to its name.
Interestingly, the Redskins' stadium
is in Landover, Md., so Sunday will
feature a team called Washington that
doesn't play in Washington playing a
team from Washington that doesn't
call itself Washington.


Colts travel to face Ravens


Associated Press

BALTIMORE There's
no telling how effective Ray
Lewis will be Sunday
against the Indianapolis
Colts after missing 12 weeks
with a torn right triceps.
Fortunately, for the
Ravens, he's already pro-
vided an emotional lift.
With his announcement
that he will step into retire-
ment after Baltimore com-
pletes its 2013 playoff run,
Lewis gave the slumping
Ravens a boost heading into
their wild-card game.
"Just having him back on
the field is an inspiration,"
Baltimore defensive coordi-
nator Dean Pees said.
There are plenty of engag-
ing story lines for this game,
which pits Baltimore's cur-
rent NFL team against the
one that left the city in a car-
avan of moving vans during
a March 1984 snowstorm.
The matchup features the
return of Colts head coach
Chuck Pagano, who served
as the Ravens' defensive co-
ordinator last year and is
back on the sideline after
being treated for leukemia.
What's more, Baltimore
offensive coordinator Jim
Caldwell was head coach at
Indianapolis for three sea-
sons, culminating his up-
and-down run with last
year's 2-14 debacle. There's
also the Ravens' playoff ex-
perience this is their fifth
straight trip under coach
John Harbaugh against a
young Colts team that has 28
players making their post-
season debut.
But nothing is more note-
worthy than the pending re-


Associated Press
Indianapolis wide receiver T.Y. Hilton and the Colts meet the
Baltimore Ravens today in a AFC wild-card playoff game in
Baltimore.


tirement of the 37-year-old
Lewis, who has been Balti-
more's starting middle line-
backer for 17 years, or as
long as the Ravens have
been the Ravens.
On Sunday, the aged war-
rior will don his gear inside
his home arena for perhaps


one last time.
Lewis will
then emerge
from the tun-
nel to per-
form his
ceremonial
dance, gyrat-
ing to the
tune of
Nelly's "Hot
in Herre" for
the fervent,
crowd.


AFC wil
gar
Indianapo
(11-5) at E
Ravens
Time: 1 p.r
TV: CBS.

appreciative


"That's when it's going to
hit me the most," Ravens
running back Ray Rice said.
"That's when I think it's
going to hit the city of Balti-
more the most, that it could
possibly be the last time
coming through that tunnel.


The emotions are going to
be too rough to even think
about, because Baltimore is
Ray Lewis, and when he
comes out of that tunnel,
everybody is electrified."
Lewis has always had an
impeccable sense of timing,
and his calculated announce-
ment served
Id-card as a perfect
me example of
that trait Bal-
Alis Colts timore (10-6)
Baltimore needed a
(10-6) boost after
going 1-4 in
n. today. December,
and Lewis
provided it
Wednesday by
telling his teammates "this
would be my last ride."
"He never talks about indi-
vidual awards and accolades.
He always talks about trying
to get another trophy, another
Lombardi," wide receiver
Torrey Smith said. "We're
one of 12 teams that have an
opportunity to go out there


and get it, and we want to
send him out the right way."
Pagano said, "Whether he
announced his retirement
or not, just having Ray back,
having his presence on the
football field, they have
their leader back. That's
going to give any team an
extra edge or spark."
Pagano has been a similar
source of inspiration for the
Colts (11-5). He laid the
groundwork for their come-
back season during the sum-
mer, left after three games
to receive treatment for
leukemia and returned last
week to guide Indianapolis
to a 28-16 win over the
Houston Texans.
Now he returns to Balti-
more, with no small meas-
ure of emotion.
"It's going to be special,"
Pagano said. "I have great re-
lationships with so many peo-
ple in that organization. They
were so good to me and my
family I wouldn't be sitting
where I'm at today if John
Harbaugh hadn't given me
the opportunity to join him
when he was first hired as a
head football coach there."
The Colts have the better
record and more momen-
tum, having won five of six
and nine of 11. Baltimore
has playoff experience and
the home-field advantage; as
AFC North champions the
Ravens get to play at home,
where they've won 33 of 40
since 2008.
Ravens quarterback Joe
Flacco has been to the play-
offs in each of his five NFL
seasons. He's won at least
once in every postseason and
twice has taken the Ravens
to the AFC title game.


Cyclist Armstrong


considers confessing


Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas Lance
Armstrong may be consid-
ering a change in course,
dropping his years of de-
nials and admitting that he
used performance-enhanc-
ing drugs though
whether such a move would
help him is uncertain.
The New York Times,
citing anonymous sources,
reported late Friday that
Armstrong has told associ-
ates he is thinking about
the move.
However, Armstrong at-
torney Tim Herman says
that the cyclist hasn't
reached out to USADA
chief executive Travis Ty-
gart and David Howman,
director general of the
World Anti-Doping Agency
A USADA spokeswoman
declined comment on Sat-
urday while Howman was
quoted by the Sunday
Star-Times in New Zealand,
where he is vacationing,
saying Armstrong has not
approached his group.
USADA stripped Arm-
strong of his seven Tour de
France titles last year and
issued a report portraying
the cyclist as the leader of a
sophisticated doping oper-
ation on his winning teams.
Public confessions and
apologies have been the
route of redemption for
several athletes who have
gotten in trouble.
For example, Tiger Woods
said he was sorry for cheat-
ing on his wife in televised
speech, and baseball slug-
ger Mark McGwire eventu-
ally admitted to steroid use.
Yet Armstrong faces serious
legal entanglements those
megastars didn't, and a con-
fession to doping could end
up complicating matters for
Armstrong not making
them easier
The U.S. Department of
Justice is considering
whether to join a federal
whistle-blower lawsuit
filed by former Armstrong
teammate Floyd Landis al-
leging fraud against the
U.S. Postal Service during
the years the agency spon-
sored Armstrong's teams.
A Dallas-based promo-
tions company has also said
it wants to recover several
million dollars paid to Arm-
strong in bonuses for win-
ning the Tour de France.
And the British newspaper
The Sunday Times is suing


to recover about $500,000
paid to Armstrong to settle
a libel lawsuit
Armstrong has testified
under oath that he never
used performance-enhanc-
ing drugs, which could the-
oretically lead to charges if
he confessed. Former U.S.
track star Marion Jones
spent several months in
federal prison for lying to
investigators about her
drug use.
And after so many years
of vehement denials and
sworn statements that he
never doped, at this point,
what would Armstrong
gain from a confession?
There would be no guaran-
tee that his personal spon-
sors would return or that
the public would accept it.
Is the public even inter-
ested in an Amrstrong con-
fession?
Gene Grabowski, execu-
tive vice president of Lev-
ick, a Washington,
D.C.-based crisis and is-
sues management firm,
said "it may be too little,
too late because he's been
denying it for so long."
A confession would only
work to salvage Armstrong's
reputation if he accepted
full responsibility and
blamed no one else,
Grabowski said. And it
would have to include some
public act of atonement.
"If he does all three, he
has a shot," Grabowski
said. "You have to show
people you are willing to
pay a price."
The New York Times re-
ported the 41-year-old Arm-
strong may be considering
a confession in an attempt
to reduce his lifetime ban
from cycling and Olympic
sport so he can return to
competing in triathlons
and elite running events.
Armstrong lost most of
his personal sponsorship
worth tens of millions of
dollars after USADA is-
sued its report and he left
the board of the Livestrong
cancer-fighting charity he
founded in 1997. He is still
worth about a reported
$100 million.
Livestrong might be one
reason to issue an apology.
The charity supports can-
cer patients and still faces
an image problem because
of its association with its
famous founder.


Associated Press
According to sources, Lance Armstrong is mulling over
admitting he used performance-enhancing drugs.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Bardot to France:
Elephants or me
PARIS Sex symbol-
turned-animal rights ac-
tivist Brigitte Bardot is
threatening to join actor
Gerard Depardieu in
Russian exile unless
France halts the sched-
uled euthanasia of two
sick circus elephants.
The 1960s screen diva
says authorities have ig-
nored her "numerous
proposals" to save Baby
and Nepal, a pair of 42-
year-old elephants dying
of tuberculosis at a Lyon
zoo.
In a statement on her
foundation's website Bar-
dot says that if the ele-
phants are killed she will
request Russian citizen-
ship "to flee this country
that is now just a grave-
yard for animals."
This week France was
shocked to learn Depar-
dieu, an Academy Award-
winner and pillar of
French cinema, had re-
ceived Russian citizen-
ship after he was called
"pathetic" by France's
prime minister in a bust-up
over the country's proposed
75 percent income tax for
the superrich.

Cabinet chiefs all
in documentary
PASADENA, Calif. -
Makers of a Discovery
network documentary on
presidential chiefs of
staff have a perfect par-
ticipation record.
All 19 living men who
had that job gave inter-
views for "The Presi-
dents' Gatekeepers." The
four-hour documentary is
expected to air in two
parts early this summer
Filmmakers Jules and
Gedeon Naudet said
Saturday that their well-
regarded previous docu-
mentary on the Sept. 11
terrorist attack in New
York was a calling card
that probably helped
them convince some for-
mer chiefs to participate.
Their longest interview
was with former Vice
President Dick Cheney,
who was President Ger-
ald Ford's chief of staff in
the 1970s. Cheney said a
chief is more powerful
than a vice president.

Bond's anniversary
celebrated at Oscars
LOS ANGELES -
Oscar won't be the only
chiseled man in the spot-
light at the 85th Academy
Awards.
Telecast producers say
the show will also feature
a celebration of Bond,
James Bond.
Producers Craig Zadan
and Neil Meron an-
nounced Friday that the
show will pay tribute to
the 50th anniversary of
the James Bond film
franchise, which they de-
scribe as "the longest-
running motion picture
franchise in history and
a beloved global
phenomenon."
The most recent Bond
film, "Skyfall," was re-
leased in November and
has made more than $1
billion worldwide a
franchise record.
Nominations for this
year's Academy Awards
will be announced Jan.
10. The Oscars will be
presented Feb. 24 at the
Dolby Theatre in Los
Angeles.


ERICH SCHLEGEL/The Dallas Morning News
Texas quarterback Vince Young celebrates Jan. 6, 2006, after Texas beat Southern California 41-38 in the Rose
Bowl in Pasadena, Calif. The 2006 game was on in nearly 22 percent of American homes with televisions; the second-
best number is under 18 percent. Now, seven years later, the Notre Dame-Alabama matchup may finally challenge
that Rose Bowl's TV ratings record.





The biggest yet?


Alabama/Notre Dame showdown may shatter ratings records


RACHEL COHEN
Associated Press

NEW YORK
Two undefeated teams, three
Heisman Trophy finalists,
five lead changes and 19
seconds left when the winning
touchdown was scored.
No other BCS title game has
come close to matching that per-
fect formula for broad appeal.
The 2006 tilt between Texas and
Southern California was on in
nearly 22 percent of American
homes with televisions; the second-
best number is under 18 percent.
Now, seven years later, a matchup
may finally challenge that Rose
Bowl's TV ratings record.
No. 1 Notre Dame, so popular it
can stay independent and negotiate
its own television contract, is com-
peting for its first championship
since the 1988 season. Notre Dame's
opponent, No. 2 Alabama, is a big
name in its own right, made bigger
by two titles in the past three years
and the Southeastern Confer-
ence's run of six straight crowns.
"It sets up really remarkable
possibilities," said Burke Magnus,
ESPN's senior vice president for
college sports programming.
Just as fans and media break
down position-by-position battles
for the Fighting Irish and Crimson
Tide, a look at how this year's
matchup stacks up against the
record-holders from 2006:
NAME RECOGNITION. Texas
and USC are hardly slouches in the
tradition and popularity depart-
ments, but Notre Dame is in its own
category Plus there's the added
intrigue of the Irish's title drought.
"It definitely raises the bar of
the hype and the buzz of this na-
tional championship compared to
any of the other games I've had
the good fortune to call," ESPN
analyst Kirk Herbstreit said.
Even if much of the interest
sprouts from fans rooting against
one of the teams.
"Notre Dame is the Yankees, is
the Celtics, the Lakers and so on,
the Dallas Cowboys. They're po-
larizing, which helps," Magnus
said. "Actually, both of them are
right now because of the SEC fac-
tor, and Alabama has been the
standard-bearer for that."
Herbstreit chuckled at the thought
of some fans vowing not to watch
because they detest both teams.
"Anybody who takes the time to
make a comment like that clearly
will be watching the game," he said.
"They'll in fact watch the four hours
of pregame we have before the


game and be blogging and tweet-
ing about how wrong everybody is
on those shows."
STAR POWER Texas-USC
sparkled far brighter here. The
three Heisman finalists that season
were from those two teams: Tro-
jans quarterback Matt Leinart
(who won the previous year) and
running back Reggie Bush (who
won this time, before later return-
ing the trophy because of NCAA
violations) and Longhorns quar-
terback Vince Young. All were skill
position players believed at the time
to have promising NFL futures.
Notre Dame's Heisman finalist
is a defensive guy, linebacker
Manti Te'o. Alabama's four first-
team All-Americans are offensive
linemen or defenders.
ANTICIPATION. Texas and
USC were the undisputed top
teams in college football the
only undefeated squads in the
country who led the rankings all
season. Alabama has one loss, and
while there has been almost no
controversy as to whether the
Tide deserves to play in the title
game, the late-season rankings
scramble that led to this game
doesn't carry quite the same buzz.
MARKET SIZE. In the NBA,
NHL and Major League Baseball,
postseason viewership often
varies significantly based on
whether the teams involved hail
from cities big or small. In college
football, that's less of a factor,
though it didn't hurt the 2006 title
game that a school from Los Ange-
les, the country's second-largest
market, was involved.
The program from South Bend,
Ind., of course is a classic exam-
ple of national appeal.
"(Alabama is) the franchise
right now and another mega
brand," Magnus said. "It doesn't
matter that it's Tuscaloosa the
TV markets don't matter when it
comes to teams like that."
ON-FIELD THEATER One of
the biggest factors in the final rat-
ing won't be known until the game
kicks off. If the score stays close,
more viewers will stick around to
the end and more will join in.
Magnus believes the rise of social
media will increase the audience
of tight games even more than in
the past, as casual fans learn
through Twitter or Facebook that
they can catch a tense finish if
they tune in.
The Longhorns' 41-38 win featured
10 touchdowns, and the teams
combined to score five times in
the fourth quarter Neither school
ever led by more than 12 points.


Notre Dame has had a pen-
chant for close games all season
and Alabama also has lately But
the other half of the entertain-
ment equation high scoring -
may be less likely with these two
programs. Each allows fewer than
11 points a game.
RAW NUMBERS. The Texas-
USC title game set the record with
a 21.7 rating- 22 percent higher
than the next best BCS champi-
onship. No. 2 all-time was the 2001
Oklahoma-Florida State final with
a 17.8. The best ratings since 2006
were a 17.4 for both the 2007
Florida-Ohio State and 2008 LSU-
Ohio State matchups.
The 2006 championship was on
ABC, but the BCS games have
since moved to cable. ESPN is in
about 14 percent fewer homes
than the traditional broadcast net-
works, though executives note
that college football fans are more
likely than the general population
to have cable. Ratings since the
switch have seemingly been more
affected by the matchups and
competitiveness of games than by
their availability.
Regular-season viewership,
while still strong, was down for
college football this year On
ESPN's networks, the average au-
dience decreased more than 10
percent on ABC, almost 4 percent
on ESPN, and nearly 13 percent
on ESPN2 from 2011. SEC games
on CBS also dropped 10 percent.
For the four BCS games so far,
preliminary ratings are up 1 per-
cent on ESPN from last season.
But Notre Dame and Alabama
have already shown their ability to
lure big audiences. The rating for
the Tide's SEC title game against
Georgia essentially a national
semifinal was up 34 percent
from the previous year's LSU-
Georgia matchup. With an average
of 16.2 million viewers, it was the
season's most-watched college
football game before the bowls.
No. 2 was Notre Dame's win
over USC to clinch a berth in the
BCS title game with 16.1 million
viewers. That was the highest-
rated Saturday night regular-season
game on ABC since at least 1991.
Herbstreit is one of those sports
fans who watch golf only when
Tiger Woods is in contention on a
Sunday He considers Notre
Dame-Alabama to be the college
football equivalent of that.
"Without a doubt," he said, "if
you're a college football fan, or
even if you're a fringe college
football fan, you're going to
watch."


-From wire reports


Birthday Remain optimistic while looking for upswings
in both your personal and financial affairs in the year
ahead. Adopting some positive convictions is one of the
quickest ways to attract good things in ways you might
never suspect.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -Your enthusiastic nature is
exceptionally contagious, and it won't take much to get oth-
ers involved in whatever interests you. However, you'll be
selective as to whom you enroll.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -This could be one of those
strange days when you might not do much right, yet every-
thing will turn out OK. Work on something big while Lady
Luck is with you.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) What makes you so effec-
tively persuasive is your ability to isolate a key person and
turn him or her into your ally. This person will convince oth-
ers to join your cause.


Today's HOROSCOPE
Aries (March 21-April 19) Something you're trying to
put together with another has a good chance of succeeding
if you plan your strategy while your mind is rested and, con-
sequently, a bit sharper than usual.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) If you're required to make an
important decision that is likely to have some far-reaching
effects, try to make it now.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) You want to see things
through to their conclusions, but sticking to any one project
is another story. Today, however, chances are you will finish
what you start.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) --Your sphere of influence is
likely to be very pronounced, making a strong impact on
most everything you do. You'll even be able to solve some
difficult problems with ease.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Don't allow small, problematic
distractions to disturb you. You'll have a natural way of


working things out for the ultimate good.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) If you're not totally spent from
the holidays, make an effort to make some quality time for
activities that require physical and mental exertion. It'll help
revitalize your outlook.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) You could be rather fortunate
where your material circumstances are concerned. The op-
portunity to profit from one of your many irons in the fire is
quite high.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Bold leadership, good judg-
ment and strong initiative can be some of your more domi-
nating characteristics, and it's one of those times when you
might be motivated to use them all.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Huge influences that you
probably aren't aware of will be stirring beneath the sur-
face. When they do decide to emerge, they'll prove to be
materially lucky for you.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 4
Mega Money: 9 17 35 37
Mega Ball: 16
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 2 $4,034.50
3-of-4 MB 51 $346.50
3-of-4 985 $53.50
2-of-4 MB 1,408 $26
1-of-4 MB 12,247 $3
2-of-4 30,996 $2
Fantasy 5:1 4 8 10 27
5-of-5 3 winners $79,207.79
4-of-5 449 $85
3-of-5 12,970 $8
THURSDAY, JANUARY 3
Fantasy 5:1 12 19 30 36
5-of-5 1 winner $220,507.03
4-of-5 304 $116.50
3-of-5 9,281 $10.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Jan. 6,
the sixth day of 2013. There
are 359 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Jan. 6, 1963, "Oliver!,"
Lionel Bart's musical adapta-
tion of the Charles Dickens
novel "Oliver Twist," opened
on Broadway.
On this date:
In 1759, George Washing-
ton and Martha Dandridge
Custis were married in New
Kent County, Va.
In 1838, Samuel Morse
and Alfred Vail gave the first
successful public demonstra-
tion of their telegraph, in Mor-
ristown, N.J.
In 1912, New Mexico be-
came the 47th state.
In 1919, the 26th president
of the United States,
Theodore Roosevelt, died in
Oyster Bay, N.Y., at age 60.
In 1941, President Franklin
D. Roosevelt, in his State of
the Union address, outlined a
goal of "Four Freedoms:"
Freedom of speech and ex-
pression; the freedom of peo-
ple to worship God in their
own way; freedom from want;
freedom from fear.
In 1942, the Pan American
Airways Pacific Clipper, a flying
boat built by Boeing, arrived in
New York more than a month
after leaving California and
following a westward route.
In 1963, "Mutual of
Omaha's Wild Kingdom" pre-
miered on NBC-TV.
In 1982, truck driver William
G. Bonin was convicted in Los
Angeles of 10 of the "Freeway
Killer" slaying of young men
and boys. (Bonin was later
convicted of four other killings;
he was executed in 1996.)
In 1993, authorities rescued
Jennifer Stolpa and her infant
son, Clayton, after Jennifer's
husband, James, succeeded
in reaching help, ending the
family's eight-day ordeal in the
snow-covered Nevada desert.
Ten years ago: Iraqi Presi-
dent Saddam Hussein accused
U.N. inspectors of engaging
in "intelligence work" instead
of searching for suspected
nuclear, chemical and biolog-
ical weapons in his country.
Five years ago: In a video
posted on the Internet, al-
Qaida's American-born
spokesman, Adam Gadahn,
urged fighters to meet Presi-
dent George W. Bush with
bombs during his upcoming
Mideast visit.
One year ago: A bomb ex-
ploded at a busy Damascus
intersection, killing 25 people
and wounding dozens in the
second major attack in the
Syrian capital in as many
weeks.
Today's birthdays: Retired
MLB All-Star Ralph Branca is
87. Author E.L. Doctorow is
82. Rock musician Malcolm


Young (AC-DC) is 60. Come-
dian Rowan Atkinson is 58.
Thought for Today:
"What this generation was
bred to at television's knees
was not wisdom, but cyni-
cism." Pauline Kael, Amer-
ican movie critic (1919-2001).











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


::.
2! Bjillii iiiiiimu


- p - .4.


The price of private


GREG BIANCE
Special to the Chronicle
O ne of the curses of
being older is seeing
patterns over time.
Being a moderate, yet
socially responsible to educa-
tion, my purpose before I retire
is to avoid the destruction of
public education. It is not per-
fect, but what is? Every trade
and business has anticlines and
synclines to embrace. I am con-
cerned that the socially conser-
vative perspective is equating
the value of people to a number
that influences their worth. We
and children are more complex,
but we are seen with this myopic
vision.
The recession has taken a toll
on so many Americans, includ-
ing my family Income loss for
retirement, housing value di-
minished and a general salary
that has been flat for five con-
secutive years. Yes, we are part
of the 90 percent that have jobs
and we are also part of the lower
50 percent that must be slackers.
I cannot see numbers and dol-
lars, but real faces in the class-
room. I hear tragic stories and I
feel their pain. Most community
members do not realize that cut-
backs have been an ongoing
process for a decade. Trust me,
there are no gold faucets and big
salaries in Citrus County The
once-mocked Taj Mahal, built 25
years ago, is now filled with em-
ployees supporting our planned
growth as we increased in size.
Obviously it was a good invest-
ment at yesterday's prices.


I know many businesses that fail in the
first two years, so there is no guarantee
that charter schools would not fail as well.
The reality is when I taught at an established
private school called Jacksonville Bolles, I
made more money than in public education,
but no retirement. In my return I understood
that the security of taking less as a teacher
at the time, but securing a small pension.


The fiscal cliff of doom has
been reducing education's
waistline for some time. Since
the '70s our waistline has always
been lean and small. Large dis-
tricts and our northern states
have supported public educa-
tion more respectfully Our local
teachers and principals have ex-
perienced multiple cuts for the
last 10 years. The difference is in
the last six years, where it has
been very aggressive and now
becoming critical toward our
survival. Anorexic feeding leads
to a poor diet while teachers and
kids lose.
Now that budgets are slashed,
education employees have to
survive as well. Imagine our
young teachers, earning $34,000
and starting life with thousands
of dollars in college loans. Fu-
ture teachers are getting se-
verely impacted as they have
little say with their earnings.
When our economy turns
around soon, these younger
teachers will fly north at the
same time as the retirees fly


south. Maybe they can wave to
each other during their flight.
We can only blame ourselves
when this happens.
Now the talk is about busi-
nesses taking over public
schools, because the business-
man has supposed better skills
for managing dollars. I know
many businesses that fail in the
first two years, so there is no
guarantee that charter schools
would not fail as well. The real-
ity is when I taught at an estab-
lished private school called
Jacksonville Bolles, I made
more money than in public edu-
cation, but no retirement. In my
return I understood that the se-
curity of taking less as a teacher
at the time, but securing a small
pension from Florida. This was
my compromise to come back
into public education and ap-
proach my profession more con-
servatively Yes, I left
higher-performing students, but
the challenge in teaching public
schools is with a more diverse
population.


In America we accept all stu-
dents in public education,
where the private sector can
screen out the average student
to the academic best. I was a
part of this in 12 years of
Catholic school and my parents
had parish support for the three
kids under scholarship. The
wealthier have financial advan-
tages, but the less fortunate
hope for scholarships. The
Charter school movement would
only drain more dollars that are
funded to public education. It
will impact a migration of nor-
mal to high intelligence. This
will leave public education with
those that cannot afford private
school, cannot get into it aca-
demically or are raised in a less
supportive home situation. We
know this would create a
spreadsheet indicating our fail-
ure. The real failure comes from
the lack of genuine financial
support from community that
may prefer to cut funding even
more. Our teacher pay and chil-
dren funding will drop even
more in this semi-rural area of
Florida. Remember, America
and Citrus County is a cross-
section of all types of people and
learners. We are at crossroads as
you choose our future.
My concern is with our pock-
ets of conservative thinkers
aligned with the above mindset.
Embracing this approach might
become the above plan in the fu-
ture. That would be a travesty Our
population has to get behind
public education and support it


Page C3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Conflicts

of interest


should be

on table
I had a complaint the
other day from a
reader about a poten-
tial conflict of interest that
I might have had, and I
think there was enough
smoke around this fire
that a further explanation
was needed.
Readers of the Chroni-
cle have a right to know
that I do not have any
other financial interests
in this county other than
my interest in the newspa-
per and the private com-
pany that owns the
newspaper I have no other
stock, land or side busi-
nesses in our community
While there is a restau-
rant in Hernando called
"Mulligans," that is not
this Mulligan, and the
truth is I haven't even vis-
ited yet But I will.
None of the coverage in
this newspaper is ever de-
veloped to promote any
business or interest or fi-
nancial gain for myself or
the members of our news
or leadership team.
Now, that is not to say
we don't have interests or
concerns outside of the
newspaper responsibili-
ties I do.
As an extension of the
newspaper role I play and
my personal interests, I
am involved in many com-
munity and business or-
ganizations. They are all
volunteer positions.
My top outside activity
right now is that I serve as
the chairman of the Citrus
County YMCA board, and we
are working to expand
programming and raising
money to build a Y facility
on State Road 486.
I have a strong bias that
Citrus County deserves to
have a YMCA and the
great programming that
comes with it.
Another key interest is
that I serve on the board
of directors of the United
Way and have been in-
volved since 1986, when I
sat on the founding execu-
tive board. I help raise
contributions for the 19
nonprofit agencies that get
funding from United Way
I have a strong bias that
we, the working citizens
and comfortable retirees
of the county, should con-
tribute money to non-
governmental, nonprofit
agencies that provide serv-
ices to people in need.
For more than 20 years
I have served on the Cit-
rus County Chamber of
Commerce (and the Nature
Coast Chamber of Com-
merce). The Chamber is
an apolitical business or-
ganization that promotes
Citrus County and the
businesses that operate
here.
See Page C3


Moving Citrus County forward in 2013


As we begin a new year, I would
like to take this opportunity as
the new chairman of the Citrus
County Board of County Commission-
ers, to talk about the year ahead, ini-
tiatives we will work on, and assure
the citizens of our community, that
your local government will be focused
on improving our county
I'd like to thank the citizens of our
county for re-electing me to a second
term on the commission, and to tell
you I am grateful to have the oppor-
tunity to make a positive impact on


the place I was born and raised, and
where I am raising my family
I had the absolute honor and privi-
lege to be selected by my fellow board
members as the chairman of the
board. I take this position very seri-
ously, and view this as an opportunity
to bring forward initiatives that I be-
lieve our county can focus on to im-
prove our community
Along those lines, I have intro-
duced a chairman's plan that identi-
fies specific areas I would like to see
our county focus on this year. The fol-


lowing is a list of the initiatives with
brief details on each area. Over the
next few months, I will be working
hard on each of these areas, and writ-
ing columns like this one, to go in
depth about each topic, and what we
are doing to address them. The fol-
lowing are initiatives listed in my
chairman's plan.
Address and confront budget issues
This will be one of the biggest is-
sues we will face in 2013. This is an
area we had to address this year, but
the recent tax issue with


Duke/Progress Energy highlights the
necessity for this to happen. We must
work to do a complete review of rev-
enue and expenses, and look at op-
tions to address the continued budget
shortfall. I have asked the county ad-
ministrator to bring budget discus-
sions forward early in 2013 and for us
as a Commission to start the discus-
sion of addressing our budget issues
now. The goal is to work to build a
sustainable and balanced budget into

See Page C4


Joe Meek
GUEST
COLUMN







Page C2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013



PINION


"All artists today are expected to cultivate a little fashionable unhappiness."
Lawrence Durrell, "Justine," 1957


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
J EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan........... .................. publisher
Mike Arnold ................... ................. editor
Charlie Brennan ......................... editor at large
Curt Ebitz.............. ............ citizen member
iL Mac Harris ..................... .........citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ........... ................. copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


BUSINESS-FRIENDLY





Pudgee's





raises vital





questions


Government has the best
intentions, but its rules
and regulations don't al-
ways recognize the reality of
life and business in 2013.
And sometimes the strict en-
forcement of rules and regula-
tions goes against common
sense and the
community's in- THE I
terests.
Such was the Enforc
case last week of gover
when county and regulk
state inspectors
caught up with OUR 01
Pudgee's All
AmericanHotDogs Use comr
in Floral City. to help b
After some in- comply an
spectors visited
the popular outdoor eatery,
they determined that owner
John Sterling was violating the
county fire ordinance. The in-
spectors wanted Pudgee's to
install an expensive fire-sup-
pression system used in most
county restaurants that are in-
doors and have seating.
Sterling took a hard look at
the cost of the regulations and
decided compliance was too
expensive and that it would
make more sense to go out of
business.
After Sterling put a sign up
announcing the business' clo-
sure, many in the community
became enraged.
Pudgee's is not a five-star
restaurant, but it is an institu-
tion in southeast Citrus County
that attracts people from


Having it their own way
If I understand this correctly, the
county is millions of dollars in the
hole because Duke Power did not
pay all its taxes, but is still looking
and is now looking at closing fire
stations and libraries to make up
for the tax loss. But there's still
over $4,000 in the
budget to send Brad 0
Thorpe to New Orleans to
be trained as director of
a port that we don't have
and may never have be-
cause the feasibility
study has not even been
done? Oh, but I forget, if
the county commission
doesn't like the results of CAL
feasibility studies, they 563-
can just reject it and fund
the port anyway. They've
done this in the past. In 1993
they paid the Withlacoochee Re-
gional Planning Council to study
the feasibility of privatizing EMS.
When the council recommended
to keep public EMS, the commis-
sion dismissed the study as
flawed. And who led the way?
Commissioner Brad Thorpe.


S
ce

at

P
-r


u
n


I0

(


throughout the area. Support-
ers let Sterling know how im-
portant Pudgee's is to the
community.
Fortunately, the county fire
prevention office has taken a
step back from its initial rigid
interpretation of enforcement,
and there is a
;SUE. chance Pudgee's
can survive.
cement It is important
mental that county fire
tions. services make
sure that busi-
INION: nesses are in com-
pliance with the
ion sense law But it's also
businesses important county
d survive, government rec-
ognize that some-
times the rigid enforcement of
codes and ordinances can be
the final nail in the coffin of a
business trying to survive in
these difficult economic times.
Protecting health and safety
is an important public concern.
But working with business as a
partner and a taxpayer is a
more appropriate governance
philosophy
We have confidence our offi-
cials at the county (and those in
economic development) will
work to help Pudgee's survive.
Health and safety rules are ir-
relevant if businesses are
closed down and people put
out of work.
We'd like to see that philoso-
phy become the way we always
do the business of government
in Citrus County.


Restricted license
Well, I'm reading about the 92-
year-old driver that drove through
two businesses and injured sev-
eral people. I'd certainly like to
know when we're going to start
putting some age restrictions on
people behind the wheel.
JND Thanks for laughs
W I just want to say that
Qf the Chronicle has out-
done themselves with the
Sound Off, the "Best of
2012." The person that
called in that said that
they were waiting in line
i at a grocery store in a
"10 items or less line"
)579 and actually counted the
eggs in one carton as
being 12, those people
really, truly need to get another
hobby. Thank you, Chronicle.
Missing topic
I noticed all the Sound Offs in your
special edition, but a major cate-
gory, this dumb port idea that
these commissioners are pushing,
was totally missing. Why is that?


United Way needs your help
The United Way of Citrus County needs your help this holiday
season. The Chronicle is asking readers to join in and support the
countywide nonprofit agency by making a contribution of $31.12 (or
whatever you can afford). The United Way helps fund 19 nonprofit
agencies in the community and is leading the effort to impact
important community concerns. Please send your contribution to
Gerry Mulligan at the Chronicle/United Way, 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429.
Gerry Mulligan, publisher


Luck of the Irish


-WASHINGTON
et another reason to re-
vere Calvin Coolidge is
that he thought the
Chicago Bears were a circus act.
In the 1920s, professional football
was small beer compared to the
already big business of college
football. Which today prospers
partly by selling beer: Watch the
commercials that pay
for the television con- -
tracts that have re-
cently disordered
many college football .-
conferences and nul-
lified what were /
solemnly called "tra-
ditional rivalries."
On the eve of the
national champi- Georg
onship game between OTI
Notre Dame and Ala-
bama, which probably V014
will have two-thirds
as many viewers as will the pres-
ident's inauguration, consider
some curiosities of the sports-
academia complex. According to
Eric M. Leifer in "Making the Ma-
jors: The Transformation of
Team Sports in America" (Har-
vard University Press, 1995), in
the 1920s, the professional foot-
ball Maroons of Pottsville, Pa.,
(population 23,000) drew such
large crowds that the New York
Giants chose to play them there
rather than in Gotham. By the
1890s, Yale's football receipts "ac-
counted for one-eighth of the in-
stitution's total income, an
amount greater than its expendi-
tures on law and medicine."
Before the late Myles Brand
was president of Indiana Univer-
sity he was a philosophy profes-
sor, and when he left Indiana to
become head of the NCAA, he
waxed philosophical about en-
tangling a huge entertainment
business with higher education.
It is, he said, "essentially malfea-
sance" for university administra-
tors not to make the most of the
money-making opportunities that
sports present: 'Athletics, like the
university as a whole, seeks to
maximize revenues." In doing so,


college football teams have aban-
doned old conferences and em-
braced new ones with more
lucrative television and other
payouts.
College football has proved
Karl Marx right about how capi-
talism dissolves old social
arrangements: "... uninterrupted
disturbance of all social condi-
tions, everlasting un-
certainty and
agitation ... all fixed,
fast-frozen relations...
are swept away ... all
that is solid melts into
air." Blame college
football's turmoil on
male beer-drinking
B truck drivers, and
e Will technology.
-ER Young men are, in
television-speak, a
DES "coveted demo-
graphic." Why? They
buy beer and pickup trucks. But
like everyone else nowadays,
they tape television programs
and watch them later, fast-for-
warding through commercials.
The technology that makes this
possible has caused the explosive
growth of lucrative television
contracts for sports broadcasting
rights: Men cannot fast-forward
through live sports telecasts.
Monday night's game should be
sweet satisfaction for Father
Theodore Hesburgh, 95, who
managed to make athletic and ac-
ademic excellence compatible.
This year Notre Dame is the first
school in the history of the Bowl
Championship Series to rank
first in football and first in the
graduation rate (tied with North-
western) of its football players.
Notre Dame graduates 97 per-
cent; Alabama 75 percent. In this,
Notre Dame benefits from a self-
imposed recruiting handicap -
the two-semester math require-
ment for all freshmen that pre-
vents the university from
recruiting many blue-chip high
school players.
Hesburgh's achievement was
hard-won. In the 1920s, the first
golden age of sports superstars


(Babe Ruth, Red Grange, Jack
Dempsey, Bill Tilden), Notre
Dame under Knute Rockne, who
became coach in 1918, was known
as a football factory Rockne's
most famous player, halfback
George Gipp (played by Ronald
Reagan in "Knute Rockne: All
American"), was a hard-drinking
gambler who bet on Notre Dame
games.
Beginning in 1941 under coach
Frank Leahy, Notre Dame came
to dominate the sport as no team
has since, with six undefeated
seasons, including 39 games with-
out a loss, and four national
championships. But in 1949,
when Hesburgh was appointed
the university's executive vice
president and athletics chair-
man, he set out to make Notre
Dame "the Harvard of the Mid-
west," which required de-empha-
sizing football. This required
bringing to heel the imperious
and mercurial Leahy, who
flouted NCAA rules with illegal
practices and refused to speak
to Hesburgh.
Leahy was a national celebrity.
In 1956, Leahy would second the
nomination of Dwight Eisenhower
at the Republican convention. In
1953, however, the steely Hesburgh
had fired Leahy never mind
the talk about Leahy leaving be-
cause of health problems. Since
then, Notre Dame's football for-
tunes have varied but its academic
reputation has risen steadily
Football has hardly lost its hold
on the campus. The large mural
on the library that overlooks the
stadium shows Jesus with both
arms raised and is famously
called "Touchdown Jesus." The
statue of Father William Corby-
a 19th-century president of the
university- depicts him with his
right hand held straight up and is
known as "Fair Catch Corby" And
the statue of Moses with his index
finger pointed skyward is "We're
No. 1 Moses."
--In--
George Will's email address
is georgewill@washpost. com.


_ LETTERS to the Editor


Blown opportunity
In today's paper (Dec. 11) I read
the BOCC has decided to spend
$320,000 to create a "baseline"
appraisal of real and tangible
property belonging to Progress
Energy. I am going to assume the
"baseline" appraisal will be
done by an outside source.
Why? Is this not the job of
Geoff Greene and his property
appraiser's office? If this needs
to be done, do it in house. The
property appraiser's office is in
existence to do just that. If they
do not have the people and re-
sources to do the "baseline" ap-
praisal, then why do we have a
property appraiser's office?
That $320,000 will keep a lot of
local folks employed!
And while I've not been a fan of
Scott Adams, I applaud the ques-
tions he's been asking about the
actions of the BOCC prior to his
arrival. I agree with his statement
that the county should have ac-
cepted Progress Energy's offer
of $30 million in tax payments.
They should have gotten the check
in hand, and then do to Progress
Energy what they would do to


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board should call 352-
564-2930.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including emailed letters.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

anyone else in the county who
didn't pay their taxes put a
lien on Progress Energy's plant!
Ronnie King
Lecanto


Taxing situation
As Mark Twain once said:
"Suppose you were an idiot. And
suppose you were a member of
Congress. But, I repeat myself."
I feel as though the ones who
make decisions for Citrus County
are like this. It doesn't seem to
matter what the majority think,
as long as they can have it their
way Mr Adams, the newcomer,
is sensible and his answers seem
to reflect that. It's too bad the
others ridicule him when he
seems to have good ideas. What's
it going to take for them to realize
their decision-making process
needs to be changed?
We get deeper in debt and more
and more taxes. For what? What
do we have to show for it? Spend
less, get rid of bureaucratic ex-
cess and we'll all do better.
Mark Twain also said: "The
only difference between a tax
man and a taxidermist is that
the taxidermist leaves the skin."
That observation has never been
more appropriate.
Brian Palmer
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


-(
H
ic





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A muted ingredient, but allowed to stir the pot


Christmas has now
passed, and we were
left with very pleas-
ant memories and many
gifts. Some of the gifts are
things which we will never,
ever find a need for, but oth-
ers are really quite useful.
For each of the past sev-
eral years, our children
have given us a most signifi-
cant gift a calendar. It's
not an ordinary calendar,
but one on which the pic-
tures are of our grandchil-
dren participating in
various activities. It brings
us much joy each time we
turn a page.
Today, as I flipped
through the calendar, my
eyes rested on one particu-
lar photograph. It was a pic-
ture which brought back


memories from many years Becky came to sit with me in
ago, from a time long before the stands for just a few
the subject was born. minutes. While there, she
During the fall of 1984, looked at the game program.
Becky was a Then, like rum-
freshman at Cit- making through
rus High School ... a catalogue, she
and was a mem- A pointed to one of
ber of the CHS the football play-
band's flag ers and said,
corps. At that "That's the one I
time, she was a want, Dad."
14-year-old girl. I was shocked.
With closely I wasn't ready
cropped hair, Fred Brannen for my little girl
boots and blue A SLICE to be at all inter-
jeans, she could ested in boys,
easily be mis- OF LIFE and she'd not
taken for a 14- just picked any
year-old boy- a cute boy, old boy, she'd picked the
but a boy nonetheless. star quarterback a most
One Friday evening, after popular fellow named Kurt
the band finished its foot- Lasse.
ball game halftime show, What is a father to do? I


didn't know, so I winged it
and said, "Sweetheart, all
you have to do is grow up and
I'm sure he'll want you, too."
Time passed, and Kurt
did in fact notice Becky as
she grew into a very lovely
young lady Eight years later,
in 1992, after both of them
had graduated from college,
they were married. Five
years later, they were
blessed with Miss Emily
As I looked at the photo-
graph of Em flying through
the air toward the basket as
a member of an AAU bas-
ketball team, the Katy
(Texas) Rebels, I remem-
bered a skinny little 14-year-
old girl and the most
unlikely promise I'd made
to her, which ultimately
came true.


I thought about the athletic
genes Emily has inherited
from her paternal grandfather,
Dick Lasse, a former Pitts-
burgh Steeler, thatwere passed
on to her by her father, Kurt.
I looked at the fabulous
beauty she is becoming due
to genes inherited from her
maternal grandmother, my
Cheryl, and passed on to Em
by her mother, Becky
No, I didn't see any of my
physical characteristics in
Miss Em. None whatsoever.
She's God's own special recipe.
I'm not among the notice-
able ingredients, but He has
allowed me to stir the pot!


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist.


Special to the Chronicle
Emily Lasse of the AAU Katy
(Texas) Rebels soars in for a
score during 2012.


Bizarre idea
Commissioner Damato's idea to put
a band shell for concerts at the Citrus
Avenue/U.S. 19 intersection is bizarre, to
say the least. Who wants to listen to music
while 18-wheel rock trucks roar by? These
are the same trucks Mr. Damato and
commission failed to limit by joining with
Levy County to oppose their permits over
a year ago. The most appropriate and
obvious use for that site is parking or a
municipal complex like Meadowcrest.


SCHOOLS
Continued from Page C1

financially How long can
salaries lay flat, before edu-
cators' migration occurs?
We have proven our value
well under Sam Himmel's
leadership and school
board members' policy, be-
cause we are a top school
district. I would prefer to
hear strong leadership com-
ing from our local citizen-
ship, teachers and
administration as they push
against this negative wave
that will change the land-
scape like a large tsunami.
If we do not then we reap
what we sow
If we have performed well
then financial backings
should follow. If we were a
C- to F-rated school district


then the logic of Charter
seems to be a stronger case
of abandonment, but still
not the right thing to do in
America. Yes, our nation is
wobbling, but we have not
fallen. You can dwell on the
fall or shift our support to
bring us back again. You can
build footers for high risers
or thatched roof structure
as we educate the diverse
population. Every kid de-
serves the opportunity to
excel and succeed. I have
never hidden on writing
about the wobble, but losing
faith in America has never
crossed my mind. We need
to do the right thing and
rally behind this great
county we all live in.


GregBiance is a former
Citrus County District
Teacher of the Year


LUTE OMYTCERB TMROES


Tommy Tucker is a Citrus County "Super Hero" who will guide you to a healthier lifestyle.
He is also the spokesperson against alcohol, tobacco & prescription drug abuse.


Letters to THE EDITOR


Plan moving forward
A letter from a respected local
businessperson appeared in the
Jan. 4 edition of the Chronicle
that, in essence, raised the fol-
lowing question: What difference
does it make if the development
of a plan for public investment in
the future of Crystal River comes
from a single person, a partner-
ship or a group of locals?
My answer is, "Actually, it
makes a great deal of difference."
It seems to have been lost in
the recent discussion that the
City of Crystal River, in fact, has a
vision for its future that incorpo-
rates a number of specific action
items to move the community for-
ward. In 2008, the city, through its
Community Redevelopment
Agency (CRA), went through a
very public process to develop a
vision plan for the future of
downtown Crystal River. That
process involved open work-
shops, personal interviews with
major community stakeholders,
open houses where public com-
ment was solicited, online sur-
veys and a final public workshop
where the basic plan was deter-
mined. In addition, more than
550 people at the 2008 Manatee
Festival were asked for input on
what might make the community
a better destination point for visi-
tors and a more desirable place
for residents. This 2008 plan was
subsequently formally adopted
by Crystal River City Council and
has served since that time to
guide projects to improve Crystal
River as a community
Projects that have been under-
taken as a result of the 2008 plan
include the South Citrus
streetscape, the development of a
master plan for Hunters Spring


Park, the acquisition of addi-
tional public parking to support
the South Citrus/Riverwalk area,
the installation of wayfaring sig-
nage in the downtown area, the
continued improvement of King's
Bay Park, the implementation of
"mixed-use" land use within the
CRA District and along the U.S.
19 business corridor, the ongoing
exploration of the feasibility of a
marina in the downtown area,
and improved "walkability"
within the downtown area
through the installation of addi-
tional sidewalks. The most im-
portant project, of course, is the
proposed Riverwalk project.
After 20 years of discussion, the
city, with valuable involvement
from the newly formed Crystal
River Area Council of the Cham-
ber of Commerce, has moved this
concept to a point where tenta-
tive buy-in from the affected
property owners is in hand and a
final decision on the viability of
the project should be able to be
made by the middle of the year.
The 2008 plan, and the various
projects that comprise the plan,
have already involved consider-
able public investment and will
ultimately involve considerably
more public investment. It is our
belief that the public should ab-
solutely be allowed to have input
into any plans that drive such
decisions.
The recent letter also raises
the following question: Are we
satisfied with the status quo, or
are we ready to make new and
progressive changes to Crystal
River?
Obviously, no one is satisfied
with the struggling nature of the
national and local economies
and the impact of those economic
conditions on our local commu-


nity That is why there has been
broad community support for the
above-listed initiatives that are
intended to make the City of
Crystal River a better place in
which to live, visit, and invest. It
is also why city council has indi-
cated a willingness to work with
the Chamber, the county, the Eco-
nomic Development Council, the
Tourist Development Council,
and others to develop ways to
make the U.S. 19 commercial cor-
ridor a more viable and success-
ful location. The challenges of
that corridor are diverse and so-
lutions will not be simple, but a
true partnership could accom-
plish much.
At the same time, changes such
as the proposal to significantly
increase the maximum allowed
height of buildings will warrant
public discussion. On one hand,
the potential for such construc-
tion to stimulate new investment
and allow greater leeway for
green space to be provided could
be seen by many as advanta-
geous. On the other hand, the po-
tential impact on adjacent
residential areas and to the over-
all nature of the community could
be of genuine concern to others.
There is a process in place for
changes of that nature to the
city's Land Development Code to
be reviewed, which ensures that
the public has the chance to be
heard and that process will be
followed if a formal proposal of
that nature is received.
As the city manager, I have to
take responsibility for the fact
that so many people seem to be
unaware of the 2008 plan and the
progress we have made in pursu-
ing the projects identified within
that plan. I intend to take active
measures to address that prob-


lem, believing as I do that our
residents, business owners, and
visitors deserve to know what we
are trying to accomplish and
what we are doing with their
money
The Jan. 4 letter stressed that
there is a need for unity to better
serve Crystal River in terms of
moving our community forward,
and I agree. The 2008 plan al-
ready in effect, as it may be dis-
cussed and amended going
forward, should serve as the
basis for a unified effort to im-
prove our downtown area. A co-
operative effort between the city,
the county, the Chamber of Com-
merce, and others to revitalize
the U.S. 19 corridor would be
welcomed, and could only benefit
the entire community
A. R. Houston
City Manager

Tax the rich more
A key proponent of raising
taxes on the wealthy is Warren
Buffet. Also, Bill Gates seems to
agree. Included are several oth-
ers, including some high level
CEOs who can be as generous
with their stockholders money as
our president is with the general
public's money Those who favor
this probably have more money
than President Obama is asking
for at this time.
This being the case, I would
suggest they contribute enough to
cover the president's request.
Then they can feel confident the
rich have done their part. How-
ever, they are smart enough to
know any contribution will never
be enough. Government leaders
believe they can continue to
spend at any rate they wish, since


they believe there is an unlim-
ited source of revenue available
to them.
People are being led to believe
President Obama is asking for
taxes on the wealthy to solve a fi-
nancial problem. Has anyone no-
ticed, in addition to the tax
increase, he is proposing massive
spending increases? At the same
time, he keeps talking about pro-
tecting the middle class. What
have his policies done so far to
protect the middle class?
He has kept jobs scarce since
employers are reluctant to ex-
pand due to an uncertain future,
stolen money from the Social Se-
curity trust fund by lowering the
premiums, and created an insur-
ance program to enrich insur-
ance companies who support
him financially along with many
other anti-middle class policies.
Has anyone looked at the register
on a gas pump when you fill your
tank? Also, each subsequent trip
to the grocery store results in a
thinner purse.
When in the course of the "fis-
cal cliff" discussion has anything
been said about dealing with our
ever-increasing debt All we hear is
the rich must pay their fair share
and the Republicans are block-
ing such a reasonable request.
Will we ever see government
leadership that promotes a se-
cure and viable economy rather
than trying to do whatever it
takes to get re-elected? One
would think President Obama
would have this as a goal instead
of immediately starting a cam-
paign for his third term. In four
years, a third term might well be
a reality
Robert Hagaman
Homosassa


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

I have a strong bias to-
ward helping businesses in
Citrus County succeed and
believe a healthy Chamber
plays an important role.
Mostly I end up working
gates at festivals on cold
weekend mornings and
being grumpy, but that's
what chambers do.
I also serve as chairman
of the Crystal River Area
Council, a subgroup of the
Chamber of Commerce that
is specifically working on


business and tourism prob-
lems in the city This group's
focus has been to work with
the city to get the Riverwalk
on King's Bay constructed
and to promote business
activities.
I have a strong bias to-
ward helping grow tourism
and business success in our
community because it cre-
ates jobs, generates income
and helps the community
come together.
I have been an active
member of the Crystal River
Rotary Club for more than
20 years.
I have a strong bias that
the six Rotary Clubs of Cit-


rus County do an excellent
job of promoting good deeds
in our community. They
plan festivals and raise
money and then give it all
away to nonprofit organiza-
tions in the community
They even work with Bill
Gates to help eradicate
polio around the world.
I also serve as one of the
two Citrus County represen-
tatives on the Withla-
coochee Electric Co-op's
Operation Roundup board
of directors (Chet Cole of
the Key Center is the other
Citrus representative). This
group gives grants to resi-
dents of Central Florida suf-


fering from unusual finan-
cial circumstances due to
health or personal crises.
The funds come from co-op
members who voluntarily
round up their monthly
electric bill to the next high-
est dollars. Since 1994, the
group has given out over $2.4
million to people in need.
Again, I have a bias that we
should help people in need.
As the publisher (and be-
fore that editor) of this
newspaper for the past 34
years, I have been in the for-
tunate position to tell sto-
ries and promote ideas. I
have a tendency or bias to-
ward those who are helping


make this a better place.
We do have rules that no
news employee or leader
can be involved in the elec-
tion process. We do not at-
tend fundraising events or
make political contributions
to any candidates. While we
do make editorial endorse-
ments in local political
races, we use the same pro-
Citrus County filter to make
selections.
I once had an ex-sister-in-
law who ran for the county
school board, and that put
me in a sticky position. Our
editorial board endorsed
her opponent.
You cannot escape con-


flicts or biases when you
live in a small town. We try
hard to avoid conflicts and
to promote organizations
that are doing good things.
In fact, this past year the
Chronicle partnered with
more than 250 separate Cit-
rus County organizations to
promote community events,
golf tournaments, festivals
and fundraisers.
That is our bias, and we
readily admit it.


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.


FOUNDD


563-0579


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 C3





C4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013


MEEK
Continued from Page Cl

the future, ensuring services impor-
tant to citizens are maintained and
that our community continues to be
an affordable and attractive place to
live, work and retire. We must con-
tinue to find ways to reduce our
costs and improve the efficiency of
government. It should be noted that
your local government has reduced
its budget by more than $40 million
over the past four years, and as a
commission, we have cut costs and
reduced spending by the largest
amount in the history of Citrus
County. As a county, we now have
one of the lowest tax rates in the en-
tire state of Florida. However, be-
cause of the continued drastic
decline in our real estate values, we
have drawn from reserves to bal-
ance the county budget over the past
few years. Fortunately, we have been
able to maintain services important
to many in our community while cut-
ting large amounts of discretionary
spending. We are at a point that we
must address this issue to ensure the
financial stability of our county and
maintain adequate reserve levels.
To be clear, we still have reserve
funds, but we cannot continue to rely
on those funds to balance our
budget. As a county commission,
working with our citizens, we should
have a clear understanding and di-
rection as a community regarding
what our priorities are and how we
spend taxpayer dollars. As a com-
mission and working with the com-
munity, we will work hard this year to
define those priorities and build a
sustainable, balanced budget that
meets the needs of our citizens, while
keeping our costs as low as possible.
Enhance and diversify
Citrus County economy
This is another area that is ex-
tremely important for us to pursue
as a community. The recent issue
with Duke/Progress Energy high-
lights the need for us to work to di-
versify our economy. Our economy


has been based on two primary in-
dustries for many years, construc-
tion and utility/power generation.
The construction industry has fallen
on hard times for many years now,
and now we see the possibility of the
utility industry threatened. We are
seeing right now the results of not
having a diversified economy. The
Citrus County Economic Develop-
ment Council (EDC) has been work-
ing very hard to address this issue,
and has developed a plan based
upon facts and data, and created a
targeted industry initiative. These
are industries that have the oppor-
tunity to substantially grow based on
our demographics, workforce and
other factors. The targeted indus-
tries include light manufacturing fa-
cilities, technology-based businesses,
marine activities, agriculture, tourism
and the medical industry. The EDC
has created multiple incentive pro-
grams and worked with county gov-
ernment to incentivize investment in
those particular areas. As a county,
we should continue to work on the
numerous initiatives currently under
way to diversify our local economy.
In addition, we should continue to
work with the EDC and especially
support its focus on workforce de-
velopment and working with the
College of Central Florida and With-
lacoochee Technical Institute to
train individuals for jobs available
in our community. We also should
focus on infrastructure projects that
spur investments throughout our
county. The goal should be to create
an atmosphere that encourages eco-
nomic market diversification.
Development partnerships and
strengthen relationships with
cities, organizations
This is an area that, as a county,
we can definitely improve on. When
our cities do well, everyone benefits.
There are many opportunities for
the county to work with both cites
that include redevelopment proj-
ects, transportation projects, parks,
trailways, Riverwalk projects and
many others. Both cities have
worked very hard over the past few
years to improve themselves, and as


a county, we want to be partners,
working together to improve our
community. There is an immense
amount of potential for this to hap-
pen, and over the next few months,
the county commission will work
hard to move this forward.
Begin developing comprehensive,
detailed long-range plan
While our county has a compre-
hensive plan that guides land-use
planning and development, as a
community we need to take a more
holistic approach, and work to en-
sure the future success of our
county. This should be a compre-
hensive project that entails tourism,
economic development, land-use
planning, development standards,
transportation planning and brand-
ing of our county This would include
multiple organizations: both cities,
the Economic Development Coun-
cil, the Tourist Development Coun-
cil, the Transportation Planning
Organization, the school board and
others, including working with indi-
viduals, civic groups, businesses and
professional organizations. This would
be a detailed, multi-year process
that guides our community forward,
builds on existing strengths, utilizes
investments made and highlights as-
sets within our community and
within each of the respective areas
of interest to improve and grow our
county (Google "Pasco County BOCC
Strategic Plan;" not known for plan-
ning, Pasco County has undergone a
comprehensive change to how it ap-
proaches planning and economic
development, along with major
changes to its growth-management
planning.) As the chairman, I am
going to invite Pasco County officials
to present the process which they
have gone through over the past few
years so we can see how that can re-
late to our community.
Focus on a specific environmental
project within King's Bay
While there are many issues and
worthy environmental projects, we
should highlight one specific project
and work to get the city, county and
state government, along with private
individuals and businesses, to fund


and execute a single project or area
of focus that improves the quality of
the Crystal River and King's Bay
This will also assist with working
with the city of Crystal River. The
hope is we can create a rallying cry
for a specific environmental project
that everyone can get behind and
which can be achieved. This can
also serve as a catalyst to form and
move forward on a detailed master
plan to improve the quality of King's
Bay The master plan should address
the broader goal of improving the
bay, including addressing septic pol-
lution and water runoff issues. As a
county, we have already started this
process. In November, the commis-
sion approved $225,000 from the
water quality reserve fund to help
the "One Rake at a Time" program
working to remove lyngbya from
King's Bay. This is an excellent pro-
gram that is a true public/private
partnership, in which the state, county,
City of Crystal River and many private
citizens and nonprofits have come
together to improve our community.
The project has an immense amount
of potential to really make a differ-
ence and improve our community.
While there are many different
initiatives we can focus on, these
five areas can be a catalyst to start
addressing and confronting issues of
importance in our county.
I would be remiss if I did not
briefly mention a major issue con-
fronting our community right now:
the Duke/Progress Energy tax dis-
pute. As your local government, we
have worked hard to address this
issue in a way that protects our citi-
zens and the financial stability of our
county. While some in leadership
positions have understandably had
very emotional responses, I want to
assure our community that we are
committed and dedicated to dealing
with this issue in a professional and
responsible manner. In a short time
frame, we have presented and ap-
proved a multiphase plan that ad-
dresses the immediate budget
shortfall, and are building future
budgets to address this issue. I want
to make it very clear: Citrus County


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

seeks to have a great relationship
with our largest employer and tax-
payer. Citrus County has been a good
partner with Progress Energy for
many years, and we are grateful for
the investment, jobs and industry it
provides to our community. Our
county has also been good to
Progress Energy, and very support-
ive of its operations. We seek resolu-
tion to this issue, in a way and
manner that both organizations can
mutually benefit. Citrus County
hopes to continue to be partners
with Duke/Progress Energy for
many years ahead, and I genuinely
hope we can reach consensus and
resolve this soon. Though this is a
disagreement between the property
appraiser and Duke/Progress En-
ergy on the valuation of its facility, as
the chairman of the BOCC, I have
and will continue to work very hard
to help facilitate a resolution. It is in
the best interest of our community that
we have a strong relationship with
our biggest employer, and an organ-
ization that greatly affects our local
economy. Over the next few weeks, I
will detail in depth how your local
county commission has addressed
this issue, and where we are headed.
While there are many issues we
will face in 2013,1 I am confident your
local government will rise to the oc-
casion and meet the challenges
ahead. Your commissioners and
county staff are dedicated and de-
termined to making sure we are a
successful community, and will work
tirelessly to make that happen. Cit-
rus County is a great community, and
we are so fortunate to be blessed
with so many wonderful people. My
commitment is to this county, and I
will do everything I can to ensure
that we not only continue to be a
great place to live, work and retire,
but we improve ourselves. Our fu-
ture is bright, and together, we can
and will make Citrus County a better
place to call home. Happy New Year!
0]
Joe Meek is chairman of the
Citrus County Board of County
Commissioners.


. .: . .... . . .: ... .. .... .
Ii u. .: H.,r. ... n .. E mp a
(91""


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All through January
Children's POW Camps
For more information call the museum at
352-341-6427 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

January 11th 20th
Art Center Theater "Nunsense"
Call the box office for tickets or more information at
352-746-7606 or visit www.citruscountyartcenter.com.

January 17th
Concerts at the Old Courthouse
For reservations or information call 352-341-6427.

January 18th 10 a.m.
Arbor Day Celebration
For more information call 352-527-6915.

January 19th 9 a.m.
Seniors on the Move trip to
Clearwater Aquarium
For more information contact: 352-527-5959

January 19th 20th
Saturday 9 a.m. 5 p.m.. Sunday 9 a.m.- 4 p.m.
Florida Manatee Festival
For more information call 352-795-1921
or visit www.citruscountychamber.com

January 20th 1 p.m.- 3p.m.
Zumbathon for Precious Paws Rescue
For more Information call: 352-419-4124.

January 25th
10 a.m.- 12:30 p.m.
Lu the Hippo's Birthday
For more information call 352-628-5343.

January 25th 26th
Truck and
Tractor Pull
For more information visit
www.citruscountyfair.com/tractor.html or call 352-726-2993.

January 26th
Books and Beyond Book Festival
Call 352-634-4216 for more information
or for ticket reservations.

January 26th 9 a.m.
Rotary Club of Sugarmill Woods
Golf Tournament
Call 352-382-7706 for more information.











BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Chevrolet Sonics move down the line April 25, 2012, at the General Motors Orion Assembly plant in Orion Township, Mich. Nearly four years
after GM filed for bankruptcy protection, the automaker is building the Sonic, the best-selling subcompact car in the nation. It's a vehicle no
one thought could be made profitably in the U.S., by a company few people thought would last.




Tiny Sonic helps




Detroit shake off rust


Associated Press
DETROIT
When the word reached the Orion
Assembly Plant, it spread along
the serpentine assembly line
like news of a death or natural
disaster: General Motors, the biggest au-
tomaker in the world, had filed for bank-
ruptcy protection.
On that grim day in 2009, Chevrolet and
Pontiac sedans kept rolling down the line.
And 1,700 worried workers stayed at their
stations even as GM announced it would
close the plant in a desperate bid to survive.
"The unknown was the scariest part," re-
called Gerald Lang, who had worked at
Orion for two years installing dashboards
and doors. "We really had no clue what was
going to happen."
There was something else that the work-
ers didn't know: They were witnessing the
opening act of one of the greatest recovery
stories in American business.
Nearly four years later, Chevrolets are still
moving down the assembly line under the
plant's 82-acre roof. Lang and his co-work-
ers now build the Sonic, the best-selling sub-
compact car in the nation. It's a vehicle no
one thought could be made profitably in the
U.S., by a company that few people thought
would last.
But GM has not only survived, it has
earned $16 billion in profits in the past three
years. And the industry is on track to make
this year its best year since 2007.
Detroit's improbable comeback is the
work of many: President George W Bush,
who authorized the first bailout loans; Pres-
ident Barack Obama, who made more loans;
workers who took lower wages and focused
more on quality to compete with foreign ri-


vals; and executives and designers who de-
veloped better cars amid the financial mael-
strom happening around them.
To be sure, there were victims: share-
holders, auto-parts makers and other sup-
pliers who went out of business, as well as
taxpayers who will never get all their money
back.
But there is no denying that American car-
makers have made a remarkable recovery
Nearly 790,000 people now have jobs build-
ing cars, trucks and parts, up 27 percent
from the dark days of 2009. The story of the
Sonic shows how the industry, along with a
community in a downtrodden state, got
there.
The downward spiral
The collapse of the industry in 2008 that
nearly put GM and Chrysler out of business
and cost Ford billions of dollars came from
a perfect storm that included the Great Re-
cession, expensive gasoline and the finan-
cial meltdown that dried up funding for car
loans. But the automakers' problems were
years in the making.
They had business models that couldn't
generate enough cash to cover expenses.
They had too many factories making too
many cars and trucks. They sold too many
vehicles at discounts or even steep losses
just to move them out of showrooms to make
room for more. And their workers earned
more in wages and benefits than Japanese
competitors.
Even when autoworkers were laid off,
companies couldn't get them off their books.
Union-mandated "jobs banks" forced au-
tomakers to keep paying workers whose
plants had been shut down. They got paid to
sit in rooms and do crossword puzzles.
Years of losses caused the three U.S. au-


tomakers to rack up $200 billion in debt,
about half the liabilities that are now stran-
gling Greece. GM alone lost $82 billion in the
four years before bankruptcy. All three com-
panies had to pay escalating health care
costs for workers and a staggering half-mil-
lion retirees a number about equal to the
population of Portland, Ore. At GM, medical
costs for workers and retirees added $1,500
to the price of a car.
An increasingly bad situation turned
worse during the 2001 recession, which was
followed by rising gas prices that lasted for
most of the decade. Then came the 2008 fi-
nancial meltdown. As GM and Chrysler ca-
reened toward bankruptcy, President Bush
stepped in, loaning $17.4 billion to GM and
Chrysler just before he left office. But auto
sales remained in a free fall, plummeting to
a 30-year low of 10.4 million by the end of
2009.
At the Orion (pronounced OHR'-ee-uhn)
plant, the recession had slowed sales of the
midsized Pontiac G6 and Chevrolet Malibu
cars that were made there. In February
2009, the company eliminated a shift and
laid off 400 workers. The outlook darkened
even more when GM announced it would
dump the Pontiac brand. Since the G6 made
up half of Orion's production, workers
feared the plant was doomed.
It didn't take long for issues inside the
plant to ripple outside to the surrounding
concrete industrial parks. Dozens of auto-
parts companies laid off workers. At Casey's
Chicken, a barbecue joint in a nearby strip
mall, a healthy side business catering GM
birthday and retirement parties dried up.
About that time, Orion Township's chief
executive, Matt Gibb, got a call from Ed

See Page D4


'Braatz stats' reveal SCORE's impact in 2012


Reciting statistics can sug-
gest trends, lend credibil-
ity to changes, indicate
consumer preferences and, in gen-
eral, support facts. If you want to
place emphasis on something, cite
the statistics. Quoting the "stats"
on a subject highlights the impor-
tance of the topic often securing
the close attention of a listener.
So what are "Braatz stats?" They
are the volunteer service numbers
Citrus County SCORE President
and Chairman Robert Braatz pre-
sented at the annual holiday din-
ner in December. Each year
during December, Citrus SCORE
hosts a holiday dinner meeting.
This annual event recognizes and
thanks the SCORE's strategic part-
ners, along with the chapter vol-
unteers who contribution their
time and expertise to the small
businesses in our community
The stats and facts
Each month, Citrus SCORE re-
ports to the national association
headquarters in the Washington,
D.C., area regarding how we have


performed by listing our
service statistics. The
quality of our mentoring
is also closely reviewed
by national SCORE. Our
chapter earned the
"Top Gun" award,
which encompasses
both real service num-
bers and their quality.
The stats
President/Chairman
Braatz reported the fol-
lowing stats for the cal-
endar year of 2012:


Dr. Fred
Herz
EXPERI
MATT


Two hundred and eleven new
clients came to Citrus SCORE for
counseling/mentoring services.
Four hundred and six follow-
up sessions were performed.
SCORE produced 15 work-
shops.
One hundred and eighty-eight
clients attended SCORE Work-
shops.
Citrus SCORE earned a 95
percent performance rating from
National, which is a solid "A" on


any report card.
New-business
startup represented 75
percent of all client
services.
Existing businesses
represented 25 percent
of clients counseled.
Seventy-four new
businesses were started
derick as a result of SCORE
zog services.
IENCE HA total of nearly 700
hours of counselor time
ERS was logged.
Sixty percent of the
services were provided to women.
Forty percent of the services
were provide to men.
Service modes
Technology is here to stay, and
Citrus County SCORE uses differ-
ent methods to advance its coun-
seling for better client service.
Face-to-face mentoring, telephone
follow ups, email and Internet
services are just standard. We
have also provided a variation of


the focus group method to help
with marketing efforts.
Our SBI (Small Business Insti-
tute) and R U Ready Seminars
have different components added
to them where attendees come to-
gether to discuss their issues and
concerns with the goal of helping
each other succeed. In this regard,
SCORE follows the well-remem-
bered Burger King advertising
phrase that suggested you can
"Have it your way!"
To the SCORE volunteers and
strategic partners The Citrus
County Chronicle, the College of
Central Florida, the Chamber of
Commerce and the Economic De-
velopment Council a well-de-
served thank-you for your support
and work throughout the entire
year.

Dr Frederick J Herzog is
immediate past chairman of
Citrus County SCORE. He can
be reached via email at
therzog@tampabay.rrcom.


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Selling


house


may be


the only


way out
DEAR BRUCE: I
am single and 61.
My hours at work
got cut, and now I'm find-
ing that the monthly mort-
gage payment is choking
me. My payment is $1,275
a month, and once I pay it,
I have nothing left for
much of anything else.
I have an IRA worth
$50,000 and a life insur-
ance policy with a cash
value of $20,000. I'm going
to need to use this money
to help defray the monthly
costs; I'm just not sure
which one to dig into first.
- Sandy, via email
DEAR SANDY: With
house payments of $15,300
a year, neither of your in-
vestments is going to last
long. Between the IRA and
the insurance, you have
$70,000 in savings. If you
were to use your savings
alone to pay your mortgage,
this would last you only a
little over four years.
Unless you can supple-
ment your income with a
part-time job, it seems to
me that you cannot afford
your house. You could sell
the house, bank the pro-
ceeds and rent a place to
live. You would have far
fewer financial responsi-
bilities by not owning a
house because there would
be no repairs, insurance,
property taxes, etc.
I hate to be the bearer
of bad news, and I know
it's tough to give up a
home for reasons like this.
But unless you can sup-
plement your monthly in-
come, I don't see any other
choice. I wish you well.
DEAR BRUCE: Re-
cently my wife and I an-
swered a mailer to meet
for "lunch" with a finan-
cial planner. We thought,
"Hey, what the heck, noth-
ing better to do."
This guy advised us to
take out a reverse mort-
gage on our house, which
is paid for He then said we
should use those funds to
buy a life insurance policy
on my wife for $275,000,
which would then go to
our son as the beneficiary
when she passes away.
The rest of the money (our
house is worth approxi-
mately $500,000) could
then be invested.
I'm not sure why we
should really do this, as
our income is fine and we
live comfortably What do
you think? Reader, via
email
DEAR READER: Why
in the world would you
pay the rather high inter-
est rate and fees that
come with a reverse mort-
gage to produce a life in-
surance policy? From
what you've told me, the
only guy who benefits is
the insurance salesman
who is posing as a finan-
cial planner and selling
a rather substantial life
insurance policy
Forget the reverse mort-
gage and continue doing
what you've been doing. It
seems to be working for
you, so don't change it.
DEAR BRUCE: I know
you have received many
letters from parents about
lending their children
money and never getting
See Page D3










D2

SUNDAY
JANUARY 6, 2013


Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


Scan RERl
this:
[ER Ir %L 'w


numberr connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Annual Florida Manatee Festival puts


more manatee into the festival in 2013


Golf, anyone?
Register yourself or your four-
some today for the First An-
nual Tee Off for Tourette Golf
Outing on Feb. 2 at Plantation
on Crystal River. Individual
player cost is $100 and a four-
some is $400. Greens fee, cart,
lunch and goodie bags included.
Shotgun start at 9 a.m.; email
Gary D'Amico at gary78@
tampabay.rr.com to register or
for more details. A few spon-
sorships are still available. Re-
member, sponsorship is a
great way to get your business
name out in the public.
Citrus County Builder Associa-
tion's annual Jim Blackshear
Memorial Golf Outing will be
held Feb. 23 at Seven Rivers
Golf & Country Club, with 50
percent of proceeds benefit-
ting the Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County. Entry includes
greens fee, cart, lunch, door
prizes and one mulligan ticket!
Other activities include a put-
ting contest and reverse draw
card game. 352-746-9028.
March 4! Reserve your four-
some today! Proceeds benefit
projects of Citrus Memorial
Health System. This is an 18-
hole scramble. Registration
and Continental breakfast at
8:30 a.m; shotgun start at 10 a.m.
Cost per player is $325. Team
prizes available for first, second
and third place. Cash prize of
$25,000 for a hole-in-one;
longest drive, closest to pin,
putting contest, drawings and
door prizes also available.
Sponsorship packages available
at cmhfoundation.com under
"upcoming events," or call Lance
LeDoux at 352-344-6442 or
Chris Pool at 352-344-6560.
Presenting sponsor is Wells
Fargo Insurance.
Score, counselors to small
business, is making plans for
its 15th annual Golf Classic in
April. Watch the Community
Calendar at www.citruscounty
chamber.com for details.

January Health
Programs at
Citrus Memorial
Take steps toward
strong bones
Join physical therapist Bruno
Silva to find out which lifestyle
choices you can modify to pre-
vent bone loss. You'll also get
a sneak peak at how weight-
bearing, resistance and bal-
ance exercises slow down or
prevent the thinning of bone.
Attend on Wednesday, Jan.
23, at 1 p.m. in the Medical
Offices Building Community
Room. Program free; registra-
tion requested. 352-795-1234.
Prostate cancer
screening
During January, men over age
40 who have not had a
prostate cancer screening in
the past 12 months may register
for a free prostate-specific
antigen (PSA) and physical
exam on Wednesday, Jan. 30.
Appointments are limited and
will be scheduled between 4 p.m.
and 7 p.m. Call 800-436-8436.


Welcome December One Rake at Time
members


These businesses chose to
invest in Citrus County with a
membership in the Chamber
and we thank them. We hope
that you will support these
new members and visit their
facilities/consider using their
services. The Chamber of
Commerce and Economic De-
velopment Council encourage
you to Shop Citrus First!
Blueberry Hill Farm
7083 N. Lecanto Highway,
Hernando, FL 34442
352-489-2383
Ed Buckley State Farm
3899 W. Suncoast Blvd., Ho-
mosassa, FL 34448
352-628-6944
Citrus County Fallen Hero
Monument Inc.
Bicentennial Park, Crystal
River, FL 34429
888-738-7381
McCoy Financial Services
Crystal River
617-319-0581
Top Performance Real Estate
Consultants
1942 N. Prospect Ave.,
Lecanto, FL 34461
352-746-9924
West Central Solutions
305 S. Salisbury Terrace, Ste.
C, Lecanto, FL 34461
352-457-9644


uncovers another


healthy spring vent

King's Bay Rotary's One Rake at a Time com-
munity service project uncovered another
spring vent in King's Bay while removing lyngbya
on the last day of 2012. Right at the end of one of
the Hunters Spring canals, fresh clean water is
bubbling up through white sand where it had not
been seen in years. Next to the seawall, more
water gushes up where it had been uncovered in
November.
The canals and springs around Hunters Spring
are slowly coming back to life again as ton after
ton of thick benthic mats of lyngbya are removed.
Since September 2011, more than 548 tons have
been removed from King's Bay. Cleanups have
taken place at Hunters Spring basin and canals,
Indian River, Three Sisters Springs and canals,
Cedar Cove, the northwest boat ramp, the Third
Street Pier, Stoney Point, Palm Springs and other
various sections of Crystal River and King's Bay.
The next public cleanup will be Jan. 26 from 1
p.m. to 3 p.m. at Hunters Spring Park in Crystal
River. About 40 college students and teachers that
were here last year from Darton College in
Georgia are coming back to join community vol-
unteers in the kick off for the new year. For more
information, contact Art Jones at MrAWJones
@aol.com, follow the project on Facebook at
"Save Kings Bay" or watch "One Rake at a Time"
on TV every Sunday at noon on WYKE cable 16
broadcast 47 to learn more. To see the project
in action, search "SaveKingsBay" on YouTube or
visit www.youtube.com/user/SaveKingsBay


Gold: Nature Coast Fi-
nancial Advisors and Na-
ture Coast Healthy Living
Magazine; Progress Energy
Silver: The Fox 96.7/
Citrus 95.3 and Hometown
Values.
Bronze: Bailey Electrical
Contracting, Crime Stoppers
of Citrus County, Florida
Virtual School, Insight
Credit Union, Neon Leon's/
Ike's, Suncoast Schools
Federal Credit Union.
Friends of the Festival:
Life Care Center of Citrus
County, Mobile 1 Lube Ex-
press and Nature Coast Bank
This year's festival the
event's 26th anniversary-
is bigger, better and more
manatee than ever before!
On Saturday, Jan. 19 only,
you have the opportunity
to tour Three Sisters
Springs at no charge. On


both Saturday and Sunday,
our local boat captains will
be available to take you on
a 20- to 30-minute tour
around the area to view
the manatee and other
wildlife that may include
osprey and bald eagles.
Tickets are available at the
boat dock area and only
good on the day of pur-
chase. And we've added a
display of dragon boats
and an additional
beer/wine garden.
Both Saturday and Sun-
day offer continuous live
entertainment on two
stages, more than two
dozen fine-art exhibits, a
variety of children's games
and activities, manatee
boat tours, two beer and
wine gardens, delicious
food in two areas, more
than 50 local marketplace


vendors and more than 150
crafts vendors.
We are pleased to have
local favorite and county
staples Cajun Dave and
Neon Leon open the wa-
terfront beer garden Satur-
day with their
Cajun/zydeco/rock music.
Following Cajun Dave, and
back by popular demand,
is Tampa-based Mighty
Mongo, and their combina-
tion of pop and reggae.
Sunday offers traditional
country/bluegrass music by
Bob and Sheila Everhart
and the great Central
Florida Susanne Smith
rock band that plays every-
thing from Aretha Franklin
to Linda Ronstadt. Be-
tween bands, enjoy the
sounds of DJ Trae Vance.
Family entertainment at
the gazebo area includes


Unique crafts, enter-
tainment, fine art,
mouthwatering
food, children's games,
manatee viewing and
dragon boats all come to-
gether at one intersection
for the best Florida Mana-
tee Festival yet on Satur-
day, Jan. 19, and Sunday,
Jan. 20.
The Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce,
the Rotary Club of Crystal
River, the City of Crystal
River and supporting part-
ner the Citrus County
Chronicle join 2013 pre-
senting sponsor Crystal
Automotive and 2013 plat-
inum sponsor the Tampa
Bay Times to bring you this
annual event, one of
Florida's largest festivals.
Our sponsors for 2013


Jan. 16 Ribbon-cutting,
4:30 p.m. at REMAX ONE
Jan. 19 and Jan. 20 -
Florida Manatee Festival in
Crystal River, http://www.flori-
damanateefestival.com
Jan. 24 Business After
Hours, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
GRUMPY GATORS
Feb. 8 February Chamber
Lunch, 11:30 a.m. Plantation
Feb. 21 Business After
Hours, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
JAZZIN' BEAN &BRITTON IN-
SURANCE AFLAC
Remember, coupons and
discounts also appear on the
mobile and regular website!
Check out our complete cal-
endar for community, entertain-
ment and fundraising events.


Shazahdi and Jewels of the
Desert dance troupe and
the ever-popular Phantas-
tic Sounds.
So come on out and cele-
brate the manatee with us.
Enjoy the boat tours,
crafters, marketplace ven-
dors, fine art show, fantas-
tic food and kids' area. We
recommend you park at
the Crystal River Mall and
take advantage of the shut-
tle to the festival site. The
shuttle is $1 round trip per
person, and $1 is well
worth avoiding the limited
parking in the downtown
area. Admission to the fes-
tival is $3 per person and
children 12 and under are
admitted free. For more in-
formation, visit www.
floridamanateefestival.
com or call the Chamber at
352-726-2801.





CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce

Upcoming

Chamber

events
Jan. 9 Ribbon-cutting,
4:30 p.m. at WELLS FARGO in
Crystal River
Jan. 10 Business After
Hours, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
CEDAR
CREEK
Jan. 11
,-D -- Janu-
ITRUS COUNTY ry
Economic Developr ary
c..n.. n. Chamber
"q Lunch
11:30 a.m. at Citrus Hills. Guest
speaker Joe Lopano, CEO at
TPI.


Jamey Clovis, Patriot Sporting Goods,
named 2012 SFVU Pro Staffer of the Year


3 T .1


Ii-'--, I




In consideration of his outstanding loyalty to SFVU (Sports Fishing Ventures Unlimited) and our factory part-
ners, his spectacular pioneering and promotional efforts and his extraordinary support of disabled veterans
using the sport of fishing as therapy, the 2012 selection of Jamey Clovis was a no-brainer.
"I have known Jamey for years and while he was a faithful and consistent loyal supporter of SFVU and our fac-
tory partners during his time as a touring FLW & PAA pro," said Ian Godwin, president and CEO of The SFVU
Business Group, pictured at left. "It was not until after he retired from full-time tournament fishing that all of us
at SFVU realized just how really blessed we were to have Jamey as a pro staffer. This year I have watched him take
on personal risk and exhaustive time to exclusively support SFVU factory partners, efforts which alone would
have qualified him for consideration for this honor. What really did it for all of us was the work Jamey has done
in 2012, utilizing the sport and industry of fishing to benefit America's disabled veterans. Don't take this wrong -
Jamey is a great and accomplished fishermen, but all of that pales in comparison to the work he is doing now as
an SFVU pro staffer in support of America's Wounded Warriors, and for that, we are honored to have him as our
2012 Pro Staffer of the Year!"


Rotaiy project


r 'm--- ,- "- I
FoLoOoRo oDoA






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. .- :



;"-'-; -*- "- .i^ ^^'"





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Legal consultancy
specialize in medical
Mayer & Associates LLC has
launched Citrus County's newest inde-
pendent legal nurse consulting prac-
tice to help attorneys win
medical-related cases. Founded by
Certified Legal Nurse Consultant
Kathryn Mayer, RN, CLNC, Mayer &
Associates provides services de-
signed to save attorneys time and
money.
Mayer & Associates also screens
cases for merit, locates expert wit-
nesses and assists the attorney with
discovery and trial preparation.
For more information on Mayer &
Associates LLC, call 352-601-7971,
email mayerlegalnurse@gmail.com or
visit www.mayerlegalnurse.com.
Mall hosting
speed networking
One hundred contacts in two hours:
speed networking. An evening of busi-
ness matchmaking, 5:30 p.m. to 8
p.m. Thursday, Jan. 10, at The Crystal
River Mall. Pre-registration $10, or $15
at the door. Expand your network,
maximize your time, meet new con-
tacts every few minutes and meet
face-to-face with prospective clients,
partners and referrals. Don't miss this
fast-paced, exciting and innovative op-
portunity! Call 352-795-2585 to regis-
ter or for more information.
Mike Hall elected
president of AAA
Mike Hall, president/CEO of Nature
Coast EMS has been recently se-
lected by ballot as president-elect of
the American Am-
bulance Associa-
tion. The AAA is a
national trade asso-
S ciation that serves
over 600 member
companies through-
out the United
Mike States serving as a
Hall voice and clearing-
house for ambulance services across
the nation.
Mike has been active as a member
of the Board of Directors in Region II
for 16 years. The past 10, he has
served in leadership positions as an
alternate Director in Region IV, Chair
of Membership Committee, Commit-
tee Chair of the MTI, Stars of Life
Committee, and Chair of the Recruit-
ment & Retention Task Force.
Zales named
Business of the Month
Zales is the November Business of
the Month at The Crystal River Mall.
Angela Oglesbee, manager of Zales,
approached the mall office to inquire
about the free in-mall advertising.
She took advantage of 22x28s, table
tents, marquee and the website. The
Zales staff also takes time to call
clients to let them know when they
are having sales and specials. Zales
is always clean, customer-friendly
and offers outstanding customer
service.
Crystal River Mall is honoring a
Business of the Month every month.
The criteria for the award include out-
standing visual appearance of the
store, creative displays, use of adver-
tising, thinking outside the box and
outstanding customer service.
For more information on leasing op-
portunities or Crystal River Mall, con-
tact the mall office at 352-795-2585;
visit our website at www.thecrystal-
rivermall.com or like us on Facebook
at The Crystal River Mall.


Special to the Chronicle
Mall manager Millie Bresnahan, left, presents the Business of the Month
award to Zales manager Angela Oglesbee.


HPH Hospice recognizes
employees' years of service
Two HPH Hospice Citrus employ-
ees were recently recognized by the
not-for-profit agency for their many
years of dedicated service.
Chief Executive Officer Tom Barb,
left, recognized Kate Brusik, RN,
regional director, for her 15 years of
service.
Chief Executive Officer Tom Barb
recognized Kathy Kidd, a social
worker for her 20 years of service.
Gwendolyn Burk, manager of Social
Work Services, added her
congratulations.
HPH Hospice, Healing People's
Hearts provides dignity, comfort and
care for patients affected by a life-limit-
ing illness regardless of their ability to
pay. Services also include support,
both emotionally and spiritually for pa-
tients loved ones. For more informa-
tion please call 5274600 or visit our
website at www.hph-hospice.org.
Workforce Connection
warns about scams
OCALA-- Workforce Connection of
Citrus, Levy and Marion counties cau-
tions jobseekers to be alert for scam-
mers usurping the names of legitimate
businesses and organizations to take
advantage of those looking for work.
Workforce Connection CEO Rusty
Skinner said the regional workforce
board decided to issue the warning
after hearing about the problem from
other workforce boards. In Panama
City, he said, the Gulf Coast Work-
force Board recently reported scam-
mers posted jobs on the Employ
Florida Marketplace luring jobseekers
who, when they responded, were in-
structed to send money in advance for
"required" job training.
"Scammers are unscrupulous,
clever and are often very good at what
they do," Skinner said. "It is uncon-
scionable that these imposters are tak-
ing money from people who are
diligently seeking employment."
The Employ Florida Marketplace, or
EFM, is the state's premier online job
bank and used by all 24 regional work-
force boards. Even though EFM posts
scamming warnings on nearly every
page, Skinner said when someone is
searching for work and finds what ap-
pears to be a promising job, "it's easy
to get excited and let your guard down."
Skinner noted there have been no
reports of similar employment scams
in Citrus, Levy and Marion counties,
and he hopes to keep it that way by
alerting jobseekers to warning signs,
such as claims of guaranteed employ-
ment and requests for payment of up-


front fees.
In order to protect themselves, job-
seekers are asked to keep the follow-
ing tips in mind:
Research the company to make
sure it is the real deal (to ensure a
business is authentic, contact the Bet-
ter Business Bureau at www.bbb.org).
Keep your email address private
and do not provide your Social Secu-
rity number or any sensitive informa-
tion to an employer unless you are
confident they are legitimate.
Be wary of any employer offering
a job without an interview.
Be alert for any employer charg-
ing fees to either employ, find place-
ment or provide training.
Investigate thoroughly any em-
ployer requesting you transfer funds or
receive packages for reshipment, es-
pecially if they are located overseas.
Avoid vague offers, exaggerated
claims of possible earnings or product
effectiveness, or any job posting
claiming "no experience necessary."
Likewise, jobseekers should exer-
cise caution when replying to unso-
licited emails for work-at-home
employment as well as for employers
who conduct their interviews in a
home setting or in motel rooms.
Anyone who suspects they have
been victimized in an employment scam
should contact the Attorney General's
Fraud Hotline at 866-966-7226.


WE WANT YOUR PHOTOS
Photos need to be in sharp
focus.
Photos need to be in proper
exposure: neither too light nor
too dark.
Include your name, address
and phone number on all
photos.
When identifying persons in
your photo, do so from left to
right.
E If desired, include the name of
the photographer for credit.
We discourage the use of
Polaroid prints.
Photos printed on home
printers do not reproduce
well; submit the digital image
via disk or e-mail.
Photos submitted electroni-
cally should be in maximum-
resolution JPEG (.jpg) format.
Photos cannot be returned
without a self-addressed,
stamped envelope.
For more information, call
352-563-5660.


Senators ask if coal


exports skirt royalties


Associated Press

BILLINGS, Mont Lawmak-
ers asked the U.S. Department of
Interior on Friday to review
whether companies are short-
changing federal and state gov-
ernments out of millions of
dollars in royalties on coal ex-
ported to foreign markets.
The request from Oregon Sen.
Ron Wyden and Alaska Sen. Lisa
Murkowski comes as U.S. coal ex-
ports hit record levels last year -
an estimated 124 million tons, ac-
cording to projections from the
Department of Energy
That includes increasing quan-
tities of steam coal used in power
plants, which is being shipped to
Asia from the Powder River
Basin of Montana and Wyoming
by companies including Arch
Coal Inc., Peabody Energy Corp.
and Cloud Peak Energy Inc.
The senators want to know if
companies violated federal leas-
ing law by paying royalties based
on the coal's mine price, then
selling it overseas at a higher
price through affiliated brokers.
Interior officials said Friday they
are looking into the issue. Mon-
tana Gov Brian Schweitzer said
he has seen no evidence compa-
nies are dodging what they owe.
Wyden is the incoming Demo-
cratic chairman of the Senate
Energy and Natural Resources
Committee, and Murkowski is the
panel's ranking Republican.
They said the rise in export vol-
umes makes it crucial that
proper royalties are collected on
coal mined from federal land.
The senators asked Salazar to
respond by Feb. 4.
Representatives of Peabody


and Cloud Peak said the compa-
nies were fully compliant with
federal royalty rules. A spokes-
woman for Arch declined com-
ment
Powder River Basin coal is
sold domestically for roughly $10
a ton. That compares with prices
in countries such as Japan that
can top $100 per ton.
Some mining companies, par-
ticularly in the West, sell their
coal at the mine price to brokers
or marketing agents that are af-
filiated with the company making
the sale, said National Mining
Association spokeswoman Carol
Raulston. The broker then sells
the coal to overseas customers at
a higher price.
Raulston and other industry
representatives said that still can
amount to an arm's-length trans-
action, with royalties paid on the
mine price, as long as the origi-
nal sales price to the broker was
not discounted.
Yates Petroleum settles
allegations over royalties
DENVER Prosecutors said
Yates Petroleum Corp. has agreed to
pay $416,000 to settle allegations it
may have underreported the royalties
it owed for natural gas recovered
from federal leases in Wyoming.
The Artesia, N.M.-based company
was accused of using unapproved
meters to measure how much gas it
recovered from 12 leases in the Pow-
der River Basin. The U.S. Attorney's
Office in Denver said the company
may have underreported how much
gas it collected, and therefore how
much it owed in royalties to the fed-
eral government, between May 2009
and April 2012.


Associated Press

TOKYO A bluefin tuna sold
for a record $1.76 million at a
Tokyo auction Saturday, nearly
three times the previous high set
last year.
In the year's first auction at
Tokyo's sprawling Tsukiji fish
market, a 489-pound tuna caught
off northeastern Japan sold for
155.4 million yen, said Ryoji Yagi,
a market official.
The fish's tender pink and red
meat is prized for sushi and
sashimi, but bluefin tuna stocks
have fallen globally over the past
15 years amid overfishing.
The winning bidder, Kiyoshi
Kimura, president of Kiyomura Co.,
which operates the Sushi-Zan-
mai restaurant chain, said "the
price was a bit high," but that he
wanted to "give Japan a boost,"
according to Kyodo News agency
He was planning to serve the fish
to customers later Saturday
Kimura also set the old record
of 56.4 million yen at last year's
New Year's auction, which tends
to attract high bids as a celebra-
tory way to kick off the new year
- or get some publicity. The high
prices don't necessarily reflect
exceptionally high fish quality.


The price works out to a stun-
ning 700,000 yen per kilogram, or
$3,603 per pound.
The best slices of fatty bluefin
- called "otoro" here can sell
for $24 per piece at tony Tokyo
sushi bars.
Japanese eat 80 percent of the
Atlantic and Pacific Bluefin tuna
caught, and much of the species
caught worldwide is shipped to
Japan for consumption. A 2010
stock assessment of the Pacific
Bluefin indicated a declining
population.
Stocks of bluefin caught in the
Atlantic and Mediterranean
plunged by 60 percent between
1997 and 2007 due to rampant,
often illegal, overfishing and lax
quotas. Although there has been
some improvement in recent
years, experts say the outlook for
the species is still fragile.
In November, the 48 member
nations of the International Com-
mission for the Conservation of
Atlantic Tunas, or ICCAT, voted to
maintain strict catch limits on
the species, although some coun-
tries argued for higher limits.
The quota will be allowed to rise
slightly from 12,900 metric tons a
year to 13,500. Quotas were as
high as 32,000 tons in 2006.


MONEY
Continued from Page D1

paid back. I have the perfect
solution.
I have been keeping a
running total of what has
gone out and not been re-
paid. In my will, I state that
whatever is still owed is de-
ducted from my children's
inheritance. Everyone in
the end gets that same
amount of money, no excep-
tions. None gets more than
another. My kids know this,
so they can either have it
now or get it later. -
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: First of
all, I have said many times
in my column that I don't be-
lieve each child should be
treated equally If one has a
greater need than the other,
or if one is far more suc-
cessful than the others,
there's no need to share and
share alike.
When lending money to
your offspring, you must
start with the notion that
you will not be repaid.
Money should be consid-
ered a gift, at least in your
mind. If you cannot afford to
lose it, then you shouldn't
lend it.
DEAR BRUCE: My 45-
year-old son keeps getting
phone calls about a debt.
He has no idea what it is
for, and he has asked re-
peatedly for proof. As of yet,


the callers have not come
forth with any documenta-
tion for this $1,000 debt,
which they claim goes back
four years.
I would think there is a
statute of limitations on a
bill that no one has tried to
collect in that time. What
can my son do to get them to
quit calling? Reader, via
email
DEAR READER: You
should understand that the
callers likely represent a
company that has bought
the obligation for a few pen-
nies on the dollar. The com-
pany will do whatever it can
to collect and make a profit
on that transaction.
The first thing to do is to
find out what the statutory
limitations are, if any, in the
state where your son lives.
Under no circumstances
should he agree to pay any-
thing until all claims are
reasonably substantiated IN
WRITING.
DEAR BRUCE: I finally
relented and decided it was
time to get my will drawn
up. My property is all in my
daughter's name. My ques-
tion is, since it's in her
name, will it have to go
through probate when the
time comes? -Reader, via
email
DEAR READER: Con-
gratulations on having your
will done with an attorney
So many people want to get
it over with quickly and do it
online.


If the property is all in
your daughter's name as
you described, there is no
reason the will would be
filed for probate. It would
be filed but not probated,
since there are no assets re-
maining in your name. In
the event that you've over-
looked assets, the will is
there to cover that eventual-
ity. You've done well!
DEAR BRUCE: Several
years ago, I was billed for an
item that I did not order or
receive. It was an error by
the company; the item was
charged by another family
member. The company cor-
rected its error and ac-
knowledged that there was
no debt after a lot of aggra-
vation and phone calls.
Now, three years later, I
have received a letter from
a collection agency de-
manding payment. I have
tried to contact the company
and the bank it is using for
its credit card, and they
won't respond to any of my
calls or emails. In the mean-
time, the collection agency
is hounding me. I have tried
everything I can think of
and don't know what else to
do. S.R., via email
DEAR S.R.: This is a case
where telephones and
emails are largely a waste of
time.
I would write one and
only one letter in which
you briefly describe the cir-
cumstances and state that
you have no intention of


meeting this alleged obliga-
tion. Send the letter to the
collection agency by certi-
fied mail, return receipt re-
quested. This will give you
absolute proof that your let-
ter was delivered. Have no
further contact with the
agency until it gives you de-
finitive written information


about its alleged claim.
By and large, I think the
agency will look at the letter,
and that will be the end of
that. Obviously, you are
going to keep indefinitely
the receipt and any infor-
mation you have in your
files about the alleged obli-
gation.


Send questions to bruce@
brucewilliams.com or to
Smart Money, PO. Box 7150,
Hudson, FL 34674. Ques-
tions ofgeneral interest
will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the vol-
ume of mail, personal
replies cannot be provided.


g)RUSH

For more information about advertising

contact 564-2917 or 563-3273


Bluefin tuna sells for


record $1.76M in Tokyo


SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 D3






D4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013


DETROIT
Continued from Page DI

Montgomery, President Obama's
auto-recovery czar, telling him the
plant was on a secret list of GM
factories to be closed. The factory
was the township's largest em-
ployer and taxpayer. About a third
of its 35,000 residents work for
GM, Chrysler or parts suppliers.
As Gibb watched the local econ-
omy unravel, he was haunted by a
documentary he had seen about
Janesville, Wis., where another
GM plant had closed, leaving be-
hind empty industrial parks and
ball fields overgrown with weeds.
"I don't want to be Janesville,"
he told friends.
Anguish and
another chance
GM, meanwhile, was drowning,
even with emergency loans from
the government. On June 1, 2009,
it became the largest American in-
dustrial company ever to file for
Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.
It had just $2 billion in cash and
$172.8 billion in liabilities.
The bankruptcy wiped out GM's
debts, allowed it to shed 21,000
jobs, dump 2,600 dealers and close
factories, including Orion.
"It was like somebody just took
the heart out of you," recalled
Mike Dunn, the chief United Auto
Workers union bargainer at Orion.
"You didn't really know if you
would have a future."
Worries spun through his head.
He had to support six kids, in-
cluding two in college. He was
nearing retirement after 28 years
at GM, and his pension was in
jeopardy But as he walked toward
the plant floor, his immediate con-
cern was what to say to workers.
As lawyers for GM and its cred-
itors fought in court over scraps of
the company, Orion's second
chance emerged.
In exchange for its $50 billion
bailout, the government got a 60
percent stake in the company and
GM agreed to build a tiny car
known as the Sonic at one of the
U.S. plants it was closing. Small-
car production had long been rel-
egated to other countries where
wages weren't as high. But GM
couldn't take government money
and build a small car overseas.
For folks in Orion like Dunn and
Pat Sweeney, the local union pres-
ident, the mission was clear: Get
the Sonic.


First, they met with Michigan
Gov Jennifer Granholm and other
state officials, who promised GM a
$779 million, 20-year tax credit.
Gibb spent all spring organizing
petition drives and thinking of
ways to cut the plant's costs. So
when an army of GM lawyers and
tax experts showed up at his of-
fice, he was ready with a generous
package of tax incentives. The
township also promised a new $4.5
million water-storage tower and
pledged to buy water at off-peak
hours so GM could get lower rates.
The tax abatement cost the
township and its schools about
$780,000 per year, but Gibb said it
was worth it to save the plant's
roughly 3,600 jobs. If the plant
closed, he estimated that half of
the area's commercial properties
would be vacant within two years.
At the end of June, GM made up
its mind: The Orion factory would
get the small car But there was a
catch. The plant had to shut down for
more than a year to be revamped.
Dunn watched as workers re-
moved the plant's equipment,
knowing GM could pull out of the
deal at any time.
"You could see from one end to
the other," he said. "There was
nothing in there but cement and
pillars."
Negotiating a future
There was another obstacle. GM
and the UAW had to figure out
how to cut labor costs at the plant.
For decades, the UAW and au-
tomakers fought openly as the
companies tried to reduce costs
and the union demanded pay in-
creases. The UAW would strike, or
threaten to, and the companies
would cave in. By 2007, GM was
paying $1,400 more per vehicle for
labor than nonunion Toyota.
That same year, both sides
agreed to a historic compromise
on labor costs. They established a
two-tier wage system that would
pay new employees around $14 an
hour, or half the hourly wage of
older workers. Worker pay and
pensions were frozen. Union
trusts funded by the company and
workers would take over retiree
health care costs. Union President
Bob King said each worker gave
up at least $7,000 during the four-
year contract.
But GM still couldn't make
money building the Sonic at Orion
without an immediate influx of
lower-wage workers. So the UAW
and GM went beyond the national
agreement and came up with an


unprecedented solution. More
lower-wage workers could be
hired at Orion than any other
plant in the country Forty percent
would be paid the lower wage, as
opposed to a maximum of 25 per-
cent at other factories.
Union leaders Sweeney and Dunn
accepted the deal in October 2010,
figuring it was better to have
lower-paying jobs than none at all.
After the wage deal, GM started
moving equipment into Orion. But
there were still no workers to sup-
port the restaurants and shops
surrounding the plant.
By early 2010, some of the small
businesses around Casey's Chicken
had started to close. Engineers
who had been laid off by nearby
parts suppliers came in asking to
work for owner Casey Barnard for
$8 an hour.
Meanwhile, plant workers were
struggling. Unemployment bene-
fits and a subsidy from GM that
provided up to 70 percent of their
pay began to run out. Some took
jobs at other GM plants in Ohio or
Missouri, where they bunked with
fellow workers in crowded apart-
ments or trailers and commuted
home on weekends.
At the UAW hall, meetings had
standing-room only crowds of 500
and lasted for hours. Workers
stepped up to the microphone ask-
ing for help because their homes
were being foreclosed and their
cars repossessed.
Workers started trickling back
to the plant in November 2010. But
it wasn't enough for Casey's
Chicken. After 14 years, the
restaurant closed in the fall of
2011. Barnard is now working at a
vacuum store a few doors from his
former restaurant
The comeback begins
Early in 2010, Americans began
returning to car dealerships as the
economy improved. Sales were
nowhere near pre-recession lev-
els, but they were enough for GM
to celebrate its first quarterly
profit in three years.
As a dreadful winter ended, GM
delivered on its promise to invest
at Orion. Crates of robot arms,
carts and conveyor parts arrived,
filling the vast open space that
had frightened Dunn just a few
months earlier.
By midyear, Lang, the assembly
line worker, got an offer from GM to
move 160 miles away to Lordstown,
Ohio, to work on the Chevrolet
Cruze. By then, it was clear Orion
would reopen to build the Sonic,


and there were hopes of getting
another car, the compact Buick
Verano.
Lang and his wife had saved
some money and decided to stay
in Michigan, foregoing GM pay
and benefits until he was called
back to work at his home plant. By
summer of 2011, he was back on
the job testing the assembly line.
"Pack your lunchbox and head
off to work. That's a great feeling,"
he said.
Gradually, all the older workers
who wanted to return to the plant
were hired back at the same pay
as when they left. New workers
were added at the lower wage,
adding up to 1,800 on two shifts.
The first Sonic, a white hatch-
back, rolled out of the Orion fac-
tory in August 2011.
Sonic boom
Even when their company was
in bankruptcy, GM engineers and
designers across the world never
stopped working on the Sonic, a
new mini car that would take on the
Honda Fit and Toyota Yaris. The
Sonic was part of a wave of small
cars from Detroit that came with
more than just good gas mileage
and a lower price: They had ag-
gressive styling, better handling
and more amenities like leather
seats and navigation systems.
At GM's expansive technical
center, 30 miles south of Orion, en-
gineers worked to make the Sonic
accelerate faster and ride quieter
than the Aveo, its cheap South
Korea-built predecessor. The
Sonic emerged with hatchback
and four-door versions. It came in
eight colors, including bright or-
ange, and it got up to 40 mpg.
The car hit showrooms with a
sticker price of just under $14,000
- $1,300 less than the Fit. A year
later, the tiny Chevy was the best-
selling subcompact in the country
Last year, GM sold more than
81,000 Sonics. Hyundai's Accent
finished second at 61,000.
GM is confident the Sonic will
soon turn a profit, largely because
workers at Orion keep finding
ways to cut costs. Earlier this year,
a team in the body shop suggested
a small fix in the plant's machin-
ery It ensures that the car's frame
fits together correctly every time
and reduces the amount of steel
going to the scrap heap.
Even the wage differences don't
seem to be a big source of friction.
Tammy Ballard, who makes the
lower wage that is now $16.66 per
hour, said workers don't ask each


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

other about pay. She left an auto-
parts company for greater job se-
curity at GM.
"I knew what I was coming into,
and I'm satisfied with that," she
said.
On her purple T-shirt is Orion's
slogan: "We build it like we own it"
Two months after the plant re-
opened, Obama and South Korean
President Lee Myung-bak visited
to celebrate a new free trade
agreement. It was a little over 27
years since President Ronald
Reagan had spoken at the plant's
dedication.
It was an emotional moment for
Dunn, who shook the president's
hand.
"I was taught in my household
that you take care of the people
that take care of you," he said.
"That man took care of me."
By the time Obama visited, GM
had reported its sixth straight
quarterly profit and repaid some
of its government loans in cash
and with a public stock offering.
The government still owns 19 per-
cent of the company and is still
roughly $22 billion in the hole on
its $49.5 billion bailout of GM.
To the smaller companies near
the Orion plant, GM's survival was
huge relief.
Can it last?
Detroit has seen many booms
and busts in a century of auto
making. There were 41 car com-
panies in the city in 1913. Almost
all failed or were consolidated into
the Big Three. Chrysler nearly went
bankrupt in 1980 before being res-
cued by the government. Sales ebb
and flow with the economy, gas
prices and even the weather.
But industry experts say things
have changed. The reforms De-
troit undertook make it less prone
to financial disaster. Car compa-
nies have closed plants, laid off
workers and sold or closed entire
brands. GM now has 12 U.S. assem-
bly plants and 101,000 employees
in North America; a decade ago, it
had 22 plants and 202,000 employees.
Detroit is finally doing many
things right GM, Ford and Chrysler
are all building vehicles like the
Sonic that can be sold globally,
saving billions that used to be spent
developing cars for individual
markets. Because they are no longer
overproducing cars and trucks,
they can command higher prices.
As she turned back to her sta-
tion, Ballard took stock of the
progress: "I think we're rolling
along like is expected of us."


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


o sisi SituMti Meiclt Medicl, SM I9 *Io *Tae
----fi Fe Ofes -anted I I 1 1 Skills I


INVERNESS
Jan 6th 1p -4pm
3/2 Furnished,
Appl, Ig screen porch &
shed, great cond $16,000
911 Hoffmann Lane
Melody MH Park
(352) 364-3747
Looking for small
businesses or individuals
that need to enhance
their computer skills
w/MS Office or Quick
Books. Call for rates
(352) 382-7585
PERSONAL
ASSISTANT

Responsibilities from
Housekeeping to Fin.
Assist.
Must like animals
Live in only
(352) 522-1109
1pm-6pm Only
Please reapply if
applied prior



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191



5 HENS & 1 ROOSTER
FREE
(352) 560-6155
(352)-201-0702
5 Month Old Kittens
to good home. Have
both males & females
(352) 476-5230
12 Rode Islands Reds,
Free, 10 hens, 2 roosters
Hens just finished
moulting
(352) 564-6820
16 Ft above ground pool.
Complete w/ pump and
all acceccories.
(352) 794-6365
Black Lab/German
Pointer Mix
11 weeks old. 2males
(317) 341-1974


Free Firewood
Cut and Haul
(352) 249-7212
FREE KITTENS
16 wks old
Calico, litter trained
(352) 212-4061
FREE KITTENS
7 WEEKS OLD
WORMED. ASK FOR
JENNIFER 352-503-9206
Free Queen Size
Mattress & Box spring
(352) 410-9901




FRESH CITRUS@
BELLAMY GROVE
Greens, Strawberries,
Broccoli, Gift Shipping,
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378



Australian Cattle Dog
Grey & BIk Female 11 yrs
old named Jersey. Last
seen near Independence
& Grant in Inverness
(352) 257-5675
Long Haired BIk Cat w/
white undercoat. Large
Male 2 yrsold. Neutered
and chipped. Tom-tom
was lost on 10/21 in
Beverly Hills. Has been
seen on N. Columbus St.
(352) 527-1519

C and read
Lost "Millie" our 13 yr
old Timneh African
Grey flew out of house
somewhere between
488, 495 and Lake
Rousseau area.
Heartbroken..794-3256
LOST INDOOR KITTEN
Grey stripped; in the area
of 156 W Sugarberry Ln
Beverly Hills
(352) 527-1519
PITBULL
light brown, approx.
5 yrs old. jumped out of
fenced back yard approx.
1 week ago, near the
end ofApopka Ave
in Inverness
pls call 352-860-0728


MOIAM.LL. DLm..Cl .CA
His name is Cole,
has blue collar on, lost
in community of
Fairview Estates
pls call 352-419-7255




Black & White, Female
Dog. medium weight
451bs. Dunnellon Area
(352) 422-3697





YOU'LL THIS!
JAZZERCISE
*** 2 DAY SALE ***
January 7th & 8th
Join us & try your
first class FREE!!
Jazzercise is a group
fitness class that
combines dance-based
cardio with strength
training and stretching
to sculpt, tone and
lengthen muscles for
maximum fat burn.
18 classes weekly in
low impact and regular
format.
www.iazzercise.com/sale
352-634-5661





SPRING HILL
January Classes
COSMO DAYS
January 14, 2013
COSMO NIGHTS
January 14, 2013
BARBER NIGHTS
February 25, 2013
MASSAGE DAY
January 14, 2013,
MASSAGE NIGHTS
January 14, 2013,
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only
BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com


Looking for small
businesses or individuals
that need to enhance
their computer skills
w/MS Office or Quick
Books. Call for rates
(352) 382-7585
Volunteer Needed
Legal Assistant Retired,
Must be knowledgea-
ble in County Laws,
Call (352) 464-0779
PROJECT PET



CNA NEEDED ONE
PATIENT ONLY
Pay commensurate with
experience. Lodging
available in exchange for
services. No smokers.
Please fax resume with
two professional refer-
ences to 1-888-344-5055




-A *- ^

Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




Your World









i i i f ,


ARNP or PA
Wanted Part Time for
a busy Pediatric
Practice in Crystal
River, Send Resume
to: lindapracticemar


Avante
At inverness
is currently looking
for
IPart time Dietary Aid
1 Full Time Dietary Aid
Apply online at
Avantecenters.com

FIT RN

IV Exp. preferred
For physicians office
with benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1787M.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida, 34429

*SEVEN RIVERS

Join Our Team
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center
Please visit our
Career Center at
www.SevenRlvers
Realonal.com
Phone 352-795-8462
Fax-352-795-8464
6201 N. Suncoast Bvd.
Crystal River, FL 34428
Stephanie Arduser
Recruiter
EOE Drug /Tobacco
Free Workplace

MEDICAL
BILLER/CODER
Medical Biller/Coder
needed for busy
radiology practice in
Citrus County. Medicare
& Commercial Insurance
knowledge required. CPC
or CPC-R preferred but
not necessary. Amicas &
Health+Pro experience
helpful. Good benefit
package. Fax resume' to
352-637-1034 or email
lIolander@inverness
medicalimaging.com


Medical Billing/
Medical Assist.
Part time
Fax Resume to:
352-465-3733

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

NEEDED
PSYCH ARNP
Initially PT Soon FT
Call 352-726-3950

OUTPATIENT
SURGERY CENTER
RN
OPERATING ROOM-
EXPERIENCED ONLY!
CST- Graduate of
approved Surgical
Tech program and
Certified- ONLY I
Excellent working
environment, com-
prehensive benefit
package, competi-
tive pay and no call,
nights, or weekends.
Fax Resume to:
352-527-1827

Therapy
Management
Corporation
Homosassa, FL
is seeking
the following
Full time position:
Senior Executive Ad-
ministrative Assistant
to the President and
Founder.
This is a fast paced po-
sition that requires at-
tention to detail and the
ability to multi task and
change direction at a
moment's notice. Must
be a strong team player.
Minimum of 2 years' ex-
perience in an Execu-
tiveAssistant role.
Please apply online @
www.therapymgmt
.com


P/T, DIETARY
AIDE
Looking for Responsi-
ble Individual
with flexible hours.
Apply in Person:
700 SE 8th Ave
Crystal River, 34429
DFWP, EOE






PRODUCTION
MANAGER
for Citrus County
strawberry, blueberry,
and citrus farm.
Full time, year round
position. Must be willing
to relocate to Floral
City, Florida.
Responsible for:
Supervision of irrigation
technician and spray
technician. Operation
and light maintenance
of irrigation systems,
spray equipment, trac-
tors and other farm ve-
hicles. Interaction with
Harvest Manger to en-
sure production yield
and quality.
Requires detailed
knowledge of:
Agricultural chemicals
and spray equipment,
calibration and mainte-
nance. Irrigation,
fertigation, chemigation
equipment, calibration
and maintenance.
Diesel pumps and
wells. Record keeping
and daily logs.Tractors
and other farm equip-
ment. Computers MS
office suite, internet.
College Agricultural
Degree a plus.
Private Pesticide Appli-
cators License a plus.
Starting salary com-
mensurate with experi-
ence, plus housing, ve-
hicle, insurance, 401K,
bonus after 1st year.
Respond with resume
FERRIS FARMS
7607 S FLORIDA AVE,
FLORAL CITY, FL
34436


INSUKANUL
CUSTOMER SERVICE
Licensed 440 or 220
agent for insurance office
in Homosassa.
Fax resume to
352-621-3088 or email to
pat@whitingins.com



HIRING SERVERS
Must be 18 or older.
Apply Fisherman's
Restaurant
12311 E Gulf to Lake
(352) 637-5888



Acct Specialist
Filling Immediate
Openings;
benefits offered and
training provided.
Call 352-436-4460 to
Schedule an Interview



Big TrucklEquip.
Mechanic
Must have tools & exp.
***apply at:***
6730 N. Citrus Ave.
Crystal River, FL
no phone calls please


S






S Employment
# I source is...







1www chronideonline cor


Exp. Marine
Fork Lift Driver
7 day shift
**Apply in Person**
Twin Rivers Marina
2880 N. Seabreeze Pt
Crystal River Fl 34429
no phone calls pis


Hernando United
Methodist Church
(Citrus County) has
two positions open,
AUDIO-VISUAL TECH
and a PIANO
ACCOMPANIST
Both are staff/paid
positions. Please call
(352) 726-7245
for information and
application. E-mail -
hernandoumc@
tampabay.rr.com


Water
Conservation
Specialist
Announcement
#13-01
Enforces Southwest
Florida Water
Management District
and/or county
watering restrictions.
Previous enforce-
ment experience
preferred. Horticul-
tural knowledge
beneficial. Flexible
hours required,
Sunday-Saturday.
Starting pay
$11.53 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, January 11,
2013. EOE/ADA


I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WELDER/
FABRICATOR
Experienced aluminum
welder with fabrication
skills. Automotive or boat
skills a plus.
Call 352-637-0645




CDL DRIVER

Class A, clean record,
dump truck exp. reqd.
352-795-5755

Experienced
TELEMARKETERS

NEEDED. Good
Commission Pay.
Write your own check
Apply In Person
6421 W. Homosassa Tr

PERSONAL
ASSISTANT

Responsibilities from
Housekeeping to Fin.
Assist.
Must like animals
Live in only
(352) 522-1109
1pm-6pm Only
Please reapply if
applied prior

RESIDENT CARE
SPECIALIST

New Horizons
Village a residential
care facility for devel-
opmentally disabled
adults, is
seeking FT 3rd Shift
professionals to pro-
vide personal care
and training to these
individuals through
direct care.
Hours:
1:00am 9:00am.
Basic auallflcatlons
Include:
I HS diploma
I Ability to pass
a mandatory criminal
background investi-
gation, reference,
inquiry, and a
post-offer physical
exam & drug screen.
New Horizon Villaae
offers:
I Competitive
wages, excellent ben-
efits package
& a tobacco -free
campus.
To be considered,
please complete an
application at 1275 N.
Rainbow Loop,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
(352) 746-3262.





MARKETER
OUTGOING, SELF
MOTIVED, ENERGETIC
PERSON FOR B2B.
TRANSPORTATION A
MUST. CALL
352-563-2777.

PART-TIME
EXPERIENCED
BARTENDER

Apply in Person:
VFW Post #4337
906 Hwy. 44 E., Inv.


SPRING HILL
January Classes
* ** * *
COSMO DAYS
January 14, 2013
COSMO NIGHTS
January 14, 2013
BARBER NIGHTS
February 25, 2013
MASSAGE DAY
January 14, 2013,
MASSAGE NIGHTS
January 14, 2013,
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com















Thurs Jan 3rd



antiques, box after box
Sun Jan 6th3rd
Antique & Collectible
Auction 1pm
Quality Furniture from
Victorian to Deco, Art,
lighting, jewelry, won-
derful selection of yin
nwaire, toys, cmins,c.

webox after
www.dudleysauction.
comr
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maie-ly Real Estate
#381384




50 Wizard Comics One
Half edition
$1 ea obo
20 Holiday Barbie Dolls
$1 eca. obo
(352) 860-1110
550
Matchbox Carse
co.
















(352) 860-1110%

DIECAST MODEL
MILITARY AIRCRAFT 15
Madieast model Esmilitatery










352 c563- 5386

LIGHTED CHRISTMAS
Hockingberry. 500
ceramic pieces. $1000
OBO. Can be seen at
20451 Powell Rd Lot 115
Dunnellon(352) 48960-1110713






OCCUPIED JAPAN
AICHI BREAD PLATES
(2) Gold trimmed, pink
roses, 7.5" very good. $5
352-601-0067
352-601-0067


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





110V Apartment Size
Washer & Dryer w/stand
1 yr old. $175.
(352) 344-8067.
DRYER$100 Works
great. 90 day full
warranty. Call/text
352-364-6504
Gas Stove/electric
oven, stainless steel
w/ black top,
$250.
Call Evenings
(352) 527-2300
GE Refrigerator 18cu
Almond Great Cond.
$75.
Range hood like new
2 speed $25
(352) 422-3371
KENMORE WASHER
White looks good works
great! guaranteed. $100.
Dennis @ 352476-9019
MAYTAG NEPTUNE
Electric Dryer *
Runs great, Sensor dry.
First $125 takes it!
(352) 4644690
Microwave, Maytag,
over stove, bisque
$75.obo Dishwasher,
Maytag $100. obo
Excellent Condition
352-598-9626
Refrigerator, Maytag,
26 cu ft., side by side,
bisque, $300. obo
Range, whirlpool elec.
smooth top self clean
$150.obo Excel. Cond.
352-598-9626
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers &
dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179
TRUE COMMERCIAL
COOLER 6FT X 3FT.
$300 OBO. CALL PLAZA
HEALTH FOODS
(352) 795-0911
TURKEY FRYER
MASTERBUILT BUT-
TERBALL, USED ONCE
$95. (352) 527-8993
WASHER OR DRYER
$135 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like new,
Excellent Condition. Free
Del. 352 263-7398
WASHER$100 Works
great. 90 day full
warranty. Call/ text
352-364-6504
Whirlpool super cap dryer
$100. will deliver local call
after 6 pm 352-563-8033


I Clletib


DUDLEY'S

**YEAR!!! *
TWO AUCTIONS





Thurs Jan 3rd
Walk About Auction
3pm w/full yard of treas-
ures, inside and out Fur-
niture, tools, misc.
antiques, box after box
Sun Jan 6th
Antique & Collectible
Auction 1pm
Quality Furniture from
Victorian to Deco, Art,
lighting, jewelry, won-
derful selection of vin-
tage Mexican Stone-
ware, toys, coins,
Roseville+++check
website
www.dudleysauction.
corn
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384






Fri. 01/04 Preview @
4pm, Auction@ 6pm
General Merchandise
-WE BUY ESTATES**
6055 N. Carl G. Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
AB3232 (352) 613-1389




BENCHMARK
CHOPSAW 10 inch
chopsaw want $40 home
phone (352)794-3041
HITACHI SAWS
10 saws need batteries
$10 each home phone
(352)794-3041




HITACHI 32" TV WITH
REMOTE GOOD
CONDITION $50
352-613-0529
SHARP 32" TV WITH
REMOTE $25
352-613-0529




INTERIOR DOOR
MASONITE, WHITE 8'H
X 2'W $40.
(352) 527-8993
MIRROR BEVELED
PLATE GLASS MIRROR
39"H X 62"W $30.
(352)527-8993




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP WEB MOUSE W/
SCROLL WHEEL grey
colored, brand new,
packed, $10
(352)465-1616
LEXMARK FAX
PRINTER/SCANNER
Like new $25
352-860-2475


CLASSIFIED



TOSHIBA LAPTOP 7
years old, has new
hard-drive, Windows, of-
fice new 2007, no cam-
era, $90 (352)465-1616




POOL LADDER 6 ft pool
ladder never used want
$25 home phone
(352)794-3041




4 drawer file cabinet,$40
letter size, putty, excellent
condition 352-382-7585
can email picture
4 GREAT DINETTE
CHAIRS Wood Frame
w/ uphlostered seat &
backs on wheels $140.
352-527-9332
ATTRACTIVE, CLEAN,
COMFORTABLE
SECTIONAL Tan cotton
with batik floral design
$275 352-897-4154
CALl KING BED Good
mattress,springs,and
frame $100 call
352464-4280
COUCH AND
LOVESEAT Very good
condition cream teal
peach stripe $200.
352-628-4447
Dining Room Set
glass top table & 4 chairs
$300 obo, Kitchen set,
table & 4 chairs
w/oak finish $50 obo
352-382-2450
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER holds tv with
side glass front,good
cond,$50. Call after 6 pm
352-563-8033
Home Office Desk
Maple, Great Condition
$500 obo, White Formica
Student Desk, good
condition $25 obo,
352-382-2450
LEATHER SOFA &
LOVESEAT
burgundy, excellent
condition $650. obo
352-746-0855
Leather Sofa, Chair & Ot-
toman, 1 coffee, 2 end ta-
bles. Twin bed, mat. set &
head board. Round din-
ing room table w/ 4chrs.
Lamp. $600 for all
(404) 242-7117
LIVING ROOM SET
SOFA, IOVESEAT &
END TABLES. EARTH
TONES, EXC COND
$425 obo(352) 302-8265
Matching end & coffee
tables $75 Scandinavian
teak, glass good
condition, can email
pictures 352-382-7585
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
WHITE WICKER
COMPUTER DESK &
CHAIR Attractive, Like
New $225 352-8974154
WICKER Henry Link,
chair & large couch ,
new cushions, end table
coffee table
$350
(352) 597-7353


Bamboo Coffee Table
Like new $35
352-860-2475



FREE PINE NEEDLES
Free 'You Rake" pine
needles. 352-795-5335
SOLD
Craftsmen Tractor
24 hsp. includes
trailer, spreader, charge
auto transmission $750



2 ORIGINAL AVON
BARBIE LIKE DOLLS,
CIRCA 1980. $20 ea.
obo. in box never used.
(352)527-2085
3 IN 1 COMMODE. SAN-
ITIZED, $35 OBO. Over
commode adjustable,
bedside. (352) 527-2085
3 PAIR CROCS. SIZE
MEN'S 8/LADIES' 9. $10
EA.OBO exc. cond.
(352) 527-2085
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat for resting, folds for
storage, spring pressure
brakes, Ex., $35.
352-628-0033
6.5 FT. CO. PINE
PRE-LIT TREE IN BOX.
$10 OBO More
decorations avail.
(352) 527-2085
9 ft. GRAPHITE FLY
ROD- B & S Custom
Rod, 2 pc., 3/4 wt., cork
grip, Ex+, $40.
352-628-0033
20 FT ELECTRICAL
POWER POLE W/meter
can& 100amp panel
W/12 breakers. You pull
$300 OBO(352)628-2980
12,000LB REESE
TRAILER HITCH RE-
CEIVER- pintle hook
mounting plate with
2-5/16 ball,$60.
Ex., 352-628-0033
4-PRONGED ALUMI-
NUM CANE. $15 OBO.
exc. cond.
(352) 527-2085
ADJUSTABLE SHOWER
CHAIR WITH BACK. $25
OBO exc. cond.
(352) 527-2085
DUDLEY'S
-HAPPTWfNEW*
**YEAR!!!**
TWO AUCTIONS





Thurs Jan 3rd
Walk About Auction
3pm w/full yard of treas-
ures, inside and out Fur-
niture, tools, misc.
antiques, box after box
Sun Jan 6th
Antique & Collectible
Auction 1pm
Quality Furniture from
Victorian to Deco, Art,
lighting, jewelry, won-
derful selection of vin-
tage Mexican Stone-
ware, toys, coins,
Roseville+++check
website
www.dudleysauction.
corn
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384


AFFORDABLE
SHED MOVER
Lic/Ins. 352-634-5183
941-623-3742
ALUMINUM WALKER
WITH 2 WHEELS. $20
OBO. Folding, exc. cond.
(352) 527-2085
BLACK POLE LAMP. $15
OBO exc.cond.
(352) 527-2085
BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING SIZES 5 & 6
SHIRTS, PANTS &
JACKETS $35
352-613-0529
CELL PHONE
BLACKBERRY CURVE
8330 VERIZON Camera
Chargers Bluetooth head-
set $25 352-601-0067
CRAFTSMAN 10"
Compound Miter Saw
Model 113.234610, with
dust bag & new 80 tooth
blade., Ex. $40. 628-0033
DOG SNUGGLES.
SM.OR MED. PINK OR
BLUE. $5 EA. OBO
Never used.
(352) 527-2085
EXTENSION "GRAB IT"
POLE. $5 Reach high or
low. (352) 527-2085
FLOORMATS
WEATHERTECH- GRAY
- LEXUS RX CUSTOM
MATS $75.
(352) 527-8993
GE DIGITAL TELE-
PHONE ANSWERING
MACHINE $10 LIKE
NEW ALL CONNEC-
TIONS 419-5981
GERBIL CAGE GOOD
CONDITION $25
352-613-0529
GPS TRAVEL KIT Day
Tripper New in box,
Charger, Case, Gripmat
up to 5" screen. $10
352-601-0067
GRAB BAR WITH 2
BUTTONS. $5 Works
anywhere.
(352) 527-2085
GUITAR TREE STAND
Holds 3 Guitars, folds &
knocks down for storage,
Ex., $25. 352-628-0033
HOSPITAL BED TABLE
$45. OBO Locking
wheels, exc. cond.
(352) 527-2085
HOSPITAL BED WITH
REMOTE. $100
OBO.(352) 527-2085
JET STREAM OVEN.$40
OBO W/EXPANSION
RINGS Bake in 1/2 the
time. (352) 527-2085
KIDS TRAIN TABLE Step
2 deluxe canyon road
train table with lid $40.
352-628-4447
LT. BLUE WOODEN
ROCKER FOR
CHILD/DOLL. $20 OBO.
Vintage. (352) 527-2085
MATRESS COVER Pad-
ded feather pad Good
clean cond. $30.00
352-344-5311
MOVING/STORAGE
BOXES- 20 new/4 sizes
26x20x5,22x1 5x27,
27x16x27,24x24x24
$3 ea. 352-422-0294
NEW BLACK LEATHER
PURSE BY ROLF $25
CAN E-MAIL PHOTO IN-
VERNESS 419-5981
ORIGINAL BOX
Ex. cond. console,
controllers, DVD cony.,
DVD remote, & games.
$100 CALL AFTER 5PM
(352) 212-4888


OLD TRAIN
Old traffic I
$50. 352
ORIGII
Ex. condo
controllers
DVD remo
$100 CALL
(352)2
QUANTUM
CASTING
6'6", 1 pc
medium hv
Ex+, $25 e
SAMSONIT
TRAVEL
LUG
CARRIER/
DOLLY $1
SHAKESP
STICK SUR
1100 12'0",
H, 12-40 lbs
$30. 6
SLIDING
CHAIR WITI
OBO. e
(352)5
SPRINT
ANYWHE
In box $4C
864-2E
TRO
GENERA
watts, 85
watts. O
circulate
$350. Call
WEDDING
SIZE 1/2. $
shoulder
(352)5



REHABILIC
STIMULATI
Rehabilice
Portable Ele
Stimulatic
{TENS} un
back and
Paid $375,
call 352


sell for $200
-4194767


BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676



COOLER IGLOO WHITE
-150 QT. $75.
(352) 527-8993
DECORATIVE KITCHEN
CANISTER SET WITH
LIDS $10 IRIDESCENT
QUICHE DISH NEW $10
INVERNESS 419-5981



Bowflex with leg
extension & training
charts $75. Call after 6
pm 352-563-8033



.308 AMMO-$100. Soft
Point, Hollow Point..New
352-503-2792
2 26" Huffy Bicycles,
Cranbrook model
Men's, Black
Women's Blue $50 ea.
(352) 564-2746
14 Gallon
Marine portable, Gas
Tank, 10ft hose w/
pump syphon handle,
$75. (352) 564-2746


BOAT TRAILER 16 ft
boat trailer $100. Home
phone (352)794-3041
NEW
HAULMARK 6X12
ENCLOSED TRAILERS
ONLY $1999.
(352) 621-3678
TANDEM AXLE
TRAILER 4 by 6 yard
trailer $100. Home phone
(352)794-3041


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


~eaD~~~1r'


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers &
dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179



Maximum Auto Repair
& Performance
Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts,
Classic car restoration, tires
new & used, Performance
engines. (352) 419-6549



Maximum Auto Repair
& Performance
Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts,
Classic car restoration, tires
new & used, Performance
engines. (352) 419-6549



JEFF'S Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lie. (352) 746-3444



AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551, 584-3730
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097


YI' 1 '" W.' II ISt.


CI1(ONiCLE
l ____ Class ifieds


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838 *



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



*BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194


DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696



Install, Restretch, Repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl Car-
pet, Laminent, Lic#4857
Mitch, (352) 201-2245



1 CALL & RELAX! 25vrs
Exp in 100% property
maint & all repairs, call
H&H Services today!
lic#37658 352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


World Class

Window Tinting

Reduce Heat, Fade, Glare
AUTO HOME OFFICE
Marion & Citrus Free Estimates
352-465-6079


Ii


Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
I or pool or plan


S : ompletIeynew!
x ~"Often imitate
never duplicate


SOU INTERLOCKING BRICKPAVER SPECIALIST
SCOPES
I POOL AND PAVER LLC
Licensed -400-388
& Insured 352-400uuj88


Affordable Handvman
v FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
v RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *



Home/Office
Cleaning



(352) 427-4166





The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lie/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




LARRY'S TRACTOR *
SERVICE FINISH GRAD-
ING & BUSHHOGGING
352-302-3523***


All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120




GOT LEAVES
Let our DR VAC
Do the work!
Call 352-502-6588
Winter Clean Up, Leaves,
Power Washing & More
Call Coastal Lawn Care
(352) 601-1447




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small
engine service & repair.
352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767


ALL OF CITRUS CLEAN
UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
HAULING
FREE ESTIMATES
scrap metals haul for
FREE (352) 344-9273
JEFF'S Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 746-3444




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE CLEANING
& PAINTING
352-341-3300
Winter Clean Up, Leaves,
Power Washing & More
Call Coastal Lawn Care
(352) 601-1447


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


Penoonsumers.
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. It you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.



Your World







CHKONICl


ALL EXTERIOR

ALUMINUM, INC.


352-621-0881
FAX 352-6102
6" Seamless Gutters
Screen Rooms Car Ports
Hurricane Protection
allextalum13@yahoo.com
Citrus Lic. #2396 LICENSED & INSURED


WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838 *



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


GENERAL
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric. LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
EROO015377







Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
S- ALL Home
S Repairs
Small Carpentry
Fencing
Screening
( Clean Dryer
Vents
Affordatfle & Dependable
Expenence lifelong
352.344-0905
cell: 400-1722
oo .. wed Lic.#37761


NEED SOMEONE TO
GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?

WE MAKE IT




DISAPPEAR FOR LESS
IF YOU WANT IT
TAKEN AWAY...CALL FOR A
FREE ESTIMATE TODAY! o
352-220-9190


ROOFING


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


WINDOW`
.ENIE."'"
We lean Windows and oWhole Lot More'
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


AAA ROOFING CA l
CARPET &
Call the ak6ustes" UPHOLSTERY
Free Written Estimate CLEANING

$100 OFFn in: Gft
$ i siecn en i n: Certificates
Any Re-Roof Carpet Stretching Available
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed arpe tre ng
Lic./ns. CCC57537 DMZN carpet Repair
.......i. 352-282-1480 cell
7... & 352-547-1636 office-
X r "~ c ns Free In Home Estimates
|Lie & Ins Lifetime Warranty. e


CAR1JTCAJE


SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 D5



FFIC LIGHT COLT Single Action
ight from NY Army, nickel finish
-628-4447 4.75 barrel, 45colt
NAL BOX unfired 3rd generation
. console mint cond. $1700 obo
, DVD cony., 352-441-0645
te, & games. Concealed Weapons
AFTER 5PM Permit Course
2124888 DAN'S GUN ROOM
M IM6 BAIT (352) 726-5238
FISH RODS- CUSTOMS MADE
., graphite, CROSS BOWS, 150LB
y., cork grip, PULL W/SCOPE $350
a. 628-0033 (352) 628-7633
TE HANGING GOLF CART CLUB CAR
L BAG $10 EZ-GO 36volt new
GAGE charger, new tires &
'PERSONAL brakes. $1200. Golf Cart
0 419-5981 parts- top & seats $100
EARE UGLY cell (315) 466-2268
F ROD- BWS Golf Cart Club Car
2 pc., action with utility bed on
3., sigma, Ex+, back, runs good,
28-0033 comes w/ charger and
BATH TUB spare tire. Asking $875
H BACK. $30 352-564-2756
xc. cond. SHOT GUN 20 Gauge
527-2085 JC Higgins pump, adj.
INTERNET chock, Like new $275
ERE CARD OBO. (352) 476-1113
0 Hernando or (352)-513-5125
83-5797 SKS ASSAULT RIFLE
Y BILT 30 rd mag, AK stock, plus
ATOR 5500 original Teak wood stock,
550 starting scope, & ammo $750.
)nly run to (352) 302-6565
oil. Like new Taurus PT 1911, 45 ACP
352-527-0832 semi auto pistol, gray &
DRESS, JR. black never fired
100 OBO Off flawless cond. All extras
r+ access. Included $975.
527-2085 (352) 344-0355
TREADMILL
Golds Gym 450. Electric
key board, used 3
hours. Retail $900, ask-
ARE NERVE ing $475 (352) 746-0506
ON SYSTEM
are Promax Winchester model 1300,
ectrical Nerve 12 gauge rifled barrel,
on System $400. Winchester model
it for chronic 9430-30cal.$400.
nerve pain. (352) 503-6037







D6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013


94 S-10 BLAZER PARTS
black interior glass and
seats 100.00 will sepa-
rate nice cond. dennis @
352-476-9019




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369




5 Tiny Yorkies
$550 and up, Small,
Tiny & Very Tiny Only 2
females,1 Male Maltese,
Raised in loving home.
CKC Reg. health certs, &
puppy pacs. Parents on
site come watch them
play (352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258
AKC BOXER PUPPIES
Boxer Puppies
$450-$600 4-females,
3-males
8 WKS 1/08/2013
352-302-0918


BELLA
Bella is a beautiful
silvery brindle Cattle
Dog/Shepherd mix,
came to the shelter
because her family
lost their home. She is
4 years old, spayed,
housebroken, micro-
chipped, and
Heartworm-negative,
weighs 45 pounds.
Walks well on a leash,
gets along with other
dogs and is very, very
playful. Fenced yard
is preferred, but can
jump a low fence.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.

MINIATURE POODLES
miniature poodle pups
born 10/16/12 Health
Cert 1 apricot & 1 black
female & 1 black male al-
most potty trained, raised
in our home. $500 cash
call 352419-5662 or
karaluv3@yahoo.com
NEW Classes this week
DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com






(352) 634-5039*


NICKY
Nicky is a 2 y.o.
lab/bulldog mix, weigh-
ing about 78 pounds,
and is Heart-worm
negative. Is very sweet
and loveable, very intel-
ligent. However, he is a
big, strong dog who
needs a strong person
to handle him, and a
fenced yard is strongly
recommended. He
knows how to sit for
treats and wants to
please his human
friend very much.
He is available now at
the Citrus County
Animal Shelter.
Call 352-746-8400


RED MINIATURE
POODLE PUPS
7 WEEKS;2 MALES AND
1 FEMALE; $850.
REGISTRATION AND
HEALTH CERTIFI-
CATES; AVAILABLE
12-22-12. CALL
352-419-8233 OR
janiceannross@msn.com
SENEGAL PARROT
$350 WITH CAGE,
FEMALE VERY GOOD
BIRD. CASH ONLY
EXC. HEALTH
(352) 503-2383









STONEY
Stoney is a Boxer/
Hound mix, light tan
and white, who
came to the shelter
as a stray. He is
Heartworm negative,
neutered, micro-
chipped, and house-
broken. He is a very
easy-going, calm,
gentle dog, gets
along with other
dogs, walks well on a
leash, and is very
affectionate. He is
medium in size. Has a
laid-back personality.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


Livestock


2005 BOAT TRAILER
18 to 21 ft boat. Tandem
axle. All tires, lights,
axles, & guides in exc.
cond. MUST SEE!
Asking $895 OBO.
Priced $350 below value.
Call / txt(352) 422-7737
2011 20 HSP YAMAHA
stroke, shortshaft
stainless steel propeller
like new, under warranty
$2000 352-795-0257
BOAT TRANSIT
TRAILER Very Ig., dbl.
axles up to 33 ft. Any
boat type! $1800 or
OBO (813) 244-3945



1988 27 ft Sportscraft
Coastal Fisherman,
cabin cruiser, $10k
OBO (813)-244-3945



MUST SELL


BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motor, AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth finder,
2001 Rolls float on
trailer worth $1000.
Comes w/spare motor
Has service manual,
2nd owner -$2500
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855
HURRICANE DECK
BOAT
2003 Hurricane Deck
Boat with 2003 90hp
Yahama 4 Stroke engine.
Excellent condition. In-
cludes trailer, bimini top,
winter cover, stereo, fish-
finder, gps porta pottinew
interior, livewell plus full
coast guard safety equip
New bottom paint 2011
Very economical on fuel
$8500 Contact Phil
Tomko at 352-220-9435
No calls before 8:00 am
TRI PONTOON BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com



NATIONAL RV
2006 Tropical One
owner,34ft, 26000
miles,no smoke/pets,
300HP Cummins diesel,2
slides, 6 new tires, 3yr
warranty,many extras.
$87000. Well maintained.
352-341-4506



FOREST RIVER
2010, Surveyor, Sport
189, 20 ft. Travel Trailer,
1 slide, fully equipped
w/AC, qn. bed, awn-
ing, pwr. tonque jack,
corner jacks, micro-
wave, equilizing hitch,
Sleeps 2-3
$10,500 (352) 382-1826
HI-LO TRAVEL
TRAILER 2003, tow lite
model 22-03t,exc. cond.
$6000 obo 352-422-8092
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lie/Ins.
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides,
kg bdlike new, 60amp
serve. NADA $29K asking
$25K obo 352-382-3298
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
A XMAS SALE
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition, Title,
No Title, Bank Lien,
No Problem, Don't Trade
it in. We Will Pay up to
$25K Any Make, Any
Model. 813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ


A XMAS SALE
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUICK
2007, Lucerne, CXL
55K miles, Leather
$13,500. obo
Call Troy (352)621-7113
CADILLAC
2003 CTS, Must see.
Luxury car at an
affordable price.
Call 352-628-4600
for an appointment.
CHEVROLET
2005 Venture
$4,300.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
'98, Lumina GL, 4 Door,
loaded, low miles, V6,
pwr., garaged, clean
$3,750. (352) 212-9383
CHEVY
2000 Corvette Metallic
Bowling Green Std shift,
one owner,& garage kept.
See to appreciate.
(352) 621-9874
FORD
2001 COBRA MUSTANG
CONV. 5 SPEED,
LEATHER MUST SEE
CALL 352-628-4600
For More Info
FORD
2005, Five Hundred LMT,
40K miles, leather, V6
$9,980
Call Troy 352-621-7113
FORD
2006 Focus ZXW, SE
4DR, WGN. 85k miles
$5,800 obo
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
HONDA
2011 CRV LX, 19K miles,
Ilkenew, 4 Cyl. $19,950
Call Troy 352-621-7113
HYUNDAI
2006 Elantra, GLS 90K
miles, Ilkenew, 4 DR,
auto. $6,800
Call Troy 352-621-7113
KIA
'99, Sportage, Conv.
Top, low miles,
Runs great.
CALL 352-628-4600
For pricing.
LINCOLN
1998, MARK VIII
Automatic, COLD A/C
CALL 352-628-4600
For an appointment
to see!
MAZDA
2002, Tribute
$3,990
352-341-0018


MAZDA
2006 Miata MX5 Grand
Touring 40K Miles, Auto
Transmission, Cloth
Seats, MP-3 multi-Disk
(6), $13,250
352400-1551
OLDS
2000, Intrique
$3,990.
352-341-0018
SATURN ION
2007, 4 cyl, 4dr. gold,
auto, AC,CD, 27k miles
exc. cond. many extras
$8300 obo 352-382-0428
TOYOTA
2000, Camry LE
V6, 183K miles Super
Clean $5,800. obo
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
TOYOTA
2000, Camry, Good fuel
economy, 4 door
transportation.
CALL 352-628-4600
for pricing & details.
TOYOTA
2007, Yarls, 59K miles,
2 DR, H/B $7,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113
TOYOTA
'96, Camary LE,
sunroof, clean,
non smoker, $3,600
(352) 344-8553




CHEVY-
95 Impala SS
Rare Collector Car
LT-lengine, Superb
Condition $8,500
(352) 249-7678
1971 CHEVELLE
CONVERTIBLE
stunning, 40k+ in-
vested, fully restored,
350 auto, buckets, con-
sistant show winner,
high end stereo, red w/
white top & interior
$23,900, 352-513-4257

AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. JAN.. 6. 2013
1-800-438-8559
OLDS 98 REGENCY
Brougham. 4dr w /fp,
orig. 1989, 163k orig.,
V6 24mpg, new tires &
brakes, 2nd owner $1550
(352) 637-1074







Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


Mee^tingB
Notice


A XMAS SALE
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
CHEVY C20
1984, LB, solid body &
bed, good glass, interior
needs tic, dual exhaust,
350v8, Turbo 400, Holly 4
barrel, needs ps pump
$1400 obo 352-628-7243
pls leave message
Dodge Ram
2008 Big Horn 5.7 Hemi
30k Great cond. $19,000
Call Fred
(352) 628-6470
FORD
1992 F150 Work Truck.
8ft bed, Under 150k mi.
$3000 (352) 527-0688
FORD RANGER
1999 XLT 4 door, 3.0 V6,
Auto, 131K. Many extras.
Garaged, excellent cond.
$4,500 (352) 382-2801
TOYOTA
2000 Tacoma 5 sp, 174k
mi, cold air. runs great.
$4450 (352) 503-2629
TOYOTA
2004, 4 Runner Sport
2WD, 94K ml, Leather
$12,800. obo
Call Troy 352-621-7113



CADILLAC
2007, Escalade,
44k miles, Luxury NAV,
$29,500.
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
CHEVROLET
1997 Suburban LT,
loaded, low mi. ex cond.
Good Tires $5200 obo
(352) 249-7702
CHEVY TRAIL-
BLAZER LT 05
exc. cond. asking $7000
obo, in Hernando
(904) 923-2902



1978 MIDAS RV
90k miles, 26ft, sleeps 4
**$1500 obo**
352-212-7032



CHEVY
'05 TRAILBLAZER
57K miles, Excel. Cond.
$8,500.
352-249-7756
JEEP
1995, Wrangler
$$6,450
352-341-0018
JEEP
2004, Wrangler X 4WD,
Only 57K miles,
Hard Top $13,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113



CHEVY
1995 Lumina Van120k mi
7 passenger, a/c Sunroof
clean, etc. $1995 OBO
Lecanto 508-642-9163
FORD
1995E-150 Conversion
Van, $3,250.
'Irl-IA ^^1n


RANGERS
AS LOW AS 7888.
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS
2002, SPORTSMAN
ATV. 4X4, SERVICED
AND READY FOR
HUNTING SEASON.
$2995
(352) 621-3678

Motorcycles


N .". .IT CE TA:Y:::...






YEAH, IT'LL TOW





YOU RBAT!


HARLEY-DAVIDSON
2006 FLHTPI, low miles,
all service recorded,
GREAT looking, good
title, runs strong. Asking
$10,500. (352)513-4294


HARLEY-DAVIDSON
2006 FLHTPI, low miles,
all service recorded,
GREAT looking, good
title, runs strong. Asking
$10,500. (352)5134294
HONDA
2005, VTX 1300CC
3 TO CHOOSE FROM
YOU PICK $4,888.
(352) 621-3678
HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley,1100CC, Chrome,
bags, trade?, 70mpg
$3,500. Crystal River
(727) 207-1619
KYMCO
2009, 125 cc. Looks and
drives great Only $995
(352) 621-3678
VICTORY
2005, KINGPIN
2 TONE, STAGE ONE,
LOADED WITH
OPTIONS
ONLY $7888.
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
2005, ROYAL STAR
TOUR DELUXE, READY
FOR A ROAD TRIP
ONLY $6688.
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
2007 STRATOLINER
1800CC LOADED WITH
OPTIONS A REAL TOUR
BIKE ONLY $5889.
(352) 621-3678

Mee^tingB
Notices


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
"# ^ "# "A- "# "A- "# *<


397-0106SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will
meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 10, 2013 in Room 166 of the Lecanto Gov-
ernment Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Engi-
neering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352)
527-5446.
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes)
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days be-
fore the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
January 6, 2013.


*AII Offers While Supplies Last.


VILLAGE TOYOTA

www..illa....ola. CRYSTAL RIVER



352-628-5100


000DOQI


CLASSIFIED


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Metn




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CY -
SCRYSTAL .- ,

.. .... _......


DECEMBER'S 5000 WINNER!
BARBARA WILBURN-YORK
YOU COULD BE THIS MONTH'S WINNER!
VISIT ANY CRYSTAL LOCATION FOR DETAILS


2009 NISSAN VERSA
f $6,999 OR$121 MO.
I -^^-^ Ba~aa:ii :B^j~~ak.


2009 HYUNDAI ACCENT
$6,9990R $121 o.
2009 DODGE CALIBER r n
$9,999 OR $174. .


2008 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
$9,999 OR $174m.M
2008 CHEVROLET HHR
Im $8,999 OR$156 .
119 2008 TOYOTA RAV4
$11,999 0R$2081M .
1 1 2008 NISSAN ROGUE
2007 CHEVROLET IMPALA
$8,999 OR$156mo.
2007 NISSAN ALTIMA
$8,999 OR $159o..


2007 HUMMER H2
$24,999 OR $434. i
BMBIi :g^B ^l Ji I ^


2009 CHRYSLER SEBRING
$7,9990R $139 M.
2009 DODGE JOURNEY
$11,999OR $208=.
liaM~af:ii i:~i^a:~


2009 NISSAN MURANO
$15,999OR $278m .


I


2008 NISSAN ALTIMA
$8,999 oR $156 MO.
2008 DODGE CARAVAN
$10,999 OR$191MO.
2008 CHRYSLER 300
Ss$11,999.R $208o.
2008 HONDA PILOT
$1 $13,999 OR$243m.
-a^ ^ trt'lim^.It- I I g il'.^tg11,11011li


2007 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 2500
$24,999 OR $434M.
2007 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
$8,999 R $156o.


2006 CHRYSLER SEBRING
$5,999OR. $130
l$I 3 O!MO.
I,: mm.Ul ~*j. :1 :q


S2006 CHEVROLET COBALT
$5,999 OR $130.
2006 JEEP LIBERTY
$7,999 OR $173m0.


2006 TOYOTA RUNNER
$12,999..R $281 Mo
P p 1: 1 11ii ,i
T I : ,. ll I I


II
IalumIi


2006 DODGE RAM
- S $9,999 OR $216mo.
2006 VOLKSWAGEN TOUREG
$10 ,999 OR $238o
2005 DODGE RAM
S$7999oR $1E73O.


ITIIlI


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II:iI


-. I, /


CALL THE INSTANT
h., ) APPRAISAL LINE


w CRYSTAL
Nl AUTOMOTIVE

352-564-1971 WWW.CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd. 1005 S. Suncoast Blvd. 937 S. Suncoast Blvd. 2077 Highway 44W 14358 Cortez Blvd.
Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL Inverness, FL Brooksville, FL

*ALL PRICES INCLUDE $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PAYMENTS ARE 66 MONTHS AT 4.99% APR WITH APPROVED CREDIT. INCLUDES $1000 CRYSTAL
TRADE ASSISTANCE. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. +PAYMENTS ARE 54 MONTHS AT 6.99% APRWITH APPROVED CREDIT INCLUDES $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE
000DOUP $599.50. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK


2010 DODGE RAM
S15,999 OR $278Mo.
I ^-^K HyeasB~iiiii'.gi ^fWillii


i


2009 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY
$13,9990R $243o..


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41q


SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 D7


, -r -. ". '


tLa II 1 o ai




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DECEMBER'S

5000 WINNER!
BARBARA WILBURN-YORK

YOU COULD BE THIS
MONTH'S WINNER!
VISIT ANY CRYSTAL LOCATION FOR DETAILS


'12 XB


:a. 4 M I
1-800-584-875 Ex.13040IHJ~J _^


' '12 IMPALA`


'12 500


I.:4H FRDnM&A %Tl ~lAN PCUMN


.inai : : *in'


zig2 H .EODE ES~kWiIFAADSEO MM


L $10,999 O$12999 ;&$14,999 *B$14,999
OR $1721 OR $203m OR $235? OR $235 J
Vo !!L !9-- T/ -.)


H2AM IAWA
:0.52256


'12 CRUZE


S Hin : ^* :*EWNN ^AD *PIC
1-0 -8485 DE~A>^* wr- 'ct.17 !*


r' '12 SONATA



FREE M R *CR ESAE TIiF Ml0C RCN


'12 MALIBU


S 2 R R W M D *P


" $14,999 '$15,999 ,u$15,999 -'$15,999
OR $235M1. JR $250 P O.R $250o.3 OR $250MO


zi : :.
FRE 3HI ICOLE ACEIIHIFO N PWPICIN
1-800--584-8755 EyiB18182


'12 JOURNEY



.11 10 :


r '12 EQUINOX -


PLE W O


r'12 CHALLENGERi


I I 4 N 1C RDWSCEWJJiIf0M fcj RP
1-80-58-875 ExA26


I e"ye4B moUY9I'I I I
Fo$16,9991 FR$17,999 $19,999 p$20,999
OR $266 PEROR PER28213,PE OR $328, J
v- $26" v- $28 Mo _) v_ $3 m.- k


' '12 CAMARO


' '12 PRIUS


'12 RAM QUAD CAB'


r '12 WRANGLER


Fo$20,9999 FOR99 29 F999,
OR $328" OR $360M0. OR $360M. OR $360M0.
MO.v v


CRYSTAL
AUTOMOTIVE


352-564-1971 WWW.CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd. 1005 S. Suncoast Blvd. 2077 Highway 44W 14358 Cortez Blvd. 937 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL Inverness, FL Brooksville, FL Homosassa, FL

'PRICE AND PAYMENTS INCLUDE $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599 50 PAYMENTS ARE FOR;' MONTHS AT 3 99': APR WITH APPROVED CREDIT PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PUR-
POSES ONLY. RIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK
000DOUI


1%


,Wft


Ift


'N%


D8 SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013


I I^_ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^


a I_^^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ _


a I__ _^ ^ ^ _^ ^ ^






Section E -SUNDAY, JANUARY 6,2013



SO ME CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE
CIT^RUS, COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


INSIDE |
B Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E4


Sm .- s :-
S SE -
i I


b* S S


S
S '
S* .*










/
( "















V.. T


rT ]PJ7/tL









E2 SUNDA'I~ JANUARY 6, 2013 Cimus Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


CHARMING CONTEMPORARY
AT AN AFFORDABLE PRICE
Modern 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on low maintenance
lot in the Homosassa area. Short drive to shopping,
parks and local waterways. Cathedral ceilings, split
bedroom plan and nice screened room. This home is
in great condition and would make a perfect starter
home. Approved short sale.
STEVE VARNADOE 795-2441 OR 795-9661 ij
Email: stevevarnadoe@remax.net


1035 S. BROOKFIELD DR.
PRETTY AS A PICTURE
* 3BD/2BA/2CG + POOL Remodeled Kitchen
SGranite Counters L New Flooring
SPool Has Pavers, Waterfall & Large Lanai
PETER & MARVIA KOROL 1
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


INFO LIN~E1
",*637.2828
"^le !o~er ha u'
se 3501-- is~


* 3BD/3BA/2+CG + POOL Newly Remodeled Kitchen
SWonderfully Maintained ON THE GOLF COURSE
,2,000+/- Living Area Gas Fireplace/Great Rm.
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


*55+ Golf Course Community Bright and Cheerful
* Newer Air Conditioner Professionally Landscaped
*30-Year Roof New Fence
* Low HOA Fees
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 [
Email: sherylpotls@aol.com
Welsile: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


NOT A DRIVE BY!!!
UPDATES GALORE Large 2BR, 2BA, 2 Car
Circular Drive Updated Kit. w/Wood Cab
Extra Insulation New Florida Room
* Double Pane Windows
KELLIE GODDARD 352-476-8536
www.Kellyg.remaxagent.com




--as




REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


S 2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish







$118 MILLION

SOLD IN 2012

#1

In Citrus County
Call Us To Sell Your Home!


CRYSTAL HIVEK
*3BR/3BA/3CG Home Great Room wT/
* Gourmet Kitchen Lg. Master Suite
*Screened Pool & Spa Lots of Beautiful
*900 Sq. Ft. Workshop *2 Covered Boat
* Beautiful Natural FL Setting
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Ptmnil. IAnhnnmArirlmnv nta


auted Ceilings
Decking
Slips


i. .7 2rItFOLINE
'g3 2828






19786 SW 86TH PLACE
RAINBOW SPRINGS
* Nce 3BR/2BA/2CG Home Lg. Kitchen w/Eat In Area
*Great Room/Dining Room *Office/Den
* Screened Lanai *Beautiful Landscaping
*Move-In Ready
* Lg. Utility Room w/Extra 1 3x8 Hobby Room
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpulmer@remax.net


Ent house#12iJ 11


Emi l ] i
S O LD^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


Recently SOLD In Crystal Glen
CALL
RVM44B REALTY ONE


Recently SOLD In Sugarmill Woods
CALL
LRV4dI REALTY ONE


FLUHAL CITY
2 Bedrooms, 1 Bath, Concrete Block Home
Large Living Room w/Fireplace
Inside Laundry
Corner Lot 1 06 Acres
Carport & Large Detached Garage
2 Sheds
BBQ Pit & Concrete Slab for Entertaining
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM I
(352) 637-6200 |
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


STUNNINU pool home! Lovely 3/2/3+
den boasts a solar heated pool & spa, gas
fireplace, RV pad with 50 amp, large open
kitchen. Upgrades include flooring, custom
window treatments and baths. Enjoy your
morning coffee in the breakfast nook
overlooking your pool.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


242 N. Ieai w. eel il 2-82w wRtA~o I 0 N. Flrd.AeIvens6760
835S Snosi Bv. Horosss 62-70 ww.*ue'nielsfeco 504 NE Hwy 19 C ier7524


... .. ..: ... i


E2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


.BiY oB







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Using a calendar to plan gardening


his year I plan to be
more efficient and or-
ganized about the gar-
den. A new calendar is
designated solely to garden-
ing. The daily squares have
enough space to jot weather
conditions such as a.m.
frost, freeze until 9 a.m.,
heavy rain, 2-inch down-
pours, cloudy all day or


beautiful sunrise, sunny all
day My gardening friend
Jim has a huge calendar on
a wall inside his garage near
shelves where he stores gar-
den tools and chemicals. I
adopted his idea.
Green highlights lawn
care days: seeding, mowing,
edging, top-dressing with or-
ganic humus, etc. On my old


6260 S. CANNA LILY Ir 7239 COT
3/2 359137 $59 900/4+CPDet.3


6541 W. COPENHAGEN
3/2 356535 $89,500


--A


4710W. MUSTAN 8597 N. DORA WAY 16 S. ADAMS 15 S. FILLMORE 29 N WASHINGTON
3/2/3 359604 $249,900 322 358108 $37 W 2/1 356532 $42,900 2/2 354359 $49,900 2/1 356448
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


2012 calendar it is easy to
see that the rye grass
planted last October was cut
twice in November and De-
cember, taking three hours
each time with a corded,
electric push mower. Blue
indicates rain or irrigation,
yellow is for weed killers
and pre-emergent preven-
ters, and red is for insecti-


1E AL i i


Amanda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BIOKER/ASSOC. REALTORR GR REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR


746-9000.


cides like Talstar and BT.
Maybe pruning should be
noted in purple.
The pictures stored in the
computer will always
record when they were
taken. Notes on the calen-
dar document when the


nectarine trees showed
their first bloom (Jan. 1), and
when the thin green leaves
emerged from the Zephyr
Lily corms lining the edge of
a path (Dec. 27).
See JANE/Page E9


r.* Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney [
-L Realtor., A HOUSE Realtor
IU 302.3179 sowLDN.a& 287.9022
WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746.6700 ODP2E


- 'p
*.1


I -K


"TRUE" FOUR-BEDROOM POOL HOME!
Set on 2 lots in South Oak Village
4+office/3/3 with pool 2700 sq. ft. living
Granite kitchen overlooks family room
Fireplace in living room
Hardwood flooring in dining & office
Home warranty for buyers
#351467 $279,000


BEVERLY HILLS
61 S. TYLER ST.
2-1-1 Central H/A 03, re-roof 10/12,
'il beautiful tile. Nice carpeting, new
kitchen counters, turn key, shed in
ft backyard. Beautiful curb appeal.
Seller will consider owner financing.


3200 SQUARE FEET OF LIVING AREA!
* 3+ office/3 with pool
* Expanded garage is 19'9x29'6
* Family/media room off the pool
* Zoned AC/heat security system
* 42" cherry cabinetry w/SS appliances
* Paved lanai and pool deck
#358920 $309,000


Q "Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods"'
NANCY Direct:
PONTICOS 352-634-4225
SMulti-Million $$$ Producer yN EA LTn INC.
8015 S Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL 382-1700 Nancy@Nancyknows.com


GORGEOUS UPDATED POOL HOME! TREMENDOUS BUY & TERRIFIC LOCATION!
* Granite,Wood & Tile Kitchen to Family Room Living & Famly Rooms AND Florida Room too
* Newer Roof & A/C POOL Resurfaced too Heat Pump 2010 Split Bedroom Floor Plan
* Tile Lanai w/View to Gorgeous Private Greenbelt Paver Patio area looks to Large Backyard
$162,500 MLS#359320 $85,000 MLS#344849
lake.myMWIftUflTT


Jane Weber
JANE'S
GARDEN


vvvvw^^0trusbastb* 0c S


-HEI


1.5 ACR IE HO*MI= Sil-FkI


EY "Always There For You"
"I i GAIL COOPER
tIMo lotn ,r, I 1Irilnlion Dollar Realtor
*n (4, ULltI Cell: (352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com
iH^^B .U..


L^*1 C R IGE


SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 E3


, I i 1 k I !







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
..................................... .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................352-563-5966
News information................................................ 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CifiipNsILE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
* Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
* News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
* Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
* Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
* For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Become an Extension Volunteer


I f your New Year's resolution is to
become more active or involved in
your local community, UF/IFAS Cit-
rus County Extension has the ideal so-
lution for you. Citrus County Extension
is currently seeking volunteers to help
enhance their Learning Landscape lo-

Extension office
at 3650 West Sov-
ereign Path,
Lecanto.
The Florida-
friendly Learn-
ing Landscape is
a vital educa-
tional tool for Joan Bradshaw
Citrus County FLORIDA-
Extension. Due
to the loss of a FRIENDLY
longtime land- LIVING
scape attendant,
volunteer support is being requested.
The learning center is based on
principles of Florida-friendly Land-
scaping (FFL) using low-maintenance
plants and environmentally sustain-
able practices to create a beautiful
landscape that saves time, energy and
money while protecting our natural
resources. This learning center is
based on the nine FFL principles,
which are quite simple and include:


Volunteer assistance is needed to maintain
an aesthetically pleasing landscape. Activities
include planting, trimming, applying mulch and
other functions related to the design and upkeep
of the learning center.


Selecting the right plant for the
right place.
Watering efficiently
Fertilizing appropriately
Applying mulch.
Attracting wildlife.
Managing yard pests responsibly
Yard trimming recycling.
Reducing stormwater runoff.
Protecting the waterfront.
Florida-friendly Landscaping
means using low-maintenance plants
and environmentally sustainable
practices. Learn how you can have a
beautiful landscape that could save
you time, energy and money while
protecting our future.
Volunteer assistance is needed to
maintain an aesthetically pleasing
landscape. Activities include planting,
trimming, applying mulch and other
functions related to the design and up-
keep of the learning center


As a volunteer with UF/IFAS Citrus
County Extension, you will have access
to the most current horticulture infor-
mation on Florida-friendly landscaping
practices. Volunteering takes place
Monday to Friday during regular busi-
ness hours, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. For informa-
tion, contact Joan Bradshaw, Citrus
County Extension, at 352-527-5700.
Citrus County Extension links the
public with the University of Florida/
IFAS's knowledge, research, and re-
sources to address youth, family, com-
munity, and agricultural needs. Pro-
grams and activities offered by the Ex-
tension Service are available to all per-
sons without regard to race, color, hand
icap, sex, religion, or national origin.


Dr Joan Bradshaw is Director of Cit-
rus County University of
Florida/IFAS Extension Service.


Bronze sculpture likely composite; eyeing Windsor chairs


D earJohn: I enjoy your col-
umn. I was wondering if
you could shed any light
on the sculpture I re-
cently purchased. It ap-
pears to be made of
some composite and
covered in bronze. It is
13 1/2 inches tall and
approximately 6 inches
in diameter. It weighs
approximately 10
pounds. There are no
identifying marks that I John S
can find. It has some SIKOF
machining marks on AT
the bottom that may in-
dicate a reproduction
or a not-so-old piece. Thank you
in advance for any comments you
are able to make. J.M.,
Hernando
Dear J.M.: Yes, the foundation
or base material is likely a com-
posite or plaster of Paris. Then it
is covered with copper and fin-
ished with a bronze wash. Figural
pieces like these were produced


I

1
1


in large quantities during the late
19th century and well into the
20th century. Your piece was
likely made in Japan
circa 1900. I think it de-
picts a Taoist priest.
There is no specific
collector interest. Po-
tential dollar value is
$25 to $75.
Dear John: I am
sending you pictures of
two Windsor chairs. I
ikorski did not realize it until I
SKI'S got them both side-by-
TIC side, but they are from
different manufactur-
ers. One has been in
one bedroom while the other has
been in another all these years.
One has a label on the bottom that
says "The House of Windsor
Chairs" and "Nichols & Stone
Co."
The other chair has a small
piece of label on the bottom that
has "Grand Rapids, Mich." on it. I
guess I just assumed they were


identical, since they both came
from the aunt's house. Can you
tell me what they are worth? -
R.G., Gainesville
Dear RG.: A Windsor chair, a
wood plank saddle seat with the
legs and backrest stiles set in, first
appeared in England in the 18th
century Shortly thereafter, the
chairs were being made in Amer-
ica in numerous variations. They
have been a popular category in
the antiques marketplace for
decades.
The type of Windsor chairs you
have are called brace-backs, re-
ferring to the two spindles at the
back of the chairs. They both ap-
pear to be well-made and in nice
condition. Time of production is
early 20th century Though they
may be close to 100 years old, they
are considered antique reproduc-
tions. Potential dollar value is
below $100 each.
Dear John: I purchased this

See ATTIC/Page E6


Special to the Chronicle
LEFT: This bronze sculpture was likely produced in Japan around 1900. It
probably depicts a Taoist priest. RIGHT: Windsor chairs have been popu-
lar with collectors for decades.


E4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Gulling closes out
record 2012 /
Congratulations to Mary
Gulling of EXIT Realty
Leaders in Crystal River,
who sold $1.6 million in
closed sales in 2012. Mary Mary
is an extremely professional Gulling
agent, who is very knowl- EXIT Realty
edgable about Citrus Leaders
County. Contact her at 352-
794-0888, or visit online at www.exit


realtyleaders.com.
Miele hits new
high for year
ERA American Realty &
Investments is proud to an-
nounce the latest production
level achieved by one of its
agents year to date. Lou
Miele, Beverly Hills office,
surpassed the $3 million
mark in closed sales volume
in 2012.


Lou
Miele
ERA
American
Realty.


ERAAmerican Realty is proud to recog-

trusSold CitrusCou ty





WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
For a FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
$8.6 million already closed by Dec. 31, 2012
Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
3 To) Leam More 46M924
L (352) 746-9924 "


Real Estate DIGEST
nize the achievements of this fine real es-
tate professional. Lou Miele can be
reached at the Beverly Hills office of ERA
American Realty by calling 352-746-3600.


Peter
Korol
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Marvia
Korol
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Alan Ivory of the Crystal River office re-
cently passed $9 million in closed sales
volume for 2012. He continues to rank in
the top 1 percent of local Realtors in sales
production.


Alan
Ivory
RE/MAX
Realty One.


RE/MAX agents celebrate
stellar year in 2012
Marvia and Peter Korol surpassed $4
million in closed sales volume in 2012.
Marvia and Peter work out of the Central
Ridge office of RE/MAX Realty One lo-
cated in Lecanto on Country Road 491.


I I


FORMS AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and
engagement announcements, anniversaries, birth
announcements and first birthdays.


WATERFRONT IN GREAT NEIGHBORHOOD!
is beautiful updated kitchen w/cabinets galore. Many extras at an suites, near bike trail & more. 7504 E. Broyhill PI.
i9 $299,900 #357705. Call Tonva Koch 352-613-6427


D. Newer almost everything. Gotta see it to believe EXQUISITE 3/3/2 CUSTOM HOME in Clearview Estates, highlights many top end features. Tropical pool area, dream
174 Kathy Chapman 352-476-4988 kitchen,14 ceiling, formal living rm & dining rm. + den, large square footage. #340869


PINE RIDGE
4/3/3 POOL HOME
Best Priced Home on Market.
Hurry! Beautiful lot, large lanai.
Convenient location, 2630 sq. ft
cooled. MUST SEE!
$205,000
Call Joe 302-0910
O00Dow8


CONGRATULATIONS

KARIS GEISTFELD

2012 Sales Associate
of the Year!
We're so pleased to recognize Karis. As successful as she is as a Sales Associate,
she's an even better person. By putting the needs and desires of her clients first
she consistently exceeds their expectations, and that in turn has led to a
loyal following of satisfied customers.
Thank you Karis for all you do here at the Villages of Citrus Hills.
Congratulations from us all.
C251 VILLAGES OF
00DOPIitrus/ fils


IT S CHEAP.....8 IT LOOKS GOOD! . CRYSTAL MANOR 3 2 POOL HOME.... i
lome w/split plan, vaulted ceilings, screen porch, & eat in MOVE-IN READY 2007 4/2.5/2 HOME w/2888 MOL w/2275 living. Features a metal roof, split floor plan,
kitchen for $54,900! #357012.11041 Tigerwood. Tomika living for $134,900 New Int. paint & flooring....#359607 lanai, breakfast bar, wood cabinets, corner lot. #359664
;pires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 1 7414 Cricket Dr. Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. ONLY $159,900! Km Fuller 212-5752 f


SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 E5







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


4BR PLUS office, 2.5BAs, original owner, decorator
upgrades. Formal living and casual a eas quroality tile AFFORDABLE PINE RIDGE NEW WATERFRONT LISTING NEW WATERFRONT LISTING
volume ceilings, Transom windows for natural Spotless and sparkling!! Original owners. This Affordable waterfront home *2 bedroom, 1.5 bath, DW MAINTENANCE FREE LIVING AT ITS FINEST!!
lighting. Master suite with Ig. walk-in shower, garden home is dated but in great shape!! 3BRs, 2BAs, mobile home with stucco outside and shingle roof High style and low maintenance. Spectacular water views!
tub. This home has over 2860 sq. ft. living area and 3 larqe open great rm. with fireplace. 2 car Large open living room 2 spacious bedrooms This home has been updated throughout! 2 bedroom,
car gar. All neutral colors. Retired owner has qaraqe PLUS a detached 15x20 workshop. All on Workshop* boat dock* Ouiet neighborhood on north 2 hath, 2-car, den, plus screen lanai. Upgraded
maintained this home-looks like new!! Price below 1.43 acres backing to the horse trail! end of Lake Tsala Apopka. appliances. This home is move-in ready! MLS # 359051
replacement at$299,900. MLS#t35 668 $109,900 MLS#358724 MLS 359043 $38,900 PRICED RIGHT $129,900




CITRUS HILLS
INVERNESS GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Eloquent elegance that is priceless!! This custom "Rutenburg"
Waterfront home Check the space in the 3 bedroom 2 home has over 6200 sq. ft. of liv. area. Winding oak staircase
WATERFRONT LOTS THE GLENN bath open floor plan design with over 2100 sq. ft of accents the huge entry foyer. Formal and casual areas. In-law
ONLY $8,900 $19,900 IN BEVERLY HILLS living area. Great home for entertaining or active suite on fist floor offers great space for the grandparents. Kit.
Homes only neighborhood *Access to Floral City chain 2 Bedroom, 2 bath, single garage, GREAT ROOM, family living 3 Br 2 bath 2 car garage Located on has all the whistles and bells. Center ishnd plus a truly walk-in
of lakes paved roads Minutes to downtown bright and cheery kitchen, full equipped, inside canal just one block from the club house. Where else pantry. Fam. rm. opens to large ENTERTAINING AREA around the
Inverness, hospital and shopping. laundry. KM/LCL can you fish and golf in the same neighborhood??? caged-in pool. 4-car gar. Priced below replacement. Membership


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

bell at an estate sale. It was all black
and after cleaning it, it has HMS Re-
pulse 1892, one of two Royal Navy bat-
tleships shot down by Japan. Is this a
reproduction? The bell is very heavy
and has the original clapper and rope.
Any help relative to age or value is ap-
preciated. -K.D., Internet
Dear KD.: Perhaps the folks at Mar-
tifacts in Jacksonville can help -they
specialize in nautical and marine an-
tiques. The website is wwwmarit-
facts.com. The phone number is
904-645-0150. Let us know what you
discover.
Dear John: I have a wall clock with a
pendulum, which is electric, manufac-
tured by the United Clock Factory of
Brooklyn, N.Y, with a serial number of
597. The clock is wooden, with an over-
all length of approximately 19 inches. It
has a dial with Roman numerals about
11 inches in diameter, with bowed glass


over the dial face. Does this clock have
any value? Thank you for your assis-
tance in this matter -M.G., Internet
Dear MG.: The United Clock Com-
pany produced novelty clocks in mas-
sive quantities. Currently they are low
on the totem pole of collector interest.
If you like, take a few good photo-
graphs and I will give you an opinion
of value based on decorative interest.


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to 1 p.m. Send
questions to Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box
2513, Ocala 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.

PHOTO REQUESTS
Chronicle photographers will con-
sider requests to take photos of
community events. Call 352-563-
5660 for details.


S l Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
rra 2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
_____ & BrentwoodResales (352) 746-6121 0 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center

REALTY G RO UP BILL DECKER 352-464-0647 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133* VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777






S D SINGLE FAMILY HOME 3 BED, 3 BATH, 5 CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH
DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS DETACHED VILLA3 BED, 3.5 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS This one is exceptional Elegant maintenance free home in Terra Vista This
Come live the Brentwood Terra Vista lifestyle Mantenance free 3/2/2 villa Open floor Come and see this really nice custom Windward on the 5th hole of Skyview
plan, spacious kitchen with Third bedroom can Golf Course P th .... t rooms boast their own full baths The expanded
be used as den Extended on cul-desac Only lanai has a .... i .. overlooking the golf course and has a summer
steps from Community Pool and Golf course MLS 359725 $114,900 kitchen The garage is enlarged for extra room MLS 356463 $225,000 $339.000 $469.000






DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS ..
SINGLE FAMILY HOME 3 BEDROOMS, 2 BATH, 2 CAR HILLSIDE SOUTH SINGLE FAMILY HOME 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2 CAR HILLSIDE SOUTH
Elegant, immaculate with a fabulous panoramic viewl Don't miss this 3/3/2 DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS

$140,000 ,$199,000 .,,..i. i $'.,, i $376,500 ...i i. ...... i I .i i $189,900










DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS THIS LOVELY 2 BEDROOM + DEN HOME features an extended lanai -i.'
Fully Furnished 2/2/2 Detached Villa in Terra Vista Beautifully decorated Enjoy Immaculate unfurnished home in the Community of Brentwood Open floor plan with an inground spa Open floor plan with tile and carpet Located on a cul de BRENTWOOD TOWNHOME, 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR
.......i .. .. 1, .. .. ,, , .,,,,1. 1 ....y 11, i i. .. i .. .. ,, ,,, .. ,b sac n the esirable community of Terra Vista Social Membership Included Furnshed Townhome in Brentwood for rent Nice 2/Bd with 2 1/2 baths King in
,,,,,| ... ~,, 11~. ,1 .S. ,1.500 $ ,i.. 1,100 #1223 $1,300 master Comes with the Citrus Hlls Social Club Membership #1190 $1,000


E6 SUNDAY. TANUARY 6. 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Do-it-yourself bedroom style


This image shows knock-off
version of a populd but pricier
PB_Teen.bedding ensemble using
inexpensive sheet sets and
\ iron-on ribbon created by Austin.
TX-based A ison epwrth.lShe
provides a ttoria on o er blkg
www.house6fhep vorth .conr.
h!co~


Design pros show how you can have cool, comfy bedding- without breaking the bank


KIM COOK
Associated Press
There are stores full of exqui-
site bedding. But fancy
sheets, duvets and mat-
tresses can sometimes fall short
of our wish lists, in style, price,
comfort or all three.
What if you could make your
own?


You don't need to be a profes-
sional designer, or even much of
a sewer, to create one-of-a-kind
bedding that looks as nice as the
stuff of dreams.
First, your existing bedding
can be embellished with sew-on
or iron-on appliquds, available in
craft and stitchery supply stores.
Writer and crafter Kim Ray of-
fers suggestions on the website


Doityourself.com. Trim the edges
of sheets with flowers or butter-
flies for a feminine touch. Mono-
grammed initials give a smart,
tailored and custom look. Ray
also recommends edging a sheet
with lace, making simple ruffles
out of rayon seam binding, and
embellishing coverlets with flow-
ers made of various-size buttons.
www. doityourself. corn


Allison Hepworth of Austin,
Texas, chronicles her efforts to
creatively and affordably deco-
rate her "cookie-cutter" home on
her blog, House of Hepworth.
When shopping for a bedding en-
semble for her daughter's room,
she found what she liked at PB
Teen but didn't want to spend
$400. Instead, she bought a cou-
ple of basic sheet sets from Wal-


Mart, cut one up to make a pretty
pink band on the sheets, and
used heat bonding to attach a
contrasting grosgrain ribbon trim
on comforter and sham. Her final
cost was under $70.
"I rarely sew and couldn't
make a dress if my life depended
on it," Hepworth says. "I can,


Page E8


SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 E7







E8 SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013


BEDDING
Continued from Page E7

however, sew bedding sets
and curtains, because it


BANK OWNED-LECANTO, FL
2br/2ba mobile on 1 acre. 25 x 30 detached bldg.
$30,000 MLS#359561




TO SETTLE ESTATE-FLORAL CITY, FL
Gorgeous oaks and backdrop on Lake Magnolia.
3BR/2BA DW on large lot. Central water.
$37,000 MLS#359133


only involves a straight line
and patience."
If you'd rather have some-
one else put your bedding
together, check out Inmod's
Design Studio. The online
option page lets you pick a


- L
BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Commercial location several blocks from Old
Courthouse. Former flower shop.
$105,000 MLS#356806




BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
Waterfront 6BR/3BA home on gorgeous 2.63
acres. Fireplace.
$180,000 MLS#700012


I CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352) 726-2471
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 302-6714 "'


REAL ESTATE, INC.
rr 5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
J MLS CRYSTAL RIVER,FL34429
OFFICE: (352) 795-6633
WWW.ALEXRE.COM E-MAIL: SALES@ALEXRE .OM


6 eST
R.t


A *I 3E ODT-V DAYS A WEEK!


pattern from a selection of
nature and graphic themes.
You then move on to fabric
choices cotton, linen/cot-
ton blend or Dupioni silk,
then embroidery colors.
You're given the opportu-
nity to see your final design


in a virtual room before pur-
chasing. www.inmod.com
Got specific colors in
mind? You can customize
duvets and sheet sets in any
color combination at
www. custom-bedding. com.
If you want to really get


custom, you can make your
own mattress. Former Man-
hattan interior designer
Lynne Cimino started hav-
ing back problems and
found that the marketplace
had options, but pricey
ones. Working out of her
Marbletown, N.Y, home,
she came up with a
no-sew buckwheat mattress
that's similar to a Japanese
futon.
Sections of cotton canvas
are filled with the hulls,
then twisted and tied in sec-
tions for a custom-size fin-
ished product that looks like
a big billowy cloud. Since
the hulls have no nutritional


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

value, she says, pests aren't
a problem. The hulls are vir-
tually non-flammable so no
harsh retardants are
needed, nor is buckwheat
typically farmed with pesti-
cides. The cotton covers are
machine-washable. You buy
both elements separately
and do the assembling your-
self. www.openyoureyes
bedding.com
Nest Bedding of Albany,
Calif., offers a range of DIY
mattress components in-
cluding natural latex cores,
vegan or cotton and wool
covers, kapok and wool
comfort layers and toppers.
www.nestbedding.com


01I,- ALL- O CTU COUNT


PINE RIDGE
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


(* Prudential

Florida Showcase

Properties


CITRUS HILLS
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


NEW LISTING


4 I'


a 4964 W Pine Ridge Blvd
MLS#359650 $329,900
Former model home, 3/3/3 with pool.
Lovely!
Richard DeVita 352-601-8273


<* Afl$5 6328 W Glory Hill St
3- MLS#355794 $349,900
Custom 4/3/3 pool home. many
upgrades. 3+ acres.
Mike McHale 352-302-3203


7)ista 597 WDoerr Path ftaUeS 2605 W Sunrise St
MLS#359119 $199,000 MLS#355961 $174,500
Lantana model, many upgrades & great Nice 3/2/2 home in quiet community w/
curb appeal. tile roof
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 Mark Casper 352-476-8136


14 S Polestar Pt
MLS#352140 $348,000
TWO masters, full guest suite, office,
3.5 baths.
Mark Casper352-476-8136






C 4?4 n 8225 N Duval Dr
MLS#358732 $141,000
Perfect size home on a "WOW" golf
course lot.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


460 W Doerr Path
'WVsta MLS#356086 $325,000
Very nice 3/2.5/2 villa on Skyview Golf
Course
Helen Forte 352-220-4764






'h 755 W Toucan Lp
MLS#344859 $99,000
Immaculate main free villa. 2 car gar,
3 solar tubes.
Helen Forte 352-220-4764


5544 N Crockett Terr .itis 571 W Massachusetts St 314 S Fillmore St ,n 3605 N Timothy Terr
MLS#356913 $231,000 MLS#356487 $179,000 44111S MLS#358326 $99,500 MLS#358123 $49,900
3/2.5/2 pool home on one beautifully One of a kind pool home on a pretty A beautifully renovated 3/2/2 pool NICE 2BR/BA VILLA IN 55+
landscaped acre. wooded acre lot. home. COMMUNITY OF THE GLEN.
Brian Murray 352-212-5913 Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926 Teresa Boozer352-634-0213 Joy Holland 352-464-4952 |
S 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the -
Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


Learn The Art of

Real Estate Investing
We've developed this ini estor education
program and the accompuan inmg technology
tools because we know the right way to build
wealth in American real estate.

Register Now For Free at
w w iv-.exitreal tvleaders.com


Fo a Vita Tou or Mutil PhotSos,
www6.orid howcse-rSertis- cS







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



JANE
Continued from Page E3

Parallel small branches
mark the area where the
corms were dormant be-
neath the soil and leaf litter.
The date when these rain
lilies start to bloom can be
jotted on the calendar. It is
handy to know when plants
flower in any individual
garden.
The calendar reminds me
that the first strawberry
bloomed Dec. 2, and the first
fruit was picked on Dec. 24
by a snowbird visitor. Inter-
net information tells me
that strawberries are
planted in fall in Florida.
My calendar shows mine
were planted in March and
April when bare root and
potted plants were available
in grocery stores.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 E9


Over the summer I let the
runners root into half-buried
pots of sandy garden soil
amended with half-
decayed organic humus.
These plants grew with no
care all year and are
adapted to the cold. They are
ready to replant anytime as
a border along the edge of a
newly finished paved patio.
The trailers that cascaded
over the 8-inch retaining
wall have rooted in the
lawn. These baby strawber-
ries will require care and
sprinkling after transplant-
ing into raised beds, but
they may bloom and give
fruit so perhaps they
should be moved after har-
vest? Moving some now and
leaving the rest until later
would prove which is better
I can document the experi-
ment easily on the calendar
Dates to enter in pencil in-
clude: early January-spray


It is handy to

know when

plants flower in

any individual

garden.

weeds in dormant planting
beds with glyphosate herbi-
cide; late January prune
roses, shrubs and crape myr-
tles, relocate dormant liatris
corms from back forest; Feb
15 pre-emergent 0-0-7 her-
bicide on lawns, Ronstar pre-
em on flower beds and rows
of nursery stock; early March
- top dress lawns with half-
inch compost or fine milled
mulch; mid-March last
frost, remove insulating
mulch from citrus and
emerging perennials; March
15 fertilize lawn with time-
released 21-0-10+Talstar in-


secticide in mix; late March
- prune Azaleas after flow-
ers finish; late April more
top dressing on lawns, over-
seed with Bahia grass; early
May divide blue-eyed iris,
Chinese domestic iris, and
Black-eyed Susans; Mid May
- Ronstar planting beds, re-
move older strawberry
plants.
January mornings are too
cold for gardening. Planning
and entering reminders on
the calendar can be a warm
indoor pastime.


Jane Weber is a Profes-
sional Gardener and Con-
sultant. Semi-retired, she
grows thousands of native
plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon,
Marion County garden. For
an appointment, call 352-
249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


GOT A NEWS TIP?

* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about
breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-563-5660,
and be prepared to give your name, phone number,
and the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-
563-5660 and ask for Nancy Kennedy. Again, be pre-
pared to leave a detailed message.


53 DOUGLAS ST. #18 4 GINGERWOOD DR.
Sugarmill Woods, Cypress Southern Woods Golf Course.
Village. 2 Bedroom, 2/2 bath, 1 3 Bedroom, 2 bath, with office
car garage. Priced to sell at and 3 car garage. Priced to sell
$59,000. at $219,900.


000BOSH


Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.cor






ELEGANT
CUSTOM BUILT HOME
In the equestrian section of Pine
Ridge next to riding trails. Take a
3600 interactive virtual tour at
www.mypineridgehome.com.
MLS #355468. $410,000







QUICK TRIP OUT INTO
THE GULF OF MEXICO!
3/3/1 Spanish style home, seawall and
boat slip on deep .. 1 1 I.
to the Crystal Ri ....
room, fireplace, newer roof and windows;
great income potential, too!
MLS 359564 $220,000







CLASSIC AND
CONTEMPORARY
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront
estate w/pool and separate apartment. A
true masterpi 1 hI .h I'
Lake Tsala .
family to move right in!
000DNV6 MLS #357471 $425,000


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@ myflorida-house .com


MOVE RIGHT IN -
BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS!!
Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home on a 1 acre
corner lot with mature oak trees and lots
of privacy! Very well maintained, new
roof 05/09. Just bring your suitcase and
move right in! Community features golf,
tennis, clubhouse.
MLS #358397 $169,000



.. =. .


A BOATER'S DREAM
COME TRUE!
Sailboat water (no bridges); 240
feet of seawall; stationary & float-
ing dock; spacious modem 3/25
home sits high and dry (never
flooded) on 2 lots. This meticu-
lously maintained property is a
must see! $499,000

.p


NATURE'S .. .. .. ..
BEST KEPT SECRET BE REAL ESTATE!
3/2 5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River This amazing property sits right
Oaks East, a gated waterfront community on the water at Lake Tsala
on the Withlacoochee River Apopka! $899,000
$218,000 For more information please visit
will buy you this peace of heaven! www.eclectic-house.com


LIVING ON THE WATER! 4590 WORLDWIDE DR., INVERNESS
This classic contemporary pool home is Completely updated 3/2 home! New: roof
the right setting for living the Florida 10/12, A/C & e-panel 01/12, windows
lifestyle. Open and airy with the 01/11, W/H 2009! Florida room, fenced
plantation shutters diffusing the sunlight, backyard, 2 sheds, corner lot, quiet
190 ft. of seawall gives you plenty of 1 .: .. :. 1 r., ..
room to dock all the water toys ... ... .
imaginable! i .1 I I ... .
MLS#354435 $489,000 n *i $68,900


U


mI









E10 SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013







Real Estate


Classifieds


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966



Classifieds


SIn Print

. .and



Online


All


The Time


I Fax: (32 56I56 r Tol -ee -88 85-24 1 Emi:-asfescrndoln~o I wesie Iwh~llenlv~


CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, pets ok
psbl rent w/option
to buy $695
352-634-3862
HOMOSASSA
$350-$550 2 bedroom. 1
bath. also 1 bed 1 bath
lovely setting, quiet
park with pool, com-
munity center,1/2 mile
from boat dock,several
available call
(352)628-4441
HOMOSASSA
2 Bd, 2 Ba. fully turn.
352-746-0524

HOMOSASSA
2/11 /Fenced yard$425
352-220-6303

HOMOSASSA
DW, 2/1, shed w/
wash/Dry, Ig. Fl. Rm &
carport $475. mo. 1st &
sec. (352) 628-1425
LECANTO
LEISURE ACRES
3/2 water & garbage incl.
$600mo. (352) 628-5990




2BR. 1/2 BA.on your
own 75x 150 lot.
no fees! new enclosed
sunroom, Ig laundry
room turn, 2 storage
buildings, 5111 Castle
Lake Ave. S. of
Inverness on SR41
$39,500 (740) 255-0125
3bdr/2 full baths/ 2 car
carport on 1 acre.
split layout, steel roof,
caged pool, 20x25 ft
deck, Ig storage build-
ing, Furnished Modular
$76,900, 5215 Bridget
Pt, Castle Lake Park
Inverness 352-597-7353

BANK
FORECLOSURE
Land-n-Home, 3/2
1500 sq. ft. On 2 Acre,
paved rd. LOOKS
GOOD, Have financing
if needed, only $2,500
down, $381.44mo. P&I
W.A.C. OR $69,900.
Call 352-613-0587
or 352-621-9183


HERNANDO
3BR 2BA MH
Ready to move in !
FHA & Owner Financing
avail, call 352-795-1272
HOME-ON-LAND
3/2 Great Shape.
%Acre. Move In Now
$59,900.
Call 352-401-2979,
352-621-3807
Palm Harbor Homes
14 x 50 Mobile Condo
2/2 $29,900
Park Special
800-622-2832 ext 210

REPO'S- REPO'S
REPO'S
WE HAVE REPO'S
CALL 352-621-9181




"CRYSTALRIVER**
3b/2ba. den newer c/h/a
cpt & vinyl, very clean +
bonus RV Hkup. $34.900
Cridland Real Estate
Jackie 352-634-6340
CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice Large 4br 2ba MH
READY TO MOVE IN!
-Owner Fin. Avail. +
CALL (352) 795-1272
HOMOSASSA
-3/2, Fenced Yard,**
NEW Flooring. NEW AC
$5.000 Down. $435. mo
(352) 476-7077
HOMOSASSA
2ba 1 % ba MH needs
complete rehab. Good
shed, well & septic.
6524 W. Akazian
$12,500 (603) 860-6660




2/2 on Lake Rousseau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent $240/mo.
2003. Used Seasonally
Owner bought a house.
207-546-6115, cell
Adult Park 2/1,
Mobile, heat and air,
nicely furn. large shed,
sreen rm. carport, $8,200
Lot Rent $160 mo.
(352) 287-3729


CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
WINTER SPECIALS*
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
3/2, 2001, $19,900
2/2 waterfront. $31,000
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

INGLIS
3/2 Furn., screened porch.
Lot rent $295
Includes amenities.
$15,000 (352) 212-8873
INVERNESS
3/2 Furn.,Appl., Ig screen
porch & shed, Great
cond. $16,000. Call for
appt. (352)364-3747
INVERNESS
Harbor Lights 55+ park,
on Big Lake Henderson.
Lovely d/w 2/2 new appl.
new floors, screened
porch, shed, & carport.
$13,500 (352)344-1828
LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access. ramp & shower
$25,000. 352-212-6804
Waterfront/Homosassa
Westwind Village 55+
Beautifully furnished
Move In Ready, 2/2
2 Scrn rms, dbl door,
refrig./Ice maker
Washer Dryer, Low
mntnly payments,
$19000 obo
(850) 449-1811 Cell




INVERNESS
RV Spaces. Bring your
own boat and fishing
gear. AGE 55+ com-
munity. Lot rent only
$360-$375 including
electric. Edge Water
Oaks 352-344-1380




HOMOSASSA
Large 3br 2ba MH
Rent to Own
*Ready to Move In
Owner Financina Avail.
CALL (352) 795-1272


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL


Need a Good Tenant?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!


3/2/2 ..............$800
4/2 On A Canal .......$750
3/1 Fpl,, screen room. .$650
2/2 Townhouse.......$652
2/1/1 ................$600


3/2 ..................$650
2/1 ...................$450
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
SCheryl Scruggs,
SRealtor-Associate
L 352-726-9010


ACTION
RENTAL MANAGEMENT)
S REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.itrusCounlyHomneRentals.comn
LECANTO/CITRUS SPRINGS
1073 N. Commerce Ter.. .$525
2/1 apt, screened lanai
8160 N. Duval Dr. (CS)... $1,200

CRYSTAL RIVER
2271 N. Crede............. $450
2/1 SW mobile, furnished
9454 W. Wisconsin Cf.. $775
3/2 quiet dead end street
HOMOSASSA
6325 W. Holiday St. (H). $675
2/2/1 DW on Ig. lot, country setting
8019 W. Grove St ....... $575
2/2 SW mobile on 1.25 Acres
HERNANDO/INVERNESS
5525 S. Kline Ter......... $875
2/2/1 unfurnished, aid lawncare
994 E.Winnetka St. (Her)..$625
2/1.5 on 1 acre with carport

Chassahowitzka
3/2 Waterfront DW, $500
2/2, Fenced Yd DW, $500
2/2, House w/ Gar., $600
Suaarmill Woods
3/2/2, Furnished, $900.
AGENT (352) 382-1000


CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
With inground Pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135

-p rt e ts-

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Hse. Near Twn 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE

APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
Ridgeview Apts
1 & 2 BR HC and
non-HC accessible
apartments. HUD
vouchers welcome.
Call (352) 563-1283
TDD 711/TTY 710
880 SE 8th Ave
Crystal River
Equal Housing
Opportunity
CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments
for Rent 352-465-2985
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, Quiet, Clean .
ncld's water, $575 mo.
nomosassa,1/1, incld's
water $375 mo.
Lecanto 2/1, quiet,clean,
scrn porch, $525mo.
352-257- 6461, 563-2114
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Incld water, trash
& lawn. $550 mo. + Sec.
352-634-5499

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


INVERNESS
1 BR & 2 BR Garden
& Townhouse Apts.
$512 to $559 a mo
WSG included, small
pets welcome.
Barrier Free Unit
Available
GATEHOUSE
APTS
(352) 726-6466
Equal Housing
Opportunity




CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret Harbour
Apts. Newly remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incl Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037




LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza, Office/
Retail, CR 486, 900 sf. @
$700+ util. & sales tax. 1
mo. Free w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801




CITRUS HILLS
2/21/2 Townhouse
condo, full appliances,
carport, Citrus Hills
membership included
Prudential Florida
Showcase Properties
call 352-476-8136

INVERNESS
2/2/1 Lg Condo
Waterfront Community
with heated pool.
Non-smoker, pet restrict.
$665. mo 317-442-1063




Citrus Springs
2/2/1 $650/mo
352-746-7990
HOMOSASSA 2/1
2/1 $525 mo 2/2 $550
mo. incl. garb. Pets?
No smoking. 1st & sec.
352-212-4981


INVERNESS
2/1, Clean, W/D Hk-up,
No pets, $550mo. + Sec
(352) 220-4818




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1 Country Home on
stilts,w/fenced yard.
$600 + Utilities.
Call 920-922-6800




SUGARMILL WDS
furn, 2/2/1 $675 mnth
River Links Realty
352-628-1616




A NICE HOME IN
THE HAMMOCKS/
SMW 3/2/2
Heat. S Pool, FP
maint. free. $1,0000
(352) 422-1933

BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, Fresh paint, appl's
Flooring $475. mo.
352-302-3987
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/2,quiet,safe
area.Clean & newly
remodeled.$650
mo.1st/last/sec $400.
Call 352-489-1239
Cit.Hills/Brentwood
2/2/2 on golf course.
Club included $900/mo
516-991-5747
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 Sm cottage. Good
rental history a must.
1st/last/sec $400 + elec.
352-628-1062
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
W/ inground pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135


HERNANDO
2 bedroom. 2 bath single
family home with garage,
screened patio, & com-
munity pool/clubhouse
privileges. $875/month,
980-285-8125

HOMOSASSA
2/1 Duplex, $475;
3/2/2 House $635.
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 house, $700.
River Links Realty
352-628-1616

HOMOSASSA/SMW
2/2/2 FI rm, fireplace no
pets non-smoker. $800
mo. 1st last + sec dep
(850) 384-4859

Invern. Highlands
2/2/1, City Water Excel.
Loc. $675. 352-860-2554




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225

INVERNESS
2/2, Unfurn. waterfront
Lake Henderson, Ig
florida rm, Ig carport
w/work area, fire pit,
access to private boat
ramp. $750 mo. Call after
9am (352) 726-6320
Lake Front Home
on Gospel Island,
spectacular views
spacious 3/2/2,
For Rent, $700
or Sale (908) 322-6529




BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV & W/D
WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611

Citrus Hills/Condo
m/bd rm w/ba heated
Pool. $450 352-249-7804

CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfront Priv. Rm./Ba.
share kit. $400 everything
Included 352-875-5998


FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1 Furn.
$950. 352-419-4421




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site and a separate gated
storage lot; plus almost
new 5th-wheel with
slides, screened gazebo,
and storage building. All
for $79,900. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441
Fero Cemetery Beverly
Hills Two Plots Under Lrg
Shaded Oak Tree -
Row 251 Lots D & E
Only $2500 for Both
(1/2 Price) 352-364-4010


From mobiles to
mansions,
From Gulf to Lakes,
give me a call,
I sell 'em all!
352-422-4137
nancv.wilsona
vahoo.com

Nancy J. Wilson
Realtor@
Broker-Associate
SRES@GRI
Waybright Real Estate,
Inc.








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-3
MOTIVATED SELLER
wants this alone! !
6 Acres w Big SHOP,
Nice 2/2/2 House,
porches Barns, pond,
pvd rd, Concrete
drive. Reduced!
$114 900 MLS 357108.
www.crosslandrealty.
corn 352 726 6644

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY




Quiet Country Setting
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Dunnellon/Citrus Springs
area, only 20 Min. to
Ocala $132,000 Call
352-302-6784 for appt.

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial







Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND YOU
A VIEW TO LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.





I THIS OUT!
Brentwood of Citrus
Hills 2/2/2 Quiet
culdesac. Totally re-
modeled Hrwd
flrs,ceramic,cpt.
scrn lanai, Iscp yard.
Must see!
New on market FSBO
1816 W. Jena Ct
Lecanto OPEN
SAT&SUN 11-2
$97,500
NO agents please
610-248-2090

INVERNESS
Jan 6th 1p -4pm
3/2 Furnished,
Appl, Ig screen porch &
shed, great cond $16,000
911 Hoffmann Lane
Melody MH Park
(352) 364-3747


Beverly Hills 3 bedroom.
1 bath. OWNER FIN.
W/$5000 DN $822mo
NO CREDIT CK Just
remodeled,new roof, tile,
block, w/sep. 2car garage
(352) 793-7223




Lowest Priced Home
in ARBOR LAKES
**OPEN HOUSE**
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR &
Gated Comm. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista TrI
(352) 419-7418




INVERNESS
Block home 2br, 1ba
w/ 2porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres.
$130,000 Call Buzz
352-341-0224 or
David 607-539-7872




FLORAL CITY
3/2/1, quiet st, Lg. lot,
best offer -inspection
Sat, Sun fm 1 to 5,
Home will be sold Sun-
day night to highest
bidder 727-288-6020




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
W/ inground pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135
New & Customize 3/2
home on 6 acres.
Fenced in paddock.
(352)621-1236




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RFOMI
REALTY ONE

OWNER SACRIFICE
$100,000.4 yrs. Ago,
*Selling for $29.900*
CALL 352-564-0207
Forest View/Gated 55+

The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558


HOMOSASSA SPRINGS





2/2/2 Great Country
home on 2 % acre
landscaped lot, in great
neighborhood. Move in
Ready! Call for appt.
126K 352-503-6511






4/2/3 HEATED POOL
lots of extras!
SELLER MOTIVATED!
reduced to 210k
352-688-6500 or
352-212-5023










Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty,
Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503

PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws, there is room for
everything! 4/3 % w/7 car
garage/workshop & in-law
suite on 5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164


GAIL STEARNS
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298
Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available

HAPPY 2013!
I'm Selling
2 PROPERTIES
A WEEK
I NEED LISTINGS!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real EstateL...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


CRYSTAL RIVER No Flood Insuran,
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath Priced reduced frc
2 boat slips near KINGS $369,000 to $169,(
BAY $425,000. Make Call Bernie
Offers 352-563-9857 (352) 563-0116




HowDo



Youf



Your Da


Chronicle

Classifieds

In Print


YOUR "High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


Hme


tb


,/ .. .'

F' A/ g


& Online /




Cl IRON ICI.E 4CHoNCL



(352) 563-5966 Z VI]


Hme


-Heatherwood 581W
access to game reserve
& Tillus Hill, 2.42 Acres
well, septic, no impact
fees, $30,000 by
owner, sold as is
(352) 422-0435
1 ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact fee
credit, high and dry,
trees, $11,000 obo
(352) 795-3710


SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 Ell


Waterfront
Homes I









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NEED LAND AND A BIG HOUSE?
.i f hi d i.].^ 9., |.l .il 1 :. 1 .i l 1 1. h- I v



Mi 5 = I*1'/I $290,000
Call Vicki Root Realtoi Associate
352.212. 1926 o0 housescitius, gimail.com


1001 LOUNDS

I..wn ll c.l ;l Il..ll} lM.r A ll ...n ll. l ,II i.
Mi 5 = iiiiii:i: $69,000
Call Stelan Suat ,-'352 212 0211
ot Isaac Baylon ,'352 697 2493


l .. d n . ,. ..... .,j1. llt 1 1 i .



$95,000
Call Jim Mmo ton at 352 422 2173 lot
I out personal tout ol Emetald Hills


OPEN HOUSE TODAY: 1-3PM








12668 S. Pleasant Grove Rd. Floral Cily

* . ..... .I 1. 1



M.. = ?'.,i $375,000
Jeanne Pickiel 2123410


MEVEILY nILL*!
Hil* ll...u iI b i i ll h


Mi. =:i 1:1 $48.,900
loamine 0 Regan 5860075


ROOM TOS-P-R-E-A-D OUT
,:. i,(1 ; Hiinlf ;IT( I : '. : I....... I ,i.n. .., ,i

llIb H,.lh I I .... I.}II. H n.. .....] lh.... i .) .]
....)... .i. ] I. I I.. I.. ..l l.....
lt. -.i .. ASKING $248,900
Pa. Danis ,325221/2 1280
I'Iei hstings n1111 c2/1a.dan s cornm


.lin ..ij i .,ii :Ji.-ijI l Iau. .i. ha ,l.lu.
l.J ub i vi .J. O-ub i l l.. ll .. .j .l
h. j,Vl ll "l .. I.... lJ) J. .. I . 1 I .... IN

I.1. ;._ h..n. f |.Ju|J.. |J 11I.. I, ,,.llr
$75,000
Call Dois Mine .' 352 726 6668


h I I ,I ,i,,, d i ,,, 1,,',h I l I :, ,,,. ,, .. ,


MlN1 = il ASKING $148,900
PaI Dais ,3521212 /280
[',te hslipn c2/oda.ni is cornm


lb9,90U KEUGUIU!





, I I al l I.a.I,: n 3 4 1
Mal,y Parsons 352634 1213


I ii.h1 .,i ,: j i lIII l b INI l. lI'IIll .I l'l l
I_.. I l. .J .I... ,11". . i.in ,..J ...., .I
.hfj JJ h. Ihj h,.n. ,i |.jil
Ml.-. = %..0 ASKING $110,000
Call Casel Keatse 476.6549
to vie'w Itis warm lamild home


GREAT LOCATION FOR A DR'S OFFICE OR
MEDICAL LAB NEXT TO CITRUS MEMORIAL



Mli. 1= 3. ASKING $225,000
Call Jim Morton 422 2173 lot you tout


BRAND NEW INVERNESS
WATERFRONT HOME!

_ ,il ,.llv : I al .) vh.w a I. vtl


ASKING 199K
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


PRIME SUGARMILL WOODS
GOLF COURSE TOWNHOME


* 1.1 :1 l .1 -, :JI .i i i ii l . ,

OFFERED AT ONLY $63,500
Call Ehas G. Kiallah 352 400 2635


SECLUDED HOME ON OVER 1 ACF
* I..:.) : .) .! .] il, li ] ,i.:i i J A .:l.:. hf IPA l...;
v h phl plah.l R* [f. I- .d
* N .'.B fli,:n milli :. .l| l l. ni n.h .. h .I l.l ^ .il :.. I l l.h ni -l-i,: -

M I_ = 5.I_"11I $ 115,0 0 0 Ii0..l pi...i li.. li,:i l i.,i l, n,.
Jeanne 8 Willaid Pickiel 2123410 Mi = 3'.717 $264,500
I'tit'. ciluiscounti sold. corn Call Charles Kelly 352 422 2387


SNOWBIRD SPECIAL
.,fi I ..j .... I 'mJ.. .J.im ..a .J
l .....h. flull, l. j.J ,i.j rj.,,, H dl I ';l 1l

.h.. qlll..- i.j b .l .., i l I.jI -.h ujiN-n.h. J Th .. ,F

Ml .. = 3~ i34 $19,900
Pat Davis i3521 212 7280
View sting online c2lpatdar'is corn


INVERNESS TRIPLEX
I .j )l us Ih I li 01 IIb; i
i,: .1 I.:Jn: i .. I 1. ip II I..4.h .:..:.r.6
h l lb ; ,1 l ,J 1 .I, :ll l.jql j ll I.:.jl .l n.

Mi =-0 0)0 ASKING $240,000
Call Emil lupu lot youth personal tout
at 302 1713


GOLF & COUNTRY HOME
S. JIh(l : .1.. HI l l.z.hi 1...:.l. Ily ,hl.il l
S 11 :11:1 if fI,: J l i h.. 'i.: l\ H .i. l .: ..i .

Mi 5 = ; i .1y PRICED TO SELL S139,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


BEAUTIFUL CONTEMPORARY HOME
h ,-,h ,,, I lh ~d. l 'H .1 1 ,1 1 1

.l.l... hI h I I lll. I h .1 1 I I h il h l
I l I h- ll I-II I I h ll l ll l d I- ll l l I l
NMi; = S'*..' $159,900
C4 li i [ i h 33?635 w'i ti' peu o,,fai o toui


2/1/1 HIGHLANDS HOME
I llZ.. .l v.. il. jh.Il v In n l

$49,900
Tetij R. Blanco 352 419 9252


E12 SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013