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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 01-05-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02991

Full Text






TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
66 Mostly cloudy. Twenty
LOW percent chance of
56 showers. PAGE A4
wv PAGE A4


Back to work: Citrus, Lecanto resume rivalry /B1


CITR U-S CO U N T






SN www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


VOLUME 118 ISSUE 151


Property tax talks reach stalemate


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER -
Both sides in the Progress
Energy Florida tax dispute
met Friday in a negotiation
session brokered by Com-
missioner Joe Meek, but
the talks lasted less than
two hours and made no
headway
No further meetings are


planned, much to Meek's
chagrin.
"I'm very disappointed
there wasn't positive news
out of this meeting," said
Meek who, while bringing
both sides to the table,
neither attended the meet-
ing nor participated in
negotiations.
Citrus County Property
Appraiser Geoff Greene
said he refused Progress


Energy
Florida ... "
President
A 1 e x
Glenn's
request to -
negotiate
assess-
ments for Geoff
pollution- Greene
control property
equipment appraiser.
used in cal-
culating 2012 taxes.
Progress is suing Greene
over his method of assess-
ing pollution-control
equipment.


"I'm not
willing to
negotiate
_. pollution
control for
2 0 1 2 "
Greene
said. "I'll
Joe put every-
Meek thing on
county the table
commissioner. for 2013.
I'm not in a
position to go backwards."
Progress Energy spokes-
woman Suzanne Grant said
the company would not
comment on settlement ne-


gotiations. She said
Progress is committed to
further negotiations with
Greene.
Progress, Citrus County's
largest private employer
and taxpayer, is disputing
$1.3 billion in pollution-
control equipment in-
stalled in 2009. The
company relies on a state
law that says it should be
assessed as salvage, at 10
percent of its value.
Greene said a 1989 court
decision found that law
unconstitutional and his of-
fice assesses the equip-


ment at a higher value.
Progress in November
paid $19.3 million of the
$36 million that Citrus
County officials say is
owed, sending local gov-
ernments into a budgetary
tailspin.
Meek, the county com-
mission chairman and
president of the Citrus
County Economic Develop-
ment Council, said he
wanted to broker a discus-
sion between Greene and
Progress in the hopes of
See Page A2


CBO REPORT:
Cliff averted,
deficits loom
Fiscal cliff deal leaves in
place deficits averaging
more than $900 billion a
year, says Congressional
Budget Office./Page A5

NATIONAL SECURITY:
New term,
new team
Sen. Chuck Hagel is the
frontrunner for the top
Pentagon post in
Obama's reconfigured
national security team,
aides say./Page A5


Still helping
A former World War II
chaplain is joining the
fight to help today's
generation of fighting
men and women./
Page C1

STATE NEWS:
Sentencing
A U.S. Supreme Court
ruling on juvenile killers
is presenting some
thorny legal issues for
Florida judges./Page A3

WALL STREET:
Stocks up
H hiring figures,
cliff bill give
investors
hope./Page A7


NATION & WORLD:


Watching the birds


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Citrus County Audubon Society members, from left, Effie Smith; Fred Hileman, vice president; Mike Smith and Tom Gulley work as a team to spot
and identify as many species of birds as they can Friday in a designated area on the west side of Citrus County. In recent weeks, Audubon mem-
bers around the world have been conducting bird counts as part of the annual Christmas Bird Count.

Audubon Society volunteers scour the sky during annual Christmas Bird Count


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
As the early birds were heading
out to catch the worm, they no-
ticed strangers occupying their
woods.
Some sang along in harmony,
while others woke up on the
wrong side of the nest
It was a crisp, cool morning


with dampness in the air. How-
ever, that did not prevent eager
birders from wanting to catch a
glimpse of their feathered
friends.
Birders across Citrus County
and the nation spent Friday par-
ticipating in the National
Audubon Society's Christmas
Bird Count. Nationally, the bird
counts began Dec. 16 and con-


tinue through today, with thou-
sands of volunteers participating.
The count, launched in 1900,
brings people outdoors to count
birds instead of shooting them.
"The idea is to see how many
birds you get this year compared
to what you had last year and the
last few years," said 20-year bird
counter Mike Smith.
Locally, the Citrus County


Audubon Society set aside Friday
as its day to count Only two days
were available for the count,
since it is determined by the
tides.
"Tides are very important,"
Smith said. "You have to have the
proper tide for that. If the tide is
down, the birds will be out in the
See Page A2


Food safety
The Food and Drug
Administration
proposes the most
sweeping food safety
rules in decades./
Page A10


Comics . . . . .C8
Community ...... .C6
Crossword ........ C7
Editorial ......... A8
Entertainment ..... B6
Horoscope ........ B6
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies .......... .C8
Obituaries ....... .A5
Classifieds ....... .C9
TV Listings ....... C7


6 1 841578 2002! U


New York homes for elderly

under scrutiny after Sandy


Associated Press
NEW YORK A nursing home
and an assisted living facility are
under scrutiny by state officials
and an advocacy group after The
Associated Press disclosed that
hundreds of elderly and disabled
people forced to evacuate because
of superstorm Sandy were still
sleeping on cots in cramped and
sometimes oppressive conditions
almost two months later.
New York's attorney general
sent two investigators to the
Bishop Henry B. Hucles Episcopal
Rehabilitation and Skilled Nurs-
ing Center in Brooklyn last week
after the AP reported the home
was swollen to nearly double its
240-bed licensed capacity with
evacuees from the storm-damaged
Rockaway Care Center on the
Queens seashore.
As of Christmas, many of those
patients were still sleeping, field-
hospital style, on rows of cots


SUPERSTORM AID
* Congress rushes out $9.7
billion to help pay flood


insurance cla

squeezed into co
rehabilitation gy
home's tiny chap
The state's Off
Care Ombudsma
a representative
editions. State HE
officials were i:
vestigating how o
out of the facility
cold Friday night
a hospital two da
Separately, a
MFY Legal Serv
ing why disabled
dents of Belle I
adult care home
still being asked
of their monthly


Health department


sees increase in flu


Special to the Chronicle


ims./Page AIO The Citrus County Health De-
partment (CCHD) has seen an in-
crease in seasonal flu cases
immunity rooms, a throughout the past holiday
*m and the nursing season.
)el. Seasonal flu is an infection of the
fice of Long Term respiratory tract caused by the in-
n also dispatched fluenza virus. Compared with most
to check on con- other viral respiratory infections,
health Department such as the common cold, in-
ndependently in- fluenza infection often causes a
)ne patient walked more severe illness.
ty unnoticed on a "The most effective precautions
t, only to turn up at we can take to fight illness are get-
ays later ting vaccinated against the flu
legal aid group, virus and practicing good hy-
vices, is question- giene," CCHD Medical Director Dr
and elderly resi- Mary Ann Kolar said. "This season,
harbor Manor, an everyone 6 months and older
I in Queens, were should get vaccinated, even if they
to sign over most received a vaccine last season.
y Social Security With the holidays over and many
See Page A2 people traveling, these simple pre-


cautions lessen your risk of expo-
sure to the virus or transmission to
others."
Be sure to watch for symptoms of
influenza, such as headache, fever,
cough, body aches or extreme
tiredness.
The Florida Department of
Health urges the following preven-
tive steps for the flu:
Get re-vaccinated every flu
season because flu viruses change
each year.
If you are sick with a flu-like
illness, stay home for at least 24
hours after your fever is gone, ex-
cept to get medical care. Your fever
should be gone without the use of
fever-reducing medicine.
If you have a chronic illness, or
are pregnant, contact your health
care provider if you have an illness
that might be influenza. You may

See Page A2


CERTIFIED
SALES EVENT




See Page 012

VILLAGE TOYOTA
CRYSTAL RIVER


Negotiations with Greene,

Progress lead nowhere





A2 SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 2013


SANDY
Continued from Page Al

checks to the facility to
cover room and board even
though they have been
flooded out of their rooms
since Halloween.
After the storm, those res-
idents were sent to an emer-
gency shelter, then to an
overcrowded hotel, and fi-
nally to a halfway house for
the mentally ill. During that
time, many residents have
continued to pay rent to
Belle Harbor Manor
"We haven't had any serv-
ices in the last three
months. But he has been
getting our rent. What I
want to know is, 'Where is
this money going?'" asked
resident Alex Woods, 57.
"After what we went
through, he should be pay-
ing us."
MFY senior lawyer Shelly
Weizman said it isn't clear
whether residents are
legally obligated to keep
paying when they have ef-
fectively been evicted by the
storm.
At Belle Harbor and many
other adult care homes in
New York, residents sign an
agreement when they first
arrive that obligates them to
turn over their Social Secu-
rity checks to the facility,
which uses most of the
money to cover housing and
care. Administrators return a
small portion to the residents
in the form of an allowance.
Now, Weizman said, "they
are paying, but they aren't
getting the services. It is a
confusing situation."
Residents got their latest
benefit checks on Jan. 3. A
few did decide to withhold
their January rent payment,
which for many residents
was around $1,200, Weizman
said.



BIRDS
Continued from Page Al

Gulf and you can't get them
in to count them."
With approximately 140
species of birds recorded
last year in Citrus County, 43
birders split into 10 groups
spread across a 15-mile ra-
dius with the center
being the Crystal River Air-
port to record the differ-
ent species of birds in the
county.
Birders used binoculars,
cameras and spotting
scopes to maintain a calcu-
lation along the western re-
gion of the county.
The National Audubon
Society and other organiza-
tions use the data collected
in the census as a means to
establish the health of bird
populations as well as to as-
sist direct conservation
actions.
Traveling road by road,
birders spent the day count-
ing the diverse species in
designated areas. Once the
day was over, all 10 groups
joined together in Beverly
Hills to compile their find-
ings. A recorder noted the
findings and then sends the
totals to headquarters.
Birders find the annual
count an enjoyable experi-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
The Bishop Henry B. Hucles Episcopal Rehabilitation and
Skilled Nursing Center in the Bedford Stuyvesant section of
Brooklyn, N.Y., was swollen to nearly double its licensed ca-
pacity by elderly and disabled New Yorkers it took in after
they were evacuated from seaside nursing homes and as-
sisted living residences following superstorm Sandy.


The phone rang unan-
swered Friday in the admin-
istrative office at Belle
Harbor Manor, as it has
since the storm. The presi-
dent of the nonprofit com-
pany that controls the home,
Samuel Aschkenazi, de-
clined to talk with the AP
and referred questions to
another board member, who
didn't return messages or
answer his telephone. The
home's accountant also did
not return calls.
A spokeswoman for Epis-
copal Health Services,
which owns the Bishop Hu-
cles nursing home, said ad-
ministrators expect the
state will give the Rockaway
Care Center approval to re-
open in about a week, clear-
ing the way for patients to
return.
In the meantime, the
number of evacuees staying
at Bishop Hucles has
dropped from 187 to 136,
said the spokeswoman,
Penny Chin. She said that
the state Health Depart-
ment had been aware from
the start that the nursing
home had taken on so many
extra patients, and had ap-


ence, with opportunities to
discover new birds.
"I really enjoy it," said
Citrus County Audubon So-
ciety Vice President Fred
Hileman. "You get out and
are with great people. I'm
always on the lookout for
another new bird to add to
my personal life list that I
keep. We all have one. I
have added a lot since I
have been in Florida for the
last two years. The members
of the Audubon are all after
the same thing a bird."
Hileman and his three
team members covered an
area between U.S. 19 from
Bluebird Springs in Ho-
mosassa south toward Car-
dinal Street.
"He likes to bird because
he likes for me to take the
pictures and then make him
videos," said 20-year birder
Effie Smith about her hus-
band, Mike Smith. "When
his knees hurt so bad that he
can't stand it, he likes to go
lie down and watch the
videos with music."
Effie began making "shh,
shh, shh" sounds with her
mouth. Known as phishing,
it is a technique birders uti-
lize to awaken birds for ob-
servation.
"What she is doing there
is phishing," Hileman said.
"It is terminology that we
use to kind of attract some


proved the situation.
More than 6,200 people
were evacuated from 47
nursing and adult care
homes because of the Oct.
29 storm, according to state
health officials. At least
hundreds are still dis-
placed, living in different
nursing homes or other tem-
porary facilities.
Several of the Belle Har-
bor evacuees, who are a mix
of the elderly and people
with mild psychiatric disor-
ders, told the AP that they
have found the staff at the
halfway house kindly, but
the setting isolating and
overly restrictive. They can-
not have visitors in their
rooms. Most haven't been
able to retrieve their be-
longings from Belle Harbor
It was unclear when resi-
dents might return to Belle
Harbor, which is undergo-
ing a gut renovation and re-
placing heating, electrical
and fire suppression sys-
tems ruined in the flood.
New York City's Buildings
Department inspected it
Friday and concluded that
the work was about halfway
done.


birds. Birds will come up
and listen to what you are
doing. They are curious."
Friday's count did not
produce any first finds but
some of the species ob-
served and counted by the
group include the common
American robin, cardinal,
red wing, downie wood-
pecker, marsh wrens, vul-
tures and wood ducks.
Birders also used sound-
making devices to mimic
specific species to lure them
in for counting. Hileman
carried his phone with an
application that made vari-
ous bird chirps and tweets.
Hileman said he will con-
tinue to participate in the
annual counts.
"It's a wonderful manage-
ment tool," he said.
Chronicle reporter Eryn
Worthington can be con-
tacted at 352-563-5660, ext.
1334, or eworthington@
chronicleonline. com.







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TALKS
Continued from Page Al

thwarting a costly and time-
consuming lawsuit.
"My hope and intent was
to facilitate a meeting with
both of the parties to find
common ground and seek
resolution on this issue,"
Meek said.
Meek said he met indi-
vidually with both Greene
and Glenn to learn, in a
broad way, what each side
could discuss. He said he
did not ask for details nor
wished to get involved in
the negotiations.
The meeting was Friday
in the Orlando offices of
Tom Cloud, Greene's attor-
ney in the Progress lawsuit
Along with Greene and
Glenn, both sides included
experts and attorneys.
Greene did not invite Bill
Keith, a former Progress
tax official who is Greene's
consultant who oversees
the Progress Energy tax re-
turn for his office. Greene
said Keith was available by
phone if needed.
"I hoped we were going
to have some fruitful dis-
cussions," Greene said. "I
was cautiously optimistic
going down there. They
thought we were bringing
an offer I don't know where
that came from. We were
going there to listen."
Greene downplayed
Meek's role in setting up
the session, saying only that
Meek asked Greene to pro-
vide Glenn with a potential
meeting.



FLU
Continued from Page Al

benefit from treatment
with prescription antiviral
medication.
Cover your nose and
mouth with a tissue when
you cough or sneeze. Throw
the tissue in the trash after
you use it. Avoid touching
your eyes, nose and mouth.
Germs spread this way
Wash your hands often
throughout the day, whether


I'm very disappointed. I
sincerely hope and desire we're
able to come to some resolution.
It's in the best interest in this
county and community ...

Joe Meek
county commissioner.


Greene said while he and
Glenn found common
ground on some minor
points, neither side budged
from their positions
on the pollution-control
assessment.
"Nothing really jelled,"
he said. "Nothing came to
fruition."
Before leaving, Greene
said he handed Glenn a
letter demanding access
in the coming weeks to
the Progress Energy com-
plex north of Crystal
River and other locales
for Greene's office to con-
duct a thorough assess-
ment for 2013.
The letter states his real
estate team will require
eight days between Jan. 14
and Feb. 1 to inspect the
coal plants, nuclear facility
and pollution-control
equipment.
"Please let me know
which days that you will
have your knowledgeable
staff available and be able
to provide full access to
the assets," the letter
states.
The county commission
and school board are split-
ting the cost of litigation
and the new assessment,


you are sick or not, with soap
and water If soap and water
are not available, use an al-
cohol-based hand sanitizer
Chronic illnesses that
put you at risk for more se-
vere influenza and compli-
cations, no matter how old
you are, include: diabetes,
heart disease, asthma, em-
physema, chronic obstruc-
tive pulmonary disease
(COPD), cancer, and neuro-
logical and developmental
disorders. People who are
obese are also at increased
risk of severe influenza.


though members of both
boards say they want a
close watch on the money
spent.
Both boards voted in
early December to spend
up to $175,000 each in at-
torney and expert costs.
School board members
since have questioned the
need for an equal split
since the tax fallout a net
of about $2.5 million is
far below the county's $7.5
million loss.
Meek said before he
would support further
county backing, he wants
Greene to show he is mak-
ing attempts to settle with
Progress.
He said he was hoping
Friday's meeting would
have started that process in
earnest.
"I'm very disappointed,"
Meek said. "I sincerely
hope and desire we're able
to come to some resolution.
It's in the best interest in
this county and community
to have a strong partner-
ship with Progress Energy.
I'm not saying the valuation
is right or wrong. I'd like to
see us settle this without
going through an expensive
legal battle."


To locate flu vaccine,
contact your health care
provider or visit these
links: www.flu.gov/where
youlive/index.html or
www. doh.state.fl.us/
Disease_ctrl/immune/flu/
flu locatorhtm.
For more information,
visit the state Department of
Health website at www.doh.
state.fl.us or the county
health department at www.
citruscountyhealth.org.

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Page A3 SATURDAY, JANUARY 5,2013



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Couny BRIEFS Courts facing juvenile sentencing issues


Sign cards for
Sandy Hook
Howard's Flea Market has
donated Space No. 18 on its
main aisle today to a young
student who has created sym-
pathy cards for the families of
those devastated by the Sandy
Hook Elementary School
shooting in Connecticut.
The student, who created
the cards herself, is asking
for members of the public to
stop by between 9 a.m. and
3 p.m. today and sign the
cards so that she can send
them to families.
Howard's is at 6373 S.
Suncoast Blvd. (U.S. 19) in
Homosassa. For more infor-
mation, call the flea market at
352-628-4656.
Workshop set for
County Road 491
Citrus County is preparing
a planning study for a corridor
segment of North Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491).
The segment, designated
as the CR-491 Corridor Plan-
ning Project, extends from
State Road 44 north to
County Road 486. The study
will identify needed infrastruc-
ture improvements to provide
a strategic planning approach
to guide development along
the corridor and its future
widening. The study will in-
clude travel necessities, public
water and sewer amenities,
comprehensive stormwater
management systems, and
other essential utility services.
Residents are invited to
participate in a community
workshop to discuss the
major infrastructure issues
and challenges.
The workshop is sched-
uled from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Jan.
31 at the Lecanto Govern-
ment Building, 3600 W. Sov-
ereign Path, Room 280,
Lecanto. Call Jenette Collins,
AICP, at 352-527-5239 or
email Jenette.Collins@
bocc.citrus.fl.us.
Author to speak
to Republicans
Mauguerite Cavenaugh will
speak about her award-win-
ning book, "Buzz Your Busi-
ness & Be The Best," at 1
p.m. at the Jan. 5 meeting of
the Ronald Reagan Republi-
can Assembly, 938 N. Sun-
coast Blvd. (U.S. 19), Crystal
River, in the South Square
Plaza. Books will be available
for purchase and refresh-
ments provided. Call 352-
257-5381. CASA donations
accepted.
Port Authority
to meet Jan. 8
The Citrus County Port Au-
thority will meet at 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 8, in the Citrus
County Courthouse, Room
100, at 110 N. Apopka Ave.,
Inverness. This meeting is
open to the public.
Library Friends
plan sweet event
On Tuesday, Jan. 8, the
Lakes Library Friends will
host a special program titled
"In Pursuit of Chocolate Ex-
cellence Nobody Knows
the Truffles I've Seen."
Chocolate expert Greg
Sedbrook will present a his-
tory of chocolate, its origin and
development as a favorite
sweet, varieties, health bene-
fits and recipes. Samples of
different kinds of chocolate will
be available for tasting.
The public is invited to at-
tend this free program in the
Lake Library Community
Room at 1511 Druid Road,
Inverness. The program be-
gins right after a brief Lakes
Library Friends annual meet-
ing and installation of officers
10:30 a.m. For information,
call Marcia at 726-3828.
Republican clubs
to host speaker
Nature Coast Republican
Club and Citrus Republican
Womens Club will conduct a
monthly meeting Saturday,
Jan. 12: coffee at 8:30 a.m.,
meeting at 9, at American Le-


gion Post 155, Crystal River.
Linda Powers will present
"Status of our Schools." Call
352-746-2545 for information.
-From staff reports


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE A U.S.
Supreme Court ruling that
struck down laws requiring
automatic life sentences
without parole for juvenile
killers is presenting some
thorny legal issues for
Florida judges.
That includes an appel-
late court that split over


how to apply the decision to
a Jacksonville case Friday
A three-judge panel of the
1st District Court of Appeal
unanimously upheld
Thomas Partlow's murder
conviction but ordered a
new sentencing hearing.
Partlow was 16 years old
when he fatally stabbed a
man after robbing him of $3
three years ago.


By a 2-1 vote, though, the
panel declined to offer the
trial judge any guidance.
That part of the ruling
pleased Partlow's lawyers.
"This is the remedy we
have been looking for," said
Assistant Public Defender
Glen Gifford.
The high court last year in
a pair of cases from Alabama
and Arkansas decided


mandatory life sentences
without parole for juveniles
constitute cruel and unusual
punishment and, thus, are
unconstitutional. Judges
must consider age and other
factors when sentencing ju-
venile killers, the majority
said in the 5-4 decision.
Most states, including
Florida, required life with-
out parole for certain types


of murder if juvenile defen-
dants were prosecuted as
adults.
The ruling could affect
more than 260 cases in
Florida, according to the ad-
vocacy group Fair Sentenc-
ing of Youth, if it's
determined to be retroac-
tive. That's another issue
Florida courts are tussling
with.


Clerk of Courts Betty Strifler retires


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Citrus County Clerk of Courts Betty Strifler is greeted Friday afternoon by Circuit Court Judge Ric Howard at a retirement reception in Inver-
ness in honor of Strifler's 24 years of service as clerk. The staff and leadership of the Clerk of Courts Office had the reception in honor of their
boss. Judge Howard, who has worked with Strifler for many years, said, "Betty Strifler's well-earned retirement is a sad passing to Citrus
County because she represents the old style clerk, which is class and a quiet confidence. She couples that with the new-age technology she's
been spearheading so we're losing a great clerk. But, we're looking forward to Angela Vick taking the ball and bringing it to the next level be-
cause Angela is an outstanding clerk, also." Dozens of friends, co-workers and associates stopped by the Old Courthouse to visit with Strifler.


Around the STATE


Ocala


Panama City


Deputies say woman
shot, killed her baby
Authorities say a 20-year-old
woman shot her infant son and
then turned the gun on herself.
The Marion County Sheriff's
Office reported that 6-month-
old Jonah Mendoza was pro-
nounced dead Friday
afternoon. His mother, Melanie
Reyes, was in critical condition
at an area hospital.
The Ocala Star-Banner re-
ported a relative of the mother
saw a Facebook posting con-
cerning the woman and a sui-
cide. The relative called
authorities, and deputies went
to the home of the young
woman's parents, which is
where the young woman and
her baby lived.
Deputies arrived about
11:15 a.m. to find the woman
and baby in a back bedroom.
No one else was home.
A handgun was recovered.
Investigators were processing
the shooting scene.

Tampa
Officials discuss
gun violence
Two Tampa Bay lawmakers
are proposing solutions to gun
violence in the wake of the
Connecticut school shooting.
A Hillsborough County com-
missioner wants an annual gun
buyback program and a yearly
memorial for victims of gun
violence.
The Tampa Tribune reported
commissioner Kevin Beckner
will make a proposal next week.
Under his plan, money to buy
weapons would come from an
annual county allocation plus
local business support.
In St. Petersburg, Council-
man Steve Kornell will propose
next week to support a lobbying
effort with state and federal offi-
cials for increased gun control,
including reinstating a national
ban on assault-type weapons.
Kornell said he wants to ban
military-style weapons as well
as create laws that make it
easier to prosecute people
who illegally purchase guns for
others.


failed, as well as numerous
ballot-scanning errors and


Inmate pleads guilty missing logs of ballots.
in $50,000 gov't scam
Land O'Lakes


A prison inmate has pleaded
guilty to stealing more than
$50,000 from the government
by using the identities of other
inmates for false tax returns.
The News-Herald of
Panama City reported Michael
William Joseph III pleaded
guilty to 41 charges including
stealing government money,
mail fraud and false tax returns
on Thursday.
He is scheduled for a March
20 sentencing hearing where
he faces up to 20 years in
prison on the mail fraud charge.
Investigators said he submit-
ted nearly $180,000 in false
tax return claims from 2006
through 2008 while incarcer-
ated at the Apalachee Correc-
tional Institute in Sneads.
The government paid
$51,298 of the claims. Investi-
gators said they recovered
$17,000 from his bank account
and $11,600 buried in his
mother's back yard in Tampa.

W. Palm Beach

St. Lucie elections
procedures probed
A state report says election
staff inexperience and inade-
quate procedures fueled vote-
counting problems in one of
the country's most-watched
congressional races.
The report out Friday from
the Department of State fo-
cuses on St. Lucie County,
where Allen West and Patrick
Murphy battled in the country's
most expensive House race.
The razor-thin contest gave
way to two weeks of recounts,
court fights and allegations
that votes weren't properly
counted.
Murphy was ultimately de-
clared the winner of the race,
unseating West, a first-term
hero of the tea party move-
ment. But it came after many
allegations of electoral malfea-
sance by supporters of West.
The Department of State re-
view found at least four inci-
dences in which St. Lucie
voting machine memory cards


Deputies arrest man
accused in shooting
Pasco County Sheriff's
deputies have arrested a 25-
year-old man accused of
shooting another man in the
face with a BB gun in a Wal-
mart parking lot.
Authorities said Daniel P.
Quinnell asked the unidentified
24-year-old if he was from the
Middle East and if he was
Muslim.
Officials say the man said no
to both questions before Quin-
nell pulled out a BB gun
Wednesday and fired at least
20 shots at the man and his
girlfriend.
The man was treated at the
scene, while his girlfriend was
not hurt.
Quinnell was arrested late
Thursday and charged with ag-
gravated battery.
Detectives in Pasco County
said they received several tips
after releasing video and pho-
tos of the attacker, including
one he was staying at a hotel
near Interstate 75.

Naples
Two juvenile panther
deaths discovered
Two juvenile Florida pan-
thers have been killed, continu-
ing a trend that led to record
mortality rates in 2012.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
reported the remains of a
7-month-old female were col-
lected Tuesday in Hendry
County, and the remains of a
10-month-old male were found
Thursday in Collier County.
Experts estimate the popula-
tion to be 160 juveniles and
breeding adults and said the
increase in road kills is due
mostly to an increase in pan-
ther numbers.
Also in 2012, biologists re-
ported some good panther
news: 15 radio-collared fe-
males gave birth to 40 kittens.
-From wire reports


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
James Bussiere and Krysteen McCray welcomed son Clay-
ton Bussiere into the world at 8 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 3, at
Citrus Memorial Health System the first baby of 2013
born in Citrus County. The 8-pound, 8 1/2-ounce, 21-inch-
long baby boy is McCray's fourth child and the couple's first.
The family lives in Inverness.



Three dead after plane


hits house near airport


Associated Press

PALM COAST At least
three people were dead
after a small plane crashed
into a house Friday after-
noon while trying to land at
a central Florida airport,
the Florida Highway Patrol
reported.
The 1957 Beechcraft H35
Bonanza was heading from
Fort Pierce to Knoxville,
Tenn., when it began expe-
riencing mechanical prob-
lems, FHP Lt. Justin Asbury
said. The pilot told con-
trollers the engine was
shaky and there was smoke
coming from the plane. The
plane was also entering bad
weather
The Flagler County Sher-
iff's Office reported the
plane hit a Palm Coast home
just east of the Flagler
County Airport around 2:20
p.m., several minutes after
the pilot's call.
Robert Ferrigno, who


lives down the street, said
he heard the crash from his
home.
"Planes go over here all
the time, but this afternoon,
I heard, 'putt, putt, putt,' and
then I heard, 'boom,"' Fer-
rigno said. "I looked out-
side, and there were flames
shooting up over the trees."
Ferrigno and another
neighbor, Armando Gonza-
lez, ran down the street to
the crash site.
The home's owner -
identified by FHP as Susan
Crockett was already out-
side when they arrived,
screaming that a plane had
crashed into her house.
"The house was in flames,
and there were explosions -
boom, boom, boom inside
the house," Gonzalez said.
He said the tail appeared to
be sticking out of the roof of
the single-story ranch home.
Authorities didn't imme-
diately identify the people
on the plane.


New year, new baby






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Man faces 23 child


porn charges

Chronicle who is being detained at the
Citrus County Detention
An Inverness man ar- Facility, now faces 23 counts
rested last April on charges of possession of child
of using the Internet pornography
to lure a child for The new charges
sex acts, lewd/lasciv- stem from two
ious exhibition live I videos and numer-
over the Internet ous thumbnails
and transmitting found on his com-
child pornography is puter that show
facing 23 new children performing
charges as a result sexual acts.
of a forensic exam Dale A law enforce-
on his computer, ac- Heath Jr. ment officer con-
cording to his arrest tacted him at the jail and
affidavit, informed him of the new
Dale Heath Jr., 34, of South charges. His total bond for
Nolen Terrance, Inverness, all charges is $20,500.

For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic
battery arrest
Connie Beal, 62, of Dun-
nellon, at 5:29 p.m. Thursday
on a misdemeanor charge of
domestic battery. No bond.
DUI arrest
Norman Anderson, 51, of
East Bard Court, Inverness, at
10:40 p.m. Tuesday on misde-
meanor charges of driving
under the influence and driving
while license suspended or re-
voked. According to his arrest
affidavit, he was driving an SUV
pulling a boat on a trailer, which
did not have trailer lights, in the
area of North Little John Av-
enue in Inverness when he was
pulled over. When a law en-
forcement officer approached
him, he was slumped over in
the driver's seat and unrespon-
sive. Then he responded to the
officer and at one point said he
had consumed "a few beers"
that day. He had difficulty per-


forming field sobriety tasks and
refused to submit to a test of his
breath. Bond $10,500.
Other arrest
Richard Miller, 18, at
7:03 p.m. Wednesday on a mis-
demeanor charge of posses-
sion of less than 20 grams of
cannabis and a Citrus County
warrant for failure to appear in
court for an original misde-
meanor charge of driving while
license suspended or revoked.
Bond $5,000.
Burglaries
A residential burglary was
reported at 5:57 p.m. Thursday,
Jan. 3, in the 500 block of N.E.
16th Court, Crystal River.
A residential burglary was
reported at 6:40 p.m. Jan. 3 in
the 300 block of South Blvd.,
Inverness.
Vandalism
A vandalism was reported
at 9:52 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 3,
in the 4600 block of N. Carl G.
Rose Highway, Hernando.


Red-light camera repeal filed


Report states crashes down where devices used


News Service of Florida

TALLAHASSEE A
South Florida lawmaker
filed legislation Friday to
repeal the law allowing the
use of red-light cameras,
following a report earlier
this week stating intersec-
tions where they're used
have seen drops in crashes
in most places.
Rep. Daphne Campbell,
D-Miami, filed legislation
Friday seeking to end the
use of the cameras, saying
they unfairly dole out tickets
to people who can't defend
themselves, noting that mal-
functioning cameras can't be
cross-examined.
Meanwhile, the Depart-
ment of Highway Safety
and Motor Vehicles re-
leased a report Thursday
showing that crashes were
less frequent at intersec-
tions with the camera,
based on data from 73 agen-


cies. The report said acci-
dents were less frequent in
intersections with cameras
in 41 jurisdictions but up in
such intersections in 11 ju-
risdictions.
The rest of the 73 juris-
dictions where they are in
use didn't have the data,
and the state didn't say
what the overall numbers
were in the report.
Since state law was
changed in 2010 to allow
local governments to use the
cameras to catch red-light
runners, they've been under
attack A repeal effort was
mounted starting the very
next year in the Legislature.
Campbell's legislation
(HB 91) would repeal the
state law that authorizes
their use. The law also sets
out how the money from
such tickets is allocated.
Before there was a state
law, some local jurisdic-
tions used them, but there


was considerable confusion
about whether they were
legal. Even since the law
has been passed, their use
has continued to be chal-
lenged in court.
"The red-light camera
companies exploit victims
to push Florida laws to gain
millions," Campbell said in
a statement. "People are
presumed guilty by the pic-
ture of the camera."
The Florida League of
Cities, however, said Friday
that keeping the cameras is
a top priority.
"Providing cities with the
tools they need to keep res-
idents safe is the Florida
League of Cities No. 1 pri-
ority, and this technology
has been proven to help au-
thorities punish lawbreak-
ers, reduce dangerous
T-bone crashes and change
the behavior of those driv-
ers who selfishly choose to
run red lights," the league


said in a statement
Local governments don't
want to lose their share of
the revenue from the $158
fines paid by people caught
on red light cameras, but
also said their law enforce-
ment budgets are strained
and the cameras help them
enforce laws they other-
wise wouldn't be able to.
"While the data in this re-
port suggests a significant
positive effect on traffic
safety, the Florida League of
Cities believes the govern-
ment closest to the people
governs best, and nobody
knows a city better than its
residents," the league's
statement said. "Some mu-
nicipalities have determined
that red light running is not
a problem in their commu-
nity and have chosen not to
install traffic infraction de-
tectors. Other cities, after
holding public hearings and
listening to concerned citi-
zens, have determined that
red light safety cameras will
make their streets safer"


Legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle







Self Storage



Notices....................C1 2


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
sh
pc
pc
sh
pc
c
c
sh
sh


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


New Orleans 56 41 pc 59 46
New York City 37 30 s 38 31
Norfolk 46 26 s 47 36
Oklahoma City 47 22 s 50 27
Omaha 36 12 pc 32 14
Palm Springs 63 38 s 67 39
Philadelphia 40 30 s 38 29
Phoenix 62 41 s 63 42
Pittsburgh 32 26 pc 33 26
Portland, ME 34 9 s 28 15
Portland, Ore 42 34 .02 r 45 36
Providence, R.I. 37 23 s 37 23
Raleigh 51 26 s 52 37
Rapid City 40 11 pc 36 20
Reno 33 12 c 31 20
Rochester, NY 34 27 pc 30 24
Sacramento 57 30 c 57 41
St. Louis 41 24 pc 43 26
St. Ste. Marie 33 25 .02 sn 26 23
Salt Lake City 20 7 pc 27 15
San Antonio 44 38 .14 sh 53 37
San Diego 65 43 s 64 47
San Francisco 55 40 c 57 46
Savannah 58 43 s 62 44
Seattle 50 36 .26 r 45 39
Spokane 27 8 c 32 27
Syracuse 35 28 s 30 21
Topeka 43 14 pc 39 18
Washington 46 27 s 42 33
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 83 Marathon, Fla. LOW -34 Alamosa,
Colo.
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 88/73/pc Madrid
Amsterdam 48/45/c Mexico City
Athens 55/44/pc Montreal
Beijing 20/5/s Moscow
Berlin 46/43/c Paris
Bermuda 66/60/pc Rio
Cairo 65/49/pc Rome
Calgary 33/25/s Sydney
Havana 84/69/pc Tokyo
Hong Kong 68/59/pc Toronto
Jerusalem 51/45/sh Warsaw


54/51/c
49/47/c
52/32/s
69/45/pc
16/10/s
23/19/c
43/39/c
83/73/ts
54/44/pc
88/65/pc
40/32/pc
30/29/c
35/32/sf


F'cast
pc
sh
sh
c
sh
c
sh
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northeast winds around 10 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have light. Mostly cloudy
with a chance of showers today.


2 53trace 59 52 0.20

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exusive daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
i High: 66 Low: 56
^^ a Mostly cloudy; 20% chance of
sprinkles/shower
SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 75 Low: 54
SCloudy with rain showers likely

1 MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 68 Low: 54
Clearing skies; breezy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 60/50
Record 84/16
Normal 70/42
Mean temp. 55
Departure from mean -1
PRECIPITATION*
Friday trace
Total for the month trace
Total for the year trace
Normal for the year 0.35 in.
*As of 7 p mrn at Inverness
UV INDEX: 3
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.23 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 93
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, Elm
Today's count: 9.3/12
Sunday's count: 7.0
Monday's count: 8.5
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
1/5 SATURDAY 11:42 5:29 5:55
1/6 SUNDAY 12:05 6:19 12:33 6:47
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


0
JAN. 26


FEB. 3


SUNSET TONIGHT 5:47 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:25 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY .........................12:46 A.M.
MOONSET TODAYM .......................... 12:22 P.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
informationon drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 11:22 a/7:00 a 11:17 p/6:49 p
Crystal River** 9:43 a/4:22 a 9:38 p/4:11 p
Withlacoochee* 7:30 a/2:10 a 7:25 p/1:59 p
Homosassa*** 10:32 a/5:59 a 10:27 p/5:48 p


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
12:59 p/8:18a -- /7:59 p
11:20 a/5:40 a 10:40 p/5:21 p
9:07 a/3:28 a 8:27 p/3:09 p
12:09 p/7:17 a 11:29 p/6:58 p


Gulf water
temperature


63
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.97 NA 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.23 NA 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 39.22 NA 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.57 NA 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


City


Albany 37 18 s 27 20
Albuquerque 34 11 s 40 19
Asheville 42 27 pc 49 29
Atlanta 51 30 pc 51 40
Atlantic City 39 28 s 39 30
Austin 45 37 .13 sh 53 35
Baltimore 42 23 s 40 29
Billings 38 24 s 37 20
Birmingham 51 26 pc 50 35
Boise 22 3 pc 24 17
Boston 38 21 s 37 22
Buffalo 33 27 pc 31 26
Burlington, VT 36 16 s 21 10
Charleston, SC 57 35 s 61 43
Charleston, WV 36 30 pc 44 29
Charlotte 51 22 s 53 36
Chicago 36 13 sn 35 27
Cincinnati 39 29 pc 38 30
Cleveland 28 24 sn 33 29
Columbia, SC 56 34 s 56 41
Columbus, OH 32 25 sn 33 28
Concord, N.H. 36 -3 s 29 15
Dallas 50 39 s 50 33
Denver 47 12 pc 41 13
Des Moines 35 12 pc 34 14
Detroit 29 22 sn 30 28
El Paso 34 28 .03 s 44 24
Evansville, IN 37 21 pc 38 28
Harrisburg 39 32 s 34 24
Hartford 39 20 s 36 20
Houston 50 43 sh 56 40
Indianapolis 29 18 pc 34 26
Jackson 53 29 sh 54 36
Las Vegas 51 30 s 53 38
Little Rock 48 26 pc 48 29
Los Angeles 66 46 s 65 49
Louisville 41 28 pc 39 30
Memphis 49 26 pc 49 33
Milwaukee 30 13 pc 32 25
Minneapolis 30 15 pc 24 10
Mobile 58 34 pc 59 38
Montgomery 58 28 pc 54 39
Nashville 47 21 pc 45 30
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


C I T R U S.


C 0 U N TY


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


CHRONICLE
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Friday Saturday Friday Saturday
H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


o*
JAN.11 JAN.18


I-


A4 SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 2013


LOCAI/STATE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Chester
Van Orden, 80
LECANTO
Chester Van Orden, 80, of
Lecanto, Fla., passed away
Jan. 2, 2013. Private burial
took place Friday, Jan. 4,
2013 at Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell.
Arrangements were under
the direction of Brown
Funeral Home & Crematory
in Lecanto.

Theresa 'Terry'
Brienza, 96
INVERNESS
Theresa "Terry" Brienza,
96, Inverness, died Jan. 3,
2013. Entombment in Fern-
cliff Cemetery, Oceanside,
N.Y Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home.





Louise
Matson, 92
INVERNESS
Louise Emma Matson, 92,
died Jan. 2, 2013, under the
loving care of her family,
Hospice of Citrus County
and the staff of Arbor Trail
Rehab and
Nursing
C Center.
Louise was
born Dec.
25, 1920, in
Anchor, Ill.,
to the late
Emile and
Louise Anna Stein-
Matson licht She
served our country in the
United States Coast Guard.
Louise was employed as an
accountant for Procter and
Gamble's Gillette Division.
She was a lifetime member
of the VFW 4337 of Inver-
ness, Elks Club, Moose Club
and was a volunteer for the
Citrus County Library Sys-
tem. She also enjoyed her
membership in the Citrus
County Quilting Group.
Left to cherish her mem-
ory are her children, Melvin
E. (Dottie) Matson, Greg E.
Matson, all of Weymouth,
Mass., Carl R. Matson,
Inverness; Signian (Ken-
neth) McGeary, Cheshire,
Conn., Janice E. Matson,
Marlborough, Mass., Linda
M. Honneus, Marshfield,
Mass.; six grandchildren
and nine great-grandchil-
dren. She was preceded in
death by her husband,
Melvin S. Matson, Jan. 30,
2000, and her sisters, Viola
and Margaret
A celebration tribute of
her life will be at 1 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013, at
the Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory, with
Pastor Tom Beaverson offi-
ciating. Burial with military
honors will follow at Florida
National Cemetery. The
family requests memorial
donations in her name to ei-
ther Hospice of Citrus
County, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464 or
the Ladies Auxiliary to the
Veterans of Foreign Wars of
the United States in lieu of
flowers.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Agnes
Baro, 70
INVERNESS
Dr Agnes L. Baro, 70, of
Inverness, Fla., passed
away Jan. 4,2013, at Hospice
of Citrus County in Lecanto.
Arrangements by McGan
Cremation Service LLC,
Hernando.

Timothy
Marrone Sr., 71
BROOKSVILLE
Timothy M. Marrone Sr.,
71 of Brooksville, Fla., died
Jan. 4, 2013, at his home.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness.


To Place Your

S"In Memory" ad,

Saralynne


Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller@chronicleonline.com


Maurice
McDaniel, 66
MIAMI
Maurice McDaniel, 66, of
Miami, formerly of Inver-
ness, died Dec. 21, 2012, in
Miami. A native of Macon,
Ga., he was born Sept. 25,
1946, to the
late John
and Buena
Vista Purvis
McDaniel
S and had
been a resi-
dent of Cit-
rus County
Maurice since 1965.
McDaniel He was the
former owner and operator
of McDaniel's Nursery and
Landscaping, Citrus Sod
Company, McDaniel's Mo-
bile Home Sales, A-1 Tree
Service, Eagle Oxygen Com-
pany and Durable Medical
Equipment.
Other than his parents,
McDaniel was preceded in
death by six brothers, Roy
McDaniel, Thomas Garrett,
Jack Rowe, Jerome, Billy,
and James McDaniel; four
sisters, Ruth McDaniel, Eve-
lyn McDaniel Young, Gladys
McDaniel Downum and
Mary Emma McDaniel
McAlpin; and an infant sib-
ling. Survivors include six
children, Maurice Thomas
(Michelle) McDaniel, Inver-
ness; Corey Jason Mc-
Daniel, St Petersburg; Chad
Bryan McDaniel, Coral
Springs, Fla.; Rachel M.
(Geoff) Banning, Hernando;
Lacy Bartlett-King, Inver-
ness, and Melissa; two
brothers, John W (Diane)
McDaniel, Springfield, Ky.,
and Ray McDaniel; three
sisters, Marsha (Don) Cook,
Hernando, Fay McDaniel,
and Patricia Lindsey; 14
grandchildren; and his for-
mer wife, Gail Savary-
Bouchard.
A celebration of Mau-
rice's life will be conducted
from the Chas E Davis Fu-
neral Home at 4 p.m. Friday,
Jan 11, 2013, with his
brother, the Rev John Mc-
Daniel officiating. Inter-
ment will follow at Fletcher
Cemetery, Alapaha, Ga.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Leonard
'Mooch'
Laurain Sr., 56
FLORAL CITY
Leonard Leroy "Mooch"
Laurain Sr, passed away
peacefully due to natural
causes at the age of 56, Dec.
31, 2012, at St. Petersburg
General Hospital, sur-
rounded by family and
friends.
A memorial will be at his
residence, per his request,
in Floral City, 1:30 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 6, 2013.
He leaves behind his son,
Leonard "Tug" Laurain Jr,
of Floral City; three broth-
ers, Garry of Maggie Valley,
N.C., Earl of St Petersburg,
and Allen of Floral City; one
sister, Linda Totten of
Inverness; several nieces
and nephews.

Ralph
Miller, 57
INVERNESS
Ralph M. Miller, 57, Inver-
ness, died Jan. 3,2013, at his
residence. Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Crema-
tory is in charge of private
arrangements.

SO YOU KNOW
Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted by
funeral homes.









S l. l S Si


Gerald
Whittle, 86
CRYSTAL RIVER
Gerald Lee Whittle, 86,
died Jan. 3, 2013, in Crystal
River, Fla. Mr Whittle was
born in Sarasota, Fla., Oct 4,
1926. He was the son of the
late Reason Alexander
Whittle and Ruby Ervin
Paullin Whittle. Mr Whittle
retired as a welder and
ironworker with Florida
Power, he was also an un-
derwater diver, and aviator
He served in World War II
with the U.S. Army and was
a member of VFW Post 8698
in Inglis.
He is survived by his
daughters, Beverly Kay
McBride, and Shirley
Jeanette Addison and his
son, Hulen Workman Jr, all
of Inglis, along with seven
grandchildren and thirteen
great-grandchildren.
Visitation will take place
from 10 to 11 a.m. Monday,
Jan. 7, 2013, at Roberts Fu-
neral Home of Dunnellon. A
service will follow at 11 a.m.,
in the Roberts Funeral
Home Chapel with the Rev.
Christopher Greaves of
Rainbow Springs Village
Church officiating. Inter-
ment in Dunnellon Memo-
rial Gardens will follow
immediately
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.





Richard 'Ike'
Malmstrom, 79
Richard (Ike) Malmstrom
passed away Dec. 25, 2012,
leaving behind a wife,
Maxine,
seven chil-
dren and 23
grandchil-
dren all
S who call
S" |him their
hero and
miss him
Richard tremen -
Valmstrom dously Also
surviving him are five sis-
ters and their families.
He was 79.
Children, Valerie Edge of
Plum City, Wis., Michael, de-
ceased, Lea Bryan of
Covington, La., Mitchell of
Orlando, Fla., Alan of
Piedmont, S.C., Laurie Cole
of Campobello, S.C., Marty
of Campobello, S.C., and
Merry of Inman, S.C.; sis-
ters, Pat Brandmeyer,
Nancy Passini, Merry Noah,
Joann Hubband and
Rebecca Miner Preceding
him in death were his par-
ents, Edwin and Ella, a
brother, Dale and two sis-
ters, Judy Kassel and Beth
Crack.
Ike was a graduate of
UTHS, served two years in
the Army, worked for R.I.
Lines, drove trucks for
Hatten Trucking, farmed six
years in Wisconsin and later
worked trucks with Malm-
strom and Sharp evolving
into Malmstrom Trucking
out of Florida with his son,
Alan. He was so proud of his
family
His immediate family has
had a private ceremony
However, a memorial trib-
ute is planned to be on his
birthday, June 10, 2013, in
Tryon, N.C. For further in-
formation, contact
864-921-5036. Petty Funeral
Home & Crematory, Lan-
drum, S.C., provided
information.
Sign the guest book at
ww.chronicleonline. cornm.


Thelma
Champeau, 86
CITRUS SPRINGS
Thelma M. Champeau, 86
of Citrus Springs, Fla.,
passed away Tuesday,
Jan. 1, 2013.
Visitation was Friday, Jan.
4, 2013, at Fero Funeral
Home. Funeral Mass, 11
a.m. Saturday, Jan. 5, 2013,
at St. Elizabeth Seton
Catholic Church. Interment
will follow at Fero Memorial
Gardens Cemetery

Kenneth
Killian, 29
HOMOSASSA
Kenneth M. Killian, 29 of
Homosassa, Fla., died
Jan. 4, 2013, at Citrus
Memorial Hospital in
Inverness. Heinz Funeral
Home & Cremation,
Inverness.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County Chron-
icle's policy permits
both free and paid obit-
uaries.
Obituaries must be
submitted by the fu-
neral home or society
in charge of arrange-
ments.
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are in-
cluded, this will be des-
ignated as a paid
obituary and a cost es-
timate provided to the
sender.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S. mili-
tary. (Please note this
service when submit-
ting a free obituary.)
Additionally, all obituar-
ies will be posted online
at www.chronicleonline
.com.
Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted by
funeral homes or soci-
eties.
Paid obituaries may in-
clude the information
permitted in the free
obituaries, as well as
date of birth; parents'
names; predeceased
and surviving family
members; year married
and spouse's name
(date of death, if pre-
deceased by spouse);
religious affiliation; bi-
ographical information,
including education,
employment, military
service, organizations
and hobbies; officiating
clergy; interment/in-
urnment; and memorial
contributions.
Area funeral homes
with established ac-
counts with the Chroni-
cle are charged $8.75
per column inch.
Non-local funeral
homes and those with-
out accounts are re-
quired to pay in
advance by credit card,
and the cost is $10 per
column inch.
Small photos of the de-
ceased's face can be in-
cluded for an additional
charge.
Larger photos, span-
ning the entire column,
can also be accommo-
dated, and will incur a
size-based fee.


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CBO: 'Cliff' deal leaves


big deficits in place


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Legis-
lation passed this week to
avert the "fiscal cliff"
could still leave in place
deficits averaging more
than $900 billion a year
over the coming decade if
Congress fails to follow its
tax increases up with fur-
ther spending cuts or tax
hikes, the nonpartisan
scorekeeper for Congress
said Friday
The Congressional
Budget Office also says the
measure should reduce the
risk of recession this year
by not slamming the econ-
omy with a huge tax in-
crease.
The CBO issued a study
in August predicting a $10
trillion deficit over the
next 10 years if Congress
simply followed existing
tax and spending policies
instead of following the
laws that threatened a
combination of automatic
tax increases and spending
cuts.
This weeks' cliff law
would cut $700 billion to
$800 billion from CBO's 10-
year, $10 trillion deficit es-
timate. But it also leaves in
place across-the-board
spending cuts that would
cut more than $1 trillion
from the budget over that
time.


The analysis also esti-
mates that the new law will
increase the size of the
economy by 1.5 to 1.75 per-
centage points compared
with what would have hap-
pened if the government
went over the cliff. Using
data from last summer,
when the economy was still
limping badly, CBO now es-
timates the economy will
grow by just 1 percentage
point next year
An official CBO estimate
of the nation's economic
and budget outlook is due
next month.
The CBO study also notes
that Congress didn't avoid
going over the cliff com-
pletely The Social Security
payroll tax jumped back to
6.2 percent this week after
President Barack Obama
failed to win renewal of the
temporary 2 percentage
point payroll tax cut that's
been in place for two years.
And the CBO analysis as-
sumes across-the-board
cuts of 8 to 9 percent to
many domestic programs
and the Pentagon budget
would stay in place, which
would cost the economy al-
most 1 percentage point in
growth.
Lawmakers promise to
replace those across-the-
board cuts with more tar-
geted steps that could take
longer to implement.


Obama may round


out national security


team next week


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Presi-
dent Barack Obama may
round out his new national
security leadership team
next week, with a nomina-
tion for defense secretary
expected and a pick to lead
the CIA possible.
Former Republican Sen.
Chuck Hagel of Nebraska
is the front-runner for the
top Pentagon post. Acting
CIA Director Michael Morell
and Obama counterterror-
ism adviser John Brennan
are leading contenders to
head the spy agency
White House aides said
the president has not made
a final decision on either
post and won't until he re-
turns from Hawaii, where
he is vacationing with his
family Obama is due back
in Washington Sunday
morning.
Obama nominated Sen.
John Kerry, D-Mass., to re-
place Hillary Rodham
Clinton as secretary of
state in December, his first
step in filling out his sec-
ond term Cabinet and na-
tional security team. Kerry,
as well as the nominees for
the Pentagon and CIA,
must be confirmed by the
Senate.
Hagel, the former senator
from Nebraska, is a con-
trarian Republican moder-
ate and decorated Vietnam
combat veteran who is likely
to support a more rapid
withdrawal of U.S. troops
from Afghanistan. If con-
firmed, Hagel would give
Obama a whiff of biparti-
sanship in his Cabinet.


Even before his nomina-
tion, Hagel's consideration
for the top Pentagon job
raised concerns among
some of his former Senate
colleagues, who ques-
tioned his pronounce-
ments on Iraq, Israel and
the Middle East. Troubling
for some lawmakers are
Hagel's comments and ac-
tions on Israel, including
his reference to the "Jew-
ish lobby" in the United
States.
Hagel has also been crit-
icized for comments he
made in 1998 about an
openly gay nominee for an
ambassadorship. In an in-
terview with the Omaha
World-Herald in 1998,
Hagel said he believed that
for a U.S. ambassador, "it is
an inhibiting factor to be
gay" and referred to James
C. Hormel as "openly, ag-
gressively gay". He has
since apologized for those
comments.
If nominated and con-
firmed, Hagel would re-
place current Defense
Secretary Leon Panetta.
Morell has served as the
CIA's acting director since
early November, after
David Petraeus resigned
after admitting to an affair
with his biographer
Brennan, Obama's top
counterterrorism adviser,
worked at the CIA for 25
years, including a stint as
station chief in Saudi Ara-
bia. He also served as chief
of staff to then CIA Director
George Tenent from 1999 to
2001, when he was named
the agency's deputy execu-
tive director


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308 S. Line Ave.
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4363 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa Springs
(352) 503-2011


Obituaries


(7 al. 4 aItL
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Memorial Gathering Sat. 1-3:00 PM
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Service: Tues. 3:00 PM Chapel
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SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 2013 A5










A6~TH SAMDYAJNARR,203SOKSEiusCUTY IN)ECHRONICL


I How To sREDHEMRKT*IN REIEWI


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 1250574 12.11 +.15 Vringo 94868 3.32 -.18 SiriusXM 897371 3.10 +.02 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
S&P500ETF981138 146.37 +.64 CheniereEn 73811 20.14 +.33 Facebookn 717781 28.76 +.99 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
FordM 539556 13.57 +.11 Rentech 27613 2.73 +.03 Microsoft 511166 26.74 -.51 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
iShEMkts 488798 44.99 +.09 NovaGld g 26472 4.80 +.07 Zynga 365556 2.63 +.22 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
SprintNex 478987 5.92 +.10 Walterlnv 24536 44.05 +1.84 Cisco 361953 20.48 +.03 Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by...

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempton by company. d- New 52-week
low. dd Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Cha Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
JPM2x10yT30.01 +10.10 +50.7 SwGAFn 10.50 +.75 +7.7 EagleBu rs 2.26 +.46 +25.6 ing qualification. n -Stock was a new issue in the last year.The 52-week high and low fig-
ParagSh rs 3.00 +.44 +17.2 NDynMn g 3.54 +.23 +6.9 DryShips 2.17 +.44 +25.4 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferred stockissue.pr- Preferences.pp-
Supvalu 2.94 +.35 +13.5 BowlA 12.90 +.82 +6.8 UniPixel 16.95 +2.85 +20.2 Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt- Right to buy security at a specified price. s-
Quiksilvr 5.07 +.54 +11.9 Reeds 6.47 +.41 +6.8 Gevo 2.18 +.36 +19.8 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi Trades will be settled when the
Xerium 3.60 +.38 +11.8 Lannett 5.53 +.33 +6.3 GoodTme 2.82 +.40 +16.5 stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock., u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
CSVlnvNG 21.97 -1.91 -8.0 Medgenwt 2.00 -.22 -9.7 Accuray 5.41 -1.37 -20.2
JinkoSolar 6.59 -.57 -8.0 IncOpR 3.25 -.23 -6.5 EmmisCpf 11.99 -1.93 -13.8
TrinaSolar 4.92 -.37 -7.0 GoldRsvg 3.08 -.20 -6.1 Silicnlmg 4.60 -.56 -10.9
CitiS&P14 10.17 -.73 -6.7 Medgenics 7.09 -.41 -5.5 iShEMEgy 44.83 -5.09 -10.2 52-Week Net % YT[
BarcShtC 10.00 -.68 -6.4 Vringo 3.32 -.18 -5.1 MGC Diag 5.80 -.66 -10.2 High Low Name Last Chg Chg Ch


DIARY


2,333 Advanced
715 Declined
107 Unchanged
3,155 Total issues
291 New Highs
2 New Lows
3,364,659,179 Volume


DIARY


287 Advanced
133 Declined
40 Unchanged
460 Total issues
8 New Highs
4 New Lows
81,291,861 Volume


1,597
859
112
2,568
137
5
1,705,463,243


13,661.72 12,035.09Dow Jones Industrials
5,513.20 4,795.28Dow Jones Transportation
499.82 435.57Dow Jones Utilities
8,647.65 7,222.88NYSE Composite
2,509.57 2,164.87Amex Index
3,196.93 2,627.23Nasdaq Composite
1,474.51 1,258.86S&P 500
15,432.54 13,189.93Wilshire 5000
878.43 729.75Russell 2000


13,435.21
5,534.06
464.62
8,667.68
2,388.67
3,101.66
1,466.47
15,450.18
879.15


I NYSE


D % 52-wk
ig % Chg


+43.85 +.33 +2.53 +8.70
+64.13 +1.17 +4.28 +9.17
+3.05 +.66 +2.54 +2.97
+59.89 +.70 +2.65+14.69
+26.34 +1.11 +1.40 +4.08
+1.09 +.04 +2.72+15.98
+7.10 +.49 +2.82+14.76
+87.59 +.57 +3.03+15.31
+6.55 +.75 +3.51 +17.27


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BkofAm 12.11 +.15
BkMontg 62.45 +.36
BkNYMel 27.29 +.71
Barday 17.84 +.13
ABB Ltd 21.08 +.20 BariPVixrs 27.55 -.58
ACE Ltd 82.32 +.10 BarnesNob 13.35 -.87
ADTCpn 46.75 +.64 BarrickG 34.60 +.15
AESCorp 11.20 +.26 Baxter 68.43 +.65
AFLAC 52.04 -.66 Beam Inc 61.09 +.16
AGL Res 41.13 +.60 BeazerH rs 18.59 +.54
AK Steel 4.81 +.19 BectDck 80.35 -.04
ASA Gold 21.69 -.03 BerkHa Al40803.00 +254.00
AT&T Inc 35.23 +.21 BerkH B 93.85 +.23
AbtLabs 33.07 -.20 BestBuy 12.11 +.12
AbbVien 34.39 -.44 BBarrett 18.34 -.86
AberFitc 47.41 +.30 BioMedR 19.98 +.19
Accenture 69.19 +.38 BIkHillsCp 38.04 +.44
AdamsEx 10.93 +.10 BlkDebtStr 4.33 -.08
AMD 2.59 +10 BlkEnhC&l 12.79 +.16
AdvSemi 4.54 -.09 BIkGlbOp 13.63 +.22
Aeropostl 13.27 +.27 Blackstone 16.46 +.30
Aetna 45.48 +.21 BlockHR 19.25 +.11
Agilent 42.86 +.83 Boeing 77.69 +.22
Agniomg 51.06 -.48 BonanzaCE 30.10 +1.69
AlcatelLuc 1.64 +.18 BorgWarn 73.79 -.60
Alcoa 9.26 +.19 BostBeer 137.37 -3.88
Alere 18.95 -.17 BostProp 107.47 +.69
AllegTch 32.23 +1.02 BostonSci 5.92 -.03
Allergan 97.87 +1.34 BoydGm 6.98 +.08
Allete 42.99 +.70 Brinker 33.02 +.70
AlliBGIbHi 15.92 +.12 BrMySq 33.35 +.11
AlliBlnco 8.14 -.03 BrownShoe 17.19 -1.03
AlliBern 18.68 +.69 Brunswick 31.49 -.02
Allstate 42.20 +.62 Buckeye 48.19 +.03
AlphaNRs 10.38 +.23 Buenavent 35.13 +.13
AlpTotDiv 4.17 +.05 BurgerKn 17.47 +.22
AIpAlerMLP 16.57 +.14 CBREGrp 20.72 +.56
Alria 32.54 -.02 CBSB 38.65 -.41
AmBev 42.45 -.06 CH Engy 65.30 +.02
Ameren 31.19 ... CITGrp 40.14 +1.04
AMovilL 24.19 +.72 CMS Eng 25.10 +.22
AEngleOut 20.65 +.25 CNOgFind 9.50 +.10
AEP 43.55 -.07 CSS Inds 22.42 +.14
AmExp 59.61 +.61 CSX 20.94 +.58
AmlntGrp 36.30 +.12 CVSCare 49.99 +.21
AmSIP3 7.49 ... CYS Invest 12.46 +.07
AmTower 77.05 -.07 CblvsnNY 15.31 +.28
Amerigas 39.70 -.42 CabotOG s 50.11 +.22
AmeriBrgn 43.69 +.29 CallGolf 6.59 +.09
Anadarko 78.27 +1.94 Calpine 18.09 +.04
AnglogldA 30.48 +.09 Camecog 19.57 -.41
ABInBev 88.41 +1.56 Cameron 58.52 +.69
Annaly 14.84 +.35 CampSp 35.68 -.31
Anworth 6.02 +.08 CdnNRsgs 30.55 +.66
Aon plc 57.13 +.02 CapOne 61.96 +1.41
Apache 83.20 +1.38 CapitlSrce 7.79 +.04
AquaAn 26.27 -.03 CapM pB 14.56 +.11
ArcelorMit 17.77 +.22 CardnlHIth 42.45 +.66
ArchCol 7.66 +.33 CareFusion 29.10 +.01
ArchDan 29.22 +.78 CarMax 37.86 -.08
ArosDor 13.72 +.86 Carnival 37.06 +.03
ArmourRsd 7.00 +.15 Caterpillar 94.92 +.52
Ashland 84.74 +1.68 Celanese 47.50 +1.07
AsdEstat 16.11 -.33 Cemex 10.35 +.04
AssuredG 15.62 +.82 Cemigpfs 10.79 -.42
ATMOS 35.94 +.35 CenterPnt 19.82 +.14
AuRicog 8.13 +.04 CenEIBras 3.39 +.03
AubNan 42.23 +1.65 Cnty4ink 39.91 +.15
Avon 16.09 +.50 Checkpnt 11.12 +10
BB&TCp 30.20 +.28 ChesEng 17.45 +.68
BHP BilILt 79.40 +.37 ChesUtI 46.86 +.26
BP PLC 43.66 +.39 Chevron 110.50 +.58
BRFBrasil 21.59 +.27 ChicB&l 46.59 +.04
BRT 6.30 -.15 Chicos 18.68 +.31
BakrHu 43.53 +.98 Chimera 2.73 +.03
BallCorp 46.50 +.06 ChinaMble 58.68 -.35
BcoBradpf 18.39 -.20 Cigna 54.75 +.40
BoSantSA 8.29 +.11 CindBell 5.56 +.11
BcoSBrasil 7.31 -.10 Citlgroup 42.43 +1.04


CleanHarb 56.59 +1.04
CliffsNRs 37.49 -.68
Clorox 74.71 +.82
Coach 55.51 +.56
CobaltlEn 26.43 +.68
CCFemsa 152.58 +.68
CocaColas 37.66 +.06
CocaCE 32.87 +.43
CohStlnfra 19.20 +.30
ColgPal 107.90 +1.24
Comerica 32.59 +.87
CmclMis 15.54 +.26
CmwREIT 16.28 +.13
CmtyHIt 32.27 +.57
ComstkRs 15.14 -.06
Con-Way 29.40 +.09
ConAgra 30.24 +.22
ConocPhil s 59.83 +.66
ConsolEngy 32.43 +.50
ConEd 56.90 +.32
ConstellA 36.75 +.06
Cnvrgys 17.16 +.53
CorErgylnf 6.20 +.12
Corning 12.73 -.04
CottCp 8.59 +.22
Covidien 58.72 +.42
Crane 47.30 +.16
CSVellIVSt 18.84 +.36
CSVS2xVxrs 7.03 -.32
CredSuiss 25.79 +.63
CrwnCsfle 73.54 -.06
Cummins 113.86 -.31

DCTIndl 6.61 +.09
DDRCorp 15.87 +13
DNP Selct 9.74 +.07
DR Horton 20.72 +.34
DSW Inc 67.43 +.65
DTE 61.64 +.21
DanaHldg 16.25 +.02
Danaher 58.09 +.06
Darden 46.46 +1.62
Darling 16.47 +.31
DeanFds 17.56 +.40
Deere 88.67 +.90
DelphiAuto 38.51 +.16
DeltaAir 12.98 +.40
DenburyR 16.77 +.27
DevonE 54.58 +1.19
DiamRk 9.47 +.15
DicksSptg 47.97 +1.00
DrxFnBull 133.95 +4.47
DirSCBear 12.13 -.22
DirFnBear 13.40 -.51
DirSPBear 15.47 -.23
DirDGIdBII 10.19 +.09
DrxEnBear 7.06 -.24
DirxSCBull 70.55 +1.31
Discover 40.04 +.64
Disney 52.19 +.98
DoleFood 9.82 -.10
DollarGen 44.60 +2.27
DomRescs 53.54 +.56
DowChm 33.63 +.48
DuPont 45.73 +.44
DuffPhelp 15.62 -.04
DukeEnrs 65.06 +.19
DukeRlty 14.27 +.14
E-House 4.85 +.44
EMC Cp 24.33 -.04
EOG Res 125.80 +1.62
EQTCorp 60.42 +1.36
EastChem 70.16 +1.28
Eaton 56.75 +.38
EatnVan 33.09 +.50
EVEnEq 10.99 +.07
Edisonlnt 47.00 +.66
Elan 10.93 +.03


BdorGldg 12.66 -.01
EmersonEl 55.07 +.21
EmpDist 20.93 +.08
EnbrdgEPt 29.10 -.13
EnCanag 20.40 +.51
EnPro 41.79 +.13
ENSCO 62.73 +2.06
Entergy 64.43 -.01
EntPrPt 52.72 +.32
Equifax 55.56 +1.06
EqtyRsd 57.23 -.02
EsteeLdr s 62.69 +.46


GNC 33.89 +1.69
GabelliET 5.76 +.05
GabHIthW 8.71 +.01
GabUll 6.43 +.08
GafisaSA 4.66 -.27
GameStop 24.80 +.44
Gannett 18.82 +.34
Gap 32.10 +.01
GencoShip 4.13 +.28
GenDynam 71.07 -.42
GenElec 21.20 +.10
GenGrPrp 19.27 -.19


HartfdFn 24.52 +.35
HarvNRes 10.25 +1.04
HawaiiEl 26.06 +.18
HItCrREIT 61.73 +.33
HItMgmt 9.45 -.10
HlthcrRlty 24.91 +.23
HealthNet 25.01 +.05
Heckmann 4.12 +.03
HeclaM 5.78 -.09
Heinz 58.68 +.06
HelixEn 21.84 +.98
HedmPayne 57.66 +.67


iShUK 18.18
iShSilver 29.24
iShChina25 41.62
iSCorSP500147.16
iShCorTBd 110.79
iShEMkts 44.99
iShiBxB 120.55
iShEMBd 122.67
iShB20T 118.40
iS Eafe 57.47
iShiBxHYB 94.00
iSR1KV 75.06


www.chronicleonline.com



]EZ Pay












563- 5655


E-Cg tIt's aEZ sa
*Charge may vary at first transaction and at each vacation start.


ExcelM .61 +.16
ExooRes 6.90 +.16
Exelon 30.27 +.21
ExxonMbl 88.96 +.41
FairchldS 14.98 +.09
FamilyDIr 56.65 +.91
FedExCp 94.91 +.31
FedSignl 7.88 +.05
Fedlnvst 22.55 +1.03
Ferrellgs 17.72 -.14
Ferro 4.57 +.07
RdlNRn 24.45 +.01
FidNatlnfo 35.98 +.41
Fifth&Pac 13.45 +.63
FstHorizon 10.46 +.40
FTActDiv 7.77 +.02
FtTrEnEq 12.15 +.10
FirstEngy 42.01 -.03
RowrsFds 25.05 +.24
FootLockr 33.13 +.63
FordM 13.57 +.11
ForestCA 16.63 +.08
ForestLab 37.07 +.79
ForestOil 7.22 +.08
Fortress 4.85 +.21
FMCG 35.49 +.64
Freescale 11.60 +.05
Frontine 3.56 +.18
Fusion-io 22.07 -.01

GATX 44.85 +.82


GenMills 41.77 +.43
GenMotors 29.86 +.04
Genpact 16.11 +.65
Genworth 8.28 +.15
GaGulf 42.35 +1.02
Gerdau 9.53 +.05
Giantlnter 6.48 +.25
GlaxoSKIn 44.26 +.28
GlimchRt 11.26
GolLinhas 6.36 -.10
GoldFLtd 12.21 +.18
Goldcrpg 35.75 +.14
GoldmanS 134.51 +3.57
GoodrPet 10.17 +.54
GtPlainEn 20.79 +.05
GreenbCos 16.68 +.62
Griffon 11.76 +.04
GpFSnMxn 16.10 -.21
GpTelevisa 27.69 +.06
GuangRy 19.81 +.29
HCA HIdg 31.94 +.29
HCP Inc 45.78 +18
HSBC 53.68 +.33
HSBC Cap 25.45 +.07
HalconRrs 7.29 +.20
Hallibrtn 36.65 +.34
HanJS 16.64 +.08
HanPrmDv 13.73 +.03
Hanesbrds 37.11 +.94
Hanoverlns 39.77 +.20
HarleyD 48.69 -.27
HarmonyG 8.47 +.05


Herbalife 37.00 +.65
Hersha 5.13
Hertz 17.34 +.30
Hess 55.02 +.82
HewlettP 15.14
HighwdPrp 34.03 +.19
Hillshiren 29.17 +.57
HollyFront 44.35 -.20
HomeDp 63.18 -.12
Honda 37.75 -.14
HonwIllntI 66.33 +1.33
Hormel 34.31 +1.11
HospPT 24.29 +.14
HostHotfs 16.68 +.33
HovnanE 6.91 -.05
Humana 67.47 +1.22
Huntsmn 17.74 +.96
IAMGId g 11.08 -.06
ING 9.70 +.22
iShGold 16.11 -.08
iSAsfia 25.48 +.11
iSAstria 18.29 +.06
iShBraz 57.18 -.14
iShGer 24.74 +.14
iShHK 19.72 +13
iShltaly 13.67 +.18
iShJapn 9.86 -.04
iSh Kor 63.60 -.26
iSMalas 15.25 +.05
iShMex 72.25 +.52
iShSing 13.76 -.01
iSTaiwn 13.63 -.05


iSR1KG 67.14 +.12
iShR2K 87.24 +.64
iShUSPfd 40.02 +.18
iShREst 66.12 +.40
iShDJHm 21.92 +.19
iShCrSPSm 80.79 +.52
iStar 8.39 +.01
ITT Corp 24.66 +.35
Idacorp 43.62 -.01
ITW 62.40 +.17
Imafon 4.09 +.04
Infosys 42.68 -.79
IngerRd 49.77 +.81
IntegrysE 54.29 +.49
IntcnfEx 129.60 +2.68
Intermec 9.84 +.01
IBM 193.99 -1.28
InfGame 14.93 +.23
IntPap 40.85 +.48
Interpublic 11.76 -.10
Invesco 27.56 +.55
IronMtn 33.20 +.53
ItauUnibH 17.34 -.07

JPMorgCh 45.36 +.79
Jabil 19.44 -.06
JanusCap 9.26 +.19
Jefferies 18.76 +.02
JohnJn 71.55 +.81
JohnsnCt 31.39 -.41
JnprNtwk 20.38 +.21


KBHome 16.22 +.13 McMoRn 15.79 -.14
KBRInc 31.32 +.64 McEwenM 3.75 +.03
KKR 15.49 -.02 MeadJohn 69.99 +.04
KCSouthn 88.82 +1.19 Medtrnic 42.66 +.19
Kaydons 24.60 -.15 Merck 41.97 -.36
KAEngTR 25.68 +.20 Meritor 5.30 +.10
Kellogg 56.64 +.12 MetLife 35.95 +.85
KeyEngy 7.62 +.22 MetroPCS 9.73 +.10
Keycorp 8.95 +.11 MKors 52.23 +.18
KimbClk 86.36 +.35 MidAApt 65.71 +.27
Kimco 19.80 +.17 MindrayM 32.47 +1.17
KindME 84.98 +.86 MitsuUFJ 5.50 +.03
KindMorg 36.71 -.27 MolsCoorB 42.75 -.19
KindrMwt 4.07 +.08 Molyoorp 10.30 +.11
Kinross g 9.40 -.02 MoneyGrm 13.93 +.70
KnghtCap 3.67 +.04 Monsanto 96.11 +.77
KodiakOg 9.21 +.01 Moodys 52.77 +.79
Kohls 42.23 -.12 MorgStan 20.19 +.61
KoreaElc 14.71 +.02 MSEmMkt 15.93 -.02
KrispKrm 11.15 +1.06 Mosaic 58.62 +1.85
Kroger 26.46 +.07 MotrlaSolu 56.28 +.27
KronosWw 20.23 +.14 NCR Corp 26.50 +.36
LDKSolar 2.14 +.22 NRG Egy 23.18 +.22
LGDisplay 14.25 -.54 NVEnergy 18.77 +.12
LTC Prp 36.32 +.67 NYSE Eur 32.74 +.48
LaZBoy 15.27 +.50 Nabors 15.41 +.41
Ladede 38.56 +.20 NBGreece 1.90 +.07
LaredoPet 17.83 +.13 NatFuGas 51.07 +.13
LVSands 51.19 +1.43 NatGrid 57.36 +.22
LeapFrog 8.86 +.25 NOilVarco 71.75 +2.08
LeggMason 26.32 +.23 Natfonstrn 33.23 +1.92
LennarA 40.23 +.32 Navistar 23.05 +.96
LeucNatf 24.01 -.08 NewAmHi 10.42 +.06
Level3 24.68 +.31 NJ Rscs 40.43 +.49
Lexmark 26.08 +11 NYCmtyB 13.35 -.11
LbtyASG 4.22 +.06 Newcastle 8.99 +.08
LillyEli 51.56 +1.84 NewellRub 22.55 +.09
Limited 44.88 +.17 NewfldExp 28.03 +.52
LincNat 28.11 +.21 NewmtM 45.94 +.32
Lindsay 81.26 -.68 NewpkRes 8.29 +.07
LloydBkg 3.25 +.04 Nexeng 26.97 -.03
LockhdM 93.90 +.35 NextEraEn 70.88 +.35
LonePineg 1.35 +.10 NiSource 25.40 +.18
LaPac 20.45 +.38 NikeBs 52.88 +.51
Lowes 35.58 -.27 NobleCorp 37.34 +.89
M ag e 4 NokiaCp 4.18 +.02
NordicAm 9.15 +.44
Nordstrm 54.73 -.54
M&TBk 102.80 +1.67 NorfkSo 65.37 +1.91
MBIA 9.09 +.95 NoestUt 39.64 +.04
MDU Res 21.77 +.11 NorthropG 68.76 +.82
MEMC 3.70 +.01 NStarRIt 7.37 +.06
MFAhFnd 8.56 +.14 Novarts 64.28 +.58
MCR 10.33 -.16 NuSdn 41.17 +1.68
MGIC 3.13 ... Nucor 45.28 +.59
MGM Rsts 12.64 +18 NustarEn 45.88 -.27
Macquarie 46.89 +.13 NuvMuOpp 15.90 +.10
Macys 37.94 +.47 NvPfdlnco 10.07 +.12
MageiMPts 46.20 +.80 NuvQPf2 9.52 -.02
Magnalntg 51.55 +.41 OGEEngy 57.80 +.49
MagHRes 4.18 +.03 OasisPet 32.88 +.19
Manitowoc 16.74 +11 OcciPet 79.84 +1.37
Manulifeg 14.20 +09 OcwenFn 34.89 +.21
MarathnO 32.01 +.42 OfficeDpt 3.66 +.06
MarathPet 62.55 +.33 OfficeMax 10.02 +.42
MktVGold 45.33 +19 OiSAs 4.13 +03
MVOilSvs 40.64 +.79 Olin 22.63 +.21
MVSemi 33.24 -.20 OmegaHIt 24.66 +.18
MktVRus 30.57 +09 Omnicom 51.47 -.16
MktVJrGId 20.11 +.22 OnAssign 22.63 +.37
MarlntA 39.23 +.13 ONEOKs 44.37 +.37
MarshM 35.39 -.10 OneokPtrs 57.26 +.59
MStewrt 2.69 +.02 OpkoHlth 5.16 +.16
Masoo 17.47 +.17 hkoshn 260 53
Mastec 26.13 +.59 = @ -
McDrmlnt 11.85 +.47 i fi
McDnlds 89.85 -.78 PG&ECp 41.17 +.41
McGrwH 55.10 -.18 PNC 60.48 +.73
McKesson 99.94 +1.20 PNM Res 21.23 +.12


PPG 139.47 +1.72 Raloorp 89.72 -.04
PPLCorp 29.21 +.01 RangeRs 65.14 +1.74
PVRPtrs 27.19 +.17 RJamesFn 40.91 +1.07
PallCorp 62.65 +.06 Rayonier 53.22 +.32
PaloANetn 48.25 -1.10 Rltylnco 41.33 +.34
Pandora 10.45 +.45 RedHat 54.25 +.34
PeabdyE 27.24 +.60 RegalEnt 14.13 -.06
Pengrthg 5.06 +.07 RegionsFn 7.59 +.26
PennWstg 11.26 +.19 ReneSola 1.85 -.05
Penney 20.62 +.51 Renren 3.76 +.10
PennyMac 25.82 -.38 RepubSvc 29.86 +.13
Pentair 49.94 -.22 Revlon 15.51 +.55
PepBoy 10.30 +.14 ReynAmer 42.79 +.04
PepcoHold 20.43 +.13 RioTinto 58.28 -.20
PepsiCo 69.46 +.10 RiteAid 1.36 -.02
PerkElm 33.17 +1.17 RobtHalf 33.41 +.53
Prmian 13.50 +.28 RockwAut 87.29 +1.10
PetrbrsA 20.05 +.25 RockColl 59.54 -.10
Petrobras 20.37 +.40 Rowan 34.25 +.81
Pfizer 25.96 +.11 RBScotind 10.85 +.15
PhilipMor 86.52 +.66 RyCarb 35.79
Phillips66n 53.14 -.05 RoyDShllB 71.28 +.34
PiedNG 32.24 +.45 RoyDShllA 69.38 +.38
PimoStrat 11.54 +10 Royce 13.94 +.09
PinWst 52.40 +.04
PioNtrl 113.17 +1.85
PitnyBw 11.37 +.28 SAIC 11.82 +.25
PlainsEx 47.71 +.53 SAP AG 80.42 -.03
PlumCrk 45.99 +.48 SCANA 46.67 +.04
Polaris 85.62 -.09 SKTIcm 15.99 +.30
PolyOne 23.22 +.40 SpdrDJIA 134.06 +.43
PostPrp 50.44 -.08 SpdrGold 160.44 -.76
Potash 41.56 +.62 SPMid 192.05 +1.33
PwshDB 27.53 -.12 S&P500ETF146.37 +.64
PSSPLwV 28.43 +.14 SpdrHome 27.61 +.22
PShEMSov 31.52 +.05 SpdrLehHY 40.99 +.05
Praxair 113.34 +.76 SpdrS&P RB 29.50 +.34
PrecDrill 8.95 +.34 SpdrRetl 63.92 +50
PrinFnd 29.33 +.46 SpdrOGEx 56.01 +.60
ProLogis 37.71 +.31 SpdrMetM 46.60 +.67
ProShtS&P 33.05 -.15 Safeway 18.30 -.04
PrUItQQQs 57.39 -.42 StJoe 22.79 -.13
PrUShQQQ 28.21 +.21 StlUude 37.07 +.30
ProUltSP 63.53 +.55 Saks 10.58 +.04
PrUltSP500 95.45 +1.41 SallyBty 24.28 -.50
PrUVxSTrs 15.30 -.63 SJuanB 14.06 -.13
ProUltSilv 43.49 +.01 SandRdge 6.56 +.10
ProctGam 69.09 +.14 Sanofi 48.03 +.32
ProgsvCp 22.27 +.24 Sichlmbrg 72.01 +1.09
PrUShSPrs 51.17 -.49 Sichwab 15.46 +.40
PrUShL20rs 66.33 -.45 ScrippsNet 58.31 -1.56
PUSSP500rs34.66 -.46 SeadrillLtd 37.80 +.10
Prudent 56.52 +.87 SealAir 18.11 +.11
PSEG 31.06 +.13 Sensient 36.61 +.24
PubStrg 146.22 +.67 SiderurNac 6.09 -.06
PulteGrp 19.06 +.49 SigneUwlrs 53.87 -.32
PPrIT 5.46 +.01 SilvWhtng 35.71 +.10
QEP Res 31.37 +.44 SilvrcpMg 4.75 -.14
Qihoo360 31.67 +.58 SimonProp 158.59 +.07
QuanexBId 20.97 -.20 Skedichers 18.91 +.09
QuantaSvc 27.96 +.29 SmithAO 64.29 +.69
QstDiag 58.00 -.37 SmithfF 22.80 -.09
Questar 20.97 +.48 Smucker 90.20 +1.02
QksilvRes 2.85 +.02 SonyCp 11.14 -.35
Quiksilvr 5.07 +54 SoJernd 51.74 +.57
RPM 30.50 +.15 SouthnCo 44.16 +.39
RadianGrp 6.48 +.08 SthnCopper 39.08 +.35
RadioShk 2.23 +.03 SwstAirl 10.88 +.16




The remainder of the

NYSE listings can be

found on the next page.


IA EIA N SOC5 CANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.90 +.03
AbdnEMTel 21.68 -.02
AdmRsc 35.81 -.35
Advenbx .65 +.01
AlexoRg 3.85 +.09
AlldNevG 27.65 -.90
AlmadnMg 3.02 -.09
AmAppared 1.13
AtfatsaRg .16 +.01
Aurizong 3.33 -.02
AvalnRare 1.47 +.03
Banrog 2.77 +.10


BarcUBS36 40.95 -.05 ComstkMn 2.10 +.05
BarcGSOil 22.15 +.10 CornstProg 5.38 +.09
BlkMunvst 11.64 +.13 CornstTR 5.72 +.09
BrigusGg .94 +.03 CornerstStr 6.46 +.11
BritATob 102.14 +1.29 CrSuiHiY 3.22
CAMACEn .65 +.01
CelSd .29 +.00 DeourEg .22
CFCdag 21.17 -.12 Denisng 1.22 -.02
CheniereEn 20.14 +.33 EVLtdDur 16.88 -.09
CheniereE 22.85 +.47 EVMuni2 14.00 +.07
ChiArmMt .54 +.01 ElephTalk .97 +.03
ChiBotanP .49 +.04 EllswthFd 7.32 +.04
ChinaShen .43 -.02 EmrldOrs 5.59 +.04
ClaudeRg .55 -.02 ExeterRgs 1.18 -.03
ClghGlbOp 12.09 +.04 Fortunel .17 -.01


FrkStPrp 12.85 -.02

GamGldNR 13.22 +.09
GascoEngy .08 +.01
Gastargrs 1.29 +.05
GenMoly 4.23 +.09
GeoGloblR .06 -.00
GoldRsvg 3.08 -.20
GoldResrc 14.32 -.31
GoldStdVg 1.25 -.01
GoldenMin 4.59 -.01
GoldStrg 1.73 -.03
GIdFId 2.03 +.04
GranTrrag 5.71 +.09
GtPanSilvg 1.67 +.09


Hemisphrx .27 +.03
HooperH .46 +.03
HstnAEn .22 -.01
ImmunoCII 2.10 +.06
ImpOilgs 43.60 +.65
InfuSystem 1.63 +.04
InovioPhm .53 +.01
IntellgSys 1.37 -.02


KeeganRg 3.93 -.07
LadThalFn 1.46 +.05
LkShrGldg .76 -.01
LucasEngy 1.64 +.09


NthnO&G 17.19 +.24
NovaBayP 1.12 +.01
MadCatzg .54 +.02 NovaCppn 2.06 +.05
MeetMe 3.58 +.02 NovaGldg 4.80 +.07 SamsO&G .85 +.01
Mental 209 08 NMH 1442 14 Sandstgrs 11.74 -.04
SilvrCrstg 2.63 +.02
MdwGoldg 1.42 +.01 SynergyRs 5.76 +.12
NTN Buzz .23 +.01 ParaG&S 2.35 +.03 TanzRyg 4.00 +.01
NaideaBio 2.97 +.03 PhmAt 1.18 +02 Taseko 3.22 +.11
NeoStem .66 +.03 PolyMetg .92 -.03 TimberlnR .24 +.03
NBRESec 4.72 +.03 PyramidOil 4.10 +.02 TrnsaitPet 1.00 +.03
Neuralstem 1.30 +.09 RareEleg 3.71 +.16 TriarngPet 6.43 +.20
Nevsung 4.26 +.11 Rentech 2.73 +.03 Tuoowsg 1.50 +.04
NwGoldg 10.91 +.15 RexahnPh .33 +.01 TwoHrbwt .84 +.06
NAPallg 1.50 ... Richmntg 2.91 ... USGeoth .36 -.01
NDynMng 3.54 +.23 Rubion g 2.48 +.01 Univlnsur 4.66 +.06


Uranerz 1.45 +.01
UraniumEn 2.64


VangTotV 50.46 +.24
VantageDrl 1.88 +.03
VirnetX 31.59 +.79
VistaGold 2.58 +.06
Vringo 3.32 -.18
Walterlnv 44.05 +1.84
WFAdvlnco 10.30 -.03
YM Biog 2.87 -.01
ZBB Engy .34 +.01


I ASDQ AION AL AKT1


Name Last Chg


AMCNet 51.22 -11
ASML HId 64.71 -.67
AXT Inc 3.09 +.09
Aastrom 1.41 +.02
Abiomed 13.41 -.04
Abraxas 2.25
AcadaTc 26.57 -.01
AcadiaHIt 23.63 -.56
AcadiaPh 4.95 +.20
Accelrys 9.22 -.12
Accuray 5.41 -1.37
Achillion 9.45 +.69
AcmePkt 23.94 +2.56
AoordaTh 27.75 +.80
ActvsBliz 11.17 +.16
AcuraPhm 2.63 +.09
AdobeSy 38.13 +.38
Adtran 20.79 +.55
AdventSoft 23.09 +.80
Aegerion 26.44 -.67
AEterngrs 2.57 +.03
Affymax 20.39 -.44
Affymetrix 3.38 -.07
AirMethd s 38.46 +.70
AkamaiT 40.43 -.52
Akorn 13.53 -.01
Alexion 97.62 -.86
Alexzars 5.00 +.04
AlignTech 29.31 +.14
Alkermes 20.32 +.40
AllotComm 14.63 +.78
AllscriptH 9.37 -.06
AlteraCplf 35.14 -.05
AlterraCap 28.76 +.24
Alvarion h .42 +.01
Amarin 8.41 +.03
Amazon 259.15 +.67
ACapAgy 31.05 +.54
AmCapLd 12.77 +.19
ACapMtg 25.09 +.20
ARItyCTn 11.94 +.24
AmSupr 2.90
AmCasino 26.53 +.04
Amgen 88.98 +.39
AmicusTh 3.58 +.28
AmkorTch 4.70 +.26
Amyris 3.52 +.14
Anadigc 2.39 -.14
AnalogDev 42.52 -.77
Anlogic 74.51 +.82
Analystlnt 3.58 +.28
AngioDyn 11.15 -.03
Ansys 70.50 +.73
AntaresP 3.90 +.05
AntheraP h .67 -.01
ApolloGrp 22.03 +.25
Apollolnv 8.61 +.16
Applelnc 527.00 -15.10
ApldMatI 11.81
AMCC 8.61 +.06
Approach 26.15 +.24
ArQule 3.06 +.08
ArchCap 44.63 +.38
ArenaPhm 9.00 +.06
AresCap 17.84 +.04
AriadP 19.38 -.37
ArmHId 38.45 -.16
ArrayBio 4.11 +.16
Arris 15.29 +.01
ArubaNet 21.93 +.73
AscenaRts 18.11 +.08
AscentSol h .70 -.00
AsiaEntRs 3.45 +.25
AspenTech 27.70 -.09
AsscdBanc 13.90 +.11
AstexPhm 2.95 +.02
athenahlth 76.35 +1.51
Athersys 1.18 +.04
Atmel 6.86 -.15
Audience n 11.40 +.97
Autodesk 36.36 -.01
AutoData 59.14 +.52
Auxilium 18.51 +.18
AvagoTch 32.50 -.21


AvanirPhm 2.94 +.05 Clearwire 2.88
AVEO Ph 8.60 +.30 ClevBioL h 1.54 +.11
AviatNetw 3.39 -.11 ClovisOnc 16.88 +.12
AvisBudg 21.75 +.41 CognizTech 75.18 -.18
Aware s 5.74 +.25 CogoGrp 2.42 +.04
Axcelis 1.39 ... Coinstar 50.10 -1.95
B/EAero 51.28 +.62 ColBnkg 18.95 +.31
BG Med 2.63 -.12 ColumLb h .63 +.01
BGCPtrs 3.72 +.05 Comcast 38.07 -.02
BJsRest 35.15 +.48 Comcspd 36.63 +.09
BMCSft 40.93 +.17 CmcBMO 37.13 +.34
Baidu 104.65 -.33 CommSys 10.54 +.08
BallardP h .62 +.03 CommVIt 71.65 +1.36
BankMuft 4.70 +.17 CmplGnom 3.14
BeacnRfg 34.74 ... Compuwre 10.83 -.02
BeasleyB 5.00 +.15 Comverse 3.87 -.02
BebeStrs 3.69 -.09 ConcurTch 69.78 +.85
BedBath 56.90 +.28 Conmed 28.21 +.18
Biocryst 1.66 -.02 Conns 29.30 +.32
BioFuelrs 4.63 -.48 ConsolCom 16.71 +.25
Biogenldc 145.93 -1.93 CopanoEn 32.95 +.21
BioMarin 52.54 +.37 Corcept 1.87 +.24
BioSanters 1.29 -.01 CorinthC 2.80 +.21
BIkRKelso 10.40 +.10 Costoo 102.16 -.33
Bluora 15.89 +.10 CowenGp 2.50 -.04
BobEvans 43.03 +1.65 Cray Inc 16.48 +.23
BttmlnT 26.61 -.51 Cree Inc 34.36 -.21
BoulderBr 13.54 -.11 Crocs 15.35 +.27
BreitBurn 19.33 +.17 CrosstexE 15.00 -.05
Broadcom 34.44 -.19 CrosstxLP 15.55 -.06
BroadSoft 35.68 -.23 Ctrip.oom 23.59 +.24
BrcdeCm 5.50 +.06 CubistPh 43.21 +.04
BrkIneB 8.79 -.05 CumMed 2.70 +.03
BrukerCp 15.98 +.01 Cymer 91.19 -.59
BuffabWW 77.19 +1.42 CypSemi 11.18 +.19
CAInc 23.05 +.40 Cytodneth .80 +.10
CBOE 31.25 +.72 Cvtori 2.81 +.06
CH Robins 63.04 +.70
CMEGrps 53.77 +2.21
CTC Media 8.21 +.05 DARABioh .84 +.06
CVBFnd 11.16 +.16 Dealertrk 30.28 -.06
CadencePh 5.27 +.02 DeckrsOut 39.79 +.55
Cadence 13.43 -.20 Delcath 1.32 +.02
CalaCvHi 12.53 +.06 Dell Inc 10.97 +.03
CalaCvOp 12.33 +.07 Dndreon 6.01 +.22
CalaStrTR 10.15 +.05 Dennys 5.08 +.08
CalumetSp 33.11 +.30 Dentsply 40.76 +.35
CdnSolar 3.80 +.13 DexCom 14.17 +.20
CapCtyBk 11.82 +.27 DiamndFh 14.06 +.08
CapFedFn 11.86 +.07 DianaCont 6.44 +.12
CpstnTrb h .93 +.01 DigitalGen 11.36 -.04
Cardicah 1.68 +.03 Diodes 18.12 +.15
Cardiomgh .44 -.02 DirecTV 51.14 -.48
Cardtronic 23.59 +.10 DiscComA 66.08 +.55
CareerEd 3.76 +.26 DiscovLab 2.23 -.11
CaribouC 16.10 -.06 DishNetwk 36.89 -.04
Carrizo 21.20 -.10 DollarTrs 39.62 +.14
CarverBcp 4.09 +.09 DonlleyRR 9.27 +.30
Caseys 54.47 +.11 DotHillSyh 1.11 +.18
CatalystPh .49 +.02 DragonWg 3.66 +.05
Catamarns 50.07 +.81 DrmWksA 16.64 +.23
CathayGen 19.75 +.20 DryShips 2.17 +.44
Cavium 32.48 -.45 Dunkin 33.77 -.03
Celgene 82.09 +.42 DyaxCp 3.56 +.02
CellTherrs 1.29 -.01 Dynavax 2.87 +.03
CelldexTh 7.08 +.06 E-Trade 9.39 +.20
Celsion 8.03 -.12 eBay 52.78 +.33
CentEurop 2.39 +.04 EDAP TMS 2.61 +.25
CentAI 9.59 +.44 eHealth 25.39 -1.85
Cepheid 32.75 -1.34 EagleBurs 2.26 +.46
Cerner 81.07 +.86 EaglRkEn 9.11 +.08
CerusCp 3.00 -.08 ErthLink 6.75 +.04
Changyou 29.12 +.86 EstWstBcp 22.96 +.34
Chartlnds 66.23 -2.13 Ebixlnc 16.50 +.26
CharterCm 77.60 -.38 EducDevel 3.91 -.01
ChkPoint 46.84 -.34 8x8 Inc 7.49 +.03
Cheesecake 34.69 +.89 ElectSd 10.01 -.07
ChelseaTh .85 +.03 ElectArts 14.88 +.14
ChildPlace 45.90 -.08 EFII 19.31 +.14
ChrchllD 69.86 +.85 EndoPhrm 25.06 -1.19
CienaCorp 16.10 -.10 Endobgix 14.70
CinnFin 40.34 +.47 ErngyXXI 33.03 -.08
Cintas 42.59 +.41 Entegris 9.54 +.03
Cirrus 28.32 -1.03 EntropCom 5.64 -.05
Cisco 20.48 +.03 EnzonPhs 4.72 +.13
CitzRepBc 20.36 +.39 Epoch 27.95 +.03
CitrixSys 66.55 +.69 Equinix 215.26 +3.15
CleanEngy 13.73 +.07 Ericsson 10.42 +.12


Euroseas 1.00 +.07 IPG Photon 64.38 -3.34
ExactSdh 11.06 -.02 iShAsiaexJ 61.29
Exelixis 4.83 +.03 iShACWX 42.49 +.23
ExideTc 3.69 ... iShACWI 49.04 +.21
Expedia 64.46 +1.63 iShDevRE 33.21 +.09
ExpdlntI 41.82 +.79 iShNsdqBio 142.62 +.85
ExpScripts 55.00 +.30 Ion PLC 28.82 +.33
ExtrmNet 3.58 -.16 loonixBr 22.50 +.01
Ezoorp 20.31 +.24 IdenixPh 5.36 +.27
F5 Netwks 97.53 +.28 Illumina 54.76 -.79
FEICo 57.59 -.46 ImunoGn 13.53 -.08
FLIRSys 23.62 -.24 Imunmd 3.04 +.01
Facebookn 28.76 +.99 ImpaxLabs 21.23 +.21
Fastenal 48.04 +.06 Incyte 17.28 +.18
FifthStRn 10.85 +.12 Ininera 6.50 +.11
FifthThird 15.69 +.06 IninityPh 36.85 -.19
FindEngin 28.86 +.71 Informat 30.42 +.41
Fndlnst 19.31 +.19 Insulet 21.81 +.09
Finisar 16.37 -.01 IntgDv 7.67 -.02
FinLine 17.46 -1.58 Intel 21.16 -.16
FstCashFn 49.72 -.25 Inteliquent 3.08 +.09
FFnclOH 15.26 +.21 InteractB 14.09 +.28
FMidBc 13.20 +.11 InterDig 44.12 +.21
FstNiagara 8.39 +.13 InterMune 10.29 -.17
FstSolar 33.59 -.83 IntlSpdw 28.13 -.38
FstMerit 15.23 +.32 Intersil 8.56 +.02
Fiserv 80.70 +.03 Intuit 62.22 +.48
Flextrn 6.39 +.06 IridiumCm 6.86
FlushFn 15.60 IronwdPh 12.38 +.52
FocusMda 25.59 -.01 Isis 10.89 +.40
FormFac 4.75 +.14 IMa 17.53 -.14
Fortnet 19.31 -.02
Fossil Inc 97.12 +2.08
FosterWhl 24.86 +.19 j2Global 31.88 +.19
Francesca 27.02 -.54 JA Solar rs 5.06 +.09
FredsInc 13.01 -.05 JDS Uniph 13.83 -.03
FreeSeash .10 +.03 JackHenry 41.00 +.09
FreshMkt 46.70 -1.50 JacklnBox 29.22 +.03
FronterCm 4.36 -.01 Jamba 2.48 +.13
FuelCell h 1.04 +.02 JamesRiv 3.60 +.01
FultonFncl 10.47 +.13 JazzPhrm 55.62 +.41
JetBlue 5.95
JiveSoftw 15.13 -.05
GTAdvTc 3.45 +.03 JoesJeanh 1.07 +.04
GalenaBio 1.79 +.09 KCAPRFin 9.62 +.08
Garmin 42.09 ... KLATnc 48.98 -.16
Gentex 19.04 -.07 KeryxBio 2.73
Gentivah 10.73 +.09 KiOR 6.97 -.02
GeronCp 1.58 +.05 KnightT 6.39 +.45
Gevo 2.18 +.36 KraftFGpn 45.37 -.21
GileadSd 75.73 +.78 KratosDef 4.98 +.08
GluMobile 2.47 +.15 Kulicke 12.40 -.04
GolLNGLtd 38.00 +10 LKQCps 22.29 -.03
GoodTme 2.82 +.40 LPL Find 29.47 +.17
Goodyear 14.35 +.28 LSI Corp 7.30 -.04
Google 737.97 +14.30 LSI Indlf 7.60 +.05
GrLkDrge 9.41 +.16 LamResrch 38.07 +.09
GreenMtC 42.08 -.79 LamarAdv 39.99 +.63
Grifols rs 24.95 -.60 Landec 11.89 +.53
Groupon 5.27 +.15 Landstar 53.58 +.08
GulfRes 1.18 ... Lattice 4.17 +.06
GulfportE 40.39 +1.26 LeapWirlss 7.01 +.30
HMN Fn 3.50 ... LegacyRes 24.79 +.09
HMS Hldgs 25.75 -.57 LedPhrm 2.30 +.02
HainCel 56.52 -.04 LibGlobA 65.47 +.17
Halozyme 6.93 +.36 LibCapA 120.50 +.66
HancHId 33.34 +.36 LibtylntA 20.51 +.12
HanwhaSol 1.27 LifeTech 51.11 +.39
Harmonic 5.17 +.17 LifePtH 40.38 +.83
Hasbro 35.74 -.38 LigandPh 19.38 -1.04
HawHold 7.11 +.26 LincElec 51.10 +.56
HIthCSvc 23.50 +.11 LinearTch 35.71 -.10
HeartWare 89.50 -.68 LinnEngy 36.58 +.13
Heelys 2.24 +.01 LinnCon 37.23 +.14
HSchein 82.37 -.08 Liquidity 43.02 +1.01
HercOffsh 6.55 +.14 LivePrsn 13.50 +.00
Hollysys 12.26 +.21 LodgeNeth .04
Hologic 20.60 -.12 Logitech 7.83 +.18
HmLnSvcn 19.34 +.34 LookSmth .87 -.02
HomeAway 23.40 +1.29 Lulkin 59.62 +2.72
HorizPhm 2.63 +.22 lululem 7195 -3.14
HorsehdH 10.50 -.02 = I
HotTopic 10.65 -.15
HudsCity 8.53 +.14 MAP Phm 15.97 +.17
HuntJB 61.88 +.62 MELASci 1.71 +.02
HuntBncsh 6.69 +.04 MGE 52.06 +.22
IAC Inter 46.94 +.45 MIPSTech 7.86 +.01
IdexxLabs 94.88 +.88 MKS Inst 26.27 -.33


MTS 52.60
MagelnHI 48.47
MagicJack 17.42
MAKO Srg 11.99
Manitex 8.30
MannKd 2.49
MktAxess 34.96
MarvelT 7.81
Masimo 19.53
Mattel 36.45
MattressF 25.43
Maxim Into 29.80
MaxwlT 8.71
MedAssets 17.97
MedicAcln 3.77
MediCo 25.56
Medivatns 53.85
MeloCrwn 18.20
Mellanox 52.31
MentorGr 16.92
MercadoL 82.79
MergeHIth 2.70
Merrimkn 6.19
Microchp 33.21
MicronT 6.96
MicrosSys 42.92
MicroSemi 21.74
Microsoft 26.74
Mindspeed 4.81
Misonix 6.80
MitekSys 3.49
Molex 28.62
Momenta 12.35
Mondelez 26.74
MonroMuf 36.20
MonstrBvs 51.89
Motricityh .42
Mylan 28.20
MyriadG 26.17
NETgear 39.54
NIl Hldg 7.00
NPS Phm 8.84
NXP Semi 27.34
Nanosphere 3.00
NasdOMX 26.48
Natlnstrm 26.48
NatPenn 9.63
NektarTh 7.82
Neonode 5.02
NeptuneTg 1.89
NetApp 34.08
NetEase 43.40
Netflix 95.98
NetSpend 12.20
Neurcrine 8.37
NYMtgTr 6.61
NewsCpA 26.50
NewsCpB 27.03
NorTrst 53.42
NwstBcsh 12.42
NovfiWrls 1.29
Novavax 1.94
NuVasive 16.32
NuanceCm 22.94
NuPathe 3.34
NutriSyst 8.82
Nvidia 13.15
NxStageMd 11.41
OCZTech 1.95
OReillyAu 91.65
OSI Sys 69.01
OceanRig 15.69
Oclaro 1.64
OdysMar 2.91
OldDomFs 35.54
Omeros 5.85
OmniVisn 14.74
OnSmcnd 7.42
Onoolytg 3.85
Onoothyr 2.06
OnyxPh 81.38
OpenTable 53.10
OpbmerPh 9.25
Oracle 34.61
Orexigen 6.04
Orthfx 37.98
OtterTail 25.45
Overstk 14.70


PDC Engy 35.23 +.42
PDLBio 7.39 +.12
PLXTch 3.97 -.01
PMCSra 5.54 +.01
PSS Wrld 28.90 +.02
PacWstBc 26.58 +.07
Paccar 46.80 +.47
Pacerlnti 4.11 +.17
PacEthan h .35 -.01
PacPreBc 10.49 -.08
PacSunwr 1.74 +.04
PainThers 2.73 -.07
PanASIv 18.53 +.19
ParamTch 23.19 +.19
Parexel 32.07 +.43
ParkerVsn 1.98 +.08
Patterson 34.71 -.04
PattUTI 19.50 +.34
Paychex 32.17 +.27
PnnNGm 50.81 +.33
PennantPk 11.24 +.11
PeopUtdF 12.60 +.12
PeregrinP 1.35 +.08
PerfectWd 12.68 +.76
Perrigo 108.48 +.46
PetSmart 69.63 +.18
Pharmacyc 62.70 +1.27
PilgrimsP 8.11 +.05
Polyoom 10.88 +.10
Popular rs 21.96 -.02
Potlatch 40.22 +.17
Power-One 4.67 +.13
PwShs QQQ 66.63 -.22
PriceTR 68.34 +1.35
priceline 648.41 -.32
PrivateB 16.44 +.37
PrUPQQQs 55.23 -.55
ProceraN 18.13 +.76
PrognicsPh 3.15 +.04
ProgrsSoft 22.02 +1.13
PUShQQQrs37.61 +.37
ProspctCap 11.22 +.18
Prothenan 6.55 -.28
PureCycle 3.10 +.15
QIAGEN 18.55 -.14
QlikTech h 20.70 +.01
Qlogic 10.17 +.07
Qualoom 63.50 -.95
QltyDistr 6.58 +.13
QualitySys 17.39 -.05
Questoor 26.11 -.46
QuickLog 2.39 +.04
Quidel 21.64 +1.65
RFMicD 4.87 +.15
Rambus 4.91 +.01
Randgold 95.83 -1.97
RaptorPhm 6.20 +.20
RedRobin 36.50 +.38
Regenrn 181.07 +.36
RentACt 34.86 +.30
ReprosTh 15.13 -.31
RepubAir 7.60 +.48
RschMotn 11.95 +.48
Responsys 6.50 -.06
RexEnergy 13.12 -.12
RigelPh 6.84 +.27
RiverbedT 21.14 +.54
RosettaR 46.67 +.16
RossStrs 57.95 -.83
RoviCorp 16.78 +.93
RoyGId 79.31 -.91


SBACom 70.64 -.82
SEI Inv 24.57 +.39
SHFL Ent 14.63 +.23
SLM Cp 17.50 +.15
STEC 5.15 +.03
SVB FnGp 60.34 +1.36
SalixPhm 44.70 +.99
SanderFm 50.13 +.14
SanDisk 45.46 +.78
SangBio 6.65 +.32
Sanmina 11.44 +.22
Santarus 11.42 -.07


Sapient 10.98 +.07 TripAdis 44.12 +.21
Sareptars 29.00 +.86 TriQuint 5.22 +.03
SaientPh 1.16 +.03 TrstNY 5.43 -.01
Schulmn 30.32 +1.22 Trustmk 23.84 -.14
SciClone 4.83 +.32 USATechh 1.98 +.13
SciGames 9.59 +.10 UTiWrd 13.61 +08
SeagateT 31.45 +.07 UWrldwd 13.61 +.08
SearsHIdgs 42.19 -.07 UltaSalon 97.85 -4.14
SearsH&On 35.06 +.10 Ultrapetrh 1.80 +.08
SeattGen 24.97 +.50 Umpqua 12.57 +.11
SecNtllf 10.27 +.38 UniPixel 16.95 +2.85
SelCmfrt 27.13 +.22 Unilife 2.35 +.03
SelectMlns 20.23 +.27 UtdNtrIF 54.15 +.22
Semtech 29.38 +.09 UtdOnln 5.87 +.12
Sequenom 5.23 +.18 U n 5. +.
SvcSource 6.46 +.18 US Enr 1.66 +09
ShandaG s 3.12 +.02 UtdTherap 51.97 -.85
Shire 93.50 +.76 UnivDisp 28.22 +.51
Shutterfly 32.08 +.39 UnivFor 40.86 -.21
SigmaAld 75.27 -.04 UnwiredP 1.29 -.03
Silinmlmg 4.60 -.56 UranmRsh .36 +.02
SilicnMotn 14.66 +.03 UrbanOut 41.39 +.65
Slcnware 5.42 +.01
SilvStdg 14.76 +.16 '
Sina 52.76 -.01 VCAAnt 21.80 -.06
Sindair 13.46 -.08 VOX)Ind 7.22 +17
SiriusXM 3.10 +.02 V .66 +.07
SironaDent 65.22 +.09 ValueClick 19.66 +.07
Skullcandy 6.86 +.16 VanSTCpB 80.09
SkyWest 13.48 +.74 VanlntCpB 87.82 +.09
SkywksSol 20.95 -.54 Veeoolnst 30.38 -.41
SmithWes 8.80 +.03 Velt 5.26 +.35
SodaStrm 48.69 +.78 Venaxisrs 2.74 +.11
Sohu.cm 47.90 +.15 VBradley 24.32 +.08
SolarCityn 14.40 +1.38 Verisign 40.04 +.
Solazyme 8.41 +.04 Verisgn 4053.50 +.09
SonicCorp 10.65 -.09
Sonus 2.20 +.20 VertxPh 45.85 +.70
SouMoBc 23.49 -.44 ViacomB 57.51 +1.06
Sourcefire 45.61 -.31 Vical 3.15 +.07
SpectPh 12.03 +.10 VirgnMdah 37.37 -.15
SpiritAir 18.10 +.60 ViroPhrm 23.76 +.39
Splunkn 29.68 +.33 Vivus 13.75 +.74
Spreadtrm 17.17 -.78 Vodafone 25.81 +.49
Staples 11.76 +.01 Volcan 23.55 .04
StarSdent 2.82 -.06 cano .5 -.04
Starbucks 55.69 +.32 Volterra 16.44 -.52
StDynam 14.60 +.35 WarnerCh 12.86 +.33
StemCells 1.70 +.02 WarrenRs 2.98 -.02
Stericyde 95.24 +.21 WashFed 17.05 +.03
SMadden 42.31 +.18 Web.com 15.36 +.28
Stratasys 82.25 +.34 WebMD 15.51 +.23
SunPwrh 8.73 -.34 Websense 15.11 +.26
support.cm 4.16 -.24 WendysCo 4.76 +.01
SusqBnc 11.13 +.05 yo r .7 +01
SycamNets 2.24 -.01 WernerEnt 22.51 +.26
Symantec 19.62 +.21 WDigita 42.88 -.14
Symetricm 5.89 ... Westmrld 10.08
Synaorn 5.81 +.06 Wstptlnng 28.83 -.48
Synageva 47.53 ... WetSeal 2.72 -.03
Synaptlcs 30.75 +.31 WholeFd 91.22 -.56
SynrgyPh 5.99 -.04 WilshBcp 6.11 +.13
Synopsys 31.65 -.25 Wndstrm 9.32 +.44
SyntaPhm 9.83 +.26 Winust 38.39 -.01
Syntrolmh .46 +.03 Wrst 7. -.0
TFS Fncl 10.04 +.05 WsdomTr 7.16 +.50
TICCCap 10.49 +.03 Wynn 120.78 +1.44
tw teleom 26.45 +.29 XOMA 2.75 +.03
TakeTwo 12.20 +.32 XenoPort 8.84 -.21
Tangoe 13.51 +.59 X)linx 36.50 -.52
TASER 9.24 +.02 Xyratexs 7.99 -.22
TedhData 46.93 +.24 YRCWwde 6.67 -.11
Tellabs 2.27 -.01 YY Incn 13.50 -.74
TeslaMot 34.40 -.37
TetraTc 28.26 +1.39 Yahoo 19.86 +.08
TxCapBsh 47.32 +.67 Yandex 23.24 -.04
Texlnst 31.82 -.07 Yongye 5.71 +.01
TexRdhse 18.00 +.64 ZaZaEngy 2.22 +.09
Theravnce 21.57 -.71 Zagg 7.45 +.02
Thoratec 37.01 +.01 Zalicus .82 +.06
ThrshdPhm 4.21 -.04 Zllow 29.60 +.98
TibcoSft 22.12 +.48 ZonBcp 22.65 +.63
TitanMach 25.75 +.07
TiVo Inc 12.40 -.03 Zopharm 4.49 +.10
Towers 3.61 -.03 Zpcar 12.21 +.04
TractSupp 91.64 -.12 Zogenix 1.49 +.03
Tranzyme .52 -.03 Zumiez 21.48 +.26
TrimbleN 61.94 +.69 Zynga 2.63 +.22


DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.9270 4.9260
Australia .9546 .9544
Bahrain .3771 .3771
Brazil 2.0340 2.0399
Britain 1.6064 1.6107
Canada .9869 .9874
Chile 473.22 473.13
China 6.2316 6.2335
Colombia 1772.30 1761.50
Czech Rep 19.41 19.34
Denmark 5.7066 5.7112
Dominican Rep 40.40 40.40
Egypt 6.4209 6.4216
Euro .7650 .7656
Hong Kong 7.7507 7.7509
Hungary 222.16 221.19
India 54.975 54.485
Indnsia 9790.00 9650.00
Israel 3.7795 3.7590
Japan 88.13 87.18
Jordan .7105 .7099
Lebanon 1505.00 1505.50
Malaysia 3.0485 3.0315
Mexico 12.7515 12.7726
N. Zealand 1.2032 1.2066
Norway 5.6148 5.5801
Peru 2.550 2.551
Poland 3.15 3.13
Russia 30.3325 30.2663
Singapore 1.2276 1.2248
So. Africa 8.5552 8.5755
So. Korea 1063.07 1063.87
Sweden 6.5445 6.5263
Switzerlnd .9250 .9260
Taiwan 29.03 29.01
Thailand 30.48 30.38
Turkey 1.7813 1.7841
U.A.E. 3.6731 3.6728
Uruguay 19.3399 19.3499
Venzuel 4.2951 4.2927


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.07 0.02
6-month 0.12 0.10
5-vear 0.81 0.71
10-year 1.90 1.70
30-year 3.10 2.87



S FUTURES

Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Feb 13 93.09 +.17
Corn CBOT Mar 13 6801/4 -9
Wheat CBOT Mar 13 7471/4 -814
Soybeans CBOT Mar13 13671/4 -1914
Cattle CME Feb 13 132.95 -.90
Sugar (world) ICE Mar 13 18.85 -.25
Orange Juice ICE Mar13 112.95 +1.35


SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $1648.10 $1654.30
Silver (troy oz., spot) $29.896 $29.92U
Copper (pound) $3.6/90 $3.b//b
Platinum (troy oz., spot)$15bbb.20 $15/.4U

NMER= NewYork Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


I AMEX


I NASDA


Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD
AKSteel ... ... ... 4.81 +.19 +4.6 McDnlds 3.08 3.4 17 89.85 -.78 +1.9
AT&Tlnc 1.80 5.1 46 35.23 +.21 +4.5 Microsoft .92 3.4 14 26.74 -.51 +.1
Ameteks .24 .6 22 38.92 +.45 +3.6 MotrlaSolu 1.04 1.8 24 56.28 +.27 +1.1
ABInBev 1.57 1.8 ... 88.41 +1.56 +1.1 NextEraEn 2.40 3.4 14 70.88 +.35 +2.4
BkofAm .04 .3 32 12.11 +.15 +4.3 Penney ... ... 20.62 +.51 +4.6
CapCtyBk ......... 11.82 +.27 +4.0 PiedmOfc .80 4.4 16 18.25 +.15 +1.1
CntryLink 2.90 7.3 36 39.91 +.15 +2.0 RegionsFn .04 .5 ... 7.59 +.26 +6.5
Citigroup .04 .1 13 42.43 +1.04 +7.3 SearsHIdgs .. ....... 42.19 -.07 +2.0
CmwREIT 1.00 6.1 29 16.28 +.13 +2.8 Smucker 2.08 2.3 21 90.20 +1.02 +4.6
Disney .75 1.4 17 52.19 +.98 +4.8 SprintNex ... ....... 5.92 +.10 +4.4
DukeEn rs 3.06 4.7 18 65.06 +.19 +2.0 Texlnst .84 2.6 20 31.82 -.07 +3.0
EPR Prop 3.00 6.5 21 46.34 +.16 +.5 TimeWarn 1.04 2.1 18 49.37 -.41 +3.2
ExxonMbI 2.28 2.6 11 88.96 +.41 +2.8 UniFirst .15 .2 16 82.07 +.20 +11.9
FordM .20 1.5 11 13.57 +.11 +4.8 VerizonCm 2.06 4.7 41 44.30 +.24 +2.4
GenElec .76 3.6 16 21.20 +.10 +1.0 Vodafone 1.54 6.0 ... 25.81 +.49 +2.5
HomeDp 1.16 1.8 22 63.18 -.12 +2.2 WalMart 1.59 2.3 14 69.06 +.26 +1.2
Intel .90 4.3 9 21.16 -.16 +2.6 Walgrn 1.10 3.0 17 37.18 -.61 +.5
IBM 3.40 1.8 13193.99 -1.28 +1.3 YRCWwde ....... 6.67 -.11 -1.2
Lowes .64 1.8 21 35.58 -.27 +.2


AG SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 2013


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 2013 A7


I MUTUALFUDSA I


Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital I:
Balancp 17.36 +.07
Retlnc 8.94
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGr 7.00 +.05
AllianceBern A:
GblRiskp 16.32 -.05
GlbThGrAp 67.64 +.55
HighlncoAp 9.57 +.01
SmCpGrA 38.71 +.17
AllianceBern Adv:
LgCpGrAd 31.18 +.17
AllianceBern B:
GIbThGrBt 57.85 +.48
GrowthBt 28.12 +.07
SCpGrBt 30.50 +.13
AllianceBern C:
SCpGrCt 30.68 +.13
Allianz Fds Insti:
NFJDvVI 13.03 +.07
SmCpVi 31.03 +.25
Allianz Funds C:
AGICGrthC 25.31 +.08
Amer Beacon Insti:
LgCaplnst 22.34 +.16
Amer Beacon Inv:
LgCaplnv 21.21 +.16
Amer Century Adv:
EqGroAp 25.12 +.12
Amer Century Inv:
AIICapGr 29.28 +.07
Balanced 17.28 +.05
DivBnd 11.11
Eqlnc 7.99 +.04
Growth 27.53 +.08
Heritagel 22.93 +.11
IncGro 28.00 +.09
InfAdjBd 13.06 +.01
IntDisc 10.33
InfiGrol 11.63
New Opp 8.66 +.06
OneChAg 13.49 +.04
OneChMd 12.89 +.03
RealEstl 23.98 +.11
Ultra 26.68 +.04
Valuelnv 6.56 +.05
American Funds A:
AmcpAp 22.22 +.09
AMuiAp 29.05 +.11
BalAp 20.78 +.08
BondAp 12.91
CaplBAp 53.47 +.16
CapWGAp 37.87 +.13
CapWAp 21.05 -.04
EupacAp 41.71 +.01
FdlnvAp 41.84 +.20
GIblBalA 26.99 +.05
GovtAp 14.16
GwthAp 35.26 +.16
HI TrAp 11.43 +.01
HilnMuniA 15.41 -.01
IncoAp 18.33 +.05
IntBdAp 13.73
InfiGrlncAp 31.99 +.06
ICAAp 30.98 +.14
LtTEBAp 16.33 -.01
NEcoAp 29.13 +.10
NPerAp 31.91 +.16
NwWrldA 55.23 +.07
STBFAp 10.07
SmCpAp 40.72 +.13
TxExA p 13.15 -.01
WshAp 32.02 +.17
Ariel Investments:
Apprec 42.78 +.39
Ariel 53.17 +.38
Artisan Funds:
Inl 24.91 +.10
Inbinst 25.04 +.10
InfiVal r 30.73 +.07
MidCap 38.44 +.08
MidCapVal 21.49 +.14
BBH Funds:
CorSeIN 17.81 +.11
Baron Funds:
Asset 50.52 +.31
Growth 55.29 +.31
SmallCap 27.02 +.19
Bernstein Fds:
IntDur 14.03
DivMu 14.81
TxMgdlnI 14.19 +.07
Berwyn Funds:
Fund 33.23 +.04
BlackRock A:
EqtyDiv 20.35 +.09
GIAIAr 19.99 +.07
HiYlnvA 8.15 +.01
InfOpAp 33.26 +.18
BlackRock B&C:
GIAICt 18.61 +.06
BlackRock Instl:
EquityDv 20.39 +.09
GlbAllocr 20.08 +.07
HiYldBd 8.15 +.01
BruceFund 398.67 +1.71
Buffalo Funds:
SmCapn 28.92 +.16
CGM Funds:
Focusn 31.13 +.51
MutI n 29.52 +.38
Realtyn 30.06 +.12
Calamos Funds:
GrwthAp 48.29 +.18
Calvert Invest:
Incop 16.57 +.01
InflEqAp 14.36 +.04
SocialAp 31.09 +.05
SocBdp 16.24
SocEqAp 39.51 +.12
TxFLgp 16.54 -.01
Cohen & Steers:
RltyShrs 65.58 +.26
Columbia Class A:
Acornt 30.21 +.16
CaAlloMod p11.47 +.03
DivOpptyA 8.93 +.05
LgCapGrA t27.72 +.16
LgCorQAp 6.64 +.03
MdCpGrOp 10.43 +.07
MidCVlOp p 8.78 +.08
TxEAp 14.28 -.01
FrontierA 11.20 +.09
GlobTech 21.29 -.01
Columbia Cl 1,T&G:
EmMktOpIn 9.03
Columbia Class Z:
AcornZ 31.33 +.16
AcornlntZ 41.43 +.16
DivlncoZ 15.14 +.06
IntTEBd 10.99
SelLgCapG 14.25 +.06
Credit Suisse Comm:
ComRett 7.95 -.06
DFA Funds:
InftCorEqn 10.84 +.07
USCorEql n12.75 +.09
USCorEq2nl2.58 +.09
DWS Invest A:
CommAp 19.33 +.09
DWS Invest S:
CoreEqtyS 18.79 +.12
CorPlslnc 11.25 +.01
EmMkGrr 16.82 -.02
EnhEmMk 11.44
EnhGlbBdr 10.33 +.01
GIbSmCGr 38.49 +.19
GIblThem 23.91 +.18
Gold&Prc 13.55 -.02
HiYldTx 13.08 -.01
IntTxAMT 12.15 -.01
Intl FdS 43.44 +.16
LgCpFoGr 33.37 -.01
LatAmrEq 33.47 +.04
MgdMuniS 9.54
MATES 15.22 -.02
SP500S 19.47 +.09
WorldDiv 24.13 +.15
Davis Funds A:
NYVenA 36.02 +.35
Davis Funds B:
NYVenB 34.41 +.34
Davis Funds C:
NYVenC 34.72 +.34
Davis FundsY:
NYVenY 36.41 +.36
Delaware Invest A:
Diver Incp 9.33 ...
SMIDCapG 23.63 +14
TxUSAp 12.27 -.01
Delaware Invest B:
SelGrBt 36.06 +.17
Dimensional Fds:
EmMCrEqn20.81 +.03
EmMktV 30.61 +.08
IntSmVan 16.32 +.15
LargeCo 11.54 +.05
TAUSCorE2 nl 0.30 +.08
USLgVan 23.72 +.25
USMicron 15.08 +09
USTgdVal 17.61 +.14
USSmalln 23.46 +.17
USSmVa 27.16 +.23
IntSmCon 16.19 +.10
EmMktSCn21.61 +.08
EmgMktn 28.05 +.01
Fixdn 10.32
IntGFxlnn 12.93 -.01
IntVan 16.90 +.13
InfProSec 12.67 -.01
Glb5Fxlncnll1.11 -.01
2YGIFxdn 10.04
DFARIEn 26.77 +.11
Dodge&Cox:
Balanced 79.94 +.44
Income 13.85 +.01


IntStk 35.22 +.08
Stock 125.82 +.85
DoubleUne Funds:
TRBdNI 11.33
TRBdNp 11.32
Dreyfus:
Aprec 44.93 +.10
CTA 12.32 -.02
CorVA
Dreyf 10.07 +.07
DryMid r 29.93 +.22
GNMA 15.64 -.01
GrChinaA r 37.58 +.11
HiYldAp 6.71
StratValA 31.98 +.31
TechGroA 35.08 -.07
DreihsAclnc 10.72
Driehaus Funds:
EMktGr 31.15
EVPTxMEmI 49.48 +.12
Eaton Vance A:
ChinaAp 18.87 +.01
AMTFMuInc 10.50 -.01
MultiCGrA 8.72 +.05
InBosA 6.04 +.01


Name NAV Chg
LgCpVal 20.00 +.14
NatlMunlnc 10.31 -.01
SpEqtA 16.89 +.16
TradGvA 7.32 +.01
Eaton Vance B:
HIthSBt 9.31 +.05
NatlMulnc 10.31 -.01
Eaton Vance C:
GovtC p 7.30
NatMunlnc 10.31 -.01
Eaton Vance I:
FltgRt 9.14 +.01
GblMacAbR 9.88 -.01
LgCapVal 20.05 +.14
ParStEMkt 15.24 +.03
FMI Funds:
LgCappn 17.61 +.12
FPA Funds:
Newlnco 10.58
FPACres 28.62 +.08
Fairholme 32.09 +.19
Federated A:
MidGrStA 37.05 +.26
MuSecA 10.77 -.01
Federated Instl:
KaufmnR 5.17 +.04
TotRetBd 11.39 +.01
StrValDvlS 5.11 +.03
Fidelity Adv FocT:
EnergyT 37.09 +.43
HItCarT 23.07 +.09
Fidelity Advisor A:
Nwlnsghp 23.33 +.07
StrlnA 12.69
Fidelity Advisor C:
Nwlnsghtn 22.05 +.07
Fidelity Advisor I:
EqGrl n 67.01 +.20
EqlnI n 27.10 +.16
FItRatel n 9.94 +.01
IntBdl n 11.70 +.01
Nwlnsgtl n 23.62 +.08
StrIlnI n 12.84 -.01
Fidelity Advisor T:
BalancT 16.94 +.07
DivGrTp 13.75 +.07
EqGrTp 62.63 +.18
EqInT 26.68 +.15
GrOppT 42.69 +.12
HilnAdTp 10.45 +.01
IntBdT 11.68 +.01
MulncTp 13.76 -.01
OvrseaT 18.16 +.07
STFiT 9.35
Fidelity Freedom:
FF2010n 14.26 +.03
FF2010K 13.01 +.02
FF2015n 11.93 +.03
FF2015K 13.09 +.03
FF2020n 14.47 +.03
FF2020K 13.55 +.04
FF2025n 12.12 +.03
FF2025K 13.77 +.04
FF2030n 14.45 +.04
FF2030K 13.93 +.04
FF2035n 12.03 +.03
FF2035K 14.11 +.04
FF2040 n 8.40 +.02
FF2040K 14.16 +.05
FF2045K 14.35 +.04
Fidelity Invest:
AIISectEq 12.35 +.07
AMgr50n 16.64 +.05
AMgr70rn 17.62 +.06
AMgr20rn 13.18 +.02
Balancn 20.54 +.08
BalancedK 20.54 +.08
BlueChGrn 50.35 +.13
BluChpGrK 50.39 +.13
CAMunn 12.95 -.01
Canada n 54.27 +.28
CapApo n 30.31 +.23
CapDevOn 12.07 +.06
Cplncrn 9.57 +.01
ChinaRgtr 31.43 +.03
CngS 465.09
CTMunrn 11.97 -.01
Contra n 79.60 +.28
ContraK 79.54 +.27
CnvSckn 26.55 +.12
DisEqvn 25.05 +.16
DiscEqF 24.99 +.16
Divlntln 30.31 +.12
DivrslntKr 30.25 +.12
DivStkOn 17.86 +.10
DivGthn 30.74 +.17
EmergAs r n30.26 -.02
EmrMkn 23.58 +.01
Eqlncn 48.31 +.27
EQIIn 19.99 +.12
ECapAp 19.25 +.12
Europe 31.58 +.19
Exch 323.88
Exportn 22.48 +.12
Fidel n 36.85 +.22
Fifty r n 20.85 +.20
FItRateHi r n 9.94
FrInOnen 29.82 +.14
GNMAn 11.76
GovtInc 10.54
GroCo n 95.95 +.29
Grolncn 21.82 +.11
GrowCoF 95.82 +.28
GrowthCoK 95.84 +.29
GrStratrn 21.27 +.13
Highlncrn 9.40 +.01
Indepnn 26.73 +.22
InProBdn 13.24 +.01
IntBd n 11.11
IntGovn 10.83
IntmMun 10.64 -.01
InftDiscn 33.46 +.11
InDSCprn 20.53 -.03
InvGrBdn 11.55 +.01
InvGBn 7.98 +.01
Japan r 9.99 -.01
JpnSm n 9.11 -.08
LgCapVal 11.51 +.09
LatAm 47.22 +.20
LevCoStkn 33.15 +.28
LowPrn 40.21 +.18
LowPriKr 40.18 +.19
Magelln n 75.34 +.44
MDMurn 11.61 -.01
MAMunn 12.66 -.01
MegaCpStknl2.21 +.06
MIMunn 12.53 -.01
MidCapn 30.28 +.18
MNMunn 11.98 -.01
MtgSecn 11.37 +.01
Munilncn 13.54 -.02
NJMunrn 12.23 -.01
NwMktrn 17.92 -.03
NwMilln 31.16 +.20
NYMunn 13.66 -.02
OTCn 62.06 +.15
OhMunn 12.37 -.01
0l0Index 9.69 +.04
Ovrsean 32.66 +.13
PcBasn 25.36 -.02
PAMunrn 11.45 -.01
Puritnn 19.74 +.07
PuritanK 19.73 +.06
RealElncr 11.50 +.03
RealEn 32.63 +.13
SAIISecEqF 12.35 +.08
SCmdtyStrt n 8.72 -.04
SCmdtyStrF n8.75 -.04
SrEmrgMkt 17.41 -.01
SEmgMktF 17.44 -.01
SrslntGrw 12.08 +.03
SerlnDGrF 12.10 +.03
SrslntVal 9.50 +.04
SerlnfVaIF 9.52 +.05
SrlnvGrdF 11.56 +.01
StlntMu n 10.85
STBF n 8.60 +.01
SmCapDisc n25.00 +.21
SmllCpSrn 18.66 +.15
SCpValur 16.84 +.16
StkSelLCVrnl2.06 +.09
SllSlcACap n29.08 +.17
SWSelSmCp 20.79 +.16
SBratlncn 11.37
SfrReRtr 9.63
TaxFrBrn 11.69 -.02
TotalBdn 10.93 +.01
Trend n 75.41 +.19
USBI n 11.85 +.01
Utility 19.07 +.11
ValStratn 32.54 +.27
Value n 78.68 +.59
Wrldwn 20.80 +.12
Fidelity Selects:
Aimn 42.16 +.56
Banking n 20.12 +.25
Biotchn 114.86 +.88
Brokrn 52.38 +.74
Chemn 122.91 +1.27
ComEquip n23.99 +.20
Compn 62.68 -.15
ConDisn 26.30 +.13
ConsuFnn 15.21 +.20
ConStapn 81.72 +.40
CstHo n 49.87 +.09
DfAer n 89.80 +.54
Eleck n 47.24 -.02
Enrgy n 52.46 +.60
EngSvn 69.87 +1.27
EnvAltEnrnl7.58 +.10
FinSv n 63.80 +.57
Gold r n 36.45 -.06
Healilin 137.81 +.50
Insur n 53.45 +.38
Leisrn 105.44 +.79
Material n 73.43 +.69
MedDI n 58.06 +.30


MdEqSysn 28.68 +.05
Multmdn 59.17 +.27
NtGasn 32.14 +.48
Pharmn 15.48 +.09
Retail n 63.55 +.16
Softwr n 84.46 +.47
Techn 103.29 +.06
Telcm n 52.08 +.25
Trans n 53.83 +.78
UtilGr n 58.04 +.34
Wireless n 8.47 +.04
Fidelity Spartan:
5001dxlnvn 51.92 +.25
5001dxl I 51.92 +.25
InlrnxInvn 34.75 +.17
TotMldxF r 42.46 +.23
TotMktlnv n 42.46 +.23
USBondl 11.85 +.01
Fidelity Spart Adv:
ExMktAdr n41.36 +.34
5001dxcAdvn51.92 +.25
IntAdrn 34.75 +.17
TotMktAd r n42.46 +.23
USBondl 11.85 +.01


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
First Eagle:
GIbIA 49.30 +.30
OverseasA 22.20 +.17
First Investors A
BIChpAp
Eqtylnco p 7.84 +.04
GloblA p 7.06
GovtAp 11.38
GrolnAp 17.10 +.10
IncoAp 2.65 +.01
MATFAp 12.42 -.01
MITFAp 12.84 -.02
NJTFAp 13.65 -.02
NYTFAp 15.19 -.02
OppAp 30.58 +.27
PATFAp 13.77 -.01
SpSitAp 24.32 +.21
TxExIncop 10.27
TotRtAp 16.83 +.06
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 11.09 +.01
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUS p 8.84
ALTFAp 11.85 -.01
AZTFAp 11.47 -.02
CallnsAp 12.99 -.01
CAIntAp 12.17
CalTFAp 7.51
COTFAp 12.41 -.01
CTTFAp 11.38 -.01
CvtScAp 15.51 +.05
DblTFA 11.91 -.02
DynTchA 34.01 +.09
EqlncAp 18.61 +.08
Fedlntp 12.55 -.02
FedTFAp 12.72 -.01
FLTFAp 11.89 -.01
FoundAlp 11.38 +.04
GATFAp 12.76 -.02
GoldPrMA 30.64 -.08
GrwthAp 51.73 +.20
HYTFAp 10.91 -.01
HilncA 2.09
IncomAp 2.27 +.01
InsTFAp 12.60 -.02
NYITFp 11.91 -.02
LATFAp 12.00 -.01
LMGvScA 10.23
MDTFAp 11.92 -.02
MATFAp 12.14 -.01
MITFAp 12.34 -.01
MNInsA 12.98 -.01
MOTFAp 12.70 -.01
NJTFAp 12.54 -.02
NYTFAp 12.08 -.01
NCTFAp 12.90 -.01
OhiolAp 13.10 -.02
ORTFAp 12.54 -.01
PATFAp 10.90 -.01
ReEScAp 17.20 +.07
RisDvAp 38.68 +.15
SMCpGrA 35.00 +.24
Stratlnc p 10.72
TtlRtnAp 10.31 +.01
USGovAp 6.80
UbIsAp 13.95 +.07
VATFAp 12.21 -.01
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdvn 13.42 -.01
IncmeAd 2.25
TGIbTRAdv 13.72
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.29 +.01
USGvC t 6.75 -.01
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 22.91 +.15
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktAp 24.17 +.03
ForgnAp 7.01 +.02
GIBdAp 13.47 -.01
GrwthAp 19.91 +.10
WorldAp 16.16 +.10
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 23.61 +.03
ForgnC p 6.87 +.02
GIBdCp 13.49 -.01
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 16.80 +.13
GE Elfun S&S:
S&Slnc 11.72
US Eqty 45.84 +.34
GMOTrust:
USTreasx 25.00
GMOTrust III:
Quality 22.85 +.08
GMOTrust IV:
InilntrMV 21.26 +.16
GMOTrust VI:
EmgMktsr 11.95 +.02
IntCorEq 28.86 +.18
Quality 22.85 +.08
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 53.38 +.30
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 40.19 +.32
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 25.41 +.15
HiYield 7.36 +.01
HYMunin 9.41 -.01
MidCapV 40.46 +.32
ShtDrTF n 10.64
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.44
CapAplnst 43.48 +.12
Intlnv t 62.52 +.51
Intl r 63.10 +.51
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 35.52 +.32
DivGthAp 21.22 +.14
IntOpAp 15.28 +.06
Hartford FdsY:
CapAppl n 35.50 +.31
Hartford HLS IA :
CapApp 44.71 +.37
Div&Gr 22.11 +.14
Balanced 21.39 +.08
MidCap 29.15 +.30
TotRetBd 11.96
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
StrGrowth 10.59 -.01
ICON Fds:
EnergyS 19.48 +.18
HIthcareS 17.74 +.05
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.92
IVA Funds:
WldwideIr 16.12 +.02
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 13.87 +.09
Invesco Funds:
Energy 38.84 +.65
Utlites 17.57 +.09
Invesco Funds A:
BalRiskA 12.41 -.05
Chartp 18.37 +.12
CmstkA 18.38 +.14
Constp 24.58 +.10
DivrsDivp 13.87 +.09
EqlncA 9.40 +.06
GrIlncAp 21.61 +.19
HilncMu p
HiYld p 4.47 +.01
HYMuA 10.11
InfiGrow 29.22 +.16
MunilnA 13.92
PATFA 17.05 -.02
USMortgA 13.03 +.02
Invesco Funds B:
MunilnB 13.89 -.01
USMortg 12.96 +.01
Invesco Funds Y:
BalRiskY 12.49 -.05
Ivy Funds:
AssetSC t 25.85 +06
AssetStA p 26.50 +.06
AssetStl r 26.69 +.06
HilncAp 8.58 +.01
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 12.02 .01
MCpValp 28.36 +.21
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBd p 12.08
JP Morgan Insth:
MdCpValIn 28.81 +.22
JPMorgan R C:
CoreBondn 12.03
ShtDurBd 10.99
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 11.54 +.05
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 12.02
HighYId n 8.20 +.01
IntmTFBdn 11.31 -.01
LgCpGr 24.54 +.06
ShtDurBd n 10.99
USLCCrPIsn22.82 +.12
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 26.60 +.08
ContrarnT 15.72 +.17
EnterprT 67.81 +.16
FIxBndT 10.78 -.01
GIUfeSciTr 30.85 +.21
GIbSelT 10.27 +.04
GITechTr 19.26 -.01
Grw&lncT 35.01 +.15
JanusT 32.61 +05
OvrseasTr 35.52 +19
PrkMCVal T21.95 +.19
ResearchT 33.38 +.10
ShTmBdT 3.08
Twenty T 63.28 -.10
VentureT 56.09 +.50
WrldWTr 48.63 +.26
John Hancock A:


BondAp 16.44 +.02
IncomeA p 6.78
RgBkA 14.81 +.15
John Hancock B:
IncomeB 6.78
John Hancock CIl1:
LSAggr 13.21 +.08
LSBalanc 13.75 +.04
LSConsrv 13.48 +.02
LSGrwth 13.76 +.07
LSModer 13.45 +.03
Lazard InstI:
EmgMktl 19.89 +.05


Name NAV Chg
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 20.38 +.05
Legg Mason A:
CBInrlAIIC 9.40 +.05
CBAAgGr 129.45 +.75
CBAAppr 16.13 +.09
CBALgCGr 23.45 +.11
WAHilncAt 6.32 +.01
WAMgMup 17.21 -.01
Legg Mason B:
CBALgCGr 21.09 +.10
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 31.76 +.31
CMValTrp 44.02 +.29
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 27.36 +.20
SmCap 29.85 +.18
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 15.22 +.02
StrlncC 15.70 +.02
LSBondR 15.16 +.02
StrlncA 15.61 +.02
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.63 +.01
InvGrBdY 12.64 +.01
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 12.43 +.11
BdDebAp 8.20 +.01
ShDurlncAp 4.65
MidCpAp 18.56 +.17
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncC t 4.68
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.65
MFS Funds A:
MITA 22.04 +.14
MIGA 18.30 +.07
EmGA 50.12 +.18
HilnA 3.61
MFLA
TotRA 15.49 +.08
UtilA 18.99 +.07
ValueA 26.15 +.20
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 16.47 +.07
GvScBn 10.42 -.01
HilnBn 3.62
MulnBn 9.00 -.02
TotRBn 15.50 +.08
MFS Funds I:
Valuel 26.27 +.20
MFS Funds Instl:
InflEqn 19.41 +.04
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 6.14
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 14.85 +.07
GovtBt 8.92
HYIdBBt 6.11
IncmBldr 17.97 +.05
InflEqB 10.99 +.02
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 39.85 +.33
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 86.64 +.64
Managers Funds:
Yacktmanpnl9.64 +.10
YacktFocn 21.03 +.10
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 7.87 +.06
Matthews Asian:
AsiaDvlnvr 14.72
AsianGlInv 18.71 +.01
Indialnvr 17.50 -.13
PacTgrlnv 24.69 +.04
MergerFdn 15.88 +.02
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.86
TotRtBdl 10.85 -.01
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 2.58 -.02
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 15.33 +.10
MorganStanley Inst:
InflEql 14.58 +.09
MCapGrl 35.68 +.23
Muhlenkn 54.25 +.41
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 29.04 +.14
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrY 33.74 +.18
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 13.73 +.09
GblDiscA 28.97 +.17
GIbDiscZ 29.36 +.17
QuestZ 16.94 +.13
SharesZ 23.08 +.15
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 23.17 +.15
Geneslnst 50.08 +.19
Int r 17.75 +.03
LgCapV lnv 29.11 +.31
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 52.09 +.19
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc In 9.93 +.01
Nicholasn 49.79 +.17
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 10.91
HiYFxlnc 7.59
SmCpldx 9.59 +.07
Stkldx 18.18 +.09
Technly 16.56 +.06
Nuveen Cl A:
HYMuBdp 17.14
LtMBAp 11.21 -.01
Nuveen Cl R:
IntDMBd 9.35 -.01
HYMunBd 17.14
Nuveen Cl Y:
RealEstn 21.59 +.09
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 45.17 +.41
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 29.07 +.12
Globall 24.14 +.08
Intl lr 21.32 +.02
Oakmark 49.93 +.26
Select 32.00 +.13
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.65 +.02
GIbSMdCap 14.96 +.05
LgCapStrat 10.21 +.05
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 7.29
AMTFrN 12.32 -.01
CAMuniAp 8.83
CapApAp 49.78 +.22
CaplncAp 9.18 +.02
DvMktAp 35.79 +.05
Discp 60.56 +.33
EquityA 9.82 +.06
EqlncAp 26.36 +.20
GlobAp 65.89 +.33
GIbOppA 30.01 +.09
GblStfrlncA 4.37
Goldp 31.07 -.05
IntBdA p 6.57 -.01
IntGrw p 31.18 +.16
LtdTmMu 15.10 -.01
MnStFdA 38.16 +.25
PAMuniAp 11.51 -.01
SenFltRtA 8.31
USGv p 9.53
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 7.25
AMTFrW 12.32 -.02
CplncB t 8.99 +.01
EquityB 9.09 +.05
GblStfrlncB 4.38
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.38 -.01
RoMuAp 17.01 -.01
RcNtMuA 7.62 -.01
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 35.37 +.05
IntlBdY 6.57 -.01
IntGrowY 31.01 +.16
Osterweis Funds:
Stlncon 11.69
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.87
TotRtAd 11.20
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AlAsetAutr 11.09
AIIAsset 12.64 +.01
ComodRR 6.55 -.04
Divlnc 12.29 +.01
EmgMkCur 10.56 .01
EmMkBd 12.58 .01
Fltlnc r 9.04 +.01
ForBdUnr 10.72 -.06
FrgnBd 10.74 -.02
HiYId 9.70
InvGrCp 11.11 +.01
LowDu 10.49
ModDur 10.88 +.01
RealRtnIl 12.16 +.01
ShortT 9.87
TotRt 11.20
TRII 10.63
TRIll 9.86
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIlAstAutt 11.07 +.01
LwDurA 10.49
RealRtAp 12.16 +.01
TotRtA 11.20
PIMCO Funds C:
AIIAstAutt 11.03
RealRtCp 12.16 +.01
TotRtCt 11.20
PIMCO Funds D:
RealRhp 12.16 +.01
TRhip 11.20
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIAuthP 11.09


TotRtnP 11.20
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 30.05 +.18
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 48.82 -.10
Pioneer Funds A:
BondAp 9.91
InfiValA 19.57 +.14
PionFdAp 33.38 +.19
ValueAp 12.22 +.11
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 10.55 +.03


Name NAV Chg
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 10.65 +.02
Pioneer FdsY:
StratlncYp 11.30
Price Funds:
Balance n 20.97 +.08
BlChipn 46.95 +.18
CABondn 11.54 -.01
CapAppn 22.65 +.11
DivGron 27.03 +.14
EmMktBn 14.27 -.04
EmEurop 19.86 -.07
EmMktS n 34.58 -.05
Eqlncn 27.24 +.19
Eqlndexn 39.49 +.19
Europen 16.18 +.06
GNMAn 10.00
Growthin 38.78 +.10
Gr&lnn 23.20 +.14
HIthSci n 42.65 +.26
HiYield n 7.03 +.01
InsfCpG 19.41 +.07
InstHiYId n 9.82 +.01
MCEqGrn 31.45 +.19
InitBondn 9.97 -.04
IntDisn 46.58 +.14
Intl G&l 13.10 +.03
InftStkn 14.59 +.01
Japann 8.10 -.01
LatAm n 38.95 +.09
MDShrtn 5.22
MDBondn 11.08
MidCap n 58.02 +.36
MCapValn 24.81 +.22
NAmern 36.69 +.22
NAsian 16.97 -.01
NewEran 43.16 +.40
NHorizn 34.28 +.23
N Incn 9.83 +.01
NYBondn 11.91 -.01
OverSSFn 8.61 +.02
PSIncn 17.43 +.04
RealAssetr nll.29 +.02
RealEstn 21.37 +.08
R2010n 16.67 +.03
R2015n 13.07 +.03
R2020n 18.19 +.06
R2025n 13.37 +.05
R2030n 19.31 +.07
R2035n 13.67 +.05
R2040n 19.52 +.08
R2045n 12.99 +.05
SciTecn 27.97 +.02
ShtBd n 4.85
SmCpStkn 35.19 +.26
SmCapVal n40.52 +.29
SpecGrn 19.87 +.09
Speclnn 13.03 +.01
TFIncn 10.57
TxFrHn 11.92 -.01
TxFrSIn 5.69
USTIntn 6.18
USTLgn 13.19 +.03
VABondn 12.30 -.01
Value n 27.28 +.26
Principal Inv:
Divlnfllnst 10.39 +.05
LgCGIIn 10.15 +.04
LT20201n 12.81 +.05
LT20301n 12.72 +.05
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 18.97 +.14
HiYIdAp 5.75 +.01
MidCpGrA 32.05 +.13
MuHilncA 10.36 -.01
STCrpBdA 11.56
UtlityA 12.23 +.06
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 18.68 +.05
HiYIdBt 5.74
Prudential Fds Z&l:
MadCapGrZ 33.28 +.14
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.12
AZTE 9.50 -.02
ConvSec 20.83 +.07
DvrlnAp 7.85 +.02
EqlnAp 17.50 +.14
EuEq 20.71 +.14
GeoBalA 13.55 +.06
GIbEqty p 9.86 +.07
GrlnAp 15.32 +.13
GIblHIthA 45.53 +.35
HiYdAp 8.01 +.01
HiYId In 6.20 +.01
IncmAp 7.25
IntGrln p 9.89 +.04
InvAp 14.97 +.08
NJTxA p 9.83 -.01
MulICpGr 57.43 +.28
PATE 9.53 -.01
TxExA p 9.06 -.01
TFInAp 15.71 -.02
TFHYA 12.74 -.01
USGvAp 13.50
GIblUtilA 10.47 +.06
VoyAp 22.75 +.12
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.73 -.02
DvrlnBt 7.78 +.02
Eqlnct 17.35 +.14
EuEq 19.90 +.13
GeoBalB 13.41 +.06
GIbEq t 8.92 +.06
GINtRst 18.20 +.19
GrlnBt 15.05 +.12
GIblHIthB 35.56 +.27
HiYIdB t 8.00 +.01
HYAdBt 6.07
IncmBt 7.18
IntGrln t 9.84 +.05
InfGrltit 14.90 +.06
InvBt 13.50 +.08
NJTxBd t 9.81 -.02
MuItCpGr 49.13 +.24
TxExBt 9.07 -.01
TFHYBt 12.76 -.01
USGvBt 13.43
GlblUtilB 10.44 +.06
VoyBt 19.16 +.11
RS Funds:
IntGrA 18.42 +.10
LgCAIphaA 45.31 +.42
Value 26.72 +.27
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 8.81 +.02
Royce Funds:
MicroCapl 15.05 +.03
PennMulr 11.88 +.08
Premierlr 19.74 +.13
TotRetlsr 14.09 +.12
ValSvc t 11.66 +.09
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 11.25 -.01
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 16.49 -.05
SEI Portfolios:
S&P500En 40.33 +.19
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 21.01 -.06
Schwab Funds:
HIlhCare 18.87 +.11
0OOOInvr 39.59 +.21
S&P Sel 22.82 +.11
SmCpSl 21.84 +.15
TSMSelr 26.53 +.15
Scout Funds:
Intl 33.60 +.07
Selected Funds:
AmShD 43.11 +.40
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 35.08 +.23
Sequoia 172.46 +.42
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 44.55 +.11
SoSunSCInv tn23.21+.13
St FarmAssoc:
Gwll 57.03 +.31
Stratton Funds:
Mul-Cap 38.65 +41
RealEstate 30.51 +.12
SmCap 57.42 +50
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 9.95
TCW Funds:
EmMktln 9.43 +.01
TotRetBdl 10.27 -.01
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 10.95
Eqldxlnst 11.12 +.06
InflEqllnst 16.47 +.12
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 19.88 +.04
Third Avenue Fds:
InflValnstr 17.22
REVallnstr 25.60 +.08
Valuelnst 51.03 +.35
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 28.04 +.21
IncBuildAt 19.24 +.08
IncBuildCp 19.24 +.08
IntValue I 28.69 +.21
LtTMul 14.66
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 5.09
Income 9.33
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp 9.78 +.01
Flexlncp 9.40 +.01
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 34.70 +.26
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 23.68 +.10
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 26.00 +.06
ChinaReg 7.93 +.04
GIbRs 10.00 +.07


Gld&Mtls 11.68 +.01
WdPrcMn 11.67 +.03
USAA Group:
AgvGt 33.54 +.10
CABd 11.14 -.01
CrnstStr 23.27 +.06
GovSec 10.30 -.01
GrTxStr 14.79 +.03
Growth 17.36 +.08
Gr&lnc 16.63 +.10
IncStk 13.95 +.07
Inco 13.45 +.01
Inf 26.24 +.01


Name NAV Chg
NYBd 12.51
PrecMM 26.36 -.04
SciTech 15.12 +.09
ShtTBnd 9.28
SmCpStk 15.50 +.12
TxElt 13.73 -.01
TxELT 13.94
TxESh 10.82
VABd 11.63
WldGr 22.08 +.12
VALIC:
MdCpldx 21.69 +.16
Stkldx 26.84 +.13
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 20.29 +.12
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdmln 24.15 +.08
CAITAdmn 11.73 -.01
CALTAdrnn11.99 -.01
CpOpAdl n 79.81 +.50
EMAdmr r n 37.50 +.02
Energyn 114.30 +1.24
EqlnAdm n n51.89 +.22
EuroAdml n 61.54 +.57
ExplAdml n 76.51 +.58
ExtdAdm n 47.48 +.37
500Admln 135.11 +.65
GNMAAdn 10.91
GrwAdmn 37.62 +.12
HlthCrn 61.61 +.37
HiYldCpn 6.13
InfProAdnn 28.28 +.03
ITBdAdml n 11.88
ITsryAdmln 11.63
IntGrAdm n 62.34 +.25
ITAdmln 14.36 -.01
ITGrAdmrn 10.29 +.01
LtdTrAdn 11.14
LTGrAdmln 10.74 +.05
LTAdmln 11.79 -.01
MCpAdml nl05.19 +.77
MorgAdmrn 63.26 +.23
MuHYAdrnm nl1.28
NYLTAdn 11.78 -.01
PrmCap r n 74.03 +.46
PALTAdmnn11.72
ReitAdm r n 94.83 +.42
STsyAdml n 10.73
STBdAdmln10.62 +.01
ShtTrAd n 15.91
STFdAdn 10.79
STIGrAdn 10.83 +.01
SmCAdmn 40.12 +.31
SmCapGrth n32.31 +.22
SmCapVal n32.39 +.28
TxMCap r n 73.25 +.38
TUBAdml n 11.04
TStkAdm n 36.71 +.20
ValAdml n 23.65 +.17
WellslAdmrn n58.80 +.15
WelltnAdm n59.51 +.30
Windsor n 52.64 +.45
WdsrllAdn 53.56 +.35
Vanguard Fds:
CALTn 11.99 -.01
CapOppn 34.56 +.21
Convrtn 12.89 +.04
DivApplnn 24.48 +.11
DivdGron 17.04 +.09
Energy n 60.89 +.66
Eqlncn 24.76 +.11
Explr n 82.26 +.62
FLLTn 12.20 -.01
GNMAn 10.91
GlobEqn 19.12 +.12
Grolncn 31.14 +.14
GrthEqn 12.57 +.04
HYCorpn 6.13
HlthCren 146.04 +.86
InflaPron 14.40 +.02
InlExplrn 14.87 +.06
IntlGrn 19.60 +.08
InfiValn 31.76 +.20
ITIGraden 10.29 +.01
ITTsryn 11.63
LifeConn 17.11 +.04
LifeGron 23.76 +.10
Lifelncn 14.24 +.01
LifeMod n 20.85 +.07
LTIGraden 10.74 +.05
LTTsryn 12.75 +.03
Morg n 20.41 +.07
MuHYn 11.28
Mulntn 14.36 -.01
MuLtd n 11.14
MuLongn 11.79 -.01
MuShrtn 15.91
NJLTn 12.32 -.01
NYLTn 11.78 -.01
OHLTTEn 12.69 -.01
PALTn 11.72
PrecMtls rn 16.13 -.08
PrmcpCorn 15.34 +.11
Prmcprn 71.38 +.45
SelValurn 21.62 +.14
STARn 21.11 +.09
STIGraden 10.83 +.01
STFedn 10.79
STTsryn 10.73
StratEqn 22.11 +.17
TgtRetlncn 12.25 +.02
TgRe2010n24.34 +.07
TgtRe20l15 nl3.55 +.04
TgRe2020 n24.19 +.08
TgtRe20250 nl3.83 +.06
TgRe2030On23.84 +.10
TgtRe2035 n4.40 +.07
TgtRe2040On23.71 +.11
TgtRe2050 n23.62 +.12
TgtRe204 n5n4.89 +.08
USGron 21.85 +.09
USValuen 12.23 +.11
Wellsly n 24.27 +.06
Welltnn 34.45 +.17
Wndsr n 15.61 +.14
Wndsllin 30.18 +.20
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl r n102.38 +71
ExtMktln 117.15 +.90
MidCplstP nl 14.58 +.83
TotlntAdm r r25.48 +.14
TotlntllnstrnlOl.89 +.55
TotlntllP r nl01.91 +.56
TotlntSig rn 30.56 +.16
500n 135.11 +.65
Balancedn 24.15 +.08
EMktn 28.55 +.01
Europe n 26.42 +.24
Extend n 47.47 +.36
Growth n 37.62 +.12
LgCaplxn 27.08 +.14
LTBndn 14.05 +.05
MidCapn 23.18 +.16
Pacific n 10.30 +.02
REITrIn 22.22 +.09
SmCapn 40.11 +.31
SmlCpGth n25.83 +.17
STBndn 10.62 +.01
TotBndn 11.04
TotllntI n 15.23 +.08
TotStkm n 36.70 +.20
Value n 23.65 +.17
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 24.15 +.08
DevMklnstn 9.83 +.07
EmMklnstn 28.52 +.02
Extln n 47.47 +.36
FTAIIWIdl r n90.94 +.48
Grwthlstn 37.62 +.12
InfProlnstn 11.52 +.01
Instldxn 134.23 +.64
InsPIn 134.24 +.65
InstTStldxn 33.23 +.18
lnsTStPlus n33.24 +.18
MidCplstn 23.23 +.17
REITInstrn 14.68 +.07
STBondldx n10.62 +.01
STIGrlnstn 10.83 +.01
SCInstn 40.12 +31
TBIstn 11.04
TSInstn 36.72 +.20
Valuelstn 23.65 +.17
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgln 111.60 +.54
GroSign 34.83 +.10
ITBdSign 11.88
MidCpldxn 33.19 +.24
STBdldxn 10.62 +.01
SmCpSign 36.15 +.28
TotBdSgl n 11.04
TotStkSgln 35.43 +.19
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.97
Virtus Funds I:
EmMktl 10.37 -.02
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetSp 10.09 +.03
CorelnvA 6.50 +.03
DivOppAp 15.85 +.14
DivOppCt 15.69 +.13
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 42.30 +.18
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 12.52
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmSlllnv 21.61 +.15
Opptylnv 40.83 +.34
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UlStMulnc 4.82
Wells Fargo Admin:
Growth 42.79 +.09
Western Asset:
CrPIsBdF1 p11.65 +.01
CorePlus I 11.65
William Blair N:
GrowthN 12.38 +.04


Stock gains push





S&P to five-year high


Associated Press


NEW YORK The Stan-
dard & Poor's 500 closed at
its highest level in five years
Friday after a report
showed that hiring held up
in December, giving stocks
an early lift.
The S&P 500 finished up
7.10 points at 1,466.47, its
highest close since Decem-
ber 2007.
The index began its de-
scent from a record close of
1,565.15 in October 2007, as
the early signs of the finan-
cial crisis began to emerge.
The index bottomed out in
March 2009 at 676.53 before
staging a recovery that has
seen it more than double in
value and move to within 99
points of its all-time peak.
The remarkable recovery
has come despite a halting
recovery in the U.S. econ-
omy as the Federal Reserve
provided huge support to
the financial system, buying
hundreds of billions of dol-
lars' worth of bonds and
holding benchmark interest
rates near zero. Last month
the Fed said it would keep
rates low until the unem-
ployment rate improved sig-
nificantly
"Without the Federal Re-
serve doing what they did


gained 3.8 percent for the
Market watch week, its biggest weekly ad-
Jan. 4, 2013 vance since June. The Nas-
daq closed up 1.09 point at
Dow Jones +43.85 3,101.66.
industrials3,101.66.
industrials 13,435.21 Stocks have surged this


Nasdaq +1.09 week after lawmakers
composite daq +1.09 passed a bill to avoid a com-
composite 3,101.66 bination of government

Standard & +7.10 spending cuts and tax in-
Poor's 500 1o466 47 creases that have come to be
1,466.47 known as the "fiscal cliff."
Russell +6.55 The law passed late Tues-
2000 879.15 day night averted that out-
come, which could have
NYSE diary pushed the economy back
Advanced: 2,333 into recession.

Declined: 715 The Labor Department
said U.S. employers added
Unchanged: 107 155,000 jobs in December,

Volume: 3.4 b showing that hiring held up

Nasda dia during the tense fiscal nego-
Nasdaq diary tiations in Washington. It
Advanced: 1,597 also said hiring was

Declined: 859 stronger in November than

Unchanged: 112 first thought. The unem-
ployment rate held steady at
Volume: 1.7 b AP 7.8 percent.

The jobs report failed to
or the last few years, there give stocks more of a boost
vould be no way you'd be because the number of jobs
lear any of these levels in was exactly in line with ana-
he index," said Joe Saluzzi, lysts' forecasts, said JJ Ki-
o-head of equity trading at nahan, chief derivatives
Phemis Trading. "I would trader for TD Ameritrade.
all this the Fed-levitating "The jobs report couldn't
market." have been more in line," Ki-
The Dow Jones industrial nahan said. "The market
average finished 43.85 had more to lose than to
points higher at 13,435.21. It gain from it."


investments in its "P-Fresh"
fresh-food section. Out of its
1,782 stores, about 1100 have
an expanded fresh food lay-
out and more than 250 have
a full grocery store.
With that push complete,
Target decided the time was
right to put the focus on its
groceries, but in a way that
still plays on Target's fash-
ion know how, said chief
marketing officer Jeff Jones.
Target, with ad agency
Mono in Minneapolis, cre-
ated the tongue-in-cheek
campaign that treats gro-
ceries and home products
like fashion accessories in a
photo shoot. Spending is
undisclosed on the ad cam-
paign, but it will include eight
TV ads that will run through-
out 2013. In addition to TV
spots and newspaper inserts,
it will include three radio ads
and digital short films that
will run as banner ads online.
One TV ad shows an
$11.99 bottle of Tide laundry
detergent and a model in a
white dress dancing fanci-
fully
"We all yearn for some-
thing," says a voiceover as
bubbles float by the model.
"And that something is the


other sock."
The campaign "creates a
foil for what people are
used to seeing for grocery
advertising," said Jones. "It
combines the design ethos
and fashion creditability
that Target has with the idea
that it also has great grocery
items at a great price."
Target's ad campaign
comes as the retailer faces
some challenges.
On Thursday, Target re-
ported that revenue at
stores open at least one year
was flat in December a
key holiday sales period.
The company, based in Min-
neapolis, blamed the de-
cline in part on weakness in
sales of merchandise such
as furniture and electronics.
Target, which also has be-
come known for pairing up
with upscale designers who
create lines that it can sell
for a limited time, was also
recently dinged by bad pub-
licity for its collaboration
with posh retailer Neiman
Marcus. The line debuted
Dec. 1 and included 50
products from 24 designers,
including a $70 Marc Jacobs
scarf and a $500 Alice +
Olivia bike.


I NEWYORKSTOCK EXCHANGE I


Name Last Chg
SwstnEngy 34.34 +.87
SpectraEn 28.33 +.14
SprintNex 5.92 +.10
SP Mais 38.67 +.47
SP HIthC 40.90 +.18
SPCnSt 35.81 +.10
SPConsum 48.73 +.18
SP Engy 73.79 +.81
SPDRFncl 17.05 +.20
SP Inds 39.12 +.29
SPTedch 29.50 -.12
SP UI 35.74 +.18
StdPac 7.66 +.10
Standex 52.20 +.58
StanBlkDk 74.76 +.71
StarwdHfl 60.38 +.80
StateStr 49.39 +1.33
Steris 35.42 +.27
SDIIwrM 13.03 +.05
StratHotels 6.60 -.03
Sbyker 56.73 +.59
SturmRug 47.33 -.01
SubPpne 41.24 +.31
SunCmts 40.92 +.17
Suncorgs 33.97 +.23
SunriseSen 14.47 +.02
Suntedich 1.87 +.05
SunTrst 29.42 +.79
SupEnrgy 22.36 +.51
Supvalu 2.94 +.35
Synovus 2.69 +.12


Sysco 31.85
TCFFncl 12.94
TDAmeritr 18.05
TE Connect 37.64
TECO 17.18
TJXs 44.56
ThawSemi 17.96
TalismEg 12.03
TangerFac 34.35
Target 60.58
TataMotors 28.83
TeckResg 37.74
TelefEsp 13.64
TenetHltrs 34.11
Teradyn 17.30
Terex 29.58
TerraNitro 231.22
Tesoro 42.54
TetraTech 8.07
TevaPhrm 38.04
Textron 26.23
Theragen 1.61
ThermoFis 65.37
ThomCrkg 4.33
3DSys 58.84
3MCo 95.37
Tiffany 61.18
TW Cable 97.75
TimeWarn 49.37
Timken 48.80
TollBros 33.66
TorchEngy .65
Torchmark 53.46


TorDBkg 83.91
Total SA 52.31
TotalSys 22.27
Transom 51.82
Travelers 74.06
Tredgar 21.44
TriConf 16.55
TrinaSolar 4.92
TurqHillRs 8.91
TwoHrblnv 11.72
Tycolntis 29.78
Tyson 20.34
UBSnAG 16.07
UDR 23.99
UIL Hold 36.95
UNS Engy 44.04
US Airwy 14.73
USEC .62
UltraPtg 18.81
UndArmrs 49.35
UniFirst 82.07
UnionPac 130.89
UtdContI 25.85
UPSB 76.57
UtdRentals 48.99
US Bancrp 33.22
USNGsrs 18.42
US OilFd 33.88
USSteel 25.70
UtdTedch 84.98
UtdhlthGp 52.09
UnumGrp 21.89


ValeSA 21.07 -.18
ValeSApf 20.37 -.21
ValeantPh 60.71 -.36
ValeroE 35.31 +.59
VMyNBcp 10.10 +.13
VangTotBd 83.78 +.13
VangTSM 75.43 +.40
VangREIT 66.92 +.31
VangDivAp 61.20 +.28
VangAlIW 46.27 +.22
VangEmg 45.28 +.08
VangEur 49.26 +.41
VangEAFE 35.65 +.20
VarianMed 72.72 .96
Vecren 30.44 +.11
Ventas 64.98 +.30
VeoliaEnv 11.93 +.09
VeriFone 30.83 +.52
VerizonCm 44.30 +.24
Visa 156.77 +1.27
VMware 93.21 +1.27
Vornado 82.25 +.94
WGL Hold 40.46 +.37
WPXErngy 15.73 +.16
Wabash 9.67 -.07
WalMart 69.06 +.26
Walgrn 37.18 -.61
WalterEn 38.02 +.39
WsteMInc 34.08 -.01
WatsnPh 85.30 -.62
Weathflnb 11.59 +.28


ft


n
ti
c
T
c
n


a
p


Target hopes to lure




more grocery shoppers







..I .











)-.



/






Associated Press
This screen grab provided by Target shows an advertisement from the company featuring
a model interacting with baking products. Target is pushing its food, laundry detergent and
other groceries in a national ad campaign that pokes fun at high-fashion advertising by fea-
turing models interacting with everyday products.



Campaign mocks high-fashion advertising


Associated Press


NEW YORK Is Target's
grocery aisle ready for its
close up?
Target is pushing its food,
laundry detergent and other
groceries in a national ad
campaign that pokes fun at
high-fashion advertising by
featuring models interact-
ing with everyday products.
In one ad, a model in a
white dress and high heels
struts by blueberry muffin
and cake mix boxes that ex-
plode in different colors.
Then she crushes an egg
with her hand.
"Dominate that PTA bake
sale," a voiceover whispers.
"The Everyday Collection.
By Target"
The campaign is part of a
larger move by Target, bet-
ter known for its cheap-chic
clothing and home goods, to
focus more on its grocery-
store aisle. Discounters
such as Wal-Mart Stores Inc.
have increasingly focused
expanding their selections
of groceries to lure more
customers into stores.
For its part, Target has
been expanding its grocery
selection, particularly with


WtWatch 58.54
WeinRIt 27.69
WellPoint 59.29
WellsFargo 34.94
WestarEn 29.44
WAstEMkt 15.80
WstAMgdHi 6.25
WAstlnfOpp 13.21
WstnRefin 28.82
WstnUnion 14.02
Weyerhsr 29.39
Whrlpl 105.99
WhiteWvn 15.98
WhibngPet 46.27
WmsCos 34.14
WmsPtrs 50.33
Winnbgo 18.42
WiscEngy 37.69
WTJpTot 37.99
WT India 19.82
Worthgtn 27.09
Wyndham 56.14
XL Grp 26.01
XcelEngy 27.40
Xerox 7.11
YPFSoc 14.87
Yamanag 16.57
Yelpn 21.52
YingliGrn 2.80
YoukuTud 19.49
YumBrnds 68.32







Page A8 SATURDAY, JANUARY 5,2013



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan........... .................. publisher
Mike Arnold ................... ................. editor
Charlie Brennan ......................... editor at large
Curt Ebitz.............. ............ citizen member
Z i fl Mac Harris ..................... .........citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ........... ................. copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


BAD ANSWER





Arming





teachers





not viable


After the initial shock of
the terrible school vio-
lence at Newtown, par-
ents, educators and police
began to look for answers for
what led to the tragedy, and


what could be
done to prevent
another. Pre-
dictably, the pro-
posed solutions
have been varied
and sometimes at
odds with each
other.
Some have
called for much
stricter restric-


THE IS
Arming t
to prevent
violer

OUR OP
Not a good


tions on gun purchases, for re-
strictions on assault weapons
and high-capacity magazines,
and other limits on gun owner-
ship. Others have urged for
money for improvements in
identifying and treating mental
health issues, and still others
have called for more guns in
schools, including arming
teachers.
Arming teachers is based on
the argument if teachers had
guns, a would-be killer would
know they could fire back, and
thus would be deterred. This is
the argument pitched by the
National Rifle Association and
the idea appeals to many in our
community.
Others, however, including
many educational leaders at
the local, state and federal lev-
els, oppose arming teachers on
both practical and philosophi-
cal grounds.
We side with the second
group opposing arming teach-
ers. While this idea has super-
ficial appeal, we believe the
potential risks far outweigh the
benefits.
Aside from the question of
whether teachers who entered
the field to educate the young
would want to carry weapons,
there are both practical and
philosophic issues involved
with arming teachers.
Currently, we allow law en-


What will be cut?
I haven't seen much on the
budget. Now I'm checking to see
where the cut in spending's going to
be. If you can itemize that a little bit
and let us know. There's a lot of
room that we can cut things back,
so let's cut them back. Let
the people know where f
we're cutting back stuff. V
They have to shut down
things that are out there
just kind of making it fun
for people. Let's shut the
fun stuff down and cut
these taxes back to protect j
these property owners and
make sure that they can CAL
cut the spending in the 5Q
commission office and 3-"
move this county along to a
better day.
The larger the boom
I'm looking at a picture on page
12 of the Friday (Dec. 28) Chroni-
cle of a woman being taught to


I


I

0


forcement officers to carry
weapons and use deadly force
if necessary, while acting in the
scope of their authority as offi-
cers of the law. They have some
immunity from lawsuits for
damages that
might occur when
;SUE: using these
teachers weapons. It is fair
t school to ask whether the
t school state is prepared
to extend this im-
munity to teachers
INION: who do not have
I solution. the level of train-
ing and experi-
ence of police
officers.
Also, it is fair to ask whether
parents want teachers with
limited training and experi-
ence in the use of firearms, au-
thorized to discharge deadly
weapons on school grounds.
Would a teacher be willing to,
and capable of, engaging a gun-
man firing rapidly in a school,
or would a teacher armed with
a pistol be simply outgunned
by a person with an assault
rifle and perhaps body armor?
These are not trivial
questions.
Our schools already have
deputies who serve as School
Resources Officers. It is fair to
ask whether this program
should be extended. Do we be-
lieve we can assure safety by
adding ever more levels of po-
lice and/or armed security at
our schools? Is this a practical
solution?
It is also fair to ask whether
adding more armed presence
would solve the problem or be
little more than a Band-Aid
that has more cosmetic than
healing value.
There are no easy answers to
these questions. We encourage
real dialogue on the issue of how
to prevent future events such as
those at Newtown, but as part of
this dialogue, we do not support
arming teachers. We believe
there are better solutions.


use a 9mm Glock pistol in her
classroom out in Utah. This
seems almost insane to me. Two
reasons: One is, pistols don't be-
long in the classroom anyhow. It's
not the OK Corral. But the second
reason is, why would a teacher
use a 9mm? You might as well
teach her to use a
JND Bazooka or a small can-
JlD non. I would think a
WE woman of that size
would be well armed with
S a .25 or a .30 caliber au-
tomatic, never mind a big
killer like a 9mm. Appar-
ently this is part of the
firearms cult, the belief
that the bigger the cal-
)C579 iber, the larger the bullet,
) 7 v the larger the boom.
Money the master
This Sound Off goes out to the
person that says you can't serve
two masters, God and money. Well,
I'm going to serve money because,
after all, we know that's real.


The face of death
Editor's note: Davida E Tolley,
a sophomore at Inverness Chris-
tian Academy, was stirred to
write the following letter to the
editor following the Sandy Hook
Elementary tragedy.
Dear Editor,
When I heard about the chil-
dren being killed at Sandy Hook
Elementary school, I was deeply
moved. I sat down and this is
what I wrote.
I am the voice of innocence.
My voice crawls out of my hid-
ing place.
My eyes stare into the face of
death.
The black smoke terroizes my
body
Trails of blood blur my vision.
I watch the trail pour into the
streets.
They begin to flow into the
path of graves.
My desire is not to face death.
Not here! Not now!
The choice does not belong to


me.
Bright rays sting my s
I am blinded by the li
standing before me.
I am here.
I am safe.
I am finally home.
Davida


Fund SRO,
Dear Governor Scott:
The tragic shootings i
town, Conn., have stirre
tions and reactions that
spectrum of anger and o
It has also brought to th
the need for greater scr


"Fear is the main source of superstition,
and one of the main sources of cruelty."
Bertrand Russell, 1950


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Scales balanced for Biden


BY DOUGLAS COHN
AND ELEANOR CLIFT
WASHINGTON
t was after 11 in the evening
on New Year's Day when
President Obama stepped
into the White House briefing
room with Vice President Joe
Biden at his side to thank all the
parties involved, and to praise his
vice president for brokering the
tax package that saved the coun-
try from the fiscal cliff. It was a
good deal from Obama's perspec-
tive, and a lot of the credit goes to
Biden.
First elected to the Senate at
age 29, Biden took office at age
30, the minimum age required for
the job in the Constitution, and
he had served as Delaware's sen-
ator for 35 years when Obama
chose him for vice president. The
wisdom of that choice became
abundantly clear during the fal-
tering fiscal cliff negotiations
when Republican leader Mitch
McConnell called Biden asking,
"Does anybody down there know
how to make a deal?"
After checking first with
Obama, Biden threw himself into
the fray, making offers and
counter-offers to McConnell, cob-
bling together a workable com-
promise and then selling it to
nervous Democrats wary that the
White House was giving away too
much in search of a bipartisan
consensus. Like Ted Kennedy be-
fore him, Biden is a Democrat
that other Democrats trust to


ii

Kt~K


make compromises they can live
with.
When Biden cast his vote for
the Obama-Biden ticket in his
home state of Delaware on Nov 6,
reporters wanted to know if he
felt nostalgic, and if this was the
last time he would vote for him-
self. "No, I don't think so," he
replied with a smile. Sure, sure,
the pundits said, indulging good
ole Joe in what looked to most
like fantasy, that he would be
Obama's natural heir and con-
tend for the presidency in 2016.
Biden turned 70 in November,
and for a Democratic coalition
built around the 51-year-old
Obama, the vice president isn't
the first person who comes to
mind to pick up the Obama man-
tle. The drumbeat has been for
Hillary Clinton, the most ad-
mired woman in the world for
each of the past 11 years, and the
presumed frontrunner for the
2016 Democratic nomination,
should she choose to run. Former
House Speaker Newt Gingrich
has said he can't think of anyone
in either party who could chal-
lenge Hillary
Granted, it's way too early to be
handicapping the 2016 presiden-
tial race, but at this moment, with
Clinton looking physically vul-
nerable and Biden looking like
the master legislator, the scales
have evened out somewhat. After
four grueling years as secretary
of state, Clinton may decide she
likes private life where, like her


husband, the former president,
she can make a huge impact on
issues she cares about without
getting the day-to-day scrutiny
from the media and political
opponents.
Biden, who has had health is-
sues in the past, is fully recovered
from the brain aneurysm he suf-
fered in 1988. He's energetic and
gregarious and seems to enjoy
politics in the same way Bill Clin-
ton does, drawing energy from
the campaign trail. He loves to
talk, almost too much, and he's
known for his gaffes, but when it
comes down to doing business on
Capitol Hill, he knows what to do
and how to do it.
Presidents are expected to do
all sorts of things and working
with Congress is high on the list.
The friendships Biden made dur-
ing his more than three decades
in the Senate are paying off now,
and it's fair to ask how much
more a president could accom-
plish legislatively if he or she had
Biden's experience and relation-
ships. Biden's presidential aspi-
rations suddenly don't seem as
farfetched as they once did. And
as Obama fades into lame-duck
status, Biden could be the man to
watch.

Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift
author the Washington
Merry-Go-Round column,
founded in 1932 by Drew
Pearson.


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Mike Arnold
at 352-564-2930.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

school and classroom safety. I
have an idea that I believe may


go a long way towards making
eight. our state's public schools safer
ght During my lengthy legislative
career I have visited many pub-
lic schools. I have found that the
presence of school resource offi-
cers (SRO) in middle and high
schools have had a positive im-
F. Tolley pact on many aspects of school
Inverness operations. School resource offi-
cers are trained to understand
S the unique needs of children, in
addition to their roles as en-
forcement officers. SROs have
n New- proven time and again more
d emo- than able to not only maintain a
L span the safe school environment, they
outrage. often are able to see and help
e fore address needs that students may
utiny of have both in and out of school.


My idea is simple. I would
greatly appreciate it if you
would include a proposal in
your budget that would fund a
SRO in Florida's elementary
schools. Although there are no
guarantees, it is quite possible
that the mere presence of a law
enforcement officer on campus
may be enough of a deterrent to
curb or totally prevent school-
based violence. While this no
doubt will be an expensive
proposition, no price tag can be
placed on the lives of the pre-
cious children our public
schools are entrusted with each
and every day of the school year
Thank you in advance for your
consideration of this request If
you would like to discuss this
proposal in greater detail please
do not hesitate to contact me.
Mike Fasano
state representative, District 36

Seeking peace of mind
As a mother of three children
who attend Citrus County
schools, I have been horrified
since the events that took place
at Sandy Hook Elementary
School. I could only imagine the
pain and fear they must all have,
but we ourselves have fear of
sending our children to school
because of current threats that
have been made.
I know the sheriff's office and
schools are doing the best they
can to keep our children safe,
but until the fear is gone a lot of
parents, including myself, will
be keeping our children home
for peace of mind. But will this
fear ever really go away?
Nikki Collier
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


LETTERS


I to the Editor





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LETTERS < to the Editor


Unions hurt US
I see that Chuck Weiler
disagrees with me again,
but I respect him for send-
ing a letter with his name
rather than being a coward
with a phone call.
That being said, it is easy
to see he has swallowed the
union story that they are
never to blame; that Host-
ess and Eastern Airlines
were going to go belly up
anyway It makes nice copy,
but it is just propaganda.
Last week while in Tampa,
we saw a car with a
bumper sticker that read
"Live Well; Work Union,"
and it was on the rear of a
new Japanese car I'll bet
his brothers at the UAW
loved him.
While Ford may or may
not have been a strike tar-
get in 1961, the Ford ware-
house I worked at did
strike, and they talked
about ax handles, knees
and busted windshields as
I stated. I didn't see any of
it as I went fishing during
the strike.
No Mr Weiler, nobody
"got me the job" with Ford,
I got it myself and yes it
was covering the summer
break after I got out of the
service waiting for college
to begin. At a buck an hour,
I would hardly call that a
good job as he does.
The union did teach me
a great deal about their
work ethic. Our shift was
from 6 p.m. until 2 a.m. and
on the top warehouse
racks were huge cartons
that were filled will small
boxes of instruments,
gauges etc. They would cut
an opening in the side of
the big box to get to the lit-
tle boxes inside, but the
opening was always to-
wards the wall so no one
on the floor below could
see the opening. The guys
would take turns sleeping
inside these boxes and if
the foreman came too
close, a buddy would raise
a signal so the guy didn't
get caught napping. Yep,
the unions have done a lot
for the United States.
And now Mr Weiler


claims I am attacking the
middle class? Mr Weiler, I
am in the middle class ... at
the lower end.
I would have responded
sooner but we just got back
from Tampa after a couple
weeks where the incredible
people at Moffitt Cancer
Center gave my wife her
life back. God bless them!
Harry Cooper
Hernando

Missing the mark
Most people love Christ-
mas lights and decorations,
and I'm no exception. I was
excited to read that our
community, Cypress Village
of Sugarmill Woods, was
getting new decorations at
our entrance on U.S. 19.
They're up but I'm very dis-
appointed! Just lights and
trees that look snow-cov-
ered, and a 'Happy Holi-
days' sign. To me, no
warmth or good feelings
are evoked by these deco-
rations, they're very cold.
I know it's politically cor-
rect to say 'Happy Holi-
days' instead of 'Merry
Christmas' to avoid giving
offense to people with
other religious beliefs. But
to me, that belittles my hol-
iday without recognizing
the other holidays.
I'd rather that public
decorations include a na-
tivity scene and a menorah,
and even a Santa Claus! I
don't know what other reli-
gions use for their own hol-
iday decorations, but I'd
rather include all of them
than be so generic that
Christmas cannot be men-
tioned. I would guess that
80 percent of the general
public celebrates Christ-
mas, whether Baby Jesus
or Santa Claus is their rea-
son for the season!
So please, say 'Merry
Christmas' if that's your
holiday, and be proud of it!
And please, cities and
towns and private busi-
nesses and communities,
don't fall back on the 'Happy
Holidays' theme. Include all
the holidays instead of ex-
cluding any, so we can all


celebrate together
Dorothy Abel
Homosassa

Time for change
The murders of the New-
town children and teachers
was and is a horrifying and
sorrowful wake-up call to
America to get its act to-
gether concerning gun con-
trol. I don't own a gun
because I have children in
the house, but I do believe in
the Second Amendment... to
a point. I feel it needs some
updating. Violence and
death caused by guns has
become absurdly common-
place in America. You now
can't go to a movie, a mall,
school, political events...
without looking for a way to
exit in case some deranged
person decides to kill every-
one in sight
As we all now know, the
shooter's mother was a gun
nut, who by all outside ap-
pearances was a responsi-
ble, registered gun owner.
The first thing that needs to
change is that if you have a
mentally ill person in your
family, then sorry, a firearm
is not for you. My right to
my family's safety defi-
nitely trumps your right to
own a handgun. Unfortu-
nately the love for guns re-
sulted in tragedy for others.
We also have to stop
being controlled by the
NRA, which is so wealthy
and powerful it can buy
and sell politicians. I am
looking forward to seeing
the NRA's conference to
see the solution it offers to
end gun violence. I hope it
offers substantial solutions
because I have had enough
of gun violence and will
fight for change. It's shame-
ful the assault weapons ban
expired in 2004 and hasn't
been renewed. That also
needs to change. Gun con-
trol is going to be the
biggest issue of 2013, and it
should be. Let's debate this
strongly, compromise and
figure out how we can pro-
tect our children.
E.G. Yerian
Homosassa


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4. ) ( ,
ul ,:


- I,!-.


Low pay not prosperity
I seriously love how Mr. Mulligan says
Citrus County is doing so good with em-
ployment because we're opening all
these new retail shops, like a new Wal-
mart, and new grocery stores, like the
Publix in Inverness. Come on, Mr. Mulli-
gan, these are retail jobs. They don't
even pay $10 an hour, which isn't a living
wage anywhere, much less Citrus County,
Fla. So these new jobs don't mean any-
thing to anyone. As long as they pay less
than $10 an hour, they're nothing.
Who makes it up?
I've been amazed at the number of
people in this area both calling in and
writing in to your paper supporting
Progress Energy on their nonpayment of
taxes. Don't they understand that home-
owners will have to make up the shortfall?
And what's to say Progress Energy won't
pay less tax again next year because they
feel they're overpaying since they have
seem to have gotten away with it this
time? What if other businesses decide
they also are paying too much in taxes?
Trashy roadsides
I agree with the mess of the roads,
the sides of Citrus County roads and it
really is starting to look disgusting.
(U.S.) 41 has been cleaned up and we
much appreciate that. My husband and
I cleaned up the entrance to our area,
which is (County Road) 495 and Basil-
ico. If everyone else would do the same,
that would be helpful. It would also be
nice to see in the paper the phone num-
ber that you could call if you see some-
one littering because I would like them
prosecuted to the fullest extent of the


law. Our roadsides look horrible lately
and it wasn't like this a year ago when
we moved here. It's very sad that people
can't do away with their own trash.
NRA affiliations
It should be obvious to the thinking
few that the National Rifle Association is
in bed with the gun manufacturers. Wake
up, America. A former NRA member.
Don't give away water
I see now they're going to be doing a
study of the groundwater levels in nine
counties, trying to figure out a way to re-
plenish them, maybe using water out of
the rivers. How about not giving away our
water to the blankety-blank bottling com-
pany. Would that be a good start, huh?
Port spending
Regarding questions about training
funds for Port Citrus: How can you take
county money ad valorem taxes and
spend it on training for something that's
going to be a public port? I don't under-
stand how you can spend county money
on a public port.
Yellow book deluge
We got another small Yellow Pages tele-
phone book. How many of these do we
need? We need one with residents, a small
one with Crystal River and Homosassa. We
don't need another yellow book.
Looking for lost jumper
Sunday, Dec. 16, between 8 and 12
o'clock noon, my husband dropped his
short-sleeved Skyview jumper on the
golf course between the eighth and
ninth green. It was never turned in. I
hope you enjoy it as much as he did.


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OPINION


SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 2013 A9


FRAM-Y 2WN9tEl












NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NationBRIEFS Some push secret lottery wins
Farm show


WorldBRIEFS

Protests


Associated Press
Ducklings keep warm near
a heat lamp Friday at the
97th Pennsylvania Farm
Show in Harrisburg, Pa. The
show runs through Jan. 12.


Electoral College
affirms Obama
WASHINGTON Con-
gress made the obvious offi-
cial on Friday. President
Barack Obama has been
re-elected.
In a joint session, Congress
formally certified Obama and
Vice President Joe Biden
were the winners in the No-
vember election with 332 elec-
toral votes, well more than the
270 required. Republican Mitt
Romney and his running
mate, Rep. Paul Ryan of Wis-
consin, won 206 votes.
It's a mostly ceremonial -
yet constitutionally necessary
- vote that's mostly intrigu-
ing to political junkies and
policy wonks. The count Fri-
day lacked the suspense of
the drawn-out campaign and
election but was steeped in
tradition.
Library amasses
170 billion tweets
WASHINGTON -The Li-
brary of Congress says it's
amassed about 170 billion
tweets since it began collect-
ing an archive of all Twitter
messages in 2010.
Twitter is donating its
archive to the library, going
back to the first one posted in
2006.
Library Director of Commu-
nications Gayle Osterberg
wrote in a blog post Friday
that the volume of tweets it
receives has grown from 140
million daily in February 2011
to nearly half a billion tweets
each day in late 2012.
Librarians have been de-
veloping a system to preserve
and organize the collection.
Now the library is shifting its
focus to handle the technical
challenges of making such a
massive archive available to
researchers.
The library may work with a
private partner to provide ac-
cess because its own search
technology is slow.
Senator pleads
guilty to DWI
ALEXANDRIA, Va. U.S.
Sen. Michael Crapo pleaded
guilty Friday to a charge of
driving while intoxicated and
then apologized for his ac-
tions and asked forgiveness
from his constituents.
The Idaho Republican said
nothing dur-
ing a brief 1
appearance
in Alexan-
dria Gen-
eral District
Court,
where he
pleaded
guilty to the iSen.
misde- Crapo
meanor vowed to
and was or- stop drinking.
dered to
pay a $250 fine and complete
an alcohol safety program.
He also agreed to a 12-month
suspension of his driver's li-
cense. The sentence is typi-
cal for first-time drunken-
driving offenders in Virginia.
Outside of court and in a
subsequent conference call
with reporters in his home
state, Crapo apologized and
said he'd been drinking alco-
hol a few nights a week, in vi-
olation of the tenets of his
Mormon faith.
Crapo said he tried alcohol
for the first time about a year
ago, though he couldn't re-
member the details.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
PHOENIX When two
winning tickets for a record
$588 million Powerball jack-
pot were claimed from the
Nov 28 drawing, the world
focused on the winners.
A Missouri couple ap-
peared at a news conference
and held up the traditional
giant-sized check. The Ari-
zona winner, however,
skipped the news confer-
ence where lottery officials
announced last month that
someone had claimed the
second half of the prize.


Associated Press
WASHINGTON The new Con-
gress on Friday rushed out $9.7 bil-
lion to help pay flood insurance
claims to 115,000 people and busi-
nesses afflicted by Superstorm
Sandy, two days after New Jersey's
governor and other Northeast Re-
publicans upbraided Speaker John
Boehner for killing a broader pack-
age for state and local governments
in the storm's path.
The bill replenishes the National
Flood Insurance Program that was
due to run out of money next week
with the pending Sandy-related
claims, as well as 5,000 unresolved
claims from other floods.
"It's a small down payment on the
larger aid we need," said Sen. Chuck
Schumer, D-N.Y The legislation
cleared the Senate by a voice vote
following passage by the House, 354-
67.
The government already has spent
about $2 billion on the emergency re-
sponse to the late October storm, one
of the worst ever in the Northeast It
slammed the Atlantic coastline from
North Carolina to Maine, with the
worst damage occurring in New York
City and its suburbs, New Jersey and
Connecticut The storm is blamed for
140 deaths.


The differing approach to
releasing information on
the winners reflects a
broader debate that is play-
ing out in state Legislatures
and lottery offices nation-
wide: Should the winners'
names be secret?
Lawmakers in Michigan
and New Jersey think so,
proposing bills to allow
anonymity because winners
are prone to falling victim to
scams, shady businesses,
greedy distant family mem-
bers and violent criminals
looking to shake them down.
Lotteries object, arguing


that publicizing the win-
ners' names drives sales
and having their names re-
leased ensures people know
there isn't something fishy
afoot, like a game rigged so
a lottery insider wins.
When players see that an
actual person won, "it has a
much greater impact than
when they might read that
the lottery paid a big prize
to an anonymous player,"
said Andi Brancato, director
of public relations for the
Michigan state lottery
Most states require the
names of lottery winners be


.. -' ;K. g si-" '^ ^ ;,-i;* r .
,s i.- \ -'", |
' L I;" ,, -a


Boehner has promised a vote Jan.
15 on a broader, $51 billion package
of aid, which would bring the total to
the more than $60 billion requested
by President Barack Obama. Senate
leaders have promised a vote the fol-
lowing week
The Senate passed a $60.4 billion
bill a week ago but House Republi-
cans, complaining that it was laden
with pork projects unrelated to the
storm, cut it by more than half.
Boehner canceled a New Year's Day
vote on it after nearly two-thirds of
House Republicans voted against
the "fiscal cliff" package of tax and
spending increases.
The White House praised Friday's
vote helping homeowners, renters
and businesses, and urged Congress
to act quickly on the remainder of
Obama's request.
New Jersey Gov Chris Christie
and New York Gov Andrew Cuomo
issued a joint statement also implor-
ing Congress to move hastily on the
rest of the money "We are trusting
Congress to act accordingly on Janu-
ary 15th," they said.
It was a more temperate response
than was heard earlier in the week,
when a livid Christie blistered
House Republicans and Boehner
himself for holding up the aid and
other GOP figures from the region, as


disclosed, albeit in different
ways. Some states require
the winner to appear at a
news conference, like Mis-
souri winners Mark and
Cindy Hill did on Nov 30.
Arizona and other states
allow winners not to appear
in public, but their names
can be obtained through
public records laws. The
Arizona winner, Matthew
Good, was not identified at
the news conference a week
after the Hills came for-
ward, and has not given in-
terviews or appeared in
public.


a


well as Democrats, cried "betrayal."
All of the "no" votes in the House
were cast by Republicans, who said
other government programs should
have been cut to pay for the meas-
ure. As with past natural disasters,
the Sandy aid proposals do not pro-
vide for offsetting spending cuts,
meaning the aid comes at the cost of
higher deficits.
The bill gives more authority to
the National Flood Insurance Pro-
gram to borrow money from the U.S.
Treasury to pay claims. Premiums
average about $625 per year and res-
idential claims under the program
average nearly $30,000.
Rep. Tim Huelskamp, R-Kan., a
fiscal conservative who voted
against the flood bill, said he was
among those with concerns it would
add to huge budget deficits. "We
have to talk seriously about offsets,"
Huelskamp said. "We can't take $60
billion off budget, that's my problem
with it."
The Club For Growth, a conserva-
tive group, urged lawmakers to op-
pose the flood insurance bill.
"Congress should not allow the fed-
eral government to be involved in the
flood insurance industry in the first
place, let alone expand the national
flood insurance program's author-
ity," the group said in a statement


FDA proposes sweeping new food safety rules


Associated Press


WASHINGTON The
Food and Drug Administra-
tion on Friday proposed the
most sweeping food safety
rules in decades, requiring
farmers and food compa-
nies to be more vigilant in
the wake of deadly out-
breaks in peanuts, can-
taloupe and leafy greens.
The long-overdue regula-
tions are aimed at reducing
the estimated 3,000 deaths a
year from foodborne illness.
Just since last summer, out-
breaks of listeria in cheese
and salmonella in peanut
butter, mangoes and can-
taloupe have been linked to
more than 400 illnesses and
as many as seven deaths, ac-
cording to the federal Cen-


ters for Disease Control and
Prevention. The actual
number of those sickened is
likely much higher
The FDAs proposed rules
would require farmers to
take new precautions
against contamination, to
include making sure work-
ers' hands are washed, irri-
gation water is clean, and
that animals stay out of
fields. Food manufacturers
will have to submit food
safety plans to the govern-
ment to show they are keep-
ing their operations clean.
Many responsible food
companies and farmers are
already following the steps
that the FDA would now re-
quire them to take. But offi-
cials say the requirements
could have saved lives.


Associated Press
Cantaloupes rot in the afternoon heat Sept. 28, 2011, on a
field on the Jensen Farms near Holly, Colo. The U.S. Food
and Drug Administration on Friday proposed the most sweep-
ing food safety rules in decades, requiring farmers and food
companies to be more vigilant in the wake of deadly out-
breaks in peanuts, cantaloupe and leafy greens.


Superstorm aid


Associated Press
A Jordanian boy wears a
headband with Arabic writ-
ing that reads "there is no
God but Allah, and Mo-
hammed is his Prophet,"
during a rally Friday by Jor-
danian and Syrian followers
of the banned Islamic-ori-
ented Hizb AI-Tahrir, Libera-
tion Party, in front of the
Syrian embassy in Amman,
Jordan. Hundreds of pro-
testers shouted slogans
proclaiming that Syria will
have an Islamic state after
the toppling of Bashar
Assad and his regime.


Puerto Rico to call
National Guard
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico-
Puerto Rico's new governor is
calling out National Guard
troops to help prevent drug
and weapons smuggling.
Alejandro Garcia Padilla
said late Thursday that sol-
diers will be stationed in ports
and airports across the U.S.
territory to help bolster secu-
rity. It was his first executive
order as governor.
At least 50 soldiers and air-
men will be activated by Feb-
ruary, National Guard
spokesman Maj. Paul Dahlen
said Friday.
The National Guard was last
activated in February 2010 for
one year to help Puerto Rico
fight rising crime on the island
of 4 million people.
Chavez fighting
lung infection
CARACAS, Venezuela -
Venezuelan President Hugo
Chavez is being treated for
"respiratory deficiency" after
complica-
tions from a
severe lung
infection,
his govern-
ment said,
pointing to
a deepen-
ing crisis for
the ailing Hugo
58-year-old Chavez
president. Venezuelan
Chavez president
hasn't spo- seen Dec. 8.
ken publicly
or been seen since his Dec.
11 operation in Cuba, and the
latest report from his govern-
ment Thursday night in-
creased speculation he is
unlikely to be able to be
sworn in for another term as
scheduled in less than a
week.
Venezuela's vice president
says that President Hugo
Chavez could be sworn in by
the Supreme Court later on if
he's not able to take the oath
of office next week before
lawmakers.
Atom smasher
to go on hiatus
GENEVA- The world's
largest and most powerful
atom smasher goes into a 2-
year hibernation in March, as
engineers carry out a revamp
to help it reach maximum en-
ergy levels that could lead to
more stunning discoveries fol-
lowing the detection of the so-
called "God particle."
With the reopening of its
$10 billion proton collider in
early 2015, the stage will be
set for observing more rare
phenomena and unlocking
more mysteries, said James
Gillies, chief spokesman for
the European particle physics
laboratory known as CERN.
The Large Hadron Collider
under the Swiss-French bor-
der will operate for two more
months, then shut down
through 2014, allowing engi-
neers to lay thousands more
superconducting cables
aimed at bringing the ma-
chine up to "full design en-
ergy," Gillies told The
Associated Press on Friday.
-From wire reports


Lia-
-
-- -
---i- : _


Associated Press
A large construction vehicle carries remnants of the boardwalk Thursday in Seaside Heights, N.J., that was de-
stroyed two months ago by Superstorm Sandy. Under intense pressure from angry Republicans, House Speaker
John Boehner has agreed to a vote this week on aid for Superstorm Sandy recovery.

New Congress approves $9.7 billion in Sandy flood assistance











SPORTS


The NFL playoffs
kick off today with
two matchups./B3




CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 College football/B2
0 NFL/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 Sports briefs/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 High school sports/B5
0 Basketball/B5
o Entertainment/B6


Baldner All-State honorable mention


JON-MICHAEL SORACCHI
Staff Writer
Crystal River senior running
back Dallas Baldner earned an
honorable mention on the Florida
Class 5A All-State Football Team,
which was announced by the As-
sociated Press on Friday morning.
Baldner was the only player
from Citrus County on any of the
teams.
"It's well-deserved," Crystal
River interim coach Randy Owens
said. "I've watched him for four
years; he's a tremendous kid and
he deserves what he got, for sure."
The 6-foot, 175-pound athlete had


1,192 rushing yards, 286 receiving
yards and 15 total touchdowns in
nine games. The touchdowns were
spread out, with nine rushing, four
receiving and two kickoffs.
Baldner's best game of the
season came against Williston,
when he scored five total touch-
downs and had 262 yards from
scrimmage.
"With all the adversity the team
had to go through, I feel like this
is a big honor," Baldner said.
Baldner, the returning 2011
Chronicle Co-Football Player of
the Year, is also one of three final-
ists for the 2012 Chronicle Offen-
sive Football Player of the Year


Baldner is the third member of
his immediate family to be
named to an all-state team: his fa-
ther Russ received the honor in
the late '80s and brother Ronnie
made the second team in 2007.
"It means a lot to my dad, him
being the football player he was,
and my uncle," Baldner said. "My
brother, too."
Besides the numbers, Owens
said Baldner possessed attributes
that don't show up on the stat sheet
"You can't ask for an individual
who has the heart and the deter-
mination Dallas does," Owens said.
"He's very coachable and very
knowledgeable about the game."


Crystal River
senior
running back
Dallas Baldner
was the only
Citrus County
football player
honored by the
Associated
Press as the
Pirate grabbed
honorable
mention
honors on the
Florida Class
5A All-State
football team
Chronicle file photo


Runnin away

18-0 run to open

third quarter

gives Lecanto

rout of Citrus
: O- ....tO.,,,
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
LECANTO It may have
been a season-saving quarter
for the Lecanto boys' basketball
squad. .. ....
The Panthers entered Fri- .
day's home game against Citrus
as losers of four of their last six
games and went into halftime
trailing 33-25.
But an 18-0 run in the third
quarter lifted Lecanto's spirits
and helped hand the Hurri-
canes their first district defeat .
as the Panthers avenged an ear-
lier loss to their county and dis-
trict foes with a 79-64 victory.
Lecanto (11-4 overall, 4-2 dis- .
trict) drained four 3s, which in-
cluded a pair by senior guard
Mikey Makros,
who tallied 12
of his team-
high 14 points
in the second
For more half, during the
photos, click third-quarternd
on this story at rally, and
www.chronicle watched Citrus
online.com. (9-5, 3-1), win-
ners of eight
straight before Thursday's loss
to Hernando, miss 11 straight
from the field to grab a 43-33
lead midway into the period.
"We hit some shots," Lecanto
head coach Frank Vilardi said.
"I think we got great looks in "
the first half, but they weren't
going down. It seemed like
everybody got hot at the same
time.
"We could have been down at
half, but the kids had good en-
ergy. They understood we were
getting the shots we wanted but
just weren't falling. That hap-
pens here sometimes, and
when the shots go down like
that, we make big runs."
The Panthers sustained the
See .Page B4
Lecanto senior Mikey Makros
goes in for the layup as the
Panthers triumphed over Citrus
Friday night at Lecanto
High School.
STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle


Panthers

shut out

'Canes

Lecanto soccer

takes season

sweep of Citrus
JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent
INVERNESS For the
better part of the first half, it
appeared to be something of a
duel between Lecanto's
quick-footed striker Taylor
Christian and acrobatic Citrus
goalkeeper Elizabeth Rinaldi.
Christian put three of her
five shots in the game on Ri-
naldi during the first half
alone while trying to score off
some pretty heart-stopping
breakaway situations.
Ultimately, Christian's ethic
paid off in the 26th minute as
she scored Lecanto's first goal
on the way to a 3-0 shutout win
over the Citrus Hurricanes on
Friday evening at Hurricane
Stadium.
Lecanto (13-4-1 overall) has
won both meetings against the
Hurricanes (9-7) this season,
shutting the Lady 'Canes out
4-0 as well in their Dec. 3
contest.
Rinaldi's style is to be very
upfront and aggressive in net;
rather than hanging back by
the goal, she will actively pur-
sue opposing players as they
attempt to dribble in and shoot
"You just have to be aggres-
sive," Rinaldi said of her ap-
proach. "You can't wait to
come out. As a keeper you
have to make a quick decision
and once I make that decision
I come out to the player which
cuts off the angle and allows
me a better chance of saving
the ball."
Lecanto collectively fired 12
shots at Rinaldi in the first half
with one getting past her Un-
fortunately, Rinaldi's upfront
tactic backfired when Panther
midfielder Jessica Allen arced
a past behind the leading Ri-
naldi to a waiting Christian for
the easy tap-in goal.
Citrus goalkeeper Lauren
Heise (five saves) stepped in
for Rinaldi in the second half.
The Panthers held the Hur-
ricanes shotless in the first 40
minutes and Citrus only man-
aged two shots in the game to
Lecanto's 20.
The Lady Panthers struck


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Still fell short


FSU wins

Orange Bowl,

12 games, but

no BCS title

Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE
Florida State won the At-
lantic Coast Conference, the
Orange Bowl and had 12 vic-
tories for the third time in
school history.
Still, there remains a no-
table void on the school's
2012 resume.
The last two times the
Seminoles won 12 games,
the seasons culminated with
national titles. Everything
seemed to be lined up for
the 13th-ranked Seminoles
(12-2) to make a run at an-
other championship with a
talent-laden, veteran roster,
experienced quarterback
and a favorable schedule.
But the Seminoles were
derailed by a 17-16 loss at
North Carolina State, blow-
ing a 16-point lead against
the double-digit underdog
Wolfpack. Florida State also
lost to archrival Florida in
its regular season finale.
Nonetheless, coach Jimbo
Fisher points out 2012 was
Florida State's best season
since 2000 when it lost to
Oklahoma in the national
championship game.
"We're knocking on the
door," Fisher said after Mon-
day's 31-10 Orange Bowl win
over outmanned Northern
Illinois. "We're right there."
Fisher is 31-10 since tak-
ing over for the iconic
Bobby Bowden in early
2010, a significant turn-
around from the Seminoles'
23-16 in his predecessor's
final three years. And
Fisher believes he has
enough talent aboard to
keep the Seminoles moving
upward. He stands 3-0 in
bowl games, 5-1 against in-
trastate rivals Miami and
Florida in addition to his
first ACC title.
Fisher heads into his
fourth season in 2013 in
need of replacing his start-
ing backfield, three of the
nation's top defensive ends
and the most productive
kicker in NCAA history,
along with at least four de-
parting assistant coaches.
The biggest loss could be
the departure of defensive
coordinator Mark Stoops,
who quickly built one of the
nation's best defenses out of
the ashes of one of the coun-
try's weakest the year be-
fore his arrival. Kentucky
gave Stoops a five-year, $11
million contract to become
their head coach in hopes of
working his magic there.
Restocking one of the na-
tion's stingiest defenses
with a new coordinator will
also be important in the
Seminoles' ability to repeat
as ACC champions in 2013.
EJ Manuel, Chris Thomp-
son and Lonnie Pryor ac-
counted for 11,825 yards and
91 touchdowns between
them and the speedy
Thompson's career was ba-
sically cut in half by injury
A pair of juniors, defensive


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Associated Press
Florida State quarterback EJ Manuel looks to pass during the first half of the Orange Bowl
on Tuesday against Northern Illinois in Miami.


end Bjoern Werner and cor-
nerback Xavier Rhodes, are
also leaving school early
with the likelihood of being
high picks in the NFL draft
in April.
And the Seminoles will
turn to untried redshirt
freshman Roberto Aguayo
as a replacement for place-
kicker Dustin Hopkins, who
leaves as the NCAA's all-
time scoring and field goal
leader. Hopkins' toe ac-
counted for 466 points, in-
cluding 88 field goals during
his record-setting career.
"These guys laid the foun-
dation," Fisher said.
With the veteran backfield
and several key defenders
departing, Fisher and new
defensive coordinator Je-
remy Pruitt face a first
major lineup reshuffling.


While incorporating a
handful of new assistant
coaches into the program,
the restructuring for 2013
starts with finding Manuel's
replacement at quarter-
back. Manuel, who was
Christian Ponder's under-
study his first two years,
went 25-6 as a starter, in-
cluding a 4-0 bowl mark.
Manuel joined former West
Virginia quarterback Pat
White as the lone quarter-
backs to lead their team to
four wins in bowl games.
Although rising redshirt
junior Clint Trickett begins
spring practice in March as
Manuel's replacement, he'll
be challenged by Jacob
Coker, Sean McGuire and
Jameis Winston, an elusive
6-4, 210-pound athlete con-
sidered by many the best


quarterback coming out of
high school a year ago. Win-
ston, however, will split time
with the baseball team while
competing for the starting
quarterback position.
Whoever wins the starting
quarterback job should ben-
efit from an experienced of-
fensive line that returns
virtually intact and a cadre of
talented receivers led by
Rashad Greene, who is al-
ready closing in on the top 10
career marks at Florida State
in catches, receiving yards
and touchdowns as he heads
into his junior campaign.
Tailbacks James Wilder Jr
and Devonta Freeman, who
will both be juniors, may
each see an increased work-
load next year The two have
combined for 2,034 and 28
touchdowns rushing.


Golden trying to


move Miami up


Coach's goal

for 'Canes is

BCS game

Associated Press

FORT LAUDERDALE
- The national champi-
onship will be won on the
Miami Hurricanes' home
field this season.
Al Golden won't be
watching.
Instead, the Hurricanes'
coach will be busy trying to
get his own team closer to
that level. When either No.
1 Notre Dame or No. 2 Ala-
bama hoists that crystal
football on Monday night,
someone might
have to tell
Golden who
wins. For
Golden and the
Hurricanes, the
2012 season is a
thing of the past, with prepa-
rations already well under-
way for the 2013 campaign
- things like finishing up
playbook-related items and
making sure recruiting ends
with a flourish.
"We're moving forward,"
Golden said. "We like the
University of Miami and
we're very excited about
the team that we have. We
lose one starter on offense
and one starter on defense,
and when everybody re-
ports back for spring, we're
going to add about 20 guys
to that with redshirts and
people enrolling at
midyear. That doesn't hap-
pen very often."
Miami self-imposed a
second consecutive post-
season ban after finishing
7-5 in 2012, costing the Hur-
ricanes a trip to the At-


lantic Coast Conference
championship game and a
bowl appearance possi-
bly the Orange Bowl, which
would have been their final
destination if they won the
ACC title. The Hurricanes
sat out because of an ongo-
ing NCAA investigation
into compliance practices,
a probe that started in 2011
and is now believed to be
winding down.
The next step in that
plan is for the NCAA to de-
liver the notice of allega-
tions, a move that has been
expected for months and
still has not occurred.
"We just want to receive
the notice," Golden said.
"The day we do that is the
day we take a big step for-
ward. I don't think there's
any question
That will be a re-
lease. And the
good thing there
is we don't antic-
ipate any shock
or any surprise."
Once Miami receives the
notice of allegations, the
school can either agree
with the NCAA findings -
that almost certainly won't
happen or file a re-
sponse within 90 days and
schedule a hearing before
the Committee on
Infractions.
"In this joint inquiry
we've been open and hon-
est and we feel like we're
on top of it as a university
and certainly as an admin-
istration," Golden said.
Golden and his staff are
at some high school All-
Star games around the
country this weekend,
looking for more commit-
ments, and the Hurricanes
have already signed Beau
Sandland the nation's
top-ranked junior college
tight end.


Turner announced


as FIU head coach


Associated Press

MIAMI Florida Inter-
national announced the
hiring of football coach
Ron Turner at an introduc-
tory news conference
Friday
Turner signed a five-year
deal with a base salary of
$500,000 on Thursday
night. He takes over for
Mario Cristobal after a 3-9
season and will look to
lead the Golden Panthers
into Conference USA from
the Sun Belt.
"I really believe this pro-
gram is ready to take the
next step, which is to win at
a high level in Conference
USA, to win consistently
and compete for a Confer-
ence USA championship
on a regular basis," Turner
said. "That's our goal.
That's our vision."
The 59-year-old Turner
returns to college football
for the first time since he
was fired at Illinois in
2004 after eight seasons as
the head coach. He was
the quarterbacks coach


for the Tampa Bay Bucca-
neers this past season and
has coached 12 years in
the NFL.
"I love the challenge of
being the head coach,"
Turner said. "The happi-
est times I've had in
coaching were the nine
years that I was the head
coach in college. I love the
relationships that you es-
tablish, that you build with
the student-athletes, with
their families. Those are
the kind of things that
when you go through what
you go through, that last a
lifetime."
Turner was fired at Illi-
nois three seasons after
taking the Illini to what
was their first Big Ten title
in a decade. Illinois went
to the Sugar Bowl after
that 10-2 season in 2001
and Turner was Big Ten
coach of the year. Illinois
won only nine of its next
34 games under Turner, in-
cluding just one Big Ten
game in a two-season
span. He left Illinois with
a 35-57 record in eight
seasons.


Oregon runs past K-State 35-17 at Fiesta Bowl


Associated Press

GLENDALE, Ariz. As
Oregon coach Chip Kelly
was about to receive the
massive Fiesta Bowl trophy,
Ducks fans inside University
of Phoenix Stadium started
a chant of "We want Chip!"
Whether he returns or not
is up in the air.
If Kelly does head to the
NFL, this was a great
send- off.
Sparked by De'Anthony
Thomas' 94-yard touchdown
return on the opening kick-
off, No. 5 Oregon turned the
Fiesta Bowl into a track
meet from the start and
bolted past No. 7 Kansas
State 35-17 Thursday night
in what could be Kelly's
final game with the Ducks.
"This wasn't going to be a
distraction," Kelly said of re-
ports that he was headed to
the NFL. "It wasn't a dis-
traction for me I think it's
an honor But I think it's an
honor because of the players
we have in this program that
people want to talk to me."


Teams that had their na-
tional title aspirations end
on the same day, Oregon and
Kansas State ended up in
the desert for a marquee
matchup billed as a battle of
styles: The fast-flying Ducks
vs. the methodical Wildcats.
With Kelly reportedly
talking to several NFL
teams, Oregon (12-1) was too
much for Kansas State and
its Heisman Trophy finalist,
Collin Klein, who were
playing catch-up from the
start.
Thomas followed his
before-everyone-sat-down
kickoff return with a 23-yard
touchdown catch, finishing
with 195 total yards.
Kenjon Barner ran for 143
yards on 31 carries and
scored on a 24-yard touch-
down pass from Marcus
Mariota in the second quar-
ter. Mariota later scored on
a 2-yard run in the third
quarter, capped by an ob-
scure 1-point safety that
went in the Ducks' favor.
Even Oregon's defense got
into the act, intercepting


Associated Press
Oregon running back De'Anthony Thomas returned the open-
ing kickoff 94 yards for a touchdown Thursday against Kansas
State during the first half of the Fiesta Bowl in Glendale, Ariz.


Klein twice and holding him
to 30 yards on 13 carries.
"We got beat by a better
team tonight, combined by
the fact that we let down
from time to time," coach
Bill Snyder said after
Kansas State's fifth straight
bowl loss.
Last year's Fiesta Bowl
was an offensive fiesta, with
Oklahoma State outlasting


Stanford 41-38 in overtime.
The 2013 version was an
upgrade: Nos. 4 and 5 in the
BCS, two of the nation's best
offenses, dynamic players
and superbly successful
coaches on both sides.
Oregon has become the
standard for go-go-go football
under Kelly, its fleet of Ducks
making those shiny helmets
- green like Christmas tree


bulbs for the Fiesta Bowl -
and flashy uniforms blur
across the grassy landscape.
Thomas offered the first
flash of speed, picking up a
couple of blocks and racing
toward a not-so-photo finish
at the line.
Thomas hit the Wildcats
(11-2) again late in the first
quarter, breaking a couple
of tackles and dragging
three defenders into the
end zone for a catch-and-
run TD that put the Ducks
up 15-0.
It's nothing new for Ore-
gon's sophomore sensation:
He had 314 total yards and
two long touchdown runs in
the 2012 Rose Bowl. The
Ducks are used to it, too, av-
eraging more than 50 points
per game.
And they kept flying.
Oregon followed a missed
40-yard field goal by Kansas
State's Anthony Cantele by
unleashing one of its blink-
and-you'll-miss-it scoring
drives late in the second
quarter. Moving 77 yards in
46 seconds, the Ducks went


up 22-10 at halftime after
Mariota hit Barner on a
24-yard TD pass.
Alejandro Maldonado hit
a 33-yard field goal on Ore-
gon's opening drive of the
third quarter and Mariota
capped a long drive with an
easy 2-yard TD run to the
left. Kansas State's Javonta
Boyd blocked the point-
after attempt, but even that
went wrong for the Wild-
cats. Chris Harper was tack-
led in the end zone for a
bizarre 1-point safety that
put Oregon up 32-10.
It was the first 1-point
safety in major college foot-
ball since 2004 when Texas
did it against Texas A&M,
STATS said.
"There were so many
things that could have
changed the outcome of this
game," Kansas State line-
backer Arthur Brown said.
Kansas State needed a lit-
tle time to get its wheels
spinning on offense, labor-
ing early before Klein
scored on a 6-yard run early
in the second quarter.


B2 SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 2013


COLLEGE FOOTBALL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Deja vu for NFC rivals


Vikings travel to

Green Bay for 2nd

meeting in 2 weeks

Associated Press

GREEN BAY, Wis. It's not just -
wild-card weekend in Minnesota
and Green Bay
It's Groundhog Day
Six days after facing off in the
regular-season finale, and five
weeks after their first meeting of
the season, the Minnesota Vikings
and Green Bay Packers are at it m
again Saturday night. This is no
yawner of a sequel, though, not


NFC
Wild-Card game
Minnesota
Vikings (10-6)
at Green Bay
Packers (11-5)
Time: 8 p.m.
today
TV: NBC


what color they have on," Packers
coach Mike McCarthy said. "It's
about fundamentals, matchups,
and that's what we're focused on.
We're playing at home, it's going to
be a great environment. ... The
Vikings obviously have done a
great job to get into the tourna-
ment, and we respect that, but this
is a different deal.
"This is what everybody's been
fighting for, and this is what we're
excited about"
Minnesota (10-6) and Green Bay
(11-5) split their first two meetings,
with the Vikings' victory last Sun-


wr

Associated Press
Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson finished the 2012 NFL regular season at 2,097 rushing yards,
falling just short of Eric Dickerson's record of 2,105 yards.


day in Minneapolis giving them the
last wild-card spot It also dropped
the Packers from the No. 2 to the
No. 3 seed, and forced the NFC
North champs to work a weekend
they were hoping to have off.
At least neither team had to scram-
ble to dig up film or scouting reports.
As division rivals, the Packers
and Vikings already know plenty
about each other. After playing
twice in December, they know each
other so well they could probably
call each other's plays. There won't
be any big surprises, no new wrin-
kles to the offense or defense that
the other hasn't already seen.
"So much familiarity with the
team that we are playing because of
the number of times we have


played them in the last month and a
half," Vikings coach Leslie Frazier
said. "So not a whole lot that needs
to be discussed as far as getting mo-
tivated to play this game."
The Vikings game plan will be
simple: Give the ball to Adrian Pe-
terson and get out of the way
That's the plan pretty much every
week, but particularly against
Green Bay He's rushed for 409
yards in their two games, more than
some running backs manage in 16,
and is averaging a whopping 7.4
yards per carry He had the longest
run of his career, 82 yards for a
touchdown, in the Dec. 2 game, and
a career-high 34 carries on Sunday
Peterson has gained more yards
against Green Bay (1,442 in 12


games) than any other team, and he
chews up the Lambeau Field grass
as easily as the Metrodome turf.
"It's just the rivalry," he said.
"There's more emphasis on that
game because we know that's a team
that we have to beat in order to ac-
complish our goals we've set forth."
Yeah, but the Packers had a goal
last weekend, too, and that didn't
help against Peterson.
"We had the right calls, we just
need to be a little smarter as far as
where we fit and then a little more
accountable and reliable as far as
what we do," Packers linebacker
Clay Matthews said. "There were a
couple of times where, perhaps
playing somebody else, we could
fall inside somebody else's gap."


Bengals, Texans meet again in wild card


Houston hosts

Cincinnati today

Associated Press

HOUSTON The Houston Tex-
ans were looking forward to enjoy-
ing a bye this week before
beginning their work in the playoffs
as the AFC's top seed.
Instead, a terrible month in
which they lost three of four games
dropped the Texans to the third
seed. It has them in the exact same
spot as year ago, hosting the Cincin-
nati Bengals in a wild-card playoff
game Saturday
The Texans wasted little time
this week lamenting their missed
opportunities, though, instead fo-
cusing on their next task.
"Would we like to be in a different
situation? Yeah, but at the same
time, it's the playoffs. It's the start of
the playoffs. Everything you've done
up to this point, it doesn't really mat-
ter," Houston's Andre Johnson said.
"It only matters what you do now ...
we just have to take advantage of the
opportunity we have now."
They'll face a Cincinnati team
that enters Saturday, having won
three in a row and seven of its last
eight games. The Bengals are in the
playoffs for consecutive seasons for
the first time since 1981-82. Their
last playoff win came Jan. 6, 1991
against the Oilers, the team the
Texans replaced in Houston.
Cincinnati offensive tackle An-
drew Whitworth said he isn't wor-
ried about the more than 20-year
streak of playoff futility He wants to
focus on the improvement this
young team has made.
"Last year, we did what it took to
get into the playoffs when a lot of
people predicted us to be 0-16,"
Whitworth said. "This year, we got
back into the playoffs when a lot of
people didn't think we could. We're


Associated Press
Houston defensive end J.J. Watt will need another big game to help the
Texans regain their form after losing three of its last four games in a
wild-card game against Cincinnati.


here. The next step is winning a
playoff game. Hopefully, we can let
that be a chip on our shoulder."
Bengals quarterback Andy Dal-
ton was sacked four times and
threw three interceptions in last
year's 31-10 post-
season loss to the AFC Wild-(
Texans. Houston AFC Wid-
defensive end J.J. Cincinnal
Watt returned one (10-6) at
of those intercep- Texans
tions 29 yards for a Texan
touchdown that U Time: 4:30
gave the Texans a
lead they wouldn't U TV: NBC
relinquish.
Dalton, who grew
up in suburban Houston, believes
he's grown since that game and
learned from the mistakes he made.
"I definitely feel like I'm a better
quarterback this year," he said.
"I've got more control of the of-
fense. There's a lot more stuff that
I'm doing at the line of scrimmage,
and making checks and doing dif-
ferent things this year than I was


C
ti
s
I
0


doing last year. But that's helped
me become a better player."
Another player who has certainly
improved in Year 2 is Watt The de-
fensive end led the NFL with 20 /2
sacks this season, has 107 tackles,
including 39 for
"ard game losses, 16 passes de-
fended and has
i Bengals forced four fumbles.
Houston Bengals coach
Marvin Lewis got
(12-4) creative this week
p.m. today when asked how he
planned to stop
Watt
"I wrote a letter to
the commissioner to
petition for 13," Lewis joked. "I fig-
ure if we put a guy on each side of
him and a guy in front of him, we've
got a good opportunity."
Then Lewis got serious.
"He's been an incredible player
and he's fun to watch if you're not
preparing to play the Texans,"
Lewis said. "He's a great model for
young players to look at and be like.


He really is something."
Houston defensive coordinator
Wade Phillips, who has been coach-
ing in the NFL since 1976, couldn't
say enough about Watt's perform-
ance this season.
"This is the best defensive line
play of anybody since I've been in
football," Phillips said. "He is by far
the best defensive player. He
should obviously be the defensive
player of the year in the league."
The AFC South champion Texans
are also in the playoffs for the sec-
ond straight year, the only two times
in franchise history Houston lost to
the Ravens in the second round after
beating the Bengals last January
The Texans believe that experi-
ence will help them this time.
"I feel like we've come a long
ways," Watt said. "Obviously, this
isn't new to us. This is something
we've been through before. We're
excited. We can't wait. We had a
taste of the playoffs last year and
we're really excited to get back in it
this year and to go to work."
Third-string quarterback TJ.
Yates was behind center last year
after injuries knocked out Matt
Schaub and Matt Leinart. Now,
Schaub, a nine-year veteran, will
get his first postseason start.
He's looking to bounce back from a
tough month in which he threw three
interceptions with just one touch-
down pass. He'll try to do it with two
big weapons in Johnson and Arian
Foster Johnson led the AFC with a
career-high 1,598 yards receiving, and
Foster finished second in the AFC in
rushing with 1,424 yards.
"They have three or four guys
who have been playmakers in this
league for a while," Bengals cor-
nerback Leon Hall said of the Tex-
ans. "It starts with Foster.
Obviously, they have Johnson out-
side. It starts with knowing that we
have to stop the run. If you don't
stop the run, you're on your heels
for the rest of the game."


NFL STATISTICS


NFL playoff glance
All Times EST
Wild-card Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 5
Cincinnati at Houston, 4:30 p.m. (NBC)
Minnesota at Green Bay, 8 p.m. (NBC)
Sunday, Jan. 6
Indianapolis at Baltimore, 1 p.m. (CBS)
Seattle at Washington, 4:30 p.m. (FOX)
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 12
Baltimore, Indianapolis or Cincinnati at Denver, 4:30 p.m.
(CBS)
Washington, Seattle or Green Bay at San Francisco, 8
p.m. (FOX)
Sunday, Jan. 13
Washington, Seattle or Minnesota at Atlanta, 1 p.m. (FOX)
Baltimore, Indianapolis or Houston at New England, 4:30
p.m. (CBS)
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 20
AFC, TBA (CBS)
NFC, TBA (FOX)
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 27
At Honolulu
AFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (NBC)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 3
At New Orleans
AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6 p.m. (CBS)


NFL injury report
NEW YORK- The National Football League injury re-
port, as provided by the league (OUT Definitely will not
play; DNP Did not practice; LIMITED Limited participation
in practice; FULL Full participation in practice):
MINNESOTA VIKINGS at GREEN BAY PACKERS -
VIKINGS: DNP: LBTyrone McKenzie (shoulder), RB Adrian
Peterson (abdomen), CB Antoine Winfield (hand). LIMITED:
QB Christian Ponder (right elbow), DE Brian Robison (shoul-
der), S Harrison Smith (knee). FULL: DE Jared Allen (shoul-
der), CB A.J. Jefferson (ankle), DE George Johnson
(quadriceps), P Chris Kluwe (left knee), T Phil Loadholt
(knee). PACKERS: OUT: DE Jerel Worthy (knee). DNP:WR
Jarrett Boykin (ankle). LIMITED: WR Randall Cobb (ankle),
TE Jermichael Finley (quadriceps), CB Davon House (hip),
WR Jordy Nelson (knee), RB James Starks (knee). FULL:
RB Alex Green (knee), S Charles Woodson (collarbone).
CINCINNATI BENGALS at HOUSTON TEXANS BEN-
GALS: DNP: DE Wallace Gilberry (illness). LIMITED: CB
Jason Allen (hamstring), S Chris Crocker (thigh), RB Ben-
Jarvus Green-Ellis (hamstring), S Taylor Mays (hamstring),
CB Terence Newman (groin). FULL: LB Dan Skuta (thigh).
TEXANS: DNP: G Antoine Caldwell (back), LBTim Dobbins
(ankle). LIMITED: CB Alan Ball (foot), NT Shaun Cody
(back), TE Owen Daniels (chest, knee), T Derek Newton
(knee), LB Brooks Reed (groin), DE Antonio Smith (ankle),
G Wade Smith (knee). FULL: RBTyler Clutts (abdomen), RB
Justin Forsett (knee), S Shiloh Keo (ankle), WR DeVier
Posey (foot), RB Ben Tate (foot), QBTJ.Yates (right elbow).
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS at BALTIMORE RAVENS -
COLTS: DNP: LB Pat Angerer (illness), LB Dwight Freeney
(not injury related), DT Kellen Heard (illness), G Joe Reitz


(concussion). LIMITED: RB Delone Carter (ankle), NT An-
tonio Johnson (ankle), T Winston Justice (shoulder), DE
Cory Redding (quadriceps), C A.Q. Shipley (knee), S Tom
Zbikowski (knee). FULL: LB Jerrell Freeman (thumb), QB
Andrew Luck (knee), C Samson Satele (ankle), CB Teddy
Williams (knee). RAVENS: LIMITED: RB Anthony Allen
(head), TE Billy Bajema (head), WR Tandon Doss (ankle),
CB Chris Johnson (thigh), RB Vonta Leach (knee, ankle),
DE Pernell McPhee (thigh), DT Haloti Ngata (knee), RB
Bernard Pierce (ankle), S Bernard Pollard (chest), G Jah
Reid (toe), G Marshal Yanda (shoulder, knee). FULL: WR
Anquan Boldin (shoulder), LB Dannell Ellerbe (ankle), DE
Arthur Jones (thigh), LB Ray Lewis (triceps), LB Albert Mc-
Clellan (shoulder, thigh), G Kelechi Osemele (knee), S Ed
Reed (shoulder), CB Jimmy Smith (abdomen), WR Torrey
Smith (knee), LB Terrell Suggs (biceps).
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS at WASHINGTON REDSKINS -
SEAHAWKS: No Data Reported REDSKINS: DNP: QB Kirk
Cousins (illness), LB London Fletcher (ankle), CB Domonique
Johnson (knee), G Kory Lichtensteiger (ankle). LIMITED: S
DeJon Gomes (knee). FULL: LB Lorenzo Alexander (shoul-
der), DE Stephen Bowen (biceps), WR Pierre Garcon (foot),
QB Robert Griffin III (knee), CB DeAngelo Hall (elbow), LB
Ryan Kerrigan (ankle), CWill Montgomery (knee), WR Joshua
Morgan (hand, foot), S Jordan Pugh (ankle), P Sav Rocca
(right knee), S Madieu Williams (elbow).
NFL calendar
Jan. 5-6 -Wild-card playoff games.
Jan. 6 Assistant coaches under contract to playoff
clubs that have byes in the wild-card weekend may be in-
terviewed for head coaching positions through the conclu-
sion of wild-card games.


Jan. 12-13 Divisional playoff games.
Jan. 13 -Assistant coaches under contract to playoff clubs
that won wild-card games may be interviewed for head coach-
ing positions through the conclusion of divisional playoff games.
Jan. 15 Deadline for underclassmen to petition for spe-
cial eligibility for the 2013 NFL draft.
Jan. 19 East-West Shrine Game, Tropicana Field, St.
Petersburg, Fla.
Jan. 20 -AFC and NFC championship games.
Jan. 27 Pro Bowl, Aloha Stadium, Honolulu; An assis-
tant coach, whose team is in the Super Bowl and who has
previously interviewed for another club's head coaching job,
may have a second interview with the club no later than the
Sunday preceding the Super Bowl.
Feb. 3 Super Bowl, Superdome, New Orleans
March 9-11 Clubs may enter negotiations with certi-
fied agents of players who will be unrestricted free agents at
end of league year.
March 12 Before 4 p.m. EDT, clubs must exercise op-
tions for 2013 on all players who have option clauses in their
2012 contracts; clubs must submit qualifying offers to their
restricted free agents with expiring contracts and to whom
they desire to retain a right of first refusal/compensation;
clubs must submit a minimum salary offer to retain exclu-
sive negotiating rights to players with expiring 2012 con-
tracts and who have fewer than three seasons of free
agency credit; all 2012 player contracts expire. All clubs must
be underthe salary cap.The 2013 league year, free agency
and trading period begins at 4 p.m. EDT
March 17-20- Annual league meeting, Phoenix
April 25-27- NFL draft, NewYork
May 20-22 NFL spring league Meeting, Boston
Sept. 5, 8-9- 2013 NFL season begins.


when the
stakes are
win or
winter va-
cation.
"Like I
tell the
team, it
doesn't
matter
w h o
comes out
of that
tunnel, I
don't care


with the situation said Fri-
day. The person spoke to
The Associated Press on
condition of anonymity be-
cause the team has not
publically discussed details
of the process.
Khan fired GM Gene
Smith on Monday and has
since been crisscrossing
the country interviewing
potential replacements. He
has spoken with Atlanta's
David Caldwell, San Fran-
cisco's Tom Gamble and
Marc Ross of the New
York Giants.
From wire reports


NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 2013 B3






Reid arrives in
KC, nears deal to
become coach
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -
Andy Reid has arrived in
Kansas City and the Chiefs
are close to making an an-
nouncement that he will
become their new coach.
Reid and the Chiefs
have reportedly agreed to
a deal giving the longtime
Eagles coach broad au-
thority over football deci-
sions. His deal Friday
came hours after the
Chiefs announced they
had parted with general
manager Scott Pioli after
four tumultuous seasons.
Reid would be inheriting
a team that was 2-14 and
matched the worst finish in
franchise history, but that
also had five players voted
to the Pro Bowl.
Browns set to
interview Oregon
coach Kelly
CLEVELAND The
Browns are set to interview
Oregon coach Chip Kelly,
who said he hopes to have
the process "wrapped up
quickly."
Kelly led the Ducks to a
35-17 win over Kansas
State on Thursday night.
Afterward, Kelly acknowl-
edged he will meet with
some NFL teams on what
he described "as a fact-
finding mission, finding out
if it fits or doesn't fit." Kelly
did not say which teams he
will meet with Friday and
left open the possibility he
would not make the jump
to the pros. He turned
down an offer from Tampa
Bay last year.
The Buffalo Bills and
Philadelphia Eagles are
also interested in Kelly,
who is 46-7 in four seasons
with the Ducks.
Kelly is believed to be
the top choice of the
Browns.
Caribbean storm:
Rex Ryan has
Sanchez tattoo
NEW YORK With the
ink not even dry on the
New York Jets'dreadful
season, Rex Ryan fled to
the Bahamas only to be
photographed lounging
poolside at a resort hotel,
book in hand, with an inter-
esting tattoo gracing his
right biceps.
It showed his wife,
Michelle, wearing an un-
mistakably green Jets jer-
sey emblazoned with the
unmistakable No. 6 of em-
battled quarterback Mark
Sanchez. And nothing else.
The Daily News ran a
front-page photo Friday,
and by lunchtime it was an
Internet sensation. That's
pretty much the way the
NFL team's soap-opera
season played out. Ryan
was criticized for sticking
with Sanchez despite los-
ing efforts when Tim Tebow
was available. The Jets fin-
ished the season 6-10.
When approached by a
Daily News reporter,
Ryan cursed and bolted
with his wife.
There were no other jer-
sey numbers tattooed on
Ryan's arm, based on the
photo.
Jags assistants
can pursue
other jobs
JACKSONVILLE -
Jacksonville Jaguars assis-
tant coaches are no longer
in limbo.
Owner Shad Khan is al-
lowing the assistants to
look for other jobs while he
continues interviewing
general manager candi-
dates, a person familiar






B4 SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 2013




Bowl Glance
All Times EST
Saturday, Dec. 15
New Mexico Bowl
At Albuquerque
Arizona 49, Nevada 48
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
Utah State 41, Toledo 15
Thursday, Dec. 20
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
BYU 23, San Diego State 6
Friday, Dec. 21
Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
UCF 38, Ball State 17
Saturday, Dec. 22
New Orleans Bowl
Louisiana-Lafayette 43, East Carolina 34
MAACO Bowl
LasVegas
Boise State 28, Washington 26
Monday, Dec. 24
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
SMU 43, Fresno State 10
Wednesday, Dec. 26
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
Central Michigan 24, Western Kentucky 21
Thursday, Dec. 27
Military Bowl
At Washington
San Jose State 29, Bowling Green 20
Belk Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
Cincinnati 48, Duke 34
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Baylor 49, UCLA 26
Friday, Dec. 28
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Ohio 45, Louisiana-Monroe 14
Russell Athletic Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Virginia Tech 13, Rutgers 10, OT
Meineke Car Care Bowl
At Houston
Texas Tech 34, Minnesota 31
Saturday, Dec. 29
Armed Forces Bowl
At Fort Worth, Texas
Rice 33, Air Force 14
Pinstripe Bowl
At New York
Syracuse 38, West Virginia 14
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
Arizona State 62, Navy 28
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Texas 31, Oregon State 27
Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl
At Tempe, Ariz.
Michigan State 17, TCU 16
Monday, Dec. 31
Music City Bowl
At Nashville, Tenn.
Vanderbilt 38, N.C. State 24
Sun Bowl
At El Paso, Texas
Georgia Tech 21, Southern Cal 7
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis, Tenn.
Tulsa 31, Iowa State 17
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
Clemson 25, LSU 24
Tuesday, Jan. 1
Heart of Dallas Bowl
At Dallas
Oklahoma State 58, Purdue 14
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville, Fla.
Northwestern 34, Mississippi State 20
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Georgia 45, Nebraska 31
Outback Bowl
At Tampa, Fla.
South Carolina 33, Michigan 28
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Stanford 20, Wisconsin 14
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Florida State 31, Northern Illinois 10
Wednesday, Jan. 2
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Louisville 33, Florida 23
Thursday, Jan. 3
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
Oregon 35, Kansas State 17
Friday, Jan. 4
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington, Texas
Texas A&M (10-2) vs. Oklahoma (10-2), late
Saturday, Jan. 5
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. Mississippi (6-6), 1 p.m.
(ESPN)
Sunday, Jan. 6
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
Kent State (11-2) vs. Arkansas State (9-3), 9
p.m. (ESPN)
Monday, Jan. 7
BCS National Championship
At Miami
Notre Dame (12-0) vs. Alabama (12-1), 8:30
p.m. (ESPN)
Saturday, Jan.19
RAYCOM College Football All-Star Classic
At Montgomery, Ala.
Stars vs. Stripes, 3 p.m. (CBSSN)
East-West Shrine Classic
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
East vs. West, 4 p.m. (NFLN)
Saturday, Jan.26
Senior Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
North vs. South, 4 p.m. (NFLN)



PANTHERS
Continued from Page B1


again in the opening minutes
of the second half as fresh-
man Laura Hamilton maneu-


vered a shot into the net off
teammate Lauryn Cole's as-
sist Hamilton currently leads
her team with 10 goals this
season.
Sophomore Lexi Moore
hammered home the final
goal in the shutout, scoring in
the 64th minute her sev-
enth of the season.
Lecanto head coach
Roselle Lattin came away
from the victory pleased with
her girls but still sees a few
kinks after the long holiday
break
"You know, it's (our first)
game after Christmas and we
passed pretty well but I
thought we could have done


Warriors storm Manziel, Texas A&M
past Branford defeat Oklahoma in


For the record


== lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
.<;. 1-3-9
S. -.. CASH 3 (late)
3-8-6
PLAY 4 (early)
S 3-2-8-0

I 3-5-6-2
FANTASY 5
1 4-8-10-27
MEGA MONEY
9-17-35-37
oida Lottery MEGA BALL
16



On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1 p.m. (CBS) Lucas Oil Challenge Cup (Taped)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
11 a.m. (ESPN2) Pittsburgh at Rutgers
12 p.m. (CW) Virginia Tech at Maryland
1:30 p.m. (SUN) South Carolina State at South Carolina
2:30 p.m. (CW) Miami at Georgia Tech
4 p.m. (ESPN2) North Carolina State at Boston College
4 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida State at Clemson
4 p.m. (SUN) Bucknell at Missouri
5 p.m. (NBCSPT) Lehigh at Virginia Commonwealth
11 p.m. (FSNFL) California at USC
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Oklahoma at Texas
2 p.m. (CBS) Purdue at Nebraska
4 p.m. (CBS) Notre Dame at Connecticut
BOYS HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL
6 p.m. (ESPN2) Montverde (Fla.) vs. Simeon (111.)
NBA
7 p.m. (FSNFL) New York Knicks at Orlando Magic
HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
1 p.m. (NBC) U.S. Army All-American Bowl
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN) BBVA Compass Bowl Mississippi vs.
Pittsburgh
1 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAA FCS Division I final North Dakota
State vs. Sam Houston State
NFL
4:30 p.m. (NBC) AFC Wild-Card Game Cincinnati
Bengals at Houston Texans
8 p.m. (NBC) NFC Wild-Card Game Minnesota Vikings
at Green Bay Packers
GOLF
5:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: Hyundai Tournament of
Champions First Round
SOCCER
12 p.m. (FOX) FA Cup: 3rd Round -West Ham vs.
Manchester United
6 p.m. (62 UNI) Mexican Premier Division: America vs.
Monterrey

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



Prep CALENDAR


TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
WRESTLING
9 a.m. Citrus in Deland Duals
9 a.m. Lecanto in Zephyrhills duals


The Seven Rivers Christian
boys basketball team took a 68-
25 triumph at Branford on
Friday night.
Adam Gage led all scorers
with 24 points for the Warriors
while teammate Cory Weiand
added 20 of his own.
Seven Rivers (5-5 overall)
got seven points and eight
rebounds from Zach Saxer
as well. The Warriors play
Tuesday at Cornerstone
Academy.



RUNNING
Continued from Page BI


momentum for the ensuing
eight minutes, with senior
center Geoffrey Ruiz (six re-
bounds, three blocks) pour-
ing in 12 of his 13 points in
the half while Lecanto got at
least two buckets apiece
from seven different players
during the stretch.
Citrus junior point guard
Devin Pryor had game-highs
of 30 points and 10 re-
bounds, but even his four 3-
pointers and 3-for-3 foul
shooting in the fourth
weren't enough to signifi-
cantly narrow the gap late in
the game.
Both teams weren't very
sharp early in the game, but
the 'Canes did grab a 16-6
advantage in the first period
behind sophomore forward
Desmond Franklin's (19
points) 12-point opening


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cotton Bowl
ARLINGTON, Texas Heis-
man Trophy winner Johnny
Manziel ran for two touch-
downs, threw for another score
and already had a Cotton Bowl-
record 419 total yards for 10th-
ranked Texas A&M, which led
No. 12 Oklahoma 34-13 after
three quarters Friday night en
route to a 41-13 victory.
Playing his first game since
becoming the first freshman to
win the Heisman after an SEC-


quarter.
'"After the game we played
last night, I was okay with
where we were at halftime,"
Citrus head coach Tom
Densmore said. "Lecanto
had that run that we could-
n't seem to stop. We were
missing shots right around
the basket while they were
hitting deep 3s, so it was
kind of a bad combination
for us. And then we kind of
righted the ship late, but it
was too late."
Ruiz credited Lecanto's
sixth man for helping give
his team a needed boost out
of the break.
"When you have fans like
that, that are that loud, it just
gets to you and you start
playing even better," he said.
"I love playing Citrus. It's al-
ways loud and a lot of fun."
Panthers junior point
guard Thomas Vilardi hit 3s
in three different quarters to
finish with 13 points, and
sophomore power forward


NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 22 10 .688 -
Brooklyn 18 15 .545 412
Boston 15 17 .469 7
Philadelphia 15 19 .441 8
Toronto 12 21 .364 101/2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 22 9 .710 -
Atlanta 20 11 .645 2
Orlando 12 20 .375 1012
Charlotte 8 24 .250 1412
Washington 4 27 .129 18
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 18 13 .581 -
Indiana 19 14 .576 -
Milwaukee 16 15 .516 2
Detroit 13 22 .371 7
Cleveland 8 26 .235 111Y2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 26 9 .743 -
Memphis 20 10 .667 312
Houston 19 14 .576 6
Dallas 13 20 .394 12
New Orleans 7 25 .219 1712
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 25 7 .781 -
Portland 17 15 .531 8
Denver 18 16 .529 8
Minnesota 15 14 .517 812


better at clearing the ball in
the back," Lattin said. "We
didn't capitalize on all of our
opportunities and we had
plenty of them.
"We didn't take shots. One
too many touches or passes.
We just weren't pulling the
trigger But it's a win and
hopefully this game will pre-
pare us for districts," Lattin
added.
Lattin went on further to
complement Rinaldi's stellar
work in front of the net for
Citrus.
"I thought Lizzie Rinaldi
did a great job in the first
half," Lattin said. "She had
several great saves. She does
a really good job of coming
out of the net I think that def-
initely contributed to us not
pulling the trigger as often
because of her presence."
Citrus head coach Ian
Feldt was impressed by Ri-
naldi and with his team's


Utah 17 17 .500 9
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 25 8 .758 -
Golden State 22 10 .688 212
L.A. Lakers 15 16 .484 9
Sacramento 13 20 .394 12
Phoenix 12 22 .353 1312
Thursday's Games
New York 100, San Antonio 83
Minnesota 101, Denver 97
Friday's Games
Cleveland 106, Charlotte 104
Sacramento 105, Toronto 96
Brooklyn 115, Washington 113,20T
Detroit 85, Atlanta 84
Portland 86, Memphis 84
Oklahoma City 109, Philadelphia 85
Boston 94, Indiana 75
Chicago 96, Miami 89
Houston 115, Milwaukee 101
Utah 87, Phoenix 80
L.A. Lakers at L.A. Clippers, late
Today's Games
Boston at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Indiana, 7 p.m.
New York at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Houston at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Portland at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Utah at Denver, 9 p.m.
Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Oklahoma City at Toronto, 1 p.m.
Washington at Miami, 6 p.m.
Charlotte at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Memphis at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Denver at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.


level of toughness against a
very formidable Lecanto op-
ponent
"I think the first half Liz
played amazing," Feldt said
of Rinaldi. "Because she's
also a field player, she's not
afraid to come out of the box,
so opportunities (Lecanto)
maybe used to having (are
denied) because she's
aggressive."
"I'm disappointed in the
loss obviously," Feldt contin-
ued. "But I think we played
tough against an extremely
good Lecanto team. We tried
to play our seniors tonight
and I think they all worked
really hard to try and win this
game."
The inter-county match-up
was also Senior Night for Cit-
rus, who honored Nayomi
DeJesus, Meghan Flaherty,
Alex Mundreana, Deycasha
Miller and injured goal-
keeper Paige Gramer


Florida Class 5A
and 6A All-State
Football teams
The Florida Class 5A and 6A All-State Team as
chosen by newspaper editors and reporters.
CLASS 6A
FIRST TEAM OFFENSE
QB-Juwan Brown, 6-1 190, Sr., Largo
RB-Ralph Webb, 5-10195, Sr., Gainesville High
RB-Joseph Yearby, 5-10195, Jr, Miami Central
RB-Manny Morgan, 5-9 185, Sr., Naples
WR-James Clark, 5-11 175, Sr., New Smyrna
Beach
WR-Ermon Lane, 6-3 190, Jr. Homestead
OL-Laremy Tunsil, 6-6 310, Sr., Lake City Co-
lumbia
OL-Ramsey Myers, 6-4 285, Sr, Orange Park
Ridgeview
OL-Dan Gallman, 6-1 295, Sr., Naples
OL-Tyler Reagan, 6-5 285, Sr, Fruit Cove Bar-
tram Trail
OL-Keonte Cash, 6-0 300, Sr., Miami Belen
UT-Josh Moore, 5-11 200, Sr., Orange Park
Ridgeview
K-Ryan Santoso, 6-5 260, Sr, Pace
FIRST TEAM DEFENSE
DL-Denzel Ware, 6-2 220, Jr., Crestview
DL-Kennard Swanson, 6-0 250, Sr., Lakeland
Lake Gibson
DL-Jontey Byrd, 5-11 260, Sr., Daytona Beach
Mainland LB-Keith Kelsey 6-2 215, Sr.,
Gainesville High
LB-Nigel Harris, 6-1 200, Sr., Tampa Hillsbor-
ough
LB-Freddie Stevenson, 6-2 230, Sr, Bartow
LB-Quinton Powell, 6-5 215, Sr., Daytona
Beach Mainland
DB-Leon McQuay III1, 6-2190, Sr., Seffner Arm-
wood
DB-Vontarius West, 6-0 180, Sr., Bartow
DB-Tre Marshall, 6-0 185, Jr., Lake City Co-
lumbia
DB-Ahmad Thomas, 6-0 205, Sr., Miami Cen-
tral
UT-Dalvin Cook, 6-0 190, Jr., Miami Central
P-Emilio Nadelman, 5-9 185, Sr., Miami Cen-
tral
SECOND TEAM OFFENSE
QB-Kilton Anderson, 6-1 190, Jr., Naples
RB-DariusTice, 6-0210, Sr, Miami Northwest-
ern
RB-Richard Montgomery, 5-7 180, Sr., Jack-
sonville Atlantic Coast
RB-Jay Warren, 6-1 190, Sr., Navarre
WR-Eric Carter, 6-1 190, Sr., Lakeland Lake
Gibson
WR-Bobby Mitchell, 6-2 180, Sr., St. Augustine
OL-Trevor Darling, 6-5 310, Jr., Miami Central
OL-Travis Bennett, 6-3 270, Sr, Jacksonville At-
lantic Coast
OL-Gerald Wright, 6-2 310, Sr., Miami North-
western
OL-Nick Haynes, 6-3 300, Sr, Niceville
OL-Matt Bennett, 6-4 260, Sr., New Smyrna
Beach
UT-TJ. Douglas, 6-1 185, Sr., Fort Myers
K-Jordan Patsch, 6-3 170, Sr., Daytona Beach
Seabreeze
SECOND TEAM DEFENSE
DL-Marquese Blanchard, 6-3 225, Sr., Miami
Northwestern
DL-Mike Heuermann, 6-4 220, Sr., Naples Bar-
ron Collier
DL-Reggie Meant, 6-4 262, Sr., Cape Coral
Baker
LB-Alex Gonzales, 5-10 185, Sr., Gainesville
High
LB-Brian Donnelly, 5-10 218, Sr., Naples
LB-DeMichael McQueen, 5-10 205, Sr., Milton
LB-Kyle Sandner, 5-9185, Sr, Ocala Vanguard
DB-Nick Benton, 5-10 170, Sr., Navarre
DB-Artie Burns, 6-2190, Sr., Miami Northwest-
ern
DB-Reggie Warren, 6-0 180, Sr., Pensacola
High
DB-Kendall Gant, 6-3 185, Jr., Lakeland Lake
Gibson
UT-Jayron Kearse, 6-4 200, Sr., South Fort
Myers
P-Zach Theriault, 6-2 185, Sr., Fort Walton
Beach Choctawhatchee
THIRD TEAM OFFENSE
QB-Kurt Benkert, 6-3 202, Sr., Cape Coral Is-
land Coast
RB-Ronald Timmons, 5-9 185, Sr., Lake City
Columbia
RB-Jarvis Stewart, 5-9 170, Jr., Largo RB-
Adam Lane, 5-9 210, Sr., Winter Haven
WR-Jordan Leggett, 6-5 230, Sr., Navarre
WR-Jonathan Moore, 6-0 170, Sr., Tampa Jef-
ferson
OL-Raul Diaz, 6-2 270, Jr., Miami Central
OL-Laquandre Kinsler, 6-6 360, Sr., OcalaVan-
guard
OL-Shamar Johnson, 6-5 285, Sr., Pensacola
Pine Forest
OL-JalynWesley, 5-9 215, Sr., Gainesville High
OL-Diante Crumitie, 6-3 270, Jr., Lake City Co-
lumbia
UT-Alvin Bailey, 5-11 170, Sr., Seffner Armwood
K-Andrew Mitchell, 6-5 220, Sr., Niceville


THIRDTEAM DEFENSE
DL-Mike Smith, 6-3 230, Jr., Miami Northwest-
ern
DL-Eric Brelia, 6-2 205, Sr., FortWalton Beach
Choctawhatchee
DL-Robert Hill Bronson, 5-11 200, Sr.,
Brooksville Hernando
LB-Shane Jones, 6-2 190, Sr., Palm Bay Her-
itage
LB-Luke McLeod, 6-2 210, Sr., Springhill
Springstead
LB-Kailik Williams, 5-11 190, Jr., Daytona
Beach Seabreeze
LB-James Clark, 6-2 215, Sr., Sebastian River
DB-Rujerry McClisse, 6-2 185, Sr., Palm Bay
Bayside
DB-Diamante Mitchell, 5-9 180, Sr., New
Smyrna Beach
DB-Kendrick Holland, 6-3 180, Jr., Winter
Haven
DB-Mike Harris, 5-10 195, Sr., Stuart South
Fork
UT-Ja'von Harrison, 6-2185, Jr., Lakeland Kath-
leen
P-Todd Ryals, 5-8 145, Sr., Gonzalez Tate
HONORABLE MENTION
QB Akeem Jones, 6-3 200, Sr. Carol City; QB
Trey Congdon, 6-3 200, Jr., Lakeland Lake Gib-
son; QB Mark Cato, 6-2 200, Sr., Gainesville
High; QB Austin Chipoletti, 6-0 180, Sr., Orange
Park Oakleaf; QB Blake James, 6-1 170, Sr.,
Fort Walton Beach; QB Cody Labanowitz, 6-2
200, Sr., Stuart South Fork; QB Marcus John-
son, 6-1 190, Jr., New Smyrna Beach; QB San-
don Mims, 6-2185, Sr., St. Augustine; RB Micah
Reed, 5-11185, Sr., Crestview; RBTyler Brown,
5-11 185, Sr., Lakeland Lake Gibson; RB Tre-
bian Suggs, 5-8 175, Sr., Pensacola Pine For-
est; RB Leroy Berry, 5-8 178, Sr., Palm Bay; RB
Matt Brieda, 5-10 175, Sr., Brooksville Nature
Coast; WR Karel Hamilton, 6-3 185, Sr., Plant
City Strawberry Crest; WR Case Harrison, 6-0
180 Sr., Gainesville High; UT Cameron Hadley,
5-11 180, Sr., Daytona Beach Mainland; UT
Austin Lawrence, 5-11 172, Sr., Seminole
Osceola; UT Andre Flakes, 5-10 175, Jr, Mil-
ton; UT Derrick Doss, 5-9 200, Sr., Largo; LB
Jake Berman, 6-1 235, Sr., Naples Barron Col-
lier; LB AK Olusanya, 6-0 200, Sr., Tampa Sick-
les; LB Jordan Griffin, 6-0 200, So., Seffner
Armwood; LB Griffin Goins, 6-1 235, Sr., Holly-
wood Hills; DB D.A. Williams, 5-10 175, Sr., St.
Augustine; DB Da'wan Hunte, 5-10 190, Sr.,
Miami Central; DB Da'cota Dixon, 5-10 190, Jr.,
New Smyrna Beach; DB Jules Dornevil, 6-0
170, Sr., Naples; DB Jeremiah Green, 5-8 165,
Sr., Tampa Hillsboough; DB Nat Dixon, 6-3170,
Jr., Lynn Haven Mosley; DB Tyrus Wooten, 6-1
175, Sr., Palm Bay Heritage; DB Lamont Sim-
mons, 6-2 180, Jr., Jacksonville Lee; UT Tyrail
Hawkins, 5-11 190, Sr., Brooksville Hernando;
UT Charles Nelson, 5-10 175, Jr., Daytona
Beach Seabreeze.
CLASS 5A
FIRST TEAM OFFENSE
QB-John Wolford, 6-1 200, Jr., Jacksonville
Bishop Kenny
RB-Sony Michel, 6-0 210, Jr., Plantation Amer-
ican Heritage
RB-Courtney Allen, 5-7 180, Jr., Bradenton
Southeast
RB-Falon Lee, 5-10 190, Sr., Glen St Mary
Baker County
WR-Lawrence Lee, 5-11 170, Jr., Pensacola
West Florida
WR-Ryan Sousa, 6-0 180, Jr., Orlando Lake
Nona
OL-Chris Griffin, 6-6 275, Sr., Crawfordville
Wakulla
OL-Lucas Crowley 6-3 280, Sr., Ponte Vedra
Nease
OL-Ben Lyda, 6-2 260, Jr., Tallahassee Godby
OL-Cameron Ruff, 6-4 280, Sr., Tampa Jesuit
OL- saiah Wynn, 6-4 275, Jr., St Petersburg
Lakewood
UT-Janarion Grant, 5-11 170, Sr., Dade City
Pasco
K-Luke Jackson, 5-11 170, Sr., Pensacola West
Florida
FIRST TEAM DEFENSE
DL-Deadrin Senat, 6-1 300, Sr., Immokalee
DL-CeCe Jefferson, 6-4 250, So., Glen St Mary
Baker County
DL-VernelTrent, 6-4 255, Sr, Jacksonville Forrest
DL-Bruce Hector, 6-3 265, Sr., Tampa Robin-
son
LB-Mackenro Alexander, 6-0 185, Sr.,
Immokalee
LB-Jacob Pugh, 6-4 215, Jr., Tallahassee
Godby
LB-Kevin James, 6-0 240, Sr., Crawfordville
Wakulla
DB-Mackensie Alexander, 5-11 175, Sr.,
Immokalee
DB-Will Likely 5-7170, Sr., Belle Glade Glades
Central
DB-Lester Thomas, 5-11 170, Sr, Tallahassee
Godby
DB-Shaquill Griffin, 6-0,200, Sr., St Petersburg
Lakewood
UT-Sir Jackson, 6-0 185, Sr., Gainesville East-
side
P-Tommy Openshaw, 6-2 175, Sr., St. Johns
Creekside


record 4,600 total yards in the
regular season, the 20-year-old
Manziel had more highlight
plays in his first bowl game. He
already had 243 yards passing
and 176 more rushing.
Oklahoma, led by quarter-
back Landry Jones in his 50th
career start, had only 312 total
yards as a team.
Manziel tiptoed along the
sideline for a 23-yard touch-
down on the Aggies' opening
drive of the game, setting a
school record with his 20th
rushing TD.
From staff and wire reports


Brandon Burich added 11
points and six boards to the
Lecanto effort.
Panthers senior Richie
Rizzolo, who has recently
struggled to overcome an in-
jury, came off the bench and
added a pair of 3s during the
critical third, while senior
point guard Matt Michelet
(six points) and senior for-
ward Robert Vega (eight
points, four boards, two
steals) were also key to
Lecanto's late success.
"Richie's been hurt and
we just wanted to give him a
little different look, and he
responded in a big way,"
Frank Vilardi said.
Senior forward Randy
Lynn grabbed nine re-
bounds and had a block and
two steals for the 'Canes.
Citrus and Lecanto both
play Tuesday: the Panthers
travel to Central for a 7:30
p.m. tipoff while the Hurri-
canes play at 7 p.m. at
Wildwood.


SECOND TEAM OFFENSE
QB-Joey Baker 6-3 200, Jr., Pensacola West
Florida
RB-Khalid Thomas, 5-11 175, Sr, Tallahassee
Godby
RB-Ulysses Bryant, 5-7 175, Sr., Ponte Vedra
Nease
RB-Cole Mazza, 6-1 220, Sr, Ponte Vedra
WR-Maronkie Tapper, 5-10 185, Sr., Jack-
sonville Bishop Kenny
WR-J.C. Jackson, 5-10180, Jr., Immokalee
OL-Kyle Jones, 6-4 290, Sr., Mulberry
OL-Connor Rafferty 6-4 275, Sr., Tampa Robin-
son
OL-Austin Droogsma, 6-4 305, Sr., Gulf Breeze
OL-Blake Mills, 6-0 260, Sr., Glen St. Mary
Baker County
OL-Rick Johnson, 6-3 300, Sr., Gainesville
Eastside
UT-Ahmad Fulwood, 6-4 200, Sr., Jacksonville
Bishop Kenny
K-Tate Mathewson, 6-1 190, Sr, Lake Wales
SECOND TEAM DEFENSE
DL-Bobby Leath, 6-4 290, Sr., Lake Wales
DL-Nate Crawford, 6-4 270, Sr., Pensacola
West Florida
DL-Paul James, 6-3 250, Sr., Miami Norland
DL-Joey Ivie, 6-4 270, Sr., Dade City Pasco
LB-Luke Helms, 6-2 230, Sr., Tallahassee
Godby
LB-J.J. Johnson, 6-2 180, Jr., Tampa Robinson
LB-Michael Deeb, 6-3 235, Sr., Plantation
American Heritage
DB-Carlos Duclos, 5-10170, Sr., Tampa Robin-
son
DB-Shaquem Griffin, 6-0 200, Sr., St. Peters-
burg Lakewood
DB-Demetrius Smith, 6-0 180, Sr., Pensacola
West Florida
DB-Deion Singleton, 6-2 185, Jr., Tallahassee
Godby
UT-Isaiah McKenzie, 5-9 170, Jr., Plantation
American Heritage
P-Shane Laychur, 5-11 165, Sr., Jensen Beach
THIRDTEAM OFFENSE
QB-Winky Flowers, 6-1 200, Jr., Miami Jackson
RB-Eric McFadden, 5-10 180, Sr, Estero
RB-Martin Ruiz, 6-0 190, Sr., Tampa Robinson
RB-David Emmanuel, 5-11 185, Sr., Dade City
Pasco
WR-Jacob Sannon, 6-0 175, Sr., Bradenton
Southeast
WR-Travon Lee, 6-1 175, Jr., Fort Lauderdale
Cardinal Gibbons
OL-HectorTorres, 6-0 245, Sr., Orlando Bishop
Moore
OL-Luke Hiers, 6-4 265, So., Lake Wales
OL-Alex Pagonis, 6-3 336, Sr, Gulf Breeze
OL-Caleb Brown, 6-1 260, Sr., Crawfordville
Wakulla
OL-Michael Scott, 6-0 255, Sr, Ponte Vedra
UT-DreSean Nelson, 5-7 165, Sr., Fort Laud-
erdale Dillard
K-Noe Guillen, 5-11 175, Jr., Mulberry
THIRDTEAM DEFENSE
DL-Lucien Minard, 6-0 330, Sr., Auburndale
DL-Robby Garcia, 6-4 255, Sr., Tampa Jesuit
DL-Justin Madison, 6-4 215, Sr., Tampa Robin-
son
DL-Brian Denmark, 6-3 210, Sr., Tallahassee
Rickards
LB-Devontae Tyler, 6-2 220., Sr., Arcadia DeS-
oto
LB-Treyvon Williams, 6-2 220, Sr., Miami Nor-
land
LB-Dylan Bates, 6-3 235, Jr., Ponte Vedra
DB-Devondre Powell, 5-9 180, Sr., Miami Jack-
son
DB-Johnny Batch, 5-11 170, Jr., Merritt Island
DB-Kendall Sawyer, 6-2 180, Jr., East Lee
County
DB-Reggie Wilkerson, 5-11 165, Sr, Citra North
Marion
UT-Mikel Cromartie, 5-9 170, Sr, Crawfordville
Wakulla
UT-Xavier Richardson, 6-3190, Sr., Immokalee
No punter chosen for third team.
HONORABLE MENTION
QB Tyler Cogswell, 6-3 210, Sr., Plantation
American Heritage; QB Tucker Israel, 6-1 190,
So., Orlando Lake Nona; QBTshumbi Johnson,
5-11 175, Sr., Immokalee; QB Zain Gilmore, 6-
0180, Sr, Tampa Robinson; QB Jake Lutzen, 6-
2 200, Sr, Boynton Beach; RB Tim Longmire,
5-10 200, Sr., Tallahassee Godby; RB D'Ernest
Johnson, 5-11 190, Jr., Immokalee; RB Dallas
Baldner, 5-11 175, Sr., Crystal River; WR
Shaq Harris, 6-2 205, Sr., Palmetto; WR Andrew
Meyer, 5-10 175, Sr., Hudson Fivay; OL Hal
Weaver, 6-3 260, Sr, Live Oak Suwannee; OL
Nathan Kirschmeier, 6-4 295, Jr., Plantation
American Heritage; OLTristan Cotton, 6-2 300,
Sr., Ponte Vedra Nease; UT Derwin James, 6-2
200 So., Auburndale; DL Morgan Flournory, 6-
2 225, Sr, Dade City Pasco; DL Jeremy Faulk,
6-2 265, Sr., Palatka; DL Ke'Tyrus Marks, 6-2
280, Sr, Riviera Beach Suncoast; DLWilshonn
Jefferson, 6-0 215, Sr., Auburndale; LB Myles
Stewart, 6-2 210, Sr., Citra North Marion; LB
Grady Cable, 6-2 200, Sr., Satellite Beach
Satellite; LB Jordan Guyton, 5-11 185, Jr.,
Tampa Robinson; UTTra'von Holmes, 5-9 160,
Sr., Tallahassee Rickards; UTTrey Anderson, 5-
9 170, Sr., Orlando Bishop Moore


Sports BRIEFS


High School FOOTBALL


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Jackson's 43 sinks Crystal River girls


Pirates blow lead

en route to 59-51

loss to Dunnellon
C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER Paced by a
43-point offensive effort from
Tanika Jackson, Dunnellon over-
came a 12-point deficit after three
quarters to outscore Crystal River
26-6 in the fourth, giving the Tigers
a 59-51 girls basketball triumph in
a District 5A-7 matchup Friday at
Crystal River.
Jackson poured in 17 points in


the fourth quarter to power Dun-
nellon past the Pirates. The next
best scorer in the game for the
Tigers was Tyra Thomas with
eight.
Megan Wells netted 18 to pace
Crystal River. Katelyn Hannigan
added 14 and Jasmyne Eason
scored 11.
Asked if it was difficult knowing
she had to carry the offensive load
for her team, Jackson answered,
"Not at all. I keep my head up and
keep my attitude in check"
It seemed wherever Jackson po-
sitioned herself on the court, she
found a way to score. Trailing 45-
33 going into the fourth quarter,
the Tigers scored the first 15
points of the period to take a 48-45
lead. Jackson had seven of those,


then netted 10 of her team's final
11 points.
"It's simple really," Crystal River
coach Jason Rodgers said. "You
can't quit playing defense. And you
can't allow (Jackson) to score. You
can't let her get the ball."
Jackson's offensive effort was
only part of Crystal River's prob-
lem. The Pirates started the game
slowly four and a half minutes
had elapsed in the first quarter
when they got their first points -
and they finished it just as poorly,
converting on just 6-of-28 second-
half shots.
"You're not going to beat any-
body missing layup after layup,"
Rodgers said.
The outcome has made the Dis-
trict 5A-7 race anybody's race.


Dunnellon evened its overall
record at 9-9 while improving to 4-
2 in 5A-7. Crystal River is now 4-2
in the district as well, falling to 10-
6 overall.
For three quarters, the Pirates
controlled the game, with a dou-
ble-digit lead most of the time that
reached 18 in the first half (31-13)
and was 15 (44-29) with 1:10 left in
the third quarter. In both in-
stances, a Jackson-propelled point
spree aided a quarter-closing rally
Two Crystal River turnovers led
to a basket and a three-point play
by Jackson to make it 31-18 in the
first half. And with her team facing
a 15-point deficit late in the third,
Jackson who had 12 third-quar-
ter points got two baskets to trim
it to 12.


"We've done it before," Dunnel-
lon coach Tony Maldonado said.
"We were down in the first half,
but these girls are unafraid. These
girls are something special."
Dunnellon started the game
playing a 2-3 zone defense, but
with the Pirates in the midst of an
18-5 second-quarter run, the pres-
sure defense the Tigers are used
to playing was applied. By the
fourth quarter, it began to pay div-
idends. The Pirates had eight
turnovers in the final period; turn-
ing them into points was left to
Jackson.
"She's amazing," Maldonado
said. "Whatever the situation, she
will put the team on her back and
carry it. She has the best basket-
ball IQ I've ever had in a player"


Bulls beat


Associated Press
MIAMI Carlos Boozer scored
27 points and the Chicago Bulls
dominated on the boards to be-
come only the third visiting team to
win in Miami this season, beating
the Heat 96-89 Friday night.
Chicago outrebounded Miami 48-
28. The Bulls had 19 offensive re-
bounds to four for the Heat.
The Eastern Conference-leading
Heat fell to 15-3 at home. Their
other home losses came against the
Knicks and Warriors.
Miami's LeBron James scored 30
points, extending his streaks of
scoring at least 20 points to 31 con-
secutive games this season, and 52
games in a row overall when in-
cluding last year's playoff run. He
has scored at least 25 in eight con-
secutive games.
The first meeting between the
teams this season was a bruiser,
and the Bulls repeatedly outfought
and outfoxed Miami on the boards.
The Heat had won four games this
season when outrebounded by 15
or more, but this time the disparity
beat them.
Nets 115,
Wizards 113, 20T
WASHINGTON Joe Johnson's
jumper with 0.7 seconds left in the sec-
ond overtime lifted Brooklyn over
Washington.
Bradley Beal's two free throws tied the
score at 113 with 9.1 seconds to play
before Johnson, who had 18 points, hit
the shot that improved Brooklyn to 4-1
under interim coach P.J. Carlesimo.
Brook Lopez had 27 points and 13 re-
bounds for the Nets, and Deron Williams
added 24 points and 10 assists.
Beal had a career-high 24 points.
Jordan Crawford scored 23 points and
Nene, who fouled out in the first over-
time, had 20 for Washington, which lost
its fourth in a row and is now 4-27.
After Martell Webster's jumper gave
the Wizards a 106-104 lead to begin
the second overtime, Gerald Wallace
made a layup and Keith Bogans con-
verted a three-point play and a layup for
a 111-106 lead with 3:21 to play.
Beal hit a 3-pointer as the first over-
time ended to tie the score at 104. It
was the second time Washington ex-
tended the game at the horn. Nene hit
a hook shot to tie it at 93 in regulation.
Thunder 109, 76ers 85
OKLAHOMA CITY-- Russell West-
brook scored 27 points, Kevin Durant
added 26 and Oklahoma City bounced
back from a rare home loss to beat
Philadelphia.
Oklahoma City made eight of its first
10 3-point attempts in the second half
and never trailed after scoring the final
five points before halftime.
Serge Ibaka chipped in 15 points and
10 rebounds and Kevin Martin had 16


ASSO(
The Chicago Bulls' Jimmy Butler forces Miami Heat guard Dwyan
to pass the ball during the first half Friday in Miami.


points off the bench for the Thunder,
who haven't lost consecutive home
games since dropping two of the first
three to start the 2010-11 season.
Nick Young led Philadelphia with 21
points, and Jrue Holiday had 15 points
and nine assists. The Sixers fell to 2-5
on their eight-game road trip, which
started before Christmas and con-
cludes Saturday night at San Antonio.
Cavs 106, Bobcats 104
CHARLOTTE, N.C. Kyrie Irving
scored 33 points, including a pull-up
jumper from the foul line with one sec-
ond left, to lift Cleveland over Charlotte.
Irving had 14 of his team's final 16
points and 26 points in the second half
as the Cavaliers snapped a three-game
losing streak.
Irving was 10 of 21 from the field and
converted all 10 free throws while scor-
ing 16 points in the fourth quarter. He
also had six assists and five rebounds.
Tristan Thompson added 19 points
and C.J. Miles added 18 for the Cavs.
Ben Gordon led Charlotte's second-
half charge, finishing with 27 points.
Ramon Sessions added 20 points
and Gerald Henderson had 17, includ-
ing a career-high four 3-pointers for the
Bobcats, who have lost 19 of 20.


Celtics 94, Pacers
BOSTON Kevin Garnett s
18 points before he was ejecte
flagrant foul in the fourth quart<
the Celtics snapped a four-gam
ing streak.
Rajon Rondo added 18 point
assists and five rebounds for Bo
which had lost eight of 10 to fall
son-worst three games below .
Garnett also had seven reboun
Tyler Hansbrough scored 19
and David West and Roy Hibbe
10 rebounds apiece for the Pac
Central Division leaders had wo
seven and nine of 11.
The Celtics used a 17-3 run in
ond quarter to take control of the
Pistons 85, Hawks
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -Aus
had a season-best 20 points and
earned its fourth consecutive vict
The Hawks, who trailed by as
as 19, had the ball in the final s
butAndre Drummond blocked L
Williams'jumper at the buzzer t
serve the win.
The Pistons have won six of
overall, with the only loss coming
double overtime at Atlanta. The


Heat

unit has powered the surge, outscoring
the starters in several games, and the
reserves outscored Atlanta's backups
41-14, led by Daye.
Josh Smith had 20 points for Atlanta,
while Al Horford had 18 points and 15
rebounds.
T. Blazers 86, Grizzlies 84
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Wesley
Matthews scored 21 points, J.J. Hick-
son added 19 points and 11 rebounds,
and Portland beat Memphis.
Rudy Gay's jumper from near the top
of the key was off the mark, allowing
the Trail Blazers to escape a closely
played game that saw nine ties and 21
lead changes.
LaMarcus Aldridge had 15 points and
12 rebounds for Portland, while Nicolas
Batum and Damian Lillard added 11
points apiece, Lillard also handing out
eight assists.
Marreese Speights had a season-
high 22 points and 13 rebounds for the
Grizzlies in place of Zach Randolph,
who missed the game with flu-like
symptoms. Gay had 19 points, but was
8 of 21 from the field.
Marc Gasol scored 12 points and
had a career-best eight blocks. Darrell
Arthur contributed 10 points off the
Memphis bench.
Kings 105, Raptors 96
TORONTO DeMarcus Cousins
i B scored a season-high 31 points and
matched his career high with 20 re-
bounds, John Salmons scored eight of
ciated Press his 20 points in the fourth quarter and
ie Wade Sacramento beat Toronto.
Jason Thompson scored 14 points
75 and Isaiah Thomas had 11 as the Kings
won their second straight road game.
scored Sacramento had gone 1-13 away from
d for a home before winning at Cleveland on
er, and Wednesday.
ne los- The Kings have won six of eight
overall following their second five-game
s, seven losing streak of the season.
oston, Kyle Lowry scored 24 and Ed Davis
I a sea- had 11 points and 13 rebounds for the
500. Raptors, who came in having won eight
ds. of nine and a season-best five straight
points at home.
rt had Alan Anderson scored 20, DeMar
;ers. The DeRozan had 14 and Jose Calderon
cn six of added 13 for the Raptors.

ithe sec- Rockets 115, Bucks 101
game. MILWAUKEE James Harden
5 94 scored 29 points to lead the Houston
Rockets to a 115-101 victory over the
stin Daye Milwaukee Bucks.
Detroit Harden shot 11 of 18 from the floor to
ory. go with seven assists and four steals
s many for Houston, which has won 10 of its
seconds, last 13 games.
Lou The Rockets, who shot 54 percent
o pre- from the field, also got 22 points from
Carlos Delfino in his return to Milwaukee.
seven He played for the Bucks from 2009-12
ig in before signing with Houston as an unre-
second stricted free agent in the offseason.


Sharks


swim by


Pirates


CR girls soccer

drops 5-0 loss
DAVID PIEKLIK
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER It
was not the way the Crystal
River girls soccer team
wanted to start the new year.
The Pirates were thor-
oughly outplayed in a 5-0 loss
Friday to Nature Coast Tech.
The loss dropped Crystal
River to 9-7-1 overall and
ended a four game winning
streak, and had head coach
Bill Reyes questioning his
team's desire afterward.
As his players sat on the
bench following the game,
he told them, "The team I
watched out there didn't
care. The team I watched
doesn't seem to care how
their season ends."
Pirates forward Christina
Bresson agreed with the
coach that her team wasn't
playing with heart, adding
after he spoke, "I think we
kind of took this game
lightly"
Though the Pirates are 6-
1 in district play this season,
Reyes was disappointed
with his team's lackluster
effort in the non-district tilt
against the Sharks (11-1-1).
Only a handful of games re-
main on the season before
district playoffs begin, and
Reyes was quick to put
things in perspective.
Though the game might
not have meant anything for
the playoff picture, Reyes
said this is not the way his
seniors want their soccer
careers to end, and added
he needs better play from
everyone.
Nature Coast forward Sil-
vana Paonessa led her team
in scoring with two goals,
and goalkeeper Samantha
Oliveira had nine saves to
record the clean sheet.
Crystal River's backup goal-
keeper Kristina Hartwell
had 18 saves on 23 shots.
The Pirates travel to
Ocala on Monday to play
Vanguard, the first of three
non-district games to close
out the season.
Bresson expects her team
to play with more intensity
next time out.
"We don't like to get coach
upset," she said.


Washed out at PGA opener


First-day play

postponed in

Hawaii

Associated Press
KAPALUA, Hawaii The PGA
Tour season now starts on Saturday
Wind squalls that howled down off
the mountains above Maui were so
severe Friday that tour officials
scrapped the first round of the Tour-
nament of Champions. All scores
were erased only 20 players in the
30-man field even had scores on
Charlie Beljan drives on the first hole
Friday at the Tournament of Champi-
ons golf tournament in Kapalua,
Hawaii. After a morning of severe
wind and rain, tournament officials
suspended play and scrapped the
opening round.
Associated Press


their cards and the round will
start over Saturday with 36 holes,
weather permitting.
"I can honestly say the forecast
isn't real good, but maybe we'll get
lucky," said Slugger White, the tour's
vice president of rules and competi-
tion. "That's the hope."
Rickie Fowler and Jason Dufner,
who supposedly started the 2013 sea-
son by playing in the first group, only
made it through eight holes. Six play-
ers, including defending champion
Steve Stricker, had not even teed off.
It was the first time since The
Players Championship in 2005 that a
round had been wiped clean.
The decision was great news for
Scott Stallings, who made a quadru-
ple-bogey 8 on the third hole and al-
ready was 7-over par after four
holes. He will tee off as if none of
that ever happened. As for U.S. Open
champion Webb Simpson?
"It stinks for me," Simpson said.
With a conversative game plan and
a few good putts, Simpson was 3
under par after seven holes when


play was stopped. Jonas Blixt of
Sweden at 1 under was the only
player surviving par.
So much for starting the season in
paradise.
This felt more like work than a
working vacation, and the 40 mph
gusts became too much when Carl
Pettersson lagged a 40-foot putt that
was slowing around the hole until a
gust came up and blew it another 30
feet and just off the green. Hunter
Mahan went to address a putt and
ball blew a few feet forward. Ian
Poulter said he used his umbrella to
shield the wind so he could mark his
ball on the green, but when the um-
brella moved, so did his golf ball.
"You couldn't identify the best
players out here," Pettersson said.
The plan was to play 36 holes Sat-
urday, although the forecast was not
much better occasional bursts of
rain and big gusts. The Plantation
Course at Kapalua was built on a
mountain, and it's one of the tough-
est courses to walk all year. It figures
to be a brutal day for the caddies.


SPORTS


SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 2013 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

'Star Wars' creator
engaged
LOS ANGELES -
"Star Wars" creator
George Lucas is engaged.
A spokeswoman for
Lucasfilm
Ltd. says
the 68-
1 year-old

is en-
gaged to
43-year-
old in-
George vestment
Lucas firm pres-
ident Mellody Hobson.
No other details were
provided.
Hobson serves as
chairman of DreamWorks
Animation and is a finan-
cial contributor to ABC's
"Good Morning
America."
Lucas helped to
launch the modern
blockbuster age with his
"Star Wars" sagas and
"Indiana Jones" adven-
tures. The original "Star
Wars" still stands as the
No. 2 film in terms of
tickets sold domestically,
behind only "Gone with
the Wind."
Lucas has three chil-
dren: Amanda, Katie and
Jett. He was previously
married to film editor
Marcia Lucas from 1969
to 1983.

Actor Nick Stahl
arrested
LOS ANGELES- Los
Angeles police say actor
Nick Stahl has been ar-
rested for investigation of
lewd conduct.
The 33-year-old
"Terminator 3" star was
arrested about 8 p.m.
Thursday on Hollywood
Boulevard. He was
booked on a misde-
meanor count of lewd
conduct and released
from custody
In May, Stahl had been
reported missing by his
wife, but he later turned
up.

Missing dog
mystery
BROOKLINE, Mass. -
Dennis Lehane has a new
mystery on his mind, but
it's not something the
best-selling author can
control from behind a
keyboard.
The crime novelist and
his family started an all-
out search after their res-
cue beagle Tessa escaped
from their yard on
Christmas Eve.
The 47-year-old is sur-
prised by
the media
S attention
the
4 search is
attracting,
and
thinks it
has to do
Dennis with his
Lehane offer to
name a book character
after whoever finds
Tessa.
Word of the search has
spread so much that
Lehane even heard from
a San Francisco dog
psychic who offered help.
The dilemma arrived
as the author of books i
including "Mystic
River" and "Gone, Baby,
Gone" faces a Friday
deadline.
It's for a movie script
based on his short story
'Animal Rescue."
-From wire reports


Magic on Broadway


Associated Press
Matthew James Thomas, left, as Pippin and Rachel Bay Jones as Catherine in a production of "Pippin" at the
American Repertory Theater in Cambridge, Mass.

Musical Pippin' to transfer to Broadway


MARK KENNEDY
AP Drama Writer

NEW YORK There's magic to
do on Broadway -
"Pippin" is coming back.
Producers of the revival that is
currently playing at the American
Repertory Theater outside Boston
said late Thursday that "Pippin"
will transfer to the Music Box
Theatre this spring. Performances
begin March 23, with an official
opening April 25.
A whimsical coming-of-age story
about the son of the first Holy
Roman Emperor, "Pippin" boasts
pop-rock music and lyrics by
Stephen Schwartz and a book by
Roger 0. Hirson. Schwartz's other
hits include "Wicked" and
"Godspell."
This "Pippin" is being directed by


Diane Paulus, who leads the
American Repertory Theater in
Cambridge, Mass., where the latest
revival got its start. Her revivals of
both "Hair" and "The Gershwins'
Porgy and Bess" also went to
Broadway and each won Tony
Awards for best musical revivals.
"Pippin" opened in 1972 under
the direction of Bob Fosse and ran
for five years, winning five Tonys. It
became a favorite with schools,
summer stocks and community
theaters across the country
Directed and choreographed by
Bob Fosse, the Broadway original
version starred Ben Vereen as the
Leading Player, an emcee-like role
that won him a best-actor Tony
John Rubinstein played Pippin and
the cast also included Jill
Clayburgh and Ann Reinking.


In Massachusetts, the Vereen role
is being filled by Patina Miller, the
Tony-nominated star of "Sister Act,"
but there was no immediate word
on whether she would join the
production on Broadway
Schwartz wrote the show while a
student at Carnegie Tech in Pitts-
burgh and his success with
"Godspell" helped get it on
Broadway Its breakout songs in-
clude "Magic to Do," "No Time at
All," "Corner of the Sky," and "Kind
of Woman."
Gypsy Snider, an ex-Cirque du
Soleil member who founded the
Montreal-based collective known as
7 Fingers, has choreographed the
circus parts of the show, and Chet
Walker, who was in the original
"Pippin," has choreographed the
dance parts in a Fosse style.


Actor Dempsey: Coffee chain bid appears successful


Associated Press


SEATTLE Actor
Patrick Dempsey said it ap-
pears his bid to buy a small
coffee chain has prevailed
in a bankruptcy auction that
included Starbucks Corp.
Late Thursday night,
Dempsey announced his
company, Global Baristas
LLC, made the winning bid
for Tully's Coffee. He noted
in a KOMO-TV interview
that a bankruptcy judge will
have the final say on Jan. 11.
Still, Dempsey tweeted "We
got it! Thank you Seattle!"
Dempsey's company will
pay $9,150,000 for Tully's
and complete the purchase
later this month after the
court hearing, he said in a
statement.
"I'm thrilled that we won
and I'm even more excited
about saving Tully's Coffee
and its hundreds of jobs,"
he said. "Tully's is a great
company with committed
employees, and with its
base in Seattle, one of the
world's greatest cities, I'm
confident we will be able to
successfully build the brand
and help grow the
economy."


Birthday Trial and error has taught you lots of valuable
shortcuts that you're likely to use in the year ahead. Certain
objectives that you previously had difficulty achieving can
now be done with relative ease.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) If you want to assert your-
self, it's important that you do so without being aggressive.
Be tactful and considerate, but also firm.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You're a quick study and
capable of learning much from other people as well as from
books. It behooves you to closely observe the habits of
people you admire.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) It could be one of those
times when the people you know could be just as important
as the things you know. Hanging out with certain
associates could prove to be extremely helpful.
Aries (March 21-April 19)- What makes you so suc-
cessful is your cooperative spirit. Anyone whom you assist


Tully's Coffee has 47 com-
pany-owned locations in
Washington and California.
The company, with more
than 500 employees, filed
for Chapter 11 bankruptcy
protection in October.
Dempsey, who gained the
nickname "McDreamy" on
the TV show "Grey's
Anatomy" set in a fictional
Seattle hospital, has said he
wants to rescue the chain.
"Seattle has been very
good to me over my career,
and I am honored to have
the privilege to own
Tully's and work closely
with the company's em-
ployees," he said in his
statement.
After Thursday's auction,
Starbucks spokesman Zack
Hutson confirmed his com-
pany participated and "is
currently in a back-up posi-
tion" for some of Tully's as-
sets. The final certification
of the winning bid won't
occur until the Jan. 11 bank-
ruptcy court hearing,
Hutson said.
"We have to wait until
next week to make sure
everything I believe the
11th to make sure it's all
finalized," Dempsey told


Today's HOROSCOPE
or go out of your way for will feel impelled to respond
equivalently.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) The best way to enhance
your feelings of self-worth is to busy your heart, head and
hands with lots of productive activities. Make everything
you do count.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) There is likely to be an addi-
tional facet to your personality that makes you even more
appealing and fascinating to people. When you sense it,
use it, but do so responsibly.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Give top priority to anything
you can do to make things happier in the household,
especially if someone is feeling down in the dumps.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) If you're in charge of a social
gathering, it behooves you to limit the participants to a few
choice pals. It's likely to be more fun if there aren't too
many people involved.


Associated Press
Actor Patrick Dempsey's bid to buy a small Seattle chain of
coffee shops at a bankruptcy auction has been successful,
Depsey said.


KOMO-TV
The Starbucks spokes-
man said his company
made an offer for 13 of
Tully's company-owned
stores in the Puget Sound
region, plus 12 outlets at
Boeing Co. sites. Hutson


said another bidder made
an offer for all other assets
- and is in a back-up posi-
tion for those.
Both Starbucks and
Tully's are based in Seattle.
The auction process was
not public.


Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) There is a strong possibility
that you could derive profit through an involvement with a
close relative or a friend of the family. Chances are you
won't have to ask to be included.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Your gift of persuasion is one
of your strongest assets, so if you have a special idea or
product that you're trying to sell or promote, make your
pitch now. You won't find a better time.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Lucky you, because one of
your greatest benefits is likely to come through the good
auspices of another and not from anything you do on your
own. Good people help other good people.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Someone you recently
met and liked is as eager to get to know you better as you
are to know him or her. However, this person is really shy,
so it's going to be up to you to make the first move.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 3
Fantasy 5:1 12 19 30 36
5-of-5 1 winner $220,507.03
4-of-5 304 $116.50
3-of-5 9,281 $10.50
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2
Powerball: 18 20 28 35 53
Powerball: 20
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 1 winner $2 million
No Florida winner
Lotto: 9 17 27 44 48 51
6-of-6 1 winner $16 million
5-of-6 32 $4,518
4-of-6 1,634 $70.50
3-of-6 32,479 $5
Fantasy 5:10 11 12 25 32
5-of-5 2 winners $118,035.75
4-of-5 318 $119.50
3-of-5 10,668 $9.50


INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, Jan. 5,
the fifth day of 2012. There
are 360 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Jan. 5, 1983, President
Ronald Reagan announced
he was nominating Elizabeth
Dole to succeed Drew Lewis
as secretary of transporta-
tion; Dole became the first
woman to head a Cabinet
department in Reagan's ad-
ministration, and the first to
head the DOT.
On this date:
In 1589, Catherine de
Medici of France died at age
69.
In 1781, a British naval ex-
pedition led by Benedict
Arnold burned Richmond, Va.
In 1895, French Capt.
Alfred Dreyfus, convicted of
treason, was publicly stripped
of his rank. (He was
ultimately vindicated.)
In 1896, an Austrian news-
paper, Wiener Presse, re-
ported the discovery by
German physicist Wilhelm
Roentgen of a type of radia-
tion that came to be known
as X-rays.
Ten years ago: Two
Palestinian suicide bombers
set off back-to-back blasts in
central Tel Aviv, killing 15
Israelis and eight foreign na-
tionals in the bloodiest attack
in six months. Chinese state
media reported that an un-
manned Shenzhou IV space
capsule had returned safely
to Earth.
Five years ago: Republi-
can Mitt Romney won the
Wyoming caucuse, picking
up eight delegates; in a de-
bate three days before the
New Hampshire primary,
Romney clashed with Mike
Huckabee on foreign policy,
and John McCain on immi-
gration.
One year ago: Speaking
at the Pentagon, President
Barack Obama launched a
reshaping and shrinking of
the military, vowing to pre-
serve U.S. pre-eminence
even as the Army and Marine
Corps shed troops and the
administration considered
reducing its arsenal of
nuclear weapons.
Today's Birthdays: For-
mer Vice President Walter F.
Mondale is 85. Actor Robert
Duvall is 82. Pro Football Hall
of Fame coach Chuck Noll is
81. King Juan Carlos of
Spain is 75. Talk show host
Charlie Rose is 71.
Thought for Today: "How
far you go in life depends on


your being tender with the
young, compassionate with
the aged, sympathetic with
the striving and tolerant of the
weak and strong. Because
someday in your life you will
have been all of these." -
George Washington Carver
(1864-1943).








RELIGION15,
.L ,EIGION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Still helping soldiers


-~ I -


GREG WILLIAMSON/The Leaf-Chronicle
John David Laida, formerly a Chaplain in World War II and a veteran of the Battle of the Bulge, poses for a photo in front of the First Baptist
Church in Clarksville, Tenn. At 23, Laida was the youngest chaplain in the Army at the time he signed up for duty during World War II. At 93,
he will be the oldest representative at a Jan. 11 Fort Campbell meeting between civilian pastors and military chaplains seeking to help today's
soldiers through the ravages of post-traumatic stress and other problems related to wartime service.


Former WWII

chaplain joins

fight for today's

warriors

PHILIP GREY
The Leaf-Chronicle
CLARKSVILLE, Tenn.
Sixty-eight Christmas Eves
ago, during a season dedi-
cated to peace on earth
and good will towards men, a
young Army chaplain was con-
fronting the horrors of war at
the Battle of the Bulge.
For John David Laida, best
known in Clarksville for his 28
years of service to First Baptist
Church, the memories of serving
during those dark days of World
War II remain mostly unspoken,
even to close family He chooses
instead to focus on the present
and future, and on a message he
has never ceased to carry forth
to the world since the day it
changed his life at the age of 17
that there is a hope beyond
the world and its wars and
strife, with the power to heal the
worst injuries to body, mind and
soul.
At 93, Laida is at an age when
most people have long left off
taking on new challenges, but
the noted pastor and Army vet-
eran feels he has another fight
left in him.
To talk to him is to believe he
still has the energy for another
cause. He doesn't look anywhere
near his age and the voice still
conveys power and conviction
after more than 70 years of
preaching.
Since "retiring" from his du-
ties at First Baptist Church 25
years ago, he has continued to
preach every Sunday while
serving as interim pastor for
other churches in need, working
full-time hours in part-time
jobs. And on Jan. 11, he will join
with today's chaplains and local
pastors at Fort Campbell's Lib-
erty Chapel as they seek to find
a way to cope with the ravages
of war afflicting a new genera-
tion of soldiers and military
families.
Laida was washing dishes,
working his way through Gordon
See Page C5




Worship ning with di
urday contE
Men are invited to attend at 5:30 p.m
First Christian Church of Ho- service is a
mosassa Springs' Men's Fel- church is a
lowship breakfast at 8 a.m. Cleveland I
today. The public is invited to a the minster
marriage enrichment series fice at 352-
Wednesday evenings begin- 0 The M


I,
---i-- ~


-- - ~d
* .44 J a~ ~ ~
.1


The Leaf-Chronicle
This undated photo shows John David Laida when he served as a Chaplain during World War II.


Religion NOTES


inner at 6 p.m. Sat-
emporary service is
n. Sunday worship
at 10:30 a.m. The
t 7030 W. Grover
Blvd., Dan Wagner is
r. Call the church of-
628-5556.
len and Women's


Club of St. Margaret's Episco- at 10:30 a.m. Children's church a.m. Sunday. A nursery is pro-
pal Church will meet today at is during the 10:30 a.m. Family vided during the 10:30 a.m.
8:30 a.m. for breakfast and a Eucharist. Lunch and youth service. Christian Formation is
workday. The church will cele- Sunday school follow at noon. at 9:15 a.m. Godly Play Sunday
brate Holy Eucharist Rite 1 at 8 0 Shepherd of the Hills school is at 10 a.m. There is a
a.m. Sunday and Holy Eu- Episcopal Church in Lecanto healing service at 10 a.m.
charist Rite 2 at 10:30 a.m. will celebrate the Epiphany with Wednesday followed by Bible
Adult Sunday school is at 9:30 Holy Eucharist services at 5
a.m. Family Eucharist service is p.m. today and 8 and 10:30 See Page C2


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


I am


24601,


and so


are you

In case you haven't
seen "Les Mis6rables"
go see it.
In case you don't fully
understand the concept of
the power of grace and
mercy to change a human
heart go see it
In case you're caught up
in the drive to make oth-
ers pay for their wrongs
and can't see your own -
go see it.
I heard it said once that
all of life illustrates Bible
doctrine, and this movie
does just that.
Based on the 1862 novel
by Victor Hugo, the story
is set in 19th-century
France and begins with
Prisoner No. 24601, Jean
Valjean, who finishes
serving 19 brutal years on
a prison chain gang for
stealing bread to feed his
starving family
Free at last and deeply
embittered, he immedi-
ately violates his parole by
stealing silver from a
bishop who had kindly
See Page C4


Judi Siegal
JUDI'S
JOURNAL


Pekuach


Nefesh:


Saving

a life
This is the first in a se-
ries of articles on Jewish
values.
One of the most im-
portant mitzvot,
commandments, in
the Jewish religion is the
saving of human life. The
concept for this com-
mandment comes from
my oft-quoted Leviticus
19, known as the Holiness
Code: "Neither should
you stand by the blood of
your neighbor" (Lev.19:
16) If a human being's life
is in danger, one is obli-
gated to do everything
possible for the preserva-
tion of that life.
One may violate the
Sabbath, Yom Kippur, the
holiest day of the year, and
even eat unkosher food if
this will save a life. One
may also travel on the
Sabbath if this would help
save a person's life. The
donation of organs after
death or from a living
donor is also recognized
by Judaism because of its
life-saving measures. The
chief Sephardic rabbi of
Israel, Ovaday Yosef, has
ruled that one can be a liv-
ing donor, as in the case of
a kidney donation, as long
as the donor's life is not
put into jeopardy This
See Page C5


MAI-----f -A





C2 SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 2013


NOTES
Continued from Page C1

study. SOS is from 9 a.m. to
noon Thursday at Good Shep-
herd Lutheran Church. Evening
Bible study is at 7 p.m.
Thursday.
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church in America invites the
public to attend Great Vespers
Forefeast: Theophany (blessing
of the water) at 5 p.m. today
and Divine Liturgy Theo-
phany at 10 a.m. Sunday. The
church is at 1277 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness (off U.S. 41 North,
across from Dollar General).
The Holy Myrrhbearers ask at-
tendees to bring a box or can of
food for distribution at Family
Resource Center in Hernando.
The public is also invited to at-
tend Great Vespers at 6:30
p.m. Tuesday in The Villages at
St. George Episcopal Church,
1250 Paige Place, Lady Lake,
Call 352-726-4777.
North Oak Baptist
Church in Citrus Springs has
offered a Saturday night wor-
ship for more than a year and is
continuing to make changes in
order to meet the needs of
today's families. The Saturday
night service time is changing
to 7. A"come-as-you-are" at-
mosphere, combined with
timely messages and contem-
porary praise and worship
make this a positive experience
for people of all ages. Childcare
is provided for birth through 4
years of age and a children's
group for kids through third
grade meet at the same time.
Pastor Stan Stewart's message
tonight is, "When Your Sighs
Turn To Snorts," and Jan. 12's
message is "Finding Inspiration
in the Foot Draggers." All are in-
vited to attend. The church is at
the intersection of North Elk-
cam Boulevard and North Cit-
rus Springs Boulevard. Call
352-489-1688 or 352-746-1500
for more information.
First Presbyterian


RELIGION


Church is at 206 Washington
Ave., Inverness. Sunday wor-
ship schedule includes tradi-
tional services at 8 and 11 a.m.,
casual service at 9:30 a.m.,
Sunday school hour at 9:30
a.m., and coffee hour from 9 to
11 a.m. The Rev. Craig S.
Davies will preach on "Possibly
Our Best Year" with readings
from Isaiah 60:1-6. The annual
Men's Fellowship trash and
treasure and bake sale is from
8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday and
Friday. Proceeds, including un-
sold items, are given to charity.
Widow/widowers' "Real Time"
Ministry is a new group that
meets at the church from 10:45
to 11:45 a.m. the first and third
Monday monthly at the
church. Call the church at 352-
637-0770.
St. Anne's Episcopal
Church (a parish in the Angli-
can Communion) will celebrate
the Epiphany with services at 8
and 10:15 a.m. Sunday. St.
Anne's hosts Our Father's
Table from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. today. Overeaters Anony-
mous meets at 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday in the parish li-
brary. "Recovering From Food
Addiction" meets at 1 p.m.
Thursday in the parish library.
Alcoholics Anonymous meets
at 8 p.m. Friday and Mondays
in the parish library. All are in-
vited to join St. Anne's for a
Bluegrass Gospel sing-along at
6 p.m. the fourth Sunday
monthly. Annie and Tim's
United Bluegrass Gospel Band
will lead the singing.
First Baptist Church of
Floral City, 8545 E. Magnolia
St., invites everyone to share in
Sunday's worship services at
the 8:30 a.m. blended service
and the 11 a.m. traditional serv-
ice. Coffee and doughnuts are
served in the fellowship hall
from 9 to 9:45 a.m. Sunday
school classes for all ages
begin at 9:45 a.m. For more in-
formation, www.fbcfloralcity.org
or call 352-726-4296.
Inverness Church of God
Sunday worship services are at


8:30 and 10:30 a.m. The first
Sunday monthly is designated
for children to have a special
time together in the "Children's
Church" room during the 10:30
a.m. worship service. The re-
maining Sundays, children will
remain in the auditorium for
worship with their parents. Sun-
day school begins at 9:30 a.m.
with classes for everyone. Adult
Bible class is at 7 p.m.
Wednesday in rooms 105 and
106. The youth group meets at
7 p.m. Wednesday in the
Youth Ministries Building. K.I.D.
Zone (for children pre-k through
eighth grade) meets from 6 to 8
p.m. Wednesday. This in-
cludes K.I.D.'s choir practice
from 6 to 6:30; K.I.D.'s dinner
from 6:30 to 7; and children's
Bible study classes from 7 to 8
p.m. The church is at 416 U.S.
41 S., Inverness. Call 352-
726-4524.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church invites the
public to worship at 8:30 and 11
a.m. Sunday. A coffee hour fol-
lows both services. The church
is barrier free and offers a free
CD ministry, large-print service
helps and hearing devices. A
nursery attendant is available
for preschool-age children. The
church is on County Road 486
opposite Citrus Hills Boulevard
in Hernando. Call 352-
746-7161.
NorthRidge Church in-
vites the community to the 9
a.m. Sunday worship service.
Tomorrow we will partake in
Communion together, and col-
lect nonperishable items for the
local SOS Food Pantry. Acof-
fee fellowship will follow the
morning service. Weekly Bible
study meets at 7 p.m. Wednes-
days; this week, the Faith Jour-
ney video series is the topic of
study with lessons that will help
us understand the scriptures as
related to the culture and land
of biblical times. NorthRidge is
a nondenominational church
where you will experience a
friendly, loving and casual at-
mosphere. The church meets at


the Inverness Woman's Club,
1715 Forest Ridge Drive,
across from the Whispering
Pines Park entrance. Call Pas-
tor Kennie Berger at 352-
302-5813.
The Nature Coast Unitar-
ian Universalist Fellowship of
Citrus County welcomes Doug
Worthington to the pulpit at
10:30 a.m. Sunday. Worthing-
ton's topic, "How I Went Around
the World and Became a Uni-
tarian," recounts how he left the
United States in 1963, spent
two years in Ethiopia, and re-
turned to the States by way of
Aden, India, Thailand and Hong
Kong. The trip introduced him
to a wide range of religious be-
liefs and outlooks, which led to
the change of his own personal
religious beliefs. The fellowship
meets at 7633 N. Florida Ave.,
Citrus Springs. Call 352-
465-4225.
Gravity Church starts a
mini-series this Sunday called
Resolution. Cafe opens at
10:30 a.m. and the service
starts at 11 a.m. The church is
at 801 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal
River. Visit www.gravity
church.org.
First Presbyterian
Church of Crystal River
meets for worship at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Christian Education
classes (two adults, one chil-
dren's) begin at 9 a.m. Elder
Roy Cawley will preach the ser-
mon, "Turning Point." All are
welcome. The Forum resumes
at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 16,
with Thrivent Financial with Peg
Weston and DeAnna Edwards.
Community members are wel-
come. The church will celebrate
its 130th year of serving the
Lord in the Citrus County area
on Sunday, Feb. 10. The FPC
food pantry is open the second
and the fourth Tuesday
monthly. Call 352-795-2259 or
email fpccr01@gmail.com.
Abundant Life of Crystal
River is a growing church
where you can find a church
home, as well as a caring
church family. The Sunday


morning service is at 10:30 and
the midweek service is at 7
p.m. Wednesday. Both services
have uncompromised and en-
couraging Bible-based teach-
ings that will build your faith.
Abundant Life is a full-Gospel,
nondenominational church that
believes in the power of Pente-
cost. Come and grow with us.
Come as you are and leave for-
ever changed by the presence
of the Lord. Abundant Life of
Crystal River is at 4515 N. Tal-
lahassee Road, Crystal River.
Visit www.abundantlifecitrus.org
or call 352-795-LIFE
"Just Follow the Signs,"
from Matthew 2:1-12, is theme
given by Pastor Stephen Lane
at Faith Lutheran Church off
State Road 44 and County
Road 490 in Crystal Glen Sub-
division in Lecanto. The church
is handicapped accessible, pro-
vides hearing assistance and
has a cry room. Bible study and
Sunday school resumes at 11
a.m. this week preceded by fel-
lowship. The church will cele-
brate Friendship Sunday on
Jan. 13 where friends and con-
gregation members will invite a
new person to join them in
church. Call 352-527-3325 or
visit faithlecanto.com.
Covenant Love Ministry
meets in building 11 at Sham-
rockAcres Industrial Park, 6843
N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River.
There is a gospel sing at 7 p.m.
Friday. Regular church serv-
ices are at 10:30 a.m. Sunday.
The ministry website is
Covenant-Love.com. Call Pas-
tor Brian Kinker at 352-
601-4868.
First Baptist Church of
Inverness, 550 Pleasant Grove
Road, offers the following Sun-
day activities: SONrise Sunday
school class at 7:45 a.m.,
blended worship service at 9
a.m., "Kids' Church" for ages 4
through fourth grade during the
9 a.m. service, Sunday school
classes for all ages at 10:30
a.m. A nursery is available for
all services except the 7:45
a.m. class. On Sunday


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

evening, Connection classes
are offered and AWANA begins
at 5:15. Midweek worship serv-
ice for adults is at 6 p.m.
Wednesday. For the youths,
there is "Ignite," and for chil-
dren, "Wednesday Worship
Kids." Call the office at 352-
726-1252 or visit www.fbc
inverness.com.
Peace Lutheran Church
has Sunday morning Bible
classes for children and youths
at 9. Adult Bible study groups
meet at 9 a.m. Sunday and 10
a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday.
Sunday morning worship serv-
ice is at 10. The church is five
miles north of Dunnellon at the
junction of U.S. 41 and State
Road 40. Call the church office
at 352-489-5881 or visit
www.PeaceLutheranOnline.org.
First Baptist Church of
Homosassa, 10540 W. Yulee
Drive, weekly schedule: Sun-
day school for all ages at 9 a.m.
followed by morning worship at
10:25. Youth Bible study is at
4:30 p.m. in the fellowship hall.
Sunday evening Bible study be-
gins at 6. Life Care Center is
open (food and clothing) from
9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Monday
and Thursdays. Call 352-
628-3858.
First Christian Church of
Chassahowitzka, 11275 S.
Riviera Drive, Homosassa,
meets at 9:30 a.m. Sunday for
Bible study and 10:30 for morn-
ing worship. Call 352-382-2557.
First Baptist Church of
Hernando Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m., following fel-
lowship, coffee and goodies.
The morning service begins at
10:45. The evening service is at
6. Midweek services are at 6:30
p.m. Wednesday. Young Musi-
cians/Puppeteers meet at 6:30
p.m. Wednesday. Youth Bible
study for ages 11 and older is
from 6 to 7:30 p.m. the second
and fourth Fridays monthly in
the fellowship hall. The church
is on East Parsons Point Road
in Hernando.

See NOTES/Page C3


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA


0 Crystal River
Church of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nurser
Provided


SST. ANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org


ST. THOMAS

CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
aturday.....4:30 P.M.
unday......8:00 A.M.
..............10:30 A.M.


6287t0


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES --
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
795-4479




o 0
"The
Church
in the
Heart

Community
with a
Heart

Community"







i; Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour @ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


Crystal
River

Foursquare

Gospel Church

1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager


Special

Event or

Weekly
Services

Please Call
Beverly at

564-2912

For
Advertising

Information


THE
SALVATION
ARMY CIrRUSCOUNTY
CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 AM.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A.M.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller







Homosassa
First United
Methodist
church
S Everyone
Becoming
A Disciple
of Christ

Sunday Worship
8:00 am & 9:30 am
& 11:00 am
Sunday School
9:30 am
Reverend
Kip Younger
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org
Office Hours:
8:30 4:30 M-F
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors


Crystal River
CHURCH OF

CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M. 11:00 A.M. 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239






HEKE, YOU'LL FIND
A CkPJNC FAMILY
IN CHPKIST!

C KY NL
RIVC y -
VNITCD
M ETHODI
CHURCH H
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www. crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
: A Stephen Ministry Provider.


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship, i li Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J.Alan Ritter
Troy Allen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


W West

Citrus
Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352.564.8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.






US Hwy.19



SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
S Bob Dickey
OLJ^^^





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

Find a church home at
Faith Baptist Church at 6918
S. Spartan Ave. in Homosassa
(one mile from U.S. 19, off Car-
dinal Street). Visit comeand-
seefbc.org. Services are
interpreted for the deaf. Sunday
school classes at 9:45 a.m. with
Sunday worship at 11 a.m. and
6 p.m. "King's Kids" and "Fly-
ers" for K-5 grades from 6 to
7:15 p.m. Sunday. Wednes-
day Bible study and prayer
meeting at 7 p.m. with "War-
riors" for grades 6 through 12
from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Call 352-
628-4793.
Beverly Hills Community
Church is nondenominational.
Worship services are at 10 a.m.
Sunday. Bible study is at 6
p.m. Wednesday in the
chapel. Everyone is welcome.
Call 352-746-3620.
Crystal River Church of
Christ meets for Bible study at
10 a.m. Sunday, worship at 11,
and evening service at 6.
Wednesday Bible study is at 7
p.m. Everyone is welcome. The
church is at the intersection of
State Road 44 and U.S. 19.


Community Church
'N4-


Sunday 10:00am
New Location
1196 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto
Rev. Brian Baggs Pastor
(352) 527-4253
www.aenesiscommunitvchurch.ora
* Authentic Love Relevant Faith
Embracing Community


_U Floral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


First BaptistI
Church
of Floral City
S ting Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
Swww.fbcfloralcity.org




Grace Bible
Church


Sunday
9:30 AM...............D...iscovery Time
1:00AM.................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM..................Evening Service
Monday
6:15PM ...................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM .Awana (Sept. Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM............... .lible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev.Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS
Infant & Toddler Nursery
1y2mi.east of US. 19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


Call Evangelist George Hick-
man at 352-794-3372 or 352-
795-8883, or email
georgehickman@yahoo.com.
Anglican Church of the
Holy Spirit offers a traditional
1928 BCP Communion service
at 10:15 a.m. Sunday. Call for
directions: 855-426-4542.
First Church of God of
Inverness, 5510 E. Jasmine
Lane, invites the public to Sun-
day morning worship services
at 10:30. Call 352-344-3700.
The public is invited to
worship at Trinity Independent
Baptist Church, 2840 E.
Hayes St. (on the corner of
Croft and Hayes), Hernando.
Call 352-726-0100.
Special events
Everyone is welcome at
the "2013 Homecoming/Fam-
ily and Friends Day" at 11
a.m. Sunday, Jan. 13, at The
Independent House of God
Church of the Living God Pillar
and Ground of the Truth Inc.
Join the church for the service
and homestyle buffet after-
wards. All are also welcome to
join in the annual Community-
wide Mass Choir, which will
begin rehearsals at 5 p.m. Sat-
urday, Jan. 12. Participants are
asked to wear black for the

SHomosassa Springs
X SEVMDAYAM ST'CHRCH


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am |
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com



The New Church
Without Walls
"An Exciting & Growing
Multi-Cultural
Non-Denominational
Congregation Ministering to
the Heart of Citrus County"
Senior Pastors & Founders


Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr.
& Lady "T" Alexander

Sunday School 9:30 am
Sunday Service 11:00 am
Wednesday Bible Study 7pm

3962 N. Roscoe Rd.
Hernando, FL
Ph: 352-344-2425
www.newchurchwithoutwalls.com
Email:cwow@embarqmail.com

"The perfect church for
people who aren't"


1 Faith
Lutheran

Church(L.M.)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy.44 just E. of 490
527-3325
COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com

Sa9& wi-t 9,o -Mhew.


Sunday service). The church is
at 557 N.E. Second Ave., Crys-
tal River. Call 352-257-4348.
Everyone is invited to
"Friend Day" on Sunday at
Heritage Baptist Church, 2
Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. Start
the New Year right. Come to
church. Come with a friend.
Meet new friends. Every guest
will receive a new Bible. Coffee
and doughnuts served at 9:30,
followed by the worship service
at 10:15 a.m. Call 352-
746-6171.
A "Community Revival
Celebration" will take place
Sunday through Wednesday at
Dunnellon First United
Methodist Church, 21501 W.
State Road 40.Gospel music,
praise and prayers for healing
will be included in the services.
Interdenominational speakers
are Claude Ray, an evangelist
biker; the Rev. Nathaniel
Rawls, pastor of First Bethel
Missionary Baptist Church;
Dunnellon's own Ernie Mills,
who played football with the
Gators, the Pittsburg Steelers
and the Dallas Cowboys; and
David Vander Klay, a New York
detective. The community is in-
vited. Nursery available. Call
the church office at 352-
489-4026.


LECANTO

CHURCH

OF CHRIST
797 S Rowe Terrace
Lecanto, FL 34460
Sunday AM
Bible Class....... 10:00 a.m.
Worship............ 11:00 a.m.
Sunday PM
Worship.............. 5:00 p.m.
Wednesday PM
Bible Class.........7:00 p.m.
Committed to restoring
the "old paths" of New
Testament Christianity.
Visitors Come Worship With Us
A Warm Welcome Awaits You!
"Speak where the Bible Speaks;
be silent were it is silent."


S Minister
John D. Arnold
352-746-4919 Office
386-208-4967 Cell

HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church






Hwt2125 E, Nrvell Bryat Hwy (486)
OP

0D (


S - - - r Children and Families"
2125E,NorvelllBryant Hwy,(486)
(1 / miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl .org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM


The annual Citrus County
Camp Meeting will take place
Sunday through Friday at Trin-
ity Independent Baptist Church
on the corner of Croft Road and
Hayes Street in Hernando.
Guest speakers are James
Knox of DeLand and Eddie
Goddard of Chattanooga, Tenn.
Special singing nightly along
with a nursery will be provided.
Call Pastor Jerry Bloxton at
352-726-0100.
The newly formed "Spirit
in the Wind Fellowship" ex-
amines how Christian and Na-
tive American spiritualities
blend for stronger Christian
faith. The public is invited to the
fellowship's gathering from
10:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday
at the host congregation, First
Presbyterian Church in Crystal
River, 1501 S.E. U.S. 19, near
the Fort Island Trail intersec-
tion. Members of the local Red
Eagle Lodge will join us with ar-
tifacts from their mobile cultural
center. There will be learning,
Scripture accompanied by
Amerindian wisdom, fun activi-
ties, and closing simple wor-
ship. This is a free gathering.
Call the Rev. Mike Fonfara, D.
Min., a retired Presbyterian
Church (U.S.A.) pastor and
Montaukett Indian Nation mem-


Hernando
Churchof
STheNazarene
A Place to Belong

2101 N. Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 am
11:30 am
Saturday
Vigil
4:00 pm
6:00 pm
Weekday
Masses
8:30 am
Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm
(352) 746-9422


ber, at 352-527-8321.
All widows in the commu-
nity are invited to join the Wid-
ows Ministry Group from 4 to
5:30 p.m. Wednesday at Cor-
nerstone Baptist Church, 1100
W. Highland Blvd., Inverness.
"God isn't finished with us yet!"
Call Darla at 352-270-8115.
Hernando Church of the
Nazarene, 2101 N. Florida
Ave., will host the Triumphant
Quartet in concert on Wednes-
day. This nationally acclaimed
group has numerous top 10
radio singles, yet keep God first
in everything they do. Join us
for this gospel concert. The
church's own orchestra and
choir, Celebration Sounds, will
open the concert at 6:45 p.m.
Doors will open at 6 p.m. There
is no charge for this event; a
love offering will be collected.
Did you think Kwanzaa
was an alternative to Christ-
mas? Not so. Its message is
universal, nondenominational
and celebrated in various ways.
The Nature Coast Unitarian
Universalists will honor Kwan-
zaa at its 10:30 a.m. service
Sunday, Jan. 13. This will in-
clude a history and music of the
holiday, a discussion of the
principles and symbols that are
its foundation, and its impor-


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
000DJ8Y Floral City, FL.



H Shepherd

of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon offaith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Sunday School
Adult 9:15
Child 10:00
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
S (T.SOTHEt'jn'r ....
.n....,^ :".


SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 2013 C3

tance as a celebration of
African American heritage. A
special guest, d'Adjoa Nutefe-
wola Avadada, of Citrus Hills,
will participate. "Dee" has made
eight trips to Africa and has or-
ganized Kwanzaa programs for
the Unity Church. All are in-
vited. Refreshments will follow.
The fellowship meets at 7633
N. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41), Citrus
Springs. Call 352-465-4225 or
visit naturecoastuu.org.
Americans United for
Separation of Church and
State (Nature Coast Chapter)
will meet at 4 p.m. Tuesday,
Jan. 15, at Lakes Region Li-
brary, 1511 Druid Road, Inver-
ness. Mr. Rose, president of
this chapter, will give a talk on
"Piety & Politics," written by the
Rev. Barry Lynn, executive di-
rector of Americans United for
Separation of Church and
State. The public is welcome to
attend. Call Maralyn at 352-
726-9112 or email nature
coastau@hotmail.com.
The Council of Catholic
Women of Our Lady of Grace
Church will host its annual
"Tricky Tray Fundraiser" on
Saturday, Jan. 19, in the Parish
Life Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
See NOTES/Page C4


mWdsday Prayer
Metn/ibeSuy1
6:30 ^^^^^ p^^m.
Rev. Keith Dendy ^^^


0


Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA









Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

3 - 6


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits willbe lifted!! !

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS





C4 SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 2013


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

Beverly Hills. Doors open at 10
a.m. and drawings begin at
11:30 a.m. The event features
baskets with contents valued
at $25 or more, raffles and
money trees. Items include a
mah jongg set, gift certificates
for golf, restaurants and super-
markets. Purchase a sheet of
25 numbered tickets for $5 for
deposit in a bag adjacent to
your choice of baskets. The
Life South Blood Mobile will be
on site. Ticket tenders will be
available for blood donors and
for those who cannot stay. Pro-
ceeds go to needed items for
the church and charitable con-
tributions. Call Bernita Becker
at 352-344-0235. For member-
ship information, call Rosalie
Madigan at 352-746-2987.
The third Saturday sup-
per is from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 19, in the De-
wain Farris Fellowship Hall at
Community Congregational
Christian Church, 9220 N. Cit-
rus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs. Menu includes beef
stew, salad, homemade bread,
granny cake, coffee and tea.
Cost is $10 for adults and $5
for children. Tickets can be
purchased at the door. Take-
outs available. Call the church
at 352-489-1260.
Dunnellon Presbyterian
Church had to accept Leslie
Hammes' withdrawal from per-
forming Jan. 20 due to a re-
cent illness. However, the
church's own musician, Renee
Deuvall has prepared a pro-
gram for 3 p.m. that day.
Renee will sing, and perform
classical to contemporary
arrangements: Chopin to
Gershwin, Rachmaninov to
Scott Joplin. Her vocals will in-
clude an operatic aria, and she
is planning to perform a local,
first-time young composer's
arrangement. Deuvall has re-
quested all proceeds are to
benefit the church's building
project.
The St. Elizabeth Ann
Seton Parish Men's Associa-
tion is sponsoring its annual "A
Day at the Races" trip to
Tampa Bay Downs for an ex-
citing day of thoroughbred
horse racing on Wednesday,
Jan. 23. Cost of $45 per per-
son includes round-trip bus
transportation from the church
parking lot, entry fee and re-
served seating in the club-
house, racing form and a hot
buffet luncheon.
In dark times, like world-
ending prophecies, economic
failure, war-torn areas through-
out the world, and family and


RELIGION


life problems, it is hard to find
peace. We sometimes lose di-
rection and neglect the bless-
ings, gifts and talents God has
given us. We need to be re-
freshed! Acts 2:44: "All the be-
lievers were together and had
everything in common." We in-
vite people of all ages to come
and be refreshed or refresh
others with your musical tal-
ents, poetry, creativity or per-
sonal testimony of how God
has enhanced your life begin-
ning at 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 25,
at First United Methodist
Church in Inverness, 3896 S.
Pleasant Grove Road. Re-
freshments will be provided.
For information and talent par-
ticipation, call Joe Hupchick at
352-726-9998 or the church of-
fice at 352-726-2522.
The St. Scholastica Coun-
cil of Catholic Women will
sponsor a "Bunco Bash
Event" at 11:30 a.m. Saturday,
Jan. 26, at the Fr. James Hoge
Parish Center, 4301 W. Ho-
mosassa Trail, Lecanto. En-
trance fee is $12. Free food
and door prizes. All funds
raised will go to such charities
as Daystar Life Center, Family
Life and Pregnancy Center,
Hugs for the Homeless, mi-
grant workers of Florida, and
overseas missionaries.
Floral City United
Methodist Church will host its
first dinner of the new year
from 3 to 6 p.m. Saturday, Jan.
26, in Hilton Hall at 8478 E.
Marvin St. across from the ele-
mentary school. Menu includes
roast pork, candied sweet po-
tatoes, fresh green beans,
salad, assorted desserts, and
beverages for a donation of
$7.50. Takeouts available. Call
352-344-1771.
The ladies of Lecanto
Church of Christ meet for
Bible study at 10 a.m. the
second Tuesday monthly. Bible
study is followed by a lunch-
eon. Studies have included
such subjects as prayer, love
and patience. All ladies are in-
vited to attend and enjoy
Christian fellowship.
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady
of Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
604 U.S. 41 S. Proceeds fund
the food pantry. The store ac-
cepts donations of household
items, clothing and small appli-
ances. Call 352-726-1707.
The Altar and Rosary Soci-
ety of St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church will host a Chi-
nese auction from 11 a.m. to 2
p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, in Father
Stegeman Hall at the corner of
U.S. 41 and State Road 40
East in Dunnellon. Drawings for
the items will begin at 1 p.m. An


envelope of 20 tickets is $5 and
can be purchased at the door.
Also included is a free ticket for
coffee and dessert. Food and
drinks will be available at a
nominal charge. Call Pat at
352-489-1984.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church will host a Military
Card Party on Monday, Feb.
11. Lunch will be served at
12:15 p.m., followed by card
play at 1 p.m. Enjoy fun, prizes
and a raffle. Cost is $12 per
player. Make up your table of
four or come as a single and
we will pair you. Call Dottie at
352-382-3656 or Marilyn at
352-746-6583 for reservations
by Feb. 7. The church is at 114
N. Osceola Ave., Inverness.
Upward Youth Soccer
registration for boys and girls
in kindergarten through sixth
grade will take place from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday
through Saturday, Feb. 13-16
at Joy Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 7045 S.W. 83rd Place
at State Road 200, Ocala.
Registration fee of $65 per
child includes a reversible jer-
sey, water bottle, socks, car
magnet and an end-of-season
reward. Scholarships are avail-
able. All players must attend
one soccer evaluation that pro-
motes equal and competitive
teams, as well as a substitution
system, to complete the regis-
tration process. Practice be-
gins Tuesday, Feb. 26 and
Thursday, Feb. 28. The first
game is Saturday, March 9. All
events will occur at Hope Field
at Joy Lutheran Church. Volun-
teers are needed to help with
coaching, registering the par-
ticipants and organizing the
players. Call Pastor Ed Hol-
loway at 352-854-4509, Ext.
223, or Fran Johnson at 352-
854-4509, ext. 221.
Announcements
Gulf to Lake Church is
collecting coats for schoolchild-
ren in grades K-8 (sizes 6
through juniors up to adult
small). Cayla's Coats Min-
istry was started in memory of
Cayla Barnes, who passed in
2010. Her mother, Jessica
Barnes, is a teacher in the
county and sees first-hand the
need for kids inadequately
dressed for our occasional
cold weather. Coat donations
are accepted at the church,
1454 N. Gulf Ave. (off State
Road 44 across from Meadow-
crest). Call the church at 352-
795-8077 or Joan Cook at
352-422-2635.
A GriefShare seminar is
offered from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Wednesday through Nov. 14
at Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church. Call 352-746.6200 or
visit www.sevenrivers.org.


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

given him shelter and food
and a warm bed. He runs
off, only to be caught and
brought back to the bishop's
house where the bishop lies
and tells the police that he,
indeed, gave the silver to
Valjean. He tells Valjean,
"But you forgot to take the
candlesticks."
Valjean is set free again,
but this time he's so over-
come with the bishop's
mercy that he goes on to live
a transformed life. The
bishop tells him his life now
belongs to God.
The movie fast-forwards
several years and Valjean is
wealthy and respectable, a
mayor and a businessman.
Enter Fantine, one of the
women in Valjean's employ,
who gets into a fight with an-
other woman and is fired
from her sewing job by the
foreman. She eventually be-
comes a prostitute for
her little daughter, Cosette,
who lives with a pair of cor-
rupt (but also comical in the
movie) innkeepers.
Valjean meets up with
Fantine again when she's
sick and dying. He brings
her to a hospital and as she
dies he vows to care for
Cosette as his own daughter
So, he goes to the innkeep-
ers and pays a ransom for
her and rescues her from a
life of drudgery
Throughout the movie,
Valjean never forgets that
he is still Prisoner No.
24601. He remains humble,
grateful and fearless. He
pours out his life for others.
It's an awesome picture of
a life that's been transformed
by grace. He knows he de-
serves to be thrown back into
prison and yet he is blessed.
Also throughout the movie
there's Javert, a police in-
spector. He's there at the be-
ginning, overseeing the
prisoners. He's the one who
pursues Valjean continually,
especially after an innocent
man is falsely identified as
the fugitive Valjean and is
arrested. Valjean goes to the
man's trial and confesses to
be the real 24601 and tells
Javert to give him three days
to fetch Cosette.
He gets the girl, but takes
off and finds a safe place to
raise her as his own daugh-
ter, although Javert is al-
ways at his heels, constantly
on the hunt.
The most fascinating part
of the movie, in my opinion,
is Javert's relentless obses-
sion with the law the law
that must be obeyed, that
must be followed. There is


Valjean never
forgets that he
is still Prisoner
No. 24601. He
remains humble,
grateful and
fearless. He
pours out his
life for others.
It's an awesome
picture of a life
that's been
transformed by
grace.

no forgiveness or mercy.
There is no grace.
It drives him and ulti-
mately destroys him.
To me, Javert is a picture
of the struggle of religious
people who believe it is only
our obedience to the law of
God that matters.
Even when Valjean shows
Javert mercy by sparing his
life it would take too long
to explain how, that's why
you need to see the movie -
Javert can't accept it.
Whereas mercy shown to


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Valjean provoked him to be
merciful, a similar mercy
drove Javert to despair.
It doesn't make sense to
me, but religious people
who try to live by the law
genuinely hate grace and
mercy Their preoccupation
with doing the right thing,
with keeping the law, actu-
ally makes them intolerant
and unforgiving, holding
grudges, keeping score -
all in the name of serving
God.
In their defense, they are
often as hard on themselves
as they are on others.
They live and die bitter,
never truly understanding
that we are all prisoners de-
serving condemnation. We
are all 24601.
However, through grace
we are set free.
Only those who know they
are great sinners can appre-
ciate the far surpassing
greatness of the grace and
mercy of God.

Nancy Kennedy is the au-
thor of"Move Over, Victoria
- I Know the Real Secret,"
"Girl on a Swing," and her
latest book, "Lipstick
Grace. "She can be reached
at 352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday, or via
email atnkennedy@
chronicleonline. com.


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Trh. Pr- r r. .:-G.I Cir.

T,.. \ ;_ 1Oak ::-,:,lf ,I- u


F I 46 Years of
IRST Bringing Christ
FIR I I to Inverness

LUTHERAN

CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am

Sunday School
& Bible Class
A f 8:45 A.M.
726-1637
I r Missouri Synod
Swww.1 stlutheran net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson

Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart .Jamison, III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion. 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


COMMUNITY
CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH







'/Iw// Welcomes


SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260



Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca cornn


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School ............9:00
Worship................10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School.............6:30


..









VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.


SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. & 10:30 A.M.


SPANISH MASS:
12:30 Pm.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.. to 3:15 P.M. Sat.
orByAppointment


WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM.


6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
wwwourladyofgracefl
i. .catholicweb.com .-


Hwy.44E@
Washington Ave., Inverness U

S Sunday Services
S Traditional
S8:00 AM & 11:00 AM
S Casual Service
S 9:30 AM
11:00 AM Service
S Tapes & CD's Available
" Sunday School for all ages
0 9:30 AM
" Nursery Provided
Fellowship & Youth Group
5 to9 7 PM 0
Web Site: www.fpcinv.org
Podcast: FPC inv.com

SChurch Office 637-0770
Pastor Craig Davies U
* 9


The Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal
Church would like to acknowledge all the
wonderful businesses that contributed to
our Father Christmas Ball this year.


SThonl. \,01 t, t th, ott,_ndi,-
ond Is,_ Tioini _,. _1,nt._.
S.L ul -uppk lt hIlped to nimok-
,1IL \- Lilt t h I -LICC, It %\,0"-.
Thnk- ,,.oin -,, oLNI mu C .
S Father Christias Ball
Committee Slhehlierd of the
Hills E/'isco/7al Chulirch.

*


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CHAPLAIN
Continued from Page C1

College, a Christian institu-
tion near Boston, Mass.,
when he heard President
Roosevelt speaking about
the attack on Pearl Harbor
on Dec. 7,1941.
At the time, he was also
serving as a student pastor
at a country church in
Bellingham, Mass., with a
small congregation of about
30 people, about 20 miles
from Boston.
He wanted to serve as a
chaplain, and the Army
counted his three years of
service as a pastor together
with his educational expe-
rience to help him qualify.
In 1942, when Laida signed
up for duty the day after his
23rd birthday, he was the
youngest chaplain in the
Army
Laida did his basic train-
ing and chaplain school at
Fort Devins, where his
training as a chaplain
amounted primarily to a
few simple guidelines.
"They told us we want
you to do exactly what you
did in your church," he re-
called. "Help people. Minis-
ter to them spiritually I was
a Baptist minister, but I was
never a "Big B" Baptist as a
chaplain because I had to
serve everybody That's
what they said. Be a pastor
to all of them. You can't dif-
ferentiate. You can't focus
on denomination."
Laida laughed at the
memory of 40 chaplains
learning drill and cere-
mony, basic soldier skills
and Army terminology, in-
cluding the stuff that wasn't
in the manual.
"Thanks to our drill ser-
geant, we learned every
curse word there was," he
remembered, "and it didn't
make any difference to
him.
"He knew we were all
chaplains and he did re-
spect that, but when he got
excited or mad, he let it out
A typical drill sergeant. We
got used to it."
Other things he experi-
enced later were harder to
get used to.
"I knew war was bad," he
said, "but I had no idea
what my reaction was going
to be. Even though I was a
chaplain, I was a human
being and I saw a lot of guys
who went on, I hope, to
heaven.
"The thing that hurt me
more than anything were
those 18-year-olds that they
pushed over there into Eu-

gPRIMERA IGLESIA
/ HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM -Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Biblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pihero, Pastor
1370 N Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711




"First For Christ"... John 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF T
INVERNESS Ill
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr. Ray Kelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
6:00 P M. Bible Study
!,S


INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. Larry Powers
Senior Pastor
Sunday Services:
Traditional Service...............8:30
Sunday School.....................9:30
Contemporary Service........10:30 M
Evening Service....................6:00 PM
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes...............7:00 PM
Boys and Girls Brigade..7:00 PM
Teens.......................... 7:15 P
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726 4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"


RELIGION


rope. They gave them about
four weeks of training and
they were not prepared for
battle. I saw them die."
The first real action for
Laida and his fellow sol-
diers of the 30th Infantry
Division came during the
worst period of the war on
Europe's western front, in
Dec. 1944.
The Third Reich had
staked everything on one
massive counterattack
against the American Army,
a large part of which had
penetrated deep into
France and Belgium on its
way toward the German bor-
der, forming a bulge that left
it vulnerable to being cut off
from the sides by German
armored formations.
Laida's division was
rushed in on Dec. 17 to
block part of the German
assault, and took the full
brunt of the attack's fury in
doing so.
He and his fellow sol-
diers went in knowing little
about what they were going
to be called upon to do or
what the situation was.
"Nobody knew what was
going on," Laida said. "We
didn't have a newspaper or
TV We didn't know as much
as people in the U.S."
He hints darkly about his
experiences of that time,
but still can't bring himself
to discuss details beyond
memories of holding the
hands of dying boys and
praying with them at the
battalion aid station where
many spent their last
moments.
Laida said that while his
own faith never wavered,
he was confronted by things
that made him have to
think more deeply about
the questions that war
forces upon human beings.
"I had soldiers who
searched me out because
they had seen things and it
really got them thinking
about life and death.
"There was a lot of,
'Chaplain, how can God
allow something like this?'
That was pretty hard to
overcome, especially if
someone didn't have a
basic faith to begin with,
but it was a pretty valid
question to ask."
A particular memory that
sticks with him occurred
during the last days of the
war as his division was
driving fast through Ger-
many They came upon a
town called Kassel that
highlighted for him the full
ruinous effects of war.
"The only road through
the town had been made by
bulldozers pushing aside


INVERNESS
First CHuRcH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study, Gospel
-,, ..i... l.i -in Dinners, singing
the old hymns? Then you'll enjoy
this Church family.
Home of the
"Saturday Nite GOSPEL
JUBILEE" A great Nite Out!
Last Saturday of the month 6:00
Fun, Food, Fellowship & Free!


first United

Methodist


(Church
of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor


8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion

9:45 AM
Sunday School

10:00 AM
Contemporary
Praise & Worship
A


the rubble," Laida said. "I
thought, like everyone else,
what a shame. All those
magnificent statues and
cathedrals, but that's just
what war is."
Toward the end of the war,
Laida was severely
wounded and evacuated
back to the U.S., where he
ended up with other soldiers
at Halloran General Hospi-
tal on Staten Island, N.Y
He spent three months
recovering. A plain-spoken
man, who at his age doesn't
believe in sugar-coating
events, he admits to having
been psychologically af-
fected by the war and hav-
ing been close to the edge of
an abyss of self-pity as a re-
sult of what he had endured.
His turning point came
following his recovery
when he was assigned as a
chaplain at the hospital.
"When I became a chap-
lain again," he said, "it was
my responsibility to help
the guys in the paraplegic
ward. They had two men
there who were quadruple
amputees and when I saw
those guys, I thought to my-
self, 'Why am I feeling sorry
for myself?"'
Laida feels that a big part
of the problem for many
who return from war is that
they withdraw within them-
selves. As a man of faith, he
also feels that without a be-
lief in something greater
than themselves, many who
turn within find little there
to sustain them through the
hard journey back.
"The reason I was able to
overcome that," he said, "is
because I saw that there
were people in the world
who needed me more than
I needed to think about my-
self. If some of these guys
today could put self aside
and try to help someone
else, it would make a
difference.
"Jesus spent all of his life
helping other people, as an
example that we ought to
emulate as his followers -
to be of service to others."
It is a message that some
might consider overly sim-
plistic, but one that Laida
feels is key to helping many
who are wounded by war,
particularly those who are
wounded psychologically,
morally and spiritually
However, he is going to
the Jan. 11 meeting of chap-
lains and pastors at Fort
Campbell with an open
mind, being more inter-
ested, he says, in learning
what he can do to help the
soldiers he still feels a re-
sponsibility for, 70 years
after donning the uniform.


At
Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Smild.i, Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to belong.A place to become."


LIFE
Continued from Page C1

comes from the Jewish
maxim that one life cannot
be compromised for another
The famous and revered
Rabbi Akiva ruled that
when faced with such a
dilemma, it is permissible to
save one's one life based on
the verse: "Let him live by
your side as your kinsman."
Your life takes precedence
over another's. This situa-
tion is the difference one
would find in a Jewish hos-
pital. If a mother and child
were in danger, all would be
done to save the mother. In
a Catholic hospital, the
child would be saved. In the
Jewish faith, one cannot be
a martyr except in cases
where one would be forced
to commit adultery, incest,
murder or idolatry
The preservation of
human life transcends all the
other commandments of Ju-
daism. One cannot observe
the other mitzvot without the
blessing of life and health.
Therefore, Jews are com-
manded to preserve life in
any way they can so that they
may live by the command-
ments and not die by them.
The obligation to save a
life can take the form of sav-
ing someone from immedi-
ate danger, such as drowning,
or saving someone from a sit-
uation that might prove life-
threatening in the future. I
have taken upon myself the
mitzvah of"pekuach nefesh"
because I wish to raise
awareness of a virulent type
of breast cancer that is often
misdiagnosed and is not usu-
ally presented with a lump or
a calcification on a
mammogram.
The cancer I am referring
to is called Inflammatory
Breast Cancer (IBC), and
the campaign for its aware-
ness is called Check for IBC.
It strikes men as well as
women, and is the most ag-
gressive (fast-growing) and
deadly form of the disease.
Though more rare than
other forms, accounting for
only 5 percent of breast can-
cers, speed in diagnosis and
awareness of this form
would make for "pekuach
nefesh," saving of a life.
Symptoms of IBC include:
Increase in breast size; red-
ness, rash or blotchiness re-
sembling a bruise on the
breast; lump or thickening
or dimpling of the skin on
the breast; warmth or ten-
derness of the breast; lymph
node swelling under the arm
or above the collarbone; flat-


7


road

tist


rch

5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


In the Talmud it
says that
whoever saves
a life, it is as if
they have saved
a world. If
I have made one
person aware of
this disease,
I may have
saved a life.

tening of the nipple or dis-
charge from the nipple.
Contrary to what most
women have been taught,
IBC can be painful, and a
single lump in the breast is
not usually how this form of
the disease presents itself.
If you or a loved one witness
any of these symptoms, get
medical attention immedi-
ately to rule out IBC. Many
doctors misdiagnose this
form of cancer, so being
proactive is essential.
IBC does its malevolence
by traveling through the
lymph system. IBC cells
block the lymph vessels in
the skin of the breast,
thereby causing the signa-
ture redness and inflamed
areas, which give the disease
its name. Unlike other forms
of breast cancer, this variety
grows in nests or sheets in-
stead of a confined solid
tumor, making detection on a
mammogram unreliable. A
doctor's clinical exam or
biopsy or breast ultrasound
are also used in diagnosis.


SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 2013 C5

I am making my readers
aware of this insidious form
of cancer because it is so
often misdiagnosed. It can
appear like a breast infec-
tion, but if one experiences
five days of treatment with
no improvement, IBC
should be looked into. It can
come on quickly, often
overnight. By the time it is
finally recognized, the dis-
ease has advanced to stage
IIIB, with a five-year sur-
vival rate of 40 percent
IBC is treated with
chemotherapy, surgery (usu-
ally a mastectomy) and radi-
ation. Depending on the
composition of the tumor,
hormonal therapy using
Herceptin may be em-
ployed. Every person is an
individual, and success of
treatment varies with indi-
viduals. New treatments
and drugs have turned
breast cancer in general
into a chronic disease, no
longer the death sentence of
30 years ago. Still, the pub-
lic needs to be made aware
so that lives can be saved.
In the Talmud it says that
whoever saves a life, it is as
if they have saved a world. If
I have made one person
aware of this disease, I may
have saved a life maybe
even my own.
For further information
on IBC, contact the Inflam-
matory Breast Cancer Foun-
dation at 1-866-944-4223 or
online at www.eraseibc.com.

Judi Siegal is a retired
teacher and Jewish educa-
tor She lives in Ocala with
her husband, Phil. She can
be reached at
niejudis@yahoo. com.


Monday-Thursday
Early Bird 4pm-6pm ...........$......13.95
Thursday
Rib Eye.................. .......$........... 19.95
Martini Night 4pm-10pm
Specialty Martinis .... ............. $5.00
Friday
1 '/2 lb. Live Maine Lobster........$19.95
Sunday
Award Winning Sunday Brunch
11:30am-2:00pm .............................$15.95

Call for reservations or more information.


AWet82L
BAR & GRILL
*W


First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452















OFFICE: (352) 726-11Rushing


at Plantation on Crystal River
9301 W. Fort Island Trail,
SCrystal River
352-795-4211
www.plantationoncrystalriver.com


Our Lady of
Fatima
CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy. 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
/ Weekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30- 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June August)
9:00 and 11:00A.M. /
726-1670


ORTHRIDGE
CHURCH




SUNDAY
Family Worship
9:00 AM
Coffee Fellowship- ,I .11 . '.
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study & Prayer
7:00 PM
We are a nondenominational church
meeting at the Inverness Womans Club
1715 Forest Drive, Inverness
(across from Whispering Pines Park entrance)
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813 I


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted !!!


SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS


I


I







Page C6 SATURDAY, JANUARY 5,2013



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Learn quilting
this winter
Quilting classes are of-
fered from 7 to 9 p.m. Mon-
days at Whispering Pines
Park in Inverness.
Registration fee $56 for
eight weeks. The next class
begins Jan. 7 and meets
weekly until Feb. 25. Karol
Kusmaul is the instructor; she
has been making quilts for
several years, has won
awards and frequently dis-
plays her quilts.
For more information, call
352-726-3913 between
8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Club to host
card party
The Gulf to Lakes Pilot
Club of Citrus County will
host a Military Card Party
Wednesday, Jan. 16, at the
Crystal River Woman's Club.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and
play begins at 7 p.m.
There will be refreshments,
share the pot and door
prizes. Tickets are $12. For
more information or to pur-
chase tickets, call Judy at
352-746-0636; RSVP
by Jan. 9.
F.C. Garden Club
to convene Jan. 11
The Floral City Garden
Club will meet at noon Friday,
Jan. 11, at the Community
Center, East Orange Avenue.
The program starts at 12:30
p.m. and the business meet-
ing follows at 1:30 p.m.
At the January meeting,
the club will celebrate mem-
bers' birthdays with a cake.
Marcia Beasley will present a
slide show of floral designs
from the 1980s consisting of
20 horticulture and 20 floral
designs.
The program, with Jan
Caldwell and Laurie Vitt, will
be about "Garden Surprises,
Racers, Leapers and
Crawlers in the Florida
Landscape."
All meetings are open to
the public. For more informa-
tion, call President Christine
Harnden at 352-341-3247.
Sugarmill Chorale
to begin rehearsals
The Sugarmill Chorale will
begin rehearsals for this
year's spring concert at 6:30
p.m. Thursday, Jan. 10, at
First United Methodist
Church, 8831 W. Bradshaw
St., Homosassa.
All persons interested in
learning more may call 352-
503-6243.


Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA

London


First Responder of the Year


Special to the Chronicle
At its Dec. 19 breakfast meeting, the Rotary Club of Central Citrus presented the Rotary First Responder of the Year for
2012 award to Detective Dody Pruitt of the Citrus Country Sheriff's Office. Pictured with Pruitt, from left, are: Commander
Buddy Grant, Ken Swade, Central Citrus Rotary President and Capt. David DeCarlo. While working in the Internet Crimes
Against Children Unit (ICAC), Pruitt organized two large undercover operations that targeted those individuals who prey
on children. Through her diligence, 41 individuals were successfully apprehended in the efforts. Pruitt has earned a repu-
tation throughout the state of Florida that has allowed her to educate and assist other law enforcement agencies with
their efforts in fighting Internet crimes against children. The Rotary Club of Central Citrus County is very active in the com-
munity. Members meet at 7:30 a.m. Wednesday at Skeet's Restaurant in Beverly Hills. Visitors are welcome one morn-
ing to learn about Rotary and its service to the community and around the world. For more information, call club secretary
Karen Stephenson at 352-746-4355.


County
office in
Workplace
Campaign

The employees of the Citrus
County Property Appraisers
Office recently kicked off
their annual United Way
Workplace Campaign. The
employees are dedicated to
the United Way movement.
Pictured are: Amy Meek,
United Way CEO; Geoff
Greene, property appraiser;
and Rosa Scalzi, finance
and records assistant.

Special to the Chronicle


Computer users to meet Jan. 9


Special to the Chronicle

The Crystal River (computer) Users
Group will meet at 6 p.m. Wednesday,
Jan. 9, at the Crystal Oaks Clubhouse,
Crystal Oaks Drive, Lecanto. The pub-
lic is welcome.
Guest speaker Alana Rouse will dis-
cuss Bright House Network's "State of
the Art" Home Security System and its
benefits to residential customers.
Go to www.crug.com to sign up for
January classes:
Digital Card Making from 1 to


3:30 p.m. Jan. 10, 17 and 24. Cost is $25
for members and $35 for nonmembers.
Create digital greeting cards using
Photoshop Elements; with Laura
Boetto.
Adobe Elements from 9:30 to
11:30 a.m. Jan. 21, 28, Feb. 4 and 11.
Cost is $25 for members and $35 for
nonmembers.
Elements is a superior image edit-
ing program that can fix most common
problems that occur when using a dig-
ital camera or scanning a photograph.
Students should have basic computer


skills for this class. Photoshop Ele-
ments 10 will be used during this class.
WordPress from 9:30 a.m. to 1
p.m. Jan. 14. Cost is $10 for members
and $15 for nonmembers. Class will
cover how to create your own website
using Wordpress, which has grown to
be the largest self-hosted blogging tool
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WordPress is an Open Source proj-
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Working with youths rewarding feeling


Special to the Chronicle
London came to the Haven
as a skinny young mom
with a litter of kittens. Now
this 1-1/2-year-old orange
tabby girl has filled out and
is showing her sweet, play-
ful and loving personality.
Visitors are welcome from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 to
4 p.m. Monday through
Saturday at the Humanitar-
ians' Manchester House on
the corner of State Road
44 and Conant Avenue
east of Crystal River.
Please drop by and enjoy
our felines in their cage-
free, homestyle environ-
ment. Call the
Humanitarians at 352-613-
1629 for adoptions, or
view most of the Hardin
Haven's felines online at
www.petfinder.com/
shelters/fl186.html.


There is no finer feeling than the The job of a mentor is an important
one you experience when you one and may make a tremendous dif-
give back to the community that ference in a child's life. And that's a
has given so much to you. Volunteer- good feeling.
ing or mentoring at a Boys A volunteer may present a
& Girls Clubs of Citrus project or program to a
County facility is espe- group, help kids with home-
cially rewarding. work, read a story, play a
Kids need attention. game or have a conversa-
They need acceptance. tion. All of these activities
They need to feel appreci- are valuable to the growth of
ated and respected by a child. Every child deserves
adults. Volunteering does to feel that they are worth
not require great wealth the time and attention of
on your part nor does it re- someone they look up to.
quire extensive education Lane Vick Both mentors and volun-
or talent. BOYS & teers who have direct con-
Mentoring requires a tact with the children must
commitment that you will GIRLS CLUBS have background clear-
show up when you said ances.
you would. In addition to However, there are other
being a steady influence, it requires jobs that are important to the clubs,
that you show respect and liking for but will not involve the children. Vol-
your mentee and earn the same in re- unteers are needed to assist in the of-
turn. When you mentor at a Boys & fice, help with fundraising events,
Girls Club, there are training and provide maintenance at the club sites
rules to follow. For instance, all men- and, if experienced, help with grant
touring takes place on club campuses. writing. These jobs do not require ex-


tensive background clearance checks.
It's a simple process. If you are in-
terested, call 352-621-9225. Tell us
what you want to do. Training will be
set up and, believe me, we can put you
to work. Let's review the essentials:
Wanted: Volunteers and mentors
for Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County;
Requirements: Must be 18 years
or older;
Must like to be around and enjoy
boys and girls from age 5 to 18 years
(not all at once);
Must be responsible and trust-
worthy;
Must be able to pass clearance
with fingerprinting;
Pay: Laughter, fun, learning about
others and sometimes, adoration.
Great futures start at the Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County. Call 352-
621-9225 today and be a part of what
we do for kids.


Lane Vickis grant coordinator of the
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County.


News NOTES

Thinkers to host
intuitive Jan. 12
New Age Thinkers' next
presentation will be at 2 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 12, at the Ellie
Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park, with
guest speaker Carol Jo
Garfinkel, intuitive medium.
Garfinkel has been doing
trance medium work since
1974, has a Bachelor of Sci-
ence degree in esoteric sci-
ence and has appeared on
many TV and radio programs
throughout the country.
All are welcome at her
presentation on "Predictions"
for 2013. For more informa-
tion, email miss-donna@
tampabay.rr.com or call
Donna at 352-628-3253.
B.H. chorus gets
ready to rehearse
The Chorus of Beverly
Hills is looking forward to its
spring concert. Rehearsals
will begin at 10 a.m. Friday,
Jan. 11, in the sanctuary of
the Beverly Hills Community
Church, 82 Civic Circle.
Singers may register be-
ginning at 10 a.m., pay a $10
fee and receive their music.
Rehearsals will continue from
10:30 a.m. until noon each
Friday until the concert.
New voices are needed to
fill out all sections: sopranos,
altos, tenors and basses.
Membership is open to all
singers in Citrus County who
have a love of singing. The
ability to read music is not
necessary.
The chorus is sponsored
by the Beverly Hills Commu-
nity Church. For more infor-
mation, call music chairman
Volena Van Gunst at 352-
746-5680, or Jackie Dean at
352-527-8405.
Update driving
skills with AARP
Florida is a mandated state
and any insurance company
doing business in Florida
must give a discount to those
completing an AARP Safe
Driving Course, open to all
age 50 and older. Update to
earn a discount and learn
about newly enacted motor
vehicle and traffic laws.
Course fee is $12 for
AARP members; $14 for all
others.
Call the listed instructor to
register:
Crystal River, Homosassa
Jan. 15and 16-1 to4
p.m., Coastal Region Library,
8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal
River. Call Lou Harmin at
352-564-0933.
Inverness, Hernando,
Floral City
SJan. 15 and 16, 9 a.m.
to noon, Citrus Memorial
Health System Auditorium.
Call Don Slough at 352-
344-4003.
Dunnellon
Jan. 22 and 23, 1 to 4
p.m., Rainbow Lakes Estates
Clubhouse, north of Dunnel-
Ion. Call Dale Stephenson at
352-489-1574.
Be in on annual
return to Hawaii
Open spots still remain for
those couples and individuals
interested in taking a trip to
Hawaii with a group of veter-
ans, their families and
friends.
The annual trek, coordi-
nated and led by Don
McLean, a U.S. Navy vet-
eran, is scheduled this year
for Sept. 17 to Oct. 4.
Participants will visit sev-
eral islands and take part in
memorial services at the
USS Arizona and the
National Cemetery of the
Pacific.
Reservations should be
made as soon as possible.
Call McLean at 352-637-
5131, or email dmclean8@
tampabay.rr.com for more in-
formation about the trip and
how to sign up.
The group has luncheon


meetings prior to the trip to
get to know one another. Call
McLean for information.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY EVENING JANUARY 5, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 I 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00110:30 11:00 11:30
0 WESH NBC 19 19 News Football Entertainment 'Night NFL Football AFC or NFC Wild-Card Game: Teams TBA. (N) ma News SNL
Nature Tiger cub's last The Lawrence Welk AreYou Keeping As Time As Time Waiting for Yes New Tricks "Dockers"
S(WE PBS 3 3 14 6 days.'PG Show'G' Served? Up Goes By Goes By God Minister 'PG'Ex
0 WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Lawrence Welk Griffith |Griffith *** "An Affair to Remember"(1957) Austin City Limits (N) Front Row Center 'G'
NFL Football AFC or NFC Wild-Card Game: NFL Football AFC or NFC Wild-Card Game: Teams TBA. (N) (In Stereo News Saturday
I (WFLA NBC 8 8 8 8 8 Teams TBA. (N) (In Stereo Live) xa Live) xa Night Live
V ABC 20 20 20 News World Jeopardy! Wheel of Once Upon a Time Once Upon a Time Once Upon a Time News Hot Topics
ABC20 2020 News 'G' c Fortune "Broken'PG' s "The Crocodile"'PG' "Tallahassee"'PG'
10 News, Evening Wheel of Jeopardy! The Mentalist (In 48 Hours (N) (In 48 Hours (N) (In 10 News Paid
I (WD SP)CBS 10 10 10 10 10 6pmr(N) News Fortune 'G'Ec Stereo)'14'xc Stereo) 'PG's Stereo) 'PG's 11pm(N) Program
n___ FOvX13 6:00 News (N) TMZ (N) (In Stereo) Cops (N) Cops'PG' The Mob Doctor FOX13 10:00 News (N) News MasterChef
SWTV FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) xc 'PG'Ea "PG cXResurrection"'14' (In Stereo) c '14'
D WCJB ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Entertainment 'Night Once Upon a Time Once Upon a Time Once Upon a Time News Crook
Cornerstone With John Jack Van Prophecy In Touch With Dr. Leslie Hale x 7th Street All Over CTN Pure
SWCL IND 2 2 2 22 22 Hagee'G' Impe News Charles Stanley 'G' Theater the World Special Passion
SWT ABC 11 1 1 News World Paid Let's Ask Once Upon a Time Once Upon a Time Once Upon a Time News Private
ABC 11 11 11 News Program America "Broken"PG' c "The Crocodile"'PG' "Tallahassee"'PG' Practice
WMRIND 12 12 16 .Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Leverae "The Wedding Leverage "The Stork Movie'PG'
1 4' 'PG' Theory Theory Job"'P G' Job"'PG' E
D WTTAI MNT 6 6 6 9 9 House Paid Paid Paid Bloopers Bloopers Futurama Futurama Ringof Honor Wrest. Bones'14' c
MD (WAC TBN 21 21 Pain? Gospel Jim Raley Life Center Church Rabbi Messer B. Hinn Paid |Paid Chosen |Kingdom
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Beyond Scared Straight Gangsters: America's Gangsters: America's Gangsters: America's Gangsters: America's Gangsters: America's
4c54 48 54 25 27 '14 MosfEvil cMosfEvila xMosfEvila cMostfEvila cMosfEvilc
*** "The Patriot" (2000, War) Mel Gibson, *** "Signs" (2002) Mel Gibson. A widower investigates **Y "Hannibal" (2001) Anthony
CAi) 55 64 55 Heath Ledger.'NR' cc huge circles in his crop fields.'PG-13' Hopkins.'R' sc
Pit Boss "Four Feet Tall Too Cute! "Puppy Love" Too Cute! Animal spe- Pit Boss (Season Pit Bulls and Parolees Pit Boss (In Stereo)
52 35 52 19 21 & Rising"'14' (In Stereo) 'G' cies mingle.'G' Premiere) (N)'PG' (N)'PG' 'PG'
S n96 19 96n "The *** "Barbershop 2: Back in Business" (2004, Comedy) **Y "Beauty Shop" (2005, Comedy) Queen ** "Four Brothers"
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7 ** "Tommy Boy"(1995, Comedy) **Y "Dinner for Schmucks" (2010, Comedy) Steve Carell, *** "Hot Tub Time Machine" (2010, Comedy)
) 27 61 27 33 Chris Farley PG-13 x Paul Rudd, Bruce Greenwood.'PG-13' x John Cusack.'R' x
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CMT 98 45 98 28 37 Idiots Comedy)'NR' (Season Finale) (N)
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(Cil 40 29 40 41 46 The Situation Room CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents'PG' Piers Morgan Piers Morgan CNN Presents'PG'
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I 29 52 29 20 28 Cyrus, Greg Kinnear, Liam Hemsworth.'PG' McAdams. A man tells a story to a woman about two overs.'NR' Traveler's Wife"
*** "Ransom"(1996, Suspense) Mel Gibson, *** "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless ***Y "Lost in Translation" (2003) "Sex,
118 170 Rene Russo. (In Stereo) 'R' s Mind" (2004, Romance) Jim Carrey. 'R' c Bill Murray. 'R's Lies'
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[FSiL) 35 39 35 In Magic |Magic NBA Basketball New York Knicks at Orlando Magic. |Magic In Magic |In Magic College Basketball
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***, "Class"(2010, ** "Elevator Girl"(2010, Romance) Lacey "The Seven Year Hitch" (2012, Romance- ** "The Nanny
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302 201 302 2 2 (2001) Daniel Radcliffe.'PG' c Sean Hayes. 'PG' s Wiig, Maya Rudolph. (In Stereo) 'R' s Stooges"
303 202 303 ** "Welcome to ** "What's Your Number?" (2011) Anna Faris, Boardwalk Empire Game of Thrones (In Treme (In Stereo)
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i) 320 221 320 3 3*** "Crazy, Stupid, Love."(2011) **/ "Life" 1999) Eddie Murphy. ** "Horrible Bosses" 2011, Comedy) Jason "Showgirls"(1995)
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109 65 109 44 American Colony: Meet Alaska State Troopers Alaska State Troopers Doomsday Preppers Doomsday Preppers Doomsday Preppers
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Bridge


North 01-05-13
4 K QJ 10 9
V J 7 2
+ AK5
E A 4
East


West


4 8543
VA 9 6
J 7
SQJ 7 3


South
4 A 6
V K854
+ 86432
&492

Dealer: North
Vulnerable: Both
South West North


1 4 Pass
Pass 3 NT All pass


1 NT


Opening lead: 4 6

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Hunter S. Thompson, a journalist and author
who died in 2005, said, "When the going gets weird,
the weird turn pro."
If it looks weird, talks weird and smells weird, it
must be weird especially if produced by a pro.
In other words, if a competent player does some-
thing weird, it is (almost certainly) not because he
has lost his marbles, but because he is hoping to
sneak a trick past an unsuspecting opponent.
In today's deal, South is in three no-trump. East
is in the spotlight West leads a fourth-highest club
six. What should East be thinking?
First, though, let's look at declarer's problem.
He has only eight top tricks: five spades, two dia-
monds and one club. And with clubs wide open, he
must hope that East has the heart ace and is sleep-
ing soundly South should win the first trick and
call for the heart jack, trying to look like a man
about to take a finesse.
What should East conclude now?
Initially, East should have asked himself this
question: What is declarer likely to do at trick two?
Here, if South doesn't have the spade ace, he will
surely establish that suit. So, when South doesn't
do that, it is because he has the spade ace. Ergo,
the suit is ready to run and declarer has eight top
tricks: five spades, two diamonds and one club.
Why is he calling for the heart jack?
South must be trying to sneak his ninth trick.
East mustn't fall for it: He should jump in with
the heart ace and play clubs. If East ducks, South,
in desperation, will put up his king and, when it
wins, claim.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
YUPPP

@2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Rghls Reserved
SALIA



SIEWUN



GGGILE
!^~ p^^^


THE L-FECTRIPIAN
WOUL-P O T PONE
IF HE KEPT ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A:
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday Jumbles: WOOZY ICING RADIUS ICONIC
I Answer: The astrologer's new billboard was -
A ZODIAC SIGN


East


ACROSS
1 Bon -
(witticism)
4 Prospect for
gold
7 Draft of air
11 PFC mail drop
12 Gush over
13 Thunder
14 down
(burdened)
16 Greed's
cousin
17 Sticky soils
18 Alleviate
19 Messy place
20 Adherent
21 Visual aid
24 Popeye's
tattoo
27 Insult,
slangily
28 Natural elevs.
30 Filth
32 Lost one's
footing
34 Strikes
36 Come to a halt
37 Scoldina


39 Poker pair Answer to Previous Puzzle
41 Belly dance
instrument T L
42 -and yang T A D A N T A W L
43 Brickmaker's ERE L I AR ED I E
oven ME W GAME MALA
45 Humerus
neighbors P A SSA G E SBI L K
48 Not fake m K EA EMOR Y
49 New Mexico
cavern WHEY RATED
52 "BusStop" A AH TAR E YING
author GITS I0 OP
53 Wheel tracks G I T S IC K OP
54 Actress BA I Z E DUBS
Hagen SWORN LTDm
55 Where
heather grows A NON 0 F L U T T E R
56 Signs off on R I M E P L AN V A
57 Decimal base CPAS TORE F E N


DOWN IHENm
1 Animal's 6 Jarrett of
gullet NASCAR
2 Fuel cartel 7 Floral bands
3 Work hard 8 Charged
4 Fall guy particles
5 Gladiator's 9 Pew locale
hello 10 Dehydrated


_E SlSEmUNDI
12 Musical beat
15 Shocked
sound
18 PC key
20 Part of MIT
21 Mdse.
22 Exasperate
23 China's place
24 Indigo dye
25 Sign
26 Ladder step
29 Clunk
31 NFL scores
33 More amusing
35 Job
requirements
38 Good times
40 Rustic
lodgings
42 Round
dwellings
43 Casino game
44 Othello's
betrayer
46 Meet edge to
edge
47 More than
satisfy
48 Teacup part
49 -Magnon
man
50 Puffin kin
51 Aykroyd or
Rather


Dear Annie: I am a di-
vorced father of two
teenagers. Their mother
and I have maintained
a good relationship
when it comes to rais-
ing the children.
However, an issue
has now come up.
Since my divorce, I
have enjoyed interna-
tional travel to the
Caribbean. My chil-
dren have seen many
pictures and heard my
stories and are very in-
terested in traveling ANN
with me. I now think MAIL
they are old enough to
enjoy it. Their mother,
however, is afraid to fly and has
not been willing to sign the pa-
perwork required to get pass-
ports for the kids. We have had
discussions about this over the
years without success.
I think this would be a wonder-
ful experience for my children,
and I'd like to take them with me
to the tropical climate. In our last
discussion, my ex said I could
take them anywhere I wanted
within the U.S., but she wasn't
comfortable having them outside
of the country if something were
to happen. I offered to pay for her
passport so she would have it in
case she needed to see them, but
she has made no effort to follow
through. What do you think? -
Kidless in the Caribbean
Dear Kidless: Your wife is
afraid to fly and is also afraid that
something will happen to the
children. This is slightly irra-
tional, which means it will be dif-
ficult to convince her that the
kids will be safe. You can ask her


to accompany you on this trip,
you can recommend that she
work on her fears with a thera-
pist, or you can simply
wait until the kids are
a little older. Some-
times life demands pa-
tience.
Dear Annie: I'd like
to get a point across to
someone, and it is im-
portant that I remain
anonymous. Here
goes:
Money versus a rela-
tionship: Granted,
IE'S money is important
-BOX and should be re-
spected. Striving to
earn enough to buy a
home, put food on the table, drive
a decent car, pay the bills and
have some savings is necessary It
provides us with security and sta-
bility.
That being said, there are
many things that money cannot
do. Money doesn't ask "How are
you feeling?" Money doesn't tell
you it has been thinking about
you. Money doesn't spend a ro-
mantic evening with a candlelit
dinner and intimate conversa-
tion.
Money doesn't take the time to
listen to you or greet you at the
door. Money doesn't hold your
hand or give you a luscious kiss
goodnight. You can't give money
a phone call and say, "I'd really
like to see you tonight."
You decide: money or relation-
ship? Or don't you want someone
to care about you? -Anonymous
Dear Anonymous: If your Sig-
nificant Other is focused on
money to the detriment of the re-
lationship, it's unlikely to change


appreciably And if you insist on
remaining anonymous, your
point may not get across. Please
speak up and settle this before
you commit to something that
will make both of you unhappy
Dear Annie: I hope you have
room for one more reply to "Your
Husband." It is true, our rela-
tionship is based on love. You say
the only thing missing from our
relationship is sex. This is not the
only thing missing. Over the
years, I have done all I can to sup-
port your needs, even during in-
timacy You would get what you
needed, but if I dared to ask for
what I needed, you would get
angry When I tried to talk to you
about it, you never had time. We
sought counseling, but you said I
was "crazy" and quit going.
A year ago, my doctor found
that I had an STD. In order to
protect myself, I stopped having
sex with you. I have given most of
my life to being there for you, and
you say I haven't done enough.
Going outside of our marriage is
just another betrayal by someone
who doesn't consider me worth
the effort. Your Wife


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann Lan-
ders column. Please email your
questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 7373rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read fea-
tures by other Creators Syndi-
cate writers and cartoonists,
visit www creators.com.


772
VQ 10 3
SQ 10 9
4 K 10 8 6 5


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


ENTERTAINMENT


SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 2013 C7


y





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


CAN YOU DON'T YOU WOR R ABOUT ALL THATG BETTER ..LI IN DREAD
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Sally Forth


Dilbert


The Born Loser

'5GA.,,'YOU KNOW YOU'\VEEATEN W AFROUTKTOOPEN TRE
TOO tUCR\ OE-TRE-E ROLU'S,. TOP BUTTON O Y'OUR .PmAI5
S|TO LOO$E -N-I"/I
\ 17) 1 UMWNST AT 6,. KT7


gONL- TO REALIZE TA W'OU'-
W E.N STPNG STCHPN 'IT5
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Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


For Better or For Worse


NOLUL DOuNCE-FND
BOUNCe-BOUNCE-
BOUNCE- UFRN-

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TIST-WTwIST-iLoiST-
ThIsFT-AGARIN-SIX-
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Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


Blondie


DEAR, WOULD YOU SAY THAT'S
A GOOD GAME?

-' WOUL- )


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


WELL,THAT DOES IT!
I'M BROKE' BUSTED!
LOOKS LIKE YOU
WIN, FRANCIS'


A MOB OF FABOYS, FAA(-
TA9 ITr AWP BASEMEUT-
WEL.LER5 ALL LEAKIA(6
TESTOSTERONE!

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Joe.



I I -


E- AN' AROARET HAVE A LOT IN COAMAON,,,
WE C&ETON EACH OT4ER'S NERP\MEeS"
Betty


Frank & Ernest


THAT's MORE LIKE IT

THE GAME GOT
t MORE FUN
WHEN WE
S ADDED A
REFEREE
7-,

UZI-I
-3'


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Parental Guidance" (PG) 11 a.m., 1:40 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Les Miserables" (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 3:15 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Django Unchained" (R) ID required. 11:15 a.m.
3:05 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 9:50 p.m. No passes.
"Jack Reacher" (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 3:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Monsters Inc" (G) In 3D. 11:05 a.m., 1:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Monsters Inc" (G) 3:50 p.m.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" (PG-13) In 3D.
12 p.m., 8 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" (PG-13) 4 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Les Miserables" (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 3:15 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Django Unchained" (R) ID required. 12 p.m., 3:40 p.m.,


7:20 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"Parental Guidance" (PG) 11:35 a.m., 2:15 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:50 p.m.
"Jack Reacher" (PG-13) 11:25 a.m., 2:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:40 p.m. No passes.
"This is 40" (R) ID required. 11:50 a.m., 2:50 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:45 p.m.
"Monsters Inc." (G) 2:10 p.m.
"Monsters Inc" (G) In 3D. 11:45 a.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
9:45 p.m. No passes.
"The Guilt Trip" (PG-13) 11:10 a.m., 2:05 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 9:40 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" (PG-13) In 3D.
11 a.m., 6:45 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" (PG-13) 3 p.m.
"Playing for Keeps" (PG-13) 11:40 a.m., 2:25 p.m.,
5:50 p.m.
"Lincoln" (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 2:30 p.m., 6:30 p.m.,
9:50 p.m.


Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp.
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious


Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 Classic Rock
WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


Pickles


LET'S CHECK
FOR PARASITES!

LH7)WHO ,0LET
THE VET IN?!



>1a~s~^^t^


Doonesbury


V


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0



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s-.


K'


~if,


"When it got cold they all moved to
their winter home an Ugg boot."


Big Nate


Arlo and Janis


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: 0 slenba x


"EYU GOE SW BSAIMAI WSP NSZUEYMAI


JMBB GBJGKN VU ZSPU MAEUANU EYGA


EYU PUXDMEMAI SW ME."


IGMB ISRJMA

Previous Solution: "We all live in suspense from day to day; in other words, we are
the hero of our own story." Mary McCarthy
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-5


I


C8 SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 2013


COMICS








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966




Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


^^ 21= ij W a W 'V^. %0- I Ia aJ .! ,9b!J-


Fax:m m (352 563566 1^ Toll Free (888 85 -24 1 Emil clsiidscrnceoln o I3 w e w wcrnle l in.com


4 GREAT DINETTE
CHAIRS -Wood Frame
w/ uphlostered seat &
backs on wheels $140.
352-527-9332

CHEVROLET
1997 Suburban LT,
loaded, low mi. ex cond.
Good Tires $5200 obo
(352) 249-7702

CHEVY
'05 TRAILBLAZER
57K miles, Excel. Cond.
$8,500.
352-249-7756







ESTATE SALE in Nature
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site and a separate gated
storage lot; plus almost
new 5th-wheel with
slides, screened gazebo,
and storage building. All
for $79,900. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441

GOLF CART CLUB CAR
EZ-GO 36volt new
charger, new tires &
brakes. $1200. Golf Cart
parts-top & seats $100
cell (315) 466-2268

Golf Cart Club Car
with utility bed on
back, runs good,
comes w/ charger and
spare tire. Asking $875
352-564-2756

Home/Office
Cleaning



(352) 427-4166

HOMOSASSA/SMW
2/2/2 Fl rm, fireplace no
pets non-smoker. $800
mo. 1st last + sec dep
(850) 384-4859

INVERNESS
2/1, Clean, W/D Hk-up,
No pets, $550mo. + Sec
(352) 220-4818

INVERNESS
3/2 Furn.,Appl., Ig screen
porch & shed, Great
cond. $16,000. Call for
appt. (352)364-3747



4Z and read
Lost "Millie" our 13 yr
old Timneh African
Grey flew out of house
somewhere between
488, 495 and Lake
Rousseau area.
Heartbroken..794-3256


MEDICAL
BILLER/CODER
Medical Biller/Coder
needed for busy
radiology practice in
Citrus County. Medicare
& Commercial Insurance
knowledge required. CPC
or CPC-R preferred but
not necessary. Amicas &
Health+Pro experience
helpful. Good benefit
package. Fax resume' to
352-637-1034 or email
lolander@inverness
medicalimaging.com


New & Customize 3/2
home on 6 acres.
Fenced in paddock.
(352)621-1236
SKS ASSAULT RIFLE
30 rd mag, AK stock, plus
original Teak wood stock,
scope, & ammo $750.
(352) 302-6565
Taurus PT1911,45ACP
semi auto pistol. gray &
black never fired
flawless cond. All extras
Included $975.
(352) 344-0355
TOYOTA
2000 Tacoma 5 sp, 174k
mi, cold air. runs great.
$4450 (352) 503-2629
TREADMILL
Golds Gym 450. Electric
key board, used 3
hours. Retail $900, ask-
ing $475 (352) 746-0506
TRUE COMMERCIAL
COOLER 6FT X 3FT.
$300 OBO. CALL PLAZA
HEALTH FOODS
(352) 795-0911
WICKER Henry Link,
chair & large couch ,
new cushions, end table
coffee table
$350
(352) 597-7353



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191



5 HENS & 1 ROOSTER
FREE
(352) 560-6155
(352)-201-0702
5 Month Old Kittens
to good home. Have
both males & females
(352) 476-5230
12 Rode Islands Reds,
Free, 10 hens, 2 roosters
Hens just finished
moulting
(352) 564-6820
16 Ft above ground pool.
Complete w/ pump and
all acceccones.
(352) 794-6365
Black Lab/German
Pointer Mix
11 weeks old. 2males
(317) 341-1974
Free Firewood
Cut and Haul
(352) 249-7212
FREE KITTENS
7 WEEKS OLD
WORMED. ASK FOR
JENNIFER 352-503-9206
Free Queen Size
Mattress & Box spring
(352) 410-9901
Mission in Citrus has a
FREE garage sale to
those in need.
No resale agents! Lots of
baby items, household
items and kids toys.
A little bit of everything.
If you are in need or
know someone who is,
please tell them.
2488 N. Pennsylvania
Crystal River
(near Manatee Lanes)
Fri & Sat all day




FRESH CITRUS@
BELLAMY GROVE
Greens, Strawberries,
Broccoli, Gift Shipping,
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378


Australian Cattle Dog
Grey & BIk Female 11 yrs
old named Jersey Last
seen near Independence
& Grant in Inverness
(352) 257-5675
Black Labrador Retnever,
about 1% yrs old, an-
swers to "Buddy", lost in
vicinity ofW. Dunnellon
Rd. (352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662

a and read
Lost "Millie" our 13 yr
old Timneh African
Grey flew out of house
somewhere between
488, 495 and Lake
Rousseau area.
Heartbroken..794-3256
PITBULL
light brown, approx.
5 yrs old. jumped out of
fenced back yard approx.
1 week ago, near the
end ofApopka Ave
in Inverness
pls call 352-860-0728
SMALL BLACK CAT
His name is Cole,
has blue collar on, lost
in community of
Fairview Estates
pls call 352-419-7255



Black & White, Female
Dog. medium weight
451bs. Dunnellon Area
(352) 422-3697
FOUND Grey dog on
Glenn ST Inverness. On
Saturday 12/29/12
Please call to
identify. 352-613-0269




YOU'LL v THIS!
JAZZERCISE
** 2 DAY SALE **
January 7th & 8th
Join us & try your
first class FREE!!
Jazzercise is a group
fitness class that
combines dance-based
cardio with strength
training and stretching
to sculot, tone and
lengthen muscles for
maximum fat burn.
18 classes weekly in
low impact and regular
format.
www.iazzercise.com/sale
352-634-5661





SPRING HILL
January Classes
COSMO DAYS
January 14, 2013
COSMO NIGHTS
January 14, 2013
BARBER NIGHTS
February 25, 2013
MASSAGE DAY
January 14, 2013,
MASSAGE NIGHTS
January 14, 2013,
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com




Volunteer Needed
Legal Assistant Retired,
Must be knowledgea-
ble in County Laws,
Call (352) 464-0779
PROJECT PET


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966






ARNP or PA

Wanted Part Time for
a busy Pediatric
Practice in Crystal
River, Send Resume
to: lindaoracticemar
0tampabav.rr.com

Avante
At inverness
is currently looking
for
1 Part time Dietary Aid
1 Full Time Dietary Aid
Apply online at
Avantecenters.com


FIT RN

IV Exp. preferred
For physicians office
with benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1787M.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida, 34429

MEDICAL
BILLER/CODER
Medical Biller/Coder
needed for busy
radiology practice in
Citrus County. Medicare
& Commercial Insurance
knowledge required. CPC
or CPC-R preferred but
not necessary. Amicas &
Health+Pro experience
helpful. Good benefit
package. Fax resume' to
352-637-1034 or email
lolander@inverness
medicalimaging.com

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

OUTPATIENT
SURGERY CENTER

RN
OPERATING ROOM-
EXPERIENCED ONLY!
CST- Graduate of
approved Surgical
Tech program and
Certified- ONLY !


Medical Billing/
Medical Assist.
Part time

Fax Resume to:
352-465-3733

NEEDED
PSYCH ARNP
Initially PT Soon FT

Call 352-726-3950

P/T, DIETARY
AIDE

Looking for Responsi-
ble Individual
with flexible hours.
Applv in Person:
700 SE 8th Ave
Crystal River, 34429
DFWP, EOE

Therapy
Management
Corporation
Homosassa, FL
is seeking
the following
Full time position:

Senior Executive Ad-
ministrative Assistant
to the President and
Founder.

This is a fast paced po-
sition that requires at-
tention to detail and the
ability to multi task and
change direction at a
moment's notice. Must
be a strong team player.
Minimum of 2 years' ex-
perience in an Execu-
tiveAssistant role.
Please apply online @
www.therapymgmt
.com





PRODUCTION
MANAGER

for Citrus County
strawberry, blueberry,
and citrus farm.
Full time, year round
position. Must be willing
to relocate to Floral
City, Florida.
Responsible for:
Supervision of irrigation
technician and spray
technician. Operation
and light maintenance
of irrigation systems,
spray equipment, trac-
tors and other farm ve-
hicles. Interaction with
Harvest Manger to en-
sure production yield
and quality.
Requires detailed
knowledge of:
Agricultural chemicals
and spray equipment,
calibration and mainte-
nance. Irrigation,
fertigation, chemigation
equipment, calibration
and maintenance.
Diesel pumps and
wells. Record keeping
and daily logs.Tractors
and other farm equip-
ment. Computers MS
office suite, internet.
College Agrcultural
Degree a plus.
Private Pesticide Appli-
cators License a plus.
Starting salary com-
mensurate with experi-
ence, plus housing, ve-
hicle, insurance, 401K,
bonus after 1st year.
Respond with resume
FERRIS FARMS
7607 S FLORIDA AVE,
FLORAL CITY, FL
34436


INSURANCE
CUSTOMER SERVICE
Licensed 440 or 220
agent for insurance office
in Homosassa.
Fax resume to
352-621-3088 or email to
pat@whitingins.com






HIRING SERVERS

Must be 18 or older.
Apply Fisherman's
Restaurant
12311 E Gulf to Lake
(352) 637-5888






Big Truck/Equip.
Mechanic

Must have tools & exp.
***apply at:***
6730 N. Citrus Ave.
Crystal River, FL
no phone calls please


Exp. Marine
Fork Lift Driver

7 day shift
**Apply in Person"
Twin Rivers Marina
2880 N. Seabreeze Pt
Crystal River Fl 34429
no phone calls pis


Hernando United
Methodist Church
(Citrus County) has
two positions open,
AUDIO-VISUAL TECH
and a PIANO
ACCOMPANIST
Both are staff/paid
positions. Please call
(352) 726-7245
for information and
application. E-mail -
hernandoumc@
tampabay.rr.com


WELDER/
FABRICATOR
Experienced aluminum
welder with fabrication
skills. Automotive or boat
skills a plus.
Call 352-637-0645


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo


Apartment
Maintenance
Position Available

Co. seeking P/T Mainte-
nance. Requires own
tools, experience & reli-
able transportation. Po-
sition requires plumb-
ing, HVAC, electrical,
and painting skills.
Please apply during the
hours of 9am-1pm,
Monday-Friday at Wild-
wood Townhomes, 301
E. Gulf Atlantic Hwy,
and Wildwood or
email csaunders@
hallmarkco.com

CDL DRIVER

Class A, clean record,
dump truck exp. reqd.
352-795-5755

Property Manager
for Apartment
Community

An established
property management
company is seeking a
F/T seasoned
professional Property
Manager for an RD
complex in Floral City.
Must be highly skilled at
communication and
working in an organized
manner. We offer a
competitive salary and
an excellent benefit
package including
401(k). On site apart-
ment a possibility.
Please send
resume or apply at:
Floral Oaks Apts.
8092 S. Floral Oaks
Cir, Floral City, FL or
e-mail csaunders@
hallmarkco.com.




MARKETER
OUTGOING, SELF
MOTIVED, ENERGETIC
PERSON FOR B2B.
TRANSPORTATION A
MUST. CALL
352-563-2777.

PART-TIME
EXPERIENCED
BARTENDER

Apply in Person:
VFW Post #4337
906 Hwy. 44 E., Inv.










SPRING HILL
January Classes
*** *****
COSMO DAYS
January 14, 2013
COSMO NIGHTS
January 14, 2013
BARBER NIGHTS
February 25, 2013
MASSAGE DAY
January 14, 2013,
MASSAGE NIGHTS
January 14, 2013
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only
*********
BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com


DUDLEY'S

**HAPPYTNEW**
**YEAR!!!**
TWO AUCTIONS





Thurs Jan 3rd
Walk About Auction
3pm w/full yard of treas-
ures, inside and out Fur-
niture, tools, misc.
antiques, box after box
Sun Jan 6th
Antique & Collectible
Auction 1pm
Quality Furniture from
Victorian to Deco, Art,
lighting, jewelry, won-
derful selection of vin-
tage Mexican Stone-
ware, toys, coins,
Roseville+++check
website
www.dudleysauction.
corn
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB 1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384






50 Wizard Comics One
Half edition $1 ea obo
20 Holiday Barbie Dolls
$1 ea. obo
550 Matchbox Cars $1
ea.
(352)860-1110

550 Matchbox Cars $1
ea.
(352) 860-1110

1918 JENNY STAMP
good condition.Call for
e-mail picture. $100.OBO
Linda 352-341-2271

DIECAST MODEL
MILITARY AIRCRAFT 15
diecast model military
aircraft $75.
352-563-5386

ELVIS SUN RECORDS
All 5 Sun
Records-1954-55.
Re-issues. VG-Mint. $75.
352-560-0046

OCCUPIED JAPAN
AICHI BREAD PLATES
(2) Gold trimmed, pink
roses, 7.5" very good. $5
352-601-0067



Appliances


DRYER$1 00 Works
great. 90 day full
warranty. Call/text
352-364-6504
Gas Stove/electric
oven, stainless steel
w/ blacktop,
$250.
Call Evenings
(352) 527-2300
GE Refrigerator 18cu
Almond Great Cond.
$75.
Range hood like new
2 speed $25
(352) 422-3371
KENMORE DRYER
white, looks good, works
great. Guarenteed. $100
352-476-9019
KENMORE WASHER
White looks good works
great! guaranteed. $100.
Dennis @352-476-9019
KOHLER CAST IRON
SINK White,dbl basin,
standard, excellent
condition. $75.
352-513-4027
MAYTAG NEPTUNE
Electric Dryer *
Runs great, Sensor dry.
First $125 takes it!
(352) 464-4690
Microwave, Maytag,
over stove, bisque
$75.obo Dishwasher,
Maytag $100. obo
Excellent Condition
352-598-9626
Refrigerator, Maytag,
26 cu ft., side by side,
bisque, $300. obo
Range, whirlpool elec.
smooth top self clean
$150.obo Excel. Cond.
352-598-9626
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers &
dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179
TRUE COMMERCIAL
COOLER 6FT X 3FT.
$300 OBO. CALL PLAZA
HEALTH FOODS
(352) 795-0911
TURKEY FRYER
MASTERBUILT BUT-
TERBALL, USED ONCE
$95. (352) 527-8993
WASHER OR DRYER
$135 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like new,
Excellent Condition. Free
Del. 352 263-7398
WASHER$1 00 Works
great. 90 day full
warranty. Call/ text
352-364-6504
Whirlpool super cap dryer
$100. will deliver local call
after 6 pm 352-563-8033


SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 2013 C9


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352-625-7519

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*Siding *Soffit Fascia Skirting *Roofovers *Carports Screen Rooms* Decks *Windows* Doors *Additions
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ClO SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 2013


SHARP 32" TV WITH
REMOTE $25
352-613-0529
STEREO (AIWA) Multi
Disk,Cassette,AM/FM
Player w/side speakers.
Exc. sound. $35
352-746-4160




INTERIOR DOOR
MASONITE, WHITE 8'H
X 2W $40.
(352) 527-8993
MIRROR BEVELED
PLATE GLASS MIRROR
39"H X 62"W $30.
(352)527-8993
SKYLIGHT 26" BY 26"
NEW BUBBLE TYPE
NOT USED ONLY $45.
352464-0316
SOLO TUBE NEW
(SKYLIGHT) NEVER
INSTALLED. LIGHT UP
THAT DARK ROOM
$100.352-464-0316




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP WEB MOUSE W/
SCROLL WHEEL grey
colored, brand new,
packed, $10
(352)465-1616
LEXMARK FAX
PRINTER/SCANNER
Like new $25
352-860-2475
TOSHIBA LAPTOP 7
years old, has new
hard-drive, Windows, of-
fice new 2007, no cam-
era, $90 (352)465-1616




POOL LADDER 6 ft pool
ladder never used want
$25 home phone
(352)794-3041




4 drawer file cabinet,$40
letter size, putty, excellent
condition 352-382-7585
can email picture
4 GREAT DINETTE
CHAIRS Wood Frame
w/ uphlostered seat &
backs on wheels $140.
352-527-9332
ATTRACTIVE, CLEAN,
COMFORTABLE
SECTIONAL Tan cotton
with batik floral design
$275 352-897-4154
Bamboo Coffee Table
Like new $35
352-860-2475
COUCH AND
LOVESEAT Very good
condition cream teal
peach stripe $200.
352-628-4447
Dining Room Set
glass top table & 4 chairs
$300 obo, Kitchen set,
table & 4 chairs
w/oak finish $50 obo
352-382-2450
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER holds tv with
side glass front,good
cond,$50. Call after 6 pm
352-563-8033
Home Office Desk
Maple, Great Condition
$500 obo, White Formica
Student Desk, good
condition $25 obo,
352-382-2450
LEATHER SOFA &
LOVESEAT
burgundy, excellent
condition $650. obo
352-746-0855
Leather Sofa, Chair & Ot-
toman, 1 coffee, 2 end ta-
bles. Twin bed, mat. set &
head board. Round din-
ing room table w/ 4chrs.
Lamp. $600 for all
(404) 242-7117
LIVING RM SET
7 PCS EXC COND. $600
&
PATIO TABLE W/6
CHAIRS. $150
954-531-8295
LIVING ROOM SET
SOFA, IOVESEAT &
END TABLES. EARTH
TONES, EXC COND
$425 obo(352) 302-8265
LOVE SEAT LIKE
NEW.CALL FOR E-MAIL
PICTURE LINDA
352-341-2271
Matching end & coffee
tables $75 Scandinavian
teak, glass good
condition, can email
pictures 352-382-7585
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
PAUL'S FURNITURE
& THRIFT SHOP
Homosassa 628-2306


Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Rattan Entertainment
Center Old Florida style,
off white Great Shape
$100. 352-464-0955
WHITE WICKER
COMPUTER DESK &
CHAIR Attractive, Like
New $225 352-897-4154
WICKER Henry Link,
chair & large couch ,
new cushions, end table
coffee table
$350
(352) 597-7353




FREE PINE NEEDLES
Free "You Rake" pine
needles. 352-795-5335
SOLD
Craftsmen Tractor
24 hsp. includes
trailer, spreader, charge
auto transmission $750




CITRUS SPRINGS
FRI & SAT 7A-2P
4 MOVING SALE 4*
Furn. misc items, riding
lawn mower, Generator
7755 N Pocono Dr.
PINE RIDGE
Fri & Sat 7a- 3pm
Household items.
2715 W Blackwood Dr




CRYSTAL RIVER
Meadowcrest, Fri, Sat
Jan 4th & 5th, 9a to 3p
collectibles, furn,
clothing, hshld, more
1752 N Envoy Drive




LEATHER/SUEDE
JACKETS Womens, can
e-mail pics. Size 8-12
$25. each or 3 for $60.
352-513-4027
RECITAL DANCE
COSTUMES 2 different
girls, several years, lots
of costumes. Take them
all for $75. 352-476-9563
TJ MAX GIFT CARDS
50.00 FOR 40.00/25.00
FOR 20.00
WILL VERIFY TO YOU
LINDA 352-341-444




2 ORIGINAL AVON
BARBIE LIKE DOLLS,
CIRCA 1980. $20 ea.
obo. in box never used.
(352)527-2085
3 IN 1 COMMODE. SAN-
ITIZED, $35 OBO. Over
commode adjustable,
bedside. (352) 527-2085
3 PAIR CROCS. SIZE
MEN'S 8/LADIES' 9. $10
EA.OBO exc. cond.
(352) 527-2085
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat for resting, folds for
storage, spring pressure
brakes, Ex., $35.
352-628-0033
6.5 FT. CO. PINE
PRE-LIT TREE IN BOX.
$10 OBO More
decorations avail.
(352) 527-2085
9 ft. GRAPHITE FLY
ROD- B & S Custom
Rod, 2 pc., 3/4 wt., cork
grip, Ex+, $40.
352-628-0033
20 FT ELECTRICAL
POWER POLE W/meter
can & 100amp panel
W/12 breakers. You pull
$300 OBO(352)628-2980
50.00 TJ MAX GIFT
CARD SELLING FOR
40.00 Will meet you there
to verify to you. linda
352-341-4449
12,000LB REESE
TRAILER HITCH RE-
CEIVER- pintle hook
mounting plate with
2-5/16 ball,$60.
Ex., 352-628-0033
4-PRONGED ALUMI-
NUM CANE. $15 OBO.
exc. cond.
(352) 527-2085
ADJUSTABLE SHOWER
CHAIR WITH BACK. $25
OBO exc. cond.
(352) 527-2085
AFFORDABLE
SHED MOVER
Lio/Ins. 352-634-5183
941-623-3742
ALUMINUM WALKER
WITH 2 WHEELS. $20
OBO. Folding, exc. cond.
(352) 527-2085
BLACK POLE LAMP. $15
OBO exc.cond.
(352) 527-2085


BUNWINTER
CLOTHING SIZES 5 & 6
SHIRTS, PANTS &
JACKETS $35
352-613-0529
CELL PHONE
BLACKBERRY CURVE
8330 VERIZON Camera
Chargers Bluetooth head-
set $25 352-601-0067
CRAFTSMAN 10"
Compound Miter Saw
Model 113.234610, with
dust bag & new 80 tooth
blade., Ex. $40. 628-0033
DOG SNUGGLES.
SM.OR MED. PINK OR
BLUE. $5 EA. OBO
Never used.
(352) 527-2085
DUDLEY'S
**HAPP rEW**
"YEAR!!!**
TWO AUCTIONS






Thurs Jan 3rd
Walk About Auction
3pm w/full yard of treas-
ures, inside and out Fur-
niture, tools, misc.
antiques, box after box
Sun Jan 6th
Antique & Collectible
Auction 1pm
Quality Furniture from
Victorian to Deco, Art,
lighting, jewelry, won-
derful selection of vin-
tage Mexican Stone-
ware, toys, coins,
Roseville.+++check
website
www.dudleysauction.
comr
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384
EXTENSION "GRAB IT"
POLE. $5 Reach high or
low. (352) 527-2085
FLOORMATS
WEATHERTECH- GRAY
- LEXUS RX CUSTOM
MATS $75.
(352) 527-8993
FORD HOOD good
condition. 85 F150 type.
$45. 352-302-7451
GE DIGITAL TELE-
PHONE ANSWERING
MACHINE $10 LIKE
NEW ALL CONNEC-
TIONS 419-5981
GERBIL CAGE GOOD
CONDITION $25
352-613-0529
GPS TRAVEL KIT Day
Tripper New in box,
Charger, Case, Gnrpmat
up to 5" screen. $10
352-601-0067
GRAB BAR WITH 2
BUTTONS. $5 Works
anywhere.
(352) 527-2085
GUITAR TREE STAND
Holds 3 Guitars, folds &
knocks down for storage,
Ex., $25. 352-628-0033
HOSPITAL BED TABLE
$45. OBO Locking
wheels, exc. cond.
(352) 527-2085
HOSPITAL BED WITH
REMOTE. $100
OBO.(352) 527-2085
JET STREAM OVEN.$40
OBO W/EXPANSION
RINGS Bake in 1/2 the
time. (352) 527-2085
KIDS TRAIN TABLE Step
2 deluxe canyon road
train table with lid $40.
352-628-4447
LEAD CRYSTAL VASE
Exc Cond $15
7"H x 4"D
352-527-8287
LEAD CRYSTAL VASES
$10/15
Lenox/European
4"/7" 352-527-8287
LP'S Songs from
60's,70's & 80's. Original
Artists. Records in
exc.cond.$100 obo.Must
buy all 352-746-4160
LT. BLUE WOODEN
ROCKER FOR
CHILD/DOLL. $20 OBO.
Vintage. (352) 527-2085
MATRESS COVER Pad-
ded feather pad Good
clean cond. $30.00
352-344-5311
MOVING/STORAGE
BOXES- 20 new/4 sizes
26x20x5, 22x15x27,
27x16x27,24x24x24
$3 ea. 352-422-0294
NEW BLACK LEATHER
PURSE BY ROLF $25
CAN E-MAIL PHOTO IN-
VERNESS 419-5981
OLD TRAFFIC LIGHT
Old traffic light from NY
$50. 352-628-4447
ORECK XL UPRIGHT
VACUUM CLEANER
WORKS GREAT (IT'S
AN ORECK) ONLY $100.
352-464-0316


QUANTUM IM6 BAIT
CASTING FISH RODS-
6'6", 1 pc., graphite,
medium hvy., cork grip,
Ex+, $25 ea. 628-0033
SAMSONITE HANGING
TRAVEL BAG $10
LUGGAGE
CARRIER/PERSONAL
DOLLY $10 419-5981
SHAKESPEARE UGLY
STICK SURF ROD- BWS
1100 12'0", 2 pc., action
H, 12-40 lbs., sigma, Ex+,
$30. 628-0033
SLIDING BATH TUB
CHAIR WITH BACK. $30
OBO. exc. cond.
(352) 527-2085
SPRINT INTERNET
ANYWHERE CARD
In box $40 Hernando
864-283-5797
TROY BILT
GENERATOR 5500
watts, 8550 starting
watts. Only run to
circulate oil. Like new
$350. Call 352-527-0832
TYPEWRITER Elec.w/all
features.Carrying
case,owners manual &
xtra tape cartridge.Like
new.$50 352-746-4160
WEDDING DRESS, JR.
SIZE 1/2. $100 OBO Off
shoulder + access.
(352) 527-2085




ADDING MACHINE
Unisonic Desk Top 12
Digit Memory Elec.
Printing Calculator $25.
352-746-4160




4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES AND
SEAT GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $85.
352-464-0316
ALUMINUM WALKER &
BEDSIDE COMMODE
ONLY $20. EACH
352-464-0316
MANUAL WHEELCHAIR
WIT FOOTRESTS $100.
352-464-0316
REHABILICARE NERVE
STIMULATION SYSTEM
Rehabilicare Promax
Portable Electrical Nerve
Stimulation System
{TENS} unit for chronic
back and nerve pain,
Paid $375,sell for $200
call 352-419-4767
SHOWER CHAIR WITH
BACK WHITE
FIBERGLASS WITH
ADJUSTABLE LEGS
ONLY $30. 352-464-0316
TRANSPORT
WHEELCHAIR (small
wheels) Very light
w/ footrests. ONLY $100.
352-464-0316




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676


COLLECTOR BUYING
STERLING SILVER
FLATWARE & U S
SILVER COINS.
352-601-7074
GOLDEN COINS 7
DIFFERENT
PRESIDENT COINS
$5.00 EACH LINDA
352-341-4449




COOLER IGLOO WHITE
150 QT. $75.
(352) 527-8993
CORNINGWARE
Various sizes-no covers
$2 each 352-527-8287
DECORATIVE KITCHEN
CANISTER SET WITH
LIDS $10 IRIDESCENT
QUICHE DISH NEW $10
INVERNESS 419-5981




Bowflex with leg
extension & training
charts $75. Call after 6
pm 352-563-8033
EXERCISE BIKE FAN
TYPE WORKS THE
ARMS TOO great shape
only $85. 352-464-0316
PUNCHING BAG Hangs
from ceiling, great
work-out. Do not use any
more. Exc. shape. $25.
352-746-4160
PURSUIT EXERCISE
BIKE ALL
ELECTRONICS SUPER
SAPE $100.
352-464-0316


CLASSIFIED



ROWING MACHINE BY
BODY ROW GET IN
SHAPE $85.
352-464-0316




.308 AMMO-$100. Soft
Point, Hollow Point..New
352-503-2792
2 26" Huffy Bicycles,
Cranbrook model
Men's, Black
Women's Blue $50 ea.
(352) 564-2746
14 Gallon
Marine portable, Gas
Tank, 10ft hose w/
pump syphon handle,
$75. (352) 564-2746
COLT Single Action
Army, nickel finish
4.75 barrel, 45colt
unfired 3rd generation
mint cond. $1700 obo
352-441-0645
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
CUSTOMS MADE
CROSS BOWS, 150LB
PULL W/SCOPE $350
(352) 628-7633
GOLF CART CLUB CAR
EZ-GO 36volt new
charger, new tires &
brakes. $1200. Golf Cart
parts-top& seats $100
cell (315) 466-2268
Golf Cart Club Car
with utility bed on
back, runs good,
comes w/ charger and
spare tire. Asking $875
352-564-2756
SHOT GUN 20 Gauge
JC Higgins pump, adj.
chock, Like new $275
OBO. (352) 476-1113
or (352)-513-5125
SKS ASSAULT RIFLE
30 rd mag, AK stock, plus
original Teak wood stock,
scope, & ammo $750.
(352) 302-6565

SOLD
TOURING KAYAK
KITSILANO by
Current Design, Paddle,
PSD, Carrier, Cockpit
cover, P/U bed extender.
Taurus PT 1911, 45 ACP
semi auto pistol. gray &
black never fired
flawless cond. All extras
Included $975.
(352) 344-0355
TREADMILL
Golds Gym 450. Electric
key board, used 3
hours. Retail $900, ask-
ing $475 (352) 746-0506
Winchester model 1300,
12 gauge rifled barrel,
$400. Winchester model
94 30-30 cal. $400.
(352) 503-6037




BOAT TRAILER 16 ft
boat trailer $100. Home
phone (352)794-3041
NEW
HAULMARK 6X12
ENCLOSED TRAILERS
ONLY $1999.
(352) 621-3678
TANDEM AXLE
TRAILER 4 by 6 yard
trailer $100. Home phone
(352)794-3041




94 S-10 BLAZER PARTS
black interior glass and
seats 100.00 will sepa-
rate nice cond. dennis @
352-476-9019


**I
Tel

"Ha
with
ui


inc



3Ca





WAN
or M
Cond
Call F


5 Tiny Yorkies
$550 and up, Small,
Tiny & Very Tiny Only 2
females,1 Male Maltese,
Raised in loving home.
CKC Reg. health certs, &
puppy pacs. Parents on
site come watch them
play (352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258
AKC BOXER PUPPIES
Boxer Puppies
$450-$600 4-females,
3-males
8 WKS 1/08/2013
352-302-0918


BELLA
Bella is a beautiful
silvery brindle Cattle
Dog/Shepherd mix,
came to the shelter
because her family
lost their home. She is
4 years old, spayed,
housebroken, micro-
chipped, and
Heartworm-negative,
weighs 45 pounds.
Walks well on a leash,
gets along with other
dogs and is very, very
playful. Fenced yard
is preferred, but can
jump a low fence.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.

MINIATURE POODLES
miniature poodle pups
born 10/16/12 Health
Cert 1 apricot & 1 black
female & 1 black male al-
most potty trained, raised
in our home. $500 cash
call 352-419-5662 or
karaluv3@yahoo.com

~II-


NICKY
Nicky is a 2 y.o.
lab/bulldog mix, weigh-
ing about 78 pounds,
and is Heart-worm
negative. Is very sweet
and loveable, very intel-
ligent. However, he is a
big, strong dog who
needs a strong person
to handle him, and a
fenced yard is strongly
recommended. He
knows how to sit for
treats and wants to
please his human
friend very much.
He is available now at
the Citrus County
Animal Shelter.
Call 352-746-8400








RED MINIATURE
POODLE PUPS
7 WEEKS;2 MALES AND
1 FEMALE; $850.
REGISTRATION AND
HEALTH CERTIFI-
CATES; AVAILABLE
12-22-12. CALL
352419-8233 OR
janiceannross@msn.com
SENEGAL PARROT
$350 WITH CAGE,
FEMALE VERY GOOD
BIRD. CASH ONLY
EXC. HEALTH
(352) 503-2383


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


S :::::. i









1 -5 Laughingtock Internatonal Inc, Dst by Uni versa UCIk lor US, 2013

"How d'you expect me to remember your

birthday? I was only a year old."





Thank You For 15 fears, ofVotes!


I I 1 SBEAUFUL RfESULT3F




Esi 1988




coM 3524-218291 ; 'LI.
........ ...... .


person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
D T3 6 f* .*





CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, pets ok
psbl rent w/option
to buy $695
352-634-3862
HOMOSASSA
$350-$550 2 bedroom. 1
bath. also 1 bed 1 bath
lovely setting, quiet
park with pool, com-
munity center,1/2 mile
from boat dock,several
available call
(352)628-4441
HOMOSASSA
2 Bd, 2 Ba. fully furn.
352-746-0524

FHOMOSASSA
I ~ 03j cptV &n~f ..-.tIl


3bdr/2 full baths/2 car
caroort on 1 acre.
split layout, steel roof,
caged pool, 20x25 ft
deck, Ig storage build-
ing, Furnished Modular
$76,900, 5215 Bridget
Pt, Castle Lake Park
Inverness 352-597-7353

BANK
FORECLOSURE
Land-n-Home, 312
1500 sq. ft. On 1/2 Acre,
paved rd. LOOKS
GOOD, Have financing
if needed, only $2,500
down, $381.44mo. P&I
W.A.C. OR $69,900.
Call 352-613-0587
or 352-621-9183

HERNANDO
3BR 2BA MH
Ready to move in !
FHA & Owner Financing
avail, call 352-795-1272

HOME-ON-LAND
3/2 Great Shape.
2Acre. Move In Now
$59,900.
Call 352-401-2979,
352-621-3807

Palm Harbor Homes
Stilt Homes
Waterfront, Beach
www.plantcitv.palm
harbor.com
John Lyons
800-622-2832

REPO'S- REPO'S
REPO'S
WE HAVE REPO'S
CALL 352-621-9181


"Cl


S 352-220-6303 cpt &
S. bonus
HOMOSASSA Crid
j DW, 2/1, shed w/ Jaci
wash/Dry, Ig. Fl. Rm &
carport $475. mo. 1st & CR'Y
S sec. (352) 628-1425 NiceL
I that special REAHOMOSASSA
person STONEY S. Slashpine 2/1 $425+ CAL
ppy Birthday Stoney is a Boxer/ avail now 352-287-0086 -
a classified ad Hound mix light tan HERN.
under Happy and white, who LECANTO 2br SV
Notes. came to the shelter LEISURE ACRES Cave/
Only $28.50 as a stray. He is 3/2 water & garbage incl. 28x40
ludes a photo Heartworm negative, $600mo. (352) 628-5990 Cnd
neutered, micro- (3
our Classified chipped, and house-
pt for details broken. He is a very HO
52-563-5966 easy-going, calm, 3/2
* **** gentle dog, gets 2BR, 1% BA,on your $5.00
along with other own 75x 150 lot. (
dogs, walks well on a no fees! new enclosed
leash, and is very sunroom, Ig laundry H
affectionate. He is room, furn, 2 storage 2ba
4T TO BUY HOUSE medium in size. Has a buildings, 5111 Castle comr
4OBILE Any Area laid-back personality. Lake Ave. S. of she
lition or Situation. Call Joanne @ Inverness on SR 41 65
red, 352-726-9369 352-795-1288. $39,500 (740) 255-0125 $12,5


RYSTALRIVER**
a den.newer c/h/a
vinyl, very clean +
RV Hkup. $34.900
land Real Estate
kie 352-634-6340
YSTAL RIVER
Large 4br 2ba MH
DY TO MOVE IN!
Writer Fin. Avail.+-
L (352) 795-1272
ANDO/486 1+acre,
VMH+ den/flp, Man
Work Shop w/AC
, $47,500 J. Desha
land Real Estate
352)634-6340
OMOSASSA
T, Fenced Yard,**
Flooring. NEW AC
O Down. $435. mo
352) 476-7077
OMOSASSA
1 ba MH needs
)lete rehab. Good
ed, well & septic.
i24 W. Akazian
00 (603) 860-6660


2/2 on Lake Rousseau.
NOW $17,500
Low Lot Rent $240/mo.
2003. Used Seasonally
Owner bought a house.
207-546-6115, cell
Adult Park 2/1,
Mobile, heat and air,
nicely furn. large shed,
sreen rm. carport, $8,200
Lot Rent $160 mo.
(352) 287-3729

CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
WINTER SPECIALS *
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
3/2, 2001, $19,900
2/2 waterfront. $31,000
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

INGLIS
3/2 Furn., screened porch.
Lot rent $295
Includes amenities.
$15,000 (352) 212-8873

INVERNESS
3/2 Furn.,Appl., Ig screen
porch & shed, Great
cond. $16,000. Call for
appt. (352)364-3747

INVERNESS
Harbor Lights 55+ park,
on Big Lake Henderson.
Lovely d/w 2/2 new appl.
new floors, screened
porch, shed, & carport.
$13,500 (352)344-1828
LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access. ramp & shower
$25,000. 352-212-6804
Waterfront/Homosassa
Westwind Village 55+
Beautifully furnished
Move In Ready, 2/2
2 Scrn rms, dbl door,
refrig./Ice maker
Washer Dryer, Low
mntnly payments,
$19000 obo
(850) 449-1811 Cell





INVERNESS
RV Spaces. Bring your
own boat and fishing
gear. AGE 55+ com-
munity. Lot rent only
$360-$375 including
electric. Edge Water
Oaks 352-344-1380





HOMOSASSA
Large 3br 2ba MH
Rent to Own
*Ready to Move In 4
Owner Financina Avail.
CALL (352) 795-1272


0oe


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers &
dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179




Maximum Auto Repair
& Performance
Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts,
Classic car restoration, tires
new & used, Performance
engines. (352) 419-6549




Maximum Auto Repair
& Performance
Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts,
Classic car restoration, tires
new & used, Performance
engines. (352) 419-6549


JEFF'S Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 746-3444




AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551, 584-3730
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




*BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *k




DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696




Install, Restretch, Repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl Car-
pet, Laminent, Lic#4857
Mitch, (352) 201-2245


1 CALL & RELAX! 25vrs
Exp in 100% property
maint & all repairs, call
H&H Services today!
lic#37658 352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handvman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *




Home/Office
Cleaning



(352) 427-4166


Bath


The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lie/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




LARRY'S TRACTOR *
SERVICE FINISH GRAD-
ING & BUSHHOGGING
***352-302-3523***
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120




GOT LEAVES
Let our DR VAC
Do the work!
Call 352-502-6588




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small
engine service & repair.
352-220-4244


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS CLEAN
UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
HAULING
FREE ESTIMATES
scrap metals haul for
FREE (352) 344-9273
JEFF'S Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 746-3444




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE CLEANING
& PAINTING
352-341-3300


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713





MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.





Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.




Your World




,..,,---,


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838







A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452


All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955


DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852


R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827







344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


I Pets


I Livestoc


INEVA









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


- t WORD GUBY TRICKY RICKY KANE

RE TALM N-AGMN 1. Ming artifact protective box (1) Every answer isa rhymin
I RENTAL MANAGEMENTr z- 1 pair of words (like FAT C
REA3LT,-INC- and DOUBLE TROUBLE

www.itrus(ountyHomeRentalsco0n 2. Punjabi believer's 7-day periods (1) ar they will fit inthe letter
___________________________________ squares. The number af7 o
LECANTO/CITRUS SPRINGS IIIIIII I I definition tells you how m
1073 N. commercee Ter.. .$525 3. Millionaire's boat's small kids (1) syllables in each word.
2/1 apt., screened lanai
8160 N. Duval Dr. (S)... $1,200 2013 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Ucick


3/2/2 pool home fully furn. shortterm unilitiescap
CRYSTAL RIVER
2271 N. Crede ............. $450
2/1 SW mobile, furnished
9454 W. Wisconsin Ct.. $775
3/2 quiet dead end street
HOMOSASSA
6325 W. Holiday St. (H). $675
2/2/1 DW on Ig. lot, country setting
8019 W. Grove St........ $575
2/2 SW mobile on 1.25 Acres
HERNANDO/INVERNESS
5525 S. KlineTer......... $875
2/2/1 unfurnished, inc. lawncare
994 E. Winnetka St. (Her)..S625
2/1.5 on 1 acre with carbpo

Chassahowitzka
3/2 Waterfront DW, $500
2/2, Fenced Yd DW, $500
2/2, House w/ Gar., $600
Sugarmill Woods
3/2/2, Furnished, $900.
AGENT (352) 382-1000
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
With inground Pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Hse. Near Twn 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE

APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
Ridgeview Apts
1 & 2 BR HC and
non-HC accessible
apartments. HUD
vouchers welcome.
Call (352) 563-1283
TDD 711/ TTY 710
880 SE 8th Ave
Crystal River
Equal Housing
Opportunity

CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments
for Rent 352-465-2985
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, Quiet, Clean .
incld's water, $575 mo.
Homosassa,1/1, incld's
water $375 mo.
Lecanto 2/1, quiet,clean,
scrn porch, $525mo.
352-257- 6461, 563-2114
FLORAL CITY
FREE Use of boat ramp,
fishing dock, canoe &
Jon boat rentals. 1 BR
$300/$200 dp.Trails End
Camp, A Friendly Place
to Live 352-726-3699
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Incld water, trash
& lawn. $550 mo. + Sec.
352-634-5499

INVERNESS
1 BR & 2 BR Garden
& Townhouse Apts.
$512 to $559 a mo
WSG included, small
pets welcome.
Barrier Free Unit
Available
GATEHOUSE
APTS
(352) 726-6466
Equal Housing
Opportunity




CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret Harbour
Apts. Newly remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incl Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037




LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza, Office/
Retail, CR 486, 900 sf. @
$700+ util. & sales tax. 1_
mo. Free w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801




CITRUS HILLS
2/2/2 Townhouse
condo, full appliances,
carport, Citrus Hills
membership included
Prudential Florida
Showcase Properties
call 352-476-8136

INVERNESS
2/2/1 Lg Condo
Waterfront Community
with heated pool.
Non-smoker, pet restrict.
$665. mo 317-442-1063




Citrus Springs
2/2/1 $650/mo
352-746-7990
HOMOSASSA 2/1
2/1 $525 mo 2/2 $550
mo. incl. garb. Pets?
No smoking. 1st & sec.
352-212-4981
INVERNESS
2/1, Clean, W/D Hk-up,
No pets, $550mo. + Sec
(352) 220-4818




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1 Country Home on
stilts,w/fenced yard.
$600 + Utilities.
Call 920-922-6800


i


A NICE HOME IN
THE HAMMOCKS/
SMW 3/2/2
Heat. S Pool, FP
maint. free. $1,000
(352) 422-1933

BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, Fresh paint, appl's
Flooring $475. mo.
352-302-3987


I Real Estatel


4. Dining room furniture tag (2)


5. Blamed a soda fountain shake (2)


6. Mean Seuss creature's ruler parts (2)


7. On-the-job advancement ruckus (3)


NOIIONIOJ NOIiONOUd L SMHJNI SHIJNIHt *9 U II IaNa'IYI "s
'IaaVi IaIVL *t SIOL SLH3VA T SHIHA SHHIS aSVO aSVA "I
1-5-13 SH3ASNV


BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/2,quiet,safe
area.Clean & newly
remodeled.$650
mo.lst/last/sec $400.
Call 352-489-1239
Cit.Hills/Brentwood
2/2/2 on golf course.
Club included $900/mo
516-991-5747
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 Sm cottage. Good
rental history a must.
1st/last/sec $400 + elec.
352-628-1062
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
W/ inground pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135
HERNANDO
2 bedroom. 2 bath single
family home with garage,
screened patio, & com-
munity pool/clubhouse
privileges. $875/month,
980-285-8125
HOMOSASSA/SMW
2/2/2 Fl rm, fireplace no
pets non-smoker. $800
mo. 1st last + sec dep
(850) 384-4859
INVERNESS
3/2 Brand New, Granite
tops, marble firs, SS Ap
$895 (352) 634-3897
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 Quiet w/ fire plc
Rent or rent to own.
$800/mo 352-382-2904
352-697-0458




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225

INVERNESS
2/2, Unfurn. waterfront
Lake Henderson, Ig
florida rm, Ig carport
w/work area, fire pit,
access to private boat
ramp. $750 mo. Call after
9am (352) 726-6320
Lake Front Home
on Gospel Island,
spectacular views
spacious 3/2/2,
For Rent, $700
or Sale (908) 322-6529




BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV & W/D
WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611
CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfront Priv. Rm./Ba.
share kit. $400 everything
Included 352-875-5998




FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1 Furn.
$950.352-419-4421


ESTATE SALE in Nature
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site and a separate gated
storage lot; plus almost
new 5th-wheel with
slides, screened gazebo,
and storage building. All
for $79,900. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441
PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Fero Cemetery Beverly
Hills Two Plots Under Lrg
Shaded Oak Tree -
Row 251 Lots D & E
Only $2500 for Both
(1/2 Price) 352-364-4010









From mobiles to
mansions,
From Gulf to Lakes,
give me a call,
I sell 'em all!
352-422-4137
nancy.wilson(&
yahoo.com

Nancy J. Wilson
Realtor@
Broker-Associate
SRESGRI
Waybright Real Estate,
Inc.

MOTIVATED SELLER
wants this gonee!!!
6 Acres w Big SHOP,
Nice 2/2/2 House,
porches Barns, pond,
pvd rd, Concrete
drive. Reduced!
$114, 900 MLS 357108.
www.crosslandrealty.
corn 352 726 6644

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY




Quiet Country Setting
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Dunnellon/Citrus Springs
area, only 20 Mm. to
Ocala $132,000 Call
352-302-6784 for appt.

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial









Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND YOU
A VIEW TO LOVE"


crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


V THIS OUT!
Brentwood of Citrus
Hills 2/2/2 Quiet
culdesac. Totally re-
modeled Hrwd
flrs,ceramic,cpt.
scrn lanai, Iscp yard.
Must see!
New on market FSBO
1816 W. Jena Ct
Lecanto OPEN
SAT&SUN 11-2
$97,500
NO agents please
610-248-2090




Beverly Hills 3 bedroom.
1 bath. OWNER FIN.
W/$5000 DN $822mo
NO CREDIT CK Just
remodeled,new roof, tile,
block, w/sep. 2car garage
(352) 793-7223




HERNANDO
Citrus Hills Pool Home
4/3/2+, circular drive,
1 acre lot, below $200k
352-527-7856




Lowest Priced Home
in ARBOR LAKES
**OPEN HOUSE-
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR &
Gated Comm. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista TrI
(352) 419-7418




INVERNESS
Block home 2br, 1ba
w/ 2porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres.
$130,000 Call Buzz
352-341-0224 or
David 607-539-7872



FLORAL CITY
3/2/1, quiet st, Lg. lot,
best offer -inspection
Sat, Sun fm 1 to 5,
Home will be sold Sun-
day night to highest
bidder 727-288-6020




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
W/ inground pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135
New & Customize 3/2
home on 6 acres.
Fenced in paddock.
(352)621-1236




OWNER SACRIFICE
$100,000.4 yrs. Ago,
*Selling for $29.900*
CALL 352-564-0207
Forest View/Gated 55+
The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558




HOMOSASSA SPRINGS






2/2/2 Great Country
home on 2 acre
landscaped lot, in great
neighborhood. Move in
Ready! Call for appt.
126K 352-503-6511






4/2/3 HEATED POOL
lots of extras!
SELLER MOTIVATED!


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty,
Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 2013 CII


I


00DM1Q



ig
AT
,), and

r the
many


for


I


CLASSIFIED








C12 SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 2013


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


GAIL STEARNS
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298
Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available


I've SOLD
20 Properties
this year!
I NEED LISTINGS!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!..
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.comrn

"MERRY CHRISTMAS!"
....and,
Happy New Year!


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515

PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room for
everything! 4/3 w/7 car
garage/workshop & in-law
suite on 5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near KINGS
BAY $425,000. Make
Offers 352-563-9857


Hme


L.I La--'- .'*. I
SCAN OR GO TO
WWW.
BestN-~ firCoast
Properties.corn
"To view
great waterfront
properties"



**Heatherwood 581**
access to game reserve
& Tillus Hill, 2.42 Acres
well, septic, no impact
fees, $30,000 by
owner, sold as is
(352) 422-0435
%/ ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact fee
credit, high and dry,
trees, $11,000 obo
(352) 795-3710



HOMOSASSA
Wooded Lot, wet lands
on Lee Woods Drive
112x 114 ft. river ac-
cess, but not on River
$7,000. 352-621-1664



2005 BOAT TRAILER
18to 21 ft boat. Tandem
axle. All tires, lights,
axles, & guides in exc.
cond. MUST SEE!
Asking $895 OBO.
Priced $350 below value.
Call / txt(352) 422-7737
2011 20 HSP YAMAHA
stroke, shortshaft
stainless steel propeller
like new, under warranty
$2000 352-795-0257
BOAT TRANSIT
TRAILER Very Ig., dbl.
axles up to 33 ft. Any
boat type! $1800 or
OBO (813) 244-3945



1988 27 ft Sportscraft
Coastal Fisherman,
cabin cruiser, $10k
OBO (813)-244-3945


MUST SELL

BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motor, AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth finder,
2001 Rolls float on
trailer worth $1000.
Comes w/spare motor
Has service manual,
2nd owner $2500
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855
HURRICANE DECK
BOAT
2003 Hurricane Deck
Boat with 2003 90hp
Yahama 4 Stroke engine.
Excellent condition. In-
cludes trailer, bimini top,
winter cover, stereo, fish-
finder, gps porta pottinew
interior, livewell plus full
coast guard safety equip
New bottom paint 2011
Very economical on fuel
$8500 Contact Phil
Tomko at 352-220-9435
No calls before 8:00 am
TRI PONTOON BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com



NATIONAL RV
2006 Tropical One
owner,34ft, 26000
milesno smoke/pets,
300HP Cummins diesel,2
slides, 6 new tires, 3yr
warranty,many extras.
$87000. Well maintained.
352-341-4506



FOREST RIVER
2010, Surveyor, Sport
189, 20 ft. Travel Trailer,
1 slide, fully equipped
w/AC, qn. bed, awn-
ing, pwr. tonque jack,
corner jacks, micro-
wave, equilizing hitch,
Sleeps 2-3
$10,500 (352) 382-1826
HI-LO TRAVEL
TRAILER 2003, tow lite
model 22-03t,exc. cond.
$6000 obo 352-422-8092
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides,
kg bdlike new, 60amp
serv. NADA $29K asking
$25K obo 352-382-3298
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945


DUNNELLON
Here is that home on
Lake Rousseau that you
have always wanted! 2br
1 ba on 1.43 acres
w/168ft lake frontage.
Completely remodeled all
new interior & windows.
No Flood Insurance!
Priced reduced from
$369,000 to $169,000
Call Bernie
(352) 563-0116
YOUR "High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


MAZDA
2006 Miata MX5, Grand
Touring 40K Miles, Auto
Transmission, Cloth
Seats, MP-3 multi-Disk
(6), $13,250
352-400-1551
MR2 SPYDER
2002 TRD model, 1
owner. Mint condition.
Garage kept, no acci-
dents, smoking, or pets.
New soft top & leather
seats. C352-464-7501.
$13.5K.
OLDS
2000, Intrique
$3,990.
352-341-0018
SATURN ION
2007, 4 cyl, 4dr. gold,
auto, AC,CD, 27k miles
exc. cond. many extras
$8300 obo 352-382-0428
TOYOTA
2000, Camry LE
V6, 183K miles Super
Clean $5,800. obo
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
TOYOTA
2000, Camry, Good fuel
economy, 4 door
transportation.
CALL 352-628-4600
for pricing & details.
TOYOTA
2007, Yaris, 59K miles,
2 DR, H/B $7,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113
TOYOTA
'96, Camary LE,
sunroof, clean,
non smoker, $3,600
(352) 344-8553



1971 CHEVELLE
CONVERTIBLE
stunning, 40k+ in-
vested, fully restored,
350 auto, buckets, con-
sistant show winner,
high end stereo, red w/
white top & interior
$23,900, 352-513-4257
AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. JAN.. 6. 2013
1-800-438-8559






Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
A***A**


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
A XMAS SALE
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition, Title,
No Title, Bank Lien,
No Problem, Don't Trade
it in. We Will Pay up to
$25K Any Make, Any
Model. 813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ



A XMAS SALE
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUICK
2007, Lucerne, CXL
55K miles, Leather
$13,500. obo
Call Troy (352)621-7113
CADILLAC
2003 CTS, Must see.
Luxury car at an
affordable price.
Call 352-628-4600
for an appointment.
CHEVROLET
2005 Venture
$4,300.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
'98, Lumina GL, 4 Door,
loaded, low miles, V6,
pwr., garaged, clean
$3,750. (352) 212-9383
CHEVY
2000 Corvette Metallic
Bowling Green Std shift,
one owner,& garage kept.
See to appreciate.
(352) 621-9874
FORD
2001 COBRA MUSTANG
CONV. 5 SPEED,
LEATHER MUST SEE
CALL 352-628-4600
For More Info
FORD
2005, Five Hundred LMT,
40K miles, leather, V6
$9,980
Call Troy 352-621-7113
FORD
2006 Focus ZXW, SE
4DR, WGN. 85k miles
$5,800 obo
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
HONDA
2011 CRV LX, 19K miles,
likenew, 4 Cyl. $19,950
Call Troy 352-621-7113
HYUNDAI
2006 Elantra, GLS 90K
miles, likenew, 4 DR,
auto. $6,800
Call Troy 352-621-7113
KIA
'99, Sportage Cony.
Top, low miles,
Runs great.
CALL 352-628-4600
For pricing.
LINCOLN
1998, MARK VIII
Automatic, COLD A/C
CALL 352-628-4600
For an appointment
to see!
MAZDA
2002, Tribute
$3,990
352-341i-0018


RANGERS
AS LOW AS 7888.
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS
2002, SPORTSMAN
ATV. 4X4, SERVICED
AND READY FOR
HUNTING SEASON.
$2995
(352) 621-3678



HONDA
2005, VTX 1300CC
3 TO CHOOSE FROM
YOU PICK $4,888.
(352) 621-3678
HONDA
2007 Full Size Shadow.
Harley,1100CC, Chrome,
bags, trade?, 70mpg
$3,500. Crystal River
(727) 207-1619
KYMCO
2009, 125 cc. Looks and
drives great Only $995
(352) 621-3678
VICTORY
2005, KINGPIN
2 TONE, STAGE ONE,
LOADED WITH
OPTIONS
ONLY $7888.
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
2005, ROYAL STAR
TOUR DELUXE, READY
FOR A ROAD TRIP
ONLY $6688.
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
2007 STRATOLINER
1800CC LOADED WITH
OPTIONS A REAL TOUR
BIKE ONLY $5889.
(352) 621-3678



283-0105 SACRN
01-05 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
Inverness Mini Storage
hereby gives notice that
the entire contents of the
following units will be
auctioned on January 15,
2013 at 10:00 a.m.
Helen Jean Allen
3460 Hendrick St.
Detroit, Mi 48204 Units
27-S, 28-S, 10-S & 13-E
Judy Bennett
P 0 Box 367
Inverness, FL 34451
Units 15-E, 17-E & 18-E
Troy Maniscaloo
6245 Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34452
Units 9-E & 12-S
Kathy Powers
9043 Aquavista Dr.
Inverness, FL 34450
Unit 8-W
Tamara Holton
5741 S. Calgery Terr.
Inverness, FL 34452
Unit 9-W
Laura Ann Crougiola
3797 E. Johnson PI.
Inverness, FL 34453
Unit 2-N
This notice is iven pursu-
ant to section 83.806 Fl
Statutes to satisfy the self
service facility owners lien
on contents thereof.
December 22, 29 & Janu-
ary 5, 2013.


** CHEVY**
95 Impala SS
Rare Collector Car
LT-lengine, Superb
Condition $8,500
(352) 249-7678
OLDS 98 REGENCY
Brougham. 4drw/fp,
orig. 1989, 163k orig.,
V6 24mpg, new tires &
brakes, 2nd owner $1550
(352) 637-1074



A XMAS SALE
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
CHEVY C20
1984, LB, solid body &
bed, good glass, interior
needs tic, dual exhaust,
350v8, Turbo 400, Holly 4
barrel, needs ps pump
$1400 obo 352-628-7243
pls leave message
Dodge Ram
2008 Big Horn 5.7 Hemi
30k Great cond. $19,000
Call Fred
(352) 628-6470
FORD
1992 F 50 Work Truck.
8ft bed, Under 150k mi.
$3000 (352) 527-0688
FORD RANGER
1999 XLT 4 door, 3.0 V6,
Auto, 131K. Many extras.
Garaged, excellent cond.
$4,500 (352) 382-2801
TOYOTA
2000 Tacoma 5 sp, 174k
mi, cold air. runs great.
$4450 (352) 503-2629
TOYOTA
2004, 4 Runner Sport
2WD, 94K mi, Leather
$12,800. obo
Call Troy 352-621-7113



CADILLAC
2007, Escalade,
44k miles, Luxury NAV,
$29,500.
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
CHEVROLET
1997 Suburban LT,
loaded, low mi. ex cond.
Good Tires $5200 obo
(352) 249-7702
CHEVY TRAIL-
BLAZER LT 05
exc. cond. asking $7000
obo, in Hernando
(904) 923-2902



1978 MIDAS RV
90k miles, 26ft, sleeps 4
**$1500 obo**
352-212-7032



CHEVY
'05 TRAILBLAZER
57K miles, Excel. Cond.
$8,500.
352-249-7756
JEEP
1995, Wrangler
$$6,450
352-341-0018
JEEP
2004, Wrangler X 4WD,
Only 57K miles,
Hard Top $13,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113



CHEVY
1995 Lumina Van12Ok mi
7 passenger, a/c Sunroof
clean, etc. $1995 OBO
Lecanto 508-642-9163
FORD
1995E-150 Conversion
Van. 3.250.


THE BEST QUALITY



PREOWNED VEHICLES



'07 TOYOTA

in COROLLA

LE, 4 Cyl, Power



r"lg Sar1IO995


F4 or $199/mo.


'07 TOYOTA


CAMRY

4 Dr. Sdn, Auto, LE
12120299


O12,995

or $239/mo.


'11 TOYOTA


VENZA


12119003


$19,995

or $319/mo.


'12 TOYOTA


CAMRY

4 Dr. Sdn, Auto, LE
12119010


$19 995

or $329imo.


C



I
S U
4.


~pj~ s'


'12 TOYOTA


ETACOMA


12120213


$ 26,995

or $425imo.


'12 TOYOTA


SEQUOIA

RWD, 4.6L, SR5
12119005


31r 995

or $469/mo.


~vji


VILLAGE TOYOTA


CRYSTAL RIVER

www.villagetovota.com 352-628-5100

*Payments are with $2,000 cash down or trade equity and with approved credit. See dealer for details.


SALES El
CERTIF




















Included 7-year/100,000-mile Warranty, Standard New-Car

Financing Rates Available, 160-Point Quality Assurance

Inspection, Free CARFAX Vehicle History Report, Extend

Warranty Coverage transferable at no cost for added resale


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DECEMBER'S $CI1
.5000 WINNER!.OAT
BARBARA WILBURN-YORK
YOU COULD BE THIS MONTH'S WINNER!
VISIT ANY CRYSTAL LOCATION FOR DETAILS


L FRE 2 TF
800l584-8755 B EXT. 3102] V


FREE 24 HORRCRE :ESG IT NO&PCA RCN


FREE 24HU :EODE ESG IT NO&SECA:RCN


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80-54-75 ET.312


FREE 24HU :EODE ESG IT NO&SECA:RCN


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FRE 2 *HOR ECODE MESAE ITHIF PCA RCN
800-58f4-8755 EX1 T. 3119I 1


h CRYSTALAUTOS.COM D
1005 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa 14358 Cortez Blvd. Brooksville 2077 Highway 44W Inverness

352-564-1971
Sales: Monday-Friday 8:00am-8:00pm Saturday 9:00am-7:30pm Sunday-Closed
Service: M, W, F 7:30am-5:30pm T, TH 7:30am-7:00pm Saturday 8:00am-4:00pm Sunday-Closed Body Shop: M-F 7:30am-5:30pm
tSEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. +PRICE INCLUDES $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX. TAG. TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. WITH APPROVED CREDIT. LEASES ARE FOR 39 MONTHS
39,000 MILES FOR THE LIFE OF THE LEASE 15 CENTS PER MILE OVER. $3999 DUE AT SIGNING WITH APPROVED CREDIT. "0%, SPECIAL FINANCE OFFERS AND NO PAYMENTS UNTIL MARCH 2013 ARE AVAILABLE WITH APPROVED CREDIT, NOT EVERYONE WILL
QUALIFY PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK. A25 MPG BASED ON EPA HIGHWAY FUEL ECONOMY ESTIMATES.
O0 DU00DOUO_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 2013 C13




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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2012 Chevy Volt
Now's the time to GO GREEN!!!




AND / APR for 72 Mos.
I


All-New 213 Chevy Spak 1LS
Audomatic Transmission


2013 Chevy Equlnox LS
Stk 013135. Auto, 4cy MSRP: S25M030


2012 Chevy Iverse LS
Stk #C1 2336, Auto, Sats 71. Was $750


2012 Chevy Silverado LT
Stk #T1238, Et Cab.Was $30,750


2012 Chevy Cmze LS
Stk #C12267, Gas Saver!! Was $18,800


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C14 SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 2013


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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New 2012 Honda CMc LX
AUTOMATIC


41,4
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New 2013 Honda Fit 5-
MODEL GE8H3CEXW, EQUIPPED NOT STRIPPED
WITH AUTOMATIC. A/C AND CRUISE r



New 2012 Honda AcconI LX Sedao
MODEL CP2F3CEW, AUTOMATIC.POWER PKG,
CRUISE TRACTION CONTROL AND SO MUCH MORE



New 2012 Honda Civic Hybrid
NOIL FmUEMio 'mtRMSl WEH WIG T EiF- Xu.. .C' E00
ASSET rSIE~B,1ilK VIW 1HIT? E UP ILETOT I HiFIEEuM



New 2012 Honda CR-V LX 2WD
MODEL RM3iC'EW, COME SEE WHY THE CR-V ISTHE BEST
SELUNG COACT SWIN AMERCA SAVE WH THEY LAST!



New 2012 Honda Ridgellne RT
MOOEL YKIF2CEW, 4WOWIH THE TRUNK 1 T1E BEl POWER PKG,
CRUISE CONTROL V4 POW AND A RICE E NO OTHER


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New 212 Honda Cslr2WD 2A L4EX
M OEL TF3H3C, AUTOMATE ATCHBACK W1H STYLE ADM ND CMFRT. .

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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DECEMBER'S _
5000 WINNER!
BARBARA WILBURN-YORK Chevy Runs Deep
YOU COULD BE THIS MONTH'S WINNER!
VISIT ANY CRYSTAL LOCATION FOR DETAILS


2013 CHEVROLET MALIBU


BUY$18,991
FOR1%91


2013 CHEVROLET SPARK


FRE 24H RCRDDMESG WITHNFOANDPICN
1 m800=584=8755j4


BUY
FOR


99,868


2012 CHEVROLET CRUZE


2013 CHEVROLET E(


ouy19,880
FOREE2 RRCRE ESG HIF N RCN


2013 CHEVROLET CAMARO


BUY$ 19,991

2012 CHEVROLET SILVERADO EXT


eu0 515,800
FOR1


I m800=584=8755 I


BUY
FOR$1


749


5 0 A 0 0 "AB
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CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE


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CRYSTAL
CHEVROLET


1035 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448 352-795-1515


tSEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. *PRICE INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT ALL WILL QUALIFY, PLUS $2999 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEAL-
ER FEE OF $599.50 WITH APPROVED CREDIT PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


CrystalAutos.com *


C16 SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 2013