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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 12-30-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02986

Full Text



All county: See picks for cross country team /B1


Sunny but chilly.
PAGE A4


CITRUR-S CO U N T Y






HIRwwNIC .onneco
www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOLUME 118 ISSUE 145


LOCAL NEWS:
L -------


Last-minute fiscal cliff talks in Senate


House fire
Citrus Sheriff Fire
Rescue responds to a
fire Friday./Page A2


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Senate
leaders groped for a last-
minute compromise Satur-
day to avoid middle-class
tax increases and possibly
prevent deep spending cuts
at the dawn of the new year
as President Barack Obama
warned that failure could
mean a "self-inflicted
wound to the economy."
Obama chastised law-


makers in his weekly radio
and Internet address for
waiting until the last
minute to try and avoid a
"fiscal cliff," yet said there
was still time for an agree-
ment. "We cannot let Wash-
ington politics get in the
way ofAmerica's progress,"
he said as the hurry-up ne-
gotiations unfolded.
Senate Republicans said
they were ready to compro-
mise. "Divided government


President
Obama


John
Boehner


is a good time to solve hard
problems and in the next
few days, leaders in Wash-


ington have an important
responsibility to work to-
gether and do just that,"
said Sen. Roy Blunt of Mis-
souri, delivering his party's
weekly address.
Even so, there was no
guarantee of success.
In a blunt challenge to
Republicans, Obama said
that barring a bipartisan
agreement, he expected
both houses to vote on his
own proposal to block tax


increases on all but the
wealthy and simultaneously
preserve expiring unem-
ployment benefits.
Political calculations
mattered as much as deep-
seated differences over the
issues, as divided govern-
ment struggled with its first
big challenge since the No-
vember elections.
Speaker John Boehner

See Page A6


2012 Year in REVIEW





Price of Progress


Office work
Employees beam into
work and maintain
presence./Page D1

OPINION:
Thank you
Letters writers issue
thanks for fundraisers
and other assistance./
Page A7
COMMENTARY:











Health of US
Columnists debate the
Affordable Care Act in
this week's Chronicle./
Page Cl
HOMEFRONT:


What's this?
Antiques expert John
Sikorski discusses this
carved wood shot glass
holder novelty music
box./Page E4


NATIONAL NEWS:
r--, I ,


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
The Progress Energy complex north of Crystal River is at the center of the county's largest tax dispute.

Progress taxpayment a power move Greene to court: OrderProgressto pay


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER For
decades, they've been the rich
uncle who shows up at Christ-
mastime with C-notes for the
kids.
No matter what was happening
in the Citrus County economy,
from construction ebbs to growth
slowdowns, local governments
could always count on that big tax
payday from the power company
Florida Power Corp., later
Progress Energy, delivered in
earnest, paying annual tax bills
in the tens of millions of dollars
for its nuclear and coal plants
north of Crystal River
County officials and economic
leaders always worried about the
day the goose would no longer lay
its golden egg.
That day occurred in 2012.


And it could happen again in
2013.
Progress Energy Florida be-
came a subsidiary of Duke En-
ergy in the summer of 2012. In
November, the company paid
$19.3 million in property taxes -
56 percent of its total $36 million
owed.
Progress then sued PropertyAp-
praiser Geoff Greene, saying his of-
fice improperly set a high taxable
value on the company's pollution-
control equipment, installed in
See Page A8


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Progress
Energy Florida should pay its
full 2012 Citrus County property
taxes because its property as-
sessments are appropriate, at-
torneys for Property Appraiser
Geoff Greene said in court
documents.
Greene's answer to the
Progress lawsuit, received by
the circuit court last week, also
says the company never dis-
puted its taxes since a
1998 court decision that allowed
the property appraiser to
fully assess pollution-control
equipment.
Greene's attorneys also allege
the company filed its tax returns
too late and never contested the


2012 assessments.
Progress sued Greene over its
2012 assessment, claiming that
pollution-control equipment
should be taxed as salvage at 10
percent of its cost in accordance
to state law.
Greene, however, is relying on
the 1998 court decision declar-
ing that law unconstitutional.
The judge in that case, Patri-
cia Thomas, recused herself
from the current lawsuit.
Progress in November paid
$19.3 million in taxes;
the county says it owes about
$35 million.
The county and school board
now have a "fiscal emergency"
because of the lesser-than-
expected tax payment, Greene's
See Page A8


Centers teaches teens life without drugs, alcohol


150 years
New year's marks the
150th anniversary of
the Emancipation
Proclamation./Page A9


Annie's Mailbox ......A12
Classifieds ................D5
Crossword ..............A12
Editorial................. .... C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ................B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies .................. A12
Obituaries ................A6
Together................ A14


6 1|1184578 121101007L I o


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
LECANTO Steve spent
his 16th birthday sur-
rounded by friends but
wishing he was somewhere
else.
"I started crying this
morning. I was extremely
emotional," Steve says. "I
had big plans for my 16th
birthday I was going to go
out and get high with my
friends Patrick and Joey"
He didn't do that, of
course. Steve, whose last
name is not mentioned to
protect his privacy, is in his
final days at the Centers
treatment facility in
Lecanto.
An alcoholic and drug ad-
dict, Steve is scheduled to
leave the Centers on Friday
for his grandparents' house
in Spring Hill.
His grandparents, who
watch him because his


MATTHEW BECK/Chroncle
The Centers is along County Road 491 in Lecanto. An in-house program treats 15 teenagers
with alcohol or drug addictions.


mother in Baltimore kicked
him out of the house, have a
strict regimental plan -
school, ROTC, church activ-
ities to keep him busy
and out of trouble.
Steve is confident he will
stay away from alcohol and


drugs, despite the real po-
tential of meeting up with
the same buddies with
whom he partied in the
past.
"I've learned a lot through
recovery," he says. "I take it
a lot more serious."


In-house program
Steve is one of 15
teenagers with drug or alco-
hol addictions being treated
at the Centers, an in-house
program that was created
about four years ago.


Clinical manager Steve
Archbold said teens arrive
at the Centers through sev-
eral paths, including court-
ordered stays or being sent
by their parents.
"What they all have in
common is they have all
tried something else and it
hasn't worked," says Arch-
bold, a 33-year veteran in
substance-abuse counseling
who has been at the Centers
since October
Teens at the Centers at-
tend school classes, 12-step
meetings, visit with coun-
selors and learn a life
they've never known.
"Some of these kids don't
have any reference of what
normalcy is," Archbold says.
"Their earliest memories
are of being beat up by their
mother or having sex with
their parents. You have to
teach them what the new
normalcy is."
See Page A5


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
57
LOW
40


TOYOTATHON


at VILLAGE
TOYOTA EESE
ON PGD. 7 TovoTA


BUSINESS:


I-."SL U I N I D r '


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~Qbai~,





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Pudgee's world famous


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Michael Yingling and Pamela Oesch enjoy Pudgee's fare after waiting in a long line Saturday in Floral City.

Crowds converge in support oflocal eatery facingfire-code issues


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
FLORAL CITY Parking
was tense and lines were
extensive. Mouths watered
in anticipation of the local
flavor customers had fallen
in love with. Memories were
told as customers waited pa-
tiently in line for what could
have been their last oppor-
tunity for the world-famous
hot dog.
"Every time my daughter
comes into town we have to
take a trip to Pudgee's," said
customer and Floral City
resident Pamela Oesch.
"Last time my son-in-law
flew in, he was getting ready
to leave for Afghanistan and
he wanted to make sure to
get Pudgee's."
Upon asking for an inter-
view with owner John Ster-
ling, who was busy cooking,
the crowd simultaneously
screamed "no."
"You were in serious trou-
ble then, darling," said Joan
Stainthorpe, who visits from
England. "You can't take
him away from his food.
"You can eat the same
thing in 50 different restau-
rants around here, but there
aren't enough mom-and-pop
restaurants. We look for that
all the time when we are vis-
iting from England. These
places are too far and few
between. I just hope he gets
to stay here. This is a good
thing."
Pudgee's All American
Hot Dogs, a roadside dining
attraction on the edge of
Floral City, has been given
more time to comply with
fire code requirements that
threatened to shut down the
more than a decade old
business.
The mom-and-pop eatery
received immense attention
last week, after Sterling an-
nounced he was closing
Dec. 29. His announcement
was in response to a citation
that gave him just over a
week to comply
On Friday, Deputy Chief
of Fire Rescue Jim Good-
worth met with Sterling
about the citation and gave
him an extension to con-
form to. Goodworth is


WATERING FINES
Citrus County is issuing
citations that carry with
them a fine of $100 for
first offenders of local
watering rules.
Second violations cost
$250, third or more
cost $500.
Find watering rules in
the weather map on
Page A4 daily.


Nicole Sterling takes orders from the long line of customers waiting for a taste of Pudgee's.


scheduled to return on Jan.
15, to see if Sterling has re-
solved the minor issues and
is able to provide a time-
frame for the installation for
a fire suppression system.
However, the extension
did not stop the crowds from
coming.
"I think it's the quality of
food and the character that
he has that makes this
place," Oesch said. "He
knows and remembers each
customer. You can walk up
six months after your last
visit and he will remember
what you want and like. He
is even famous in New Jer-
sey and San Diego. Our kids
made us a calendar that has
our grandson's picture of
him eating here at
Pudgee's."
What many of the cus-
tomers kept commenting


about was the family con-
nection built into Pudgee's.
"One of the things that we
want to prevent is one of
these mom-and-pop opera-
tions from failing," said cus-
tomer Bryan Melhado.
"That's really the nucleus
thatAmerica was built on. If
you look at today it is all
families here. Anytime I


have ever been here,
Pudgee's business is just
about families. Not only
that, but Pudgee's and his
family are really wonderful
people."
Chronicle reporter Eryn
Worthington can be con-
tacted at 352-563-5660, ext.
1334, or eworthington@
chronicleonline. com.


Photo courtesy of Citrus Sheriff Fire Rescue
This home at 5716 S. Gray Oak Terrace In Lecanto caught
fire Friday afternoon. The structure was vacant and not oc-
cupied at the time of the blaze.


Lecanto home


burns Friday


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
LECANTO The Citrus
Sheriff Fire Rescue re-
sponded to a structure fire
at 1:24 p.m. Friday at 5716
S. Gray Oak Terrace in
Lecanto.
Upon arrival, Homosassa
firefighters found the 2,200-
square-foot, wood-framed
home 80 percent involved
with fire.
Crews went into a defen-
sive mode and extin-
guished the fire from the
exterior due to the amount
of fire involvement An ad-
dition that was added to
the structure was not com-
pletely destroyed due to
crews protecting the area.
Crews from several sta-
tions arrived and the fire
was completely extin-


guished at 2:38 p.m. Due to
the lack of hydrants in the
area, a water shuttle was
used to provide water sup-
ply for extinguishment.
The structure was vacant
and not occupied at time of
the blaze. The power com-
pany disconnected power
to the property
The State Fire Marshal
is investigating the scene.
According to the fire in-
cident report, 100 percent
of the structure was dam-
aged. Damage to the con-
tents was estimated at
$105,000, per the Citrus
County Property Ap-
praiser's website.
Chronicle reporter Eryn
Worthington can be con-
tacted at 352-563-5660, ext.
1334, or eworthington@
chronicleonline. com.


SOLICITOR PERMIT REQUIRED
* In order to solicit residences, the seller must have a
permit issued by the Citrus County Clerk of Courts,
which will include a passport photo.
* Lack of legal permit is a first-degree misdemeanor
in the state of Florida.
* If the person appears suspicious, simply call 911 or
352-726-1121. If at all possible, provide a descrip-
tion of the personss, a tag number and/or a de-
scription of the vehicle.
* Examples of home solicitation sales: home clean-
ing, tree service, lawn maintenance, meat sales,
alarm companies, magazine sales, home mainte-
nance/repair and anything unusual or suspicious.


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A2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012


LOCAL







Page A3- SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30,2012



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Around Progress warns customers of scam


Citrus County
Free tows available
for holiday revelers
Ed's Towing and Scally's
Lube and Go are again par-
ticipating in the Tow to Go
program through Jan. 2. Driv-
ers who have consumed al-
cohol and run the risk of
being arrested for drunken
driving can receive a free tow
directly home by calling Ed's
Towing at 352-726-5223 or
Scally's at 352-860-0550.
Those requesting the serv-
ice are advised that they can
only be towed directly home
and not to other locations.
Author to speak to
Republican assembly
Mauguerite Cavenaugh will
speak about her award-win-
ning book, "Buzz Your Busi-
ness & Be The Best," at 1
p.m. at the Jan. 5 meeting of
the Ronald Reagan Republi-
can Assembly, 938 N. Sun-
coast Blvd. (U.S. 19), Crystal
River, in the South Square
Plaza. To learn more about
the author, visit Mauguerite
Cavenaugh.com books
will be available for purchase
and refreshments provided.
Call 352-257-5381. CASA
donations accepted.
Obama supporters'
party set for Jan. 19
Party for supporters for
President Obama will meet 5
p.m. Saturday, Jan. 19, at
Seven Rivers Country Club,
7305 W. Pine Brook St.,
Crystal River. Cost is $30 per
person. Contact Vicky lozzia
at 352-563-2651 or
viozzia@tampabay.rr.com.
Deadline to register is Jan. 4.
Code review board
seeks applicants
Applications are needed
for the Code Review and Ap-
peals Board (CRAB).
The CRAB reviews any lo-
cally proposed technical
amendments to building stan-
dards or regulations and
makes recommendations to
the Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners
(BOCC). It also hears ap-
peals of code interpretations
and makes decisions on vari-
ations and modifications con-
cerning technical codes and
standards. It makes recom-
mendations to the BOCC on
changes to Article II, Chapter
18 of the Citrus County Code.
For an application, go to:
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/
commissioners/advboards/
advisoryboards and return to:
Department of Planning and
Development, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Suite 111, Lecanto,
FL 34461, attn: Julia Vascimini.

Miami

Survivors want
memorial for jet crash
The survivors of a 1972 jet-
liner crash in the Florida
Everglades are trying to raise
money for a memorial honor-
ing its victims.
Eastern Flight 401 from New
York to Miami crashed Dec. 29,
1972. About 75 people sur-
vived, and 101 people died.
Forty years later, the sur-
viving passengers and crew
say it's time for a permanent
memorial to honor the dead.

Homestead
Vultures pick at cars
in Everglades
Visitors to parts of Ever-
glades National Park are get-
ting tarps and bungee cords
to make their vehicles less
delectable to vultures.
Migrating vultures have de-
veloped a habit of ripping off
windshield wipers, sunroof
seals and other rubber and
vinyl vehicle parts. Visitors to
the park's Homestead and
Flamingo entrances are
loaned "anti-vulture kits" to
protect their vehicles.
Park Superintendent Dan
Kimball says complaints have
declined since employees


began distributing the tarps
and bungee cords last year.
From staff and wire reports


Special to the Chronicle
Progress Energy Florida
is urging customers to be on
alert for a new utility bill
payment scam affecting cus-
tomers across the
country
Under the scam, cus-
tomers are receiving a call
informing them their elec-
tric service is scheduled for
immediate disconnection


and they should make a pay-
ment by purchasing a
"money pack" card at a local
drug or convenience store.
Progress Energy has re-
ceived reports of customers
who have been contacted
about this scam in its
Florida service territory,
targeting Spanish-speaking
customers.
The "money pack" card is
a temporary pre-pay credit


card that requires a regis-
tration process.
After the customer pur-
chases the card, he or she is
instructed to call the fraud-
ulent party back to make a
payment. The customer is
instructed to provide a re-
ceipt number and PIN num-
ber Once that information is
obtained, the money on the
card is then transferred to
the fraudulent party


Progress Energy does not
contact customers to obtain
personally identifiable in-
formation. In addition, the
company encourages any-
one who receives a call in-
dicating their electric
service is scheduled for im-
mediate disconnect to con-
tact law enforcement and
report the attempted fraud.
Any homeowner in doubt
about the identity of some-


one claiming to be a Progress
Energy employee should call
Progress Energy's customer
service center at 800-700-
8744 to confirm the em-
ployee's identity
Customers who are con-
tacted by phone, email,
through social media or
through other channels can
verify an individual's affili-
ation with Progress Energy
by calling the same number


Cold case still cold


Man was

murdered in

1974, but

body not ID'd

until2011

NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
R osemary Norris
Southward has
never been to Cit-
rus County, but in 1974
her brother, James Nor-
ris, came here with
$12,000 cash all the way
from California to buy
some Colombian-grade
marijuana.
A postcard dated Oct. 4,
1974, and sent from In-
glis, was the last South-
ward and her family
heard from him.
In 1976, a heavy equip-
ment operator in north-
ern Dixie County found
some skeletal remains
that were turned over to
the Florida Department
of Law Enforcement.
Thirty-five years later,
the remains were identi-
fied as James Norris.
In 2011, Southward and
her sister came to
Florida to claim the re-
mains of their brother On
what would have been
Norris' 63rd birthday, the
family erected a head-
stone at his gravesite.
FDLE is still actively
seeking information
about what happened to
James Norris.
"I was 13 and Jimmy
was 24 when he went to
Florida," Southward said
in a phone interview. "We
resembled each other I
was his little sidekick...
I still think about him
every day It affected me
so deeply, because I was
just a kid."
For 37 years the family
searched for their
brother, their son, never
giving up hope that they
would find him.
Southward still recalls
the pain of hearing the
news that the remains of
her big brother had been
found.
"It's difficult to go from
thinking of him as a miss-
ing person for all those
many years to all of a
sudden knowing," she
said. "That was like los-
ing him all over again
when we learned about


Special to the Chronicle
Rosemary Norris Southward is still searching for information about the death of her brother, James Norris, who was
presumed missing for 37 years until his remains were identified two years ago. In 1974, Norris had left his home
in California and came to Citrus County to buy marijuana.


*:''~ Ii i lr 1





~ -'a
',, vi I V-~


Special to the Chronicle


Family photo of the Norrises.


his fate. It started a dif-
ferent type of loss."
She said she had
thought being able to
bury her brother would
bring closure, but it
hasn't Not entirely
"My goal was to recover
his remains, and I was
shocked when FDLE
called to say they opened
a criminal investigation,"
Southward said. "There's
someone out there that
has lived all these years,
who took my brother's


life, and that's not OK. I
think about how this af-
fected my family, how my
mother was completely
devastated.
"That was the cruelest
thing," she said. "When
you lose a child, even as a
young adult the an-
guish of not knowing and
to see my mother struggle
all those years to figure
this out, desperate, al-
ways reaching out for
help in finding her son.
She didn't live to see the


* Many in-depth articles and newspaper stories
have been written about the life, disappearance
and death of James Norris. To read more, visit
www.whokilledJamesNorris.com.
* Any information you have, no matter how small,
may be the key to solving this unsolved homicide
case. Call CrimeStoppers of Citrus County at 888-
ANY-TIPS, text the word CITRUS and your tip to
274637 or visit crimestopperscitrus.com.


day, and I think about her
all the time and the pain
she went through."
"My brother was a
missing person up until
we were notified of his
fate two years ago, and
for those decades we
didn't know what became
of him," Southward said.
"To us, his death is still
new; we are still grieving,
just like any family would
if their loved one was
brutally murdered."
Even though the mur-
der happened nearly
four decades ago, it's
still an open, active in-
vestigation, said Ken
Perez, CrimeStoppers
law enforcement
coordinator.
"We recently assisted
(FDLE) in getting a bill-
board placed regarding
the case," Perez said.
Currently, a billboard
will James Norris' photo
and information is on
County Road 486 near


Meadowcrest Boulevard
in Crystal River
"We're also working
with county transit to ad-
vertise this case on some
of their buses, so this is
still an active case,"
Perez said.
"There is a reason that
there is no statute of limi-
tations on murder: As a
society, we have deemed
it to be among the most
heinous of crimes, one
not only against man but
against God as well,"
Southward said. "Does it
matter that Jimmy's mur-
der happened in 1974
rather than last year?
The law of the land says,
'No,' and I suspect that if
Jimmy were your son,
your brother, your loved
one or friend, you'd feel
the same way"
Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy can be
reached atnkennedy
@chronicleonline.com or
352-564-2927.


Bird walk slated for January County offices to be


Wildlife park, CitrusCounty HATPepperCreek closed for holiday


Audubon Society to host event


Special to the Chronicle
Join an experienced birder
from the Citrus County
Audubon Society on Saturday,
Jan. 26, on a bird watchingtrek
down Pepper Creek Trail
Ellie Schiller Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park,
in cooperation with Citrus
County Audubon Society,
will host the bird walk on
Pepper Creek Trail, one of
19 birding trails in Citrus
County that are part of the
west section of the Great
Florida Birding Trail.


Participants should meet
at 7:45 a.m. at the entrance to
the park's Visitor Center The
bird walk will begin at 8 a.m.
Binoculars and a field guide
are recommended. Partici-
pation in the bird walk on
Pepper Creek is free.
Pepper Creek Trail is ap-
proximately 3/4 mile in
length and follows along the
park's tram road, connecting
the Visitor Center on U.S. 19
and the West entrance on
Fishbowl Drive. Partici-
pants can either walk back
down the trail or wait and


* WHEN: 7:45 a.m.
Saturday, Jan. 26.
WHERE: Meet at Ho-
mosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park's
visitors center.

take the first returning boat
after the park opens. There
is no charge to use the Pep-
per Creek trail or to take the
return boat trip.
Bird walks are planned for
October, November, and
monthly from January
through April. For more in-
formation and to register, call
352-628-5343, ext 1002, or visit
www.floridastateparks.org.


Chronicle
The Citrus County
Central Landfill will close
for regular business on
Tuesday, Jan. 1, and will re-
open on Wednesday, Jan. 2.
Call 352-527-7670 during
office hours or go to the
county's website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us. Click
on departments, then Pub-
lic Works, then Solid Waste
Management
Citrus County Animal
Services' will close to the
public Tuesday, Jan. 1.
Kennel staffwill be on-site
each day to clean and feed


the animals in their care.
Call 352-746-8400 or visit
www.citruscritters.com.
All county government
offices will close Tuesday,
Jan. 1. For more informa-
tion, log onto wwwbocc.
citrus.fl.us.
The Small Business
Development Center of-
fices will be closed from
Dec. 21 to Jan. 1. The of-
fices will reopen on Jan 2.
The Chronicle's busi-
ness offices in Inverness
will be closed Monday, Dec.
31, and Tuesday, Jan. 1. The
Crystal River office will be
closed Tuesday, Jan. 1.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Driver dies in single-vehicle
accident in Sumter County
According to a Florida Highway Patrol report,
a fatal accident occurred at 10:08 p.m. Friday on
County Road 48 in Sumter County.
Bradley Walker, 27, of Inverness, was fatally
injured as he drove a 2001 GTI Volkswagen
eastbound.
For unknown reasons, the vehicle traveled
onto the south shoulder of the roadway. Walker
over-corrected and drove back across the road-
way and onto the north shoulder. Once on the
north shoulder, the vehicle collided with a tree
and came to a rest.
Walker received fatal injuries in the collision
and died at the scene.

Dunnellon man faces charges
of sexual abuse of boy
DUNNELLON -A Dunnellon man was ar-
rested Dec. 20 on charges of sexually abusing a
16-year-old boy, according to the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office.
Kevin Jameselvis Walker, 18, N. Firwood Cir-
cle, faces a charge of lewd and lascivious mo-
lestation. His bond is $5,000.
According to the arrest report, the boy had
been caught acting out sexually, which prompted
a child protection team to initiate an investiga-
tion. The boy confided to an investigator that
Walker was performing inappropriate sexual ac-
tivities on him.
He told investigators Walker made him per-
form sexual acts on him.
Walker reportedly told investigators a similar
story. He was transported to the Citrus County
Detention Center.

Minimum wage workers
to get 12-cent increase
MIAMI Florida's minimum wage earners
are about to get a 12-cents-an-hour boost.
But experts say the increase won't help that
many people and adds up to less than $5 a
week.
Minimum wage in the Sunshine State will rise
to $7.79 on Tuesday. Only about 210,000 out of
7.4 million employed workers Florida workers will
benefit.
The increase likely will affect phone sales
workers, drivers, housekeepers, toll collectors,
security guards and many hourly wage workers
in the hotel and restaurant industry.
Younger workers may feel the greatest impact.


A University of Central Florida economist said
workers under the age of 24 account for roughly
half of all minimum-wage earners.
The National Employment Law Project esti-
mates the increase will add $46.2 million to the
state's gross domestic product.

Elephant born at Tampa's
Lowry Park Zoo
TAMPA-ATampa zoo has a new baby
elephant.
Officials at Lowry Park Zoo said an African
elephant named Mbali gave birth to her first calf
Dec. 23. Mbali was one of 11 elephants rescued
from culling in Swaziland, Africa, and brought to
the U.S. nearly a decade ago.
The newborn female, sired by a bull named
Sdudla, is the second African elephant to be
born at Lowry Park, the first from the rescued
herd.
Officials said the calf is significant because
she introduces new DNA into the gene pool of
elephants managed in North America.
Zoo workers are monitoring Mbali and her calf
to ensure established nursing and proper mater-
nal behavior. They will soon be reunited with two
other mature females, who will help care for the
newborn.
The newborn calf has not yet been named,
but the zoo has extended an invitation to the
Reilly family in Swaziland to select an appropri-
ate name, in honor of their leadership in estab-
lishing three national parks for wildlife
conservation in that country.

Next Mega Money jackpot an
estimated $1 million
TALLAHASSEE No tickets matched the
four winning numbers plus the Mega Ball, so the
jackpot rolled over to an estimated $1 million in
the Mega Money game, the Florida Lottery said
Saturday.
Six tickets won $1,220.50 each for picking 4-
of-4; 39 tickets won $411.50 each for picking 3-
of-4 plus the Mega Ball number; 1,070 tickets
won $44.50 each for picking 3-of-4; 1,326 tickets
won $25 each for picking 2-of-4 plus the Mega
Ball; 11,064 won $3 each for matching one num-
ber plus the Mega Ball; 30,622 tickets won $2
each for picking 2-of-4; and 24,944 won a free
Quick Pick ticket for matching the Mega Ball.
The numbers drawn Friday night were 6-10-
22-38 and the Mega Ball was 14.
-From staff and wire reports


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic battery
arrest
Beau Freeman, 29, of
Dunnellon, at 1:23 a.m. Dec. 22
on a misdemeanor charge of
domestic battery. No bond.
DUI arrests
Jennifer Keenan, 44, of
West Jefferson Street, Inver-
ness, at 8:40 p.m. Dec. 21 on a
misdemeanor charge of driving
under the influence with prop-
erty damage. According to her
arrest affidavit, she was arrested
following a traffic crash in the
area of 2612 State Road 44 W.
in Invemess. She reportedly told
a law enforcement officer she
had consumed two beers and
then said she had more than a
six pack within the past hour.
Tests of her breath showed her
blood alcohol concentration was
0.297 percent and 0.282 per-
cent. The legal limit is 0.08 per-
cent. Bond $1,000.
Theodore Sharp III, 24, of
West State Street, Homosassa,
at 3:37 a.m. Dec. 22 on misde-
meanor charges of driving
under the influence with prop-
erty damage, driving under the
influence and driving while li-
cense suspended or revoked.
According to his arrest affidavit,
he was arrested following a
crash at U.S. 19 and West
Ozello Trail in Crystal River. He
showed signs of intoxication


ON THE NET

For more information
about arrests made by
the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the Public
Information link, then
Arrest Reports.
For the Record reports
are also archived on-
line at www.chronicle
online.com.


and performed sobriety tasks
poorly, according to the affidavit.
Bond $2,000.
Other arrests
Marcus Natteal Sr., 41, of
Northeast 5th Street, Crystal
River, at 2:32 p.m. Dec. 19 on a
Citrus County warrant for viola-
tion of injunction for protection
against domestic violence and
aggravated stalking after injunc-
tion for protection. No bond.
Gary Stine, 36, of South
Chestnut Terrace, Lecanto, at
1:20 p.m. Dec. 21 on a Citrus
County warrant for failure to ap-
pear in court for an original
felony charge of possession of
a controlled substance and orig-
inal misdemeanor charges of
resisting a law enforcement offi-
cer without violence and pos-
session of drug paraphernalia.
No bond.
Bobby Metz II, 44, of West


Old Citrus Road, Lecanto, at
10:27 p.m. Dec. 22 on a misde-
meanor charge of trespassing.
Bond $500.
Burglaries
SA commercial burglary was
reported at 2:43 a.m. Wednes-
day, Dec. 26, in the 400 block of
N. Dacie Point, Lecanto.
A residential burglary was
reported at 3:51 a.m. Dec. 26 in
the 6300 block of W. Liberty
Lane, Homosassa.
Thefts
SA grand theft was reported
11:45 a.m. Wednesday, Dec.
26, in the 5600 block of S.
Mason Creek Road,
Homosassa.
SA larceny petit theft was re-
ported at 4:32 p.m. Dec. 26 in
the 3600 block of S. Alabama
Ave., Homosassa.
SA petit theft was reported at
6:50 p.m. Dec. 26 in the 10200
block of S. Buckskin Ave., Floral
City.
Vandalisms
A vandalism was reported
at 2:19 a.m. Wednesday, Dec.
26, in the 3700 block of E. Fox-
wood Lane, Invemess.
A vandalism was reported
at 11:13 a.m. Dec. 26 in the
6900 block of N. Florida Ave.,
Hemando.
A vandalism was reported
at 2:36 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 27,
in the 2600 block of W. Wood-
land Ridge Drive, Lecanto.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
PR ~-HI LOPR HI L
1.10 NA NA NA 71 55


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
s
S
S
s
s
s
S
S
S
5


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


L F'cast
62 s
39 s
50 s
42 s
48 s
33 s
47 s
57 s
59 s


MARINE OUTLOOK


North winds around 20 knots. Seas 3
to 5 feet. Bay and inland waters will
be choppy. Skies will be mostly sunny
today.


73 57 0.40 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exlusteaily

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 57 Low: 40
Sunny but chilly

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 70 Low: 50
Mostly sunny

H .. TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
.- High: 76 Low: 53
Sunny to partly cloudy


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 70/54
Record 83/23
Normal 71/43
Mean temp. 62
Departure from mean +5
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.70 in.
Total for the month 3.00 in.
Total for the year 62.01 in.
Normal for the year 51.63 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 4
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.98 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 56
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 68%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, maple, oak
Today's count: 8.3/12
Monday's count: 7.4
Tuesday's count: 8.1
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
12/30 SUNDAY 6:39 12:28 7:03 12:51
12/31 MONDAY 7:30 1:19 7:53 1:41
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


S
JAN.280


SUNSET TONIGHT ............................ 5:43 PM .
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................7:24 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY ...........................8:01 PM.
MOONSET TODAY ........................8:43 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 6:01 a/2:12 a 7:30 p/2:49 p
Crystal River** 4:22 a/12:11 p 5:51 p/-
Withlacoochee* 2:09 a/9:59 a 3:38 p/10:00 p
Homosassa*** 5:11 a/1:11 a 6:40 p/1:48 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
6:39 a/2:50 a 7:58 p/3:20 p
5:00 a/12:12 a 6:19 p/12:42 p
2:47 a/10:30 a 4:06 p/10:40 p
5:49 a/1:49 a 7:08 p/2:19 p


Gulf water
temperature



63
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.96 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.22 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.25 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.61 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


23 .21
13
32 .16
36 .67
30 .25
26
32 .16
15
35 .03
19
29 .09
25 .21
19 .26
48 .79
31 .29
37 .28
26 trace
30 .01
27 .25
43 .69
28 .39
13 .06
27
5
11
26 .13
27
27 .10
28 .17
23 .21
34
24 .14
36
35
29
44 .28
28 .20
32
25 .06
12
41
39
32 .09


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 50 44 s 53 44
New York City 34 30 .25 pc 35 24
Norfolk 47 40 .41 s 45 30
Oklahoma City 46 15 pc 44 34
Omaha 26 10 pc 34 16
Palm Springs 59 40 pc 60 38
Philadelphia 36 32 .22 pc 37 27
Phoenix 65 37 pc 61 41
Pittsburgh 31 26 .30 sn 29 17
Portland, ME 29 14 .08 pc 31 11
Portland, Ore 41 29 trace pc 43 33
Providence, R.I. 34 22 .23 pc 31 16
Raleigh 52 37 .41 s 46 28
Rapid City 30 4 pc 29 4
Reno 32 26 .01 sn 31 12
Rochester, NY 29 16 .25 sn 28 22
Sacramento 53 40 trace pc 52 32
St. Louis 34 26 s 38 28
St. Ste. Marie 25 9 sn 27 20
Salt Lake City 29 16 sn 31 19
San Antonio 53 35 c 54 48
San Diego 59 48 .03 sh 59 45
San Francisco 54 46 .11 pc 52 39
Savannah 57 50 .65 s 52 34
Seattle 41 38 .05 pc 41 34
Spokane 25 19 .01 pc 28 19
Syracuse 30 26 .28 pc 25 20
Topeka 38 16 pc 44 26
Washington 44 34 .18 pc 39 27
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 85 Kendall, Fla. LOW -30 Angel Fire,
N.M.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 90/75/s Madrid
Amsterdam 45/43/sh Mexico City
Athens 60/52/sh Montreal
Beijing 20/8/pc Moscow
Berlin 47/40/pc Paris
Bermuda 70/58/r Rio
Cairo 68/52/s Rome
Calgary 19/10/pc Sydney
Havana 76/60/pc Tokyo
Hong Kong 65/48/sh Toronto
Jerusalem 60/47/s Warsaw


57/45/pc
46/44/pc
47/30/pc
71/43/pc
23/16/pc
20/17/c
50/42/c
91/75/ts
51/40/s
76/65/sh
54/33/sh
28/21/pc
36/32/pc


C I T R U S


C U N TY


Local/State BRIEFS


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


HRKONICLE
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To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
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1 year: $116.07*
*Subscription price Includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
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Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
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residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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Ave M d Crystal River,
1 \ MadoAcrel FL 34429
N \ :

SInverness
Courthouse office
Tompkins St. g square
0 106 W. Main
S 41 44 Inverness, FL
34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............ .. ...................................................... P publisher, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
Mike Arnold .................................. Editor, 564-2930
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trista Stokes.................................................................. Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ..................................................M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories ............................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Com m unity content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff .............................................................................................................. 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
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SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


JAN. 4 JAN.11 JAN.18


I-


A4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CENTERS
Continued from Page Al

Case history
Steve, fresh faced with
pieced earrings in both
lobes, grew up with his older
brother and sister in Balti-
more with his mother His fa-
ther, Steve said, spent nearly
all of his time in jail on petty
crimes that piled up.
Steve's mother, who was
bipolar and a drug user, con-
doned drug and alcohol use
with her children.
"My mom wanted to be a
cool mom," he says. "There
were always parties at our
house."
Steve started smoking
marijuana with his friends,
Marcus and Nieman, when
they were in middle school.
"I don't honestly know
how it happened," Steve
says. "I really liked it when I
did it. It wasn't a common,
every day thing."
He was arrested at age 13
for trying to steal a four-
wheeler.
"I was so scared at the
time," he says. "My mom
picked on me. She smacked
the crap out of me."
His mother sent him to
live with his grandparents
in Florida.
"I was good for about
seven months," he said. "I
started getting high with a
whole bunch of people."
He smoked "Spice," legal
synthetic marijuana sold at
some local convenience
stores. Steve got in more
trouble, including fights. He
was booted from school in
the eighth grade.
"I don't know why they ex-
pelled me. Being high, I
guess," Steve says.
He was drinking cans of
"Four Loko" 23-ounce
cans of alcohol that, until No-
vember 2010, were mixed
with caffeine. One can equals
the alcohol content of about
four or five regular beers.
"My friends' parents
bought it for us. We would
drink at least five of them on
the weekend," he says. "We
would drink it like water."
His grandparents sent
him back to Maryland. The
situation with his mother
deteriorated.


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 A5


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Clinical manager Steve Archbold said teens arrive at the Centers through several paths, in-
cluding court-ordered stays or being sent by their parents.


"One day I came home
from school and all my stuff
was in the middle of the
yard," Steve says.
He went to live with his
girlfriend's parents, who
were good people. Still,
Steve drank and drugged.
In June, he boarded a
plane back to Florida.
Road to recovery
It was June 15, to be exact
"That was the last time I
used," Steve says. "I got high
before I got on the plane. I
was so high I didn't say bye
to them. I just walked off. I
was so high and didn't even
realize it."
The destination was an
Eckerd wilderness camp in
Brooksville, a Level 6 facil-
ity for boys. Hard work was
the key Counseling or re-
covery was not.
The camp closed and


Steve was transferred to the
Centers in Lecanto. He was
introduced to 12-step pro-
grams and began to learn of
another way of life.
"I was quiet. I didn't talk
to anybody," he says. "Then I
began to open up."
He's a regular at 12-step
meetings and is working a
program of recovery with
his counselor.
"I realized I'm not really
alone," he says.
Consistent success
The key to the Centers'
success with teens, Arch-
bold says, is consistency
The teens need to know and
see that counselors follow
through.
"It's a lot of repetition,"
Archbold says. "It's hard
work for them. It's very hard
work for them."
Archbold says he has a


INFORMATION
www.thecenters.us
24-hour crisis line: 352-
726-7155.
Substance abuse: 352-
628-5020.

history of drug problems
that were resolved years
ago. "I've been sober for
many, many years," he said.
So he gets to teach the
teens from knowledge and
experience.
"We talk about the 12
steps at some point every
day," Archbold says. "We
teach them they can have
some fun when they're
clean and sober. They can
have some joy in their life."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


Texas spaceport


backers look to


state for help


Associated Press
BROWNSVILLE, Texas
- Texas space aficionados
hope rockets will someday
be launched into orbit
from a beachside site near
the U.S.-Mexico border, but
a tight state budget and a
previously frustrated at-
tempt to land such a space-
port could complicate
efforts.
Backers of a proposal to
build a launch site at Boca
Chica Beach, about 25
miles east of Brownsville,
concede finding more
money to lure California-
based SpaceX to the state's
southernmost tip will be a
challenge.
An underfunded educa-
tion system and health
care reform are just a sam-
ple of the issues facing law-
makers in the upcoming
session. With the Univer-
sity of Texas Board of Re-
gents also pushing to
accelerate creation of a
medical school in the Rio
Grande Valley, the pro-
posed spaceport will not
even be the biggest local
economic development
cause.
Still, some officials think
the state's ability to offer a
blank canvas for a dedi-
cated commercial space-
port in the same state
where SpaceX already
tests its rocket engines
could prove attractive,
even if Texas cannot match
the money being waved by
some competitors.
"There is a point that
we're not going to be able
to reach and I don't know
that we'll ever be able to be
as financially competitive
as either one of those,
Florida or Puerto Rico,"
said state Rep. Rene
Oliveira, D-Brownsville.
"I'm also sensitive to the
fact that these are taxpayer
dollars that we should still
be reasonable with how


much we offer."
Oliveira recently at-
tended a meeting with staff
to discuss creating a fund
to promote aerospace busi-
nesses picking Texas. He
said the state had pledged
$3.2 million toward entic-
ing SpaceX.
Texas' economic devel-
opment arm, contained
within the governor's of-
fice, does not comment on
its negotiations. The local
economic development
council is expected to put
up about another $3 mil-
lion. But Oliveira's heard
talk of Florida offering up-
ward of $10 million. A
spokesperson with Space
Florida, the state's dedi-
cated space agency, did not
return a call seeking
comment.
"I've told everybody
who's asking for money
that they're in line with
school children, universi-
ties, the mentally ill, health
care, everybody is in line
wanting to get their fair
share so it's not going to be
easy," Oliveira said. "But
we'll do the best we can."
Texas' potential also
hinges on an environmen-
tal review underway for
the Federal Aviation Ad-
ministration. Preliminary
results are expected early
next year And SpaceX is in
the early stages of the re-
view process, said spokes-
woman Katherine Nelson,
adding that Georgia is also
in the running.
The company, run by
PayPal co-founder Elon
Musk, currently launches
most of its rockets from
Florida's Cape Canaveral,
but plans to begin some
from California's Vanden-
berg Air Force Base next
year. Still, it's looking for
additional launch capacity,
and not having to compete
with the government for
launch windows would be
an advantage.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


William
Anderson, 89
INVERNESS
William Edward Ander-
son, 89, of Inverness, died
Thursday,
Dec. 27,
2012, at Cit-
rus Memo-
rial hospital
in Inver- -
ness. /-*
Born Dec.
10, 1923, in
Tarpon
Springs, William
Fla., to the Anderson
late William
and Hilda Anderson, he
came here in 1976 from
New Port Richey, Fla. Mr.
Anderson was a supervisor
with the GTE telephone
company. He was a World
War II Navy veteran and he
enjoyed fishing, hunting
and dancing. William was a
member of Elks Lodge No.
2284 in New Port Richey,
having served as exalted
ruler
He was preceded in death
by his wife of 51 years, Mary
Patricia, Jan. 2, 2009. Left to
cherish his memory are his
son, William "Kendall" An-
derson, Bushnell; daugh-
ters, Linda Kulik of New
Port Richey, Teresa Perry of
Inverness and Tracy (Allan)
Trepcyk of Pinehurst, N.C.;
seven grandchildren; and
five great-grandchildren.
Funeral services for Mr.
Anderson will be conducted
at 2 p.m. Dec. 31,2012, at the
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with the Rev Leary
Willis officiating. Burial will
follow at the Hills of Rest
Cemetery in Floral City
Friends may call at the fu-
neral home from 3 to 5 p.m.
Sunday (today).
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Edward Fox, 60
INVERNESS
Edward Dean Fox, 60, In-
verness, died Saturday, Dec.
22, 2012. No local services.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home With Crematory

MILITARY SERVICE
U.S. flags denote
military service on local
obituaries.
The U.S. military
consists of five active-
duty services and their
respective guard and
reserve units: Army,
Marine Corps, Navy, Air
Force and Coast Guard.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)




CLIFF
Continued from Page Al

remained at arms-length,
juggling a desire to avoid
the fiscal cliff with his goal
of winning another new
term as speaker when a new
Congress convenes next
Thursday Any compromise
legislation is certain to in-
clude higher tax rates on
the wealthy, and the House
GOP rank and file rejected
the idea when Boehner pre-
sented it as part of a final at-
tempt to strike a more
sweeping agreement with
Obama.
Yet lawmakers have until
the new Congress convenes
to pass any compromise,
and even the calendar mat-
tered. Democrats said they
had been told House Re-
publicans might reject a
deal until after Jan. 1, to
avoid a vote to raise taxes


To Place Your

"In7 Memory" ad,

Saralynne


Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller@chronicleonline.com

I 'II 'I


Donald
White Jr., 40
CITRUS SPRINGS
Donald Wayne White Jr.,
40, of Citrus Springs, Fla.,
passed away Dec. 28,2012.
He was born Aug. 21, 1972,
in West Palm Beach, Fla., to
Donald Wayne Sr. and Joan
(Martin) White. Donald
moved to Citrus County five
years ago from Lake Worth,
Fla. He was an air condi-
tioner tech and of the
Protestant faith.
In addition to his parents,
Donald is survived by three
sisters, Patty Thompson of
Florida, Marcie Fife and
Tammy Mask, both of Ore-
gon; and several aunts, un-
cles, nephews and nieces.
Family will receive
friends at the Brown Fu-
neral Home in Lecanto,
Fla., on Monday, Dec. 3,
from 10 a.m. until services
time at noon.
Burial will follow at the
Magnolia Cemetery in
Lecanto, Fla.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions can be made to the an-
imal rescue in Citrus
County
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.




John 'Pat'
Carroll, 80
CITRUS HILLS
John W "Pat" Carroll, 80,
of Citrus Hills, died
Wednesday, Dec. 26, 2012, at
Ocala Regional Medical
Center
Funeral services will be
at 11 a.m. Monday, Dec. 31,
2012, at Fero Funeral Home.
The family will receive
friends at 10 a.m.


OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries.
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of the
arrangements.
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.



before they had technically
gone up and then vote to cut
taxes after they had risen.
Nor was any taxpayer
likely to feel any adverse
impact if legislation is
signed and passed into law
in the first two or three days
of 2013 instead of the final
hours of 2012.
Gone was the talk of a
grand bargain of spending
cuts and additional tax rev-
enue in which the two par-
ties would agree to slash
deficits by trillions of dol-
lars over a decade.
Now negotiators had a
more cramped goal of pre-
venting additional damage
to the economy in the form
of higher taxes across the
board with some families



"Your Trusted Family-Owned
Funeral Home for 50 Years"


William 'Bill'
Barker, 67
INVERNESS
William C. "Bill" Barker,
67, of Inverness, Fla., passed
away Friday, Dec. 28, 2012,
at Hospice of Citrus County
in Inverness.
He was born April 4,1945,
in Gainesville, Fla., to the
late Roy C. and Mary Edna
(Slade) Barker. Bill was a
construction contractor and
designer, and arrived in this
area in 2003, coming from
Canon City, Colo., where he
was a volunteer with Col-
orado Habitat for Humanity
He was a U.S. Air Force
Vietnam-era veteran. Bill
was a member of Redemp-
tion Christian Church in In-
verness. He was a loving
husband, father and friend
who enjoyed rebuilding his
home and working with his
hands.
He was preceded in death
by one sister, Shirley Finch.
Bill is survived by his loving
wife of 49 years, Betty Other
survivors include one son,
William C. (Deborah)
Barker Jr of Inverness; one
daughter, Susan N. (Marvin)
Gifford of Peggs, Okla.; two
grandchildren, Daniel
Joseph and Madeline
Nicole Gifford; one sister,
Peggy Lanton; special
cousin, R.C. Barker; and
many extended family
members.
At Bill's request, there
will be no services sched-
uled. His urn will be placed
at Fairview Cemetery in
Burlington, Colo., at a later
date. In lieu of flowers, the
family requests donations to
Hospice of Citrus County,
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464. Private
arrangements are under the
care Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory,
Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

INFORMATION
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or fax 352-
563-3280.
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.
The national database
Legacy.com maintains
the Chronicle's obituar-
ies and guest books.
Per Legacy policy, all
guest book comments
are screened by its
staff for appropriate
content before being
placed online. Allow 24
hours for review of
guest book entries. A
printed Commemora-
tive Guest Book may be
purchased from Legacy
in a hardcover or soft-
cover format.


facing increases measured
in the thousands of dollars
- as well as cuts aimed at
the Pentagon and hundreds
of domestic programs.
Republicans said they
were willing to bow to
Obama's call for higher
taxes on the wealthy as part
of a deal to prevent them
from rising on those less
well-off.
Democrats said Obama
was sticking to his campaign
call for tax increases above
$250,000 in annual income,
even though he said in re-
cent negotiations he said he
could accept $400,000.
There were indications
from Republicans that es-
tate taxes might hold more
significance for them than


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Mary
Gilbert, 89
LAKE PANASOFFKEE
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mrs. Mary B.
Gilbert, age 89, of Lake
Panasoffkee, Florida, will
be held 11:30 AM, Wednes-
day, January 2, 2013 at the
Inverness Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Homes with Pastor
Bill Johnson officiating. In-
terment will follow at
Florida National Cemetery,
Bushnell, Florida. The fam-
ily will receive friends from
10:30 until the time of serv-
ice at the chapel. The family
requests expressions of
sympathy take the form of
memorial donations to Hos-
pice of Citrus County, PO.
Box 641270, Beverly Hills,
FL 34464. Online condo-
lences may be sent to the
family at www.Hooper
FuneralHome.com. Mrs.
Gilbert was born March 24,
1923 in Luttrell, TN, daugh-
ter of the late Ernest and
Matilda Wood. She died De-
cember 28, 2012 in Lecanto,
FL. She moved to Florida as
a child and lived in Gulfport
until moving to Lake Pana-
soffkee in 1992. She was a
homemaker, a member of
the First Baptist Church of
Rutland and enjoyed cross-
word puzzles, working in the
church nursery, and spend-
ing time with her family
Mrs. Gilbert was preceded
in death by her parents, her
husband of 62 years, James
J. "J.J." Gilbert, 4 brothers,
William, Terrance, Merle
and John, and 2 sisters,
Stella, and Gertrude Elaine.
Survivors include son,
James J. Gilbert Jr of Gulf-
port, daughter, Mary
(Charles) Barnes of Inver-
ness, grandson, Michael
(Athena) Ross of Lake Pana-
soffkee, 2 sisters-in-law,
Joan Wood of Leesburg,
Drusilla Wood of IN, and
many nieces and nephews.

PRICING
Area funeral homes
with established
accounts with the
Chronicle are charged
$8.75 per column inch.
Non-local funeral
homes and those
without accounts are
required to pay in
advance by credit card,
and the cost is $10 per
column inch.
Small photos of the
deceased's face can be
included for an
additional charge.
Larger photos,
spanning the entire
column, can also be
accommodated, and
will incur a size-based
fee.
Additional days of
publication or reprints
due to errors in
submitted material are
charged at the same
rates.


the possibility of higher
rates on income.
One senior Republican,
Sen. Jon Kyl ofArizona, said
late Friday he was "totally
dead set" against Obama's
estate tax proposal, and as if
to reinforce the point, Blunt
mentioned the issue before
any other in his broadcast
remarks.
"Small businesses and
farm families don't know
how to deal with the unfair
death tax a tax that the
president and congressional
leaders have threatened to
expand to include even
more family farms and even
more small businesses," he
said.
Officials said any compro-
mise was likely to ease the


Martha 'Marty'
Mclntosh, 73
HOMOSASSA
Martha Mae "Marty"
McIntosh, 73, of Homosassa,
joined her son and mother
in heaven, and in time for
Christmas, on Dec. 23, 2012.
Martha
was born
Oct. 8, 1939,
in Mercers-
burg, Pa.,
and grew up
in Hager-
stown, Md.
Upon grad-
uating from Martha
high school, Mcintosh
she moved
to the suburbs of Washing-
ton, D.C., where she enjoyed
a varied career including
positions in the Office of the
Secretary of the Air Force at
the Pentagon and retail
management. After moving
to Homosassa in 1981, Marty
co-owned and operated Es-
ther and Marty's Ceramics
for many years. She retired
from the U.S. Postal Service
in 2002 after a fulfilling ca-
reer as a rural route carrier
in Crystal River.
While still working, Marty
enjoyed getting to know her
customers as well as their
pets. She knew the favorite
treats of many of the dogs on
her route and took great
pleasure in spoiling them.
After retirement, she de-
voted herself to lovingly car-
ing for her mother, Esther.
They were the best of
friends and enjoyed doing
crafts, pampering their cats,
watching the raccoons and
birds in their backyard, and
just spending time together
Martha was preceded in
death by her son, Paul Zuker
Jr; and parents, Clarence
Bryan and Esther Oyler
She is survived by her
daughter and son-in-law
Dawn and Richard Jolly of
Mount Vernon, Va.; brothers
Terry Bryan (Jean) of Cas-
selberry, Fla., and Roy
Barnhart (Kim) of Tampa,
Fla.; as well as numerous
nieces, nephews, cousins,
dear friends and beloved
"furry" companions.
An informal celebration
of Martha's life will take
place at 1 p.m. on Sunday,
Jan. 6, at Ike's (the Old Izaak
Walton Lodge), 6301 River-
side Dr., Yankeetown, Fla.
In accordance with her
wishes, Martha's ashes will
be scattered with those of
her son in Pennsylvania on
his birthday in July 2013.
In lieu of flowers and as a
means of honoring the soft
spot in Marty's heart for an-
imals, the family requests
tax-deductible donations be
made in her memory to Pre-
cious Paws Rescue, 13161 S.
Betty Point, Floral City, FL
34436.
Email expressions of con-
dolence can be sent directly
to her family at
Marty122312@gmail.com.


impact of the alternative
minimum tax, originally de-
signed to make sure mil-
lionaires did not escape
taxation. If left unchanged,
it could hit an estimated 28
million households for the
first time in 2013, with an av-


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Harry
Norton Jr., 85
LAS VEGAS, NEV.
Harry Joseph Norton Jr,
85, died Saturday, Dec. 22,
2012, in Las Vegas, Nev
Harry was born Jan. 29,
1927, in
Roslindale,
Mass., to
Harry J.
Norton and
Kathryn
Warren
Norton. He
served in
the U.S. Harry
Navy 1945 Norton Jr.
to 1946. He
was married to Jane Kohler
from 1952 to 1968 and they
had three children in Holly-
wood, Fla. He married Pa-
tricia Pullen in 1970, and
after all their children were
grown, they relocated to
quieter places in Florida,
eventually settling in Crys-
tal River in 1990.
In addition to his long ca-
reer in property manage-
ment for a large private
Miami bank, Harry was a
talented musician, artist
and craftsman. As an ac-
complished musician, he
played saxophone, clarinet,
violin and organ. He
arranged and composed
music, and was the founder
and director of multiple
bands and choral groups
throughout his life. He lived
a rich life full of love, laugh-
ter and music, and brought
honor, humor and happi-
ness to many throughout his
life.
He was surrounded by
family the weeks preceding
his death, and was attended
to by hospice care in the
home of his son and daugh-
ter-in-law, Glenn and Dar-
lene Norton of Las Vegas,
where he moved in March
2012. He is survived by his
children, Janet Chagnon,
Valerie DeWitt, Glenn (Dar-
lene) Norton and David
Pullen; five grandchildren;
and one great-grandchild;
his sister, Rita Marino of
Naples, Fla.; brother,
Robert (Nancy) Norton of
Norfolk, Mass.; and five
nieces and nephews.
Harry will be cremated
and memorial services will
be held in 2013 at the
Florida National Cemetery
in Sumter County, where he
will join his wife, Patricia.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

* All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to the
contrary is made.
Additionally, obituaries
will be posted online at
www.chronicleonline
.com.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Thank-you letters to THE EDITOR


Help in city of
Homosassa
Here in Homosassa, peo-
ple are never too busy to
stop and help our neigh-
bors in need.
We have a family here in
great financial need due to
high medical bills.
This family had been too
proud to ask for help and
has been struggling to
make it on their own. He is
a crab boat captain and she
is a school teacher in Ho-
mosassa. They have three
children they are raising.
She has been battling can-
cer for more than four
years. The one medication
she has to take costs more
than $400 a week. This has
taken most of their weekly
wages.
The Freezer and Bill
Blossom organized a barbe-
cue benefit to raise money
for this family
I took it upon myself to
go out and solicit dona-
tions. I was totally amazed
and overwhelmed with the
generosity of the patrons in
our community. These peo-
ple gave with all their
hearts and wished this fam-
ily the best.
All these people truly
know the meaning of the
Christmas spirit! I would
like to mention all their
names and to thank them
for being an early Santa
Claus: Eagle Buick, Shel-
don-Palmes, Sea Grass, Old
Mill, Harley Davidson, Mr.
B's Car Wash, Manatee
Lanes, Nature's Resort,
Manatee Pub, Applebee's,
Pawfection Ranch, In &
Out Express Lube, High
Octane, Mr. and Mrs. Den-
nis O'Sullivan, Diane and
Phil Hartley, MacRae's and
Gator Cove.
If I missed anyone, I'm
truly sorry There were so
many big hearts. All I can
say is thank you! Thank all
of you for helping one of
your neighbors.
Nancy Rushford
Homosassa

United Way
thanks you
The Wine Shop III and
Burke's of Ireland recently
teamed up to host a "guys
vs. girls" fundraising event
to support the United Way
of Citrus County The event,
titled "He Said, She Said,"
was a lot of fun with terrific
results.
Pouring for the ladies


were Jewel Lamb, Jennifer
Petrella and Carol Kim-
brough. Pouring for the
guys were Steve Lamb and
Dr. Andy Petrella. The
United Way would like to
thank everyone who was a
part of this event and
helped to make it such a
huge success!
Amy Meek
CEO and president
United Way of Citrus County

Thanks for
helping with cats
On behalf of the Humani-
tarians of Florida Inc., I
would like to thank the Cit-
rus County Animal Serv-
ices and merchants of the
downtown Inverness com-
munity for their support of
the trap, neuter, return pro-
gram and for remembering
Cliff Dungleman in such a
kind way
Cliff was a very special
person who loved cats and
made certain the ones he
could reach never went
hungry Thank you also for
encouraging the commu-
nity to donate to the Hu-
manitarians in honor of
"the catman," as he was af-
fectionately known to
many The Humanitarians
are continuing to help the
feral cats through steriliza-
tion and by providing food.
At present, approxi-
mately three dozen cats are
in the downtown area and
as near as we can deter-
mine no new kittens have
been born in this vicinity
due to the TNR program.


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The statistics tell us if 24
cats are sterilized, 288 kit-
tens are not being born to
roam our streets.
The Humanitarians have
registered 120 colonies in
Citrus County since May of
2011, and from these colonies
we have sterilized 773 cats.
We are sincerely trying to
stop the overpopulation of
cats at no cost to the county
We ask for your support and
patience as we continue to
try to make a difference in
our community
Maggie Hypes,
president
Humanitarians of Florida

Wishing peace,
good will
I just wanted to thank all
the hard-working American
people this Christmas and
throughout the year who
gave their time for our
needs, including all volun-
teers. Thanks to the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office, fire
departments, post office
workers, all food chains, re-
tail business, and all the
volunteers and services for
the homeless and less fortu-
nate. Many troops are serv-
ing our country and can't be
with their families this holi-
day Thanks to our veterans,
military, etc. and the
beloved ones who aren't
with us today, you will be in


our prayers. If I forgot any-
one, you will be in my
prayers this holiday and the
coming New Year So many
people have been helpful.
God bless all of you.
Dorraine Baltzell
Lecanto


Thanks for
donations
The Center for Victim
Rights and Wear To Go con-
signment at Times Square
Plaza on State Road 44 in
Inverness wish to thank
everyone for all the won-
derful donations that have
been made that go toward
the packages sent overseas,
baskets and stockings for
our soldiers through the
Welcome Home Project
and Barbara Mills.
Shampoo, toothpaste,
toothbrushes, floss, game
books, soaps, combs, snack
foods and no longer needed
cell phones are ongoing
needed items, and any
other items you feel would
be useful. If you would like
to donate, call Kim at Wear
To Go at 352-344-4327.
Thank you Citrus County
Cynthia Holden
Center for Victim Rights
Inverness


Community shows
it really cares
Hello, my name is Tiffany
Davenport, and back in Au-
gust my whole life was
turned upside down when
my parents tragically
passed away I am writing
this today to say a big thank
you to Citrus County The
overwhelming support and
love everyone has shown to
my brother, sister and me
has been amazing. I cannot
put into words how much
this community means to
me. With my parents' pass-
ing, I now feel everyone
here is like my extended
family because of every-
one's efforts to make this
transition in our life a little
bit easier I am truly grate-
ful and I am proud to have
been raised here, and to
finish raising my brother
and sister here. Thank you!
Tiffany Davenport and
family
Inverness


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


i av son loves when
I do the monster voices.
He doesn't know
I already beat the biggest
monster ofii.


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Citrus KIA would like to
recognize and congratulate
Mr. Joe Slater
as their
Salesperson of the Year.

Joe has earned this honor for his
outstanding performance. He is a six-year
dedicated and loyal employee, not only to
Citrus KIA, but to all of his repeat and new
customers. He is a very knowledgeable,
experienced and exciting salesman.

Joe would like to take this opportunity to
thank Citrus KIA and all of his loyal
customers that have taken part and helped
him achieve this honor. He would like to
invite everyone to come by and see for
themselves why he believes that
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Come by and ask for Joe and say hello!

U S 1850 S.E. Hwy. 19 Crystal River, FL

e;Citrus$L 352-564-8668
SrhePower toSurpri se HOURS: Mon- Fri: 9:00am- 7:00pm o Sat 9:00am- 6:00pm o Sunday Noon- 5:00pm


I


OPINION


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 A7


GWAN





A8 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012

PROGRESS
Continued from Page Al

2009 at a cost of $1.3 billion.
The company relies on a
state statute declaring pollu-
tion-control is salvage
equipment, taxable at 10
percent of its value. The
property appraiser is rely-
ing on a 1998 Citrus County
circuit court case finding
that statute unconstitu-
tional.
Citrus County's largest
taxing authorities, the
county commission and
school board, each took a
significant hit with the com-
pany's lower-than-expected
tax payment. The county is
out $7.5 million and made
cuts to absorb that loss in
revenue, including freezing
vehicle purchases and sus-
pending the capital im-
provements program.
The school district, which
lost $8.1 million, is a differ-
ent story. The state, which
allocates funding and sets
local tax rates to ensure
equalized per-student fund-
ing statewide, will reim-
burse about $5.5 million to
the school district to help
cover that shortfall.
Both the school district
and county commission
pledged $175,000 each to
cover Greene's legal and ex-
pert costs in fighting the
Progress Energy lawsuit.
The county and school
board also joined the lawsuit
on Greene's behalf, thanks to
a 2008 state Supreme Court
ruling that said property ap-
praisers cannot challenge
the constitutionality of a
state law in a lawsuit
brought by a taxpayer
Incredibly, county officials
were already feeling nerv-
ous about Progress Energy
before the tax dispute.
Company officials haven't
decided yet whether to re-
pair the nuclear plant, of-
fline since 2009. Shutting the
nuclear plant permanently
could cost the county mil-
lions of dollars in tax rev-
enue, plus the loss of highly
skilled, high-paying jobs.
That decision is expected
sometime this summer.
And two of the company's
four coal plants are sched-
uled to go offline in 2016,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


though company officials
say they haven't decided yet
whether to retire the plants
or not
Still, county commission
chairman Joe Meek, who
also heads the county's eco-
nomic development council,
said the tax issue and uncer-
tainty of the nuclear plant
underscore the county's
need to reduce its reliance
on Progress.
"This issue highlights the
importance and necessity to
change some of the ways we
operate," Meek said. "We
need to focus on diversifying
our economy in areas like
tourism, technology-based
businesses, medical busi-
nesses. That can't happen
overnight There's no quick
fix."
Meek also said county
economic leaders should
continue their strong sup-
port for Progress/Duke be-
cause it continues such a
significant role in the
county's economy
The days following the
Progress $19.3 million tax
payment brought many
words of anger and angst
from local officials, who im-
plored Duke president Jim
Rogers to make the full
payment.
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy said he
would blame Progress if
budget cuts placed his offi-
cers in danger County Com-
missioner J.J. Kenney called
Duke "a bunch of thugs."
Progress spokeswoman
Suzanne Grant said the com-
pany stands by its decision,
even while acknowledging
the anxiety locally
"We know this is a difficult
situation for Citrus County
and its residents," she wrote
in an email to the Chronicle,
seeking comment on the
lawsuit. "We understand the
concerns that have been
shared with us. We care
deeply about Citrus County
and all the counties we
serve, and we are commit-
ted to paying our fair share
of taxes."
Meek said he hopes for a
resolution prevents a costly
legal battle.
"We do have a relation-
ship with Progress Energy,"
he said. "Obviously this is
causing friction in that rela-
tionship. We hope to find
common ground."


GREENE
Continued from PageAl

attorneys contend.
Progress said its $19.3 million is a
"good faith" payment of taxes.
Greene's court response is the pay-
ment represents just 56 percent of the
taxes owed.
Other highlights of Greene's re-
sponse, according to court files:
Progress did not file a return for
its pollution control equipment until
after the April 1, 2012, deadline. The
company requested and received an
extension for its tangible personal
property but the extension did not in-
clude the pollution control. Progress
cannot claim the salvage exemption
because it missed the filing deadline.
Pollution-control equipment is
included in the Progress rate base
and therefore should be considered
part of the energy-generating
equipment.
After the 1998 court case, the
property appraiser and Progress


Progress Energy Florida complies with the
tax laws in every jurisdiction in which we do
business. We believe we are in compliance
with tax laws applicable to our business in
Citrus County, and we are working through the
appropriate system to resolve this issue.
Suzanne Grant
emailed statement by the Progress Energy Florida spokeswoman.


agreed on a methodology to assess
pollution-control equipment.
Greene's response said the company
never disputed that agreement nor
did it contest any of the taxes until
this year.
The school board and county
commission each relied on Progress
to make its full tax payment.
The company should pay at least
$15.1 million in addition to what it has
paid for 2012.
Progress spokeswoman Suzanne
Grant declined to answer specific


questions regarding the lawsuit. She
emailed a statement that read, in
part:
"Progress Energy Florida complies
with the tax laws in every jurisdiction
in which we do business. We believe
we are in compliance with tax laws
applicable to our business in Citrus
County, and we are working through
the appropriate system to resolve this
issue."
Contact Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright at 352-563-3228 or wright@
chronicleonline. com.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Watch Nights mark Emancipation Proclamation 150th


Associated Press

WASHINGTON As
New Year's Day ap-
proached 150 years ago, all
eyes were on President
Abraham Lincoln in expec-
tation of what he warned
100 days earlier would be
coming his final procla-
mation declaring all slaves
in states rebelling against
the Union to be "forever
free."
A tradition began Dec. 31,
1862, as many black
churches held Watch Night
services, awaiting word that
Lincoln's Emancipation
Proclamation would take ef-
fect amid a bloody Civil War
Later, congregations lis-
tened as the president's his-
toric words were read
aloud.
The proclamation would
not end slavery outright and
at the time couldn't be en-
forced by Lincoln in areas
under Confederate control.
But the president made
clear from that day forward
that his forces would be
fighting to bring the Union
back together without the
institution of slavery
Lincoln issued his prelim-
inary Emancipation Procla-
mation in September 1862,
after the Battle ofAntietam,
announcing if rebel states
did not cease fighting and
rejoin the Union by Jan. 1,
1863, all slaves in rebellious
states or parts of states
would be declared free from
that date forward.
This year, the Watch Night
tradition will follow the his-
toric document to its home
at the National Archives,
with a special midnight dis-
play planned with readings,
songs and bell ringing
among the nation's founding
documents.
The official document
bears Lincoln's signature
and the United States seal,
setting it apart from copies
and drafts. It will make a
rare public appearance
from Sunday to Tuesday -
New Year's Day for thou-
sands of visitors to mark its
anniversary On New Year's
Eve, the display will remain
open past midnight as 2013
arrives.
"We will be calling back to


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Associated Press
The original Emancipation Proclamation on display Feb. 18, 2005, in the Rotunda of the National Archives in Washington.
A tradition began Dec. 31, 1862, as many black churches held Watch Night services, awaiting word that Lincoln's Eman-
cipation Proclamation would take effect amid a bloody Civil War.


an old tradition," said U.S.
Archivist David Ferriero,
noting the proclamation's
legacy "When you see thou-
sands of people waiting in
line in the dark and cold ...
we know that they're not
there just for words on paper
"On this 150th anniver-
sary, we recall those who
struggled with slavery in
this country, the hope that
sustained them and the in-
spiration the Emancipation
Proclamation has given to
those who seek justice."
The National Archives al-
lows 100 visitors at a time
into its rotunda, where the
Emancipation Proclama-
tion will be displayed along
with the Constitution and
Declaration of Independ-
ence. On the busiest days,
8,000 people file through for
a glimpse of the founding
charters.
Performances and re-en-
actments are scheduled to
continue throughout New
Year's Day The U.S. Postal


Service will unveil a new
Emancipation Proclama-
tion stamp as well.
This special display is just
one of many commemora-
tions planned in Washington
and in churches nationwide
to mark the anniversary of
Lincoln's actions to end slav-
ery and end the Civil War
President Lincoln's Cot-
tage in Washington, where
the 16th president spent
much of his time and where
he began drafting the
proclamation, is displaying
a signed copy of the docu-
ment through February It
also will host its own New
Year's Eve celebration.
The Library of Congress
will display the first draft
handwritten by Lincoln. It
will be on display for six
weeks beginning Jan. 3 in
the library's exhibit, "The
Civil War in America,"
which features many per-
sonal letters and diaries
from the era.
Also, the Smithsonian's


National Museum ofAfrican
American History and Cul-
ture just opened its newest
exhibition, "Changing
America," to recount the
1863 emancipation of slaves
and the 1963 March on
Washington for Civil Rights.
It includes a rare signed
copy of the 13th Amendment
to the Constitution that ulti-
mately abolished slavery
The Watch Night tradition
also continues at many sites
Monday night.
In Washington, the Metro-
politan A.M.E. Church,
where abolitionist Freder-
ick Douglass was a member,
will host a special 150th an-
niversary service.
History lovers say this is a
chance to remember what
the Emancipation Procla-
mation actually signified.
Lincoln wrote in part: "I
do order and declare that
all persons held as slaves
within said designated


States, and parts of States,
are, and henceforward,
shall be free."
He went on to say the mil-
itary would recognize the
freedom of slaves, that freed
slaves should avoid violence
and that freed slaves could
enlist in the U.S. armed
forces. It did not immedi-
ately free a single slave,
though, because Lincoln
didn't have the power to en-
force the declaration in the
Confederacy Still, many
slaves had already been
freeing themselves, and the
document gave them pro-
tection, said Reginald Wash-
ington, an archivist of
African-American history at
the National Archives.
"It was a first, important
step in paving the way for
the abolishment of slavery
with the ratification of the
13th Amendment," he said.
It also brought "a funda-
mental change in the char-


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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 A9


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ON THE NET
www.archives.gov

acter of the war," Washing-
ton said. "With the stroke of
Lincoln's pen, a war to pre-
serve the union had
overnight become a war of
human liberation."
The proclamation be-
came a symbol of hope for
nearly 4 million slaves and a
confirmation that the war
should be fought to secure
their freedom, said Wash-
ington, who is retiring from
the Archives after nearly 40
years. Some historians and
scholars have come to view
to proclamation as one of
the most important docu-
ments in U.S. history
The final proclamation
has been rarely shown be-
cause it was badly damaged
decades ago by long expo-
sure to light. After it was
signed at the White House,
it was kept at the State De-
partment for many years
with other presidential
proclamations. In 1936, it
was transferred to the Na-
tional Archives.
Records show it was dis-
played between 1947 and
1949 in a "Freedom Train"
exhibit that traveled the
country Then it was shown
briefly in January 1963 to
mark the 100th anniversary
of its signing.
It wasn't until 1993 that
the Emancipation Procla-
mation has been shown
more regularly to the public.
In the past decade, it has
been shown in 10 other mu-
seums and libraries nation-
wide for no more than three
days at a time to limit its ex-
posure to light. A 2011 exhi-
bition at the Henry Ford
Museum in Dearborn,
Mich., that was open around
the clock drew lines
amounting to eight-hour
waits to see the document.
Conservators rotate
which of the five pages are
shown to limit their light ex-
posure. In Washington, they
will display pages two and
five, which is Lincoln's sig-
nature page. High-quality
copies are shown in place of
the other original pages.












NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


inter Mars rover set for road trip


WorldBRIEFS

Explosion


Curiosity's trek to Mount Sharp expected to take much of2013


Associated Press
Cindi Ding, of Toronto,
Canada, pushes her sister
Karolynn Ding on Saturday
in a snowfall at Buffalo Ni-
agara International Airport
in Buffalo, N.Y., as they ar-
rive for a flight to Miami.


Bush moved out
of intensive care
HOUSTON Former
President George H.W.
Bush's condition continued to
improve Saturday, prompting
doctors to move him out of in-
tensive care, a spokesman
said.
"President Bush's condition
has improved, so he has
been moved today from the
intensive care unit to a regu-
lar patient room at The
Methodist Hospital to con-
tinue his recovery," family
spokesman Jim McGrath said
Saturday. "The Bushes thank
everyone for their prayers
and good wishes."
Bush was hospitalized Nov.
23 for treatment of a bronchi-
tis-related cough. He was
moved to intensive care at
the Houston hospital on Dec.
23 after he developed a fever.
Arrest in subway
shoving death
NEW YORK -A woman
accused of pushing a man to
his death in front of a subway
train was charged Saturday
with murder as a hate crime.
Police arrested Erica
Menendez on Saturday after
a passer-by on a street no-
ticed she resembled the
woman seen in a surveillance
video.
A spokeswoman for
Queens District Attorney
Richard A. Brown said
Menendez told authorities
she hates Hindus and
Muslims.
Subway shoving victim
Sunando Sen was from India,
but it's unclear if he was Mus-
lim or Hindu.
The attack was the second
time this month that a man
was pushed to his death in a
city subway station.
Police: Casino
worker killed girl
LAS VEGAS Police sus-
pect that a casino worker
killed a 10-year-girl before
going to a Las Vegas resort
and allegedly slashing the
face of a co-worker with razor
blades.
The search for Jade Morris
ended Friday afternoon when
officials confirmed that it was
her body that was found a
day earlier in an undeveloped
housing tract.
The Clark County coro-
ner's office said she died of
multiple stab wounds. Jade
was last seen Dec. 21 with
family friend Brenda Stokes
Wilson, who picked her up to
go Christmas shopping.
Wilson, 50, returned the
car she had borrowed for the
outing to a friend two hours
later. Jade never came back.
Investigators later found
blood on the driver's door and
steering wheel.
Later that night, Wilson
was wrestled to the ground
with razors in each hand after
allegedly slashing the face of
a female co-worker at the
Bellagio casino.
Ajudge raised her bail from
$60,000 to $600,000 Friday
morning after she was identi-
fied as the prime suspect in
the child's killing.
From wire reports


Associated Press

PASADENA, Calif. -
Since captivating the world
with its acrobatic landing,
the Mars rover Curiosity has
fallen into a rhythm: Drive,
snap pictures, zap at boul-
ders, scoop up dirt. Repeat.
Topping its to-do list in
the new year: Set off toward
a Martian mountain a
trek that will take up a good
chunk of the year
The original itinerary
called for starting the drive
before the Times Square ball
drop, but Curiosity lingered


Associated Press


MOSCOW Russia's for-
eign minister said Saturday
that Syrian President
Bashar Assad has no inten-
tion of stepping down and it
would be impossible to try
to persuade him otherwise.
After a meeting with
Lakhdar Brahimi, the U.N.'s
envoy for the Syrian crisis,
Sergey Lavrov also said that
the Syrian opposition risks
sacrificing many more lives
if it continues to insist on
Assad leaving office as a
precondition for holding
talks on Syria's future.
Assad "has repeatedly


longer than planned at a pit
stop, delaying the trip.
Curiosity will now head
for Mount Sharp in mid-
February after it drills into
its first rock.
"We'll probably be ready
to hit the pedal to the metal
and give the keys back to the
rover drivers," mission chief
scientist John Grotzinger
said in a recent interview at
his office on the sprawling
NASA Jet Propulsion Labo-
ratory campus 15 miles east
of downtown Los Angeles.
The road trip comes amid
great expectations. After all,


said publicly and privately,
including in his meeting
with Lakhdar Brahimi in
Damascus not long ago, that
he does not intend to leave
for anywhere, that he will
stay to the end in his post,
that he will, as he expressed
it, defend the Syrian people,
Syrian sovereignty and so
forth," Lavrov said. "There's
no possibility to change this
position."
Brahimi warned that the
country's civil war could
plunge the entire region into
chaos by sending hundreds
of thousands of refugees into
neighboring nations, but his
talks in Moscow produced


it's the reason the $2.5 bil-
lion mission targeted Gale
Crater near the Martian
equator. Soaring from the
center of the ancient crater
is a 3-mile-high peak with
intriguing layers of rocks.
Curiosity's job is to figure
out whether the landing site
ever had the right environ-
mental conditions to sup-
port microbes. Scientists
already know water flowed
in the past thanks to the
rover's discovery of an old
streambed. Besides water,
life as we know it also needs
energy, the sun.


no sign of progress toward
settling the crisis.
Brahimi and Lavrov both
said after their meeting that
the 21-month-old Syrian
conflict can only be settled
through talks, while admit-
ting that the parties in the
conflict have shown no de-
sire for compromise. Nei-
ther official hinted at a
possible solution that would
persuade the Syrian govern-
ment and the opposition to
agree to a ceasefire and sit
down for talks about a polit-
ical transition.
Brahimi, who arrived in
Moscow on a one-day trip
following his talks in Dam-


What's missing are the
chemical building blocks of
life: complex carbon-based
molecules. If they're pre-
served on Mars, scientists
figure the best place to hunt
for them is at the base of
Mount Sharp where images
from space reveal hints of
interesting geology.
It's a six-month journey if
Curiosity drives nonstop.
But since scientists will
want to command the six-
wheel rover to rest and ex-
amine rocky outcrops along
the way, it'll turn into a nine-
month odyssey


Egypt leader lashes out


Associated Press
An Egyptian soldier eats a sandwich Saturday in Cairo, Egypt, as he secures a road leading to the Shura Council,
where President Mohammed Morsi addressed the country's newly convened upper house of parliament.

President warns opponents about dangers offurther unrest


Associated Press

CAIRO Egypt's Islamist presi-
dent used his first address before
the newly convened upper house of
parliament on Saturday to warn
against any unrest that could harm
the country's battered economy, as
he renewed calls for the opposition
to join in a national dialogue.
In the nationally televised
speech, Mohammed Morsi said the
nation's entire efforts should be fo-
cused on "production, work, seri-
ousness and effort" now that a new
constitution came into effect this
week. He blamed protests and vio-
lence the past month for causing
further damage to an economy al-
ready deteriorating from the tur-
moil since the fall of autocrat Hosni
Mubarak early last year
In an alarm bell over the econ-
omy, the central bank announced
soon after Morsi's speech that for-
eign currency reserves which
have been bleeding away for nearly
two years are at a "critical" level,
the minimum needed to cover for-
eign debt payments and buy strate-
gic imports.
Morsi's strongly worded address
to lawmakers appeared aimed at
sending a message to the mainly lib-


eral and secular opposition
not to engage in any new
protests, depicting unrest as
a threat to the priority of
rebuilding.
All sides must "realize the
needs of the moment" and
work only through "mature
democracy while avoiding Moha
violence," Morsi told the MIl
270-member upper house, presi
or Shura Council. "We con- Eg
demn and reject all forms of
violence by individuals, groups, in-
stitutions and even from the nation
and its government. This is com-
pletely rejected."
He appeared to chide the opposi-
tion for not working with him.
"We all know the interests of the
nation," he said. "Would any of us
be happy if the nation goes bank-
rupt? I don't doubt anyone's inten-
tions. But can anyone here be
happy if the nation is exposed to
economic weakness?"
The mainly liberal and secular
opposition accuses Morsi of con-
centrating all power on the Muslim
Brotherhood, from which he hails,
and other Islamists and steam-
rolling any alternative voices.
The main opposition groups have
refused to join a national dialogue


convened by Morsi, saying
past talks have brought no
compromise. They also
stayed out of the president's
S appointments last week of a
few opposition figures to
the overwhelmingly Is-
lamist Shura Council, call-
,ined ing the move tokenism.
orsi The bitterness between
dent of the two sides was inflamed
ypt. by the crisis of the past
month leading up to the ref-
erendum that passed the new con-
stitution. Mass street rallies were
held by both the opposition trying to
stop the charter and by Morsi's Is-
lamist supporters determined to
push it to victory
Clashes that erupted left 10 dead.
The charter was approved by 64
percent, but with a low turnout of
around 33 percent. Civil society
groups and the opposition also
point to incidents of fraud in the
vote they say have not been prop-
erly investigated.
Opponents fear the new charter
will consecrate the Islamists'
power. The document allows for a
stronger implementation of Islamic
law, or Shariah, than in the past and
has provisions that could limit civil
rights and freedoms of minorities.


ascus with Assad this week,
voiced concern about the
escalation of the conflict,
which he said is becoming
"more and more sectarian."
The envoy warned that "if
you have a panic in Damas-
cus and if you have 1 million
people leaving Damascus in
a panic, they can go to only
two places Lebanon and
Jordan," and those countries
may not be able to endure
half a million refugees each.
Brahimi said that "if the
only alternative is really
hell or a political process,
then we have got all of us to
work ceaselessly for a polit-
ical process."


Associated Press
A Pakistani woman grieves
Saturday after losing her
son in a blast, at a local
hospital in Karachi, Pak-
istan. The blast that ripped
through a bus set the vehi-
cle on fire and killed scores
of people and left many in-
jured. Police were trying to
determine whether the ex-
plosion was caused by a
bomb or a gas cylinder,
said police spokesman.
Many buses in Pakistan run
on natural gas.

French panel
overturns tax
PARIS Embattled
French President Francois
Hollande suffered a fresh set-
back Saturday when France's
highest court threw out a plan
to tax the ultrawealthy at a 75
percent rate, saying it was
unfair.
In a stinging rebuke to one
of Socialist Hollande's flag-
ship campaign promises, the
constitutional council ruled
Saturday that the way the
highly contentious tax was
designed was unconstitu-
tional. It was intended to hit
incomes over $1.32 million.
Prime Minister Jean-Marc
Ayrault was quick to respond,
saying in a statement follow-
ing the decision the govern-
ment would resubmit the
measure to take the court's
concerns into account. The
court's ruling took issue not
with the size of the tax, but
with the way it discriminated
between households depend-
ing on how incomes were dis-
tributed among its members.
In recent weeks, Gerard
Depardieu France's most
famous actor announced
his intention to turn in his
French passport and move to
a village in a tax-friendly
Belgium.
City: Prison for
animal abuse
MEXICO CITY Mexico
City lawmakers have ap-
proved prison terms for ani-
mal cruelty, previously
considered a civil offense
sanctioned with fines and
detentions.
The capital's legislative as-
sembly unanimously agreed
that people who intentionally
abuse and cause animals
harm will face up to two years
in prison and pay up to $500.
If the animal is killed, they can
face up to four years in prison
and a $2,000 fine.
Antonio Padierna, presi-
dent of the assembly's law
enforcement and justice com-
mittee, said late Friday that if
animals are killed for food, the
death must be quick and not
cause pain.
Berlusconi knocks
Monti's about-face
ROME Ex-Premier Sil-
vio Berlusconi sharply criti-
cized the decision by Mario
Monti to run in Italy's general
elections and vowed Satur-
day to launch a parliamentary
inquiry into the 2011 fall of his
government and appointment
of Monti as Italy's premier.
Berlusconi spoke out after
Monti ended weeks of hedg-
ing and announced Friday he
would head a coalition of cen-
trist forces, businessmen and
pro-Vatican forces running for
office in Feb. 24-25 elections.
Berlusconi said he never
expected Monti would renege
on his repeated assurances
that he "wouldn't use the pub-
lic prominence as head of a
technical government for an
ulterior presence in politics."
He said the decision repre-
sented a "loss of credibility"
for Monti, a respected econo-
mist and former European
Commissioner, and said if he
is elected premier he would
immediately launch a parlia-
mentary inquiry into the fall of
his government.
From wire reports


Russian official: Assad won't leave

Foreign minister says Syria opposition risking many more lives











EXCURSIONS


* Veterans /""*
Notes ,.y--'-
can be /1 ':
found \ r ---3$
on Page A13 of
today's Chronicle.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE /






Adriatic adventures




Dalmatian Coast offers rich glimpse of history


Story and photos by Neil Sauyer

he Adriatic Sea, long and narrow, stretches along

the entire east coast of Italy across from Croatia
and Albania. The Adriatic, anchored by Venice on
the northern end, was well represented by explorers
dating back two millennia, searching for new territory
and shipping routes, and doing what early sailors did -
sailing to unknown and uncharted waters.


Venice was home port to scores of
early explorers, some well known -
Byrd, Balboa, Polo and Cabot -but
many less notable made significant dis-
coveries. They had one thing in com-
mon the Adriatic Sea was their
starting point. Most explorers sailed be-
yond the islands they first encountered,
probably answering the call to discover
new worlds over the horizon.
The eastern
area of the Adri-
atic, bordering
Croatia, is virtu-
ally covered with
a string of islands,
often only a day's
sail away from the
next island.
Through time,
each of the is-
Neil Sawyer lands was ex-
SPONTANEOUS plored,
TRAVE R particularly by the
earliest explorers,
some of whom
planted the Vene-
tian flag on new territories. Today, all
13 islands and peninsulas are part of
the district of Croatia and are collec-
tively referred to as Dalmatia.
We boarded our small ship (50 pas-
sengers) at Split, originally settled in
1300 B.C., the second largest city in
Croatia. Split was home to Roman Em-
peror Diocletian, whose palace, built in
A.D. 305, is still inhabited and in good
condition. At times, the city had a popu-
lation of 9,000 to 10,000 people.
The Dalmatian coast is replete with
historically famous islands, and towns.
First came the island of Hvar the
longest of the offshore islands, which
has recently been referred to as the
"new Riviera." The weather is near
perfect year-round, with an average 315
days of blue sky blanketing the fields of
lavender, olive groves and vineyards.
Fishing also plays a prominent role in
its commerce. While there, we enjoyed
a pleasurable wine tasting in an an-
cient wine cellar
'MARCO!' 'POLO!'
Next on the horizon was the island of
Korcula and its largest city of the same
name, referred to as Korcula Town, es-
tablished in the 12th century B.C. It
was a blustery overcast day as we
strolled around and through the town
doing our share of touristy things -
gawking at dates on the buildings,
shopping for souvenirs and looking for
a coffee shop. On one especially nar-
row street we spotted a sign, "Marco
Polo," but upon closer inspection, we
noticed an added word, "shop." Sou-
venirs, of course. A smaller sign nearby
read "Home of Marco Polo," although
Venetians claim he was born in Venice.
We heard a distinct yell from down
the street, "Marco!" immediately fol-
lowed by an echo in the other direc-
tion, "Polo!" After a moment it became
obvious that the "locals" were having
their bit of daily fun toying with the
American tourists. They succeeded!
Flashback! I immediately envisioned
earlier days in my family life with our
three pre-teen children, spaced about


15 months apart in age, who practically
lived in our swimming pool. Our chil-
dren and their friends played what ap-
peared to be an incessant game of
"Marco Polo." The game became popu-
lar in the United States, Australia and
Canada.
"Marco Polo" is a water game where
one player, deemed "it," is blindfolded
and attempts to tag another swimmer.
"It" calls out "Marco" and all other
players must reply "Polo," while at-
tempting to evade being tagged. When
tagged, that swimmer becomes "it" The
cycle continues until the game must be
ended, usually due to lunch or dinner-
time.
So, what's the connection between
Marco Polo in the swimming pool at
home and Marco Polo in Korcula, or
Venice, or wherever he might be? His-
tory reveals that the real Marco Polo
was a prodigious explorer with numer-
ous excursions to faraway places, often
ending up in unintended places like
the Gobi Desert, Siberia or China,
where he spent 24 years at the behest
of Kublai Khan.
Long-distance communication was
nil in those days, and no one really
knew where Marco was at any particu-
lar time. It is surmised that some schol-
arly history buff, aware of Marco's
historic escapades, applied the uncer-
tainty of his whereabouts to a game of
hide-and-seek in the swimming pool.
I'm not sure he did us a favor, as I used
to wake up at night yelling "Polo," but
we always knew where our children
were, along with their neighborhood
friends!
Marco Polo died in 1324, at age 68,
and was buried at the church in San
Lorenzo, Italy

WALLED CITY
The great walled city of Dubrovnik,
which rivaled Venice in the 15th and
16th centuries, was our next destina-
tion. The ritual at Dubrovnik is to go to
the old walled city, either by bus from
the commercial docks, or walk if you're
in good shape, as it is approximately
two miles to the ancient town with its
many steep alleyways.
There is a beautiful central plaza
worthy of a relaxing stop to watch the
action: people of all ages absorbing the
beauty of the architecture and intricate
stonework. To take full advantage of
this awesome landmark, one must walk
atop the wall that surrounds the town.
From this vantage point, you will walk
past the town harbor full of a great vari-
ety of fishing and pleasure boats, and
also look down on rooftops of the
town's residences and shops.
The stroll on the wall is well worth
the approximate one-hour time. You
will also be able to spot the buildings
damaged during the Serbian attack on
Dubrovnik in 1991 the damaged
buildings all have new red tile roofs.
The finale of our cruise, through the
fascinating islands of the Dalmatian
coast, led us through the Corinth Canal
to Piraeus, the port city for Athens,
Greece.
A visit to the famous Acropolis con-
cluded our tracing of the route of many


~I



5
* N'


In Old Town Korcula, an ancient stone tower is now a
cafe/bar; the Dubrovnik boat basin looking down from the top of the wall; a view from
the wall that rings the city (many new red roofs due to the shelling by Serbia in 1991);
and the Marco Polo Shop on the island of Korcula.


early explorers.
Until next time: "Marco!"

Neil and Karyn Sawyer have been
residents of Crystal River for 27years.


They travel frequently having been to
48 states, 64 countries and seven
continents. Neil welcomes comments
and questions about travel.
Contact him via email to
gobuddy@tampabay.rrcom.


All together
Sal and Carol Perrone of Homosassa were married Dec. 15, 1962. Fifty years
later, they celebrated on Dec. 15, 2012, with a dream vacation with family at
Dreams Riviera Cancun Resort and Spa. One daughter, one son and their spouses
and children flew from New York. Another daughter, on an international
assignment, flew from India to the resort to join in the celebration. It was a dream
come true: a beautiful place, great weather and a family all together.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATONS
r0ata Coanest

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.






A12 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012


Seniors may need


clean, new clothes


SUNDAY EVENING DECEMBER 30, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: OakForest H Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
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W 117 69 117 Porsha"'14' Gloria"'14' panic attack. 14 Danyelle"14' Danni"'14' panic attack.'14'
IWGNWA 18 18 18 18 20 "Grow Old With" Bloopers! Mother Mother Mother Mother IMother News IReplay 30 Rock 30 Rock


Dear Annie: Many of
our parents and
grandparents are
aging and have been placed
in nursing homes or as-
sisted-living facilities.
As an employee at one of
these facilities, I would like
to make a suggestion: Many
of our residents have cloth-
ing that desperately needs
to be replaced. It
makes me sad
when I go
through their
closets and
everything has a
hole in the seam
or a waistband
that is falling
apart. Please
check the status
of your loved
one's clothing .
and replace
what needs it. ANN
This brings me MAIL
to another point.
Many people
never have visitors, so there
is no one to replace their
clothing or even to tell about
it. It may be something to
consider for a community
service project to provide
new clothing for the resi-
dents who are unable to
shop for themselves. Useful
items include sweaters,
sweatshirts, front-button or
zipper shirts, pants with an
elastic waistband, socks and
slip-on or Velcro-strap
shoes. Even secondhand
clothing would be wonder-
fully appreciated as long as
it is in good repair Our sen-
iors have paved the way for
us, and we should not forget
about them. -A Long-Term


Today MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness;
637-3377
"Parental Guidance" (PG)
11 a.m., 1:40 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Les Miserables" (PG-13)
11:30 a.m., 3:15 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Django Unchained" (R) ID
required. 11:15 a.m.. 3:05 p.m.,
7:05 p.m., 9:50 p.m. No passes.
"Jack Reacher" (PG-13)
11:45 a.m., 3:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Monsters Inc" (G) In 3D.
11:05 a.m., 1:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Monsters Inc" (G) 3:50 p.m.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected
Journey" (PG-13) In 3D. 12 p.m.,
8 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected
Journey" (PG-13) 4 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Les Miserables" (PG-13)
11:30 a.m., 3:15 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Django Unchained" (R) ID


required. 12 p.m., 3:40 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"Parental Guidance" (PG)
11:35 a.m., 2:15 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10:50 p.m.
"Jack Reacher" (PG-13)
11:25 a.m., 2:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:40 p.m. No passes.
"This is 40" (R) ID required.
11:50 a.m., 2:50 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
10:45 p.m.
"Monsters Inc." (G) 2:10 p.m.
"Monsters Inc" (G) In 3D.
11:45 a.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
9:45 p.m. No passes.
"The Guilt Trip" (PG-13)
11:10 a.m., 2:05 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 9:40 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected
Journey" (PG-13) In 3D. 11 a.m.,
6:45 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected
Journey" (PG-13) 3 p.m.
"Lincoln" (PG-13) 11:15 a.m.,
2:30 p.m., 6:30 p.m., 9:50 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for
area movie listings and entertain-
ment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Group
of graduates
6 Gores
11 Bribery
16 Grief
21 Spartan slave
22 Kind of lamp
23 Speeder's undoing
24 Destroy
by degrees
25 Friendship
26 Mountain nymph
27 Fine instrument
28 Raze
29 "A Boy Named -
30 Golf standard
31 Drizzle
33 Flavoring for gin
35 Letter after zeta
36 Borgnine
or Hemingway
39 Discern
43 Set afire
44 Rob-
45 Schoolbook
47 Serious
49 Use needle
and thread
51 Jet
54 Official order
57 Come forth
59 Woeful cry
63 Skeletal part
64 Animal enclosure
66 Character in a play
68 "Essays of-"
69 Scotia
70 Lendl or Turgenev
72 Literary collection
74 Twist
76 exmachina
78 Abbr. in citations
79 Object from space
82 Watery trench
84 Child's winter
garment
86 Hippodrome
87 Painful
89 Expired
91 In addition
92 Cunning
93 Psychic ability
95 Chinese dynasty
97 Navigation hazard
99 Lump
101 Mil. rank
104 Writer Fleming
106 Water bird
108 Brooks and Gibson


110 Scandinavian
114 Emotional
breakdown
117 Louver
119 Reject as untrue
121 Ill-mannered
122 Line of rotation
124 Level
126 poetica
127 Dishonest one
128 "--a kick
out of you"
129 Test
131 Cut short
133 Abbr. in bus
135 Lanka
136 Mexican money
137 Loved
139 Seafood item
141 Della or Pee Wee
143 -sequitur
145 Kind
of congestion
147 Warning
149 Edge
152 Paved ways (abbr.)
154 Face
on a ten spot
157 Flowering
161 Actress
Thurman
162 Type size
164 Callit---
165 Breakfast food
167 Employ
168 Indian prince
170 In the company of
173 Ordinary language
175 Moving about
177 Old marketplace
178 Talent show
179 Des Moines native
180 Root
181 Actress Sophia -
182 Leaf
183 Dozed
184 Towel material


DOWN
1 Pursue
2 Arboreal animal
3 Foreign
4 Drunken fellow
5 Pigpen
6 Old Greek portico
7 Dawdled
8 Honest -
9 Raucous sound
10 Car type


Stone for building
Crash against
Town
in Oklahoma
Waller or Domino
Warble
Take out
Mineral
Inamorata
"-- Billie Joe"
Send along
School org.
"-a boy!"
River in France
Eagle
Ooze
Kind of coffee
Notoriety
Produce
Hopper
or Rodman
Wipes
Dies down
- donna
Body organ
Lessen
Cry of a crow
Streetcar
Thin and bony
Egyptian water lily
Benefit
Like brine
Cup handle
Walked on
Hawaiian goose
Particle
Duo
Before very long
Fertile spot
Guitarist Clapton
Abound
Injury
Slaughter
of baseball
Antlered animal
Daddy
Tiger's game
Tiny performer
Seethe
Gaza or Sunset
Estimate
Ebb and neap
Vetoed
Soft mineral
Time of year
Union demand
Top actors
Strange
Reveal (2 wds.)
Ford's


predecessor
Field cover
Serv. branch
- Jessica Parker
Rocky hill
Tableland
El -, Texas
Complainer
"The King -"
Marred
Variety of apple


Annex
Little -Annie
Box top
Old horse
Countrified
Adult insect
Important
Ascot
- lazuli
Region in the Alps
External


Willow rod
Cheerful
Part ofAARP (abbr.)
Fellow
Exist
Ab -
Mother Superior
Be in debt
Play part
That girl


Puzzle answer is on Page A14.


12-30


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Care Employee
Dear Employee: What a
lovely, helpful suggestion.
Those who have family in
nursing homes should re-
member to check that their
clothing is clean, comfort-
able and in decent shape.
And a community effort to
supply such items would be
much appreciated and a
wonderfully com-
passionate way to
start off the new
year.
Dear Annie: I
^4 .want to say thank
you again for
helping me last
year when I
needed brain sur-
gery and was
alone. Your read-
ers were wonder-
ful, and I also
IE'S contacted my
BOX family to be there
for me and they
all made it. Since
the surgery, I have moved in
with my father so someone
can keep an eye on me. I
also have reenergized my
faith, and that is really
helping.
November was Epilepsy
Awareness Month. My
grandfather drowned when
having a seizure in water,
and my brother died after
brain surgery But my
mother, sister and nephew
are living well with this, as
am I.
Please help me get the
word out that epilepsy can
be controlled, and no one
should be afraid of it. I am
45 and have dealt with it all
my life. Omaha


ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I
.I





CIRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well as
events to which the public is in-
vited. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.

POST NEWS
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Saturday
monthly at 1 p.m. for lunch and
coffee at the Country Kitchen
restaurant in Brooksville, 20133
Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50,
east of U.S. 41). All Coastie vet-
erans are welcome. For more
information, call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
Tickets are available for the
New Year's Eve steak dinner
on Dec. 31. Cost is $12.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155 is
at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Lounge
open at 11 a.m. Monday
through Saturday and noon
Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the American
Legion, American Legion Rid-
ers and 40/8 families have din-
ners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The post will have its New
Year's Eve party Monday, Dec.
31, with cocktail hour beginning
at 5 p.m. with party snacks of
shrimp, pepperoni, cheese and
chips. Dinner will be prime rib,
baked potato, salad and
dessert. Live entertainment all
night; champagne toast with
party favors. Cost is $25; see
bartender in lounge for tickets.
The post is currently taking
consideration for new bands,
deejays and karaoke entertain-
ers for the upcoming year. If in-
terested in being considered as
an entertainer or musician at
the post, call Elfi Baker or Patti
Foster at 352-795-6526.
For more information about
the post and its other activities,
call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at 352-
302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters, daugh-
ters, granddaughters, great-
granddaughters or grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
wartime. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-7663,
or membership chairman
Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers ac-
tivities such as meals, bingo,
golf, darts, karaoke, pool and
more for members and guests.
Review the monthly newsletter
for activities and updates, and
call the post at 352-746-0440.
The VFW Post 10087 is off
County Road 491, directly be-
hind Cadence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 746-0440. The
Cake Crab Company Golf
League plays at Twisted Oaks
G.C. Monday at 8 a.m. Check
with Jack Gresham for tee
times.
The VFW Mixed Golf League
plays Thursdays alternating be-
tween Twisted Oaks Golf Club
and Citrus Springs Country
Club. Tee time is 8 a.m. New
players, both men and women,
are welcome. You do not have
to be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,


352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking is
allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Salisbury steak is on the din-
ner menu from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 4. Cost is $8; chil-
dren younger than 6 eat for $4.
All are welcome.
The New Year's Eve party
will be Monday, Dec. 31. Happy
hour from 5 to 7 p.m. Buffet din-


ner from 7 to 8:30 p.m., with
music from 8 p.m. to midnight.
Tickets (available at the post)
are $15; $25 per couple.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive. We thank veterans
for their service and welcome
any disabled veteran to join us
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tues-
day or Thursday at the chapter
hall. This is also the time that
we accept donated non-
perishable foods for our
continuing food drive.
Our main function is to assist
disabled veterans and their
families when we are able. Any-
one who knows a disabled vet-
eran or their family who
requires assistance is asked to
call Commander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart at
352-419-0207, or 352-
344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged
veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone Com-
mander Linda Brice at 352-560-
3867 or Adjutant Lynn Armitage
at 352-341-5334.One of the
DAVA's projects is making lap
robes and ditty, wheelchair and
monitor bags for needy veter-
ans in nursing homes. All who
wish to help in our projects are
welcome. We need to make the
items certain sizes, so please
call for information. We also
collect toiletry items for the vet-
erans. Good, clean material
and yarn are needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries are at
906 Highway 44 East, Inver-
ness. Call the post at 352-344-
3495, or visit www.vfw4337.org
for information about all weekly
post activities.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Post and auxiliary meet the first
Wednesday of the month at
7 p.m. Dunnellon Young
Marines meet 6 p.m. Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4 p.m.
All are welcome at the out-
door flea market and pancake
breakfast on Jan. 19. All-you-
can-eat breakfast is served
from 7:30 to 10:30 a.m. for $5.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets the second
Saturday monthly at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul Drive
in Inverness. This is an advo-
cacy group for current and fu-
ture veterans, as well as for
POWs and MIAs. Florida Chap-
ter 7 welcomes new members
to help promote public aware-
ness of the POW/MIA issue


and help veterans in need of
help. Full membership is open
to all individuals 18 years or
older who wish to dedicate time
to the cause. Visit the website
at www.rollingthunderfl7.com
for more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker for
your next meeting or event. Call
club President Ray Thompson
at 813-230-9750 (cell), or email


him at ultraray1997@
yahoo.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at the VFW in
Beverly Hills. Call JV Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Presi-
dent Elaine Spikes at 352-860-
2400 for information. New
members are welcome. Mem-
bership fee is $30 a year. Any
female relative age 16 or older
who is a wife, widow, mother,
mother-in-law, stepmother, sis-
ter, daughter, stepdaughter,
grandmother, granddaughter,
aunt or daughter-in-law of an
honorably discharged Marine
and FMF Corpsman eligible to
join the Marine Corps League,
and female Marines (former,
active and reserves) and asso-
ciate members are eligible for
MCLA membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339. Send
emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com. Call or visit
the post for regular and special
events, as well as meetings.
Google VFW 4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at the
Sunday buffet breakfasts from
10 a.m. to noon; cost is $5.
The post welcomes everyone
to "Speed Bingo" at 10 a.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 9. Refresh-
ments will be available. Pro-
ceeds will benefit cancer aid
and research. Call 352-
726-5206 for information.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for informa-
tion. VFW membership is open
to men and women veterans
who have participated in an
overseas campaign, including
service in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The Korean Campaign medal
remains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans to join or transfer
to our Post 237 family. There
are many activities (call the
post for information), and
monthly dinners sell out fast
and are a big hit. Legionnaires,
Sons of the American Legion
(SAL), or American Legion Aux-
iliary (ALA) are active helping
veterans and the community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org to
view the calendar of upcoming
events. Call the post at 352-
746-5018.
The post will host a benefit


OFFSHORE
fa FISHING CHARTERS R
SCap Dan Cyr, Crystal Rive,


perpemon
. L, 1: I t i, ITacklear l I,

352-422-4640.
L, kngclam.cor I
Split Charters Can Be Arranged


poker run Saturday, Jan. 26,
with proceeds going to support
American Cancer Society Mof-
fitt Cancer Center Ovarian Can-
cer Research and patients and
families served by Hospice of
Citrus County. A $10 entry fee
per rider will include a poker
hand and a meal at the end of
the run. Registration begins at
10 a.m. at American Legion
Post 237 in Beverly Hills. Last
bike in will be 4:30 p.m., when
food will be served. All vehicles
are welcome to participate.
Music will be provided and do-
nated by George Marshall.
There will be door prizes, a
50/50 drawing and fun. For
more information, call 352-
746-5018 or John Roby at 352-
341-5856.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Any veteran who has seen hon-
orable service in any of the
Armed Forces of the U.S. is eli-
gible for membership if said
service was within Korea, in-
cluding territorial waters and
airspace, at any time from Sept.
3, 1945, to the present or if said
service was outside of Korea
from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the former Inverness
Highlands S & W Civic Associa-
tion building at 4375 Little Al
Point, off Arbor Street.. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 or Auxiliary pres-
ident Marie Cain at 352-697-
3151 for information about the
post and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food is
available.
The auxiliary will host a New
Year's Eve Party on Dec. 31.
Nashville Artist John Thomas
and the Ramblin' Fever Band
will provide music for dancing
and listening pleasure from 8
p.m. to midnight. Food will be
served all evening and a light
breakfast after midnight. Tickets
are $20 in advance and $25 at
the door. Table reservations for
six or more people can be
made with advance ticket sales.
The event will be in the new
home of Post 77, the former In-
verness Highlands S & W Civic
Association building. For ad-
vance tickets or to reserve tick-
ets, call Alice at 352-860-2981;
if no answer, leave a message
for a return call.
The post will do a bus tour to
Miami and Key West Feb. 18 to
24, 2013. Profits from the trip
will be used to purchase a brick
for the Fisher House Walk of
Courage and for new equip-


n Give Your Out-Of-Town
SGuest A Memory
Of A Lifetime!
J Manatee Snorkeling Tours
Sightseeing Tours
Dive Classes
Boat Rentals
% Family Discounts
525 NW 7th Ave. (Located at NW Hwy. 19 Best Western)
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ment for the Color Guard of
Post 77. The Fisher House will
be a home for the families of
hospitalized veterans at the
Malcom Randal Veterans Hos-
pital in Gainesville; the Walk of
Courage will be the paved
walkway between the Fisher
House and the hospital. For
more information, call Alice at
352-860-2981.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 352-
726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Dinner is at 6 p.m. and the
meeting follows at 7. All veter-
ans in the Homosassa/
Homosassa Springs area are
invited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166. For informa-
tion about the post or the Amer-
ican Legion, call and leave a
message for the post com-
mander at 352-860-2090. Your
call will be returned within 24
to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for
the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-
746-1959; or visit us on the
Web at www.Postl 55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at
2 p.m. the third Tuesday of Jan-
uary, March, May, July, Sep-
tember and November. All
combat-wounded veterans, lin-
eal descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are invited. To
learn more about Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 MOPH,
visit the chapter's website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Purple
Heart has announced two
scholarship opportunities for
college-bound students -
Chapter 776's College of Cen-
tral Florida (CF) Endowed
Scholarship and the Military
Order of the Purple Heart


(MOPH) Scholarship for
Academic Year 2013/14.
Chapter 776's CF Endowed
Scholarship for Academic Year
2013/14 awards $500 to an ap-
plicant accepted or enrolled at
CF as a full-time student (12 or
more semester credit hours).
Chapter 776 scholarship infor-
mation and an application can
be obtained at www.citruspur-
pleheart.org, or by calling 352-
382-3847. Chapter 776 must
receive scholarship applications
no later than 5 p.m. Feb. 28,
2013.
The MOPH Scholarship for
Academic Year 2013/14 awards
$3,000 to a member of the
MOPH; a spouse, widow, direct
lineal descendant (child,
stepchild, adopted child, grand-
child) of a MOPH member or of
a veteran killed in action, or
who died of wounds before
having the opportunity to be-
come a MOPH member. Great-
grandchildren are not eligible.
Applicant must be a U.S. citi-
zen, a graduate or pending
graduate of an accredited high
school; be accepted or enrolled
as a full-time student (12 se-
mester credit hours or 18 quar-
ter hours) at a U.S. college or
trade school and have at least
a 2.75 cumulative GPA based
on an un-weighted 4.0 grading
system. Scholarship applica-
tions must be received at
MOPH Headquarters in Spring-
field, Va., no later than 5 p.m.
Feb. 13, 2013. MOPH scholar-
ship information and an appli-
cation can be obtained by
visiting the MOPH website at
www.purpleheart.org.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social hour
follows. All Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are welcome. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-
746-1135, Ted Archambault at
352-382-0462 or Bion St.
Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men'sAuxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Monday. LAVFW meets at 5
p.m. and the membership
meeting is at 6:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday at the post. Call
the post at 352-447-3495 for in-
formation about the post and its
activities.

See VETERANS/Page A14


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A14 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012


Christmas carols Barbershop style!


BOB SPENCE/Special to the Chronicle
The Chorus of the Highlands, Citrus County Chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society, has been performing Christ-
mas programs for local events. Pictured getting ready, with their Christmas ties, are members of the chorus, singing as
an octet, for a small gathering for a holiday event. From left are: Art Lemieux, Barry Disbrow, Fran Donohoe (director),
Dick Lamery, Howard Christ and Vern Stephan. They have been busy singing and enjoying the Christmas season, and
invite men of any age who like to sing and would like to learn barbershop harmony to visit them starting in January. The
chorus meets in Inverness, and more information can be obtained by calling 352-382-0336.


Creative Quilters' Christmas


JOAN NOVAK/Special to the Chronicle
Creative Quilters brought bags of nonperishable food to its annual Christmas party for St. Ann's Episcopal Church to re-
plenish the food pantry for parishioners who need assistance. The Rev. Cheryl and Bert Bakker, pictured, came to ac-
cept the gift bags of food. The members enjoyed a variety of appetizers and punch while chatting and watching a slide
show of the photos taken during the past years, followed by lunch. Chris Novak and his wife, Kristin Brinner, the designers
of the Creative Quilters website, made a presentation. The couple then offered to sit down, one on one, with any mem-
ber who hasn't established an account or is having trouble accessing the site.


Dec. 31 to Jan. 4 MENUS


SENIOR DINING
Monday: Pork riblet with brown gravy, Southern-style turnip
greens, hoppin'john, banana loaf, whole-grain roll, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: New Year's Day: All sites closed.
Wednesday: Baked chicken thigh with chicken gravy,
mashed potatoes, green beans, graham crackers, slice
whole-grain bread with margarine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Hamburger patty on bun with ketchup and


VETERANS
Continued from Page A13

Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets at
7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome. Call
Commander Tom Gallagher at
860-1629 for information and
directions.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.

SERVICES
& GROUPS
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to vet-
erans in need. Food donations
and volunteers are always wel-
comed and needed. The
CCVC is on the DAV property
in Inverness at the corner of
Paul and Independence, off
U.S. 41 north. Hours of opera-
tion are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday. Ap-
pointments are encouraged by


calling 352-400-8952. CCVC
general meetings are at 10
a.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the DAV building in
Inverness. All active duty and
honorably discharged veter-
ans, their spouses, widows
and widowers, along with other
veterans' organizations and
current coalition members are
welcome. The CCVC is a non-
profit corporation; donations
are tax deductible. Members
can renew with Gary
Williamson at 352-527-4537,
or at the meeting. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Gerald A. Shonk Chapter
70 of Inverness announces the
design and availability of this
year's Citrus County Veter-
ans Appreciation Commem-
orative Pin. In keeping with
this year's theme, "Honoring
our Military Retirees," the na-
tional symbol of the bald eagle
will represent the men and
women who made military
service a career. The image is
set in the outline of Citrus
County.
The pins are still available
for $3 each by calling the
chapter at 352-344-3464, or
John Seaman at 352-860-
0123. They are also available
at the Citrus County Veterans
Service Office. All proceeds
benefit Chapter 70's scholar-
ship fund and veterans' assis-
tance programs.
Hunger and Homeless


mustard, baked beans, yellow corn with diced tomato, mixed
fruit, low-fat milk.
Friday: Chicken salad, beet and onion salad, three-bean
salad, citrus fruit, slice whole-grain bread with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include: Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal River,
Homosassa Springs, Inverness and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support Services at 352-527-5975.


Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran
in need of food, haircut, voter
ID, food stamps, medical as-
sistance or more blankets is
asked to call Ed Murphy at the
Hunger and Homeless Coali-
tion at 352-382-0876, or pass
along this phone number to the
veteran.
Open spots still remain for
those couples and individuals
interested in taking a trip to
Hawaii with a group of veter-
ans, their families and friends.
The annual trek, coordinated
and led by Don McLean, a
U.S. Navy veteran, is sched-
uled this year for Feb. 21
through March 9. Participants
will visit the islands of Oahu
(Hale Koa Hotel), Kauai (Mar-
riott), Hawaii (stay in the KMC
inside the volcano) and Maui
(Royal Lahina Resort). Reser-
vations should be made as
soon as possible. Call McLean
at 352-637-5131, or email
dmclean8@tampabay.rr.com.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency
ServiceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, of email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored with
centerpieces with their names


on them at The Old
Homosassa Veterans'
Memorial. Call Shona Cook at
352-422-8092.
Ex-military and retired mil-
itary personnel are needed to
assist the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and
non-law enforcement pro-
grams.Criminal background
check and membership are re-
quired. Email Vince Maida at
vsm440@aol.com, or call
917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA),
provides tailored care for veter-
ans and their families. The pro-
gram is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and staff
is trained to provide Hospice
care specific to illnesses and
conditions unique to each mili-
tary era or war. It also provides
caregiver education and a
recognition program to honor
veterans' services and
sacrifices. HPH Hospice care
and programs do not affect
veterans' benefits. Call the
Citrus Team Office at 352-
527-4600.
Yoga teacher Ann Sand-
strom is associated with the
national service organization,
Yoga For Vets. Free classes
to combat veterans are offered
by her at several locations and
times. Call her at 352-
382-7397.


In SERVICE


Samuel
Shewbart
Air Force Reserve
Airman 1st Class
Samuel D. Shewbart
graduated from basic
military training at
Lackland Air Force
Base, San Antonio,
Texas.
The airman com-
pleted an intensive,


Samuel
Shewbart
U.S. Air Force
Reserve.


eight-week program that in-
cluded training in military disci-
pline and studies, Air Force


core values, physical
fitness, and basic war-
fare principles and
skills.
Airmen who com-
plete basic training
earn four credits to-
ward an associate in
applied science degree
through the Commu-
nity College of the Air
Force.
Shewbart is the son


of Felicia Shewbart of Crystal
River. He is a 2012 graduate of
Lecanto High School.


Divorces 12/17/12 to 12/23/12
Dawn Marie Dearth, Lecanto
vs. David S. Dearth,
Homosassa Springs
Jonathan Delicate, Ocala vs.
Dondi Delicate, Citrus Springs
Edwin R. Peters, Crystal
River vs. Debra K. Peters,
Beverly Hills

Marriages 12/17/12 to
12/23/12
Dale Nolan Hartzell,
Inverness/Dawn Marie Reed,
Inverness
Timothy Paul Proctor,


ST r ere's the prob-
lem. When she
Comes to eat at
our house, we serve meat
and vegetables plenty of
vegetables. She can eat all
the vegetables she wants,
and she never has to touch
the meat. Which is fine -
there's more meat for the
rest of us. But when we go to
her house, she serves only
vegetables."
My friend Jackson has
just returned from his vege-
tarian sister-in-
law's house,
where she
hosted the holi-
day meal as she
does in alter-
nating years.
"There's never
any meat at her
place," he says.
"It's not fair."
"Is she a good JIMI
cook?" I asked. MU
"Yes, but MUL
you're missing
the point. Why is it that we
bend over backward to ac-
commodate her by serving
mashed potatoes and
creamed corn and cran-
berry sauce, but she never
makes the tiniest bit of meat
for us?"
"Wow, you are really
bending over backward," I
interjected. "It's not as if
you had all that stuff lying
around your house anyway"
"Once again, you're miss-
ing the point. I'm not saying
she has to go out and slaugh-
ter a cow just so I can have a
piece of meat, but come on!
Would it kill her to put a lit-
tle chicken on the table for
the holidays? I'm not even
asking her to cook a turkey
or a ham just a chicken.
Not even a big one. A
chicken is practically a veg-
etable anyway It's like a
vegetable with legs."
"Yes, it's hard to believe
that someone who wouldn't
hurt a fly won't cook you a
chicken. So I guess you had
to fill up on chips and dip."
"If only She doesn't have
anything like that. It's all
pieces of cauliflower and
broccoli with hummus and


Inverness/Alyssa Marie Gladu,
Inverness
Cali Rosario, Inverness/
Patricia Ann Simard, Inverness

Divorces and marriages filed
in the state of Florida are a
matter of public record,
available from each county's
Clerk of the Courts Office. For
Citrus County, call the clerk at
352-341-6400 or visit www.
clerk.citrus.fl.us/. For
proceedings filed in another
county, contact the clerk in that
area.


olives and little bits of gooey
cheese that a friend of hers
makes. There's no real food
anywhere."
"My life did flash in front
of my eyes, but it wasn't
from the lack of meat. It was
when Sarah started asking
for the recipes for stuff. 'Oh,
that was delicious. You'd
never know that was a
gluten-free cake. Can I have
the recipe?' Yesterday she
made me lentil soup for
lunch. What is that? Her sis-
ter is a bad influ-
ence on her."
Jackson's wife,
Sarah, regularly
prepares things
Jack distrusts
under the guise of
keeping him
healthy. "What's
this?" is a question
I've heard at their
dinner table
dozens of times.
EN "It's a fish taco,"
Sarah might reply.
"All the magazines say we
should eat less meat and
more fish. Fish once a week
isn't going to kill you. You
could stand to lose some
weight."
"Yeah, I see those people
in the magazines you read.
All skin and bones like your
sister That can't be healthy"
"Can you imagine what
would happen if I told
Sarah she could stand to
lose some weight?" Jack
asks me.
"It would upset the bal-
ance of world peace; it
would cause untold misery;
life as we know it would
come to an end," I said.
"Go ahead, make fun of
me," Jack said. "But when
someone invites you to their
house for dinner, it would be
nice if they served an actual
dinner"
"That's the holiday spirit.
The good news is we all
know what to get you for
Christmas next year," I said.
"The Spam Gift Collection."


Jim Mullen' can be reached
on the Web at
JimMullenBooks. com.


Sunday PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A12.


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TOGETHER & COMMUNITY


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1
Ll











SPORTS


* Florida Gators
fly by Air Force
in Orange Bowl
Basketball
Classic./B2


0 NBA, college basketball/B2
0 NFL, college football/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 The Game/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Florida teen chases lifelong dream to Brazil


Jeremy Potter trains to be professional

soccer player with Sao Paulo club


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
FLORAL CITY He still
seemed sleepy, trying to recover
from a 12-hour flight and the
three-hour change in time zones.
But Jeremy Potter was back home
in Floral City after spending six
months in what has become his
new home, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
Potter turned 16 just four
months ago, but he is on his way
to becoming what he always
dreamed of being a top-line
professional soccer player After
his Aug. 31 birthday, he signed a
pro contract with Futbol Club Jar-
inu in Sao Paola.
He has lived on his own in


Brazil since June in a residence
set up for him with Goreti Cunha
and her son, Victor He didn't
know the language (Portuguese)
when he arrived, he didn't know
anybody, and he didn't expect to
be treated as an outcast by many
of his own teammates.
"I was homesick for about a
month," Potter said. "I was crying
every night."
He talked with his mother, Re-
bekah, via computer every day
And while everything he grew up
with was about 3,700 miles away,
"He never said one time I want to
come home," she said.
The reason: "I wanted it,"
Jeremy said.
Only time will tell if he has the


It's getting up
and going every day
24/7, with no break
really.
Jeremy Potter
a 16-year-old who trains with
a soccer club in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

talent to play the game he loves
on a major stage, perhaps some-
where in Europe. But the road,
previously littered with rejec-
tions from the Olympic Develop-
ment Program and elite clubs
based in the Tampa area, is open.
Few, if any, U.S.-born soccer
players who are Potter's age have
signed pro contracts with Brazil-
ian clubs. By doing so, he has
committed to the rigors of an
everyday career He spends two


hours a day on his education
through virtual schooling via com-
puter The rest of his time is spent
training and learning soccer
"I just love to play," Potter said.
"I wanted a change, to see how
other people play."
But it is no longer playing a
game. It's a business, requiring
constant attention.
"It's getting up and going every
day, 24/7, with no break really," he
said.
While Potter is still in training
camp, he returned to Floral City
on Christmas Eve. He will in
Florida until February since soc-
cer season in Brazil doesn't start
until March. =.: .
In the meantime, he trains in a ,,-44 .- .-
weight room and plays 5-on-5 in- ~ .
door soccer during the week. He Special to the Chronicle
also scrimmages on Sundays to Jeremy Potter, 16, of Floral City,
learning as much as possible. signed a professional contract to
play soccer with Futbol Club
See Page B4 Jarinu in Sao Paola, Brazil.


= Boys Cross Country Runner of the Yearfinalists AND ALL-CHRONICLE TEAM =





County frontrunners









a






'I
--


Corey Pollard, Sam Alford,
Crystal River senior Lecanto sophomore


Brandon Harris,
Crystal River junior


Alford Harris, Pollard finalists for Boys Cross Country Runner of the Year


Sometimes there is no guesswork in
picking the most deserving athletes
to honor for an award.
Crystal River's Brandon Harris and
Corey Pollard and Lecanto's Sam Alford
were the only three Citrus County male
cross country runners
to break the 18-minute
mark in 2012.
For that reason alone,
among many others, the
three teens are up for
the Chronicle's Boys
Cross Country Runner
of the Year award.
SThe finalists have
Jon-Michael standing invitations to
the Chronicle sports
oracchi banquet at the conclu-
ON POINT sion of the 2012-13
school year, where the
winner will be announced.
All three had great seasons and, overall,
were the top three runners in the county.
While Harris and Pollard pushed each
other throughout the season as a potent
1-2 punch for the Pirates, Alford was
clearly the best runner for the Panthers by
nearly half a minute at the end.


All-Chronicle
boys cross country team
Cameron Grant,
Citrus sophomore
Grant came in third at the Citrus County
Championship meet with a time of 18:16
followed by a 13th-place finish at the
Citrus-Hernando meet.
Brandon Harris,
Crystal River junior
Harris won the Citrus County Champi-
onship meet and the Crystal River Invitational.
His runner-up spot at the District 2A-5 meet
and 11th-place finish at the Region 2A-2 meet
made him the only Citrus County male runner
to run in the state meet.
Corey Pollard,
Crystal River senior
Pollard's highlights included his third-place
finish in the District 2A-5 meet and second at
the Citrus County Championship and the
Crystal River Invitational.


Sam Alford,
Lecanto sophomore
Alford came in fourth in the Citrus County
Championship meet and Whispering Pines
Invitational, and seventh in the Citrus-Hernando
meet. The underclassman also ran a 17:47 in
the District 3A-6 meet to come in 16th place.
Connor Dupler,
Lecanto senior
Dupler capped his last season by finishing
sixth at the Citrus County Championship in
a time of 18:36. He also ran a 18:33 at the
Citrus-Hernando meet.
Matt Lopes,
Lecanto sophomore
Lopes came in seventh at the Citrus County
Championship and finished in 10th place at
the Crystal River Invitational.
Colin Spain,
Lecanto sophomore
Spain ran a 18:29 at the Citrus County
Championship meet to come in fifth place.


Falcons

eye Bucs as

regular

opponent

Atlanta plans for
business as usual
against Tampa Bay

Associated Press
ATLANTA Falcons
starters are not expecting a
short day against Tampa Bay on
Sunday just because they've
clinched home-field advantage
in the NFC playoffs.
"We're getting paid so we've
got to go out and play," center
Todd McClure said.
Added quarterback Matt
Ryan: "My mindset is to pre-
pare myself to play the entire
game and that's the way I'm
going to go into it and really it
will be no different than any
other week."
No different? It's not that
clear-cut, at least for those look-
ing at the game from outside
the Falcons' meetings.
The Falcons (13-2) would
seem to have little to play for
other than the goal of bringing
momentum into the playoffs.
Atlanta coach Mike Smith
would be second-guessed if a
key player suffers an injury
which could hurt the team's
postseason hopes.
There's so much uncertainty
about how long starters Ryan,
tight end Tony Gonzalez and re-
ceivers Roddy White and Julio
Jones will play there is no bet-
ting line on the game.
Smith is motivated to end his
streak of three straight playoff
losses. The Falcons also were
the NFC's top seed when they
lost to Green Bay after the 2010
season. Atlanta was embar-
rassed in a 24-2 loss at the Gi-
ants in the 2011 playoffs.
The success of the Packers
and Giants, who each won
Super Bowls after beating the
Falcons in the playoffs, has
shown momentum is more im-
portant than carrying the best
See Page B3


------------------------------------


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


UConn


breaks


Stanford's


win streak


Baylor beats

Southeastern La.
Associated Press
STANFORD, Calif. Kaleena
Mosqueda-Lewis and second-
ranked Connecticut played spoiler
and streak-buster this time, snap-
ping No. 1 Stanford's nation-lead-
ing 82-game home unbeaten run
with a surprisingly easy 61-35 rout
Saturday
It was the Huskies who saw the
end of their NCAA record 90-game
winning streak at Maples Pavilion
with a 71-59 loss two years ago, al-
most to the day on Dec. 30.
Mosqueda-Lewis scored 19
points as UConn (11-0) thoroughly
outplayed Stanford (11-1) on both
ends of the floor in this highly
touted game featuring the coun-
try's top programs and Final Four
regulars from opposite coasts.
Chiney Ogwumike had 18 points
and 13 rebounds as Stanford lost at
Maples Pavilion for the first time
since March 2007.
No. 3 Baylor 106, SE
Louisiana 41
WACO, Texas Jordan Madden
scored all 13 of her points in the first
half and third-ranked Baylor took con-
trol early in a 106-41 victory over
Southeastern Louisiana on Saturday
night.
The Lady Bears (10-1) have won 46
consecutive games at home, now the
longest active streak in women's col-
lege basketball. Earlier Saturday, No. 2
Connecticut won 61-35 at top-ranked
Stanford to end the 82-game home
streak by the Cardinal.
No. 5 Notre Dame 74,
No. 11 Purdue 47
SOUTH BEND, Ind. Kayla
McBride scored 18 points, Natalie
Achonwa had 15 points and 17 re-
bounds, and Skylar Diggins shook off
early foul trouble to finish with 16
points Saturday to help Notre Dame
rout Purdue.
Courtney Moses led the Boilermak-
ers (11-2) with 13 points and Taylor
Manuel added 12.
Diggins also had her 300th career
steal 5:37 into the second half when
she poked the ball away from Court-
ney Moses and drove in for a layup,
which pushed Notre Dame's lead to
23. The senior guard is the third player
in Notre Dame history with at least 300
career steals.
No. 9 Maryland 72,
Hartford 40
COLLEGE PARK, Md. -Alyssa
Thomas had 22 points and 11 re-
bounds, helping No. 9 Maryland cruise
to a victory over Hartford in the cham-
pionship game of the Terrapin Classic.
Tianna Hawkins scored 16 points
and Alicia DeVaughn added 13 points
and 13 rebounds for Maryland (10-2),
which has won six straight games. The
Terrapins improved to 96-5 in non-con-
ference games at Comcast Center.
Daphne Elliott had nine points for
Hartford (9-4).
Hawkins was selected as the Most
Valuable Player of the tournament.
No. 18 Oklahoma 79,
Cal State Northridge 57
NORMAN, Okla. -Aaryn Ellenberg
scored 24 points, and Portia Durrett
had 14 points and 10 rebounds to lead
Oklahoma to a victory over Cal State
Northridge.
Ellenberg was 5 of 9 from 3-point
range for the Sooners (10-2), who
made 12 of 28 from behind the arc in
their last non-conference tuneup be-
fore the start of Big 12 play.
Janae Sharpe and Jianni Jackson
scored 12 points each for the Mata-
dors (6-5).
No. 23 Colorado 84,
New Mexico 39
BOULDER, Colo. Lexy Kresl
scored 20 points to lead unbeaten Col-
orado over New Mexico.
Kresl was 5 of 5 from 3-point range,
tying a school record for most 3-point


attempts without a miss.
Arielle Roberson scored 18 points,
and Chucky Jeffery had 11 points,
eight assists and eight rebounds. Jen
Reese added 10 points.
No. 19 South Carolina 66,
Western Carolina 44
COLUMBIA, S.C. Tiffany Mitchell
scored 12 points to lead No. 19 South
Carolina to an easy 66-44 victory over
Western Carolina.
leasia Walker had nine points for
South Carolina (12-2), and her five
blocks pushed her over the 200 mark
for her career, the 13th Gamecocks
player to reach that milestone.


Florida flys by Air Force


Duke down Santa

Clara; Louisville

beats Kentucky

Associated Press

SUNRISE, Fla. Kenny Boyn-
ton snapped a shooting slump Sat-
urday with three 3-pointers in the
second half, when No. 14 Florida
pulled away to beat Air Force 78-
61 in the second game of the Or-
ange Bowl Basketball Classic.
Boynton had made only 4 of 32
from 3-point range over the previ-
ous five games, but he hit three in
a span of 8 minutes to break the
game open. The Gators used their
superior size and smothering de-
fense to grind down the Falcons,
who shot 48 percent in the first
half and 32 percent in the second
half.
Florida (9-2) won for only the
second time in the past four
games. Air Force (8-3) fell to 2-77
against ranked teams.
No. 1 Duke 90,
Santa Clara 77
DURHAM, N.C. Seth Curry
scored 12 of his season-high 31
points during the late run that helped
No. 1 Duke pull away for a 90-77 vic-
tory over pesky Santa Clara.
Mason Plumlee added 22 points
and 13 rebounds for the Blue Devils
(12-0), who needed a huge run late to
overcome a big game from Kevin
Foster and a real scare from the
Broncos (11-3).
Foster scored 18 of his 29 points in
the first half, and his soaring baseline
dunk put the Broncos up 45-41 with
16:30 left.
No. 2 Michigan 88,
Central Michigan 73
ANN ARBOR, Mich. Trey Burke
had 22 points and 10 assists as No. 2
Michigan finished its non-conference
schedule with a 88-73 victory over
Central Michigan.
Michigan played without junior Tim
Hardaway Jr. who missed the first
game of his career with an ankle in-
jury. That meant the Wolverines
started three freshmen Nik
Stauskas, Glenn Robinson III and
Caris LeVert along with Burke and
Jordan Morgan.
No. 4 Louisville 80,
Kentucky 77
LOUISVILLE, Ky. Russ Smith
scored 21 points and Chane Behanan
had 20 and Louisville ended a four-
game losing streak to rival Kentucky.
Peyton Siva added 19 points as the
Cardinals (12-1) won a hard-fought
Battle of the Bluegrass. Though the
Cardinals trail the series 30-15, their
victory followed last spring's 69-61
national semifinal loss to the Wildcats,
who went on to win their eighth na-
tional championship.
No. 6 Kansas 89,
American University 57
LAWRENCE, Kan. Travis Rele-
ford scored 19 points and No. 6


Associated Press
Florida's Patric Young, center, and Air Force's Kyle Green, left, and Kamryn Williams wait for a rebound
during the second half of Saturday's game in Sunrise. Florida won 78-61.


Kansas hit a scorching 13 of its first
18 3-point attempts, rolling to an 89-
57 victory over American University
on Saturday night.
Kansas (11-1) took command with
a 21-4 spree in the opening minutes
and wound up with six players scoring
at least nine points against the out-
manned Eagles (4-9). Releford was 7
for 8 from the floor, including 5 of 6 3-
pointers. Elijah Johnson had 12
points and was 4 for 5 from behind
the arc as the Jayhawks finished with
15-for-24 3-point shooting.
No. 9 Syracuse 57,
Alcorn State 36
SYRACUSE, N.Y.- C.J. Fair
scored 13 points, Trevor Cooney
added 12, all in the second half to key
a late surge, and No. 9 Syracuse beat
Alcorn State 57-36 in the final game
of the Gotham Classic.
It was the 901st win for Orange
coach Jim Boeheim, one behind Bob
Knight for second place all-time among
Division I men's coaches. Duke's Mike
Krzyzewski leads with 939 wins.
No. 10 Ohio St. 87,
Chicago St. 44
COLUMBUS, Ohio- Deshaun
Thomas scored 17 points and Ohio
State regained its shooting touch in its
final tuneup before beginning Big Ten
play.
LaQuinton Ross added 15 points,
Lenzelle Smith Jr. had 13, Amedeo
Della Valle had career-high 11 and
Aaron Craft scored 10 for the Buck-
eyes (10-2).
The Buckeyes hit 33 of 58 shots
from the field (57 percent).
No. 12 Illinois 81,
Auburn 79
CHICAGO Tracy Abrams scored
a career-high 27 points for Illinois.
The Illini (13-1) saw an 11-point
lead shrink to one in the closing min-
utes, but they prevailed after falling to


Missouri in the Braggin' Rights game
a week earlier their first loss under
coach John Groce.
Frankie Sullivan buried a 3 for
Auburn (5-7) to make it 68-67 with
4:29 remaining. Illinois then hit 13 of
18 free throws the rest of the way for
a rare win at the United Center, where
they had dropped three straight and
five of six after winning 18 in a row.
No. 16 Creighton 87,
Evansville 70
OMAHA, Neb. Doug McDermott
scored 14 of his 29 points in a 6/2-
minute stretch of the second half
when No. 16 Creighton pulled away
from Evansville for an 87-70 victory
on Saturday night.
Gregory Echenique had 13 points
and 13 rebounds, Jahenns Manigat
added 13 points, and Avery Dingman
had 11 for the Bluejays (12-1), who
won their Missouri Valley Conference
opener.
No. 18 Butler 68,
Vanderbilt 49
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Rotnei
Clarke hit seven 3-pointers and fin-
ished with 22 points and the 18th-
ranked Butler Bulldogs shook off a
sluggish start and routed Vanderbilt
68-49 Saturday night for their seventh
straight victory.
The Bulldogs (10-2) missed their
first seven 3-pointers and led only 25-
22 at halftime before taking control of
the game with a 14-3 run to open the
second half.
North Carolina 79,
No. 20 UNLV 73
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. P.J. Hair-
ston scored 15 points in his first ca-
reer start for North Carolina.
Dexter Strickland added a season-
high 16 points for the Tar Heels (10-
3), who led by 15 points in the first
half and by nine at the break. But
UNC had to turn away a second-half


surge by the Runnin' Rebels (11-2) to
earn the program's 63rd straight
home win against nonconference op-
ponents.
No. 23 N.C. St. 84,
W. Michigan 68
RALEIGH, N.C. C.J. Leslie
scored 19 points to lead North Car-
olina State.
Richard Howell added 18 points on
8-of-8 shooting for the Wolfpack (10-2),
who won their sixth consecutive game.
N.C. State shot 55 percent from the
field, padding its NCAA-leading field
goal percentage.
T.J. Warren scored 15 points, Scott
Wood had 11 and Lorenzo Brown
added 10 for the Wolfpack.
No. 25 Kansas State 52,
Missouri-Kansas City 44
MANHATTAN, Kan. Rodney Mc-
Gruder scored 17 points, Thomas
Gipson had 13 points and six re-
bounds and No. 25 Kansas State
struggled to a 52-44 victory over Mis-
souri-Kansas City.
Playing without guards Angel Ro-
driguez and Martavious Irving due to
injuries, the Wildcats (10-2) shot 32
percent from the field and went 2 of
10 from beyond the arc in their first
game since beating then-No. 8
Florida on a neutral floor.
South Florida 61,
George Mason 57
TAMPA- Jawanza Poland scored
16 points as South Florida beat
George Mason 61-57 in a game that
saw a scary injury involving Bulls'
point guard Anthony Collins.
Collins was hurt with 10:30 to go in
the second half, which resulted in the
South Florida sophomore having his
neck and head stabilized before being
taken off the court on the stretcher.
It appeared Collins' head hit the
knee of another player. He did have
movement in his arms and legs.


Raptors rush to win against Magic


Associated Press

ORLANDO DeMar DeRozan
scored 21 points and Jose
Calderon added 15 points and 10
assists, helping the Toronto Rap-
tors to an easy 123-88 victory over
the injury-depleted Orlando
Magic on Saturday night.
Rookie Ed Davis had 18 points
and seven rebounds as Toronto
won for the seventh time in eight
games. The Raptors, who hit a
season-high 15 3-pointers, got 16
points apiece from Kyle Lowry
and Terrence Ross.
Rookie Andrew Nicholson led
Orlando with a career-high 22
points. Arron Afflalo added 14
points and Ish Smith had 13
points and six assists.
The Raptors hit nine of their
first 10 attempts from behind the
3- point line and built a 67-47 half-
time lead. Orlando cut the deficit
to 76-65 after two free throws by
Nicholson with 5:16 left in the
third quarter, but that was as
close as the Magic would get the
rest of the game.
The Magic played without start-
ing point guard Jameer Nelson
(hip) and his backup E'Twaun
Moore (elbow).
Hawks 109, Pacers 100
ATLANTA- Lou Williams had 21
points and a career-high 12 assists, Al
Horford added 20 points and the At-
lanta Hawks won their fourth straight,
109-100 over the Indiana Pacers.
David West scored a game-high 29
points for the Pacers, who had won
four straight and seven of eight.
Hawks coach Larry Drew started
Zaza Pachulia, who responded with 17
points and a game-high 14 rebounds.


Associated Press
Toronto Raptors guard Jose Calderondrives past Orlando Magic guard
Ish Smith during the first half of Saturday's game in Orlando.


Indiana never got closer than three
in the fourth quarter after Paul
George's three-point play made it 91-
88 at the 5:18 mark.
Nets 103, Cavaliers 100
NEW YORK Brook Lopez
scored a season-high 35 points and
grabbed 11 rebounds, and the Brook-
lyn Nets improved to 2-0 under in-


terim coach P.J. Carlesimo by beating
the Cleveland Cavaliers 103-100 on
Saturday night.
Lopez followed his 26-point, 11-re-
bound performance in a victory Friday
over Charlotte by shooting 13 of 20
from the field, making a number of
timely baskets in the fourth quarter
that the Nets ultimately needed to
hold on.


Timberwolves 111,
Suns 107
MINNEAPOLIS Nikola Pekovic
had 28 points and 11 rebounds and
Kevin Love added 23 points and 18
boards to lift the Minnesota Timber-
wolves to a 111-107 victory over the
Phoenix Suns on Saturday night.
Andrei Kirilenko added 20 points
and five rebounds for the Timber-
wolves, who were missing guard
Ricky Rubio because of back
spasms.
Luis Scola had 33 points and 10 re-
bounds for the Suns, who lost their
fifth straight game. They led 102-99
with 3:30 to play, but once again
failed to close it out.
Pekovic scored two quick ones un-
derneath but the Suns still had a
chance down three with 8.1 seconds
left. But Dante Cunningham stole the
inbounds pass to seal it.

Hornets 98, Bobcats 95
CHARLOTTE, N.C. Eric Gordon
had 24 points and seven assists,
helping the New Orleans Hornets
overcome a 21-point first-half deficit
and extend the Charlotte Bobcats'
losing streak to 18 games with a 98-
95 victory Saturday night.
The Bobcats are one game away
from a winless December. They
haven't won since Nov. 24.
Gordon, who hadn't played since
April 22 following arthroscopic right
knee surgery, was 5 of 13 from the
field and 12 of 14 from the free throw
line in 24 minutes.
Ryan Anderson had 19 points and
made a pair of 3-pointers in the final
period as the Hornets won for the
second time in three games.


B2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012


BASKETBALL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


== College Football BOWLS


Associated Press
Syracuse running back Prince-Tyson Gulley, front, and
guard Zack Chibane celebrate Gulley's third-quarter TD
against West Virginia in the Pinstripe Bowl game Saturday
at Yankee Stadium in New York. Syracuse won 38-14.



Syracuse plows



through WVU



and snow, 38-14


Associated Press

NEW YORK Prince-
Tyson Gulley ran for 217
yards and had three touch-
downs, Syracuse scored
twice on safeties and the
Orange bid a snow-covered
farewell to the Big East
with a 38-14 victory over
West Virginia in the Pin-
stripe Bowl on Saturday
Syracuse (8-5) will enter
the Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence on a roll after finish-
ing this season with six
wins in its last seven
games, capped by its sec-
ond postseason victory at
Yankee Stadium in the past
three years.
In a bowl game played in
a baseball stadium with
weather better suited for a
playoff game in Green Bay,
the team that plays in a
dome ended up being bet-
ter equipped to handle the
elements.
The Orange leaned on
their running game to plow
through former Big East
rival West Virginia (7-6) and
the snow. Jerome Smith
added 158 yards rushing.
Geno Smith connected
with Stedman Bailey for
two touchdown passes, but
the Mountaineers' quarter-
back also was sacked in the
end zone in the first half
and called for intentional
grounding in the end zone
in the second half as he
tried to avoid another sack.
Smith, an early Heisman
Trophy front-runner as the
Mountaineers got off to a 5-
0 start, was 18 for 26 for 197
yards in the final game of
his record-breaking career
Syracuse's Ryan Nassib
threw two touchdown
passes and an interception.

FIGHT HUNGER BOWL

Arizona State 62,
Navy 28
SAN FRANCISCO Taylor
Kelly threw four touchdown
passes and ran for a fifth
score to help Arizona State
rout Navy in the Fight Hunger
Bowl for the Sun Devils' first
bowl win in seven years.
Offensive MVP Marion
Grice ran for 159 yards and
two touchdowns for the Sun
Devils (8-5), who used their
fast-paced spread offense to
score touchdowns on their first
nine possessions.
That helped provide a bright
end to a successful first sea-
son at Arizona State for coach
Todd Graham, who helped the
Sun Devils win their most
games since 2007 and win a
bowl for the first time since the
2005 Insight Bowl against Rut-
gers. The Sun Devils also
capped their season by beat-
ing rival Arizona and winning a
bowl, a feat they had accom-
plished just once in the past 33
seasons.
The Midshipmen (8-5) have


FALCONS
Continued from Page B1

record into the postseason. That has
been a popular subject for Smith
and veteran Falcons players, in-
cluding McClure, this week.
"Like Todd says, there's no 'men-
tum like momentum," linebacker
Sean Weatherspoon said.
Atlanta has won two straight
since a loss at Carolina. Ryan has


lost five of their last six bowl
games. Among the few high-
lights for Navy were Keenan
Reynolds' 3-yard TD pass to
Matt Aiken in the first half and
a 95-yard kickoff return for a
score by Gee Gee Greene in
the third quarter.
ARMED FORCES
BOWL

Rice 33,
Air Force 14
FORT WORTH, Texas -
Freshman Driphus Jackson
threw for 264 yards in relief for
injured starter Taylor McHar-
gue, including two touchdown
passes to Jordan Taylor, and
Rice beat Air Force in the
Armed Forces Bowl.
Jackson's first series after
taking over for McHargue
ended with a bad pitch for a
fumble near the goal line only
2 seconds before halftime,
when the Owls (7-6) trailed
14-7.
But Jackson made up for it
after halftime, when Rice
scored 26 straight points. Tay-
lor caught nine passes for 153
yards, with a 16-yard TD pass
from McHargue in the first
quarter. McHargue left be-
cause of an apparent head in-
jury after a helmet-to-helmet
collision with about 5 minutes
left in the first half.
Air Force (6-7), which
scored on consecutive drives
in the second quarter with
backup quarterback Kale
Pearson in the game, was
held to a season-low 214 total
yards.
ALAMO BOWL

Texas 31,
Oregon State 27
SAN ANTONIO David
Ash threw two fourth-quarter
touchdown passes, the last a
36-yard strike to Marquise
Goodwin with 2:24 left, to give
Texas a 31-27 comeback vic-
tory over No. 15 Oregon State
in the Alamo Bowl on Saturday
night.
The Longhorns (9-4) never
led before Goodwin scored his
second touchdown on a deep
post pattern, just a play after
Texas converted a fourth-and-1
play to keep its chances alive.
Storm Woods ran for 118
yards and scored two touch-
downs for Oregon State (9-4).
The Beavers left stunned after
looking as though they would
wrap up their first 10-win sea-
son since 2006.
The victory was a dose of
much-needed good news for
Texas after coming into the
game under a cloud of ques-
tions following the suspen-
sions of two players on Friday.
Backup quarterback Chase
McCoy and injured linebacker
Jordan Hicks weren't on the
sideline, a day after Texas
sent home the two players for
violating team rules.


Associated Press
Houston Texans quarterback Matt Schaub hands the ball to running back Justin Forsett during the fourth quarter of the
Dec. 23 game against the Minnesota Vikings in Houston.




Texans in tough spot


Houston weigh

playing started
BARRY WILNER
AP Pro Football Writer

Here's how damaging los-
ing two of their last three
games has been to the Hous-
ton Texans.
If they fail at Indianapolis
on Sunday, they could go
from the AFC's top seed,
with home-field advantage
in the playoffs to the third-
ranked team with no bye.
Houston has the same 12-
3 record as Denver, but has
beaten the Broncos, and is
one game up on New Eng-
land. The Patriots earned
one of those victories
against the Texans this
month and have the
tiebreaker if both teams fin-
ish with the same record.
So, a victory at division
rival Indianapolis, which is
set as the No. 5 seed with a
wild card, becomes vital.
And Houston never has won
in Indy
"We know we have a huge
challenge," Texans coach
Gary Kubiak said. "Tough
place to play, and histori-
cally a tough place to play
for us. We are going to have
to play a lot better, so we are
kind of focused on ourselves
trying to get better."
The Colts get back Chuck
Pagano, who last coached
them in September before
undergoing treatment for
leukemia. Interim coach
Bruce Arians was 9-3 filling
in.
"I asked the players one
thing, 'If (Pagano) couldn't
come back for this week,
let's make sure we extend
the season until he could
come back,"' Arians said.
"That meant one playoff
game, two playoff games,
whatever it took and our
guys bought the cause.
"Professional athletes are
funny cats. When you get
them to play for something
more than a paycheck, they
will do some funny things."
Kansas City (2-13)
at Denver (12-3)

Miami (7-8) at New
England (11-4)
When the Broncos fell at New
England to drop to 2-3, they
couldn't possibly have envi-
sioned not losing again and hav-
ing a shot at the AFC's top seed.
A win over the wretched Chiefs
gets them 11 in a row. That and
a loss by the Texans makes
them No. 1 in the conference.
Kansas City is in the running
with Jacksonville for another,
uh, distinction: the top overall
draft pick next April.


seven touchdown passes with no in-
terceptions in the two wins. Smith
wants the Falcons to enter the play-
offs on a roll.
"I think it's very important for
us," Smith said. "We've talked all
along about having a different mis-
sion every week, but we want the
same result, to win.
"We're going to go through the
process like we always do. I think it's
very important for us to finish the
regular season off the right way and
Tampa is a very good football team."


hspros, cons of

rs against Indy
The Patriots must have be-
lieved a bye was beyond reach
when they were beaten two
weeks ago by San Francisco.
Instead, they would move up to
No. 2 in the AFC should they
take the Dolphins for the sixth
time in the last seven meetings
at Foxborough while Houston
loses.
They could even get the top
seed if Denver and Houston fall.
Miami would be riding quite a
high by finishing off a .500
record with a victory at New
England.
Baltimore (10-5)
at Cincinnati (9-6)
A potential warmup for the wild-
card round, but only if the Patriots
lose to Miami and the Ravens
win. The Bengals are locked into
the sixth seed in the AFC.
Baltimore struggled on both
sides of the ball for nearly a
month until it blew out the Gi-
ants last Sunday. The Bengals
picked up what could become a
signature victory by taking
down the Steelers in Pittsburgh
to clinch their second straight
playoff spot.
Just like against the Steelers
before last weekend, Bengals
QB Andy Dalton has not de-
feated the Ravens in three tries.
Dallas (8-7) at
Washington (9-6)
It doesn't get simpler than
this: The winner of the prime-
time affair takes the NFC East.
Dallas has been in this posi-
tion twice before against the
other division opponents, losing
to the Eagles in the 2008 and
the Giants a year ago in the fi-
nale with the East crown on the
line. The Cowboys have dis-
played moxie in winning five of
seven, but lost to the Redskins
on Thanksgiving Day.
'You live for games like this,"
Cowboys coach Jason Garrett
said.
Only if you win them. And
with the way Washington is per-
forming, from rookie sensation
Robert Griffin III at quarterback
to emerging playmakers else-
where, getting that victory will
be extremely difficult.
Green Bay (11-4)
at Minnesota (9-6)

Philadelphia (4-11)
at N.Y. Giants (8-7)

Chicago (9-6) at
Detroit (4-11)
In addition to the Packers
securing a first-round bye,
these games matter in the NFC
wild-card chase.


The Buccaneers (6-9) have lost
five straight games. The streak
began with a 24-23 home loss to the
Falcons on Nov 25. Tampa Bay was
a playoff contender before the sud-
den collapse.
Buccaneers coach Greg Schiano
said he can only wish he had
Smith's dilemma of deciding how
best to prepare his starters for the
playoffs.
"That's not my concern. That's
Mike's issue," Schiano said. "I wish
it were my issue to deal with, but


Minnesota is in the best spot,
if you want to call it that, consid-
ering the quality of the opposi-
tion. Awin and the Vikings are
in, regardless of whether Adrian
Peterson gets the 102 yards
rushing he needs for 2,000 -
or the 207 required to equal
Eric Dickerson's all-time single-
season mark.
"This is everything. All the
chips are in now," linebacker
Chad Greenway said. "We
wanted this. We asked for it."
If the Vikings do lose, and
Green Bay has won four in a
row and nine of 10, they need
losses by Dallas, Chicago and
New York.
The defending Super Bowl
champion Giants have fallen
apart the last two weeks
against playoff-bound oppo-
nents. Now they get the Eagles
in what almost certainly is Andy
Reid's finale after 14 seasons
as Philadelphia's coach.
Michael Vick, who also fig-
ures to be gone from Philly, re-
turns as the starting QB with
Nick Foles sidelined by a bro-
ken right hand.
Reeling Detroit has the
league's longest slide with
seven consecutive losses and
will be hard-pressed to chal-
lenge Chicago. The Bears are
very banged-up, but the de-
fense got back to making plays
and scoring touchdowns a
week ago at Arizona.
Arizona (5-10) at
San Fran. (10-4-1)

St. Louis (7-7-1)
at Seattle (10-5)
After the beating the Sea-
hawks put on the 49ers, clinch-
ing a playoff berth, they are
soaring with confidence. They
probably aren't thinking about
stealing the NFC West, know-
ing the odds of the Cardinals
winning at San Francisco.
Still, their closing burst of six
wins in seven games, including
150 points in the last three out-
ings, must make potential op-
ponents shudder.
"We've been playing well for
quite a while and I can feel it in
the room and the guys can un-
derstand it and all," coach Pete
Carroll said. "But that doesn't
mean anything unless we can
do it again."
San Francisco must fix a
leaky defense, which might not
be an issue against the impo-
tent Cardinals but will be in the
postseason. The Niners also
can grab back a bye with a vic-
tory and a loss by Green Bay.
Cleveland (5-10)
at Pittsburgh (7-8)
So strange to see the Steel-
ers as an also-ran with a week
remaining. They need to redis-
cover their big playmakers.


not this year. My whole deal is get-
ting my team prepared. We'll be fa-
miliar with all the backups in case
they play, but we're planning on
seeing their starters and we'll go
from there."
Tampa Bay has been over-
whelmed by a wave of turnovers, in-
cluding five in two straight weeks.
Josh Freeman has thrown four in-
terceptions in each of the last two
losses. He threw only three inter-
ceptions in his previous eight
games.


They struggled in close
games, previously a strength,
going 3-5 in games decided by
three points or less.
"We've been in a lot of close
football games and we just con-
sistently haven't made the nec-
essary plays to win those
games," coach Mike Tomlin
said. 'You have to make the
critical plays down the stretch in
those games if you want to be a
consistent winner."
Cleveland, out of the playoffs
for the 10th consecutive year,
will undergo plenty of changes
in the offseason under new
owner Jimmy Haslam.
Oakland (4-11)
at San Diego (6-9)
Likely the final game for Norv
Turner as Chargers coach, but
the team has won its last two
road games. San Diego has al-
lowed only three more points
than it has scored, an indication
this might not be too dire a situa-
tion for someone else to tackle.
Oakland? That might be
hopeless. The Raiders are bet-
ter than only three teams in
points and have yielded more
than everyone except Ten-
nessee and Buffalo.
Jacksonville (2-13)
at Tennessee (5-10)
Two coaches with short re-
sumes that could be marred by
losing their positions.
Mike Mularkey has done
nothing to improve Jack-
sonville's offense to be fair,
his best player, Maurice Jones-
Drew, has appeared in only six
games. His first season with the
Jaguars could be his last.
Mike Munchak, who spent
three decades with the Ten-
nessee franchise, was given an
ultimatum by owner Bud Adams
to upgrade the Titans' perform-
ance. It hasn't happened.
Carolina (6-9) at
New Orleans (7-8)
This season won't end the
way the Saints hoped. At least
they can put behind the bounty
scandal and look ahead to get-
ting back coach Sean Payton
- depending on his contract
situation with the team and
contending next year.
The Panthers might have
saved coach Ron Rivera's job
with a surge. They've won three
straight and four of five.
New York Jets (6-9)
at Buffalo (5-10)
The mess at the Meadow-
lands mercifully concludes with
Greg McElroy at quarterback
trying to avoid another beat-
down. Bills defensive end Mario
Williams, who's had his own
disappointing year, must be
salivating after seeing San
Diego get 11 sacks last week.


CALLING ALL
SENIOR GOLFERS!
Membership is open
for 2013 Golf Season

Save $10
by Dec. 31, 2012
North Central Florida Senior
Amateur Golf Tour. Join Today!
www.senioramateurgolftour.net
"Where Amleurs Are Trealed Like Pro's"
IOODLFH


FOOTBALL


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 B3






B4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012




College football
bowl schedule
Monday, Dec. 24
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
SMU 43, Fresno State 10
Wednesday, Dec. 26
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
Central Michigan 24, Western Kentucky 21
Thursday, Dec. 27
Military Bowl
At Washington
San Jose State 29, Bowling Green 20
Belk Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
Cincinnati 48, Duke 34
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Baylor 49, UCLA 26
Friday, Dec. 28
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Ohio 45, Louisiana-Monroe 14
Russell Athletic Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Virginia Tech 13, Rutgers 10, OT
Meineke Car Care Bowl
At Houston
Texas Tech 34, Minnesota 31
Saturday, Dec. 29
Armed Forces Bowl
At FortWorth, Texas
Rice 33, Air Force 14
Pinstripe Bowl
At New York
Syracuse 38, West Virginia 14
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
Arizona State (7-5) vs. Navy (8-4), 4 p.m.
(ESPN2)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Texas (8-4) vs. Oregon State (9-3), 6:45 p.m.
(ESPN)
Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl
AtTempe, Ariz.
Michigan State (6-6) vs. TCU (7-5), 10:15
p.m. (ESPN)
Monday, Dec. 31
Music City Bowl
At Nashville, Tenn.
Vanderbilt (8-4) vs. N.C. State (7-5), Noon
(ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El Paso,Texas
Georgia Tech (6-7) vs. Southern Cal (7-5), 2
p.m. (CBS)
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis, Tenn.
Iowa State (6-6) vs. Tulsa (10-3), 3:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
LSU (10-2) vs. Clemson (10-2), 7:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Tuesday, Jan. 1
Heart of Dallas Bowl
At Dallas
Purdue (6-6) vs. Oklahoma State (7-5), Noon
(ESPNU)
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville, Fla.
Mississippi State (8-4) vs. Northwestern (9-
3), Noon (ESPN2)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Georgia (11-2) vs. Nebraska (10-3), 1 p.m.
(ABC)
Outback Bowl
At Tampa, Fla.
South Carolina (10-2) vs. Michigan (8-4), 1
p.m. (ESPN)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Stanford (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (8-5), 5 p.m.
(ESPN)
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Northern Illinois (12-1) vs. Florida State (11-
2), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Wednesday, Jan. 2
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Florida (11-1) vs. Louisville (10-2), 8:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Thursday, Jan. 3
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
Kansas State (11-1) vs. Oregon (11-1), 8:30
p.m. (ESPN)
Friday, Jan. 4
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington, Texas
Texas A&M (10-2) vs. Oklahoma (10-2), 8
p.m. (FOX)
Saturday, Jan. 5
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. Mississippi (6-6), 1 p.m.
(ESPN)
Sunday, Jan. 6
GoDaddycom Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
Kent State (11-2) vs. Arkansas State (9-3), 9
p.m. (ESPN)
Monday, Jan. 7
BCS National Championship
At Miami
Notre Dame (12-0) vs. Alabama (12-1), 8:30
p.m. (ESPN)
Saturday, Jan. 19
RAYCOM College Football All-Star Classic
At Montgomery, Ala.
Stars vs. Stripes, 3 p.m. (CBSSN)
East-West Shrine Classic
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
East vs. West, 4 p.m. (NFLN)
Saturday, Jan. 26
Senior Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
North vs. South, 4 p.m. (NFLN)


NCAA Football
Monday
Music City Bowl at Nashville,Tenn.
FAVORITEOPEN O/U UNDERDOG
Vanderbilt 5 712 (52) NC State
Sun Bowl at El Paso, Texas
Southern Cal 10 8 (64) Georgia Tech
Liberty Bowl at Memphis,Tenn.
Iowa St. +3 1 (51) Tulsa
Chick-fil-A Bowl at Atlanta
LSU 3 6 (59) Clemson
Tuesday
Heart of Dallas Bowl
Oklahoma St. 18 17 (70) Purdue
Gator Bowl at Jacksonville, Fla.
Northwestern +2 1 (53) Mississippi St.
Outback Bowl at Tampa, Fla.
South Carolina 4 5/2 (48) Michigan
Capital One Bowl at Orlando, Fla.


Georgia 8 9 (61) Nebraska
Rose Bowl at Pasadena, Calif.
Stanford 6 6 (47'2) Wisconsin
Orange Bowl at Miami
Florida St. 15 13'2 (58Y2) N.Illinois
Wednesday
Sugar Bowl at New Orleans
Florida 13'2 14 (45Y2) Louisville
Thursday
Fiesta Bowl at Glendale, Ariz.
Oregon 9Y2 9 (75Y2) Kansas St.
Friday
Cotton Bowl at Arlington, Texas
Texas A&M 3 3Y2 (72) Oklahoma
Saturday
Compass Bowl at Birmingham, Ala.
Mississippi 12 3/2 (52Y2) Pittsburgh
Jan. 6
GoDaddy.com Bowl at Mobile, Ala.
Arkansas St. +1 4 (61Y2) Kent St.
Jan. 7
BCS National Championship at Miami
Alabama 7Y2 9Y2 (41'2) Notre Dame
NFL
Today


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr lthe record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
3-0-4
CASH 3 (late)
.. 6- 3-6-2

PLAY 4 (early)
6-7-6-7
PLAY 4 (late)
9-4-7-1

FANTASY 5
ld LOtty 4-9-21-25-27

POWERBALL LOTTERY
36 46 50 52 55 15 18 21-31-40-41
POWER BALL XTRA
14 2



On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (SUN) Wofford at Virginia
BOWLING
1 p.m. (ESPN) PBAWorld Series: Chameleon
Championship (Taped)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
5 a.m. (ESPN2) New Era Pinstripe Bowl Syracuse vs.
West Virginia (Same-day tape)
2:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Bell HelicopterArmed Forces Bowl -
Air Force vs. Rice (Taped)
NFL
1 p.m. (6 CBS) Jacksonville Jaguars at Tennessee Titans
1 p.m. (10 CBS) Houston Texans at Indianapolis Colts
1 p.m. (13 FOX) NFL regional coverage: Carolina Panthers
at New Orleans Saints or Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Atlanta
Falcons or Philadelphia Eagles at New York Giants or
Chicago Bears at Detroit Lions
4 p.m. (10 CBS) Miami Dolphins at New England Patriots
4 p.m. (13 FOX) NFL regional coverage: Green Bay
Packers at Minnesota Vikings or Arizona Cardinals at San
Francisco 49ers or St. Louis Rams at Seattle Seahawks
8:20 p.m. (8 NBC) Dallas Cowboys at Washington Redskins
GOLF
2 p.m. (ESPN2) 2012 Re/Max World Long Drive
Championship (Taped)
4 p.m. (8 NBC) Golf Tyco Skills Challenge, Day 2 (Taped)
TENNIS
2 p.m. (FSNFL) Champions Series: San Jose. Agassi vs.
McEnroe (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



Prep CALENDAR


TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
GIRLS BASKETBALL
TBA Seven Rivers at Disney Christmas Tournament


FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
at Buffalo 3 3/2 (39) N.Y.Jets
at New England11 10'/2 (46/2) Miami
at Cincinnati 3 212 (41) Baltimore
at Pittsburgh 10 10 (34/2) Cleveland
Houston 5/2 7(46/2) at Indianapolis
at Tennessee 5/2 4/2 (42) Jacksonville
at N.Y. Giants 9/2 7 (46) Philadelphia
at Washington3/2 3 (48/2) Dallas
Chicago 3 3 (45) at Detroit
Green Bay 3 3/2 (46) at Minnesota
at Atlanta 6 5 (4512) Tampa Bay
at New Orleans 4 5 (54) Carolina
at Denver 16 16 (42) Kansas City
at San Diego10/2 9/2 (39/2) Oakland
at San Franciscol 5 16'2 (39) Arizona
at Seattle 10 10'/2 (4112) St. Louis
NCAA Basketball
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG
Illinois St. 3 at Indiana St.
at Akron 9'/2 Princeton
at Saint Mary's (Cal) 22 Yale
at Alabama 11 Tulane
at Wichita St. 8 N. Iowa
S. Illinois 3 at Missouri St.
Dayton 11/2 at Southern Cal
at Virginia 13'2 Wofford
at Detroit 7Y2 Canisius
at West Virginia 9Y2 E. Kentucky
at SMU 14 Furman
at Memphis 12'2 Loyola (Md.)
NBA
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG
at Detroit 1 Milwaukee
San Antonio 5 at Dallas
Boston 3 at Sacramento
at L.A. Clippers 9Y2 Utah




Men's scores
EAST
Babson 74, Utica 63
Boston College 70, Holy Cross 60
Bridgewater (Mass.) 70, MaryWashington 60
Bryant 80, Lehigh 79
Coll. of Charleston 62, Vermont 50
College of NJ 57, W. Connecticut 53
Columbia 69, Manhattan 58
DeSales 99, Penn St.-Abington 84
Gettysburg 74, Grove City 64
Keene St. 89, Montclair St. 80
LIU Post 91, Chestnut Hill 75
La Salle 80, Siena 52
Maine 76, Quinnipiac 71
Mount St. Mary's 58, UMBC 55
Old Westbury 100, Misericordia 97
Penn St. 84, Duquesne 74
Randolph-Macon 76, Washington (Md.) 55
St. Peter's 71, CCSU 69
Stonehill 57, Philadelphia 52
Syracuse 57, Alcorn St. 36
UConn 61, Washington 53
Wagner 68, Penn 63, OT
William Paterson 54, Lehman 48
SOUTH
Alabama St. 73, Auburn-Montgomery 50
Campbell 72, UNC Wilmington 60
Catholic 77, Denison 35
Charleston Southern 105, Va. Intermont 59
Coker 87, St. Andrews 73
Cumberlands 100, Tenn. Wesleyan 83
Davidson 70, Richmond 64
Duke 90, Santa Clara 77
East Carolina 74, Norfolk St. 63
Fairfield 55, Old Dominion 54
Florida 78, Air Force 61
Florida St. 82, Tulsa 63
Georgia 82, Florida A&M 73
Georgia Southern 68, Georgia St. 64, OT
Georgia Tech 73, Fordham 48
Guilford 88, Birmingham-Southern 85
Jacksonville St. 83, Tennessee Tech 62
Kentucky Wesleyan 93, Salem International
67
Lenoir-Rhyne 60, Lander 58


Lindsey Wilson 100, Hamilton 69
Louisiana-Monroe 65, FAU 64
Louisville 80, Kentucky 77
Maryland 79, Delaware St. 50
Miami (Ohio)-Middletown 82,
Thomas More 79
Middle Tennessee 69, FlU 52
NC State 84, W. Michigan 68
North Carolina 79, UNLV 73
Radford 95, Cent. Pennsylvania 68
SE Louisiana 71, Spring Hill 61
South Carolina 76, Presbyterian 60
South Florida 61, George Mason 57
Southern Wesleyan 76, Georgia College 74
Tennessee 51, Xavier 47
UAB 83, Northeastern 63
VCU 96, Fairleigh Dickinson 67
Valparaiso 66, Murray St. 64
MIDWEST
Ashland 95, Ohio Christian 63
Baker 82, Harris-Stowe 73
Baldwin-Wallace 74, King's (Pa.) 57
Cardinal Stritch 75, Purdue-N. Central 52
Concordia (Mich.) 85, Siena Heights 77
Concordia (Moor.) 81, St. Scholastica 59
Davenport 91, Goshen 71
Findlay 74, Northwestern Ohio 38
Gustavus 61, Wis.-Eau Claire 47
Hope 96, Aurora 85
Illinois 81, Auburn 79
Kansas St. 52, UMKC 44
Loras 74, Wis.-Stout 67
Loyola of Chicago 69, DePaul 61
Marquette 75, NC Central 66
Michigan 88, Cent. Michigan 73
Michigan Tech 69, Wis.-Parkside 51
Millikin 78, Rockford 75
Milwaukee 95, Ohio Dominican 80
Minn. St.-Moorhead 63, Viterbo 53
N. Dakota St. 65, S. Dakota St. 62
Nebraska 68, Nicholls St. 59
Oakland 84, IUPUI 62
Ohio St. 87, Chicago St. 44
Penn St. Behrend 60, Otterbein 42
Purdue 73, William & Mary 66
SE Missouri 65, UT-Martin 60
South Dakota 95, Nebraska-Omaha 72
St. Cloud St. 90, Ashford 59
Toledo 74, Ill.-Chicago 55
UMass 64, N. Illinois 59
Walsh 98, Ohio Mid-Western 61
Wis.-River Falls 79, St. John's (Minn.) 73
Wis.-Superior 74, St. Olaf 65
Wis.-Whitewater71, Northwestern (Minn.) 61
Wisconsin 87, Samford 51
Youngstown St. 93, Marygrove 52
SOUTHWEST
Houston 80, Prairie View 75
Lamar 81, LIU Brooklyn 80
Sam Houston St. 90, Howard Payne 49
San Jose St. 72, Texas St. 55
Stephen F Austin 67, Texas A&M-CC 56
Texas 57, Rice 41
Texas A&M 61, Army 55
Utah St. 71, UTSA 67
FAR WEST
Arizona St. 68, Coppin St. 52
BYU 97, Virginia Tech 71
Cal Poly 58, UC Riverside 48
Colorado 80, Hartford 52
Colorado St. 80, Adams St. 55
Long Beach St. 67, Pacific 63
Towson 67, Oregon St. 66, OT
Washington St. 74, Idaho St. 39
TOURNAMENT
Dr Pepper Classic Championship
Chattanooga 76, Utah Valley 69
Third Place
High Point 76, Austin Peay 74
NYU Holiday Classic
First Round
NYU 97, Widener 88
UCF Holiday Classic Championship
UCF 66, Belmont 63
Third Round
Boston U. 71, Howard 44


Women's scores
EAST
Boston U. 68, Fairleigh Dickinson 42
Canisius 56, Vermont 55
Chestnut Hill 70, Mercy 56
Colgate 72, New Hampshire 61
E. Mennonite 93, Cairn 40 I
La Salle 72, St. Peter's 55
Lafayette 54, Fordham 50
Lehigh 67, Binghamton 37
NYU 66, Skidmore 63
Penn 52, Alabama St. 37
St. Francis (NY) 58, Rider 55
Susquehanna 69, Mass. College 58
Utica 67, Drew 64
William Smith 56, Plattsburgh 53
Wis.-Platteville 49, Brooklyn 39
SOUTH
Alabama 80, LIU Brooklyn 58
Auburn 80, Samford 51
Austin Peay 67, Alabama A&M 54 NHL C,
Belmont 66, SIU-Edwardsville 52 commit
E. Illinois 76, Tennessee St. 67 commit
East Carolina 71, Elon 64 York. Da
FAU 82, Louisiana-Monroe 72 morning
FlU 66, Northeastern 56
Furman 85, SC-Upstate 80, OT
George Mason 54, Georgia Southern 53
Georgia St. 76, MVSU 60
High Point 58, UNC Asheville 57
Liberty 90, Winthrop 57
Longwood 57, Radford 49
Louisiana-Lafayette 56, UALR 54, 20T
McNeese St. 80, Mississippi 75
Memphis 72, Missouri 69
N. Illinois 69, Norfolk St. 38
Old Dominion 79, SC State 63
Presbyterian 50, Coastal Carolina 30
South Alabama 53, Arkansas St. 47 C
South Carolina 66, W. Carolina 44
South Florida 100, Florida A&M 75 A
Tennessee Tech 73, Jacksonville St. 51
Toledo 76, Charlotte 66
Tulane 71, E. Michigan 65 NEW
Virginia 54, Xavier 45 question
W. Kentucky 82, North Texas 80 swers ir
Wake Forest 84, Campbell 68 The 1
MIDWEST
Concordia (Mich.) 81, Siena Heights 74 ers ass
Cornerstone 71, Olivet 40 of Satu
Davenport 114, Holy Cross (Ind.) 61 other v
Drake 80, Milwaukee 70 Conver
Hope 82, Baldwin-Wallace 58 for the
Iowa St. 83, Air Force 35
Kalamazoo 87, Michigan-Dearborn 81 inform
Marietta 74, Hiram 45 new co]
Marygrove 66, St. Claire 54 made
McPherson 81, Baker 75, OT Thursd
Michigan 82, Niagara 44
Michigan St. 57, Temple 47 though
N. Iowa 73, Saint Louis 64 get toge
Notre Dame 74, Purdue 47 York to
Ohio Northern 83, Adrian 50 tions f(
Otterbein71, Thiel58 weeks,
Rockford 66, Spalding 62
S. Illinois 69, Chicago St. 66 been si
Valparaiso 58, Ball St. 53 Saturda
William Penn 79, St. Scholastica 56 "Som
William Woods 65, St. Gregory's 51 session
Wis.-Stevens Pt. 77, Edgewood 58
Wis.-Eau Claire 72, Frostburg St. 43 NHL d
Youngstown St. 69, Bucknell 51 Bill Dal
FAR WEST Press
Colorado 84, New Mexico 39 "Nothin
Kansas St. 60, UC Santa Barbara 45 that"
Long Beach St. 79, Columbia 50th
Louisiana Tech 82, Denver 77, 20T The u
Montana St.-Billings 57, Montana St. 54 latest N
North Dakota 62, Utah 56 at endi
Pacific 75, San Francisco 59 reacheI
Providence 71, Colorado St. 53 d
S. Utah 66, Utah Valley 49 day an(
San Jose St. 98, Texas St. 96 hockey
Santa Clara 58, Fresno St. 53 would i
Seattle 76, Idaho 71 no late]
UConn 61, Stanford 35 would
Vanderbilt 74, Southern Cal 56 would
Washington St. 57, Gonzaga 51 to start
Wyoming 84, Loyola Marymount 68 and a
TOURNAMENT begin J:
Hawk Classic Championship Satur
Saint Joseph's 79, UMBC 38
Third Place calls we
Fairfield 81, Wagner 44 night sc
Terrapin Classic Championship league
Maryland 72, Hartford 40 about t
Third Place
Brown 57, Md.-Eastern Shore 46 propose;
UM Holiday Tournament Championship progress
Miami 67, Wisconsin 44 lead to
Third Place mains t
CCSU 76, Delaware St. 54 m-


New York
Brooklyn
Boston
Philadelp
Toronto


Miami
Atlanta
Orlando
Charlotte
Washing


Chicago
Indiana
Milwauke
Detroit
Clevelani


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
21 9 .700
16 14 .533
14 14 .500
hia 14 16 .467
11 20 .355
Southeast Division
W L Pct
20 7 .741
19 9 .679
12 18 .400
7 23 .233
:on 4 24 .143
Central Division
W L Pct
16 12 .571
17 13 .567
ee 15 12 .556
10 22 .313
j 7 25 .219


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
San Antonio 23 8 .742
Memphis 19 8 .704
Houston 16 13 .552
Dallas 12 18 .400
New Orleans 7 23 .233
Northwest Division
W L Pct
Oklahoma City 22 6 .786
Denver 17 15 .531
Minnesota 14 13 .519
Portland 14 14 .500
Utah 15 16 .484
Pacific Division
W L Pct
L.A. Clippers 24 6 .800
Golden State 20 10 .667
L.A. Lakers 15 15 .500
Phoenix 11 20 .355
Sacramento 10 19 .345
Friday's Games
Indiana 97, Phoenix 91
Washington 105, Orlando 97
Atlanta 102, Cleveland 94
Brooklyn 97, Charlotte 81
Detroit 109, Miami 99
Toronto 104, New Orleans 97, OT
Denver 106, Dallas 85
San Antonio 122, Houston 116
L.A. Clippers 116, Utah 114
Sacramento 106, New York 105
Golden State 96, Philadelphia 89
L.A. Lakers 104, Portland 87
Saturday's Games
Atlanta 109, Indiana 100
New Orleans 98, Charlotte 95
Toronto 123, Orlando 88
Brooklyn 103, Cleveland 100
Washington at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Houston, 8 p.m.
Denver at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Miami at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Portland, 10 p.m.
Boston at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
San Antonio at Dallas, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Sacramento, 9 p.m.
Utah at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Charlotte at Chicago, 3 p.m.
Memphis at Indiana, 3 p.m.


The s
together
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GB NHL a
5 haven't
6 Dec. 6,
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Associated Press
commissioner Gary Bettman, right, and deputy
ssioner Bill Daly speak Dec. 6 to reporters in New
aly said some information sessions are set for Sunday
g between the NHL and the union.



NHL, union



"pend day on



inferencee calls


associated Press


SYORK Lots of
ns, but still no an-
n the NHL labor fight.
league and the play-
ociation spent much
rday talking to each
via conference call.
stations were strictly
purpose of sharing
nation regarding the
tract offer the NHL
to the union late
ay The initial
twas the sides would
ether Sunday in New
hold official negotia-
or the first time in
but those hadn't
scheduled as of late
ay afternoon.
e more informational
s in the morning,"
eputy commissioner
y told The Associated
regarding Sunday
ng planned beyond

inion pored over the
JHL proposal aimed
ng the lockout that
d its 105th day Satur-
i saving the delayed
season. The league
like to reach a deal
r than Jan. 11, which
allow training camps
t the following day,
48-game season to
an. 19.
rday's conference
ere scheduled Friday
Sthe union could ask
officials questions
;he nearly 300-page
al. Whether enough
ss will be made to
face-to-face talks re-
o be seen.
sides haven't gotten
*r since Dec. 13 with
mediators. Bargain-
sions with only the
md union involved
been held since
when talks abruptly
after the players' as-
on made a counter-
al to the league's
is offer. The league
e offer was contin-
the union accepting
elements uncondi-
, and without further
ling.
NHL then pulled all
g offers off the table.
ays of sessions with


A DAILY LOOK AT
THE NHL LOCKOUT

DATE: Saturday,
Dec. 29.
DAY: 105.
LAST NEGOTIATIONS:
In-person talks Dec. 13
in New Jersey.
Bargaining conference
call Dec. 14.
NEXT NEGOTIATIONS:
None scheduled.
Perhaps Sunday in
New York.
GAMES LOST: 625 (all
games through Jan. 14,
including New Year's
Day Winter Classic, and
All-Star weekend).
ON THIS DAY LAST
YEAR: Philadelphia Fly-
ers forward Jaromir
Jagr scored his 12th
goal of the season in
his return to Pittsburgh,
helping his club top the
Penguins 4-2. Jagr
joined the Flyers before
the season, spurning
the Penguins who
hoped to bring the star
back to Pittsburgh,
where his stellar career
began.

mediators the following
week ended without any
progress made.
The players' association's
executive board and negoti-
ating committee went over
the new proposal during an
internal conference call
Friday
A person familiar with
key points of the offer told
The Associated Press the
league proposed raising the
limit of individual free-
agent contracts to six years
from five seven years if a
team re-signs its own
player; raising the salary
variance from one year to
another to 10 percent, up
from 5 percent; and one
compliance buyout for the
2013-14 season that wouldn't
count toward a team's
salary cap but would be in-
cluded in the overall play-
ers' share of income.
The person spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity because de-
tails of the new offer weren't
being discussed publicly


FREE SOCCER CLINIC
Jeremy Potter will host a free soccer clinic from 2 to 6 p.m.
Jan. 6 and from 5 to 8 p.m. Jan. 7 and Jan. 8 at the Ho-
mosassa Fields off Grover Cleveland Avenue in Homosassa.
Also on hand for the camps will be Eddie Oyakhilome, a trainer
and former member of the Nigerian National Team, and
Thadeu Goncalzes, a trainer and talent scout for Brazilian
clubs. Both were instrumental in helping Potter sign with his
Brazilian team.
For more information about the clinic, or to register, go to
www.jeremy-potter.com.


DREAM
Continued from Page B1

"They have me at attack-
ing midfielder now," the
longtime defender said. "It
doesn't really matter to me,
as long as I'm on the field."
Getting on the field was
one of Potter's earliest prob-
lems. Before joining Futbol
Club Jarinu, he was with a
team whose captain didn't
appreciate having an Amer-
ican who couldn't even
speak the language.
"For a week, I just sat
there at the end of the
bench," he said.
Potter, however, played in
pick-up matches he found in
Sao Paulo.
"I got no respect (at first),"
he said, noting he was
called Gringo. "Once I got
there, I did earn it."
His reputation spread
and his nickname now is the


"Stunner"
Potter is learning his
craft, especially the pace
and mentality of the game.
"I'm way more patient,"
he said. "I used to go 100
miles per hour, but now I've
learned to wait for them to
make a mistake and then
take advantage of it.
"It's like chess. If you're
caught off-guard, you're
down."
Potter's not down, to be
sure. He's absorbing as
much as he can. And while
the dream of playing Euro-
pean soccer is always in the
back of his mind, he leaves
it there and does not dwell
on it.
"Whatever happens, hap-
pens," he said nonchalantly
of his future. "It's not really
on my mind.
"It's like a book. I take
every day like a chapter"
This book has just started
and plenty of chapters are
still to be written.


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO YOUTH SPORTS


IN


THE


GAME


Fishing for fun; learning to P.L.A.Y.


Clinic teaches kids

about marine life;

children learn rules

of T-bal soccer
Special to the Chronicle
Teaching children a lifelong
hobby, appreciation for the ma-
rine environment and a fun family
outing are the objectives for the
Kids' Fishing Clinic.
Florida Fish, the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC) and Citrus County
Parks and Recreation (CCPR) will
present a free Kids' Fishing Clinic
for pre-registered children be-
tween the ages of 5 and 15 on Sat-
urday, Feb. 23, at Fort Island Trail
Park. Times for catch-and-
release activity will be 9 a.m., 10
a.m., 11 a.m., noon and 1 p.m. All
participants must be accompa-
nied by an adult.
Because space is limited, pre-
registration is required. Registra-
tion will open after Jan. 1. To
register, visit wwwcitruscounty
parks. com or call 352-527-7540.
The free clinic enables youths
to learn the basics of environmen-
tal stewardship, fishing ethics, an-
gling skills and safety. In addition,


Special to the Chronicle
ABOVE: A child learns the basics of
soccer during the P.L.A.Y. program.
LEFT: Children check out the
different shapes and sizes of fish at
an annual Kids Fishing Clinic.
environmental displays will pro-
vide participants with a unique
chance to experience Florida's
marine life firsthand. The main
objective is to create responsible
marine resource stewards by
teaching children about the vul-
nerability of Florida's marine
ecosystems.
Individuals or companies inter-
ested in helping to sponsor the
event or volunteer contact Citrus


County Parks and Recreation at
352-527-7540.
P.L.A.Y. spaces fill up fast
The PL.A.Y (Preparing Little
Athletes Youth) program is a com-
prehensive motor skills develop-
ment program to prepare children
ages 3 to 5 for organized sports.
Each child will receive a team
T-shirt and age appropriate sports
equipment. Each program runs
for six weeks, one night a week for
one hour. Soccer and T-ball are
the next sports being offered.
Soccer will be 5 to 6 p.m. or 6 to
7 p.m. Monday at Central Ridge
District Park beginning Jan. 14, or
Wednesday at Homosassa Area
Recreational Park beginning
Jan. 16.
T-ball will be 5 to 6 p.m. or 6 to
7 p.m. Tuesday at Central Ridge
District Park starting Jan. 15. The
sport also will be played from 5 to
6 p.m. Thursday at Bicentennial
Park starting Jan. 17.
Parents may pick the time and
location that works for them.
Cost is $45 per child. Sign chil-
dren up for more than one sport in
the same session and save $10.
Registration is open. Space is
limited and pre-registration is
required.
For more information, contact
Citrus County Parks & Recreation
at 352-527-7540 or visit wwwcitrus
countyparks.com.


Recreation BRIEFS


Boys & Girls clubs open
for holiday camp
The Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County Holiday Camp will be open
from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. through Jan. 4 at
the three club sites in Beverly Hills, In-
verness and halfway between Crystal
River and Homosassa.
Cost is $10 per day. Programs are
open to all children between the ages
of 5 and 18 years.
Children will learn and have fun at
the same time while participating in
games, arts and crafts, sports and
recreation, technology, cooking and
nutrition programs. Children should
bring a sack lunch each day.
Pre-registration is important so that
clubs can maintain adequate staffing
ratios. To pre-register, call the Robert
Halleen Club in Homosassa at 352-
795-8624, the Evelyn Waters Club in
Inverness at 352-341-2507, or the
Central Ridge Club in Beverly Hills at
352-270-8841. Drop-ins are accepted,
as long as children are pre-registered.
Donations for camp scholarships
($60 for the entire camp) may be
mailed to the Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County at P.O. Box 907,
Lecanto, FL 34460, or arranged by
calling 352-621-9225.
Volunteers needed for
Youth Basketball League
Citrus County YMCA seeks to con-
nect volunteers through its Y Commu-
nity Champions program. Volunteers
are needed for the Winter Youth Bas-
ketball League to begin Jan. 28 in Crys-
tal River at the Key Training Center.
The Youth Basketball League will
run for 10 weeks (two weeks of prac-
tice and eight weeks of games) and is
a friendly noncompetitive league cen-
tered on teamwork and sportsmanship.
Volunteer coaches would be needed
one weekday evening for practice and
Saturday for games. Referees and
score keepers are also needed for Sat-
urday games. Basketball experience
and/or a youth sports background is
preferred. All volunteers must undergo
a background screening.
Benefits of volunteering include per-
sonal development, health and well-
ness, building relationships and having
a community connection. Volunteers
are needed in the areas of special
events and office administration.
For more information or to volun-
teer, call 352-637-0132, or stop by the
office at 3909 N. Lecanto Highway in
Beverly Hills.
Youth Basketball
registration open
Citrus County YMCA is accepting
registrations for its 2013 Winter Youth
Basketball League, which begins
Monday, Jan. 28.
The league will run for 10 weeks
(two weeks of practice and eight weeks
of games) and is open to children ages
3 through 12. The Junior League will
have ages 3 through 5, and the Youth
League will consist of 6- through 12-
year-olds with several age brackets.
Practice will be once a week on a
weekday evening, with games on Sat-
urday. All practices and games will be
at the Key Training Center Chet Cole
Life Enrichment Center gymnasium.
Open tryouts and a skill assessment


will be Monday, Jan. 28, to determine
team placement.
Cost is $85 for ages 6 to 12, and
$65 for 3 to 5. Scholarships are avail-
able through the YMCA's Financial As-
sistance program. To apply, call the
office at 352-637-0132.
To register for the league, visit
www.ymcasuncoast.org and download
the form on the Citrus County page.
Interested participants may also visit
the office at 3909 N. Lecanto Highway
or call 352-637-0132 for more details.
Beach volleyball
returns in March
The beach volleyball league is com-
petitive although fun at the same time.
Teams bring out their families and
game faces every Tuesday night.
The league will start again in March.
The parks and recreation department
hopes for even more than 10 teams in
the upcoming season. Cost is $40 a
team to play.
For more information, call Citrus
County Parks & Rec's Recreation
Program Specialist Jess Sandino at
352-527-7547.
Little League
registration on horizon
The 2013 Crystal River Little
League Baseball registration will take
place at the baseball side concession
at Bicentennial Park in Crystal River
on the following:
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday,
Jan. 12;
6 to 8 p.m. Monday through
Friday, Jan. 7 through 11.
Registration fee is $55 per child for all
ages and divisions, including T-ball,
baseball and softball. All parents and
guardians must bring a birth certificate
and three documents proving residency.
Afterschool clubs
resume Jan. 14
The Citrus County YMCA's After-
school Enrichment Clubs will resume
their normal schedule for the second
half of the school year by offering a
third session beginning Jan. 14.
The Afterschool Clubs will be of-
fered at: Central Ridge Elementary,
Citrus Springs Elementary, Crystal
River Primary, Floral City Elementary,
Forest Ridge Elementary, Homosassa
Elementary, Inverness Primary,
Lecanto Primary, Pleasant Grove Ele-
mentary and Rock Crusher Elemen-
tary. The clubs are open to all children
in kindergarten through fifth grade.
The upcoming session will offer chil-
dren the opportunity to participate in
soccer, basketball cheerleading and
two new art programs, which are intro-
duction to watercolor and introduction
to drawing.
The Citrus County YMCA has re-
ceived a grant for the Afterschool Pro-
grams from Suncoast Federal Schools
Credit Union. The grant enables the Y
to provide full scholarships this year to
children across the county to partici-
pate in the Enrichment Clubs. To apply
for the grant scholarship and financial
assistance for other YMCA programs,
call the Y office at 352-637-0132.
Fort Cooper
to have bird walk
Come join in exploring the trails in


RECREATION BRIEF
SUBMISSIONS
To submit a brief, e-mail sports@
chronicleonline.com. Include a brief
description along with the time,
date, place and phone number of a
contact person.

search of birds that call Fort Cooper
State Park home. An approximate 2 to
2 1/2-hour bird walk will take place
beginning at 8 a.m. Jan. 12.
The walk will be led by members of
the local Audubon society and is open
to all experience levels of birders.
Bring your binoculars, field guides,
bug repellant and anything that would
enhance the experience on the outing
to Fort Cooper State Park, 3100 S.
Old Floral City Road, Inverness.
Normal park entrance fee of $3 per
vehicle (up to eight people per vehicle)
is required. For more information, call
the park at 352-726-0315.
Search the skies for
stars at the preserve
Back by popular demand, the
Chiefland Star Party Group will pres-
ent a telescopic view of the stars and
planets beginning at 6 p.m. Friday,
Jan. 18, at the Withlacoochee Gulf
Preserve.
It will begin with a laser show of the
constellations. Several large tele-
scopes will be available for viewing.
Multiple objects will be observed, in-
cluding the bands on Jupiter and its
moons.
The late-rising moon gives little
night light interference for better
stargazing conditions. The preserve
has very low artificial lighting, which
adds to the experience.
For safety, it is recommended par-
ticipants arrive before sunset to sign
in. Bring a flashlight and bug spray. If
possible, bring a piece of red tissue
paper along to dim the flashlight for
better star viewing for everyone.
Visit www.withlacoocheegulf
preserve.com.
Learn 'About Boating
Safely' next month
The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, Ho-
mosassa Flotilla 15-4, will conduct a
four-session "About Boating Safely"
program from 7 to 9 p.m. Monday,
Jan. 14 and 21, and Thursdays,
Jan. 17 and 24, at the West Citrus
Community Center, 8940 Veterans
Drive, Homosassa.
Subjects covered will include knowl-
edge of your boat, boating prepara-
tion, how to navigate on the
waterways, safe vessel operation, the
legal requirements, both federal and
state. Also included will be information
on boating emergencies/what to do,
carbon monoxide dangers and hy-
pothermia warnings.
At the completion of the program,
students will receive a certificate of
completion, safe boating card and the
knowledge and information for safe
boating to truly enjoy the beautiful
Florida waters.
Cost is $30.
For more information or to sign up
for this class, call Ned Barry at
352-249-1042 or email nedbarry
@tampabay.rr.com.


Throw horseshoes
in Beverly Hills
Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club meets
at 8:30 a.m. each Wednesday. Men,
women and juniors age 10 and older
can join.
There are all levels of play; handi-
capped method.
For more information, call Ron Fair
352-746-3924, or email rfair3@tampa
bay.rr.com.
YMCA is SilverSneakers
location
Citrus County YMCA is an official
SilverSneakers location for their group
exercise program in Homosassa.
SilverSneakers is the nation's lead-
ing exercise program designed exclu-
sively for older adults and is available
at little or no additional cost through
Medicare health plans, Medicare Sup-
plement carriers and group retiree
plans.
Group exercise classes meet at the
First United Methodist Church in Ho-
mosassa on Mondays, Wednesdays
and Fridays. Classes include cardio
interval, Pilates and stability and
strength.
To find out if you are eligible for
SilverSneakers, call your health plan
provider.
For more information, call the
YMCA office at 352-637-0132.
Free yoga class
at Unity Church
Unity Church of Citrus County, 2628
W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto, is the
host site for a community Divine Yoga
class at 10 a.m. Thursday.
The free class is open to all ages
and physical abilities. Some of the
benefits of yoga are improved bal-
ance, coordination, strength and flexi-
bility. Yoga is also helpful in
counteracting stress and anxiety.
For more information, call Sheila
Abrahams at 352-270-8019 or email
divineyogas@gmail.com.
YMCA offers group
exercise program
The Citrus County YMCA offers
group exercise in Citrus Springs at the
Hope Evangelical Lutheran Church,
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
The location offers classes in Pi-
lates and cardio circuit on a regular
basis beginning.
The Y has three other areas in the
county where group exercise classes
are offered, including Homosassa, In-
verness and Crystal River. Financial
assistance is available to all those who
qualify.
For more information, call the
YMCA office in Beverly Hills at
352-637-0132, or visit www.ymca
suncoast.org.
Whispering Park offers
tennis lessons
Whispering Pines Park offers tennis
lessons with Lindsay Rodriquez. Pre-
registration and pre-payment are re-
quired at the park office.
Lessons cost $100 for four hours, or
$30 per hour. Times are arranged with
the instructor.
Whispering Pines also offers rac-
quetball lessons.


Call 352-726-3913 for registration
and information.
Learn to stretch with
Parks & Rec
Citrus County Parks & Recreation
offers a low-impact stretching class.
The ongoing class will be from 10 to
11 a.m. at Citrus Springs Community
Center. Cost is $5 per class.
The low-impact class is easy, fun
with good benefits. Stretching helps to
make you more flexible and regular
stretching will help mobility and bal-
ance. This helps to slow down the
onset of common degenerative condi-
tions, such as osteoarthritis. Stretching
increases physical and mental relax-
ation and reduces the risk of joint
sprain, muscle strain or back prob-
lems.
Low-impact exercises can improve
health and fitness without harming
weight-bearing joints. Research sug-
gests moderate-intensity, low-impact
activity is just as effective as high-
impact activity in lowering the risk of
heart disease.
For more information, visit www.
citruscountyparks.com and click on
instructional classes, or call 352-465-
7007.
Join Zumba classes
at Citrus Springs
Citrus County Parks & Recreation
offers Zumba classes with instructor
Lynn DaSilva at Citrus Springs Com-
munity Center. Zumba is a fitness pro-
gram designed with exciting Latin and
international dance rhythms. No mem-
bership or contracts.
Ongoing classes are: 11:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. Monday; 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday; and 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Thursday. Cost is $5.
For information, visit www.citrus
countyparks.com or call 352-465-7007.
Zumba offered
at Dunnellon church
Zumba, the Latin-inspired dance-
fitness class, is offered at 4:30 p.m.
Monday and Thursday afternoons at
Dunnellon Presbyterian Church,
20641 Chestnut St.
Call 352-489-3021 for more
information.
Woman's Club offers
Zumba lessons
Yankeetown/Inglis Woman's Club is
offering Zumba classes in air-
conditioned comfort from 5:30 to 6:30
p.m. Monday and Wednesdays.
Everyone is welcome.
For information, call 352-447-2057.
Shuffleboard Club
invites public
Floral City Shuffleboard Club plays
at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday and Fridays
and at 1 p.m. Wednesday at Floral
Park in Floral City.
It is a great opportunity to meet peo-
ple in the community and get some
light exercise. All newcomers are
welcome.
Yearly dues are $3 per person, and
there is no need to purchase any
equipment.
Call the vice president of the Floral
City Shuffleboard Club, Dana Bause,
at 352-726-0670.


_ I


G Page B5-suNA, DEC



GET












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Queen


salutes


Britain's


best


McCartney,

Higgs lead list

Associated Press

LONDON Stella Mc-
Cartney, who designed the
uniforms worn by
Britain's record-smashing
Olympic team, and Scot-
tish physicist Peter Higgs,
who gave his name to the
so-called "God particle,"
are among the hundreds
being honored by Queen
Elizabeth II this New
Year.
The list is particularly
heavy with Britain's
Olympic heroes, but it also
includes "Star Wars" actor
Ewan McGregor, eccentric
English singer Kate Bush,
Roald Dahl illustrator
Quentin Blake, and Jamie
Lowther-Pinkerton, the
royal aide who helped or-
ganize the watched-
around-the-world
wedding of Prince William
to Kate Middleton.
McCartney was hon-
ored with the title of Offi-
cer of the Order of the
British Empire, or OBE,
in part for her work creat-
ing the skintight, red-
white-and-blue uniforms
worn by British athletes
as they grabbed 65 medals
during the 2012 games
hosted by London.
McCartney is the de-
signer daughter of ex-
Beatle Paul McCartney
and his first wife Linda,
and she has moved to
make the family name al-
most as synonymous with
fashion as it is with music,
setting up a successful
business and a critically-
acclaimed label.
Higgs' achievements,
which made him a Com-
panion of Honor, touch on
the nature and origins of
the universe. The 83-year-
old researcher's work in
theoretical physics sought
to explain what gives
things weight. He said it
was while walking
through the Scottish
mountains that he hit
upon the concept of what
would later become
known as the Higgs boson,
an elusive subatomic par-
ticle that gives objects
mass and combines with
gravity to give them
weight
For decades, the exis-
tence of such a particle re-
mained just a theory, but
earlier this year scientists
working at the European
Organization for Nuclear
Research, or CERN, said
they'd found compelling
evidence the Higgs boson
was out there. Or in there.
Or whatever
All of Britain's gold
medalists from this year's
games were on the list,
with cyclist Bradley Wig-
gins and sailor Ben
Ainslie honored with
knighthoods.
Honors lists typically in-
clude a sprinkling of star
power, and this year was
no different.
Ewan McGregor, who
came to public attention
through his role as the
heroin-addled anti-hero
of British drug drama
"Trainspotting," was
awarded an OBE.


Entertainer of the Year


Associated Press
In this Feb. 12, 2012, file photo, Adele poses backstage with her six awards at the 54th annual Grammy Awards
in Los Angeles. Adele won awards for best pop solo performance for "Someone Like You," song of the year, record
of the year, and best short form music video for "Rolling in the Deep," and album of the year and best pop vocal
album for "21." After a year of Grammy glory and James Bond soundtracking, Adele has been voted The
Associated Press Entertainer of the Year.


Singer beats out "Fifty Shades of Grey


JAKE COYLE
AP Entertainment Writer

NEW YORK
hough Adele didn't have a new
album or a worldwide tour in
2012, she's still rolling. After a
year of Grammy glory and James
Bond soundtracking, Adele has
been voted The Associated Press
Entertainer of the Year.
In 132 ballots submitted by mem-
bers and subscribers of the AP,
Adele easily outpaced other vote-
getters like Taylor Swift, "Fifty
Shades of Grey" author E.L.
James, the South Korean viral
video star PSY and the cast of
"Twilight." Editors and broadcast-
ers were asked to cast their ballot
for the person who had the most
influence on entertainment and
culture in 2012.
Adele's year began in triumph at
the Grammys, took a turn through
recording the theme to the 007 film
"Skyfall," and ended with the birth
of her son in October. The ubiqui-
tous Adele was that rare thing in
pop culture: an unqualified sensa-
tion, a megastar in a universe of
niche hits.
By the end of the year, her soph-
omore album, "21," had passed 10
million copies sold in the U.S.,
only the 21st album in the Nielsen
SoundScan era (begun in 1991) to
achieve diamond status. Buoyed
by hits like "Someone Like You"
and "Rolling in the Deep" long
after its release in early 2011, "21"
was also the top-selling album on
iTunes for the second year
running.
As David Panian, news editor for
Michigan's Daily Telegram, put it:
"It just seemed like you couldn't
turn on the radio without hearing
one of her songs."


Birthday Although your material prospects appear to be
quite hopeful in the year ahead, you're likely to generate
funds in spurts instead of at a consistent rate. Be prudent to
minimize the lean times.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) If someone with whom
you're closely involved is doing things differently from you,
don't try to make him or her over in your own image. This
person's way might actually be better.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Be smart when choosing a
partner, because aligning yourself with an ineffective ally
could seriously impede your progress. Make sure the other
party possesses what you lack.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -Avoid inclinations to make
hard work out of something that should be relatively simple.
Adopting a poor attitude could destroy your initiative and
purpose.


With such an
avalanche of
success and now a
mother of a newborn
son, Adele has
understandably
taken a step out of
the spotlight. One
exception was
recording the
theme song to
"Skyfall."

Women have had a lock on the
annual Entertainer of the Year se-
lection. Previous winners include
Lady Gaga, Taylor Swift, Betty
White and Tina Fey Stephen Col-
bert is the lone male winner in the
six-year history of voting.
The Grammy Awards in Febru-
ary were essentially the de-facto
crowning of the 24-year-old Adele,
whose real name is Adele Adkins,
as a pop queen. She won six
awards, including album of the
year. It was also a comeback of
sorts for Adele, who performed for
the first time since having vocal
cord surgery, drawing a standing
ovation from the Staples Center
crowd.
Accepting the album of the year
award, a teary Adele exclaimed:
"Mum, girl did good!" The emo-
tional, sniffling singer endeared
many viewers to her when she
copped in her acceptance speech
to having "a bit of snot."


Today's HOROSCOPE
Aries (March 21-April 19) Even if you're usually pretty
good at managing your resources, there's a good chance
you may not be so currently. Double-check everything cost-
ing you money.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -Associates are likely to ignore
you if they feel you're not setting the kind of example they want
to follow. Don't expect others to do what you won't do yourself.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -Although you might be ana-
lytical and very observant, if you focus merely on the nega-
tive, these attributes may be squandered. Instead of being
assertive, you'll end up a defeatist.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) If an endeavor in which
you're involved is not turning out to be as promising as
you'd hoped, reassess it so you don't spend any more
money on it than you need to.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Even though it's in you to be an


author, rapper PSY

"This record is inspired by
something that is really normal
and everyone's been through it:
just a rubbish relationship," Adele
said.
But her luck in love has since
turned, thanks to her boyfriend
Simon Konecki. In an interview
with Vogue magazine, Adele said
she was through with break-up
records and done being "a bitter
witch." When Adele announced in
June she was having a baby with
Konecki, her website promptly
crashed under the heavy traffic.
Their son was born in
October.
With such an avalanche of suc-
cess and now a mother of a new-
born son, Adele has understandably
taken a step out of the spotlight
One notable exception was record-
ing the opening credits theme song
to "Skyfall." The song was recorded
with her "21" producer Paul Ep-
worth at the Abbey Road Studios in
London with a 77-piece orchestra.
Within hours, it zoomed to the top of
digital charts.
"There was an overwhelming
embrace of Adele and her music,"
said Joe Butkiewicz, executive edi-
tor of the Times Leader in Wilkes-
Barre, Pa. "And that was never
more evident to me than when I
heard teenagers express their en-
thusiastic expectations for the new
James Bond movie because Adele
performed the theme song."
The song recently received a
Golden Globe nomination. No
Bond theme has ever won the best
original song Oscar, but given
Adele's awards success thus far, it
wouldn't be a stretch to think she
has a chance of changing that. The
tune is among the 75 short-listed
songs in the Academy Awards
category


above-average achiever, you might start focusing only on
objectives that would provide you with little or no gratifica-
tion. Try to look before you leap.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Challenges might normally
bring out the best in you, but if you're not careful, you could
easily waffle under pressure owing to an insecure attitude.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) If you can, you should avoid all
activities that require a lot of money in order to be fun.
You're not likely to get value for your dollars.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Whenever you're not up to
making decisions for yourself, you can bet your bottom dol-
lar others will do so for you. It's important to be your own
person if you hope to get what you want.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Upon occasion, your
hunches are right on target, but your intuitive processes
could start playing tricks on you. Rely solely on your logic.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28
MegaMoney: 6 10-22 -38
Mega Ball: 14
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 6 $1,220.50
3-of-4 MB 39 $411.50
3-of-4 1,070 $44.50
2-of-4 MB 1,326 $25
1-of-4 MB 11,064 $3
2-of-4 30,622 $2
Fantasy 5:3 6 16-17-28
5-of-5 2 winners $115,010.93
4-of-5 349 $106
3-of-5 11,091 $9
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 27
Fantasy 5: 4 14 22 24 27
5-of-5 3 winners $70.362.56
4-of-5 343 $99
3-of-5 9,667 $9.50
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26
Powerball: 11 -13 -23 -43- 54
Powerball: 4
5-of-5 PB 1 winner $50 million
1 Florida winner
5-of-5 5 winners $1 million
1 Florida winner
INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Dec. 30,
the 365th day of 2012. There
is one day left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Dec. 30, 1962, the
Green Bay Packers defeated
the New York Giants 16-7 in
the NFL Championship
Game; the event was filmed
by Blair Motion Pictures,
which later became NFL
Films.
On this date:
In 1853, the United States
and Mexico signed a treaty
under which the U.S. agreed
to buy some 45,000 square
miles of land from Mexico for
$10 million in a deal known
as the Gadsden Purchase.
In 1860, 10 days after
South Carolina seceded from
the Union, the state militia
seized the U.S. Arsenal in
Charleston.
In 1922, Vladimir I. Lenin
proclaimed the establishment
of the Union of Soviet Social-
ist Republics.
In 1936, the United Auto
Workers union staged its first
"sit-down" strike at the Gen-
eral Motors Fisher Body
Plant No. 1 in Flint, Mich.
(The strike lasted until Feb.
11, 1937.)
In 2006, Iraqis awoke to
news Saddam Hussein had
been hanged; victims of his
three decades of autocratic
rule took to the streets to
celebrate.
Ten years ago: A suspected
extremist killed three U.S. mis-
sionaries at a Baptist hospital
in Yemen. (The gunman, Abed
Abdul Razak Kamel, was exe-
cuted in Feb. 2006.)
Five years ago: Kenya's
President Mwai Kibaki was
declared winner of an elec-
tion opponents and ob-
servers alleged was rigged;
violence flared in Nairobi
slums and coastal resort
towns, killing scores in the
following days.
One year ago: North
Korea warned the world there
would be no softening of its
position toward South
Korea's government following
Kim Jong II's death as Py-
ongyang strengthened his
son and heir's authority with
a new title: "Great Leader."
Today's Birthdays: Base-
ball Hall-of-Famer Sandy Ko-
ufax is 77. Actor Fred Ward is
70. Singer Patti Smith is 66.
TV host Meredith Vieira is 59.
"Today" show co-host Matt
Lauer is 55. Radio-TV com-


mentator Sean Hannity is 51.
Golfer Tiger Woods is 37.
NBA player LeBron James is
28.
Thought for Today: "I al-
ways say beauty is only sin
deep." H.H. Munro ("Saki"),
British author (1870-1916).












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE





Caring for health of cou


John Rea
GUES
COLUMN


US health

system in

of repair

he Affordabi
(ACA) of 201(
of the land n
U.S. Supreme Cou
held it. It was des:
phased in over seven
allow insurance
government agency
caid and states timE
to the new rules.
The last and m
matic installment
Jan. 1, 2014, when tl
vidual mandate rec
nearly all citizens t
chase medical insu
becomes effective.
is a huge underta!
and has sparked lot
heated debate in 1
past few years. TI
new law can b
viewed from man
angles, but in the
end, it all boils
down to the issue
of greater and
necessary cen-
tral control over
a gigantic and
increasingly
costly and in-
efficient
health care
industry
O u r
current
health care system
can be traced back t
Truman's Fair De
which, among ot]
tried to introduce
health care. But the
Fair Deal covering:
health care was d
strong opposition f
surance industry
the medical establi
By the end of W(
health insurance w,
primarily through c
offering insurance
employees. As a
United States dec:
adopt the centraliz
insurance systems
rope. But much o
was a time of neai
ployment and health
was seen as an i:
corporate perquis
cruiting employee;
cost of medical
nowhere near as
pervasive and com
today
Since the 1950s,
been many attempt
ment universal h
through the federal
but all failed until th
Care Act was pass
Conservatives main
not afford it and it is
lation of the Const
individual rights.
take the position we


Point COUNTERPOINT

DEBATING PROS AND CONS OF THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT
Since its passage, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act has sparked debate, frayed the nerves of
business owners and spawned numerous lawsuits. The most striking changes are still a year away, but indi-
vidual state governments will be busy setting up programs designed to meet the law's mandates. Given the
political ideology that separates the two sides on the issue, guest columnists Robert Hagaman and John
Read have offered their opinions on the subject.


r
IIST


care

need Oce Hours.

work By Appoinent Only

e Care Act
)0 is the law A joRes_
ow that the AG
irt has up-
igned to be / Ye
ral years to
companies,
ies, Medi-
e to adjust

lost dra-
will be
he indi-
quiring
to pur-
rance
This .
king
;s of
the
he
)e
y

t



REPEAT....P.R.M
REPEAT...
REpar "--MONTHS


;o President
al of 1949
her things,
e universal
parts of the
g universal
defeated by
rom the in-
allied with
shment.
world War II,
as available
corporations
to attract
result, the
ided not to
;ed medical
used in Eu-
f the 1950s
rly full em-
h insurance
expensive
site to re-
s, since the
care was
expensive,
plex as it is

there have
ts to imple-
ealth care
government,
e Affordable
ed in 2010.
tain we can-
; a gross vio-
itution and
Democrats
can't afford


........ TIMEs


not
do it, because the cost
of health care has been skyrock-
eting for decades and shows no
sign of slowing down, no matter
what the private health care in-
dustry has done to manage costs.
The fact is our population is
growing and long-term and un-
sustainable pressures and de-
mands are on the health care
industry dealing with more
than 310 million people.
Constitutional arguments
have been used to resist the im-
plementation of Obamacare. It
has been called an assault on
freedom and liberty and leads
to socialism. But if one cuts
through the Constitutional
flapdoodle, one may see these
arguments ring hollow and
self-serving.
In fact, many modern reali-
ties are not spelled out in the
Constitution, such as automo-
bile insurance. If you own and
drive a car, you must purchase
insurance, an expensive and
inconvenient but necessary
fact of modern life. But there is
no push to get rid of auto insur-
ance, even if the Constitution
does not mention it.
One must also remember the
"promote the general welfare"
and "insure domestic tranquil-
ity" spelled out in the pream-
ble of the document.


Admittedly, these
are broadly defined c:teLoriees
and open to many interpret.-
tions, but surely hi\ iiL .de-
quate national he.Alth
insurance can be seenll ji
form of domestic trjnqlllllt
and general welfare
Currently, at least 40 m11llion:
people are rejected b.\ :or
priced out of private iedit :.
insurance. FortunateI.. ift .i\o
are 65 or older you I:.In Si ln 1
for Medicare and receive de-
cent and affordable he.ilth
care. Veterans also eni:o.\ en-
erally decent VA med it:1 I bene-
fits, also paid for b:. t. \)p.i ersi
However, the rest of the non-
veteran population younger
than 65 must acquire insur-
ance through their employers
or private insurance, which is
often far too expensive for
most people. And if they are
unemployed or not covered by
an employer, many go without
insurance and gamble they will
not become dangerously ill or
injured. In fact, when the unin-
sured needs medical help, then
we pay for that, too in insur-
ance premiums and tax con-
cessions for
employer-sponsored coverage.
Because insurance provided


b.\ eii-
ployers is
a form of
untaxed in-
come as they
are hidden
benefits and
not calculated into
employee's taxable earnings,
employees pay no taxes on
employer-subsidized medical
coverage. With Medicare hos-
pital expenditures alone likely
to approach $2.5 trillion in the
next 10 years, that's costing so-
ciety a fortune. Unpaid hospi-
tal bills for uninsured "free

See Page C3


Robert Hagaman
GUEST
COLUMNIST


Addressing

health care in

imperfect world

his law was named "af-
fordable" to make it
sound positive. Since
then, it has been dubbed
"Obamacare," which has a
positive or negative connota-
tion depending on who is ob-
serving it. At any rate, it could
only be affordable in a perfect
world. But with world events
such as they are, we obviously
do not have a perfect world.
From everything I have
learned, the law does very lit-
tle to address the health care
problems our country faces.
First of all, the main thrust of
the bill is to force everyone to
purchase health insurance.
This does little to enhance the
availability or quality of health
care. It does, however, advance
the financial health of insur-
ance companies and pharma-
ceutical companies.
Various laws have been
passed through the years to ad-
vance the availability of health
care. Yet, the major problem
with the availability of health
care while included in the
bill is not addressed.
People with major health
problems in many cases will
not have their needs ad-
dressed, because they cannot
afford to pay the insurance
premiums. Also, insurance
companies forced to cover
expenses they cannot reason-
ably anticipate may go broke
at the time their customers
need them most.
And now many people who
could survive without purchas-
ing health insurance either
will be forced to purchase in-
surance or pay a fine. That fine
starts out small, but increases
dramatically in a few years.
Provisions for subsidies are
for people who cannot afford
the premiums. Guess where
the funds for those subsidies
come from. You guessed it; they
come from existing federal
programs operating on bor-
rowed money, or from the fed-
eral government that is broke.
That means more borrowing
or higher taxes for those who
pay taxes. All the federal credit
cards are maxed out and soon
creditors are going to demand
a repayment. That is when the
dramatic tax increases will hit.
Again, we will pay the bill if we
have anything left
Another little-publicized
event that occurred after the
law passed is the granting of ex-
emptions. Some well-connected
allies of the Obama administra-
tion received immediate ex-
emptions. Notable are the labor

See Page C3


Grading community's goals from 2012


E ach year, the
Chronicle pub-
lishes a New
Year's Day editorial
listing goals for the '.
community And at the
end of the year, I spend
a little time reviewing
the previous year and
give those involved a
grade. So here goes. Gerry
Goal 1: Improve the OUT
local economy WIN
Grade C.
The economy has im-
proved some. The unemployment
rate is lower than the previous
year and there are some signs of
life. The county's Economic De-
velopment Council is probably
operating better than it ever has.


Mulligan
rTHE
DOW


But the troubles at
Progress Energy could
be huge problems for
Citrus County in the
next year If Duke closes
the nuclear plant, many
of the county's highest-
paid workers will leave
the community
We need more eco-
nomic diversification.
Goal 2: Citrus Memo-
rial Health System's
dispute resolution -
SGrade B+.


The three-year battle at the
county hospital in Inverness ap-
pears to be settled. After millions
of dollars in legal fees, the two
fighting governing boards now
are communicating again.


Gov Rick Scott deserves some
of the credit for changing out his
appointments and finding volun-
teers who could resolve the prob-
lem. The future looks brighter for
CMH, but more obstacles are
ahead in 2013, as the hospital re-
acts to a law ordering private hos-
pitals to consider a sale or
merger with private enterprise.
Goal 3: A better plan for the
homeless Grade D.
Citrus County still has no plan
for the homeless. We have a
homeless coalition, but what we
really have is a bunch of folks
dosing their own thing.
The Mission in Citrus is proba-
bly the largest organization for
the homeless, but it fights against
accountability and working with


other agencies. County govern-
ment, the United Way, the
churches and nonprofit agencies
have all failed to make real
progress in 2012.
Goal 4: Crystal River and the
federal government Grade C.
The fight over the future use of
King's Bay and Crystal River will
be a story that stays with us for
many years. The federal govern-
ment implemented its new rules
for boats in 2012 and expanded
manatee sanctuaries. A citizen
group responded by officially
challenging the protective desig-
nation of the manatees to down-
grade the species from its current
endangered status.
While all sides are talking, this
confrontation will continue in ad-


ministrative hearings and court-
rooms for many years to come.
Goal 5: Creative public spend-
ing- Grade C.
It still appears our local officials
are hoping the current economic
mess we are in simply disappears
and tax dollars will flow again.
That will not happen. And the
sooner everyone accepts that, the
sooner we can develop a new plan.
But, then Duke Energy comes
along and does not pay its tax bill
and Citrus County is forced to face
the new reality. Government is
going to have to do more with less.
Most branches of government have
just about run out of reserves.
Structural changes are needed.


Page C3


I


ad







Page C2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012



PINION


"Kindness can become its own motive.
We are made kind by being kind."
Eric Hoffer
"The Passionate State of Mind, 1954


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan ................... ..................... publisher
M ike A rnold .................................................editor
S Charlie Brennan ................................editor at large
Curt Ebitz................. ..................citizen member
Mac Harris ........... ................. citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ................ ........... ...... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


PAYING IT FORWARD






#26Acts





promotes





kindness
Some things just grab our how good it felt to give to some-
collective at- one else with no
tention and expectation of re-
won't let go. When turn. Many call it
those things are THE ISSUE: addicting.
positive, it's some- Tragedy-sparked This phenome-
thing to celebrate. goodwill movement non echoes the
Currently, it's goes ial "pay it forward"
the goodwill ini- gocontagion from a
tiative spawned O OPINIsentimental movie
on Twitter known OUR OPINION: released in 2000.
as #26Acts. Unfor- The challenge will The protagonist's
tunately, it grew be to keep this idea was to sys-
from the horrific mindset year-round. tematically net-
mid-December work good deeds
murders at a New- to grow geometri-


town, Conn., elementary
school.
Ann Curry of NBC News
started it with a tweet just after
the event: "Imagine if every-
one could commit to doing one
act of kindness for every one of
those children killed in
Newtown."
She declared, "I'm in" and
encouraged others to commit
and pass along the message. It
began with "20 acts of kind-
ness" for the 20 children killed,
then expanded to 26 to include
the adults at the school.
Hundreds of thousands
across the country and the
globe have jumped onboard.
They've posted on Facebook,
Twitter and numbers of other
sites, detailing the acts of kind-
ness they and their families
have undertaken.
While some commentators
suggest "boasting" about doing
helpful things for others di-
minishes the gift, others assert
the posts are inspiring idea-in-
cubators. Nearly all declare


Spirit of giving
You know, it's the Christmas
spirit time when people pay for
your meal in advance, like when
you're at a drive-through. You've
heard of good things within the
county, that people are doing that
and leaving. Their names and who
did that, you know, they
leave that out. And, well,
today (Dec. 19), I went
through RaceTrac to get
gas over in Inverness and
just wanted to say some-
one had put a prepaid
amount of $20 on the j
gas pump and when I
pulled up, nobody was
there and it was a good CAL
deed somebody had done 56Q
and I just want to thank 56 "
them. And I did use that
$20 and I'm going to do the same
thing for somebody else at a gas
station too. I think that's really a
wonderful thing and thank you
again to whoever did that and


cally as each recipient does a
good deed for someone else.
As the late motivational guru
Zig Ziglar said, "You never
know when one kind act or
word of encouragement can
change a life forever."
Here in Citrus County, we've
seen the proof of that. We are a
giving community, and we like
to look out for our own. Pick up
the newspaper any given week
to read about a grateful recipi-
ent of community assistance.
It's part of what makes us
happy to call Citrus County
home.
The challenge for us all will
be to retain the goodwill mind-
set after the current #26Acts
craze abates.
John Wooden, famed basket-
ball player, UCLA coach and
six-time NCAA coach of the
year, knew about living a good
life. As he put it, "You can't live
a perfect day without doing
something for someone who
will never be able to repay
you."


merry Christmas.
Think before speaking
I was a retired paid firefighter
from the Northeast. Last week,
somebody wrote in and said they
should get rid of the paid fire-
fighters in Citrus County, because
they make too much money. Actu-


ally, I make more on my
pension than these poor
guys make in a year put-
ting their life on the line
every day. Also, some-
body wrote in and said
volunteers shouldn't be
paid. Where I came from
in the Northeast, I had
such a problem getting
volunteer firefighters. The
way they got around it
was, they'd give them
anywhere from $500 to


0579


$750 a month in their clothing al-
lowance if they made 50 percent
of the calls. So people should
think about what they say before
they call in.


United Way needs your help
The United Way of Citrus County needs your help this holiday
season. The Chronicle is asking readers to join in and support the
countywide nonprofit agency by making a contribution of $31.12 (or
whatever you can afford). The United Way helps fund 19 nonprofit
agencies in the community and is leading the effort to impact
important community concerns. Please send your contribution to
Gerry Mulligan at the Chronicle/United Way, 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429.
Gerry Mulligan, publisher


Disdain is all around


WASHINGTON
W while accusing the
Supreme Court's conser-
vative justices of "dis-
dain for democracy,"
Pamela S. Karlan
proves herself tal-
ented at dispensing
disdain. The Stanford
law professor is, how-
ever, less talented at
her chosen task of pre- /
senting a coherent un- r-
derstanding of judicial
review. Still, her
"Democracy and Dis- Georg
dain" in the November OTI
Harvard Law Review
usefully illustrates VOI
progressivism's consis-
tent disdain for the Founders'
project of limiting government.
The primary focus of her dis-
pleasure is, remarkably, Chief
Justice John Roberts' opinion
mostly "upholding" Obamacare.
But she begins by being appalled
at Justice Antonin Scalia's sug-
gestion the lopsided majorities
by which Congress in 2006 ex-
tended Section 5 of the 1965 Vot-
ing Rights Act were "a reason not
for deference, but for suspicion."
Well.
That section requires some
Southern states and other juris-
dictions to seek Justice Depart-
ment permission to make even
minor changes in voting proce-
dures. This was a justifiable in-
fringement of federalism in 1965.
But in 2006, when blacks were
registering and voting at higher
rates than whites in some cov-
ered states, Congress extended
the act until 2031 using voting in-
formation from 1972. Surely
Scalia was correct that Congress,
indifferent to evidence, contin-
ued to sacrifice federalism
merely to make a political ges-
ture. The Roberts court was ex-
cessively deferential in not
overturning Section 5 in a 2009
case, when it merely urged Con-
gress to reconsider the section.
Karlan's disdain for the Citi-
zens United decision which
held Americans do not forfeit
their First Amendment rights
when they choose to speak col-


I






tg
H
(


lectively through corporate enti-
ties is muddled. She de-
nounces "spending by outside
groups" without explaining what
they are outside of. Ev-
idently, she accepts the
self-interested as-
sumption of the politi-
cal class the parties
and candidates that
elections are their
property and inde-
pendent participants
are trespassers. Karlan
approvingly quotes
e Will Justices Ruth Bader
IER Ginsburg's and
Stephen Breyer's un-
DES substantiated asser-
tion -itself disdainful
of elected officials to whom Kar-
lan urges vast deference that
contributions "buy candidates'
allegiance." She seems unaware
abundant social science demon-
strates that contributors respond
to candidates' behavior, not the
reverse. And when darkly warn-
ing about campaign contributions
from corporations' "manage-
ment," she seems unaware that
much of the corporate political
spending is by "nonprofit advo-
cacy corporations" Planned
Parenthood, not Microsoft.
It is, however, the court's health
care decision that she thinks es-
pecially reveals "disrespect for,
and exasperation with, Con-
gress." Even though Roberts up-
held the crucial provision the
mandate he did so with what
Karlan considers a faulty atti-
tude. His opinion was "grudging"
in finding that, although Congress
flinched from calling the man-
date a tax, the law could be saved
by calling it this.
Karlan is very difficult to
please. Roberts rescued Con-
gress' handiwork from Congress'
clumsy legislative craftsmanship,
and still she complains because
in doing so Roberts inevitably
made "a thinly veiled critique of
Congress." Which Karlan seems
to consider lese-majeste. "He
conveyed disdain even as he up-
held the Act," thereby revealing
the conservative justices'
"premise of distrust" toward Con-


gress. They are in good company:
James Madison warned of Con-
gress "everywhere extending the
sphere of its activity, and drawing
all power into its impetuous vor-
tex." But prudent wariness about
Congress is not tantamount to dis-
dain for it or democracy
Today's American public does
not share Karlan's nostalgia for
the Warren court, which she said
was "optimistic about the possi-
bility of politics." Karlan sub-
scribes to the progressive axiom
the cure for the ills of democracy
is democracy, meaning elections.
She sees little need for courts to
protect against what the
Founders feared liberty-
threatening excesses of majori-
ties. With a true progressive's
impatience with the crux of the
Constitution, the separation of
powers, Karlan wants the court to
consider Congress "a full partner
in seeking to address the nation's
pressing problems." But often
our institutions preserve liberty
by being rivals rather than col-
laborators.
She abhors the conservative
justices' "combination of institu-
tional distrust the court is bet-
ter at determining constitutional
meaning and substantive dis-
trust congressional power
must be held in check." Clearly
she thinks Congress would be
"better" at judging the limits of
its own power. This fits her as-
sumption restraints on its power
are presumptively anti-democra-
tic.
She concludes: "For if the jus-
tices disdain us, how ought we to
respond?" Her pronoun radiates
democratic sentimentality -
"us" conflates the citizenry and
Congress. Today, just 18 percent
of the citizenry approves of Con-
gress' performance. What be-
comes of Karlan's argument
when the conservative justices'
distrust of Congress, for which
she disdains them as anti-demo-
cratic, is exceeded by the public's
distrust of Congress?
--*--A
George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


SLETTERS to the Editor


Port spending
wrong-headed
Sending our county adminis-
trator for port training to the
tune of $4,267.52, at the taxpay-
ers' expense, is a ridiculous
waste of money Mr. Thorpe de-
fended the trip, saying the Citrus
County Port Authority asked him
to take the training.
Mr. Thorpe should take some
personal responsibility, and say,
"Hey, I think it's wrong for me to
take this trip at such a critical
time, and when every penny
counts, especially since the port
feasibility study hasn't been
completed yet."
This shows very bad judgment
on the part of the BOCC and the
county administrator. I would
like to see some fiscal responsi-
bility being taken up there on
high. In my opinion, the BOCC is
acting more like tax and spend
progressives, rather than fiscally
responsible Republicans.
It's time to call them on it. We
need to get our house in order,
and if they think they can ask the
good citizens of Citrus County to
bail them out by paying more,
then I think they should exam-
ine their moral conscience. Is it


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Mike Arnold
at 352-564-2930.
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SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
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right to ask people to pay more
when you are being so fiscally ir-
responsible with their money? I
don't think so.


It may not matter to the Citrus
County BOCC where the money
comes from, but it certainly mat-
ters to the people of Citrus
County where and how they
spend it.
Wayne Sessa
Beverly Hills

Blame anti-gun
liberals for shooting
Well, looks like another per-
son has chosen a school to go
crazy with a gun.
Now we have all the liberal
gun control freaks, including
Obama, screaming for more laws
or outright confiscation. It is
their fault this has occurred.
They have made your schools
into shooting galleries with no
danger to the maniacs who per-
petrate these crimes. This per-
son knew he could get away with
murder because antigun liberals
had made it possible. No guns in
school meant it was no danger to
this guy to carry out his plan.
If you stop and think about it,
the liberal antigun agenda and
people are directly to blame.
Jeff Goshorn
Hernando


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Winged monkey rock star of show WConti


In 1900, L. Frank rent computer and elec-
Baum wrote the tronic games age, kids
children's novel, used to enjoy reading
"The Wonderful Wizard books.
of Oz." Some of the As the years passed, I
characters painted by saw the marvelous
his words are warm movie starring Judy
friends and others are Garland. Then, on a
detestable villains. most delightful evening
The bumbling wizard, during the summer of
the heroine Dorothy, the Fred Brannen 2010, Cheryl and I saw
Cowardly Lion, the Tin A SLICE "Wicked" at a London
Man, the Scarecrow, OF LIFE theater.
good witches, bad Great stuff.
witches and even winged monkeys Most recently, we enjoyed a ver-
became a part of my life when I sion of the "Wizard of Oz" pre-
first read the book. And, yes, as a sented by the Apopka (Florida)
child I read the book. High School drama department.
Believe it or not, before the cur- Did I say high school? It doesn't


SoundFF

Cliff jumping
Did Mr. Damato and Mr.
Thorpe miss the news about the
financial difficulties in this
county? Reworking programs
that are doing well and present-
ing plans in such a unilateral
fashion is high-handed as well
as expensive. A new game called
"Cliff Jumping" has just been
introduced in Citrus County.
Zero points
When will the Tampa Bay
Bucs football owners and staff
admit their multimillion-dollar
quarterback is not what they
have? I have nothing against the
young man. He is doing the best
he can, but his best is not good
enough. I think one of his big
faults is when he makes bad
plays, he tries to blame some-
one else and he can't admit he's
at fault. The worst thing he does
is yell at some player. And you
don't blame someone else, es-
pecially when you're on the field
and a million people are watch-
ing on TV. I know he is their
multimillion-dollar dream, but
he's really their nightmare. If
someone thinks I don't know
what I'm talking about, just
think about (the Dec. 17) game.
Bucs zero. When was the last
time? I rest my case.
Standing my ground
I'm supporting Dennis Baxley,
who sponsored the Stand Your
Ground Law. I believe in the
Stand Your Ground Law. I'm not
going to go out and shoot any-
body, but I guarantee you, if
they try to come into my home,
especially my bedroom, I'm
going to shoot them and kill
them. I lived in Miami for a
while and I was broken into a
couple times and the police
down there told me you need to
protect yourself because there's
a lot of people out here who
have nothing to lose. So I don't
care if they take the TV or what-
ever they can steal. If they
break into my bedroom and try
to hurt me or my family, I'm
going to kill them. I'm a woman
and I'm an old woman, but I'm
going to stand my ground.
Lost Social Security
Just a point to point out in the
obituaries today (Dec. 19), peo-
ple are 40, 52, 56, 62, 61 and
then my husband, who is 61. All
these people (who) don't make it
to 65 don't get to draw on the
Social Security they paid into. I
just wanted to point that out, be-
cause they never talk about that
in all these discussions, that a
lot of people pay in and pay in
and then they die right before
they get to retirement age. So I
just wanted to point that out.
Please return photos
For the person who has my
black bag and camera: Could
you please develop the pictures,
at least our anniversary picture,
and turn them (it) in to the
photo department at Walmart
under the name George? I would
appreciate it so much.



REPAIR
Continued from Page C1

riders" wind up raising premiums
via "pass through" from hospitals
to private health insurers and that
cost is passed on to the rest of us,
as seen in ever-increasing monthly
premiums and deductibles.
And there we have a dilemma: Is
government obligated to help those
who cannot afford it or have been
denied medical care, or is it none
of the government's business? I
suppose that largely depends on
whether you are healthy and/or in-
sured and think you don't need to
worry about it. If so, then maybe
you can afford the luxury of a prin-
cipled stance on the Constitution,
Originalism and other abstract
18th-century idioms of liberty and
freedom and the magic of the mar-
ketplace. If not, then you cannot af-
ford these dilettante luxuries and
will spend much of your time wor-


seem possible.
It seems like only a day or so ago,
Ariana Sara Brannen was sleeping
contentedly as I cradled her small
body in my arms. But now, she's in
high school.
Not only that, it's her second
year. She's a sophomore and rush-
ing headlong toward her 16th birth-
day
Back to the "Oz" presentation.
The AHS thespians offered an
abbreviated version of the stage
production, which was initially
adapted from Baum's book in 1902.
Grandchildren do things. Some-
times they do things without even
thinking, which touch our hearts
beyond measure.


During the performance, the
winged monkeys swooped down
the aisles making their grand en-
trance. I was seated in an aisle seat.
Quite unexpectedly, as the swoosh
came by, one of the monkeys gently
gripped my shoulder. Without miss-
ing a step, Ariana looked back and
gave me a telling smile, one that
still says, "I love you, Granddaddy!"
No, she wasn't in the lead role
and she wasn't playing Dorothy But
as far as I'm concerned, my very
own winged monkey was the star of
the show!


Fred Brannen is an Inverness resi-
dent and a Chronicle columnist.


Letters to THE EDITOR


Moving toward collapse
A gentleman called me up the
other day to tell me he agreed with
my latest letter.."but." It's always
the butss" that are my clue to hang
up the phone and get on with my
day. But I let him continue.
His first point was valid. Republi-
can administrations have con-
tributed to our $16.2 trillion
national debt I asked him if he
could enumerate just how much
they had contributed to it and he re-
verted to democratic dogma. At that
point, I asked him if he could de-
scribe the difference between a bil-
lion and a trillion and he deferred
on that question also. I then asked
him if he knew how many stacks of
a billion dollars it would take to
make up a trillion dollars. Again, all
I got were more democratic talking
points. He brought up the cost of the
"Bush" wars and after reminding
him nearly every Democrat in Con-
gress signed on for them, I asked
him if he could put a number to the
costs of the wars. He had no clue. So
at that point, I terminated the con-
versation.
I swear I could have been having
that conversation with Barack
Obama himself and got the same
answers. He avoids specifics like
the plague. He prefers to talk in
broad platitudes and avoids hard
facts much as my caller did. The
reason the socialist elite refuse to
discuss hard facts is their entire
rotten program collapses once you
hold it under the light of day and
expose it to the real numbers of the
situation. They cannot show me a
single instance of a successful so-
cialist society You cannot base a
society on equality of outcome.
Obama calls it fairness, but it is
pure redistribution of income and
wealth in spades. It's a program to
create a society dependent on the
government for subsistence and to
empower those who would rule in
such a society It's a corrupt system
where the government owns the
means of production and all prop-


rying about illness or an accident
that can put you in the hospital and
eventually into the tender mercies
of the debt collection industry -
and won't that be fun.
With so many people out of work
and without insurance, these are real
day-to-day concerns falling outside of
the pugnacious tea party hoipolloi
and their hoity-toity views on govern-
ment assistance. By saving trillions of
dollars over the next decade, Oba-
macare will come as a lifeline to in-
dividuals and the economy We owe it
to others and ourselves to support
this new approach and allow it time
to fix a system that has been breaking
down for decades.
As the old adage says "if it ain't
broke, don't fix it." Well, the cur-
rent system is broken and now is
the time to fix it


John Read is the assistant public
information officer for the Citrus
County Democratic Executive
Committee.


erty, and the citizens exist to serve
the government.
Here is the way I see it. Barack
Obama inherited $10 trillion in na-
tional debt. In four years, he ran it
up to $16.2 trillion. That is 50 per-
cent more in four years than Bush
managed in eight. The Congres-
sional Budget Office predicts by
the time his next term is up, he will
have added $6 trillion more to the
national debt. He will have en-
slaved our children and our grand-
children for their entire lives. He
will have accumulated more debt
in eight years than all the previous
presidents combined.
Any reasonable thinking citizen
should be asking himself why he
would do that It's clear to me
Obama, (Harry) Reid and (Nancy)
Pelosi are disciples of Cloward-
Piven. If you don't remember them,
they were the two socialist profes-
sors who came up with the idea of
bankrupting the country by over-
loading the welfare system and es-
tablishing a new socialist society
from the ashes. By refusing to ad-
dress the real problem of over-
spending by trillions on social
programs and nattering endlessly
over a few billion, the socialists are
bringing us ever closer to that fiscal
collapse.


Harle


ay Lawrence
Homosassa


Big win for Democrats
The Democratic Party is not
going to be beat in any election
anytime soon. That is, until the
money runs out, like it has in
Greece.
The psalmist said correctly "they
have ears to hear, but they do not
listen, they have eyes to see, but
they cannot see."
This rings true today with the
current situation in our country In
our haste to help everyone, we are
not only taking care of the needy,
but we have created a "moocher
class" (who) get free phones, free


WORLD
Continued from Page C1

unions that overwhelmingly sup-
port the current administration
as long as they get favored treat-
ment. Many other well-con-
nected employers and others
have been granted exemptions.
Naturally, many others are
saying, "How about me?"
If enough exemptions are
granted, the pool left to pay the
bill will become smaller and be-
come totally unaffordable rather
than "affordable." Who can have
confidence in such a major law
supposed to benefit all of us
when so many are exempted?
I recently purchased a book ti-
tled "Obamacare Survival
Guide" written by Nick J. Tate.
One would expect it to be a neg-
ative evaluation, since it was
published by conservative
"Newsmax" corporation. How-


food, 99 weeks of unemployment
and unqualified welfare, health
care and now lowered restrictions
on qualifying for disability.
Don't get me wrong; helping oth-
ers is what we as Americans are all
about. In fact, you could say it is our
"sweet spot" It's something we all
want to do. However, the moochers
have caught on to this and now we
have a growing class of people
(who) demand these services.
What's wrong with this picture?
Fewer of us are paying for this and
this is causing the government to
spend more than it is taking in. Tax-
ing the rich will not solve this prob-
lem but will likely make it worse.
The so-called rich own the small
businesses that employ most of our
workers, they pay most of the taxes
and they contribute to charities.
Who will be impacted and how
will they be impacted when the
money runs out? How will they
react? Well my liberal friends, you
got what you wanted now let's see
how you handle it When your car is
burning will you still feel the love?
Jerry Alvarez
Beverly Hills

Retributive job cuts
t, n ania llir tmrnld rl m ersnl nrre


Jl....lU .l.Jy p. ur. A lllJ.,J v i_.
feel they need to reduce their num-
ber of employees can use the follow-
ing notice: As CEO I have resigned
myself to the fact that Barrack
Obama is our president and taxes-
government fees will increase as a
result. To compensate for this I will
have to increase our prices about 10
percent We cannot do that and sur-
vive because of the poor economy
In place of the price increase, I
will have to lay off 50 employees. I
do not know the best way to do this
so I walked through our parking lot
and found 50 cars with Obama
stickers. This is the fair way to find
the 50 since you voted for change.
Dick Weaver
Crystal River


ever, it reviews the pros and cons
of the various aspects in an un-
biased way If all the positive as-
pects of the various parts would
occur, the bill might be fairly
good. However, the book also
lists what might happen if things
do not happen fully as intended.
Reading through the book, one
can only hope at least most of the
positives occur.
Another major issue not ad-
dressed is tort reform. Would
anyone care to guess why this
was left out? Who do you think
wrote the bill?
It appears health insurance
companies, pharmaceutical
companies and lawyers are the
only ones who really love this
law and obviously stand to gain
the most from it.
One of the most frightening as-
pects of the law is it will be in-
corporated and managed by
unelected commissions. This al-
lows our elected officials to
avoid any responsibility when-


Goal 6: Political cam-
paigns without the rancor
- Grade E
The 2012 elections were
some of the worst Citrus
County has ever experi-
enced. Many politicians
hid behind anonymous
special interest groups to
produce campaign adver-
tisements showing a total
lack of familiarity with the
truth. They lied, they
laughed and they won. The
election process in Florida
is an embarrassment.
Goal 7: Protecting the
environment- Grade B+
Some good things have
happened. Art Jones and
his band of merry Rotari-
ans are cleaning up King's
Bay Swiftmud is building
storm-water retention at
the Three Sisters Springs
project. Inverness diverts
reused water to Inverness
Golf and Country Club.
The city of Crystal River,
Swiftmud and Progress
Energy have inked a deal
to transfer treated water
from its west side sewer
plant to cool the towers at
the energy site. Millions of
gallons of water from the
aquifer will be saved each
day
Plenty of work still to
do, but finally some
progress.
Goal 8: Citrus County
needs a YMCA- Grade C.
Plans continue to raise
funds for a YMCA. A
group is organized and the
fundraising will really get
going in 2013. Negotia-
tions are under way with
Citrus Memorial Hospital
Foundation to partner in
the effort.
More than 1,000 people
were served by the Citrus
YMCA in 2012, even
though there is not a
branch facility. (Dis-
claimer: I am personally
involved in the effort to
raise funds to build the Y,
so my opinion may be
challenged on this one).
Goal 9: Keep the com-
munity safe Grade B.
Citrus County is a safe
community. Our chief law
enforcement officer, Jeff
Dawsy, was re-elected by
voters who appreciate the
strong and uncompromis-
ing position he has taken.
During the year, the
sheriff's office assumed
responsibility for fire serv-
ices and has expanded the
safety net. While there
have been well-publicized
crimes, the sheriff's office
has done a good job of
keeping the peace. Citrus
County is a safe place to
live and retire.
Goal 10: Education
measures up Grade B.
Even though most of
public schools received
an A grade from the state,
we will still go with a B,
because there is always
room for improvement.
Our schools do a lot of
things right. They could
do more in preparing
older students and adults
for employment and we'd
like to see a stronger rela-
tionship between the Col-
lege of Central Florida
and the vocational educa-
tion school.
But overall, we can be
proud of what happens in
our public schools. And our
two largest private schools
- 7 Rivers Presbyterian
and Pope John II Catholic
School do terrific work.


Gerry Mulligan is the pub-
lisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan@
chronicleonline.com.


ever unintended consequences
strike us. A major part of the af-
fordable health care law has
nothing to do with physical
health care. However, it may se-
riously affect our financial and
mental well-being.
Obviously a 2,600-page law
cannot be summed up in a few
words. Therefore, I will have to
say again we can only hope the
law works as intended or we get
a correction before any drastic
consequences hit us.
Our legislators have no idea
how to fix a badly flawed "fiscal
cliff" bill they wrote. Do you re-
ally believe they can do anything
to fix the "affordable health care
law" that someone else wrote?
Affordable health care? We
will soon know!


Robert E. Hagaman is Citrus
County Republican state
committeeman. He resides in
Homosassa.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 C3





C4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012

Tree cutting poser
I'd like to know if some-
body out there might know
why they're cutting all the
trees down (on) both sides
of the road on Dunklin
Road. What are they putting
in there? Are they just clean-
ing it out or what is happen-
ing? It's each side of
Dunklin Road.
Post office needed
To the person complain-
ing about the U.S. Postal
(Service): Stop and think.
How would you send your
packages and letters other-
wise? It's a long drive to
some of the states you mail
your packages to. Just think
again and be thankful we've
got what we have.
Bus schedule change
With all this discussion
about the loss of revenue
from Duke Energy not pay-
ing their tax bill, and the
school board, along with the
sheriff's department, wor-
ried about their budget, I
live on Turner Camp Road
and I can count at least four
school buses going out this
road and some of them are
probably two or three min-
utes apart. And it appears
the buses are a very long
way from being filled. I just
wonder if some of these
routes couldn't be resched-
uled. I realize it might be a
problem. It might even be
an inconvenience, but the
cost of that bus, the fuel,
their operator, the vehicle it-
self, I think there could be a
big savings made if some-
body would sit down and do
some homework.
Double yuck
I can relate to the writer's
concerns in Julianne Munn's


OPINION


article last week. I have also
observed servers wiping ta-
bles and chairs using the
same cloth. Yuck! And so
may I add a favorite eating
place of ours has a big
garbage can with no cover
right next to where they
scrape all the used plates in
full view of the diners.
That's a double yuck.
Coyotes on links
I felt I had to get in on the
coyote deal. Citrus Springs
Golf Course has at least 18
coyotes and the golf cart
people out there golfing
feed them. So if anybody's
saying there's no coyotes
here, go to Citrus Springs
Golf Course. Also, the
woman (who) lives on the


golf course lost her poodle
while she was walking the
dog on a leash. The coyote
came, grabbed the poodle.
So everybody who's saying
we don't have coyotes, I'm
with the person who said we
do have coyotes. In fact,
there's two right up the
street from me. So get your
facts straight.
Get rid of planes
This is a rebuttal for peo-
ple (who) want to get rid of
assault rifles and gun shows
and everything. Are these
people crazy? I have guns.
My guns have never killed
anybody. It's not the guns
that does the killing; it's the
people. And furthermore,
you've got the biggest army


in the world in this country,
because people have guns.
That's why we've never been
attacked. Also, when we
were attacked on 9/11 -
why don't they take planes
away then? Talk about get-
ting rid of guns. These peo-
ple are crazy.
Felons registry
This is a question for the
editor, I hope, because I re-
ally need to know. I was told
by an officer with the sheriff's
office (that) anyone even visit-
ing Citrus County, if they're a
felon, they have to register at
the jail. Is this true if you're
just visiting here?
Editor's note: If a visiting
felon is in the county longer
than 48 hours, then, he/she


must register as a felon at the
county jail- unless he/she is
on probation and his/her pro-
bation officer has issued
him/her a travel permit.
Felons who move into Citrus
County must register as a
felon at the county jail.
Lost Social Security
Just a point to point out
in the obituaries today (Dec.
19), people are 40, 52, 56,
62, 61 and then my hus-
band, who is 61. All these
people (who) don't make it
to 65 don't get to draw on
the Social Security they
paid into. I just wanted to
point that out, because they
never talk about that in all
these discussions, that a lot
of people pay in and pay in


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

and then they die right be-
fore they get to retirement
age. So I just wanted to
point that out.
Return photos
For the person who has
my black bag and camera:
Could you please develop
the pictures, at least our an-
niversary picture, and turn
them (it) in to the photo de-
partment at Walmart under
the name George? I would
appreciate it so much.
Thanks Warren
I was wanting to thank
Warren from the Harley-
Davidson shop for the Harley
run that we had for the Cit-
rus County foster kids. It
was a real success. Just
wanted to say thank you and
to thank all the Harley run-
ners who'd done the run for
them. Thank you. This is
from the Citrus County Fos-
ter Parents Association.
Shame on you
Hey, I know the economy
is bad and things don't look
really good. Yard sales are a
great way for people to save
a little money and to make a
little money. But to the per-
son who saw fit to steal the
cookbooks, the ladies'
tights, the little crystal clock
and other odds-and-ends
from the yard sale that I was
going to have: Well, I hope
you're satisfied with yourself
and remember what comes
around and goes around will
come back to you.
Good Samaritan
I want to thank the won-
derful people who found the
envelope in front of the
bank from which I had just
withdrawn Christmas
money. God bless you and
thank you so much.


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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


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Telepresence robots let employees 'beam' into building instead ofcommuting


Associated Press
PALO ALTO, Calif.
Engineer Dallas Goecker
attends meetings, jokes
with colleagues and
roams the office building just
like other employees at his
company in Silicon Valley
But Goecker isn't in California.
He's more than 2,300 miles away,
working at home in Seymour, Ind.
It's all made possible by the
Beam a mobile video-confer-
encing machine he can drive
around the Palo Alto offices
and workshops of Suitable
Technologies. The 5-foot-tall de-
vice, topped with a large video
screen, gives him a physical
presence that makes him and
his colleagues feel like he's ac-
tually there.
"This gives you that casual in-
teraction that you're used to at
work," Goecker said, speaking
on a Beam. "I'm sitting in my
desk area with everybody else.
I'm part of their conversations
and their socializing."
Suitable Technologies, which
makes the Beam, is one of more
than a dozen companies selling
so-called telepresence robots.
These remote-controlled ma-
chines are equipped with video
cameras, speakers, micro-
phones and wheels to allow
users to see, hear, talk and
"walk" in faraway locations.
More and more employees
are working remotely, thanks to
computers, smartphones, email,
instant messaging and video-
conferencing. But those tech-
nologies are no substitute for
actually being in the office,
where casual face-to-face con-
versations allow for easy collab-


Associated Press
Bo Preising, Suitable Technologies' vice president of engineering,
talks with fellow engineers, Josh Faust, center on screen, and Josh
Tyler, on screen at right, both using a Beam remote presence system
Dec. 12 in Palo Alto, Calif. Engineer Christian Carlberg tests
the Beam through an obstacle course with the help of fellow engineer
Dallas Goecker, top right on screen, communicating remotely from
Seymour, Ind., to Suitable Technologies in Palo Alto, Calif.


oration and camaraderie.
Telepresence-robot makers
are trying to bridge the gap
with wheeled machines con-
trolled over wireless Internet
connections to give remote
workers a physical presence in
the workplace.
These robotic stand-ins are
still a long way from going
mainstream, with only a small
number of organizations start-
ing to use them. The machines
can be expensive, difficult to
navigate or even get stuck if
they venture into areas with
poor Internet connectivity
Stairs can be lethal, and non-
techies might find them too
strange to use regularly
"There are still a lot of ques-
tions, but I think the potential is
really great," said Pamela
Hinds, co-director of Stanford
University's Center on Work,
Technology, & Organization. "I
don't think face-to-face is going
away, but the question is, how
much face-to-face can be re-
placed by this technology?"
Technology watchers said the
machines sometimes called
remote presence devices -
could be used for many pur-
poses. They could let managers
inspect overseas factories,
salespeople greet store cus-
tomers, family members check
on elderly relatives or art
lovers tour foreign museums.
Some physicians are already
seeing patients in remote hospi-
tals with the RP-VITA robot co-
developed by Santa Barbara,
Calif.,-based InTouch Health and
iRobot, the Bedford, Mass.,-based
maker of the Roomba vacuum.
See Page D2


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Inherited


coins are

unlikely


cash cow
Dear Bruce: When
my parents died,
some coins were
passed on to me. I've just
held on to them, not really
having any interest in
them.
I saw in the paper an
antique show is coming to
one of the local hotels in a
few months; the dealers
are looking for antique
furniture, accessories,
gems and coins. I am
thinking about taking in
my coins to see what they
are worth and maybe even
selling them. They look to
be in good condition, so
I'm hoping they are worth
something.
Do you think this is a
good place to get an idea
of their value? I don't
know if I should hold on to
them or sell them. S.T.
in New Mexico
Dear S.T: One thing you
should know about coins
is they are rated and
their value is determined
- by their condition. Un-
fortunately, your idea of
"good condition" may not
be the same as a dealer's.
In fact, what looks like
good condition to you is
likely a low grade.
You can get an idea of
your coins' value, if any,
before going to the an-
tique show by visiting any
bookstore that has a vari-
ety of coin books and mag-
azines. Of course, there's
always the Internet.
These coins are nice
things to hang on to, but as
an investment, I wouldn't
get my hopes up too much.
Dear Bruce: I have
heard you talk about um-
brella policies and would
like to get one. I'm not
sure if it's a problem or
not, but I have my car in-
surance with one com-
pany and my homeowners
insurance with another.
Should they both be with
the same company to have
an umbrella policy? -
Reader, via email
Dear Reader: As you
know, I am very much in
favor of an umbrella pol-
icy, which in general
raises your liability insur-
ance from the paltry
amount most people carry
on their cars and homes to
a respectable several mil-
lion dollars. That may
sound like a lot of money,
but it's not difficult to
incur that kind of damage
in today's world.
Although it is not neces-
sary to have your auto and
homeowners policies with
the same company, it does
make the umbrella under-
writing and claims proce-
dures much easier. Unless
there is a significant rea-
son why you have your
auto and homeowners
policies with different
companies, I would
choose one company and
have it write all three
policies.
Dear Bruce: My daugh-
ter and her husband have
always been responsible
people. Recently, my
daughter had to have
emergency surgery. Al-
though she is fine now, this
medical emergency has put
a financial strain on them
because of the amount they
owe the hospital.
I don't have any money
to help them. They are
having a hard time dig-
ging out of this one, and I
See Page D2


-1!





D2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012


BUSINESS


Associated Press
Justin McCartney of Hampton, Va., holds up a cup with the words "Come Together"
written on it outside a Starbucks caf6 Dec. 27 in Washington.




Political platform


Starbucks cups

promote message

of unity to all

Associated Press

NEW YORK Starbucks
is using its coffee cups to
jump into the political fray
in Washington.
The world's biggest coffee
chain asked employees at
cafes in the Washington,
D.C., area to scribble the
words "Come Together" on
cups for drink orders Thurs-
day and Friday CEO
Howard Schultz said the
words are intended as a
message to lawmakers about
the damage being caused by
the divisive negotiations
over the "fiscal cliff."
It's the first time employ-
ees at Starbucks caf6s are
being asked to write any-
thing other than customers'
names on cups.
While companies gener-
ally steer clear of politics to
avoid alienating customers,
the plea to "Come Together"
is a sentiment unlikely to
cause controversy If any-
thing, Starbucks could score


A customer walks into a Starbucks on Dec. 27 in Washington.


points with customers and
burnish its image as a so-
cially conscious company
This isn't the first time the
coffee chain is using its plat-
form to send a political mes-
sage. In the summer of 2011,
Schultz also asked other
CEOs and the public to stop
making campaign contribu-
tions until politicians found
a way to deal with a crisis
over the debt ceiling that
led to a downgrade in the
country's credit rating.
For the latest push, Star-
bucks took out an ad in the
Washington Poston Thursday
showing a cup with the words
"Come Together" on it


The "fiscal cliff" refers to
the steep tax hikes and
spending cuts set to take ef-
fect Jan. 1, unless the White
House and Congress reach
an agreement to avoid them.
As for whether customers
will be confused by the
"Come Together" message
or understand it's related to
the fiscal cliff, Schultz said
in an interview there's wide
public awareness about the
negotiations and Starbucks
will use social media to ex-
plain the effort The Seattle-
based company said test
runs at select stores showed
operations wouldn't be
slowed.


MONEY
Continued from Page D1

don't know what to do for
them. Any suggestions? -
Reader, via email
Dear Reader: I am sorry
they are having problems.
Many of us have been in
similar situations.
The best thing for them to
do is to sit down with the fi-
nance department of the
hospital and come up with a
payment plan. It's far better
for your daughter and her
husband to be proactive and
approach the hospital than
to have the hospital come
after them.
If she has fully recovered
from her emergency, maybe
she or her husband (or both)
could pick up a part-time job
to earn extra money to get
out from under this debt. I
wish them well.
Dear Bruce: It seems to
me reverse mortgages are
expensive. Why can't you
achieve the same thing with
a home equity line of credit?
If you can get a line of credit
about the same size as the
reverse mortgage, it would
seem relatively easy to take
out every month the amount
of money you would get from
the reverse mortgage, plus
the amount needed to make
the payment on the home
equity loan. I don't under-
stand what the big deal is. -
Reader, via email
Dear Reader: What you
are overlooking, forgetting
the costs for the moment, is
if you take out a reverse
mortgage, you make no pay-
ments. While the amount
you can borrow is limited by
factors such as your age,
your spouse's age, the value
of the house, the amount of
equity, etc., once the mort-
gage is approved, there is no
monthly payment to make.
With a home equity loan,
you have to start repaying
the lender immediately
The great thing about a re-
verse mortgage is as long as
you pay the taxes and insur-
ance, you can stay in the
home until you pass away,
without having to make pay-
ments on the equity you bor-
rowed against The house is
sold after you die, and the
amount of money owed for
the reverse mortgage is sub-
tracted from the proceeds.
There may be nothing left
for your heirs, but at least it's
a great way to live out your


life comfortably
Dear Bruce: You often say
in your column and on your
radio show credit is a tool
that must be used properly I
agree credit card debt
should definitely be paid off,
but what about a mortgage
and loans taken out for
things like cars? Sandy in
Missouri
Dear Sandy: Borrowing
money for frivolous activi-
ties, cars, trips, etc., that you
simply can't afford is a bad
idea. On the other hand,
how many people would
ever own a home if they
couldn't pay it off in the form
of a mortgage? How many
people could afford an auto-
mobile without having debt?
The reason debit cards
are rapidly gaining popular-
ity is if you don't have the
money, you can't spend it On
the other hand, a credit
card, as long as you are dis-
ciplined and know the
amount you can pay back in
full every month, can be a
wonderful tool. As a practi-
cal matter, you're getting the
use of somebody else's
money without any cost as
long as you pay it before the
interest kicks in.
As you said, credit is a
wonderful tool when used
properly
Dear Bruce: My sister re-
cently lost her job. She has
been known to charge up
her credit cards and not pay
them off monthly, and now
she has lost her job, she is in
deep, deep debt with her
credit cards. She has been
trying to pay $700 a month
toward her debt but can't
sustain it
I suggested she file credit
card bankruptcy, as opposed
to normal bankruptcy Is it
true credit card bankruptcy
will appear on your credit
history for a shorter time
than regular bankruptcy? -
Reader, via email
DearReader. I know of no
such thing as "credit card
bankruptcy," and I do not
believe it exists.
You failed to tell me the
total amount your sister
owes. If it's a relatively mod-
est amount, to declare Chap-
ter 7 bankruptcy would be a
huge mistake. It would ef-
fectively stay with her for
the rest of her life.
Of course, we don't know
how your sister got this far
into hock. Until she licks
that problem, all we're doing
is putting a Band-Aid on a
cancer, which makes no


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

sense.
Dear Bruce: I am looking
to buy a new home, and I've
gone to one lender who has
offered me 11 percent I am
confused, because I thought
interest rates were half that
amount. I have excellent
credit and a high credit
score. It seems like too much
to me. Am I wrong? -
Reader, via email
Dear Reader: You have
got to be kidding. I hope you
said no thank you and ran
out If what you say is true
and you really do have a
high credit score and excel-
lent credit rating, there is no
way you should be getting of-
fered a rate that high.
Interest rates are as low as
they have been in five
decades. Unless you have
terrible credit or want to
put nothing down and even
take some money out of the
deal -4 percent is a reason-
able, attainable rate when
purchasing a private home.
Lots of people out there
want to lend you money If
you have good credit, go and
seek them out
Dear Bruce: My husband
received a settlement of
$25,000 and would like to in-
vest it and forget about it We
are relatively young, 39 and
38. We both have good jobs,
so we don't need this money
We would like to let it grow
until one day when we do
need it What are your sug-
gestions? S.P, via e-mail
Dear S.EP With the state of
the economy at present,
bank accounts and CDs are
paying practically nothing.
There are some good deals
out there in the stock mar-
ket If you have the stomach
for it and think you can af-
ford to do without the
$25,000 for a substantial pe-
riod, the place to be is in
some type of aggressive mu-
tual fund or funds.
If you're not familiar with
the fund market, it's time
you make the effort. Begin
your research by reading fi-
nancial magazines such as
Money and Forbes, as well
as the business sections of
local and national newspa-
pers.
With the amount of money
you have to invest, you're
going to have to do it your-
self Since you work hard for
your money, it seems to me
that it's worth investing
some time and effort to
learn the language of invest-
ing and the options that are
open to you.


Associated Press
Senior software engineer, Josh Faust, seen on screen, navigates his company's office using
a Beam remote presence system, as fellow engineer Stephanie Lee, at right, works on a
project Dec. 12 at Suitable Technologies in Palo Alto, Calif. More employees are working
from home, but there's still no substitute for actually being at the office. Enter the Beam.
It's a roving computer screen with video cameras, microphones and speakers that
stands five feet and rides on motorized wheels.


ROBOTS
Continued from Page C1

The global market for
telepresence robots is pro-
jected to reach $13 billion
by 2017, said Philip Solis, re-
search director for emerg-
ing technologies at ABI
Research.
The robots have attracted
the attention of Russian ven-
ture capitalist Dimitry
Grishin, who runs a $25 mil-
lion fund that invests in
early-stage robotics
companies.
"It's difficult to predict
how big it will be, but I defi-
nitely see a lot of opportu-
nity," Grishin said.
"Eventually it can be in
each home and each office."
His Grishin Robotics fund
recently invested $250,000
in a startup called Double
Robotics. The Sunnyvale,
Calif.,-based company
started selling a Segway-like
device called the Double
that holds an Apple iPad,
which has a built-in video-
conferencing system called
FaceTime. The Double can
be controlled remotely from
an iPad or iPhone.
So far, Double Robotics
has sold more than 800 units
costing $1,999 each, co-


founder Mark DeVidts said.
The Beam got its start as a
side project at Willow
Garage, a robotics company
in Menlo Park where
Goecker worked as an
engineer
A few years ago, he moved
back to his native Indiana to
raise his family, but he
found it difficult to collabo-
rate with engineering col-
leagues using existing
video-conferencing systems.
"I was struggling with re-
ally being part of the team,"
Goecker said. "They were
doing all sorts of wonderful
things with robotics. It was
hard for me to participate."
So Goecker and his col-
leagues created their own
telepresence robot. The re-
sult: the Beam and a new
company to develop and
market it.
At $16,000 each, the Beam
isn't cheap. But Suitable
Technologies said it was de-
signed with features that
make "pilots" and "locals"
feel the remote worker is
physically in the room: pow-
erful speakers, highly sensi-
tive microphones and
robust wireless connectivity
The company began ship-
ping Beams last month,
mostly to tech companies
with widely dispersed engi-
neering teams, officials said.


"Being there in person is
really complicated com-
muting there, flying there,
all the different ways peo-
ple have to get there. Beam
allows you to be there with-
out all that hassle," said
CEO Scott Hassan, beaming
in from his office at Willow
Garage in nearby Menlo
Park.
Not surprisingly, Suitable
Technologies has fully em-
braced the Beam as a work-
place tool. On any given day,
up to half of its 25 employ-
ees "beam" into work, with
employees on Beams sitting
next to their flesh-and-blood
colleagues and even joining
them for lunch in the
cafeteria.
Software engineer Josh
Faust beams in daily from
Hawaii, where he moved to
surf, and plans to spend the
winter hitting the slopes in
Lake Tahoe. He can't play
pingpong or eat the free,
catered lunches in Palo
Alto, but he otherwise feels
like he's part of the team.
"I'm trying to figure out
where exactly I want to live.
This allows me to do that
without any of the instabil-
ity of trying to find a differ-
ent job," Faust said,
speaking on a Beam from
Kaanapali, Hawaii. "It's
pretty amazing."










D3

SUNDAY
DECEMBER 30, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


Scan .
this:
iii riCFB


numberr Connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


New Year's Day
and New Year's Eve
entertainment and
dining options
Eats
Havana House Grill
6875 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.,
Crystal River, 352-563-0080.
Open New Year's Eve and New
Year's Day. Holiday catering
available.

Joe's Family Restaurant
911 W. Main St., Inverness,
352-726-1688.
Open New Year's Day from
6 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Plantation on Crystal River
9301 W. Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River, 352-795-4211.
Open New Year's Eve from
6 a.m. to 9 p.m. with dinner
specials.

Taverna Manos
5705 W. Gulf-to-Lake Hwy.,
Crystal River, 352-564-0078.
Open New Year's Eve.

Entertainment
Citrus 95.3 presents New
Year's Eve in the Palm Room
at the Plantation on Crystal
River from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m.,
$39 per person. DJ Stump
spinning, champagne toast at
midnight, hors d'oeuvres 10
p.m. to midnight, and a cash
bar with special pricing. Dis-
counted room packages for
two people overnight and tick-
ets to the Palm Room event
are $199. Call 352-795-4211.

Come watch your favorite bowl
game in the West 82 & The
19th Hole Bars at the Planta-
tion on Crystal River On New
Year's Day from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.

New Year's Eve gala at the
Villages of Citrus Hills,
Hampton Room. Music pro-
vided by Paradise Band. This
black-tie event features a cash
bar and hors d'oeuvres, as
well as a dinner buffet and
champagne toast. Just $75
for members, $85 for guests.
Call to purchase tickets up
until 1 p.m. Monday, Dec. 31,
at 352-746-7633.

Enjoy dinner and dancing at a
New Year's Eve ball at the
Citrus Springs Community
Center. Tickets are $35 per
person for a formal dinner
catered by Gruff's Elite Ban-
quet & Catering, with a cash
bar and dancing melodies for
your entertainment. Call 352-
527-7540.

Bowl in the New Year at Man-
atee Lanes for $100 per lane
for up to six people. Includes
four hours of bowling, a live
deejay, party favors, chips,
veggies, pretzels, nuts and
dip, pizza and our famous
(mild) hot wing buffet at 11 p.m.
Free champagne toast at mid-
night, free coffee after mid-
night and one drink ticket per
person (alcohol for guests 21
and over.) Reservations only!
Call 352-795-4546.

Golf, anyone?
Register yourself or your four-
some now for the first annual
Tee Off for Tourette golf out-
ing on Feb. 2 at Plantation on
Crystal River. Cost is $100 is
per player or $400 per four-
some is $400. Greens fee,
cart, lunch and goody bags in-
cluded. Shotgun start 9 a.m.
Contact Gary D'Amico at
gary78@tampabay.rr.com.
Sponsorships still available.

Citrus County Builder Associa-
tion's annual Jim Blackshear
Memorial golf outing will be
Feb. 23 at Seven Rivers Golf &
Country Club, with 50 percent
of proceeds benefitting the
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County. Entry includes greens
fee, cart, lunch, door prizes
and one mulligan ticket! Call
352-746-9028.

March 4! Proceeds benefit
projects of Citrus Memorial
Health System. This is an 18-
hole scramble. Registration
and continental breakfast at
8:30 a.m. Shotgun start at 10
a.m. Cost per player $325.
Team prizes for first, second
and third places. Cash prize
of $25,000 for a hole in one.


Sponsorship packages available
at cmhfoundation.com or by
calling 352-344-6442 or 352-
344-6560. Presenting sponsor
is Wells Fargo Insurance.


Have you ever considered joining? CI
YOU CITRUS COUNTY
Carol Kimbrough, Specialty Gems, shares her thoughts on Chamber membership: Chamber of commerce
"S specialty Gems has working opportunities and resources. The Chamber is luncheons and mixers are U pco in
been amemberofthe business contacts. Wehave like one-stop shopping. just a few of thebenefits U pc
Crystal River/Citrus County watched the Chamber Through one membership, we enjoy. The friendships C h
Chamber of Commerce grow from three separate we have many opportuni- we have forged over the her
since 1985. To use an old parochial entities into one ties to grow both person- years with local busi-
phrase, membership has very effective, cohesive ally and professionally. nesses have created a en
its rewards. The Chamber and unified organization. Educational seminars, fes- sense of community and events
has been a constant re- "Beinga smallbusiness, tivals, legislative func- loyalty to Citrus County Jan. 10- Business After
source of leadership, net- we have limited time and tions, business networking that will last a lifetime." ur f 5 p.m. t 7 ..
Hours from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
at CEDAR CREEK LIVING
FACILITY
Jan. 11 January Chamber
m-e- m I members
-- a-,lunch
__ 'from
11:30
CI la.m. to 1
cnrln p.m. at
S ': Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club
Jan. 19 and 20 Florida
Manatee Festival in Crystal
S River; www.floridamanatee
festival.com.
Jan. 24 Business After
Hours from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
GRUMPY GATORS
March 2 and 3 Floral City
Strawberry Festival; www.floral-
citystrawberryfestival .com.
LEGISLATIVE DAYS Yes,
plural in 2013! Save the dates:
Joining the group from Kingsway are Chamber ambassadors Bill Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County; Janet March 20 and 21. More details
Mayo, Plantation on Crystal River; Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers; Lillian Smith, Mary Kay; Mike to come.
Buchanan, Excel Printing; Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast Bank; Sarah Fitts, First International Title; and Remember, coupons and
Tom Corcoran, Life Care Center of Citrus County. discounts appear on the mobile
and regular website!
Check out our complete cal-
Welcome new members: Kingsway Check out our complete cal-
endar for community, entertain-

Beverly Hills and Nature Coast Primary Care ment and fundraising events.
ingsway Beverly Hills is an independent living Dr. Savage has come full circle by completing his medical
facility located at 6150 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. training, practicing in Tampa for four years, attaining his
Apartments are still available. Call 352-456-6006 for board certification, and coming home to practice family S H O P
more information or visit their website at www.kingsway medicine. You may see Dr. Savage for health mainte-
beverlyhills.com. nance, medical disease management, skin care and other
N nature Coast Primary Care is the office of Dr. issues. Nature Coast Primary Care is located at 927
Kenneth C. Savage Jr., D.O. Coming from a family of N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River. The phone number is
physicians, Dr. Savage strongly believes in providing top- 352-436-4328 and more information is available at
quality and compassionate care. A Citrus County resident, www.naturecoastprimarycare.com. F IR S T


D o you make New
t Year's resolutions?
No matter how you answer
that question, please make
one resolution for 2013:
SHOP CITRUS FIRST.
"....It is important to keep as
many dollars as possible
within our county. Keeping
our local businesses and
stores open helps our tax
revenue base, holds unem-
ployment down and creates
a stronger, more vibrant
economic community.
Many small shops make
and sell products grown
and produced locally. Buy-
ing at one local store may
affect several businesses
and families. Shopping at
larger, national stores that
Dr. Kenneth Savage, center, with his wife Dr. Olga Savage to his left, is joined by ambassadors of the Citrus are within our county
County Chamber of Commerce at the ribbon-cutting ceremony for Nature Coast Primary Care. Ambassadors keeps dollars in the county
in attendance include: Crystal Ashe, Health Center at Brentwood; Mike Buchanan, Excel Printing; Tom and people employed.
Corcoran, Life Care Center of Citrus County; Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers; Sarah Fitts, First International So large or small, Shop
Title; Bill Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County; Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast Bank; Janet Mayo, Plantation Citrus First and help keep
on Crystal River; Betty Murphy, Citrus Archives and Computers; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; Bonnie Citrus County a great
Hardiman-Pushee; and Dan Pushee. place to live, work and
play!


ik "like"us on
facebook


-WFoLoOoRo I oDo A


L : Ii, rt' "- l ,. i'
Fma m wm!,


-w


Are your pants fitting a little tighter after those
holiday meals? If so this weeks Chamber Chat will
help you slim down and get healthy in the new
year! Lace Blue-Mclean from the Inverness Yoga &
Wellness Center co-hosts Chamber Chat this week
and shares how yoga and pilates can get you back
into your skinny jeans and into a healthier state of
mind. We will also learn how the Inverness Farmers
Market makes eating healthier more affordable and
accessible to those looking to keep that new years
resolution. Wendell Husebo from Healthy Living
Magazine shares how this publication provides
excellent articles on topics ranging from mental
and physical health, to financial and medical
information as well. Get out your yoga pants and
be sure to stay with us through the final segment
where Lace shows us some simple yoga poses for
the mind and body.
You have 3 chances to watch Chamber Chat--
Monday 6pm-- Thursday 8am-- Friday 1pm-- every
week! If you would like your business or local event
featured on Chamber Chat-- at no cost to you--
Email Melissa Benefield at
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Andrew Neitlich, seen in front of one his investment homes Sept. 12 in Venice, Fla., once
worked as a financial analyst picking stocks for a mutual fund. During the dot-com crash
12 years ago, Neitlich didn't sell his stocks, but like many others, he is selling now. An
analysis by The Associated Press finds individual investors have pulled at least
$380 billion from U.S. stock funds since they started selling in April 2007.



Losing faith in stocks


Investorspull

money out of

Wall Street

BERNARD CONDON
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK Andrew
Neitlich is the last person
you'd expect to be rattled by
the stock market.
He once worked as a fi-
nancial analyst picking
stocks for a mutual fund. He
has huddled with dozens of
CEOs in his current career
as an executive coach. Dur-
ing the dot-com crash 12
years ago, he kept his wits
and did not sell.
But he's selling now.
"You have to trust your
government. You have to
trust other governments.
You have to trust Wall
Street," said Neitlich, 47.
"And I don't trust any of
these."
Selling frenzy
Defying decades of invest-
ment history, ordinary
Americans are selling
stocks for a fifth year in a
row. The selling has not let
up despite unprecedented
measures by the Federal
Reserve to persuade people
to buy and the come-hither
allure of a levitating market
Stock prices have doubled
from March 2009, their low
point during the Great Re-
cession.
It's the first time ordinary
folks have sold during a sus-
tained bull market since rel-
evant records were first
kept during World War II, an
examination by The Associ-
ated Press has found. The
AP analyzed money flowing
into and out of stock funds
of all kinds, including rela-
tively new exchange-traded
funds, which investors like
because of their low fees.
"People don't trust the
market anymore," said fi-
nancial historian Charles
Geisst of Manhattan Col-
lege. He said a "crisis of
confidence" similar to one
after the crash of 1929 will
keep people away from
stocks for a generation or
more.
The implications for the
economy and living stan-
dards are unclear but po-
tentially big. If the pullback
continues, some experts
said, it could lead to lower
spending by companies,
slower U.S. economic
growth and perhaps lower
gains for those who remain
in the market.
Big, unusual moves
Since they started selling
in April 2007, eight months
before the start of the Great
Recession, individual in-
vestors have pulled at least
$380 billion from U.S. stock
funds, a category that in-
cludes mutual funds and ex-
change-traded funds,
according to estimates by
the AP That is the equiva-
lent of all the money they
put into the market in the
previous five years.
Instead of stocks, they're
putting money into bonds
because those are widely
perceived as safer invest-
ments. Individuals have put
more than $1 trillion into
bond mutual funds alone
since April 2007, according
to the Investment Company
Institute, a trade group rep-
resenting investment funds.
Selling during a downturn
and a recovery is unusual
because Americans almost


always buy more than they
sell during both.
Since World War II, nine
recessions besides the
Great Recession have been
followed by recoveries last-
ing at least three years. Ac-
cording to data from the
Investment Company Insti-
tute, individual investors
sold during and after only
one of those previous down-
turns the one from No-
vember 1973 through March
1975. And back then a scary
stock drop around the start
of the recovery's third year,
1977, gave people ample
reason to get out of the mar-
ket.
Risk spreads
The unusual pullback this
time has spread to other big
investors public and pri-
vate pension funds, invest-
ment brokerages and state
and local governments.
These groups have sold a
total of $861 billion more
than they have bought since
April 2007, according to the
Federal Reserve.
Even foreigners, big pur-
chasers in recent years, are
selling now $16 billion in
the 12 months through Sep-
tember
As these groups have sold,
much of the stock buying
has fallen to companies.
They've bought $656 billion
more than they have sold
since April 2007. Companies
are mostly buying back their
own stock.
Investors rebel
On Wall Street, the in-
vestor revolt has largely
been dismissed as tempo-
rary But doubts are creep-
ing in.
A Citigroup research re-
port sent to customers con-
cludes the "cult of equities"
that fueled buying in the
past has little chance of
coming back soon. Investor
blogs speculate about the
"death of equities," a line
from a famous Business-
Week cover story in 1979,
another time many people
had seemingly given up on
stocks. Financial analysts
lament how the retreat by
Main Street has left daily
stock trading at low levels.
The investor retreat may
have already hurt the frag-
ile economic recovery
The number of shares
traded each day has fallen
40 percent from before the
recession to a 12-year low,
according to the New York
Stock Exchange. That's cut
into earnings of investment
banks and online brokers,
which earn fees helping oth-
ers trade stocks. Initial pub-
lic offerings, another source
of Wall Street profits, are
happening at one-third the
rate before the recession.
Testing old ways
And old assumptions
about stocks are being
tested. One investing gospel
is because stocks generally
rise in price, companies
don't need to raise their
quarterly cash dividends
much to attract buyers. But
companies are increasing
them lately
Dividends in the S&P 500
rose 11 percent in the 12
months through September,
and the number of compa-
nies choosing to raise them
is the highest in at least 20
years, according to FactSet,
a financial data provider.
Stocks now throw off more
cash in dividends than U.S.
government bonds do in in-
terest.
Many on Wall Street think
this is an unnatural state


that cannot last. After all,
people tend to buy stocks
because they expect them to
rise in price, not because of
the dividend. But for much
of the history of U.S. stock
trading, stocks were consid-
ered too risky to be re-
garded as little more than
vehicles for generating divi-
dends. In every year from
1871 through 1958, stocks
yielded more in dividends
than U.S. bonds did in inter-
est, according to data from
Yale economist Robert
Shiller exactly what is
happening now.
So maybe that's normal,
and the past five decades
were the aberration.
Underestimating
People who think the
market will snap back to
normal are underestimating
how much the Great Reces-
sion scared investors, said
Ulrike Malmendier, an
economist who has studied
the effect of the Great De-
pression on attitudes to-
ward stocks.
She said people are ig-
noring something called the
"experience effect," or the
tendency to place great
weight on what you most re-
cently went through in de-
ciding how much financial
risk to take, even if it runs
counter to logic. Extrapolat-
ing from her research on
"Depression Babies," the
title of a 2010 paper she co-
wrote, she said many young
investors won't fully em-
brace stocks again for an-
other two decades.
"The Great Recession will
have a lasting impact be-
yond what a standard eco-
nomic model would
predict," said Malmendier,
who teaches at the Univer-
sity of California, Berkeley
She could be wrong, of
course. But it's a measure of
the psychological blow from
the Great Recession that,
more than three years since
it ended, big institutions, not
just amateur investors, are
still trimming stocks.
Power of pensions
Public pension funds
have cut stocks from 71 per-
cent of their holdings before
the recession to 66 percent
last year, breaking at least
40 years of generally rising
stock allocations, according
to "State and Local Pen-
sions: What Now?," a book
by economist Alicia
Munnell. They're shifting
money into bonds.
Private pension funds,
like those run by big compa-
nies, have cut stocks more:
from 70 percent of holdings
to under 50 percent, back to
the 1995 level.
"People aren't looking to
swing for the fences any-
more," says Gary Goldstein,
an executive recruiter on
Wall Street, referring to the
bankers and traders he
helps get jobs. "They're get-
ting less greedy"
Greed
The lack of greed is re-
markable given how much
official U.S. policy is de-
signed to stoke it.
When Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke
launched the first of three
bond-buying programs four
years ago, he said one aim
was to drive Treasury yields
so low that frustrated in-
vestors would feel they had
no choice but to take a risk on
stocks. Their buying would
push stock prices up, and
everyone would be wealthier
and spend more. That would
help revive the economy


Business DIGEST

Tally Ho vacations premier agency


Special to the Chronicle
Tally Ho Vacations has qualified to be a premier agency with the Globus Family of Brands.
Receiving the qualification plaque are Ed Lattin, president and owner of Tally Ho
Vacations; Denise Fraind, sales manager of Globus; and Debbie Muir, Tally Ho Vacations
manager. Globus Family of Brands includes Avalon Waterways, Globus Tours, Monogram
Tours and Cosmos Vacations. Globus selects only a few agencies that qualify for the pres-
tigious award. For more information on Globus Family, contact Tally Ho Vacations at 352-
860-2805, www.tallyhovacations.com or dmuir@tallyhovacations.


Salon welcomes
two new stylists
CSI, aka Cynthias Salon
Inc., welcomes Tammy
Bergenbush and Laurrie
Spivey to the salon. Bergen-
bush offers phases of hair care
and roller sets while Spivey will
provide phases of hair care,
pedicures and shellac for nails.
Both stylists can be reached
by calling 352-795-6050 Tues-
day through Saturday.
CSI is in the Crystal Square
shopping center behind Ameri-
can Pro Dive Shop in Crystal
River.
Chas. Davis Funeral
home recertified
Charles E. Davis, CFSP, a
funeral director with Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home in Inver-
ness, has recently qualified for
recertification of the designa-
tion of Certified Funeral Serv-
ice Practitioner (CFSP), by the
Academy of Professional Fu-
neral Service Practice.
A number of professions
grant special recognition to
members upon completion of
specified academic and pro-
fessional programs and
"CFSP" is funeral service's na-
tional individual recognition.
A select few have distin-
guished themselves among
their peers within the funeral
service profession as they con-
tinue their education to exceed
the highest standards of care.
This achievement is especially
notable because Charles has
voluntarily elected to partici-
pate in quality educational and
service opportunities that far
surpass what the funeral serv-
ice licensing board in Florida
requires. Charles has commit-
ted to a program of lifelong
learning to serve you and fami-
lies in your community with the
level of excellence expected of
a CFSP.
The Board of Trustees of the
Academy of Professional Fu-
neral Service Practice com-
mends you for choosing to put
your trust in the hands of a
Certified Funeral Service
Practitioner.
Since its 1976 founding,
the Academy has had as its


g)RUSH


For more information about advertising

contact 564-2917 or 563-3273


goals: 1) to recognize those
practitioners who have volun-
tarily entered into a program of
personal and professional
growth, 2) to raise and improve
the standards of funeral serv-
ice and 3) to encourage practi-
tioners to make continuing
education a life-long process in
their own self-interest, the in-
terest of the families they
serve, and the community in
which they serve.
To initially receive this
award, the practitioner must
complete a 180 hour program
of continuing education activi-
ties and events. In addition, the
practitioner is required to accu-
mulate 20 hours per year to re-
certify. Credits are awarded by
the Academy for work leading
to personal and/or professional
growth in four areas: Academic
Activities, Professional Activi-
ties, Career Review (for
retroactive credit), Community
and Civic Activities.
Information about Acad-
emy membership and certifica-
tion may be obtained by
contacting: Academy of Pro-
fessional Funeral Service
Practice, Inc., KimberlyA.
Gehlert, Executive Director,
P.O. Box 2275, Westerville,
OH 43086. Phone: 614-899-
6200. Website: www.apfsp.org.
Workforce warns
about scams
OCALA- Workforce Con-
nection of Citrus, Levy and
Marion counties cautions job-
seekers to be alert for scam-
mers usurping the names of
legitimate businesses and or-
ganizations to take advantage


of those looking for work.
Workforce Connection CEO
Rusty Skinner said the re-
gional workforce board de-
cided to issue the warning
after hearing about the prob-
lem from other workforce
boards. In Panama City, he
said, the Gulf Coast Work-
force Board recently reported
scammers posted jobs on the
Employ Florida Marketplace
luring jobseekers who, when
they responded, were in-
structed to send money in ad-
vance for "required" job
training.
"Scammers are unscrupu-
lous, clever and are often very
good at what they do," Skin-
ner said. "It is unconscionable
that these imposters are tak-
ing money from people who
are diligently seeking employ-
ment."
The Employ Florida Market-
place, or EFM, is the state's
premier online job bank and
used by all 24 regional work-
force boards. Even though
EFM posts scamming warn-
ings on nearly every page,
Skinner said when someone is
searching for work and finds
what appears to be a promis-
ing job, "it's easy to get excited
and let your guard down."
Skinner noted there have
been no reports of similar em-
ployment scams in Citrus,
Levy and Marion counties,
and he hopes to keep it that
way by alerting jobseekers to
warning signs, such as claims
of guaranteed employment
and requests for payment of
up-front fees.
From staff reports


Tammy Bergenbush and Laurrie Spivey


--


D4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012


BUSINESS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For more information on how to reach
Citrus County readers call
352-563-5592.


CITRUS COUNTY


CH ONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com


*(Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission; myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/AlligatorlncidentsFactsSheet.htm) Scarborough 2010


0008XGS


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CLASSIFIED


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 D5


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D6 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Irm I Imn


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
** * *


Someone is missing.
Lovely Lady, degree,
distinguished, pretty,
slender. Caring for elderly
parents. Would like to
meet man of character,
intelligent, ethical, suc-
cessful in his endeavors.
Age 55 to early 70's.
Rely: Blind Box 1820
Citrus Cnty Chronicle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River, FI
34429



HOMOSASSA
2/1 eat in kitchen, tile
floors, laundry rm, $450 +
sec. (727) 244-3949



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$


-- Home e Finder
www.chroniclehomefinder.com


$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191




FREE KITTENS
14 wks old, litter trained
352-382-4654
FREE
Twelve cockatiels & 3
large cages. Call after
8am (352) 341-0703
SHEPHERD MIX
male, blonde, approx. 3
yrs. old. need fenced
yard, loving home
352-489-6072




FRESH CITRUS
BELLAMY GROVE
Greens, Strawberries,
Broccoli, Gift Shipping,
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
32-9.72.6-637r


Female Pug found in
Beverly Hills area. Out of
state dog tags. Call to
identify. 352-220-2014


FOUND SHELTIE DOG
IN INVERNESS
AROUND THE AREA OF
INDEPENDENCE
(352)212-6182
Found: orange/white kit-
ten found in vicinity of Cit-
rus Ave/Turkey Oak Ave
on 12/24. Very loving and
cries for her missing
owner at night. If yours,
please call to claim:
VYnr PrwsvH/HW& 564-7931.
Gold Wedding Band
Search Hundreds of Local Listings found in Inverness
www.chroniclehomefinder.com Rails to Trails. Call &
Identify (352) 860-1228


Hounddog approx 6mo
old Brown & white. Found
in the area of Mini Farms
Dunklan/ Dunnellon
(352) 465-7625
Pomeranian, Female
found in Old Homosassa,
Shadytree Path area. Call
to identify (352)621-3130




HOUSEKEEPING
PERSON
Opening on house-
keeping staff at Citrus
Hills. Responsible for
cleaning hospitality
villas, including laundry,
as well as offices and
models needed.
Flexible Full -Time
schedule to include
weekends.
Apply at Terra Vista
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd, Hernando, FL







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





ARNP or PA
Wanted Part Time for
a busy Pediatric
Practice in Crystal
River, Send Resume
to: lindaoracticemar
0tampabav.rr.com


FIT RN

IV Exp. preferred
For physicians office
with benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1787M.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida, 34429

SEVEN RIVERS

Join Our Team
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center
Please visit our
Career Center at
www.SevenRivers
Regional.com
Phone 352-795-8462
Fax-352-795-8464
6201 N. Suncoast Bvd.
Crystal River, FL 34428
Stephanie Arduser
Recruiter
EOE Drug /Tobacco
Free Workplace

MEDICAL
OPPORTUNITIES

Billing Clerk
*Receptionist
*Medical Asst.
Scanning Asst.
Blind Box 1792P
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624
N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal
River, FL 34429

MEDICAL
RECEPTIONIST
Busy medical office
looking for exp.
receptionist. Must be
familiar with billing & able
to multi task.
Fax resume to:
352-746-5784
NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


P/T, DIETARY
AIDE
Looking for Responsi-
ble Individual
with flexible hours.
Aoolv in Person:
700 SE 8th Ave
Crystal River, 34429
DFWP, EOE





PRODUCTION
MANAGER
for Citrus County
strawberry, blueberry,
and citrus farm.
Full time, year round
position. Must be willing
to relocate to Floral
City, Florda.
Responsible for:
Supervision of irrigation
technician and spray
technician. Operation
and light maintenance
of irrigation systems,
spray equipment, trac-
tors and other farm ve-
hicles. Interaction with
Harvest Manger to en-
sure production yield
and quality.
Requires detailed
knowledge of:
Agricultural chemicals
and spray equipment,
calibration and mainte-
nance. Irrigation,
fertigation, chemigation
equipment, calibration
and maintenance.
Diesel pumps and
wells. Record keeping
and daily logs.Tractors
and other farm equip-
ment. Computers MS
office suite, internet.
College Agricultural
Degree a plus.
Pnvate Pesticide Appli-
cators License a plus.
Starting salary com-
mensurate with expen-
ence, plus housing, ve-
hicle, insurance, 401K,
bonus after 1st year.
Respond with resume
FERRIS FARMS
7607 S FLORIDA AVE,
FLORAL CITY, FL
34436


FINANCE
DIRECTOR
THE CITY OF
CRYSTAL RIVER
is seeking applicants
for the position of
Finance Director. Po-
sition reports directly
to the City Manager
and is responsible for
financial reporting,
budget development,
utility billing, collec-
tions, human
resources, risk man-
agement, and
payroll/benefits ad-
ministration. Required
qualifications
include a degree in
accounting/business
administration and
prior experience in
governmental ac-
counting. Salary
range is $50,688 to
$71,806. Letters of
application, with a full
resume, should be
mailed to:
City Manager,
123 NW Highway 19,
Crystal River, FL
34428 and be post-
marked no later than
January 9, 2013. En-
velopes should be
marked as "Finance
Director Applicant".
Equal Opportunity
Employer


Sales / Project
Coordinator
Needed ASAP
Manufactured
Homes Exp. Req.
Serious inquires only!
Call Henry
(352) 795-1272






NOW HIRING
Entry-level to Mgmt.
Exp. Not req'd. Train-
ing provided. Benefit
package offered.
$600-$850/wk. Call
Ashley 352-436-4460


AUTO TECHS & Experi-
enced Detailer Needed.
Competitive Pay & Bene-
fits. ASE & or Ford Certi-
fied line techs. Call
(352)493-4297 for Russ
Hall for appointment.
Please bring resume to
interview.


Exp. Marine
Fork Lift Driver

7 day shift
"Apply in Person"
Twin Rivers Marina
2880 N. Seabreeze Pt
Crystal River FI 34429
no phone calls pls






COMMUNITY
HOSTESS

Seeking high-energy
hostesses for seasonal
part-time position
shuttling potential
homeowners around
countryclub comm-
unity's amenities. Must
be articulate, upbeat
and service oriented.
Apply at Terra Vista
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd., Hernando, FL


garttimef


PRO SHOP
PERSONNEL
& OUTSIDE CART
ATTENDANT
Part time position,
some golf knowledge
required, Must have
excellent people
skills & flexible hours
Apply in Person at
Sugarmill Woods Golf
& Country Club
1 Douglas St.
Homosassa Fl.


SPRING HILL
January Classes
COSMO DAYS
January 14,2013
COSMO NIGHTS
January 14, 2013
BARBER NIGHTS
February 25, 2013
MASSAGE DAY
January 14,2013,
MASSAGE NIGHTS
January 14,2013,
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com





Colectble


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
Q* ** *t *


0




tans ~


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179



Maximum Auto Repair
& Performance
Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts,
Classic car restoration, tires
new & used, Performance
engines. (352) 419-6549



Maximum Auto Repair
& Performance
Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts,
Classic car restoration, tires
new & used, Performance
engines. (352) 419-6549



SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518


JEFF'S Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 746-3444




AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551, 584-3730
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078

CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120

FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097

ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
352-302-6838 *




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




*BOB BROWN'S*
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279 "*


DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696

SEASONED SPLIT OAK
FIREWOOD 4x8 stacked
& deliv. $80
352-621-1656, 302-3515




Install, Restretch, Repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl Car-
pet, Laminent, Lic#4857
Mitch, (352) 201-2245




1 CALL & RELAX! 25vrs
Exp in 100% property
maint & all repairs, call
H&H Services today!
lic#37658 352-476-2285

#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777

ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201

Affordable Handyman
/FAST 100% Guar.
/ AFFORDABLE
/ RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *


Affordable Handyman
/FAST 100% Guar.
/ AFFORDABLE
/ RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
/FAST 100% Guar.
/ AFFORDABLE
/ RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
/FAST. 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *



CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
Exp House Keeper for
Hire. Contact Sheila @
352-586-7018


Bath
-**-*
The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lie/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




SLARRY'S TRACTOR *
SERVICE FINISH GRAD-
ING & BUSHHOGGING
***352-302-3523***


All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120



GOT LEAVES
Let our DR VAC
Do the work!
Call 352-502-6588



AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small
engine service & repair.
352-220-4244



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS CLEAN
UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790


LHAULIN
FREE ESTIMATES
scrap metals haul for
FREE (352) 344-9273
JEFF'S Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 746-3444



Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE CLEANING
& PAINTING
352-341-3300




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.









Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


WIEUNTyW EDRY5
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
S352-302-6838



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & tnmming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


Your World




CI R5)NI( :1.E


NEED SOMEONE TO
GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?

WE MAKE IT



DISAPPEAR FOR LESS
IF YOU WANT IT
TAKEN AWAY...CALL FOR A
FREE ESTIMATE TODAY!
352-220-9190





GENERAL
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac- Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377

352621124


CARPET & C
UPHOLSTERY
CLEANING

Special 1Zing in: Gift
Certificates
Carpet Stretching Available
Carpet Repair
352-282-1480 cell 1
352-547-1636 office
Free In Home Estimates
Lic & Ins Lifetime Warranty a


tee I *'

Add an arlidic touch lo your exiting yard
I or pol or plan
tmsoelhin
S ompleley new!
.,-.- Often imtatfed,
never dupicatedl


YOURINTERLOCKINGBRICKPAVER SPECIALIST
I COPES
P POOL AND PAVER LLC
& Insured 352-400-3188


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
a ALL Home
S Repairs
. Small Carpentry

Screening
S lean Dryer
Vents
S Af fo, ruW e & Dependable
S Experience lifelong
352.344-0905
cell- 400-1722
;ured Lic.#37761




WI.NDW -


We aeon Wm!iw and owsnd Whole Lot More
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
352-683-0093
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


TILE


WOOD


LAMINATE

352-563-0238

302-8090
Lic# CC2544





BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


AAA ROOFING
Call te eak6usters"
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF
Any Re-Roof
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed |
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 DDBP


World Class
Window Tinting
Reduce -Heat, Fade, Glare
AUTO HOME OFFICE
Marion & Citrus Free Estmates
352,465,6079 _










ALL EXTERIOR

ALUMINUM,INc.

352-621-0881
FAX 352-621-0812
6" Seamless Gutters
Screen Rooms Car Ports
Hurricane Protection
allextaluml3@yahoo.com
Citrus Lic. #2396 LICENSED&lNSURED


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


F"
O

I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DRYER $100 Works
great. 90 day full
warranty. Call/text
352-364-6504
DRYER $100 works
great. 90 day full warranty
call/text 352-364-6504
GE WASHER Good
working condition $75
KENMORE DryerAlso
Good condition $75
(812) 207-5691
Kenmore (Sears) 700
series clothes washer
and GE dryer,
$350 for both.
Good condition.
352-419-7017
KENMORE WASHER
White Kenmore looks
good, works great
guarranted. $100
Dennis @352-476-9019
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WASHER $100 works
great. 90 day full warranty
call/text 352-364-6504
WASHER$100 Works
great. 90 day full
warranty. Call/text
352-364-6504






HAMMER DOWN
AUCTIONEERS
Sat 12/29 Prev@ 4p
Auction @6p Gen.Merch.
Sun 12/30 Auction@ lp
Tailgate Box Lot Auction
**WE BUY ESTATES**
6055 N. Carl G. Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
AB3232 (352) 613-1389


HITACHI 32" TV WITH
REMOTE GOOD
CONDITION $50
352-613-0529
SHARP 32" TV WITH
REMOTE $25
32-613-0529
SONY TV 52" sony tv,
rear projection, with sony
surround unit. can see
working. $ 75.
352-795-4674
VIZIO 42 INCH 3D TV
Vizlo E3D420VX 3D TV
LCD 1080p 120hz with
box and remote. Great
condition. 6 pairs of 3D
glasses included. $400
Gerome 352-322-6779


480W POWER SUPPLY
like new $30 Inverness
864-283-5797
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
TOSHIBA SATELLITE
LAPTOP good condition,
$100 (352)465-1616


Black/gold/glass coffee
and 2 end tables, entry
table, mirror and corner
piece $100 Call Elaine
Simons 352-637-2464
Dining Room Set
glass top table & 4 chairs
$300 obo, Kitchen set,
table & 4 chairs
w/oak finish $50 obo
352-382-2450
DOUBLE SIZE
MATTRESS SET Very
clean and in excellent
condition. $100.00
352-257-5722
Home Office Desk
Maple, Great Condition
$500 obo, White Formica
Student Desk, good
condition $25 obo,
352-382-2450
KING SIZED MATTRESS
AND BOX SPRINGS
good cond. $75 Call
Walter @ 352-362-2583
LEATHER LA-Z-BOY
ROCKER RECLINER
Taupe in color. In ac-
ceptable condition.
Some leather wear.
mechanisms work
good. $150 OBO
746-7355
LEATHER LOVE SEAT
Ivory Leather Love Seat
in good condition.
$150 OBO 746-7355
LEATHER SOFA &
LOVESEAT
burgundy, excellent
condition 352-746-0855
Leather Sofa, Chair & Ot-
toman, 1 coffee, 2 end ta-
bles. Twin bed, mat. set &
head board. Round din-
ing room table w/ 4chrs.
Lamp. $600 for all
(352) 242-7117
LIGHT-COLORED
Wooden Table for
Breakfast Nook or
Kitchen Island, New
Condition 34"H 36"L
24"W Two Stools
ALL for $75.00
(352) 527-9930 BH
LIVING ROOM SET
SOFA, IOVESEAT &
END TABLES. EARTH
TONES, EXC COND
$475 obo(352) 302-8265
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95 Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
PAIR OF KING SIZED
BOX SPRINGS Good
condition $25 for the pair.
Call Walter @
352-364-2583
PAUL'S FURNITURE
& THRIFT SHOP
Daybed w/ trundle & Mat.
Homosassa 628-2306
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
QUEEN MATTRESS
SET Non-smoker, very
clean. $100.00
352-257-5722
QUEEN SIZE MAT-
TRESS AND BOX SPR-
ING Very good condition
$100 Call Walter @
352-364-2583
REDUCED
Solid Oak
Entertainment Center
leaded glass trim,
3 lighted sect. lighted, fits
up to 42" TV, 9ft 6" W,
20"D 6'2%H, Holds 220
CD's/DVD's $300 obo
Antique Roll Top Desk,
beautiful carve front, 5W,
30" D, $300. OBO
(352) 746-7318
SECTIONAL SOFA BED
Tan sectional/sofa bed -
excellent condition $200
Tan recliner $$50 Call
Elaine Simons
352-637-2464 or email
dancen57@gmail.com


Good condition $75
352-257-5722


SOLD
Craftsmen Tractor
24 hsp. includes
trailer, spreader, charge
auto transmission $750


BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING SIZES 5 & 6
SHIRTS, PANTS &
JACKETS $35
352-613-0529
PANTS,LADIES 18 Tall,
corduroy, Navy Blue,
washed once
352-344-3472.$8.


3 MINIATURE DOLLS
nicely dressed old all for
$25. 352-382-1191
14.4 ELECTRIC DRILL
SET brand new in
carrying case $65. or
OBO 352-382-1191
40 PC. RATCHET SET
all sizes rachets and
sockets $20.
352-382-1191
103 PC. SOCKET AND
WRENCH SET new
never used 470. or obo
352-382-1191
ANTIQUE ELECTRIC
IRON this is from the 50s
works great $25. Firm
352-382-1191
BREADMAKER Good
condition, Breadman, $10
(352)465-1616
GERBIL CAGE GOOD
CONDITION $25
352-613-0529
LEXMARK COMPUTER
COPIER both inks Inc.
needs cable $10
352-382-1191
missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
& Veteran's Shelters
Now 80-100 a night
includes 18 children
EMERGENCY FUNDS
& Other needs are
needed at this time.
352-794-3825
NEW PAPER
SHREDDER electric,
never used $20.00
352-382-1191
POOL ITEMS
salt, de earth,10 ft poles
with brushes, net, $10
each 352-382-1191
PRESIDIO PHONE AND
ANSWERING UNIT
works fine $20.00 white
color 352-382-1191
QUANTUM 6000
WHEEL CHAIR. 2 new
batt w/ wty, charger, and
more. Value $15,000.
Asking $2,500 obo
(352) 527-2085
SOLD
CLUB CAR 2 Seater,
weather cover, lights,
mirrors, Trojan batteries
excel, cond. $1,400.
TODDLER HEADBOARD
Brand New Metal
Headboard, $15
(352)465-1616
Trademark 3-in-l
Rotating Table Game
(Billiards, Air Hockey,
and Foosball), 42.5 x 33
x 33-Inch, space saving
design, $350. 419-7017
WESTELL COMPUTER
WIRELESS BOX
Includes box and cables
$25.00 obo
352-382-1191
WHITE LARGE
NUMBERS PHONE big
letters so you can see
$20.00 352-382-1191


WIRE SETS TV
wires,phonesets,cables
all lengths new $5.00
each 352-382-1191


BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676


ANIMAL/BIRD CAGE
Heavy wire/wood.On
wheels&Uprght. $45.
352-344-3472
CHAMPION JUICER
Fresh juice for your
health! Almond color, in
excellent condition $160
(828) 483-4550
Crystal River


CLUB CAR ELECTRIC
NEW TIRES, BATTERY
CHARGER & NEW
COVER. EXC COND.
CASH ONLY $2500
(352) 503-2383
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Full Set of new Taylor
Made Burner Plus Irons
used 4 times, can no
longer use, original price
$699, sell for $225
call 352-464-4897
Ladies 26" Lamborghini
Road Bike
21 speed like new
$129.
(352) 249-4460
ROUGH RIDER
STOCKMAN POCKET
KNIFE New in box, 3
blades $14 860-2475


NEW
HAULMARK 6X12
ENCLOSED TRAILERS
ONLY $1999.
(352) 621-3678


BABY STROLLER
Deluxe model with
canopy $25 860-2475

Sell r Swa


\V-


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966



WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369


All Rems




2012





MODEL



Will Be


LI


THIS WEEK


To Make



Room For



The



Incoming


Citrus County's


Volume Sales Leader



We Deliver The Best


m Showroom


i Buying Experience


i Cars


m Customer Service




Come See Why We Are


Rated The Best!






SVILLAGETOYOTA



OF CRYSTAL RIVER



www.vilaget..t.com 352-503-4121


SINGLE COPY


CONTRACTOR


WANTED

Are You
Interested In:

SBeing your own
boss.

o Increasing potential
earnings.

exclusive area?

S "- *Working

S - independently?

L, '" *L Working with a
S6,.h ... .successful company?





CHkONCL1E
Swww.chronicleonline.com


Call (352) 563-6363 ext. 1201
Business Hours 9 AM-4 PM Daily


Requirements: Do you have what it takes?

Ability to work overnight Attention to detail
Covered Truck, Van or SUV 365 Days/Year
Clean Driving Record Deadline and Customer
Credit & Background Check Service oriented
Access to your own hel Flexible under pressure
Lifting and physical ability Flexible under pressure
h Team Player Positive Thinker
9 Must have a back-up plan Hard and smart worker
9 Computer & Internet Access Keen sense of urgency

0 Deliver to stores and coin racks.
1 Experience preferred but not required.


CLASSIFIED


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 D7


I Fumitur


^^TOYOnTATHONB





^KTOnYOlAwHO






TOYOTATHON


I









D8 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012


5 Tiny Yorkies
$550 and up, Small,
Tiny & Very Tiny Only 2
females,1 Male Maltese,
Raised in loving home.
CKC Reg. health certs, &
puppy pacs. Parents on
site come watch them
play (352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258
DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com






S(352) 634-5039
LABRADOODLE
PUPPIES 2 left! 1 black
male, 1 cream female.
Born 9/21/12. Shots,
dewormed, health certs.,
flea protection,
heartworm prevention.
Please call for prices.
352-410-0080


RED MINIATURE
POODLE PUPS
7 WEEKS;2 MALES AND
1 FEMALE; $850.
REGISTRATION AND
HEALTH CERTIFI-
CATES; AVAILABLE
12-22-12. CALL
352-419-8233 OR
janiceannross@msn.com
SENEGAL PARROT
$350 WITH CAGE,
FEMALE VERY GOOD
BIRD. CASH ONLY
EXC. HEALTH
(352) 503-2383


LG DOG CRATE
black finish
48"length x292 width
35" height $45
(352) 527-0982


Livestock


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





2005 BOAT TRAILER
18 to 21 ft boat. Tandem
axle. All tires, lights,
axles, & guides in exc.
cond. MUST SEE!
Asking $895 OBO.
Priced $350 below value.
Call / txt(352) 422-7737
BOAT TRANSIT
TRAILER Very Ig., dbl.
axles up to 33 ft. Any
boat type! $1800 or
OBO (813) 244-3945




15 ft ALUM. BOAT WIDE
DEEP V, 25HP ELEC.
START, TRAILER.
OLDER BUT CHEAPER!
$995 (352) 341-4949



AIRBOAT
15ft, Rivermaster
6 cyl, Continental Aircraft
engine, warp-drive prop,
$7000 352-637-1391



MUOS SELL


BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motor, AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth finder,
2001 Rolls float on
trailer worth $1000.
Comes w/spare motor
Has service manual,
2nd owner $2500
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855

TRI PONTOON BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453


1988 27 ft Sportscraft
Coastal Fisherman,
cabin cruiser, $10k
OBO (813)-244-3945
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com



NATIONAL RV
2006 Tropical One
owner,34ft, 26000
miles,no smoke/pets,
300HP Cummins diesel,2
slides, 6 new tires, 3yr
warranty,many extras.
$87000. Well maintained.
352-341-4506



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
A XMAS SALE
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not -
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333



94 OLDS MOBILE
CUTLASS CIERA
SEDAN 6CY RUNS &
LOOKS GOOD. ASKING
$1575. 352-637-2588
or 845-588-0759
2000 Chevy Corvette
Metallic Bowling Green
Std shift, one owner,
& garage kept.
See to appreciate.
(352) 621-9874
A XMAS SALE
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUICK
2007, Lucerne, CXL
55K miles, Leather
$13,500. obo
Call Troy (352)621-7113
CHEVROLET
2000 IMPALA
$4995
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2003 AVALANCHE
$6850
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2004 TRAILBLAZER
4X4 $6999
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2001 TOWN &
COUNTRY $4550
352-341-0018
DODGE
2004 NEON, 4DR AUTO-
MATIC. PRICED TO SEL.
CALL 628-4600
For More Information
FORD
2005, Five Hundred LMT,
40K miles, leather, V6
$9,980
Call Troy 352-621-7113
FORD
2006 Focus ZXW, SE
4DR, WGN. 85k miles
$5,800 obo
Call Troy (352) 621-7113




393-1230 SUCRN
1/11 Sale
Knightly Auto Service
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
gies Notice of
Foreco-
sure of Uen and intent to
sell these vehicles on Fri-
day, January 11,2013
8:00 AM at 61 NE HWY 19
SUITE A CRYSTAL RIVER FL
pursuant to subsection
713.78 of the Florida Stat-
utes. KNIGHTLY AUTO
SERVICE reserves the right
to accept or reject any
and/or all bids.
2002 Chev Silverado
VIN 1GCEK19T72Z240468
December 30,2012


HONDA
2004, ACCORD 4DR, IT'S
A HONDA...Call For Pric-
ing and Appointment
352-628-4600
HONDA
2011 CRV LX, 19K miles,
likenew, 4 Cyl. $19,950
Call Troy 352-621-7113
HYUNDAI
2006 Elantra, GLS 90K
miles, likenew, 4 DR,
auto. $6,800
Call Troy 352-621-7113


MAZDA
2006 Miata MX5, Grand
Touring 40K Miles, Auto
Transmission, Cloth
Seats, MP-3 multi-Disk
(6), $13,250
352-400-1551
MR2 SPYDER
2002 TRD model, 1
owner. Mint condition.
Garage kept, no acci-
dents, smoking, or pets.
New soft top & leather
seats. C352-464-7501.
$13.5K.
NISSAN
2005ALTIMA SE V6
$7495
352-341-0018
OLDS 89 REGENCY
Brougham. 4drw/fp,
ong. 1989, 163k ong.,
V6 24mpg, new tires &
brakes, 2nd owner $1750
(352) 637-1074
SATURN ION
2007, 4 cyl, 4dr. gold,
auto, AC,CD, 27k miles
exc. cond. many extras
$8300 obo 352-382-0428
TOYOTA
'05 Camry LE, Silver.
leather interior, very good
condition, 86k miles.
$8900 (352) 637-2838
TOYOTA
2000, Camry LE
V6, 183K miles Super
Clean $5,800. obo
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
TOYOTA
2007, Yaris, 59K miles,
2 DR, H/B $7,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113




1971 CHEVELLE
CONVERTIBLE
stunning, 40k+ in-
vested, fully restored,
350 auto, buckets, con-
sistant show winner,
high end stereo, red w/
white top & interior
$24,900, 352-513-4257







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





A XMAS SALE
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
DODGE
1998 Ram 1500 Truck
Quad cab 360 body, tires
& interior good, needs
engine & transmission
work $1800 or best offer
352-464-4764




395-1230 SUCRN
1/14 Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC AUCTION
The following vehicles will
be sold at PUBLIC AUC-
TION on the property of
SCALLY'S LUBE & GO TOW-
ING AND RECOVERY, 1185
N. Paul Drive, Inverness, FL
34453: 352-860-0550: In
accordance with Florida
Statute 713.78. Auction
Date as Follows: All Sales
will begin at 8:00 AM.
Vehicle may be viewed
30 minutes before sale.
For details call
352-860-0550.
2011 Zhng GTR 50


FORD
1999 F150 Good
condition, 4 new tires
352-270-7420 $5,000
FORD
2003 EXPEDITION
LEATHER SEATS, V8
3rd ROW SEATING
CALL 628-4600
For An Appointment
FORD
2004 F150XL 4x4,115K
miles, Camper top, V8,
White reg. cab
$7000.00 352-746-9150
TOYOTA
2004, 4 Runner Sport
2WD, 94K mi, Leather
$12,800. obo
Call Troy 352-621-7113




CADILLAC
2007, Escalade,
44k miles, Luxury NAV,
$29,500.
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
CHEVY TRAIL-
BLAZER LT 05
exc. cond. asking $7000
obo, in Hernando
(904) 923-2902




CHEVY
2005, Colorado 4 x4,
Sitting on 33's, Auto.,
Call 352-628-4600
For More Information
DODGE
2004, DAKOTA, 4 x 4
Crew Cab, MUST SEE,
Priced to Sell, Call For
Details 352-628-4600
JEEP
2004, Wrangler X 4WD,
Only 57K miles,
Hard Top $13,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113




HONDA
2005, VTX 1300CC
3 TO CHOOSE FROM
YOU PICK $4,888.
(352) 621-3678
KYMCO
2009, 125 cc. Looks and
drives great Only $995
(352) 621-3678
NEW POLARIS
RANGERS
AS LOW AS 7888.
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS
2002. SPORTSMAN ATV.
4X4. SERVICED AND
READY FOR HUNTING
SEASON. $2995
(352) 621-3678
VICTORY
2005, KINGPIN
2 TONE, STAGE ONE,
LOADED WITH OPTIONS
ONLY $7888.
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
2005, ROYAL STAR TOUR
DELUXE, READY FOR A
ROAD TRIP ONLY $6688.
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
2007 STRATOLINER
1800CC LOADED WITH
OPTIONS A REAL TOUR
BIKE ONLY $5889.
(352) 621-3678



'08 Suzuki Burgman 400
Candy apple red, exc.
cond., 5090 miles. 61 mi
per gallon, luggage back,
(352) 897-4549



HONDA
1986, V4, Magna,
750CC, needs Carbs
cleaned, otherwise
road ready, clean Fl.
Title many extras $600.
Greg 352-419-7382




Color: gray VIN#
L5YACBPAXBI 116351
Auction Date: 1/14/2013
1998 Plymouth Voyager
Color: white VIN#
2P4GP45G8WR519234
Auction Date: 1/14/2013
1998 Toyota Corolla
Color: teal VIN#
1NXBR18ESWZ105859
Auction Date: 1/14/2013
Scally's Lube and Go re-
serves
The right to bid on all
vehicles in Auction. All
sales are final at 9:00 AM
Published: 12/30/2012


391-1230 SUCRN
07-09 CC Tourist Development Council Meeting
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
will hold a regular meeting on Wednesday, January 9, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. at the
Lecanto Government Building, Room 166, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Ex-
ecutive Offices of the Board of County Commissioners, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, In-
verness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
N. Apopka Avenue, Room 102, Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560, at least one
day before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
Governing Body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based (Section 286.0101, Florida Statute).
December 30, 2012.

392-1230 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
1/10/13 Meeting of the Citrus County Economic Development Council, Inc.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Thursday, January 10, 2013 at 8:30 am. at the College of Central
Florida, Lecanto, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: John Siefert, Executive Director
December 30, 2012.


396-1230 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Noticeunder
Ficti-
tious Name Law, pursuant
to Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN, that the
undersigned, desiring to


engage in business under
the fictitious name of
WEST FLORIDA SERVICES,
located at 2161 South
Border Avenue, Inverness,
Florida 34452, in the
County of Citrus, intends
to register said name with
Florida Department of
State, Division of Corpora-


tions, Tallahassee, Florida.
Dated at
Inverness, R
this 26th day of Decem-
ber, 2012.
/s/ Danelle Rife
Owner
Published one (1) time in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle. December 30,2012.


DECEMBER'S


15000 WINNER!

BARBARA WILBURN-YORK


YOU COULD BE THIS

MONTH'S WINNER!


VISIT ANY CRYSTAL

LOCATION FOR DETAILS


12 CHEVY MALIBU












I 13,999OR $219PE Mo


12 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY












$18,999 OR $297 PER M


12 CADILAC CTS 12 NISSAN TITAN




.G1 I IA I-Il







$24 999OR $391 PO $24,9 99O$391 PER










CRYSTAL




AUTOMOTIVE


352-564-1971

WWW.CRYSTALAUTOS.cOM

1035 S. Suncoast Blvd. 1005 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL

937 S. Suncoast Blvd. 2077 Highway 44W 14358 Cortez Blvd.
Homosassa, FL Inverness, FL Brooksville, FL


*PRICE AND PAYMENTS INCLUDE $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE
$599.50. PAYMENTS ARE FOR72 MONTHS AT 3.99% APR WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES
ONLY. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.
000DF1H


--L


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


I


0


I







H Section E -SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012



OMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL


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REALTY ONE
Celebrating Another Year
As Citrus County's #1
Real Estate Company*
1 1 U


$114.1
MILLION
M1..10
":E/ U'


Kqb q


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$70.2
MILLION


$42.4
MILLION


S0&_2


E2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Choosing palms



for local gardens


FORMS AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and engagement announcements, anniver-
saries, birth announcements and first birthdays.


Jane Weber
JANE'S
GARDEN


Gardeners should familiarize them-
selves with reliable and accurate
knowledge before buying expensive
palms for their garden. Wholesale prices
from southern growers to local retailers are
doubled by delivery distance, palm size and
weight. Then they have to be planted a
labor-intensive chore involving the deliv-
erer and machinery

See JANE/Page E5


Real Estate DIGEST


Shemet hits
new high for
2012
Congratulations to
Pamela Shemet of EXIT
Realty Leaders in Crys-
tal River, who has sold
$1.9 million in closed Pamela
sales so far in 2012 Shemet
Pamela is a hard- EXIT Realty
working agent who Leaders.
brings a wealth of knowl-
edge to every transaction. You can contact
her at 352-794-0888.


Debbie Cleary
Realtor Associate Hometown
Your CLEAR Choice in Real Estate HmetOWn
debbieclearyfl@yahoo.com Realty
www.debbiecleary.com 6050W Gulf to Lake Hwy
Crystal River, FL
352-601-6664 office 352-564-0333
r =1pJI Ir i|-! I l4 [il i[.I.IJ.I 'J


Johnsons,
S Balfour top
$10M
S Citrus Ridge Realty
is proud to announce
that Kirk and Amanda
Johnson, with buyer
Kirk and specialist Tom Balfour,
Amanda have closed more than
Johnson $10 million in sales for
Central Ridge 2012.
Realty. Contact the Johnson
Team at 352-746-9000 or by e-mail at
citrusridgerealty@centurylink.net.


IN IDE H


PINE RIDGE
41313 POOL HOME
Best Priced Home on Market.
Hurry! Beautiful lot, large lanai.
Convenient location, 2630 sq. ft
cooled. MUST SEE!
$205,000
Call Joe 302-0910


REDUCED BUSHNELL HOME I I1 1 .I ...
of lots of love...2/1 with living & family rm, 6 acres MOL, CITRUS SPRINGS POOL HOME featuring fresh interior paint, new flooring, side entry garage, rear privacy fencing, interior
bonus room, & more. $65,000. #357562 laundry recess lighting, dining area, living room, breakfast bar, move in ready 140 W Frisco Ln.
Kimberly Fuller 212-5752 $89,900! #359044 Kimberly Fuller 212-5752


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 E3







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information........352-563-5592
......... .....................................advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information........................... 352-563-5966
News information.......................... ................. 352-563-5660
...... ......................... .............newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing...............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"




HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
* Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
* News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
* Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
* Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
* For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Take in state's natural wonders


ith the New Year just around
the comer, there is no better
time than the present to make
a commitment in 2013 to spend more
time outdoors exploring the natural
wonders of Citrus County. Americans
have moved indoors during the past
couple of decades, which
has takenits toll on the
physical well-being of
today's population.
According to the Center ,
for Disease Control, more
than one-third of U.S.
adults (35.7) are obese, and
obesity-related conditions
(including heart disease,
stroke, type 2 diabetes and Joan B1
certain types of cancer) are FLOI
some of the leading causes FRIE
of preventable death.
Getting out and exploring LIV
not only will improve your
health and well-being, but you will ac-
quire a greater appreciation of the
natural areas of Citrus County.
The Southwest Florida Water Man-
agement District (SWFWMD) has 54
recreation areas, covering more than
343,000 acres of land within its 16-
county district. Better yet, four of
SWFWMD's recreation areas are right
here in Citrus County. Topping the list


of pristine natural exploration desti-
nations are Chassahowitzka River and
Coastal Swamps, Flying Eagle, Potts
Preserve and Two Mile Prairie, with
six more recreation areas within five
miles of the county line!
Because of its nearly pristine condi-
tion, the Chassahowitzka
River is one of the more sce-
nic rivers in Florida, earn-
ing the distinction of being
one of the state's "Outstand-
ing Florida Waters."
This beautiful spring-fed
river is well worth spending
an afternoon paddling down-
stream observing wildlife.
adshaw For landlovers at heart, don
IIDA- your hiking shoes and head
MDLY to Potts Preserve (2988 N.
Hooty Point, Inverness) for
ING river hiking trails where you
may get a glimpse of gopher
tortoises, alligators, a flock of wild turkey
or numerous egrets and herons.
All of the recreation areas offer a
stunning diversity of natural habitats
and wildlife and are open to the public
to enjoy a wide variety of outdoor activ-
itiessuch as hiking, cycling, inline skat-
ing, hunting, fishing, boating, paddling,
horseback riding, bird watching, pic-
nicking and camping. To better acquaint


you with the variety of fun activities
found at each location, a recreation
guide has been designed to showcase
the 54 recreational areas. This docu-
ment can be downloaded or ordered
from SWFWMD by visiting www.Water
Matters.org or by calling 800-423-1476.
Get off on the right foot in 2013 by
heading outdoors and seeing for your-
self the natural beauty that Citrus
County holds. For additional informa-
tion, call Citrus County Extension at
352-527-5700.
Citrus County Extension links the
public with the University of
Florida/IFAS' knowledge, research and
resources to address youth, family, com-
munity and agricultural needs. All pro-
grams and related activities sponsored
for, or assisted by, the Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences are open to
all persons without discrimination with
respect to race, creed, color, religion,
age, disability, sex, sexual orientation,
marital status, national origin, political
opinions or affiliations, genetic infor-
mation and veteran status as protected
under the Vietnam Era Veterans' Read-
justment Assistance Act

Dr Joan Bradsha w is Director of UF
IFAS Citrus County Extension.


Antique U.S. flags sought by collectors; shot glass holder


Dear John: My mother was raised in
Garden City Long Island in the
1920s to 1940s. I am attaching a
copy of a letter that accompa-
nies a flag I have in my posses-
sion from my mother's estate. I
would like to donate the flag to a
historical society, museum, or
group I know would appreciate
the heritage and make it visible
to the public i.e., I am not in-
terested in having it hidden in a
private collection. Any informa-
tion or contacts you can provide John S
me would be greatly SIKOI
appreciated. AT
I tried contacting the Great
Neck Long Island Historical So-
ciety, but they never followed through. In
addition, I contacted a website in Georgia
that wanted to know the price of the flag. I
would like to know its value before I would
consider selling it. -B.K, Beverly Hills
Dear B.K: Thirty-star American flags
are actively sought after by collectors.
Since you are thinking of selling your flag,
it would be advisable to contact an auction
company that specializes in historic Amer-


'I





i
,1

1


icana. Heritage Auction Company in Dal-
las, Texas would be a good resource. The
website is www.ha.com. Good luck
Dear John: I would like your
help with this item. It is 7 inches
wide by 8 1/2 high. I cannot find
any markings on it. It is a
wooden carved man with a
cigar in his mouth, dressed in
tails and top hat. The head
moves around. He is leaning
over a barrel with hands at-
tached to the top of the barrel.
korski The lid lifts up, revealing a 13/4
SKI'S inch by 2 3/4 inch opening with a
S wooden base that you can turn
so it winds up the music box.
This wooden base sits on a
metal base that has three small ball legs.
It plays "How dry I am." It looks to me like
See ATTIC/Page E7
Genuine thirty-star American flags such as
this one are popular with collectors; it's
advisable to contact an auction house
that specializes in historical memorabilia
when selling one.
Special to the Chronicle


E4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012


r







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E3

Large container speci-
mens require heavy equip-
ment to load and plant
them. Tall trees may weigh
more than a ton, so they
need some sort of crane or
derrick to move and install
them carefully. Buds must
be protected and roots cut
as wide as possible, then
wrapped and kept moist
during transit. Aftercare is
critical for the first year as
roots grow to take up water
and nutrients.
Palms epitomize Florida
landscapes. Small palms
are readily available at
nurseries and big box out-
lets. With planning, many
palm species can thrive in
local gardens.
Some marginally tender,
smaller palms make great
potted plants inside a pool
cage. The screen provides
enough shade to prevent
summer leaf scorch. Water
evaporating from the pool
creates a moist atmosphere
in summer. Heat radiating
from the pool in winter may
be enough to protect tropi-
cal plants from short morn-
ing frosts.
Shade-loving Lady Palms
in the Rhapis genus origi-
nated in southern China
and Thailand. There are
about 12 frost-tender
species. R.excelsia, R. hu-
mulis and R.multifida can
be planted outside with
frost and summer sun pro-
tection. Many gardeners use
potted or in-ground lady
palms inside the protective
screen enclosure. There is a
fine cluster of Rhapis shel-
tered by the Sun Trust bank
in Dunnellon near the two
rivers. West of U.S. 19, in
places such as The Islands,
Lady and other tender
palms are protected by the
microclimate next to the


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 E5


warm Gulf waters. I once
counted 13 species of palms
there.
Windmill Palm, Trachy-
carpusfortunei, Zones 8-11,
is also called Chusan and
Chinese Fan. It is fully
hardy locally, takes full sun
and needs little care in the
garden. Be aware it will
grow a group of slender
trunks to 30 feet tall in time.
Trunks are clothed in inter-
esting brown fibrous hairs.
Long-stalked, palmate
leaves are green above but
blue-green below. Dead
fronds naturally hang in a
pretty skirt around the
trunks. These provide
homes for wildlife. Dark
blue, marble-sized fruit has
a whitish wax coating and is
enjoyed by birds and small
creatures.
Mediterranean Fan Palm,
Chamaeropshumilis, is the
only indigenous palm to
evolve in Europe. It also oc-
curs in northeast Africa, in
Zones 8-11. It grows in warm
climates along the sea coast
in full sun or part shade and
likes pockets of soil in lime-
rock outcrops. It is a popu-
lar palm in Central and
North Florida, growing up
to 12 feet tall.
Thirteen palms are native
to Florida; however only six
grow naturally in the tri-
county area. Several exotic
palms can thrive if selected
with forethought and some
winter protection. Visitors
are welcome come visit the
eight palm species in my
garden, in Zone 8B. Please
call for an appointment.

Jane Weberis a Profes-
sional Gardener and Con-
sultant. Semi-retired, she
grows thousands ofnative
plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon,
Marion Countygarden. For
an appointment call 352-
249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about
breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-563-5660,
and be prepared to give your name, phone number,
and the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-
563-5660 and ask for Nancy Kennedy.


Plan a kid-friendly New Year's Eve


Associated Press

How do you make a New
Year's party that the whole
family can enjoy?
For years, I barely ac-
knowledged New Year's
Eve to my three kids so they
wouldn't know they were
missing anything. I either
went to some flashy


grownup event or skipped it
and went to bed. In the
morning, I explained about
the date change.
Last year, though, our
family attended a party at a
friend's, and it was gen-
uinely heartwarming. I
began to think it was worth
making an effort to mark the
holiday, together, at home.


New Year's is not just for
adults. A small party is
doable and relaxing; think
about inviting extended
family or close friends and
their children.
"Parents feel more com-
fortable with their kids
around," says Selvi Rudge,
a mother of three in Larch-
mont, N.Y, who often


friends and kids for New
Year's. "And having the kids
there just makes the cele-
bration better."
Preparing with some
simple crafting and cook-
ing projects can make
everyone feel part of the
holiday

See NEW YEAR'S/Page E7


Lr khITRP UL1IDE EbUL1LTY


Amanda& Kirk Johnson Tom Ballour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BROKER/ASSOC. REALTOR, Mi REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR


746-9000_


0w~ irub sbu~o I


1 5 CRE OME IYS


CRSA IVE


S OWNER FINANCING + +


BEELtIL


wEEL IL


iD











Do your plants break the law?


A gardener's guide

to plantpatents
and trademarks

LEE REICH .
Associated Press / "
he intricacies of plant patenting
came home for me this past year
with a shipment of strawberry
plants.
Strawberry plants send out run- 1
ners, thin stems on the ends of which *
new plants form, which themselves A '
take root and bear fruits and send -
out more runners. Those daughter .
plants forming at the ends of runners
are useful for filling in a strawberry
bed, as well as for transplanting else- ?I. _S-
where to make a new bed.
But these particular plants I ...
bought last spring were a patented '
variety (Chandler). So transplanting
those daughter plants would consti-
tute a crime.
How about just letting the plants -
root by themselves? OK, but only for .
fruit production to fill in my straw-
berry bed. Propagation of any plant s L
produced asexually (that is, not by
seed) just to make new plants is for-
bidden under the Plant Patent Act of I "
1930. t ~ t ,
The only exceptions are plants J .
propagated by edible tubers white ,
potatoes, for example. Growers of
white potatoes evidently were vocal i
enough back when the Act was being
drafted to press for the right to save
and replant their own potato tubers. -
The beginning of .,
plant protections
Some might argue that the Plant
Patent Act was too long in coming. If
it had been in place earlier, then i .. -
Stark Brothers Nursery, which .4h :K~
bought propagation rights to the orig-
inal Red Delicious apple for $3,000 in
1894, would not have had to erect a
cage around the original Red
See Page E8
This undated photo shows "lawbreak-
ing" Heritage birches in Bryn Mawr,
Pa. The variety name under which this
plant was patented is Heritage; it was
later trademarked Heritage. That's a
no-no: a variety and trademark name
must be different.
LEE REICH/Associated Press


E6 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NEW YEAR'S
Continued from Page E5

1. New Year's Poster Take an 18-by-24-
inch poster board and label it, "What I want
to do in 2013." It can be simple, with a lot of
room to write, or it can be decorated by kids
who know their way around a poster board.
Tape it up somewhere central I like the
refrigerator and keep washable markers
nearby Write in an entry or two, whether
resolution-like ("I want to take up jogging")
or wishful thinking ("I want to explore the
Amazon"). The poster can be a family proj-
ect or it can be opened up to guests as a less-
formal guest book at this less-formal party
2. Table Top Table decor can be kid-
constructed and reusable, and it does not


have to look childlike or chaotic. A great
idea from Sabrina James, style director at
Parenting Magazine, is to paint inexpensive
plastic chargers (the larger plates that go
under dinner plates) with black chalkboard
paint, then have the kids decorate the
plates with white chalk. They can draw
stars or write guests' names or "2013" -
even toddlers can scribble. "It all stays
black and white, it still looks sophisticated,
and the kids have a hand in decorating the
table," says James.
3. Making Some Noise Of course there
must be noisemakers. James suggests this
fresh take: Paint small, empty raisin boxes
with silver or gold paint spray paint is
easiest and then decorate them with
small gems or sequins. Fill the boxes with
dry pasta or rice, and tape a Popsicle stick
to the back. The noisemakers can sit in


vases around the table. Kids will be proud
of their contributions, and you'll be happy
to have them as attractive table decorations.
4. Food To avoid holiday feast fatigue,
a New Year's feast should consist of foods
the family actually likes. You're not tied to
tradition, so focus on old family favorites,
or on foods that some cultures say bring
good luck. According to Epicurious.com,
cooked greens symbolize money and good
fortune; pork means prosperity. Don't eat
anything that moves backwards, like lob-
ster My teenage daughter likes to bake a
holiday cake and get creative with frosting.
Baking infuses the air with cheer and al-
lows kids to participate. Limit how many
sprinkles or frosting colors you offer; adult
guests don't always enjoy a crunchy inch-
thick layer of purple sugar.
5. After-meal activity Karaoke is a new


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 E7
tradition for our family; we learned it from
the friends who held last year's party Sys-
tems range in price from less than $100 to
more than $1,000, and can be rented, too.
Whether you rock the oldies or attempt to
rap, the kids are just as entertained as the
adults. And they will want their turn, so
make sure your song list includes some cur-
rent hits or favorites they know.
Finally, do you or don't you keep the kids
up 'til midnight? Go for it, but be prepared
to send them to bed or say goodnight early
if they fall apart.
And they may But the karaoke, other kids
and special treats may keep them fueled
and happy enough to see the ball drop. And
then you will have another family memory
tucked away, and maybe another entry for
the 2013 poster: I want the whole family to
ring in the new year together again in 2014.


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

a whiskey jigger could sit in the
barrel. It was my grandpa's and
I have had it since about 1949.
Is it worth anything? I read
your articles in the Sunday
paper all the time and enjoy
them. -B., Internet
Dear B.: I think your carved
wood shot glass holder novelty
music box was made in Switzer-
land circa 1920. It is a fun piece,
but of no specific collector in-
terest. Potential dollar value is
$25 to $75.
Dear John: Enclosed you will


find a photograph of an embroi-
dery of peacocks that was given
to me years ago by an aunt It is
25 1/2 inches by 17 3/4 inches. I
am curious as to the value of it
- KB., Crystal River
Dear KB.: Wow, what a beau-
tiful embroidery I think it was
likely made in China. There is
no specific collector interest.
Beautiful work like this is still
being produced in large quanti-
ties throughout Southeast Asia.
Dear John: I have a newspa-
per from the day Lincoln was
shot. The date of the paper is
April 15, 1865. The paper is the
New York Herald. It contains the
first three or four pages of the
paper, although they are not vis-


ible as they are behind the front
page. My father who was born in
1911 told me he remembered the
paper being in his house when
he was a child. The family story
is my great-grandmother put the
paper in the frame. On your
show you were quite doubtful it
was real; I would like to know ei-
ther way -JB., Internet
Dear J.B.: The front page of
the New York Herald for April
15, 1865, "Lincoln Shot," was
used as an attention-getter for
^J ^4i ^- l,4l^ T , -H C ^


auvertisers uy te r
long time after it ha
your paper could b
years old but not fro
inal era. This is why
ful about your pa


original. To check for sure, the
National Association of News-
papers Collectors has a website
that explains the situation at
wwwhistorybuff. com.


John Sikorski has been a pro-


-0001BOSH

Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com


fessional in the antiques busi-
ness for 30 years. He hosts a
call-in radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM) Sat-
urdays from noon to 1 p.m.
Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, PO. Box 2513, Ocala
34478 or asksikorski@aol. com.


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@ myflorida-house .com


ierau lud r a
ppened. So '
e over 100
m the orig-
I am doubt-
iper being -- n
ELEGANT MOVE RIGHT IN -
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Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home on a 1 acre
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0 interactive virtual tou at roof 05/09. Just bring your suitcase and
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RVER MLS #355468.$410,000 MLS #358397 $169,000
RIVER -D
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CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is Completely updated 3/2 home! New: roof
the right setting for living the Florida 10/12, A/C & e-panel 01/12, windows
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0 .DN7C MLS #357471 $425,000 MLS#354435 $489,000 in $68,900










E8 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012


PLANTS
Continued from Page E6

Delicious tree. That cage
only stopped people from
using the original tree for
propagation, however; once
Stark Brothers started sell-
ing trees, those trees could
be used by anyone to propa-
gate new ones.
On to seeds, and
even genes
The 1930 legislation was
broadened, in 1970, with the
Plant Variety Protection Act
It meant that seeds, which
are sexually produced when
pollen fertilizes eggs, could
now also be protected by
patents so-called utility
patents. That's the same
kind of patent used for, say, a
new and better stapler or
dog whistle or more re-
cently and controversially
- genes.
To be offered patent pro-
tection, a seed variety must
not have been sold in the
U.S. for longer than a year,


or elsewhere for longer than
four years. The variety must
also reproduce reliably and
be distinct.
Distinctiveness has al-
ways been a potential bone
of contention, especially
since DNA fingerprinting
can now be used to unlock a
plant's genetic code, some
of which is just "junk," not
expressing any trait
Patents are valid for
about 20 years, after which
anyone can propagate the
plant for sale or otherwise.
Someone could even then
produce hybrid seeds, pro-
duced by crossing specific
parents, because patents,
available for anyone to see,
spell out exactly how a
product is made.
What's in a name?
Enter trademarks.
Whether or not a plant has
been patented, it could be
assigned a trademark name.
What's more, that trade-
mark is assigned to a com-
pany or individual, who
could put that name on any
of their plants, even a few


A patented plant is one thing and a trademark name
another. Patents have a limited life; trademarks can be
renewed indefinitely, which makes them useful. If you
start selling some outstanding patented plant under a
trademarked name, people will continue to buy it under
that trademark even after the patent expires. Other
people could propagate the patented plant, but could
not sell it under your trademark.


different ones. A patented
variety also could be mar-
keted under more than one
trademark.
A patented plant is one
thing and a trademark name
another. Patents have a lim-
ited life; trademarks can be
renewed indefinitely, which
makes them useful. If you
start selling some outstand-
ing patented plant under a


trademarked name, people
will continue to buy it under
that trademark even after
the patent expires. Other
people could propagate the
patented plant, but could
not sell it under your
trademark.
A plant label stating
"PPAF" (plant patent ap-
plied for) means, for plants,
the same thing as "patent


0OODNUA

REAL ESTATE, INC.
[ 5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
AMS CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFFICE: (352) 795-6633
WWWALEXRE.COM E-MAL: SALES@ALEXRE COM


P-it


IWT^ J1 ? lu I h I =1 I Ti W

AN ON DY

71111


pending" for anything;
"PVR" (Plant Variety Rights)
means the plant has been
patented. A plant may be
patented, though, without it
stating so on its label.
Names of trademarked
plants are followed by a
symbol that looks like "R"
with a circle around it.
I recently learned that


2121
F
*2/2/
*Fre
* Du
* Op
*Wo
*Wa


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

three birch trees I planted
have broken a rule about
patenting and trademark-
ing. They are Heritage
birches. The variety name
under the patent is Her-
itage, and the plant was
later trademarked Heritage.
That's a no-no: a variety and
trademark name must be
different.
Oh well, I'm not the one
who broke the rule, and the
plant is pest-resistant and
beautiful despite its brush
with the law.

WATERING FINES
Citrus County is issuing
citations that carry with
them a fine of $100 for
first offenders of local
watering rules. Second
violations cost $250,
third or more cost
$500.


KEYr "Always There For Yo4 "
"REALT GAIL COOPER,
I. l uliIt llioir Dollar Realli rl
S ERA :,'. Cell: (352) 634-4346'
Office: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com






PERFECT WINTER GETAWAY! GAS FIREPLACE FOR COZY EVENINGS!
1 villa on a lot and a half 3/2 pool home set on 1/2 acre lot
shly painted interior Side entry garage w/sliding screen
al pane slider out to lanai Whole house generator
en patio in rear- Southern exposure Corian with wood cabinetry
oded private greenbelt New AC/heat in 2011
Ik-in closet in Master Furnishings available separately
#359666 $69,900 #353289 $215,000


TO SETTLE ESTATE-FLORAL CITY, FL
Gorgeous oaks and backdrop on Lake Magnolia.
3BR/2BA DW on large lot. Central water.
$37,000 MLS#359133


PRIME LOCATION-BANK BUILDING
1400 sq. ft building with canopy.
Commercial zoned. Unlimited uses.
$349,900 MLS#354393


Learn The Art of

Real Estate Investing
We've developed this investor education
program and the acco mp n1 in g technology
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CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 1302-6714 "'


BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM HOMES THROUGHOUT THE NATURE COAST


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Pine Ridge
Citrus Hills
Waterfront


COME SEE OUR MODELS!



BEST [i1f
BEST, Of Citrus
1 Inc. I1 usanh
HOMEBUILDER CBC049056 FaC
Hwy. 19, 4/2miles south of Homosassa Springs. 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd.
352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


ci----~


I









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




ghronicle


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 E9


To place an ad, call 563-5966


-' -
L - -


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!
w!


INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
*1 BEDROOM
start@$325 inc. H20
2 BEDROOMS
start@$450 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!

HERNANDO
RENT TO OWN, 2/1/
older mobile needs TLC
$1,000 Down, $275. mo.
(352) 726-9369

HOMOSASSA
2 Bd, 2 Ba. fully furn.
352-746-0524

HOMOSASSA
2/1, $425/mo.+ until. No
Pets, 1574 S. Iroquois
Ave (352) 503-7562

HOMOSASSA
2/1, NICE SWMH
Big Yard, Fenced Back-
yard, Screened Back
Porch, In nice area on
Paved Street. Pets
Allowed $495.pr month
Ist, Last, $300 Deposit.
Call 352 634-3862 or
352-794-3760

HOMOSASSA
3/2 D/W $650 mo.,
1st, last, sec. Very nice
home. Ask for Walter
(561) 248-4200

INGLIS
2/2, Close to Plant
on 1 acre Clean, Quiet
$495. (352) 447-6016

LECANTO
LEISURE ACRES
3/2 water & garbage incl.
$600mo. (352) 628-5990


2BR. 1% BA.on your
own 75x 150 lot.
no fees! new enclosed
sunroom, Ig laundry
room furn, 2 storage
buildings, 5111 Castle
Lake Ave. S. of
Inverness on SR 41
$39,500 (740) 255-0125
3bdr/2 full baths/ 2 car
carport on 1 acre.
split layout, steel roof,
caged pool, 20x25 ft
deck, Ig storage build-
ing, Furnished Modular
$76,900, 5215 Bridget
Pt, Castle Lake Park
Inverness 352-597-7353

BANK
FORECLOSURE
Land-n-Home, 3/2
1500 sq. ft. On 1/2 Acre,
paved rd. LOOKS
GOOD, Have financing
if needed, only $2,500
down, $381.44mo. P&l
W.A.C. OR $69,900.
Call 352-613-0587
or 352-621-9183

HERNANDO
3BR 2BA MH
Ready to move in !
FHA & Owner Financing
avail, call 352-795-1272

HOME-ON-LAND
3/2 Great Shape.
% Acre. Move In Now
$59,900.
Call 352-401-2979,
352-621-3807

Palm Harbor Homes
Stilt Homes
Waterfront, Beach
www.plantcitv.palm
harbor.com
John Lyons
800-622-2832

REPO'S- REPO'S
REPO'S
WE HAVE REPO'S
CALL 352-621-9181





CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice Large 4br 2ba MH
READY TO MOVE IN!
+Owner Fin. Avail.e-
CALL (352) 795-1272


FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof over,
w/ porch & carport on
fenced 1 acre, Very Nice
Quiet, Less Than
$46,500. Cash- 586-9498
HERNANDO/486 1+acre,
2br SWMH+ den/flp, Man
Cave/Work Shop w/ AC
28x40, $47,500 J. Desha
Cridland Real Estate
(352)634-6340

HOMOSASSA
2ba 1 % ba MH needs
complete rehab. Good
shed, well & septic.
6524 W. Akazian
$12,500 (603) 860-6660






VILLAGE
WINTER SPECIALS
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
3/2, 2001, $19,900
2/2 waterfront. $31,000
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

FLORAL CITY
55 + Park. Fully furn.,
2/2, DW, 2 Carports,
screened porch & remod-
eled. Fun park lots of
activities! Lot Rent $176.
$17,500. 352-344-2420

INGLIS
3/2 Furn., screened porch.
Lot rent $295
Includes amenities.
$15,000 (352) 212-8873

INVERNESS
Harbor Lights 55+ park,
on Big Lake Henderson.
Lovely d/w 2/2 new appl.
new floors, screened
porch, shed, & carport.
$13,500 (352)344-1828

INVERNESS PARK
55+, 14X60, 2/2, new
roof, all appliances, partly
furn. screen room, shed,
352-419-6476

LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access. ramp & shower
$25,000. 352-212-6804


Lecanto Senior Park 3
bedroom. 2 bath. 14x66
S/W Mobile home fur-
nished. 12x22 Screened
porch, 2 sheds, roof over,
new plumbing, new hot
water heater, new skirt-
ing, very clean, painted in
2011. Call 815-535-7958




INVERNESS
RV Spaces. Bring your
own boat and fishing
gear. AGE 55+ com-
munity. Lot rent only
$360-$375 including
electric. Edge Water
Oaks 352-344.1380







*Ready to Move In
Owner Financing Avail.
CALL (352) 795-1272






AffTION

REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CirusCounlyHonieRentals.con
LECANTO
2334 W Silverhill Ln. .... $525
2/1 ground floor apt.
1073 N commercee Ter.. $525
2/1 apt.,screened lanai
CRYSTAL RIVER
2271 N (rede.............. $450
2/1 SW mobile, furnished
9454 W Wisconsin C... S775
3/2 quiet ded end street
HOMOSASSA
9540 S Lotus Pft...... $625
2/1.5 DW mobile, huge lot
8019 W Grove St ........ $575
2/2 SW mobile on 1.25 Acres
HERNANDO/INVERNESS
5525 S Kine Ter. ......... $875
2/2/1 unfumishedind. lowncare
6315 N Shorewood Dr.. $700
2/1 cute home, nice yard


CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
With inground Pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135




Crystal River
1/1 Great neighborhood
7 mos min. No smoking

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Hse. Near Twn 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/ BA$400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments
for Rent 352-465-2985
FLORAL CITY
FREE Use of boat ramp,
fishing dock, canoe &
Jon boat rentals. 1 BR
$300/$200 dp.Trails End
Camp, A Friendly Place
to Live 352-726-3699
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Incld water trash
& lawn. $550 mo. + Sec.
352-634-5499

LECANTO
Nice, Clean 1 BR,
Ceramic tile throughout
352-216-0012/613-6000


INVERNESS
1 BR& 2 BR Garden
& Townhouse Apts.
$512 to $559 a mo
WSG included, small
pets welcome.
Barrier Free Unit
Available
GATEHOUSE
APTS
(352) 726-6466
Equal Housing
Opportunity

SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant Rd.
to So. on Tallahasse
Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719









CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret Harbour
Apts. Newly remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incl Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037




HERNANDO
APROX. 1100SQ FT
OFFICE ON OVER 1/2
ACRE ON HWY 200
$725 mo.352-344-3084

Homosassa Spgs
SmlRestaurant/Pizza
Shop for Rent, $800
269-369-2509


LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza, Office/
Retail, CR 486, 900 sf. @
$700+ util. & sales tax. 1
mo. Free w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801




CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furn w/ member-
ship, Seasonal/Annual
352-476-4242, 527-8002
INVERNESS
2/2/1 Lg Condo
Waterfront Community
with heated pool.
Non-smoker, pet restrict.
$665. mo 317-442-1063




HOMOSASSA 2/1
$525 mo incl. garb. Wtr.,
Sept. Pets? No smk 1st
Ist. & sec. 352-212-4981




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
HERNANDO
On private prop. Wood
burning stove, utilities
included. $450 mo.
(352)341-0787




BLACK DIAMOND
EXCLUSIVE 3/2/2
3389 N Bent Tree Pt
1650 SF, Pool, $1285/mo
(740) 398-9585
CRYS. RIV. & BH
Great Neigh., Like New
352-302-1370




CRYSTAL RIVER
Crystal Paradise Estates
3/2 Clean, turn-key,
fenced yard. Sec + Credit
Check $750. Call
352-220-6032


BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, Carport, Carpet
$500.mo. 352-302-3987

Cit.Hills/Brentwood
2/2/2 on golf course.
Club included $900/mo
516-991-5747

CITRUS HILLS
2/2/2 Townhouse
condo, full appliances,
carport, Citrus Hills
membership included
Prudential Florida
Showcase Properties
call 352-476-8136

CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
W/ inground pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135

FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1 Furn.
$950. 352-419-4421

HERNANDO
4 BR, 2 BA, Playroom &
office, fenced yard, on
over 1/AC, or Comm.
Office on Hwy 200
$875+Sec. 352-344-3084

INV. S. HIGHLANDS
2/2/2, Ist & Sec. $850.
mo. 352-419-5442

INVERNESS
2/1 near hospital
fam. room, scn porch.
$600 352-422-2393

INVERNESS
3/2 Brand New, Granite
tops, marble firs, SS Ap
$895 (352) 634-3897





HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225

Lake Front Home
on Gospel Island,
spectacular views
spacious 312/2,
For Rent, $700
or Sale (908) 322-6529


For Sale %o


CHASSA-

HOWITZKA
Charming 2br 1.5ba,
newly remodeled in quiet
area. 980sq ft $60,000.
Owner Fin. 10% down
amortized over 15yrs at
7% 5-yr balloon.
Possible trade for
land/home in TN or GA.
call 352-382-1800





BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV & W/D
WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF/MW"
REALTY ONE






ESTATE SALE in Nature
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site and a separate gated
storage lot; plus almost
new 5th-wheel with
slides, screened gazebo,
and storage building. All
for $79,900. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441

Fero Cemetery Beverly
Hills Two Plots Under Lrg
Shaded Oak Tree -
Row 251 Lots D & E
Only $2500 for Both
(1/2 Price) 352-364-4010


I Fa: (52)563566 1 oll ree (88) 52-3401 Emil:clasifedschrniclon~ne~om wesit: ww~chonileolin~co








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-el3stt


From mobiles to
mansions,
From Gulf to Lakes,
give me a call,
I sell 'em all!
352-422-4137
nancv.wilsonia
vahoo.com
Nancy J. Wilson
Realtor@
Broker-Associate
SRESOGRI
Waybright Real Estate,
Inc.
Motivated seller
wants this aone!!!
6 acres w Big SHOP,
Nice 2/2/2 House,
porches Barns, pond,
pvd rd, Concrete
drive. $ 149K
MLS 357108.
www.crosslandrealty.
com 352 726 6644



#1 Employment source is







Ww.chronicleonline.com


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Ufestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND YOU
A VIEW TO LOVE"

crosslandrealty.corn
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


' THIS OUT!
Brentwood of Citrus
Hills 2/2/2 Quiet
culdesac. Totally re-
modeled Hrwd
flrs,ceramic,cpt.
scrn lanai, Iscp yard.
Must see!
New on market FSBO
1816 W. Jena Ct
Lecanto OPEN
SAT&SUN 11-2
$97,500
NO agents please
610-248-2090




HERNANDO
Citrus Hills Pool Home
4/3/2+, circular drive,
1 acre lot, below $200k
352-527-7856



Lowest Priced Home
in ARBOR LAKES
**OPEN HOUSE**
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR &
Gated Comm. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista Trl
(352) 419-7418



INVERNESS
Block home 2br, iba
w/ 2porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres.
$130,000 Call Buzz
352-341-0224 or
David 607-539-7872


FLORAL CITY
3/2/1, quiet st, Lg. lot,
best offer -inspection
Sat, Sun fm 1 to 5,
Home will be sold Sun-
day night to highest
bidder 727-288-6020





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

Rr/MC"
REALTY ONE

CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
W/ inground pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RE/MOW
REALTY ONE

OWNER SACRIFICE
$100,000.4 yrs. Ago,
*Selling for $29.900*
CALL 352-564-0207
Forest View/Gated 55+

The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC &Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558

WALDEN WOODS
55+ Adult Community.
Furn. 2/2 DW. $700 mo +
util, sec dep, & 1mo rent.
(352) 428-6919




HOMOSASSA SPRINGS





2/2/2 Great Country
home on 2 % acre
landscaped lot, in great
neighborhood. Move in
Ready! Call for appt.
126K 352-503-6511


4/2/3 HEATED POOL
lots of extras!
SELLER MOTIVATED!
reduced to 210k
352-688-6500 or
352-212-5023


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Ciru Cont


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


GAIL STEARNS
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298
Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available


PINE RIDGE- THIS IS
THE PROPERTY
YOU'VE BEEN LOOK-
ING FOR! Bring your
boat, horses, in-laws;
there is room for
everything! 4/3.5 w/7 car
garage/workshop & in-law
suite on 5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded with large
back yard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352.249.9164


I've SOLD
20 Properties
this year!
I NEED LISTINGS!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Cell:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com

"MERRY CHRISTMAS!"
....and,
Happy New Year!


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty,
Inc.
352-726-1515



Quiet Country Setting
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Dunnellon/Citrus Springs
area, only 20 Min. to
Ocala $132,000 Call
352-302-6784 for appt.





Get results



InlheAomefront



ClassifdsI


[4I







Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
*Buy or Sell*

I'll Represent
YOU

ERA
American Realty







"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near KINGS
BAY $425,000. Make
Offers 352-563-9857


DUNNELLON
Here is that home on
Lake Rousseau that you
have always wanted! 2br
1 % ba on 1.43 acres
w/168ft lake frontage.
Completely remodeled all
new interior & windows.
No Flood Insurance!
Priced reduced from
$369,000 to $169,000
Call Bernie
(352) 563-0116


Open Waterfront on
Lake Hernando
3,300 sf under roof 2,000
liv., 3/2/1. den & fam.
rm. cage inground
pool. 2 Irg. sheds, dock,
on 1 acre $269,900
813-240-7925


YOUR "High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SCAN OR GO TO
www.
BestN''uireCoast
Properties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"



"Heatherwood 581W
access to game reserve
& Tillus Hill, 2.42 Acres
well, septic, no impact
fees, $30,000 by
owner, sold as is
(352) 422-0435
% ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact fee
credit, high and dry,
trees, $11,000 obo
(352) 795-3710



HOMOSASSA
Wooded Lot, wet lands
on Lee Woods Drive
112x 114ft. river ac-
cess, but not on River
$7,000. 352-621-1664






\our"\\ 1d [lirt

Need a joh
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


C ihONI dE
SOUTCO^^^^^^^
(.


E10 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Telescoping pole cleans high spaces with ease


D ear Sara: We
have two very
high plant
shelves in our house.
They are 16 feet high
and 3 feet wide. Years
ago, we were able to get
up there with a 20-foot
ladder to clean them,
but with our health, that Sara
is no longer an option.
We have no one in the FRU
family on whom we LIV
could or would impose.
We looked at the new Swifter ex-
tenders, and they are too short
(we'd still need a ladder) and the
heads too small. We also searched
online for cleaning services, but
they only seem to do the usual,
everyday cleaning. We would wel-
come any suggestions, because it's
filthy up there! -KathyS., Arizona
Dear Kathy: You were on the


I


right track with the Swif-
fer extenders. There are
telescoping dusting
poles (often called "tele-
poles") that are longer
S(10-30 feet, plus the
length of the duster).
Many are designed for
cleaning ceiling fans and
Noel high windows, but they
would work well for your
GAL situation, too. Amazon.
NG com carries a few, but
you can look for them at
your local home improvement store
(Home Depot, Lowe's, etc.). To help
point you in the right direction, the
brand Unger has a few telepoles of
varying lengths to choose from.
Dear Sara: My husband left a
pen in his work shirt and threw it
in the laundry hamper. I didn't no-
tice and washed the whole thing.
Result: a HUGE ink stain that


runs down the arm of the shirt. I
tried using alcohol, but it isn't get-
ting all of the stain. I've now
doused and blotted about five
times and there is still a lot of ink.
Any suggestions? The shirt is gray
and the fabric is a polyester and
cotton blend. -M.K, Canada
Dear M.K: The rubbing alcohol
should work. I'd continue to apply
it and dab/blot it You can try shav-
ing cream, nail polish remover,
baking soda-and-water paste and
cheap aerosol hairspray (one at a
time) to boost your efforts. See
which removes the most ink and
continue to use that method. It is
going to come out in multiple
stages and not immediately Be
sure to have a folded towel behind
the stained area so the ink doesn't
bleed through the garment.
Dear Sara: Can you advise me on
how to clean my shower? It has


brass trim and I have mold and cal-
cification. All cleaners are too
strong for the brass. Can you sug-
gest something for me? Joan A,
Arizona
DearJoan: Please try Bar Keep-
ers Friend (barkeepersfriend .com)
if it's not lacquered. There's a
coupon available on the website.
You can typically find Bar Keepers
Friend at Walmart, Ace Hardware,
Target, Lowe's, Home Depot and
Kmart. You can also try Bon Ami,
which can be found in many of the
same stores.
Dear Sara: I enjoyed your article
on cookie stamps. Can you give me
idea where to find them? Bon-
nie, Arizona
Dear Bonnie: You can find
cookie stamps in many retail stores
during the holiday season. Their
availability can be fairly random
and depends on what stores decide


to carry them. Try Macy's. Nordic
Ware, Wilton and Norpro are some
of the more popular brands. I like
the clay type available at Rycraft
(cookiestamp.com) and JBK Pot-
tery (jbkpotterycom). Sears sells
JBK Pottery, too. QVC, Williams-
Sonoma, Pampered Chef and
Stampin' Up sometimes offer
cookie stamps. There are also
lovely glass and clay stamps avail-
able for sale on eBay com,
Etsycom and Amazon.com.


Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal
Village (wwwfrugalvillage.com),
a website that offers practical,
money-saving strategies for
everyday living. Write to Sara
Noel, c/o Universal Uclick, 1130
Walnut Street, Kansas City MO
64106, or email sara@frugal
village. com.


REALTY GROUP


Sierra


oup, LL.I


2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703


Uthce in the
Terra Vista
Welcome Center


BILL DECKER 352-464-0647 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133 VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777


I 'Wa~Ud II W aI I II ,- ~ ra~r 2U


SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH
Elegant, immaculate with a fabulous panoramic view Don't miss this 3/3/2
home on the Skyview Golf Course of Terra Vista gas and solar heated pool &
$', 376,500


DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS i iI fi
You Must See i room 2 Bath Home In The Gated Brentwood DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
Community of II I II Is Loaded Ti Include Ceramic This one is exceptlo I I. 1 I .. ..... ...... h I.. ... i in Terra Vista This
Tile Floors n Kitchen and BathWood Kitchen CountersDeluxe bedroom 2 5 bath 2( a.. ,I ,. I i i ....... on the 8th green
App ances.Bult n Office/Desk Space In GreatroomMaster Bedroom WalkIn Skyview If you are i., . .. 1 i .1.. I, ...I tastes, please don
ClosetsMaster Bath Dua Sinks w/Coran Top & Wood CabinetScreened lanai w/ miss seeing this home with neutral colors throughout This is surely the kitcht
Ted Gril i i i i A The of your dreams, with cabinetry, counter tops and appliances of the high
Amenities 1 11 140,000 quality Membership required MLS 357018 $339,000

____ L *^ ^^^^I^ ^I-^ !


BRENTWOOD TOWN HOME, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR J -
II., ... i.,. ..... i.. ,,.i., ,,..,.i ,1 i i ., .. .-,.., 11. .. L
.....,. i .. .... i .i. ... .i i i . 1 .. i . SINGLE FAMILY, 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE
i, .i, ,.i ,i. i, ..i, ,1 ... i .. .. h, I i . i ,. i, a ... i. Spectacular Terra Vista home Situated on a cul de sac, beautiful views
,,,i ,11 .ii .. I I I I I. II ... .... ... I, Custom details with upgrades galore Professionally decorated Pool, spa,
i .... i .. i .... .. i i I 11 129.900 extended lanai with extensive landscape MLS 356255 $499,000


DETA
with mar


This home is in
Custom home
$375,000


rades MLS 356101


Fully Furnished 2/2/2 Detached Villa in Terra Vista Beautifully decorated Enjoy
... .. 1 1... . i , h ,,,' .. .. I, 1 ,, ,, ,, .. . I, . .. ly


2 BATH, 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
in the Community of Brentwood Open floor
Dining area, breakfast nook and Den Social


THIS LOVELY 2 BEDROOM + DEN HOME features an extended lanai I-1
I . . ....,I .1'' .1 i .II 1 ... 11. .1..1. i .I I. Located on a cul de
I . i. . .I. I . ......... I I .. . i ... I 1 em bership Included Furni


STNHME
TOWNHOME,
Dmnh lll -- e, .


,2.5 BATH, 1
2/Bd with 2 1/2 b
nhershin #1190


Spcaiin nTrr it

& Benwod esle


r 6 r or More


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 Ell









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MOTIVATED SELLER SERvt1 ,
THREE BEDROOM, TWO BATH COUNT
IN CITRUS SPRINGS CITUOR OVER

Mi = iw'.:-I SHORT SALE S109,900 37 V "e -
Call Isaac Baylon 352 697 2494


SHOPPING CENTER
* 4 _;1. i .. .I, i ..H,.:
* 4 1.-l 1 .I 'ilal 1 i .. I::.l i a 1:1 1: i
* l:ii : Tl,:F l:, l ,f,: ii

Offered at $ 262,000
Call Ehas G. Ktallah at 352 400 2635
lot mote Inloimation.


L.mne a uc .uuNu infI .Lun
* I '. I. I1:..'.11 l .i H .:.i

* i.i l.il B.v
$150,000 Mi : = .: ::
Jeanne Pickiel 2123410
I'i'irl. CltlusCountlSold. comn


H II. _ll, J ,,,,ii,, :" ni i* yl l,,n,, ,,: i ,lh

I A.- I a .l i .i ,l i ..a i l

PRICED TO SELL QUICK! $175,000
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


OPEN WATERFRONT ,,,. L .i. i.a.i
. i. l l l i.:l..i .: .a v .ali j
Mil = .I ASKING $119,900
Call Jim Mot on at 352 4222173
to veir the potential ol this beautllul
i rateitont piopei ty


CUSTOM BUILT HOME


.iii i l i ii Ii c' ,:II i s h, :li lh .1.. .. llll Ii.i

,, A ll I 1'iii l'l:iii ; l ;, li, i
Ml = I.:'/ii $236,000
Teii, Blanco t3521 4199252
letil'tblanco. cor


.Ij l l .-i l l ... H .. .: i. 1 1. .

Asking $44,000 Mil' = 111
Pat Davis 13522122 7280
I/erw hosting.: viviv. c21patdavis.com


AVOID COOL..WITH HEATED POOL!
PELICAN COVE IN THE MOORINGS
j I ii 11, ... -I I... ,, ,1

I h... ....... ... 1 1 .. .. I .. .. I.. I mh.

il: = ". i. Newly Priced at $147,000
Call Dono .in 220 0328 oe
IIl Booth 637 4904 Itr del.air'


C IT Y L IM IT S ,..11. ,,h1.1.- ih.

h .1,, ,,, .,,..., I


Asking Only $75,000 NM 1 i
C.al Danid I(uliz at 964 383 8186
ho i oi peisn.;I/ touli
" ~ ~ ~_ I I








EDEN GARDENS
IUU y l ilh ill h ,:l ,iif I .l lhl hl ll l,:ib innllll I
pfdI jf.%A In..I n

,:/ li n i l ll ,: l ,: h ,i I 1 ,ll: I i:ll i1: llI


Mil = 1 $73,900
Stelan Stuat 352 212 0211


LECANTO 2/2 POOL HOME

Pi V .i L : hill H.ii VV.iii l
Ml = C ", 2 6. 6
Ndda Cano 726 6668


JUST LISTED!

i_ .i I,:i J :] I iIf: li ui: i i j d h .i' ll:I: Hi :'.6 i4i4


Mt I = -.5::~1' $219,000
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


ruNmIUUN Iu In Lin.la.
GREAT WATERFRONT
2002 DOUBLEWIDE WITH
PONTOON BOAT INCLUDED!!
I'p'. .i"],,,itmal. I 1.,,, 1i.I,1,0; ]I.."' ". "
.... ........ $99,000 Fll. =- ll: 1
Call Doris Minei lot appointment
352 726 6668.


GREAT LOCATION ON THE FOREST

* 1 : 1 , .| h _" IVII .. i:...i ,: ,l,1
* I i H, ,niI i _i 11 ,.. i ,l ,,

$75,000 Mi1 = 3.'.
Nancy Jenks 352 4008072
I'I'rl'. sell/ngcittuscountl/lhomes. comn


CAMBRIDGE GREENS
1086 N. CHANCE WAY
* B, .i llhh l I_:.i,.il lm:. l h ul.la : l,: i, 1 .11 .ll
* rll I: I n :.11111. 1`66l N. 3.ill _. ,Ih. _.:lll.il H
* l.i l :ll l1 0. U^ .I.] :f ll I[ I:.:.1.:.[ IU1h l\l ..il .
$174,500 Mt i = i.:3 '
Jeanne ot Wdlatd Pickiel 212 3410
iirI,.l CiliusCountlySold. com


FHA AND USDA FINANCING
FRIENDLY HOME
* B il ii Il

* I :.1:..a,,1:1 Ia .i.-

Offered at Only $67,900
Call Ehas G. Knallah at 352 400 2635
lot mote Inloimation.


INVERNESS HOME WITH 4 BEDROOMS!!!


* I .a.11: lI. I .l 1.i, l., I:. ll ppll I

Mil = -:. '. ONLY $55.000
Call Charles Kelly 352 422 2387


CAMBRIDGE GREENS
1864 E. MONOPOLY LOOP

* Nl. N. l.. ll Mi m v A. i

$135.000 M i = )Ql-:l:.
Jeanne ot Wi/lad Pickiel 212 3410
iswi'ir. CiitusCountlySold. corn


E12 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012