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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 12-29-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02985

Full Text




CHEEK P LET

EE PAGES C16 & C1


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


VOLUME 118 ISSUE 144


TODAY & next morning
HIGH LOW
70 33




Line of showers
passes; windy and
drier afternoon.
PAGE A4




Sign cards
for Sandy
Hook victims
Howard's Flea
Market has donated
Space No. 26 on its
main aisle today to a
young student who
has created sympa-
thy cards for the
families of those
devastated by the
Sandy Hook Ele-
mentary School
shooting in
Connecticut.
The student, who
created the cards
herself, is asking for
members of the pub-
lic to stop by be-
tween 9 a.m. and 3
p.m. today and sign
the cards so that she
can send them to
families.
Howard's is at
6373 S. Suncoast
Blvd. (U.S. 19) in
Homosassa. For
more information,
call the flea market
at 352-628-4656.
B&GC car
drawing
postponed
The car drawing
fundraiser for the
Boys & Girls Clubs
of Citrus County
originally scheduled
for 1 p.m. today has
been postponed so
that more tickets can
be sold.
The car giveaway
is the largest
fundraiser the clubs
do each year and it
is important that the
funds earned
through it are
enough to supple-
ment the donations
and grants that keep
the clubs open and
programs running for
the children of Citrus
County.
The new drawing
time is 1 p.m. May
25, 2013, at Love
Chevrolet, 2209
State Road 44 West,
Inverness. The win-
ner of the drawing
will have a choice of
a 2013 Chevy Malibu
or a 2013 Equinox
SUV or the cash
value of the vehicle.
Call 352-621-9225.
From staff reports


LOCAL NEWS:
Cold days
Visitors and locals alike
feel the chill./Page A3
Trayvon Martin
Teen's death is AP's
Florida story of the
year./Page A3

Comics ......... C8
Community .......C6
Crossword ....... .C7
Editorial ........ .A8
Entertainment . . .B6
Horoscope ....... .B6
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies .......... .C8
Obituaries . . ... .A5
Classifieds . . ... .C9
TV Listings ...... .C7


I6 184178I [ 20fU 02! I


Another chance for eatery





reprieve

PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
j-
FLORAL CITY Citrus
County's favorite Coney -
Dogs will still be around T I
for a while.
They are the No. 1 seller i i / -
at Pudgee's All American -.. ..
Hot Dogs. The roadside
stand on the edge of Floral
City has been given some
more time to comply with
fire code requirements that
threatened to shut it down. PAT FAHERTY/Chronicle
A sign outside Pudgee's lists Dec. 29 as its last day. The hot dog stand on Friday was
See Page A4 given more time to work out its fire code requirements.


Fire


destroys


home
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
HERNANDO A home,
its contents, two pets and a
vehicle were lost to a fire
Friday, according to a fire
incident report.
Firefighters from Her-
nando fire station re-
sponded at 4:35 a.m. Friday
to a structure fire at 4920 E.
Parsons Point, according to
the Citrus County Sheriff's
Office Fire Rescue Division.
Upon arrival, firefighters
found a manufactured home
fully involved with fire.
See Page A4


2012: a year of loss


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle file
Workers at LKQ Service Center in Crystal River line County Road 486 to pay their respects as the hearse carrying the remains of Lenny Damron passes
the business in August.


2012 Year in REVIEW


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
E very year Citrus County
says goodbye to many of its
citizens.
From business people and
artists to doctors, lawyers and
county pioneers, each one has
contributed to the fabric of the
community, making it and us
richer and better for having
known them.
Although we can't print every-
one's name and contribution,
here are some of the people of
Citrus County who have died dur-
ing 2012:
Leonard "Lenny" Damron III,
61, longtime Crystal River resi-
dent and businessman, died


There were quite a few of us that
started out in the salvage business
back in the '70s and '80s, and we all had
a certain amount of vision and drive.
Lenny had a boatload of both.
Barney Thompson
30-year friend of Crystal River resident and businessman
Leonard "Lenny" Damron III, who died Aug. 10.


Aug. 10.
To the community, the name
Damron was synonymous with
auto parts and repair in Citrus
County. Damron grew a small sal-
vage yard into a family business
of regional note. In 1981, he


opened Damron's Auto Parts Inc.
on County Road 486 near Crystal
River. Eventually, he expanded
his company to other locations,
such as Gainesville, Melbourne
and Atlanta, Ga.
In 1998, Damron, along with


sons Chad and Casey, sold the
auto salvage business to Illinois-
based LKQ Corp. Damron served
as senior vice president managing
LKQ's self-service and heavy-duty
truck divisions until his death.
"There were quite a few of us
that started out in the salvage
business back in the '70s and '80s,
and we all had a certain amount
of vision and drive. Lenny had a
boatload of both," said Barney
Thompson, a 30-year friend, at
Damron's memorial service.
Irene DeLaby, 90, dedicated
and enthusiastic volunteer for the
Florida Parks Service, died Oct. 6.
DeLaby volunteered more than
27,000 hours to the park system
that she loved, and was the first
See Page A2


Paddling group to tour Withlacoochee River


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
A flotilla of kayaks and ca-
noes will paddle through
Citrus County on the Withla-
coochee River in February
Up to 100 paddlers are
expected to participate in
the trip called "The Wild
Wonderful Withlacoochee."
It is being organized by Pad-
dle Florida, Inc., a non-


profit supporting canoeing
and kayaking in Florida.
Bill Richards is executive
director of the Gainesville-
based group. He said it was
started in 2007 and has
been a 501(c)3 nonprofit for
the past year and a half.
"Our mission is to raise
awareness about water con-
servation, wildlife conser-
vation, restoring springs
and protection of water re-


sources," Richards said.
"This will be our 20th event
in four and a half years."
They do one trip out of five
in each of Florida's water
management districts.
The organization also
works to promote Florida as
an international destination
for nature-based tourism.
The trips include
Florida's most scenic rivers,
water trails and coastal


environments. A trip in the
Florida Keys is set for Janu-
ary, with a trip on the
Ochlockonee River sched-
uled for March. Past trips
have included the St. Johns
River, the Suwannee River
and the Peace River.
With online reservations,
Richards said it is difficult
to have an exact number of
participants for the Withla-
coochee trip until the


deadline passes. "I would
expect at least 50 people,"
he said. "But it might be 20,
it might be 100." He was one
of the Paddle Florida staff
who scouted the trip in ad-
vance. Aardvark's Florida
Kayak Co. and Rainbow
River Canoe and Kayak are
the official outfitters.
The adventure is open to
See .Page A2


Panthers girls pull off upset of Gibbs /B1








HwwwNICle
O(www.chronicleonline.com


END OF THE YEAR
CERTIFIED
SALES EVENT



See Page C13

VILLAGE TOYOTA
CRYSTAL RIVER





A2 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012


STATE/LOCAL


State BRIEFS


Private facilities
transferred to gov't
TALLAHASSEE The
Florida Government Utility Au-
thority (FGUA) announced
today that it signed an agree-
ment to purchase most of the
water and wastewater systems,
currently owned by Aqua Utili-
ties Florida, Inc., and Crystal
River Utilities, Inc., located in
Florida.
Friday the FGUA Board ap-
proved the $49.2 million to pur-
chase the majority of the water
and wastewater systems cur-
renty owned byAqua Utilities
Florida, Inc., putting these assets
into government management.
As part of the process, FGUA
plans to stabilize rates and will
continue to improve the quality
of service for these customers.
Pasco County has encour-



LOSS
Continued from Page Al

Florida parks volunteer to
contribute 10,000 hours,
which was recognized by
the governor.
In 2000 she received a na-
tional volunteer service
award and in 2004 was
awarded the national Take
Pride in America award for
volunteerism.
During the 1940s, DeLaby
played professional base-
ball for the All American
Girls Professional Baseball
League. During World War
II, she worked in a defense
plant Later, she went on to
teach high school in Fox
Lake, Ill. She moved to
Florida in 1989.
"She was a dynamite lady
and the consummate advo-
cate for volunteers in trying
to be a champion for volun-
teers," said Tom Linley, for-
mer Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park ranger,
at DeLaby's memorial serv-
ice. "She was very much a
leader at a time when there
weren't a lot of women in
leadership."
Shawn Fitzpatrick, 31,
Inverness attorney who, in
2007, took over the family
law firm his late father and
grandfather built, died Oct.
22 of an undisclosed illness
he had battled for at least a
year.
Born and raised in Inver-
ness, Fitzpatrick received
his law degree in December
2006 just seven months
after cancer claimed his fa-
ther, Richard "Spike" Fitz-
patrick. Spike Fitzpatrick
had hoped to live long
enough to practice together
with his son at the Fitz-
patrick & Fitzpatrick office
on North Apopka Avenue
where he had practiced law
with his father, Charles B.
Fitzpatrick.
Shawn Fitzpatrick prac-
ticed law with his sister,
Megan Fitzpatrick.
"He was a fantastic men-
tor. He was following in my
dad's footsteps," Megan told
the Chronicle shortly after
her brother's death. "He
was the most caring person
I've ever known. He was my
brother and my best friend."
Nola Gravius, 74, the
woman who was the com-
passionate face of CUB for
many years, died at her Flo-
ral City home June 10.
She came to Citrus
County in 1979 and went to
work for CUB in 1989 when
it was still in the basement
of the historic courthouse.


aged FGUA to acquire private
facilities in its community.
County Commissioner Jack
Mariano said after the purchase
of private utilities in Pasco
County, facility upgrades were
achieved while rates remained
lower than other private utilities
in the County.
The purchase of the facilities
is expected to be complete in
the first quarter of 2013.
Man gets 11 years
for fatal DUI crash
BROOKSVILLE -A Tampa
Bay area man has been sen-
tenced to 11 years in prison for
a drunken driving crash that left
his friend dead.
A Hernando County judge
sentenced 33-year-old Mikell
Begley on Thursday after he
pleaded no contest to DUI
manslaughter.


"One of Nola's strongest
attributes was her love for
children," said Deborah
Rossfeld, current CUB exec-
utive director, shortly after
Gravius' death. "She was
gentle and went out of her
way above and beyond to
help people."
James Franklin "Doc"
Hudson, Sr, 90, longtime
Crystal River resident,
teacher, coach and school
principal, died Dec. 5.
One of Hudson's claims to
local fame was coaching a
six-man football team at
Crystal River High School
that won a state champi-
onship in the late 1940s. He
was also known for his keen
memory of people and
events in Crystal River.
In the 1980s, Hudson
recorded the oral histories
of local "old timers."
"My parents spoke of him,
something akin to a movie
star," said Jack Dumas,
Crystal River fire chief,
shortly after Hudson's
death. "He was a wonderful
person who will be missed."
Shawn Kersh, 41, father
of three, dedicated family
practice physician, both as a
partner in private practice
at Inverness Family Care
and as a physician for the
county school board em-
ployees at Citrus County
Health and Wellness Center,
as well as a coach for the In-
verness Storm Pop Warner
football league, died May 25


Authorities say Begley had
spent the afternoon drinking
with a co-worker 46-year-
old Gary Ziegler at a Spring
Hill bar in April. Shortly after
the men left, Begley lost con-
trol of the car after swerving to
avoid hitting a Hernando County
deputy's car. The car flipped,
and then hit a fire hydrant and a
tree. Ziegler died, and Begley
was seriously injured.
Tests showed that Begley's
blood-alcohol level after the
crash was 0.121 and 0.125 per-
cent. Florida law considers a
driver impaired at 0.08 percent.
Call violations lead
consumer complaints
TALLAHASSEE Do Not
Call violations top the list of
consumer complaints in Florida
for the fourth straight year.
The Florida Department of


at his home in Inverness
after a sudden illness.
"Kids played their best
because they believed in
Shawn and wanted to
please him. He inspired the
players and he inspired
the other coaches," said Jim
Bergman, fellow coach and
Kersh's best friend at
Kersh's memorial service.
Gary Maidhof, 54, oper-
ations and projects officer
for Citrus County, died May
27, in Council, Idaho, while
visiting with family
Among his many contribu-
tions to the community:
Maidhof's regulation in-
volvement included: mining,
impact fees, billboards, sep-
tic tanks, land development
code, manatee protection.
As the county's development
regulator, he appeared in
news stories involving some
controversial names:
Florida Rock, SunCruz,
Brown Schools at Beverly
Hills, the Freezer bar and
Sen. Charlie Dean's barn.
He was a board member
of Citrus 2020 and prime or-
ganizer of Save Our Waters
Week, as a Scoutmaster he
helped oversee numerous
Eagle Scout projects and he
was the 1998 Chronicle Citi-
zen of the Year. He was well
known for his years of prob-
lem solving.
"Gary had a rare combi-
nation of intellectual and
historical knowledge of our
county," County Administra-


Our Goal Is A


Healthier You

New Patients & Walk-Ins
Are Always Welcome
Humana, Freedom, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted

B.K. Patel, M.D. H. Khan, M.D.
Internal Medicine Board Certified Family Pactice
Geriatrics
Family & General Medicine
Internal Medicine
Intensive ('are (Hospital
Long-Term Care (Nursing Home)
Active Staff at both Seven Rivers
& Citrus Memorial Hospitals




Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am


Beverly Hills
3775 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills
(352) 746-0600


Inverness
308 S. Line Ave.
Inverness
(352) 344-5511


Homosassa
4363 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa Springs
(352) 503-2011


Agriculture and Consumer
Services reported Friday it re-
ceived 17,337 complaints in the
2012 calendar year from citi-
zens who received unwanted
calls despite being on the
state's Do Not Call list.
Agriculture Commissioner
Adam Putnam said more than
330,000 numbers have been
added to Florida's Do Not Call
List since it became available
at no cost to Floridians as a re-
sult of a measure passed dur-
ing the 2012 legislative session
- increasing subscriptions
five-fold. He noted that more
than $3.8 million was recov-
ered on behalf of Florida con-
sumers in 2012.
Albeit far below the Do Not
Call violations, telemarketing
calls finished second on the list
with 4,159 complaints.
From wire reports


tor Brad Thorpe told the
Chronicle in May. "He
touched many lives. He
loved his family, the envi-
ronment and the people he
worked with and served
during his 32 years with the
county"
Don Mayo, 71, well-
known waterfowl and ma-
rine artist, died Oct. 18 at his
Crystal River home after a
year's battle with bladder
cancer
Some of his works are in
the personal collections of
former President George
Bush Sr, baseball legend
the late Ted Williams, singer
Anne Murray and the late
Gen. Norman H.
Schwarzkopf.
In April, Mayo was hon-
ored as Citrus County's only
person to be named a life-
time member of the Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce.
In October, Mayo's wife
Sue Mayo told the Chroni-
cle, "He has always appreci-
ated and studied in depth
the many aspects of nature.
He was extremely well-
known for his expert fly
fishing, saltwater sport fish-
ing along with duck and ma-
rine guiding."
Phil Price, 75, former
Crystal River city council-
man, former chamber of


TOUR
Continued from PageAl

all types of paddlers includ-
ing canoes, kayaks, paddle-
boards and similar craft.
Trip details, fees and entry
information are online at
www.paddleflorida.org.
The early registration
deadline is Jan. 30.
The Withlacoochee trip
is set for Feb. 13-18. Ac-
cording to trip details from
the website, it will start at
Sumter County's Marsh
Bend Outlet Park in Lake
Panasoffkee. From there
paddlers will head to the
riverside campsite at Potts
Preserve.
Paddlers will spend a day
exploring Gum Slough, a lit-
tle known four-mile spring
run near the Sumter-Citrus
County border. It flows into
the Withlacoochee just east


commerce president and
1992 chamber "Person of
the Year" and the first CPA
in Citrus County, died Dec.
2. As a council member he
was known for his fiscal
conservatism saving
money and cutting costs.
"He wasn't afraid to stand
up for what he believed in,"
former Crystal River mayor
Ron Kitchen told the Chron-
icle after Price's death. "He
was a good advocate for the
taxpayers. He was one of
those guys who made a huge
impact on the community,
and I don't think a lot of peo-
ple know all the good things
he did."
Kay Tolle, 86, lifelong,
fourth-generation resident
of Citrus County, died Aug. 3
at her home in Crystal
River.
From Crystal River to In-
verness, Kay Tolle impacted
the community She grew up
as Beulah Katherine "Kay"
Barco in Inverness and
moved to Crystal River
when she married Ed, her
husband of 66 years.
The personification of
Southern charm and grace,
her daughter Laura Lou
Fitzpatrick said at Tolle's
memorial service, "Mom
showed us that you can be
told the worst news in the
world 'You have cancer


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

of Potts Preserve.
The next leg of the trip is
Potts Preserve to Rainbow
Springs where boats will
have the option of paddling
up the Rainbow River or
being shuttled. The organi-
zation has a tradition of vis-
iting a Florida State Park
on each of its trips.
Paddlers will ride the
current back down the
Rainbow River then head
back on the Withlacoochee
to Lake Rousseau. They
will camp near the dam.
Boats and paddlers will be
shuttled to the spillway for
the next day's launch.
On the final day, the
group will paddle through
Yankeetown to the trip's
conclusion at Levy
County's Bird Creek Park
on the Gulf of Mexico.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. com.


and there's nothing we can
do' and handle it with dig-
nity and grace.
Eloise Tindale Van
Ness, 89, lifelong Citrus
County resident and much-
loved local treasure whom
many called "Grand-
mother," died Feb. 14.
Decades ago, Van Ness
started Ease's Rough Riders
4-H horse club and volun-
teered with 4-H for 49 years,
teaching generations of kids
how to ride and how to live.
She led local Christmas
parades on horseback, drove
a school bus, served with
many local organizations
and earned many honors
and accolades. Up until two
years ago, she rode in the an-
nual cattle drive as part of
the Hernando Southern
Heritage Days and she
could pop a mean cow whip.
"The legacy she left and
the greatest tribute to her
are the generations of chil-
dren she impacted," said
Hal Porter, president of the
Citrus County Fair Board
who grew up being loved
and mentored by "Grand-
mother" Van Ness. "I'm a
different person for having
known her."
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@ chronicle
online, corn or 352-564-2927.


I







Page A3 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


County BRIEFS

County, Lowe's
bring holiday cheer
The county's Parks and
Recreation Department,
along with workers from
Lowe's Home Improvement,
delivered 65 Christmas trees
in two days to families
throughout the community.
Lowe's in Inverness do-
nated the trees. Some of the
county's organizations, fami-
lies, nonprofits and busi-
nesses decorated their
adopted trees on Friday at
the tree-lighting event at the
Central Ridge Community
Center at Beverly Hills.
Trees were dropped off at
homes in Beverly Hills, Her-
nando, Inverness, Lecanto,
Homosassa and Crystal River.
Families who received trees
were nominated by the We
Care Food Pantry, Daystar,
Citrus United Basket and the
Family Resource Center.
Organizers would like to
thank the Craftsman Guild of
Beverly Hills for making the
wooden tree stands and the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office
for watching the staging site
of the trees.
Port Authority
to meet Jan. 8
The Citrus County Port Au-
thority will meet at 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 8, in the Citrus
County Courthouse, Room
100. Among the topics to be
discussed is the Port Citrus
feasibility agreement with
TranSystems.
This meeting is open to the
public.
The courthouse is at 110
N. Apopka Ave., Inverness.
Apply for Water &
Wastewater group
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners is
seeking applicants for a tech-
nical member position and al-
ternate member position on
the Water & Wastewater Au-
thority (WWA). The WWA
provides for the regulation of
the private, for-profit water,
bulk water, and wastewater
utilities within the unincorpo-
rated areas of Citrus County.
An applicant must be a per-
manent resident of Citrus
County. Those with experi-
ence in engineering of water
and sewer systems, finance,
accounting, rate-making, util-
ity regulation, or business ad-
ministration are encouraged
to apply. The application form
is available at www.bocc.
citrus.fl.us/commissioners/
advboards/advisory_board_
application.pdf
The Water & Wastewater
Authority generally meets the
first Monday of every month
at 1 p.m. at the Lecanto Gov-
ernment Building.
Send completed applica-
tion together with a recent re-
sume to: Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners,
Attn: Denise Gallagher, Citrus
County Administration, 3600
W. Sovereign Path, Suite
267, Lecanto, FL 34461.


Holiday cL

The Citrus
Central Landfill
regular business
Jan. 1, and will r
Wednesday, Jar
527-7670 during
or go to the coui
at www. bocc.cit
Click on depart
Public Works, th
Waste Manager
Citrus Cou
Services will clo
public Tuesday,
Kennel staff w
each day to clear
the animals in th
Call 352-746-
www.citruscritter
H All county
offices will close
Jan. 1. For inforr
onto www.bocc.'
The Small
Development C
are closed throu
The offices wi
Jan 2.
The Chron
ness offices in Ir
be closed Mond
and Tuesday, Ja
Crystal River off
closed Tuesday,


LOSINGS

County
I will close for
sTuesday,
reopen
n. 2. Call 352-
office hours
nty's website
rus.fl.us.
nents, then
ien Solid
nent.
inty Animal
:se to the
Jan. 1.
vill be on-site
in and feed
ieir care.
8400 or visit
rs.com.
government
e Tuesday,
nation, log
citrus.fl.us.
Business
:enter offices
gh Jan. 1.
ll reopen on

icle's busi-
nverness will
ay, Dec. 31,
in. 1. The
ice will be
Jan. 1.
-From staff reports


DON'T LIKE THE WEATHER?



Wait 10 minutes


.
-- - -



-







MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
James Fredette, left, and Jonathan Steeves, both of Minneapolis, Minn., don't seem to mind the cold tempera-
tures Wednesday afternoon during the beginning of a strong cold front that passed across the state, dropping
temperatures. Both men were shoeless and leisurely walked in the water along Fort Island Gulf Beach.

Forecast: Cold, then warm, then rain, then cold, then...


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer

CRYSTAL RIVER
Warm, dry, rain, cold.
Welcome to a
typical Florida
winter
Temperatures in
the low 30s greeted Citrus
County on Friday morning but it
had warmed into the 60s by
mid-afternoon.
Rain was forecast Friday night
and today, followed by a chilly
Sunday, warmer through the week
and another cold front Thursday
Get the picture?
Brian McClure, Bay News 9 me-
teorologist, said the weather pat-
tern for this winter looks
scattered in other words,
normal.
"It's a very typical weather pat-
tern for winter up and down,
up and down," he said.
After a dry November, Decem-
ber has seen some significant rain
showers, McClure said. Those
rain bands are followed by drops


ON THE NET
For up-to-the-minute
weather, go online to
www.baynews9.com.

in temperatures, then clearing
and cold nights.
The holidays and cold weather
are a natural draw for tourists to
see manatees at Three Sisters
Springs. Michael Lusk, manager
of the Chassahowitzka National
Wildlife Refuge, said Friday he
enlarged the sanctuary at Three
Sisters to accommodate a large
number of manatees that have
gathered to warm themselves.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Serv-
ice this year declared all of King's
Bay a manatee refuge, giving Lusk
the authority to expand sanctuaries
or close springs during extreme
cold.
Lusk said he would be unlikely
to close the springs based simply
on a cold morning or two. A con-
tinuous cold snap, he said, might
lead to the springs being closed.
'As long as it's getting warm


Closing Three
Sisters is a last
resort.

Michael Lusk
manager, Chassahowitzka National
Wildlife Refuge.
during the daylight, I'm not too
concerned," Lusk said. "Closing
Three Sisters is a last resort."
McClure said Citrus County res-
idents shouldn't concern them-
selves with a repeat of 2010, when
record low temperatures kept the
area shivering through January,
February and part of March.
"I don't see that pattern. That's
a tough pattern to hold," he said.
"Last year was more typical. It's
all about perception. People think
we live in Florida, it's not sup-
posed to get cold. It's just aver-
ages. So far this winter is starting
out typical."
Contact Chronicle reporter
Mike Wright at 352-563-3228 or
mwright@ chronicleonline.com.


Trayvon Martin death is story of year


Associated Press


ORLANDO Trayvon
Martin's shooting death was
just a blip on the local tele-
vision news when it was
first reported on a soggy
night in late February
But the questions the 17-
year-old's death raised over
the following weeks about
gun control, race and equal
justice under the law
helped make it Florida's
top story of 2012, well
ahead of Florida's election
woes which finished sec-
ond, according to a poll of
newspaper editors con-
ducted by The Associated
Press.
Martin was fatally shot by
neighborhood watch volun-
teer George Zimmerman
during a confrontation in a
gated community in the Or-
lando suburb, Sanford.
Zimmerman has claimed
self-defense under
Florida's controversial
"stand-your-ground" law,
which gives broad legal
protection to anyone who
says they used deadly force
because they feared death
or great bodily harm.
The former volunteer
claimed Martin tried to
reach for Zimmerman's gun
during a struggle. Zimmer-
man is pleading not guilty
to second-degree murder,
and his trial is set for the
middle of next year.
The shooting death origi-
nally was covered in a rou-
tine crime-blotter manner.
But as Martin's parents
grew frustrated over the
lack of an arrest, they went
public with their criticism
of the investigation by the
Sanford Police Depart-
ment. The story gained in-
ternational attention after
the Sanford Police Depart-
ment released 911 calls of
neighbors reporting the
shooting. Cries for help
could be heard on the 911
calls. Martin's parents
claimed they were from
their son, proving that he


FLORIDA'S TOP 10 NEWS OF 2012
This is a list of the Florida's Top 10 news stories in
2012 as voted on by the state's news editors:
1. Sanford neighborhood watch volunteer George
Zimmerman fatally shoots teenager Trayvon Martin,
setting off a national debate about the state's
so-called "stand your ground law" and leading to
Zimmerman's eventual arrest on second-degree
murder charges.
2. Florida's general election is marred by long lines at
the polls and a long count in the presidential race.
3. Thirteen Florida A&M marching band members are
charged in connection with the 2011 hazing death
of drum major Robert Champion, the band is
suspended from performing for at least a year and
the school's president resigns.
4. Tampa hosts the Republican National Convention as
Mitt Romney is nominated inside while outside the
streets remained calm with few arrests.
5. Florida voters narrowly prefer President Barack
Obama over Republican challenger Mitt Romney as
the Democratic candidate carries the state for the
third time in the last five elections.
6. Eleven people die in an Interstate 75 pileup near
Gainesville minutes after the Florida Highway Patrol
reopened the highway, which had been closed for
smoke and fog.
7. The U.S. Supreme Court upholds President Barack
Obama's health care overhaul plan, rejecting an
appeal by Florida and other states.
8. Florida voters reject eight of 11 proposed state
constitutional amendments on November's ballot,
including proposals pushed by conservatives that
would have further restricted abortion, allowed
taxpayer funding of religious schools, capped state
revenue and put the state on record as opposed to
Obamacare.
9. The head of Florida's economic development agency
resigns amid questions about receiving jobless
benefits before he was hired by Gov. Rick Scott.
10. An obscure legislative panel approves a plan to
privatize medical care at Florida's prisons, a move
that is immediately challenged in the courts by
public employee unions.


was being attacked. Zim-
merman's father said he
had no doubts the cries
were those of his son, prov-
ing that he was acting in
self-defense.
Soon, Martin's face was
everywhere: on T-shirts, on
placards raised at protests
around the nation demand-
ing Zimmerman's arrest
and on television shows
around the world. Presi-
dent Barack Obama


weighed in on the shooting.
Thousands of protesters at
demonstrations wore hood-
ies similar to what Martin
wore when he was fatally
shot, and Rep. Bobby Rush
donned a hoodie during a
speech on the House floor
to deplore his death.
Martin's death was the
first shooting of 2012 to
raise questions about the
role of guns in U.S. society
in a year in which the mas-


associated Press
George Zimmerman sits in
court Dec. 11 at the Semi-
nole County courthouse for
a hearing in Sanford. The
shooting of Trayvon Martin
was voted the top state
news story for 2012 by
newspaper editors.

sacre of schoolchildren in
Connecticut and movie pa-
trons in Colorado have
pushed the issue to the
forefront The 44-day delay
in Zimmerman's arrest also
raised questions about race
and equal justice under the
law. Martin's parents said
Zimmerman would have
been arrested on the spot if
he had been black and Mar-
tin had been white.
Sanford police officials
said their hands were tied
in arresting Zimmerman on
the spot because of the
"stand your ground" law.
Zimmerman wasn't charged
with a crime until the in-
vestigation was transferred
to the office of Jack-
sonville's prosecutor.
Civil rights leaders Al
Sharpton, Jesse Jackson
and Ben Jealous took up
Martin's cause and talked
about shaping it into a
movement to challenge
"stand your ground" laws
around the nation.


Manatee


Festival


set for


January

Special to the Chronicle

Celebrate the manatee
Saturday and Sunday, Jan.
19 and 20, with boat tours,
crafters, marketplace ven-
dors, a fine art show, food
and a kids' area at the 26th
annual Florida Manatee
Festival.
Unique for 2013 is an op-
portunity to tour Three Sis-
ters Springs at no charge on
Saturday only This joint ef-
fort of the Florida Manatee
Festival, Friends of the
Crystal River National
Wildlife Refuge Complex
and U.S. Fish and Wildlife
will take visitors directly to
the Three Sisters Springs
for tours. As always, local
boat captains will be ready
on Saturday and Sunday to
take visitors on a 30-minute
tour around the area to view
the manatees.
The waterfront beer gar-
den will swing with the
sounds of the popular
Tampa-based Mighty Mongo
and their combination of pop
and reggae, as well as local
Cajun/Zydeco/rock favorite
Cajun Dave and the Dixie
Swingers on Saturday Sun-
day offers traditional coun-
try/bluegrass music by Bob &
Sheila Everhart and the Cen-
tral Florida Susan Smith
rock band that plays every-
thing from Aretha Franklin
to Linda Ronstadt A second
entertainment area has been
added this year in the chil-
dren's area in the park by
City Hall on the east side of
U.S. 19. Currently scheduled
in that venue are Breez,
Shazahdi, Emily Rose and
Zero Gravity
When not viewing the
friendly manatees, or listen-
ing to live music, wander
the stores on Citrus Avenue
and shop the varied selec-
tion of the many crafters
that come from near and far.
This year, an additional
wine/beer garden will be on
Citrus Avenue. Cross over
U.S. 19 and enjoy the works
of fine artists from around
the area. More than 50 local
merchants will be on hand
to discuss their services. A
children's area will feature
age-appropriate music and
other kid-friendly activities.
Plan to park at the Crystal
River Mall. A shuttle bus
will bring visitors into the
festival for $1 round trip.
Cost to enter the festival is
$3; children 12 and under
free. Boat tours are $10 per
person; children 10 and
younger free.
The Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce, the Ro-
tary Club of Crystal River,
the city of Crystal River and
Citrus County Chronicle
team up to organize this an-
nual event In 2013, the two-
day event is presented by
Crystal Automotive and
Platinum sponsor The
Tampa Bay Times. Gold
sponsors include Nature
Coast Financial Advisors
and Nature Coast Healthy
Living Magazine. Silver
sponsors include the Fox
96.3/Citrus 95.3 and Home-
town Values Magazine.
Bronze sponsors are
Florida Virtual School and
Insight Credit Union.



County BRIEFS

Free tows for
holiday revelers
Ed's Towing and Scally's
Lube and Go are again partici-
pating in the Tow to Go program
through Jan. 2. Drivers who
have consumed alcohol and run
the risk of being arrested for
drunken driving can receive a


free tow directly home by calling
Ed's Towing at 352-726-5223 or
Scally's at 352860-0550.
Those requesting the service
are advised that they can only
be towed directly home and not
to other locations.
-From staff reports






A4 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012



EATERY
Continued from Page Al

The tiny eatery got big at-
tention last week, after
owner John Sterling an-
nounced he was closing
Dec. 29. His announcement
was in response to a cita-
tion that gave him just over
a week to comply It called
for minor improvements
and the installation of an
expensive fire suppression
system over the grill.
Once the closing date was
posted on a roadside sign,
an outpouring of support
began for the family busi-
ness that started in 2001.
On Friday, Deputy Chief
of Fire Rescue Jim Good-
worth met with Sterling
about the violations. "It
went very well, we are
going to work with him and
he is working with us,"
Goodworth said. "He un-
derstands the reasons for
the codes. Our intent is not
to shut him down, but to
help him meet the code."
Goodworth said he will
return on Jan. 15, which
gives Sterling enough time



FIRE
Continued from Page Al

Due to lack of fire hy-
drants in the immediate
area, other responding
units provided water via
apparatus shuttles. Units
from Inverness, South
Kensington Avenue, Pine
Ridge, Connell Heights and
Citrus Springs arrived on
scene to provide additional
assistance. Nature Coast
EMS and Sheriff's deputies
also arrived to assist
All fire units completed
the assignment in about
two hours.
One of the residents


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


to take care of the minor is-
sues and provide a time-
frame for the installation for
a fire suppression system.
"He understood where
we are coming from," Good-
worth said. "We have an ob-
ligation once we receive a
complaint from a state reg-
ulator to investigate that.
"We will assist him in get-
ting to compliance. Keep-
ing that business compliant
is in our best interest."
Goodworth said the sys-
tems really work on grease
fires, which can spread
quickly. He said having
those systems in place is
one of the reasons they do
not have a lot of commer-
cial restaurant fires.
"It went real good," Ster-
ling said about the meet-
ing. "They gave me more
time, a little more leniency
I'll have to make it work."
"It's been insane," he
said Friday afternoon
about the number of peo-
ple stopping by "We're ex-
pecting a big crowd
Saturday"
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. com.

suffered burns while unsuc-
cessfully attempting to res-
cue two pet dogs. The dogs
died in the fire and the vic-
tim was transported to the
hospital. One vehicle at the
burned home was damaged.
Electrical service was dis-
connected to the residence
by the local power company
The American Red Cross
was requested to provide as-
sistance to the occupants.
The cause of the fire is
under investigation by the
Florida State Fire Mar-
shal's Office.
Chronicle reporter Eryn
Worthington can be con-
tacted at 352-563-5660, ext
1334, or eworthington@
chronicleonline. com.


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglaries
A residential burglary was
reported at 10:55 a.m. Thursday,
Dec. 27, in the 600 block of N.
Corbin Ave., Invemess.
A commercial burglary was
reported at 2:32 p.m. Dec. 27 in
the 1600 block of N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto.
A residential burglary was
reported at 3:24 p.m. Dec. 27 in
the 10700 block of N. CitrusAve.,
Crystal River.
A residential burglary was
reported at 3:29 a.m. Friday,
Dec. 28, in the 2900 block of S.
Coleman Ave., Homosassa.
Thefts
A petit theft was reported at
4:30 p.m. Dec. 20 in the 4500
block of S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
A petit theft was reported at
8:49 p.m. Dec. 20 in the 400
block of S. U.S. 41, Invemess.
A larceny petit theft was re-
ported at 5:05 p.m. Friday, Dec.
21, in the 6800 block of S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa.
A petit theft was reported at
11:24 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 22, in
the 200 block of South Blvd.,
Invemess.
A larceny petit theft was re-
ported at 2:16 p.m. Dec. 22 in the
9800 block of W. Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River.
A grand theft was reported
at 2:50 p.m. Dec. 22 in the 12000
block of N. Bluff Cove Path,
Dunnellon.
A grand theft was reported
at 2:59 p.m. Dec. 22 in the 6400
block of S. Tropicana Ave.,
Lecanto.
A larceny petit theft was re-
ported at4:17 p.m. Dec. 22 in the
5500 block of W. Thomas Court,
Homosassa.
A grand theft was reported
at 9:26 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 23, in
the 11700 block of N. Bluff Cove
Path, Dunnellon.


For the RECORD


ON THE NET
* For information about arrests made by the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriffcitrus.org and
click on the Public Information link, then on Arrest
Reports.
* Also under Public Information on the CCSO website,
click on Crime Mapping for a view of where each type
of crime occurs in Citrus County. Click on Offense Re-
ports to see lists of burglary, theft and vandalism.
* For the Record reports are also archived online at
www.chronicleonline.com.


A larceny petit theft was re-
ported at 3:15 p.m. Dec. 23 in the
4700 block of N. Hidden Oaks
Way, Crystal River.
A grand theft was reported
at 4:37 p.m. Dec. 23 in the 2400
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Invemess.
A grand theft was reported
at 7:13 p.m. Dec. 23 in the 800
block of N.E. 5th Ave., Crystal
River.
petit theft was reported at
2:14 p.m. Monday, Dec. 24, in
the 6800 block of S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa.
A grand theft was reported
at 4:05 p.m. Dec. 24 in the 6700
block of W. Van Buren Drive,
Homosassa.
A grand theft was reported
at 6:18 p.m. Dec. 24 in the 2400
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Invemess.
A petit theft was reported at
7:37 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 25, in
the 3100 block of S. Lee Way,
Homosassa.
A grand theft was reported
at 10:30 p.m. Dec. 25 in the 5700


block of E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness.
An auto theft was reported
at 7:02 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 27,
in the 1200 block of N.E. 5th St.,
Crystal River.
A grand theft was reported
at 8:48 a.m. Dec. 27 at Montana
Street, Beverly Hills.
A petit theft was reported at
9 a.m. Dec. 27 in the 100 block of
N. Florida Ave., Invemess.
A petit theft was reported at
4:08 p.m. Dec. 27 in the 6800
block of S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
A grand theft was reported
at 11 p.m. Dec. 27 in the 10400
block of N. Spence Ave.,
Dunnellon.
Vandalisms

A vandalism was reported at
2:27 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 18, in
the 100 block of S. Columbus
St., Beverly Hills.

A vandalism was reported at
12:29 p.m. Dec. 18 in the 800
block of S. Apopka Ave.,
Inverness.


A vandalism was reported at
2:09 p.m. Dec. 18 at Village Cen-
ter Circle, Homosassa.
A vandalism was reported at
noon Wednesday, Dec. 19, in the
200 block of S. Desoto St.,
Beverly Hills.
A vandalism was reported at
12:56 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 20, in
the 300 block ofW. Redsox Path,
Hemando.
A vandalism was reported at
1:39 p.m. Dec. 20 in the 100
block of N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal.
River.
A felony vandalism was re-
ported at 2:58 p.m. Dec. 20 in the
3700 block of E. Camelot Place,
Hemando.
A vandalism was reported at
3:51 a.m. Friday, Dec. 21, in the
600 block of N.E. U.S. 19,
Crystal River.
A vandalism was reported at
1:37 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 22, in
the 500 block of N. Citrus Ave,
Crystal River.
A vandalism was reported at
10:39 p.m. Dec. 22 in the
7800 block of N. Creek Way,
Dunnellon.
A vandalism was reported at
3:33 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 25, in
the 9200 block of E. Windwood
Loop, Invemess.
A vandalism was reported at
2:19 a.m. Wednesday, Dec. 26,
in the 3700 block of E. Foxwood
Lane, Invemess.
A vandalism was reported at
2:36 a.m. Dec. 27 in the 2600
block of W. Woodland Ridge
Drive, Lecanto.


egal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle




Self Storage

SNotices ......................... C 13


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
) PR LO PR | HI Li
NA -INA NA NA kN ,63 31
NA k


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
pc
ts
ts
pc
ts
pc
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
T.illiuIi : e
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
ts
ts
pc
ts
pc
ts
ts
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


HI LO PR HI LO PR
68 34 0.00 68 38 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Ecusive daily
forecast by:


TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 70 Low: 33
-- Line of showers passes; windy and
drier afternoon
... SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 58 Low: 39
Sunny but cniiI,

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 70 Low: 46
Mostly sunny

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 70/35
Record 83/25
Normal 71/43
Mean temp. 53
Departure from mean -4
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 2.30 in.
Total for the year 61.31 in.
Normal for the year 51.56 in.
*As of 7 p.m. at inverness
UV INDEX: 3
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 29.99 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 32
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, Maple, Oak
Today's count: 0.5/12
Sunday's count: 5.6
Monday's count: 7.7
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


40

2%


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
12/29 SATURDAY 5:49 -6:13 12:01
12/30 SUNDAY 6:39 12:28 7:03 12:51
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT ..................5:42 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:23 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY........................... 7:07 PM.
JAN. 4 JAl. 11 JAN. 18 JAN. 26 MOONSET TODAY ............................ 8:03 AM.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. S.:.- ni,-,. n pl% -i".-:" iri ,, q'.'.r1 1 ,:.r ,. ii.:.rnl
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 5:24 a/1:34 a 7:01 p/2:18 p
Crystal River" 3:45 a/11:40 a 5:22 p/11:34 p
Withlacoochee* 1:32 a/9:28 a 3:09 p/9:22 p
Homosassa** 4:34 a/12:33 a 6:11 p/1:17 p


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
6:01 a/2:12 a 7:30 p/2:49 p
4:22 a/12:11 p 5:51 p/-
2:09 a/9:59 a 3:38 p/10:00 p
5:11 a/1:11 a 6:40 p/1:48 p


Southwest winds from 15 to 20 knots.
Seas 3 to 5 feet. Bay and inland
waters will be choppy. Mostly cloudy
with a chance of showers and thun-
derstorms today.


Gulf water
temperature



62
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 29.00 28.96 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.23 38.22 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.26 39.25 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.62 40.61 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION

20S Billing !


S .
__o ,n_ -- -- i e





:-<,. ElPaao D W ---- A2" 1
60s i Merrople.
-.., U 4 1'


10 '
20s .*



City

City


o 50s .l '


84/60


80s



Friday Saturday
H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany 31 23 sn 31 19
Albuquerque 37 22 s 40 27
Asheville 45 26 rs 46 24
Atlanta 50 31 pc 48 29
Atlantic City 43 27 sh 42 29
Austin 63 40 01 s 52 29
Baltimore 42 31 rs 37 29
Billings 28 19 pc 34 15
Birmingham 46 32 14 s 45 26
Boise 37 21 fg 34 17
Boston 37 28 sn 34 26
Buffalo 28 21 .01 sn 30 23
Burington, VT 28 19 .07 sn 26 15
Charleston, SC 58 33 ts 62 37
Charleston, WV 41 30 rs 40 27
Charlotte 45 29 pc 53 31
Chicago 32 29 .01 pc 32 22
Cincinnati 35 25 pc 33 22
Cleveland 31 21 sn 32 27
Columbia, SC 52 32 pc 55 31
Columbus, OH 34 24 sn 31 23
Concord, N.H. 32 24 sn 30 17
Dallas 43 36 .03 s 44 28
Denver 32 9 .01 pc 36 14
Des Moines 29 25 .05 s 21 5
Detroit 30 13 trace sn 31 22
El Paso 49 32 s 52 32
Evansville, IN 38 29 pc 34 19
Harrisburg 38 30 sn 31 25
Hartford 36 28 sn 32 23
Houston 60 50 .12 s 57 32
Indianapolis 31 28 pc 31 18
Jackson 55 41 1.03 s 47 25
Las Vegas 50 32 pc 49 34
Little Rock 36 33 .34 s 40 24
Los Angeles 62 45 sh 63 48
Louisville 38 32 pc 31 21
Memphis 43 35 .58 s 39 24
Milwaukee 33 28 .01 pc 32 15
Minneapolis 26 19 .06 pc 20 7
Mobile 63 39 01 pc 52 27
Montgomery 58 30 s 50 28
Nashville 39 33 12 pc 35 24
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


City
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Palm Springs
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, Ore
Providence, R.I.
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Rochester, NY
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Ste. Marie
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Savannah
Seattle
Spokane
Syracuse
Topeka
Washington


Friday Saturday
H LPcp. Fcst H L


70 51
37 30
44 36
33 26
23 19
62 41
42 32
51 38
32 26
37 25
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30 17
28 23
48 31
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18 6 tr
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71 46
63 45
50 41
57 31
47 38 tr
31 27
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45 36


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39 30


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 82 Marathon, Fla. LOW-17 Pine Ridge,
S.D.
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 90/73/s Madrid
Amsterdam 51/44/pc Mexico City
Athens 60/48/sh Montreal
Beijing 24/5/s Moscow
Berlin 41/32/c Paris
Bermuda 69/66/c Rio
Cairo 67/53/s Rome
Calgary 27/13/pc Sydney
Havana 84/71/pc Tokyo
Hong Kong 73/49/sh Toronto
Jerusalem 59/46/pc Warsaw


59/50/sh
52/40/r
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23/18/pc
25/20/sf
52/39/pc
85/76/ts
53/41/s
76/64/pc
54/42/sh
25/17/sn
33/31/c


C I T R U S


C U N TY


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


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CIRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Elva 'Tootie'
Colasanti, 86
INVERNESS
Elva G. "Tootie" Cola-
santi, 86, of Inverness, Fla.,
and formerly of Weymouth,
Mass., passed away Wednes-
day, Dec. 26,2012, in the lov-
ing care of her family,
Hospice of Citrus County
and the -
wonderful i
staff who .
cared for
her at Arbor
Trails Nurs-
ing Home.
Elva was
born Oct. 9,
1926, in Elva
Everett, Colasanti
Mass., to
Edith and George Lemieux.
She is survived by her hus-
band of 64 years, Albert P
Colasanti Sr; five children,
Linda Federico (Michael) of
Rockland, Mass., Donna
Hancsarik (Robert) of John-
ston, R.I., John Colasanti
(Susan) of Lecanto, Fla., Al-
bert Jr Colasanti (Pamela)
of Jensen Beach, Fla., and
Doreen Budd (Lamar), of In-
verness, Fla.; 17 grandchil-
dren; 11 great-
grandchildren; her brother,
Arthur Lemieux of Inver-
ness, Fla.; and her sister,
Edith Hatfield of Alabama.
She was preceded in death
by her brothers, George and
Malcolm Lemieux and sis-
ters, Clara Daru and Lillian
Shaw.
Elva worked as a head
teller at East Weymouth
Savings Bank, Mass., for
many years before moving
to Florida in 1977. She was
employed at First Federal
Savings and Loan in Inver-
ness until retirement in
1988. For many years, Al and
Tootie enjoyed spending
their evenings at Whisper-
ing Pines Park supporting
and cheering for the many
adult softball games played
there. She was such a fan
that when one time one of
the teams was short a player
they asked Tootie if she
wanted to fill in and she did
- in right field! She was a
devoted and much loved
wife, mother, grandmother
and great-grandmother and
will be missed by all for the
way she touched their lives
with her friendly, good-na-
tured personality and infec-
tious smile.
Funeral services will be
conducted Monday, Dec. 31,
at 10:30 a.m. from the Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home of
Inverness. Entombment will
follow in The Fountains
Cemetery Mausoleum.
Reposing hours will be Sun-
day from 3 to 5 p.m. at Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home. In
lieu of flowers, the family
requests donations be made
to Hospice of Citrus County
or to the Alzheimer's
Association.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.


Harry
Carey Jr., 91
CHARACTER
ACTOR
LOS ANGELES Harry
Carey Jr, a character actor
who starred in such West-
erns as "3 Godfathers" and
"Wagon
Master," has
died. He
was 91.
H i s
daughter,
Melinda
Carey, said
he died
Thursday of
natural Harry
causes sur- Carey Jr.
rounded by
family at a hospice facility
in Santa Barbara, Calif.
"He went out as grace-
fully as he came in," she
said Friday
Carey's career spanned
more than 50 years and in-
cluded such John Ford clas-
sics as "She Wore a Yellow
Ribbon," "The Searchers"
and "The Long Gray Line."
Later in life, he appeared in
the movies "Gremlins" and
"Back to the Future Part
III."
His memoir, "Company of
Heroes: My Life as an Actor
in the John Ford Stock Com-
pany," was published in
1994.
Carey was the son of
silent-film Western star
Harry Carey Sr. and actress
Olive Carey He was born on
May 16, 1921, on his family's
ranch and graduated from
Hollywood's Black-Foxe
Military Institute.
During World War II, he


SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Obituaries must be
verified with the funeral
home or society in
charge of the
arrangements.

Bonnie Pigg, 62
CHARLOTTE, N.C.
Bonnie Pope Pigg, 62, of
Charlotte, N.C., died
Wednesday, Dec. 26, 2012, at
home.
A memorial service will
be at 4 p.m. Saturday, Dec.
29, 2012, in the chapel at
Wilson Funeral and Crema-
tion Service, 5301 Albe-
marle Road, Charlotte, N.C.

Morgan
Tynes Sr., 75
FLORAL CITY
Morgan R. Tynes Sr, 75,
Floral City, died Thursday,
Dec. 27,2012.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is as-
sisting the family with pri-
vate arrangements.

Margaret
Waters, 85
INVERNESS
Margaret S. Waters, 85, of
Inverness, Fla., died Mon-
day, Dec. 24, 2012, at Hos-
pice of Citrus County in
Lecanto. Margaret was born
June 19, 1927, in Detroit,
Mich., the daughter of
Joseph and Mary Barbarich.
She was a homemaker. Mar-
garet moved to Inverness in
1987 from Detroit. She was a
member of Our Lady of Fa-
tima Catholic Church in
Inverness.
Margaret was preceded in
death by her son, Gregory
Waters. Survivors include
her husband of 66 years,
Jerry A. Waters of Inver-
ness; daughters, Susan Wa-
ters of Long Beach, Calif.,
and Donna Rasin-Waters of
Brooklyn, N.Y.
The family will receive
friends from 2 to 4 p.m. Sun-
day, Dec. 30, 2012, at Heinz
Funeral Home with a Vigil
Service at 2 p.m. A funeral
Mass for Mrs. Waters will be
at 10 a.m. Monday, Dec. 31,
2012, at Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church in Inver-
ness. Interment will be at
11:30 a.m. Monday, Dec. 31,
2012, at Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell.
Heinz Funeral Home & Cre-
mation, Inverness, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.


served in the Navy and
worked with Ford on films
for the Navy.
He is survived by his wife,
a son, two daughters, three
grandchildren and two
great-grandchildren.

Jean Harris, 89
DOCTOR KILLER
NEW HAVEN, Conn. -
Jean Harris, who spent 12
years in prison for killing
the "Scarsdale Diet" doctor
in a lovers' quarrel, has died
at age 89.
Her son James said Har-
ris died
Sunday at
an assisted-
living facil-
ity in New
Haven,
Conn.
Harris
had claimed
it was an ac-
cidentwhen Jean Harris
she shot her
longtime lover, Dr. Herman
Tarnower, in 1980. She said
she had really intended to
confront him over his wom-
anizing and then kill her-
self.
But she was convicted of
murder in 1981 and sen-
tenced to 15 years to life.
She was granted clemency
in 1992 after suffering two
heart attacks in prison.
She had been head-
mistress of the fashionable
Madeira School for girls in
Virginia. The 69-year-old
Tarnower had developed
the famous Scarsdale Diet
of the 1970s and sold mil-
lions of books.


-From wire reports


Black gold boom


Trains carry

more oil

across US

Associated Press

BILLINGS, Mont En-
ergy companies behind the
oil boom on the Northern
Plains are increasingly turn-
ing to an industrial-age
workhorse -the locomotive
- to move their crude to re-
fineries across the U.S., as
plans for new pipelines stall
and existing lines can't keep
up with demand.
Delivering oil thousands
of miles by rail from the
heartland to refineries on
the East, West and Gulf
coasts costs more, but it can
mean increased profits -up
to $10 or more a barrel -be-
cause of higher oil prices on
the coasts. That works out to
roughly $700,000 per train.
The parade of mile-long
trains carrying hazardous
material out of North Dakota
and Montana and across the
country has experts and fed-
eral regulators concerned.
Rail transport is less safe
than pipelines, they say, and
the proliferation of oil trains
raises the risk of a major de-
railment and spill.
Since 2009, the number of
train cars carrying crude
hauled by major railroads
has jumped from about
10,000 a year to a projected
200,000 in 2012. Much of it
has been in the Northern
Plains' Bakken crude patch,
but companies say oil trains
are rolling or will be soon
from Texas, Colorado and
western Canada.
"This is all occurring very
rapidly, and history teaches
that when those things hap-
pen, unfortunately, the next
thing that is going to occur
would be some sort of disas-
ter," said Jim Hall, a trans-
portation consultant and
former chairman of the Na-
tional Transportation Safety
Board.
Rail companies said the
industry places a priority on
safety and has invested
heavily in track upgrades,
provided emergency train-
ing and taken other meas-
ures to guard against
accidents. There have been
no major oil train derail-
ments from the Bakken, ac-
cording to federal
regulators.
Union Pacific Railroad
CEO Jack Koraleski said
hauling oil out of places
like North Dakota will be a
long-term business for rail-
roads because trains are
faster than pipelines, reli-
able and offer a variety of
destinations.
"The railroads are look-
ing at this as a unique op-
portunity, a game-changing
opportunity for their busi-
ness," said Jeffery Elliot, a


Associated Press
Tractor-trailers line up for two miles Nov. 17 as they wait to
unload oil in Trenton, N.D. Energy companies behind the oil
boom on the Northern Plains are increasingly turning to an
industrial-age workhorse the locomotive to move their
crude to refineries across the U.S., as plans for new
pipelines stall and existing lines can't keep up with demand.


rail expert with the New
York-based consulting firm
Oliver Wyman.
BNSF Railway Co., the
prime player in the Bakken,
has bolstered its oil train ca-
pacity to a million barrels a
day and expects that figure
to increase further. To ac-
commodate the growth, in
part, the railroad is sinking
$197 million into track up-
grades and other improve-
ments in Montana and
North Dakota.
BNSF is also increasing
train sizes, from 100 oil cars
per train to as many as 118.
Larger trains are harder to
control, and that increases
the chances of something
going wrong, safety experts
said. State and local emer-
gency officials worry about a
derailment in a population
center or an environmen-
tally sensitive area such as a
river crossing.
Rail accidents occur 34
times more frequently than
pipeline ones for every ton
of crude or other hazardous
material shipped compara-
ble distances, according to a
recent study by the Manhat-
tan Institute, a conservative
think tank The Association
of American Railroads con-
tends the study was flawed
but acknowledges the likeli-
hood of a rail accident is
double or triple the chance
of a pipeline problem.
The environmental fears
carry an ironic twist: Oil
trains are gaining popular-

lA&. baull
Funeral Home With Crematory
MARGIE OWINGS
Graveside Service: Sat. 11:00 AM
Oak Ridge
ELVA COLASANTI
Viewing: Sun. 3 5:00 PM
Service: Monday 10:30 AM
Entombment: The Fountains
WILLIAM ANDERSON
Viewing: Sun. 35:00 PM
Service: Monday 2:00 PM
Burial: Hills of Rest
MORGAN TYNES
Private Arrangements
HERMAN ROESCH
Gathering: Sat.,Jan. 12 10:00 AM
726-8323 ...DGKD


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("In Memoy" ad, "Your Trusted Family-Owned
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Saralynne
Miller
at 564-2917
scmiller@chronicleonline.com
l iai 'CI


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Funeral Directors
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1901 SE Hwy. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


ity in part because of a short-
age of pipeline capacity a
problem that has been wors-
ened by environmental op-
position to such projects as
TransCanada's stalled Key-
stone XL pipeline. That
project would carry Bakken
and Canadian crude to the
Gulf of Mexico.
Wayde Schafer, a North
Dakota spokesman for the
Sierra Club, described rail
as "the greater of two evils"
because trains pass
through cities, over water-
ways and through wetlands
that pipelines can be built
to avoid.
"It's an accident waiting to
happen. It's going to be a
mess and we don't know
where that mess is going to
be," Schafer said.
For oil companies, the
embrace of rail is a matter of
expediency Oil-loading rail
terminals can be built in a
matter of months, versus
three to five years for
pipelines to clear regulatory
hurdles and be put into serv-








DIGNIY & oRSPEC


ice, said Justin Kringstad of
the North Dakota Pipeline
Authority Although more
pipelines are in the works,
he said moving oil by rail
will continue.
The surge comes at the
right time for railroads: Coal
shipments a mainstay of
the rail industry have suf-
fered because of competi-
tion from cheap natural gas.
In the eastern U.S., CSX
and Norfolk Southern rail-
roads haven't seen as much
growth because oil from the
Marcellus Shale area of
Pennsylvania, Ohio and
New York is close enough to
refineries that trucks haul
the crude.
Yet BNSF is beginning to
haul Bakken crude east to
Chicago, where it hands off
the tank cars to CSX or Nor-
folk Southern for delivery
to Eastern refineries. It has
also sent oil to the West
Coast, a trend that could in-
crease if Alaska crude pro-
duction falters, as some
industry observers are
predicting.
The growth will require
significant upgrades to al-
ready congested rail lines,
industry analysts said.
Overall, crude oil ship-
ments still represent less
than 1 percent of all car-
loads. And there are far
more dangerous materials
aboard the nation's trains,
including explosives, poi-
sonous gases and other in-
dustrial chemicals.
But emergency officials
are increasingly wary of
major accidents involving
oil trains, which carry far
more cargo than some other
hazardous-material trains.
While oil is not as volatile
as some other products, a
rupture of just one car can
spill 20,000 to 30,000 gal-
lons, said Sheldon Lustig, a
rail expert who consults
with local governments on
accidents and hazardous
materials.

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Obituaries


S Deaths ELSEWHERE


Citrus KIA would like to
recognize and congratulate
Mr. Joe Slater
as their
Salesperson of the Year.

Joe has earned this honor for his
outstanding performance. He is a six-year
dedicated and loyal employee, not only to
Citrus KIA, but to all of his repeat and new
customers. He is a very knowledgeable,
experienced and exciting salesman.

Joe would like to take this opportunity to
thank Citrus KIA and all of his loyal
customers that have taken part and helped
him achieve this honor. He would like to
invite everyone to come by and see for
themselves why he believes that
Citrus KIA, their staff, and their entire
top-of-the-line inventory speaks for itself.

Come by and ask for Joe and say hello!

1850 S.E. Hwy. 19 Crystal River, FL

CitrusAKi 352-564-8668
rhe Power to Surprise HOURS: Mon- Fri: 900m 7:00pm 7 Sat 9:00am 6:00pm Sunday Noon 5:00pm


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012 A5












AH S D E 0KSTYINR)VCHROIC


I HowTKs *I '1,H"TI f i W


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 1245315 11.36 -.11 CheniereEn 37301 18.25 -.32 Facebookn 556859 25.91 -.14 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
S&P500ETF1224378140.03 -1.53 NAPallg 29353 1.31 +.08 SiriusXM 329676 2.89 -.01 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
FordM 944323 12.87 +.11 Vringo 20058 2.66 -.11 PwShsQQQ305931 63.78 -.62 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
iShEMkts 404235 43.70 +.16 YMBiog 18960 2.87 ... RschMotn 286196 11.79 +.03 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
NokiaCp 396330 3.81 -.19 NovaGldg 15262 4.45 +.02 Microsoft 276786 26.55 -.41 Chg: Loss or gain for the day No change indicated by.

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempbon by company, d- New 52-week
low. dd Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the Amencan Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus Ilst-
PrUVxSTrs 27.54 +2.51 +10.0 MexcoEn 6.22 +.88 +16.4 Tri-Tech 2.78 +.96 +52.7 ng qualification n- Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low fig-
BarcShtC 17.52 +1.42 +8.8 FieldPnt 3.85 +.43 +12.6 vjAmpal rs 3.02 +.62 +25.8 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferred stock Issue. pr- Preferences. pp-
CSVS2xVxrsl2.09 +.96 +8.6 NTS RIty 7.15 +.55 +8.3 Yongye 5.71 +.75 +15.1 Holder owes Installments of purchase pnce. rt- Right to buy security at a specified pnce. s-
Towerlntl 8.07 +.63 +8.5 MastchH s 5.11 +.36 +7.6 AEtern grs 2.47 +.30 +13.8 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi -Trades will be settled when the
CSVLgCppr44.74 +3.44 +8.3 PyramidOil 4.10 +.29 +7.5 Oxigene rs 5.29 +.63 +13.6 stock is issued. wd When distributed, wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
BiP GCrb 7.83 -1.37 -14.9 Crexendo 2.73 -.26 -8.7 PlumasBc 3.04 -.75 -19.8
AmbwEd 2.52 -.32 -11.3 InvCapHId 3.76 -.26 -6.5 RoyaleEn 2.45 -.53 -17.8 I
QksilvRes 2.73 -.23 -7.8 MGTCap rs 3.83 -.26 -6.5 BOS Ltd rs 4.32 -.53 -10.9


NavistrpfD 7.02 -.58 -7.6 RareEleg 3.18 -.22 -6.5 SecNtllf 8.63 -.96 -10.0
PetroArgs 4.84 -.36 -6.9 NHItcrpfA 14.63 -.97 -6.2 Omeros 5.32 -.52 -8.9


970 Advanced
2,086 Declined
102 Unchanged
3,158 Total issues
40 New Highs
27 New Lows
2,384,024,387 Volume


DIARY


182 Advanced
249 Declined
40 Unchanged
471 Total issues
4 New Highs
9 New Lows
64,541,994 Volume


832
1,638
117
2,587
25
29
1,127,350,575


52-Week
High Low Name
13,661.72 12,035.09Dow Jones Industrials
5,390.11 4,795.28Dow Jones Transportation
499.82 435.57Dow Jones Utilities
8,519.14 7,222.88NYSE Composite
2,509.57 2,164.87Amex Index
3,196.93 2,586.85Nasdaq Composite
1,474.51 1,248.64S&P500
15,432.54 13,092.13Wilshire 5000
868.50 729.75Russell 2000


Last
12,938.11
5,220.98
446.70
8,316.17
2,324.06
2,960.31
1,402.43
14,741.91
832.10


I NYSE


Net % YTD % 52-wk
Chg Chg Chg %Chg
-158.20 -1.21 +5.90 +5.90
-44.72 -.85 +4.01 +4.01
-4.28 -.95 -3.87 -3.87
-83.66 -1.00+11.22+11.22
-17.01 -.73 +2.01 +2.01
-25.60 -.86 +13.63+13.63
-15.67 -1.11+11.52+11.52
-146.55 -.98+11.77+11.77
-5.30 -.63+12.31 +12.31


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BallCorp 44.29 -.35
BoBradpf 17.18 -.10
BmSantSA 7.92 -.13
BmSBrasil 7.23 +.05
ABB Ltd 20.49 -.30 BkofAm 11.36 -.11
ACE Ltd 78.97 -.65 BMontg 60.99 -.22
ADTCpn 45.35 -.88 BkNYMel 25.42 -.23
AESCorp 10.51 -.13 Barday 16.75 -.45
AFLAC 52.25 -.76 BariPVixrs 35.43 +1.72
AGLRes 39.68 -.25 BarnesNob 14.97 +.62
AK Steel 4.30 -.08 BarrickG 34.01 -.25
AOL 29.43 -.37 Baxter 65.59 -.94
ASAGold 21.23 -.06 Beam Inc 60.05 -.89
AT&T Inc 33.32 -.34 BeazerHrs 16.26 -.33
AbtLab 64.42 -.63 BectDck 77.34 -.94
AbtLabwi 30.00 -.18 BerkHaA133000.00-900.00
AbbViewi 34.52 -.45 BerkH B 88.55 -.67
AberFitc 45.76 -.40 BestBuy 11.29 -.22
Accenture 65.66 -.56 BioMedR 19.22 -.14
AcftveNet 4.80 +.10 BIkHillsCp 35.76 -.23
AdamsEx 10.49 -.06 BlkDebtStr 4.25 +.05
AMD 2.28 -.11 BlkEnhC&l 12.27 -.09
Aeropost 12.58 BIkGlbOp 12.97 -.06
Aetna 45.56 -.68 Blackstone 15.25 -.08
Agilent 39.83 -.81 BlockHR 18.24 -.23
Agniog 50.68 -.17 Boeing 74.69 -1.14
AlcatelLuc 1.35 -.05 BorgWarn 70.05 -.42
Alma 8.50 -.12 BostBeer 132.98 -1.87
AllegTch 29.17 -.54 BostProp 104.94 -.73
Allete 40.27 -.37 BostonSci 5.58 -.12
AlliBGlbHi 15.74 BoydGm 6.53 -.13
AlliBlnco 8.13 +.01 Brandyw 12.07 -.05
AlliBern 17.48 +.53 BrMySq 31.90 -.24
Allstate 39.86 -.27 BrkfidAsg 36.17 -.12
AlphaNRs 9.27 -.05 Brunswidc 27.49 +.04
AlpTotDiv 4.01 -.01 Budckeye 45.00
AIpAlerMLP 15.81 +.04 BurgerKn 16.23 -.30
Altria 31.09 -.31 CBLAsC 20.83 -.02
AmBev 41.97 +.04 CBREGrp 19.39 -.20
Ameren 30.32 -.27 CBS B 36.85 -.43
AMovilL 22.93 +.08 CHEngy 65.11 -.08
AmAxle 10.88 +.13 CMS Eng 24.05 -.19
AEagleOut 19.85 +.15 CNOFind 9.08 -.08
AEP 42.21 -.43 CSS Inds 21.23 +.51
AEqlnvLf 11.87 +.04 CSX 19.43 -.19
AmExp 56.67 -.02 CVR Engy 47.68 -.52
AmlntGrp 34.58 -.39 CVSCare 47.92 -.48
AmSIP3 7.55 ... CYS Invest 11.79 +.03
AmTower 75.89 -.40 CblvsnNY 14.73 -.09
Amerigas 38.63 +.22 CabotOGs 48.83 -.92
Ameriprise 62.19 -.38 CallGolf 6.32
AmeriBrgn 42.82 -.41 Calpine 17.75 -.24
Anadarko 72.31 -1.46 Camecog 19.27 -.35
AnglogldA 30.66 -.29 Cameron 54.18 -.63
ABlnBev 86.81 -1.15 CampSp 34.56 -.31
Ann Inc 32.25 +.14 CdnNRsgs 28.47 -.16
Annaly 14.01 -.10 CapOne 57.10 -.25
Anworth 5.74 -.03 CapifiSrce 7.48 -.04
Aonplc 55.50 -.68 CapMplB 14.28 -.02
Apache 77.05 -1.19 CapsteadM 11.40 +.01
AquaAm 25.10 -.11 CardnlHlth 40.72 -.35
ArcelorMit 16.84 -.38 CareFusion 28.34 -.16
ArchCoal 7.02 -.15 CarMax 36.69 -.60
ArchDan 27.06 -.43 Carnival 36.03 -.67
AromsDor 11.95 +.12 Caterpillar 86.81 -.85
ArmourRsd 6.47 -.06 Celanese 43.28 -.68
Ashland 79.06 -.52 Cemex 9.68 -.05
AsdEstat 15.95 -.10 Cemigpfs 10.80 -.14
AstaZen 46.88 -.29 CenterPnt 19.00 -.05
ATMOS 34.63 -.32 CenEIBras 3.06 +.05
AuRicog 7.78 -.16 Cntyink 38.56 -.40
Avon 13.98 -.16 Checkpnt 10.44 -.06
BB&TCp 28.85 -.21 ChesEg 16.56 -.30
BHP BiILt 76.86 -.23 ChesUfi 44.35 -.52
BP PLC 41.22 -.40 Chevron 106.45 -2.07
BPZRes 2.90 -.13 ChicB&l 44.70 -1.00
BRFBrasil 20.64 -.19 Chios 17.91 +.04
BRT 6.50 +.03 Chimera 2.59 -.05
BakrHu 39.93 -.14 ChinaMble 58.25 -.06


Cigna 52.85 -.81
CindBell 5.25 -.07
Cifgroup 39.01 -.24
CleanHarb 52.49 +.20
CliffsNRs 35.58 -.46
Clorox 72.66 -.43
Coach 54.30 -.56
CobaltlEn 24.01 -.51
CCFemsa 146.88 +.57
CocaColas 35.97 -.45
CocaCE 31.29 -.31
Coeur 23.68 -.21
CohStlnfra 18.18 +.08
ColgPal 104.04 -1.23
Comerica 30.13 -.04
CmwREIT 15.74 -.02
CompSci 39.04 -.20
Con-Way 27.50 -.56
ConAgra 29.20 -.19
ConchoRes 78.87 +.72
ConocPhils 57.07 -.83
ConsolEngy 31.76 -.46
ConEd 54.93 -.49
ConstellA 34.37 -.47
ContlRes 70.82 -1.67
Cnvrgys 16.03 -.20
Corning 12.47 -.11
CosanLtd 17.13 -.13
CottCp 7.90 -.08
Covidien 56.31 -1.04
Crane 45.47 -.57
CSVellVSt 15.70 -.88
CSVS2xVxrsl12.09 +.96
Cummins 105.82 -.98

nDT inrl 644 A -0


DDRCorp 15.43
DNP Selct 9.01
DR Horton 19.24
DSWInc 64.31
DTE 59.41
DanaHldg 15.09
Danaher 55.02
Darden 44.44
DeanFds 16.12
Deere 84.55
DelphiAuto 37.72
DeltaAir 11.50
DenburyR 15.60
DevonE 51.15
DiaOffs 67.23
DiamRk 8.84
DicksSptg 45.05
DrxFnBull 115.57
DirSCBear 14.39
DirFnBear 15.69
DirSPBear 17.85
DirDGIdBII 10.05
DrxEnBear 8.36
DirEMBear 9.45
DirxSCBull 60.15
DirxEnBull 45.68
Discover 37.99
Disney 49.15
DollarGen 42.70
DomRescs 51.08
DowChm 31.62
DuPont 44.71
DukeEnrs 63.01
DukeRlty 13.74
EMCCp 24.83
EOGRes 118.61
EQT Corp 58.13
EastChem 66.05
Eaton 53.09
EVEnEq 10.49
EVTxMGlo 8.70
Edisonlnt 44.77


Ban 10.04
BdorGldg 12.55
EmersonEl 52.14
EmpDist 20.13
EnbrdgEPt 27.79
EnCanag 19.59
EngyTsfr 42.48
Enerplsg 12.51
EnPro 40.13
ENSCO 57.61
Entergy 62.58
EntPrPt 49.25
EqtyRsd 55.90


GabelliET 5.47
GabHlthW 8.55
GabUl 6.08
GaisaSA 4.58
GameStop 24.53
Gannett 17.61
Gap 30.43
GenDynam 67.88
GenElec 20.44
GenGrPrp 19.68
GenMills 40.06
GenMotors 27.85
Genworth 7.22


Heckmann 3.84 -.08
HeclaM 5.63 -.13
Heinz 57.22 -.64
Herbalife 29.39 +1.09
Hersha 4.93 -.06
Hertz 15.82 -.21
Hess 51.28 -1.17
HewlettP 13.68 -.36
HighwdPrp 33.21 -.24
HollyFront 44.76 -.97
HomeDp 60.65 -.42
Honwlllni 62.92 -.82
HospPT 22.97 -.07


iShB1-3T 84.42
iS Eafe 56.01
iShiBxHYB 92.95
iSR1KV 71.54
iSR1KG 64.28
iSR2KV 73.98
iSR2KG 93.36
iShR2K 82.53
iShUSPfd 39.51
iSRus3K 83.09
iShREst 64.08
iShDJHm 20.60
iStar 7.98


I- I I
C I T R U S .. I


www.chronicleonline.com






EKZ Pay










563-5655


ay var at's t v in
*Charge may vary at first transaction and at each vacation start.


EsteeLdrs 57.93 -.52
ExoRes 6.88 -.11
Exelon 29.06 -.38
ExxonMbl 85.10 -1.76
FMCTech 40.81 -.37
FamilyDIr 62.70 +.21
FedExCp 90.39 -1.11
FedSignl 7.45 -.04
Fedlnvst 19.84 -.10
Ferrellgs 16.88 -.18
Ferro 4.24 +.09
RdlNRn 23.51 -.18
FidNatlnfo 34.26 -.32
FstHorizon 9.77 -.05
FMajSilvg 19.58 -.53
FTActDiv 7.39 -.04
FtTrEnEq 11.60 -.11
FirstEgy 41.18 -.47
Ruor 57.23 -.97
FootLodkr 31.80 -.15
FordM 12.87 +.11
ForestLab 34.84 +.02
ForestOil 6.38 -.23
Fortess 4.34 -.04
FBHmSec 28.85 -.28
FranceTel 10.83 -.25
FMCG 33.14 -.54
Fronfline 3.19 -.15
Fusion-io 22.04 -.09

GATX 42.53 -.43
GNC 32.60 -.04


GeoGrp 27.89
GaGulf 40.08
Gerdau 8.84
GlaxoSKln 43.23
GolLinhas 6.29
GoldFLd 12.15
Goldarpg 35.59
GoldmanS 125.52
Graffech 9.05
GtPlainEn 20.02
Griffon 10.70
GpFSnMxn 16.03
GuangRy 19.43
Guess 24.17
HCAHIdg 30.14
HCP Inc 44.84
HSBC 52.54
HSBCCap 25.50
HalconRrs 6.84
Hallibrth 34.01
HanJS 16.16
HanPrmDv 13.38
Hanesbrds 34.98
Hanoverlns 38.22
HarleyD 47.27
HarmonyG 8.63
HartfdFn 22.16
HatterasF 24.67
HawaiiEl 24.76
Headwats 8.36
HItCrREIT 60.83
HItMgmt 8.96
HlthcrRlty 23.79


HostHofs 15.38
HovnanE 6.72
Humana 67.51
Huntsmn 15.62
Hyperdyn .59
IAMGIdg 11.03
ICICIBk 43.48
ING 9.17
iShGold 16.13
iSAsfia 24.69
iShBraz 55.26
iSCan 28.00
iShEMU 32.72
iShGer 24.26
iShHK 19.19
iShJapn 9.67
iSh Kor 62.26
iSMalas 14.90
iShMex 69.43
iShSing 13.59
iSPacxJpn 46.40
iSTaiwn 13.42
iSh UK 17.66
iShSilver 29.10
iShS&P100 63.63
iShDJDv 56.41
iShChina25 39.55
iSCorSP500140.64
iShCorTBd 111.28
iShEMkts 43.70
iShiBxB 121.63
iSSPGth 74.39
iShB20T 123.31


Idacorp 42.38 -.59
ITW 60.02 -.67
Imafon 4.44 -.10
ImaxCorp 21.76 +.17
Infosys 41.79 +.09
IngerRd 46.88 -.20
IntegrysE 51.61 -.62
IntcnfEx 123.66 -.56
IBM 189.83 -2.88
InfiGame 13.65 -.08
IntPap 38.91 -.71
Interpublic 10.78 -.05
Invesco 25.78 -.19
InvMtgCap 19.69
IronMth 30.68 -.25
ItauUnibH 16.23 -.05

JPMorgCh 43.24 -.39
JPMAJerian 37.92 +.12
Jabil 18.61 -.56
Jaguar g .61 -.02
JanusCap 8.39 +.02
Jefferies 18.42 -.10
JohnJn 69.48 -.61
JohnsnCfi 30.11 -.27
JoyGIbl 61.48 -.72
JnprNtwk 19.38 -.41
KB Home 15.37 +.06
KKR 14.70 +.06
KCSouthn 82.06 -.34
Kaydons 23.58 -.19
KAEngTR 24.10 -.17


Kellogg 55.33 -.41 MidAApt 64.33 -.31 PepsiCo 68.02 -.65 RobtHalf 31.44 -.23
KeyEngy 6.68 -.20 MitsuUFJ 5.29 +.01 Prmian 12.15 -.10 RockwAut 82.02 -.72
Keycorp 8.35 -.07 MobileTele 18.64 +.18 PetrbrsA 18.98 -.13 RockColl 57.51 -.63
KimbClk 83.13 -.80 Molyorp 9.15 -.15 Petrobras 19.07 -.19 RylCarb 33.23 -.39
Kimco 19.05 -.17 MoneyGrm 12.84 +.03 Pfizer 24.89 -.25 RoyDShllA 68.50 -1.03
KindME 78.23 +.17 Monsanto 93.08 -.91 PhilipMor 82.65 -1.12 Roce 1321 -.06
KindMorg 34.62 -.15 MonstrWw 5.37 -.22 Phillips66n 50.57 -.99
Kinrossg 9.42 -.12 MorgStan 18.62 -.15 PiedNG 30.72 -.22
KnghtCap 3.49 +.02 MSEmMkt 15.24 +.07 PimoStrat 11.09 -.04 SAIC 11.09 -.01
KodiakOg 8.55 -.14 Mosaic 55.21 -.94 PinWst 50.52 -.51 SCANA 45.10 -.52
Kohls 42.28 -.26 MotrlaSolu 54.08 -.80 PioNtrl 102.41 -2.54 SKTIcm 15.70 +.04
KoreaElc 13.94 +.32 MurphO 58.48 -.99 PitnyBw 10.41 -.11 SpdrDJIA 129.07 -1.53
KrispKrm 9.25 +.03 NCRCorp 24.99 -.06 PlainsAAs 44.53 -.05 SpdrGold 160.54 -.62
Kroger 25.68 -.28 NRGEgy 22.59 -.34 PlainsEx 46.07 -.30 SPMid 182.73 -1.12
LDKSolar 1.35 +.13 NVEnergy 17.98 -.20 PlumCrk 43.86 -.53 S&P500ETF140.03 -1.53
LGDisplay 14.27 +.12 NYSEEur 31.63 -.06 Polaris 81.62 -.48 SpdrDiv 57.30 -.59
LTCPrp 34.85 -.11 Nabors 14.00 -.20 PostPrp 49.40 -.49 SpdrHome 25.90 .13
LaZBoy 13.86 -.06 NBGreece 1.81 -.05 Potash 39.77 -.37 SpdrS&PBk 23.56 .11
Ladede 37.70 -.18 NatFuGas 50.24 -.29 PwshDB 27.63 -.08 SpdrLehHY 40.55 .11
LVSands 44.72 -.83 NatGrid 56.63 -.20 Praxair 107.90 -1.68 SpdrS&PRB 27.70 .14
LeapFrog 8.29 +.32 NOilVarco 65.88 -1.09 PrinFnd 28.08 -.03 SpdrRefl 60.91 -.31
LeggPlat 26.44 -.29 Navistar 21.09 +.04 ProLogis 35.77 -.51 SpdrOGEx 52.63 -.96
LennarA 37.62 -.46 NewAmHi 10.30 +.01 ProShtS&P 34.62 +.37 SpdrMetM 43.60 -.66
LeucNatl 23.47 -.26 NJRscs 39.03 -.36 PrUItQQQs 52.68 -1.05 SPXCp 68.34 +.06
LexRltyTr 10.31 -.04 NYCmtyB 12.94 -.09 PrUShQQQ 30.94 +.59 STMiaro 6.99 -.02
LbtyASG 4.00 -.01 Newcasle 8.46 -.05 ProUltSP 58.30 -1.32 Safeway 17.70 -.02
LibtProp 35.69 +.03 NewellRub 21.82 .15 ProShtR2K 24.79 +.13 StJoe 23.00 +.27
LillyEli 48.60 -.37 NewfdEx 25.79 -.49 PrUltSP500 83.67 -2.99 SUude 35.47 -.40
Limited 45.90 -.51 NewmtM 45.03 -.44 PrUVxSTrs 27.54 +2.51 Saks 10.22 -.07
LincNat 25.23 -.21 NewpkRes 7.77 .14 PrUltCrude 28.78 -.20 Salesforce 164.18 -2.06
Lindsay 77.87 +.84 Nexeng 26.85 +.10 PrUShCrde 41.18 +.33 SallyBty 23.43 -.57
Linkedln 112.89 -1.14 NextEraEn 68.25 -.96 ProctGam 67.15 -.82 SJuanB 13.25 +.40
LloydBkg 3.12 -.06 NiSource 24.63 -.09 ProgsvCp 20.85 -.12 SandRdge 6.23 .18
LodhdM 91.34 -1.49 NikeBs 50.99 -.77 PrUShSPrs 56.18 +1.27 Schlmbrg 67.96 -1.21
LaPac 18.56 -.15 NobleCorp 34.05 -.63 PrUShL20rs61.26 -.72 Schwab 14.14 -.07
Lowes 34.98 -.15 NokiaCp 3.81 -.19 ProUSR2K 26.38 +.31 SeadrillLd 36.34 -.59
51 Nordsrm 52.16 +.38 PUSSP500rs39.99 +1.36 SealAir 17.09 -.28
I NorfkSo 61.07 .15 Prudent 52.47 -.58 SemGroup 37.80 -.01
NoestUt 38.44 -.34 PSEG 29.94 -.34 SempraEn 70.19 -.55
M&TBk 97.55 -.71 NorthropG 66.76 -.98 PubSrg 143.46 -.91 Sensient 35.77 -.39
MBIA 7.80 +02 NStarRlt 6.90 .01 PulteGrp 17.60 -16 ServiceCp 13.62 .18
MDU Res 20.89 -.31 Novafs 62.90 -43 PPrlT 5.38 +.03 ServNown 29.05 -.47
MEMC 3.17 +09 NuSn 3534 +.18 QEPRes 29.61 -.53 ShawGrp 46.19 -.30
MFA Fnd 8.07 -.06 Nur 42.44 .71 Qihoo360 27.33 +.53 SiderurNac 5.81 +.06
MCR 10.05 -.02 NusaEn 41.99 -.89 QuanexBld 19.81 -.19 SilvWhng 34.66 +.10
M FA nd 10.05 -.02 NustarEn 41.99 -.89 iu -..
MGIC 2.59 +.03 NuvMuOpp 15.37 +07 QuantaSvc 2648 -.51 SilvrcpMg 5.0 -.08
MGMRsts 11.43 -.28 NvPfdlnco 9.71 -.03 Quet 1936 -.14 SimonProp 156.02 -1.91
MackCali 25.97 +.15 NuvQPf2 9.13 QksilvRes 2.73 -.23 Skechers 18.15 +.02
Macquarie 44.82 -.29 OGEEy 55.56 .15 Quiksilvr 4.11 +.06 SmithAO 61.84 -.02
Macys 37.36 +.28 OciPe 75.3 1.56 RPM 28.97 +.01 SmithfF 20.96 -.06
MageMPts 42.49 14 OcwenFn 33.63 .01 Rackspace 72.72 +.55 Smutcer 85.25 -.28
Magnalntg 49.44 -.26 OfceDpt 3.27 +06 RadianGrp 5.72 -.05 SonyCp 11.01 -.03
MagHRes 3.7844 -.26 OfficeDpt 3.27 +.06 RadioShk 2.11 -.09 SoJerlnd 49.48 -.54
MagHRes 3.78 OfficeMax 9.29 -.21 aln 8 Sthn 4 -
Manitowoc 15.22 -.17 OiSAs 3.99 +.01 Racorp 89.33 -.05 SouthnCo 42.33 -.35
Maulifeg 13.41 .09 Olin 21.24 16 RJamesFn 38.05 -.04 SthnCopper 37.27 -.57
MaranhnO 29.81 -.51 Omi al 2 1.24 -.1 Rayonier 50.94 -.22 SwstAirl 10.16 -.10
MarathPn .81 -.51 OmegaHt 23.59 -.21 Raytheon 56.70 -.60 SwstnEny 32.78 -.35
Marathet 61.11 -.91 Omnicom 49.16 -.25
MktVGold 4493 -.51 Om 1n9.56 .07 Rltylno 40.14 -.26 SpecraEn 26.97 +.09
MVkOitol 44.97 -.51 OnAsign 19.56 -.07 RedHat 51.98 -.80 SpiritAero 16.23 -.21
MVOilSvs 37.67 -.56 ONEOKs 42.07 -.09 RegalEnt 13.73 .14 SprintNex 5.60 -.02
MVSemi 31.72 -.22 OneokPs 53.40 +.37 RegionsFn 6.93 -.06 SprottSilv 11.92 -.07
MktVRus 29.40 .12 OshkoshCp 28.57 .42 Reren 3.30 +.01 Sprottold 14.05 -.08
MktVJrGld 19.26 -.14 OwensCorn 36.32 -.35 RepubSvc 29.01 -.26 SPMas 36.82 -.47
MkVHYMu 3280 .10 RepubSvc 29.01 -.26 SPMas 36.82 .47
MarlntA 36.48 -.40 ResrceCap 5.55 -.06 SPHIthC 39.46 -.39
MarshM 34.23 -.31 PG&E Cp 39.71 -.31 Revlon 13.93 -.27 SPCnSt 34.45 -.37
MStewrt 2.41 -.03 PNC 57.46 -.49 ReynAmer 40.99 -.22 SP Consum 46.51 -.38
Masm 16.04 -.25 PNMRes 20.28 -.26 RioTinto 57.06 -.32 SP Engy 69.83 -1.24
Sfrmlnt, 1.7,1 .1 PDDP i ll -2 RiteAid 1.39 -.05 SPDRFncl 16.18 -.13


McDnlds 87.58
McGrwH 53.23
McMoRn 15.75
McEwenM 3.68
Mechel 6.77
Medrnic 40.75
Merck 40.64
Meritor 4.59
MetLife 32.27
MetroPCS 9.81
MKors 49.18


-1.14 PPLCorp 28.18
-.38 PVR Prs 25.65
+.02 PallCorp 59.67
-.10 Pandora 9.01
+.05 PeabdyE 25.36
-.59 Pengrth g 4.75
-.56 PennWstg 10.59
-.08 Penney 18.97
-.61 Pentair 47.51
-.07 PepBoy 9.61
-.23 PepoHold 19.31


IA EIA N 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.74 -.03
AbdnEMTel 21.21 +.10
AdmRsc 33.99 +1.39
AlexoRg 3.42 -.03
AlldNevG 28.96 -.44
AmApparel .96 -.03
AfatsaRg .15 -.01
Augustag 2.29 -.06
Aurizong 3.35 -.03
AvalnRare 1.33 +.03
Bacterin 1.33
Banrog 2.65 -.02


BarcUBS36 41.30
BarcGSOil 21.58
BlkMulT2 16.24
BlkMunvst 11.01
BrigusGg .89
CardiumTh .19
CelSd .27
CFCdag 20.93
CheniereEn 18.25
CheniereE 20.93
ChiBotanP .40
ChinaShen .47
ClaudeRg .52
ClghGlbOp 11.67
ComstkMn 2.23


+.01 CornstProg 4.93 -.02
-.09 CornstTR 5.31 -.04
+.11 CornerstSt 6.00 +.04
-.05 CrSuiHiY 3.17
-.01 Crosshr .11 .00
-.00
-.00
-01 DejourEg .22 +.01
-.20 DenisnMg 1.19 -.02
-.32 ERBA Diag .97 +.14
-.28 EVLtdDur 16.50 -.05
-.02 EVMuniBd 13.94 -.16
+.01 EVMuni2 13.66 -.04
-.00 EllswthFd 7.07 -.04
+16 EmrldOrs 5.12 -.10
-.02 EnteeGold .43 -.01


ExeterRgs 1.20 -.02


GamGldNR 12.64 -.11
GascoEngy .07 -.00
Gastargrs 1.24 -.02
GenMoly 3.74 -.02
GeoGloblR .06 -.00
GoldResrc 15.09 -.15
GoldenMin 4.51 +.03
GoldStrg 1.75 -.03
GranTrrag 5.47 -.01
GtPanSilvg 1.53
Hemisphrx .27 +.01
HooperH .38 -.03


HstnAEn .21 +.00
iShGerSCbt 30.44 -.30
iShlndiabt 25.74 -.74
iBb .66
ImmunoCII 1.89 +.01
ImpOilgs 42.52 -.33
InovioPhm .49 -.00
IntellgSys 1.42 -.08
nvAdvMu2 13.05 -.02

LadThalFn 1.38 -.01
LkShrGldg .73 -.00
LongweiPI 2.17 -.11
LucasEngy 1.34 -.04


NovaCpp n 1.82 -.04 RevetMWin 2.74 -.08
NovaGldg 4.45 +.02 RexahnPh .32 +.03
MadCatzg .51 -.01 NuvDiv3 15.08 +.07 Rubicona 2.38 +.01
Metalio 1.93 -.01 NvLSCmd 21.44 -.36
NaideaBio 2.69 -.09 9 *o .65 .0


NeoStem .60
NBRESec 4.55
Neuralstem 1.10
Nevsung 4.17
NewEnSys .41
NwGoldg 10.64
NAPallg 1.31
NDynMng 3.20
NthnO&G 16.21
NovaBayP 1.14


PalafnTch .58
ParaG&S 2.24
PhrmAth 1.12
PlatGpMet .82
PolyMetg .87
PyramidOil 4.10
Quaterrag .34
RareEleg 3.18
ReavesUtl 23.82
Rentech 2.55


+.02 Sandstgrs 11.46
+.04 SondeRgrs 1.70
-.01 SynergyRs 5.29
TanzRyg 4.23
-.01 Taseko 3.00
+.29 TimberlnR .22
-.00 TrnsafiPet .83
-.22 TriangPet 5.65
-.06 UQM Tech .76
-.04 US Geoth .37


Uranerz 1.31 -.04
UraniumEn 2.45 -.09


VangTotW 48.78 -.30
VantageDrl 1.79 +.05
VirnetX 29.36 -.23
VistaGold 2.58 -.04
Vringo 2.66 -.11
Walterlnv 41.67 +.23
WFAdvlnco 9.98 +.01
YMBiog 2.87


I AASDAQ NATIONAL5MARKET 11


Name Last Chg


AMCNet 49.18 -.57
ASMLHId 63.13 -.44
Aastrom 1.27 -.06
Abiomed 13.46 -.17
Abraxas 2.00 -.05
AcadaTc 24.79 +.78
AcadiaPh 4.51 -.03
Accuray 6.31 -.15
Achillion 8.02 -.27
AcmePkt 21.16 -.37
AordaTh 24.21 -.06
AcfivsBliz 10.56 -.03
AcuraPhm 2.27 +.05
AdobeSy 36.90 -.40
Adtran 19.35 +.06
AdvisBds 47.00 -1.41
Aegerion 24.91 -.56
AEterngrs 2.47 +.30
Affymax 18.54 -.11
Afymetrix 3.11 -.06
AkamaiT 40.40 -.63
Akorn 13.03 -.27
AlaskCom 1.98 -.02
Alexion 92.36 -1.26
Alexzars 4.88 +.01
AlignTech 27.07 -.43
Alkermes 18.52 -.29
AllotComm 17.39 +.09
AllscriptH 9.19
AlteraCplf 34.01 -.33
AlterraCap 27.94 +.02
Amarin 7.70 +.02
Amazon 245.18 -3.13
Ambrllan 11.00 +.57
ACapAgy 29.00 -.09
AmCapLi 11.92 -.08
ACapMtg 23.52 -.31
ARItyCTn 11.51 -.11
AmSupr 2.51 -.13
AmCasino 26.25 -.02
Amgen 85.24 -.91
AmicusTh 2.60 -.07
AmkorTch 4.10 -.03
Amyris 2.45 -.19
AnaorPh 5.08 +.04
Anadigc 2.50
AnalogDev 41.47 -.42
Anlogic 73.69 -.07
Analystlnt 3.19 -.01
Ancestry 32.05 +.05
AngiesList 11.75 -.27
Ansys 67.00 -.62
AntaresP 3.73 -.02
AntheraPh .62 -.03
ApolloGrp 20.46 +.09
Apollolnv 8.28 -.03
Apple Inc 509.59 -5.47
ApldMai 11.26 -.09
AMCC 8.26 -.03
Approach 24.07 -.25
ArQule 2.70 -.06
ArchCap 43.38 -.06
ArenaPhm 8.85 +.06
AresCap 17.20 -.12
AriadP 19.42 -.31
ArkBest 9.24 -.04
ArmHId 37.10 -.24
ArrayBio 3.60 -.07
Arris 14.73 -.27
ArubaNet 20.27 -.09
AscenaRts 18.15 -.07
AscentSol h .64 -.04
AsiaEntRs 2.85 -.10
AspenTech 27.04 -.07
AssodBanc 13.03 -.11
AstexPhm 2.86 -.01
athenahlth 72.52 -1.39
Athersys 1.10
Atmel 6.20 +.03
Autodesk 34.99 -.13
AutoData 56.33 -.56
Auxilium 18.15 -.13
AvagoTch 31.15 -.22
AvanirPhm 2.57 -.05


AVEOPh 7.74
AviatNetw 3.32
AvisBudg 19.38
Awares 5.40
Axcelis 1.36
BCD Semi 7.60
B/EAero 48.73
BGC Pts 3.37
BJsRest 33.13
BMCSft 39.56
Baidu 99.00
BannerCp 30.62
Bazaarvcn 9.06
BeacnRfg 32.65
BeasleyB 4.66
BebeStrs 3.78
BedBath 54.91
BioDlvrylf 4.14
Biogenldc 146.05
BioMarin 47.94
BioSanters 1.25
BIkRKelso 9.85
Blckbaud 23.25
BloominBn 15.69
BobEvans 39.66
BreitBurn 18.33
Broadcom 32.48
BroadSoft 34.94
BrcdeCm 5.28
BrukerCp 15.05
BuffabWW 71.94
CAInc 21.79
CBOE 29.37
CH Robins 62.15
CMEGrps 50.12
CTC Media 7.75
CVBFnd 10.34
CadencePh 4.81
Cadence 13.44
Caesars n 6.73
CalaCvHi 11.99
CalaStrTR 9.75
CalumetSp 29.55
CdnSolar 3.27
CapCtyBk 11.17
CapProd 6.33
CapFedFn 11.71
CpstnTrbh .89
Cardiom gh .37
CareerEd 3.31
CaribouC 16.13
Carmike 14.52
Carrizo 20.64
CarverBcp 4.06
CatalystPh .44
Catamarns 46.65
CathayGen 19.12
Cavium 30.69
Celgene 77.73
CellTherrs 1.30
CelldexTh 6.66
Celsion 8.17
CentEurop 2.07
CentAI 8.19
Cepheid 33.04
Cerner 76.08
Chartlnds 65.30
CharterCm 73.58
ChkPoint 47.07
Cheesecake 32.37
ChelseaTh .76
ChildPlace 43.88
ChinaLodg 16.20
ChrchllD 64.41
CienaCorp 15.33
CinnFin 38.56
Cintas 40.34
Cirrus 27.11
Cism 19.45
CitrixSys 64.30
CityTlcm s 6.76
CleanEngy 12.07
Cleantchrs 3.82
Clearwire 2.88
ClevBioLh 1.33
CogentC 22.55
CognizTech 72.31
Cogo Grp 2.26


+.02 Coinstar 50.43 +.09
+.05 ColBnkg 17.79 +.02
-.13 Comcast 36.54 -.29
-.10 Comcspd 35.21 -.27
-.03 CmcBMO 34.98 -.06
+.19 CommSys 10.36
-.28 CommVlt 67.24 -1.71
+.16 CmplGnom 3.13
-.97 Compuwre 10.70 -.12
-.32 Comverse 3.83 +.10
-.43 ConcurTch 66.83 -.80
+.09 Conmed 27.47 -.45
-.02 Conns 29.79 -.20
+.02 ConstantC 13.65 -.26
-.21 CopanoEn 31.30 +.11
-.01 Coparts 29.12 -.43
-.49 Corcept 1.45 -.03
+.09 CorinthC 2.36 -.08
-1.71 CorOnDem 28.47 -.12
-.69 Costo 96.97 -.95
-.01 CreeInc 33.20 -.29
-.06 Crocs 13.87 +.13
+.62 CrosstxLP 13.97 +.24
-.04 Crumbwt .09 +.03
-.46 Ctrip.om 22.03 -.31
+.06
-.22 CubistPh 41.60 -.92
+.92 Cyclaceirs 6.33 +.30
+.06 CypSemi 10.50 -.20
-.10 C on 2.71 +.03
+.64
-.14
+.04 DeclksOut 37.92 -.19
-.65 Delcath 1.23 +.01
-.23 dELIAs 1.27 +.22
-.06 Dell Inc 9.97 -.14
-.05 Dndreon 5.21 -.06
-.05 Dentsply 39.01 -.37
+.01 DexCom 13.22 -.03
+.01 DiamndFh 13.68 -.04
-.13 DianaCont 5.82 -.03
-.10 DigitalGen 10.62 +.23
-.22 Diodes 17.02 -.12
-.10 DirecTV 49.42 -.29
-.12 DiscComA 61.89 -.49
-.01 DiscComC 57.12 -.38
+.01 DishNetwk 35.43 -.38
+.00 DollarTrs 39.60 -.13
-.03 DonlleyRR 8.91 +.16
+.06 DragonWg 3.26 -.04
+.01 DrmWksA 16.35 -.18
-.03 DryShips 1.58 -.07
-1.17 Dunkin 32.35 -.04
-.09 DyaxCp 3.47 -.06
-.01 Dynavax 2.74 -.03
-.05 E-Trade 8.76 +.03
-.04 eBay 49.81 -.48
-.01 EaglRkEn 8.41 -.04
-.85 ErthLink 6.34 -.07
+.01 EstWstBcp 21.30 -.03
+.05 Ebix Inc 15.79 -.20
+.18 EchelonC 2.45 -.08
-.12 EchoGLog 17.92 +.44
-.15 EchoThera 1.03 +.03
+.34 EducDevel 3.87 +.07
-.63 8x8 Inc 7.29 -.01
-.31 EinsteinNs 12.18 +.34
-.09 ElectSd 9.62 -.17
-.19 ElectArts 13.92 -.10
-.36 EFII 18.49 -.09
-.05 EndoPhrm 25.60 -.23
-.24 Endobgix 14.03 +.51
+.74 EnrgyRec 3.33 -.05
+.37 EngyXXI 30.71 -.66
-.08 Enphasen 3.60 +.09
-.53 Entegris 8.77 -.26
-.36 EnteroMed 2.70 +.22
-.45 EntropCom 5.30 -.02
-.20 EnzonPhs 4.42 +.07
-.83 Equinix 203.23 -.99
+.31 Ericsson 9.96 -.05
-.32 Euronet 23.28 -.05
-.22 Euroseas .86 -.01
ExactScih 10.45 -.04
+.02 Exelids 4.51 -.04
-.23 EddeTc 3.37 +.27
-.69 Eqxedia 59.36 -.94
-.09 Expdlni 39.03 -.24


ExpScripts 52.93 -.43 IonixBr 21.85 -.19
ExtrmNet 3.57 -.01 IdenixPh 4.47 -.36
EZchip 32.93 -.41 Idenfve 1.46 +.01
Ezorp 19.60 -.05 Illumina 54.75 -.66
F5Netwks 96.14 -.99 ImunoGn 12.41 -.07
FLIRSys 22.09 -.11 Imunmd 2.85 -.03
FXEner 3.94 -.17 ImpaxLabs 20.01 -.10
Facebookn 25.91 -.14 Incyte 16.07 -.01
Fastenal 46.18 -.14 Infinera 5.80 -.03
FifthStRn 10.19 -.02 InfinityPh 34.72 -.32
Fifthiird 14.99 -.09 Informat 30.12 -.37
FindEngin 27.53 -.26 InnerWkgs 13.87
Fndlnst 18.50 -.07 IntjDv 7.04 -.11
Finisar 15.70 -.03 Intel 20.23 -.28
FinLine 18.63 -.02 Inteliquent 2.51 -.14
FstCashFn 48.31 +.42 InteractB 13.56 -.05
FstCityF 9.72 -.03 InterDig 39.89 -.67
FMidBc 12.45 -.17 Intrface 15.78 -.22
FstNiagara 7.86 -.01 InterMune 9.53 -.19
FstSolar 29.80 -.22 InterNAP 6.83 +.06
FstMerit 14.12 -.11 InflSpdw 26.93 -.26
Fiserv 78.52 -.61 Intersil 8.10 -.08
Flextn 6.06 -.11 Intuit 59.33 -1.01
FocusMda 25.59 +.09 IntSurg 479.50 -7.67
Forfnet 20.93 +.15 IridiumCm 6.29 +.25
Fossil Inc 89.31 -1.44 IronwdPh 10.93 -.07
FosterWhl 23.33 -.38 Isis 10.10 -.18
Francesca 24.92 -.05 IvanhoeEh .70 -.02
FreshMkt 47.65 -.53 IMa 16.67 -.05
FronterCm 4.19
FuelSysSol 14.54 +.16
FudCelllh .92 -.04 JASolarrs 4.16 -.01
FultonFncl 9.59 -.08 JDSUniph 13.16 -.13
JackHenry 39.23 -.14
JacklnBox 28.40 -.19
GSVCap 8.44 -.06 Jamba 2.18 +.07
GTAdvTc 2.94 +.08 JamesRiv 3.14 -.19
GalenaBio 1.50 -.05 JazzPhrm 52.75 -.25
Garmin 40.00 -1.32 JetBlue 5.58 -.10
Gentex 18.66 -.09 JiveSoftw 14.31 -.28
Genfvah 10.10 +.24 KCAPFin 9.09 +.10
GeronCp 1.46 -.03 KLATnc 47.02 -.41
Gevo 1.55 -.01 KeryxBio 2.55 -.04
GileadSd 72.38 -.22 Kforce 14.54 +.28
Gleacherh .74 -.06 KiOR 6.58 +.13
GlbSpcMet 13.47 -.12 KnightT 5.20 -.01
GluMobile 2.31 -.05 KraftFGpn 44.41 +.02
GolLNGLd 36.10 -.37 KratosDef 4.80 -.12
Goodyear 13.29 -.13 Kulicke 11.61 -.03
Google 700.01 -6.28 LKQ Cps 20.73 -.29
GreenMtC 40.35 -1.05 LPLFind 28.12 -.18
Grifolsrs 25.27 +.17 LSICorp 6.92 +.01
Groupon 4.78 -.08 LSI Indlf 6.91 -.08
GulfportE 37.26 -.74 LamResrch 35.67 -.31
HMN Fn 3.47 +.17 LamarAdv 38.43 +.01
HMSHdgs 25.35 -.22 Landstar 51.62 -.12
HainCel 52.68 -.39 Lattce 3.83 -.03
Halozyme 6.65 +.03 LeapWirlss 6.41 -.19
HancHId 31.38 -.07 LegacyRes 23.18 -.12
HansenMed 2.05 +.01 LexPhrm 1.91 -.03
HanwhaSol .00 +.05 LibGlobA 61.65 -.64
Harmonic 4.96 -.01 LibGlobC 57.72 -.65
Hasbro 35.31 -.25 LibCapA 114.08 -.50
HawHold 6.46 +.03 LibtylntA 19.08 -.01
HIthCSvc 22.64 +.07 LifeTech 48.42 -.53
HrfndEx 12.89 -.15 Lifevantge 2.08 -.12
Heelys 2.23 +.01 LimelghtN 2.22 -.07
HSchein 79.96 -.26 LincElec 47.93 -.13
HercOffsh 5.93 -.12 LinearTch 33.80 -.16
Hibbett 52.00 +.33 LinnEngy 35.24 -.09
Hollysys 11.71 -.18 LinnCon 35.98 -.06
Hologic 19.91 -.21 Liquidity 39.91 +.84
HmLnSvcn 18.78 -.13 LivePrsn 12.89 +.05
HomeAway 21.31 +.06 LodgeNeth .08 -.01
HorizPhm 2.30 Logitech 7.52 -.20
HotTopic 9.37 -.07 LookSmth .96 +.00
HudsCity 8.04 -.03 Lulkin 55.40 -.88
HudsonTc 3.59 +.16 lululemngs 74.31 -.34
HuntJB 58.48 -.16 Luminex 16.43 -.03
HuntBncsh 6.28 -.06
IAC Inter 46.23 -.17
iRobot 18.59 -.41 MCGCap 4.52
iShAsiaexJ 59.61 +.31 MELASci 1.82 -.08
iShACWX 41.38 -.26 MGE 50.21 -.47
iShACWI 47.36 -.36 MIPSTech 7.75 +.01
iShDevRE 32.70 -.23 MTS 49.98 -.57
iShNsdqBio 134.94 -1.27 MagicJack 17.95 +1.67
IconPLC 27.57 -.09 MaidenH 9.11 -.03


Majesco .97 -.04 Pacerlnf 3.70 -.14
MAKOSrg 12.09 -.48 PacEthanh .32 -.01
MannKd 2.31 -.07 PacSunwr 1.50 +.14
MarvellT 7.17 +.03 PaciraPhm 17.42 +.17
Mattel 35.84 -.30 Pactera 7.95
Mattsonh .86 -.05 PainThers 2.62 +.02
Maximlnig 28.93 -.29 PanASIv 18.16 -.44
MaxwlT 8.18 -.18 PaneraBrd 156.81 -.17
MedAssets 16.73 +.01 ParamTch 22.55 +.04
MedicAcIn 2.69 +.01 Parexel 29.21 +.14
MediCo 23.76 -.24 ParkerVsn 2.04 -.01
Medivatns 50.10 -.70 Patterson 33.85 -.06
MeloCrwn 16.26 -.24 PattUTI 18.12 -.34
Mellanox 59.95 +1.73 Paychex 30.88 -.23
MentorGr 16.81 -.06 Pendrell 1.24 +.08
MercadoL 77.40 -.99 PnnNGm 48.45 -.55
MergeHIth 2.45 -.09 PennantPk 10.74 -.03
Merrimkn 5.95 -.13 PeopUdF 11.97 -.10
Metabolix 1.51 -.02 PeregrinP 1.23 +.05
Microchp 32.11 -.21 PermFixh .71 -.03
MicronT 6.13 -.09 Perrigo 102.28 -1.10
MicrosSys 42.09 -.15 PetSmart 67.55 -.61
Microsoft 26.55 -.41 Pharmacyc 57.66 -.29
Mindspeed 4.42 -.06 PhotrIn 5.77 -.03
Misonix 7.66 +.51 PilgrimsP 7.19 +.10
MissnW 9.15 +.02 PlugPowrh .54 -.04
MitekSys 3.36 +.30 Polyom 10.45 -.15
Molex 26.68 -.39 Popularrs 20.45 -.19
Momenta 11.38 -.06 Power-One 4.19 -.03
Mondelez 25.26 -.10 PwShsQQQ 63.78 -.62
MonroMuf 34.42 +.19 PriceTR 63.93 -1.12
MonstrBvs 51.88 -.34 priceline 608.88 -1.15
Motricityh .44 +.00 PrivateB 15.26 -.08
MulmGm 13.59 -.35 PrUPQQQs 48.60 -1.45
Mylan 26.92 -.43 ProceraN 17.87
MyriadG 27.09 -.15 PrognicsPh 2.77 -.03
NIC Inc 16.13 -.16 ProgrsSoft 20.65 -.03
NIlHIdg 6.99 -.28 PUShQQQrs43.34 +1.22
NPS Phm 8.98 -.02 ProspctCap 10.65 -.02
NXPSemi 25.36 -.07 Prothenan 6.87 -.03
Nanosphere 2.90 +.05 PureCycle 2.76 -.04
NasdOMX 24.89 -.16 QIAGEN 18.08 -.07
Natlnstrm 25.36 -.24 QLT 7.64 +.12
NatPenn 9.19 -.03 QlikTechh 21.41 -.14
NektarTh 7.08 +.13 Qlogic 9.55 -.08
Neonode 4.78 +.12 Qualom 60.64 -.87
NeptuneTg 2.09 +.06 QualitySys 17.25 +.21
NetApp 32.82 -.60 Questor 26.93 -.85
NetEase 42.34 +.56 RFMicD 4.38 +.03
Netiix 89.33 -1.17 RTIBiolog 4.10 -.09
NYMtgTr 6.15 -.09 Radware 32.82 -.27
NewsCpA 24.61 -.28 Rambus 4.91
NewsCpB 25.28 -.21 Randgold 96.32 -1.41
NorTrst 49.95 +.01 RaptorPhm 5.71 +.43
NwstBcsh 12.04 -.08 RealPage 21.13 -.43
NovfiWrls 1.30 +.02 Regenrn 167.97 -.80
Novavax 1.82 -.01 RentACt 33.70 -.32
NuVasive 15.14 -.11 ReprosTh 15.41 -.17
NuanceCm 21.87 -.21 RepubAir 5.71 -.01
NuPathe 3.34 -.06 RschMotn 11.79 +.03
NutriSyst 7.87 +.01 ResConn 11.81 +.41
Nvidia 12.10 -.06 Responsys 5.83 +.08
OCZTech 1.91 -.11 RexEnergy 12.73
OReillyAu 88.10 -.61 RigelPh 6.35 +.02
Oclaro 1.54 -.03 RiverbedT 19.55 -.11
OdysMar 2.86 ... RosttaGrs 4.24 -.03
OldDomFs 34.05 -.20 RosettaR 44.10 -.50
Omeros 5.32 -.52 RossStrs 53.21 +.07
OmniVisn 13.59 -.08 RoviCorp 15.24 -.05
OnSmcnd 6.85 -.01 RoyGId 79.06 -1.04
Onolytg 3.74 +.01 RoyaleEn 2.45 -.53
Onothyr 1.84 -.05 RubionTc 6.08 -.16
OnyxPh 75.64 -1.29 rue21 27.55 +.50
OpfbmerPh 8.88 -.11 Ranair 34.06 -.33
Oracle 33.02 -.25
OraSure 6.69 -.08
Orexigen 5.05 -.08 SBACom 70.27 -.32
Orthfx 38.52 -.50 SEIInv 23.06 -.24
OtterTail 24.53 -.19 SHFLEnt 13.98 -.31
Oversk 13.95 -.15 SLMCp 16.80 +.03
SS&CTech 22.93 +.49
STEC 4.82 -.05
PDCEngy 31.98 -.84 SabaSftwIf 8.63 +.21
PDLBio 7.09 -.05 SalixPhm 39.69 -.70
PLXTch 3.60 -.03 SanderFm 47.29 -.03
PMCSra 5.12 -.05 SanDisk 42.68 -.54
PSSWrld 28.87 +.02 SangBio 5.96 -.08
Paccar 44.43 -.19 Sanmina 10.33 -.41


Santarus 10.75
Sapient 10.51
Sareptars 23.79
SavientPh 1.14
SchoolSp .96
SciGames 8.41
SeaChange 9.46
SeagateT 29.95
SearsHldgs 39.50
SeattGen 22.98
SecNlIf 8.63
SelCmfrt 24.51
Selectvlns 18.87
SemiLedsh .82
Semtech 28.48
Sequenom 4.50
SvcSource 5.78
ShandaGs 3.12
ShoreTel 4.25
Shutterfly 29.29
SigmaAld 72.86
SilganHId 40.81
Silicnlmg 4.91
Slcnware 5.27
SilvStdg 14.45
Sina 48.35
Sindair 12.41
SiriusXM 2.89
SironaDent 62.90
SkywksSol 19.88
SmartBal 12.55
SmartTcg 1.42
SmithWes 8.18
SodaStrm 43.60
Sohu.cm 46.47
Solazyme 7.75
SonicCorp 10.23
Sonus 1.65
SouMoBc 22.35
Sourcefire 46.09
SpectPh 11.28
SpiritAir 17.68
Splunkn 28.41
Spreadtm 17.33
Staples 11.10
StarSdent 2.65
Starbucks 52.64
SiDynam 13.14
StemCells 1.52
Stericyde 91.90
SMadden 41.21
StewEnt 7.21
Stratasys 77.90
SunesisPh 4.16
SunOpta 5.59
SunPwrh 5.49
SupcndTch .29
SusqBnc 10.37
SwisherHIf 1.71
Symantec 18.16
Symetricm 5.66
Synaorn 5.10
Synaptcs 29.58
Synchron 21.17
SynrgyPh 4.95
Synopsys 31.63
SyntaPhm 8.89
Syntolmh .35
TFS Fncl 9.43
TICCCap 9.82
twteleom 25.32
TakeTwo 11.02
Tangoe 12.03
TASER 8.63
TechData 44.79
Tellabs 2.34
TescoCp 10.88
TeslaMot 33.22
TxCapBsh 44.56
Texlnst 30.47
TexRdhse 16.60
Thoratec 37.09
ThrshdPhm 4.20
TibcoSft 21.68
TiVoInc 12.26
TowerGrp 17.98
Towersbm 3.12
TractSupp 87.47


-.13 TrimbleN 58.60 -.47
-.04 TripAdvis 41.34 -.59
-.75 TriQuint 4.74 -.01
+.01 Tri-Tech 2.78 +.96
+.01 TriusmTer 4.78 -.13
+.06
-.13 TrueRelig 24.78 -.23
-.26 TrstNY 5.22 -.02
+.20 Trusbmk 22.23 -.02
-.28 UTStarcm 1.00 -.02
-.96 UTiWrldwd 13.06 -.07
-.13 UltaSalon 96.55 +.11
-.20 Umpqua 11.57 -.18
-.08 UtdOnln 5.46 -.18
-.04 USEnr 1.52 -.02
-04 UtdTherap 52.14 -.48
-.03
+.02 UnivDisp 24.60 -.58
-.16 UnivFor 37.81 -.13
+.11 UnwiredP 1.21 -.03
-.82 UranmRsh .32 -.01
-.30 UrbanOut 38.22 -.39
+.01
+.01
-.37 VCAAnt 20.95 +.04
+1.05 VOXXInDt 6.54 -.03
-.11 ValueClick 19.00 -.21
-.01 VandaPhm 3.57 -.28
-.09 VanSTCpB 80.19 -.07
-.01 VanlntCpB 88.19 +.39
-.02 VanTlntStk 46.25 -.33
-.08 Veeolnst 28.03 -.95
-.06 VelD 4.66 -.09
+1.31 VBradley 24.61 +.03
-.33 VerintSys 29.07 +.33
+.06 Verisign 38.00 -.12
-.04 Verisk 50.11
-.93 VertxPh 40.94 -.82
+.31
-.0 ViaSat 38.04 -.37
-.03 ViacomB 51.96 -.65
-.37 Vical 2.74 -.07
-.04 ViewPtFn 20.84 +.08
-.12 VirgnMdah 36.41 -.25
+.01 ViroPhrm 22.24 -.62
-.60 VistaPrt 31.33 -.64
-.24 Vivus 13.21 -.46
-.03 Vodafone 25.01 -.20
.29 Volcano 23.46
-.07
.29 Volterra 16.94 -.61
+2.71 WarnerCh 11.69 -.05
+.08 WarrenRs 2.75 -.01
+.03 WashFed 16.60 +.02
-.04 WebMD 14.42 -.37
+.01 WendysCo 4.73 +.01
-.11 WernerEnt 21.36 -.17
-.16 WDigital 41.46 -.61
-.06 Wesimrd 9.50 -.17
-.09
+.04 Wsttlnn g 25.92 -.24
-.50 WetSeal 2.66 -.03
+.68 WholeFd 89.20 -.89
-.11 Windstrm 8.30 -.11
-.12 WisdomTr 5.98 -.03
+.06 Wynn 109.67 -1.34
+.01 XOMA 2.38 -.02
+.08 Xilinx 35.31 -.47
-.09 Xyratexs 8.32 -.28
.14 YRCWwde 6.70 -.01
+.02 Yahoo 19.50 -.10
-.02
-.02 Yandex 21.75 -.19
-.38 Yongye 5.71 +.75
ZaZaEngy 2.16
-.17 Zagg 7.16 -.12
-.47 Zalicus .65
+.15 hongpin 12.85 +.11
-.27 Zllow 27.36 -.52
-.06 ZonBcp 21.13 -.13
-.30 Zopharm 4.21
-.02 Zpcar 8.10 -.34
-10 Zogenix 1.31 -.04
-.12 Zoltek 7.52 -.10
-.06 Zumiez 18.66 +.10
-.20 Zyna 2.33 -.09


The remainder of the

NYSE listings can be

found on the next page.






Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.9110 4.9125
Australia .9644 .9636
Bahrain .3771 .3771
Brazil 2.0450 2.0440
Britain 1.6152 1.6108
Canada .9963 .9949
Chile 480.85 480.15
China 6.2342 6.2405
Colombia 1777.50 1774.50
Czech Rep 19.00 18.94
Denmark 5.6427 5.6324
Dominican Rep 40.25 39.90
Egypt 6.1905 6.1905
Euro .7564 .7552
Hong Kong 7.7517 7.7519
Hungary 219.92 220.13
India 54.760 54.955
Indnsia 9635.00 9660.00
Israel 3.7338 3.7282
Japan 86.07 86.02
Jordan .7087 .7092
Lebanon 1504.50 1505.00
Malaysia 3.0620 3.0605
Mexico 13.0172 12.9881
N. Zealand 1.2197 1.2191
Norway 5.5867 5.5736
Peru 2.553 2.544
Poland 3.08 3.08
Russia 30.3636 30.4100
Singapore 1.2237 1.2228
So. Africa 8.4846 8.4843
So. Korea 1068.94 1072.30
Sweden 6.5143 6.5023
Switzerlnd .9132 .9133
Taiwan 29.01 29.07
Thailand 30.59 30.63
Turkey 1.7895 1.7895
U.A.E. 3.6731 3.6731
Uruguay 19.1499 19.2400
Venzuel 4.2927 4.2927


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.02 0.06
6-month 0.10 0.12
5-year 0.71 0.76
10-year 1.70 1.76
30-year 2.87 2.93



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Feb 13 90.80 -.07
Corn CBOT Mar 13 694 +21/2
Wheat CBOT Mar13 7783/4 +612
Soybeans CBOT Mar13 1418 +4
Cattle CME Feb 13 133.57 +.52
Sugar (world) ICE Mar13 19.42 -.03
Orange Juice ICE Mar13 126.50 -5.30



SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz.. spot) $1654.30 $1659.10
Silver(troyoz., spot) $29.920 $30.142
Copper (pound) $3.b//b $3.bbbb
Platinum (troy oz., spot)t$15 .40 $1b36.90

NMER= NewYork Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


DIARY


DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


I AMEX


I NASDA


Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD Name Div YId PE Last Chg %YTD
AKSteel ........ 4.30 -.08-47.9 McDnlds 3.08 3.5 16 87.58 -1.14-12.7
AT&TInc 1.80 5.4 43 33.32 -.34+10.2 Microsoft .92 3.5 14 26.55 -.41 +2.3
Ameteks .24 .6 20 37.08 -.23+32.1 MotrlaSolu 1.04 1.9 23 54.08 -.80 +16.8
ABlnBev 1.57 1.8 ... 86.81 -1.15 +42.3 NextEraEn 2.40 3.5 13 68.25 -.96 +12.1
BkofAm .04 .4 30 11.36 -.11+104.3 Penney ......18.97 -.55-46.0
CapCtyBk .........11.17 -.12 +17.0 PiedmOfc .80 4.5 16 17.94 -.16 +5.3
CntryLink 2.90 7.5 35 38.56 -.40 +3.7 RegionsFn .04 .6 12 6.93 -.06 +61.2
Citigroup .04 .1 12 39.01 -.24 +48.3 SearsHldgs ... ... ...39.50 +.20 +24.3
CmwREIT 1.00 6.4 28 15.74 -.02 -5.4 Smucker 2.08 2.4 20 85.25 -.28 +9.1
Disney .75 1.5 16 49.15 -.38 +31.1 SprintNex ... ...... 5.60 -.02+139.3
DukeEnrs 3.06 4.9 17 63.01 -.70 ... Texlnst .84 2.8 19 30.47 -.27 +4.7
EPRProp 3.00 6.6 20 45.52 -.78 +4.1 TimeWarn 1.04 2.2 17 46.93 -.49+29.9
ExxonMbl 2.28 2.7 11 85.10-1.76 +.4 UniFirst .15 .2 15 72.72 -.22 +28.2
FordM .20 1.6 11 12.87 +.11 +19.6 VerizonCm 2.06 4.8 40 42.90 -.58 +6.9
GenElec .76 3.7 15 20.44 -.25 +14.1 Vodafone 1.54 6.2 ... 25.01 -.20-10.8
HomeDp 1.16 1.9 22 60.65 -.42 +44.3 WalMart 1.59 2.4 14 67.61 -.58 +13.1
Intel .90 4.4 9 20.23 -.28-16.6 Walgrn 1.10 3.0 16 36.54 +.01 +10.5
IBM 3.40 1.8 13189.83 -2.88 +3.2 YRCWwde ......... 6.70 -.01-32.8
Lowes .64 1.8 21 34.98 -.15+37.8


A6 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012 A7


I B A l3FUND Ii


Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital I:
Balancp 16.93 -.10
Retlnc 8.97
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGr 6.63 -.05
AllianceBern A:
GblRiskp 16.44 -.02
GlbThGrAp 64.65 -.27
HighlncoAp 9.50 -.01
SmCpGrA 36.83 -.17
AllianceBern Adv:
LgCpGrAd 29.89 -.31
AllianceBern B:
GlbThGrBt 55.29 -.23
GrowthBt 26.88 -.27
SCpGrBt 29.02 -.14
AllianceBern C:
SCpGrCt 29.19 -.14
Allianz Fds Instl:
NFJDvVI 12.51 -.14
SmCpVI 29.46 -.20
Allianz Funds C:
AGICGrthC 24.27 -.26
Amer Beacon Insti:
LgCaplnst 21.31 -.23
Amer Beacon Inv:
LgCaplnv 20.23 -.22
Amer Century Adv:
EqGroAp 24.06 -.25
EqlncAp 7.74 -.06
Amer Century Inv:
AIICapGr 27.98 -.26
Balanced 16.87 -.10
DivBnd 11.17 +.01
Eqlnc 7.74 -.06
Growthl 26.40 -.29
Heritagel 21.88 -.16
IncGro 26.86 -.30
InfAdjBd 13.23
IntDisc 10.13 -.04
InfGrol 11.40 -.05
New Opp 8.20 -.04
OneChAgx 13.09 -.29
OneChMdx 12.60 -.19
RealEstl 23.27 -.20
Ultra 25.54 -.26
Valuelnv 6.29 -.06
American Funds A:
AmcpAp 21.38 -.19
AMuDAp 28.00 -.27
BalAp 20.20 -.14
BondAp 12.97 +.02
CaplBAp 52.44 -.21
CapWGAp 36.82 -.23
CapWAp 21.23 +.01
EupacAp 40.86 -.11
FdlnvAp 40.16 -.37
GIblBalA 26.59 -.09
GovtAp 14.22 +.01
GwtAp 33.80 -.29
HITrAp 11.36
HilnMuniA 15.42
IncoAp 17.91 -.10
IntBdAp 13.77 +.01
lnfGrlncAp31.42 -.14
ICAAp 29.73 -.29
LtTEBAp 16.34 +.01
NEcoAp 28.03 -.10
NPerAp 30.86 -.20
NwWrldA 53.99
STBFAp 10.07
SmCpAp 39.38 -.04
TxExAp 13.16
WshAp 30.78 -.33
Ariel Investments:
Apprec 40.16 -.38
Ariel 50.22 -.37
Artisan Funds:
Inl 24.38 -.08
Inllnst 24.51 -.09
IntlValr 30.10 -.17
MidCap 36.87 -.33
MidCapVal 20.50 -.19
BBH Funds:
CorSelN 17.16 -.15
Baron Funds:
Asset 48.10 -.28
Growth 52.91 -.26
SmallCap 25.72 -.16
Bernstein Fds:
IntDur 14.11 +.01
DivMu 14.82 +.01
TxMgdlnl 13.81 -.11
Berwyn Funds:
Fundx 31.38 -2.38
BlackRock A:
EqtyDiv 19.63 -.19
GIAIAr 19.57 -.10
HiYlnvA 8.08
InlOpAp 32.30 -.34
BlackRock B&C:
GIAIC t 18.23 -.09
BlackRock Instl:
EquityDv 19.66 -.20
GlbAllocr 19.66 -.09
HiYdBd 8.08
BruceFund 392.27 -1.41
Buffalo Funds:
SmCapn 27.65 -.13
CGM Funds:
Focusn 28.50 -.17
Mutln 27.93 -.10
Realty n 29.07 -.27
Calamos Funds:
GrwthAp 46.13 -.44
Calvert Invest:
Incop 16.64
InlEqAp 14.05-.06
SocialAp 30.39 -.18
SocBdp 16.35 +.01
SocEqAp 37.81 -.40
TxFLgp 16.53 +.01
Cohen & Steers:
RltyShrs 63.84 -.47
Columbia Class A:
Acorn t 28.85 -.20
CaAlloModp11.24 -.05
DivOpptyA 8.58 -.08
LgCapGrA t 26.45 -.26
LgCorQAp 6.35 -.07
MdCpGrOp 9.98 -.08
MidCVOp p 8.34 -.07
TxEAp 14.29
FrontierA 10.65 -.06
GlobTech 20.53 -.14
Columbia Cl I,T&G:
Em MktOp I n 8.81
Columbia Class Z:
Acorn Z 29.92 -.20
AcornlntZ 40.46 -.16
DivlncoZ 14.56 -.15
IntTEBd 11.00 +.01
SelLgCapG 13.58 -.14
Credit Suisse Comm:
ComRett 8.03
DFA Funds:
InlCorEqn 10.53 -.10
USCorEqln12.14 -.11
USCorEq2nll.96 -.11
DWS Invest A:
CommAp 18.66 -.19
DWS Invest S:
CoreEqtyS 17.96 -.19
CorPlslnc 11.28 +.01
EmMkGrr 16.41
EnhEmMk 11.35 +.01
EnhGlbBdr 10.36 +.01
GIbSmCGr 37.29 -.20
GlblThem 23.03 -.17
Gold&Prc 13.39 -.14
HiYldTx 13.09
IntTxAMT 12.17 +.01
Intl FdS 42.59 -.27
LgCpFoGr 32.11 -.34
LatAmrEq 32.38 -.03
MgdMuniS 9.54
MATFS 15.25 +.01
SP500S 18.62 -.21
WorldDiv 23.47 -.21
Davis Funds A:
NYVenA 34.31 -.28
Davis Funds B:
NYVen B 32.78 -.27
Davis Funds C:
NYVen C 33.08 -.27
Davis FundsY:
NYVenY 34.68 -.28
Delaware Invest A:
Diver Incp 9.35
SMIDCapG 22.58 -.13
TxUSAp 12.29
Delaware Invest B:
SelGrBt 34.33 -.27
Dimensional Fds:
EmMCrEqn20.14 -.01
EmMktV 29.41 -.02
IntSmVan 15.80 -.11
LargeCo 11.04 -.12
TAUSCorE2n9.79 -.09
USLgVan 22.46 -.25
USMicron 14.29 -.08
USTgdVal 16.66 -.12
USSmalln 22.21 -.13
USSmVa 25.62 -.18
IntlSmCon 15.76 -.09
EmMktSCn20.94 +.04
EmgMktn 27.20 -.02
Fixdn 10.32
IntGFxlnn 13.04 +.01
IntVan 16.37 -.20
InfProSec 12.83 -.02
Glb5Fxlncn11.15
2YGIFxdn 10.04
DFARIEn 26.05 -.19
Dodge&Cox:
Balanced 77.10 -.63


GblStock 8.87 -.09
Income 13.87 +.01
InlStk 34.23 -.35
Stock 119.87 -1.32
DoubleUne Funds:
TRBdln 11.39
TRBdNpn 11.38 -.01
Dreyfus:
Aprec 43.31 -.47
CTA 12.34
CorVA
Dreyf 9.62 -.10
DryMidr 28.47 -.20
GNMA 15.64
GrChinaA r 35.63 +.52
HiYdAp 6.67
StratValA 30.39 -.33
TechGroA 33.87 -.35
DreihsAclnc 10.66 -.01
Driehaus Funds:
EMktGr 30.21
EVPTxMEml48.16 -.03
Eaton Vance A:
ChinaAp 18.09 -.04
AMTFMulnc 10.49


Name NAV Chg
MulICGrA 8.31 -.08
InBosA 6.00 -.01
LgCpVal 19.21 -.20
NatlMunlnc 10.24
SpEqtA 16.00 -.11
TradGvA 7.32
Eaton Vance B:
HlthSBt 9.01 -.10
NatlMulnc 10.24
Eaton Vance C:
GovtC p 7.31
NatMunlnc 10.24
Eaton Vance I:
FltgRt 9.12
GblMacAbR 9.82 +.01
LgCapVal 19.25 -.21
FMI Funds:
LgCappxn 16.89 -.23
FPA Funds:
Newlnco 10.64 +.01
FPACres 29.08 -.17
Fairholme 30.93 -.14
Federated A:
MidGrStA 35.42 -.30
MuSecA 10.78
Federated Instl:
KaufmnR 4.94 -.03
TotRetBd 11.61
SbrValDvIS 4.95 -.04
Fidelity Adv FocT:
EnergyT 35.11 -.56
HItCarT 22.15 -.21
Fidelity Advisor A:
Nwlnsghp 22.35 -.20
StrlnA 12.70 +.01
Fidelity Advisor C:
Nwlnsghtn 21.12 -.19
Fidelity Advisor l:
EqGrl n 64.09 -.52
Eqlnl n 26.05 -.24
FItRatel n 9.92
IntBdln 11.74 +.01
Nwlnsgtln 22.62 -.20
SbtlnIn 12.85
Fidelity AdvisorT:
BalancT 16.45 -.10
DivGrTp 13.13 -.11
EqGrTp 59.90 -.50
EqInT 25.65 -.24
GrOppT 40.65 -.36
HilnAdTp 10.35 -.01
IntBdT 11.72 +.01
MulncTp 13.78 +.01
OvrseaT 17.76 -.10
STFiT 9.36 +.01
Fidelity Freedom:
FF2010xn 14.03 -.35
FF2010Kx 12.81 -.37
FF2015xn 11.74 -.29
FF2015Kx 12.88 -.37
FF2020xn 14.20 -.37
FF2020Kx 13.29 -.40
FF2025xn 11.84 -.31
FF2025Kx 13.46 -.39
FF2030xn 14.10 -.37
FF2030Kx 13.60 -.40
FF2035xn 11.70 -.29
FF2035Kx 13.72 -.37
FF2040xn 8.16 -.20
FF2040Kx 13.76 -.37
FF2045Kx 13.93 -.36
Fidelity Invest:
AIISectEq 11.78 -.12
AMgr50n 16.33 -.06
AMgr70rn 17.16 -.09
AMgr20rn 13.09 -.02
Balancn 19.95 -.13
BalancedK 19.95 -.13
BlueChGrn 48.07 -.46
BluChpGrK 48.10 -.47
CAMunn 12.96
Canadan 52.95 -.31
CapApn 28.81 -.21
CapDevOn 11.58 -.09
Cplncrn 9.49
ChinaRgr 30.18 +.13
CngS 465.09
CTMunrn 11.99 +.01
Contra n 76.22 -.67
ConbaK 76.16 -.68
CnvScn 25.58 -.11
DisEqn 23.95 -.21
DiscEqF 23.90 -.21
Divlntln 29.68 -.15
DivrslntKr 29.63 -.15
DivSkOn 17.06 -.16
DivGthn 29.33 -.26
EmergAsr n29.55 +.14
EmrMkn 22.99 +.07
Eq lncn 46.45 -.43
EQII n 19.21 -.20
ECapAp 18.79 -.14
Europe 30.95 -.24
Exch 323.88
Exportn 21.54 -.20
Fideln 35.19 -.33
Fiftyrn 19.78 -.19
FItRateHi r n 9.92
FrnOnexn 28.85 -.88
GNMAn 11.75 +.01
Govtlnc 10.59
GroCon 91.44 -.81
Grolnc n 20.95 -.20
GrowCoF 91.31 -.82
GrowthCoK 91.33 -.82
GrStratrn 20.38 -.16
Highlncrn 9.34
Indepnn 25.31 -.22
InProBdn 13.41
IntBdn 11.15 +.01
IntGovn 10.87 +.01
InfMu n 10.65
InfiDiscn 32.76 -.17
InlfSCprn 20.18 +.06
InvGrBdn 11.61 +.01
InvGBn 8.02 +.01
Japan r 9.76 -.01
JpnSm n 9.05 +.01
LgCapVal 10.96 -.12
LatAm 45.88 +.15
LevCoStkn 31.62 -.28
LowPrn 38.99 -.20
LowPriKr 38.96 -.20
Magellnn 71.90 -.68
MDMurn 11.62
MAMunn 12.69 +.01
MegaCpStknll.71 -.12
MIMunn 12.54
MidCapn 28.89 -.17
MNMunn 11.99
MtgSecn 11.36 +.01
Munilncn 13.57 +.01
NJMunrn 12.25
NwMktrn 17.77 +.01
NwMilln 29.85 -.25
NYMunn 13.69
OTCn 59.32 -.60
OhMunn 12.39
100index 9.27 -.11
Ovrsean 32.06 -.17
PcBasn 24.75 +.08
PAMunrn 11.47
Purihtn 19.21 -.10
PuritanK 19.20 -.10
RealElncr 11.36 -.01
RealEn 31.75 -.26
SAIISecEqF11.77 -.12
SCmdtyStrt n 8.80 -.01
SCmdtyStrF n8.84
SrEmrgMkt 16.94 +.05
SEmgMktF 16.97 +.05
SrslntGrw 11.78 -.05
SerlntGrF 11.80 -.05
SrslntVal 9.30 -.08
SerlnfValF 9.31 -.08
SrlnvGrdF 11.62 +.01
StlntMun 10.85 +.01
STBFn 8.60 +.01
SmCapDiscn23.56 -.13
SmllCpSrn 17.83 -.11
SCpValur 15.90 -.10
SkSellCVrnll.53 -.11
SkSlcACap e n27.85-.24
SkSelSmCp 19.79 -.11
Sratlncn 11.38 +.01
SbrReRtr 9.63 -.01
TaxFrBrn 11.72 +.01
TotalBdn 10.97 +.01
Trendn 72.15 -.68
USBI n 11.91 +.01
Utilityn 18.40 -.16
ValStratn 31.10 -.25
Value n 75.04 -.64
Wrldwn 20.04 -.14
Fidelity Selects:
Air n 39.72 -.41
Bankingn 19.13 -.11
Biotchn 108.25 -1.04
Brokrn 49.48 -.13
Chemn 117.04 -1.25
ComEquipn22.82 -.23
Compn 60.01 -.71
ConDisn 25.03 -.20
ConsuFnn 14.36 -.07
ConStapn 79.22 -.70
CstHon 47.84 -.36
DfAern 85.77 -1.05
Elecb n 44.66 -.41
Enrgyn 49.67 -.78
EngSvn 64.85 -.89
EnvAltEnrnl6.74 -.16
FinSvn 61.03 -.25
Gold r n 36.00 -.35
Healihn 132.25 -1.29
Insur n 50.96 -.36
Leisrn 99.67 -1.09
Materialn 70.11 -.77
MedDI n 56.71 -.51


MdEqSysn 27.39 -.32
Mulfd n 56.27 -.42
NtGasn 30.18 -.38
Pharmn 14.87 -.14
Retail n 61.02 -.41
Softwrn 81.13 -.53
Tech n 99.23 -.70
Telcm n 50.23 -.46
Trans n 50.62 -.47
UtilGrn 55.87 -.45
Wirelessn 8.17 -.07
Fidelity Spartan:
5001dxlnvn 49.64 -.55
5001dx I 49.64 -.56
Inlnxlrnvn 33.98 -.20
TotMldxF r 40.52 -.43
TotMktlnv n 40.52 -.42
USBondl 11.91 +.01
Fidelity Spart Adv:
ExMktAdrn39.19 -.26
5001dxAdvn49.64 -.56
IntAd rn 33.98 -.20
TotMktAd r n40.52 -.42
USBondl 11.91 +.01


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg | Name NAV Chg


First Eagle:
GlblA 48.12 -.35
OverseasA 21.85 -.14
First Investors A
BIChpAp
Eqtylnco p 7.59 -.08
GloblAp 6.87 -.06
GovtAp 11.39
GrolnAp 16.48 -.18
IncoAp 2.63
MATFAp 12.50
MITFAp 12.89
NJTFAp 13.70
NYTFAp 15.22 +.01
OppAp 30.14 -.24
PATFAp 13.80
SpSitAp 24.40 -.16
TxExlncop 10.27
TotRtAp 16.77 -.10
Forum Funds:
AbsSrlr 11.11 +.01
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUSp 8.84
ALTFAp 11.88
AZTFAp 11.50
CallnsAp 13.02
CAIntAp 12.18
CalTFAp 7.54
COTFAp 12.44 +.01
CTTFAp 11.41
CvtScAp 15.06 -.07
DblTFA 11.95 +.01
DynTchA 32.64 -.29
EqlncAp 17.92 -.19
Fedlntp 12.57 +.01
FedTFAp 12.77
FLTFAp 11.97 +.01
FoundAlpx 11.02 -.28
GATFA p 12.79
GoldPrMA 29.88 -.10
GrwthAp 49.88 -.46
HYTFA p 10.94
HilncA 2.09
IncomAp 2.23 -.01
InsTFAp 12.63 +.01
NYITFp 11.95 +.01
LATFAp 12.03
LMGvScA 10.25
MDTFAp 11.95 +.01
MATFAp 12.17
MITFAp 12.36 +.01
MNInsA 13.00 +.01
MOTFAp 12.73
NJTFAp 12.58 +.01
NYTFAp 12.13
NCTFAp 12.93 +.01
OhiolAp 13.13
ORTFAp 12.57
PATFAp 10.93
ReEScAp 16.75 -.12
RisDvAp 37.30 -.43
SMCpGrA 33.34 -.26
Stratlncpx 10.68 -.10
TtlRtnAp 10.55 +.01
USGovApx 6.80 -.02
UbIsAp 13.44 -.11
VATFAp 12.24
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdvn 13.28 +.01
IncmeAd 2.21 -.01
TGIbTRAdv 13.58
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.25 -.01
USGvCtx 6.76 -.01
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 22.05 -.16
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktAp 23.52 +.12
ForgnAp 6.80 -.04
GIBdAp 13.33 +.02
GrwthAp 19.22 -.14
WorldAp 15.55 -.10
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 22.97 +.11
ForgnC p 6.66 -.05
GIBdCp 13.35 +.01
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 16.27 -.08
GE Elfun S&S:
S&Slnc 11.76
US Eqty 43.69 -.46
GMOTrust:
USTreasx 25.01 +.01
GMOTrust III:
Quality 22.09 -.22
GMOTrust IV:
Intllntrl 20.68 -.26
GMOTrustVI:
EmgMktsr 11.58
IntlCorEq 28.14-.30
Quality 22.09 -.23
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 51.11 -.44
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 38.38 -.34
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 24.28 -.19
HiYield 7.31
HYMunin 9.43
MidCapV 38.63 -.35
ShtDrTF n 10.64
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.48
CapAplnst 41.71 -.43
Inllnv t 60.84 -.59
Intir 61.41 -.59
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 33.83 -.29
DivGthAp 20.34 -.22
IntOpAp 14.90 -.15
Hartford Fds Y:
CapAppl n 33.81 -.30
Hartford HLSIA:
CapApp 42.63 -.40
Div&Gr 21.18 -.23
Balanced 20.82 -.15
MidCap 27.74 -.23
TotRetBd 12.00
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
StrGrowth 10.96 +.06
ICON Fds:
EnergyS 18.48 -.30
HIlhcareS 17.11 -.17
ISI Funds:
NoAmp 7.94 -.01
IVA Funds:
Wdwide Ir 15.79 -.08
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 13.29 -.11
Invesco Funds:
Energy 36.39 -.62
Ublibes 16.99 -.14
Invesco Funds A:
BalRiskA 12.41 -.04
Chart p 17.72 -.15
Cmstk 17.52 -.19
Constp 23.47 -.21
DivrsDivp 13.29 -.12
EqlncA 9.10 -.06
GrIncAp 20.64 -.20
HilncMu p
HiYldp 4.44
HYMuA 10.12 +.01
InfGrow 28.58 -.13
MunilnA 13.93
PATFA 17.07
US MortgA 13.01
Invesco Funds B:
MunilnB 13.91 +.01
US Mortg 12.94
Invesco FundsY:
BalRiskY 12.49 -.04
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCt 24.78 -.18
AssetStAp 25.41 -.18
AssetStrlr 25.59 -.18
HilncAp 8.53 -.01
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 12.11
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 12.16
JP Morgan Instl:
MdCpVal n 27.61 -.20
JPMorgan R CI:
CoreBondnl2.12 +.01
ShtDurBd 11.01 +.01
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 11.02 -.12
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 12.11 +.01
HighYldn 8.19
IntmTFBdn11.35 +.01
LgCpGr 23.48 -.21
ShtDurBd n 11.00
USLCCrPIsn21.74 -.24
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 25.98 -.17
ContrarnT 14.82 -.11
EnterprT 64.88 -.46
FIlxBndT 11.04
GlUfeSciTr 29.55 -.25
GIbSelT 9.85 -.08
GITechTr 18.53 -.12
Grw&lncT 33.63 -.36
JanusT 31.35 -.27
OvrseasTr 33.51 -.02
PrkMCVal T21.03 -.18
ResearchT 31.95 -.31
ShTmBdT 3.10
TwentyT 60.70 -.62
VentureT 53.46 +.06
WrldWTr 46.45 -.38
John Hancock A:
BondAp 16.45 +.01
IncomeAp 6.75


RgBkA 14.04 -.09
John Hancock B:
IncomeB 6.75
John Hancock Cl 1:
LSAggr 12.71 -.09
LSBalanc 13.43 -.06
LSConsrv 13.39 -.02
LSGrwth 13.32 -.08
LSModer 13.25 -.04
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 19.40 +.03


Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 19.89 +.03
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 124.18 -1.42
CBApprp 15.46 -.16
CBLCGrp 22.49 -.26
GCIAIICOp 9.12 -.06
WAHilncAt 6.27
WAMgMup 17.23
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 20.23 -.23
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 30.12 -.24
CMValTrp 41.95 -.35
Longleaf Partners:
Partnersx 26.07 -.51
SmCapx 28.54 -.21
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 15.08 -.02
StrlncC 15.49 -.05
LSBondR 15.02 -.02
StrncA 15.40 -.04
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.61 -.01
InvGrBdY 12.62
Lord Abbett A:
AffilApx 11.83 -.18
BdDebAp 8.13 -.01
ShDurlncAp 4.65
MidCpAp 17.66 -.16
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncC t 4.68
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.65 +.01
MFS Funds A:
MITA 21.16 -.22
MIGA 17.56 -.17
EmGA 47.80 -.47
HilnA 3.59
MFLA
TotRA 15.15 -.10
UtilA 18.52 -.11
ValueA 25.04-.26
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 15.80 -.16
GvScBn 10.46 -.01
HilnBn 3.60
MulnBn 9.03
TotRBn 15.15 -.10
MFS Funds I:
Valuel 25.15 -.27
MFS Funds Instl:
InlEqn 19.05 -.12
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 6.11
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 14.34 -.08
GovtBt 8.93
HYIdBBt 6.08
IncmBldr 17.55 -.11
InflEqB 10.84 -.03
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 37.97 -.40
Mairs & Power:
Growthxn 82.71 -2.36
Managers Funds:
Yackfnanpnl8.88 -.17
YacktFocn 20.28 -.18
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 7.66 -.07
Matthews Asian:
AsiaDvlnvr 14.46
AsianGllnv 18.46 -.05
Indialnvr 17.31 +.10
PacTgrlnv 24.13 -.06
MergerFdx nl5.77 -.35
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.90 -.01
TotRtBdl 10.90
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 2.52 -.02
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 14.60 -.13
MorganStanley Inst:
InflEql 14.25 -.06
MCapGrl 34.22 -.25
Muhlenkn 51.28 -.47
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 27.76 -.25
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrY 32.15 -.23
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 13.22 -.07
GblDiscA 28.01 -.20
GlbDiscZ 28.38 -.21
QuestZ 16.41 -.08
SharesZ 22.22 -.16
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 22.20 -.22
Geneslnst 48.03 -.27
Intir 17.44 -.11
LgCapVInv 27.60 -.30
Neuberger&BermTr:
Genesis 49.96 -.28
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc In 9.86 +.01
Nicholasn 47.71 -.36
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 10.97
HiYFxlnc 7.55
IntTxEx 10.74
SmCpldx 9.08 -.05
Stkldx 17.38 -.20
Technly 15.99 -.15
Nuveen CI A:
HYMuBdp 17.14
LtMBAp 11.22
Nuveen CI R:
IntDMBd 9.36
HYMunBd 17.14
Nuveen CI Y:
RealEstxn 21.04 -.25
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 42.98 -.41
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 28.17 -.21
Globall 23.19 -.13
Inll I r 20.78 -.03
Oakmark 47.81 -.47
Select 30.39 -.30
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.52 -.02
GIbSMdCap 14.52 -.05
LgCapStrat 9.89 -.05
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMux 7.30
AMTFrNYx 12.33
CAMuniApx 8.84
CapApAp 47.43 -.48
CaplncAp 9.08 -.02
DvMktAp 35.00 +.02
Discp 57.73 -.19
EquityA 9.40 -.10
EqlncAp 25.13 -.20
GlobAp 63.88 -.54
GIbOppA 28.69 -.12
GblStrlncA 4.36
Goldp 30.54 -.33
IntBdApx 6.58 -.04
LtdTmMux 15.11
MnStFdA 36.46 -.36
PAMuniApx11.52
SenFltRtAx 8.30
USGvpx 9.57 -.24
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMux 7.26 +.01
AMTFrNYx 12.34 +.01
CplncB t 8.90 -.02
EquityB 8.70 -.09
GblStrlncB 4.38 +.01
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYApx 3.38
RoMuApx 17.02
RcNtMuAx 7.63
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 34.58 +.02
InlBdYx 6.58 -.04
IntGrowY 30.37 -.17
Osterweis Funds:
Strlncon 11.64
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAd p 9.88
TotRtAd 11.25 +.01
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AIAsetAutr 11.22 +.03
AIIAsset 12.66 +.01
ComodRR 6.65
Divlnc 12.25
EmgMkCur 10.54
EmMkBd 12.49 +.01
Fltlnc r 8.95 -.01
ForBdUnr 10.91
FrgnBd 10.78 +.01
HiYld 9.64 -.01
InvGrCp 11.15 +.01
LowDu 10.51
ModDur 10.90 +.01
RealRtnl 12.31
ShortT 9.88
TotRt 11.25 +.01
TRII 10.69 +.01
TRIll 9.90 +.01
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAutt 11.17 +.03
LwDurA 10.51
RealRtAp 12.31
TotRtA 11.25 +.01
PIMCO Funds C:
AIIAstAutt 11.09 +.04
RealRtCp 12.31
TotRtCt 11.25 +.01
PIMCO Funds D:
RealRh p 12.31
TRhip 11.25 +.01
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIAuthP 11.22 +.04
TotRtnP 11.25 +.01


Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 28.82 -.23
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 48.23 -.23
Pioneer Funds A:
BondAp 9.93
InfValA 18.98 -.12
PionFdAp 31.94 -.32
ValueAp 11.67 -.13
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 10.37 -.03


Name NAV Chg
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdCt 10.47 -.03
Pioneer FdsY:
StatlncYp 11.28
Price Funds:
Balancen 20.45 -.12
BIChipn 44.73 -.46
CABondn 11.55
CapAppn 22.06 -.12
DivGron 25.98 -.25
EmMktBn 14.21 +.01
EmEurop 19.24 -.09
EmMktSn 33.69 +.02
Eqlncn 26.06 -.27
Eqlndexn 37.76 -.42
Europe n 15.87 -.17
GNMAn 10.00 -.01
Growth n 37.04 -.36
Gr&ln n 22.22 -.22
HIlhScin 40.64 -.38
HiYieldn 6.98
InsfCpG 18.49 -.21
InstHiYld n 9.76
MCEqGrn 30.06 -.25
InlBondn 10.11 -.01
IntDisn 45.71 -.07
IntlG&l 12.84 -.10
IntlStkn 14.23 -.11
Japan n 7.95 -.03
LatAmn 37.62 +.06
MDShrtn 5.22
MDBondn 11.09
MidCapn 55.50 -.45
MCapVal n 23.67 -.21
NAmern 35.31 -.31
NAsian 16.66 +.02
NewEran 41.03 -.49
NHorizn 32.57 -.19
NlIncn 9.86 +.01
NYBondn 11.92
OverSSFn 8.43 -.06
PSIncn 17.13 -.06
RealAssetrnlO.93 -.09
RealEstn 20.78 -.16
R2010n 16.34 -.08
R2015n 12.76 -.07
R2020n 17.69 -.11
R2025n 12.96 -.09
R2030n 18.68 -.14
R2035n 13.20 -.10
R2040n 18.82 -.15
R2045n 12.53 -.10
SciTecn 26.69 -.19
ShtBdn 4.85
SmCpStkn 33.38 -.19
SmCapVal n38.39 -.20
SpecGrn 19.09 -.17
Speclnn 12.98 -.01
TFIncn 10.57
TxFrHn 11.92
TxFrSIn 5.69
USTIntn 6.23
USTLgn 13.68 +.05
VABondn 12.31
Value n 25.95 -.29
Principal Inv:
Divlnllnst 10.11 -.08
LgCGIIn 9.67 -.11
LT20201n 12.78 -.08
LT20301n 12.63 -.08
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 18.11 -.16
HiYldAp 5.71
MidCpGrAx 30.69 -.28
MuHilncA 10.37
STCrpBdA 11.56
UtlityA 11.74 -.06
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 17.93 -.18
HiYldBt 5.70 -.01
Prudential Fds Z&I:
MadCapGrZ x 31.86-.29
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.16
AZTE 9.52
ConvSec 20.31 -.05
DvrlnAp 7.77
EqlnAp 16.71 -.18
EuEq 20.45
GeoBalA 13.22 -.08
GlbEqtyp 9.56
GrlnAp 14.76
GIblHIthA 44.04 -.43
HiYdAp 7.95
HiYldln 6.16
IncmAp 7.27 +.01
IntGrlnp 9.67 -.06
InvAp 14.31 -.15
NJTxAp 9.85
MultCpGr 54.80 -.55
PATE 9.54
TxExA p 9.08
TFInAp 15.74
TFHYA 12.76
USGvAp 13.52
GlblUtilA 10.23 -.09
VoyAp 21.59 -.23
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.76 +.01
DvrlnBt 7.70
Eqlnct 16.57 -.18
EuEq 19.65
GeoBalB 13.08 -.09
GIbEqt 8.64
GINtRst 17.43 -.25
GrlnBt 14.50
GIblHIthB 34.40 -.34
HiYldBt 7.94
HYAdBt 6.03 -.01
IncmBt 7.20
IntGrlnt 9.61 -.07
IntlGrth t 14.51 -.08
InvBt 12.90 -.14
NJTxB t 9.84 +.01
MultCpGr 46.88 -.48
TxExBt 9.08
TFHYBt 12.78
USGvBt 13.45
GlblUtilB 10.20 -.09
VoyBt 18.17 -.20
RS Funds:
IntGrA 17.83 -.16
LgCAIphaA 43.24 -.40
Value 25.48 -.19
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 8.41 -.09
Royce Funds:
MicroCaplx 14.48 -.09
PennMulrx 11.27 -.11
Premierl rx 18.85 -.18
TotRetl rx 13.40 -.10
ValSvct 11.11 -.09
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 11.30
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 15.78 -.16
SEI Portfolios:
S&P500En 38.56 -.43
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 20.60 +.08
Schwab Funds:
HIthCare 18.22 -.19
10001nvr 37.82 -.40
S&PSel 21.82 -.24
SmCpSI 20.81
TSMSelr 25.32 -.26
Scout Funds:
Inl 32.96 -.29
Selected Funds:
AmShD 41.14 -.34
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 33.65 -.35
Sequoia 166.62 -.96
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 42.74 -.46
SoSunSClnv t n22.08-.21
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 54.79 -.60
Stratton Funds:
Mull-Cap 36.73 -.31
RealEstate 29.67 -.18
SmCap 54.35 -.35
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.05
TCW Funds:
EmMktlnx 9.31 -.25
TotRetBdlx 10.29 -.05
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 11.01
Eqldxlnst 10.62 -.11
InlEqllnst 16.04 -.16
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 19.46 -.10
Third Avenue Fds:
InlValnstr 16.84 -.08
REVallnstr 25.16 -.09
Valuelnst 49.40 -.09
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 27.38 -.05
IncBuildAt 18.74 -.08
IncBuildCp 18.73 -.09
IntValue I 28.02 -.04
LtTMul 14.66 +.01
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 5.07
Incom 9.37
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp9.69 -.01
Flexlncp 9.38 +.01
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 32.92 -.21
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 23.23 -.09
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 24.94 -.23
ChinaReg 7.57 +.04
GlbRs 9.58 -.08


Name NAV Chg
NYBd 12.52
PrecMM 26.06 -.22
SciTech 14.52 -.11
ShtTBnd 9.28
SmCpSk 14.80 -.09
TxElt 13.75 +.01
TxELT 13.94
TxESh 10.83
VABd 11.64
WldGr 21.44 -.15
VALIC :
MdCpldx 20.63 -.14
Stkldx 25.66 -.29
Value Line Fd:
LrgCox 19.49 -.31
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdmln 23.54 -.13
CAITAdm n 11.74
CALTAdn 12.00
CpOpAdl n 76.41 -.77
EMAdmr r n 36.42 +.05
Energyn 109.25 -4.05
EqlnAdm n n49.94 -.57
EuroAdml n 59.98 -.72
ExplAdml n 72.51 -.48
ExtdAdm n 45.03 -.31
500Admlnl 129.18 -1.43
GNMAAdn 10.91 -.09
GrwAdm n 35.97 -.37
HlthCrn 59.85 -.55
HiYldCpn 6.11
InfProAd n 28.65
ITBdAdml n 11.99 +.02
ITsryAdml n 11.72 -.06
IntGrAdm n 60.64 -.40
ITAdmln 14.38 +.01
ITGrAdmn 10.34 -.14
LtdTrAdn 11.14
LTGrAdmln 10.96 -.05
LTAdmln 11.80
MCpAdmnln00.21 -.89
MorgAdm n 60.61 -.60
MuHYAdm nl1.29
NYLTAdn 11.79
PrmCaprn 71.08 -.76
PALTAdm n11.73
ReitAdm r n 92.23 -.66
STsyAdmln 10.74 -.05
STBdAdml nlO.63
ShtTrAdn 15.91
STFdAdn 10.80 -.09
STIGrAdn 10.83 -.04
SmCAdm n 38.02 -.25
SmCapGrth n30.65 -.19
SmCapValn30.66 -.21
TxMCap r n 69.99 -.74
TUBAdmln 11.11 +.01
TStkAdm n 35.05 -.36
ValAdmlIn 22.59 -.25
WellslAdm n58.24 -.18
WellnAdm n58.00 -1.63
Windsorn 50.09 -.52
WdsrllAdn 51.36 -.53
Vanguard Fds:
CALTn 12.00
CapOppn 33.09 -.33
Convrtn 12.57 -.55
DivApplnn 23.50 -.26
DivdGron 16.44 -.37
Energy 58.20 -2.12
Eqlncn 23.83 -.27
Explr n 77.97 -.52
FLLTn 12.21 -.02
GNMAn 10.91 -.09
GlobEqn 18.45 -.47
Grolncn 29.80 -.33
GrthEqn 12.06 -.12
HYCorpn 6.11
HlthCren 141.87 -1.30
InflaPron 14.58
InlExplrn 14.60 -.46
IntlGrn 19.07 -.12
InfVal n 30.87 -.29
ITIGraden 10.34 -.14
ITTsryn 11.72 -.06
LifeConn 16.89 -.51
LifeGron 23.04 -.80
Lifelncn 14.20 -.61
LifeModn 20.39 -.78
LTIGraden 10.96 -.05
LTTsryn 13.23 -.13
Morg n 19.56 -.19
MuHYn 11.29
Mulntn 14.38 +.01
MuLtdn 11.14
MuLongn 11.80
MuShrtn 15.91
NJLTn 12.34 +.01
NYLTn 11.79
OHLTTEn 12.71 -.02
PALTn 11.73
PrecMtlsrn 15.61 -.48
PrmcpCorn 14.71 -.16
Prmcp r n 68.53 -.74
SelValurn 20.61 -.17
STARn 20.64 -.44
STIGraden 10.83 -.04
STFedn 10.80 -.09
STTsryn 10.74 -.05
StratEqn 21.03 -.52
TgtRetlncn 12.16 -.16
TgRe2010n24.02 -.65
TgtRe2015 n3.29 -.38
TgRe2020n23.63 -.66
TgtRe2025 n3.46 -.39
TgRe2030n23.13 -.67
TgtRe2035 n3.92 -.42
TgtRe2040n22.88 -.69
TgtRe2050n22.79 -.68
TgtRe2045 n4.37 -.43
USGron 20.85 -.20
USValuen 11.65 -.12
Wellslyn 24.04 -.07
Wellnn 33.58 -.94
Wndsrn 14.85 -.15
Wndsll n 28.94 -.30
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl r n99.80 -.89
ExtMktln 111.12 -.76
MidCplstP n109.17 -.96
TotlntAdm r r24.81 -.15
Totlntllnstr n99.23 -.58
TotlntllP rn 99.25 -.57
TotlntSig r n 29.77 -.17
500 n 129.19 -1.43
Balancedn 23.54 -.13
EMktn 27.73 +.04
Europe n 25.76 -.31
Extend n 45.03 -.31
Growth n 35.98 -.37
LgCaplxn 25.88 -.28
LTBndn 14.41 +.05
MidCapn 22.09 -.19
Pacific n 10.05 -.03
REITrn 21.62 -.15
SmCapn 38.01 -.25
SmlCpGthln24.51 -.15
STBndn 10.63
TotBndn 11.11 +.01
Totllntln 14.84 -.08
TotStk n 35.04 -.36
Value n 22.59 -.25
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 23.54 -.13
DevMklnstn 9.58 -.09
EmMklnstn27.69 +.03
Extlnn 45.03 -.31
FTAIIWdl r n88.54 -.54
Grwthlstn 35.97 -.37
InfProlnstn 11.67
Instldxn 128.34-1.43
InsPIn 128.35 -1.42
InstTStldxn 31.73 -.32
InsTStPlus n31.73 -.33
MidCplstn 22.13 -.20
REITInstrn 14.27 -.11
STBondldxnlO0.63
STIGrlnstn 10.83 -.04
SClnstn 38.02 -.25
TBIstn 11.11 +.01
TSInstn 35.05 -.36
Valuelstn 22.59 -.25
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgln 106.71 -1.18
GroSign 33.31 -.34
ITBdSign 11.99 +.02
MidCpldxcbn 31.62 -.28
STBdlcdxbn 10.63
SmCpSig n 34.25 -.23
TotBdSgln 11.11 +.01
TotStkSgl n 33.83 -.34
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.96
Virtus Funds I:
EmMktl 10.25 +.02
Waddell & Reed Adv:
Assets p 9.66 -.07
CorelnvA 6.18 -.07
DivOppAp 15.12 -.16
DivOppCt 14.98 -.15
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 40.65 -.12
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 12.59
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmSklnv 20.54 -.15
Opptylnv 38.95 -.34
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UIStMulnc 4.82
Wells Fargo Admin:
Growth 41.01 -.32
Western Asset:
CrPlsBdFlp 11.68
CorePlusl I 11.68
William Blair N:
GrowihN 11.81 -.12


Gld&Mtls 11.49 -.05
WdPrcMn 11.34 -.01
USAA Group:
AgvGt 32.13 -.33
CABd 11.15
CrnstStr 22.89 -.05
GovSec 10.32
GrTxSr 14.49 -.07
Grwth 16.62 -.16
Gr&lnc 15.90 -.17
IncStk 13.41 -.14
Inco 13.48
Inl 25.80 -.09


Stocks tumble


Market watch
Dec. 28, 2012

Dow Jones -158.20
industrials ,938.11
12,938.11

Nasdaq -25.60
composite 2,960.31


Associated Press


NEW YORK Stocks fell
for a fifth day on concern
that Washington lawmakers
will fail to reach a budget
deal before a self-imposed
year-end deadline.
The five-day losing streak
for the Dow Jones industrial
average was the longest
since July
The Dow dropped 158.20
points to 12,938.11 points,
with losses accelerating in
the last 20 minutes of trad-
ing as reports circulated
that President Barack
Obama would not be making
a new budget proposal in a
meeting with congressional
leaders.
The Standard & Poor 500
index fell 15.67 points to
1,402.43, its longest losing
streak in three months, and
the Nasdaq dropped 25.59
points to 2,960.31.
"The reality, late in the day,
is that a deal is just not going
to get done," said Ryan Det-
rick, a senior technical
strategist at Schaeffer Invest-
ment Research. "We could be
greeted by a big sell-off at the
start of January"
President Barack Obama


-15.67

1,402.43


Russell -5.30
2000
2000 832.10


NYSE diary
Advanced: 970

Declined: 2,086

Unchanged: 101

Volume: 2.4 b

Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 832

Declined: 1,638

Unchanged: 117

Volume: 1.1 b
AP


returned from a Christmas
break in Hawaii to meet
with congressional leaders
at the White House to try
thrash out the terms of a
deal that would prevent
across-the-board tax in-
creases for millions of


Americans as well as simul-
taneous government spend-
ing cuts beginning Jan. 1.
Those measures, if imple-
mented, could push the
economy back into reces-
sion, economists say
Stocks closed lower
Thursday but erased most of
an early loss after Republi-
cans said they would recon-
vene the House of
Representatives Sunday in
hopes of piecing together a
last-minute budget deal.
Traders have been focus-
ing on Washington, and the
budget negotiations, since
the Nov 6 presidential elec-
tion returned a divided gov-
ernment to power.
"I can't wait till this is
done, so we can start talking
about markets again and not
just about politics," said
Doug Cote, chief market
strategist at ING Investment
Management. Cote doesn't
expect lawmakers will man-
age to reach a deal before the
deadline and says that when
people assess the extent of
tax increases on the way, "the
market is going to reel."
Cote also expects slowing
earnings growth to hit
stocks.


Business HIGHLIGHTS


Champagne loses fizz in

Europe after tough year

PARIS Europeans are finding fewer reasons
to pop open a bottle of Champagne as another
year of economic troubles and high unemploy-
ment saps the region's appetite for the finer
things. But while the latest industry figures show
that sales might be on the wane in Europe, other
markets, particularly Japan and the United States,
are developing a taste for a glass of bubbly.
In what is certain to be bad news for the vine-
yards, France Champagne's largest market
- is drinking fewer bottles. Sales of Champagne
for the country were down 4.9 percent, and 5
percent elsewhere in the 27-country European
Union, in the first nine months of 2012 compared
with the same period in 2011, according to CIVC,
the national association of growers and produc-
ers of the wine.

US pending home sales rise

to highest in 2 1/2 years

WASHINGTON -A measure of Americans
who signed contracts to buy homes increased
last month to its highest level in two and a half
years, the latest sign of improvement in the
once-battered housing market.
The National Association of Realtors said Fri-
day its seasonally adjusted pending home sales
index rose 1.7 percent in November from Octo-
ber to 106.4. That's the highest since April 2010,
when a homebuyer tax credit caused a spike in
sales. And after excluding those months when
the tax credit was available, it's the best reading
since February 2007.
The increase followed a 5 percent gain in Oc-
tober and suggests higher sales of previously
occupied homes in the coming months.
-From wire reports


Name Last Chg
SP Inds 37.22 -.41
SPTech 28.36 -.32
SP UI 34.45 -.35
StdPac 7.11 -.03
Standex 49.95 +.29
StarwdHl 56.14 -.79
StateSt 46.05 -.03
Steris 34.64 -.27
SIIwtrM 12.47 +.04
Stryker 54.45 -.71
SturmRug 43.86 +.59
SubPpne 38.74 +.79
SunOmts 39.11 -.17
Suncorgs 32.27 -.46
SunriseSen 14.39
Suntedch 1.40 +.07
SunTrst 27.79 -.20
SupEnrgy 20.11 -.34
Supvalu 2.40 -.07
Synovus 2.44
Syso 31.41 -.30
TCF Fncl 12.04 -.08
TDAmeritr 16.65 -.10
TEConnect 36.34 -.59
TECO 16.56 -.16
TIM Part 19.99 +.39
TJXs 41.62 +.09
TRWAuto 52.00 -.79
TaiwSemi 17.13 +.15
TalismEg 11.04 -.16


Target 58.57
TataMotors 28.34
TeckResg 35.22
TelefBrasil 24.08
TelefEsp 13.23
TenetHltrs 31.33
Teradyn 16.42
Terex 26.32
TerraNitro 211.04
Tesoro 42.75
TetraTech 7.40
TevaPhrm 37.20
Textron 24.12
Theragen 1.55
ThermoFis 62.91
ThomCrkg 4.22
3DSys 51.08
3MCo 91.78
Tiffany 56.44
TWCable 95.18
TimeWarn 46.93
Timken 46.30
TitanMet 16.49
TollBros 31.27
TorchEngy .60
Torchmark 50.96
TorDBkg 83.50
TotalSA 51.43
TotalSys 21.23
Transocn 44.20
Travelers 71.24
Tredgar 19.65


TriConf 15.86 -.12 ValeSApf 19.86
TrinaSolar 4.22 -.07 ValeroE 33.10
Tronoxs 18.38 -.54 VlyNBcp 9.16
TurqHillRs 7.27 -.01 VangTotBd 84.11
TwoHrblnv 10.95 -.17 VanHiDvY 48.63
Tyolnfs 28.57 -.34 VangTSM 71.98
Tyson 19.18 -.19 VanS&P500 64.09
UBSAG 15.61 -.23 VangREIT 65.11
UDR 23.58 -.18 VangDivAp 58.73
UIL Hold 35.17 -.46 VangAIIW 44.98
UNSEngy 42.01 -.58 VangEmg 43.88
USAirwy 12.79 -.31 VangEur 47.90
USG 27.05 -.20 VangEAFE 34.72
UltaPtg 18.05 -.35 VarianMed 69.62
UndArmrs 47.42 -.63 Vecten 29.02
UniFirst 72.72 -.22 VeoliaEnv 11.83
UnilevNV 37.87 -.34 VeriFone 28.70
UnionPac 123.54 -1.08 VerizonOm 42.90
UtdContl 23.04 -.15 Visa 148.65
UtdMicro 2.00 -.02 Vishaylnt 10.15
UPS B 72.83 -1.08 VMware 92.85
UtdRentals 42.72 -.76 Vonage 2.30
US Bancrp 31.68 -.34 Vornado 79.27
US NGs rs 19.47 +.31 WGL Hol 38.65
USOilFd 33.04 -.15 WPXEnn 14.74
USSteel 23.03 -.61 Wabash 9.12
UtdTech 80.81 -1.26 WalMart 67.61
UtdhlthGp 53.86 -.58 Walgrn 36.54
U G 2055 16 WalterEn 33.82
WsteMInc 33.46
V SA 5- Weathflnl 10.58
ValeSA 20.52 -.10 WeinRlt 26.55


Standard &
Poor's 500


Fewer US banks failing as

industry strengthens

WASHINGTON U.S. banks are ending the
year with their best profits since 2006 and fewer
failures than at any time since the financial crisis
struck in 2008. They're helping support an econ-
omy slowed by high unemployment, flat pay,
sluggish manufacturing and anxious consumers.
As the economy heals from the worst financial
crisis since the Great Depression, more people
and businesses are taking out and repaying
- loans. For the first time since 2009, banks'
earnings growth is being driven by higher rev-
enue a healthy trend. Banks had previously
managed to boost earnings by putting aside less
money for possible losses.

Trains carrying more oil

across US amid boom

BILLINGS, Mont. Energy companies be-
hind the oil boom on the Northern Plains are in-
creasingly turning to an industrial-age workhorse
- the locomotive to move their crude to re-
fineries across the U.S., as plans for new
pipelines stall and existing lines can't keep up
with demand.
Delivering oil thousands of miles by rail from
the heartland to refineries on the East, West and
Gulf coasts costs more, but it can mean in-
creased profits up to $10 or more a barrel -
because of higher oil prices on the coasts. That
works out to about $700,000 per train.
The parade of mile-long trains carrying haz-
ardous material out of North Dakota and Mon-
tana and across the country has experts and
federal regulators concerned. Rail transport is
less safe than pipelines, they say, and the prolif-
eration of oil trains raises the risk of a major de-
railment and spill.


I*s-.S. 1.L iP AND ;. IPV R


YOUR INTERLOCKINGBRICKPAVERSPECIALIST

COPES A
SPOOL AND PAVER LLC

Inrd 352-400-3188


I NEWYORKSTOCK EXCHANGE I


WellPoint 59.89
WellsFargo 33.91
WestarEn 28.16
WAstEMkt 15.18
WstAMgdHi 6.09
WAstlnfOpp 13.18
WstnRefin 27.25
WsnUnion 13.38
Weyerhsr 27.58
Whrlpl 99.02
WhifngPet 41.67
WmsCos 31.79
WmsPtrs 47.25
WmsSon 42.71
Winnbgo 16.72
WiscEngy 36.48
WTJpTot 36.35
WTIndia 19.14
Worthgn 25.10
Wyndham 52.13
XLGrp 24.69
XcelEngy 26.25
Xerox 6.69
Yamanag 16.74
YingliGrn 2.27
YumBrnds 64.72







Page A8 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012



PINION


"The whole difference between construction and
creation is exactly this: that a thing constructed can
only be loved after it is constructed; but a thing
created is loved before it exists.
Charles Dickens, (1812-1870)


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan....................................... publisher
M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
S Charlie Brennan ................................editor at large
Curt Ebitz................. .................citizen member
S Mac Harris ..................... ........... citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ...............................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ................ ....... ....... ...... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

MAKING THINGS HAPPEN




Crystal River



revitalization



project


There's been a big stir in
Crystal River lately over
a revitalization vision
and master plan proposal
championed by District 1
County Commissioner Dennis
Damato. The stir seems to be
more about the plan's proposer
than the plan itself. That's a
shame, because the real focus
needs to be on Crystal River's


project.
The vision part of the plan
pulls in a well-developed con-
cept successfully applied else-
where in Florida and
nationwide. Most folks' eyes
glaze over at the mention of
"form-based land use codes,"
but the phrase refers to a de-
sign code for preserving or en-
abling a specific urban area


future, that establishes
Damato pre- THEISSUE basic physical
sented his ideas standards, then
to the County A vision and the invites develop-
Commission, the beginnings of a plan ers to creatively
Crystal River are on the table. operate within
City Council those stan-
(which under- OUR OPINION: dards. It's about
standably didn't creating a liv-
like being left Come together to make able, walkable,
out of the plan- good things happen e n j o yable
ning process) place.
and, at a recent town hall The conceptual plan pro-
meeting, to more than 100 poses three major districts:
community residents and downtown/historic waterfront;
leaders, town center/environmental;
Overall, audiences were re- and resort.


ceptive to con-
sidering the
ideas, which is a
good thing. But
it's just a start.
As Henry Ford
famously said:
"Coming to-
gether is a begin-
ning. Keeping
together is
progress. Work-
ing together is
success."


* See the "Partnership
for a New Beginning"
presentation document
on Commissioner
Dennis Damato's page
at the Citrus County
Board of County
Commissioners' web-
site: http://www.citrus
countyfl.org/events/
cr_redev_concept.pdf


The goal of Damato's "Part-
nership for a New Beginning"
is to revitalize Crystal River
using modern planning stan-
dards to connect unique city
assets for living, working and
playing in a green, water-sen-
sitive environment.
The plan makes a lot of sense
and encompasses many of the
good things Crystal River al-
ready has in play. The city has
rebuilt parks, is moving ahead
with the proposed Riverwalk,
has detailed Cutler Spur im-
provements and is "all-in" for
the Three Sisters Springs


Found wedding ring
I wish to acknowledge a person
in Winn-Dixie pro-
duce section named 01
Jerry. He found my
24-carat wideband
wedding ring and,
God bless him, he re-
turned it to the serv-
ice desk and I was
able to recover it yes-
terday. I bless him
and thank him ... I CLL
just wish to say 563-1
thank you very, very
much, Jerry, for re-
turning my wedding ring. I had
lost my husband back in January


I

0


The practical
part of the plan
delivers the
good news that
public funding
for much of it is
already avail-
able, and its exe-
cution should
make Crystal
River more at-
tractive for de-
sirable private
or public/private


development.
The challenge to making
these proposed good things
happen for Crystal River will
be getting all the interested
parties to the table, able and
willing to collaborate and con-
tribute ideas, knowledge and
resources. That includes all
manner of government groups
including local, regional and
state, as well as business and
private groups and individuals.
Casey Stengel had it right:
"Gettin' good players is easy.
Gettin' 'em to play together is
the hard part."


and it was very, very important to
me. He is a very, very honest man.
He could have sold it. He could
have pawned it. He
JND could have done any-
F thing and I'm very,
O very grateful.
Thank you ... I lost
my ring on Dec. 19
and did not realize it
was off my finger until
the next morning.
I retraced my steps
)579 and then I found that
Jerry was kind enough
to return the ring and I
now have it back again. Thank you
very, very much.


United Way needs your help
The United Way of Citrus County needs your help this holiday
season. The Chronicle is asking readers to join in and support the
countywide nonprofit agency by making a contribution of $31.12 (or
whatever you can afford). The United Way helps fund 19 nonprofit
agencies in the community and is leading the effort to impact
important community concerns. Please send your contribution to
Gerry Mulligan at the Chronicle/United Way, 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429.
Gerry Mulligan, publisher


A salute to

(4 ceace on earth, good ber when the Senat
will toward men." That U.N. Convention on
Sentiment, so noble Persons With Disal
and hopeful, rings particularly an international
hollow in Washington this holiday mainly on the An
season. Just look at the last few Disabilities Act th
weeks. into law in 1990
House Republi- George H.V
can hard-liners tor- ,.. treaty was
pedoed efforts by his son,
their own leader, Younger, in
Speaker John been ratil
Boehner, to pass an countries.
extremely modest The treat
revenue bill raising '; strong sup
taxes on million- ) John McCa:
aires. The Heritage Sen. Bob
Foundation con- verely wou
demned the meas- Cokie and veterans an
ure by saying it Steven Roberts nominees J
would "constitute a Dole felt s(
clear path toward OTHER that he wa
surrender on VOICES the Senat(
conservative wheelchair
principles." debate. That mean
What principles are those, ex- person who ever
actly? Political paralysis? Chaotic dent on the GOP tic
markets? Looming recession? n't find Mitt Romr
Retiring Sen. Joe Lieberman of endorsed the tre
Connecticut called the failure of eight GOP senators
Congress to deal with the fiscal it lost by five votes.
crisis "the most colossal ... act of The arguments
congressional irresponsibility in treaty were stunni]
a long time," and that's probably ceit and ignorance
an understatement. hofe of Oklahoma
Then there is Wayne LaPierre, empower "overzea
the head of the National Rifle As- tional organization
sociation, who responded to the American biases
bloodshed in Newtown, Conn., by upon American
condemning even the smallest at- Mike Lee of Utah
tempt to control high-powered, parents were worry
military-style weapons as a devi- eign body based
ous scheme "built on lies" to "de- Switzerland, (woul
stroy the Second Amendment." what is best for a cl
Apparently the spirit of the Utah." Former Sei
season has eluded him as well. rum of Pennsylvani
Conservative columnist Ross under the treaty,
Douthat wrote in The New York could decide to e
Times that "no Stephen Colbert abled children.
parody of conservatism could The message: D
match" LaPierre's histrionic re- McCain or Dole o
jection of reasonableness. The treaty was "t
But those were not the low Raising taxes, con
points. The most egregious exam- ratifying treaties -
ple of distrust and downright sinister plot to "sl
craziness came early in Decem- servative principle







I CONTROL GUN CONTROL GUN CO











LETTERS











LETTERS >


Be on alert
This day, Dec. 7, "a day that
will live in infamy," as said by
the late President Franklin De-
lano Roosevelt, the Japanese
bombed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii,
in a sneak attack. Over 2,400
lives were lost.
We need to always be on the
alert these days to terrorists.
They are often tiny groups of
people but they can cause mas-
sive fright and costs in security.
There are metal scans at air-
ports, government buildings,
personal searches and of lug-
gage, especially at airports, all of
which cause a large cost due to
extra personnel. Whenever
there is an incident or report of
an attempt is reported, there is
fear amongst travelers.
Our fear of sneak attack by ter-
rorists is a new type of war,
where the enemy is not in uni-
form and not readily identifiable
by sight.
Robert E. Blum
Homosassa

Second chance for pet
Every day, animals are aban-
doned, dumped at shelters and


go
te defeated the
n the Rights of
abilities. This is
treaty based
nericans With
at was signed
by President
W. Bush. The
negotiated by
George the
2006 and has
fied by 126
y also had the
port of Sen.
in and former
Dole, both se-
nded combat
id Republican
for president.
o passionately
s pushed onto
e floor in a
to witness the
Is every living
ran for presi-
cket (we could-
ley's position)
aty Yet only
voted yes, and
against the
ng in their de-
e. Sen. Jim In-
said it would
alous interna-
ns with anti-
that infringe
society." Sen.
said religious
ied that "a for-
in Geneva,
d) be deciding
lild at home in
n. Rick Santo-
ia implied that
U.N. officials
euthanize dis-
)on't listen to
r the Bushes.
built on lies."
trolling guns,
- they're all a
surrender con-
es." Good will?


od


will


Bah, humbug!
A few weeks after the treaty
was defeated, Sen. Daniel Inouye
of Hawaii died at age 88. Bob
Dole was again wheeled into the
Capitol, but he insisted that he
walk -with considerable help -
to Inouye's coffin that was lying in
state. "I don't want Danny to see
me in a wheelchair," he ex-
plained, wiping away tears.
Then he saluted with his left
arm, his only good arm. His right
one was shattered by a German
machine gun in Italy, in April of
1945. In that same month, in that
same country, Inouye lost his
right arm after it was mutilated
by a German grenade. They met
in a military hospital (now named
for them) as they recovered from
their wounds and formed a life-
long friendship that crossed par-
tisan lines and loyalties.
Perhaps there is a lesson here.
Dole and Inouye first served
their country as soldiers, not
politicians. Their first allegiance
was to the nation, not to a party.
They bled and almost died for
their fellow infantrymen, not
their fellow officeholders. And
that indelible experience helped
shape their approach to politics.
That generation is almost gone
now. George H.W Bush, now ail-
ing himself, was the last World
War II veteran to serve as presi-
dent With Inouye's death, Frank
Lautenberg of New Jersey, ap-
proaching 89, is the last one left
in the Senate. Through the horror
of war, those men learned to be-
lieve in the national interest, and
in one another They trusted one
another and loved one another
As Bob Dole struggled to his
feet and saluted his friend Danny,
he reminded us how precious
good will is in our national life.
And how much we miss it today

Steve and Cokie Roberts can be
contacted by email at
stevecokie@gmail. corn.







UN CONTROL GUN CONTROL


GA(ORCS( .
DOMICS-c) 2-"1Z


S to the Editor


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Mike Arnold
at 352-564-2930.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

given away for reasons that, in
my opinion, are unforgiveable. If
a pet owner becomes ill and un-
able to adequately care for an
animal, that's understandable.


However, this is rarely the case.
I was saddened and appalled
to yet again see the photo of a
beautiful Chihuahua silently
pleading for a loving home sim-
ply because he grew too big to
suit his former owner's taste!
Apparently, this little guy carries
some sort of purchase promise
not to weigh more than 4
pounds, but grew to a whopping
12. So, after keeping him three
whole years, his body weight be-
came a major issue and he was
discarded like a bag of trash.
I do not know to whom this
dog previously belonged. I do
know, whoever it is should never
be allowed to own another pet
Also this heartless person better
hope not to be judged as
"Skippy" was. Don't gain or lose
weight; don't wear false teeth or
end up with a bald head! Don't
become ill, speak out-of-turn, or
make a mess. None of the things
were in that original promise
and a person just like yourself
may decide to get rid of you.
The difference is, there proba-
bly won't be any sympathy or a
second chance. And, you cer-
tainly don't deserve one.
Joanie Welch
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012 A9


P^ES
VW4

4^
1 pt











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NatThe clock is ticking'
Tasty The clock is tickin
I .1' A9


Associated Press
Johanna Schwinghamer
plays in the snow Friday at
Northland Arboretum in
Baxter, Minn.


Police ID subway
push victim in NYC
NEW YORK- The man
who was shoved to his death
in front of a subway train
Thursday night was a 46-
year-old from India who lived
in New York City and worked
for a printing business, police
said.
Investigators on Friday
searched for an unidentified
woman who rose from a
bench and suddenly pushed
the man in the back with both
hands, sending him flying
onto the tracks as a train en-
tered an elevated station in
Queens.
Police released surveil-
lance video of the woman
fleeing the area and have
been interviewing witnesses,
including some who said she
was mumbling and cursing to
herself.
Dockworkers
strike averted
NEW YORK Dockwork-
ers along the East Coast and
the Gulf of Mexico agreed Fri-
day to extend their contract
for more than a month, avert-
ing a weekend strike that
could have crippled major
ports from Boston to Houston
and bottled up billions of dol-
lars' worth of cargo.
Talks aimed at reaching a
new contract covering the
14,500 longshoremen will
continue during the extension,
which runs through Feb. 6.
The dockworkers' union
and an alliance of port opera-
tors and shipping lines
agreed to the extension after
resolving one of the stickier
points in their negotiations, in-
volving royalty payments to
longshoremen for each con-
tainer they unload.


World BRIEFS

Flighty


Associated Press
Volunteers ready a mass of
balloons for release Friday,
a year-end tradition in
downtown Sao Paulo,
Brazil. The annual event is
organized by the city's
commerce association.


Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
end game at hand, the White
House and Senate leaders
made a final stab at com-
promise Friday night to pre-
vent middle-class tax
increases from taking effect
at the turn of the new year
and possibly block sweeping
spending cuts as well.
"I'm optimistic we may


still be able to reach an
agreement that can pass
both houses in time," Presi-
dent Barack Obama said at
the White House after meet-
ing for more than an hour
with top lawmakers from
both houses.
Surprisingly, after weeks
of postelection gridlock,
Senate leaders sounded
even more bullish.
The Republican leader,


Sen. Mitch McConnell of
Kentucky, said he was
"hopeful and optimistic" of
a deal that could be pre-
sented to rank-and-file law-
makers as early as Sunday, a
little more than 24 hours be-
fore the year-end deadline.
Said Majority Leader
Harry Reid: "I'm going to do
everything I can" to prevent
the tax increases and
spending cuts that threaten
to send the economy into re-
cession. He cautioned,
"Whatever we come up with
is going to be imperfect"
House Speaker John
Boehner, a Republican who


has struggled recently with
anti-tax rebels inside his
own party, said through an
aide he would await the re-
sults of the talks between the
Senate and White House.
Under a timetable
sketched by congressional
aides, any agreement would
first go to the Senate for a
vote. The House would then
be asked to assent, possibly
as late as Jan. 2, the final full
day before a new Congress
takes office.
Officials said there was a
general understanding that
any agreement would block
scheduled income tax in-


creases for middle class
earners while letting rates
rise at upper income levels.
Democrats said Obama
was sticking to his campaign
call for increases above
$250,000 in annual income,
even though in recent nego-
tiations he said he could ac-
cept $400,000.
The two sides also con-
fronted a divide over estate
taxes.
Obama favors a higher tax
than is currently in effect,
but one senior Republican,
Sen. Jon Kyl ofArizona, said
he's "totally dead set"
against it.


Associated Press
El Cajon, Calif., Police department school resource officer Rich Agundez Jr., who confronted and wounded a student who attacked Granite Hills
High School with a shotgun in 2001, testifies May 10, 2001, in El Cajon. The National Rifle Association's response to a Connecticut school mas-
sacre envisions, in part, having trained, armed volunteers in every school in America. But Agundez, school safety experts and school board mem-
bers say there's a huge difference between a trained law enforcement officer who becomes part of the school family and a guard with a gun.


Experts: Trained police needed for school security


Associated Press
WASHINGTON The stu-
dent's attack began with a shotgun
blast through the windows of a
California high school. Rich
Agundez, the El Cajon policeman
assigned to the school, felt his
mind shift into overdrive.
People yelled at him amid the
chaos but he didn't hear He ex-
perienced "a tunnel vision of
concentration."
While two teachers and three
students were injured when the
glass shattered in the 2001 attack
on Granite Hills High School,
Agundez confronted the assailant
and wounded him before he could
get inside the school and use his
second weapon, a handgun.
The National Rifle Association's
response to a Connecticut school
massacre envisions, in part, hav-
ing trained, armed volunteers in
every school in America. But
Agundez, school safety experts
and school board members say
there's a huge difference between
a trained law enforcement officer
who becomes part of the school
family and a guard with a gun.
The NRA's proposal has


In the wake of the Sandy Hook massacre,
school boards, administrators,
teachers and parents are reviewing their
security measures.


sparked a debate across the coun-
try as gun control rises once again
as a national issue. President
Barack Obama promised to pres-
ent a plan in January to confront
gun violence in the aftermath of
the killing of 20 Sandy Hook Ele-
mentary School students and six
teachers in Newtown, Conn.
Agundez said what happened
before the shooting in the San
Diego County school should
frame the debate over the NRA's
proposal.
With a shooting at another
county school just weeks before,
Agundez had trained the staff in
how to lock down the school, as-
signed evacuation points, in-
structed teachers to lock doors,
close curtains and turn off the
lights. He even told them com-
puters should be used where pos-
sible to communicate, to lessen
the chaos.


And his training? A former
SWAT team member, Agundez'
preparation placed him in simu-
lated stressful situations and
taught him to evade a shooter's
bullets. And the kids in the school
knew to follow his advice be-
cause they knew him. He spoke
in their classrooms and coun-
seled them when they came to
him with problems.
In the wake of the Sandy Hook
massacre, school boards, admin-
istrators, teachers and parents
are reviewing their security
measures.
School security officers can
range from the best-trained police
officers to unarmed private
guards. Some big-city districts
with gang problems and crime
formed their own police agencies
years ago. Others, after the mur-
der of 13 people at Columbine
High School in 1999, started joint


agreements with local police de-
partments to have officers as-
signed to schools even though
that was no guarantee of prevent-
ing violence. A trained police offi-
cer at Columbine confronted one
of two shooters, but couldn't pre-
vent the death of 13 people.
Former Rep. Asa Hutchinson,
who also was a top Homeland Se-
curity official and will head the
NRA effort, said the program will
have two key elements.
One is a model security plan
"based on the latest, most up-to-
date technical information from
the foremost experts in their
fields." Each school could tweak
the plan to its own circumstances,
and "armed, trained, qualified
school security personnel will be
but one element."
The second element may prove
the more controversial because,
to avoid massive funding for local
authorities, it would use volun-
teers. Hutchinson said in his
home state of Arkansas, his son
was a volunteer with a local group
"Watchdog Dads," who volun-
teered at schools to patrol play-
grounds and provide added
security


Indian rape victim
dies in hospital
SINGAPORE Young
Indian woman who was
gang-raped and severely
beaten on a bus died Satur-
day at a Singapore hospital,
after her horrific ordeal galva-
nized Indians to demand
greater protection for women
from sexual violence that im-
pacts thousands of them
every day.
She "passed away peace-
fully" with her family and offi-
cials of the Indian embassy
by her side," said Dr. Kevin
Loh, the chief executive of
Mount Elizabeth hospital,
where she had been treated
since Thursday.
-From wire reports


Texas builds 'hurricane domes'for double-duty


Associated Press
Bob Wells, superintendent of the Edna Independent School
District, talks Dec. 6 about the new domed gym under con-
struction in Edna, Texas. The hurricane dome, a structure
being built in part with money from the Federal Emergency
Management Agency, can be used to house first responders
s or residents evacuated during a storm.


Associated Press
EDNA, Texas Most of the time, the
windowless building with the dome-shaped
roof will be a typical high school gymna-
sium filled with cheering fans watching
basketball and volleyball games.
But come hurricane season, the structure
that resembles a miniature version of the
famed Astrodome will double as a hurri-
cane shelter, part of an ambitious storm-de-
fense system that is taking shape along
hundreds of miles of the Texas Gulf Coast.
Its brawny design including double-
layer cinder-block walls reinforced by
heavy duty steel bars and cement piers that
plunge 30 feet into the ground should
allow it to withstand winds up to 200 mph.
"There is nothing standard" about the
building, said Bob Wells, superintendent of
the Edna school district, as he stood inside


the $2.5 million gym, which is set to be com-
pleted by March. "The only standard stuff
is going to be the stuff we do inside."
The Edna dome is one of 28 such build-
ings planned to protect sick, elderly and
special-needs residents who might be un-
able to evacuate ahead of a hurricane.
First-responders and local leaders will also
be able to take refuge in the domes, allow-
ing them to begin recovery efforts faster
after a storm has passed.
Storm-defense structures are getting in-
creased attention in the aftermath of Hur-
ricane Sandy, which inflicted heavy
damage on the East Coast in October The
city of New York, for instance, is consider-
ing a multi-billion-dollar system of sea
barriers.
For Texas, the domes offer the extra ben-
efit of serving as recreation or community
centers when not needed as shelters.


Last-ditch effort to avoid

fiscal cliff under way











SPORTS


* Jacksonville
Jaguars running
back Maurice
Jones-Drew had
season-ending
foot surgery
Friday./B5


0 NFL/B2, B5
0 College football/B2
0 NHL, tennis/B2
0 Basketball/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Lecanto girls pull off upset of Gibbs


Foul trouble on foe

helps Panthers to

46-43 victory
C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
LECANTO Perhaps a corner
was turned.
Trailing by 12 at the half and by
11 entering the fourth quarter,
Lecanto's girls basketball team
found a way to track down a tough
St. Petersburg Gibbs team by


using the same type of tactics the
Gladiators had used against them.
It resulted in a 19-6 fourth-
quarter comeback, fueled by 11
personal fouls and a techni-
cal called against Gibbs,
and a 46-43 Lecanto tri-
umph in Friday's final
girls game of the
Lecanto Christmas
Classic Tournament.
The same kind of defen-
sive pressure the Gladiators had
used to cause 15 Lecanto
turnovers in the last 12 minutes of
the first half was instrumental in
the Panthers' comeback. After


committing just eight turnovers
in the middle two quarters, Gibbs
had eight in the last period six
of those in the final 3:30.
"We just played hard," said
Lecanto coach Brittany
Szunko, her team improv-
ing to 6-11 with the two
tournament wins.
"There's no substitution
for hard work. We were
playing with just one senior
and the young kids stepped up big.
"All I wanted was five girls on
the floor who, when the pressure
See Page B4


Lady Hurricanes stomp past North Marion


CARL MCDERMOTT
Correspondent


LECANTO The Citrus High
School girls basketball team
used its pressure defense to
blow by North Marion on Friday,
never letting the Colts get any
rhythm to their offense during a
68-29 victory in the final day of
the Chris Nichols Christmas
Classic at Lecanto High School.
The Hurricanes' win was a
total team effort as they had


seven players score at least six
points. The Hurricanes (13-4
overall) were led by freshman
Shelly Morales. who came off the
bench to score 16 points and pull
down five rebounds. Treleasha
Simmons poured in 11 points
and grabbed four rebounds.
Citrus showed no let up, even
after playing back-to-back
games. Hurricanes coach Brian
Lattin was very pleased with his
See Page B4


Uncaged




Tigers


Despite furious rally, Lecanto

falls to Dunnellon 75-66


STEVE
MCGUNNIGLE
Correspondent
LECANTO From the
Panthers' Den, the
Lecanto boys basketball
team was upset by visiting
Dunnellon 75-66 Friday
night, as the hosts of the
Chris Nichols Christmas
Classic fell in the finale
by struggling for
much of the first
half and coming
up short in a
valiant late come-
back attempt.
Mikey Makros potrm
photos
(game-high 24 on this
points) led the www.c
late charge for online.
Lecanto (10-3
overall), as the Panthers
nearly dug out of a 50-22
hole late in the third
quarter. Lecanto carried
a 17-4 run into the fourth,
as Makros and Thomas
Vilardi each hit a pair of
three pointers in the
stretch to cut the deficit
to 54-41.
With 2:07 remaining,
Richie Rizzolo (11 points)
put up a three from the
wing that rolled around
the rim before bouncing
in, getting the Panthers to
within 64-57. Dunnellon's
Andre Jackson re-


iiii



ore
S, (
Sst
hr(
.co


sponded with a three-
pointer on the other end,
then watched Brandon
Burich hit a contested
three from the corner,
making it 67-60.
But the Tigers (4-10
overall) hit their free
throws down the stretch
while Lecanto did not,
making the hole just too
much for the Panthers to
overcome.
Lecanto trailed
30-16 at the half,
and Dunnellon
broke it wide
open in the third,
lick with balanced
story at scoring and main-
onicle training compo-
oM. sure against the
Panthers' signa-
ture full-court press.
"I think early in the
game they just came out
with a lot more energy
than we did," Lecanto
head coach Frank Vilardi
said. "We were settling for
shots, and we're not going
to beat anybody by scoring
16 points in the first half."
After a Makros three-
pointer made it 32-19
early in the third, Dun-
nellon embarked on an
18-3 run to take a com-
manding 28-point lead.


Page B4


Lecanto center Geoffrey Ruiz shoots over Dunnellon's
Budo Sigogo on Thursday night at Lecanto High School.
STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle

Citrus coasts by Fivay 78-40
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
LECANTO The Citrus boys basketball
squad shook off a somewhat sluggish offensive
start to eventually coast to its eight consecutive
victory by defeating Fivay 78-40 on the final day
of the Chris Nichols Christmas Classic in the
Lecanto gym on Friday
The Hurricanes went on a 27-7 run that gobbled
up nearly 12 minutes of the first and second peri-
ods to help themselves to a 29-11 advantage with
three minutes remaining in the opening half.
Citrus (9-3 overall) led just 8-4 after five
See Page B4


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B2 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012


Saint for a while


Saints, Payton agree

to terms on new deal

Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS The New Or-
leans Saints and suspended coach
Sean Payton will indeed be together
again next season as the bounty scan-
dal fades into history and the bid to
win a second Super Bowl resumes.
Payton has agreed in principle to a
multiyear contract extension, according
to two people familiar with the deal.
The people told The Associated
Press about the deal Friday night on
condition of anonymity because it
hasn't been signed and final details
regarding the length of the contract
and financial compensation are still
being worked out.
"Very happy it is official," Brees
said in an email to the AP "Never had
any doubts."
Payton was due to begin his sev-
enth season as the Saints' head coach
in 2012 before being suspended for
the whole season by NFL Commis-
sioner Roger Goodell in connection
with the NFEs bounty investigation.
Payton signed an extension in 2011
that would have kept him in New Or-
leans through 2015, but Goodell ob-
jected to certain language in that
deal, leaving Payton's future uncer-
tain until the deal was reached Fri-
day The language in question in the
previous extension gave Payton the
right to opt out early if general man-
ager Mickey Loomis left the club for
any reason.
The new agreement, which was
first reported by Fox Sports, also must
be approved by the NFL.
Payton is the only coach in Saints
history to win a Super Bowl, a title
earned at the end of the 2009 season.
But his legacy was tarnished by the
NFEs bounty probe, as Goodell ruled
that Payton failed to exert proper in-
stitutional control over a cash-for-hits
bounty program run by former de-
fensive coordinator Gregg Williams
from 2009-2011.
Although the Saints objected to the
characterization of what coaches and
players have said was nothing more
than a performance pool for big plays,
Goodell suspended Payton for the en-
tire season. The commissioner also
suspended Loomis for half of the sea-
son and assistant head coach Joe Vitt
for six games.


Associated Press
Suspended New Orleans Saints head coach Sean Payton has agreed in princi-
ple to a multiyear contract extension with the team Friday, according to two
people familiar with the deal.


Payton is 62-34 as in regular-season
games as Saints head coach and 5-3 in
the postseason. During the three sea-
sons before his suspension, the Saints
won 41 regular-season and playoff
games combined, more than any
other team in the NFL.
Payton has primarily handled the
offense in New Orleans, teaming up
with Brees to break numerous NFL
and club records. The single-season
NFL records set by the Saints in 2011
included yards passing by a team
(5,505) and a quarterback (5,476). The


Saints also set a record for total of-
fensive yards with 7,474.
Although speculation ran rampant
that Payton could essentially be-
come a free agent after this season
and end up elsewhere, Brees re-
peatedly said he would be "shocked"
if Payton ended up anywhere but
New Orleans next season. Brees is
under contract with the Saints
through the 2016 season, and Payton
was the driving force in the Saints'
effort to acquire Brees as a free
agent in 2006.


Associated Press
Virginia Tech quarterback Logan Thomas, center, throws to an open receiver while under pressure from Rutgers
defensive end Marvin Booker during the second quarter Friday of the Russell Athletic Bowl in Orlando.



Va. Tech edges Rutgers in OT


Associated Press

ORLANDO CodyJournell kicked
a 22-yard field goal on the first pos-
session of overtime to help Virginia
Tech beat Rutgers 13-10 in the Russell
Athletic Bowl on Friday night
Virginia Tech (7-6) won its third
straight game to avoid its first losing
season since 1992.
Rutgers (9-4) had a chance to tie it
in overtime, but Nick Borgese missed
a 42-yard field-goal attempt to the
right.
Virginia Tech trailed 10-0 at the
half, then rallied in the final 30 min-
utes thanks to some timely turnovers
and offense. Quarterback Logan
Thomas struggled in the first and fin-
ished with a pair of interceptions, but
also had 192 passing yards and the
game's only passing touchdown.
The win also was the Hokies' 12th
straight victory over their former Big
East Conference rival.
Virginia Tech cornerback Antone
Exum, selected the most valuable
player of the game, picked off Gary
Nova's pass early in the fourth quar-
ter to set up the tying score.
Rutgers seemed to be in command
until the opening minutes of the
fourth quarter, when turnovers and a
sudden surge from the Hokies' of-


fense quickly turned the momentum.
Down 10-0, Virginia Tech took over
after Rutgers missed field goal and
moved into Scarlet Knights' territory
for the first time in the game on a 32-
yard pass from Thomas to Dyrell
Roberts.
Thomas then found Corey Fuller
for a 25-yard strike on the next play,
before the drive stalled on the 8. It
forced the Hokies to settle for Jour-
nell's 25-yard field goal.
Exum intercepted Nova's pass on
the ensuing drive, giving the Hokies a
first down on the Rutgers 21.
The Hokies found the end zone
three plays later on a 21-yard touch-
down pass from Thomas to Fuller with
10:56 left as steady rain began to fall.
Virginia Tech defensive end Tyrel
Wilson then came up with the de-
fense's second turnover of the night,
recovering a fumble inside the Scar-
let Knights 40 after Nova dropped a
snap while lined up in the shotgun.
An intentional grounding penalty
on Thomas forced a punt, though,
with less than 7 minutes to play
They got another chance a few se-
ries later, only to see Journell's 51-
yard field goal come up short with
2:20 showing on the clock.
Rutgers punted, but got it back just
a play later when Thomas' pass was


intercepted by Brandon Jones.
The Scarlet Knights came into
game ranked 14th in the nation in
total defense, surrendering 321.25
yards per game.
It was defense on both sides that
controlled the action in the first half
as Rutgers took a 10-0 halftime lead.
Independence Bowl

Ohio 45, La.-Monroe 14
SHREVEPORT, La. Tyler Tettleton
threw for 331 yards and two touchdowns,
Beau Blankenship ran for four scores,
and Ohio cruised to a 45-14 victory
over Louisiana-Monroe at the
Independence Bowl.
Chase Cochran caught three passes for
162 yards and a touchdown as the Bob-
cats (9-4) won their second straight bowl
game. Blankenship's four rushing touch-
downs set an Independence Bowl record.
He added 104 yards rushing.
Tettleton was especially sharp in the
first half, completing 9 of 14 passes for
215 yards and two touchdowns as Ohio
built a 24-7 lead.
Louisiana-Monroe (8-5) struggled in its
first bowl game after 19 seasons in the
Football Bowl Subdivision. Kolton Brown-
ing completed 21 of 39 passes for 219
yards and two touchdowns, but also threw
three first-half interceptions.


NHL makes



new offer


Associated Press

NEW YORK The NHL
made a new offer to the
players' association, hoping
to spark talks toward ending
the long lockout and saving
the hockey season.
Deputy commissioner Bill
Daly said Friday the league
presented its proposal
Thursday and was waiting
for a response. The sides
haven't met in person since
a second round of talks with
a federal mediator broke
down Dec. 13.
The lockout has reached
its 104th day, and the NHL
said it doesn't want a season
of less than 48 games. That
means a deal would need to
be reached mid-January
"We delivered to the
union a new, comprehen-
sive proposal for a succes-
sor CBA," Daly said in a
statement Friday. "We are
not prepared to discuss the
details of our proposal at
this time. We are hopeful
that once the union's staff
and negotiating committee
have had an opportunity to
thoroughly review and con-
sider our new proposal, they
will share it with the play-
ers. We want to be back on
the ice as soon as possible."
A person familiar with
key points of the offer told
The Associated Press that
the league proposed raising
the limit of individual free-
agent contracts to six years
from five seven years if a
team re-signs its own
player; raising the salary
variance from one year to
another to 10 percent, up
from 5 percent; and one
compliance buyout for the
2013-14 season that wouldn't
count toward a team's
salary cap but would be in-
cluded in the overall play-
ers' share of income.
The person spoke on con-
dition of anonymity because
details of the new offer were
not being discussed publicly
The NHL maintained the
deferred payment amount
of $300 million it offered in
its previous proposal, an in-
crease from an earlier offer
of $211 million. The initial
$300 million offer was
pulled off the table after ne-
gotiations broke off earlier
this month.
The latest proposal is for
10 years, running through
the 2021-22 season, with
both sides having the right
to opt out after eight years.
A conference call with
the players' association's
negotiating committee and
its executive board was


scheduled for Friday after-
noon and was expected to
last several hours.
The lockout has reached a
critical stage, threatening to
shut down a season for the
second time in eight years.
All games through Jan. 14,
plus the Winter Classic and
the All-Star game already
have been called off. The
next round of cuts could
claim the entire schedule.
The NHL is the only
North American profes-
sional sports league to can-
cel a season because of a
labor dispute, losing the
2004-05 campaign to a lock-
out. A 48-game season was
played in 1995 after a lock-
out stretched into January
It is still possible this dis-
pute could eventually be
settled in the courts if the
sides can't reach a deal on
their own.
The NHL filed a class-ac-
tion suit this month in U.S.
District Court in New York
in an effort to show its lock-
out is legal. In a separate
move, the league filed an
unfair labor practice charge
with the National Labor Re-
lations Board, contending
bad-faith bargaining by the
union.
Those moves were made
because the players' associ-
ation took steps toward po-
tentially filing a "disclaimer
of interest," which would
dissolve the union and
make it a trade association.
That would allow players to
file antitrust lawsuits
against the NHL.
Union members voted
overwhelmingly to give
their board the power to file
the disclaimer by Jan. 2. If
that deadline passes, an-
other authorization vote
could be held to approve a
later filing.
Negotiations between the
NHL and the union have
been at a standstill since
talks ended Dec. 6. One
week later, the sides con-
vened again with federal
mediators in New Jersey,
but still couldn't make
progress.
The sides have been un-
able to reach agreement on
the length of the new deal,
the length of individual
player contracts, and the
variance in salary from year
to year. The NHL is looking
for an even split of revenues
with players.
The NHL pulled all previ-
ous offers off the table after
the union didn't agree to
terms on its last proposal
without negotiation.


Associated Press
Rafael Nadal will miss the Australian Open because of a
stomach virus, further delaying his comeback after being
sidelined since June.



Virus knocks Nadal


from Aussie Open


Associated Press

BARCELONA, Spain -
Just when Rafael Nadal had
recovered from a knee in-
jury, a stomach virus has de-
layed his return to tennis by
a couple of months.
Nadal announced Friday
he will miss next month's
Australian Open and proba-
bly won't play again until
the end of February. The
Spaniard said he needs
time to recover from the
virus that already prevented
him from coming back this
week at Abu Dhabi.
Nadal has been sidelined
since June with a knee in-
jury, which forced him to
miss the London Olympics
and U.S. Open. He had
planned to rejoin the ATP
tour at the Qatar Open in
Doha next month before the
Jan. 14-27 Australian Open,
but pulled out of both.


"We just hope he gets bet-
ter quickly and we see him
back on the tour as soon as
possible," Australian Open
tournament director Craig
Tiley said. "Tennis fans
across the world have been
missing him."
While he is expected to re-
cover from the virus in time
for the year's first Grand
Slam tournament, Nadal
and his team said he would-
n't have the proper prepara-
tion for a five-set event
Nadal stressed that his
decision had nothing to do
with the tendinitis in his left
knee. That injury prompted
him to take a break follow-
ing a second-round loss to
then 100th-ranked Lukas
Rosol at Wimbledon in June.
"My knee is much better
and the rehabilitation
process has gone well as
predicted by the doctors,"
Nadal said in a statement.


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Wizards make magic D-Wade ready


Orlando loses

to Washington

Associated Press

WASHINGTON -Jordan
Crawford scored 27 points
and the worst-in-the-NBA
Washington Wizards showed
they can still win a game
every once in a while,
breaking an eight-game los-
ing streak Friday night with
a 105-97 victory over the Or-
lando Magic.
Nene added season highs
of 23 points and 11 rebounds
and shot fourth-quarter free
throws while hearing chants
of "R-G-3!" the new
equivalent of "M-V-P!" in a
city where Redskins quar-
terback Robert Griffin III is
the new superstar as
Washington won by its
largest margin of the season.
The game represented
one-quarter of the win total
for the 4-23 Wizards, who
have been stymied in part
by the knee injury that has
kept franchise player John
Wall on the sidelines. Craw-
ford's point total tied the
high for any Washington
player this season.
Pistons 109,
Heat 99
AUBURN HILLS, Mich.-
Will Bynum had 25 points and
10 assists, leading another spir-
ited performance by the Detroit
bench, and the Pistons beat the
short-handed Miami Heat 109-
99 despite 35 points by LeBron
James.
Miami was without Dwyane
Wade, suspended for a game
by the NBA for flailing his leg
and making contact with a
Charlotte player Wednesday.
The Detroit reserves, who
scored 85 points in a loss to At-
lanta on Wednesday, con-
tributed 64 on Friday. Charlie
Villanueva had 18 and Austin
Daye added 11, helping the
Pistons snap Miami's six-game
winning streak.
Chris Bosh had 28 points for
Miami.
Hawks 102,
Cavaliers 94
CLEVELAND -Jeff Teague
scored a career-high 27 points
and the Atlanta Hawks scored
the game's final nine points to
beat the Cleveland Cavaliers
102-94.
Teague's jumper from the
foul line gave the Hawks a 95-
94 lead with 2:32 remaining to
spark the late run and send At-
lanta to its third straight win.
Kyrie Irving led Cleveland
with 28 points, but the Cava-
liers failed to score in the final
2:53 after taking a 94-93 lead.
Lou Williams scored 16
points for Atlanta, which is 8-4
on the road. Al Horford added
14 points and 11 rebounds.
Dion Waiters scored 18
points for Cleveland, which had
its season-high two-game win-
ning streak end.
Cavaliers center Anderson
Varajeo, the league's leading
rebounder, missed his fifth


Heat guard

served ban for

illegal contact

Associated Press

AUBURN HILLS, Mich.
-The Miami Heat said Fri-
day the franchise didn't
agree with the one-game
suspension given to
Dwyane Wade for making
contact with Charlotte's
Ramon Sessions earlier this
week
"While we accept the de-
cision of the NBA regard-
ing Dwyane Wade, we do
not agree with it," the team
said. "In his 10 years in the
league, Dwyane has never
been suspended, and has
been an exemplary player
and positive influence to
his teammates and fans
and we have been honored
to have him as part of the
Miami Heat family Unfor-
tunately, he is the type of
player, along with other


Associated Press
Washington Wizards center Nene watches as Orlando Magic power forward Kyle O'Quinn
dunks and scores during the first quarter Friday at the Verizon Center in Washington.


straight game with a bruised
right knee.
Nets 97, Bobcats 81
NEW YORK The Brooklyn
Nets gave P.J. Carlesimo a vic-
tory in his debut and the Char-
lotte Bobcats a 17th straight
loss, getting 26 points and 11
rebounds from Brook Lopez in
a 97-81 rout.
A day after firing Avery John-
son, the Nets played as they
did last month, when they were
11-4 and Johnson was Eastern
Conference coach of the
month. They are just 4-10 in
December, a slump that cost
Johnson his job, but got back
over .500 with ease.
Deron Williams added 17 of
his 19 points in the first half and
Joe Johnson had 16 for the
Nets, who led by 29 points and
won for just the second time in
seven games.
Hakim Warrick scored 13
points and Ramon Sessions
had 12 for the Bobcats (7-22).
Pacers 97, Suns 91
INDIANAPOLIS George
Hill scored 22 points, including
three 3-pointers, and led the In-
diana Pacers to a 97-91 victory
over the Phoenix Suns.
Paul George had 15 points,


and David West added 14
points and seven rebounds for
the Pacers, who have won four
straight and seven of eight.
Sebastian Telfair had 19
points and six assists, and
Marcin Gortat had 15 points
and 10 rebounds for the Suns,
who have lost four in a row.
Spurs 122,
Rockets 116
SAN ANTONIO Tim Dun-
can, Tony Parker and Manu Gi-
nobili combined to score 84
points, and the San Antonio
Spurs snapped the Houston
Rockets' five-game winning
streak with a 122-116 victory.
Parker had 31 points and 10
assists, Duncan had 30 points
and five rebounds, and Ginobili
had a season-high 23 points for
San Antonio (23-8). Danny
Green was 5 for 7 on 3-pointers
and finished with 17 points.
James Harden scored 33
points, Chandler Parsons
added 24, and Jeremy Lin had
21 for Houston (16-13).
Nuggets 106,
Mavericks 85
DALLAS Daniro Gallinari
scored a career-high 39 points
and the Denver Nuggets
spoiled Dirk Nowitzki's first


home game since returning
from knee surgery by beating
the Dallas Mavericks 106-85.
Nowitzki had five points in 17
minutes in his third game back,
and the Mavericks lost their fifth
straight for the first time since
January 2011.
Gallinari scored five points in
the last 5.3 seconds before
halftime and opened the sec-
ond half with a 3-pointer to put
the Nuggets up by 11. Andre
Iguodala hit four 3-pointers in a
32-point third quarter and fin-
ished with 29 points.
O.J. Mayo led Dallas with 15
points.
Raptors 104,
Hornets 97, OT
NEW ORLEANS DeMar
DeRozan scored 30 points,
Kyle Lowry had two big baskets
in overtime and the Toronto
Raptors held off the New Or-
leans Hornets 104-97.
The Raptors, who never
trailed in the second half, scored
nine of the first 11 points in over-
time after blowing a seven-point
lead in the last 1:30 of regula-
tion. Amir Johnson scored under
the basket to give Toronto a 93-
91 lead. Lowry then drove the
baseline for a reverse layup and
hit a 3-pointer to make it 98-93.


players on our roster, that
defenses take privileges
with. We stand with
Dwyane and support him
in this situation and have
made our feelings known
to the league office.
Wade was suspended for
Friday night's game at De-
troit for flailing his leg and
making contact with Ses-
sions' groin during the
Heat's 105-92 victory over
the Bobcats on Wednesday
Wade tweeted Thursday
that he's not a dirty player
and was just reacting to
contact with Sessions dur-
ing the game.
"You'd kind of have to be
there," Wade said at Fri-
day's shootaround. "With
the whole video, it could
be taken any kind of way.
Like I said, I've made my
statement and I'm looking
forward to moving on and
getting ready for tomorrow
night" against Milwaukee.
He said he would try to
look at Friday as a "rest
day" and hoped to watch
Friday's game against the
Pistons on TV


Associated Press
Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade served a one-game
suspension Friday night for illegal contact with Charlotte
Bobcats guard Ramon Sessions on Wednesday.




No.* 13 Gonzaga


downs Baylor


Associated Press

SPOKANE, Wash. -
Kevin Pangos made seven
3-pointers and scored 31
points to lead No. 13 Gon-
zaga past Baylor 94-87 on
Friday night.
Kelly Olynyk scored 21 for
Gonzaga (12-1), Elias Harris
had 17 and Gary Bell Jr.
added 12. The Bulldogs shot
52 percent from the field on
31 of 59 shooting. Pangos
made 10 of 13 shots and fin-
ished two points shy of his
career-high.
Pierre Jackson led Bay-
lor (8-4) with 26 points, Isa-
iah Austin, a 7-foot-1
220-pound freshman, had
20 and Cory Jefferson
added 13. The Bears also
shot 52 percent for the
game, but attempted 21
fewer free-throws than
Gonzaga.
Gonzaga didn't hold a
lead until the 4:53 mark of
the first half. But once they
got the lead, they were de-
termined not to relinquish
it. The Bulldogs never
trailed after halftime and


led by as many as 12.
No. 5 Indiana 93,
Jacksonville 59
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -
Jordan Hulls scored 17 of his
season-high 20 points in the
first half, leading No. 5 Indiana
past Jacksonville 93-59.
The Hoosiers (12-1) will
take a three-game winning
streak into Big Ten play, which
begins Monday at Iowa. Indi-
ana also has won 29 consecu-
tive non-league games at
Assembly Hall.
Jacksonville (5-8) was led
by Dylan Fritsch with 15 points
and Jarvis Haywood with nine,
but is now 0-4 this season
against teams from the tradi-
tional power conferences.
Indiana wasn't itself early,
missing its first four shots and
committing four turnovers in
the first three minutes. But the
Hoosiers eventually turned it
around and used a 9-2 first-
half spurt to start pulling away.
Hulls followed that flurry with
three straight 3-pointers, help-
ing the Hoosiers take a 48-33
halftime lead.


Women's basketball: Illinois deals No. 6 UGA first loss


Associated Press

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Karisma
Penn had 27 points and 19 re-
bounds, and Illinois sent Georgia
to its first loss of the season with a
70-59 victory over the No. 6 Lady
Bulldogs on Friday night.
Penn scored 13 points to help the
Illini (7-5) jump out to a 31-13 lead.
She also had 11 points during a
game-changing 13-5 run that gave
Illinois a 65-57 advantage after
Georgia (12-1) had tied it at 52.
Guard Adrienne GodBold, play-
ing her first game of the season
after regaining her eligibility, and
Amber Moore added 11 points
apiece for Illinois.
Jasmine James and Khaalidah
Miller each scored 17 points for
the Lady Bulldogs.
Illinois hadn't beaten a team
ranked in the top six since a win
over then-No. 5 Georgia on Jan. 2,
2000. The Lady Bulldogs came in
as one of the nation's seven unde-
feated teams with a 28.1-point av-
erage margin of victory
No. 7 Kentucky 90,
Alcorn St. 23
LEXINGTON, Ky. Samarie
Walker had 21 points and 14 re-
bounds, and No. 7 Kentucky allowed
its fewest points in school history with


a 90-23 win over Alcorn State.
The Wildcats (11-1) led 44-11 at
halftime, holding Alcorn State without
a basket for the final 16 minutes of the
first half. The Braves (0-9) went a total
of 19 minutes and 26 seconds be-
tween field goals, a span that carried
over into the second half.
The Braves pulled within three with
15:04 left in the first half the score
was 8-5 but Kentucky then ran off
17 straight points.
The previous school record for
points allowed in a game was 25,
most recently accomplished on Nov.
15, 2011, against Jacksonville State.
No. 9 Maryland 76,
Brown 36
COLLEGE PARK, Md. -Tianna
Hawkins scored 16 of her 20 points
in the first half, and No. 9 Maryland
cruised to a 76-36 victory over
Brown in the opening round of the
Terrapin Classic.
Alyssa Thomas had 16 points and
Katie Rutan added 11 points for the
Terrapins (9-2), who have won five
consecutive games. Maryland leads
the nation with a 19.1 rebounding mar-
gin and outrebounded Brown 43-24.
Lauren Clarke had eight points for
the Bears (3-6), who have lost four of
their past five games.
Maryland got off to a sluggish start


and trailed until Rutan made a 3-
pointer with 13:09 left in the first half
for a 16-14 lead. Maryland took over
and a layup by Hawkins capped a 12-
2 run, helping the Terps extend the
margin to 37-24 at the break.
The Terps shot 54.8 percent (17-31)
in the first half and outscored Brown
24-12 in the paint. The Bears man-
aged 10 points off 14 turnovers.
In the second half, eight points by
Thomas sparked a 19-0 run and in-
creased the lead to 62-31 with 6:02
remaining.
Maryland plays the winner of the
University of Maryland Eastern Shore
and Hartford on Saturday. After the
tournament, the Terrapins return to
ACC play Thursday at No. 16 North
Carolina.
No. 13 Tennessee 75,
Davidson 40
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. Bashaara
Graves and Cierra Burdick recorded
double-doubles as No. 13 Ten-
nessee trounced Davidson 75-40 to
avoid its first three-game losing
streak since 1986.
Graves scored 16 points and pulled
down 10 rebounds for the fifth double-
double of her freshman season de-
spite resting for the game's final 10
minutes, 47 seconds. Burdick added
10 points and 10 rebounds. Isabelle


Harrison just missed a double-double
with 13 points and nine rebounds.
Tennessee (8-3) had fallen 76-53 at
No. 3 Baylor and 73-60 to No. 1 Stan-
ford in its last two games. The Lady
Vols haven't dropped three straight
games since losing 68-54 to No. 8
Mississippi, 66-60 to No. 11 Auburn
and 59-56 to No. 3 Louisiana Tech on
Feb. 5-10, 1986.
Sophia Aleksandravicius had 12
points and seven rebounds to lead
Davidson (4-7) in both categories.
Laura Murray added 11 points, but she
shot just 4 of 15.
No. 16 UNC 85, ETSU 44
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. Tierra Ruf-
fin-Pratt had 18 points and nine assists
to lead No. 16 North Carolina to an 85-
44 win over East Tennessee State.
Xylina McDaniel added 11 points for
the Tar Heels (12-1) in their fifth
straight win after nine days off.
Serena Clark and Brianna Mc-
Queen each scored nine points for
East Tennessee State (2-5), which
trailed 41-25 at halftime.
North Carolina finished 6 of 18
from 3-point range, while ETSU
made 1 of 13.
However, the Tar Heels were outre-
bounded 47-39, with Destiny Mitchell
grabbing a game-high 10.


No. 17 UCLA 77,
Pepperdine 46
MALIBU, Calif. Nirra Fields
scored 19 points and grabbed 12 re-
bounds to lead No. 17 UCLA to a 77-
46 win over Pepperdine.
In addition to her double-double,
Fields had six assists and six steals.
Atonye Nyingifa had 12 rebounds,
and Markel Walker had 11 points for
the Bruins (8-2).
UCLA led 34-17 at halftime and never
trailed in the game. UCLA had 34 points
off Pepperdine turnover and got 44
points from its bench. The Bruins shot
44 percent from the field for the game,
while the Waves shot 34.7 percent.
No. 24 Texas A&M 74,
Prairie View 52
COLLEGE STATION, Texas -
Kelsey Bone had 18 points and nine
rebounds and No. 24 Texas A&M de-
feated Prairie View 74-52.
Kristi Bellock scored 14 points and
Courtney Walker and Karla Gilbert
scored 11 apiece for the winners.
Bone matched her season aver-
ages in points and rebounds as the
Aggies (9-4) won in their first game
since last Friday's 83-74 loss to No. 5
Notre Dame in Las Vegas. Texas
A&M shot 54 percent and led 39-19
at halftime.


SPORTS


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012 B3






B4 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 21 8 .724 -
Brooklyn 15 14 .517 6
Boston 14 14 .500 6V2
Philadelphia 14 15 .483 7
Toronto 9 20 .310 12
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 20 7 .741 -
Atlanta 18 9 .667 2
Orlando 12 17 .414 9
Charlotte 7 22 .241 14
Washington 4 23 .148 16
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 17 12 .586 -
Milwaukee 15 12 .556 1
Chicago 15 12 .556 1
Detroit 10 22 .313 8Y2
Cleveland 7 24 .226 11
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 23 8 .742 -
Memphis 18 8 .692 212
Houston 16 13 .552 6
Dallas 12 17 .414 10
New Orleans 6 22 .214 1512
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 22 6 .786 -
Denver 16 14 .533 7
Portland 14 13 .519 712
Minnesota 13 13 .500 8
Utah 15 15 .500 8
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 23 6 .793 -
Golden State 19 10 .655 4
L.A. Lakers 14 15 .483 9
Phoenix 11 19 .367 1212
Sacramento 9 19 .321 1312
Thursday's Games
Oklahoma City 111, Dallas 105, OT
L.A. Clippers 106, Boston 77
Friday's Games
Indiana 97, Phoenix 91
Washington 105, Orlando 97
Atlanta 102, Cleveland 94
Brooklyn 97, Charlotte 81
Detroit 109, Miami 99
San Antonio 122, Houston 116
Toronto at New Orleans, late
Denver at Dallas, late
L.A. Clippers at Utah, late
New York at Sacramento, late
Philadelphia at Golden State, late
Portland at L.A. Lakers, late
Today's Games
Indiana at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Houston, 8 p.m.
Denver at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Miami at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Portland, 10 p.m.
Boston at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
San Antonio at Dallas, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Sacramento, 9 p.m.
Utah at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.


Bowl Glance
Thursday, Dec. 27
Military Bowl
At Washington
San Jose State 29, Bowling Green 20
Belk Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
Cincinnati 48, Duke 34
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Baylor 49, UCLA 26
Friday, Dec. 28
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Ohio 45, Louisiana-Monroe 14
Russell Athletic Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Virginia Tech 13, Rutgers 10, OT
Meineke Car Care Bowl
At Houston
Minnesota (6-6) vs. Texas Tech (7-5), 9 p.m.
(ESPN)
Saturday, Dec. 29
Armed Forces Bowl
At Fort Worth, Texas
Rice (6-6) vs. Air Force (6-6), 11:45 a.m.
(ESPN)
Pinstripe Bowl
At New York
Syracuse (7-5) vs. West Virginia (7-5), 3:15
p.m. (ESPN)
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
Arizona State (7-5) vs. Navy (8-4), 4 p.m.
(ESPN2)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Texas (8-4) vs. Orgeon State (9-3), 6:45 p.m.
(ESPN)
Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl
AtTempe, Ariz.
Michigan State (6-6) vs. TCU (7-5), 10:15
p.m. (ESPN)
Monday, Dec. 31
Music City Bowl
At Nashville, Tenn.
Vanderbilt (8-4) vs. N.C. State (7-5), Noon
(ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El Paso,Texas
Georgia Tech (6-7) vs. Southern Cal (7-5), 2
p.m. (CBS)
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis, Tenn.
Iowa State (6-6) vs. Tulsa (10-3), 3:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
LSU (10-2) vs. Clemson (10-2), 7:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Tuesday, Jan. 1
Heart of Dallas Bowl
At Dallas
Purdue (6-6) vs. Oklahoma State (7-5), Noon
(ESPNU)
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville, Fla.
Mississippi State (8-4) vs. Northwestern (9-
3), Noon (ESPN2)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Georgia (11-2) vs. Nebraska (10-3), 1 p.m.
(ABC)
Outback Bowl
At Tampa, Fla.
South Carolina (10-2) vs. Michigan (8-4), 1
p.m. (ESPN)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Stanford (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (8-5), 5 p.m.
(ESPN)
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Northern Illinois (12-1) vs. Florida State (11-
2), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Wednesday, Jan. 2
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Florida (11-1) vs. Louisville (10-2), 8:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Thursday, Jan. 3
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
Kansas State (11-1) vs. Oregon (11-1), 8:30


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr the record


F== lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
<:; -1-3-4
S... -. CASH 3 (late)
2-4-5
PLAY 4 (early)
S 9-0-7-8
PLAY 4 (late)

FANTASY 5
3 6-16-17-28
MEGA MONEY
6-10-22-38
loida Lottey MEGA BALL
14


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Santa Clara at Duke
2 p.m. (ESPN2) UNLV at North Carolina
2 p.m. (SUN) Orange Bowl Classic Florida State vs. Tulsa
4 p.m. (CBS) Kentucky at Louisville
4:30 p.m. (SUN) Orange Bowl Classic -Air Force vs. Florida
5 p.m. (NBCSPT) Governor's Holiday Hoops Classic -
Old Dominion vs. Virginia
7:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Washington at Connecticut
NBA
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Toronto Raptors at Orlando Magic
8 p.m. (WGN-A) Washington Wizards at Chicago Bulls
8:30 p.m. (SUN) Miami Heat at Milwaukee Bucks
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
5 a.m. (ESPN2) AdvoCare V100 Independence Bowl -
Louisiana-Monroe vs. Ohio (Same-day Tape)
11:45 a.m. (ESPN) Bell Helicopter Armed Forces Bowl -
Air Force vs. Rice
3:15 p.m. (ESPN) New Era Pinstripe Bowl Syracuse vs.
West Virginia
4 p.m. (ESPN2) Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl -Arizona State
vs. Navy
6:45 p.m. (ESPN) Valero Alamo Bowl Oregon State vs.
Texas
10:15 p.m. (ESPN) Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl Michigan
State vs. Texas Christian
GOLF
4 p.m. (NBC) Tyco Skills Challenge: Day 1 (Taped)
SOCCER
9:55 a.m. (ESPN2) English Premier League: Manchester
United vs. West Bromwich Albion
SNOWBOARDING
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) Paul Mitchell Progression Session: Rail
Jam (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
GIRLS BASKETBALL
TBA Seven Rivers at Disney Christmas Tournament
TBA Crystal River at Arnold High Invitational


p.m. (ESPN)
Friday, Jan. 4
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington, Texas
Texas A&M (10-2) vs. Oklahoma (10-2), 8
p.m. (FOX)
Monday, Jan. 7
BCS National Championship
At Miami
Notre Dame (12-0) vs. Alabama (12-1), 8:30
p.m. (ESPN)



NFL playoff
scenarios
AFC
CLINCHED: Houston, AFC South; Denver,
AFC West; New England, AFC East; Baltimore,
AFC North; Indianapolis, No. 5 playoff spot;
Cincinnati, No. 6 playoff spot.
HOUSTON (at Indianapolis)
Clinches first-round bye with:
-Win ortie, or
New England loss or tie, or
Denver loss
Clinches home-field advantage throughout
AFC playoffs with:
-Win, or
-Tie AND Denver loss ortie, or
New England loss or tie AND Denver loss
DENVER (vs. Kansas City)
Clinches first-round bye with:
-Win ortie, or
New England loss ortie
Clinches home-field advantage throughout
AFC playoffs with:
-Win AND Houston loss or tie, or
-Tie AND Houston loss
NEW ENGLAND (vs. Miami)
Clinches first-round bye with:
-Win AND Denver or Houston loss
Clinches home-field advantage throughout
AFC playoffs with:
-Win AND Denver and Houston loss
NFC
CLINCHED: Atlanta, NFC South and home-
field advantage; Green Bay, NFC North; San
Francisco, playoff spot; Seattle, playoff spot
GREEN BAY (at Minnesota)
Clinches first-round bye with:
-Win, or
-Tie AND San Francisco loss or tie, or
-San Francisco loss AND Seattle loss or tie
SAN FRANCISCO (vs. Arizona)
Clinches NFC West with:
-Win ortie, or
Seattle loss or tie
Clinches first-round bye with:
-Win AND Green Bay loss or tie, or
-Tie AND Green Bay loss
SEATTLE (vs. St. Louis)
Clinches NFC West with:
-Win AND San Francisco loss
Clinches first-round bye with:
Win AND San Francisco loss AND Green
Bay loss
WASHINGTON (vs. Dallas)
Clinches NFC East with:
-Win ortie
Clinches playoff spot with:
Chicago loss AND Minnesota loss
DALLAS (at Washington)
Clinches NFC East with:
-Win
NEWYORK GIANTS (vs. Philadelphia)
Clinches playoff spot with:
-Win AND Dallas loss or tie AND Chicago
loss AND Minnesota loss
MINNESOTA (vs. Green Bay)
Clinches playoff spot with:
-Win, or


-Tie AND Chicago loss or tie, or
Dallas loss or tie AND N.Y. Giants loss or
tie AND Chicago loss
CHICAGO (at Detroit)
Clinches playoff spot with:
Win AND Minnesota loss or tie, or
-Tie AND Minnesota loss
Pro Bowl rosters
At Aloha Stadium, Honolulu
Sunday, Jan. 27
AFC
Offense
Quarterbacks Tom Brady, New England;
Peyton Manning, Denver; Matt Schaub, Hous-
ton
Running Backs Jamaal Charles, Kansas
City; Arian Foster, Houston; Ray Rice, Baltimore
Fullback-Vonta Leach, Baltimore
Wide Receivers A.J. Green, Cincinnati;
Andre Johnson, Houston; Reggie Wayne, Indi-
anapolis; WesWelker, New England
Tight Ends Rob Gronkowski, New Eng-
land; Heath Miller, Pittsburgh
Tackles Duane Brown, Houston; Ryan
Clady, Denver; Joe Thomas, Cleveland; Mar-
shall Yanda, Baltimore
Guards Logan Mankins, New England;
Wade Smith, Houston
Centers Chris Myers, Houston; Maurkice
Pouncey, Pittsburgh
Defense
Ends Elvis Dumervil, Denver; Cameron
Wake, Miami; J.J. Watt, Houston
Interior Linemen Geno Atkins, Cincinnati;
Haloti Ngata, Baltimore; Vince Wilfork, New
England
Outside Linebackers-Tamba Hall, Kansas
City; Robert Mathis, Indianapolis; Von Viller,
Denver
Inside/Middle Linebackers Derrick John-
son, Kansas City; Jerod Mayo, New England
Cornerbacks Champ Bailey, Denver; An-
tonio Cromartie, N.Y. Jets; Johnathan Joseph,
Houston
Strong Safeties Eric Berry, Kansas City;
LaRon Landry, N.Y. Jets
Free Safety Ed Reed, Baltimore
NFC
Offense
Quarterbacks- Robert Griffin IlII, Washington;
Aaron Rodgers, Green Bay; Matt Ryan, Atlanta
Running Backs Frank Gore, San Francisco;
Marshawn Lynch, Seattle; Adrian Peterson, Min-
nesota
Fullback-Jerome Felton, Minnesota
Wide Receivers Victor Cruz, N.Y Giants;
Calvin Johnson, Detroit; Julio Jones, Atlanta; Bran-
don Marshall, Chicago
Tight Ends -Tony Gonzalez, Atlanta; Jason
Witten, Dallas
Tackles Russell Okung, Seattle; Joe Staley,
San Francisco; Trent Williams, Washington
Guards-Jahri Evans, New Orleans; Mike lu-
pati, San Francisco; Chris Snee, N.Y Giants
Centers Jeff Saturday, Green Bay; Max
Unger, Seattle
Defense
Ends- Jared Allen, Minnesota; Julius Peppers,
Chicago; Jason Pierre-Paul, N.Y. Giants
Interior Linemen -Gerald McCoy Tampa Bay;
Henry Melton, Chicago; Justin Smith, San Fran-
cisco
Outside Linebackers Clay Matthews, Green
Bay; Aldon Smith, San Francisco; DeMarcus Ware,
Dallas
Inside/Middle Linebackers- NaVorro Bowman,
San Francisco; Patrick Willis, San Francisco
Cornerbacks-Tim Jennings, Chicago; Patrick
Peterson, Arizona; Charles Tillman, Chicago
Strong Safeties Donte Whitner, San Fran-
cisco
Free Safeties Dashon Goldson, San Fran-
cisco; Earl Thomas, Seattle


Nets preach patience


Brooklyn turns to interim coach

Carlesimo, but for how long?


Associated Press

NEW YORK Mikhail
Prokhorov said Friday he
decided to fire Avery John-
son last week, but now
wants patience with interim
coach PJ. Carlesimo.
A day after dismissing
Johnson after just 28 games,
Prokhorov said he won't
rush into a coaching search,
insisting he wants Carles-
imo to have a chance to lead
the Brooklyn Nets out of
their slump.
The Russian billionaire
cut short a vacation to
British Columbia to travel to
New York, where he plans
to meet Saturday with Car-
lesimo. But even with big
names such as Phil Jackson
potentially available and
Prokhorov vowing to spend
whatever it takes to build a
championship team, he said



UNCAGED
Continued from Page B1

Desmond Frazier and
Willie Robinson hit consecu-
tive threes for the Tigers, and
the rout was on. And midway
through the fourth, when
Lecanto responded with
their own big run, Dunnellon
did just enough to hold the
Panthers back
Makros' final of four
three-pointers made it a 10-
point game with four min-
utes left, but the Tigers
broke Lecanto's press to find
Chris Jackson downcourt,
who took two dribbles into



STOMP
Continued from Page BI

team's effort and praised
every member who played.
"The winner tonight was
the entire team," Lattin said.
"We never let up and the re-
sults can be seen on the
scoreboard."
The constant pressure by
the Citrus defense led to nu-
merous turnovers and
forced shots that failed to fall



COASTS
Continued from Page BI

minutes of play when
'Canes head coach Tom
Densmore used a timeout
to implore his team to pick
up its pace against an over-
matched Falcons squad.
Citrus then put together
scoring totals of 22, 26 and
18 for the final three quar-
ters while out-rebounding
Fivay (3-13 overall) by a 2-
to-1 margin to force a run-
ning clock midway into the
fourth.
"I didn't think we were
entirely focused in the first
quarter even though we
won it 12-6," Densmore
said. "I worried about that
coming into the game. We
came out and it looked like
we played at Fivay's pace. I
thought we were holding
the ball in one spot too long,
and we told our guys that's
to Fivay's advantage. We
turned it up after that and
things took off for us. Those
last three quarter are



UPSET
Continued from Page B1l

was on, would play hard.
They knocked 'em down
when the pressure was on."
The key free throws -
Lecanto scored its final six
points at the line came
from junior point guard
Paige Richards. A technical
foul against Gibbs' Rodtavia
McCall sent her to the
bench, the third Gladiator to
foul out. Richards, who fin-
ished with 10 points, sank 3-
of-4 free throws to put the
Panthers up 44-43 with 28.2
seconds left
Richards added two more
at the line three seconds
later to increase Lecanto's
lead to 46-43. That foul was


called on Jessica Takdari,
who suffered a leg injury
with 5:36 left in the game
and had to be helped from
the court. She limped back
on because Gibbs' coach Ed
Jackson had no one else on
his bench; the foul was Tak-


repeatedly that Carlesimo
was the head coach.
Prokhorov did say that if
the Nets do look for a new
coach, he would be person-
ally involved. He wouldn't
discuss anyone by name,
even joking he had never
heard of Jackson, the 11-
time champion coach.
"Now PJ. is the head
coach and if it becomes nec-
essary, you know who the
usual suspects are,"
Prokhorov told reporters at
halftime of the Nets' game
against Charlotte.
Johnson led the Nets to
an 11-4 start, winning East-
ern Conference coach of the
month honors for Novem-
ber But they were just 3-10
in December, had been
blown out of their last two
games, and Prokhorov said
the Nets were lacking team
spirit.

the lane before throwing
down an emphatic one-
handed dunk over the lone
Panther defender at the
other end. Jackson had 14
points and six rebounds for
Dunnellon while Frazier fin-
ished with 10 points and five
rebounds.
The Tigers refused to be
rattled by the Panther press,
aggressively protecting their
lead down the stretch by at-
tacking.
"At that point in time when
you're down by that much,
you've got to take some
chances, and when you do,
they're going to make you
pay," Vilardi said. "You've got
to give them credit down the


for North Marion. After play-
ing the first four minutes to a
tie at six points each, the
Hurricanes went on a 13-0
run to basically put the game
away The first half ended
with Citrus leading 37-18
On the offensive end of the
court, the high-speed tempo
of the Hurricanes caused the
Lady Colts to foul to try to
keep the Hurricanes from
scoring easy baskets.
The Hurricanes used the
free shots to their advantage
as they converted 20 of 28


where we like to play to
score around 80 points a
game."
After the 'Canes led 34-17
at halftime, Fivay improved
its shooting early in the
third period to narrow its
deficit to 11 with 4:15 left in
the quarter
But Citrus had an answer
at every turn with leading
scorer Devin Pryor pouring
in 16 points after the break
while going 9-for-12 at the
foul line in the half.
Pryor finished with 28
and was 5-for-6 on technical
foul shots alone.
Citrus sophomore small
forward Desmond Franklin
added eight points of his 14
points in the third quarter
and managed six rebounds
in the game, and junior
guard Mitchell Ellis tallied
all 12 of his points in the
second and third periods to
help his 'Canes build an un-
surmountable lead.
In the low post, senior
Randy Lynn (six points)
grabbed 10 rebounds while
junior center Ben Janicki
scored a double-double


dari's fifth, making her the
fourth Gladiator to foul out.
They finished the game with
four players on the floor
"They're young kids,"
Jackson said of his team,
now 9-7. "And they don't put
enough time in when
they're away from the gym.
They just don't understand
the game.
"We were shorthanded.
Once 14 (Shelbria Murphy)
got tossed, we were limited
in what we could do. We had
one ball handler, and they
didn't want to come get (the
ball)."
That ball handler was
Bria Bostick, who finished
as the game's high scorer
with 15 points. But once the
Panthers realized their op-
ponents' limitations, they
pressured Bostick relent-


lessly, double and even
triple-teaming her
"We changed our offense
and we changed our de-
fense (at halftime)," said
Lecanto's only senior, Marie
Buckley, who together with
Deanna Moehring paced


Still, deciding Johnson
would be fired last week
means Prokhorov had made
up his mind even before the
lackluster Christmas per-
formance at home against
Boston that preceded a rout
Wednesday in Milwaukee.
"I think we have very tal-
ented players but they are
capable of much more than
what we have seen in the re-
cent weeks," Prokhorov
said. "I respect Avery and
really I wish him well, but
sometimes chemistry just
isn't right. It happens.
"I think the main question
is why we were unable to
bounce back and to play like
champions," he added.
Prokhorov added around
$300 million in payroll this
summer and has set the ex-
pectations high, saying he
believes the Nets can reach
the Eastern Conference fi-
nals. Though it's believed he
wouldn't back away from
paying top dollar for a
coach, he left open the pos-
sibility that he may already
have the guy he wants.

stretch there."
Ngqabutho Sigogo led the
way for Dunnellon, as the 6-
foot-7 center scored 24 points
and grabbed 11 rebounds.
Dunnellon outrebounded
Lecanto 34-23 on the night
Vilardi took the game as a
learning experience for his
team immediately after
"We found some kids that
want to play hard. The five or
six kids that played at the
end, I'm really proud of
them," Vilardi said. "They
played hard, never gave up
and we'll learn from this."
Lecanto travels to the
Amway Arena in Orlando to
face Melbourne for a 1 p.m.
game Tuesday


free throws. Micah Jenkins
was a perfect 6 for 6 from the
charity stripe. Shenelle
Toxen and Elizabeth Lynch
combined for five points
from the line.
North Marion never gave
up despite the score. The
Colts were led by sopho-
mores Shaye Hardy (10
points) and Charlisa Daniels
(six points).
Citrus is off until Jan. 8,
when the Hurricanes host
District 6A-6 opponent Cen-
tral for a 7:30 p.m. start


with 11 points seven in
third and 13 boards.
"We started to focus after
we came out and played
slow," Janicki said. "But
after we started cleaning it
up and playing, we started
putting it away"
Freshman forward
Jerome Merritt led his Fal-
cons with a symmetrical 12
points and 12 rebounds,
while junior guard Luke
Calleja had 10 points.
Densmore hopes the
back-to-back games in the
Classic will help his squad,
which beat Dunnellon 78-68
on Thursday, for games
against Hernando and
Lecanto next week.
Citrus plays Hernando at
home on Thursday at 7 p.m.
before returning to the Pan-
thers' gym for a big county
and district matchup next
Friday
"I told our kids it's simi-
lar to what we had this
week in terms of schedule
and practice," Densmore
said. "I was thinking this
week will be good prep for
next week."


the Panthers with 12 points.
"And it seemed like it
worked. We were down
something like 13 in the
third quarter
"We just played good
defense."
Missing from the Lecanto
lineup are seniors Miranda
Barber, who left the team,
and Megan Straight, who
will return. That left Buck-
ley as the lone senior and
took two starters out of the
lineup.
Gibbs was also missing
key players due to the holi-
day break, including 6-foot-
3 freshman center
Royhanna Streater But it


wasn't just those absences
that plagued the Gladiators;
it was an inability to convert
Jackson's directions.
After taking four free
throws in the first half, the
Panthers went to the line 32
times in the second half, 23
of those in the fourth quar-
ter Their performance was
spotty they hit just 15. But
it was enough to overtake
Gibbs.


SCOREBOARD






NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


MJD finally opts for surgery


Jaguars RB will

repair foot, be out

until at least May

Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE Jack-
sonville's worst season in fran-
chise history may include a
botched injury
Star running back Maurice
Jones-Drew had surgery on his
left foot Friday and will be out at
least until May The operation
came 10 weeks after Jones-Drew
hurt his foot at Oakland on Oct 21
and created plenty of questions
about why the team didn't opt for
surgery months ago.
The Jaguars (2-13) were 1-5
after that loss, in the middle of a
seven-game losing streak, and
knew Jones-Drew would be out
an extended period. Surgery was
an option back then. Instead, the
team held out hope Jones-Drew
could return.
"We had hoped it would as
others have heal without sur-


Associated Press
Jacksonville running back Maurice Jones-Drew, right, had surgery on
his left foot Friday after missing the previous 10 weeks with an injury.
Jones-Drew will be out of action until at least May.


gery, and it didn't," coach Mike
Mularkey said Friday
Mularkey said the two-month
delay means little because play-
ers can't start offseason work with
coaches until April 15.
"Hopefully back by May, late
May, early June," Mularkey said.
"If it's May, we're not going to miss


a lot I don't think it's significant
that we're doing it now. We all felt
like he had a chance to play all
the way up until this week, and
really we were hoping he could."
But it could be later. And any
kind of setback could mean miss-
ing organized team activities and
possibly training camp.


Sticking to his policy about not
talking about injuries, Mularkey
declined to offer specifics about
Jones-Drew's foot injury
"There's just some space in his
foot," the coach said. "They
wanted to keep it healing on its
own. I don't know all the medical
terms. There's a lot of things
going on in the foot. Something
that you hoped would naturally
go back didn't, so we're going to
hold it in place."
The Jaguars placed Jones-Drew
on injured reserve and filled his
roster spot by signing rookie de-
fensive tackle Jerome Long off
Kansas City's practice squad.
Jones-Drew, who led the league
in rushing in 2011, finished with
414 yards and a touchdown this
season. The Jaguars rank 30th in
the league in rushing.
MJD skipped the entire offsea-
son program, sitting out training
camp and the preseason during a
38-day holdout while looking for
a new contract. The Jaguars did-
n't budge, refusing to renegotiate
since he had two years remaining
on a five-year deal worth $31.5
million. He made $4.45 million
this season and is due to get $4.95
million next year.


o trip down


Peyton Manning

closes memory lane

Associated Press

Peyton Manning isn't one to
look back or even up at the
scoreboard.
The Broncos can clinch the top
seed in the AFC playoffs with a
win over Kansas City and a Hous-
ton loss at Indianapolis on Sun-
day While many Denver fans will
be cheering on the Colts, Manning
won't be paying any attention.
"I don't think anybody's going to
tell ME during the game," Man-
ning said.
The Colts have been the feel-
good story of the year with assis-
tant coach Bruce Arians and
Manning's successor, rookie An-
drew Luck, leading them to nine
straight wins while new coach
Chuck Pagano was sidelined by
chemotherapy treatments to fight
leukemia. Pagano returned to the
team this week.
Manning spent his first 14 sea-
sons in Indianapolis, a city he put
back on the NFL map, and he still
has plenty of friends on the Colts
and many ties to the community.
But when asked if he was happy
for the Colts' success or was even
paying attention to their surpris-
ing season, Manning demurred.
"I mean, I've just had so much
on my plate here. And it's been
quite a challenge here handling
everything going on in Denver So,
that's really kind of what I've fo-
cused on all season long," Man-
ning said. "But, hey, to make the
playoffs in the NFL, you've got to
have a great year. So, any team
that's in, that says a lot, especially
in the AFC, because I think it's as
competitive as it ever has been."
Best seat in the house
Minnesota Vikings defensive
end Jared Allen has enjoyed an
up-close-and-personal view of
history being made this season.
Vikings defenders typically have
a quick meeting with their
coaches after a series on game
days, but Allen likes to keep that
as short as possible so he can get
back up near the field to watch
Adrian Peterson go to work.
"I've got a front row seat," Allen
said. "I have to take advantage
of it."
Peterson enters the finale 102
yards rushing from 2,000 for this
season and 208 from breaking Eric
Dickerson's single-season record.
"Adrian's a great teammate and
that's what makes it more fun for
us," Allen said. "You're watching
your friend do something out
there. He's just battling. He just
wants to win. Obviously he wants
that record. I think you see his de-
termination, his motivation. You
see everything he's worked for
culminate this year, and it drives
you to do the same thing....
"He's doing remarkable things.
It's just fun to watch it and be on
the team with a legend in the
making."
Told you so
The Bengals acknowledged a
mistake by bringing back safety
Chris Crocker three games into
the season. The move has made a
big impact on the defense and
given the 10th-year safety a lot of
satisfaction.
"Yeah, it is sweet vindication,"
Crocker said this week.
Crocker was a mainstay on the
defense in Cincinnati from


NFL standings


y-New England
Miami
N.Y. Jets
Buffalo

y-Houston
x-Indianapolis
Tennessee
Jacksonville

y-Baltimore
x-Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Cleveland

y-Denver
San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City


Washington
Dallas
N.Y. Giants
Philadelphia

y-Atlanta
New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Carolina

y-Green Bay
Minnesota
Chicago
Detroit


x-San Fran.
x-Seattle
St. Louis
Arizona


ME.


Associated Press
Dallas Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo needs 315 yards passing Sunday against the Washington Redskins
to get 5,000 yards for the season. If Romo reached the mark, it would be just the sixth time in NFL history.


2008-11, helping the Bengals get to
the playoffs twice. They released
him after last season, when he
started all 16 games and a playoff
loss to Houston even though he
was limited by injuries. The Ben-
gals thought he was finished.
After the defense got shredded
in the first three games this sea-
son without Crocker, ranking 29th
in the league in yards allowed,
the Bengals brought him back.
Crocker has started at strong
safety for the last eight games and
made three interceptions, tied for
the team lead.
With Crocker settling down the
secondary, the Bengals have
moved up to No. 6 in defense
heading into the final regular-
season game against Baltimore.
His steady play has made his
point about last season.
"They don't really see and don't
really understand that you can't
play at a high level or high effi-
ciency for 16 weeks playing hurt,"
Crocker said. "I know my body, I
know myself, I know when I'm
done. I knew I wasn't done. So it
feels good just to kind of go
through where I'd been to where
I am now."
Romo's run at 5K
Dallas quarterback Tony Romo
needs 315 yards passing Sunday
at Washington for his first 5,000-
yard season. Sitting at 4,685 yards,
Romo has already broken his own
franchise record of 4,483 and now
has the top four passing seasons
in Cowboys history
Two months ago, Romo was the


NFL leader with 13 intercep-
tions. He has three since and
17 touchdowns.
"I'd say I've improved," Romo
said. "You're always improving."
He's been busy, too. Twice he's
set the franchise record for pass-
ing attempts in a game: 62
against the New York Giants and
Washington. He's broken his
franchise record for attempts in
a season, and could end up 100
throws clear of the 2009 mark
of 550.
"I think more than anything I'm
a completely different player than
I was four, three, two years ago,"
Romo said. "Just overall skill.
Being able to put the ball where I
want to compared to then, and un-
derstanding of the game."
There have been five 5,000-yard
passing seasons, two by Drew
Brees. The New Orleans quarter-
back could do it again. He's at
4,781 yards. Detroit's Matthew
Stafford, who threw for 5,038
yards last season, is 10 yards
ahead of Romo.
Looking ahead
The Titans (5-10) are trying to
make the best of the injuries that
have led to 12 offensive linemen
playing this season by giving
Byron Stingily a second straight
start at right tackle.
Tennessee drafted the 6-foot-5,
313-pound Stingily out of
Louisville in the sixth round in
2011. He didn't play at all as a
rookie, but will wrap up his sec-
ond season appearing in five
games with two starts.


Titans coach Mike Munchak
says the decision isn't a reflection
on backup Mike Otto, who started
two games after David Stewart
broke his right leg Dec. 2.
"Where we're at as a team, it's a
good chance to see what you have
at tackle," Munchak said.
"They're going to have to compete
again next year for that swing
spot. We know what Mike can do.
Mike has played enough games
for us that we know what he can
do. Him playing one more game is
not going to change our opinion of
him one way or the other. This
gives us a chance really to see
where Byron is because other-
wise, the only competing they do
is in preseason games, which is
hard to evaluate sometimes, or in
training camp. This gives us a
chance to see how the guy did in
live work."
Stingily will get to work against
Jaguars defensive end Jason
Babin, whom the Titans know
well from when he got 12 1/2 sacks
for Tennessee in 2010. Stingily, a
converted lineman who played
defensive end in high school,
used pilates during the offseason
to improve his flexibility. Mun-
chak said they knew Stingily had
plenty of room to develop and
credits offensive line coach
Bruce Matthews with helping the
lineman grow.
Now they want to see if Stingily
can put together consecutive
games.
"That will mean a lot for him
and for us going into the offsea-
son," Munchak said.


AFC
East
W L T Pct PF
11 4 0 .733 529
7 8 0 .467 288
6 9 0 .400 272
5 10 0 .333 316
South
W L T Pct PF
12 3 0 .800 400
10 5 0 .667 329
5 10 0 .333 292
2 13 0 .133 235
North
W L T Pct PF
10 5 0 .667 381
9 6 0 .600 368
7 8 0 .467 312
5 10 0 .333 292
West
W L T Pct PF
12 3 0 .800 443
6 9 0 .400 326
4 11 0 .267 269
2 13 0 .133 208
NFC
East
W L T Pct PF
9 6 0 .600 408
8 7 0 .533 358
8 7 0 .533 387
4 11 0 .267 273
South
W L T Pct PF
13 2 0 .867 402
7 8 0 .467 423
6 9 0 .400 367
6 9 0 .400 313
North
W L T Pct PF
11 4 0 .733 399
9 6 0 .600 342
9 6 0 .600 349
4 11 0 .267 348
West
W L T Pct PF
10 4 1 .700 370
10 5 0 .667 392
7 7 1 .500 286
5 10 0 .333 237


x-clinched playoff spot, y-clinched division
Sunday, Dec.30
Jacksonville at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Carolina at New Orleans, 1 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Houston at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y Giants, 1 p.m.
Chicago at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
Oakland at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
St. Louis at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.
Kansas City at Denver, 4:25 p.m.
Green Bay at Minnesota, 4:25 p.m.
Miami at New England, 4:25 p.m.
Dallas at Washington, 8:20 p.m.
AFC leaders
Week 16
Quarterbacks
Att Com Yds
Manning, DEN 554 377 4355
Brady NWE 601 379 4543
Roethlis., PIT 426 269 3131
Schaub, HOU 508 326 3733
Flacco, BAL 523 313 3783
Dalton, CIN 513 319 3591
P Rivers, SND 510 325 3455
C. Palmer, OAK 565 345 4018
Fitzpatrick, BUF 479 294 3175
Hassel., TEN 221 138 1367
Rushers
Att Yds Avg
Charles, KAN 271 1456 5.37
A. Foster, HOU 335 1328 3.96
Ridley, NWE 270 1189 4.40
Johnson, TEN 255 1187 4.65
Spiller, BUF 183 1185 6.48
R. Rice, BAL 254 1138 4.48
Green-Ellis, CIN 278 1094 3.94
Greene, NYJ 257 989 3.85
Re. Bush, MIA 219 960 4.38
Richardson, CLE 267 950 3.56
Receivers
No Yds Avg
Welker, NWE 110 1260 11.5
Wayne, IND 102 1315 12.9
Johnson, HOU 100 1457 14.6
A.. Green, CIN 95 1324 13.9
Thomas, DEN 87 1312 15.1
Decker, DEN 78 988 12.7
B. Myers, OAK 75 753 10.0
Johnson, BUF 73 935 12.8
B. Lloyd, NWE 73 902 12.4
H. Miller, PIT 71 816 11.5
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec
A. Foster, HOU 16 14 2
Richardson, CLE 12 11 1
Decker, DEN 11 0 11
A.. Green, CIN 11 0 11
Gronkowski, NWE 10 0 10
R. Rice, BAL 10 9 1
Ridley, NWE 10 10 0
De.Thomas, DEN 9 0 9
H. Miller, PIT 8 0 8
Re.Bush, MIA 8 6 2
NFC leaders


Rodgers, GBY
Griffin III, WAS
Ale. Smith, SNF
M. Ryan, ATL
R. Wilson, SEA
Brees, NOR
Romo, DAL
Newton, CAR
Manning, NYG
Bradford, STL


Peterson, MIN
M. Lynch, SEA
Morris, WAS
Martin, TAM
Gore, SNF
Forte, CHI
Jackson, STL
Bradshaw, NYG
L. McCoy, PHL
M. Turner, ATL


Johnson, DET
B. Marshall, CHI
Witten, DAL
D. Bryant, DAL
Gonzalez, ATL
R. White, ATL
Cruz, NYG
Cobb, GBY
Colston, NOR
Crabtree, SNF


Jones, GBY
D. Bryant, DAL
M. Lynch, SEA
A. Peterson, MIN
B. Marshall, CHI
Do. Martin, TAM
Ju. Jones, ATL
Morris, WAS
M. Turner, ATL
Rudolph, MIN


Week 16
Quarterbacks
Att Com Yds
512 343 3930
375 249 3100
217 152 1731
571 394 4481
374 237 2868
627 393 4781
611 405 4685
452 264 3621
515 308 3740
509 303 3450
Rushers
Att Yds Avg
314 1898 6.04
297 1490 5.02
302 1413 4.68
291 1312 4.51
238 1146 4.82
224 991 4.42
246 990 4.02
205 908 4.43
190 795 4.18
216 782 3.62
Receivers
No Yds Avg
117 1892 16.2
113 1466 13.0
103 983 9.5
88 1311 14.9
88 889 10.1
87 1309 15.0
82 1040 12.7
80 954 11.9
78 1102 14.1
77 933 12.1
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec
13 0 13
12 0 12
12 11 1
11 11 0
11 0 11
11 10 1
10 0 10
10 10 0
10 9 1
9 0 9


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


Associated Press
Beyonce performs on ABC's
"Good Morning America"
in New York. Through a
photo contest, 100 fans
will join Beyonce onstage
during the singer's halftime
show at the 2013 Super
Bowl on Feb. 3, at the
Mercedes-Benz Superdome
in New Orleans.


Fans to join
Beyonce onstage
NEW YORK-All the
single ladies and fellas
-will have a chance to
join Beyonce onstage at
the upcoming Super Bowl.
Pepsi announced Friday
100 fans will hit the stage
when the Grammy-win-
ning diva performs Feb. 3
at the Mercedes-Benz Su-
perdome in New Orleans.
A contest kicking off Satur-
day will allow fans to sub-
mit photos of themselves
in various poses, including
head bopping, feet tapping
and hip shaking. Those
pictures will be used in a
TV ad introducing Bey-
once's halftime perform-
ance, and 50 people -
along with a friend will
be selected to join the
singer onstage.
The photo contest at
www.pepsi.com/halftime
-ends Jan. 19, but Jan. 11
is the cut-off date for those
interested in appearing
onstage with Beyonce.

Ringling settles
animal lawsuit
WASHINGTON -An
animal rights group will
pay Ringling Bros. and
Barnum & Bailey Circus
$9.3 million to settle its
part of a lawsuit stem-
ming from claims the cir-
cus abused its elephants.
The circus company's
owners announced the
settlement with the
American Society for the
Prevention of Cruelty to
Animals on Friday The
animal rights group was
one of several in 2000
which sued the circus'
owner, Feld Entertain-
ment Inc., claiming ele-
phants were abused.
Courts later found the an-
imal rights activists had
paid a former Ringling
employee to bring the
lawsuit and the man did-
n't have the right to sue
the circus.

Stahl arrested on
lewd conduct
LOS ANGELES Los
Angeles police say actor
Nick Stahl has been ar-
rested for investigation of
lewd conduct.
The 33-year-old "Ter-
minator 3" star was ar-
rested about 8 p.m.
Thursday on Hollywood
Boulevard. He was
booked on a misde-
meanor count of lewd
conduct and released
from custody
-From wire reports


Good moon rising


Associated Press
Kara Hayward, from left, Jared Gilman and Jason Schwartzman are shown in a scene from "Moonrise Kingdom."
"Moonrise Kingdom" picked up five nominations to lead the Spirit Awards honoring independent films.


Germain picks top

10 films of2012

Editor's note: This is the third in
a three-part series of national
movie critics selecting their picks
as top 10 films of2012.

DAVID GERMAIN
AP Movie Writer

1. "Moonrise Kingdom" First
love is never this crazy and fanciful,
but it sure felt like it way back
when. Wes Anderson presents a
wondrous romance about two
12-year-old runaways seeking
refuge from life's cruelties and dis-
appointments. Newcomers Jared
Gilman and Kara Hayward beguile
us with performances precociously
passionate yet disarmingly in-
nocent, complemented by a group
of sweet adult sad-sacks among
them Bill Murray, Frances
McDormand, Bruce Willis and
Edward Norton who find respite
from disillusionment themselves
with a glimpse through the kids'
pure eyes.
2. "Life of Pi" A film about a
youth alone on a lifeboat with a
Bengal tiger has no business work-
ing. But Ang Lee adapts Yann Mar-
tel's introspective novel with
inspired narrative wiles and glori-
ous visuals presented in 3-D that
lovingly enfolds and enlarges the
action. Newcomer Suraj Sharma is
a marvel as the teen cast adrift And
the film richly explores our cathar-
tic need to tell tales, its dual ending
asking a lady-or-the-tiger question:
Which story do you prefer, the one
of genuine horror or the one of
hopeful, improbable possibility?
3. "Zero Dark Thirty" Kathryn
Bigelow follows her Academy
Award triumph on "The Hurt
Locker" with a docudrama of even
greater ambition and scope. Collab-
orating again with screenwriter
Mark Boal, Bigelow crafts a stu-
diously detailed, relentlessly paced
chronicle about the hunt for Osama
bin Laden. Jessica Chastain is fero-
cious as a CIA analyst tracking bin
Laden with almost blind obsession.
The film's third act the Navy
SEALs assault that killed bin Laden
- is as tense and absorbing as
big-screen action gets.
4. "Argo" Ben Affleck surges
forward as both actor and director
with this true-life story of a CIA op-
erative who concocted an incredi-
ble ruse to free six Americans from


Birthday A number of critical changes in your life could
take place in the year ahead. Some of them will be person-
ally initiated, while others will be the result of events or the
vicissitudes of time.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -When in a partnership
arrangement, there's a chance your counterpart might have
a better way of doing something. Give it a test, at the very
least.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Use your common sense in
matters pertaining to your health and welfare. Take special
care to avoid anything that would adversely affect your
well-being.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) In order to appease an-
other, there's a chance you could engage in something you
know would not serve your best interests. Feeling remorse
later won't take it back.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Try to involve yourself in ac-


Iran, disguised as a movie crew,
after the 1979 embassy takeover
The film has it all smarts,
suspense, dark laughs, exacting at-
tention to period style. This ar-
guably is Affleck's best on-screen
performance, and he's backed with
tremendous heart and humor by
John Goodman and Alan Arkin as
Hollywood insiders helping to pull
off the con.
5. "Searching for Sugar Man" -
Imagine the bitterness of the true
artist who fades back to obscurity
after being on the verge of stardom.
Now imagine a soul so noble that
bitterness never enters the picture.
That's a guy who truly deserves an-
other chance. Singer-songwriter
Rodriquez gets just that as Malik
Bendjelloul's inspiring documen-
tary recounts apocryphal rumors
about his fate then reveals what
really happened after his brush
with success in the 1970s. To para-
phrase Joey the Lips in "The Com-
mitments," success for Rodriquez
would have been predictable. The
way it turned out is poetry
6. "Rust and Bone" Jacques
Audiard delivers one of the oddest
of screen couples in this deeply in-
volving and completely unpre-
dictable romantic drama about a
whale trainer (Marion Cotillard)
who loses her legs in an orca acci-
dent and a negligent single dad
(Matthias Schoenaerts) training as
a mixed martial-arts fighter Only in
a movie would these two fall in love
- more likely in a bad movie. But
Audiard and his devoted stars find
so many moments of grace and
pathos that the relationship grows
from tenuous to genuine with
complete conviction.
7. "The Master" Good thing
Joaquin Phoenix's retirement
turned out to be a hoax. He does his
best work ever in his return to the
screen as a volatile World War II vet
who becomes both disciple and an-
tagonist to an L. Ron Hubbard-style
cult leader (Philip Seymour Hoff-
man, in a performance rivaling his
own career high in "Capote"). Fol-
lowing the battle-of-wills drama of
"There Will Be Blood," Paul
Thomas Anderson is proving him-
self a master of duality, crafting an-
other grand work of egos and
outlooks in deadly conflict.
8. "Lincoln" Few performances
qualify as monumental. That's the
best word to characterize Daniel
Day-Lewis as Abraham Lincoln,
though. He vanishes into the presi-
dent's awkward, folksy, melancholy
spirit, creating an unforgettable
portrait of greatness that pretty


Today's HOROSCOPE

tivities that allow you to exercise some kind of custodial
influence. Doing what you do best will make for a very
satisfying day.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -Your mental attributes are
likely to be far more vigorous and energetic than your phys-
ical ones. Try to select activities that challenge your mind.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) This might be one of those
rare days when you can actually trust your instincts regard-
ing financial or commercial affairs, because, positive or
negative, they should be right on the mark.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Endeavors you originate will
have excellent possibilities for success, provided you're the
one who calls the shots. Don't delegate authority, unless, of
course, you have no choice.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Usually you're the one who likes
to be in the middle of the action, but going off by yourself
might be just what you need in order to sort out some of


Jared Gilman is shown in a scene
from "Moonrise Kingdom."
much puts to rest any thought of
another actor trying his hand at a
serious portrayal of Lincoln for a
good long while. Steven Spielberg
eschews the battlefield for a talky
yet affecting look at Lincoln's final
months. America couldn't have
done without Lincoln, and
Spielberg couldn't have done
without Day-Lewis.
9. "West of Memphis" This is a
vote not only for a film, but for
artists who joined in protest to save
three men from prison one from
Death Row after they were con-
victed in the 1993 slaying of three
Cub Scouts. Inspired by "Paradise
Lost," an earlier documentary
about the case, Peter Jackson and
wife Fran Walsh bankrolled their
own investigation and produced
this new film by Amy Berg that calls
into question the case built by pros-
ecutors. The story's enthralling, the
climax triumphant
10. "Looper" For someone who
thinks Bruce Willis' "Twelve Mon-
keys" is the defining time-travel
flick, it's irresistible to see him in
another clever, careening tale of
time-hopping. Joseph Gordon-
Levitt wonderfully channels the
younger Willis as a hit man whose
latest assignment is to snuff his
older self, in a perverse retirement
system where the mob of the future
eventually has its assassins kill off
themselves. Writer-director Rian
Johnson has concocted a rare
thriller whose brains equal its ac-
tion, telling the story with great
style and provocative irony


your important ideas.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -Associating with some of your
closer friends could be what the doctor ordered. Instead of
choosing your pals at random, be extremely selective as to
which ones you want to hang with.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) No one wants to push them-
selves too hard unless they have to, but you might feel it to
be necessary soon. This kind of stimulation could be just
what you need.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -You're not inclined to dictate
to others how they should run their lives, yet if someone
comes to you for just such advice, you'll have much to say,
and you'll be right.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Don't accept the status
quo when it comes to an endeavor in which you're
presently involved. Although it might be insignificant to an-
other, it could be important to you.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 27
Fantasy 5:4 14 22 24 27
5-of-5 3 winners $70,362.56
4-of-5 343 $99
3-of-5 9,667 $9.50
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26
Powerball: 11 -13 -23 -43- 54
Powerball: 4
5-of-5 PB 1 winner $50 million
1 Florida winner
5-of-5 5 winners $1 million
1 Florida winner
Lotto: 1 6 22 -24 -32 -48
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 21 $6,826
4-of-6 1,650 $70
3-of-6 34,625 $5
Fantasy 5:13 14 19 33 35
5-of-5 5 winners $46,227.82
4-of-5 240 $155
3-of-5 8,383 $12

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, Dec.
29, the 364th day of 2012.
There are two days left in the
year.
Today's Highlight:
On Dec. 29, 1972, Eastern
Air Lines Flight 401, a Lock-
heed L-1011 Tristar, crashed
into the Florida Everglades
near Miami International Air-
port, killing 101 of the 176
people aboard. (Investigators
determined the crew was dis-
tracted by a burned-out indi-
cator light, and failed to notice
the autopilot had become dis-
engaged, sending the plane
into a slow descent leading to
the late-night crash.)
On this date:
In 1845, Texas was admit-
ted as the 28th state.
In 1890, the Wounded
Knee massacre took place in
South Dakota as an esti-
mated 300 Sioux Indians
were killed by U.S. troops
sent to disarm them.
In 1916, Grigory Rasputin,
the so-called "Mad Monk"
who'd wielded great influence
with Czar Nicholas II, was
killed by a group of Russian
noblemen in St. Petersburg.
In 1940, during World War
II, Germany dropped incendi-
ary bombs on London, set-
ting off what came to be
known as "The Second Great
Fire of London."
In 1975, a bomb exploded
in the main terminal of New
York's LaGuardia Airport,
killing 11 people.
Ten years ago: Secretary
of State Colin Powell, making
the rounds of the Sunday TV
talk shows, said there was still
time to find a diplomatic reso-
lution to North Korea's devel-
opment of nuclear weapons,
and the situation hadn't yet
reached the crisis stage.
Five years ago: The New
England Patriots ended their
regular season with a re-
markable 16-0 record follow-
ing a 38-35 comeback victory
over the New York Giants.
(New England became the
first NFL team since the 1972
Dolphins to win every game
on the schedule.)
One year ago: The No. 15
Baylor Bears, led by Heisman
Trophy winner Robert Griffin
III, pulled out an incredible
Alamo Bowl victory in the
highest-scoring regulation
bowl game in history, beating
the Washington Huskies 67-
56 at the Alamodome in San
Antonio, Texas.
Today's Birthdays: ABC
newscaster Tom Jarriel is 78.
Actress Mary Tyler Moore is 76.


Thought for Today: "Ours
is the age of substitutes: In-
stead of language we have
jargon; instead of principles,
slogans; and instead of gen-
uine ideas, bright sugges-
tions." Eric Bentley,
British-born American author
and educator.











RELIGION


,;,1w1


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Answering the call


GARY FOUNTAIN/Houston Chronicle
Quique Autrey, a student who is finishing his masters of divinity degree, studies in Sugar Land, Texas. The 26-year-old had considered a St.
Louis seminary after finishing an undergraduate degree, but his wife couldn't find a job. The young couple stayed in Sugar Land, and he took
an internship running youth programs at Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

Night, online courses help students bridge gap in pursuing ministerialstudies


JAYME FRASER
Houston Chronicle
HOUSTON
Lizbeth Tulloch just could
not leave her long career as
an oil industry lawyer to
spend years at a seminary
She couldn't ignore her call to
ministry either
Tulloch finally found a way to
explore her faith without risking
her legal career: She enrolled in
night and online courses at the
University of St. Thomas' St.
Mary's Seminary
"It took me a long time to lis-
ten," Tulloch, 55, said. "I first
felt the call in 1983."


While online education is no
longer a novelty in higher edu-
cation, seminaries have been
slower than other colleges to
adopt the format. Most Houston-
area seminaries offer night
classes and distance learning,
but none offers a degree that
can be completed solely online.
Some in the field feel that
studies must include regular
face-to-face time for students to
not only learn the facts of their
faith, but also live out a spiritual
transformation. Others argue
the quality of any class, online
or not, depends on the profes-
sor's skill at teaching. If semi-
naries don't embrace the format,


they could isolate potential stu-
dents with already busy lives
who increasingly expect flexible
options in the digital age.
Tulloch, like many seminari-
ans, is older with an established
career Others also have chil-
dren or already work for a
church they don't want to leave
behind. They need more flexi-
bility than a typical college stu-
dent, but don't want to sacrifice
quality.
More than half of all Texas
seminary students pursue their
studies part time, according to
2011 statistics gathered by the
Association of Theological
Schools. Many choose online


courses because they are al-
ready in leadership roles with a
congregation, work full time or
have family commitments.
Quique Autrey had the tri-
fecta.
The 26-year-old had consid-
ered a St Louis seminary after
finishing an undergraduate de-
gree, but his wife couldn't find a
job. The young couple stayed in
Sugar Land, and he took an in-
ternship running youth pro-
grams at Redeemer
Presbyterian Church.
After almost five years, Autrey
is about to finish his masters of
See Page C5


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


For a


perfect


new


year

One day at the li-
brary, a book fell off
a shelf and hit a boy
named Milo Crinkley on
the head.
The title, "Be a Perfect
Person in Just Three
Days," was just what he
needed.
Wanting more than any-
thing to be perfect, Milo
checked the book out and
set out to do everything
the author, Dr K. Pinker-
son Silverfish, prescribed.
So begins the 1982 chil-
dren's book "Be a Perfect
Person in Just Three
Days" by Stephen Manes.
As Milo discovered, to
be perfect he had to follow
three steps perfectly On
day one he had to wear a
stalk of broccoli around
his neck like a necklace
all day When asked about
it, he said he had a rare
disease that only a broc-
coli necklace could cure.
Day two: Milo had to go
without eating for the en-
tire day Day three: Milo
See Page C5


Terry Mattingly
ON
RELIGION


Sunday worship
Covenant Love Ministry
meets in building 11 at Sham-
rock Acres Industrial Park, 6843
N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River.
There is a gospel sing at 7 p.m.
Friday. Regular church serv-
ices are at 10:30 a.m. Sunday.
The ministry website is
Covenant-Love.com. Call Pas-
tor Brian Kinker at 352-
601-4868.
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church in America invites the
public to attend Great Vespers
at 5 p.m. today and Divine
Liturgy at 10 a.m. Sunday. The
church is at 1277 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness (off U.S. 41 North,
across from Dollar General).
The Holy Myrrhbearers ask at-
tendees to bring a box or can of
food for distribution at Family
Resource Center in Hernando.
Call 352-726-4777.
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in Lecanto
will celebrate Holy Eucharist
services at 5 p.m. today and 8
and 10:30 a.m. Sunday. A nurs-
ery is provided during the 10:30
a.m. service. Christian Forma-
tion is at 9:15 a.m. Godly Play
Sunday school is at 10 a.m.
There is a healing service and
Eucharist and Bible study at
10 a.m. Wednesday. SOS is
from 9 a.m. to noon Thursday
at Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church. Evening Bible study is
at 7 p.m. Thursday.
First Christian Church of
Homosassa Springs' new
contemporary worship service
begins at 5:30 p.m. today. The
public is invited to a weekly
marriage enrichment series be-
ginning Wednesday and ending
with a vow renewal service on
Feb. 13. Sunday worship is at


Religion NOTES

2013 UMW officers


Special to the Chronicle
The First United Methodist Church of Homosassa installed the 2013 officers for the United
Methodist Women. The Rev. Sandra Garner, a retired Methodist minster, was the installing
officer. She used the theme "Service to God Through Women." New officers, from left, are:
Patricia Blake, president; Laurie Stainton, vice president; Helen Lefave, secretary/trea-
surer; Barbara Jackson, secretary of program resources; Ann Ice, spiritual growth coordi-
nator; and Claudette Kirby, chairwoman of the nominating committee.


10:30 a.m. The church is at
7030 W. Grover Cleveland
Blvd. Dan Wagner is the minis-
ter. Call the church office at
352-628-5556.
"After The Christmas
Story," from Luke 2:22-40, is
theme of Pastor Lane's sermon
today at 6 p.m. and Sunday at
9:30 a.m. at Faith Lutheran
Church in Crystal Glen Subdi-
vision, off State Road 44 and
County Road 490. Fellowship
time is after the Sunday serv-


ice. Bible study and Sunday
school will resume next Sun-
day. Call 352-527-3325 or visit
fatihlecanto.com. Everyone is
invited to services and
activities.
First Baptist Church of
Inverness, 550 Pleasant Grove
Road, offers the following Sun-
day activities: SONrise Sunday
school class at 7:45 a.m.,
blended worship service at 9
a.m., "Kid's Church" for ages 4
through fourth grade during the


9 a.m. service, Sunday school
classes for all ages at 10:30
a.m. A nursery is available for
all services except the 7:45
a.m. class. On Sunday
evening, Connection classes
are offered and AWANA begins
at 5:15. Midweek worship serv-
ice for adults is at 6 p.m.
Wednesday. For the youths,
there is "Ignite," and for chil-
dren, "Wednesday Worship
Kids." Call the office at 352-
726-1252 or visit www.fbc


inverness.com.
First Presbyterian
Church is at 206 Washington
Ave., Inverness. Sunday wor-
ship schedule includes tradi-
tional services at 8 and 11 a.m.,
casual service at 9:30 a.m.,
Sunday school hour at 9:30
a.m., and coffee hour from 9 to
11 a.m. For the first Sunday
after Christmas, Denise Lay will
bring the message, "They Gave
Him What?" with readings from
Matthew 2:1-12. Widow/widow-
ers' "Real Time" Ministry is a
new group that meets at the
church from 10:45 to 11:45 a.m.
the first and third Mondays
monthly at the church. Call the
church at 352-637-0770.
St. Anne's Episcopal
Church (a parish in the Angli-
can Communion) on Fort Island
Trail West, will celebrate the
first Sunday after Christmas
with services at 8 and
10:15 a.m. St. Anne's hosts Our
Father's Table from 11:30 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. today. Overeaters
Anonymous meets at
10:30 a.m. Wednesday in the
parish library. "Recovering
From Food Addiction" meets at
1 p.m. Thursday in the parish
library. Alcoholics Anonymous
meets at 8 p.m. Friday and
Monday in the parish library.
All are invited to join St. Anne's
for a Bluegrass Gospel sing-
along at 6 p.m. the fourth Sun-
day monthly. Annie and Tim's
United Bluegrass Gospel Band
will perform.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church will celebrate Holy Eu-
charist Rite 1 at 8 a.m. Sunday
and Holy Eucharist Rite 2 at
10:30 a.m. Adult Sunday school
is at 9:30 a.m. Family Eucharist
See Page C2


Top


religion


news of


2012

T was the Sunday
night before the
Selection and the
Rev Robert Jeffress took
to the pulpit to offer a
message that, from his
point of view, was both
shocking and rather nu-
anced.
The bottom line: If
Barack Obama won a sec-
ond White House term,
this would be yet another
sign that the reign of the
Antichrist is near
Inquiring minds wanted
to know if the leader of
the highly symbolic First
Baptist Church of Dallas
was suggesting that the
president was truly You
Know Anti-who.
"I want you to hear me
tonight: I am not saying
that President Obama is
the Antichrist. I am not
saying that at all," said
Jeffress, who previously
made headlines during a
national rally of conserva-
tive politicos by calling
Mormonism a "theological
cult."
"President Obama is
not the Antichrist. But
what I am saying is this:
The course he is choosing

See Page C5


lzz::





C2 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012


NOTES
Continued from Page Cl

service is at 10:30 a.m. and the
youth will participate in the
liturgy of the 10:30 a.m. service.
Children's church is during the
10:30 a.m. Family Eucharist.
Feed My Sheep, a feeding pro-
gram for people in need, is at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday fol-
lowed by a Holy Eucharist and
healing service celebrating the
Holy Name of Our Lord Jesus
Christ.
First Baptist Church of
Floral City, 8545 E. Magnolia
St., invites everyone to share in
Sunday's worship services at
the 8:30 a.m. blended service
and the 11 a.m. traditional serv-
ice. Coffee and doughnuts are
served in the fellowship hall
from 9 to 9:45 a.m. Sunday
school classes for all ages
begin at 9:45 a.m. Sunday
evening, the Rev. John Rothra
will continue with the series
"Christian Doctrines: What We
Believe and Why" at 6 p.m. No
Wednesday evening supper or
services on Jan. 2. For more in-
formation, www.fbcfloralcity.org
or call 352-726-4296.
Inverness Church of God
Sunday worship services are at
8:30 and 10:30 a.m. The first
Sunday monthly is designated
for children to have a special
time together in the "Children's
Church" room during the 10:30
a.m. worship service. The re-
maining Sundays, children will
remain in the auditorium for
worship with their parents. Sun-
day school begins at 9:30 a.m.
with classes for everyone. Adult
Bible class is at 7 p.m.
Wednesday in rooms 105 and
106. The youth group meets at
7 p.m. Wednesday in the
Youth Ministries Building. K.I.D.
Zone (for children pre-k through
eighth grade) meets from 6 to 8
p.m. Wednesday. This in-
cludes K.I.D.'s choir practice
from 6 to 6:30; K.I.D.'s dinner
from 6:30 to 7; and children's
Bible study classes from 7 to 8
p.m. The church is at 416 U.S.
41 S., Inverness. Call 352-
726-4524.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church invites the
public to Lessons and Carols
worship services at 8:30 and 11
a.m. Sunday. A coffee hour fol-
lows both services. The church
is barrier free and offers a free
CD ministry, large-print service
helps and hearing devices. A
nursery attendant is available
for preschool-age children. The
church is on County Road 486
opposite Citrus Hills Boulevard
in Hernando. Call 352-
746-7161.
Peace Lutheran Church
has Sunday morning Bible
classes for children and youths
at 9. Adult Bible study groups
meet at 9 a.m. Sunday and 10
a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday.
Sunday morning worship serv-
ice is at 10. The church is five
miles north of Dunnellon at the
junction of U.S. 41 and State
Road 40. Call the church office
at 352-489-5881 or visit
www.PeaceLutheranOnline.org.
First Baptist Church of
Homosassa, 10540 W Yulee
Drive, weekly schedule: Sun-
day school for all ages at 9 a.m.
followed by morning worship at
10:25. Youth Bible study is at
4:30 p.m. in the fellowship hall.
Sunday evening Bible study be-
gins at 6. Life Care Center is
open (food and clothing) from
9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Monday
and Thursdays. Call 352-
628-3858.
First Christian Church of
Chassahowitzka, 11275 S.
Riviera Drive, Homosassa,
meets at 9:30 a.m. Sunday for
Bible study and 10:30 for morn-
ing worship. Call 352-382-2557.
First Baptist Church of
Hernando Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m., following fel-
lowship, coffee and goodies.
The morning service begins at
10:45. The evening service is at
6. Midweek services are at 6:30
p.m. Wednesday. Young Musi-
cians/Puppeteers meet at 6:30
p.m. Wednesday. Youth Bible


study for ages 11 and older is
from 6 to 7:30 p.m. the second
and fourth Fridays monthly in
the fellowship hall. The church
is on East Parsons Point Road
in Hernando.
Find a church home at
Faith Baptist Church at 6918
S. Spartan Ave. in Homosassa
(one mile from U.S. 19, off Car-
dinal Street). Visit comeand-
seefbc.org. Services are
interpreted for the deaf. Sunday
school classes at 9:45 a.m. with
Sunday worship at 11 a.m. and
6 p.m. "King's Kids" and "Fly-
ers" for K-5 grades from 6 to
7:15 p.m. Sunday. Wednes-
day Bible study and prayer
meeting at 7 p.m. with "War-


RELIGION


riors" for grades 6 through 12
from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Call 352-
628-4793.
Beverly Hills Community
Church is nondenominational.
Worship services are at 10 a.m.
Sunday. Bible study is at 6
p.m. Wednesday in the
chapel. Everyone is welcome.
Call 352-746-3620.
Crystal River Church of
Christ meets for Bible study at
10 a.m. Sunday, worship at 11,
and evening service at 6.
Wednesday Bible study is at 7
p.m. Everyone is welcome. The
church is at the intersection of
State Road 44 and U.S. 19.
Call Evangelist George Hick-
man at 352-794-3372 or 352-
795-8883, or email
georgehickman@yahoo.com.
Anglican Church of the
Holy Spirit offers a traditional
1928 BCP Communion service
at 10:15 a.m. Sunday. Call for
directions: 855-426-4542.
The Nature Coast Unitar-
ian Universalist Fellowship of
Citrus County welcomes the
Nature Coast Dulcimer Players
to their sanctuary at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. The Players will pres-
ent the history of the dulcimer
which, along with the banjo, is
truly an American instrument.
The Dulcimer Players will play
carols of the season, some of
which are familiar and some
you may have never heard be-
fore. Come join us for a delight-
ful morning service. The NCUU
meets at 7633 N. Florida Ave.
(U.S.41, Citrus Springs.) Call
352-465-4225.
Abundant Life of Crystal
River is a growing church
where you can find a church
home, as well as a caring
church family. The Sunday
morning service is at 10:30 and
the midweek service is at 7
p.m. Wednesday. Both services
have uncompromised and en-
couraging Bible-based teach-
ings that will build your faith.
Abundant Life is a full-Gospel,
nondenominational church that
believes in the power of Pente-
cost. Come and grow with us.


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour @ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship with Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Troy Allen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (All Age Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir/ Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am

DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am

HOLY DAYS
As Announced

CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 -4:30pmr
795-4479


Come as you are and leave for-
ever changed by the presence
of the Lord. Abundant Life of
Crystal River is at 4515 N. Tal-
lahassee Road, Crystal River.
Visit www.abundantlifecitrus.org
or call 352-795-LIFE
First Church of God of
Inverness, 5510 E. Jasmine
Lane, invites the public to Sun-
day morning worship services
at 10:30. Call 352-344-3700.
Joy & Praise Fellowship
will celebrate the life of Virginia
"Ginny" Cieply, who died Dec.
10 at age 47. The service is at
3 p.m. Sunday at Joy & Praise
Fellowship, 4007 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills. A recep-
tion will follow the service.
The public is invited to
worship at Trinity Independent
Baptist Church, 2840 E.
Hayes St. (on the corner of
Croft and Hayes), Hernando.
Call 352-726-0100.
As families get busier and
busier, it may be difficult to get
to church on Sunday and so
many just don't go to church at
all. North Oak Baptist Church
in Citrus Springs has offered
a Saturday night worship for
more than a year and is contin-
uing to make changes in order
to meet the needs of today's
families. Saturday is a day full
of activity and to give families
time to get home and have din-
ner and still make it to worship,
the service time is changing to
7 p.m. A "come-as-you-are" at-
mosphere combined with timely
messages and contemporary
praise and worship make this a
positive experience for people
of all ages. Childcare is pro-
vided for birth through 4 years
of age and a children's group
for kids through third grade
meet at the same time. Pastor
Stan Stewart is beginning a se-
ries of messages titled "Energy
Zappers" based on the book by
Shaun Blakeney and Wallace
Henley. On Jan. 5, the mes-
sage is"When Your Sighs Turn
To Snorts," and Jan. 12's mes-
sage is "Finding Inspiration in
the Foot Draggers." Member-


ST. THOMAS

CATHOLIC

CHURCH


MASSES:
saturday 4:30 P.M.
unday 8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.

I[I Hl i[ r i .. lt r .




ST. ANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
wwwstannescr.org


Crystal River
CHURCH OF

CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.' 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


ship is not necessary and all
are invited to attend. The
church is at the intersection of
North Elkcam Boulevard and
North Citrus Springs Boulevard.
Call 352-489-1688 or 352-
746-1500 for more information.
Special events
The St. Scholastica Coun-
cil of Catholic Women will spon-
sor a "Bunco Bash Event" at
11:30 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 26, at
the Fr. James Hoge Parish
Center, 4301 W. Homosassa
Trail, Lecanto. Entrance fee is
$12. Free food and door prizes.
All funds raised will go to such
charities as Daystar Life Cen-
ter, Family Life and Pregnancy
Center, Hugs for the Homeless,
migrant workers of Florida, and
overseas missionaries.
Inverness Church of God
will have a healing service
with Evangelist Len Kelley dur-
ing the 10:30 a.m. worship
service Sunday. The public is
invited. The church is at 416
U.S. 41 S., Inverness. Call the
church at 352-726-4524.
Everyone is invited to
"Friend Day" on Sunday, Jan.
6, at Heritage Baptist Church, 2
Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. Start
the New Year right. Come to
church. Come with a friend.
Meet new friends. Every guest
will receive a new Bible. Coffee
and doughnuts served at 9:30
followed by the worship service
at 10:15 a.m. Call 352-
746-6171.
A "Community Revival
Celebration" will take place
Jan. 6-9 at Dunnellon First
United Methodist Church,
21501 W. State Road
40.Gospel music, praise and
prayers for healing will be in-
cluded in the services. Interde-
nominational speakers are
Claude Ray, an evangelist
biker; the Rev. Nathaniel
Rawls, pastor of First Bethel
Missionary Baptist Church;
Dunnellon's own Ernie Mills,
who played football with the
Gators, the Pittsburg Steelers
and the Dallas Cowboys; and


B0 Crystal
2I River

Foursquare

Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager



( Crystal River

Church of God

Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
S (12th Ave.) Nurser
Provided


; Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034

Rabbi
Lenny Sarko

Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon


David Vander Klay, a New York
detective. The community is in-
vited. Nursery available. Call
the church office at 352-
489-4026.
The annual Citrus County
Camp Meeting will take place
Sunday through Friday, Jan. 6-
11, at Trinity Independent Bap-
tist Church on the corner of
Croft Road and Hayes Street in
Hernando. Guest speakers are
James Knox of DeLand and
Eddie Goddard of Chat-
tanooga, Tenn. Special singing
nightly along with a nursery will
be provided. Call Pastor Jerry
Bloxton at 352-726-0100.
The newly formed "Spirit
in the Wind Fellowship" ex-
amines how Christian and Na-
tive American spiritualities
blend for stronger Christian
faith. The public is invited to the
fellowship's gathering from
10:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday,
Jan. 9, at the host congrega-
tion, First Presbyterian Church
in Crystal River, 1501 S.E. U.S.
19, near the Fort Island Trail in-
tersection. Members of the
local Red Eagle Lodge will join
us with artifacts from their mo-
bile cultural center. There will
be learning, Scripture accom-
panied by Amerindian wisdom,
fun activities, and closing sim-
ple worship. This is a free gath-
ering. Call the Rev. Mike
Fonfara, D. Min., a retired Pres-
byterian Church (U.S.A.) pastor
and Montaukett Indian Nation
member, at 352-527-8321.
All widows in the commu-
nity are invited to join the Wid-
ows Ministry Group from 4 to
5:30 p.m. Wednesday begin-
ning Jan. 9, at Cornerstone
Baptist Church, 1100 W. High-
land Blvd., Inverness. "God isn't
finished with us yet!" Call Darla
at 352-270-8115.
Hernando Church of the
Nazarene, 2101 N. Florida
Ave., will host the Triumphant
Quartet in concert on Wednes-
day, Jan. 9. This nationally ac-
claimed group has numerous
top 10 radio singles, yet keep
God first in everything they do.


THE
SALVATION
ARMY CITRUS COUNTY
ARMY CORPS
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 M.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 AM.
Lt. Vanessa Miller









HEKR, YOU'LL FIND
A CA IN G FAMILY
IN CH IST!

C YSTAL
RIVECK
VNITID
)- ATH ODIST
CHU KCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
-, A Stephen Ministry Provider .:


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Join us for this gospel concert.
The church's own orchestra
and choir, Celebration Sounds,
will open the concert at 6:45
p.m. Doors will open at 6 p.m.
There is no charge for this
event; a love offering will be
collected.
Americans United for
Separation of Church and
State (Nature Coast Chapter)
will meet at 4 p.m. Tuesday,
Jan. 15, at Lakes Region Li-
brary, 1511 Druid Road, Inver-
ness. Mr. Rose, president of
this chapter, will give a talk on
"Piety & Politics," written by the
Rev. Barry Lynn, executive di-
rector of Americans United for
Separation of Church and
State. The public is welcome to
attend. Call Maralyn at 352-
726-9112 or email nature
coastau@hotmail.com.
The Council of Catholic
Women of Our Lady of Grace
Church will host its annual
"Tricky Tray Fundraiser" on
Saturday, Jan. 19, in the Parish
Life Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills. Doors open at 10
a.m. and drawings begin at
11:30 a.m. The event features
baskets with contents valued at
$25 or more, raffles and money
trees. Items include a mah
jongg set, gift certificates for
golf, restaurants and supermar-
kets. Purchase a sheet of 25
numbered tickets for $5 for de-
posit in a bag adjacent to your
choice of baskets. The Life
South Blood Mobile will be on
site. Ticket tenders will be avail-
able for blood donors and for
those who cannot stay. Pro-
ceeds go to needed items for
the church and charitable con-
tributions. Call Bernita Becker
at 352-344-0235. For member-
ship information, call Rosalie
Madigan at 352-746-2987.
The third Saturday sup-
per is from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 19, in the De-
wain Farris Fellowship Hall at
Community Congregational
Christian Church, 9220

See NOTES/Page C3


SWest

Citrus
Church of Christ

9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352.564.8565
v .





























Bible Study 9:30





Worship 10:30

Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
citrus























SBob Dickey
SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday

Bible Study 7:00


EVANGELIST
Bob Dickey





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs. Menu includes beef
stew, salad, homemade bread,
granny cake, coffee and tea.
Cost is $10 for adults and $5
for children. Tickets can be pur-
chased at the door. Takeouts
available. Call the church at
352-489-1260.
Dunnellon Presbyterian
Church had to accept Leslie
Hammes' withdrawal from per-
forming Jan. 20 due to a recent
illness. However, the church's
own musician, Renee Deuvall


RELIGION


has prepared a program for 3
p.m. that day. Renee will sing,
and perform classical to con-
temporary arrangements,
Chopin to Gershwin, Rach-
maninov to Scott Joplin. Her
vocals will include an operatic
aria, and she is planning on
performing a local, first-time
young composer's arrange-
ment. Deuvall has requested all
proceeds are to benefit the
church's building project.
The St. Elizabeth Ann
Seton Parish Men's Association
is sponsoring its annual "A Day
at the Races" trip to Tampa
Bay Downs for an exciting day
of thoroughbred horse racing
on Wednesday, Jan. 23. Cost


of $45 per person includes
round-trip bus transportation
from the church parking lot,
entry fee and reserved seating
in the clubhouse, racing form
and a hot buffet luncheon.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church will host a Military
Card Party on Monday, Feb.
11. Lunch will be served at
12:15 p.m. followed by card
play at 1 p.m. Enjoy fun, prizes
and a raffle. Cost is $12 per
player. Make up your table of
four or come as a single and
we will pair you. Call Dottie at
352-382-3656 or Marilyn at
352-746-6583 for reservations
by Feb. 7. The church is at 114
N. Osceola Ave., Inverness.


The ladies of Lecanto
Church of Christ meet for Bible
study at 10 a.m. the second
Tuesday monthly.
Bible study is followed by a
luncheon. Studies have in-
cluded such subjects as prayer,
love and patience. All ladies are
invited to attend and enjoy
Christian fellowship.
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
604 U.S. 41 S. Proceeds fund
the food pantry. The store ac-
cepts donations of household
items, clothing and small appli-
ances. Call 352-726-1707.


Announcements
Gulf to Lake Church is col-
lecting coats for schoolchildren in
grades K-8 (sizes 6 through jun-
iors up to adult small). Cayla's
Coats Ministry was started in
memory of Cayla Barnes, who
passed in 2010. Her mother, Jes-
sica Barnes, is a teacher in the
county and sees first-hand the
need for kids inadequately
dressed for our occasional cold
weather.
Coat donations are accepted
at the church, 1454 N. GulfAve.
(off State Road 44 across from
Meadowcrest). Call the church at
352-795-8077 or Joan Cook at
352-422-2635.


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012 C3

A GriefShare seminar is
offered from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Wednesday through Nov. 14
at Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church.
Call 352-746.6200 or visit
www.sevenrivers.org.
Before- and after-school
care is available in Citrus
Springs for children through fifth
grade at North Oak Baptist
Church. Call 352- 489-3359.
The Sonshine Singles
group meets at 6 p.m. the first
and third Saturday monthly at
Trusting Heart Ministries, 176
N. Rooks Ave, Inverness. Call
352-860-0052 or 352-586-5174
or email trustingheartministry
@yahoo.com.


vof the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon offaith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Sunday School
Adult 9:15
Child 10:00
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)


OHernando
STheNazarene
R Place to Belong

210] N, Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org

HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church


Ope

Ope

Ope
Voorw


4. ryfor Children and Families"
2125 E.Norvell Bryant Hwy.(486)
(12 miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl .org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Individual Hearing Devices


Special


Event or


Weekly


Services


Please Call


Beverly at


564-2912






For


Information


On Your


Religious


Advertising


Minister
John D. Arnold
352-746-4919 Office
386-208-4967 Cell


First Baptist"
Church
of Floral City
Lifting Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
wwwfbcfloralcity.org


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 am
11:30 am
Saturday
Vigil
4:00 pm
6:00 pm
Weekday
Masses
8:30 am
Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm
(352)746-9422
\___/__


COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com
^tffiw^^rMeotw..


Community Church
N.



Sunday 10:00am
New Location
1196 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto
Rev. Brian Baggs Pastor
(352) 527-4253
www.aenesiscommunitvch urch.orq
*Authentic Love Relevant Faith
Embracing Community




Grace Bible
Church





Sunday
9:30 AM-..................Discovery Time
11:00 AM................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM...................Evening Service
Monday
6:15 PM ...................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept. Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM-..................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
1i2 mi.eastof US.19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O.Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr.
& Lady "T" Alexander
Sunday School 9:30 am
Sunday Service 11:00 am
Wednesday Bible Study 7pm
3962 N. Roscoe Rd. t
Hemando, FL
Ph: 352-344-2425
www.newchurchwithoutwalls.com
Email:cwow@embarqmail.com
"The perfect church for
people who aren't"


Floral City
United Methodist
S Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com

Homosassa Springs
A SEVENTH-DAYADVENTISTCHURCH






Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


0


Good
Shepherd
Lutheran
Church
ELCA









Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

35-76-16


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! !

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
.00A5H7 Floral City, FL.


LECANTO
CHURCH
OF CHRIST
797 S Rowe Terrace
Lecanto, FL 34460
Sunday AM
Bible Class....... 10:00 a.m.
Worship............ 11:00 a.m.
Sunday PM
Worship.............. 5:00 p.m.
Wednesday PM
Bible Class.........7:00 p.m.
Committed to restoring
the "old paths" of New
Testament Christianity.
Visitors Come Worship With Us
A Warm Welcome Awaits You!
"Speak where the Bible Speaks;
be silent were it is silent."


The New Church
Without Walls
"An Exciting & Growing
Multi-Cultural
S Rev. Stephen Lane Non-Denominational
Congregation Ministering to
Faith the Heart of Citrus County "
Lutheran Senior Pastors & Founders

Church(LCMS) 11 J
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto "
Crystal Glen Subdivision I
Hwy.44 just E. of 490
527-3325


R HERNANDO

| yADVENTIS

^B'"E"*CHURCHES~

^ *i i SEVENTH-DA
^B~ii^S'1 1 880 N Trucs Ave.^M^^
KS~Hernando, FL 3444
^!BnB(352) 344-2008
^^^^^^^HL^H*rTne Fellowship &
iTBB'Wph Us InJesusB
laiB53SthiH^ dySerices^


Le<3"L









Styles change, but pipe organs endure


Associated Press
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. The pipe
organ has ruled the Christian worship
sanctuary for centuries, and the ma-
jestic instrument continues to reign
supreme in many Roman Catholic and
mainline Protestant parishes.
It's a tougher sell for congregations
moving toward contemporary worship.
The growth in praise-band led serv-
ices, combined with a nationwide
shortage of qualified organists, is
prompting many congregations to leave
pipe organs out of their new construc-
tion plans.
Jerry Aultman thinks that's a
mistake.
The longtime organist and music
professor at Southwestern Baptist The-
ological said the pipe organ doesn't
need to be relegated to funerals and
weddings, and it fits nicely into modern
worship when used in the right way
"We shouldn't abandon the organ in
contemporary music styles," said Ault-
man, who plays each Sunday at First
Baptist Church in Dallas. "The organ is
a wonderful instrument to blend in
with any kind of instrumental ensem-
ble. It can fill in a lot of holes in the
sound."
The pipe organ, which dates back to
the third century B.C., "has always
been the choice for churches who want
one musician to fill the room with
sound," South Dakota organ builder
John Nordlie said.
The instrument has been considered
expensive throughout its history, with
current price tags ranging from
$100,000 to well into the millions. But
pipe organs hold their value and can
last for generations if they're well-de-
signed and well-maintained, he said.
Nordlie crafted his first instrument
in 1977 for a church in Appleton, Minn.,
and has built nearly 50 organs in his
Sioux Falls shop. Each part is hand-
crafted, from the wood and metal pipes
that turn airflow into notes to the or-
nate cabinetry that houses the massive
structures.
Although electronic and digital in-
struments can try to emulate the sound
of wind being pushed through pipes,
"they will never match the sound of the
pipe organ," Nordlie said.


"The difference is there," he said.
"Whether you take the time to listen
carefully is entirely up to you."
The large megabuilders of the 1960s
have largely disappeared, but numer-
ous smaller companies are building as
many instruments as they can turn out,
said James Weaver, executive director
of the Organ Historical Society
Weaver said music aficionados still
value the incredible amount of crafts-
manship put into each organ. For
proof, he points to the top-of-the line
organs being built for municipal con-
cert halls such as the Meyerson Sym-
phony Center in Dallas, the Kimmel
Center for the Performing Arts in
Philadelphia and Walt Disney Concert
Hall in Los Angeles.
"The idea of a handmade instrument
is something which is just still quite a
wonderful thing in our society and it's
something that we really care about,"
Weaver said.
Another factor contributing to the
organ's decline is a fewer number of
musicians qualified to sit behind the
consoles. The pipe organ is a complex
instrument, and playing it well re-
quires intensive training and practice.
Weaver said the number of organ stu-
dents dropped tremendously a few
years ago as musicians worried about
whether their degrees would lead to
jobs. He said he's starting to see a turn-
around.
"Now there are more positions avail-
able I think," he said.
Aultman agreed. He said there are
fewer universities offering organ de-
grees, but the ones that remain are
stronger
"There are still students who are ma-
joring in organ, and there are still
churches that will hire them and pay
them a living wage," he said. "And I
think that's just going to get better."
Aultman urges organists who want to
make a living to embrace contempo-
rary styles. He suggests that organists
trained to playing only off sheet music
to learn play off chord charts like
Nashville studio musicians.
"My advice to organists is, 'Don't be a
snob,"' he said. "You're not going to
probably find a position where you can
play all Bach preludes and fugues for
the bulk of your work."


Associated Press
In this Friday, Nov. 30 photo, organ builder John Nordlie points at some of the towering pipes on an
instrument he built for First United Methodist Church, in Sioux Falls, S.D. The pipe organ has ruled
the Christian worship sanctuary for centuries, but a growth in praise-band worship services and a
nationwide shortage of qualified organists are prompting many congregations to leave the majestic
instrument out of their new building construction plans. But organ aficionados say they see a bright
future for the instrument.


Special
Event or
Weekly
Services
Please Call

Beverly at
564-2912
For
Advertising

Information



Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School..............9:00
W orship.....................10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School...............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(At The Flashing Light
For more
information call
352-422-6535
Pastor
Todd
Langdon


j^ o PRIMER IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711


$5


INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. Larry Powers
Senior Pastor


Sunday Services:
Traditional Service..................8:30 A
Sunday School.........................9:30 AM
Contemporary Service...........10:30 AM
Evening Service.......................6:00 P
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes.............7....7:00
Boys and Girls Brigade.....7:00 -
Teens............................... 7:15 M
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726 4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study, Gospel
S.......[. Pl,!,-in Dinners, singing
the old hymns? Then you'll enjoy
this Church family.
IJ Home of the i
"Saturday Nite GOSPEL
JUBILEE" A great Nite Out!
Last Saturday of the month 6:00
Fun, Food, Fellowship & Free!


Our Lady of
Fatima
CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy. 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
SWeekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 PM.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30 -3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 &11:00A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June -August)
9:00 and 11:00A.M.
726-1670


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor







All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033


Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!




First

Assembly

of God


COMMUNITY
8 CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH I







/'u ~Fr/ Weelomes.

SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260










Hwy.44 E@
* Washington Ave., Inverness
" Sunday Services *
a Traditional
S8:00 AM & 11:00 AM
* Casual Service a
* 9:30 AM
11:00 AM Service *
* Tapes & CD's Available *
SSunday School for all ages 0
a 9:30 AM 0
a Nursery Provided *
Fellowship & Youth Group0
5 to 7 PM
SWeb Site: www.fpcinv.org a
Podcast: FPC inv.com a

a Church Office 637-0770 U
SPastor Craig Davies
U U


I OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca .com












VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.
************
SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM. & 10:30 A..

SPANISH MASS:
12:30 Pm.

CONFESSIONS:
2:30 p.. to 3:15 P.M Sat.
orByAppointment

WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
L. .catholicweb.com .


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!! !

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS


C4 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012


RELIGION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

was required to do absolutely
nothing for 24 hours no TV
no crocheting, singing or read-
ing, no playing cards, snapping
fingers, eating or even sleeping.
He endured the embarrass-
ment of having to wear broccoli
and he was able to not eat for
24 hours, but Milo failed at
doing nothing. (He fell asleep.)
He was crestfallen when he re-
alized he couldn't achieve
perfection.
The story ends with Milo
learning that "perfect means
never doing anything wrong,
which means never doing any-
thing at all. Therefore, perfect
is boring." The moral of the
story: Embrace your not-per-
fectness and you'll live happily
ever after
It's a cute book, but terrible
theology, since God demands
perfection. And that's a huge
problem for us imperfect hu-
mans.
Even so, like Milo, lots of us
try to be as perfect as we can
be, whether we're aware of it or
not. You can tell by asking peo-
ple if they think they're going to
heaven after they die, and if
yes, why they think they will.
Those who say they will be-
cause they try to do more good
than bad, because they pray,
because they go to church and


RELIGION


put money in the offering plate,
because they read the Bible -
those who give these reasons
are like Milo Crinkley, hoping
to be perfect by trying.
The truth is, those people
who are perfect, who obey
every single law of God from
the day they're born until their
last breath,will have earned
their way into heaven. But that
takes too much work, and for
most of us, if not all, we've man-
aged to break a commandment
or two, which disqualifies us.
As my pastor says, we break
every one of God's command-
ments every day of our lives, if
not in our deeds, then in our
thoughts and motives. Even our
best deeds are tinged with self-
promotion and self-interest.
The bad news: God lets only
the perfect into heaven. The
rest of us are toast.
However, here's the good
news: Jesus came not just to die
to pay the penalty for the sins of
his people, for our not-perfect-
ness, but to be perfect for us.
Because he knew we could-
n't, Jesus obeyed every single
law and commandment of God
and said that if we believe we
can exchange our imperfection
for his perfection, so when God
asks us why he should let us
into his heaven we can say with
complete assurance, "You
shouldn't. But Jesus said I
could on his record, not mine."
That's the only record of per-
fection God accepts, which


should give us all great joy and
freedom. If given a choice be-
tween having to be perfect for
my entire life by working at it
from the day I'm born or trust-
ing in Jesus' perfect life lived
for me, I'd be a fool not to
choose Jesus, especially when
I know darn well that I've never
lived a perfect moment ever I
probably even sin in my sleep.
Christians are those who be-
lieve that in Christ God sees
them as perfect, not based on
what they do or have done, but
solely on what Christ has done.
When Christians try to add their
own perfection to that of
Christ's by keeping score of all
the good things they do for God,
it's actually a slap in God's face.
It's saying, 'Jesus, your life, your
cross, your sacrifice was nice
and all, but it wasn't enough."
So, here's my thought: Let's
start 2013 by being perfect,
since in Christ that's what we
are we have his perfection as
our own.
I can't think of any better way
to have a perfectly happy new
year

Nancy Kennedy is the author
of "Move Over Victoria -I
Know the Real Secret," "Girl
on a Swing," and her latest
book, "Lipstick Grace. "She
can be reached at 352-564-
2927, Monday through Thurs-
day or via email at nkennedy
@chronicleonline. com.


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012 CS


Religion BRIEFS


Israeli leader seeks
alternative to prayer ban
JERUSALEM Israel's prime minister
has instructed a quasi-governmental Jew-
ish organization to find a solution for non-
Orthodox Jewish female groups wishing to
pray at one of Judaism's holiest sites.
An official said Tuesday Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu asked Natan Sha-
ransky, chairman of the Jewish Agency, to
look into the matter.
Last week Israeli police detained
women from a liberal Jewish group who
approached the Western Wall in
Jerusalem carrying prayer shawls. Ortho-
dox Jews insist those are for men only.
The women seek to worship at the site
without such restrictions.
Jewish Agency spokesman Benjamin
Rutland said Netanyahu told Sharansky
that the Western Wall "must remain a
source of Jewish unity rather than divi-
sion." The wall is a remnant of the biblical
Jewish Temple compound.
Homeowners appeal
church construction plans
SANTA FE, N.M. -A group of Taos-
area homeowners is appealing Santa Fe
County's decision to allow construction of
a church where members drink a hallu-
cinogenic tea as a sacrament.
The six Arroyo Hondo homeowners ob-
ject to the county spending about
$400,000 to extend a waterline and build a
sewage-treatment system there.
The notice of appeal filed in state court


Wednesday argues using taxpayer money
violates New Mexico's anti-donation
clause and the U.S. Constitution's separa-
tion of church and state.
The Santa Fe New Mexican reports the
church known as the UDV has been in-
volved in legal battles for a decade and
consistently declined comment.
The church sued after the county re-
jected its building plan. The county agreed
last month to let it build a temple and to
put in the water line.
Stolen Bible turns up
at antique shop
ST. LOUIS -A 19th-century Bible
stolen from a St. Louis church several
days before Christmas has turned up at
an antique shop and a suspect has been
arrested.
The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that
a man hawked the Bible for $30 Sunday.
But after conducting an Internet search
Wednesday, the store that bought the
nearly 15-pound Bible learned it had been
stolen from St. Johns Lutheran Church.
Police were called and the Bible returned.
The church has been the target of re-
peated burglaries. Thieves have stolen
property, ruined food for the poor and
damaged the building itself.
Police believe the man who's been ar-
rested may be responsible for six burgla-
ries at the church since September. Now,
an anonymous donor is contributing
money so the church can buy a security
system.
From wire reports


NEWS
Continued from Page Cl

to lead our nation is paving
the way for the future reign
of the Antichrist"
That's pretty strong rheto-
ric, until one considers how
hot things got on the religion-
and-politics beat in 2012.
After all, one Gallup poll
found that an amazing 44 per-
cent of Americans surveyed
responded "don't know"
when asked to identify the
president's faith. The good
news was that a mere 11 per-
cent in that poll said Obama
is a Muslim down from 18
percent in a Pew Research
Center poll in 2010. The pres-
ident has, of course, repeat-
edly professed that he is a
liberal, mainline Christian.
Could church-state affairs
get any hotter?
Amazingly, the answer
was "yes," with a White
House order requiring most
religious institutions to
offer health care plans cov-


CALL
Continued from Page C1

divinity degree from Hous-
ton's newest seminary, a
branch of the California-
based Fuller Theological
Seminary He hopes to con-
tinue working in youth or
college ministry
Although Autrey admitted
his most formative experi-
ences have been face-to-
face interactions, he
acknowledges several ad-
vantages of online course-
work. For instance, he said
he had access to top theolo-
gians at a distance campus,
and classmates studying on
other continents shared
new perspectives.
Convenience is the main
reason most students enroll
online. Autrey found those
classes even more flexible
than his night courses.
"If you're working in full-
time ministry you get to the
point you already have night
events and the time with
family gets diminished,"
Autrey said. "I could actu-
ally put the kids to bed and
start my homework at 10 or
11 o'clock."
Many seminary leaders
said courses focused on
learning information rather
than applying skills or grow-
ing spiritually are more ap-
propriate for the online
format
Lawrence DiPaolo, asso-
ciate dean and professor at
St. Mary's, said only a hand-
ful of their classes could be
offered online.
"Preaching is something
that has to be done live," Di-
Paolo said as an example.
"It's something that has to
be experienced."
Even with video chat, he
said students could not
practice engaging with a
live audience and that voice
projection, body language
and eye contact just would
not read the same across a
computer monitor.
"We're training people to
go out and work with human
beings," DiPaolo said.
Seminary guides reli-
gious leaders through a per-
sonal transformation, while


ering sterilizations and all
FDA-approved forms of con-
traception, including so-
called "morning-after pills."
The key: The Health and
Human Services mandate
only recognizes the con-
science rights of a nonprofit
group if it has the "inculca-
tion of religious values as its
purpose," primarily em-
ploys "persons who share its
religious tenets" and prima-
rily "serves persons who
share its religious tenets."
America's Catholic bish-
ops and other traditional re-
ligious leaders cried foul,
claiming that under the
leadership of Obama, the
U.S. Justice Department and
other branches of the na-
tional government were try-
ing to separate "freedom of
worship" in religious sanctu-
aries from the First Amend-
ment's more sweeping
protection of "free exercise
of religion" in public life.
In a year packed with
church-state fireworks, the
members of the Religion
Newswriters Association se-

most secular degrees teach
students job skills to apply
five days a week, said James
Furr, president of Houston
Graduate School of
Theology.
"In the online options, it
seems more obvious you're
going to be able to transfer
information than deal with
the subtleties and complex-
ities of personal character
and formation," Furr said.
Kevin Osborn, the new as-
sociate provost at Fuller,
disagrees with other semi-
nary leaders that an online-
only program would
inherently sacrifice quality.
"It just floors me the level
of personal connections
people can make online,"
Osborn said. "Students are
so busy And when they have
family and full-time jobs,
what they do is race to class
and get out of there. Online
they have flexibility to
spend time with each other."
Osborn, who overhauled
Fuller's online courses a
few years ago, said the qual-
ity of any class, online or
not, depends on the profes-
sor's skill at teaching.
He said some professors
learned so much from
Fuller's mandatory training
program about online
courses that they turned
around and revamped their
traditional classes, too. He
said it is important to accept
that students are adults, not
children, and focus the
course around student in-
teraction rather than pas-


elected this religious-liberty
clash as the year's top reli-
gion news story Meanwhile,
Cardinal Timothy Dolan of
New York, the point man for
Catholic opposition to the
mandate, was voted the
year's top religion news-
maker from a ballot that
did not contain the presi-
dent's name.
The story I ranked No. 2
overall didn't make it into
the association's Top 10 list
I was convinced that the 9-0
U.S. Supreme Court deci-
sion affirming a Missouri
Synod Lutheran congrega-
tion's right to hire and fire
employees based on doc-
trine could be crucial in the
years or even months -
ahead.
Here's the rest of the
RNA Top 10 list:
Research by the Pew
Forum on Religion and Pub-
lic Life finds that religiously
unaffiliated people the
so-called noness" make
up the fastest-growing reli-
gious group in modern
America, approaching 20

sively absorbing a profes-
sor's lecture.
Osborn believes the hesi-
tancy to fully embrace tech-
nology will wane as
members of the younger
generation, born into the
computer world, begin to
outnumber those who have
simply found themselves
adapting to it.
Although optimistic, Os-
born said a fully online pro-
gram is at least a decade
away
Like colleges that build
online programs for secular
degrees, seminaries will
have to convince their ac-
crediting agency that no
quality was sacrificed, in
addition to the churches
hiring graduates.
Tulloch might never have
been able to answer her call
to the ministry without the
online courses. She will fin-
ish two graduate degrees in
May after completing
courses at night and in hy-
brid classes that meet both
online and in-person. She
hopes to continue minister-
ing as a hospital chaplain,
which she started as part of
her St. Mary's training.
Still, she acknowledged
that the face-to-face experi-
ences were critical to her
education.
"There's something form-
ative in seeing God in some-
one's eyes," Tulloch said.
"You can tell so much about
a person's heart. You can't
do that with a computer or a
camera."


percent of the population.
The online trailer of an
anti-Islam film, "Innocence
of Muslims," is alleged to
have inspired violence in
several countries, including
a fatal attack on a U.S. con-
sulate in Libya.
White House candidate
Mitt Romney's Mormon faith
turns out to be a non-issue
for white evangelical voters,
who support him more
strongly than they did 2008
GOP nominee John McCain.
Monsignor William Lynn
of Philadelphia becomes the
first senior U.S. Catholic of-
ficial found guilty of hiding
priestly child abuse, fol-


S"First For Christ"...ohn 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS
We welcomeyou and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr Ray Kelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study


Vi

in


At

Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Simid.,, Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to belong.A place to become."


lowed by Bishop Robert
Finn of Kansas City, Mo.
Vatican officials harshly
criticize liberal leaders
among U.S. nuns, citing the
Leadership Conference of
Women Religious for its his-
tory of criticism of church
teachings on sexuality, abor-
tion and the all-male
priesthood.
Voters in Maine, Mary-
land and Washington affirm
same-sex marriage. Min-
nesota defeats a ban on same-
sex marriage, while North
Carolina approves one.
Episcopal Church lead-
ers adopt a trial ritual for
blessing same-sex couples.


FR 46 Years of
F ST Bringing Christ
F I I I to Inverness

LUTHERAN

CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am

Sunday School
& Bible Class
8:45 AM.
726-1637
Missouri Synod
www.1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson





First United


Methodist


of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor



8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion

9:45 AM
Sunday School

10:00 AM
Contemporary
Praise & Worship


A gunman police de-
scribe as a neo-Nazi kills six
Sikhs and wounds three oth-
ers in a suburban Milwau-
kee temple.
The Southern Baptist
Convention unanimously
elects its first African-Amer-
ican president, the Rev.
Fred Luter of New Orleans.

Terry Mattingly is the di-
rector of the Washington
Journalism Center at the
Council for Christian Col-
leges and Universities and
leads the GetReligion.org
project to study religion
and the news.


NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH


SUNDAY
Family Worship
9:00 AM
Coffee Fellowship following the Service
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study & Prayer
7:00 PM
W e are a ,,,,, h i ,,, ,,, .ri 1,i ,# ,
it the Inverness Womans ( ,
1 1j Forest Drive, Inverness
(across from Whispering Pines Park entrance)
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813


5335 E. Jasm
Inverni
/ Miles North Of I
North (Formally C
Church Loc

You're in
to our Se
Sunday S
10:00
Sund
10:45 AM &
Wednesday

Indeper
Fundam
Past
Terry Ro
Ph: 726-
- =*


road


fist


rch

line Lane,
ess
K-Mart Off41
Calvary Bible
cation)

vited
rvices
school
AM
ay
6:00 PM
7:00 PM

,dent
mental
or
)berts
-0201


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all,


Come onover to "His" house, your spirits ill/be 'ifl !!!

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS


Outstanding Southern Gospel Music
First Church of God
5510 E. Jasmine Lane, Inverness


-








Page C6 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29,2012



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES Ntt with dvte NOTES

Snippits to begin baw itadvoArtwork sought for
new year Jan. 3 annual exhibition


A new year of exciting and
interesting sewing programs
begins at 10 a.m. Jan. 3 atA-
White Sew & Vac. This is the
first meeting of the year of
the Snippits, a neighborhood
group of the American
Sewing Guild.
The program for the day
will be a demonstration on
making a travel tote. All
sewing enthusiasts are wel-
come to attend. A-White is in
the Airport Plaza on U.S. 19.
For more information, call
Marcia at 352-563-2879.
Learn about
Adobe Lightroom
The Citrus County Art Cen-
ter will offer a five-week train-
ing course on Adobe
Lightroom 4, the most current
version of the No. 1 selling
photo software from Adobe.
The class starts at 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 2, at the Art
Center, 2644 N. Annapolis
Ave., Hernando, and meets
every Wednesday night
through Jan. 26. Each partici-
pant will be provided a man-
ual written by the instructor to
cover the work completed
and more. Laptops or desk-
top computers are sug-
gested, but not required.
Instructor is Paul Simison,
who has worked with Light-
room since the Beta versions
in 2007 and has been ac-
tively involved in photography
since 1964. Class tuition is
$50 for all five classes. To en-
roll and for more information,
call the Art Center Camera
Club at 352-746-0944.
Calligraphers
to meet Jan. 10
The Creative Calligraphers
of Citrus Springs will meet
Thursday, Jan. 10, at the Cit-
rus Springs Memorial Library,
1826 W. Country Club Blvd.
in Citrus Springs.
The group will start at
12:30 p.m. with a practice
session, where members will
work on the capital italic
hand. The business meeting
will begin at 1 p.m., followed
by a program to create valen-
tines both to send and to
decorate the library.
New members are wel-
come and encouraged to
bring paper, tracing paper,
calligraphy pen(s) and other
embellishments to adorn their
valentine creations.
For more information, call
the library at 352-489-2313.


Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA

Princeton


Special to the Chronicle
This sweet and attentive
little orange tabby boy is
Princeton. He is 12 weeks
old and all fixed and ready
for his new home. If you are
looking for a more mature
feline, we are currently run-
ning an adoption special -
all adult cat adoption fees
are half price at $27.50.
Visitors are welcome from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 to
4 p.m. Monday through
Saturday at the Humanitar-
ians' Manchester House on
the corner of State Road
44 and Conant Avenue,
east of Crystal River.
Please drop by and enjoy
our felines in their cage-
free, homestyle environ-
ment. Call 352-613-1629
for adoptions, or view most
of the Hardin Haven's fe-
lines online at www.pet
finder.com/shelters/fl186.
html.


Dunnellon library to host speaker on


Special to the Chronicle

Friends of the Dunnellon
Public Library will present
a free public program with
Shari Blissett-Clark, who
sits on the board of Bat Bel-
frys Inc., a
nonprofit
organiza-
tion dedi-
cated to
conserving
Florida's
b a t s
through
Shari public edu-
Blissett- cation and
Clark habitat
dedicated restoration.
to bat Blissett-
conservation. Clark will
speak at
10:30 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 19,
in the library meeting room,
20351 Robinson Road, Dun-


chiropteran conservation


opecla L to e lnironilie
Red bats in flight. Dunnellon Public Library will present a free
program about bats Jan. 19.


nellon.
She serves on the boards
of the Florida Native Plant
Society and Brevard Botan-
ical Garden. A child of a
globe-trotting military fam-


Forum links



volunteers,


opportunities


Special to the Chronicle

Learn where you can
make a difference and dis-
cover your niche in com-
munity service. The
Nature Coast Volunteer
Center and Retired and
Senior Volunteer Program
host a forum for people to
link up with volunteer op-
portunities.
This is an opportunity to
meet with NCVC/RSVP
staff and volunteer man-
agers throughout the
county and learn about
their programs and oppor-
tunities for service.
Opportunity Links will
be at 3 p.m. Thursday, Jan.
10, at the Central Ridge


Community Center, 77
Civic Circle, Beverly Hills.
NCVC/RSVP works on a
community-wide basis to
develop high-impact volun-
teer programming.
Through building relation-
ships with nonprofit,
school, faith-based and
other groups, NCVC/RSVP
plays a critical role in
leveraging volunteer
power to the fullest effect.
For more information,
call 352-249-1275, or email
patty.lascuola@bocc.cit-
rus.fl.us. Visit on the Web at
www.naturecoastvolun-
teercenter.org. Persons
with disabilities requiring
reasonable accommoda-
tions may call ahead.


ily, she moved to Florida in
1984.
Blisset-Clark became in-
terested in bats when while
sailing, she whipped the
cover off the mainsail of her


boat and was startled by
bats bursting out of the sail.
She leapt into Matanzas
Bay After the paramedics
left, she did some soul
searching and decided to
find out more about bats.
She joined the Bat Conser-
vation International's bat
house researcher program
to quickly learn that her
fear of bats was based on
myth and misconception,
not facts. Blisset-Clark dis-
covered her passion for the
fascinating little mammals
and has been a bat advocate
ever since.
The program will cover
bat facts, species diversity,
environmental and eco-
nomic benefits of bats and
the overstated disease risks.
It will be a one-hour pro-
gram including a question-
and-answer time.






Donation
to Jessie's
Place

Representatives of Lifecare
Centers of America Rehab
Dept & Associate Council
recently donated toys to
children at Jessie's Place in
Beverly Hills. From left are:
Tom Corcoran, marketing
director; Jesse Meyer, rehab
tech; Elaine Diesing,
COTA/L; and Melissa
Bowermaster, director of
Jessie's Place.

Special to the Chronicle


Helping Toys For Tots


Special to the Chronicle
The Pine Ridge R/C Electric Airplane Club had its annual
club Christmas party at Skeet's Family Barbeque on Dec. 8.
The club has continued its tradition of supporting the Ma-
rine Corps League's Toy's For Tots program to benefit the
children of Citrus County. In addition, many club members
also participate in the Santa for Seniors program, as well as
other programs giving back to residents of Citrus County.
For more information about the club and the hobby of flying
radio-controlled airplanes, call Jerry Dittmar at 352-527-
7860, Bob Birkholz at 352-746-6657, or Matt Wayne at
352-527-8836, or visit www.pineridgerce.com. Pictured,
from left, are: Jerry Dittmar, Matt Wayne and Bob Birkholz.


Worth NOTING


Holiday Camp open
at Boys & Girls Clubs
The Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County Holiday Camp
will be open from 7 a.m. until 6
p.m. through Jan. 4 at the three
club sites in Beverly Hills, Inver-
ness and halfway between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
The cost is $10 per day and
programs are open to all chil-
dren between the ages of 5 and
18 years. Children will learn
and have fun at the same time
participating in games, arts and
crafts, sports and recreation,
technology, cooking and nutri-
tion programs. Children should
bring a sack lunch each day.
Pre-registration is important
so that clubs can maintain ade-


quate staffing ratios. To pre-reg-
ister, call the Robert Halleen
Club in Homosassa at 352-795-
8624, the Evelyn Waters Club
in Inverness at 352-341-2507,
or the Central Ridge Club in
Beverly Hills at 352-270-8841.
Drop-ins are also accepted, as
long as children are pre-
registered.

Class to teach
family history
Beginning Genealogy, a four-
week class to get participants
started on collecting family his-
tories, is slated for 10 a.m. to
noon Wednesdays.
The fee is $20. The class
meets at Whispering Pines
Park Recreation Building. One


week will be spent at the library
using its resources. Jackie
Reiss is the instructor.
For more information, call
352-726-3913 between 8 a.m.
and 5 p.m.

Volunteers welcome
for Inverness Relay
Inverness Relay For Life
meets the last Tuesday monthly
at Cornerstone Baptist Church
on Highland Boulevard, Inver-
ness. Committee meeting starts
at 5:30 p.m., with a team meet-
ing following at 6 p.m.
This is part of a nationwide
community-based voluntary
health organization dedicated
to eliminating cancer as a major
health problem by seeking to


prevent cancer, save lives and
diminish suffering from cancer
through research, education,
advocacy and service. Pro-
grams provided in Citrus
County are: HOPE Lodge,
which offers lodging and sup-
port; Look Good Feel Better for
chemo or radiation patients,
which offers help by licensed
cosmetologists; Road to Re-
covery, whose drivers assist
with transportation to treat-
ments; Reach to Recovery,
which provides support and ed-
ucation to breast cancer pa-
tients; I CAN COPE, offering
education for patients and care-
givers; and ROCK, a program
for children with cancer.
For more information, call
800-227-2345.


Artists are invited to submit
works for competition in the
third annual exhibition at the
Art Center of Citrus County
on County Road 486 in Citrus
Hills, 2466 N. Annapolis Ave,
Hernando.
Entries will be received
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Jan. 2
and 3. Best of Show, first,
second, third places and hon-
orable mentions in four cate-
gories will be awarded
ribbons and cash at an artists'
reception at 6 p.m. Friday,
Jan. 11. Jurors will be award-
winning artists Debbie Rankin
Cason and Sally Shisler.
Artists may submit up to
five entries for the juried and
judged show. For a prospec-
tus, call 352-746-0924 or visit
artcenterofcitruscounty.org.
Learn quilting this
winter in Inverness
Quilting classes are offered
from 7 to 9 p.m. Monday at
Whispering Pines Park in
Inverness.
Registration fee $56 for
eight weeks. The next class
begins Jan. 7 and meets
weekly until Feb. 25. Karol
Kusmaul is the instructor; she
has been making quilts for
several years and has won
awards.
For more information, call
352-726-3913 between
8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Sandhill stitchers
to meet Jan. 2
The Sandhill Crane Chap-
ter of the Embroiderers' Guild
of America will meet from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday,
Jan. 2, at Faith Evangelical
Presbyterian Church, 200
Mount Fair Ave., Brooksville.
Groups of members will be
taking classes, but open
stitching for others will occur
until 2 p.m. Bring a lunch and
enjoy the day. Membership is
open to anyone who is inter-
ested in stitching, from the
most experienced to those
who would like to learn to
stitch. Mentors are available.
For membership information,
call 352-621-6680.
Friendship Quilters
to gather Jan. 3
The Citrus Friendship Quil-
ters Guild will meet at 1 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 3, at the
Lakes Region Library, 1551
Druid Road, Inverness.
The club meets the first
and third Thursdays of the
month. This meeting will be
the installation of new office
for 2013. There will also be
show and tell at the meeting.
There are also workshops by
different members about
shortcuts on projects so they
can be finished faster, or new
ways of doing quilting.
The club will not meet Jan.
17; the club is celebrating its
25th anniversary.
For more information, call
Nancy Cagle at 352-
422-5967, or Nancy Osborn
352-726-7805.
B.H. chorus gets
ready to rehearse
After a successful Christ-
mas concert, the Chorus of
Beverly Hills is looking for-
ward to its spring concert. Re-
hearsals will begin at 10 a.m.
Friday, Jan. 11, in the sanctu-
ary of the Beverly Hills Com-
munity Church, 82 Civic
Circle.
Singers may register be-
ginning at 10 a.m., pay a $10
fee and receive their music.
Rehearsals will continue from
10:30 a.m. until noon each
Friday until the concert.
New voices are needed to
fill out all sections: sopranos,
altos, tenors and basses.
Membership is open to all in
Citrus County who love
singing. The ability to read
music is not necessary.
For more information, call
music chairman Volena Van
Gunst at 352-746-5680, or
Jackie Dean at 352-
527-8405.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bridge


SATURDAY EVENING DECEMBER 29, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
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7 "Waiting..."(2005) ** "The House Bunny" (2008, Comedy) Anna *** "Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story" Aziz Ansari:
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North
4 J543
V 742
S94
A J 8 3
East


12-29-12


887
SJ 10 9
SQ J 10 7
9 7 6 2
South
4 AKQ 10 9 6 2
V A Q 5
SAQ5
*AK


Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East


2 -
2-4
4 NT
5 NT


Pass 2
Pass 3 4
Pass 5 -
Pass 64


Pass
Pass
Pass
All pass


Opening lead: K


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Ed Koch, former mayor of New York City, said,
"In action, be primitive; in foresight, a strategist."
It requires foresight to see the strategy neces-
sary to make this six-spade contract. What should
South do after West leads the club king?
When North raised to three spades, promising
some points (usually 4 to 7), South used Roman
Key Card Blackwood. North showed one key card
(an ace or the spade king). Then South asked for
specific kings, North denying any. (Note that the
heart king would make a grand slam sure, but the
club king would not.)
South has two possible heart losers. He also has
only 11 top tricks: seven spades, one heart, two di-
amonds and one club. So at first glance it looks as
if declarer needs the heart finesse to work. How-
ever, assuming West has the club queen behind his
king-lead, he is a candidate for an endplay
South, though, must have the foresight to ruff a
club at trick two, and not to ruff with the spade
two. South needs three dummy entries (two for
club ruffs and one for the endplay), which must be
the club ace and two in trumps.
After the club ruff, declarer takes his spade ace,
overtakes a middle spade with dummy's jack, ruffs
another club high, cashes his top diamonds, and
plays the spade two to dummy's four. With the pre-
liminaries complete, South calls for the club jack
and discards his heart five.
West is trapped, forced either to lead away from
the heart king or to concede a ruff-and-sluff (South
ruffs on the board and sluffs his heart queen).


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
TGISH

@2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Rights Reserved
REDYB



PULCTS



ROMMYE
7f; L]


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
I know we're early,
but can we check
innow?/ You re in luck.
/ Your room is'
ready now.


,







OWNeFR OF THE INN IF
THEY COUL- CHECK IN
EARLY, HE 5AIP --
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


here: L I I <
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday I Jumbles: AGILE UNION RUDDER WAIVER
I Answer: The Jumble artist's cartoon is a -
LINE DRAWING


ACROSS
1 Humerus
neighbor
5 Film terrier
9 Dice spot
12 "Aquarius"
musical
13 Zodiac beast
14 Bunion site
15 Fuel cartel
16 Guess
18 Overly rushed
20 Taj -
21 Luau
welcomes
22 "My gal" of
song
23 Keyboard
sound
26 Cookbook
amts.
30 Picture border
33 A Great Lake
34 Ms. Teasdale
35 Gouda cousin
37 Elevator name
39 Web suffix
40 Home of
jazz


41 Brainy club
43 FBI
counterpart
45 Big horn
48 Circle sizes
51 de corps
53 Huge
56 Imported car
57 Dit partner
58 Browser
bookmarks
59 News morsel
60 Dernier -
61 Leisure
62 Lipstick
shades


Answer to Previous Puzzle


PLOP A Y N BYEE
JEERS SU E LOY
STRIP PL UMAGE
AR S RABID

WAN CHEST BONA
RNA TTA EXI T
ESTA FERN ICE
NEED URDU DEN
L0OTHER
,IFI IIInAIM I


DOWN A-PP AL
1 Oops!(hyph.) RA
2 Boutonniere's M E G R A
spot [HJfIE 1
3 Dorothy, to
Em 9 Egyptian god
4 Frigid region 10 Teeny bit
5 A Baldwin 11 Flake off
6 Bro's sib 17 Soda fountain
7 Little one treats
8 Feminine side 19 Large cay


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


T GE NIE
I DALY


22 Flock of
geese
24 Bakery lure
25 Write up a
speeder
27 Pouch
28 Old hand
29 Miss Kitty's
barkeeper
30 The "Velvet
Fog" Torme
31 Lemony drink
32 Bronzed
36 Port near
Hong Kong
38 Mach 1
breakers of
yore
42 Nanny from
abroad
(2 wds.)
44 Hand out
46 Kind of
strength
47 Lent a hand
48 Heavy-metal
band
49 Jungle
warning
50 Post-
kindergarten
51 Otherwise
52 Burton and
Tebow
54 Mexican Mrs.
55 Pacino and
Unser


Dear Annie: My husband
and I have been married
for 23 years, and we have
two teenage daughters.
Our biggest issue is
disciplining the kids. I
think they should do
more household
chores. My husband
agrees in theory, but
does nothing to hold
them accountable
when they don't coop-
erate, so the burden of
discipline falls on me.
I'm sick of being the
bad guy and living in a AN
slovenly house that no MAII
one else cares about.
I've talked to them
until I'm blue in the face. I've
tried letting things go to see
whether they'd eventually do
something, and that doesn't work
either. Usually, I end up so frus-
trated that I throw a big hissy fit
and clean it myself. I'm ready to
move out. To me, it's more than
the mess. It's teaching the kids to
be independent, to have some
work ethic and to be accountable
for their actions. To them, I'm
being a nag. What should I do? -
Tired in Rural Oregon
Dear Tired: Nagging is part of
your job as a parent. And it's OK
to let some things go. The girls'
rooms are theirs. Leave their
clothes on the floor and their
beds unmade. Tell them those
things are their responsibility,
and show them how to use the
washer and dryer. If you can't
stand the sight of the mess in
their rooms, close the doors.
Common areas will be tougher,
but they are counting on you to
give up. Firmly and repeatedly


remind your husband and chil-
dren to do whatever chores you
assign. Do not do these things for
them out of exaspera-
tion, and try not to be-
come angry Offer
incentives in the form
of increased or de-
creased allowance.
Help them understand
that you are not a ser-
vant. Being a member
of the family means
doing your share. If
your husband won't
help, discuss hiring
IE'S outside cleaning assis-
BOX tance.
Dear Annie: I am a
senior in high school
and plan to have a family gradu-
ation party next spring. However,
I haven't spoken to my maternal
grandparents in six months. They
have never been a part of my life
and have said and done some
hurtful things over the years.
They often start fights at family
get-togethers. I have no desire to
invite them, but my mom says I
should because I would other-
wise regret it later. Honestly, I'd
be happy never to see them
again, but I don't want to hurt my
mom by not inviting her parents.
Should I? East Coast Senior
Dear Senior: Yes not only
because it would please your
mother, but also because it will
give your grandparents a chance
to behave better. One should take
advantage of opportunities to
reconcile when possible.
DearAnnie: "Washington" said
her mother was diagnosed with
multiple sclerosis 30 years ago.
She had been active in her
church and had lots of friends,


but at age 49, she was in a nurs-
ing home. Now the only person
who visits is her daughter
I was diagnosed with MS in
1961 at age 19. In 1962, I became
wheelchair bound. I'm fortunate
to have a loving, caring husband
of 52 years who does the things I
cannot do for myself. This dis-
ease turns your life upside down.
It makes the MS patient feel like
a burden to society. But disabled
people want to be loved, too.
I have a chin-controlled power
chair to move around in. I can
use the computer with a voice-ac-
tivated system, and I listen to
books on tape. I stay as active as
my limitations will allow. But
with everything I do, someone
has to assist me. I am blessed to
have my husband.
For people who say they're
bored: How about volunteering
for the disabled? Faithful Fol-
lower in Florida
Dear Florida: A wonderful sug-
gestion. Approximately 400,000
Americans are currently diag-
nosed with MS. For those who
want more information, please
contact the National MS Society
at nationalmssocietyorg.


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar
longtime editors of the Ann Lan-
ders column. Please email your
questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 7373rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox visit the Cre-
ators Syndicate Web page at
www creators. com.


West
4 -
V K 8 6 3
YK863
S8 6 5 3 2
* K Q 10 4


12-29


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


ENTERTAINMENT


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012 C7


I


I






C8 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012


Peanuts


Garfield


Pickles


Sally Forth


Beetle Bailey


I .. DON'T KNOW YOU'RE DOING
SUPPOSED N AD
TO DO THIS. D- A


The Born Loser


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Doonesbury


YOU KNOW, SOME PEOPLE
THINK FOX MAKES TOO
MUCH OF THE WAR ON
CHRISTMAS...









Big Nate -


Arlo and Janis


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Parental Guidance" (PG) 11 a.m., 1:40 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Les Miserables" (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 3:15 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Django Unchained" (R) ID required. 11:15 a.m.,
3:05 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 9:50 p.m. No passes.
"Jack Reacher" (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 3:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Monsters Inc" (G) In 3D. 11:05 a.m., 1:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Monsters Inc" (G) 3:50 p.m.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" (PG-13) In 3D.
12 p.m., 8 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" (PG-13) 4 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Les Miserables" (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 3:15 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Django Unchained" (R) ID required. 12 p.m., 3:40 p.m.,


THAT 1 IT NEVER 1S.
NOT THE THIS IWHY
POINT! I PESPISE
S BARTENP-IN











*KoFF'' I WAS
...WHICH BEHIND
S15 WHY THE
SI DON'T BLEACHERS
4 REMEMBER WITH
SIT ARNIE
EITHER! PFEFFER.I.
9I? --7-


7:20 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"Parental Guidance" (PG) 11:35 a.m., 2:15 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:50 p.m.
"Jack Reacher" (PG-13) 11:25 a.m., 2:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:40 p.m. No passes.
"This is 40" (R) ID required. 11:50 a.m., 2:50 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:45 p.m.
"Monsters Inc." (G) 2:10 p.m.
"Monsters Inc" (G) In 3D. 11:45 a.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
9:45 p.m. No passes.
"The Guilt Trip" (PG-13) 11:10 a.m., 2:05 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 9:40 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" (PG-13) In 3D.
11 a.m., 6:45 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" (PG-13) 3 p.m.
"Lincoln" (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 2:30 p.m., 6:30 p.m.,
9:50 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


Blondie


FINE! IN THAT CASE, VERY
Hi'l-L HAVE FOUR i CLEVER...
--ESODAS ANYTHING



I -- i




229: *


VES, TWO FOOT-LONG THERE -
HOT DOGS YOU GO
AGAIN/ !






H M7-71


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


*IT5 ALL.YOURG,RLFF. I PON'T USE TE FIVE-
SECoNP RULE FoRVEGGIES, ONLY1-YPESR."
Betty


www lamlycircus corn
"First there's January, then it's
February, then Marchuary..."


Frank & Ernest


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 Classic Rock
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: X slenba


"YF WXDZGKJ CBCG'K KDZXK YZ XJ BM


KNZDZ TXJ


XGFKNBGS BG KNZ TADVC B


LAHVCG'K CA, ZOLZWK


UZ HGPBGC."


PDBJKBG NZDJN

Previous Solution: "All of us are guinea pigs in the laboratory of God. Humanity is
just a work in progress." Tennessee Williams
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 12-29


12 29




.- -.-- ---- -- --- .,
.... --> '--- /--. i ^l e f " -' .--, i"


4'5 jj 0 SUDDENLY THE DO6 REALIZED THAT HIS DAD HAD
NEVER TAUGHT HIM HOW TO THROW SNOJWALLS.. ....,


For Better or For Worse


Dilbert


The Grizzwells


S(OU NEE.DTO
S5TA- T AUNKRG

| W&OWLk M (


- TWO 1( SORRV, IT'S AGAINST
JUMBO THEATER POLICY TO
SODAS, SELL ANY MORE JUA .13
PLEASE SODAS BECAUSE OF
TH PO TENTIAL
HEALTH RISK ,



,, -,~ .; J
tui 7


THAT WASN'T ME.
THAT WAS THAT
TRAMP ABIGAIL
OSTRANG.


COMICS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Chronicle


CLASSIFIED


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012 C9


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds ..


F :3 ) 6 55. To Fre. ( ),.T.T.i..S e 1. m al *sii. *hoiJ.!Iw.cl c


Someone is missing.
Lovely Lady, degree,
distinguished, pretty,
slender. Caring for elderly
parents. Would like to
meet man of character,
intelligent, ethical, suc-
cessful in his endeavors.
Age 55 to early 70's.
Rely: Blind Box 1820
Citrus Cnty Chronicle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River, Fl
34429



2005 BOAT TRAILER
18 to 21 ft boat. Tandem
axle. All tires, lights,
axles, & guides in exc.
cond. MUST SEE!
Asking $895 OBO.
Priced $350 below value.
Call / txt(352) 422-7737
%/ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact fee
credit, high and dry,
trees, $11,000 obo
(352) 795-3710
Fero Cemetery Beverly
Hills Two Plots Under Lrg
Shaded Oak Tree -
Row 251 Lots D & E
Only $2500 for Both
(1/2 Price) 352-364-4010
















How

To Make
Your

Car

Disappear...

Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!


(352) 563-5966

C i i )icl.i E
wwchronicleonline com


\V;




Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


HERNANDO
On private prop. Wood
burning stove, utilities
included. $450 mo.
(352)341-0787
INVERNESS
RV Spaces. Bring your
own boat and fishing
gear. AGE 55+ com-
munity. Lot rent only
$360-$375 including
electric. Edge Water
Oaks 352-344-1380
Lake Front Home
on Gospel Island,
spectacular views
spacious 3/2/2,
For Rent, $700
or Sale (908) 322-6529
LEATHER SOFA &
LOVESEAT
burgundy, excellent
condition 352-746-0855
Leather Sofa, Chair & Ot-
toman, 1 coffee, 2 end ta-
bles. Twin bed, mat. set &
head board. Round din-
ing room table w/ 4chrs.
Lamp. $600 for all
(352) 242-7117
Looking for anyone wit-
nessing an accident on
12/26/12 betwn 3-4pm on
Citrus Ave 2 mi So. of
Crystal River. Vehicles:
Silver Hyundai & white
Ford F-150.Call 795-6166
OLDS 89 REGENCY
Brougham. 4drw/fp,
orig. 1989, 163k orig.,
V6 24mpg, new tires &
brakes, 2nd owner $1750
(352) 637-1074
QUANTUM 6000
WHEEL CHAIR. 2 new
batt w/ wty, charger, and
more. Value $15,000.
Asking $2,500 obo
(352) 527-2085



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191



FREE KITTENS
14 wks old, litter trained
352-382-4654
FREE
Twelve cockatiels & 3
large cages. Call after
8am (352) 341-0703
SHEPHERD MIX
male, blonde, approx. 3
yrs. old. need fenced
yard, loving home
352-489-6072




FRESH CITRUS@
BELLAMY GROVE
Greens, Strawberries,
Broccoli, Gift Shipping,
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378




Female Pug found in
Beverly Hills area. Out of
state dog tags. Call to
identify. 352-220-2014



Found: orange/white kit-
ten found in vicinity of Cit-
rus Ave/Turkey Oak Ave
on 12/24. Very loving and
cries for her missing
owner at night. If yours,
please call to claim:
564-7931.


IN INVERNESS
AROUND THE AREA OF
INDEPENDENCE
(352) 212-6182
Gold Wedding Band
found in Inverness
Rails to Trails. Call &
Identify (352) 860-1228
Hounddog approx 6mo
old Brown & white. Found
in the area of Mini Farms
Dunklan/ Dunnellon
(352) 465-7625



Looking for anyone wit-
nessing an accident on
12/26/12 betwn 3-4pm on
Citrus Ave 2 mi So. of
Crystal River. Vehicles:
Silver Hyundai & white
Ford F-150.Call 795-6166




HOUSEKEEPING
PERSON
Opening on house-
keeping staff at Citrus
Hills. Responsible for
cleaning hospitality
villas, including laundry,
as well as offices and
models needed.
Flexible Full -Time
schedule to include
weekends.
Apply at Terra Vista
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd, Hernando, FL







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





ARNP or PA
Wanted Part Time for
a busy Pediatric
Practice in Crystal
River, Send Resume
to: lindaoracticemar
itampabav.rr.com

F/T RN

IV Exp. preferred
For physicians office
with benefits.
Send Resume to:
Blind Box 1787M.
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida, 34429
MEDICAL
RECEPTIONIST
Busy medical office
looking for exp.
receptionist. Must be
familiar with billing & able
to multi task.
Fax resume to:
352-746-5784
NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


Sudoku ****** 4puz.com


579 8


1 _4

_1 __3



9 57


2 3 7 9


76 1


3 4





_5 7__ 74

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.
All, ofou.r
dIP aacedJ tla m structures
withstand

Installations b Brian cBC125385s3 ".. h winds,

352-628-7519


'FREE"
Permit And
I Engineering Fees I
Up to $200 value I

*Siding *Soffit *Fascia *Skirting* Roofovers Carports* Screen Rooms* Decks *Windows* Doors *Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


PIT, DIETARY
AIDE
Looking for Responsi-
ble Individual
with flexible hours.
Aoolv in Person:
700 SE 8th Ave
Crystal River, 34429
DFWP, EOE




PRODUCTION
MANAGER

for Citrus County
strawberry, blueberry,
and citrus farm.
Full time, year round
position. Must be willing
to relocate to Floral
City, Florida.
Responsible for:
Supervision of irrigation
technician and spray
technician. Operation
and light maintenance
of irrigation systems,
spray equipment, trac-
tors and other farm ve-
hicles. Interaction with
Harvest Manger to en-
sure production yield
and quality.
Requires detailed
knowledge of:
Agricultural chemicals
and spray equipment,
calibration and mainte-
nance. Irrigation,
fertigation, chemigation
equipment, calibration
and maintenance.
Diesel pumps and
wells. Record keeping
and daily logs.Tractors
and other farm equip-
ment. Computers MS
office suite, internet.
College Agricultural
Degree a plus.
Private Pesticide Appli-
cators License a plus.
Starting salary com-
mensurate with experi-
ence, plus housing, ve-
hicle, insurance, 401K,
bonus after 1st year.
Respond with resume
FERRIS FARMS
7607 S FLORIDA AVE,
FLORAL CITY, FL
34436

Sales / Project
Coordinator
Needed ASAP
Manufactured
Homes Exp. Req.
Serious inquires only!
Call Henry
(352) 795-1272




Exp. Marine
Fork Lift Driver

7 day shift
**Apply in Person*
Twin Rivers Marina
2880 N. Seabreeze Pt
Crystal River F 34429
no phone calls pls




PRO SHOP
PERSONNEL
& OUTSIDE CART
ATTENDANT

Part time position,
some golf knowledge
required, Must have
excellent people
skills &flexible hours
Apply in Person at
Sugarmill Woods Golf
& Country Club
1 Douglas St.
Homosassa Fl.









SPRING HILL
January Classes
COSMO DAYS
January 14, 2013
COSMO NIGHTS
January 14, 2013
BARBER NIGHTS
February 25, 2013
MASSAGE DAY
January 14, 2013,
MASSAGE NIGHTS
January 14, 2013,
SKIN & NAILS
Day School Only

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
1-866-724-2363
www.isbschool.com


Colletible


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


DRYER $100 Works
great. 90 day full
warranty. Call/text
352-364-6504

DRYER $100 works
great. 90 day full warranty
call/text 352-364-6504

GE WASHER Good
working condition $75
KENMORE DryerAlso
Good condition $75
(812) 207-5691

GE WASHER Good
working condition $75
KENMORE DryerAlso
Good condition $75
(812) 207-5691

Kenmore (Sears) 700
series clothes washer
and GE dryer,
$350 for both.
Good condition.
352-419-7017

KENMORE WASHER
White Kenmore looks
good, works great
guarranted. $100
Dennis @352-476-9019

SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179

WASHER $100 works
great. 90 day full warranty
call/text 352-364-6504

WASHER$100 Works
great. 90 day full
warranty. Call/text
352-364-6504

WASHING MACHINE
$100 Kenmore Three
Speed Automatic Washer
Contact Rich @
352-897-4842









HAMMER DOWN
AUCTIONEERS
Sat 12/29 Prev@ 4p
Auction @6p Gen.Merch.
Sun 12/30 Auction@ lip
Tailgate Box Lot Auction
**WE BUY ESTATES**
6055 N. Carl G. Rose
Hwy 200 Hernando
AB3232 (352) 613-1389




HITACHI 32" TV WITH
REMOTE GOOD
CONDITION $50
352-613-0529

SHARP 32" TV WITH
REMOTE $25
32-613-0529

SONY TV 52" sony tv,
rear projection, with sony
surround unit. can see
working. $ 75.
352-795-4674

VIZIO 42 INCH 3D TV
Vizio E3D420VX 3D TV
LCD 1080p 120hz with
box and remote. Great
condition. 6 pairs of 3D
glasses included. $400
Gerome 352-322-6779




480W POWER SUPPLY
like new $30 inverness
864-283-5797

DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469

TOSHIBA SATELLITE
LAPTOP good condition,
$100 (352)465-1616




Dining Room Set
glass top table & 4 chairs
$300 obo, Kitchen set,
table & 4 chairs
w/oak finish $50 obo
352-382-2450

DOUBLE SIZE
MATTRESS SET Very
clean and in excellent
condition. $100.00
352-257-5722

Home Office Desk
Maple, Great Condition
$500 obo, White Formica
Student Desk, good
condition $25 obo,
352-382-2450

KING SIZED MATTRESS
AND BOX SPRINGS
good cond. $75 Call
Walter @ 352-362-2583

LEATHER LA-Z-BOY
ROCKER RECLINER
Taupe in color. In ac-
ceptable condition.
Some leather wear.
mechanisms work
good. $150 OBO
746-7355

LEATHER LOVE SEAT
Ivory Leather Love Seat
in good condition.
$150 OBO 746-7355

LEATHER SOFA &
LOVESEAT
burgundy, excellent
condition 352-746-0855

LIGHT-COLORED
Wooden Table for
Breakfast Nook or
Kitchen Island, New
Condition 34"H 36"L
24"W Two Stools
ALL for $75.00
(352) 527-9930 BH


toman, 1 coffee, 2 end ta-
bles. Twin bed, mat. set &
head board. Round din-
ing room table w/ 4chrs.
Lamp. $600 for all
(352) 242-7117
LIVING ROOM SET
SOFA, IOVESEAT &
END TABLES. EARTH
TONES, EXC COND
$475 obo(352) 302-8265
MATTRESS SETS Beautiful
Factory Seconds
Twin $99.95, Full $129.95
Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95
352-621-4500
PAIR OF KING SIZED
BOX SPRINGS Good
condition $25 for the pair.
Call Walter @
352-364-2583
PAUL'S FURNITURE
& THRIFT SHOP
Daybed w/ trundle & Mat.
Homosassa 628-2306
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
QUEEN MATTRESS
SET Non-smoker, very
clean. $100.00
352-257-5722
QUEEN SIZE MAT-
TRESS AND BOX SPR-
ING Very good condition
$100 Call Walter @
352-364-2583
RECLINER Brown fabric.
Good condition $75
352-257-5722
REDUCED
Solid Oak
Entertainment Center
leaded glass trim,
3 lighted sect. lighted, fits
up to 42" TV, 9ft 6" W,
20"D 6'22H, Holds 220
CD's/DVD's $300 obo
Antique Roll Top Desk,
beautiful carve front, 5W,
30" D, $300. OBO
(352) 746-7318
Sculptured
Wall hanging
Tasmanian Artist
Carolyn Audet, 9 Little
brass fish on driftwood,
$100.
(352) 341-3651
Solid oak Not Veneer
Coffee Table with swivel
top to increase available
surface area.
Solid Oak 6 sided end
table w/ glass top $70 for
Both (352) 341-3651



SOLD
Craftsmen Tractor
24 hIsp. includes
trailer, spreader, charge
auto transmission $750
Weed Eater hedge
trimmer $10
352-860-0183



FLORAL CITY
Thurs, Fnri, Sat & 9a -5p
Moving Multi Family
Tools, boat stuff, band
saw, drill press,
Adult trike
7590 S Aroostook Way
(989) 493-1083


HOMOSASSA
FRI & SAT 9A-1 P
MOVING SALE
RIVERHAVEN VILLAGE
11517 W Riverhaven Dr.
INVERNESS
Sat Only, 8am to 1pm
A little bit of everything!
6431 E Quail Run Lane



BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING SIZES 5 & 6
SHIRTS, PANTS &
JACKETS $35
352-613-0529



16" Pedestal Fan
$15
352-860-0183
BREADMAKER Good
condition, Breadman, $10
(352)465-1616
CORNING WARE
$2 each-no covers
Blue Cornflower
Spice of Life
352-527-8287
GERBIL CAGE GOOD
CONDITION $25
352-613-0529
HAND Sweeper
$20, Miter Saw $20
Hand Spreader $5
352-860-0183
LENOX CRYSTAL VASE
4" Odler
Exc Cond
$7 352-527-8287
missionincitrus.com
Citrus County's Only
Emergency Homeless
& Veteran's Shelters
Now 80-100 a night
includes 18 children
EMERGENCY FUNDS
& Other needs are
needed at this time.
352-794-3825
QUANTUM 6000
WHEEL CHAIR. 2 new
batt w/ wty, charger, and
more. Value $15,000.
Asking $2,500 obo
(352) 527-2085
SOLD
CLUB CAR 2 Seater,
weather cover, lights,
mirrors, Trojan batteries
excel. cond. $1,400.
TODDLER HEADBOARD
Brand New Metal
Headboard, $15
(352)465-1616
Trademark 3-in-I
Rotating Table Game
(Billiards, Air Hockey,
and Foosball), 42.5 x 33
x 33-Inch, space saving
design, $350. 419-7017
Webber Grill
$20, Black & Decker
Workmate Table $20
352-860-0183




SOLD
GO GO SCOOTER
Elite, used only a few
times, like new $375 firm


*


1235689-47



28531 7469

43769285 1
396 7 84 215
7 154256398
8 5 293 1G 67-4


BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676




Cassio Keyboard
WK1800, like new,
Stand and bench in-
cluded $200 cash,
Citrus Hills
352-637-6762




CHAMPION JUICER
Fresh juice for your
health! Almond color, in
excellent condition $160
(828) 483-4550
Crystal River
Health Meter Scale
$25
352-860-0183




BICYCLE 28" Diamond-
back Edgewood hybrid
24sp exc condition.$145.
352-419-7200




.308 SAVAGE RIFLE,
Stainless, $400.
WEATHERBY .223
RIFLE Stainless $600.
Scopes, cases, included.
(352) 503-2792
CLUB CAR ELECTRIC
NEW TIRES, BATTERY
CHARGER & NEW
COVER. EXC COND.
CASH ONLY $2500
(352) 503-2383
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Full Set of new Taylor
Made Burner Plus Irons
used 4 times, can no
longer use, original price
$699, sell for $225
call 352-464-4897
Ladies 26" Lamborghini
Road Bike
21 speed like new
$129.
(352) 249-4460


Pool Table
4 x 8 ft, 1 slate,
leather pockets,
oak frame $700
(352) 586-9598
ROUGH RIDER
STOCKMAN POCKET
KNIFE New in box, 3
blades $14 860-2475
Tanning Bed
Professional, 24 Lamp
$600.
Hot Tub, color marble
gray, 220V, seats 4-6
600. (352) 586-9598




NEW
HAULMARK 6X12
ENCLOSED TRAILERS
ONLY $1999.
(352) 621-3678




BABY STROLLER
Deluxe model with
canopy $25 860-2475


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situation.
Call Fred, 352-726-9369


Are You

Interested In:

* Being your own
boss.

* Increasing potential
earnings.

* Growing your
exclusive area?


.. Working
Independently?

,j. !:x I '' Workinq with a
, 1 .: '. j' successful company?

C I T R U S, C 0 UNTY




www.chronicleonline.com

Call (352) 563-6363 ext. 1201

Business Hours 9 AM-4 PM Daily


Deliver to stores and coin racks.
Experience preferred but not required.


II


SINGLE COPY



CONTRACTOR



WANTED


Requirements:

* Ability to work overnight
Covered Truck, Van or SUV
SClean Driving Record
* Credit & Background Check
* Access to your own help
* Lifting and physical ability
* Team Player
* Must have a back-up plan
* Computer & Internet Access


Do you have what it takes?

* Attention to detail

* 365 Days/Year

* Deadline and Customer
Service oriented

* Flexible under pressure

* Positive Thinker

* Hard and smart worker

* Keen sense of urgency









CIO SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012


5 Tiny Yorkies
$550 and up, Small,
Tiny & Very Tiny Only 2
females,1 Male Maltese,
Raised in loving home.
CKC Reg. health certs, &
puppy pacs. Parents on
site come watch them
play (352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258
F6 BENGAL CAT CUBS
*Spotted & Marbles*
*Snows & Browns*
*$275, FL Health*
*Cert. & Shots*
*352-601-5362*
LABRADOODLE
PUPPIES 2 left! 1 black
male, 1 cream female.
Born 9/21/12. Shots,
dewormed, health certs.,
flea protection,
heartworm prevention.
Please call for prices.
352-410-0080


RED MINIATURE
POODLE PUPS
7 WEEKS;2 MALES AND
1 FEMALE; $850.
REGISTRATION AND
HEALTH CERTIFI-
CATES; AVAILABLE
12-22-12. CALL
352419-8233 OR
janiceannross@msn.com
SENEGAL PARROT
$350 WITH CAGE,
FEMALE VERY GOOD
BIRD. CASH ONLY
EXC. HEALTH
(352) 503-2383



SMOOTH MINI
DACHSHUNDS


family raised,
ready to go

$200ea.
call Debbie at
352-564-0855 eves





LG DOG CRATE
black finish
48"length x29/2 width
35" height $45
(352) 527-0982


Livestock


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
** *- *


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!








INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
* 1 BEDROOM
start@$325 inc. H20
* 2 BEDROOMS
start@$450 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!

HERNANDO
RENT TO OWN, 2/1/
older mobile needs TLC
$1,000 Down, $275. mo.
(352) 726-9369

HOMOSASSA
2 Bd, 2 Ba. fully furn.
352-746-0524

HOMOSASSA
2/1, $425/mo.+ util. No
Pets, 1574 S. Iroquois
Ave (352) 503-7562

HOMOSASSA
2/1, NICE SWMH
Big Yard, Fenced Back-
yard, Screened Back
Porch, In nice area on
Paved Street. Pets
Allowed $495.pr mnth
Ist, Last, $300 Deposit.
Call 352 634-3862 or
352-794-3760

HOMOSASSA
3/2 D/W $650 mo.,
1st, last, sec. Very nice
home. Ask for Walter
(561) 248-4200

HOMOSASSA
S. Slashpine 3/1 $475+
also 2/1 $425+ avail
now 352-287-0086

INGLIS
2/2, Close to Plant
on 1 acre Clean, Quiet
$495. (352) 447-6016

LECANTO
LEISURE ACRES
3/2 water & garbage incl.
$600mo. (352) 628-5990





2BR. 1'%BA.on your
own 75x 150 lot.
no fees! new enclosed
sunroom, Ig laundry
room furn, 2 storage
buildings, 5111 Castle
Lake Ave. S. of
Inverness on SR 41
$39,500 (740) 255-0125

3bdr/2 full baths/2 car
carport on 1 acre.
split layout, steel roof,
caged pool, 20x25 ft
deck, Ig storage build-
ing, Furnished Modular
$76,900, 5215 Bridget
Pt, Castle Lake Park
Inverness 352-597-7353

BANK
FORECLOSURE
Land-n-Home, 312
1500 sq. ft. On /2 Acre,
paved rd. LOOKS
GOOD, Have financing
if needed, only $2,500
down, $381.44mo. P&l
W.A.C. OR $69,900.
Call 352-613-0587
or 352-621-9183

HERNANDO
3BR 2BA MH
Ready to move in !
FHA & Owner Financing
avail. call 352-795-1272

HOME-ON-LAND
3/2 Great Shape.
Acre. Move In Now
$59,900.
Call 352-401-2979,
352-621-3807

Palm Harbor Homes
New Home Stimulus
5K For Your Used
Mobile Home -
Any Condition
800-622-2832

REPO'S- REPO'S
REPO'S
WE HAVE REPO'S
CALL 352-621-9181





CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice Large 4br 2ba MH
READY TO MOVE IN!
4Owner Fin. Avail.+
CALL (352) 795-1272


FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof over,
w/ porch & carport on
fenced 1 acre, Very Nice
Quiet, Less Than
$46,500. Cash- 586-9498
HERNANDO/486 1+acre,
2br SWMH+ den/flp, Man
Cave/Work Shop w/AC
28x40, $47,500 J. Desha
Cndland Real Estate
(352)634-6340
HOMOSASSA
2ba 1 ba MH needs
complete rehab. Good
shed, well & septic.
6524 W. Akazian
$12,500 (603) 860-6660




CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
WINTER SPECIALS *
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
3/2, 2001, $19,900
2/2 waterfront. $31,000
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

FLORAL CITY
55 + Park. Fully furn.,
2/2, DW, 2 Carports,
screened porch & remod-
eled. Fun park lots of
activities! Lot Rent $176.
$17,500. 352-344-2420
INGLIS
3/2 Furn., screened porch.
Lot rent $295
Includes amenities.
$15,000 (352) 212-8873
INVERNESS
Harbor Lights 55+ park,
on Big Lake Henderson.
Lovely d/w 2/2 new appl.
new floors, screened
porch, shed, & carport.
$13,500 (352)344-1828
INVERNESS PARK
55+, 14X60, 2/2, new
roof, all appliances, partly
furn. screen room, shed,
352419-6476
LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access, ramp & shower
$25,000. 352-212-6804
Lecanto Senior Park 3
bedroom. 2 bath. 14x66
S/W Mobile home fur-
nished. 12x22 Screened
porch, 2 sheds, roof over,
new plumbing, new hot
water heater, new skirt-
ing, very clean, painted in
2011. Call 815-535-7958
MOBILE HOME, Fully
Furnished. Everything
stays. Just move in. 2
Sheds, washer/dryer all
appliances. Must See!
$8,000. (708) 308-3138





COMING
SOON!
RV RENTALS
I CONSIGNMENT USA I
US 19 By Airport, CR
For Info 461-4518

INVERNESS
RV Spaces. Bring your
own boat and fishing
gear. AGE 55+ com-
munity. Lot rent only
$360-$375 including
electric. Edge Water
Oaks 352-344-1380




HOMOSASSA
Large 3br 2ba MH
Rent to Own
*Ready to Move In *
Owner Financinga Avail.
CALL (352) 795-1272





AUION

I RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REAL, INC. J
352-795-7368
www.itrus(ounlyHomeRentals.corn
LECANTO
2334 WSilverhill Ln.... $525
2/1 ground floor apt.
1073 N Commerce Ter.. $525
2/1 apt,screened lanai
CRYSTAL RIVER
2271 N Crede.............. $450
2/1 SW mobile,furnished
9454 W Wisconsin (I... $775
3/2 quiet dead end street
HOMOSASSA
9540 S Lotus Pf........... $625
2/1 5 DW mobile, huge lot
8019 W Grove St........ $575
2/2 SW mobile on 125 Acres
HERNANDO/INVERNESS
5525 S Kine Ter.......... $875
2/2/1 unfurnished,incd lwncare
6315 N Shorewood Dr..$700
2/1 cute home, nice yard


CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
With inground Pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135





Crystal River
1/1 Great neighborhood
7 mos min. No smoking
No Pets 352-422-0374

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Hse. Near Twn 563-9857

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025





Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $400-$500
ALSO HOMES &
MOBILES AVAILABLE


CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments
for Rent 352-465-2985

FLORAL CITY
FREE Use of boat ramp,
fishing dock, canoe &
Jon boat rentals. 1 BR
$300/$200 dp.Trails End
Camp, A Friendly Place
to Live 352-726-3699

HOMOSASSA
2/1, Incld water, trash
& lawn. $550 mo. + Sec.
352-634-5499

LECANTO
Nice, Clean I BR,
Ceramic tile throughout
352-216-0012/613-6000


SEVEN RIVERS
APARTMENTS
A Beautiful Place
To Call Home!
on 10 wooded Acres
Near Power Plant
7 Rivers Hospital and
Crystal River Mall,
Quite, Clean,
Well Maintained Apts
READY NOW!
STARTING AT $519.
DIRECTIONS:
Hwy 19NW Turn at
Days Inn, Go West to
Tallahasse Rd. or
From Power Plant Rd.
to So. on Tallahasse
Rd. 3.0 Miles
(352) 795-3719





asI





CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret Harbour
Apts. Newly remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incl Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037





Homosassa Spgs
SmlRestaurant/Pizza
Shop for Rent, $800
269-369-2509

LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza, Office/
Retail, CR 486, 900 sf. @
$700+ util. & sales tax. 1
mo. Free w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801





CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furn w/ member-
ship, Seasonal/Annual
352-476-4242, 527-8002

INVERNESS
2/2/1 Lg Condo
Waterfront Community
with heated pool.
Non-smoker, pet restrict.
$665. mo 317-442-1063





HOMOSASSA 2/1
$525 mo incl. garb. Wtr.,
Sept. Pets? No smk 1st
Ist. & sec. 352-212-4981


CLASSIFIED




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
HERNANDO
On private prop. Wood
burning stove, utilities
included. $450 mo.
(352)341-0787




BLACK DIAMOND
EXCLUSIVE 3/2/2
3389 N Bent Tree Pt
1650 SF, Pool, $1285/mo
(740) 398-9585
CRYS. RIV. & BH
Great Neigh., Like New
352-302-1370




BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, Carport, Carpet
$500.mo. 352-302-3987
Cit.Hills/Brentwood
2/2/2 on golf course.
Club included $900/mo
516-991-5747

CITRUS HILLS
2/21/2 Townhouse
condo, full appliances,
carport, Citrus Hills
membership included
Prudential Florida
Showcase Properties
call 352-476-8136
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
W/ inground pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135
FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1 Furn.
$950. 352-419-4421
INVERNESS
2/1 near hospital
fam. room, scn porch.
$600 352-422-2393
INVERNESS
3/2 Brand New, Granite
tops, marble firs, SS Ap
$895 (352) 634-3897




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225
Lake Front Home
on Gospel Island,
spectacular views
spacious 3/2/2,
For Rent, $700
or Sale (908) 322-6529





For Sale a

CHASSA-

HOWITZKA
Charming 2br 1.5ba,
newly remodeled in quiet
area. 980sq ft $60,000.
Owner Fin. 10% down
amortized over 15yrs at
7% 5-yr balloon.
Possible trade for
land/home in TN or GA.
call 352-382-1800




BUSHNELL
On 50 acres TV & W/D
WIFI UTILITIES
$450 (352) 603-0611

Rel Estate'd


ESTIAE SALE in Nature
Coast Landings RV Re-
sort. Large developed
site and a separate gated
storage lot; plus almost
new 5th-wheel with
slides, screened gazebo,
and storage building. All
for $79,900. For more
info and pictures, click on
www.detailsbyowner.com
352-843-5441








From mobiles to
mansions,
From Gulf to Lakes,
give me a call,
I sell 'em all!
352-422-4137
nancy.wilson(iD
vahoo.com

Nancy J. Wilson
Realtor@
Broker-Associate
SRESGRI
Waybright Real Estate,
Inc.


Fero Cemetery Beverly
Hills Two Plots Under Lrg
Shaded Oak Tree -
Row 251 Lots D & E
Only $2500 for Both
(1/2 Price) 352-364-4010



Motivated seller
wants this gone!!!
6 acres w Big SHOP,
Nice 2/2/2 House,
porches Barns, pond,
pvd rd, Concrete
drive. $ 149K
MLS 357108.
www.crosslandrealty.
com 352 726 6644




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national ongin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discriminationn"
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing mpaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY




Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial









Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com



UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND YOU
A VIEW TO LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.









' THIS OUT!
Brentwood of Citrus
Hills 2/2/2 Quiet
culdesac. Totally re-
modeled Hrwd
flrs,ceramic,cpt.
scrn lanai, Iscp yard.
Must see!
New on market FSBO
1816 W. Jena Ct
Lecanto OPEN
SAT&SUN 11-2
$97,500
NO agents please
610-248-2090


"Whatever that was, I'll have
another one."




Thank You For 15 hears ofVotes!!


I' EAUF1IFL RESULYFS

CONSTRUCT ON CORP


0"w- -
M WILL""c '1





Cal 352-428-2291 IL
....2.. L...hn 1-1ok -irtrnatoai in Di byJ n IUCikrrU 01


HERANADO
3 Bay industrial bldg.
acre lot fenced $1200
mo + elec(352) 637-1411





HERNANDO
Citrus Hills Pool Home
4/3/2+, circular drive,
1 acre lot, below $200k
352-527-7856





Lowest Priced Home
in ARBOR LAKES
**OPEN HOUSE**
2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR &
Gated Comm. 10a-3p
4695 N. Lake Vista TrI
(352) 419-7418





INVERNESS
Block home 2br, 1ba
w/ 2porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres.
$130,000 Call Buzz
352-341-0224 or
David 607-539-7872





FLORAL CITY
3/2/1, quiet st, Lg. lot,
best offer -inspection
Sat, Sun fm 1 to 5,
Home will be sold Sun-
day night to highest
bidder 727-288-6020





CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 on 10 Acres,
W/ inground pool
$1000/mo(352) 621-3135





OWNER SACRIFICE
$100,000. 4 yrs. Ago,
*Selling for $29.900*
CALL 352-564-0207
Forest View/Gated 55+

The Meadows Sub.
2/2/1, New roof,
New AC & Appliances
Move In, clean cond.
3876 S. Flamingo Terr.
Asking $58,000
(352) 382-5558

WALDEN WOODS
55+ Adult Community.
Furn. 2/2 DW. $700 mo +
until, sec dep, & 1mo rent.
(352) 428-6919


HOMOSASSA SPRINGS






2/2/2 Great Country
home on 2 acre
landscaped lot, in great
neighborhood. Move in
Ready! Call for appt.
126K 352-503-6511







4/2/3 HEATED POOL
lots of extras!
SELLER MOTIVATED!
reduced to 210k
352-688-6500 or
352-212-5023


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc
352Y586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


GAIL STEARNS
Realtor

Tropic Shores
Realty
(352) 422-4298

Low overhead =
Low Commissions

Waterfront,
Foreclosures
Owner financing
available


tnDew


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179


Top Notch Appliance
Rpr & Dryer Vent CIng.
All Rpr Guar. Lic/Ins. 30
yrs exp.(352) 586-9109





Maximum Auto Repair
& Performance
Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts,
Classic car restoration, tires
new & used, Performance
engines. (352)419-6549





Maximum Auto Repair
& Performance
Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts,
Classic car restoration, tires
new & used, Performance
engines. (352) 419-6549






SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518


JEFF'S Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 746-3444




AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
We Come to You!
352-212-1551, 584-3730
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Side
walks. Pool deck repair
/Stain 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097

ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs Tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


All AROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
S352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777

DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




*BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279 ;*


DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696
SEASONED SPLIT OAK
FIREWOOD 4x8 stacked
& deliv. $80
352-621-1656, 302-3515



Install, Restretch, Repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl Car-
pet, Laminent, Lic#4857
Mitch, (352) 201-2245




1 CALL & RELAX! 25vrs
Exp in 100% property
maint & all repairs, call
H&H Services today!
lic#37658 352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
/FAST 100% Guar.
/ AFFORDABLE
/ RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
,/FAST 100% Guar.
,/ AFFORDABLE
/ RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *


Affordable Handyman
/FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
/ RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
,/FAST 100% Guar.
,/ AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *




CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly.
GREAT RATES *
352-503-7800, 476-3820
Exp House Keeper for
Hire. Contact Sheila @
352-586-7018





The Tile Man
Bathroom Remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




LARRY'S TRACTOR *
SERVICE FINISH GRAD-
ING & BUSHHOGGING
***352-302-3523***
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955


All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120



GOT LEAVES
Let our DR VAC
Do the work!
Call 352-502-6588



AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small
engine service & repair.
352-220-4244




A-I Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS CLEAN
UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
HAULING
FREE ESTIMATES
scrap metals haul for
FREE (352) 344-9273


JEFF'S Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 746-3444




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397

CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE CLEANING
& PAINTING
352-341-3300





All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.









Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


COUNTY WIDE DRY-
WALL 25 ys exp lic2875
all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Pop Corn Removal
S352-302-6838






A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452


All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955


DOUBLE J Tree Serv.
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852


R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & tnmming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827






344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'-^Q


12-29


0 LaughingStock International Inc Dist bv Universal UCIick for UFS. 2012


Citrus County
&Huo




SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012 Cll


P with HUNDREDS
CARS, TRUCKS, SUVs and VANS


That must go before the end of the year.
NOWis the time to get the best vehicle and the best deal!


2009 LINCOLN


2011 ACURA


2011 CHEVROLET


2010 HYUNDAI


2012 CHEVROLET


2012 CHEVROLET

SIi -


D01500
,, M826


Every vehicle is priced at or just above wholesale,
offering the lowest rates -with no payments for 90 days, a -
and you'll get more for your trade!
AutoMax will do whatever it takes, within reason, to SUPER CLEAN
earn your business. Don't miss this sale. LOW MILES
AutoMax is so confident that they will have the best prices that they have put the lowest price and payment on
the RED TAGS. No games, no gimmicks, no pushy sales people just the lowest price and payment.
DON'T WANT TO TAKE THE DRIVE?
You can find all the same information online at AUTOMAXOCALA.COM and see if there is anything that you are interested in.
* THIS SALE WILL LAST FROM NOW UNTIL THE END OF THE YEAR.

QUALITY CARS AT OUTLET PRICES
Marion County's Preowned Dealer! ____1


2007 MAZDA


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




C12 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012


THE PERFECT LAST MINUTE
GIFT IS AT CRYSTAL!


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:
800-440-9054


2010 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER


: :~
.11 . 6cmifa


2010 HYUNDAI SONATA



.ini :11::r


2010 NISSAN ALTIMA


2010 CHEVY EQUINOX


$99999 $12,999 $12,999 $15,999
OR$1 56MO. OR203J OR S203 h o.R250 R


F 60NJF R. JH JIAii
1-0:* -8: 7B:r1.6 : 1800-584-8:7MI.l:.,: r iJ'.


2010 CHRYSLER 300


2010 CHEVY TRAVERSE


2009 CHRYSLER SEBRING


2009 SCION XD


1430-8-85 ExtMO:1EIoo -58"5 :6x.180


:Eej .w'ij iILL,!JC.J,, ,J:oo 'I
RIE!4.R EM. MESAE IT IF 5 M D O U

$15,999 $16,999* $!9999 $9999
ORMi$250 OR.$266. .OR $1 56 OR .$156I


2009 HYUNDAI ELANTRA


2009 DODGE JOURNEY


2009 HYUNDAI SANTE FE


2009 CHEVY EQUINOX


REE4RREORSAGWIT1H1 I
1:800.5M-875 ExtMW2 1400%W"755 Fi.139


$9999 $11,999 $12,999 $12,999
OR$156M. OR$188M._,, OR$203M OR,$203MO.


2008 NISSAN ROGUE


$23999 I $11999
OR.$375 o. OR$188


2008 DODGE CHARGER


2008 CHEVY SILVERADO
.,


$11,999 $13,999
OR$188M ORs219 M.


2008 NISSAN TITAN


.6 .. .1
kiEELi9i'-"A Mftl
RIE 2 H RCM MMM WrHIND D W.-.RION


2008 TOYOTA TACOMA


2008 TOYOTA SEQUOIA


$14,999 $15,999 $22,999
OR$235 Mo. OR250M OR360M


2008 FORD F350


$25999
OR$407 Mo


1-00-5"75 :37


A
r ,' F.-~ *~


ii
0


CRYSTAL
A I I T H V I'n T I V I


352-564-1971 WWW.CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd. 1005 S. Suncoast Blvd. 937 S. Suncoast Blvd. 2077 Highway 44W 14358 Cortez Blvd.
Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL Inverness, FL Brooksville, FL

*PRICE INCLUDES $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50 WITH APPROVED CREDIT +PAYMENTS INCLUDE $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE, NOT EVERYONE
WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. PAYMENTS ARE 72 MONTHS AT 3.99%APR WITH APPROVED CREDIT PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


REE 24 HeR RECOM MESSAGE aiiFO MDSE I'AL IC
1-800-8"755 xtA255


liJRIEE2 RREC IM ESAGE ITH NO N SEIAL PMING
1-800-58"75 Ext.3258


=Et24HRRCDEM INFOM PC
1-800-5"755 Ex.1 11


1%


1%


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


* r


dk


\


I








SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012 C13


WORDY GURDY BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. "Les Miz" film star Jackson jetted (l) Every answer is rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. NBA star Bryant's kimono sashes (2) they wll fit in the letter
-_-_-_-_ -- ~ squares. The number after the
_definition tells you how many
3. Phoned "The French Chef" Julia (1) syllables in each word.
SI2012 UFS, Dist by Univ UchickforUFS
4. Arrive carrying twine (1)

5. Renowned gumshoe (2)

6. Nonclergy person's pollen bearers (2)

7. Halting balloon bursting (2)


ONIddOd 9NIddOIS *L SNaivIS SNVAVI 9 SfnaVHS SflOWVA "
ONIIS ONIfH '\ O'IH T O (IIVII 's SIO SHOM "* A Ma'Id HflH "I
12-29-12 S3AMSNV

'J :IATAI dI Iii


PINE RIDGE- THIS IS
THE PROPERTY
YOU'VE BEEN LOOK-
ING FOR! Bring your
boat, horses, in-laws;
there is room for
everything! 4/3.5 w/7 car
garage/workshop & in-law
suite on 5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded with large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352.249.9164



Quiet Country Setting
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Dunnellon/Citrus Springs
area, only 20 Mm. to
Ocala $132,000 Call
352-302-6784 for appt.











Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
*Buy or Sell*

I'll Represent
YOU

ERA
American Realty





"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week


LISA VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near KINGS
BAY $425,000. Make
Offers 352-563-9857

YOUR "High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


ROD KENNER
352-436-3531
ERA
Suncoast Realty







SCAN OR GO TO
WWW.
Propertes.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"


DUNNELLON
Here is that home on
Lake Rousseau that you
have always wanted! 2br
1 '/2 ba on 1.43 acres
w/168ft lake frontage.
Completely remodeled all
new interior & windows.
No Flood Insurance!
Priced reduced from
$369,000 to $169,000
Call Bernie
(352) 563-0116
Open Waterfront on
Lake Hernando
3,300 sf under roof 2,000
liv., 3/2/1. den &fam.
rm. cage inground
pool. 2 Irg. sheds, dock,
on 1 acre $269,900
813-240-7925



**Heatherwood 581"
access to game reserve
& Tillus Hill, 2.42 Acres
well, septic, no impact
fees, $30,000 by
owner, sold as is
(352) 422-0435
% ACRE LOT
with well, septic and
power pole, impact fee
credit, high and dry,
trees, $11,000 obo
(352) 795-3710



HOMOSASSA
Wooded Lot, wet lands
on Lee Woods Drive
112x 114 ft. river ac-
cess, but not on River
$7,000. 352-621-1664



2005 BOAT TRAILER
18 to 21 ft boat. Tandem
axle. All tires, lights,
axles, & guides in exc.
cond. MUST SEE!
Asking $895 OBO.
Priced $350 below value.
Call / txt(352) 422-7737
BOAT TRANSIT
TRAILER Very Ig., dbl.
axles up to 33 ft. Any
boat type! $1800 or
OBO (813) 244-3945



15 ft ALUM. BOAT WIDE
DEEP V. 25HP ELEC.
START, TRAILER.
OLDER BUT CHEAPER!
$995 (352) 341-4949
198827 ft Sportscraft
Coastal Fisherman,
cabin cruiser, $10k
OBO (813)-244-3945


AIRBOAT
15ft, Rivermaster
6 cyl, Continental Aircraft
engine, warp-drive prop,
$7000 352-637-1391


MUST SELL

BAYLINER 1984
cuddy cabin, hard top,
Volvo motor, AQ125A,
needs tune-up. Has 2
props, fish/depth finder,
2001 Rolls float on
trailer worth $1000.
Comes w/spare motor
Has service manual,
2nd owner $2500
call Doug after 4pm
352-212-8385
or 352-564-0855
TRI PONTOON BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fish-
ing Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com



NATIONAL RV
2006 Tropical One
owner,34ft, 26000
miles,no smoke/pets,
300HP Cummins diesel,2
slides, 6 new tires, 3yr
warranty,many extras.
$87000. Well maintained.
352-341-4506



DUTCHMAN 40FT
2012-2 slides, 2 ac's
new $51,900 ask. $32k
obo, call for more info
(850) 449-1811 Homoss.
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
WE BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call US 352-201-6945


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
A XMAS SALE
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not -
CASH PAID $300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333



94 OLDS MOBILE
CUTLASS CIERA
SEDAN 6CY RUNS &
LOOKS GOOD. ASKING
$1575. 352-637-2588
or 845-588-0759
2000 Chevy Corvette
Metallic Bowling Green
Std shift, one owner,
& garage kept.
See to appreciate.
(352) 621-9874
A XMAS SALE
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUICK
2007, Lucerne, CXL
55K miles, Leather
$13,500. obo
Call Troy (352)621-7113
CHEVROLET
2000 IMPALA
$4995
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2003 AVALANCHE
$6850
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2004 TRAILBLAZER
4X4 $6999
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2001 TOWN &
COUNTRY $4550
352-341-0018
DODGE
2004 NEON, 4DR AUTO-
MATIC, PRICED TO SEL,
CALL 628-4600
For More Information
FORD
2005, Five Hundred LMT,
40K miles, leather, V6
$9,980
Call Troy 352-621-7113
FORD
2006 Focus ZXW, SE
4DR, WGN. 85k miles
$5,800 obo
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
HONDA
2004, ACCORD 4DR, ITS
A HONDA...Call For Pric-
ing and Appointment
352-628-4600
HONDA
2011 CRV LX, 19K miles,
likenew, 4 Cyl. $19,950
Call Troy 352-621-7113
HYUNDAI
2006 Elantra, GLS 90K
miles, likenew, 4 DR,
auto. $6,800
Call Troy 352-621-7113


MAZDA
2006 Miata MX5 Grand
Touring 40K Miles, Auto
Transmission, Cloth
Seats, MP-3 multi-Disk
(6), $13,250
352-400-1551
MR2 SPYDER
2002 TRD model, 1
owner. Mint condition.
Garage kept, no acci-
dents, smoking, or pets.
New soft top & leather
seats. C352-464-7501.
$13.5K.
NISSAN
2005 ALTIMA SE V6
$7495
352-341-0018
OLDS 89 REGENCY
Brougham. 4drw /fp,
orig. 1989, 163k onrig.,
V6 24mpg, new tires &
brakes, 2nd owner $1750
(352) 637-1074
SATURN ION
2007, 4 cyl, 4dr. gold,
auto, AC,CD, 27k miles
exc. cond. many extras
$8300 obo 352-382-0428
TOYOTA
'05 Camry LE, Silver.
leather interior, very good
condition, 86k miles.
$8900 (352) 637-2838
TOYOTA
2000, Camry LE
V6, 183K miles Super
Clean $5,800. obo
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
TOYOTA
2007, Yaris, 59K miles,
2 DR, H/B $7,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113


1971 CHEVELLE
CONVERTIBLE
stunning, 40k+ in-
vested, fully restored,
350 auto, buckets, con-
sistant show winner,
high end stereo, red w/
white top & interior
$24,900, 352-513-4257






Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




A XMAS SALE
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
CONSIGNMENTUSA.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
DODGE
1998 Ram 1500 Truck
Quad cab 360 body, tires
& interior good, needs
engine & transmission
work $1800 or best offer
352-464-4764
FORD
1999 F 150 Good
condition, 4 new tires
352-270-7420 $5,000
FORD
2003 EXPEDITION
LEATHER SEATS, V8
3rd ROW SEATING
CALL 628-4600
For An Appointment
FORD
2004 F150XL 4x4,115K
miles, Camper top, V8,
White reg. cab
$7000.00 352-746-9150
TOYOTA
2004,4 Runner Sport
2WD, 94K mi, Leather
$12,800. obo
Call Troy 352-621-7113



CADILLAC
2007, Escalade,
44k miles, Luxury NAV,
$29,500.
Call Troy (352) 621-7113
CHEVY TRAIL-
BLAZER LT 05
exc. cond. asking $7000
obo, in Hernando
(904) 923-2902



CHEVY
2005, Colorado 4 x 4,
Sifting on 33's, Auto.,
Call 352-628-4600
For More Information
DODGE
2004, DAKOTA, 4 x 4
Crew Cab, MUST SEE,
Priced to Sell, Call For
Details 352-628-4600
JEEP
2004, Wrangler X 4WD,
Only 57K miles,
Hard Top $13,800.
Call Troy 352-621-7113



HONDA
2005, VTX 1300CC
3 TO CHOOSE FROM
YOU PICK $4,888.
(352) 621-3678
KYMCO
2009, 125cc. Looks and
drives great Only $995
(352) 621-3678
NEW POLARIS
RANGERS
AS LOW AS 7888.
(352) 621-3678
POLARIS
2002, SPORTSMAN ATV
4X4, SERVICED AND
READY FOR HUNTING
SEASON. $2995
(352) 621-3678
VICTORY
2005, KINGPIN
2 TONE, STAGE ONE,
LOADED WITH OPTIONS
ONLY $7888.
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
2005, ROYAL STAR TOUR
DELUXE, READY FOR A
ROAD TRIP ONLY $6688.
(352) 621-3678
YAMAHA
2007 STRATOLINER
1800CC LOADED WITH
OPTIONS A REAL TOUR
BIKE ONLY $5889.
(352) 621-3678



'08 Suzuki Burgman 400
Candy apple red, exc.
cond., 5090 miles. 61 mi
per gallon, luggage back,
& garage kept. $4500
(352) 897-4549



HONDA
1986, V4, Magna,
750CC, needs Carbs
cleaned otherwise
road ready, clean F.
Title many extras $600.
Greg 352-419-7382



283-0105 SACRN
01-05 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
Inverness Mini Storage
hereby gives notice that
the entire contents of the
following units will be
auctioned on January 15,
2013 at 10:00 a.m.
Helen Jean Allen
3460 Hendrick St.
Detroit, Mi 48204 Units


27-5, 28-S, 10-S & 13-E
Judy Bennett
P 0 Box 367
Inverness, FL 34451
Units 15-E, 17-E & 18-E
Troy Maniscaloo
6245 Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34452
Units 9-E & 12-S
Kathy Powers
9043 Aquavista Dr.
Inverness, FL 34450
Unit 8-W
Tamara Holton
5741 S. Calgery Terr.
Inverness, FL 34452
Unit 9-W
Laura Ann Crougiola
3797 E. Johnson PI.
Inverness, FL 34453
Unit 2-N
This notice is iven pursu-
ant to section 83.806 Fl
Statutes to satisfy the self
service facility owners lien
on contents thereof.
December 22, 29 & Janu-
ary 5,2013.


END OF THE YEAR






CERTIFIED SALES EVENT


Included 7-year/100,000-mile Warranty, Standard New-Car

Financing Rates Available, 160-Point Quality Assurance

Inspection, Free CARFAX Vehicle History Report, Extend

Warranty Coverage transferable at no cost for added resale


ed '

value.


THE BEST QUALITY



PREOWNED VEHICLES



'07 TOYOTA


L r1. COROLLA
LE, 4 Cyl, Power
-12100428


r ^10F995

..." or s99i/mo.
IS S^li .'../ *- *** W a/ IU


'09 TOYOTA


MATRIX

5 Dr. Wgn, Auto, FWD
12120008


1o,995 I

or 199i/mo.


'07 TOYOTA


CAMRY
4 Dr. Sdn, Auto, LE
12120299


s12,995

or $239/mo.


'10 TOYOTA W


RAV4 1

FWD, 4 Dr., 4 Cyl, 4 Spd, LMT
12120180


r18,995

or $319/mo.


S12 TOYOTA


I CAM RY
4 Dr. Sdn, Auto, LE
12119010


s19,995

or s329/mo.


'12 TOYOTA


SEQUOIA

RWD, 4.6L, SR5
12119005


s31 995

or $469/mo.


VILLAGE TOYOTA


CRYSTAL RIVER

www.uillagetoyota.com 352-628-5100
*Payments are with $2,000 cash down or trade equity and with approved credit. See dealer for details.


----I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED




C14 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012


SEASON
TO SAVE


!
r
!
^
k
^


WITH APPROVED CREDIT


INTEREST
0% FOR UP TO 72 MONTHS


PAYMENT!
UNTIL MARCH 2013


2013 NISSAN ALTIMA


$119,999+

109 SIAPR
Modol# 13013, Vin# 136690 1 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE, S3,999 DUE AT SIGNING.
\__________________


2013 NISSAN SENTRA


,999


FRE 24 OURRECRDEMESAG W ITHIFO&PRCN
800=584=8755 EXiiju~rT.T 6109


$1


$179O 2.49/
1792 APR
Model# 12113, Vin# 612959 1 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE, S3,999 DUE AT SIGNING.
<^ .,


2012 NISSAN
VERSA


$12,999
$119o 0O
Model# 11462, Vin# 287990
1 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE. 53.999 DUE AT SIGNING.


2012 NISSAN
FRONTIER
Ii^ k.


$15,999
$149o 0R
Model# 31112. Vin# 461839
I OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE S3 999 DUE AI SIGNING


2012 NISSAN
ROGUE


$17,999
$139 0 APR
Model# 22112, Vin# 613231
I OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE S3999 DUE AI SIGNING


2012 NISSAN
MURANO


$24,999
$219 o 0
Model# 23112, Vin# 120649
1 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT [HIS PRICE S3999 DUE AT SIGNING.


\


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:
800-440-9054


CRYSTAL
NISSAN


7 352-564-1971
41XiNk 937 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL
yY2 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM


I


Sales: Monday-Friday 8:00am-8:00pm Saturday 9:00am-7:30pm Sunday-Closed
Service: M, W, F 7:30am-5:30pm T, TH 7:30am-7:00pm Saturday 8:00am-4:00pm Sunday-Closed Body Shop: M-F 7:30am-5:30pm
+PRICE INCLUDES $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY EXCLUDES TAX TAG TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. WAC. *LEASES ARE FOR 39 MONTHS 39,000
MILES FOR THE LIFE OF THE LEASE. 15 CENTS PER MILE OVER. $3999 DUE AT SIGNING WITH APPROVED CREDIT. **0%, SPECIAL FINANCE OFFERS AND NO PAYMENTS UNTIL MARCH 2013 ARE AVAILABLE WITH APPROVED
CREDIT, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. OFFERS CANNOT BE COMBINED. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


L


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LNIMSSAIM


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SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012 C15


$1 9,483/285..
2009 BUICK
ENCLAVE CXL


$27,9880405m..


15,988P236mB. 21,988/320mo. 22,99O8335m..


2012 TOYOTA
CAMRY XLE


2011 BUICK
LACROSSE CXS


U


2005 DODGE
RAM 1500


$25,988P377mo. $27,488/398m. $11,998P180Om.


$40,988/588m.


2006 CADILLAC
DTS LUXURY
SrW~f i'


$11,998/180...


2012 CADILLAC
CTS LUXIIRY


U


2010 BUICK
LACROSSE CXL


2006 LINCOLN
NAVIGATOR


1 6,988/2 50m. $39,988574m ..


2004 CADILLAC
CTS LUXURY
I SiOWSN


U-


2002 OLDS.
INTRIGUE GLS


2010 FORD
MIISTANG


$6,988/S1 09mo.


-1


2008 HUMMER
H2


2005 CADILLAC
DEVILLE




$8,S88i-137mo.


2010 CHEVY
SILVERADO


$1 3,988/208m..


2005 JEEP LIBERTY
LIMITED 4X4


4040 SW COLLEGE ROAD OCALA, FL


* 352-732-4700


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


$29,788/m430m.


$21,988/320m.


$71988M 23mo.


$1 6,588/244mo.


$11,488/0173mo.




C16 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012


*4 L


(/"


New 2012 Honda Civic LX
AUTOMATIC


New 2013 Honda Fit -5
MODEL GE8H3CEXW, EQUIPPED NOT STRIPPED A
WITH AUTOMATIC, A/C AND CRUISE



New 2012 Honda Accord LX Sedan
MODEL CP2F3CEW, AUTOMATIC,POWER PKG,
CRUISE,TRACTION CONTROL AND SO MUCH MORE



New 2012 Honda Civic Hybrid
MODEL FB4F2CEW, AUTO CVTTRANSMISSION, RATED 44MPG* ALL AROUND, ECO
ASSIST SYSTEM, 100,000 MILES WITHOUT TUNE UP, BLUETOOTH HANDS FREE LINK



New 2012 Honda CR-V LX 2WD
MODEL RM3H3CEW, COME SEEWHYTHE CR-V IS THE BEST
SELLING COMPACT SUV IN AMERICA! SAVE WHILETHEY LAST!



New 2012 Honda Ridgeline RT
MODELYK1F2CEW, 4WD WITHTHETRUNK INTHE BED. POWER PKG,
CRUISE CONTROL, V-6 POWER AND A RIDE LIKE NO OTHER.


New 2012 Honda Crosstour 2WD 2.4 LA EX
MODELTF3H3CJW. AUTOMATIC HATCHBACK WITH STYLE AND COMFORT,
ALLTHE LUXURY AMENITIES AND ROOMTO DOWHATYOU NEED.
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AF I &l


Honda Days
il SALES EVENT


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


:4 9k


1 0 o 4, up.


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SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012 C17


0


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2012 Chevy Volt
Now's the time to GO GREEN!!!




AND 0% APR for 72 Mos.
_______J


2012 Chew Impala LT
Stk. #C12125, Auto, AC, Onstar. Was $28,610
$.-fnnlf EELj


2013 Chevy Equinox LS
Stk. #C13025, Auto, 4cyl. Was $24,595
.$40 N 00


2012 Chew Traverse LS
Stk #C12326, Auto, Seats 7!. Was $30,750
S'nA AC1f


2012 Chevy Silverado LT
Stk #CT12368, Ext Cab. Was $30,750
S9000 OFF!


2012 Chew Cruze LS
Stk #C12267, Gas Saver!!! Was $18,800


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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C18 SATURDAY DECEMBER 29, 2012


BMW in Ocala


0


The Ultimate
bmwinocala.com Driving Machine*

THE BMW
HAPPIER NEW YEAR
EVENT
Going on now, with a
holiday credit of up to $3500*
Get Savings Up To $12,000 Off
New 2012 BMWs!^
Plus through December 31st, Business Owners can receive
a tax credit on the purchase of a new BMW X5 or X6**
New 2013
BMW
328i
Sedan
New 2013
BMW
528i
SiSedan
New 2013
BMW
640i Gran
Coupe
New 2013
BMW
650i
Coupe


New 2013
BMW
750 Li
Sedan
New 2013
BMW
X1
sDrive28i
New 2013
BMW
X3
xDrive28i
New 2013
BMW
X5
xDrive35i


BMW Ultimate ServiceTM:
Pay Nothing 4 years or 50,000 Miles Total Maintenance Charges: $0
Take ATest Drive And Receive
$100 In Gift Certificates!"
^Ex: New 2012 BMW 750Li, STK#MW84700, MSRP $92,695. Discount includes all BMW factory rebates and incentives. Discount excludes tax, tag,
title, registration and dealer fee. See dealer for details. *$3500 BMW holiday credit available on select new BMWs through BMW Financial Services. "To
qualify, the BMW X5 orX6 must be purchased (not leased) and must be used for at least 50% for business purposes. Must be purchased before 12/31/12.
See dealer for tax credit details. Financing available through BMW Financial Services. Photos used for display purposes only. All vehicles subject to
prior sale. ^^Promotional Gift cards are valued at $25 each with available shopping credit to be used at four (4) different eOutlet Store retailers. Gift
card value may be applied toward the purchase of products, services, and S&H fees exclusively from the specific websites noted on the gift cards. Only
one (1) gift card may be redeemed per transaction. Gift cards have no cash value, are not redeemable for cash and may not be combined with credits
from other store gift cards. Other terms and conditions apply see eOutletStores.com for full details and restrictions. Offers expire end of day 12/31/12.


BMW
of Ocala


3949 SW College Rd. Ocala
On SW College Rd. Just West Of 1-75
1-352-861-0234
BMWinOcala.com


ght Now At Volkswagen Of Occ
It's The...
E-


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I


End of The Yea

Sa es Even p
All 2012 Volkswagen -
Priced At Dealer Invoicel
Plus Get 0% Financing For
Up To 72 Months!* \


now '9
i :"
: ISset


*0% is $13.89 per month per $1000 borrowed with approved credit. Dealer invoice pricing on select in-stock models only. Excludes tax, l, title, registration and dealerfee.
Prior sales excluded. Offers cannot be combined. See dealer for details. ^ ^ Promotional Gift cards are valued at $25 each with available shopping credit to be used at
four (4) different eOutlet Store retailers. Gift card value may be applied toward the purchase of products, services, and S&H fees exclusively from te specific websites noted
on the gift cards. Only one (1) gift card may be redeemed per transaction. Gift cards have no cash value, are not redeemable for cash and may not be combined with credits
from other store gift cards. Other terms and conditions apply see eOutletStores.com for full details and restrictions. Offers expire end of day 12/31/12.

Volkswagen T
of Ocala


3949 SW College Rd., Ocala On SW College Rd. Just West Of 1-75
1-352-861-0234 VWofOcala.com


Das Auto.


I


I I New 2012 Volkswacien I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


I




SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012 C19


Chevy Runs Deep


2013 CHEVROLET MALIBU


BUY1$
FOR$18,991


2013 CHEVROLET SPARK


E 2 4H E i -EI A PICING
I emem58"755 I4


BUY
FOR


$9,868


2012 CHEVROLET CRUZE


FE* 2 H E W I AN S. Im

BUY 5,800
FOR 1 9 0


2013 CHEVROLET EQUINOX




BUY*19,880

2013 CHEVROLET CAMARO


FO$19,991
2012 CHEVROLET SILVERADO EXT
. .. ......... ... ..


A **
BUY1$
FOR 189749


CfIAl LVTHINSUTANT APRA1SANl I NE


..dtll- ..11: EU 1/E1 I MUI6 r'rlUlElE E i klJ11 i


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CrystalAutos.com *


CRYSTAL
CHEVROLET


1035 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448 352-795-1515


tSEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. *PRICE INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT ALL WILL QUALIFY, PLUS $2999 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEAL-
ER FEE OF $599.50 WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.
000DF8I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Mp,


!


I




C20 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2012


iFINtISH 202 WITH
-wH )2-Ofl-W_0I J"rr


MONEY DOWN
WITH APPROVED CREDIT
BRAND NEW CHRYSLER 200

BRAND NEW CHRYSLER 200


THE ALL NEW
2013 ,A
HAS ARRIVED
* 25 HWY MPG^
* 89001b MAX TOWING
* ALL NEW INTERIOR


0% FOR UP TO 72 MONTHS

2013 DODGE JOURNEY




$18,495'
DRIVE$ PER
FOR MOO MO. OR UAPR


$21,885
DRIVE FOR


FRE 24HURRCRDDMESG WI THINF PCA RCN


CRYSTALAUTOS.COM


1005 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa


14358 Cortez Blvd. Brooksville


2077 Highway 44W Inverness


352-564-1971
Sales: Monday-Friday 8:00am-8:00pm Saturday 9:00am-7:30pm Sunday-Closed
Service: M, W, F 7:30am-5:30pm T, TH 7:30am-7:00pm Saturday 8:00am-4:00pm Sunday-Closed Body Shop: M-F 7:30am-5:30pm
tSEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. +PRICE INCLUDES $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. WITH APPROVED CREDIT. *LEASES ARE FOR 39 MONTHS
39,000 MILES FOR THE LIFE OF THE LEASE. 15 CENTS PER MILE OVER. $3999 DUE AT SIGNING WITH APPROVED CREDIT. **0%, SPECIAL FINANCE OFFERS AND NO PAYMENTS UNTIL MARCH 2013 ARE AVAILABLE WITH APPROVED CREDIT, NOT EVERYONE WILL
QUALIFY PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK. ^25 MPG BASED ON EPA HIGHWAY FUEL ECONOMY ESTIMATES.


$16,915
DRIVE$ I PER f
FOR OO MO. OR UAPR
BRAND NEW CHRYSLER 300


$26,845
DRIVE$9 PER 0/
FOR 9fO MO. OR UAPR
BRAND NEW CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY




$26,995
DRIVE $9PER n
FOR Mii MO. OR 0UAPR


E

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1*


Jeep


2013 JEEP COMPASS


$17,465
DRIVE$ IR PER |*9
FOR MUO MO. ORE APR
2013 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEI



*26,495
DRIVE $9R PER 9"
FOR 00 MO. OR A APR
2013 JEEP WRANGLER


$22,195
DRIVE $1PER
FOR 199 MO


2013 DODGE AVENGER
adlorm4


$18,995'
RIVE$ PER f0
FOR 00 MO. OR UAPR
2013 DODGE CHALLENGER


$25,495
DRIVE$ $9R PER 1.90
FOR -U0 MO. OR APR


. uuuu-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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